WorldWideScience

Sample records for replication initiation sites

  1. Replicative Intermediates of Human Papillomavirus Type 11 in Laryngeal Papillomas: Site of Replication Initiation and Direction of Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auborn, K. J.; Little, R. D.; Platt, T. H. K.; Vaccariello, M. A.; Schildkraut, C. L.

    1994-07-01

    We have examined the structures of replication intermediates from the human papillomavirus type 11 genome in DNA extracted from papilloma lesions (laryngeal papillomas). The sites of replication initiation and termination utilized in vivo were mapped by using neutral/neutral and neutral/alkaline two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis methods. Initiation of replication was detected in or very close to the upstream regulatory region (URR; the noncoding, regulatory sequences upstream of the open reading frames in the papillomavirus genome). We also show that replication forks proceed bidirectionally from the origin and converge 180circ opposite the URR. These results demonstrate the feasibility of analysis of replication of viral genomes directly from infected tissue.

  2. Initiation of DNA replication from non-canonical sites on an origin-depleted chromosome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi L Bogenschutz

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic DNA replication initiates from multiple sites on each chromosome called replication origins (origins. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, origins are defined at discrete sites. Regular spacing and diverse firing characteristics of origins are thought to be required for efficient completion of replication, especially in the presence of replication stress. However, a S. cerevisiae chromosome III harboring multiple origin deletions has been reported to replicate relatively normally, and yet how an origin-deficient chromosome could accomplish successful replication remains unknown. To address this issue, we deleted seven well-characterized origins from chromosome VI, and found that these deletions do not cause gross growth defects even in the presence of replication inhibitors. We demonstrated that the origin deletions do cause a strong decrease in the binding of the origin recognition complex. Unexpectedly, replication profiling of this chromosome showed that DNA replication initiates from non-canonical loci around deleted origins in yeast. These results suggest that replication initiation can be unexpectedly flexible in this organism.

  3. P1 plasmid replication: initiator sequestration is inadequate to explain control by initiator-binding sites.

    OpenAIRE

    Pal, S. K.; Chattoraj, D K

    1988-01-01

    The unit-copy plasmid replicon mini-P1 consists of an origin, a gene for an initiator protein, RepA, and a control locus, incA. Both the origin and the incA locus contain repeat sequences that bind RepA. It has been proposed that the incA repeats control replication by sequestering the rate-limiting RepA initiator protein. Here we show that when the concentration of RepA was increased about fourfold beyond its normal physiological level from an inducible source in trans, the copy number of a ...

  4. Initiation of adenovirus DNA replication.

    OpenAIRE

    Reiter, T; Fütterer, J; Weingärtner, B; Winnacker, E L

    1980-01-01

    In an attempt to study the mechanism of initiation of adenovirus DNA replication, an assay was developed to investigate the pattern of DNA synthesis in early replicative intermediates of adenovirus DNA. By using wild-type virus-infected cells, it was possible to place the origin of adenovirus type 2 DNA replication within the terminal 350 to 500 base pairs from either of the two molecular termini. In addition, a variety of parameters characteristic of adenovirus DNA replication were compared ...

  5. Initiation of Replication in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimodt-Møller, Jakob

    The circular chromosome of Escherichia coli is replicated by two replisomes assembled at the unique origin and moving in the opposite direction until they meet in the less well defined terminus. The key protein in initiation of replication, DnaA, facilitates the unwinding of double-stranded DNA...... to single-stranded DNA in oriC. Although DnaA is able to bind both ADP and ATP, DnaA is only active in initiation when bound to ATP. Although initiation of replication, and the regulation of this, is thoroughly investigated it is still not fully understood. The overall aim of the thesis was to investigate...... the regulation of initiation, the effect on the cell when regulation fails, and if regulation was interlinked to chromosomal organization. This thesis uncovers that there exists a subtle balance between chromosome replication and reactive oxygen species (ROS) inflicted DNA damage. Thus, failure in regulation...

  6. Mechanism of chromosomal DNA replication initiation and replication fork stabilization in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, LiHong; Liu, Yang; Kong, DaoChun

    2014-05-01

    Chromosomal DNA replication is one of the central biological events occurring inside cells. Due to its large size, the replication of genomic DNA in eukaryotes initiates at hundreds to tens of thousands of sites called DNA origins so that the replication could be completed in a limited time. Further, eukaryotic DNA replication is sophisticatedly regulated, and this regulation guarantees that each origin fires once per S phase and each segment of DNA gets duplication also once per cell cycle. The first step of replication initiation is the assembly of pre-replication complex (pre-RC). Since 1973, four proteins, Cdc6/Cdc18, MCM, ORC and Cdt1, have been extensively studied and proved to be pre-RC components. Recently, a novel pre-RC component called Sap1/Girdin was identified. Sap1/Girdin is required for loading Cdc18/Cdc6 to origins for pre-RC assembly in the fission yeast and human cells, respectively. At the transition of G1 to S phase, pre-RC is activated by the two kinases, cyclindependent kinase (CDK) and Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK), and subsequently, RPA, primase-polα, PCNA, topoisomerase, Cdc45, polδ, and polɛ are recruited to DNA origins for creating two bi-directional replication forks and initiating DNA replication. As replication forks move along chromatin DNA, they frequently stall due to the presence of a great number of replication barriers on chromatin DNA, such as secondary DNA structures, protein/DNA complexes, DNA lesions, gene transcription. Stalled forks must require checkpoint regulation for their stabilization. Otherwise, stalled forks will collapse, which results in incomplete DNA replication and genomic instability. This short review gives a concise introduction regarding the current understanding of replication initiation and replication fork stabilization.

  7. Non‐Canonical Replication Initiation: You’re Fired!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bazilė Ravoitytė

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The division of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells produces two cells that inherit a perfect copy of the genetic material originally derived from the mother cell. The initiation of canonical DNA replication must be coordinated to the cell cycle to ensure the accuracy of genome duplication. Controlled replication initiation depends on a complex interplay of cis‐acting DNA sequences, the so‐called origins of replication (ori, with trans‐acting factors involved in the onset of DNA synthesis. The interplay of cis‐acting elements and trans‐acting factors ensures that cells initiate replication at sequence‐specific sites only once, and in a timely order, to avoid chromosomal endoreplication. However, chromosome breakage and excessive RNA:DNA hybrid formation can cause breakinduced (BIR or transcription‐initiated replication (TIR, respectively. These non‐canonical replication events are expected to affect eukaryotic genome function and maintenance, and could be important for genome evolution and disease development. In this review, we describe the difference between canonical and non‐canonical DNA replication, and focus on mechanistic differences and common features between BIR and TIR. Finally, we discuss open issues on the factors and molecular mechanisms involved in TIR.

  8. Initiation of chromosomal replication in predatory bacterium Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukasz Makowski

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus is a small Gram-negative predatory bacterium that attacks other Gram-negative bacteria, including many animal, human, and plant pathogens. This bacterium exhibits a peculiar biphasic life cycle during which two different types of cells are produced: non-replicating highly motile cells (the free-living phase and replicating cells (the intracellular-growth phase. The process of chromosomal replication in B. bacteriovorus must therefore be temporally and spatially regulated to ensure that it is coordinated with cell differentiation and cell cycle progression. Recently, B. bacteriovorus has received considerable research interest due to its intriguing life cycle and great potential as a prospective antimicrobial agent. Although we know that chromosomal replication in bacteria is mainly regulated at the initiation step, no data exists about this process in B. bacteriovorus. We report the first characterization of key elements of initiation of chromosomal replication – DnaA protein and oriC region from the predatory bacterium, B. bacteriovorus. In vitro studies using different approaches demonstrate that the B. bacteriovorus oriC (BdoriC is specifically bound and unwound by the DnaA protein. Sequence comparison of the DnaA-binding sites enabled us to propose a consensus sequence for the B. bacteriovorus DnaA box (5’-NN(A/TTCCACA-3’. Surprisingly, in vitro analysis revealed that BdoriC is also bound and unwound by the host DnaA proteins (relatively distantly related from B. bacteriovorus. We compared the architecture of the DnaA–oriC complexes (orisomes in homologous (oriC and DnaA from B. bacteriovorus and heterologous (BdoriC and DnaA from prey, E. coli or P. aeruginosa systems. This work provides important new entry points toward improving our understanding of the initiation of chromosomal replication in this predatory bacterium.

  9. 3D replicon distributions arise from stochastic initiation and domino-like DNA replication progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löb, D; Lengert, N; Chagin, V O; Reinhart, M; Casas-Delucchi, C S; Cardoso, M C; Drossel, B

    2016-04-07

    DNA replication dynamics in cells from higher eukaryotes follows very complex but highly efficient mechanisms. However, the principles behind initiation of potential replication origins and emergence of typical patterns of nuclear replication sites remain unclear. Here, we propose a comprehensive model of DNA replication in human cells that is based on stochastic, proximity-induced replication initiation. Critical model features are: spontaneous stochastic firing of individual origins in euchromatin and facultative heterochromatin, inhibition of firing at distances below the size of chromatin loops and a domino-like effect by which replication forks induce firing of nearby origins. The model reproduces the empirical temporal and chromatin-related properties of DNA replication in human cells. We advance the one-dimensional DNA replication model to a spatial model by taking into account chromatin folding in the nucleus, and we are able to reproduce the spatial and temporal characteristics of the replication foci distribution throughout S-phase.

  10. A dimeric Rep protein initiates replication of a linear archaeal virus genome: implications for the Rep mechanism and viral replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oke, Muse; Kerou, Melina; Liu, Huanting

    2011-01-01

    that a protein encoded in the 34-kbp genome of the rudivirus SIRV1 is a member of the replication initiator (Rep) superfamily of proteins, which initiate rolling-circle replication (RCR) of diverse viruses and plasmids. We show that SIRV Rep nicks the viral hairpin terminus, forming a covalent adduct between...... positioned active sites, each with a single tyrosine residue, work in tandem to catalyze DNA nicking and joining. We propose a novel mechanism for rudivirus DNA replication, incorporating the first known example of a Rep protein that is not linked to RCR. The implications for Rep protein function and viral...

  11. Plasticity of DNA replication initiation in Epstein-Barr virus episomes.

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    Paolo Norio

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available In mammalian cells, the activity of the sites of initiation of DNA replication appears to be influenced epigenetically, but this regulation is not fully understood. Most studies of DNA replication have focused on the activity of individual initiation sites, making it difficult to evaluate the impact of changes in initiation activity on the replication of entire genomic loci. Here, we used single molecule analysis of replicated DNA (SMARD to study the latent duplication of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV episomes in human cell lines. We found that initiation sites are present throughout the EBV genome and that their utilization is not conserved in different EBV strains. In addition, SMARD shows that modifications in the utilization of multiple initiation sites occur across large genomic regions (tens of kilobases in size. These observations indicate that individual initiation sites play a limited role in determining the replication dynamics of the EBV genome. Long-range mechanisms and the genomic context appear to play much more important roles, affecting the frequency of utilization and the order of activation of multiple initiation sites. Finally, these results confirm that initiation sites are extremely redundant elements of the EBV genome. We propose that these conclusions also apply to mammalian chromosomes.

  12. Identification of putative DnaN-binding motifs in plasmid replication initiation proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalrymple, Brian P; Kongsuwan, Kritaya; Wijffels, Gene

    2007-01-01

    Recently the plasmid RK2 replication initiation protein, TrfA, has been shown to bind to the beta subunit of DNA Polymerase III (DnaN) via a short pentapeptide with the consensus QL[S/D]LF. A second consensus peptide, the hexapeptide QLxLxL, has also been demonstrated to mediate binding to DnaN. Here we describe the results of a comprehensive survey of replication initiation proteins encoded by bacterial plasmids to identify putative DnaN-binding sites. Both pentapeptide and hexapeptide motifs have been identified in a number of families of replication initiation proteins. The distribution of sites is sporadic and closely related families of proteins may differ in the presence, location, or type of putative DnaN-binding motif. Neither motif has been identified in replication initiation proteins encoded by plasmids that replicate via rolling circles or strand displacement. The results suggest that the recruitment of DnaN to the origin of replication of a replisome by plasmid replication initiation proteins is not generally required for plasmid replication, but that in some cases it may be beneficial for efficiency of replication initiation.

  13. The replication initiator of the cholera pathogen's second chromosome shows structural similarity to plasmid initiators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, Natalia; Gerding, Matthew; Ivashkiv, Olha; Olinares, Paul Dominic B; Chait, Brian T; Waldor, Matthew K; Jeruzalmi, David

    2016-12-27

    The conserved DnaA-oriC system is used to initiate replication of primary chromosomes throughout the bacterial kingdom; however, bacteria with multipartite genomes evolved distinct systems to initiate replication of secondary chromosomes. In the cholera pathogen, Vibrio cholerae, and in related species, secondary chromosome replication requires the RctB initiator protein. Here, we show that RctB consists of four domains. The structure of its central two domains resembles that of several plasmid replication initiators. RctB contains at least three DNA binding winged-helix-turn-helix motifs, and mutations within any of these severely compromise biological activity. In the structure, RctB adopts a head-to-head dimeric configuration that likely reflects the arrangement in solution. Therefore, major structural reorganization likely accompanies complex formation on the head-to-tail array of binding sites in oriCII Our findings support the hypothesis that the second Vibrionaceae chromosome arose from an ancestral plasmid, and that RctB may have evolved additional regulatory features.

  14. Dissection of the beta-globin replication-initiation region reveals specific requirements for replicator elements during gene amplification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoya Okada

    Full Text Available Gene amplification plays a pivotal role in malignant transformation of human cells. A plasmid with both a mammalian replication-initiation region (IR/origin/replicator and a nuclear matrix-attachment region (MAR is spontaneously amplified in transfected cells by a mechanism that involves amplification at the extrachromosomal site, followed by amplification at the chromosomal arm, ultimately generating a long homogeneously staining region (HSR. Several observations suggest that replication initiation from IR sequences might mediate amplification. To test this idea, we previously dissected c-myc and DHFR IRs to identify the minimum sequence required to support amplification. In this study, we applied an improved analysis that discriminates between two amplification steps to the ß-globin RepP IR, which contains separate elements already known to be essential for initiation on the chromosome arm. The IR sequence was required at least for the extrachromosomal amplification step. In addition to the vector-encoded MAR, amplification also required an AT-rich region and a MAR-like element, consistent with the results regarding replicator activity on the chromosome. However, amplification did not require the AG-rich tract necessary for replicator activity, but instead required a novel sequence containing another AG-rich tract. The differential sequence requirement might be a consequence of extrachromosomal replication.

  15. Initiation and regulation of paramyxovirus transcription and replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noton, Sarah L; Fearns, Rachel

    2015-05-01

    The paramyxovirus family has a genome consisting of a single strand of negative sense RNA. This genome acts as a template for two distinct processes: transcription to generate subgenomic, capped and polyadenylated mRNAs, and genome replication. These viruses only encode one polymerase. Thus, an intriguing question is, how does the viral polymerase initiate and become committed to either transcription or replication? By answering this we can begin to understand how these two processes are regulated. In this review article, we present recent findings from studies on the paramyxovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, which show how its polymerase is able to initiate transcription and replication from a single promoter. We discuss how these findings apply to other paramyxoviruses. Then, we examine how trans-acting proteins and promoter secondary structure might serve to regulate transcription and replication during different phases of the paramyxovirus replication cycle.

  16. Mechanisms Governing DDK Regulation of the Initiation of DNA Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larasati

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The budding yeast Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK complex—comprised of cell division cycle (Cdc7 kinase and its regulatory subunit dumbbell former 4 (Dbf4—is required to trigger the initiation of DNA replication through the phosphorylation of multiple minichromosome maintenance complex subunits 2-7 (Mcm2-7. DDK is also a target of the radiation sensitive 53 (Rad53 checkpoint kinase in response to replication stress. Numerous investigations have determined mechanistic details, including the regions of Mcm2, Mcm4, and Mcm6 phosphorylated by DDK, and a number of DDK docking sites. Similarly, the way in which the Rad53 forkhead-associated 1 (FHA1 domain binds to DDK—involving both canonical and non-canonical interactions—has been elucidated. Recent work has revealed mutual promotion of DDK and synthetic lethal with dpb11-1 3 (Sld3 roles. While DDK phosphorylation of Mcm2-7 subunits facilitates their interaction with Sld3 at origins, Sld3 in turn stimulates DDK phosphorylation of Mcm2. Details of a mutually antagonistic relationship between DDK and Rap1-interacting factor 1 (Rif1 have also recently come to light. While Rif1 is able to reverse DDK-mediated Mcm2-7 complex phosphorylation by targeting the protein phosphatase glycogen 7 (Glc7 to origins, there is evidence to suggest that DDK can counteract this activity by binding to and phosphorylating Rif1.

  17. Insights into the Determination of the Templating Nucleotide at the Initiation of φ29 DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Prado, Alicia; Lázaro, José M; Longás, Elisa; Villar, Laurentino; de Vega, Miguel; Salas, Margarita

    2015-11-06

    Bacteriophage φ29 from Bacillus subtilis starts replication of its terminal protein (TP)-DNA by a protein-priming mechanism. To start replication, the DNA polymerase forms a heterodimer with a free TP that recognizes the replication origins, placed at both 5' ends of the linear chromosome, and initiates replication using as primer the OH-group of Ser-232 of the TP. The initiation of φ29 TP-DNA replication mainly occurs opposite the second nucleotide at the 3' end of the template. Earlier analyses of the template position that directs the initiation reaction were performed using single-stranded and double-stranded oligonucleotides containing the replication origin sequence without the parental TP. Here, we show that the parental TP has no influence in the determination of the nucleotide used as template in the initiation reaction. Previous studies showed that the priming domain of the primer TP determines the template position used for initiation. The results obtained here using mutant TPs at the priming loop where Ser-232 is located indicate that the aromatic residue Phe-230 is one of the determinants that allows the positioning of the penultimate nucleotide at the polymerization active site to direct insertion of the initiator dAMP during the initiation reaction. The role of Phe-230 in limiting the internalization of the template strand in the polymerization active site is discussed.

  18. Insights into the Initiation of Eukaryotic DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruck, Irina; Perez-Arnaiz, Patricia; Colbert, Max K; Kaplan, Daniel L

    2015-01-01

    The initiation of DNA replication is a highly regulated event in eukaryotic cells to ensure that the entire genome is copied once and only once during S phase. The primary target of cellular regulation of eukaryotic DNA replication initiation is the assembly and activation of the replication fork helicase, the 11-subunit assembly that unwinds DNA at a replication fork. The replication fork helicase, called CMG for Cdc45-Mcm2-7, and GINS, assembles in S phase from the constituent Cdc45, Mcm2-7, and GINS proteins. The assembly and activation of the CMG replication fork helicase during S phase is governed by 2 S-phase specific kinases, CDK and DDK. CDK stimulates the interaction between Sld2, Sld3, and Dpb11, 3 initiation factors that are each required for the initiation of DNA replication. DDK, on the other hand, phosphorylates the Mcm2, Mcm4, and Mcm6 subunits of the Mcm2-7 complex. Sld3 recruits Cdc45 to Mcm2-7 in a manner that depends on DDK, and recent work suggests that Sld3 binds directly to Mcm2-7 and also to single-stranded DNA. Furthermore, recent work demonstrates that Sld3 and its human homolog Treslin substantially stimulate DDK phosphorylation of Mcm2. These data suggest that the initiation factor Sld3/Treslin coordinates the assembly and activation of the eukaryotic replication fork helicase by recruiting Cdc45 to Mcm2-7, stimulating DDK phosphorylation of Mcm2, and binding directly to single-stranded DNA as the origin is melted.

  19. Insights into the Initiation of Eukaryotic DNA Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruck, Irina; Perez-Arnaiz, Patricia; Colbert, Max K; Kaplan, Daniel L

    2015-01-01

    The initiation of DNA replication is a highly regulated event in eukaryotic cells to ensure that the entire genome is copied once and only once during S phase. The primary target of cellular regulation of eukaryotic DNA replication initiation is the assembly and activation of the replication fork helicase, the 11-subunit assembly that unwinds DNA at a replication fork. The replication fork helicase, called CMG for Cdc45-Mcm2–7, and GINS, assembles in S phase from the constituent Cdc45, Mcm2–7, and GINS proteins. The assembly and activation of the CMG replication fork helicase during S phase is governed by 2 S-phase specific kinases, CDK and DDK. CDK stimulates the interaction between Sld2, Sld3, and Dpb11, 3 initiation factors that are each required for the initiation of DNA replication. DDK, on the other hand, phosphorylates the Mcm2, Mcm4, and Mcm6 subunits of the Mcm2–7 complex. Sld3 recruits Cdc45 to Mcm2–7 in a manner that depends on DDK, and recent work suggests that Sld3 binds directly to Mcm2–7 and also to single-stranded DNA. Furthermore, recent work demonstrates that Sld3 and its human homolog Treslin substantially stimulate DDK phosphorylation of Mcm2. These data suggest that the initiation factor Sld3/Treslin coordinates the assembly and activation of the eukaryotic replication fork helicase by recruiting Cdc45 to Mcm2–7, stimulating DDK phosphorylation of Mcm2, and binding directly to single-stranded DNA as the origin is melted. PMID:26710261

  20. Sequence and recombination analyses of the geminivirus replication initiator protein

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Vadivukarasi; K R Girish; R Usha

    2007-01-01

    The sequence motifs present in the replication initiator protein (Rep) of geminiviruses have been compared with those present in all known rolling circle replication initiators. The predicted secondary structures of Rep representing each group of organisms have been compared and found to be conserved. Regions of recombination in the Rep gene and the adjoining 5′ intergenic region (IR) of representative species of Geminiviridae have been identified using Recombination Detection Programs. The possible implications of such recombinations on the increasing host range of geminivirus infections are discussed.

  1. Initiation of Replication in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimodt-Møller, Jakob

    of initiation, which leads to hyperinitiation, results in double-strand breaks when replication forks encounters single-stranded DNA lesions generated while removing oxidized bases, primarily 8-oxoG, from the DNA. Thus, the number of replication forks can only increase when ROS formation is reduced or when...... that the cell needs a copy of both DARS1 and DARS2 for proper regulation of initiation; i.e. DARS1 is a poor replacement for DARS2 and vice versa. Last we suggest that transcription has a negative effect of the activity of the non-coding regions....

  2. DnaA and ORC : more than DNA replication initiators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholefield, Graham; Veening, Jan-Willem; Murray, Heath

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in DNA replication initiator genes in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes lead to a pleiotropic array of phenotypes, including defects in chromosome segregation, cytokinesis, cell cycle regulation and gene expression. For years, it was not clear whether these diverse effects were indirect cons

  3. DnaA and ORC : more than DNA replication initiators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholefield, Graham; Veening, Jan-Willem; Murray, Heath

    Mutations in DNA replication initiator genes in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes lead to a pleiotropic array of phenotypes, including defects in chromosome segregation, cytokinesis, cell cycle regulation and gene expression. For years, it was not clear whether these diverse effects were indirect

  4. DnaA and ORC : more than DNA replication initiators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholefield, Graham; Veening, Jan-Willem; Murray, Heath

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in DNA replication initiator genes in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes lead to a pleiotropic array of phenotypes, including defects in chromosome segregation, cytokinesis, cell cycle regulation and gene expression. For years, it was not clear whether these diverse effects were indirect cons

  5. Regulation of DNA Replication Initiation by Chromosome Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Magnan, David; Bates, David

    2015-01-01

    Recent advancements in fluorescence imaging have shown that the bacterial nucleoid is surprisingly dynamic in terms of both behavior (movement and organization) and structure (density and supercoiling). Links between chromosome structure and replication initiation have been made in a number of species, and it is universally accepted that favorable chromosome structure is required for initiation in all cells. However, almost nothing is known about whether cells use changes in chromosome struct...

  6. Nuclear DNA replication initiation in kinetoplastid parasites: new insights into an ancient process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiengwe, Calvin; Marques, Catarina A; McCulloch, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear DNA replication is, arguably, the central cellular process in eukaryotes, because it drives propagation of life and intersects with many other genome reactions. Perhaps surprisingly, our understanding of nuclear DNA replication in kinetoplastids was limited until a clutch of studies emerged recently, revealing new insight into both the machinery and genome-wide coordination of the reaction. Here, we discuss how these studies suggest that the earliest acting components of the kinetoplastid nuclear DNA replication machinery - the factors that demarcate sites of the replication initiation, termed origins - are diverged from model eukaryotes. In addition, we discuss how origin usage and replication dynamics relate to the highly unusual organisation of transcription in the genome of Trypanosoma brucei.

  7. Replication initiatives will not salvage the trustworthiness of psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, James C

    2016-05-31

    Replication initiatives in psychology continue to gather considerable attention from far outside the field, as well as controversy from within. Some accomplishments of these initiatives are noted, but this article focuses on why they do not provide a general solution for what ails psychology. There are inherent limitations to mass replications ever being conducted in many areas of psychology, both in terms of their practicality and their prospects for improving the science. Unnecessary compromises were built into the ground rules for design and publication of the Open Science Collaboration: Psychology that undermine its effectiveness. Some ground rules could actually be flipped into guidance for how not to conduct replications. Greater adherence to best publication practices, transparency in the design and publishing of research, strengthening of independent post-publication peer review and firmer enforcement of rules about data sharing and declarations of conflict of interest would make many replications unnecessary. Yet, it has been difficult to move beyond simple endorsement of these measures to consistent implementation. Given the strong institutional support for questionable publication practices, progress will depend on effective individual and collective use of social media to expose lapses and demand reform. Some recent incidents highlight the necessity of this.

  8. Rif1 regulates initiation timing of late replication origins throughout the S. cerevisiae genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared M Peace

    Full Text Available Chromosomal DNA replication involves the coordinated activity of hundreds to thousands of replication origins. Individual replication origins are subject to epigenetic regulation of their activity during S-phase, resulting in differential efficiencies and timings of replication initiation during S-phase. This regulation is thought to involve chromatin structure and organization into timing domains with differential ability to recruit limiting replication factors. Rif1 has recently been identified as a genome-wide regulator of replication timing in fission yeast and in mammalian cells. However, previous studies in budding yeast have suggested that Rif1's role in controlling replication timing may be limited to subtelomeric domains and derives from its established role in telomere length regulation. We have analyzed replication timing by analyzing BrdU incorporation genome-wide, and report that Rif1 regulates the timing of late/dormant replication origins throughout the S. cerevisiae genome. Analysis of pfa4Δ cells, which are defective in palmitoylation and membrane association of Rif1, suggests that replication timing regulation by Rif1 is independent of its role in localizing telomeres to the nuclear periphery. Intra-S checkpoint signaling is intact in rif1Δ cells, and checkpoint-defective mec1Δ cells do not comparably deregulate replication timing, together indicating that Rif1 regulates replication timing through a mechanism independent of this checkpoint. Our results indicate that the Rif1 mechanism regulates origin timing irrespective of proximity to a chromosome end, and suggest instead that telomere sequences merely provide abundant binding sites for proteins that recruit Rif1. Still, the abundance of Rif1 binding in telomeric domains may facilitate Rif1-mediated repression of non-telomeric origins that are more distal from centromeres.

  9. Specificity and function of Archaeal DNA replication initiator proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, Rachel Y.; Xu, Yanqun; Gadelha, Catarina

    2013-01-01

    to investigate the role of ATP binding and hydrolysis in initiator function in vivo and in vitro. We find that the ATP-bound form of Orc1-1 is proficient for replication and implicates hydrolysis of ATP in downregulation of origin activity. Finally, we reveal that ATP and DNA binding by Orc1-1 remodels...... the protein's structure rather than that of the DNA template....

  10. Replication of Mu prophages lacking the central strong gyrase site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pato, Martin L

    2004-09-01

    Replication of Mu prophages lacking the central strong gyrase site (SGS) is severely slowed. To study details of the replication of these prophages, an assay was developed for determining the rate and extent of introduction of nicks at the 3'-ends of a Mu prophage, an early step in Mu replicative transposition. The maximal level of end-nicking of a prophage with the SGS, about 70-90% depending upon the host strain, was achieved within about 15 min after induction, whereas at that time less than 5% nicking was observed with a prophage lacking the SGS. The amount of nicking at the end of the SGS(-) prophage increased with time, and approx. 30% nicking of the SGS(-) prophage was achieved by 60 min post-induction. Nicking kinetics were identical at each end of the prophages, and no nicking was observed at the 5'-ends of the prophages, verifying in vivo the earlier results with in vitro systems. To determine if prophage location affects the kinetics of replication, we examined prophages at numerous chromosomal locations. SGS(+) prophages at different chromosomal locations showed essentially identical replication kinetics. SGS(-) prophages showed a range of delays in replication and host lysis. A gradient of delays was apparent, with prophages further from the chromosomal origin of replication, oriC, showing longer delays than ones nearer to oriC. However, there were also exceptions to this overall gradient. Possible explanations for the differences in the delays observed with SGS(-) prophages are discussed.

  11. A role for the weak DnaA binding sites in bacterial replication origins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbon, Godefroid; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2011-01-01

    DnaA initiates the chromosomal DNA replication in nearly all bacteria, and replication origins are characterized by binding sites for the DnaA protein (DnaA-boxes) along with an ‘AT-rich’ region. However, great variation in number, spatial organization and specificity of DnaA-boxes is observed...... between species. In the study by Taylor et al. (2011), new and unexpectedly weak DnaA-boxes were identified within the Caulobacter crescentus origin of replication (Cori). The position of weak and stronger DnaA-boxes follows a pattern seen in Escherichia coli oriC. This raises the possibility...

  12. Replication intermediate analysis confirms that chromosomal replication origin initiates from an unusual intergenic region in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassinga, A K; Marczynski, G T

    2001-11-01

    The alpha-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus possesses a developmental cell cycle that restricts chromosome replication to a stalked cell type. The proposed C.crescentus chromosome replication origin (Cori) lies between hemE and RP001, an unusual intergenic region not previously associated with bacterial replication origins, although a similar genomic arrangement is also present at the putative replication origin in the related bacterium Rickettsia prowazekii. The cloned Cori supports autonomous plasmid replication selectively in the stalked cell type implying that replication of the entire chromosome also initiates between hemE and RP001. To confirm this location, we applied the 2-D (N/N) agarose gel electrophoresis technique to resolve and identify chromosome replication intermediates throughout a 30 kb region spanning Cori. Replication initiation in Cori was uniquely characterized by an 'origin bubble and Y-arc' pattern and this observation was supported by simple replication fork 'Y-arc' patterns that characterized the regions flanking Cori. These replication forks originated bi-directionally from within Cori as determined by the fork direction assay. Therefore, chromosomal replication initiates from the unusual hemE/RP001 intergenic region that we propose represents a new class of replication origins.

  13. Characteristics of DNA replication in isolated nuclei initiated by an aprotinin-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, F D; Fresa, K L; Hameed, M; Cohen, S

    1993-02-01

    Isolated cell nuclei were used as the source of template DNA to investigate the role of a cytosolic aprotinin-binding protein (ADR) in the initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication. Computerized image cytometry demonstrated that the DNA content of individual nuclei increased significantly following incubation with ADR-containing preparations, and the extent of DNA synthesis is consistent with that allowed by the limiting concentration of dTTP. Thus, dTTP incorporation into isolated nuclei represents DNA synthesis and not parent strand repair. We found that dTTP incorporation into the isolated nuclei is dependent on DNA polymerase alpha (a principal polymerase in DNA replication) but that DNA polymerase beta (a principal polymerase in DNA repair processes) does not play a significant role in this system. Finally, neither aprotinin nor a previously described cytosolic ADR inhibitor can block the replication of nuclease-treated calf thymus DNA, while both strongly inhibit replication of DNA in isolated nuclei. This result, coupled with the relative ineffectiveness of nuclease-treated DNA compared with nuclear DNA to serve as a replicative template in this assay, argues against a significant contribution from repair or synthesis which initiates at a site of DNA damage. These data indicate that ADR-mediated incorporation of 3H-dTTP into isolated nuclei results from DNA replicative processes that are directly relevant to in vivo S phase events.

  14. Dynamic Association of the Replication Initiator and Transcription Factor DnaA with the Bacillus subtilis Chromosome during Replication Stress ▿

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    DnaA functions as both a transcription factor and the replication initiator in bacteria. We characterized the DNA binding dynamics of DnaA on a genomic level. Based on cross-linking and chromatin immunoprecipitation data, DnaA binds at least 17 loci, 15 of which are regulated transcriptionally in response to inhibition of replication (replication stress). Six loci, each of which has a cluster of at least nine potential DnaA binding sites, had significant increases in binding by DnaA when repl...

  15. The Caulobacter crescentus chromosome replication origin evolved two classes of weak DnaA binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, James A; Ouimet, Marie-Claude; Wargachuk, Richard; Marczynski, Gregory T

    2011-10-01

    The Caulobacter crescentus replication initiator DnaA and essential response regulator CtrA compete to control chromosome replication. The C. crescentus replication origin (Cori) contains five strong CtrA binding sites but only two apparent DnaA boxes, termed G-boxes (with a conserved second position G, TGATCCACA). Since clusters of DnaA boxes typify bacterial replication origins, this discrepancy suggested that C. crescentus DnaA recognizes different DNA sequences or compensates with novel DNA-binding proteins. We searched for novel DNA sites by scanning mutagenesis of the most conserved Cori DNA. Autonomous replication assays showed that G-boxes and novel W-boxes (TCCCCA) are essential for replication. Further analyses showed that C. crescentus DnaA binds G-boxes with moderate and W-boxes with very weak affinities significantly below DnaA's capacity for high-affinity Escherichia coli-boxes (TTATCCACA). Cori has five conserved W-boxes. Increasing W-box affinities increases or decreases autonomous replication depending on their strategic positions between the G-boxes. In vitro, CtrA binding displaces DnaA from proximal G-boxes and from distal W-boxes implying CtrA-DnaA competition and DnaA-DnaA cooperation between G-boxes and W-boxes. Similarly, during cell cycle progression, CtrA proteolysis coincides with DnaA binding to Cori. We also observe highly conserved W-boxes in other replication origins lacking E. coli-boxes. Therefore, strategically weak DnaA binding can be a general means of replication control. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. A Dimeric Rep Protein Initiates Replication of a Linear Archaeal Virus Genome: Implications for the Rep Mechanism and Viral Replication ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oke, Muse; Kerou, Melina; Liu, Huanting; Peng, Xu; Garrett, Roger A.; Prangishvili, David; Naismith, James H.; White, Malcolm F.

    2011-01-01

    The Rudiviridae are a family of rod-shaped archaeal viruses with covalently closed, linear double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genomes. Their replication mechanisms remain obscure, although parallels have been drawn to the Poxviridae and other large cytoplasmic eukaryotic viruses. Here we report that a protein encoded in the 34-kbp genome of the rudivirus SIRV1 is a member of the replication initiator (Rep) superfamily of proteins, which initiate rolling-circle replication (RCR) of diverse viruses and plasmids. We show that SIRV Rep nicks the viral hairpin terminus, forming a covalent adduct between an active-site tyrosine and the 5′ end of the DNA, releasing a 3′ DNA end as a primer for DNA synthesis. The enzyme can also catalyze the joining reaction that is necessary to reseal the DNA hairpin and terminate replication. The dimeric structure points to a simple mechanism through which two closely positioned active sites, each with a single tyrosine residue, work in tandem to catalyze DNA nicking and joining. We propose a novel mechanism for rudivirus DNA replication, incorporating the first known example of a Rep protein that is not linked to RCR. The implications for Rep protein function and viral replication are discussed. PMID:21068244

  17. End of the beginning: elongation and termination features of alternative modes of chromosomal replication initiation in bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayaraman Gowrishankar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In bacterial cells, bidirectional replication of the circular chromosome is initiated from a single origin (oriC and terminates in an antipodal terminus region such that movement of the pair of replication forks is largely codirectional with transcription. The terminus region is flanked by discrete Ter sequences that act as polar, or direction-dependent, arrest sites for fork progression. Alternative oriC-independent modes of replication initiation are possible, one of which is constitutive stable DNA replication (cSDR from transcription-associated RNA-DNA hybrids or R-loops. Here, I discuss the distinctive attributes of fork progression and termination associated with different modes of bacterial replication initiation. Two hypothetical models are proposed: that head-on collisions between pairs of replication forks, which are a feature of replication termination in all kingdoms of life, provoke bilateral fork reversal reactions; and that cSDR is characterized by existence of distinct subpopulations in bacterial cultures and a widespread distribution of origins in the genome, each with a small firing potential. Since R-loops are known to exist in eukaryotic cells and to inflict genome damage in G1 phase, it is possible that cSDR-like events promote aberrant replication initiation even in eukaryotes.

  18. Amiloride inhibits the initiation of Coxsackievirus and poliovirus RNA replication by inhibiting VPg uridylylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogram, Sushma A; Boone, Christopher D; McKenna, Robert; Flanegan, James B

    2014-09-01

    The mechanism of amiloride inhibition of Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) and poliovirus type 1 (PV1) RNA replication was investigated using membrane-associated RNA replication complexes. Amiloride was shown to inhibit viral RNA replication and VPgpUpU synthesis. However, the drug had no effect on polymerase elongation activity during either (-) strand or (+) strand synthesis. These findings indicated that amiloride inhibited the initiation of RNA synthesis by inhibiting VPg uridylylation. In addition, in silico binding studies showed that amiloride docks in the VPg binding site on the back of the viral RNA polymerase, 3D(pol). Since VPg binding at this site on PV1 3D(pol) was previously shown to be required for VPg uridylylation, our results suggest that amiloride inhibits VPg binding to 3D(pol). In summary, our findings are consistent with a model in which amiloride inhibits VPgpUpU synthesis and viral RNA replication by competing with VPg for binding to 3D(pol).

  19. Rif1 Regulates Initiation Timing of Late Replication Origins throughout the S. cerevisiae Genome

    OpenAIRE

    Peace, Jared M.; Anna Ter-Zakarian; Aparicio, Oscar M

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal DNA replication involves the coordinated activity of hundreds to thousands of replication origins. Individual replication origins are subject to epigenetic regulation of their activity during S-phase, resulting in differential efficiencies and timings of replication initiation during S-phase. This regulation is thought to involve chromatin structure and organization into timing domains with differential ability to recruit limiting replication factors. Rif1 has recently been identi...

  20. High-Resolution Profiling of Drosophila Replication Start Sites Reveals a DNA Shape and Chromatin Signature of Metazoan Origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Comoglio

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available At every cell cycle, faithful inheritance of metazoan genomes requires the concerted activation of thousands of DNA replication origins. However, the genetic and chromatin features defining metazoan replication start sites remain largely unknown. Here, we delineate the origin repertoire of the Drosophila genome at high resolution. We address the role of origin-proximal G-quadruplexes and suggest that they transiently stall replication forks in vivo. We dissect the chromatin configuration of replication origins and identify a rich spatial organization of chromatin features at initiation sites. DNA shape and chromatin configurations, not strict sequence motifs, mark and predict origins in higher eukaryotes. We further examine the link between transcription and origin firing and reveal that modulation of origin activity across cell types is intimately linked to cell-type-specific transcriptional programs. Our study unravels conserved origin features and provides unique insights into the relationship among DNA topology, chromatin, transcription, and replication initiation across metazoa.

  1. High-resolution profiling of Drosophila replication start sites reveals a DNA shape and chromatin signature of metazoan origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comoglio, Federico; Schlumpf, Tommy; Schmid, Virginia; Rohs, Remo; Beisel, Christian; Paro, Renato

    2015-05-05

    At every cell cycle, faithful inheritance of metazoan genomes requires the concerted activation of thousands of DNA replication origins. However, the genetic and chromatin features defining metazoan replication start sites remain largely unknown. Here, we delineate the origin repertoire of the Drosophila genome at high resolution. We address the role of origin-proximal G-quadruplexes and suggest that they transiently stall replication forks in vivo. We dissect the chromatin configuration of replication origins and identify a rich spatial organization of chromatin features at initiation sites. DNA shape and chromatin configurations, not strict sequence motifs, mark and predict origins in higher eukaryotes. We further examine the link between transcription and origin firing and reveal that modulation of origin activity across cell types is intimately linked to cell-type-specific transcriptional programs. Our study unravels conserved origin features and provides unique insights into the relationship among DNA topology, chromatin, transcription, and replication initiation across metazoa.

  2. Inclusion bodies are a site of ebolavirus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenen, Thomas; Shabman, Reed S; Groseth, Allison; Herwig, Astrid; Weber, Michaela; Schudt, Gordian; Dolnik, Olga; Basler, Christopher F; Becker, Stephan; Feldmann, Heinz

    2012-11-01

    Inclusion bodies are a characteristic feature of ebolavirus infections in cells. They contain large numbers of preformed nucleocapsids, but their biological significance has been debated, and they have been suggested to be aggregates of viral proteins without any further biological function. However, recent data for other viruses that produce similar structures have suggested that inclusion bodies might be involved in genome replication and transcription. In order to study filovirus inclusion bodies, we fused mCherry to the ebolavirus polymerase L, which is found in inclusion bodies. The resulting L-mCherry fusion protein was functional in minigenome assays and incorporated into virus-like particles. Importantly, L-mCherry fluorescence in transfected cells was readily detectable and distributed in a punctate pattern characteristic for inclusion bodies. A recombinant ebolavirus encoding L-mCherry instead of L was rescued and showed virtually identical growth kinetics and endpoint titers to those for wild-type virus. Using this virus, we showed that the onset of inclusion body formation corresponds to the onset of viral genome replication, but that viral transcription occurs prior to inclusion body formation. Live-cell imaging further showed that inclusion bodies are highly dynamic structures and that they can undergo dramatic reorganization during cell division. Finally, by labeling nascent RNAs using click technology we showed that inclusion bodies are indeed the site of viral RNA synthesis. Based on these data we conclude that, rather than being inert aggregates of nucleocapsids, ebolavirus inclusion bodies are in fact complex and dynamic structures and an important site at which viral RNA replication takes place.

  3. Structures of minute virus of mice replication initiator protein N-terminal domain: Insights into DNA nicking and origin binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tewary, Sunil K.; Liang, Lingfei; Lin, Zihan; Lynn, Annie [Department of Molecular Biosciences, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045 (United States); Cotmore, Susan F. [Departments of Laboratory Medicine, Yale University Medical School, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Tattersall, Peter [Departments of Laboratory Medicine, Yale University Medical School, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Departments of Genetics, Yale University Medical School, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Zhao, Haiyan, E-mail: zhaohy@ku.edu [Department of Molecular Biosciences, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045 (United States); Tang, Liang, E-mail: tangl@ku.edu [Department of Molecular Biosciences, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Members of the Parvoviridae family all encode a non-structural protein 1 (NS1) that directs replication of single-stranded viral DNA, packages viral DNA into capsid, and serves as a potent transcriptional activator. Here we report the X-ray structure of the minute virus of mice (MVM) NS1 N-terminal domain at 1.45 Å resolution, showing that sites for dsDNA binding, ssDNA binding and cleavage, nuclear localization, and other functions are integrated on a canonical fold of the histidine-hydrophobic-histidine superfamily of nucleases, including elements specific for this Protoparvovirus but distinct from its Bocaparvovirus or Dependoparvovirus orthologs. High resolution structural analysis reveals a nickase active site with an architecture that allows highly versatile metal ligand binding. The structures support a unified mechanism of replication origin recognition for homotelomeric and heterotelomeric parvoviruses, mediated by a basic-residue-rich hairpin and an adjacent helix in the initiator proteins and by tandem tetranucleotide motifs in the replication origins. - Highlights: • The structure of a parvovirus replication initiator protein has been determined; • The structure sheds light on mechanisms of ssDNA binding and cleavage; • The nickase active site is preconfigured for versatile metal ligand binding; • The binding site for the double-stranded replication origin DNA is identified; • A single domain integrates multiple functions in virus replication.

  4. Reconstruction of adenovirus replication origins with a human nuclear factor I binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhya, S; Shneidman, P S; Hurwitz, J

    1986-03-05

    Nuclear factor I is a host-coded DNA-binding protein that stimulates initiation of adenovirus DNA replication. To understand the mechanism of action of nuclear factor I, we have constructed, by recombinant DNA techniques, origins of replication in which the adenovirus type 5 nuclear factor I binding site (FIB site) has been replaced by a FIB site isolated from human genomic DNA (Gronostajski, R. M., Nagata, K., and Hurwitz, J. (1984) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 81, 4013-4017). Assays of such recombinants for initiation and elongation in vitro showed that nuclear factor I was active only when the FIB site was relatively close to the DNA terminus, i.e. the FIB site was centered at nucleotides 30-36 from the end of the DNA. Nuclear factor I was active in either orientation within this distance range. The presence of one or two additional FIB sites in the downstream region had no effect. The implications of these results for the mechanism of nuclear factor I action are discussed.

  5. Data from a pre-publication independent replication initiative examining ten moral judgement effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tierney, W. (Warren); Schweinsberg, M. (Martin); Jordan, J. (Jennifer); Kennedy, D.M. (Deanna M.); Qureshi, I. (Israr); Sommer, S.A. (S. Amy); Thornley, N. (Nico); Madan, N. (Nikhil); M. Vianello (Michelangelo); Awtrey, E. (Eli); Zhu, L.L. (Luke Lei); Diermeier, D. (Daniel); Heinze, J.E. (Justin E.); Srinivasan, M. (Malavika); Tannenbaum, D. (David); Bivolaru, E. (Eliza); Dana, J. (Jason); Davis-Stober, C.P. (Clintin P.); Du Plessis, C. (Christilene); Gronau, Q.F. (Quentin F.); Hafenbrack, A.C. (Andrew C.); Liao, E.Y. (Eko Yi); Ly, A. (Alexander); Marsman, M. (Maarten); Murase, T. (Toshio); Schaerer, M. (Michael); Tworek, C.M. (Christina M.); E.J. Wagenmakers (Eric-Jan); Wong, L. (Lynn); Anderson, T. (Tabitha); Bauman, C.W. (Christopher W.); Bedwell, W.L. (Wendy L.); Brescoll, V. (Victoria); Canavan, A. (Andrew); J. Chandler (Jesse); Cheries, E. (Erik); Cheryan, S. (Sapna); Cheung, F. (Felix); Cimpian, A. (Andrei); Clark, M.A. (Mark A.); Cordon, D. (Diana); Cushman, F. (Fiery); Ditto, P.H. (Peter H.); Amell, A. (Alice); Frick, S.E. (Sarah E.); Gamez-Djokic, M. (Monica); Grady, R.H. (Rebecca Hofstein); Graham, J. (Jesse); Gu, J. (Jun); Hahn, A. (Adam); Hanson, B.E. (Brittany E.); Hartwich, N.J. (Nicole J.); Hein, K. (Kristie); Inbar, Y. (Yoel); Jiang, L. (Lily); Kellogg, T. (Tehlyr); Legate, N. (Nicole); Luoma, T.P. (Timo P.); Maibeucher, H. (Heidi); Meindl, P. (Peter); Miles, J. (Jennifer); Mislin, A. (Alexandra); Molden, D.C. (Daniel C.); Motyl, M. (Matt); Newman, G. (George); Ngo, H.H. (Hoai Huong); Packham, H. (Harvey); Ramsay, P.S. (P. Scott); Ray, J.L. (Jennifer L.); Sackett, A.M. (Aaron M.); Sellier, A.-L. (Anne-Laure); Sokolova, T. (Tatiana); Sowden, W. (Walter); Storage, D. (Daniel); Sun, X. (Xiaomin); Van Bavel, J.J. (Jay J.); Washburn, A.N. (Anthony N.); Wei, C. (Cong); Wetter, E. (Erik); Wilson, C.T. (Carlos T.); Darroux, S.-C. (Sophie-Charlotte); Uhlmann, E.L. (Eric Luis)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractWe present the data from a crowdsourced project seeking to replicate findings in independent laboratories before (rather than after) they are published. In this Pre-Publication Independent Replication (PPIR) initiative, 25 research groups attempted to replicate 10 moral judgment effects

  6. High-Resolution Replication Profiles Define the Stochastic Nature of Genome Replication Initiation and Termination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Hawkins

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic genome replication is stochastic, and each cell uses a different cohort of replication origins. We demonstrate that interpreting high-resolution Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome replication data with a mathematical model allows quantification of the stochastic nature of genome replication, including the efficiency of each origin and the distribution of termination events. Single-cell measurements support the inferred values for stochastic origin activation time. A strain, in which three origins were inactivated, confirmed that the distribution of termination events is primarily dictated by the stochastic activation time of origins. Cell-to-cell variability in origin activity ensures that termination events are widely distributed across virtually the whole genome. We propose that the heterogeneity in origin usage contributes to genome stability by limiting potentially deleterious events from accumulating at particular loci.

  7. Adenovirus replication and transcription sites are spatially separated in the nucleus of infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pombo, A; Ferreira, J; Bridge, E; Carmo-Fonseca, M

    1994-11-01

    We have visualized the intranuclear topography of adenovirus replication and transcription in infected HeLa cells. The results show that viral DNA replication occurs in multiple foci that are highly organized in the nucleoplasm. Pulse-chase experiments indicate that newly synthesized viral double-stranded DNA molecules are displaced from the replication foci and spread throughout the nucleoplasm, while the single-stranded DNA replication intermediates accumulate in adjacent sites. Double-labelling experiments and confocal microscopy show that replication occurs in foci localized at the periphery of the sites where single-stranded DNA accumulates. The simultaneous visualization of viral replication and transcription reveals that the sites of transcription are predominantly separated from the sites of replication. Transcription is detected adjacent to the replication foci and extends around the sites of single-stranded DNA accumulation. These data indicate that newly synthesized double-stranded DNA molecules are displaced from the replication foci and spread in the surrounding nucleoplasm, where they are used as templates for transcription. Splicing snRNPs are shown to co-localize with the sites of transcription and to be excluded from the sites of replication. This provides evidence that splicing of viral RNAs occurs co-transcriptionally and that the sites of viral DNA replication are spatially distinct from the sites of RNA transcription and processing.

  8. A Novel Mechanism for Activator-Controlled Initiation of DNA Replication that Resolves the Auto-regulation Sequestration Paradox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, K.; Ehrenberg, M.

    For bacterial genes to be inherited to the next bacterial generation, the gene containing DNA sequences must be duplicated before cell division so that each daughter cell contains a complete set of genes. The duplication process is called DNA replication and it starts at one defined site on the DNA molecule called the origin of replication (oriC) [1]. In addition to chromosomal DNA, bacteria often also contain plasmid DNA. Plasmids are extra-chromosomal DNA molecules carrying genes that increase the fitness of their host in certain environments, with genes encoding antibiotic resistance as a notorious example [2]. The chromosome is found at a low per cell copy number and initiation of replication takes place synchronously once every cell generation [3,4], while many plasmids exist at a high copy number and replication initiates asynchronously, throughout the cell generation [5]. In this chapter we present a novel mechanism for the control of initiation of replication, where one type of molecule may activate a round of replication by binding to the origin of replication and also regulate its own synthesis accurately. This mechanism of regulating the initiation of replication also offers a novel solution to the so-called auto-regulation sequestration paradox, i.e. how a molecule sequestered by binding to DNA may at the same time accurately regulate its own synthesis [6]. The novel regulatory mechanism is inspired by the molecular set-up of the replication control of the chromosome in the bacterium Escherichia coli and is here transferred into a plasmid model. This allows us to illustrate principles of replication control in a simple way and to put the novel mechanism into the context of a previous analysis of plasmids regulated by inhibitor-dilution copy number control [7]. We analyze factors important for a sensitive response of the replication initiation rate to changes in plasmid concentration in an asynchronous model and discover a novel mechanism for creating a

  9. The Escherichia coli Tus-Ter replication fork barrier causes site-specific DNA replication perturbation in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Nicolai B; Sass, Ehud; Suski, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Replication fork (RF) pausing occurs at both 'programmed' sites and non-physiological barriers (for example, DNA adducts). Programmed RF pausing is required for site-specific DNA replication termination in Escherichia coli, and this process requires the binding of the polar terminator protein, Tus......, to specific DNA sequences called Ter. Here, we demonstrate that Tus-Ter modules also induce polar RF pausing when engineered into the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. This heterologous RF barrier is distinct from a number of previously characterized, protein-mediated, RF pause sites in yeast, as it is neither...

  10. Replication initiator DnaA binds at the Caulobacter centromere and enables chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mera, Paola E; Kalogeraki, Virginia S; Shapiro, Lucy

    2014-11-11

    During cell division, multiple processes are highly coordinated to faithfully generate genetically equivalent daughter cells. In bacteria, the mechanisms that underlie the coordination of chromosome replication and segregation are poorly understood. Here, we report that the conserved replication initiator, DnaA, can mediate chromosome segregation independent of replication initiation. It does so by binding directly to the parS centromere region of the chromosome, and mutations that alter this interaction result in cells that display aberrant centromere translocation and cell division. We propose that DnaA serves to coordinate bacterial DNA replication with the onset of chromosome segregation.

  11. Multiple origin usage for DNA replication in sdrA(rnh) mutants of Escherichia coli K-12. Initiation in the absence of oriC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Massy, B; Fayet, O; Kogoma, T

    1984-09-15

    In stable DNA replication (sdrA/rnh) mutants of Escherichia coli, initiation of rounds of DNA replication occurs in the absence of the normal origin of replication, oriC. To determine whether or not the initiation occurs at a fixed site(s) on the chromosome in sdrA mutants, the DNA from exponentially growing sdrA mutant cells with or without the oriC site (delta oriC) was analyzed for the relative copy numbers of various genes along the chromosome. The results suggest that there are at least four fixed sites or regions of the sdrA delta oriC chromosome from which DNA replication can be initiated in the absence of the oriC sequence.

  12. Metal-Induced Stabilization and Activation of Plasmid Replication Initiator RepB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Masó, José A.; Bordanaba-Ruiseco, Lorena; Sanz, Marta; Menéndez, Margarita; del Solar, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    Initiation of plasmid rolling circle replication (RCR) is catalyzed by a plasmid-encoded Rep protein that performs a Tyr- and metal-dependent site-specific cleavage of one DNA strand within the double-strand origin (dso) of replication. The crystal structure of RepB, the initiator protein of the streptococcal plasmid pMV158, constitutes the first example of a Rep protein structure from RCR plasmids. It forms a toroidal homohexameric ring where each RepB protomer consists of two domains: the C-terminal domain involved in oligomerization and the N-terminal domain containing the DNA-binding and endonuclease activities. Binding of Mn2+ to the active site is essential for the catalytic activity of RepB. In this work, we have studied the effects of metal binding on the structure and thermostability of full-length hexameric RepB and each of its separate domains by using different biophysical approaches. The analysis of the temperature-induced changes in RepB shows that the first thermal transition, which occurs at a range of temperatures physiologically relevant for the pMV158 pneumococcal host, represents an irreversible conformational change that affects the secondary and tertiary structure of the protein, which becomes prone to self-associate. This transition, which is also shown to result in loss of DNA binding capacity and catalytic activity of RepB, is confined to its N-terminal domain. Mn2+ protects the protein from undergoing this detrimental conformational change and the observed protection correlates well with the high-affinity binding of the cation to the active site, as substituting one of the metal-ligands at this site impairs both the protein affinity for Mn2+and the Mn2+-driven thermostabilization effect. The level of catalytic activity of the protein, especially in the case of full-length RepB, cannot be explained based only on the high-affinity binding of Mn2+ at the active site and suggests the existence of additional, lower-affinity metal binding site(s

  13. CtIP is required to initiate replication-dependent interstrand crosslink repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle L Duquette

    Full Text Available DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs are toxic lesions that block the progression of replication and transcription. CtIP is a conserved DNA repair protein that facilitates DNA end resection in the double-strand break (DSB repair pathway. Here we show that CtIP plays a critical role during initiation of ICL processing in replicating human cells that is distinct from its role in DSB repair. CtIP depletion sensitizes human cells to ICL inducing agents and significantly impairs the accumulation of DNA damage response proteins RPA, ATR, FANCD2, γH2AX, and phosphorylated ATM at sites of laser generated ICLs. In contrast, the appearance of γH2AX and phosphorylated ATM at sites of laser generated double strand breaks (DSBs is CtIP-independent. We present a model in which CtIP functions early in ICL repair in a BRCA1- and FANCM-dependent manner prior to generation of DSB repair intermediates.

  14. A genetic screen for replication initiation defective (rid mutants in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Locovei Alexandra M

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In fission yeast the intra-S phase and DNA damage checkpoints are activated in response to inhibition of DNA replication or DNA damage, respectively. The intra-S phase checkpoint responds to stalled replication forks leading to the activation of the Cds1 kinase that both delays cell cycle progression and stabilizes DNA replication forks. The DNA damage checkpoint, that operates during the G2 phase of the cell cycle delays mitotic progression through activation of the checkpoint kinase, Chk1. Delay of the cell cycle is believed to be essential to allow time for either replication restart (in S phase or DNA damage repair (in G2. Previously, our laboratory showed that fission yeast cells deleted for the N-terminal half of DNA polymerase ε (Cdc20 are delayed in S phase, but surprisingly require Chk1 rather than Cds1 to maintain cell viability. Several additional DNA replication mutants were then tested for their dependency on Chk1 or Cds1 when grown under semi-permissive temperatures. We discovered that mutants defective in DNA replication initiation are sensitive only to loss of Chk1, whilst mutations that inhibit DNA replication elongation are sensitive to loss of both Cds1 and Chk1. To confirm that the Chk1-sensitive, Cds1-insensitive phenotype (rid phenotype is specific to mutants defective in DNA replication initiation, we completed a genetic screen for cell cycle mutants that require Chk1, but not Cds1 to maintain cell viability when grown at semi-permissive temperatures. Our screen identified two mutants, rid1-1 and rid2-1, that are defective in Orc1 and Mcm4, respectively. Both mutants show defects in DNA replication initiation consistent with our hypothesis that the rid phenotype is replication initiation specific. In the case of Mcm4, the mutation has been mapped to a highly conserved region of the protein that appears to be required for DNA replication initiation, but not elongation. Therefore, we conclude that the cellular

  15. DNA polymerase beta can substitute for DNA polymerase I in the initiation of plasmid DNA replication.

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that mammalian DNA polymerase beta can substitute for DNA polymerase I of Escherichia coli in DNA replication and in base excision repair. We have now obtained genetic evidence suggesting that DNA polymerase beta can substitute for E. coli DNA polymerase I in the initiation of replication of a plasmid containing a pMB1 origin of DNA replication. Specifically, we demonstrate that a plasmid with a pMB1 origin of replication can be maintained in an E. coli polA mutant ...

  16. Architectures of archaeal GINS complexes, essential DNA replication initiation factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saito Mihoko

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the early stage of eukaryotic DNA replication, the template DNA is unwound by the MCM helicase, which is activated by forming a complex with the Cdc45 and GINS proteins. The eukaryotic GINS forms a heterotetramer, comprising four types of subunits. On the other hand, the archaeal GINS appears to be either a tetramer formed by two types of subunits in a 2:2 ratio (α2β2 or a homotetramer of a single subunit (α4. Due to the low sequence similarity between the archaeal and eukaryotic GINS subunits, the atomic structures of the archaeal GINS complexes are attracting interest for comparisons of their subunit architectures and organization. Results We determined the crystal structure of the α2β2 GINS tetramer from Thermococcus kodakaraensis (TkoGINS, comprising Gins51 and Gins23, and compared it with the reported human GINS structures. The backbone structure of each subunit and the tetrameric assembly are similar to those of human GINS. However, the location of the C-terminal small domain of Gins51 is remarkably different between the archaeal and human GINS structures. In addition, TkoGINS exhibits different subunit contacts from those in human GINS, as a consequence of the different relative locations and orientations between the domains. Based on the GINS crystal structures, we built a homology model of the putative homotetrameric GINS from Thermoplasma acidophilum (TacGINS. Importantly, we propose that a long insertion loop allows the differential positioning of the C-terminal domains and, as a consequence, exclusively leads to the formation of an asymmetric homotetramer rather than a symmetrical one. Conclusions The DNA metabolizing proteins from archaea are similar to those from eukaryotes, and the archaeal multi-subunit complexes are occasionally simplified versions of the eukaryotic ones. The overall similarity in the architectures between the archaeal and eukaryotic GINS complexes suggests that the GINS function

  17. A dynamic stochastic model for DNA replication initiation in early embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arach Goldar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Eukaryotic cells seem unable to monitor replication completion during normal S phase, yet must ensure a reliable replication completion time. This is an acute problem in early Xenopus embryos since DNA replication origins are located and activated stochastically, leading to the random completion problem. DNA combing, kinetic modelling and other studies using Xenopus egg extracts have suggested that potential origins are much more abundant than actual initiation events and that the time-dependent rate of initiation, I(t, markedly increases through S phase to ensure the rapid completion of unreplicated gaps and a narrow distribution of completion times. However, the molecular mechanism that underlies this increase has remained obscure. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using both previous and novel DNA combing data we have confirmed that I(t increases through S phase but have also established that it progressively decreases before the end of S phase. To explore plausible biochemical scenarios that might explain these features, we have performed comparisons between numerical simulations and DNA combing data. Several simple models were tested: i recycling of a limiting replication fork component from completed replicons; ii time-dependent increase in origin efficiency; iii time-dependent increase in availability of an initially limiting factor, e.g. by nuclear import. None of these potential mechanisms could on its own account for the data. We propose a model that combines time-dependent changes in availability of a replication factor and a fork-density dependent affinity of this factor for potential origins. This novel model quantitatively and robustly accounted for the observed changes in initiation rate and fork density. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This work provides a refined temporal profile of replication initiation rates and a robust, dynamic model that quantitatively explains replication origin usage during early embryonic S phase

  18. [The effects of TorR protein on initiation of DNA replication in Escherichia coli].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yao; Jiaxin, Qiao; Jing, Li; Hui, Li; Morigen, Morigen

    2015-03-01

    The two-component systems, which could sense and respond to environmental changes, widely exist in bacteria as a signal transduction pathway. The bacterial CckA/CtrA, ArcA/ArcB and PhoP/PhoQ two-component systems are associated with initiation of DNA replication and cell division, however, the effects of the TorS/TorR system on cell cycle and DNA replication remains unknown. The TorS/TorR system in Escherichia coli can sense changes in trimethylamine oxide (TMAO) concentration around the cells. However, it is unknown if it also affects initiation of DNA replication. We detected DNA replication patterns in ΔtorS and ΔtorR mutant strains by flow cytometry. We found that the average number of replication origins (oriCs) per cell and doubling time in ΔtorS mutants were the same while the average number of oriCs in ΔtorR mutants was increased compared with that in wild-type cells. These results indicated that absence of TorR led to an earlier initiation of DNA replication than that in wild-type cells. Strangely, neither overexpression of TorR nor co-expression of TorR and TorS could restore ΔtorR mutant phenotype to the wild type. However, overexpression of SufD in both wild type and ΔtorR mutants promoted initiation of DNA replication, while mutation of SufD delayed it in ΔtorR mutants. Thus, TorR may affect initiation of DNA replication indirectly through regulating gene expression of sufD.

  19. Data from a pre-publication independent replication initiative examining ten moral judgement effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Warren; Schweinsberg, Martin; Jordan, Jennifer; Kennedy, Deanna M.; Qureshi, Israr; Sommer, S. Amy; Thornley, Nico; Madan, Nikhil; Vianello, Michelangelo; Awtrey, Eli; Zhu, Luke Lei; Diermeier, Daniel; Heinze, Justin E.; Srinivasan, Malavika; Tannenbaum, David; Bivolaru, Eliza; Dana, Jason; Davis-Stober, Clintin P.; du Plessis, Christilene; Gronau, Quentin F.; Hafenbrack, Andrew C.; Liao, Eko Yi; Ly, Alexander; Marsman, Maarten; Murase, Toshio; Schaerer, Michael; Tworek, Christina M.; Wagenmakers, Eric-Jan; Wong, Lynn; Anderson, Tabitha; Bauman, Christopher W.; Bedwell, Wendy L.; Brescoll, Victoria; Canavan, Andrew; Chandler, Jesse J.; Cheries, Erik; Cheryan, Sapna; Cheung, Felix; Cimpian, Andrei; Clark, Mark A.; Cordon, Diana; Cushman, Fiery; Ditto, Peter H.; Amell, Alice; Frick, Sarah E.; Gamez-Djokic, Monica; Grady, Rebecca Hofstein; Graham, Jesse; Gu, Jun; Hahn, Adam; Hanson, Brittany E.; Hartwich, Nicole J.; Hein, Kristie; Inbar, Yoel; Jiang, Lily; Kellogg, Tehlyr; Legate, Nicole; Luoma, Timo P.; Maibeucher, Heidi; Meindl, Peter; Miles, Jennifer; Mislin, Alexandra; Molden, Daniel C.; Motyl, Matt; Newman, George; Ngo, Hoai Huong; Packham, Harvey; Ramsay, P. Scott; Ray, Jennifer L.; Sackett, Aaron M.; Sellier, Anne-Laure; Sokolova, Tatiana; Sowden, Walter; Storage, Daniel; Sun, Xiaomin; Van Bavel, Jay J.; Washburn, Anthony N.; Wei, Cong; Wetter, Erik; Wilson, Carlos T.; Darroux, Sophie-Charlotte; Uhlmann, Eric Luis

    2016-01-01

    We present the data from a crowdsourced project seeking to replicate findings in independent laboratories before (rather than after) they are published. In this Pre-Publication Independent Replication (PPIR) initiative, 25 research groups attempted to replicate 10 moral judgment effects from a single laboratory’s research pipeline of unpublished findings. The 10 effects were investigated using online/lab surveys containing psychological manipulations (vignettes) followed by questionnaires. Results revealed a mix of reliable, unreliable, and culturally moderated findings. Unlike any previous replication project, this dataset includes the data from not only the replications but also from the original studies, creating a unique corpus that researchers can use to better understand reproducibility and irreproducibility in science. PMID:27727246

  20. Enhancement of internal ribosome entry site-mediated translation and replication of hepatitis C virus by PD98059.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Takayuki; Hijikata, Makoto; Shimotohno, Kunitada

    2005-09-15

    Translation initiation of hepatitis C virus (HCV) occurs in an internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-dependent manner. We found that HCV IRES-dependent protein synthesis is enhanced by PD98059, an inhibitor of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway, while cellular cap-dependent translation was relatively unaffected by the compound. Treatment of cells with PD98059 allowed for robust HCV replication following cellular incubation with HCV-positive serum. Though the molecular mechanism underlying IRES enhancement remains elusive, PD98059 is a potent accelerator of HCV RNA replication.

  1. A structural framework for replication origin opening by AAA plus initiation factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duderstadt, Karl E.; Berger, James M.

    2013-01-01

    ATP-dependent initiation factors help process replication origins and coordinate replisome assembly to control the onset of DNA synthesis. Although the specific properties and regulatory mechanisms of initiator proteins can vary greatly between different organisms, certain nucleotide-binding element

  2. Large heterogeneity of mitochondrial DNA transcription and initiation of replication exposed by single-cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatre, Laurent; Ricchetti, Miria

    2013-02-15

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication and transcription are crucial for cell function, but these processes are poorly understood at the single-cell level. We describe a novel fluorescence in situ hybridization protocol, called mTRIP (mitochondrial transcription and replication imaging protocol), that reveals simultaneously mtDNA and RNA, and that can also be coupled to immunofluorescence for in situ protein examination. mTRIP reveals mitochondrial structures engaged in initiation of DNA replication by identification of a specific sequence in the regulatory D-loop, as well as unique transcription profiles in single human cells. We observe and quantify at least three classes of mitochondrial structures: (i) replication initiation active and transcript-positive (Ia-Tp); (ii) replication initiation silent and transcript-positive (Is-Tp); and (iii) replication initiation silent and transcript-negative (Is-Tn). Thus, individual mitochondria are dramatically heterogeneous within the same cell. Moreover, mTRIP exposes a mosaic of distinct nucleic acid patterns in the D-loop, including H-strand versus L-strand transcripts, and uncoupled rRNA transcription and mtDNA initiation of replication, which might have functional consequences in the regulation of the mtDNA. Finally, mTRIP identifies altered mtDNA processing in cells with unbalanced mtDNA content and function, including in human mitochondrial disorders. Thus, mTRIP reveals qualitative and quantitative alterations that provide additional tools for elucidating the dynamics of mtDNA processing in single cells and mitochondrial dysfunction in diseases.

  3. Tus-Ter as a tool to study site-specific DNA replication perturbation in eukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Nicolai B; Hickson, Ian D; Mankouri, Hocine W

    2014-01-01

    The high-affinity binding of the Tus protein to specific 21-bp sequences, called Ter, causes site-specific, and polar, DNA replication fork arrest in E coli. The Tus-Ter complex serves to coordinate DNA replication with chromosome segregation in this organism. A number of recent and ongoing studies...... have demonstrated that Tus-Ter can be used as a heterologous tool to generate site-specific perturbation of DNA replication when reconstituted in eukaryotes. Here, we review these recent findings and explore the molecular mechanism by which Tus-Ter mediates replication fork (RF) arrest in the budding...... yeast, S. cerevisiae. We propose that Tus-Ter is a versatile, genetically tractable, and regulatable RF blocking system that can be utilized for disrupting DNA replication in a diverse range of host cells....

  4. Rifampicin resistant initiation of chromosome replication from oriC in ihf mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Freiesleben, Ulrik; Rasmussen, Knud V.; Atlung, Tove

    2000-01-01

    IHF (integration host factor) mutants exhibit asynchronous initiation of chromosome replication from oriC as determined from flow cytometric analysis of cultures where RNA synthesis was inhibited with rifampicin. However, the run-out kinetics of chromosome replication in ihf mutants shows...... that they continue to produce oriCs for some time in the absence of RNA synthesis resulting in a twofold increase in the oriC per mass ratio. An ihf dnaA double mutant did not exhibit this continued increase of the oriC per mass ratio. This indicates that ihf mutants can initiate replication from ori......C in a rifampicin-resistant initiation mode but requires fully functional DnaA protein. The origin per mass ratio, determined by a quantitative Southern blotting technique, showed that the ihf mutants had an origin per mass ratio that was 60% of the wild type although it had a normal DnaA protein concentration...

  5. Control of Initiation of DNA Replication in Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie H. Jameson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Initiation of DNA Replication is tightly regulated in all cells since imbalances in chromosomal copy number are deleterious and often lethal. In bacteria such as Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli, at the point of cytokinesis, there must be two complete copies of the chromosome to partition into the daughter cells following division at mid-cell during vegetative growth. Under conditions of rapid growth, when the time taken to replicate the chromosome exceeds the doubling time of the cells, there will be multiple initiations per cell cycle and daughter cells will inherit chromosomes that are already undergoing replication. In contrast, cells entering the sporulation pathway in B. subtilis can do so only during a short interval in the cell cycle when there are two, and only two, chromosomes per cell, one destined for the spore and one for the mother cell. Here, we briefly describe the overall process of DNA replication in bacteria before reviewing initiation of DNA replication in detail. The review covers DnaA-directed assembly of the replisome at oriC and the multitude of mechanisms of regulation of initiation, with a focus on the similarities and differences between E. coli and B. subtilis.

  6. Control of Initiation of DNA Replication in Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, Katie H; Wilkinson, Anthony J

    2017-01-10

    Initiation of DNA Replication is tightly regulated in all cells since imbalances in chromosomal copy number are deleterious and often lethal. In bacteria such as Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli, at the point of cytokinesis, there must be two complete copies of the chromosome to partition into the daughter cells following division at mid-cell during vegetative growth. Under conditions of rapid growth, when the time taken to replicate the chromosome exceeds the doubling time of the cells, there will be multiple initiations per cell cycle and daughter cells will inherit chromosomes that are already undergoing replication. In contrast, cells entering the sporulation pathway in B. subtilis can do so only during a short interval in the cell cycle when there are two, and only two, chromosomes per cell, one destined for the spore and one for the mother cell. Here, we briefly describe the overall process of DNA replication in bacteria before reviewing initiation of DNA replication in detail. The review covers DnaA-directed assembly of the replisome at oriC and the multitude of mechanisms of regulation of initiation, with a focus on the similarities and differences between E. coli and B. subtilis.

  7. Rapid Exchange of Bound ADP on the Staphylococcus aureus Replication Initiation Protein DnaA*

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, regulatory inactivation of the replication initiator DnaA occurs after initiation as a result of hydrolysis of bound ATP to ADP, but it has been unknown how DnaA is controlled to coordinate cell growth and chromosomal replication in Gram-positive bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus. This study examined the roles of ATP binding and its hydrolysis in the regulation of the S. aureus DnaA activity. In vitro, S. aureus DnaA melted S. aureus oriC in the presence of ATP but n...

  8. Replication of a Career Academy Model: The Georgia Central Educational Center and Four Replication Sites. Summary. Issues & Answers. REL 2011-No. 101

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detgen, Amy; Alfeld, Corinne

    2011-01-01

    The study surveyed four career academies in Georgia that replicated the model of the Georgia Central Educational Center, which integrates technical instruction and academics at the high school level. The four replication sites adhered to the major tenets of the model. The model's flexibility helped the new sites meet community needs. [For the main…

  9. Replication Validity of Initial Association Studies: A Comparison between Psychiatry, Neurology and Four Somatic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas-Mallet, Estelle; Button, Katherine; Boraud, Thomas; Munafo, Marcus; Gonon, François

    2016-01-01

    Context There are growing concerns about effect size inflation and replication validity of association studies, but few observational investigations have explored the extent of these problems. Objective Using meta-analyses to measure the reliability of initial studies and explore whether this varies across biomedical domains and study types (cognitive/behavioral, brain imaging, genetic and “others”). Methods We analyzed 663 meta-analyses describing associations between markers or risk factors and 12 pathologies within three biomedical domains (psychiatry, neurology and four somatic diseases). We collected the effect size, sample size, publication year and Impact Factor of initial studies, largest studies (i.e., with the largest sample size) and the corresponding meta-analyses. Initial studies were considered as replicated if they were in nominal agreement with meta-analyses and if their effect size inflation was below 100%. Results Nominal agreement between initial studies and meta-analyses regarding the presence of a significant effect was not better than chance in psychiatry, whereas it was somewhat better in neurology and somatic diseases. Whereas effect sizes reported by largest studies and meta-analyses were similar, most of those reported by initial studies were inflated. Among the 256 initial studies reporting a significant effect (p<0.05) and paired with significant meta-analyses, 97 effect sizes were inflated by more than 100%. Nominal agreement and effect size inflation varied with the biomedical domain and study type. Indeed, the replication rate of initial studies reporting a significant effect ranged from 6.3% for genetic studies in psychiatry to 86.4% for cognitive/behavioral studies. Comparison between eight subgroups shows that replication rate decreases with sample size and “true” effect size. We observed no evidence of association between replication rate and publication year or Impact Factor. Conclusion The differences in reliability

  10. Translation initiation of the replication initiator repB gene of promiscuous plasmid pMV158 is led by an extended non-SD sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Aguilar, Celeste; Ruiz-Masó, José A; Rubio-Lepe, Tania Samir; Sanz, Marta; del Solar, Gloria

    2013-07-01

    RepB is the pMV158-encoded protein that initiates rolling-circle replication of this promiscuous plasmid. Availability of RepB is rate-limiting for the plasmid replication process, and therefore the repB gene encoding the protein is subjected to strict control. Two trans-acting plasmid elements, CopG and the antisense RNAII, are involved in controlling the synthesis of the initiator at the transcriptional and translational level, respectively. In addition to this dual control of repB expression that senses and corrects fluctuations in plasmid copy number, proper availability of RepB also relies on the adequate functionality of the transcription and translation initiation regulatory signals. Translation of repB has been postulated to depend on an atypical ribosome binding site that precedes its start codon, although such a hypothesis has never been proved. To define sequences involved in translation of repB, several mutations in the translation initiation region of the repB mRNA have been characterized by using an Escherichia coli in vitro expression system wherein the synthesis of RepB was detected and quantified. We showed that translation of repB is not coupled to that of copG and depends only on its own initiation signals. The atypical ribosome binding site, as it was defined, is not involved in translation initiation. However, the sequence just upstream of the repB start codon, encompassing the proximal box of the atypical ribosome binding site and the four bases immediately downstream of it, is indeed important for efficient translation of repB. The high degree of conservation of this sequence among the rep genes of plasmids of the same pMV158 family supports its relevancy as a translation initiation signal in mRNAs without a recognizable Shine-Dalgarno sequence.

  11. Murine gamma-herpesvirus 68 hijacks MAVS and IKKbeta to initiate lytic replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaonan Dong

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Upon viral infection, the mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS-IKKbeta pathway is activated to restrict viral replication. Manipulation of immune signaling events by pathogens has been an outstanding theme of host-pathogen interaction. Here we report that the loss of MAVS or IKKbeta impaired the lytic replication of gamma-herpesvirus 68 (gammaHV68, a model herpesvirus for human Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus and Epstein-Barr virus. gammaHV68 infection activated IKKbeta in a MAVS-dependent manner; however, IKKbeta phosphorylated and promoted the transcriptional activation of the gammaHV68 replication and transcription activator (RTA. Mutational analyses identified IKKbeta phosphorylation sites, through which RTA-mediated transcription was increased by IKKbeta, within the transactivation domain of RTA. Moreover, the lytic replication of recombinant gammaHV68 carrying mutations within the IKKbeta phosphorylation sites was greatly impaired. These findings support the conclusion that gammaHV68 hijacks the antiviral MAVS-IKKbeta pathway to promote viral transcription and lytic infection, representing an example whereby viral replication is coupled to host immune activation.

  12. Redistribution of Endosomal Membranes to the African Swine Fever Virus Replication Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel Cuesta-Geijo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available African swine fever virus (ASFV infection causes endosomal reorganization. Here, we show that the virus causes endosomal congregation close to the nucleus as the infection progresses, which is necessary to build a compact viral replication organelle. ASFV enters the cell by the endosomal pathway and reaches multivesicular late endosomes. Upon uncoating and fusion, the virus should exit to the cytosol to start replication. ASFV remodels endosomal traffic and redistributes endosomal membranes to the viral replication site. Virus replication also depends on endosomal membrane phosphoinositides (PtdIns synthesized by PIKfyve. Endosomes could act as platforms providing membranes and PtdIns, necessary for ASFV replication. Our study has revealed that ASFV reorganizes endosome dynamics, in order to ensure a productive infection.

  13. DNA replication origins in archaea

    OpenAIRE

    Zhenfang eWu; Jingfang eLiu; Haibo eYang; Hua eXiang

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication initiation, which starts at specific chromosomal site (known as replication origins), is the key regulatory stage of chromosome replication. Archaea, the third domain of life, use a single or multiple origin(s) to initiate replication of their circular chromosomes. The basic structure of replication origins is conserved among archaea, typically including an AT-rich unwinding region flanked by several conserved repeats (origin recognition box, ORB) that are located adjacent to ...

  14. Initial results from MARmara SuperSITE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meral Ozel, Nurcan; Necmioglu, Ocal; Favali, Paolo; Douglas, John; Mathieu, Pierre-Philippe; Geli, Louis; Ergintav, Semih; Oguz Ozel, Asım; Tan, Onur; Gurbuz, Cemil; Erdik, Mustafa

    2014-05-01

    shaking measurements, has been prepared by INERIS to be set up on the field to be also set up as an early warning system prototype to be progressively parameterized and tested on near to real time condition. Slip rate on the Main Marmara Fault from 3D seismic data has been estimated and extremely young age of the North Anatolian Fault in the Sea of Marmara has been determined. Seismic risk study for IGDAS Natural Gas Network including pipelines and its components has been carried out with several earthquake scenarios in Marmara Sea. An automatic shut-off algorithm has been developed for the automatic shut-off of the gas flow at the IGDAS district regulators during an extreme event. All the European and international initiatives and projects that could have links with MARsite were identified as the initial step for the integration of data management practices and coordination with ongoing research infrastructures. EPOS and EMSO are considered to be crucial links that could provide sustainability of MARsite's developments beyond the project's lifetime. Concerning EMSO, Marmara is one of the nodes of the research infrastructure, in which a permanent installation at sea is being integrated with land-based networks. In the context of EPOS, MARsite will be a thematic core service. In addition, the data collection and dissemination in MARsite is carried out according to the data management principles of EMSO and EPOS. Dissemination activities reached a certain level of maturity through the relesea of Public Annual Report, quarterly newsletter, ID card and poster, social media interaction, dedicated web sites, videos and several conferences and workhops participated, such as GEO European Projects' Workshop, Supersites Coordination Workshop and GEO-X Plenary & Geneva Ministerial Summit .

  15. Disaster recovery using VMware vSphere Replication and vCenter Site Recovery Manager

    CERN Document Server

    GB, Abhilash

    2014-01-01

    This is a step-by-step guide that will help you understand disaster recovery using VMware vSphere Replication 5.5 and VMware vCenter Site Recovery Manager (SRM) 5.5. The topics and configuration procedures are accompanied with relevant screenshots, flowcharts, and logical diagrams that makes grasping the concepts easier. This book is a guide for anyone who is keen on using vSphere Replication or vCenter Site Recovery Manager as a disaster recovery solution. This is an excellent handbook for solution architects, administrators, on-field engineers, and support professionals. Although the book as

  16. Ultrastructure of the replication sites of positive-strand RNA viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harak, Christian; Lohmann, Volker, E-mail: volker_lohmann@med.uni-heidelberg.de

    2015-05-15

    Positive strand RNA viruses replicate in the cytoplasm of infected cells and induce intracellular membranous compartments harboring the sites of viral RNA synthesis. These replication factories are supposed to concentrate the components of the replicase and to shield replication intermediates from the host cell innate immune defense. Virus induced membrane alterations are often generated in coordination with host factors and can be grouped into different morphotypes. Recent advances in conventional and electron microscopy have contributed greatly to our understanding of their biogenesis, but still many questions remain how viral proteins capture membranes and subvert host factors for their need. In this review, we will discuss different representatives of positive strand RNA viruses and their ways of hijacking cellular membranes to establish replication complexes. We will further focus on host cell factors that are critically involved in formation of these membranes and how they contribute to viral replication. - Highlights: • Positive strand RNA viruses induce massive membrane alterations. • Despite the great diversity, replication complexes share many similarities. • Host factors play a pivotal role in replication complex biogenesis. • Use of the same host factors by several viruses hints to similar functions.

  17. The DNA helicase Pfh1 promotes fork merging at replication termination sites to ensure genome stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinacher, Roland; Osman, Fekret; Dalgaard, Jacob Z.; Lorenz, Alexander; Whitby, Matthew C.

    2012-01-01

    Bidirectionally moving DNA replication forks merge at termination sites composed of accidental or programmed DNA–protein barriers. If merging fails, then regions of unreplicated DNA can result in the breakage of DNA during mitosis, which in turn can give rise to genome instability. Despite its importance, little is known about the mechanisms that promote the final stages of fork merging in eukaryotes. Here we show that the Pif1 family DNA helicase Pfh1 plays a dual role in promoting replication fork termination. First, it facilitates replication past DNA–protein barriers, and second, it promotes the merging of replication forks. A failure of these processes in Pfh1-deficient cells results in aberrant chromosome segregation and heightened genome instability. PMID:22426535

  18. Independent control of replication initiation of the two Vibrio cholerae chromosomes by DnaA and RctB

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duigou, Stephane; Knudsen, Kristine Groth; Skovgaard, Ole

    2006-01-01

    Although the two Vibrio cholerae chromosomes initiate replication in a coordinated fashion, we show here that each chromosome appears to have a specific replication initiator. DnaA overproduction promoted overinitiation of chromosome I and not chromosome II. In contrast, overproduction of Rct...

  19. HIV integration sites in latently infected cell lines: evidence of ongoing replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symons, Jori; Chopra, Abha; Malatinkova, Eva; De Spiegelaere, Ward; Leary, Shay; Cooper, Don; Abana, Chike O; Rhodes, Ajantha; Rezaei, Simin D; Vandekerckhove, Linos; Mallal, Simon; Lewin, Sharon R; Cameron, Paul U

    2017-01-13

    Assessing the location and frequency of HIV integration sites in latently infected cells can potentially inform our understanding of how HIV persists during combination antiretroviral therapy. We developed a novel high throughput sequencing method to evaluate HIV integration sites in latently infected cell lines to determine whether there was virus replication or clonal expansion in these cell lines observed as multiple integration events at the same position. We modified a previously reported method using random DNA shearing and PCR to allow for high throughput robotic processing to identify the site and frequency of HIV integration in latently infected cell lines. Latently infected cell lines infected with intact virus demonstrated multiple distinct HIV integration sites (28 different sites in U1, 110 in ACH-2 and 117 in J1.1 per 150,000 cells). In contrast, cell lines infected with replication-incompetent viruses (J-Lat cells) demonstrated single integration sites. Following in vitro passaging of the ACH-2 cell line, we observed a significant increase in the frequency of unique HIV integration sites and there were multiple mutations and large deletions in the proviral DNA. When the ACH-2 cell line was cultured with the integrase inhibitor raltegravir, there was a significant decrease in the number of unique HIV integration sites and a transient increase in the frequency of 2-LTR circles consistent with virus replication in these cells. Cell lines latently infected with intact HIV demonstrated multiple unique HIV integration sites indicating that these cell lines are not clonal and in the ACH-2 cell line there was evidence of low level virus replication. These findings have implications for the use of latently infected cell lines as models of HIV latency and for the use of these cells as standards.

  20. Low doses of ultraviolet radiation and oxidative damage induce dramatic accumulation of mitochondrial DNA replication intermediates, fork regression, and replication initiation shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torregrosa-Muñumer, Rubén; Goffart, Steffi; Haikonen, Juha A; Pohjoismäki, Jaakko L O

    2015-11-15

    Mitochondrial DNA is prone to damage by various intrinsic as well as environmental stressors. DNA damage can in turn cause problems for replication, resulting in replication stalling and double-strand breaks, which are suspected to be the leading cause of pathological mtDNA rearrangements. In this study, we exposed cells to subtle levels of oxidative stress or UV radiation and followed their effects on mtDNA maintenance. Although the damage did not influence mtDNA copy number, we detected a massive accumulation of RNA:DNA hybrid-containing replication intermediates, followed by an increase in cruciform DNA molecules, as well as in bidirectional replication initiation outside of the main replication origin, OH. Our results suggest that mitochondria maintain two different types of replication as an adaptation to different cellular environments; the RNA:DNA hybrid-involving replication mode maintains mtDNA integrity in tissues with low oxidative stress, and the potentially more error tolerant conventional strand-coupled replication operates when stress is high.

  1. Genome-scale analysis of metazoan replication origins reveals their organization in specific but flexible sites defined by conserved features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayrou, Christelle; Coulombe, Philippe; Vigneron, Alice; Stanojcic, Slavica; Ganier, Olivier; Peiffer, Isabelle; Rivals, Eric; Puy, Aurore; Laurent-Chabalier, Sabine; Desprat, Romain; Méchali, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    In metazoans, thousands of DNA replication origins (Oris) are activated at each cell cycle. Their genomic organization and their genetic nature remain elusive. Here, we characterized Oris by nascent strand (NS) purification and a genome-wide analysis in Drosophila and mouse cells. We show that in both species most CpG islands (CGI) contain Oris, although methylation is nearly absent in Drosophila, indicating that this epigenetic mark is not crucial for defining the activated origin. Initiation of DNA synthesis starts at the borders of CGI, resulting in a striking bimodal distribution of NS, suggestive of a dual initiation event. Oris contain a unique nucleotide skew around NS peaks, characterized by G/T and C/A overrepresentation at the 5′ and 3′ of Ori sites, respectively. Repeated GC-rich elements were detected, which are good predictors of Oris, suggesting that common sequence features are part of metazoan Oris. In the heterochromatic chromosome 4 of Drosophila, Oris correlated with HP1 binding sites. At the chromosome level, regions rich in Oris are early replicating, whereas Ori-poor regions are late replicating. The genome-wide analysis was coupled with a DNA combing analysis to unravel the organization of Oris. The results indicate that Oris are in a large excess, but their activation does not occur at random. They are organized in groups of site-specific but flexible origins that define replicons, where a single origin is activated in each replicon. This organization provides both site specificity and Ori firing flexibility in each replicon, allowing possible adaptation to environmental cues and cell fates. PMID:21750104

  2. Cyclin-dependent kinase suppression by WEE1 kinase protects the genome through control of replication initiation and nucleotide consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Halfdan; Nähse-Kumpf, Viola; Larsen, Marie Sofie Yoo

    2012-01-01

    of replication. This leads to nucleotide shortage and reduces replication fork speed, which is followed by SLX4/MUS81-mediated DNA double-strand breakage. Fork speed is normalized and DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation is suppressed when CDT1, a key factor for replication initiation, is depleted....... Furthermore, addition of nucleosides counteracts the effects of unscheduled CDK activity on fork speed and DNA DSB formation. Finally, we show that WEE1 regulates the IR-induced S phase checkpoint, consistent with its role in control of replication initiation. In conclusion, these results suggest...

  3. Aquareovirus NS80 Initiates Efficient Viral Replication by Retaining Core Proteins within Replication-Associated Viral Inclusion Bodies

    OpenAIRE

    Liming Yan; Jie Zhang; Hong Guo; Shicui Yan; Qingxiu Chen; Fuxian Zhang; Qin Fang

    2015-01-01

    Viral inclusion bodies (VIBs) are specific intracellular compartments for reoviruses replication and assembly. Aquareovirus nonstructural protein NS80 has been identified to be the major constituent for forming globular VIBs in our previous study. In this study, we investigated the role of NS80 in viral structural proteins expression and viral replication. Immunofluorescence assays showed that NS80 could retain five core proteins or inner-capsid proteins (VP1-VP4 and VP6), but not outer-capsi...

  4. TRII: A Probabilistic Scoring of Drosophila melanogaster Translation Initiation Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rice Michael D

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Relative individual information is a measurement that scores the quality of DNA- and RNA-binding sites for biological machines. The development of analytical approaches to increase the power of this scoring method will improve its utility in evaluating the functions of motifs. In this study, the scoring method was applied to potential translation initiation sites in Drosophila to compute Translation Relative Individual Information (TRII scores. The weight matrix at the core of the scoring method was optimized based on high-confidence translation initiation sites identified by using a progressive partitioning approach. Comparing the distributions of TRII scores for sites of interest with those for high-confidence translation initiation sites and random sequences provides a new methodology for assessing the quality of translation initiation sites. The optimized weight matrices can also be used to describe the consensus at translation initiation sites, providing a quantitative measure of preferred and avoided nucleotides at each position.

  5. SirA enforces diploidy by inhibiting the replication initiator DnaA during spore formation in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Jennifer K; Marquis, Kathleen A; Rudner, David Z

    2009-09-01

    How cells maintain their ploidy is relevant to cellular development and disease. Here, we investigate the mechanism by which the bacterium Bacillus subtilis enforces diploidy as it differentiates into a dormant spore. We demonstrate that a sporulation-induced protein SirA (originally annotated YneE) blocks new rounds of replication by targeting the highly conserved replication initiation factor DnaA. We show that SirA interacts with DnaA and displaces it from the replication origin. As a result, expression of SirA during growth rapidly blocks replication and causes cell death in a DnaA-dependent manner. Finally, cells lacking SirA over-replicate during sporulation. These results support a model in which induction of SirA enforces diploidy by inhibiting replication initiation as B. subtilis cells develop into spores.

  6. Mutated primer binding sites interacting with different tRNAs allow efficient murine leukemia virus replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M; Lovmand, J

    1993-01-01

    can replicate by using various tRNA molecules as primers and propose primer binding site-tRNA primer interactions to be of major importance for tRNA primer selection. However, efficient primer selection does not require perfect Watson-Crick base pairing at all 18 positions of the primer binding site.......Two Akv murine leukemia virus-based retroviral vectors with primer binding sites matching tRNA(Gln-1) and tRNA(Lys-3) were constructed. The transduction efficiency of these mutated vectors was found to be comparable to that of a vector carrying the wild-type primer binding site matching t......RNA(Pro). Polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequence analysis of transduced proviruses confirmed the transfer of vectors with mutated primer binding sites and further showed that tRNA(Gln-2) may act efficiently in conjunction with the tRNA(Gln-1) primer binding site. We conclude that murine leukemia virus...

  7. GBF1- and ACBD3-independent recruitment of PI4KIIIβ to replication sites by rhinovirus 3A proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorobantu, Cristina M; Ford-Siltz, Lauren A; Sittig, Simone P; Lanke, Kjerstin H W; Belov, George A; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; van der Schaar, Hilde M

    2014-01-01

    PI4KIIIβ recruitment to Golgi membranes relies on GBF1/Arf and ACBD3. Enteroviruses like poliovirus and coxsackievirus recruit PI4KIIIβ to their replication sites via their 3A proteins. Here, we show that human rhinovirus (HRV) 3A also recruited PI4KIIIβ to replication sites. Unlike other enteroviru

  8. Lack of a unique termination site for the first round of bacteriophage lambda DNA replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valenzuela, M.S. (Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA); Freifelder, D.; Inman, R.B.

    1976-01-01

    From previous data on the first round of bacteriophage lambdacIIcIII DNA replication (Schnos and Inman, 1970) it is possible to estimate, by extrapolation, the position on circular lambda DNA where bidirectional growing points meet. In the present study we have investigated whether this position occurs at a genetically defined site. To this end, replicative intermediates of lambda mutants containing either deletions to the left of the replication origin, or one deletion plus a duplication to the right, were analyzed in the electron microscope. Our results indicate that (i) leftward growing points can traverse the extrapolated termination point calculated from the lambdacIIcIII data, (ii) no discontinuity of either right or leftward growing fork position is observed, and (iii) the extrapolated termination points for these mutants are well removed from those calculated for lambdacIIcIII DNA. From these data we conclude that there is probably no unique termination site for the first round of lambda DNA replication and that termination occurs simply by collision of the growing forks.

  9. In Vitro Whole Genome DNA Binding Analysis of the Bacterial Replication Initiator and Transcription Factor DnaA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet L Smith

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available DnaA, the replication initiation protein in bacteria, is an AAA+ ATPase that binds and hydrolyzes ATP and exists in a heterogeneous population of ATP-DnaA and ADP-DnaA. DnaA binds cooperatively to the origin of replication and several other chromosomal regions, and functions as a transcription factor at some of these regions. We determined the binding properties of Bacillus subtilis DnaA to genomic DNA in vitro at single nucleotide resolution using in vitro DNA affinity purification and deep sequencing (IDAP-Seq. We used these data to identify 269 binding regions, refine the consensus sequence of the DnaA binding site, and compare the relative affinity of binding regions for ATP-DnaA and ADP-DnaA. Most sites had a slightly higher affinity for ATP-DnaA than ADP-DnaA, but a few had a strong preference for binding ATP-DnaA. Of the 269 sites, only the eight strongest binding ones have been observed to bind DnaA in vivo, suggesting that other cellular factors or the amount of available DnaA in vivo restricts DnaA binding to these additional sites. Conversely, we found several chromosomal regions that were bound by DnaA in vivo but not in vitro, and that the nucleoid-associated protein Rok was required for binding in vivo. Our in vitro characterization of the inherent ability of DnaA to bind the genome at single nucleotide resolution provides a backdrop for interpreting data on in vivo binding and regulation of DnaA, and is an approach that should be adaptable to many other DNA binding proteins.

  10. 40 CFR 280.63 - Initial site characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Initial site characterization. 280.63 Section 280.63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES... Hazardous Substances § 280.63 Initial site characterization. (a) Unless directed to do otherwise by...

  11. RK2 plasmid dynamics in Caulobacter crescentus cells--two modes of DNA replication initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegrzyn, Katarzyna; Witosinska, Monika; Schweiger, Pawel; Bury, Katarzyna; Jenal, Urs; Konieczny, Igor

    2013-06-01

    Undisturbed plasmid dynamics is required for the stable maintenance of plasmid DNA in bacterial cells. In this work, we analysed subcellular localization, DNA synthesis and nucleoprotein complex formation of plasmid RK2 during the cell cycle of Caulobacter crescentus. Our microscopic observations showed asymmetrical distribution of plasmid RK2 foci between the two compartments of Caulobacter predivisional cells, resulting in asymmetrical allocation of plasmids to progeny cells. Moreover, using a quantitative PCR (qPCR) method, we estimated that multiple plasmid particles form a single fluorescent focus and that the number of plasmids per focus is approximately equal in both swarmer and predivisional Caulobacter cells. Analysis of the dynamics of TrfA-oriV complex formation during the Caulobacter cell cycle revealed that TrfA binds oriV primarily during the G1 phase, however, plasmid DNA synthesis occurs during the S and G2 phases of the Caulobacter cell cycle. Both in vitro and in vivo analysis of RK2 replication initiation in C. crescentus cells demonstrated that it is independent of the Caulobacter DnaA protein in the presence of the longer version of TrfA protein, TrfA-44. However, in vivo stability tests of plasmid RK2 derivatives suggested that a DnaA-dependent mode of plasmid replication initiation is also possible.

  12. [Similarities in periodical structures in the position of nucleotides in regions of initiation of replication of bacterial genomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravatskaia, G I; Frank, G K; Makeev, V Iu; Esipova, N G

    2002-01-01

    The regions of initiation of replication of some bacterial genomes were studied by the method of Fourier matrix analysis. A generalized spectral portrait of the primary structures of E. coli-like regions of initiation of replication in bacteria was obtained, which reflects the features of their structural and functional organization. It contains well-pronounced peaks that correspond to the periods T = 2, 11, 17, 27, 86-105 of nucleotides. The peaks corresponding to T = 9, 13, 14, 18, 19, 33-35, 45-47, 74-85, 106-110 are less pronounced. The uniqueness of the Fourier spectrum corresponding to the region of initiation of replication of E. coli oriC was considered by the example of the complete genome of E. coli. Some regions of the E. coli genome were identified that differ from oriC in the primary structure but have Fourier spectra resembling the spectrum of oriC. A number of these regions are alternative points of initiation of replication in sdrA(rnh) mutants of E. coli, the others are localized in yet unidentified regions of the E. coli genome but are capable, in our opinion, to participate in the initiation of replication. Thus, from the similarity of spectral portraits of different regions of the genome, it was possible to reveal several regions that have similar functions, i.e., are involved in initiation of replication.

  13. Execution programme for the initial site investigations at Forsmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-05-01

    In the feasibility studies that were completed in 2001, eight sites were identified as potentially suitable for hosting a repository. All the identified sites meet the safety requirements with respect to bedrock conditions that could be checked at that time. The feasibility studies have revealed good potential when it comes to the technical and environmental aspects as well. Based on an integrated evaluation SKB proposed to start site investigations with test drillings at three sites; Forsmark, Simpevarp and Tierp. Site investigations have started at Forsmark and Simpevarp. The municipal council of Tierp voted no to a site investigation in April 2002. The site investigations are divided into two main phases; initial and complete investigations. Initial site investigations are performed to identify the site within a specified area that is deemed to be most suitable for a deep repository and to determine whether the feasibility study's judgement of the suitability of the area holds up in the light of borehole data from repository depth. The initial site investigations are expected to take 1.5-2 years. If the assessment shows that the site has good potential to host a repository, complete site investigations will follow for an expected duration of 3.5-4 years. The purpose of the complete site investigations is to gather all information required to select one of the sites as the main alternative and to apply for a permit for construction of the deep repository at that site. A general programme in which the results from feasibility studies are summarized, the candidate sites presented and the framework of programme for the site investigation phase presented has been published. The general programme, and main references to the programme, specifies which data are required in order to design the repository and carry out a safety assessment, how the investigations should be carried out in order to provide these data, criteria with which the site must comply, as well as

  14. Nucleotide insertion initiated by van der Waals interaction during polymerase beta DNA replication

    CERN Document Server

    Arulsamy, Andrew Das

    2011-01-01

    Immortality will remain a fantasy for as long as aging is determined by the erroneous biochemical reactions during a particular DNA replication. The replication and base excision repair mechanism, associated to eukaryotic DNA polymerase-beta enzyme are central to maintaining a healthy cell. Here, we give a series of unambiguous theoretical analyses and prove that the exclusive biochemical reaction involved in a single nucleotide insertion into the DNA primer can be efficiently tracked using the renormalized van der Waals interaction of the stronger type, and the Hermansson blue-shifting hydrogen bond effect. We found that there are two biochemical steps involved to complete the insertion of a single dCTP into the 3' end of a DNA primer. First, the O3' (from a DNA primer) initiates the nucleophilic attack on P_alpha?(from an incoming dCTP), in response, O3_alpha (bonded to P_alpha) retaliates by interacting with H' (bonded to O3'). These interactions are shown to be strongly interdependent and require the form...

  15. Nutritional Control of DNA Replication Initiation through the Proteolysis and Regulated Translation of DnaA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Leslie

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria can arrest their own growth and proliferation upon nutrient depletion and under various stressful conditions to ensure their survival. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for suppressing growth and arresting the cell cycle under such conditions remain incompletely understood. Here, we identify post-transcriptional mechanisms that help enforce a cell-cycle arrest in Caulobacter crescentus following nutrient limitation and during entry into stationary phase by limiting the accumulation of DnaA, the conserved replication initiator protein. DnaA is rapidly degraded by the Lon protease following nutrient limitation. However, the rate of DnaA degradation is not significantly altered by changes in nutrient availability. Instead, we demonstrate that decreased nutrient availability downregulates dnaA translation by a mechanism involving the 5' untranslated leader region of the dnaA transcript; Lon-dependent proteolysis of DnaA then outpaces synthesis, leading to the elimination of DnaA and the arrest of DNA replication. Our results demonstrate how regulated translation and constitutive degradation provide cells a means of precisely and rapidly modulating the concentration of key regulatory proteins in response to environmental inputs.

  16. Regulatory mechanisms that prevent re-initiation of DNA replication can be locally modulated at origins by nearby sequence elements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher D Richardson

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cells must inhibit re-initiation of DNA replication at each of the thousands of origins in their genome because re-initiation can generate genomic alterations with extraordinary frequency. To minimize the probability of re-initiation from so many origins, cells use a battery of regulatory mechanisms that reduce the activity of replication initiation proteins. Given the global nature of these mechanisms, it has been presumed that all origins are inhibited identically. However, origins re-initiate with diverse efficiencies when these mechanisms are disabled, and this diversity cannot be explained by differences in the efficiency or timing of origin initiation during normal S phase replication. This observation raises the possibility of an additional layer of replication control that can differentially regulate re-initiation at distinct origins. We have identified novel genetic elements that are necessary for preferential re-initiation of two origins and sufficient to confer preferential re-initiation on heterologous origins when the control of re-initiation is partially deregulated. The elements do not enhance the S phase timing or efficiency of adjacent origins and thus are specifically acting as re-initiation promoters (RIPs. We have mapped the two RIPs to ∼ 60 bp AT rich sequences that act in a distance- and sequence-dependent manner. During the induction of re-replication, Mcm2-7 reassociates both with origins that preferentially re-initiate and origins that do not, suggesting that the RIP elements can overcome a block to re-initiation imposed after Mcm2-7 associates with origins. Our findings identify a local level of control in the block to re-initiation. This local control creates a complex genomic landscape of re-replication potential that is revealed when global mechanisms preventing re-replication are compromised. Hence, if re-replication does contribute to genomic alterations, as has been speculated for cancer cells, some

  17. Near-atomic structural model for bacterial DNA replication initiation complex and its functional insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Masahiro; Noguchi, Yasunori; Sakiyama, Yukari; Kawakami, Hironori; Katayama, Tsutomu; Takada, Shoji

    2016-12-13

    Upon DNA replication initiation in Escherichia coli, the initiator protein DnaA forms higher-order complexes with the chromosomal origin oriC and a DNA-bending protein IHF. Although tertiary structures of DnaA and IHF have previously been elucidated, dynamic structures of oriC-DnaA-IHF complexes remain unknown. Here, combining computer simulations with biochemical assays, we obtained models at almost-atomic resolution for the central part of the oriC-DnaA-IHF complex. This complex can be divided into three subcomplexes; the left and right subcomplexes include pentameric DnaA bound in a head-to-tail manner and the middle subcomplex contains only a single DnaA. In the left and right subcomplexes, DnaA ATPases associated with various cellular activities (AAA+) domain III formed helices with specific structural differences in interdomain orientations, provoking a bend in the bound DNA. In the left subcomplex a continuous DnaA chain exists, including insertion of IHF into the DNA looping, consistent with the DNA unwinding function of the complex. The intervening spaces in those subcomplexes are crucial for DNA unwinding and loading of DnaB helicases. Taken together, this model provides a reasonable near-atomic level structural solution of the initiation complex, including the dynamic conformations and spatial arrangements of DnaA subcomplexes.

  18. Replication and pathogenicity of primer binding site mutants of SL3-3 murine leukemia viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Schmidt, J; Luz, A

    1999-01-01

    delayed relative to that of the wild-type virus, molecular tumor analysis indicated that all the primer binding site-modified viruses induce T-cell lymphomas similar to those induced by the wild-type virus in terms of frequencies of genomic rearrangements within the T-cell receptor beta......) in undifferentiated embryonic cells. In this study we test whether SL3-3 MLV can replicate stably using tRNA primers other than the cognate tRNAPro and analyze the effect of altering the primer binding site sequence to match the 3' end of tRNA1Gln, tRNA3Lys, or tRNA1,2Arg in a mouse pathogenicity model. Contrary...... to findings from cell culture studies of primer binding site-modified human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and avian retroviruses, our findings were that SL3-3 MLV may stably and efficiently replicate with tRNA primers other than tRNAPro. Although lymphoma induction of the SL3-3 Lys3 mutant was significantly...

  19. Replicative bypass of abasic site in Escherichia coli and human cells: similarities and differences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savithri Weerasooriya

    Full Text Available Abasic [apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP] sites are the most common DNA damages, opposite which dAMP is frequently inserted ('A-rule' in Escherichia coli. Nucleotide insertion opposite the AP-site in eukaryotic cells depends on the assay system and the type of cells. Accordingly, a 'C-rule', 'A-rule', or the lack of specificity has been reported. DNA sequence context also modulates nucleotide insertion opposite AP-site. Herein, we have compared replication of tetrahydrofuran (Z, a stable analog of AP-site, in E. coli and human embryonic kidney 293T cells in two different sequences. The efficiency of translesion synthesis or viability of the AP-site construct in E. coli was less than 1%, but it was 7- to 8-fold higher in the GZGTC sequence than in the GTGZC sequence. The difference in viability increased even more in pol V-deficient strains. Targeted one-base deletions occurred in 63% frequency in the GZG and 68% frequency in GZC sequence, which dropped to 49% and 21%, respectively, upon induction of SOS. The full-length products with SOS primarily involved dAMP insertion opposite the AP-site, which occurred in 49% and 71% frequency, respectively, in the GZG and GZC sequence. dAMP insertion, largely carried out by pol V, was more efficient when the AP-site was a stronger replication block. In contrast to these results in E. coli, viability was 2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher in human cells, and the 'A-rule' was more rigidly followed. The AP-site in the GZG and GZC sequences gave 76% and 89%, respectively, Z → T substitutions. In human cells, targeted one-base deletion was undetectable, and dTMP>dCMP were the next preferred nucleotides inserted opposite Z. siRNA knockdown of Rev1 or pol ζ established that both these polymerases are vital for AP-site bypass, as demonstrated by 36-67% reduction in bypass efficiency. However, neither polymerase was indispensable, suggesting roles of additional DNA polymerases in AP-site bypass in human cells.

  20. SirA enforces diploidy by inhibiting the replication initiator DnaA during spore formation in Bacillus subtilis

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer K. Wagner; Marquis, Kathleen A.; Rudner, David Z.

    2009-01-01

    How cells maintain their ploidy is relevant to cellular development and disease. Here, we investigate the mechanism by which the bacterium Bacillus subtilis enforces diploidy as it differentiates into a dormant spore. We demonstrate that a sporulation-induced protein SirA (originally annotated YneE) blocks new rounds of replication by targeting the highly conserved replication initiation factor DnaA. We show that SirA interacts with DnaA and displaces it from the replication origin. As a resu...

  1. Reversible Switching of Cooperating Replicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urtel, Georg C.; Rind, Thomas; Braun, Dieter

    2017-02-01

    How can molecules with short lifetimes preserve their information over millions of years? For evolution to occur, information-carrying molecules have to replicate before they degrade. Our experiments reveal a robust, reversible cooperation mechanism in oligonucleotide replication. Two inherently slow replicating hairpin molecules can transfer their information to fast crossbreed replicators that outgrow the hairpins. The reverse is also possible. When one replication initiation site is missing, single hairpins reemerge from the crossbreed. With this mechanism, interacting replicators can switch between the hairpin and crossbreed mode, revealing a flexible adaptation to different boundary conditions.

  2. Genome-wide mapping of human DNA-replication origins: levels of transcription at ORC1 sites regulate origin selection and replication timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellino, Gaetano Ivan; Cittaro, Davide; Piccioni, Rossana; Luzi, Lucilla; Banfi, Stefania; Segalla, Simona; Cesaroni, Matteo; Mendoza-Maldonado, Ramiro; Giacca, Mauro; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    We report the genome-wide mapping of ORC1 binding sites in mammals, by chromatin immunoprecipitation and parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq). ORC1 binding sites in HeLa cells were validated as active DNA replication origins (ORIs) using Repli-seq, a method that allows identification of ORI-containing regions by parallel sequencing of temporally ordered replicating DNA. ORC1 sites were universally associated with transcription start sites (TSSs) of coding or noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). Transcription levels at the ORC1 sites directly correlated with replication timing, suggesting the existence of two classes of ORIs: those associated with moderate/high transcription levels (≥1 RNA copy/cell), firing in early S and mapping to the TSSs of coding RNAs; and those associated with low transcription levels (<1 RNA copy/cell), firing throughout the entire S and mapping to TSSs of ncRNAs. These findings are compatible with a scenario whereby TSS expression levels influence the efficiency of ORC1 recruitment at G(1) and the probability of firing during S.

  3. Co-opted oxysterol-binding ORP and VAP proteins channel sterols to RNA virus replication sites via membrane contact sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barajas, Daniel; Xu, Kai; de Castro Martín, Isabel Fernández; Sasvari, Zsuzsanna; Brandizzi, Federica; Risco, Cristina; Nagy, Peter D

    2014-10-01

    Viruses recruit cellular membranes and subvert cellular proteins involved in lipid biosynthesis to build viral replicase complexes and replication organelles. Among the lipids, sterols are important components of membranes, affecting the shape and curvature of membranes. In this paper, the tombusvirus replication protein is shown to co-opt cellular Oxysterol-binding protein related proteins (ORPs), whose deletion in yeast model host leads to decreased tombusvirus replication. In addition, tombusviruses also subvert Scs2p VAP protein to facilitate the formation of membrane contact sites (MCSs), where membranes are juxtaposed, likely channeling lipids to the replication sites. In all, these events result in redistribution and enrichment of sterols at the sites of viral replication in yeast and plant cells. Using in vitro viral replication assay with artificial vesicles, we show stimulation of tombusvirus replication by sterols. Thus, co-opting cellular ORP and VAP proteins to form MCSs serves the virus need to generate abundant sterol-rich membrane surfaces for tombusvirus replication.

  4. Adaptation and Diversification of an RNA Replication System under Initiation- or Termination-Impaired Translational Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuuchi, Ryo; Ichihashi, Norikazu; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2016-07-01

    Adaptation to various environments is a remarkable characteristic of life. Is this limited to extant complex living organisms, or is it also possible for a simpler self-replication system to adapt? In this study, we addressed this question by using a translation-coupled RNA replication system that comprised a reconstituted translation system and an RNA "genome" that encoded a replicase gene. We performed RNA replication reactions under four conditions, under which different components of translation were partly inhibited. We found that replication efficiency increased with the number of rounds of replication under all the tested conditions. The types of dominant mutations differed depending on the condition, thus indicating that this simple system adapted to different environments in different ways. This suggests that even a primitive self-replication system composed of a small number of genes on the early earth could have had the ability to adapt to various environments.

  5. P-body components LSM1, GW182, DDX3, DDX6 and XRN1 are recruited to WNV replication sites and positively regulate viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahar, Harendra S; Chen, Shuiping; Manjunath, N

    2013-02-05

    In mammalian cells, proteins involved in mRNA silencing and degradation localize to discrete cytoplasmic foci called processing or P-bodies. Here we show that microscopically visible P-bodies are greatly diminished following West Nile viral infection, but the component proteins are not depleted. On the other hand, many P-body components including LSM1, GW182, DDX3, DDX6 and XRN1, but not others like DCP1a and EDC4 are recruited to the viral replication sites, as evidenced by their colocalization at perinuclear region with viral NS3. Kinetic studies suggest that the component proteins are first released from P-bodies in response to WNV infection within 12 h post-infection, followed by recruitment to the viral replication sites by 24-36 h post-infection. Silencing of the recruited proteins individually with siRNA interfered with viral replication to varying extents suggesting that the recruited proteins are required for efficient viral replication. Thus, the P-body proteins might provide novel drug targets for inhibiting viral infection.

  6. Genetic networks controlled by the bacterial replication initiator and transcription factor DnaA in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Tracy A; Smith, Janet L; Grossman, Alan D

    2017-10-01

    DnaA is the widely conserved bacterial AAA+ ATPase that functions as both the replication initiator and a transcription factor. In many organisms, DnaA controls expression of its own gene and likely several others during growth and in response to replication stress. To evaluate the effects of DnaA on gene expression, separate from its role in replication initiation, we analyzed changes in mRNA levels in Bacillus subtilis cells with and without dnaA, using engineered strains in which dnaA is not essential. We found that dnaA was required for many of the changes in gene expression in response to replication stress. We also found that dnaA indirectly affected expression of several regulons during growth, including those controlled by the transcription factors Spo0A, AbrB, PhoP, SinR, RemA, Rok and YvrH. These effects were largely mediated by the effects of DnaA on expression of sda. DnaA activates transcription of sda, and Sda inhibits histidine protein kinases required for activation of the transcription factor Spo0A. We also found that loss of dnaA caused a decrease in the development of genetic competence. Together, our results indicate that DnaA plays an important role in modulating cell physiology, separate from its role in replication initiation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Tissue Sites of Persistent Infection and Active Replication of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus during Acute Disease and Asymptomatic Infection in Experimentally Infected Equids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrold, Sharon M.; Cook, Sheila J.; Cook, R. Frank; Rushlow, Keith E.; Issel, Charles J.; Montelaro, Ronald C.

    2000-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) infection of horses is characterized by recurring cycles of disease and viremia that typically progress to an inapparent infection in which clinical symptoms are absent as host immune responses maintain control of virus replication indefinitely. The dynamics of EIAV viremia and its association with disease cycles have been well characterized, but there has been to date no comprehensive quantitative analyses of the specific tissue sites of EIAV infection and replication in experimentally infected equids during acute disease episodes and during asymptomatic infections in long-term inapparent carriers. To characterize the in vivo site(s) of viral infection and replication, we developed a quantitative competitive PCR assay capable of detecting 10 copies of viral DNA and a quantitative competitive reverse transcription-PCR assay with a sensitivity of about 30 copies of viral singly spliced mRNA. Animals were experimentally infected with one of two reference viruses: the animal-passaged field isolate designated EIAVWyo and the virulent cell-adapted strain designated EIAVPV. Tissues and blood cells were isolated during the initial acute disease or from asymptomatic animals and analyzed for viral DNA and RNA levels by the respective quantitative assays. The results of these experiments demonstrated that the appearance of clinical symptoms in experimentally infected equids coincided with rapid widespread seeding of viral infection and replication in a variety of tissues. During acute disease, the predominant cellular site of viral infection and replication was the spleen, which typically accounted for over 90% of the cellular viral burden. In asymptomatic animals, viral DNA and RNA persisted in virtually all tissues tested, but at extremely low levels, a finding indicative of tight but incomplete immune control of EIAV replication. During all disease states, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were found to harbor less than 1% of

  8. The Miscoding Potential of 5-Hydroxycytosine Arises Due to Template Instability in the Replicative Polymerase Active Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahn, Karl E.; Averill, April; Wallace, Susan S.; Doublié, Sylvie (Vermont)

    2012-07-18

    5-Hydroxycytosine (5-OHC) is a stable oxidation product of cytosine associated with an increased frequency of C {yields} T transition mutations. When this lesion escapes recognition by the base excision repair pathway and persists to serve as a templating base during DNA synthesis, replicative DNA polymerases often misincorporate dAMP at the primer terminus, which can lead to fixation of mutations and subsequent disease. To characterize the dynamics of DNA synthesis opposite 5-OHC, we initiated a comparison of unmodified dCMP to 5-OHC, 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC), and 5-methylcytosine (5-MEC) in which these bases act as templates in the active site of RB69 gp43, a high-fidelity DNA polymerase sharing homology with human replicative DNA polymerases. This study presents the first crystal structure of any DNA polymerase binding this physiologically important premutagenic DNA lesion, showing that while dGMP is stabilized by 5-OHC through normal Watson-Crick base pairing, incorporation of dAMP leads to unstacking and instability in the template. Furthermore, the electronegativity of the C5 substituent appears to be important in the miscoding potential of these cytosine-like templates. While dAMP is incorporated opposite 5-OHC {approx}5 times more efficiently than opposite unmodified dCMP, an elevated level of incorporation is also observed opposite 5-FC but not 5-MEC. Taken together, these data imply that the nonuniform templating by 5-OHC is due to weakened stacking capabilities, which allows dAMP incorporation to proceed in a manner similar to that observed opposite abasic sites.

  9. Inhibition of human Chk1 causes increased initiation of DNA replication, phosphorylation of ATR targets, and DNA breakage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syljuåsen, Randi G; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard; Hansen, Lasse Tengbjerg

    2005-01-01

    by increased amounts of nonextractable RPA protein, formation of single-stranded DNA, and induction of DNA strand breaks. Moreover, these responses were prevented by siRNA-mediated downregulation of Cdk2 or the replication initiation protein Cdc45, or by addition of the CDK inhibitor roscovitine. We propose...

  10. mRNA decay factor AUF1 binds the internal ribosomal entry site of enterovirus 71 and inhibits virus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Yi Lin

    Full Text Available AU-rich element binding factor 1 (AUF1 has a role in the replication cycles of different viruses. Here we demonstrate that AUF1 binds the internal ribosome entry site (IRES of enterovirus 71 (EV71 and negatively regulates IRES-dependent translation. During EV71 infection, AUF1 accumulates in the cytoplasm where viral replication occurs, whereas AUF1 localizes predominantly in the nucleus in mock-infected cells. AUF1 knockdown in infected cells increases IRES activity and synthesis of viral proteins. Taken together, the results suggest that AUF1 interacts with the EV71 IRES to negatively regulate viral translation and replication.

  11. Young Adult Capacity Initiative Cross-Site Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Academy for Educational Development, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This cross-site analysis presents findings about the implementation, impact, and outcomes of the Young Adult Capacity Initiative (YACI), at 13 community-based organizations in New York City. These agencies received technical assistance and small incentive grants from the Fund for the City of New York Youth Development Institute (YDI) to build…

  12. Mu-like prophage strong gyrase site sequences: analysis of properties required for promoting efficient mu DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oram, Mark; Pato, Martin L

    2004-07-01

    The bacteriophage Mu genome contains a centrally located strong gyrase site (SGS) that is required for efficient prophage replication. To aid in studying the unusual properties of the SGS, we sought other gyrase sites that might be able to substitute for the SGS in Mu replication. Five candidate sites were obtained by PCR from Mu-like prophage sequences present in Escherichia coli O157:H7 Sakai, Haemophilus influenzae Rd, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi CT18, and two strains of Neisseria meningitidis. Each of the sites was used to replace the natural Mu SGS to form recombinant prophages, and the effects on Mu replication and host lysis were determined. The site from the E. coli prophage supported markedly enhanced replication and host lysis over that observed with a Mu derivative lacking the SGS, those from the N. meningitidis prophages allowed a small enhancement, and the sites from the Haemophilus and Salmonella prophages gave none. Each of the candidate sites was cleaved specifically by E. coli DNA gyrase both in vitro and in vivo. Supercoiling assays performed in vitro, with the five sites or the Mu SGS individually cloned into a pUC19 reporter plasmid, showed that the Mu SGS and the E. coli or N. meningitidis sequences allowed an enhancement of processive, gyrase-dependent supercoiling, whereas the H. influenzae or Salmonella serovar Typhi sequences did not. While consistent with a requirement for enhanced processivity of supercoiling for a site to function in Mu replication, these data suggest that other factors are also important. The relevance of these observations to an understanding of the function of the SGS is discussed. Copyright 2004 American Society for Microbiology

  13. Putative Phosphorylation Sites On WCA Domain of HA2 Is Essential For Helicoverpa armigera Single Nucleopolyhedrovirus Replication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-pin Lv; Qian Wang; Chun-chen Wu; Rong Juan Pei; Yuan Zhou; Yun Wang; Xin-wen Chen

    2011-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most common post-translational modification processes that play an essential role in regulating protein functionality.The Helicoverpa armigera single nucleopolyhedrovirus (HearNPv) orf2-encoded nucleocapsid protein HA2 participates in orchestration of virus-induced actin polymerization through its WCA domain,in which phosphorylation status are supposed to be critical in respect to actin polymerization.In the present study,two putative phosphorylation sites (232Thr and 250Ser) and a highly conserved Serine (245Ser) on the WCA domain of HA2 were mutated,and their phenotypes were characterized by reintroducing the mutated HA2 into the HearNPV genome.Viral infectivity assays demonstrated that only the recombinant HearNPV bearing HA2 mutation at 245Ser can produce infectious virions,both 232Tbr and 250Ser mutations were lethal to the virus.However,actin polymerization assay demonstrated that all the three viruses bearing HA2 mutations were still capable of initiating actin polymerization in the host nucleus,which indicated the putative phosphorylation sites on HA2 may contribute to HearNPV replication through another unidentified pathway.

  14. Execution programme for the initial site investigations at Simpevarp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-10-01

    In the feasibility studies that were completed in 2001, eight sites were identified as potentially suitable for hosting a repository. All the identified sites meet the safety requirements with respect to bedrock conditions that could be checked at that time. The feasibility studies have revealed good potential when it comes to the technical and environmental aspects as well. Based on an integrated evaluation SKB proposed to start site investigations with test drillings at three sites; Simpevarp, Forsmark, and Tierp north. The site investigations have started at Simpevarp and Forsmark. The municipal council of Tierp rejected a site investigation in April 2002. The site investigations are divided into two main phases; initial and complete investigations. Initial Site Investigation is performed to identify the site within a specified area that is deemed to be most suitable for a deep repository and to determine whether the feasibility study's judgement of the suitability of the area holds up in the light of borehole data from repository depth. The Initial Site Investigation is expected to take about 3 years. If the assessment shows that the site has good potential to host a repository, Complete Site Investigation will follow for an expected duration of another 3 years. The purpose of the Complete Site Investigation is to gather all information required to select one of the sites as the main alternative and to apply for a permit for construction of the deep repository at that site. The site-specific programme gives an overview of the whole site investigation phase as well as a detailed description of the initial stage. The results of the initial investigations will determine whether Simpevarp is appropriate for further investigation, i.e. the Complete Site Investigation. This document summarizes the investigations that will be carried out at Simpevarp during the Initial Site Investigations. The document is a working document, which will be successively updated as

  15. Mechanism of initiation site selection promoted by the human rhinovirus 2 internal ribosome entry site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Ann; Pöyry, Tuija A A; Skene, Peter J; Jackson, Richard J

    2010-07-01

    Translation initiation site usage on the human rhinovirus 2 internal ribosome entry site (IRES) has been examined in a mixed reticulocyte lysate/HeLa cell extract system. There are two relevant AUG triplets, both in a base-paired hairpin structure (domain VI), with one on the 5' side at nucleotide (nt) 576, base paired with the other at nt 611, which is the initiation site for polyprotein synthesis. A single residue was inserted in the apical loop to put AUG-576 in frame with AUG-611, and in addition another in-frame AUG was introduced at nt 593. When most of the IRES was deleted to generate a monocistronic mRNA, the use of these AUGs conformed to the scanning ribosome model: improving the AUG-576 context increased initiation at this site and decreased initiation at downstream sites, whereas the converse was seen when AUG-576 was mutated to GUA; and AUG-593, when present, took complete precedence over AUG-611. Under IRES-dependent conditions, by contrast, much less initiation occurred at AUG-576 than in a monocistronic mRNA with the same AUG-576 context, mutation of AUG-576 decreased initiation at downstream sites by approximately 70%, and introduction of AUG-593 did not completely abrogate initiation at AUG-611, unless the apical base pairing in domain VI was destroyed by point mutations. These results indicate that ribosomes first bind at the AUG-576 site, but instead of initiating there, most of them are transferred to AUG-611, the majority by strictly linear scanning and a substantial minority by direct transfer, which is possibly facilitated by the occasional persistence of base pairing in the apical part of the domain VI stem.

  16. Wall shear stress at the initiation site of cerebral aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geers, A J; Morales, H G; Larrabide, I; Butakoff, C; Bijlenga, P; Frangi, A F

    2017-02-01

    Hemodynamics are believed to play an important role in the initiation of cerebral aneurysms. In particular, studies have focused on wall shear stress (WSS), which is a key regulator of vascular biology and pathology. In line with the observation that aneurysms predominantly occur at regions of high WSS, such as bifurcation apices or outer walls of vascular bends, correlations have been found between the aneurysm initiation site and high WSS. The aim of our study was to analyze the WSS field at an aneurysm initiation site that was neither a bifurcation apex nor the outer wall of a vascular bend. Ten cases with aneurysms on the A1 segment of the anterior cerebral artery were analyzed and compared with ten controls. Aneurysms were virtually removed from the vascular models of the cases to mimic the pre-aneurysm geometry. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were created to assess the magnitude, gradient, multidirectionality, and pulsatility of the WSS. To aid the inter-subject comparison of hemodynamic variables, we mapped the branch surfaces onto a two-dimensional parametric space. This approach made it possible to view the whole branch at once for qualitative evaluation. It also allowed us to empirically define a patch for quantitative analysis, which was consistent among subjects and encapsulated the aneurysm initiation sites in our dataset. To test the sensitivity of our results, CFD simulations were repeated with a second independent observer virtually removing the aneurysms and with a 20 % higher flow rate at the inlet. We found that branches harboring aneurysms were characterized by high WSS and high WSS gradients. Among all assessed variables, the aneurysm initiation site most consistently coincided with peaks of temporal variation in the WSS magnitude.

  17. Effects of vaccinia virus uracil DNA glycosylase catalytic site and deoxyuridine triphosphatase deletion mutations individually and together on replication in active and quiescent cells and pathogenesis in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moss Bernard

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low levels of uracil in DNA result from misincorporation of dUMP or cytosine deamination. Vaccinia virus (VACV, the prototype poxvirus, encodes two enzymes that can potentially reduce the amount of uracil in DNA. Deoxyuridine triphosphatase (dUTPase hydrolyzes dUTP, generating dUMP for biosynthesis of thymidine nucleotides while decreasing the availability of dUTP for misincorporation; uracil DNA glycosylase (UNG cleaves uracil N-glycosylic bonds in DNA initiating base excision repair. Studies with actively dividing cells showed that the VACV UNG protein is required for DNA replication but the UNG catalytic site is not, whereas the dUTPase gene can be deleted without impairing virus replication. Recombinant VACV with an UNG catalytic site mutation was attenuated in vivo, while a dUTPase deletion mutant was not. However, the importance of the two enzymes for replication in quiescent cells, their possible synergy and roles in virulence have not been fully assessed. Results VACV mutants lacking the gene encoding dUTPase or with catalytic site mutations in UNG and double UNG/dUTPase mutants were constructed. Replication of UNG and UNG/dUTPase mutants were slightly reduced compared to wild type or the dUTPase mutant in actively dividing cells. Viral DNA replication was reduced about one-third under these conditions. After high multiplicity infection of quiescent fibroblasts, yields of wild type and mutant viruses were decreased by 2-logs with relative differences similar to those observed in active fibroblasts. However, under low multiplicity multi-step growth conditions in quiescent fibroblasts, replication of the dUTPase/UNG mutant was delayed and 5-fold lower than that of either single mutant or parental virus. This difference was exacerbated by 1-day serial passages on quiescent fibroblasts, resulting in 2- to 3-logs lower titer of the double mutant compared to the parental and single mutant viruses. Each mutant was more

  18. Quinacrine impairs enterovirus 71 RNA replication by preventing binding of polypyrimidine-tract binding protein with internal ribosome entry sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianmin Wang

    Full Text Available Since the 1980s, epidemics of enterovirus 71 (EV71 and other enteroviruses have occurred in Asian countries and regions, causing a wide range of human diseases. No effective therapy is available for the treatment of these infections. Internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs are indispensable for the initiation of translation in enteroviruses. Several cellular factors, as well as the ribosome, are recruited to the conserved IRES during this process. Quinacrine intercalates into the RNA architecture and inhibits RNA transcription and protein synthesis, and a recent study showed that quinacrine inhibited encephalomyocarditis virus and poliovirus IRES-mediated translation in vitro without disrupting internal cellular IRES. Here, we report that quinacrine was highly active against EV71, protecting cells from EV71 infection. Replication of viral RNA, expression of viral capsid protein, and production of virus were all strongly inhibited by quinacrine. Interaction of the polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB with the conserved IRES was prevented by quinacrine. Coxsackieviruses and echovirus were also inhibited by quinacrine in cultured cells. These results indicate that quinacrine may serve as a potential protective agent for use in the treatment of patients with chronic enterovirus infection.

  19. Direct Binding to Replication Protein A (RPA)-coated Single-stranded DNA Allows Recruitment of the ATR Activator TopBP1 to Sites of DNA Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Julyana; Yan, Shan; Michael, W Matthew

    2016-06-17

    A critical event for the ability of cells to tolerate DNA damage and replication stress is activation of the ATR kinase. ATR activation is dependent on the BRCT (BRCA1 C terminus) repeat-containing protein TopBP1. Previous work has shown that recruitment of TopBP1 to sites of DNA damage and stalled replication forks is necessary for downstream events in ATR activation; however, the mechanism for this recruitment was not known. Here, we use protein binding assays and functional studies in Xenopus egg extracts to show that TopBP1 makes a direct interaction, via its BRCT2 domain, with RPA-coated single-stranded DNA. We identify a point mutant that abrogates this interaction and show that this mutant fails to accumulate at sites of DNA damage and that the mutant cannot activate ATR. These data thus supply a mechanism for how the critical ATR activator, TopBP1, senses DNA damage and stalled replication forks to initiate assembly of checkpoint signaling complexes.

  20. HuR and Ago2 Bind the Internal Ribosome Entry Site of Enterovirus 71 and Promote Virus Translation and Replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Yi Lin

    Full Text Available EV71 (enterovirus 71 RNA contains an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES that directs cap-independent initiation of translation. IRES-dependent translation requires the host's translation initiation factors and IRES-associated trans-acting factors (ITAFs. We reported recently that mRNA decay factor AUF1 is a negative-acting ITAF that binds IRES stem-loop II. We also reported that the small RNA-processing enzyme Dicer produces at least four small RNAs (vsRNAs from the EV71 IRES. One of these, vsRNA1, derived from IRES stem-loop II, reduces IRES activity and virus replication. Since its mechanism of action is unknown, we hypothesized that it might control association of ITAFs with the IRES. Here, we identified the mRNA stability factor HuR and the RISC subunit Argonaute 2 (Ago2 as two ITAFs that bind stem-loop II. In contrast to AUF1, HuR and Ago2 promote EV71 IRES activity and virus replication. In vitro RNA-binding assays revealed that vsRNA1 can alter association of Ago2, HuR, and AUF1 with stem-loop II. This presents a possible mechanism by which vsRNA1 could control viral translation and replication.

  1. Prodigal: prokaryotic gene recognition and translation initiation site identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Land Miriam L

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The quality of automated gene prediction in microbial organisms has improved steadily over the past decade, but there is still room for improvement. Increasing the number of correct identifications, both of genes and of the translation initiation sites for each gene, and reducing the overall number of false positives, are all desirable goals. Results With our years of experience in manually curating genomes for the Joint Genome Institute, we developed a new gene prediction algorithm called Prodigal (PROkaryotic DYnamic programming Gene-finding ALgorithm. With Prodigal, we focused specifically on the three goals of improved gene structure prediction, improved translation initiation site recognition, and reduced false positives. We compared the results of Prodigal to existing gene-finding methods to demonstrate that it met each of these objectives. Conclusion We built a fast, lightweight, open source gene prediction program called Prodigal http://compbio.ornl.gov/prodigal/. Prodigal achieved good results compared to existing methods, and we believe it will be a valuable asset to automated microbial annotation pipelines.

  2. DNA replication initiation, doubling of rate of phospholipid synthesis, and cell division in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Joseleau-Petit, D; Képès, F; Peutat, L; D'Ari, R; Képès, A

    1987-01-01

    In synchronized culture of Escherichia coli, the specific arrest of phospholipid synthesis (brought about by glycerol starvation in an appropriate mutant) did not affect the rate of ongoing DNA synthesis but prevented the initiation of new rounds. The initiation block did not depend on cell age at the time of glycerol removal, which could be before, during, or after the doubling in the rate of phospholipid synthesis (DROPS) and as little as 10 min before the expected initiation. We conclude t...

  3. Relationship between DNA damage response, initiated by camptothecin or oxidative stress, and DNA replication, analyzed by quantitative 3D image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berniak, K; Rybak, P; Bernas, T; Zarębski, M; Biela, E; Zhao, H; Darzynkiewicz, Z; Dobrucki, J W

    2013-10-01

    A method of quantitative analysis of spatial (3D) relationship between discrete nuclear events detected by confocal microscopy is described and applied in analysis of a dependence between sites of DNA damage signaling (γH2AX foci) and DNA replication (EdU incorporation) in cells subjected to treatments with camptothecin (Cpt) or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Cpt induces γH2AX foci, likely reporting formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), almost exclusively at sites of DNA replication. This finding is consistent with the known mechanism of induction of DSBs by DNA topoisomerase I (topo1) inhibitors at the sites of collisions of the moving replication forks with topo1-DNA "cleavable complexes" stabilized by Cpt. Whereas an increased level of H2AX histone phosphorylation is seen in S-phase of cells subjected to H2O2, only a minor proportion of γH2AX foci coincide with DNA replication sites. Thus, the increased level of H2AX phosphorylation induced by H2O2 is not a direct consequence of formation of DNA lesions at the sites of moving DNA replication forks. These data suggest that oxidative stress induced by H2O2 and formation of the primary H2O2-induced lesions (8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine) inhibits replication globally and triggers formation of γH2AX at various distances from replication forks. Quantitative analysis of a frequency of DNA replication sites and γH2AX foci suggests also that stalling of replicating forks by Cpt leads to activation of new DNA replication origins. © 2013 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  4. Performance improvement initiative: prevention of surgical site infection (SSI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Wai Khuan; Awad, Nawal

    2015-01-01

    Mafraq Hospital performs an average of 10,000 surgeries every year. The impact of having high volume high risk surgical procedures calls for the need to ensure safe surgery and a prevention of surgical site infection (SSI). SSI represents a significant portion of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). The impact on morbidity, mortality, and cost of care has resulted in identifying the need to reduce SSI as a top priority to prevent healthcare associated infections. The good news is that the majority of SSIs are preventable. Mafraq Hospital performs a range of surgical procedures that covers 14 surgical specialties. The infection prevention and control team performs surveillance for SSI for all patients who undergo operative procedure included in Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) Operative Procedure Category (40 surgical procedures). Out of the 40 CDC NHSN listed, 33 operative procedures were performed at Mafraq Hospital, of which 17 were reported with SSI for 2013 and 2014. Surgical site infection has implicated an increase average length of stay from seven to 10 additional postoperative hospital days and additional costs of AED 10,000 to AED 100,000/SSI depending on procedure and pathogen. A multidisciplinary team was formed to develop and implement measures to reduce/eliminate surgical site infection, as well as evaluate and monitor compliance. Hence a group of multidisciplinary teams were initiated to analyse the results, find out the gaps, and implement a quality improvement project to correct the deficits. Recommendations for appropriate improvement measures were formed on evidence-based international guidelines from the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) and CDC. Evidence based practice supports that many of the causes of surgical site infection can be prevented with proper medical attention and care.

  5. Gap-directed translesion DNA synthesis of an abasic site on circular DNA templates by a human replication complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Villani

    Full Text Available DNA polymerase ε (pol ε is believed to be the leading strand replicase in eukaryotes whereas pols λ and β are thought to be mainly involved in re-synthesis steps of DNA repair. DNA elongation by the human pol ε is halted by an abasic site (apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP site. We have previously reported that human pols λ, β and η can perform translesion synthesis (TLS of an AP site in the presence of pol ε. In the case of pol λ and β, this TLS requires the presence of a gap downstream from the product synthetized by the ε replicase. However, since these studies were conducted exclusively with a linear DNA template, we decided to test whether the structure of the template could influence the capacity of the pols ε, λ, β and η to perform TLS of an AP site. Therefore, we have investigated the replication of damaged "minicircle" DNA templates. In addition, replication of circular DNA requires, beyond DNA pols, the processivity clamp PCNA, the clamp loader replication factor C (RFC, and the accessory proteins replication protein A (RPA. Finally we have compared the capacity of unmodified versus monoubiquitinated PCNA in sustaining TLS by pols λ and η on a circular template. Our results indicate that in vitro gap-directed TLS synthesis by pols λ and β in the presence of pol ε, RPA and PCNA is unaffected by the structure of the DNA template. Moreover, monoubiquitination of PCNA does not affect TLS by pol λ while it appears to slightly stimulate TLS by pol η.

  6. Characterization of S1 nuclease sensitive site at transcription initiation region of Attacus ricini rDNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何明亮; 赵慕钧; 靳嘉瑞; 李载平

    1997-01-01

    A single-stranded S1 nuclease hypersensitive site which contains a d(AT)18 sequence structure locat-ed in the 5 -non transcription spacer of silkworm A . ricini ribosomal RNA gene has been reported[1] Using starved-refed silkworms, another S1 nuclease sensitive site was found existing in the rDNA chromatin, while under merely starving, this S1 sensitive site disappeared[2] . Recently this inducible S1 sensitive site has been further determined. It consists of a d(GT)10-d(AT)10 special DNA sequence at the transcription initiation region, and shows a behavior of ease in DNA-unwinding, indicating that S1 nuclease sensitive sites may have an important function in the regulation of rDNA transcription and replication.

  7. Gene and translation initiation site prediction in metagenomic sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyatt, Philip Douglas [ORNL; LoCascio, Philip F [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Uberbacher, Edward C [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Gene prediction in metagenomic sequences remains a difficult problem. Current sequencing technologies do not achieve sufficient coverage to assemble the individual genomes in a typical sample; consequently, sequencing runs produce a large number of short sequences whose exact origin is unknown. Since these sequences are usually smaller than the average length of a gene, algorithms must make predictions based on very little data. We present MetaProdigal, a metagenomic version of the gene prediction program Prodigal, that can identify genes in short, anonymous coding sequences with a high degree of accuracy. The novel value of the method consists of enhanced translation initiation site identification, ability to identify sequences that use alternate genetic codes and confidence values for each gene call. We compare the results of MetaProdigal with other methods and conclude with a discussion of future improvements.

  8. Hsp90 interacts specifically with viral RNA and differentially regulates replication initiation of Bamboo mosaic virus and associated satellite RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Wen Huang

    Full Text Available Host factors play crucial roles in the replication of plus-strand RNA viruses. In this report, a heat shock protein 90 homologue of Nicotiana benthamiana, NbHsp90, was identified in association with partially purified replicase complexes from BaMV-infected tissue, and shown to specifically interact with the 3' untranslated region (3' UTR of BaMV genomic RNA, but not with the 3' UTR of BaMV-associated satellite RNA (satBaMV RNA or that of genomic RNA of other viruses, such as Potato virus X (PVX or Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV. Mutational analyses revealed that the interaction occurs between the middle domain of NbHsp90 and domain E of the BaMV 3' UTR. The knockdown or inhibition of NbHsp90 suppressed BaMV infectivity, but not that of satBaMV RNA, PVX, or CMV in N. benthamiana. Time-course analysis further revealed that the inhibitory effect of 17-AAG is significant only during the immediate early stages of BaMV replication. Moreover, yeast two-hybrid and GST pull-down assays demonstrated the existence of an interaction between NbHsp90 and the BaMV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. These results reveal a novel role for NbHsp90 in the selective enhancement of BaMV replication, most likely through direct interaction with the 3' UTR of BaMV RNA during the initiation of BaMV RNA replication.

  9. MetWAMer: eukaryotic translation initiation site prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendel Volker

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Translation initiation site (TIS identification is an important aspect of the gene annotation process, requisite for the accurate delineation of protein sequences from transcript data. We have developed the MetWAMer package for TIS prediction in eukaryotic open reading frames of non-viral origin. MetWAMer can be used as a stand-alone, third-party tool for post-processing gene structure annotations generated by external computational programs and/or pipelines, or directly integrated into gene structure prediction software implementations. Results MetWAMer currently implements five distinct methods for TIS prediction, the most accurate of which is a routine that combines weighted, signal-based translation initiation site scores and the contrast in coding potential of sequences flanking TISs using a perceptron. Also, our program implements clustering capabilities through use of the k-medoids algorithm, thereby enabling cluster-specific TIS parameter utilization. In practice, our static weight array matrix-based indexing method for parameter set lookup can be used with good results in data sets exhibiting moderate levels of 5'-complete coverage. Conclusion We demonstrate that improvements in statistically-based models for TIS prediction can be achieved by taking the class of each potential start-methionine into account pending certain testing conditions, and that our perceptron-based model is suitable for the TIS identification task. MetWAMer represents a well-documented, extensible, and freely available software system that can be readily re-trained for differing target applications and/or extended with existing and novel TIS prediction methods, to support further research efforts in this area.

  10. Fat(al) attraction : Picornaviruses Usurp Lipid Transfer at Membrane Contact Sites to Create Replication Organelles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schaar, Hilde M; Dorobantu, Cristina M; Albulescu, Lucian; Strating, Jeroen R P M; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M

    All viruses that carry a positive-sense RNA genome (+RNA), such as picornaviruses, hepatitis C virus, dengue virus, and SARS- and MERS-coronavirus, confiscate intracellular membranes of the host cell to generate new compartments (i.e., replication organelles) for amplification of their genome.

  11. DNA vaccine initiates replication of live attenuated chikungunya virus in vitro and elicits protective immune response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretyakova, Irina; Hearn, Jason; Wang, Eryu; Weaver, Scott; Pushko, Peter

    2014-06-15

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) causes outbreaks of chikungunya fever worldwide and represents an emerging pandemic threat. Vaccine development against CHIKV has proved challenging. Currently there is no approved vaccine or specific therapy for the disease. To develop novel experimental CHIKV vaccine, we used novel immunization DNA (iDNA) infectious clone technology, which combines the advantages of DNA and live attenuated vaccines. Here we describe an iDNA vaccine composed of plasmid DNA that encode the full-length infectious genome of live attenuated CHIKV clone 181/25 downstream from a eukaryotic promoter. The iDNA approach was designed to initiate replication of live vaccine virus from the plasmid in vitro and in vivo. Experimental CHIKV iDNA vaccines were prepared and evaluated in cultured cells and in mice. Transfection with 10 ng of iDNA was sufficient to initiate replication of vaccine virus in vitro. Vaccination of BALB/c mice with a single 10 μg of CHIKV iDNA plasmid resulted in seroconversion, elicitation of neutralizing antibodies, and protection from experimental challenge with a neurovirulent CHIKV. Live attenuated CHIKV 181/25 vaccine can be delivered in vitro and in vivo by using DNA vaccination. The iDNA approach appears to represent a promising vaccination strategy for CHIK and other alphaviral diseases. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Inhibition of Lassa virus glycoprotein cleavage and multicycle replication by site 1 protease-adapted alpha(1-antitrypsin variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maisa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Proteolytic processing of the Lassa virus envelope glycoprotein precursor GP-C by the host proprotein convertase site 1 protease (S1P is a prerequisite for the incorporation of the subunits GP-1 and GP-2 into viral particles and, hence, essential for infectivity and virus spread. Therefore, we tested in this study the concept of using S1P as a target to block efficient virus replication. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: We demonstrate that stable cell lines inducibly expressing S1P-adapted alpha(1-antitrypsin variants inhibit the proteolytic maturation of GP-C. Introduction of the S1P recognition motifs RRIL and RRLL into the reactive center loop of alpha(1-antitrypsin resulted in abrogation of GP-C processing by endogenous S1P to a similar level observed in S1P-deficient cells. Moreover, S1P-specific alpha(1-antitrypsins significantly inhibited replication and spread of a replication-competent recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus expressing the Lassa virus glycoprotein GP as well as authentic Lassa virus. Inhibition of viral replication correlated with the ability of the different alpha(1-antitrypsin variants to inhibit the processing of the Lassa virus glycoprotein precursor. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data suggest that glycoprotein cleavage by S1P is a promising target for the development of novel anti-arenaviral strategies.

  13. A quantitative model of DNA replication in Xenopus embryos: reliable replication despite stochasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng-Hsin Yang, Scott; Bechhoefer, John

    2008-03-01

    DNA synthesis in Xenopus frog embryos initiates stochastically in time at many sites (origins) along the chromosome. Stochastic initiation implies fluctuations in the replication time and may lead to cell death if replication takes longer than the cell cycle time (˜ 25 min.). Surprisingly, although the typical replication time is about 20 min., in vivo experiments show that replication fails to complete only about 1 in 250 times. How is replication timing accurately controlled despite the stochasticity? Biologists have proposed two mechanisms: the first uses a regular spatial distribution of origins, while the second uses randomly located origins but increases their probability of initiation as the cell cycle proceeds. Here, we show that both mechanisms yield similar end-time distributions, implying that regular origin spacing is not needed for control of replication time. Moreover, we show that the experimentally inferred time-dependent initiation rate satisfies the observed low failure probability and nearly optimizes the use of replicative proteins.

  14. Safeguards First Principles Initiative at the Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geneva Johnson

    2007-07-08

    The Material Control and Accountability (MC&A) program at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was selected as a test bed for the Safeguards First Principles Initiative (SFPI). The implementation of the SFPI is evaluated using the system effectiveness model and the program is managed under an approved MC&A Plan. The effectiveness model consists of an evaluation of the critical elements necessary to detect, deter, and/or prevent the theft or diversion of Special Nuclear Material (SNM). The modeled results indicate that the MC&A program established under this variance is still effective, without creating unacceptable risk. Extensive performance testing is conducted through the duration of the pilot to ensure the protection system is effective and no material is at an unacceptable risk. The pilot was conducted from January 1, 2007, through May 30, 2007. This paper will discuss the following activities in association with SFPI: 1. Development of Timeline 2. Crosswalk of DOE Order and SFPI 3. Peer Review 4. Deviation 5. MC&A Plan and Procedure changes 6. Changes implemented at NTS 7. Training 8. Performance Test

  15. Growth factor-dependent initiation of DNA replication in nuclei isolated from an interleukin 3-dependent murine myeloid cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munshi, N C; Gabig, T G

    1990-01-01

    To study the proliferative response of hematopoietic cells to growth factors at the molecular level, we developed a cell-free system for growth factor-dependent initiation of genomic DNA replication. Nuclei were isolated from the IL-3-dependent cell line NFS/N1-H7 after a 10-h period of IL-3 deprivation. Cytosolic and membrane-containing subcellular fractions were prepared from proliferating NFS/N1-H7 cells. Nuclei from the nonproliferating cells (+/- IL-3) showed essentially no incorporation of [3H]thymidine during a 16-h incubation with a mixture of unlabeled GTP, ATP, UTP, CTP, dGTP, dATP, dCTP, and [3H]dTTP. When the combination of IL-3, a cytosolic fraction, and a membrane-containing fraction from proliferating cells was added to nuclei from nonproliferating cells, a burst of [3H]thymidine incorporation into DNA began after a 12-h lag period, attained a maximal rate at 16 h, and reached a level of 860 pmol thymidine/10(6) nuclei at 24 h (corresponding to replication of approximately 56% total mouse genomic DNA). This DNA synthesis was inhibited approximately 90% by the specific DNA polymerase alpha inhibitor aphidicolin. Deletion of a single cellular component or IL-3 from the system resulted in a marked reduction of DNA replication (-membrane, 80 +/- 4%; -cytosol, 90% +/- 4%; -IL-3, 74 +/- 7% inhibition). This model requires a growth factor (IL-3), a sedimentable cell fraction containing its receptor and possibly additional membrane-associated components, and a cytosolic fraction. It appears to recapitulate the molecular events required for progression from early G1 to S phase of the cell cycle induced by IL-3 binding to its receptor.

  16. Absence of Non-histone Protein Complexes at Natural Chromosomal Pause Sites Results in Reduced Replication Pausing in Aging Yeast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marleny Cabral

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available There is substantial evidence that genomic instability increases during aging. Replication pausing (and stalling at difficult-to-replicate chromosomal sites may induce genomic instability. Interestingly, in aging yeast cells, we observed reduced replication pausing at various natural replication pause sites (RPSs in ribosomal DNA (rDNA and non-rDNA locations (e.g., silent replication origins and tRNA genes. The reduced pausing occurs independent of the DNA helicase Rrm3p, which facilitates replication past these non-histone protein-complex-bound RPSs, and is independent of the deacetylase Sir2p. Conditions of caloric restriction (CR, which extend life span, also cause reduced replication pausing at the 5S rDNA and at tRNA genes. In aged and CR cells, the RPSs are less occupied by their specific non-histone protein complexes (e.g., the preinitiation complex TFIIIC, likely because members of these complexes have primarily cytosolic localization. These conditions may lead to reduced replication pausing and may lower replication stress at these sites during aging.

  17. Inhibition of Influenza Virus Replication by DNA Aptamers Targeting a Cellular Component of Translation Initiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma Rodriguez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The genetic diversity of the influenza virus hinders the use of broad spectrum antiviral drugs and favors the appearance of resistant strains. Single-stranded DNA aptamers represent an innovative approach with potential application as antiviral compounds. The mRNAs of influenza virus possess a 5′cap structure and a 3′poly(A tail that makes them structurally indistinguishable from cellular mRNAs. However, selective translation of viral mRNAs occurs in infected cells through a discriminatory mechanism, whereby viral polymerase and NS1 interact with components of the translation initiation complex, such as the eIF4GI and PABP1 proteins. We have studied the potential of two specific aptamers that recognize PABP1 (ApPABP7 and ApPABP11 to act as anti-influenza drugs. Both aptamers reduce viral genome expression and the production of infective influenza virus particles. The interaction of viral polymerase with the eIF4GI translation initiation factor is hindered by transfection of infected cells with both PABP1 aptamers, and ApPABP11 also inhibits the association of NS1 with PABP1 and eIF4GI. These results indicate that aptamers targeting the host factors that interact with viral proteins may potentially have a broad therapeutic spectrum, reducing the appearance of escape mutants and resistant subtypes.

  18. Inhibition of adenovirus replication by the E1A antisense transcript initiated from hsp70 and VA-1 promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miroshnichenko, O I; Borisenko, A S; Ponomareva, T I; Tikhonenko, T I

    1990-03-01

    The E1A region of the adenoviral genome, important for initiation of virus infection and activation of other viral genes, was chosen as a target for engineering antisense RNA (asRNA) to inhibit adenovirus 5 (Ad5) replication in COS-1 cell culture in vitro. The hsp70 promoter, taken from the appropriate heat-shock-protein gene of Drosophila melanogaster, and the VA-1 RNA promoter, derived from the Ad5 gene coding for low-molecular-mass VA-1 RNA and recognized by RNA polymerase III were used as regulatory elements of transcription. The two types of recombinant constructs contained E1A fragments of 710 bp (hsp70 constructs) or 380 or 740 bp (VA-1 RNA constructs) in reverse orientation relative to the promoter position, as well as a transcription termination signal, the SV40 ori, and the gene controlling Geneticin (antibiotic G418) resistance (G418R). After selection of transfected COS-1 cells in the presence of G418, a number of stable G418R cell lines were raised which expressed engineered asRNAs. Plating of Ad5 suspensions of known titre on monolayers of transfected COS-1 cells clearly showed strong inhibition of adenovirus replication by asRNAs: 75% with the hsp70 promoter and 90% with the VA-1 RNA promoter.

  19. Nucleotide insertion initiated by van derWaals interaction during polymerase beta DNA replication

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Andrew Das Arulsamy

    2013-09-01

    We present here an unambiguous theoretical analyses and to show that the exclusive biochemical reaction involved in a single nucleotide insertion into the DNA primer can be efficiently tracked using the renormalized van derWaals (vdW) interaction of a stronger type, the Hermansson blue-shifting hydrogen bond effect, and the Arunan composite hydrogen-vdW bond. We find that there are two biochemical steps involved to complete the insertion of a single base (cytosine) into the 3' end of a DNA primer. First, the O3' (from a DNA primer) initiates the nucleophilic attack on P (from an incoming dCTP), in response, O3 (bonded to P) interacts with H' (bonded to O3'). These interactions are shown to be strongly interdependent and require the forming and breaking of P—O and H—O covalent bonds, which in turn imply that we do not need any external energy supply.

  20. Towards observing the encounter of the T7 DNA replication fork with a lesion site at the Single molecule level

    KAUST Repository

    Shirbini, Afnan

    2017-05-01

    Single-molecule DNA flow-stretching assays have been a powerful approach to study various aspects on the mechanism of DNA replication for more than a decade. This technique depends on flow-induced force on a bead attached to a surface-tethered DNA. The difference in the elastic property between double-strand DNA (long) and single-strand DNA (short) at low regime force allows the observation of the beads motion when the dsDNA is converted to ssDNA by the replisome machinery during DNA replication. Here, I aim to develop an assay to track in real-time the encounter of the bacteriophage T7 replisome with abasic lesion site inserted on the leading strand template. I optimized methods to construct the DNA substrate that contains the abasic site and established the T7 leading strand synthesis at the single molecule level. I also optimized various control experiments to remove any interference from the nonspecific interactions of the DNA with the surface. My work established the foundation to image the encounter of the T7 replisome with abasic site and to characterize how the interactions between the helicase and the polymerase could influence the polymerase proofreading ability and its direct bypass of this highly common DNA damage type.

  1. A Combined Computational and Experimental Study on the Structure-Regulation Relationships of Putative Mammalian DNA Replication Initiator GINS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Reiko Hayashi; Takako Arauchi; Moe Tategu; Yuya Goto; Kenichi Yoshida

    2006-01-01

    GINS, a heterotetramer of SLD5, PSF1, PSF2, and PSF3 proteins, is an emerging chromatin factor recognized to be involved in the initiation and elongation step of DNA replication. Although the yeast and Xenopus GINS genes are well documented, their orthologous genes in higher eukaryotes are not fully characterized.In this study, we report the genomic structure and transcriptional regulation of mammalian GINS genes. Serum stimulation increased the GINS Mrna levels in human cells. Reporter gene assay using putative GINS promoter sequences revealed that the expression of mammalian GINS is regulated by 17β-Estradiolstimulated estrogen receptor α, and human PSF3 acts as a gene responsive to transcription factor E2F1. The goal of this study is to present the current data so as to encourage further work in the field of GINS gene regulation and functions in mammalian cells.

  2. Experimental hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis): evidence of active extrahepatic site of HAV replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amado, Luciane A; Marchevsky, Renato S; de Paula, Vanessa S; Hooper, Cleber; Freire, Marcos da S; Gaspar, Ana Maria C; Pinto, Marcelo A

    2010-02-01

    This work studied the replication sites of hepatitis A virus (HAV) in cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) after intravenous inoculation. The cynomolgus monkeys were inoculated with the Brazilian hepatitis A virus strain (HAF-203). Monkeys were euthanized on days 15, 30, 45 and 60 postinoculation (pi). Liver samples, submandibular salivary gland, mesenteric lymph node and tonsils were removed for virological and pathological evaluation. Immunofluorescence analyses on liver and salivary gland sections using confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed the presence of HAV antigen (HAV Ag). The presence of HAV genome was monitored by real-time PCR. The HAV RNA was detected at 7 days postinoculation (dpi), concomitantly in serum, saliva and faeces. The highest HAV viral load was observed in faeces at 15 dpi (10(5) copies/ml), followed by serum viral load of 10(4) copies/ml at 20 dpi and saliva viral load of 10(3 )copies/ml at 7 dpi. The animals showed first histological and biochemical signs of hepatitis at 15 dpi. The HAV antigen (Ag) was present from day 7 until day 60 pi in the liver and salivary glands. The HAV replicative intermediate was also detected in the liver (4.5 x 10(4) copies/mg), salivary glands (1.9 x 10(3) copies/mg), tonsils (4.2 x 10(1) copies/mg) and lymph nodes (3.4 x 10(1) copies/mg). Our data demonstrated that the salivary gland as an extrahepatic site of early HAV replication could create a potential risk of saliva transmitted infection. In addition, the cynomolgus monkey was confirmed as a suitable model to study the pathogenesis of HAV human infection.

  3. Initiation points for cellular deoxyribonucleic acid replication in human lymphoid cells converted by Epstein-Barr virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oppenheim, A.; Shlomai, Z.; Ben-Bassat, H.

    1981-08-01

    Replicon size was estimated in two Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-negative human lymphoma lines, BJAB and Ramos, and four EBV-positive lines derived from the former ones by infection (conversion) with two viral strains, B95-8 and P3HR-1. Logarithmic cultures were pulse-labeled with (/sup -3/H)thymidine, and the deoxyribonucleic acid was spread on microscopic slides and autoradiographed by the method of Huberman and Riggs. Three of the four EBV-converted cell lines, BJAB/B95-8, Ra/B95-8, and Ra/HRIK, were found to have significantly shorter replicons (41, 21, 54% shorter, respectively), i.e., more initiation points, than their EBV-negative parents. BJAB/HRIK had replicons which were only slightly shorter (11%) than those of BJAB. However, analysis of track length demonstrated that extensive track fusion occurred during the labeling of BJAB/HRIK, implying that its true average replicon size is shorter than the observed value. The results indicate that in analogy to simian virus 40, EBV activates new initiation points for cellular DNA replication in EBV-transformed cells.

  4. Prion uptake in the gut: identification of the first uptake and replication sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kujala, P.; Raymond, C.R.; Romeijn, M.; Godsave, S.F.; Van Kasteren, S.I.; Wille, H.; Prusiner, S.B.; Mabbott, N.A.; Peters, P.J.

    2011-01-01

    After oral exposure, prions are thought to enter Peyer's patches via M cells and accumulate first upon follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) before spreading to the nervous system. How prions are actually initially acquired from the gut lumen is not known. Using high-resolution immunofluorescence and cr

  5. Influence of retinoblastoma-related gene silencing on the initiation of DNA replication by African cassava mosaic virus Rep in cells of mature leaves in Nicotiana benthamiana plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Gareth

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geminiviruses mainly infect terminally differentiated tissues and cells in plants. They need to reprogramme host cellular machinery for DNA replication. This process is thought to be mediated by inactivation of cell-cycle repressor proteins and by induction of host DNA synthesis protein expression through actions of the geminviral replication initiator protein (Rep. Findings Exploiting a Nicotiana benthamiana pOri2 line, which is transformed with a transgene consisting of a direct repeat of the African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV-replication origin (Ori flanking a non-viral DNA region, and virus-induced RNA silencing (VIGS, the impact of host gene expression on replication of the ACMV-derived replicon was investigated. The ACMV Rep trans-replicated the viral episomal replicon in leaves of young but not older pOri2 plants. Upon VIGS-mediated down-regulation of N. benthamiana NbRBR1, the retinoblastoma-related protein gene coding for a negative cell-cycle suppressor, recovered the ability of ACMV Rep for trans DNA replication, whereas the silencing of NbPCNA coding for the sliding clamp of DNA polymerase had no effect. Conclusions These results suggest that the cellular machinery for DNA replication in differentiated tissues of older leaves cannot be reprogrammed by Rep alone but may need other uncharacterised viral and plant factors.

  6. RNase H confers specificity in the dnaA-dependent initiation of replication at the unique origin of the Escherichia coli chromosome in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, T; Pickett, G G; Kogoma, T; Kornberg, A

    1984-02-01

    Escherichia coli rnh mutants defective in RNase H activity display the features of previously described sdrA (stable DNA replication) and dasF (dnaA suppressor) mutants: (i) sustained DNA replication in the absence of protein synthesis, (ii) lack of requirement for dnaA protein and the origin of replication (oriC), and (iii) sensitivity of growth to a rich medium. Both the sdrA mutants (selected for continued DNA replication in the absence of protein synthesis) and the dasF mutants (selected as dnaA suppressors) are defective in RNase H activity, measured in vitro. Furthermore, a 760-base-pair fragment containing the rnh+ structural gene complements the phenotype of each of the rnh, sdrA, and dasF mutants, indicative of a single gene. One function of RNase H in vivo is in the initiation of a cycle of DNA replication at oriC dependent on dnaA+. In keeping with these results, RNase H contributes to the specificity of dnaA protein-dependent replication initiated at oriC in a partially purified enzyme system.

  7. Inhibition of Hepatitis B Virus Replication and Expression in Vitro and in Vivo by the Hammerhead Ribozymes Targeted Different Sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei; Dai; Rong; Zhou; Hong; Yu; Xiao-juan; Li

    2012-01-01

    Objective To develop an effective and specific medicine targeting hepatitis B virus(HBV) pregenome. Based on the identified accessible target sites for hammerhead ribozyme in our previous researches, a recombinant hepatitis delta virus(HDV) ribozyme was chosen and used to demonstrate the effective cleavage in vitro and in vivo. Methods Three hammerhead ribozymes for potential target sites(S, X and C genes) and co-expression plasmid(pTr-dB, pTdδ-dB, pTrX-dB and pTrC-dB) as well as four HDV-ribozyme chimera constructs with HBV(pTdXX, pTdXC, pTdSX and pTdSC) were severally chosen to validate the inhibition of the replication and expression of HBV. The co-expression plasmids(pTdδ and pTr-Db) in physiological saline were hydrodynamically injected to mice by tail vein. Results Compared with the group injected with pTr-dB in Huh-7 cell, hepatitis B surface antigen(HBsAg) was reduced by 31% in the group injected with pTdδ-dB, by 54%, 26%, 72% and 97% in the group injected with recombinant-ribozymes pTdSX, pTdSC, pTdXC and pTdXX, respectively. The inhibiting effects of endogenous ribozymes RzX and RzC on the HBsAg expression were 66% and 57%, respectively. Compared with the positive control, the amount of HBsAg was decreased in mice injected with pTdXX through tail vein by 88% and 96% on the second day and the third day, respectively. HBsAg was undetectable on the 6th day and could not primitively be detected on the 9th day in the sera from all mice. HBV DNA was not detected in the sera of BALB/c mice injected with pTdXX-dB, pTrX-dB or replicating-defective plasmid pHBV, while HBV DNA replication in control group could be detected on the 6th day. While HBcAg could not be detected in liver tissues of mice injected with plasmid pTdXX-dB on the 3rd day. Conclusions Encoding regions of HBV S, C and X gene were the effective cleavage sites for hammerhead ribozyme in vitro and in vivo, which provides basis for further construction of therapeutic recombinant HDV and the

  8. Control of bacterial chromosome replication by non-coding regions outside the origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimodt-Møller, Jakob; Charbon, Godefroid; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Chromosome replication in Eubacteria is initiated by initiator protein(s) binding to specific sites within the replication origin, oriC. Recently, initiator protein binding to chromosomal regions outside the origin has attracted renewed attention; as such binding sites contribute to control the f...

  9. Autoregulation of the dnaA-dnaN operon and effects of DnaA protein levels on replication initiation in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Y; Imai, Y; Ogasawara, N; Moriya, S

    2001-07-01

    In Escherichia coli, the DnaA protein level appears to play a pivotal role in determining the timing of replication initiation. To examine the effects on replication initiation in B. subtilis, we constructed a strain in which a copy of the dnaA gene was integrated at the purA locus on the chromosome under the control of an isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG)-inducible promoter. However, increasing the DnaA level resulted in cell elongation and inhibition of cell growth by induction of the SOS response. Transcription of the native dnaA-dnaN operon was greatly reduced at high DnaA levels, but it was increased in a dnaA-null mutant, indicating autoregulation of the operon by DnaA. When a copy of the dnaN gene was added downstream of the additional dnaA gene at purA, the cells grew at high DnaA levels, suggesting that depletion of DnaN (beta subunit of DNA polymerase III) within the cell by repression of the native dnaA-dnaN operon at high DnaA levels was the cause of the SOS induction. Flow cytometry of the cells revealed that the cell mass at initiation of replication increased at a lower DnaA level and decreased at DnaA levels higher than those of the wild type. Proper timing of replication initiation was observed at DnaA levels nearly comparable to the wild-type level. These results suggest that if the DnaA level increases with progression of the replication cycle, it could act as a rate-limiting factor of replication initiation in B. subtilis.

  10. Early Results in Capella's Prior Learning Assessment Experimental Site Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Jillian

    2017-01-01

    In July 2014, the U.S. Department of Education announced a new round of experimental sites focusing on competency-based education. Capella University was selected to participate in three of the Department of Education's competency-based education (CBE) experiments and began by implementing the prior learning assessment experiment, which allows…

  11. Initiating Events for Multi-Reactor Plant Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhlheim, Michael David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Flanagan, George F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Poore, III, Willis P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Inherent in the design of modular reactors is the increased likelihood of events that initiate at a single reactor affecting another reactor. Because of the increased level of interactions between reactors, it is apparent that the Probabilistic Risk Assessments (PRAs) for modular reactor designs need to specifically address the increased interactions and dependencies.

  12. msCentipede: Modeling Heterogeneity across Genomic Sites and Replicates Improves Accuracy in the Inference of Transcription Factor Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Anil; Shim, Heejung; Gilad, Yoav; Pritchard, Jonathan K; Stephens, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Understanding global gene regulation depends critically on accurate annotation of regulatory elements that are functional in a given cell type. CENTIPEDE, a powerful, probabilistic framework for identifying transcription factor binding sites from tissue-specific DNase I cleavage patterns and genomic sequence content, leverages the hypersensitivity of factor-bound chromatin and the information in the DNase I spatial cleavage profile characteristic of each DNA binding protein to accurately infer functional factor binding sites. However, the model for the spatial profile in this framework fails to account for the substantial variation in the DNase I cleavage profiles across different binding sites. Neither does it account for variation in the profiles at the same binding site across multiple replicate DNase I experiments, which are increasingly available. In this work, we introduce new methods, based on multi-scale models for inhomogeneous Poisson processes, to account for such variation in DNase I cleavage patterns both within and across binding sites. These models account for the spatial structure in the heterogeneity in DNase I cleavage patterns for each factor. Using DNase-seq measurements assayed in a lymphoblastoid cell line, we demonstrate the improved performance of this model for several transcription factors by comparing against the Chip-seq peaks for those factors. Finally, we explore the effects of DNase I sequence bias on inference of factor binding using a simple extension to our framework that allows for a more flexible background model. The proposed model can also be easily applied to paired-end ATAC-seq and DNase-seq data. msCentipede, a Python implementation of our algorithm, is available at http://rajanil.github.io/msCentipede.

  13. msCentipede: Modeling Heterogeneity across Genomic Sites and Replicates Improves Accuracy in the Inference of Transcription Factor Binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Raj

    Full Text Available Understanding global gene regulation depends critically on accurate annotation of regulatory elements that are functional in a given cell type. CENTIPEDE, a powerful, probabilistic framework for identifying transcription factor binding sites from tissue-specific DNase I cleavage patterns and genomic sequence content, leverages the hypersensitivity of factor-bound chromatin and the information in the DNase I spatial cleavage profile characteristic of each DNA binding protein to accurately infer functional factor binding sites. However, the model for the spatial profile in this framework fails to account for the substantial variation in the DNase I cleavage profiles across different binding sites. Neither does it account for variation in the profiles at the same binding site across multiple replicate DNase I experiments, which are increasingly available. In this work, we introduce new methods, based on multi-scale models for inhomogeneous Poisson processes, to account for such variation in DNase I cleavage patterns both within and across binding sites. These models account for the spatial structure in the heterogeneity in DNase I cleavage patterns for each factor. Using DNase-seq measurements assayed in a lymphoblastoid cell line, we demonstrate the improved performance of this model for several transcription factors by comparing against the Chip-seq peaks for those factors. Finally, we explore the effects of DNase I sequence bias on inference of factor binding using a simple extension to our framework that allows for a more flexible background model. The proposed model can also be easily applied to paired-end ATAC-seq and DNase-seq data. msCentipede, a Python implementation of our algorithm, is available at http://rajanil.github.io/msCentipede.

  14. Plasmid Rolling-Circle Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Masó, J A; MachóN, C; Bordanaba-Ruiseco, L; Espinosa, M; Coll, M; Del Solar, G

    2015-02-01

    Plasmids are DNA entities that undergo controlled replication independent of the chromosomal DNA, a crucial step that guarantees the prevalence of the plasmid in its host. DNA replication has to cope with the incapacity of the DNA polymerases to start de novo DNA synthesis, and different replication mechanisms offer diverse solutions to this problem. Rolling-circle replication (RCR) is a mechanism adopted by certain plasmids, among other genetic elements, that represents one of the simplest initiation strategies, that is, the nicking by a replication initiator protein on one parental strand to generate the primer for leading-strand initiation and a single priming site for lagging-strand synthesis. All RCR plasmid genomes consist of a number of basic elements: leading strand initiation and control, lagging strand origin, phenotypic determinants, and mobilization, generally in that order of frequency. RCR has been mainly characterized in Gram-positive bacterial plasmids, although it has also been described in Gram-negative bacterial or archaeal plasmids. Here we aim to provide an overview of the RCR plasmids' lifestyle, with emphasis on their characteristic traits, promiscuity, stability, utility as vectors, etc. While RCR is one of the best-characterized plasmid replication mechanisms, there are still many questions left unanswered, which will be pointed out along the way in this review.

  15. Selection of functional tRNA primers and primer binding site sequences from a retroviral combinatorial library: identification of new functional tRNA primers in murine leukemia virus replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M; Pedersen, F S

    2000-01-01

    . While most of the selected primer binding sites are complementary to the 3'-end of tRNA((Pro)), we also retrieved PBS sequences matching four other tRNA molecules and demonstrate that Akv murine leukemia virus vectors may efficiently replicate using tRNA(Arg(CCU)), tRNA(Phe(GAA))and a hitherto unknown......Retroviral reverse transcription is initiated from a cellular tRNA molecule and all known exogenous isolates of murine leukemia virus utilise a tRNA(Pro)molecule. While several studies suggest flexibility in murine leukemia virus primer utilisation, studies on human immunodeficiency virus and avian...... retro-viruses have revealed evidence of molecular adapt-ation towards the specific tRNA isoacceptor used as replication primer. In this study, murine leukemia virus tRNA utilisation is investigated by in vivo screening of a retroviral vector combinatorial library with randomised primer binding sites...

  16. A dual binding site for integration host factor and the response regulator CtrA inside the Caulobacter crescentus replication origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siam, Rania; Brassinga, Ann Karen C; Marczynski, Gregory T

    2003-09-01

    The response regulator CtrA controls chromosome replication by binding to five sites, a, b, c, d, and e, inside the Caulobacter crescentus replication origin (Cori). In this study, we demonstrate that integration host factor (IHF) binds Cori over the central CtrA binding site c. Surprisingly, IHF and CtrA share DNA recognition sequences. Rather than promoting cooperative binding, IHF binding hinders CtrA binding to site c and nearby site d. Unlike other CtrA binding sites, DNA mutations in the CtrA c/IHF site uniquely impair autonomous Cori plasmid replication. These mutations also alter transcription from distant promoters more than 100 bp away. When the CtrA c/IHF site was deleted from the chromosome, these cells grew slowly and became selectively intolerant to a CtrA phosphor-mimic allele (D51E). Since CtrA protein concentration decreases during the cell cycle as IHF protein concentration increases, we propose a model in which IHF displaces CtrA in order to bend Cori and promote efficient chromosome replication.

  17. Modulation of replication efficacy of the hepatitis C virus replicon Con1 by site-directed mutagenesis of an NS4B aminoterminal basic leucine zipper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welker, M-W; Susser, S; Welsch, C; Perner, D; Füller, C; Kronenberger, B; Herrmann, E; Zeuzem, S; Sarrazin, C

    2012-11-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 4B (NS4B) is assumed to function as a membrane anchor and protein hub for the viral replication complex. The aim of the current work was to modulate HCV replication efficacy in the subgenomic Con1 replicon by mutations of specific sites within the aminoterminal-located basic leucine zipper (bZIP), a candidate motif for protein-protein interactions involving NS4B. Mutational sites and amino acid substitutes were determined by in-silico sequence analyses of the NS4B-bZIP motif in 357 isolates of HCV genotype 1b from the euHCVdB and LosAlamos database and consecutive analysis of conserved physico-chemical properties at bZIP specific positions. Mutants with predicted minor, medium or major reduction of replication efficacy were tested in the pFKI389neo/NS3-3'/ET plasmid replicon model. Four sites (L25, T29, V39 and W43) of crucial importance for bZIP-mediated protein interaction with predicted apolarity of respective amino acid positions were selected for mutational studies. Substitutes with physico-chemical properties matching the predicted requirements either well (T29A), moderately (L25W, V39W), or insufficiently (T29E, W43E) were associated with slightly improved, moderate and marked decreased replication efficacy, respectively. Spontaneous (T29G) and adaptive (A28G, E40G) mutations occurred in the T29E mutation isolate only and were associated with marked reduction of replication efficacy. The bZIP motif region of NS4B is crucial for RNA replication in the subgenomic Con1 replicon system. RNA replication efficacy can be modulated by site-directed mutagenesis at specific bZIP functional sites. New adaptive amino acid mutations were identified within the HCV NS4B protein.

  18. Single molecule analysis of replicated DNA reveals the usage of multiple KSHV genome regions for latent replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhash C Verma

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV, an etiologic agent of Kaposi's sarcoma, Body Cavity Based Lymphoma and Multicentric Castleman's Disease, establishes lifelong latency in infected cells. The KSHV genome tethers to the host chromosome with the help of a latency associated nuclear antigen (LANA. Additionally, LANA supports replication of the latent origins within the terminal repeats by recruiting cellular factors. Our previous studies identified and characterized another latent origin, which supported the replication of plasmids ex-vivo without LANA expression in trans. Therefore identification of an additional origin site prompted us to analyze the entire KSHV genome for replication initiation sites using single molecule analysis of replicated DNA (SMARD. Our results showed that replication of DNA can initiate throughout the KSHV genome and the usage of these regions is not conserved in two different KSHV strains investigated. SMARD also showed that the utilization of multiple replication initiation sites occurs across large regions of the genome rather than a specified sequence. The replication origin of the terminal repeats showed only a slight preference for their usage indicating that LANA dependent origin at the terminal repeats (TR plays only a limited role in genome duplication. Furthermore, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation for ORC2 and MCM3, which are part of the pre-replication initiation complex to determine the genomic sites where these proteins accumulate, to provide further characterization of potential replication initiation sites on the KSHV genome. The ChIP data confirmed accumulation of these pre-RC proteins at multiple genomic sites in a cell cycle dependent manner. Our data also show that both the frequency and the sites of replication initiation vary within the two KSHV genomes studied here, suggesting that initiation of replication is likely to be affected by the genomic context rather than the DNA

  19. Structure of eukaryotic CMG helicase at a replication fork and implications to replisome architecture and origin initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgescu, Roxana; Yuan, Zuanning; Bai, Lin; de Luna Almeida Santos, Ruda; Sun, Jingchuan; Zhang, Dan; Yurieva, Olga; Li, Huilin; O'Donnell, Michael E

    2017-01-31

    The eukaryotic CMG (Cdc45, Mcm2-7, GINS) helicase consists of the Mcm2-7 hexameric ring along with five accessory factors. The Mcm2-7 heterohexamer, like other hexameric helicases, is shaped like a ring with two tiers, an N-tier ring composed of the N-terminal domains, and a C-tier of C-terminal domains; the C-tier contains the motor. In principle, either tier could translocate ahead of the other during movement on DNA. We have used cryo-EM single-particle 3D reconstruction to solve the structure of CMG in complex with a DNA fork. The duplex stem penetrates into the central channel of the N-tier and the unwound leading single-strand DNA traverses the channel through the N-tier into the C-tier motor, 5'-3' through CMG. Therefore, the N-tier ring is pushed ahead by the C-tier ring during CMG translocation, opposite the currently accepted polarity. The polarity of the N-tier ahead of the C-tier places the leading Pol ε below CMG and Pol α-primase at the top of CMG at the replication fork. Surprisingly, the new N-tier to C-tier polarity of translocation reveals an unforeseen quality-control mechanism at the origin. Thus, upon assembly of head-to-head CMGs that encircle double-stranded DNA at the origin, the two CMGs must pass one another to leave the origin and both must remodel onto opposite strands of single-stranded DNA to do so. We propose that head-to-head motors may generate energy that underlies initial melting at the origin.

  20. Staufen1 promotes HCV replication by inhibiting protein kinase R and transporting viral RNA to the site of translation and replication in the cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Updesh; Pandey, Ashutosh K.; Mishra, Priya; Sengupta, Amitabha; Pandey, Virendra N.

    2016-01-01

    Persistent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection leads to chronic hepatitis C (CHC), which often progresses to liver cirrhosis (LC) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The molecular mechanisms that establish CHC and cause its subsequent development into LC and HCC are poorly understood. We have identified a cytoplasmic double-stranded RNA binding protein, Stau1, which is crucial for HCV replication. In this study, Stau1 specifically interacted with the variable-stem-loop region in the 3′ NTR and domain IIId of the HCV-IRES in the 5′ NTR, and promoted HCV replication and translation. Stau1 coimmunoprecipitates HCV NS5B and a cell factor, protein kinase R (PKR), which is critical for interferon-induced cellular antiviral and antiproliferative responses. Like Stau1, PKR displayed binding specificity to domain IIId of HCV-IRES. Stau1 binds to PKR and strongly inhibits PKR-autophosphorylation. We demonstrated that the transport of HCV RNA on the polysomes is Stau1-dependent, being mainly localized in the monosome fractions when Stau1 is downregulated and exclusively localized in the polysomes when Stau1 is overexpressed. Our findings suggest that HCV may appropriate Stau1 to its advantage to prevent PKR-mediated inhibition of eIF2α, which is required for the synthesis of HCV proteins for translocation of viral RNA genome to the polysomes for efficient translation and replication. PMID:27106056

  1. Regulation of chromosomal replication in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Justine

    2012-03-01

    The alpha-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus is characterized by its asymmetric cell division, which gives rise to a replicating stalked cell and a non-replicating swarmer cell. Thus, the initiation of chromosomal replication is tightly regulated, temporally and spatially, to ensure that it is coordinated with cell differentiation and cell cycle progression. Waves of DnaA and CtrA activities control when and where the initiation of DNA replication will take place in C. crescentus cells. The conserved DnaA protein initiates chromosomal replication by directly binding to sites within the chromosomal origin (Cori), ensuring that DNA replication starts once and only once per cell cycle. The CtrA response regulator represses the initiation of DNA replication in swarmer cells and in the swarmer compartment of pre-divisional cells, probably by competing with DnaA for binding to Cori. CtrA and DnaA are controlled by multiple redundant regulatory pathways that include DNA methylation-dependent transcriptional regulation, temporally regulated proteolysis and the targeting of regulators to specific locations within the cell. Besides being critical regulators of chromosomal replication, CtrA and DnaA are also master transcriptional regulators that control the expression of many genes, thus connecting DNA replication with other events of the C. crescentus cell cycle. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Alternative DFN model based on initial site investigations at Simpevarp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darcel, C. [Itasca Consultants, Ecully (France); Davy, S.A.P.; Bour, O.; Dreuzy, J.R. de [Geosciences, Rennes (France)

    2004-12-01

    In this report, we provide a first-order analysis of the fracture network at the Simpevarp site. The first order model is the fracture distribution function, noted, fdf, which provides the number of fractures having a given orientation and length, and belonging to a given volume of observation. The first-order distribution model does not describe higher-order correlation between fracture parameters, such as a possible dependency of fracture length distribution with orientations. We also check that most of the information is contained in this 1st-order distribution model, and that dividing the fracture networks into different sets do not bring a better statistical description. The fracture distribution function contains 3 main distributions: the probability distribution of fracture orientations, the dependency on the size of the sampling domain that may exhibit non-trivial scaling in case of fractal correlations, and the fracture-length density distribution, which appears to be well fitted by a power law. The main scaling parameters are the fractal dimension and the power-law exponent of the fracture length distribution. The former was found to be about equal to the embedding dimension, meaning that fractal correlations are weak and can be neglected in the DFN model. The latter depends on geology, that is either lithology or grain size, with values that ranges from 3.2 for granite-like outcrops to 4 for diorite or monzodiorite outcrops, as well as for the large-scale lineament maps. When analyzing the consistency of the different datasets (boreholes, outcrops, lineament maps), we found that two different DFNs can be described: the first one is derived from the fdf of the outcrop with fine-grained size lithology, and is valid across all scales investigated in this study, from the highly-fractured cores to large-scale maps; the second one is derived from the fdf of the outcrops with coarse-grained size lithology, and is found consistent with cores that present the

  3. A suboptimal 5' splice site downstream of HIV-1 splice site A1 is required for unspliced viral mRNA accumulation and efficient virus replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoltzfus C Martin

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inefficient alternative splicing of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1(HIV-1 primary RNA transcript results in greater than half of all viral mRNA remaining unspliced. Regulation of HIV-1 alternative splicing occurs through the presence of suboptimal viral 5' and 3' splice sites (5' and 3'ss, which are positively regulated by exonic splicing enhancers (ESE and negatively regulated by exonic splicing silencers (ESS and intronic splicing silencers (ISS. We previously showed that splicing at HIV-1 3'ss A2 is repressed by ESSV and enhanced by the downstream 5'ss D3 signal. Disruption of ESSV results in increased vpr mRNA accumulation and exon 3 inclusion, decreased accumulation of unspliced viral mRNA, and decreased virus production. Results Here we show that optimization of the 5'ss D2 signal results in increased splicing at the upstream 3'ss A1, increased inclusion of exon 2 into viral mRNA, decreased accumulation of unspliced viral mRNA, and decreased virus production. Virus production from the 5'ss D2 and ESSV mutants was rescued by transient expression of HIV-1 Gag and Pol. We further show that the increased inclusion of either exon 2 or 3 does not significantly affect the stability of viral mRNA but does result in an increase and decrease, respectively, in HIV-1 mRNA levels. The changes in viral mRNA levels directly correlate with changes in tat mRNA levels observed upon increased inclusion of exon 2 or 3. Conclusion These results demonstrate that splicing at HIV-1 3'ss A1 is regulated by the strength of the downstream 5'ss signal and that suboptimal splicing at 3'ss A1 is necessary for virus replication. Furthermore, the replication defective phenotype resulting from increased splicing at 3'ss A1 is similar to the phenotype observed upon increased splicing at 3'ss A2. Further examination of the role of 5'ss D2 and D3 in the alternative splicing of 3'ss A1 and A2, respectively, is necessary to delineate a role for non

  4. Reactivation of DNA replication in nuclei from terminally differentiated cells: nuclear membrane permeabilization is required for initiation in Xenopus egg extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leno, G H; Munshi, R

    1997-05-01

    We have used Xenopus egg extract to investigate the requirements for reactivation of DNA replication in nuclei isolated from terminally differentiated chicken erythrocytes. Previous work has shown that reactivation of erythrocyte nuclei in egg extract is accompanied by chromatin decondensation, nuclear envelope reformation, and the accumulation of egg lamin, LIII. However, in those studies, erythrocyte nuclei were prepared by methods that were not designed to maintain the selective permeability of the nuclear membrane, and as such, it is not clear if loss of nuclear membrane integrity played a role in the reactivation process. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine if changes in nuclear membrane permeability are required for reactivation of erythrocyte nuclei in egg extract. Nuclei with intact nuclear membranes were prepared from erythrocytes with streptolysin O and permeable nuclei by treatment of intact nuclei with the detergent Nonidet-P40. Like permeable nuclei, most intact nuclei decondensed, imported nuclear protein, and accumulated lamin LIII from the extract. However, unlike permeable nuclei, which replicated extensively in the extract, few intact nuclei initiated replication under the same conditions. These data demonstrate that permeabilization of the nuclear membrane is required for reactivation of DNA replication in terminally differentiated erythrocyte nuclei by egg extract and suggest that loss of nuclear membrane integrity may be a general requirement for replication of quiescent cell nuclei by this system.

  5. Deciphering DNA replication dynamics in eukaryotic cell populations in relation with their averaged chromatin conformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldar, A.; Arneodo, A.; Audit, B.; Argoul, F.; Rappailles, A.; Guilbaud, G.; Petryk, N.; Kahli, M.; Hyrien, O.

    2016-03-01

    We propose a non-local model of DNA replication that takes into account the observed uncertainty on the position and time of replication initiation in eukaryote cell populations. By picturing replication initiation as a two-state system and considering all possible transition configurations, and by taking into account the chromatin’s fractal dimension, we derive an analytical expression for the rate of replication initiation. This model predicts with no free parameter the temporal profiles of initiation rate, replication fork density and fraction of replicated DNA, in quantitative agreement with corresponding experimental data from both S. cerevisiae and human cells and provides a quantitative estimate of initiation site redundancy. This study shows that, to a large extent, the program that regulates the dynamics of eukaryotic DNA replication is a collective phenomenon that emerges from the stochastic nature of replication origins initiation.

  6. Activation of nucleotide oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2 by human cytomegalovirus initiates innate immune responses and restricts virus replication.

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    Arun Kapoor

    Full Text Available Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2 is an important innate immune sensor of bacterial pathogens. Its induction results in activation of the classic NF-κB pathway and alternative pathways including type I IFN and autophagy. Although the importance of NOD2 in recognizing RNA viruses has recently been identified, its role in sensing DNA viruses has not been studied. We report that infection with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV results in significant induction of NOD2 expression, beginning as early as 2 hours post infection and increasing steadily 24 hours post infection and afterwards. Infection with human herpesvirus 1 and 2 does not induce NOD2 expression. While the HCMV-encoded glycoprotein B is not required for NOD2 induction, a replication competent virion is necessary. Lentivirus-based NOD2 knockdown in human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs and U373 glioma cells leads to enhanced HCMV replication along with decreased levels of interferon beta (IFN-β and the pro-inflammatory cytokine, IL8. NOD2 induction in HCMV-infected cells activates downstream NF-κB and interferon pathways supported by reduced nuclear localization of NF-κB and pIRF3 in NOD2 knockdown HFFs. Stable overexpression of NOD2 in HFFs restricts HCMV replication in association with increased levels of IFN-β and IL8. Similarly, transient overexpression of NOD2 in U373 cells or its downstream kinase, RIPK2, results in decreased HCMV replication and enhanced cytokine responses. However, overexpression of a mutant NOD2, 3020insC, associated with severe Crohn's disease, results in enhanced HCMV replication and decreased levels of IFN-β in U373 cells. These results show for the first time that NOD2 plays a significant role in HCMV replication and may provide a model for studies of HCMV recognition by the host cell and HCMV colitis in Crohn's disease.

  7. Laparoendoscopic Single-Site Cholecystectomy: First Experiences with a New Standardized Technique Replicating the Four-Port Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Conde, Salvador; Cañete-Gómez, Jesús; Gómez, Virginia; Socas Macías, María; Moreno, Antonio Barranco; Del Agua, Isaias Alarcón; Ruíz, Francisco Javier Padillo

    2016-10-01

    After reports on laparoendoscopic single-site (LESS) cholecystectomy, concerns have been raised over the level of difficulty and a potential increase in complications when moving away from conventional gold standard multiport laparoscopy due to incomplete exposure and larger umbilical incisions. With continued development of technique and technology, it has now become possible to fully replicate this gold standard procedure through an LESS approach. First experiences with the newly developed technique and instrument are reported. Fifteen patients presenting with cholelithiasis without signs of inflammation were operated using all surgical steps considered appropriate for the conventional four-port laparoscopic approach, but applied through a single access device. Operation-centered outcomes are presented. There were no peri- or postoperative complications. Mean operating time was 32.3 minutes. No conversion to regular laparoscopy was required. The critical view of safety was achieved in all cases. Mean skin incision length was 2.2 cm. The application of a standardized technique combined with the use of a four-port LESS device allows us to perform LESS cholecystectomy, giving us a correct exposure of the structures and without increasing the mean operating time combining previously reported advantages of LESS. A universal trait of any new technique should be safety and reproducibility. This will enhance its applicability by large number of surgeons and to large number of patients requiring cholecystectomy.

  8. Replication intermediates formed during initiation of DNA synthesis in methotrexate-resistant CHOC 400 cells are enriched for sequences derived from a specific, amplified restriction fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burhans, W C; Selegue, J E; Heintz, N H

    1986-01-28

    1-beta-D-Arabinofuranosylcytosine (ara-C) inhibits nuclear DNA replication in Chinese hamster ovary cells by an efficient chain termination mechanism without affecting the rate at which cells traverse G1 and enter S [Heintz, N. H., & Hamlin, J. L. (1983) Biochemistry 22, 3557-3562]. Here we have employed ara-C to enrich for replication intermediates formed during initiation of DNA synthesis in synchronized CHOC 400 cells, a methotrexate-resistant derivative of Chinese hamster ovary cells that contains approximately 1000 copies of an early replicating 150-kb chromosomal domain. This highly amplified domain includes the gene for dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). CHOC 400 cells were collected at the G1/S boundary of the cell cycle with aphidicolin prior to release into S in the presence of both [methyl-3H] thymidine and various concentrations of ara-C. Chromatographic fractionation of restriction endonuclease digests over benzoylated naphthoylated DEAE-cellulose (BND-cellulose) showed that high concentrations of ara-C inhibited the maturation of chromosomal replication intermediates containing ssDNA (replication forks) into dsDNA for up to 60 min. The effect of ara-C on the sequence complexity of replication intermediates formed during early S phase was determined by hybridizing purified intermediates labeled with 32P in vitro to Southern blots of genomic DNA derived from both methotrexate-sensitive and methotrexate-resistant Chinese hamster ovary cells. In the absence of ara-C, 32P-labeled ssDNA BND-cellulose fractions from cultures released into S for 30-60 min hybridized to a spectrum of restriction fragments encompassing 40-50 kb of the amplified DHFR domain.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. A novel functional site in the PB2 subunit of influenza A virus essential for acetyl-CoA interaction, RNA polymerase activity, and viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, Dai; Shoji, Masaki; Yamayoshi, Seiya; Hirota, Takenori; Nagae, Monami; Yanagisawa, Shin; Nakano, Masahiro; Ohmi, Naho; Noda, Takeshi; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Kuzuhara, Takashi

    2014-09-05

    The PA, PB1, and PB2 subunits, components of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of influenza A virus, are essential for viral transcription and replication. The PB2 subunit binds to the host RNA cap (7-methylguanosine triphosphate (m(7)GTP)) and supports the endonuclease activity of PA to "snatch" the cap from host pre-mRNAs. However, the structure of PB2 is not fully understood, and the functional sites remain unknown. In this study, we describe a novel Val/Arg/Gly (VRG) site in the PB2 cap-binding domain, which is involved in interaction with acetyl-CoA found in eukaryotic histone acetyltransferases (HATs). In vitro experiments revealed that the recombinant PB2 cap-binding domain that includes the VRG site interacts with acetyl-CoA; moreover, it was found that this interaction could be blocked by CoA and various HAT inhibitors. Interestingly, m(7)GTP also inhibited this interaction, suggesting that the same active pocket is capable of interacting with acetyl-CoA and m(7)GTP. To elucidate the importance of the VRG site on PB2 function and viral replication, we constructed a PB2 recombinant protein and recombinant viruses including several patterns of amino acid mutations in the VRG site. Substitutions of the valine and arginine residues or of all 3 residues of the VRG site to alanine significantly reduced the binding ability of PB2 to acetyl-CoA and its RNA polymerase activity. Recombinant viruses containing the same mutations could not be replicated in cultured cells. These results indicate that the PB2 VRG sequence is a functional site that is essential for acetyl-CoA interaction, RNA polymerase activity, and viral replication. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Insights into the initiation of JC virus DNA replication derived from the crystal structure of the T-antigen origin binding domain.

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    Gretchen Meinke

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available JC virus is a member of the Polyomavirus family of DNA tumor viruses and the causative agent of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML. PML is a disease that occurs primarily in people who are immunocompromised and is usually fatal. As with other Polyomavirus family members, the replication of JC virus (JCV DNA is dependent upon the virally encoded protein T-antigen. To further our understanding of JCV replication, we have determined the crystal structure of the origin-binding domain (OBD of JCV T-antigen. This structure provides the first molecular understanding of JCV T-ag replication functions; for example, it suggests how the JCV T-ag OBD site-specifically binds to the major groove of GAGGC sequences in the origin. Furthermore, these studies suggest how the JCV OBDs interact during subsequent oligomerization events. We also report that the OBD contains a novel "pocket"; which sequesters the A1 & B2 loops of neighboring molecules. Mutagenesis of a residue in the pocket associated with the JCV T-ag OBD interfered with viral replication. Finally, we report that relative to the SV40 OBD, the surface of the JCV OBD contains one hemisphere that is highly conserved and one that is highly variable.

  11. Cytotoxicity of p-tyrosol and its derivatives may correlate with the inhibition of DNA replication initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Eun-Young; Jiang, Yahong; Zhang, Yanjun; Son, Eun Mi; You, Song; Kang, Shin-Won; Park, Jang-Su; Jung, Jee H; Lee, Burm-Jong; Kim, Dong-Kyoo

    2008-02-01

    p-Tyrosol is a phenolic compound present in different dietary sources that can exert mild antioxidant properties based on in vitro and in vivo studies. In our study, two p-tyrosol derivatives (p-tyrosyl gallate and p-tyrosyl acetate) were synthesized and compared together with p-tyrosol and gallic acid for their cytotoxic activities on human cancer cells. p-Tyrosyl gallate had the most potent cytotoxicity and the major cytotoxic mechanism of its action was studied. We found that in HeLa cells, p-tyrosyl gallate can effectively induce cell cycle arrest during S phase and inhibited in vitro simian virus (SV40 DNA) replication. In addition, p-tyrosyl gallate can inhibit three important functional replication proteins (topoisomerase I, RPA and pol alpha-primase), especially pol alpha-primase. These results suggest that p-tyrosyl gallate-induced cell cycle arrest during S phase correlates with the inhibition of DNA replication. Pol alpha-primase may be the main target molecule. Taken together, we suggest that p-tyrosyl gallate is a strong anticancer drug candidate that warrants further investigation.

  12. Mapping and Use of a Sequence that Targets DNA Ligase I to Sites of DNA Replication In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Cardoso, M. Cristina; Joseph, Cuthbert; Rahn, Hans-Peter; Reusch, Regina; Nadal-Ginard, Bernardo; Leonhardt, Heinrich

    1997-01-01

    The mammalian nucleus is highly organized, and nuclear processes such as DNA replication occur in discrete nuclear foci, a phenomenon often termed “functional organization” of the nucleus. We describe the identification and characterization of a bipartite targeting sequence (amino acids 1–28 and 111–179) that is necessary and sufficient to direct DNA ligase I to nuclear replication foci during S phase. This targeting sequence is located within the regulatory, NH2-terminal domain of the protei...

  13. Single molecule analysis of Trypanosoma brucei DNA replication dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderano, Simone Guedes; Drosopoulos, William C; Quaresma, Marina Mônaco; Marques, Catarina A; Kosiyatrakul, Settapong; McCulloch, Richard; Schildkraut, Carl L; Elias, Maria Carolina

    2015-03-11

    Eukaryotic genome duplication relies on origins of replication, distributed over multiple chromosomes, to initiate DNA replication. A recent genome-wide analysis of Trypanosoma brucei, the etiological agent of sleeping sickness, localized its replication origins to the boundaries of multigenic transcription units. To better understand genomic replication in this organism, we examined replication by single molecule analysis of replicated DNA. We determined the average speed of replication forks of procyclic and bloodstream form cells and we found that T. brucei DNA replication rate is similar to rates seen in other eukaryotes. We also analyzed the replication dynamics of a central region of chromosome 1 in procyclic forms. We present evidence for replication terminating within the central part of the chromosome and thus emanating from both sides, suggesting a previously unmapped origin toward the 5' extremity of chromosome 1. Also, termination is not at a fixed location in chromosome 1, but is rather variable. Importantly, we found a replication origin located near an ORC1/CDC6 binding site that is detected after replicative stress induced by hydroxyurea treatment, suggesting it may be a dormant origin activated in response to replicative stress. Collectively, our findings support the existence of more replication origins in T. brucei than previously appreciated.

  14. Picornaviruses and nuclear functions: targeting a cellular compartment distinct from the replication site of a positive-strand RNA virus

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    Dylan eFlather

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The compartmentalization of DNA replication and gene transcription in the nucleus and protein production in the cytoplasm is a defining feature of eukaryotic cells. The nucleus functions to maintain the integrity of the nuclear genome of the cell and to control gene expression based on intracellular and environmental signals received through the cytoplasm. The spatial separation of the major processes that lead to the expression of protein-coding genes establishes the necessity of a transport network to allow biomolecules to translocate between these two regions of the cell. The nucleocytoplasmic transport network is therefore essential for regulating normal cellular functioning. The Picornaviridae virus family is one of many viral families that disrupt the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of cells to promote viral replication. Picornaviruses contain positive-sense, single-stranded RNA genomes and replicate in the cytoplasm of infected cells. As a result of the limited coding capacity of these viruses, cellular proteins are required by these intracellular parasites for both translation and genomic RNA replication. Being of messenger RNA polarity, a picornavirus genome can immediately be translated upon entering the cell cytoplasm. However, the replication of viral RNA requires the activity of RNA-binding proteins, many of which function in host gene expression, and are consequently localized to the nucleus. As a result, picornaviruses disrupt nucleocytoplasmic trafficking to exploit protein functions normally localized to a different cellular compartment from which they translate their genome to facilitate efficient replication. Furthermore, picornavirus proteins are also known to enter the nucleus of infected cells to limit host-cell transcription and down-regulate innate antiviral responses. The interactions of picornavirus proteins and host-cell nuclei are extensive, required for a productive infection, and are the focus of this review.

  15. Picornaviruses and nuclear functions: targeting a cellular compartment distinct from the replication site of a positive-strand RNA virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flather, Dylan; Semler, Bert L

    2015-01-01

    The compartmentalization of DNA replication and gene transcription in the nucleus and protein production in the cytoplasm is a defining feature of eukaryotic cells. The nucleus functions to maintain the integrity of the nuclear genome of the cell and to control gene expression based on intracellular and environmental signals received through the cytoplasm. The spatial separation of the major processes that lead to the expression of protein-coding genes establishes the necessity of a transport network to allow biomolecules to translocate between these two regions of the cell. The nucleocytoplasmic transport network is therefore essential for regulating normal cellular functioning. The Picornaviridae virus family is one of many viral families that disrupt the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of cells to promote viral replication. Picornaviruses contain positive-sense, single-stranded RNA genomes and replicate in the cytoplasm of infected cells. As a result of the limited coding capacity of these viruses, cellular proteins are required by these intracellular parasites for both translation and genomic RNA replication. Being of messenger RNA polarity, a picornavirus genome can immediately be translated upon entering the cell cytoplasm. However, the replication of viral RNA requires the activity of RNA-binding proteins, many of which function in host gene expression, and are consequently localized to the nucleus. As a result, picornaviruses disrupt nucleocytoplasmic trafficking to exploit protein functions normally localized to a different cellular compartment from which they translate their genome to facilitate efficient replication. Furthermore, picornavirus proteins are also known to enter the nucleus of infected cells to limit host-cell transcription and down-regulate innate antiviral responses. The interactions of picornavirus proteins and host-cell nuclei are extensive, required for a productive infection, and are the focus of this review.

  16. Establishment and Application of a High Throughput Screening System Targeting the Interaction between HCV Internal Ribosome Entry Site and Human Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor 3

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    Yuying Zhu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Viruses are intracellular obligate parasites and the host cellular machinery is usually recruited for their replication. Human eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 (eIF3 could be directly recruited by the hepatitis C virus (HCV internal ribosome entry site (IRES to promote the translation of viral proteins. In this study, we establish a fluorescence polarization (FP based high throughput screening (HTS system targeting the interaction between HCV IRES and eIF3. By screening a total of 894 compounds with this HTS system, two compounds (Mucl39526 and NP39 are found to disturb the interaction between HCV IRES and eIF3. And these two compounds are further demonstrated to inhibit the HCV IRES-dependent translation in vitro. Thus, this HTS system is functional to screen the potential HCV replication inhibitors targeting human eIF3, which is helpful to overcome the problem of viral resistance. Surprisingly, one compound HP-3, a kind of oxytocin antagonist, is discovered to significantly enhance the interaction between HCV IRES and eIF3 by this HTS system. HP-3 is demonstrated to directly interact with HCV IRES and promote the HCV IRES-dependent translation both in vitro and in vivo, which strongly suggests that HP-3 has potentials to promote HCV replication. Therefore, this HTS system is also useful to screen the potential HCV replication enhancers, which is meaningful for understanding the viral replication and screening novel antiviral drugs. To our knowledge, this is the first HTS system targeting the interaction between eIF3 and HCV IRES, which could be applied to screen both potential HCV replication inhibitors and enhancers.

  17. Twenty-Eight Years of Poliovirus Replication in an Immunodeficient Individual: Impact on the Global Polio Eradication Initiative.

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    Glynis Dunn

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available There are currently huge efforts by the World Health Organization and partners to complete global polio eradication. With the significant decline in poliomyelitis cases due to wild poliovirus in recent years, rare cases related to the use of live-attenuated oral polio vaccine assume greater importance. Poliovirus strains in the oral vaccine are known to quickly revert to neurovirulent phenotype following replication in humans after immunisation. These strains can transmit from person to person leading to poliomyelitis outbreaks and can replicate for long periods of time in immunodeficient individuals leading to paralysis or chronic infection, with currently no effective treatment to stop excretion from these patients. Here, we describe an individual who has been excreting type 2 vaccine-derived poliovirus for twenty eight years as estimated by the molecular clock established with VP1 capsid gene nucleotide sequences of serial isolates. This represents by far the longest period of excretion described from such a patient who is the only identified individual known to be excreting highly evolved vaccine-derived poliovirus at present. Using a range of in vivo and in vitro assays we show that the viruses are very virulent, antigenically drifted and excreted at high titre suggesting that such chronic excreters pose an obvious risk to the eradication programme. Our results in virus neutralization assays with human sera and immunisation-challenge experiments using transgenic mice expressing the human poliovirus receptor indicate that while maintaining high immunisation coverage will likely confer protection against paralytic disease caused by these viruses, significant changes in immunisation strategies might be required to effectively stop their occurrence and potential widespread transmission. Eventually, new stable live-attenuated polio vaccines with no risk of reversion might be required to respond to any poliovirus isolation in the post

  18. Universal sequence replication, reversible polymerization and early functional biopolymers: a model for the initiation of prebiotic sequence evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Imari Walker

    Full Text Available Many models for the origin of life have focused on understanding how evolution can drive the refinement of a preexisting enzyme, such as the evolution of efficient replicase activity. Here we present a model for what was, arguably, an even earlier stage of chemical evolution, when polymer sequence diversity was generated and sustained before, and during, the onset of functional selection. The model includes regular environmental cycles (e.g. hydration-dehydration cycles that drive polymers between times of replication and functional activity, which coincide with times of different monomer and polymer diffusivity. Template-directed replication of informational polymers, which takes place during the dehydration stage of each cycle, is considered to be sequence-independent. New sequences are generated by spontaneous polymer formation, and all sequences compete for a finite monomer resource that is recycled via reversible polymerization. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate that this proposed prebiotic scenario provides a robust mechanism for the exploration of sequence space. Introduction of a polymer sequence with monomer synthetase activity illustrates that functional sequences can become established in a preexisting pool of otherwise non-functional sequences. Functional selection does not dominate system dynamics and sequence diversity remains high, permitting the emergence and spread of more than one functional sequence. It is also observed that polymers spontaneously form clusters in simulations where polymers diffuse more slowly than monomers, a feature that is reminiscent of a previous proposal that the earliest stages of life could have been defined by the collective evolution of a system-wide cooperation of polymer aggregates. Overall, the results presented demonstrate the merits of considering plausible prebiotic polymer chemistries and environments that would have allowed for the rapid turnover of monomer resources and for

  19. Universal Sequence Replication, Reversible Polymerization and Early Functional Biopolymers: A Model for the Initiation of Prebiotic Sequence Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Sara Imari; Grover, Martha A.; Hud, Nicholas V.

    2012-01-01

    Many models for the origin of life have focused on understanding how evolution can drive the refinement of a preexisting enzyme, such as the evolution of efficient replicase activity. Here we present a model for what was, arguably, an even earlier stage of chemical evolution, when polymer sequence diversity was generated and sustained before, and during, the onset of functional selection. The model includes regular environmental cycles (e.g. hydration-dehydration cycles) that drive polymers between times of replication and functional activity, which coincide with times of different monomer and polymer diffusivity. Template-directed replication of informational polymers, which takes place during the dehydration stage of each cycle, is considered to be sequence-independent. New sequences are generated by spontaneous polymer formation, and all sequences compete for a finite monomer resource that is recycled via reversible polymerization. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate that this proposed prebiotic scenario provides a robust mechanism for the exploration of sequence space. Introduction of a polymer sequence with monomer synthetase activity illustrates that functional sequences can become established in a preexisting pool of otherwise non-functional sequences. Functional selection does not dominate system dynamics and sequence diversity remains high, permitting the emergence and spread of more than one functional sequence. It is also observed that polymers spontaneously form clusters in simulations where polymers diffuse more slowly than monomers, a feature that is reminiscent of a previous proposal that the earliest stages of life could have been defined by the collective evolution of a system-wide cooperation of polymer aggregates. Overall, the results presented demonstrate the merits of considering plausible prebiotic polymer chemistries and environments that would have allowed for the rapid turnover of monomer resources and for regularly varying monomer

  20. Twenty-Eight Years of Poliovirus Replication in an Immunodeficient Individual: Impact on the Global Polio Eradication Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Glynis; Klapsa, Dimitra; Wilton, Thomas; Stone, Lindsay; Minor, Philip D; Martin, Javier

    2015-08-01

    There are currently huge efforts by the World Health Organization and partners to complete global polio eradication. With the significant decline in poliomyelitis cases due to wild poliovirus in recent years, rare cases related to the use of live-attenuated oral polio vaccine assume greater importance. Poliovirus strains in the oral vaccine are known to quickly revert to neurovirulent phenotype following replication in humans after immunisation. These strains can transmit from person to person leading to poliomyelitis outbreaks and can replicate for long periods of time in immunodeficient individuals leading to paralysis or chronic infection, with currently no effective treatment to stop excretion from these patients. Here, we describe an individual who has been excreting type 2 vaccine-derived poliovirus for twenty eight years as estimated by the molecular clock established with VP1 capsid gene nucleotide sequences of serial isolates. This represents by far the longest period of excretion described from such a patient who is the only identified individual known to be excreting highly evolved vaccine-derived poliovirus at present. Using a range of in vivo and in vitro assays we show that the viruses are very virulent, antigenically drifted and excreted at high titre suggesting that such chronic excreters pose an obvious risk to the eradication programme. Our results in virus neutralization assays with human sera and immunisation-challenge experiments using transgenic mice expressing the human poliovirus receptor indicate that while maintaining high immunisation coverage will likely confer protection against paralytic disease caused by these viruses, significant changes in immunisation strategies might be required to effectively stop their occurrence and potential widespread transmission. Eventually, new stable live-attenuated polio vaccines with no risk of reversion might be required to respond to any poliovirus isolation in the post-eradication era.

  1. Quality improvement initiative: Preventative Surgical Site Infection Protocol in Vascular Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parizh, David; Ascher, Enrico; Raza Rizvi, Syed Ali; Hingorani, Anil; Amaturo, Michael; Johnson, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Objective A quality improvement initiative was employed to decrease single institution surgical site infection rate in open lower extremity revascularization procedures. In an attempt to lower patient morbidity, we developed and implemented the Preventative Surgical Site Infection Protocol in Vascular Surgery. Surgical site infections lead to prolonged hospital stays, adjunctive procedure, and additive costs. We employed targeted interventions to address the common risk factors that predispose patients to post-operative complications. Methods Retrospective review was performed between 2012 and 2016 for all surgical site infections after revascularization procedures of the lower extremity. A quality improvement protocol was initiated in January 2015. Primary outcome was the assessment of surgical site infection rate reduction in the pre-protocol vs. post-protocol era. Secondary outcomes evaluated patient demographics, closure method, perioperative antibiotic coverage, and management outcomes. Results Implementation of the protocol decreased the surgical site infection rate from 6.4% to 1.6% p = 0.0137). Patient demographics and comorbidities were assessed and failed to demonstrate a statistically significant difference among the infection and no-infection groups. Wound closure with monocryl suture vs. staple proved to be associated with decreased surgical site infection rate ( p surgical site infections in the vascular surgery population are effective and necessary. Our data suggest that there may be benefit in the incorporation of MRSA and Gram-negative coverage as part of the Surgical Care Improvement Project perioperative guidelines.

  2. Deciphering DNA replication dynamics in eukaryotic cell populations in relation with their averaged chromatin conformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldar, A.; Arneodo, A.; Audit, B.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a non-local model of DNA replication that takes into account the observed uncertainty on the position and time of replication initiation in eukaryote cell populations. By picturing replication initiation as a two-state system and considering all possible transition configurations......, and by taking into account the chromatin's fractal dimension, we derive an analytical expression for the rate of replication initiation. This model predicts with no free parameter the temporal profiles of initiation rate, replication fork density and fraction of replicated DNA, in quantitative agreement...... with corresponding experimental data from both S. cerevisiae and human cells and provides a quantitative estimate of initiation site redundancy. This study shows that, to a large extent, the program that regulates the dynamics of eukaryotic DNA replication is a collective phenomenon that emerges from the stochastic...

  3. Sites of replication of bovine respiratory syncytial virus in naturally infected calves as determined by in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viuff, B.; Uttenthal, Åse; Tegtmeier, C.

    1996-01-01

    Replication of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) was studied in three naturally infected calves by in situ hybridization using strand-specific RNA probes. One of the calves was a 5-month-old Friesian, the other two calves were a 3-month-old and a 2-week-old Jersey. Two Jersey calves, 3 mo...

  4. The Site of Spontaneous Ectopic Spike Initiation Facilitates Signal Integration in a Sensory Neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Städele, Carola; Stein, Wolfgang

    2016-06-22

    Essential to understanding the process of neuronal signal integration is the knowledge of where within a neuron action potentials (APs) are generated. Recent studies support the idea that the precise location where APs are initiated and the properties of spike initiation zones define the cell's information processing capabilities. Notably, the location of spike initiation can be modified homeostatically within neurons to adjust neuronal activity. Here we show that this potential mechanism for neuronal plasticity can also be exploited in a rapid and dynamic fashion. We tested whether dislocation of the spike initiation zone affects signal integration by studying ectopic spike initiation in the anterior gastric receptor neuron (AGR) of the stomatogastric nervous system of Cancer borealis Like many other vertebrate and invertebrate neurons, AGR can generate ectopic APs in regions distinct from the axon initial segment. Using voltage-sensitive dyes and electrophysiology, we determined that AGR's ectopic spike activity was consistently initiated in the neuropil region of the stomatogastric ganglion motor circuits. At least one neurite branched off the AGR axon in this area; and indeed, we found that AGR's ectopic spike activity was influenced by local motor neurons. This sensorimotor interaction was state-dependent in that focal axon modulation with the biogenic amine octopamine, abolished signal integration at the primary spike initiation zone by dislocating spike initiation to a distant region of the axon. We demonstrate that the site of ectopic spike initiation is important for signal integration and that axonal neuromodulation allows for a dynamic adjustment of signal integration. Although it is known that action potentials are initiated at specific sites in the axon, it remains to be determined how the precise location of action potential initiation affects neuronal activity and signal integration. We addressed this issue by studying ectopic spiking in the axon of

  5. Minichromosome replication in vitro: inhibition of re-replication by replicatively assembled nucleosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krude, T; Knippers, R

    1994-08-19

    Single-stranded circular DNA, containing the SV40 origin sequence, was used as a template for complementary DNA strand synthesis in cytosolic extracts from HeLa cells. In the presence of the replication-dependent chromatin assembly factor CAF-1, defined numbers of nucleosomes were assembled during complementary DNA strand synthesis. These minichromosomes were then induced to semiconservatively replicate by the addition of the SV40 initiator protein T antigen (re-replication). The results indicate that re-replication of minichromosomes appears to be inhibited by two independent mechanisms. One acts at the initiation of minichromosome re-replication, and the other affects replicative chain elongation. To directly demonstrate the inhibitory effect of replicatively assembled nucleosomes, two types of minichromosomes were prepared: (i) post-replicative minichromosomes were assembled in a reaction coupled to replication as above; (ii) pre-replicative minichromosomes were assembled independently of replication on double-stranded DNA. Both types of minichromosomes were used as templates for DNA replication under identical conditions. Replicative fork movement was found to be impeded only on post-replicative minichromosome templates. In contrast, pre-replicative minichromosomes allowed one unconstrained replication cycle, but re-replication was inhibited due to a block in fork movement. Thus, replicatively assembled chromatin may have a profound influence on the re-replication of DNA.

  6. Hon-yaku: a biology-driven Bayesian methodology for identifying translation initiation sites in prokaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Hoon Michiel JL

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computational prediction methods are currently used to identify genes in prokaryote genomes. However, identification of the correct translation initiation sites remains a difficult task. Accurate translation initiation sites (TISs are important not only for the annotation of unknown proteins but also for the prediction of operons, promoters, and small non-coding RNA genes, as this typically makes use of the intergenic distance. A further problem is that most existing methods are optimized for Escherichia coli data sets; applying these methods to newly sequenced bacterial genomes may not result in an equivalent level of accuracy. Results Based on a biological representation of the translation process, we applied Bayesian statistics to create a score function for predicting translation initiation sites. In contrast to existing programs, our combination of methods uses supervised learning to optimally use the set of known translation initiation sites. We combined the Ribosome Binding Site (RBS sequence, the distance between the translation initiation site and the RBS sequence, the base composition of the start codon, the nucleotide composition (A-rich sequences following start codons, and the expected distribution of the protein length in a Bayesian scoring function. To further increase the prediction accuracy, we also took into account the operon orientation. The outcome of the procedure achieved a prediction accuracy of 93.2% in 858 E. coli genes from the EcoGene data set and 92.7% accuracy in a data set of 1243 Bacillus subtilis 'non-y' genes. We confirmed the performance in the GC-rich Gamma-Proteobacteria Herminiimonas arsenicoxydans, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Burkholderia pseudomallei K96243. Conclusion Hon-yaku, being based on a careful choice of elements important in translation, improved the prediction accuracy in B. subtilis data sets and other bacteria except for E. coli. We believe that most remaining

  7. Plasmid DNA initiates replication of yellow fever vaccine in vitro and elicits virus-specific immune response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretyakova, Irina; Nickols, Brian; Hidajat, Rachmat; Jokinen, Jenny; Lukashevich, Igor S; Pushko, Peter

    2014-11-01

    Yellow fever (YF) causes an acute hemorrhagic fever disease in tropical Africa and Latin America. To develop a novel experimental YF vaccine, we applied iDNA infectious clone technology. The iDNA represents plasmid that encodes the full-length RNA genome of 17D vaccine downstream from a cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter. The vaccine was designed to transcribe the full-length viral RNA and to launch 17D vaccine virus in vitro and in vivo. Transfection with 10 ng of iDNA plasmid was sufficient to start replication of vaccine virus in vitro. Safety of the parental 17D and iDNA-derived 17D viruses was confirmed in AG129 mice deficient in receptors for IFN-α/β/γ. Finally, direct vaccination of BALB/c mice with a single 20 μg dose of iDNA plasmid resulted in seroconversion and elicitation of virus-specific neutralizing antibodies in animals. We conclude that iDNA immunization approach combines characteristics of DNA and attenuated vaccines and represents a promising vaccination strategy for YF.

  8. 40 CFR 280.62 - Initial abatement measures and site check.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to monitor and mitigate any additional fire and safety hazards posed by vapors or free product that... release confirmation, site investigation, abatement, or corrective action activities. If these remedies... initial abatement steps taken under paragraph (a) of this section and any resulting information or data....

  9. (p)ppGpp modulates cell size and the initiation of DNA replication in Caulobacter crescentus in response to a block in lipid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stott, Kristina V; Wood, Shannon M; Blair, Jimmy A; Nguyen, Bao T; Herrera, Anabel; Mora, Yannet G Perez; Cuajungco, Math P; Murray, Sean R

    2015-03-01

    Stress conditions, such as a block in fatty acid synthesis, signal bacterial cells to exit the cell cycle. Caulobacter crescentus FabH is a cell-cycle-regulated β-ketoacyl-acyl carrier protein synthase that initiates lipid biosynthesis and is essential for growth in rich media. To explore how C. crescentus responds to a block in lipid biosynthesis, we created a FabH-depletion strain. We found that FabH depletion blocks lipid biosynthesis in rich media and causes a cell cycle arrest that requires the alarmone (p)ppGpp for adaptation. Notably, basal levels of (p)ppGpp coordinate both a reduction in cell volume and a block in the over-initiation of DNA replication in response to FabH depletion. The gene ctrA encodes a master transcription factor that directly regulates 95 cell-cycle-controlled genes while also functioning to inhibit the initiation of DNA replication. Here, we demonstrate that ctrA transcription is (p)ppGpp-dependent during fatty acid starvation. CtrA fails to accumulate when FabH is depleted in the absence of (p)ppGpp due to a substantial reduction in ctrA transcription. The (p)ppGpp-dependent maintenance of ctrA transcription during fatty acid starvation initiated from only one of the two ctrA promoters. In the absence of (p)ppGpp, the majority of FabH-depleted cells enter a viable but non-culturable state, with multiple chromosomes, and are unable to recover from the miscoordination of cell cycle events. Thus, basal levels of (p)ppGpp facilitate C. crescentus' re-entry into the cell cycle after termination of fatty acid starvation.

  10. Replication Restart in Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Bénédicte; Sandler, Steven J

    2017-07-01

    In bacteria, replication forks assembled at a replication origin travel to the terminus, often a few megabases away. They may encounter obstacles that trigger replisome disassembly, rendering replication restart from abandoned forks crucial for cell viability. During the past 25 years, the genes that encode replication restart proteins have been identified and genetically characterized. In parallel, the enzymes were purified and analyzed in vitro, where they can catalyze replication initiation in a sequence-independent manner from fork-like DNA structures. This work also revealed a close link between replication and homologous recombination, as replication restart from recombination intermediates is an essential step of DNA double-strand break repair in bacteria and, conversely, arrested replication forks can be acted upon by recombination proteins and converted into various recombination substrates. In this review, we summarize this intense period of research that led to the characterization of the ubiquitous replication restart protein PriA and its partners, to the definition of several replication restart pathways in vivo, and to the description of tight links between replication and homologous recombination, responsible for the importance of replication restart in the maintenance of genome stability. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  11. Patterns of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 recombination ex vivo provide evidence for coadaptation of distant sites, resulting in purifying selection for intersubtype recombinants during replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galli, Andrea; Kearney, Mary; Nikolaitchik, Olga A

    2010-01-01

    High-frequency recombination is a hallmark of HIV-1 replication. Recombination can occur between two members of the same subtype or between viruses from two different subtypes, generating intra- or intersubtype recombinants, respectively. Many intersubtype recombinants have been shown to circulate....../B) and between viruses with pol genes from subtype B or F (B/F). Recombination events generated during a single cycle of infection without selection pressure on pol gene function were analyzed by single-genome sequencing. We found that recombination occurred slightly ( approximately 30%) less frequently in B...... subtypes; these sites may be segregated by recombination events, causing the newly generated intersubtype recombinants to undergo purifying selection. Therefore, the ability of the recombinants to replicate is the major barrier for many of these viruses....

  12. Plasmid DNA initiates replication of yellow fever vaccine in vitro and elicits virus-specific immune response in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tretyakova, Irina; Nickols, Brian; Hidajat, Rachmat [Medigen, Inc., 8420 Gas House Pike, Suite S, Frederick, MD 21701 (United States); Jokinen, Jenny; Lukashevich, Igor S. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Medicine, Center for Predictive Medicine and Emerging Infectious Diseases, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (United States); Pushko, Peter, E-mail: ppushko@medigen-usa.com [Medigen, Inc., 8420 Gas House Pike, Suite S, Frederick, MD 21701 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Yellow fever (YF) causes an acute hemorrhagic fever disease in tropical Africa and Latin America. To develop a novel experimental YF vaccine, we applied iDNA infectious clone technology. The iDNA represents plasmid that encodes the full-length RNA genome of 17D vaccine downstream from a cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter. The vaccine was designed to transcribe the full-length viral RNA and to launch 17D vaccine virus in vitro and in vivo. Transfection with 10 ng of iDNA plasmid was sufficient to start replication of vaccine virus in vitro. Safety of the parental 17D and iDNA-derived 17D viruses was confirmed in AG129 mice deficient in receptors for IFN-α/β/γ. Finally, direct vaccination of BALB/c mice with a single 20 μg dose of iDNA plasmid resulted in seroconversion and elicitation of virus-specific neutralizing antibodies in animals. We conclude that iDNA immunization approach combines characteristics of DNA and attenuated vaccines and represents a promising vaccination strategy for YF. - Highlights: • The iDNA{sup ®} platform combines advantages of DNA and live attenuated vaccines. • Yellow fever (YF) 17D vaccine was launched from iDNA plasmid in vitro and in vivo. • Safety of iDNA-generated 17D virus was confirmed in AG129 mice. • BALB/c mice seroconverted after a single-dose vaccination with iDNA. • YF virus-neutralizing response was elicited in iDNA-vaccinated mice.

  13. The kissing-loop motif is a preferred site of 5' leader recombination during replication of SL3-3 murine leukemia viruses in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Mikkelsen, J G; Schmidt, J

    1999-01-01

    , and the upstream part of the 5' untranslated region, enabled us to map recombination sites, guided by distinct scattered nucleotide differences. In 30 of 44 analyzed sequences, recombination was mapped to a 33-nucleotide similarity window coinciding with the kissing-loop stem-loop motif implicated in dimerization...... of the diploid genome. Interestingly, the recombination pattern preference found in replication-competent viruses from T-cell tumors is very similar to the pattern previously reported for retroviral vectors in cell culture experiments. The data therefore sustain the hypothesis that the kissing loop, presumably...

  14. Chromatin replication and epigenome maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alabert, Constance; Groth, Anja

    2012-01-01

    initiates, whereas the replication process itself disrupts chromatin and challenges established patterns of genome regulation. Specialized replication-coupled mechanisms assemble new DNA into chromatin, but epigenome maintenance is a continuous process taking place throughout the cell cycle. If DNA...

  15. Chromatin replication and epigenome maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alabert, Constance; Groth, Anja

    2012-01-01

    initiates, whereas the replication process itself disrupts chromatin and challenges established patterns of genome regulation. Specialized replication-coupled mechanisms assemble new DNA into chromatin, but epigenome maintenance is a continuous process taking place throughout the cell cycle. If DNA...

  16. The Integrated Coastal Area Management (ICAM) Initiative in the Nyali-Bamburi-Shanzu Site, Mombasa, Kenya.

    OpenAIRE

    Mwandotto, B.A.J.

    1997-01-01

    A multi-institutional planning team headed by Coast Development Authority (CDA) in Kenya initiated an Integrated Coastal Area Management (ICAM) process in 1994. The pilot study site was Nyali-Bamburi-Shanzu area in Mombasa. The objective was to provide a starting point for addressing urgent coastal issues facing the area and to enrich the dialogue on how to address urgent coastal management problems nationwide. The pertinent coastal issues that were profiled in a participatory and interactive...

  17. Illuminating the Sites of Enterovirus Replication in Living Cells by Using a Split-GFP-Tagged Viral Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Schaar, H M; Melia, C E; van Bruggen, J A C; Strating, J R P M; van Geenen, M E D; Koster, A J; Bárcena, M; van Kuppeveld, F J M

    2016-01-01

    Like all other positive-strand RNA viruses, enteroviruses generate new organelles (replication organelles [ROs]) with a unique protein and lipid composition on which they multiply their viral genome. Suitable tools for live-cell imaging of enterovirus ROs are currently unavailable, as recombinant enteroviruses that carry genes that encode RO-anchored viral proteins tagged with fluorescent reporters have not been reported thus far. To overcome this limitation, we used a split green fluorescent protein (split-GFP) system, comprising a large fragment [strands 1 to 10; GFP(S1-10)] and a small fragment [strand 11; GFP(S11)] of only 16 residues. The GFP(S11) (GFP with S11 fragment) fragment was inserted into the 3A protein of the enterovirus coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3), while the large fragment was supplied by transient or stable expression in cells. The introduction of GFP(S11) did not affect the known functions of 3A when expressed in isolation. Using correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM), we showed that GFP fluorescence was detected at ROs, whose morphologies are essentially identical to those previously observed for wild-type CVB3, indicating that GFP(S11)-tagged 3A proteins assemble with GFP(S1-10) to form GFP for illumination of bona fide ROs. It is well established that enterovirus infection leads to Golgi disintegration. Through live-cell imaging of infected cells expressing an mCherry-tagged Golgi marker, we monitored RO development and revealed the dynamics of Golgi disassembly in real time. Having demonstrated the suitability of this virus for imaging ROs, we constructed a CVB3 encoding GFP(S1-10) and GFP(S11)-tagged 3A to bypass the need to express GFP(S1-10) prior to infection. These tools will have multiple applications in future studies on the origin, location, and function of enterovirus ROs. IMPORTANCE Enteroviruses induce the formation of membranous structures (replication organelles [ROs]) with a unique protein and lipid composition specialized for

  18. Ubiquinone-binding site mutagenesis reveals the role of mitochondrial complex II in cell death initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluckova, K; Sticha, M; Cerny, J; Mracek, T; Dong, L; Drahota, Z; Gottlieb, E; Neuzil, J; Rohlena, J

    2015-05-07

    Respiratory complex II (CII, succinate dehydrogenase, SDH) inhibition can induce cell death, but the mechanistic details need clarification. To elucidate the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation upon the ubiquinone-binding (Qp) site blockade, we substituted CII subunit C (SDHC) residues lining the Qp site by site-directed mutagenesis. Cell lines carrying these mutations were characterized on the bases of CII activity and exposed to Qp site inhibitors MitoVES, thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA) and Atpenin A5. We found that I56F and S68A SDHC variants, which support succinate-mediated respiration and maintain low intracellular succinate, were less efficiently inhibited by MitoVES than the wild-type (WT) variant. Importantly, associated ROS generation and cell death induction was also impaired, and cell death in the WT cells was malonate and catalase sensitive. In contrast, the S68A variant was much more susceptible to TTFA inhibition than the I56F variant or the WT CII, which was again reflected by enhanced ROS formation and increased malonate- and catalase-sensitive cell death induction. The R72C variant that accumulates intracellular succinate due to compromised CII activity was resistant to MitoVES and TTFA treatment and did not increase ROS, even though TTFA efficiently generated ROS at low succinate in mitochondria isolated from R72C cells. Similarly, the high-affinity Qp site inhibitor Atpenin A5 rapidly increased intracellular succinate in WT cells but did not induce ROS or cell death, unlike MitoVES and TTFA that upregulated succinate only moderately. These results demonstrate that cell death initiation upon CII inhibition depends on ROS and that the extent of cell death correlates with the potency of inhibition at the Qp site unless intracellular succinate is high. In addition, this validates the Qp site of CII as a target for cell death induction with relevance to cancer therapy.

  19. [Homologue pairing: initiation sites and effects on crossing over and chromosome disjunction in Drosophila melanogaster].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubykin, V L

    1996-01-01

    The role of homologue pairing and chromocentral association of chromosomes in recombination and segregation during cell division is discussed. Peculiarities of mitotic and meiotic chromosome pairing in Drosophila males and females are considered. On the basis of our own and published data, the presence and localization of sites of homologue pairing initiation in euchromatin are substantiated. The effects of transfer of initiation sites along a chromosome (exemplified by inversions) on chromosome pairing (asynapsis), crossing over (intrachromosomal, interchromosomal, and centromeric effects), and segregation are discussed. To record the effects of pairing sites on crossing over, a method of comparing crossing-over frequencies in an inverted region with those in a region of the same size and position with regard to the centromere on cytological maps was proposed. Chromosomes orient toward opposite division poles during paracentromeric heterochromatin pairing. This occurs after successful euchromatin pairing, during which the chromocentral circular structure is reorganized. If heterochromatin pairing is disrupted because of structural or locus mutations, nonexchange bivalents segregate randomly. In this case, chromosome coordination may occur due to proximal chiasmata or chromocentral associations between homologues.

  20. Sustainable Sites Initiative: US updated rating criteria for open spaces design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Valente

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the U.S. Sustainable Sites Initiative, by illustrating and commenting the recent updates of the rating criteria in addition to a number of certified projects, including some sites visited by the author in California. The system is compared with existing tools, as LEED 2009 for Neighborhood Development Rating System, albeit some differences also in scale of interventions. In the work, scientific literature and personal considerations are given about those aspects still not evaluated by the system and its potential wider applicability with regard to directions of research on the topic. The theme fits well in the mainstream of studies dedicated to the design of resilient open spaces, contributing to adaptation and mitigation of climate change.

  1. Initial source and site characterization studies for the U.C. Santa Barbara campus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archuleta, R.; Nicholson, C.; Steidl, J.; Gurrola, L.; Alex, C.; Cochran, E.; Ely, G.; Tyler, T. [University of California, Santa Barbara (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The University of California Campus-Laboratory Collaboration (CLC) project is an integrated 3 year effort involving Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and four UC campuses - Los Angeles (UCLA), Riverside (UCR), Santa Barbara (UCSB), and San Diego (UCSD) - plus additional collaborators at San Diego State University (SDSU), at Los Alamos National Laboratory and in industry. The primary purpose of the project is to estimate potential ground motions from large earthquakes and to predict site-specific ground motions for one critical structure on each campus. This project thus combines the disciplines of geology, seismology, geodesy, soil dynamics, and earthquake engineering into a fully integrated approach. Once completed, the CLC project will provide a template to evaluate other buildings at each of the four UC campuses, as well as provide a methodology for evaluating seismic hazards at other critical sites in California, including other UC locations at risk from large earthquakes. Another important objective of the CLC project is the education of students and other professional in the application of this integrated, multidisciplinary, state-of-the-art approach to the assessment of earthquake hazard. For each campus targeted by the CLC project, the seismic hazard study will consist of four phases: Phase I - Initial source and site characterization, Phase II - Drilling, logging, seismic monitoring, and laboratory dynamic soil testing, Phase III - Modeling of predicted site-specific earthquake ground motions, and Phase IV - Calculations of 3D building response. This report cover Phase I for the UCSB campus and incudes results up through March 1997.

  2. Dragon TIS Spotter: An Arabidopsis-derived predictor of translation initiation sites in plants

    KAUST Repository

    Magana-Mora, Arturo

    2012-10-30

    In higher eukaryotes, the identification of translation initiation sites (TISs) has been focused on finding these signals in cDNA or mRNA sequences. Using Arabidopsis thaliana (A.t.) information, we developed a prediction tool for signals within genomic sequences of plants that correspond to TISs. Our tool requires only genome sequence, not expressed sequences. Its sensitivity/specificity is for A.t. (90.75%/92.2%), for Vitis vinifera (66.8%/94.4%) and for Populus trichocarpa (81.6%/94.4%), which suggests that our tool can be used in annotation of different plant genomes. We provide a list of features used in our model. Further study of these features may improve our understanding of mechanisms of the translation initiation. The Author(s) 2012. Published by Oxford University Press.

  3. Initial evaluation of the radioecological situation at the Semipalatinsk Test Site in the Republic of Kazakhstan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voigt, G.; Semiochkina, N. [GSF - Forschungszentrum fuer Umwelt und Gesundheit Neuherberg GmbH, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenschutz

    1998-12-31

    The Semipalatinsk Test Site (STS) located in the Republic of Kazakhstan (Figure 1.1) was one of the major nuclear weapon test sites of the former Soviet Union. At the site, four hundred fifty six nuclear explosions took place between 1949 and 1989 within the STS (Mikhailov et al. 1996; Dubasov et al. 1994a), resulting in radioactive contamination both within and around the STS. Incidences of radiation related illnesses in such areas may be higher than normal levels (Burkhart 1996). Published estimates of the resulting dose to the public vary according to the source, but an independent study (Grosche 1996) indicated that as many as 30,000-40,000 people could have been exposed to an average dose of 1.6 Sv (160 rem) or more (mainly due to short-lived radionuclides such as {sup 131}I). A detailed international assessment of the impact of these tests on the local population has not yet been undertaken. A current investigation under the acronym, RADTEST, includes an evaluation of Semipalatinsk as part of a broad review of internal and external doses to people arising from nuclear tests at many different sites in the world. In the context of the European Commission funded project RESTORE (Restoration Strategy for Radioactive Contaminated Ecosystems) an attempt is being made to assess the present radiolecological situation in the STS. This initial report collates currently available data published in Russian-language literature and internal CIS reports, reports from Europe and the USA, and other international literature. In this initial evaluation, only an overview of published data made available to the RESTORE project is provided and briefly discussed. In addition, further assessments including experimental work are suggested. Additional sources of data will be pursued and will be integrated with experimental results in the final evaluation report. (orig.)

  4. Stress induced by premature chromatin condensation triggers chromosome shattering and chromothripsis at DNA sites still replicating in micronuclei or multinucleate cells when primary nuclei enter mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzoudi, Georgia I; Karakosta, Maria; Pantelias, Antonio; Hatzi, Vasiliki I; Karachristou, Ioanna; Pantelias, Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    Combination of next-generation DNA sequencing, single nucleotide polymorphism array analyses and bioinformatics has revealed the striking phenomenon of chromothripsis, described as complex genomic rearrangements acquired in a single catastrophic event affecting one or a few chromosomes. Via an unproven mechanism, it is postulated that mechanical stress causes chromosome shattering into small lengths of DNA, which are then randomly reassembled by DNA repair machinery. Chromothripsis is currently examined as an alternative mechanism of oncogenesis, in contrast to the present paradigm that considers a stepwise development of cancer. While evidence for the mechanism(s) underlying chromosome shattering during cancer development remains elusive, a number of hypotheses have been proposed to explain chromothripsis, including ionizing radiation, DNA replication stress, breakage-fusion-bridge cycles, micronuclei formation and premature chromosome compaction. In the present work, we provide experimental evidence on the mechanistic basis of chromothripsis and on how chromosomes can get locally shattered in a single catastrophic event. Considering the dynamic nature of chromatin nucleoprotein complex, capable of rapid unfolding, disassembling, assembling and refolding, we first show that chromatin condensation at repairing or replicating DNA sites induces the mechanical stress needed for chromosome shattering to ensue. Premature chromosome condensation is then used to visualize the dynamic nature of interphase chromatin and demonstrate that such mechanical stress and chromosome shattering can also occur in chromosomes within micronuclei or asynchronous multinucleate cells when primary nuclei enter mitosis. Following an aberrant mitosis, chromosomes could find themselves in the wrong place at the wrong time so that they may undergo massive DNA breakage and rearrangement in a single catastrophic event. Specifically, our results support the hypothesis that premature chromosome

  5. Mutation of the dengue virus type 2 envelope protein heparan sulfate binding sites or the domain III lateral ridge blocks replication in Vero cells prior to membrane fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roehrig, John T., E-mail: jtr1@cdc.gov [Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, CO 80521 (United States); Butrapet, Siritorn; Liss, Nathan M. [Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, CO 80521 (United States); Bennett, Susan L. [Arthropod-borne and Infectious Diseases Laboratory, Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (United States); Luy, Betty E.; Childers, Thomas; Boroughs, Karen L.; Stovall, Janae L.; Calvert, Amanda E. [Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, CO 80521 (United States); Blair, Carol D. [Arthropod-borne and Infectious Diseases Laboratory, Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Pathology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (United States); Huang, Claire Y.-H. [Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, CO 80521 (United States)

    2013-07-05

    Using an infectious cDNA clone we engineered seven mutations in the putative heparan sulfate- and receptor-binding motifs of the envelope protein of dengue virus serotype 2, strain 16681. Four mutant viruses, KK122/123EE, E202K, G304K, and KKK305/307/310EEE, were recovered following transfection of C6/36 cells. A fifth mutant, KK291/295EE, was recovered from C6/36 cells with a compensatory E295V mutation. All mutants grew in and mediated fusion of virus-infected C6/36 cells, but three of the mutants, KK122/123EE, E202K, G304K, did not grow in Vero cells without further modification. Two Vero cell lethal mutants, KK291/295EV and KKK307/307/310EEE, failed to replicate in DC-SIGN-transformed Raji cells and did not react with monoclonal antibodies known to block DENV attachment to Vero cells. Additionally, both mutants were unable to initiate negative-strand vRNA synthesis in Vero cells by 72 h post-infection, suggesting that the replication block occurred prior to virus-mediated membrane fusion. - Highlights: • Heparan sulfate- and receptor-binding motifs of DENV2 envelope protein were mutated. • Four mutant viruses were isolated—all could fuse C6/36 cells. • Two of these mutants were lethal in Vero cells without further modification. • Lethal mutations were KK291/295EV and KKK305/307/310EEE. • Cell attachment was implicated as the replication block for both mutants.

  6. Chikungunya virus infectivity, RNA replication and non-structural polyprotein processing depend on the nsP2 protease's active site cysteine residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rausalu, Kai; Utt, Age; Quirin, Tania; Varghese, Finny S; Žusinaite, Eva; Das, Pratyush Kumar; Ahola, Tero; Merits, Andres

    2016-11-15

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), genus Alphavirus, family Togaviridae, has a positive-stand RNA genome approximately 12 kb in length. In infected cells, the genome is translated into non-structural polyprotein P1234, an inactive precursor of the viral replicase, which is activated by cleavages carried out by the non-structural protease, nsP2. We have characterized CHIKV nsP2 using both cell-free and cell-based assays. First, we show that Cys478 residue in the active site of CHIKV nsP2 is indispensable for P1234 processing. Second, the substrate requirements of CHIKV nsP2 are quite similar to those of nsP2 of related Semliki Forest virus (SFV). Third, substitution of Ser482 residue, recently reported to contribute to the protease activity of nsP2, with Ala has almost no negative effect on the protease activity of CHIKV nsP2. Fourth, Cys478 to Ala as well as Trp479 to Ala mutations in nsP2 completely abolished RNA replication in CHIKV and SFV trans-replication systems. In contrast, trans-replicases with Ser482 to Ala mutation were similar to wild type counterparts. Fifth, Cys478 to Ala as well as Trp479 to Ala mutations in nsP2 abolished the rescue of infectious virus from CHIKV RNA transcripts while Ser482 to Ala mutation had no effect. Thus, CHIKV nsP2 is a cysteine protease.

  7. Somitogenesis clock-wave initiation requires differential decay and multiple binding sites for clock protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Campanelli

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Somitogenesis is a process common to all vertebrate embryos in which repeated blocks of cells arise from the presomitic mesoderm (PSM to lay a foundational pattern for trunk and tail development. Somites form in the wake of passing waves of periodic gene expression that originate in the tailbud and sweep posteriorly across the PSM. Previous work has suggested that the waves result from a spatiotemporally graded control protein that affects the oscillation rate of clock-gene expression. With a minimally constructed mathematical model, we study the contribution of two control mechanisms to the initial formation of this gene-expression wave. We test four biologically motivated model scenarios with either one or two clock protein transcription binding sites, and with or without differential decay rates for clock protein monomers and dimers. We examine the sensitivity of wave formation with respect to multiple model parameters and robustness to heterogeneity in cell population. We find that only a model with both multiple binding sites and differential decay rates is able to reproduce experimentally observed waveforms. Our results show that the experimentally observed characteristics of somitogenesis wave initiation constrain the underlying genetic control mechanisms.

  8. A model analysis of mechanisms for radial microtubular patterns at root hair initiation sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Krupinski

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Plant cells have two main modes of growth generating anisotropic structures. Diffuse growth where whole cell walls extend in specific directions, guided by anisotropically positioned cellulose fibers, and tip growth, with inhomogeneous addition of new cell wall material at the tip of the structure. Cells are known to regulate these processes via molecular signals and the cytoskeleton. Mechanical stress has been proposed to provide an input to the positioning of the cellulose fibers via cortical microtubules in diffuse growth. In particular, a stress feedback model predicts a circumferential pattern of fibers surrounding apical tissues and growing primordia, guided by the anisotropic curvature in such tissues. In contrast, during the initiation of tip growing root hairs, a star-like radial pattern has recently been observed. Here, we use detailed finite element models to analyze how a change in mechanical properties at the root hair initiation site can lead to star-like stress patterns in order to understand whether a stress-based feedback model can also explain the microtubule patterns seen during root hair initiation. We show that two independent mechanisms, individually or combined, can be sufficient to generate radial patterns. In the first, new material is added locally at the position of the root hair. In the second, increased tension in the initiation area provides a mechanism. Finally, we describe how a molecular model of Rho-of-plant (ROP GTPases activation driven by auxin can position a patch of activated ROP protein basally along a 2D root epidermal cell plasma membrane, paving the way for models where mechanical and molecular mechanisms cooperate in the initial placement and outgrowth of root hairs.

  9. Early events in the pathogenesis of foot-and-mouth disease in pigs; identification of oropharyngeal tonsils as sites of primary and sustained viral replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Stenfeldt

    Full Text Available A time-course study was performed to elucidate the early events of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV infection in pigs subsequent to simulated natural, intra-oropharyngeal, inoculation. The earliest detectable event was primary infection in the lingual and paraepiglottic tonsils at 6 hours post inoculation (hpi characterized by regional localization of viral RNA, viral antigen, and infectious virus. At this time FMDV antigen was localized in cytokeratin-positive epithelial cells and CD172a-expressing leukocytes of the crypt epithelium of the paraepiglottic tonsils. De novo replication of FMDV was first detected in oropharyngeal swab samples at 12 hpi and viremia occurred at 18-24 hpi, approximately 24 hours prior to the appearance of vesicular lesions. From 12 through 78 hpi, microscopic detection of FMDV was consistently localized to cytokeratin-positive cells within morphologically characteristic segments of oropharyngeal tonsil crypt epithelium. During this period, leukocyte populations expressing CD172a, SLA-DQ class II and/or CD8 were found in close proximity to infected epithelial cells, but with little or no co-localization with viral proteins. Similarly, M-cells expressing cytokeratin-18 did not co-localize with FMDV proteins. Intra-epithelial micro-vesicles composed of acantholytic epithelial cells expressing large amounts of structural and non-structural FMDV proteins were present within crypts of the tonsil of the soft palate during peak clinical infection. These findings inculpate the paraepiglottic tonsils as the primary site of FMDV infection in pigs exposed via the gastrointestinal tract. Furthermore, the continuing replication of FMDV in the oropharyngeal tonsils during viremia and peak clinical infection with no concurrent amplification of virus occurring in the lower respiratory tract indicates that these sites are the major source of shedding of FMDV from pigs.

  10. Purified JC virus T antigen derived from insect cells preferentially interacts with binding site II of the viral core origin under replication conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollag, B; Mackeen, P C; Frisque, R J

    1996-04-01

    The human polyomavirus JC virus (JCV) establishes persistent, asymptomatic infections in most individuals, but in severely immunocompromised hosts it may cause the fatal demyelinating brain disease progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. In cell culture JCV multiplies inefficiently and exhibits a narrow host range. This restricted behavior occurs, in part, at the level of DNA replication, which is regulated by JCV's multifunctional large tumor protein (TAg). To prepare purified JCV TAg (JCT) for biochemical analyses, the recombinant baculovirus B-JCT was generated by cotransfection of insect cells with wild-type baculovirus and the vector pVL-JCT(Int-) containing the JCT-coding sequence downstream of the efficient polyhedrin promoter. JCT expressed in infected cells was immunoaffinity purified using the anti-JCT monoclonal antibody PAb 2000. Characterization of the viral oncoprotein indicated that it exists in solution as a mixture of monomeric and oligomeric species. With the addition of ATP, the population of monomers decreased and that of hexamers and double hexamers increased. A DNA mobility shift assay indicated that origin binding occurred primarily with the double-hexamer form. A comparison of the specific DNA-binding activities of JCT and SV40 TAg (SVT) revealed that JCT generally exhibited greater affinity for binding site II relative to binding site I (B.S. I) of both viral origin regions, whereas SVT preferentially bound B.S. I. Furthermore, JCT bound nonviral DNA more efficiently than did SVT. These functional differences between the two TAgs may contribute to the reduced DNA replication potential of JCV in vitro, and to the virus' ability to establish persistent infections in vivo.

  11. Chromatin replication and epigenome maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alabert, Constance; Groth, Anja

    2012-01-01

    Stability and function of eukaryotic genomes are closely linked to chromatin structure and organization. During cell division the entire genome must be accurately replicated and the chromatin landscape reproduced on new DNA. Chromatin and nuclear structure influence where and when DNA replication...... initiates, whereas the replication process itself disrupts chromatin and challenges established patterns of genome regulation. Specialized replication-coupled mechanisms assemble new DNA into chromatin, but epigenome maintenance is a continuous process taking place throughout the cell cycle. If DNA...

  12. Single-stranded annealing induced by re-initiation of replication origins provides a novel and efficient mechanism for generating copy number expansion via non-allelic homologous recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth J Finn

    Full Text Available Copy number expansions such as amplifications and duplications contribute to human phenotypic variation, promote molecular diversification during evolution, and drive the initiation and/or progression of various cancers. The mechanisms underlying these copy number changes are still incompletely understood, however. We recently demonstrated that transient, limited re-replication from a single origin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae efficiently induces segmental amplification of the re-replicated region. Structural analyses of such re-replication induced gene amplifications (RRIGA suggested that RRIGA could provide a new mechanism for generating copy number variation by non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR. Here we elucidate this new mechanism and provide insight into why it is so efficient. We establish that sequence homology is both necessary and sufficient for repetitive elements to participate in RRIGA and show that their recombination occurs by a single-strand annealing (SSA mechanism. We also find that re-replication forks are prone to breakage, accounting for the widespread DNA damage associated with deregulation of replication proteins. These breaks appear to stimulate NAHR between re-replicated repeat sequences flanking a re-initiating replication origin. Our results support a RRIGA model where the expansion of a re-replication bubble beyond flanking homologous sequences followed by breakage at both forks in trans provides an ideal structural context for SSA-mediated NAHR to form a head-to-tail duplication. Given the remarkable efficiency of RRIGA, we suggest it may be an unappreciated contributor to copy number expansions in both disease and evolution.

  13. Single-stranded annealing induced by re-initiation of replication origins provides a novel and efficient mechanism for generating copy number expansion via non-allelic homologous recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth J Finn

    Full Text Available Copy number expansions such as amplifications and duplications contribute to human phenotypic variation, promote molecular diversification during evolution, and drive the initiation and/or progression of various cancers. The mechanisms underlying these copy number changes are still incompletely understood, however. We recently demonstrated that transient, limited re-replication from a single origin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae efficiently induces segmental amplification of the re-replicated region. Structural analyses of such re-replication induced gene amplifications (RRIGA suggested that RRIGA could provide a new mechanism for generating copy number variation by non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR. Here we elucidate this new mechanism and provide insight into why it is so efficient. We establish that sequence homology is both necessary and sufficient for repetitive elements to participate in RRIGA and show that their recombination occurs by a single-strand annealing (SSA mechanism. We also find that re-replication forks are prone to breakage, accounting for the widespread DNA damage associated with deregulation of replication proteins. These breaks appear to stimulate NAHR between re-replicated repeat sequences flanking a re-initiating replication origin. Our results support a RRIGA model where the expansion of a re-replication bubble beyond flanking homologous sequences followed by breakage at both forks in trans provides an ideal structural context for SSA-mediated NAHR to form a head-to-tail duplication. Given the remarkable efficiency of RRIGA, we suggest it may be an unappreciated contributor to copy number expansions in both disease and evolution.

  14. Initiation and termination of DNA replication during S phase in relation to cyclins D1, E and A, p21WAF1, Cdt1 and the p12 subunit of DNA polymerase δ revealed in individual cells by cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Zhao, Hong; Zhang, Sufang; Lee, Marietta Y W T; Lee, Ernest Y C; Zhang, Zhongtao

    2015-05-20

    During our recent studies on mechanism of the regulation of human DNA polymerase δ in preparation for DNA replication or repair, multiparameter imaging cytometry as exemplified by laser scanning cytometry (LSC) has been used to assess changes in expression of the following nuclear proteins associated with initiation of DNA replication: cyclin A, PCNA, Ki-67, p21(WAF1), DNA replication factor Cdt1 and the smallest subunit of DNA polymerase δ, p12. In the present review, rather than focusing on Pol δ, we emphasize the application of LSC in these studies and outline possibilities offered by the concurrent differential analysis of DNA replication in conjunction with expression of the nuclear proteins. A more extensive analysis of the data on a correlation between rates of EdU incorporation, likely reporting DNA replication, and expression of these proteins, is presently provided. New data, specifically on the expression of cyclin D1 and cyclin E with respect to EdU incorporation as well as on a relationship between expression of cyclin A vs. p21(WAF1) and Ki-67 vs. Cdt1, are also reported. Of particular interest is the observation that this approach makes it possible to assess the temporal sequence of degradation of cyclin D1, p21(WAF1), Cdt1 and p12, each with respect to initiation of DNA replication and with respect to each other. Also the sequence or reappearance of these proteins in G2 after termination of DNA replication is assessed. The reviewed data provide a more comprehensive presentation of potential markers, whose presence or absence marks the DNA replicating cells. Discussed is also usefulness of these markers as indicators of proliferative activity in cancer tissues that may bear information on tumor progression and have a prognostic value.

  15. Site of initial diabetes education does not affect metabolic outcomes in children with T1DM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonyushkina, Ksenia N; Visintainer, Paul F; Jasinski, Christopher F; Wadzinski, Thomas L; Allen, Holley F

    2014-03-01

    To determine the difference in metabolic outcomes at 1 and 2 yr post type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) diagnosis in children depending on the site of initial diabetes education: inpatient, vs. outpatient, vs. mixed locations. A retrospective chart review was performed for all patients with new onset antibody positive T1DM, aged 1-18 yr old, diagnosed in 2004-2009, and followed for at least 1 yr in a diabetes program at a tertiary academic health care center. Patients were divided into three groups based on the site of initial diabetes education: inpatient, outpatient, and mixed locations. The primary outcome was A1c at 1 and 2 yr. We enrolled 238 children (133 boys), mean (± SD) age 9.9 (± 4.1). A1c levels did not differ among inpatient, outpatient, and mixed location groups at 1 and 2 yr post diagnosis (p = 0.85 and p = 0.69, respectively) and the long-acting insulin doses were similar at 1 and 2 yr (p = 0.18 and p = 0.15, respectively). There was no difference in the number of acute diabetes complications between the groups. At 1 yr, 21.8% of outpatient-educated children were on insulin pump therapy in contrast to 14.7% of inpatient and 2.7% of mixed educated groups (p = 0.04). Families of children with new onset T1DM can be successfully and safely educated in a clinic setting. An 'education' admission for a medically stable patient is not necessary most of the time, however, clinical judgment and careful assessment of the family's coping and learning capabilities are important when determining the site of education. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems: REFERENCE SITE INITIAL ASSESSMENT FOR A SALT DOME REPOSITORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harwell, M. A.; Brandstetter, A.; Benson, G. L.; Raymond, J. R.; Brandley, D. J.; Serne, R. J.; Soldat, J. K.; Cole, C. R.; Deutsch, W. J.; Gupta, S. K.; Harwell, C. C.; Napier, B. A.; Reisenauer, A. E.; Prater, L. S.; Simmons, C. S.; Strenge, D. L.; Washburn, J. F.; Zellmer, J. T.

    1982-06-01

    As a methodology demonstration for the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI), the Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program conducted an initial reference site analysis of the long-term effectiveness of a salt dome repository. The Hainesville Salt Dome in Texas was chosen to be representative of the Gulf Coast interior salt domes; however, the Hainesville Site has been eliminated as a possible nuclear waste repository site. The data used for this exercise are not adequate for an actual assessment, nor have all the parametric analyses been made that would adequately characterize the response of the geosystem surrounding the repository. Additionally, because this was the first exercise of the complete AEGIS and WASTE Rock Interaction Technology (WRIT) methodology, this report provides the initial opportunity for the methodology, specifically applied to a site, to be reviewed by the community outside the AEGIS. The scenario evaluation, as a part of the methodology demonstration, involved consideration of a large variety of potentially disruptive phenomena, which alone or in concert could lead to a breach in a salt dome repository and to a subsequent transport of the radionuclides to the environment. Without waste- and repository-induced effects, no plausible natural geologic events or processes which would compromise the repository integrity could be envisioned over the one-million-year time frame after closure. Near-field (waste- and repository-induced) effects were excluded from consideration in this analysis, but they can be added in future analyses when that methodology development is more complete. The potential for consequential human intrusion into salt domes within a million-year time frame led to the consideration of a solution mining intrusion scenario. The AEGIS staff developed a specific human intrusion scenario at 100 years and 1000 years post-closure, which is one of a whole suite of possible scenarios. This scenario

  17. Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems: REFERENCE SITE INITIAL ASSESSMENT FOR A SALT DOME REPOSITORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harwell, M. A.; Brandstetter, A.; Benson, G. L.; Bradley, D. J.; Serne, R. J.; Soldat, J. K; Cole, C. R.; Deutsch, W. J.; Gupta, S. K.; Harwell, C. C.; Napier, B. A.; Reisenauer, A. E.; Prater, L. S.; Simmons, C. S.; Strenge, D. L.; Washburn, J. F.; Zellmer, J. T.

    1982-06-01

    As a methodology demonstration for the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI), the Assessment of Effectiveness of Geologic Isolation Systems (AEGIS) Program conducted an initial reference site analysis of the long-term effectiveness of a salt dome repository. The Hainesville Salt Dome in Texas was chosen to be representative of the Gulf Coast interior salt domes; however, the Hainesville Site has been eliminated as a possible nuclear waste repository site. The data used for this exercise are not adequate for an actual assessment, nor have all the parametric analyses been made that would adequately characterize the response of the geosystem surrounding the repository. Additionally, because this was the first exercise of the complete AEGIS and WASTE Rock Interaction Technology (WRIT) methodology, this report provides the initial opportunity for the methodology, specifically applied to a site, to be reviewed by the community outside the AEGIS. The scenario evaluation, as a part of the methodology demonstration, involved consideration of a large variety of potentially disruptive phenomena, which alone or in concert could lead to a breach in a salt dome repository and to a subsequent transport of the radionuclides to the environment. Without waste- and repository-induced effects, no plausible natural geologic events or processes which would compromise the repository integrity could be envisioned over the one-million-year time frame after closure. Near-field (waste- and repository-induced) effects were excluded from consideration in this analysis, but they can be added in future analyses when that methodology development is more complete. The potential for consequential human intrusion into salt domes within a million-year time frame led to the consideration of a solution mining intrusion scenario. The AEGIS staff developed a specific human intrusion scenario at 100 years and 1000 years post-closure, which is one of a whole suite of possible scenarios. This scenario

  18. Cerebellum as Initial Site of Distant Metastasis from Papillary Carcinoma of Thyroid: Review of Three Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutahir A. Tunio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The cerebellum as initial site of distant metastasis from differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC including papillary (PTC and follicular thyroid carcinoma (FTC is rare manifestation. Case Presentations. Herein, we present three cases of cerebellar metastasis (CBM of PTC. Mean age of patients was 67 years (range: 64–72, and mean duration between initial diagnosis and CBM was 49.6 months (range: 37–61. Frequent location was left cerebellar hemisphere and was associated with hydrocephalus. All patients underwent suboccipital craniectomy, and in two patients postoperative intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT was given to deliver 5000 cGy in 25 fractions to residual lesions. Patient without postoperative IMRT had cerebellar recurrence along with lung and bone metastasis after 38 months. However, two patients were found alive and free of disease at the time of last follow-up. Conclusion. CBM from PTC is a rare clinical entity and is often associated with hydrocephalus. Histopathological diagnosis is important to initiate effective treatment, which relies on multidisciplinary approach to prolong the disease-free and overall survival rates.

  19. The Escherichia coli cryptic prophage protein YfdR binds to DnaA and initiation of chromosomal replication is inhibited by overexpression of the gene cluster yfdQ-yfdR-yfdS-yfdT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaunori eNoguchi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The initiation of bacterial chromosomal replication is regulated by multiple pathways. To explore novel regulators, we isolated multicopy suppressors for the cold-sensitive hda-185 ΔsfiA(sulA mutant. Hda is crucial for the negative regulation of the initiator DnaA and the hda-185 mutation causes severe replication overinitiation at the replication origin oriC. The SOS-associated division inhibitor SfiA inhibits FtsZ ring formation, an essential step for cell division during the SOS response, and ΔsfiA enhances the cold sensitivity of hda-185 cells in colony formation. One of the suppressors comprised the yfdQ-yfdR-yfdS-yfdT gene cluster carried on a cryptic prophage. Increased copy numbers of yfdQRT or yfdQRS inhibited not only hda-185-dependent overinitiation, but also replication overinitiation in a hyperactive dnaA mutant, and in a mutant lacking an oriC-binding initiation-inhibitor SeqA. In addition, increasing the copy number of the gene set inhibited the growth of cells bearing specific, initiation-impairing dnaA mutations. In wild-type cells, multicopy supply of yfdQRT or yfdQRS also inhibited replication initiation and increased hydroxyurea (HU-resistance, as seen in cells lacking DiaA, a stimulator of DnaA assembly on oriC. Deletion of the yfdQ-yfdR-yfdS-yfdT genes did not affect either HU resistance or initiation regulation. Furthermore, we found that DnaA bound specifically to YfdR in soluble protein extracts oversupplied with YfdQRST. Purified YfdR also bound to DnaA, and DnaA Phe46, an amino acid residue crucial for DnaA interactions with DiaA and DnaB replicative helicase was important for this interaction. Consistently, YfdR moderately inhibited DiaA-DnaA and DnaB-DnaA interactions. In addition, protein extracts oversupplied with YfdQRST inhibited replication initiation in vitro. Given the roles of yfdQ and yfdS in cell tolerance to specific environmental stresses, the yfdQ-yfdR-yfdS-yfdT genes might downregulate the initiator

  20. Neural Network Prediction of Translation Initiation Sites in Eukaryotes: Perspectives for EST and Genome analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Nielsen, Henrik

    1997-01-01

    Translation in eukaryotes does not always start at the first AUG in an mRNA, implying that context information also plays a role.This makes prediction of translation initiation sites a non-trivial task, especially when analysing EST and genome data where the entire mature mRNA sequence is not known...... and global sequence information. Furthermore, analysis of false predictions shows that AUGs in frame with the actual start codon are more frequently selected than out-of-frame AUGs, suggesting that our nteworks use reading frame detection. A number of conflicts between neural network predictions and database...... annotations are analysed in detail, leading to identification of possible database errors....

  1. Left Transperitoneal Adrenalectomy with a Laparoendoscopic Single-Site Surgery Combined Technique: Initial Case Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Sumino

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Laparoendoscopic single-site surgery (LESS is a step toward the development of minimally invasive surgery. It is initially difficult for surgeons with limited experience to perform the surgery. We describe two cases of left adrenalectomy with a LESS combined with the addition of an accessory port. After a 2.5-cm skin incision was made at the level of the paraumbilicus to insert the primary 12-mm trocar for the laparoscope, a 5-mm nonbladed trocar was placed through the skin incision side-by-side with the primary trocar. A second 3-mm nonbladed trocar was then placed along the anterior axillary line; a multichannel trocar was not used as a single port. Both adrenalectomies were completed successfully. In patients with a minor adrenal tumor, a combined technique using LESS and an additional port is easier than LESS alone and may, therefore, be a bridge between the conventional laparoscopic approach and LESS.

  2. U.S. Department of Energy's site screening, site selection, and initial characterization for storage of CO2 in deep geological formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodosta, T.D.; Litynski, J.T.; Plasynski, S.I.; Hickman, S.; Frailey, S.; Myer, L.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the lead Federal agency for the development and deployment of carbon sequestration technologies. As part of its mission to facilitate technology transfer and develop guidelines from lessons learned, DOE is developing a series of best practice manuals (BPMs) for carbon capture and storage (CCS). The "Site Screening, Site Selection, and Initial Characterization for Storage of CO2 in Deep Geological Formations" BPM is a compilation of best practices and includes flowchart diagrams illustrating the general decision making process for Site Screening, Site Selection, and Initial Characterization. The BPM integrates the knowledge gained from various programmatic efforts, with particular emphasis on the Characterization Phase through pilot-scale CO2 injection testing of the Validation Phase of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (RCSP) Initiative. Key geologic and surface elements that suitable candidate storage sites should possess are identified, along with example Site Screening, Site Selection, and Initial Characterization protocols for large-scale geologic storage projects located across diverse geologic and regional settings. This manual has been written as a working document, establishing a framework and methodology for proper site selection for CO2 geologic storage. This will be useful for future CO2 emitters, transporters, and storage providers. It will also be of use in informing local, regional, state, and national governmental agencies of best practices in proper sequestration site selection. Furthermore, it will educate the inquisitive general public on options and processes for geologic CO2 storage. In addition to providing best practices, the manual presents a geologic storage resource and capacity classification system. The system provides a "standard" to communicate storage and capacity estimates, uncertainty and project development risk, data guidelines and analyses for adequate site characterization, and

  3. Roles for Dam methylation in bacterial chromosome replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbon, Godefroid; Koch, Birgit; Skovgaard, Ole;

    GATC sequences in the DNA of Escherichia coli and related species are methylated at the adenine residue by DNA adenine methyltransferase (DamMT). These methylated residues and/or the level of DamMT influence initiation of chromosome replication from the replication origin, oriC, which contain...... an over-representation of GATC sites, in at least two ways. First, full methylation of oriC promotes duplex opening and hence certain oriC mutants are dependent on Dam methylation for initiation. Second, newly replicated and hemimethylated origins, are bound by SeqA (‘sequestered’) and remain inactive...... for initiation is not affected by additional SeqA whereas DnaA binding to sites outside the origin is inhibited by increased sequestration and/or hemimethylation....

  4. Chikungunya virus infectivity, RNA replication and non-structural polyprotein processing depend on the nsP2 protease’s active site cysteine residue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rausalu, Kai; Utt, Age; Quirin, Tania; Varghese, Finny S.; Žusinaite, Eva; Das, Pratyush Kumar; Ahola, Tero; Merits, Andres

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), genus Alphavirus, family Togaviridae, has a positive-stand RNA genome approximately 12 kb in length. In infected cells, the genome is translated into non-structural polyprotein P1234, an inactive precursor of the viral replicase, which is activated by cleavages carried out by the non-structural protease, nsP2. We have characterized CHIKV nsP2 using both cell-free and cell-based assays. First, we show that Cys478 residue in the active site of CHIKV nsP2 is indispensable for P1234 processing. Second, the substrate requirements of CHIKV nsP2 are quite similar to those of nsP2 of related Semliki Forest virus (SFV). Third, substitution of Ser482 residue, recently reported to contribute to the protease activity of nsP2, with Ala has almost no negative effect on the protease activity of CHIKV nsP2. Fourth, Cys478 to Ala as well as Trp479 to Ala mutations in nsP2 completely abolished RNA replication in CHIKV and SFV trans-replication systems. In contrast, trans-replicases with Ser482 to Ala mutation were similar to wild type counterparts. Fifth, Cys478 to Ala as well as Trp479 to Ala mutations in nsP2 abolished the rescue of infectious virus from CHIKV RNA transcripts while Ser482 to Ala mutation had no effect. Thus, CHIKV nsP2 is a cysteine protease. PMID:27845418

  5. Npro of classical swine fever virus contributes to pathogenicity in pigs by preventing type I interferon induction at local replication sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Tomokazu; Nagashima, Naofumi; Ruggli, Nicolas; Summerfield, Artur; Kida, Hiroshi; Sakoda, Yoshihiro

    2014-04-17

    Classical swine fever (CSF) caused by CSF virus (CSFV) is a highly contagious disease of pigs. The viral protein Npro of CSFV interferes with alpha- and beta-interferon (IFN-α/β) induction by promoting the degradation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). During the establishment of the live attenuated CSF vaccine strain GPE-, Npro acquired a mutation that abolished its capacity to bind and degrade IRF3, rendering it unable to prevent IFN-α/β induction. In a previous study, we showed that the GPE- vaccine virus became pathogenic after forced serial passages in pigs, which was attributed to the amino acid substitutions T830A in the viral proteins E2 and V2475A and A2563V in NS4B. Interestingly, during the re-adaptation of the GPE- vaccine virus in pigs, the IRF3-degrading function of Npro was not recovered. Therefore, we examined whether restoring the ability of Npro to block IFN-α/β induction of both the avirulent and moderately virulent GPE--derived virus would enhance pathogenicity in pigs. Viruses carrying the N136D substitution in Npro regained the ability to degrade IRF3 and suppress IFN-α/β induction in vitro. In pigs, functional Npro significantly reduced the local IFN-α mRNA expression in lymphoid organs while it increased quantities of IFN-α/β in the circulation, and enhanced pathogenicity of the moderately virulent virus. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that functional Npro influences the innate immune response at local sites of virus replication in pigs and contributes to pathogenicity of CSFV in synergy with viral replication.

  6. Database Replication

    CERN Document Server

    Kemme, Bettina

    2010-01-01

    Database replication is widely used for fault-tolerance, scalability and performance. The failure of one database replica does not stop the system from working as available replicas can take over the tasks of the failed replica. Scalability can be achieved by distributing the load across all replicas, and adding new replicas should the load increase. Finally, database replication can provide fast local access, even if clients are geographically distributed clients, if data copies are located close to clients. Despite its advantages, replication is not a straightforward technique to apply, and

  7. Comparative analysis of contextual bias around the translation initiation sites in plant genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Paras; Rangan, Latha; Ramesh, T Venkata; Gupta, Mudit

    2016-09-07

    Nucleotide distribution around translation initiation site (TIS) is thought to play an important role in determining translation efficiency. Kozak in vertebrates and later Joshi et al. in plants identified context sequence having a key role in translation efficiency, but a great variation regarding this context sequence has been observed among different taxa. The present study aims to refine the context sequence around initiation codon in plants and addresses the sampling error problem by using complete genomes of 7 monocots and 7 dicots separately. Besides positions -3 and +4, significant conservation at -2 and +5 positions was also found and nucleotide bias at the latter two positions was shown to directly influence translation efficiency in the taxon studied. About 1.8% (monocots) and 2.4% (dicots) of the total sequences fit the context sequence from positions -3 to +5, which might be indicative of lower number of housekeeping genes in the transcriptome. A three base periodicity was observed in 5' UTR and CDS of monocots and only in CDS of dicots as confirmed against random occurrence and annotation errors. Deterministic enrichment of GCNAUGGC in monocots, AANAUGGC in dicots and GCNAUGGC in plants around TIS was also established (where AUG denotes the start codon), which can serve as an arbiter of putative TIS with efficient translation in plants.

  8. TISs-ST: a web server to evaluate polymorphic translation initiation sites and their reflections on the secretory targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menossi Marcelo

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nucleotide sequence flanking the translation initiation codon (start codon context affects the translational efficiency of eukaryotic mRNAs, and may indicate the presence of an alternative translation initiation site (TIS to produce proteins with different properties. Multi-targeting may reflect the translational variability of these other protein forms. In this paper we present a web server that performs computations to investigate the usage of alternative translation initiation sites for the synthesis of new protein variants that might have different functions. Results An efficient web-based tool entitled TISs-ST (Translation Initiation Sites and Secretory Targets evaluates putative translation initiation sites and indicates the prediction of a signal peptide of the protein encoded from this site. The TISs-ST web server is freely available to both academic and commercial users and can be accessed at http://ipe.cbmeg.unicamp.br/pub/TISs-ST. Conclusion The program can be used to evaluate alternative translation initiation site consensus with user-specified sequences, based on their composition or on many position weight matrix models. TISs-ST provides analytical and visualization tools for evaluating the periodic frequency, the consensus pattern and the total information content of a sequence data set. A search option allows for the identification of signal peptides from predicted proteins using the PrediSi software.

  9. Rad3-Cds1 mediates coupling of initiation of meiotic recombination with DNA replication. Mei4-dependent transcription as a potential target of meiotic checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogino, Keiko; Masai, Hisao

    2006-01-20

    Premeiotic S-phase and meiotic recombination are known to be strictly coupled in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the checkpoint pathway regulating this coupling has been largely unknown. In fission yeast, Rad3 is known to play an essential role in coordination of DNA replication and cell division during both mitotic growth and meiosis. Here we have examined whether the Rad3 pathway also regulates the coupling of DNA synthesis and recombination. Inhibition of premeiotic S-phase with hydroxyurea completely abrogates the progression of meiosis, including the formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). DSB formation is restored in rad3 mutant even in the presence of hydroxyurea, although repair of DSBs does not take place or is significantly delayed, indicating that the subsequent recombination steps may be still inhibited. Examination of the roles of downstream checkpoint kinases reveals that Cds1, but not Chk1 or Mek1, is required for suppression of DSB in the presence of hydroxyurea. Transcriptional induction of some rec+ genes essential for DSB occurs at a normal timing and to a normal level in the absence of DNA synthesis in both the wild-type and cds1delta cells. On the other hand, the transcriptional induction of the mei4+ transcription factor and cdc25+ phosphatase, which is significantly suppressed by hydroxyurea in the wild-type cells, occurs almost to a normal level in cds1delta cells even in the presence of hydroxyurea. These results show that the Rad3-Cds1 checkpoint pathway coordinates initiation of meiotic recombination and meiotic cell divisions with premeiotic DNA synthesis. Because mei4+ is known to be required for DSB formation and cdc25+ is required for activation of meiotic cell divisions, we propose an intriguing possibility that the Rad3-Cds1 meiotic checkpoint pathway may target transcription of these factors.

  10. TbRGG2 facilitates kinetoplastid RNA editing initiation and progression past intrinsic pause sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammerman, Michelle L; Presnyak, Vladimir; Fisk, John C; Foda, Bardees M; Read, Laurie K

    2010-11-01

    TbRGG2 is an essential kinetoplastid RNA editing accessory factor that acts specifically on pan-edited RNAs. To understand the mechanism of TbRGG2 action, we undertook an in-depth analysis of edited RNA populations in TbRGG2 knockdown cells and an in vitro examination of the biochemical activities of the protein. We demonstrate that TbRGG2 down-regulation more severely impacts editing at the 5' ends of pan-edited RNAs than at their 3' ends. The initiation of editing is reduced to some extent in TbRGG2 knockdown cells. In addition, TbRGG2 plays a post-initiation role as editing becomes stalled in TbRGG2-depleted cells, resulting in an overall decrease in the 3' to 5' progression of editing. Detailed analyses of edited RNAs from wild-type and TbRGG2-depleted cells reveal that TbRGG2 facilitates progression of editing past intrinsic pause sites that often correspond to the 3' ends of cognate guide RNAs (gRNAs). In addition, noncanonically edited junction regions are either absent or significantly shortened in TbRGG2-depleted cells, consistent with impaired gRNA transitions. Sequence analysis further suggests that TbRGG2 facilitates complete utilization of certain gRNAs. In vitro RNA annealing and in vivo RNA unwinding assays demonstrate that TbRGG2 can modulate RNA-RNA interactions. Collectively, these data are consistent with a model in which TbRGG2 facilitates initiation and 3' to 5' progression of editing through its ability to affect gRNA utilization, both during the transition between specific gRNAs and during usage of certain gRNAs.

  11. Assessment of Site Specific Mutational Effect on Transcription Initiation at Escherichia coli Promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kannan

    2009-01-01

    extended promoter region also played a key role in regulation transcription initiation in JM109 strain of E. coli. Conclusion: The present study concluded that the site specific changed in the extended promoter regions, particularly the-17/-16 base pairs had greater influence in the transcription initiation in E. coli. Thus the promoter engineering study will definitely pave the way to do both, on or off the genetic switches in bacterial system according to our needs to produce high protein of interest or decrease or block the expression of a particular unwanted protein.

  12. Initial Experience with Electronic Tracking of Specific Tumor Sites in Men Undergoing Active Surveillance of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonn, Geoffrey A.; Filson, Christopher P.; Chang, Edward; Natarajan, Shyam; Margolis, Daniel J.; Macairan, Malu; Lieu, Patricia; Huang, Jiaoti; Dorey, Frederick J.; Reiter, Robert E.; Marks, Leonard S.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Targeted biopsy, using magnetic resonance (MR) – ultrasound (US) fusion, may allow tracking of specific cancer sites in the prostate. We aimed to evaluate initial use of the technique to follow tumor sites in men on active surveillance of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials Fifty-three men with prostate cancer (all T1c) underwent re-biopsy of 74 positive biopsy sites, which were tracked and targeted using the Artemis MR-US fusion device (Eigen, Grass Valley, CA, USA) from March 2010 through January 2013. The initial biopsy included 12 cores from a standard template (mapped by software) and directed biopsies from regions of interest seen on MRI. In the repeat biopsy, samples were taken from sites containing cancer at the initial biopsy. Outcomes of interest at second MR-US biopsy included (a) presence of any cancer and (b) presence of clinically significant cancer. Results All cancers on initial biopsy were either Gleason score 3+3=6 (N=63) or 3+4=7 (N=11). At initial biopsy, 23 cancers were within an MRI target, and 51 were found on systematic biopsy. Cancer detection rate on repeat biopsy (29/74, 39%) was independent of Gleason score on initial biopsy (p=NS) but directly related to initial cancer core length (CCL) (pbiopsies were positive. An increase of Gleason score was uncommon (9/74, 12%). Conclusions Monitoring of specific prostate cancer-containing sites may be achieved in some men using an electronic tracking system. The chances of finding tumor on repeat specific-site sampling was directly related to the length of tumor in the initial biopsy core and presence of tumor within an MRI target; upgrading of Gleason score was uncommon. Further research is required to evaluate the potential utility of site-specific biopsy tracking for prostate cancer patients on active surveillance. PMID:25027689

  13. Preliminary safety evaluation for the Laxemar subarea. Based on data and site descriptions after the initial site investigation stage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Johan [JA Streamflow AB, Aelvsjoe (Sweden)

    2006-03-15

    The main objectives of this Preliminary Safety Evaluation (PSE) of the Laxemar subarea have been to determine, with limited efforts, whether the feasibility study's judgement of the suitability of the candidate area with respect to long-term safety holds up in the light of the actual site investigation data; to provide feedback to continued site investigations and site-specific repository design and to identify site-specific scenarios and geoscientific issues for further analyses. The PSE focuses on comparing the attained knowledge of the sites with the suitability criteria as set out by SKB in 2000. These criteria both concern properties of the site judged to be necessary for safety and engineering (requirements) and properties judged to be beneficial (preferences). The findings are then evaluated in order to provide feedback to continued investigations and design work. The PSE does not aim at comparing sites and does not assess compliance with safety and radiation protection criteria. The latter is eventually done in coming Safety Assessments. This preliminary safety evaluation shows that, according to existing data, the Laxemar subarea meets all safety requirements. The evaluation also shows that the Laxemar subarea meets most of the safety preferences, but for some aspects of the site description further reduction of the uncertainties would enhance the safety case. Despite the stated concerns, there is no reason, from a safety point of view, not to continue the Site Investigations at the Laxemar subarea. There are uncertainties to resolve and the safety would eventually need to be verified through a proper safety assessment. Only some of the uncertainties noted in the Site Descriptive Model have safety implications and need further resolution for this reason. Furthermore, uncertainties may need resolving for other reasons, such as giving an adequate assurance of site understanding or assisting in optimising design. Notably, there are questions about the

  14. Eukaryotic DNA Replication Fork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgers, Peter M J; Kunkel, Thomas A

    2017-06-20

    This review focuses on the biogenesis and composition of the eukaryotic DNA replication fork, with an emphasis on the enzymes that synthesize DNA and repair discontinuities on the lagging strand of the replication fork. Physical and genetic methodologies aimed at understanding these processes are discussed. The preponderance of evidence supports a model in which DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε) carries out the bulk of leading strand DNA synthesis at an undisturbed replication fork. DNA polymerases α and δ carry out the initiation of Okazaki fragment synthesis and its elongation and maturation, respectively. This review also discusses alternative proposals, including cellular processes during which alternative forks may be utilized, and new biochemical studies with purified proteins that are aimed at reconstituting leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis separately and as an integrated replication fork.

  15. Oligo kernels for datamining on biological sequences: a case study on prokaryotic translation initiation sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merkl Rainer

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kernel-based learning algorithms are among the most advanced machine learning methods and have been successfully applied to a variety of sequence classification tasks within the field of bioinformatics. Conventional kernels utilized so far do not provide an easy interpretation of the learnt representations in terms of positional and compositional variability of the underlying biological signals. Results We propose a kernel-based approach to datamining on biological sequences. With our method it is possible to model and analyze positional variability of oligomers of any length in a natural way. On one hand this is achieved by mapping the sequences to an intuitive but high-dimensional feature space, well-suited for interpretation of the learnt models. On the other hand, by means of the kernel trick we can provide a general learning algorithm for that high-dimensional representation because all required statistics can be computed without performing an explicit feature space mapping of the sequences. By introducing a kernel parameter that controls the degree of position-dependency, our feature space representation can be tailored to the characteristics of the biological problem at hand. A regularized learning scheme enables application even to biological problems for which only small sets of example sequences are available. Our approach includes a visualization method for transparent representation of characteristic sequence features. Thereby importance of features can be measured in terms of discriminative strength with respect to classification of the underlying sequences. To demonstrate and validate our concept on a biochemically well-defined case, we analyze E. coli translation initiation sites in order to show that we can find biologically relevant signals. For that case, our results clearly show that the Shine-Dalgarno sequence is the most important signal upstream a start codon. The variability in position and composition

  16. Preliminary safety evaluation for the Simpevarp subarea. Based on data and site descriptions after the initial site investigation stage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-04-01

    The main objectives of this Preliminary safety evaluation (PSE) of the Simpevarp subarea are: to determine, whether the feasibility study's judgement of the suitability of the candidate area with respect to long-term safety holds up in the light of the site investigation data; to provide feedback to continued site investigations and site-specific repository design and to identify site specific scenarios and geoscientific issues for further analyses. The PSE focuses on comparing the attained knowledge of the sites with the suitability criteria as set out by SKB in the report SKB-TR--00-12. These criteria both concern properties of the site judged to be necessary for safety and engineering (requirements) and properties judged to be beneficial (preferences). The findings are then evaluated in order to provide feedback to continued investigations and design work. The PSE does not aim at comparing sites and does not assess compliance with safety and radiation protection criteria. The evaluation shows that even considering remaining uncertainties, the Simpevarp subarea meets all safety requirements and most of the safety preferences. Consequently, from a safety point of view, there is no reason not to continue the Site Investigations of the Simpevarp subarea. There are still uncertainties to resolve and the safety would eventually need to be verified through a full safety assessment. Still, this Preliminary Safety Evaluation demonstrates that it is likely that a safe repository for spent nuclear fuel of the KBS-3 type could be constructed at the site. The following feedback is provided to the site investigations and the associated site modelling: Reducing the uncertainty on the deformation zone geometry within the Simpevarp subarea would allow for a more specified layout, although the sensitivity analysis shows that the space needed is rather robust with respect to uncertainties in the zones. There is substantial uncertainty in the discrete fracture network (DFN

  17. Mapping replication dynamics in Trypanosoma brucei reveals a link with telomere transcription and antigenic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, Rebecca; Marques, Catarina A; Paape, Daniel; Prorocic, Marko; Zurita-Leal, Andrea C; Campbell, Samantha J; Lapsley, Craig; Dickens, Nicholas; McCulloch, Richard

    2016-05-26

    Survival of Trypanosoma brucei depends upon switches in its protective Variant Surface Glycoprotein (VSG) coat by antigenic variation. VSG switching occurs by frequent homologous recombination, which is thought to require locus-specific initiation. Here, we show that a RecQ helicase, RECQ2, acts to repair DNA breaks, including in the telomeric site of VSG expression. Despite this, RECQ2 loss does not impair antigenic variation, but causes increased VSG switching by recombination, arguing against models for VSG switch initiation through direct generation of a DNA double strand break (DSB). Indeed, we show DSBs inefficiently direct recombination in the VSG expression site. By mapping genome replication dynamics, we reveal that the transcribed VSG expression site is the only telomeric site that is early replicating - a differential timing only seen in mammal-infective parasites. Specific association between VSG transcription and replication timing reveals a model for antigenic variation based on replication-derived DNA fragility.

  18. iROS-gPseKNC: Predicting replication origin sites in DNA by incorporating dinucleotide position-specific propensity into general pseudo nucleotide composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xuan; Ye, Han-Xiao; Liu, Zi; Jia, Jian-Hua; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2016-01-01

    DNA replication, occurring in all living organisms and being the basis for biological inheritance, is the process of producing two identical replicas from one original DNA molecule. To in-depth understand such an important biological process and use it for developing new strategy against genetics diseases, the knowledge of duplication origin sites in DNA is indispensible. With the explosive growth of DNA sequences emerging in the postgenomic age, it is highly desired to develop high throughput tools to identify these regions purely based on the sequence information alone. In this paper, by incorporating the dinucleotide position-specific propensity information into the general pseudo nucleotide composition and using the random forest classifier, a new predictor called iROS-gPseKNC was proposed. Rigorously cross–validations have indicated that the proposed predictor is significantly better than the best existing method in sensitivity, specificity, overall accuracy, and stability. Furthermore, a user-friendly web-server for iROS-gPseKNC has been established at http://www.jci-bioinfo.cn/iROS-gPseKNC, by which users can easily get their desired results without the need to bother the complicated mathematics, which were presented just for the integrity of the methodology itself. PMID:27147572

  19. Initiating a participatory action research process in the Agincourt health and socio-demographic surveillance site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wariri, Oghenebrume; D'Ambruoso, Lucia; Twine, Rhian; Ngobeni, Sizzy; van der Merwe, Maria; Spies, Barry; Kahn, Kathleen; Tollman, Stephen; Wagner, Ryan G; Byass, Peter

    2017-06-01

    Despite progressive health policy, disease burdens in South Africa remain patterned by deeply entrenched social inequalities. Accounting for the relationships between context, health and risk can provide important information for equitable service delivery. The aims of the research were to initiate a participatory research process with communities in a low income setting and produce evidence of practical relevance. We initiated a participatory action research (PAR) process in the Agincourt health and socio-demographic surveillance site (HDSS) in rural north-east South Africa. Three village-based discussion groups were convened and consulted about conditions to examine, one of which was under-5 mortality. A series of discussions followed in which routine HDSS data were presented and participants' subjective perspectives were elicited and systematized into collective forms of knowledge using ranking, diagramming and participatory photography. The process concluded with a priority setting exercise. Visual and narrative data were thematically analyzed to complement the participants' analysis. A range of social and structural root causes of under-5 mortality were identified: poverty, unemployment, inadequate housing, unsafe environments and shortages of clean water. Despite these constraints, single mothers were often viewed as negligent. A series of mid-level contributory factors in clinics were also identified: overcrowding, poor staffing, delays in treatment and shortages of medications. In a similar sense, pronounced blame and negativity were directed toward clinic nurses in spite of the systems constraints identified. Actions to address these issues were prioritized as: expanding clinics, improving accountability and responsiveness of health workers, improving employment, providing clean water, and expanding community engagement for health promotion. We initiated a PAR process to gain local knowledge and prioritize actions. The process was acceptable to those

  20. Preliminary safety evaluation for the Forsmark area. Based on data and site descriptions after the initial site investigation stage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Johan [JA Streamflow AB, Aelvsjoe (Sweden)

    2005-08-01

    The main objectives of this Preliminary Safety Evaluation (PSE) of the Forsmark area have been to determine, with limited efforts, whether the feasibility study's judgement of the suitability of the candidate area with respect to long-term safety holds up in the light of the actual site investigation data; to provide feedback to continued site investigations and site-specific repository design and to identify site-specific scenarios and geoscientific issues for further analyses. The PSE focuses on comparing the attained knowledge of the sites with the suitability criteria as set out by SKB. The PSE does not aim at comparing sites and does not assess compliance with safety and radiation protection criteria. The evaluation shows that, even considering remaining uncertainties, the Forsmark area meets all stated safety requirements and preferences. Consequently, from a safety point of view, there is no reason not to continue the Site Investigations of the Forsmark area. There are still uncertainties to resolve and the safety would eventually need to be verified through a full safety assessment. Nevertheless, this Preliminary Safety Evaluation demonstrates that it is likely that a safe repository for spent nuclear fuel of the KBS-3 type could be constructed at the site. The following feedback is provided to the site investigations and the associated site modelling: Reducing the uncertainty on the deformation zone geometry inside the target area would be needed to more firmly define locations of the suitable deposition volumes. There is substantial uncertainty in the Discrete Fracture Network model. Further reduction of the uncertainties, if needed, would probably only be possible from the underground, detailed investigation phase. Efforts need also be spent on improving the DFN-modelling. There are assumptions made in current models that could be challenged and there seems to be room for better use of the borehole information. It is particularly important to

  1. Preliminary safety evaluation for the Forsmark area. Based on data and site descriptions after the initial site investigation stage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Johan [JA Streamflow AB, Aelvsjoe (Sweden)

    2005-08-01

    The main objectives of this Preliminary Safety Evaluation (PSE) of the Forsmark area have been to determine, with limited efforts, whether the feasibility study's judgement of the suitability of the candidate area with respect to long-term safety holds up in the light of the actual site investigation data; to provide feedback to continued site investigations and site-specific repository design and to identify site-specific scenarios and geoscientific issues for further analyses. The PSE focuses on comparing the attained knowledge of the sites with the suitability criteria as set out by SKB. The PSE does not aim at comparing sites and does not assess compliance with safety and radiation protection criteria. The evaluation shows that, even considering remaining uncertainties, the Forsmark area meets all stated safety requirements and preferences. Consequently, from a safety point of view, there is no reason not to continue the Site Investigations of the Forsmark area. There are still uncertainties to resolve and the safety would eventually need to be verified through a full safety assessment. Nevertheless, this Preliminary Safety Evaluation demonstrates that it is likely that a safe repository for spent nuclear fuel of the KBS-3 type could be constructed at the site. The following feedback is provided to the site investigations and the associated site modelling: Reducing the uncertainty on the deformation zone geometry inside the target area would be needed to more firmly define locations of the suitable deposition volumes. There is substantial uncertainty in the Discrete Fracture Network model. Further reduction of the uncertainties, if needed, would probably only be possible from the underground, detailed investigation phase. Efforts need also be spent on improving the DFN-modelling. There are assumptions made in current models that could be challenged and there seems to be room for better use of the borehole information. It is particularly important to

  2. Core Promoter Plasticity Between Maize Tissues and Genotypes Contrasts with Predominance of Sharp Transcription Initiation Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía-Guerra, María Katherine; Li, Wei; Galeano, Narmer F; Vidal, Mabel; Gray, John; Doseff, Andrea I; Grotewold, Erich

    2015-12-01

    Core promoters are crucial for gene regulation, providing blueprints for the assembly of transcriptional machinery at transcription start sites (TSSs). Empirically, TSSs define the coordinates of core promoters and other regulatory sequences. Thus, experimental TSS identification provides an essential step in the characterization of promoters and their features. Here, we describe the application of CAGE (cap analysis of gene expression) to identify genome-wide TSSs used in root and shoot tissues of two maize (Zea mays) inbred lines (B73 and Mo17). Our studies indicate that most TSS clusters are sharp in maize, similar to mice, but distinct from Arabidopsis thaliana, Drosophila melanogaster, or zebra fish, in which a majority of genes have broad-shaped TSS clusters. We established that ∼38% of maize promoters are characterized by a broader TATA-motif consensus, and this motif is significantly enriched in genes with sharp TSSs. A noteworthy plasticity in TSS usage between tissues and inbreds was uncovered, with ∼1500 genes showing significantly different dominant TSSs, sometimes affecting protein sequence by providing alternate translation initiation codons. We experimentally characterized instances in which this differential TSS utilization results in protein isoforms with additional domains or targeted to distinct subcellular compartments. These results provide important insights into TSS selection and gene expression in an agronomically important crop.

  3. Uterine cervical cancer with brain metastasis as the initial site of presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yumi; Tanaka, Kei; Kobayashi, Yoichi; Shibuya, Hiromi; Nishigaya, Yoshiko; Momomura, Mai; Matsumoto, Hironori; Iwashita, Mitsutoshi

    2015-07-01

    Brain metastasis from uterine cervical cancer is rare, with an incidence of 0.5%, and usually occurs late in the course of the disease. We report a case of uterine cervical cancer with brain metastasis as the initial site of presentation. A 50-year-old woman with headache, vertigo, amnesia and loss of appetite was admitted for persistent vomiting. Contrast enhanced computed tomography showed a solitary right frontal cerebral lesion with ring enhancement and uterine cervical tumor. She was diagnosed with uterine cervical squamous cell carcinoma with parametrium invasion and no other distant affected organs were detected. The cerebral lesion was surgically removed and pathologically proved to be metastasis of uterine cervical squamous cell carcinoma. The patient underwent concurrent chemoradiotherapy, followed by cerebral radiation therapy, but multiple metastases to the liver and lung developed and the patient died 7 months after diagnosis of brain metastasis. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2015 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  4. Succession on regraded placer mine spoil in Alaska, USA, in relation to initial site characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Densmore, R.V.

    1994-01-01

    This study evaluated the rate and pattern of natural succession on regraded placer mine spoil in relation to initial substrate characteristics. The study site was the Glen Creek watershed of the Kantishna mining area of Denali National Park and Preserve, Alaska. After regrading, twelve 0.01-ha plots were established and substrate characteristics were measured. Natural plant succession was evaluated after five growing seasons. Three successional patterns were identified on the basis of plant community characteristics using cluster analysis, and were related to substrate characteristics. First, a riparian plant community with vigorous Salix alaxensis and Alnus crispa grew rapidly on topsoil that had been spread over the regraded spoil. Second, a similar plant community with less vigorous S. alaxensis developed more slowly on unprocessed spoil and spoil amended with a small amount of topsoil. Third, processed spoil remained almost bare of vegetation, although S. alaxensis was able to establish and persist in a stunted growth form. In contrast, Alnus crispa had difficulty establishing on processed spoil, but the few established seedlings grew well. Several substrate variables, including the proportion of silt and clay vs. sand, total nitrogen, and water retention capacity, were good predictors of the rate and pattern of succession. Total nitrogen was the best single predictor for the number of vigorous S. alaxensis.

  5. Abiotic self-replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Adam J; Ellefson, Jared W; Ellington, Andrew D

    2012-12-18

    The key to the origins of life is the replication of information. Linear polymers such as nucleic acids that both carry information and can be replicated are currently what we consider to be the basis of living systems. However, these two properties are not necessarily coupled. The ability to mutate in a discrete or quantized way, without frequent reversion, may be an additional requirement for Darwinian evolution, in which case the notion that Darwinian evolution defines life may be less of a tautology than previously thought. In this Account, we examine a variety of in vitro systems of increasing complexity, from simple chemical replicators up to complex systems based on in vitro transcription and translation. Comparing and contrasting these systems provides an interesting window onto the molecular origins of life. For nucleic acids, the story likely begins with simple chemical replication, perhaps of the form A + B → T, in which T serves as a template for the joining of A and B. Molecular variants capable of faster replication would come to dominate a population, and the development of cycles in which templates could foster one another's replication would have led to increasingly complex replicators and from thence to the initial genomes. The initial genomes may have been propagated by RNA replicases, ribozymes capable of joining oligonucleotides and eventually polymerizing mononucleotide substrates. As ribozymes were added to the genome to fill gaps in the chemistry necessary for replication, the backbone of a putative RNA world would have emerged. It is likely that such replicators would have been plagued by molecular parasites, which would have been passively replicated by the RNA world machinery without contributing to it. These molecular parasites would have been a major driver for the development of compartmentalization/cellularization, as more robust compartments could have outcompeted parasite-ridden compartments. The eventual outsourcing of metabolic

  6. Kinetochores coordinate pericentromeric cohesion and early DNA replication by Cdc7-Dbf4 kinase recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsume, Toyoaki; Müller, Carolin A; Katou, Yuki; Retkute, Renata; Gierliński, Marek; Araki, Hiroyuki; Blow, J Julian; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Nieduszynski, Conrad A; Tanaka, Tomoyuki U

    2013-06-01

    Centromeres play several important roles in ensuring proper chromosome segregation. Not only do they promote kinetochore assembly for microtubule attachment, but they also support robust sister chromatid cohesion at pericentromeres and facilitate replication of centromeric DNA early in S phase. However, it is still elusive how centromeres orchestrate all these functions at the same site. Here, we show that the budding yeast Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK) accumulates at kinetochores in telophase, facilitated by the Ctf19 kinetochore complex. This promptly recruits Sld3-Sld7 replication initiator proteins to pericentromeric replication origins so that they initiate replication early in S phase. Furthermore, DDK at kinetochores independently recruits the Scc2-Scc4 cohesin loader to centromeres in G1 phase. This enhances cohesin loading and facilitates robust pericentromeric cohesion in S phase. Thus, we have found the central mechanism by which kinetochores orchestrate early S phase DNA replication and robust sister chromatid cohesion at microtubule attachment sites.

  7. INITIAL SINGLE SHELL TANK (SST) SYSTEM PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT OF THE HANFORD SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JARAYSI, M.N.

    2007-01-08

    The ''Initial Single-Shell Tank System Performance Assessment for the Hanford Site [1] (SST PA) presents the analysis of the long-term impacts of residual wastes assumed to remain after retrieval of tank waste and closure of the SST farms at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site. The SST PA supports key elements of the closure process agreed upon in 2004 by DOE, the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The SST PA element is defined in Appendix I of the ''Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (HFFACO) (Ecology et al. 1989) [2], the document that establishes the overall closure process for the SST and double-shell tank (DST) systems. The approach incorporated in the SST PA integrates substantive features of both hazardous and radioactive waste management regulations into a single analysis. The defense-in-depth approach used in this analysis defined two major engineering barriers (a surface barrier and the grouted tank structure) and one natural barrier (the vadose zone) that will be relied on to control waste release into the accessible environment and attain expected performance metrics. The analysis evaluates specific barrier characteristics and other site features that influence contaminant migration by the various pathways. A ''reference'' case and a suite of sensitivity/uncertainty cases are considered. The ''reference case'' evaluates environmental impacts assuming central tendency estimates of site conditions. ''Reference'' case analysis results show residual tank waste impacts on nearby groundwater, air resources; or inadvertent intruders to be well below most important performance objectives. Conversely, past releases to the soil, from previous tank farm operations, are shown to have groundwater impacts that re significantly above most performance objectives. Sensitivity

  8. Establishing a health demographic surveillance site in Bhaktapur district, Nepal: initial experiences and findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aryal Umesh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A health demographic surveillance system (HDSS provides longitudinal data regarding health and demography in countries with coverage error and poor quality data on vital registration systems due to lack of public awareness, inadequate legal basis and limited use of data in health planning. The health system in Nepal, a low-income country, does not focus primarily on health registration, and does not conduct regular health data collection. This study aimed to initiate and establish the first HDSS in Nepal. Results We conducted a baseline survey in Jhaukhel and Duwakot, two villages in Bhaktapur district. The study surveyed 2,712 households comprising a total population of 13,669. The sex ratio in the study area was 101 males per 100 females and the average household size was 5. The crude birth and death rates were 9.7 and 3.9/1,000 population/year, respectively. About 11% of births occurred at home, and we found no mortality in infants and children less than 5 years of age. Various health problems were found commonly and some of them include respiratory problems (41.9%; headache, vertigo and dizziness (16.7%; bone and joint pain (14.4%; gastrointestinal problems (13.9%; heart disease, including hypertension (8.8%; accidents and injuries (2.9%; and diabetes mellitus (2.6%. The prevalence of non-communicable disease (NCD was 4.3% (95% CI: 3.83; 4.86 among individuals older than 30 years. Age-adjusted odds ratios showed that risk factors, such as sex, ethnic group, occupation and education, associated with NCD. Conclusion Our baseline survey demonstrated that it is possible to collect accurate and reliable data in a village setting in Nepal, and this study successfully established an HDSS site. We determined that both maternal and child health are better in the surveillance site compared to the entire country. Risk factors associated with NCDs dominated morbidity and mortality patterns.

  9. Modeling inhomogeneous DNA replication kinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel G Gauthier

    Full Text Available In eukaryotic organisms, DNA replication is initiated at a series of chromosomal locations called origins, where replication forks are assembled proceeding bidirectionally to replicate the genome. The distribution and firing rate of these origins, in conjunction with the velocity at which forks progress, dictate the program of the replication process. Previous attempts at modeling DNA replication in eukaryotes have focused on cases where the firing rate and the velocity of replication forks are homogeneous, or uniform, across the genome. However, it is now known that there are large variations in origin activity along the genome and variations in fork velocities can also take place. Here, we generalize previous approaches to modeling replication, to allow for arbitrary spatial variation of initiation rates and fork velocities. We derive rate equations for left- and right-moving forks and for replication probability over time that can be solved numerically to obtain the mean-field replication program. This method accurately reproduces the results of DNA replication simulation. We also successfully adapted our approach to the inverse problem of fitting measurements of DNA replication performed on single DNA molecules. Since such measurements are performed on specified portion of the genome, the examined DNA molecules may be replicated by forks that originate either within the studied molecule or outside of it. This problem was solved by using an effective flux of incoming replication forks at the model boundaries to represent the origin activity outside the studied region. Using this approach, we show that reliable inferences can be made about the replication of specific portions of the genome even if the amount of data that can be obtained from single-molecule experiments is generally limited.

  10. Hepatitis B virus replication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Hepadnaviruses, including human hepatitis B virus (HBV), replicate through reverse transcription of an RNA intermediate, the pregenomic RNA (pgRNA). Despite this kinship to retroviruses, there are fundamental differences beyond the fact that hepadnavirions contain DNA instead of RNA. Most peculiar is the initiation of reverse transcription: it occurs by protein-priming, is strictly committed to using an RNA hairpin on the pgRNA,ε, as template, and depends on cellular chaperones;moreover, proper replication can apparently occur only in the specialized environment of intact nucleocapsids.This complexity has hampered an in-depth mechanistic understanding. The recent successful reconstitution in the test tube of active replication initiation complexes from purified components, for duck HBV (DHBV),now allows for the analysis of the biochemistry of hepadnaviral replication at the molecular level. Here we review the current state of knowledge at all steps of the hepadnaviral genome replication cycle, with emphasis on new insights that turned up by the use of such cellfree systems. At this time, they can, unfortunately,not be complemented by three-dimensional structural information on the involved components. However, at least for the s RNA element such information is emerging,raising expectations that combining biophysics with biochemistry and genetics will soon provide a powerful integrated approach for solving the many outstanding questions. The ultimate, though most challenging goal,will be to visualize the hepadnaviral reverse transcriptase in the act of synthesizing DNA, which will also have strong implications for drug development.

  11. Genetic Algorithms for Models Optimization for Recognition of Translation Initiation Sites

    KAUST Repository

    Mora, Arturo Magana

    2011-06-01

    This work uses genetic algorithms (GA) to reduce the complexity of the artificial neural networks (ANNs) and decision trees (DTs) for the accurate recognition of translation initiation sites (TISs) in Arabidopsis Thaliana. The Arabidopsis data was extracted directly from genomic DNA sequences. Methods derived in this work resulted in both reduced complexity of the predictors, as well as in improvement in prediction accuracy (generalization). Optimization through use of GA is generally a computationally intensive task. One of the approaches to overcome this problem is to use parallelization of code that implements GA, thus allowing computation on multiprocessing infrastructure. However, further improvement in performance GA implementation could be achieved through modification done to GA basic operations such as selection, crossover and mutation. In this work we explored two such improvements, namely evolutive mutation and GA-Simplex crossover operation. In this thesis we studied the benefit of these modifications on the problem of TISs recognition. Compared to the non-modified GA approach, we reduced the number of weights in the resulting model\\'s neural network component by 51% and the number of nodes in the model\\'s DTs component by 97% whilst improving the model\\'s accuracy at the same time. Separately, we developed another methodology for reducing the complexity of prediction models by optimizing the composition of training data subsets in bootstrap aggregation (bagging) methodology. This optimization is achieved by applying a new GA-based bagging methodology in order to optimize the composition of each of the training data subsets. This approach has shown in our test cases to considerably enhance the accuracy of the TIS prediction model compared to the original bagging methodology. Although these methods are applied to the problem of accurate prediction of TISs we believe that these methodologies have a potential for wider scope of application.

  12. PreTIS: A Tool to Predict Non-canonical 5’ UTR Translational Initiation Sites in Human and Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Kerstin; Helms, Volkhard

    2016-01-01

    Translation of mRNA sequences into proteins typically starts at an AUG triplet. In rare cases, translation may also start at alternative non–AUG codons located in the annotated 5’ UTR which leads to an increased regulatory complexity. Since ribosome profiling detects translational start sites at the nucleotide level, the properties of these start sites can then be used for the statistical evaluation of functional open reading frames. We developed a linear regression approach to predict in–frame and out–of–frame translational start sites within the 5’ UTR from mRNA sequence information together with their translation initiation confidence. Predicted start codons comprise AUG as well as near–cognate codons. The underlying datasets are based on published translational start sites for human HEK293 and mouse embryonic stem cells that were derived by the original authors from ribosome profiling data. The average prediction accuracy of true vs. false start sites for HEK293 cells was 80%. When applied to mouse mRNA sequences, the same model predicted translation initiation sites observed in mouse ES cells with an accuracy of 76%. Moreover, we illustrate the effect of in silico mutations in the flanking sequence context of a start site on the predicted initiation confidence. Our new webservice PreTIS visualizes alternative start sites and their respective ORFs and predicts their ability to initiate translation. Solely, the mRNA sequence is required as input. PreTIS is accessible at http://service.bioinformatik.uni-saarland.de/pretis. PMID:27768687

  13. How Xenopus laevis embryos replicate reliably: investigating the random-completion problem

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Scott Cheng-Hsin

    2008-01-01

    DNA synthesis in \\textit{Xenopus} frog embryos initiates stochastically in time at many sites (origins) along the chromosome. Stochastic initiation implies fluctuations in the time to complete and may lead to cell death if replication takes longer than the cell cycle time ($\\approx 25$ min). Surprisingly, although the typical replication time is about 20 min, \\textit{in vivo} experiments show that replication fails to complete only about 1 in 300 times. How is replication timing accurately controlled despite the stochasticity? Biologists have proposed two solutions to this "random-completion problem." The first solution uses randomly located origins but increases their rate of initiation as S phase proceeds, while the second uses regularly spaced origins. In this paper, we investigate the random-completion problem using a type of model first developed to describe the kinetics of first-order phase transitions. Using methods from the field of extreme-value statistics, we derive the distribution of replication-c...

  14. Psychology, replication & beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, Keith R

    2016-06-01

    Modern psychology is apparently in crisis and the prevailing view is that this partly reflects an inability to replicate past findings. If a crisis does exists, then it is some kind of 'chronic' crisis, as psychologists have been censuring themselves over replicability for decades. While the debate in psychology is not new, the lack of progress across the decades is disappointing. Recently though, we have seen a veritable surfeit of debate alongside multiple orchestrated and well-publicised replication initiatives. The spotlight is being shone on certain areas and although not everyone agrees on how we should interpret the outcomes, the debate is happening and impassioned. The issue of reproducibility occupies a central place in our whig history of psychology.

  15. Site-directed mutagenesis of HIV-1 vpu gene demonstrates two clusters of replication-defective mutants with distinct ability to down-modulate cell surface CD4 and tetherin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masako Nomaguchi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 Vpu acts positively on viral infectivity by mediating CD4 degradation in endoplasmic reticulum and enhances virion release by counteracting a virion release restriction factor, tetherin. In order to define the impact of Vpu activity on HIV-1 replication, we have generated a series of site-specific proviral vpu mutants. Of fifteen mutants examined, seven exhibited a replication-defect similar to that of a vpu-deletion mutant in a lymphocyte cell line H9. These mutations clustered in narrow regions within transmembrane domain (TMD and cytoplasmic domain (CTD. Replication-defective mutants displayed the reduced ability to enhance virion release from a monolayer cell line HEp2 without exception. Upon transfection with Vpu expression vectors, neither TMD mutants nor CTD mutants blocked CD4 expression at the cell surface in another monolayer cell line MAGI. While TMD mutants were unable to down-modulate cell surface tetherin in HEp2 cells, CTD mutants did quite efficiently. Confocal microscopy analysis revealed the difference of intracellular localization between TMD and CTD mutants. In total, replication capability of HIV-1 carrying vpu mutations correlates well with the ability of Vpu to enhance virion release and to impede the cell surface expression of CD4 but not with the ability to down-modulate cell surface tetherin. Our results here suggest that efficient viral replication requires not only down-regulation of cell surface tetherin but also its degradation.

  16. Selection and mapping of replication origins from a 500-kb region of the human X chromosome and their relationship to gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivella, S; Palermo, B; Pelizon, C; Sala, C; Arrigo, G; Toniolo, D

    1999-11-15

    In higher eukaryotes the mechanism controlling initiation of DNA replication remains largely unknown. New technologies are needed to shed light on how DNA replication initiates along the genome in specific regions. To identify the human DNA sequence requirements for initiation of replication, we developed a new method that allows selection of replication origins starting from large genomic regions of human DNA. We repeatedly isolated 15 new putative replication origins (PROs) from a human DNA region of 500 kb in which 17 genes have previously been characterized. Fine-mapping of these PROs showed that DNA replication can initiate at many specific points along actively transcribed DNA in the cell lines used for our selection. In conclusion, in this paper we describe a new method to identify PROs that suggests that the availability of initiation sites is dependent on the transcriptional state of the DNA.

  17. Study of New Youth Initiatives in Apprenticeship. Interim Report. Volume 2: Site Visit Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CSR, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This second volume of the interim report provides detailed case study reports on each of the eight Youth Apprenticeship Projects. (Volume 1, an overview of data from the site visits, is available separately as CE 032 791.) Discussion areas covered in each site visit report are local context/operational environment, administrative information,…

  18. TECHNICAL APPROACHES TO CHARACTERIZING AND CLEANING UP IRON AND STEEL MILL SITES UNDER THE BROWNFIELDS INITIATIVE

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document provides brownfields planners with an overview of the technical methods that can be used to achieve successful site assessment and cleanup which are two key components of the brownfields redevelopment process. No two brownfields sites are identical and planners will...

  19. Initial success of native grasses is contingent on multiple interactions among exotic grass competition, temporal priority, rainfall and site effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Truman P.; Zefferman, Emily P.; Vaughn, Kurt J.; Fick, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Ecological communities are increasingly being recognized as the products of contemporary drivers and historical legacies that are both biotic and abiotic. In an attempt to unravel multiple layers of ecological contingency, we manipulated (i) competition with exotic annual grasses, (ii) the timing of this competition (temporal priority in arrival/seeding times) and (iii) watering (simulated rainfall) in a restoration-style planting of native perennial grasses. In addition, we replicated this experiment simultaneously at three sites in north-central California. Native perennial grasses had 73–99 % less cover when planted with exotic annuals than when planted alone, but this reduction was greatly ameliorated by planting the natives 2 weeks prior to the exotics. In a drought year, irrigation significantly reduced benefits of early planting so that these benefits resembled those observed in a non-drought year. There were significant differences across the three sites (site effects and interactions) in (i) overall native cover, (ii) the response of natives to competition, (iii) the strength of the temporal priority effect and (iv) the degree to which supplemental watering reduced priority effects. These results reveal the strong multi-layered contingency that underlies even relatively simple communities. PMID:25480888

  20. Initial success of native grasses is contingent on multiple interactions among exotic grass competition, temporal priority, rainfall and site effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Truman P; Zefferman, Emily P; Vaughn, Kurt J; Fick, Stephen

    2014-12-05

    Ecological communities are increasingly being recognized as the products of contemporary drivers and historical legacies that are both biotic and abiotic. In an attempt to unravel multiple layers of ecological contingency, we manipulated (i) competition with exotic annual grasses, (ii) the timing of this competition (temporal priority in arrival/seeding times) and (iii) watering (simulated rainfall) in a restoration-style planting of native perennial grasses. In addition, we replicated this experiment simultaneously at three sites in north-central California. Native perennial grasses had 73-99 % less cover when planted with exotic annuals than when planted alone, but this reduction was greatly ameliorated by planting the natives 2 weeks prior to the exotics. In a drought year, irrigation significantly reduced benefits of early planting so that these benefits resembled those observed in a non-drought year. There were significant differences across the three sites (site effects and interactions) in (i) overall native cover, (ii) the response of natives to competition, (iii) the strength of the temporal priority effect and (iv) the degree to which supplemental watering reduced priority effects. These results reveal the strong multi-layered contingency that underlies even relatively simple communities.

  1. Dynamics of Escherichia coli Chromosome Segregation during Multifork Replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Jørck; Youngren, Brenda; Hansen, Flemming G.

    2007-01-01

    Slowly growing Escherichia coli cells have a simple cell cycle, with replication and progressive segregation of the chromosome completed before cell division. In rapidly growing cells, initiation of replication occurs before the previous replication rounds are complete. At cell division...

  2. An Initial Evaluation of Siting Considerations on Current and Future Wind Deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tegen, Suzanne [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lantz, Eric [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Mai, Trieu [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Heimiller, Donna [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hand, Maureen [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ibanez, Eduardo [GE Energy Consulting, Denver, CO (United States)

    2016-07-01

    This report provides a deeper understanding of the wind project development process, from desktop studies to a successful project in the ground. It examines three siting consideration categories that wind project sponsors must include in the development process: wildlife (species that live in, near, or migrate through the area where wind development is possible), radar (wind turbines can cause interference with radar signals), and public engagement (representing communities and stakeholders who live near wind power projects). The research shows that although this country's abundant wind resource provides numerous options for addressing siting considerations, actually siting individual projects is becoming more difficult because of regulatory and other uncertainties. Model results are based on the premise that developers will be able to site, permit, and build successful projects, which is not always the case in reality.

  3. Replication Termination: Containing Fork Fusion-Mediated Pathologies in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juachi U. Dimude

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Duplication of bacterial chromosomes is initiated via the assembly of two replication forks at a single defined origin. Forks proceed bi-directionally until they fuse in a specialised termination area opposite the origin. This area is flanked by polar replication fork pause sites that allow forks to enter but not to leave. The precise function of this replication fork trap has remained enigmatic, as no obvious phenotypes have been associated with its inactivation. However, the fork trap becomes a serious problem to cells if the second fork is stalled at an impediment, as replication cannot be completed, suggesting that a significant evolutionary advantage for maintaining this chromosomal arrangement must exist. Recently, we demonstrated that head-on fusion of replication forks can trigger over-replication of the chromosome. This over-replication is normally prevented by a number of proteins including RecG helicase and 3’ exonucleases. However, even in the absence of these proteins it can be safely contained within the replication fork trap, highlighting that multiple systems might be involved in coordinating replication fork fusions. Here, we discuss whether considering the problems associated with head-on replication fork fusion events helps us to better understand the important role of the replication fork trap in cellular metabolism.

  4. Factors Related to Initiating Interpersonal Contacts on Internet Dating Sites: A View From the Social Exchange Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivka Shtatfeld

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to identify factors that influence dating-site users to initiate contact with potential romantic partners. The study was carried out by observing online behaviors and analyzing the profiles and authentic messages of these users (N = 106 over seven months. Contacts made by and with the research participants were analyzed in terms of the relationships between initiators‘ and receivers‘ demographic variables (marital status, age, level of education, income, writing skills, and stated physical appearance. In addition, the relationship between contacting partners and site accessibility was examined. The findings revealed that dating-site users initiated contact primarily with those having a similar marital status or slightly better characteristics (income, education, writing skills. In regard to writing skills, it was found that skilled writers attracted more contacts than did less skilled writers. However, the factor that was found to be most significantly related to initiating contact was the length of time that elapsed from last connection to the site, which implies the perceived accessibility of potential romantic partners. The findings were explained in terms of the Social Exchange Theory: people are attracted to those who grant them rewards.

  5. Genome-wide studies highlight indirect links between human replication origins and gene regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadoret, Jean-Charles; Meisch, Françoise; Hassan-Zadeh, Vahideh; Luyten, Isabelle; Guillet, Claire; Duret, Laurent; Quesneville, Hadi; Prioleau, Marie-Noëlle

    2008-10-14

    To get insights into the regulation of replication initiation, we systematically mapped replication origins along 1% of the human genome in HeLa cells. We identified 283 origins, 10 times more than previously known. Origin density is strongly correlated with genomic landscapes, with clusters of closely spaced origins in GC-rich regions and no origins in large GC-poor regions. Origin sequences are evolutionarily conserved, and half of them map within or near CpG islands. Most of the origins overlap transcriptional regulatory elements, providing further evidence of a connection with gene regulation. Moreover, we identify c-JUN and c-FOS as important regulators of origin selection. Half of the identified replication initiation sites do not have an open chromatin configuration, showing the absence of a direct link with gene regulation. Replication timing analyses coupled with our origin mapping suggest that a relatively strict origin-timing program regulates the replication of the human genome.

  6. Initial Experience of Laparoendoscopic Single-Site Radical Prostatectomy Requiring Well-Equipped Appliances and a Skilled Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joo Yong Lee

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We report an initial experience in laparoendoscopic single-site radical prostatectomy (LESSRP using a homemade single-port device for prostate cancer. A 63-year-old man was diagnosed with prostate cancer. The patient underwent LESSRP using an Alexis® wound retractor, which was inserted through an umbilical incision. A homemade single-port device was made by fixing a 61/2 surgical glove to the retractor’s outer ring and securing the glove finger to the end of 4 trocars with a tie. Using the flexible laparoscopic and rigid instruments, LESSRP was performed using a procedure similar to conventional laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (LRP. In the current case, we could not perform complete LESSRP, so we report our initial experience and consider the reason why laparoendoscopic single-site surgery was converted to conventional LRP.

  7. Internal initiation of translation from the human rhinovirus-2 internal ribosome entry site requires the binding of Unr to two distinct sites on the 5' untranslated region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Emma C; Hunt, Sarah L; Jackson, Richard J

    2007-11-01

    Internal initiation of translation from the human rhinovirus-2 (HRV-2) internal ribosome entry site (IRES) is dependent upon host cell trans-acting factors. The multiple cold shock domain protein Unr and the polypyrimidine tract-binding protein have been identified as synergistic activators of HRV-2 IRES-driven translation. In order to investigate the mechanism by which Unr acts in this process, we have mapped the binding sites of Unr to two distinct secondary structure domains of the HRV-2 IRES, and have identified specific nucleotides that are involved in the binding of Unr to the IRES. The data suggest that Unr acts as an RNA chaperone to maintain a complex tertiary IRES structure required for translational competency.

  8. Timing of initial arrival at the breeding site predicts age at first reproduction in a long-lived migratory bird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Peter H; Dittmann, Tobias; Ludwigs, Jan-Dieter; Limmer, Bente; Ludwig, Sonja C; Bauch, Christina; Braasch, Alexander; Wendeln, Helmut

    2008-08-26

    In long-lived vertebrates, individuals generally visit potential breeding areas or populations during one or more seasons before reproducing for the first time. During these years of prospecting, they select a future breeding site, colony, or mate and improve various skills and their physical condition to meet the requirements of reproduction. One precondition of successful reproduction is arrival in time on the breeding grounds. Here, we study the intricate links among the date of initial spring arrival, body mass, sex, and the age of first breeding in the common tern Sterna hirundo, a long-lived migratory colonial seabird. The study is based on a unique, individual-based, long-term dataset of sexed birds, marked with transponders, which allow recording their individual arrival, overall attendance, and clutch initiation remotely and automatically year by year over the entire lifetime at the natal colony site. We show that the seasonal date of initial arrival at the breeding grounds predicts the individual age at first reproduction, which mostly occurs years later. Late first-time arrivals remain delayed birds throughout subsequent years. Our findings reveal that timing of arrival at the site of reproduction and timing of reproduction itself are coherent parameters of individual quality, which are linked with the prospects of the breeding career and may have consequences for fitness.

  9. Department of the Navy Explosives Safety Site Approval Process Improvement Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    software deployment and sustainment within the DON for: • Automated Site Planning Tool ( ASPT )—ESSv6 • WebSAR • Explosives Safety Database The...Measures  Administrative Record for ESA  Configuration/Data Control of facility-related ES data for ASPT The NOSSA level roll-up of the...the DDESB by 30 December 2010. At this point, the following principles are guiding the development of the implementation plan:  Use DDESB ASPT

  10. Nariva Swamp Ramsar Site, Trinidad and Tobago (West Indies) Wetland Habitat Restoration Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montserrat Carbonell; Nadra Nathai-Gyan

    2005-01-01

    Trinidad and Tobago, a twin island nation, is the most southerly of the Caribbean islands and lies just 11 km off the coast of Venezuela, near the Orinoco delta. Trinidad, the larger of the two islands, is approximately 5,000 km² and the Nariva Swamp is located on its eastern coast (fig. 1). In 1993, this site was designated as a wetland of international...

  11. Controlled synthesis of biodegradable lactide polymers and copolymers using novel in situ generated or single-site stereoselective polymerization initiators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Zhiyuan; Dijkstra, Pieter J; Feijen, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Polylactides and their copolymers are key biodegradable polymers used widely in biomedical, pharmaceutical and ecological applications. The development of synthetic pathways and catalyst/initiator systems to produce pre-designed polylactides, as well as the fundamental understanding of the polymerization reactions, has continuously been an important topic. Here, we will address the recent advances in the ring-opening polymerization of lactides, with an emphasis on the highly versatile in situ generated initiator systems and single-site stereoselective initiators. The in situ generated initiators including in situ formed yttrium, calcium and zinc alkoxides all have been shown to bring about a rapid and living polymerization of lactides under mild conditions, which facilitated the preparation of a variety of advanced lactide-based biomaterials. For example, well-defined di- and tri-block copolymers consisting of hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol) blocks and hydrophobic polyester blocks, which form novel biodegradable polymersomes or biodegradable thermosensitive hydrogels, have been prepared. In the past few years, significant progress has also been made in the area of stereoselective polymerization of lactides. This new generation of initiators has enabled the production of polylactide materials with novel microstructures and/or properties, such as heterotactic (--RRSSRRSSRRSS--) polylactide, crystalline syndiotactic (--RSRSRSRSRSRS--) polylactide and isotactic stereoblock (--Rn Sn Rn Sn--) polylactide, exhibiting a high melting temperature. The recently developed polymerizations using in situ generated initiators and stereoselective polymerizations have no doubt opened a brand-new avenue for the design and exploration of polylactides and their copolymers.

  12. LHCb experience with LFC replication

    CERN Document Server

    Bonifazi, F; Perez, E D; D'Apice, A; dell'Agnello, L; Düllmann, D; Girone, M; Re, G L; Martelli, B; Peco, G; Ricci, P P; Sapunenko, V; Vagnoni, V; Vitlacil, D

    2008-01-01

    Database replication is a key topic in the framework of the LHC Computing Grid to allow processing of data in a distributed environment. In particular, the LHCb computing model relies on the LHC File Catalog, i.e. a database which stores information about files spread across the GRID, their logical names and the physical locations of all the replicas. The LHCb computing model requires the LFC to be replicated at Tier-1s. The LCG 3D project deals with the database replication issue and provides a replication service based on Oracle Streams technology. This paper describes the deployment of the LHC File Catalog replication to the INFN National Center for Telematics and Informatics (CNAF) and to other LHCb Tier-1 sites. We performed stress tests designed to evaluate any delay in the propagation of the streams and the scalability of the system. The tests show the robustness of the replica implementation with performance going much beyond the LHCb requirements.

  13. LHCb experience with LFC replication

    CERN Document Server

    Carbone, Angelo; Dafonte Perez, Eva; D'Apice, Antimo; dell'Agnello, Luca; Duellmann, Dirk; Girone, Maria; Lo Re, Giuseppe; Martelli, Barbara; Peco, Gianluca; Ricci, Pier Paolo; Sapunenko, Vladimir; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Vitlacil, Dejan

    2007-01-01

    Database replication is a key topic in the framework of the LHC Computing Grid to allow processing of data in a distributed environment. In particular, the LHCb computing model relies on the LHC File Catalog, i.e. database which stores information about files spread across the GRID, their logical names and the physical locations of all the replicas. The LHCb computing model requires the LFC to be replicated at Tier-1s. The LCG 3D project deals with the database replication issue and provides a replication service based on Oracle Streams technology. This paper describes the deployment of the LHC File Catalog replication to the INFN National Center for Telematics and Informations (CNAF) and to other LHCb Tier-1 sites. We performed stress tests designed to evaluate any delay in the propagation of the streams and the scalability of the system. The tests show the robustness of the replica implementation with performance going much beyond the LHCb requirements.

  14. Initial source and site characterization studies for the U. C. San Diego campus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, S.; Erick, F.; Heuze, F.E.; Mellors, R.; Minster, B.; Park, S.; Wagoner, J.

    1999-07-01

    The basic approach of the Campus Laboratory Collaboration (CLC) project is to combine the substantial expertise that exists within the University of California (UC) system in geology, seismology, geotechnical engineering, and structural engineering to evaluate the effects of large earthquakes on UC facilities. These estimates draw upon recent advances in hazard assessment, seismic wave propagation modeling in rocks and soils, dynamic soil testing, and structural dynamics. The UC campuses currently chosen for applications of our integrated methodology are Riverside, San Diego, and Santa Barbara. The basic procedure is first to identify possible earthquake source regions and local campus site conditions that may affect estimates of strong ground motion. Combined geological , geophysical, and geotechnical studies are conducted to characterize each campus with specific focus on the location of particular target buildings of special interest to the campus administrators. The project will then drill and log deep boreholes next to the target structure, to provide direct in-situ measurements of subsurface material properties and to install uphole and downhole 3-component seismic sensors capable of recording both weak and strong motions. The boreholes provide access to deeper materials, below the soil layers, that have relatively high seismic shear-wave velocities. Analysis of conjugate downhole and uphole records provides a basis for optimizing the representation of the low-strain response of the sites. Earthquake rupture scenarios of identified causative faults are combined with the earthquake records and nonlinear soil models to provide site-specific estimates of strong motions at the selected target locations. The predicted ground motions are then used as input to the dynamic analysis of the buildings.

  15. Site characterization of the Romanian Seismic Network stations: a national initiative and its first preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grecu, Bogdan; Zahria, Bogdan; Manea, Elena; Neagoe, Cristian; Borleanu, Felix; Diaconescu, Mihai; Constantinescu, Eduard; Bala, Andrei

    2017-04-01

    The seismic activity in Romania is dominated by the intermediate-depth earthquakes occurring in Vrancea region, although weak to moderate crustal earthquakes are produced regularly in different areas of the country. The National Institute for Earth Physics (NIEP) built in the last years an impressive infrastructure for monitoring this activity, known as the Romanian Seismic Network (RSN). At present, RSN consists of 122 seismic stations, of which 70 have broadband velocity sensors and 42 short period sensors. One hundred and eleven stations out of 122 have accelerometer sensors collocated with velocity sensors and only 10 stations have only accelerometers. All the stations record continuously the ground motion and the data are transmitted in real-time to the Romanian National Data Center (RoNDC), in Magurele. Last year, NIEP has started a national project that addresses the characterization of all real-time seismic stations that constitute the RSN. We present here the steps that were undertaken and the preliminary results obtained since the beginning the project. The first two activities consisted of collecting all the existent technical and geological data, with emphasize on the latter. Then, we performed station noise investigations and analyses in order to characterize the noise level and estimate the resonances of the sites. The computed H/V ratios showed clear resonant peaks at different frequencies which correlate relatively well with the thickness of the sedimentary package beneath the stations. The polarization analysis of the H/V ratios indicates for some stations a strong directivity of the resonance peak which suggests possible topographic effects at the stations. At the same time, special attention was given to the estimation of the site amplification from earthquake data. The spectral ratios obtained from the analysis of more than 50 earthquakes with magnitudes (Mw) larger than 4.1 are characterized by similar resonance peaks as those obtained from

  16. How Xenopus laevis embryos replicate reliably: Investigating the random-completion problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Scott Cheng-Hsin; Bechhoefer, John

    2008-10-01

    DNA synthesis in Xenopus frog embryos initiates stochastically in time at many sites (origins) along the chromosome. Stochastic initiation implies fluctuations in the time to complete and may lead to cell death if replication takes longer than the cell cycle time (≈25min) . Surprisingly, although the typical replication time is about 20min , in vivo experiments show that replication fails to complete only about 1 in 300 times. How is replication timing accurately controlled despite the stochasticity? Biologists have proposed two solutions to this “random-completion problem.” The first solution uses randomly located origins but increases their rate of initiation as S phase proceeds, while the second uses regularly spaced origins. In this paper, we investigate the random-completion problem using a type of model first developed to describe the kinetics of first-order phase transitions. Using methods from the field of extreme-value statistics, we derive the distribution of replication-completion times for a finite genome. We then argue that the biologists’ first solution to the problem is not only consistent with experiment but also nearly optimizes the use of replicative proteins. We also show that spatial regularity in origin placement does not alter significantly the distribution of replication times and, thus, is not needed for the control of replication timing.

  17. Choosing a suitable method for the identification of replication origins in microbial genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengcheng eSong

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available As the replication of genomic DNA is arguably the most important task performed by a cell and given that it is controlled at the initiation stage, the events that occur at the replication origin play a central role in the cell cycle. Making sense of DNA replication origins is important for improving our capacity to study cellular processes and functions in the regulation of gene expression, genome integrity in much finer detail. Thus, clearly comprehending the positions and sequences of replication origins which are fundamental to chromosome organization and duplication is the first priority of all. In view of such important roles of replication origins, tremendous work has been aimed at identifying and testing the specificity of replication origins. A number of computational tools based on various skew types have been developed to predict replication origins. Using various in silico approaches such as Ori-Finder 2, and databases such as DoriC and oriDB, researchers have predicted the locations of replication origins sites for thousands bacterial chromosomes and archaeal genomes. Based on the predicted results, we should choose an effective method for identifying and confirming the interactions at origins of replication. Here we describe the main existing experimental methods that aimed to determine the replication origin regions and list some of the many the practical applications of these methods.

  18. Terrace Geochemistry at the Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Site - WM2017-17232 Initial Phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kautsky, Mark [USDOE Office of Legacy Management, Washington, DC (United States); Ranalli, Tony [Navarro Research and Engineering, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dander, David [Navarro Research and Engineering, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Miller, David [Navarro Research and Engineering, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-03-08

    The objective of this investigation was to identify and differentiate potential non- mill-related water inputs to a shallow terrace groundwater system through the use of aqueous chemical and isotopic tracers at a former uranium- and vanadium-ore processing facility. Terrace groundwater in the vicinity of the Shiprock, New Mexico, site is hypothesized to be largely anthropogenic because natural rates of recharge in the terrace are likely insufficient to sustain a continuous water table in the terrace alluvial system, as observed in several analogue terrace locations east of the site and in response to post-mill dewatering efforts across the site. The terrace is composed of alluvial sand and gravel and weathered and unweathered Mancos Shale. Terrace groundwater exists and flows in the alluvium and to a much less extent in the Mancos Shale. Historical data established that in both the terrace and floodplain below the terrace, mill-derived uranium and sulfate is found primarily in the alluvium and the upper portion of the weathered Mancos Shale. Groundwater extraction is being conducted in the vicinity of former mill operations and in washes and seeps to dewater the formation and remove contamination, thus eliminating these exposure pathways and minimizing movement to the floodplain. However, past and present contribution of non-mill anthropogenic water sources may be hindering the dewatering effort, resulting in reduced remedy effectiveness. Groundwater source signatures can be determined based on chemical and isotopic ratios and are used to help identify and delineate both mill and non-mill water contributions. Aqueous chemical and isotopic tracers, such as 234U/238U activity ratios and uranium concentrations, δ34S sulfate and sulfate concentrations, tritium concentrations, and δ2Hwater and δ18O water are being used in this Phase I study. The aqueous chemical and isotopic analysis has identified areas on the terrace where groundwater is derived from mill

  19. Implementation of a referral to discharge glycemic control initiative for reduction of surgical site infections in gynecologic oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Laura; Brown-Broderick, Jennifer; Hearn, James; Malcolm, Janine; Chan, James; Hicks-Boucher, Wendy; De Sousa, Filomena; Walker, Mark C; Gagné, Sylvain

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the frequency of surgical site infections before and after implementation of a comprehensive, multidisciplinary perioperative glycemic control initiative. As part of a CUSP (Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program) initiative, between January 5 and December 18, 2015, we implemented comprehensive, multidisciplinary glycemic control initiative to reduce SSI rates in patients undergoing major pelvic surgery for a gynecologic malignancy ('Group II'). Key components of this quality of care initiative included pre-operative HbA1c measurement with special triage for patients meeting criteria for diabetes or pre-diabetes, standardization of available intraoperative insulin choices, rigorous pre-op/intra-op/post-op glucose monitoring with control targets set to maintain BG ≤10mmol/L (180mg/dL) and communication/notification with primary care providers. Effectiveness was evaluated against a similar control group of patients ('Group I') undergoing surgery in 2014 prior to implementation of this initiative. We studied a total of 462 patients. Subjects in the screened (Group II) and comparison (Group I) groups were of similar age (avg. 61.0, 60.0years; p=0.422) and BMI (avg. 31.1, 32.3kg/m(2); p=0.257). Descriptive statistics served to compare surgical site infection (SSI) rates and other characteristics across groups. Women undergoing surgery prior to implementation of this algorithm (n=165) had an infection rate of 14.6%. Group II (n=297) showed an over 2-fold reduction in SSI compared to Group I [5.7%; p=0.001, adjRR: 0.45, 95% CI: (0.25, 0.81)]. Additionally, approximately 19% of Group II patients were newly diagnosed with either prediabetes (HbA1C 6.0-6.4) or diabetes (HbA1C≥6.5) and were referred to family or internal medicine for appropriate management. Implementation of a comprehensive multidisciplinary glycemic control initiative can lead to a significant reduction in surgical site infections in addition to early identification of an important health

  20. The Werner and Bloom syndrome proteins help resolve replication blockage by converting (regressed) holliday junctions to functional replication forks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machwe, Amrita; Karale, Rajashree; Xu, Xioahua; Liu, Yilun; Orren, David K

    2011-08-16

    Cells cope with blockage of replication fork progression in a manner that allows DNA synthesis to be completed and genomic instability minimized. Models for resolution of blocked replication involve fork regression to form Holliday junction structures. The human RecQ helicases WRN and BLM (deficient in Werner and Bloom syndromes, respectively) are critical for maintaining genomic stability and thought to function in accurate resolution of replication blockage. Consistent with this notion, WRN and BLM localize to sites of blocked replication after certain DNA-damaging treatments and exhibit enhanced activity on replication and recombination intermediates. Here we examine the actions of WRN and BLM on a special Holliday junction substrate reflective of a regressed replication fork. Our results demonstrate that, in reactions requiring ATP hydrolysis, both WRN and BLM convert this Holliday junction substrate primarily to a four-stranded replication fork structure, suggesting they target the Holliday junction to initiate branch migration. In agreement, the Holliday junction binding protein RuvA inhibits the WRN- and BLM-mediated conversion reactions. Importantly, this conversion product is suitable for replication with its leading daughter strand readily extended by DNA polymerases. Furthermore, binding to and conversion of this Holliday junction are optimal at low MgCl(2) concentrations, suggesting that WRN and BLM preferentially act on the square planar (open) conformation of Holliday junctions. Our findings suggest that, subsequent to fork regression events, WRN and/or BLM could re-establish functional replication forks to help overcome fork blockage. Such a function is highly consistent with phenotypes associated with WRN- and BLM-deficient cells.

  1. Replication of plasmids in gram-negative bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    Replication of plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is dependent on three stages: initiation, elongation, and termination. The first stage, initiation, depends on plasmid-encoded properties such as the replication origin and, in most cases, the replication initiation protein (Rep protein). In recent years the understanding of initiation and regulation of plasmid replication in Escherichia coli has increased considerably, but it is only for the ColE1-type plasmids that significant biochemical d...

  2. Initial computational fluid dynamics modeling of the Giant Magellan Telescope site and enclosure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danks, Ryan; Smeaton, William; Bigelow, Bruce; Burgett, William

    2016-08-01

    In the era of extremely large telescopes (ELTs), with telescope apertures growing in size and tighter image quality requirements, maintaining a controlled observation environment is critical. Image quality is directly influenced by thermal gradients, the level of turbulence in the incoming air flow and the wind forces acting on the telescope. Thus any ELT enclosure must be able to modulate the speed and direction of the incoming air and limit the inflow of disturbed ground-layer air. However, gaining an a priori understanding of the wind environment's impacts on a proposed telescope is complicated by the fact that telescopes are usually located in remote, mountainous areas, which often do not have high quality historic records of the wind conditions, and can be subjected to highly complex flow patterns that may not be well represented by the traditional analytic approaches used in typical building design. As part of the design process for the Giant Magellan Telescope at Cerro Las Campanas, Chile; the authors conducted a parametric design study using computational fluid dynamics which assessed how the telescope's position on the mesa, its ventilation configuration and the design of the enclosure and windscreens could be optimized to minimize the infiltration of ground-layer air. These simulations yielded an understanding of how the enclosure and the natural wind flows at the site could best work together to provide a consistent, well controlled observation environment. Future work will seek to quantify the aerothermal environment in terms of image quality.

  3. NASA's Beachside Corrosion Test Site and Current Environmentally Friendly Corrosion Control Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Richard W.; Calle, Luz Marina; Johnston, Frederick; Montgomery, Eliza L.; Curran, Jerome P.; Kolody, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    NASA began corrosion studies at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in 1966 during the Gemini/Apollo Programs with the evaluation of long-term corrosion protective coatings for carbon steel. KSC's Beachside Corrosion Test Site (BCTS), which has been documented by the American Society of Materials (ASM) as one of the most corrosive, naturally occurring, environments in the world, was established at that time. With the introduction of the Space Shuttle in 1981, the already highly corrosive conditions at the launch pad were rendered even more severe by the acid ic exhaust from the solid rocket boosters. In the years that followed, numerous studies have identified materials, coatings, and maintenance procedures for launch hardware and equipment exposed to the highly corrosive environment at the launch pad. This paper presents a historical overview of over 45 years of corrosion and coating evaluation studies and a description of the BCTS's current capabilities. Additionally, current research and testing programs involving chromium free coatings, environmentally friendly corrosion preventative compounds, and alternates to nitric acid passivation will be discussed.

  4. Activity-based protein profiling of the hepatitis C virus replication in Huh-7 hepatoma cells using a non-directed active site probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McKay Craig S

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV poses a growing threat to global health as it often leads to serious liver diseases and is one of the primary causes for liver transplantation. Currently, no vaccines are available to prevent HCV infection and clinical treatments have limited success. Since HCV has a small proteome, it relies on many host cell proteins to complete its life cycle. In this study, we used a non-directed phenyl sulfonate ester probe (PS4≡ to selectively target a broad range of enzyme families that show differential activity during HCV replication in Huh-7 cells. Results The PS4≡ probe successfully targeted 19 active proteins in nine distinct protein families, some that were predominantly labeled in situ compared to the in vitro labeled cell homogenate. Nine proteins revealed altered activity levels during HCV replication. Some candidates identified, such as heat shock 70 kDa protein 8 (or HSP70 cognate, have been shown to influence viral release and abundance of cellular lipid droplets. Other differentially active PS4≡ targets, such as electron transfer flavoprotein alpha, protein disulfide isomerase A5, and nuclear distribution gene C homolog, constitute novel proteins that potentially mediate HCV propagation. Conclusions These findings demonstrate the practicality and versatility of non-directed activity-based protein profiling (ABPP to complement directed methods and accelerate the discovery of altered protein activities associated with pathological states such as HCV replication. Collectively, these results highlight the ability of in situ ABPP approaches to facilitate the identification of enzymes that are either predominantly or exclusively labeled in living cells. Several of these differentially active enzymes represent possible HCV-host interactions that could be targeted for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes.

  5. Confidently estimating the number of DNA replication origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskar, Anand; Keich, Uri

    2010-01-01

    We present a method for estimating and providing a confidence interval for the number of DNA replication origins in the genome of the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis. The method requires an initial set of verified sites from which a position specific frequency matrix (PSFM) can be constructed. We further assume that we have access to a sparingly used experimental procedure which can verify the functionality of a few, but not all, computationally predicted sites. While our motivation comes from estimating the number of autonomously replicating sequences (ARSs), our method can also be applied to estimating the genome-wide number of "functional" transcription factor binding sites, where functionality is determined by experimental verification of the transcription factor binding event using, for example, ChIP data. The reliability of our method is demonstrated by correctly predicting the known number of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ARSs as well as the number of S. cerevisiae probes that bind to the transcription factor ABF1.

  6. 大肠杆菌TorS/TorR二组分体应答蛋白TorR对DNA复制起始的影响%The effects of TorR protein on initiation of DNA replication in Escherichia coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚远; 乔佳鑫; 李静; 李慧; 莫日根

    2015-01-01

    二组分体作为一种信号转导系统在细菌中普遍存在,能够感知外界环境变化并做出应答。细菌中CckA/CtrA、ArcA/ArcB和PhoP/PhoQ二组分体与DNA复制起始和细胞分裂相关,但目前还未见TorS/TorR二组分体对细胞周期及 DNA复制影响的相关报道。大肠杆菌 TorS/TorR 二组分体能够监测细胞周围氧化三甲胺(Trimethylamine oxide, TMAO)的浓度变化,但其是否影响DNA复制起始呢?文章利用流式细胞仪检测了ΔtorS和ΔtorR 突变体菌株的复制式样。结果发现,ΔtorS 突变菌株每个细胞复制起始原点数目和倍增时间与野生型细胞一致,而ΔtorR突变菌株每个细胞复制起始原点数目多于野生型细胞,说明复制起始发生时间比野生型细胞早。但是过表达TorR蛋白或者共同表达 TorS和 TorR蛋白都不能使ΔtorR突变体表型恢复为野生型表型。而在野生型和ΔtorR突变细胞中过表达SufD蛋白能使复制起始提早发生,在ΔtorR和ΔsufD双突变细胞中复制起始延迟。所以,TorR可能通过改变sufD基因的表达来间接影响染色体复制起始。%The two-component systems, which could sense and respond to environmental changes, widely exist in bacteria as a signal transduction pathway. The bacterial CckA/CtrA, ArcA/ArcB and PhoP/PhoQ two-component systems are associated with initiation of DNA replication and cell division, however, the effects of the TorS/TorR system on cell cycle and DNA replication remains unknown. The TorS/TorR system in Escherichia coli can sense changes in trimethylamine oxide (TMAO) concentration around the cells. However, it is unknown if it also affects initiation of DNA replication. We detected DNA replication patterns in ΔtorS and ΔtorR mutant strains by flow cytometry. We found that the average number of replication origins (oriCs) per cell and doubling time inΔtorS mutants were the same while the average number of oriCs in ΔtorR mutants was

  7. Global profiling of DNA replication timing and efficiency reveals that efficient replication/firing occurs late during S-phase in S. pombe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Eshaghi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During S. pombe S-phase, initiation of DNA replication occurs at multiple sites (origins that are enriched with AT-rich sequences, at various times. Current studies of genome-wide DNA replication profiles have focused on the DNA replication timing and origin location. However, the replication and/or firing efficiency of the individual origins on the genomic scale remain unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using the genome-wide ORF-specific DNA microarray analysis, we show that in S. pombe, individual origins fire with varying efficiencies and at different times during S-phase. The increase in DNA copy number plotted as a function of time is approximated to the near-sigmoidal model, when considering the replication start and end timings at individual loci in cells released from HU-arrest. Replication efficiencies differ from origin to origin, depending on the origin's firing efficiency. We have found that DNA replication is inefficient early in S-phase, due to inefficient firing at origins. Efficient replication occurs later, attributed to efficient but late-firing origins. Furthermore, profiles of replication timing in cds1Delta cells are abnormal, due to the failure in resuming replication at the collapsed forks. The majority of the inefficient origins, but not the efficient ones, are found to fire in cds1Delta cells after HU removal, owing to the firing at the remaining unused (inefficient origins during HU treatment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, our results indicate that efficient DNA replication/firing occurs late in S-phase progression in cells after HU removal, due to efficient late-firing origins. Additionally, checkpoint kinase Cds1p is required for maintaining the efficient replication/firing late in S-phase. We further propose that efficient late-firing origins are essential for ensuring completion of DNA duplication by the end of S-phase.

  8. Strength distribution of fatigue crack initiation sites in an Al-Li alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, T.

    2006-10-01

    The stress-number of cycles to failure (S-N) curves were measured along the short-transverse (S) and rolling (L) directions of a hot-cross-rolled AA 8090 Al-Li alloy plate (45-mm thick). The alloy was solution heat treated, quenched in water, strained by 6 pct, and peak aged. Fatigue tests were carried out in four-point bend at room temperature, 20 Hz, R=0.1, in air. It was found that the fatigue limits in the S and L directions were 147 and 197 MPa, respectively. The crack population on the surface of a sample at failure increased with the applied stress level and was found to be a Weibull function of the applied maximum stress in this alloy. The strength distribution of fatigue weakest links, where cracks were initiated, was derived from the Weibull function determined by the experimental data. The fatigue weakest-link density was defined as the crack population per unit area at a stress level close to the ultimate tensile stress and can be regarded as a materials property. The density and strength distribution of fatigue weakest links were found to be markedly different between the L and S directions, accounting for the difference in fatigue limit between the directions in this alloy. They were also found to be different between S-L and S-T samples, and between L-T and L-S samples of this alloy, which could not be revealed by the corresponding S-N curves measured. These differences were due to the anisotropy of the microstructures in different directions in this alloy.

  9. The One-Kilobase DNA Fragment Upstream of the ardC Actin Gene of Physarum polycephalum Is Both a Replicator and a Promoter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierron, Gérard; Pallotta, Dominick; Bénard, Marianne

    1999-01-01

    The 1-kb DNA fragment upstream of the ardC actin gene of Physarum polycephalum promotes the transcription of a reporter gene either in a transient-plasmid assay or as an integrated copy in an ectopic position, defining this region as the transcriptional promoter of the ardC gene (PardC). Since we mapped an origin of replication activated at the onset of S phase within this same fragment, we examined the pattern of replication of a cassette containing the PardC promoter and the hygromycin phosphotransferase gene, hph, integrated into two different chromosomal sites. In both cases, we show by two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis that an efficient, early activated origin coincides with the ectopic PardC fragment. One of the integration sites was a normally late-replicating region. The presence of the ectopic origin converted this late-replicating domain into an early-replicating domain in which replication forks propagate with kinetics indistinguishable from those of the native PardC replicon. This is the first demonstration that initiation sites for DNA replication in Physarum correspond to cis-acting replicator sequences. This work also confirms the close proximity of a replication origin and a promoter, with both functions being located within the 1-kb proximal region of the ardC actin gene. A more precise location of the replication origin with respect to the transcriptional promoter must await the development of a functional autonomously replicating sequence assay in Physarum. PMID:10207074

  10. Primer retention owing to the absence of RNase H1 is catastrophic for mitochondrial DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, J Bradley; Akman, Gokhan; Wood, Stuart R; Sakhuja, Kiran; Cerritelli, Susana M; Moss, Chloe; Bowmaker, Mark R; Jacobs, Howard T; Crouch, Robert J; Holt, Ian J

    2015-07-28

    Encoding ribonuclease H1 (RNase H1) degrades RNA hybridized to DNA, and its function is essential for mitochondrial DNA maintenance in the developing mouse. Here we define the role of RNase H1 in mitochondrial DNA replication. Analysis of replicating mitochondrial DNA in embryonic fibroblasts lacking RNase H1 reveals retention of three primers in the major noncoding region (NCR) and one at the prominent lagging-strand initiation site termed Ori-L. Primer retention does not lead immediately to depletion, as the persistent RNA is fully incorporated in mitochondrial DNA. However, the retained primers present an obstacle to the mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ in subsequent rounds of replication and lead to the catastrophic generation of a double-strand break at the origin when the resulting gapped molecules are copied. Hence, the essential role of RNase H1 in mitochondrial DNA replication is the removal of primers at the origin of replication.

  11. Initial Observations and Activities of Curiosity's Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) at the Gale Field Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aileen Yingst, R.; Edgett, Kenneth; MSL Science Team

    2013-04-01

    The Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) is a 2-megapixel focusable macro lens color camera on the turret on the Mars Science Laboratory rover, Curiosity's, robotic arm. The investigation centers on stratigraphy, grain-scale texture, structure, mineralogy, and morphology. MAHLI acquires focused images at working distances of 2.1 cm to infinity; at 2.1 cm the scale is 14 µm/pixel; at 6.9 cm it is 31 µm/pixel, like the Spirit and Opportunity Microscopic Imagers (MI). Most MAHLI use during the first 100 Martian days (sols) was focused on instrument, rover, and robotic arm engineering check-outs and risk reduction, including (1) interrogation of an eolian sand shadow for suitability for scooping, decontamination of the sample collection and processing system (CHIMRA, Collection and Handling for In-Situ Martian Rock Analysis), and first solid sample delivery to the Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) and Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instruments; (2) documentation of the nature of this sand; (3) verification that samples were delivered to SAM and passed through a 150 µm mesh and a 2 mm funnel throat in the CheMin inlet; (4) development of methods for future precision robotic arm positioning of MAHLI and the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS); and (5) use of MAHLI autofocus for range-finding to determine locations to position the scoop before each scooping event. Most Sol 0-100 MAHLI images were obtained at scales of 31-110 µm/pixel; some geologic targets were imaged at 21-31 µm/pixel. No opportunities to position the camera close enough to obtain 14-20 µm/pixel images were available during this initial period. Only two rocks, named Jake Matijevic and Bathurst Inlet, were imaged at a resolution higher than MI. Both were dark gray and mantled with dust and fine/very fine sand. In both cases, the highest resolution images of these rocks show no obvious, indisputable grains, suggesting that grain sizes (as expressed at the rock surfaces) are < 80 µm. However, because of

  12. Paleomagnetic results from IODP Expedition 344 Site U1381 and implications for the initial subduction of the Cocos Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong-Xiang; Zhao, Xixi; Jovane, Luigi; Petronotis, Katerina; Gong, Zheng; Xie, Siyi

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the processes that govern the strength, nature, and distribution of slip along subduction zones is a fundamental and societally relevant goal of modern earth science. The Costa Rica Seismogenesis Project (CRISP) is specially designed to understand the processes that control nucleation and seismic rupture of large earthquakes at erosional subduction zones. Drilling directly on the Cocos Ridge (CR) during International Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 344 discovered a sedimentary hiatus in Site U1381 cores. In this study, we conducted a magnetostratigraphic and rock magnetic study on the Cenozoic sedimentary sequences of site U1381. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility data from sediments above and below the hiatus show oblate fabrcis, but the Kmin axes of the AMS data from sediments below the hiatus are more dispersed than those from sediments above the hiatus, implying that formation of hiatus may have affected AMS. Paleomagnetic results of the U1381 core, together with available Ar-Ar dates of ash layers from sediments below the hiatus, allow us to establish a geomagnetic polarity timescale that brackets the hiatus between ca. 9.61 and 1.52 Ma. Analyses of sedimentary records from ODP/IODP cores in the vicinity reveal that the hiatus appears to be regional, spanning the northeastern end of the CR. Also, the hiatus appears to occur only at certain locations. Its regional occurrence at unique locations implies a link to the initial shallow subduction of the Cocos Ridge. The hiatus was probably produced by either bottom current erosion or the CR buckling upon its initial collision with the Middle American trench (MAT). Thus, the initial subduction of the CR must have taken place on or before 1.52 Ma.

  13. Direct visualization of replication dynamics in early zebrafish embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriya, Kenji; Higashiyama, Eriko; Avşar-Ban, Eriko; Okochi, Nanami; Hattori, Kaede; Ogata, Shin; Takebayashi, Shin-Ichiro; Ogata, Masato; Tamaru, Yutaka; Okumura, Katsuzumi

    2016-05-01

    We analyzed DNA replication in early zebrafish embryos. The replicating DNA of whole embryos was labeled with the thymidine analog 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU), and spatial regulation of replication sites was visualized in single embryo-derived cells. The results unveiled uncharacterized replication dynamics during zebrafish early embryogenesis.

  14. The sporulation protein SirA inhibits the binding of DnaA to the origin of replication by contacting a patch of clustered amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahn-Lee, Lilah; Merrikh, Houra; Grossman, Alan D; Losick, Richard

    2011-03-01

    Bacteria regulate the frequency and timing of DNA replication initiation by controlling the activity of the replication initiator protein DnaA. SirA is a recently discovered regulator of DnaA in Bacillus subtilis whose synthesis is turned on at the start of sporulation. Here, we demonstrate that SirA contacts DnaA at a patch of 3 residues located on the surface of domain I of the replication initiator protein, corresponding to the binding site used by two unrelated regulators of DnaA found in other bacteria. We show that the interaction of SirA with domain I inhibits the ability of DnaA to bind to the origin of replication. DnaA mutants containing amino acid substitutions of the 3 residues are functional in replication initiation but are immune to inhibition by SirA.

  15. Archaeal DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelman, Lori M; Kelman, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication is essential for all life forms. Although the process is fundamentally conserved in the three domains of life, bioinformatic, biochemical, structural, and genetic studies have demonstrated that the process and the proteins involved in archaeal DNA replication are more similar to those in eukaryal DNA replication than in bacterial DNA replication, but have some archaeal-specific features. The archaeal replication system, however, is not monolithic, and there are some differences in the replication process between different species. In this review, the current knowledge of the mechanisms governing DNA replication in Archaea is summarized. The general features of the replication process as well as some of the differences are discussed.

  16. The replication domain model: regulating replicon firing in the context of large-scale chromosome architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Benjamin D; Gilbert, David M

    2013-11-29

    The "Replicon Theory" of Jacob, Brenner, and Cuzin has reliably served as the paradigm for regulating the sites where individual replicons initiate replication. Concurrent with the replicon model was Taylor's demonstration that plant and animal chromosomes replicate segmentally in a defined temporal sequence, via cytologically defined units too large to be accounted for by a single replicon. Instead, there seemed to be a program to choreograph when chromosome units replicate during S phase, executed by initiation at clusters of individual replicons within each segment. Here, we summarize recent molecular evidence for the existence of such units, now known as "replication domains", and discuss how the organization of large chromosomes into structural units has added additional layers of regulation to the original replicon model.

  17. Trapping DNA replication origins from the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eki, Toshihiko; Murakami, Yasufumi; Hanaoka, Fumio

    2013-04-17

    Synthesis of chromosomal DNA is initiated from multiple origins of replication in higher eukaryotes; however, little is known about these origins' structures. We isolated the origin-derived nascent DNAs from a human repair-deficient cell line by blocking the replication forks near the origins using two different origin-trapping methods (i.e., UV- or chemical crosslinker-treatment and cell synchronization in early S phase using DNA replication inhibitors). Single-stranded DNAs (of 0.5-3 kb) that accumulated after such treatments were labeled with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU). BrdU-labeled DNA was immunopurified after fractionation by alkaline sucrose density gradient centrifugation and cloned by complementary-strand synthesis and PCR amplification. Competitive PCR revealed an increased abundance of DNA derived from known replication origins (c-myc and lamin B2 genes) in the nascent DNA fractions from the UV-treated or crosslinked cells. Nucleotide sequences of 85 and 208 kb were obtained from the two libraries (I and II) prepared from the UV-treated log-phase cells and early S phase arrested cells, respectively. The libraries differed from each other in their G+C composition and replication-related motif contents, suggesting that differences existed between the origin fragments isolated by the two different origin-trapping methods. The replication activities for seven out of 12 putative origin loci from the early-S phase cells were shown by competitive PCR. We mapped 117 (library I) and 172 (library II) putative origin loci to the human genome; approximately 60% and 50% of these loci were assigned to the G-band and intragenic regions, respectively. Analyses of the flanking sequences of the mapped loci suggested that the putative origin loci tended to associate with genes (including conserved sites) and DNase I hypersensitive sites; however, poor correlations were found between such loci and the CpG islands, transcription start sites, and K27-acetylated histone H3 peaks.

  18. The DnaK Chaperone Uses Different Mechanisms To Promote and Inhibit Replication of Vibrio cholerae Chromosome 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Jyoti K; Li, Mi; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Miller Jenkins, Lisa M; Wlodawer, Alexander; Chattoraj, Dhruba

    2017-04-18

    Replication of Vibrio cholerae chromosome 2 (Chr2) depends on molecular chaperone DnaK to facilitate binding of the initiator (RctB) to the replication origin. The binding occurs at two kinds of site, 12-mers and 39-mers, which promote and inhibit replication, respectively. Here we show that DnaK employs different mechanisms to enhance the two kinds of binding. We found that mutations in rctB that reduce DnaK binding also reduce 12-mer binding and initiation. The initiation defect is suppressed by second-site mutations that increase 12-mer binding only marginally. Instead, they reduce replication inhibitory mechanisms: RctB dimerization and 39-mer binding. One suppressing change was in a dimerization domain which is folded similarly to the initiator of an iteron plasmid-the presumed progenitor of Chr2. In plasmids, DnaK promotes initiation by reducing dimerization. A different mutation was in the 39-mer binding domain of RctB and inactivated it, indicating an alternative suppression mechanism. Paradoxically, although DnaK increases 39-mer binding, the increase was also achieved by inactivating the DnaK binding site of RctB. This result suggests that the site inhibits the 39-mer binding domain (via autoinhibition) when prevented from binding DnaK. Taken together, our results reveal an important feature of the transition from plasmid to chromosome: the Chr2 initiator retains the plasmid-like dimerization domain and its control by chaperones but uses the chaperones in an unprecedented way to control the inhibitory 39-mer binding.IMPORTANCE The capacity of proteins to undergo remodeling provides opportunities to control their function. However, remodeling remains a poorly understood aspect of the structure-function paradigm due to its dynamic nature. Here we have studied remodeling of the initiator of replication of Vibrio cholerae Chr2 by the molecular chaperone, DnaK. We show that DnaK binds to a site on the Chr2 initiator (RctB) that promotes initiation by reducing

  19. Detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus RNA in pharyngeal epithelium biopsy samples obtained from infected cattle: Investigation of possible sites of virus replication and persistence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenfeldt, Anna Carolina; Belsham, Graham

    2012-01-01

    was used to investigate the level of FMDV RNA present at this site at sequential time points during the infection. Results were compared to measurements of virus excretion in samples of oropharyngeal fluid collected at corresponding time points. Possible sites of virus persistence were investigated through...... measurements of the levels of FMDV RNA in the DSP as well as mandibular and retropharyngeal lymph nodes beyond 28 days after infection. Results indicated only low levels of FMDV RNA present in samples of pharyngeal epithelia during both early and persistent phases of infection with significantly higher levels...

  20. Completion Report for Multi-Site Incentive MRT 2779 Implement ASC Tripod Initiative by 30SEP08

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    East, D; Cerutti, J; Noe, J; Cupps, K; Loncaric, J; Sturtevant, J

    2008-09-22

    This report provides documentation and evidence for the completion of the deployment of the Tripod common operating system (TripodOS, also known as and generally referred to below as TOSS). Background documents for TOSS are provided in Appendices A and B, including the initial TOSS proposal accepted by ASC HQ and Executives in July 2007 and a Governance Model defined by a Tri-Lab working group in September 2007. Appendix C contains a document that clarifies the intent and requirements for the completion criteria associated with MRT 2779. The deployment of TOSS is a Multi-Site Incentive from the ASC FY08-09 Implementation Plan due at the end of Quarter 4 in FY08.

  1. Replication Stress: A Lifetime of Epigenetic Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simran Khurana

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available DNA replication is essential for cell division. Challenges to the progression of DNA polymerase can result in replication stress, promoting the stalling and ultimately collapse of replication forks. The latter involves the formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs and has been linked to both genome instability and irreversible cell cycle arrest (senescence. Recent technological advances have elucidated many of the factors that contribute to the sensing and repair of stalled or broken replication forks. In addition to bona fide repair factors, these efforts highlight a range of chromatin-associated changes at and near sites of replication stress, suggesting defects in epigenome maintenance as a potential outcome of aberrant DNA replication. Here, we will summarize recent insight into replication stress-induced chromatin-reorganization and will speculate on possible adverse effects for gene expression, nuclear integrity and, ultimately, cell function.

  2. How frog embryos replicate their DNA reliably

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechhoefer, John; Marshall, Brandon

    2007-03-01

    Frog embryos contain three billion base pairs of DNA. In early embryos (cycles 2-12), DNA replication is extremely rapid, about 20 min., and the entire cell cycle lasts only 25 min., meaning that mitosis (cell division) takes place in about 5 min. In this stripped-down cell cycle, there are no efficient checkpoints to prevent the cell from dividing before its DNA has finished replication - a disastrous scenario. Even worse, the many origins of replication are laid down stochastically and are also initiated stochastically throughout the replication process. Despite the very tight time constraints and despite the randomness introduced by origin stochasticity, replication is extremely reliable, with cell division failing no more than once in 10,000 tries. We discuss a recent model of DNA replication that is drawn from condensed-matter theories of 1d nucleation and growth. Using our model, we discuss different strategies of replication: should one initiate all origins as early as possible, or is it better to hold back and initiate some later on? Using concepts from extreme-value statistics, we derive the distribution of replication times given a particular scenario for the initiation of origins. We show that the experimentally observed initiation strategy for frog embryos meets the reliability constraint and is close to the one that requires the fewest resources of a cell.

  3. Nucleotide Metabolism and DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Digby F; Evans, Joanna C; Mizrahi, Valerie

    2014-10-01

    The development and application of a highly versatile suite of tools for mycobacterial genetics, coupled with widespread use of "omics" approaches to elucidate the structure, function, and regulation of mycobacterial proteins, has led to spectacular advances in our understanding of the metabolism and physiology of mycobacteria. In this article, we provide an update on nucleotide metabolism and DNA replication in mycobacteria, highlighting key findings from the past 10 to 15 years. In the first section, we focus on nucleotide metabolism, ranging from the biosynthesis, salvage, and interconversion of purine and pyrimidine ribonucleotides to the formation of deoxyribonucleotides. The second part of the article is devoted to DNA replication, with a focus on replication initiation and elongation, as well as DNA unwinding. We provide an overview of replication fidelity and mutation rates in mycobacteria and summarize evidence suggesting that DNA replication occurs during states of low metabolic activity, and conclude by suggesting directions for future research to address key outstanding questions. Although this article focuses primarily on observations from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, it is interspersed, where appropriate, with insights from, and comparisons with, other mycobacterial species as well as better characterized bacterial models such as Escherichia coli. Finally, a common theme underlying almost all studies of mycobacterial metabolism is the potential to identify and validate functions or pathways that can be exploited for tuberculosis drug discovery. In this context, we have specifically highlighted those processes in mycobacterial DNA replication that might satisfy this critical requirement.

  4. Diversification of DnaA dependency for DNA replication in cyanobacterial evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohbayashi, Ryudo; Watanabe, Satoru; Ehira, Shigeki; Kanesaki, Yu; Chibazakura, Taku; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi

    2016-05-01

    Regulating DNA replication is essential for all living cells. The DNA replication initiation factor DnaA is highly conserved in prokaryotes and is required for accurate initiation of chromosomal replication at oriC. DnaA-independent free-living bacteria have not been identified. The dnaA gene is absent in plastids and some symbiotic bacteria, although it is not known when or how DnaA-independent mechanisms were acquired. Here, we show that the degree of dependency of DNA replication on DnaA varies among cyanobacterial species. Deletion of the dnaA gene in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 shifted DNA replication from oriC to a different site as a result of the integration of an episomal plasmid. Moreover, viability during the stationary phase was higher in dnaA disruptants than in wild-type cells. Deletion of dnaA did not affect DNA replication or cell growth in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 or Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, indicating that functional dependency on DnaA was already lost in some nonsymbiotic cyanobacterial lineages during diversification. Therefore, we proposed that cyanobacteria acquired DnaA-independent replication mechanisms before symbiosis and such an ancestral cyanobacterium was the sole primary endosymbiont to form a plastid precursor.

  5. Chikungunya virus infectivity, RNA replication and non-structural polyprotein processing depend on the nsP2 protease’s active site cysteine residue

    OpenAIRE

    Kai Rausalu; Age Utt; Tania Quirin; Varghese, Finny S.; Eva Žusinaite; Pratyush Kumar Das; Tero Ahola; Andres Merits

    2016-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), genus Alphavirus, family Togaviridae, has a positive-stand RNA genome approximately 12 kb in length. In infected cells, the genome is translated into non-structural polyprotein P1234, an inactive precursor of the viral replicase, which is activated by cleavages carried out by the non-structural protease, nsP2. We have characterized CHIKV nsP2 using both cell-free and cell-based assays. First, we show that Cys478 residue in the active site of CHIKV nsP2 is indispensa...

  6. Dynamics of Escherichia coli chromosome segregation during multifork replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Henrik J; Youngren, Brenda; Hansen, Flemming G; Austin, Stuart

    2007-12-01

    Slowly growing Escherichia coli cells have a simple cell cycle, with replication and progressive segregation of the chromosome completed before cell division. In rapidly growing cells, initiation of replication occurs before the previous replication rounds are complete. At cell division, the chromosomes contain multiple replication forks and must be segregated while this complex pattern of replication is still ongoing. Here, we show that replication and segregation continue in step, starting at the origin and progressing to the replication terminus. Thus, early-replicated markers on the multiple-branched chromosomes continue to separate soon after replication to form separate protonucleoids, even though they are not segregated into different daughter cells until later generations. The segregation pattern follows the pattern of chromosome replication and does not follow the cell division cycle. No extensive cohesion of sister DNA regions was seen at any growth rate. We conclude that segregation is driven by the progression of the replication forks.

  7. Spatial regulation and organization of DNA replication within the nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Duplication of chromosomal DNA is a temporally and spatially regulated process. The timing of DNA replication initiation at various origins is highly coordinated; some origins fire early and others late during S phase. Moreover, inside the nuclei, the bulk of DNA replication is physically organized in replication factories, consisting of DNA polymerases and other replication proteins. In this review article, we discuss how DNA replication is organized and regulated spatially within the nucleu...

  8. Dynamic replication of Web contents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The phenomenal growth of the World Wide Web has brought huge increase in the traffic to the popular web sites.Long delays and denial of service experienced by the end-users,especially during the peak hours,continues to be the common problem while accessing popular sites.Replicating some of the objects at multiple sites in a distributed web-server environment is one of the possible solutions to improve the response time/Iatency. The decision of what and where to replicate requires solving a constraint optimization problem,which is NP-complete in general.In this paper, we consider the problem of placing copies of objects in a distributed web server system to minimize the cost of serving read and write requests when the web servers have Iimited storage capacity.We formulate the problem as a 0-1 optimization problem and present a polynomial time greedy algorithm with backtracking to dynamically replicate objects at the appropriate sites to minimize a cost function.To reduce the solution search space,we present necessary condi tions for a site to have a replica of an object jn order to minimize the cost function We present simulation resuIts for a variety of problems to illustrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed algorithms and compare them with those of some well-known algorithms.The simulation resuIts demonstrate the superiority of the proposed algorithms.

  9. Prediction of translation initiation sites in human mRNA sequences with AUG start codon in weak Kozak context: A neural network approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikole, Suhas; Sankararamakrishnan, Ramasubbu

    2008-05-16

    Translation of eukaryotic mRNAs is often regulated by nucleotides around the start codon. A purine at position -3 and a guanine at position +4 contribute significantly to enhance the translation efficiency. Algorithms to predict the translation initiation site often fail to predict the start site if the sequence context is not present. We have developed a neural network method to predict the initiation site of mRNA sequences that lack the preferred nucleotides at the positions -3 and +4 surrounding the translation initiation site. Neural networks of various architectures comprising different number of hidden layers were designed and tested for various sizes of windows of nucleotides surrounding translation initiation sites. We found that the neural network with two hidden layers showed a sensitivity of 83% and specificity of 73% indicating a vastly improved performance in successfully predicting the translation initiation site of mRNA sequences with weak Kozak context. WeakAUG server is freely available at http://bioinfo.iitk.ac.in/AUGPred/.

  10. Small RNAs targeting transcription start site induce heparanase silencing through interference with transcription initiation in human cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guosong Jiang

    Full Text Available Heparanase (HPA, an endo-h-D-glucuronidase that cleaves the heparan sulfate chain of heparan sulfate proteoglycans, is overexpressed in majority of human cancers. Recent evidence suggests that small interfering RNA (siRNA induces transcriptional gene silencing (TGS in human cells. In this study, transfection of siRNA against -9/+10 bp (siH3, but not -174/-155 bp (siH1 or -134/-115 bp (siH2 region relative to transcription start site (TSS locating at 101 bp upstream of the translation start site, resulted in TGS of heparanase in human prostate cancer, bladder cancer, and gastric cancer cells in a sequence-specific manner. Methylation-specific PCR and bisulfite sequencing revealed no DNA methylation of CpG islands within heparanase promoter in siH3-transfected cells. The TGS of heparanase did not involve changes of epigenetic markers histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation (H3K9me2, histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3 or active chromatin marker acetylated histone H3 (AcH3. The regulation of alternative splicing was not involved in siH3-mediated TGS. Instead, siH3 interfered with transcription initiation via decreasing the binding of both RNA polymerase II and transcription factor II B (TFIIB, but not the binding of transcription factors Sp1 or early growth response 1, on the heparanase promoter. Moreover, Argonaute 1 and Argonaute 2 facilitated the decreased binding of RNA polymerase II and TFIIB on heparanase promoter, and were necessary in siH3-induced TGS of heparanase. Stable transfection of the short hairpin RNA construct targeting heparanase TSS (-9/+10 bp into cancer cells, resulted in decreased proliferation, invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis of cancer cells in vitro and in athymic mice models. These results suggest that small RNAs targeting TSS can induce TGS of heparanase via interference with transcription initiation, and significantly suppress the tumor growth, invasion, metastasis and angiogenesis of cancer cells.

  11. Dual interaction of a geminivirus replication accessory factor with a viral replication protein and a plant cell cycle regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settlage, S B; Miller, A B; Gruissem, W; Hanley-Bowdoin, L

    2001-01-20

    Geminiviruses replicate their small, single-stranded DNA genomes through double-stranded DNA intermediates in plant nuclei using host replication machinery. Like most dicot-infecting geminiviruses, tomato golden mosaic virus encodes a protein, AL3 or C3, that greatly enhances viral DNA accumulation through an unknown mechanism. Earlier studies showed that AL3 forms oligomers and interacts with the viral replication initiator AL1. Experiments reported here established that AL3 also interacts with a plant homolog of the mammalian tumor suppressor protein, retinoblastoma (pRb). Analysis of truncated AL3 proteins indicated that pRb and AL1 bind to similar regions of AL3, whereas AL3 oligomerization is dependent on a different region of the protein. Analysis of truncated AL1 proteins located the AL3-binding domain between AL1 amino acids 101 and 180 to a region that also includes the AL1 oligomerization domain and the catalytic site for initiation of viral DNA replication. Interestingly, the AL3-binding domain was fully contiguous with the domain that mediates AL1/pRb interactions. The potential significance of AL3/pRb binding and the coincidence of the domains responsible for AL3, AL1, and pRb interactions are discussed.

  12. Nucleosome occupancy as a novel chromatin parameter for replication origin functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Jairo; Lee, Laura; Lynch, Bryony; Tsukiyama, Toshio

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotic DNA replication initiates from multiple discrete sites in the genome, termed origins of replication (origins). Prior to S phase, multiple origins are poised to initiate replication by recruitment of the pre-replicative complex (pre-RC). For proper replication to occur, origin activation must be tightly regulated. At the population level, each origin has a distinct firing time and frequency of activation within S phase. Many studies have shown that chromatin can strongly influence initiation of DNA replication. However, the chromatin parameters that affect properties of origins have not been thoroughly established. We found that nucleosome occupancy in G1 varies greatly around origins across the S. cerevisiae genome, and nucleosome occupancy around origins significantly correlates with the activation time and efficiency of origins, as well as pre-RC formation. We further demonstrate that nucleosome occupancy around origins in G1 is established during transition from G2/M to G1 in a pre-RC-dependent manner. Importantly, the diminished cell-cycle changes in nucleosome occupancy around origins in the orc1-161 mutant are associated with an abnormal global origin usage profile, suggesting that proper establishment of nucleosome occupancy around origins is a critical step for regulation of global origin activities. Our work thus establishes nucleosome occupancy as a novel and key chromatin parameter for proper origin regulation. PMID:27895110

  13. Spatial regulation and organization of DNA replication within the nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsume, Toyoaki; Tanaka, Tomoyuki U

    2010-01-01

    Duplication of chromosomal DNA is a temporally and spatially regulated process. The timing of DNA replication initiation at various origins is highly coordinated; some origins fire early and others late during S phase. Moreover, inside the nuclei, the bulk of DNA replication is physically organized in replication factories, consisting of DNA polymerases and other replication proteins. In this review article, we discuss how DNA replication is organized and regulated spatially within the nucleus and how this spatial organization is linked to temporal regulation. We focus on DNA replication in budding yeast and fission yeast and, where applicable, compare yeast DNA replication with that in bacteria and metazoans.

  14. Regulation of eukaryotic DNA replication and nuclear structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WUJIARUI

    1999-01-01

    In eukaryote,nuclear structure is a key component for the functions of eukaryotic cells.More and more evidences show that the nuclear structure plays important role in regulating DNA replication.The nuclear structure provides a physical barrier for the replication licensing,participates in the decision where DNA replication initiates,and organizes replication proteins as replication factory for DNA replication.Through these works,new concepts on the regulation of DNA replication have emerged,which will be discussed in this minireview.

  15. Role of preterminal protein processing in adenovirus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, A; Leith, I R; Nicholson, J; Hounsell, J; Hay, R T

    1997-09-01

    Preterminal protein (pTP), the protein primer for adenovirus DNA replication, is processed at two sites by the virus-encoded protease to yield mature terminal protein (TP). Here we demonstrate that processing to TP, via an intermediate (iTP), is conserved in all serotypes sequenced to date; and in determining the sites cleaved in Ad4 pTP, we extend the previously published substrate specificity of human adenovirus proteases to include a glutamine residue at P4. Furthermore, using monoclonal antibodies raised against pTP, we show that processing to iTP and TP are temporally separated in the infectious cycle, with processing to iTP taking place outside the virus particles. In vitro and in vivo studies of viral DNA replication reveal that iTP can act as a template for initiation and elongation and argue against a role for virus-encoded protease in switching off DNA replication. Virus DNA with TP attached to its 5' end (TP-DNA) has been studied extensively in in vitro DNA replication assays. Given that in vivo pTP-DNA, not TP-DNA, is the template for all but the first round of replication, the two templates were compared in vitro and shown to have different properties. Immunofluorescence studies suggest that a region spanning the TP cleavage site is involved in defining the subnuclear localization of pTP. Therefore, a likely role for the processing of pTP-DNA is to create a distinct template for early transcription (TP-DNA), while the terminal protein moiety, be it TP or pTP, serves to guide the template to the appropriate subcellular location through the course of infection.

  16. SUMO and KSHV Replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Pei-Ching [Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Kung, Hsing-Jien, E-mail: hkung@nhri.org.tw [Institute for Translational Medicine, College of Medical Science and Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); UC Davis Cancer Center, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Division of Molecular and Genomic Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, 35 Keyan Road, Zhunan, Miaoli County 35053, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-29

    Small Ubiquitin-related MOdifier (SUMO) modification was initially identified as a reversible post-translational modification that affects the regulation of diverse cellular processes, including signal transduction, protein trafficking, chromosome segregation, and DNA repair. Increasing evidence suggests that the SUMO system also plays an important role in regulating chromatin organization and transcription. It is thus not surprising that double-stranded DNA viruses, such as Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), have exploited SUMO modification as a means of modulating viral chromatin remodeling during the latent-lytic switch. In addition, SUMO regulation allows the disassembly and assembly of promyelocytic leukemia protein-nuclear bodies (PML-NBs), an intrinsic antiviral host defense, during the viral replication cycle. Overcoming PML-NB-mediated cellular intrinsic immunity is essential to allow the initial transcription and replication of the herpesvirus genome after de novo infection. As a consequence, KSHV has evolved a way as to produce multiple SUMO regulatory viral proteins to modulate the cellular SUMO environment in a dynamic way during its life cycle. Remarkably, KSHV encodes one gene product (K-bZIP) with SUMO-ligase activities and one gene product (K-Rta) that exhibits SUMO-targeting ubiquitin ligase (STUbL) activity. In addition, at least two viral products are sumoylated that have functional importance. Furthermore, sumoylation can be modulated by other viral gene products, such as the viral protein kinase Orf36. Interference with the sumoylation of specific viral targets represents a potential therapeutic strategy when treating KSHV, as well as other oncogenic herpesviruses. Here, we summarize the different ways KSHV exploits and manipulates the cellular SUMO system and explore the multi-faceted functions of SUMO during KSHV’s life cycle and pathogenesis.

  17. Defects of mitochondrial DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, William C

    2014-09-01

    Mitochondrial DNA is replicated by DNA polymerase γ in concert with accessory proteins such as the mitochondrial DNA helicase, single-stranded DNA binding protein, topoisomerase, and initiating factors. Defects in mitochondrial DNA replication or nucleotide metabolism can cause mitochondrial genetic diseases due to mitochondrial DNA deletions, point mutations, or depletion, which ultimately cause loss of oxidative phosphorylation. These genetic diseases include mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes such as Alpers or early infantile hepatocerebral syndromes, and mitochondrial DNA deletion disorders, such as progressive external ophthalmoplegia, ataxia-neuropathy, or mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy. This review focuses on our current knowledge of genetic defects of mitochondrial DNA replication (POLG, POLG2, C10orf2, and MGME1) that cause instability of mitochondrial DNA and mitochondrial disease.

  18. Regulatory cross-talk links Vibrio cholerae chromosome II replication and segregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiharu Yamaichi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available There is little knowledge of factors and mechanisms for coordinating bacterial chromosome replication and segregation. Previous studies have revealed that genes (and their products that surround the origin of replication (oriCII of Vibrio cholerae chromosome II (chrII are critical for controlling the replication and segregation of this chromosome. rctB, which flanks one side of oriCII, encodes a protein that initiates chrII replication; rctA, which flanks the other side of oriCII, inhibits rctB activity. The chrII parAB2 operon, which is essential for chrII partitioning, is located immediately downstream of rctA. Here, we explored how rctA exerts negative control over chrII replication. Our observations suggest that RctB has at least two DNA binding domains--one for binding to oriCII and initiating replication and the other for binding to rctA and thereby inhibiting RctB's ability to initiate replication. Notably, the inhibitory effect of rctA could be alleviated by binding of ParB2 to a centromere-like parS site within rctA. Furthermore, by binding to rctA, ParB2 and RctB inversely regulate expression of the parAB2 genes. Together, our findings suggest that fluctuations in binding of the partitioning protein ParB2 and the chrII initiator RctB to rctA underlie a regulatory network controlling both oriCII firing and the production of the essential chrII partitioning proteins. Thus, by binding both RctB and ParB2, rctA serves as a nexus for regulatory cross-talk coordinating chrII replication and segregation.

  19. Regulatory cross-talk links Vibrio cholerae chromosome II replication and segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaichi, Yoshiharu; Gerding, Matthew A; Davis, Brigid M; Waldor, Matthew K

    2011-07-01

    There is little knowledge of factors and mechanisms for coordinating bacterial chromosome replication and segregation. Previous studies have revealed that genes (and their products) that surround the origin of replication (oriCII) of Vibrio cholerae chromosome II (chrII) are critical for controlling the replication and segregation of this chromosome. rctB, which flanks one side of oriCII, encodes a protein that initiates chrII replication; rctA, which flanks the other side of oriCII, inhibits rctB activity. The chrII parAB2 operon, which is essential for chrII partitioning, is located immediately downstream of rctA. Here, we explored how rctA exerts negative control over chrII replication. Our observations suggest that RctB has at least two DNA binding domains--one for binding to oriCII and initiating replication and the other for binding to rctA and thereby inhibiting RctB's ability to initiate replication. Notably, the inhibitory effect of rctA could be alleviated by binding of ParB2 to a centromere-like parS site within rctA. Furthermore, by binding to rctA, ParB2 and RctB inversely regulate expression of the parAB2 genes. Together, our findings suggest that fluctuations in binding of the partitioning protein ParB2 and the chrII initiator RctB to rctA underlie a regulatory network controlling both oriCII firing and the production of the essential chrII partitioning proteins. Thus, by binding both RctB and ParB2, rctA serves as a nexus for regulatory cross-talk coordinating chrII replication and segregation.

  20. A class of edit kernels for SVMs to predict translation initiation sites in eukaryotic mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haifeng; Jiang, Tao

    2005-01-01

    The prediction of translation initiation sites (TISs) in eukaryotic mRNAs has been a challenging problem in computational molecular biology. In this paper, we present a new algorithm to recognize TISs with a very high accuracy. Our algorithm includes two novel ideas. First, we introduce a class of new sequence-similarity kernels based on string editing, called edit kernels, for use with support vector machines (SVMs) in a discriminative approach to predict TISs. The edit kernels are simple and have significant biological and probabilistic interpretations. Although the edit kernels are not positive definite, it is easy to make the kernel matrix positive definite by adjusting the parameters. Second, we convert the region of an input mRNA sequence downstream to a putative TIS into an amino acid sequence before applying SVMs to avoid the high redundancy in the genetic code. The algorithm has been implemented and tested on previously published data. Our experimental results on real mRNA data show that both ideas improve the prediction accuracy greatly and that our method performs significantly better than those based on neural networks and SVMs with polynomial kernels or Salzberg kernels.

  1. iTIS-PseKNC: Identification of Translation Initiation Site in human genes using pseudo k-tuple nucleotides composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, Muhammad; Iqbal, Muhammad; Ahmad, Saeed; Hayat, Maqsood

    2015-11-01

    Translation is an essential genetic process for understanding the mechanism of gene expression. Due to the large number of protein sequences generated in the post-genomic era, conventional methods are unable to identify Translation Initiation Site (TIS) in human genes timely and accurately. It is thus highly desirable to develop an automatic and accurate computational model for identification of TIS. Considerable improvements have been achieved in developing computational models; however, development of accurate and reliable automated systems for TIS identification in human genes is still a challenging task. In this connection, we propose iTIS-PseKNC, a novel protocol for identification of TIS. Three protein sequence representation methods including dinucleotide composition, pseudo-dinucleotide composition and Trinucleotide composition have been used in order to extract numerical descriptors. Support Vector Machine (SVM), K-nearest neighbor and Probabilistic Neural Network are assessed for their performance using the constructed descriptors. The proposed model iTIS-PseKNC has achieved 99.40% accuracy using jackknife test. The experimental results validated the superior performance of iTIS-PseKNC over the existing methods reported in the literature. It is highly anticipated that the iTIS-PseKNC predictor will be useful for basic research studies.

  2. Integrated Features by Administering the Support Vector Machine (SVM of Translational Initiations Sites in Alternative Polymorphic Contex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Arneida Husin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Many algorithms and methods have been proposed for classification problems in bioinformatics. In this study, the discriminative approach in particular support vector machines (SVM is employed to recognize the studied TIS patterns. The applied discriminative approach is used to learn about some discriminant functions of samples that have been labelled as positive or negative. After learning, the discriminant functions are employed to decide whether a new sample is true or false. In this study, support vector machines (SVM is employed to recognize the patterns for studied translational initiation sites in alternative weak context. The method has been optimized with the best parameters selected; c=100, E=10-6 and ex=2 for non linear kernel function. Results show that with top 5 features and non linear kernel, the best prediction accuracy achieved is 95.8%. J48 algorithm is applied to compare with SVM with top 15 features and the results show a good prediction accuracy of 95.8%. This indicates that the top 5 features selected by the IGR method and that are performed by SVM are sufficient to use in the prediction of TIS in weak contexts.

  3. A systemic increase in the recombination frequency upon local infection of Arabidopsis thaliana plants with oilseed rape mosaic virus depends on plant age, the initial inoculum concentration and the time for virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Youli; Kathiria, Palak; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2013-01-01

    In the past, we showed that local infection of tobacco leaves with either tobacco mosaic virus or oilseed rape mosaic virus (ORMV) resulted in a systemic increase in the homologous recombination frequency (HRF). Later on, we showed that a similar phenomenon occurs in Arabidopsis thaliana plants infected with ORMV. Here, we tested whether the time of removing the infected leaves as well as viral titer have any effect on the degree of changes in HRF in systemic tissues. An increase in HRF in systemic non-infected tissues was more pronounced when the infected leaves were detached from the infected plants at 60-96 h post-infection, rather than at earlier time. Next, we found that exposure to higher concentrations of inoculum was much more efficient in triggering an increase in HRF than exposure to lower concentrations. Finally, we showed that older plants exhibited a higher increase in HRF than younger plants. We found that an increase in genome instability in systemic tissues of locally infected plants depends on plant age, the concentration of initial inoculums and the time of viral replication.

  4. A systemic increase in the recombination frequency upon local infection of Arabidopsis thaliana plants with oilseed rape mosaic virus depends on plant age, the initial inoculum concentration and the time for virus replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youli eYao

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In the past, we showed that local infection of tobacco leaves with either Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV or Oilseed rape mosaic virus (ORMV resulted in a systemic increase in the homologous recombination frequency (HRF. Later on, we showed that a similar phenomenon occurs in Arabidopsis thaliana plants infected with ORMV. Here, we tested whether the time of removing the infected leaves as well as viral titer have any effect on the degree of changes in HRF in systemic tissues. An increase in HRF in systemic non-infected tissues was more pronounced when the infected leaves were detached from the infected plants at 60-96 hours post infection, rather than at earlier time. Next, we found that exposure to higher concentrations of inoculum was much more efficient in triggering an increase in HRF than exposure to lower concentrations. Finally, we showed that older plants exhibited a higher increase in HRF than younger plants. We found that an increase in genome instability in systemic tissues of locally infected plants depends on plant age, the concentration of initial inoculums and the time of viral replication.

  5. Control of DNA replication by anomalous reaction-diffusion kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechhoefer, John; Gauthier, Michel

    2010-03-01

    DNA replication requires two distinct processes: the initiation of pre-licensed replication origins and the propagation of replication forks away from the fired origins. Experiments indicate that these origins are triggered over the whole genome at a rate I(t) (the number of initiations per unreplicated length per time) that increases throughout most of the synthesis (S) phase, before rapidly decreasing to zero at the end of the replication process. We propose a simple model for the control of DNA replication in which the rate of initiation of replication origins is controlled by protein-DNA interactions. Analyzing recent data from Xenopus frog embryos, we find that the initiation rate is reaction limited until nearly the end of replication, when it becomes diffusion limited. Initiation of origins is suppressed when the diffusion-limited search time dominates. To fit the experimental data, we find that the interaction between DNA and the rate-limiting protein must be subdiffusive.

  6. Chromosome replication and segregation in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Lamothe, Rodrigo; Nicolas, Emilien; Sherratt, David J

    2012-01-01

    In dividing cells, chromosome duplication once per generation must be coordinated with faithful segregation of newly replicated chromosomes and with cell growth and division. Many of the mechanistic details of bacterial replication elongation are well established. However, an understanding of the complexities of how replication initiation is controlled and coordinated with other cellular processes is emerging only slowly. In contrast to eukaryotes, in which replication and segregation are separate in time, the segregation of most newly replicated bacterial genetic loci occurs sequentially soon after replication. We compare the strategies used by chromosomes and plasmids to ensure their accurate duplication and segregation and discuss how these processes are coordinated spatially and temporally with growth and cell division. We also describe what is known about the three conserved families of ATP-binding proteins that contribute to chromosome segregation and discuss their inter-relationships in a range of disparate bacteria.

  7. In vitro replication of plasmids containing human ribosomal gene sequences: origin localization and dependence on an aprotinin-binding cytosolic protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, F D; Georgoff, I; Fresa, K L; Sylvester, J; Gonzalez, I; Cohen, S

    1993-11-01

    We previously investigated the role of an aprotinin-binding protein (ADR) in the initiation of DNA replication in isolated quiescent nuclei. In the present study, we have used a cell-free DNA replication system to test the ability of plasmid vectors which contain sequences from the human ribosomal RNA gene to serve as replicative templates in vitro when exposed to ADR-containing preparations. Significant dTTP incorporation was seen using DNA from either a 7-kb sequence in the 5' spacer region (CHE) or a 7-kb sequence which begins near the end of the 28S coding region and extends into the 3' spacer region (ADBB), while sequences from other regions of the rRNA gene mediated little or no dTTP incorporation. The characteristics of plasmid-directed dTTP incorporation indicate that most incorporation is due to DNA replication and not repair or damage-initiated processes. To conclusively demonstrate origin-dependent replication in the plasmid system and to further map replication origins, an approach was developed using ddGTP to restrict the length of daughter strands followed by hybridization of these replication products to restriction fragments spanning the putative origin region. This approach allowed us to identify replication origin activity apart from parent strand repair or synthesis initiated at random damaged sites. One of the origins was localized to a 1375-bp fragment within the 5' spacer region, and this fragment contains sequences homologous to those found in other replication origins.

  8. Mapping of RNA initiation sites by high doses of uv iradiation: evidence for three independent promoters within the left 11% of the Ad-2 genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, M.C.; Fraser, N.W.; Darnell, J.E. Jr.

    1979-04-15

    Cells infected with Ad-2 virus were irradiated so that uv-induced lesions were introduced every 500 to 1000 nucleotides in the genomes, consequently leading to the premature termination of RNA transcription. Such cells when labeled with (/sup 3/H)uridine accumulate labeled promoter proximal RNA. Hybridization of this RNA after size fractionation to restriction fragments of the Ad-2 genome allowed the identification of DNA sequences containing active RNA initiation sites. Early during the infectious cycle two active RNA initiation sites were found within the left 11% of the Ad-2 genome within the 0 to 3.0 and 4.4 to 8.0 restriction fragments. During late infection (15 hr) an additional uv resistant transcript was detected indicating that a newly activated RNA initiation site, presumably for protein IX, resides within the fragment 8.0 to 11.2.

  9. Dengue virus binding and replication by platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Ayo Y; Sutherland, Michael R; Pryzdial, Edward L G

    2015-07-16

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection causes ∼200 million cases of severe flulike illness annually, escalating to life-threatening hemorrhagic fever or shock syndrome in ∼500,000. Although thrombocytopenia is typical of both mild and severe diseases, the mechanism triggering platelet reduction is incompletely understood. As a probable initiating event, direct purified DENV-platelet binding was followed in the current study by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and confirmed antigenically. Approximately 800 viruses specifically bound per platelet at 37°C. Fewer sites were observed at 25°C, the blood bank storage temperature (∼350 sites), or 4°C, known to attenuate virus cell entry (∼200 sites). Dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) and heparan sulfate proteoglycan were implicated as coreceptors because only the combination of anti-DC-SIGN and low-molecular-weight heparin prevented binding. Interestingly, at 37°C and 25°C, platelets replicated the positive sense single-stranded RNA genome of DENV by up to ∼4-fold over 7 days. Further time course experiments demonstrated production of viral NS1 protein, which is known to be highly antigenic in patient serum. The infectivity of DENV intrinsically decayed in vitro, which was moderated by platelet-mediated generation of viable progeny. This was shown using a transcription inhibitor and confirmed by freeze-denatured platelets being incapable of replicating the DENV genome. For the first time, these data demonstrate that platelets directly bind DENV saturably and produce infectious virus. Thus, expression of antigen encoded by DENV is a novel consideration in the pathogen-induced thrombocytopenia mechanism. These results furthermore draw attention to the possibility that platelets may produce permissive RNA viruses in addition to DENV.

  10. Feasibility Study of Biopower in East Helena, Montana. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriarty, K.

    2013-02-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed the RE-Powering America's Land initiative to reuse contaminated sites for renewable energy generation when aligned with the community's vision for the site. The former American Smelting and Refining Company (Asarco) smelter in East Helena, Montana, was selected for a feasibility study under the initiative. Biomass was chosen as the renewable energy resource based on the wood products industry in the area. Biopower was selected as the technology based on Montana's renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requiring utilities to purchase renewable power.

  11. Shutoff of RNA polymerase II transcription by poliovirus involves 3C protease-mediated cleavage of the TATA-binding protein at an alternative site: incomplete shutoff of transcription interferes with efficient viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Pallob; Raychaudhuri, Santanu; Tsai, Weimin; Dasgupta, Asim

    2005-08-01

    The TATA-binding protein (TBP) plays a crucial role in cellular transcription catalyzed by all three DNA-dependent RNA polymerases. Previous studies have shown that TBP is targeted by the poliovirus (PV)-encoded protease 3C(pro) to bring about shutoff of cellular RNA polymerase II-mediated transcription in PV-infected cells. The processing of the majority of viral precursor proteins by 3C(pro) involves cleavages at glutamine-glycine (Q-G) sites. We present evidence that suggests that the transcriptional inactivation of TBP by 3C(pro) involves cleavage at the glutamine 104-serine 105 (Q104-S105) site of TBP and not at the Q18-G19 site as previously thought. The TBP Q104-S105 cleavage by 3C(pro) is greatly influenced by the presence of an aliphatic amino acid at the P4 position, a hallmark of 3C(pro)-mediated proteolysis. To examine the importance of host cell transcription shutoff in the PV life cycle, stable HeLa cell lines were created that express recombinant TBP resistant to cleavage by the viral proteases, called GG rTBP. Transcription shutoff was significantly impaired and delayed in GG rTBP cells upon infection with poliovirus compared with the cells that express wild-type recombinant TBP (wt rTBP). Infection of GG rTBP cells with poliovirus resulted in small plaques, significantly reduced viral RNA synthesis, and lower viral yields compared to the wt rTBP cell line. These results suggest that a defect in transcription shutoff can lead to inefficient replication of poliovirus in cultured cells.

  12. Recent advances in the genome-wide study of DNA replication origins in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong ePeng

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available DNA replication, one of the central events in the cell cycle, is the basis of biological inheritance. In order to be duplicated, a DNA double helix must be opened at defined sites, which are called DNA replication origins (ORIs. Unlike in bacteria, where replication initiates from a single replication origin, multiple origins are utilized in the eukaryotic genome. Among them, the ORIs in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe have been best characterized. In recent years, advances in DNA microarray and next-generation sequencing technologies have increased the number of yeast species involved in ORIs research dramatically. The ORIs in some nonconventional yeast species such as Kluyveromyces lactis and Pichia pastoris have also been genome-widely identified. Relevant databases of replication origins in yeast were constructed, then the comparative genomic analysis can be carried out. Here, we review several experimental approaches that have been used to map replication origins in yeast and some of the available web resources related to yeast ORIs. We also discuss the sequence characteristics and chromosome structures of ORIs in the four yeast species, which can be utilized to improve the replication origins prediction.

  13. Links between DNA Replication, Stem Cells and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Vassilev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancers can be categorized into two groups: those whose frequency increases with age, and those resulting from errors during mammalian development. The first group is linked to DNA replication through the accumulation of genetic mutations that occur during proliferation of developmentally acquired stem cells that give rise to and maintain tissues and organs. These mutations, which result from DNA replication errors as well as environmental insults, fall into two categories; cancer driver mutations that initiate carcinogenesis and genome destabilizing mutations that promote aneuploidy through excess genome duplication and chromatid missegregation. Increased genome instability results in accelerated clonal evolution leading to the appearance of more aggressive clones with increased drug resistance. The second group of cancers, termed germ cell neoplasia, results from the mislocation of pluripotent stem cells during early development. During normal development, pluripotent stem cells that originate in early embryos give rise to all of the cell lineages in the embryo and adult, but when they mislocate to ectopic sites, they produce tumors. Remarkably, pluripotent stem cells, like many cancer cells, depend on the Geminin protein to prevent excess DNA replication from triggering DNA damage-dependent apoptosis. This link between the control of DNA replication during early development and germ cell neoplasia reveals Geminin as a potential chemotherapeutic target in the eradication of cancer progenitor cells.

  14. Links between DNA Replication, Stem Cells and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilev, Alex; DePamphilis, Melvin L

    2017-01-25

    Cancers can be categorized into two groups: those whose frequency increases with age, and those resulting from errors during mammalian development. The first group is linked to DNA replication through the accumulation of genetic mutations that occur during proliferation of developmentally acquired stem cells that give rise to and maintain tissues and organs. These mutations, which result from DNA replication errors as well as environmental insults, fall into two categories; cancer driver mutations that initiate carcinogenesis and genome destabilizing mutations that promote aneuploidy through excess genome duplication and chromatid missegregation. Increased genome instability results in accelerated clonal evolution leading to the appearance of more aggressive clones with increased drug resistance. The second group of cancers, termed germ cell neoplasia, results from the mislocation of pluripotent stem cells during early development. During normal development, pluripotent stem cells that originate in early embryos give rise to all of the cell lineages in the embryo and adult, but when they mislocate to ectopic sites, they produce tumors. Remarkably, pluripotent stem cells, like many cancer cells, depend on the Geminin protein to prevent excess DNA replication from triggering DNA damage-dependent apoptosis. This link between the control of DNA replication during early development and germ cell neoplasia reveals Geminin as a potential chemotherapeutic target in the eradication of cancer progenitor cells.

  15. Geminin: a major DNA replication safeguard in higher eukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melixetian, Marina; Helin, Kristian

    2004-01-01

    Eukaryotes have evolved multiple mechanisms to restrict DNA replication to once per cell cycle. These mechanisms prevent relicensing of origins of replication after initiation of DNA replication in S phase until the end of mitosis. Most of our knowledge of mechanisms controlling prereplication...

  16. Geminin: a major DNA replication safeguard in higher eukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melixetian, Marina; Helin, Kristian

    2004-01-01

    Eukaryotes have evolved multiple mechanisms to restrict DNA replication to once per cell cycle. These mechanisms prevent relicensing of origins of replication after initiation of DNA replication in S phase until the end of mitosis. Most of our knowledge of mechanisms controlling prereplication...

  17. Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover initial Mastcam geomorphologic and multispectral characterization of the Gale crater field site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, J. F.; Malin, M.; Maki, J.; Dietrich, W. E.; Edgett, K. S.; Edwards, L.; Garvin, J. B.; Hallet, B.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Heydari, E.; Johnson, J. R.; Kah, L. C.; Lemmon, M. T.; Minitti, M.; Olson, T. S.; Parker, T. J.; Rice, M. S.; Rowland, S. K.; Schieber, J.; Sletten, R. S.; Sullivan, R. J.; Sumner, D. Y.; Thomas, P. C.; Yingst, R.; Team, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover landed in Gale crater on August 6, 2012 and has been enabling the exploration of a variety of geologic terrains between the rover's landing site at Bradbury Rise and the nearby topographic low point known as Yellowknife Bay. Curiosity carries a multispectral imaging system known as Mastcam, which consists of two boresighted CCD cameras, one of which acquires relatively wide field images (34-mm focal length, 18.4x15 degree FOV) and the other of which obtains narrower-angle telephoto images (100-mm focal length, 6.3x5.1 degree FOV). Each of these cameras has an 8-position filter wheel to enable imaging through broadband RGB Bayer filtes, nine specific narrowband filters in the 445 to 1012 nm region to enabled limited detectability of certain ferric, ferrous, and hydrated minerals, and neutral density solar filters for monitoring of atmospheric opacity. The Mastcams acquire images designed primarily to address specific scientific goals in geology, mineralogy, and atmospheric science, but also to support operational decisions related to rover driving, arm instrument placement, and rover subsystems status. Here we provide an overview of the initial scientific imaging results from the Mastcam investigation, from sol 0 (landing sol) through the end of the drilling campaign in Yellowknife Bay and the beginning of the long drive from there to the base of Mt. Sharp. A diversity of materials exposed at the surface have been encountered. This includes angular to sub-angular rock fragments scattered across the surface, boulder to fine gravel in size, variably dusty, and commonly fine grained. Thin outcrops of pebble to gravel conglomerate have been encountered across Bradbury rise. Granular ripples and other fine grained deposits were periodically encountered. In the wind-eroded Yellowknife Bay area, extensive polygonally fractured outcrops of sandstone and mudstone (with light-toned fracture fills) were discovered. The occurrence of

  18. Polyhomologation based on in situ generated Boron-thexyl-silaboracyclic initiating sites: a novel strategy towards the synthesis of polyethylene-based complex architectures

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zhen

    2015-04-10

    A novel strategy, based on the in situ generated Boron-thexyl-silaboracyclic initiating sites for the polyhomologation of dimethylsulfoxonium methylide, has been developed for the synthesis of complex polyethylene-based architectures. As examples, the synthesis of a 4-arm polyethylene star, three (polystyrene)(polyethylene)2 3-miktoarm stars and a PE-branched double graft copolymers are given.

  19. The magic spot: a ppGpp binding site on E. coli RNA polymerase responsible for regulation of transcription initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Wilma; Vrentas, Catherine E; Sanchez-Vazquez, Patricia; Gaal, Tamas; Gourse, Richard L

    2013-05-01

    The global regulatory nucleotide ppGpp ("magic spot") regulates transcription from a large subset of Escherichia coli promoters, illustrating how small molecules can control gene expression promoter-specifically by interacting with RNA polymerase (RNAP) without binding to DNA. However, ppGpp's target site on RNAP, and therefore its mechanism of action, has remained unclear. We report here a binding site for ppGpp on E. coli RNAP, identified by crosslinking, protease mapping, and analysis of mutant RNAPs that fail to respond to ppGpp. A strain with a mutant ppGpp binding site displays properties characteristic of cells defective for ppGpp synthesis. The binding site is at an interface of two RNAP subunits, ω and β', and its position suggests an allosteric mechanism of action involving restriction of motion between two mobile RNAP modules. Identification of the binding site allows prediction of bacterial species in which ppGpp exerts its effects by targeting RNAP.

  20. Mathematical Framework for A Novel Database Replication Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divakar Singh Yadav

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the detailed overview of the database replication is presented. Thereafter, PDDRA (Pre-fetching based dynamic data replication algorithm algorithm as recently published is detailed. In this algorithm, further, modifications are suggested to minimize the delay in data replication. Finally a mathematical framework is presented to evaluate mean waiting time before a data can be replicated on the requested site.

  1. DNA replication origin activation in space and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragkos, Michalis; Ganier, Olivier; Coulombe, Philippe; Méchali, Marcel

    2015-06-01

    DNA replication begins with the assembly of pre-replication complexes (pre-RCs) at thousands of DNA replication origins during the G1 phase of the cell cycle. At the G1-S-phase transition, pre-RCs are converted into pre-initiation complexes, in which the replicative helicase is activated, leading to DNA unwinding and initiation of DNA synthesis. However, only a subset of origins are activated during any S phase. Recent insights into the mechanisms underlying this choice reveal how flexibility in origin usage and temporal activation are linked to chromosome structure and organization, cell growth and differentiation, and replication stress.

  2. Cryptic Protein Priming Sites in Two Different Domains of Duck Hepatitis B Virus Reverse Transcriptase for Initiating DNA Synthesis In Vitro▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boregowda, Rajeev K.; Lin, Li; Zhu, Qin; Tian, Fang; Hu, Jianming

    2011-01-01

    Initiation of reverse transcription in hepadnaviruses is accomplished by a unique protein-priming mechanism whereby a specific Y residue in the terminal protein (TP) domain of the viral reverse transcriptase (RT) acts as a primer to initiate DNA synthesis, which is carried out by the RT domain of the same protein. When separate TP and RT domains from the duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) RT protein were tested in a trans-complementation assay in vitro, the RT domain could also serve, unexpectedly, as a protein primer for DNA synthesis, as could a TP mutant lacking the authentic primer Y (Y96) residue. Priming at these other, so-called cryptic, priming sites in both the RT and TP domains shared the same requirements as those at Y96. A mini RT protein with both the TP and RT domains linked in cis, as well as the full-length RT protein, could also initiate DNA synthesis using cryptic priming sites. The cryptic priming site(s) in TP was found to be S/T, while those in the RT domain were Y and S/T. As with the authentic TP Y96 priming site, the cryptic priming sites in the TP and RT domains could support DNA polymerization subsequent to the initial covalent linkage of the first nucleotide to the priming amino acid residue. These results provide new insights into the complex mechanisms of protein priming in hepadnaviruses, including the selection of the primer residue and the interactions between the TP and RT domains that is essential for protein priming. PMID:21593164

  3. Silencing of hepatitis C virus replication by a non-viral vector based on solid lipid nanoparticles containing a shRNA targeted to the internal ribosome entry site (IRES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrecilla, Josune; Del Pozo-Rodríguez, Ana; Solinís, María Ángeles; Apaolaza, Paola S; Berzal-Herranz, Beatriz; Romero-López, Cristina; Berzal-Herranz, Alfredo; Rodríguez-Gascón, Alicia

    2016-10-01

    Gene silencing mediated by RNAi has gained increasing interest as an alternative for the treatment of infectious diseases such as refractory hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. In this work we have designed and evaluated a non-viral vector based on solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) bearing hyaluronic acid, protamine and a short hairpin RNA (shRNA74) targeted to the Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES) of the HCV. The vector was able to inhibit the expression of the HCV IRES in Huh-7 cells, with the inhibition level dependent on the shRNA74 to SLN ratio and on the shRNA74 dose added to the culture cells. The nanocarrier was also able to inhibit the replication in human hepatoma cells supporting a subgenomic HCV replicon (Huh-7 NS3-3'). The vector was quickly and efficiently internalized by the cells, and endocytosis was the most productive uptake mechanism for silencing. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis and to a lesser extent caveolae/lipid raft-mediated endocytosis were identified as endocytic mechanisms involved in the cell uptake. Internalization via the CD44 receptor was also involved, although this entry route seems to be less productive for silencing than endocytosis. The vector did not induce either hemolysis or agglutination of red cells in vitro, which was indicative of good biocompatibility. In summary, we have shown for the first time the ability of a non-viral SLN-based vector to silence a HCV replicon.

  4. DNA replication and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyer, Anne-Sophie; Walter, David; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2016-01-01

    A dividing cell has to duplicate its DNA precisely once during the cell cycle to preserve genome integrity avoiding the accumulation of genetic aberrations that promote diseases such as cancer. A large number of endogenous impacts can challenge DNA replication and cells harbor a battery of pathways...... causing DNA replication stress and genome instability. Further, we describe cellular and systemic responses to these insults with a focus on DNA replication restart pathways. Finally, we discuss the therapeutic potential of exploiting intrinsic replicative stress in cancer cells for targeted therapy....

  5. The DnaK Chaperone Uses Different Mechanisms To Promote and Inhibit Replication of Vibrio cholerae Chromosome 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jha, Jyoti K.; Li, Mi; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Miller Jenkins, Lisa M.; Wlodawer, Alexander; Chattoraj, Dhruba; Dunny, Gary M.

    2017-04-18

    Replication of Vibrio cholerae chromosome 2 (Chr2) depends on molecular chaperone DnaK to facilitate binding of the initiator (RctB) to the replication origin. The binding occurs at two kinds of site, 12-mers and 39-mers, which promote and inhibit replication, respectively. Here we show that DnaK employs different mechanisms to enhance the two kinds of binding. We found that mutations inrctBthat reduce DnaK binding also reduce 12-mer binding and initiation. The initiation defect is suppressed by second-site mutations that increase 12-mer binding only marginally. Instead, they reduce replication inhibitory mechanisms: RctB dimerization and 39-mer binding. One suppressing change was in a dimerization domain which is folded similarly to the initiator of an iteron plasmid—the presumed progenitor of Chr2. In plasmids, DnaK promotes initiation by reducing dimerization. A different mutation was in the 39-mer binding domain of RctB and inactivated it, indicating an alternative suppression mechanism. Paradoxically, although DnaK increases 39-mer binding, the increase was also achieved by inactivating the DnaK binding site of RctB. This result suggests that the site inhibits the 39-mer binding domain (via autoinhibition) when prevented from binding DnaK. Taken together, our results reveal an important feature of the transition from plasmid to chromosome: the Chr2 initiator retains the plasmid-like dimerization domain and its control by chaperones but uses the chaperones in an unprecedented way to control the inhibitory 39-mer binding. IMPORTANCE The capacity of proteins to undergo remodeling provides opportunities to control their function. However, remodeling remains a poorly understood aspect of the structure-function paradigm due to its dynamic nature. Here we have studied remodeling of the initiator of replication ofVibrio choleraeChr2 by the molecular chaperone, DnaK. We show that DnaK binds to a site on the Chr2 initiator (RctB) that

  6. Rescue from replication stress during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragkos, Michalis; Naim, Valeria

    2017-04-03

    Genomic instability is a hallmark of cancer and a common feature of human disorders, characterized by growth defects, neurodegeneration, cancer predisposition, and aging. Recent evidence has shown that DNA replication stress is a major driver of genomic instability and tumorigenesis. Cells can undergo mitosis with under-replicated DNA or unresolved DNA structures, and specific pathways are dedicated to resolving these structures during mitosis, suggesting that mitotic rescue from replication stress (MRRS) is a key process influencing genome stability and cellular homeostasis. Deregulation of MRRS following oncogene activation or loss-of-function of caretaker genes may be the cause of chromosomal aberrations that promote cancer initiation and progression. In this review, we discuss the causes and consequences of replication stress, focusing on its persistence in mitosis as well as the mechanisms and factors involved in its resolution, and the potential impact of incomplete replication or aberrant MRRS on tumorigenesis, aging and disease.

  7. PCNA Modifications for Regulation of Post-Replication Repair Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Stalled DNA replication forks activate specific DNA repair mechanism called post-replication repair (PRR) pathways that simply bypass DNA damage. The bypassing of DNA damage by PRR prevents prolonged stalling of DNA replication that could result in double strand breaks (DSBs). Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) functions to initiate and choose different bypassing pathways of PRR. In yeast, DNA replication forks stalled by DNA damage induces monoubiquitination of PCNA at K164, which is ...

  8. Development and Validation of a Preprocedural Risk Score to Predict Access Site Complications After Peripheral Vascular Interventions Based on the Vascular Quality Initiative Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ortiz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Access site complications following peripheral vascular intervention (PVI are associated with prolonged hospitalization and increased mortality. Prediction of access site complication risk may optimize PVI care; however, there is no tool designed for this. We aimed to create a clinical scoring tool to stratify patients according to their risk of developing access site complications after PVI. Methods: The Society for Vascular Surgery’s Vascular Quality Initiative database yielded 27,997 patients who had undergone PVI at 131 North American centers. Clinically and statistically significant preprocedural risk factors associated with in-hospital, post-PVI access site complications were included in a multivariate logistic regression model, with access site complications as the outcome variable. A predictive model was developed with a random sample of 19,683 (70% PVI procedures and validated in 8,314 (30%. Results: Access site complications occurred in 939 (3.4% patients. The risk tool predictors are female gender, age > 70 years, white race, bedridden ambulatory status, insulin-treated diabetes mellitus, prior minor amputation, procedural indication of claudication, and nonfemoral arterial access site (model c-statistic = 0.638. Of these predictors, insulin-treated diabetes mellitus and prior minor amputation were protective of access site complications. The discriminatory power of the risk model was confirmed by the validation dataset (c-statistic = 0.6139. Higher risk scores correlated with increased frequency of access site complications: 1.9% for low risk, 3.4% for moderate risk and 5.1% for high risk. Conclusions: The proposed clinical risk score based on eight preprocedural characteristics is a tool to stratify patients at risk for post-PVI access site complications. The risk score may assist physicians in identifying patients at risk for access site complications and selection of patients who may benefit from bleeding avoidance

  9. Ecological Monitoring at Long-Term Study Sites in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Initial Projects in 1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — We established two longterm ecological monitoring sites in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in 1996 and three more will be established between 1997 and 1999. The...

  10. Roles for endocytic trafficking and phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase III alpha in hepatitis C virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Kristi L; Cooper, Jacob D; Heaton, Nicholas S; Yoon, Rosa; Oakland, Todd E; Jordan, Tristan X; Mateu, Guaniri; Grakoui, Arash; Randall, Glenn

    2009-05-05

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) reorganizes cellular membranes to establish sites of replication. The required host pathways and the mechanism of cellular membrane reorganization are poorly characterized. Therefore, we interrogated a customized small interfering RNA (siRNA) library that targets 140 host membrane-trafficking genes to identify genes required for both HCV subgenomic replication and infectious virus production. We identified 7 host cofactors of viral replication, including Cdc42 and Rock2 (actin polymerization), EEA1 and Rab5A (early endosomes), Rab7L1, and PI3-kinase C2gamma and PI4-kinase IIIalpha (phospholipid metabolism). Studies of drug inhibitors indicate actin polymerization and phospholipid kinase activity are required for HCV replication. We found extensive co-localization of the HCV replicase markers NS5A and double-stranded RNA with Rab5A and partial co-localization with Rab7L1. PI4K-IIIalpha co-localized with NS5A and double-stranded RNA in addition to being present in detergent-resistant membranes containing NS5A. In a comparison of type II and type III PI4-kinases, PI4Ks were not required for HCV entry, and only PI4K-IIIalpha was required for HCV replication. Although PI4K-IIIalpha siRNAs decreased HCV replication and virus production by almost 100%, they had no effect on initial HCV RNA translation, suggesting that PI4K-IIIalpha functions at a posttranslational stage. Electron microscopy identified the presence of membranous webs, which are thought to be the site of HCV replication, in HCV-infected cells. Pretreatment with PI4K-IIIalpha siRNAs greatly reduced the accumulation of these membranous web structures in HCV-infected cells. We propose that PI4K-IIIalpha plays an essential role in membrane alterations leading to the formation of HCV replication complexes.

  11. Replicating animal mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A. McKinney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA replication has been experiencing incredible progress in recent years, and yet little is certain about the mechanism(s used by animal cells to replicate this plasmid-like genome. The long-standing strand-displacement model of mammalian mtDNA replication (for which single-stranded DNA intermediates are a hallmark has been intensively challenged by a new set of data, which suggests that replication proceeds via coupled leading-and lagging-strand synthesis (resembling bacterial genome replication and/or via long stretches of RNA intermediates laid on the mtDNA lagging-strand (the so called RITOLS. The set of proteins required for mtDNA replication is small and includes the catalytic and accessory subunits of DNA polymerase y, the mtDNA helicase Twinkle, the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein, and the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (which most likely functions as the mtDNA primase. Mutations in the genes coding for the first three proteins are associated with human diseases and premature aging, justifying the research interest in the genetic, biochemical and structural properties of the mtDNA replication machinery. Here we summarize these properties and discuss the current models of mtDNA replication in animal cells.

  12. Crinivirus replication and host interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsofia A Kiss

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Criniviruses comprise one of the genera within the family Closteroviridae. Members in this family are restricted to the phloem and rely on whitefly vectors of the genera Bemisia and/or Trialeurodes for plant-to-plant transmission. All criniviruses have bipartite, positive-sense ssRNA genomes, although there is an unconfirmed report of one having a tripartite genome. Lettuce infectious yellows virus (LIYV is the type species of the genus, the best studied so far of the criniviruses and the first for which a reverse genetics system was available. LIYV RNA 1 encodes for proteins predicted to be involved in replication, and alone is competent for replication in protoplasts. Replication results in accumulation of cytoplasmic vesiculated membranous structures which are characteristic of most studied members of the Closteroviridae. These membranous structures, often referred to as BYV-type vesicles, are likely sites of RNA replication. LIYV RNA 2 is replicated in trans when co-infecting cells with RNA 1, but is temporally delayed relative to RNA1. Efficient RNA 2 replication also is dependent on the RNA 1-encoded RNA binding protein, P34. No LIYV RNA 2-encoded proteins have been shown to affect RNA replication, but at least four, CP, CPm, Hsp70h, and p59 are virion structural components and CPm is a determinant of whitefly transmissibility. Roles of other LIYV RNA 2-encoded proteins are largely as yet unknown, but P26 is a non-virion protein that accumulates in cells as characteristic plasmalemma deposits which in plants are localized within phloem parenchyma and companion cells over plasmodesmata connections to sieve elements. The two remaining crinivirus-conserved RNA 2-encoded proteins are P5 and P9. P5 is 39 amino acid protein and is encoded at the 5’ end of RNA 2 as ORF1 and is part of the hallmark closterovirus gene array. The orthologous gene in BYV has been shown to play a role in cell-to-cell movement and indicated to be localized to the

  13. ppGpp Binding to a Site at the RNAP-DksA Interface Accounts for Its Dramatic Effects on Transcription Initiation during the Stringent Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Wilma; Sanchez-Vazquez, Patricia; Chen, Albert Y; Lee, Jeong-Hyun; Burgos, Hector L; Gourse, Richard L

    2016-06-16

    Throughout the bacterial domain, the alarmone ppGpp dramatically reprograms transcription following nutrient limitation. This "stringent response" is critical for survival and antibiotic tolerance and is a model for transcriptional regulation by small ligands. We report that ppGpp binds to two distinct sites 60 Å apart on E. coli RNA polymerase (RNAP), one characterized previously (site 1) and a second identified here at an interface of RNAP and the transcription factor DksA (site 2). The location and unusual tripartite nature of site 2 account for the DksA-ppGpp synergism and suggest mechanisms for ppGpp enhancement of DksA's effects on RNAP. Site 2 binding results in the majority of ppGpp's effects on transcription initiation in vitro and in vivo, and strains lacking site 2 are severely impaired for growth following nutritional shifts. Filling of the two sites at different ppGpp concentrations would expand the dynamic range of cellular responses to changes in ppGpp levels.

  14. Definition of the transcription initiation site of human plasminogen gene in liver and non hepatic cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malgaretti, N; Bruno, L; Pontoglio, M; Candiani, G; Meroni, G; Ottolenghi, S; Taramelli, R

    1990-12-31

    We have mapped the cap site of the human plasminogen mRNA by primer extension and PCR techniques and found that it is located at position -161 relative to the first ATG, 97 bases upstream to the 5' end of the previously isolated cDNA clone. Seven human hepatic and non hepatic cell lines and fresh liver cells were tested for human plasminogen mRNA expression: the liver and the liver derived HepG2 cell line represent the major site of plasminogen RNA synthesis while the other cell lines (Hep3B, HeLa, IMR, 293 CaCo and SW626) show much lower levels.

  15. Using autonomous replication to physically and genetically define human origins of replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krysan, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    The author previously developed a system for studying autonomous replication in human cells involving the use of sequences from the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome to provide extrachromosomal plasmids with a nuclear retention function. Using this system, it was demonstrated that large fragments of human genomic DNA could be isolated which replicate autonomously in human cells. In this study the DNA sequences which function as origins of replication in human cells are defined physically and genetically. These experiments demonstrated that replication initiates at multiple locations distributed throughout the plasmid. Another line of experiments addressed the DNA sequence requirements for autonomous replication in human cells. These experiments demonstrated that human DNA fragments have a higher replication activity than bacterial fragments do. It was also found, however, that the bacterial DNA sequence could support efficient replication if enough copies of it were present on the plasmid. These findings suggested that autonomous replication in human cells does not depend on extensive, specific DNA sequences. The autonomous replication system which the author has employed for these experiments utilizes a cis-acting sequence from the EBV origin and the trans-acting EBNA-1 protein to provide plasmids with a nuclear retention function. It was therefore relevant to verify that the autonomous replication of human DNA fragments did not depend on the replication activity associated with the EBV sequences utilized for nuclear retention. To accomplish this goal, the author demonstrated that plasmids carrying the EBV sequences and large fragments of human DNA could support long-term autonomous replication in hamster cells, which are not permissive for EBV replication.

  16. The Golgi protein ACBD3 facilitates Enterovirus 71 replication by interacting with 3A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Xiaobo; Xiao, Xia; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Ma, Yijie; Qi, Jianli; Wu, Chao; Xiao, Yan; Zhou, Zhuo; He, Bin; Wang, Jianwei

    2017-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a human pathogen that causes hand, foot, mouth disease and neurological complications. Although EV71, as well as other enteroviruses, initiates a remodeling of intracellular membrane for genomic replication, the regulatory mechanism remains elusive. By screening human cDNA library, we uncover that the Golgi resident protein acyl-coenzyme A binding domain-containing 3 (ACBD3) serves as a target of the 3A protein of EV71. This interaction occurs in cells expressing 3A or infected with EV71. Genetic inhibition or deletion of ACBD3 drastically impairs viral RNA replication and plaque formation. Such defects are corrected upon restoration of ACBD3. In infected cells, EV71 3A redirects ACBD3, to the replication sites. I44A or H54Y substitution in 3A interrupts the binding to ACBD3. As such, viral replication is impeded. These results reveal a mechanism of EV71 replication that involves host ACBD3 for viral replication. PMID:28303920

  17. Fate of HIV-1 cDNA intermediates during reverse transcription is dictated by transcription initiation site of virus genomic RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Takao; Sato, Yoko; Huang, Yu-Lun; Koi, Satoshi; Takahata, Tatsuro; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Kawai, Gota; Kannagi, Mari

    2015-01-01

    Retroviral reverse transcription is accomplished by sequential strand-transfers of partial cDNA intermediates copied from viral genomic RNA. Here, we revealed an unprecedented role of 5′-end guanosine (G) of HIV-1 genomic RNA for reverse transcription. Based on current consensus for HIV-1 transcription initiation site, HIV-1 transcripts possess a single G at 5′-ends (G1-form). However, we found that HIV-1 transcripts with additional Gs at 5′-ends (G2- and G3-forms) were abundantly expressed in infected cells by using alternative transcription initiation sites. The G2- and G3-forms were also detected in the virus particle, although the G1-form predominated. To address biological impact of the 5′-G number, we generated HIV clone DNA to express the G1-form exclusively by deleting the alternative initiation sites. Virus produced from the clone showed significantly higher strand-transfer of minus strong-stop cDNA (-sscDNA). The in vitro assay using synthetic HIV-1 RNAs revealed that the abortive forms of -sscDNA were abundantly generated from the G3-form RNA, but dramatically reduced from the G1-form. Moreover, the strand-transfer of -sscDNA from the G1-form was prominently stimulated by HIV-1 nucleocapsid. Taken together, our results demonstrated that the 5′-G number that corresponds to HIV-1 transcription initiation site was critical for successful strand-transfer of -sscDNA during reverse transcription. PMID:26631448

  18. Controlled synthesis of biodegradable lactide polymers and copolymers using novel in situ generated or single-site stereoselective polymerization initiators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhong, Zhiyuan; Dijkstra, Pieter J.; Feijen, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Polylactides and their copolymers are key biodegradable polymers used widely in biomedical, pharmaceutical and ecological applications. The development of synthetic pathways and catalyst/initiator systems to produce pre-designed polylactides, as well as the fundamental understanding of the polymeriz

  19. The nucleotide-binding site of bacterial translation initiation factor 2 (IF2) as a metabolic sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milon, P.; Tischenko, E.V.; Tomsic, J.; Caserta, E.; Folkers, G.E.; La Teana, A.; Rodnina, M.V.; Pon, C.L.; Boelens, R.; Gualerzi, C.O.

    2006-01-01

    Translational initiation factor 2 (IF2) is a guanine nucleotide-binding protein that can bind guanosine 3′,5′-(bis) diphosphate (ppGpp), an alarmone involved in stringent response in bacteria. In cells growing under optimal conditions, the GTP concentration is very high, and that of ppGpp very low.

  20. Decreased replication origin activity in temporal transition regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zeqiang; Hughes, Christina M; Kosiyatrakul, Settapong; Norio, Paolo; Sen, Ranjan; Fiering, Steven; Allis, C David; Bouhassira, Eric E; Schildkraut, Carl L

    2009-11-30

    In the mammalian genome, early- and late-replicating domains are often separated by temporal transition regions (TTRs) with novel properties and unknown functions. We identified a TTR in the mouse immunoglobulin heavy chain (Igh) locus, which contains replication origins that are silent in embryonic stem cells but activated during B cell development. To investigate which factors contribute to origin activation during B cell development, we systematically modified the genetic and epigenetic status of the endogenous Igh TTR and used a single-molecule approach to analyze DNA replication. Introduction of a transcription unit into the Igh TTR, activation of gene transcription, and enhancement of local histone modifications characteristic of active chromatin did not lead to origin activation. Moreover, very few replication initiation events were observed when two ectopic replication origin sequences were inserted into the TTR. These findings indicate that the Igh TTR represents a repressive compartment that inhibits replication initiation, thus maintaining the boundaries between early and late replication domains.

  1. The Replication Recipe: What makes for a convincing replication?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandt, M.J.; IJzerman, H.; Dijksterhuis, A.J.; Farach, F.J.; Geller, J.; Giner-Sorolla, R.; Grange, J.A.; Perugini, M.; Spies, J.R.; Veer, A. van 't

    2014-01-01

    Psychological scientists have recently started to reconsider the importance of close replications in building a cumulative knowledge base; however, there is no consensus about what constitutes a convincing close replication study. To facilitate convincing close replication attempts we have developed

  2. A New Replication Norm for Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne P LeBel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been a growing concern regarding the replicability of findings in psychology, including a mounting number of prominent findings that have failed to replicate via high-powered independent replication attempts. In the face of this replicability “crisis of confidence”, several initiatives have been implemented to increase the reliability of empirical findings. In the current article, I propose a new replication norm that aims to further boost the dependability of findings in psychology. Paralleling the extant social norm that researchers should peer review about three times as many articles that they themselves publish per year, the new replication norm states that researchers should aim to independently replicate important findings in their own research areas in proportion to the number of original studies they themselves publish per year (e.g., a 4:1 original-to-replication studies ratio. I argue this simple approach could significantly advance our science by increasing the reliability and cumulative nature of our empirical knowledge base, accelerating our theoretical understanding of psychological phenomena, instilling a focus on quality rather than quantity, and by facilitating our transformation toward a research culture where executing and reporting independent direct replications is viewed as an ordinary part of the research process. To help promote the new norm, I delineate (1 how each of the major constituencies of the research process (i.e., funders, journals, professional societies, departments, and individual researchers can incentivize replications and promote the new norm and (2 any obstacles each constituency faces in supporting the new norm.

  3. The origin recognition complex interacts with a subset of metabolic genes tightly linked to origins of replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Shor

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The origin recognition complex (ORC marks chromosomal sites as replication origins and is essential for replication initiation. In yeast, ORC also binds to DNA elements called silencers, where its primary function is to recruit silent information regulator (SIR proteins to establish transcriptional silencing. Indeed, silencers function poorly as chromosomal origins. Several genetic, molecular, and biochemical studies of HMR-E have led to a model proposing that when ORC becomes limiting in the cell (such as in the orc2-1 mutant only sites that bind ORC tightly (such as HMR-E remain fully occupied by ORC, while lower affinity sites, including many origins, lose ORC occupancy. Since HMR-E possessed a unique non-replication function, we reasoned that other tight sites might reveal novel functions for ORC on chromosomes. Therefore, we comprehensively determined ORC "affinity" genome-wide by performing an ORC ChIP-on-chip in ORC2 and orc2-1 strains. Here we describe a novel group of orc2-1-resistant ORC-interacting chromosomal sites (ORF-ORC sites that did not function as replication origins or silencers. Instead, ORF-ORC sites were comprised of protein-coding regions of highly transcribed metabolic genes. In contrast to the ORC-silencer paradigm, transcriptional activation promoted ORC association with these genes. Remarkably, ORF-ORC genes were enriched in proximity to origins of replication and, in several instances, were transcriptionally regulated by these origins. Taken together, these results suggest a surprising connection among ORC, replication origins, and cellular metabolism.

  4. Initial Response of Pine Seedlings and Weeds to Dried Sewage Sludge in Rehabilitation of an Eroded Forest Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Berry

    1977-01-01

    Dried sewage sludge was applied at rates of 0, 17, 34, and 69 metric tons/ha on a badly eroded forest site in the Piedmont region of northeast Georgia. Production of weed bio mass varied directly with amount of sludge applied. Heigh growth for both shortleafand loblolly pine seedlings appeared to be greater on plots receiving 17 metric tons of sludge/ha, bu differences...

  5. Limiting DNA replication to once and only once

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    In Escherichia coli cells, the origin of chromosomal replication is temporarily inactivated after initiation has occurred. Origin sequestration is the first line of defence against over-initiation, providing a time window during which the initiation potential can be reduced by: (i) titration of DnaA proteins to newly replicated chromosomal elements; (ii) regulation of the activity of the DnaA initiator protein; and (iii) sequestration of the dnaA gene promoter. This review represents the firs...

  6. Modeling DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Recommends the use of a model of DNA made out of Velcro to help students visualize the steps of DNA replication. Includes a materials list, construction directions, and details of the demonstration using the model parts. (DDR)

  7. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Tower Road Site in Aurora, Colorado. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Geet, O.; Mosey, G.

    2013-03-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Tower Road site in Aurora, Colorado, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site. This study did not assess environmental conditions at the site.

  8. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Price Landfill Site in Pleasantville, New Jersey. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salasovich, J.; Geiger, J.; Mosey, G.; Healey, V.

    2013-05-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Price Landfill site in Pleasantville, New Jersey, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site. This study did not assess environmental conditions at the site.

  9. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Former Chicago, Milwaukee, and St. Paul Rail Yard Company Site in Perry, Iowa. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salasovich, J.; Geiger, J.; Healey, V.; Mosey, G.

    2013-03-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Former Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Rail Yard Company site in Perry, Iowa, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site. This study did not assess environmental conditions at the site.

  10. Combining bulk sediment OSL and meteoric 10 Be fingerprinting techniques to identify gully initiation sites and erosion depths

    OpenAIRE

    Portenga, E.W.; Bishop, P; Rood, D.H.; Bierman, P.R.

    2017-01-01

    Deep erosional gullies dissect landscapes around the world. Existing erosion models focus on predicting where gullies might begin to erode, but identifying where existing gullies were initiated and under what conditions is difficult, especially when historical records are unavailable. Here we outline a new approach for fingerprinting alluvium and tracing it back to its source by combining bulk sediment optically stimulated luminescence (bulk OSL) and meteoric 10Be (10Bem) measurements made on...

  11. Adenovirus DNA Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Hoeben, Rob C.; Uil, Taco G.

    2013-01-01

    Adenoviruses have attracted much attention as probes to study biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, splicing, and cellular transformation. More recently these viruses have been used as gene-transfer vectors and oncolytic agents. On the other hand, adenoviruses are notorious pathogens in people with compromised immune functions. This article will briefly summarize the basic replication strategy of adenoviruses and the key proteins involved and will deal with the new deve...

  12. Control of chromosome replication in caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marczynski, Gregory T; Shapiro, Lucy

    2002-01-01

    Caulobacter crescentus permits detailed analysis of chromosome replication control during a developmental cell cycle. Its chromosome replication origin (Cori) may be prototypical of the large and diverse class of alpha-proteobacteria. Cori has features that both affiliate and distinguish it from the Escherichia coli chromosome replication origin. For example, requirements for DnaA protein and RNA transcription affiliate both origins. However, Cori is distinguished by several features, and especially by five binding sites for the CtrA response regulator protein. To selectively repress and limit chromosome replication, CtrA receives both protein degradation and protein phosphorylation signals. The signal mediators, proteases, response regulators, and kinases, as well as Cori DNA and the replisome, all show distinct patterns of temporal and spatial organization during cell cycle progression. Future studies should integrate our knowledge of biochemical activities at Cori with our emerging understanding of cytological dynamics in C. crescentus and other bacteria.

  13. Alphavirus polymerase and RNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietilä, Maija K; Hellström, Kirsi; Ahola, Tero

    2017-01-16

    Alphaviruses are typically arthropod-borne, and many are important pathogens such as chikungunya virus. Alphaviruses encode four nonstructural proteins (nsP1-4), initially produced as a polyprotein P1234. nsP4 is the core RNA-dependent RNA polymerase but all four nsPs are required for RNA synthesis. The early replication complex (RC) formed by the polyprotein P123 and nsP4 synthesizes minus RNA strands, and the late RC composed of fully processed nsP1-nsP4 is responsible for the production of genomic and subgenomic plus strands. Different parts of nsP4 recognize the promoters for minus and plus strands but the binding also requires the other nsPs. The alphavirus polymerase has been purified and is capable of de novo RNA synthesis only in the presence of the other nsPs. The purified nsP4 also has terminal adenylyltransferase activity, which may generate the poly(A) tail at the 3' end of the genome. Membrane association of the nsPs is vital for replication, and alphaviruses induce membrane invaginations called spherules, which form a microenvironment for RNA synthesis by concentrating replication components and protecting double-stranded RNA intermediates. The RCs isolated as crude membrane preparations are active in RNA synthesis in vitro, but high-resolution structure of the RC has not been achieved, and thus the arrangement of viral and possible host components remains unknown. For some alphaviruses, Ras-GTPase-activating protein (Src-homology 3 (SH3) domain)-binding proteins (G3BPs) and amphiphysins have been shown to be essential for RNA replication and are present in the RCs. Host factors offer an additional target for antivirals, as only few alphavirus polymerase inhibitors have been described.

  14. Transcription-replication conflicts at chromosomal fragile sites—consequences in M phase and beyond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Vibe Hallundbæk; Lisby, Michael

    2017-01-01

    transcription and replication patterns. At the same time, these chromosomal fragile sites engage in aberrant DNA structures in mitosis. Here, we discuss the mechanistic details of transcription–replication conflicts including putative scenarios for R-loop-induced replication inhibition to understand how...... transcription–replication conflicts transition from S phase into various aberrant DNA structures in mitosis....

  15. Compaction and transport properties of newly replicated Caulobacter crescentus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sun-Hae; McAdams, Harley H

    2011-12-01

    Upon initiating replication of the Caulobacter chromosome, one copy of the parS centromere remains at the stalked pole; the other moves to the distal pole. We identified the segregation dynamics and compaction characteristics of newly replicated Caulobacter DNA during transport (highly variable from cell to cell) using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. The parS centromere and a length (also highly variable) of parS proximal DNA on each arm of the chromosome are segregated with the same relatively slow transport pattern as the parS locus. Newly replicated DNA further than about 100 kb from parS segregates with a different and faster pattern, while loci at 48 kb from parS segregate with the slow pattern in some cells and the fast pattern in others. The observed parS-proximal DNA compaction characteristics have scaling properties that suggest the DNA is branched. HU2-deletion strains exhibited a reduced compaction phenotype except near the parS site where only the ΔHU1ΔHU2 double mutant had a compaction phenotype. The chromosome shows speed-dependent extension during translocation suggesting the DNA polymer is under tension. While DNA segregation is highly reliable and succeeds in virtually all wild-type cells, the high degree of cell to cell variation in the segregation process is noteworthy.

  16. Cloning of an origin of DNA replication of Xenopus laevis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, S.; Taylor, J.H.

    1980-09-01

    DNA fragments of Xenopus laevis, the African frog, were cloned in the EcoRI site of the Eschrichia coli plasmid pACYC189 and tested for ability to initiate and complete replication of the recombinant plasmid when injected into unfertilized eggs of X. laevis. After measurement of the (/sup 3/H)-thymidine incorporation per egg for a number of recombinant plasmids, pSW14 and pSW9, which respectively contain a small segment (550 base pairs) and several kilobases of frog DNA, were selected for more extensive analysis. In spite of the small size of th segment in pSW14, it incorporates in 2 hr at least 3 times as much labeled thymidine as either pSW9 or the vector alone. To determine the number of replications of pSW14, a novel method was employed. The results showed that about 50% of the labeled, supercoiled DNA recovered from eggs after 4 hr was sensitive to EcoRI digestion, which indicates that most of the DNA that incorporated (/sup 3/H)thymidine had replicated twice during the 4 hr in the unfertilized eggs of X. laevis. We conclude the pSW14 has a functional origin in the Xenopus DNA segment.

  17. TSPA 1991: An initial total-system performance assessment for Yucca Mountain; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, R.W.; Wilson, M.L.; Dockery, H.A.; Kaplan, P.G.; Eaton, R.R.; Bingham, F.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gauthier, J.H.; Robey, T.H. [Spectra Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-07-01

    This report describes an assessment of the long-term performance of a repository system that contains deeply buried highly radioactive waste; the system is assumed to be located at the potential site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The study includes an identification of features, events, and processes that might affect the potential repository, a construction of scenarios based on this identification, a selection of models describing these scenarios (including abstraction of appropriate models from detailed models), a selection of probability distributions for the parameters in the models, a stochastic calculation of radionuclide releases for the scenarios, and a derivation of complementary cumulative distribution functions (CCDFs) for the releases. Releases and CCDFs are calculated for four categories of scenarios: aqueous flow (modeling primarily the existing conditions at the site, with allowances for climate change), gaseous flow, basaltic igneous activity, and human intrusion. The study shows that models of complex processes can be abstracted into more simplified representations that preserve the understanding of the processes and produce results consistent with those of more complex models.

  18. Shared Skies Partnership: A Dual-Site All-Sky Live Remote Observing Initiative for Research and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kielkopf, John F.; Hart, R.; Carter, B.; Collins, K. A.; Brown, C.; Hay, J.; Hons, A.; Marsden, S.

    2014-01-01

    The University of Southern Queensland's Mt. Kent Observatory in Queensland, Australia, and the University of Louisville's Moore Observatory in Kentucky, USA, are collaborating in the development of live remote observing for research, student training, and education. With a focus on flexible operation assisted by semi-autonomous controllers, rather than completely robotic data acquisition, the partnership provides interactive hands-on experience to students at all levels, optimized performance based on real-time observations, and flexible scheduling for transient events and targets of opportunity. Two sites on opposites sides of the globe cover the entire sky, and for equatorial regions allow nearly continuous coverage. The facilites include 0.5-m corrected Dall-Kirkham (CDK) telescopes at both sites, a 0.6 m Ritchie-Chretien telescope at Moore, and a new Nasmyth design 0.7-meter CDK at Mt. Kent instrumented for milli-magnitude precision photometry and wide field imaging, with spectrographs under development. We will describe the operational and data acquisition software, recent research results, and how remote access is being made available to students and observers.

  19. TSPA 1991: An initial total-system performance assessment for Yucca Mountain; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnard, R.W.; Wilson, M.L.; Dockery, H.A.; Kaplan, P.G.; Eaton, R.R.; Bingham, F.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gauthier, J.H.; Robey, T.H. [Spectra Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-07-01

    This report describes an assessment of the long-term performance of a repository system that contains deeply buried highly radioactive waste; the system is assumed to be located at the potential site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The study includes an identification of features, events, and processes that might affect the potential repository, a construction of scenarios based on this identification, a selection of models describing these scenarios (including abstraction of appropriate models from detailed models), a selection of probability distributions for the parameters in the models, a stochastic calculation of radionuclide releases for the scenarios, and a derivation of complementary cumulative distribution functions (CCDFs) for the releases. Releases and CCDFs are calculated for four categories of scenarios: aqueous flow (modeling primarily the existing conditions at the site, with allowances for climate change), gaseous flow, basaltic igneous activity, and human intrusion. The study shows that models of complex processes can be abstracted into more simplified representations that preserve the understanding of the processes and produce results consistent with those of more complex models.

  20. Assembly and initial characterization of a panel of 85 genomically validated cell lines from diverse head and neck tumor sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mei; Sano, Daisuke; Pickering, Curtis R; Jasser, Samar A; Henderson, Ying C; Clayman, Gary L; Sturgis, Erich M; Ow, Thomas J; Lotan, Reuben; Carey, Thomas E; Sacks, Peter G; Grandis, Jennifer R; Sidransky, David; Heldin, Nils Erik; Myers, Jeffrey N

    2011-12-01

    Human cell lines are useful for studying cancer biology and preclinically modeling cancer therapy, but can be misidentified and cross-contamination is unfortunately common. The purpose of this study was to develop a panel of validated head and neck cell lines representing the spectrum of tissue sites and histologies that could be used for studying the molecular, genetic, and phenotypic diversity of head and neck cancer. A panel of 122 clinically and phenotypically diverse head and neck cell lines from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, thyroid cancer, cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, oral leukoplakia, immortalized primary keratinocytes, and normal epithelium was assembled from the collections of several individuals and institutions. Authenticity was verified by carrying out short tandem repeat analysis. Human papillomavirus (HPV) status and cell morphology were also determined. Eighty-five of the 122 cell lines had unique genetic profiles. HPV-16 DNA was detected in 2 cell lines. These 85 cell lines included cell lines from the major head and neck primary tumor sites, and close examination shows a wide range of in vitro phenotypes. This panel of 85 genomically validated head and neck cell lines represents a valuable resource for the head and neck cancer research community that can help advance understanding of the disease by providing a standard reference for cell lines that can be used for biological as well as preclinical studies. ©2011 AACR.

  1. Mcm10 regulates DNA replication elongation by stimulating the CMG replicative helicase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lõoke, Marko; Maloney, Michael F.; Bell, Stephen P.

    2017-01-01

    Activation of the Mcm2–7 replicative DNA helicase is the committed step in eukaryotic DNA replication initiation. Although Mcm2–7 activation requires binding of the helicase-activating proteins Cdc45 and GINS (forming the CMG complex), an additional protein, Mcm10, drives initial origin DNA unwinding by an unknown mechanism. We show that Mcm10 binds a conserved motif located between the oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide fold (OB-fold) and A subdomain of Mcm2. Although buried in the interface between these domains in Mcm2–7 structures, mutations predicted to separate the domains and expose this motif restore growth to conditional-lethal MCM10 mutant cells. We found that, in addition to stimulating initial DNA unwinding, Mcm10 stabilizes Cdc45 and GINS association with Mcm2–7 and stimulates replication elongation in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, we identified a lethal allele of MCM10 that stimulates initial DNA unwinding but is defective in replication elongation and CMG binding. Our findings expand the roles of Mcm10 during DNA replication and suggest a new model for Mcm10 function as an activator of the CMG complex throughout DNA replication. PMID:28270517

  2. The DnaK Chaperone Uses Different Mechanisms To Promote and Inhibit Replication of Vibrio cholerae Chromosome 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti K. Jha

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Replication of Vibrio cholerae chromosome 2 (Chr2 depends on molecular chaperone DnaK to facilitate binding of the initiator (RctB to the replication origin. The binding occurs at two kinds of site, 12-mers and 39-mers, which promote and inhibit replication, respectively. Here we show that DnaK employs different mechanisms to enhance the two kinds of binding. We found that mutations in rctB that reduce DnaK binding also reduce 12-mer binding and initiation. The initiation defect is suppressed by second-site mutations that increase 12-mer binding only marginally. Instead, they reduce replication inhibitory mechanisms: RctB dimerization and 39-mer binding. One suppressing change was in a dimerization domain which is folded similarly to the initiator of an iteron plasmid—the presumed progenitor of Chr2. In plasmids, DnaK promotes initiation by reducing dimerization. A different mutation was in the 39-mer binding domain of RctB and inactivated it, indicating an alternative suppression mechanism. Paradoxically, although DnaK increases 39-mer binding, the increase was also achieved by inactivating the DnaK binding site of RctB. This result suggests that the site inhibits the 39-mer binding domain (via autoinhibition when prevented from binding DnaK. Taken together, our results reveal an important feature of the transition from plasmid to chromosome: the Chr2 initiator retains the plasmid-like dimerization domain and its control by chaperones but uses the chaperones in an unprecedented way to control the inhibitory 39-mer binding.

  3. ASAR15, A cis-acting locus that controls chromosome-wide replication timing and stability of human chromosome 15.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Donley

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA replication initiates at multiple sites along each mammalian chromosome at different times during each S phase, following a temporal replication program. We have used a Cre/loxP-based strategy to identify cis-acting elements that control this replication-timing program on individual human chromosomes. In this report, we show that rearrangements at a complex locus at chromosome 15q24.3 result in delayed replication and structural instability of human chromosome 15. Characterization of this locus identified long, RNA transcripts that are retained in the nucleus and form a "cloud" on one homolog of chromosome 15. We also found that this locus displays asynchronous replication that is coordinated with other random monoallelic genes on chromosome 15. We have named this locus ASynchronous replication and Autosomal RNA on chromosome 15, or ASAR15. Previously, we found that disruption of the ASAR6 lincRNA gene results in delayed replication, delayed mitotic condensation and structural instability of human chromosome 6. Previous studies in the mouse found that deletion of the Xist gene, from the X chromosome in adult somatic cells, results in a delayed replication and instability phenotype that is indistinguishable from the phenotype caused by disruption of either ASAR6 or ASAR15. In addition, delayed replication and chromosome instability were detected following structural rearrangement of many different human or mouse chromosomes. These observations suggest that all mammalian chromosomes contain similar cis-acting loci. Thus, under this scenario, all mammalian chromosomes contain four distinct types of essential cis-acting elements: origins, telomeres, centromeres and "inactivation/stability centers", all functioning to promote proper replication, segregation and structural stability of each chromosome.

  4. Rif1 controls DNA replication by directing Protein Phosphatase 1 to reverse Cdc7-mediated phosphorylation of the MCM complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraga, Shin-Ichiro; Alvino, Gina M; Chang, Fujung; Lian, Hui-Yong; Sridhar, Akila; Kubota, Takashi; Brewer, Bonita J; Weinreich, Michael; Raghuraman, M K; Donaldson, Anne D

    2014-02-15

    Initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication requires phosphorylation of the MCM complex by Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK), composed of Cdc7 kinase and its activator, Dbf4. We report here that budding yeast Rif1 (Rap1-interacting factor 1) controls DNA replication genome-wide and describe how Rif1 opposes DDK function by directing Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1)-mediated dephosphorylation of the MCM complex. Deleting RIF1 partially compensates for the limited DDK activity in a cdc7-1 mutant strain by allowing increased, premature phosphorylation of Mcm4. PP1 interaction motifs within the Rif1 N-terminal domain are critical for its repressive effect on replication. We confirm that Rif1 interacts with PP1 and that PP1 prevents premature Mcm4 phosphorylation. Remarkably, our results suggest that replication repression by Rif1 is itself also DDK-regulated through phosphorylation near the PP1-interacting motifs. Based on our findings, we propose that Rif1 is a novel PP1 substrate targeting subunit that counteracts DDK-mediated phosphorylation during replication. Fission yeast and mammalian Rif1 proteins have also been implicated in regulating DNA replication. Since PP1 interaction sites are evolutionarily conserved within the Rif1 sequence, it is likely that replication control by Rif1 through PP1 is a conserved mechanism.

  5. Rif1 controls DNA replication by directing Protein Phosphatase 1 to reverse Cdc7-mediated phosphorylation of the MCM complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraga, Shin-ichiro; Alvino, Gina M.; Chang, FuJung; Lian, Hui-yong; Sridhar, Akila; Kubota, Takashi; Brewer, Bonita J.; Weinreich, Michael; Raghuraman, M.K.; Donaldson, Anne D.

    2014-01-01

    Initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication requires phosphorylation of the MCM complex by Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK), composed of Cdc7 kinase and its activator, Dbf4. We report here that budding yeast Rif1 (Rap1-interacting factor 1) controls DNA replication genome-wide and describe how Rif1 opposes DDK function by directing Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1)-mediated dephosphorylation of the MCM complex. Deleting RIF1 partially compensates for the limited DDK activity in a cdc7-1 mutant strain by allowing increased, premature phosphorylation of Mcm4. PP1 interaction motifs within the Rif1 N-terminal domain are critical for its repressive effect on replication. We confirm that Rif1 interacts with PP1 and that PP1 prevents premature Mcm4 phosphorylation. Remarkably, our results suggest that replication repression by Rif1 is itself also DDK-regulated through phosphorylation near the PP1-interacting motifs. Based on our findings, we propose that Rif1 is a novel PP1 substrate targeting subunit that counteracts DDK-mediated phosphorylation during replication. Fission yeast and mammalian Rif1 proteins have also been implicated in regulating DNA replication. Since PP1 interaction sites are evolutionarily conserved within the Rif1 sequence, it is likely that replication control by Rif1 through PP1 is a conserved mechanism. PMID:24532715

  6. Break-seq reveals hydroxyurea-induced chromosome fragility as a result of unscheduled conflict between DNA replication and transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Elizabeth A; McCulley, Andrew; Haarer, Brian; Arnak, Remigiusz; Feng, Wenyi

    2015-03-01

    We have previously demonstrated that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae replication, checkpoint inactivation via a mec1 mutation leads to chromosome breakage at replication forks initiated from virtually all origins after transient exposure to hydroxyurea (HU), an inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase. Here we sought to determine whether all replication forks containing single-stranded DNA gaps have equal probability of producing double-strand breaks (DSBs) when cells attempt to recover from HU exposure. We devised a new methodology, Break-seq, that combines our previously described DSB labeling with next generation sequencing to map chromosome breaks with improved sensitivity and resolution. We show that DSBs preferentially occur at genes transcriptionally induced by HU. Notably, different subsets of the HU-induced genes produced DSBs in MEC1 and mec1 cells as replication forks traversed a greater distance in MEC1 cells than in mec1 cells during recovery from HU. Specifically, while MEC1 cells exhibited chromosome breakage at stress-response transcription factors, mec1 cells predominantly suffered chromosome breakage at transporter genes, many of which are the substrates of those transcription factors. We propose that HU-induced chromosome fragility arises at higher frequency near HU-induced genes as a result of destabilized replication forks encountering transcription factor binding and/or the act of transcription. We further propose that replication inhibitors can induce unscheduled encounters between replication and transcription and give rise to distinct patterns of chromosome fragile sites.

  7. Initial excavation and dating of Ngalue Cave: a Middle Stone Age site along the Niassa Rift, Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercader, Julio; Asmerom, Yemane; Bennett, Tim; Raja, Mussa; Skinner, Anne

    2009-07-01

    Direct evidence for a systematic occupation of the African tropics during the early late Pleistocene is lacking. Here, we report a record of human occupation between 105-42ka, based on results from a radiometrically-dated cave section from the Mozambican segment of the Niassa (Malawi/Nyasa) Rift called Ngalue. The sedimentary sequence from bottom to top has five units. We concentrate on the so-called "Middle Beds," which contain a Middle Stone Age industry characterized by the use of the discoidal reduction technique. A significant typological feature is the presence of formal types such as points, scrapers, awls, and microliths. Special objects consist of grinders/core-axes covered by ochre. Ngalue is one of the few directly-dated Pleistocene sites located along the biogeographical corridor for modern human dispersals that links east, central, and southern Africa, and, with further study, may shed new light on hominin cave habitats during the late Pleistocene.

  8. Investigating variation in replicability: A "Many Labs" replication project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, R.A.; Ratliff, K.A.; Vianello, M.; Adams, R.B.; Bahnik, S.; Bernstein, M.J.; Bocian, K.; Brandt, M.J.; Brooks, B.; Brumbaugh, C.C.; Cemalcilar, Z.; Chandler, J.; Cheong, W.; Davis, W.E.; Devos, T.; Eisner, M.; Frankowska, N.; Furrow, D.; Galliani, E.M.; Hasselman, F.W.; Hicks, J.A.; Hovermale, J.F.; Hunt, S.J.; Huntsinger, J.R.; IJzerman, H.; John, M.S.; Joy-Gaba, J.A.; Kappes, H.B.; Krueger, L.E.; Kurtz, J.; Levitan, C.A.; Mallett, R.K.; Morris, W.L.; Nelson, A.J.; Nier, J.A.; Packard, G.; Pilati, R.; Rutchick, A.M.; Schmidt, K.; Skorinko, J.L.M.; Smith, R.; Steiner, T.G.; Storbeck, J.; Van Swol, L.M.; Thompson, D.; Veer, A.E. van 't; Vaughn, L.A.; Vranka, M.; Wichman, A.L.; Woodzicka, J.A.; Nosek, B.A.

    2014-01-01

    Although replication is a central tenet of science, direct replications are rare in psychology. This research tested variation in the replicability of 13 classic and contemporary effects across 36 independent samples totaling 6,344 participants. In the aggregate, 10 effects replicated consistently.

  9. An MSC2 Promoter-lacZ Fusion Gene Reveals Zinc-Responsive Changes in Sites of Transcription Initiation That Occur across the Yeast Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yi-Hsuan; Taggart, Janet; Song, Pamela Xiyao; MacDiarmid, Colin; Eide, David J.

    2016-01-01

    The Msc2 and Zrg17 proteins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae form a complex to transport zinc into the endoplasmic reticulum. ZRG17 is transcriptionally induced in zinc-limited cells by the Zap1 transcription factor. In this report, we show that MSC2 mRNA also increases (~1.5 fold) in zinc-limited cells. The MSC2 gene has two in-frame ATG codons at its 5’ end, ATG1 and ATG2; ATG2 is the predicted initiation codon. When the MSC2 promoter was fused at ATG2 to the lacZ gene, we found that unlike the chromosomal gene this reporter showed a 4-fold decrease in lacZ mRNA in zinc-limited cells. Surprisingly, β-galactosidase activity generated by this fusion gene increased ~7 fold during zinc deficiency suggesting the influence of post-transcriptional factors. Transcription of MSC2ATG2-lacZ was found to start upstream of ATG1 in zinc-replete cells. In zinc-limited cells, transcription initiation shifted to sites just upstream of ATG2. From the results of mutational and polysome profile analyses, we propose the following explanation for these effects. In zinc-replete cells, MSC2ATG2-lacZ mRNA with long 5’ UTRs fold into secondary structures that inhibit translation. In zinc-limited cells, transcripts with shorter unstructured 5’ UTRs are generated that are more efficiently translated. Surprisingly, chromosomal MSC2 did not show start site shifts in response to zinc status and only shorter 5’ UTRs were observed. However, the shifts that occur in the MSC2ATG2-lacZ construct led us to identify significant transcription start site changes affecting the expression of ~3% of all genes. Therefore, zinc status can profoundly alter transcription initiation across the yeast genome. PMID:27657924

  10. Regulation of replication fork progression through histone supply and demand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Anja; Corpet, Armelle; Cook, Adam J L

    2007-01-01

    DNA replication in eukaryotes requires nucleosome disruption ahead of the replication fork and reassembly behind. An unresolved issue concerns how histone dynamics are coordinated with fork progression to maintain chromosomal stability. Here, we characterize a complex in which the human histone...... chaperone Asf1 and MCM2-7, the putative replicative helicase, are connected through a histone H3-H4 bridge. Depletion of Asf1 by RNA interference impedes DNA unwinding at replication sites, and similar defects arise from overproduction of new histone H3-H4 that compromises Asf1 function. These data link Asf......1 chaperone function, histone supply, and replicative unwinding of DNA in chromatin. We propose that Asf1, as a histone acceptor and donor, handles parental and new histones at the replication fork via an Asf1-(H3-H4)-MCM2-7 intermediate and thus provides a means to fine-tune replication fork...

  11. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Geothermal Power Generation at the Lakeview Uranium Mill Site in Lakeview, Oregon. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillesheim, M.; Mosey, G.

    2013-11-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Lakeview Uranium Mill site in Lakeview, Oregon, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The EPA contracted with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to provide technical assistance for the project. The purpose of this report is to describe an assessment of the site for possible development of a geothermal power generation facility and to estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts for the facility. In addition, the report recommends development pathways that could assist in the implementation of a geothermal power system at the site.

  12. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Former Bethlehem Steel Plant Brownfield Site in Lackawanna, New York. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salasovich, J.; Geiger, J.; Mosey, G.; Healey, V.

    2013-04-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Former Bethlehem Steel Plant site in Lackawanna, New York, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

  13. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Brisbane Baylands Brownfield Site in Brisbane, California. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salasovich, J.; Geiger, J.; Healey, V.; Mosey, G.

    2013-04-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Brisbane Baylands site in Brisbane, California, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

  14. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the VAG Mine Site in Eden and Lowell, Vermont. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, J.; Mosey, G.

    2013-04-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Vermont Asbestos Group (VAG) Mine site in Eden, Vermont, and Lowell, Vermont, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

  15. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Standard Chlorine of Delaware Superfund Site in Delaware City, Delaware. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salasovich, J.; Geiger, J.; Mosey, G.; Healey, V.

    2013-06-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Standard Chlorine of Delaware site in Delaware City, Delaware, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

  16. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Former Fort Ord Army Base Site in Marina, California. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoltenberg, B.; Konz, C.; Mosey, G.

    2013-05-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Former Fort Ord Army Base (FOAB) site in Marina, California, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

  17. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Sky Park Landfill Site in Eau Claire, Wisconsin. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, J.; Mosey, G.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Sky Park Landfill site in Eau Claire, Wisconsin, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

  18. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Kerr McGee Site in Columbus, Mississippi. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, J.; Mosey, G.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Kerr McGee site in Columbus, Mississippi, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

  19. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the TechCity East Campus Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Site in Kingston, New York. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salasovich, J.; Geiger, J. W.; Mosey, G.; Healey, V.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the TechCity East Campus site in Kingston, New York, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this study is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

  20. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Snohomish County Cathcart Landfill Site in Snohomish County, Washington. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olis, D.; Salasovich, J.; Mosey, G.; Healey, V.

    2013-04-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Snohomish County Cathcart Landfill Site in Snohomish County, Washington, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

  1. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Crazy Horse Landfill Site in Salinas, California. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoltenberg, B.; Konz, C.; Mosey, G.

    2013-03-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, selected the Crazy Horse Landfill site in Salinas, California, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) was contacted to provide technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this report is to assess the site for a possible photovoltaic (PV) system installation and estimate the cost, performance, operation and maintenance requirements, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

  2. Initial field testing definition of subsurface sealing and backfilling tests in unsaturated tuff; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Case, J.B.; Tyburski, J.R. [I. T. Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-05-01

    This report contains an initial definition of the field tests proposed for the Yucca Mountain Project repository sealing program. The tests are intended to resolve various performance and emplacement concerns. Examples of concerns to be addressed include achieving selected hydrologic and structural requirements for seals, removing portions of the shaft liner, excavating keyways, emplacing cementitious and earthen seals, reducing the impact of fines on the hydraulic conductivity of fractures, efficient grouting of fracture zones, sealing of exploratory boreholes, and controlling the flow of water by using engineered designs. Ten discrete tests are proposed to address these and other concerns. These tests are divided into two groups: Seal component tests and performance confirmation tests. The seal component tests are thorough small-scale in situ tests, the intermediate-scale borehole seal tests, the fracture grouting tests, the surface backfill tests, and the grouted rock mass tests. The seal system tests are the seepage control tests, the backfill tests, the bulkhead test in the Calico Hills unit, the large-scale shaft seal and shaft fill tests, and the remote borehole sealing tests. The tests are proposed to be performed in six discrete areas, including welded and non-welded environments, primarily located outside the potential repository area. The final selection of sealing tests will depend on the nature of the geologic and hydrologic conditions encountered during the development of the Exploratory Studies Facility and detailed numerical analyses. Tests are likely to be performed both before and after License Application.

  3. Laparoendoscopic single-site radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy: initial multi-institutional experience for treatment of invasive cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boruta, David M; Fagotti, Anna; Bradford, Leslie S; Escobar, Pedro F; Scambia, Giovanni; Kushnir, Christina L; Michener, Chad M; Fader, Amanda Nickles

    2014-01-01

    To describe the feasibility, safety, and outcomes of women with stage I cervical cancer treated with laparoendoscopic single-site surgery radical hysterectomy (LESS-RH). A retrospective descriptive study (Canadian Task Force classification III). Multiple academic teaching hospitals. Women with Fédération Internationale de Gynécologie et d'Obstétrique FIGO stage IA1 to IB1 cervical cancer. LESS-RH as the primary therapy for cervical cancer performed by a gynecologic oncologist with expertise in LESS. A multichannel, single-port access device; a flexible-tipped 5-mm laparoscope; and a multifunctional instrument were used in all cases. Clinicopathologic, surgical, and perioperative outcomes were analyzed. Twenty-two women were identified in whom a LESS-RH was attempted; 20 (91%) successfully underwent the procedure, including 19 in whom pelvic lymphadenectomy (PLND) was completed. Of the 2 converted procedures, 1 patient underwent 2-port laparoscopy secondary to truncal obesity, and 1 patient underwent conversion to laparotomy secondary to external iliac vein laceration during PLND. The median age and body mass index were 46 years and 23.3 kg/m(2), respectively. The median number of pelvic lymph nodes removed was 22. One patient experienced an intraoperative complication, and no patient required reoperation. The margins of excision were negative. One patient with 2 positive pelvic nodes and 1 patient with microscopic parametrial disease received adjuvant chemosensitized radiation; 3 additional patients received adjuvant radiation therapy secondary to an intermediate risk for recurrence. After a median follow up of 11 months, no recurrences were detected. LESS-RH/PLND is feasible and safe for select patients with stage I cervical cancer. Larger studies are needed to confirm whether the increased technical difficulty of this procedure justifies its use in routine gynecologic oncology practice. Copyright © 2014 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Heat induction of a novel Rad9 variant from a cryptic translation initiation site reduces mitotic commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janes, Simon; Schmidt, Ulrike; Ashour Garrido, Karim; Ney, Nadja; Concilio, Susanna; Zekri, Mohamed; Caspari, Thomas

    2012-10-01

    Exposure of human cells to heat switches the activating signal of the DNA damage checkpoint from genotoxic to temperature stress. This change reduces mitotic commitment at the expense of DNA break repair. The thermal alterations behind this switch remain elusive despite the successful use of heat to sensitise cancer cells to DNA breaks. Rad9 is a highly conserved subunit of the Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 (9-1-1) checkpoint-clamp that is loaded by Rad17 onto damaged chromatin. At the DNA, Rad9 activates the checkpoint kinases Rad3(ATR) and Chk1 to arrest cells in G2. Using Schizosaccharomyces pombe as a model eukaryote, we discovered a new variant of Rad9, Rad9-M50, whose expression is specifically induced by heat. High temperatures promote alternative translation from a cryptic initiation codon at methionine-50. This process is restricted to cycling cells and is independent of the temperature-sensing mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. While full-length Rad9 delays mitosis in the presence of DNA lesions, Rad9-M50 functions in a remodelled checkpoint pathway to reduce mitotic commitment at elevated temperatures. This remodelled pathway still relies on Rad1 and Hus1, but acts independently of Rad17. Heat-induction of Rad9-M50 ensures that the kinase Chk1 remains in a hypo-phosphorylated state. Elevated temperatures specifically reverse the DNA-damage-induced modification of Chk1 in a manner dependent on Rad9-M50. Taken together, heat reprogrammes the DNA damage checkpoint at the level of Chk1 by inducing a Rad9 variant that can act outside of the canonical 9-1-1 complex.

  5. An Initial Evaluation Of Characterization And Closure Options For Underground Pipelines Within A Hanford Site Single-Shell Tank Farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badden, Janet W. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, WA (United States); Connelly, Michael P. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, WA (United States); Seeley, Paul N. [Cenibark International, Inc., Kennewick (United States); Hendrickson, Michelle L. [Washington State Univ., Richland (United States). Dept. of Ecology

    2013-01-10

    The Hanford Site includes 149 single-shell tanks, organized in 12 'tank farms,' with contents managed as high-level mixed waste. The Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order requires that one tank farm, the Waste Management Area C, be closed by June 30, 2019. A challenge to this project is the disposition and closure of Waste Management Area C underground pipelines. Waste Management Area C contains nearly seven miles of pipelines and 200 separate pipe segments. The pipelines were taken out of service decades ago and contain unknown volumes and concentrations of tank waste residuals from past operations. To understand the scope of activities that may be required for these pipelines, an evaluation was performed. The purpose of the evaluation was to identify what, if any, characterization methods and/or closure actions may be implemented at Waste Management Area C for closure of Waste Management Area C by 2019. Physical and analytical data do not exist for Waste Management Area C pipeline waste residuals. To develop estimates of residual volumes and inventories of contamination, an extensive search of available information on pipelines was conducted. The search included evaluating historical operation and occurrence records, physical attributes, schematics and drawings, and contaminant inventories associated with the process history of plutonium separations facilities and waste separations and stabilization operations. Scoping analyses of impacts to human health and the environment using three separate methodologies were then developed based on the waste residual estimates. All analyses resulted in preliminary assessments, indicating that pipeline waste residuals presented a comparably low long-term impact to groundwater with respect to soil, tank and other ancillary equipment residuals, but exceeded Washington State cleanup requirement values. In addition to performing the impact analyses, the assessment evaluated available sampling technologies and

  6. The oligomeric Rep protein of Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) is a likely replicative helicase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Nirupam Roy; Malik, Punjab Singh; Singh, Dharmendra Kumar; Islam, Mohammad Nurul; Kaliappan, Kosalai; Mukherjee, Sunil Kumar

    2006-01-01

    Geminiviruses replicate by rolling circle mode of replication (RCR) and the viral Rep protein initiates RCR by the site-specific nicking at a conserved nonamer (TAATATT downward arrow AC) sequence. The mechanism of subsequent steps of the replication process, e.g. helicase activity to drive fork-elongation, etc. has largely remained obscure. Here we show that Rep of a geminivirus, namely, Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV), acts as a replicative helicase. The Rep-helicase, requiring > or =6 nt space for its efficient activity, translocates in the 3'-->5' direction, and the presence of forked junction in the substrate does not influence the activity to any great extent. Rep forms a large oligomeric complex and the helicase activity is dependent on the oligomeric conformation ( approximately 24mer). The role of Rep as a replicative helicase has been demonstrated through ex vivo studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in planta analyses in Nicotiana tabacum. We also establish that such helicase activity is not confined to the MYMIV system alone, but is also true with at least two other begomoviruses, viz., Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) and Indian cassava mosaic virus (ICMV).

  7. The fork and the kinase: a DNA replication tale from a CHK1 perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Besteiro, Marina A; Gottifredi, Vanesa

    2015-01-01

    Replication fork progression is being continuously hampered by exogenously introduced and naturally occurring DNA lesions and other physical obstacles. Checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) is activated at replication forks that encounter damaged DNA. Subsequently, Chk1 inhibits the initiation of new replication factories and stimulates the firing of dormant origins (those in the vicinity of stalled forks). Chk1 also avoids fork collapse into DSBs (double strand breaks) and promotes fork elongation. At the molecular level, the current model considers stalled forks as the site of Chk1 activation and the nucleoplasm as the location where Chk1 phosphorylates target proteins. This model certainly serves to explain how Chk1 modulates origin firing, but how Chk1 controls the fate of stalled forks is less clear. Interestingly, recent reports demonstrating that Chk1 phosphorylates chromatin-bound proteins and even holds kinase-independent functions might shed light on how Chk1 contributes to the elongation of damaged DNA. Indeed, such findings have unveiled a puzzling connection between Chk1 and DNA lesion bypass, which might be central to promoting fork elongation and checkpoint attenuation. In summary, Chk1 is a multifaceted and versatile signaling factor that acts at ongoing forks and replication origins to determine the extent and quality of the cellular response to replication stress.

  8. A Self-Replicating Ligase Ribozyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Natasha; Joyce, Gerald F.

    2002-01-01

    A self-replicating molecule directs the covalent assembly of component molecules to form a product that is of identical composition to the parent. When the newly formed product also is able to direct the assembly of product molecules, the self-replicating system can be termed autocatalytic. A self-replicating system was developed based on a ribozyme that catalyzes the assembly of additional copies of Itself through an RNA-catalyzed RNA ligation reaction. The R3C ligase ribozyme was redesigned so that it would ligate two substrates to generate an exact copy of itself, which then would behave in a similar manner. This self-replicating system depends on the catalytic nature of the RNA for the generation of copies. A linear dependence was observed between the initial rate of formation of new copies and the starting concentration of ribozyme, consistent with exponential growth. The autocatalytic rate constant was 0.011 per min, whereas the initial rate of reaction in the absence of pre-existing ribozyme was only 3.3 x 10(exp -11) M per min. Exponential growth was limited, however, because newly formed ribozyme molecules had greater difficulty forming a productive complex with the two substrates. Further optimization of the system may lead to the sustained exponential growth of ribozymes that undergo self-replication.

  9. Replication studies in longevity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varcasia, O; Garasto, S; Rizza, T

    2001-01-01

    In Danes we replicated the 3'APOB-VNTR gene/longevity association study previously carried out in Italians, by which the Small alleles (less than 35 repeats) had been identified as frailty alleles for longevity. In Danes, neither genotype nor allele frequencies differed between centenarians and 20...

  10. Replication-Fork Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duderstadt, Karl E.; Reyes-Lamothe, Rodrigo; van Oijen, Antoine M.; Sherratt, David J.

    2014-01-01

    The proliferation of all organisms depends on the coordination of enzymatic events within large multiprotein replisomes that duplicate chromosomes. Whereas the structure and function of many core replisome components have been clarified, the timing and order of molecular events during replication re

  11. Coronavirus Attachment and Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-28

    synthesis during RNA replication of vesicular stomatitis virus. J. Virol. 49:303-309. Pedersen, N.C. 1976a. Feline infectious peritonitis: Something old...receptors on intestinal brush border membranes from normal host species were developed for canine (CCV), feline (FIPV), porcine (TGEV), human (HCV...gastroenteritis receptor on pig BBMs ...... ................. ... 114 Feline infectious peritonitis virus receptor on cat BBMs ... .............. 117 Human

  12. The C-terminal Domain (CTD) of Human DNA Glycosylase NEIL1 Is Required for Forming BERosome Repair Complex with DNA Replication Proteins at the Replicating Genome: DOMINANT NEGATIVE FUNCTION OF THE CTD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Pavana M; Dutta, Arijit; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Mitra, Joy; Adhikari, Sanjay; Tomkinson, Alan E; Li, Guo-Min; Boldogh, Istvan; Hazra, Tapas K; Mitra, Sankar; Hegde, Muralidhar L

    2015-08-21

    The human DNA glycosylase NEIL1 was recently demonstrated to initiate prereplicative base excision repair (BER) of oxidized bases in the replicating genome, thus preventing mutagenic replication. A significant fraction of NEIL1 in cells is present in large cellular complexes containing DNA replication and other repair proteins, as shown by gel filtration. However, how the interaction of NEIL1 affects its recruitment to the replication site for prereplicative repair was not investigated. Here, we show that NEIL1 binarily interacts with the proliferating cell nuclear antigen clamp loader replication factor C, DNA polymerase δ, and DNA ligase I in the absence of DNA via its non-conserved C-terminal domain (CTD); replication factor C interaction results in ∼8-fold stimulation of NEIL1 activity. Disruption of NEIL1 interactions within the BERosome complex, as observed for a NEIL1 deletion mutant (N311) lacking the CTD, not only inhibits complete BER in vitro but also prevents its chromatin association and reduced recruitment at replication foci in S phase cells. This suggests that the interaction of NEIL1 with replication and other BER proteins is required for efficient repair of the replicating genome. Consistently, the CTD polypeptide acts as a dominant negative inhibitor during in vitro repair, and its ectopic expression sensitizes human cells to reactive oxygen species. We conclude that multiple interactions among BER proteins lead to large complexes, which are critical for efficient BER in mammalian cells, and the CTD interaction could be targeted for enhancing drug/radiation sensitivity of tumor cells.

  13. Opening the strands of replication origins – still an open question

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhruba Chattoraj

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The local separation of duplex DNA strands (strand opening is necessary for initiating basic transactions on DNA such as transcription, replication and homologous recombination. Strand opening is commonly a stage at which these processes are regulated. Many different mechanisms are used to open the DNA duplex, the details of which are of great current interest. In this review, we focus on a few well-studied cases of DNA replication origin opening in bacteria. In particular, we discuss the opening of origins that support the theta ( mode of replication, which is used by all chromosomal origins and many extra-chromosomal elements such as plasmids and phages. Although the details of opening can vary among different origins, a common theme is binding of the initiator to multiple sites at the origin, causing stress that opens an adjacent and intrinsically unstable A+T rich region. The initiator stabilizes the opening by capturing one of the open strands. How the initiator binding energy is harnessed for strand opening remains to be understood.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of multi-active site grafting starch copolymer initiated by KMnO4 and HIO4/H2SO4 systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qiaoxia; Wang, Yanqing; Fan, Ya; Liu, Xiwen; Ren, Shenyong; Wen, Yuanzhen; Shen, Baojian

    2015-03-06

    A novel initiator system containing KMO4, HIO4, and H2SO4 for synthesizing grafting starch copolymers is reported. In this system, KMnO4 was used to oxidize the primary hydroxyl group to aldehyde group of glucose in the starch, and the formed aldehyde group reacted with Mn(4+), Mn(3+) to afford starch free radical. At the same time HIO4 perform as the oxidant to open the C2C3 bond of glucose ring in starch to form two more aldehyde groups, and then two more free radicals are generated. As a result one glucose unit could provide ultimately three active sites for starch grafting reaction. Graft copolymers with a higher grafting ratio and grafting efficiency could be obtained by using the composite initiation system than the KMnO4/H2SO4 initiation system. The grafting of polyacrylamide onto the corn starch backbone was confirmed by viscometry, elemental analysis, infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy.

  15. Approaches to ensuring and improving quality in the context of health system strengthening: a cross-site analysis of the five African Health Initiative Partnership programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschhorn, Lisa R; Baynes, Colin; Sherr, Kenneth; Chintu, Namwinga; Awoonor-Williams, John Koku; Finnegan, Karen; Philips, James F; Anatole, Manzi; Bawah, Ayaga A; Basinga, Paulin

    2013-01-01

    Integrated into the work in health systems strengthening (HSS) is a growing focus on the importance of ensuring quality of the services delivered and systems which support them. Understanding how to define and measure quality in the different key World Health Organization building blocks is critical to providing the information needed to address gaps and identify models for replication. We describe the approaches to defining and improving quality across the five country programs funded through the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation African Health Initiative. While each program has independently developed and implemented country-specific approaches to strengthening health systems, they all included quality of services and systems as a core principle. We describe the differences and similarities across the programs in defining and improving quality as an embedded process essential for HSS to achieve the goal of improved population health. The programs measured quality across most or all of the six WHO building blocks, with specific areas of overlap in improving quality falling into four main categories: 1) defining and measuring quality; 2) ensuring data quality, and building capacity for data use for decision making and response to quality measurements; 3) strengthened supportive supervision and/or mentoring; and 4) operational research to understand the factors associated with observed variation in quality. Learning the value and challenges of these approaches to measuring and improving quality across the key components of HSS as the projects continue their work will help inform similar efforts both now and in the future to ensure quality across the critical components of a health system and the impact on population health.

  16. Complementation of a primer binding site-impaired murine leukemia virus-derived retroviral vector by a genetically engineered tRNA-like primer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M; Lovmand, J

    1997-01-01

    , but not with a noncomplementary tRNA-like molecule. The engineered primer was shown to be involved in both the initiation of first-strand synthesis and second-strand transfer. These results provide an in vivo demonstration that the retroviral replication machinery may recognize sequence complementarity rather than actual primer...... binding site and 3' primer sequences. Use of mutated primer binding site vectors replicating via engineered primers may add additional control features to retroviral gene transfer technology....

  17. Coordination between chromosome replication, segregation, and cell division in Caulobacter crescentus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Bugge

    2006-01-01

    Progression through the Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle is coupled to a cellular differentiation program. The swarmer cell is replicationally quiescent, and DNA replication initiates at the swarmer-to-stalked cell transition. There is a very short delay between initiation of DNA replication......, and the completely replicated terminus regions stay associated with each other after chromosome replication is completed, disassociating very late in the cell cycle shortly before the final cell division event. Invagination of the cytoplasmic membrane occurs earlier than separation of the replicated terminus regions...

  18. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Biomass Power Generation at the Former Farmland Industries Site in Lawrence, Kansas. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomberlin, G.; Mosey, G.

    2013-03-01

    Under the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) provided funding to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to support a feasibility study of biomass renewable energy generation at the former Farmland Industries site in Lawrence, Kansas. Feasibility assessment team members conducted a site assessment to gather information integral to this feasibility study. Information such as biomass resources, transmission availability, on-site uses for heat and power, community acceptance, and ground conditions were considered.

  19. Recombination occurs within minutes of replication blockage by RTS1 producing restarted forks that are prone to collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Michael O; Jalan, Manisha; Morrow, Carl A; Osman, Fekret; Whitby, Matthew C

    2015-01-01

    The completion of genome duplication during the cell cycle is threatened by the presence of replication fork barriers (RFBs). Following collision with a RFB, replication proteins can dissociate from the stalled fork (fork collapse) rendering it incapable of further DNA synthesis unless recombination intervenes to restart replication. We use time-lapse microscopy and genetic assays to show that recombination is initiated within ∼10 min of replication fork blockage at a site-specific barrier in fission yeast, leading to a restarted fork within ∼60 min, which is only prevented/curtailed by the arrival of the opposing replication fork. The restarted fork is susceptible to further collapse causing hyper-recombination downstream of the barrier. Surprisingly, in our system fork restart is unnecessary for maintaining cell viability. Seemingly, the risk of failing to complete replication prior to mitosis is sufficient to warrant the induction of recombination even though it can cause deleterious genetic change. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04539.001 PMID:25806683

  20. An Auto-Catalytic Surface for Conformational Replication of Amyloid Fibrils—Genesis of an Amyloid World?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammarström, Per; Ali, Malik M.; Mishra, Rajesh; Salagic, Belma; Svensson, Samuel; Tengvall, Pentti; Lundström, Ingemar

    2011-08-01

    Amyloid fibrils are composed of self assembled stacked peptide or protein molecules folded and trapped in a stable cross-beta-sheet conformation. The amyloid fibrillation mechanism represents an intriguing self-catalyzed process rendering replication of a molecular conformational memory of interest for prebiotic chemistry. Herein we describe how a solid surface can be rendered auto-catalytic for fibrillation of a protein solution. We have discovered that a hydrophobic silicon or glass surface can be made to continuously fibrillate solutions of insulin monomers under stressed conditions (pH 1.6, 65°C). It was found that the surface acts as a platform for the formation of nascent seeds that induce fibril replication on and at the surface. This autocatalytic effect stems from a layer a few insulin molecules thick representing an oligomeric layer of misfolded, conformationally trapped, insulin molecules that rapidly through epitaxial growth catalyze the rate determining step (nucleation) during fibril replication. This autocatalytic layer is generated by the protein-solid surface interaction and conformational changes of the adsorbed protein during exposure at the air-water interface. The resulting autocatalytic surface thus both initiates local conformational molecular self-replication and acts as a reservoir for fibril seeds budding off into solution spreading fibril replication entities to the surrounding medium. The possibility of catalysis of the conformational replication process by minute amounts of nucleation sites located on a recruiting surface can evade the issue of dramatic concentration dependence of amyloidogenesis.

  1. Self-replication with magnetic dipolar colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempster, Joshua M; Zhang, Rui; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2015-10-01

    Colloidal self-replication represents an exciting research frontier in soft matter physics. Currently, all reported self-replication schemes involve coating colloidal particles with stimuli-responsive molecules to allow switchable interactions. In this paper, we introduce a scheme using ferromagnetic dipolar colloids and preprogrammed external magnetic fields to create an autonomous self-replication system. Interparticle dipole-dipole forces and periodically varying weak-strong magnetic fields cooperate to drive colloid monomers from the solute onto templates, bind them into replicas, and dissolve template complexes. We present three general design principles for autonomous linear replicators, derived from a focused study of a minimalist sphere-dimer magnetic system in which single binding sites allow formation of dimeric templates. We show via statistical models and computer simulations that our system exhibits nonlinear growth of templates and produces nearly exponential growth (low error rate) upon adding an optimized competing electrostatic potential. We devise experimental strategies for constructing the required magnetic colloids based on documented laboratory techniques. We also present qualitative ideas about building more complex self-replicating structures utilizing magnetic colloids.

  2. Cross-talk between free and bound spermatozoa to modulate initial sperm:egg ratios at the site of fertilization in the mammalian oviduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, R H F; Gadea, J

    2014-08-01

    This essay proposes that highly localized communication between free and bound spermatozoa in the caudal portion of the oviduct acts to regulate the numbers detaching from the epithelium and progressing to the site of fertilization close to the time of ovulation. Low initial sperm:egg ratios are essential for monospermic fertilization. Liberation of surface macromolecules and metabolic prompting from activated spermatozoa, together with altered patterns of sperm movement and dynamic differences in intracellular Ca(2+) ion status between neighboring sperm cells, would influence the progressive release of spermatozoa from the reservoir in the oviduct isthmus. Different intensities of preovulatory epithelial binding, reflecting a range of states in the sperm surface membranes and associated proteins, would provide a further explanation for a chronologically staggered periovulatory detachment of spermatozoa. Intimate sperm-sperm interactions within the confines of the oviduct isthmus offer a sensitive means of fine-tuning the vanguard of competent male gametes reaching the isthmo-ampullary junction.

  3. Isolation of novel single-chain Cro proteins targeted for binding to the bcl-2 transcription initiation site by repertoire selection and subunit combinatorics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Kristina; Van Der Vries, Erhard; Nilsson, Mikael T I; Widersten, Mikael

    2005-11-01

    New designed DNA-binding proteins may be recruited to act as transcriptional regulators and could provide new therapeutic agents in the treatment of genetic disorders such as cancer. We have isolated tailored DNA-binding proteins selected for affinity to a region spanning the transcription initiation site of the human bcl-2 gene. The proteins were derived from a single-chain derivative of the lambda Cro protein (scCro), randomly mutated in its recognition helices to construct libraries of protein variants of distinct DNA-binding properties. By phage display-afforded affinity selections combined with recombination of shuffled subunits, protein variants were isolated, which displayed high affinity for the target bcl-2 sequence, as determined by electrophoretic mobility shift and biosensor assays. The proteins analyzed were moderately sequence-specific but provide a starting point for further maturation of desired function.

  4. Functional interactions of DNA topoisomerases with a human replication origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdurashidova, Gulnara; Radulescu, Sorina; Sandoval, Oscar; Zahariev, Sotir; Danailov, Miltcho B; Demidovich, Alexander; Santamaria, Laura; Biamonti, Giuseppe; Riva, Silvano; Falaschi, Arturo

    2007-02-21

    The human DNA replication origin, located in the lamin B2 gene, interacts with the DNA topoisomerases I and II in a cell cycle-modulated manner. The topoisomerases interact in vivo and in vitro with precise bonds ahead of the start sites of bidirectional replication, within the pre-replicative complex region; topoisomerase I is bound in M, early G1 and G1/S border and topoisomerase II in M and the middle of G1. The Orc2 protein competes for the same sites of the origin bound by either topoisomerase in different moments of the cell cycle; furthermore, it interacts on the DNA with topoisomerase II during the assembly of the pre-replicative complex and with DNA-bound topoisomerase I at the G1/S border. Inhibition of topoisomerase I activity abolishes origin firing. Thus, the two topoisomerases are closely associated with the replicative complexes, and DNA topology plays an essential functional role in origin activation.

  5. The effect of the intra-S-phase checkpoint on origins of replication in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnani, Neerja; Dutta, Anindya

    2011-03-15

    Although many chemotherapy drugs activate the intra-S-phase checkpoint pathway to block S-phase progression, not much is known about how and where the intra-S-phase checkpoint regulates origins of replication in human chromosomes. A genomic analysis of replication in human cells in the presence of hydroxyurea (HU) revealed that only the earliest origins fire, but the forks stall within 2 kb and neighboring clusters of dormant origins are activated. The initiation events are located near expressed genes with a preference for transcription start and end sites, and when they are located in intergenic regions they are located near regulatory factor-binding regions (RFBR). The activation of clustered neo-origins by HU suggests that there are many potential replication initiation sites in permissive parts of the genome, most of which are not used in a normal S phase. Consistent with this redundancy, we see multiple sites bound to MCM3 (representative of the helicase) in the region flanking three out of three origins studied in detail. Bypass of the intra-S-phase checkpoint by caffeine activates many new origins in mid- and late-replicating parts of the genome. The intra-S-phase checkpoint suppresses origin firing after the loading of Mcm10, but before the recruitment of Cdc45 and AND-1/CTF4; i.e., after helicase loading but before helicase activation and polymerase loading. Interestingly, Cdc45 recruitment upon checkpoint bypass was accompanied by the restoration of global Cdk2 kinase activity and decrease in both global and origin-bound histone H3 Lys 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3), consistent with the suggestion that both of these factors are important for Cdc45 recruitment.

  6. Percutaneous suture-mediated closure of femoral access sites deployed through the procedure sheath: initial clinical experience with a novel vascular closure device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggebrecht, Holger; Naber, Christoph; Woertgen, Uta; Ringe, Sonia; Konorza, Thomas F M; Schmermund, Axel; von Birgelen, Clemens; Haude, Michael; Kroeger, Knut; Erbel, Raimund; Baumgart, Dietrich

    2003-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the initial safety and feasibility of a novel suture-mediated device for closure of femoral access sites immediately after diagnostic or interventional cardiac catheterization. In a prospective study, 150 patients (mean age, 61.5 years; 109 male) underwent femoral access closure with a novel suture closure device (Superstitch, Sutura) immediately after diagnostic (n = 106) or interventional (n = 44) catheterization procedures, independently of the coagulation status. All patients were monitored for 24 hr after the procedure. The closure device was successfully deployed in 92% of patients. Immediate hemostasis was achieved in 77% of patients with no differences between patients undergoing diagnostic catheterization or coronary interventions (79% vs. 73%; P = 0.659). After 2 min of additional light manual compression, hemostasis was achieved in 92% of patients. There was one major complication requiring vascular surgery (0.7%). The novel suture closure device is a safe and effective device that allows for immediate closure of femoral puncture sites after both diagnostic and interventional procedures with a low rate of major complications.

  7. Replication Research and Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travers, Jason C.; Cook, Bryan G.; Therrien, William J.; Coyne, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Replicating previously reported empirical research is a necessary aspect of an evidence-based field of special education, but little formal investigation into the prevalence of replication research in the special education research literature has been conducted. Various factors may explain the lack of attention to replication of special education…

  8. Replication Research and Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travers, Jason C.; Cook, Bryan G.; Therrien, William J.; Coyne, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Replicating previously reported empirical research is a necessary aspect of an evidence-based field of special education, but little formal investigation into the prevalence of replication research in the special education research literature has been conducted. Various factors may explain the lack of attention to replication of special education…

  9. Melanoma patients with unknown primary site or nodal recurrence after initial diagnosis have a favourable survival compared to those with synchronous lymph node metastasis and primary tumour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Weide

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A direct comparison of prognosis between patients with regional lymph node metastases (LNM detected synchronously with the primary melanoma (primary LNM, patients who developed their first LNM subsequently (secondary LNM and those with initial LNM in melanoma with unknown primary site (MUP is missing thus far. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Survival of 498 patients was calculated from the time point of the first macroscopic LNM using Kaplan Meier and multivariate Cox hazard regression analysis. RESULTS: Patients with secondary LNM (HR = 0.67; p = 0.009 and those with initial LNM in MUP (HR = 0.45; p = 0.008 had a better prognosis compared to patients with primary LNM (median survival time 52 and 65 vs. 24 months, respectively. A high number of involved nodes, the presence of in-transit/satellite metastases and male gender had an additional independent unfavourable effect. CONCLUSIONS: Survival of patients with LNM in MUP and with secondary LNM is similar and considerably more favourable compared to those with primary LNM. This difference needs to be considered during patient counselling and for stratification purposes in clinical trials. The assumption of an immune privilege of patients with MUP which is responsible for rejection of the primary melanoma, and results in a favourable prognosis is not supported by our data.

  10. Replication data collection highlights value in diversity of replication attempts

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSoto, K. Andrew; Schweinsberg, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Researchers agree that replicability and reproducibility are key aspects of science. A collection of Data Descriptors published in Scientific Data presents data obtained in the process of attempting to replicate previously published research. These new replication data describe published and unpublished projects. The different papers in this collection highlight the many ways that scientific replications can be conducted, and they reveal the benefits and challenges of crucial replication research. The organizers of this collection encourage scientists to reuse the data contained in the collection for their own work, and also believe that these replication examples can serve as educational resources for students, early-career researchers, and experienced scientists alike who are interested in learning more about the process of replication. PMID:28291224

  11. The Cell Cycle Timing of Human Papillomavirus DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinson, Tormi; Henno, Liisi; Toots, Mart; Ustav, Mart; Ustav, Mart

    2015-01-01

    Viruses manipulate the cell cycle of the host cell to optimize conditions for more efficient viral genome replication. One strategy utilized by DNA viruses is to replicate their genomes non-concurrently with the host genome; in this case, the viral genome is amplified outside S phase. This phenomenon has also been described for human papillomavirus (HPV) vegetative genome replication, which occurs in G2-arrested cells; however, the precise timing of viral DNA replication during initial and stable replication phases has not been studied. We developed a new method to quantitate newly synthesized DNA levels and used this method in combination with cell cycle synchronization to show that viral DNA replication is initiated during S phase and is extended to G2 during initial amplification but follows the replication pattern of cellular DNA during S phase in the stable maintenance phase. E1 and E2 protein overexpression changes the replication time from S only to both the S and G2 phases in cells that stably maintain viral episomes. These data demonstrate that the active synthesis and replication of the HPV genome are extended into the G2 phase to amplify its copy number and the duration of HPV genome replication is controlled by the level of the viral replication proteins E1 and E2. Using the G2 phase for genome amplification may be an important adaptation that allows exploitation of changing cellular conditions during cell cycle progression. We also describe a new method to quantify newly synthesized viral DNA levels and discuss its benefits for HPV research.

  12. Anatomy of Mammalian Replication Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takebayashi, Shin-ichiro; Ogata, Masato; Okumura, Katsuzumi

    2017-01-01

    Genetic information is faithfully copied by DNA replication through many rounds of cell division. In mammals, DNA is replicated in Mb-sized chromosomal units called “replication domains.” While genome-wide maps in multiple cell types and disease states have uncovered both dynamic and static properties of replication domains, we are still in the process of understanding the mechanisms that give rise to these properties. A better understanding of the molecular basis of replication domain regulation will bring new insights into chromosome structure and function. PMID:28350365

  13. Evidence for sequential and increasing activation of replication origins along replication timing gradients in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilbaud, Guillaume; Rappailles, Aurélien; Baker, Antoine; Chen, Chun-Long; Arneodo, Alain; Goldar, Arach; d'Aubenton-Carafa, Yves; Thermes, Claude; Audit, Benjamin; Hyrien, Olivier

    2011-12-01

    Genome-wide replication timing studies have suggested that mammalian chromosomes consist of megabase-scale domains of coordinated origin firing separated by large originless transition regions. Here, we report a quantitative genome-wide analysis of DNA replication kinetics in several human cell types that contradicts this view. DNA combing in HeLa cells sorted into four temporal compartments of S phase shows that replication origins are spaced at 40 kb intervals and fire as small clusters whose synchrony increases during S phase and that replication fork velocity (mean 0.7 kb/min, maximum 2.0 kb/min) remains constant and narrowly distributed through S phase. However, multi-scale analysis of a genome-wide replication timing profile shows a broad distribution of replication timing gradients with practically no regions larger than 100 kb replicating at less than 2 kb/min. Therefore, HeLa cells lack large regions of unidirectional fork progression. Temporal transition regions are replicated by sequential activation of origins at a rate that increases during S phase and replication timing gradients are set by the delay and the spacing between successive origin firings rather than by the velocity of single forks. Activation of internal origins in a specific temporal transition region is directly demonstrated by DNA combing of the IGH locus in HeLa cells. Analysis of published origin maps in HeLa cells and published replication timing and DNA combing data in several other cell types corroborate these findings, with the interesting exception of embryonic stem cells where regions of unidirectional fork progression seem more abundant. These results can be explained if origins fire independently of each other but under the control of long-range chromatin structure, or if replication forks progressing from early origins stimulate initiation in nearby unreplicated DNA. These findings shed a new light on the replication timing program of mammalian genomes and provide a general

  14. Properties and use of novel replication-competent vectors based on Semliki Forest virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lulla Valeria

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Semliki Forest virus (SFV has a positive strand RNA genome and infects different cells of vertebrates and invertebrates. The 5' two-thirds of the genome encodes non-structural proteins that are required for virus replication and synthesis of subgenomic (SG mRNA for structural proteins. SG-mRNA is generated by internal initiation at the SG-promoter that is located at the complementary minus-strand template. Different types of expression systems including replication-competent vectors, which represent alphavirus genomes with inserted expression units, have been developed. The replication-competent vectors represent useful tools for studying alphaviruses and have potential therapeutic applications. In both cases, the properties of the vector, such as its genetic stability and expression level of the protein of interest, are important. Results We analysed 14 candidates of replication-competent vectors based on the genome of an SFV4 isolate that contained a duplicated SG promoter or an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES-element controlled marker gene. It was found that the IRES elements and the minimal -21 to +5 SG promoter were non-functional in the context of these vectors. The efficient SG promoters contained at least 26 residues upstream of the start site of SG mRNA. The insertion site of the SG promoter and its length affected the genetic stability of the vectors, which was always higher when the SG promoter was inserted downstream of the coding region for structural proteins. The stability also depended on the conditions used for vector propagation. A procedure based on the in vitro transcription of ligation products was used for generation of replication-competent vector-based expression libraries that contained hundreds of thousands of different genomes, and maintained genetic diversity and the ability to express inserted genes over five passages in cell culture. Conclusion The properties of replication-competent vectors

  15. Transformation abrogates an early G1-phase arrest point required for specification of the Chinese hamster DHFR replication origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J R; Keezer, S M; Gilbert, D M

    1998-03-16

    The origin decision point (ODP) was originally identified as a distinct point during G1-phase when Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell nuclei experience a transition that is required for specific recognition of the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) origin locus by Xenopus egg extracts. Passage of cells through the ODP requires a mitogen-independent protein kinase that is activated prior to restriction point control. Here we show that inhibition of an early G1-phase protein kinase pathway by the addition of 2-aminopurine (2-AP) prior to the ODP arrests CHO cells in G1-phase. Transformation with simian virus 40 (SV40) abrogated this arrest point, resulting in the entry of cultured cells into S-phase in the presence of 2-AP and a disruption of the normal pattern of initiation sites at the DHFR locus. Cells treated with 2-AP after the ODP initiated replication specifically within the DHFR origin locus. Transient exposure of transformed cells to 2-AP during the ODP transition also disrupted origin choice, whereas non-transformed cells arrested in G1-phase and then passed through a delayed ODP after removal of 2-AP from the medium. We conclude that mammalian cells have many potential sites at which they can initiate replication. Normally, events occurring during the early G1-phase ODP transition determine which of these sites will be the preferred initiation site. However, if chromatin is exposed to S-phase-promoting factors prior to this transition, mammalian cells, like Xenopus and Drosophila embryos, can initiate replication without origin specification.

  16. Optical tweezers reveal how proteins alter replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaurasiya, Kathy

    acids. We use single molecule DNA stretching to show that the nucleocapsid protein (NC) of the yeast retrotransposon Ty3, which is likely to be an ancestor of HIV NC, has optimal nucleic acid chaperone activity with only a single zinc finger. We also show that the chaperone activity of the ORF1 protein is responsible for successful replication of the mouse LINE-1 retrotransposon. LINE-1 is also 17% of the human genome, where it generates insertion mutations and alters gene expression. Retrotransposons such as LINE-1 and Ty3 are likely to be ancestors of retroviruses such as HIV. Human APOBEC3G (A3G) inhibits HIV-1 replication via cytidine deamination of the viral ssDNA genome, as well as via a distinct deamination-independent mechanism. Efficient deamination requires rapid on-off binding kinetics, but a slow dissociation rate is required for the proposed deaminase-independent mechanism. We resolve this apparent contradiction with a new quantitative single molecule method, which shows that A3G initially binds ssDNA with fast on-off rates and subsequently converts to a slow binding mode. This suggests that oligomerization transforms A3G from a fast enzyme to a slow binding protein, which is the biophysical mechanism that allows A3G to inhibit HIV replication. A complete understanding of the mechanism of A3G-mediated antiviral activity is required to design drugs that disrupt the viral response to A3G, enhance A3G packaging inside the viral core, and other potential strategies for long-term treatment of HIV infection. We use single molecule biophysics to explore the function of proteins involved in bacterial DNA replication, endogenous retrotransposition of retroelements in eukaryotic hosts such yeast and mice, and HIV replication in human cells. Our quantitative results provide insight into protein function in a range of complex biological systems and have wide-ranging implications for human health.

  17. Geochemistry of Volcanic Rocks from International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Site 1438, Amami Sankaku Basin: Implications for Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) Arc Initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey-Vargas, R.; Ishizuka, O.; Yogodzinski, G. M.; Bizimis, M.; Savov, I. P.; McCarthy, A. J.; Arculus, R. J.; Bogus, K.

    2015-12-01

    IODP Expedition 351 drilled 150 m of volcanic basement overlain by 1461 m of sedimentary material at Site 1438 in the Amami Sankaku basin, just west of the Kyushu Palau Ridge, the locus of IBM arc initiation. Age interpretations based on biostratigraphy (Arculus et al., Nat. Geosci., in-press) determined that the age of the basement section is between 64 and 51 Ma, encompassing the age of the earliest volcanic products of the IBM arc. The Site 1438 volcanic basement consists of multiple flows of aphyric microcrystalline to finely crystalline basalts containing plagioclase and clinopyroxene with rare olivine pseudomorphs. New XRF major and ICPMS trace element data confirm findings of shipboard analysis that the basalts are moderately differentiated (6-14 % MgO; Mg# = 51-83; 73-490 ppm Cr and 58-350 ppm Ni) with downcore variations related to flow units. Ti/V and Ti/Sc ratios are 16-27 and 75-152, respectively, with lowest values at the base of the core. One prominent characteristic of the basalts is their depletion of immobile highly incompatible elements compared with MORB. Basalts have MORB-normalized La/Nd of 0.5 to 0.9, and most have Th/La andesites from three sills in the lowermost sedimentary unit have arc-like trace element patterns with La/Nb > 3 and primitive mantle normalized La/Yb > 1. Our results suggest that mantle melting at the onset of subduction involved exceptionally depleted sources. Enrichment over time may be related to increasing subduction inputs and/or other processes, such as entrainment of fertile asthenosphere during extension of the overriding plate.

  18. Unveiling the mystery of mitochondrial DNA replication in yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xin Jie; Clark-Walker, George Desmond

    2017-08-01

    Conventional DNA replication is initiated from specific origins and requires the synthesis of RNA primers for both the leading and lagging strands. In contrast, the replication of yeast mitochondrial DNA is origin-independent. The replication of the leading strand is likely primed by recombinational structures and proceeded by a rolling circle mechanism. The coexistent linear and circular DNA conformers facilitate the recombination-based initiation. The replication of the lagging strand is poorly understood. Re-evaluation of published data suggests that the rolling circle may also provide structures for the synthesis of the lagging-strand by mechanisms such as template switching. Thus, the coupling of recombination with rolling circle replication and possibly, template switching, may have been selected as an economic replication mode to accommodate the reductive evolution of mitochondria. Such a replication mode spares the need for conventional replicative components, including those required for origin recognition/remodelling, RNA primer synthesis and lagging-strand processing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  19. Multifork chromosome replication in slow-growing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojanowski, Damian; Hołówka, Joanna; Ginda, Katarzyna; Jakimowicz, Dagmara; Zakrzewska-Czerwińska, Jolanta

    2017-01-01

    The growth rates of bacteria must be coordinated with major cell cycle events, including chromosome replication. When the doubling time (Td) is shorter than the duration of chromosome replication (C period), a new round of replication begins before the previous round terminates. Thus, newborn cells inherit partially duplicated chromosomes. This phenomenon, which is termed multifork replication, occurs among fast-growing bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. In contrast, it was historically believed that slow-growing bacteria (including mycobacteria) do not reinitiate chromosome replication until the previous round has been completed. Here, we use single-cell time-lapse analyses to reveal that mycobacterial cell populations exhibit heterogeneity in their DNA replication dynamics. In addition to cells with non-overlapping replication rounds, we observed cells in which the next replication round was initiated before completion of the previous replication round. We speculate that this heterogeneity may reflect a relaxation of cell cycle checkpoints, possibly increasing the ability of slow-growing mycobacteria to adapt to environmental conditions. PMID:28262767

  20. Replicated Spectrographs in Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, Gary J

    2014-01-01

    As telescope apertures increase, the challenge of scaling spectrographic astronomical instruments becomes acute. The next generation of extremely large telescopes (ELTs) strain the availability of glass blanks for optics and engineering to provide sufficient mechanical stability. While breaking the relationship between telescope diameter and instrument pupil size by adaptive optics is a clear path for small fields of view, survey instruments exploiting multiplex advantages will be pressed to find cost-effective solutions. In this review we argue that exploiting the full potential of ELTs will require the barrier of the cost and engineering difficulty of monolithic instruments to be broken by the use of large-scale replication of spectrographs. The first steps in this direction have already been taken with the soon to be commissioned MUSE and VIRUS instruments for the Very Large Telescope and the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, respectively. MUSE employs 24 spectrograph channels, while VIRUS has 150 channels. We compa...

  1. A novel class of mutations that affect DNA replication in E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordman, Jared; Skovgaard, Ole; Wright, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    Over-initiation of DNA replication in cells containing the cold-sensitive dnaA(cos) allele has been shown to lead to extensive DNA damage, potentially due to head-to-tail replication fork collisions that ultimately lead to replication fork collapse, growth stasis and/or cell death. Based on the a...

  2. USP7 is a SUMO deubiquitinase essential for DNA replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lecona, Emilio; Rodriguez-Acebes, Sara; Specks, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational modification of proteins by ubiquitin (Ub) and Ub-like modifiers regulates DNA replication. We have previously shown that chromatin around replisomes is rich in SUMO and poor in Ub, whereas mature chromatin exhibits an opposite pattern. How this SUMO-rich, Ub-poor environment...... is maintained at sites of DNA replication in mammalian cells remains unexplored. Here we identify USP7 as a replisome-enriched SUMO deubiquitinase that is essential for DNA replication. By acting on SUMO and SUMOylated proteins, USP7 counteracts their ubiquitination. Inhibition or genetic deletion of USP7 leads...... to the accumulation of Ub on SUMOylated proteins, which are displaced away from replisomes. Our findings provide a model explaining the differential accumulation of SUMO and Ub at replication forks and identify an essential role of USP7 in DNA replication that should be considered in the development of USP7...

  3. USP7 is a SUMO deubiquitinase essential for DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecona, Emilio; Rodriguez-Acebes, Sara; Specks, Julia; Lopez-Contreras, Andres J; Ruppen, Isabel; Murga, Matilde; Muñoz, Javier; Mendez, Juan; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar

    2016-04-01

    Post-translational modification of proteins by ubiquitin (Ub) and Ub-like modifiers regulates DNA replication. We have previously shown that chromatin around replisomes is rich in SUMO and poor in Ub, whereas mature chromatin exhibits an opposite pattern. How this SUMO-rich, Ub-poor environment is maintained at sites of DNA replication in mammalian cells remains unexplored. Here we identify USP7 as a replisome-enriched SUMO deubiquitinase that is essential for DNA replication. By acting on SUMO and SUMOylated proteins, USP7 counteracts their ubiquitination. Inhibition or genetic deletion of USP7 leads to the accumulation of Ub on SUMOylated proteins, which are displaced away from replisomes. Our findings provide a model explaining the differential accumulation of SUMO and Ub at replication forks and identify an essential role of USP7 in DNA replication that should be considered in the development of USP7 inhibitors as anticancer agents.

  4. Five-year results: the initial clinical trial of MammoSite balloon brachytherapy for partial breast irradiation in early-stage breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez, Pamela R; Keisch, Martin E; Vicini, Frank; Stolier, Alan; Scroggins, Troy; Walker, Alonzo; White, Julia; Hedberg, Peter; Hebert, Mary; Arthur, Doug; Zannis, Vic; Quiet, Coral; Streeter, Oscar; Silverstein, Mel

    2007-10-01

    Patients with early-stage invasive ductal breast cancer were prospectively evaluated using MammoSite RTS balloon brachytherapy (RTS Cytyc Corp, Marlborough, MA) as the sole modality for delivering accelerated partial breast irradiation to the lumpectomy bed with breast-conserving surgery. This report presents the 5-year results of the treated patients. From May 2000 to October 2001, 70 patients were enrolled in this prospective study. Forty-three patients completed accelerated partial breast irradiation with MammoSite brachytherapy following lumpectomy and axillary staging. Thirty-six patients have been followed for a median of 5.5 years (mean 65.2 months). Criteria for entry into the study were unifocal invasive ductal carcinoma, tumor size or = 45 years, absence of extensive intraductal component, cavity size > or = 3 cm in 1 dimension, node-negative, and final margins negative per National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project definition. A minimum balloon-to-skin surface distance of 5 mm was required. A dose of 34 Gy was delivered in 10 fractions over 5 days prescribed to 1 cm from the applicator surface using iridium-192 high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Data on infection, seromas, cosmetic outcome, and toxicities were collected at 3 and 6 months and at yearly intervals. Local recurrences, both true recurrences in the lumpectomy bed and failures outside the initially treated target volume (elsewhere failures), were recorded. Contralateral breast failure rates were noted. The catheter was not implanted in 16 of the 70 enrolled patients due to cavity size not amenable to balloon placement (n = 10), ineligible by criteria (n = 4), and skin spacing (n = 2). Fifty-four patients were implanted and 43 were successfully treated with MammoSite balloon brachytherapy. Reasons for catheter explantation in 11 patients were poor cavity conformance in 7, inadequate skin spacing in 2, positive node in 1 and age less than 45 years in 1. Of the 43 patients who completed

  5. Efficient usage of Adabas replication

    CERN Document Server

    Storr, Dieter W

    2011-01-01

    In today's IT organization replication becomes more and more an essential technology. This makes Software AG's Event Replicator for Adabas an important part of your data processing. Setting the right parameters and establishing the best network communication, as well as selecting efficient target components, is essential for successfully implementing replication. This book provides comprehensive information and unique best-practice experience in the field of Event Replicator for Adabas. It also includes sample codes and configurations making your start very easy. It describes all components ne

  6. Solving the Telomere Replication Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestroni, Laetitia; Matmati, Samah; Coulon, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    Telomeres are complex nucleoprotein structures that protect the extremities of linear chromosomes. Telomere replication is a major challenge because many obstacles to the progression of the replication fork are concentrated at the ends of the chromosomes. This is known as the telomere replication problem. In this article, different and new aspects of telomere replication, that can threaten the integrity of telomeres, will be reviewed. In particular, we will focus on the functions of shelterin and the replisome for the preservation of telomere integrity. PMID:28146113

  7. DNA breaks early in replication in B cell cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research by scientists at the NCI has identified a new class of DNA sites in cells that break early in the replication process. They found that these break sites correlate with damage often seen in B cell cancers, such as diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

  8. Termination of DNA replication forks: "Breaking up is hard to do".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Rachael; Priego Moreno, Sara; Gambus, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    To ensure duplication of the entire genome, eukaryotic DNA replication initiates from thousands of replication origins. The replication forks move through the chromatin until they encounter forks from neighboring origins. During replication fork termination forks converge, the replisomes disassemble and topoisomerase II resolves the daughter DNA molecules. If not resolved efficiently, terminating forks result in genomic instability through the formation of pathogenic structures. Our recent findings shed light onto the mechanism of replisome disassembly upon replication fork termination. We have shown that termination-specific polyubiquitylation of the replicative helicase component - Mcm7, leads to dissolution of the active helicase in a process dependent on the p97/VCP/Cdc48 segregase. The inhibition of terminating helicase disassembly resulted in a replication termination defect. In this extended view we present hypothetical models of replication fork termination and discuss remaining and emerging questions in the DNA replication termination field.

  9. DNA replication checkpoint signaling depends on a Rad53-Dbf4 N-terminal interaction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Chou; Kenworthy, Jessica; Gabrielse, Carrie; Hänni, Christine; Zegerman, Philip; Weinreich, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK) and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) are essential to initiate DNA replication at individual origins. During replication stress, the S-phase checkpoint inhibits the DDK- and CDK-dependent activation of late replication origins. Rad53 kinase is a central effector of the replication checkpoint and both binds to and phosphorylates Dbf4 to prevent late-origin firing. The molecular basis for the Rad53-Dbf4 physical interaction is not clear but occurs through the Dbf4 N terminus. Here we found that both Rad53 FHA1 and FHA2 domains, which specifically recognize phospho-threonine (pT), interacted with Dbf4 through an N-terminal sequence and an adjacent BRCT domain. Purified Rad53 FHA1 domain (but not FHA2) bound to a pT Dbf4 peptide in vitro, suggesting a possible phospho-threonine-dependent interaction between FHA1 and Dbf4. The Dbf4-Rad53 interaction is governed by multiple contacts that are separable from the Cdc5- and Msa1-binding sites in the Dbf4 N terminus. Importantly, abrogation of the Rad53-Dbf4 physical interaction blocked Dbf4 phosphorylation and allowed late-origin firing during replication checkpoint activation. This indicated that Rad53 must stably bind to Dbf4 to regulate its activity.

  10. Role for RNA: DNA hybrids in origin-independent replication priming in a eukaryotic system

    OpenAIRE

    Stuckey, Ruth; García Rodriguez, Néstor; Aguilera López, Andrés; Wellinger, Ralf Erik

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication initiates at defined replication origins along eukaryotic chromosomes, ensuring complete genome duplication within a single S-phase. A key feature of replication origins is their ability to control the onset of DNA synthesis mediated by DNA polymerase-α and its intrinsic RNA primase activity. Here, we describe a novel origin-independent replication process that is mediated by transcription. RNA polymerase I transcription constraints lead to persistent RNA:DNA hybrids (R-loops)...

  11. Initiation and growth of multiple-site damage in the riveted lap joint of a curved stiffened fuselage panel: An experimental and analytical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Abubaker Ali

    As part of the structural integrity research of the National Aging Aircraft Research Program, a comprehensive study on multiple-site damage (MSD) initiation and growth in a pristine lap-joint fuselage panel has been conducted. The curved stiffened fuselage panel was tested at the Full-Scale Aircraft Structural Test Evaluation and Research (FASTER) facility located at the Federal Aviation Administration William J. Hughes Technical Center. A strain survey test was conducted to verify proper load application. The panel was then subjected to a fatigue test with constant-amplitude cyclic loading. The applied loading spectrum included underload marker cycles so that crack growth history could be reconstructed from post-test fractographic examinations. Crack formation and growth were monitored via nondestructive and high-magnification visual inspections. Strain gage measurements recorded during the strain survey tests indicated that the inner surface of the skin along the upper rivet row of the lap joint experienced high tensile stresses due to local bending. During the fatigue loading, cracks were detected by eddy-current inspections at multiple rivet holes along the upper rivet row. Through-thickness cracks were detected visually after about 80% of the fatigue life. Once MSD cracks from two adjacent rivet holes linked up, there was a quick deterioration in the structural integrity of the lap joint. The linkup resulted in a 2.87" (72.9-mm) lead fatigue crack that rapidly propagated across 12 rivet holes and crossed over into the next skin bay, at which stage the fatigue test was terminated. A post-fatigue residual strength test was then conducted by loading the panel quasi-statically up to final failure. The panel failed catastrophically when the crack extended instantaneously across three additional bays. Post-test fractographic examinations of the fracture surfaces in the lap joint of the fuselage panel were conducted to characterize subsurface crack initiation and

  12. RAD52 Facilitates Mitotic DNA Synthesis Following Replication Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhowmick, Rahul; Minocherhomji, Sheroy; Hickson, Ian D

    2016-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is necessary to counteract DNA replication stress. Common fragile site (CFS) loci are particularly sensitive to replication stress and undergo pathological rearrangements in tumors. At these loci, replication stress frequently activates DNA repair synthesis in mitosis....... This mitotic DNA synthesis, termed MiDAS, requires the MUS81-EME1 endonuclease and a non-catalytic subunit of the Pol-delta complex, POLD3. Here, we examine the contribution of HR factors in promoting MiDAS in human cells. We report that RAD51 and BRCA2 are dispensable for MiDAS but are required to counteract...

  13. Cis-motifs upstream of the transcription and translation initiation sites are effectively revealed by their positional disequilibrium in eukaryote genomes using frequency distribution curves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harter Klaus

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The discovery of cis-regulatory motifs still remains a challenging task even though the number of sequenced genomes is constantly growing. Computational analyses using pattern search algorithms have been valuable in phylogenetic footprinting approaches as have expression profile experiments to predict co-occurring motifs. Surprisingly little is known about the nature of cis-regulatory element (CRE distribution in promoters. Results In this paper we used the Motif Mapper open-source collection of visual basic scripts for the analysis of motifs in any aligned set of DNA sequences. We focused on promoter motif distribution curves to identify positional over-representation of DNA motifs. Using differentially aligned datasets from the model species Arabidopsis thaliana, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we convincingly demonstrated the importance of the position and orientation for motif discovery. Analysis with known CREs and all possible hexanucleotides showed that some functional elements gather close to the transcription and translation initiation sites and that elements other than the TATA-box motif are conserved between eukaryote promoters. While a high background frequency usually decreases the effectiveness of such an enumerative investigation, we improved our analysis by conducting motif distribution maps using large datasets. Conclusion This is the first study to reveal positional over-representation of CREs and promoter motifs in a cross-species approach. CREs and motifs shared between eukaryotic promoters support the observation that an eukaryotic promoter structure has been conserved throughout evolutionary time. Furthermore, with the information on positional enrichment of a motif or a known functional CRE, it is possible to get a more detailed insight into where an element appears to function. This in turn might accelerate the in depth examination of known and yet unknown

  14. Autophagy facilitates Salmonella replication in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hong B; Croxen, Matthew A; Marchiando, Amanda M; Ferreira, Rosana B R; Cadwell, Ken; Foster, Leonard J; Finlay, B Brett

    2014-03-11

    Autophagy is a process whereby a double-membrane structure (autophagosome) engulfs unnecessary cytosolic proteins, organelles, and invading pathogens and delivers them to the lysosome for degradation. We examined the fate of cytosolic Salmonella targeted by autophagy and found that autophagy-targeted Salmonella present in the cytosol of HeLa cells correlates with intracellular bacterial replication. Real-time analyses revealed that a subset of cytosolic Salmonella extensively associates with autophagy components p62 and/or LC3 and replicates quickly, whereas intravacuolar Salmonella shows no or very limited association with p62 or LC3 and replicates much more slowly. Replication of cytosolic Salmonella in HeLa cells is significantly decreased when autophagy components are depleted. Eventually, hyperreplication of cytosolic Salmonella potentiates cell detachment, facilitating the dissemination of Salmonella to neighboring cells. We propose that Salmonella benefits from autophagy for its cytosolic replication in HeLa cells. IMPORTANCE As a host defense system, autophagy is known to target a population of Salmonella for degradation and hence restricting Salmonella replication. In contrast to this concept, a recent report showed that knockdown of Rab1, a GTPase required for autophagy of Salmonella, decreases Salmonella replication in HeLa cells. Here, we have reexamined the fate of Salmonella targeted by autophagy by various cell biology-based assays. We found that the association of autophagy components with cytosolic Salmonella increases shortly after initiation of intracellular bacterial replication. Furthermore, through a live-cell imaging method, a subset of cytosolic Salmonella was found to be extensively associated with autophagy components p62 and/or LC3, and they replicated quickly. Most importantly, depletion of autophagy components significantly reduced the replication of cytosolic Salmonella in HeLa cells. Hence, in contrast to previous reports, we propose

  15. Charter School Replication. Policy Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhim, Lauren Morando

    2009-01-01

    "Replication" is the practice of a single charter school board or management organization opening several more schools that are each based on the same school model. The most rapid strategy to increase the number of new high-quality charter schools available to children is to encourage the replication of existing quality schools. This policy guide…

  16. Entropy involved in fidelity of DNA replication

    CERN Document Server

    Arias-Gonzalez, J Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    Information has an entropic character which can be analyzed within the Statistical Theory in molecular systems. R. Landauer and C.H. Bennett showed that a logical copy can be carried out in the limit of no dissipation if the computation is performed sufficiently slowly. Structural and recent single-molecule assays have provided dynamic details of polymerase machinery with insight into information processing. We introduce a rigorous characterization of Shannon Information in biomolecular systems and apply it to DNA replication in the limit of no dissipation. Specifically, we devise an equilibrium pathway in DNA replication to determine the entropy generated in copying the information from a DNA template in the absence of friction. Both the initial state, the free nucleotides randomly distributed in certain concentrations, and the final state, a polymerized strand, are mesoscopic equilibrium states for the nucleotide distribution. We use empirical stacking free energies to calculate the probabilities of incorpo...

  17. Replicative DNA polymerase mutations in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitzer, Ellen; Tomlinson, Ian

    2014-02-01

    Three DNA polymerases - Pol α, Pol δ and Pol ɛ - are essential for DNA replication. After initiation of DNA synthesis by Pol α, Pol δ or Pol ɛ take over on the lagging and leading strand respectively. Pol δ and Pol ɛ perform the bulk of replication with very high fidelity, which is ensured by Watson-Crick base pairing and 3'exonuclease (proofreading) activity. Yeast models have shown that mutations in the exonuclease domain of Pol δ and Pol ɛ homologues can cause a mutator phenotype. Recently, we identified germline exonuclease domain mutations (EDMs) in human POLD1 and POLE that predispose to 'polymerase proofreading associated polyposis' (PPAP), a disease characterised by multiple colorectal adenomas and carcinoma, with high penetrance and dominant inheritance. Moreover, somatic EDMs in POLE have also been found in sporadic colorectal and endometrial cancers. Tumors with EDMs are microsatellite stable and show an 'ultramutator' phenotype, with a dramatic increase in base substitutions.

  18. Stress responses and replication of plasmids in bacterial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wegrzyn Alicja

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Plasmids, DNA (or rarely RNA molecules which replicate in cells autonomously (independently of chromosomes as non-essential genetic elements, play important roles for microbes grown under specific environmental conditions as well as in scientific laboratories and in biotechnology. For example, bacterial plasmids are excellent models in studies on regulation of DNA replication, and their derivatives are the most commonly used vectors in genetic engineering. Detailed mechanisms of replication initiation, which is the crucial process for efficient maintenance of plasmids in cells, have been elucidated for several plasmids. However, to understand plasmid biology, it is necessary to understand regulation of plasmid DNA replication in response to different environmental conditions in which host cells exist. Knowledge of such regulatory processes is also very important for those who use plasmids as expression vectors to produce large amounts of recombinant proteins. Variable conditions in large-scale fermentations must influence replication of plasmid DNA in cells, thus affecting the efficiency of recombinant gene expression significantly. Contrary to extensively investigated biochemistry of plasmid replication, molecular mechanisms of regulation of plasmid DNA replication in response to various environmental stress conditions are relatively poorly understood. There are, however, recently published studies that add significant data to our knowledge on relations between cellular stress responses and control of plasmid DNA replication. In this review we focus on plasmids derived from bacteriophage λ that are among the best investigated replicons. Nevertheless, recent results of studies on other plasmids are also discussed shortly.

  19. In vitro replication of cyanobacterial plasmids from Synechocystis PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X; Daniell, H; McFadden, B

    1994-09-01

    Little knowledge of DNA replication in cyanobacteria is available. In this study, we report the development and characterization of an in vitro system for studies of replication of the endogenous plasmids from the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803. This system (fraction III) was isolated at high salt concentrations and partially purified on a heparin-agarose column. DNA polymerases in Synechocystis 6803 appeared to be associated with membranes and could be released by the addition of ammonium sulfate to 20% saturation. DNA synthesis in fraction III was dependent on the addition of cyanobacterial plasmids isolated from the same strain. The in vitro replication products consist mostly of the supercoiled form of the plasmids. Unlike replication of many Escherichia coli plasmids, replication of cyanobacterial plasmids did not require added ATP, was not inhibited by omission of the ribonucleotides, and was insensitive to the RNA polymerase inhibitor rifampicin and the gyrase inhibitor novobiocin, but was inhibited by ethidium bromide. These data suggest that RNA may not be involved in the initiation of replication of cyanobacterial plasmids from Synechocystis 6803. In addition, intermediates of replication have been detected by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Density labeling experiments also indicate that cyanobacterial plasmid synthesis in vitro occurs by a semiconservative replication.

  20. A subset of replication proteins enhances origin recognition and lytic replication by the Epstein-Barr virus ZEBRA protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman El-Guindy

    Full Text Available ZEBRA is a site-specific DNA binding protein that functions as a transcriptional activator and as an origin binding protein. Both activities require that ZEBRA recognizes DNA motifs that are scattered along the viral genome. The mechanism by which ZEBRA discriminates between the origin of lytic replication and promoters of EBV early genes is not well understood. We explored the hypothesis that activation of replication requires stronger association between ZEBRA and DNA than does transcription. A ZEBRA mutant, Z(S173A, at a phosphorylation site and three point mutants in the DNA recognition domain of ZEBRA, namely Z(Y180E, Z(R187K and Z(K188A, were similarly deficient at activating lytic DNA replication and expression of late gene expression but were competent to activate transcription of viral early lytic genes. These mutants all exhibited reduced capacity to interact with DNA as assessed by EMSA, ChIP and an in vivo biotinylated DNA pull-down assay. Over-expression of three virally encoded replication proteins, namely the primase (BSLF1, the single-stranded DNA-binding protein (BALF2 and the DNA polymerase processivity factor (BMRF1, partially rescued the replication defect in these mutants and enhanced ZEBRA's interaction with oriLyt. The findings demonstrate a functional role of replication proteins in stabilizing the association of ZEBRA with viral DNA. Enhanced binding of ZEBRA to oriLyt is crucial for lytic viral DNA replication.

  1. The hunt for origins of DNA replication in multicellular eukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urban, J. M.; Foulk, M. S.; Casella, Cinzia;

    2015-01-01

    Origins of DNA replication (ORIs) occur at defined regions in the genome. Although DNA sequence defines the position of ORIs in budding yeast, the factors for ORI specification remain elusive in metazoa. Several methods have been used recently to map ORIs in metazoan genomes with the hope...... that features for ORI specification might emerge. These methods are reviewed here with analysis of their advantages and shortcomings. The various factors that may influence ORI selection for initiation of DNA replication are discussed....

  2. DATABASE REPLICATION IN HETEROGENOUS PLATFORM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendro Nindito

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of diverse database technologies in enterprises today is increasingly a common practice. To provide high availability and survavibality of real-time information, a database replication technology that has capability to replicate databases under heterogenous platforms is required. The purpose of this research is to find the technology with such capability. In this research, the data source is stored in MSSQL database server running on Windows. The data will be replicated to MySQL running on Linux as the destination. The method applied in this research is prototyping in which the processes of development and testing can be done interactively and repeatedly. The key result of this research is that the replication technology applied, which is called Oracle GoldenGate, can successfully manage to do its task in replicating data in real-time and heterogeneous platforms.

  3. Replication regions of two pairs of incompatible lactococcal theta-replicating plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravesen, A; von Wright, A; Josephsen, J; Vogensen, F K

    1997-01-01

    Incompatibility tests were performed employing 12 replicons belonging to a family of homologous lactococcal theta-replicating plasmids. Two pairs of incompatible plasmids were found, namely, pFV1001 and pFV1201, and pJW565 and pFW094. The replicons of plasmids pFV1001, pFV1201, pJW565, pJW566, and pFW094 were sequenced. Alignments were made of the replicational origins (repA) and putative replication proteins (RepB) of these and 11 related plasmid sequences. Comparison of the alignments with the incompatibility data indicated that the incompatibility determinant could be contained within the 22-bp tandem repeats DRII and/or the inverted repeat IR1 in repA. In support, the incompatibility determinant of pJW563 was localized to a 743-bp fragment encompassing repA. A stretch of 13 amino acids of RepB was proposed to be responsible for the plasmid-specific initiation of replication. This stretch is part of a domain containing features that are highly conserved within the proposed DNA binding regions of the initiation proteins from several well-characterized plasmids from Gram-negative bacteria, including pSC101, R6K, and mini-F.

  4. Phosphorylation of NS5A Serine-235 is essential to hepatitis C virus RNA replication and normal replication compartment formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eyre, Nicholas S., E-mail: nicholas.eyre@adelaide.edu.au [School of Biological Sciences and Research Centre for Infectious Diseases, University of Adelaide, Adelaide (Australia); Centre for Cancer Biology, SA Pathology, Adelaide (Australia); Hampton-Smith, Rachel J.; Aloia, Amanda L. [School of Biological Sciences and Research Centre for Infectious Diseases, University of Adelaide, Adelaide (Australia); Centre for Cancer Biology, SA Pathology, Adelaide (Australia); Eddes, James S. [Adelaide Proteomics Centre, School of Biological Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide (Australia); Simpson, Kaylene J. [Victorian Centre for Functional Genomics, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Parkville (Australia); Hoffmann, Peter [Adelaide Proteomics Centre, School of Biological Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide (Australia); Institute for Photonics and Advanced Sensing (IPAS), University of Adelaide, Adelaide (Australia); Beard, Michael R. [School of Biological Sciences and Research Centre for Infectious Diseases, University of Adelaide, Adelaide (Australia); Centre for Cancer Biology, SA Pathology, Adelaide (Australia)

    2016-04-15

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5A protein is essential for HCV RNA replication and virus assembly. Here we report the identification of NS5A phosphorylation sites Ser-222, Ser-235 and Thr-348 during an infectious HCV replication cycle and demonstrate that Ser-235 phosphorylation is essential for HCV RNA replication. Confocal microscopy revealed that both phosphoablatant (S235A) and phosphomimetic (S235D) mutants redistribute NS5A to large juxta-nuclear foci that display altered colocalization with known replication complex components. Using electron microscopy (EM) we found that S235D alters virus-induced membrane rearrangements while EM using ‘APEX2’-tagged viruses demonstrated S235D-mediated enrichment of NS5A in irregular membranous foci. Finally, using a customized siRNA screen of candidate NS5A kinases and subsequent analysis using a phospho-specific antibody, we show that phosphatidylinositol-4 kinase III alpha (PI4KIIIα) is important for Ser-235 phosphorylation. We conclude that Ser-235 phosphorylation of NS5A is essential for HCV RNA replication and normal replication complex formation and is regulated by PI4KIIIα. - Highlights: • NS5A residues Ser-222, Ser-235 and Thr-348 are phosphorylated during HCV infection. • Phosphorylation of Ser-235 is essential to HCV RNA replication. • Mutation of Ser-235 alters replication compartment localization and morphology. • Phosphatidylinositol-4 kinase III alpha is important for Ser-235 phosphorylation.

  5. The origin of replication, oriC, and the dnaA protein are dispensable in stable DNA replication (sdrA) mutants of Escherichia coli K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogoma, T; von Meyenburg, K

    1983-01-01

    The sdrA224 mutants of Escherichia coli K-12, capable of continued DNA replication in the absence of protein synthesis (stable DNA replication), tolerate inactivation of the dnaA gene by insertion of transposon Tn10. Furthermore, oriC, the origin of E. coli chromosome replication, can be deleted from the chromosome of sdrA mutants without loss of viability. The results suggest the presence of a second, normally repressed, initiation system for chromosome replication alternative to the 'normal' dnaA+ oriC+-dependent initiation mechanism.

  6. Initiation of genome instability and preneoplastic processes through loss of Fhit expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua C Saldivar

    Full Text Available Genomic instability drives tumorigenesis, but how it is initiated in sporadic neoplasias is unknown. In early preneoplasias, alterations at chromosome fragile sites arise due to DNA replication stress. A frequent, perhaps earliest, genetic alteration in preneoplasias is deletion within the fragile FRA3B/FHIT locus, leading to loss of Fhit protein expression. Because common chromosome fragile sites are exquisitely sensitive to replication stress, it has been proposed that their clonal alterations in cancer cells are due to stress sensitivity rather than to a selective advantage imparted by loss of expression of fragile gene products. Here, we show in normal, transformed, and cancer-derived cell lines that Fhit-depletion causes replication stress-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Using DNA combing, we observed a defect in replication fork progression in Fhit-deficient cells that stemmed primarily from fork stalling and collapse. The likely mechanism for the role of Fhit in replication fork progression is through regulation of Thymidine kinase 1 expression and thymidine triphosphate pool levels; notably, restoration of nucleotide balance rescued DNA replication defects and suppressed DNA breakage in Fhit-deficient cells. Depletion of Fhit did not activate the DNA damage response nor cause cell cycle arrest, allowing continued cell proliferation and ongoing chromosomal instability. This finding was in accord with in vivo studies, as Fhit knockout mouse tissue showed no evidence of cell cycle arrest or senescence yet exhibited numerous somatic DNA copy number aberrations at replication stress-sensitive loci. Furthermore, cells established from Fhit knockout tissue showed rapid immortalization and selection of DNA deletions and amplifications, including amplification of the Mdm2 gene, suggesting that Fhit loss-induced genome instability facilitates transformation. We propose that loss of Fhit expression in precancerous lesions is the first step in the

  7. Initiation of genome instability and preneoplastic processes through loss of Fhit expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua C Saldivar

    Full Text Available Genomic instability drives tumorigenesis, but how it is initiated in sporadic neoplasias is unknown. In early preneoplasias, alterations at chromosome fragile sites arise due to DNA replication stress. A frequent, perhaps earliest, genetic alteration in preneoplasias is deletion within the fragile FRA3B/FHIT locus, leading to loss of Fhit protein expression. Because common chromosome fragile sites are exquisitely sensitive to replication stress, it has been proposed that their clonal alterations in cancer cells are due to stress sensitivity rather than to a selective advantage imparted by loss of expression of fragile gene products. Here, we show in normal, transformed, and cancer-derived cell lines that Fhit-depletion causes replication stress-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Using DNA combing, we observed a defect in replication fork progression in Fhit-deficient cells that stemmed primarily from fork stalling and collapse. The likely mechanism for the role of Fhit in replication fork progression is through regulation of Thymidine kinase 1 expression and thymidine triphosphate pool levels; notably, restoration of nucleotide balance rescued DNA replication defects and suppressed DNA breakage in Fhit-deficient cells. Depletion of Fhit did not activate the DNA damage response nor cause cell cycle arrest, allowing continued cell proliferation and ongoing chromosomal instability. This finding was in accord with in vivo studies, as Fhit knockout mouse tissue showed no evidence of cell cycle arrest or senescence yet exhibited numerous somatic DNA copy number aberrations at replication stress-sensitive loci. Furthermore, cells established from Fhit knockout tissue showed rapid immortalization and selection of DNA deletions and amplifications, including amplification of the Mdm2 gene, suggesting that Fhit loss-induced genome instability facilitates transformation. We propose that loss of Fhit expression in precancerous lesions is the first step in the

  8. Structure and interactions of the Bacillus subtilis sporulation inhibitor of DNA replication, SirA, with domain I of DnaA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, Katie H; Rostami, Nadia; Fogg, Mark J; Turkenburg, Johan P; Grahl, Anne; Murray, Heath; Wilkinson, Anthony J

    2014-09-01

    Chromosome copy number in cells is controlled so that the frequency of initiation of DNA replication matches that of cell division. In bacteria, this is achieved through regulation of the interaction between the initiator protein DnaA and specific DNA elements arrayed at the origin of replication. DnaA assembles at the origin and promotes DNA unwinding and the assembly of a replication initiation complex. SirA is a DnaA-interacting protein that inhibits initiation of replication in diploid Bacillus subtilis cells committed to the developmental pathway leading to formation of a dormant spore. Here we present the crystal structure of SirA in complex with the N-terminal domain of DnaA revealing a heterodimeric complex. The interacting surfaces of both proteins are α-helical with predominantly apolar side-chains packing in a hydrophobic interface. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments confirm the importance of this interface for the interaction of the two proteins in vitro and in vivo. Localization of GFP-SirA indicates that the protein accumulates at the replisome in sporulating cells, likely through a direct interaction with DnaA. The SirA interacting surface of DnaA corresponds closely to the HobA-interacting surface of DnaA from Helicobacter pylori even though HobA is an activator of DnaA and SirA is an inhibitor.

  9. NACSA Charter School Replication Guide: The Spectrum of Replication Options. Authorizing Matters. Replication Brief 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Paul

    2010-01-01

    One of the most important and high-profile issues in public education reform today is the replication of successful public charter school programs. With more than 5,000 failing public schools in the United States, there is a tremendous need for strong alternatives for parents and students. Replicating successful charter school models is an…

  10. Multiple regulatory systems coordinate DNA replication with cell growth in Bacillus subtilis.

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Author Summary DNA replication must be coordinated with cellular physiology to ensure proper genome inheritance. Model bacteria such as the soil-dwelling Bacillus subtilis can achieve a wide range of growth rates in response to nutritional and chemical signals. In order to match the rate of DNA synthesis to the rate of nutrient-mediated cell growth, bacteria regulate the initiation frequency of DNA replication. This control of bacterial DNA replication initiation was first observed over forty...

  11. Application of ground-truth for classification and quantification of bird movements on migratory bird habitat initiative sites in southwest Louisiana: final report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Wylie C.; Baldwin, Michael J.; Randall, Lori A.; Pitre, John; Dudley, Kyle J.

    2013-01-01

    This project was initiated to assess migrating and wintering bird use of lands enrolled in the Natural Resources Conservation Service’s (NRCS) Migratory Bird Habitat Initiative (MBHI). The MBHI program was developed in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010, with the goal of improving/creating habitat for waterbirds affected by the spill. In collaboration with the University of Delaware (UDEL), we used weather surveillance radar data (Sieges 2014), portable marine radar data, thermal infrared images, and visual observations to assess bird use of MBHI easements. Migrating and wintering birds routinely make synchronous flights near dusk (e.g., departure during migration, feeding flights during winter). Weather radars readily detect birds at the onset of these flights and have proven to be useful remote sensing tools for assessing bird-habitat relations during migration and determining the response of wintering waterfowl to wetland restoration (e.g., Wetlands Reserve Program lands). However, ground-truthing is required to identify radar echoes to species or species group. We designed a field study to ground-truth a larger-scale, weather radar assessment of bird use of MBHI sites in southwest Louisiana. We examined seasonal bird use of MBHI fields in fall, winter, and spring of 2011-2012. To assess diurnal use, we conducted total area surveys of MBHI sites in the afternoon, collecting data on bird species composition, abundance, behavior, and habitat use. In the evenings, we quantified bird activity at the MBHI easements and described flight behavior (i.e., birds landing in, departing from, circling, or flying over the MBHI tract). Our field sampling captured the onset of evening flights and spanned the period of collection of the weather radar data analyzed. Pre- and post-dusk surveys were conducted using a portable radar system and a thermal infrared camera. Landbirds, shorebirds, and wading birds were commonly found on MBHI fields during diurnal

  12. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) origin of DNA replication oriS influences origin-dependent DNA replication and flanking gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Mohamed I; Sommer, Marvin H; Hay, John; Ruyechan, William T; Arvin, Ann M

    2015-07-01

    The VZV genome has two origins of DNA replication (oriS), each of which consists of an AT-rich sequence and three origin binding protein (OBP) sites called Box A, C and B. In these experiments, the mutation in the core sequence CGC of the Box A and C not only inhibited DNA replication but also inhibited both ORF62 and ORF63 expression in reporter gene assays. In contrast the Box B mutation did not influence DNA replication or flanking gene transcription. These results suggest that efficient DNA replication enhances ORF62 and ORF63 transcription. Recombinant viruses carrying these mutations in both sites and one with a deletion of the whole oriS were constructed. Surprisingly, the recombinant virus lacking both copies of oriS retained the capacity to replicate in melanoma and HELF cells suggesting that VZV has another origin of DNA replication.

  13. New Solutions of Translation Initiation Site Prediction for Prokaryotic Genomes%原核基因翻译起始位点预测的新方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡钢清; 刘永初; 郑晓斌; 杨一帆; 余振苏; 朱怀球

    2008-01-01

    翻译起始位点(TIS,即基因5′端)的精确定位是原核生物基因预测的一个关键问题,而基因组GC含量和翻译起始机制的多样性是影响当前TIS预测水平的重要因素.结合基因组结构的复杂信息(包括GC含量、TIS邻近序列及上游调控信号、序列编码潜能、操纵子结构等),发展刻画翻译起始机制的数学统计模型,据此设计TIS预测的新算法MED-StartPlus.并将MED-StartPlus与同类方法RBSfinder、GS-Finder、MED-Start、TiCo和Hon-yaku等进行系统地比较和评价.测试针对两种数据集进行:当前14个已知的TIS被确认的基因数据集,以及300个物种中功能已知的基因数据集.测试结果表明,MED-StartPlus的预测精度在总体上超过同类方法.尤其是对高GC含量基因组以及具有复杂翻译起始机制的基因组,MED-StartPlus具有明显的优势.%Accurate prediction of the translation initiation site (TIS) is an important issue for prokaryotic genome annotation. However, it is still a challenge for the existing methods to predict the TIS in the genomes over a wide variety of GC content. Besides, the existing methods have not yet undergone a comprehensive evaluation, leaving prediction reliability as a largely open problem. A new algorithm MED-StartPlus, a tool that predicts TIS in prokaryotic genomes with a wide variety of GC content was presented. It makes several efforts to model the nucleotide composition bias, the regulatory motifs upstream of the TIS, the sequence patterns around the TIS, and the operon structure. Tests on hundreds of reliable data sets, with TISs confirmed by experiments or having annotated functions, show that the new method achieves a totally high accuracy of TIS prediction. Compared with existing TIS predictors, the method reports a totally higher performance, especially for genomes that are GC-rich or have complex initiation mechanisms. The potential application of the method to improve the TIS annotation

  14. Pressure tube replication techniques using the advanced NDE system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isherwood, A.; Jarron, D.; Travers, J.; Hanley, K. [Ontario Power Generation, Pickering, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: andrew.isherwood@opg.com

    2006-07-01

    and rotary position of the flaw, as determined by ultrasonics, is entered and the tool is positioned in the channel and locked in place. A twenty minute auto-sequence is then initiated which injects material into the flaw and allows it to cure. Once complete, the delivery machine comes off channel and the tool is pushed out of the machine onto a loading trough. The operators remove the replica and recharge the tool for the next set of indications. Once the removed replica has been examined by trained technicians, it is moved to an on-site laser profilometry device to convert the positive of the flaw to a 3D computer image. This image is then curve fitted to determine the smallest radius of the flaw. The combination of in-vault recharging and a two plate tool has reduced c