WorldWideScience

Sample records for replication homologous recombination

  1. Slow Replication Fork Velocity of Homologous Recombination-Defective Cells Results from Endogenous Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Therese; Ragu, Sandrine; Magdalou, Indiana; Machon, Christelle; Dardillac, Elodie; Técher, Hervé; Guitton, Jérôme; Debatisse, Michelle; Lopez, Bernard S

    2016-05-01

    Replications forks are routinely hindered by different endogenous stresses. Because homologous recombination plays a pivotal role in the reactivation of arrested replication forks, defects in homologous recombination reveal the initial endogenous stress(es). Homologous recombination-defective cells consistently exhibit a spontaneously reduced replication speed, leading to mitotic extra centrosomes. Here, we identify oxidative stress as a major endogenous source of replication speed deceleration in homologous recombination-defective cells. The treatment of homologous recombination-defective cells with the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine or the maintenance of the cells at low O2 levels (3%) rescues both the replication fork speed, as monitored by single-molecule analysis (molecular combing), and the associated mitotic extra centrosome frequency. Reciprocally, the exposure of wild-type cells to H2O2 reduces the replication fork speed and generates mitotic extra centrosomes. Supplying deoxynucleotide precursors to H2O2-exposed cells rescued the replication speed. Remarkably, treatment with N-acetyl-cysteine strongly expanded the nucleotide pool, accounting for the replication speed rescue. Remarkably, homologous recombination-defective cells exhibit a high level of endogenous reactive oxygen species. Consistently, homologous recombination-defective cells accumulate spontaneous γH2AX or XRCC1 foci that are abolished by treatment with N-acetyl-cysteine or maintenance at 3% O2. Finally, oxidative stress stimulated homologous recombination, which is suppressed by supplying deoxynucleotide precursors. Therefore, the cellular redox status strongly impacts genome duplication and transmission. Oxidative stress should generate replication stress through different mechanisms, including DNA damage and nucleotide pool imbalance. These data highlight the intricacy of endogenous replication and oxidative stresses, which are both evoked during tumorigenesis and senescence initiation

  2. Homologous Recombination as a Replication Fork Escort: Fork-Protection and Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Costes

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination is a universal mechanism that allows DNA repair and ensures the efficiency of DNA replication. The substrate initiating the process of homologous recombination is a single-stranded DNA that promotes a strand exchange reaction resulting in a genetic exchange that promotes genetic diversity and DNA repair. The molecular mechanisms by which homologous recombination repairs a double-strand break have been extensively studied and are now well characterized. However, the mechanisms by which homologous recombination contribute to DNA replication in eukaryotes remains poorly understood. Studies in bacteria have identified multiple roles for the machinery of homologous recombination at replication forks. Here, we review our understanding of the molecular pathways involving the homologous recombination machinery to support the robustness of DNA replication. In addition to its role in fork-recovery and in rebuilding a functional replication fork apparatus, homologous recombination may also act as a fork-protection mechanism. We discuss that some of the fork-escort functions of homologous recombination might be achieved by loading of the recombination machinery at inactivated forks without a need for a strand exchange step; as well as the consequence of such a model for the stability of eukaryotic genomes.

  3. Homologous recombination as a replication fork escort: fork-protection and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costes, Audrey; Lambert, Sarah A E

    2012-12-27

    Homologous recombination is a universal mechanism that allows DNA repair and ensures the efficiency of DNA replication. The substrate initiating the process of homologous recombination is a single-stranded DNA that promotes a strand exchange reaction resulting in a genetic exchange that promotes genetic diversity and DNA repair. The molecular mechanisms by which homologous recombination repairs a double-strand break have been extensively studied and are now well characterized. However, the mechanisms by which homologous recombination contribute to DNA replication in eukaryotes remains poorly understood. Studies in bacteria have identified multiple roles for the machinery of homologous recombination at replication forks. Here, we review our understanding of the molecular pathways involving the homologous recombination machinery to support the robustness of DNA replication. In addition to its role in fork-recovery and in rebuilding a functional replication fork apparatus, homologous recombination may also act as a fork-protection mechanism. We discuss that some of the fork-escort functions of homologous recombination might be achieved by loading of the recombination machinery at inactivated forks without a need for a strand exchange step; as well as the consequence of such a model for the stability of eukaryotic genomes.

  4. BRCA1 controls homologous recombination at Tus/Ter-stalled mammalian replication forks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Nicholas A; Chandramouly, Gurushankar; Huang, Bin; Kwok, Amy; Follonier, Cindy; Deng, Chuxia; Scully, Ralph

    2014-06-26

    Replication fork stalling can promote genomic instability, predisposing to cancer and other diseases. Stalled replication forks may be processed by sister chromatid recombination (SCR), generating error-free or error-prone homologous recombination (HR) outcomes. In mammalian cells, a long-standing hypothesis proposes that the major hereditary breast/ovarian cancer predisposition gene products, BRCA1 and BRCA2, control HR/SCR at stalled replication forks. Although BRCA1 and BRCA2 affect replication fork processing, direct evidence that BRCA gene products regulate homologous recombination at stalled chromosomal replication forks is lacking, due to a dearth of tools for studying this process. Here we report that the Escherichia coli Tus/Ter complex can be engineered to induce site-specific replication fork stalling and chromosomal HR/SCR in mouse cells. Tus/Ter-induced homologous recombination entails processing of bidirectionally arrested forks. We find that the Brca1 carboxy (C)-terminal tandem BRCT repeat and regions of Brca1 encoded by exon 11-two Brca1 elements implicated in tumour suppression-control Tus/Ter-induced homologous recombination. Inactivation of either Brca1 or Brca2 increases the absolute frequency of 'long-tract' gene conversions at Tus/Ter-stalled forks, an outcome not observed in response to a site-specific endonuclease-mediated chromosomal double-strand break. Therefore, homologous recombination at stalled forks is regulated differently from homologous recombination at double-strand breaks arising independently of a replication fork. We propose that aberrant long-tract homologous recombination at stalled replication forks contributes to genomic instability and breast/ovarian cancer predisposition in BRCA mutant cells.

  5. The MMS22L-TONSL complex mediates recovery from replication stress and homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Lara; Panier, Stephanie; Wildenhain, Jan; Tkach, Johnny M; Al-Hakim, Abdallah; Landry, Marie-Claude; Escribano-Diaz, Cristina; Szilard, Rachel K; Young, Jordan T F; Munro, Meagan; Canny, Marella D; Kolas, Nadine K; Zhang, Wei; Harding, Shane M; Ylanko, Jarkko; Mendez, Megan; Mullin, Michael; Sun, Thomas; Habermann, Bianca; Datti, Alessandro; Bristow, Robert G; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Tyers, Michael D; Brown, Grant W; Durocher, Daniel

    2010-11-24

    Genome integrity is jeopardized each time DNA replication forks stall or collapse. Here we report the identification of a complex composed of MMS22L (C6ORF167) and TONSL (NFKBIL2) that participates in the recovery from replication stress. MMS22L and TONSL are homologous to yeast Mms22 and plant Tonsoku/Brushy1, respectively. MMS22L-TONSL accumulates at regions of ssDNA associated with distressed replication forks or at processed DNA breaks, and its depletion results in high levels of endogenous DNA double-strand breaks caused by an inability to complete DNA synthesis after replication fork collapse. Moreover, cells depleted of MMS22L are highly sensitive to camptothecin, a topoisomerase I poison that impairs DNA replication progression. Finally, MMS22L and TONSL are necessary for the efficient formation of RAD51 foci after DNA damage, and their depletion impairs homologous recombination. These results indicate that MMS22L and TONSL are genome caretakers that stimulate the recombination-dependent repair of stalled or collapsed replication forks. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Schizosaccharomyces pombe Mms1 channels repair of perturbed replication into Rhp51 independent homologous recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejrup-Hansen, Rasmus; Mizuno, Ken'Ichi; Miyabe, Izumi

    2011-01-01

    In both Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Mms22 and Mms1 form a complex with important functions in the response to DNA damage, loss of which leads to perturbations during replication. Furthermore, in S. cerevisiae, Mms1 has been suggested to function in concert with a Cullin......-like protein, Rtt101/Cul8, a potential paralog of Cullin 4. We performed epistasis analysis between ¿mms1 and mutants of pathways with known functions in genome integrity, and measured the recruitment of homologous recombination proteins to blocked replication forks and recombination frequencies. We show that......, in S. pombe, the functions of Mms1 and the conserved components of the Cullin 4 ubiquitin ligase, Pcu4 and Ddb1, do not significantly overlap. Furthermore, unlike in S. cerevisiae, the function of the H3K56 acetylase Rtt109 is not essential for Mms1 function. We provide evidence that Mms1 function...

  7. FBH1 influences DNA replication fork stability and homologous recombination through ubiquitylation of RAD51

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chu, Wai Kit; Payne, Miranda J; Beli, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Unscheduled homologous recombination (HR) can lead to genomic instability, which greatly increases the threat of neoplastic transformation in humans. The F-box DNA helicase 1 (FBH1) is a 3'-5' DNA helicase with a putative function as a negative regulator of HR. It is the only known DNA helicase...... leads to hyperrecombination, as well as several phenotypes indicative of an altered response to DNA replication stress. These effects are likely to be mediated by the enhanced nuclear matrix association of the ubiquitylation-resistant RAD51. These data are consistent with FBH1 acting as a negative...

  8. Role and regulation of homologous recombination in response to DNA double strand breaks and replication stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Falcettoni,

    2014-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a key pathway to maintain genomic integrity from one generation to another (meiosis) and during ontogenic development in a single organism (DNA repair). Recombination is required for the repair or tolerance of DNA damage and the recovery of stalled or broken replication forks. However, recombination is also potentially dangerous as it can lead to gross chromosomal rearrangements and potentially lethal intermediates. For this reason, recombinational events must...

  9. Alleles of the homologous recombination gene, RAD59, identify multiple responses to disrupted DNA replication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddell, Lauren C; Manthey, Glenn M; Owens, Shannon N; Fu, Becky X H; Bailis, Adam M

    2013-10-14

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rad59 is required for multiple homologous recombination mechanisms and viability in DNA replication-defective rad27 mutant cells. Recently, four rad59 missense alleles were found to have distinct effects on homologous recombination that are consistent with separation-of-function mutations. The rad59-K166A allele alters an amino acid in a conserved α-helical domain, and, like the rad59 null allele diminishes association of Rad52 with double-strand breaks. The rad59-K174A and rad59-F180A alleles alter amino acids in the same domain and have genetically similar effects on homologous recombination. The rad59-Y92A allele alters a conserved amino acid in a separate domain, has genetically distinct effects on homologous recombination, and does not diminish association of Rad52 with double-strand breaks. In this study, rad59 mutant strains were crossed with a rad27 null mutant to examine the effects of the rad59 alleles on the link between viability, growth and the stimulation of homologous recombination in replication-defective cells. Like the rad59 null allele, rad59-K166A was synthetically lethal in combination with rad27. The rad59-K174A and rad59-F180A alleles were not synthetically lethal in combination with rad27, had effects on growth that coincided with decreased ectopic gene conversion, but did not affect mutation, unequal sister-chromatid recombination, or loss of heterozygosity. The rad59-Y92A allele was not synthetically lethal when combined with rad27, stimulated ectopic gene conversion and heteroallelic recombination independently from rad27, and was mutually epistatic with srs2. Unlike rad27, the stimulatory effect of rad59-Y92A on homologous recombination was not accompanied by effects on growth rate, cell cycle distribution, mutation, unequal sister-chromatid recombination, or loss of heterozygosity. The synthetic lethality conferred by rad59 null and rad59-K166A alleles correlates with their inhibitory effect on association

  10. Competition between replicative and translesion polymerases during homologous recombination repair in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P Kane

    Full Text Available In metazoans, the mechanism by which DNA is synthesized during homologous recombination repair of double-strand breaks is poorly understood. Specifically, the identities of the polymerase(s that carry out repair synthesis and how they are recruited to repair sites are unclear. Here, we have investigated the roles of several different polymerases during homologous recombination repair in Drosophila melanogaster. Using a gap repair assay, we found that homologous recombination is impaired in Drosophila lacking DNA polymerase zeta and, to a lesser extent, polymerase eta. In addition, the Pol32 protein, part of the polymerase delta complex, is needed for repair requiring extensive synthesis. Loss of Rev1, which interacts with multiple translesion polymerases, results in increased synthesis during gap repair. Together, our findings support a model in which translesion polymerases and the polymerase delta complex compete during homologous recombination repair. In addition, they establish Rev1 as a crucial factor that regulates the extent of repair synthesis.

  11. Sirtuin 6 (SIRT6) rescues the decline of homologous recombination repair during replicative senescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhiyong; Tian, Xiao; Van Meter, Michael; Ke, Zhonghe; Gorbunova, Vera; Seluanov, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    Genomic instability is a hallmark of aging tissues. Genomic instability may arise from the inefficient or aberrant function of DNA double-stranded break (DSB) repair. DSBs are repaired by homologous recombination (HR) and nonhomologous DNA end joining (NHEJ). HR is a precise pathway, whereas NHEJ frequently leads to deletions or insertions at the repair site. Here, we used normal human fibroblasts with a chromosomally integrated HR reporter cassette to examine the changes in HR efficiency as cells progress to replicative senescence. We show that HR declines sharply with increasing replicative age, with an up to 38-fold decrease in efficiency in presenescent cells relative to young cells. This decline is not explained by a reduction of the number of cells in S/G2/M stage as presenescent cells are actively dividing. Expression of proteins involved in HR such as Rad51, Rad51C, Rad52, NBS1, and Sirtuin 6 (SIRT6) diminished with cellular senescence. Supplementation of Rad51, Rad51C, Rad52, and NBS1 proteins, either individually or in combination, did not rescue the senescence-related decline of HR. However, overexpression of SIRT6 in “middle-aged” and presenescent cells strongly stimulated HR repair, and this effect was dependent on mono-ADP ribosylation activity of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP1). These results suggest that in aging cells, the precise HR pathway becomes repressed giving way to a more error-prone NHEJ pathway. These changes in the processing of DSBs may contribute to age-related genomic instability and a higher incidence of cancer with age. SIRT6 activation provides a potential therapeutic strategy to prevent the decline in genome maintenance. PMID:22753495

  12. Rad51 and Rad52 are involved in homologous recombination of replicating herpes simplex virus DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ka-Wei Tang

    Full Text Available Replication of herpes simplex virus 1 is coupled to recombination, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this process are poorly characterized. The role of Rad51 and Rad52 recombinases in viral recombination was examined in human fibroblast cells 1BR.3.N (wild type and in GM16097 with replication defects caused by mutations in DNA ligase I. Intermolecular recombination between viruses, tsS and tsK, harboring genetic markers gave rise to ∼17% recombinants in both cell lines. Knock-down of Rad51 and Rad52 by siRNA reduced production of recombinants to 11% and 5%, respectively, in wild type cells and to 3% and 5%, respectively, in GM16097 cells. The results indicate a specific role for Rad51 and Rad52 in recombination of replicating herpes simplex virus 1 DNA. Mixed infections using clinical isolates with restriction enzyme polymorphisms in the US4 and US7 genes revealed recombination frequencies of 0.7%/kbp in wild type cells and 4%/kbp in GM16097 cells. Finally, tandem repeats in the US7 gene remained stable upon serial passage, indicating a high fidelity of recombination in infected cells.

  13. Dpb11/TopBP1 plays distinct roles in DNA replication, checkpoint response and homologous recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Germann, Susanne Manuela; Østergaard, Vibe Hallundbæk; Haas, Caroline

    2011-01-01

    displays altered rates of heteroallelic and direct-repeat recombination, sensitivity to DSB-inducing drugs as well as delayed kinetics of mating-type switching with a defect in the DNA synthesis step thus implicating Dpb11 in homologous recombination. We conclude that Dpb11/TopBP1 plays distinct roles......DPB11/TopBP1 is an essential evolutionarily conserved gene involved in initiation of DNA replication and checkpoint signaling. Here, we show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae Dpb11 forms nuclear foci that localize to sites of DNA damage in G1, S and G2 phase, a recruitment that is conserved for its...... and Tel1, and of the checkpoint mediator Rad9. In a site-directed mutagenesis screen, we identify a separation-of-function mutant, dpb11-PF, that is sensitive to DSB-inducing agents yet remains proficient for DNA replication and the S-phase checkpoint at the permissive temperature. The dpb11-PF mutant...

  14. Excess Polθ functions in response to replicative stress in homologous recombination-proficient cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rugy, T. Goullet; Bashkurov, M.; Datti, A.; Betous, R.; Guitton-Sert, L.; Cazaux, C.; Durocher, D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT DNA polymerase theta (Polθ) is a specialized A-family DNA polymerase that functions in processes such as translesion synthesis (TLS), DNA double-strand break repair and DNA replication timing. Overexpression of POLQ, the gene encoding Polθ, is a prognostic marker for an adverse outcome in a wide range of human cancers. While increased Polθ dosage was recently suggested to promote survival of homologous recombination (HR)-deficient cancer cells, it remains unclear whether POLQ overexpression could be also beneficial to HR-proficient cancer cells. By performing a short interfering (si)RNA screen in which genes encoding druggable proteins were knocked down in Polθ-overexpressing cells as a means to uncover genetic vulnerabilities associated with POLQ overexpression, we could not identify genes that were essential for viability in Polθ-overexpressing cells in normal growth conditions. We also showed that, upon external DNA replication stress, Polθ expression promotes cell survival and limits genetic instability. Finally, we report that POLQ expression correlates with the expression of a set of HR genes in breast, lung and colorectal cancers. Collectively, our data suggest that Polθ upregulation, besides its importance for survival of HR-deficient cancer cells, may be crucial also for HR-proficient cells to better tolerate DNA replication stress, as part of a global gene deregulation response, including HR genes. PMID:27612511

  15. Excess Polθ functions in response to replicative stress in homologous recombination-proficient cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Goullet de Rugy

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available DNA polymerase theta (Polθ is a specialized A-family DNA polymerase that functions in processes such as translesion synthesis (TLS, DNA double-strand break repair and DNA replication timing. Overexpression of POLQ, the gene encoding Polθ, is a prognostic marker for an adverse outcome in a wide range of human cancers. While increased Polθ dosage was recently suggested to promote survival of homologous recombination (HR-deficient cancer cells, it remains unclear whether POLQ overexpression could be also beneficial to HR-proficient cancer cells. By performing a short interfering (siRNA screen in which genes encoding druggable proteins were knocked down in Polθ-overexpressing cells as a means to uncover genetic vulnerabilities associated with POLQ overexpression, we could not identify genes that were essential for viability in Polθ-overexpressing cells in normal growth conditions. We also showed that, upon external DNA replication stress, Polθ expression promotes cell survival and limits genetic instability. Finally, we report that POLQ expression correlates with the expression of a set of HR genes in breast, lung and colorectal cancers. Collectively, our data suggest that Polθ upregulation, besides its importance for survival of HR-deficient cancer cells, may be crucial also for HR-proficient cells to better tolerate DNA replication stress, as part of a global gene deregulation response, including HR genes.

  16. Ubiquitin-dependent recruitment of the Bloom syndrome helicase upon replication stress is required to suppress homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikoo, Shweta; Madhavan, Vinoth; Hussain, Mansoor; Miller, Edward S; Arora, Prateek; Zlatanou, Anastasia; Modi, Priyanka; Townsend, Kelly; Stewart, Grant S; Sengupta, Sagar

    2013-06-12

    Limiting the levels of homologous recombination (HR) that occur at sites of DNA damage is a major role of BLM helicase. However, very little is known about the mechanisms dictating its relocalization to these sites. Here, we demonstrate that the ubiquitin/SUMO-dependent DNA damage response (UbS-DDR), controlled by the E3 ligases RNF8/RNF168, triggers BLM recruitment to sites of replication fork stalling via ubiquitylation in the N-terminal region of BLM and subsequent BLM binding to the ubiquitin-interacting motifs of RAP80. Furthermore, we show that this mechanism of BLM relocalization is essential for BLM's ability to suppress excessive/uncontrolled HR at stalled replication forks. Unexpectedly, we also uncovered a requirement for RNF8-dependent ubiquitylation of BLM and PML for maintaining the integrity of PML-associated nuclear bodies and as a consequence the localization of BLM to these structures. Lastly, we identified a novel role for RAP80 in preventing proteasomal degradation of BLM in unstressed cells. Taken together, these data highlight an important biochemical link between the UbS-DDR and BLM-dependent pathways involved in maintaining genome stability.

  17. The homologous recombination system of Ustilago maydis

    OpenAIRE

    Holloman, William K.; Schirawski, Jan; Holliday, Robin

    2008-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a high fidelity, template-dependent process that is used in repair of damaged DNA, recovery of broken replication forks, and disjunction of homologous chromosomes in meiosis. Much of what is known about recombination genes and mechanisms comes from studies on baker's yeast. Ustilago maydis, a basidiomycete fungus, is distant evolutionarily from baker's yeast and so offers the possibility of gaining insight into recombination from an alternative perspective. Here we...

  18. Cell biology of homologous recombination in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckert-Boulet, Nadine Valerie; Rothstein, Rodney; Lisby, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Homologous recombination is an important pathway for error-free repair of DNA lesions, such as single- and double-strand breaks, and for rescue of collapsed replication forks. Here, we describe protocols for live cell imaging of single-lesion recombination events in the yeast Saccharomyces...

  19. The homologous recombination system of Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloman, William K; Schirawski, Jan; Holliday, Robin

    2008-08-01

    Homologous recombination is a high fidelity, template-dependent process that is used in repair of damaged DNA, recovery of broken replication forks, and disjunction of homologous chromosomes in meiosis. Much of what is known about recombination genes and mechanisms comes from studies on baker's yeast. Ustilago maydis, a basidiomycete fungus, is distant evolutionarily from baker's yeast and so offers the possibility of gaining insight into recombination from an alternative perspective. Here we have surveyed the genome of U. maydis to determine the composition of its homologous recombination system. Compared to baker's yeast, there are fundamental differences in the function as well as in the repertoire of dedicated components. These include the use of a BRCA2 homolog and its modifier Dss1 rather than Rad52 as a mediator of Rad51, the presence of only a single Rad51 paralog, and the absence of Dmc1 and auxiliary meiotic proteins.

  20. Regulation of homologous recombination at telomeres in budding yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckert-Boulet, Nadine; Lisby, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Homologous recombination is suppressed at normal length telomere sequences. In contrast, telomere recombination is allowed when telomeres erode in the absence of telomerase activity or as a consequence of nucleolytic degradation or incomplete replication. Here, we review the mechanisms...... that contribute to regulating mitotic homologous recombination at telomeres and the role of these mechanisms in signalling short telomeres in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae....

  1. ATR-p53 restricts homologous recombination in response to replicative stress but does not limit DNA interstrand crosslink repair in lung cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca M Sirbu

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination (HR is required for the restart of collapsed DNA replication forks and error-free repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB. However, unscheduled or hyperactive HR may lead to genomic instability and promote cancer development. The cellular factors that restrict HR processes in mammalian cells are only beginning to be elucidated. The tumor suppressor p53 has been implicated in the suppression of HR though it has remained unclear why p53, as the guardian of the genome, would impair an error-free repair process. Here, we show for the first time that p53 downregulates foci formation of the RAD51 recombinase in response to replicative stress in H1299 lung cancer cells in a manner that is independent of its role as a transcription factor. We find that this downregulation of HR is not only completely dependent on the binding site of p53 with replication protein A but also the ATR/ATM serine 15 phosphorylation site. Genetic analysis suggests that ATR but not ATM kinase modulates p53's function in HR. The suppression of HR by p53 can be bypassed under experimental conditions that cause DSB either directly or indirectly, in line with p53's role as a guardian of the genome. As a result, transactivation-inactive p53 does not compromise the resistance of H1299 cells to the interstrand crosslinking agent mitomycin C. Altogether, our data support a model in which p53 plays an anti-recombinogenic role in the ATR-dependent mammalian replication checkpoint but does not impair a cell's ability to use HR for the removal of DSB induced by cytotoxic agents.

  2. Homology requirements for recombination in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Watt, V M; Ingles, C J; Urdea, M S; Rutter, W J

    1985-01-01

    The DNA sequence homology required for recombination in Escherichia coli has been determined by measuring the recombination frequency between insulin DNA in a miniplasmid pi VX and a homologous sequence in a bacteriophage lambda vector. A minimum of approximately equal to 20 base pairs in a completely homologous segment is required for significant recombination. There is an exponential increase in the frequency of recombination when the length of homologous DNA is increased from 20 base pairs...

  3. Homologous recombination in Leishmania enriettii.

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    We have used derivatives of the recently developed stable transfection vector pALT-Neo to formally demonstrate that Leishmania enriettii contains the enzymatic machinery necessary for homologous recombination. This observation has implications for gene regulation, gene amplification, genetic diversity, and the maintenance of tandemly repeated gene families in the Leishmania genome as well as in closely related organisms, including Trypanosoma brucei. Two plasmids containing nonoverlapping del...

  4. Homologous recombination in plants: an antireview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman-Lazarovich, Michal; Levy, Avraham A

    2011-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a central cellular process involved in many aspects of genome maintenance such as DNA repair, replication, telomere maintenance, and meiotic chromosomal segregation. HR is highly conserved among eukaryotes, contributing to genome stability as well as to the generation of genetic diversity. It has been intensively studied, for almost a century, in plants and in other organisms. In this antireview, rather than reviewing existing knowledge, we wish to underline the many open questions in plant HR. We will discuss the following issues: how do we define homology and how the degree of homology affects HR? Are there any plant-specific HR qualities, how extensive is functional conservation and did HR proteins acquire new functions? How efficient is HR in plants and what are the cis and the trans factors that regulate it? Finally, we will give the prospects for enhancing the rates of gene targeting and meiotic HR for plant breeding purposes.

  5. Single-stranded annealing induced by re-initiation of replication origins provides a novel and efficient mechanism for generating copy number expansion via non-allelic homologous recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth J Finn

    Full Text Available Copy number expansions such as amplifications and duplications contribute to human phenotypic variation, promote molecular diversification during evolution, and drive the initiation and/or progression of various cancers. The mechanisms underlying these copy number changes are still incompletely understood, however. We recently demonstrated that transient, limited re-replication from a single origin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae efficiently induces segmental amplification of the re-replicated region. Structural analyses of such re-replication induced gene amplifications (RRIGA suggested that RRIGA could provide a new mechanism for generating copy number variation by non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR. Here we elucidate this new mechanism and provide insight into why it is so efficient. We establish that sequence homology is both necessary and sufficient for repetitive elements to participate in RRIGA and show that their recombination occurs by a single-strand annealing (SSA mechanism. We also find that re-replication forks are prone to breakage, accounting for the widespread DNA damage associated with deregulation of replication proteins. These breaks appear to stimulate NAHR between re-replicated repeat sequences flanking a re-initiating replication origin. Our results support a RRIGA model where the expansion of a re-replication bubble beyond flanking homologous sequences followed by breakage at both forks in trans provides an ideal structural context for SSA-mediated NAHR to form a head-to-tail duplication. Given the remarkable efficiency of RRIGA, we suggest it may be an unappreciated contributor to copy number expansions in both disease and evolution.

  6. Single-stranded annealing induced by re-initiation of replication origins provides a novel and efficient mechanism for generating copy number expansion via non-allelic homologous recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth J Finn

    Full Text Available Copy number expansions such as amplifications and duplications contribute to human phenotypic variation, promote molecular diversification during evolution, and drive the initiation and/or progression of various cancers. The mechanisms underlying these copy number changes are still incompletely understood, however. We recently demonstrated that transient, limited re-replication from a single origin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae efficiently induces segmental amplification of the re-replicated region. Structural analyses of such re-replication induced gene amplifications (RRIGA suggested that RRIGA could provide a new mechanism for generating copy number variation by non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR. Here we elucidate this new mechanism and provide insight into why it is so efficient. We establish that sequence homology is both necessary and sufficient for repetitive elements to participate in RRIGA and show that their recombination occurs by a single-strand annealing (SSA mechanism. We also find that re-replication forks are prone to breakage, accounting for the widespread DNA damage associated with deregulation of replication proteins. These breaks appear to stimulate NAHR between re-replicated repeat sequences flanking a re-initiating replication origin. Our results support a RRIGA model where the expansion of a re-replication bubble beyond flanking homologous sequences followed by breakage at both forks in trans provides an ideal structural context for SSA-mediated NAHR to form a head-to-tail duplication. Given the remarkable efficiency of RRIGA, we suggest it may be an unappreciated contributor to copy number expansions in both disease and evolution.

  7. Single-stranded heteroduplex intermediates in λ Red homologous recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Youming

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Red proteins of lambda phage mediate probably the simplest and most efficient homologous recombination reactions yet described. However the mechanism of dsDNA recombination remains undefined. Results Here we show that the Red proteins can act via full length single stranded intermediates to establish single stranded heteroduplexes at the replication fork. We created asymmetrically digestible dsDNA substrates by exploiting the fact that Redα exonuclease activity requires a 5' phosphorylated end, or is blocked by phosphothioates. Using these substrates, we found that the most efficient configuration for dsDNA recombination occurred when the strand that can prime Okazaki-like synthesis contained both homology regions on the same ssDNA molecule. Furthermore, we show that Red recombination requires replication of the target molecule. Conclusions Hence we propose a new model for dsDNA recombination, termed 'beta' recombination, based on the formation of ssDNA heteroduplexes at the replication fork. Implications of the model were tested using (i an in situ assay for recombination, which showed that recombination generated mixed wild type and recombinant colonies; and (ii the predicted asymmetries of the homology arms, which showed that recombination is more sensitive to non-homologies attached to 5' than 3' ends. Whereas beta recombination can generate deletions in target BACs of at least 50 kb at about the same efficiency as small deletions, the converse event of insertion is very sensitive to increasing size. Insertions up to 3 kb are most efficiently achieved using beta recombination, however at greater sizes, an alternative Red-mediated mechanism(s appears to be equally efficient. These findings define a new intermediate in homologous recombination, which also has practical implications for recombineering with the Red proteins.

  8. Homologous recombination in Leishmania enriettii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, J F; Laban, A; Wirth, D F

    1991-02-01

    We have used derivatives of the recently developed stable transfection vector pALT-Neo to formally demonstrate that Leishmania enriettii contains the enzymatic machinery necessary for homologous recombination. This observation has implications for gene regulation, gene amplification, genetic diversity, and the maintenance of tandemly repeated gene families in the Leishmania genome as well as in closely related organisms, including Trypanosoma brucei. Two plasmids containing nonoverlapping deletions of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene, as well as the neomycin-resistance gene, were cotransfected into L. enriettii. Analysis of the DNA from these cells by Southern blotting and plasmid rescue revealed that a full-length or doubly deleted CAT gene could be reconstructed by homologous crossing-over and/or gene conversion between the two deletion plasmids. Additionally, parasites cotransfected with pALT-Neo and pALT-CAT-S, a plasmid containing two copies of the chimeric alpha-tubulin-CAT gene, resulted in G418-resistant parasites expressing high levels of CAT activity. The structure of the DNA within these cells, as shown by Southern blot analysis and the polymerase chain reaction, is that which would be expected from a homologous exchange event occurring between the two plasmids.

  9. How homologous recombination maintains telomere integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacconi, Eliana M C; Tarsounas, Madalena

    2015-06-01

    Telomeres protect the ends of linear chromosomes against loss of genetic information and inappropriate processing as damaged DNA and are therefore crucial to the maintenance of chromosome integrity. In addition to providing a pathway for genome-wide DNA repair, homologous recombination (HR) plays a key role in telomere replication and capping. Consistent with this, the genomic instability characteristic of HR-deficient cells and tumours is driven in part by telomere dysfunction. Here, we discuss the mechanisms by which HR modulates the response to intrinsic cellular challenges that arise during telomere replication, as well as its impact on the assembly of telomere protective structures. How normal and tumour cells differ in their ability to maintain telomeres is deeply relevant to the search for treatments that would selectively eliminate cells whose capacity for HR-mediated repair has been compromised.

  10. Homologous recombination and its regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krejci, Lumir; Altmannova, Veronika; Spirek, Mario; Zhao, Xiaolan

    2012-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is critical both for repairing DNA lesions in mitosis and for chromosomal pairing and exchange during meiosis. However, some forms of HR can also lead to undesirable DNA rearrangements. Multiple regulatory mechanisms have evolved to ensure that HR takes place at the right time, place and manner. Several of these impinge on the control of Rad51 nucleofilaments that play a central role in HR. Some factors promote the formation of these structures while others lead to their disassembly or the use of alternative repair pathways. In this article, we review these mechanisms in both mitotic and meiotic environments and in different eukaryotic taxa, with an emphasis on yeast and mammal systems. Since mutations in several proteins that regulate Rad51 nucleofilaments are associated with cancer and cancer-prone syndromes, we discuss how understanding their functions can lead to the development of better tools for cancer diagnosis and therapy. PMID:22467216

  11. Homologous recombination in DNA repair and DNA damage tolerance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuan Li; Wolf-Dietrich Heyer

    2008-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) comprises a series of interrelated pathways that function in the repair of DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) and interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). In addition, recombination provides critical sup-port for DNA replication in the recovery of stalled or broken replication forks, contributing to tolerance of DNA damage. A central core of proteins, most critically the RecA homolog Rad51, catalyzes the key reactions that typify HR: homology search and DNA strand invasion. The diverse functions of recombination are reflected in the need for context-specific factors that perform supplemental functions in conjunction with the core proteins. The inability to properly repair complex DNA damage and resolve DNA replication stress leads to genomic instability and contributes to cancer etiology. Mutations in the BRCA2 recombination gene cause predisposition to breast and ovarian cancer as well as Fanconi anemia, a cancer predisposition syndrome characterized by a defect in the repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks. The cellular functions of recombination are also germane to DNA-based treatment modaUties of cancer, which target replicating cells by the direct or indirect induction of DNA lesions that are substrates for recombination pathways. This review focuses on mechanistic aspects of HR relating to DSB and ICL repair as well as replication fork support.

  12. Transcription-replication collision increases recombination efficiency between plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jialiang, Li; Feng, Chen; Zhen, Xu; Jibing, Chen; Xiang, Lv; Lingling, Zhang; Depei, Liu

    2013-11-01

    It has been proposed that the stalling of the replication forks can induce homologous recombination in several organisms, and that arrested replication forks may offer nuclease targets, thereby providing a substrate for proteins involved in double-strand repair. In this article, we constructed a plasmid with the potential for transcription-replication collision (TRC), in which DNA replication and RNA transcription occur on the same DNA template simultaneously. Theoretically, transcription will impede DNA replication and increase homologous recombination. To validate this hypothesis, another plasmid was constructed that contained a homologous sequence with the exception of some mutated sites. Co-transfection of these two plasmids into 293T cells resulted in increased recombination frequency. The ratio of these two plasmids also affected the recombination frequency. Moreover, we found high expression levels of RAD51, which indicated that the increase in the recombination rate was probably via the homologous recombination pathway. These results indicate that mutant genes in plasmids can be repaired by TRC-induced recombination.

  13. Productive homologous and non-homologous recombination of hepatitis C virus in cell culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheel, Troels K H; Galli, Andrea; Li, Yi-Ping

    2013-01-01

    . In addition, recombination is an important regulatory mechanism of cytopathogenicity for the related pestiviruses. Here we describe recombination of HCV RNA in cell culture leading to production of infectious virus. Initially, hepatoma cells were co-transfected with a replicating JFH1ΔE1E2 genome (genotype 2a......) lacking functional envelope genes and strain J6 (2a), which has functional envelope genes but does not replicate in culture. After an initial decrease in the number of HCV positive cells, infection spread after 13-36 days. Sequencing of recovered viruses revealed non-homologous recombinants with J6...

  14. Building up and breaking down: mechanisms controlling recombination during replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branzei, Dana; Szakal, Barnabas

    2017-08-01

    The complete and faithful duplication of the genome is an essential prerequisite for proliferating cells to maintain genome integrity. This objective is greatly challenged by DNA damage encountered during replication, which causes fork stalling and in certain cases, fork breakage. DNA damage tolerance (DDT) pathways mitigate the effects on fork stability induced by replication fork stalling by mediating damage-bypass and replication fork restart. These DDT mechanisms, largely relying on homologous recombination (HR) and specialized polymerases, can however contribute to genome rearrangements and mutagenesis. There is a profound connection between replication and recombination: recombination proteins protect replication forks from nuclease-mediated degradation of the nascent DNA strands and facilitate replication completion in cells challenged by DNA damage. Moreover, in case of fork collapse and formation of double strand breaks (DSBs), the recombination factors present or recruited to the fork facilitate HR-mediated DSB repair, which is primarily error-free. Disruption of HR is inexorably linked to genome instability, but the premature activation of HR during replication often leads to genome rearrangements. Faithful replication necessitates the downregulation of HR and disruption of active RAD51 filaments at replication forks, but upon persistent fork stalling, building up of HR is critical for the reorganization of the replication fork and for filling-in of the gaps associated with discontinuous replication induced by DNA lesions. Here we summarize and reflect on our understanding of the mechanisms that either suppress recombination or locally enhance it during replication, and the principles that underlie this regulation.

  15. DNA Sequence Alignment during Homologous Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Eric C

    2016-05-27

    Homologous recombination allows for the regulated exchange of genetic information between two different DNA molecules of identical or nearly identical sequence composition, and is a major pathway for the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. A key facet of homologous recombination is the ability of recombination proteins to perfectly align the damaged DNA with homologous sequence located elsewhere in the genome. This reaction is referred to as the homology search and is akin to the target searches conducted by many different DNA-binding proteins. Here I briefly highlight early investigations into the homology search mechanism, and then describe more recent research. Based on these studies, I summarize a model that includes a combination of intersegmental transfer, short-distance one-dimensional sliding, and length-specific microhomology recognition to efficiently align DNA sequences during the homology search. I also suggest some future directions to help further our understanding of the homology search. Where appropriate, I direct the reader to other recent reviews describing various issues related to homologous recombination.

  16. DNA Sequence Alignment during Homologous Recombination*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    Homologous recombination allows for the regulated exchange of genetic information between two different DNA molecules of identical or nearly identical sequence composition, and is a major pathway for the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. A key facet of homologous recombination is the ability of recombination proteins to perfectly align the damaged DNA with homologous sequence located elsewhere in the genome. This reaction is referred to as the homology search and is akin to the target searches conducted by many different DNA-binding proteins. Here I briefly highlight early investigations into the homology search mechanism, and then describe more recent research. Based on these studies, I summarize a model that includes a combination of intersegmental transfer, short-distance one-dimensional sliding, and length-specific microhomology recognition to efficiently align DNA sequences during the homology search. I also suggest some future directions to help further our understanding of the homology search. Where appropriate, I direct the reader to other recent reviews describing various issues related to homologous recombination. PMID:27129270

  17. Why do bacteria engage in homologous recombination?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, M.

    2009-01-01

    Microbiologists have long recognized that the uptake and incorporation of homologous DNA from outside the cell is a common feature of bacteria, with important implications for their evolution. However, the exact reasons why bacteria engage in homologous recombination remain elusive. This Opinion

  18. Why do bacteria engage in homologous recombination?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, M.

    2009-01-01

    Microbiologists have long recognized that the uptake and incorporation of homologous DNA from outside the cell is a common feature of bacteria, with important implications for their evolution. However, the exact reasons why bacteria engage in homologous recombination remain elusive. This Opinion art

  19. Regulation of Homologous Recombination by SUMOylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinela da Silva, Sonia Cristina

    factors such as the homologous recombination (HR) machinery. HR constitutes the main DSB repair pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and despite being largely considered an error-free process and essential for genome stability, uncontrolled recombination can lead to loss of heterozygosity, translocations...

  20. The minimum amount of homology required for homologous recombination in mammalian cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Rubnitz, J; Subramani, S

    1984-01-01

    Although DNA sequence homology is believed to be a prerequisite for homologous recombination events in procaryotes and eucaryotes, no systematic study has been done on the minimum amount of homology required for homologous recombination in mammalian cells. We have used simian virus 40-pBR322 hybrid plasmids constructed in vitro as substrates to quantitate intramolecular homologous recombination in cultured monkey cells. Excision of wild-type simian virus 40 DNA by homologous recombination was...

  1. [DNA homologous recombination repair in mammalian cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popławski, Tomasz; Błasiak, Janusz

    2006-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the most serious DNA damage. Due to a great variety of factors causing DSBs, the efficacy of their repair is crucial for the cell's functioning and prevents DNA fragmentation, chromosomal translocation and deletion. In mammalian cells DSBs can be repaired by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), homologous recombination (HRR) and single strand annealing (SSA). HRR can be divided into the first and second phase. The first phase is initiated by sensor proteins belonging to the MRN complex, that activate the ATM protein which target HRR proteins to obtain the second response phase--repair. HRR is precise because it utilizes a non-damaged homologous DNA fragment as a template. The key players of HRR in mammalian cells are MRN, RPA, Rad51 and its paralogs, Rad52 and Rad54.

  2. Regulation of Homologous Recombination by SUMOylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinela da Silva, Sonia Cristina

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the most deleterious types of DNA lesions challenging genome integrity. The DNA damage response (DDR) promotes fast and effective detection and repair of the damaged DNA, leading to cell cycle arrest through checkpoint activation and the recruitment of repair...... factors such as the homologous recombination (HR) machinery. HR constitutes the main DSB repair pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and despite being largely considered an error-free process and essential for genome stability, uncontrolled recombination can lead to loss of heterozygosity, translocations....... In this study I present new insights for the role of SUMOylation in regulating HR by dissecting the role of SUMO in the interaction between the central HR-mediator protein Rad52 and its paralogue Rad59 and the outcome of recombination. This data provides evidence for the importance of SUMO in promoting protein...

  3. Gene Disruption by Homologous Recombination in the Xylella fastidiosa Citrus Variegated Chlorosis Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaurivaud, Patrice; Souza, Leonardo C. A.; Virgílio, Andrea C. D.; Mariano, Anelise G.; Palma, Renê R.; Monteiro, Patrícia B.

    2002-01-01

    Mutagenesis by homologous recombination was evaluated in Xylella fastidiosa by using the bga gene, coding for β-galactosidase, as a model. Integration of replicative plasmids by homologous recombination between the cloned truncated copy of bga and the endogenous gene was produced by one or two crossover events leading to β-galactosidase mutants. A promoterless chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene was used to monitor the expression of the target gene and to select a cvaB mutant. PMID:12200328

  4. [Homologous recombination among bacterial genomes: the measurement and identification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xianwei, Yang; Ruifu, Yang; Yujun, Cui

    2016-02-01

    Homologous recombination is one of important sources in shaping the bacterial population diversity, which disrupts the clonal relationship among different lineages through horizontal transferring of DNA-segments. As consequence of blurring the vertical inheritance signals, the homologous recombination raises difficulties in phylogenetic analysis and reconstruction of population structure. Here we discuss the impacts of homologous recombination in inferring phylogenetic relationship among bacterial isolates, and summarize the tools and models separately used in recombination measurement and identification. We also highlight the merits and drawbacks of various approaches, aiming to assist in the practical application for the analysis of homologous recombination in bacterial evolution research.

  5. MutS2 Promotes Homologous Recombination in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burby, Peter E; Simmons, Lyle A

    2017-01-15

    Bacterial MutS proteins are subdivided into two families, MutS1 and MutS2. MutS1 family members recognize DNA replication errors during their participation in the well-characterized mismatch repair (MMR) pathway. In contrast to the well-described function of MutS1, the function of MutS2 in bacteria has remained less clear. In Helicobacter pylori and Thermus thermophilus, MutS2 has been shown to suppress homologous recombination. The role of MutS2 is unknown in the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis In this work, we investigated the contribution of MutS2 to maintaining genome integrity in B. subtilis We found that deletion of mutS2 renders B. subtilis sensitive to the natural antibiotic mitomycin C (MMC), which requires homologous recombination for repair. We demonstrate that the C-terminal small MutS-related (Smr) domain is necessary but not sufficient for tolerance to MMC. Further, we developed a CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing system to test if the inducible prophage PBSX was the underlying cause of the observed MMC sensitivity. Genetic analysis revealed that MMC sensitivity was dependent on recombination and not on nucleotide excision repair or a symptom of prophage PBSX replication and cell lysis. We found that deletion of mutS2 resulted in decreased transformation efficiency using both plasmid and chromosomal DNA. Further, deletion of mutS2 in a strain lacking the Holliday junction endonuclease gene recU resulted in increased MMC sensitivity and decreased transformation efficiency, suggesting that MutS2 could function redundantly with RecU. Together, our results support a model where B. subtilis MutS2 helps to promote homologous recombination, demonstrating a new function for bacterial MutS2. Cells contain pathways that promote or inhibit recombination. MutS2 homologs are Smr-endonuclease domain-containing proteins that have been shown to function in antirecombination in some bacteria. We present evidence that B. subtilis MutS2 promotes recombination

  6. RPA homologs and ssDNA processing during meiotic recombination

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, Jonathan; Abby, Emilie; Livera, Gabriel; Martini, Emmanuelle

    2015-01-01

    Meiotic homologous recombination is a specialized process that involves homologous chromosome pairing and strand exchange to guarantee proper chromosome segregation and genetic diversity. The formation and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) during meiotic recombination differs from those during mitotic recombination in that the homologous chromosome rather than the sister chromatid is the preferred repair template. The processing of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) formed on intermediate re...

  7. Investigations of homologous recombination pathways and their regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, James M; Kwon, YoungHo; Niu, Hengyao; Sung, Patrick

    2013-12-13

    The DNA double-strand break (DSB), arising from exposure to ionizing radiation or various chemotherapeutic agents or from replication fork collapse, is among the most dangerous of chromosomal lesions. DSBs are highly cytotoxic and can lead to translocations, deletions, duplications, or mutations if mishandled. DSBs are eliminated by either homologous recombination (HR), which uses a homologous template to guide accurate repair, or by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), which simply rejoins the two broken ends after damaged nucleotides have been removed. HR generates error-free repair products and is also required for generating chromosome arm crossovers between homologous chromosomes in meiotic cells. The HR reaction includes several distinct steps: resection of DNA ends, homologous DNA pairing, DNA synthesis, and processing of HR intermediates. Each occurs in a highly regulated fashion utilizing multiple protein factors. These steps are being elucidated using a combination of genetic tools, cell-based assays, and in vitro reconstitution with highly purified HR proteins. In this review, we summarize contributions from our laboratory at Yale University in understanding HR mechanisms in eukaryotic cells.

  8. Replication, recombination, and repair: going for the gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Hannah L; Kreuzer, Kenneth N

    2002-03-01

    DNA recombination is now appreciated to be integral to DNA replication and cell survival. Recombination allows replication to successfully maneuver through the roadblocks of damaged or collapsed replication forks. The signals and controls that permit cells to transition between replication and recombination modes are now being identified.

  9. Relative rates of homologous and nonhomologous recombination in transfected DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, D B; Wilson, J H

    1985-05-01

    Both homologous and nonhomologous recombination events occur at high efficiency in DNA molecules transfected into mammalian cells. Both types of recombination occur with similar overall efficiencies, as measured by an endpoint assay, but their relative rates are unknown. In this communication, we measure the relative rates of homologous and nonhomologous recombination in DNA transfected into monkey cells. This measurement is made by using a linear simian virus 40 genome that contains a 131-base-pair duplication at its termini. Once inside the cell, this molecule must circularize to initiate lytic infection. Circularization can occur either by direct, nonhomologous end-joining or by homologous recombination within the duplicated region. Although the products of the two recombination pathways are different, they are equally infectious. Since homologous and nonhomologous recombination processes are competing for the same substrate, the relative amounts of the products of each pathway should reflect the relative rates of homologous and nonhomologous recombination. Analysis of individual recombinant genomes from 164 plaques indicates that the rate of circularization by nonhomologous recombination is 2- to 3-fold higher than the rate of homologous recombination. The assay system described here may prove to be useful for testing procedures designed to influence the relative rates of homologous and nonhomologous recombination.

  10. Dynamic protein assemblies in homologous recombination with single DNA molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, A.H.

    2007-01-01

    What happens when your DNA breaks? This thesis describes experimental work on the single-molecule level focusing on the interaction between DNA and DNA-repair proteins, in particular bacterial RecA and human Rad51, involved in homologous recombination. Homologous recombination and its central event

  11. Reappearance from Obscurity: Mammalian Rad52 in Homologous Recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kritika Hanamshet

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination (HR plays an important role in maintaining genomic integrity. It is responsible for repair of the most harmful DNA lesions, DNA double-strand breaks and inter-strand DNA cross-links. HR function is also essential for proper segregation of homologous chromosomes in meiosis, maintenance of telomeres, and resolving stalled replication forks. Defects in HR often lead to genetic diseases and cancer. Rad52 is one of the key HR proteins, which is evolutionarily conserved from yeast to humans. In yeast, Rad52 is important for most HR events; Rad52 mutations disrupt repair of DNA double-strand breaks and targeted DNA integration. Surprisingly, in mammals, Rad52 knockouts showed no significant DNA repair or recombination phenotype. However, recent work demonstrated that mutations in human RAD52 are synthetically lethal with mutations in several other HR proteins including BRCA1 and BRCA2. These new findings indicate an important backup role for Rad52, which complements the main HR mechanism in mammals. In this review, we focus on the Rad52 activities and functions in HR and the possibility of using human RAD52 as therapeutic target in BRCA1 and BRCA2-deficient familial breast cancer and ovarian cancer.

  12. Assembly and dynamics of the bacteriophage T4 homologous recombination machinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morrical Scott W

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Homologous recombination (HR, a process involving the physical exchange of strands between homologous or nearly homologous DNA molecules, is critical for maintaining the genetic diversity and genome stability of species. Bacteriophage T4 is one of the classic systems for studies of homologous recombination. T4 uses HR for high-frequency genetic exchanges, for homology-directed DNA repair (HDR processes including DNA double-strand break repair, and for the initiation of DNA replication (RDR. T4 recombination proteins are expressed at high levels during T4 infection in E. coli, and share strong sequence, structural, and/or functional conservation with their counterparts in cellular organisms. Biochemical studies of T4 recombination have provided key insights on DNA strand exchange mechanisms, on the structure and function of recombination proteins, and on the coordination of recombination and DNA synthesis activities during RDR and HDR. Recent years have seen the development of detailed biochemical models for the assembly and dynamics of presynaptic filaments in the T4 recombination system, for the atomic structure of T4 UvsX recombinase, and for the roles of DNA helicases in T4 recombination. The goal of this chapter is to review these recent advances and their implications for HR and HDR mechanisms in all organisms.

  13. Relative rates of homologous and nonhomologous recombination in transfected DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Roth, D B; Wilson, J H

    1985-01-01

    Both homologous and nonhomologous recombination events occur at high efficiency in DNA molecules transfected into mammalian cells. Both types of recombination occur with similar overall efficiencies, as measured by an endpoint assay, but their relative rates are unknown. In this communication, we measure the relative rates of homologous and nonhomologous recombination in DNA transfected into monkey cells. This measurement is made by using a linear simian virus 40 genome that contains a 131-ba...

  14. Altering symplectic manifolds by homologous recombination

    CERN Document Server

    Abouzaid, Mohammed

    2010-01-01

    We use symplectic cohomology to study the non-uniqueness of symplectic structures on the smooth manifolds underlying affine varieties. Starting with a Lefschetz fibration on such a variety and a finite set of primes, the main new tool is a method, which we call homologous recombination, for constructing a Lefschetz fibration whose total space is smoothly equivalent to the original variety, but for which symplectic cohomology with coefficients in the given set of primes vanishes (there is also a simpler version that kills symplectic cohomology completely). Rather than relying on a geometric analysis of periodic orbits of a flow, the computation of symplectic cohomology depends on describing the Fukaya category associated to the new fibration. As a consequence we use a result of McLean to prove, for example, that an affine variety of real dimension greater than or equal to 4 supports infinitely many different (Wein)stein structures of finite type, and, assuming a mild cohomological condition, uncountably many d...

  15. Precise genome editing by homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshijima, K; Jurynec, M J; Grunwald, D J

    2016-01-01

    Simple and efficient methods are presented for creating precise modifications of the zebrafish genome. Edited alleles are generated by homologous recombination between the host genome and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) donor molecules, stimulated by the induction of double-strand breaks at targeted loci in the host genome. Because several kilobase-long tracts of sequence can be exchanged, multiple genome modifications can be generated simultaneously at a single locus. Methods are described for creating: (1) alleles with simple sequence changes or in-frame additions, (2) knockin/knockout alleles that express a reporter protein from an endogenous locus, and (3) conditional alleles in which exons are flanked by recombinogenic loxP sites. Significantly, our approach to genome editing allows the incorporation of a linked reporter gene into the donor sequences so that successfully edited alleles can be identified by virtue of expression of the reporter. Factors affecting the efficiency of genome editing are discussed, including the finding that dsDNA products of I-SceI meganuclease enzyme digestion are particularly effective as donor molecules for gene-editing events. Reagents and procedures are described for accomplishing efficient genome editing in the zebrafish.

  16. Identification of the MMS22L-TONSL complex that promotes homologous recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duro, Eris; Lundin, Cecilia; Ask, Katrine

    2010-01-01

    Budding yeast Mms22 is required for homologous recombination (HR)-mediated repair of stalled or broken DNA replication forks. Here we identify a human Mms22-like protein (MMS22L) and an MMS22L-interacting protein, NF¿BIL2/TONSL. Depletion of MMS22L or TONSL from human cells causes a high level...

  17. The cell-cycle checkpoint kinase Chk1 is required for mammalian homologous recombination repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Claus Storgaard; Hansen, Lasse Tengbjerg; Dziegielewski, Jaroslaw

    2005-01-01

    The essential checkpoint kinase Chk1 is required for cell-cycle delays after DNA damage or blocked DNA replication. However, it is unclear whether Chk1 is involved in the repair of damaged DNA. Here we establish that Chk1 is a key regulator of genome maintenance by the homologous recombination...

  18. Recombination, Pairing, and Synapsis of Homologs during Meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zickler, Denise; Kleckner, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Recombination is a prominent feature of meiosis in which it plays an important role in increasing genetic diversity during inheritance. Additionally, in most organisms, recombination also plays mechanical roles in chromosomal processes, most notably to mediate pairing of homologous chromosomes during prophase and, ultimately, to ensure regular segregation of homologous chromosomes when they separate at the first meiotic division. Recombinational interactions are also subject to important spatial patterning at both early and late stages. Recombination-mediated processes occur in physical and functional linkage with meiotic axial chromosome structure, with interplay in both directions, before, during, and after formation and dissolution of the synaptonemal complex (SC), a highly conserved meiosis-specific structure that links homolog axes along their lengths. These diverse processes also are integrated with recombination-independent interactions between homologous chromosomes, nonhomology-based chromosome couplings/clusterings, and diverse types of chromosome movement. This review provides an overview of these diverse processes and their interrelationships. PMID:25986558

  19. Recombination, Pairing, and Synapsis of Homologs during Meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zickler, Denise; Kleckner, Nancy

    2015-05-18

    Recombination is a prominent feature of meiosis in which it plays an important role in increasing genetic diversity during inheritance. Additionally, in most organisms, recombination also plays mechanical roles in chromosomal processes, most notably to mediate pairing of homologous chromosomes during prophase and, ultimately, to ensure regular segregation of homologous chromosomes when they separate at the first meiotic division. Recombinational interactions are also subject to important spatial patterning at both early and late stages. Recombination-mediated processes occur in physical and functional linkage with meiotic axial chromosome structure, with interplay in both directions, before, during, and after formation and dissolution of the synaptonemal complex (SC), a highly conserved meiosis-specific structure that links homolog axes along their lengths. These diverse processes also are integrated with recombination-independent interactions between homologous chromosomes, nonhomology-based chromosome couplings/clusterings, and diverse types of chromosome movement. This review provides an overview of these diverse processes and their interrelationships.

  20. Monitoring homologous recombination in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Zhuanying; Tang Li [Guangdong Provincial Key Lab of Biotechnology for Plant Development, College of Life Sciences, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China); Li Meiru [South China Botanic Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Chen Lei; Xu Jie [Guangdong Provincial Key Lab of Biotechnology for Plant Development, College of Life Sciences, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China); Wu Goujiang [South China Botanic Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Li Hongqing, E-mail: hqli@scnu.edu.cn [Guangdong Provincial Key Lab of Biotechnology for Plant Development, College of Life Sciences, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China)

    2010-09-10

    Here we describe a system to assay homologous recombination during the complete life cycle of rice (Oryza sativa L.). Rice plants were transformed with two copies of non-functional GUS reporter overlap fragments as recombination substrate. Recombination was observed in all plant organs examined, from the seed stage until the flowering stage of somatic plant development. Embryogenic cells exhibited the highest recombination ability with an average of 3 x 10{sup -5} recombination events per genome, which is about 10-fold of that observed in root cells, and two orders of that observed in leaf cells. Histological analysis revealed that recombination events occurred in diverse cell types, but preferentially in cells with small size. Examples of this included embryogenic cells in callus, phloem cells in the leaf vein, and cells located in the root apical meristem. Steady state RNA analysis revealed that the expression levels of rice Rad51 homologs are positively correlated with increased recombination rates in embryogenic calli, roots and anthers. Finally, radiation treatment of plantlets from distinct recombination lines increased the recombination frequency to different extents. These results showed that homologous recombination frequency can be effectively measured in rice using a transgene reporter assay. This system will facilitate the study of DNA damage signaling and homologous recombination in rice, a model monocot.

  1. A mRad51-GFP antimorphic allele affects homologous recombination and DNA damage sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uringa, Evert-Jan; Baldeyron, Céline; Odijk, Hanny; Wassenaar, Evelyne; van Cappellen, Wiggert A; Maas, Alex; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Baarends, Willy M; Kanaar, Roland; Essers, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    Accurate DNA double-strand break repair through homologous recombination is essential for preserving genome integrity. Disruption of the gene encoding RAD51, the protein that catalyzes DNA strand exchange during homologous recombination, results in lethality of mammalian cells. Proteins required for homologous recombination, also play an important role during DNA replication. To explore the role of RAD51 in DNA replication and DSB repair, we used a knock-in strategy to express a carboxy-terminal fusion of green fluorescent protein to mouse RAD51 (mRAD51-GFP) in mouse embryonic stem cells. Compared to wild-type cells, heterozygous mRad51(+/wt-GFP) embryonic stem cells showed increased sensitivity to DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation and mitomycin C. Moreover, gene targeting was found to be severely impaired in mRad51(+/wt-GFP) embryonic stem cells. Furthermore, we found that mRAD51-GFP foci were not stably associated with chromatin. From these experiments we conclude that this mRad51-GFP allele is an antimorphic allele. When this allele is present in a heterozygous condition over wild-type mRad51, embryonic stem cells are proficient in DNA replication but display defects in homologous recombination and DNA damage repair. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Is homologous recombination really an error-free process?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard S Lopez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination (HR is an evolutionarily conserved process that plays a pivotal role in the equilibrium between genetic stability and diversity. HR is commonly considered to be error-free, but several studies have shown that HR can be error-prone. Here, we discuss the actual accuracy of HR.First, we present the product of genetic exchanges (gene conversion, GC, and crossing over, CO and the mechanisms of HR during double strand break repair and replication restart. We discuss the intrinsic capacities of HR to generate genome rearrangements by GC or CO, either during DSB repair or replication restart. During this process, abortive HR intermediates generate genetic instability and cell toxicity. In addition to genome rearrangements, HR also primes error-prone DNA synthesis and favors mutagenesis on single stranded DNA, a key DNA intermediate during the HR process. The fact that cells have developed several mechanisms protecting against HR excess emphasize its potential risks. Consistent with this duality, several pro-oncogenic situations have been consistently associated with either decreased or increased HR levels. Nevertheless, this versatility also has advantages that we outline here.We conclude that HR is a double-edged sword, which on one hand controls the equilibrium between genome stability and diversity but, on the other hand, can jeopardize the maintenance of genomic integrity. Therefore, whether non-homologous end joining (which, in contrast with HR, is not intrinsically mutagenic or HR is the more mutagenic process is a question that should be re-evaluated. Both processes can be Dr. Jekyll in maintaining genome stability/variability and Mr. Hyde in jeopardizing genome integrity.

  3. Homologous recombination in bovine pestiviruses. Phylogenetic and statistic evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Leandro Roberto; Weber, E Laura

    2004-12-01

    Bovine pestiviruses (Bovine Viral Diarrea Virus 1 (BVDV 1) and Bovine Viral Diarrea Virus 2 (BVDV 2)) belong to the genus Pestivirus (Flaviviridae), which is composed of positive stranded RNA viruses causing significant economic losses world-wide. We used phylogenetic and bootstrap analyses to systematically scan alignments of previously sequenced genomes in order to explore further the evolutionary mechanisms responsible for variation in the virus. Previously published data suggested that homologous crossover might be one of the mechanisms responsible for the genomic rearrangements observed in cytopathic (cp) strains of bovine pestiviruses. Nevertheless, homologous recombination involves not just homologous crossovers, but also replacement of a homologous region of the acceptor RNA. Furthermore, cytopathic strains represent dead paths in evolution, since they are isolated exclusively from the fatal cases of mucosal disease. Herein, we report evidence of homologous inter-genotype recombination in the genome of a non-cytopathic (ncp) strain of Bovine Viral Diarrea Virus 1, the type species of the genus Pestivirus. We also show that intra-genotype homologous recombination might be a common phenomenon in both species of Pestivirus. This evidence demonstrates that homologous recombination contribute to the diversification of bovine pestiviruses in nature. Implications for virus evolution, taxonomy and phylogenetics are discussed.

  4. Regulation of Rad51-Mediated Homologous Recombination by BRCA2, DSS1 and RAD52

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rants, Louise Olthaver Juhl

    Homologous recombination (HR) provides a mechanism to restore integrity and maintain stability of the genetic material. HR is a major pathway for repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), recovery of broken replication forks and generation of meiotic crossovers. The defining step in HR...... in governing the activity of Rad51 and to learn how other recombination-associated proteins such as DSS1 and RAD52 contribute to its regulation. We use the yeast-like fungus Ustilago maydis and the avian DT40 cell line as experimental systems since both have a well-conserved BRCA2-based recombinational repair...

  5. Single-Stranded DNA Curtains for Studying Homologous Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, C J; Steinfeld, J B; Greene, E C

    2017-01-01

    Homologous recombination is an important pathway involved in the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. Genetic studies form the foundation of our knowledge on homologous recombination. Significant progress has also been made toward understanding the biochemical and biophysical properties of the proteins, complexes, and reaction intermediates involved in this essential DNA repair pathway. However, heterogeneous or transient recombination intermediates remain extremely difficult to assess through traditional ensemble methods, leaving an incomplete mechanistic picture of many steps that take place during homologous recombination. To help overcome some of these limitations, we have established DNA curtain methodologies as an experimental platform for studying homologous DNA recombination in real-time at the single-molecule level. Here, we present a detailed overview describing the preparation and use of single-stranded DNA curtains in applications related to the study of homologous DNA recombination with emphasis on recent work related to the study of the eukaryotic recombinase Rad51. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Replication and recombination factors contributing to recombination-dependent bypass of DNA lesions by template switch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Vanoli

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Damage tolerance mechanisms mediating damage-bypass and gap-filling are crucial for genome integrity. A major damage tolerance pathway involves recombination and is referred to as template switch. Template switch intermediates were visualized by 2D gel electrophoresis in the proximity of replication forks as X-shaped structures involving sister chromatid junctions. The homologous recombination factor Rad51 is required for the formation/stabilization of these intermediates, but its mode of action remains to be investigated. By using a combination of genetic and physical approaches, we show that the homologous recombination factors Rad55 and Rad57, but not Rad59, are required for the formation of template switch intermediates. The replication-proficient but recombination-defective rfa1-t11 mutant is normal in triggering a checkpoint response following DNA damage but is impaired in X-structure formation. The Exo1 nuclease also has stimulatory roles in this process. The checkpoint kinase, Rad53, is required for X-molecule formation and phosphorylates Rad55 robustly in response to DNA damage. Although Rad55 phosphorylation is thought to activate recombinational repair under conditions of genotoxic stress, we find that Rad55 phosphomutants do not affect the efficiency of X-molecule formation. We also examined the DNA polymerase implicated in the DNA synthesis step of template switch. Deficiencies in translesion synthesis polymerases do not affect X-molecule formation, whereas DNA polymerase δ, required also for bulk DNA synthesis, plays an important role. Our data indicate that a subset of homologous recombination factors, together with DNA polymerase δ, promote the formation of template switch intermediates that are then preferentially dissolved by the action of the Sgs1 helicase in association with the Top3 topoisomerase rather than resolved by Holliday Junction nucleases. Our results allow us to propose the choreography through which different

  7. Bacterial Recombineering: Genome Engineering via Phage-Based Homologous Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, Gur; Freed, Emily F; Winkler, James D; Gill, Ryan T

    2015-11-20

    The ability to specifically modify bacterial genomes in a precise and efficient manner is highly desired in various fields, ranging from molecular genetics to metabolic engineering and synthetic biology. Much has changed from the initial realization that phage-derived genes may be employed for such tasks to today, where recombineering enables complex genetic edits within a genome or a population. Here, we review the major developments leading to recombineering becoming the method of choice for in situ bacterial genome editing while highlighting the various applications of recombineering in pushing the boundaries of synthetic biology. We also present the current understanding of the mechanism of recombineering. Finally, we discuss in detail issues surrounding recombineering efficiency and future directions for recombineering-based genome editing.

  8. Hotspots of homologous recombination in the human genome: not all homologous sequences are equal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupski, James R

    2004-01-01

    Homologous recombination between alleles or non-allelic paralogous sequences does not occur uniformly but is concentrated in 'hotspots' with high recombination rates. Recent studies of these hotspots show that they do not share common sequence motifs, but they do have other features in common.

  9. Hotspots of homologous recombination in the human genome: not all homologous sequences are equal

    OpenAIRE

    Lupski, James R

    2004-01-01

    Homologous recombination between alleles or non-allelic paralogous sequences does not occur uniformly but is concentrated in 'hotspots' with high recombination rates. Recent studies of these hotspots show that they do not share common sequence motifs, but they do have other features in common.

  10. A defect in homologous recombination leads to increased translesion synthesis in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naiman, Karel; Pagès, Vincent; Fuchs, Robert P

    2016-09-19

    DNA damage tolerance pathways allow cells to duplicate their genomes despite the presence of replication blocking lesions. Cells possess two major tolerance strategies, namely translesion synthesis (TLS) and homology directed gap repair (HDGR). TLS pathways involve specialized DNA polymerases that are able to synthesize past DNA lesions with an intrinsic risk of causing point mutations. In contrast, HDGR pathways are essentially error-free as they rely on the recovery of missing information from the sister chromatid by RecA-mediated homologous recombination. We have investigated the genetic control of pathway choice between TLS and HDGR in vivo in Escherichia coli In a strain with wild type RecA activity, the extent of TLS across replication blocking lesions is generally low while HDGR is used extensively. Interestingly, recA alleles that are partially impaired in D-loop formation confer a decrease in HDGR and a concomitant increase in TLS. Thus, partial defect of RecA's capacity to invade the homologous sister chromatid increases the lifetime of the ssDNA.RecA filament, i.e. the 'SOS signal'. This increase favors TLS by increasing both the TLS polymerase concentration and the lifetime of the TLS substrate, before it becomes sequestered by homologous recombination. In conclusion, the pathway choice between error-prone TLS and error-free HDGR is controlled by the efficiency of homologous recombination. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Homologous recombination is required for recovery from oxidative DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Michio; Umezu, Keiko

    2017-04-03

    We have been studying the genetic events, including chromosome loss, chromosome rearrangements and intragenic point mutations, that are responsible for the deletion of a URA3 marker in a loss of heterozygosity (LOH) assay in the yeast Saccharomycess cerevisiae. With this assay, we previously showed that homologous recombination plays an important role in genome maintenance in response to DNA lesions that occur spontaneously in normally growing cells. Here, to investigate DNA lesions capable of triggering homologous recombination, we examined the effects of oxidative stress, a prominent cause of endogenous DNA damage, on LOH events. Treatment of log-phase cells with H2O2 first caused growth arrest and then, during the subsequent recovery, chromosome loss and various chromosome rearrangements were induced more than 10-fold. Further analysis of the rearrangements showed that gene conversion was strongly induced, approximately 100 times more frequently than in untreated cells. Consistent with these results, two diploid strains deficient for homologous recombination, rad52Δ/rad52Δ and rad51Δ/rad51Δ, were sensitive to H2O2 treatment. In addition, chromosome DNA breaks were detected in H2O2-treated cells using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Altogether, these results suggest that oxidative stress induced recombinogenic lesions on chromosomes, which then triggered homologous recombination leading to chromosome rearrangements, and that this response contributed to the survival of cells afflicted by oxidative DNA damage. We therefore conclude that homologous recombination is required for the recovery of cells from oxidative stress.

  12. Evidence for homologous recombination in Chikungunya Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casal, Pablo E; Chouhy, Diego; Bolatti, Elisa M; Perez, Germán R; Stella, Emma J; Giri, Adriana A

    2015-04-01

    Chikungunya Virus (CHIKV), a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus, causes acute fever and joint pain in humans. Recently, endemic CHIKV infection outbreaks have jeopardized public health in wider geographical regions. Here, we analyze the phylogenetic associations of CHIKV and explore the potential recombination events on 152 genomic isolates deposited in GenBank database. The CHIKV genotypes [West African, Asian, East/Central/South African (ECSA)], and a clear division of ECSA clade into three sub-groups (I-II-III), were defined by Bayesian analysis; similar results were obtained using E1 gene sequences. A nucleotide identity-based approach is provided to facilitate CHIKV classification within ECSA clade. Using seven methods to detect recombination, we found a statistically significant event (p-values range: 1.14×10(-7)-4.45×10(-24)) located within the nsP3 coding region. This finding was further confirmed by phylogenetic networks (PHI Test, p=0.004) and phylogenetic tree incongruence analysis. The recombinant strain, KJ679578/India/2011 (ECSA III), derives from viruses of ECSA III and ECSA I. Our study demonstrates that recombination is an additional mechanism of genetic diversity in CHIKV that might assist in the cross-species transmission process.

  13. Two pathways of homologous recombination in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Colin; Proudfoot, Chris; Burton, Peter; Barry, J David; McCulloch, Richard

    2002-09-01

    African trypanosomes are unicellular parasites that use DNA recombination to evade the mammalian immune response. They do this in a process called antigenic variation, in which the parasites periodically switch the expression of VSG genes that encode distinct Variant Surface Glycoprotein coats. Recombination is used to move new VSG genes into specialised bloodstream VSG transcription sites. Genetic and molecular evidence has suggested that antigenic variation uses homologous recombination, but the detailed reaction pathways are not understood. In this study, we examine the recombination pathways used by trypanosomes to integrate transformed DNA into their genome, and show that they possess at least two pathways of homologous recombination. The primary mechanism is dependent upon RAD51, but a subsidiary pathway exists that is RAD51-independent. Both pathways contribute to antigenic variation. We show that the RAD51-independent pathway is capable of recombining DNA substrates with very short lengths of sequence homology and in some cases aberrant recombination reactions can be detected using such microhomologies.

  14. Examining a DNA Replication Requirement for Bacteriophage λ Red- and Rac Prophage RecET-Promoted Recombination in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn C. Thomason

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Recombineering, in vivo genetic engineering with bacteriophage homologous recombination systems, is a powerful technique for making genetic modifications in bacteria. Two systems widely used in Escherichia coli are the Red system from phage λ and RecET from the defective Rac prophage. We investigated the in vivo dependence of recombineering on DNA replication of the recombining substrate using plasmid targets. For λ Red recombination, when DNA replication of a circular target plasmid is prevented, recombination with single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides is greatly reduced compared to that under replicating conditions. For RecET recombination, when DNA replication of the targeted plasmid is prevented, the recombination frequency is also reduced, to a level identical to that seen for the Red system in the absence of replication. The very low level of oligonucleotide recombination observed in the absence of any phage recombination functions is the same in the presence or absence of DNA replication. In contrast, both the Red and RecET systems recombine a nonreplicating linear dimer plasmid with high efficiency to yield a circular monomer. Therefore, the DNA replication requirement is substrate dependent. Our data are consistent with recombination by both the Red and RecET systems occurring predominately by single-strand annealing rather than by strand invasion.

  15. Examining a DNA Replication Requirement for Bacteriophage λ Red- and Rac Prophage RecET-Promoted Recombination in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, Lynn C.; Costantino, Nina

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recombineering, in vivo genetic engineering with bacteriophage homologous recombination systems, is a powerful technique for making genetic modifications in bacteria. Two systems widely used in Escherichia coli are the Red system from phage λ and RecET from the defective Rac prophage. We investigated the in vivo dependence of recombineering on DNA replication of the recombining substrate using plasmid targets. For λ Red recombination, when DNA replication of a circular target plasmid is prevented, recombination with single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides is greatly reduced compared to that under replicating conditions. For RecET recombination, when DNA replication of the targeted plasmid is prevented, the recombination frequency is also reduced, to a level identical to that seen for the Red system in the absence of replication. The very low level of oligonucleotide recombination observed in the absence of any phage recombination functions is the same in the presence or absence of DNA replication. In contrast, both the Red and RecET systems recombine a nonreplicating linear dimer plasmid with high efficiency to yield a circular monomer. Therefore, the DNA replication requirement is substrate dependent. Our data are consistent with recombination by both the Red and RecET systems occurring predominately by single-strand annealing rather than by strand invasion. PMID:27624131

  16. Malaria parasites utilize both homologous recombination and alternative end joining pathways to maintain genome integrity

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Malaria parasites replicate asexually within their mammalian hosts as haploid cells and are subject to DNA damage from the immune response and chemotherapeutic agents that can significantly disrupt genomic integrity. Examination of the annotated genome of the parasite Plasmodium falciparum identified genes encoding core proteins required for the homologous recombination (HR) pathway for repairing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), but surprisingly none of the components of the canonical non-hom...

  17. Phenylbutyrate inhibits homologous recombination induced by camptothecin and methyl methanesulfonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Gitte Schalck; Germann, Susanne Manuela; Westergaard, Tine

    2011-01-01

    (CPT) and the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) is blocked by sodium phenylbutyrate (PBA) in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In particular, PBA suppresses CPT- and MMS-induced genetic recombination as well as DNA double-strand break repair during mating-type interconversion....... Treatment with PBA is accompanied by a dramatic reduction in histone H4 lysine 8 acetylation. Live cell imaging of homologous recombination proteins indicates that repair of CPT-induced DNA damage is redirected to a non-recombinogenic pathway in the presence of PBA without loss in cell viability......Homologous recombination is accompanied by extensive changes to chromatin organization at the site of DNA damage. Some of these changes are mediated through acetylation/deacetylation of histones. Here, we show that recombinational repair of DNA damage induced by the anti-cancer drug camptothecin...

  18. High Risk Alpha Papillomavirus Oncogenes Impair the Homologous Recombination Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Nicholas A; Khanal, Sujita; Robinson, Kristin L; Wendel, Sebastian O; Messer, Joshua J; Galloway, Denise A

    2017-08-02

    Persistent high risk genus α human papillomavirus (HPV) infections cause nearly every cervical carcinoma and a subset of tumors in the oropharyngeal tract. During the decades required for HPV-associated tumorigenesis, the cellular genome becomes significantly destabilized. Our analysis of cervical tumors from 4 separate data sets found a significant upregulation of the homologous recombination (HR) pathway genes. The increased abundance of HR proteins can be replicated in primary cells by expression of the two HPV oncogenes (E6 and E7) required for HPV-associated transformation. HPV E6 and E7 also enhanced the ability of HR proteins to form repair foci, yet both E6 and E7 reduce the ability of the HR pathway to complete double strand break (DSB) repair by about 50%. The HPV oncogenes hinder HR by allowing the process to begin at points in the cell cycle when the lack of a sister chromatid to serve as a homologous template prevents completion of the repair. Further, HPV E6 attenuates repair by causing RAD51 to be mislocalized away from both transient and persistent DSBs, while HPV E7 is only capable of impairing RAD51 localization to transient lesions. Finally, we show that the inability to robustly repair DSBs causes some of these lesions to be more persistent, a phenotype that correlates with increased integration of episomal DNA. Together these data support our hypothesis that HPV oncogenes contribute to the genomic instability observed in HPV-associated malignancies by attenuating the repair of damaged DNA.IMPORTANCE: This work expands the understanding of HPV biology, establishing a direct role for both HPV E6 and E7 in the destabilization of the host genome by blocking the homologous repair of DSBs. To our knowledge, this is the first time that both viral oncogenes were shown to disrupt this DSB repair pathway. We show that HPV E6 and E7 allow HR to initiate at an inappropriate part of the cell cycle. The mislocalization of RAD51 away from DSBs in cells

  19. Construction of yellow fever virus subgenomic replicons by yeast-based homologous recombination cloning technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina R.A. Queiroz

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available RNA replicon derived from Flavivirus genome is a valuable tool for studying viral replication independent of virion assembly and maturation, besides being a great potencial for heterologous gene expression. In this study we described the construction of subgenomic replicons of yellow fever virus by yeast-based homologous recombination technique. The plasmid containing the yellow fever 17D strain replicon (pBSC-repYFV-17D, previously characterized, was handled to heterologous expression of the green fluorescent protein (repYFV-17D-GFP and firefly luciferase (repYFV-17D-Luc reporter genes. Both replicons were constructed by homologous recombination between the linearized vector pBSC-repYFV-17D and the PCR product containing homologous 25 nucleotides ends incorporated into PCR primers. The genomic organization of these constructs is similar to repYFV-17D, but with insertion of the reporter gene between the remaining 63 N-terminal nucleotides of the capsid protein and 72 C-terminal nucleotides of the E protein. The replicons repYFV-17D-GFP and repYFV-17D-Luc showed efficient replication and expression of the reporter genes. The yeast-based homologous recombination technique used in this study proved to be applicable for manipulation of the yellow fever virus genome in order to construct subgenomic replicons.

  20. DNA-Pairing and Annealing Processes in Homologous Recombination and Homology-Directed Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrical, Scott W.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of heteroduplex DNA is a central step in the exchange of DNA sequences via homologous recombination, and in the accurate repair of broken chromosomes via homology-directed repair pathways. In cells, heteroduplex DNA largely arises through the activities of recombination proteins that promote DNA-pairing and annealing reactions. Classes of proteins involved in pairing and annealing include RecA-family DNA-pairing proteins, single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding proteins, recombination mediator proteins, annealing proteins, and nucleases. This review explores the properties of these pairing and annealing proteins, and highlights their roles in complex recombination processes including the double Holliday junction (DhJ) formation, synthesis-dependent strand annealing, and single-strand annealing pathways—DNA transactions that are critical both for genome stability in individual organisms and for the evolution of species. PMID:25646379

  1. Impact of homologous and non-homologous recombination in the genomic evolution of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didelot, Xavier; Méric, Guillaume; Falush, Daniel; Darling, Aaron E

    2012-06-19

    Escherichia coli is an important species of bacteria that can live as a harmless inhabitant of the guts of many animals, as a pathogen causing life-threatening conditions or freely in the non-host environment. This diversity of lifestyles has made it a particular focus of interest for studies of genetic variation, mainly with the aim to understand how a commensal can become a deadly pathogen. Many whole genomes of E. coli have been fully sequenced in the past few years, which offer helpful data to help understand how this important species evolved. We compared 27 whole genomes encompassing four phylogroups of Escherichia coli (A, B1, B2 and E). From the core-genome we established the clonal relationships between the isolates as well as the role played by homologous recombination during their evolution from a common ancestor. We found strong evidence for sexual isolation between three lineages (A+B1, B2, E), which could be explained by the ecological structuring of E. coli and may represent on-going speciation. We identified three hotspots of homologous recombination, one of which had not been previously described and contains the aroC gene, involved in the essential shikimate metabolic pathway. We also described the role played by non-homologous recombination in the pan-genome, and showed that this process was highly heterogeneous. Our analyses revealed in particular that the genomes of three enterohaemorrhagic (EHEC) strains within phylogroup B1 have converged from originally separate backgrounds as a result of both homologous and non-homologous recombination. Recombination is an important force shaping the genomic evolution and diversification of E. coli, both by replacing fragments of genes with an homologous sequence and also by introducing new genes. In this study, several non-random patterns of these events were identified which correlated with important changes in the lifestyle of the bacteria, and therefore provide additional evidence to explain the

  2. Mechanism of Homologous Recombination and Implications for Aging-Related Deletions in Mitochondrial DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Homologous recombination is a universal process, conserved from bacteriophage to human, which is important for the repair of double-strand DNA breaks. Recombination in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was documented more than 4 decades ago, but the underlying molecular mechanism has remained elusive. Recent studies have revealed the presence of a Rad52-type recombination system of bacteriophage origin in mitochondria, which operates by a single-strand annealing mechanism independent of the canonical RecA/Rad51-type recombinases. Increasing evidence supports the notion that, like in bacteriophages, mtDNA inheritance is a coordinated interplay between recombination, repair, and replication. These findings could have profound implications for understanding the mechanism of mtDNA inheritance and the generation of mtDNA deletions in aging cells. PMID:24006472

  3. DNA sequence alignment by microhomology sampling during homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhi; Redding, Sy; Lee, Ja Yil; Gibb, Bryan; Kwon, YoungHo; Niu, Hengyao; Gaines, William A; Sung, Patrick; Greene, Eric C

    2015-02-26

    Homologous recombination (HR) mediates the exchange of genetic information between sister or homologous chromatids. During HR, members of the RecA/Rad51 family of recombinases must somehow search through vast quantities of DNA sequence to align and pair single-strand DNA (ssDNA) with a homologous double-strand DNA (dsDNA) template. Here, we use single-molecule imaging to visualize Rad51 as it aligns and pairs homologous DNA sequences in real time. We show that Rad51 uses a length-based recognition mechanism while interrogating dsDNA, enabling robust kinetic selection of 8-nucleotide (nt) tracts of microhomology, which kinetically confines the search to sites with a high probability of being a homologous target. Successful pairing with a ninth nucleotide coincides with an additional reduction in binding free energy, and subsequent strand exchange occurs in precise 3-nt steps, reflecting the base triplet organization of the presynaptic complex. These findings provide crucial new insights into the physical and evolutionary underpinnings of DNA recombination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Examining a DNA Replication Requirement for Bacteriophage λ Red- and Rac Prophage RecET-Promoted Recombination in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomason, Lynn C; Costantino, Nina; Court, Donald L

    2016-09-13

    Recombineering, in vivo genetic engineering with bacteriophage homologous recombination systems, is a powerful technique for making genetic modifications in bacteria. Two systems widely used in Escherichia coli are the Red system from phage λ and RecET from the defective Rac prophage. We investigated the in vivo dependence of recombineering on DNA replication of the recombining substrate using plasmid targets. For λ Red recombination, when DNA replication of a circular target plasmid is prevented, recombination with single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides is greatly reduced compared to that under replicating conditions. For RecET recombination, when DNA replication of the targeted plasmid is prevented, the recombination frequency is also reduced, to a level identical to that seen for the Red system in the absence of replication. The very low level of oligonucleotide recombination observed in the absence of any phage recombination functions is the same in the presence or absence of DNA replication. In contrast, both the Red and RecET systems recombine a nonreplicating linear dimer plasmid with high efficiency to yield a circular monomer. Therefore, the DNA replication requirement is substrate dependent. Our data are consistent with recombination by both the Red and RecET systems occurring predominately by single-strand annealing rather than by strand invasion. Bacteriophage homologous recombination systems are widely used for in vivo genetic engineering in bacteria. Single- or double-stranded linear DNA substrates containing short flanking homologies to chromosome targets are used to generate precise and accurate genetic modifications when introduced into bacteria expressing phage recombinases. Understanding the molecular mechanism of these recombination systems will facilitate improvements in the technology. Here, two phage-specific systems are shown to require exposure of complementary single-strand homologous targets for efficient recombination; these single

  5. Structure-specific endonucleases Xpf and Mus81 play overlapping but essential roles in DNA repair by homologous recombination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Kikuchi (Koji); T. Narita (Takeo); V.C. Pham (Van Ca); J. Iijima (Junko); T. Hirota (Tomomitsu); I.S. Keka (Islam Shamima); Mohiuddin; K. Okawa (Katsuya); T. Hori (Toshiyuki); T. Fukagawa (Tatsuo); J. Essers (Jeroen); R. Kanaar (Roland); M.C. Whitby (Matthew); K. Sugasawa (Kaoru); Y. Taniguchi (Yoshihito); K. Kitagawa; S. Takeda (Shiunichi)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractDNA double-strand breaks (DSB) occur frequently during replication in sister chromatids and are dramatically increased when cells are exposed to chemotherapeutic agents including camptothecin. Such DSBs are efficiently repaired specifically by homologous recombination (HR) with the intac

  6. Structure-specific endonucleases Xpf and Mus81 play overlapping but essential roles in DNA repair by homologous recombination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Kikuchi (Koji); T. Narita (Takeo); V.C. Pham (Van Ca); J. Iijima (Junko); T. Hirota (Tomomitsu); I.S. Keka (Islam Shamima); Mohiuddin; K. Okawa (Katsuya); T. Hori (Toshiyuki); T. Fukagawa (Tatsuo); J. Essers (Jeroen); R. Kanaar (Roland); M.C. Whitby (Matthew); K. Sugasawa (Kaoru); Y. Taniguchi (Yoshihito); K. Kitagawa; S. Takeda (Shiunichi)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractDNA double-strand breaks (DSB) occur frequently during replication in sister chromatids and are dramatically increased when cells are exposed to chemotherapeutic agents including camptothecin. Such DSBs are efficiently repaired specifically by homologous recombination (HR) with the intac

  7. Implication of RuvABC and RecG in homologous recombination in Streptomyces ambofaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Grégory; Bertrand, Claire; Piotrowski, Emilie; Thibessard, Annabelle; Leblond, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Most bacterial organisms rely on homologous recombination to repair DNA double-strand breaks and for the post-replicative repair of DNA single-strand gaps. Homologous recombination can be divided into three steps: (i) a pre-synaptic step in which the DNA 3'-OH ends are processed, (ii) a recA-dependent synaptic step allowing the invasion of an intact copy and the formation of Holliday junctions, and (iii) a post-synaptic step consisting of migration and resolution of these junctions. Currently, little is known about factors involved in homologous recombination, especially for the post-synaptic step. In Escherichia coli, branch migration and resolution are performed by the RuvABC complex, but could also rely on the RecG helicase in a redundant manner. In this study, we show that recG and ruvABC are well-conserved among Streptomyces. ΔruvABC, ΔrecG and ΔruvABC ΔrecG mutant strains were constructed. ΔruvABC ΔrecG is only slightly affected by exposure to DNA damage (UV). We also show that conjugational recombination decreases in the absence of RuvABC and RecG, but that intra-chromosomal recombination is not affected. These data suggest that RuvABC and RecG are indeed involved in homologous recombination in Streptomyces ambofaciens and that alternative factors are able to take over Holliday junction in Streptomyces. Copyright © 2016 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. RPA mediates recombination repair during replication stress and is displaced from DNA by checkpoint signalling in human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sleeth, Kate M; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard; Issaeva, Natalia

    2007-01-01

    The replication protein A (RPA) is involved in most, if not all, nuclear metabolism involving single-stranded DNA. Here, we show that RPA is involved in genome maintenance at stalled replication forks by the homologous recombination repair system in humans. Depletion of the RPA protein inhibited...... the formation of RAD51 nuclear foci after hydroxyurea-induced replication stalling leading to persistent unrepaired DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). We demonstrate a direct role of RPA in homology directed recombination repair. We find that RPA is dispensable for checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) activation...... and that RPA directly binds RAD52 upon replication stress, suggesting a direct role in recombination repair. In addition we show that inhibition of Chk1 with UCN-01 decreases dissociation of RPA from the chromatin and inhibits association of RAD51 and RAD52 with DNA. Altogether, our data suggest a direct role...

  9. A PHF8 homolog in C. elegans promotes DNA repair via homologous recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changrim Lee

    Full Text Available PHF8 is a JmjC domain-containing histone demethylase, defects in which are associated with X-linked mental retardation. In this study, we examined the roles of two PHF8 homologs, JMJD-1.1 and JMJD-1.2, in the model organism C. elegans in response to DNA damage. A deletion mutation in either of the genes led to hypersensitivity to interstrand DNA crosslinks (ICLs, while only mutation of jmjd-1.1 resulted in hypersensitivity to double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs. In response to ICLs, JMJD-1.1 did not affect the focus formation of FCD-2, a homolog of FANCD2, a key protein in the Fanconi anemia pathway. However, the dynamic behavior of RPA-1 and RAD-51 was affected by the mutation: the accumulations of both proteins at ICLs appeared normal, but their subsequent disappearance was retarded, suggesting that later steps of homologous recombination were defective. Similar changes in the dynamic behavior of RPA-1 and RAD-51 were seen in response to DSBs, supporting a role of JMJD-1.1 in homologous recombination. Such a role was also supported by our finding that the hypersensitivity of jmjd-1.1 worms to ICLs was rescued by knockdown of lig-4, a homolog of Ligase 4 active in nonhomologous end-joining. The hypersensitivity of jmjd-1.1 worms to ICLs was increased by rad-54 knockdown, suggesting that JMJD-1.1 acts in parallel with RAD-54 in modulating chromatin structure. Indeed, the level of histone H3 Lys9 tri-methylation, a marker of heterochromatin, was higher in jmjd-1.1 cells than in wild-type cells. We conclude that the histone demethylase JMJD-1.1 influences homologous recombination either by relaxing heterochromatin structure or by indirectly regulating the expression of multiple genes affecting DNA repair.

  10. Accelerated homologous recombination and subsequent genome modification in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baena-Lopez, Luis Alberto; Alexandre, Cyrille; Mitchell, Alice; Pasakarnis, Laurynas; Vincent, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    Gene targeting by ‘ends-out’ homologous recombination enables the deletion of genomic sequences and concurrent introduction of exogenous DNA with base-pair precision without sequence constraint. In Drosophila, this powerful technique has remained laborious and hence seldom implemented. We describe a targeting vector and protocols that achieve this at high frequency and with very few false positives in Drosophila, either with a two-generation crossing scheme or by direct injection in embryos. The frequency of injection-mediated gene targeting can be further increased with CRISPR-induced double-strand breaks within the region to be deleted, thus making homologous recombination almost as easy as conventional transgenesis. Our targeting vector replaces genomic sequences with a multifunctional fragment comprising an easy-to-select genetic marker, a fluorescent reporter, as well as an attP site, which acts as a landing platform for reintegration vectors. These vectors allow the insertion of a variety of transcription reporters or cDNAs to express tagged or mutant isoforms at endogenous levels. In addition, they pave the way for difficult experiments such as tissue-specific allele switching and functional analysis in post-mitotic or polyploid cells. Therefore, our method retains the advantages of homologous recombination while capitalising on the mutagenic power of CRISPR. PMID:24154526

  11. Sequence and recombination analyses of the geminivirus replication initiator protein

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Vadivukarasi; K R Girish; R Usha

    2007-01-01

    The sequence motifs present in the replication initiator protein (Rep) of geminiviruses have been compared with those present in all known rolling circle replication initiators. The predicted secondary structures of Rep representing each group of organisms have been compared and found to be conserved. Regions of recombination in the Rep gene and the adjoining 5′ intergenic region (IR) of representative species of Geminiviridae have been identified using Recombination Detection Programs. The possible implications of such recombinations on the increasing host range of geminivirus infections are discussed.

  12. Impact of homologous and non-homologous recombination in the genomic evolution of Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didelot Xavier

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Escherichia coli is an important species of bacteria that can live as a harmless inhabitant of the guts of many animals, as a pathogen causing life-threatening conditions or freely in the non-host environment. This diversity of lifestyles has made it a particular focus of interest for studies of genetic variation, mainly with the aim to understand how a commensal can become a deadly pathogen. Many whole genomes of E. coli have been fully sequenced in the past few years, which offer helpful data to help understand how this important species evolved. Results We compared 27 whole genomes encompassing four phylogroups of Escherichia coli (A, B1, B2 and E. From the core-genome we established the clonal relationships between the isolates as well as the role played by homologous recombination during their evolution from a common ancestor. We found strong evidence for sexual isolation between three lineages (A+B1, B2, E, which could be explained by the ecological structuring of E. coli and may represent on-going speciation. We identified three hotspots of homologous recombination, one of which had not been previously described and contains the aroC gene, involved in the essential shikimate metabolic pathway. We also described the role played by non-homologous recombination in the pan-genome, and showed that this process was highly heterogeneous. Our analyses revealed in particular that the genomes of three enterohaemorrhagic (EHEC strains within phylogroup B1 have converged from originally separate backgrounds as a result of both homologous and non-homologous recombination. Conclusions Recombination is an important force shaping the genomic evolution and diversification of E. coli, both by replacing fragments of genes with an homologous sequence and also by introducing new genes. In this study, several non-random patterns of these events were identified which correlated with important changes in the lifestyle of the bacteria, and

  13. Deletion of a KU80 homolog enhances homologous recombination in the thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Jin Ho; Han, Changpyo; Kim, Jae-Young; Kang, Hyun Ah

    2014-10-01

    Targeted gene replacement in the thermotolerant yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus KCTC 17555 has been hampered by its propensity to non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). To enhance homologous recombination (HR) by blocking NHEJ, we identified and disrupted the K. marxianus KU80 gene. The ku80 deletion mutant strain (Kmku80∆) of K. marxianus KCTC 17555 did not show apparent growth defects under several conditions with the exception of exposure to tunicamycin. The targeted disruption of the three model genes, KmLEU2, KmPDC1, and KmPDC5, was increased by 13-70 % in Kmku80∆, although the efficiency was greatly affected by the length of the homologous flanking fragments. In contrast, the double HR frequency was 0-13.7 % in the wild-type strain even with flanking fragments 1 kb long. Therefore, Kmku80∆ promises to be a useful recipient strain for targeted gene manipulation.

  14. Remodeling and Control of Homologous Recombination by DNA Helicases and Translocases that Target Recombinases and Synapsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J. Northall

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Recombinase enzymes catalyse invasion of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA into homologous duplex DNA forming “Displacement loops” (D-loops, a process called synapsis. This triggers homologous recombination (HR, which can follow several possible paths to underpin DNA repair and restart of blocked and collapsed DNA replication forks. Therefore, synapsis can be a checkpoint for controlling whether or not, how far, and by which pathway, HR proceeds to overcome an obstacle or break in a replication fork. Synapsis can be antagonized by limiting access of a recombinase to ssDNA and by dissociation of D-loops or heteroduplex formed by synapsis. Antagonists include DNA helicases and translocases that are identifiable in eukaryotes, bacteria and archaea, and which target synaptic and pre-synaptic DNA structures thereby controlling HR at early stages. Here we survey these events with emphasis on enabling DNA replication to be resumed from sites of blockage or collapse. We also note how knowledge of anti-recombination activities could be useful to improve efficiency of CRISPR-based genome editing.

  15. Homologous Recombination in Protozoan Parasites and Recombinase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelso, Andrew A; Waldvogel, Sarah M; Luthman, Adam J; Sehorn, Michael G

    2017-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway that utilizes a homologous template to fully repair the damaged DNA. HR is critical to maintain genome stability and to ensure genetic diversity during meiosis. A specialized class of enzymes known as recombinases facilitate the exchange of genetic information between sister chromatids or homologous chromosomes with the help of numerous protein accessory factors. The majority of the HR machinery is highly conserved among eukaryotes. In many protozoan parasites, HR is an essential DSB repair pathway that allows these organisms to adapt to environmental conditions and evade host immune systems through genetic recombination. Therefore, small molecule inhibitors, capable of disrupting HR in protozoan parasites, represent potential therapeutic options. A number of small molecule inhibitors were identified that disrupt the activities of the human recombinase RAD51. Recent studies have examined the effect of two of these molecules on the Entamoeba recombinases. Here, we discuss the current understandings of HR in the protozoan parasites Trypanosoma, Leishmania, Plasmodium, and Entamoeba, and we review the small molecule inhibitors known to disrupt human RAD51 activity.

  16. Hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein 2 promotes DNA repair by homologous recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baude, Annika; Aaes, Tania Løve; Zhai, Beibei; Al-Nakouzi, Nader; Oo, Htoo Zarni; Daugaard, Mads; Rohde, Mikkel; Jäättelä, Marja

    2016-01-01

    We have recently identified lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75, also known as PSIP1) as a component of the homologous recombination DNA repair machinery. Through its Pro-Trp-Trp-Pro (PWWP) domain, LEDGF/p75 binds to histone marks associated with active transcription and promotes DNA end resection by recruiting DNA endonuclease retinoblastoma-binding protein 8 (RBBP8/CtIP) to broken DNA ends. Here we show that the structurally related PWWP domain-containing protein, hepatoma-derived growth factor-related protein 2 (HDGFRP2), serves a similar function in homologous recombination repair. Its depletion compromises the survival of human U2OS osteosarcoma and HeLa cervix carcinoma cells and impairs the DNA damage-induced phosphorylation of replication protein A2 (RPA2) and the recruitment of DNA endonuclease RBBP8/CtIP to DNA double strand breaks. In contrast to LEDGF/p75, HDGFRP2 binds preferentially to histone marks characteristic for transcriptionally silent chromatin. Accordingly, HDGFRP2 is found in complex with the heterochromatin-binding chromobox homologue 1 (CBX1) and Pogo transposable element with ZNF domain (POGZ). Supporting the functionality of this complex, POGZ-depleted cells show a similar defect in DNA damage-induced RPA2 phosphorylation as HDGFRP2-depleted cells. These data suggest that HDGFRP2, possibly in complex with POGZ, recruits homologous recombination repair machinery to damaged silent genes or to active genes silenced upon DNA damage. PMID:26721387

  17. Constructing recombinant replication-defective adenoviral vectors that express glucose transporter-1 through in vitro ligation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fangcheng Li; Junliang Li; Ranyi Liu; Xinke Xu; Kaichang Yuan; Zhonghua Wu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We constructed a homologous recombination bacterial method based on the pAdEasy system, a widely used system, for generating recombinant adenoviral vectors that express glucose transporter-1 (GLUT1) in rats.OBJECTIVE: This study was designed to investigate the feasibility of generating recombinant replication-defective adenoviral vectors that express GLUT1 in rats by in vitro ligation based on the Adeno-XTM system. DESIGN: An in vitro cell-based experiment. SETTING: This study was performed at the Linbaixin Medical Research Center of the Second Hospital Affiliated to Sun Yat-sen University and Central Laboratory for Prevention and Treatment of Tumor, Sun Yat-sen University between January and August 2004. MATERIALS: Male, adult, Sprague Dawley rats were used to extract total RNA from brain tissue. E. coli DH5?and human embryonic kidney 293 cells (HEK293 cells) used in the present study were cryo-preserved by the Second Hospital Affiliated to Sun Yat-sen University. Rabbit anti-rat GLUT1 polyclonal antibody (Chemicon, U.S.A.) and primers (Shanghai Boya Bioengineering Co., Ltd) were also used. METHODS: E1/E3-deleted replication-defective adenoviral vectors were used. Using in vitro ligation, the target gene was first sub-cloned into a shuttle vector plasmid to obtain the fragment containing target gene expression cassettes by enzyme digestion. Subsequently, the fragment was co-transformed with linearized adenoviral backbone vector into the E. coli strain. The recombinant adenoviral plasmid was transfected into HEK293 cells to assembly recombinant adenoviral vectors with replication capabilities. The procedure was repeated several times for recombinant adenoviral vectors amplification. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Efficiency of recombinant adenoviral vectors to express the target gene was measured by gene and protein expression through polymerase chain reaction and Western Blot assays, respectively.RESULTS: Results demonstrated that recombinant adenoviral

  18. DEK is required for homologous recombination repair of DNA breaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Eric A; Gole, Boris; Willis, Nicholas A

    2017-01-01

    -deficiency phenotypes were thought to arise from a moderate attenuation of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair, the role of DEK in DNA repair remains incompletely understood. We present new evidence demonstrating the observed decrease in NHEJ is insufficient to impact immunoglobulin class switching in DEK knockout...... mice. Furthermore, DEK knockout cells were sensitive to apoptosis with NHEJ inhibition. Thus, we hypothesized DEK plays additional roles in homologous recombination (HR). Using episomal and integrated reporters, we demonstrate that HR repair of conventional DSBs is severely compromised in DEK...... filament formation, stability, or function. These findings define DEK as an important and multifunctional mediator of HR, and establish a synthetic lethal relationship between DEK loss and NHEJ inhibition....

  19. Seamless gene tagging by endonuclease-driven homologous recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Khmelinskii

    Full Text Available Gene tagging facilitates systematic genomic and proteomic analyses but chromosomal tagging typically disrupts gene regulatory sequences. Here we describe a seamless gene tagging approach that preserves endogenous gene regulation and is potentially applicable in any species with efficient DNA double-strand break repair by homologous recombination. We implement seamless tagging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and demonstrate its application for protein tagging while preserving simultaneously upstream and downstream gene regulatory elements. Seamless tagging is compatible with high-throughput strain construction using synthetic genetic arrays (SGA, enables functional analysis of transcription antisense to open reading frames and should facilitate systematic and minimally-invasive analysis of gene functions.

  20. The response of mammalian cells to UV-light reveals Rad54-dependent and independent pathways of homologous recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eppink, Berina; Tafel, Agnieszka A; Hanada, Katsuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced DNA lesions can be efficiently repaired by nucleotide excision repair (NER). However, NER is less effective during replication of UV-damaged chromosomes. In contrast, translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) and homologous recombination (HR) are capable of dealing....... We demonstrate using chromosome fiber analysis at the individual replication fork level, that HR activity is important for the restart of DNA replication after induction of DNA damage by UV-light in NER-deficient cells. Furthermore, our data reveal RAD54-dependent and -independent contributions of HR...

  1. TALEN-mediated homologous recombination in Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Takashi; Kato, Yasuhiko; Matsuura, Tomoaki; Watanabe, Hajime

    2015-12-17

    Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs) offer versatile tools to engineer endogenous genomic loci in various organisms. We established a homologous recombination (HR)-based knock-in using TALEN in the crustacean Daphnia magna, a model for ecological and toxicological genomics. We constructed TALENs and designed the 67 bp donor insert targeting a point deletion in the eyeless mutant that shows eye deformities. Co-injection of the TALEN mRNA with donor DNA into eggs led to the precise integration of the donor insert in the germ line, which recovered eye deformities in offspring. The frequency of HR events in the germ line was 2% by using both plasmid and single strand oligo DNA with 1.5 kb and 80 nt homology to the target. Deficiency of ligase 4 involved in non-homologous end joining repair did not increase the HR efficiency. Our data represent efficient HR-based knock-in by TALENs in D. magna, which is a promising tool to understand Daphnia gene functions.

  2. Cell cycle-dependent control of homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xin; Wei, Chengwen; Li, Jingjing; Xing, Poyuan; Li, Jingyao; Zheng, Sihao; Chen, Xuefeng

    2017-08-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are among the most deleterious type of DNA lesions threatening genome integrity. Homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) are two major pathways to repair DSBs. HR requires a homologous template to direct DNA repair, and is generally recognized as a high-fidelity pathway. In contrast, NHEJ directly seals broken ends, but the repair product is often accompanied by sequence alterations. The choice of repair pathways is strictly controlled by the cell cycle. The occurrence of HR is restricted to late S to G2 phases while NHEJ operates predominantly in G1 phase, although it can act throughout most of the cell cycle. Deregulation of repair pathway choice can result in genotoxic consequences associated with cancers. How the cell cycle regulates the choice of HR and NHEJ has been extensively studied in the past decade. In this review, we will focus on the current progresses on how HR is controlled by the cell cycle in both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mammals. Particular attention will be given to how cyclin-dependent kinases modulate DSB end resection, DNA damage checkpoint signaling, repair and processing of recombination intermediates. In addition, we will discuss recent findings on how HR is repressed in G1 and M phases by the cell cycle. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Homologous recombination in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius: genetic assays and functional properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogan, Dennis W

    2009-02-01

    HR (homologous recombination) is expected to play important roles in the molecular biology and genetics of archaea, but, so far, few functional properties of archaeal HR have been measured in vivo. In the extreme thermoacidophile Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, a conjugational mechanism of DNA transfer enables quantitative analysis of HR between chromosomal markers. Early studies of this system indicated that HR occurred frequently between closely spaced mutations within the pyrE gene, and this result was later supported by various analyses involving defined point mutations and deletions. These properties of intragenic HR suggested a non-reciprocal mechanism in which donor sequences become incorporated into the recipient genome as short segments. Because fragmentation of donor DNA during cell-to-cell transfer could not be excluded from contributing to this result, subsequent analyses have focused on electroporation of selectable donor DNA directly into recipient strains. For example, S. acidocaldarius was found to incorporate synthetic ssDNA (single-stranded DNA) of more than approximately 20 nt readily into its genome. With respect to various molecular properties of the ssDNA substrates, the process resembled bacteriophage lambdaRed-mediated 'recombineering' in Escherichia coli. Another approach used electroporation of a multiply marked pyrE gene to measure donor sequence tracts transferred to the recipient genome in individual recombination events. Initial results indicate multiple discontinuous tracts in the majority of recombinants, representing a relatively broad distribution of tract lengths. This pattern suggests that properties of the HR process could, in principle, account for many of the apparent peculiarities of intragenic recombination initiated by S. acidocaldarius conjugation.

  4. Extrachromosomal recombination in vaccinia-infected cells requires a functional DNA polymerase participating at a level other than DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colinas, R J; Condit, R C; Paoletti, E

    1990-12-01

    Homologous recombination was measured in vaccinia-infected cells cotransfected with two plasmid recombination substrates. One plasmid contains a vaccinia protein lacZ coding region bearing a 1.1 kb 3' terminal deletion while the other plasmid contains a non-promoted lacZ coding region bearing a 1.1 kb 5' terminal deletion. Homologous recombination occurring between the 825 bp of lacZ common to both plasmids regenerates a functional lacZ gene from which B-galactosidase expression was measured. The entire 3 kb lacZ gene was used as a positive control. A panel of thermosensitive mutants was screened in cells either transfected with the positive control plasmid or cotransfected with the recombination substrates. A DNA - mutant, ts42, known to map to the viral DNA polymerase gene was found to be defective in recombination. Significantly, other DNA - mutants, ts17 or ts25, or other DNA polymerase mutants did not exhibit a defect in recombination similar to ts42. Inhibitors of viral DNA synthesis did not uniformly affect recombination. Cytosine arabinoside and aphidicolin inhibited B-galactosidase expression from the recombination substrates but not from the positive control plasmid, whereas hydroxyurea enhanced expression from both. Marker rescue with the cloned wildtype DNA polymerase gene repaired the defect in ts42. Southern and western analyses demonstrated that B-galactosidase activity was consistent with a recombined lacZ gene and unit size 116 kDa protein. Measurement of plasmid and viral DNA replication in cells infected with the different DNA - mutants indicated that recombination was independent of plasmid and viral DNA replication. Together these results suggest that the vaccinia DNA polymerase participates in homologous recombination at a level other than that of DNA replication.

  5. High-Resolution Mapping of Homologous Recombination Events in rad3 Hyper-Recombination Mutants in Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominska, Margaret; Moriel-Carretero, María; Herrera-Moyano, Emilia; Aguilera, Andrés; Petes, Thomas D.

    2016-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisae RAD3 gene is the homolog of human XPD, an essential gene encoding a DNA helicase of the TFIIH complex involved in both nucleotide excision repair (NER) and transcription. Some mutant alleles of RAD3 (rad3-101 and rad3-102) have partial defects in DNA repair and a strong hyper-recombination (hyper-Rec) phenotype. Previous studies showed that the hyper-Rec phenotype associated with rad3-101 and rad3-102 can be explained as a consequence of persistent single-stranded DNA gaps that are converted to recombinogenic double-strand breaks (DSBs) by replication. The systems previously used to characterize the hyper-Rec phenotype of rad3 strains do not detect the reciprocal products of mitotic recombination. We have further characterized these events using a system in which the reciprocal products of mitotic recombination are recovered. Both rad3-101 and rad3-102 elevate the frequency of reciprocal crossovers about 100-fold. Mapping of these events shows that three-quarters of these crossovers reflect DSBs formed at the same positions in both sister chromatids (double sister-chromatid breaks, DSCBs). The remainder reflects DSBs formed in single chromatids (single chromatid breaks, SCBs). The ratio of DSCBs to SCBs is similar to that observed for spontaneous recombination events in wild-type cells. We mapped 216 unselected genomic alterations throughout the genome including crossovers, gene conversions, deletions, and duplications. We found a significant association between the location of these recombination events and regions with elevated gamma-H2AX. In addition, there was a hotspot for deletions and duplications at the IMA2 and HXT11 genes near the left end of chromosome XV. A comparison of these data with our previous analysis of spontaneous mitotic recombination events suggests that a sub-set of spontaneous events in wild-type cells may be initiated by incomplete NER reactions, and that DSCBs, which cannot be repaired by sister

  6. Homologous recombination efficiency enhanced by inhibition of MEK and GSK3β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhaoyu; Zhang, Yanli; Gao, Tianyun; Wang, Liudi; Zhang, Qing; Zhou, Juan; Zhao, Jing

    2014-11-01

    Homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells (ESCs) is widely utilized in genome engineering, particularly in the generation of gene targeted mice. However, genome engineering is often plagued by the problem of low homologous recombination efficiency. In this study, we developed a novel method to increase the efficiency of homologous recombination in ESCs by changing its culture conditions. By comparing the efficiency of different ESCs in various culture conditions, we determined that chemicals that inhibit the MEK and GSK3β pathways (2i condition) enhance homologous recombination and eliminate differences in efficiencies among cell lines. Analysis of gene expression patterns in ESCs maintained in different culture conditions has identified several homologous recombination-related candidates, including the pluripotent markers Eras and Tbx3. The results of this study suggest that homologous recombination is associated with ESC pluripotency. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Homologous recombination in human telomerase-positive and ALT cells occurs with the same frequency

    OpenAIRE

    Bechter, Oliver E.; Zou, Ying; Shay, Jerry W.; Woodring E. Wright

    2003-01-01

    Homologous recombination is thought to be the molecular mechanism for maintaining telomere length in alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) cells. We used a recombination reporter system to show that the frequency of homologous recombination is the same for ALT- and telomerase-positive cells, suggesting that if ALT cells have a recombination defect it specifically involves telomeric sequences. We compared internal and telomere-adjacent positions of our ...

  8. Transcription-coupled homologous recombination after oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Leizhen; Levine, Arthur Samuel; Lan, Li

    2016-08-01

    Oxidative DNA damage induces genomic instability and may lead to mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. As severe blockades to RNA polymerase II (RNA POLII) during transcription, oxidative DNA damage and the associated DNA strand breaks have a profoundly deleterious impact on cell survival. To protect the integrity of coding regions, high fidelity DNA repair at a transcriptionally active site in non-dividing somatic cells, (i.e., terminally differentiated and quiescent/G0 cells) is necessary to maintain the sequence integrity of transcribed regions. Recent studies indicate that an RNA-templated, transcription-associated recombination mechanism is important to protect coding regions from DNA damage-induced genomic instability. Here, we describe the discovery that G1/G0 cells exhibit Cockayne syndrome (CS) B (CSB)-dependent assembly of homologous recombination (HR) factors at double strand break (DSB) sites within actively transcribed regions. This discovery is a challenge to the current dogma that HR occurs only in S/G2 cells where undamaged sister chromatids are available as donor templates.

  9. Homology Requirements and Competition between Gene Conversion and Break-Induced Replication during Double-Strand Break Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Anuja; Beach, Annette; Haber, James E

    2017-02-02

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae mating-type switching is initiated by a double-strand break (DSB) at MATa, leaving one cut end perfectly homologous to the HMLα donor, while the second end must be processed to remove a non-homologous tail before completing repair by gene conversion (GC). When homology at the matched end is ≤150 bp, efficient repair depends on the recombination enhancer, which tethers HMLα near the DSB. Thus, homology shorter than an apparent minimum efficient processing segment can be rescued by tethering the donor near the break. When homology at the second end is ≤150 bp, second-end capture becomes inefficient and repair shifts from GC to break-induced replication (BIR). But when pol32 or pif1 mutants block BIR, GC increases 3-fold, indicating that the steps blocked by these mutations are reversible. With short second-end homology, absence of the RecQ helicase Sgs1 promotes gene conversion, whereas deletion of the FANCM-related Mph1 helicase promotes BIR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The PCNA-associated protein PARI negatively regulates homologous recombination via the inhibition of DNA repair synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burkovics, Peter; Dome, Lili; Juhasz, Szilvia

    2016-01-01

    Successful and accurate completion of the replication of damage-containing DNA requires mainly recombination and RAD18-dependent DNA damage tolerance pathways. RAD18 governs at least two distinct mechanisms: translesion synthesis (TLS) and template switching (TS)-dependent pathways. Whereas TS...... is mainly error-free, TLS can work in an error-prone manner and, as such, the regulation of these pathways requires tight control to prevent DNA errors and potentially oncogenic transformation and tumorigenesis. In humans, the PCNA-associated recombination inhibitor (PARI) protein has recently been shown...... to inhibit homologous recombination (HR) events. Here, we describe a biochemical mechanism in which PARI functions as an HR regulator after replication fork stalling and during double-strand break repair. In our reconstituted biochemical system, we show that PARI inhibits DNA repair synthesis during...

  11. Srs2 and Mus81-Mms4 Prevent Accumulation of Toxic Inter-Homolog Recombination Intermediates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Keyamura

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination is an evolutionally conserved mechanism that promotes genome stability through the faithful repair of double-strand breaks and single-strand gaps in DNA, and the recovery of stalled or collapsed replication forks. Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATP-dependent DNA helicase Srs2 (a member of the highly conserved UvrD family of helicases has multiple roles in regulating homologous recombination. A mutation (srs2K41A resulting in a helicase-dead mutant of Srs2 was found to be lethal in diploid, but not in haploid, cells. In diploid cells, Srs2K41A caused the accumulation of inter-homolog joint molecule intermediates, increased the levels of spontaneous Rad52 foci, and induced gross chromosomal rearrangements. Srs2K41A lethality and accumulation of joint molecules were suppressed by inactivating Rad51 or deleting the Rad51-interaction domain of Srs2, whereas phosphorylation and sumoylation of Srs2 and its interaction with sumoylated proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA were not required for lethality. The structure-specific complex of crossover junction endonucleases Mus81 and Mms4 was also required for viability of diploid, but not haploid, SRS2 deletion mutants (srs2Δ, and diploid srs2Δ mus81Δ mutants accumulated joint molecule intermediates. Our data suggest that Srs2 and Mus81-Mms4 have critical roles in preventing the formation of (or in resolving toxic inter-homolog joint molecules, which could otherwise interfere with chromosome segregation and lead to genetic instability.

  12. The ATPase activity of Fml1 is essential for its roles in homologous recombination and DNA repair.

    OpenAIRE

    Nandi, S; Whitby, MC

    2012-01-01

    In fission yeast, the DNA helicase Fml1, which is an orthologue of human FANCM, is a key component of the machinery that drives and governs homologous recombination (HR). During the repair of DNA double-strand breaks by HR, it limits the occurrence of potentially deleterious crossover recombinants, whereas at stalled replication forks, it promotes HR to aid their recovery. Here, we have mutated conserved residues in Fml1's Walker A (K99R) and Walker B (D196N) motifs to determine whether its a...

  13. Non-catalytic Roles for XPG with BRCA1 and BRCA2 in Homologous Recombination and Genome Stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trego, Kelly S.; Groesser, Torsten; Davalos, Albert R.;

    2016-01-01

    about how XPG loss results in this devastating disease. We identify XPG as a partner of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in maintaining genomic stability through homologous recombination (HRR). XPG depletion causes DNA double-strand breaks, chromosomal abnormalities, cell-cycle delays, defective HRR, inability...... to overcome replication fork stalling,and replication stress. XPG directly interacts withBRCA2, RAD51, and PALB2, and XPG depletion reduces their chromatin binding and subsequent RAD51 foci formation. Upstream in HRR, XPG interacts directly with BRCA1. Its depletion causes BRCA1 hyper...

  14. The RecQ DNA helicase Rqh1 constrains Exonuclease 1-dependent recombination at stalled replication forks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Fekret; Ahn, Jong Sook; Lorenz, Alexander; Whitby, Matthew C

    2016-03-09

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair by homologous recombination (HR) involves resection of the break to expose a 3' single-stranded DNA tail. In budding yeast, resection occurs in two steps: initial short-range resection, performed by Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 and Sae2; and long-range resection catalysed by either Exo1 or Sgs1-Dna2. Here we use genetic assays to investigate the importance of Exo1 and the Sgs1 homologue Rqh1 for DNA repair and promotion of direct repeat recombination in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We find that Exo1 and Rqh1 function in alternative redundant pathways for promoting survival following replication fork breakage. Exo1 promotes replication fork barrier-induced direct repeat recombination but intriguingly limits recombination induced by fork breakage. Direct repeat recombination induced by ultraviolet light depends on either Exo1 or Rqh1. Finally, we show that Rqh1 plays a major role in limiting Exo1-dependent direct repeat recombination induced by replication fork stalling but only a minor role in constraining recombination induced by fork breakage. The implications of our findings are discussed in the context of the benefits that long-range resection may bring to processing perturbed replication forks.

  15. In vivo importance of homologous recombination DNA repair for mouse neural stem and progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Rousseau (Laure); O. Etienne (Olivier); T. Roque (Telma); C. Desmaze (Chantal); C. Haton (Céline); M.-A. Mouthon (Marc-André.); J. Bernardino-Sgherri (Jacqueline); J. Essers (Jeroen); R. Kanaar (Roland); F.D. Boussin (François)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractWe characterized the in vivo importance of the homologous recombination factor RAD54 for the developing mouse brain cortex in normal conditions or after ionizing radiation exposure. Contrary to numerous homologous recombination genes, Rad54 disruption did not impact the cortical developm

  16. Nuclear dynamics of RAD52 group homologous recombination proteins in response to DNA damage.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Essers (Jeroen); A.B. Houtsmuller (Adriaan); L.R. van Veelen (Lieneke); C. Paulusma (Coen); A.L. Nigg (Alex); A. Pastink (Albert); W. Vermeulen (Wim); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); R. Kanaar (Roland)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractRecombination between homologous DNA molecules is essential for the proper maintenance and duplication of the genome, and for the repair of exogenously induced DNA damage such as double-strand breaks. Homologous recombination requires the RAD52 group proteins, including Rad51, Rad52 and

  17. Use of homologous recombination in yeast to create chimeric bovine viral diarrhea virus cDNA clones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Arenhart

    Full Text Available Abstract The open reading frame of a Brazilian bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV strain, IBSP4ncp, was recombined with the untranslated regions of the reference NADL strain by homologous recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, resulting in chimeric full-length cDNA clones of BVDV (chi-NADL/IBSP4ncp#2 and chi-NADL/IBSP4ncp#3. The recombinant clones were successfully recovered, resulting in viable viruses, having the kinetics of replication, focus size, and morphology similar to those of the parental virus, IBSP4ncp. In addition, the chimeric viruses remained stable for at least 10 passages in cell culture, maintaining their replication efficiency unaltered. Nucleotide sequencing revealed a few point mutations; nevertheless, the phenotype of the rescued viruses was nearly identical to that of the parental virus in all experiments. Thus, genetic stability of the chimeric clones and their phenotypic similarity to the parental virus confirm the ability of the yeast-based homologous recombination to maintain characteristics of the parental virus from which the recombinant viruses were derived. The data also support possible use of the yeast system for the manipulation of the BVDV genome.

  18. Use of homologous recombination in yeast to create chimeric bovine viral diarrhea virus cDNA clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenhart, Sandra; Silva, José Valter Joaquim; Flores, Eduardo Furtado; Weiblen, Rudi; Gil, Laura Helena Vega Gonzales

    The open reading frame of a Brazilian bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) strain, IBSP4ncp, was recombined with the untranslated regions of the reference NADL strain by homologous recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, resulting in chimeric full-length cDNA clones of BVDV (chi-NADL/IBSP4ncp#2 and chi-NADL/IBSP4ncp#3). The recombinant clones were successfully recovered, resulting in viable viruses, having the kinetics of replication, focus size, and morphology similar to those of the parental virus, IBSP4ncp. In addition, the chimeric viruses remained stable for at least 10 passages in cell culture, maintaining their replication efficiency unaltered. Nucleotide sequencing revealed a few point mutations; nevertheless, the phenotype of the rescued viruses was nearly identical to that of the parental virus in all experiments. Thus, genetic stability of the chimeric clones and their phenotypic similarity to the parental virus confirm the ability of the yeast-based homologous recombination to maintain characteristics of the parental virus from which the recombinant viruses were derived. The data also support possible use of the yeast system for the manipulation of the BVDV genome. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Malaria parasites utilize both homologous recombination and alternative end joining pathways to maintain genome integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkman, Laura A; Lawrence, Elizabeth A; Deitsch, Kirk W

    2014-01-01

    Malaria parasites replicate asexually within their mammalian hosts as haploid cells and are subject to DNA damage from the immune response and chemotherapeutic agents that can significantly disrupt genomic integrity. Examination of the annotated genome of the parasite Plasmodium falciparum identified genes encoding core proteins required for the homologous recombination (HR) pathway for repairing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), but surprisingly none of the components of the canonical non-homologous end joining (C-NHEJ) pathway were identified. To better understand how malaria parasites repair DSBs and maintain genome integrity, we modified the yeast I-SceI endonuclease system to generate inducible, site-specific DSBs within the parasite's genome. Analysis of repaired genomic DNA showed that parasites possess both a typical HR pathway resulting in gene conversion events as well as an end joining (EJ) pathway for repair of DSBs when no homologous sequence is available. The products of EJ were limited in number and identical products were observed in multiple independent experiments. The repair junctions frequently contained short insertions also found in the surrounding sequences, suggesting the possibility of a templated repair process. We propose that an alternative end-joining pathway rather than C-NHEJ, serves as a primary method for repairing DSBs in malaria parasites.

  20. Frequency of nonallelic homologous recombination is correlated with length of homology: evidence that ectopic synapsis precedes ectopic crossing-over.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pengfei; Lacaria, Melanie; Zhang, Feng; Withers, Marjorie; Hastings, P J; Lupski, James R

    2011-10-07

    Genomic disorders constitute a class of diseases that are associated with DNA rearrangements resulting from region-specific genome instability, that is, genome architecture incites genome instability. Nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR) or crossing-over in meiosis between sequences that are not in allelic positions (i.e., paralogous sequences) can result in recurrent deletions or duplications causing genomic disorders. Previous studies of NAHR have focused on description of the phenomenon, but it remains unclear how NAHR occurs during meiosis and what factors determine its frequency. Here we assembled two patient cohorts with reciprocal genomic disorders; deletion associated Smith-Magenis syndrome and duplication associated Potocki-Lupski syndrome. By assessing the full spectrum of rearrangement types from the two cohorts, we find that complex rearrangements (those with more than one breakpoint) are more prevalent in copy-number gains (17.7%) than in copy-number losses (2.3%); an observation that supports a role for replicative mechanisms in complex rearrangement formation. Interestingly, for NAHR-mediated recurrent rearrangements, we show that crossover frequency is positively associated with the flanking low-copy repeat (LCR) length and inversely influenced by the inter-LCR distance. To explain this, we propose that the probability of ectopic chromosome synapsis increases with increased LCR length, and that ectopic synapsis is a necessary precursor to ectopic crossing-over. Copyright © 2011 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A universal cloning method based on yeast homologous recombination that is simple, efficient, and versatile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joska, Tammy M.; Mashruwala, Ameya; Boyd, Jeffrey M.; Belden, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Cloning by homologous recombination (HR) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an extremely efficient and cost-effective alternative to other methods of recombinant DNA technologies. Unfortunately, it is incompatible with all the various specialized plasmids currently used in microbiology and biomedical research laboratories, and is therefore, not widely adopted. In an effort to dramatically improve the versatility of yeast gap-repair cloning and make it compatible with any DNA plasmid, we demonstrate that by simply including a yeast-cloning cassette (YCC) that contains the 2-micron origin of replication (2 μm ori) and the ura3 gene for selection, multiple DNA fragments can be assembled into any DNA vector. We show this has almost unlimited potential by building a variety of plasmid for different uses including: recombinant protein production, epitope tagging, site-directed mutagenesis, and expression of fluorescent fusion proteins. We demonstrate the use in a variety of plasmids for use in microbial systems and even demonstrate it can be used in a vertebrate model. This method is remarkably simple and extremely efficient, plus it provides a significant cost saving over commercially available kits. PMID:24418681

  2. Change of gene structure and function by non-homologous end-joining, homologous recombination, and transposition of DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfgang Goettel; Joachim Messing

    2009-01-01

    An important objective in genome research is to relate genome structure to gene function. Sequence comparisons among orthologous and paralogous genes and their allelic variants can reveal sequences of functional significance. Here, we describe a 379-kb region on chromosome 1 of maize that enables us to reconstruct chromosome breakage, transposition, non-homologous end-joining, and homologous recombination events. Such a high-density composition of various mechanisms in a small chromosomal int...

  3. Role of teh Rad52 Amino-terminal DNA Binding Activity in DNA Strand Capture in Homologous Recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Idina; Hallwyl, Swee Chuang Lim; Seong, Changhyun

    2009-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad52 protein promotes homologous recombination by nucleating the Rad51 recombinase onto replication protein A-coated single-stranded DNA strands and also by directly annealing such strands. We show that the purified rad52-R70A mutant protein, with a compromised amino...... conversion intermediates reveals that rad52-R70A cells can mediate DNA strand invasion but are unable to complete the recombination event. These results provide evidence that DNA binding by the evolutionarily conserved amino terminus of Rad52 is needed for the capture of the second DNA end during homologous......-terminal DNA binding domain, is capable of Rad51 delivery to DNA but is deficient in DNA annealing. Results from chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments find that rad52-R70A associates with DNA double-strand breaks and promotes recruitment of Rad51 as efficiently as wild-type Rad52. Analysis of gene...

  4. Engineered Zinc Finger Nuclease–Mediated Homologous Recombination of the Human Rhodopsin Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, David L.; Cashman, Siobhan M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. Novel zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) were designed to target the human rhodopsin gene and induce homologous recombination of a donor DNA fragment. Methods. Three-finger zinc finger nucleases were designed based on previously published guidelines. To assay for ZFN specificity, the authors generated human embryonic retinoblast cell lines stably expressing a Pro23His rhodopsin, the most common mutation associated with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa in North America. They report quantification of these rhodopsin-specific ZFNs to induce a targeted double-strand break in the human genome, demonstrate their ability to induce homologous recombination of a donor DNA fragment, and report the quantification of the frequency of ZFN-mediated homologous recombination. Results. Compared with endogenous homologous recombination, the authors observed a 12-fold increase in homologous recombination and an absolute frequency of ZFN-directed homologous recombination as high as 17% in the human rhodopsin gene. Conclusions. ZFNs are chimeric proteins with significant potential for the treatment of inherited diseases. In this study, the authors report the design of novel ZFNs targeting the human rhodopsin gene. These ZFNs may be useful for the treatment of retinal diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa, one of the most common causes of inherited blindness in the developed world. Herein, they also report on several aspects of donor fragment design and in vitro conditions that facilitate ZFN-mediated homologous recombination. PMID:20671268

  5. Better understanding of homologous recombination through a 12-week laboratory course for undergraduates majoring in biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Shen, Xiaodong; Zhao, Yan; Hu, Xiaomei; Hu, Fuquan; Rao, Xiancai

    2017-07-08

    Homologous recombination, a central concept in biology, is defined as the exchange of DNA strands between two similar or identical nucleotide sequences. Unfortunately, undergraduate students majoring in biotechnology often experience difficulties in understanding the molecular basis of homologous recombination. In this study, we developed and implemented a 12-week laboratory course for biotechnology undergraduates in which gene targeting in Streptococcus suis was used to facilitate their understanding of the basic concept and process of homologous recombination. Students worked in teams of two to select a gene of interest to create a knockout mutant using methods that relied on homologous recombination. By integrating abstract knowledge and practice in the process of scientific research, students gained hands-on experience in molecular biology techniques while learning about the principle and process of homologous recombination. The learning outcomes and survey-based assessment demonstrated that students substantially enhanced their understanding of how homologous recombination could be used to study gene function. Overall, the course was very effective for helping biotechnology undergraduates learn the theory and application of homologous recombination, while also yielding positive effects in developing confidence and scientific skills for future work in research. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(4):329-335, 2017. © 2017 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  6. Transcription inhibition by 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB) causes DNA damage and triggers homologous recombination repair in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoimenov, Ivaylo [Department of Genetics Microbiology and Toxicology, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Gottipati, Ponnari [Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom); Schultz, Niklas [Department of Genetics Microbiology and Toxicology, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Helleday, Thomas, E-mail: helleday@gmt.su.se [Department of Genetics Microbiology and Toxicology, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-10

    Transcription, replication and homologous recombination are intrinsically connected and it is well established that an increase of transcription is associated with an increase in homologous recombination. Here, we have studied how homologous recombination is affected during transcription inhibition by 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB), a compound that prevents activating phosphorylations of the RNA Pol II C-terminal domain. We identify that DRB triggers an increase in homologous recombination within the hprt gene as well as increasing RAD51 foci formation in mammalian cells. Furthermore, we find that DRB-induced transcriptional stress is associated with formation of the nuclear foci of the phosphorylated form of H2AX ({gamma}H2AX). We accounted that about 72% of RAD51 foci co-localized with the observed {gamma}H2AX foci. Interestingly, we find that XRCC3 mutated, homologous recombination defective cells are hypersensitive to the toxic effect of DRB and fail to form RAD51 foci. In conclusion, we show that DRB-induced transcription inhibition is associated with the formation of a lesion that triggers RAD51-dependent homologous recombination repair, required for survival under transcriptional stress.

  7. Caffeine suppresses homologous recombination through interference with RAD51-mediated joint molecule formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelensky, Alex N.; Sanchez, Humberto; Ristic, Dejan; Vidic, Iztok; van Rossum-Fikkert, Sari E.; Essers, Jeroen; Wyman, Claire; Kanaar, Roland

    2013-01-01

    Caffeine is a widely used inhibitor of the protein kinases that play a central role in the DNA damage response. We used chemical inhibitors and genetically deficient mouse embryonic stem cell lines to study the role of DNA damage response in stable integration of the transfected DNA and found that caffeine rapidly, efficiently and reversibly inhibited homologous integration of the transfected DNA as measured by several homologous recombination-mediated gene-targeting assays. Biochemical and structural biology experiments revealed that caffeine interfered with a pivotal step in homologous recombination, homologous joint molecule formation, through increasing interactions of the RAD51 nucleoprotein filament with non-homologous DNA. Our results suggest that recombination pathways dependent on extensive homology search are caffeine-sensitive and stress the importance of considering direct checkpoint-independent mechanisms in the interpretation of the effects of caffeine on DNA repair. PMID:23666627

  8. Homologous recombination is a primary pathway to repair DNA double-strand breaks generated during DNA rereplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Lan N; Li, Yongjiang; Sun, Emily; Ang, Katrina; Hwang, Patty Yi-Hwa; Wu, Xiaohua

    2014-10-17

    Re-initiation of DNA replication at origins within a given cell cycle would result in DNA rereplication, which can lead to genome instability and tumorigenesis. DNA rereplication can be induced by loss of licensing control at cellular replication origins, or by viral protein-driven multiple rounds of replication initiation at viral origins. DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are generated during rereplication, but the mechanisms of how these DSBs are repaired to maintain genome stability and cell viability are poorly understood in mammalian cells. We generated novel EGFP-based DSB repair substrates, which specifically monitor the repair of rereplication-associated DSBs. We demonstrated that homologous recombination (HR) is an important mechanism to repair rereplication-associated DSBs, and sister chromatids are used as templates for such HR-mediated DSB repair. Micro-homology-mediated non-homologous end joining (MMEJ) can also be used but to a lesser extent compared to HR, whereas Ku-dependent classical non-homologous end joining (C-NHEJ) has a minimal role to repair rereplication-associated DSBs. In addition, loss of HR activity leads to severe cell death when rereplication is induced. Therefore, our studies identify HR, the most conservative repair pathway, as the primary mechanism to repair DSBs upon rereplication. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. Allele-dependent recombination frequency: homology requirement in meiotic recombination at the hot spot in the mouse major histocompatibility complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, M; Sagai, T; Lindahl, K F; Toyoda, Y; Moriwaki, K; Shiroishi, T

    1995-05-20

    Meiotic recombination break joints in the mouse major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are clustered within short segments known as hot spots. We systematically investigated the requirement for sequence homology between two chromosomes for recombination activity at the hot spot next to the Lmp2 gene. The results indicated that a high rate of recombination required a high degree of similarity of overall genome structure at the hot spot. In particular, the same copy number of repetitive sequences within the hot spot was essential for a high frequency of recombination, suggesting that recombination in mouse meiosis is more sensitive to heterozygous deletion or insertion of DNA than to mismatches of single-base substitutions.

  10. Construction of a novel kind of expression plasmid by homologous recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Xiangling

    2005-01-01

    [1]Brunelli, J. P., Pall, M. L., A series of yeast vectors for expression of cDNAs and other DNA sequences, Yeast, 1993, 9: 1299―1308.[2]Sikorski, R. S., Hieter, P., A system of shuttle vectors and yeast host strains designed for efficient manipulation of DNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Genetics, 1989, 122: 19―27.[3]Bonneaud, N., Ozier-Kalogerogoulos, O., Li, G. et al., A family of low and high copy replicative, integrative and single-stranded S. cerevisiae /E. coli shuttle vector, Yeast, 1991, 7: 609―615.[4]Huo, K. K., Yu, L. L., Chen, X. J., Li, Y. Y., A stable vector for high-level expression and secretion of human interferon alpha A in yeast, Science in China, Ser. B, 1993, 36(5): 557―567.[5]Zhou, Z. X., Yuan, H. Y., He, W. et al., Expression of the modified HBsAg gene SA-28 directed by a constitutive promoter, Journal of Fudan university (Natural Science), 2000, 39(3): 264―268.[6]Paques, F., Haber, J. E., Multiple pathways of recombination induces by double-strand breaks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Microbiology and Molecular Biology Reviews, 1999, 63(2): 349―404.[7]Martin, K., Damage-induced recombination in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Mutation Research, 2000, 451: 91―105.[8]Alira, S., Tomoko, O., Homologous recombination and the roles of double-strand breaks, TIBS, 1995, 20: 387―391.[9]Patrick, S., Kelly, M. T., Stephen, V. K., Recombination factor of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Mutation Research, 2000, 451: 257―275.[10]Manivasakam, P., Weber, S. C., McElver, J., Schiestl, R. H., Micro-homology mediated PCR targeting in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Nucleic Acids Res., 1995, 23(14): 2799―2800.[11]Baudin, A., Lacroute, F., Cullin, C., A simple and efficient method for direct gene deletion in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Nucleic Acids Res., 1993, 21(14): 3329―3330.[12]Hua, S. B., Qiu, M., Chan, E., Zhu, L., Luo, Y., Minimum length of sequence homology required for in vivo cloning by homolo-gous recombination in yeast, Plasmid, 1997, 38

  11. Expansion of a chromosomal repeat in Escherichia coli: roles of replication, repair, and recombination functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poteete Anthony R

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies of gene amplification in Escherichia coli have suggested that it occurs in two steps: duplication and expansion. Expansion is thought to result from homologous recombination between the repeated segments created by duplication. To explore the mechanism of expansion, a 7 kbp duplication in the chromosome containing a leaky mutant version of the lac operon was constructed, and its expansion into an amplified array was studied. Results Under selection for lac function, colonies bearing multiple copies of the mutant lac operon appeared at a constant rate of approximately 4 to 5 per million cells plated per day, on days two through seven after plating. Expansion was not seen in a recA strain; null mutations in recBCD and ruvC reduced the rate 100- and 10-fold, respectively; a ruvC recG double mutant reduced the rate 1000-fold. Expansion occurred at an increased rate in cells lacking dam, polA, rnhA, or uvrD functions. Null mutations of various other cellular recombination, repair, and stress response genes had little effect upon expansion. The red recombination genes of phage lambda could substitute for recBCD in mediating expansion. In the red-substituted cells, expansion was only partially dependent upon recA function. Conclusion These observations are consistent with the idea that the expansion step of gene amplification is closely related, mechanistically, to interchromosomal homologous recombination events. They additionally provide support for recently described models of RecA-independent Red-mediated recombination at replication forks.

  12. Hepadnaviruses and retroviruses share genome homology and features of replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, W S; Miller, R H; Marion, P L

    1987-01-01

    The hepadnavirus family includes hepatitis B virus (HBV), woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV), ground squirrel hepatitis virus (GSHV) and duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV). These viruses share unique ultrastructural, molecular and biological features. HBV has great medical importance in many parts of the world. More important numerically than acute hepatitis B in high prevalence geographic regions is the liver disease associated with chronic infection. There appear to be more than 200 million chronically infected humans in the world, and these HBV infections appear to be the single most common cause of chronic liver disease and liver cancer in man. All hepadnaviruses share the propensity for silent infection in early life leading to persistence of the virus, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is clearly associated with long-standing persistent infection in man, woodchucks and ground squirrels. Although the viral DNA has been found to be integrated in cellular DNA of many HCC in man, woodchucks and ground squirrels, the precise role of the virus in tumor formation has not been defined. Hepadna viruses have an interesting molecular structure and mechanisms of replication, and they appear to share certain important features with retroviruses as reviewed here. It is of interest to define similarities and differences between hepadnaviruses and retroviruses in order to understand their evolutionary relationship and to determine whether they share a common oncogenic mechanism, since infection with members of both virus families is associated with neoplastic disease.

  13. Retroviral vectors for homologous recombination provide efficient cloning and expression in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Eiji; Kishi, Hiroyuki; Ozawa, Tatsuhiko; Horii, Masae; Hamana, Hiroshi; Nagai, Terumi; Muraguchi, Atsushi

    2014-02-14

    Homologous recombination technologies enable high-throughput cloning and the seamless insertion of any DNA fragment into expression vectors. Additionally, retroviral vectors offer a fast and efficient method for transducing and expressing genes in mammalian cells, including lymphocytes. However, homologous recombination cannot be used to insert DNA fragments into retroviral vectors; retroviral vectors contain two homologous regions, the 5'- and 3'-long terminal repeats, between which homologous recombination occurs preferentially. In this study, we have modified a retroviral vector to enable the cloning of DNA fragments through homologous recombination. To this end, we inserted a bacterial selection marker in a region adjacent to the gene insertion site. We used the modified retroviral vector and homologous recombination to clone T-cell receptors (TCRs) from single Epstein Barr virus-specific human T cells in a high-throughput and comprehensive manner and to efficiently evaluate their function by transducing the TCRs into a murine T-cell line through retroviral infection. In conclusion, the modified retroviral vectors, in combination with the homologous recombination method, are powerful tools for the high-throughput cloning of cDNAs and their efficient functional analysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Employing libraries of zinc finger artificial transcription factors to screen for homologous recombination mutants in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindhout, Beatrice I; Pinas, Johan E; Hooykaas, Paul J J; van der Zaal, Bert J

    2006-11-01

    A library of genes for zinc finger artificial transcription factors (ZF-ATF) was generated by fusion of DNA sequences encoding three-finger Cys(2)His(2) ZF domains to the VP16 activation domain under the control of the promoter of the ribosomal protein gene RPS5A from Arabidopsis thaliana. After introduction of this library into an Arabidopsis homologous recombination (HR) indicator line, we selected primary transformants exhibiting multiple somatic recombination events. After PCR-mediated rescue of ZF sequences, reconstituted ZF-ATFs were re-introduced in the target line. In this manner, a ZF-ATF was identified that led to a 200-1000-fold increase in somatic HR (replicated in an independent second target line). A mutant plant line expressing the HR-inducing ZF-ATF exhibited increased resistance to the DNA-damaging agent bleomycin and was more sensitive to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), a combination of traits not described previously. Our results demonstrate that the use of ZF-ATF pools is highly rewarding when screening for novel dominant phenotypes in Arabidopsis.

  15. Suppression of mutagenesis by Rad51D-mediated homologous recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinz, J M; Tebbs, R S; Wilson, P F; Nham, P B; Salazar, E P; Nagasawa, H; Urbin, S S; Thompson, L H

    2005-11-15

    Homologous recombinational repair (HRR) restores chromatid breaks arising during DNA replication and prevents chromosomal rearrangements that can occur from the misrepair of such breaks. In vertebrates, five Rad51 paralogs are identified that contribute in a nonessential but critical manner to HRR efficiency. We constructed and characterized a Rad51D knockout cell line in widely studied CHO cells. The rad51d mutant (51D1) displays sensitivity to a wide spectrum of induced DNA damage, indicating the broad relevance of HRR to genotoxicity. Untreated 51D1 cells exhibit {approx}5-fold elevated chromosomal breaks, a 12-fold increased rate of hprt mutation, and 4- to 10-fold increased rates of gene amplification at the dhfr and CAD loci, respectively. These results explicitly show the quantitative importance of HHR in preventing these types genetic alterations, which are associated with carcinogenesis. Thus, HRR copes in an error-free manner with spontaneous DNA damage encountered during DNA replication, and Rad51D is essential for this fidelity.

  16. Dynamics and impact of homologous recombination on the evolution of Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Sophia; Sánchez-Busó, Leonor; Harris, Simon R; Marttinen, Pekka; Rusniok, Christophe; Buchrieser, Carmen; Harrison, Timothy G; Parkhill, Julian

    2017-06-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an environmental bacterium and the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease. Previous genomic studies have shown that recombination accounts for a high proportion (>96%) of diversity within several major disease-associated sequence types (STs) of L. pneumophila. This suggests that recombination represents a potentially important force shaping adaptation and virulence. Despite this, little is known about the biological effects of recombination in L. pneumophila, particularly with regards to homologous recombination (whereby genes are replaced with alternative allelic variants). Using newly available population genomic data, we have disentangled events arising from homologous and non-homologous recombination in six major disease-associated STs of L. pneumophila (subsp. pneumophila), and subsequently performed a detailed characterisation of the dynamics and impact of homologous recombination. We identified genomic "hotspots" of homologous recombination that include regions containing outer membrane proteins, the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) region and Dot/Icm effectors, which provide interesting clues to the selection pressures faced by L. pneumophila. Inference of the origin of the recombined regions showed that isolates have most frequently imported DNA from isolates belonging to their own clade, but also occasionally from other major clades of the same subspecies. This supports the hypothesis that the possibility for horizontal exchange of new adaptations between major clades of the subspecies may have been a critical factor in the recent emergence of several clinically important STs from diverse genomic backgrounds. However, acquisition of recombined regions from another subspecies, L. pneumophila subsp. fraseri, was rarely observed, suggesting the existence of a recombination barrier and/or the possibility of ongoing speciation between the two subspecies. Finally, we suggest that multi-fragment recombination may occur in L. pneumophila

  17. Efficient assembly of full-length infectious clone of Brazilian IBDV isolate by homologous recombination in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, J V J; Arenhart, S; Santos, H F; Almeida-Queiroz, S R; Silva, A N M R; Trevisol, I M; Bertani, G R; Gil, L H V G

    2014-01-01

    The Infectious Bursal Disease Virus (IBDV) causes immunosuppression in young chickens. Advances in molecular virology and vaccines for IBDV have been achieved by viral reverse genetics (VRG). VRG for IBDV has undergone changes over time, however all strategies used to generate particles of IBDV involves multiple rounds of amplification and need of in vitro ligation and restriction sites. The aim of this research was to build the world's first VRG for IBDV by yeast-based homologous recombination; a more efficient, robust and simple process than cloning by in vitro ligation. The wild type IBDV (Wt-IBDV-Br) was isolated in Brazil and had its genome cloned in pJG-CMV-HDR vector by yeast-based homologous recombination. The clones were transfected into chicken embryo fibroblasts and the recovered virus (IC-IBDV-Br) showed genetic stability and similar phenotype to Wt-IBDV-Br, which were observed by nucleotide sequence, focus size/morphology and replication kinetics, respectively. Thus, IBDV reverse genetics by yeast-based homologous recombination provides tools to IBDV understanding and vaccines/viral vectors development.

  18. uv induced enhancement of recombination among lambda bacteriophages: relation with replication of irradiated DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordone, L.; Sperandeo-Mineo, R.M.; Mannino, S.

    1975-07-01

    Experimental results are reported showing the dependence of the uv induced enhancement of recombinants on the presence of the functional O gene product. This fact is tentatively interpreted as a replication dependence of the uv induced recombination.

  19. Methotrexate-mediated inhibition of RAD51 expression and homologous recombination in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Li-Qing; Du, Xiao-Qing; Bai, Jian-Qiang; Wang, Yan; Yang, Qing-Shan; Wang, Xiao-Chun; Zhao, Peng; Wang, Hong; Liu, Qiang; Fan, Fei-Yue

    2012-05-01

    Methotrexate is an inhibitor of folic acid metabolism. Homologous recombination is one of the most important ways to repair double-stranded breaks in DNA and influence the radio- and chemosensitivity of tumor cells. But the relationship between methotrexate and homologous recombination repair has not been elucidated. Induction of double-strand breaks by methotrexate in HOS cells is assessed by the neutral comet assay. Inhibition of subnuclear repair foci by methotrexate is measured by immunofluorescence. Western blot and quantitative real-time PCR are conducted to detect whether methotrexate affects the expression level of genes involved in homologous recombination. In addition, we used a pCMV3xnls-I-SceI construct to determine whether methotrexate directly inhibits the process of homologous recombinational repair in cells, and the sensitivity to methotrexate in the Ku80-deficient cells is detected using clonogenic survival assays. The result showed that methotrexate can regulate the repair of DNA double-strand breaks after radiation exposure, and methotrexate inhibition caused the complete inhibition of subnuclear repair foci in response to ionizing radiation. Mechanistic investigation revealed that methotrexate led to a significant reduction in the transcription of RAD51 genes. Treatment with methotrexate resulted in a decreased ability to perform homology-directed repair of I-SceI-induced chromosome breaks. In addition, enhancement of cell death was observed in Ku mutant cells compared to wild-type cells. These results demonstrate that methotrexate can affect homologous recombination repair of DNA double-strand breaks by controlling the expression of homologous recombination-related genes and suppressing the proper assembly of homologous recombination-directed subnuclear foci.

  20. Transformation-associated recombination between diverged and homologous DNA repeats is induced by strand breaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larionov, V.; Kouprina, N. [National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)]|[Institute of Cytology, St. Petersburg, (Russian Federation); Edlarov, M. [National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)]|[Center of Bioengineering, Moscow, (Russian Federation); Perkins, E.; Porter, G.; Resnick, M.A. [National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Rearrangement and deletion within plasmid DNA is commonly observed during transformation. We have examined the mechanisms of transformation-associated recombination in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a plasmid system which allowed the effects of physical state and/or extent of homology on recombination to be studied. The plasmid contains homologous or diverged (19%) DNA repeats separated by a genetically detectable color marker. Recombination during transformation for covalently closed circular plasmids was over 100-fold more frequent than during mitotic growth. The frequency of recombination is partly dependent on the method of transformation in that procedures involving lithium acetate or spheroplasting yield higher frequencies than electroporation. When present in the repeats, unique single-strand breaks that are ligatable, as well as double-strand breaks, lead to high levels of recombination between diverged and identical repeats. The transformation-associated recombination between repeat DNA`s is under the influence of the RADS2, RADI and the RNCI genes,

  1. Reporter-Expressing, Replicating-Competent Recombinant Arenaviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Martínez-Sobrido

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Several arenaviruses cause hemorrhagic fever (HF disease in humans and pose an important public health problem in their endemic regions. To date, no Food and Drug Administration (FDA-licensed vaccines are available to combat human arenavirus infections, and current anti-arenaviral drug therapy is limited to an off-label use of ribavirin that is only partially effective. The development of arenavirus reverse genetic approaches has provided investigators with a novel and powerful approach for the study of arenavirus biology including virus–host interactions underlying arenavirus induced disease. The use of cell-based minigenome systems has allowed examining the cis- and trans-acting factors involved in arenavirus replication and transcription, as well as particle assembly and budding. Likewise, it is now feasible to rescue infectious arenaviruses containing predetermined mutations in their genomes to investigate virus-host interactions and mechanisms of pathogenesis. The use of reverse genetics approaches has also allowed the generation of recombinant arenaviruses expressing additional genes of interest. These advances in arenavirus molecular genetics have also facilitated the implementation of novel screens to identify anti-arenaviral drugs, and the development of novel strategies for the generation of arenavirus live-attenuated vaccines. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge on reporter-expressing, replicating-competent arenaviruses harboring reporter genes in different locations of the viral genome and their use for studying and understanding arenavirus biology and the identification of anti-arenaviral drugs to combat these important human pathogens.

  2. Reporter-Expressing, Replicating-Competent Recombinant Arenaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; de la Torre, Juan Carlos

    2016-07-20

    Several arenaviruses cause hemorrhagic fever (HF) disease in humans and pose an important public health problem in their endemic regions. To date, no Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-licensed vaccines are available to combat human arenavirus infections, and current anti-arenaviral drug therapy is limited to an off-label use of ribavirin that is only partially effective. The development of arenavirus reverse genetic approaches has provided investigators with a novel and powerful approach for the study of arenavirus biology including virus-host interactions underlying arenavirus induced disease. The use of cell-based minigenome systems has allowed examining the cis- and trans-acting factors involved in arenavirus replication and transcription, as well as particle assembly and budding. Likewise, it is now feasible to rescue infectious arenaviruses containing predetermined mutations in their genomes to investigate virus-host interactions and mechanisms of pathogenesis. The use of reverse genetics approaches has also allowed the generation of recombinant arenaviruses expressing additional genes of interest. These advances in arenavirus molecular genetics have also facilitated the implementation of novel screens to identify anti-arenaviral drugs, and the development of novel strategies for the generation of arenavirus live-attenuated vaccines. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge on reporter-expressing, replicating-competent arenaviruses harboring reporter genes in different locations of the viral genome and their use for studying and understanding arenavirus biology and the identification of anti-arenaviral drugs to combat these important human pathogens.

  3. Copy-number gains of HUWE1 due to replication- and recombination-based rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froyen, Guy; Belet, Stefanie; Martinez, Francisco; Santos-Rebouças, Cíntia Barros; Declercq, Matthias; Verbeeck, Jelle; Donckers, Lene; Berland, Siren; Mayo, Sonia; Rosello, Monica; Pimentel, Márcia Mattos Gonçalves; Fintelman-Rodrigues, Natalia; Hovland, Randi; Rodrigues dos Santos, Suely; Raymond, F Lucy; Bose, Tulika; Corbett, Mark A; Sheffield, Leslie; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M A; Dijkhuizen, Trijnie; Coutton, Charles; Satre, Veronique; Siu, Victoria; Marynen, Peter

    2012-08-10

    We previously reported on nonrecurrent overlapping duplications at Xp11.22 in individuals with nonsyndromic intellectual disability (ID) harboring HSD17B10, HUWE1, and the microRNAs miR-98 and let-7f-2 in the smallest region of overlap. Here, we describe six additional individuals with nonsyndromic ID and overlapping microduplications that segregate in the families. High-resolution mapping of the 12 copy-number gains reduced the minimal duplicated region to the HUWE1 locus only. Consequently, increased mRNA levels were detected for HUWE1, but not HSD17B10. Marker and SNP analysis, together with identification of two de novo events, suggested a paternally derived intrachromosomal duplication event. In four independent families, we report on a polymorphic 70 kb recurrent copy-number gain, which harbors part of HUWE1 (exon 28 to 3' untranslated region), including miR-98 and let-7f-2. Our findings thus demonstrate that HUWE1 is the only remaining dosage-sensitive gene associated with the ID phenotype. Junction and in silico analysis of breakpoint regions demonstrated simple microhomology-mediated rearrangements suggestive of replication-based duplication events. Intriguingly, in a single family, the duplication was generated through nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR) with the use of HUWE1-flanking imperfect low-copy repeats, which drive this infrequent NAHR event. The recurrent partial HUWE1 copy-number gain was also generated through NAHR, but here, the homologous sequences used were identified as TcMAR-Tigger DNA elements, a template that has not yet been reported for NAHR. In summary, we showed that an increased dosage of HUWE1 causes nonsyndromic ID and demonstrated that the Xp11.22 region is prone to recombination- and replication-based rearrangements.

  4. Heterogeneity in the frequency and characteristics of homologous recombination in pneumococcal evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafal Mostowy

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus is one of the most important human bacterial pathogens, and a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The pneumococcus is also known for undergoing extensive homologous recombination via transformation with exogenous DNA. It has been shown that recombination has a major impact on the evolution of the pathogen, including acquisition of antibiotic resistance and serotype-switching. Nevertheless, the mechanism and the rates of recombination in an epidemiological context remain poorly understood. Here, we proposed several mathematical models to describe the rate and size of recombination in the evolutionary history of two very distinct pneumococcal lineages, PMEN1 and CC180. We found that, in both lineages, the process of homologous recombination was best described by a heterogeneous model of recombination with single, short, frequent replacements, which we call micro-recombinations, and rarer, multi-fragment, saltational replacements, which we call macro-recombinations. Macro-recombination was associated with major phenotypic changes, including serotype-switching events, and thus was a major driver of the diversification of the pathogen. We critically evaluate biological and epidemiological processes that could give rise to the micro-recombination and macro-recombination processes.

  5. COM-1 promotes homologous recombination during Caenorhabditis elegans meiosis by antagonizing Ku-mediated non-homologous end joining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmens, Bennie B L G; Johnson, Nicholas M; Tijsterman, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Successful completion of meiosis requires the induction and faithful repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). DSBs can be repaired via homologous recombination (HR) or non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), yet only repair via HR can generate the interhomolog crossovers (COs) needed for meiotic chromosome segregation. Here we identify COM-1, the homolog of CtIP/Sae2/Ctp1, as a crucial regulator of DSB repair pathway choice during Caenorhabditis elegans gametogenesis. COM-1-deficient germ cells repair meiotic DSBs via the error-prone pathway NHEJ, resulting in a lack of COs, extensive chromosomal aggregation, and near-complete embryonic lethality. In contrast to its yeast counterparts, COM-1 is not required for Spo11 removal and initiation of meiotic DSB repair, but instead promotes meiotic recombination by counteracting the NHEJ complex Ku. In fact, animals defective for both COM-1 and Ku are viable and proficient in CO formation. Further genetic dissection revealed that COM-1 acts parallel to the nuclease EXO-1 to promote interhomolog HR at early pachytene stage of meiotic prophase and thereby safeguards timely CO formation. Both of these nucleases, however, are dispensable for RAD-51 recruitment at late pachytene stage, when homolog-independent repair pathways predominate, suggesting further redundancy and/or temporal regulation of DNA end resection during meiotic prophase. Collectively, our results uncover the potentially lethal properties of NHEJ during meiosis and identify a critical role for COM-1 in NHEJ inhibition and CO assurance in germ cells.

  6. COM-1 promotes homologous recombination during Caenorhabditis elegans meiosis by antagonizing Ku-mediated non-homologous end joining.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennie B L G Lemmens

    Full Text Available Successful completion of meiosis requires the induction and faithful repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. DSBs can be repaired via homologous recombination (HR or non-homologous end joining (NHEJ, yet only repair via HR can generate the interhomolog crossovers (COs needed for meiotic chromosome segregation. Here we identify COM-1, the homolog of CtIP/Sae2/Ctp1, as a crucial regulator of DSB repair pathway choice during Caenorhabditis elegans gametogenesis. COM-1-deficient germ cells repair meiotic DSBs via the error-prone pathway NHEJ, resulting in a lack of COs, extensive chromosomal aggregation, and near-complete embryonic lethality. In contrast to its yeast counterparts, COM-1 is not required for Spo11 removal and initiation of meiotic DSB repair, but instead promotes meiotic recombination by counteracting the NHEJ complex Ku. In fact, animals defective for both COM-1 and Ku are viable and proficient in CO formation. Further genetic dissection revealed that COM-1 acts parallel to the nuclease EXO-1 to promote interhomolog HR at early pachytene stage of meiotic prophase and thereby safeguards timely CO formation. Both of these nucleases, however, are dispensable for RAD-51 recruitment at late pachytene stage, when homolog-independent repair pathways predominate, suggesting further redundancy and/or temporal regulation of DNA end resection during meiotic prophase. Collectively, our results uncover the potentially lethal properties of NHEJ during meiosis and identify a critical role for COM-1 in NHEJ inhibition and CO assurance in germ cells.

  7. Mutants of Streptomyces roseosporus that express enhanced recombination within partially homologous genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosted, T J; Baltz, R H

    1996-10-01

    Streptomyces roseosporus mutants that express enhanced recombination between partially homologous (homeologous) sequences were isolated by selection for recombination between the bacteriophage phi C31 derivative KC570 containing the Streptomyces coelicolor glucose kinase (glk) gene and the S. roseosporus chromosome. The frequencies of homeologous recombination in the ehr mutants were determined by measuring the chromosomal insertion frequencies of plasmids containing S. coelicolor glnA or whiG genes. S. roseosporus ehr mutants showed 10(2)- to 10(4)-fold increases in homeologous recombination relative to Ehr+ strains, but no increase in homologous recombination. Southern hybridization analysis revealed single unique sites for the insertion of each of the plasmids, and the crossovers occurred in frame and in proper translational register, yielding functional chimeric glnA and whiG genes.

  8. Measurement of recombination frequencies between two homologous DNA segments embedded in a YAC vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, H; Kurosawa, Y

    1993-07-15

    We measured the frequencies of recombination in a yeast host between two homologous segments of DNA that had been inserted with the same polarity in a yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) vector. Three kinds of YAC clones were constructed in which the gene encoding neomycin(Nm) resistance was sandwiched between two homologous segments of DNA, such as the IS3 elements of Escherichia coli or human Alu sequences. Frequencies of homologous recombination in yeast were measured in terms of loss of resistance to Nm. In the case of IS3 fragments, homologous recombination between them did occur at a relatively high frequency (5 x 10(-4). In contrast, recombination between two Alu sequences did not occur at a detectable level during a 30-day incubation. Thus, the frequency was less than 10(-5). These results indicate that the Alu sequences do not sufficiently promote the frequency of recombination between two homologous fragments in yeast as to induce rearrangements of DNA in a substantial fraction of YAC clones in libraries.

  9. Role of homologous recombination in adaptive diversification of extraintestinal Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Sandip; Linardopoulou, Elena V; Billig, Mariya; Tchesnokova, Veronika; Price, Lance B; Johnson, James R; Chattopadhyay, Sujay; Sokurenko, Evgeni V

    2013-01-01

    The contribution of homologous exchange (recombination) of core genes in the adaptive evolution of bacterial pathogens is not well understood. To investigate this, we analyzed fully assembled genomes of two Escherichia coli strains from sequence type 131 (ST131), a clonal group that is both the leading cause of extraintestinal E. coli infections and the main source of fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli. Although the sequences of each of the seven multilocus sequence typing genes were identical in the two ST131 isolates, the strains diverged from one another by homologous recombination that affected at least 9% of core genes. This was on a par with the contribution to genomic diversity of horizontal gene transfer and point gene mutation. The genomic positions of recombinant and mobile genetic regions were partially linked, suggesting their concurrent occurrence. One of the genes affected by homologous recombination was fimH, which encodes mannose-specific type 1 fimbrial adhesin, resulting in functionally distinct copies of the gene in ST131 strains. One strain, a uropathogenic isolate, had a pathoadaptive variant of fimH that was acquired by homologous replacement into the commensal strain background. Close examination of FimH structure and function in additional ST131 isolates revealed that recombination led to acquisition of several functionally distinct variants that, upon homologous exchange, were targeted by a variety of pathoadaptive mutations under strong positive selection. Different recombinant fimH strains also showed a strong clonal association with ST131 isolates that had distinct fluoroquinolone resistance profiles. Thus, homologous recombination of core genes plays a significant role in adaptive diversification of bacterial pathogens, especially at the level of clonally related groups of isolates.

  10. A recurrent translocation is mediated by homologous recombination between HERV-H elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermetz Karen E

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosome rearrangements are caused by many mutational mechanisms; of these, recurrent rearrangements can be particularly informative for teasing apart DNA sequence-specific factors. Some recurrent translocations are mediated by homologous recombination between large blocks of segmental duplications on different chromosomes. Here we describe a recurrent unbalanced translocation casued by recombination between shorter homologous regions on chromosomes 4 and 18 in two unrelated children with intellectual disability. Results Array CGH resolved the breakpoints of the 6.97-Megabase (Mb loss of 18q and the 7.30-Mb gain of 4q. Sequencing across the translocation breakpoints revealed that both translocations occurred between 92%-identical human endogenous retrovirus (HERV elements in the same orientation on chromosomes 4 and 18. In addition, we find sequence variation in the chromosome 4 HERV that makes one allele more like the chromosome 18 HERV. Conclusions Homologous recombination between HERVs on the same chromosome is known to cause chromosome deletions, but this is the first report of interchromosomal HERV-HERV recombination leading to a translocation. It is possible that normal sequence variation in substrates of non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR affects the alignment of recombining segments and influences the propensity to chromosome rearrangement.

  11. Homologous Recombination Defective Arabidopsis Mutants Exhibit Enhanced Sensitivity to Abscisic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sujit; Das, Kali Pada

    2017-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) acts as an important plant hormone in regulating various aspects of plant growth and developmental processes particularly under abiotic stress conditions. An increased ABA level in plant cells inhibits DNA replication and cell division, causing plant growth retardation. In this study, we have investigated the effects of ABA on the growth responses of some major loss-of-function mutants of DNA double-stand break (DSB) repair genes in Arabidopsis during seed germination and early stages of seedling growth for understanding the role of ABA in the induction of genome instability in plants. A comparative analysis of ABA sensitivity of wild-type Arabidopsis and the knockout mutant lines related to DSB sensors, including atatm, atatr, the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway genes, and mutants related to homologous recombination (HR) pathway genes showed relatively enhanced sensitivity of atatr and HR-related mutants to ABA treatment. The expression levels of HR-related genes were increased in wild-type Arabidopsis (Col-0) during seed germination and early stages of seedling growth. Immunoblotting experiments detected phosphorylation of histone H2AX in wild-type (Col-0) and DSB repair gene mutants after ABA treatment, indicating the activation of DNA damage response due to ABA treatment. Analyses of DSB repair kinetics using comet assay under neutral condition have revealed comparatively slower DSB repair activity in HR mutants. Overall, our results have provided comprehensive information on the possible effect of ABA on DNA repair machinery in plants and also indicated potential functional involvement of HR pathway in repairing ABA induced DNA damage in Arabidopsis. PMID:28046013

  12. Right or left turn? RecA family protein filaments promote homologous recombination through clockwise axial rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting-Fang; Chen, Li-Tzu; Wang, Andrew H-J

    2008-01-01

    The RecA family proteins mediate homologous recombination, a ubiquitous mechanism for repairing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and stalled replication forks. Members of this family include bacterial RecA, archaeal RadA and Rad51, and eukaryotic Rad51 and Dmc1. These proteins bind to single-stranded DNA at a DSB site to form a presynaptic nucleoprotein filament, align this presynaptic filament with homologous sequences in another double-stranded DNA segment, promote DNA strand exchange and then dissociate. It was generally accepted that RecA family proteins function throughout their catalytic cycles as right-handed helical filaments with six protomers per helical turn. However, we recently reported that archaeal RadA proteins can also form an extended right-handed filament with three monomers per helical turn and a left-handed protein filament with four monomers per helical turn. Subsequent structural and functional analyses suggest that RecA family protein filaments, similar to the F1-ATPase rotary motor, perform ATP-dependent clockwise axial rotation during their catalytic cycles. This new hypothesis has opened a new avenue for understanding the molecular mechanism of RecA family proteins in homologous recombination.

  13. Next-Generation DNA Curtains for Single-Molecule Studies of Homologous Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soniat, Michael M; Myler, Logan R; Schaub, Jeffrey M; Kim, Yoori; Gallardo, Ignacio F; Finkelstein, Ilya J

    2017-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a universally conserved DNA double-strand break repair pathway. Single-molecule fluorescence imaging approaches have revealed new mechanistic insights into nearly all aspects of HR. These methods are especially suited for studying protein complexes because multicolor fluorescent imaging can parse out subassemblies and transient intermediates that associate with the DNA substrates on the millisecond to hour timescales. However, acquiring single-molecule datasets remains challenging because most of these approaches are designed to measure one molecular reaction at a time. The DNA curtains platform facilitates high-throughput single-molecule imaging by organizing arrays of DNA molecules on the surface of a microfluidic flowcell. Here, we describe a second-generation UV lithography-based protocol for fabricating flowcells for DNA curtains. This protocol greatly reduces the challenges associated with assembling DNA curtains and paves the way for the rapid acquisition of large datasets from individual single-molecule experiments. Drawing on our recent studies of human HR, we also provide an overview of how DNA curtains can be used for observing facilitated protein diffusion, processive enzyme translocation, and nucleoprotein filament dynamics on single-stranded DNA. Together, these protocols and case studies form a comprehensive introduction for other researchers that may want to adapt DNA curtains for high-throughput single-molecule studies of DNA replication, transcription, and repair. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Analysis of mammalian cis-regulatory DNA elements by homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiering, S; Bender, M A; Groudine, M

    1999-01-01

    The use of homologous recombination to modify and thereby functionally analyze cis-regulatory DNA elements in mammalian cells has become an important approach in mammalian gene expression research. We have emphasized the necessity of designing a system that allows the removal of selectable markers used in targeting and facilitates the further modification of the region under study. To perform these tasks, we presently favor making an initial HR-mediated replacement of the entire element under study with an active positive selectable marker in combination with either an inactive second positive selectable marker or an active negative selectable marker. The plug and socket system, in which an inactive selectable marker is complemented by HR, is the most dependable and well-characterized option for making secondary modifications. However, the double-replacement system has certain advantages, and the recently developed RMCE approach, which allows replacement of a negative selectable marker by site-specific recombinase-mediated insertion without using a positive selectable marker, will likely prove very valuable in future experiments. Each of the systems, or combinations thereof, should be considered in light of the specifics of any given experiment to select the most appropriate option. Although the emphasis of this article has been the analysis of cis-acting regulatory elements involved in transcription, these same approaches can be used to analyze other regulatory elements (e.g., origins of replication) and to make multiple subtle mutations in polypeptides.

  15. [An homologous recombination strategy to directly clone mammalian telemeres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    We have pursued three goals over the past year. The first involved determining whether the HARY vector could be used for homologous integration in the human genome. The second was to ascertain whether inserted sequences could be amplified in preference to the endogenous DHFR genes. The third was to determine if the HARY insertion could provide an anchor point for long range restriction mapping. The progress in each goal is described.

  16. Nascent DNA synthesis during homologous recombination is synergistically promoted by the rad51 recombinase and DNA homology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundia, Maureen M; Desai, Vatsal; Magwood, Alissa C; Baker, Mark D

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we exploited a plasmid-based assay that detects the new DNA synthesis (3' extension) that accompanies Rad51-mediated homology searching and strand invasion steps of homologous recombination to investigate the interplay between Rad51 concentration and homology length. Mouse hybridoma cells that express endogenous levels of Rad51 display an approximate linear increase in the frequency of 3' extension for homology lengths of 500 bp to 2 kb. At values below ∼500 bp, the frequency of 3' extension declines markedly, suggesting that this might represent the minimal efficient processing segment for 3' extension. Overexpression of wild-type Rad51 stimulated the frequency of 3' extension by ∼3-fold for homology lengths homology was >2 kb, 3' extension frequency increased by as much as 10-fold. Excess wild-type Rad51 did not increase the average 3' extension tract length. Analysis of cell lines expressing N-terminally FLAG-tagged Rad51 polymerization mutants F86E, A89E, or F86E/A89E established that the 3' extension process requires Rad51 polymerization activity. Mouse hybridoma cells that have reduced Brca2 (Breast cancer susceptibility 2) due to stable expression of small interfering RNA show a significant reduction in 3' extension efficiency; expression of wild-type human BRCA2, but not a BRCA2 variant devoid of BRC repeats 1-8, rescues the 3' extension defect in these cells. Our results suggest that increased Rad51 concentration and homology length interact synergistically to promote 3' extension, presumably as a result of enhanced Brca2-mediated Rad51 polymerization.

  17. Heteroduplex formation, mismatch resolution, and genetic sectoring during homologous recombination in the hyperthermophilic archaeon sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Dominic; Grogan, Dennis W

    2012-01-01

    Hyperthermophilic archaea exhibit certain molecular-genetic features not seen in bacteria or eukaryotes, and their systems of homologous recombination (HR) remain largely unexplored in vivo. We transformed a Sulfolobus acidocaldariuspyrE mutant with short DNAs that contained multiple non-selected genetic markers within the pyrE gene. From 20 to 40% of the resulting colonies were found to contain two Pyr(+) clones with distinct sets of the non-selected markers. The dual-genotype colonies could not be attributed to multiple DNAs entering the cells, or to conjugation between transformed and non-transformed cells. These colonies thus appear to represent genetic sectoring in which regions of heteroduplex DNA formed and then segregated after partial resolution of inter-strand differences. Surprisingly, sectoring was also frequent in cells transformed with single-stranded DNAs. Oligonucleotides produced more sectored transformants when electroporated as single strands than as a duplex, although all forms of donor DNA (positive-strand, negative-strand, and duplex) produced a diversity of genotypes, despite the limited number of markers. The marker patterns in the recombinants indicate that S. acidocaldarius resolves individual mismatches through un-coordinated short-patch excision followed by re-filling of the resulting gap. The conversion events that occur during transformation by single-stranded DNA do not show the strand bias necessary for a system that corrects replication errors effectively; similar events also occur in pre-formed heteroduplex electroporated into the cells. Although numerous mechanistic details remain obscure, the results demonstrate that the HR system of S. acidocaldarius can generate remarkable genetic diversity from short intervals of moderately diverged DNAs.

  18. Heteroduplex formation, mismatch resolution, and genetic sectoring during homologous recombination in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis W. Grogan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthermophilic archaea exhibit certain molecular-genetic features not seen in bacteria or eukaryotes, and their systems of homologous recombination (HR remain largely unexplored in vivo. We transformed a Sulfolobus acidocaldarius pyrE mutant with short DNAs that contained multiple non-selected genetic markers within the pyrE gene. From 20 to 40% of the resulting colonies were found to contain two Pyr+ clones with distinct sets of the non-selected markers. The dual-genotype colonies could not be attributed to multiple DNAs entering the cells or conjugation between transformed and non-transformed cells. These colonies thus appear to represent genetic sectoring in which stretches of heteroduplex DNA formed during HR and segregated without complete resolution of inter-strand differences. Surprisingly, sectoring was also frequent in transformation with single-stranded DNAs. Oligonucleotides, for example, produced somewhat more sectored transformants when electroporated as single strands than as a duplex, although all forms (positive-strand, negative-strand, and duplex produced a diversity of genotypes from the limited number of markers. The marker patterns in the recombinants indicate that S. acidocaldarius resolves individual mismatches through un-coordinated short-patch excision followed by re-filling of the resulting gap. These gene-conversion events exhibit little strand bias, and can occur in pre-formed heteroduplex. These properties suggest that this process does not play a central role in the fidelity of genome replication, but may generate 3’ single-strand tails, and thereby initiate the incorporation of duplex DNA into the recipient chromosome. Regardless of the molecular details of its mechanism, HR between the S. acidocaldarius chromosome and a multiply-marked DNA produces a strikingly high level of genetic diversity in a very short chromosomal interval, and suggests that HR in Sulfolobus has significant mutagenic potential if not

  19. Enhancer of Rudimentary Homolog Affects the Replication Stress Response through Regulation of RNA Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanaugh, Gina; Zhao, Runxiang; Guo, Yan; Mohni, Kareem N.; Glick, Gloria; Lacy, Monica E.; Hutson, M. Shane; Ascano, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Accurate replication of DNA is imperative for the maintenance of genomic integrity. We identified Enhancer of Rudimentary Homolog (ERH) using a whole-genome RNA interference (RNAi) screen to discover novel proteins that function in the replication stress response. Here we report that ERH is important for DNA replication and recovery from replication stress. ATR pathway activity is diminished in ERH-deficient cells. The reduction in ATR signaling corresponds to a decrease in the expression of multiple ATR pathway genes, including ATR itself. ERH interacts with multiple RNA processing complexes, including splicing regulators. Furthermore, splicing of ATR transcripts is deficient in ERH-depleted cells. Transcriptome-wide analysis indicates that ERH depletion affects the levels of ∼1,500 transcripts, with DNA replication and repair genes being highly enriched among those with reduced expression. Splicing defects were evident in ∼750 protein-coding genes, which again were enriched for DNA metabolism genes. Thus, ERH regulation of RNA processing is needed to ensure faithful DNA replication and repair. PMID:26100022

  20. The ATPase activity of Fml1 is essential for its roles in homologous recombination and DNA repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Saikat; Whitby, Matthew C.

    2012-01-01

    In fission yeast, the DNA helicase Fml1, which is an orthologue of human FANCM, is a key component of the machinery that drives and governs homologous recombination (HR). During the repair of DNA double-strand breaks by HR, it limits the occurrence of potentially deleterious crossover recombinants, whereas at stalled replication forks, it promotes HR to aid their recovery. Here, we have mutated conserved residues in Fml1’s Walker A (K99R) and Walker B (D196N) motifs to determine whether its activities are dependent on its ability to hydrolyse ATP. Both Fml1K99R and Fml1D196N are proficient for DNA binding but totally deficient in DNA unwinding and ATP hydrolysis. In vivo both mutants exhibit a similar reduction in recombination at blocked replication forks as a fml1Δ mutant indicating that Fml1’s motor activity, fuelled by ATP hydrolysis, is essential for its pro-recombinogenic role. Intriguingly, both fml1K99R and fml1D196N mutants exhibit greater sensitivity to genotoxins and higher levels of crossing over during DSB repair than a fml1Δ strain. These data suggest that without its motor activity, the binding of Fml1 to its DNA substrate can impede alternative mechanisms of repair and crossover avoidance. PMID:22844101

  1. rec genes and homologous recombination proteins in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, A J

    1991-04-01

    The twenty-five years since the first published report of recA mutants in Escherichia coli has seen the identification of more than 12 other recombination genes. The genes are usually grouped into three pathways named RecBCD, RecE and RecF for prominent genes which function in each. A proposal is made here that there are two RecF pathways, one sensitive and one resistant to exonuclease I, the SbcB enzyme. Five methods of grouping the genes functionally are discussed: 1) by enzyme activity, 2) by common indirect suppressor, 3) by common phenotype, 4) by common regulation and 5) by epistasis. Five classes of enzyme activities implicated in recombination are discussed according to their involvement in presynapsis, synapsis or postsynapsis: 1) nucleases 2) helicases 3) DNA-binding proteins 4) topoisomerases and 5) ligases. Plausible presynaptic steps for the RecBCD, RecF (SbcBS) and RecE pathways show the common feature of generating 3'-terminated single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). On this ssDNA it is proposed that a RecA protein filament is generated discontinuously. This implies the existence of nucleation and possibly measurement and 3' end protection proteins. Specific proposals are made for which recombination genes might encode such products. Finally the generality of the RecA-ssDNA-filament mechanism of synapsis in the cellular biological world is discussed.

  2. Homologous recombination and gene replacement at the dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase locus in Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald, R G; Roos, D S

    1994-02-01

    To investigate the feasibility of genomic transgene expression and gene targeting in Toxoplasma gondii, parasites have been transfected with constructs differing in the length of contiguous genomic sequence spanning the dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (DHFR-TS) gene. We have previously reported that vectors derived from a DHFR-TS cDNA 'minigene' containing mutations in the DHFR coding sequence confer pyrimethamine resistance to transfected parasites (Donald and Roos, 1993). Stably resistant parasite clones arise at high frequency, generally by virtue of transgene integration into parasite chromosomes at locations scattered throughout the genome. In contrast, using a vector which contains 8 kb of contiguous genomic sequence (vs. homologous recombination. Homologous recombination appears to occur at even higher frequency when a 16 kb genomic clone is used. Circular plasmids were more efficient than linearized molecules at producing homologous recombination in this system, integrating by reciprocal crossing-over to produce a duplication of the DHFR-TS locus. Double crossing-over (or gene conversion) was also observed at low frequency, resulting in complete allelic replacement in this haploid stage of the parasite. The ability to produce either homologous or non-homologous recombinants, by the selection of appropriate transformation constructs, has considerable genetic potential.

  3. DNA同源重组机制的确立%The establishment of homologous recombination mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    向义和

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of homologous recombination mechanisms is introduced. The key events include the discover of gene linkage and recombination phenomena, the proposition of chiasmatype hypothesis, the appear of breakage, reunion and copy choice hypothesis, the establishment of three models of homologous recombination: Holliday model, single-strand-break and double-strand-break repair model for recombination.%介绍了DNA同源重组机制确立的过程.其主要内容包括基因连锁和重组现象的发现,交叉假设的提出,断裂重接假设和复制选择假设的出现,同源重组的三个模型(Holliday模型、单链断裂模型和双链断裂模型)的确立.

  4. Increase of homologous recombination frequency in vascular tissue of Arabidopsis plants exposed to salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyko, Alex; Hudson, Darryl; Bhomkar, Prasanna; Kathiria, Palak; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2006-06-01

    Here we analyzed the influence of salt stress on plant genome stability. Homologous recombination events were detected in transgenic Arabidopsis plants that carried in their genome a beta-glucuronidase recombination marker. Recombination events were scored as blue sectors using a stereo microscope. Exposure to 50 mM salt resulted in a 3.0-fold increase in recombination frequency. To analyze the organ and tissue specificity of recombination events, we examined cross-sections of leaves, stems and roots. We found that nearly 30% of recombination events in plants grown under normal conditions and nearly 50% of events in plants grown on salt were undetected by the conventional method. Most of the recombination events represented a cluster/group of cells (12 on average), although events with single cells were also detected. Recombination events were very frequent in leaf mesophyll cells. On average, individual recombination events located on leaves contained more cells than events located on roots or stems. Analysis of recombination events in cross-sectioned tissue of salt-treated plants revealed a shift in the distribution of recombination events towards the vascular tissue. We discuss the significance of the finding for plant stress physiology.

  5. Change of gene structure and function by non-homologous end-joining, homologous recombination, and transposition of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goettel, Wolfgang; Messing, Joachim

    2009-06-01

    An important objective in genome research is to relate genome structure to gene function. Sequence comparisons among orthologous and paralogous genes and their allelic variants can reveal sequences of functional significance. Here, we describe a 379-kb region on chromosome 1 of maize that enables us to reconstruct chromosome breakage, transposition, non-homologous end-joining, and homologous recombination events. Such a high-density composition of various mechanisms in a small chromosomal interval exemplifies the evolution of gene regulation and allelic diversity in general. It also illustrates the evolutionary pace of changes in plants, where many of the above mechanisms are of somatic origin. In contrast to animals, somatic alterations can easily be transmitted through meiosis because the germline in plants is contiguous to somatic tissue, permitting the recovery of such chromosomal rearrangements. The analyzed region contains the P1-wr allele, a variant of the genetically well-defined p1 gene, which encodes a Myb-like transcriptional activator in maize. The P1-wr allele consists of eleven nearly perfect P1-wr 12-kb repeats that are arranged in a tandem head-to-tail array. Although a technical challenge to sequence such a structure by shotgun sequencing, we overcame this problem by subcloning each repeat and ordering them based on nucleotide variations. These polymorphisms were also critical for recombination and expression analysis in presence and absence of the trans-acting epigenetic factor Ufo1. Interestingly, chimeras of the p1 and p2 genes, p2/p1 and p1/p2, are framing the P1-wr cluster. Reconstruction of sequence amplification steps at the p locus showed the evolution from a single Myb-homolog to the multi-gene P1-wr cluster. It also demonstrates how non-homologous end-joining can create novel gene fusions. Comparisons to orthologous regions in sorghum and rice also indicate a greater instability of the maize genome, probably due to diploidization

  6. Germline and somatic mutations in homologous recombination genes predict platinum response and survival in ovarian, fallopian tube, and peritoneal carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Kathryn P; Walsh, Tom; Harrell, Maria I; Lee, Ming K; Pennil, Christopher C; Rendi, Mara H; Thornton, Anne; Norquist, Barbara M; Casadei, Silvia; Nord, Alexander S; Agnew, Kathy J; Pritchard, Colin C; Scroggins, Sheena; Garcia, Rochelle L; King, Mary-Claire; Swisher, Elizabeth M

    2014-02-01

    Hallmarks of germline BRCA1/2-associated ovarian carcinomas include chemosensitivity and improved survival. The therapeutic impact of somatic BRCA1/2 mutations and mutations in other homologous recombination DNA repair genes is uncertain. Using targeted capture and massively parallel genomic sequencing, we assessed 390 ovarian carcinomas for germline and somatic loss-of-function mutations in 30 genes, including BRCA1, BRCA2, and 11 other genes in the homologous recombination pathway. Thirty-one percent of ovarian carcinomas had a deleterious germline (24%) and/or somatic (9%) mutation in one or more of the 13 homologous recombination genes: BRCA1, BRCA2, ATM, BARD1, BRIP1, CHEK1, CHEK2, FAM175A, MRE11A, NBN, PALB2, RAD51C, and RAD51D. Nonserous ovarian carcinomas had similar rates of homologous recombination mutations to serous carcinomas (28% vs. 31%, P = 0.6), including clear cell, endometrioid, and carcinosarcoma. The presence of germline and somatic homologous recombination mutations was highly predictive of primary platinum sensitivity (P = 0.0002) and improved overall survival (P = 0.0006), with a median overall survival of 66 months in germline homologous recombination mutation carriers, 59 months in cases with a somatic homologous recombination mutation, and 41 months for cases without a homologous recombination mutation. Germline or somatic mutations in homologous recombination genes are present in almost one third of ovarian carcinomas, including both serous and nonserous histologies. Somatic BRCA1/2 mutations and mutations in other homologous recombination genes have a similar positive impact on overall survival and platinum responsiveness as germline BRCA1/2 mutations. The similar rate of homologous recombination mutations in nonserous carcinomas supports their inclusion in PARP inhibitor clinical trials. ©2013 AACR.

  7. Unequal sister chromatid and homolog recombination at a tandem duplication of the A1 locus in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yandeau-Nelson, Marna D; Xia, Yiji; Li, Jin; Neuffer, M Gerald; Schnable, Patrick S

    2006-08-01

    Tandemly arrayed duplicate genes are prevalent. The maize A1-b haplotype is a tandem duplication that consists of the components, alpha and beta. The rate of meiotic unequal recombination at A1-b is ninefold higher when a homolog is present than when it is absent (i.e., hemizygote). When a sequence heterologous homolog is available, 94% of recombinants (264/281) are generated via recombination with the homolog rather than with the sister chromatid. In addition, 83% (220/264) of homolog recombination events involved alpha rather than beta. These results indicate that: (1) the homolog is the preferred template for unequal recombination and (2) pairing of the duplicated segments with the homolog does not occur randomly but instead favors a particular configuration. The choice of recombination template (i.e., homolog vs. sister chromatid) affects the distribution of recombination breakpoints within a1. Rates of unequal recombination at A1-b are similar to the rate of recombination between nonduplicated a1 alleles. Unequal recombination is therefore common and is likely to be responsible for the generation of genetic variability, even within inbred lines.

  8. Arabidopsis RecQ14A suppresses homologous recombination and modulates DNA damage responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bagherieh-Najjar, M.B.; De Vries, O.H.M.; Hille, J.; Dijkwel, P.P.

    2005-01-01

    Arabidopsis RecQl4A suppresses homologous recombination and modulates DNA damage responses Authors: Bagherieh-Najjar, Mohammad B.; Vries, Onno M.H.; Hille, Jacques; Dijkwel, Paul P. Source: The Plant Journal, Volume 43, Number 6, September 2005 , pp. 789-798(10) Publisher: Blackwell Publishing Abstr

  9. Resistance of hypoxic cells to ionizing radiation is influenced by homologous recombination status.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprong, D.; Janssen, H.L.K.; Vens, C.; Begg, A.C.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the role of DNA repair in hypoxic radioresistance. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Chinese hamster cell lines with mutations in homologous recombination (XRCC2, XRCC3, BRAC2, RAD51C) or nonhomologous end-joining (DNA-PKcs) genes were irradiated under normoxic (20% oxygen) and hypoxic (&

  10. Fen-1 facilitates homologous recombination by removing divergent sequences at DNA break ends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Kikuchi (Koji); H. Koyama (Hideki); M. Jasin (Maria); D.C. van Gent (Dik); S. Takeda (Shiunichi); Y. Taniguchi (Yoshihito); A. Hatanaka (Atsushi); E. Sonoda (Eiichiro); H. Hochegger (Helfrid); N. Adachi (Noritaka)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractHomologous recombination (HR) requires nuclease activities at multiple steps, but the contribution of individual nucleases to the processing of double-strand DNA ends at different stages of HR has not been clearly defined. We used chicken DT40 cells to investigate the r

  11. Disruption of mouse RAD54 reduces ionizing radiation resistance and homologous recombination.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Essers (Jeroen); R.W. Hendriks (Rudi); S.M.A. Swagemakers (Sigrid); C. Troelstra (Christine); J. de Wit (Jan); D. Bootsma (Dirk); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); R. Kanaar (Roland)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractDouble-strand DNA break (DSB) repair by homologous recombination occurs through the RAD52 pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Its biological importance is underscored by the conservation of many RAD52 pathway genes, including RAD54, from fungi to humans. We have analyzed the phenotype o

  12. In vivo importance of homologous recombination DNA repair for mouse neural stem and progenitor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laure Rousseau

    Full Text Available We characterized the in vivo importance of the homologous recombination factor RAD54 for the developing mouse brain cortex in normal conditions or after ionizing radiation exposure. Contrary to numerous homologous recombination genes, Rad54 disruption did not impact the cortical development without exogenous stress, but it dramatically enhanced the radiation sensitivity of neural stem and progenitor cells. This resulted in the death of all cells irradiated during S or G2, whereas the viability of cells irradiated in G1 or G0 was not affected by Rad54 disruption. Apoptosis occurred after long arrests at intra-S and G2/M checkpoints. This concerned every type of neural stem and progenitor cells, showing that the importance of Rad54 for radiation response was linked to the cell cycle phase at the time of irradiation and not to the differentiation state. In the developing brain, RAD54-dependent homologous recombination appeared absolutely required for the repair of damages induced by ionizing radiation during S and G2 phases, but not for the repair of endogenous damages in normal conditions. Altogether our data support the existence of RAD54-dependent and -independent homologous recombination pathways.

  13. Evolution and homologous recombination of the hemagglutinin-esterase gene sequences from porcine torovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of the present study was to gain new insights into the evolution, homologous recombination and selection pressures imposed on the porcine torovirus (PToV), by examining changes in the hemagglutinin-esterase (HE) gene. The most recent common ancestor of PToV was estimated to have emerge...

  14. Induction of homologous recombination following in utero exposure to DNA-damaging agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karia, Bijal; Martinez, Jo Ann; Bishop, Alexander J R

    2013-11-01

    Much of our understanding of homologous recombination, as well as the development of the working models for these processes, has been derived from extensive work in model organisms, such as yeast and fruit flies, and mammalian systems by studying the repair of induced double strand breaks or repair following exposure to genotoxic agents in vitro. We therefore set out to expand this in vitro work to ask whether DNA-damaging agents with varying modes of action could induce somatic change in an in vivo mouse model of homologous recombination. We exposed pregnant dams to DNA-damaging agents, conferring a variety of lesions at a specific time in embryo development. To monitor homologous recombination frequency, we used the well-established retinal pigment epithelium pink-eyed unstable assay. Homologous recombination resulting in the deletion of a duplicated 70 kb fragment in the coding region of the Oca2 gene renders this gene functional and can be visualized as a pigmented eyespot in the retinal pigment epithelium. We observed an increased frequency of pigmented eyespots in resultant litters following exposure to cisplatin, methyl methanesulfonate, ethyl methanesulfonate, 3-aminobenzamide, bleomycin, and etoposide with a contrasting decrease in the frequency of detectable reversion events following camptothecin and hydroxyurea exposure. The somatic genomic rearrangements that result from such a wide variety of differently acting damaging agents implies long-term potential effects from even short-term in utero exposures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The effect of thermal dose on hyperthermia-mediated inhibition of DNA repair through homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Tempel, Nathalie; Laffeber, Charlie; Odijk, Hanny; van Cappellen, Wiggert A; van Rhoon, Gerard C; Franckena, Martine; Kanaar, Roland

    2017-07-04

    Hyperthermia has a number of biological effects that sensitize tumors to radiotherapy in the range between 40-44 °C. One of these effects is heat-induced degradation of BRCA2 that in turn causes reduced RAD51 focus formation, which results in an attenuation of DNA repair through homologous recombination. Prompted by this molecular insight into how hyperthermia attenuates homologous recombination, we now quantitatively explore time and temperature dynamics of hyperthermia on BRCA2 levels and RAD51 focus formation in cell culture models, and link this to their clonogenic survival capacity after irradiation (0-6 Gy). For treatment temperatures above 41 °C, we found a decrease in cell survival, an increase in sensitization towards irradiation, a decrease of BRCA2 protein levels, and altered RAD51 focus formation. When the temperatures exceeded 43 °C, we found that hyperthermia alone killed more cells directly, and that processes other than homologous recombination were affected by the heat. This study demonstrates that optimal inhibition of HR is achieved by subjecting cells to hyperthermia at 41-43 °C for 30 to 60 minutes. Our data provides a guideline for the clinical application of novel combination treatments that could exploit hyperthermia's attenuation of homologous recombination, such as the combination of hyperthermia with PARP-inhibitors for non-BRCA mutations carriers.

  16. Pathways for Holliday Junction Processing during Homologous Recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashton, Thomas M; Mankouri, Hocine W; Heidenblut, Anna

    2011-01-01

    exposure to methyl methanesulfonate, rmi1-1 mutants accumulate unprocessed homologous recombination repair (HRR) intermediates. These intermediates are slowly resolved at the restrictive temperature, revealing a redundant resolution activity when Rmi1 is impaired. This resolution depends on Mus81-Mms4...

  17. Homologous recombination promoted by reverse transcriptase during copying of two distinct RNA templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negroni, M; Ricchetti, M; Nouvel, P; Buc, H

    1995-01-01

    Retroviruses are known to mutate at high rates. An important source of genetic variability is recombination taking place during reverse transcription of internal regions of the two genomic RNAs. We have designed an in vitro model system, involving genetic markers carried on two RNA templates, to allow a search for individual recombination events and to score their frequency of occurrence. We show that Moloney murine leukemia virus reverse transcriptase alone promotes homologous recombination efficiently. While RNA concentration has little effect on recombination frequency, there is a clear correlation between the amount of reverse transcriptase used in the assay and the extent of recombination observed. Under conditions mimicking the in vivo situation, a rate compatible with ex vivo estimates has been obtained. PMID:7542781

  18. Ecological genomics in Xanthomonas: the nature of genetic adaptation with homologous recombination and host shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao-Li; Pu, Pei-Hua; Huang, Hao-Jen; Sung, Huang-Mo; Liaw, Hung-Jiun; Chen, Yi-Min; Chen, Chien-Ming; Huang, Ming-Ban; Osada, Naoki; Gojobori, Takashi; Pai, Tun-Wen; Chen, Yu-Tin; Hwang, Chi-Chuan; Chiang, Tzen-Yuh

    2015-03-15

    Comparative genomics provides insights into the diversification of bacterial species. Bacterial speciation usually takes place with lasting homologous recombination, which not only acts as a cohering force between diverging lineages but brings advantageous alleles favored by natural selection, and results in ecologically distinct species, e.g., frequent host shift in Xanthomonas pathogenic to various plants. Using whole-genome sequences, we examined the genetic divergence in Xanthomonas campestris that infected Brassicaceae, and X. citri, pathogenic to a wider host range. Genetic differentiation between two incipient races of X. citri pv. mangiferaeindicae was attributable to a DNA fragment introduced by phages. In contrast to most portions of the genome that had nearly equivalent levels of genetic divergence between subspecies as a result of the accumulation of point mutations, 10% of the core genome involving with homologous recombination contributed to the diversification in Xanthomonas, as revealed by the correlation between homologous recombination and genomic divergence. Interestingly, 179 genes were under positive selection; 98 (54.7%) of these genes were involved in homologous recombination, indicating that foreign genetic fragments may have caused the adaptive diversification, especially in lineages with nutritional transitions. Homologous recombination may have provided genetic materials for the natural selection, and host shifts likely triggered ecological adaptation in Xanthomonas. To a certain extent, we observed positive selection nevertheless contributed to ecological divergence beyond host shifting. Altogether, mediated with lasting gene flow, species formation in Xanthomonas was likely governed by natural selection that played a key role in helping the deviating populations to explore novel niches (hosts) or respond to environmental cues, subsequently triggering species diversification.

  19. Ecological genomics in Xanthomonas: the nature of genetic adaptation with homologous recombination and host shifts

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Chao-Li

    2015-03-15

    Background: Comparative genomics provides insights into the diversification of bacterial species. Bacterial speciation usually takes place with lasting homologous recombination, which not only acts as a cohering force between diverging lineages but brings advantageous alleles favored by natural selection, and results in ecologically distinct species, e.g., frequent host shift in Xanthomonas pathogenic to various plants. Results: Using whole-genome sequences, we examined the genetic divergence in Xanthomonas campestris that infected Brassicaceae, and X. citri, pathogenic to a wider host range. Genetic differentiation between two incipient races of X. citri pv. mangiferaeindicae was attributable to a DNA fragment introduced by phages. In contrast to most portions of the genome that had nearly equivalent levels of genetic divergence between subspecies as a result of the accumulation of point mutations, 10% of the core genome involving with homologous recombination contributed to the diversification in Xanthomonas, as revealed by the correlation between homologous recombination and genomic divergence. Interestingly, 179 genes were under positive selection; 98 (54.7%) of these genes were involved in homologous recombination, indicating that foreign genetic fragments may have caused the adaptive diversification, especially in lineages with nutritional transitions. Homologous recombination may have provided genetic materials for the natural selection, and host shifts likely triggered ecological adaptation in Xanthomonas. To a certain extent, we observed positive selection nevertheless contributed to ecological divergence beyond host shifting. Conclusion: Altogether, mediated with lasting gene flow, species formation in Xanthomonas was likely governed by natural selection that played a key role in helping the deviating populations to explore novel niches (hosts) or respond to environmental cues, subsequently triggering species diversification. © Huang et al.

  20. Nonhomologous end joining and homologous recombination DNA repair pathways in integration mutagenesis in the xylose-fermenting yeast Pichia stipitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maassen, Nicole; Freese, Stefan; Schruff, Barbara; Passoth, Volkmar; Klinner, Ulrich

    2008-08-01

    Pichia stipitis integrates linear homologous DNA fragments mainly ectopically. High rates of randomly occurring integration allow tagging mutagenesis with high efficiency using simply PCR amplificates of suitable selection markers from the P. stipitis genome. Linearization of an autonomously replicating vector caused a distinct increase of the transformation efficiency compared with the circular molecule. Cotransformation of a restriction endonuclease further enhanced the transformation efficiency. This effect was also observed with integrative vector DNA. In most cases vector integration in chromosomal targets did not depend on microhomologies, indicating that restriction-enzyme-mediated integration (REMI) does not play an essential role in P. stipitis. Small deletions were observed at the ends of the integrated vectors and in the target sites. Disruption of the PsKU80 gene increased the frequency of homologous integration considerably but resulted in a remarkable decrease of the transformation efficiency. These results suggest that in P. stipitis the nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway obviously predominates the homologous recombination pathway of double-strand break repair.

  1. Recombination-independent recognition of DNA homology for repeat-induced point mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladyshev, Eugene; Kleckner, Nancy

    2017-06-01

    Numerous cytogenetic observations have shown that homologous chromosomes (or individual chromosomal loci) can engage in specific pairing interactions in the apparent absence of DNA breakage and recombination, suggesting that canonical recombination-mediated mechanisms may not be the only option for sensing DNA/DNA homology. One proposed mechanism for such recombination-independent homology recognition involves direct contacts between intact double-stranded DNA molecules. The strongest in vivo evidence for the existence of such a mechanism is provided by the phenomena of homology-directed DNA modifications in fungi, known as repeat-induced point mutation (RIP, discovered in Neurospora crassa) and methylation-induced premeiotically (MIP, discovered in Ascobolus immersus). In principle, Neurospora RIP can detect the presence of gene-sized DNA duplications irrespectively of their origin, underlying nucleotide sequence, coding capacity or relative, as well as absolute positions in the genome. Once detected, both sequence copies are altered by numerous cytosine-to-thymine (C-to-T) mutations that extend specifically over the duplicated region. We have recently shown that Neurospora RIP does not require MEI-3, the only RecA/Rad51 protein in this organism, consistent with a recombination-independent mechanism. Using an ultra-sensitive assay for RIP mutation, we have defined additional features of this process. We have shown that RIP can detect short islands of homology of only three base-pairs as long as many such islands are arrayed with a periodicity of 11 or 12 base-pairs along a pair of DNA molecules. While the presence of perfect homology is advantageous, it is not required: chromosomal segments with overall sequence identity of only 35-36 % can still be recognized by RIP. Importantly, in order for this process to work efficiently, participating DNA molecules must be able to co-align along their lengths. Based on these findings, we have proposed a model, in which

  2. The population and evolutionary dynamics of homologous gene recombination in bacterial populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce R Levin

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In bacteria, recombination is a rare event, not a part of the reproductive process. Nevertheless, recombination -- broadly defined to include the acquisition of genes from external sources, i.e., horizontal gene transfer (HGT -- plays a central role as a source of variation for adaptive evolution in many species of bacteria. Much of niche expansion, resistance to antibiotics and other environmental stresses, virulence, and other characteristics that make bacteria interesting and problematic, is achieved through the expression of genes and genetic elements obtained from other populations of bacteria of the same and different species, as well as from eukaryotes and archaea. While recombination of homologous genes among members of the same species has played a central role in the development of the genetics and molecular biology of bacteria, the contribution of homologous gene recombination (HGR to bacterial evolution is not at all clear. Also, not so clear are the selective pressures responsible for the evolution and maintenance of transformation, the only bacteria-encoded form of HGR. Using a semi-stochastic simulation of mutation, recombination, and selection within bacterial populations and competition between populations, we explore (1 the contribution of HGR to the rate of adaptive evolution in these populations and (2 the conditions under which HGR will provide a bacterial population a selective advantage over non-recombining or more slowly recombining populations. The results of our simulation indicate that, under broad conditions: (1 HGR occurring at rates in the range anticipated for bacteria like Streptococcus pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Haemophilus influenzae, and Bacillus subtilis will accelerate the rate at which a population adapts to environmental conditions; (2 once established in a population, selection for this capacity to increase rates of adaptive evolution can maintain bacteria-encoded mechanisms of recombination and prevent

  3. Transformation-associated recombination between diverged and homologous DNA repeats is induced by strand breaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larionov, V.; Kouprina, N. [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIH), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)]|[Institute of Cytology, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Eldarov, M. [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIH), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)]|[Center for Bioengineering, Moscow (Russian Federation); Perkins, E.; Porter, G.; Resnick, M.A. [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIH), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1994-10-01

    Rearrangement and deletion within plasmid DNA is commonly observed during transformation. We have examined the mechanisms of transformation-associated recombination in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a plasmid system which allowed the effects of physical state and/or extent of homology on recombination to be studied. The plasmid contains homologous or diverged (19%) DNA repeats separated by a genetically detectable color marker. Recombination during transformation for covalently closed circular plasmids was over 100-fold more frequent than during mitotic-growth. The frequency of recombination is partly dependent on the method of transformation In that procedures involving lithium acetate or spheroplasting yield higher frequencies than electroporation. When present in the repeats, unique single-strand breaks that are ligatable, as well as double-strand breaks, lead to high levels of recombination between diverged and identical repeats. The transformation-associated recombination between repeat DNA`s is under the influence of the RAD52, RAD1 and the RNC1 genes.

  4. Cohesin Is limiting for the suppression of DNA damage-induced recombination between homologous chromosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shay Covo

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Double-strand break (DSB repair through homologous recombination (HR is an evolutionarily conserved process that is generally error-free. The risk to genome stability posed by nonallelic recombination or loss-of-heterozygosity could be reduced by confining HR to sister chromatids, thereby preventing recombination between homologous chromosomes. Here we show that the sister chromatid cohesion complex (cohesin is a limiting factor in the control of DSB repair and genome stability and that it suppresses DNA damage-induced interactions between homologues. We developed a gene dosage system in tetraploid yeast to address limitations on various essential components in DSB repair and HR. Unlike RAD50 and RAD51, which play a direct role in HR, a 4-fold reduction in the number of essential MCD1 sister chromatid cohesion subunit genes affected survival of gamma-irradiated G(2/M cells. The decreased survival reflected a reduction in DSB repair. Importantly, HR between homologous chromosomes was strongly increased by ionizing radiation in G(2/M cells with a single copy of MCD1 or SMC3 even at radiation doses where survival was high and DSB repair was efficient. The increased recombination also extended to nonlethal doses of UV, which did not induce DSBs. The DNA damage-induced recombinants in G(2/M cells included crossovers. Thus, the cohesin complex has a dual role in protecting chromosome integrity: it promotes DSB repair and recombination between sister chromatids, and it suppresses damage-induced recombination between homologues. The effects of limited amounts of Mcd1and Smc3 indicate that small changes in cohesin levels may increase the risk of genome instability, which may lead to genetic diseases and cancer.

  5. Somatic homologous recombination in planta: the recombination frequency is dependent on the allelic state of recombining sequences and may be influenced by genomic position effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swoboda, P; Hohn, B; Gal, S

    1993-02-01

    We have previously described a non-selective method for scoring somatic recombination in the genome of whole plants. The recombination substrate consists of a defective partial dimer of Cauliflower Mosaic Virus (CaMV) sequences, which can code for production of viable virus only upon homologous recombination; this leads to disease symptoms on leaves. Brassica napus plants (rapeseed) harbouring the recombination substrate as a transgene were used to examine the time in plant development at which recombination takes place. The analysis of three transgene loci revealed recombination frequencies specific for each locus. Recombination frequencies were increased if more than one transgene locus was present per genome, either in allelic (homozygosity of the transgene locus) or in non-allelic positions. In both cases, the overall recombination frequency was found to be elevated to approximately the sum of the frequencies for the individual transgene loci or slightly higher, suggesting that the respective transgene loci behave largely independently of each other. For all plants tested (single locus, two or multiple loci) maximal recombination frequencies were of the order of 10(-6) events per cell division.

  6. Human DNA Helicase B Functions in Cellular Homologous Recombination and Stimulates Rad51-Mediated 5′-3′ Heteroduplex Extension In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hanjian; Yan, Peijun; Fanning, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Homologous recombination is involved in the repair of DNA damage and collapsed replication fork, and is critical for the maintenance of genomic stability. Its process involves a network of proteins with different enzymatic activities. Human DNA helicase B (HDHB) is a robust 5′-3′ DNA helicase which accumulates on chromatin in cells exposed to DNA damage. HDHB facilitates cellular recovery from replication stress, but its role in DNA damage response remains unclear. Here we report that HDHB silencing results in reduced sister chromatid exchange, impaired homologous recombination repair, and delayed RPA late-stage foci formation induced by ionizing radiation. Ectopically expressed HDHB colocalizes with Rad51, Rad52, RPA, and ssDNA. In vitro, HDHB stimulates Rad51-mediated heteroduplex extension in 5′-3′ direction. A helicase-defective mutant HDHB failed to promote this reaction. Our studies implicate HDHB promotes homologous recombination in vivo and stimulates 5′-3′ heteroduplex extension during Rad51-mediated strand exchange in vitro. PMID:25617833

  7. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 complex promotes trinucleotide repeat expansions independently of homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yanfang; Kirkham-McCarthy, Lucy; Lahue, Robert S

    2016-07-01

    Trinucleotide repeats (TNRs) are tandem arrays of three nucleotides that can expand in length to cause at least 17 inherited human diseases. Somatic expansions in patients can occur in differentiated tissues where DNA replication is limited and cannot be a primary source of somatic mutation. Instead, mouse models of TNR diseases have shown that both inherited and somatic expansions can be suppressed by the loss of certain DNA repair factors. It is generally believed that these repair factors cause misprocessing of TNRs, leading to expansions. Here we extend this idea to show that the Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 (MRX) complex of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a causative factor in expansions of short TNRs. Mutations that eliminate MRX subunits led to significant suppression of expansions whereas mutations that inactivate Rad51 had only a minor effect. Coupled with previous evidence, this suggests that MRX drives expansions of short TNRs through a process distinct from homologous recombination. The nuclease function of Mre11 was dispensable for expansions, suggesting that expansions do not occur by Mre11-dependent nucleolytic processing of the TNR. Epistasis between MRX and post-replication repair (PRR) was tested. PRR protects against expansions, so a rad5 mutant gave a high expansion rate. In contrast, the mre11 rad5 double mutant gave a suppressed expansion rate, indistinguishable from the mre11 single mutant. This suggests that MRX creates a TNR substrate for PRR. Protein acetylation was also tested as a mechanism regulating MRX activity in expansions. Six acetylation sites were identified in Rad50. Mutation of all six lysine residues to arginine gave partial bypass of a sin3 HDAC mutant, suggesting that Rad50 acetylation is functionally important for Sin3-mediated expansions. Overall we conclude that yeast MRX helps drive expansions of short TNRs by a mechanism distinct from its role in homologous recombination and independent of the nuclease function of Mre11. Copyright

  8. A Replicating Adenovirus Capsid Display Recombinant Elicits Antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum Sporozoites in Aotus nancymaae Monkeys

    OpenAIRE

    Karen, Kasey A.; Deal, Cailin; Adams, Robert J; Nielsen, Carolyn; Ward, Cameron; Espinosa, Diego A.; Xie, Jane; Zavala,Fidel; Ketner, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Decades of success with live adenovirus vaccines suggest that replication-competent recombinant adenoviruses (rAds) could serve as effective vectors for immunization against other pathogens. To explore the potential of a live rAd vaccine against malaria, we prepared a viable adenovirus 5 (Ad5) recombinant that displays a B-cell epitope from the circumsporozoite protein (CSP) of Plasmodium falciparum on the virion surface. The recombinant induced P. falciparum sporozoite-neutralizing antibodie...

  9. Change of gene structure and function by non-homologous end-joining, homologous recombination, and transposition of DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Goettel

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available An important objective in genome research is to relate genome structure to gene function. Sequence comparisons among orthologous and paralogous genes and their allelic variants can reveal sequences of functional significance. Here, we describe a 379-kb region on chromosome 1 of maize that enables us to reconstruct chromosome breakage, transposition, non-homologous end-joining, and homologous recombination events. Such a high-density composition of various mechanisms in a small chromosomal interval exemplifies the evolution of gene regulation and allelic diversity in general. It also illustrates the evolutionary pace of changes in plants, where many of the above mechanisms are of somatic origin. In contrast to animals, somatic alterations can easily be transmitted through meiosis because the germline in plants is contiguous to somatic tissue, permitting the recovery of such chromosomal rearrangements. The analyzed region contains the P1-wr allele, a variant of the genetically well-defined p1 gene, which encodes a Myb-like transcriptional activator in maize. The P1-wr allele consists of eleven nearly perfect P1-wr 12-kb repeats that are arranged in a tandem head-to-tail array. Although a technical challenge to sequence such a structure by shotgun sequencing, we overcame this problem by subcloning each repeat and ordering them based on nucleotide variations. These polymorphisms were also critical for recombination and expression analysis in presence and absence of the trans-acting epigenetic factor Ufo1. Interestingly, chimeras of the p1 and p2 genes, p2/p1 and p1/p2, are framing the P1-wr cluster. Reconstruction of sequence amplification steps at the p locus showed the evolution from a single Myb-homolog to the multi-gene P1-wr cluster. It also demonstrates how non-homologous end-joining can create novel gene fusions. Comparisons to orthologous regions in sorghum and rice also indicate a greater instability of the maize genome, probably due to

  10. Rad51 Paralogs Remodel Pre-synaptic Rad51 Filaments to Stimulate Homologous Recombination

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, MRG; Špírek, M; Chaurasiya, KR; Ward, JD; Carzaniga, R.; Yu, X; Egelman, EH; Collinson, LM; Rueda, D.; Krejci, L; Boulton, SJ

    2015-01-01

    Summary Repair of DNA double strand breaks by homologous recombination (HR) is initiated by Rad51 filament nucleation on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), which catalyzes strand exchange with homologous duplex DNA. BRCA2 and the Rad51 paralogs are tumor suppressors and critical mediators of Rad51. To gain insight into Rad51 paralog function, we investigated a heterodimeric Rad51 paralog complex, RFS-1/RIP-1, and uncovered the molecular basis by which Rad51 paralogs promote HR. Unlike BRCA2, which ...

  11. Homologous recombination in Agrobacterium: potential implications for the genomic species concept in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costechareyre, Denis; Bertolla, Franck; Nesme, Xavier

    2009-01-01

    According to current taxonomical rules, a bona fide bacterial species is a genomic species characterized by the genomic similarity of its members. It has been proposed that the genomic cohesion of such clusters may be related to sexual isolation, which limits gene flow between too divergent bacteria. Homologous recombination is one of the most studied mechanisms responsible for this genetic isolation. Previous studies on several bacterial models showed that recombination frequencies decreased exponentially with increasing DNA sequence divergence. In the present study, we investigated this relationship in the Agrobacterium tumefaciens species complex, which allowed us to focus on sequence divergence in the vicinity of the genetic boundaries of genomic species. We observed that the sensitivity of the recombination frequency to DNA divergence fitted a log-linear function until approximately 10% sequence divergence. The results clearly revealed that there was no sharp drop in recombination frequencies at the point where the sequence divergence distribution showed a "gap" delineating genomic species. The ratio of the recombination frequency in homogamic conditions relative to this frequency in heterogamic conditions, that is, sexual isolation, was found to decrease from 8 between the most distant strains within a species to 9 between the most closely related species, for respective increases from 4.3% to 6.4% mismatches in the marker gene chvA. This means that there was only a 1.13-fold decrease in recombination frequencies for recombination events at both edges of the species border. Hence, from the findings of this investigation, we conclude that--at least in this taxon--sexual isolation based on homologous recombination is likely not high enough to strongly hamper gene flow between species as compared with gene flow between distantly related members of the same species. The 70% relative binding ratio cutoff used to define bacterial species is likely correlated to

  12. Isolation of Specific Clones from Nonarrayed BAC Libraries through Homologous Recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Nefedov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a new approach to screen bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC libraries by recombination selection. To test this method, we constructed an orangutan BAC library using an E. coli strain (DY380 with temperature inducible homologous recombination (HR capability. We amplified one library segment, induced HR at 42∘C to make it recombination proficient, and prepared electrocompetent cells for transformation with a kanamycin cassette to target sequences in the orangutan genome through terminal recombineering homologies. Kanamycin-resistant colonies were tested for the presence of BACs containing the targeted genes by the use of a PCR-assay to confirm the presence of the kanamycin insertion. The results indicate that this is an effective approach for screening clones. The advantage of recombination screening is that it avoids the high costs associated with the preparation, screening, and archival storage of arrayed BAC libraries. In addition, the screening can be conceivably combined with genetic engineering to create knockout and reporter constructs for functional studies.

  13. Genetic probing of homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining during meiotic prophase in irradiated mouse spermatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Emad A. [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Faculty of Science, Utrecht University, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands); Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, Assiut University, 71516 Assiut (Egypt); Philippens, Marielle E.P.; Kal, Henk B. [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands); Rooij, Dirk G. de, E-mail: d.g.derooij@uu.nl [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Faculty of Science, Utrecht University, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands); Center for Reproductive Medicine, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, 1105 AZ Amsterdam (Netherlands); Boer, Peter de [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2010-06-01

    This study was designed to obtain a better insight into the relative contribution of homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) to the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at first meiotic prophase. Early and late pachytene and early diplotene spermatocytes that had completed crossing over were sampled. We studied the kinetics of {gamma}-H2AX chromatin foci removal after irradiation of mice deficient for HR and mice deficient for NHEJ. Analyzing {gamma}-H2AX signals in unirradiated RAD54/RAD54B deficient spermatocytes indicated incomplete meiotic recombination repair due to the pronounced increase of {gamma}-H2AX foci in late prophase primary spermatocytes. In these mice, 8 h after irradiation, early pachytene spermatocytes showed a reduction of the numbers of {gamma}-H2AX foci by 52% compared to 82% in the wild type, the difference being significant. However, after crossing over (in late pachytene and early diplotene), no effect of RAD54/RAD54B deficiency on the reduction of irradiation-induced foci was observed. In NHEJ deficient SCID mice, repair kinetics in early spermatocytes were similar to those in wild type mice. However, 1 h after irradiation in late pachytene and early diplotene spermatocytes 1.7 times more foci were found than in wild type mice. This difference might be related to the absence of a DNA-PKcs dependent fast repair component in SCID mice. As subsequent repair is normal, HR likely is taking over. Taken together, the results obtained in RAD54/RAD54B deficient mice and in SCID mice indicate that DSB repair in early pachytene spermatocytes is mainly carried out through HR. In late spermatocytes (late pachytenes and early diplotenes) NHEJ is active. However, probably there is an interplay between these repair pathways and when in late spermatocytes the NHEJ pathway is compromised HR may take over.

  14. Homologous recombination and non-homologous end-joining repair pathways in bovine embryos with different developmental competence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henrique Barreta, Marcos [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Universitario de Curitibanos, Curitibanos, SC (Brazil); Laboratorio de Biotecnologia e Reproducao Animal-BioRep, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Garziera Gasperin, Bernardo; Braga Rissi, Vitor; Cesaro, Matheus Pedrotti de [Laboratorio de Biotecnologia e Reproducao Animal-BioRep, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Ferreira, Rogerio [Centro de Educacao Superior do Oeste-Universidade do Estado de Santa Catarina, Chapeco, SC (Brazil); Oliveira, Joao Francisco de; Goncalves, Paulo Bayard Dias [Laboratorio de Biotecnologia e Reproducao Animal-BioRep, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Bordignon, Vilceu, E-mail: vilceu.bordignon@mcgill.ca [Department of Animal Science, McGill University, Ste-Anne-De-Bellevue, QC (Canada)

    2012-10-01

    This study investigated the expression of genes controlling homologous recombination (HR), and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) DNA-repair pathways in bovine embryos of different developmental potential. It also evaluated whether bovine embryos can respond to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced with ultraviolet irradiation by regulating expression of genes involved in HR and NHEJ repair pathways. Embryos with high, intermediate or low developmental competence were selected based on the cleavage time after in vitro insemination and were removed from in vitro culture before (36 h), during (72 h) and after (96 h) the expected period of embryonic genome activation. All studied genes were expressed before, during and after the genome activation period regardless the developmental competence of the embryos. Higher mRNA expression of 53BP1 and RAD52 was found before genome activation in embryos with low developmental competence. Expression of 53BP1, RAD51 and KU70 was downregulated at 72 h and upregulated at 168 h post-insemination in response to DSBs induced by ultraviolet irradiation. In conclusion, important genes controlling HR and NHEJ DNA-repair pathways are expressed in bovine embryos, however genes participating in these pathways are only regulated after the period of embryo genome activation in response to ultraviolet-induced DSBs.

  15. The unconventional xer recombination machinery of Streptococci/Lactococci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Bourgeois, Pascal; Bugarel, Marie; Campo, Nathalie; Daveran-Mingot, Marie-Line; Labonte, Jessica; Lanfranchi, Daniel; Lautier, Thomas; Pages, Carine; Ritzenthaler, Paul

    Homologous recombination between circular sister chromosomes during DNA replication in bacteria can generate chromosome dimers that must be resolved into monomers prior to cell division. In Escherichia coli, dimer resolution is achieved by site-specific recombination, Xer recombination, involving

  16. Generation of TALEN-Mediated GRdim Knock-In Rats by Homologous Recombination

    OpenAIRE

    Verónica Ponce de León; Anne-Marie Mérillat; Laurent Tesson; Ignacio Anegón; Edith Hummler

    2014-01-01

    Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALEN) are potential tools for precise genome engineering of laboratory animals. We report the first targeted genomic integration in the rat using TALENs (Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases) by homology-derived recombination (HDR). We assembled TALENs and designed a linear donor insert targeting a pA476T mutation in the rat Glucocorticoid Receptor (Nr3c1) namely GR(dim), that prevents receptor homodimerization in the mouse. TALEN m...

  17. (A new method employing homologous recombination and YAC rescue to expedite gap filling long range mapping)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    We have embarked on three areas of research relevant to the telomere rescue strategy mediated by homologous recombination described in this proposal. First, we have constructed the telomere rescue vector. Second, we have carried out tests in yeast and mammalian cells to ascertain whether the various crucial components function. Finally, we have begun to develop the molecular reagents required to target the telomeric regions of chromosome 16. The specific progress in each area is described briefly below.

  18. A chemical compound that stimulates the human homologous recombination protein RAD51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayathilaka, Krishanthi; Sheridan, Sean D; Bold, Tyler D; Bochenska, Katarzyna; Logan, Hillary L; Weichselbaum, Ralph R; Bishop, Douglas K; Connell, Philip P

    2008-10-14

    RAD51 and other members of the RecA family of strand exchange proteins assemble on ssDNA to form presynaptic filaments, which carry out the central steps of homologous recombination. A microplate-based assay was developed for high-throughput measurement of hRAD51 filament formation on ssDNA. With this method, a 10,000 compound library was screened, leading to the identification of a small molecule (RS-1) that enhances hRAD51 binding in a wide range of biochemical conditions. Salt titration experiments showed that RS-1 can enhance filament stability. Ultrastructural analysis of filaments formed on ssDNA showed that RS-1 can increase both protein-DNA complex lengths and the pitch of helical filament turns. RS-1 stimulated hRAD51-mediated homologous strand assimilation (D-loop) activity by at least 5- to 11-fold, depending on the condition. This D-loop stimulation occurred even in the presence of Ca(2+) or adenylyl-imidodiphosphate, indicating that the mechanism of stimulation was distinct from that conferred by Ca(2+) and/or inhibition of ATPase. No D-loop activity was observed in the absence of a nucleotide triphosphate cofactor, indicating that the compound does not substitute for this requirement. These results indicate that RS-1 enhances the homologous recombination activity of hRAD51 by promoting the formation of active presynaptic filaments. Cell survival assays in normal neonatal human dermal fibroblasts demonstrated that RS-1 promotes a dose-dependent resistance to the cross-linking chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin. Given that RAD51-dependent recombination is a major determinant of cisplatin resistance, RS-1 seems to function in vivo to stimulate homologous recombination repair proficiency. RS-1 has many potential applications in both research and medical settings.

  19. Arabidopsis RAD51C gene is important for homologous recombination in meiosis and mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Kiyomi; Osakabe, Keishi; Nakayama, Shigeki; Endo, Masaki; Tagiri, Akemi; Todoriki, Setsuko; Ichikawa, Hiroaki; Toki, Seiichi

    2005-10-01

    Rad51 is a homolog of the bacterial RecA recombinase, and a key factor in homologous recombination in eukaryotes. Rad51 paralogs have been identified from yeast to vertebrates. Rad51 paralogs are thought to play an important role in the assembly or stabilization of Rad51 that promotes homologous pairing and strand exchange reactions. We previously characterized two RAD51 paralogous genes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) named AtRAD51C and AtXRCC3, which are homologs of human RAD51C and XRCC3, respectively, and described the interaction of their products in a yeast two-hybrid system. Recent studies showed the involvement of AtXrcc3 in DNA repair and functional role in meiosis. To determine the role of RAD51C in meiotic and mitotic recombination in higher plants, we characterized a T-DNA insertion mutant of AtRAD51C. Although the atrad51C mutant grew normally during vegetative developmental stage, the mutant produced aborted siliques, and their anthers did not contain mature pollen grains. Crossing of the mutant with wild-type plants showed defective male and female gametogeneses as evidenced by lack of seed production. Furthermore, meiosis was severely disturbed in the mutant. The atrad51C mutant also showed increased sensitivity to gamma-irradiation and cisplatin, which are known to induce double-strand DNA breaks. The efficiency of homologous recombination in somatic cells in the mutant was markedly reduced relative to that in wild-type plants.

  20. Activities of wildtype and mutant p53 in suppression of homologous recombination as measured by a retroviral vector system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Xiongbin; Lozano, Guillermina; Donehower, Lawrence A

    2003-01-28

    DNA repair of double strand breaks, interstrand DNA cross-links, and other types of DNA damage utilizes the processes of homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining to repair the damage. Aberrant homologous recombination is likely to be responsible for a significant fraction of chromosomal deletions, duplications, and translocations that are observed in cancer cells. To facilitate measurement of homologous recombination frequencies in normal cells, mutant cells, and cancer cells, we have developed a high titer retroviral vector containing tandem repeats of mutant versions of a GFP-Zeocin resistance fusion gene and an intact neomycin resistance marker. Recombination between the tandem repeats regenerates a functional GFP-Zeo{sup R} marker that can be easily scored. This retroviral vector was used to assess homologous recombination frequencies in human cancer cells and rodent fibroblasts with differing dosages of wild type or mutant p53. Absence of wild type p53 stimulated spontaneous and ionizing radiation-induced homologous recombination, confirming previous studies. Moreover, p53{sup +/-} mouse fibroblasts show elevated levels of homologous recombination compared to their p53{sup +/+} counterparts following retroviral vector infection, indicating that p53 is haploinsufficient for suppression of homologous recombination. Transfection of vector-containing p53 null Saos-2 cells with various human cancer-associated p53 mutants revealed that these altered p53 proteins retain some recombination suppression function despite being totally inactive for transcriptional transactivation. The retroviral vector utilized in these studies may be useful in performing recombination assays on a wide array of cell types, including those not readily transfected by normal vectors.

  1. Activities of wildtype and mutant p53 in suppression of homologous recombination as measured by a retroviral vector system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiongbin; Lozano, Guillermina; Donehower, Lawrence A

    2003-01-28

    DNA repair of double strand breaks, interstrand DNA cross-links, and other types of DNA damage utilizes the processes of homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining to repair the damage. Aberrant homologous recombination is likely to be responsible for a significant fraction of chromosomal deletions, duplications, and translocations that are observed in cancer cells. To facilitate measurement of homologous recombination frequencies in normal cells, mutant cells, and cancer cells, we have developed a high titer retroviral vector containing tandem repeats of mutant versions of a GFP-Zeocin resistance fusion gene and an intact neomycin resistance marker. Recombination between the tandem repeats regenerates a functional GFP-Zeo(R) marker that can be easily scored. This retroviral vector was used to assess homologous recombination frequencies in human cancer cells and rodent fibroblasts with differing dosages of wild type or mutant p53. Absence of wild type p53 stimulated spontaneous and ionizing radiation-induced homologous recombination, confirming previous studies. Moreover, p53(+/-) mouse fibroblasts show elevated levels of homologous recombination compared to their p53(+/+) counterparts following retroviral vector infection, indicating that p53 is haploinsufficient for suppression of homologous recombination. Transfection of vector-containing p53 null Saos-2 cells with various human cancer-associated p53 mutants revealed that these altered p53 proteins retain some recombination suppression function despite being totally inactive for transcriptional transactivation. The retroviral vector utilized in these studies may be useful in performing recombination assays on a wide array of cell types, including those not readily transfected by normal vectors.

  2. Resolving RAD51C function in late stages of homologous recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznetsov Sergey G

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract DNA double strand breaks are efficiently repaired by homologous recombination. One of the last steps of this process is resolution of Holliday junctions that are formed at the sites of genetic exchange between homologous DNA. Although various resolvases with Holliday junctions processing activity have been identified in bacteriophages, bacteria and archaebacteria, eukaryotic resolvases have been elusive. Recent biochemical evidence has revealed that RAD51C and XRCC3, members of the RAD51-like protein family, are involved in Holliday junction resolution in mammalian cells. However, purified recombinant RAD51C and XRCC3 proteins have not shown any Holliday junction resolution activity. In addition, these proteins did not reveal the presence of a nuclease domain, which raises doubts about their ability to function as a resolvase. Furthermore, oocytes from infertile Rad51C mutant mice exhibit precocious separation of sister chromatids at metaphase II, a phenotype that reflects a defect in sister chromatid cohesion, not a lack of Holliday junction resolution. Here we discuss a model to explain how a Holliday junction resolution defect can lead to sister chromatid separation in mouse oocytes. We also describe other recent in vitro and in vivo evidence supporting a late role for RAD51C in homologous recombination in mammalian cells, which is likely to be resolution of the Holliday junction.

  3. Mismatch repair regulates homologous recombination, but has little influence on antigenic variation, in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Joanna S; McCulloch, Richard

    2003-11-14

    Antigenic variation is critical in the life of the African trypanosome, as it allows the parasite to survive in the face of host immunity and enhance its transmission to other hosts. Much of trypanosome antigenic variation uses homologous recombination of variant surface glycoprotein (VSG)-encoding genes into specialized transcription sites, but little is known about the processes that regulate it. Here we describe the effects on VSG switching when two central mismatch repair genes, MSH2 and MLH1, are mutated. We show that disruption of the parasite mismatch repair system causes an increased frequency of homologous recombination, both between perfectly matched DNA molecules and between DNA molecules with divergent sequences. Mismatch repair therefore provides an important regulatory role in homologous recombination in this ancient eukaryote. Despite this, the mismatch repair system has no detectable role in regulating antigenic variation, meaning that VSG switching is either immune to mismatch selection or that mismatch repair acts in a subtle manner, undetectable by current assays.

  4. Replication Restart in Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Bénédicte; Sandler, Steven J

    2017-07-01

    In bacteria, replication forks assembled at a replication origin travel to the terminus, often a few megabases away. They may encounter obstacles that trigger replisome disassembly, rendering replication restart from abandoned forks crucial for cell viability. During the past 25 years, the genes that encode replication restart proteins have been identified and genetically characterized. In parallel, the enzymes were purified and analyzed in vitro, where they can catalyze replication initiation in a sequence-independent manner from fork-like DNA structures. This work also revealed a close link between replication and homologous recombination, as replication restart from recombination intermediates is an essential step of DNA double-strand break repair in bacteria and, conversely, arrested replication forks can be acted upon by recombination proteins and converted into various recombination substrates. In this review, we summarize this intense period of research that led to the characterization of the ubiquitous replication restart protein PriA and its partners, to the definition of several replication restart pathways in vivo, and to the description of tight links between replication and homologous recombination, responsible for the importance of replication restart in the maintenance of genome stability. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  5. A replicating adenovirus capsid display recombinant elicits antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites in Aotus nancymaae monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karen, Kasey A; Deal, Cailin; Adams, Robert J; Nielsen, Carolyn; Ward, Cameron; Espinosa, Diego A; Xie, Jane; Zavala, Fidel; Ketner, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Decades of success with live adenovirus vaccines suggest that replication-competent recombinant adenoviruses (rAds) could serve as effective vectors for immunization against other pathogens. To explore the potential of a live rAd vaccine against malaria, we prepared a viable adenovirus 5 (Ad5) recombinant that displays a B-cell epitope from the circumsporozoite protein (CSP) of Plasmodium falciparum on the virion surface. The recombinant induced P. falciparum sporozoite-neutralizing antibodies in mice. Human adenoviruses do not replicate in mice. Therefore, to examine immunogenicity in a system in which, as in humans, the recombinant replicates, we constructed a similar recombinant in an adenovirus mutant that replicates in monkey cells and immunized four Aotus nancymaae monkeys. The recombinant replicated in the monkeys after intratracheal instillation, the first demonstration of replication of human adenoviruses in New World monkeys. Immunization elicited antibodies both to the Plasmodium epitope and the Ad5 vector. Antibodies from all four monkeys recognized CSP on intact parasites, and plasma from one monkey neutralized sporozoites in vitro and conferred partial protection against P. falciparum sporozoite infection after passive transfer to mice. Prior enteric inoculation of two animals with antigenically wild-type adenovirus primed a response to the subsequent intratracheal inoculation, suggesting a route to optimizing performance. A vaccine is not yet available against P. falciparum, which induces the deadliest form of malaria and kills approximately one million children each year. The live capsid display recombinant described here may constitute an early step in a critically needed novel approach to malaria immunization. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. A new thermosensitive smc-3 allele reveals involvement of cohesin in homologous recombination in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Baudrimont

    Full Text Available The cohesin complex is required for the cohesion of sister chromatids and for correct segregation during mitosis and meiosis. Crossover recombination, together with cohesion, is essential for the disjunction of homologous chromosomes during the first meiotic division. Cohesin has been implicated in facilitating recombinational repair of DNA lesions via the sister chromatid. Here, we made use of a new temperature-sensitive mutation in the Caenorhabditis elegans SMC-3 protein to study the role of cohesin in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs and hence in meiotic crossing over. We report that attenuation of cohesin was associated with extensive SPO-11-dependent chromosome fragmentation, which is representative of unrepaired DSBs. We also found that attenuated cohesin likely increased the number of DSBs and eliminated the need of MRE-11 and RAD-50 for DSB formation in C. elegans, which suggests a role for the MRN complex in making cohesin-loaded chromatin susceptible to meiotic DSBs. Notably, in spite of largely intact sister chromatid cohesion, backup DSB repair via the sister chromatid was mostly impaired. We also found that weakened cohesins affected mitotic repair of DSBs by homologous recombination, whereas NHEJ repair was not affected. Our data suggest that recombinational DNA repair makes higher demands on cohesins than does chromosome segregation.

  7. Homologous recombination occurs in Entamoeba and is enhanced during growth stress and stage conversion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishant Singh

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination (HR has not been demonstrated in the parasitic protists Entamoeba histolytica or Entamoeba invadens, as no convenient method is available to measure it. However, HR must exist to ensure genome integrity, and possible genetic exchange, especially during stage conversion from trophozoite to cyst. Here we show the up regulation of mitotic and meiotic HR genes in Entamoeba during serum starvation, and encystation. To directly demonstrate HR we use a simple PCR-based method involving inverted repeats, which gives a reliable read out, as the recombination junctions can be determined by sequencing the amplicons. Using this read out, we demonstrate enhanced HR under growth stress in E. histolytica, and during encystation in E. invadens. We also demonstrate recombination between chromosomal inverted repeats. This is the first experimental demonstration of HR in Entamoeba and will help future investigations into this process, and to explore the possibility of meiosis in Entamoeba.

  8. Homologous recombination occurs in Entamoeba and is enhanced during growth stress and stage conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nishant; Bhattacharya, Alok; Bhattacharya, Sudha

    2013-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) has not been demonstrated in the parasitic protists Entamoeba histolytica or Entamoeba invadens, as no convenient method is available to measure it. However, HR must exist to ensure genome integrity, and possible genetic exchange, especially during stage conversion from trophozoite to cyst. Here we show the up regulation of mitotic and meiotic HR genes in Entamoeba during serum starvation, and encystation. To directly demonstrate HR we use a simple PCR-based method involving inverted repeats, which gives a reliable read out, as the recombination junctions can be determined by sequencing the amplicons. Using this read out, we demonstrate enhanced HR under growth stress in E. histolytica, and during encystation in E. invadens. We also demonstrate recombination between chromosomal inverted repeats. This is the first experimental demonstration of HR in Entamoeba and will help future investigations into this process, and to explore the possibility of meiosis in Entamoeba.

  9. The role of Deinococcus radiodurans RecFOR proteins in homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Katsuya; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Ishaque, Abu M; Ohba, Hirofumi; Yamada, Mitsugu; Tejima, Kouhei; Onodera, Takefumi; Narumi, Issay

    2012-04-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans exhibits extraordinary resistance to the lethal effect of DNA-damaging agents, a characteristic attributed to its highly proficient DNA repair capacity. Although the D. radiodurans genome is clearly devoid of recBC and addAB counterparts as RecA mediators, the genome possesses all genes associated with the RecFOR pathway. In an effort to gain insights into the role of D. radiodurans RecFOR proteins in homologous recombination, we generated recF, recO and recR disruptant strains and characterized the disruption effects. All the disruptant strains exhibited delayed growth relative to the wild-type, indicating that the RecF, RecO and RecR proteins play an important role in cell growth under normal growth conditions. A slight reduction in transformation efficiency was observed in the recF and recO disruptant strains compared to the wild-type strain. Interestingly, disruption of recR resulted in severe reduction of the transformation efficiency. On the other hand, the recF disruptant strain was the most sensitive phenotype to γ rays, UV irradiation and mitomycin C among the three disruptants. In the recF disruptant strain, the intracellular level of the LexA1 protein did not decrease following γ irradiation, suggesting that a large amount of the RecA protein remains inactive despite being induced. These results demonstrate that the RecF protein plays a crucial role in the homologous recombination repair process by facilitating RecA activation in D. radiodurans. Thus, the RecF and RecR proteins are involved in the RecA activation and the stability of incoming DNA, respectively, during RecA-mediated homologous recombination processes that initiated the ESDSA pathway in D. radiodurans. Possible mechanisms that involve the RecFOR complex in homologous intermolecular recombination and homologous recombination repair processes are also discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Distribution of the phenotypic effects of random homologous recombination between two virus species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Vuillaume

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Recombination has an evident impact on virus evolution and emergence of new pathotypes, and has generated an immense literature. However, the distribution of phenotypic effects caused by genome-wide random homologous recombination has never been formally investigated. Previous data on the subject have promoted the implicit view that most viral recombinant genomes are likely to be deleterious or lethal if the nucleotide identity of parental sequences is below 90%. We decided to challenge this view by creating a bank of near-random recombinants between two viral species of the genus Begomovirus (Family Geminiviridae exhibiting 82% nucleotide identity, and by testing infectivity and in planta accumulation of recombinant clones randomly extracted from this bank. The bank was created by DNA-shuffling-a technology initially applied to the random shuffling of individual genes, and here implemented for the first time to shuffle full-length viral genomes. Together with our previously described system allowing the direct cloning of full-length infectious geminivirus genomes, it provided a unique opportunity to generate hundreds of "mosaic" virus genomes, directly testable for infectivity. A subset of 47 randomly chosen recombinants was sequenced, individually inoculated into tomato plants, and compared with the parental viruses. Surprisingly, our results showed that all recombinants were infectious and accumulated at levels comparable or intermediate to that of the parental clones. This indicates that, in our experimental system, despite the fact that the parental genomes differ by nearly 20%, lethal and/or large deleterious effects of recombination are very rare, in striking contrast to the common view that has emerged from previous studies published on other viruses.

  11. Involvement of Caveolin-1 in repair of DNA damage through both homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Zhu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Caveolin-1 (Cav-1, the major component of caveolae, is a 21-24 kDa integral membrane protein that interacts with a number of signaling molecules. By acting as a scaffolding protein, Cav-1 plays crucial roles in the regulation of various physiologic and patho-physiologic processes including oncogenic transformation and tumorigenesis, and tumor invasion and metastasis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study we sought to explore the role of Cav-1 in response to DNA damage and the mechanism involved. We found that the level of Cav-1 was up-regulated rapidly in cells treated with ionizing radiation. The up-regulation of Cav-1 following DNA damage occurred only in cells expressing endogenous Cav-1, and was associated with the activation of DNA damage response pathways. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the expression of Cav-1 protected cells against DNA damage through modulating the activities of both the homologous recombination (HR and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ repair systems, as evidenced by the inhibitory effects of the Cav-1-targeted siRNA on cell survival, HR frequency, phosphorylation of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK, and nuclear translocation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR following DNA damage, and by the stimulatory effect of the forced expression of Cav-1 on NHEJ frequency. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that Cav-1 may play a critical role in sensing genotoxic stress and in orchestrating the response of cells to DNA damage through regulating the important molecules involved in maintaining genomic integrity.

  12. Is it time to split strategies to treat homologous recombinant deficiency in pancreas cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Min Yuen; O'Reilly, Eileen M

    2016-10-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal malignancy which tends to present with late stage disease. To date, identification of oncogenic drivers and aberrations has not led to effective targeted therapy. Approximately 5-15% of pancreatic cancer has an inheritable component. In fact, pancreatic adenocarcinoma is now recognized as a BRCA1/2-related cancer. Germline BRCA1/2 mutations can be found in up to 3.6-7% of unselected pancreatic cancer patients although the rates are significantly higher amongst patients with Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry. Germline mutations of other components of DNA repair and homologous recombination have also been identified although at much lower frequency. Large sequencing efforts have further identified somatic mutations in these genes in a small subset of pancreatic cancers. Small series and case reports have suggested that pancreatic cancers harboring BRCA1/2 or other homologous repair gene mutations demonstrate enhanced response to platinum-based chemotherapy although this has not been prospectively validated. Clinical trials with poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors as monotherapy or in combination with chemotherapy in different clinical settings are currently on-going. A subtype of pancreatic adenocarcinoma as characterized by deficiency in homologous recombination exists although the optimal management strategy remains to be fully elucidated.

  13. Efficient homologous recombination-mediated genome engineering in zebrafish using TALE nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jimann; Chen, Jiakun; Solnica-Krezel, Lilianna

    2014-10-01

    Custom-designed nucleases afford a powerful reverse genetic tool for direct gene disruption and genome modification in vivo. Among various applications of the nucleases, homologous recombination (HR)-mediated genome editing is particularly useful for inserting heterologous DNA fragments, such as GFP, into a specific genomic locus in a sequence-specific fashion. However, precise HR-mediated genome editing is still technically challenging in zebrafish. Here, we establish a GFP reporter system for measuring the frequency of HR events in live zebrafish embryos. By co-injecting a TALE nuclease and GFP reporter targeting constructs with homology arms of different size, we defined the length of homology arms that increases the recombination efficiency. In addition, we found that the configuration of the targeting construct can be a crucial parameter in determining the efficiency of HR-mediated genome engineering. Implementing these modifications improved the efficiency of zebrafish knock-in generation, with over 10% of the injected F0 animals transmitting gene-targeting events through their germline. We generated two HR-mediated insertion alleles of sox2 and gfap loci that express either superfolder GFP (sfGFP) or tandem dimeric Tomato (tdTomato) in a spatiotemporal pattern that mirrors the endogenous loci. This efficient strategy provides new opportunities not only to monitor expression of endogenous genes and proteins and follow specific cell types in vivo, but it also paves the way for other sophisticated genetic manipulations of the zebrafish genome.

  14. DNA end resection controls the balance between homologous and illegitimate recombination in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siniša Ivanković

    Full Text Available Even a partial loss of function of human RecQ helicase analogs causes adverse effects such as a cancer-prone Werner, Bloom or Rothmund-Thompson syndrome, whereas a complete RecQ deficiency in Escherichia coli is not deleterious for a cell. We show that this puzzling difference is due to different mechanisms of DNA double strand break (DSB resection in E. coli and humans. Coupled helicase and RecA loading activities of RecBCD enzyme, which is found exclusively in bacteria, are shown to be responsible for channeling recombinogenic 3' ending tails toward productive, homologous and away from nonproductive, aberrant recombination events. On the other hand, in recB1080/recB1067 mutants, lacking RecBCD's RecA loading activity while preserving its helicase activity, DSB resection is mechanistically more alike that in eukaryotes (by its uncoupling from a recombinase polymerization step, and remarkably, the role of RecQ also becomes akin of its eukaryotic counterparts in a way of promoting homologous and suppressing illegitimate recombination. The sickly phenotype of recB1080 recQ mutant was further exacerbated by inactivation of an exonuclease I, which degrades the unwound 3' tail. The respective recB1080 recQ xonA mutant showed poor viability, DNA repair and homologous recombination deficiency, and very increased illegitimate recombination. These findings demonstrate that the metabolism of the 3' ending overhang is a decisive factor in tuning the balance of homologous and illegitimate recombination in E. coli, thus highlighting the importance of regulating DSB resection for preserving genome integrity. recB mutants used in this study, showing pronounced RecQ helicase and exonuclease I dependence, make up a suitable model system for studying mechanisms of DSB resection in bacteria. Also, these mutants might be useful for investigating functions of the conserved RecQ helicase family members, and congruently serve as a simpler, more defined model system

  15. Inference of homologous recombination in bacteria using whole-genome sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didelot, Xavier; Lawson, Daniel; Darling, Aaron; Falush, Daniel

    2010-12-01

    Bacteria and archaea reproduce clonally, but sporadically import DNA into their chromosomes from other organisms. In many of these events, the imported DNA replaces an homologous segment in the recipient genome. Here we present a new method to reconstruct the history of recombination events that affected a given sample of bacterial genomes. We introduce a mathematical model that represents both the donor and the recipient of each DNA import as an ancestor of the genomes in the sample. The model represents a simplification of the previously described coalescent with gene conversion. We implement a Monte Carlo Markov chain algorithm to perform inference under this model from sequence data alignments and show that inference is feasible for whole-genome alignments through parallelization. Using simulated data, we demonstrate accurate and reliable identification of individual recombination events and global recombination rate parameters. We applied our approach to an alignment of 13 whole genomes from the Bacillus cereus group. We find, as expected from laboratory experiments, that the recombination rate is higher between closely related organisms and also that the genome contains several broad regions of elevated levels of recombination. Application of the method to the genomic data sets that are becoming available should reveal the evolutionary history and private lives of populations of bacteria and archaea. The methods described in this article have been implemented in a computer software package, ClonalOrigin, which is freely available from http://code.google.com/p/clonalorigin/.

  16. Unveiling novel RecO distant orthologues involved in homologous recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Marsin

    Full Text Available The generation of a RecA filament on single-stranded DNA is a critical step in homologous recombination. Two main pathways leading to the formation of the nucleofilament have been identified in bacteria, based on the protein complexes mediating RecA loading: RecBCD (AddAB and RecFOR. Many bacterial species seem to lack some of the components involved in these complexes. The current annotation of the Helicobacter pylori genome suggests that this highly diverse bacterial pathogen has a reduced set of recombination mediator proteins. While it is now clear that homologous recombination plays a critical role in generating H. pylori diversity by allowing genomic DNA rearrangements and integration through transformation of exogenous DNA into the chromosome, no complete mediator complex is deduced from the sequence of its genome. Here we show by bioinformatics analysis the presence of a RecO remote orthologue that allowed the identification of a new set of RecO proteins present in all bacterial species where a RecR but not RecO was previously identified. HpRecO shares less than 15% identity with previously characterized homologues. Genetic dissection of recombination pathways shows that this novel RecO and the remote RecB homologue present in H. pylori are functional in repair and in RecA-dependent intrachromosomal recombination, defining two initiation pathways with little overlap. We found, however, that neither RecOR nor RecB contributes to transformation, suggesting the presence of a third, specialized, RecA-dependent pathway responsible for the integration of transforming DNA into the chromosome of this naturally competent bacteria. These results provide insight into the mechanisms that this successful pathogen uses to generate genetic diversity and adapt to changing environments and new hosts.

  17. Transient suppression of hepatocellular replication in the mouse liver following transduction with recombinant adeno-associated virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dane, A P; Cunningham, S C; Kok, C Y; Logan, G J; Alexander, I E

    2015-11-01

    Recombinant vectors based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) are proving to be powerful tools for genetic manipulation of the liver, for both discovery and therapeutic purposes. The system can be used to deliver transgene cassettes for expression or, alternatively, DNA templates for genome editing via homologous recombination. The replicative state of target cells is known to influence the efficiency of these processes and knowledge of the host-vector interactions involved is required for optimally effective vector deployment. Here we show, for the first time in vivo, that in addition to the known effects of hepatocellular replication on AAV-mediated gene transfer, the vector itself exerts a potent, albeit transient suppressive effect on cell cycle progression that is relieved on a time course that correlates with the known rate of clearance of input single-stranded vector DNA. This finding requires further mechanistic investigation, delineates an excellent model system for such studies and further deepens our insight into the complexity of interactions between AAV vectors and the cell cycle in a clinically promising target tissue.

  18. Competitive repair by naturally dispersed repetitive DNA during non-allelic homologous recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoang, Margaret L.; Tan, Frederick J.; Lai, David C.; Celniker, Sue E.; Hoskins, Roger A.; Dunham, Maitreya J.; Zheng, Yixian; Koshland, Douglas

    2010-08-27

    Genome rearrangements often result from non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR) between repetitive DNA elements dispersed throughout the genome. Here we systematically analyze NAHR between Ty retrotransposons using a genome-wide approach that exploits unique features of Saccharomyces cerevisiae purebred and Saccharomyces cerevisiae/Saccharomyces bayanus hybrid diploids. We find that DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induce NAHR-dependent rearrangements using Ty elements located 12 to 48 kilobases distal to the break site. This break-distal recombination (BDR) occurs frequently, even when allelic recombination can repair the break using the homolog. Robust BDR-dependent NAHR demonstrates that sequences very distal to DSBs can effectively compete with proximal sequences for repair of the break. In addition, our analysis of NAHR partner choice between Ty repeats shows that intrachromosomal Ty partners are preferred despite the abundance of potential interchromosomal Ty partners that share higher sequence identity. This competitive advantage of intrachromosomal Tys results from the relative efficiencies of different NAHR repair pathways. Finally, NAHR generates deleterious rearrangements more frequently when DSBs occur outside rather than within a Ty repeat. These findings yield insights into mechanisms of repeat-mediated genome rearrangements associated with evolution and cancer.

  19. Enhanced homologous recombination is induced by alpha-particle radiation in somatic cells of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Po; Liu, Ping; Wu, Yuejin

    Almost 9 percent of cosmic rays which strike the earth's atmosphere are alpha particles. As one of the ionizing radiations (IR), its biological effects have been widely studied. However, the plant genomic instability induced by alpha-particle radiation was not largely known. In this research, the Arabidopsis thaliana transgenic for GUS recombination substrate was used to evaluate the genomic instability induced by alpha-particle radiation (3.3MeV). The pronounced effects of systemic exposure to alpha-particle radiation on the somatic homologous recombination frequency (HRF) were found at different doses. The 10Gy dose of radiation induced the maximal HRF which was 1.9-fold higher than the control. The local radiation of alpha-particle (10Gy) on root also resulted in a 2.5-fold increase of somatic HRF in non-radiated aerial plant, indicating that the signal(s) of genomic instability was transferred to non-radiated parts and initiated their genomic instability. Concurrent treatment of seedlings of Arabidopsis thaliana with alpha-particle and DMSO(ROS scavenger) both in systemic and local radiation signifi- cantly suppressed the somatic HR, indicating that the free radicals produced by alpha-particle radiation took part in the production of signal of genomic instability rather than the signal transfer. Key words: alpha-particle radiation, somatic homologous recombination, genomic instability

  20. Viral replication is enhanced by an HIV-1 intersubtype recombination-derived Vpu protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salomón Horacio

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple HIV-1 intersubtype recombinants have been identified in human populations. Previous studies from our lab group have shown that the epidemic in Argentina is characterized by the high prevalence of a circulating recombinant form, CRF12_BF, and many related BF recombinant forms. In these genomic structures a recombination breakpoint frequently involved the vpu coding region. Due to the scarce knowledge of Vpu participation in the virion release process and its impact on pathogenesis and of the functional capacities of intersubtype recombinant Vpu proteins, the aim of this work was to perform a comparative analysis on virion release capacity and relative replication capacity among viral variants harboring either a BF recombinant Vpu or a subtype B Vpu. Results Our results showed that BF recombinant Vpu was associated to an increased viral particles production when compared to WT B variant in tetherin-expressing cell lines. This observation was tested in the context of a competition assay between the above mentioned variants. The results showed that the replication of the BF Vpu-harboring variant was more efficient in cell cultures than subtype B, reaching a higher frequency in the viral population in a short period of time. Conclusion This study showed that as a result of intersubtype recombination, a structurally re-organized HIV-1 Vpu has an improved in vitro capacity of enhancing viral replication, and provides evidence of the changes occurring in this protein function that could play an important role in the successful spread of intersubtype recombinant variants.

  1. Mechanism of homologous recombination from the RecA-ssDNA/dsDNA structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zhucheng; Yang, Haijuan; Pavletich, Nikola P [HHMI

    2008-07-08

    The RecA family of ATPases mediates homologous recombination, a reaction essential for maintaining genomic integrity and for generating genetic diversity. RecA, ATP and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) form a helical filament that binds to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), searches for homology, and then catalyses the exchange of the complementary strand, producing a new heteroduplex. Here we have solved the crystal structures of the Escherichia coli RecA-ssDNA and RecA-heteroduplex filaments. They show that ssDNA and ATP bind to RecA-RecA interfaces cooperatively, explaining the ATP dependency of DNA binding. The ATP {gamma}-phosphate is sensed across the RecA-RecA interface by two lysine residues that also stimulate ATP hydrolysis, providing a mechanism for DNA release. The DNA is underwound and stretched globally, but locally it adopts a B-DNA-like conformation that restricts the homology search to Watson-Crick-type base pairing. The complementary strand interacts primarily through base pairing, making heteroduplex formation strictly dependent on complementarity. The underwound, stretched filament conformation probably evolved to destabilize the donor duplex, freeing the complementary strand for homology sampling.

  2. DNA End Resection: Nucleases Team Up with the Right Partners to Initiate Homologous Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cejka, Petr

    2015-09-18

    The repair of DNA double-strand breaks by homologous recombination commences by nucleolytic degradation of the 5'-terminated strand of the DNA break. This leads to the formation of 3'-tailed DNA, which serves as a substrate for the strand exchange protein Rad51. The nucleoprotein filament then invades homologous DNA to drive template-directed repair. In this review, I discuss mainly the mechanisms of DNA end resection in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which includes short-range resection by Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 and Sae2, as well as processive long-range resection by Sgs1-Dna2 or Exo1 pathways. Resection mechanisms are highly conserved between yeast and humans, and analogous machineries are found in prokaryotes as well.

  3. Tankyrases Promote Homologous Recombination and Check Point Activation in Response to DSBs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furst, Audrey; Koch, Marc; Fischer, Benoit; Soutoglou, Evi

    2016-01-01

    DNA lesions are sensed by a network of proteins that trigger the DNA damage response (DDR), a signaling cascade that acts to delay cell cycle progression and initiate DNA repair. The Mediator of DNA damage Checkpoint protein 1 (MDC1) is essential for spreading of the DDR signaling on chromatin surrounding Double Strand Breaks (DSBs) by acting as a scaffold for PI3K kinases and for ubiquitin ligases. MDC1 also plays a role both in Non-Homologous End Joining (NHEJ) and Homologous Recombination (HR) repair pathways. Here we identify two novel binding partners of MDC1, the poly (ADP-ribose) Polymerases (PARPs) TNKS1 and 2. We find that TNKSs are recruited to DNA lesions by MDC1 and regulate DNA end resection and BRCA1A complex stabilization at lesions leading to efficient DSB repair by HR and proper checkpoint activation. PMID:26845027

  4. Tankyrases Promote Homologous Recombination and Check Point Activation in Response to DSBs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zita Nagy

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available DNA lesions are sensed by a network of proteins that trigger the DNA damage response (DDR, a signaling cascade that acts to delay cell cycle progression and initiate DNA repair. The Mediator of DNA damage Checkpoint protein 1 (MDC1 is essential for spreading of the DDR signaling on chromatin surrounding Double Strand Breaks (DSBs by acting as a scaffold for PI3K kinases and for ubiquitin ligases. MDC1 also plays a role both in Non-Homologous End Joining (NHEJ and Homologous Recombination (HR repair pathways. Here we identify two novel binding partners of MDC1, the poly (ADP-ribose Polymerases (PARPs TNKS1 and 2. We find that TNKSs are recruited to DNA lesions by MDC1 and regulate DNA end resection and BRCA1A complex stabilization at lesions leading to efficient DSB repair by HR and proper checkpoint activation.

  5. Construction of recombinant industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with bglS gene insertion into PEP4 locus by homologous recombination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang ZHANG; Qi-he CHEN; Ming-liang FU; Jin-ling WANG; Hong-bo ZHANG; Guo-qing HE

    2008-01-01

    The bglS gene encoding endo-1,3-1,4-β-glucanase from Bacillus subtilis was cloned and sequenced in this study. The bglS expression cassette, including PGK1 promoter, bglS gene fused to the signal sequence of the yeast mating pheromone α-factor (MFals), and ADH1 terminator with G418-resistance as the selected marker, was constructed. Then one of the PEP4 allele of Saccharomyces cerevisiae WZ65 strain was replaced by bglS expression cassette using chromosomal integration of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-mediated homologous recombination, and the bglS gene was expressed simultaneously. The recombinant strain S. cerevisiae (SC-βG) was preliminarily screened by the clearing hydrolysis zone formed after the barley β-glucan was hydrolyzed in the plate and no proteinase A (PrA) activity was measured in fermenting liquor. The results of PCR analysis ofgenome DNA showed that one of the PEP4 allele had been replaced and bglS gene had been inserted into the locus of PEP4 gene in recombinant strains. Different endo-1,3-1,4-β-glucanase assay methods showed that the recombinant strain SC-βG had high endo-1,3-1,4-β-glucanase expression level with the maximum of 69.3 U/(h-ml) after 60 h of incubation. Meanwhile, the Congo Red method was suitable for the determination of endo-1,3-1,4-β-glucanase activity during the actual brewing process. The current research implies that the constructed yeast strain could be utilized to improve the industrial brewing property of beer.

  6. A novel engineered meganuclease induces homologous recombination in yeast and mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epinat, Jean-Charles; Arnould, Sylvain; Chames, Patrick; Rochaix, Pascal; Desfontaines, Dominique; Puzin, Clémence; Patin, Amélie; Zanghellini, Alexandre; Pâques, Frédéric; Lacroix, Emmanuel

    2003-06-01

    Homologous gene targeting is the ultimate tool for reverse genetics, but its use is often limited by low efficiency. In a number of recent studies, site- specific DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) have been used to induce efficient gene targeting. Engineering highly specific, dedicated DNA endonucleases is the key to a wider usage of this technology. In this study, we present two novel, chimeric meganucleases, derived from homing endonucleases. The first one is able to induce recombination in yeast and mammalian cells, whereas the second cleaves a novel (chosen) DNA target site. These results are a first step toward the generation of custom endonucleases for the purpose of targeted genome engineering.

  7. BLM has early and late functions in homologous recombination repair in mouse embryonic stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chu, W K; Hanada, K; Kanaar, R;

    2010-01-01

    function of BLM remains unclear. Multiple roles have been proposed for BLM in the homologous recombination (HR) repair pathway, including 'early' functions, such as the stimulation of resection of DNA double-strand break ends or displacement of the invading strand of DNA displacement loops, and 'late...... in Rad54(-/-) cells rescued their mitomycin C (MMC) sensitivity, and decreased both the level of DNA damage and cell cycle perturbation induced by MMC, suggesting an early role for Blm. Our data are consistent with Blm having at least two roles in HR repair in mammalian cells....

  8. A chemical compound that stimulates the human homologous recombination protein RAD51

    OpenAIRE

    Jayathilaka, Krishanthi; Sheridan, Sean D.; Bold, Tyler D.; Bochenska, Katarzyna; Logan, Hillary L.; Weichselbaum, Ralph. R.; Bishop, Douglas K.; Connell, Philip P.

    2008-01-01

    RAD51 and other members of the RecA family of strand exchange proteins assemble on ssDNA to form presynaptic filaments, which carry out the central steps of homologous recombination. A microplate-based assay was developed for high-throughput measurement of hRAD51 filament formation on ssDNA. With this method, a 10,000 compound library was screened, leading to the identification of a small molecule (RS-1) that enhances hRAD51 binding in a wide range of biochemical conditions. Salt titration ex...

  9. Targeting of human aFGF gene into silkworm,Bombyx mori L. through homologous recombination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴小锋; 曹翠平

    2004-01-01

    The long-arm and short-arm genes of fibroin light chain (L-chain) of silkworm, Bombyx Mori L., and the gene of human acidic fibroblast growth factor were cloned respectively and subsequently inserted into a transfer vector pVL 1392 used as a tool to target the L-chain region of the silkworm genome. Genomic DNA from their offsprings was extracted and the expected targeting was detected using polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing, as well as protein analysis. The results showed that positive events occurred and that the FGF gene was integrated into the L-chain locus through homologous recombination.

  10. Targeting of human aFGF gene into silkworm, Bombyx mori L.Through homologous recombination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴小锋; 曹翠平

    2004-01-01

    The long-arm and short-arm genes of fibroin light chain (L-chain) of silkworm, Bombyx Mori L., and the gene of human acidic fibroblast growth factor were cloned respectively and subsequently inserted into a transfer vector pVL1392 used as a tool to target the L-chain region of the silkworm genome. Genomic DNA from their offsprings was extracted and the expected targeting was detected using polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing, as well as protein analysis. The results showed that positive events occurred and that the FGF gene was integrated into the L-chain locus through homologous recombination.

  11. Ago2 facilitates Rad51 recruitment and DNA double-strand break repair by homologous recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Min; Wei, Wei; Li, Ming Hua

    2014-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are highly cytotoxic lesions and pose a major threat to genome stability if not properly repaired. We and others have previously shown that a class of DSB-induced small RNAs (diRNAs) is produced from sequences around DSB sites. DiRNAs are associated with Argonaute...... (Ago) proteins and play an important role in DSB repair, though the mechanism through which they act remains unclear. Here, we report that the role of diRNAs in DSB repair is restricted to repair by homologous recombination (HR) and that it specifically relies on the effector protein Ago2 in mammalian...

  12. Early days of DNA repair: discovery of nucleotide excision repair and homology-dependent recombinational repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, W Dean

    2013-12-13

    The discovery of nucleotide excision repair in 1964 showed that DNA could be repaired by a mechanism that removed the damaged section of a strand and replaced it accurately by using the remaining intact strand as the template. This result showed that DNA could be actively metabolized in a process that had no precedent. In 1968, experiments describing postreplication repair, a process dependent on homologous recombination, were reported. The authors of these papers were either at Yale University or had prior Yale connections. Here we recount some of the events leading to these discoveries and consider the impact on further research at Yale and elsewhere.

  13. Patterns of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 recombination ex vivo provide evidence for coadaptation of distant sites, resulting in purifying selection for intersubtype recombinants during replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galli, Andrea; Kearney, Mary; Nikolaitchik, Olga A

    2010-01-01

    High-frequency recombination is a hallmark of HIV-1 replication. Recombination can occur between two members of the same subtype or between viruses from two different subtypes, generating intra- or intersubtype recombinants, respectively. Many intersubtype recombinants have been shown to circulate....../B) and between viruses with pol genes from subtype B or F (B/F). Recombination events generated during a single cycle of infection without selection pressure on pol gene function were analyzed by single-genome sequencing. We found that recombination occurred slightly ( approximately 30%) less frequently in B...... subtypes; these sites may be segregated by recombination events, causing the newly generated intersubtype recombinants to undergo purifying selection. Therefore, the ability of the recombinants to replicate is the major barrier for many of these viruses....

  14. Ultrafine anaphase bridges, broken DNA and illegitimate recombination induced by a replication fork barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofueva, Sevil; Osman, Fekret; Lorenz, Alexander; Steinacher, Roland; Castagnetti, Stefania; Ledesma, Jennifer; Whitby, Matthew C.

    2011-01-01

    Most DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in S- and G2-phase cells are repaired accurately by Rad51-dependent sister chromatid recombination. However, a minority give rise to gross chromosome rearrangements (GCRs), which can result in disease/death. What determines whether a DSB is repaired accurately or inaccurately is currently unclear. We provide evidence that suggests that perturbing replication by a non-programmed protein–DNA replication fork barrier results in the persistence of replication intermediates (most likely regions of unreplicated DNA) into mitosis, which results in anaphase bridge formation and ultimately to DNA breakage. However, unlike previously characterised replication-associated DSBs, these breaks are repaired mainly by Rad51-independent processes such as single-strand annealing, and are therefore prone to generate GCRs. These data highlight how a replication-associated DSB can be predisposed to give rise to genome rearrangements in eukaryotes. PMID:21576223

  15. Widespread interspecies homologous recombination reveals reticulate evolution within the genus Streptomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kun; Rong, Xiaoying; Huang, Ying

    2016-09-01

    Homologous recombination is increasingly being recognized as a driving force in microbial evolution. However, recombination in streptomycetes, a rich source of diverse secondary metabolites, particularly among different species, remains minimally investigated. In this study, the largest sample of Streptomyces species to date, consisting of 142 type strains spanning the genus, with available sequences of 16S rRNA, atpD, gyrB, recA, rpoB and trpB genes, were collected and subjected to a comprehensive population genetic analysis to generate an overall estimate of the level of Streptomyces interspecies genetic exchange and its effect on the evolution of this genus. The results indicate frequent homologous recombination among Streptomyces species, which occurred three times more frequently and was nearly 14 times more important than point mutation in nucleotide sequence divergence (ρ/θw=3.10, r/m=13.74). As a result, a facilitating effect on the evolutionary process and confusion in phylogenetic relationships were observed, as well as a number of specific transfer events of the six gene fragments. A resultant phylogenetic network depicted extensive horizontal genetic exchange which decays clonality in streptomycetes. Moreover, seven evolutionary lineage groups were identified in the present sample in the Structure analysis, generally consistent with morphological and physiological data, and the contribution of recombination was detected to be varied among them. Our analyses demonstrated a reticulate evolution within Streptomyces due to the high level of interspecies gene exchange, which greatly challenges the traditional tree-shaped phylogeny in this genus and may advance our evolutionary understanding of a genuine Streptomyces species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Polynucleotide phosphorylase is implicated in homologous recombination and DNA repair in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carzaniga, Thomas; Sbarufatti, Giulia; Briani, Federica; Dehò, Gianni

    2017-04-04

    Polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase, encoded by pnp) is generally thought of as an enzyme dedicated to RNA metabolism. The pleiotropic effects of PNPase deficiency is imputed to altered processing and turnover of mRNAs and small RNAs, which in turn leads to aberrant gene expression. However, it has long since been known that this enzyme may also catalyze template-independent polymerization of dNDPs into ssDNA and the reverse phosphorolytic reaction. Recently, PNPase has been implicated in DNA recombination, repair, mutagenesis and resistance to genotoxic agents in diverse bacterial species, raising the possibility that PNPase may directly, rather than through control of gene expression, participate in these processes. In this work we present evidence that in Escherichia coli PNPase enhances both homologous recombination upon P1 transduction and error prone DNA repair of double strand breaks induced by zeocin, a radiomimetic agent. Homologous recombination does not require PNPase phosphorolytic activity and is modulated by its RNA binding domains whereas error prone DNA repair of zeocin-induced DNA damage is dependent on PNPase catalytic activity and cannot be suppressed by overexpression of RNase II, the other major enzyme (encoded by rnb) implicated in exonucleolytic RNA degradation. Moreover, E. coli pnp mutants are more sensitive than the wild type to zeocin. This phenotype depends on PNPase phosphorolytic activity and is suppressed by rnb, thus suggesting that zeocin detoxification may largely depend on RNA turnover. Our data suggest that PNPase may participate both directly and indirectly through regulation of gene expression to several aspects of DNA metabolism such as recombination, DNA repair and resistance to genotoxic agents.

  17. Resolution by unassisted Top3 points to template switch recombination intermediates during DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glineburg, M Rebecca; Chavez, Alejandro; Agrawal, Vishesh; Brill, Steven J; Johnson, F Brad

    2013-11-15

    The evolutionarily conserved Sgs1/Top3/Rmi1 (STR) complex plays vital roles in DNA replication and repair. One crucial activity of the complex is dissolution of toxic X-shaped recombination intermediates that accumulate during replication of damaged DNA. However, despite several years of study the nature of these X-shaped molecules remains debated. Here we use genetic approaches and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of genomic DNA to show that Top3, unassisted by Sgs1 and Rmi1, has modest capacities to provide resistance to MMS and to resolve recombination-dependent X-shaped molecules. The X-shaped molecules have structural properties consistent with hemicatenane-related template switch recombination intermediates (Rec-Xs) but not Holliday junction (HJ) intermediates. Consistent with these findings, we demonstrate that purified Top3 can resolve a synthetic Rec-X but not a synthetic double HJ in vitro. We also find that unassisted Top3 does not affect crossing over during double strand break repair, which is known to involve double HJ intermediates, confirming that unassisted Top3 activities are restricted to substrates that are distinct from HJs. These data help illuminate the nature of the X-shaped molecules that accumulate during replication of damaged DNA templates, and also clarify the roles played by Top3 and the STR complex as a whole during the resolution of replication-associated recombination intermediates.

  18. Minimum length of direct repeat sequences required for efficient homologous recombination induced by zinc finger nuclease in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, ChongHua; Yan, Qiang; Zhang, ZhiYing

    2014-10-01

    Zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) technology is a powerful molecular tool for targeted genome modifications and genetic engineering. However, screening for specific ZFs and validation of ZFN activity are labor intensive and time consuming. We previously designed a yeast-based ZFN screening and validation system by inserting a ZFN binding site flanked by a 164 bp direct repeat sequence into the middle of a Gal4 transcription factor, disrupting the open reading frame of the yeast Gal4 gene. Expression of the ZFN causes a double stranded break at its binding site, which promotes the cellular DNA repair system to restore expression of a functional Gal transcriptional factor via homologous recombination. Expression of Gal4 transcription factor leads to activation of three reporter genes in an AH109 yeast two-hybrid strain. However, the 164 bp direct repeat appears to generate spontaneous homologous recombination frequently, resulting in many false positive ZFNs. To overcome this, a series of DNA fragments of various lengths from 10 to 150 bp with 10 bp increase each and 164 bp direct repeats flanking the ZFN binding site were designed and constructed. The results demonstrated that the minimum length required for ZFN-induced homologous recombination was 30 bp, which almost eliminated spontaneous recombination. Using the 30 bp direct repeat sequence, ZFN could efficiently induce homologous recombination, while false positive ZFNs resulting from spontaneous homologous recombination were minimized. Thus, this study provided a simple, fast and sensitive ZFN screening and activity validation system in yeast.

  19. SV40 utilizes ATM kinase activity to prevent non-homologous end joining of broken viral DNA replication products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory A Sowd

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Simian virus 40 (SV40 and cellular DNA replication rely on host ATM and ATR DNA damage signaling kinases to facilitate DNA repair and elicit cell cycle arrest following DNA damage. During SV40 DNA replication, ATM kinase activity prevents concatemerization of the viral genome whereas ATR activity prevents accumulation of aberrant genomes resulting from breakage of a moving replication fork as it converges with a stalled fork. However, the repair pathways that ATM and ATR orchestrate to prevent these aberrant SV40 DNA replication products are unclear. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and Southern blotting, we show that ATR kinase activity, but not DNA-PK(cs kinase activity, facilitates some aspects of double strand break (DSB repair when ATM is inhibited during SV40 infection. To clarify which repair factors associate with viral DNA replication centers, we examined the localization of DSB repair proteins in response to SV40 infection. Under normal conditions, viral replication centers exclusively associate with homology-directed repair (HDR and do not colocalize with non-homologous end joining (NHEJ factors. Following ATM inhibition, but not ATR inhibition, activated DNA-PK(cs and KU70/80 accumulate at the viral replication centers while CtIP and BLM, proteins that initiate 5' to 3' end resection during HDR, become undetectable. Similar to what has been observed during cellular DSB repair in S phase, these data suggest that ATM kinase influences DSB repair pathway choice by preventing the recruitment of NHEJ factors to replicating viral DNA. These data may explain how ATM prevents concatemerization of the viral genome and promotes viral propagation. We suggest that inhibitors of DNA damage signaling and DNA repair could be used during infection to disrupt productive viral DNA replication.

  20. SV40 utilizes ATM kinase activity to prevent non-homologous end joining of broken viral DNA replication products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowd, Gregory A; Mody, Dviti; Eggold, Joshua; Cortez, David; Friedman, Katherine L; Fanning, Ellen

    2014-12-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) and cellular DNA replication rely on host ATM and ATR DNA damage signaling kinases to facilitate DNA repair and elicit cell cycle arrest following DNA damage. During SV40 DNA replication, ATM kinase activity prevents concatemerization of the viral genome whereas ATR activity prevents accumulation of aberrant genomes resulting from breakage of a moving replication fork as it converges with a stalled fork. However, the repair pathways that ATM and ATR orchestrate to prevent these aberrant SV40 DNA replication products are unclear. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and Southern blotting, we show that ATR kinase activity, but not DNA-PK(cs) kinase activity, facilitates some aspects of double strand break (DSB) repair when ATM is inhibited during SV40 infection. To clarify which repair factors associate with viral DNA replication centers, we examined the localization of DSB repair proteins in response to SV40 infection. Under normal conditions, viral replication centers exclusively associate with homology-directed repair (HDR) and do not colocalize with non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) factors. Following ATM inhibition, but not ATR inhibition, activated DNA-PK(cs) and KU70/80 accumulate at the viral replication centers while CtIP and BLM, proteins that initiate 5' to 3' end resection during HDR, become undetectable. Similar to what has been observed during cellular DSB repair in S phase, these data suggest that ATM kinase influences DSB repair pathway choice by preventing the recruitment of NHEJ factors to replicating viral DNA. These data may explain how ATM prevents concatemerization of the viral genome and promotes viral propagation. We suggest that inhibitors of DNA damage signaling and DNA repair could be used during infection to disrupt productive viral DNA replication.

  1. Gene targeting using homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells: The future for behavior genetics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eGerlai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Gene targeting with homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells created a revolution in the analysis of the function of genes in behavioral brain research. The technology allowed unprecedented precision with which one could manipulate genes and study the effect of this manipulation on the central nervous system. With gene targeting, the uncertainty inherent in psychopharmacology regarding whether a particular compound would act only through a specific target was removed. Thus, gene targeting became highly popular. However, with this popularity came the realization that like other methods, gene targeting also suffered from some technical and principal problems. For example, two decades ago, issues about compensatory changes and about genetic linkage were raised. Since then, the technology developed, and its utility has been better delineated. This review will discuss the pros and cons of the technique along with these advancements from the perspective of the neuroscientist user. It will also compare and contrast methods that may represent novel alternatives to the homologous recombination based gene targeting approach, including the TALEN and the CRISPR/Cas9 systems. The goal of the review is not to provide detailed recipes, but to attempt to present a short summary of these approaches a behavioral geneticist or neuroscientist may consider for the analysis of brain function and behavior.

  2. Deficiency in Homologous Recombination Renders Mammalian Cells More Sensitive to Proton Versus Photon Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosse, Nicole; Fontana, Andrea O. [Laboratory for Molecular Radiobiology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Hug, Eugen B.; Lomax, Antony; Coray, Adolf [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Augsburger, Marc [Laboratory for Molecular Radiobiology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Paganetti, Harald [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sartori, Alessandro A. [Institute of Molecular Cancer Research, University of Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland); Pruschy, Martin, E-mail: martin.pruschy@usz.ch [Laboratory for Molecular Radiobiology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of the 2 major DNA repair machineries on cellular survival in response to irradiation with the 2 types of ionizing radiation. Methods and Materials: The DNA repair and cell survival endpoints in wild-type, homologous recombination (HR)-deficient, and nonhomologous end-joining-deficient cells were analyzed after irradiation with clinically relevant, low-linear energy transfer (LET) protons and 200-keV photons. Results: All cell lines were more sensitive to proton irradiation compared with photon irradiation, despite no differences in the induction of DNA breaks. Interestingly, HR-deficient cells and wild-type cells with small interfering RNA-down-regulated Rad51 were markedly hypersensitive to proton irradiation, resulting in an increased relative biological effectiveness in comparison with the relative biological effectiveness determined in wild-type cells. In contrast, lack of nonhomologous end-joining did not result in hypersensitivity toward proton irradiation. Repair kinetics of DNA damage in wild-type cells were equal after both types of irradiation, although proton irradiation resulted in more lethal chromosomal aberrations. Finally, repair kinetics in HR-deficient cells were significantly delayed after proton irradiation, with elevated amounts of residual γH2AX foci after irradiation. Conclusion: Our data indicate a differential quality of DNA damage by proton versus photon irradiation, with a specific requirement for homologous recombination for DNA repair and enhanced cell survival. This has potential relevance for clinical stratification of patients carrying mutations in the DNA damage response pathways.

  3. Homologous recombination in the archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius: effects of DNA substrates and mechanistic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwood, Jananie; Mao, Dominic; Grogan, Dennis W

    2013-09-01

    Although homologous recombination (HR) is known to influence the structure, stability, and evolution of microbial genomes, few of its functional properties have been measured in cells of hyperthermophilic archaea. The present study manipulated various properties of the parental DNAs in high-resolution assays of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius transformation, and measured the impact on the efficiency and pattern of marker transfer to the recipient chromosome. The relative orientation of homologous sequences, the type and position of chromosomal mutation being replaced, and the length of DNA flanking the marked region all affected the efficiency, linkage, tract continuity, and other parameters of marker transfer. Effects predicted specifically by the classical reciprocal-exchange model of HR were not observed. One analysis observed only 90 % linkage between markers defined by adjacent bases; in another series of experiments, sequence divergence up to 4 % had no detectable impact on overall efficiency of HR or on the co-transfer of a distal non-selected marker. The effects of introducing DNA via conjugation, rather than transformation, were more difficult to assess, but appeared to increase co-transfer (i.e. linkage) of relatively distant non-selected markers. The results indicate that HR events between gene-sized duplex DNAs and the S. acidocaldarius chromosome typically involve neither crossing over nor interference from a mismatch-activated anti-recombination system. Instead, the donor DNA may anneal to a transient chromosomal gap, as in the mechanism proposed for oligonucleotide-mediated transformation of Sulfolobus and other micro-organisms.

  4. Construction of a novel kind of expression plasmid by homologous recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiangling; YUAN Hanying; HE Wei; HU Xianghua; LU Hong; LI Yuyang

    2005-01-01

    Based on a previously used plasmid pHC11, a new plasmid pHC11R was constructed. Cutting plasmid pHC11R with proper restriction enzymes, the resulting larger DNA fragment pHC11R' was co-transformed with a PCR amplified expression cassette of human IFNα2b into yeast. By means of the homologous sequences at both ends of two DNA fragments, a novel expression plasmid pHC11R-IFNα2b was formed via homologous recombination in the yeast. Compared with pHC11-IFNα2b, the expression plasmid pHC11R-IFNα2b was smaller in size and in absence of antibiotic resistant gene. The stability and copy number of pHC11R- IFNα2b were greatly increased and the expression level of heterologous protein was improved. As the derivatives of pHC11R, a series of recombination expression vectors pHRs containing different combination of expression elements were developed. This led to a rapid and powerful method for cloning and expressing of different genes in yeast.

  5. Gene Targeting Using Homologous Recombination in Embryonic Stem Cells: The Future for Behavior Genetics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlai, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Gene targeting with homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells created a revolution in the analysis of the function of genes in behavioral brain research. The technology allowed unprecedented precision with which one could manipulate genes and study the effect of this manipulation on the central nervous system. With gene targeting, the uncertainty inherent in psychopharmacology regarding whether a particular compound would act only through a specific target was removed. Thus, gene targeting became highly popular. However, with this popularity came the realization that like other methods, gene targeting also suffered from some technical and principal problems. For example, two decades ago, issues about compensatory changes and about genetic linkage were raised. Since then, the technology developed, and its utility has been better delineated. This review will discuss the pros and cons of the technique along with these advancements from the perspective of the neuroscientist user. It will also compare and contrast methods that may represent novel alternatives to the homologous recombination based gene targeting approach, including the TALEN and the CRISPR/Cas9 systems. The goal of the review is not to provide detailed recipes, but to attempt to present a short summary of these approaches a behavioral geneticist or neuroscientist may consider for the analysis of brain function and behavior.

  6. Homologous recombination of exogenous DNA with the Sulfolobus acidocaldarius genome: properties and uses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosawa, Norio; Grogan, Dennis W

    2005-12-01

    In order to quantify recombination between exogenous DNA and the Sulfolobus acidocaldarius chromosome, we electroporated pyrE (uracil-auxtotrophic) recipient strains with functional pyrE sequences and counted Pyr+ transformants by direct plating. Certain culture and post-electroporation conditions increased the yield of Pyr+ recombinants from non-replicating pyrE plasmid, whereas cognate methylation of SuaI restriction sites in the plasmid decreased it. Recombination of linear DNAs with the S. acidocaldarius genome was proportional to the length of a limiting overlap, but even synthetic oligonucleotides produced reasonable numbers of recombinants with appropriate recipient strains. To investigate uses of this latter property, we electroporated an 18-bp pyrE deletion mutant with mixtures of synthetic oligonucleotides altering glycine-55 of the orotate phosphoribosyl transferase encoded by pyrE. Pyr+ transformants were recovered in which this codon was converted to each of the alternatives encoded by the oligonucleotide mixtures, thereby identifying five amino acid substitutions tolerated at this position of the thermostable enzyme.

  7. Recruitment of wild-type and recombinant adeno-associated virus into adenovirus replication centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzman, M D; Fisher, K J; Wilson, J M

    1996-03-01

    Replication of a human parvovirus, adeno-associated virus (AAV), is facilitated by coinfection with adeno-virus to provide essential helper functions. We have used the techniques of in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry to characterize the localization of AAV replication within infected cells, Previous studies have shown that adenovirus establishes foci called replication centers within the nucleus, where adenoviral replication and transcription occur. Our studies indicate that AAV is colocalized with the adenovirus replication centers, where it may utilize adenovirus and cellular proteins for its own replication. Expression of the AAV Rep protein inhibits the normal maturation of the adenovirus centers. Similar experiments were performed with recombinant AAV (rAAV) to establish a relationship between intranuclear localization and rAAV transduction. rAAV efficiently entered the cell, and its genome was faintly detectable in a perinuclear distribution and was mobilized to replication centers when the cell was infected with adenovirus. The recruitment of the replication-defective genome into the intranuclear adenovirus domains resulted in enhanced transduction. These studies illustrate the importance of intracellular compartmentalization for such complex interactions as the relationship between AAV and adenovirus.

  8. RSC facilitates Rad59-dependent homologous recombination between sister chromatids by promoting cohesin loading at DNA double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oum, Ji-Hyun; Seong, Changhyun; Kwon, Youngho; Ji, Jae-Hoon; Sid, Amy; Ramakrishnan, Sreejith; Ira, Grzegorz; Malkova, Anna; Sung, Patrick; Lee, Sang Eun; Shim, Eun Yong

    2011-10-01

    Homologous recombination repairs DNA double-strand breaks by searching for, invading, and copying information from a homologous template, typically the homologous chromosome or sister chromatid. Tight wrapping of DNA around histone octamers, however, impedes access of repair proteins to DNA damage. To facilitate DNA repair, modifications of histones and energy-dependent remodeling of chromatin are required, but the precise mechanisms by which chromatin modification and remodeling enzymes contribute to homologous DNA repair are unknown. Here we have systematically assessed the role of budding yeast RSC (remodel structure of chromatin), an abundant, ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complex, in the cellular response to spontaneous and induced DNA damage. RSC physically interacts with the recombination protein Rad59 and functions in homologous recombination. Multiple recombination assays revealed that RSC is uniquely required for recombination between sister chromatids by virtue of its ability to recruit cohesin at DNA breaks and thereby promoting sister chromatid cohesion. This study provides molecular insights into how chromatin remodeling contributes to DNA repair and maintenance of chromatin fidelity in the face of DNA damage.

  9. Genetic battle between Helicobacter pylori and humans. The mechanism underlying homologous recombination in bacteria, which can infect human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, Katsuhiro; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2014-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a gram-negative pathogenic bacterium that colonises the human stomach. The chronic infection it causes results in peptic ulcers and gastric cancers. H. pylori can easily establish a chronic infection even if the immune system attacks this pathogen with oxidative stress agents and immunoglobulins. This is attributed to bacterial defence mechanisms against these stresses. As a defence mechanism against oxidative stresses, in bacterial genomes, homologous recombination can act as a repair pathway of DNA's double-strand breaks (DSBs). Moreover, homologous recombination is also involved in the antigenic variation in H. pylori. Gene conversion alters genomic structures of babA and babB (encoding outer membrane proteins), resulting in escape from immunoglobulin attacks. Thus, homologous recombination in bacteria plays an important role in the maintenance of a chronic infection. In addition, H. pylori infection causes DSBs in human cells. Homologous recombination is also involved in the repair of DSBs in human cells. In this review, we describe the roles of homologous recombination with an emphasis on the maintenance of a chronic infection.

  10. A role for RAD51 and homologous recombination in Trypanosoma brucei antigenic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, R; Barry, J D

    1999-11-01

    Antigenic variation is an immune evasion strategy used by African trypanosomes, in which the parasites periodically switch the expression of VSG genes that encode their protective variant surface glycoprotein coat. Two main routes exist for VSG switching: changing the transcriptional status between an active and an inactive copy of the site of VSG expression, called the bloodstream VSG expression site, or recombination reactions that move silent VSGs or VSG copies into the actively transcribed expression site. Nothing is known about the proteins that control and catalyze these switching reactions. This study describes the cloning of a trypanosome gene encoding RAD51, an enzyme involved in DNA break repair and genetic exchange, and analysis of the role of the enzyme in antigenic variation. Trypanosomes genetically inactivated in the RAD51 gene were shown to be viable, and had phenotypes consistent with lacking functional expression of an enzyme of homologous recombination. The mutants had an impaired ability to undergo VSG switching, and it appeared that both recombinational and transcriptional switching reactions were down-regulated, indicating that RAD51 either catalyzes or regulates antigenic variation. Switching events were still detectable, however, so it appears that trypanosome factors other than RAD51 can also provide for antigenic variation.

  11. The Elephant and the Blind Men: Making Sense of PARP Inhibitors in Homologous Recombination Deficient Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana eDe Lorenzo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Poly(ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP1 is an important component of the base excision repair (BER pathway as well as a regulator of homologous recombination (HR and nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ. Previous studies have demonstrated that treatment of HR-deficient cells with PARP inhibitors results in stalled and collapsed replication forks. Consequently, HR-deficient cells are extremely sensitive to PARP inhibitors. Several explanations have been advanced to explain this so-called synthetic lethality between HR deficiency and PARP inhibition: i inhibition of base excision repair leading to enhanced DNA double-strand breaks, which cannot be repaired in the absence of HR; ii trapping of inhibited PARP1 at sites of DNA damage, which inhibits access of other repair proteins; iii failure to synthesize poly(ADP-ribose polymer, which is required to recruit mutant BRCA1 to sites of DNA damage; and iv activation of the NHEJ pathway, which selectively induces error-prone repair in HR-deficient cells. Here we review evidence regarding these various explanations for the ability of PARP inhibitors to selectively kill HR-deficient cancer cells.

  12. SETD2-Dependent Histone H3K36 Trimethylation Is Required for Homologous Recombination Repair and Genome Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia X. Pfister

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Modulating chromatin through histone methylation orchestrates numerous cellular processes. SETD2-dependent trimethylation of histone H3K36 is associated with active transcription. Here, we define a role for H3K36 trimethylation in homologous recombination (HR repair in human cells. We find that depleting SETD2 generates a mutation signature resembling RAD51 depletion at I-SceI-induced DNA double-strand break (DSB sites, with significantly increased deletions arising through microhomology-mediated end-joining. We establish a presynaptic role for SETD2 methyltransferase in HR, where it facilitates the recruitment of C-terminal binding protein interacting protein (CtIP and promotes DSB resection, allowing Replication Protein A (RPA and RAD51 binding to DNA damage sites. Furthermore, reducing H3K36me3 levels by overexpressing KDM4A/JMJD2A, an oncogene and H3K36me3/2 demethylase, or an H3.3K36M transgene also reduces HR repair events. We propose that error-free HR repair within H3K36me3-decorated transcriptionally active genomic regions promotes cell homeostasis. Moreover, these findings provide insights as to why oncogenic mutations cluster within the H3K36me3 axis.

  13. A sensitive and rapid assay for homologous recombination in mosquito cells: impact of vector topology and implications for gene targeting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Yuguang

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent progress in insect transgenesis has been dramatic but existing transposon-based approaches are constrained by position effects and potential instability. Gene targeting would bring a number of benefits, however progress requires a better understanding of the mechanisms involved. Much can be learned in vitro since extrachromosomal recombination occurs at high frequency, facilitating the study of multiple events and the impact of structural changes among the recombining molecules. We have investigated homologous recombination in mosquito cells through restoration of luciferase activity from deleted substrates. The implications of this work for the construction of insect gene targeting vectors are discussed. Results We show that linear targeting vectors are significantly more efficient than circular ones and that recombination is stimulated by introducing double-strand breaks into, or near, the region of homology. Single-strand annealing represents a very efficient pathway but may not be feasible for targeting unbroken chromosomes. Using circular plasmids to mimic chromosomal targets, one-sided invasion appears to be the predominant pathway for homologous recombination. Non-homologous end joining reactions also occur and may be utilised in gene targeting if double-strand breaks are first introduced into the target site. Conclusions We describe a rapid, sensitive assay for extrachromosomal homologous recombination in mosquito cells. Variations in substrate topology suggest that single-strand annealing and one-sided invasion represent the predominant pathways, although non-homologous end joining reactions also occur. One-sided invasion of circular chromosomal mimics by linear vectors might therefore be used in vitro to investigate the design and efficiency of gene targeting strategies.

  14. Control of helicase loading in the coupled DNA replication and recombination systems of bacteriophage T4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branagan, Amy M; Klein, Jenny A; Jordan, Christian S; Morrical, Scott W

    2014-01-31

    The Gp59 protein of bacteriophage T4 promotes DNA replication by loading the replicative helicase, Gp41, onto replication forks and recombination intermediates. Gp59 also blocks DNA synthesis by Gp43 polymerase until Gp41 is loaded, ensuring that synthesis is tightly coupled to unwinding. The distinct polymerase blocking and helicase loading activities of Gp59 likely involve different binding interactions with DNA and protein partners. Here, we investigate how interactions of Gp59 with DNA and Gp32, the T4 single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding protein, are related to these activities. A previously characterized mutant, Gp59-I87A, exhibits markedly reduced affinity for ssDNA and pseudo-fork DNA substrates. We demonstrate that on Gp32-covered ssDNA, the DNA binding defect of Gp59-I87A is not detrimental to helicase loading and translocation. In contrast, on pseudo-fork DNA the I87A mutation is detrimental to helicase loading and unwinding in the presence or absence of Gp32. Other results indicate that Gp32 binding to lagging strand ssDNA relieves the blockage of Gp43 polymerase activity by Gp59, whereas the inhibition of Gp43 exonuclease activity is maintained. Our findings suggest that Gp59-Gp32 and Gp59-DNA interactions perform separate but complementary roles in T4 DNA metabolism; Gp59-Gp32 interactions are needed to load Gp41 onto D-loops, and other nucleoprotein structures containing clusters of Gp32. Gp59-DNA interactions are needed to load Gp41 onto nascent or collapsed replication forks lacking clusters of Gp32 and to coordinate bidirectional replication from T4 origins. The dual functionalities of Gp59 allow it to promote the initiation or re-start of DNA replication from a wide variety of recombination and replication intermediates.

  15. Generation of TALEN-mediated GRdim knock-in rats by homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce de León, Verónica; Mérillat, Anne-Marie; Tesson, Laurent; Anegón, Ignacio; Hummler, Edith

    2014-01-01

    Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALEN) are potential tools for precise genome engineering of laboratory animals. We report the first targeted genomic integration in the rat using TALENs (Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases) by homology-derived recombination (HDR). We assembled TALENs and designed a linear donor insert targeting a pA476T mutation in the rat Glucocorticoid Receptor (Nr3c1) namely GR(dim), that prevents receptor homodimerization in the mouse. TALEN mRNA and linear double-stranded donor were microinjected into rat one-cell embryos. Overall, we observed targeted genomic modifications in 17% of the offspring, indicating high TALEN cutting efficiency in rat zygotes.

  16. Transcriptionally active chromatin recruits homologous recombination at DNA double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aymard, François; Bugler, Beatrix; Schmidt, Christine K; Guillou, Emmanuelle; Caron, Pierre; Briois, Sébastien; Iacovoni, Jason S; Daburon, Virginie; Miller, Kyle M; Jackson, Stephen P; Legube, Gaëlle

    2014-04-01

    Although both homologous recombination (HR) and nonhomologous end joining can repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), the mechanisms by which one of these pathways is chosen over the other remain unclear. Here we show that transcriptionally active chromatin is preferentially repaired by HR. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq) to analyze repair of multiple DSBs induced throughout the human genome, we identify an HR-prone subset of DSBs that recruit the HR protein RAD51, undergo resection and rely on RAD51 for efficient repair. These DSBs are located in actively transcribed genes and are targeted to HR repair via the transcription elongation-associated mark trimethylated histone H3 K36. Concordantly, depletion of SETD2, the main H3 K36 trimethyltransferase, severely impedes HR at such DSBs. Our study thereby demonstrates a primary role in DSB repair of the chromatin context in which a break occurs.

  17. Generation of TALEN-mediated GRdim knock-in rats by homologous recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Ponce de León

    Full Text Available Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALEN are potential tools for precise genome engineering of laboratory animals. We report the first targeted genomic integration in the rat using TALENs (Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases by homology-derived recombination (HDR. We assembled TALENs and designed a linear donor insert targeting a pA476T mutation in the rat Glucocorticoid Receptor (Nr3c1 namely GR(dim, that prevents receptor homodimerization in the mouse. TALEN mRNA and linear double-stranded donor were microinjected into rat one-cell embryos. Overall, we observed targeted genomic modifications in 17% of the offspring, indicating high TALEN cutting efficiency in rat zygotes.

  18. Changes to DNA methylation and homologous recombination frequency in the progeny of stressed plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migicovsky, Zoë; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2013-02-01

    Plants undergo changes in response to biotic and abiotic stresses that help them adjust and survive. Some of these changes may even be passed on to progeny and eventually lead to adaptive evolution. Transgenerational changes in response to stress include alterations in DNA methylation and changes in homologous recombination frequency (HRF). The progeny of plants that were stressed often show elevated HRF as well as genomic hypermethylation, although specific loci that are beneficial in times of stress may be hypomethylated. One of the possible mechanisms responsible for passing the memory to the progeny involves small interfering RNAs; Dicer-like proteins, DCL2 and DCL3, are in part required for this process. However, while epigenetic modifications are often present in the untreated progeny of stressed plants, they are not usually sustained for multiple unexposed generations. Still, transgenerational inheritance of such changes has already begun to provide evidence for an important role of epigenetics in enhancing stress resistance.

  19. LEDGF (p75) promotes DNA-end resection and homologous recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Mads; Baude, Annika; Fugger, Kasper

    2012-01-01

    ) by the homologous recombination repair pathway. Depletion of LEDGF impairs the recruitment of C-terminal binding protein interacting protein (CtIP) to DNA DSBs and the subsequent CtIP-dependent DNA-end resection. LEDGF is constitutively associated with chromatin through its Pro-Trp-Trp-Pro (PWWP) domain that binds......Lens epithelium-derived growth factor p75 splice variant (LEDGF) is a chromatin-binding protein known for its antiapoptotic activity and ability to direct human immunodeficiency virus into active transcription units. Here we show that LEDGF promotes the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs...... preferentially to epigenetic methyl-lysine histone markers characteristic of active transcription units. LEDGF binds CtIP in a DNA damage-dependent manner, thereby enhancing its tethering to the active chromatin and facilitating its access to DNA DSBs. These data highlight the role of PWWP-domain proteins in DNA...

  20. The role of DNA double-strand breaks in spontaneous homologous recombination in S. cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lettier, Gaëlle; Feng, Q.; Mayolo, A.A. de

    2006-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a source of genomic instability and the loss of heterozygosity in mitotic cells. Since these events pose a severe health risk, it is important to understand the molecular events that cause spontaneous HR. In eukaryotes, high levels of HR are a normal feature...... of meiosis and result from the induction of a large number of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). By analogy, it is generally believed that the rare spontaneous mitotic HR events are due to repair of DNA DSBs that accidentally occur during mitotic growth. Here we provide the first direct evidence that most...... spontaneous mitotic HR in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is initiated by DNA lesions other than DSBs. Specifically, we describe a class of rad52 mutants that are fully proficient in inter- and intra-chromosomal mitotic HR, yet at the same time fail to repair DNA DSBs. The conclusions are drawn from genetic analyses...

  1. Nap1 stimulates homologous recombination by RAD51 and RAD54 in higher-ordered chromatin containing histone H1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, Shinichi; Takaku, Motoki; Ikura, Masae; Sun, Jiying; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Kobayashi, Wataru; Kinomura, Aiko; Osakabe, Akihisa; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Horikoshi, Yasunori; Fukuto, Atsuhiko; Matsuda, Ryo; Ura, Kiyoe; Tashiro, Satoshi; Ikura, Tsuyoshi; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2014-05-06

    Homologous recombination plays essential roles in mitotic DNA double strand break (DSB) repair and meiotic genetic recombination. In eukaryotes, RAD51 promotes the central homologous-pairing step during homologous recombination, but is not sufficient to overcome the reaction barrier imposed by nucleosomes. RAD54, a member of the ATP-dependent nucleosome remodeling factor family, is required to promote the RAD51-mediated homologous pairing in nucleosomal DNA. In higher eukaryotes, most nucleosomes form higher-ordered chromatin containing the linker histone H1. However, the mechanism by which RAD51/RAD54-mediated homologous pairing occurs in higher-ordered chromatin has not been elucidated. In this study, we found that a histone chaperone, Nap1, accumulates on DSB sites in human cells, and DSB repair is substantially decreased in Nap1-knockdown cells. We determined that Nap1 binds to RAD54, enhances the RAD54-mediated nucleosome remodeling by evicting histone H1, and eventually stimulates the RAD51-mediated homologous pairing in higher-ordered chromatin containing histone H1.

  2. Biochemical analysis of the human ENA/VASP-family proteins, MENA, VASP and EVL, in homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaku, Motoki; Ueno, Hiroyuki; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2011-06-01

    MENA, VASP and EVL are members of the ENA/VASP family of proteins and are involved in cytoplasmic actin remodeling. Previously, we found that EVL directly interacts with RAD51, an essential protein in the homologous recombinational repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and stimulates the RAD51-mediated recombination reactions in vitro. The EVL-knockdown MCF7 cells exhibited a clear reduction in RAD51-foci formation, suggesting that EVL may function in the DSB repair pathway through RAD51-mediated homologous recombination. However, the DSB repair defects were less significant in the EVL-knockdown cells, implying that two EVL paralogues, MENA and VASP, may complement the EVL function in human cells. Therefore, in the present study, we purified human MENA, VASP and EVL as recombinant proteins, and compared their biochemical activities in vitro. We found that all three proteins commonly exhibited the RAD51 binding, DNA binding and DNA-annealing activities. Stimulation of the RAD51-mediated homologous pairing was also observed with all three proteins. In addition, surface plasmon resonance analyses revealed that MENA, VASP and EVL mutually interacted. These results support the ideas that the ENA/VASP-family proteins are functionally redundant in homologous recombination, and that all three may be involved in the DSB repair pathway in humans.

  3. Homologous recombination mediates functional recovery of dysferlin deficiency following AAV5 gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William E Grose

    Full Text Available The dysferlinopathies comprise a group of untreatable muscle disorders including limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B, Miyoshi myopathy, distal anterior compartment syndrome, and rigid spine syndrome. As with other forms of muscular dystrophy, adeno-associated virus (AAV gene transfer is a particularly auspicious treatment strategy, however the size of the DYSF cDNA (6.5 kb negates packaging into traditional AAV serotypes known to express well in muscle (i.e. rAAV1, 2, 6, 8, 9. Potential advantages of a full cDNA versus a mini-gene include: maintaining structural-functional protein domains, evading protein misfolding, and avoiding novel epitopes that could be immunogenic. AAV5 has demonstrated unique plasticity with regards to packaging capacity and recombination of virions containing homologous regions of cDNA inserts has been implicated in the generation of full-length transcripts. Herein we show for the first time in vivo that homologous recombination following AAV5.DYSF gene transfer leads to the production of full length transcript and protein. Moreover, gene transfer of full-length dysferlin protein in dysferlin deficient mice resulted in expression levels sufficient to correct functional deficits in the diaphragm and importantly in skeletal muscle membrane repair. Intravascular regional gene transfer through the femoral artery produced high levels of transduction and enabled targeting of specific muscle groups affected by the dysferlinopathies setting the stage for potential translation to clinical trials. We provide proof of principle that AAV5 mediated delivery of dysferlin is a highly promising strategy for treatment of dysferlinopathies and has far-reaching implications for the therapeutic delivery of other large genes.

  4. Generation of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene knockout rabbits by homologous recombination and gene trapping through somatic cell nuclear transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Mingru Yin; Weihua Jiang; Zhenfu Fang; Pengcheng Kong; Fengying Xing; Yao Li; Xuejin Chen; Shangang Li

    2015-01-01

    The rabbit is a common animal model that has been employed in studies on various human disorders, and the generation of genetically modified rabbit lines is highly desirable. Female rabbits have been successfully cloned from cumulus cells, and the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology is well established. The present study generated hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene knockout rabbits using recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated homologous recombination and SCNT....

  5. Rad51 Paralogs Remodel Pre-synaptic Rad51 Filaments to Stimulate Homologous Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Martin R G; Špírek, Mário; Chaurasiya, Kathy R; Ward, Jordan D; Carzaniga, Raffaella; Yu, Xiong; Egelman, Edward H; Collinson, Lucy M; Rueda, David; Krejci, Lumir; Boulton, Simon J

    2015-07-16

    Repair of DNA double strand breaks by homologous recombination (HR) is initiated by Rad51 filament nucleation on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), which catalyzes strand exchange with homologous duplex DNA. BRCA2 and the Rad51 paralogs are tumor suppressors and critical mediators of Rad51. To gain insight into Rad51 paralog function, we investigated a heterodimeric Rad51 paralog complex, RFS-1/RIP-1, and uncovered the molecular basis by which Rad51 paralogs promote HR. Unlike BRCA2, which nucleates RAD-51-ssDNA filaments, RFS-1/RIP-1 binds and remodels pre-synaptic filaments to a stabilized, "open," and flexible conformation, in which the ssDNA is more accessible to nuclease digestion and RAD-51 dissociation rate is reduced. Walker box mutations in RFS-1, which abolish filament remodeling, fail to stimulate RAD-51 strand exchange activity, demonstrating that remodeling is essential for RFS-1/RIP-1 function. We propose that Rad51 paralogs stimulate HR by remodeling the Rad51 filament, priming it for strand exchange with the template duplex. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A method mediated AAVS1 recombination with Rep mRNA and homologous arms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiantong Xiang; Linian Huang; Sijia Guo; Fang Chen; Xiaojun Zha; Bing Chen; Liangdan Sun; Haisheng Zhou; Depei Liu

    2012-01-01

    The adeno-associated virus (AAV) genome can be stably integrated into the AAVS1 region of human chromosome 19 (19q13.4-qter) with the assistance of Rep68/78 protein.In the current models of AAV integration in a locusspecific manner,the foreign genes were randomly inserted into the AAVS1 region,which contains several functional genes.As random integration in this region may lead to insertion mutations and disrupt normal gene expression or critical signaling pathways of the host cells,it is necessary to find a precise insertion site in the AAVS1 region.Homologous recombination is the most accurate and versatile mechanism for such site-specific integration.To investigate site-specific integration in the AAVS1 region,a targeted vector containing two homologous arms derived from AAVS1 and a reporter gene was transfected into HeLa cells with or without Rep68/78 mRNA.The results indicated that transient expression of Rep68/78 in HeLa cells improved integration of the gene of interest at the AAVS1 locus in a site-specific manner.Compared with locus-specific integration reported in previous studies,sitespecific integration may minimize the risk associated with random DNA integration in the AAVS1 region,which might be helpful for gene therapy.

  7. ATM release at resected double-strand breaks provides heterochromatin reconstitution to facilitate homologous recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Geuting

    Full Text Available Non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ and homologous recombination (HR represent the two main pathways for repairing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. During the G2 phase of the mammalian cell cycle, both processes can operate and chromatin structure is one important factor which determines DSB repair pathway choice. ATM facilitates the repair of heterochromatic DSBs by phosphorylating and inactivating the heterochromatin building factor KAP-1, leading to local chromatin relaxation. Here, we show that ATM accumulation and activity is strongly diminished at DSBs undergoing end-resection during HR. Such DSBs remain unrepaired in cells devoid of the HR factors BRCA2, XRCC3 or RAD51. Strikingly, depletion of KAP-1 or expression of phospho-mimic KAP-1 allows repair of resected DSBs in the absence of BRCA2, XRCC3 or RAD51 by an erroneous PARP-dependent alt-NHEJ process. We suggest that DSBs in heterochromatin elicit initial local heterochromatin relaxation which is reversed during HR due to the release of ATM from resection break ends. The restored heterochromatic structure facilitates HR and prevents usage of error-prone alternative processes.

  8. A phosphorylation-deubiquitination cascade regulates the BRCA2-RAD51 axis in homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Kuntian; Li, Lei; Li, Yunhui; Wu, Chenming; Yin, Yujiao; Chen, Yuping; Deng, Min; Nowsheen, Somaira; Yuan, Jian; Lou, Zhenkun

    2016-12-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is one of the major DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathways in mammalian cells. Defects in HR trigger genomic instability and result in cancer predisposition. The defining step of HR is homologous strand exchange directed by the protein RAD51, which is recruited to DSBs by BRCA2. However, the regulation of the BRCA2-RAD51 axis remains unclear. Here we report that ubiquitination of RAD51 hinders RAD51-BRCA2 interaction, while deubiquitination of RAD51 facilitates RAD51-BRCA2 binding and RAD51 recruitment and thus is critical for proper HR. Mechanistically, in response to DNA damage, the deubiquitinase UCHL3 is phosphorylated and activated by ATM. UCHL3, in turn, deubiquitinates RAD51 and promotes the binding between RAD51 and BRCA2. Overexpression of UCHL3 renders breast cancer cells resistant to radiation and chemotherapy, while depletion of UCHL3 sensitizes cells to these treatments, suggesting a determinant role of UCHL3 in cancer therapy. Overall, we identify UCHL3 as a novel regulator of DNA repair and reveal a model in which a phosphorylation-deubiquitination cascade dynamically regulates the BRCA2-RAD51 pathway. © 2016 Luo et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  9. Homologous recombination preferentially repairs heat-induced DNA double-strand breaks in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Akihisa; Mori, Eiichiro; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Kajihara, Atsuhisa; Kirita, Tadaaki; Pittman, Douglas L; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Ohnishi, Takeo

    2016-11-13

    Heat shock induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), but the precise mechanism of repairing heat-induced damage is unclear. Here, we investigated the DNA repair pathways involved in cell death induced by heat shock. B02, a specific inhibitor of human RAD51 (homologous recombination; HR), and NU7026, a specific inhibitor of DNA-PK (non-homologous end-joining; NHEJ), were used for survival assays of human cancer cell lines with different p53-gene status. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking Lig4 (NHEJ) and/or Rad54 (HR) were used for survival assays and a phosphorylated histone H2AX at Ser139 (γH2AX) assay. MEFs lacking Rad51d (HR) were used for survival assays. SPD8 cells were used to measure HR frequency after heat shock. Human cancer cells were more sensitive to heat shock in the presence of B02 despite their p53-gene status, and the effect of B02 on heat sensitivity was specific to the G2 phase. Rad54-deficient MEFs were sensitive to heat shock and showed prolonged γH2AX signals following heat shock. Rad51d-deficient MEFs were also sensitive to heat shock. Moreover, heat shock-stimulated cells had increased HR. The HR pathway plays an important role in the survival of mammalian cells against death induced by heat shock via the repair of heat-induced DNA DSBs.

  10. Functional Analysis of Homologous Recombination Repair Proteins HerA and NurA in the Thermophile Sulfolobus islandicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Qihong

    A number of DNA lesions are generated in each cell every day, among which double-stranded breaks (DSBs) constitute one of the most detrimental types of DNA damage. DSBs lead to genome instability, cell death, or even tumorigenesis in human, if not repaired timely. Two main pathways are known...... for DSB repair, homologous recombination repair (HRR) and Non-homologous end joint (NHEJ). HR repairs DSBs using a homologous DNA molecule as a template resulting in error free DNA repair, whereas NHEJ promotes direct re-ligation of the broken DNA ends in an error-prone manner. In eukaryotes DSBs occurred...

  11. Intertypic modular exchanges of genomic segments by homologous recombination at universally conserved segments in human adenovirus species D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Gabriel; Koyanagi, Kanako O; Aoki, Koki; Kitaichi, Nobuyoshi; Ohno, Shigeaki; Kaneko, Hisatoshi; Ishida, Susumu; Watanabe, Hidemi

    2014-08-15

    Human adenovirus species D (HAdV-D), which is composed of clinically and epidemiologically important pathogens worldwide, contains more taxonomic "types" than any other species of the genus Mastadenovirus, although the mechanisms accounting for the high level of diversity remain to be disclosed. Recent studies of known and new types of HAdV-D have indicated that intertypic recombination between distant types contributes to the increasing diversity of the species. However, such findings raise the question as to how homologous recombination events occur between diversified types since homologous recombination is suppressed as nucleotide sequences diverge. In order to address this question, we investigated the distribution of the recombination boundaries in comparison with the landscape of intergenomic sequence conservation assessed according to the synonymous substitution rate (dS). The results revealed that specific genomic segments are conserved between even the most distantly related genomes; we call these segments "universally conserved segments" (UCSs). These findings suggest that UCSs facilitate homologous recombination, resulting in intergenomic segmental exchanges of UCS-flanking genomic regions as recombination modules. With the aid of such a mechanism, the haploid genomes of HAdV-Ds may have been reshuffled, resulting in chimeric genomes out of diversified repertoires in the HAdV-D population analogous to the MHC region reshuffled via crossing over in vertebrates. In addition, some HAdVs with chimeric genomes may have had the opportunity to avoid host immune responses thereby causing epidemics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. TRF2 is required for repair of nontelomeric DNA double-strand breaks by homologous recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhiyong; Seluanov, Andrei; Jiang, Ying; Gorbunova, Vera

    2007-01-01

    TRF2 (telomeric repeat binding factor 2) is an essential component of the telomeric cap, where it forms and stabilizes the T-loop junctions. TRF2 forms the T-loops by stimulating strand invasion of the 3′ overhang into duplex DNA. TRF2 also has been shown to localize to nontelomeric DNA double-strand breaks, but its functional role in DNA repair has not been examined. Here, we present evidence that TRF2 is involved in homologous recombination (HR) repair of nontelomeric double-strand breaks. Depletion of TRF2 strongly inhibited HR and delayed the formation of Rad51 foci after γ-irradiation, whereas overexpression of TRF2 stimulated HR. Depletion of TRF2 had no effect on nonhomologous end-joining, and overexpression of TRF2 inhibited nonhomologous end-joining. We propose, based on our results and on the ability of TRF2 to mediate strand invasion, that TRF2 plays an essential role in HR by facilitating the formation of early recombination intermediates. PMID:17670947

  13. Genome-Wide Demethylation Promotes Triplet Repeat Instability Independently of Homologous Recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dion, Vincent; Lin, Yunfu; Price, Brandee A.; Fyffe, Sharyl L.; Seluanov, Andrei; Gorbunova, Vera; Wilson, John H.

    2008-01-01

    Trinucleotide repeat instability is intrinsic to a family of human neurodegenerative diseases. The mechanism leading to repeat length variation is unclear. We previously showed that treatment with the demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-aza-CdR) dramatically increases triplet repeat instability in mammalian cells. Based on previous reports that demethylation increases homologous recombination (HR), and our own observations that HR destabilizes triplet repeats, we hypothesized that demethylation alters repeat stability by stimulating HR. Here, we test that hypothesis at the Aprt (adenosine phosphoribosyl transferase) locus in CHO cells, where CpG demethylation and HR have both been shown to increase CAG repeat instability. We find that the rate of HR at the Aprt locus is not altered by demethylation. The spectrum of recombinants, however, was shifted from the usual 6:1 ratio of conversions to crossovers to more equal proportions in 5-aza-CdR-treated cells. The subtle influences of demethylation on HR at the Aprt locus are not sufficient to account for its dramatic effects on repeat instability. We conclude that 5-aza-CdR promotes triplet repeat instability independently of HR. PMID:18083071

  14. E. coli recA gene improves gene targeted homologous recombination in Mycoplasma hyorhinis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishag, Hassan Z A; Xiong, Qiyan; Liu, Maojun; Feng, Zhixin; Shao, Guoqing

    2017-05-01

    Mycoplasma hyorhinis is an opportunistic pathogen of pigs. Recently, it has been shown to transform cell cultures, increasing the attention of the researchers. Studies on the pathogenesis require specific genetic tool that is not yet available for the pathogen. To address this limitation, we constructed two suicide plasmids pGEMT-tetM/LR and pGEMT-recA-tetM/LR having a tetracycline resistance marker flanked by two hemolysin gene arms. The latter plasmid encodes an E. coli recA, a gene involved in DNA recombination, repair and maintenance of DNA. Using inactivation of the hemolysin gene, which results in a detectable and measurable phenotype, we found that each plasmid can disrupt the hemolysin gene of M. hyorhinis through a double cross-over homologous recombination. However, inclusion of the E. coli recA gene in the construct resulted in 9-fold increase in the frequency of hemolysin gene mutants among the screened tetracycline resistance colonies. The resultant hemolysin mutant strain lacks the ability to lyse mouse bed blood cells (RBC) when tested in vitro (p<0.001). The host-plasmid system described in this study, has applications for the genetic manipulation of this pathogen and potentially other mycoplasmas.

  15. Homology-independent discovery of replicating pathogenic circular RNAs by deep sequencing and a new computational algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qingfa; Wang, Ying; Cao, Mengji; Pantaleo, Vitantonio; Burgyan, Joszef; Li, Wan-Xiang; Ding, Shou-Wei

    2012-03-06

    A common challenge in pathogen discovery by deep sequencing approaches is to recognize viral or subviral pathogens in samples of diseased tissue that share no significant homology with a known pathogen. Here we report a homology-independent approach for discovering viroids, a distinct class of free circular RNA subviral pathogens that encode no protein and are known to infect plants only. Our approach involves analyzing the sequences of the total small RNAs of the infected plants obtained by deep sequencing with a unique computational algorithm, progressive filtering of overlapping small RNAs (PFOR). Viroid infection triggers production of viroid-derived overlapping siRNAs that cover the entire genome with high densities. PFOR retains viroid-specific siRNAs for genome assembly by progressively eliminating nonoverlapping small RNAs and those that overlap but cannot be assembled into a direct repeat RNA, which is synthesized from circular or multimeric repeated-sequence templates during viroid replication. We show that viroids from the two known families are readily identified and their full-length sequences assembled by PFOR from small RNAs sequenced from infected plants. PFOR analysis of a grapevine library further identified a viroid-like circular RNA 375 nt long that shared no significant sequence homology with known molecules and encoded active hammerhead ribozymes in RNAs of both plus and minus polarities, which presumably self-cleave to release monomer from multimeric replicative intermediates. A potential application of the homology-independent approach for viroid discovery in plant and animal species where RNA replication triggers the biogenesis of siRNAs is discussed.

  16. BTK gene targeting by homologous recombination using a helper-dependent adenovirus/adeno-associated virus hybrid vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, H; Ishimura, M; Ochiai, M; Takada, H; Kusuhara, K; Nakatsu, Y; Tsuzuki, T; Mitani, K; Hara, T

    2016-02-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is one of the most common humoral immunodeficiencies, which is caused by mutations in Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) gene. To examine the possibility of using gene therapy for XLA, we constructed a helper-dependent adenovirus/adeno-associated virus BTK targeting vector (HD-Ad.AAV BTK vector) composed of a genomic sequence containing BTK exons 6-19 and a green fluorescence protein-hygromycin cassette driven by a cytomegalovirus promoter. We first used NALM-6, a human male pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line, as a recipient to measure the efficiency of gene targeting by homologous recombination. We identified 10 clones with the homologous recombination of the BTK gene among 107 hygromycin-resistant stable clones isolated from two independent experiments. We next used cord blood CD34⁺ cells as the recipient cells for the gene targeting. We isolated colonies grown in medium containing cytokines and hygromycin. We found that the targeting of the BTK gene occurred in four of the 755 hygromycin-resistant colonies. Importantly, the gene targeting was also observed in CD19⁺ lymphoid progenitor cells that were differentiated from the homologous recombinant CD34⁺ cells during growth in selection media. Our study shows the potential for the BTK gene therapy using the HD-Ad.AAV BTK vector via homologous recombination in hematopoietic stem cells.

  17. The de-ubiquitylating enzymes USP26 and USP37 regulate homologous recombination by counteracting RAP80

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Typas, Dimitris; Luijsterburg, Martijn S; Wiegant, Wouter W

    2015-01-01

    conjugates through RAP80 is known to be inhibitory to DSB repair by homologous recombination (HR). However, the precise regulation of this mechanism remains poorly understood. Through genetic screens we identified USP26 and USP37 as key de-ubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs) that limit the repressive impact of RNF...

  18. [Effect of endonuclease G depletion on plasmid DNA uptake and levels of homologous recombination in hela cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misic, V; El-Mogy, M; Geng, S; Haj-Ahmad, Y

    2016-01-01

    Endonuclease G (EndoG) is a mitochondrial apoptosis regulator that also has roles outside of programmed cell death. It has been implicated as a defence DNase involved in the degradation of exogenous DNA after transfection of mammalian cells and in homologous recombination of viral and endogenous DNA. In this study, we looked at the effect of EndoG depletion on plasmid DNA uptake and the levels of homologous recombination in HeLa cells. We show that the proposed defence role of EndoG against uptake of non-viral DNA vectors does not extend to the cervical carcinoma HeLa cells, as targeting of EndoG expression by RNA interference failed to increase intracellular plasmid DNA levels. However, reducing EndoG levels in HeLa cells resulted in a statistically significant reduction of homologous recombination between two plasmid DNA substrates. These findings suggest that non-viral DNA vectors are also substrates for EndoG in its role in homologous recombination.

  19. Cloning of human and mouse genes homologous to RAD52, a yeast gene involved in DNA repair and recombination.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.F.R. Muris; O.Y. Bezzubova (Olga); J-M. Buerstedde; K. Vreeken; A.S. Balajee; C.J. Osgood; C. Troelstra (Christine); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); K. Ostermann; H. Schmidt (Henning); A.T. Natarajan; J.C.J. Eeken; P.H.M. Lohmann (Paul); A. Pastink (Albert)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe RAD52 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for recombinational repair of double-strand breaks. Using degenerate oligonucleotides based on conserved amino acid sequences of RAD52 and rad22, its counterpart from Schizosaccharomyces pombe, RAD52 homologs from man and mouse were

  20. A highly efficient site-specific integration strategy using combination of homologous recombination and the ΦC31 integrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Hailong; Huang, Ying; Ma, Qingwen; Ren, Zhaorui; Huang, Shuzhen; Zeng, Fanyi; Zeng, Yitao

    2013-09-20

    The introduction of double-strand breaks (DSBs) at target sites could greatly enhance homologous recombination, and engineered nucleases, such as zinc finger and transcription activator-like effector nucleases, have been successfully developed for making such breaks. In this study, we present a highly efficient site-specific integration strategy based on homologous recombination and ΦC31 integrase. An attB sequence was introduced at the homologous arm of an insertion targeting vector. DSBs at the target locus and donor were then simultaneously generated by the ΦC31 integrase when co-transfected with the donor vector, consequently stimulating homologous recombination. The results demonstrated that our strategy is feasible and the efficiency at the BF4 target site, which we previously identified in the bovine genome, was as high as 93%. The frequency at another site (BF10) was almost two-fold greater in comparison to the vector without homologous arms. This technology requires no sophisticated nuclease design efforts, and the off-target effect is reduced by ΦC31 integrase compared to the use of engineered nucleases, thereby offering a simple and safe way to effectively express a donor gene at a desired locus. This development has great potential value, especially in transgenesis or gene therapy applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. High efficient generation of replication-defective adenoviruses containing thymidine kinase by homogeneous recombination in bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CONG Tie-chuan; LU Zhe-ming; LI Yong; ZHENG Li; QIN Yong

    2007-01-01

    Background Suicide gene therapy is a widely used molecular treatment for head and neck cancer. In this study, we try to use the method of homogenous recombination in bacteria to clone thymidine kinase gene (tk)-a kind of suicide gene to adenovirus backbone vectors for the construction of replication-defective adenoviruses.Methods pAdTrack-CMV/tk was constructed through subclone of a restriction endonuclease fragment including thymidine kinase gene from plasmid pCMV-tk to another plasmid pAdTrack-CMV, and then co-transfected with supercoiled pAdEasy-1, which was an adenoviral backbone vector except for deletions of E1 and E3, to competent E.coli BJ5183 for homogenous recombination using electroporation procedure. With the same method, pAdTrack-CMV was also co-transformed with pAdEasy-1 for homogenous recombination in BJ5183. Identified with restriction endonuclease Pacl and polymerase chain reaction (PCR), plasmids pAd-GFP/tk and pAd-GFP were successfully constructed. Each of them was digested with Pacl and sequently transfected into human embryo kidney 293 cells (HEK293) using Lipofectamine 2000.Results Comet-like adenovirus-producing foci of Ad-GFP/tk and Ad-GFP were observed after 5 to 7 days of cell culture.After twelve days of packaging, the replication-defective adenoviruses were collected. Identified with PCR, thymidine kinase gene was successfully constructed into Ad-GFP/tk.Conclusion The replication-defective adenoviruses containing thymidine kinase can be constructed more easily by homogenous recombination in bacteria than conventional techniques.

  2. Target-selective homologous recombination cloning for high-throughput generation of monoclonal antibodies from single plasma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isobe Masaharu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular cloning of functional immunoglobulin genes from single plasma cells is one of the most promising technologies for the rapid development of monoclonal antibody drugs. However, the proper insertion of PCR-amplified immunoglobulin genes into expression vectors remains an obstacle to the high-throughput production of recombinant monoclonal antibodies. Results We developed a single-step cloning method, target-selective homologous recombination (TS-HR, in which PCR-amplified immunoglobulin variable genes were selectively inserted into vectors, even in the presence of nonspecifically amplified DNA. TS-HR utilizes Red/ET-mediated homologous recombination with a target-selective vector (TS-vector with unique homology arms on its termini. Using TS-HR, immunoglobulin variable genes were cloned directly into expression vectors by co-transforming unpurified PCR products and the TS-vector into E. coli. Furthermore, the high cloning specificity of TS-HR allowed plasmids to be extracted from pools of transformed bacteria without screening single colonies for correct clones. We present a one-week protocol for the production of recombinant mouse monoclonal antibodies from large numbers of single plasma cells. Conclusion The time requirements and limitations of traditional cloning procedures for the production of recombinant immunoglobulins have been significantly reduced with the development of the TS-HR cloning technique.

  3. Efficient detection of unpaired DNA requires a member of the rad54-like family of homologous recombination proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarajeewa, Dilini A; Sauls, Pegan A; Sharp, Kevin J; Smith, Zachary J; Xiao, Hua; Groskreutz, Katie M; Malone, Tyler L; Boone, Erin C; Edwards, Kevin A; Shiu, Patrick K T; Larson, Erik D; Hammond, Thomas M

    2014-11-01

    Meiotic silencing by unpaired DNA (MSUD) is a process that detects unpaired regions between homologous chromosomes and silences them for the duration of sexual development. While the phenomenon of MSUD is well recognized, the process that detects unpaired DNA is poorly understood. In this report, we provide two lines of evidence linking unpaired DNA detection to a physical search for DNA homology. First, we have found that a putative SNF2-family protein (SAD-6) is required for efficient MSUD in Neurospora crassa. SAD-6 is closely related to Rad54, a protein known to facilitate key steps in the repair of double-strand breaks by homologous recombination. Second, we have successfully masked unpaired DNA by placing identical transgenes at slightly different locations on homologous chromosomes. This masking falls apart when the distance between the transgenes is increased. We propose a model where unpaired DNA detection during MSUD is achieved through a spatially constrained search for DNA homology. The identity of SAD-6 as a Rad54 paralog suggests that this process may be similar to the searching mechanism used during homologous recombination. Copyright © 2014 by the Genetics Society of America.

  4. A new method for rapidly generating gene-targeting vectors by engineering BACs through homologous recombination in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotta-de-Almeida, Vinicius; Schonhoff, Susan; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Leiter, Andrew; Snapper, Scott B

    2003-09-01

    Generating knockout mice is still an expensive and highly time-consuming process. Target construct generation, the first labor-intensive step in this process, requires the manipulation of large fragments of DNA and numerous, and often cumbersome, cloning steps. Here we show the development of a rapid approach for generating targeting constructs that capitalizes on efficient homologous recombination between linear DNA fragments and circular plasmids in Escherichia coli ("recombineering"), the availability of bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs), and the accessibility of the sequence of the mouse genome. Employing recombineering, we demonstrate with only 1-2 template plasmids, short homologies (40-50bp) between donor and target DNA, and one subcloning step that we can efficiently manipulate BACs in situ to generate a complicated targeting vector. This procedure avoids the need to construct or screen genomic libraries and permits the generation of most standard, conditional, or knock-in targeting vectors, often within two weeks.

  5. Crystal structure of the homology domain of the eukaryotic DNA replication proteins Sld3/Treslin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itou, Hiroshi; Muramatsu, Sachiko; Shirakihara, Yasuo; Araki, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-02

    The initiation of eukaryotic chromosomal DNA replication requires the formation of an active replicative helicase at the replication origins of chromosomal DNA. Yeast Sld3 and its metazoan counterpart Treslin are the hub proteins mediating protein associations critical for the helicase formation. Here, we show the crystal structure of the central domain of Sld3 that is conserved in Sld3/Treslin family of proteins. The domain consists of two segments with 12 helices and is sufficient to bind to Cdc45, the essential helicase component. The structure model of the Sld3-Cdc45 complex, which is crucial for the formation of the active helicase, is proposed.

  6. Suppression of homologous recombination sensitizes human tumor cells to IGF-1R inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodhia, Kunal A; Gao, Shan; Aleksic, Tamara; Esashi, Fumiko; Macaulay, Valentine M

    2015-06-15

    Inhibition of type 1 IGF receptor (IGF-1R) sensitizes to DNA-damaging cancer treatments, and delays repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) by non-homologous end-joining and homologous recombination (HR). In a recent screen for mediators of resistance to IGF-1R inhibitor AZ12253801, we identified RAD51, required for the strand invasion step of HR. These findings prompted us to test the hypothesis that IGF-1R-inhibited cells accumulate DSBs formed at endogenous DNA lesions, and depend on residual HR for their repair. Indeed, initial experiments showed time-dependent accumulation of γH2AX foci in IGF-1R -inhibited or -depleted prostate cancer cells. We then tested effects of suppressing HR, and found that RAD51 depletion enhanced AZ12253801 sensitivity in PTEN wild-type prostate cancer cells but not in cells lacking functional PTEN. Similar sensitization was induced in prostate cancer cells by depletion of BRCA2, required for RAD51 loading onto DNA, and in BRCA2(-/-) colorectal cancer cells, compared with isogenic BRCA2(+/-) cells. We also assessed chemical HR inhibitors, finding that RAD51 inhibitor BO2 blocked RAD51 focus formation and sensitized to AZ12253801. Finally, we tested CDK1 inhibitor RO-3306, which impairs HR by inhibiting CDK1-mediated BRCA1 phosphorylation. R0-3306 suppressed RAD51 focus formation consistent with HR attenuation, and sensitized prostate cancer cells to IGF-1R inhibition, with 2.4-fold reduction in AZ12253801 GI50 and 13-fold reduction in GI80. These data suggest that responses to IGF-1R inhibition are enhanced by genetic and chemical approaches to suppress HR, defining a population of cancers (PTEN wild-type, BRCA mutant) that may be intrinsically sensitive to IGF-1R inhibitory drugs. © 2014 UICC.

  7. Bcl-2 inhibits nuclear homologous recombination by localizing BRCA1 to the endomembranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laulier, Corentin; Barascu, Aurélia; Guirouilh-Barbat, Josée; Pennarun, Gaëlle; Le Chalony, Catherine; Chevalier, François; Palierne, Gaëlle; Bertrand, Pascale; Verbavatz, Jean Marc; Lopez, Bernard S

    2011-05-15

    Genetic stability requires coordination of a network of pathways including DNA repair/recombination and apoptosis. In addition to its canonical anti-apoptotic role, Bcl-2 negatively impacts genome stability. In this study, we identified the breast cancer tumor suppressor BRCA1, which plays an essential role in homologous recombination (HR), as a target for Bcl-2 in the repression of HR. Indeed, ionizing radiation-induced BRCA1 foci assembly was repressed when Bcl-2 was expressed ectopically, in human SV40 fibroblasts, or spontaneously, in lymphoma t(14:18) cells and in HeLa and H460 cancer cell lines. Moreover, we showed that the transmembrane (TM) domain of Bcl-2 was required for both inhibition of BRCA1 foci assembly and the inhibition of HR induced by a double-strand break targeted into an intrachromosomal HR substrate by the meganuclease I-SceI. Fluorescence confocal microscopy, proximity ligation assay, and electron microscopy analyses as well as Western blot analysis of subcellular fractions showed that Bcl-2 and BRCA1 colocalized to mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum in a process requiring the TM domain of Bcl-2. Targeting BRCA1 to the endomembranes depletes BRCA1 from the nucleus and, thus, accounts for the inhibition of HR. Furthermore, our findings support an apoptosis-stimulatory role for the cytosolic form of BRCA1, suggesting a new tumor suppressor function of BRCA1. Together, our results reveal a new mode of BRCA1 regulation and for HR in the maintenance of genome stability.

  8. Mitochondrial genome rearrangements in glomus species triggered by homologous recombination between distinct mtDNA haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudet, Denis; Terrat, Yves; Halary, Sébastien; de la Providencia, Ivan Enrique; Hijri, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Comparative mitochondrial genomics of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) provide new avenues to overcome long-lasting obstacles that have hampered studies aimed at understanding the community structure, diversity, and evolution of these multinucleated and genetically polymorphic organisms.AMF mitochondrial (mt) genomes are homogeneous within isolates, and their intergenic regions harbor numerous mobile elements that have rapidly diverged, including homing endonuclease genes, small inverted repeats, and plasmid-related DNA polymerase genes (dpo), making them suitable targets for the development of reliable strain-specific markers. However, these elements may also lead to genome rearrangements through homologous recombination, although this has never previously been reported in this group of obligate symbiotic fungi. To investigate whether such rearrangements are present and caused by mobile elements in AMF, the mitochondrial genomes from two Glomeraceae members (i.e., Glomus cerebriforme and Glomus sp.) with substantial mtDNA synteny divergence,were sequenced and compared with available glomeromycotan mitochondrial genomes. We used an extensive nucleotide/protein similarity network-based approach to investigated podiversity in AMF as well as in other organisms for which sequences are publicly available. We provide strong evidence of dpo-induced inter-haplotype recombination, leading to a reshuffled mitochondrial genome in Glomus sp. These findings raise questions as to whether AMF single spore cultivations artificially underestimate mtDNA genetic diversity.We assessed potential dpo dispersal mechanisms in AMF and inferred a robust phylogenetic relationship with plant mitochondrial plasmids. Along with other indirect evidence, our analyses indicate that members of the Glomeromycota phylum are potential donors of mitochondrial plasmids to plants.

  9. Arabidopsis thaliana siRNA biogenesis mutants have the lower frequency of homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Youli; Bilichak, Andriy; Golubov, Andrey; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2016-07-02

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are involved in the regulation of plant development and response to stress. We have previously shown that mutants impaired in Dicer-like 2 (DCL2), DCL3 and DCL4, RDR2, RDR6 and NPRD1 are partially impaired in their response to stress and dcl2 and dcl3 plants are also impaired in transgenerational response to stress, including changes in homologous recombination frequency (HRF). Here, we have analyzed genome stability of dcl2, dcl3, dcl4, dcl2 dcl3, dcl2 dcl3 dcl4 and rdr6 mutants by measuring the non-induced and the stress-induced recombination frequency. We found that all mutants had the lower spontaneous HRF. The analysis of strand breaks showed that all tested Arabidopsis mutants had a higher level of spontaneous strand breaks, suggesting that the lower HRF is not due to the unusually low level of breaks. Exposure to methyl methane sulfonate (MMS) resulted in an increase in the level of strand breaks in wild-type plants and a decrease in mutants. All mutants had the higher methylation of cytosines at CpG sites under non-induced conditions. Exposure to MMS resulted in a decrease in methylation level in wild-type plants and an increase in methylation in all dcl mutants. The expression of several DNA repair genes was altered in dcl4 plants under non-induced and induced conditions. Our data suggest that siRNA biogenesis may be essential for the maintenance of the genome stability and stress response in Arabidopsis.

  10. Generation of β-lactoglobulin-modified transgenic goats by homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongmei; Hu, Linyong; Liu, Jun; Chen, Huatao; Cui, Chenchen; Song, Yujie; Jin, Yaping; Zhang, Yong

    2016-12-01

    β-Lactoglobulin (BLG) is a dominant allergen present in the milk of goats and other ungulates, although it is not found in human breast milk. Thus, the presence of BLG restricts the consumption of goat's milk by humans. In the present study, we examined whether the disruption of the BLG gene in goats by homologous recombination (HR) reduced BLG content in goat's milk and decreased the allergic response to milk. In one approach, exon 2 of the BLG gene was efficiently targeted using HR with a BLG knockout vector. In a second approach to disrupt BLG gene expression and drive exogenous human α-lactalbumin (hLA) gene expression, two hLA knock-in constructs were used to target exons 1-4 of the BLG gene via HR, and expression of hLA was then confirmed in goat mammary epithelial cells in vitro. The recombinant clones from both approaches were then used for somatic cell nuclear transfer, generating two transgenic goats possessing a BLG knockout allele or site-specific hLA integration allele. Milk assays demonstrated a reduction in BLG levels in both the BLG knockout and hLA knock-in goats; furthermore, hLA was present in the hLA knock-in goat's milk. Allergenic analysis in mice indicated that the transgenic goat's milk was less allergenic than wild-type goat's milk. These results support the development of gene-targeted animals as an effective tool for reducing allergic reactions to milk and improving nutrition. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  11. Efficient generation of long-distance conditional alleles using recombineering and a dual selection strategy in replicate plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Hong-Erh

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conditional knockout mice are a useful tool to study the function of gene products in a tissue-specific or inducible manner. Classical approaches to generate targeting vectors for conditional alleles are often limited by the availability of suitable restriction sites. Furthermore, plasmid-based targeting vectors can only cover a few kB of DNA which precludes the generation of targeting vectors where the two loxP sites are placed far apart. These limitations have been overcome in the recent past by using homologous recombination of bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs in Escherichia coli to produce large targeting vector containing two different loxP-flanked selection cassettes so that a single targeting event is sufficient to introduce loxP-sites a great distances into the mouse genome. However, the final targeted allele should be free of selection cassettes and screening for correct removal of selection cassettes can be a laborious task. Therefore, we developed a new strategy to rapidly identify ES cells containing the desired allele. Results Using BAC recombineering we generated a single targeting vector which contained two different selection cassettes that were flanked by loxP-loxP sites or by FRT-FRT/loxP sites so that they could be deleted sequentially by Cre- and FLPe-recombinases, respectively. Transfected ES cells were first selected in the presence of both antibiotics in vitro before correctly targeted clones were identified by Southern blot. After transfection of a Cre recombinase expression plasmid ES cell clones were selected on replicate plates to identify those clones which maintained the FRT-FRT/loxP flanked cassette and lost the loxP-loxP flanked cassette. Using this strategy facilitated the identification of ES cell clones containing the desired allele before blastocyst injection. Conclusion The strategy of ES cell cultures in replicate plates proved to be very efficient in identifying ES cells that had

  12. Recombinant interferon-γ lentivirus co-infection inhibits adenovirus replication ex vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Zhang

    Full Text Available Recombinant interferon-γ (IFNγ production in cultured lentivirus (LV was explored for inhibition of target virus in cells co-infected with adenovirus type 5 (Ad5. The ability of three different promoters of CMV, EF1α and Ubiquitin initiating the enhanced green fluorescence protein (GFP activities within lentiviruses was systematically assessed in various cell lines, which showed that certain cell lines selected the most favorable promoter driving a high level of transgenic expression. Recombinant IFNγ lentivirus carrying CMV promoter (LV-CMV-IFNγ was generated to co-infect 293A cells with a viral surrogate of recombinant GFP Ad5 in parallel with LV-CMV-GFP control. The best morphologic conditions were observed from the two lentiviruses co-infected cells, while single adenovirus infected cells underwent clear pathologic changes. Viral load of adenoviruses from LV-CMV-IFNγ or LV-CMV-GFP co-infected cell cultures was significantly lower than that from adenovirus alone infected cells (P=0.005-0.041, and the reduction of adenoviral load in the co-infected cells was 86% and 61%, respectively. Ad5 viral load from LV-CMV-IFNγ co-infected cells was significantly lower than that from LV-CMV-GFP co-infection (P=0.032, which suggested that IFNγ rather than GFP could further enhance the inhibition of Ad5 replication in the recombinant lentivirus co-infected cells. The results suggest that LV-CMV-IFNγ co-infection could significantly inhibit the target virus replication and might be a potential approach for alternative therapy of severe viral diseases.

  13. Recombinant interferon-γ lentivirus co-infection inhibits adenovirus replication ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Yin, Sen; Tan, Wanlong; Xiao, Dong; Weng, Yunceng; Wang, Wenjing; Li, Tingting; Shi, Junwen; Shuai, Lifang; Li, Hongwei; Zhou, Jianhua; Allain, Jean-Pierre; Li, Chengyao

    2012-01-01

    Recombinant interferon-γ (IFNγ) production in cultured lentivirus (LV) was explored for inhibition of target virus in cells co-infected with adenovirus type 5 (Ad5). The ability of three different promoters of CMV, EF1α and Ubiquitin initiating the enhanced green fluorescence protein (GFP) activities within lentiviruses was systematically assessed in various cell lines, which showed that certain cell lines selected the most favorable promoter driving a high level of transgenic expression. Recombinant IFNγ lentivirus carrying CMV promoter (LV-CMV-IFNγ) was generated to co-infect 293A cells with a viral surrogate of recombinant GFP Ad5 in parallel with LV-CMV-GFP control. The best morphologic conditions were observed from the two lentiviruses co-infected cells, while single adenovirus infected cells underwent clear pathologic changes. Viral load of adenoviruses from LV-CMV-IFNγ or LV-CMV-GFP co-infected cell cultures was significantly lower than that from adenovirus alone infected cells (P=0.005-0.041), and the reduction of adenoviral load in the co-infected cells was 86% and 61%, respectively. Ad5 viral load from LV-CMV-IFNγ co-infected cells was significantly lower than that from LV-CMV-GFP co-infection (P=0.032), which suggested that IFNγ rather than GFP could further enhance the inhibition of Ad5 replication in the recombinant lentivirus co-infected cells. The results suggest that LV-CMV-IFNγ co-infection could significantly inhibit the target virus replication and might be a potential approach for alternative therapy of severe viral diseases.

  14. Scaffolding protein SPIDR/KIAA0146 connects the Bloom syndrome helicase with homologous recombination repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Li; Han, Jinhua; Liu, Ting; Dong, Shunli; Xie, Feng; Chen, Hongxia; Huang, Jun

    2013-06-25

    The Bloom syndrome gene product, BLM, is a member of the highly conserved RecQ family. An emerging concept is the BLM helicase collaborates with the homologous recombination (HR) machinery to help avoid undesirable HR events and to achieve a high degree of fidelity during the HR reaction. However, exactly how such coordination occurs in vivo is poorly understood. Here, we identified a protein termed SPIDR (scaffolding protein involved in DNA repair) as the link between BLM and the HR machinery. SPIDR independently interacts with BLM and RAD51 and promotes the formation of a BLM/RAD51-containing complex of biological importance. Consistent with its role as a scaffolding protein for the assembly of BLM and RAD51 foci, cells depleted of SPIDR show increased rate of sister chromatid exchange and defects in HR. Moreover, SPIDR depletion leads to genome instability and causes hypersensitivity to DNA damaging agents. We propose that, through providing a scaffold for the cooperation of BLM and RAD51 in a multifunctional DNA-processing complex, SPIDR not only regulates the efficiency of HR, but also dictates the specific HR pathway.

  15. Nanog reporter system in mouse embryonic stem cells based on highly efficient BAC homologous recombination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Nanog is a novel transcription factor specifically expressed in mouse embryonic stem cells (mES cells). It has been reported that Nanog plays an essential role in maintaining multi-potency of ES cells. The expression of Nanog is very sensitive to ES cells differentiation, making Nanog one of the best markers to indicate the status of ES cells. In this study, we developed an efficient method to construct Nanog promoter driven EGFP reporter system based on the BAC homologous recombination. We further generated a Nanog-EGFP reporter mES cell line. This reporter mES cell line exhibited features similar to those of normal mES cells, and the EGFP reporter efficiently reflected the expression of Nanog, indicating the differentiation status of mES cells. We achieved a reliable experimental reporter system to research self-renewal and differentiation of mES cells. The system could facilitate research on culture system of mES cells and researches on the expression and regulation of Nanog and other related factors in mES cells.

  16. DNA homologous recombination factor SFR1 physically and functionally interacts with estrogen receptor alpha.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxin Feng

    Full Text Available Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα, a ligand-dependent transcription factor, mediates the expression of its target genes by interacting with corepressors and coactivators. Since the first cloning of SRC1, more than 280 nuclear receptor cofactors have been identified, which orchestrate target gene transcription. Aberrant activity of ER or its accessory proteins results in a number of diseases including breast cancer. Here we identified SFR1, a protein involved in DNA homologous recombination, as a novel binding partner of ERα. Initially isolated in a yeast two-hybrid screen, the interaction of SFR1 and ERα was confirmed in vivo by immunoprecipitation and mammalian one-hybrid assays. SFR1 co-localized with ERα in the nucleus, potentiated ER's ligand-dependent and ligand-independent transcriptional activity, and occupied the ER binding sites of its target gene promoters. Knockdown of SFR1 diminished ER's transcriptional activity. Manipulating SFR1 expression by knockdown and overexpression revealed a role for SFR1 in ER-dependent and -independent cancer cell proliferation. SFR1 differs from SRC1 by the lack of an intrinsic activation function. Taken together, we propose that SFR1 is a novel transcriptional modulator for ERα and a potential target in breast cancer therapy.

  17. Rad51 inhibits translocation formation by non-conservative homologous recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn M Manthey

    Full Text Available Chromosomal translocations are a primary biological response to ionizing radiation (IR exposure, and are likely to result from the inappropriate repair of the DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs that are created. An abundance of repetitive sequences in eukaryotic genomes provides ample opportunity for such breaks to be repaired by homologous recombination (HR between non-allelic repeats. Interestingly, in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae the central strand exchange protein, Rad51 that is required for DSB repair by gene conversion between unlinked repeats that conserves genomic structure also suppresses translocation formation by several HR mechanisms. In particular, Rad51 suppresses translocation formation by single-strand annealing (SSA, perhaps the most efficient mechanism for translocation formation by HR in both yeast and mammalian cells. Further, the enhanced translocation formation that emerges in the absence of Rad51 displays a distinct pattern of genetic control, suggesting that this occurs by a separate mechanism. Since hypomorphic mutations in RAD51 in mammalian cells also reduce DSB repair by conservative gene conversion and stimulate non-conservative repair by SSA, this mechanism may also operate in humans and, perhaps contribute to the genome instability that propels the development of cancer.

  18. Gene targeting and transgene stacking using intra genomic homologous recombination in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Barone, Pierluigi; Smith, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Modern agriculture has created a demand for plant biotechnology products that provide durable resistance to insect pests, tolerance of herbicide applications for weed control, and agronomic traits tailored for specific geographies. These transgenic trait products require a modular and sequential multigene stacking platform that is supported by precise genome engineering technology. Designed nucleases have emerged as potent tools for creating targeted DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). Exogenously supplied donor DNA can repair the targeted DSB by a process known as gene targeting (GT), resulting in a desired modification of the target genome. The potential of GT technology has not been fully realized for trait deployment in agriculture, mainly because of inefficient transformation and plant regeneration systems in a majority of crop plants and genotypes. This challenge of transgene stacking in plants could be overcome by Intra-Genomic Homologous Recombination (IGHR) that converts independently segregating unlinked donor and target transgenic loci into a genetically linked molecular stack. The method requires stable integration of the donor DNA into the plant genome followed by intra-genomic mobilization. IGHR complements conventional breeding with genetic transformation and designed nucleases to provide a flexible transgene stacking and trait deployment platform.

  19. ATPase activity tightly regulates RecA nucleofilaments to promote homologous recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bailin; Zhang, Dapeng; Li, Chengmin; Yuan, Zheng; Yu, Fangzhi; Zhong, Shangwei; Jiang, Guibin; Yang, Yun-Gui; Le, X Chris; Weinfeld, Michael; Zhu, Ping; Wang, Hailin

    2017-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR), catalyzed in an evolutionarily conserved manner by active RecA/Rad51 nucleofilaments, maintains genomic integrity and promotes biological evolution and diversity. The structures of RecA/Rad51 nucleofilaments provide information critical for the entire HR process. By exploiting a unique capillary electrophoresis-laser-induced fluorescence polarization assay, we have discovered an active form of RecA nucleofilament, stimulated by ATP hydrolysis, that contains mainly unbound nucleotide sites. This finding was confirmed by a nuclease protection assay and electron microscopy (EM) imaging. We further found that these RecA-unsaturated filaments promote strand exchange in vitro and HR in vivo. RecA mutants (P67D and P67E), which only form RecA-unsaturated nucleofilaments, were able to mediate HR in vitro and in vivo, but mutants favoring the formation of the saturated nucleofilaments failed to support HR. We thus present a new model for RecA-mediated HR in which RecA utilizes its intrinsic DNA binding-dependent ATPase activity to remodel the nucleofilaments to a less saturated form and thereby promote HR. PMID:28101376

  20. The RecU Holliday junction resolvase acts at early stages of homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañas, Cristina; Carrasco, Begoña; Ayora, Silvia; Alonso, Juan C

    2008-09-01

    Homologous recombination is essential for DNA repair and generation of genetic diversity in all organisms. It occurs through a series of presynaptic steps where the substrate is presented to the recombinase (RecA in bacteria). Then, the recombinase nucleoprotein filament mediates synapsis by first promoting the formation of a D-loop and later of a Holliday junction (HJ) that is subsequently cleaved by the HJ resolvase. The coordination of the synaptic step with the late resolution step is poorly understood. Bacillus subtilis RecU catalyzes resolution of HJs, and biochemical evidence suggests that it might modulate RecA. We report here the isolation and characterization of two mutants of RecU (recU56 and recU71), which promote resolution of HJs, but do not promote RecA modulation. In vitro, the RecU mutant proteins (RecUK56A or RecUR71A) bind and cleave HJs and interact with RuvB. RecU interacts with RecA and inhibits its single-stranded DNA-dependent dATP hydrolysis, but RecUK56A and RecUR71A do not exert a negative effect on the RecA dATPase and fail to interact with it. Both activities are important in vivo since RecU mutants impaired only in RecA interaction are as sensitive to DNA damaging agents as a deletion mutant.

  1. Involvement of ATM in homologous recombination after end resection and RAD51 nucleofilament formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakr, A; Oing, C; Köcher, S; Borgmann, K; Dornreiter, I; Petersen, C; Dikomey, E; Mansour, W Y

    2015-03-31

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is needed for the initiation of the double-strand break (DSB) repair by homologous recombination (HR). ATM triggers DSB end resection by stimulating the nucleolytic activity of CtIP and MRE11 to generate 3'-ssDNA overhangs, followed by RPA loading and RAD51 nucleofilament formation. Here we show for the first time that ATM is also needed for later steps in HR after RAD51 nucleofilament formation. Inhibition of ATM after completion of end resection did not affect RAD51 nucleofilament formation, but resulted in HR deficiency as evidenced by (i) an increase in the number of residual RAD51/γH2AX foci in both S and G2 cells, (ii) the decrease in HR efficiency as detected by HR repair substrate (pGC), (iii) a reduced SCE rate and (iv) the radiosensitization of cells by PARP inhibition. This newly described role for ATM was found to be dispensable in heterochromatin-associated DSB repair, as KAP1-depletion did not alleviate the HR-deficiency when ATM was inhibited after end resection. Moreover, we demonstrated that ATR can partly compensate for the deficiency in early, but not in later, steps of HR upon ATM inhibition. Taken together, we describe here for the first time that ATM is needed not only for the initiation but also for the completion of HR.

  2. Comparison of nonhomologous end joining and homologous recombination in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhiyong; Bozzella, Michael; Seluanov, Andrei; Gorbunova, Vera

    2009-01-01

    The two major pathways for repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are homologous recombination (HR) and nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). HR leads to accurate repair, while NHEJ is intrinsically mutagenic. To understand human somatic mutation it is essential to know the relationship between these pathways in human cells. Here we provide a comparison of the kinetics and relative contributions of HR and NHEJ in normal human cells. We used chromosomally integrated fluorescent reporter substrates for real-time in vivo monitoring of the NHEJ and HR. By examining multiple integrated clones we show that the efficiency of NHEJ and HR is strongly influenced by chromosomal location. Furthermore, we show that NHEJ of compatible ends (NHEJ-C) and NHEJ of incompatible ends (NHEJ-I) are fast processes, which can be completed in approximately 30 min, while HR is much slower and takes 7h or longer to complete. In actively cycling cells NHEJ-C is twice as efficient as NHEJ-I, and NHEJ-I is three times more efficient than HR. Our results suggest that NHEJ is a faster and more efficient DSB repair pathway than HR. PMID:18675941

  3. The role of DNA double-strand breaks in spontaneous homologous recombination in S. cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaëlle Lettier

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination (HR is a source of genomic instability and the loss of heterozygosity in mitotic cells. Since these events pose a severe health risk, it is important to understand the molecular events that cause spontaneous HR. In eukaryotes, high levels of HR are a normal feature of meiosis and result from the induction of a large number of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. By analogy, it is generally believed that the rare spontaneous mitotic HR events are due to repair of DNA DSBs that accidentally occur during mitotic growth. Here we provide the first direct evidence that most spontaneous mitotic HR in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is initiated by DNA lesions other than DSBs. Specifically, we describe a class of rad52 mutants that are fully proficient in inter- and intra-chromosomal mitotic HR, yet at the same time fail to repair DNA DSBs. The conclusions are drawn from genetic analyses, evaluation of the consequences of DSB repair failure at the DNA level, and examination of the cellular re-localization of Rad51 and mutant Rad52 proteins after introduction of specific DSBs. In further support of our conclusions, we show that, as in wild-type strains, UV-irradiation induces HR in these rad52 mutants, supporting the view that DNA nicks and single-stranded gaps, rather than DSBs, are major sources of spontaneous HR in mitotic yeast cells.

  4. Perturbing A-to-I RNA editing using genetics and homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staber, Cynthia J; Gell, Selena; Jepson, James E C; Reenan, Robert A

    2011-01-01

    Evidence for the chemical conversion of adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) in messenger RNA (mRNA) has been detected in numerous metazoans, especially those "most successful" phyla: Arthropoda, Mollusca, and Chordata. The requisite enzymes for A-to-I editing, ADARs (adenosine deaminases acting on RNA) are highly conserved and are present in every higher metazoan genome sequenced to date. The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, represents an ideal model organism for studying A-to-I editing, both in terms of fundamental biochemistry and in relation to determining adaptive downstream effects on physiology and behavior. The Drosophila genome contains a single structural gene for ADAR (dAdar), yet the fruit fly transcriptome has the widest range of conserved and validated ADAR targets in coding mRNAs of any known organism. In addition, many of the genes targeted by dADAR have been genetically identified as playing a role in nervous system function, providing a rich source of material to investigate the biological relevance of this intriguing process. Here, we discuss how recent advances in the use of ends-out homologous recombination (HR) in Drosophila make possible both the precise control of the editing status for defined adenosine residues and the engineering of flies with globally altered RNA editing of the fly transcriptome. These new approaches promise to significantly improve our understanding of how mRNA modification contributes to insect physiology and ethology.

  5. Molecular players of homologous recombination in protozoan parasites: implications for generating antigenic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Mrinal Kanti; Norris, Douglas E; Kumar, Nirbhay

    2004-06-01

    A major impediment to vaccine development against infections caused by protozoan parasites such as Plasmodium falciparum and Trypanosoma is the extraordinary ability of these parasites to rapidly change their surface molecules, a phenomenon known as antigenic variation. A prominent determinant of antigenic variation in these organisms is associated with rearrangements of genes, especially those known as var in P. falciparum and vsg in Trypanosoma. However, mechanisms underlying generation of anitgenic diversities among these protozoan parasites are poorly understood. The hypothesis that links all the different sections in this review is that antigenic variations in the protozoan parasites is coupled with genetic rearrangements, which occur during the course of DNA break repair. Here, we provide comprehensive and up-to-date information on Rad51 in these organisms, an eukaryotic homologue of bacterial RecA, and homologous recombination mechanisms. In trypanosomes both Rad51-dependent and -independent mechanisms have been suggested to play roles in antigenic variation. Finally, we speculate on how might similar DNA repair mechanisms contribute to genetic rearrangement associated with antigenic variation in the apicomplexan Plasmodium parasites, an immune evasion strategy.

  6. Assessing the function of homologous recombination DNA repair in malignant pleural effusion (MPE) samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, M J; Sutton, R E; Forrest, I; Sharrock, R; Lane, M; Kaufmann, A; O'Donnell, R; Edmondson, R J; Wilson, B T; Curtin, N J

    2014-07-08

    Patients with malignant pleural effusions (MPEs) generally have advanced disease with poor survival and few therapeutic options. Cells within MPEs may be used to stratify patients for targeted therapy. Targeted therapy with poly(ADP ribose) polymerase inhibitors (PARPi) depends on identifying homologous recombination DNA repair (HRR)-defective cancer cells. We aimed to determine the feasibility of assaying HRR status in MPE cells. A total of 15 MPE samples were collected from consenting patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), mesothelioma and ovarian and breast cancer. Primary cultures were confirmed as epithelial by pancytokeratin, and HRR status was determined by the detection of γH2AX and RAD51 foci following a 24-h exposure to rucaparib, by immunofluorescence microscopy. Massively parallel next-generation sequencing of DNA repair genes was performed on cultured MPE cells. From 15 MPE samples, 13 cultures were successfully established, with HRR function successfully determined in 12 cultures. Four samples - three NSCLC and one mesothelioma - were HRR defective and eight samples - one NSCLC, one mesothelioma, one sarcomatoid, one breast and four ovarian cancers - were HRR functional. No mutations in DNA repair genes were associated with HRR status, but there was probable loss of heterozygosity of FANCG, RPA1 and PARP1. HRR function can be successfully detected in MPE cells demonstrating the potential to stratify patients for targeted therapy with PARPi.

  7. Multi-Homologous Recombination-Based Gene Manipulation in the Rice Pathogen Fusarium fujikuroi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Sun Hwang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Gene disruption by homologous recombination is widely used to investigate and analyze the function of genes in Fusarium fujikuroi, a fungus that causes bakanae disease and root rot symptoms in rice. To generate gene deletion constructs, the use of conventional cloning methods, which rely on restriction enzymes and ligases, has had limited success due to a lack of unique restriction enzyme sites. Although strategies that avoid the use of restriction enzymes have been employed to overcome this issue, these methods require complicated PCR steps or are frequently inefficient. Here, we introduce a cloning system that utilizes multi-fragment assembly by In-Fusion to generate a gene disruption construct. This method utilizes DNA fragment fusion and requires only one PCR step and one reaction for construction. Using this strategy, a gene disruption construct for Fusarium cyclin C1 (FCC1 , which is associated with fumonisin B1 biosynthesis, was successfully created and used for fungal transformation. In vivo and in vitro experiments using confirmed fcc1 mutants suggest that fumonisin production is closely related to disease symptoms exhibited by F. fujikuroi strain B14. Taken together, this multi-fragment assembly method represents a simpler and a more convenient process for targeted gene disruption in fungi.

  8. Efficient genome engineering by targeted homologous recombination in mouse embryos using transcription activator-like effector nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Daniel; Peters, Annika; Wirtz, Tristan; Mai, Maren; Ackermann, Justus; Thabet, Yasser; Schmidt, Jürgen; Weighardt, Heike; Wunderlich, F Thomas; Degen, Joachim; Schultze, Joachim L; Beyer, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Generation of mouse models by introducing transgenes using homologous recombination is critical for understanding fundamental biology and pathology of human diseases. Here we investigate whether artificial transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs)-powerful tools that induce DNA double-strand breaks at specific genomic locations-can be combined with a targeting vector to induce homologous recombination for the introduction of a transgene in embryonic stem cells and fertilized murine oocytes. We describe the generation of a conditional mouse model using TALENs, which introduce double-strand breaks at the genomic locus of the special AT-rich sequence-binding protein-1 in combination with a large 14.4 kb targeting template vector. We report successful germline transmission of this allele and demonstrate its recombination in primary cells in the presence of Cre-recombinase. These results suggest that TALEN-assisted induction of DNA double-strand breaks can facilitate homologous recombination of complex targeting constructs directly in oocytes.

  9. Phylogenetic incongruence in E. coli O104: understanding the evolutionary relationships of emerging pathogens in the face of homologous recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weilong Hao

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli O104:H4 was identified as an emerging pathogen during the spring and summer of 2011 and was responsible for a widespread outbreak that resulted in the deaths of 50 people and sickened over 4075. Traditional phenotypic and genotypic assays, such as serotyping, pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST, permit identification and classification of bacterial pathogens, but cannot accurately resolve relationships among genotypically similar but pathotypically different isolates. To understand the evolutionary origins of E. coli O104:H4, we sequenced two strains isolated in Ontario, Canada. One was epidemiologically linked to the 2011 outbreak, and the second, unrelated isolate, was obtained in 2010. MLST analysis indicated that both isolates are of the same sequence type (ST678, but whole-genome sequencing revealed differences in chromosomal and plasmid content. Through comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of five O104:H4 ST678 genomes, we identified 167 genes in three gene clusters that have undergone homologous recombination with distantly related E. coli strains. These recombination events have resulted in unexpectedly high sequence diversity within the same sequence type. Failure to recognize or adjust for homologous recombination can result in phylogenetic incongruence. Understanding the extent of homologous recombination among different strains of the same sequence type may explain the pathotypic differences between the ON2010 and ON2011 strains and help shed new light on the emergence of this new pathogen.

  10. SERBP1 affects homologous recombination-mediated DNA repair by regulation of CtIP translation during S phase

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Jang-Won; Kim, Sunjik; Na, Wooju; Baek, Su-Jin; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Min, Keehong; Yeom, Jeonghun; Kwak, Hoyun; JEONG, SUNJOO; Lee, Cheolju; Kim, Seon-Young; Choi, Cheol Yong

    2015-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the most severe type of DNA damage and are primarily repaired by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) in the G1 and S/G2 phase, respectively. Although CtBP-interacting protein (CtIP) is crucial in DNA end resection during HR following DSBs, little is known about how CtIP levels increase in an S phase-specific manner. Here, we show that Serpine mRNA binding protein 1 (SERBP1) regulates CtIP expression at the translational level...

  11. Rosa26-GFP direct repeat (RaDR-GFP mice reveal tissue- and age-dependence of homologous recombination in mammals in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle R Sukup-Jackson

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination (HR is critical for the repair of double strand breaks and broken replication forks. Although HR is mostly error free, inherent or environmental conditions that either suppress or induce HR cause genomic instability. Despite its importance in carcinogenesis, due to limitations in our ability to detect HR in vivo, little is known about HR in mammalian tissues. Here, we describe a mouse model in which a direct repeat HR substrate is targeted to the ubiquitously expressed Rosa26 locus. In the Rosa26 Direct Repeat-GFP (RaDR-GFP mice, HR between two truncated EGFP expression cassettes can yield a fluorescent signal. In-house image analysis software provides a rapid method for quantifying recombination events within intact tissues, and the frequency of recombinant cells can be evaluated by flow cytometry. A comparison among 11 tissues shows that the frequency of recombinant cells varies by more than two orders of magnitude among tissues, wherein HR in the brain is the lowest. Additionally, de novo recombination events accumulate with age in the colon, showing that this mouse model can be used to study the impact of chronic exposures on genomic stability. Exposure to N-methyl-N-nitrosourea, an alkylating agent similar to the cancer chemotherapeutic temozolomide, shows that the colon, liver and pancreas are susceptible to DNA damage-induced HR. Finally, histological analysis of the underlying cell types reveals that pancreatic acinar cells and liver hepatocytes undergo HR and also that HR can be specifically detected in colonic somatic stem cells. Taken together, the RaDR-GFP mouse model provides new understanding of how tissue and age impact susceptibility to HR, and enables future studies of genetic, environmental and physiological factors that modulate HR in mammals.

  12. High-throughput plasmid construction using homologous recombination in yeast: its mechanisms and application to protein production for X-ray crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Kimihiko

    2015-01-01

    Homologous recombination is a system for repairing the broken genomes of living organisms by connecting two DNA strands at their homologous sequences. Today, homologous recombination in yeast is used for plasmid construction as a substitute for traditional methods using restriction enzymes and ligases. This method has various advantages over the traditional method, including flexibility in the position of DNA insertion and ease of manipulation. Recently, the author of this review reported the construction of plasmids by homologous recombination in the methanol-utilizing yeast Pichia pastoris, which is known to be an excellent expression host for secretory proteins and membrane proteins. The method enabled high-throughput construction of expression systems of proteins using P. pastoris; the constructed expression systems were used to investigate the expression conditions of membrane proteins and to perform X-ray crystallography of secretory proteins. This review discusses the mechanisms and applications of homologous recombination, including the production of proteins for X-ray crystallography.

  13. NBS1 cooperates with homologous recombination to counteract chromosome breakage during replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J.L. Brugmans (Linda); N.S. Verkaik (Nicole); M. Kunen (Maurice); E. van Drunen (Ellen); B.R. Williams (Bret); J.H.J. Petrini (John); R. Kanaar (Roland); J. Essers (Jeroen); D.C. van Gent (Dik)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractNijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is characterized by genome instability and cancer predisposition. NBS patients contain a mutation in the NBS1 gene, which encodes the NBS1 component of the DNA double-strand break (DSB) response complex MRE11/RAD50/NBS1. To investigate the NBS phenotype i

  14. TP53 mutations, tetraploidy and homologous recombination repair defects in early stage high-grade serous ovarian cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Chien, Jeremy; Sicotte, Hugues; Fan, Jian-Bing; Humphray, Sean; Julie M Cunningham; Kalli, Kimberly R.; Oberg, Ann L.; Hart, Steven N.; Li, Ying; Davila, Jaime I; Baheti, Saurabh; Wang, Chen; Dietmann, Sabine; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Yan W Asmann

    2015-01-01

    To determine early somatic changes in high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC), we performed whole genome sequencing on a rare collection of 16 low stage HGSOCs. The majority showed extensive structural alterations (one had an ultramutated profile), exhibited high levels of p53 immunoreactivity, and harboured a TP53 mutation, deletion or inactivation. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations were observed in two tumors, with nine showing evidence of a homologous recombination (HR) defect. Combined Analysis ...

  15. [A new method employing homologous recombination and YAC rescue to expedite gap filling long range mapping]. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    We have embarked on three areas of research relevant to the telomere rescue strategy mediated by homologous recombination described in this proposal. First, we have constructed the telomere rescue vector. Second, we have carried out tests in yeast and mammalian cells to ascertain whether the various crucial components function. Finally, we have begun to develop the molecular reagents required to target the telomeric regions of chromosome 16. The specific progress in each area is described briefly below.

  16. Production of recombinant snakehead rhabdovirus: the NV protein is not required for viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M C; Simon, B E; Kim, C H; Leong, J A

    2000-03-01

    Snakehead rhabdovirus (SHRV) affects warm water fish in Southeast Asia and belongs to the genus Novirhabdovirus by virtue of its nonvirion gene (NV). Because SHRV grows best at temperatures between 28 and 31 degrees C, we were able to use the T7 expression system to produce viable recombinant SHRV from a cloned cDNA copy of the viral genome. Expression of a positive-strand RNA copy of the 11, 550-nucleotide SHRV genome along with the viral nucleocapsid (N), phosphoprotein (P), and polymerase (L) proteins resulted in the generation of infectious SHRV in cells preinfected with a vaccinia virus vector for T7 polymerase expression. Recombinant virus production was verified by detection of a unique restriction site engineered into the SHRV genome between the NV and L genes. Since we were now able to begin examining the function of the NV gene, we constructed a recombinant virus containing a nonsense mutation located 22 codons into the coding sequence of the NV protein. The NV knockout virus was produced at a concentration as high as that of wild-type virus in cultured fish cells, and the resulting virions appeared to be identical to the wild-type virions in electron micrographs. These initial studies suggest that NV has no critical function in SHRV replication in cultured fish cells.

  17. Mutant IDH1-driven cellular transformation increases RAD51-mediated homologous recombination and temozolomide resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohba, Shigeo; Mukherjee, Joydeep; See, Wendy L; Pieper, Russell O

    2014-09-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutations occur in most lower grade glioma and not only drive gliomagenesis but are also associated with longer patient survival and improved response to temozolomide. To investigate the possible causative relationship between these events, we introduced wild-type (WT) or mutant IDH1 into immortalized, untransformed human astrocytes, then monitored transformation status and temozolomide response. Temozolomide-sensitive parental cells exhibited DNA damage (γ-H2AX foci) and a prolonged G2 cell-cycle arrest beginning three days after temozolomide (100 μmol/L, 3 hours) exposure and persisting for more than four days. The same cells transformed by expression of mutant IDH1 exhibited a comparable degree of DNA damage and cell-cycle arrest, but both events resolved significantly faster in association with increased, rather than decreased, clonogenic survival. The increases in DNA damage processing, cell-cycle progression, and clonogenicity were unique to cells transformed by mutant IDH1, and were not noted in cells transformed by WT IDH1 or an oncogenic form (V12H) of Ras. Similarly, these effects were not noted following introduction of mutant IDH1 into Ras-transformed cells or established glioma cells. They were, however, associated with increased homologous recombination (HR) and could be reversed by the genetic or pharmacologic suppression of the HR DNA repair protein RAD51. These results show that mutant IDH1 drives a unique set of transformative events that indirectly enhance HR and facilitate repair of temozolomide-induced DNA damage and temozolomide resistance. The results also suggest that inhibitors of HR may be a viable means to enhance temozolomide response in IDH1-mutant glioma.

  18. PARP3 affects the relative contribution of homologous recombination and nonhomologous end-joining pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Carole; Boehler, Christian; Guirouilh Barbat, Josée; Bonnet, Marie-Elise; Illuzzi, Giuditta; Ronde, Philippe; Gauthier, Laurent R; Magroun, Najat; Rajendran, Anbazhagan; Lopez, Bernard S; Scully, Ralph; Boussin, François D; Schreiber, Valérie; Dantzer, Françoise

    2014-05-01

    The repair of toxic double-strand breaks (DSB) is critical for the maintenance of genome integrity. The major mechanisms that cope with DSB are: homologous recombination (HR) and classical or alternative nonhomologous end joining (C-NHEJ versus A-EJ). Because these pathways compete for the repair of DSB, the choice of the appropriate repair pathway is pivotal. Among the mechanisms that influence this choice, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) end resection plays a critical role by driving cells to HR, while accurate C-NHEJ is suppressed. Furthermore, end resection promotes error-prone A-EJ. Increasing evidence define Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 3 (PARP3, also known as ARTD3) as an important player in cellular response to DSB. In this work, we reveal a specific feature of PARP3 that together with Ku80 limits DNA end resection and thereby helps in making the choice between HR and NHEJ pathways. PARP3 interacts with and PARylates Ku70/Ku80. The depletion of PARP3 impairs the recruitment of YFP-Ku80 to laser-induced DNA damage sites and induces an imbalance between BRCA1 and 53BP1. Both events result in compromised accurate C-NHEJ and a concomitant increase in DNA end resection. Nevertheless, HR is significantly reduced upon PARP3 silencing while the enhanced end resection causes mutagenic deletions during A-EJ. As a result, the absence of PARP3 confers hypersensitivity to anti-tumoral drugs generating DSB. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  19. DNA repair by nonhomologous end joining and homologous recombination during cell cycle in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhiyong; Bozzella, Michael; Seluanov, Andrei; Gorbunova, Vera

    2009-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are dangerous lesions that can lead to potentially oncogenic genomic rearrangements or cell death. The two major pathways for repair of DSBs are nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). NHEJ is an intrinsically error-prone pathway while HR results in accurate repair. To understand the origin of genomic instability in human cells it is important to know the contribution of each DSB repair pathway. Studies of rodent cells and human cancer cell lines have shown that the choice between NHEJ or HR pathways depends on cell cycle stage. Surprisingly, cell cycle regulation of DSB repair has not been examined in normal human cells with intact cell cycle checkpoints. Here we measured the efficiency of NHEJ and HR at different cell cycle stages in hTERT-immortalized diploid human fibroblasts. We utilized cells with chromosomally-integrated fluorescent reporter cassettes, in which a unique DSB is introduced by a rare-cutting endonuclease. We show that NHEJ is active throughout the cell cycle, and its activity increases as cells progress from G1 to G2/M (G1

  20. Homologous recombination in Arabidopsis seeds along the track of energetic carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Ting [University of Science and Technology of China, 96 Jinzhai Road, Hefei 230026 (China); Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Institute of Technical Biology and Agricultural Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 350 Shushanhu Road, Hefei 230031 (China); Li Fanghua [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Institute of Technical Biology and Agricultural Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 350 Shushanhu Road, Hefei 230031 (China); Liu Qingfang [Radiobiology Laboratory, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 509 Nanchang Road, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Bian Po, E-mail: bianpo@ipp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Institute of Technical Biology and Agricultural Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 350 Shushanhu Road, Hefei 230031 (China); Wang Jufang [Radiobiology Laboratory, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 509 Nanchang Road, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wu Yuejin; Wu Lijun [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-engineering, Institute of Technical Biology and Agricultural Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 350 Shushanhu Road, Hefei 230031 (China); Li Wenjian [Radiobiology Laboratory, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 509 Nanchang Road, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2012-09-01

    Heavy ion irradiation has been used as radiotherapy of deep-seated tumors, and is also an inevitable health concern for astronauts in space mission. Unlike photons such as X-rays and {gamma}-rays, a high linear energy transfer (LET) heavy ion has a varying energy distribution along its track. Therefore, it is important to determine the correlation of biological effects with the Bragg curve energy distribution of heavy ions. In this study, a continuous biological tissue equivalent was constructed using a layered cylinder of Arabidopsis seeds, which was irradiated with carbon ions of 87.5 MeV/nucleon. The position of energy loss peak in the seed pool was determined with CR-39 track detectors. The mutagenic effect in vivo along the path of carbon ions was investigated with the seeds in each layer as an assay unit, which corresponded to a given position in physical Bragg curve. Homologous recombination frequency (HRF), expression level of AtRAD54 gene, germination rate of seeds, and survival rate of young seedlings were used as checking endpoints, respectively. Our results showed that Arabidopsis S0 and S1 plants exhibited significant increases in HRF compared to their controls, and the expression level of AtRAD54 gene in S0 plants was significantly up-regulated. The depth-biological effect curves for HRF and the expression of AtRAD54 gene were not consistent with the physical Bragg curve. Differently, the depth-biological effect curves for the developmental endpoints matched generally with the physical Bragg curve. The results suggested a different response pattern of various types of biological events to heavy ion irradiation. It is also interesting that except for HRF in S0 plants, the depth-biological effect curves for each biological endpoint were similar for 5 Gy and 30 Gy of carbon irradiation.

  1. Methotrexate induces DNA damage and inhibits homologous recombination repair in choriocarcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie L

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Lisha Xie,1,* Tiancen Zhao,1,2,* Jing Cai,1 You Su,1 Zehua Wang,1 Weihong Dong1 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Central Hospital of Wuhan, Wuhan, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the mechanism of sensitivity to methotrexate (MTX in human choriocarcinoma cells regarding DNA damage response. Methods: Two choriocarcinoma cancer cell lines, JAR and JEG-3, were utilized in this study. An MTX-sensitive osteosarcoma cell line MG63, an MTX-resistant epithelial ovarian cancer cell line A2780 and an MTX-resistant cervical adenocarcinoma cell line Hela served as controls. Cell viability assay was carried out to assess MTX sensitivity of cell lines. MTX-induced DNA damage was evaluated by comet assay. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was used to detect the mRNA levels of BRCA1, BRCA2, RAD51 and RAD52. The protein levels of γH2AX, RAD 51 and p53 were analyzed by Western blot. Results: Remarkable DNA strand breaks were observed in MTX-sensitive cell lines (JAR, JEG-3 and MG63 but not in MTX-resistant cancer cells (A2780 and Hela after 48 h of MTX treatment. Only in the choriocarcinoma cells, the expression of homologous recombination (HR repair gene RAD51 was dramatically suppressed by MTX in a dose- and time-dependent manner, accompanied with the increase in p53. Conclusion: The MTX-induced DNA strand breaks accompanied by deficiencies in HR repair may contribute to the hypersensitivity to chemotherapy in choriocarcinoma. Keywords: choriocarcinoma, chemotherapy hypersensitivity, DNA double-strand break, RAD51, p53

  2. A role for the p53 tumour suppressor in regulating the balance between homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moureau, Sylvie; Luessing, Janna; Harte, Emma Christina; Voisin, Muriel; Lowndes, Noel Francis

    2016-09-01

    Loss of p53, a transcription factor activated by cellular stress, is a frequent event in cancer. The role of p53 in tumour suppression is largely attributed to cell fate decisions. Here, we provide evidence supporting a novel role for p53 in the regulation of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway choice. 53BP1, another tumour suppressor, was initially identified as p53 Binding Protein 1, and has been shown to inhibit DNA end resection, thereby stimulating non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Yet another tumour suppressor, BRCA1, reciprocally promotes end resection and homologous recombination (HR). Here, we show that in both human and mouse cells, the absence of p53 results in impaired 53BP1 focal recruitment to sites of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation. This effect is largely independent of cell cycle phase and the extent of DNA damage. In p53-deficient cells, diminished localization of 53BP1 is accompanied by a reciprocal increase in BRCA1 recruitment to DSBs. Consistent with these findings, we demonstrate that DSB repair via NHEJ is abrogated, while repair via homology-directed repair (HDR) is stimulated. Overall, we propose that in addition to its role as an 'effector' protein in the DNA damage response, p53 plays a role in the regulation of DSB repair pathway choice. © 2016 The Authors.

  3. New single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in homologous recombination repair genes detected by microarray analysis in Polish breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanowicz, Hanna; Strapagiel, Dominik; Słomka, Marcin; Sobalska-Kwapis, Marta; Kępka, Ewa; Siewierska-Górska, Anna; Zadrożny, Marek; Bieńkiewicz, Jan; Smolarz, Beata

    2016-11-30

    Breast cancer is the most common cause of malignancy and mortality in women worldwide. This study aimed at localising homologous recombination repair (HR) genes and their chromosomal loci and correlating their nucleotide variants with susceptibility to breast cancer. In this study, authors analysed the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in homologous recombination repair genes and the incidence of breast cancer in the population of Polish women. Blood samples from 94 breast cancer patients were analysed as test group. Individuals were recruited into the study at the Department of Oncological Surgery and Breast Diseases of the Institute of the Polish Mother's Memorial Hospital in Lodz, Poland. Healthy controls (n = 500) were obtained from the Biobank Laboratory, Department of Molecular Biophysics, University of Lodz. Then, DNA of breast cancer patients was compared with one of the disease-free women. The test was supported by microarray analysis. Statistically significant correlations were identified between breast cancer and 3 not described previously SNPs of homologous recombination repair genes BRCA1 and BRCA2: rs59004709, rs4986852 and rs1799950. Further studies on larger groups are warranted to support the hypothesis of correlation between the abovementioned genetic variants and breast cancer risk.

  4. Activation of homologous recombination DNA repair in human skin fibroblasts continuously exposed to X-ray radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipov, Andreyan N; Grekhova, Anna; Pustovalova, Margarita; Ozerov, Ivan V; Eremin, Petr; Vorobyeva, Natalia; Lazareva, Natalia; Pulin, Andrey; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Roumiantsev, Sergey; Klokov, Dmitry; Eremin, Ilya

    2015-09-29

    Molecular and cellular responses to protracted ionizing radiation exposures are poorly understood. Using immunofluorescence microscopy, we studied the kinetics of DNA repair foci formation in normal human fibroblasts exposed to X-rays at a dose rate of 4.5 mGy/min for up to 6 h. We showed that both the number of γH2AX foci and their integral fluorescence intensity grew linearly with time of irradiation up to 2 h. A plateau was observed between 2 and 6 h of exposure, indicating a state of balance between formation and repair of DNA double-strand breaks. In contrast, the number and intensity of foci formed by homologous recombination protein RAD51 demonstrated a continuous increase during 6 h of irradiation. We further showed that the enhancement of the homologous recombination repair was not due to redistribution of cell cycle phases. Our results indicate that continuous irradiation of normal human cells triggers DNA repair responses that are different from those elicited after acute irradiation. The observed activation of the error-free homologous recombination DNA double-strand break repair pathway suggests compensatory adaptive mechanisms that may help alleviate long-term biological consequences and could potentially be utilized both in radiation protection and medical practices.

  5. Recombination occurs within minutes of replication blockage by RTS1 producing restarted forks that are prone to collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Michael O; Jalan, Manisha; Morrow, Carl A; Osman, Fekret; Whitby, Matthew C

    2015-01-01

    The completion of genome duplication during the cell cycle is threatened by the presence of replication fork barriers (RFBs). Following collision with a RFB, replication proteins can dissociate from the stalled fork (fork collapse) rendering it incapable of further DNA synthesis unless recombination intervenes to restart replication. We use time-lapse microscopy and genetic assays to show that recombination is initiated within ∼10 min of replication fork blockage at a site-specific barrier in fission yeast, leading to a restarted fork within ∼60 min, which is only prevented/curtailed by the arrival of the opposing replication fork. The restarted fork is susceptible to further collapse causing hyper-recombination downstream of the barrier. Surprisingly, in our system fork restart is unnecessary for maintaining cell viability. Seemingly, the risk of failing to complete replication prior to mitosis is sufficient to warrant the induction of recombination even though it can cause deleterious genetic change. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04539.001 PMID:25806683

  6. Comparative Immunization in BALB/c Mice with Recombinant Replication-Defective Adenovirus Vector and DNA Plasmid Expressing a SARS-CoV Nucleocapsid Protein Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunling Ma; Kun Yao; Feng Zhou; Minsheng Zhu

    2006-01-01

    In order to investigate immunogenicity in the induction of humoral and cellular immune responses, severe acute respiratory syndrome associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV)-N gene recombinant replication-defective adenoviral vector, rAd-N, was generated and immunized BALB/c mice in a pcDNA3.1-N prime-rAd-N boost regimen. After humoral and cellular immune response detection, different levels of SARS-CoV N protein specific antibodies and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) secretion are shown compared to controls. The humoral immune response was induced more effectively by the DNA priming and recombinant adenovirus boosting regimen. There is a significant difference between heterogeneous and homologous vaccinations. The heterogeneous combinations were all higher than those of the homologous combinations in the induction of anti-N antibody response. Among the three heterogeneous combinations, pcDNA3.1-N/pcDNA3.1-N/pcDNA3.1-N/rAd-N induced the strongest antibody response. In the induction of IFN-γ production, the homologous combination of rAd-N/rAd-N/rAd-N/rAd- N was significantly stronger than that of pcDNA3.1-N/pcDNA3. 1-N/pcDNA3.1-N/pcDNA3.1-N, but was relatively weaker than the heterogeneous combination of pcDAN3.1-N/pcDAN3.1-N/pcDAN3.1-N/rAd-N. This combination was a most efficient immunization regimen in induction of SARS-CoV-N-specific (IFN-γ) secretion just as the antibody response. These results suggest that DNA immunization followed by recombinant adenovirus boosting could be used as a potential SARS-CoV vaccine.

  7. Analysis of the genomic homologous recombination in Theilovirus based on complete genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Maoli

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract At present, Theilovirus is considered to comprise four distinct serotypes, including Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus, Vilyuisk human encephalomyelitis virus, Thera virus, and Saffold virus. So far, there is no systematical study that investigated the genomic recombination of Theilovirus. The present study performed the phylogenetic and recombination analysis of Theilovirus over the complete genomes. Seven potentially significant recombination events were identified. However, according to the strains information and references related to the recombinants and their parental strains, four of the recombination events might happen non-naturally. These results will provide valuable hints for future research on evolution and antigenic variability of Theilovirus.

  8. Analysis of the genomic homologous recombination in Theilovirus based on complete genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guangming; Zhang, Xiaodan; Yi, Maoli; Shao, Shihe; Zhang, Wen

    2011-09-17

    At present, Theilovirus is considered to comprise four distinct serotypes, including Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus, Vilyuisk human encephalomyelitis virus, Thera virus, and Saffold virus. So far, there is no systematical study that investigated the genomic recombination of Theilovirus. The present study performed the phylogenetic and recombination analysis of Theilovirus over the complete genomes. Seven potentially significant recombination events were identified. However, according to the strains information and references related to the recombinants and their parental strains, four of the recombination events might happen non-naturally. These results will provide valuable hints for future research on evolution and antigenic variability of Theilovirus.

  9. Inhibition of hepatitis B virus DNA replicative intermediate forms by recombinant interferon-γ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Khalid Parvez; Deepak Sehgal; Shiv Kumar Sarin; Seemi Farhat Basir; Shahid Jameel

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the in vitro anti-HBV activity of recombinant human IFN-γ, alone and in combination with lamivudine.METHODS: A recombinant baculovirus-HBV/HepG2 culture system was developed which could support productive HBV infection in vitro. Expression of HBsAg and HBeAg in infected HepG2 culture medium was detected by commercial enzyme immunoassays. HBV DNA replication intermediates were detected in infected cells by Southern hybridization and viral DNA load was determined by dot hybridization.RESULTS: IFN-γ at 0.1 to 5 μg/L efficiently down regulated HBsAg expression in transduced HepG2 cells.At 5 μg/L, IFN-γ also suppressed HBV DNA replication in these cells. While treatment with a combination of lamivudine and IFN-γ showed no additive effect,sequential treatment first with lamivudine and then IFN-γ was found to be promising. In this culture system the best HBV suppression was observed with a pulse of 2 μmol/L lamivudine for two days, followed by 1 μg/L IFN-γ for another four days. Compared to treatment with lamivudine alone, the sequential use of 0.2 μmol/L lamivudine for two days, followed by 5 μg/L IFN-γ for six days showed a 72% reduction in HBV cccDNA pool.CONCLUSION: This in vitro study warrants further evaluation of a combination of IFN-γ and lamivudine,especially in IFN-α non-responder chronic hepatitis B patients. A reduced duration of lamivudine treatment would also restrict the emergence of drug-resistant HBV mutants.

  10. DNA ligase IV and artemis act cooperatively to suppress homologous recombination in human cells: implications for DNA double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosawa, Aya; Saito, Shinta; So, Sairei; Hashimoto, Mitsumasa; Iwabuchi, Kuniyoshi; Watabe, Haruka; Adachi, Noritaka

    2013-01-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) are two major pathways for repairing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs); however, their respective roles in human somatic cells remain to be elucidated. Here we show using a series of human gene-knockout cell lines that NHEJ repairs nearly all of the topoisomerase II- and low-dose radiation-induced DNA damage, while it negatively affects survival of cells harbouring replication-associated DSBs. Intriguingly, we find that loss of DNA ligase IV, a critical NHEJ ligase, and Artemis, an NHEJ factor with endonuclease activity, independently contribute to increased resistance to replication-associated DSBs. We also show that loss of Artemis alleviates hypersensitivity of DNA ligase IV-null cells to low-dose radiation- and topoisomerase II-induced DSBs. Finally, we demonstrate that Artemis-null human cells display increased gene-targeting efficiencies, particularly in the absence of DNA ligase IV. Collectively, these data suggest that DNA ligase IV and Artemis act cooperatively to promote NHEJ, thereby suppressing HR. Our results point to the possibility that HR can only operate on accidental DSBs when NHEJ is missing or abortive, and Artemis may be involved in pathway switching from incomplete NHEJ to HR.

  11. DNA ligase IV and artemis act cooperatively to suppress homologous recombination in human cells: implications for DNA double-strand break repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aya Kurosawa

    Full Text Available Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ and homologous recombination (HR are two major pathways for repairing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs; however, their respective roles in human somatic cells remain to be elucidated. Here we show using a series of human gene-knockout cell lines that NHEJ repairs nearly all of the topoisomerase II- and low-dose radiation-induced DNA damage, while it negatively affects survival of cells harbouring replication-associated DSBs. Intriguingly, we find that loss of DNA ligase IV, a critical NHEJ ligase, and Artemis, an NHEJ factor with endonuclease activity, independently contribute to increased resistance to replication-associated DSBs. We also show that loss of Artemis alleviates hypersensitivity of DNA ligase IV-null cells to low-dose radiation- and topoisomerase II-induced DSBs. Finally, we demonstrate that Artemis-null human cells display increased gene-targeting efficiencies, particularly in the absence of DNA ligase IV. Collectively, these data suggest that DNA ligase IV and Artemis act cooperatively to promote NHEJ, thereby suppressing HR. Our results point to the possibility that HR can only operate on accidental DSBs when NHEJ is missing or abortive, and Artemis may be involved in pathway switching from incomplete NHEJ to HR.

  12. Requirement of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C for BRCA gene expression and homologous recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel W Anantha

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C1/C2 (hnRNP C is a core component of 40S ribonucleoprotein particles that bind pre-mRNAs and influence their processing, stability and export. Breast cancer tumor suppressors BRCA1, BRCA2 and PALB2 form a complex and play key roles in homologous recombination (HR, DNA double strand break (DSB repair and cell cycle regulation following DNA damage. METHODS: PALB2 nucleoprotein complexes were isolated using tandem affinity purification from nuclease-solubilized nuclear fraction. Immunofluorescence was used for localization studies of proteins. siRNA-mediated gene silencing and flow cytometry were used for studying DNA repair efficiency and cell cycle distribution/checkpoints. The effect of hnRNP C on mRNA abundance was assayed using quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR. RESULTS AND SIGNIFICANCE: We identified hnRNP C as a component of a nucleoprotein complex containing breast cancer suppressor proteins PALB2, BRCA2 and BRCA1. Notably, other components of the 40S ribonucleoprotein particle were not present in the complex. hnRNP C was found to undergo significant changes of sub-nuclear localization after ionizing radiation (IR and to partially localize to DNA damage sites. Depletion of hnRNP C substantially altered the normal balance of repair mechanisms following DSB induction, reducing HR usage in particular, and impaired S phase progression after IR. Moreover, loss of hnRNP C strongly reduced the abundance of key HR proteins BRCA1, BRCA2, RAD51 and BRIP1, which can be attributed, at least in part, to the downregulation of their mRNAs due to aberrant splicing. Our results establish hnRNP C as a key regulator of BRCA gene expression and HR-based DNA repair. They also suggest the existence of an RNA regulatory program at sites of DNA damage, which involves a unique function of hnRNP C that is independent of the 40S ribonucleoprotein particles and most other hnRNP proteins.

  13. Gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma displays abnormalities in homologous recombination and nucleotide excision repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewalt RI

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Robin I Dewalt,1 Kenneth A Kesler,2 Zane T Hammoud,3 LeeAnn Baldridge,4 Eyas M Hattab,4 Shadia I Jalal1,5 1Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, 2Cardiothoracic Division, Department of Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 3Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI, USA; 4Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA; 5Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, Indianapolis, IN, USA Objective: Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC continues to be a disease associated with high mortality. Among the factors leading to poor outcomes are innate resistance to currently available therapies, advanced stage at diagnosis, and complex biology. Platinum and ionizing radiation form the backbone of treatment for the majority of patients with EAC. Of the multiple processes involved in response to platinum chemotherapy or ionizing radiation, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA repair has been a major player in cancer sensitivity to these agents. DNA repair defects have been described in various malignancies. The purpose of this study was to determine whether alterations in DNA repair are present in EAC compared with normal gastroesophageal tissues. Methods: We analyzed the expression of genes involved in homologous recombination (HR, nonhomologous end-joining, and nucleotide excision repair (NER pathways in 12 EAC tumor samples with their matched normal counterparts. These pathways were chosen because they are the main pathways involved in the repair of platinum- or ionizing-radiation-induced damage. In addition, abnormalities in these pathways have not been well characterized in EAC. Results: We identified increased expression of at least one HR gene in eight of the EAC tumor samples. Alterations in the expression of EME1, a structure-specific endonuclease involved in HR, were the most prevalent, with messenger (mRNA overexpression in six of the EAC samples

  14. Recombination Promoted by DNA Viruses: Phage λ to Herpes Simplex Virus

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to explore recombination strategies in DNA viruses. Homologous recombination is a universal genetic process that plays multiple roles in the biology of all organisms, including viruses. Recombination and DNA replication are interconnected, with recombination being essential for repairing DNA damage and supporting replication of the viral genome. Recombination also creates genetic diversity, and viral recombination mechanisms have important implications for unders...

  15. Integration of a transfected gene into the genome of Babesia bovis occurs by legitimate homologous recombination mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Carlos E; Johnson, Wendell C; Herndon, David R; Laughery, Jacob M; Davis, William C

    2015-08-01

    This study examines the patterns of gene integration of gfp-bsd upon stable transfection into the T3Bo strain of Babesia bovis using a plasmid designed to integrate homologous sequences of the parasite's two identical ef-1α A and B genes. While the transfected BboTf-149-6 cell line displayed two distinct patterns of gene integration, clonal lines derived from this strain by cell sorting contained only single gfp-bsd insertions. Whole genome sequencing of two selected clonal lines, E9 and C6, indicated two distinct patterns of gfp-bsd insertion occurring by legitimate homologous recombination mechanisms: one into the expected ef-1α orf B, and another into the ef-1α B promoter. The data suggest that expression of the ef-1α orf B is not required for development of B. bovis in cultured erythrocyte stages. Use of legitimate homologous recombination mechanisms in transfected B. bovis supports the future use of transfection methods for developing efficient gene function assignment experiments using gene knockout techniques. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Various applications of TALEN- and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated homologous recombination to modify the Drosophila genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongsheng Yu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Modifying the genomes of many organisms is becoming as easy as manipulating DNA in test tubes, which is made possible by two recently developed techniques based on either the customizable DNA binding protein, TALEN, or the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Here, we describe a series of efficient applications derived from these two technologies, in combination with various homologous donor DNA plasmids, to manipulate the Drosophila genome: (1 to precisely generate genomic deletions; (2 to make genomic replacement of a DNA fragment at single nucleotide resolution; and (3 to generate precise insertions to tag target proteins for tracing their endogenous expressions. For more convenient genomic manipulations, we established an easy-to-screen platform by knocking in a white marker through homologous recombination. Further, we provided a strategy to remove the unwanted duplications generated during the “ends-in” recombination process. Our results also indicate that TALEN and CRISPR/Cas9 had comparable efficiency in mediating genomic modifications through HDR (homology-directed repair; either TALEN or the CRISPR/Cas9 system could efficiently mediate in vivo replacement of DNA fragments of up to 5 kb in Drosophila, providing an ideal genetic tool for functional annotations of the Drosophila genome.

  17. Either non-homologous ends joining or homologous recombination is required to repair double-strand breaks in the genome of macrophage-internalized Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Brzostek

    Full Text Available The intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb is constantly exposed to a multitude of hostile conditions and is confronted by a variety of potentially DNA-damaging assaults in vivo, primarily from host-generated antimicrobial toxic radicals. Exposure to reactive nitrogen species and/or reactive oxygen species causes different types of DNA damage, including oxidation, depurination, methylation and deamination, that can result in single- or double-strand breaks (DSBs. These breaks affect the integrity of the whole genome and, when left unrepaired, can lead to cell death. Here, we investigated the role of the DSB repair pathways, homologous recombination (HR and non-homologous ends joining (NHEJ, in the survival of Mtb inside macrophages. To this end, we constructed Mtb strains defective for HR (ΔrecA, NHEJ [Δ(ku,ligD], or both DSB repair systems [Δ(ku,ligD,recA]. Experiments using these strains revealed that either HR or NHEJ is sufficient for the survival and propagation of tubercle bacilli inside macrophages. Inhibition of nitric oxide or superoxide anion production with L-NIL or apocynin, respectively, enabled the Δ(ku,ligD,recA mutant strain lacking both systems to survive intracellularly. Complementation of the Δ(ku,ligD,recA mutant with an intact recA or ku-ligD rescued the ability of Mtb to propagate inside macrophages.

  18. Mutation of the BRCA1 SQ-cluster results in aberrant mitosis, reduced homologous recombination, and a compensatory increase in non-homologous end joining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckta, Jason M; Dever, Seth M; Gnawali, Nisha; Khalil, Ashraf; Sule, Amrita; Golding, Sarah E; Rosenberg, Elizabeth; Narayanan, Aarthi; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Xu, Bo; Povirk, Lawrence F; Valerie, Kristoffer

    2015-09-29

    Mutations in the breast cancer susceptibility 1 (BRCA1) gene are catalysts for breast and ovarian cancers. Most mutations are associated with the BRCA1 N- and C-terminal domains linked to DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. However, little is known about the role of the intervening serine-glutamine (SQ) - cluster in the DNA damage response beyond its importance in regulating cell cycle checkpoints. We show that serine-to-alanine alterations at critical residues within the SQ-cluster known to be phosphorylated by ATM and ATR result in reduced homologous recombination repair (HRR) and aberrant mitosis. While a S1387A BRCA1 mutant - previously shown to abrogate S-phase arrest in response to radiation - resulted in only a modest decrease in HRR, S1387A together with an additional alteration, S1423A (BRCA12P), reduced HRR to vector control levels and similar to a quadruple mutant also including S1457A and S1524A (BRCA14P). These effects appeared to be independent of PALB2. Furthermore, we found that BRCA14P promoted a prolonged and struggling HRR late in the cell cycle and shifted DSB repair from HRR to non-homologous end joining which, in the face of irreparable chromosomal damage, resulted in mitotic catastrophe. Altogether, SQ-cluster phosphorylation is critical for allowing adequate time for completing normal HRR prior to mitosis and preventing cells from entering G1 prematurely resulting in gross chromosomal aberrations.

  19. DNA Double-Strand Break Resection Occurs during Non-homologous End Joining in G1 but Is Distinct from Resection during Homologous Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biehs, Ronja; Steinlage, Monika; Barton, Olivia; Juhász, Szilvia; Künzel, Julia; Spies, Julian; Shibata, Atsushi; Jeggo, Penny A; Löbrich, Markus

    2017-02-16

    Canonical non-homologous end joining (c-NHEJ) repairs DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in G1 cells with biphasic kinetics. We show that DSBs repaired with slow kinetics, including those localizing to heterochromatic regions or harboring additional lesions at the DSB site, undergo resection prior to repair by c-NHEJ and not alt-NHEJ. Resection-dependent c-NHEJ represents an inducible process during which Plk3 phosphorylates CtIP, mediating its interaction with Brca1 and promoting the initiation of resection. Mre11 exonuclease, EXD2, and Exo1 execute resection, and Artemis endonuclease functions to complete the process. If resection does not commence, then repair can ensue by c-NHEJ, but when executed, Artemis is essential to complete resection-dependent c-NHEJ. Additionally, Mre11 endonuclease activity is dispensable for resection in G1. Thus, resection in G1 differs from the process in G2 that leads to homologous recombination. Resection-dependent c-NHEJ significantly contributes to the formation of deletions and translocations in G1, which represent important initiating events in carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Impact of two DNA repair pathways, homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining, on bacterial spore inactivation under simulated martian environmental conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Ralf; Schuerger, Andrew C.; Reitz, Günther; Nicholson, Wayne L.

    2011-09-01

    Spores of Bacillus subtilis were used as a model system to study the impact of the two major DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair mechanisms [homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ)] on the survivability of air-dried mono- and multilayers of bacterial spores under a simulated martian environment; i.e., an environment with low temperature (-10 °C), pure CO 2 atmosphere (99.99% CO 2), 200-1100 nm UV-VIS-NIR radiation, and 0.69 kPa pressure. Spores in multilayers exhibited low inactivation rates compared to monolayers, mainly due to shadowing effects of overlying spores. Simulated martian UV irradiation reduced dramatically spore viability, whereas when shielded from martian UV radiation, spores deficient in NHEJ- and HR-mediated DNA repair were significantly more sensitive to simulated martian environmental conditions than were wild-type spores. In addition, NHEJ-deficient spores were consistently more sensitive than HR-deficient spores to simulated Mars environmental conditions, suggesting that DSBs were an important type of DNA damage. The results indicated that both HR and NHEJ provide an efficient set of DNA repair pathways ensuring spore survival after exposure to simulated martian environmental conditions.

  1. The efficiency of homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining systems in repairing double-strand breaks during cell cycle progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Bee

    Full Text Available This study investigated the efficiency of Non-Homologous End Joining (NHEJ and Homologous Recombination (HR repair systems in rejoining DNA double-strand breaks (DSB induced in CCD-34Lu cells by different γ-ray doses. The kinetics of DNA repair was assessed by analyzing the fluorescence decrease of γ-H2AX foci measured by SOID (Sum Of Integrated Density parameter and counting foci number in the time-interval 0.5-24 hours after irradiation. Comparison of the two methods showed that the SOID parameter was useful in determining the amount and the persistence of DNA damage signal after exposure to high or low doses of ionizing radiation. The efficiency of DSB rejoining during the cell cycle was assessed by distinguishing G1, S, and G2 phase cells on the basis of nuclear fluorescence of the CENP-F protein. Six hours after irradiation, γ-H2AX foci resolution was higher in G2 compared to G1 cells in which both NHEJ and HR can cooperate. The rejoining of γ-H2AX foci in G2 phase cells was, moreover, decreased by RI-1, the chemical inhibitor of HR, demonstrating that homologous recombination is at work early after irradiation. The relevance of HR in DSB repair was assessed in DNA-PK-deficient M059J cells and in CCD-34Lu treated with the DNA-PKcs inhibitor, NU7026. In both conditions, the kinetics of γ-H2AX demonstrated that DSBs repair was markedly affected when NHEJ was absent or impaired, even in G2 phase cells in which HR should be at work. The recruitment of RAD51 at DSB sites was, moreover, delayed in M059J and in NU7026 treated-CCD-34Lu, with respect to DNA-PKcs proficient cells and continued for 24 hours despite the decrease in DNA repair. The impairment of NHEJ affected the efficiency of the HR system and significantly decreased cell survival after ionizing radiation, confirming that DSB rejoining is strictly dependent on the integrity of the NHEJ repair system.

  2. Arabidopsis RecQl4A suppresses homologous recombination and modulates DNA damage responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bagherieh-Najjar, MB; de Vries, OMH; Hille, J; Dijkwel, PP; Bagherieh-Najjar, Mohammad B.

    2005-01-01

    The DNA damage response and DNA recombination are two interrelated mechanisms involved in maintaining the integrity of the genome, but in plants they are poorly understood. RecO is a family of genes with conserved roles in the regulation of DNA recombination in eukaryotes; there are seven members in

  3. The role of Candida albicans homologous recombination factors Rad54 and Rdh54 in DNA damage sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    White Theodore C

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The fungal pathogen Candida albicans is frequently seen in immune suppressed patients, and resistance to one of the most widely used antifungals, fluconazole (FLC, can evolve rapidly. In recent years it has become clear that plasticity of the Candida albicans genome contributes to drug resistance through loss of heterozygosity (LOH at resistance genes and gross chromosomal rearrangements that amplify gene copy number of resistance associated genes. This study addresses the role of the homologous recombination factors Rad54 and Rdh54 in cell growth, DNA damage and FLC resistance in Candida albicans. Results The data presented here support a role for homologous recombination in cell growth and DNA damage sensitivity, as Candida albicans rad54Δ/rad54Δ mutants were hypersensitive to MMS and menadione, and had an aberrant cell and nuclear morphology. The Candida albicans rad54Δ/rad54Δ mutant was defective in invasion of Spider agar, presumably due to the altered cellular morphology. In contrast, mutation of the related gene RDH54 did not contribute significantly to DNA damage resistance and cell growth, and deletion of either Candida albicans RAD54 or Candida albicans RDH54 did not alter FLC susceptibility. Conclusions Together, these results support a role for homologous recombination in genome stability under nondamaging conditions. The nuclear morphology defects in the rad54Δ/rad54Δ mutants show that Rad54 performs an essential role during mitotic growth and that in its absence, cells arrest in G2. The viability of the single mutant rad54Δ/rad54Δ and the inability to construct the double mutant rad54Δ/rad54Δ rdh54Δ/rdh54Δ suggests that Rdh54 can partially compensate for Rad54 during mitotic growth.

  4. Disruption of the Pfg27 locus by homologous recombination leads to loss of the sexual phenotype in P. falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, C A; Fujioka, H; Aikawa, M; Kumar, N

    1999-06-01

    Transmission of malaria depends upon the differentiation and development of the sexual stages of the parasite. In Plasmodium falciparum, it is a complex, multistage process, involving the expression of a large number of sexual stage-specific proteins. Pfg27 is one such protein, abundantly expressed at the onset of gametocytogenesis. We report successful disruption of the Pfg27 locus using homologous recombination and show that it is essential for the maintenance of the sexual phenotype. Transfectants lacking Pfg27 abort early in sexual development, resulting in vacuolated, highly disarranged, and disintegrating parasites. This suggests a critical role for Pfg27 in the sexual development of the parasite.

  5. Subtelomeric I-SceI-Mediated Double-Strand Breaks Are Repaired by Homologous Recombination in Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiurillo, Miguel A.; Moraes Barros, Roberto R.; Souza, Renata T.; Marini, Marjorie M.; Antonio, Cristiane R.; Cortez, Danielle R.; Curto, María Á.; Lorenzi, Hernán A.; Schijman, Alejandro G.; Ramirez, José L.; da Silveira, José F.

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi chromosome ends are enriched in surface protein genes and pseudogenes (e.g., trans-sialidases) surrounded by repetitive sequences. It has been proposed that the extensive sequence variability among members of these protein families could play a role in parasite infectivity and evasion of host immune response. In previous reports we showed evidence suggesting that sequences located in these regions are subjected to recombination. To support this hypothesis we introduced a double-strand break (DSB) at a specific target site in a T. cruzi subtelomeric region cloned into an artificial chromosome (pTAC). This construct was used to transfect T. cruzi epimastigotes expressing the I-SceI meganuclease. Examination of the repaired sequences showed that DNA repair occurred only through homologous recombination (HR) with endogenous subtelomeric sequences. Our findings suggest that DSBs in subtelomeric repetitive sequences followed by HR between them may contribute to increased variability in T. cruzi multigene families. PMID:28066363

  6. Subtelomeric I-SceI-Mediated Double-Strand Breaks Are Repaired by Homologous Recombination in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiurillo, Miguel A; Moraes Barros, Roberto R; Souza, Renata T; Marini, Marjorie M; Antonio, Cristiane R; Cortez, Danielle R; Curto, María Á; Lorenzi, Hernán A; Schijman, Alejandro G; Ramirez, José L; da Silveira, José F

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi chromosome ends are enriched in surface protein genes and pseudogenes (e.g., trans-sialidases) surrounded by repetitive sequences. It has been proposed that the extensive sequence variability among members of these protein families could play a role in parasite infectivity and evasion of host immune response. In previous reports we showed evidence suggesting that sequences located in these regions are subjected to recombination. To support this hypothesis we introduced a double-strand break (DSB) at a specific target site in a T. cruzi subtelomeric region cloned into an artificial chromosome (pTAC). This construct was used to transfect T. cruzi epimastigotes expressing the I-SceI meganuclease. Examination of the repaired sequences showed that DNA repair occurred only through homologous recombination (HR) with endogenous subtelomeric sequences. Our findings suggest that DSBs in subtelomeric repetitive sequences followed by HR between them may contribute to increased variability in T. cruzi multigene families.

  7. Generation of hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase gene knockout rabbits by homologous recombination and gene trapping through somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Mingru; Jiang, Weihua; Fang, Zhenfu; Kong, Pengcheng; Xing, Fengying; Li, Yao; Chen, Xuejin; Li, Shangang

    2015-11-02

    The rabbit is a common animal model that has been employed in studies on various human disorders, and the generation of genetically modified rabbit lines is highly desirable. Female rabbits have been successfully cloned from cumulus cells, and the somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology is well established. The present study generated hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene knockout rabbits using recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated homologous recombination and SCNT. Gene trap strategies were employed to enhance the gene targeting rates. The male and female gene knockout fibroblast cell lines were derived by different strategies. When male HPRT knockout cells were used for SCNT, no live rabbits were obtained. However, when female HPRT(+/-) cells were used for SCNT, live, healthy rabbits were generated. The cloned HPRT(+/-) rabbits were fertile at maturity. We demonstrate a new technique to produce gene-targeted rabbits. This approach may also be used in the genetic manipulation of different genes or in other species.

  8. Genes encoding homologous antigens in taeniid cestode parasites: Implications for development of recombinant vaccines produced in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauci, Charles; Lightowlers, Marshall W

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant vaccine antigens are being evaluated for their ability to protect livestock animals against cysticercosis and related parasitic infections. Practical use of some of these vaccines is expected to reduce parasite transmission, leading to a reduction in the incidence of neurocysticercosis and hydatid disease in humans. We recently showed that an antigen (TSOL16), expressed in Escherichia coli, confers high levels of protection against Taenia solium cysticercosis in pigs, which provides a strategy for control of T. solium parasite transmission. Here, we discuss the characteristics of this antigen that may affect the utility of TSOL16 and related antigens for development as recombinant vaccines. We also report that genes encoding antigens closely related to TSOL16 from T. solium also occur in other related species of parasites. These highly homologous antigens have the potential to be used as vaccines and may provide protection against related species of Taenia that cause infection in other hosts.

  9. DNA Replication Origins in Immunoglobulin Switch Regions Regulate Class Switch Recombination in an R-Loop-Dependent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, Eva-Maria; Peycheva, Mihaela; Pavri, Rushad

    2016-12-13

    Class switch recombination (CSR) at the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) locus generates antibody isotypes. CSR depends on double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). Although DSB formation and repair machineries are active in G1 phase, efficient CSR is dependent on cell proliferation and S phase entry; however, the underlying mechanisms are obscure. Here, we show that efficient CSR requires the replicative helicase, the Mcm complex. Mcm proteins are enriched at IgH switch regions during CSR, leading to assembly of facultative replication origins that require Mcm helicase function for productive CSR. Assembly of CSR-associated origins is facilitated by R loops and promotes the physical proximity (synapsis) of recombining switch regions, which is reduced by R loop inhibition or Mcm complex depletion. Thus, R loops contribute to replication origin specification that promotes DSB resolution in CSR. This suggests a mechanism for the dependence of CSR on S phase and cell division.

  10. BRCA1 deficient embryonic stem cells display a decreased homologous recombination frequency and an increased frequency of non-homologous recombination that is corrected by expression of a brca1 transgene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snouwaert, J N; Gowen, L C; Latour, A M; Mohn, A R; Xiao, A; DiBiase, L; Koller, B H

    1999-12-20

    BRCA1 is a nuclear phosphoprotein that has been classified as a tumor suppressor based on the fact that women carrying a mutated copy of the BRCA1 gene are at increased risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer. The association of BRCA1 with RAD51 has led to the hypothesis that BRCA1 is involved in DNA repair. We describe here the generation and analysis of murine embryonic stem (ES) cell lines in which both copies of the murine homologue of the human BRCA1 gene have been disrupted by gene targeting. We show that exogenous DNA introduced into these BRCA1 deficient cells by electroporation is randomly integrated into the genome at a significantly higher rate than in wild type ES cells. In contrast, integration of exogenous DNA by homologous recombination occurs in BRCA1 deficient cells at a significantly lower rate than in wild type controls. When BRCA1 expression is re-established at 5-10% of normal levels by introduction of a Brca1 transgene into BRCA1 deficient ES cells, the frequency of random integration is reduced to wild type levels, although the frequency of homologous recombination is not significantly improved. These results suggest that BRCA1 plays a role in determining the response of cells to double stranded DNA breaks.

  11. Independent intrachromosomal recombination events underlie the pericentric inversions of chimpanzee and gorilla chromosomes homologous to human chromosome 16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goidts, Violaine; Szamalek, Justyna M; de Jong, Pieter J; Cooper, David N; Chuzhanova, Nadia; Hameister, Horst; Kehrer-Sawatzki, Hildegard

    2005-09-01

    Analyses of chromosomal rearrangements that have occurred during the evolution of the hominoids can reveal much about the mutational mechanisms underlying primate chromosome evolution. We characterized the breakpoints of the pericentric inversion of chimpanzee chromosome 18 (PTR XVI), which is homologous to human chromosome 16 (HSA 16). A conserved 23-kb inverted repeat composed of satellites, LINE and Alu elements was identified near the breakpoints and could have mediated the inversion by bringing the chromosomal arms into close proximity with each other, thereby facilitating intrachromosomal recombination. The exact positions of the breakpoints may then have been determined by local DNA sequence homologies between the inversion breakpoints, including a 22-base pair direct repeat. The similarly located pericentric inversion of gorilla (GGO) chromosome XVI, was studied by FISH and PCR analysis. The p- and q-arm breakpoints of the inversions in PTR XVI and GGO XVI were found to occur at slightly different locations, consistent with their independent origin. Further, FISH studies of the homologous chromosomal regions in macaque and orangutan revealed that the region represented by HSA BAC RP11-696P19, which spans the inversion breakpoint on HSA 16q11-12, was derived from the ancestral primate chromosome homologous to HSA 1. After the divergence of orangutan from the other great apes approximately 12 million years ago (Mya), a duplication of the corresponding region occurred followed by its interchromosomal transposition to the ancestral chromosome 16q. Thus, the most parsimonious interpretation is that the gorilla and chimpanzee homologs exhibit similar but nonidentical derived pericentric inversions, whereas HSA 16 represents the ancestral form among hominoids.

  12. Mutagenesis and homologous recombination in Drosophila cell lines using CRISPR/Cas9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R. Bassett

    2013-12-01

    We have applied the CRISPR/Cas9 system to Drosophila S2 cells to generate targeted genetic mutations in more than 85% of alleles. By targeting a constitutive exon of the AGO1 gene, we demonstrate homozygous mutation in up to 82% of cells, thereby allowing the study of genetic knockouts in a Drosophila cell line for the first time. We have shown that homologous gene targeting is possible at 1–4% efficiency using this system, allowing for the construction of defined insertions and deletions. We demonstrate that a 1 kb homology arm length is optimal for integration by homologous gene targeting, and demonstrate its efficacy by tagging the endogenous AGO1 protein. This technology enables controlled genetic manipulation in Drosophila cell lines, and its simplicity offers the opportunity to study cellular phenotypes genome-wide.

  13. Variable correction of Artemis deficiency by I-Sce1-meganuclease-assisted homologous recombination in murine hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivière, J; Hauer, J; Poirot, L; Brochet, J; Souque, P; Mollier, K; Gouble, A; Charneau, P; Fischer, A; Pâques, F; de Villartay, J-P; Cavazzana, M

    2014-05-01

    The correction of genetic mutations by homologous recombination is an attractive approach to gene therapy. We used the DNA double-strand breaks introduced by the site-specific endonuclease I-Sce1 as a means of increasing homologous recombination of an exogenous DNA template in murine hematopoietic stem cells (mHSCs). To develop this approach, we chose an Artemis knockout (Art(-/-)) mouse in which exon 12 of the Artemis gene had been replaced by an I-Sce1 recognition site. The I-Sce1 enzyme and the Artemis correction template were each delivered by a self-inactivating (SIN)-integrase-defective lentiviral vector (SIN-IDLV-CMV-ISce1 and SIN-IDLV-Art, respectively). Transduction of Art(-/-) mHSCs with the two vectors successfully reverted the Art(-/-) phenotype in 2 of our 10 experiments. Even though the potential for genotoxicity has yet to be evaluated, this new approach to gene editing appears to be promising. Improving the efficacy of this approach will require further technical work.

  14. DNA Repair by Homologous Recombination, But Not by Nonhomologous End Joining, Is Elevated in Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyong Mao

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant double-stranded break (DSB repair leads to genomic instability, which is a hallmark of malignant cells. Double-stranded breaks are repaired by two pathways: homologous recombination (HR and nonhomologous DNA end joining (NHEJ. It is not known whether these repair pathways are affected in sporadic breast tumors. Here, we examined the efficiency of HR and NHEJ repair in a panel of sporadic breast cancer cell lines and tested whether the efficiency of HR or NHEJ correlates with radioresistance. Homologous recombination and NHEJ in breast cancer cells were analyzed using in vivo fluorescent assays. Unexpectedly, our analysis revealed that the efficiency of HR is significantly elevated in breast cancer cells compared with normal mammary epithelial cells. In contrast, the efficiency of NHEJ in breast cancer cells is not different from normal cells. Overall, breast cancer cells were more sensitive to radiation than normal cells, but the levels of resistance did not correlate with either HR or NHEJ efficiency. Thus, we demonstrate that sporadic breast cancers are not associated with a deficiency in DSB repair, but rather with upregulation of the HR pathway. Our finding of elevated HR in sporadic breast cancer cell lines suggests that therapies directed against the components of HR will be highly tumor-specific.

  15. DNA Repair by Homologous Recombination, But Not by Nonhomologous End Joining, Is Elevated in Breast Cancer Cells12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhiyong; Jiang, Ying; Liu, Xiang; Seluanov, Andrei; Gorbunova, Vera

    2009-01-01

    Aberrant double-stranded break (DSB) repair leads to genomic instability, which is a hallmark of malignant cells. Double-stranded breaks are repaired by two pathways: homologous recombination (HR) and nonhomologous DNA end joining (NHEJ). It is not known whether these repair pathways are affected in sporadic breast tumors. Here, we examined the efficiency of HR and NHEJ repair in a panel of sporadic breast cancer cell lines and tested whether the efficiency of HR or NHEJ correlates with radioresistance. Homologous recombination and NHEJ in breast cancer cells were analyzed using in vivo fluorescent assays. Unexpectedly, our analysis revealed that the efficiency of HR is significantly elevated in breast cancer cells compared with normal mammary epithelial cells. In contrast, the efficiency of NHEJ in breast cancer cells is not different from normal cells. Overall, breast cancer cells were more sensitive to radiation than normal cells, but the levels of resistance did not correlate with either HR or NHEJ efficiency. Thus, we demonstrate that sporadic breast cancers are not associated with a deficiency in DSB repair, but rather with upregulation of the HR pathway. Our finding of elevated HR in sporadic breast cancer cell lines suggests that therapies directed against the components of HR will be highly tumor-specific. PMID:19568413

  16. Specific targeted gene repair using single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides at an endogenous locus in mammalian cells uses homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLachlan, Jennifer; Fernandez, Serena; Helleday, Thomas; Bryant, Helen E

    2009-12-03

    The feasibility of introducing point mutations in vivo using single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides (ssON) has been demonstrated but the efficiency and mechanism remain elusive and potential side effects have not been fully evaluated. Understanding the mechanism behind this potential therapy may help its development. Here, we demonstrate the specific repair of an endogenous non-functional hprt gene by a ssON in mammalian cells, and show that the frequency of such an event is enhanced when cells are in S-phase of the cell cycle. A potential barrier in using ssONs as gene therapy could be non-targeted mutations or gene rearrangements triggered by the ssON. Both the non-specific mutation frequencies and the frequency of gene rearrangements were largely unaffected by ssONs. Furthermore, we find that the introduction of a mutation causing the loss of a functional endogenous hprt gene by a ssON occurred at a similarly low but statistically significant frequency in wild type cells and in cells deficient in single strand break repair, nucleotide excision repair and mismatch repair. However, this mutation was not induced in XRCC3 mutant cells deficient in homologous recombination. Thus, our data suggest ssON-mediated targeted gene repair is more efficient in S-phase and involves homologous recombination.

  17. The Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-Associated Protein SWIB5 Influences mtDNA Architecture and Homologous Recombination

    KAUST Repository

    Blomme, Jonas

    2017-04-19

    In addition to the nucleus, mitochondria and chloroplasts in plant cells also contain genomes. Efficient DNA repair pathways are crucial in these organelles to fix damage resulting from endogenous and exogenous factors. Plant organellar genomes are complex compared with their animal counterparts, and although several plant-specific mediators of organelle DNA repair have been reported, many regulators remain to be identified. Here, we show that a mitochondrial SWI/SNF (nucleosome remodeling) complex B protein, SWIB5, is capable of associating with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in Arabidopsis thaliana. Gainand loss-of-function mutants provided evidence for a role of SWIB5 in influencing mtDNA architecture and homologous recombination at specific intermediate-sized repeats both under normal and genotoxic conditions. SWIB5 interacts with other mitochondrial SWIB proteins. Gene expression and mutant phenotypic analysis of SWIB5 and SWIB family members suggests a link between organellar genome maintenance and cell proliferation. Taken together, our work presents a protein family that influences mtDNA architecture and homologous recombination in plants and suggests a link between organelle functioning and plant development.

  18. Clinicopathological features of homologous recombination-deficient epithelial ovarian cancers: sensitivity to PARP inhibitors, platinum, and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Asima; Plummer, Elizabeth R; Elattar, Ahmed; Soohoo, San; Uzir, Bisha; Quinn, Jennifer E; McCluggage, W Glenn; Maxwell, Perry; Aneke, Harriet; Curtin, Nicola J; Edmondson, Richard J

    2012-11-15

    Up to 50% of epithelial ovarian cancers (EOC) display defects in the homologous recombination (HR) pathway. We sought to determine the ramifications of the homologous recombination-deficient (HRD) status on the clinicopathologic features, chemotherapy response, and survival outcomes of patients with EOCs. HR status was determined in primary cultures from ascitic fluid in 50 chemotherapy-naïve patients by a functional RAD51 immunofluorescence assay and correlated with in vitro sensitivity to the PARP inhibitor (PARPi), rucaparib. All patients went on to receive platinum-based chemotherapy; platinum sensitivity, tumor progression, and overall survival were compared prospectively in HR-competent versus HRD patients. Compared with HR-competent patients, the HRD group was predominantly serous with a higher median CA125 at presentation. HRD was associated with higher ex vivo PARPi sensitivity and clinical platinum sensitivity. Median follow-up duration was 14 months; patients in the HRD group had lower tumor progression rates at 6 months, lower overall/disease-specific death rates at 12 months, and higher median survival. We therefore suggest that HRD as predicted by a functional RAD51 assay correlates with in vitro PARPi sensitivity, clinical platinum sensitivity, and improved survival outcome. ©2012 AACR.

  19. Topoisomerase II-mediated DNA damage is differently repaired during the cell cycle by non-homologous end joining and homologous recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo de Campos-Nebel

    Full Text Available Topoisomerase II (Top2 is a nuclear enzyme involved in several metabolic processes of DNA. Chemotherapy agents that poison Top2 are known to induce persistent protein-mediated DNA double strand breaks (DSB. In this report, by using knock down experiments, we demonstrated that Top2alpha was largely responsible for the induction of gammaH2AX and cytotoxicity by the Top2 poisons idarubicin and etoposide in normal human cells. As DSB resulting from Top2 poisons-mediated damage may be repaired by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ or homologous recombination (HR, we aimed to analyze both DNA repair pathways. We found that DNA-PKcs was rapidly activated in human cells, as evidenced by autophosphorylation at serine 2056, following Top2-mediated DNA damage. The chemical inhibition of DNA-PKcs by wortmannin and vanillin resulted in an increased accumulation of DNA DSB, as evaluated by the comet assay. This was supported by a hypersensitive phenotype to Top2 poisons of Ku80- and DNA-PKcs- defective Chinese hamster cell lines. We also showed that Rad51 protein levels, Rad51 foci formation and sister chromatid exchanges were increased in human cells following Top2-mediated DNA damage. In support, BRCA2- and Rad51C- defective Chinese hamster cells displayed hypersensitivity to Top2 poisons. The analysis by immunofluorescence of the DNA DSB repair response in synchronized human cell cultures revealed activation of DNA-PKcs throughout the cell cycle and Rad51 foci formation in S and late S/G2 cells. Additionally, we found an increase of DNA-PKcs-mediated residual repair events, but not Rad51 residual foci, into micronucleated and apoptotic cells. Therefore, we conclude that in human cells both NHEJ and HR are required, with cell cycle stage specificity, for the repair of Top2-mediated reversible DNA damage. Moreover, NHEJ-mediated residual repair events are more frequently associated to irreversibly damaged cells.

  20. Avian influenza mucosal vaccination in chickens with replication-defective recombinant adenovirus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, Haroldo; Suarez, David L; Tang, De-chu C; van Ginkel, Frederik W; Breedlovea, Cassandra

    2011-03-01

    We evaluated protection conferred by mucosal vaccination with replication-competent adenovirus-free recombinant adenovirus expressing a codon-optimized avian influenza (AI) H5 gene from A/turkey/WI/68 (AdTW68.H5ck). Commercial, layer-type chicken groups were either singly vaccinated ocularly at 5 days of age, singly vaccinated via spray at 5 days of age, or ocularly primed at 5 days and ocularly boosted at 15 days of age. Only chickens primed and boosted via the ocular route developed AI systemic antibodies with maximum hemagglutination inhibition mean titers of 3.9 log2 at 32 days of age. In contrast, single vaccination via the ocular or spray routes maintained an antibody status similar to unvaccinated controls. All chickens (16/16) subjected to ocular priming and boosting with AdTW68.H5ck survived challenge with highly pathogenic AI virus A/chicken/Queretaro/14588-19/95 (H5N2). Single ocular vaccination resulted in 63% (10/16) of birds surviving the challenge followed by a 44% (7/16) survival of single-sprayed vaccinated birds. Birds vaccinated twice via the ocular route also showed significantly lower (P < 0.05) AI virus RNA concentrations in oropharyngeal swabs compared to unvaccinated-challenged controls.

  1. Efficient generation of targeted and controlled mutational events in porcine cells using nuclease-directed homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, James R; Santos, Rafael M N; Martens, Gregory R; Ladowski, Joseph M; Wang, Zheng-Yu; Li, Ping; Tector, Matthew; Tector, A Joseph

    2017-05-15

    Nuclease-based genome editing has rapidly sped the creation of new models of human disease. These techniques also hold great promise for the future of clinical xenotransplantation and cell-based therapies for cancer or immunodeficient pathology. However, to fully realize the potential of nuclease editing tools, the efficiency and precision of their application must be optimized. The object of this study was to use nonintegrating selection and nuclease-directed homologous recombination to efficiently control the genetic modification of the porcine genome. Clustered randomly integrating spaced palindromic repeats and associated Cas9 protein (CRISPR/Cas9)-directed mutagenesis with a single-guide RNA target was designed to target the alpha-1,3-galactosyltransferase locus (GGTA1) of the porcine genome. A vector expressing a single-guide RNA, Cas9 protein, and green fluorescent protein was used to increase plasmid-delivered mutational efficiency when coupled with fluorescence sorting. Single and double-strand DNA oligonucleotides with a restriction site replacing the start codon were created with variable homology lengths surrounding the mutational event site. Finally, a transgene construct was flanked with 50 base pairs of homology directed immediately 5' to a nuclease cut site. These products were introduced to cells with a constant concentration of CRISPR/cas9 vector. Phenotype-specific mutational efficiency was measured by flow cytometer. Controlled homologous insertion was measured by Sanger sequence, restriction enzyme digest and flow cytometry. Expression of a fluorescence protein on the Cas9 vector functioned as a nonintegrating selection marker. Selection by this marker increased phenotype-silencing mutation rates from 3.5% to 82% (P = 0.0002). Insertion or deletion mutation increased from 11% to 96% (P = 0.0007). Co-transfection with homologous DNA oligonucleotides increased the aggregate phenotype-silencing mutation rates up to 22% and increased biallelic

  2. The role of the adenovirus DNA binding protein in DNA replication and recombination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breukelen, B. van

    2003-01-01

    Replication of adenovirus DNA in infected cells is an efficient process that, compared to cellular replication, has the use of a protein primer as a hallmark. The mechanism of this DNA replication process and especially the role of one of the replication proteins, the DNA binding protein DBP, is the

  3. Germline Chromothripsis Driven by L1-Mediated Retrotransposition and Alu/Alu Homologous Recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nazaryan-Petersen, Lusine; Bertelsen, Birgitte; Bak, Mads

    2016-01-01

    L1-endonuclease potential target sites in other breakpoints. In addition, we found four Alu elements flanking the 110-kb deletion and associated with an inversion. We suggest that chromatin looping mediated by homologous Alu elements may have brought distal DNA regions into close proximity...

  4. XRCC3 is essential for proper double-strand break repair and homologous recombination in rice meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bingwei; Wang, Mo; Tang, Ding; Li, Yafei; Xu, Meng; Gu, Minghong; Cheng, Zhukuan; Yu, Hengxiu

    2015-09-01

    RAD51 paralogues play important roles in the assembly and stabilization of RAD51 nucleoprotein filaments, which promote homologous pairing and strand exchange reactions in organisms ranging from yeast to vertebrates. XRCC3, a RAD51 paralogue, has been characterized in budding yeast, mouse, and Arabidopsis. In the present study, XRCC3 in rice was identified and characterized. The rice xrcc3 mutant exhibited normal vegetative growth but complete male and female sterility. Cytological investigations revealed that homologous pairing and synapsis were severely disrupted in the mutant. Meiotic chromosomes were frequently entangled from diplotene to metaphase I, resulting in chromosome fragmentation at anaphase I. The immunostaining signals from γH2AX were regular, implying that double-strand break (DSB) formation was normal in xrcc3 meiocytes. However, COM1 was not detected on early prophase I chromosomes, suggesting that the DSB end-processing system was destroyed in the mutant. Moreover, abnormal chromosome localization of RAD51C, DMC1, ZEP1, ZIP4, and MER3 was observed in xrcc3. Taken together, the results suggest that XRCC3 plays critical roles in both DSB repair and homologous chromosome recombination during rice meiosis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Induction of Epstein-Barr Virus Lytic Replication by Recombinant Adenoviruses Expressing the Zebra Gene with EBV Specific Promoters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu CHEN; Juan YIN; Yi CHEN; Jiang ZHONG

    2005-01-01

    The latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is found in the cells of many tumors. For example, EBV is detectable in almost all cases, and in almost all tumor cells, of non-keratinizing nasopharyngeal carcinoma.Activating the latent virus, which will result in its lytic replication and the death of tumor cells, is a potential approach for the treatment of EBV-associated cancers. In this study, three recombinant adenoviruses were constructed to express the Zebra gene, an EBV gene responsible for switching from the latent state to lytic replication. EBV-specific promoters were used in order to limit Zebra expression in EBV-positive cells, and reduce the potential side effects. The EBV promoters used were Cp, Zp and a dual promoter combining both promoters, CpZp. The Zebra protein was detected in HEK293 cells as well as the EBV-positive D98-HR1 cells infected with recombinant viruses. An EBV lytic replication early antigen, EA-D, was also detected in infected D98-HR1, implying the initiation of lytic replication. In the cell viability assay, Zebra-expressing adenoviruses had little effect on EBV-negative HeLa cells, while significantly reducing the cell viability and proliferation of D98-HR1 cells. The results indicate that EBV virus promoters can be used in adenovirus vectors to express the Zebra gene and induce EBV lytic replication in D98-HR1 cells.

  6. Consideration of the haplotype diversity at nonallelic homologous recombination hotspots improves the precision of rearrangement breakpoint identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillmer, Morten; Summerer, Anna; Mautner, Victor-Felix; Högel, Josef; Cooper, David N; Kehrer-Sawatzki, Hildegard

    2017-09-01

    Precise characterization of nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR) breakpoints is key to identifying those features that influence NAHR frequency. Until now, analysis of NAHR-mediated rearrangements has generally been performed by comparison of the breakpoint-spanning sequences with the human genome reference sequence. We show here that the haplotype diversity of NAHR hotspots may interfere with breakpoint-mapping. We studied the transmitting parents of individuals with germline type-1 NF1 deletions mediated by NAHR within the paralogous recombination site 1 (PRS1) or paralogous recombination site 2 (PRS2) hotspots. Several parental wild-type PRS1 and PRS2 haplotypes were identified that exhibited considerable sequence differences with respect to the reference sequence, which also affected the number of predicted PRDM9-binding sites. Sequence comparisons between the parental wild-type PRS1 or PRS2 haplotypes and the deletion breakpoint-spanning sequences from the patients (method #2) turned out to be an accurate means to assign NF1 deletion breakpoints and proved superior to crude reference sequence comparisons that neglect to consider haplotype diversity (method #1). The mean length of the deletion breakpoint regions assigned by method #2 was 269-bp in contrast to 502-bp by method #1. Our findings imply that paralog-specific haplotype diversity of NAHR hotspots (such as PRS2) and population-specific haplotype diversity must be taken into account in order to accurately ascertain NAHR-mediated rearrangement breakpoints. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Abiotic stress leads to somatic and heritable changes in homologous recombination frequency, point mutation frequency and microsatellite stability in Arabidopsis plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao Youli, E-mail: youli.yao@uleth.ca [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, T1K 3M4 Alberta (Canada); Kovalchuk, Igor, E-mail: igor.kovalchuk@uleth.ca [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, T1K 3M4 Alberta (Canada)

    2011-02-10

    In earlier studies, we showed that abiotic stresses, such as ionizing radiation, heavy metals, temperature and water, trigger an increase in homologous recombination frequency (HRF). We also demonstrated that many of these stresses led to inheritance of high-frequency homologous recombination, HRF. Although an increase in recombination frequency is an important indicator of genome rearrangements, it only represents a minor portion of possible stress-induced mutations. Here, we analyzed the influence of heat, cold, drought, flood and UVC abiotic stresses on two major types of mutations in the genome, point mutations and small deletions/insertions. We used two transgenic lines of Arabidopsis thaliana, one allowing an analysis of reversions in a stop codon-containing inactivated {beta}-glucuronidase transgene and another one allowing an analysis of repeat stability in a microsatellite-interrupted {beta}-glucuronidase transgene. The transgenic Arabidopsis line carrying the {beta}-glucuronidase-based homologous recombination substrate was used as a positive control. We showed that the majority of stresses increased the frequency of point mutations, homologous recombination and microsatellite instability in somatic cells, with the frequency of homologous recombination being affected the most. The analysis of transgenerational changes showed an increase in HRF to be the most prominent effect observed in progeny. Significant changes in recombination frequency were observed upon exposure to all types of stress except drought, whereas changes in microsatellite instability were observed upon exposure to UVC, heat and cold. The frequency of point mutations in the progeny of stress-exposed plants was the least affected; an increase in mutation frequency was observed only in the progeny of plants exposed to UVC. We thus conclude that transgenerational changes in genome stability in response to stress primarily involve an increase in recombination frequency.

  8. Abiotic stress leads to somatic and heritable changes in homologous recombination frequency, point mutation frequency and microsatellite stability in Arabidopsis plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Youli; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2011-02-10

    In earlier studies, we showed that abiotic stresses, such as ionizing radiation, heavy metals, temperature and water, trigger an increase in homologous recombination frequency (HRF). We also demonstrated that many of these stresses led to inheritance of high-frequency homologous recombination, HRF. Although an increase in recombination frequency is an important indicator of genome rearrangements, it only represents a minor portion of possible stress-induced mutations. Here, we analyzed the influence of heat, cold, drought, flood and UVC abiotic stresses on two major types of mutations in the genome, point mutations and small deletions/insertions. We used two transgenic lines of Arabidopsis thaliana, one allowing an analysis of reversions in a stop codon-containing inactivated β-glucuronidase transgene and another one allowing an analysis of repeat stability in a microsatellite-interrupted β-glucuronidase transgene. The transgenic Arabidopsis line carrying the β-glucuronidase-based homologous recombination substrate was used as a positive control. We showed that the majority of stresses increased the frequency of point mutations, homologous recombination and microsatellite instability in somatic cells, with the frequency of homologous recombination being affected the most. The analysis of transgenerational changes showed an increase in HRF to be the most prominent effect observed in progeny. Significant changes in recombination frequency were observed upon exposure to all types of stress except drought, whereas changes in microsatellite instability were observed upon exposure to UVC, heat and cold. The frequency of point mutations in the progeny of stress-exposed plants was the least affected; an increase in mutation frequency was observed only in the progeny of plants exposed to UVC. We thus conclude that transgenerational changes in genome stability in response to stress primarily involve an increase in recombination frequency.

  9. Targeting Homologous Recombination in Notch-Driven C. elegans Stem Cell and Human Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xinzhu; Michaelson, David; Tchieu, Jason; Cheng, Jin; Rothenstein, Diana; Feldman, Regina; Lee, Sang-gyu; Fuller, John; Haimovitz-Friedman, Adriana; Studer, Lorenz; Powell, Simon; Fuks, Zvi; Hubbard, E Jane Albert; Kolesnick, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian NOTCH1-4 receptors are all associated with human malignancy, although exact roles remain enigmatic. Here we employ glp-1(ar202), a temperature-sensitive gain-of-function C. elegans NOTCH mutant, to delineate NOTCH-driven tumor responses to radiotherapy. At ≤20°C, glp-1(ar202) is wild-type, whereas at 25°C it forms a germline stem cell⁄progenitor cell tumor reminiscent of human cancer. We identify a NOTCH tumor phenotype in which all tumor cells traffic rapidly to G2⁄M post-irradiation, attempt to repair DNA strand breaks exclusively via homology-driven repair, and when this fails die by mitotic death. Homology-driven repair inactivation is dramatically radiosensitizing. We show that these concepts translate directly to human cancer models.

  10. Targeting Homologous Recombination in Notch-Driven C. elegans Stem Cell and Human Tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinzhu Deng

    Full Text Available Mammalian NOTCH1-4 receptors are all associated with human malignancy, although exact roles remain enigmatic. Here we employ glp-1(ar202, a temperature-sensitive gain-of-function C. elegans NOTCH mutant, to delineate NOTCH-driven tumor responses to radiotherapy. At ≤20°C, glp-1(ar202 is wild-type, whereas at 25°C it forms a germline stem cell⁄progenitor cell tumor reminiscent of human cancer. We identify a NOTCH tumor phenotype in which all tumor cells traffic rapidly to G2⁄M post-irradiation, attempt to repair DNA strand breaks exclusively via homology-driven repair, and when this fails die by mitotic death. Homology-driven repair inactivation is dramatically radiosensitizing. We show that these concepts translate directly to human cancer models.

  11. FBH1 helicase disrupts RAD51 filaments in vitro and modulates homologous recombination in mammalian cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simandlova, Jitka; Zagelbaum, Jennifer; Payne, Miranda J;

    2013-01-01

    filaments on DNA through its ssDNA translocase function. Consistent with this, a mutant mouse embryonic stem cell line with a deletion in the FBH1 helicase domain fails to limit RAD51 chromatin association and shows hyper-recombination. Our data are consistent with FBH1 restraining RAD51 DNA binding under...

  12. Genomic rearrangements at the FRA2H common fragile site frequently involve non-homologous recombination events across LTR and L1(LINE) repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueckner, Lena M; Sagulenko, Evgeny; Hess, Elisa M; Zheglo, Diana; Blumrich, Anne; Schwab, Manfred; Savelyeva, Larissa

    2012-08-01

    Common fragile sites (cFSs) are non-random chromosomal regions that are prone to breakage under conditions of replication stress. DNA damage and chromosomal alterations at cFSs appear to be critical events in the development of various human diseases, especially carcinogenesis. Despite the growing interest in understanding the nature of cFS instability, only a few cFSs have been molecularly characterised. In this study, we fine-mapped the location of FRA2H using six-colour fluorescence in situ hybridisation and showed that it is one of the most active cFSs in the human genome. FRA2H encompasses approximately 530 kb of a gene-poor region containing a novel large intergenic non-coding RNA gene (AC097500.2). Using custom-designed array comparative genomic hybridisation, we detected gross and submicroscopic chromosomal rearrangements involving FRA2H in a panel of 54 neuroblastoma, colon and breast cancer cell lines. The genomic alterations frequently involved different classes of long terminal repeats and long interspersed nuclear elements. An analysis of breakpoint junction sequence motifs predominantly revealed signatures of microhomology-mediated non-homologous recombination events. Our data provide insight into the molecular structure of cFSs and sequence motifs affected by their activation in cancer. Identifying cFS sequences will accelerate the search for DNA biomarkers and targets for individualised therapies.

  13. Efficacy of soluble recombinant FliC protein from Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis as a potential vaccine candidate against homologous challenge in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Masashi; Matsumoto, Wakako; Seike, Fumio; Tanaka, Yuuya; Teratani, Chie; Tozuka, Maki; Kashimoto, Takashige; Takehara, Kazuaki; Nakamura, Masayuki; Yoshikawa, Yasuhiro

    2012-06-01

    FliC, the flagellin antigen of Salmonella Enteritidis, was tested as a vaccine candidate for protective effect against a homologous challenge in chickens. After immunization with recombinant FliC (rFliC) or administration of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) at 56 days old, the chickens were challenged with 10(9) colony-forming units of Salmonella Enteritidis at 76 days old. The vaccinated birds showed significantly decreased bacterial counts in the liver and cecal contents compared to those administered PBS at 7 days postchallenge, but the protection was partial. The replication experiment also showed a similar result. In both experiments, vaccination induced an increased level of serum anti-rFliC IgG, which was also reactive to the native flagella. The intestinal IgA level was slightly higher in the vaccinated birds than in the control. However, neither the proliferative response nor interferon-gamma secretion of splenic cells upon stimulation with rFliC was induced. Therefore, the effect of rFliC as a vaccine is limited, and further improvement is needed.

  14. [An homologous recombination strategy to directly clone mammalian telemeres]. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    We have pursued three goals over the past year. The first involved determining whether the HARY vector could be used for homologous integration in the human genome. The second was to ascertain whether inserted sequences could be amplified in preference to the endogenous DHFR genes. The third was to determine if the HARY insertion could provide an anchor point for long range restriction mapping. The progress in each goal is described.

  15. ERCC1/XPF protects short telomeres from homologous recombination in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Baptiste Vannier

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Many repair and recombination proteins play essential roles in telomere function and chromosome stability, notwithstanding the role of telomeres in "hiding" chromosome ends from DNA repair and recombination. Among these are XPF and ERCC1, which form a structure-specific endonuclease known for its essential role in nucleotide excision repair and is the subject of considerable interest in studies of recombination. In contrast to observations in mammalian cells, we observe no enhancement of chromosomal instability in Arabidopsis plants mutated for either XPF (AtRAD1 or ERCC1 (AtERCC1 orthologs, which develop normally and show wild-type telomere length. However, in the absence of telomerase, mutation of either of these two genes induces a significantly earlier onset of chromosomal instability. This early appearance of telomere instability is not due to a general acceleration of telomeric repeat loss, but is associated with the presence of dicentric chromosome bridges and cytologically visible extrachromosomal DNA fragments in mitotic anaphase. Such extrachromosomal fragments are not observed in later-generation single-telomerase mutant plants presenting similar frequencies of anaphase bridges. Extensive FISH analyses show that these DNAs are broken chromosomes and correspond to two specific chromosome arms. Analysis of the Arabidopsis genome sequence identified two extensive blocks of degenerate telomeric repeats, which lie at the bases of these two arms. Our data thus indicate a protective role of ERCC1/XPF against 3' G-strand overhang invasion of interstitial telomeric repeats. The fact that the Atercc1 (and Atrad1 mutants dramatically potentiate levels of chromosome instability in Attert mutants, and the absence of such events in the presence of telomerase, have important implications for models of the roles of recombination at telomeres and is a striking illustration of the impact of genome structure on the outcomes of equivalent recombination

  16. DNA annealing by Redβ is insufficient for homologous recombination and the additional requirements involve intra- and inter-molecular interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Sivaraman; Erler, Axel; Fu, Jun; Kranz, Andrea; Tang, Jing; Gopalswamy, Mohanraj; Ramakrishnan, Saminathan; Keller, Adrian; Grundmeier, Guido; Müller, Daniel; Sattler, Michael; Stewart, A. Francis

    2016-01-01

    Single strand annealing proteins (SSAPs) like Redβ initiate homologous recombination by annealing complementary DNA strands. We show that C-terminally truncated Redβ, whilst still able to promote annealing and nucleoprotein filament formation, is unable to mediate homologous recombination. Mutations of the C-terminal domain were evaluated using both single- and double stranded (ss and ds) substrates in recombination assays. Mutations of critical amino acids affected either dsDNA recombination or both ssDNA and dsDNA recombination indicating two separable functions, one of which is critical for dsDNA recombination and the second for recombination per se. As evaluated by co-immunoprecipitation experiments, the dsDNA recombination function relates to the Redα-Redβ protein-protein interaction, which requires not only contacts in the C-terminal domain but also a region near the N-terminus. Because the nucleoprotein filament formed with C-terminally truncated Redβ has altered properties, the second C-terminal function could be due to an interaction required for functional filaments. Alternatively the second C-terminal function could indicate a requirement for a Redβ-host factor interaction. These data further advance the model for Red recombination and the proposition that Redβ and RAD52 SSAPs share ancestral and mechanistic roots. PMID:27708411

  17. Control of the rescue and replication of Semliki Forest virus recombinants by the insertion of miRNA target sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaspar Ratnik

    Full Text Available Due to their broad cell- and tissue-tropism, alphavirus-based replication-competent vectors are of particular interest for anti-cancer therapy. These properties may, however, be potentially hazardous unless the virus infection is controlled. While the RNA genome of alphaviruses precludes the standard control techniques, host miRNAs can be used to down-regulate viral replication. In this study, target sites from ubiquitous miRNAs and those of miRNAs under-represented in cervical cancer cells were inserted into replication-competent DNA/RNA layered vectors of Semliki Forest virus. It was found that in order to achieve the most efficient suppression of recombinant virus rescue, the introduced target sequences must be fully complementary to those of the corresponding miRNAs. Target sites of ubiquitous miRNAs, introduced into the 3' untranslated region of the viral vector, profoundly reduced the rescue of recombinant viruses. Insertion of the same miRNA targets into coding region of the viral vector was approximately 300-fold less effective. Viruses carrying these miRNAs were genetically unstable and rapidly lost the target sequences. This process was delayed, but not completely prevented, by miRNA inhibitors. Target sites of miRNA under-represented in cervical cancer cells had much smaller but still significant effects on recombinant virus rescue in cervical cancer-derived HeLa cells. Over-expression of miR-214, one of these miRNAs, reduced replication of the targeted virus. Though the majority of rescued viruses maintained the introduced miRNA target sequences, genomes with deletions of these sequences were also detected. Thus, the low-level repression of rescue and replication of targeted virus in HeLa cells was still sufficient to cause genetic instability.

  18. Control of the rescue and replication of Semliki Forest virus recombinants by the insertion of miRNA target sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnik, Kaspar; Viru, Liane; Merits, Andres

    2013-01-01

    Due to their broad cell- and tissue-tropism, alphavirus-based replication-competent vectors are of particular interest for anti-cancer therapy. These properties may, however, be potentially hazardous unless the virus infection is controlled. While the RNA genome of alphaviruses precludes the standard control techniques, host miRNAs can be used to down-regulate viral replication. In this study, target sites from ubiquitous miRNAs and those of miRNAs under-represented in cervical cancer cells were inserted into replication-competent DNA/RNA layered vectors of Semliki Forest virus. It was found that in order to achieve the most efficient suppression of recombinant virus rescue, the introduced target sequences must be fully complementary to those of the corresponding miRNAs. Target sites of ubiquitous miRNAs, introduced into the 3' untranslated region of the viral vector, profoundly reduced the rescue of recombinant viruses. Insertion of the same miRNA targets into coding region of the viral vector was approximately 300-fold less effective. Viruses carrying these miRNAs were genetically unstable and rapidly lost the target sequences. This process was delayed, but not completely prevented, by miRNA inhibitors. Target sites of miRNA under-represented in cervical cancer cells had much smaller but still significant effects on recombinant virus rescue in cervical cancer-derived HeLa cells. Over-expression of miR-214, one of these miRNAs, reduced replication of the targeted virus. Though the majority of rescued viruses maintained the introduced miRNA target sequences, genomes with deletions of these sequences were also detected. Thus, the low-level repression of rescue and replication of targeted virus in HeLa cells was still sufficient to cause genetic instability.

  19. A role for RAD51 and homologous recombination in Trypanosoma brucei antigenic variation

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    Antigenic variation is an immune evasion strategy used by African trypanosomes, in which the parasites periodically switch the expression of VSG genes that encode their protective variant surface glycoprotein coat. Two main routes exist for VSG switching: changing the transcriptional status between an active and an inactive copy of the site of VSG expression, called the bloodstream VSG expression site, or recombination reactions that move silent VSGs or VSG copies into the actively transcribe...

  20. IGF-1R inhibition enhances radiosensitivity and delays double-strand break repair by both non-homologous end-joining and homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitnis, M M; Lodhia, K A; Aleksic, T; Gao, S; Protheroe, A S; Macaulay, V M

    2014-11-06

    Inhibition of type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) enhances tumor cell sensitivity to ionizing radiation. It is not clear how this effect is mediated, nor whether this approach can be applied effectively in the clinic. We previously showed that IGF-1R depletion delays repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), unlikely to be explained entirely by reduction in homologous recombination (HR) repair. The current study tested the hypothesis that IGF-1R inhibition induces a repair defect that involves non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). IGF-1R inhibitor AZ12253801 blocked cell survival and radiosensitized IGF-1R-overexpressing murine fibroblasts but not isogenic IGF-1R-null cells, supporting specificity for IGF-1R. IGF-1R inhibition enhanced radiosensitivity in DU145, PC3 and 22Rv1 prostate cancer cells, comparable to effects of Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated inhibition. AZ12253801-treated DU145 cells showed delayed resolution of γH2AX foci, apparent within 1 h of irradiation and persisting for 24 h. In contrast, IGF-1R inhibition did not influence radiosensitivity or γH2AX focus resolution in LNCaP-LN3 cells, suggesting that radiosensitization tracks with the ability of IGF-1R to influence DSB repair. To differentiate effects on repair from growth and cell-survival responses, we tested AZ12253801 in DU145 cells at sub-SF50 concentrations that had no early (⩽48 h) effects on cell cycle distribution or apoptosis induction. Irradiated cultures contained abnormal mitoses, and after 5 days IGF-1R-inhibited cells showed enhanced radiation-induced polyploidy and nuclear fragmentation, consistent with the consequences of entry into mitosis with incompletely repaired DNA. AZ12253801 radiosensitized DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK)-proficient but not DNA-PK-deficient glioblastoma cells, and did not radiosensitize DNA-PK-inhibited DU145 cells, suggesting that in the context of DSB repair, IGF-1R functions in the same pathway as DNA

  1. Memory B cells and CD8⁺ lymphocytes do not control seasonal influenza A virus replication after homologous re-challenge of rhesus macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy D Carroll

    Full Text Available This study sought to define the role of memory lymphocytes in the protection from homologous influenza A virus re-challenge in rhesus macaques. Depleting monoclonal antibodies (mAb were administered to the animals prior to their second experimental inoculation with a human seasonal influenza A virus strain. Treatment with either anti-CD8α or anti-CD20 mAbs prior to re-challenge had minimal effect on influenza A virus replication. Thus, in non-human primates with pre-existing anti-influenza A antibodies, memory B cells and CD8α⁺ T cells do not contribute to the control of virus replication after re-challenge with a homologous strain of influenza A virus.

  2. A PALB2-interacting domain in RNF168 couples homologous recombination to DNA break-induced chromatin ubiquitylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luijsterburg, Martijn S; Typas, Dimitris; Caron, Marie-Christine

    2017-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) elicit a ubiquitylation cascade that controls DNA repair pathway choice. This cascade involves the ubiquitylation of histone H2A by the RNF168 ligase and the subsequent recruitment of RIF1, which suppresses homologous recombination (HR) in G1 cells. The RIF1-dependent...... recognizes histone ubiquitylation by physically associating with ubiquitin-bound RNF168. This direct interaction is mediated by the newly identified PALB2-interacting domain (PID) in RNF168 and the WD40 domain in PALB2, and drives DNA repair by facilitating the assembly of PALB2-containing HR complexes...... at DSBs. Our findings demonstrate that RNF168 couples PALB2-dependent HR to H2A ubiquitylation to promote DNA repair and preserve genome integrity....

  3. Cross-talk between nucleotide excision and homologous recombination DNA repair pathways in the mechanism of action of antitumor trabectedin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, Ana B; Martín-Castellanos, Cristina; Marco, Esther; Gago, Federico; Moreno, Sergio

    2006-08-15

    Trabectedin (Yondelis) is a potent antitumor drug that has the unique characteristic of killing cells by poisoning the DNA nucleotide excision repair (NER) machinery. The basis for the NER-dependent toxicity has not yet been elucidated but it has been proposed as the major determinant for the drug's cytotoxicity. To study the in vivo mode of action of trabectedin and to explore the role of NER in its cytotoxicity, we used the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as a model system. Treatment of S. pombe wild-type cells with trabectedin led to cell cycle delay and activation of the DNA damage checkpoint, indicating that the drug causes DNA damage in vivo. DNA damage induced by the drug is mostly caused by the NER protein, Rad13 (the fission yeast orthologue to human XPG), and is mainly repaired by homologous recombination. By constructing different rad13 mutants, we show that the DNA damage induced by trabectedin depends on a 46-amino acid region of Rad13 that is homologous to a DNA-binding region of human nuclease FEN-1. More specifically, an arginine residue in Rad13 (Arg961), conserved in FEN1 (Arg314), was found to be crucial for the drug's cytotoxicity. These results lead us to propose a model for the action of trabectedin in eukaryotic cells in which the formation of a Rad13/DNA-trabectedin ternary complex, stabilized by Arg961, results in cell death.

  4. H2AX post-translational modifications in the ionizing radiation response and homologous recombination

    OpenAIRE

    Xie,anyong; Odate, Shobu; Chandramouly, Gurushankar; Scully, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Histone H2AX phosphorylation on a C-terminal serine residue to form “γ-H2AX” is a critical early event in the chromatin response to chromosomal DNA double strand breaks in eukaryotes. In mammalian cells, γ-H2AX is formed when H2AX is phosphorylated on serine 139 by ATM or by other DNA damage response kinases. H2AX prevents genomic instability and tumorigenesis, and supports class-switch recombination at immunoglobulin heavy chain loci in mammals. We showed previously that H2AX controls double...

  5. Germline Gene Editing in Chickens by Efficient CRISPR-Mediated Homologous Recombination in Primordial Germ Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Lazar; Pedersen, Darlene; Ching, Kathryn H; Yi, Henry; Collarini, Ellen J; Izquierdo, Shelley; van de Lavoir, Marie-Cecile; Leighton, Philip A

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system has been applied in a large number of animal and plant species for genome editing. In chickens, CRISPR has been used to knockout genes in somatic tissues, but no CRISPR-mediated germline modification has yet been reported. Here we use CRISPR to target the chicken immunoglobulin heavy chain locus in primordial germ cells (PGCs) to produce transgenic progeny. Guide RNAs were co-transfected with a donor vector for homology-directed repair of the double-strand break, and clonal populations were selected. All of the resulting drug-resistant clones contained the correct targeting event. The targeted cells gave rise to healthy progeny containing the CRISPR-targeted locus. The results show that gene-edited chickens can be obtained by modifying PGCs in vitro with the CRISPR/Cas9 system, opening up many potential applications for efficient genetic modification in birds.

  6. Regulation of Rad51-Mediated Homologous Recombination by BRCA2, DSS1 and RAD52

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rants, Louise Olthaver Juhl

    in governing the activity of Rad51 and to learn how other recombination-associated proteins such as DSS1 and RAD52 contribute to its regulation. We use the yeast-like fungus Ustilago maydis and the avian DT40 cell line as experimental systems since both have a well-conserved BRCA2-based recombinational repair...... system that resembles the one seen in human. In U. maydis, we show that Brh2, the BRCA2 homologue, and Dss1 colocalize at DNA damage-induced foci, with Dss1 exhibiting a dynamic association with Brh2 foci. Dss1 focus formation is dependent on interaction with full-length Brh2, and the Dss1-Brh2...... interaction is required for resistance to DNA damage. In avian DT40 cells, we show that endogenously tagged DSS1 redistributes into subnuclear foci in response to DNA damaging agents. However, DSS1 rarely colocalizes with BRCA2. Our data also indicate that both U. maydis Dss1 and avian DSS1 are involved...

  7. Full-length RecE enhances linear-linear homologous recombination and facilitates direct cloning for bioprospecting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jun; Bian, Xiaoying; Hu, Shengbaio; Wang, Hailong; Huang, Fan; Seibert, Philipp M; Plaza, Alberto; Xia, Liqiu; Müller, Rolf; Stewart, A Francis; Zhang, Youming

    2012-05-01

    Functional analysis of genome sequences requires methods for cloning DNA of interest. However, existing methods, such as library cloning and screening, are too demanding or inefficient for high-throughput application to the wealth of genomic data being delivered by massively parallel sequencing. Here we describe direct DNA cloning based on the discovery that the full-length Rac prophage protein RecE and its partner RecT mediate highly efficient linear-linear homologous recombination mechanistically distinct from conventional recombineering mediated by Redαβ from lambda phage or truncated versions of RecET. We directly cloned all ten megasynthetase gene clusters (each 10–52 kb in length) from Photorhabdus luminescens into expression vectors and expressed two of them in a heterologous host to identify the metabolites luminmycin A and luminmide A/B. We also directly cloned cDNAs and exactly defined segments from bacterial artificial chromosomes. Direct cloning with full-length RecE expands the DNA engineering toolbox and will facilitate bioprospecting for natural products.

  8. Multilocus sequence typing of a dairy-associated Leuconostoc mesenteroides population reveals clonal structure with intragenic homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenyi; Liu, Wenjun; Song, Yuqing; Xu, Haiyan; Menghe, Bilige; Zhang, Heping; Sun, Zhihong

    2015-04-01

    Leuconostoc mesenteroides strains play an important role in food fermentation. In this study, 136 strains from different dairy products in China and Mongolia were examined by multilocus sequence typing of 9 housekeeping genes. In total, 82 polymorphic sites were detected among the 9 loci. The number of polymorphic nucleotide sites varied between 4 (dnaA) and 18 (uvrC), whereas the nucleotide diversity per site among the 9 genes varied from 0.00379 in dnaA to 0.01195 in uvrC, suggesting a relatively low level of sequence diversity. For the recombination measurement, incongruence in the trees based on a single gene and concatenated sequences of all sequencing types were observed, indicative of extensive intragenic homologous recombination. The overall relatedness built by minimum spanning trees showed no clear relationship between the clonal complexes and either isolation source or sampling location of the strains. Our study presents, for the first time, the population structure of Leuc. mesenteroides strains of dairy origin.

  9. Promotion of Homologous Recombination and Genomic Stability byRAD51AP1 via RAD51 Recombinase Enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiese, Claudia; Dray, Eloise; Groesser, Torsten; San Filippo,Joseph; Shi, Idina; Collins, David W.; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Williams,Gareth; Rydberg, Bjorn; Sung, Patrick; Schild, David

    2007-04-11

    Homologous recombination (HR) repairs chromosome damage and is indispensable for tumor suppression in humans. RAD51 mediates the DNA strand pairing step in HR. RAD51AP1 (RAD51 Associated Protein 1) is a RAD51-interacting protein whose function has remained elusive. Knockdown of RAD51AP1 in human cells by RNA interference engenders sensitivity to different types of genotoxic stress. Moreover, RAD51AP1-depleted cells are impaired for the recombinational repair of a DNA double-strand break and exhibit chromatid breaks both spontaneously and upon DNA damaging treatment. Purified RAD51AP1 binds dsDNA and RAD51, and it greatly stimulates the RAD51-mediated D-loop reaction. Biochemical and cytological results show that RAD51AP1 functions at a step subsequent to the assembly of the RAD51-ssDNA nucleoprotein filament. Our findings provide the first evidence that RAD51AP1 helps maintain genomic integrity via RAD51 recombinase enhancement.

  10. Transcriptional profile of the homologous recombination machinery and characterization of the EhRAD51 recombinase in response to DNA damage in Entamoeba histolytica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-Camarillo César

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, homologous recombination is an accurate mechanism to generate genetic diversity, and it is also used to repair DNA double strand-breaks. RAD52 epistasis group genes involved in recombinational DNA repair, including mre11, rad50, nsb1/xrs2, rad51, rad51c/rad57, rad51b/rad55, rad51d, xrcc2, xrcc3, rad52, rad54, rad54b/rdh54 and rad59 genes, have been studied in human and yeast cells. Notably, the RAD51 recombinase catalyses strand transfer between a broken DNA and its undamaged homologous strand, to allow damaged region repair. In protozoan parasites, homologous recombination generating antigenic variation and genomic rearrangements is responsible for virulence variation and drug resistance. However, in Entamoeba histolytica the protozoan parasite responsible for human amoebiasis, DNA repair and homologous recombination mechanisms are still unknown. Results In this paper, we initiated the study of the mechanism for DNA repair by homologous recombination in the primitive eukaryote E. histolytica using UV-C (150 J/m2 irradiated trophozoites. DNA double strand-breaks were evidenced in irradiated cells by TUNEL and comet assays and evaluation of the EhH2AX histone phosphorylation status. In E. histolytica genome, we identified genes homologous to yeast and human RAD52 epistasis group genes involved in DNA double strand-breaks repair by homologous recombination. Interestingly, the E. histolytica RAD52 epistasis group related genes were differentially expressed before and after UV-C treatment. Next, we focused on the characterization of the putative recombinase EhRAD51, which conserves the typical architecture of RECA/RAD51 proteins. Specific antibodies immunodetected EhRAD51 protein in both nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments. Moreover, after DNA damage, EhRAD51 was located as typical nuclear foci-like structures in E. histolytica trophozoites. Purified recombinant EhRAD51 exhibited DNA binding

  11. Homologous recombination among bacterial genomes: the measurement and identification%细菌基因组同源重组:量化与鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨献伟; 杨瑞馥; 崔玉军

    2016-01-01

    同源重组(Homologous recombination)是塑造细菌群体多样性的重要原因之一.遗传物质通过同源重组在细菌不同种系间进行水平转移,打乱了克隆繁殖形成的竖向系统发育结构,从而为系统发育重建和种群结构判定带来困难.本文讨论了同源重组对系统发育分析和进化研究的影响,从实际应用的角度对量化重组程度和鉴定重组事件的常用软件及方法进行了综述,归纳了各软件工具和模型方法的优缺点,旨在对细菌重组分析和种群进化研究有所借鉴.%Homologous recombination is one of important sources in shaping the bacterial population diversity, which disrupts the clonal relationship among different lineages through horizontal transferring of DNA-segments. As consequence of blurring the vertical inheritance signals, the homologous recombination raises difficulties in phylogenetic analysis and reconstruction of population structure. Here we discuss the impacts of homologous recombination in inferring phylogenetic relationship among bacterial isolates, and summarize the tools and models separately used in recombination measurement and identification. We also highlight the merits and drawbacks of various approaches, aiming to assist in the practical ap-plication for the analysis of homologous recombination in bacterial evolution research.

  12. Multilocus sequence typing of Lactobacillus casei reveals a clonal population structure with low levels of homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diancourt, Laure; Passet, Virginie; Chervaux, Christian; Garault, Peggy; Smokvina, Tamara; Brisse, Sylvain

    2007-10-01

    Robust genotyping methods for Lactobacillus casei are needed for strain tracking and collection management, as well as for population biology research. A collection of 52 strains initially labeled L. casei or Lactobacillus paracasei was first subjected to rplB gene sequencing together with reference strains of Lactobacillus zeae, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, and other species. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all 52 strains belonged to a single compact L. casei-L. paracasei sequence cluster, together with strain CIP107868 (= ATCC 334) but clearly distinct from L. rhamnosus and from a cluster with L. zeae and CIP103137(T) (= ATCC 393(T)). The strains were genotyped using amplified fragment length polymorphism, multilocus sequence typing based on internal portions of the seven housekeeping genes fusA, ileS, lepA, leuS, pyrG, recA, and recG, and tandem repeat variation (multilocus variable-number tandem repeats analysis [MLVA] using nine loci). Very high concordance was found between the three methods. Although amounts of nucleotide variation were low for the seven genes (pi ranging from 0.0038 to 0.0109), 3 to 12 alleles were distinguished, resulting in 31 sequence types. One sequence type (ST1) was frequent (17 strains), but most others were represented by a single strain. Attempts to subtype ST1 strains by MLVA, ribotyping, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat characterization, and single nucleotide repeat variation were unsuccessful. We found clear evidence for homologous recombination during the diversification of L. casei clones, including a putative intragenic import of DNA into one strain. Nucleotides were estimated to change four times more frequently by recombination than by mutation. However, statistical congruence between individual gene trees was retained, indicating that recombination is not frequent enough to disrupt the phylogenetic signal. The developed multilocus sequence typing scheme should be useful for future studies of L. casei

  13. Rad18 and Rnf8 facilitate homologous recombination by two distinct mechanisms, promoting Rad51 focus formation and suppressing the toxic effect of nonhomologous end joining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kobayashi, S.; Kasaishi, Y.; Nakada, S.; Takagi, T.; Era, S.; Motegi, A.; Chiu, R. K.; Takeda, S.; Hirota, K.

    2015-01-01

    The E2 ubiquitin conjugating enzyme Ubc13 and the E3 ubiquitin ligases Rad18 and Rnf8 promote homologous recombination (HR)-mediated double-strand break (DSB) repair by enhancing polymerization of the Rad51 recombinase at.-ray-induced DSB sites. To analyze functional interactions between the three

  14. Rad18 and Rnf8 facilitate homologous recombination by two distinct mechanisms, promoting Rad51 focus formation and suppressing the toxic effect of nonhomologous end joining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kobayashi, S.; Kasaishi, Y.; Nakada, S.; Takagi, T.; Era, S.; Motegi, A.; Chiu, R. K.; Takeda, S.; Hirota, K.

    2015-01-01

    The E2 ubiquitin conjugating enzyme Ubc13 and the E3 ubiquitin ligases Rad18 and Rnf8 promote homologous recombination (HR)-mediated double-strand break (DSB) repair by enhancing polymerization of the Rad51 recombinase at.-ray-induced DSB sites. To analyze functional interactions between the three e

  15. The plant-specific CDKB1-CYCB1 complex mediates homologous recombination repair in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weimer, Annika K; Biedermann, Sascha; Harashima, Hirofumi; Roodbarkelari, Farshad; Takahashi, Naoki; Foreman, Julia; Guan, Yonsheng; Pochon, Gaëtan; Heese, Maren; Van Damme, Daniël; Sugimoto, Keiko; Koncz, Csaba; Doerner, Peter; Umeda, Masaaki; Schnittger, Arp

    2016-10-04

    Upon DNA damage, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are typically inhibited to block cell division. In many organisms, however, it has been found that CDK activity is required for DNA repair, especially for homology-dependent repair (HR), resulting in the conundrum how mitotic arrest and repair can be reconciled. Here, we show that Arabidopsis thaliana solves this dilemma by a division of labor strategy. We identify the plant-specific B1-type CDKs (CDKB1s) and the class of B1-type cyclins (CYCB1s) as major regulators of HR in plants. We find that RADIATION SENSITIVE 51 (RAD51), a core mediator of HR, is a substrate of CDKB1-CYCB1 complexes. Conversely, mutants in CDKB1 and CYCB1 fail to recruit RAD51 to damaged DNA CYCB1;1 is specifically activated after DNA damage and we show that this activation is directly controlled by SUPPRESSOR OF GAMMA RESPONSE 1 (SOG1), a transcription factor that acts similarly to p53 in animals. Thus, while the major mitotic cell-cycle activity is blocked after DNA damage, CDKB1-CYCB1 complexes are specifically activated to mediate HR. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY NC ND 4.0 license.

  16. Homology-independent discovery of replicating pathogenic circular RNAs by deep sequencing and a new computational algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Qingfa; Wang, Ying; Cao, Mengji; Pantaleo, Vitantonio; Burgyan, Joszef; Li, Wan-Xiang; Ding, Shou-wei

    2012-01-01

    A common challenge in pathogen discovery by deep sequencing approaches is to recognize viral or subviral pathogens in samples of diseased tissue that share no significant homology with a known pathogen. Here we report a homology-independent approach for discovering viroids, a distinct class of free circular RNA subviral pathogens that encode no protein and are known to infect plants only. Our approach involves analyzing the sequences of the total small RNAs of the infected plants obtained by ...

  17. New Coffee Plant-Infecting Xylella fastidiosa Variants Derived via Homologous Recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Marie-Agnès; Denancé, Nicolas; Legendre, Bruno; Morel, Emmanuelle; Briand, Martial; Mississipi, Stelly; Durand, Karine; Olivier, Valérie; Portier, Perrine; Poliakoff, Françoise; Crouzillat, Dominique

    2015-12-28

    Xylella fastidiosa is a xylem-limited phytopathogenic bacterium endemic to the Americas that has recently emerged in Asia and Europe. Although this bacterium is classified as a quarantine organism in the European Union, importation of plant material from contaminated areas and latent infection in asymptomatic plants have engendered its inevitable introduction. In 2012, four coffee plants (Coffea arabica and Coffea canephora) with leaf scorch symptoms growing in a confined greenhouse were detected and intercepted in France. After identification of the causal agent, this outbreak was eradicated. Three X. fastidiosa strains were isolated from these plants, confirming a preliminary identification based on immunology. The strains were characterized by multiplex PCR and by multilocus sequence analysis/typing (MLSA-MLST) based on seven housekeeping genes. One strain, CFBP 8073, isolated from C. canephora imported from Mexico, was assigned to X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa/X. fastidiosa subsp. sandyi. This strain harbors a novel sequence type (ST) with novel alleles at two loci. The two other strains, CFBP 8072 and CFBP 8074, isolated from Coffea arabica imported from Ecuador, were allocated to X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca. These two strains shared a novel ST with novel alleles at two loci. These MLST profiles showed evidence of recombination events. We provide genome sequences for CFBP 8072 and CFBP 8073 strains. Comparative genomic analyses of these two genome sequences with publicly available X. fastidiosa genomes, including the Italian strain CoDiRO, confirmed these phylogenetic positions and provided candidate alleles for coffee plant adaptation. This study demonstrates the global diversity of X. fastidiosa and highlights the diversity of strains isolated from coffee plants.

  18. TALEN-Mediated Homologous Recombination Produces Site-Directed DNA Base Change and Herbicide-Resistant Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Liu, Bo; Chen, Chih Ying; Yang, Bing

    2016-05-20

    Over the last decades, much endeavor has been made to advance genome editing technology due to its promising role in both basic and synthetic biology. The breakthrough has been made in recent years with the advent of sequence-specific endonucleases, especially zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) guided nucleases (e.g., Cas9). In higher eukaryotic organisms, site-directed mutagenesis usually can be achieved through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair to the DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) caused by the exogenously applied nucleases. However, site-specific gene replacement or genuine genome editing through homologous recombination (HR) repair to DSBs remains a challenge. As a proof of concept gene replacement through TALEN-based HR in rice (Oryza sativa), we successfully produced double point mutations in rice acetolactate synthase gene (OsALS) and generated herbicide resistant rice lines by using TALENs and donor DNA carrying the desired mutations. After ballistic delivery into rice calli of TALEN construct and donor DNA, nine HR events with different genotypes of OsALS were obtained in T0 generation at the efficiency of 1.4%-6.3% from three experiments. The HR-mediated gene edits were heritable to the progeny of T1 generation. The edited T1 plants were as morphologically normal as the control plants while displayed strong herbicide resistance. The results demonstrate the feasibility of TALEN-mediated genome editing in rice and provide useful information for further genome editing by other nuclease-based genome editing platforms.

  19. Tousled kinase activator, gallic acid, promotes homologous recombinational repair and suppresses radiation cytotoxicity in salivary gland cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timiri Shanmugam, Prakash Srinivasan; Nair, Renjith Parameshwaran; De Benedetti, Arrigo; Caldito, Gloria; Abreo, Fleurette; Sunavala-Dossabhoy, Gulshan

    2016-04-01

    Accidental or medical radiation exposure of the salivary glands can gravely impact oral health. Previous studies have shown the importance of Tousled-like kinase 1 (TLK1) and its alternate start variant TLK1B in cell survival against genotoxic stresses. Through a high-throughput library screening of natural compounds, the phenolic phytochemical, gallic acid (GA), was identified as a modulator of TLK1/1B. This small molecule possesses anti-oxidant and free radical scavenging properties, but in this study, we report that in vitro it promotes survival of human salivary acinar cells, NS-SV-AC, through repair of ionizing radiation damage. Irradiated cells treated with GA show improved clonogenic survival compared to untreated controls. And, analyses of DNA repair kinetics by alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis and γ-H2AX foci immunofluorescence indicate rapid resolution of DNA breaks in drug-treated cells. Study of DR-GFP transgene repair indicates GA facilitates homologous recombinational repair to establish a functional GFP gene. In contrast, inactivation of TLK1 or its shRNA knockdown suppressed resolution of radiation-induced DNA tails in NS-SV-AC, and homology directed repair in DR-GFP cells. Consistent with our results in culture, animals treated with GA after exposure to fractionated radiation showed better preservation of salivary function compared to saline-treated animals. Our results suggest that GA-mediated transient modulation of TLK1 activity promotes DNA repair and suppresses radiation cytoxicity in salivary gland cells.

  20. Prolonged particulate chromate exposure does not inhibit homologous recombination repair in North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis) lung cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Cynthia L; Wise, Catherine F; Wise, John Pierce

    2017-09-15

    Chromosome instability is a common feature of cancers that forms due to the misrepair of DNA double strand breaks. Homologous recombination (HR) repair is a high fidelity DNA repair pathway that utilizes a homologous DNA sequence to accurately repair such damage and protect the genome. Prolonged exposure (>72h) to the human lung carcinogen, particulate hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), inhibits HR repair, resulting in increased chromosome instability in human cells. Comparative studies have shown acute Cr(VI) exposure induces less chromosome damage in whale cells than human cells, suggesting investigating the effect of this carcinogen in other species may inform efforts to prevent Cr(VI)-induced chromosome instability. Thus, the goal of this study was to determine the effect of prolonged Cr(VI) exposure on HR repair and clastogenesis in North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis) lung cells. We show particulate Cr(VI) induces HR repair activity after both acute (24h) and prolonged (120h) exposure in North Atlantic right whale cells. Although the RAD51 response was lower following prolonged Cr(VI) exposure compared to acute exposure, the response was sufficient for HR repair to occur. In accordance with active HR repair, no increase in Cr(VI)-induced clastogenesis was observed with increased exposure time. These results suggest prolonged Cr(VI) exposure affects HR repair and genomic stability differently in whale and human lung cells. Future investigation of the differences in how human and whale cells respond to chemical carcinogens may provide valuable insight into mechanisms of preventing chemical carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. A Mitochondrial Autonomously Replicating Sequence from Pichia pastoris for Uniform High Level Recombinant Protein Production

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Karl Friehs; Jan-Philipp Schwarzhans; Tobias Luttermann; Daniel Wibberg; Anika Winkler; Wolfgang Hübner; Thomas Huser; Jörn Kalinowski

    2017-01-01

    Pichia pastoris is a non-conventional methylotrophic yeast that is widely used for recombinant protein production, typically by stably integrating the target gene into the genome as part of an expression cassette...

  2. Interferon γ expressed by a recombinant respiratory syncytial virus attenuates virus replication in mice without compromising immunogenicity

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    Interferon γ (IFN-γ) has pleiotropic biological effects, including intrinsic antiviral activity as well as stimulation and regulation of immune responses. An infectious recombinant human respiratory syncytial virus (rRSV/mIFN-γ) was constructed that encodes murine (m) IFN-γ as a separate gene inserted into the G-F intergenic region. Cultured cells infected with rRSV/mIFN-γ secreted 22 μg mIFN-γ per 106 cells. The replication of rRSV/mIFN-γ, but not that of a control chimeric rRSV containing t...

  3. The yeast Shu complex utilizes homologous recombination machinery for error-free lesion bypass via physical interaction with a Rad51 paralogue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Xu

    Full Text Available DNA-damage tolerance (DDT is defined as a mechanism by which eukaryotic cells resume DNA synthesis to fill the single-stranded DNA gaps left by replication-blocking lesions. Eukaryotic cells employ two different means of DDT, namely translesion DNA synthesis (TLS and template switching, both of which are coordinately regulated through sequential ubiquitination of PCNA at the K164 residue. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the same PCNA-K164 residue can also be sumoylated, which recruits the Srs2 helicase to prevent undesired homologous recombination (HR. While the mediation of TLS by PCNA monoubiquitination has been extensively characterized, the method by which K63-linked PCNA polyubiquitination leads to template switching remains unclear. We recently identified a yeast heterotetrameric Shu complex that couples error-free DDT to HR as a critical step of template switching. Here we report that the Csm2 subunit of Shu physically interacts with Rad55, an accessory protein involved in HR. Rad55 and Rad57 are Rad51 paralogues and form a heterodimer to promote Rad51-ssDNA filament formation by antagonizing Srs2 activity. Although Rad55-Rad57 and Shu function in the same pathway and both act to inhibit Srs2 activity, Shu appears to be dedicated to error-free DDT while the Rad55-Rad57 complex is also involved in double-strand break repair. This study reveals the detailed steps of error-free lesion bypass and also brings to light an intrinsic interplay between error-free DDT and Srs2-mediated inhibition of HR.

  4. The study on space-flight induced DNA damage in Arabidopsis thaliana using the related homologous recombination reporter system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qiao; Nechitailo, Galina S.; Lu, Jinying; Liu, Min; Li, Huasheng

    Usually, phenotype changes of plants were used to analayze the responding genetic damages. However, this method is time-consuming, laborious and needs a long period. Here, we developed an Arabidopsis thaliana homologous recombination reporter system, in which HR frequency and HR-related AtRAD54 gene expression level were used as mutagenic end points. Based on the system, effect of DNA damage by space-flight during the Shenzhou-9 mission was investigated. In this study, an Arabidopsis thaliana-line transgenic for GUS recombination substrates (R3L66, AtRAD54promoter:: GFP + GUS) was used to study the mutagenicity of space-flight, and the results showed that 13 days space-flight exposure of seedlings induced a significant increase in HRF compared with its ground-base three-dimensional clinostat (generally called a random positioning machine or RPM, an effective simulator of microgravity) controls and ground 1g controls. We also observed three-dimensional clinostat induced a significant increase in HRF and HR-related AtRAD54 gene expression level compared with ground 1g controls. Treatment with the ROS scavenger DMSO dramatically reduced the effects of simulated microgravity on the induction of HR and expression of the AtRAD54 gene, suggesting that ROS play a critical role in mediating the simulated microgravity mutagenic effects in plants. In order to understand the combined effects of radiation and microgravity (the main factors in space environment) on DNA damage, we further investigated the effects of modeled microgravity on radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE) n vivo in A. thaliana plants using the expression level of the HR-related AtRAD54 gene as mutagenic end points. The results showed that the modeled microgravity significantly inhibited the up-regulated expression of the AtRAD54 gene in bystander aerial plants after root irradiation, suggesting a repressive effect of microgravity on RIBE.

  5. Molecular epidemiologic evidence of homologous recombination in infectious bursal disease viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackwood, Daral J

    2012-09-01

    Nucleotide and predicted amino acid sequences of the infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) surface protein VP2 have been used to identify strains of the virus and place them into phylogenetic groups. The amino acids across the hypervariable sequence region of VP2 (hvVP2) vary, but typically variant viruses have amino acids 222T, 249K, 286I, and 318D and classic viruses have 222P, 249Q, 286T, and 318G. A molecular epidemiologic study was conducted from 2001 to 2011 in commercial chickens (Gallus gallus) from Mexico, Colombia, and Venezuela. Although many IBDVs were identified, most had the typical variant or classic amino acid sequences across the hvVP2 region. Four viruses identified in 2004, one in 2006, and 10 in 2011 from Mexico had the amino acids 222T, 249Q, 286T, and 318D. Six samples from Venezuela in 2001, one sample from Colombia in 2001, two samples from Venezuela in 2004, and one sample from Venezuela in 2005 had the amino acids 222P, 249K, 286I, and 318G. These combinations of classic and variant amino acid sequence markers had not been identified previously in any IBDV strains. The VP2 amino acid sequences in the P(BC) and P(HI) loop structures of the Venezuela and Colombia viruses were similar to most classic viruses, whereas their minor P(DE) and P(FG) loop sequences were typical of Delaware variant strains. The Mexico viruses had VP2 P(BC) loop sequences that were typical of variant IBDV strains, but their minor PDE and PFG loop structures contained amino acids that were similar but not identical to classic strains. The P(HI) loop sequences of the Mexico viruses had 318D that is typical of a Delaware variant virus, but the other amino acids in this loop structure distinguished them from all other IBDV strains. The data suggest that one or more recombination events may have occurred to create this type of sequence diversity. Because of importation regulations, immunologic studies could not be conducted in the United States to determine the

  6. I-SceI-mediated double-strand break does not increase the frequency of homologous recombination at the Dct locus in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenina, Myriam; Simon-Chazottes, Dominique; Vandormael-Pournin, Sandrine; Soueid, Jihane; Langa, Francina; Cohen-Tannoudji, Michel; Bernard, Bruno A; Panthier, Jean-Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Targeted induction of double-strand breaks (DSBs) at natural endogenous loci was shown to increase the rate of gene replacement by homologous recombination in mouse embryonic stem cells. The gene encoding dopachrome tautomerase (Dct) is specifically expressed in melanocytes and their precursors. To construct a genetic tool allowing the replacement of Dct gene by any gene of interest, we generated an embryonic stem cell line carrying the recognition site for the yeast I-SceI meganuclease embedded in the Dct genomic segment. The embryonic stem cell line was electroporated with an I-SceI expression plasmid, and a template for the DSB-repair process that carried sequence homologies to the Dct target. The I-SceI meganuclease was indeed able to introduce a DSB at the Dct locus in live embryonic stem cells. However, the level of gene targeting was not improved by the DSB induction, indicating a limited capacity of I-SceI to mediate homologous recombination at the Dct locus. These data suggest that homologous recombination by meganuclease-induced DSB may be locus dependent in mammalian cells.

  7. I-SceI-mediated double-strand break does not increase the frequency of homologous recombination at the Dct locus in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Fenina

    Full Text Available Targeted induction of double-strand breaks (DSBs at natural endogenous loci was shown to increase the rate of gene replacement by homologous recombination in mouse embryonic stem cells. The gene encoding dopachrome tautomerase (Dct is specifically expressed in melanocytes and their precursors. To construct a genetic tool allowing the replacement of Dct gene by any gene of interest, we generated an embryonic stem cell line carrying the recognition site for the yeast I-SceI meganuclease embedded in the Dct genomic segment. The embryonic stem cell line was electroporated with an I-SceI expression plasmid, and a template for the DSB-repair process that carried sequence homologies to the Dct target. The I-SceI meganuclease was indeed able to introduce a DSB at the Dct locus in live embryonic stem cells. However, the level of gene targeting was not improved by the DSB induction, indicating a limited capacity of I-SceI to mediate homologous recombination at the Dct locus. These data suggest that homologous recombination by meganuclease-induced DSB may be locus dependent in mammalian cells.

  8. Conservation of replication chronology of homologous chromosome bands between four species of the genus Cebus and man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couturier, J; Dutrillaux, B

    1981-01-01

    Replication patterns after 5-bromodeoxyuridine incorporation are analyzed in chromosomes of four species of the genus Cebus (C. capucinus, C. albifrons, C. appella, and C. nigrivittatus). They are compared with those of man, taking as reference the banding analyses previously described. It was found that the high degree of conservation of chromosome structures between Cebus and man was accompanied by conservation of the DNA-replication sequence of the bands. It is assumed that this conservation during the course of evolution may apply to other mammals. Thus, replication patterns may be useful for ensuring interspecific comparisons. The only detected difference concerns late-replicating X chromosomes from normal female cells: The predominant lymphocyte pattern described in man is rare in Cebus, in which the usual lymphocyte pattern corresponds to that of human fibroblasts or to the minor human lymphocyte pattern.

  9. Production of Toxocara cati TES-120 Recombinant Antigen and Comparison with its T. canis Homolog for Serodiagnosis of Toxocariasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahabiun, Farzaneh; Sadjjadi, Seyed Mahmoud; Yunus, Muhammad Hafiznur; Rahumatullah, Anizah; Moghaddam, Mohammad Hosein Falaki; Saidin, Syazwan; Noordin, Rahmah

    2015-08-01

    Toxocariasis is a cosmopolitan zoonotic disease caused by the infective larvae of Toxocara canis and T. cati. Diagnosis in humans is usually based on clinical symptoms and serology. Immunoglobulin G (IgG)-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits using T. canis excretory-secretory (TES) larval antigens are commonly used for serodiagnosis. Differences in the antigens of the two Toxocara species may influence the diagnostic sensitivity of the test. In this study, T. cati recombinant TES-120 (rTES-120) was cloned, expressed, and compared with its T. canis homolog in an IgG4-western blot. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of T. cati rTES-120 were 70% (33/47) and 100% (39/39), respectively. T. canis rTES-120 showed 57.4% sensitivity and 94.4% specificity. When the results of assays using rTES-120 of both species were considered, the diagnostic sensitivity was 76%. This study shows that using antigens from both Toxocara species may improve the serodiagnosis of toxocariasis.

  10. Disparate requirements for the Walker A and B ATPase motifs ofhuman RAD51D in homologous recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiese, Claudia; Hinz, John M.; Tebbs, Robert S.; Nham, Peter B.; Urbin, Salustra S.; Collins, David W.; Thompson, Larry H.; Schild, David

    2006-04-21

    In vertebrates, homologous recombinational repair (HRR) requires RAD51 and five RAD51 paralogs (XRCC2, XRCC3, RAD51B, RAD51C, and RAD51D) that all contain conserved Walker A and B ATPase motifs. In human RAD51D we examined the requirement for these motifs in interactions with XRCC2 and RAD51C, and for survival of cells in response to DNA interstrand crosslinks. Ectopic expression of wild type human RAD51D or mutants having a non-functional A or B motif was used to test for complementation of a rad51d knockout hamster CHO cell line. Although A-motif mutants complement very efficiently, B-motif mutants do not. Consistent with these results, experiments using the yeast two- and three-hybrid systems show that the interactions between RAD51D and its XRCC2 and RAD51C partners also require a functional RAD51D B motif, but not motif A. Similarly, hamster Xrcc2 is unable to bind to the non-complementing human RAD51D B-motif mutants in co-immunoprecipitation assays. We conclude that a functional Walker B motif, but not A motif, is necessary for RAD51D's interactions with other paralogs and for efficient HRR. We present a model in which ATPase sites are formed in a bipartite manner between RAD51D and other RAD51 paralogs.

  11. Sandwiched zinc-finger nucleases demonstrating higher homologous recombination rates than conventional zinc-finger nucleases in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Tomoaki; Mori, Koichi; Tobimatsu, Takamasa; Sera, Takashi

    2014-02-01

    We previously reported that our sandwiched zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), in which a DNA cleavage domain is inserted between two artificial zinc-finger proteins, cleave their target DNA much more efficiently than conventional ZFNs in vitro. In the present study, we compared DNA cleaving efficiencies of a sandwiched ZFN with those of its corresponding conventional ZFN in mammalian cells. Using a plasmid-based single-strand annealing reporter assay in HEK293 cells, we confirmed that the sandwiched ZFN induced homologous recombination more efficiently than the conventional ZFN; reporter activation by the sandwiched ZFN was more than eight times that of the conventional one. Western blot analysis showed that the sandwiched ZFN was expressed less frequently than the conventional ZFN, indicating that the greater DNA-cleaving activity of the sandwiched ZFN was not due to higher expression of the sandwiched ZFN. Furthermore, an MTT assay demonstrated that the sandwiched ZFN did not have any significant cytotoxicity under the DNA-cleavage conditions. Thus, because our sandwiched ZFN cleaved more efficiently than its corresponding conventional ZFN in HEK293 cells as well as in vitro, sandwiched ZFNs are expected to serve as an effective molecular tool for genome editing in living cells.

  12. Targeted gene addition in human epithelial stem cells by zinc-finger nuclease-mediated homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coluccio, Andrea; Miselli, Francesca; Lombardo, Angelo; Marconi, Alessandra; Malagoli Tagliazucchi, Guidantonio; Gonçalves, Manuel A; Pincelli, Carlo; Maruggi, Giulietta; Del Rio, Marcela; Naldini, Luigi; Larcher, Fernando; Mavilio, Fulvio; Recchia, Alessandra

    2013-09-01

    Preclinical and clinical studies showed that autologous transplantation of epidermis derived from genetically modified epithelial stem cells (EpSCs) leads to long-term correction of inherited skin adhesion defects. These studies were based on potentially genotoxic retroviral vectors. We developed an alternative gene transfer strategy aimed at targeting a "safe harbor" locus, the adeno-associated virus integration site 1 (AAVS1), by zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN)-induced homologous recombination (HR). Delivery of AAVS1-specific ZFNs and a GFP-expressing HR cassette by integration-defective lentiviral (LV) vectors (IDLVs) or adenoviral (Ad) vectors resulted in targeted gene addition with an efficiency of > 20% in a human keratinocyte cell line, > 10% in immortalized keratinocytes, and < 1% in primary keratinocytes. Deep sequencing of the AAVS1 locus showed that ZFN-induced double-strand breaks are mostly repaired by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) in primary cells, indicating that poor induction of the HR-dependent DNA repair pathway may be a significant limitation for targeted gene integration. Skin equivalents derived from unselected keratinocyte cultures coinfected with a GFP-IDLV and a ZFN-Ad vector were grafted onto immunodeficient mice. GFP-positive clones were observed in all grafts up to 18 weeks post-transplantation. By histological and molecular analysis, we were able to demonstrate highly efficient targeting of the AAVS1 locus in human repopulating EpSCs.

  13. Homologous recombination contributes to the repair of DNA double-strand breaks induced by high-energy iron ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zafar, Faria; Seidler, Sara B.; Kronenberg, Amy; Schild, David; Wiese, Claudia

    2010-06-29

    To test the contribution of homologous recombinational repair (HRR) in repairing DNA damaged sites induced by high-energy iron ions, we used: (1) HRR-deficient rodent cells carrying a deletion in the RAD51D gene and (2) syngeneic human cells impaired for HRR by RAD51D or RAD51 knockdown using RNA interference. We show that in response to iron ions, HRR contributes to cell survival in rodent cells, and that HRR-deficiency abrogates RAD51 foci formation. Complementation of the HRR defect by human RAD51D rescues both enhanced cytotoxicity and RAD51 foci formation. For human cells irradiated with iron ions, cell survival is decreased, and, in p53 mutant cells, the levels of mutagenesis are increased when HRR is impaired. Human cells synchronized in S phase exhibit more pronounced resistance to iron ions as compared with cells in G1 phase, and this increase in radioresistance is diminished by RAD51 knockdown. These results implicate a role for RAD51-mediated DNA repair (i.e. HRR) in removing a fraction of clustered lesions induced by charged particle irradiation. Our results are the first to directly show the requirement for an intact HRR pathway in human cells in ensuring DNA repair and cell survival in response to high-energy high LET radiation.

  14. Targeting Human α-Lactalbumin Gene Insertion into the Goat β-Lactoglobulin Locus by TALEN-Mediated Homologous Recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongmei Zhu

    Full Text Available Special value of goat milk in human nutrition and well being is associated with medical problems of food allergies which are caused by milk proteins such as β-lactoglobulin (BLG. Here, we employed transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN-assisted homologous recombination in goat fibroblasts to introduce human α-lactalbumin (hLA genes into goat BLG locus. TALEN-mediated targeting enabled isolation of colonies with mono- and bi-allelic transgene integration in up to 10.1% and 1.1%, respectively, after selection. Specifically, BLG mRNA levels were gradually decreasing in both mo- and bi-allelic goat mammary epithelial cells (GMECs while hLA demonstrated expression in GMECs in vitro. Gene-targeted fibroblast cells were efficiently used in somatic cell nuclear transfer, resulting in production of hLA knock-in goats directing down-regulated BLG expression and abundant hLA secretion in animal milk. Our findings provide valuable background for animal milk optimization and expedited development for agriculture and biomedicine.

  15. CBP and p300 histone acetyltransferases contribute to homologous recombination by transcriptionally activating the BRCA1 and RAD51 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogiwara, Hideaki; Kohno, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Histone acetylation at DNA double-strand break (DSB) sites by CBP and p300 histone acetyltransferases (HATs) is critical for the recruitment of DSB repair proteins to chromatin. Here, we show that CBP and p300 HATs also function in DSB repair by transcriptionally activating the BRCA1 and RAD51 genes, which are involved in homologous recombination (HR), a major DSB repair system. siRNA-mediated depletion of CBP and p300 impaired HR activity and downregulated BRCA1 and RAD51 at the protein and mRNA levels. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that CBP and p300 bind to the promoter regions of the BRCA1 and RAD51 genes, and that depletion of CBP and/or p300 reduces H3 and H4 acetylation and inhibits binding of the transcription factor E2F1 to these promoters. Depletion of CBP and p300 impaired DNA damage-induced phosphorylation and chromatin binding of the single-strand DNA-binding protein RPA following BRCA1-mediated DNA end resection. Consistent with this, subsequent phosphorylation of CHK1 and activation of the G2/M damage checkpoint were also impaired. These results indicate that the HATs CBP and p300 play multiple roles in the activation of the cellular response to DSBs.

  16. A new subclass of intrinsic aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferases, ANT(3")-II, is horizontally transferred among Acinetobacter spp. by homologous recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gang; Leclercq, Sébastien Olivier; Tian, Jingjing; Wang, Chao; Ai, Guomin; Liu, Shuangjiang

    2017-01-01

    The emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance among Acinetobacter spp. have been investigated extensively. Most studies focused on the multiple antibiotic resistance genes located on plasmids or genomic resistance islands. On the other hand, the mechanisms controlling intrinsic resistance are still not well understood. In this study, we identified the novel subclass of aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase ANT(3")-II in Acinetobacter spp., which comprised numerous variants distributed among three main clades. All members of this subclass can inactivate streptomycin and spectinomycin. The three ant(3")-II genes, encoding for the three ANT(3")-II clades, are widely distributed in the genus Acinetobacter and always located in the same conserved genomic region. According to their prevalence, these genes are intrinsic in Acinetobacter baumannii, Acinetobacter pittii, and Acinetobacter gyllenbergii. We also demonstrated that the ant(3")-II genes are located in a homologous recombination hotspot and were recurrently transferred among Acinetobacter species. In conclusion, our findings demonstrated a novel mechanism of natural resistance in Acinetobacter spp., identified a novel subclass of aminoglycoside nucleotidyltransferase and provided new insight into the evolutionary history of intrinsic resistance genes. PMID:28152054

  17. Identification of recurrent type-2 NF1 microdeletions reveals a mitotic nonallelic homologous recombination hotspot underlying a human genomic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Julia; Mussotter, Tanja; Bengesser, Kathrin; Claes, Kathleen; Högel, Josef; Chuzhanova, Nadia; Fu, Chuanhua; van den Ende, Jenneke; Mautner, Victor-Felix; Cooper, David N; Messiaen, Ludwine; Kehrer-Sawatzki, Hildegard

    2012-11-01

    Nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR) is one of the major mechanisms underlying copy number variation in the human genome. Although several disease-associated meiotic NAHR breakpoints have been analyzed in great detail, hotspots for mitotic NAHR are not well characterized. Type-2 NF1 microdeletions, which are predominantly of postzygotic origin, constitute a highly informative model with which to investigate the features of mitotic NAHR. Here, a custom-designed MLPA- and PCR-based approach was used to identify 23 novel NAHR-mediated type-2 NF1 deletions. Breakpoint analysis of these 23 type-2 deletions, together with 17 NAHR-mediated type-2 deletions identified previously, revealed that the breakpoints are nonuniformly distributed within the paralogous SUZ12 and SUZ12P sequences. Further, the analysis of this large group of type-2 deletions revealed breakpoint recurrence within short segments (ranging in size from 57 to 253-bp) as well as the existence of a novel NAHR hotspot of 1.9-kb (termed PRS4). This hotspot harbored 20% (8/40) of the type-2 deletion breakpoints and contains the 253-bp recurrent breakpoint region BR6 in which four independent type-2 deletion breakpoints were identified. Our findings indicate that a combination of an open chromatin conformation and short non-B DNA-forming repeats may predispose to recurrent mitotic NAHR events between SUZ12 and its pseudogene. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Yeast homologous recombination-based promoter engineering for the activation of silent natural product biosynthetic gene clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel, Daniel; Kang, Hahk-Soo; Chang, Fang-Yuan; Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Brady, Sean F

    2015-07-21

    Large-scale sequencing of prokaryotic (meta)genomic DNA suggests that most bacterial natural product gene clusters are not expressed under common laboratory culture conditions. Silent gene clusters represent a promising resource for natural product discovery and the development of a new generation of therapeutics. Unfortunately, the characterization of molecules encoded by these clusters is hampered owing to our inability to express these gene clusters in the laboratory. To address this bottleneck, we have developed a promoter-engineering platform to transcriptionally activate silent gene clusters in a model heterologous host. Our approach uses yeast homologous recombination, an auxotrophy complementation-based yeast selection system and sequence orthogonal promoter cassettes to exchange all native promoters in silent gene clusters with constitutively active promoters. As part of this platform, we constructed and validated a set of bidirectional promoter cassettes consisting of orthogonal promoter sequences, Streptomyces ribosome binding sites, and yeast selectable marker genes. Using these tools we demonstrate the ability to simultaneously insert multiple promoter cassettes into a gene cluster, thereby expediting the reengineering process. We apply this method to model active and silent gene clusters (rebeccamycin and tetarimycin) and to the silent, cryptic pseudogene-containing, environmental DNA-derived Lzr gene cluster. Complete promoter refactoring and targeted gene exchange in this "dead" cluster led to the discovery of potent indolotryptoline antiproliferative agents, lazarimides A and B. This potentially scalable and cost-effective promoter reengineering platform should streamline the discovery of natural products from silent natural product biosynthetic gene clusters.

  19. Combination of FACS and homologous recombination for the generation of stable and high-expression engineered cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Shi

    Full Text Available Traditionally, cell line generation requires several months and involves screening of over several hundred cell clones for high productivity before dozens are selected as candidate cell lines. Here, we have designed a new strategy for the generation of stable and high-expression cell lines by combining homologous recombination (HR and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS. High expression was indicated by the expression of secreted green fluorescent protein (SEGFP. Parental cell lines with the highest expression of SEGFP were then selected by FACS and identified by stability analysis. Consequently, HR vectors were constructed using the cassette for SEGFP as the HR region. After transfecting the HR vector, the cells with negative SEGFP expression were enriched by FACS. The complete exchange between SEGFP and target gene (TNFR-Fc cassettes was demonstrated by DNA analysis. Compared with the traditional method, by integrating the cassette containing the gene of interest into the pre-selected site, the highest producing cells secreted a more than 8-fold higher titer of target protein. Hence, this new strategy can be applied to isolated stable cell lines with desirable expression of any gene of interest. The stable cell lines can rapidly produce proteins for researching protein structure and function and are even applicable in drug discovery.

  20. miR-3940-5p enhances homologous recombination after DSB in Cr(VI) exposed 16HBE cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Hu, Guiping; Li, Ping; Tang, Shichuan; Zhang, Ji; Jia, Guang

    2016-02-17

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is a well-recognized human carcinogen, yet the molecular mechanisms by which cause human cancer are still not well understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs), which are small non-coding RNAs, are involved in carcinogenesis and DNA damage repair. Previous occupational population study showed that hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) downregulated plasma miR-3940-5p level, and a low miR-3940-5p level was associated with high XRCC2 expression in lymphocytes, indicating that miR-3940-5p maybe play a protective effect in Cr(VI) induced DNA damage. Here we investigated miR-3940-5p expression and its roles in DNA repair in Cr(VI)-treated 16HBE cells. miR-3940-5p change was detected by qRT-PCR. Rad51 foci formation and double strand break (DSB) were investigated to assess homologous recombination repair (HR) capacity by Immunofluorescent assay and Neutral Comet assay. XRCC2 expression was also evaluated after miRNA oligonucleotides transfection using Western blot. Cr(VI) treatment suppressed miR-3940-5p level in 16HBE cells. miR-3904-5p mimic downregulated XRCC2 expression. As a result, the formation of Rad51-foci was inhibited and DSB repair was prolonged. The results indicate that miR-3940-5p plays a protective effect in Cr(VI) induced DNA damage.

  1. A PALB2-interacting domain in RNF168 couples homologous recombination to DNA break-induced chromatin ubiquitylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luijsterburg, Martijn S; Typas, Dimitris; Caron, Marie-Christine; Wiegant, Wouter W; van den Heuvel, Diana; Boonen, Rick A; Couturier, Anthony M; Mullenders, Leon H; Masson, Jean-Yves; van Attikum, Haico

    2017-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) elicit a ubiquitylation cascade that controls DNA repair pathway choice. This cascade involves the ubiquitylation of histone H2A by the RNF168 ligase and the subsequent recruitment of RIF1, which suppresses homologous recombination (HR) in G1 cells. The RIF1-dependent suppression is relieved in S/G2 cells, allowing PALB2-driven HR to occur. With the inhibitory impact of RIF1 relieved, it remains unclear how RNF168-induced ubiquitylation influences HR. Here, we uncover that RNF168 links the HR machinery to H2A ubiquitylation in S/G2 cells. We show that PALB2 indirectly recognizes histone ubiquitylation by physically associating with ubiquitin-bound RNF168. This direct interaction is mediated by the newly identified PALB2-interacting domain (PID) in RNF168 and the WD40 domain in PALB2, and drives DNA repair by facilitating the assembly of PALB2-containing HR complexes at DSBs. Our findings demonstrate that RNF168 couples PALB2-dependent HR to H2A ubiquitylation to promote DNA repair and preserve genome integrity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20922.001 PMID:28240985

  2. CBP and p300 histone acetyltransferases contribute to homologous recombination by transcriptionally activating the BRCA1 and RAD51 genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideaki Ogiwara

    Full Text Available Histone acetylation at DNA double-strand break (DSB sites by CBP and p300 histone acetyltransferases (HATs is critical for the recruitment of DSB repair proteins to chromatin. Here, we show that CBP and p300 HATs also function in DSB repair by transcriptionally activating the BRCA1 and RAD51 genes, which are involved in homologous recombination (HR, a major DSB repair system. siRNA-mediated depletion of CBP and p300 impaired HR activity and downregulated BRCA1 and RAD51 at the protein and mRNA levels. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that CBP and p300 bind to the promoter regions of the BRCA1 and RAD51 genes, and that depletion of CBP and/or p300 reduces H3 and H4 acetylation and inhibits binding of the transcription factor E2F1 to these promoters. Depletion of CBP and p300 impaired DNA damage-induced phosphorylation and chromatin binding of the single-strand DNA-binding protein RPA following BRCA1-mediated DNA end resection. Consistent with this, subsequent phosphorylation of CHK1 and activation of the G2/M damage checkpoint were also impaired. These results indicate that the HATs CBP and p300 play multiple roles in the activation of the cellular response to DSBs.

  3. Release of Ku and MRN from DNA ends by Mre11 nuclease activity and Ctp1 is required for homologous recombination repair of double-strand breaks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Langerak

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The multifunctional Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 (MRN protein complex recruits ATM/Tel1 checkpoint kinase and CtIP/Ctp1 homologous recombination (HR repair factor to double-strand breaks (DSBs. HR repair commences with the 5'-to-3' resection of DNA ends, generating 3' single-strand DNA (ssDNA overhangs that bind Replication Protein A (RPA complex, followed by Rad51 recombinase. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 (MRX complex is critical for DSB resection, although the enigmatic ssDNA endonuclease activity of Mre11 and the DNA-end processing factor Sae2 (CtIP/Ctp1 ortholog are largely unnecessary unless the resection activities of Exo1 and Sgs1-Dna2 are also eliminated. Mre11 nuclease activity and Ctp1/CtIP are essential for DSB repair in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and mammals. To investigate DNA end resection in Schizo. pombe, we adapted an assay that directly measures ssDNA formation at a defined DSB. We found that Mre11 and Ctp1 are essential for the efficient initiation of resection, consistent with their equally crucial roles in DSB repair. Exo1 is largely responsible for extended resection up to 3.1 kb from a DSB, with an activity dependent on Rqh1 (Sgs1 DNA helicase having a minor role. Despite its critical function in DSB repair, Mre11 nuclease activity is not required for resection in fission yeast. However, Mre11 nuclease and Ctp1 are required to disassociate the MRN complex and the Ku70-Ku80 nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ complex from DSBs, which is required for efficient RPA localization. Eliminating Ku makes Mre11 nuclease activity dispensable for MRN disassociation and RPA localization, while improving repair of a one-ended DSB formed by replication fork collapse. From these data we propose that release of the MRN complex and Ku from DNA ends by Mre11 nuclease activity and Ctp1 is a critical step required to expose ssDNA for RPA localization and ensuing HR repair.

  4. Visualization of feline calicivirus replication in real-time with recombinant viruses engineered to express fluorescent reporter proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abente, Eugenio J; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V; Bok, Karin; Green, Kim Y

    2010-04-25

    Caliciviruses are non-enveloped, icosahedral viruses with a single-stranded, positive sense RNA genome. Transposon-mediated insertional mutagenesis was used to insert a transprimer sequence into random sites of an infectious full-length cDNA clone of the feline calicivirus (FCV) genome. A site in the LC gene (encoding the capsid leader protein) of the FCV genome was identified that could tolerate foreign insertions, and two viable recombinant FCV variants expressing LC fused either to AcGFP, or DsRedFP were recovered. The effects of the insertions on LC processing, RNA replication, and stability of the viral genome were analyzed, and the progression of a calicivirus single infection and co-infection were captured by real-time imaging fluorescent microscopy. The ability to engineer viable recombinant caliciviruses expressing foreign markers enables new approaches to investigate virus and host cell interactions, as well as studies of viral recombination, one of the driving forces of calicivirus evolution. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Novel PLA2G6 mutations associated with an exonic deletion due to non-allelic homologous recombination in a patient with infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Shimojima, Keiko; Shibata, Takashi; Akiyama, Mari; Oka, Makio; Akiyama, Tomoyuki; Yoshinaga, Harumi; Kobayashi, Katsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Novel PLA2G6 mutations associated with p.Asp283Asn and a unique intragenic deletion of exons 4 and 5 due to non-allelic homologous recombination were identified in a Japanese female patient with typical infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy. The patient showed progressive tetraplegia beginning at 9 months. An electroencephalogram showed a diffuse increase in fast waves, and brain magnetic resonance imaging showed progressive brain atrophy and T2 hypointensity in the globus pallidus. PMID:27081553

  6. Prevalence of Germline Mutations in Genes Engaged in DNA Damage Repair by Homologous Recombination in Patients with Triple-Negative and Hereditary Non-Triple-Negative Breast Cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Domagala

    Full Text Available This study sought to assess the prevalence of common germline mutations in several genes engaged in the repair of DNA double-strand break by homologous recombination in patients with triple-negative breast cancers and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers. Tumors deficient in this type of DNA damage repair are known to be especially sensitive to DNA cross-linking agents (e.g., platinum drugs and to poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitors.Genetic testing was performed for 36 common germline mutations in genes engaged in the repair of DNA by homologous recombination, i.e., BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2, NBN, ATM, PALB2, BARD1, and RAD51D, in 202 consecutive patients with triple-negative breast cancers and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers.Thirty five (22.2% of 158 patients in the triple-negative group carried mutations in genes involved in DNA repair by homologous recombination, while 10 (22.7% of the 44 patients in the hereditary non-triple-negative group carried such mutations. Mutations in BRCA1 were most frequent in patients with triple-negative breast cancer (18.4%, and mutations in CHEK2 were most frequent in patients with hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers (15.9%. In addition, in the triple-negative group, mutations in CHEK2, NBN, and ATM (3.8% combined were found, while mutations in BRCA1, NBN, and PALB2 (6.8% combined were identified in the hereditary non-triple-negative group.Identifying mutations in genes engaged in DNA damage repair by homologous recombination other than BRCA1/2 can substantially increase the proportion of patients with triple-negative breast cancer and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancer who may be eligible for therapy using PARP inhibitors and platinum drugs.

  7. Low doses of alpha particles do not induce sister chromatid exchanges in bystander Chinese hamster cells defective in homologous recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagasawa, H; Wilson, P F; Chen, D J; Thompson, L H; Bedford, J S; Little, J B

    2007-10-26

    We reported previously that the homologous recombinational repair (HRR)-deficient Chinese hamster mutant cell line irs3 (deficient in the Rad51 paralog Rad51C) showed only a 50% spontaneous frequency of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) as compared to parental wild-type V79 cells. Furthermore, when irradiated with very low doses of alpha particles, SCEs were not induced in irs3 cells, as compared to a prominent bystander effect observed in V79 cells (Nagasawa et al., Radiat. Res. 164, 141-147, 2005). In the present study, we examined additional Chinese hamster cell lines deficient in the Rad51 paralogs Rad51C, Rad51D, Xrcc2, and Xrcc3 as well as another essential HRR protein, Brca2. Spontaneous SCE frequencies in non-irradiated wild-type cell lines CHO, AA8 and V79 were 0.33 SCE/chromosome, whereas two Rad51C-deficient cell lines showed only 0.16 SCE/chromosome. Spontaneous SCE frequencies in cell lines defective in Rad51D, Xrcc2, Xrcc3, and Brca2 ranged from 0.23-0.33 SCE/chromosome, 0-30% lower than wild-type cells. SCEs were induced significantly 20-50% above spontaneous levels in wild-type cells exposed to a mean dose of 1.3 mGy of alpha particles (<1% of nuclei traversed by an alpha particle). However, induction of SCEs above spontaneous levels was minimal or absent after {alpha}-particle irradiation in all of the HRR-deficient cell lines. These data suggest that Brca2 and the Rad51 paralogs contribute to DNA damage repair processes induced in bystander cells (presumably oxidative damage repair in S-phase cells) following irradiation with very low doses of alpha particles.

  8. The rate of nonallelic homologous recombination in males is highly variable, correlated between monozygotic twins and independent of age.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline A L MacArthur

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR between highly similar duplicated sequences generates chromosomal deletions, duplications and inversions, which can cause diverse genetic disorders. Little is known about interindividual variation in NAHR rates and the factors that influence this. We estimated the rate of deletion at the CMT1A-REP NAHR hotspot in sperm DNA from 34 male donors, including 16 monozygotic (MZ co-twins (8 twin pairs aged 24 to 67 years old. The average NAHR rate was 3.5 × 10(-5 with a seven-fold variation across individuals. Despite good statistical power to detect even a subtle correlation, we observed no relationship between age of unrelated individuals and the rate of NAHR in their sperm, likely reflecting the meiotic-specific origin of these events. We then estimated the heritability of deletion rate by calculating the intraclass correlation (ICC within MZ co-twins, revealing a significant correlation between MZ co-twins (ICC = 0.784, p = 0.0039, with MZ co-twins being significantly more correlated than unrelated pairs. We showed that this heritability cannot be explained by variation in PRDM9, a known regulator of NAHR, or variation within the NAHR hotspot itself. We also did not detect any correlation between Body Mass Index (BMI, smoking status or alcohol intake and rate of NAHR. Our results suggest that other, as yet unidentified, genetic or environmental factors play a significant role in the regulation of NAHR and are responsible for the extensive variation in the population for the probability of fathering a child with a genomic disorder resulting from a pathogenic deletion.

  9. Plasticity of BRCA2 function in homologous recombination: genetic interactions of the PALB2 and DNA binding domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Siaud

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The breast cancer suppressor BRCA2 is essential for the maintenance of genomic integrity in mammalian cells through its role in DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR. Human BRCA2 is 3,418 amino acids and is comprised of multiple domains that interact with the RAD51 recombinase and other proteins as well as with DNA. To gain insight into the cellular function of BRCA2 in HR, we created fusions consisting of various BRCA2 domains and also introduced mutations into these domains to disrupt specific protein and DNA interactions. We find that a BRCA2 fusion peptide deleted for the DNA binding domain and active in HR is completely dependent on interaction with the PALB2 tumor suppressor for activity. Conversely, a BRCA2 fusion peptide deleted for the PALB2 binding domain is dependent on an intact DNA binding domain, providing a role for this conserved domain in vivo; mutagenesis suggests that both single-stranded and double-stranded DNA binding activities in the DNA binding domain are required for its activity. Given that PALB2 itself binds DNA, these results suggest alternative mechanisms to deliver RAD51 to DNA. In addition, the BRCA2 C terminus contains both RAD51-dependent and -independent activities which are essential to HR in some contexts. Finally, binding the small peptide DSS1 is essential for activity when its binding domain is present, but not when it is absent. Our results reveal functional redundancy within the BRCA2 protein and emphasize the plasticity of this large protein built for optimal HR function in mammalian cells. The occurrence of disease-causing mutations throughout BRCA2 suggests sub-optimal HR from a variety of domain modulations.

  10. Sensitization of Pancreatic Cancers to Gemcitabine Chemoradiation by WEE1 Kinase Inhibition Depends on Homologous Recombination Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasneem Kausar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available To improve the efficacy of chemoradiation therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer and begin to establish patient selection criteria, we investigated the combination of the WEE1 inhibitor AZD1775 with gemcitabine-radiation in homologous recombination (HR repair proficient and deficient pancreatic cancers. Sensitization to gemcitabine-radiation by AZD1775 was assessed in pancreatic cancer cells by clonogenic survival and in patient-derived xenografts by tumor growth. The contributions of HR repair inhibition and G2 checkpoint abrogation to sensitization were assessed by γH2AX, BRCA2 manipulation, and RAD51 focus formation and pHistone H3 flow cytometry, respectively. We found that AZD1775 sensitized to gemcitabine-radiation in BRCA2 wild-type but not BRCA2 mutant pancreatic cancer cells. In all cells, AZD1775 caused inhibition of CDK1 phosphorylation and G2 checkpoint abrogation. However, sensitization by AZD1775 was associated with persistent γH2AX and inhibition of RAD51 focus formation. In HR-proficient (BRCA2 wild-type or -deficient (BRAC2 null isogenic cells, AZD1775 sensitized to gemcitabine-radiation in BRCA2 wild-type, but not in BRCA2 null cells, despite significant G2 checkpoint abrogation. In patient-derived pancreatic tumor xenografts, AZD1775 significantly inhibited tumor growth and impaired RAD51 focus formation in response to gemcitabine-radiation. In conclusion, WEE1 inhibition by AZD1775 is an effective strategy for sensitizing pancreatic cancers to gemcitabine chemoradiation. Although this sensitization is accompanied by inhibition of CDK1 phosphorylation and G2 checkpoint abrogation, this mechanism is not sufficient for sensitization. Our findings demonstrate that sensitization to chemoradiation by WEE1 inhibition results from inhibition of HR repair and suggest that patient tumors without underlying HR defects would benefit most from this therapy.

  11. Embryonic stem cells deficient for Brca2 or Blm exhibit divergent genotoxic profiles that support opposing activities during homologous recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marple, Teresa [Department of Molecular Medicine and Institute of Biotechnology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 15355 Lambda Drive San Antonio, TX 78245-3207 (United States); Kim, Tae Moon [Department of Molecular Medicine and Institute of Biotechnology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 15355 Lambda Drive San Antonio, TX 78245-3207 (United States); Hasty, Paul [Department of Molecular Medicine and Institute of Biotechnology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 15355 Lambda Drive San Antonio, TX 78245-3207 (United States)]. E-mail: hastye@uthscsa.edu

    2006-12-01

    The breast cancer susceptibility protein, Brca2 and the RecQ helicase, Blm (Bloom syndrome mutated) are tumor suppressors that maintain genome integrity, at least in part, through homologous recombination (HR). Brca2 facilitates HR by interacting with Rad51 in multiple regions, the BRC motifs encoded by exon 11 and a single domain encoded by exon 27; however, the exact importance of these regions is not fully understood. Blm also interacts with Rad51 and appears to suppress HR in most circumstances; however, its yeast homologue Sgs1 facilitates HR in response to some genotoxins. To better understand the biological importance of these two proteins, we performed a genotoxic screen on mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells impaired for either Brca2 or Blm to establish their genotoxic profiles (a cellular dose-response to a wide range of agents). This is the first side-by-side comparison of these two proteins in an identical genetic background. We compared cells deleted for Brca2 exon 27 to cells reduced for Blm expression and find that the Brca2- and Blm-impaired cells exhibit genotoxic profiles that reflect opposing activities during HR. Cells deleted for Brca2 exon 27 are hypersensitive to {gamma}-radiation, streptonigrin, mitomycin C and camptothecin and mildly resistant to ICRF-193 which is similar to HR defective cells null for Rad54. By contrast, Blm-impaired cells are hypersensitive to ICRF-193, mildly resistant to camptothecin and mitomycin C and more strongly resistant to hydroxyurea. These divergent profiles support the notion that Brca2 and Blm perform opposing functions during HR in mouse ES cells.

  12. Progress in the treatment of ovarian cancer—lessons from homologous recombination deficiency—the first 10 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, S. B.

    2016-01-01

    For several years, a major obstacle in the systemic treatment of ovarian cancer has been the lack of a therapeutic strategy tailored to specific biomarkers present in the individual patient's tumour. However, considerable progress has been made recently through the development of drugs targeting cells deficient in the key mechanism of double-strand DNA repair, known as homologous recombination (HRD). These drugs, inhibitors of the enzyme poly (ADP) ribose polymerase (PARP), selectively kill HRD cells through a process known as tumour-selective synthetic lethality. Olaparib is the first such agent, now approved for the treatment of ovarian cancer associated with mutations in the BRCA 1/2 genes, since these are characterised by cells with HRD. Importantly, another group of patients with tumours bearing a similar repair deficiency but without BRCA mutations may also be susceptible to PARP inhibition and efforts to develop an HRD assay are therefore a priority so that these patients can be identified as PARPi candidates. In addition, combination strategies are an area of intense research; these include combinations with antiangiogenic agents and with inhibitors of the P13K/AKT pathway and others are likely to merit assessment since resistance to PARP inhibitors will certainly emerge as the next challenge. While olaparib is the first PARP inhibitor to receive approval for ovarian cancer treatment, others including rucaparib and niraparib are clearly effective in this disease and, within the next year or two, the results of ongoing randomised trials will clarify their respective roles. PARP inhibitors are generally well tolerated; regulatory approval at present supports their use as a maintenance therapy (in Europe) and as treatment for advanced recurrent disease (in the United States), but it is likely that these indications will extend as the results of ongoing trials become available. Ten years have elapsed between the first pre-clinical publications and the

  13. Overexpression of OsRecQl4 and/or OsExo1 enhances DSB-induced homologous recombination in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yong-Ik; Abe, Kiyomi; Osakabe, Keishi; Endo, Masaki; Nishizawa-Yokoi, Ayako; Saika, Hiroaki; Shimada, Hiroaki; Toki, Seiichi

    2012-12-01

    During homologous recombination (HR)-mediated DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair in eukaryotes, an initial step is the creation of a 3'-single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) overhang via resection of a 5' end. Rad51 polymerizes on this ssDNA to search for a homologous sequence, and the gapped sequence is then repaired using an undamaged homologous DNA strand as template. Recent studies in eukaryotes indicate that resection of the DSB site is promoted by the cooperative action of RecQ helicase family proteins: Bloom helicase (BLM) in mammals or Sgs1 in yeast, and exonuclease 1 (Exo1). However, the role of RecQ helicase and exonuclease during the 5'-resection process of HR in plant cells has not yet been defined. Here, we demonstrate that overexpression of rice proteins OsRecQl4 (BLM counterpart) and/or OsExo1 (Exo1 homolog) can enhance DSB processing, as evaluated by recombination substrate reporter lines in rice. These results could be applied to construct an efficient gene targeting system in rice.

  14. JMJD-5/KDM8 regulates H3K36me2 and is required for late steps of homologous recombination and genome integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaghet, Nico; Ramalho, João J.; Vilstrup Johansen, Jens; Salcini, Anna Elisabetta

    2017-01-01

    The eukaryotic genome is organized in a three-dimensional structure called chromatin, constituted by DNA and associated proteins, the majority of which are histones. Post-translational modifications of histone proteins greatly influence chromatin structure and regulate many DNA-based biological processes. Methylation of lysine 36 of histone 3 (H3K36) is a post-translational modification functionally relevant during early steps of DNA damage repair. Here, we show that the JMJD-5 regulates H3K36 di-methylation and it is required at late stages of double strand break repair mediated by homologous recombination. Loss of jmjd-5 results in hypersensitivity to ionizing radiation and in meiotic defects, and it is associated with aberrant retention of RAD-51 at sites of double strand breaks. Analyses of jmjd-5 genetic interactions with genes required for resolving recombination intermediates (rtel-1) or promoting the resolution of RAD-51 double stranded DNA filaments (rfs-1 and helq-1) suggest that jmjd-5 prevents the formation of stalled postsynaptic recombination intermediates and favors RAD-51 removal. As these phenotypes are all recapitulated by a catalytically inactive jmjd-5 mutant, we propose a novel role for H3K36me2 regulation during late steps of homologous recombination critical to preserve genome integrity. PMID:28207814

  15. The proteasomal Rpn11 metalloprotease suppresses tombusvirus RNA recombination and promotes viral replication via facilitating assembly of the viral replicase complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanth, K Reddisiva; Barajas, Daniel; Nagy, Peter D

    2015-03-01

    RNA viruses co-opt a large number of cellular proteins that affect virus replication and, in some cases, viral genetic recombination. RNA recombination helps viruses in an evolutionary arms race with the host's antiviral responses and adaptation of viruses to new hosts. Tombusviruses and a yeast model host are used to identify cellular factors affecting RNA virus replication and RNA recombination. In this study, we have examined the role of the conserved Rpn11p metalloprotease subunit of the proteasome, which couples deubiquitination and degradation of proteasome substrates, in tombusvirus replication and recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and plants. Depletion or mutations of Rpn11p lead to the rapid formation of viral RNA recombinants in combination with reduced levels of viral RNA replication in yeast or in vitro based on cell extracts. Rpn11p interacts with the viral replication proteins and is recruited to the viral replicase complex (VRC). Analysis of the multifunctional Rpn11p has revealed that the primary role of Rpn11p is to act as a "matchmaker" that brings the viral p92(pol) replication protein and the DDX3-like Ded1p/RH20 DEAD box helicases into VRCs. Overexpression of Ded1p can complement the defect observed in rpn11 mutant yeast by reducing TBSV recombination. This suggests that Rpn11p can suppress tombusvirus recombination via facilitating the recruitment of the cellular Ded1p helicase, which is a strong suppressor of viral recombination, into VRCs. Overall, this work demonstrates that the co-opted Rpn11p, which is involved in the assembly of the functional proteasome, also functions in the proper assembly of the tombusvirus VRCs. RNA viruses evolve rapidly due to genetic changes based on mutations and RNA recombination. Viral genetic recombination helps viruses in an evolutionary arms race with the host's antiviral responses and facilitates adaptation of viruses to new hosts. Cellular factors affect viral RNA recombination, although the role

  16. The kissing-loop motif is a preferred site of 5' leader recombination during replication of SL3-3 murine leukemia viruses in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Mikkelsen, J G; Schmidt, J

    1999-01-01

    , and the upstream part of the 5' untranslated region, enabled us to map recombination sites, guided by distinct scattered nucleotide differences. In 30 of 44 analyzed sequences, recombination was mapped to a 33-nucleotide similarity window coinciding with the kissing-loop stem-loop motif implicated in dimerization...... of the diploid genome. Interestingly, the recombination pattern preference found in replication-competent viruses from T-cell tumors is very similar to the pattern previously reported for retroviral vectors in cell culture experiments. The data therefore sustain the hypothesis that the kissing loop, presumably...

  17. XRCC3 ATPase activity is required for normal XRCC3-Rad51C complex dynamics and homologous recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, N; Hinz, J; Kopf, V L; Segalle, K; Thompson, L

    2004-02-25

    Homologous recombinational repair is a major DNA repair pathway that preserves chromosomal integrity by removing double-strand breaks, crosslinks, and other DNA damage. In eukaryotic cells, the Rad51 paralogs (XRCC2, XRCC3, Rad51B, Rad51C, and Rad51D) are involved in this process, although their exact functions are largely undetermined. All five paralogs contain ATPase motifs, and XRCC3 appears to exist in a single complex with Rad51C. To begin to examine the function of this Rad51C-XRCC3 complex, we generated mammalian expression vectors that produce human wild-type XRCC3 or mutant XRCC3 with either a non-conservative mutation (K113A) or a conservative mutation (K113R) in the GKT Walker A box of the ATPase motif. The three vectors were independently transfected into Xrcc3-deficient irs1SF CHO cells. Wild-type XRCC3 complemented irs1SF cells, albeit to varying degrees, while ATPase mutants had no complementing activity, even when the mutant protein was expressed at comparable levels to that in wild-type-complemented clones. Because of the mutants' dysfunction, we propose that ATP binding and hydrolyzing activities of XRCC3 are essential. We tested in vitro complex formation by wild-type and mutant XRCC3 with His6-tagged Rad51C upon coexpression in bacteria, nickel affinity purification, and western blotting. Wild-type and K113A mutant XRCC3 formed stable complexes with Rad51C and co-purified with Rad51C, while the K113R mutant did not and was predominantly insoluble. Addition of 5 mM ATP, but not ADP, also abolished complex formation by the wild-type proteins. These results suggest that XRCC3 is likely to regulate the dissociation and formation of Rad51C-XRCC3 complex through ATP binding and hydrolysis, with both processes being essential for the complex's ability to participate in HRR.

  18. Progress in the treatment of ovarian cancer-lessons from homologous recombination deficiency-the first 10 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, S B

    2016-04-01

    For several years, a major obstacle in the systemic treatment of ovarian cancer has been the lack of a therapeutic strategy tailored to specific biomarkers present in the individual patient's tumour. However, considerable progress has been made recently through the development of drugs targeting cells deficient in the key mechanism of double-strand DNA repair, known as homologous recombination (HRD). These drugs, inhibitors of the enzyme poly (ADP) ribose polymerase (PARP), selectively kill HRD cells through a process known as tumour-selective synthetic lethality. Olaparib is the first such agent, now approved for the treatment of ovarian cancer associated with mutations in the BRCA 1/2 genes, since these are characterised by cells with HRD. Importantly, another group of patients with tumours bearing a similar repair deficiency but without BRCA mutations may also be susceptible to PARP inhibition and efforts to develop an HRD assay are therefore a priority so that these patients can be identified as PARPi candidates. In addition, combination strategies are an area of intense research; these include combinations with antiangiogenic agents and with inhibitors of the P13K/AKT pathway and others are likely to merit assessment since resistance to PARP inhibitors will certainly emerge as the next challenge. While olaparib is the first PARP inhibitor to receive approval for ovarian cancer treatment, others including rucaparib and niraparib are clearly effective in this disease and, within the next year or two, the results of ongoing randomised trials will clarify their respective roles. PARP inhibitors are generally well tolerated; regulatory approval at present supports their use as a maintenance therapy (in Europe) and as treatment for advanced recurrent disease (in the United States), but it is likely that these indications will extend as the results of ongoing trials become available. Ten years have elapsed between the first pre-clinical publications and the

  19. Initiation of DNA double strand break repair: signaling and single-stranded resection dictate the choice between homologous recombination, non-homologous end-joining and alternative end-joining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabarz, Anastazja; Barascu, Aurélia; Guirouilh-Barbat, Josée; Lopez, Bernard S

    2012-01-01

    A DNA double strand break (DSB) is a highly toxic lesion, which can generate genetic instability and profound genome rearrangements. However, DSBs are required to generate diversity during physiological processes such as meiosis or the establishment of the immune repertoire. Thus, the precise regulation of a complex network of processes is necessary for the maintenance of genomic stability, allowing genetic diversity but protecting against genetic instability and its consequences on oncogenesis. Two main strategies are employed for DSB repair: homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). HR is initiated by single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) resection and requires sequence homology with an intact partner, while NHEJ requires neither resection at initiation nor a homologous partner. Thus, resection is an pivotal step at DSB repair initiation, driving the choice of the DSB repair pathway employed. However, an alternative end-joining (A-EJ) pathway, which is highly mutagenic, has recently been described; A-EJ is initiated by ssDNA resection but does not require a homologous partner. The choice of the appropriate DSB repair system, for instance according the cell cycle stage, is essential for genome stability maintenance. In this context, controlling the initial events of DSB repair is thus an essential step that may be irreversible, and the wrong decision should lead to dramatic consequences. Here, we first present the main DSB repair mechanisms and then discuss the importance of the choice of the appropriate DSB repair pathway according to the cell cycle phase. In a third section, we present the early steps of DSB repair i.e., DSB signaling, chromatin remodeling, and the regulation of ssDNA resection. In the last part, we discuss the competition between the different DSB repair mechanisms. Finally, we conclude with the importance of the fine tuning of this network for genome stability maintenance and for tumor protection in fine.

  20. Inhibitory effects of recombinant feline interferon on the replication of feline enteropathogenic viruses in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, M; Nakatani, H; Yoshida, M

    1994-03-01

    Antiviral activities of a recombinant feline interferon (rFeIFN) KT-80 were evaluated against feline enteropathogenic viruses in feline and canine cell lines. Sensitivity to antiviral activities of the rFeIFN varied with cell types; Felis catus whole fetus (fcwf-4) cells were more sensitive than Crandell feline kidney cells, but no sensitivity was found for Madin-Darby canine kidney cells when vesicular stomatitis virus was used as a challenge virus. Reductions were generally IFN dose-dependent and were more consistent when the cells were continuously treated with the rFeIFN than when they were pretreated only before viral challenge. Compared with each virus control culture of fcwf-4 cells, yields of rotavirus, feline panleukopenia virus (FPLV), feline calicivirus and feline infectious peritonitis coronavirus were reduced by ranges of 1.3 to < or = 3.1 log10, 0.6 to 1.6 log2, 0.8 to 3.7 log10 and 0.5 to 0.6 log10, respectively, in the cultures continuously treated with 10 to 10000 U of the rFeIFN. The yield reduction of FPLV was considered to be in part attributable to inhibition of cell growth by the rFeIFN supplemented in the medium.

  1. Replication-Competent Recombinant Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS Viruses Expressing Indicator Proteins and Antiviral Cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Blecha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV can subvert early innate immunity, which leads to ineffective antimicrobial responses. Overcoming immune subversion is critical for developing vaccines and other measures to control this devastating swine virus. The overall goal of this work was to enhance innate and adaptive immunity following vaccination through the expression of interferon (IFN genes by the PRRSV genome. We have constructed a series of recombinant PRRS viruses using an infectious PRRSV cDNA clone (pCMV-P129. Coding regions of exogenous genes, which included Renilla luciferase (Rluc, green and red fluorescent proteins (GFP and DsRed, respectively and several interferons (IFNs, were constructed and expressed through a unique subgenomic mRNA placed between ORF1b and ORF2 of the PRRSV infectious clone. The constructs, which expressed Rluc, GFP, DsRed, efficiently produced progeny viruses and mimicked the parental virus in both MARC-145 cells and porcine macrophages. In contrast, replication of IFN-expressing viruses was attenuated, similar to the level of replication observed after the addition of exogenous IFN. Furthermore, the IFN expressing viruses inhibited the replication of a second PRRS virus co-transfected or co-infected. Inhibition by the different IFN subtypes corresponded to their anti-PRRSV activity, i.e., IFNω5 » IFNα1 > IFN-β > IFNδ3. In summary, the indicator-expressing viruses provided an efficient means for real-time monitoring of viral replication thus allowing high‑throughput elucidation of the role of host factors in PRRSV infection. This was shown when they were used to clearly demonstrate the involvement of tumor susceptibility gene 101 (TSG101 in the early stage of PRRSV infection. In addition, replication‑competent IFN-expressing viruses may be good candidates for development of modified live virus (MLV vaccines, which are capable of reversing subverted innate immune responses and

  2. In vitro replication competence of a hepatitis B genotype D/A recombinant virus: dissimilar biological behaviour regarding its parental genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinks, Julieta; Sugiyama, Masaya; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Kurbanov, Fuat; Benetucci, Jorge; Giménez, Edgardo; Weissenbacher, Mercedes C; Mizokami, Masashi; Oubiña, José R

    2013-12-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA recombinants contribute to ~30% of the overall full-length sequences already deposited in GenBank. However, their biological behaviour has not been analysed so far. In this study, the in vitro replication kinetics of the first D/A recombinant from the American continent differed from its parental genotypes, exhibiting higher extracellular levels of HBV DNA and hepatitis B e antigen. Southern blots of intracellular core-associated HBV DNA were in agreement with such results. Because this recombinant was obtained from an Argentinian injecting drug user belonging to a vulnerable community, these results are of singular relevance for regional public health. Further in vivo studies are urgently needed to determine the pathogenicity of these replicative competent clones.

  3. Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet induces DNA double-strand breaks that require a Rad51-mediated homologous recombination for repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoonna; Kim, Kangil; Kang, Kyu-Tae; Lee, Jong-Soo; Yang, Sang Sik; Chung, Woo-Hyun

    2014-10-15

    Non-thermal plasma generated under atmospheric pressure produces a mixture of chemically reactive molecules and has been developed for a number of biomedical applications. Recently, plasma jet has been proposed as novel cancer therapies based on the observation that free radicals generated by plasma jet induce mitochondria-mediated apoptotic cell death. We show here that air plasma jet induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in yeast chromosomes leading to genomic instability and loss of viability, which are alleviated by Rad51, the yeast homolog of Escherichiacoli RecA recombinase, through DNA damage repair by a homologous recombination (HR) process. Hypersensitivity of rad51 mutant to air plasma was not restored by antioxidant treatment unlike sod1 mutant that was highly sensitive to reactive oxygen species (ROS) challenge, suggesting that plasma jet induces DSB-mediated cell death independent of ROS generation. These results may provide a new insight into the mechanism of air plasma jet-induced cell death.

  4. A role for the malignant brain tumour (MBT domain protein LIN-61 in DNA double-strand break repair by homologous recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas M Johnson

    Full Text Available Malignant brain tumour (MBT domain proteins are transcriptional repressors that function within Polycomb complexes. Some MBT genes are tumour suppressors, but how they prevent tumourigenesis is unknown. The Caenorhabditis elegans MBT protein LIN-61 is a member of the synMuvB chromatin-remodelling proteins that control vulval development. Here we report a new role for LIN-61: it protects the genome by promoting homologous recombination (HR for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. lin-61 mutants manifest numerous problems associated with defective HR in germ and somatic cells but remain proficient in meiotic recombination. They are hypersensitive to ionizing radiation and interstrand crosslinks but not UV light. Using a novel reporter system that monitors repair of a defined DSB in C. elegans somatic cells, we show that LIN-61 contributes to HR. The involvement of this MBT protein in HR raises the possibility that MBT-deficient tumours may also have defective DSB repair.

  5. DNA and heparin chaperone the refolding of purified recombinant replication protein A subunit 1 from Leishmania amazonensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lira, C B B; Gui, K E; Perez, A M; da Silveira, R C V; Gava, L M; Ramos, C H I; Cano, M I N

    2009-02-01

    Replication protein A (RPA) is a single-stranded DNA-binding protein that has been implicated in DNA metabolism and telomere maintenance. Subunit 1 of RPA from Leishmania amazonensis (LaRPA-1) has previously been affinity-purified on a column containing a G-rich telomeric DNA. LaRPA-1 binds and co-localizes with parasite telomeres in vivo. Here we describe the purification and characterization of native recombinant LaRPA-1 (rLaRPA-1). The protein was initially re-solubilized from inclusion bodies by using urea. After dialysis, rLaRPA-1 was soluble but contaminated with DNA, which was removed by an anion-exchange chromatography of the protein solubilized in urea. However, rLaRPA-1 precipitated after dialysis to remove urea. To investigate whether the contaminating DNA was involved in chaperoning the refolding of rLaRPA-1, salmon sperm DNA or heparin was added to the solution before dialysis. The addition of either of these substances prevented the precipitation of rLaRPA-1. The resulting rLaRPA-1 was soluble, correctly folded, and able to bind telomeric DNA. This is the first report showing the characterization of rLaRPA1 and of the importance of additives in chaperoning the refolding of this protein. The availability of rLaRPA-1 should be helpful in assessing the importance of this protein as a potential drug target.

  6. Limited replication of yellow fever 17DD and 17D-Dengue recombinant viruses in rhesus monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela F. Trindade

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available For the development of safe live attenuated flavivirus vaccines one of the main properties to be established is viral replication. We have used real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and virus titration by plaque assay to determine the replication of yellow fever 17DD virus (YFV 17DD and recombinant yellow fever 17D viruses expressing envelope proteins of dengue virus serotypes 2 and 4 (17D-DENV-2 and 17D-DENV-4. Serum samples from rhesus monkeys inoculated with YFV 17DD and 17D-DENV chimeras by intracerebral or subcutaneous route were used to determine and compare the viremia induced by these viruses. Viral load quantification in samples from monkeys inoculated by either route with YFV 17DD virus suggested a restricted capability of the virus to replicate reaching not more than 2.0 log10 PFU mL-1 or 3.29 log10 copies mL-1. Recombinant 17D-dengue viruses were shown by plaquing and real-time PCR to be as attenuated as YF 17DD virus with the highest mean peak titer of 1.97 log10 PFU mL-1 or 3.53 log10 copies mL-1. These data serve as a comparative basis for the characterization of other 17D-based live attenuated candidate vaccines against other diseases.Uma das principais propriedades a serem estabelecidas para o desenvolvimento de vacinas seguras e atenuadas de flavivirus,é a taxa de replicação viral. Neste trabalho, aplicamos a metodologia de amplificação pela reação em cadeia da polimerase em tempo real e titulação viral por plaqueamento para determinação da replicação do vírus 17DD (FA 17DD e recombinantes, expressando proteínas do envelope de dengue sorotipos 2 e 4 (17D-DENV-2 e 17D-DENV-4. As amostras de soros de macacos inoculados por via intracerebral ou subcutânea com FA 17DD ou 17D-DENV foram usadas para determinar e comparar a viremia induzida por estes vírus. A quantificação da carga viral em amostras de macacos inoculados por ambas as vias com FA 17DD sugere restrita capacidade de replicação com

  7. The inner membrane complex sub-compartment proteins critical for replication of the apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii adopt a pleckstrin homology fold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonkin, Michelle L; Beck, Josh R; Bradley, Peter J; Boulanger, Martin J

    2014-05-16

    Toxoplasma gondii, an apicomplexan parasite prevalent in developed nations, infects up to one-third of the human population. The success of this parasite depends on several unique structures including an inner membrane complex (IMC) that lines the interior of the plasma membrane and contains proteins important for gliding motility and replication. Of these proteins, the IMC sub-compartment proteins (ISPs) have recently been shown to play a role in asexual T. gondii daughter cell formation, yet the mechanism is unknown. Complicating mechanistic characterization of the ISPs is a lack of sequence identity with proteins of known structure or function. In support of elucidating the function of ISPs, we first determined the crystal structures of representative members TgISP1 and TgISP3 to a resolution of 2.10 and 2.32 Å, respectively. Structural analysis revealed that both ISPs adopt a pleckstrin homology fold often associated with phospholipid binding or protein-protein interactions. Substitution of basic for hydrophobic residues in the region that overlays with phospholipid binding in related pleckstrin homology domains, however, suggests that ISPs do not retain phospholipid binding activity. Consistent with this observation, biochemical assays revealed no phospholipid binding activity. Interestingly, mapping of conserved surface residues combined with crystal packing analysis indicates that TgISPs have functionally repurposed the phospholipid-binding site likely to coordinate protein partners. Recruitment of larger protein complexes may also be aided through avidity-enhanced interactions resulting from multimerization of the ISPs. Overall, we propose a model where TgISPs recruit protein partners to the IMC to ensure correct progression of daughter cell formation.

  8. Expression of human poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Effect on survival, homologous recombination and identification of genes involved in intracellular localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Ferla, Marco; Mercatanti, Alberto; Rocchi, Giulia; Lodovichi, Samuele; Cervelli, Tiziana; Pignata, Luca [Yeast Genetics and Genomics, Institute of Clinical Physiology, National Council of Research (CNR), via Moruzzi 1, 56122 Pisa (Italy); Caligo, Maria Adelaide [Section of Genetic Oncology, University Hospital and University of Pisa, via Roma 57, 56125 Pisa (Italy); Galli, Alvaro, E-mail: alvaro.galli@ifc.cnr.it [Yeast Genetics and Genomics, Institute of Clinical Physiology, National Council of Research (CNR), via Moruzzi 1, 56122 Pisa (Italy)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • The human poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) gene affects growth and UV-induced homologous recombination in yeast. • PARP-1 chemical inhibition impacts yeast growth and UV-induced recombination. • A genome-wide screen identifies 99 yeast genes that suppress the growth defect inferred by PARP-1. • Bioinformatics analysis identifies 41 human orthologues that may have a role in PARP-1 intracellular localization. • The findings suggest that PARP-1 nuclear localization may affect the response to PARP inhibitors in cancer therapy. - Abstract: The poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) actively participates in a series of functions within the cell that include: mitosis, intracellular signaling, cell cycle regulation, transcription and DNA damage repair. Therefore, inhibition of PARP1 has a great potential for use in cancer therapy. As resistance to PARP inhibitors is starting to be observed in patients, thus the function of PARP-1 needs to be studied in depth in order to find new therapeutic targets. To gain more information on the PARP-1 activity, we expressed PARP-1 in yeast and investigated its effect on cell growth and UV induced homologous recombination. To identify candidate genes affecting PARP-1 activity and cellular localization, we also developed a yeast genome wide genetic screen. We found that PARP-1 strongly inhibited yeast growth, but when yeast was exposed to the PARP-1 inhibitor 6(5-H) phenantridinone (PHE), it recovered from the growth suppression. Moreover, we showed that PARP-1 produced PAR products in yeast and we demonstrated that PARP-1 reduced UV-induced homologous recombination. By genome wide screening, we identified 99 mutants that suppressed PARP-1 growth inhibition. Orthologues of human genes were found for 41 of these yeast genes. We determined whether the PARP-1 protein level was altered in strains which are deleted for the transcription regulator GAL3, the histone H1 gene HHO1, the HUL4 gene, the

  9. The MCM-binding protein ETG1 aids sister chromatid cohesion required for postreplicative homologous recombination repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Takahashi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The DNA replication process represents a source of DNA stress that causes potentially spontaneous genome damage. This effect might be strengthened by mutations in crucial replication factors, requiring the activation of DNA damage checkpoints to enable DNA repair before anaphase onset. Here, we demonstrate that depletion of the evolutionarily conserved minichromosome maintenance helicase-binding protein ETG1 of Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in a stringent late G2 cell cycle arrest. This arrest correlated with a partial loss of sister chromatid cohesion. The lack-of-cohesion phenotype was intensified in plants without functional CTF18, a replication fork factor needed for cohesion establishment. The synergistic effect of the etg1 and ctf18 mutants on sister chromatid cohesion strengthened the impact on plant growth of the replication stress caused by ETG1 deficiency because of inefficient DNA repair. We conclude that the ETG1 replication factor is required for efficient cohesion and that cohesion establishment is essential for proper development of plants suffering from endogenous DNA stress. Cohesion defects observed upon knockdown of its human counterpart suggest an equally important developmental role for the orthologous mammalian ETG1 protein.

  10. A deletion distinct from the classical homologous recombination of juvenile nephronophthisis type 1 (NPH1) allows exact molecular definition of deletion breakpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, E; Betz, R; Rensing, C; Schätzle, S; Kuntzen, T; Vetsi, T; Imm, A; Hildebrandt, F

    2000-09-01

    Juvenile nephronophthisis, an autosomal recessive cystic kidney disease, is the most common genetic cause of end-stage renal disease in children and young adults. We recently identified by positional cloning the causative gene, NPHP1. Its gene product nephrocystin may play a role in focal adhesion and adherens junction signaling. Approximately 80% of all patients with NPH1 carry large homozygous deletions, which contain the NPHP1 gene. These common deletions are positioned within a complex arrangement of large inverted and direct repeats, suggesting unequal recombination as a potential cause for their origin. In this study we have characterized the deletion breakpoints in a family with juvenile nephronophthisis that bears a unique maternal deletion of the NPHP1 gene, which is not the result of an event of homologous recombination. We molecularly characterized the centromeric and telomeric deletion breakpoints by extensive genomic sequencing, Southern blot analysis, and cloning and sequencing of the junction fragment. We were able to exactly localize the breakpoints at the position of two guanines. The centromeric breakpoint was positioned within intron 2 of the NPHP1 gene 360 bp downstream of the 5' end of a complete LINE-1 element. Multiple topoisomerase I and II consensus sequences were found at the breakpoint sites, suggesting the involvement of topoisomerase II in the deletion mechanism. These findings provide the first data on a potential mechanism for a deletion of the NPHP1 gene, that most likely is not the result of an event of homologous recombination and thereby distinct from the known common deletions. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Alternative end-joining repair pathways are the ultimate backup for abrogated classical non-homologous end-joining and homologous recombination repair: Implications for the formation of chromosome translocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliakis, George; Murmann, Tamara; Soni, Aashish

    2015-11-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSB) are the most deleterious lesions for the integrity of the genome, as their misrepair can lead to the formation of chromosome translocations. Cells have evolved two main repair pathways to suppress the formation of these genotoxic lesions: homology-dependent, error-free homologous recombination repair (HRR), and potentially error-prone, classical, DNA-PK-dependent non-homologous end-joining (c-NHEJ). The most salient feature of c-NHEJ, speed, will largely suppress chromosome translocation formation, while sequence alterations at the junction remain possible. It is now widely accepted that when c-NHEJ is inactivated, globally or locally, an alternative form of end-joining (alt-EJ) removes DSBs. Alt-EJ operates with speed and fidelity markedly lower than c-NHEJ, causing thus with higher probability chromosome translocations, and generating more extensive sequence alterations at the junction. Our working hypothesis is that alt-EJ operates as a backup to c-NHEJ. Recent results show that alt-EJ can also backup abrogated HRR in G2 phase cells, again at the cost of elevated formation of chromosome translocations. These observations raise alt-EJ to a global rescuing mechanism operating on ends that have lost their chromatin context in ways that compromise processing by HRR or c-NHEJ. While responsible for eliminating from the genome highly cytotoxic DNA ends, alt-EJ provides this function at the price of increased translocation formation. Here, we analyze recent literature on the mechanisms of chromosome translocation formation and propose a functional hierarchy among DSB processing pathways that makes alt-EJ the global backup pathway. We discuss possible ramifications of this model in cellular DSB management and pathway choice, and analyze its implications in radiation carcinogenesis and the design of novel therapeutic approaches. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Analysis of branched DNA replication and recombination intermediates from prokaryotic cells by two-dimensional (2D) native-native agarose gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Nicholas P

    2013-01-01

    Branched DNA molecules are generated by the essential processes of replication and recombination. Owing to their distinctive extended shapes, these intermediates migrate differently from linear double-stranded DNA under certain electrophoretic conditions. However, these branched species exist in the cell at much low abundance than the bulk linear DNA. Consequently, branched molecules cannot be visualized by conventional electrophoresis and ethidium bromide staining. Two-dimensional native-native agarose electrophoresis has therefore been developed as a method to facilitate the separation and visualization of branched replication and recombination intermediates. A wide variety of studies have employed this technique to examine branched molecules in eukaryotic, archaeal, and bacterial cells, providing valuable insights into how DNA is duplicated and repaired in all three domains of life.

  13. Loop L1 governs the DNA-binding specificity and order for RecA-catalyzed reactions in homologous recombination and DNA repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Takeshi; Ikawa, Shukuko; Iwasaki, Wakana; Hiraki, Toshiki; Hikima, Takaaki; Mikawa, Tsutomu; Arai, Naoto; Kamiya, Nobuo; Shibata, Takehiko

    2015-01-01

    In all organisms, RecA-family recombinases catalyze homologous joint formation in homologous genetic recombination, which is essential for genome stability and diversification. In homologous joint formation, ATP-bound RecA/Rad51-recombinases first bind single-stranded DNA at its primary site and then interact with double-stranded DNA at another site. The underlying reason and the regulatory mechanism for this conserved binding order remain unknown. A comparison of the loop L1 structures in a DNA-free RecA crystal that we originally determined and in the reported DNA-bound active RecA crystals suggested that the aspartate at position 161 in loop L1 in DNA-free RecA prevented double-stranded, but not single-stranded, DNA-binding to the primary site. This was confirmed by the effects of the Ala-replacement of Asp-161 (D161A), analyzed directly by gel-mobility shift assays and indirectly by DNA-dependent ATPase activity and SOS repressor cleavage. When RecA/Rad51-recombinases interact with double-stranded DNA before single-stranded DNA, homologous joint-formation is suppressed, likely by forming a dead-end product. We found that the D161A-replacement reduced this suppression, probably by allowing double-stranded DNA to bind preferentially and reversibly to the primary site. Thus, Asp-161 in the flexible loop L1 of wild-type RecA determines the preference for single-stranded DNA-binding to the primary site and regulates the DNA-binding order in RecA-catalyzed recombinase reactions. PMID:25561575

  14. Acute inactivation of the replicative helicase in human cells triggers MCM8-9-dependent DNA synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Natsume, Toyoaki; Nishimura, Kohei; Minocherhomji, Sheroy

    2017-01-01

    (DSBs). Remarkably, these cells maintain some DNA synthesis in the absence of MCM2, and this requires the MCM8-9 complex, a paralog of the MCM2-7 replicative helicase. We show that MCM8-9 functions in a homologous recombination-based pathway downstream from RAD51, which is promoted by DSB induction....... This RAD51/MCM8-9 axis is distinct from the recently described RAD52-dependent DNA synthesis pathway that operates in early mitosis at common fragile sites. We propose that stalled replication forks can be restarted in S phase via homologous recombination using MCM8-9 as an alternative replicative helicase....

  15. Phylogeny of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing strains constructed from polymorphisms in genes involved in DNA replication, recombination and repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Mestre

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Beijing family is a successful group of M. tuberculosis strains, often associated with drug resistance and widely distributed throughout the world. Polymorphic genetic markers have been used to type particular M. tuberculosis strains. We recently identified a group of polymorphic DNA repair replication and recombination (3R genes. It was shown that evolution of M. tuberculosis complex strains can be studied using 3R SNPs and a high-resolution tool for strain discrimination was developed. Here we investigated the genetic diversity and propose a phylogeny for Beijing strains by analyzing polymorphisms in 3R genes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A group of 3R genes was sequenced in a collection of Beijing strains from different geographic origins. Sequence analysis and comparison with the ones of non-Beijing strains identified several SNPs. These SNPs were used to type a larger collection of Beijing strains and allowed identification of 26 different sequence types for which a phylogeny was constructed. Phylogenetic relationships established by sequence types were in agreement with evolutionary pathways suggested by other genetic markers, such as Large Sequence Polymorphisms (LSPs. A recent Beijing genotype (Bmyc10, which included 60% of strains from distinct parts of the world, appeared to be predominant. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We found SNPs in 3R genes associated with the Beijing family, which enabled discrimination of different groups and the proposal of a phylogeny. The Beijing family can be divided into different groups characterized by particular genetic polymorphisms that may reflect pathogenic features. These SNPs are new, potential genetic markers that may contribute to better understand the success of the Beijing family.

  16. Processing of homologous recombination repair intermediates by the Sgs1-Top3-Rmi1 and Mus81-Mms4 complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hickson, Ian D; Mankouri, Hocine W

    2011-01-01

     structures) following replicative stress. Further characterization of these X structures may reveal why loss of BLM (the human Sgs1 ortholog) leads to the human cancer predisposition disorder, Bloom syndrome. In two recent complementary studies, we examined the nature of the X structures arising in yeast strains...

  17. Dpb11/TopBP1 contributes to genomicstability via homologous recombinationand checkpoint signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Germann, Susanne Manuela

    Homologous recombination (HR) is essential for maintaining genome integrity and is a major pathway for repairing (DSBs). DPB11 is an essential gene conserved from yeast to human (TopBP1), which is involved in initiation of DNA replication and DNA checkpoint signaling. We found that Dpb11 forms foci...... rates of heteroallelic and direct repeat recombination implicate a role for Dpb11 in homologous recombination. Physical monitoring of mating-type switching as a model for DSB repair revealed that the repair kinetics of dpb11-PF are delayed. Finally, we found Dpb11 in budding yeast as well as TopBP1...

  18. Molecular genetics of DNA viruses: recombinant virus technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhierl, Bernhard; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques

    2005-01-01

    Recombinant viral genomes cloned onto BAC vectors can be subjected to extensive molecular genetic analysis in the context of E. coli. Thus, the recombinant virus technology exploits the power of prokaryotic genetics to introduce all kinds of mutations into the recombinant genome. All available techniques are based on homologous recombination between a targeting vector carrying the mutated version of the gene of interest and the recombinant virus. After modification, the mutant viral genome is stably introduced into eukaryotic cells permissive for viral lytic replication. In these cells, mutant viral genomes can be packaged into infectious particles to evaluate the effect of these mutations in the context of the complete genome.

  19. Expression of Bovine Cytosolic 5′-Nucleotidase (cN-II) in Yeast: Nucleotide Pools Disturbance and Its Consequences on Growth and Homologous Recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegrini, Simone; Filoni, Daniela Nicole; Galli, Alvaro; Collavoli, Anita; Pesi, Rossana; Camici, Marcella; Tozzi, Maria Grazia

    2013-01-01

    Cytosolic 5′-nucleotidase II is a widespread IMP hydrolyzing enzyme, essential for cell vitality, whose role in nucleotide metabolism and cell function is still to be exactly determined. Cytosolic 5′-nucleotidase overexpression and silencing have both been demonstrated to be toxic for mammalian cultured cells. In order to ascertain the effect of enzyme expression on a well-known eukaryote simple model, we expressed cytosolic 5′-nucleotidase II in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which normally hydrolyzes IMP through the action of a nucleotidase with distinct functional and structural features. Heterologous expression was successful. The yeast cells harbouring cytosolic 5′-nucleotidase II displayed a shorter duplication time and a significant modification of purine and pyrimidine derivatives concentration as compared with the control strain. Furthermore the capacity of homologous recombination in the presence of mutagenic compounds of yeast expressing cytosolic 5′-nucleotidase II was markedly impaired. PMID:23691116

  20. Polymorphisms of Homologous Recombination RAD51, RAD51B, XRCC2, and XRCC3 Genes and the Risk of Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Nowacka-Zawisza

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic polymorphisms in DNA repair genes may induce individual variations in DNA repair capacity, which may in turn contribute to the risk of cancer developing. Homologous recombination repair (HRR plays a critical role in maintaining chromosomal integrity and protecting against carcinogenic factors. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between prostate cancer risk and the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the genes involved in HRR, that is, RAD51 (rs1801320 and rs1801321, RAD51B (rs10483813 and rs3784099, XRCC2 (rs3218536, and XRCC3 (rs861539. Polymorphisms were analyzed by PCR-RFLP and Real-Time PCR in 101 patients with prostate adenocarcinoma and 216 age- and sex-matched controls. A significant relationship was detected between the RAD51 gene rs1801320 polymorphism and increased prostate cancer risk. Our results indicate that the RAD51 gene rs1801320 polymorphism may contribute to prostate cancer susceptibility in Poland.

  1. Polymorphisms of Homologous Recombination RAD51, RAD51B, XRCC2, and XRCC3 Genes and the Risk of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowacka-Zawisza, Maria; Wiśnik, Ewelina; Wasilewski, Andrzej; Skowrońska, Milena; Forma, Ewa; Bryś, Magdalena; Różański, Waldemar; Krajewska, Wanda M.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in DNA repair genes may induce individual variations in DNA repair capacity, which may in turn contribute to the risk of cancer developing. Homologous recombination repair (HRR) plays a critical role in maintaining chromosomal integrity and protecting against carcinogenic factors. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between prostate cancer risk and the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genes involved in HRR, that is, RAD51 (rs1801320 and rs1801321), RAD51B (rs10483813 and rs3784099), XRCC2 (rs3218536), and XRCC3 (rs861539). Polymorphisms were analyzed by PCR-RFLP and Real-Time PCR in 101 patients with prostate adenocarcinoma and 216 age- and sex-matched controls. A significant relationship was detected between the RAD51 gene rs1801320 polymorphism and increased prostate cancer risk. Our results indicate that the RAD51 gene rs1801320 polymorphism may contribute to prostate cancer susceptibility in Poland. PMID:26339569

  2. Break-induced ATR and Ddb1-Cul4(Cdt)² ubiquitin ligase-dependent nucleotide synthesis promotes homologous recombination repair in fission yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moss, Jennifer; Tinline-Purvis, Helen; Walker, Carol A

    2010-01-01

    Nucleotide synthesis is a universal response to DNA damage, but how this response facilitates DNA repair and cell survival is unclear. Here we establish a role for DNA damage-induced nucleotide synthesis in homologous recombination (HR) repair in fission yeast. Using a genetic screen, we found...... the Ddb1-Cul4(Cdt)² ubiquitin ligase complex and ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) to be required for HR repair of a DNA double-strand break (DSB). The Ddb1-Cul4(Cdt)² ubiquitin ligase complex is required for degradation of Spd1, an inhibitor of RNR in fission yeast. Accordingly, deleting spd1(+) suppressed...... through increasing Cdt2 nuclear levels in response to DNA damage. Our findings support a model in which break-induced Rad3 and Ddb1-Cul4(Cdt)² ubiquitin ligase-dependent Spd1 degradation and RNR activation promotes postsynaptic ssDNA gap filling during HR repair....

  3. Zinc finger artificial transcription factor-based nearest inactive analogue/nearest active analogue strategy used for the identification of plant genes controlling homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Qi; van Verk, Marcel C; Pinas, Johan E; Lindhout, Beatrice I; Hooykaas, Paul J J; van der Zaal, Bert J

    2013-12-01

    In previous work, we selected a particular transcription factor, designated VP16-HRU, from a pool of zinc finger artificial transcription factors (ZF-ATFs) used for genome interrogation. When expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana under control of the ribosomal protein S5A promoter, the RPS5A::VP16-HRU construct led to a 200- to 300-fold increase in the frequency of somatic intrachromosomal homologous recombination (iHR). Because the expression of each ZF-ATF leads to a large number of transcriptional changes, we designed a strategy employing a collection of structurally similar ZF-ATFs to filter out the transcriptional changes relevant to the phenotype by deep sequencing. In that manner, 30 transcripts were found to be consistently induced in plants with enhanced homologous recombination (HR). For 25 of the cognate genes, their effect on the HR process was assessed using cDNA/gDNA expression constructs. For three genes, ectopic expression indeed led to enhanced iHR frequencies, albeit much lower than the frequency observed when a HR-inducing ZF-ATF was present. Altogether, our data demonstrate that despite the large number of transcriptional changes brought about by individual ZF-ATFs, causal changes can be identified. In our case, the picture emerged that a natural regulatory switch for iHR does not exist but that ZF-ATFs-like VP16-HRU act as an ectopic master switch, orchestrating the timely expression of a set of plant genes that each by themselves only have modest effects, but when acting together support an extremely high iHR frequency.

  4. The impact of homologous recombination repair deficiency on depleted uranium clastogenicity in Chinese hamster ovary cells: XRCC3 protects cells from chromosome aberrations, but increases chromosome fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, Amie L. [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth Street, P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Joyce, Kellie [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Xie, Hong [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Department of Applied Medical Science, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth Street, P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Falank, Carolyne [Wise Laboratory of Environmental and Genetic Toxicology, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); Maine Center for Toxicology and Environmental Health, University of Southern Maine, 96 Falmouth St., P.O. Box 9300, Portland, ME 04104-9300, United States of America (United States); and others

    2014-04-15

    Highlights: • The role of homologous recombination repair in DU-induced toxicity was examined. • Loss of RAD51D did not affect DU-induced cytotoxicity or genotoxicity. • XRCC3 protects cell from DU-induced chromosome breaks and fusions. • XRCC3 plays a role in DU-induced chromosome fragmentation of the X chromosome. - Abstract: Depleted uranium (DU) is extensively used in both industry and military applications. The potential for civilian and military personnel exposure to DU is rising, but there are limited data on the potential health hazards of DU exposure. Previous laboratory research indicates DU is a potential carcinogen, but epidemiological studies remain inconclusive. DU is genotoxic, inducing DNA double strand breaks, chromosome damage and mutations, but the mechanisms of genotoxicity or repair pathways involved in protecting cells against DU-induced damage remain unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of homologous recombination repair deficiency on DU-induced genotoxicity using RAD51D and XRCC3-deficient Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines. Cells deficient in XRCC3 (irs1SF) exhibited similar cytotoxicity after DU exposure compared to wild-type (AA8) and XRCC3-complemented (1SFwt8) cells, but DU induced more break-type and fusion-type lesions in XRCC3-deficient cells compared to wild-type and XRCC3-complemented cells. Surprisingly, loss of RAD51D did not affect DU-induced cytotoxicity or genotoxicity. DU induced selective X-chromosome fragmentation irrespective of RAD51D status, but loss of XRCC3 nearly eliminated fragmentation observed after DU exposure in wild-type and XRCC3-complemented cells. Thus, XRCC3, but not RAD51D, protects cells from DU-induced breaks and fusions and also plays a role in DU-induced chromosome fragmentation.

  5. Nonhomologous end-joining repair plays a more important role than homologous recombination repair in defining radiosensitivity after exposure to high-LET radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Akihisa; Kubo, Makoto; Ma, Hongyu; Nakagawa, Akiko; Yoshida, Yukari; Isono, Mayu; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Ohno, Tatsuya; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Funayama, Tomoo; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Nakano, Takashi

    2014-09-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by ionizing radiation pose a major threat to cell survival. The cell can respond to the presence of DSBs through two major repair pathways: homologous recombination (HR) and nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). Higher levels of cell death are induced by high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation when compared to low-LET radiation, even at the same physical doses, due to less effective and efficient DNA repair. To clarify whether high-LET radiation inhibits all repair pathways or specifically one repair pathway, studies were designed to examine the effects of radiation with different LET values on DNA DSB repair and radiosensitivity. Embryonic fibroblasts bearing repair gene (NHEJ-related Lig4 and/or HR-related Rad54) knockouts (KO) were used and their responses were compared to wild-type cells. The cells were exposed to X rays, spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) carbon ion beams as well as with carbon, iron, neon and argon ions. Cell survival was measured with colony-forming assays. The sensitization enhancement ratio (SER) values were calculated using the 10% survival dose of wild-type cells and repair-deficient cells. Cellular radiosensitivity was listed in descending order: double-KO cells > Lig4-KO cells > Rad54-KO cells > wild-type cells. Although Rad54-KO cells had an almost constant SER value, Lig4-KO cells showed a high-SER value when compared to Rad54-KO cells, even with increasing LET values. These results suggest that with carbon-ion therapy, targeting NHEJ repair yields higher radiosensitivity than targeting homologous recombination repair.

  6. Nonallelic homologous recombination of the FCGR2/3 locus results in copy number variation and novel chimeric FCGR2 genes with aberrant functional expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagelkerke, S Q; Tacke, C E; Breunis, W B; Geissler, J; Sins, J W R; Appelhof, B; van den Berg, T K; de Boer, M; Kuijpers, T W

    2015-09-01

    The human FCGR2/3 locus, containing five highly homologous genes encoding the major IgG receptors, shows extensive copy number variation (CNV) associated with susceptibility to autoimmune diseases. Having genotyped >4000 individuals, we show that all CNV at this locus can be explained by nonallelic homologous recombination (NAHR) of the two paralogous repeats that constitute the majority of the locus, and describe four distinct CNV regions (CNRs) with a highly variable prevalence in the population. Apart from CNV, NAHR events also created several hitherto unidentified chimeric FCGR2 genes. These include an FCGR2A/2C chimeric gene that causes a decreased expression of FcγRIIa on phagocytes, resulting in a decreased production of reactive oxygen species in response to immune complexes, compared with wild-type FCGR2A. Conversely, FCGR2C/2A chimeric genes were identified to lead to an increased expression of FCGR2C. Finally, a rare FCGR2B null-variant allele was found, in which a polymorphic stop codon of FCGR2C is introduced into one FCGR2B gene, resulting in a 50% reduction in protein expression. Our study on CNRs and the chimeric genes is essential for the correct interpretation of association studies on FCGR genes as a determinant for disease susceptibility, and may explain some as yet unidentified extreme phenotypes of immune-mediated disease.

  7. A 590 kb deletion caused by non-allelic homologous recombination between two LINE-1 elements in a patient with mesomelia-synostosis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Naruto, Takuya; Watanabe, Miki; Fujita, Yuji; Ujiro, Sae; Okamoto, Nana; Horikawa, Hideaki; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Imoto, Issei

    2017-04-01

    Mesomelia-synostoses syndrome (MSS) is a rare, autosomal-dominant, syndromal osteochondrodysplasia characterized by mesomelic limb shortening, acral synostoses, and multiple congenital malformations due to a non-recurrent deletion at 8q13 that always encompasses two coding-genes, SULF1 and SLCO5A1. To date, five unrelated patients have been reported worldwide, and MMS was previously proposed to not be a genomic disorder associated with deletions recurring from non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR) in at least two analyzed cases. We conducted targeted gene panel sequencing and subsequent array-based copy number analysis in an 11-year-old undiagnosed Japanese female patient with multiple congenital anomalies that included mesomelic limb shortening and detected a novel 590 Kb deletion at 8q13 encompassing the same gene set as reported previously, resulting in the diagnosis of MSS. Breakpoint sequences of the deleted region in our case demonstrated the first LINE-1s (L1s)-mediated unequal NAHR event utilizing two distant L1 elements as homology substrates in this disease, which may represent a novel causative mechanism of the 8q13 deletion, expanding the range of mechanisms involved in the chromosomal rearrangements responsible for MSS.

  8. 表达IL-2的重组非复制型痘苗病毒的构建及活性检测%Construction and bioactivity detection of a recombinant non-replicating vaccinia virus expressing IL-2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阳静; 庞聪; 任皎; 赵莉; 王平兴; 阮力; 谭文杰; 田厚文; 让蔚清

    2015-01-01

    Objective To generate a recombinant non-replicating vaccinia virus expressing IL-2 and detect its bioactivity in vitro.Methods Based on the non-replicating vaccinia virus (Tiantan strain) vectors,recombinant virus rNTV1175IL2H6LacZ which expressed IL-2 was constructed through homologous recombination and purified by blue-white screening.Then objective gene and protein expression was identified and the bioactivity of objective protein in vitro was detected.Results Recombinant virus was identified by PCR and Western Blot indicating that IL-2 gene with 51 1bp w