WorldWideScience

Sample records for replication complex formation

  1. The plant cell cycle: Pre-Replication complex formation and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasil, Juliana Nogueira; Costa, Carinne N Monteiro; Cabral, Luiz Mors; Ferreira, Paulo C G; Hemerly, Adriana S

    2017-01-01

    The multiplication of cells in all living organisms requires a tight regulation of DNA replication. Several mechanisms take place to ensure that the DNA is replicated faithfully and just once per cell cycle in order to originate through mitoses two new daughter cells that contain exactly the same information from the previous one. A key control mechanism that occurs before cells enter S phase is the formation of a pre-replication complex (pre-RC) that is assembled at replication origins by the sequential association of the origin recognition complex, followed by Cdt1, Cdc6 and finally MCMs, licensing DNA to start replication. The identification of pre-RC members in all animal and plant species shows that this complex is conserved in eukaryotes and, more importantly, the differences between kingdoms might reflect their divergence in strategies on cell cycle regulation, as it must be integrated and adapted to the niche, ecosystem, and the organism peculiarities. Here, we provide an overview of the knowledge generated so far on the formation and the developmental controls of the pre-RC mechanism in plants, analyzing some particular aspects in comparison to other eukaryotes.

  2. PriC-mediated DNA replication restart requires PriC complex formation with the single-stranded DNA-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, Sarah R; Marceau, Aimee H; Massoni, Shawn C; Zhou, Ruobo; Ha, Taekjip; Sandler, Steven J; Keck, James L

    2013-06-14

    Frequent collisions between cellular DNA replication complexes (replisomes) and obstacles such as damaged DNA or frozen protein complexes make DNA replication fork progression surprisingly sporadic. These collisions can lead to the ejection of replisomes prior to completion of replication, which, if left unrepaired, results in bacterial cell death. As such, bacteria have evolved DNA replication restart mechanisms that function to reload replisomes onto abandoned DNA replication forks. Here, we define a direct interaction between PriC, a key Escherichia coli DNA replication restart protein, and the single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB), a protein that is ubiquitously associated with DNA replication forks. PriC/SSB complex formation requires evolutionarily conserved residues from both proteins, including a pair of Arg residues from PriC and the C terminus of SSB. In vitro, disruption of the PriC/SSB interface by sequence changes in either protein blocks the first step of DNA replication restart, reloading of the replicative DnaB helicase onto an abandoned replication fork. Consistent with the critical role of PriC/SSB complex formation in DNA replication restart, PriC variants that cannot bind SSB are non-functional in vivo. Single-molecule experiments demonstrate that PriC binding to SSB alters SSB/DNA complexes, exposing single-stranded DNA and creating a platform for other proteins to bind. These data lead to a model in which PriC interaction with SSB remodels SSB/DNA structures at abandoned DNA replication forks to create a DNA structure that is competent for DnaB loading.

  3. Planktonic replication is essential for biofilm formation by Legionella pneumophila in a complex medium under static and dynamic flow conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mampel, J.; Spirig, T.; Weber, S.S.

    2006-01-01

    within biofilms in the absence of protozoa. In this study, we analyzed surface adherence of and biofilm formation by L. pneumophila in a rich medium that supported axenic replication. Biofilm formation by the virulent L. pneumophila strain JR32 and by clinical and environmental isolates was analyzed...... formed biofilms in the inverse system if the medium was exchanged twice a day. However, after addition of Acanthamoeba castellanii, the bacteria proliferated and adhered to surfaces. Sessile (surface-attached) and planktonic (free-swimming) L. pneumophila expressed beta-galactosidase activity to similar...... extents, and therefore, the observed lack of proliferation of surface-attached bacteria was not due to impaired protein synthesis or metabolic activity. Cocultivation of green fluorescent protein (GFP)- and DsRed-labeled L. pneumophila led to randomly interspersed cells on the substratum and in aggregates...

  4. Assembly of Slx4 signaling complexes behind DNA replication forks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balint, Attila; Kim, TaeHyung; Gallo, David; Cussiol, Jose Renato; Bastos de Oliveira, Francisco M; Yimit, Askar; Ou, Jiongwen; Nakato, Ryuichiro; Gurevich, Alexey; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Smolka, Marcus B; Zhang, Zhaolei; Brown, Grant W

    2015-08-13

    Obstructions to replication fork progression, referred to collectively as DNA replication stress, challenge genome stability. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cells lacking RTT107 or SLX4 show genome instability and sensitivity to DNA replication stress and are defective in the completion of DNA replication during recovery from replication stress. We demonstrate that Slx4 is recruited to chromatin behind stressed replication forks, in a region that is spatially distinct from that occupied by the replication machinery. Slx4 complex formation is nucleated by Mec1 phosphorylation of histone H2A, which is recognized by the constitutive Slx4 binding partner Rtt107. Slx4 is essential for recruiting the Mec1 activator Dpb11 behind stressed replication forks, and Slx4 complexes are important for full activity of Mec1. We propose that Slx4 complexes promote robust checkpoint signaling by Mec1 by stably recruiting Dpb11 within a discrete domain behind the replication fork, during DNA replication stress.

  5. Analysis of the cloverleaf element in a human rhinovirus type 14/poliovirus chimera: correlation of subdomain D structure, ternary protein complex formation and virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, Elizabeth; Xiang, Wenkai; Paul, Aniko; Wimmer, Eckard

    2003-08-01

    RNA genomes of enteroviruses and rhinoviruses contain a 5'-terminal structure, the cloverleaf (CL), which serves as signal in RNA synthesis. Substitution of the poliovirus [PV1(M)] CL with that of human rhinovirus type 2 (HRV2) was shown previously to produce a viable chimeric PV, whereas substitution with the HRV14 CL produced a null phenotype. Fittingly, the HRV14 CL failed to form a complex with PV-specific proteins 3CD(pro)-3AB or 3CD(pro)-PCBP2, considered essential for RNA synthesis. It was reported previously (Rohll et al., J Virol 68, 4384-4391, 1994) that the major determinant for the null phenotype of a PV/HRV14 chimera resides in subdomain Id of the HRV14 CL. Using a chimeric PV/HRV14 CL in the context of the PV genome, stem-loop Id of HRV14 CL was genetically dissected. It contains the sequence C(57)UAU(60)-G, the underlined nucleotides forming the loop that is shorter by 1 nt when compared to the corresponding PV structure (UUGC(60)GG). Insertion of a G nucleotide to form a tetra loop (C(57)UAU(60)GG(61)) did not rescue replication of the chimera. However, an additional mutation at position 60 (C(57)UAC(60)GG(61)) yielded a replicating genome. Only the mutant PV/HRV14 CL with the UAC(60)G tetra loop formed ternary complexes efficiently with either PV proteins 3CD(pro)-3AB or 3CD(pro)-PCBP2. Thus, in the context of PV RNA synthesis, the presence of a tetra loop in subdomain D of the CL per se is not sufficient for function. The sequence and, consequently, the structure of the tetra loop plays an essential role. Biochemical assays demonstrated that the function of the CL element and the function of the cis-acting replication element in the 3D(pol)-3CD(pro)-dependent uridylylation of VPg are not linked.

  6. Assembly of alphavirus replication complexes from RNA and protein components in a novel trans-replication system in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spuul, Pirjo; Balistreri, Giuseppe; Hellström, Kirsi; Golubtsov, Andrey V; Jokitalo, Eija; Ahola, Tero

    2011-05-01

    For positive-strand RNA viruses, the viral genomic RNA also acts as an mRNA directing the translation of the replicase proteins of the virus. Replication takes place in association with cytoplasmic membranes, which are heavily modified to create specific replication compartments. Here we have expressed by plasmid DNA transfection the large replicase polyprotein of Semliki Forest virus (SFV) in mammalian cells from a nonreplicating mRNA and provided a separate RNA containing the replication signals. The replicase proteins were able to efficiently and specifically replicate the template in trans, leading to accumulation of RNA and marker gene products expressed from the template RNA. The replicase proteins and double-stranded RNA replication intermediates localized to structures similar to those seen in SFV-infected cells. Using correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM) with fluorescent marker proteins to relocate those transfected cells, in which active replication was ongoing, abundant membrane modifications, representing the replication complex spherules, were observed both at the plasma membrane and in intracellular endolysosomes. Thus, replication complexes are faithfully assembled and localized in the trans-replication system. We demonstrated, using CLEM, that the replication proteins alone or a polymerase-negative polyprotein mutant together with the template did not give rise to spherule formation. Thus, the trans-replication system is suitable for cell biological dissection and examination in a mammalian cell environment, and similar systems may be possible for other positive-strand RNA viruses.

  7. Phosphorylation of NS5A Serine-235 is essential to hepatitis C virus RNA replication and normal replication compartment formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eyre, Nicholas S., E-mail: nicholas.eyre@adelaide.edu.au [School of Biological Sciences and Research Centre for Infectious Diseases, University of Adelaide, Adelaide (Australia); Centre for Cancer Biology, SA Pathology, Adelaide (Australia); Hampton-Smith, Rachel J.; Aloia, Amanda L. [School of Biological Sciences and Research Centre for Infectious Diseases, University of Adelaide, Adelaide (Australia); Centre for Cancer Biology, SA Pathology, Adelaide (Australia); Eddes, James S. [Adelaide Proteomics Centre, School of Biological Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide (Australia); Simpson, Kaylene J. [Victorian Centre for Functional Genomics, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Parkville (Australia); Hoffmann, Peter [Adelaide Proteomics Centre, School of Biological Sciences, University of Adelaide, Adelaide (Australia); Institute for Photonics and Advanced Sensing (IPAS), University of Adelaide, Adelaide (Australia); Beard, Michael R. [School of Biological Sciences and Research Centre for Infectious Diseases, University of Adelaide, Adelaide (Australia); Centre for Cancer Biology, SA Pathology, Adelaide (Australia)

    2016-04-15

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS5A protein is essential for HCV RNA replication and virus assembly. Here we report the identification of NS5A phosphorylation sites Ser-222, Ser-235 and Thr-348 during an infectious HCV replication cycle and demonstrate that Ser-235 phosphorylation is essential for HCV RNA replication. Confocal microscopy revealed that both phosphoablatant (S235A) and phosphomimetic (S235D) mutants redistribute NS5A to large juxta-nuclear foci that display altered colocalization with known replication complex components. Using electron microscopy (EM) we found that S235D alters virus-induced membrane rearrangements while EM using ‘APEX2’-tagged viruses demonstrated S235D-mediated enrichment of NS5A in irregular membranous foci. Finally, using a customized siRNA screen of candidate NS5A kinases and subsequent analysis using a phospho-specific antibody, we show that phosphatidylinositol-4 kinase III alpha (PI4KIIIα) is important for Ser-235 phosphorylation. We conclude that Ser-235 phosphorylation of NS5A is essential for HCV RNA replication and normal replication complex formation and is regulated by PI4KIIIα. - Highlights: • NS5A residues Ser-222, Ser-235 and Thr-348 are phosphorylated during HCV infection. • Phosphorylation of Ser-235 is essential to HCV RNA replication. • Mutation of Ser-235 alters replication compartment localization and morphology. • Phosphatidylinositol-4 kinase III alpha is important for Ser-235 phosphorylation.

  8. The mammalian INO80 chromatin remodeling complex is required for replication stress recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassileva, Ivelina; Yanakieva, Iskra; Peycheva, Michaela; Gospodinov, Anastas; Anachkova, Boyka

    2014-01-01

    A number of studies have implicated the yeast INO80 chromatin remodeling complex in DNA replication, but the function of the human INO80 complex during S phase remains poorly understood. Here, we have systematically investigated the involvement of the catalytic subunit of the human INO80 complex during unchallenged replication and under replication stress by following the effects of its depletion on cell survival, S-phase checkpoint activation, the fate of individual replication forks, and the consequences of fork collapse. We report that INO80 was specifically needed for efficient replication elongation, while it was not required for initiation of replication. In the absence of the Ino80 protein, cells became hypersensitive to hydroxyurea and displayed hyperactive ATR-Chk1 signaling. Using bulk and fiber labeling of DNA, we found that cells deficient for Ino80 and Arp8 had impaired replication restart after treatment with replication inhibitors and accumulated double-strand breaks as evidenced by the formation of γ-H2AX and Rad51 foci. These data indicate that under conditions of replication stress mammalian INO80 protects stalled forks from collapsing and allows their subsequent restart. PMID:25016522

  9. Comparison of three replication strategies in complex multicellular organisms: Asexual replication, sexual replication with identical gametes, and sexual replication with distinct sperm and egg gametes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannenbaum, Emmanuel

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies the mutation-selection balance in three simplified replication models. The first model considers a population of organisms replicating via the production of asexual spores. The second model considers a sexually replicating population that produces identical gametes. The third model considers a sexually replicating population that produces distinct sperm and egg gametes. All models assume diploid organisms whose genomes consist of two chromosomes, each of which is taken to be functional if equal to some master sequence, and defective otherwise. In the asexual population, the asexual diploid spores develop directly into adult organisms. In the sexual populations, the haploid gametes enter a haploid pool, where they may fuse with other haploids. The resulting immature diploid organisms then proceed to develop into mature organisms. Based on an analysis of all three models, we find that, as organism size increases, a sexually replicating population can only outcompete an asexually replicating population if the adult organisms produce distinct sperm and egg gametes. A sexual replication strategy that is based on the production of large numbers of sperm cells to fertilize a small number of eggs is found to be necessary in order to maintain a sufficiently low cost for sex for the strategy to be selected for over a purely asexual strategy. We discuss the usefulness of this model in understanding the evolution and maintenance of sexual replication as the preferred replication strategy in complex, multicellular organisms.

  10. Molecular architecture of the preinitiation complex in adenovirus DNA replication

    OpenAIRE

    Mysiak, Monika Elzbieta

    2004-01-01

    After infection of a host cell, adenovirus (Ad) aims for generation of progeny viruses, and thus it rapidly replicates its genomic DNA. The replication process starts with the assembly of the preinitiation complex (PIC) on the origin DNA. The PIC consists of three viral proteins, DNA polymerase (pol), precursor terminal protein (pTP), DNA binding protein (DBP) and two transcription factors of the host cell, Nuclear Factor I (NFI) and Octamer binding protein (Oct-1). Both transcription factors...

  11. Evolution of DNA replication protein complexes in eukaryotes and Archaea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Chia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The replication of DNA in Archaea and eukaryotes requires several ancillary complexes, including proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, replication factor C (RFC, and the minichromosome maintenance (MCM complex. Bacterial DNA replication utilizes comparable proteins, but these are distantly related phylogenetically to their archaeal and eukaryotic counterparts at best. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: While the structures of each of the complexes do not differ significantly between the archaeal and eukaryotic versions thereof, the evolutionary dynamic in the two cases does. The number of subunits in each complex is constant across all taxa. However, they vary subtly with regard to composition. In some taxa the subunits are all identical in sequence, while in others some are homologous rather than identical. In the case of eukaryotes, there is no phylogenetic variation in the makeup of each complex-all appear to derive from a common eukaryotic ancestor. This is not the case in Archaea, where the relationship between the subunits within each complex varies taxon-to-taxon. We have performed a detailed phylogenetic analysis of these relationships in order to better understand the gene duplications and divergences that gave rise to the homologous subunits in Archaea. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This domain level difference in evolution suggests that different forces have driven the evolution of DNA replication proteins in each of these two domains. In addition, the phylogenies of all three gene families support the distinctiveness of the proposed archaeal phylum Thaumarchaeota.

  12. Architectures of archaeal GINS complexes, essential DNA replication initiation factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saito Mihoko

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the early stage of eukaryotic DNA replication, the template DNA is unwound by the MCM helicase, which is activated by forming a complex with the Cdc45 and GINS proteins. The eukaryotic GINS forms a heterotetramer, comprising four types of subunits. On the other hand, the archaeal GINS appears to be either a tetramer formed by two types of subunits in a 2:2 ratio (α2β2 or a homotetramer of a single subunit (α4. Due to the low sequence similarity between the archaeal and eukaryotic GINS subunits, the atomic structures of the archaeal GINS complexes are attracting interest for comparisons of their subunit architectures and organization. Results We determined the crystal structure of the α2β2 GINS tetramer from Thermococcus kodakaraensis (TkoGINS, comprising Gins51 and Gins23, and compared it with the reported human GINS structures. The backbone structure of each subunit and the tetrameric assembly are similar to those of human GINS. However, the location of the C-terminal small domain of Gins51 is remarkably different between the archaeal and human GINS structures. In addition, TkoGINS exhibits different subunit contacts from those in human GINS, as a consequence of the different relative locations and orientations between the domains. Based on the GINS crystal structures, we built a homology model of the putative homotetrameric GINS from Thermoplasma acidophilum (TacGINS. Importantly, we propose that a long insertion loop allows the differential positioning of the C-terminal domains and, as a consequence, exclusively leads to the formation of an asymmetric homotetramer rather than a symmetrical one. Conclusions The DNA metabolizing proteins from archaea are similar to those from eukaryotes, and the archaeal multi-subunit complexes are occasionally simplified versions of the eukaryotic ones. The overall similarity in the architectures between the archaeal and eukaryotic GINS complexes suggests that the GINS function

  13. Complexity of Formation in Holography

    CERN Document Server

    Chapman, Shira; Myers, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    It was recently conjectured that the quantum complexity of a holographic boundary state can be computed by evaluating the gravitational action on a bulk region known as the Wheeler-DeWitt patch. We apply this complexity=action duality to evaluate the `complexity of formation' (arXiv:1509.07876, arXiv:1512.04993), i.e., the additional complexity arising in preparing the entangled thermofield double state with two copies of the boundary CFT compared to preparing the individual vacuum states of the two copies. We find that for boundary dimensions $d>2$, the difference in the complexities grows linearly with the thermal entropy at high temperatures. For the special case $d=2$, the complexity of formation is a fixed constant, independent of the temperature. We compare these results to those found using the complexity=volume duality.

  14. Complexity of formation in holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Shira; Marrochio, Hugo; Myers, Robert C.

    2017-01-01

    It was recently conjectured that the quantum complexity of a holographic boundary state can be computed by evaluating the gravitational action on a bulk region known as the Wheeler-DeWitt patch. We apply this complexity=action duality to evaluate the `complexity of formation' [1, 2], i.e. the additional complexity arising in preparing the entangled thermofield double state with two copies of the boundary CFT compared to preparing the individual vacuum states of the two copies. We find that for boundary dimensions d > 2, the difference in the complexities grows linearly with the thermal entropy at high temperatures. For the special case d = 2, the complexity of formation is a fixed constant, independent of the temperature. We compare these results to those found using the complexity=volume duality.

  15. The MMS22L-TONSL complex mediates recovery from replication stress and homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Lara; Panier, Stephanie; Wildenhain, Jan; Tkach, Johnny M; Al-Hakim, Abdallah; Landry, Marie-Claude; Escribano-Diaz, Cristina; Szilard, Rachel K; Young, Jordan T F; Munro, Meagan; Canny, Marella D; Kolas, Nadine K; Zhang, Wei; Harding, Shane M; Ylanko, Jarkko; Mendez, Megan; Mullin, Michael; Sun, Thomas; Habermann, Bianca; Datti, Alessandro; Bristow, Robert G; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Tyers, Michael D; Brown, Grant W; Durocher, Daniel

    2010-11-24

    Genome integrity is jeopardized each time DNA replication forks stall or collapse. Here we report the identification of a complex composed of MMS22L (C6ORF167) and TONSL (NFKBIL2) that participates in the recovery from replication stress. MMS22L and TONSL are homologous to yeast Mms22 and plant Tonsoku/Brushy1, respectively. MMS22L-TONSL accumulates at regions of ssDNA associated with distressed replication forks or at processed DNA breaks, and its depletion results in high levels of endogenous DNA double-strand breaks caused by an inability to complete DNA synthesis after replication fork collapse. Moreover, cells depleted of MMS22L are highly sensitive to camptothecin, a topoisomerase I poison that impairs DNA replication progression. Finally, MMS22L and TONSL are necessary for the efficient formation of RAD51 foci after DNA damage, and their depletion impairs homologous recombination. These results indicate that MMS22L and TONSL are genome caretakers that stimulate the recombination-dependent repair of stalled or collapsed replication forks. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. p53/E1b58kDa complex regulates adenovirus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgway, P J; Hall, A R; Myers, C J; Braithwaite, A W

    1997-10-27

    We have explored a role for the adenovirus (Ad5) E1b58kDa/p53 protein complex in adenovirus replication. This was done by using virus mutants containing different defects in the E1b58kDa gene and cell lines that express either a wild-type p53 protein or a mutant p53 protein. We find that infection of wild-type p53-containing cells with wild-type Ad5 causes a shutoff of p53 and alpha-actin protein synthesis by distinct mechanisms, but neither occurs in mutant p53 cells. Our data also indicate that the shutoff is dependent on formation of the p53/E1b complex and may also involve another virus protein, E4ORF6. Following from these observations we asked whether failure to form the complex resulted in impaired adenovirus replication. Our experiments showed that neither wild-type Ad5 nor the E1b mutant dl338 could replicate in cells expressing a mutant p53 protein, but that wild-type adenovirus replicated well in wild-type p53-expressing cells. Collectively, our data suggest that the interaction between p53 and the E1b58kDa protein is necessary for efficient adenovirus replication. This is the first time such a direct link between the complex and virus replication has been demonstrated. These data raise serious questions about the usefulness of E1b-defective viruses in tumor therapy.

  17. Replication Stalling and Heteroduplex Formation within CAG/CTG Trinucleotide Repeats by Mismatch Repair

    KAUST Repository

    Viterbo, David

    2016-03-16

    Trinucleotide repeat expansions are responsible for at least two dozen neurological disorders. Mechanisms leading to these large expansions of repeated DNA are still poorly understood. It was proposed that transient stalling of the replication fork by the repeat tract might trigger slippage of the newly-synthesized strand over its template, leading to expansions or contractions of the triplet repeat. However, such mechanism was never formally proven. Here we show that replication fork pausing and CAG/CTG trinucleotide repeat instability are not linked, stable and unstable repeats exhibiting the same propensity to stall replication forks when integrated in a yeast natural chromosome. We found that replication fork stalling was dependent on the integrity of the mismatch-repair system, especially the Msh2p-Msh6p complex, suggesting that direct interaction of MMR proteins with secondary structures formed by trinucleotide repeats in vivo, triggers replication fork pauses. We also show by chromatin immunoprecipitation that Msh2p is enriched at trinucleotide repeat tracts, in both stable and unstable orientations, this enrichment being dependent on MSH3 and MSH6. Finally, we show that overexpressing MSH2 favors the formation of heteroduplex regions, leading to an increase in contractions and expansions of CAG/CTG repeat tracts during replication, these heteroduplexes being dependent on both MSH3 and MSH6. These heteroduplex regions were not detected when a mutant msh2-E768A gene in which the ATPase domain was mutated was overexpressed. Our results unravel two new roles for mismatch-repair proteins: stabilization of heteroduplex regions and transient blocking of replication forks passing through such repeats. Both roles may involve direct interactions between MMR proteins and secondary structures formed by trinucleotide repeat tracts, although indirect interactions may not be formally excluded.

  18. Compulsory formation of solvento complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukushkin, Yu.N.; Kukushkin, V.Yu.

    1986-01-01

    The essence of the method of the compulsory formation of solvated complexes which are labile in substitution reactions has been described in this review. It is based on three techniques for eliminating ligands from the inner sphere of the original compounds: 1) binding of the ligands in sparingly soluble productions or their conversion into highly volatile compounds; 2) binding of the ligands in stronger compounds than the original products; 3) chemical conversion of coordinated ligands, which result in a loss of donor capacity by the reaction products and the departure of these products from the inner sphere of the complex compounds. If the solvent in which the reaction is carried out has a sufficient donor capability, the coordination capacity of the central ion is saturated by means of solvent molecules with the formation of a solvento complex. The method has been illustrated by a large number of concrete examples of reactions which result in the formation of compounds with an assigned composition.

  19. Chromosome catastrophes involve replication mechanisms generating complex genomic rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pengfei; Erez, Ayelet; Nagamani, Sandesh C Sreenath; Dhar, Shweta U; Kołodziejska, Katarzyna E; Dharmadhikari, Avinash V; Cooper, M Lance; Wiszniewska, Joanna; Zhang, Feng; Withers, Marjorie A; Bacino, Carlos A; Campos-Acevedo, Luis Daniel; Delgado, Mauricio R; Freedenberg, Debra; Garnica, Adolfo; Grebe, Theresa A; Hernández-Almaguer, Dolores; Immken, LaDonna; Lalani, Seema R; McLean, Scott D; Northrup, Hope; Scaglia, Fernando; Strathearn, Lane; Trapane, Pamela; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Patel, Ankita; Cheung, Sau Wai; Hastings, P J; Stankiewicz, Paweł; Lupski, James R; Bi, Weimin

    2011-09-16

    Complex genomic rearrangements (CGRs) consisting of two or more breakpoint junctions have been observed in genomic disorders. Recently, a chromosome catastrophe phenomenon termed chromothripsis, in which numerous genomic rearrangements are apparently acquired in one single catastrophic event, was described in multiple cancers. Here, we show that constitutionally acquired CGRs share similarities with cancer chromothripsis. In the 17 CGR cases investigated, we observed localization and multiple copy number changes including deletions, duplications, and/or triplications, as well as extensive translocations and inversions. Genomic rearrangements involved varied in size and complexities; in one case, array comparative genomic hybridization revealed 18 copy number changes. Breakpoint sequencing identified characteristic features, including small templated insertions at breakpoints and microhomology at breakpoint junctions, which have been attributed to replicative processes. The resemblance between CGR and chromothripsis suggests similar mechanistic underpinnings. Such chromosome catastrophic events appear to reflect basic DNA metabolism operative throughout an organism's life cycle.

  20. Elg1 forms an alternative RFC complex important for DNA replication and genome integrity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bellaoui, Mohammed; Chang, Michael; Ou, Jiongwen; Xu, Hong; Boone, Charles; Brown, Grant W

    2003-01-01

    Genome-wide synthetic genetic interaction screens with mutants in the mus81 and mms4 replication fork-processing genes identified a novel replication factor C (RFC) homolog, Elg1, which forms an alternative RFC complex with Rfc2-5. This complex is distinct from the DNA replication RFC, the DNA

  1. Elg1 forms an alternative RFC complex important for DNA replication and genome integrity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bellaoui, Mohammed; Chang, Michael; Ou, Jiongwen; Xu, Hong; Boone, Charles; Brown, Grant W

    2003-01-01

    Genome-wide synthetic genetic interaction screens with mutants in the mus81 and mms4 replication fork-processing genes identified a novel replication factor C (RFC) homolog, Elg1, which forms an alternative RFC complex with Rfc2-5. This complex is distinct from the DNA replication RFC, the DNA damag

  2. A Polycomb complex remains bound through DNA replication in the absence of other eukaryotic proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Lengsfeld, Bettina M.

    2012-09-17

    Propagation of chromatin states through DNA replication is central to epigenetic regulation and can involve recruitment of chromatin proteins to replicating chromatin through interactions with replication fork components. Here we show using a fully reconstituted T7 bacteriophage system that eukaryotic proteins are not required to tether the Polycomb complex PRC1 to templates during DNA replication. Instead, DNA binding by PRC1 can withstand passage of a simple replication fork.

  3. Flaviviral Replication Complex: Coordination between RNA Synthesis and 5'-RNA Capping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klema, Valerie J; Padmanabhan, Radhakrishnan; Choi, Kyung H

    2015-08-13

    Genome replication in flavivirus requires (-) strand RNA synthesis, (+) strand RNA synthesis, and 51-RNA capping and methylation. To carry out viral genome replication, flavivirus assembles a replication complex, consisting of both viral and host proteins, on the cytoplasmic side of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane. Two major components of the replication complex are the viral non-structural (NS) proteins NS3 and NS5. Together they possess all the enzymatic activities required for genome replication, yet how these activities are coordinated during genome replication is not clear. We provide an overview of the flaviviral genome replication process, the membrane-bound replication complex, and recent crystal structures of full-length NS5. We propose a model of how NS3 and NS5 coordinate their activities in the individual steps of (-) RNA synthesis, (+) RNA synthesis, and 51-RNA capping and methylation.

  4. Rhinovirus uses a phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate/cholesterol counter-current for the formation of replication compartments at the ER-Golgi interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roulin, Pascal S; Lötzerich, Mark; Torta, Federico; Tanner, Lukas B; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Wenk, Markus R; Greber, Urs F

    2014-01-01

    Similar to other positive-strand RNA viruses, rhinovirus, the causative agent of the common cold, replicates on a web of cytoplasmic membranes, orchestrated by host proteins and lipids. The host pathways that facilitate the formation and function of the replication membranes and complexes are poorly

  5. Two mechanisms coordinate replication termination by the Escherichia coli Tus–Ter complex

    KAUST Repository

    Pandey, Manjula

    2015-07-13

    The Escherichia coli replication terminator protein (Tus) binds to Ter sequences to block replication forks approaching from one direction. Here, we used single molecule and transient state kinetics to study responses of the heterologous phage T7 replisome to the Tus–Ter complex. The T7 replisome was arrested at the non-permissive end of Tus–Ter in a manner that is explained by a composite mousetrap and dynamic clamp model. An unpaired C(6) that forms a lock by binding into the cytosine binding pocket of Tus was most effective in arresting the replisome and mutation of C(6) removed the barrier. Isolated helicase was also blocked at the non-permissive end, but unexpectedly the isolated polymerase was not, unless C(6) was unpaired. Instead, the polymerase was blocked at the permissive end. This indicates that the Tus–Ter mechanism is sensitive to the translocation polarity of the DNA motor. The polymerase tracking along the template strand traps the C(6) to prevent lock formation; the helicase tracking along the other strand traps the complementary G(6) to aid lock formation. Our results are consistent with the model where strand separation by the helicase unpairs the GC(6) base pair and triggers lock formation immediately before the polymerase can sequester the C(6) base.

  6. Stearoyl coenzyme A desaturase 1 is associated with hepatitis C virus replication complex and regulates viral replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, LN; Lim, YS; Pham, Long

    2014-01-01

    exogenous supplementation of either oleate or palmitoleate, products of SCD1 activity, resurrected HCV replication in SCD1 knockdown cells. SCD1 was coimmunoprecipitated with HCV nonstructural proteins and colocalized with both double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and HCV nonstructural proteins, indicating that SCD1...... is associated with HCV replication complex. Moreover, SCD1 was fractionated and enriched with HCV nonstructural proteins at detergent-resistant membrane. Electron microscopy data showed that SCD1 is required for NS4B-mediated intracellular membrane rearrangement. These data further support the idea that SCD1...

  7. Pattern Formation and Complexity Emergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezin, Alexander A.

    2001-03-01

    Success of nonlinear modelling of pattern formation and self-organization encourages speculations on informational and number theoretical foundations of complexity emergence. Pythagorean "unreasonable effectiveness of integers" in natural processes is perhaps extrapolatable even to universal emergence "out-of-nothing" (Leibniz, Wheeler). Because rational numbers (R = M/N) are everywhere dense on real axis, any digital string (hence any "book" from "Library of Babel" of J.L.Borges) is "recorded" infinitely many times in arbitrary many rationals. Furthermore, within any arbitrary small interval there are infinitely many Rs for which (either or both) integers (Ms and Ns) "carry" any given string of any given length. Because any iterational process (such as generation of fractal features of Mandelbrot Set) is arbitrary closely approximatable with rational numbers, the infinite pattern of integers expresses itself in generation of complexity of the world, as well as in emergence of the world itself. This "tunnelling" from Platonic World ("Platonia" of J.Barbour) to a real (physical) world is modern recast of Leibniz's motto ("for deriving all from nothing there suffices a single principle").

  8. Mechanism of replication machinery assembly as revealed by the DNA ligase-PCNA-DNA complex architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayanagi, Kouta; Kiyonari, Shinichi; Saito, Mihoko; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2009-03-24

    The 3D structure of the ternary complex, consisting of DNA ligase, the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) clamp, and DNA, was investigated by single-particle analysis. This report presents the structural view, where the crescent-shaped DNA ligase with 3 distinct domains surrounds the central DNA duplex, encircled by the closed PCNA ring, thus forming a double-layer structure with dual contacts between the 2 proteins. The relative orientations of the DNA ligase domains, which remarkably differ from those of the known crystal structures, suggest that a large domain rearrangement occurs upon ternary complex formation. A second contact was found between the PCNA ring and the middle adenylation domain of the DNA ligase. Notably, the map revealed a substantial DNA tilt from the PCNA ring axis. This structure allows us to propose a switching mechanism for the replication factors operating on the PCNA ring.

  9. Replication of adenovirus DNA-protein complex with purified proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Ikeda, J E; Enomoto, T.; Hurwitz, J

    1981-01-01

    A protein fraction isolated from the cytosol of adenovirus-infected HeLa cells, which contained DNA polymerase alpha, catalyzed adenoviral DNA replication in the presence of adenovirus DNA binding protein, eukaryotic DNA polymerase beta, ATP, all four dNTPs, and MgCl2. DNA replication started at either end of exogenously added adenoviral DNA and was totally dependent on the presence of terminal 55,000-dalton proteins on the DNA template. The replicaton of adenovirus DNA in the system was sens...

  10. Cdc6 ATPase activity disengages Cdc6 from the pre-replicative complex to promote DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, FuJung; Riera, Alberto; Evrin, Cecile; Sun, Jingchuan; Li, Huilin; Speck, Christian; Weinreich, Michael

    2015-08-25

    To initiate DNA replication, cells first load an MCM helicase double hexamer at origins in a reaction requiring ORC, Cdc6, and Cdt1, also called pre-replicative complex (pre-RC) assembly. The essential mechanistic role of Cdc6 ATP hydrolysis in this reaction is still incompletely understood. Here, we show that although Cdc6 ATP hydrolysis is essential to initiate DNA replication, it is not essential for MCM loading. Using purified proteins, an ATPase-defective Cdc6 mutant 'Cdc6-E224Q' promoted MCM loading on DNA. Cdc6-E224Q also promoted MCM binding at origins in vivo but cells remained blocked in G1-phase. If after loading MCM, Cdc6-E224Q was degraded, cells entered an apparently normal S-phase and replicated DNA, a phenotype seen with two additional Cdc6 ATPase-defective mutants. Cdc6 ATP hydrolysis is therefore required for Cdc6 disengagement from the pre-RC after helicase loading to advance subsequent steps in helicase activation in vivo.

  11. Stereoregularity Drives Precipitation in Polyelectrolyte Complex Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirrell, Matthew; Perry, Sarah; Leon, Lorraine; Kade, Matthew; Priftis, Dimitris; Black, Katie; Hoffman, Kyle; Whitmer, Jonathan; Qin, Jian; de Pablo, Juan

    2014-03-01

    This study investigates the effect of stereoregularity on the formation of polypeptide-based complex formation and assembly into micelles, hydrogels and ordered phases. We demonstrate that fluid complex coacervate formation (rather than solid complex precipitation) between oppositely charged polypeptides requires at least one racemic partner in order to disrupt backbone hydrogen bonding networks and prevent the hydrophobic collapse of the polymers into compact, fibrillar secondary structures. Computer simulations bear this out and enable visualization of the molecular structure of the complexes. The ability to choose between conditions of fluid phase formation and solid phase formation is a useful tool in developing new self-assembled materials based on polyelectrolyte complex formation. Support from the Argonne National Laboratory Laboratory Research and Development Program (2011-217) is gratefully acknowledged.

  12. Replication Rate, Framing, and Format Affect Attitudes and Decisions about Science Claims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph M. Barnes

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A series of five experiments examined how the evaluation of a scientific finding was influenced by information about the number of studies that had successfully replicated the initial finding. The experiments also tested the impact of frame (negative, positive and numeric format (percentage, natural frequency on the evaluation of scientific findings. In Experiments 1 through 4, an attitude difference score served as the dependent measure, while a measure of choice served as the dependent measure in Experiment 5. Results from a diverse sample of 188 non-institutionalized U.S. adults (Experiment 2 and 730 undergraduate college students (Experiments 1, 3, and 4 indicated that attitudes became more positive as the replication rate increased and attitudes were more positive when the replication information was framed positively. The results also indicate that the manner in which replication rate was framed had a greater impact on attitude than the replication rate itself. The large effect for frame was attenuated somewhat when information about replication was presented in the form of natural frequencies rather than percentages. A fifth study employing 662 undergraduate college students in a task in which choice served as the dependent measure confirmed the framing effect and replicated the replication rate effect in the positive frame condition, but provided no evidence that the use of natural frequencies diminished the effect.

  13. Replication Rate, Framing, and Format Affect Attitudes and Decisions about Science Claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Ralph M; Tobin, Stephanie J; Johnston, Heather M; MacKenzie, Noah; Taglang, Chelsea M

    2016-01-01

    A series of five experiments examined how the evaluation of a scientific finding was influenced by information about the number of studies that had successfully replicated the initial finding. The experiments also tested the impact of frame (negative, positive) and numeric format (percentage, natural frequency) on the evaluation of scientific findings. In Experiments 1 through 4, an attitude difference score served as the dependent measure, while a measure of choice served as the dependent measure in Experiment 5. Results from a diverse sample of 188 non-institutionalized U.S. adults (Experiment 2) and 730 undergraduate college students (Experiments 1, 3, and 4) indicated that attitudes became more positive as the replication rate increased and attitudes were more positive when the replication information was framed positively. The results also indicate that the manner in which replication rate was framed had a greater impact on attitude than the replication rate itself. The large effect for frame was attenuated somewhat when information about replication was presented in the form of natural frequencies rather than percentages. A fifth study employing 662 undergraduate college students in a task in which choice served as the dependent measure confirmed the framing effect and replicated the replication rate effect in the positive frame condition, but provided no evidence that the use of natural frequencies diminished the effect.

  14. DNA ligase I and Nbs1 proteins associate in a complex and colocalize at replication factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vago, Riccardo; Leva, Valentina; Biamonti, Giuseppe; Montecucco, Alessandra

    2009-08-15

    DNA ligase I is the main DNA ligase activity involved in eukaryotic DNA replication acting in the joining of Okazaki fragments. This enzyme is also implicated in nucleotide excision repair and in the long-patch base excision repair while its role in the recombinational repair pathways is poorly understood. DNA ligase I is phosphorylated during cell cycle at several serine and threonine residues that regulate its participation in different DNA transactions by modulating the interaction with different protein partners. Here we use an antibody-based array method to identify novel DNA ligase-interacting partners. We show that DNA ligase I participates in several multiprotein complexes with proteins involved in DNA replication and repair, cell cycle control, and protein modification. In particular we demonstrate that DNA ligase I complexes with Nbs1, a core component of the MRN complex critical for detection, processing and repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. The analysis of epitope tagged DNA ligase I mutants demonstrates that the association is mediated by the catalytic fragment of the enzyme. DNA ligase I and Nbs1 colocalize at replication factories during unperturbed replication and after treatment with DNA damaging agents. Since MRN complex is involved in the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks by homologous recombination at stalled replication forks our data support the notion that DNA ligase I participates in homology dependent pathways that deal with replication-associated lesions generated when replication fork encounters DNA damage.

  15. Partial Purification of a Megadalton DNA Replication Complex by Free Flow Electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Caroline M.; Miao, Yunan; Lingeman, Robert G.; Hickey, Robert J.; Malkas, Linda H.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a gentle and rapid method to purify the intact multiprotein DNA replication complex using free flow electrophoresis (FFE). In particular, we applied FFE to purify the human cell DNA synthesome, which is a multiprotein complex that is fully competent to carry-out all phases of the DNA replication process in vitro using a plasmid containing the simian virus 40 (SV40) origin of DNA replication and the viral large tumor antigen (T-antigen) protein. The isolated native DNA synthesome can be of use in studying the mechanism by which mammalian DNA replication is carried-out and how anti-cancer drugs disrupt the DNA replication or repair process. Partially purified extracts from HeLa cells were fractionated in a native, liquid based separation by FFE. Dot blot analysis showed co-elution of many proteins identified as part of the DNA synthesome, including proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), DNA topoisomerase I (topo I), DNA polymerase δ (Pol δ), DNA polymerase ɛ (Pol ɛ), replication protein A (RPA) and replication factor C (RFC). Previously identified DNA synthesome proteins co-eluted with T-antigen dependent and SV40 origin-specific DNA polymerase activity at the same FFE fractions. Native gels show a multiprotein PCNA containing complex migrating with an apparent relative mobility in the megadalton range. When PCNA containing bands were excised from the native gel, mass spectrometric sequencing analysis identified 23 known DNA synthesome associated proteins or protein subunits. PMID:28036377

  16. Proline-serine-threonine phosphatase-interacting protein 2 (PSTPIP2), a host membrane-deforming protein, is critical for membranous web formation in hepatitis C virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Ti-Chun; Su, Wen-Chi; Huang, Jing-Ying; Chen, Yung-Chia; Jeng, King-Song; Wang, Horng-Dar; Lai, Michael M C

    2012-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) reorganizes intracellular membranes to establish sites of replication. How viral and cellular proteins target, bind, and rearrange specific membranes into the replication factory remains a mystery. We used a lentivirus-based RNA interference (RNAi) screening approach to identify the potential cellular factors that are involved in HCV replication. A protein with membrane-deforming activity, proline-serine-threonine phosphatase-interacting protein 2 (PSTPIP2), was identified as a potential factor. Knockdown of PSTPIP2 in HCV subgenomic replicon-harboring and HCV-infected cells was associated with the reduction of HCV protein and RNA expression. PSTPIP2 was localized predominantly in detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs), which contain the RNA replication complex. PSTPIP2 knockdown caused a significant reduction of the formation of HCV- and NS4B-induced membranous webs. A PSTPIP2 mutant defective in inducing membrane curvature failed to support HCV replication, confirming that the membrane-deforming ability of PSTPIP2 is essential for HCV replication. Taking these results together, we suggest that PSTPIP2 facilitates membrane alterations and is a key player in the formation of the membranous web, which is the site of the HCV replication complex.

  17. A bridging model for persistence of a polycomb group protein complex through DNA replication in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Stanley M; Follmer, Nicole E; Lengsfeld, Bettina M; Madamba, Egbert V; Seong, Samuel; Grau, Daniel J; Francis, Nicole J

    2012-06-29

    Epigenetic regulation may involve heritable chromatin states, but how chromatin features can be inherited through DNA replication is incompletely understood. We address this question using cell-free replication of chromatin. Previously, we showed that a Polycomb group complex, PRC1, remains continuously associated with chromatin through DNA replication. Here we investigate the mechanism of persistence. We find that a single PRC1 subunit, Posterior sex combs (PSC), can reconstitute persistence through DNA replication. PSC binds nucleosomes and self-interacts, bridging nucleosomes into a stable, oligomeric structure. Within these structures, individual PSC-chromatin contacts are dynamic. Stable association of PSC with chromatin, including through DNA replication, depends on PSC-PSC interactions. Our data suggest that labile individual PSC-chromatin contacts allow passage of the DNA replication machinery while PSC-PSC interactions prevent PSC from dissociating, allowing it to rebind to replicated chromatin. This mechanism may allow inheritance of chromatin proteins including PRC1 through DNA replication to maintain chromatin states.

  18. Elg1 forms an alternative RFC complex important for DNA replication and genome integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellaoui, Mohammed; Chang, Michael; Ou, Jiongwen; Xu, Hong; Boone, Charles; Brown, Grant W

    2003-08-15

    Genome-wide synthetic genetic interaction screens with mutants in the mus81 and mms4 replication fork-processing genes identified a novel replication factor C (RFC) homolog, Elg1, which forms an alternative RFC complex with Rfc2-5. This complex is distinct from the DNA replication RFC, the DNA damage checkpoint RFC and the sister chromatid cohesion RFC. As expected from its genetic interactions, elg1 mutants are sensitive to DNA damage. Elg1 is redundant with Rad24 in the DNA damage response and contributes to activation of the checkpoint kinase Rad53. We find that elg1 mutants display DNA replication defects and genome instability, including increased recombination and mutation frequencies, and minichromosome maintenance defects. Mutants in elg1 show genetic interactions with pathways required for processing of stalled replication forks, and are defective in recovery from DNA damage during S phase. We propose that Elg1-RFC functions both in normal DNA replication and in the DNA damage response.

  19. Dynamics of the HP1β-PCNA-containing complexes in DNA replication and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trembecka-Lucas, Dominika O; Szczurek, Aleksander T; Dobrucki, Jurek W

    2013-01-01

    Heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1), a small non-histone chromosomal protein, was recently shown to form a complex in vivo with Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA), a key factor in DNA replication. The complex, which requires HP1β in a form of a dimer, is engaged in DNA repair and replication. We now provide further evidence based on FRET-FLIM live cell studies confirming the association and close proximity between HP1β and PCNA in the complex. We also demonstrate using FRAP, that although HP1β-PCNA complexes are highly mobile in nonreplicating nuclei, when engaged in DNA replication, they become bound and do not exchange with the mobile pool. These observations are in agreement with a notion that a subpopulation of HP1 molecules interact with PCNA in vivo during DNA replication. Similarly, HP1β which is associated with PCNA in regions of DNA repair, is bound and does not exchange with the mobile pool, suggesting that HP1β in association with PCNA may be a component of a DNA repair complex.

  20. The origin recognition complex links replication, sister chromatid cohesion and transcriptional silencing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suter, Bernhard; Tong, Amy; Chang, Michael; Yu, Lisa; Brown, Grant W; Boone, Charles; Rine, Jasper

    2004-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding the origin recognition complex (ORC) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae affect initiation of DNA replication and transcriptional repression at the silent mating-type loci. To explore the function of ORC in more detail, a screen for genetic interactions was undertaken using large

  1. Human geminin promotes pre-RC formation and DNA replication by stabilizing CDT1 in mitosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballabeni, Andrea; Melixetian, Marina; Zamponi, Raffaella

    2004-01-01

    -mediated degradation by inhibiting its ubiquitination. In particular, Geminin ensures basal levels of CDT1 during S phase and its accumulation during mitosis. Consistently, inhibition of Geminin synthesis during M phase leads to impairment of pre-RC formation and DNA replication during the following cell cycle....... Moreover, we show that inhibition of CDK1 during mitosis, and not Geminin depletion, is sufficient for premature formation of pre-RCs, indicating that CDK activity is the major mitotic inhibitor of licensing in human cells. Taken together with recent data from our laboratory, our results demonstrate...

  2. STAR FORMATION ACROSS THE W3 COMPLEX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Román-Zúñiga, Carlos G.; Ybarra, Jason E.; Tapia, Mauricio [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Unidad Académica en Ensenada, Km 103 Carr. Tijuana–Ensenada, Ensenada 22860 (Mexico); Megías, Guillermo D. [Facultad de Física. Universidad de Sevilla. Dpto. Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Sevilla, E-41080 (Spain); Lada, Elizabeth A. [Astronomy Department, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Sciences Center, FL 32611 (United States); Alves, Joáo F. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Vienna, Türkenschanzstr. 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria)

    2015-09-15

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of the history of star formation in the W3 complex. Using deep, near-infrared ground-based images combined with images obtained with Spitzer and Chandra observatories, we identified and classified young embedded sources. We identified the principal clusters in the complex and determined their structure and extension. We constructed extinction-limited samples for five principal clusters and constructed K-band luminosity functions that we compare with those of artificial clusters with varying ages. This analysis provided mean ages and possible age spreads for the clusters. We found that IC 1795, the centermost cluster of the complex, still hosts a large fraction of young sources with circumstellar disks. This indicates that star formation was active in IC 1795 as recently as 2 Myr ago, simultaneous to the star-forming activity in the flanking embedded clusters, W3-Main and W3(OH). A comparison with carbon monoxide emission maps indicates strong velocity gradients in the gas clumps hosting W3-Main and W3(OH) and shows small receding clumps of gas at IC 1795, suggestive of rapid gas removal (faster than the T Tauri timescale) in the cluster-forming regions. We discuss one possible scenario for the progression of cluster formation in the W3 complex. We propose that early processes of gas collapse in the main structure of the complex could have defined the progression of cluster formation across the complex with relatively small age differences from one group to another. However, triggering effects could act as catalysts for enhanced efficiency of formation at a local level, in agreement with previous studies.

  3. Absence of MutSβ leads to the formation of slipped-DNA for CTG/CAG contractions at primate replication forks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slean, Meghan M; Panigrahi, Gagan B; Castel, Arturo López; Pearson, August B; Tomkinson, Alan E; Pearson, Christopher E

    2016-06-01

    Typically disease-causing CAG/CTG repeats expand, but rare affected families can display high levels of contraction of the expanded repeat amongst offspring. Understanding instability is important since arresting expansions or enhancing contractions could be clinically beneficial. The MutSβ mismatch repair complex is required for CAG/CTG expansions in mice and patients. Oddly, by unknown mechanisms MutSβ-deficient mice incur contractions instead of expansions. Replication using CTG or CAG as the lagging strand template is known to cause contractions or expansions respectively; however, the interplay between replication and repair leading to this instability remains unclear. Towards understanding how repeat contractions may arise, we performed in vitro SV40-mediated replication of repeat-containing plasmids in the presence or absence of mismatch repair. Specifically, we separated repair from replication: Replication mediated by MutSβ- and MutSα-deficient human cells or cell extracts produced slipped-DNA heteroduplexes in the contraction- but not expansion-biased replication direction. Replication in the presence of MutSβ disfavoured the retention of replication products harbouring slipped-DNA heteroduplexes. Post-replication repair of slipped-DNAs by MutSβ-proficient extracts eliminated slipped-DNAs. Thus, a MutSβ-deficiency likely enhances repeat contractions because MutSβ protects against contractions by repairing template strand slip-outs. Replication deficient in LigaseI or PCNA-interaction mutant LigaseI revealed slipped-DNA formation at lagging strands. Our results reveal that distinct mechanisms lead to expansions or contractions and support inhibition of MutSβ as a therapeutic strategy to enhance the contraction of expanded repeats.

  4. Rhinovirus uses a phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate/cholesterol counter-current for the formation of replication compartments at the ER-Golgi interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roulin, Pascal S; Lötzerich, Mark; Torta, Federico; Tanner, Lukas B; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Wenk, Markus R; Greber, Urs F

    2014-11-12

    Similar to other positive-strand RNA viruses, rhinovirus, the causative agent of the common cold, replicates on a web of cytoplasmic membranes, orchestrated by host proteins and lipids. The host pathways that facilitate the formation and function of the replication membranes and complexes are poorly understood. We show that rhinovirus replication depends on host factors driving phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PI4P)-cholesterol counter-currents at viral replication membranes. Depending on the virus type, replication required phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase class 3beta (PI4K3b), cholesteryl-esterase hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) or oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP)-like 1, 2, 5, 9, or 11 associated with lipid droplets, endosomes, or Golgi. Replication invariably required OSBP1, which shuttles cholesterol and PI4P between ER and Golgi at membrane contact sites. Infection also required ER-associated PI4P phosphatase Sac1 and phosphatidylinositol (PI) transfer protein beta (PITPb) shunting PI between ER-Golgi. These data support a PI4P-cholesterol counter-flux model for rhinovirus replication.

  5. Segrosome complex formation during DNA trafficking in bacterial cell division

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A. Oliva

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial extrachromosomal DNAs often contribute to virulence in pathogenic organisms or facilitate adaptation to particular environments. The transmission of genetic information from one generation to the next requires sufficient partitioning of DNA molecules to ensure that at least one copy reaches each side of the division plane and is inherited by the daughter cells. Segregation of the bacterial chromosome occurs during or after replication and probably involves a strategy in which several protein complexes participate to modify the folding pattern and distribution first of the origin domain and then of the rest of the chromosome. Low-copy number plasmids rely on specialised partitioning systems, which in some cases use a mechanism that show striking similarity to eukaryotic DNA segregation. Overall, there have been multiple systems implicated in the dynamic transport of DNA cargo to a new cellular position during the cell cycle but most seem to share a common initial DNA partitioning step, involving the formation of a nucleoprotein complex called the segrosome. The particular features and complex topologies of individual segrosomes depend on both the nature of the DNA binding protein involved and on the recognized centromeric DNA sequence, both of which vary across systems. The combination of in vivo and in vitro approaches, with structural biology has significantly furthered our understanding of the mechanisms underlying DNA trafficking in bacteria. Here, I discuss recent advances and the molecular details of the DNA segregation machinery, focusing on the formation of the segrosome complex.

  6. Developing a novel catalytic approach for imine formation by using self-replicating catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Fatin Ilyani; Philp, Douglas; Hasbullah, Siti Aishah; Hassan, Nurul Izzaty

    2015-09-01

    Synthesis of imine compounds usually results in moderate yield due its reversibility characteristic and prone to hydrolysis. Hence, to increase the formation of imine compound, self-replicating catalyst was introduced. The self-replicating catalyst is the imine product itself. The first imine compound, 4-{[4-(3,5-Dimethyl-phenylcarbamoyl)-benzylidene]-amino}-phenyl)-acetic acid has been synthesized from 4-Amino-N-(3,5-dimethyl-phenyl)-benzamide and (4-formyl-phenyl)-acetic acid. Simultaneously, 4-formylbenzoic acid was reacted with thionyl chloride to produce 4-formylbenzoyl chloride, which was then reacted with 2-amino-4,6-dimethylpyridine in the presence of triethylamine to afford N-(4,6-dimethyl-pyridin-2-yl)-4-formyl-benzamide. N-(4,6-dimethyl-pyridin-2-yl)-4-formyl-benzamide formed then reacted with 4-amino-2-methylbenzoic acid to form the second imine derivative, 4-{[4-(4,6-dimethyl-pyridin-2-ylcarbamoyl)-benzylidene]-amino}-2-methyl-benzoic acid. The concentration time profile for the synthesis of self-replicating imine 1 reveals the classic sigmoidal shape characteristics of an autocatalytic process and the rate of the reaction are higher than that observed in the absence of recognition. In order to demonstrate the nature of self-replicating catalyst, a preformed imine 1 was doped into the reaction mixture of amine 1 and the corresponding aldehyde, 4-formylbenzoic acid. The insertion of substoichiometric amounts (15 mol%) of imine 1 at the start of the reaction has accelerated the rate formation of imine 1.

  7. Chl12 (Ctf18) Forms a Novel Replication Factor C-Related Complex and Functions Redundantly with Rad24 in the DNA Replication Checkpoint Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Naiki, Takahiro; Kondo, Tae; Nakada, Daisuke; Matsumoto, Kunihiro; Sugimoto, Katsunori

    2001-01-01

    RAD24 has been identified as a gene essential for the DNA damage checkpoint in budding yeast. Rad24 is structurally related to subunits of the replication factor C (RFC) complex, and forms an RFC-related complex with Rfc2, Rfc3, Rfc4, and Rfc5. The rad24Δ mutation enhances the defect of rfc5-1 in the DNA replication block checkpoint, implicating RAD24 in this checkpoint. CHL12 (also called CTF18) encodes a protein that is structurally related to the Rad24 and RFC proteins. We show here that a...

  8. Organizational changes of the daughter basal complex during the parasite replication of Toxoplasma gondii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Hu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The apicomplexans are a large group of parasitic protozoa, many of which are important human and animal pathogens, including Plasmodium falciparum and Toxoplasma gondii. These parasites cause disease only when they replicate, and their replication is critically dependent on the proper assembly of the parasite cytoskeletons during cell division. In addition to their importance in pathogenesis, the apicomplexan parasite cytoskeletons are spectacular structures. Therefore, understanding the cytoskeletal biogenesis of these parasites is important not only for parasitology but also of general interest to broader cell biology. Previously, we found that the basal end of T. gondii contains a novel cytoskeletal assembly, the basal complex, a cytoskeletal compartment constructed in concert with the daughter cortical cytoskeleton during cell division. This study focuses on key events during the biogenesis of the basal complex using high resolution light microscopy, and reveals that daughter basal complexes are established around the duplicated centrioles independently of the structural integrity of the daughter cortical cytoskeleton, and that they are dynamic "caps" at the growing ends of the daughters. Compartmentation and polarization of the basal complex is first revealed at a late stage of cell division upon the recruitment of an EF-hand containing calcium binding protein, TgCentrin2. This correlates with the constriction of the basal complex, a process that can be artificially induced by increasing cellular calcium concentration. The basal complex is therefore likely to be a new kind of centrin-based contractile apparatus.

  9. Isolation of restriction fragments containing origins of replication from complex genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesner, Larry D; Hamlin, Joyce L

    2015-01-01

    The identification and isolation of origins of replication from mammalian genomes has been a demanding task owing to the great complexity of these genomes. However, two methods have been refined in recent years each of which allows significant enrichment of recently activated origins of replication from asynchronous cell cultures. In one of these, nascent strands are melted from the long template DNA, and the small, origin-centered strands are isolated on sucrose gradients. The second method involves the selective entrapment of bubble-containing fragments in gelling agarose and their subsequent recovery and isolation by molecular cloning. Libraries prepared by this method from Chinese hamster and human cells have been shown to be extremely pure, and provide a renewable resource of origins that can be used as probes on microarrays or sequenced by high-throughput techniques to localize them within the genomic source. The bubble-trapping method is described here for asynchronous mammalian cells that grow with reasonable doubling times and from which nuclear matrices can be reliably prepared. The method for nuclear matrix preparation and enrichment of replication intermediates is described in an accompanying chapter entitled "Purification of restriction fragments containing replication intermediates from mammalian cells for 2-D gel analysis" (Chapter 16 ).

  10. Star Formation Across the W3 Complex

    CERN Document Server

    Román-Zúñiga, C G; Megias, G; Tapia, M; Lada, E A; Alves, J F

    2015-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of the history of star formation in the W3 complex. Using deep, near-infrared ground-based images, combined with images obtained with Spitzer and Chandra observatories, we identified and classified young embedded sources. We identified the principal clusters in the complex, and determined their structure and extension. We constructed extinction-limited samples for five principal clusters, and constructed K-band luminosity functions (KLF) that we compare with those of artificial clusters with varying ages. This analysis provided mean ages and possible age spreads for the clusters. We found that IC 1795, the centermost cluster of the complex, still hosts a large fraction of young sources with circumstellar disks. This indicates that star formation was active in IC 1795 as recently as 2 Myr ago, simultaneous to the star forming activity in the flanking embedded clusters, W3-Main and W3(OH). A comparison with carbon monoxide emission maps indicates strong velocity gradients ...

  11. The role of replication bypass pathways in dicentric chromosome formation in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paek, Andrew L; Jones, Hope; Kaochar, Salma; Weinert, Ted

    2010-12-01

    Gross chromosomal rearrangements (GCRs) are large scale changes to chromosome structure and can lead to human disease. We previously showed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that nearby inverted repeat sequences (∼20-200 bp of homology, separated by ∼1-5 kb) frequently fuse to form unstable dicentric and acentric chromosomes. Here we analyzed inverted repeat fusion in mutants of three sets of genes. First, we show that genes in the error-free postreplication repair (PRR) pathway prevent fusion of inverted repeats, while genes in the translesion branch have no detectable role. Second, we found that siz1 mutants, which are defective for Srs2 recruitment to replication forks, and srs2 mutants had opposite effects on instability. This may reflect separate roles for Srs2 in different phases of the cell cycle. Third, we provide evidence for a faulty template switch model by studying mutants of DNA polymerases; defects in DNA pol delta (lagging strand polymerase) and Mgs1 (a pol delta interacting protein) lead to a defect in fusion events as well as allelic recombination. Pol delta and Mgs1 may collaborate either in strand annealing and/or DNA replication involved in fusion and allelic recombination events. Fourth, by studying genes implicated in suppression of GCRs in other studies, we found that inverted repeat fusion has a profile of genetic regulation distinct from these other major forms of GCR formation.

  12. Bloom syndrome complex promotes FANCM recruitment to stalled replication forks and facilitates both repair and traverse of DNA interstrand crosslinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Chen; Huang, Jing; Yan, Zhijiang; Li, Yongjiang; Ohzeki, Mioko; Ishiai, Masamichi; Xu, Dongyi; Takata, Minoru; Seidman, Michael; Wang, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    The recruitment of FANCM, a conserved DNA translocase and key component of several DNA repair protein complexes, to replication forks stalled by DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) is a step upstream of the Fanconi anemia (FA) repair and replication traverse pathways of ICLs. However, detection of the FANCM recruitment has been technically challenging so that its mechanism remains exclusive. Here, we successfully observed recruitment of FANCM at stalled forks using a newly developed protocol. We report that the FANCM recruitment depends upon its intrinsic DNA translocase activity, and its DNA-binding partner FAAP24. Moreover, it is dependent on the replication checkpoint kinase, ATR; but is independent of the FA core and FANCD2-FANCI complexes, two essential components of the FA pathway, indicating that the FANCM recruitment occurs downstream of ATR but upstream of the FA pathway. Interestingly, the recruitment of FANCM requires its direct interaction with Bloom syndrome complex composed of BLM helicase, Topoisomerase 3α, RMI1 and RMI2; as well as the helicase activity of BLM. We further show that the FANCM-BLM complex interaction is critical for replication stress-induced FANCM hyperphosphorylation, for normal activation of the FA pathway in response to ICLs, and for efficient traverse of ICLs by the replication machinery. Epistasis studies demonstrate that FANCM and BLM work in the same pathway to promote replication traverse of ICLs. We conclude that FANCM and BLM complex work together at stalled forks to promote both FA repair and replication traverse pathways of ICLs.

  13. Interactive formation control in complex environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Joseph; Shum, Hubert P H; Komura, Taku

    2014-02-01

    The degrees of freedom of a crowd is much higher than that provided by a standard user input device. Typically, crowd-control systems require multiple passes to design crowd movements by specifying waypoints, and then defining character trajectories and crowd formation. Such multi-pass control would spoil the responsiveness and excitement of real-time control systems. In this paper, we propose a single-pass algorithm to control a crowd in complex environments. We observe that low-level details in crowd movement are related to interactions between characters and the environment, such as diverging/merging at cross points, or climbing over obstacles. Therefore, we simplify the problem by representing the crowd with a deformable mesh, and allow the user, via multitouch input, to specify high-level movements and formations that are important for context delivery. To help prevent congestion, our system dynamically reassigns characters in the formation by employing a mass transport solver to minimize their overall movement. The solver uses a cost function to evaluate the impact from the environment, including obstacles and areas affecting movement speed. Experimental results show realistic crowd movement created with minimal high-level user inputs. Our algorithm is particularly useful for real-time applications including strategy games and interactive animation creation.

  14. The Slx4-Dpb11 scaffold complex: coordinating the response to replication fork stalling in S-phase and the subsequent mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Princz, Lissa N; Gritenaite, Dalia; Pfander, Boris

    2015-01-01

    Replication fork stalling at DNA lesions is a common problem during the process of DNA replication. One way to allow the bypass of these lesions is via specific recombination-based mechanisms that involve switching of the replication template to the sister chromatid. Inherent to these mechanisms is the formation of DNA joint molecules (JMs) between sister chromatids. Such JMs need to be disentangled before chromatid separation in mitosis and the activity of JM resolution enzymes, which is under stringent cell cycle control, is therefore up-regulated in mitosis. An additional layer of control is facilitated by scaffold proteins. In budding yeast, specifically during mitosis, Slx4 and Dpb11 form a cell cycle kinase-dependent complex with the Mus81-Mms4 structure-selective endonuclease, which allows efficient JM resolution by Mus81. Furthermore, Slx4 and Dpb11 interact even prior to joining Mus81 and respond to replication fork stalling in S-phase. This S-phase complex is involved in the regulation of the DNA damage checkpoint as well as in early steps of template switch recombination. Similar interactions and regulatory principles are found in human cells suggesting that Slx4 and Dpb11 may have an evolutionary conserved role organizing the cellular response to replication fork stalling.

  15. Visualization of the structures of the hepatitis C virus replication complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Shih-Ching [Graduate Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Lo, Shih-Yen [Graduate Institute of Medical Biotechnology, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Liou, Je-Wen [Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Department of Biochemistry, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Lin, Min-Ching [Graduate Institute of Medical Biotechnology, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Syu, Ciao-Ling [Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Lai, Meng-Jiun; Chen, Yi- Cheng [Graduate Institute of Medical Biotechnology, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Li, Hui-Chun, E-mail: huichun@mail.tcu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China); Department of Biochemistry, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan (China)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Lipid rafts are known to play an important role in virus entry and virus assembly of many viruses. {yields} However, HCV is the first example of the association of lipid raft with viral RNA replication. {yields} Our results in this manuscript demonstrate that purified HCV RCs with associated lipid raft membrane appeared as distinct particles of around 0.7 um under EM and AFM. {yields} Knockdown of proteins associated with lipid raft suppressed the HCV replication and reduced the number of these particles. {yields} To our knowledge, structures of HCV RCs were demonstrated at its first time in this manuscript. -- Abstract: Hepatitis C viral RNA synthesis has been demonstrated to occur on a lipid raft membrane structure. Lipid raft membrane fraction purified by membrane flotation analysis was observed using transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Particles around 0.7 um in size were found in lipid raft membrane fraction purified from hepatitis C virus (HCV) replicon but not their parental HuH7 cells. HCV NS5A protein was associated with these specialized particles. After several cycles of freezing-thawing, these particles would fuse into larger sizes up to 10 um. Knockdown of seven proteins associated with lipid raft (VAPA, COPG, RAB18, COMT, CDC42, DPP4, and KDELR2) of HCV replicon cells reduced the observed number of these particles and suppressed the HCV replication. Results in this study indicated that HCV replication complexes with associated lipid raft membrane form distinct particle structures of around 0.7 um as observed from transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy.

  16. Near-atomic structural model for bacterial DNA replication initiation complex and its functional insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Masahiro; Noguchi, Yasunori; Sakiyama, Yukari; Kawakami, Hironori; Katayama, Tsutomu; Takada, Shoji

    2016-12-13

    Upon DNA replication initiation in Escherichia coli, the initiator protein DnaA forms higher-order complexes with the chromosomal origin oriC and a DNA-bending protein IHF. Although tertiary structures of DnaA and IHF have previously been elucidated, dynamic structures of oriC-DnaA-IHF complexes remain unknown. Here, combining computer simulations with biochemical assays, we obtained models at almost-atomic resolution for the central part of the oriC-DnaA-IHF complex. This complex can be divided into three subcomplexes; the left and right subcomplexes include pentameric DnaA bound in a head-to-tail manner and the middle subcomplex contains only a single DnaA. In the left and right subcomplexes, DnaA ATPases associated with various cellular activities (AAA+) domain III formed helices with specific structural differences in interdomain orientations, provoking a bend in the bound DNA. In the left subcomplex a continuous DnaA chain exists, including insertion of IHF into the DNA looping, consistent with the DNA unwinding function of the complex. The intervening spaces in those subcomplexes are crucial for DNA unwinding and loading of DnaB helicases. Taken together, this model provides a reasonable near-atomic level structural solution of the initiation complex, including the dynamic conformations and spatial arrangements of DnaA subcomplexes.

  17. Formation of a stable RuvA protein double tetramer is required for efficient branch migration in vitro and for replication fork reversal in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Alison S; Baharoglu, Zeynep; Niewiarowski, Andrew; Michel, Bénédicte; Tsaneva, Irina R

    2011-06-24

    In bacteria, RuvABC is required for the resolution of Holliday junctions (HJ) made during homologous recombination. The RuvAB complex catalyzes HJ branch migration and replication fork reversal (RFR). During RFR, a stalled fork is reversed to form a HJ adjacent to a DNA double strand end, a reaction that requires RuvAB in certain Escherichia coli replication mutants. The exact structure of active RuvAB complexes remains elusive as it is still unknown whether one or two tetramers of RuvA support RuvB during branch migration and during RFR. We designed an E. coli RuvA mutant, RuvA2(KaP), specifically impaired for RuvA tetramer-tetramer interactions. As expected, the mutant protein is impaired for complex II (two tetramers) formation on HJs, although the binding efficiency of complex I (a single tetramer) is as wild type. We show that although RuvA complex II formation is required for efficient HJ branch migration in vitro, RuvA2(KaP) is fully active for homologous recombination in vivo. RuvA2(KaP) is also deficient at forming complex II on synthetic replication forks, and the binding affinity of RuvA2(KaP) for forks is decreased compared with wild type. Accordingly, RuvA2(KaP) is inefficient at processing forks in vitro and in vivo. These data indicate that RuvA2(KaP) is a separation-of-function mutant, capable of homologous recombination but impaired for RFR. RuvA2(KaP) is defective for stimulation of RuvB activity and stability of HJ·RuvA·RuvB tripartite complexes. This work demonstrates that the need for RuvA tetramer-tetramer interactions for full RuvAB activity in vitro causes specifically an RFR defect in vivo.

  18. New World and Old World Alphaviruses Have Evolved to Exploit Different Components of Stress Granules, FXR and G3BP Proteins, for Assembly of Viral Replication Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dal Young; Reynaud, Josephine M.; Rasalouskaya, Aliaksandra; Akhrymuk, Ivan; Mobley, James A.; Frolov, Ilya; Frolova, Elena I.

    2016-01-01

    The positive-strand RNA viruses initiate their amplification in the cell from a single genome delivered by virion. This single RNA molecule needs to become involved in replication process before it is recognized and degraded by cellular machinery. In this study, we show that distantly related New World and Old World alphaviruses have independently evolved to utilize different cellular stress granule-related proteins for assembly of complexes, which recruit viral genomic RNA and facilitate formation of viral replication complexes (vRCs). Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) utilizes all members of the Fragile X syndrome (FXR) family, while chikungunya and Sindbis viruses exploit both members of the G3BP family. Despite being in different families, these proteins share common characteristics, which determine their role in alphavirus replication, namely, the abilities for RNA-binding and for self-assembly into large structures. Both FXR and G3BP proteins interact with virus-specific, repeating amino acid sequences located in the C-termini of hypervariable, intrinsically disordered domains (HVDs) of viral nonstructural protein nsP3. We demonstrate that these host factors orchestrate assembly of vRCs and play key roles in RNA and virus replication. Only knockout of all of the homologs results in either pronounced or complete inhibition of replication of different alphaviruses. The use of multiple homologous proteins with redundant functions mediates highly efficient recruitment of viral RNA into the replication process. This independently evolved acquisition of different families of cellular proteins by the disordered protein fragment to support alphavirus replication suggests that other RNA viruses may utilize a similar mechanism of host factor recruitment for vRC assembly. The use of different host factors by alphavirus species may be one of the important determinants of their pathogenesis. PMID:27509095

  19. Burkholderia cepacia complex isolates survive intracellularly without replication within acidic vacuoles of Acanthamoeba polyphaga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamothe, Julie; Thyssen, Sandra; Valvano, Miguel A

    2004-12-01

    We have previously demonstrated that isolates of the Burkholderia cepacia complex can survive intracellularly in murine macrophages and in free-living Acanthamoeba. In this work, we show that the clinical isolates B. vietnamiensis strain CEP040 and B. cenocepacia H111 survived but did not replicate within vacuoles of A. polyphaga. B. cepacia-containing vacuoles accumulated the fluid phase marker Lysosensor Blue and displayed strong blue fluorescence, indicating that they had low pH. In contrast, the majority of intracellular bacteria within amoebae treated with the V-ATPse inhibitor bafilomycin A1 localized in vacuoles that did not fluoresce with Lysosensor Blue. Experiments using bacteria fluorescently labelled with chloromethylfluorescein diacetate demonstrated that intracellular bacteria remained viable for at least 24 h. In contrast, Escherichia coli did not survive within amoebae after 2 h post infection. Furthermore, intracellular B. vietnamiensis CEP040 retained green fluorescent protein within the bacterial cytoplasm, while this protein rapidly escaped from the cytosol of phagocytized heat-killed bacteria into the vacuolar lumen. Transmission electron microscopy analysis confirmed that intracellular Burkholderia cells were structurally intact. In addition, both Legionella pneumophila- and B. vietnamiensis-containing vacuoles did not accumulate cationized ferritin, a compound that localizes within the lysosome. Thus, our observations support the notion that B. cepacia complex isolates can use amoebae as a reservoir in the environment by surviving without intracellular replication within an acidic vacuole that is distinct from the lysosomal compartment.

  20. A positive-strand RNA virus uses alternative protein-protein interactions within a viral protease/cofactor complex to switch between RNA replication and virion morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Félix A.

    2017-01-01

    The viruses of the family Flaviviridae possess a positive-strand RNA genome and express a single polyprotein which is processed into functional proteins. Initially, the nonstructural (NS) proteins, which are not part of the virions, form complexes capable of genome replication. Later on, the NS proteins also play a critical role in virion formation. The molecular basis to understand how the same proteins form different complexes required in both processes is so far unknown. For pestiviruses, uncleaved NS2-3 is essential for virion morphogenesis while NS3 is required for RNA replication but is not functional in viral assembly. Recently, we identified two gain of function mutations, located in the C-terminal region of NS2 and in the serine protease domain of NS3 (NS3 residue 132), which allow NS2 and NS3 to substitute for uncleaved NS2-3 in particle assembly. We report here the crystal structure of pestivirus NS3-4A showing that the NS3 residue 132 maps to a surface patch interacting with the C-terminal region of NS4A (NS4A-kink region) suggesting a critical role of this contact in virion morphogenesis. We show that destabilization of this interaction, either by alanine exchanges at this NS3/4A-kink interface, led to a gain of function of the NS3/4A complex in particle formation. In contrast, RNA replication and thus replicase assembly requires a stable association between NS3 and the NS4A-kink region. Thus, we propose that two variants of NS3/4A complexes exist in pestivirus infected cells each representing a basic building block required for either RNA replication or virion morphogenesis. This could be further corroborated by trans-complementation studies with a replication-defective NS3/4A double mutant that was still functional in viral assembly. Our observations illustrate the presence of alternative overlapping surfaces providing different contacts between the same proteins, allowing the switch from RNA replication to virion formation. PMID:28151973

  1. Rif1 controls DNA replication by directing Protein Phosphatase 1 to reverse Cdc7-mediated phosphorylation of the MCM complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraga, Shin-Ichiro; Alvino, Gina M; Chang, Fujung; Lian, Hui-Yong; Sridhar, Akila; Kubota, Takashi; Brewer, Bonita J; Weinreich, Michael; Raghuraman, M K; Donaldson, Anne D

    2014-02-15

    Initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication requires phosphorylation of the MCM complex by Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK), composed of Cdc7 kinase and its activator, Dbf4. We report here that budding yeast Rif1 (Rap1-interacting factor 1) controls DNA replication genome-wide and describe how Rif1 opposes DDK function by directing Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1)-mediated dephosphorylation of the MCM complex. Deleting RIF1 partially compensates for the limited DDK activity in a cdc7-1 mutant strain by allowing increased, premature phosphorylation of Mcm4. PP1 interaction motifs within the Rif1 N-terminal domain are critical for its repressive effect on replication. We confirm that Rif1 interacts with PP1 and that PP1 prevents premature Mcm4 phosphorylation. Remarkably, our results suggest that replication repression by Rif1 is itself also DDK-regulated through phosphorylation near the PP1-interacting motifs. Based on our findings, we propose that Rif1 is a novel PP1 substrate targeting subunit that counteracts DDK-mediated phosphorylation during replication. Fission yeast and mammalian Rif1 proteins have also been implicated in regulating DNA replication. Since PP1 interaction sites are evolutionarily conserved within the Rif1 sequence, it is likely that replication control by Rif1 through PP1 is a conserved mechanism.

  2. Rif1 controls DNA replication by directing Protein Phosphatase 1 to reverse Cdc7-mediated phosphorylation of the MCM complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraga, Shin-ichiro; Alvino, Gina M.; Chang, FuJung; Lian, Hui-yong; Sridhar, Akila; Kubota, Takashi; Brewer, Bonita J.; Weinreich, Michael; Raghuraman, M.K.; Donaldson, Anne D.

    2014-01-01

    Initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication requires phosphorylation of the MCM complex by Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK), composed of Cdc7 kinase and its activator, Dbf4. We report here that budding yeast Rif1 (Rap1-interacting factor 1) controls DNA replication genome-wide and describe how Rif1 opposes DDK function by directing Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1)-mediated dephosphorylation of the MCM complex. Deleting RIF1 partially compensates for the limited DDK activity in a cdc7-1 mutant strain by allowing increased, premature phosphorylation of Mcm4. PP1 interaction motifs within the Rif1 N-terminal domain are critical for its repressive effect on replication. We confirm that Rif1 interacts with PP1 and that PP1 prevents premature Mcm4 phosphorylation. Remarkably, our results suggest that replication repression by Rif1 is itself also DDK-regulated through phosphorylation near the PP1-interacting motifs. Based on our findings, we propose that Rif1 is a novel PP1 substrate targeting subunit that counteracts DDK-mediated phosphorylation during replication. Fission yeast and mammalian Rif1 proteins have also been implicated in regulating DNA replication. Since PP1 interaction sites are evolutionarily conserved within the Rif1 sequence, it is likely that replication control by Rif1 through PP1 is a conserved mechanism. PMID:24532715

  3. Oligodeoxynucleotide binding to (CTG) · (CAG) microsatellite repeats inhibits replication fork stalling, hairpin formation, and genome instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guoqi; Chen, Xiaomi; Leffak, Michael

    2013-02-01

    (CTG)(n) · (CAG)(n) trinucleotide repeat (TNR) expansion in the 3' untranslated region of the dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) gene causes myotonic dystrophy type 1. However, a direct link between TNR instability, the formation of noncanonical (CTG)(n) · (CAG)(n) structures, and replication stress has not been demonstrated. In a human cell model, we found that (CTG)(45) · (CAG)(45) causes local replication fork stalling, DNA hairpin formation, and TNR instability. Oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) complementary to the (CTG)(45) · (CAG)(45) lagging-strand template eliminated DNA hairpin formation on leading- and lagging-strand templates and relieved fork stalling. Prolonged cell culture, emetine inhibition of lagging-strand synthesis, or slowing of DNA synthesis by low-dose aphidicolin induced (CTG)(45) · (CAG)(45) expansions and contractions. ODNs targeting the lagging-strand template blocked the time-dependent or emetine-induced instability but did not eliminate aphidicolin-induced instability. These results show directly that TNR replication stalling, replication stress, hairpin formation, and instability are mechanistically linked in vivo.

  4. Rif1 provides a new DNA-binding interface for the Bloom syndrome complex to maintain normal replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dongyi; Muniandy, Parameswary; Leo, Elisabetta; Yin, Jinhu; Thangavel, Saravanabhavan; Shen, Xi; Ii, Miki; Agama, Keli; Guo, Rong; Fox, David; Meetei, Amom Ruhikanta; Wilson, Lauren; Nguyen, Huy; Weng, Nan-ping; Brill, Steven J; Li, Lei; Vindigni, Alessandro; Pommier, Yves; Seidman, Michael; Wang, Weidong

    2010-09-15

    BLM, the helicase defective in Bloom syndrome, is part of a multiprotein complex that protects genome stability. Here, we show that Rif1 is a novel component of the BLM complex and works with BLM to promote recovery of stalled replication forks. First, Rif1 physically interacts with the BLM complex through a conserved C-terminal domain, and the stability of Rif1 depends on the presence of the BLM complex. Second, Rif1 and BLM are recruited with similar kinetics to stalled replication forks, and the Rif1 recruitment is delayed in BLM-deficient cells. Third, genetic analyses in vertebrate DT40 cells suggest that BLM and Rif1 work in a common pathway to resist replication stress and promote recovery of stalled forks. Importantly, vertebrate Rif1 contains a DNA-binding domain that resembles the αCTD domain of bacterial RNA polymerase α; and this domain preferentially binds fork and Holliday junction (HJ) DNA in vitro and is required for Rif1 to resist replication stress in vivo. Our data suggest that Rif1 provides a new DNA-binding interface for the BLM complex to restart stalled replication forks.

  5. Functional cooperation between FACT and MCM is coordinated with cell cycle and differential complex formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chih-Li

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional cooperation between FACT and the MCM helicase complex constitutes an integral step during DNA replication initiation. However, mode of regulation that underlies the proper functional interaction of FACT and MCM is poorly understood. Methods & Results Here we present evidence indicating that such interaction is coordinated with cell cycle progression and differential complex formation. We first demonstrate the existence of two distinct FACT-MCM subassemblies, FACT-MCM2/4/6/7 and FACT-MCM2/3/4/5. Both complexes possess DNA unwinding activity and are subject to cell cycle-dependent enzymatic regulation. Interestingly, analysis of functional attributes further suggests that they act at distinct, and possibly sequential, steps during origin establishment and replication initiation. Moreover, we show that the phosphorylation profile of the FACT-associated MCM4 undergoes a cell cycle-dependent change, which is directly correlated with the catalytic activity of the FACT-MCM helicase complexes. Finally, at the quaternary structure level, physical interaction between FACT and MCM complexes is generally dependent on persistent cell cycle and further stabilized upon S phase entry. Cessation of mitotic cycle destabilizes the complex formation and likely leads to compromised coordination and activities. Conclusions Together, our results correlate FACT-MCM functionally and temporally with S phase and DNA replication. They further demonstrate that enzymatic activities intrinsically important for DNA replication are tightly controlled at various levels, thereby ensuring proper progression of, as well as exit from, the cell cycle and ultimately euploid gene balance.

  6. The Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex promotes viral RNA translation and replication by differential mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungfleisch, Jennifer; Chowdhury, Ashis; Alves-Rodrigues, Isabel; Tharun, Sundaresan; Díez, Juana

    2015-08-01

    The Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex binds to the 3' end of cellular mRNAs and promotes 3' end protection and 5'-3' decay. Interestingly, this complex also specifically binds to cis-acting regulatory sequences of viral positive-strand RNA genomes promoting their translation and subsequent recruitment from translation to replication. Yet, how the Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex regulates these two processes remains elusive. Here, we show that Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex acts differentially in these processes. By using a collection of well-characterized lsm1 mutant alleles and a system that allows the replication of Brome mosaic virus (BMV) in yeast we show that the Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex integrity is essential for both, translation and recruitment. However, the intrinsic RNA-binding ability of the complex is only required for translation. Consistent with an RNA-binding-independent function of the Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex on BMV RNA recruitment, we show that the BMV 1a protein, the sole viral protein required for recruitment, interacts with this complex in an RNA-independent manner. Together, these results support a model wherein Lsm1-7-Pat1 complex binds consecutively to BMV RNA regulatory sequences and the 1a protein to promote viral RNA translation and later recruitment out of the host translation machinery to the viral replication complexes.

  7. Control of Genome Integrity by RFC Complexes; Conductors of PCNA Loading onto and Unloading from Chromatin during DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiomi, Yasushi; Nishitani, Hideo

    2017-01-26

    During cell division, genome integrity is maintained by faithful DNA replication during S phase, followed by accurate segregation in mitosis. Many DNA metabolic events linked with DNA replication are also regulated throughout the cell cycle. In eukaryotes, the DNA sliding clamp, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), acts on chromatin as a processivity factor for DNA polymerases. Since its discovery, many other PCNA binding partners have been identified that function during DNA replication, repair, recombination, chromatin remodeling, cohesion, and proteolysis in cell-cycle progression. PCNA not only recruits the proteins involved in such events, but it also actively controls their function as chromatin assembles. Therefore, control of PCNA-loading onto chromatin is fundamental for various replication-coupled reactions. PCNA is loaded onto chromatin by PCNA-loading replication factor C (RFC) complexes. Both RFC1-RFC and Ctf18-RFC fundamentally function as PCNA loaders. On the other hand, after DNA synthesis, PCNA must be removed from chromatin by Elg1-RFC. Functional defects in RFC complexes lead to chromosomal abnormalities. In this review, we summarize the structural and functional relationships among RFC complexes, and describe how the regulation of PCNA loading/unloading by RFC complexes contributes to maintaining genome integrity.

  8. Control of Genome Integrity by RFC Complexes; Conductors of PCNA Loading onto and Unloading from Chromatin during DNA Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Shiomi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available During cell division, genome integrity is maintained by faithful DNA replication during S phase, followed by accurate segregation in mitosis. Many DNA metabolic events linked with DNA replication are also regulated throughout the cell cycle. In eukaryotes, the DNA sliding clamp, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, acts on chromatin as a processivity factor for DNA polymerases. Since its discovery, many other PCNA binding partners have been identified that function during DNA replication, repair, recombination, chromatin remodeling, cohesion, and proteolysis in cell-cycle progression. PCNA not only recruits the proteins involved in such events, but it also actively controls their function as chromatin assembles. Therefore, control of PCNA-loading onto chromatin is fundamental for various replication-coupled reactions. PCNA is loaded onto chromatin by PCNA-loading replication factor C (RFC complexes. Both RFC1-RFC and Ctf18-RFC fundamentally function as PCNA loaders. On the other hand, after DNA synthesis, PCNA must be removed from chromatin by Elg1-RFC. Functional defects in RFC complexes lead to chromosomal abnormalities. In this review, we summarize the structural and functional relationships among RFC complexes, and describe how the regulation of PCNA loading/unloading by RFC complexes contributes to maintaining genome integrity.

  9. Early events in the generation of autophagosomes are required for the formation of membrane structures involved in hepatitis C virus genome replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohl, Bjorn-Patrick; Bartlett, Christopher; Mankouri, Jamel; Harris, Mark

    2016-03-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has been shown to induce autophagy but the mechanisms underpinning this process remain to be elucidated. Induction of autophagy requires the class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, Vps34, which produces phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI3P) within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane. This recruits proteins with PI3P binding domains such as the double-FYVE-containing protein 1 (DFCP1). DFCP1 generates cup-shaped protrusions from the ER membrane, termed omegasomes, which provide a platform for the production of autophagosomes. Here we present data demonstrating that both Vps34 and DFCP1 are required for HCV genome replication, in the context of both a subgenomic replicon and virus infection, but did not affect virus entry or initial translation. Using live cell fluorescence microscopy we demonstrated that early during HCV infection the nascent viral genome replication complexes (identified by using non-structural protein NS5A as a marker) transiently colocalize with DFCP1-positive punctae (omegasomes), before the two structures move apart from each other. This observation is reminiscent of the transient association of LC3 and DFCP1 during omegasome formation, and therefore we propose that omegasomes are utilized by HCV to generate the double-membrane vesicles which are the hallmark of HCV replication complexes.

  10. Replicative manufacturing of complex lighting optics by non-isothermal glass molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreilkamp, Holger; Vu, Anh Tuan; Dambon, Olaf; Klocke, Fritz

    2016-09-01

    The advantages of LED lighting, especially its energy efficiency and the long service life have led to a wide distribution of LED technology in the world. However, in order to make fully use of the great potential that LED lighting offers, complex optics are required to distribute the emitted light from the LED efficiently. Nowadays, many applications use polymer optics which can be manufactured at low costs. However, due to ever increasing luminous power, polymer optics reach their technological limits. Due to its outstanding properties, especially its temperature resistance, resistance against UV radiation and its long term stability, glass is the alternative material of choice for the use in LED optics. This research is introducing a new replicative glass manufacturing approach, namely non-isothermal glass molding (NGM) which is able to manufacture complex lighting optics in high volumes at competitive prices. The integration of FEM simulation at the early stage of the process development is presented and helps to guarantee a fast development cycle. A coupled thermo-mechanical model is used to define the geometry of the glass preform as well as to define the mold surface geometry. Furthermore, simulation is used to predict main process outcomes, especially in terms of resulting form accuracy of the molded optics. Experiments conducted on a commercially available molding machine are presented to validate the developed simulation model. Finally, the influence of distinct parameters on important process outcomes like form accuracy, surface roughness, birefringence, etc. is discussed.

  11. Complex formation of p-carboxybenzeneboronic acid with fructose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulbul Islam, T.M.; Yoshino, K. [Shinshu Univ., Department of Chemistry, Matsumoto, Nagano (Japan)

    2000-10-01

    To increase the solubility of p-caboxybenzeneboronic acid (PCBA) in physiological pH 7.4, the complex formation of PCBA with fructose has been studied by {sup 11}B-NMR. PCBA formed complex with fructose and the complex increased the solubility of PCBA. The complex formation constant (log K) was obtained in pH 7.4 as 2.75 from the {sup 11}B-NMR spectra. Based on this result the complex formation ability of PCBA with fructose has been discussed. (author)

  12. The structure of a DnaA/HobA complex from Helicobacter pylori provides insight into regulation of DNA replication in bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natrajan, Ganesh; Noirot-Gros, Marie Francoise; Zawilak-Pawlik, Anna; Kapp, Ulrike; Terradot, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial DNA replication requires DnaA, an AAA+ ATPase that initiates replication at a specific chromosome region, oriC, and is regulated by species-specific regulators that directly bind DnaA. HobA is a DnaA binding protein, recently identified as an essential regulator of DNA replication in Helicobacter pylori. We report the crystal structure of HobA in complex with domains I and II of DnaA (DnaAI–II) from H. pylori, the first structure of DnaA bound to one of its regulators. Biochemical characterization of the complex formed shows that a tetramer of HobA binds four DnaAI–II molecules, and that DnaAI–II is unable to oligomerize by itself. Mutagenesis and protein–protein interaction studies demonstrate that some of the residues located at the HobA-DnaAI–II interface in the structure are necessary for complex formation. Introduction of selected mutations into H. pylori shows that the disruption of the interaction between HobA and DnaA is lethal for the bacteria. Remarkably, the DnaA binding site of HobA is conserved in DiaA from Escherichia coli, suggesting that the structure of the HobA/DnaA complex represents a model for DnaA regulation in other Gram-negative bacteria. Our data, together with those from other studies, indicate that HobA could play a crucial scaffolding role during the initiation of replication in H. pylori by organizing the first step of DnaA oligomerization and attachment to oriC. PMID:19940251

  13. Inhibition of Bim enhances replication of varicella-zoster virus and delays plaque formation in virus-infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xueqiao; Cohen, Jeffrey I

    2014-01-01

    Programmed cell death (apoptosis) is an important host defense mechanism against intracellular pathogens, such as viruses. Accordingly, viruses have evolved multiple mechanisms to modulate apoptosis to enhance replication. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) induces apoptosis in human fibroblasts and melanoma cells. We found that VZV triggered the phosphorylation of the proapoptotic proteins Bim and BAD but had little or no effect on other Bcl-2 family members. Since phosphorylation of Bim and BAD reduces their proapoptotic activity, this may prevent or delay apoptosis in VZV-infected cells. Phosphorylation of Bim but not BAD in VZV-infected cells was dependent on activation of the MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. Cells knocked down for Bim showed delayed VZV plaque formation, resulting in longer survival of VZV-infected cells and increased replication of virus, compared with wild-type cells infected with virus. Conversely, overexpression of Bim resulted in earlier plaque formation, smaller plaques, reduced virus replication, and increased caspase 3 activity. Inhibition of caspase activity in VZV-infected cells overexpressing Bim restored levels of virus production similar to those seen with virus-infected wild-type cells. Previously we showed that VZV ORF12 activates ERK and inhibits apoptosis in virus-infected cells. Here we found that VZV ORF12 contributes to Bim and BAD phosphorylation. In summary, VZV triggers Bim phosphorylation; reduction of Bim levels results in longer survival of VZV-infected cells and increased VZV replication.

  14. Dynamics of lane formation in driven binary complex plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sutterlin, K. R.; Wysocki, A.; Ivlev, A. V.; Rath, C.; Thomas, H. M.; Rubin-Zuzic, M.; W. J. Goedheer,; Fortov, V. E.; Lipaev, A. M.; Molotkov, V. I.; Petrov, O. F.; Morfill, G. E.; Lowen, H.

    2009-01-01

    The dynamical onset of lane formation is studied in experiments with binary complex plasmas under microgravity conditions. Small microparticles are driven and penetrate into a cloud of big particles, revealing a strong tendency towards lane formation. The observed time-resolved lane-formation proces

  15. Interaction of NCOR/SMRT Repressor Complexes with Papillomavirus E8^E2C Proteins Inhibits Viral Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreer, Marcel; Fertey, Jasmin; van de Poel, Saskia; Straub, Elke; Madlung, Johannes; Macek, Boris; Iftner, Thomas; Stubenrauch, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Infections with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV) such as HPV16 and 31 can lead to ano-genital and oropharyngeal cancers and HPV types from the beta genus have been implicated in the development of non-melanoma skin cancer. HPV replicate as nuclear extrachromosomal plasmids at low copy numbers in undifferentiated cells. HPV16 and 31 mutants have indicated that these viruses express an E8^E2C protein which negatively regulates genome replication. E8^E2C shares the DNA-binding and dimerization domain (E2C) with the essential viral replication activator E2 and the E8 domain replaces the replication/transcription activation domain of E2. The HR-HPV E8 domain is required for inhibiting viral transcription and the replication of the viral origin mediated by viral E1 and E2 proteins. We show now that E8^E2C also limits replication of HPV1, a mu-PV and HPV8, a beta-PV, in normal human keratinocytes. Proteomic analyses identified all NCoR/SMRT corepressor complex components (HDAC3, GPS2, NCoR, SMRT, TBL1 and TBLR1) as co-precipitating host cell proteins for HPV16 and 31 E8^E2C proteins. Co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization experiments revealed that NCoR/SMRT components interact with HPV1, 8, 16 and 31 E8^E2C proteins in an E8-dependent manner. SiRNA knock-down experiments confirm that NCoR/SMRT components are critical for both the inhibition of transcription and HPV origin replication by E8^E2C proteins. Furthermore, a dominant-negative NCoR fragment activates transcription and replication only from HPV16 and 31 wt but not from mutant genomes encoding NCoR/SMRT-binding deficient E8^E2C proteins. In summary, our data suggest that the repressive function of E8^E2C is highly conserved among HPV and that it is mediated by an E8-dependent interaction with NCoR/SMRT complexes. Our data also indicate for the first time that NCoR/SMRT complexes not only are involved in inhibiting cellular and viral transcription but also in controlling the replication of HPV origins.

  16. The Ctf18 RFC-like complex positions yeast telomeres but does not specify their replication time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraga, Shin-ichiro; Robertson, E Douglas; Donaldson, Anne D

    2006-04-05

    Chromosome ends in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are positioned in clusters at the nuclear rim. We report that Ctf18, Ctf8, and Dcc1, the subunits of a Replication Factor C (RFC)-like complex, are essential for the perinuclear positioning of telomeres. In both yeast and mammalian cells, peripheral nuclear positioning of chromatin during G1 phase correlates with late DNA replication. We find that the mislocalized telomeres of ctf18 cells still replicate late, showing that late DNA replication does not require peripheral positioning during G1. The Ku and Sir complexes have been shown to act through separate pathways to position telomeres, but in the absence of Ctf18 neither pathway can act fully to maintain telomere position. Surprisingly CTF18 is not required for Ku or Sir4-mediated peripheral tethering of a nontelomeric chromosome locus. Our results suggest that the Ctf18 RFC-like complex modifies telomeric chromatin to make it competent for normal localization to the nuclear periphery.

  17. Ku80 binds to human replication origins prior to the assembly of the ORC complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibani, Sahar; Price, Gerald B; Zannis-Hadjopoulos, Maria

    2005-05-31

    The Ku heterodimer, an abundant nuclear protein, binds DNA replication origins in a sequence-specific manner and promotes initiation. In this study, using HCT116 Ku80+/- haplo-insufficient and Orc2(delta/-) hypomorphic cells, the order of binding of Ku and the human origin recognition complex (HsORC) was determined. The nuclear expression of Ku80 was found to be decreased by 60% in Ku80+/- cells, while its general association with chromatin was decreased by 33%. Coimmunoprecipitation studies indicated that the Ku heterodimer associates specifically with the human HsOrc-2, -3, -4, and -6 subunits. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments, using cells synchronized to late G1, showed that the association of Ku80 with the lamin B2, beta-globin, and c-myc origins in vivo was decreased by 1.5-, 2.3-, and 2.5-fold, respectively, in Ku80+/- cells. The association of HsOrc-3, -4, and -6 was consistently decreased in all three origins examined in Ku80+/- cells, while that of HsOrc-2 showed no significant variation, indicating that the HsOrc-3, -4, and -6 subunits bind to the origins after Ku80. In Orc2(delta/-) cells, the association of HsOrc-2 with the lamin B2, beta-globin, and c-myc origins was decreased by 2.8-, 4.9-, and 2.8-fold, respectively, relative to wild-type HCT116 cells. Furthermore, nascent strand abundance at these three origins was decreased by 4.5-, 2.3-, and 2.6-fold in Orc2(delta/-) relative to HCT116 cells, respectively. Interestingly, the association of Ku80 with these origins was not affected in this hypomorphic cell line, indicating that Ku and HsOrc-2 bind to origins independently of each other.

  18. Differential roles of XRCC2 in S-phase RAD51 focus formation induced by DNA replication inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, C; Liu, N

    2004-05-14

    RAD51 proteins accumulate in discrete nuclear foci in response to DNA damage. Previous studies demonstrated that human RAD51 paralogs (RAD51B, RAD51C, RAD51D, XRCC2 and XRCC3) are essential for the assembly of RAD51 foci induced by ionizing radiation and cross-linking agents. Here we report that XRCC2 also plays important roles in RAD51 focus formation induced by replication arrest during S-phase of cell cycle. In wild-type hamster V79 cells treated with hydroxyurea (HU), RAD51 protein form punctuate nuclear foci, accompanied by increased RAD51 protein level in both cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions, and increased association of RAD51 with chromatin. In contrast, xrcc2 hamster mutant irs1 cells are deficient in the formation of RAD51 foci after HU treatment, suggesting that the function of XRCC2 is required for the assembly of RAD51 at HU-induced stalled replication forks. Interestingly, we found that irs1 cells are able to form intact RAD51 foci in S-phase cells treated with thymidine (TR) or aphidicolin, although irs1 cells are hypersensitive to both HU and TR. Our findings suggest that there may be two distinct pathways (XRCC2-dependent or XRCC2-independent) involved in loading of RAD51 onto stalled replication forks, probably depending upon the structure of DNA lesions.

  19. Replication-Coupled PCNA Unloading by the Elg1 Complex Occurs Genome-wide and Requires Okazaki Fragment Ligation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Kubota

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The sliding clamp PCNA is a crucial component of the DNA replication machinery. Timely PCNA loading and unloading are central for genome integrity and must be strictly coordinated with other DNA processing steps during replication. Here, we show that the S. cerevisiae Elg1 replication factor C-like complex (Elg1-RLC unloads PCNA genome-wide following Okazaki fragment ligation. In the absence of Elg1, PCNA is retained on chromosomes in the wake of replication forks, rather than at specific sites. Degradation of the Okazaki fragment ligase Cdc9 leads to PCNA accumulation on chromatin, similar to the accumulation caused by lack of Elg1. We demonstrate that Okazaki fragment ligation is the critical prerequisite for PCNA unloading, since Chlorella virus DNA ligase can substitute for Cdc9 in yeast and simultaneously promotes PCNA unloading. Our results suggest that Elg1-RLC acts as a general PCNA unloader and is dependent upon DNA ligation during chromosome replication.

  20. Formation of replicating saponite from a gel in the presence of oxalate: implications for the formation of clay minerals in carbonaceous chondrites and the origin of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Dirk; Hartman, Hyman; Eberl, Dennis D.; Sears, S. Kelly; Hesse, Reinhard; Vali, Hojatollah

    2012-01-01

    The potential role of clay minerals in the abiotic origin of life has been the subject of ongoing debate for the past several decades. At issue are the clay minerals found in a class of meteorites known as carbonaceous chondrites. These clay minerals are the product of aqueous alteration of anhydrous mineral phases, such as olivine and orthopyroxene, that are often present in the chondrules. Moreover, there is a strong correlation in the occurrence of clay minerals and the presence of polar organic molecules. It has been shown in laboratory experiments at low temperature and ambient pressure that polar organic molecules, such as the oxalate found in meteorites, can catalyze the crystallization of clay minerals. In this study, we show that oxalate is a robust catalyst in the crystallization of saponite, an Al- and Mg-rich, trioctahedral 2:1 layer silicate, from a silicate gel at 60°C and ambient pressure. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis of the saponite treated with octadecylammonium (n(C)=18) cations revealed the presence of 2:1 layer structures that have variable interlayer charge. The crystallization of these differently charged 2:1 layer silicates most likely occurred independently. The fact that 2:1 layer silicates with variable charge formed in the same gel has implications for our understanding of the origin of life, as these 2:1 clay minerals most likely replicate by a mechanism of template-catalyzed polymerization and transmit the charge distribution from layer to layer. If polar organic molecules like oxalate can catalyze the formation of clay-mineral crystals, which in turn promote clay microenvironments and provide abundant adsorption sites for other organic molecules present in solution, the interaction among these adsorbed molecules could lead to the polymerization of more complex organic molecules like RNA from nucleotides on early Earth.

  1. Formation of replicating saponite from a gel in the presence of oxalate: implications for the formation of clay minerals in carbonaceous chondrites and the origin of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Dirk; Hartman, Hyman; Eberl, Dennis D; Sears, S Kelly; Hesse, Reinhard; Vali, Hojatollah

    2012-06-01

    The potential role of clay minerals in the abiotic origin of life has been the subject of ongoing debate for the past several decades. At issue are the clay minerals found in a class of meteorites known as carbonaceous chondrites. These clay minerals are the product of aqueous alteration of anhydrous mineral phases, such as olivine and orthopyroxene, that are often present in the chondrules. Moreover, there is a strong correlation in the occurrence of clay minerals and the presence of polar organic molecules. It has been shown in laboratory experiments at low temperature and ambient pressure that polar organic molecules, such as the oxalate found in meteorites, can catalyze the crystallization of clay minerals. In this study, we show that oxalate is a robust catalyst in the crystallization of saponite, an Al- and Mg-rich, trioctahedral 2:1 layer silicate, from a silicate gel at 60°C and ambient pressure. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis of the saponite treated with octadecylammonium (n(C)=18) cations revealed the presence of 2:1 layer structures that have variable interlayer charge. The crystallization of these differently charged 2:1 layer silicates most likely occurred independently. The fact that 2:1 layer silicates with variable charge formed in the same gel has implications for our understanding of the origin of life, as these 2:1 clay minerals most likely replicate by a mechanism of template-catalyzed polymerization and transmit the charge distribution from layer to layer. If polar organic molecules like oxalate can catalyze the formation of clay-mineral crystals, which in turn promote clay microenvironments and provide abundant adsorption sites for other organic molecules present in solution, the interaction among these adsorbed molecules could lead to the polymerization of more complex organic molecules like RNA from nucleotides on early Earth.

  2. The origin recognition complex interacts with a subset of metabolic genes tightly linked to origins of replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Shor

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The origin recognition complex (ORC marks chromosomal sites as replication origins and is essential for replication initiation. In yeast, ORC also binds to DNA elements called silencers, where its primary function is to recruit silent information regulator (SIR proteins to establish transcriptional silencing. Indeed, silencers function poorly as chromosomal origins. Several genetic, molecular, and biochemical studies of HMR-E have led to a model proposing that when ORC becomes limiting in the cell (such as in the orc2-1 mutant only sites that bind ORC tightly (such as HMR-E remain fully occupied by ORC, while lower affinity sites, including many origins, lose ORC occupancy. Since HMR-E possessed a unique non-replication function, we reasoned that other tight sites might reveal novel functions for ORC on chromosomes. Therefore, we comprehensively determined ORC "affinity" genome-wide by performing an ORC ChIP-on-chip in ORC2 and orc2-1 strains. Here we describe a novel group of orc2-1-resistant ORC-interacting chromosomal sites (ORF-ORC sites that did not function as replication origins or silencers. Instead, ORF-ORC sites were comprised of protein-coding regions of highly transcribed metabolic genes. In contrast to the ORC-silencer paradigm, transcriptional activation promoted ORC association with these genes. Remarkably, ORF-ORC genes were enriched in proximity to origins of replication and, in several instances, were transcriptionally regulated by these origins. Taken together, these results suggest a surprising connection among ORC, replication origins, and cellular metabolism.

  3. Three-dimensional analysis of a viral RNA replication complex reveals a virus-induced mini-organelle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin G Kopek

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Positive-strand RNA viruses are the largest genetic class of viruses and include many serious human pathogens. All positive-strand RNA viruses replicate their genomes in association with intracellular membrane rearrangements such as single- or double-membrane vesicles. However, the exact sites of RNA synthesis and crucial topological relationships between relevant membranes, vesicle interiors, surrounding lumens, and cytoplasm generally are poorly defined. We applied electron microscope tomography and complementary approaches to flock house virus (FHV-infected Drosophila cells to provide the first 3-D analysis of such replication complexes. The sole FHV RNA replication factor, protein A, and FHV-specific 5-bromouridine 5'-triphosphate incorporation localized between inner and outer mitochondrial membranes inside approximately 50-nm vesicles (spherules, which thus are FHV-induced compartments for viral RNA synthesis. All such FHV spherules were outer mitochondrial membrane invaginations with interiors connected to the cytoplasm by a necked channel of approximately 10-nm diameter, which is sufficient for ribonucleotide import and product RNA export. Tomographic, biochemical, and other results imply that FHV spherules contain, on average, three RNA replication intermediates and an interior shell of approximately 100 membrane-spanning, self-interacting protein As. The results identify spherules as the site of protein A and nascent RNA accumulation and define spherule topology, dimensions, and stoichiometry to reveal the nature and many details of the organization and function of the FHV RNA replication complex. The resulting insights appear relevant to many other positive-strand RNA viruses and support recently proposed structural and likely evolutionary parallels with retrovirus and double-stranded RNA virus virions.

  4. Identification of Fic-1 as an enzyme that inhibits bacterial DNA replication by AMPylating GyrB, promoting filament formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Canhua; Nakayasu, Ernesto S; Zhang, Li-Qun; Luo, Zhao-Qing

    2016-01-26

    The morphology of bacterial cells is important for virulence, evasion of the host immune system, and coping with environmental stresses. The widely distributed Fic proteins (filamentation induced by cAMP) are annotated as proteins involved in cell division because of the presence of the HPFx[D/E]GN[G/K]R motif. We showed that the presence of Fic-1 from Pseudomonas fluorescens significantly reduced the yield of plasmid DNA when expressed in Escherichia coli or P. fluorescens. Fic-1 interacted with GyrB, a subunit of DNA gyrase, which is essential for bacterial DNA replication. Fic-1 catalyzed the AMPylation of GyrB at Tyr(109), a residue critical for binding ATP, and exhibited auto-AMPylation activity. Mutation of the Fic-1 auto-AMPylated site greatly reduced AMPylation activity toward itself and toward GyrB. Fic-1-dependent AMPylation of GyrB triggered the SOS response, indicative of DNA replication stress or DNA damage. Fic-1 also promoted the formation of elongated cells when the SOS response was blocked. We identified an α-inhibitor protein that we named anti-Fic-1 (AntF), encoded by a gene immediately upstream of Fic-1. AntF interacted with Fic-1, inhibited the AMPylation activity of Fic-1 for GyrB in vitro, and blocked Fic-1-mediated inhibition of DNA replication in bacteria, suggesting that Fic-1 and AntF comprise a toxin-antitoxin module. Our work establishes Fic-1 as an AMPylating enzyme that targets GyrB to inhibit DNA replication and may target other proteins to regulate bacterial morphology.

  5. The yeast and human FACT chromatin-reorganizing complexes solve R-loop-mediated transcription–replication conflicts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Moyano, Emilia; Mergui, Xénia; García-Rubio, María L.; Barroso, Sonia; Aguilera, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    FACT (facilitates chromatin transcription) is a chromatin-reorganizing complex that swaps nucleosomes around the RNA polymerase during transcription elongation and has a role in replication that is not fully understood yet. Here we show that recombination factors are required for the survival of yeast FACT mutants, consistent with an accumulation of DNA breaks that we detected by Rad52 foci and transcription-dependent hyperrecombination. Breaks also accumulate in FACT-depleted human cells, as shown by γH2AX foci and single-cell electrophoresis. Furthermore, FACT-deficient yeast and human cells show replication impairment, which in yeast we demonstrate by ChIP–chip (chromatin immunoprecipitation [ChIP] coupled with microarray analysis) of Rrm3 to occur genome-wide but preferentially at highly transcribed regions. Strikingly, in yeast FACT mutants, high levels of Rad52 foci are suppressed by RNH1 overexpression; R loops accumulate at high levels, and replication becomes normal when global RNA synthesis is inhibited in FACT-depleted human cells. The results demonstrate a key function of FACT in the resolution of R-loop-mediated transcription–replication conflicts, likely associated with a specific chromatin organization. PMID:24636987

  6. The yeast and human FACT chromatin-reorganizing complexes solve R-loop-mediated transcription-replication conflicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Moyano, Emilia; Mergui, Xénia; García-Rubio, María L; Barroso, Sonia; Aguilera, Andrés

    2014-04-01

    FACT (facilitates chromatin transcription) is a chromatin-reorganizing complex that swaps nucleosomes around the RNA polymerase during transcription elongation and has a role in replication that is not fully understood yet. Here we show that recombination factors are required for the survival of yeast FACT mutants, consistent with an accumulation of DNA breaks that we detected by Rad52 foci and transcription-dependent hyperrecombination. Breaks also accumulate in FACT-depleted human cells, as shown by γH2AX foci and single-cell electrophoresis. Furthermore, FACT-deficient yeast and human cells show replication impairment, which in yeast we demonstrate by ChIP-chip (chromatin immunoprecipitation [ChIP] coupled with microarray analysis) of Rrm3 to occur genome-wide but preferentially at highly transcribed regions. Strikingly, in yeast FACT mutants, high levels of Rad52 foci are suppressed by RNH1 overexpression; R loops accumulate at high levels, and replication becomes normal when global RNA synthesis is inhibited in FACT-depleted human cells. The results demonstrate a key function of FACT in the resolution of R-loop-mediated transcription-replication conflicts, likely associated with a specific chromatin organization.

  7. Viral precursor protein P3 and its processed products perform discrete and essential functions in the poliovirus RNA replication complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spear, Allyn; Ogram, Sushma A; Morasco, B Joan; Smerage, Lucia Eisner; Flanegan, James B

    2015-11-01

    The differential use of protein precursors and their products is a key strategy used during poliovirus replication. To characterize the role of protein precursors during replication, we examined the complementation profiles of mutants that inhibited 3D polymerase or 3C-RNA binding activity. We showed that 3D entered the replication complex in the form of its precursor, P3 (or 3CD), and was cleaved to release active 3D polymerase. Furthermore, our results showed that P3 is the preferred precursor that binds to the 5'CL. Using reciprocal complementation assays, we showed that one molecule of P3 binds the 5'CL and that a second molecule of P3 provides 3D. In addition, we showed that a second molecule of P3 served as the VPg provider. These results support a model in which P3 binds to the 5'CL and recruits additional molecules of P3, which are cleaved to release either 3D or VPg to initiate RNA replication.

  8. Absence of Non-histone Protein Complexes at Natural Chromosomal Pause Sites Results in Reduced Replication Pausing in Aging Yeast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marleny Cabral

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available There is substantial evidence that genomic instability increases during aging. Replication pausing (and stalling at difficult-to-replicate chromosomal sites may induce genomic instability. Interestingly, in aging yeast cells, we observed reduced replication pausing at various natural replication pause sites (RPSs in ribosomal DNA (rDNA and non-rDNA locations (e.g., silent replication origins and tRNA genes. The reduced pausing occurs independent of the DNA helicase Rrm3p, which facilitates replication past these non-histone protein-complex-bound RPSs, and is independent of the deacetylase Sir2p. Conditions of caloric restriction (CR, which extend life span, also cause reduced replication pausing at the 5S rDNA and at tRNA genes. In aged and CR cells, the RPSs are less occupied by their specific non-histone protein complexes (e.g., the preinitiation complex TFIIIC, likely because members of these complexes have primarily cytosolic localization. These conditions may lead to reduced replication pausing and may lower replication stress at these sites during aging.

  9. Structure of p15PAF-PCNA complex and implications for clamp sliding during DNA replication and repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Biasio, Alfredo; de Opakua, Alain Ibáñez; Mortuza, Gulnahar B

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsically disordered protein p15(PAF) regulates DNA replication and repair by binding to the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) sliding clamp. We present the structure of the human p15(PAF)-PCNA complex. Crystallography and NMR show the central PCNA-interacting protein motif (PIP...... free and PCNA-bound p15(PAF) binds DNA mainly through its histone-like N-terminal tail, while PCNA does not, and a model of the ternary complex with DNA inside the PCNA ring is consistent with electron micrographs. We propose that p15(PAF) acts as a flexible drag that regulates PCNA sliding along...

  10. p53 induces formation of NEAT1 lncRNA-containing paraspeckles that modulate replication stress response and chemosensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriaens, Carmen; Standaert, Laura; Barra, Jasmine; Latil, Mathilde; Verfaillie, Annelien; Kalev, Peter; Boeckx, Bram; Wijnhoven, Paul W G; Radaelli, Enrico; Vermi, William; Leucci, Eleonora; Lapouge, Gaëlle; Beck, Benjamin; van den Oord, Joost; Nakagawa, Shinichi; Hirose, Tetsuro; Sablina, Anna A; Lambrechts, Diether; Aerts, Stein; Blanpain, Cédric; Marine, Jean-Christophe

    2016-08-01

    In a search for mediators of the p53 tumor suppressor pathway, which induces pleiotropic and often antagonistic cellular responses, we identified the long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) NEAT1. NEAT1 is an essential architectural component of paraspeckle nuclear bodies, whose pathophysiological relevance remains unclear. Activation of p53, pharmacologically or by oncogene-induced replication stress, stimulated the formation of paraspeckles in mouse and human cells. Silencing Neat1 expression in mice, which prevents paraspeckle formation, sensitized preneoplastic cells to DNA-damage-induced cell death and impaired skin tumorigenesis. We provide mechanistic evidence that NEAT1 promotes ATR signaling in response to replication stress and is thereby engaged in a negative feedback loop that attenuates oncogene-dependent activation of p53. NEAT1 targeting in established human cancer cell lines induced synthetic lethality with genotoxic chemotherapeutics, including PARP inhibitors, and nongenotoxic activation of p53. This study establishes a key genetic link between NEAT1 paraspeckles, p53 biology and tumorigenesis and identifies NEAT1 as a promising target to enhance sensitivity of cancer cells to both chemotherapy and p53 reactivation therapy.

  11. The C-terminal Domain (CTD) of Human DNA Glycosylase NEIL1 Is Required for Forming BERosome Repair Complex with DNA Replication Proteins at the Replicating Genome: DOMINANT NEGATIVE FUNCTION OF THE CTD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Pavana M; Dutta, Arijit; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Mitra, Joy; Adhikari, Sanjay; Tomkinson, Alan E; Li, Guo-Min; Boldogh, Istvan; Hazra, Tapas K; Mitra, Sankar; Hegde, Muralidhar L

    2015-08-21

    The human DNA glycosylase NEIL1 was recently demonstrated to initiate prereplicative base excision repair (BER) of oxidized bases in the replicating genome, thus preventing mutagenic replication. A significant fraction of NEIL1 in cells is present in large cellular complexes containing DNA replication and other repair proteins, as shown by gel filtration. However, how the interaction of NEIL1 affects its recruitment to the replication site for prereplicative repair was not investigated. Here, we show that NEIL1 binarily interacts with the proliferating cell nuclear antigen clamp loader replication factor C, DNA polymerase δ, and DNA ligase I in the absence of DNA via its non-conserved C-terminal domain (CTD); replication factor C interaction results in ∼8-fold stimulation of NEIL1 activity. Disruption of NEIL1 interactions within the BERosome complex, as observed for a NEIL1 deletion mutant (N311) lacking the CTD, not only inhibits complete BER in vitro but also prevents its chromatin association and reduced recruitment at replication foci in S phase cells. This suggests that the interaction of NEIL1 with replication and other BER proteins is required for efficient repair of the replicating genome. Consistently, the CTD polypeptide acts as a dominant negative inhibitor during in vitro repair, and its ectopic expression sensitizes human cells to reactive oxygen species. We conclude that multiple interactions among BER proteins lead to large complexes, which are critical for efficient BER in mammalian cells, and the CTD interaction could be targeted for enhancing drug/radiation sensitivity of tumor cells.

  12. Sphingosine kinase 2 is a chikungunya virus host factor co-localized with the viral replication complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, St Patrick; Tritsch, Sarah R; Kota, Krishna; Chiang, Chih-Yuan; Dong, Lian; Kenny, Tara; Brueggemann, Ernest E; Ward, Michael D; Cazares, Lisa H; Bavari, Sina

    2015-10-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a re-emerging alphavirus which causes severe and prolonged arthralgic febrile illness. The recent global spread of the virus and lack of approved therapeutic options makes it imperative to gain greater insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying CHIKV pathogenesis, in particular host factors recruited by the virus. In the current study, we identify sphingosine kinase 2 (SK2) as a CHIKV host factor co-localized with the viral replication complex (VRC) during infection. SK2 was demonstrated to co-localize with viral RNA and nonstructural proteins. Targeted impairment of SK2 expression or function significantly inhibited CHIKV infection. Furthermore, affinity purification-mass spectrometry studies revealed that SK2 associates with a number of proteins involved in cellular gene expression specifically during viral infection, suggesting a role in replication. Collectively these results identify SK2 as a novel CHIKV host factor.

  13. Heat shock protein 70 is associated with replicase complex of Japanese encephalitis virus and positively regulates viral genome replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Ye

    Full Text Available Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that causes the most prevalent viral encephalitis in Asia. The NS5 protein of JEV is a key component of the viral replicase complex, which plays a crucial role in viral pathogenesis. In this study, tandem affinity purification (TAP followed by mass spectrometry analysis was performed to identify novel host proteins that interact with NS5. Heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70, eukaryotic elongation factor 1-alpha (eEF-1α and ras-related nuclear protein (Ran were demonstrated to interact with NS5. In addition to NS5, Hsp70 was also found to interact with NS3 which is another important member of the replicase complex. It was observed that the cytoplasmic Hsp70 partially colocalizes with the components of viral replicase complex including NS3, NS5 and viral dsRNA during JEV infection. Knockdown of Hsp70 resulted in a significantly reduced JEV genome replication. Further analysis reveals that Hsp70 enhances the stability of viral proteins in JEV replicase complex. These results suggest an important role for Hsp70 in regulating JEV replication, which provides a potential target for the development of anti-JEV therapies.

  14. Curcumin complexation with cyclodextrins by the autoclave process: Method development and characterization of complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagbani, Turki Al; Nazzal, Sami

    2017-03-30

    One approach to enhance curcumin (CUR) aqueous solubility is to use cyclodextrins (CDs) to form inclusion complexes where CUR is encapsulated as a guest molecule within the internal cavity of the water-soluble CD. Several methods have been reported for the complexation of CUR with CDs. Limited information, however, is available on the use of the autoclave process (AU) in complex formation. The aims of this work were therefore to (1) investigate and evaluate the AU cycle as a complex formation method to enhance CUR solubility; (2) compare the efficacy of the AU process with the freeze-drying (FD) and evaporation (EV) processes in complex formation; and (3) confirm CUR stability by characterizing CUR:CD complexes by NMR, Raman spectroscopy, DSC, and XRD. Significant differences were found in the saturation solubility of CUR from its complexes with CD when prepared by the three complexation methods. The AU yielded a complex with expected chemical and physical fingerprints for a CUR:CD inclusion complex that maintained the chemical integrity and stability of CUR and provided the highest solubility of CUR in water. Physical and chemical characterizations of the AU complexes confirmed the encapsulated of CUR inside the CD cavity and the transformation of the crystalline CUR:CD inclusion complex to an amorphous form. It was concluded that the autoclave process with its short processing time could be used as an alternate and efficient methods for drug:CD complexation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Liesegang patterns: Complex formation of precipitate in an electric field

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    István Lagzi

    2005-02-01

    Formation of 1D Liesegang patterns was studied numerically in precipitation and reversible complex formation of precipitate scenarios in an electric field. The Ostwald’s supersaturation model reported by Büki, Kárpáti-Smidróczki and Zrínyi (BKZ model) was extended further. In the presence of an electric field the position of the first and the last bands () measured from the junction point of the outer and the inner electrolytes can be described by the function = 1 $_{}^{1/2}$ + 2 + 3 , where is the time elapsed until the nth band formation, 1, 2 and 3 are constants. The variation of the total number of bands with different electric field strengths () has a maximum. For higher one can observe a moving precipitation zone that becomes wider due to precipitation and reversible complex formation.

  16. The proteasomal Rpn11 metalloprotease suppresses tombusvirus RNA recombination and promotes viral replication via facilitating assembly of the viral replicase complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanth, K Reddisiva; Barajas, Daniel; Nagy, Peter D

    2015-03-01

    RNA viruses co-opt a large number of cellular proteins that affect virus replication and, in some cases, viral genetic recombination. RNA recombination helps viruses in an evolutionary arms race with the host's antiviral responses and adaptation of viruses to new hosts. Tombusviruses and a yeast model host are used to identify cellular factors affecting RNA virus replication and RNA recombination. In this study, we have examined the role of the conserved Rpn11p metalloprotease subunit of the proteasome, which couples deubiquitination and degradation of proteasome substrates, in tombusvirus replication and recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and plants. Depletion or mutations of Rpn11p lead to the rapid formation of viral RNA recombinants in combination with reduced levels of viral RNA replication in yeast or in vitro based on cell extracts. Rpn11p interacts with the viral replication proteins and is recruited to the viral replicase complex (VRC). Analysis of the multifunctional Rpn11p has revealed that the primary role of Rpn11p is to act as a "matchmaker" that brings the viral p92(pol) replication protein and the DDX3-like Ded1p/RH20 DEAD box helicases into VRCs. Overexpression of Ded1p can complement the defect observed in rpn11 mutant yeast by reducing TBSV recombination. This suggests that Rpn11p can suppress tombusvirus recombination via facilitating the recruitment of the cellular Ded1p helicase, which is a strong suppressor of viral recombination, into VRCs. Overall, this work demonstrates that the co-opted Rpn11p, which is involved in the assembly of the functional proteasome, also functions in the proper assembly of the tombusvirus VRCs. RNA viruses evolve rapidly due to genetic changes based on mutations and RNA recombination. Viral genetic recombination helps viruses in an evolutionary arms race with the host's antiviral responses and facilitates adaptation of viruses to new hosts. Cellular factors affect viral RNA recombination, although the role

  17. Gel phase formation in dilute triblock copolyelectrolyte complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Samanvaya; Andreev, Marat; Levi, Adam E.; Goldfeld, David J.; Mao, Jun; Heller, William T.; Prabhu, Vivek M.; de Pablo, Juan J.; Tirrell, Matthew V.

    2017-02-01

    Assembly of oppositely charged triblock copolyelectrolytes into phase-separated gels at low polymer concentrations (formation of a dilute phase of individual micelles is prevented in polyelectrolyte complexation-driven assembly of triblock copolyelectrolytes. Gel phases form and phase separate almost instantaneously on solvation of the copolymers. Furthermore, molecular models of self-assembly demonstrate the presence of oligo-chain aggregates in early stages of copolyelectrolyte assembly, at experimentally unobservable polymer concentrations. Our discoveries contribute to the fundamental understanding of the structure and pathways of complexation-driven assemblies, and raise intriguing prospects for gel formation at extraordinarily low concentrations, with applications in tissue engineering, agriculture, water purification and theranostics.

  18. Mechanical Link between Cohesion Establishment and DNA Replication: Ctf7p/Eco1p, a Cohesion Establishment Factor, Associates with Three Different Replication Factor C Complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Kenna, Margaret A.; Skibbens, Robert V.

    2003-01-01

    CTF7/ECO1 is an essential yeast gene required for the establishment of sister chromatid cohesion. The findings that CTF7/ECO1, POL30 (PCNA), and CHL12/CTF18 (a replication factor C [RFC] homolog) genetically interact provided the first evidence that the processes of cohesion establishment and DNA replication are intimately coupled—a link now confirmed by other studies. To date, however, it is unknown how Ctf7p/Eco1p function is coupled to DNA replication or whether Ctf7p/Eco1p physically asso...

  19. Temperature sensitive influenza A virus genome replication results from low thermal stability of polymerase-cRNA complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiley Laurence S

    2006-08-01

    negative and positive sense polymerase-promoter complexes explains why high temperature favours transcription over replication and has implications for the control of viral RNA synthesis at physiological temperatures. Furthermore, given the different body temperatures of birds and man, these finding suggest molecular hypotheses for how polymerase function may affect host range.

  20. H4K20me0 marks post-replicative chromatin and recruits the TONSL₋MMS22L DNA repair complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saredi, Giulia; Huang, Hongda; Hammond, Colin M.; Alabert, Constance; Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Forne, Ignasi; Reverón-Gómez, Nazaret; Foster, Benjamin M.; Mlejnkova, Lucie; Bartke, Till; Cejka, Petr; Mailand, Niels; Imhof, Axel; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Groth, Anja [UCopenhagen; (MSKCC); (ICL); (LMU); (Zurich)

    2016-06-22

    Here, we report that after DNA replication, chromosomal processes including DNA repair and transcription take place in the context of sister chromatids. While cell cycle regulation can guide these processes globally, mechanisms to distinguish pre- and post-replicative states locally remain unknown. In this paper we reveal that new histones incorporated during DNA replication provide a signature of post-replicative chromatin, read by the human TONSL–MMS22L1, 2, 3, 4 homologous recombination complex. We identify the TONSL ankyrin repeat domain (ARD) as a reader of histone H4 tails unmethylated at K20 (H4K20me0), which are specific to new histones incorporated during DNA replication and mark post-replicative chromatin until the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Accordingly, TONSL–MMS22L binds new histones H3–H4 both before and after incorporation into nucleosomes, remaining on replicated chromatin until late G2/M. H4K20me0 recognition is required for TONSL–MMS22L binding to chromatin and accumulation at challenged replication forks and DNA lesions. Consequently, TONSL ARD mutants are toxic, compromising genome stability, cell viability and resistance to replication stress. Finally, together, these data reveal a histone-reader-based mechanism for recognizing the post-replicative state, offering a new angle to understand DNA repair with the potential for targeted cancer therapy.

  1. Geology of the Biwabik Iron Formation and Duluth Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirsa, Mark A; Miller, James D; Morey, G B

    2008-10-01

    The Biwabik Iron Formation is a approximately 1.9 billion year-old sequence of iron-rich sedimentary rocks that was metamorphosed at its eastern-most extent by approximately 1.1 billion year-old intrusions of the Duluth Complex. The metamorphic recrystallization of iron-formation locally produced iron-rich amphiboles and other fibrous iron-silicate minerals. The presence of these minerals in iron-formation along the eastern part of what is known as the Mesabi Iron Range, and their potential liberation by iron mining has raised environmental health concerns. We describe here the geologic setting and mineralogic composition of the Biwabik Iron Formation in and adjacent to the contact metamorphic aureole of the Duluth Complex. The effects of metamorphism are most pronounced within a few kilometers of the contact, and decrease progressively away from it. The contact aureole has been divided into four metamorphic zones-each characterized by the composition and crystal structure of the metamorphic minerals it contains. The recrystallization of iron-formation to iron-rich amphibole minerals (grunerite and cummingtonite) and iron-pyroxene minerals (hedenbergite and ferrohypersthene) is best developed in zones that are most proximal to the Duluth Complex contact.

  2. An amphipathic alpha-helix controls multiple roles of brome mosaic virus protein 1a in RNA replication complex assembly and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Liu

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Brome mosaic virus (BMV protein 1a has multiple key roles in viral RNA replication. 1a localizes to perinuclear endoplasmic reticulum (ER membranes as a peripheral membrane protein, induces ER membrane invaginations in which RNA replication complexes form, and recruits and stabilizes BMV 2a polymerase (2a(Pol and RNA replication templates at these sites to establish active replication complexes. During replication, 1a provides RNA capping, NTPase and possibly RNA helicase functions. Here we identify in BMV 1a an amphipathic alpha-helix, helix A, and use NMR analysis to define its structure and propensity to insert in hydrophobic membrane-mimicking micelles. We show that helix A is essential for efficient 1a-ER membrane association and normal perinuclear ER localization, and that deletion or mutation of helix A abolishes RNA replication. Strikingly, mutations in helix A give rise to two dramatically opposite 1a function phenotypes, implying that helix A acts as a molecular switch regulating the intricate balance between separable 1a functions. One class of helix A deletions and amino acid substitutions markedly inhibits 1a-membrane association and abolishes ER membrane invagination, viral RNA template recruitment, and replication, but doubles the 1a-mediated increase in 2a(Pol accumulation. The second class of helix A mutations not only maintains efficient 1a-membrane association but also amplifies the number of 1a-induced membrane invaginations 5- to 8-fold and enhances viral RNA template recruitment, while failing to stimulate 2a(Pol accumulation. The results provide new insights into the pathways of RNA replication complex assembly and show that helix A is critical for assembly and function of the viral RNA replication complex, including its central role in targeting replication components and controlling modes of 1a action.

  3. Oxidative peptide /and amide/ formation from Schiff base complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strehler, B. L.; Li, M. P.; Martin, K.; Fliss, H.; Schmid, P.

    1982-01-01

    One hypothesis of the origin of pre-modern forms of life is that the original replicating molecules were specific polypeptides which acted as templates for the assembly of poly-Schiff bases complementary to the template, and that these polymers were then oxidized to peptide linkages, probably by photo-produced oxidants. A double cycle of such anti-parallel complementary replication would yield the original peptide polymer. If this model were valid, the Schiff base between an N-acyl alpha mino aldehyde and an amino acid should yield a dipeptide in aqueous solution in the presence of an appropriate oxidant. In the present study it is shown that the substituted dipeptide, N-acetyl-tyrosyl-tyrosine, is produced in high yield in aqueous solution at pH 9 through the action of H2O2 on the Schiff-base complex between N-acetyl-tyrosinal and tyrosine and that a great variety of N-acyl amino acids are formed from amino acids and aliphatic aldehydes under similar conditions.

  4. Antiviral Innate Immune Response Interferes with the Formation of Replication-Associated Membrane Structures Induced by a Positive-Strand RNA Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diede Oudshoorn

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Infection with nidoviruses like corona- and arteriviruses induces a reticulovesicular network of interconnected endoplasmic reticulum (ER-derived double-membrane vesicles (DMVs and other membrane structures. This network is thought to accommodate the viral replication machinery and protect it from innate immune detection. We hypothesized that the innate immune response has tools to counteract the formation of these virus-induced replication organelles in order to inhibit virus replication. Here we have investigated the effect of type I interferon (IFN treatment on the formation of arterivirus-induced membrane structures. Our approach involved ectopic expression of arterivirus nonstructural proteins nsp2 and nsp3, which induce DMV formation in the absence of other viral triggers of the interferon response, such as replicating viral RNA. Thus, this setup can be used to identify immune effectors that specifically target the (formation of virus-induced membrane structures. Using large-scale electron microscopy mosaic maps, we found that IFN-β treatment significantly reduced the formation of the membrane structures. Strikingly, we also observed abundant stretches of double-membrane sheets (a proposed intermediate of DMV formation in IFN-β-treated samples, suggesting the disruption of DMV biogenesis. Three interferon-stimulated gene products, two of which have been reported to target the hepatitis C virus replication structures, were tested for their possible involvement, but none of them affected membrane structure formation. Our study reveals the existence of a previously unknown innate immune mechanism that antagonizes the viral hijacking of host membranes. It also provides a solid basis for further research into the poorly understood interactions between the innate immune system and virus-induced replication structures.

  5. Pattern formation in oscillatory complex networks consisting of excitable nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xuhong; Xia, Qinzhi; Qian, Yu; Zhang, Lisheng; Hu, Gang; Mi, Yuanyuan

    2011-05-01

    Oscillatory dynamics of complex networks has recently attracted great attention. In this paper we study pattern formation in oscillatory complex networks consisting of excitable nodes. We find that there exist a few center nodes and small skeletons for most oscillations. Complicated and seemingly random oscillatory patterns can be viewed as well-organized target waves propagating from center nodes along the shortest paths, and the shortest loops passing through both the center nodes and their driver nodes play the role of oscillation sources. Analyzing simple skeletons we are able to understand and predict various essential properties of the oscillations and effectively modulate the oscillations. These methods and results will give insights into pattern formation in complex networks and provide suggestive ideas for studying and controlling oscillations in neural networks.

  6. Nonlinear Stochastic Dynamics of Complex Systems, III: Noneqilibrium Thermodynamics of Self-Replication Kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Saakian, David B

    2016-01-01

    We briefly review the recently developed, Markov process based isothermal chemical thermodynamics for nonlinear, driven mesoscopic kinetic systems. Both the instantaneous Shannon entropy {\\boldmath $S[p_{\\alpha}(t)]$} and relative entropy {\\boldmath $F[p_{\\alpha}(t)]$}, defined based on probability distribution {\\boldmath $\\{p_{\\alpha}(t)\\}$}, play prominent roles. The theory is general; and as a special case when a chemical reaction system is situated in an equilibrium environment, it agrees perfectly with Gibbsian chemical thermodynamics: {\\boldmath $k_BS$} and {\\boldmath $k_BTF$} become thermodynamic entropy and free energy, respectively. We apply this theory to a fully reversible autocatalytic reaction kinetics, represented by a Delbr\\"{u}ck-Gillespie process, in a chemostatic nonequilibrium environment. The open, driven chemical system serves as an archetype for biochemical self-replication. The significance of {\\em thermodynamically consistent} kinetic coarse-graining is emphasized. In a kinetic system ...

  7. Structure of p15PAF-PCNA complex and implications for clamp sliding during DNA replication and repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Biasio, Alfredo; de Opakua, Alain Ibáñez; Mortuza, Gulnahar B.; Molina, Rafael; Cordeiro, Tiago N.; Castillo, Francisco; Villate, Maider; Merino, Nekane; Delgado, Sandra; Gil-Cartón, David; Luque, Irene; Diercks, Tammo; Bernadó, Pau; Montoya, Guillermo; Blanco, Francisco J.

    2015-03-01

    The intrinsically disordered protein p15PAF regulates DNA replication and repair by binding to the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) sliding clamp. We present the structure of the human p15PAF-PCNA complex. Crystallography and NMR show the central PCNA-interacting protein motif (PIP-box) of p15PAF tightly bound to the front-face of PCNA. In contrast to other PCNA-interacting proteins, p15PAF also contacts the inside of, and passes through, the PCNA ring. The disordered p15PAF termini emerge at opposite faces of the ring, but remain protected from 20S proteasomal degradation. Both free and PCNA-bound p15PAF binds DNA mainly through its histone-like N-terminal tail, while PCNA does not, and a model of the ternary complex with DNA inside the PCNA ring is consistent with electron micrographs. We propose that p15PAF acts as a flexible drag that regulates PCNA sliding along the DNA and facilitates the switch from replicative to translesion synthesis polymerase binding.

  8. Formation of Complex Molecules via radiative association reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharyya, Kinsuk; Herbst, Eric

    2016-07-01

    The detection of increasing numbers of complex organic molecules in the various phases of star formation plays a key role since they follow the same chemical rules of carbon-based chemistry that are observed in our planet Earth. Many of these molecules are believed to be formed on the surfaces of grains, and can then be released to the gas phase when these grains are heated. This is evident when we observe a rich chemistry in hot core regions. However, recently complex organic molecules have also been observed in cold clouds. Therefore, it is necessary to re-examine various pathways for the formation of these molecules in the gas phase. In this presentation, I will discuss role of radiative association reactions in the formation of complex molecules in the gas phase and at low temperature. We will compare abundance of assorted molecules with and without new radiative association reactions and will show that the abundance of a few complex molecules such as HCOOCH3, CH3OCH3 etc. can go up due to introduction of these reactions, which can help to explain their observed abundances.

  9. The coordination of centromere replication, spindle formation, and kinetochore-microtubule interaction in budding yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Liu

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The kinetochore is a protein complex that assembles on centromeric DNA to mediate chromosome-microtubule interaction. Most eukaryotic cells form the spindle and establish kinetochore-microtubule interaction during mitosis, but budding yeast cells finish these processes in S-phase. It has long been noticed that the S-phase spindle in budding yeast is shorter than that in metaphase, but the biological significance of this short S-phase spindle structure remains unclear. We addressed this issue by using ask1-3, a temperature-sensitive kinetochore mutant that exhibits partially elongated spindles at permissive temperature in the presence of hydroxyurea (HU, a DNA synthesis inhibitor. After exposure to and removal of HU, ask1-3 cells show a delayed anaphase entry. This delay depends on the spindle checkpoint, which monitors kinetochore-microtubule interaction defects. Overproduction of microtubule-associated protein Ase1 or Cin8 also induces spindle elongation in HU-arrested cells. The spindle checkpoint-dependent anaphase entry delay is also observed after ASE1 or CIN8 overexpression in HU-arrested cells. Therefore, the shorter spindle in S-phase cells is likely to facilitate proper chromosome-microtubule interaction.

  10. Analysis of protein-protein interactions in the feline calicivirus replication complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, William J; Chaudhry, Yasmin; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V; Goodfellow, Ian G

    2006-02-01

    Caliciviruses are a major cause of gastroenteritis in humans and cause a wide variety of other diseases in animals. Here, the characterization of protein-protein interactions between the individual proteins of Feline calicivirus (FCV), a model system for other members of the family Caliciviridae, is reported. Using the yeast two-hybrid system combined with a number of other approaches, it is demonstrated that the p32 protein (the picornavirus 2B analogue) of FCV interacts with p39 (2C), p30 (3A) and p76 (3CD). The FCV protease/RNA polymerase (ProPol) p76 was found to form homo-oligomers, as well as to interact with VPg and ORF2, the region encoding the major capsid protein VP1. A weak interaction was also observed between p76 and the minor capsid protein encoded by ORF3 (VP2). ORF2 protein was found to interact with VPg, p76 and VP2. The potential roles of the interactions in calicivirus replication are discussed.

  11. Gel phase formation in dilute triblock copolyelectrolyte complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Samanvaya; Andreev, Marat; Levi, Adam E.; Goldfeld, David J.; Mao, Jun; Heller, William T.; Prabhu, Vivek M.; de Pablo, Juan J.; Tirrell, Matthew V.

    2017-02-23

    Assembly of oppositely charged triblock copolyelectrolytes into phase-separated gels at low polymer concentrations (<1% by mass) has been observed in scattering experiments and molecular dynamics simulations. Here we show that in contrast to uncharged, amphiphilic block copolymers that form discrete micelles at low concentrations and enter a phase of strongly interacting micelles in a gradual manner with increasing concentration, the formation of a dilute phase of individual micelles is prevented in polyelectrolyte complexation-driven assembly of triblock copolyelectrolytes. Gel phases form and phase separate almost instantaneously on solvation of the copolymers. Furthermore, molecular models of self-assembly demonstrate the presence of oligo-chain aggregates in early stages of copolyelectrolyte assembly, at experimentally unobservable polymer concentrations. Our discoveries contribute to the fundamental understanding of the structure and pathways of complexation-driven assemblies, and raise intriguing prospects for gel formation at extraordinarily low concentrations, with applications in tissue engineering, agriculture, water purification and theranostics.

  12. SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC STUDIES OF SANGUINARINE-Β-CYCLODEXTRIN COMPLEX FORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veaceslav Boldescu

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this study was to investigate the influence of pH and the presence of hydrophilic polymer polyvinylpyrrolidone on the formation of sanguinarine-β-cyclodextrin (SANG-β-CD inclusion complex. Spectrophotometric studies of the SANG-β-CD systems in the presence and without 0.1 % PVP at the pH 5.0 did not show any evidence of the complex formation. However, the same systems showed several obvious evidences at the pH 8.0: the hyperchromic and the hypochromic effects and the presence of the isosbestic point in the region of 200 – 210 nm. The association constants calculated by three linear methods: Benesi-Hildebrand, Scott and Scatchard, were two times higher for the systems with addition of 0.1% PVP than for the systems without it.

  13. DNA-PK/Ku complex binds to latency-associated nuclear antigen and negatively regulates Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus latent replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Seho [Department of Life Science, Dongguk Univ-Seoul, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Chunghun [Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Young [Department of Life Science, Dongguk Univ-Seoul, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Yoon-Jae [Department of Life Science, Kyungwon University, Seongnam-Si, Kyeonggi-Do 461-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Junsoo [Division of Biological Science and Technology, Yonsei University, Wonju 220-100 (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Joonho [Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Taegun, E-mail: tseo@dongguk.edu [Department of Life Science, Dongguk Univ-Seoul, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-16

    During latent infection, latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) plays important roles in episomal persistence and replication. Several host factors are associated with KSHV latent replication. Here, we show that the catalytic subunit of DNA protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), Ku70, and Ku86 bind the N-terminal region of LANA. LANA was phosphorylated by DNA-PK and overexpression of Ku70, but not Ku86, impaired transient replication. The efficiency of transient replication was significantly increased in the HCT116 (Ku86 +/-) cell line, compared to the HCT116 (Ku86 +/+) cell line, suggesting that the DNA-PK/Ku complex negatively regulates KSHV latent replication.

  14. H4K20me0 marks post-replicative chromatin and recruits the TONSL–MMS22L DNA repair complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saredi, Giulia; Huang, Hongda; Hammond, Colin M;

    2016-01-01

    that new histones incorporated during DNA replication provide a signature of post-replicative chromatin, read by the human TONSL–MMS22L homologous recombination complex. We identify the TONSL ankyrin repeat domain (ARD) as a reader of histone H4 tails unmethylated at K20 (H4K20me0), which are specific...... is required for TONSL–MMS22L binding to chromatin and accumulation at challenged replication forks and DNA lesions. Consequently, TONSL ARD mutants are toxic, compromising genome stability, cell viability and resistance to replication stress. Together, these data reveal a histone-reader-based mechanism...... for recognizing the post-replicative state, offering a new angle to understand DNA repair with the potential for targeted cancer therapy....

  15. Formation of complex and unstable chromosomal translocations in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina H Schmidt

    Full Text Available Genome instability, associated with chromosome breakage syndromes and most human cancers, is still poorly understood. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, numerous genes with roles in the preservation of genome integrity have been identified. DNA-damage-checkpoint-deficient yeast cells that lack Sgs1, a RecQ-like DNA helicase related to the human Bloom's-syndrome-associated helicase BLM, show an increased rate of genome instability, and we have previously shown that they accumulate recurring chromosomal translocations between three similar genes, CAN1, LYP1 and ALP1. Here, the chromosomal location, copy number and sequence similarity of the translocation targets ALP1 and LYP1 were altered to gain insight into the formation of complex translocations. Among 844 clones with chromosomal rearrangements, 93 with various types of simple and complex translocations involving CAN1, LYP1 and ALP1 were identified. Breakpoint sequencing and mapping showed that the formation of complex translocation types is strictly dependent on the location of the initiating DNA break and revealed that complex translocations arise via a combination of interchromosomal translocation and template-switching, as well as from unstable dicentric intermediates. Template-switching occurred between sequences on the same chromosome, but was inhibited if the genes were transferred to different chromosomes. Unstable dicentric translocations continuously gave rise to clones with multiple translocations in various combinations, reminiscent of intratumor heterogeneity in human cancers. Base substitutions and evidence of DNA slippage near rearrangement breakpoints revealed that translocation formation can be accompanied by point mutations, and their presence in different translocation types within the same clone provides evidence that some of the different translocation types are derived from each other rather than being formed de novo. These findings provide insight into eukaryotic

  16. Dynamic spatial organization of multi-protein complexes controlling microbial polar organization, chromosome replication, and cytokinesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McAdams, Harley; Shapiro, Lucille; Horowitz, Mark; Andersen, Gary; Downing, Kenneth; Earnest, Thomas; Ellisman, Mark; Gitai, Zemer; Larabell, Carolyn; Viollier, Patrick

    2012-06-18

    This project was a program to develop high-throughput methods to identify and characterize spatially localized multiprotein complexes in bacterial cells. We applied a multidisciplinary systems engineering approach to the detailed characterization of localized multi-protein structures in vivo a problem that has previously been approached on a fragmented, piecemeal basis.

  17. Correlations between community structure and link formation in complex networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Links in complex networks commonly represent specific ties between pairs of nodes, such as protein-protein interactions in biological networks or friendships in social networks. However, understanding the mechanism of link formation in complex networks is a long standing challenge for network analysis and data mining. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Links in complex networks have a tendency to cluster locally and form so-called communities. This widely existed phenomenon reflects some underlying mechanism of link formation. To study the correlations between community structure and link formation, we present a general computational framework including a theory for network partitioning and link probability estimation. Our approach enables us to accurately identify missing links in partially observed networks in an efficient way. The links having high connection likelihoods in the communities reveal that links are formed preferentially to create cliques and accordingly promote the clustering level of the communities. The experimental results verify that such a mechanism can be well captured by our approach. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings provide a new insight into understanding how links are created in the communities. The computational framework opens a wide range of possibilities to develop new approaches and applications, such as community detection and missing link prediction.

  18. The Dynamics of Coalition Formation on Complex Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, S.; Heitzig, J.; Kornek, U.; Schöll, E.; Kurths, J.

    2015-08-01

    Complex networks describe the structure of many socio-economic systems. However, in studies of decision-making processes the evolution of the underlying social relations are disregarded. In this report, we aim to understand the formation of self-organizing domains of cooperation (“coalitions”) on an acquaintance network. We include both the network’s influence on the formation of coalitions and vice versa how the network adapts to the current coalition structure, thus forming a social feedback loop. We increase complexity from simple opinion adaptation processes studied in earlier research to more complex decision-making determined by costs and benefits, and from bilateral to multilateral cooperation. We show how phase transitions emerge from such coevolutionary dynamics, which can be interpreted as processes of great transformations. If the network adaptation rate is high, the social dynamics prevent the formation of a grand coalition and therefore full cooperation. We find some empirical support for our main results: Our model develops a bimodal coalition size distribution over time similar to those found in social structures. Our detection and distinguishing of phase transitions may be exemplary for other models of socio-economic systems with low agent numbers and therefore strong finite-size effects.

  19. Nanoparticle-protein complexes mimicking corona formation in ocular environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Dong Hyun; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Son, Jin Gyeong; Dan, Ki Soon; Song, Sang Hoon; Lee, Tae Geol; Kim, Jeong Hun

    2016-12-01

    Nanoparticles adsorb biomolecules to form corona upon entering the biological environment. In this study, tissue-specific corona formation is provided as a way of controlling protein interaction with nanoparticles in vivo. In the vitreous, the composition of the corona was determined by the electrostatic and hydrophobic properties of the associated proteins, regardless of the material (gold and silica) or size (20- and 100-nm diameter) of the nanoparticles. To control protein adsorption, we pre-incubate 20-nm gold nanoparticles with 5 selectively enriched proteins from the corona, formed in the vitreous, to produce nanoparticle-protein complexes. Compared to bare nanoparticles, nanoparticle-protein complexes demonstrate improved binding to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the vitreous. Furthermore, nanoparticle-protein complexes retain in vitro anti-angiogenic properties of bare nanoparticles. In particular, priming the nanoparticles (gold and silica) with tissue-specific corona proteins allows nanoparticle-protein complexes to exert better in vivo therapeutic effects by higher binding to VEGF than bare nanoparticles. These results suggest that controlled corona formation that mimics in vivo processes may be useful in the therapeutic use of nanomaterials in local environment.

  20. Cu(II) complex formation with xylitol in alkaline solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norkus, Eugenijus; Vaiciūniene, Jūrate; Vuorinen, Tapani; Gaidamauskas, Ernestas; Reklaitis, Jonas; Jääskeläinen, Anna-Stiina; Crans, Debbie C

    2004-02-25

    The formation of four Cu(II)-xylitol complexes was observed in aqueous alkaline solutions (11.0 or =10), whereas dinuclear complex Cu2Xyl (log beta=29.2 +/- 0.3) is the predominant species at low ligand-to-metal ratio (L:M=0.5). Diffusion coefficients and molar absorptivities of the complex species were determined. pH variable 13C NMR suggested that pKa values of xylitol are rather similar and equal to 13.8 +/- 0.2, 13.9 +/- 0.1 and 13.9 +/- 0.2 for OH-groups adjacent to (C-1,C-5), (C-3) and (C-2,C-4) carbon atoms, respectively.

  1. Complex formation between polyelectrolytes and oppositely charged oligoelectrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiajia; Barz, Matthias; Schmid, Friederike

    2016-04-01

    We study the complex formation between one long polyanion chain and many short oligocation chains by computer simulations. We employ a coarse-grained bead-spring model for the polyelectrolyte chains and model explicitly the small salt ions. We systematically vary the concentration and the length of the oligocation and examine how the oligocations affects the chain conformation, the static structure factor, the radial and axial distribution of various charged species, and the number of bound ions in the complex. At low oligocation concentration, the polyanion has an extended structure. Upon increasing the oligocation concentration, the polyanion chain collapses and forms a compact globule, but the complex still carries a net negative charge. Once the total charge of the oligocations is equal to that of the polyanion, the collapse stops and is replaced by a slow expansion. In this regime, the net charge on the complexes is positive or neutral, depending on the microion concentration in solution. The expansion can be explained by the reduction of the oligocation bridging. We find that the behavior and the structure of the complex are largely independent of the length of oligocations, and very similar to that observed when replacing the oligocations by multivalent salt cations, and conclude that the main driving force keeping the complex together is the release of monovalent counterions and coions. We speculate on the implications of this finding for the problem of controlled oligolyte release and oligolyte substitution.

  2. The structure of a DnaA/HobA complex from Helicobacter pylori provides insight into regulation of DNA replication in bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Natrajan, Ganesh; Noirot-Gros, Marie Francoise; Zawilak-Pawlik, Anna; Kapp, Ulrike; Terradot, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial DNA replication requires DnaA, an AAA+ ATPase that initiates replication at a specific chromosome region, oriC, and is regulated by species-specific regulators that directly bind DnaA. HobA is a DnaA binding protein, recently identified as an essential regulator of DNA replication in Helicobacter pylori. We report the crystal structure of HobA in complex with domains I and II of DnaA (DnaAI–II) from H. pylori, the first structure of DnaA bound to one of its regulators. Biochemical c...

  3. Association of Hepatitis C Virus Replication Complexes with Microtubules and Actin Filaments Is Dependent on the Interaction of NS3 and NS5A▿

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Chao-Kuen; Jeng, King-Song; Machida, Keigo; Lai, Michael M. C.

    2008-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA replication complex (RC), which is composed of viral nonstructural (NS) proteins and host cellular proteins, replicates the viral RNA genome in association with intracellular membranes. Two viral NS proteins, NS3 and NS5A, are essential elements of the RC. Here, by using immunoprecipitation and fluorescence resonance energy transfer assays, we demonstrated that NS3 and NS5A interact with tubulin and actin. Furthermore, immunofluorescence microscopy and electron...

  4. SirA enforces diploidy by inhibiting the replication initiator DnaA during spore formation in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Jennifer K; Marquis, Kathleen A; Rudner, David Z

    2009-09-01

    How cells maintain their ploidy is relevant to cellular development and disease. Here, we investigate the mechanism by which the bacterium Bacillus subtilis enforces diploidy as it differentiates into a dormant spore. We demonstrate that a sporulation-induced protein SirA (originally annotated YneE) blocks new rounds of replication by targeting the highly conserved replication initiation factor DnaA. We show that SirA interacts with DnaA and displaces it from the replication origin. As a result, expression of SirA during growth rapidly blocks replication and causes cell death in a DnaA-dependent manner. Finally, cells lacking SirA over-replicate during sporulation. These results support a model in which induction of SirA enforces diploidy by inhibiting replication initiation as B. subtilis cells develop into spores.

  5. Localization of the Carnation Italian ringspot virus replication protein p36 to the mitochondrial outer membrane is mediated by an internal targeting signal and the TOM complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gidda Satinder K

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carnation Italian ringspot virus (CIRV is a positive-strand RNA virus that causes massive structural alterations of mitochondria in infected host cells, the most conspicuous being the formation of numerous internal vesicles/spherules that are derived from the mitochondrial outer membrane and serve as the sites for viral RNA replication. While the membrane-bound components of the CIRV replication complex, including a 36-kD RNA-binding protein (p36, are known to be essential for these changes in mitochondrial morphology and are relatively well characterized in terms of their roles in nascent viral RNA synthesis, how these proteins are specifically targeted and inserted into mitochondria is poorly defined. Results Here we report on the molecular signal responsible for sorting p36 to the mitochondrial outer membrane. Using a combination of gain-of-function assays with portions of p36 fused to reporter proteins and domain-swapping assays with p36 and another closely-related viral RNA-binding protein, p33, that sorts specifically to the peroxisomal boundary membrane, we show that the mitochondrial targeting information in p36 resides within its two transmembrane domains (TMDs and intervening hydrophilic loop sequence. Comprehensive mutational analysis of these regions in p36 revealed that the primary targeting determinants are the moderate hydrophobicity of both TMDs and the positively-charged face of an amphipathic helix within the intervening loop sequence. We show also using bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC that p36 interacts with certain components of the translocase complex in the mitochondrial outer membrane (TOM, but not with the sorting and assembly machinery (SAM. Conclusion Our results provide insight to how viruses, such as CIRV, exploit specific host-cell protein sorting pathways to facilitate their replication. The characterization of the targeting and insertion of p36 into the mitochondrial outer

  6. Titanium complex formation of organic ligands in titania gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikiori, Hiromasa; Todoroki, Kenta; Setiawan, Rudi Agus; Teshima, Katsuya; Fujii, Tsuneo; Satozono, Hiroshi

    2015-01-27

    Thin films of organic ligand-dispersing titania gels were prepared from titanium alkoxide sols containing ligand molecules by steam treatment without heating. The formation of the ligand-titanium complex and the photoinduced electron transfer process in the systems were investigated by photoelectrochemical measurements. The complex was formed between the 8-hydroxyquinoline (HQ) and titanium species, such as the titanium ion, on the titania nanoparticle surface through the oxygen and nitrogen atoms of the quinolate. A photocurrent was observed in the electrodes containing the complex due to the electron injection from the LUMO of the complex into the titania conduction band. A bidentate ligand, 2,3-dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN), formed the complex on the titania surface through dehydration between its two hydroxyl groups of DHN and two TiOH groups of the titania. The electron injection from the HOMO of DHN to the titania conduction band was observed during light irradiation. This direct electron injection was more effective than the two-step electron injection.

  7. The ribosome-associated complex antagonizes prion formation in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor, Alvaro J; Castanzo, Dominic T; Delany, Sean P; Selechnik, Daniel M; van Ooy, Alex; Cameron, Dale M

    2015-01-01

    The number of known fungal proteins capable of switching between alternative stable conformations is steadily increasing, suggesting that a prion-like mechanism may be broadly utilized as a means to propagate altered cellular states. To gain insight into the mechanisms by which cells regulate prion formation and toxicity we examined the role of the yeast ribosome-associated complex (RAC) in modulating both the formation of the [PSI(+)] prion - an alternative conformer of Sup35 protein - and the toxicity of aggregation-prone polypeptides. The Hsp40 RAC chaperone Zuo1 anchors the RAC to ribosomes and stimulates the ATPase activity of the Hsp70 chaperone Ssb. We found that cells lacking Zuo1 are sensitive to over-expression of some aggregation-prone proteins, including the Sup35 prion domain, suggesting that co-translational protein misfolding increases in Δzuo1 strains. Consistent with this finding, Δzuo1 cells exhibit higher frequencies of spontaneous and induced prion formation. Cells expressing mutant forms of Zuo1 lacking either a C-terminal charged region required for ribosome association, or the J-domain responsible for Ssb ATPase stimulation, exhibit similarly high frequencies of prion formation. Our findings are consistent with a role for the RAC in chaperoning nascent Sup35 to regulate folding of the N-terminal prion domain as it emerges from the ribosome.

  8. Replication methods and tools in high-throughput cultivation processes - recognizing potential variations of growth and product formation by on-line monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luft Karina

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-throughput cultivations in microtiter plates are the method of choice to express proteins from recombinant clone libraries. Such processes typically include several steps, whereby some of them are linked by replication steps: transformation, plating, colony picking, preculture, main culture and induction. In this study, the effects of conventional replication methods and replication tools (8-channel pipette, 96-pin replicators: steel replicator with fixed or spring-loaded pins, plastic replicator with fixed pins on growth kinetics of Escherichia coli SCS1 pQE-30 pSE111 were observed. Growth was monitored with the BioLector, an on-line monitoring technique for microtiter plates. Furthermore, the influence of these effects on product formation of Escherichia coli pRhotHi-2-EcFbFP was investigated. Finally, a high-throughput cultivation process was simulated with Corynebacterium glutamicum pEKEx2-phoD-GFP, beginning at the colony picking step. Results Applying different replication tools and methods for one single strain resulted in high time differences of growth of the slowest and fastest growing culture. The shortest time difference (0.3 h was evaluated for the 96 cultures that were transferred with an 8-channel pipette from a thawed and mixed cryoculture and the longest time difference (6.9 h for cultures that were transferred with a steel replicator with fixed pins from a frozen cryoculture. The on-line monitoring of a simulated high-throughput cultivation process revealed strong variances in growth kinetics and a twofold difference in product formation. Another experiment showed that varying growth kinetics, caused by varying initial biomass concentrations (OD600 of 0.0125 to 0.2 led to strongly varying product formation upon induction at a defined point of time. Conclusions To improve the reproducibility of high-throughput cultivation processes and the comparability between different applied cultures, it is strongly

  9. Simulations of photochemical smog formation in complex urban areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muilwijk, C.; Schrijvers, P. J. C.; Wuerz, S.; Kenjereš, S.

    2016-12-01

    In the present study we numerically investigated the dispersion of photochemical reactive pollutants in complex urban areas by applying an integrated Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and Computational Reaction Dynamics (CRD) approach. To model chemical reactions involved in smog generation, the Generic Reaction Set (GRS) approach is used. The GRS model was selected since it does not require detailed modeling of a large set of reactive components. Smog formation is modeled first in the case of an intensive traffic emission, subjected to low to moderate wind conditions in an idealized two-dimensional street canyon with a building aspect ratio (height/width) of one. It is found that Reactive Organic Components (ROC) play an important role in the chemistry of smog formation. In contrast to the NOx/O3 photochemical steady state model that predicts a depletion of the (ground level) ozone, the GRS model predicts generation of ozone. Secondly, the effect of direct sunlight and shadow within the street canyon on the chemical reaction dynamics is investigated for three characteristic solar angles (morning, midday and afternoon). Large differences of up to one order of magnitude are found in the ozone production for different solar angles. As a proof of concept for real urban areas, the integrated CFD/CRD approach is applied for a real scale (1 × 1 km2) complex urban area (a district of the city of Rotterdam, The Netherlands) with high traffic emissions. The predicted pollutant concentration levels give realistic values that correspond to moderate to heavy smog. It is concluded that the integrated CFD/CRD method with the GRS model of chemical reactions is both accurate and numerically robust, and can be used for modeling of smog formation in complex urban areas.

  10. Theoretical study about L-arginine complexes formation with thiotriazolin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. I. Kucherenko

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Brain vascular diseases are one of the leading causes of morbidity, mortality and disability of population in the industrialized countries of the world. An important element of this problem’s solution is the creation of new highly effective and safe drugs, which would lead to mortality reduction, to increase in life expectancy and quality of life. Therefore it is interesting to create a new combined drug based on L-arginine and thiotriazolin. Purpose of the study: to consider the possible structure and energy characteristics of complexes formed by L-arginine, 3-methyl-1,2,4-triazolyl-5-thioacetate (MTTA and morpholine. Calculation method. The initial approximation to the complex geometry was obtained using molecular docking with the help of AutoDock Vina program. The obtained ternary complexes were pre-optimized by semi-empirical PM7 method with modeling the impact of the environment by COSMO method. The calculations were carried out using MOPAC2012 program. Then they were optimized by B97-D3/SVP + COSMO (Water dispersion-corrected DFT-D with geometrical spreading correction on insufficiency of gCP basis set. A more accurate calculation of the solvation energy was conducted by SMD. The calculations by density functional method were carried out using the ORCA 3.0.3 software. Energy complex formation in solution was calculated as the difference of the Gibbs free energy of the solvated complex and its individual components. Results. Quantum chemical calculations show, that thiotriazolin and L-arginine are able to form ternary complexes, where molecules are linked by multiple hydrogen bonds. The calculation data suggest, that studied complexes are thermodynamically unstable in solution. The energies of them are positive, but rather low despite charge gain of a number of intermolecular hydrogen bonds. Finding. Based on the results of the conducted quantum-chemical study of a three components system (MTTA, morpholine, and L-arginine it is possible

  11. Formation of gold mineralization in ultramafic alkalic magmatic complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabchikov, I. D.; Kogarko, L. N.; Sazonov, A. M.; Kononkova, N. N.

    2016-06-01

    Study of mineral inclusions within alluvial gold particles of the Guli Complex (East Siberia) and findings of lode gold in rocks of the same intrusion have demonstrated that gold mineralization occurs in interstitions of both early high-magnesium rocks (dunite) and later alkalic and carbonatite rocks. In dunite the native gold occurs in association with Fe-Ni sulfides (monosulfide solid solution, pentlandite, and heazlewoodite). Formation of the gold-bearing alloys took place under a low oxygen potential over a broad range of temperatures: from those close to 600°C down to below 400°C.

  12. Formation and characterization of thioglycolic acid-silver cluster complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellina, Bruno; Antoine, Rodolphe; Broyer, Michel; Gell, Lars; Sanader, Željka; Mitrić, Roland; Bonačić-Koutecký, Vlasta; Dugourd, Philippe

    2013-06-21

    Gas phase reactivity observed in an ion trap was used to produce silver clusters protected with thioglycolic acid. Fragmentation pathways as well as optical properties were explored experimentally and theoretically. Sequential losses of SCH2 and CO2 in the ion trap lead to redox reactions with charge transfers between the metal part and the carboxylate and thiolate groups. This allows us to control the number of electrons in the metallic subunit and thus optical properties of the complexes. The presented formation process can be used as a prototype for tuning optical and chemical properties of ligated metal clusters by varying the number of confined electrons within the metallic subunit.

  13. Coordinated leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis by using the herpes simplex virus 1 replication complex and minicircle DNA templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengel, Gudrun; Kuchta, Robert D

    2011-01-01

    The origin-specific replication of the herpes simplex virus 1 genome requires seven proteins: the helicase-primase (UL5-UL8-UL52), the DNA polymerase (UL30-UL42), the single-strand DNA binding protein (ICP8), and the origin-binding protein (UL9). We reconstituted these proteins, excluding UL9, on synthetic minicircular DNA templates and monitored leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis using the strand-specific incorporation of dTMP and dAMP. Critical features of the assays that led to efficient leading and lagging stand synthesis included high helicase-primase concentrations and a lagging strand template whose sequence resembled that of the viral DNA. Depending on the nature of the minicircle template, the replication complex synthesized leading and lagging strand products at molar ratios varying between 1:1 and 3:1. Lagging strand products (∼0.2 to 0.6 kb) were significantly shorter than leading strand products (∼2 to 10 kb), and conditions that stimulated primer synthesis led to shorter lagging strand products. ICP8 was not essential; however, its presence stimulated DNA synthesis and increased the length of both leading and lagging strand products. Curiously, human DNA polymerase α (p70-p180 or p49-p58-p70-p180), which improves the utilization of RNA primers synthesized by herpesvirus primase on linear DNA templates, had no effect on the replication of the minicircles. The lack of stimulation by polymerase α suggests the existence of a macromolecular assembly that enhances the utilization of RNA primers and may functionally couple leading and lagging strand synthesis. Evidence for functional coupling is further provided by our observations that (i) leading and lagging strand synthesis produce equal amounts of DNA, (ii) leading strand synthesis proceeds faster under conditions that disable primer synthesis on the lagging strand, and (iii) conditions that accelerate helicase-catalyzed DNA unwinding stimulate decoupled leading strand synthesis but not

  14. The inner membrane complex sub-compartment proteins critical for replication of the apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii adopt a pleckstrin homology fold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonkin, Michelle L; Beck, Josh R; Bradley, Peter J; Boulanger, Martin J

    2014-05-16

    Toxoplasma gondii, an apicomplexan parasite prevalent in developed nations, infects up to one-third of the human population. The success of this parasite depends on several unique structures including an inner membrane complex (IMC) that lines the interior of the plasma membrane and contains proteins important for gliding motility and replication. Of these proteins, the IMC sub-compartment proteins (ISPs) have recently been shown to play a role in asexual T. gondii daughter cell formation, yet the mechanism is unknown. Complicating mechanistic characterization of the ISPs is a lack of sequence identity with proteins of known structure or function. In support of elucidating the function of ISPs, we first determined the crystal structures of representative members TgISP1 and TgISP3 to a resolution of 2.10 and 2.32 Å, respectively. Structural analysis revealed that both ISPs adopt a pleckstrin homology fold often associated with phospholipid binding or protein-protein interactions. Substitution of basic for hydrophobic residues in the region that overlays with phospholipid binding in related pleckstrin homology domains, however, suggests that ISPs do not retain phospholipid binding activity. Consistent with this observation, biochemical assays revealed no phospholipid binding activity. Interestingly, mapping of conserved surface residues combined with crystal packing analysis indicates that TgISPs have functionally repurposed the phospholipid-binding site likely to coordinate protein partners. Recruitment of larger protein complexes may also be aided through avidity-enhanced interactions resulting from multimerization of the ISPs. Overall, we propose a model where TgISPs recruit protein partners to the IMC to ensure correct progression of daughter cell formation.

  15. Formation of Soft Nanoparticles via Polyelectrolyte Complexation: A Viscometric Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rondon Céline

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the formation of soft nanoparticles resulting from electrostatically driven complexation of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes. The system was composed of a strong polyanion (polystyrene sulfonate, PSS and a weak polycation (poly(allylamine hydrochloride, PAH in large excess. Soft nanoparticles were obtained by pouring a PSS solution into a PAH one under constant stirring. The polyelectrolyte complexes (PEC were characterized through a viscometric study complemented by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS, electrophoretic mobility and suspension turbidity measurements. PEC suspensions were centrifuged and by measuring the viscosity of the supernatant, we were able to estimate the free polycation concentration and hence the percentage of complexed polycation. We also measured the relative viscosity of the suspensions; from the estimated contribution of the PEC particles and of the polycation in excess, the average particle volume fraction was estimated. From all viscometric data, we could derive the evolution of the binding stoichiometry in PEC and of the effective particle volume fraction as a function of the mixing ratio (ratio of the cationic to anionic groups and of the pH. Our results emphasize the importance of charge accessibility in controlling both the stoichiometry and packing density of the complexes.

  16. Characterization of Hydrogen Complex Formation in III-V Semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Michael D

    2006-09-28

    Atomic hydrogen has been found to react with some impurity species in semiconductors. Hydrogenation is a methodology for the introduction of atomic hydrogen into the semiconductor for the express purpose of forming complexes within the material. Efforts to develop hydrogenation as an isolation technique for AlGaAs and Si based devices failed to demonstrate its commercial viability. This was due in large measure to the low activation energies of the formed complexes. Recent studies of dopant passivation in long wavelength (0.98 - 1.55m) materials suggested that for the appropriate choice of dopants much higher activation energies can be obtained. This effort studied the formation of these complexes in InP, This material is extensively used in optoelectronics, i.e., lasers, modulators and detectors. The experimental techniques were general to the extent that the results can be applied to other areas such as sensor technology, photovoltaics and to other material systems. The activation energies for the complexes have been determined and are reported in the scientific literature. The hydrogenation process has been shown by us to have a profound effect on the electronic structure of the materials and was thoroughly investigated. The information obtained will be useful in assessing the long term reliability of device structures fabricated using this phenomenon and in determining new device functionalities.

  17. Interactions between p27 and p88 replicase proteins of Red clover necrotic mosaic virus play an essential role in viral RNA replication and suppression of RNA silencing via the 480-kDa viral replicase complex assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mine, Akira; Hyodo, Kiwamu; Takeda, Atsushi; Kaido, Masanori; Mise, Kazuyuki; Okuno, Tetsuro

    2010-11-25

    Red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV), a positive-sense RNA virus with a bipartite genome, encodes p27 and p88 replicase proteins that are required for viral RNA replication and suppression of RNA silencing. In this study, we identified domains in p27 and p88 responsible for their protein-protein interactions using in vitro pull-down assays with the purified recombinant proteins. Coimmunoprecipitation analysis in combination with blue-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis using mutated p27 proteins showed that both p27-p27 and p27-p88 interactions are essential for the formation of the 480-kDa complex, which has RCNMV-specific RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity. Furthermore, we found a good correlation between the accumulated levels of the 480-kDa complex and replication levels and the suppression of RNA silencing activity. Our results indicate that interactions between RCNMV replicase proteins play an essential role in viral RNA replication and in suppressing RNA silencing via the 480-kDa replicase complex assembly.

  18. Thermodynamics for complex formation between palladium(ii) and oxalate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilný, Radomír; Lubal, Přemysl; Elding, Lars I

    2014-08-28

    Complex formation between [Pd(H2O)4](2+) and oxalate (ox = C2O4(2-)) has been studied spectrophoto-metrically in aqueous solution at variable temperature, ionic strength and pH. Thermodynamic parameters at 298.2 K and 1.00 mol dm(-3) HClO4 ionic medium for the complex formation [Pd(H2O)4](2+) + H2ox ⇄ [Pd(H2O)2(ox)] + 2H3O(+) with equilibrium constant K1,H (in mol dm(-3)) are log10K1,H = 3.38 ± 0.08, ΔH = -33 ± 3 kJ mol(-1), and ΔS = -48 ± 11 J K(-1) mol(-1), as determined from spectrophotometric equilibrium titrations at 15.0, 20.0, 25.0 and 31.0 °C. Thermodynamic overall stability constants β (in (mol dm(-3))(-n), n = 1,2) for [Pd(H2O)2(ox)] and [Pd(ox)2](2-) at zero ionic strength and 298.2 K, defined as the equilibrium constants for the reaction Pd(2+) + nox(2-) ⇄ [Pd(ox)n](2-2n) (water molecules omitted) are log10β = 9.04 ± 0.06 and log10β = 13.1 ± 0.3, respectively, calculated by use of Specific Ion Interaction Theory from spectrophotometric titrations with initial hydrogen ion concentrations of 1.00, 0.100 and 0.0100 mol dm(-3) and ionic strengths of 1.00, 2.00 or 3.00 mol dm(-3). The values derived together with literature data give estimated overall stability constants for Pd(ii) compounds such as [Pd(en)(ox)] and cis-[Pd(NH3)2Cl2], some of them analogs to Pt(ii) complexes used in cancer treatment. The palladium oxalato complexes are significantly more stable than palladium(ii) complexes with monodentate O-bonding ligands. A comparison between several different palladium complexes shows that different parameters contribute to the stability variations observed. These are discussed together with the so-called chelate effect.

  19. Replicating the Ice-Volume Signal of the Early Pleistocene with a Complex Earth System Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabor, C. R.; Poulsen, C. J.; Pollard, D.

    2013-12-01

    Milankovitch theory proposes high-latitude summer insolation intensity paces the ice ages by controlling perennial snow cover amounts (Milankovitch, 1941). According to theory, the ~21 kyr cycle of precession should dominate the ice-volume records since it has the greatest influence on high-latitude summer insolation. Modeling experiments frequently support Milankovitch theory by attributing the majority of Northern Hemisphere high-latitude summer snowmelt to changes in the cycle of precession (e.g. Jackson and Broccoli, 2003). However, ice-volume proxy records, especially those of the Early Pleistocene (2.6-0.8 Ma), display variability with a period of ~41 kyr (Raymo and Lisiecki, 2005), indicative of insolation forcing from obliquity, which has a much smaller influence on summer insolation intensity than precession. Several hypotheses attempt to explain the discrepancies between Milkankovitch theory and the proxy records by invoking phenomena such as insolation gradients (Raymo and Nisancioglu, 2003), hemispheric offset (Raymo et al., 2006; Lee and Poulsen, 2009), and integrated summer energy (Huybers, 2006); however, all of these hypotheses contain caveats (Ruddiman, 2006) and have yet to be supported by modeling studies that use a complex GCM. To explore potential solutions to this '41 kyr problem,' we use an Earth system model composed of the GENESIS GCM and Land Surface model, the BIOME4 vegetation model, and the Pennsylvania State ice-sheet model. Using an asynchronous coupling technique, we run four idealized transient combinations of obliquity and precession, representing the orbital extremes of the Pleistocene (Berger and Loutre, 1991). Each experiment is run through several complete orbital cycles with a dynamic ice domain spanning North America and Greenland, and fixed preindustrial greenhouse-gas concentrations. For all orbital configurations, model results produce greater ice-volume spectral power at the frequency of obliquity despite significantly

  20. An Epstein-Barr Virus-Encoded Protein Complex Requires an Origin of Lytic Replication In Cis to Mediate Late Gene Transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Djavadian

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus lytic replication is accomplished by an intricate cascade of gene expression that integrates viral DNA replication and structural protein synthesis. Most genes encoding structural proteins exhibit "true" late kinetics-their expression is strictly dependent on lytic DNA replication. Recently, the EBV BcRF1 gene was reported to encode a TATA box binding protein homolog, which preferentially recognizes the TATT sequence found in true late gene promoters. BcRF1 is one of seven EBV genes with homologs found in other β- and γ-, but not in α-herpesviruses. Using EBV BACmids, we systematically disrupted each of these "βγ" genes. We found that six of them, including BcRF1, exhibited an identical phenotype: intact viral DNA replication with loss of late gene expression. The proteins encoded by these six genes have been found by other investigators to form a viral protein complex that is essential for activation of TATT-containing reporters in EBV-negative 293 cells. Unexpectedly, in EBV infected 293 cells, we found that TATT reporter activation was weak and non-specific unless an EBV origin of lytic replication (OriLyt was present in cis. Using two different replication-defective EBV genomes, we demonstrated that OriLyt-mediated DNA replication is required in cis for TATT reporter activation and for late gene expression from the EBV genome. We further demonstrate by fluorescence in situ hybridization that the late BcLF1 mRNA localizes to EBV DNA replication factories. These findings support a model in which EBV true late genes are only transcribed from newly replicated viral genomes.

  1. SirA enforces diploidy by inhibiting the replication initiator DnaA during spore formation in Bacillus subtilis

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer K. Wagner; Marquis, Kathleen A.; Rudner, David Z.

    2009-01-01

    How cells maintain their ploidy is relevant to cellular development and disease. Here, we investigate the mechanism by which the bacterium Bacillus subtilis enforces diploidy as it differentiates into a dormant spore. We demonstrate that a sporulation-induced protein SirA (originally annotated YneE) blocks new rounds of replication by targeting the highly conserved replication initiation factor DnaA. We show that SirA interacts with DnaA and displaces it from the replication origin. As a resu...

  2. Shared Subunits of Tetrahymena Telomerase Holoenzyme and Replication Protein A Have Different Functions in Different Cellular Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, Heather E; Chan, Henry; Feigon, Juli; Collins, Kathleen

    2017-01-06

    In most eukaryotes, telomere maintenance relies on telomeric repeat synthesis by a reverse transcriptase named telomerase. To synthesize telomeric repeats, the catalytic subunit telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) uses the RNA subunit (TER) as a template. In the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila, the telomerase holoenzyme consists of TER, TERT, and eight additional proteins, including the telomeric repeat single-stranded DNA-binding protein Teb1 and its heterotrimer partners Teb2 and Teb3. Teb1 is paralogous to the large subunit of the general single-stranded DNA binding heterotrimer replication protein A (RPA). Little is known about the function of Teb2 and Teb3, which are structurally homologous to the RPA middle and small subunits, respectively. Here, epitope-tagging Teb2 and Teb3 expressed at their endogenous gene loci enabled affinity purifications that revealed that, unlike other Tetrahymena telomerase holoenzyme subunits, Teb2 and Teb3 are not telomerase-specific. Teb2 and Teb3 assembled into other heterotrimer complexes, which when recombinantly expressed had the general single-stranded DNA binding activity of RPA complexes, unlike the telomere-specific DNA binding of Teb1 or the TEB heterotrimer of Teb1, Teb2, and Teb3. TEB had no more DNA binding affinity than Teb1 alone. In contrast, heterotrimers reconstituted with Teb2 and Teb3 and two other Tetrahymena RPA large subunit paralogs had higher DNA binding affinity than their large subunit alone. Teb1 and TEB, but not RPA, increased telomerase processivity. We conclude that in the telomerase holoenzyme, instead of binding DNA, Teb2 and Teb3 are Teb1 assembly factors. These findings demonstrate that Tetrahymena telomerase holoenzyme and RPA complexes share subunits and that RPA subunits have distinct functions in different heterotrimer assemblies. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. The effect of temperature and time on the formation of amylose- lysophosphatidylcholine inclusion complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmadi-Abhari, S.; Woortman, A.J.J.; Oudhuis, A.A.C.M.; Hamer, R.J.; Loos, K.

    2014-01-01

    The formation of amylose inclusion complexes could help to decrease the susceptibility of starch granules against amylase digestion. We studied the formation of amyloselysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) inclusion complexes at temperatures at and below the gelatinization temperature of starch, using DSC,

  4. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1-mediated syncytium formation is compatible with adenovirus replication and facilitates efficient dispersion of viral gene products and de novo-synthesized virus particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H; Haviv, Y S; Derdeyn, C A; Lam, J; Coolidge, C; Hunter, E; Curiel, D T; Blackwell, J L

    2001-12-10

    Conditionally replicative adenovirus (CRAd) vectors are designed for specific oncolytic replication in tumor tissues with concomitant sparing of normal cells. As such, CRAds offer an unprecedented level of anticancer potential for malignancies that have been refractory to previous cancer gene therapy interventions. CRAd efficacy may, however, be compromised by inefficient dispersion of the replicating vector within the tumor tissue. To address this issue, we evaluated the utility of a fusogenic membrane glycoprotein (FMG), which induces the fusion of neighboring cellular membranes to form multinucleated syncytia. We hypothesized that the FMG-mediated syncytia would facilitate dispersion of the adenovirus (Ad) gene products and viral progeny. To test this, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoproteins, which induce syncytia in the presence of CD4+ target cells, were expressed by an Ad (Ad5HIVenv) in permissive (CD4-positive) and nonpermissive (CD4-negative) cell lines. After validating this Ad-FMG model, the efficiency of Ad replication in the presence or absence of syncytia was evaluated. The results demonstrated that syncytium formation was compatible with Ad replication and dramatically increased the dispersion of virus gene products within the cytoplasm of the syncytia as well as viral particles in the nuclei of the syncytial mass. Moreover, progeny virions were released more efficiently from syncytia compared with nonsyncytial cells. These data demonstrate the utility of FMGs as a dispersion agent and suggest that FMGs can improve the efficacy of CRAd gene therapy.

  5. GAPDH--a recruits a plant virus movement protein to cortical virus replication complexes to facilitate viral cell-to-cell movement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Kaido

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The formation of virus movement protein (MP-containing punctate structures on the cortical endoplasmic reticulum is required for efficient intercellular movement of Red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV, a bipartite positive-strand RNA plant virus. We found that these cortical punctate structures constitute a viral replication complex (VRC in addition to the previously reported aggregate structures that formed adjacent to the nucleus. We identified host proteins that interacted with RCNMV MP in virus-infected Nicotiana benthamiana leaves using a tandem affinity purification method followed by mass spectrometry. One of these host proteins was glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase-A (NbGAPDH-A, which is a component of the Calvin-Benson cycle in chloroplasts. Virus-induced gene silencing of NbGAPDH-A reduced RCNMV multiplication in the inoculated leaves, but not in the single cells, thereby suggesting that GAPDH-A plays a positive role in cell-to-cell movement of RCNMV. The fusion protein of NbGAPDH-A and green fluorescent protein localized exclusively to the chloroplasts. In the presence of RCNMV RNA1, however, the protein localized to the cortical VRC as well as the chloroplasts. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay and GST pulldown assay confirmed in vivo and in vitro interactions, respectively, between the MP and NbGAPDH-A. Furthermore, gene silencing of NbGAPDH-A inhibited MP localization to the cortical VRC. We discuss the possible roles of NbGAPDH-A in the RCNMV movement process.

  6. Meier-Gorlin syndrome genotype-phenotype studies: 35 individuals with pre-replication complex gene mutations and 10 without molecular diagnosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munnik, S.A. de; Bicknell, L.S.; Aftimos, S.; Al-Aama, J.Y.; Bever, Y. Van; Bober, M.B.; Clayton-Smith, J.; Edrees, A.Y.; Feingold, M.; Fryer, A.; Hagen, J.M. van; Hennekam, R.C.M.; Jansweijer, M.C.E.; Johnson, D.; Kant, S.G.; Opitz, J.M.; Ramadevi, A.R.; Reardon, W.; Ross, A.; Sarda, P.; Schrander-Stumpel, C.T.R.M.; Schoots, J.; Temple, I.K.; Terhal, P.A.; Toutain, A.; Wise, C.A.; Wright, M.; Skidmore, D.L.; Samuels, M.E.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Knoers, N.V.A.M.; Brunner, H.G.; Jackson, A.P.; Bongers, M.H.F.

    2012-01-01

    Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by microtia, patellar aplasia/hypoplasia, and short stature. Recently, mutations in five genes from the pre-replication complex (ORC1, ORC4, ORC6, CDT1, and CDC6), crucial in cell-cycle progression and growth, were

  7. Meier-Gorlin syndrome genotype-phenotype studies: 35 individuals with pre-replication complex gene mutations and 10 without molecular diagnosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munnik, S.A. de; Bicknell, L.S.; Aftimos, S.; Al-Aama, J.Y.; Bever, Y. Van; Bober, M.B.; Clayton-Smith, J.; Edrees, A.Y.; Feingold, M.; Fryer, A.; Hagen, J.M. van; Hennekam, R.C.M.; Jansweijer, M.C.E.; Johnson, D.; Kant, S.G.; Opitz, J.M.; Ramadevi, A.R.; Reardon, W.; Ross, A.; Sarda, P.; Schrander-Stumpel, C.T.R.M.; Schoots, J.; Temple, I.K.; Terhal, P.A.; Toutain, A.; Wise, C.A.; Wright, M.; Skidmore, D.L.; Samuels, M.E.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Knoers, N.V.A.M.; Brunner, H.G.; Jackson, A.P.; Bongers, M.H.F.

    2012-01-01

    Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by microtia, patellar aplasia/hypoplasia, and short stature. Recently, mutations in five genes from the pre-replication complex (ORC1, ORC4, ORC6, CDT1, and CDC6), crucial in cell-cycle progression and growth, were identifi

  8. Dynamical complexity in the perception-based network formation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Hang-Hyun; Moon, Eunyoung

    2016-12-01

    Many link formation mechanisms for the evolution of social networks have been successful to reproduce various empirical findings in social networks. However, they have largely ignored the fact that individuals make decisions on whether to create links to other individuals based on cost and benefit of linking, and the fact that individuals may use perception of the network in their decision making. In this paper, we study the evolution of social networks in terms of perception-based strategic link formation. Here each individual has her own perception of the actual network, and uses it to decide whether to create a link to another individual. An individual with the least perception accuracy can benefit from updating her perception using that of the most accurate individual via a new link. This benefit is compared to the cost of linking in decision making. Once a new link is created, it affects the accuracies of other individuals' perceptions, leading to a further evolution of the actual network. As for initial actual networks, we consider both homogeneous and heterogeneous cases. The homogeneous initial actual network is modeled by Erdős-Rényi (ER) random networks, while we take a star network for the heterogeneous case. In any cases, individual perceptions of the actual network are modeled by ER random networks with controllable linking probability. Then the stable link density of the actual network is found to show discontinuous transitions or jumps according to the cost of linking. As the number of jumps is the consequence of the dynamical complexity, we discuss the effect of initial conditions on the number of jumps to find that the dynamical complexity strongly depends on how much individuals initially overestimate or underestimate the link density of the actual network. For the heterogeneous case, the role of the highly connected individual as an information spreader is also discussed.

  9. Non coding extremities of the seven influenza virus type C vRNA segments: effect on transcription and replication by the type C and type A polymerase complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Werf Sylvie

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transcription/replication of the influenza viruses implicate the terminal nucleotide sequences of viral RNA, which comprise sequences at the extremities conserved among the genomic segments as well as variable 3' and 5' non-coding (NC regions. The plasmid-based system for the in vivo reconstitution of functional ribonucleoproteins, upon expression of viral-like RNAs together with the nucleoprotein and polymerase proteins has been widely used to analyze transcription/replication of influenza viruses. It was thus shown that the type A polymerase could transcribe and replicate type A, B, or C vRNA templates whereas neither type B nor type C polymerases were able to transcribe and replicate type A templates efficiently. Here we studied the importance of the NC regions from the seven segments of type C influenza virus for efficient transcription/replication by the type A and C polymerases. Results The NC sequences of the seven genomic segments of the type C influenza virus C/Johannesburg/1/66 strain were found to be more variable in length than those of the type A and B viruses. The levels of transcription/replication of viral-like vRNAs harboring the NC sequences of the respective type C virus segments flanking the CAT reporter gene were comparable in the presence of either type C or type A polymerase complexes except for the NS and PB2-like vRNAs. For the NS-like vRNA, the transcription/replication level was higher after introduction of a U residue at position 6 in the 5' NC region as for all other segments. For the PB2-like vRNA the CAT expression level was particularly reduced with the type C polymerase. Analysis of mutants of the 5' NC sequence in the PB2-like vRNA, the shortest 5' NC sequence among the seven segments, showed that additional sequences within the PB2 ORF were essential for the efficiency of transcription but not replication by the type C polymerase complex. Conclusion In the context of a PB2-like reporter

  10. The crystal structure of a replicative hexameric helicase DnaC and its complex with single-stranded DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Lo, Yu-Hua; Tsai, Kuang-Lei; Sun, Yuh-Ju; Chen, Wei-Ti; Huang, Cheng-Yang; Hsiao, Chwan-Deng

    2008-01-01

    DNA helicases are motor proteins that play essential roles in DNA replication, repair and recombination. In the replicative hexameric helicase, the fundamental reaction is the unwinding of duplex DNA; however, our understanding of this function remains vague due to insufficient structural information. Here, we report two crystal structures of the DnaB-family replicative helicase from Geobacillus kaustophilus HTA426 (GkDnaC) in the apo-form and bound to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The GkDnaC–...

  11. The kinase inhibitor SFV785 dislocates dengue virus envelope protein from the replication complex and blocks virus assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azlinda Anwar

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is the etiologic agent for dengue fever, for which there is no approved vaccine or specific anti-viral drug. As a remedy for this, we explored the use of compounds that interfere with the action of required host factors and describe here the characterization of a kinase inhibitor (SFV785, which has selective effects on NTRK1 and MAPKAPK5 kinase activity, and anti-viral activity on Hepatitis C, DENV and yellow fever viruses. SFV785 inhibited DENV propagation without inhibiting DENV RNA synthesis or translation. The compound did not cause any changes in the cellular distribution of non-structural 3, a protein critical for DENV RNA synthesis, but altered the distribution of the structural envelope protein from a reticulate network to enlarged discrete vesicles, which altered the co-localization with the DENV replication complex. Ultrastructural electron microscopy analyses of DENV-infected SFV785-treated cells showed the presence of viral particles that were distinctly different from viable enveloped virions within enlarged ER cisternae. These viral particles were devoid of the dense nucleocapsid. The secretion of the viral particles was not inhibited by SFV785, however a reduction in the amount of secreted infectious virions, DENV RNA and capsid were observed. Collectively, these observations suggest that SFV785 inhibited the recruitment and assembly of the nucleocapsid in specific ER compartments during the DENV assembly process and hence the production of infectious DENV. SFV785 and derivative compounds could be useful biochemical probes to explore the DENV lifecycle and could also represent a new class of anti-virals.

  12. Changes in protein structure at the interface accompanying complex formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devlina Chakravarty

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Protein interactions are essential in all biological processes. The changes brought about in the structure when a free component forms a complex with another molecule need to be characterized for a proper understanding of molecular recognition as well as for the successful implementation of docking algorithms. Here, unbound (U and bound (B forms of protein structures from the Protein–Protein Interaction Affinity Database are compared in order to enumerate the changes that occur at the interface atoms/residues in terms of the solvent-accessible surface area (ASA, secondary structure, temperature factors (B factors and disorder-to-order transitions. It is found that the interface atoms optimize contacts with the atoms in the partner protein, which leads to an increase in their ASA in the bound interface in the majority (69% of the proteins when compared with the unbound interface, and this is independent of the root-mean-square deviation between the U and B forms. Changes in secondary structure during the transition indicate a likely extension of helices and strands at the expense of turns and coils. A reduction in flexibility during complex formation is reflected in the decrease in B factors of the interface residues on going from the U form to the B form. There is, however, no distinction in flexibility between the interface and the surface in the monomeric structure, thereby highlighting the potential problem of using B factors for the prediction of binding sites in the unbound form for docking another protein. 16% of the proteins have missing (disordered residues in the U form which are observed (ordered in the B form, mostly with an irregular conformation; the data set also shows differences in the composition of interface and non-interface residues in the disordered polypeptide segments as well as differences in their surface burial.

  13. Formation of STIM and Orai complexes: puncta and distal caps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Valarie A; Bernot, Kelsie M; Shaffer, Meredith H; Burkhardt, Janis K; Samelson, Lawrence E

    2009-09-01

    In the last few years, great progress has been made in understanding how stromal interacting molecule 1 (STIM1), a protein containing a calcium sensor that is located in the endoplasmic reticulum, and Orai1, a protein that forms a calcium channel in the plasma membrane, interact and give rise to store-operated calcium entry. Pharmacological depletion of calcium stores leads to the formation of clusters containing STIM and Orai that appear to be sites for calcium influx. Similar puncta are also produced in response to physiological stimuli in immune cells. In T cells engaged with antigen-presenting cells, clusters containing STIM and Orai accumulate at the immunological synapse. We recently discovered that in activated T cells, STIM1 and Orai1 also accumulate in cap-like structures opposite the immune synapse at the distal pole of the cell. Both caps and puncta are long-lived stable structures containing STIM1 and Orai1 in close proximity. The function of puncta as sites of calcium influx is clear. We speculate that the caps may provide a secondary site of calcium entry. Alternatively, they may serve as a source of preformed channel complexes that move to new immune synapses as T cells repeatedly engage antigen-presenting cells.

  14. Integrin activation and focal complex formation in cardiac hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laser, M.; Willey, C. D.; Jiang, W.; Cooper, G. 4th; Menick, D. R.; Zile, M. R.; Kuppuswamy, D.

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is characterized by both remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and hypertrophic growth of the cardiocytes. Here we show increased expression and cytoskeletal association of the ECM proteins fibronectin and vitronectin in pressure-overloaded feline myocardium. These changes are accompanied by cytoskeletal binding and phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) at Tyr-397 and Tyr-925, c-Src at Tyr-416, recruitment of the adapter proteins p130(Cas), Shc, and Nck, and activation of the extracellular-regulated kinases ERK1/2. A synthetic peptide containing the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif of fibronectin and vitronectin was used to stimulate adult feline cardiomyocytes cultured on laminin or within a type-I collagen matrix. Whereas cardiocytes under both conditions showed RGD-stimulated ERK1/2 activation, only collagen-embedded cells exhibited cytoskeletal assembly of FAK, c-Src, Nck, and Shc. In RGD-stimulated collagen-embedded cells, FAK was phosphorylated only at Tyr-397 and c-Src association occurred without Tyr-416 phosphorylation and p130(Cas) association. Therefore, c-Src activation is not required for its cytoskeletal binding but may be important for additional phosphorylation of FAK. Overall, our study suggests that multiple signaling pathways originate in pressure-overloaded heart following integrin engagement with ECM proteins, including focal complex formation and ERK1/2 activation, and many of these pathways can be activated in cardiomyocytes via RGD-stimulated integrin activation.

  15. Integrin activation and focal complex formation in cardiac hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laser, M.; Willey, C. D.; Jiang, W.; Cooper, G. 4th; Menick, D. R.; Zile, M. R.; Kuppuswamy, D.

    2000-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is characterized by both remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and hypertrophic growth of the cardiocytes. Here we show increased expression and cytoskeletal association of the ECM proteins fibronectin and vitronectin in pressure-overloaded feline myocardium. These changes are accompanied by cytoskeletal binding and phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) at Tyr-397 and Tyr-925, c-Src at Tyr-416, recruitment of the adapter proteins p130(Cas), Shc, and Nck, and activation of the extracellular-regulated kinases ERK1/2. A synthetic peptide containing the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif of fibronectin and vitronectin was used to stimulate adult feline cardiomyocytes cultured on laminin or within a type-I collagen matrix. Whereas cardiocytes under both conditions showed RGD-stimulated ERK1/2 activation, only collagen-embedded cells exhibited cytoskeletal assembly of FAK, c-Src, Nck, and Shc. In RGD-stimulated collagen-embedded cells, FAK was phosphorylated only at Tyr-397 and c-Src association occurred without Tyr-416 phosphorylation and p130(Cas) association. Therefore, c-Src activation is not required for its cytoskeletal binding but may be important for additional phosphorylation of FAK. Overall, our study suggests that multiple signaling pathways originate in pressure-overloaded heart following integrin engagement with ECM proteins, including focal complex formation and ERK1/2 activation, and many of these pathways can be activated in cardiomyocytes via RGD-stimulated integrin activation.

  16. Identification of an HIV-1 replication inhibitor which rescues host restriction factor APOBEC3G in Vif-APOBEC3G complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaoyang; Zhong, Limei; Chen, Bing; Pan, Ting; Zhang, Xue; Liang, Liting; Li, Qianwen; Zhang, Ziying; Chen, Hui; Zhou, Jie; Luo, Haihua; Zhang, Hui; Bai, Chuan

    2015-10-01

    HIV-1 Vif protein is one of the most crucial accessory proteins for viral replication. It efficiently counteracts the important host restriction factor APOBEC3G (apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide-like 3G, A3G) which is lethal to HIV-1 by causing G to A mutation of viral genome. Vif protein mediates degradation of APOBEC3G via the complicated protein-protein interactions of Vif, APOBEC3G, Elongin C/B and Cullin 5. The importance of Vif-APOBEC3G complex makes it a good potential target to develop new therapeutics of HIV-1. We identified a potent HIV-1 replication inhibitor (ZBMA-1, IC50 = 1.01 μM) that efficiently protected APOBEC3G protein by targeting Vif-APOBEC3G complex. The co-immunoprecipitation and docking studies indicated that compound ZBMA-1 affected the binding of Elongin C with Vif protein.

  17. Molecular mechanism underlying RAG1/RAG2 synaptic complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlyakhtenko, Luda S; Gilmore, Jamie; Kriatchko, Aleksei N; Kumar, Sushil; Swanson, Patrick C; Lyubchenko, Yuri L

    2009-07-31

    Two lymphoid cell-specific proteins, RAG1 and RAG2 (RAG), initiate V(D)J recombination by assembling a synaptic complex with recombination signal sequences (RSSs) abutting two different antigen receptor gene coding segments, and then introducing a DNA double strand break at the end of each RSS. Despite the biological importance of this system, the structure of the synaptic complex, and the RAG protein stoichiometry and arrangement of DNA within the synaptosome, remains poorly understood. Here we applied atomic force microscopy to directly visualize and characterize RAG synaptic complexes. We report that the pre-cleavage RAG synaptic complex contains about twice the protein content as a RAG complex bound to a single RSS, with a calculated mass consistent with a pair of RAG heterotetramers. In the synaptic complex, the RSSs are predominantly oriented in a side-by-side configuration with no DNA strand crossover. The mass of the synaptic complex, and the conditions under which it is formed in vitro, favors an association model of assembly in which isolated RAG-RSS complexes undergo synapsis mediated by RAG protein-protein interactions. The replacement of Mg2+ cations with Ca2+ leads to a dramatic change in protein stoichiometry for all RAG-RSS complexes, suggesting that the cation composition profoundly influences the type of complex assembled.

  18. Molecular Mechanism Underlying RAG1/RAG2 Synaptic Complex Formation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlyakhtenko, Luda S.; Gilmore, Jamie; Kriatchko, Aleksei N.; Kumar, Sushil; Swanson, Patrick C.; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2009-01-01

    Two lymphoid cell-specific proteins, RAG1 and RAG2 (RAG), initiate V(D)J recombination by assembling a synaptic complex with recombination signal sequences (RSSs) abutting two different antigen receptor gene coding segments, and then introducing a DNA double strand break at the end of each RSS. Despite the biological importance of this system, the structure of the synaptic complex, and the RAG protein stoichiometry and arrangement of DNA within the synaptosome, remains poorly understood. Here we applied atomic force microscopy to directly visualize and characterize RAG synaptic complexes. We report that the pre-cleavage RAG synaptic complex contains about twice the protein content as a RAG complex bound to a single RSS, with a calculated mass consistent with a pair of RAG heterotetramers. In the synaptic complex, the RSSs are predominantly oriented in a side-by-side configuration with no DNA strand crossover. The mass of the synaptic complex, and the conditions under which it is formed in vitro, favors an association model of assembly in which isolated RAG-RSS complexes undergo synapsis mediated by RAG protein-protein interactions. The replacement of Mg2+ cations with Ca2+ leads to a dramatic change in protein stoichiometry for all RAG-RSS complexes, suggesting that the cation composition profoundly influences the type of complex assembled. PMID:19502597

  19. Gap-directed translesion DNA synthesis of an abasic site on circular DNA templates by a human replication complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Villani

    Full Text Available DNA polymerase ε (pol ε is believed to be the leading strand replicase in eukaryotes whereas pols λ and β are thought to be mainly involved in re-synthesis steps of DNA repair. DNA elongation by the human pol ε is halted by an abasic site (apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP site. We have previously reported that human pols λ, β and η can perform translesion synthesis (TLS of an AP site in the presence of pol ε. In the case of pol λ and β, this TLS requires the presence of a gap downstream from the product synthetized by the ε replicase. However, since these studies were conducted exclusively with a linear DNA template, we decided to test whether the structure of the template could influence the capacity of the pols ε, λ, β and η to perform TLS of an AP site. Therefore, we have investigated the replication of damaged "minicircle" DNA templates. In addition, replication of circular DNA requires, beyond DNA pols, the processivity clamp PCNA, the clamp loader replication factor C (RFC, and the accessory proteins replication protein A (RPA. Finally we have compared the capacity of unmodified versus monoubiquitinated PCNA in sustaining TLS by pols λ and η on a circular template. Our results indicate that in vitro gap-directed TLS synthesis by pols λ and β in the presence of pol ε, RPA and PCNA is unaffected by the structure of the DNA template. Moreover, monoubiquitination of PCNA does not affect TLS by pol λ while it appears to slightly stimulate TLS by pol η.

  20. The effect of temperature and time on the formation of amylose–lysophosphatidylcholine inclusion complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmadi-Abhari, S.; Woortman, A.J.J.; Oudhuis, A.A.C.M.; Hamer, R.J.; Loos, K.

    2014-01-01

    The formation of amylose inclusion complexes could help to decrease the susceptibility of starch granules against amylase digestion. We studied the formation of amylose–lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) inclusion complexes at temperatures at and below the gelatinization temperature of starch, using DSC,

  1. The effect of temperature and time on the formation of amylose- lysophosphatidylcholine inclusion complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmadiabhari, Salomeh; Woortman, Albert J. J.; Oudhuis, A. A. C. M. (Lizette); Hamer, Rob J.; Loos, Katja

    The formation of amylose inclusion complexes could help to decrease the susceptibility of starch granules against amylase digestion. We studied the formation of amylose-lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) inclusion complexes at temperatures at and below the gelatinization temperature of starch, using DSC,

  2. Host ESCRT proteins are required for bromovirus RNA replication compartment assembly and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Diaz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Positive-strand RNA viruses genome replication invariably is associated with vesicles or other rearranged cellular membranes. Brome mosaic virus (BMV RNA replication occurs on perinuclear endoplasmic reticulum (ER membranes in ~70 nm vesicular invaginations (spherules. BMV RNA replication vesicles show multiple parallels with membrane-enveloped, budding retrovirus virions, whose envelopment and release depend on the host ESCRT (endosomal sorting complexes required for transport membrane-remodeling machinery. We now find that deleting components of the ESCRT pathway results in at least two distinct BMV phenotypes. One group of genes regulate RNA replication and the frequency of viral replication complex formation, but had no effect on spherule size, while a second group of genes regulate RNA replication in a way or ways independent of spherule formation. In particular, deleting SNF7 inhibits BMV RNA replication > 25-fold and abolishes detectable BMV spherule formation, even though the BMV RNA replication proteins accumulate and localize normally on perinuclear ER membranes. Moreover, BMV ESCRT recruitment and spherule assembly depend on different sets of protein-protein interactions from those used by multivesicular body vesicles, HIV-1 virion budding, or tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV spherule formation. These and other data demonstrate that BMV requires cellular ESCRT components for proper formation and function of its vesicular RNA replication compartments. The results highlight growing but diverse interactions of ESCRT factors with many viruses and viral processes, and potential value of the ESCRT pathway as a target for broad-spectrum antiviral resistance.

  3. Host ESCRT proteins are required for bromovirus RNA replication compartment assembly and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Arturo; Zhang, Jiantao; Ollwerther, Abigail; Wang, Xiaofeng; Ahlquist, Paul

    2015-03-01

    Positive-strand RNA viruses genome replication invariably is associated with vesicles or other rearranged cellular membranes. Brome mosaic virus (BMV) RNA replication occurs on perinuclear endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes in ~70 nm vesicular invaginations (spherules). BMV RNA replication vesicles show multiple parallels with membrane-enveloped, budding retrovirus virions, whose envelopment and release depend on the host ESCRT (endosomal sorting complexes required for transport) membrane-remodeling machinery. We now find that deleting components of the ESCRT pathway results in at least two distinct BMV phenotypes. One group of genes regulate RNA replication and the frequency of viral replication complex formation, but had no effect on spherule size, while a second group of genes regulate RNA replication in a way or ways independent of spherule formation. In particular, deleting SNF7 inhibits BMV RNA replication > 25-fold and abolishes detectable BMV spherule formation, even though the BMV RNA replication proteins accumulate and localize normally on perinuclear ER membranes. Moreover, BMV ESCRT recruitment and spherule assembly depend on different sets of protein-protein interactions from those used by multivesicular body vesicles, HIV-1 virion budding, or tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) spherule formation. These and other data demonstrate that BMV requires cellular ESCRT components for proper formation and function of its vesicular RNA replication compartments. The results highlight growing but diverse interactions of ESCRT factors with many viruses and viral processes, and potential value of the ESCRT pathway as a target for broad-spectrum antiviral resistance.

  4. Spectroscopic investigation on the inclusion complex formation between amisulpride and γ-cyclodextrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negi, Jeetendra Singh; Singh, Shivpal

    2013-02-15

    The purpose of this research was to investigate inclusion complex formation between poorly soluble drug amisulpride (AMI) and γ-cyclodextrin (γ-CD). The solubility of AMI was enhanced by formation of inclusion complex of AMI with nano-hydrophobic cavity of γ-CD. The stoichiometry of inclusion complex was studied by continuous variation Job's plot method and found 1:1. The binding constant was found 1166.65 M(-1) by Benesi-Hildebrand plot. The molecular docking of AMI and γ-CD was done to investigate complexation. The inclusion complex formation was further confirmed by (1)H NMR and FT-IR, DSC and XRD analysis. The solubility of AMI was increased 3.74 times after inclusion complex formation with γ-CD.

  5. Complex Formation Between Iron(III) and Isonicotinohydroxamic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acer

    Nigerian Journal of Basic and Applied Science (2009), 17(2): 181-188 ... ABSTRACT: Complex of Fe(III) with isonicotinohydroxamic acid (INHA) has been .... Matrix rank analysis using nine solution ..... computation of stability constants from ...

  6. Complexity of gold nanoparticle formation disclosed by dynamics study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbrekt, Christian; Jensen, Palle Skovhus; Sørensen, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    Although chemically synthesized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) from gold salt (HAuCl4) are among the most studied nanomaterials, understanding the formation mechanisms is a challenge mainly due to limited dynamics information. A range of in situ methods with down to millisecond (ms) time resolution...... have been employed in the present report to monitor time-dependent physical and chemical properties in aqueous solution during the chemical synthesis. Chemical synthesis of AuNPs is a reduction process accompanied by release of ions and protons, and formation of solid particles. Dynamic information......]- to form Au atoms during the early stage of the synthesis process. pH- and conductivity-dynamics point further clearly to formation of coating layers on AuNPs and adsorbate exchange between MES and starch. © 2013 American Chemical Society....

  7. Coexistence facilitates interspecific biofilm formation in complex microbial communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jonas Stenløkke; Røder, Henriette Lyng; Russel, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    , the underlying role of fundamental ecological factors, specifically coexistence and phylogenetic history, in biofilm formation remains unclear. This study examines how social interactions affect biofilm formation in multi-species co-cultures from five diverse environments. We found prevalence of increased......Social interactions in which bacteria respond to one another by modifying their phenotype are central determinants of microbial communities. It is known that interspecific interactions influence the biofilm phenotype of bacteria; a phenotype that is central to the fitness of bacteria. However...

  8. Influence of the Hydrophobicity of Polyelectrolytes on Polyelectrolyte Complex Formation and Complex Particle Structure and Shape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudrun Petzold

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs were prepared by structural uniform and strongly charged cationic and anionic modified alternating maleic anhydride copolymers. The hydrophobicity of the polyelectrolytes was changed by the comonomers (ethylene, isobutylene and styrene. Additionally, the n−/n+ ratio of the molar charges of the polyelectrolytes and the procedure of formation were varied. The colloidal stability of the systems and the size, shape, and structure of the PEC particles were investigated by turbidimetry, dynamic light scattering (DLS and atomic force microscopy (AFM. Dynamic light scattering indicates that beside large PEC particle aggregates distinct smaller particles were formed by the copolymers which have the highest hydrophobicity (styrene. These findings could be proved by AFM. Fractal dimension (D, root mean square (RMS roughness and the surface profiles of the PEC particles adsorbed on mica allow the following conclusions: the higher the hydrophobicity of the polyelectrolytes, the broader is the particle size distribution and the minor is the swelling of the PEC particles. Hence, the most compact particles are formed with the very hydrophobic copolymer.

  9. Effects of chemical and enzymatic modifications on starch-linoleic acid complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arijaje, Emily Oluwaseun; Wang, Ya-Jane

    2017-02-15

    This study investigated the complexation yield and physicochemical properties of soluble and insoluble starch complexes with linoleic acid when a β-amylase treatment was applied to acetylated and debranched potato starch. The degree of acetylation was generally higher in the soluble complexes than in the insoluble ones. The insoluble complexes from the acetylated starch displayed the V-type pattern, whereas, the soluble complexes displayed a mixture of either the A-/V-type or the B-/V-type pattern. Acetylation decreased onset and peak melting temperatures for the insoluble complexes, whereas no melting endotherm was observed in the soluble complexes. Acetylation substantially increased the amount of complexed linoleic acid in the insoluble complexes, but had little positive effect on the formation of the soluble complexes. The β-amylase treatment significantly increased the complexed linoleic content in both soluble and insoluble complexes for the low acetylated starch, but not for the high acetylated starch.

  10. The Effect of Complex Formation upon the Redox Potentials of Metallic Ions. Cyclic Voltammetry Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibanez, Jorge G.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes experiments in which students prepare in situ soluble complexes of metal ions with different ligands and observe and estimate the change in formal potential that the ion undergoes upon complexation. Discusses student formation and analysis of soluble complexes of two different metal ions with the same ligand. (CW)

  11. The Effect of Complex Formation upon the Redox Potentials of Metallic Ions. Cyclic Voltammetry Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibanez, Jorge G.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes experiments in which students prepare in situ soluble complexes of metal ions with different ligands and observe and estimate the change in formal potential that the ion undergoes upon complexation. Discusses student formation and analysis of soluble complexes of two different metal ions with the same ligand. (CW)

  12. C-NH2 bond formation mediated by iridium complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Mena, Inmaculada; Casado, Miguel A.; Polo, Víctor; García-Orduña, P.; Lahoz, Fernando J.; Oro, Luis A.

    2014-01-01

    In the presence of phosphanes (PR3), the amido-bridged trinuclear complex [{Ir(μ-NH2)(tfbb)}3] (tfbb=tetrafluorobenzobarrelene) transforms into mononuclear discrete compounds [Ir(1,2-η2-4-κ-C12H8F 4N)(PR3)3], which are the products of the C-N coupling between the amido moiety and a vinylic carbon of the diolefin. An alternative synthetic approach to these species involves the reaction of the 18-e- complex [Ir(Cl)(tfbb)(PMePh2)2] with gaseous ammonia and additional phosphane. DFT studies show ...

  13. Isolation and characterization of unusual multinuclear Schiff base complexes: rearrangements reactions and octanuclear cluster formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Belmonte, Marta; Escudero-Adán, Eduardo C; Martin, Eddy; Kleij, Arjan W

    2012-05-07

    The isolation and full characterization of multinuclear Schiff base complexes is reported, and their relevance as precursors for octanuclear Zn(8) salen cluster complex formation is discussed. Starting from simple precursors, three tetranuclear Zn(4) complexes were accessed that incorporate typical half-salen units and comprise of bridging acetates. The use of alternative reaction conditions or a step-wise approach smoothly leads to Zn(8) cluster formation. In addition, the tetranuclear Zn(4) complexes themselves may also serve as precursors toward Zn(8) cluster formation when treated under appropriate reaction conditions. The influence of the solvent medium in the latter Zn(4) → Zn(8) conversion was separately studied and revealed the formation of unusual pyridine-ligated multinuclear structures with fully condensed salen coordination pockets, providing a possible prelude to octanuclear cluster formation.

  14. Dimeric interactions and complex formation using direct coevolutionary couplings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Ricardo N; Morcos, Faruck; Jana, Biman; Andricopulo, Adriano D; Onuchic, José N

    2015-09-04

    We develop a procedure to characterize the association of protein structures into homodimers using coevolutionary couplings extracted from Direct Coupling Analysis (DCA) in combination with Structure Based Models (SBM). Identification of dimerization contacts using DCA is more challenging than intradomain contacts since direct couplings are mixed with monomeric contacts. Therefore a systematic way to extract dimerization signals has been elusive. We provide evidence that the prediction of homodimeric complexes is possible with high accuracy for all the cases we studied which have rich sequence information. For the most accurate conformations of the structurally diverse dimeric complexes studied the mean and interfacial RMSDs are 1.95Å and 1.44Å, respectively. This methodology is also able to identify distinct dimerization conformations as for the case of the family of response regulators, which dimerize upon activation. The identification of dimeric complexes can provide interesting molecular insights in the construction of large oligomeric complexes and be useful in the study of aggregation related diseases like Alzheimer's or Parkinson's.

  15. Formation of transcription factor complexes during embryonic erythroid development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    X. Yu (Xiao)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractHematopoiesis is a classic model for the study of embryonic and adult stem cell differentiation. Erythropoiesis is the process of generating erythrocytes from hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). In Chapter1, we introduce the process of erythropoiesis and discuss proteins and protein complexe

  16. Database Replication

    CERN Document Server

    Kemme, Bettina

    2010-01-01

    Database replication is widely used for fault-tolerance, scalability and performance. The failure of one database replica does not stop the system from working as available replicas can take over the tasks of the failed replica. Scalability can be achieved by distributing the load across all replicas, and adding new replicas should the load increase. Finally, database replication can provide fast local access, even if clients are geographically distributed clients, if data copies are located close to clients. Despite its advantages, replication is not a straightforward technique to apply, and

  17. Apoptosis of human breast carcinoma cells in the presence of cis-platin and L-/D-PPMP: IV. Modulation of replication complexes and glycolipid: Glycosyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Patrick J; Ma, Rui; Tuteja, Narendra; Banerjee, Sipra; Basu, Subhash

    2006-05-01

    Apoptosis of human breast carcinoma cells (SKBR-3, MCF-7, and MDA-468) has been observed after treatment of these cells with anti-cancer drug cis-platin and glycosphingolipid biosynthesis inhibitor L- and D-PPMP, respectively. These drugs initiated apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner as measured by phenotypic morphological changes, by binding of a fluorescent phophatidyl serine-specific dye (PSS-380) onto the outer leaflet of the cell membranes, and by activation of caspases, -3, -8, and -9. It was observed that in two hours very little apoptotic process had started but predominant biochemical changes occurred after 6 h. DNA degradation started after 24 hours of drug treatment. However, very little is known about the stability of the ';Replication Complexes'' during the apoptotic process. DNA helicases are motor proteins that catalyze the melting of genomic DNA during its replication, repair, and recombination processes. Previously, DNA helicase-III was characterized as a component of the replication complexes isolated from embryonic chicken brains as well as breast and colon carcinoma cells. Helicase activities were measured by a novel method (ROME assay), and DNA polymerase-alpha activities were determined by regular chain extension of the nicked ACT-DNA, by determining values obtained from +/- aphidicolin-treated incubation mixtures. In all three breast carcinoma cell lines, a common trend was observed: a decrease of activities of DNA polymerase-alpha and Helicase III. A sharp decrease of activities of the glycolipid sialyltransferases: SAT-2 (CMP-NeuAc; GD3 alpha2-8 sialyltransferase) and SAT-4 (CMP-NeuAc: GM1a alpha2-3 sialyltransferase) was observed in the apoptotic carcinoma cells treated with L-PPMP compared with cis-platin.

  18. Self-replication with magnetic dipolar colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempster, Joshua M; Zhang, Rui; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2015-10-01

    Colloidal self-replication represents an exciting research frontier in soft matter physics. Currently, all reported self-replication schemes involve coating colloidal particles with stimuli-responsive molecules to allow switchable interactions. In this paper, we introduce a scheme using ferromagnetic dipolar colloids and preprogrammed external magnetic fields to create an autonomous self-replication system. Interparticle dipole-dipole forces and periodically varying weak-strong magnetic fields cooperate to drive colloid monomers from the solute onto templates, bind them into replicas, and dissolve template complexes. We present three general design principles for autonomous linear replicators, derived from a focused study of a minimalist sphere-dimer magnetic system in which single binding sites allow formation of dimeric templates. We show via statistical models and computer simulations that our system exhibits nonlinear growth of templates and produces nearly exponential growth (low error rate) upon adding an optimized competing electrostatic potential. We devise experimental strategies for constructing the required magnetic colloids based on documented laboratory techniques. We also present qualitative ideas about building more complex self-replicating structures utilizing magnetic colloids.

  19. Base Flipping in Open Complex Formation at Bacterial Promoters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E. Karpen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In the process of transcription initiation, the bacterial RNA polymerase binds double-stranded (ds promoter DNA and subsequently effects strand separation of 12 to 14 base pairs (bp, including the start site of transcription, to form the so-called “open complex” (also referred to as RPo. This complex is competent to initiate RNA synthesis. Here we will review the role of σ70 and its homologs in the strand separation process, and evidence that strand separation is initiated at the −11A (the A of the non-template strand that is 11 bp upstream from the transcription start site of the promoter. By using the fluorescent adenine analog, 2-aminopurine, it was demonstrated that the −11A on the non-template strand flips out of the DNA helix and into a hydrophobic pocket where it stacks with tyrosine 430 of σ70. Open complexes are remarkably stable, even though in vivo, and under most experimental conditions in vitro, dsDNA is much more stable than its strand-separated form. Subsequent structural studies of other researchers have confirmed that in the open complex the −11A has flipped into a hydrophobic pocket of σ70. It was also revealed that RPo was stabilized by three additional bases of the non-template strand being flipped out of the helix and into hydrophobic pockets, further preventing re-annealing of the two complementary DNA strands.

  20. Flow induced streamer formation in particle laden complex flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Nandini; Hassanpourfard, Mahtab; Ghosh, Ranajay; Trivedi, Japan; Thundat, Thomas; Kumar, Aloke

    2016-11-01

    We study the combined flow of a polyacrylamide (PAM)solution with polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles, through a microfluidic device containing an array of micropillars. The flow is characterized by a very low Reynolds number (Re= 20), PS nanoparticles localize near pillar walls to form thin slender string-like structures, which we call 'streamers' due to their morphology. Post-formation, these streamers show significant viscous behavior for short observational time-scales, and at longer observational time scales elastic response dominates. Our abiotic streamers could provide a framework for understanding similar structures that often form in biological systems. PhD student, Department of Mechanical Engineering.

  1. Protein-free parallel triple-stranded DNA complex formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchyolkina, A. K.; Timofeev, E. N.; Lysov, Yu. P.; Florentiev, V. L.; Jovin, T. M.; Arndt-Jovin, D. J.

    2001-01-01

    A 14 nt DNA sequence 5′-AGAATGTGGCAAAG-3′ from the zinc finger repeat of the human KRAB zinc finger protein gene ZNF91 bearing the intercalator 2-methoxy,6-chloro,9-amino acridine (Acr) attached to the sugar–phosphate backbone in various positions has been shown to form a specific triple helix (triplex) with a 16 bp hairpin (intramolecular) or a two-stranded (intermolecular) duplex having the identical sequence in the same (parallel) orientation. Intramolecular targets with the identical sequence in the antiparallel orientation and a non-specific target sequence were tested as controls. Apparent binding constants for formation of the triplex were determined by quantitating electrophoretic band shifts. Binding of the single-stranded oligonucleotide probe sequence to the target led to an increase in the fluorescence anisotropy of acridine. The parallel orientation of the two identical sequence segments was confirmed by measurement of fluorescence resonance energy transfer between the acridine on the 5′-end of the probe strand as donor and BODIPY-Texas Red on the 3′-amino group of either strand of the target duplex as acceptor. There was full protection from OsO4-bipyridine modification of thymines in the probe strand of the triplex, in accordance with the presumed triplex formation, which excluded displacement of the homologous duplex strand by the probe–intercalator conjugate. The implications of these results for the existence of protein-independent parallel triplexes are discussed. PMID:11160932

  2. Collectin-11/MASP complex formation triggers activation of the lectin complement pathway--the fifth lectin pathway initiation complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ying Jie; Skjoedt, Mikkel-Ole; Garred, Peter

    2013-01-01

    complement pathway regulator MAP-1. Furthermore, we found that complex formation between recombinant collectin-11 and recombinant MASP-2 on Candida albicans leads to deposition of C4b. Native collectin-11 in serum mediated complement activation and deposition of C4b and C3b, and formation of the terminal...... complement complex on C. albicans. Moreover, spiking collectin-11-depleted serum, which did not mediate complement activation, with recombinant collectin-11 restored the complement activation capability. These results define collectin-11 as the fifth recognition molecule in the lectin complement pathway...

  3. Biological pattern formation: from basic mechanisms to complex structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, A. J.; Meinhardt, H.

    1994-10-01

    The reliable development of highly complex organisms is an intriguing and fascinating problem. The genetic material is, as a rule, the same in each cell of an organism. How then do cells, under the influence of their common genes, produce spatial patterns? Simple models are discussed that describe the generation of patterns out of an initially nearly homogeneous state. They are based on nonlinear interactions of at least two chemicals and on their diffusion. The concepts of local autocatalysis and of long-range inhibition play a fundamental role. Numerical simulations show that the models account for many basic biological observations such as the regeneration of a pattern after excision of tissue or the production of regular (or nearly regular) arrays of organs during (or after) completion of growth. Very complex patterns can be generated in a reproducible way by hierarchical coupling of several such elementary reactions. Applications to animal coats and to the generation of polygonally shaped patterns are provided. It is further shown how to generate a strictly periodic pattern of units that themselves exhibit a complex and polar fine structure. This is illustrated by two examples: the assembly of photoreceptor cells in the eye of Drosophila and the positioning of leaves and axillary buds in a growing shoot. In both cases, the substructures have to achieve an internal polarity under the influence of some primary pattern-forming system existing in the fly's eye or in the plant. The fact that similar models can describe essential steps in organisms as distantly related as animals and plants suggests that they reveal some universal mechanisms.

  4. The formation and study of titanium, zirconium, and hafnium complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Bobby; Sarin, Sam; Smith, Laverne; Wilson, Melanie

    1989-01-01

    Research involves the preparation and characterization of a series of Ti, Zr, Hf, TiO, and HfO complexes using the poly(pyrazole) borates as ligands. The study will provide increased understanding of the decomposition of these coordination compounds which may lead to the production of molecular oxygen on the Moon from lunar materials such as ilmenite and rutile. The model compounds are investigated under reducing conditions of molecular hydrogen by use of a high temperature/pressure stainless steel autoclave reactor and by thermogravimetric analysis.

  5. The complex interplay between semantics and grammar in impression formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shreves, Wyley B; Hart, William; Adams, John M; Guadagno, Rosanna E; Eno, Cassie A

    2014-09-01

    We sought to bridge findings showing that (a) describing a person's behavior with the perfective verb aspect (did), compared to the imperfective aspect (was doing), increases processing of semantic knowledge unrelated to the target's action such as stereotypes and (b) an increased recognition of stereotypical thoughts often promotes a judgment correction for the stereotypes. We hypothesized an interplay between grammar (verb conjugation) and semantic information (gender) in impression-formation. Participants read a resume, attributed to a male or female, for a traditionally masculine job. When the resume was written in the imperfective, people rated a male (vs. female) more positively. When the resume was in the perfective, this pattern reversed. Only these latter effects of gender were influenced by cognitive load. Further, people more quickly indicated the applicant's gender in the perfective condition, suggesting an enhanced focus on gender during processing.

  6. C-NH2 bond formation mediated by iridium complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, Inmaculada; Casado, Miguel A; Polo, Víctor; García-Orduña, Pilar; Lahoz, Fernando J; Oro, Luis A

    2014-09-01

    In the presence of phosphanes (PR3 ), the amido-bridged trinuclear complex [{Ir(μ-NH2 )(tfbb)}3 ] (tfbb=tetrafluorobenzobarrelene) transforms into mononuclear discrete compounds [Ir(1,2-η(2) -4-κ-C12 H8 F4 N)(PR3 )3 ], which are the products of the CN coupling between the amido moiety and a vinylic carbon of the diolefin. An alternative synthetic approach to these species involves the reaction of the 18 e(-) complex [Ir(Cl)(tfbb)(PMePh2 )2 ] with gaseous ammonia and additional phosphane. DFT studies show that both transformations occur through nucleophilic attack. In the first case the amido moiety attacks a diolefin coordinated to a neighboring molecule following a bimolecular mechanism induced by the highly basic NH2 moiety; the second pathway involves a direct nucleophilic attack of ammonia to a coordinated tfbb molecule. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Crystal structure of the homology domain of the eukaryotic DNA replication proteins Sld3/Treslin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itou, Hiroshi; Muramatsu, Sachiko; Shirakihara, Yasuo; Araki, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-02

    The initiation of eukaryotic chromosomal DNA replication requires the formation of an active replicative helicase at the replication origins of chromosomal DNA. Yeast Sld3 and its metazoan counterpart Treslin are the hub proteins mediating protein associations critical for the helicase formation. Here, we show the crystal structure of the central domain of Sld3 that is conserved in Sld3/Treslin family of proteins. The domain consists of two segments with 12 helices and is sufficient to bind to Cdc45, the essential helicase component. The structure model of the Sld3-Cdc45 complex, which is crucial for the formation of the active helicase, is proposed.

  8. Localization and dynamics of amylose-lipophilic molecules inclusion complex formation in starch granules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manca, Marianna; Woortman, Albert J. J.; Mura, Andrea; Loos, Katja; Loi, Maria Antonietta

    2015-01-01

    Inclusion complex formation between lipophilic dye molecules and amylose polymers in starch granules is investigated using laser spectroscopy and microscopy. By combining confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) with spatial resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, we are able to discriminate

  9. Investigation of complex formation processes of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose and polymethacrylic acid in aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Katayeva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The complex formation process of hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC with polymethacrylic acid (PMA have been studied using methods of turbidimetric and viscosimetric titration. Position of maximum depending on polymer concentration and molecular mass of polysaccharide have different values.

  10. New Pathways for the Formation of Complex Organics and Prebiotic Synthesis in the Gas Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shall, M. S.

    2010-04-01

    We study the formation mechanisms of complex organics that are present in interstellar clouds. The reaction of acetylene ion with water produces vinyl alcohol while the reaction of benzene ion with acetylene produces naphthalene-type ion.

  11. Ionic liquid effects on Mizoroki-Heck reactions: more than just carbene complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyton, Matthew R; Cole, Marcus L; Harper, Jason B

    2011-08-28

    Reaction profiles for a Mizoroki-Heck reaction in either an ionic liquid or a molecular solvent with different palladium sources demonstrate that the rate enhancements observed in ionic liquids cannot be solely attributed to Pd-carbene complex formation.

  12. Abiotic self-replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Adam J; Ellefson, Jared W; Ellington, Andrew D

    2012-12-18

    The key to the origins of life is the replication of information. Linear polymers such as nucleic acids that both carry information and can be replicated are currently what we consider to be the basis of living systems. However, these two properties are not necessarily coupled. The ability to mutate in a discrete or quantized way, without frequent reversion, may be an additional requirement for Darwinian evolution, in which case the notion that Darwinian evolution defines life may be less of a tautology than previously thought. In this Account, we examine a variety of in vitro systems of increasing complexity, from simple chemical replicators up to complex systems based on in vitro transcription and translation. Comparing and contrasting these systems provides an interesting window onto the molecular origins of life. For nucleic acids, the story likely begins with simple chemical replication, perhaps of the form A + B → T, in which T serves as a template for the joining of A and B. Molecular variants capable of faster replication would come to dominate a population, and the development of cycles in which templates could foster one another's replication would have led to increasingly complex replicators and from thence to the initial genomes. The initial genomes may have been propagated by RNA replicases, ribozymes capable of joining oligonucleotides and eventually polymerizing mononucleotide substrates. As ribozymes were added to the genome to fill gaps in the chemistry necessary for replication, the backbone of a putative RNA world would have emerged. It is likely that such replicators would have been plagued by molecular parasites, which would have been passively replicated by the RNA world machinery without contributing to it. These molecular parasites would have been a major driver for the development of compartmentalization/cellularization, as more robust compartments could have outcompeted parasite-ridden compartments. The eventual outsourcing of metabolic

  13. OTDM-to-WDM Conversion of Complex Modulation Formats by Time-Domain Optical Fourier Transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palushani, Evarist; Richter, T.; Ludwig, R.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the utilization of the optical Fourier transform technique for serial-to-parallel conversion of 64×10-GBd OTDM data tributaries with complex modulation formats into 50-GHz DWDM grid without loss of phase and amplitude information.......We demonstrate the utilization of the optical Fourier transform technique for serial-to-parallel conversion of 64×10-GBd OTDM data tributaries with complex modulation formats into 50-GHz DWDM grid without loss of phase and amplitude information....

  14. Formation of complex anodic films on porous alumina matrices

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alexander Zahariev; Assen Girginov

    2003-04-01

    The kinetics of growth of complex anodic alumina films was investigated. These films were formed by filling porous oxide films (matrices) having deep pores. The porous films (matrices) were obtained voltastatically in (COOH)2 aqueous solution under various voltages. The filling was done by re-anodization in an electrolyte solution not dissolving the film. Data about the kinetics of re-anodization depending on the porosity of the matrices were obtained. On the other hand, the slopes of the kinetic curves during reanodization were calculated by two equations expressing the dependence of these slopes on the ionic current density. A discrepancy was ascertained between the values of the calculated slopes and those experimentally found. For this discrepancy a possible explanation is proposed, related to the temperature increase in the film, because of that the real current density significantly increases during re-anodization.

  15. Combined EXAFS Spectroscopic and Quantum Chemical Study on the Complex Formation of Am(III) with Formate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Daniel R; Kremleva, Alena; Rossberg, André; Skerencak-Frech, Andrej; Koke, Carsten; Krüger, Sven; Rösch, Notker; Panak, Petra J

    2017-06-19

    The complexation of Am(III) with formate in aqueous solution is studied as a function of the pH value using a combination of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, iterative transformation factor analysis (ITFA), and quantum chemical calculations. The Am LIII-edge EXAFS spectra are analyzed to determine the molecular structure (coordination numbers; Am-O and Am-C distances) of the formed Am(III)-formate species and to track the shift of the Am(III) speciation with increasing pH. The experimental data are compared to predictions from density functional calculations. The results indicate that formate binds to Am(III) in a monodentate fashion, in agreement with crystal structures of lanthanide formates. Furthermore, the investigations are complemented by thermodynamic speciation calculations to verify further the results obtained.

  16. SCIENTIFIC PRINCIPLES FOR MODIFICATION OF WATER-SOLUBLE POLYMERS. FORMATION OF MACROMOLECULAR COMPLEXES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    The study of nanosecond dynamics of macromolecules with the luminescent methods make it possible to investigate the formation and functioning of polymeric complexes, polymeric conjugates and macromolecular metal complexes, which are widely used for solving many practical tasks. The nanosecond dynamics of macromolecules are a highly sensitive indicator of interpolymer complexes (IPC) formation. It enables us to solve the problems of studying IPC formation and stability and to investigate the interpolymer reactions of exchange and substitution. The investigation of changes in the rotational mobility of globular protein molecules as a whole makes it possible to determine the complex composition and its stability, and to control the course of polymer-protein conjugate formstion reaction. The nanosecond dynamics of polymers interacting with surfacants' ions (S)are the sensitive indicator of the S-polymer complex formation. A method for determining the equilibrium constants of the S-polymer complex formation was developed on the basis of the study of polymer chains mobility. It is established that nanosecond dynamics influences the course of chemical reactions in polymer chains. Moreover, the marked effect of the nanosecond dynamics is also revealed in the study of photophysical processes (the formation of excimers and energy migration of electron excitation) in polymers with photoactive groups. It was found that the efficiency of both processes increases with increasing the mobility of side chains, the carriers of photoactive groups.

  17. Complex formation and solubility of Pu(IV) with malonic and succinic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Takagi, I.; Moriyama, H. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Fujiwara, A. [Radioactive Waste Management Funding and Research Center, Tokyo (Japan); Kulyako, Y.M.; Perevalov, S.A.; Myasoedov, B.F. [Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Moscow (RU). V.I. Vernadsky Inst. of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry (GEOKHI)

    2009-07-01

    The complex formation constants of tetravalent plutonium ion with malonic and succinic acids in aqueous solution were determined by the solvent-extraction method. Also, by taking the known values of the solubility products, the hydrolysis constants and the formation constants, the experimental solubility data of plutonium in the presence of carboxylates were analyzed. (orig.)

  18. A Crystallographic Study of the Role of Sequence Context in Thymine Glycol Bypass by a Replicative DNA Polymerase Serendipitously Sheds Light on the Exonuclease Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aller, Pierre; Duclos, Stéphanie; Wallace, Susan S.; Doublié, Sylvie (Vermont)

    2012-06-27

    Thymine glycol (Tg) is the most common oxidation product of thymine and is known to be a strong block to replicative DNA polymerases. A previously solved structure of the bacteriophage RB69 DNA polymerase (RB69 gp43) in complex with Tg in the sequence context 5'-G-Tg-G shed light on how Tg blocks primer elongation: The protruding methyl group of the oxidized thymine displaces the adjacent 5'-G, which can no longer serve as a template for primer elongation [Aller, P., Rould, M. A., Hogg, M, Wallace, S. S. and Doublie S. (2007). A structural rationale for stalling of a replicative DNA polymerase at the most common oxidative thymine lesion, thymine glycol. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 104, 814-818.]. Several studies showed that in the sequence context 5'-C-Tg-purine, Tg is more likely to be bypassed by Klenow fragment, an A-family DNA polymerase. We set out to investigate the role of sequence context in Tg bypass in a B-family polymerase and to solve the crystal structures of the bacteriophage RB69 DNA polymerase in complex with Tg-containing DNA in the three remaining sequence contexts: 5'-A-Tg-G, 5'-T-Tg-G, and 5'-C-Tg-G. A combination of several factors - including the associated exonuclease activity, the nature of the 3' and 5' bases surrounding Tg, and the cis-trans interconversion of Tg - influences Tg bypass. We also visualized for the first time the structure of a well-ordered exonuclease complex, allowing us to identify and confirm the role of key residues (Phe123, Met256, and Tyr257) in strand separation and in the stabilization of the primer strand in the exonuclease site.

  19. Characterization of the effects of Escherichia coli replication terminator protein (Tus) on transcription reveals dynamic nature of the tus block to transcription complex progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guajardo, R; Sousa, R

    1999-01-01

    We have characterized the blocks to progression of T7 and T3 RNA polymerase transcription complexes created when a Tus protein is bound to the template. The encounter with Tus impedes the progress of the transcription complexes of either enzyme. The duration of the block depends on which polymerase is used and the orientation of Tus on the DNA. Both genuine termination (dissociation of the transcription complex) and halting followed by continued progression after the block is abrogated are observed. The fraction of complexes that terminates depends on which polymerase is used and on the orientation of the Tus molecule. The efficiency of the block to transcription increases as the Tus concentration is increased, even if the concentration of Tus is already many times in excess of what is required to saturate its binding sites on the template in the absence of transcription. The block to transcription is rapidly abrogated if an excess of a DNA containing a binding site for Tus is added to a transcription reaction in which Tus and template have been preincubated. Finally, we find that transcription will rapidly displace Tus from a template under conditions that generate persistent blocks to transcription. These observations reveal that during the encounter with the transcription complex Tus rapidly dissociates from the template but that at sufficiently high concentrations Tus usually rebinds before the transcription complex can move forward. The advantage of a mechanism which can create a persistent block to transcription or replication complex progression, which can nevertheless be rapidly abrogated in response to down regulation of the blocking protein, is suggested. PMID:10373601

  20. Excretion technique of radioactive materials in vivo by complex formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takaya, Haruo; Uchiumi, Akira; Takatsu, Akiko [National Inst. of Materials and Chemical Research, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2000-02-01

    To establish an excretion technique of RI metals ({sup 63}Ni, {sup 109}Cd and {sup 210}Pb) in vivo, many kinds of complexing agents were developed. The performance evaluation of these agents was carried out by mouse in vivo. They are various kinds of carbohydrate formazan derivatives with deduced uni-saccharide (D-glucose, D-mannose and D-galactose) or disaccharide (maltose) and functional group (-COOH, -NH, -OH, -N=N- and pyridyl group). For example of synthesis method of, formazan derivative with maltose was described. 100 mouse with 8 to 10 g were classified to four groups. 1 group get 0.1 ml of nickel ion hemoperitoneum injection once (control). 2 group had 0.1 ml nickel ion hemoperitoneum injection at one time a day and then 0.1 ml eccritic hypodermic injection during 5 days. 3 group get 0.1 ml cadmium ion hemoperitoneum injection once (control). 4 group had 0.1 ml cadmium ion hemoperitoneum injection and then 0.1 ml eccritic hypodermic injection at one time a day for 5 days. Decay of residue was measured. PCF-maltose showed the best chemical protector against radiation in these agents. Especially, this eccritic can excrete {sup 63}Ni and {sup 109}Cd without effect on the essential metals such as calcium, magnesium and iron. (S.Y.)

  1. A single-molecule view of DNA replication : the dynamic nature of multi-protein complexes revealed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertsema, Hylkje J.; van Oijen, Antoine M.; Chiu, Wah; Wagner, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in the development of single-molecule approaches have made it possible to study the dynamics of biomolecular systems in great detail. More recently, such tools have been applied to study the dynamic nature of large multiprotein complexes that support multiple enzymatic activities. In

  2. Production of bioactive soluble interleukin-15 in complex with interleukin-15 receptor alpha from a conditionally-replicating oncolytic HSV-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C Gaston

    Full Text Available Oncolytic type-1 herpes simplex viruses (oHSVs lacking the γ134.5 neurovirulence gene are being evaluated for treatment of a variety of malignancies. oHSVs replicate within and directly kill permissive cancer cells. To augment their anti-tumor activity, oHSVs have been engineered to express immunostimulatory molecules, including cytokines, to elicit tumor-specific immune responses. Interleukin-15 (IL-15 holds potential as an immunotherapeutic cytokine because it has been demonstrated to promote both natural killer (NK cell-mediated and CD8(+ T cell-mediated cytotoxicity against cancer cells. The purpose of these studies was to engineer an oHSV producing bioactive IL-15. Two oHSVs were constructed encoding murine (mIL-15 alone (J100 or with the mIL-15 receptor α (mIL-15Rα, J100D to determine whether co-expression of these proteins is required for production of bioactive mIL-15 from oHSV. The following were demonstrated: i both oHSVs retain replication competence and cytotoxicity in permissive tumor cell lines. ii Enhanced production of mIL-15 was detected in cell lysates of neuro-2a cells following J100D infection as compared to J100 infection, suggesting that mIL-15Rα improved mIL-15 production. iii Soluble mIL-15 in complex with mIL-15Rα was detected in supernates from J100D-infected, but not J100-infected, neuro-2a, GL261, and CT-2A cells. These cell lines vary in permissiveness to oHSV replication and cytotoxicity, demonstrating soluble mIL-15/IL-15Rα complex production from J100D was independent of direct oHSV effects. iv The soluble mIL-15/IL-15Rα complex produced by J100D was bioactive, stimulating NK cells to proliferate and reduce the viability of syngeneic GL261 and CT-2A cells. v J100 and J100D were aneurovirulent inasmuch as no neuropathologic effects were documented following direct inoculation into brains of CBA/J mice at up to 1x10(7 plaque forming units. The production of mIL-15/mIL-15Rα from multiple tumor lines, as well

  3. Labeled EF-Tus for rapid kinetic studies of pretranslocation complex formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Wei; Kavaliauskas, Darius; Schrader, Jared

    2014-01-01

    The universally conserved translation elongation factor EF-Tu delivers aminoacyl(aa)-tRNA in the form of an aa-tRNA·EF-Tu·GTP ternary complex (TC) to the ribosome where it binds to the cognate mRNA codon within the ribosomal A-site, leading to formation of a pretranslocation (PRE) complex. Here w...

  4. Structure of soybean serine acetyltransferase and formation of the cysteine regulatory complex as a molecular chaperone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serine acetyltransferase (SAT) catalyzes the limiting reaction in plant and microbial biosynthesis of cysteine. In addition to its enzymatic function, SAT forms a macromolecular complex with O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS). Formation of the cysteine regulatory complex (CRC) is a critical biochem...

  5. Structural characterization of Am(III) formate complexes. Combining EXAFS spectroscopy with DFT and thermodynamical calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossberg, Andre [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Molecular Structures; Froehlich, D.R. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Physikalisch-Chemisches Inst.

    2017-06-01

    We used iterative transformation factor analysis (ITFA) in order to isolate the EXAFS spectral contributions of the complexing ligand from a Am(III)/formate pH-series. Thermodynamic calculations were used as constraint for ITFA and for density functional theory (DFT) calculations to identify the coordination mode within the formed complexes.

  6. Determination of the Formation Constant of the Inclusion Complex from a Naphthoquinone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María M. de Bertorello

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Inclusion complexation of 1 with HP-β-CD or HP-β-CD:PVP K30 in aqueous solution was spectroscopically studied and the formation constant for a 1:1 complex was determined from these measurements.

  7. Association of hepatitis C virus replication complexes with microtubules and actin filaments is dependent on the interaction of NS3 and NS5A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chao-Kuen; Jeng, King-Song; Machida, Keigo; Lai, Michael M C

    2008-09-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA replication complex (RC), which is composed of viral nonstructural (NS) proteins and host cellular proteins, replicates the viral RNA genome in association with intracellular membranes. Two viral NS proteins, NS3 and NS5A, are essential elements of the RC. Here, by using immunoprecipitation and fluorescence resonance energy transfer assays, we demonstrated that NS3 and NS5A interact with tubulin and actin. Furthermore, immunofluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy revealed that HCV RCs were aligned along microtubules and actin filaments in both HCV replicon cells and HCV-infected cells. In addition, the movement of RCs was inhibited when microtubules or actin filaments were depolymerized by colchicine and cytochalasin B, respectively. Based on our observations, we propose that microtubules and actin filaments provide the tracks for the movement of HCV RCs to other regions in the cell, and the molecular interactions between RCs and microtubules, or RCs and actin filaments, are mediated by NS3 and NS5A.

  8. A G-quadruplex-binding macrodomain within the "SARS-unique domain" is essential for the activity of the SARS-coronavirus replication-transcription complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusov, Yuri; Tan, Jinzhi; Alvarez, Enrique; Enjuanes, Luis; Hilgenfeld, Rolf

    2015-10-01

    The multi-domain non-structural protein 3 of SARS-coronavirus is a component of the viral replication/transcription complex (RTC). Among other domains, it contains three sequentially arranged macrodomains: the X domain and subdomains SUD-N as well as SUD-M within the "SARS-unique domain". The X domain was proposed to be an ADP-ribose-1"-phosphatase or a poly(ADP-ribose)-binding protein, whereas SUD-NM binds oligo(G)-nucleotides capable of forming G-quadruplexes. Here, we describe the application of a reverse genetic approach to assess the importance of these macrodomains for the activity of the SARS-CoV RTC. To this end, Renilla luciferase-encoding SARS-CoV replicons with selectively deleted macrodomains were constructed and their ability to modulate the RTC activity was examined. While the SUD-N and the X domains were found to be dispensable, the SUD-M domain was crucial for viral genome replication/transcription. Moreover, alanine replacement of charged amino-acid residues of the SUD-M domain, which are likely involved in G-quadruplex-binding, caused abrogation of RTC activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. FORMATION AND ELECTROCHEMICAL BEHAVIOUR OF POLYION COMPLEXES FOR ELECTROCHROMIC DISPLAY MATERIAL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN Guoxiang; WANG Bing; DENG Zhenghua; LUO Chunqiao

    1988-01-01

    Formation of intermacromolecular complexes containing viologen and electron-transfer reaction occurred on the electrode modified by the complex films were studied. Compositions and morphology of the complexes depend on the properties of polyanion and chemical environment of complexation. The analytical results of cyclic voltammetry (CV) and rotating disk voltammetry(RDV) indicated: (1) active sites of viologen in network of complexes transferred single electron reversibly; (2) the redox peak currents showed excellent symmetry and stability; (3) redox potentials were related to properties of polyanions, varying from -0.4 to -0.6V (vs. SCE). Electrochromic materials with different displaying colors could be obtained by changing the structure of polyviologen.

  10. The Vtc proteins in vacuole fusion: coupling NSF activity to V(0) trans-complex formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Oliver; Bayer, Martin J; Peters, Christopher

    2002-01-01

    vacuole system has revealed two subsequent molecular events: trans-complex formation of V-ATPase proteolipid sectors (V(0)) and release of LMA1 from the membrane. We have now identified a hetero-oligomeric membrane integral complex of vacuolar transporter chaperone (Vtc) proteins integrating these events......, LMA1 release, but dispensible for all preceding steps, including V(0) trans-complex formation. This suggests that Vtc3p might act close to or at fusion pore opening. We propose that Vtc proteins may couple ATP-dependent NSF activity to a subset of V(0) sectors in order to activate them for V(0) trans...

  11. Modification and clearance of low density lipoproteins during the formation of endotoxin-lipoprotein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schvartz, Ya Sh; Polyakov, L M; Dushkin, M I; Pivovarova, E N

    2008-04-01

    Changes in electrical charge and clearance rate of LDL after the formation of their complexes with bacterial LPS were studied in experiments on Wistar rats. It was found that binding of S. minnesota R595 LPS with (125)I-LDL sharply accelerated clearance of the greater part of LDL complexes, but on the other hand induced the appearance of an LDL-LPS subfraction with slower elimination rate compared to free LDL. Electrophoresis showed that after binding of LPS, LDL acquired a negative charge. These data suggest that the formation of LDL-LPS complexes is accompanied by modification of LDL due to which they acquire atherogenic properties.

  12. Suilysin-induced Platelet-Neutrophil Complexes Formation is Triggered by Pore Formation-dependent Calcium Influx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shengwei; Zheng, Yuling; Chen, Shaolong; Huang, Shujing; Liu, Keke; Lv, Qingyu; Jiang, Yongqiang; Yuan, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Platelet activation and platelet–neutrophil interactions have been found to be involved in inflammation, organ failure and soft-tissue necrosis in bacterial infections. Streptococcus suis, an emerging human pathogen, can cause streptococcal toxic-shock syndrome (STSS) similarly to Streptococcus pyogenes. Currently, S. suis–platelet interactions are poorly understood. Here, we found that suilysin (SLY), the S. suis cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC), was the sole stimulus of S. suis that induced platelet-neutrophil complexes (PNC) formation. Furthermore, P-selectin released in α-granules mediated PNC formation. This process was triggered by the SLY-induced pore forming-dependent Ca2+ influx. Moreover, we demonstrated that the Ca2+ influx triggered an MLCK-dependent pathway playing critical roles in P-selectin activation and PNC formation, however, PLC-β-IP3/DAG-MLCK and Rho-ROCK-MLCK signalling were not involved. Additionally, the “outside-in” signalling had a smaller effect on the SLY-induced P-selectin release and PNC formation. Interestingly, other CDCs including pneumolysin and streptolysin O have also been found to induce PNC formation in a pore forming-dependent Ca2+ influx manner. It is possible that the bacterial CDC-mediated PNC formation is a similar response mechanism used by a wide range of bacteria. These findings may provide useful insight for discovering potential therapeutic targets for S. suis-associated STSS. PMID:27830834

  13. Formation and recondensation of complex organic molecules during protostellar luminosity outbursts

    CERN Document Server

    Taquet, Vianney; Charnley, Steven B

    2016-01-01

    During the formation of stars, the accretion of the surrounding material toward the central object is thought to undergo strong luminosity outbursts, followed by long periods of relative quiescence, even at the early stages of star formation when the protostar is still embedded in a large envelope. We investigated the gas phase formation and the recondensation of the complex organic molecules (COMs) di-methyl ether and methyl formate, induced by sudden ice evaporation processes occurring during luminosity outbursts of different amplitudes in protostellar envelopes. For this purpose, we updated a gas phase chemical network forming complex organic molecules in which ammonia plays a key role. The model calculations presented here demonstrate that ion-molecule reactions alone could account for the observed presence of di-methyl ether and methyl formate in a large fraction of protostellar cores, without recourse to grain-surface chemistry, although they depend on uncertain ice abundances and gas phase reaction bra...

  14. Evidence for the formation of a complex between osteopontin and osteocalcin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, N M; Farach-Carson, M C; Butler, W T

    1992-08-01

    We hypothesize that the mechanisms governing bone formation and remodeling involve the assembly of some of the components of the extracellular matrix into supramolecular complexes. We have examined the associations of osteopontin (OPN) with other proteins isolated from demineralized rat long bones. Three ligand binding techniques were used to demonstrate the formation of complexes between osteopontin and osteocalcin (OCN). Using gel overlay assays, the binding between soluble 125I-OPN and OCN immobilized in acrylamide gels was visualized. Competition for 125I-OPN-OCN complexes was demonstrated when unlabeled OCN-enriched bone extract was included in gel overlay solutions. Also, gel overlay assays showed 125I-OCN binding to OPN. Saturable binding was shown in solid-phase filter binding assays, which yielded an equilibrium binding constant of moderately high affinity (approximately 10(-8) M). Specificity of OPN-OCN complex formation was confirmed by measuring binding in the presence of unlabeled OPN and OCN versus a bone-localized serum protein, alpha 2HS-glycoprotein. Finally, the formation of soluble complexes were demonstrated in a modified Hummel-Dreyer gel filtration assay. These results indicate that OPN and OCN form complexes in vitro. The possible functions of OPN-OCN complexes in osteoclast recruitment and attachment are discussed.

  15. A Self-Replicating Ligase Ribozyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Natasha; Joyce, Gerald F.

    2002-01-01

    A self-replicating molecule directs the covalent assembly of component molecules to form a product that is of identical composition to the parent. When the newly formed product also is able to direct the assembly of product molecules, the self-replicating system can be termed autocatalytic. A self-replicating system was developed based on a ribozyme that catalyzes the assembly of additional copies of Itself through an RNA-catalyzed RNA ligation reaction. The R3C ligase ribozyme was redesigned so that it would ligate two substrates to generate an exact copy of itself, which then would behave in a similar manner. This self-replicating system depends on the catalytic nature of the RNA for the generation of copies. A linear dependence was observed between the initial rate of formation of new copies and the starting concentration of ribozyme, consistent with exponential growth. The autocatalytic rate constant was 0.011 per min, whereas the initial rate of reaction in the absence of pre-existing ribozyme was only 3.3 x 10(exp -11) M per min. Exponential growth was limited, however, because newly formed ribozyme molecules had greater difficulty forming a productive complex with the two substrates. Further optimization of the system may lead to the sustained exponential growth of ribozymes that undergo self-replication.

  16. COPI is required for enterovirus 71 replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianmin Wang

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV71, a member of the Picornaviridae family, is found in Asian countries where it causes a wide range of human diseases. No effective therapy is available for the treatment of these infections. Picornaviruses undergo RNA replication in association with membranes of infected cells. COPI and COPII have been shown to be involved in the formation of picornavirus-induced vesicles. Replication of several picornaviruses, including poliovirus and Echovirus 11 (EV11, is dependent on COPI or COPII. Here, we report that COPI, but not COPII, is required for EV71 replication. Replication of EV71 was inhibited by brefeldin A and golgicide A, inhibitors of COPI activity. Furthermore, we found EV71 2C protein interacted with COPI subunits by co-immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down assay, indicating that COPI coatomer might be directed to the viral replication complex through viral 2C protein. Additionally, because the pathway is conserved among different species of enteroviruses, it may represent a novel target for antiviral therapies.

  17. Nucleoprotein of influenza B virus binds to its type A counterpart and disrupts influenza A viral polymerase complex formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaru-ampornpan, Peera, E-mail: peera.jar@biotec.or.th; Narkpuk, Jaraspim; Wanitchang, Asawin; Jongkaewwattana, Anan, E-mail: anan.jon@biotec.or.th

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •FluB nucleoprotein (BNP) can bind to FluA nucleoprotein (ANP). •BNP–ANP interaction inhibits FluA polymerase activity. •BNP binding prevents ANP from forming a functional FluA polymerase complex. •Nuclear localization of BNP is necessary for FluA polymerase inhibition. •Viral RNA is not required for the BNP–ANP interaction. -- Abstract: Upon co-infection with influenza B virus (FluB), influenza A virus (FluA) replication is substantially impaired. Previously, we have shown that the nucleoprotein of FluB (BNP) can inhibit FluA polymerase machinery, retarding the growth of FluA. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this inhibitory action awaited further investigation. Here, we provide evidence that BNP hinders the proper formation of FluA polymerase complex by competitively binding to the nucleoprotein of FluA. To exert this inhibitory effect, BNP must be localized in the nucleus. The interaction does not require the presence of the viral RNA but needs an intact BNP RNA-binding motif. The results highlight the novel role of BNP as an anti-influenza A viral agent and provide insights into the mechanism of intertypic interference.

  18. Late-Stage Reservoir Formation Effect and Its Dynamic Mechanisms in Complex Superimposed Basins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KANG Dejiang; PANG Xiongqi; KUANG Jun; LUO Xiaorong; PANG Hong; LEI Lei

    2010-01-01

    Complex superimposed basins exhibit multi-stage tectonic events and multi-stage reservoir formation; hydrocarbon reservoirs formed in the early stage have generally late-stage genesis characteristics after undergoing adjustment,reconstruction and destruction of later-stage multiple tectonic events.In this paper,this phenomenon is called the late-stage reservoir formation effect.The late-stage reservoir formation effect is a basic feature of oil and gas-forming reservoirs in complex superimposed basins,revealing not only multi-stage character,relevance and complexity of oil and gas-forming reservoirs in superimposed basins but also the importance of late-stage reservoir formation.Late-stage reservoir formation is not a basic feature of off and gas forming reservoir in superimposed basins.Multi-stage reservoir formation only characterizes one aspect of oil and gas-forming reservoir in superimposed basins and does not represent fully the complexity of oil and gas-forming reservoir in superimposed basins.We suggest using"late-stage reservoir formation effect"to replace the"late-stage reservoir formation"concept to guide the exploration of complex reservoirs in superimposed basins.Under current geologic conditions,the late-stage reservoir formation effect is represented mainly by four basic forms:phase transformation,scale reconstruction,component variation and trap adjustment.The late-stage reservoir formation effect is produced by two kinds of geologic processes:first,the off and gas retention function of various geologic thresholds(hydrocarbon expulsion threshold,hydrocarbon migration threshold,and hydrocarbon accumulating threshold)causes the actual time of oil and gas reservoir formation to be later than the time of generation of large amounts of hydrocarbon in a conventional sense,producing the late-stage reservoir formation effect; second,multiple types of tectonic events(continuously strong reconstruction,early-stage strong reconstruction,middle-stage strong

  19. Hepatitis B virus replication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Hepadnaviruses, including human hepatitis B virus (HBV), replicate through reverse transcription of an RNA intermediate, the pregenomic RNA (pgRNA). Despite this kinship to retroviruses, there are fundamental differences beyond the fact that hepadnavirions contain DNA instead of RNA. Most peculiar is the initiation of reverse transcription: it occurs by protein-priming, is strictly committed to using an RNA hairpin on the pgRNA,ε, as template, and depends on cellular chaperones;moreover, proper replication can apparently occur only in the specialized environment of intact nucleocapsids.This complexity has hampered an in-depth mechanistic understanding. The recent successful reconstitution in the test tube of active replication initiation complexes from purified components, for duck HBV (DHBV),now allows for the analysis of the biochemistry of hepadnaviral replication at the molecular level. Here we review the current state of knowledge at all steps of the hepadnaviral genome replication cycle, with emphasis on new insights that turned up by the use of such cellfree systems. At this time, they can, unfortunately,not be complemented by three-dimensional structural information on the involved components. However, at least for the s RNA element such information is emerging,raising expectations that combining biophysics with biochemistry and genetics will soon provide a powerful integrated approach for solving the many outstanding questions. The ultimate, though most challenging goal,will be to visualize the hepadnaviral reverse transcriptase in the act of synthesizing DNA, which will also have strong implications for drug development.

  20. Complex 3D Vortex Lattice Formation by Phase-Engineered Multiple Beam Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolly Xavier

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the computational results on the formation of diverse complex 3D vortex lattices by a designed superposition of multiple plane waves. Special combinations of multiples of three noncoplanar plane waves with a designed relative phase shift between one another are perturbed by a nonsingular beam to generate various complex 3D vortex lattice structures. The formation of complex gyrating lattice structures carrying designed vortices by means of relatively phase-engineered plane waves is also computationally investigated. The generated structures are configured with both periodic as well as transversely quasicrystallographic basis, while these whirling complex lattices possess a long-range order of designed symmetry in a given plane. Various computational analytical tools are used to verify the presence of engineered geometry of vortices in these complex 3D vortex lattices.

  1. Planktonic replication is essential for biofilm formation by Legionella pneumophila in a complex medium under static and dynamic flow conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mampel, J.; Spirig, T.; Weber, S.S.

    2006-01-01

    formed biofilms in the inverse system if the medium was exchanged twice a day. However, after addition of Acanthamoeba castellanii, the bacteria proliferated and adhered to surfaces. Sessile (surface-attached) and planktonic (free-swimming) L. pneumophila expressed beta-galactosidase activity to similar...

  2. Complex formation between human prostate-specific antigen and protease inhibitors in mouse plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekim, Can; Riipi, Tero; Zhu, Lei; Laakkonen, Pirjo; Stenman, Ulf-Håkan; Koistinen, Hannu

    2010-04-01

    When secreted from the prostate, most of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is free and enzymatically active. Upon reaching circulation, active PSA is inactivated by complex formation with protease inhibitors. To justify the use of mouse models for evaluation of the function of PSA and for studies on therapeutic modalities based on modulation of PSA activity, it is important to know whether PSA complexation is similar in mouse and man. To characterize the circulating forms of PSA in mouse, we used subcutaneous LNCaP and 22RV1 human prostate cancer cell xenograft tumor models. We also added PSA directly to mouse serum. Free and total PSA were measured by immunoassay, and PSA complexes were extracted by immunopurification followed by SDS-PAGE, in-gel trypsin digestion and identification of signature peptides by mass spectrometry. In mice bearing xenograft tumors, 68% of the immunoreactive PSA occurred in complex, and when added to mouse serum, over 70% of PSA forms complexes that comprises alpha(2)-macroglobulin and members of the alpha(1)-antitrypsin (AAT) family. In mouse plasma, PSA forms complexes similar to those in man, but the major immunoreactive complex contains AAT rather than alpha(1)-antichymotrypsin, which is the main complex forming serpin in man. The complex formation of PSA produced by xenograft tumor models in mice is similar to that of human prostate tumors with respect to the complexation of PSA. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Comparative thermodynamic study on complex formation of native and hydroxypropylated cyclodextrins with benzoic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terekhova, Irina V., E-mail: ivt@isc-ras.ru [Institute of Solution Chemistry of RAS, Ivanovo (Russian Federation)

    2011-11-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparative calorimetric study on complexation of benzoic acid by native and modified cyclodextrins was performed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Van der Waals interactions are responsible for complex formation with {alpha}-cyclodextrins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Complex formation of {beta}-cyclodextrins is governed by dehydration and hydrophobic interactions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Binding of two benzoic acid molecules by {gamma}-cyclodextrins is driven by van der Waals interactions and solvent reorganization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydroxypropyl groups favor binding of benzoic acid only with hydroxypropyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin. - Abstract: Complex formation of native and hydroxypropylated {alpha}-, {beta}- and {gamma}-cyclodextrins with benzoic acid in water was studied by means of calorimetry of solution at 298.15 K. The 1:1 complexes are formed with {alpha}- and {beta}-cyclodextrins, while 1:2 binding stoichiometry was observed for {gamma}-cyclodextrins. Thermodynamic parameters of complex formation of hydroxypropylated cyclodextrins were determined for the first time and analyzed. Comparison of binding affinity of native and modified cyclodextrins was carried out.

  4. Formation and metamorphic evolution of the Douling Complex from the East Qinling Mountains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张寿广; 魏春景; 赵子然; 沈洁

    1996-01-01

    The Douling Complex occurs as a Precambrian tectonic block distributed between the North China and Yangtze plates and has a protracted evolutional history. It is composed of various metamorpnic intrusives and supracrustal rocks. According to the studies on geology and geochronology, it can be concluded that the complex may have been formed in the early Proterozoic, about 2000 Ma ago and experienced two phases of regional metamorphism during the Jinningian and late Caledonian-early Hercynian. It can be correlated with the Qinling Complex from the North Qinling Mountains in lithic assemblage, formation age, tectonic setting and metamorphism, and is probably a thrust nappe split from the Qinling Complex.

  5. Evolution Methods of Formation of Neuronet Models of Complex Economic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khemelyov Oleksandr H.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses principles of formation of neuronet models of complex economic systems. It justifies prospectiveness of use of artificial intellect methods when modelling complex economic systems. It shows a possibility of use of evolution methods when forming neuronet models of complex economic systems for ensuring invariance of their generalising properties. It offers an algorithm with a genome from operons of fixed length. It considers all operons from the point of view of functional positions. It notes a specific feature of the algorithm, which allows excluding anthropogenic factors when selecting the neuronet models architecture. It proves adequacy of the formed neuronet models of complex economic systems.

  6. FEM simulation of formation of metamorphic core complex with ANSYS software

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This study utilizes ANSYS to establish FEM's model of metamorphic core complex,and used thermal-structure analysis to simulate metamorphic core complex's temperature field and stress field.The metamorphic core complex formation mechanism is discussed.The simulation results show that the temperature field change appearing as the earth surface's temperature is the lowest,and the temperature of metamorphic core complex's nucleus is the highest.The temperature field is higher along with depth increase,and the stress field change appearing as the biggest stress occurs in the nucleus.The next stress field occurs at the top of the cover.

  7. Complexometric determination: Part I - EDTA and complex formation with the Cu2+ ion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajković Miloš B.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Compounds forming very stable complexes - chelates, have a wide field of application in analytical chemistry. The most famous group of these compounds are complexons. Complexons represent organic polyaminocarbonic acids as for example ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA and its salts. The EDTA molecule has six coordinative sites. It is a hexadentate ligands i.e. it has two binding nitrogen atoms and four oxygen atoms from carboxyl groups and it forms complexes with almost all metal ions. EDTA as a tetraprotonic acid, H4Y disociates through four steps, yielding the ions HsY-, H2Y2-, HY3- and Y4-. Which of the EDTA forms will be encountered in a solution, depends on the pH. Due to the poor solubility of EDTA in pure water, as well as in most organic solvents, the disodium salt of EDTA Na2H2Y-2H2O, under the commercial name complexon III, is utilized for analytical determinations. In water, EDTA forms soluble, stabile chelate complexes with all cations, at the molar ratio 1:1, regardless of the charge of the metal ion. In contrast to other equilibria, which are mainly defined by Le Chatellier's principle, equilibria related to metal-EDTA complex formation are also dependent on the influence of the secondary equilibria of EDTA complex formation. Complexing reactions, which are equilibrium reactions, are simultaneously influenced by the following factors: solution pH and the presence of complexing agents which may also form a stabile complex with metal ions. The secondary reaction influence may be viewed and monitored through conditional stability constants. In the first part of the paper, the reaction of the formation of the Cu2+-ion complex with EDTA is analyzed beginning from the main reaction through various influences of secondary reactions on the complex Cu2+-EDTA: pH effect, complexation effect and hydrolysis effect. The equations are given for conditional stability constants, which include equilibrium reactions under actual conditions.

  8. Replication protein of tobacco mosaic virus cotranslationally binds the 5′ untranslated region of genomic RNA to enable viral replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura-Nagaya, Kazue; Ishibashi, Kazuhiro; Huang, Ying-Ping; Miyashita, Shuhei; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    Genomic RNA of positive-strand RNA viruses replicate via complementary (i.e., negative-strand) RNA in membrane-bound replication complexes. Before replication complex formation, virus-encoded replication proteins specifically recognize genomic RNA molecules and recruit them to sites of replication. Moreover, in many of these viruses, selection of replication templates by the replication proteins occurs preferentially in cis. This property is advantageous to the viruses in several aspects of viral replication and evolution, but the underlying molecular mechanisms have not been characterized. Here, we used an in vitro translation system to show that a 126-kDa replication protein of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), a positive-strand RNA virus, binds a 5′-terminal ∼70-nucleotide region of TMV RNA cotranslationally, but not posttranslationally. TMV mutants that carried nucleotide changes in the 5′-terminal region and showed a defect in the binding were unable to synthesize negative-strand RNA, indicating that this binding is essential for template selection. A C-terminally truncated 126-kDa protein, but not the full-length 126-kDa protein, was able to posttranslationally bind TMV RNA in vitro, suggesting that binding of the 126-kDa protein to the 70-nucleotide region occurs during translation and before synthesis of the C-terminal inhibitory domain. We also show that binding of the 126-kDa protein prevents further translation of the bound TMV RNA. These data provide a mechanistic explanation of how the 126-kDa protein selects replication templates in cis and how fatal collision between translating ribosomes and negative-strand RNA-synthesizing polymerases on the genomic RNA is avoided. PMID:24711385

  9. Proteomic analysis of HIV-1 Nef cellular binding partners reveals a role for exocyst complex proteins in mediating enhancement of intercellular nanotube formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukerji Joya

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 Nef protein contributes to pathogenesis via multiple functions that include enhancement of viral replication and infectivity, alteration of intracellular trafficking, and modulation of cellular signaling pathways. Nef stimulates formation of tunneling nanotubes and virological synapses, and is transferred to bystander cells via these intercellular contacts and secreted microvesicles. Nef associates with and activates Pak2, a kinase that regulates T-cell signaling and actin cytoskeleton dynamics, but how Nef promotes nanotube formation is unknown. Results To identify Nef binding partners involved in Pak2-association dependent Nef functions, we employed tandem mass spectrometry analysis of Nef immunocomplexes from Jurkat cells expressing wild-type Nef or Nef mutants defective for the ability to associate with Pak2 (F85L, F89H, H191F and A72P, A75P in NL4-3. We report that wild-type, but not mutant Nef, was associated with 5 components of the exocyst complex (EXOC1, EXOC2, EXOC3, EXOC4, and EXOC6, an octameric complex that tethers vesicles at the plasma membrane, regulates polarized exocytosis, and recruits membranes and proteins required for nanotube formation. Additionally, Pak2 kinase was associated exclusively with wild-type Nef. Association of EXOC1, EXOC2, EXOC3, and EXOC4 with wild-type, but not mutant Nef, was verified by co-immunoprecipitation assays in Jurkat cells. Furthermore, shRNA-mediated depletion of EXOC2 in Jurkat cells abrogated Nef-mediated enhancement of nanotube formation. Using bioinformatic tools, we visualized protein interaction networks that reveal functional linkages between Nef, the exocyst complex, and the cellular endocytic and exocytic trafficking machinery. Conclusions Exocyst complex proteins are likely a key effector of Nef-mediated enhancement of nanotube formation, and possibly microvesicle secretion. Linkages revealed between Nef and the exocyst complex suggest a new paradigm of

  10. Formation of complex organic molecules in cold objects: the role of gas phase reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Balucani, Nadia; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Taquet, Vianney

    2015-01-01

    While astrochemical models are successful in reproducing many of the observed interstellar species, they have been struggling to explain the observed abundances of complex organic molecules. Current models tend to privilege grain surface over gas phase chemistry in their formation. One key assumption of those models is that radicals trapped in the grain mantles gain mobility and react on lukewarm (>30 K) dust grains. Thus, the recent detections of methyl formate (MF) and dimethyl ether (DME) ...

  11. Coordinated Leading and Lagging Strand DNA Synthesis by Using the Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Replication Complex and Minicircle DNA Templates ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengel, Gudrun; Kuchta, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    The origin-specific replication of the herpes simplex virus 1 genome requires seven proteins: the helicase-primase (UL5-UL8-UL52), the DNA polymerase (UL30-UL42), the single-strand DNA binding protein (ICP8), and the origin-binding protein (UL9). We reconstituted these proteins, excluding UL9, on synthetic minicircular DNA templates and monitored leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis using the strand-specific incorporation of dTMP and dAMP. Critical features of the assays that led to efficient leading and lagging stand synthesis included high helicase-primase concentrations and a lagging strand template whose sequence resembled that of the viral DNA. Depending on the nature of the minicircle template, the replication complex synthesized leading and lagging strand products at molar ratios varying between 1:1 and 3:1. Lagging strand products (∼0.2 to 0.6 kb) were significantly shorter than leading strand products (∼2 to 10 kb), and conditions that stimulated primer synthesis led to shorter lagging strand products. ICP8 was not essential; however, its presence stimulated DNA synthesis and increased the length of both leading and lagging strand products. Curiously, human DNA polymerase α (p70-p180 or p49-p58-p70-p180), which improves the utilization of RNA primers synthesized by herpesvirus primase on linear DNA templates, had no effect on the replication of the minicircles. The lack of stimulation by polymerase α suggests the existence of a macromolecular assembly that enhances the utilization of RNA primers and may functionally couple leading and lagging strand synthesis. Evidence for functional coupling is further provided by our observations that (i) leading and lagging strand synthesis produce equal amounts of DNA, (ii) leading strand synthesis proceeds faster under conditions that disable primer synthesis on the lagging strand, and (iii) conditions that accelerate helicase-catalyzed DNA unwinding stimulate decoupled leading strand synthesis but not

  12. Can arsenic-phytochelatin complex formation be used as an indicator for toxicity in Helianthus annuus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raab, Andrea; Ferreira, Katia; Meharg, Andrew A; Feldmann, Jörg

    2007-01-01

    The formation of arsenic-phytochelatin (As-PC) complexes is thought to be part of the plant detoxification strategy for arsenic. This work examines (i) the arsenic (As) concentration-dependent formation of As-PC complex formation and (ii) redistribution and metabolism of As after arrested As uptake in Helianthus annuus. HPLC with parallel ICP-MS/ES-MS detection was used to identify and quantify the species present in plant extracts exposed to arsenate (As(V)) (between 0 and 66.7 micromol As l-1 for 24 h). At As concentrations below the EC50 value for root growth (22 micromol As l-1) As uptake is exponential, but it is reduced at concentrations above. Translocation between root and shoot seemed to be limited to the uptake phase of arsenic. No redistribution of As between root and shoot was observed after arresting As exposure. The formation of As-PC complexes was concentration-dependent. The amount and number of As-PC complexes increased exponentially with concentration up to 13.7 micromol As l-1. As(III)-PC3 and GS-As(III)-PC2 complexes were the dominant species in all samples. The ratio of PC-bound As to unbound As increased up to 1.3 micromol As l-1 and decreased at higher concentrations. Methylation of inorganic As was only a minor pathway in H. annuus with about 1% As methylated over a 32 d period. The concentration dependence of As-PC complex formation, amount of unbound reduced and oxidized PC2, and the relative uptake rate showed that As starts to influence the cellular metabolism of H. annuus negatively at As concentrations well below the EC50 value determined by more traditional means. Generally, As-PC complexes and PC-synthesis rate seem to be the more sensitive parameters to be studied when As toxicity values are to be estimated.

  13. Complex Formation of Selected Radionuclides with Ligands Commonly Found in Ground Water: Low Molecular Organic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bror Skytte; Jensen, H.

    1985-01-01

    A general approach to the analysis of potentiometric data on complex formation between cations and polybasic amphoteric acids is described. The method is used for the characterisation of complex formation between Cs+, Sr2+, Co2+, La 3+, and Eu3+ with a α-hydroxy acids, tartaric acid and citric ac......, and with the α-amino acids, aspartic acid and L-cysteine. The cations have been chosen as typical components of reactor waste, and the acids because they are often found as products of microbial activity in pits or wherever organic material decays...

  14. Thermodynamic functions of formation of n-alkane complexes with crystalline urea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolmachev, V.V.; Semenov, L.V.; Gaile, A.A.; Proskuryakov, V.A.

    1987-07-10

    For optimization of the conditions of deparaffination of petroleum fractions with the aid of urea, with the composition of the feedstock taken into account, it is important to know the equilibrium constants of formation of complexes of urea with n-alkanes differing in the number of carbon atoms in their molecules, as functions of temperature. In this investigation they obtained experimental data necessary for calculating the thermodynamic functions of formation of n-alkane complexes with crystalline urea up to the decomposition temperature, using Kirchhoff's equations.

  15. Solving the Telomere Replication Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestroni, Laetitia; Matmati, Samah; Coulon, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    Telomeres are complex nucleoprotein structures that protect the extremities of linear chromosomes. Telomere replication is a major challenge because many obstacles to the progression of the replication fork are concentrated at the ends of the chromosomes. This is known as the telomere replication problem. In this article, different and new aspects of telomere replication, that can threaten the integrity of telomeres, will be reviewed. In particular, we will focus on the functions of shelterin and the replisome for the preservation of telomere integrity. PMID:28146113

  16. Mass-dependent and -independent fractionation of isotopes in Ni and Pb chelate complex formation reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomura, Masao; Kudo, Takashi; Adachi, Atsuhiko; Aida, Masao; Fujii, Yasuhiko [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, O-okayama Meguroku, Tokyo, 152-8550 (Japan)

    2013-11-13

    Mass independent fractionation (MIF) has been a very interesting topic in the field of inorganic isotope chemistry, in particular, geo- and cosmo- chemistry. In the present work, we studied the isotope fractionation of Ni(II) and Pb(II) ions in complex formation with chelating reagent EDTA. To obtain clear results on the mass dependence of the isotope fractionation, we have conducted long-distance ion exchange chromatography of Ni(II) and Pb(II), using chelate complex reagent EDTA. The results apparently show that the isotope fractionation in Ni complex formation system is governed by the mass dependent rule. On the other hand the isotope fractionation in the Pb complex system is governed by the mass independent rule or the nuclear volume effect.

  17. Mass-dependent and -independent fractionation of isotopes in Ni and Pb chelate complex formation reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Masao; Kudo, Takashi; Adachi, Atsuhiko; Aida, Masao; Fujii, Yasuhiko

    2013-11-01

    Mass independent fractionation (MIF) has been a very interesting topic in the field of inorganic isotope chemistry, in particular, geo- and cosmo- chemistry. In the present work, we studied the isotope fractionation of Ni(II) and Pb(II) ions in complex formation with chelating reagent EDTA. To obtain clear results on the mass dependence of the isotope fractionation, we have conducted long-distance ion exchange chromatography of Ni(II) and Pb(II), using chelate complex reagent EDTA. The results apparently show that the isotope fractionation in Ni complex formation system is governed by the mass dependent rule. On the other hand the isotope fractionation in the Pb complex system is governed by the mass independent rule or the nuclear volume effect.

  18. DNA polymerase-associated lectin (DPAL) and its binding to the galactose-containing glycoconjugate of the replication complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, T J; St Amand, T; Groll, J M; Ray, S; Basu, S

    1999-10-01

    The highly purified DNA Pol-alpha from rat prostate tumor (PA-3) and human neuroblastoma (IMR-32) cells appeared to be inhibited by Ricin (RCA-II), and Con-A. Loss of activity (40 to 60%) of a specific form of DNA polymerase from IMR-32 was observed when the cells were treated with tunicamycin [Bhattacharya, P. and Basu, S. (1982) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., USA 79:1488-1492]. Binding of ConA and RCA to human recombinant DNA polymerase-alpha showed a specific labile site in the N-terminus [Hsi et al.. (1990) Nucleic Acid Res. 18:6231-6237]. The catalytic polypeptide, DNA polymerase-alpha of eukaryotic origin, was isolated from developing tissues or cultured cells as a family of 180 to 120 kDa polypeptides, perhaps derived from a single primary structure. Immunoblot analysis with a monoclonal antibody (SJK-237-71) indicated that the lower molecular weight polypeptides resulted from either proteolytic cleavage of post-translational modification after specific cleavages. Present results suggest DNA polymerase-alpha from embryonic chicken brain (ECB) contains an alpha-galactose-binding subunit which may be involved in developmental regulation of the enzyme. It was shown before that the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase-alpha reduces from 186 kDa in 11-day-old ECB to 120 kDa in 19-day-old ECB [Ray, S. et al. Cell Growth and Differentiation 2:567-573] by the treatment with methyl-alpha-galactose. The low molecular weight DNA polymerase activity (120 kDa) can be reconstituted to high molecular weight (Mr = 186 kDa) with an alpha-galactose binding, 56kDa lectin-like protein. Polyclonal antibodies raised against the purified lectin were able to precipitate DNA. Pol-alpha as determined by immunostaining with the polymerase-alpha-specific monoclonal antibody SJK 132-20, suggesting this is a DNA polymerase associated-lectin (DPAL). RCA-II and GS-I-Sepharose 4B chromatographies resulted in significant purification of DNA-alpha and a complete separation of polymerase complex and

  19. Dynamics of nanoparticle-protein corona complex formation: analytical results from population balance equations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faryad Darabi Sahneh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nanoparticle-protein corona complex formation involves absorption of protein molecules onto nanoparticle surfaces in a physiological environment. Understanding the corona formation process is crucial in predicting nanoparticle behavior in biological systems, including applications of nanotoxicology and development of nano drug delivery platforms. METHOD: This paper extends the modeling work in to derive a mathematical model describing the dynamics of nanoparticle corona complex formation from population balance equations. We apply nonlinear dynamics techniques to derive analytical results for the composition of nanoparticle-protein corona complex, and validate our results through numerical simulations. RESULTS: The model presented in this paper exhibits two phases of corona complex dynamics. In the first phase, proteins rapidly bind to the free surface of nanoparticles, leading to a metastable composition. During the second phase, continuous association and dissociation of protein molecules with nanoparticles slowly changes the composition of the corona complex. Given sufficient time, composition of the corona complex reaches an equilibrium state of stable composition. We find analytical approximate formulae for metastable and stable compositions of corona complex. Our formulae are very well-structured to clearly identify important parameters determining corona composition. CONCLUSION: The dynamics of biocorona formation constitute vital aspect of interactions between nanoparticles and living organisms. Our results further understanding of these dynamics through quantitation of experimental conditions, modeling results for in vitro systems to better predict behavior for in vivo systems. One potential application would involve a single cell culture medium related to a complex protein medium, such as blood or tissue fluid.

  20. DNA-membrane complex damages in mammalian cells after gamma irradiation and chemical agent action and role of the complex in DNA replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saenko, A.S.; Kiseleva, V.I.; Synzynys, B.I. (Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Obninsk. Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Meditsinskoj Radiologii)

    1982-06-22

    The sedimentation behavior of the DNA-membrane complex (DMC) from Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) cells after gamma irradiation and carminomycin (CM) treatment was studied. The DNA and membrane containing material released by alkaline lysis from EAT cells had an anomalous sedimentation relative to denatured DNA. The DMC sediments with a great sedimentation constant (255 S). Both the chemical and physical agents induced DNA single-strand breaks and damage of the DMC. It was shown that 0.01 g/ml CM did not affect the incorporation of exogenic thymidine into DNA but the DMC was completely disrupted by this CM dose. There was no correlation between postirradiation repair kinetics of the DMC and the kinetics of /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation into DNA of ETA cells.

  1. On the complex formation approach in modeling predator prey relations, mating, and sexual disease transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horst R. Thieme

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Complex formation is used as a unified approach to derive representations and approximations of the functional response in predator prey relations, mating, and sexual disease transmission. Applications are given to the impact of a generalist predator on a prey population and the spread of a sexually transmitted disease in a multi-group heterosexual population.

  2. Thermodynamic characteristics of the formation of complexes of nickel(II) with L-homoserine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gridchin, S. N.

    2016-12-01

    The formation of complexes of nickel(II) with L-homoserine at 298.15 K and ionic strengths I = 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 (KNO3) are investigated by potentiometry and calorimetry. Standard characteristics of studied equilibria (log K°, Δr G°, Δr H°, and Δr S°) are determined.

  3. FORMATION AND QUANTIFICATION OF PROTEIN COMPLEXES BETWEEN PEROXISOMAL ALCOHOL OXIDASE AND GROEL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    EVERS, ME; LANGER, T; HARDER, W; HARTL, FU; VEENHUIS, M; Hartl, Franz-Ulrich

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the use of yeast peroxisomal alcohol oxidase (AO) as a model protein for in vitro binding by GroEL. Dilution of denatured AO in neutral buffer leads to aggregation of the protein, which is prevented by the addition of GroEL. Formation of complexes between GroEL and denatured AO was d

  4. Quantum statistical vibrational entropy and enthalpy of formation of helium-vacancy complex in BCC W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Haohua; Woo, C. H.

    2016-12-01

    High-temperature advance-reactor design and operation require knowledge of in-reactor materials properties far from the thermal ground state. Temperature-dependence due to the effects of lattice vibrations is important to the understanding and formulation of atomic processes involved in irradiation-damage accumulation. In this paper, we concentrate on the formation of He-V complex. The free-energy change in this regard is derived via thermodynamic integration from the phase-space trajectories generated from MD simulations based on the quantum fluctuation-dissipation relation. The change of frequency distribution of vibration modes during the complex formation is properly accounted for, and the corresponding entropy change avoids the classical ln(T) divergence that violates the third law. The vibrational enthalpy and entropy of formation calculated this way have significant effects on the He kinetics during irradiation.

  5. Formation Equilibria of Ternary Metal Complexes with Citric Acid and Glutamine (Alanine) in Aqueous Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王进平; 牛春吉; 杨魁跃; 倪嘉缵

    2004-01-01

    The species and their formation constants in the ternary systems were obtained by the Scogs2 software from potentiometric titration data. The Comics software was used to calculate the distribution of species in the ternary systems. MLXH, MLXH2 and MLXH3 are the common species in these systems. The coordination behaviors of the rare earths are very similar and their stability is closely matched. The ternary rare earth complexes are more stable than the corresponding ternary complexes of calcium. The ternary zinc complex with glutamine as the secondary ligand is more stable than the corresponding complexes of rare earths, but the ternary complex with alanine as the secondary ligand shows an inverse trend. The distributions of species in the ternary systems vary with pH changing. A prediction can be made that exogenous rare earths can affect the species of Ca and Zn in human body.

  6. Structure and kinetics of formation of catechol complexes of ferric soybean lipoxygenase-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, M.J.; Brennan, B.A.; Chase, D.B. [E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., Wilmington, DE (United States)]|[Haverford College, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-11-21

    Ferric soybean lipoxygenase forms stable complexes with 4-substituted catechols. The structure of the complex between the enzyme and 3,4-dihydroxybenzonitrile has been studied by resonance Raman, electron paramagnetic resonance, visible, and X-ray spectroscopies. It is a bidentate iron-catecholate complex with at least one water ligand. The kinetics of formation of complexes between lipoxygenase and 3,4-dihydroxybenzonitrile and 3,4-dihydroxyacetophenone have been studied by stopped-flow spectroscopy. The data are consistent with two kinetically distinct, reversible steps. The pH dependence of the first step suggests that the substrate for the reaction is the catechol monoanion. When these results are combined, plausible mechanisms for the complexation reaction are suggested. 51 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Formation of complex impact craters - Evidence from Mars and other planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of the depth vs diameter data of Arthur (1980), is given along with geomorphic data for 73 Martian craters. The implications for the formation of complex impact craters on solid planets is discussed. The analysis integrates detailed morphological observations on planetary craters with geologic data from terrestrial meteorite and explosion craters. The simple to complex transition for impact craters on Mars appears at diameters in the range of 3 to 8 km. Five features appear sequentially with increasing crater size, flat floors, central peaks and shallower depths, scalloped rims, and terraced walls. This order suggests that a shallow depth of excavation and a rebound mechanism have produced the central peaks, not centripetal collapse and deep sliding. Simple craters are relatively uniform in shape from planet to planet, but complex craters vary considerably. Both the average onset diameter for complex impact craters on Mars and the average depth of complex craters vary inversely with gravitational acceleration on four planets.

  8. Stability of furosemide polymorphs and the effects of complex formation with β-cyclodextrin and maltodextrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnero, Claudia; Chattah, Ana Karina; Longhi, Marcela

    2016-11-05

    The effect of the formation of supramolecular binary complexes with β-cyclodextrin and maltodextrin on the chemical and physical stability of the polymorphs I and II of furosemide was evaluated in solid state. The solid samples were placed under accelerated storage conditions and exposed to daylight into a stability chamber for a 6-month. Chemical stability was monitored by high performance liquid chromatography, while the physical stability was studied by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance, powder X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Changes in the physical appearance of the samples were evaluated. The studies showed a significant stabilizing effect of β-cyclodextrin on furosemide form II. Our results suggest that the complex formation is a useful tool for improving the stability of furosemide polymorphs. These new complexes are promising candidates that can be used in the pharmaceutical industry for the preparation of alternative matrices that improve physicochemical properties.

  9. HCF-1 self-association via an interdigitated Fn3 structure facilitates transcriptional regulatory complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jihye; Lammers, Fabienne; Herr, Winship; Song, Ji-Joon

    2012-10-23

    Host-cell factor 1 (HCF-1) is an unusual transcriptional regulator that undergoes a process of proteolytic maturation to generate N- (HCF-1(N)) and C- (HCF-1(C)) terminal subunits noncovalently associated via self-association sequence elements. Here, we present the crystal structure of the self-association sequence 1 (SAS1) including the adjacent C-terminal HCF-1 nuclear localization signal (NLS). SAS1 elements from each of the HCF-1(N) and HCF-1(C) subunits form an interdigitated fibronectin type 3 (Fn3) tandem repeat structure. We show that the C-terminal NLS recruited by the interdigitated SAS1 structure is required for effective formation of a transcriptional regulatory complex: the herpes simplex virus VP16-induced complex. Thus, HCF-1(N)-HCF-1(C) association via an integrated Fn3 structure permits an NLS to facilitate formation of a transcriptional regulatory complex.

  10. Non‐Canonical Replication Initiation: You’re Fired!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bazilė Ravoitytė

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The division of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells produces two cells that inherit a perfect copy of the genetic material originally derived from the mother cell. The initiation of canonical DNA replication must be coordinated to the cell cycle to ensure the accuracy of genome duplication. Controlled replication initiation depends on a complex interplay of cis‐acting DNA sequences, the so‐called origins of replication (ori, with trans‐acting factors involved in the onset of DNA synthesis. The interplay of cis‐acting elements and trans‐acting factors ensures that cells initiate replication at sequence‐specific sites only once, and in a timely order, to avoid chromosomal endoreplication. However, chromosome breakage and excessive RNA:DNA hybrid formation can cause breakinduced (BIR or transcription‐initiated replication (TIR, respectively. These non‐canonical replication events are expected to affect eukaryotic genome function and maintenance, and could be important for genome evolution and disease development. In this review, we describe the difference between canonical and non‐canonical DNA replication, and focus on mechanistic differences and common features between BIR and TIR. Finally, we discuss open issues on the factors and molecular mechanisms involved in TIR.

  11. Lethal synergism between organic and inorganic wood preservatives via formation of an unusual lipophilic ternary complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Zhi-Guo; Li, Yan; Fan, Rui-Mei; Chao, Xi-Juan [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Zhu, Ben-Zhan, E-mail: bzhu@rcees.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States)

    2013-02-01

    We have shown previously that exposing bacteria to wood preservatives pentachlorophenol (PCP) and copper-containing compounds together causes synergistic toxicity. However, it is not clear whether these findings also hold true in mammalian cells; and if so, what is the underlying molecular mechanism? Here we show that PCP and a model copper complex bis-(1,10-phenanthroline) cupric (Cu(OP){sub 2}), could also induce synergistic cytotoxicity in human liver cells. By the single crystal X-ray diffraction and atomic absorption spectroscopy assay, the synergism was found to be mainly due to the formation of a lipophilic ternary complex with unusual structural and composition characteristics and subsequent enhanced cellular copper uptake, which markedly promoted cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, leading to apoptosis by decreasing mitochondrial membrane potential, increasing pro-apoptotic protein expression, releasing cytochrome c from mitochondria and activating caspase-3, and -9. Analogous results were observed with other polychlorinated phenols (PCPs) and Cu(OP){sub 2}. Synergistic cytotoxicity could be induced by PCP/Cu(OP){sub 2} via formation of an unusual lipophilic complex in HepG2 cells. The formation of ternary complexes with similar lipophilic character could be of relevance as a general mechanism of toxicity, which should be taken into consideration especially when evaluating the toxicity of environmental pollutants found at currently-considered non- or sub-toxic concentrations. -- Highlights: ► The combination of PCP/Cu(OP){sub 2} induces synergistic cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells. ► The synergism is mainly due to forming a lipophilic ternary complex between them. ► The formation of lipophilic ternary complex enhances cellular copper uptake. ► PCP/Cu(OP){sub 2} stimulates the cellular ROS production. ► The ROS promoted by PCP/Cu(OP){sub 2} induces mitochondria-dependent apoptosis.

  12. The interaction of RNA helicase DDX3 with HIV-1 Rev-CRM1-RanGTP complex during the HIV replication cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hanif Mahboobi

    Full Text Available Molecular traffic between the nucleus and the cytoplasm is regulated by the nuclear pore complex (NPC, which acts as a highly selective channel perforating the nuclear envelope in eukaryotic cells. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV exploits the nucleocytoplasmic pathway to export its RNA transcripts across the NPC to the cytoplasm. Despite extensive study on the HIV life cycle and the many drugs developed to target this cycle, no current drugs have been successful in targeting the critical process of viral nuclear export, even though HIV's reliance on a single host protein, CRM1, to export its unspliced and partially spliced RNA transcripts makes it a tempting target. Due to recent findings implicating a DEAD-box helicase, DDX3, in HIV replication and a member of the export complex, it has become an appealing target for anti-HIV drug inhibition. In the present research, we have applied a hybrid computational protocol to analyze protein-protein interactions in the HIV mRNA export cycle. This method is based on molecular docking followed by molecular dynamics simulation and accompanied by approximate free energy calculation (MM/GBSA, computational alanine scanning, clustering, and evolutionary analysis. We highlight here some of the most likely binding modes and interfacial residues between DDX3 and CRM1 both in the absence and presence of RanGTP. This work shows that although DDX3 can bind to free CRM1, addition of RanGTP leads to more concentrated distribution of binding modes and stronger binding between CRM1 and RanGTP.

  13. The interaction of RNA helicase DDX3 with HIV-1 Rev-CRM1-RanGTP complex during the HIV replication cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahboobi, Seyed Hanif; Javanpour, Alex A; Mofrad, Mohammad R K

    2015-01-01

    Molecular traffic between the nucleus and the cytoplasm is regulated by the nuclear pore complex (NPC), which acts as a highly selective channel perforating the nuclear envelope in eukaryotic cells. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) exploits the nucleocytoplasmic pathway to export its RNA transcripts across the NPC to the cytoplasm. Despite extensive study on the HIV life cycle and the many drugs developed to target this cycle, no current drugs have been successful in targeting the critical process of viral nuclear export, even though HIV's reliance on a single host protein, CRM1, to export its unspliced and partially spliced RNA transcripts makes it a tempting target. Due to recent findings implicating a DEAD-box helicase, DDX3, in HIV replication and a member of the export complex, it has become an appealing target for anti-HIV drug inhibition. In the present research, we have applied a hybrid computational protocol to analyze protein-protein interactions in the HIV mRNA export cycle. This method is based on molecular docking followed by molecular dynamics simulation and accompanied by approximate free energy calculation (MM/GBSA), computational alanine scanning, clustering, and evolutionary analysis. We highlight here some of the most likely binding modes and interfacial residues between DDX3 and CRM1 both in the absence and presence of RanGTP. This work shows that although DDX3 can bind to free CRM1, addition of RanGTP leads to more concentrated distribution of binding modes and stronger binding between CRM1 and RanGTP.

  14. PHOSPHOLIPIDS ARE NEEDED FOR PROPER FORMATION, STABILITY AND FUNCTION OF THE PHOTOACTIVATED RHODOPSIN-TRANSDUCIN COMPLEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastrzebska, Beata; Goc, Anna; Golczak, Marcin; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2009-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins become activated after they form a catalytically active complex with activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and GTP replaces GDP on the G protein α subunit. This transient coupling can be stabilized by nucleotide depletion, resulting in an empty-nucleotide G-protein-GPCR complex. Efficient and reproducible formation of conformationally homogenous GPCR-Gt complexes is a prerequisite for structural studies. Herein, we report isolation conditions that enhance the stability, and preserve activity and proper stoichiometry of productive complexes between the purified prototypical GPCR, rhodopsin (Rho), and the rod cell-specific G protein, transducin (Gt). Binding of purified Gt to photoactivated Rho (Rho*) in n-dodecyl-β-maltoside (DDM) examined by gel filtration chromatography was generally modest and purified complexes provided heterogeneous ratios of protein components, most likely because of excess detergent. Rho*-Gt complex stability and activity was greatly increased by addition of phospholipids such as DOPC, DOPE and DOPS, and asolectin to detergent-containing solutions of these proteins. In contrast, native Rho*-Gt complexes purified directly from light-exposed bovine ROS membranes by sucrose gradient centrifugation exhibited improved stability and the expected 2:1 stoichiometry between Rho* and Gt. The above results strongly indicate a lipid requirement for stable complex formation wherein the likely oligomeric structure of Rho provides a superior platform for coupling to Gt, and phospholipids likely form a matrix to which Gt can anchor through its myristoyl and farnesyl groups. Our findings also demonstrate that the choice of detergent and purification method is critical for obtaining highly purified, stable, and active complexes with appropriate stoichiometry between GPCRs and G proteins needed for structural studies. PMID:19413332

  15. Complexes of triggered star formation in supergiant shell of Holmberg II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorov, Oleg V.; Lozinskaya, Tatiana A.; Moiseev, Alexei V.; Shchekinov, Yuri A.

    2016-09-01

    We report a detailed analysis of all regions of current star formation in the walls of the supergiant H I shell (SGS) in the galaxy Holmberg II based on observations with a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer at the 6-m SAO RAS telescope. We compare the structure and kinematics of ionized gas with that of atomic hydrogen and with the stellar population of the SGS. Our deep Hα images and archival images taken by the HST demonstrate that current star formation episodes are larger and more complicated than previously thought: they represent unified star-forming complexes with sizes of several hundred pc rather than `chains' of separate bright nebulae in the walls of the SGS. The fact that we are dealing with unified complexes is evidenced by identified faint shell-like structures of ionized and neutral gas which connect several distinct bright H II regions. Formation of such complexes is due to the feedback of stars with very inhomogeneous ambient gas in the walls of the SGS. The arguments supporting an idea about the triggering of star formation in SGS by the H I supershells collision are presented. We also found a faint ionized supershell inside the H I SGS expanding with a velocity of no greater than 10 - 15 km s-1. Five OB stars located inside the inner supershell are sufficient to account for its radiation, although a possibility of leakage of ionizing photons from bright H II regions is not ruled out as well.

  16. The role of focal adhesion complexes in fibroblast mechanotransduction during scar formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustad, Kristine C; Wong, Victor W; Gurtner, Geoffrey C

    2013-10-01

    Historically, great efforts have been made to elucidate the biochemical pathways that direct the complex process of wound healing; however only recently has there been recognition of the importance that mechanical signals play in the process of tissue repair and scar formation. The body's physiologic response to injury involves a dynamic interplay between mechanical forces and biochemical cues which directs a cascade of signals leading ultimately to the formation of fibrotic scar. Fibroblasts are a highly mechanosensitive cell type and are also largely responsible for the generation of the fibrotic matrix during scar formation and are thus a critical player in the process of mechanotransduction during tissue repair. Mechanotransduction is initiated at the interface between the cell membrane and the extracellular matrix where mechanical signals are first translated into a biochemical response. Focal adhesions are dynamic multi-protein complexes through which the extracellular matrix links to the intracellular cytoskeleton. These focal adhesion complexes play an integral role in the propagation of this initial mechanical cue into an extensive network of biochemical signals leading to widespread downstream effects including the influx of inflammatory cells, stimulation of angiogenesis, keratinocyte migration, fibroblast proliferation and collagen synthesis. Increasing evidence has demonstrated the importance of the biomechanical milieu in healing wounds and suggests that an integrated approach to the discovery of targets to decrease scar formation may prove more clinically efficacious than previous purely biochemical strategies.

  17. Ubisemiquinone is the electron donor for superoxide formation by complex III of heart mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrens, J F; Alexandre, A; Lehninger, A L

    1985-03-01

    Much evidence indicates that superoxide is generated from O2 in a cyanide-sensitive reaction involving a reduced component of complex III of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, particularly when antimycin A is present. Although it is generally believed that ubisemiquinone is the electron donor to O2, little experimental evidence supporting this view has been reported. Experiments with succinate as electron donor in the presence of antimycin A in intact rat heart mitochondria, which contain much superoxide dismutase but little catalase, showed that myxothiazol, which inhibits reduction of the Rieske iron-sulfur center, prevented formation of hydrogen peroxide, determined spectrophotometrically as the H2O2-peroxidase complex. Similarly, depletion of the mitochondria of their cytochrome c also inhibited formation of H2O2, which was restored by addition of cytochrome c. These observations indicate that factors preventing the formation of ubisemiquinone also prevent H2O2 formation. They also exclude ubiquinol, which remains reduced under these conditions, as the reductant of O2. Since cytochrome b also remains fully reduced when myxothiazol is added to succinate- and antimycin A-supplemented mitochondria, reduced cytochrome b may also be excluded as the reductant of O2. These observations, which are consistent with the Q-cycle reactions, by exclusion of other possibilities leave ubisemiquinone as the only reduced electron carrier in complex III capable of reducing O2 to O2-.

  18. Complexes of triggered star formation in supergiant shell of Holmberg II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorov, Oleg V.; Lozinskaya, Tatiana A.; Moiseev, Alexei V.; Shchekinov, Yuri A.

    2017-01-01

    We report a detailed analysis of all regions of current star formation in the walls of the supergiant H I shell (SGS) in the galaxy Holmberg II based on observations with a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer at the Russian 6-m telescope. We compare the structure and kinematics of ionized gas with that of atomic hydrogen and with the stellar population of the SGS. Our deep Hα images and archival images taken by the Hubble Space Telescope demonstrate that current star formation episodes are larger and more complicated than previously thought: they represent unified star-forming complexes with sizes of several hundred pc rather than `chains' of separate bright nebulae in the walls of the SGS. The fact that we are dealing with unified complexes is evidenced by identified faint shell-like structures of ionized and neutral gas which connect several distinct bright H II regions. Formation of such complexes is due to the feedback of stars with very inhomogeneous ambient gas in the walls of the SGS. The arguments supporting an idea about the triggering of star formation in SGS by the H I supershells collision are presented. We also found a faint ionized supershell inside the H I SGS expanding with a velocity of no greater than 10-15 km s-1. Five OB stars located inside the inner supershell are sufficient to account for its radiation, although a possibility of leakage of ionizing photons from bright H II regions is not ruled out as well.

  19. Toward a Reduced Complexity Channel Resolving Model for Sedimentary Delta Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, M.; Voller, V. R.; Edmonds, D. A.; Paola, C.

    2010-12-01

    Predicting styles of delta growth in restoration areas is a challenge as we try to restore impacted coastlines. Cellular and rule-based reduced complexity models offer a worthwhile means of uncovering key dynamics in delta morphodynamics without the need to fully solve the governing transport equations. In terms of modeling sedimentary delta building processes a critical ingredients is accounting for the formation and bifurcation of channels; phenomena that can be related to the formation of levees and mouth-bars. To that end, we have developed a reduced complexity model that uses a simplified shallow-water solver to study channel formation, mouth bar deposition, and delta development under different forcings. Under the assumption that the flow has a very low Froude Number (Fr2jet. We test the reduced model against flow over Gaussian-shaped bumps of various heights. Comparison of results from this model with results from a full scale commercial code (Delft3D) show a satisfactory agreement on the critical mouth bar height needed to divert flow around the bar. Based on the same diffusive equation, we develop a low-Froude water-routing method for reduced complexity morphodynamics models. The preliminary results show that the method is capable of producing reasonable channel forms and mouth bar formation, and provides a good starting point for development of a channel resolving delta building model.

  20. Speciation of phytate ion in aqueous solution. Alkali metal complex formation in different ionic media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Stefano, Concetta; Milea, Demetrio; Pettignano, Alberto; Sammartano, Silvio

    2003-08-01

    The acid-base properties of phytic acid [ myo-inositol 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakis(dihydrogen phosphate)] (H(12)Phy; Phy(12-)=phytate anion) were studied in aqueous solution by potentiometric measurements ([H+]-glass electrode) in lithium and potassium chloride aqueous media at different ionic strengths (0iodide (Et(4)NI; e.g., at I=0.5 mol L(-1), log K(3)(H)=11.7, 8.0, 9.1, and 9.1 in Et(4)NI, LiCl, NaCl and KCl, respectively; the protonation constants in Et(4)NI and NaCl were already reported), owing to the strong interactions occurring between the phytate and alkaline cations present in the background salt. We explained this in terms of complex formation between phytate and alkali metal ions. Experimental evidence allows us to consider the formation of 13 mixed proton-metal-ligand complexes, M(j)H(i)Phy((12-i-j)-), (M+ =Li+, Na+, K+), with jstability of alkali metal complexes follows the trend Li+ > or =Na+K+. Some measurements were also performed at constant ionic strength (I=0.5 mol L(-1)), using different mixtures of Et(4)NI and alkali metal chlorides, in order to confirm the formation of hypothesized and calculated metal-proton-ligand complex species and to obtain conditional protonation constants in these multi-component ionic media.

  1. A study of the formation constants of ternary and quaternary complexes of some bivalent transition metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MADHURJYA NEOG

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation of hetero-ligand 1:1:1, M(II-Opda-Sal/Gly ternary and 1:1:1:1, M(II-Opda-Sal-Gly quaternary complexes, where M(II = Ni, Cu, Zn and Cd; Opda = o‑phenylenediamine, Sal = salicylic acid, Gly = glycine, was studied pH-metrically in aqueous medium. The formation constants for the resulting ternary and quaternary complexes were evaluated at a constant ionic strength, μ = 0.20 mol dm-3 and temperature, 30±0.1 °C. The order of the formation constants in terms of the metal ion for both type of complexes was found to be Cu(II > Ni(II > Zn(II > Cd(II. This order was explained based on the increasing number of fused rings, the coordination number of the metal ions, the Irving – William order and the stability of various species. The expected species formed in solution were pruned with the Fortran IV program SPEPLOT and the stability of the ternary and quaternary complexes is explained.

  2. The influence of amylose-LPC complex formation on the susceptibility of wheat starch to amylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi-Abhari, S; Woortman, A J J; Oudhuis, A A C M; Hamer, R J; Loos, K

    2013-09-12

    This study was aimed to assess the role of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) in the development of slowly digestible starch (SDS). The influence of LPC, on the enzymatic degradation of diluted 9% wheat starch suspensions (w/w) was investigated, using an in vitro digestion method. Wheat starch suspensions containing 0.5-5% LPC (based on starch) were heated in a Rapid Visco Analyser (RVA) till 95 °C and subjected to enzyme hydrolysis by porcine pancreatic α-amylase at 37 °C for several digestion periods. In vitro digestion measurements demonstrated that complexing starch with 5% LPC leads to a 22% decrease in rate of reducing sugar compared to the reference while the samples containing 0.5% LPC showed an equal digestibility comparable to the control. A clear decrease in the formation of reducing sugars was observed in presence of 2-5% LPC, since the results after 15 min digestion imply the formation of SDS due to the formation of amylose-LPC inclusion complexes. The DSC measurements proved the presence of amylose-LPC inclusion complexes even after 240 min digestion demonstrating the low susceptibility of amylose-V complexes to amylase.

  3. Globular cluster formation with multiple stellar populations from hierarchical star cluster complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekki, Kenji

    2017-01-01

    Most old globular clusters (GCs) in the Galaxy are observed to have internal chemical abundance spreads in light elements. We discuss a new GC formation scenario based on hierarchical star formation within fractal molecular clouds. In the new scenario, a cluster of bound and unbound star clusters (`star cluster complex', SCC) that have a power-law cluster mass function with a slope (β) of 2 is first formed from a massive gas clump developed in a dwarf galaxy. Such cluster complexes and β = 2 are observed and expected from hierarchical star formation. The most massive star cluster (`main cluster'), which is the progenitor of a GC, can accrete gas ejected from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars initially in the cluster and other low-mass clusters before the clusters are tidally stripped or destroyed to become field stars in the dwarf. The SCC is initially embedded in a giant gas hole created by numerous supernovae of the SCC so that cold gas outside the hole can be accreted onto the main cluster later. New stars formed from the accreted gas have chemical abundances that are different from those of the original SCC. Using hydrodynamical simulations of GC formation based on this scenario, we show that the main cluster with the initial mass as large as [2 - 5] × 105M⊙ can accrete more than 105M⊙ gas from AGB stars of the SCC. We suggest that merging of hierarchical star cluster complexes can play key roles in stellar halo formation around GCs and self-enrichment processes in the early phase of GC formation.

  4. Replication Origin Specification Gets a Push.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plosky, Brian S

    2015-12-03

    During the gap between G1 and S phases when replication origins are licensed and fired, it is possible that DNA translocases could disrupt pre-replicative complexes (pre-RCs). In this issue of Molecular Cell, Gros et al. (2015) find that pre-RCs can be pushed along DNA and retain the ability to support replication.

  5. A Reaction Method for Estimating Gibbs Energy and Enthalpy of Formation of Complex Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruibing; Zhang, Tingan; Liu, Yan; Kuang, Shibo

    2017-04-01

    New and updated thermodynamic data for simple binary compounds are readily available from both experimental measurements and theoretical calculations. Based on these available data, an approach is proposed to predict Gibbs energies and enthalpies of formation for complex minerals of metallurgical, chemical, and other industrial importance. The approach assumes that complex minerals are formed from binary composite oxides, which in turn, are formed from individual pure oxides. The validity of this approach is examined by comparing the calculated values of Gibbs energies and enthalpies against the experimentally measured ones reported in literature. The results show that for typical complex minerals with available experimental data, the calculated results exhibit an average residual of 0.51 pct for Gibbs energies and 0.52 pct for enthalpies, compared to the experimental results. This new approach thus correlates well with experimental approaches and can be applied to most of the complex minerals.

  6. Reversible Formation and Transmetalation of Schiff-Base Complexes in Subcomponent Self-Assembly Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewing, Dennis; Koppetz, Hannah; Hahn, F Ekkehardt

    2015-08-03

    Dinuclear complexes [Zn2(NS,NS)2] 3 and [Ni2(NS,NS)2] 6 bearing Schiff-base ligands featuring two NS donor groups were obtained in subcomponent self-assembly reactions using nickel or zinc as template metals. Several transmetalation reactions starting from 3 or 6 yielded the complexes [Pd2(NS,NS)2] 4 and [Co2(NS,NS)2] 5, and their molecular structures were determined by X-ray diffraction. Starting from the mononuclear complex [Ni(NS/NOH)2] 9 featuring a coordinated NS Schiff base and a free NOH Schiff base, completely reversible thermodynamically controlled imine bond formation was observed leading to complex [Ni2(NS,NS)2] 6 and the free Schiff -base ligand NOH,NOH 10.

  7. An autocatalytic radical chain pathway in formation of an iron(IV)-oxo complex by oxidation of an iron(II) complex with dioxygen and isopropanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Yuma; Lee, Yong-Min; Nam, Wonwoo; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2013-03-28

    Evidence of an autocatalytic radical chain pathway has been reported in formation of a non-heme iron(IV)-oxo complex by oxidation of an iron(II) complex with dioxygen and isopropanol in acetonitrile at 298 K. The radical chain reaction is initiated by hydrogen abstraction from isopropanol by the iron(IV)-oxo complex.

  8. Spectroscopic studies on U(VI)-salicylate complex formation with multiple equilibria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, W.; Cho, H.R.; Jung, E.C.; Park, K.K.; Kim, W.H.; Song, K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of). Nuclear Chemistry Research Div.

    2012-07-01

    This study investigates multiple equilibria related to the formation of the U(VI)-salicylate complex in a pH range of 3.0-5.5 using UV-Vis absorption and fluorescence measurement techniques. The absorbance changes at the characteristic charge-transfer bands of the complex were monitored, and the results indicated the presence of multiple equilibria and the formation of both 1:1 and 1:2 (U(VI):salicylate) complexes possessing bi-dentate chelate structures. The determined step-wise formation constants (log K{sub 1:1} and log K{sub 1:2}) are as follows: 12.5 {+-} 0.1 and 11.4 {+-} 0.2 for salicylate, 11.2 {+-} 0.1 and 10.1 {+-} 0.2 for 5-sulfosalicylate, and 12.4 {+-} 0.1 and 11.4 {+-} 0.1 for 2,6-dihydroxybenzoate, respectively. The molar absorptivities of the complexes are also provided. Furthermore, time-resolved laser-induced luminescence spectra of U(VI) species demonstrate the presence of both a dynamic and static quenching process upon the addition of a salicylate ligand. Particularly for the luminescent hydroxouranyl species, a strong static quenching effect is observed. The results suggest that both the UO{sub 2}(HSal){sup +} and the U(VI)-Sal chelate complexes serve as ground-state complexes that induce static quenching. The Stern-Volmer parameters were derived based on the measured luminescent intensity and lifetime data. The static quenching constants (log K{sub S}) obtained are 3.3 {+-} 0.1, 4.9 {+-} 0.1, and 4.4 {+-} 0.1 for UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, (UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(OH){sub 2}{sup 2+} and (UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(OH){sub 5}{sup +}, respectively. (orig.)

  9. Rapid-reaction kinetic characterization of the pathway of streptokinase-plasmin catalytic complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhamme, Ingrid M; Bock, Paul E

    2008-09-19

    Binding of the fibrinolytic proteinase plasmin (Pm) to streptokinase (SK) in a tight stoichiometric complex transforms Pm into a potent proteolytic activator of plasminogen. SK binding to the catalytic domain of Pm, with a dissociation constant of 12 pm, is assisted by SK Lys(414) binding to a Pm kringle, which accounts for a 11-20-fold affinity decrease when Pm lysine binding sites are blocked by 6-aminohexanoic acid (6-AHA) or benzamidine. The pathway of SK.Pm catalytic complex formation was characterized by stopped-flow kinetics of SK and the Lys(414) deletion mutant (SKDeltaK414) binding to Pm labeled at the active site with 5-fluorescein ([5F]FFR-Pm) and the reverse reactions by competitive displacement of [5F]FFR-Pm with active site-blocked Pm. The rate constants for the biexponential fluorescence quenching caused by SK and SKDeltaK414 binding to [5F]FFR-Pm were saturable as a function of SK concentration, reporting encounter complex affinities of 62-110 nm in the absence of lysine analogs and 4900-6500 and 1430-2200 nm in the presence of 6-AHA and benzamidine, respectively. The encounter complex with SKDeltaK414 was approximately 10-fold weaker in the absence of lysine analogs but indistinguishable from that of native SK in the presence of 6-AHA and benzamidine. The studies delineate for the first time the sequence of molecular events in the formation of the SK.Pm catalytic complex and its regulation by kringle ligands. Analysis of the forward and reverse reactions supports a binding mechanism in which SK Lys(414) binding to a Pm kringle accompanies near-diffusion-limited encounter complex formation followed by two slower, tightening conformational changes.

  10. cAMP prevents TNF-induced apoptosis through inhibiting DISC complex formation in rat hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Rajesh; Xiang, Wenpei; Wang, Yinna; Zhang, Xiaoying; Billiar, Timothy R

    2012-06-22

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF) is a pleiotropic proinflammatory cytokine that plays a role in immunity and the control of cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and apoptosis. The pleiotropic nature of TNF is due to the formation of different signaling complexes upon the binding of TNF to its receptor, TNF receptor type 1 (TNFR1). TNF induces apoptosis in various mammalian cells when the cells are co-treated with a transcription inhibitor like actinomycin D (ActD). When TNFR1 is activated, it recruits an adaptor protein, TNF receptor-associated protein with death domain (TRADD), through its cytoplasmic death effector domain (DED). TRADD, in turn, recruits other signaling proteins, including TNF receptor-associated protein 2 (TRAF2) and receptor-associated protein kinase (RIPK) 1, to form a complex. Subsequently, this complex combines with FADD and procaspase-8, converts into a death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) to induce apoptosis. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a second messenger that regulates various cellular processes such as cell proliferation, gene expression, and apoptosis. cAMP analogues are reported to act as anti-apoptotic agents in various cell types, including hepatocytes. We found that a cAMP analogue, dibutyryl cAMP (db-cAMP), inhibits TNF+ActD-induced apoptosis in rat hepatocytes. The protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor KT-5720 reverses this inhibitory effect of cAMP on apoptosis. Cytoprotection by cAMP involves down-regulation of various apoptotic signal regulators like TRADD and FADD and inhibition of caspase-8 and caspase-3 cleavage. We also found that cAMP exerts its affect at the proximal level of TNF signaling by inhibiting the formation of the DISC complex upon the binding of TNF to TNFR1. In conclusion, our study shows that cAMP prevents TNF+ActD-induced apoptosis in rat hepatocytes by inhibiting DISC complex formation.

  11. Thermodynamics of mixed-ligand complex formation of mercury (II) ethylenediaminetetraacetate with amino acids in solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyreu, Dmitrii, E-mail: pyreu@mail.ru [Department of Inorganic and Analytic Chemistry, Ivanovo State University, Ermak 39, Ivanovo 153025 (Russian Federation); Kozlovskii, Eugenii [Department of Inorganic and Analytic Chemistry, Ivanovo State University, Ermak 39, Ivanovo 153025 (Russian Federation); Gruzdev, Matvei; Kumeev, Roman [Institute of Solution Chemistry, Ivanovo (Russian Federation)

    2012-11-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stable mixed ligand complexes of HgEdta with amino acids at physiological pH value. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The thermodynamic and NMR data evident the ambidentate coordination mode of arginine. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Participation of the guanidinic group of Arg in coordination process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Binuclear complexes (HgEdta){sub 2}L with the bridging function of amino acid. - Abstract: The mixed-ligand complex formation in the systems Hg{sup 2+} - Edta{sup 4-} - L{sup -}(L = Arg, Orn, Ser) has been studied by means of calorimetry, pH-potentiometry and NMR spectroscopy in aqueous solution at 298.15 K and the ionic strength of I = 0.5 (KNO{sub 3}). The thermodynamic parameters of formation of the HgEdtaL, HgEdtaHL and (HgEdta){sub 2}L complexes have been determined. The most probable coordination mode for the complexone and the amino acid in the mixed-ligand complexes was discussed.

  12. High-Frequency Promoter Firing Links THO Complex Function to Heavy Chromatin Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouaikel, John; Causse, Sébastien Z; Rougemaille, Mathieu;

    2013-01-01

    The THO complex is involved in transcription, genome stability, and messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) formation, but its precise molecular function remains enigmatic. Under heat shock conditions, THO mutants accumulate large protein-DNA complexes that alter the chromatin density of target genes...... (heavy chromatin), defining a specific biochemical facet of THO function and a powerful tool of analysis. Here, we show that heavy chromatin distribution is dictated by gene boundaries and that the gene promoter is necessary and sufficient to convey THO sensitivity in these conditions. Single...

  13. Standard Enthalpies of Formation of Solid Complexes of Lanthanide Nitrates with Alanine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨旭武; 陈三平; 高胜利; 刘晓华; 史启祯

    2002-01-01

    The combustion energies of fourteen solid complexes of lanthanide nitrate with alanine were determined. The standard enthalpies of combustion, Δc,coor(s)H°, and standard enthalpies of formation, Δf,coor(s)H°, were calculated for these complexes. The relationship of Δc,coor(s)H° and Δf,coor(s)H° with the atomic numbers of the elements in the lanthanide series were examined. The results show that a certain amount of covalence is present in the chemical bond between the lanthanide cations and alanine.

  14. 3D structure and formation of hydrothermal vent complexes in the Møre Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjoberg, Sigurd; Schmiedel, Tobias; Planke, Sverre; Svensen, Henrik H.; Galland, Oliver; Jerram, Dougal A.

    2016-04-01

    The mid-Norwegian Møre margin is regarded as a type example of a volcanic rifted margin, with its formation usually related to the influence of the Icelandic plume activity. The area is characterized by the presence of voluminous basaltic complexes such as extrusive lava sequences, intrusive sills and dikes, and hydrothermal vent complexes within the Møre Basin. Emplacement of hydrothermal vent complexes is accommodated by deformation of the host rock. The edges of igneous intrusions mobilize fluids by heat transfer into the sedimentary host rock (aureoles). Fluid expansion may lead to formation of piercing structures due to upward fluid migration. Hydrothermal vent complexes induce bending of overlying strata, leading to the formation of dome structures at the paleo-surface. These dome structures are important as they indicate the accommodation created for the intrusions by deformation of the upper layers of the stratigraphy, and may form important structures in many volcanic margins. Both the morphological characteristics of the upper part and the underlying feeder-structure (conduit-zone) can be imaged and studied on 3D seismic data. Seismic data from the Tulipan prospect located in the western part of the Møre Basin have been used in this study. The investigation focusses on (1) the vent complex geometries, (2) the induced surface deformation patterns, (3) the relation to the intrusions (heat source), as well as (4) the emplacement depth of the hydrothermal vent complexes. We approach this by doing a detailed 3D seismic interpretation of the Tulipan seismic data cube. The complexes formed during the initial Eocene, and are believed to be a key factor behind the rapid warming event called the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM). The newly derived understanding of age, eruptive deposits, and formation of hydrothermal vent complexes in the Møre Basin enables us to contribute to the general understanding of the igneous plumbing system in volcanic basins and

  15. Gliding Associated Proteins Play Essential Roles during the Formation of the Inner Membrane Complex of Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Clare R; Egarter, Saskia; Gow, Matthew; Jiménez-Ruiz, Elena; Ferguson, David J P; Meissner, Markus

    2016-02-01

    The inner membrane complex (IMC) of apicomplexan parasites is a specialised structure localised beneath the parasite's plasma membrane, and is important for parasite stability and intracellular replication. Furthermore, it serves as an anchor for the myosin A motor complex, termed the glideosome. While the role of this protein complex in parasite motility and host cell invasion has been well described, additional roles during the asexual life cycle are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that core elements of the glideosome, the gliding associated proteins GAP40 and GAP50 as well as members of the GAPM family, have critical roles in the biogenesis of the IMC during intracellular replication. Deletion or disruption of these genes resulted in the rapid collapse of developing parasites after initiation of the cell cycle and led to redistribution of other glideosome components.

  16. Gliding Associated Proteins Play Essential Roles during the Formation of the Inner Membrane Complex of Toxoplasma gondii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare R Harding

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The inner membrane complex (IMC of apicomplexan parasites is a specialised structure localised beneath the parasite's plasma membrane, and is important for parasite stability and intracellular replication. Furthermore, it serves as an anchor for the myosin A motor complex, termed the glideosome. While the role of this protein complex in parasite motility and host cell invasion has been well described, additional roles during the asexual life cycle are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that core elements of the glideosome, the gliding associated proteins GAP40 and GAP50 as well as members of the GAPM family, have critical roles in the biogenesis of the IMC during intracellular replication. Deletion or disruption of these genes resulted in the rapid collapse of developing parasites after initiation of the cell cycle and led to redistribution of other glideosome components.

  17. A rapid and quantitative coat protein complex II vesicle formation assay using luciferase reporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromme, J Chris; Kim, Jinoh

    2012-02-15

    The majority of protein export from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is facilitated by coat protein complex II (COPII). The COPII proteins deform the ER membrane into vesicles at the ER exit sites. During the vesicle formation step, the COPII proteins load cargo molecules into the vesicles. Formation of COPII vesicles has been reconstituted in vitro in yeast and in mammalian systems. These in vitro COPII vesicle formation assays involve incubation of microsomal membranes and purified COPII proteins with nucleotides. COPII vesicles are separated from the microsomes by differential centrifugation. Interestingly, the efficiency of the COPII vesicle formation with purified recombinant mammalian COPII proteins is lower than that with cytosol, suggesting that an additional cytosolic factor(s) is involved in this process. Indeed, other studies have also implicated additional factors. To facilitate biochemical identification of such regulators, a rapid and quantitative COPII vesicle formation assay is necessary because the current assay is lengthy. To expedite this assay, we generated luciferase reporter constructs. The reporter proteins were packaged into COPII vesicles and yielded quantifiable luminescent signals, resulting in a rapid and quantitative COPII vesicle formation assay.

  18. EPR study of complex formation between copper (II) ions and sympathomimetic amines in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preoteasa, E.A. [Inst. of Atomic Physics, IFIN, Bucharest (Romania); Duliu, O.G.; Grecu, V.V. [Bucharest, Univ. (Romania). Dept. of Atomic and Nuclear Physics

    1997-07-01

    The complex formation between sympathomimetic amines (SA): adrenaline (AD), noradrenaline (NA), dopamine (DA), ephedrine (ED) and p-tyramine (pTA), and Cu(II) ion in aqueous solution has been studied by X-band EPR at room temperature. Excepting pTA, all investigated SA yielded two types of complexes in different pH domains. All complexes consistent with a ligand fields having a distorted octahedral symmetry, i.e., hexacoordination of Cu(II). The covalence coefficient calculated from the isotropic g and A values has shown strong ionic sigma-type ligand bonds. A structural model with the Cu(II) ion bound by four catecholic O(hydroxy) atoms for the low pH complexes of AD, NA and DA is proposed. For the high pH complexes of the former compounds as well as for both Ed complexes, the authors suppose Cu(II) bound by two N (amino) and two O (hydroxy) atoms. The spectra are consistent to water binding on the longitudinal octahedron axis in all compounds excepting the high pH complex of Ed, where OH2- ions are bound. Possible implications for the SA-cell receptors interactions are discussed.

  19. Green synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles via complex formation by using Curcuma longa extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatimah, Is; Yudha, Septian P.; Mutiara, Nur Afisa Lintang

    2016-02-01

    Synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles(NPs) were conducted via Zn(II) complex formation by using Curcuma longa extract as template. Curcuma longa extract has the ability to form zinc ions complex with curcumin as ligating agent. Study on synthesis was conducted by monitoring thermal degradation of the material. Successful formation of zinc oxide nanoparticles was confirmed by employing x-ray diffraction, surface area analysis and transmission electron microscopy(TEM) studies. From the XRD analysis it is denoted that ZnO in hexagonal wurtzite phase was formed and particle size was varied as varied temperature. The data are also confirmed by TEM analysis which shows the particle sie at the range 20-80nm. The NPs exhibited excelent photocatalytic activity for methylene blue degradation and also significant antibacterial activity for Eschericia coli. The activity in methylene blue degradation was also confirmed from fast chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction.

  20. Green synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles via complex formation by using Curcuma longa extract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fatimah, Is, E-mail: isfatimah@uii.ac.id; Yudha, Septian P.; Mutiara, Nur Afisa Lintang [Chemistry Department, Islamic University of Indonesia Kampus Terpadu UII, Jl. Kaliurang Km 14, Sleman, Yogyakarta (Indonesia)

    2016-02-08

    Synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles(NPs) were conducted via Zn(II) complex formation by using Curcuma longa extract as template. Curcuma longa extract has the ability to form zinc ions complex with curcumin as ligating agent. Study on synthesis was conducted by monitoring thermal degradation of the material. Successful formation of zinc oxide nanoparticles was confirmed by employing x-ray diffraction, surface area analysis and transmission electron microscopy(TEM) studies. From the XRD analysis it is denoted that ZnO in hexagonal wurtzite phase was formed and particle size was varied as varied temperature. The data are also confirmed by TEM analysis which shows the particle sie at the range 20-80nm. The NPs exhibited excelent photocatalytic activity for methylene blue degradation and also significant antibacterial activity for Eschericia coli. The activity in methylene blue degradation was also confirmed from fast chemical oxygen demand (COD) reduction.

  1. Pattern formation in a complex Swift-Hohenberg equation with phase bistability

    CERN Document Server

    de Valcárcel, Manuel Martínez-Quesada Germán J

    2016-01-01

    We study pattern formation in a complex Swift Hohenberg equation with phase-sensitive (parametric) gain. Such an equation serves as a universal order parameter equation describing the onset of spontaneous oscillations in extended systems submitted to a kind of forcing dubbed rocking when the instability is towards long wavelengths. Applications include two-level lasers and photorefractive oscillators. Under rocking, the original continuous phase symmetry of the system is replaced by a discrete one, so that phase bistability emerges. This leads to the spontaneous formation of phase-locked spatial structures like phase domains and dark-ring (phase-) cavity solitons. Stability of the homogeneous solutions is studied and numerical simulations are made covering all the dynamical regimes of the model, which turn out to be very rich. Formal derivations of the rocked complex Swift-Hohenberg equation, using multiple scale techniques, are given for the two-level laser and the photorefractive oscillator.

  2. Decay of Activity Complexes, Formation of Unipolar Magnetic Regions and Coronal Holes in their Causal Relation

    CERN Document Server

    Golubeva, Elena

    2016-01-01

    North-south asymmetry of sunspot activity resulted in an asynchronous reversal of the Sun's polar fields in the current cycle. The asymmetry is also observed in the formation of polar coronal holes. A stable coronal hole was first formed at the South Pole, despite the later polar-field reversal there. The aim of this study is to understand processes making this situation possible. Synoptic magnetic maps from the Global Oscillation Network Group and corresponding coronal-hole maps from the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory are analyzed here to study a causal relationship between the decay of activity complexes, evolution of large-scale magnetic fields, and formation of coronal holes. Ensembles of coronal holes associated with decaying active regions and activity complexes are presented. These ensembles take part in global rearrangements of the Sun's open magnetic flux. In particular, the...

  3. Adsorption of Thiourea and Formation of Nickel-thiourea Complexes at Initial Stage of Nickel Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Guang-hui; WU Hui-huang; YANG Fang-zu; LIU Xin-yu

    2004-01-01

    The effect of thiourea(TU) on the nickel deposition process was analyzed by means of linear-sweep voltammetry. Raman spectroscopy and infrared reflectance spectroscopy were used to investigate the adsorption of TU and the formation of nickel-TU complexes on copper surface. The experimental results indicate that the nucleation and the preceding conversion step are involved in the deposition of nickel on copper electrodes. TU makes the onset nucleation potential negative due to the formation of nickel-TU complexes, which can accelerate the nickel deposition. Moreover, the S atom in the TU molecule adsorbed on copper surface facilitates the coordination of TU to Ni2+. Meanwhile, TU might be adsorbed at a flatter orientation if no Ni2+ is on the surface, while at a perpendicular orientation when Ni2+ is coadsorbed.

  4. Peculiarities of litter invertebrates’ multispecies complexes formation on the Khortitsa island (Zaporizhzhya province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. О. Fedorchenko

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Peculiarities of litter invertebrates’ complexes formation under conditions of the Khortitsa National Reserve (Zaporizhzhya province are studied. The dispersion of taxonomic groups of different levels (families and species in litter mesofauna is swayed by the inter- and intrasystem factors; the largest influence has the power of litter and its humidity. The rate of ecological factors’ influence at different taxonomic levels may diverge.

  5. Formation and Identification of Unresolved Complex Mixtures in Lacustrine Biodegraded Oil from Nanxiang Basin, China

    OpenAIRE

    Pengfei Guo; Sheng He; Shukui Zhu; Derong Chai; Shiyan Yin; Wei Dai; Wanfeng Zhang

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC/TOFMS) method has been developed for the formation and identification of unresolved complex mixtures (UCMs) in lacustrine biodegraded oils that with the same source rock, similar maturity, and increasing degradation rank from Nanxiang Basin, China. Normal alkanes, light hydrocarbons, isoprenoids, steranes, and terpanes are degraded gradually from oil B330 to oil G574. The compounds in biodegraded oil ...

  6. The role of eIF-4C in protein synthesis initiation complex formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goumans, H.; Thomas, A.; Verhoeven, H.; Voorma, H.O.; Benne, R.

    1980-01-01

    eIF-4C has a pronounced stimulatory effect on initiation complex formation with native 80-S ribosomes (80-Sn) as the only source of ribosomal subunits, but only a small effect when washed 40-S subunits are used. eIF-4C is accessary to eIF-3 in dissociating 80-Sn ribosomes. eIF-4C is present on 40-

  7. Microscopic Mechanism and Kinetics of Ice Formation at Complex Interfaces: Zooming in on Kaolinite

    CERN Document Server

    Sosso, Gabriele C; Donadio, Davide; Tribello, Gareth A; Michaelides, Angelos

    2016-01-01

    Most ice in nature forms thanks to impurities which boost the exceedingly low nucleation rate of pure supercooled water. However, the microscopic details of ice nucleation on these substances remain largely unknown. Here, we have unraveled the molecular mechanism and the kinetics of ice formation on kaolinite, a clay mineral playing a key role in climate science. We find that the formation of ice at strong supercooling in the presence of this clay is twenty orders of magnitude faster than homogeneous freezing. The critical nucleus is substantially smaller than that found for homogeneous nucleation and, in contrast to the predictions of classical nucleation theory (CNT), it has a strong 2D character. Nonetheless, we show that CNT describes correctly the formation of ice at this complex interface. Kaolinite also promotes the exclusive nucleation of hexagonal ice, as opposed to homogeneous freezing where a mixture of cubic and hexagonal polytypes is observed.

  8. Potentiometric studies on the complex formation of some Ln(III) ions with 4-nitrocatechol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhuyan, B.C.; Dubey, S.N. (Kurukshetra Univ. (India). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1981-07-01

    The interaction of La(III), Ce(III), Pr(III), Nd(III), Sm(III), Gd(III), Tb(III), Dy(III), Ho(III) and Y(III) with 4-nitrocatechol has been investigated potentiometrically in aqueous medium at 25deg and at ionic strengths of 0.05, 0.1, 0.15 and 0.2M (KNO/sub 3/). The proton-ligand formation constants and metal-ligand formation constants have been calculated using the Calvin-Bjerrum titration technique as modified by Irving and Rossotti. The thermodynamic formation constants have also been determined. The order of stabilities of the lanthanide complexes with the above ligand is found to be: La(III) < Ce(III) approximately Pr(III) < Nd(III) < Sm(III) < Gd(III) < Y(III) < Tb(III) < Dy(III) < Ho(III).

  9. True boundary for the formation of homoleptic transition-metal hydride complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Shigeyuki; Iijima, Yuki; Sato, Toyoto; Saitoh, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Otomo, Toshiya; Miwa, Kazutoshi; Ikeshoji, Tamio; Aoki, Katsutoshi; Orimo, Shin-ichi

    2015-05-04

    Despite many exploratory studies over the past several decades, the presently known transition metals that form homoleptic transition-metal hydride complexes are limited to the Groups 7-12. Here we present evidence for the formation of Mg3 CrH8 , containing the first Group 6 hydride complex [CrH7 ](5-) . Our theoretical calculations reveal that pentagonal-bipyramidal H coordination allows the formation of σ-bonds between H and Cr. The results are strongly supported by neutron diffraction and IR spectroscopic measurements. Given that the Group 3-5 elements favor ionic/metallic bonding with H, along with the current results, the true boundary for the formation of homoleptic transition-metal hydride complexes should be between Group 5 and 6. As the H coordination number generally tends to increase with decreasing atomic number of transition metals, the revised boundary suggests high potential for further discovery of hydrogen-rich materials that are of both technological and fundamental interest.

  10. Complexes of triggered star formation in supergiant shell of Holmberg II

    CERN Document Server

    Egorov, Oleg V; Moiseev, Alexei V; Shchekinov, Yuri A

    2016-01-01

    We report a detailed analysis of all regions of current star formation in the walls of the supergiant HI shell (SGS) in the galaxy Holmberg II based on observations with a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer at the 6-m SAO RAS telescope. We compare the structure and kinematics of ionized gas with that of atomic hydrogen and with the stellar population of the SGS. Our deep H$\\alpha$ images and archival images taken by the HST demonstrate that current star formation episodes are larger and more complicated than previously thought: they represent unified star-forming complexes with sizes of several hundred pc rather than 'chains' of separate bright nebulae in the walls of the SGS. The fact that we are dealing with unified complexes is evidenced by identified faint shell-like structures of ionized and neutral gas which connect several distinct bright HII regions. Formation of such complexes is due to the feedback of stars with very inhomogeneous ambient gas in the walls of the SGS. The arguments supporting an ide...

  11. Formylglycinamide Ribonucleotide Amidotransferase from Thermotoga maritima: Structural Insights into Complex Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morar, Mariya; Hoskins, Aaron A.; Stubbe, JoAnne; Ealick, Steven E. (MIT); (Cornell)

    2008-10-02

    In the fourth step of the purine biosynthetic pathway, formyl glycinamide ribonucleotide (FGAR) amidotransferase, also known as PurL, catalyzes the conversion of FGAR, ATP, and glutamine to formyl glycinamidine ribonucleotide (FGAM), ADP, P{sub i}, and glutamate. Two forms of PurL have been characterized, large and small. Large PurL, present in most Gram-negative bacteria and eukaryotes, consists of a single polypeptide chain and contains three major domains: the N-terminal domain, the FGAM synthetase domain, and the glutaminase domain, with a putative ammonia channel located between the active sites of the latter two. Small PurL, present in Gram-positive bacteria and archaea, is structurally homologous to the FGAM synthetase domain of large PurL, and forms a complex with two additional gene products, PurQ and PurS. The structure of the PurS dimer is homologous with the N-terminal domain of large PurL, while PurQ, whose structure has not been reported, contains the glutaminase activity. In Bacillus subtilis, the formation of the PurLQS complex is dependent on glutamine and ADP and has been demonstrated by size-exclusion chromatography. In this work, a structure of the PurLQS complex from Thermotoga maritima is described revealing a 2:1:1 stoichiometry of PurS:Q:L, respectively. The conformational changes observed in TmPurL upon complex formation elucidate the mechanism of metabolite-mediated recruitment of PurQ and PurS. The flexibility of the PurS dimer is proposed to play a role in the activation of the complex and the formation of the ammonia channel. A potential path for the ammonia channel is identified.

  12. FORMATION AND RECONDENSATION OF COMPLEX ORGANIC MOLECULES DURING PROTOSTELLAR LUMINOSITY OUTBURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taquet, Vianney [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300-RA Leiden (Netherlands); Wirström, Eva S. [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala Space Observatory, SE-439 92 Onsala (Sweden); Charnley, Steven B. [Astrochemistry Laboratory and The Goddard Center for Astrobiology, Mailstop 691, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20770 (United States)

    2016-04-10

    During the formation of stars, the accretion of surrounding material toward the central object is thought to undergo strong luminosity outbursts followed by long periods of relative quiescence, even at the early stages of star formation when the protostar is still embedded in a large envelope. We investigated the gas-phase formation and recondensation of the complex organic molecules (COMs) di-methyl ether and methyl formate, induced by sudden ice evaporation processes occurring during luminosity outbursts of different amplitudes in protostellar envelopes. For this purpose, we updated a gas-phase chemical network forming COMs in which ammonia plays a key role. The model calculations presented here demonstrate that ion–molecule reactions alone could account for the observed presence of di-methyl ether and methyl formate in a large fraction of protostellar cores without recourse to grain-surface chemistry, although they depend on uncertain ice abundances and gas-phase reaction branching ratios. In spite of the short outburst timescales of about 100 years, abundance ratios of the considered species higher than 10% with respect to methanol are predicted during outbursts due to their low binding energies relative to water and methanol which delay their recondensation during cooling. Although the current luminosity of most embedded protostars would be too low to produce complex organics in the hot-core regions that are observable with current sub-millimetric interferometers, previous luminosity outburst events would induce the formation of COMs in extended regions of protostellar envelopes with sizes increasing by up to one order of magnitude.

  13. Mouse hepatitis coronavirus replication induces host translational shutoff and mRNA decay, with concomitant formation of stress granules and processing bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raaben, Matthijs; Groot Koerkamp, Marian J A; Rottier, Peter J M; de Haan, Cornelis A M

    2007-09-01

    Many viruses, including coronaviruses, induce host translational shutoff, while maintaining synthesis of their own gene products. In this study we performed genome-wide microarray analyses of the expression patterns of mouse hepatitis coronavirus (MHV)-infected cells. At the time of MHV-induced host translational shutoff, downregulation of numerous mRNAs, many of which encode protein translation-related factors, was observed. This downregulation, which is reminiscent of a cellular stress response, was dependent on viral replication and caused by mRNA decay. Concomitantly, phosphorylation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2alpha was increased in MHV-infected cells. In addition, stress granules and processing bodies appeared, which are sites for mRNA stalling and degradation respectively. We propose that MHV replication induces host translational shutoff by triggering an integrated stress response. However, MHV replication per se does not appear to benefit from the inhibition of host protein synthesis, at least in vitro, since viral replication was not negatively affected but rather enhanced in cells with impaired translational shutoff.

  14. [Regularities of formation of chlorophyll-human serum albumin functionally active complexes in the aqueous medium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semichaevskiĭ, V D

    1975-01-01

    In the system with constant content of the chlorophyll a and increasing amounts of human serum albumin, dependence of pigment incorporation into the complex upon interaction of its aqueous associates with protein solutions was studied by applying the gel filtration on Sephadex G-75 and by measuring light scattering and rate of sensitized photoreduction of the methyl red by ascorbic-acid. The curves were obtained after extraction of the chlorophyll by acetone from dry pigment-protein films formed after desiccation of the aqueous systems. Sigmoid character of the above dependences, their linearization in Hill's coordinates and the value of cooperativity coefficient close to 2 testifies in favour of the cooperative character of the complex formation, two pigment molecules reacting with a single protein molecule. Measurement of adsorption isotherms and their treatment with use of the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller theory of polymolecular adsorption make it possible to evaluate the maximum molar ratio of the pigment to the protein in the complex (close to 2). The pigment-pigment interaction suggests that the chlorophyll molecules adsorbed on the protein are in the state of loosely packed dimers. Deaggregation of aqueus pigment associates by the protein in the course of complex formation results in a considerable increase of the protosensitizing chlorophyll activity.

  15. Glycinin-gum arabic complex formation: Turbidity measurement and charge neutralization analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Die; Hua, Yufei

    2016-11-01

    The interaction between glycinin and anionic polysaccharides has gained considerable attention recently because of its scientific impact on the stability of acid soymilk systems. In this study, the formation of glycinin/gum arabic complexes driven by electrostatic interactions was investigated. Turbidity titrations at different glycinin/gum arabic ratios were conducted and critical pH values (pHφ1) where insoluble complexes began forming were determined firstly. The corresponding pHφ1 values at glycinin/gum arabic ratios of 1:4, 1:2, 1:1, 2:1, 4:1 and 8:1 were 2.85, 3.25, 3.70, 4.40, 4.85 and 5.35, respectively. Afterwards, electromobilities for glycinin and gum arabic at the pH values between 4.1 and 2.6 were measured, and charge densities (ZN) for glycinin and gum arabic were calculated based on the soft particle analysis theory. Further analysis indicated that the product of glycinin/gum arabic ratio (ρ) and ZN ratio of glycinin/gum arabic was approximate 1 at any pHφ1 values. It was revealed that charge neutralization was achieved when glycinin/gum arabic insoluble complexes began forming. NaCl displayed multiple effects on glycinin/gum arabic complex formation according to turbidity and compositional analysis. The present study could provide basic guidance in acid soymilk designing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Moessbauer study of peroxynitrito complex formation with Fe{sup III}-chelates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Homonnay, Zoltan, E-mail: homonnay@ludens.elte.hu; Buszlai, Peter; Nador, Judit [Eoetvoes University, Institute of Chemistry (Hungary); Sharma, Virender K. [Florida Institute of Technology (United States); Kuzmann, Erno; Vertes, Attila [Eoetvoes University, Institute of Chemistry (Hungary)

    2012-03-15

    The reaction of the {mu}-oxo-diiron(III)-L complex (L = EDTA, ethylene diamine tetraacetate, HEDTA, hydroxyethyl ethylene diamine triacetate, and CyDTA, cyclohexane diamine tetraacetate) with peroxynitrite in alkaline solution was studied by Moessbauer spectroscopy using rapid-freezing technique. These complexes yield an (L)Fe{sup III}({eta}{sup 2}-O{sub 2}){sup 3-} complex ion when they react with hydrogen peroxide and the formation of the peroxide adduct results in a deep purple coloration of the solution. The same color appears when the reaction occurs with peroxinitrite. Although spectrophotometry indicated some difference between the molar extinction coefficients of the peroxo and the peroxinitrito adducts, the Moessbauer parameters proved to be the same within experimental error. It is concluded that the peroxynitrite ion decomposes when reacting with Fe{sup III}(L) and the peroxo adduct forms.

  17. Pathway of actin filament branch formation by Arp2/3 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltzner, Christopher C; Pollard, Thomas D

    2008-03-14

    A spectroscopic assay using pyrene-labeled fission yeast Arp2/3 complex revealed that the complex binds to and dissociates from actin filaments extremely slowly with or without the nucleation-promoting factor fission yeast Wsp1-VCA. Wsp1-VCA binds both Arp2/3 complex and actin monomers with high affinity. These two ligands have only modest impacts on the interaction of the other ligand with VCA. Simulations of a mathematical model based on the kinetic parameters determined in this study and elsewhere account for the full time course of actin polymerization in the presence of Arp2/3 complex and Wsp1-VCA and show that an activation step, postulated to follow binding of a ternary complex of Arp2/3 complex, a bound nucleation-promoting factor, and an actin monomer to an actin filament, has a rate constant at least 0.15 s(-1). Kinetic parameters determined in this study constrain the process of actin filament branch formation during cellular motility to one main pathway.

  18. Perfluoroalkyl Cobalt(III) Fluoride and Bis(perfluoroalkyl) Complexes: Catalytic Fluorination and Selective Difluorocarbene Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, Matthew C; Bayne, Julia M; Lee, Graham M; Gorelsky, Serge I; Vasiliu, Monica; Korobkov, Ilia; Harrison, Daniel J; Dixon, David A; Baker, R Tom

    2015-12-30

    Four perfluoroalkyl cobalt(III) fluoride complexes have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, multinuclear NMR spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, and powder X-ray diffraction. The remarkable cobalt fluoride (19)F NMR chemical shifts (-716 to -759 ppm) were studied computationally, and the contributing paramagnetic and diamagnetic factors were extracted. Additionally, the complexes were shown to be active in the catalytic fluorination of p-toluoyl chloride. Furthermore, two examples of cobalt(III) bis(perfluoroalkyl)complexes were synthesized and their reactivity studied. Interestingly, abstraction of a fluoride ion from these complexes led to selective formation of cobalt difluorocarbene complexes derived from the trifluoromethyl ligand. These electrophilic difluorocarbenes were shown to undergo insertion into the remaining perfluoroalkyl fragment, demonstrating the elongation of a perfluoroalkyl chain arising from a difluorocarbene insertion on a cobalt metal center. The reactions of both the fluoride and bis(perfluoroalkyl) complexes provide insight into the potential catalytic applications of these model systems to form small fluorinated molecules as well as fluoropolymers.

  19. cAMP prevents TNF-induced apoptosis through inhibiting DISC complex formation in rat hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharjee, Rajesh [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Xiang, Wenpei [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Family Planning Research Institute, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030, People' s Republic of China (China); Wang, Yinna [Vascular Medicine Institute, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 10051-5A BST 3, 3501 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Zhang, Xiaoying [Department of Medicine/Endocrinology Division, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, 200 Lothrop St., Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Billiar, Timothy R., E-mail: billiartr@upmc.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks cell death induced by TNF and actinomycin D in cultured hepatocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks NF-{kappa}B activation induced by TNF and actinomycin D. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks DISC formation following TNF and actinomycin D exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks TNF signaling at a proximal step. -- Abstract: Tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF) is a pleiotropic proinflammatory cytokine that plays a role in immunity and the control of cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and apoptosis. The pleiotropic nature of TNF is due to the formation of different signaling complexes upon the binding of TNF to its receptor, TNF receptor type 1 (TNFR1). TNF induces apoptosis in various mammalian cells when the cells are co-treated with a transcription inhibitor like actinomycin D (ActD). When TNFR1 is activated, it recruits an adaptor protein, TNF receptor-associated protein with death domain (TRADD), through its cytoplasmic death effector domain (DED). TRADD, in turn, recruits other signaling proteins, including TNF receptor-associated protein 2 (TRAF2) and receptor-associated protein kinase (RIPK) 1, to form a complex. Subsequently, this complex combines with FADD and procaspase-8, converts into a death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) to induce apoptosis. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a second messenger that regulates various cellular processes such as cell proliferation, gene expression, and apoptosis. cAMP analogues are reported to act as anti-apoptotic agents in various cell types, including hepatocytes. We found that a cAMP analogue, dibutyryl cAMP (db-cAMP), inhibits TNF + ActD-induced apoptosis in rat hepatocytes. The protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor KT-5720 reverses this inhibitory effect of cAMP on apoptosis. Cytoprotection by cAMP involves down-regulation of various apoptotic signal regulators like TRADD and FADD and inhibition of caspase-8 and caspase-3 cleavage. We also found

  20. CARBON DIOXIDE INFLUENCE ON THE THERMAL FORMATION OF COMPLEX ORGANIC MOLECULES IN INTERSTELLAR ICE ANALOGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinogradoff, V.; Fray, N.; Bouilloud, M.; Cottin, H. [LISA Laboratoire Interuniversitaire des Systèmes Atmosphériques, UMR CNRS 7583, Université Paris Est Créteil (UPEC), Université Paris Diderot (UPD), Institut Pierre Simon Laplace, Labex ESEP, Paris (France); Duvernay, F.; Chiavassa, T., E-mail: vvinogradoff@mnhn.fr [PIIM, Laboratoire de Physique des Interactions Ioniques et Moléculaires, Université Aix-Marseille, UMR CNRS 7345, Marseille (France)

    2015-08-20

    Interstellar ices are submitted to energetic processes (thermal, UV, and cosmic-ray radiations) producing complex organic molecules. Laboratory experiments aim to reproduce the evolution of interstellar ices to better understand the chemical changes leading to the reaction, formation, and desorption of molecules. In this context, the thermal evolution of an interstellar ice analogue composed of water, carbon dioxide, ammonia, and formaldehyde is investigated. The ice evolution during the warming has been monitored by IR spectroscopy. The formation of hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) and polymethylenimine (PMI) are observed in the organic refractory residue left after ice sublimation. A better understanding of this result is realized with the study of another ice mixture containing methylenimine (a precursor of HMT) with carbon dioxide and ammonia. It appears that carbamic acid, a reaction product of carbon dioxide and ammonia, plays the role of catalyst, allowing the reactions toward HMT and PMI formation. This is the first time that such complex organic molecules (HMT, PMI) are produced from the warming (without VUV photolysis or irradiation with energetic particles) of abundant molecules observed in interstellar ices (H{sub 2}O, NH{sub 3}, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}CO). This result strengthens the importance of thermal reactions in the ices’ evolution. HMT and PMI, likely components of interstellar ices, should be searched for in the pristine objects of our solar system, such as comets and carbonaceous chondrites.

  1. Formation mechanism and biological activity of novel thiolated human-like collagen iron complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chenhui; Liu, Lingyun; Deng, Jianjun; Ma, Xiaoxuan; Hui, Junfeng; Fan, Daidi

    2016-03-01

    To develop an iron supplement that is effectively absorbed and utilized, thiolated human-like collagen was created to improve the iron binding capacity of human-like collagen. A thiolated human-like collagen-iron complex was prepared in a phosphate buffer, and one mole of thiolated human-like collagen-iron possessed approximately 28.83 moles of iron. The characteristics of thiolated human-like collagen-iron were investigated by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, circular dichroism, and differential scanning calorimetry. The results showed that the thiolated human-like collagen-iron complex retained the secondary structure of human-like collagen and had greater thermodynamic stability than human-like collagen, although interactions between iron ions and human-like collagen occurred during the formation of the complex. In addition, to evaluate the bioavailability of thiolated human-like collagen-iron, an in vitro Caco-2 cell model and an in vivo iron deficiency anemia mouse model were employed. The data demonstrated that the thiolated human-like collagen-iron complex exhibited greater bioavailability and was more easily utilized than FeSO4, ferric ammonium citrate, or ferrous glycinate. These results indicated that the thiolated human-like collagen-iron complex is a potential iron supplement in the biomedical field.

  2. Mode of formation and structural features of DNA-cationic liposome complexes used for transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershon, H; Ghirlando, R; Guttman, S B; Minsky, A

    1993-07-20

    Complexes formed between cationic liposomes and nucleic acids represent a highly efficient vehicle for delivery of DNA and RNA molecules into a large variety of eukaryotic cells. By using fluorescence, gel electrophoresis, and metal-shadowing electron microscopy techniques, the factors that affect the, yet unclear, interactions between DNA and cationic liposomes as well as the structural features of the resulting complexes have been elucidated. A model is suggested according to which cationic liposomes bind initially to DNA molecules to form clusters of aggregated vesicles along the nucleic acids. At a critical liposome density, two processes occur, namely, DNA-induced membrane fusion, indicated by lipid mixing studies, and liposome-induced DNA collapse, pointed out by the marked cooperativity of the encapsulation processes, by their modulations by DNA-condensing agents, and also by their conspicuous independence upon DNA length. The DNA collapse leads to the formation of condensed structures which can be completely encapsulated within the fused lipid bilayers in a fast, highly cooperative process since their exposed surface is substantially smaller than that of extended DNA molecules. The formation of the transfecting DNA-liposome complexes in which the nucleic acids are fully encapsulated within a positively-charged lipid bilayer is proposed, consequently, to be dominated by mutual effects exerted by the DNA and the cationic liposomes, leading to interrelated lipid fusion and DNA collapse.

  3. Quantitative serine protease assays based on formation of copper(II)-oligopeptide complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiaokang; Yang, Kun-Lin

    2015-01-07

    A quantitative protease assay based on the formation of a copper-oligopeptide complex is developed. In this assay, when a tripeptide GGH fragment is cleaved from an oligopeptide chain by serine proteases, the tripeptide quickly forms a pink GGH/Cu(2+) complex whose concentration can be determined quantitatively by using UV-Vis spectroscopy. Therefore, activities of serine proteases can be determined from the formation rate of the GGH/Cu(2+) complex. This principle can be used to detect the presence of serine protease in a real-time manner, or measure proteolytic activities of serine protease cleaving different oligopeptide substrates. For example, by using this assay, we demonstrate that trypsin, a model serine protease, is able to cleave two oligopeptides GGGGKGGH () and GGGGRGGH (). However, the specificity constant (kcat/Km) for is higher than that of (6.4 × 10(3) mM(-1) min(-1)vs. 1.3 × 10(3) mM(-1) min(-1)). This result shows that trypsin is more specific toward arginine (R) than lysine (K) in the oligopeptide sequence.

  4. Young stellar population and ongoing star formation in the HII complex Sh2-252

    CERN Document Server

    Jose, Jessy; Samal, M R; Ojha, D K; Ogura, K; Kim, J S; Kobayashi, N; Goyal, A; Chauhan, N; Eswaraiah, C

    2013-01-01

    In this paper an extensive survey of the star forming complex Sh2-252 has been undertaken with an aim to explore its hidden young stellar population as well as to understand the structure and star formation history. This complex is composed of five embedded clusters associated with the sub-regions A, C, E, NGC 2175s and Teu 136. Using 2MASS-NIR and Spitzer-IRAC, MIPS photometry we identified 577 young stellar objects (YSOs), of which, 163 are Class I, 400 are Class II and 14 are transition disk YSOs. Spatial distribution of the candidate YSOs shows that they are mostly clustered around the sub-regions in the western half of the complex, suggesting enhanced star formation activity towards its west. Using the spectral energy distribution and optical colour-magnitude diagram based age analyses, we derived probable evolutionary status of the sub-regions of Sh2-252. Our analysis shows that the region A is the youngest (~ 0.5 Myr), the regions B, C and E are of similar evolutionary stage (~ 1-2 Myr) and the cluster...

  5. Decay of Activity Complexes, Formation of Unipolar Magnetic Regions, and Coronal Holes in Their Causal Relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubeva, E. M.; Mordvinov, A. V.

    2016-12-01

    The peculiar development of solar activity in the current cycle resulted in an asynchronous reversal of the Sun's polar fields. The asymmetry is also observed in the formation of polar coronal holes. A stable coronal hole was first formed at the South Pole, despite the later polar-field reversal there. The aim of this study is to understand the processes making this situation possible. Synoptic magnetic maps from the Global Oscillation Network Group and corresponding coronal-hole maps from the Extreme ultraviolet Imaging Telescope onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory are analyzed here to study the causal relationship between the decay of activity complexes, evolution of large-scale magnetic fields, and formation of coronal holes. Ensembles of coronal holes associated with decaying active regions and activity complexes are presented. These ensembles take part in global rearrangements of the Sun's open magnetic flux. In particular, the south polar coronal hole was formed from an ensemble of coronal holes that came into existence after the decay of multiple activity complexes observed during 2014.

  6. SOHLH2 is essential for synaptonemal complex formation during spermatogenesis in early postnatal mouse testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Miree; Lee, Youngeun; Jang, Hoon; Lee, Ok-Hee; Park, Sung-Won; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Hong, Kwonho; Song, Hyuk; Park, Se-Pill; Park, Yun-Yong; Ko, Jung Jae; Choi, Youngsok

    2016-02-12

    Spermatogenesis- and oogenesis-specific helix-loop-helix transcription factor 2 (SOHLH2) is exclusively expressed in germ cells of the gonads. Previous studies show that SOHLH2 is critical for spermatogenesis in mouse. However, the regulatory mechanism of SOHLH2 during early spermatogenesis is poorly understood. In the present study, we analyzed the gene expression profile of the Sohlh2-deficient testis and examined the role of SOHLH2 during spermatogenesis. We found 513 genes increased in abundance, while 492 genes decreased in abundance in 14-day-old Sohlh2-deficient mouse testes compared to wildtype mice. Gene ontology analysis revealed that Sohlh2 disruption effects the relative abundance of various meiotic genes during early spermatogenesis, including Spo11, Dmc1, Msh4, Prdm9, Sycp1, Sycp2, Sycp3, Hormad1, and Hormad2. Western blot analysis and immunostaining showed that SYCP3, a component of synaptonemal complex, was significantly less abundant in Sohlh2-deficient spermatocytes. We observed a lack of synaptonemal complex formation during meiosis in Sohlh2-deficient spermatocytes. Furthermore, we found that SOHLH2 interacted with two E-boxes on the mouse Sycp1 promoter and Sycp1 promoter activity increased with ectopically expressed SOHLH2. Taken together, our data suggest that SOHLH2 is critical for the formation of synaptonemal complexes via its regulation of Sycp1 expression during mouse spermatogonial differentiation.

  7. Donor-Acceptor Properties of a Single-Molecule Altered by On-Surface Complex Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Tobias; Pawlak, Rémy; Kawai, Shigeki; Geng, Yan; Liu, Xunshan; Decurtins, Silvio; Hapala, Prokop; Baratoff, Alexis; Liu, Shi-Xia; Jelínek, Pavel; Meyer, Ernst; Glatzel, Thilo

    2017-08-22

    Electron donor-acceptor molecules are of outstanding interest in molecular electronics and organic solar cells for their intramolecular charge transfer controlled via electrical or optical excitation. The preservation of their electronic character in the ground state upon adsorption on a surface is cardinal for their implementation in such single-molecule devices. Here, we investigate by atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy a prototypical system consisting of a π-conjugated tetrathiafulvalene-fused dipyridophenazine molecule adsorbed on thin NaCl films on Cu(111). Depending on the adsorption site, the molecule is found either in a nearly undisturbed free state or in a bound state. In the latter case, the molecule adopts a specific adsorption site, leading to the formation of a chelate complex with a single Na(+) alkali cation pulled out from the insulating film. Although expected to be electronically decoupled, the charge distribution of the complex is drastically modified, leading to the loss of the intrinsic donor-acceptor character. The chelate complex formation is reversible with respect to lateral manipulations, enabling tunable donor-acceptor molecular switches activated by on-surface coordination.

  8. Identification of the determinants of efficient Pestivirus replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risager, Peter Christian

    The key for the survival of a virus is to copy its own genome into progeny genomes that allows continued reproduction. The mechanism behind this "copy function" or "replication" is a wellorganized process that involves the formation of a replication complex in the cell and interactions between...... the viral proteins. The replication process in single-stranded RNA viruses of positive polarity requires a particular enzyme, an RNA dependent RNA polymerase, that has no direct counterpart elsewhere in nature. The variable nature of rapidly evolving viral genomes, pose a constant challenge to the host......, gives a general introduction to RNA viruses, with the focus on viruses classified within the Flaviviridae. Next, pestiviruses are described with special attention to classical swine fever virus and the disease it is responsible for. A brief history of types of viral vaccines is provided, finishing...

  9. Solid inclusion complexes of vanillin with cyclodextrins: their formation, characterization, and high-temperature stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayaci, Fatma; Uyar, Tamer

    2011-11-09

    This study reports the formation of solid vanillin/cyclodextrin inclusion complexes (vanillin/CD ICs) with the aim to enhance the thermal stability and sustained release of vanillin by inclusion complexation. The solid vanillin/CD ICs with three types of CDs (α-CD, β-CD, and γ-CD) were prepared using the freeze-drying method; in addition, a coprecipitation method was also used in the case of γ-CD. The presence of vanillin in CD ICs was confirmed by FTIR and (1)H NMR studies. Moreover, (1)H NMR study elucidated that the complexation stoichiometry for both vanillin/β-CD IC and vanillin/γ-CD IC was a 1:1 molar ratio, whereas it was 0.625:1 for vanillin/α-CD IC. XRD studies have shown channel-type arrangement for CD molecules, and no diffraction peak for free vanillin was observed for vanillin/β-CD IC and vanillin/γ-CD IC, indicating that complete inclusion complexation was successfully achieved for these CD ICs. In the case of vanillin/α-CD IC, the sample was mostly amorphous and some uncomplexed vanillin was present, suggesting that α-CD was not very effective for complexation with vanillin compared to β-CD and γ-CD. Furthermore, DSC studies for vanillin/β-CD IC and vanillin/γ-CD IC have shown no melting point for vanillin, elucidating the true complex formation, whereas a melting point for vanillin was recorded for vanillin/α-CD IC, confirming the presence of some uncomplexed vanillin in this sample. TGA thermograms indicated that thermal evaporation/degradation of vanillin occurred over a much higher temperature range (150-300 °C) for vanillin/CD ICs samples when compared to pure vanillin (80-200 °C) or vanillin/CD physical mixtures, signifying that the thermal stability of vanillin was increased due to the inclusion complexation with CDs. Moreover, headspace GC-MS analyses indicated that the release of vanillin was sustained at higher temperatures in the case of vanillin/CD ICs due to the inclusion complexation when compared to vanillin

  10. Complex Formation of Lead(II) with Nucleotides and Their Constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigel, Astrid; Operschall, Bert P; Sigel, Helmut

    2017-04-10

    Lead is widely distributed in the environment; it is known to mankind for thousands of years and its toxicity is nowadays (again) well recognized, though on the molecular level only partly understood. One of the reasons for this shortcoming is that the coordination chemistry of the biologically important lead(II) is complicated due to the various coordination numbers it can adopt (CN = 4 to 10) as well as by the 6s2 electron lone pair which, with CN = 4, can shield one side of the Pb2+ coordination sphere. The chapter focuses on the properties of Pb2+ complexes formed with nucleotides and their constituents and derivatives. Covered are (among others) the complexes formed with hydroxy groups and sugar residues, the interactions with the various nucleobases occurring in nucleic acids, as well as complexes of phosphates. It is expeced that such interactions, next to those like with lipids and proteins, are responsible for the toxic properties of lead. To emphasize the special properties of Pb2+ complexes, these are compared as far as possible with the corresponding properties of the Ca2+, Fe2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, and Cd2+ species. It needs to be mentioned that the hard-soft rule fails with Pb2+. This metal ion forms complexes with ligands offering O donors of a stability comparable to that of Cu2+. In contrast, with aromatic N ligands, like imidazole or N7 sites of purines, complex stability is comparable to that of the corresponding Fe2+ complexes. The properties of Pb2+ towards S donor sites are difficult to generalize: On the one hand Pb2+ forms very stable complexes with nucleoside 5'-O-thiomonophosphates by coordinating to nearly 100% at S in the thiophosphate group; however, on the other hand, once a sulfur atom replaces one of the terminal oxygen atoms in the phosphodiester linkage, macrochelate formation of the phosphate-bound Pb2+ occurs with the O and not the S site. Quite generally, the phosphodiester linkage is a relatively weak binding site, but the affinity

  11. Complex Organic Molecules Formation in Space Through Gas Phase Reactions: A Theoretical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo, Pilar; Barrientos, Carmen; Largo, Antonio

    2017-02-01

    Chemistry in the interstellar medium (ISM) is capable of producing complex organic molecules (COMs) of great importance to astrobiology. Gas phase and grain surface chemistry almost certainly both contribute to COM formation. Amino acids as building blocks of proteins are some of the most interesting COMs. The simplest one, glycine, has been characterized in meteorites and comets and, its conclusive detection in the ISM seems to be highly plausible. In this work, we analyze the gas phase reaction of glycine and {{{CH}}5}+ to establish the role of this process in the formation of alanine or other COMs in the ISM. Formation of protonated α- and β-alanine in spite of being exothermic processes is not viable under interstellar conditions because the different paths leading to these isomers present net activation energies. Nevertheless, glycine can evolve to protonated 1-imide-2, 2-propanediol, protonated amino acetone, protonated hydroxyacetone, and protonated propionic acid. However, formation of acetic acid and protonated methylamine is also a favorable process and therefore will be a competitive channel with the evolution of glycine to COMs.

  12. The Protein Kingdom Extended: Ordered and Intrinsically Disordered Proteins, Their Folding, Supramolecular Complex Formation, and Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turoverov, Konstantin K.; Kuznetsova, Irina M.; Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2010-01-01

    The native state of a protein is usually associated with a compact globular conformation possessing a rigid and highly ordered structure. At the turn of the last century certain studies arose which concluded that many proteins cannot, in principle, form a rigid globular structure in an aqueous environment, but they are still able to fulfill their specific functions — i.e., they are native. The existence of the disordered regions allows these proteins to interact with their numerous binding partners. Such interactions are often accompanied by the formation of complexes that possess a more ordered structure than the original components. The functional diversity of these proteins, combined with the variability of signals related to the various intra-and intercellular processes handled by these proteins and their capability to produce multi-variant and multi-directional responses allow them to form a unique regulatory net in a cell. The abundance of disordered proteins inside the cell is precisely controlled at the synthesis and clearance levels as well as via interaction with specific binding partners and posttranslational modifications. Another recently recognized biologically active state of proteins is the functional amyloid. The formation of such functional amyloids is tightly controlled and therefore differs from the uncontrolled formation of pathogenic amyloids which are associated with the pathogenesis of several conformational diseases, the development of which is likely to be determined by the failures of the cellular regulatory systems rather than by the formation of the proteinaceous deposits and/or by the protofibril toxicity. PMID:20097220

  13. THE FORMATION OF STUDENTS’ SOCIAL COMPETENCES IN A TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY AS A MULTILEVEL EDUCATIONAL COMPLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana V. Sergeyeva

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the article deals with the problem of expanding students’ competencies. A modern technical University must train professionals who apart from having a high special competence, also have the understanding of the common cultural issues. The solution of the problem is possible through a specially organized activity in the system of lifelong education. The formation of students’ social competences assumes a particular relevance, in the educational process, of a technical university as a multilevel educational complex in the context of the implementation of competence-based approach. Materials and Methods: the authors use the following methods of scientific research: system-structural analysis, synthesis, working with literature, summarizing the e xperience, and critical reflection. Results: the article presents a programme “The Formation of Students’ Social Competences in a Technical University as a Multilevel Educational Complex” developed by the authors. The content of the programme suggests the formation of social competence of health preservation, civic consciousness, communication and social interaction as well as the formation of competence in th e field of information technology. Discussion and Conclusions: the programme developed by the authors is one of the results of research carried out in the work of the Russian Academy of Education experimental unit, case study of Penza State Technological University. The main target of this programme is to promote engineering staff training for a regional labour market. This programme can be used in dif ferent institutions of continuing education.

  14. High-throughput metagenomic technologies for complex microbial community analysis: open and closed formats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jizhong; He, Zhili; Yang, Yunfeng; Deng, Ye; Tringe, Susannah G; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2015-01-27

    Understanding the structure, functions, activities and dynamics of microbial communities in natural environments is one of the grand challenges of 21st century science. To address this challenge, over the past decade, numerous technologies have been developed for interrogating microbial communities, of which some are amenable to exploratory work (e.g., high-throughput sequencing and phenotypic screening) and others depend on reference genes or genomes (e.g., phylogenetic and functional gene arrays). Here, we provide a critical review and synthesis of the most commonly applied "open-format" and "closed-format" detection technologies. We discuss their characteristics, advantages, and disadvantages within the context of environmental applications and focus on analysis of complex microbial systems, such as those in soils, in which diversity is high and reference genomes are few. In addition, we discuss crucial issues and considerations associated with applying complementary high-throughput molecular technologies to address important ecological questions.

  15. A Meier-Gorlin syndrome mutation in a conserved C-terminal helix of Orc6 impedes origin recognition complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleichert, Franziska; Balasov, Maxim; Chesnokov, Igor; Nogales, Eva; Botchan, Michael R; Berger, James M

    2013-10-08

    In eukaryotes, DNA replication requires the origin recognition complex (ORC), a six-subunit assembly that promotes replisome formation on chromosomal origins. Despite extant homology between certain subunits, the degree of structural and organizational overlap between budding yeast and metazoan ORC has been unclear. Using 3D electron microscopy, we determined the subunit organization of metazoan ORC, revealing that it adopts a global architecture very similar to the budding yeast complex. Bioinformatic analysis extends this conservation to Orc6, a subunit of somewhat enigmatic function. Unexpectedly, a mutation in the Orc6 C-terminus linked to Meier-Gorlin syndrome, a dwarfism disorder, impedes proper recruitment of Orc6 into ORC; biochemical studies reveal that this region of Orc6 associates with a previously uncharacterized domain of Orc3 and is required for ORC function and MCM2-7 loading in vivo. Together, our results suggest that Meier-Gorlin syndrome mutations in Orc6 impair the formation of ORC hexamers, interfering with appropriate ORC functions. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00882.001.

  16. The effect of the Ti (IV-citrate complex on staphylococcus aureus growth and biofilm formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gritsenko Viktor A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this study was to investigate the influence of the Ti (IV-citrate complex on growth dynamics and biofilm formation of S. aureus. Speciation analysis was performed in order to estimate the structure of the Ti complex existing in citrate solutions at near-physiological pH. It is estimated that the fully deprotonated tris(citratetitanate ion [Ti(C6H4O73]8- predominates in solution at pH 6.46-7.44, and that this is most probably the biologically active form of Ti(IV-citrate. In in vitro experiments, increasing concentrations of citric acid solutions (0.05, 0.005, 0.0005 M, served as positive controls, while the effects of respective concentrations of Ti(IV-citrate were examined. The obtained results indicate that citrate decreased S. aureus 48 growth at all studied concentrations, whereas S. aureus 44 growth was decreased only by high concentrations of citrate (0.05M. Incubation of S. aureus culture with Ti(IV-citrate significantly potentiated citrate-induced effects. Ti(IV-citrate significantly altered specific bacterial growth rate in a similar manner. The most significant growth reduction was observed at the initial period of bacterial growth. At the same time, the opposite effect was detected in investigations of the effect of citrate and Ti(IV-citrate on S. aureus biofilm formation. Citric acid suppressed S. aureus biofilm formation, whereas Ti(IV-citrate displayed a significant stimulatory effect. Our findings suggest that Ti(IV-citrate possesses a more pronounced biological effect than citrate. The proposed mechanism of this action is activation of complex transport into the cell and induction of oxidative stress. However, the exact mechanism of Ti(IV-citrate biological action on bacterial cultures remains unknown.

  17. Electrochemistry of metal complexes applications from electroplating to oxide layer formation

    CERN Document Server

    Survila, Arvydas

    2015-01-01

    This book aims to sequentially cover all the major stages of electrochemical processes (mass transport, adsorption, charge transfer), with a special emphasis on their deep interrelation. Starting with general considerations on equilibria in solutions and at interfaces as well as on mass transport, the text acquaints readers with the theory and common experimental practice for studying electrochemical reactions of metals complexes. The core part of the book deals with all important aspects of electroplating, including a systematic discussion of co-deposition of metals and formation of alloys.

  18. Peculiarities of latent inhibition formation in SHR rats in conditioned task of different complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostyunina, N V; Loskutova, L V

    2012-05-01

    Inhibition of attention to irrelevant stimuli was studied in SHR rats using latent inhibition test. Latent inhibition was formed in two types of conditioned tasks with different levels of complexity and stress. Passive and active avoidance conditioning was preceded by preexposure to conditioned stimulus consisting of 20 and 100 non-reinforced presentations, respectively. Control Wistar rats demonstrated successful formation of latent inhibition in both tasks. SHR rats showed different degree of disruption of latent inhibition depending on the type of behavioral task. We assume that learning defect in these animals in respect to both novel and preexposed conditioned stimuli is associated with the lack of behavioral inhibition.

  19. Formation and dynamics of "waterproof" photoluminescent complexes of rare earth ions in crowded environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatova, Tetyana; Blades, Michael; Duque, Juan G; Doorn, Stephen K; Biaggio, Ivan; Rotkin, Slava V

    2014-12-28

    Understanding behavior of rare-earth ions (REI) in crowded environments is crucial for several nano- and bio-technological applications. Evolution of REI photoluminescence (PL) in small compartments inside a silica hydrogel, mimic to a soft matter bio-environment, has been studied and explained within a solvation model. The model uncovered the origin of high PL efficiency to be the formation of REI complexes, surrounded by bile salt (DOC) molecules. Comparative study of these REI-DOC complexes in bulk water solution and those enclosed inside the hydrogel revealed a strong correlation between an up to 5×-longer lifetime of REIs and appearance of the DOC ordered phase, further confirmed by dynamics of REI solvation shells, REI diffusion experiments and morphological characterization of microstructure of the hydrogel.

  20. Basic building units, self-assembly and crystallization in the formation of complex inorganic open architectures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C N R Rao

    2001-10-01

    Careful investigations of open-framework metal phosphates reveal that the formation of these complex architectures is likely to involve a process wherein one-dimensional ladders or chains, and possibly zero-dimens ional monomers, transform to higher dimensional structures. The one-dimensional ladder appears to be the primary building unit of these structures. At one stage of the building-up process, spontaneous self-assembly of a low-dimensional structure such as the ladder seems to occur, followed by crys tallization of a two- or three-dimensional structure. Accordingly, many of the higher dimensional structures retain the structural features of the 1D structure, indicating the occurrence of self-assembly. These findings mark the beginnings of our understan ding of complex supramolecular inorganic materials.

  1. Formation, Structure and In Vitro Antitumour Activity of a Novel Binuclear Organotin Complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lai Jin TIAN; Yu Xi SUN; Guo Ming YANG; Bo Chu QIAN; Zhi Cai SHANG

    2005-01-01

    A 1:1 reaction of triphenyltin chloride with potassium N-[(3,5-dibromo-2-hydroxyl-phenyl)methylene]valinate in benzene led to the formation of a novel mixed organotin dinuclear phenyl-tin bond cleavage process. In the complex, there are two distinct types of carboxylate moieties and a trans-O2SnC2N and a trans-O2SnC3 in distorted trigonal bipyramidal geometries were bridged by a carboxylate group. In vitro antimmor activity of the complex against three human tumour cell lines (HeLa, CoLo205 and MCF-7) was found to be much higher than cis-platin used in clinic.

  2. Archaeal DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelman, Lori M; Kelman, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication is essential for all life forms. Although the process is fundamentally conserved in the three domains of life, bioinformatic, biochemical, structural, and genetic studies have demonstrated that the process and the proteins involved in archaeal DNA replication are more similar to those in eukaryal DNA replication than in bacterial DNA replication, but have some archaeal-specific features. The archaeal replication system, however, is not monolithic, and there are some differences in the replication process between different species. In this review, the current knowledge of the mechanisms governing DNA replication in Archaea is summarized. The general features of the replication process as well as some of the differences are discussed.

  3. The quaternary structure of the eukaryotic DNA replication proteins Sld7 and Sld3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itou, Hiroshi; Shirakihara, Yasuo; Araki, Hiroyuki

    2015-08-01

    The initiation of eukaryotic chromosomal DNA replication requires the formation of an active replicative helicase at the replication origins of chromosomes. Yeast Sld3 and its metazoan counterpart treslin are the hub proteins mediating protein associations critical for formation of the helicase. The Sld7 protein interacts with Sld3, and the complex formed is thought to regulate the function of Sld3. Although Sld7 is a non-essential DNA replication protein that is found in only a limited range of yeasts, its depletion slowed the growth of cells and caused a delay in the S phase. Recently, the Mdm2-binding protein was found to bind to treslin in humans, and its depletion causes defects in cells similar to the depletion of Sld7 in yeast, suggesting their functional relatedness and importance during the initiation step of DNA replication. Here, the crystal structure of Sld7 in complex with Sld3 is presented. Sld7 comprises two structural domains. The N-terminal domain of Sld7 binds to Sld3, and the C-terminal domains connect two Sld7 molecules in an antiparallel manner. The quaternary structure of the Sld3-Sld7 complex shown from the crystal structures appears to be suitable to activate two helicase molecules loaded onto replication origins in a head-to-head manner.

  4. Gas Phase Reactions of Ions Derived from Anionic Uranyl Formate and Uranyl Acetate Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Evan; Hanley, Cassandra; Koehler, Stephen; Pestok, Jordan; Polonsky, Nevo; Van Stipdonk, Michael

    2016-12-01

    The speciation and reactivity of uranium are topics of sustained interest because of their importance to the development of nuclear fuel processing methods, and a more complete understanding of the factors that govern the mobility and fate of the element in the environment. Tandem mass spectrometry can be used to examine the intrinsic reactivity (i.e., free from influence of solvent and other condensed phase effects) of a wide range of metal ion complexes in a species-specific fashion. Here, electrospray ionization, collision-induced dissociation, and gas-phase ion-molecule reactions were used to create and characterize ions derived from precursors composed of uranyl cation (UVIO2 2+) coordinated by formate or acetate ligands. Anionic complexes containing UVIO2 2+ and formate ligands fragment by decarboxylation and elimination of CH2=O, ultimately to produce an oxo-hydride species [UVIO2(O)(H)]-. Cationic species ultimately dissociate to make [UVIO2(OH)]+. Anionic complexes containing acetate ligands exhibit an initial loss of acetyloxyl radical, CH3CO2•, with associated reduction of uranyl to UVO2 +. Subsequent CID steps cause elimination of CO2 and CH4, ultimately to produce [UVO2(O)]-. Loss of CH4 occurs by an intra-complex H+ transfer process that leaves UVO2 + coordinated by acetate and acetate enolate ligands. A subsequent dissociation step causes elimination of CH2=C=O to leave [UVO2(O)]-. Elimination of CH4 is also observed as a result of hydrolysis caused by ion-molecule reaction with H2O. The reactions of other anionic species with gas-phase H2O create hydroxyl products, presumably through the elimination of H2.

  5. Radiation increases the cellular uptake of exosomes through CD29/CD81 complex formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazawa, Masaharu; Tomiyama, Kenichi; Saotome-Nakamura, Ai; Obara, Chizuka; Yasuda, Takeshi; Gotoh, Takaya; Tanaka, Izumi; Yakumaru, Haruko; Ishihara, Hiroshi; Tajima, Katsushi, E-mail: tajima@nirs.go.jp

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Radiation increases cellular uptake of exosomes. • Radiation induces colocalization of CD29 and CD81. • Exosomes selectively bind the CD29/CD81 complex. • Radiation increases the cellular uptake of exosomes through CD29/CD81 complex formation. - Abstract: Exosomes mediate intercellular communication, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) or their secreted exosomes affect a number of pathophysiologic states. Clinical applications of MSC and exosomes are increasingly anticipated. Radiation therapy is the main therapeutic tool for a number of various conditions. The cellular uptake mechanisms of exosomes and the effects of radiation on exosome–cell interactions are crucial, but they are not well understood. Here we examined the basic mechanisms and effects of radiation on exosome uptake processes in MSC. Radiation increased the cellular uptake of exosomes. Radiation markedly enhanced the initial cellular attachment to exosomes and induced the colocalization of integrin CD29 and tetraspanin CD81 on the cell surface without affecting their expression levels. Exosomes dominantly bound to the CD29/CD81 complex. Knockdown of CD29 completely inhibited the radiation-induced uptake, and additional or single knockdown of CD81 inhibited basal uptake as well as the increase in radiation-induced uptake. We also examined possible exosome uptake processes affected by radiation. Radiation-induced changes did not involve dynamin2, reactive oxygen species, or their evoked p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent endocytic or pinocytic pathways. Radiation increased the cellular uptake of exosomes through CD29/CD81 complex formation. These findings provide essential basic insights for potential therapeutic applications of exosomes or MSC in combination with radiation.

  6. Hormad1 mutation disrupts synaptonemal complex formation, recombination, and chromosome segregation in mammalian meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Hyun Shin

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Meiosis is unique to germ cells and essential for reproduction. During the first meiotic division, homologous chromosomes pair, recombine, and form chiasmata. The homologues connect via axial elements and numerous transverse filaments to form the synaptonemal complex. The synaptonemal complex is a critical component for chromosome pairing, segregation, and recombination. We previously identified a novel germ cell-specific HORMA domain encoding gene, Hormad1, a member of the synaptonemal complex and a mammalian counterpart to the yeast meiotic HORMA domain protein Hop1. Hormad1 is essential for mammalian gametogenesis as knockout male and female mice are infertile. Hormad1 deficient (Hormad1(-/ (- testes exhibit meiotic arrest in the early pachytene stage, and synaptonemal complexes cannot be visualized by electron microscopy. Hormad1 deficiency does not affect localization of other synaptonemal complex proteins, SYCP2 and SYCP3, but disrupts homologous chromosome pairing. Double stranded break formation and early recombination events are disrupted in Hormad1(-/ (- testes and ovaries as shown by the drastic decrease in the γH2AX, DMC1, RAD51, and RPA foci. HORMAD1 co-localizes with γH2AX to the sex body during pachytene. BRCA1, ATR, and γH2AX co-localize to the sex body and participate in meiotic sex chromosome inactivation and transcriptional silencing. Hormad1 deficiency abolishes γH2AX, ATR, and BRCA1 localization to the sex chromosomes and causes transcriptional de-repression on the X chromosome. Unlike testes, Hormad1(-/ (- ovaries have seemingly normal ovarian folliculogenesis after puberty. However, embryos generated from Hormad1(-/ (- oocytes are hyper- and hypodiploid at the 2 cell and 8 cell stage, and they arrest at the blastocyst stage. HORMAD1 is therefore a critical component of the synaptonemal complex that affects synapsis, recombination, and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation and transcriptional silencing.

  7. Hormad1 mutation disrupts synaptonemal complex formation, recombination, and chromosome segregation in mammalian meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yong-Hyun; Choi, Youngsok; Erdin, Serpil Uckac; Yatsenko, Svetlana A; Kloc, Malgorzata; Yang, Fang; Wang, P Jeremy; Meistrich, Marvin L; Rajkovic, Aleksandar

    2010-11-04

    Meiosis is unique to germ cells and essential for reproduction. During the first meiotic division, homologous chromosomes pair, recombine, and form chiasmata. The homologues connect via axial elements and numerous transverse filaments to form the synaptonemal complex. The synaptonemal complex is a critical component for chromosome pairing, segregation, and recombination. We previously identified a novel germ cell-specific HORMA domain encoding gene, Hormad1, a member of the synaptonemal complex and a mammalian counterpart to the yeast meiotic HORMA domain protein Hop1. Hormad1 is essential for mammalian gametogenesis as knockout male and female mice are infertile. Hormad1 deficient (Hormad1(-/) (-)) testes exhibit meiotic arrest in the early pachytene stage, and synaptonemal complexes cannot be visualized by electron microscopy. Hormad1 deficiency does not affect localization of other synaptonemal complex proteins, SYCP2 and SYCP3, but disrupts homologous chromosome pairing. Double stranded break formation and early recombination events are disrupted in Hormad1(-/) (-) testes and ovaries as shown by the drastic decrease in the γH2AX, DMC1, RAD51, and RPA foci. HORMAD1 co-localizes with γH2AX to the sex body during pachytene. BRCA1, ATR, and γH2AX co-localize to the sex body and participate in meiotic sex chromosome inactivation and transcriptional silencing. Hormad1 deficiency abolishes γH2AX, ATR, and BRCA1 localization to the sex chromosomes and causes transcriptional de-repression on the X chromosome. Unlike testes, Hormad1(-/) (-) ovaries have seemingly normal ovarian folliculogenesis after puberty. However, embryos generated from Hormad1(-/) (-) oocytes are hyper- and hypodiploid at the 2 cell and 8 cell stage, and they arrest at the blastocyst stage. HORMAD1 is therefore a critical component of the synaptonemal complex that affects synapsis, recombination, and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation and transcriptional silencing.

  8. Zeaxanthin Radical Cation Formation in Minor Light-Harvesting Complexes of Higher Plant Antenna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avenson, Thomas H.; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Zigmantas, Donatas; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Li, Zhirong; Ballottari, Matteo; Bassi, Roberto; Fleming, Graham R.

    2008-01-31

    Previous work on intact thylakoid membranes showed that transient formation of a zeaxanthin radical cation was correlated with regulation of photosynthetic light-harvesting via energy-dependent quenching. A molecular mechanism for such quenching was proposed to involve charge transfer within a chlorophyll-zeaxanthin heterodimer. Using near infrared (880-1100 nm) transient absorption spectroscopy, we demonstrate that carotenoid (mainly zeaxanthin) radical cation generation occurs solely in isolated minor light-harvesting complexes that bind zeaxanthin, consistent with the engagement of charge transfer quenching therein. We estimated that less than 0.5percent of the isolated minor complexes undergo charge transfer quenching in vitro, whereas the fraction of minor complexes estimated to be engaged in charge transfer quenching in isolated thylakoids was more than 80 times higher. We conclude that minor complexes which bind zeaxanthin are sites of charge transfer quenching in vivo and that they can assume Non-quenching and Quenching conformations, the equilibrium LHC(N)<--> LHC(Q) of which is modulated by the transthylakoid pH gradient, the PsbS protein, and protein-protein interactions.

  9. Ice Complex formation in arctic East Siberia during the MIS3 Interstadial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetterich, Sebastian; Tumskoy, Vladimir; Rudaya, Natalia; Andreev, Andrei A.; Opel, Thomas; Meyer, Hanno; Schirrmeister, Lutz; Hüls, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    A continuous 15 m long sequence of Ice Complex permafrost (Yedoma) exposed in a thermo-cirque at the southern coast of Bol'shoy Lyakhovsky Island (New Siberian Archipelago, Dmitry Laptev Strait) was studied to reconstruct past landscape and environmental dynamics. The sequence accumulated during the Marine Isotope Stage 3 (MIS3) Interstadial between >49 and 29 ka BP in an ice-wedge polygon. The frozen deposits were cryolithologically described and sampled on a vertical bluff between two ice wedges. According to sedimentological and geochronological data, the section is subdivided into three units which correlate with environmental conditions of the early, middle, and late MIS3 period. Palynological data support this stratification. The stable isotope signature of texture ice in the polygon structure reflects fractionation due to local freeze-thaw processes, while the signature of an approximately 5 m wide and more than 17 m high ice wedge fits very well into the regional stable-water isotope record. Regional climate dynamics during the MIS3 Interstadial and local landscape conditions of the polygonal patterned ground controlled the Ice Complex formation. The sequence presented here completes previously published MIS3 permafrost records in Northeast Siberia. Late Quaternary stadial-interstadial climate variability in arctic West Beringia is preserved at millennial resolution in the Ice Complex. A MIS3 climate optimum was revealed between 48 and 38 ka BP from the Ice Complex on Bol'shoy Lyakhovsky Island.

  10. Formation of novel transition metal hydride complexes with ninefold hydrogen coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Shigeyuki; Iijima, Yuki; Sato, Toyoto; Saitoh, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Otomo, Toshiya; Miwa, Kazutoshi; Ikeshoji, Tamio; Orimo, Shin-ichi

    2017-01-01

    Ninefold coordination of hydrogen is very rare, and has been observed in two different hydride complexes comprising rhenium and technetium. Herein, based on a theoretical/experimental approach, we present evidence for the formation of ninefold H- coordination hydride complexes of molybdenum ([MoH9]3−), tungsten ([WH9]3−), niobium ([NbH9]4−) and tantalum ([TaH9]4−) in novel complex transition-metal hydrides, Li5MoH11, Li5WH11, Li6NbH11 and Li6TaH11, respectively. All of the synthesized materials are insulated with band gaps of approximately 4 eV, but contain a sufficient amount of hydrogen to cause the H 1s-derived states to reach the Fermi level. Such hydrogen-rich materials might be of interest for high-critical-temperature superconductivity if the gaps close under compression. Furthermore, the hydride complexes exhibit significant rotational motions associated with anharmonic librations at room temperature, which are often discussed in relation to the translational diffusion of cations in alkali-metal dodecahydro-closo-dodecaborates and strongly point to the emergence of a fast lithium conduction even at room temperature. PMID:28287143

  11. Formation of novel transition metal hydride complexes with ninefold hydrogen coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Shigeyuki; Iijima, Yuki; Sato, Toyoto; Saitoh, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Otomo, Toshiya; Miwa, Kazutoshi; Ikeshoji, Tamio; Orimo, Shin-Ichi

    2017-03-13

    Ninefold coordination of hydrogen is very rare, and has been observed in two different hydride complexes comprising rhenium and technetium. Herein, based on a theoretical/experimental approach, we present evidence for the formation of ninefold H- coordination hydride complexes of molybdenum ([MoH9](3-)), tungsten ([WH9](3-)), niobium ([NbH9](4-)) and tantalum ([TaH9](4-)) in novel complex transition-metal hydrides, Li5MoH11, Li5WH11, Li6NbH11 and Li6TaH11, respectively. All of the synthesized materials are insulated with band gaps of approximately 4 eV, but contain a sufficient amount of hydrogen to cause the H 1s-derived states to reach the Fermi level. Such hydrogen-rich materials might be of interest for high-critical-temperature superconductivity if the gaps close under compression. Furthermore, the hydride complexes exhibit significant rotational motions associated with anharmonic librations at room temperature, which are often discussed in relation to the translational diffusion of cations in alkali-metal dodecahydro-closo-dodecaborates and strongly point to the emergence of a fast lithium conduction even at room temperature.

  12. Ultrastructure of the replication sites of positive-strand RNA viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harak, Christian; Lohmann, Volker, E-mail: volker_lohmann@med.uni-heidelberg.de

    2015-05-15

    Positive strand RNA viruses replicate in the cytoplasm of infected cells and induce intracellular membranous compartments harboring the sites of viral RNA synthesis. These replication factories are supposed to concentrate the components of the replicase and to shield replication intermediates from the host cell innate immune defense. Virus induced membrane alterations are often generated in coordination with host factors and can be grouped into different morphotypes. Recent advances in conventional and electron microscopy have contributed greatly to our understanding of their biogenesis, but still many questions remain how viral proteins capture membranes and subvert host factors for their need. In this review, we will discuss different representatives of positive strand RNA viruses and their ways of hijacking cellular membranes to establish replication complexes. We will further focus on host cell factors that are critically involved in formation of these membranes and how they contribute to viral replication. - Highlights: • Positive strand RNA viruses induce massive membrane alterations. • Despite the great diversity, replication complexes share many similarities. • Host factors play a pivotal role in replication complex biogenesis. • Use of the same host factors by several viruses hints to similar functions.

  13. MMSET is dynamically regulated during cell-cycle progression and promotes normal DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Debra L; Zhang, Haoxing; Ham, Hyoungjun; Pei, Huadong; Lee, SeungBaek; Kim, JungJin; Billadeau, Daniel D; Lou, Zhenkun

    2016-01-01

    The timely and precise duplication of cellular DNA is essential for maintaining genome integrity and is thus tightly-regulated. During mitosis and G1, the Origin Recognition Complex (ORC) binds to future replication origins, coordinating with multiple factors to load the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex onto future replication origins as part of the pre-replication complex (pre-RC). The pre-RC machinery, in turn, remains inactive until the subsequent S phase when it is required for replication fork formation, thereby initiating DNA replication. Multiple myeloma SET domain-containing protein (MMSET, a.k.a. WHSC1, NSD2) is a histone methyltransferase that is frequently overexpressed in aggressive cancers and is essential for normal human development. Several studies have suggested a role for MMSET in cell-cycle regulation; however, whether MMSET is itself regulated during cell-cycle progression has not been examined. In this study, we report that MMSET is degraded during S phase in a cullin-ring ligase 4-Cdt2 (CRL4(Cdt2)) and proteasome-dependent manner. Notably, we also report defects in DNA replication and a decreased association of pre-RC factors with chromatin in MMSET-depleted cells. Taken together, our results suggest a dynamic regulation of MMSET levels throughout the cell cycle, and further characterize the role of MMSET in DNA replication and cell-cycle progression.

  14. Platelet-neutrophil complex formation-a detailed in vitro analysis of murine and human blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauler, Maximilian; Seyfert, Julia; Haenel, David; Seeba, Hannah; Guenther, Janine; Stallmann, Daniela; Schoenichen, Claudia; Hilgendorf, Ingo; Bode, Christoph; Ahrens, Ingo; Duerschmied, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Platelets form complexes with neutrophils during inflammatory processes. These aggregates migrate into affected tissues and also circulate within the organism. Several studies have evaluated platelet-neutrophil complexes as a marker of cardiovascular diseases in human and mouse. Although multiple publications have reported platelet-neutrophil complex counts, we noticed that different methods were used to analyze platelet-neutrophil complex formation, resulting in significant differences, even in baseline values. We established a protocol for platelet-neutrophil complex measurement with flow cytometry in murine and human whole blood samples. In vitro platelet-neutrophil complex formation was stimulated with ADP or PMA. We tested the effect of different sample preparation steps and cytometer settings on platelet-neutrophil complex detection and noticed false-positive counts with increasing acquisition speed. Platelet-neutrophil complex formation depends on platelet P-selectin expression, and antibody blocking of P-selectin consequently prevented ADP-induced platelet-neutrophil complex formation. These findings may help generating more comparable data among different research groups that examine platelet-neutrophil complexes as a marker for cardiovascular disease and novel therapeutic interventions.

  15. Complex dynamics of osteoclast formation and death in long-term cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timur Akchurin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Osteoclasts, cells responsible for bone resorption, contribute to the development of degenerative, metabolic and neoplastic bone diseases, which are often characterized by persistent changes in bone microenvironment. We aimed to investigate the dynamics of osteoclast formation and death in cultures that considerably exceeded the length of standard protocol and to design a mathematical model describing osteoclastogenesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: RAW 264.7 monocytic cells fuse to form multinucleated osteoclasts upon treatment with pro-resorptive cytokine RANKL. We have found that in long-term experiments (15-26 days, the dynamics of changes in osteoclast numbers was remarkably complex and qualitatively variable in different experiments. Whereas 19 of 46 experiments exhibited single peak of osteoclast formation, in 27 experiments we observed development of successive waves of osteoclast formation and death. Periodic changes in osteoclast numbers were confirmed in long-term cultures of mouse bone marrow cells treated with M-CSF and RANKL. Because the dynamics of changes in osteoclast numbers was found to be largely independent of monocytes, a two-species model of ordinary differential equations describing the changes in osteoclasts and monocytes was ineffective in recapitulating the oscillations in osteoclast numbers. Following experimental observation that medium collected from mature osteoclasts inhibited osteoclastogenesis in fresh cultures, we introduced a third variable, factor f, to describe osteoclast-derived inhibitor. This model allowed us to simulate the oscillatory changes in osteoclasts, which were coupled to oscillatory changes in the factor f, whereas monocytes changed exponentially. Importantly, to achieve the experimentally observed oscillations with increasing amplitude, we also had to assume that osteoclast presence stimulates osteoclast formation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study identifies the critical

  16. SiRNA Inhibits Replication of Langat Virus, a Member of the Tick-Borne Encephalitis Virus Complex in Organotypic Rat Brain Slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffioli, Carola; Grandgirard, Denis; Leib, Stephen L.; Engler, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis virus is the causative agent of tick-borne encephalitis, a potentially fatal neurological infection. Tick-borne encephalitis virus belongs to the family of flaviviruses and is transmitted by infected ticks. Despite the availability of vaccines, approximately 2000–3000 cases of tick-borne encephalitis occur annually in Europe for which no curative therapy is available. The antiviral effects of RNA mediated interference by small interfering RNA (siRNA) was evaluated in cell culture and organotypic hippocampal cultures. Langat virus, a flavivirus highly related to Tick-borne encephalitis virus exhibits low pathogenicity for humans but retains neurovirulence for rodents. Langat virus was used for the establishment of an in vitro model of tick-borne encephalitis. We analyzed the efficacy of 19 siRNA sequences targeting different regions of the Langat genome to inhibit virus replication in the two in vitro systems. The most efficient suppression of virus replication was achieved by siRNA sequences targeting structural genes and the 3′ untranslated region. When siRNA was administered to HeLa cells before the infection with Langat virus, a 96.5% reduction of viral RNA and more than 98% reduction of infectious virus particles was observed on day 6 post infection, while treatment after infection decreased the viral replication by more than 98%. In organotypic hippocampal cultures the replication of Langat virus was reduced by 99.7% by siRNA sequence D3. Organotypic hippocampal cultures represent a suitable in vitro model to investigate neuronal infection mechanisms and treatment strategies in a preserved three-dimensional tissue architecture. Our results demonstrate that siRNA is an efficient approach to limit Langat virus replication in vitro. PMID:22984545

  17. Investigation of molecular interactions in the complex formation of tartaric acid derivatives with di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The molecular interactions in the complex formation of two tartaric acid derivatives with di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid are investigated. The complex formation with a 1:1 stoichiometry between tartaric acid derivatives and D2EHPA can be obtained through UV-Vis titration, NMR chemical shifts and molecular dynamic simulations. Furthermore, the differences of the two complexes on the binding constants and strength of hydrogen bonds can also be determined. Such research will ideally provide insight into ways of regulating the complex forming properties of tartaric acid derivatives for composing or syn- thesizing new chiral resolving agents.

  18. Investigation of molecular interactions in the complex formation of tartaric acid derivatives with di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Bin; ZHAI Zheng; LUO GuangSheng; WANG JiaDing

    2008-01-01

    The molecular interactions in the complex formation of two tartaric acid derivatives with di(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid are investigated. The complex formation with a 1:1 stoichiometry between tartaric acid derivatives and D2EHPA can be obtained through UV-Vis titration, NMR chemical shifts and molecular dynamic simulations. Furthermore, the differences of the two complexes on the binding constants and strength of hydrogen bonds can also be determined. Such research will ideally provide insight into ways of regulating the complex forming properties of tartaric acid derivatives for composing or syn-thesizing new chiral resolving agents.

  19. Stable interaction between the human proliferating cell nuclear antigen loader complex Ctf18-replication factor C (RFC) and DNA polymerase {epsilon} is mediated by the cohesion-specific subunits, Ctf18, Dcc1, and Ctf8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Takeshi; Takano, Ryuji; Takeo, Satoshi; Taniguchi, Rina; Ogawa, Kaori; Ohashi, Eiji; Tsurimoto, Toshiki

    2010-11-05

    One of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen loader complexes, Ctf18-replication factor C (RFC), is involved in sister chromatid cohesion. To examine its relationship with factors involved in DNA replication, we performed a proteomics analysis of Ctf18-interacting proteins. We found that Ctf18 interacts with a replicative DNA polymerase, DNA polymerase ε (pol ε). Co-immunoprecipitation with recombinant Ctf18-RFC and pol ε demonstrated that their binding is direct and mediated by two distinct interactions, one weak and one stable. Three subunits that are specifically required for cohesion in yeast, Ctf18, Dcc1, and Ctf8, formed a trimeric complex (18-1-8) and together enabled stable binding with pol ε. The C-terminal 23-amino acid stretch of Ctf18 was necessary for the trimeric association of 18-1-8 and was required for the stable interaction. The weak interaction was observed with alternative loader complexes including Ctf18-RFC(5), which lacks Dcc1 and Ctf8, suggesting that the common loader structures, including the RFC small subunits (RFC2-5), are responsible for the weak interaction. The two interaction modes, mediated through distinguishable structures of Ctf18-RFC, both occurred through the N-terminal half of pol ε, which includes the catalytic domain. The addition of Ctf18-RFC or Ctf18-RFC(5) to the DNA synthesis reaction caused partial inhibition and stimulation, respectively. Thus, Ctf18-RFC has multiple interactions with pol ε that promote polymorphic modulation of DNA synthesis. We propose that their interaction alters the DNA synthesis mode to enable the replication fork to cooperate with the establishment of cohesion.

  20. Improving the aqueous solubility of triclosan by solubilization, complexation, and in situ salt formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, Christine; Liebenberg, Wilna; du Preez, Jan L; Yang, Wenzhan; de Villiers, Melgardt M

    2003-01-01

    Triclosan, an antimicrobial, although widely incorporated into many skin care products, toothpastes, and liquid soaps, presents formulation difficulties because it is practically insoluble in water. The objective of this study was to improve the aqueous solubility of triclosan through solubilization, complexation, and salt formation. The solubility of triclosan in distilled water and in phosphate buffers (pH 7.4) was determined at 30 degrees C. The order of solubilizing performance of the solubilizers was: N-methylglucamine> or =L-arginine>sodium lauryl sulfate>beta-cyclodextrin> or =hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin>ethanolamine>sodium benzoate>sodium methyl 4-hydroxybenzoate>triethanolamine> or =diethanolamine. These solubilizers increased the solubility of triclosan from 80- to 6000-fold. Micellar solubilization and the formation of either salts or complexes are postulated as possible mechanisms for the increase in the solubility of triclosan by the surfactant sodium lauryl sulphate, the cyclic sugar derivatives beta-cyclodextrin and 2-hydropropyl-beta-cyclodextrin, the amino acid L-arginine, and the amino sugar alcohol N-methylglucamine. Furthermore, although the bacteriostatic efficacy of triclosan was significantly increased when solubilized with N-methylglucamine, L-arginine, and ethanolamine, increased solubilization did not increase the effectiveness of triclosan for all solubilizers tested.

  1. Nanostructural Formation of Pd-Co Bimetallic Complex on HOPG Surfaces: XPS and AFM Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisandra Arroyo-Ramírez

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A new single source approach was developed to synthesize Pd-Co nanoparticles using a bimetallic compound, [Et3NH]2[CoPd2(μ-4-I-3,5-Me2pz4Cl4] (CoPd2, as a molecular precursor to obtain dispersed catalyst on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG surface, in view of preparing oxygen reduction catalysts for low temperature fuel cells. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and atomic force microscopy (AFM techniques were employed to characterize the nanostructure formations and to determine the composition and morphology of the complex on the HOPG. Results of high resolution XPS analysis (HR-XPS revealed the binding energies corresponding to the atomic constituents of the precursor. When the precursor solution was placed on the surface of the HOPG, the bimetallic complex assumes a tubular structure and it appears that the surface of the HOPG offers a ground for the self-organization of nanostructural formations.

  2. Replication Stress: A Lifetime of Epigenetic Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simran Khurana

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available DNA replication is essential for cell division. Challenges to the progression of DNA polymerase can result in replication stress, promoting the stalling and ultimately collapse of replication forks. The latter involves the formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs and has been linked to both genome instability and irreversible cell cycle arrest (senescence. Recent technological advances have elucidated many of the factors that contribute to the sensing and repair of stalled or broken replication forks. In addition to bona fide repair factors, these efforts highlight a range of chromatin-associated changes at and near sites of replication stress, suggesting defects in epigenome maintenance as a potential outcome of aberrant DNA replication. Here, we will summarize recent insight into replication stress-induced chromatin-reorganization and will speculate on possible adverse effects for gene expression, nuclear integrity and, ultimately, cell function.

  3. The Scaling Relations and Star Formation Laws of Mini-starburst Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Luong, Quang; Nguyen, Hans V. V.; Motte, Fredérique; Schneider, Nicola; Fujii, Michiko; Louvet, Fabien; Hill, Tracey; Sanhueza, Patricio; Chibueze, James O.; Didelon, Pierre

    2016-12-01

    The scaling relations and star formation laws for molecular cloud complexes (MCCs) in the Milky Way are investigated. MCCs are mostly large (R > 50 pc), massive (˜106 {\\text{}}{M}⊙ ) gravitationally unbound cloud structures. We compare their masses {M}{gas}, mass surface densities {{{Σ }}}{M{gas}}, radii R, velocity dispersions σ, star formation rates (SFRs), and SFR densities {{{Σ }}}{SFR} with those of structures ranging from cores, clumps, and giant molecular clouds, to MCCs, and galaxies, spanning eight orders of magnitudes in size and 13 orders of magnitudes in mass. This results in the following universal relations:σ ˜ {R}0.5,{M}{gas}˜ {R}2,{{{Σ }}}{SFR}˜ {{{Σ }}}{M{gas}}1.5, {SFR}˜ {{M}{gas}}0.9, {and} {SFR}˜ {σ }2.7. Variations in the slopes and coefficients of these relations are found at individual scales, signifying different physics acting at different scales. Additionally, there are breaks at the MCC scale in the σ {--}R relation and between starburst and normal star-forming objects in the {SFR}{--}{M}{gas} and {{{Σ }}}{SFR}-{{{Σ }}}{{{M}}{gas}} relations. Therefore, we propose to use the Schmidt-Kennicutt diagram to distinguish starburst from normal star-forming structures by applying a {{{Σ }}}{M{gas}} threshold of ˜100 {\\text{}}{M}⊙ pc-2 and a {{{Σ }}}{SFR} threshold of 1 {\\text{}}{M}⊙ yr-1 kpc-2. Mini-starburst complexes are gravitationally unbound MCCs that have enhanced {{{Σ }}}{SFR} (>1 {\\text{}}{M}⊙ yr-1 kpc-2), probably caused by dynamic events such as radiation pressure, colliding flows, or spiral arm gravitational instability. Because of dynamical evolution, gravitational boundedness does not play a significant role in regulating the star formation activity of MCCs, especially the mini-starburst complexes, which leads to the dynamical formation of massive stars and clusters. We emphasize the importance of understanding mini-starbursts in investigating the physics of starburst galaxies.

  4. Gastrointestinal migrating motor complex during early stage of cholesterol gallstone formation in guinea pigs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Ling; Bai Wenyuan; Ma Yongzhi; Gu Yong

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To determine the changes of gastrointestinal migrating motor complex (MMC) during the early stage of cholesterol gallstone formation. Methods: Totally 45 healthy adult guinea pigs were randomly and equally divided into 3 groups, that is, normal control, group B (1% cholesterol diet for 2 weeks) and group C (1% cholesterol diet for 4 weeks). Three pairs of silver electrodes were inserted into the gastric antrum, duodenum and jejunum of every animal respectively. Record of gastrointestinal MMC of these guinea pigs were recorded and analyzed.Gallbladder bile was taken to detect the formation of cholesterol gallstone. Results: There were only 29 guineapigs living. The MMC cycle time and the duration of phase Ⅱ were prolonged significantly and gradually compared with the control group (P<0.01), but the duration of phase Ⅲ became significantly and gradually shorter. Conclusion:During the early stage of cholesterol gallstone formation, the MMC cycle time and the duration of phase Ⅱ are prolonged and the duration of phase Ⅲ is shortened

  5. Quantum chemical insights in energy dissipation and carotenoid radical cation formation in light harvesting complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wormit, Michael; Dreuw, Andreas

    2007-06-21

    Light harvesting complexes (LHCs) have been identified in all photosynthetic organisms. To understand their function in light harvesting and energy dissipation, detailed knowledge about possible excitation energy transfer (EET) and electron transfer (ET) processes in these pigment proteins is of prime importance. This again requires the study of electronically excited states of the involved pigment molecules, in LHCs of chlorophylls and carotenoids. This paper represents a critical review of recent quantum chemical calculations on EET and ET processes between pigment pairs relevant for the major LHCs of green plants (LHC-II) and of purple bacteria (LH2). The theoretical methodology for a meaningful investigation of such processes is described in detail, and benefits and limitations of standard methods are discussed. The current status of excited state calculations on chlorophylls and carotenoids is outlined. It is focused on the possibility of EET and ET in the context of chlorophyll fluorescence quenching in LHC-II and carotenoid radical cation formation in LH2. In the context of non-photochemical quenching of green plants, it is shown that replacement of the carotenoid violaxanthin by zeaxanthin in its binding pocket of LHC-II can not result in efficient quenching. In LH2, our computational results give strong evidence that the S(1) states of the carotenoids are involved in carotenoid cation formation. By comparison of theoretical findings with recent experimental data, a general mechanism for carotenoid radical cation formation is suggested.

  6. Statistical considerations on the formation of circular photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes from Rhodopseudomonas palustris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Masahiko; Henry, Sarah; Cogdell, Richard J; Lindsey, Jonathan S

    2014-07-01

    Depending on growth conditions, some species of purple photosynthetic bacteria contain peripheral light-harvesting (LH2) complexes that are heterogeneous owing to the presence of different protomers (containing different αβ-apoproteins). Recent spectroscopic studies of Rhodopseudomonas palustris grown under low-light conditions suggest the presence of a C 3-symmetric LH2 nonamer comprised of two distinct protomers. The software program Cyclaplex, which enables generation and data-mining of virtual libraries of molecular rings formed upon combinatorial reactions, has been used to delineate the possible number and type of distinct nonamers as a function of numbers of distinct protomers. The yield of the C 3-symmetric nonamer from two protomers (A and B in varying ratios) has been studied under the following conditions: (1) statistical, (2) enriched (preclusion of the B-B sequence), and (3) seeded (pre-formation of an A-B-A block). The yield of C 3-symmetric nonamer is at most 0.98 % under statistical conditions versus 5.6 % under enriched conditions, and can be dominant under conditions of pre-seeding with an A-B-A block. In summary, the formation of any one specific nonamer even from only two protomers is unlikely on statistical grounds but must stem from enhanced free energy of formation or a directed assembly process by as-yet unknown factors.

  7. Formation of complex organic molecules in cold objects: the role of gas-phase reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balucani, Nadia; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Taquet, Vianney

    2015-04-01

    While astrochemical models are successful in reproducing many of the observed interstellar species, they have been struggling to explain the observed abundances of complex organic molecules. Current models tend to privilege grain surface over gas-phase chemistry in their formation. One key assumption of those models is that radicals trapped in the grain mantles gain mobility and react on lukewarm ( ≳ 30 K) dust grains. Thus, the recent detections of methyl formate (MF) and dimethyl ether (DME) in cold objects represent a challenge and may clarify the respective role of grain-surface and gas-phase chemistry. We propose here a new model to form DME and MF with gas-phase reactions in cold environments, where DME is the precursor of MF via an efficient reaction overlooked by previous models. Furthermore, methoxy, a precursor of DME, is also synthesized in the gas phase from methanol, which is desorbed by a non-thermal process from the ices. Our new model reproduces fairly well the observations towards L1544. It also explains, in a natural way, the observed correlation between DME and MF. We conclude that gas-phase reactions are major actors in the formation of MF, DME and methoxy in cold gas. This challenges the exclusive role of grain-surface chemistry and favours a combined grain-gas chemistry.

  8. Dust, Gas, and Star Formation in the MBM 18--19 High-Latitude Cloud Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Kristen A.; Reed, Cyrus M.

    Projected on the plane of the sky, the MBM 19 molecular cloud extends from the MBM 18 high-latitude cloud toward the Taurus star-forming regions. We present a new CO(J = 1--0) map of MBM 19 that shows clumpy emission with line intensities above 3 K in some regions despite low, relatively smooth 100 micron emission and modest visual extinction. This map complements data that show extremely high polarization efficiency of dust aligned along the bridge axis and low values of the ratio of total-to-selective extinction throughout the complex. In addition, several ongoing searches for spectral signatures of young stars have found evidence for star formation associated with MBM 18--19. We discuss variation in the molecular gas fraction and dust-to-gas ratio estimates, as well as the implications all these data have for understanding star formation in the region. Results of this study and others like it will provide insight into dust and gas of the translucent interstellar medium and star formation at high galactic latitude. This research was supported by the American Astronomical Society's Small Research Grant Program.

  9. Studies on chalcone derivatives: Complex formation, thermal behavior, stability constant and antioxidant activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed, Yusif S.; Gaber, M.

    2015-02-01

    The chalcone 3-[4‧-dimethylaminophenyl]-1-(2-pyridyl) prop-2-en-1-one (DMAPP) and 3-(4‧-diethylaminophenyl)-1-(2-pyridinyl) prop-2-en-1-one abbreviated as DEAPP have been synthesized and characterized with IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR spectroscopic techniques as described previously (El-Daly et al., 2008; Gaber et al., 2009; El-Sayed, 2013). By using UV visible spectroscopy method the mole fraction ratio for copper with DMAPP and DEAPP complexes were determined and it was found to be 1:1. The stability constants of this complex have been determined by Job's method. The stability constant (Kf) of copper with DMAPP and DEAPP complexes in universal buffer pH = 3.2 was determined to be 9.9 × 104 and 5.2 × 104 respectively. The effect of Cu(II) ion on the emission spectrum of the free chalcone is also assigned. Adherence to Beer's law and Ringbom optimum concentration ranges are determined. The thermal decomposition of the metal complexes is studied by TGA technique. The kinetic parameters like activation energy, pre-exponential factor and entropy of activation are estimated. The structure of complexes was energetically optimized through molecular mechanics applying MM+ force field coupled with molecular dynamics simulation. The bond lengths and bond angles have been calculated to confirm the geometry of the ligands and their Cu(II) complexes. The mode of interaction of the chalcone to copper nanoparticles was studied. The apparent association constants of the colloidal copper nanoparticles:chalcone complexes in solution were evaluated using the spectral method and compared with the formation constant of the Cu(II) chalcone complexes. Antioxidant activity of these chalcones was evaluated by using 1,1‧-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPHrad) radicals scavenging method, which showed that the antioxidant activity of DMAPP has higher value than the DEAPP. Semi-empirical study results showed that DMAPP have higher dipole moment than DEAPP [1].

  10. Studies on chalcone derivatives: complex formation, thermal behavior, stability constant and antioxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed, Yusif S; Gaber, M

    2015-02-25

    The chalcone 3-[4'-dimethylaminophenyl]-1-(2-pyridyl) prop-2-en-1-one (DMAPP) and 3-(4'-diethylaminophenyl)-1-(2-pyridinyl) prop-2-en-1-one abbreviated as DEAPP have been synthesized and characterized with IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR spectroscopic techniques as described previously (El-Daly et al., 2008; Gaber et al., 2009; El-Sayed, 2013). By using UV visible spectroscopy method the mole fraction ratio for copper with DMAPP and DEAPP complexes were determined and it was found to be 1:1. The stability constants of this complex have been determined by Job's method. The stability constant (Kf) of copper with DMAPP and DEAPP complexes in universal buffer pH=3.2 was determined to be 9.9×10(4) and 5.2×10(4) respectively. The effect of Cu(II) ion on the emission spectrum of the free chalcone is also assigned. Adherence to Beer's law and Ringbom optimum concentration ranges are determined. The thermal decomposition of the metal complexes is studied by TGA technique. The kinetic parameters like activation energy, pre-exponential factor and entropy of activation are estimated. The structure of complexes was energetically optimized through molecular mechanics applying MM(+) force field coupled with molecular dynamics simulation. The bond lengths and bond angles have been calculated to confirm the geometry of the ligands and their Cu(II) complexes. The mode of interaction of the chalcone to copper nanoparticles was studied. The apparent association constants of the colloidal copper nanoparticles:chalcone complexes in solution were evaluated using the spectral method and compared with the formation constant of the Cu(II) chalcone complexes. Antioxidant activity of these chalcones was evaluated by using 1,1'-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals scavenging method, which showed that the antioxidant activity of DMAPP has higher value than the DEAPP. Semi-empirical study results showed that DMAPP have higher dipole moment than DEAPP.

  11. Frataxin Accelerates [2Fe-2S] Cluster Formation on the Human Fe–S Assembly Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Nicholas G.; Das, Deepika; Chakrabarti, Mrinmoy; Lindahl, Paul A.; Barondeau, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Iron–sulfur (Fe–S) clusters function as protein cofactors for a wide variety of critical cellular reactions. In human mitochondria, a core Fe–S assembly complex [called SDUF and composed of NFS1, ISD11, ISCU2, and frataxin (FXN) proteins] synthesizes Fe–S clusters from iron, cysteine sulfur, and reducing equivalents and then transfers these intact clusters to target proteins. In vitro assays have relied on reducing the complexity of this complicated Fe–S assembly process by using surrogate electron donor molecules and monitoring simplified reactions. Recent studies have concluded that FXN promotes the synthesis of [4Fe-4S] clusters on the mammalian Fe–S assembly complex. Here the kinetics of Fe–S synthesis reactions were determined using different electron donation systems and by monitoring the products with circular dichroism and absorbance spectroscopies. We discovered that common surrogate electron donor molecules intercepted Fe–S cluster intermediates and formed high-molecular weight species (HMWS). The HMWS are associated with iron, sulfide, and thiol-containing proteins and have properties of a heterogeneous solubilized mineral with spectroscopic properties remarkably reminiscent of those of [4Fe-4S] clusters. In contrast, reactions using physiological reagents revealed that FXN accelerates the formation of [2Fe-2S] clusters rather than [4Fe-4S] clusters as previously reported. In the preceding paper [Fox, N. G., et al. (2015) Biochemistry 54, DOI: 10.1021/bi5014485], [2Fe-2S] intermediates on the SDUF complex were shown to readily transfer to uncomplexed ISCU2 or apo acceptor proteins, depending on the reaction conditions. Our results indicate that FXN accelerates a rate-limiting sulfur transfer step in the synthesis of [2Fe-2S] clusters on the human Fe–S assembly complex. PMID:26016518

  12. Nucleotide Metabolism and DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Digby F; Evans, Joanna C; Mizrahi, Valerie

    2014-10-01

    The development and application of a highly versatile suite of tools for mycobacterial genetics, coupled with widespread use of "omics" approaches to elucidate the structure, function, and regulation of mycobacterial proteins, has led to spectacular advances in our understanding of the metabolism and physiology of mycobacteria. In this article, we provide an update on nucleotide metabolism and DNA replication in mycobacteria, highlighting key findings from the past 10 to 15 years. In the first section, we focus on nucleotide metabolism, ranging from the biosynthesis, salvage, and interconversion of purine and pyrimidine ribonucleotides to the formation of deoxyribonucleotides. The second part of the article is devoted to DNA replication, with a focus on replication initiation and elongation, as well as DNA unwinding. We provide an overview of replication fidelity and mutation rates in mycobacteria and summarize evidence suggesting that DNA replication occurs during states of low metabolic activity, and conclude by suggesting directions for future research to address key outstanding questions. Although this article focuses primarily on observations from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, it is interspersed, where appropriate, with insights from, and comparisons with, other mycobacterial species as well as better characterized bacterial models such as Escherichia coli. Finally, a common theme underlying almost all studies of mycobacterial metabolism is the potential to identify and validate functions or pathways that can be exploited for tuberculosis drug discovery. In this context, we have specifically highlighted those processes in mycobacterial DNA replication that might satisfy this critical requirement.

  13. A MULTI-WAVELENGTH STUDY OF STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY IN THE S235 COMPLEX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewangan, L. K.; Luna, A.; Mayya, Y. D. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica, Luis Enrique Erro # 1, Tonantzintla, Puebla, C.P. 72840, México (Mexico); Ojha, D. K.; Ninan, J. P.; Mallick, K. K. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Anandarao, B. G., E-mail: lokeshd@prl.res.in [Physical Research Laboratory, Navrangpura, Ahmedabad—380 009 (India)

    2016-03-01

    We have carried out an extensive multi-wavelength study to investigate the star formation process in the S235 complex. The S235 complex has a spherelike shell appearance at wavelengths longer than 2 μm and harbors an O9.5V type star approximately at its center. A near-infrared extinction map of the complex traces eight subregions (having A{sub V} > 8 mag), and five of them appear to be distributed in an almost regularly spaced manner along the spherelike shell surrounding the ionized emission. This picture is also supported by the integrated {sup 12}CO and {sup 13}CO intensity maps and by Bolocam 1.1 mm continuum emission. The position–velocity analysis of CO reveals an almost semi-ringlike structure, suggesting an expanding H ii region. We find that the Bolocam clump masses increase as we move away from the location of the ionizing star. This correlation is seen only for those clumps that are distributed near the edges of the shell. Photometric analysis reveals 435 young stellar objects (YSOs), 59% of which are found in clusters. Six subregions (including five located near the edges of the shell) are very well correlated with the dust clumps, CO gas, and YSOs. The average values of Mach numbers derived using NH{sub 3} data for three (East 1, East 2, and Central E) out of these six subregions are 2.9, 2.3, and 2.9, indicating these subregions are supersonic. The molecular outflows are detected in these three subregions, further confirming the ongoing star formation activity. Together, all these results are interpreted as observational evidence of positive feedback of a massive star.

  14. A defined peptide that inhibits the formation of the glycoprotein IIb and IIIa complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Thomas M; Zhu, Jiaqian

    2005-01-01

    Collagen-platelet interaction plays an important role in hemostasis and pathological thrombosis. The proposed mechanism of the interaction was the activation of platelets-->releasing of contents from granules-->aggregation. The common end point is the platelets and fibrin aggregates. Platelet glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa (the alphaIIbbeta3 integrin) complexes serve as a receptor for the binding of fibrinogen to form firmed aggregates. Blockading of GP IIb/IIIa has been proposed to prevent platelet aggregation independent of the substance(s) responsible for activating the platelets. The development of various forms of GP IIb/IIIa inhibitor has resulted in the inhibition of platelet aggregation, although studies of alphaIIbbeta3 receptor function and various GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors have demonstrated the potential for these agents to produce effects on other aspects of platelet function as well as having nonplatelet effects. This study investigated platelet inhibition provided by blocking the GP IIb/IIIa complex formation by using a peptide derived from the GP IIIa molecule. The peptide inhibits both types I and III collagen-induced platelet aggregation in a dose-dependent manner. The defined peptide interferes with the formation of the GP IIb/IIIa complex by inhibiting the binding of FITC-PAC-1 onto ADP-, type I collagen-, and type III collagen-activated platelets. However, P-selectin secretion is not affected by the peptide. In addition, the peptide is not interfering with the binding of FITC-PAC-1 to platelets that were preincubated with indomethacin. Results from this study may suggest that the defined peptide is an effective agent to block the interaction of types I and III collagen with platelets.

  15. Complex processes in simple ices : laboratory and observational studies of gas-grain interactions during star formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Öberg, Karin Ingegerd

    2009-01-01

    During solar-type star formation, the chemistry evolves towards the formation of complex organic molecules, eventually setting the stage for the origin of life. This astrochemical evolution depends on the interaction between gas and microscopic interstellar grains, producing icy grain mantles. This

  16. Emergence of native peptide sequences in prebiotic replication networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Jayanta; Rubinov, Boris; Ivnitski, Denis; Mukherjee, Rakesh; Shtelman, Elina; Motro, Yair; Miller, Yifat; Wagner, Nathaniel; Cohen-Luria, Rivka; Ashkenasy, Gonen

    2017-09-05

    Biopolymer syntheses in living cells are perfected by an elaborate error correction machinery, which was not applicable during polymerization on early Earth. Scientists are consequently striving to identify mechanisms by which functional polymers were selected and further amplified from complex prebiotic mixtures. Here we show the instrumental role of non-enzymatic replication in the enrichment of certain product(s). To this end, we analyzed a complex web of reactions in β-sheet peptide networks, focusing on the formation of specific intermediate compounds and template-assisted replication. Remarkably, we find that the formation of several products in a mixture is not critically harmful, since efficient and selective template-assisted reactions serve as a backbone correction mechanism, namely, for keeping the concentration of the peptide containing the native backbone equal to, or even higher than, the concentrations of the other products. We suggest that these findings may shed light on molecular evolution processes that led to current biology.The synthesis of biopolymers in living cells is perfected by complex machinery, however this was not the case on early Earth. Here the authors show the role of non-enzymatic replication in the enrichment of certain products within prebiotically relevant mixtures.

  17. Formation of a porphyrin pi-cation radical in the fluoride complex of horseradish peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhangrazi, Z S; Sinclair, R; Powers, L; Yamazaki, I

    1995-11-21

    Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was oxidized by IrCl6(2-) to a mixture of compounds I and II, the rate of oxidation and the ratio of the mixture being greatly affected by pH (Hayashi & Yamazaki, 1979). Oxidation of HRP by IrCl6(2-) in the presence of fluoride was significantly accelerated. This resulted in the formation of a new compound which is a ferric fluoride complex containing a porphyrin pi-cation radical. The spectrum of the new compound showed a decreased absorption band in the Soret region and a broad band at 570 nm; which was converted to that of the original ferric fluoride complex by addition of ascorbate or hydroquinone. Addition of cyanide slowed down the oxidation of HRP by IrCl6(2-), and the oxidation product was the same as that obtained in the absence of cyanide. Compound I was formed when H2O2 was added to HRP in the presence of fluoride or cyanide. The one-electron reduction potential (Eo') of the oxidized HRP-fluoride complex was measured at several pH values, the Eo' value at pH 7 being 861 +/- 4 mV. The ratio of delta Eo' to delta pH was 49 mV/pH unit.

  18. Substrate-Na{sup +} complex formation: Coupling mechanism for {gamma}-aminobutyrate symporters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pallo, Anna; Simon, Agnes [Department of Neurochemistry, Institute of Biomolecular Chemistry, Chemical Research Center, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (Hungary); Bencsura, Akos [Department of Theoretical Chemistry, Institute of Structural Chemistry, Chemical Research Center, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary); Heja, Laszlo [Department of Neurochemistry, Institute of Biomolecular Chemistry, Chemical Research Center, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (Hungary); Kardos, Julianna, E-mail: jkardos@chemres.hu [Department of Neurochemistry, Institute of Biomolecular Chemistry, Chemical Research Center, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (Hungary)

    2009-07-24

    Crystal structures of transmembrane transport proteins belonging to the important families of neurotransmitter-sodium symporters reveal how they transport neurotransmitters across membranes. Substrate-induced structural conformations of gated neurotransmitter-sodium symporters have been in the focus of research, however, a key question concerning the mechanism of Na{sup +} ion coupling remained unanswered. Homology models of human glial transporter subtypes of the major inhibitory neurotransmitter {gamma}-aminobutyric acid were built. In accordance with selectivity data for subtype 2 vs. 3, docking and molecular dynamics calculations suggest similar orthosteric substrate (inhibitor) conformations and binding crevices but distinguishable allosteric Zn{sup 2+} ion binding motifs. Considering the occluded conformational states of glial human {gamma}-aminobutyric acid transporter subtypes, we found major semi-extended and minor ring-like conformations of zwitterionic {gamma}-aminobutyric acid in complex with Na{sup +} ion. The existence of the minor ring-like conformation of {gamma}-aminobutyric acid in complex with Na{sup +} ion may be attributed to the strengthening of the intramolecular H-bond by the electrostatic effect of Na{sup +} ion. Coupling substrate uptake into cells with the thermodynamically favorable Na{sup +} ion movement through substrate-Na{sup +} ion complex formation may be a mechanistic principle featuring transmembrane neurotransmitter-sodium symporter proteins.

  19. The formation of ethylene glycol and other complex organic molecules in star-forming regions

    CERN Document Server

    Rivilla, V M; Cesaroni, R; Fontani, F; Codella, C; Zhang, Q

    2016-01-01

    We study the molecular abundance and spatial distribution of the simplest sugar alcohol, ethylene glycol (EG), the simplest sugar glycoladehyde (GA), and other chemically related complex organic species towards the massive star-forming region G31.41+0.31. We have analyzed multiple single dish and interferometric data, and obtained excitation temperatures and column densities using an LTE analysis. We have reported for the first time the presence of EG towards G31.41+0.31, and we have also detected multiple transitions of other complex organic molecules such as GA, methyl formate (MF), dimethyl ether (DME) and ethanol (ET). The high angular resolution images show that the EG emission is very compact, peaking towards the maximum of the continuum. These observations suggest that low abundance complex organic molecules, like EG or GA, are good probes of the gas located closer to the forming stars. Our analysis confirms that EG is more abundant than GA in G31.41+0.31, as previously observed in other interstellar r...

  20. Hepatitis B virus and microRNAs: Complex interactions affecting hepatitis B virus replication and hepatitis B virus-associated diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamontagne, Jason; Steel, Laura F; Bouchard, Michael J

    2015-06-28

    Chronic infection with the hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the leading risk factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). With nearly 750000 deaths yearly, hepatocellular carcinoma is the second highest cause of cancer-related death in the world. Unfortunately, the molecular mechanisms that contribute to the development of HBV-associated HCC remain incompletely understood. Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs), a family of small non-coding RNAs that play a role primarily in post-transcriptional gene regulation, have been recognized as important regulators of cellular homeostasis, and altered regulation of miRNA expression has been suggested to play a significant role in virus-associated diseases and the development of many cancers. With this in mind, many groups have begun to investigate the relationship between miRNAs and HBV replication and HBV-associated disease. Multiple findings suggest that some miRNAs, such as miR-122, and miR-125 and miR-199 family members, are playing a role in HBV replication and HBV-associated disease, including the development of HBV-associated HCC. In this review, we discuss the current state of our understanding of the relationship between HBV and miRNAs, including how HBV affects cellular miRNAs, how these miRNAs impact HBV replication, and the relationship between HBV-mediated miRNA regulation and HCC development. We also address the impact of challenges in studying HBV, such as the lack of an effective model system for infectivity and a reliance on transformed cell lines, on our understanding of the relationship between HBV and miRNAs, and propose potential applications of miRNA-related techniques that could enhance our understanding of the role miRNAs play in HBV replication and HBV-associated disease, ultimately leading to new therapeutic options and improved patient outcomes.

  1. Detection of a sub-set of polysomal mRNAs associated with modulation of hypusine formation at the G1-S boundary. Proposal of a role for eIF-5A in onset of DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanauske-Abel, H M; Slowinska, B; Zagulska, S; Wilson, R C; Staiano-Coico, L; Hanauske, A R; McCaffrey, T; Szabo, P

    1995-06-12

    S phase entry, i.e. start of DNA replication, is a crucial step in proliferation. Inhibition of S phase entry correlates with inhibition of hypusine formation, an event affecting only the eukaryotic initiation factor 5A (eIF-5A). Its hypusine-containing sequence was postulated to authorize polysomal utilization of specific transcripts for proteins necessary to enable DNA replication. Using mimosine to reversibly suppress the hypusine-forming deoxyhypusyl hydroxylase (E.C. 1.14.99.29) in cells while differentially displaying their polysomal versus non-polysomal mRNA populations, we report the detection and classification of several mRNA species that indeed disappear from and reappear at polysomes in concert with inhibition and disinhibition, respectively, of hypusine formation. Based on initial sequence data, two translationally controlled enzymes, both critical for proliferation, are identified as candicate products of such mRNAs, methionine adenosyltransferase (E.C. 2.5.1.6) and cytochrome-c oxidase (EC 1.9.3.1) subunit I. The existence of such putative hypusine-dependent messenger nucleic acids (hymns) provides the basis for a proposal on their molecular function in onset of multiplication.

  2. Polysaccharide charge density regulating protein adsorption to air/water interfaces by protein/polysaccharide complex formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganzevles, R.A.; Kosters, H.; Vliet, T. van; Stuart, M.A.C.; Jongh, H.H.J. de

    2007-01-01

    Because the formation of protein/polysaccharide complexes is dominated by electrostatic interaction, polysaccharide charge density is expected to play a major role in the adsorption behavior of the complexes. In this study, pullulan (a non-charged polysaccharide) carboxylated to four different

  3. Temperature and dose dependence of defect complex formation with ion implanted Mn/Fe in ZnO

    CERN Document Server

    Mølholt, T E; Gunnlaugsson, H P; Bharuth-Ram, K; Fanciulli, M; Gíslason, H P; Johnston, K; Kobayashi, Y; Langouche, G; Masenda, H; Naidoo, D; Ólafsson, S; Sielemann, R; Weyer, G

    2009-01-01

    57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy following ion implantation of radioactive 57Mn+ ( T1/2=85.4 s) has been applied to study the formation of Fe/Mn implantation-induced defects in ZnO at temperatures between 319 and 390 K. The formation of ferric iron–vacancy complexes is found to depend strongly on the implanted dose and to be faster and more efficient at higher temperatures. The results at these temperatures suggest the mobility of the Zn vacancy, together with vacancy trapping at the substitutional Mn/Fe impurities are responsible for the formation of Fe–VZn complexes

  4. Prolactin Regulatory Element Binding Protein Is Involved in Hepatitis C Virus Replication by Interaction with NS4B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lingbao; Fujimoto, Akira; Nakamura, Mariko; Aoyagi, Haruyo; Matsuda, Mami; Watashi, Koichi; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Arita, Minetaro; Yamagoe, Satoshi; Dohmae, Naoshi; Suzuki, Takehiro; Sakamaki, Yuriko; Ichinose, Shizuko; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Wakita, Takaji

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT It has been proposed that the hepatitis C virus (HCV) NS4B protein triggers the membranous HCV replication compartment, but the underlying molecular mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we screened for NS4B-associated membrane proteins by tandem affinity purification and proteome analysis and identified 202 host proteins. Subsequent screening of replicon cells with small interfering RNA identified prolactin regulatory element binding (PREB) to be a novel HCV host cofactor. The interaction between PREB and NS4B was confirmed by immunoprecipitation, immunofluorescence, and proximity ligation assays. PREB colocalized with double-stranded RNA and the newly synthesized HCV RNA labeled with bromouridine triphosphate in HCV replicon cells. Furthermore, PREB shifted to detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs), where HCV replication complexes reside, in the presence of NS4B expression in Huh7 cells. However, a PREB mutant lacking the NS4B-binding region (PREBd3) could not colocalize with double-stranded RNA and did not shift to the DRM in the presence of NS4B. These results indicate that PREB locates at the HCV replication complex by interacting with NS4B. PREB silencing inhibited the formation of the membranous HCV replication compartment and increased the protease and nuclease sensitivity of HCV replicase proteins and RNA in DRMs, respectively. Collectively, these data indicate that PREB promotes HCV RNA replication by participating in the formation of the membranous replication compartment and by maintaining its proper structure by interacting with NS4B. Furthermore, PREB was induced by HCV infection in vitro and in vivo. Our findings provide new insights into HCV host cofactors. IMPORTANCE The hepatitis C virus (HCV) protein NS4B can induce alteration of the endoplasmic reticulum and the formation of a membranous web structure, which provides a platform for the HCV replication complex. The molecular mechanism by which NS4B induces the membranous HCV replication

  5. Formation, Isolation and Characterization of a New Ruthenium Complex in Reaction of Acetone Masked Terminal Alkynone with Transfer Hydrogenation Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭敏捷; 李到; 孙延辉; 成江; 张兆国

    2004-01-01

    Reaction of [1S,2S-(Ts-diphen)Ru(Ⅱ)(p-cymene)] (1S,2S-Ts-diphen= 1S,2S-N-tosyl-1,2-diphenylethylenediamine) and 2-hydroxy-2-methyl-non-3-yn-5-one under transfer hydrogenation condition gave a ruthenium complex bearing a 2,5-dihydrofuran moiety. The complex was characterized and a possible mechanism for the formation of the complex was proposed.

  6. Self-replication of DNA rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junghoon; Lee, Junwye; Hamada, Shogo; Murata, Satoshi; Ha Park, Sung

    2015-06-01

    Biology provides numerous examples of self-replicating machines, but artificially engineering such complex systems remains a formidable challenge. In particular, although simple artificial self-replicating systems including wooden blocks, magnetic systems, modular robots and synthetic molecular systems have been devised, such kinematic self-replicators are rare compared with examples of theoretical cellular self-replication. One of the principal reasons for this is the amount of complexity that arises when you try to incorporate self-replication into a physical medium. In this regard, DNA is a prime candidate material for constructing self-replicating systems due to its ability to self-assemble through molecular recognition. Here, we show that DNA T-motifs, which self-assemble into ring structures, can be designed to self-replicate through toehold-mediated strand displacement reactions. The inherent design of these rings allows the population dynamics of the systems to be controlled. We also analyse the replication scheme within a universal framework of self-replication and derive a quantitative metric of the self-replicability of the rings.

  7. Thermodynamics of Complex Sulfide Inclusion Formation in Ca-Treated Al-Killed Structural Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yin-tao; He, Sheng-ping; Chen, Gu-jun; Wang, Qian

    2016-08-01

    Controlling the morphology of the sulfide inclusion is of vital importance in enhancing the properties of structural steel. Long strip-shaped sulfides in hot-rolled steel can spherize when, instead of the inclusion of pure single-phase MnS, the guest is a complex sulfide, such as an oxide-sulfide duplex and a solid-solution sulfide particle. In this study, the inclusions in a commercial rolled structural steel were investigated. Spherical and elongated oxide-sulfide duplex as well as single-phase (Mn,Ca)S solid solution inclusions were observed in the steel. A thermodynamic equilibrium between the oxide and sulfide inclusions was proposed to understand the oxide-sulfide duplex inclusion formation. Based on the equilibrium solidification principle, thermodynamic discussions on inclusion precipitation during the solidification process were performed for both general and resulfurized structural steel. The predicted results of the present study agreed well with the experimental ones.

  8. Formation of complexes of antimicrobial agent norfloxacin with antitumor antibiotics of anthracycline series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evstigneev, M. P.; Rybakova, K. A.; Davies, D. B.

    2007-05-01

    The formation of complexes in solutions of the norfloxacin antimicrobial agent (NOR) with daunomycin (DAU) and nogalamycin (NOG), antitumor anthracycline antibiotics, was studied using 1H NMR spectroscopy. Based on the concentration and temperature dependences of the chemical shifts of the protons of interacting molecules, the equilibrium constants and thermodynamic parameters (enthalpy and entropy) of heteroassociation of the antibiotics were calculated. It was shown that NOR interacts with DAU (NOG) in aqueous solutions forming stacked heterocomplexes with parallel orientation of the molecular chromophores. The conclusion was drawn that such interactions should be taken into account when anthracyclines and quinolones are jointly administered during combined chemotherapy, since they can contribute to the medico-biological synergistic effect of these antibiotics.

  9. Beet yellows virus replicase and replicative compartments: parallels with other RNA viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir A. Gushchin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotic virus systems, infection leads to induction of membranous compartments in which replication occurs. Virus-encoded subunits of the replication complex mediate its interaction with membranes. As replication platforms, RNA viruses use the cytoplasmic surfaces of different membrane compartments, e.g., endoplasmic reticulum (ER, Golgi, endo/lysosomes, mitochondria, chloroplasts and peroxisomes. Closterovirus infections are accompanied by formation of multivesicular complexes from cell membranes of ER or mitochondrial origin. So far the mechanisms for vesicles formation have been obscure. In the replication-associated 1a polyprotein of Beet yellows virus (BYV and other closteroviruses, the region between the methyltransferase (MTR and helicase (HEL domains (1a central region, 1a CR is marginally conserved. Computer-assisted analysis predicts several putative membrane-binding domains in the BYV 1a CR. Transient expression of a hydrophobic segment (referred to here as CR-2 of the BYV 1a in Nicotiana benthamiana led to reorganization of the ER and formation of ~1-m mobile globules. We propose that the CR-2 may be involved in the formation of multivesicular complexes in BYV-infected cells. This provides analogy with membrane-associated proteins mediating the build-up of virus factories in cells infected with diverse positive-strand RNA viruses (alpha-like viruses, picorna-like viruses, flaviviruses, and nidoviruses and negative-strand RNA viruses (bunyaviruses.

  10. Beet yellows virus replicase and replicative compartments: parallels with other RNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gushchin, Vladimir A; Solovyev, Andrey G; Erokhina, Tatyana N; Morozov, Sergey Y; Agranovsky, Alexey A

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotic virus systems, infection leads to induction of membranous compartments in which replication occurs. Virus-encoded subunits of the replication complex mediate its interaction with membranes. As replication platforms, RNA viruses use the cytoplasmic surfaces of different membrane compartments, e.g., endoplasmic reticulum (ER), Golgi, endo/lysosomes, mitochondria, chloroplasts, and peroxisomes. Closterovirus infections are accompanied by formation of multivesicular complexes from cell membranes of ER or mitochondrial origin. So far the mechanisms for vesicles formation have been obscure. In the replication-associated 1a polyprotein of Beet yellows virus (BYV) and other closteroviruses, the region between the methyltransferase and helicase domains (1a central region (CR), 1a CR) is marginally conserved. Computer-assisted analysis predicts several putative membrane-binding domains in the BYV 1a CR. Transient expression of a hydrophobic segment (referred to here as CR-2) of the BYV 1a in Nicotiana benthamiana led to reorganization of the ER and formation of ~1-μm mobile globules. We propose that the CR-2 may be involved in the formation of multivesicular complexes in BYV-infected cells. This provides analogy with membrane-associated proteins mediating the build-up of "virus factories" in cells infected with diverse positive-strand RNA viruses (alpha-like viruses, picorna-like viruses, flaviviruses, and nidoviruses) and negative-strand RNA viruses (bunyaviruses).

  11. Validation of a Parcel-Based Reduced-Complexity Model for River Delta Formation (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, M.; Geleynse, N.; Passalacqua, P.; Edmonds, D. A.; Kim, W.; Voller, V. R.; Paola, C.

    2013-12-01

    Reduced-Complexity Models (RCMs) take an intuitive yet quantitative approach to represent processes with the goal of getting maximum return in emergent system-scale behavior with minimum investment in computational complexity. This approach is in contrast to reductionist models that aim at rigorously solving the governing equations of fluid flow and sediment transport. RCMs have had encouraging successes in modeling a variety of geomorphic systems, such as braided rivers, alluvial fans, and river deltas. Despite the fact that these models are not intended to resolve detailed flow structures, questions remain on how to interpret and validate the output of RCMs beyond qualitative behavior-based descriptions. Here we present a validation of the newly developed RCM for river delta formation with channel dynamics (Liang, 2013). The model uses a parcel-based 'weighted-random-walk' method that resolves the formation of river deltas at the scale of channel dynamics (e.g., avulsions and bifurcations). The main focus of this validation work is the flow routing model component. A set of synthetic test cases were designed to compare hydrodynamic results from the RCM and Delft3D, including flow in a straight channel, around a bump, and flow partitioning at a single bifurcation. Output results, such as water surface slope and flow field, are also compared to field observations collected at Wax Lake Delta. Additionally, we investigate channel avulsion cycles and flow path selection in an alluvial fan with differential styles of subsidence and compare model results to laboratory experiments, as a preliminary effort in pairing up numerical and experimental models to understand channel organization at process scale. Strengths and weaknesses of the RCM are discussed and potential candidates for model application identified.

  12. Nucleoporin translocated promoter region (Tpr) associates with dynein complex, preventing chromosome lagging formation during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Hiroshi; Funasaka, Tatsuyoshi; Hashizume, Chieko; Wong, Richard W

    2010-04-01

    Gain or loss of whole chromosomes is often observed in cancer cells and is thought to be due to aberrant chromosome segregation during mitosis. Proper chromosome segregation depends on a faithful interaction between spindle microtubules and kinetochores. Several components of the nuclear pore complex/nucleoporins play critical roles in orchestrating the rapid remodeling events that occur during mitosis. Our recent studies revealed that the nucleoporin, Rae1, plays critical roles in maintaining spindle bipolarity. Here, we show association of another nucleoporin, termed Tpr (translocated promoter region), with the molecular motors dynein and dynactin, which both orchestrate with the spindle checkpoints Mad1 and Mad2 during cell division. Overexpression of Tpr enhanced multinucleated cell formation. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of Tpr caused a severe lagging chromosome phenotype and disrupted spindle checkpoint proteins expression and localization. Next, we performed a series of rescue and dominant negative experiments to confirm that Tpr orchestrates proper chromosome segregation through interaction with dynein light chain. Our data indicate that Tpr functions as a spatial and temporal regulator of spindle checkpoints, ensuring the efficient recruitment of checkpoint proteins to the molecular motor dynein to promote proper anaphase formation.

  13. Unraveling the complexities of circadian and sleep interactions with memory formation through invertebrate research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian eMichel

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Across phylogeny, the endogenous biological clock has been recognized as providing adaptive advantages to organisms through coordination of physiological and behavioral processes. Recent research has emphasized the role of circadian modulation of memory in generating peaks and troughs in cognitive performance. The circadian clock along with homeostatic processes also regulates sleep, which itself impacts the formation and consolidation of memory. Thus, the circadian clock, sleep and memory form a triad with ongoing dynamic interactions. With technological advances and the development of a global 24/7 society, understanding the mechanisms underlying these connections becomes pivotal for development of therapeutic treatments for memory disorders and to address issues in cognitive performance arising from non-traditional work schedules. Invertebrate models, such as Drosophila melanogaster and the mollusks Aplysia and Lymnaea, have proven invaluable tools for identification of highly conserved molecular processes in memory. Recent research from invertebrate systems has outlined the influence of sleep and the circadian clock upon synaptic plasticity. In this review, we discuss the effects of the circadian clock and sleep on memory formation in invertebrates drawing attention to the potential of in vivo and in vitro approaches that harness the power of simple invertebrate systems to correlate individual cellular processes with complex behaviors. In conclusion, this review highlights how studies in invertebrates with relatively simple nervous systems can provide mechanistic insights into corresponding behaviors in higher organisms and can be used to outline possible therapeutic options to guide further targeted inquiry.

  14. Unraveling the complexities of circadian and sleep interactions with memory formation through invertebrate research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Maximilian; Lyons, Lisa C

    2014-01-01

    Across phylogeny, the endogenous biological clock has been recognized as providing adaptive advantages to organisms through coordination of physiological and behavioral processes. Recent research has emphasized the role of circadian modulation of memory in generating peaks and troughs in cognitive performance. The circadian clock along with homeostatic processes also regulates sleep, which itself impacts the formation and consolidation of memory. Thus, the circadian clock, sleep and memory form a triad with ongoing dynamic interactions. With technological advances and the development of a global 24/7 society, understanding the mechanisms underlying these connections becomes pivotal for development of therapeutic treatments for memory disorders and to address issues in cognitive performance arising from non-traditional work schedules. Invertebrate models, such as Drosophila melanogaster and the mollusks Aplysia and Lymnaea, have proven invaluable tools for identification of highly conserved molecular processes in memory. Recent research from invertebrate systems has outlined the influence of sleep and the circadian clock upon synaptic plasticity. In this review, we discuss the effects of the circadian clock and sleep on memory formation in invertebrates drawing attention to the potential of in vivo and in vitro approaches that harness the power of simple invertebrate systems to correlate individual cellular processes with complex behaviors. In conclusion, this review highlights how studies in invertebrates with relatively simple nervous systems can provide mechanistic insights into corresponding behaviors in higher organisms and can be used to outline possible therapeutic options to guide further targeted inquiry.

  15. Formation of Large Polysulfide Complexes during the Lithium-Sulfur Battery Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Alhassan, Saeed M.; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2014-09-01

    Sulfur cathodes have much larger capacities than transition-metal-oxide cathodes used in commercial lithium-ion batteries but suffer from unsatisfactory capacity retention and long-term cyclability. Capacity degradation originates from soluble lithium polysulfides gradually diffusing into the electrolyte. Understanding of the formation and dynamics of soluble polysulfides during the discharging process at the atomic level remains elusive, which limits further development of lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries. Here we report first-principles molecular dynamics simulations and density functional calculations, through which the discharging products of Li-S batteries are studied. We find that, in addition to simple Li2Sn (1≤n ≤8) clusters generated from single cyclooctasulfur (S8) rings, large Li-S clusters form by collectively coupling several different rings to minimize the total energy. At high lithium concentration, a Li-S network forms at the sulfur surfaces. The results can explain the formation of the soluble Li-S complex, such as Li2S8, Li2S6, and Li2S4, and the insoluble Li2S2 and Li2S structures. In addition, we show that the presence of oxygen impurities in graphene, particularly oxygen atoms bonded to vacancies and edges, may stabilize the lithium polysulfides that may otherwise diffuse into the electrolyte.

  16. Formation of Large Polysulfide Complexes during the Lithium-Sulfur Battery Discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Bin [Vanderbilt University, Nashville; Alhassan, Saeed M. [The Petroleum Institute; Pantelides, Sokrates T [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Sulfur cathodes have much larger capacities than transition-metal-oxide cathodes used in commercial lithium-ion batteries but suffer from unsatisfactory capacity retention and long-term cyclability. Capacity degradation originates from soluble lithium polysulfides gradually diffusing into the electrolyte. Understanding of the formation and dynamics of soluble polysulfides during the discharging process at the atomic level remains elusive, which limits further development of lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries. Here we report first-principles molecular dynamics simulations and density functional calculations, through which the discharging products of Li-S batteries are studied. We find that, in addition to simple Li2Sn (1 n 8) clusters generated from single cyclooctasulfur (S8) rings, large Li-S clusters form by collectively coupling several different rings to minimize the total energy. At high lithium concentration, a Li-S network forms at the sulfur surfaces. The results can explain the formation of the soluble Li-S complex, such as Li2S8, Li2S6, and Li2S4, and the insoluble Li2S2 and Li2S structures. In addition, we show that the presence of oxygen impurities in graphene, particularly oxygen atoms bonded to vacancies and edges, may stabilize the lithium polysulfides that may otherwise diffuse into the electrolyte.

  17. Teacher formation related to socio-scientific issues: complexity, contributions and limitations of an educational practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariuce Campos de Moraes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This reflection refers to teacher formation related to socio-scientific issues. Whereas such matters take into account the impact of scientific development in society, including ethical aspects and encompass dilemmas involving a wide range of prospects for its resolution, we propose analysis of the complexity that is inherent in their teaching. Thus, we aimed to analyze different spaces and teaching time that produce and are produced in close linkage between theory and practice, as well as their contributions and limitations. The study required a dynamic conversation system that led to the analysis indicators. The issue of sustainability was shown to be feasible for educational planning as cover technical and scientific knowledge, ethical, social and economic pressures. The collective production allowed understand arguments and reflective-creative processes. The lived relations in schools has accompanied and limited the ideas expressed on the socio-scientific issues. We understand that the simultaneity of research and reflection in the sociocultural context has strengthened teacher formation.

  18. P31comet, a member of the synaptonemal complex, participates in meiotic DSB formation in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Jianhui; Tang, Ding; Shen, Yi; Xue, Zhihui; Wang, Hongjun; Shi, Wenqing; Zhang, Chao; Du, Guijie; Li, Yafei; Cheng, Zhukuan

    2016-09-20

    The human mitotic arrest-deficient 2 (Mad2) binding protein p31(comet) participates in the spindle checkpoint and coordinates cell cycle events in mitosis although its function in meiosis remains unknown in all organisms. Here, we reveal P31(comet) as a synaptonemal complex (SC) protein in rice (Oryza sativa L.). In p31(comet), homologous pairing and synapsis are eliminated, leading to the homologous nondisjunction and complete sterility. The failure in loading of histone H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX) in p31(comet), together with the suppressed chromosome fragmentation in rice completion of meiotic recombination 1 (com1) p31(comet) and radiation sensitive 51c (rad51c) p31(comet) double mutants, indicates that P31(comet) plays an essential role in double-strand break (DSB) formation. Interestingly, the dynamic colocalization pattern between P31(comet) and ZEP1 (a transverse filament protein of SC) by immunostaining, as well as the interaction between P31(comet) and CENTRAL REGION COMPONENT 1 (CRC1) in yeast two-hybrid assays, suggests possible involvement of P31(comet) in SC installation. Together, these data indicate that P31(comet) plays a key role in DSB formation and SC installation, mainly through its cooperation with CRC1.

  19. Formation of complex organic molecules in cold objects: the role of gas phase reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Balucani, Nadia; Taquet, Vianney

    2015-01-01

    While astrochemical models are successful in reproducing many of the observed interstellar species, they have been struggling to explain the observed abundances of complex organic molecules. Current models tend to privilege grain surface over gas phase chemistry in their formation. One key assumption of those models is that radicals trapped in the grain mantles gain mobility and react on lukewarm (>30 K) dust grains. Thus, the recent detections of methyl formate (MF) and dimethyl ether (DME) in cold objects represent a challenge and may clarify the respective role of grain surface and gas phase chemistry. We propose here a new model to form DME and MF with gas phase reactions in cold environments, where DME is the precursor of MF via an efficient reaction overlooked by previous models. Furthermore, methoxy, a precursor of DME, is also synthetized in the gas phase from methanol, which is desorbed by a non-thermal process from the ices. Our new model reproduces fairy well the observations towards L1544. It also...

  20. Generalized additive models reveal the intrinsic complexity of wood formation dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuny, Henri E; Rathgeber, Cyrille B K; Kiessé, Tristan Senga; Hartmann, Felix P; Barbeito, Ignacio; Fournier, Meriem

    2013-04-01

    The intra-annual dynamics of wood formation, which involves the passage of newly produced cells through three successive differentiation phases (division, enlargement, and wall thickening) to reach the final functional mature state, has traditionally been described in conifers as three delayed bell-shaped curves followed by an S-shaped curve. Here the classical view represented by the 'Gompertz function (GF) approach' was challenged using two novel approaches based on parametric generalized linear models (GLMs) and 'data-driven' generalized additive models (GAMs). These three approaches (GFs, GLMs, and GAMs) were used to describe seasonal changes in cell numbers in each of the xylem differentiation phases and to calculate the timing of cell development in three conifer species [Picea abies (L.), Pinus sylvestris L., and Abies alba Mill.]. GAMs outperformed GFs and GLMs in describing intra-annual wood formation dynamics, showing two left-skewed bell-shaped curves for division and enlargement, and a right-skewed bimodal curve for thickening. Cell residence times progressively decreased through the season for enlargement, whilst increasing late but rapidly for thickening. These patterns match changes in cell anatomical features within a tree ring, which allows the separation of earlywood and latewood into two distinct cell populations. A novel statistical approach is presented which renews our understanding of xylogenesis, a dynamic biological process in which the rate of cell production interplays with cell residence times in each developmental phase to create complex seasonal patterns.

  1. Dynamics of Escherichia coli chromosome segregation during multifork replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Henrik J; Youngren, Brenda; Hansen, Flemming G; Austin, Stuart

    2007-12-01

    Slowly growing Escherichia coli cells have a simple cell cycle, with replication and progressive segregation of the chromosome completed before cell division. In rapidly growing cells, initiation of replication occurs before the previous replication rounds are complete. At cell division, the chromosomes contain multiple replication forks and must be segregated while this complex pattern of replication is still ongoing. Here, we show that replication and segregation continue in step, starting at the origin and progressing to the replication terminus. Thus, early-replicated markers on the multiple-branched chromosomes continue to separate soon after replication to form separate protonucleoids, even though they are not segregated into different daughter cells until later generations. The segregation pattern follows the pattern of chromosome replication and does not follow the cell division cycle. No extensive cohesion of sister DNA regions was seen at any growth rate. We conclude that segregation is driven by the progression of the replication forks.

  2. Protein complex formation and intranuclear dynamics of NAC1 in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Naomi; Kato, Hiroaki; Sakashita, Gyosuke; Nariai, Yuko; Nakayama, Kentaro; Kyo, Satoru; Urano, Takeshi

    2016-09-15

    Nucleus accumbens-associated protein 1 (NAC1) is a cancer-related transcription regulator protein that is also involved in the pluripotency and differentiation of embryonic stem cells. NAC1 is overexpressed in various carcinomas including ovarian, cervical, breast, and pancreatic carcinomas. NAC1 knock-down was previously shown to result in the apoptosis of ovarian cancer cell lines and to rescue their sensitivity to chemotherapy, suggesting that NAC1 may be a potential therapeutic target, but protein complex formation and the dynamics of intranuclear NAC1 in cancer cells remain poorly understood. In this study, analysis of HeLa cell lysates by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) on a sizing column showed that the NAC1 peak corresponded to an apparent molecular mass of 300-500 kDa, which is larger than the estimated molecular mass (58 kDa) of the protein. Furthermore, live cell photobleaching analyses with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fused NAC1 proteins revealed the intranuclear dynamics of NAC1. Collectively our results demonstrate that NAC1 forms a protein complex to function as a transcriptional regulator in cancer cells.

  3. Spectrophotometric Determination of Gemifloxacin Mesylate in Pharmaceutical Formulations Through Ion-Pair Complex Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marothu Vamsi Krishna

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Four simple and sensitive ion-pairing spectrophotometric methods have been described for the assay of gemifloxacin mesylate (GFX either in pure form or in pharmaceutical formulations. The developed methods involve formation of colored chloroform extractable ion-pair complexes of the drug with safranin O (SFN O and methylene blue (MB in basic medium; Napthol blue 12BR (NB 12BR and azocaramine G (AG in acidic medium. The extracted complexes showed absorbance maxima at 525, 650, 620 and 540 nm for SFN O, MB, NB 12BR and AG, respectively.Beer's law is obeyed in the concentration ranges 3-15, 4-20, 2-10 and 2-10 μg/mL with molar absorptivity of 2.81 × 104, 2.20 x 104, 4.02 × 104 and 4.15 × 104 L mole−1 cm−1 and relative standard deviation of 0.077, 0.104, 0.080 and 0.103% for SFN O, MB, NB 12BR and AG, respectively. These methods have been successfully applied for the assay of drug in pharmaceutical formulations. No interference was observed from common pharmaceutical adjuvants. Results of analysis were validated statistically and through recovery studies.

  4. Interactions between plutonism and detachments during metamorphic core complex formation, Serifos Island (Cyclades, Greece)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabillard, Aurélien; Arbaret, Laurent; Jolivet, Laurent; Le Breton, Nicole; Gumiaux, Charles; Augier, Romain; Grasemann, Bernhard

    2015-06-01

    In order to better understand the interactions between plutonic activity and strain localization during metamorphic core complex formation, the Miocene granodioritic pluton of Serifos (Cyclades, Greece) is studied. This pluton (11.6-9.5 Ma) intruded the Cycladic Blueschists during thinning of the Aegean domain along a system of low-angle normal faults belonging to the south dipping West Cycladic Detachment System (WCDS). Based on structural fieldwork, together with microstructural observations and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility, we recognize a continuum of deformation from magmatic to brittle conditions within the magmatic body. This succession of deformation events is kinematically compatible with the development of the WCDS. The architecture of the pluton shows a marked asymmetry resulting from its interaction with the detachments. We propose a tectonic scenario for the emplacement of Serifos pluton and its subsequent cooling during the Aegean extension: (1) A first stage corresponds to the metamorphic core complex initiation and associated southwestward shearing along the Meghàlo Livadhi detachment. (2) In the second stage, the Serifos pluton has intruded the dome at shallow crustal level, piercing through the ductile/brittle Meghàlo Livadhi detachment. Southwest directed extensional deformation was contemporaneously transferred upward in the crust along the more localized Kàvos Kiklopas detachment. (3) The third stage was marked by synmagmatic extensional deformation and strain localization at the contact between the pluton and the host rocks resulting in nucleation of narrow shear zones, which (4) continued to develop after the pluton solidification.

  5. A multi-wavelength study of star formation activity in the S235 complex

    CERN Document Server

    Dewangan, L K; Luna, A; Anandarao, B G; Ninan, J P; Mallick, K K; Mayya, Y D

    2016-01-01

    We have carried out an extensive multi-wavelength study to investigate the star formation process in the S235 complex. The S235 complex has a sphere-like shell appearance at wavelengths longer than 2 $\\mu$m and harbors an O9.5V type star approximately at its center. Near-infrared extinction map traces eight subregions (having A$_{V}$ $>$ 8 mag), and five of them appear to be distributed in an almost regularly spaced manner along the sphere-like shell surrounding the ionized emission. This picture is also supported by the integrated $^{12}$CO and $^{13}$CO intensity maps and by Bolocam 1.1 mm continuum emission. The position-velocity analysis of CO reveals an almost semi-ring like structure, suggesting an expanding H\\,{\\sc ii} region. We find that the Bolocam clump masses increase as we move away from the location of the ionizing star. This correlation is seen only for those clumps which are distributed near the edges of the shell. Photometric analysis reveals 435 young stellar objects (YSOs), 59\\% of which ar...

  6. Enhanced conformational sampling to visualize a free-energy landscape of protein complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Shinji; Nakamura, Haruki; Higo, Junichi

    2016-06-15

    We introduce various, recently developed, generalized ensemble methods, which are useful to sample various molecular configurations emerging in the process of protein-protein or protein-ligand binding. The methods introduced here are those that have been or will be applied to biomolecular binding, where the biomolecules are treated as flexible molecules expressed by an all-atom model in an explicit solvent. Sampling produces an ensemble of conformations (snapshots) that are thermodynamically probable at room temperature. Then, projection of those conformations to an abstract low-dimensional space generates a free-energy landscape. As an example, we show a landscape of homo-dimer formation of an endothelin-1-like molecule computed using a generalized ensemble method. The lowest free-energy cluster at room temperature coincided precisely with the experimentally determined complex structure. Two minor clusters were also found in the landscape, which were largely different from the native complex form. Although those clusters were isolated at room temperature, with rising temperature a pathway emerged linking the lowest and second-lowest free-energy clusters, and a further temperature increment connected all the clusters. This exemplifies that the generalized ensemble method is a powerful tool for computing the free-energy landscape, by which one can discuss the thermodynamic stability of clusters and the temperature dependence of the cluster networks.

  7. Electrocatalytic Oxidation of Formate with Nickel Diphosphane Dipeptide Complexes. Effect of Ligands Modified with Amino Acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galan, Brandon R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Reback, Matthew L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jain, Avijita [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Appel, Aaron M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shaw, Wendy J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-09-03

    A series of nickel bis-diphosphine complexes with dipeptides appended to the ligands were investigated for the catalytic oxidation of formate. Typical rates of ~7 s-1 were found, similar to the parent complex (~8 s-1), with amino acid size and positioning contributing very little to rate or operating potential. Hydroxyl functionalities did result in lower rates, which were recovered by protecting the hydroxyl group. The results suggest that the overall dielectric introduced by the dipeptides does not play an important role in catalysis, but free hydroxyl groups do influence activity suggesting contributions from intra- or intermolecular interactions. These observations are important in developing a fundamental understanding of the affect that an enzyme-like outer coordination sphere can have upon molecular catalysts. This work was funded by the US DOE Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Geoscience and Biosciences Division (BRG, AJ, AMA, WJS), the US DOE Basic Energy Sciences, Physical Bioscience program (MLR). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  8. Complex formation during dissolution of metal oxides in molten alkali carbonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qingfeng; Borup, Flemming; Petrushina, Irina

    1999-01-01

    Dissolution of metal oxides in molten carbonates relates directly to the stability of materials for electrodes and construction of molten carbonate fuel cells. In the present work the solubilities of PbO, NiO, Fe2O3,and Bi2O3 in molten Li/K carbonates have been measured at 650 degrees C under...... carbon dioxide atmosphere. It is found that the solubilities of NiO and PbO decrease while those of Fe2O3 and Bi2O3 remain approximately constant as the lithium mole fraction increases from 0.43 to 0.62 in the melt. At a fixed composition of the melt, NiO and PbO display both acidic and basic dissolution...... as the partial pressure of carbon dioxide varies. By combination of solubility and electromotive force measurements, a model is constructed assuming the dissolution involves complex formation. The possible species for lead are proposed to be [Pb(CO3)(2)](-2) and/or [Pb(CO3)(3)](-4). A similar complex chemistry...

  9. Susceptibility to bystander DNA damage is influenced by replication and transcriptional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Jennifer S; Baird, Brandon J; Redon, Christophe E; Avdoshina, Valeriya; Palchik, Guillermo; Wu, Junfang; Kondratyev, Alexei; Bonner, William M; Martin, Olga A

    2012-11-01

    Direct cellular DNA damage may lead to genome destabilization in unexposed, bystander, cells sharing the same milieu with directly damaged cells by means of the bystander effect. One proposed mechanism involves double strand break (DSB) formation in S phase cells at sites of single strand lesions in the DNA of replication complexes, which has a more open structure compared with neighboring DNA. The DNA in transcription complexes also has a more open structure, and hence may be susceptible to bystander DSB formation from single strand lesions. To examine whether transcription predisposes non-replicating cells to bystander effect-induced DNA DSBs, we examined two types of primary cells that exhibit high levels of transcription in the absence of replication, rat neurons and human lymphocytes. We found that non-replicating bystander cells with high transcription rates exhibited substantial levels of DNA DSBs, as monitored by γ-H2AX foci formation. Additionally, as reported in proliferating cells, TGF-β and NO were found to mimic bystander effects in cell populations lacking DNA synthesis. These results indicate that cell vulnerability to bystander DSB damage may result from transcription as well as replication. The findings offer insights into which tissues may be vulnerable to bystander genomic destabilization in vivo.

  10. Susceptibility to bystander DNA damage is influenced by replication and transcriptional activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Jennifer S.; Baird, Brandon J.; Redon, Christophe E.; Avdoshina, Valeriya; Palchik, Guillermo; Wu, Junfang; Kondratyev, Alexei; Bonner, William M.; Martin, Olga A.

    2012-01-01

    Direct cellular DNA damage may lead to genome destabilization in unexposed, bystander, cells sharing the same milieu with directly damaged cells by means of the bystander effect. One proposed mechanism involves double strand break (DSB) formation in S phase cells at sites of single strand lesions in the DNA of replication complexes, which has a more open structure compared with neighboring DNA. The DNA in transcription complexes also has a more open structure, and hence may be susceptible to bystander DSB formation from single strand lesions. To examine whether transcription predisposes non-replicating cells to bystander effect-induced DNA DSBs, we examined two types of primary cells that exhibit high levels of transcription in the absence of replication, rat neurons and human lymphocytes. We found that non-replicating bystander cells with high transcription rates exhibited substantial levels of DNA DSBs, as monitored by γ-H2AX foci formation. Additionally, as reported in proliferating cells, TGF-β and NO were found to mimic bystander effects in cell populations lacking DNA synthesis. These results indicate that cell vulnerability to bystander DSB damage may result from transcription as well as replication. The findings offer insights into which tissues may be vulnerable to bystander genomic destabilization in vivo. PMID:22941641

  11. Soft versus hard junction formation for α-terthiophene molecular wires and their charge transfer complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezzoli, Andrea; Grace, Iain M.; Brooke, Carly; Nichols, Richard J.; Lambert, Colin J.; Higgins, Simon J.

    2017-03-01

    We used a range of scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM)-based methods to conduct a detailed study of single molecule junction conductance enhancement upon charge transfer complex formation, using bis(thiaalkyl)arene molecular wires as electron donors and tetracyanoethylene (TCNE) as an electron acceptor. Using the "hard" STM break junction (STM-BJ) method, in which a Au STM tip is pushed into a Au substrate and then withdrawn in the presence of molecules, we see a single, very broad, peak in the resulting conductance histogram when all data are used; the conductance enhancement is 25-fold for a terthiophene donor and 15-fold for a phenyl group. After rational data selection, in which only current-distance curves that contain a current plateau >0.2 nm long are used in the conductance histogram, three sharper peaks are resolved in the histograms for the charge transfer complexes; two substantially lower-conductance peaks are resolved for the uncomplexed molecules. Using the "soft" STM I(s) technique, in which initial contact between tip and substrate is avoided and the current limit is about an order of magnitude lower, we were able to resolve two peaks for the uncomplexed molecules depending upon the initial set point current (i.e., tip height), one at the same value as the lower of the two data-selected STM-BJ histogram peaks and an additional peak beyond the low-current limit for the STM-BJ experiment. For the terthiophene, the low, medium, and high conductance peaks for the TCNE complex are, respectively, ca. 70, 70, and 46 times higher in conductance than the corresponding peaks for the free molecule.

  12. Oceanic crust formation in the Egeria Fracture Zone Complex (Central Indian Ocean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Minor, Marine; Gaina, Carmen; Sigloch, Karin; Minakov, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to analyse in detail the oceanic crust fabric and volcanic features (seamounts) formed for the last 10 million years at the Central Indian Ridge between 19 and 21 latitude south. Multibeam bathymetry and magnetic data has been collected in 2013 as part of the French-German expedition RHUM-RUM (Reunion hotspot and upper mantle - Reunion's unterer mantel). Three long profiles perpendicular on the Central Indian Ridge (CIR), south of the Egeria fracture zone, document the formation of oceanic crust since 10 million years, along with changes in plate kinematics and variations in the magmatic input. We have inspected the abyssal hill geometry and orientation along conjugate oceanic flanks and within one fracture zone segment where we could identify J-shaped features that are indicators of changes in plate kinematics. The magnetic anomaly data shows a slight asymmetry in seafloor spreading rates on conjugate flanks: while a steady increase in spreading rate from 10 Ma to the present is shown by the western flank, the eastern part displays a slowing down from 5 Ma onwards. The deflection of the anti J-shaped abyssal hill lineations suggest that the left-stepping Egeria fracture zone complex (including the Egeria, Flinders and an un-named fracture zone to the southeast) was under transpression from 9 to 6 Ma and under transtension since 3 Ma. The transpressional event was triggered by a clockwise mid-ocean ridge reorientation and a decrease of its offset, whereas the transtensional regime was probably due to a counter-clockwise change in the spreading direction and an increase of the ridge offset. The new multibeam data along the three profiles reveal that crust on the eastern side is smoother (as shown by the abyssal hill number and structure) and hosts several seamounts (with age estimations of 7.67, 6.10 and 0.79 Ma), in contrast to the rougher conjugate western flank. Considering that the western flank was closer to the Reunion plume, and therefore

  13. Fusion of nearby inverted repeats by a replication-based mechanism leads to formation of dicentric and acentric chromosomes that cause genome instability in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paek, Andrew L; Kaochar, Salma; Jones, Hope; Elezaby, Aly; Shanks, Lisa; Weinert, Ted

    2009-12-15

    Large-scale changes (gross chromosomal rearrangements [GCRs]) are common in genomes, and are often associated with pathological disorders. We report here that a specific pair of nearby inverted repeats in budding yeast fuse to form a dicentric chromosome intermediate, which then rearranges to form a translocation and other GCRs. We next show that fusion of nearby inverted repeats is general; we found that many nearby inverted repeats that are present in the yeast genome also fuse, as does a pair of synthetically constructed inverted repeats. Fusion occurs between inverted repeats that are separated by several kilobases of DNA and share >20 base pairs of homology. Finally, we show that fusion of inverted repeats, surprisingly, does not require genes involved in double-strand break (DSB) repair or genes involved in other repeat recombination events. We therefore propose that fusion may occur by a DSB-independent, DNA replication-based mechanism (which we term "faulty template switching"). Fusion of nearby inverted repeats to form dicentrics may be a major cause of instability in yeast and in other organisms.

  14. Time-lapse ultrashort pulse microscopy of infection in three-dimensional versus two-dimensional culture environments reveals enhanced extra-chromosomal virus replication compartment formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Holly C.; Sing, Garwin; Armas, Juan Carlos González; Campbell, Colin J.; Ghazal, Peter; Yeh, Alvin T.

    2013-03-01

    The mechanisms that enable viruses to harness cellular machinery for their own survival are primarily studied in cell lines cultured in two-dimensional (2-D) environments. However, there are increasing reports of biological differences between cells cultured in 2-D versus three-dimensional (3-D) environments. Here we report differences in host-virus interactions based on differences in culture environment. Using ultrashort pulse microscopy (UPM), a form of two-photon microscopy that utilizes sub-10-fs pulses to efficiently excite fluorophores, we have shown that de novo development of extra-chromosomal virus replication compartments (VRCs) upon murine cytomegalovirus (mCMV) infection is markedly enhanced when host cells are cultured in 3-D collagen gels versus 2-D monolayers. In addition, time-lapse imaging revealed that mCMV-induced VRCs have the capacity to grow by coalescence. This work supports the future potential of 3-D culture as a useful bridge between traditional monolayer cultures and animal models to study host-virus interactions in a more physiologically relevant environment for the development of effective anti-viral therapeutics. These advances will require broader adoption of modalities, such as UPM, to image deep within scattering tissues.

  15. Formation of ethylene glycol and other complex organic molecules in star-forming regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivilla, V. M.; Beltrán, M. T.; Cesaroni, R.; Fontani, F.; Codella, C.; Zhang, Q.

    2017-02-01

    Context. The detection of complex organic molecules related with prebiotic chemistry in star-forming regions allows us to investigate how the basic building blocks of life are formed. Aims: Ethylene glycol (CH2OH)2 is the simplest sugar alcohol and the reduced alcohol of the simplest sugar glycoladehyde (CH2OHCHO). We study the molecular abundance and spatial distribution of (CH2OH)2, CH2OHCHO and other chemically related complex organic species (CH3OCHO, CH3OCH3, and C2H5OH) towards the chemically rich massive star-forming region G31.41+0.31. Methods: We analyzed multiple single-dish (Green Bank Telescope and IRAM 30 m) and interferometric (Submillimeter Array) spectra towards G31.41+0.31, covering a range of frequencies from 45 to 258 GHz. We fitted the observed spectra with a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) synthetic spectra, and obtained excitation temperatures and column densities. We compared our findings in G31.41+0.31 with the results found in other environments, including low- and high-mass star-forming regions, quiescent clouds and comets. Results: We report for the first time the presence of the aGg' conformer of (CH2OH)2 towards G31.41+0.31, detecting more than 30 unblended lines. We also detected multiple transitions of other complex organic molecules such as CH2OHCHO, CH3OCHO, CH3OCH3, and C2H5OH. The high angular resolution images show that the (CH2OH)2 emission is very compact, peaking towards the maximum of the 1.3 mm continuum. These observations suggest that low abundance complex organic molecules, like (CH2OH)2 or CH2OHCHO, are good probes of the gas located closer to the forming stars. Our analysis confirms that (CH2OH)2 is more abundant than CH2OHCHO in G31.41+0.31, as previously observed in other interstellar regions. Comparing different star-forming regions we find evidence of an increase of the (CH2OH)2/CH2OHCHO abundance ratio with the luminosity of the source. The CH3OCH3/CH3OCHO and (CH2OH)2/C2H5OH ratios are nearly constant with

  16. Evolution of multi-mineral formation evaluation using LWD data in complex carbonates offshore Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferraris, Paolo; Borovskaya, Irina [Schlumberger, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Petrophysical Formation Evaluation using Logging While Drilling (LWD) measurements is a new requisite when drilling in carbonates reservoirs offshore Brazil. These reservoirs are difficult to characterize due to an unusual mixture of the minerals constituting the matrix and affecting rock texture. As wells are getting deeper and more expensive, an early identification of the drilled targets potential is necessary for valuable decisions. Brazil operators have been especially demanding towards service providers, pushing for development of suitable services able to positively identify and quantify not only the presence of hydrocarbons but also their flowing capability. In addition to the standard gamma ray / resistivity / porosity and density measurements, three new measurements have proven to be critical to evaluate complex carbonate formations: Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), Spectroscopy and Capture Cross-Section (sigma). Under appropriate logging conditions, NMR data provides lithology independent porosity, bound and free fluids fractions, reservoir texture and permeability. Capture Spectroscopy allows assessment of mineral composition in terms of calcite, dolomite, quartz and clay fractions, and in addition highlights presence of other heavier minerals. Finally, sigma allows performing a volumetric formation evaluation without requiring custom optimization of the classical exponents used in all forms of resistivity saturation equations. All these new measurements are inherently statistical and if provided by wireline after drilling the well they may result in significant usage of rig time. When acquired simultaneously while drilling they have three very clear advantages: 1) no extra rig time, 2) improved statistics due to long formation exposure (drilling these carbonates is a slow process and rate of penetration (ROP) rarely exceeds 10 m/hr), 3) less invasion effect and better hole condition. This paper describes the development of two LWD tools performing the

  17. Thermodynamic properties of actinide complexes. II. Thorium(IV)--acetate system. [Formation of thorium(IV)-acetate complexes in aqueous perchlorate medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portanova, R.; Di Bernardo, P.; Traverso, O.; Mazzocchin, G.A.; Magon, L.

    1975-10-01

    The changes in free energy, enthalpy and entropy for the formation of thorium(IV)--acetate complexes have been determined at 25/sup 0/C and in 1.00 M aqueous perchlorate-medium. All five complexes formed, are found to be stabilized by a large gain of entropy. The marked increase in the values of ..delta..H/sub j/ and ..delta..S/sub j/, relative to the third step of complexation has been explained in terms of a coordination change.

  18. From PII signaling to metabolite sensing: a novel 2-oxoglutarate sensor that details PII-NAGK complex formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Lüddecke

    Full Text Available The widespread PII signal transduction proteins are known for integrating signals of nitrogen and energy supply and regulating cellular behavior by interacting with a multitude of target proteins. The PII protein of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus forms complexes with the controlling enzyme of arginine synthesis, N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase (NAGK in a 2-oxoglutarate- and ATP/ADP-dependent manner. Fusing NAGK and PII proteins to either CFP or YFP yielded a FRET sensor that specifically responded to 2-oxoglutarate. The impact of the fluorescent tags on PII and NAGK was evaluated by enzyme assays, surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy and isothermal calorimetric experiments. The developed FRET sensor provides real-time data on PII - NAGK interaction and its modulation by the effector molecules ATP, ADP and 2-oxoglutarate in vitro. Additionally to its utility to monitor 2-oxoglutarate levels, the FRET assay provided novel insights into PII - NAGK complex formation: (i It revealed the formation of an encounter-complex between PII and NAGK, which holds the proteins in proximity even in the presence of inhibitors of complex formation; (ii It revealed that the PII T-loop residue Ser49 is neither essential for complex formation with NAGK nor for activation of the enzyme but necessary to form a stable complex and efficiently relieve NAGK from arginine inhibition; (iii It showed that arginine stabilizes the NAGK hexamer and stimulates PII - NAGK interaction.

  19. Forming impressions of personality: A replication and review of Asch's (1946) evidence for a primacy-of-warmth effect in impression formation

    OpenAIRE

    Nauts, S.; Langner, O.; Huijsmans, I.; Vonk, R.; Wigboldus, D.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    Asch's seminal research on "Forming Impressions of Personality'' (1946) has widely been cited as providing evidence for a primacy-of-warmth effect, suggesting that warmth-related judgments have a stronger influence on impressions of personality than competence-related judgments (e. g., Fiske, Cuddy, & Glick, 2007; Wojciszke, 2005). Because this effect does not fit with Asch's Gestalt-view on impression formation and does not readily follow from the data presented in his original paper, the go...

  20. Forming impressions of personality: A replication and review of Asch's (1946) evidence for a primacy-of-warmth effect in impression formation

    OpenAIRE

    Nauts, S.; Langner, O.; Huijsmans, I.; Vonk, R; Wigboldus, D.H.J.

    2014-01-01

    Asch's seminal research on "Forming Impressions of Personality'' (1946) has widely been cited as providing evidence for a primacy-of-warmth effect, suggesting that warmth-related judgments have a stronger influence on impressions of personality than competence-related judgments (e. g., Fiske, Cuddy, & Glick, 2007; Wojciszke, 2005). Because this effect does not fit with Asch's Gestalt-view on impression formation and does not readily follow from the data presented in his original paper, the go...

  1. The Versatile Behavior of Platinum Alkyne Complexes towards XeF2 : Formation of Fluorovinyl and Fluorido Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Josefine; Braun, Thomas; Ahrens, Theresia; Kläring, Paul; Laubenstein, Reik; Braun-Cula, Beatrice

    2017-07-03

    Reactions of platinum(0) tolane complexes, bearing a chelating ligand with P and N donor atoms, with the electrophilic fluorinating agent XeF2 give facile access to platinum(II) β-fluorovinyl fluorido complexes. A series of new platinum(II) β-fluorovinyl complexes have been synthesized and were structurally characterized. Further oxidation with XeF2 led to ortho-metalated platinum(IV) fluorido compounds. Additional reactions of platinum(0) tolane complexes, bearing a chelating P,P donor ligand, with XeF2 led to a variety of fluorido and fluorovinyl complexes. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Complex formation reactions of lanthanum(III), cerium(III), thorium(IV), dioxouranyl(IV) complexes with tricine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Mahmoud M A

    2007-08-01

    Equilibrium studies for the heavy metal ions La(III), Ce(III), Th(IV) and UO2(IV) (M) complexes of the zwitterionic buffer tricine (L) in aqueous solution are investigated. Stoichiometry and stability constants for the different complexes formed as well as hydrolysis products of the metal cations are determined at 25 degrees C and ionic strength 0.1 M NaNO3. The stability of the formed complexes are discussed in terms of the nature of the heavy metal cation. The solid complexes are synthesized and characterized by means of elemental analysis, FTIR, and TG analysis. The general molecular formulae of the obtained complexes is suggested to be [M(L)2](NO3)n-2(H2O)x, where n = the charge of the metal cation, x = no. of water molecules.

  3. Thermodynamics of the complex formation between Cu2+ and triglycine in water-ethanol solutions at 298 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham Thi, L.; Usacheva, T. R.; Khrenova, T. M.; Sharnin, V. A.

    2017-07-01

    Thermodynamic functions Δr H, Δr G, and TΔr S of the complex formation between Cu2+ and triglycine in water-ethanol solutions are calculated on the basis of calorimetric data. It is found that raising the concentration of EtOH results in a monotonic increase in the exothermic effect of [CuHL]2+ complex formation due to the weakening of triglycine solvation with the mutual compensation of ion solvation contributions. The enthalpy of [CuL]+ complex formation has an exothermic maximum at 0.1-0.3 molar fractions of EtOH due to competition between the solvation contributions from ions and ligands.

  4. Replication Restart in Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Bénédicte; Sandler, Steven J

    2017-07-01

    In bacteria, replication forks assembled at a replication origin travel to the terminus, often a few megabases away. They may encounter obstacles that trigger replisome disassembly, rendering replication restart from abandoned forks crucial for cell viability. During the past 25 years, the genes that encode replication restart proteins have been identified and genetically characterized. In parallel, the enzymes were purified and analyzed in vitro, where they can catalyze replication initiation in a sequence-independent manner from fork-like DNA structures. This work also revealed a close link between replication and homologous recombination, as replication restart from recombination intermediates is an essential step of DNA double-strand break repair in bacteria and, conversely, arrested replication forks can be acted upon by recombination proteins and converted into various recombination substrates. In this review, we summarize this intense period of research that led to the characterization of the ubiquitous replication restart protein PriA and its partners, to the definition of several replication restart pathways in vivo, and to the description of tight links between replication and homologous recombination, responsible for the importance of replication restart in the maintenance of genome stability. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  5. Exosomes in human semen restrict HIV-1 transmission by vaginal cells and block intravaginal replication of LP-BM5 murine AIDS virus complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madison, Marisa N; Jones, Philip H; Okeoma, Chioma M

    2015-08-01

    Exosomes are membranous extracellular nanovesicles secreted by diverse cell types. Exosomes from healthy human semen have been shown to inhibit HIV-1 replication and to impair progeny virus infectivity. In this study, we examined the ability of healthy human semen exosomes to restrict HIV-1 and LP-BM5 murine AIDS virus transmission in three different model systems. We show that vaginal cells internalize exosomes with concomitant transfer of functional mRNA. Semen exosomes blocked the spread of HIV-1 from vaginal epithelial cells to target cells in our cell-to-cell infection model and suppressed transmission of HIV-1 across the vaginal epithelial barrier in our trans-well model. Our in vivo model shows that human semen exosomes restrict intravaginal transmission and propagation of murine AIDS virus. Our study highlights an antiretroviral role for semen exosomes that may be harnessed for the development of novel therapeutic strategies to combat HIV-1 transmission.

  6. Chromosome replication and segregation in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Lamothe, Rodrigo; Nicolas, Emilien; Sherratt, David J

    2012-01-01

    In dividing cells, chromosome duplication once per generation must be coordinated with faithful segregation of newly replicated chromosomes and with cell growth and division. Many of the mechanistic details of bacterial replication elongation are well established. However, an understanding of the complexities of how replication initiation is controlled and coordinated with other cellular processes is emerging only slowly. In contrast to eukaryotes, in which replication and segregation are separate in time, the segregation of most newly replicated bacterial genetic loci occurs sequentially soon after replication. We compare the strategies used by chromosomes and plasmids to ensure their accurate duplication and segregation and discuss how these processes are coordinated spatially and temporally with growth and cell division. We also describe what is known about the three conserved families of ATP-binding proteins that contribute to chromosome segregation and discuss their inter-relationships in a range of disparate bacteria.

  7. The structure-specific endonuclease Mus81 contributes to replication restart by generating double-strand DNA breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, Katsuhiro; Budzowska, Magda; Davies, Sally L; van Drunen, Ellen; Onizawa, Hideo; Beverloo, H Berna; Maas, Alex; Essers, Jeroen; Hickson, Ian D; Kanaar, Roland

    2007-11-01

    Faithful duplication of the genome requires structure-specific endonucleases such as the RuvABC complex in Escherichia coli. These enzymes help to resolve problems at replication forks that have been disrupted by DNA damage in the template. Much less is known about the identities of these enzymes in mammalian cells. Mus81 is the catalytic component of a eukaryotic structure-specific endonuclease that preferentially cleaves branched DNA substrates reminiscent of replication and recombination intermediates. Here we explore the mechanisms by which Mus81 maintains chromosomal stability. We found that Mus81 is involved in the formation of double-strand DNA breaks in response to the inhibition of replication. Moreover, in the absence of chromosome processing by Mus81, recovery of stalled DNA replication forks is attenuated and chromosomal aberrations arise. We suggest that Mus81 suppresses chromosomal instability by converting potentially detrimental replication-associated DNA structures into intermediates that are more amenable to DNA repair.

  8. Swarming and complex pattern formation in Paenibacillus vortex studied by imaging and tracking cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Eshel

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Swarming motility allows microorganisms to move rapidly over surfaces. The Gram-positive bacterium Paenibacillus vortex exhibits advanced cooperative motility on agar plates resulting in intricate colonial patterns with geometries that are highly sensitive to the environment. The cellular mechanisms that underpin the complex multicellular organization of such a simple organism are not well understood. Results Swarming by P. vortex was studied by real-time light microscopy, by in situ scanning electron microscopy and by tracking the spread of antibiotic-resistant cells within antibiotic-sensitive colonies. When swarming, P. vortex was found to be peritrichously flagellated. Swarming by the curved cells of P. vortex occurred on an extremely wide range of media and agar concentrations (0.3 to 2.2% w/v. At high agar concentrations (> 1% w/v rotating colonies formed that could be detached from the main mass of cells by withdrawal of cells into the latter. On lower percentage agars, cells moved in an extended network composed of interconnected "snakes" with short-term collision avoidance and sensitivity to extracts from swarming cells. P. vortex formed single Petri dish-wide "supercolonies" with a colony-wide exchange of motile cells. Swarming cells were coupled by rapidly forming, reversible and non-rigid connections to form a loose raft, apparently connected via flagella. Inhibitors of swarming (p-Nitrophenylglycerol and Congo Red were identified. Mitomycin C was used to trigger filamentation without inhibiting growth or swarming; this facilitated dissection of the detail of swarming. Mitomycin C treatment resulted in malcoordinated swarming and abortive side branch formation and a strong tendency by a subpopulation of the cells to form minimal rotating aggregates of only a few cells. Conclusion P. vortex creates complex macroscopic colonies within which there is considerable reflux and movement and interaction of cells. Cell

  9. Formation of metamorphic core complexes in non-over-thickened continental crust: A case study of Liaodong Peninsula (East Asia)

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Kun; Burov, Evgueni; Gumiaux, Charles; Chen, Yan; Lu, Gang; Mezri, Leila; Zhao, Liang

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Pre-thickened hot orogenic crust is often considered a necessary condition for the formation of continental metamorphic core complexes (MCCs). However, the discovery of MCCs in the Liaodong Peninsula, where the crust has a normal thickness (~ 35 km), challenges the universality of this scenario. Therefore, we implement a series of 2-D numerical thermo-mechanical modeling experiments in which we investigate the conditions of MCC formation in normal crusts, as well as th...

  10. Protostellar Interferometric Line Survey (PILS): Constraining the formation of complex organic molecules with ALMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Jes K.; Coutens, Audrey; Bourke, Tyler L.; Favre, Cecile; Garrod, Robin; Lykke, Julie; Mueller, Holger; Oberg, Karin I.; Schmalzl, Markus; van der Wiel, Matthijs; van Dishoeck, Ewine; Wampfler, Susanne F.

    2015-08-01

    Understanding how, when and where complex organic and potentially prebiotic molecules are formed is a fundamental goal of astrochemistry and an integral part of origins of life studies. Already now ALMA is showing its capabilities for studies of the chemistry of solar-type stars with its high sensitivity for faint lines, high spectral resolution which limits line confusion, and high angular resolution making it possible to study the structure of young protostars on solar-system scales. We here present the first results from a large unbiased survey “Protostellar Interferometric Line Survey (PILS)” targeting one of the astrochemical template sources, the low-mass protostellar binary IRAS 16293-2422. The survey is more than an order of magnitude more sensitive than previous surveys of the source and provide imaging down to 25 AU scales (radius) around each of the two components of the binary. An example of one of the early highlights from the survey is unambiguous detections of the (related) prebiotic species glycolaldehyde, ethylene glycol (two lowest energy conformers), methyl formate and acetic acid. The glycolaldehyde-ethylene glycol abundance ratio is high in comparison to comets and other protostars - but agrees with previous measurements, e.g., in the Galactic Centre clouds possibly reflecting different environments and/or evolutionary histories. Complete mapping of this and other chemical networks in comparison with detailed chemical models and laboratory experiments will reveal the origin of complex organic molecules in a young protostellar system and investigate the link between these protostellar stages and the early Solar System.

  11. Development of excretion stimulating techniques for radioactive materials via complex formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takaya, Haruo; Utsumi, Akira; Takatsu, Akiko [National Inst. of materials and Chemical Research, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-02-01

    This research project aimed to establish a technique for rapid excretion of RI metals (Ni, Cd, Pb) incorporated into human body and here, development of removing agents which allow complex formation with metals was attempted. The reactivities of those agents with metals such as Ni, Cd were investigated. The gluco-formazan derivatives produced in the previous year; PF, PCF, PHF, PPF, PPCF and PPHF were investigated in the respect of reactivities with various metals. Those formazan derivatives were mixed with a metal ion (alkaline earth metals, lanthanoids, 1st transition metal) in buffered sodium-perchlorate solution to determine the chelating activity and the stability of metal chelation was estimated by spectrophotometric method. In formazan derivative with glucose, mannose or galactose, N atom of imino, azo and pyridyl groups, and O atoms of carboxyl and hydroxy groups possibly mediate the bonding with a metal ion. These chelate agents were little reactive for alkali metals, alkaline earth metals (Mg, Sr, Ba) or lanthanoid elements, but their affinities to Zn, Cd, Ni and Co were very high. It was demonstrated that either of the formazan derivatives was able to make chelate complex, suggesting that those are usable for excretion of RI metal ({sup 63}Ni and {sup 109}Cd). These gluco-formazan thus obtained were able to excrete these RI metals in the human body without affecting the metabolism of physiologically indispensable metals such as Ca, Mg, Fe etc. Furthermore, it seems necessary to make pharmacokinetic study on absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion of the gluco-formazan derivatives. (M.N.)

  12. ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY COMPLEXONES. THE THERMODYNAMIC CHARACTERISTICS OF THE FORMATION OF AL3+ ION COMPLEXES WITH ETHYLENEDIAMINEDISUCCINIC ACID IN AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.N. Tolkacheva

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Complex formation between Al3+ and ethylenediamine - N,N`-disuccinic acid (H4L was studied at 25°C against the background of 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 N solutions of KNO3 by potentiometry and mathematical modeling. The extrapolation of concentration constants to zero ionic strength was used to calculate the thermodynamic constants of the formation of the AlL–, AlHL complexes using an equation with one individual parameter (logβ0 = 16.27 ± 0.07, 9.19 ± 0.2 respectively.

  13. Structure Formation of Ultrathin PEO Films at Solid Interfaces—Complex Pattern Formation by Dewetting and Crystallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Georg Braun

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The direct contact of ultrathin polymer films with a solid substrate may result in thin film rupture caused by dewetting. With crystallisable polymers such as polyethyleneoxide (PEO, molecular self-assembly into partial ordered lamella structures is studied as an additional source of pattern formation. Morphological features in ultrathin PEO films (thickness < 10 nm result from an interplay between dewetting patterns and diffusion limited growth pattern of ordered lamella growing within the dewetting areas. Besides structure formation of hydrophilic PEO molecules, n-alkylterminated (hydrophobic PEO oligomers are investigated with respect to self-organization in ultrathin films. Morphological features characteristic for pure PEO are not changed by the presence of the n-alkylgroups.

  14. Apatite formation behaviour during metasomatism in the Bathtub Intrusion (Babbitt deposit, Duluth Complex, USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raič, Sara; Mogessie, Aberra; Krenn, Kurt; Hauzenberger, Christoph A.; Tropper, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The mineralized troctolitic Bathtub intrusion (Duluth Complex, NE-Minnesota) is known for its famous Cu-Ni-Sulfide±PGM Babbitt deposit, where platinum group minerals (PGMs) are either hosted by primary magmatic sulfides (base metal sulfides) or associated with hydrothermally altered portions. This secondary generation of PGMs is present in alteration patches and suggests the involvement of hydrothermal fluids in the mobilization of platinum-group elements (PGEs). Accessory fluorapatite in these samples reveals besides H2O- and CO2-rich primary fluid inclusions, textural and compositional variations that also record magmatic and metasomatic events. Based on detailed back-scattered electron imaging (BSE) and laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS), a primary magmatic origin is reflected by homogeneous or zoned grains, where zoning patterns are either concentric or oscillatory, with respect to LREE. Late magmatic to hydrothermal processes are indicated by grains with bright LREE-enriched rims or conversion textures with REE-enriched patches in the interior of the apatite. A metasomatic formation of monazite from apatite is documented by the presence of monazite inclusions in apatite and newly grown monazite at altered apatite rims. They formed by the release of REEs from the apatite during a fluid-induced alteration, based on the coupled substitution Ca2+ + P5+ = REE3+ + Si4+ (Rønsbo 1989; Rønsbo 2008). Samples with monazite inclusions in apatite further display occurrences of PGMs associated with hydrothermal alteration patches (chlorite + amphibole). The presence of H2O- and CO2-rich fluid inclusions in apatite, the metasomatically induced monazite growth, as well as the occurrence of PGMs in hydrothermally alteration zones, also suggest the involvement of aqueous chloride complexes in a H2O dominated fluid in the transportation of LREE and redistribution of the second generation of PGEs. Rønsbo, J.G. (1989): Coupled substitutions

  15. THE PRINCIPLES OF POWER-RISE BUILDINGS COMPLEXES FORMATION USING WIND ENERGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NEVGAMONNIY G. U.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Raising of problem. The methodology of designing energy-efficient tower building should be based on systematic analysis of the building as a unified energy system. The prominent architect Norman Foster (Sir Norman Foster writes: "Architects cannot solve all the world's environmental problems, but we can design buildings that require only a fraction of current energy consumption, in addition, through proper urban planning we can affect traffic flows. The location and functionality of buildings, its structural flexibility and technological resources, orientation, shape and structure, heating and ventilation characteristics used in the construction materials - all these parameters affect the amount of energy required for the construction, operation and maintenance of the building, and as for transportation, moving to it and from it" [1]. Purpose. The purpose of the study is scientific justification principles of architectural formation decisions of the power-rise energy efficient complexes and developing methods of architectural design of PRBC using wind energy. To develop the science-based principles forming the architectural buildings with the use of alternative energy and determine the specific features of the architectural design of buildings. Conclusion. The principles of architectural forming in the use of wind power and identify possible trends for the development of buildings with integrated wind installations. Polyfunctional wind power plants are in special properties of certain material and structural elements of the building structure, improve aerodynamic performance of the outer shell and therefore wind energy devices. Thus, the power efficiency of energy active building depends on its space solutions.

  16. Complexation and sequestration of BMP-2 from an ECM mimetic hyaluronan gel for improved bone formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Kisiel

    Full Text Available Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2 is considered a promising adjuvant for the treatment of skeletal non-union and spinal fusion. However, BMP-2 delivery in a conventional collagen scaffold necessitates a high dose to achieve an efficacious outcome. To lower its effective dose, we precomplexed BMP-2 with the glycosaminoglycans (GAGs dermatan sulfate (DS or heparin (HP, prior to loading it into a hyaluronic acid (HA hydrogel. In vitro release studies showed that BMP-2 precomplexed with DS or HP had a prolonged delivery compared to without GAG. BMP-2-DS complexes achieved a slightly faster release in the first 24 h than HP; however, both delivered BMP-2 for an equal duration. Analysis of the kinetic interaction between BMP-2 and DS or HP showed that HP had approximately 10 times higher affinity for BMP-2 than DS, yet it equally stabilized the protein, as determined by alkaline phosphatase activity. Ectopic bone formation assays at subcutaneous sites in rats demonstrated that HA hydrogel-delivered BMP-2 precomplexed with GAG induced twice the volume of bone compared with BMP-2 delivered uncomplexed to GAG.

  17. Calculating the contribution of different binding modes to Quinacrine - DNA complex formation from polarized fluorescence data

    CERN Document Server

    Voloshin, Igor; Karachevtsev, Victor; Zozulya, Victor

    2013-01-01

    Binding of acridine derivative quinacrine (QA) to chicken erythrocyte DNA was studied by methods of absorption and polarized fluorescent spectroscopy. Measurements were carried out in aqueous buffered solutions (pH 6.9) of different dye concentrations (QA concentration range from $10^{-6}$ till $10^{-4}$ M) and ionic strengths ($Na^{+}$ concentration rang from $10^{-3}$ till 0.15 M) in a wide range of phosphate-to-dye molar ratios ($P/D$). It is established that the minimum of fluorescent titration curve plotted as relative fluorescence intensity $vs$ $P/D$ is conditioned by the competition between the two types of QA binding to DNA which posses by different emission parameters: (i) intercalative one dominating under high $P/D$ values, and (ii) outside electrostatic binding dominating under low $P/D$ values, which is accompanied by the formation of non-fluorescent dye associates on the DNA backbone. Absorption and fluorescent characteristics of complexes formed were determined. The method of calculation of di...

  18. CD8+ TCR repertoire formation is guided primarily by the peptide component of the antigenic complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koning, Dan; Costa, Ana I; Hoof, Ilka; Miles, John J; Nanlohy, Nening M; Ladell, Kristin; Matthews, Katherine K; Venturi, Vanessa; Schellens, Ingrid M M; Borghans, Jose A M; Kesmir, Can; Price, David A; van Baarle, Debbie

    2013-02-01

    CD8(+) T cells recognize infected or dysregulated cells via the clonotypically expressed αβ TCR, which engages Ag in the form of peptide bound to MHC class I (MHC I) on the target cell surface. Previous studies have indicated that a diverse Ag-specific TCR repertoire can be beneficial to the host, yet the determinants of clonotypic diversity are poorly defined. To better understand the factors that govern TCR repertoire formation, we conducted a comprehensive clonotypic analysis of CD8(+) T cell populations directed against epitopes derived from EBV and CMV. Neither pathogen source nor the restricting MHC I molecule were linked with TCR diversity; indeed, both HLA-A and HLA-B molecules were observed to interact with an overlapping repertoire of expressed TRBV genes. Peptide specificity, however, markedly impacted TCR diversity. In addition, distinct peptides sharing HLA restriction and viral origin mobilized TCR repertoires with distinct patterns of TRBV gene usage. Notably, no relationship was observed between immunodominance and TCR diversity. These findings provide new insights into the forces that shape the Ag-specific TCR repertoire in vivo and highlight a determinative role for the peptide component of the peptide-MHC I complex on the molecular frontline of CD8(+) T cell-mediated immune surveillance.

  19. Measurement of the formation of complexes in tyrosine kinase-mediated signal transduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladbury, John E., E-mail: j.ladbury@biochem.ucl.ac.uk [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2007-01-01

    The use of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) provides a full thermodynamic characterization of an interaction in one experiment. The determination of the affinity is an important value; however, the additional layer of information provided by the change in enthalpy and entropy can help in understanding the biology. This is demonstrated with respect to tyrosine kinase-mediated signal transduction. Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) provides highly complementary data to high-resolution structural detail. An overview of the methodology of the technique is provided. Ultimately, the correlation of the thermodynamic parameters determined by ITC with structural perturbation observed on going from the free to the bound state should be possible at an atomic level. Currently, thermodynamic data provide some insight as to potential changes occurring on complex formation. Here, this is demonstrated in the context of in vitro quantification of intracellular tyrosine kinase-mediated signal transduction and the issue of specificity of the important interactions. The apparent lack of specificity in the interactions of domains of proteins involved in early signalling from membrane-bound receptors is demonstrated using data from ITC.

  20. Formation and identification of unresolved complex mixtures in lacustrine biodegraded oil from Nanxiang Basin, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Pengfei; He, Sheng; Zhu, Shukui; Chai, Derong; Yin, Shiyan; Dai, Wei; Zhang, Wanfeng

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC/TOFMS) method has been developed for the formation and identification of unresolved complex mixtures (UCMs) in lacustrine biodegraded oils that with the same source rock, similar maturity, and increasing degradation rank from Nanxiang Basin, China. Normal alkanes, light hydrocarbons, isoprenoids, steranes, and terpanes are degraded gradually from oil B330 to oil G574. The compounds in biodegraded oil (oil G574) have fewer types, the polarity difference of compounds in different types is minor, and the relative content of individual compounds is similar. All the features make the compounds in biodegraded oil coelute in GC analysis and form the raised "baseline hump" named UCMs. By injecting standard materials and analyzing mass spectrums of target compounds, it is shown that cyclic alkanes with one to five rings are the major components of UCMs. Furthermore, UCMs were divided into six classes. Classes I and II, composed of alkyl-cyclohexanes, alkyl-naphthanes, and their isomers, are originated from the enrichment of hydrocarbons resistant to degradation in normal oils. Classes III ~ VI, composed of sesquiterpenoids, tricyclic terpanes, low molecular steranes, diasteranes, norhopanes, and their isomers, are probably from some newly formed compounds during the microbial transformation of oil.

  1. Formation and Identification of Unresolved Complex Mixtures in Lacustrine Biodegraded Oil from Nanxiang Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengfei Guo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC/TOFMS method has been developed for the formation and identification of unresolved complex mixtures (UCMs in lacustrine biodegraded oils that with the same source rock, similar maturity, and increasing degradation rank from Nanxiang Basin, China. Normal alkanes, light hydrocarbons, isoprenoids, steranes, and terpanes are degraded gradually from oil B330 to oil G574. The compounds in biodegraded oil (oil G574 have fewer types, the polarity difference of compounds in different types is minor, and the relative content of individual compounds is similar. All the features make the compounds in biodegraded oil coelute in GC analysis and form the raised “baseline hump” named UCMs. By injecting standard materials and analyzing mass spectrums of target compounds, it is shown that cyclic alkanes with one to five rings are the major components of UCMs. Furthermore, UCMs were divided into six classes. Classes I and II, composed of alkyl-cyclohexanes, alkyl-naphthanes, and their isomers, are originated from the enrichment of hydrocarbons resistant to degradation in normal oils. Classes III ~ VI, composed of sesquiterpenoids, tricyclic terpanes, low molecular steranes, diasteranes, norhopanes, and their isomers, are probably from some newly formed compounds during the microbial transformation of oil.

  2. Floatation-spectrophotometric Determination of Thorium, Using Complex Formation with Eriochrome Cyanine R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiri, Sabah; Delpisheh, Ali; Haeri, Ali; Poornajaf, Abdolhossein; Khezeli, Tahereh; Badkiu, Nadie

    2011-01-23

    A novel and sensitive floatation-spectrophotometric method is presented for determination of trace amounts of thorium in water samples. The method is based on the ion-associated formation between thorium, Eriochrome cyanine R and Brij-35 at pH = 4 media. The complex was floated in the interface of the aqueous phase and n-hexane by vigorous shaking. After removing the aqueous phase the floated particles were dissolved in methanol and the absorbance was measured at 607 nm. The influence of different important parameters such as Eriochrome cyanine R and surfactants concentration, pH, volume of n-hexane, standing time and interfering ions were evaluated. Under optimized conditions the calibration graph was linear in the range of 6-230 ng mL(-1) of thorium with a correlation coefficient of 0.9985. The limit of detections (LOD), based on signal to noise ratio (S/N) of 3 was 1.7 ng mL(-1). The relative standard deviations for determination of 150 and 30 ng ml(-1) of thorium were 3.26 and 4.41%, respectively (n = 10). The method showed a good linearity, recoveries, as well as some advantages such as sensitivity, simplicity, affordability and a high feasibility. The method was successfully applied to determine thorium in different water and urine samples.

  3. Decamethylytterbocene Complexes of Bipyridines and Diazabutadienes: Multiconfigurational Ground States and Open-Shell Singlet Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booth, Corwin H.; Walter, Marc D.; Kazhdan, Daniel; Hu, Yung-Jin; Lukens, Wayne W.; Bauer, Eric D.; Maron, Laurent; Eisenstein, Odile; Andersen, Richard A.

    2009-04-22

    Partial ytterbium f-orbital occupancy (i.e., intermediate valence) and open-shell singlet formation are established for a variety of bipyridine and diazabutadiene adducts with decamethylytterbocene, (C5Me5)2Yb, abbreviated as Cp*2Yb. Data used to support this claim include ytterbium valence measurements using Yb LIII-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy, magnetic susceptibility, and complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) multiconfigurational calculations, as well as structural measurements compared to density functional theory calculations. The CASSCF calculations indicate that the intermediate valence is the result of a multiconfigurational ground-state wave function that has both an open-shell singlet f13(?*)1, where pi* is the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of the bipyridine or dpiazabutadiene ligands, and a closed-shell singlet f14 component. A number of other competing theories for the unusual magnetism in these materials are ruled out by the lack of temperature dependence of the measured intermediate valence. These results have implications for understanding chemical bonding not only in organolanthanide complexes but also for f-element chemistry in general, as well as understanding magnetic interactions in nanoparticles and devices.

  4. Decamethylytterbocene complexes of bipyridines and diazabutadines: multiconfigurational ground states and open-shell singlet formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Eric D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Booth, C H [LBNL; Walter, M D [LBNL; Kazhdan, D [LBNL; Hu, Y - J [LBNL; Lukens, Wayne [LBNL; Maron, Laurent [INSA TOULOUSE; Eisentein, Odile [UNIV MONTPELLIER 2; Anderson, Richard [LBNL

    2009-01-01

    Partial ytterbium f-orbital occupancy (i.e. intermediate valence) and open-shell singlet Draft 12/formation are established for a variety of bipyridine and diazabutadiene adducts to decamethylytterbocene, (C{sub 5}Me{sub 5}){sub 2}Yb or Cp*{sub 2}Yb. Data used to support this claim includes ytterbium valence measurements using Yb Lm-edge x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, magnetic susceptibility and Complete Active Space Self-Consistent Field (CASSCF) multi configurational calculations, as well as structural measurements compared to density-functional theory (DFT) calculations. The CASSCF calculations indicate that the intermediate valence is the result of a multiconfigurational ground state wave function that has both an open-shell singlet f{sup 13} and a closed-shell singlet f{sup 14} component. A number of other competing theories for the unusual magnetism in these materials are ruled out by the presence of intermediate valence and its lack of any significant temperature dependence. These results have implications for understanding chemical bonding not only in organolanthanide complexes, but also for organometallic chemistry in general, as well as understanding magnetic interactions in nanopartic1es and devices.

  5. Multiple episodes of star formation in the CN15/16/17 molecular complex

    CERN Document Server

    Gennaro, M; Brandner, W; Stolte, A; Rochau, B; Beuther, H; Gouliermis, D; Tackenberg, J; Kudryavtseva, N; Hussmann, B; Schuller, F; Henning, Th

    2012-01-01

    We have started a campaign to identify massive star clusters inside bright molecular bubbles towards the Galactic Center. The CN15/16/17 molecular complex is the first example of our study. The region is characterized by the presence of two young clusters, DB10 and DB11, visible in the NIR, an ultra-compact HII region identified in the radio, several young stellar objects visible in the MIR, a bright diffuse nebulosity at 8\\mu m coming from PAHs and sub-mm continuum emission revealing the presence of cold dust. Given its position on the sky (l=0.58, b=-0.85) and its kinematic distance of ~7.5 kpc, the region was thought to be a very massive site of star formation in proximity of the CMZ. The cluster DB11 was estimated to be as massive as 10^4 M_sun. However the region's properties were known only through photometry and its kinematic distance was very uncertain given its location at the tangential point. We aimed at better characterizing the region and assess whether it could be a site of massive star formatio...

  6. Reaction of a copper(II)-nitrosyl complex with hydrogen peroxide: putative formation of a copper(I)-peroxynitrite intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Apurba; Kumar, Pankaj; Mondal, Biplab

    2012-05-14

    The reaction of a Cu(II)-nitrosyl complex (1) with hydrogen peroxide at -20 °C in acetonitrile results in the formation of the corresponding Cu(I)-peroxynitrite intermediate. The reduction of the Cu(II) center was monitored by UV-visible spectroscopic studies. Formation of the peroxynitrite intermediate has been confirmed by its characteristic phenol ring nitration reaction as well as isolation of corresponding Cu(I)-nitrate (2). On air oxidation, 2 resulted in the corresponding Cu(II)-nitrate (3). Thus, these results demonstrate a possible decomposition pathway for H(2)O(2) and NO through the formation of a peroxynitrite intermediate in biological systems.

  7. Complexes of hydroxamates. V: Equilibrium and kinetics of the formation of the binary and ternary complexes involved in the nickel(II)-histidinehydroxamic acid-pyridoxal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-Ezaby, M S; Shuaib, N M; Marafie, H M; Hassan, M M

    1988-07-01

    Equilibrium-based computer models utilizing SUPERQUAD program were made to determine the formation constants of the binary complexes of Ni(II) with histidine-hydroxamic acid (HX) from pH-metric titration data at 25 degrees C and I = 0.15 M NaCl. The species were monomeric in the pH range 3.0-8.0. The mechanism of their complex formation was determined using the stopped flow technique under the same experimental conditions of the equilibrium study. It has been concluded that Ni2+ and NiOH- were the active species in the complex formation reactions. Moreover, the reaction of HX with pyridoxal (PL) was studied in the absence of metal-ions by polarographic and spectrophotometric techniques at pH greater than or equal to 5.0. No rates were observed by using the stopped-flow methods. The formation constants for the binary system (HX-PL) and the ternary system (Ni(II)-HX-PL) were also determined by the same program applied on data obtained from pH metric titration at 25 degrees C and I = 0.15 M NaCl. Ternary complex formation involving PL and the species of the Ni(II)-HX system was also investigated kinetically in the pH range of 6.5-10.5. Several rate steps have been observed which have been interpreted qualitatively in terms of sequence of processes involving the condensation of aldehydic form of PL with amino moiety of HX. A comparison with other pertinent systems is also discussed.

  8. Thermodynamics of mixed-ligand complex formation of zinc nitrilotriacetate with amino acids and dipeptides in solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyreu, Dmitrii, E-mail: pyreu@mail.ru [Department of Inorganic and Analytic Chemistry, Ivanovo State UniversityErmak 39, Ivanovo 153025 (Russian Federation); Gruzdev, Matvey; Kumeev, Roman [G.A. Krestov Institute of Solution Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Ivanovo (Russian Federation); Gridchin, Sergei [Ivanovo State University of Chemistry and Technology, Ivanovo (Russian Federation)

    2014-10-20

    Highlights: • Stable mixed ligand complexes of ZnNta with amino acids and dipeptides. • Histamine-like coordination mode of His in the complex ZnNtaHis. • Glycine-like coordination of Lys and Orn in the complexes ZnNtaL and ZnNtaHL • NH{sub 2}, CO-coordination mode of GlyGly in the complex ZnNtaGG. • NH{sub 2}, N{sup −} or NH2, N{sup −}, COO-coordination modes of GlyGly in the complex ZnNtaGGH{sub −1}. - Abstract: The isothermal calorimetry, pH-potentiometric titration and {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR methods has been used to study the mixed-ligand complex formation in the systems Zn{sup 2+}–Nta{sup 3–}–L{sup −} (L = His, Orn, Lys, GlyGly, AlaAla) in aqueous solution at 298.15 K and the ionic strength of I = 0.5 (KNO{sub 3}). The thermodynamic parameters of formation of the mixed complexes have been determined. The relationship between the probable coordination modes of the complexone and amino acid or dipeptide molecules in the mixed-ligand complex and the thermodynamic parameters has been discussed.

  9. Formation mechanism of a silane-PVA/PVAc complex film on a glass fiber surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repovsky, Daniel; Jane, Eduard; Palszegi, Tibor; Slobodnik, Marek; Velic, Dusan

    2013-10-21

    Mechanical properties of glass fiber reinforced composite materials are affected by fiber sizing. A complex film formation, based on a silane film and PVA/PVAc (polyvinyl alcohol/polyvinyl acetate) microspheres on a glass fiber surface is determined at 1) the nanoscale by using atomic force microscopy (AFM), and 2) the macroscale by using the zeta potential. Silane groups strongly bind through the Si-O-Si bond to the glass surface, which provides the attachment mechanism as a coupling agent. The silane groups form islands, a homogeneous film, as well as empty sites. The average roughness of the silanized surface is 6.5 nm, whereas it is only 0.6 nm for the non-silanized surface. The silane film vertically penetrates in a honeycomb fashion from the glass surface through the deposited PVA/PVAc microspheres to form a hexagonal close pack structure. The silane film not only penetrates, but also deforms the PVA/PVAc microspheres from the spherical shape in a dispersion to a ellipsoidal shape on the surface with average dimensions of 300/600 nm. The surface area value Sa represents an area of PVA/PVAc microspheres that are not affected by the silane penetration. The areas are found to be 0.2, 0.08, and 0.03 μm(2) if the ellipsoid sizes are 320/570, 300/610, and 270/620 nm for silane concentrations of 0, 3.8, and 7.2 μg mL(-1), respectively. The silane film also moves PVA/PVAc microspheres in the process of complex film formation, from the low silane concentration areas to the complex film area providing enough silane groups to stabilize the structure. The values for the residual silane honeycomb structure heights (Ha ) are 6.5, 7, and 12 nm for silane concentrations of 3.8, 7.2, and 14.3 μg mL(-1), respectively. The pH-dependent zeta-potential results suggest a specific role of the silane groups with effects on the glass fiber surface and also on the PVA/PVAc microspheres. The non-silanized glass fiber surface and the silane film have similar zeta potentials ranging

  10. Actinide oxalate complexes formation as a function of temperature by capillary electrophoresis coupled with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunel, Benoit; Mendes, Mickael; Aupiais, Jean [CEA, DAM, DIF, Arpajon (France); Philippini, Violaine [Nice Univ. Sophia Antipolis (France). Inst. de Chimie de Nice

    2015-05-01

    Complexation of various actinides (U(VI), Np(V), Pu(V), Am(III)) by oxalato ligand was studied by capillary electrophoresis (ICPMS detection) in 0.1 mol L{sup -1} NaClO{sub 4} ionic strength solutions at various temperatures (15, 25, 35, 45 and 55 C). For each solution a unique peak was observed as a result of a fast equilibrium between the free ions and the complexes (labile systems). The results confirmed the formation of the 1:1, 1:2 and 1:3 complexes for U(VI) and Am(III); the formation of the 1:1 and 1:2 complexes for Np(V) and the formation of only 1 complex for Pu(V). For each complex, the thermodynamic parameters (the Gibbs energy Δ{sub r}G(T), the molar entropy change Δ{sub r}S(T) and the molar enthalpy change Δ{sub r}H(T{sup 0})) were fitted to the experimental data. The effect of the ionic medium was treated using the specific ion interaction theory and the thermodynamic parameters at zero ionic strength were compared to previously published data.

  11. Formats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gehmann, Ulrich

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In the following, a new conceptual framework for investigating nowadays’ “technical” phenomena shall be introduced, that of formats. The thesis is that processes of formatting account for our recent conditions of life, and will do so in the very next future. It are processes whose foundations have been laid in modernity and which will further unfold for the time being. These processes are embedded in the format of the value chain, a circumstance making them resilient to change. In addition, they are resilient in themselves since forming interconnected systems of reciprocal causal circuits.Which leads to an overall situation that our entire “Lebenswelt” became formatted to an extent we don’t fully realize, even influencing our very percep-tion of it.

  12. Transcription-Replication Conflict Orientation Modulates R-Loop Levels and Activates Distinct DNA Damage Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamperl, Stephan; Bocek, Michael J; Saldivar, Joshua C; Swigut, Tomek; Cimprich, Karlene A

    2017-08-10

    Conflicts between transcription and replication are a potent source of DNA damage. Co-transcriptional R-loops could aggravate such conflicts by creating an additional barrier to replication fork progression. Here, we use a defined episomal system to investigate how conflict orientation and R-loop formation influence genome stability in human cells. R-loops, but not normal transcription complexes, induce DNA breaks and orientation-specific DNA damage responses during conflicts with replication forks. Unexpectedly, the replisome acts as an orientation-dependent regulator of R-loop levels, reducing R-loops in the co-directional (CD) orientation but promoting their formation in the head-on (HO) orientation. Replication stress and deregulated origin firing increase the number of HO collisions leading to genome-destabilizing R-loops. Our findings connect DNA replication to R-loop homeostasis and suggest a mechanistic basis for genome instability resulting from deregulated DNA replication, observed in cancer and other disease states. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Structure Formation of Ultrathin PEO Films at Solid Interfaces—Complex Pattern Formation by Dewetting and Crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Hans-Georg; Meyer, Evelyn

    2013-02-05

    The direct contact of ultrathin polymer films with a solid substrate may result in thin film rupture caused by dewetting. With crystallisable polymers such as polyethyleneoxide (PEO), molecular self-assembly into partial ordered lamella structures is studied as an additional source of pattern formation. Morphological features in ultrathin PEO films (thickness PEO molecules, n-alkylterminated (hydrophobic) PEO oligomers are investigated with respect to self-organization in ultrathin films. Morphological features characteristic for pure PEO are not changed by the presence of the n-alkylgroups.

  14. Replication forks reverse at high frequency upon replication stress in Physarum polycephalum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maric, Chrystelle; Bénard, Marianne

    2014-12-01

    The addition of hydroxyurea after the onset of S phase allows replication to start and permits the successive detecting of replication-dependent joint DNA molecules and chicken foot structures in the synchronous nuclei of Physarum polycephalum. We find evidence for a very high frequency of reversed replication forks upon replication stress. The formation of these reversed forks is dependent on the presence of joint DNA molecules, the impediment of the replication fork progression by hydroxyurea, and likely on the propensity of some replication origins to reinitiate replication to counteract the action of this compound. As hydroxyurea treatment enables us to successively detect the appearance of joint DNA molecules and then of reversed replication forks, we propose that chicken foot structures are formed both from the regression of hydroxyurea-frozen joint DNA molecules and from hydroxyurea-stalled replication forks. These experiments underscore the transient nature of replication fork regression, which becomes detectable due to the hydroxyurea-induced slowing down of replication fork progression.

  15. Mouse Norovirus infection promotes autophagy induction to facilitate replication but prevents final autophagosome maturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O’Donnell, Tanya B. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, at the Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, University of Melbourne, Melbourne 3010 (Australia); Hyde, Jennifer L. [School of Chemical and Biological Sciences, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Mintern, Justine D. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bio21 Molecular Science and Biotechnology Institute, University of Melbourne, Melbourne 3010 (Australia); Mackenzie, Jason M., E-mail: jason.mackenzie@unimelb.edu.au [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, at the Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, University of Melbourne, Melbourne 3010 (Australia)

    2016-05-15

    Autophagy is a cellular process used to eliminate intracellular pathogens. Many viruses however are able to manipulate this cellular process for their own advantage. Here we demonstrate that Mouse Norovirus (MNV) infection induces autophagy but does not appear to utilise the autophagosomal membrane for establishment and formation of the viral replication complex. We have observed that MNV infection results in lipidation and recruitment of LC3 to the autophagosome membrane but prevents subsequent fusion of the autophagosomes with lysosomes, as SQSTM1 (an autophagy receptor) accumulates and Lysosome-Associated Membrane Protein1 is sequestered to the MNV replication complex (RC) rather than to autophagosomes. We have additionally observed that chemical modulation of autophagy differentially affects MNV replication. From this study we can conclude that MNV infection induces autophagy, however suppresses the final maturation step of this response, indicating that autophagy induction contributes to MNV replication independently of RC biogenesis. - Highlights: • MNV induces autophagy in infected murine macrophages. • MNV does not utilise autophagosomal membranes for replication. • The MNV-induced autophagosomes do not fuse with lysosomes. • MNV sequesters SQSTM1 to prevent autophagy degradation and turnover. • Chemical modulation of autophagy enhances MNV replication.

  16. ATR-Chk1-APC/C-dependent stabilization of Cdc7-ASK (Dbf4) kinase is required for DNA lesion bypass under replication stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamada, M.; Watanabe, K.; Mistrik, M.

    2013-01-01

    Cdc7 kinase regulates DNA replication. However, its role in DNA repair and recombination is poorly understood. Here we describe a pathway that stabilizes the human Cdc7-ASK (activator of S-phase kinase; also called Dbf4), its regulation, and its function in cellular responses to compromised DNA...... replication. Stalled DNA replication evoked stabilization of the Cdc7-ASK (Dbf4) complex in a manner dependent on ATR-Chk1-mediated checkpoint signaling and its interplay with the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosomeCdh1 (APC/C) ubiquitin ligase. Mechanistically, Chk1 kinase inactivates APC/C through......) with RAD18 disables foci formation by RAD18 and hinders chromatin loading of translesion DNA polymerase h. These findings define a novel mechanism that orchestrates replication checkpoint signaling and ubiquitin-proteasome machinery with the DNA damage bypass pathway to guard against replication collapse...

  17. Timeless links replication termination to mitotic kinase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dheekollu, Jayaraju; Wiedmer, Andreas; Hayden, James; Speicher, David; Gotter, Anthony L; Yen, Tim; Lieberman, Paul M

    2011-05-06

    The mechanisms that coordinate the termination of DNA replication with progression through mitosis are not completely understood. The human Timeless protein (Tim) associates with S phase replication checkpoint proteins Claspin and Tipin, and plays an important role in maintaining replication fork stability at physical barriers, like centromeres, telomeres and ribosomal DNA repeats, as well as at termination sites. We show here that human Tim can be isolated in a complex with mitotic entry kinases CDK1, Auroras A and B, and Polo-like kinase (Plk1). Plk1 bound Tim directly and colocalized with Tim at a subset of mitotic structures in M phase. Tim depletion caused multiple mitotic defects, including the loss of sister-chromatid cohesion, loss of mitotic spindle architecture, and a failure to exit mitosis. Tim depletion caused a delay in mitotic kinase activity in vivo and in vitro, as well as a reduction in global histone H3 S10 phosphorylation during G2/M phase. Tim was also required for the recruitment of Plk1 to centromeric DNA and formation of catenated DNA structures at human centromere alpha satellite repeats. Taken together, these findings suggest that Tim coordinates mitotic kinase activation with termination of DNA replication.

  18. Timeless links replication termination to mitotic kinase activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayaraju Dheekollu

    Full Text Available The mechanisms that coordinate the termination of DNA replication with progression through mitosis are not completely understood. The human Timeless protein (Tim associates with S phase replication checkpoint proteins Claspin and Tipin, and plays an important role in maintaining replication fork stability at physical barriers, like centromeres, telomeres and ribosomal DNA repeats, as well as at termination sites. We show here that human Tim can be isolated in a complex with mitotic entry kinases CDK1, Auroras A and B, and Polo-like kinase (Plk1. Plk1 bound Tim directly and colocalized with Tim at a subset of mitotic structures in M phase. Tim depletion caused multiple mitotic defects, including the loss of sister-chromatid cohesion, loss of mitotic spindle architecture, and a failure to exit mitosis. Tim depletion caused a delay in mitotic kinase activity in vivo and in vitro, as well as a reduction in global histone H3 S10 phosphorylation during G2/M phase. Tim was also required for the recruitment of Plk1 to centromeric DNA and formation of catenated DNA structures at human centromere alpha satellite repeats. Taken together, these findings suggest that Tim coordinates mitotic kinase activation with termination of DNA replication.

  19. [Electric conductivity changes in salt-free solutions in connection with the formation of polyriboadenylic and polyribouridylic acid complexes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippov, S M; Vorontsova, O V; Kuznetsov, I A

    1984-01-01

    Conductometric and spectrophotometric investigations of concentrated salt-free solutions of poly(A) -- poly(U) demonstrated the 1:1 complex formation. It was accomplished by the increase of solution conductivity in contrast to the situation when DNA redenaturation takes place.

  20. Complex formation of 2-(o-hydroxyphenyl)-benzoxazole and 2-(o-hydroxyphenyl)-benzothiazole with beryllium ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gladilovich, D.B.; Stolyarov, K.P. (Leningradskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR))

    1984-12-01

    Using spectrophotometric and luminescence methods the interaction of beryllium ions With 2-(0-hydroxyphenyl)-benzoxazole and 2-(0-hydroxyphenyl)-benzothiazole has been studied. The formation of at least three BeL/sup +/, Be(OH)L and BeL/sub 2/ complexes (where L=singly charged anion of ligand) is established.

  1. A developmental framework for complex plasmodesmata formation revealed by large-scale imaging of the Arabidopsis leaf epidermis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgibbon, Jessica; Beck, Martina; Zhou, Ji; Faulkner, Christine; Robatzek, Silke; Oparka, Karl

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodesmata (PD) form tubular connections that function as intercellular communication channels. They are essential for transporting nutrients and for coordinating development. During cytokinesis, simple PDs are inserted into the developing cell plate, while during wall extension, more complex (branched) forms of PD are laid down. We show that complex PDs are derived from existing simple PDs in a pattern that is accelerated when leaves undergo the sink-source transition. Complex PDs are inserted initially at the three-way junctions between epidermal cells but develop most rapidly in the anisocytic complexes around stomata. For a quantitative analysis of complex PD formation, we established a high-throughput imaging platform and constructed PDQUANT, a custom algorithm that detected cell boundaries and PD numbers in different wall faces. For anticlinal walls, the number of complex PDs increased with increasing cell size, while for periclinal walls, the number of PDs decreased. Complex PD insertion was accelerated by up to threefold in response to salicylic acid treatment and challenges with mannitol. In a single 30-min run, we could derive data for up to 11k PDs from 3k epidermal cells. This facile approach opens the door to a large-scale analysis of the endogenous and exogenous factors that influence PD formation.

  2. Explicit solution format for complex-valued natural frequency of beam with R-shunted piezoelectric laminate transducer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgsberg, Jan Becker; Cöent, Adrien Le

    2014-01-01

    Analysis and design of resistive shunt circuits for piezoelectric damping of beam structures is often based on a representation in terms of the single target vibration mode of the beam, neglecting spill-over effects from the out-of-bandwidth or residual vibration modes. In this article, a solution...... format is derived for the complex-valued natural frequency of the beam with a shunted piezoelectric laminate transducer, where the influence from the residual modes is taken into account by a quasi-static representation. This explicit solution format contains system parameters that directly represent....... The accuracy of the explicit frequency solution format is verified by comparison with numerical results. It is found that the complex-valued natural frequency of the first vibration mode of a beam with a piezoelectric laminate transducer shunted to a resistance is estimated with sufficient accuracy...

  3. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of charge transfer complex formation between Silver Nitrate and Benzylcyanide in Solvent Ethylene Glycol

    CERN Document Server

    Modarress, H

    2003-01-01

    The formation constant for charge transfer complexes between electron acceptor (AgNo sub 3) and electron donor benzylcyanide (C sub 6 H sub 5 -CH sub 2 -C ident to N) in solvent ethyleneglycol [(CH sub 2 OH) sub 2] has been evaluated by using the nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shifts of aromatic group of benzylcyanide measured against external references, tetramethylsilane, hexamethyldisilane and cyclohexane at 20 sup d ig sup C. The external referencing procedure eliminated the interference of internal reference in the course of complexation. The necessary bulk magnetic susceptibility corrections on the measured chemical shifts have been made. The solution nationalised and their effects on the formation constant have been considered and a new equation has been suggested to obtain the main ionic activity coefficient of AgNO sub 3 from nuclear magnetic resonance results. The mean ionic activity coefficient has been taken into account in the formation constant calculations. The results indicated that the a...

  4. Nudel is crucial for the WAVE complex assembly in vivo by selectively promoting subcomplex stability and formation through direct interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuang Wu; Li Ma; Yibo Wu; Rong Zeng; Xueliang Zhu

    2012-01-01

    The WAVE regulatory complex (WRC),consisting of WAVE,Sra,Nap,Abi,and HSPC300,activates the Arp2/3 complex to control branched actin polymerization in response to Rac activation.How the WRC is assembled in vivo is not clear.Here we show that Nudel,a protein critical for lamellipodia formation,dramatically stabilized the Sra1-Nap1-Abi1 complex against degradation in cells through a dynamic binding to Sra1,whereas its physical interaction with HSPC300 protected free HSPC300 from the proteasome-mediated degradation and stimulated the HSPC300-WAVE2 complex formation.By contrast,Nudel showed little or no interactions with the Sra1-Nap1-Abi1-WAVE2 and the Sra1-Nap1-Abi1-HSPC300 complexes as well as the mature WRC.Depletion of Nudel by RNAi led to general subunit degradation and markedly attenuated the levels of mature WRC.It also abolished the WRC-dependent actin polymerization in vitro and the Rac1-induced lamellipodial actin network formation during cell spreading.Therefore,Nudel is important for the early steps of the WRC assembly in vivo by antagonizing the instability of certain WRC subunits and subcomplexes.

  5. Mixed ligand complex formation of FeIII with boric acid and typical N-donor multidentate ligands

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G N Mukherjee; Ansuman Das

    2002-06-01

    Equilibrium study of the mixed ligand complex formation of FeIII with boric acid in the absence and in the presence of 2,2'-bipyridine, 1,10-phenanthroline, diethylenetriamine and triethylenetetramine (L) in different molar ratios provides evidence of formation of Fe(OH)2+, Fe(OH)$^{+}_{2}$, Fe(L)3+, Fe(H2BO4), Fe(OH)(H2BO4)-, Fe(OH)2(H2BO4)2-, Fe(L)(H2BO4) and Fe2(L)2(BO4)+ complexes. Fe(L)$^{3+}_{2}$, Fe(L)2(H2BO4) and Fe2(L)4(BO4)+ complexes are also indicated with 2,2'-bipyridine and 1,10-phenanthroline. Complex formation equilibria and stability constants of the complexes at 25 ± 0 × 1° C in aqueous solution at a fixed ionic strength, = 0.1 mol -3 (NaNO3) have been determined by potentiometric method.

  6. Protection of metal artefacts with the formation of metal-oxalates complexes by Beauveria bassiana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith eJoseph

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Several fungi present high tolerance to toxic metals and some are able to transform metals into metal-oxalate complexes. In this study, the ability of Beauveria bassiana to produce copper oxalates was evaluated in vitro. Growth performance was tested on various copper-containing media. B. bassiana proved highly resistant to copper, tolerating concentrations of up to 20 g.L-1, and precipitating copper oxalates on all media tested. Chromatographic analyses showed that this species produced oxalic acid as sole metal chelator. The production of metal-oxalates can be used in the restoration and conservation of archaeological and modern metal artefacts. The production of copper-oxalates was confirmed directly using metallic pieces (both archaeological and modern. The conversion of corrosion products into copper oxalates was demonstrated as well. In order to assess whether the capability of B. bassiana to produce metal-oxalates could be applied to other metals, iron and silver were tested as well. Iron appears to be directly sequestered in the wall of the fungal hyphae forming oxalates and probably goethite. However, the formation of a homogeneous layer on the object is not yet optimal. Silver nitrate was extracellularly reduced into nanoparticles of elemental silver by an unknown mechanism. The production of copper oxalates is immediately applicable for the conservation of copper-based artefacts. For iron and silver this is not yet the case. However, the vast ability of B. bassiana to transform toxic metals using different immobilization mechanisms seems to offer considerable possibilities for industrial applications, such as the bioremediation of contaminated soils or the green synthesis of chemicals.

  7. Linking megathrust earthquakes to faulting and mineral vein formation in a fossil accretionary complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dielforder, Armin; Herwegh, Marco; Berger, Alfons

    2015-04-01

    Geodetic and seismological data recorded at active subduction zones suggest that megathrust earthquakes induce transient stress changes in the upper plate, which shift the wedge into an unstable state and trigger >Mw 6 aftershocks. These stress changes have, however, never been linked to geological structures that are preserved within fossil accretionary wedges, although plate interface of palaeo-subduction zones has been studied. The conditions under which accretionary wedges fail have therefore remained controversial. Here we show that faulting and associated vein formation in the palaeo-accretionary complex of the European Alps record stress changes generated by the subduction earthquake cycle. Our data integrate wedge deformation over millions of years but still demonstrate the dominance of specific fracture modes at different depths within the wedge. We trace the subduction of sediments by means of the 87Sr/86Sr isotope-systematics of mineral veins, which became more radiogenic at deeper levels. By combining our field observations and geochemical data with a dynamic Mohr-Coulomb wedge analysis, we show that early veins were formed in shallow levels by bedding-parallel shear during coseismic compression of the outer wedge. In contrast, later veins originated at deeper levels during normal faulting and extensional fracturing recording coseismic extension of the inner wedge. Our study shows how mineral veins can be used to reveal the dynamics of outer and inner wedges, which response in opposite ways to megathrust earthquakes by compressional and extensional faulting, respectively. We emphasise, that coseismic fracturing implicates an increase in permeability within the hanging wall of megathrusts. Understanding how fractures are generated throughout the subduction earthquake cycle is therefore essential to better contstrain the nature of postseismic fluid flow and to assess the seismic hazard of hydraulically driven aftershocks.

  8. Effect of pH and chemical mechanical planarization process conditions on the copper-benzotriazole complex formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Byoung-Jun; Kim, Jin-Yong; Hamada, Satomi; Shima, Shohei; Park, Jin-Goo

    2016-06-01

    Benzotriazole (BTA) has been used to protect copper (Cu) from corrosion during Cu chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) processes. However, an undesirable Cu-BTA complex is deposited after Cu CMP processes and it should be completely removed at post-Cu CMP cleaning for next fabrication process. Therefore, it is very important to understand of Cu-BTA complex formation behavior for its applications such as Cu CMP and post-Cu CMP cleaning. The present study investigated the effect of pH and polisher conditions on the formation of Cu-BTA complex layers using electrochemical techniques (potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy) and the surface contact angle. The wettability was not a significant factor for the polishing interface, as no difference in the contact angles was observed for these processes. Both electrochemical techniques revealed that BTA had a unique advantage of long-term protection for Cu corrosion in an acidic condition (pH 3).

  9. Replication NAND gate with light as input and output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samiappan, Manickasundaram; Dadon, Zehavit; Ashkenasy, Gonen

    2011-01-14

    Logic operations can highlight information transfer within complex molecular networks. We describe here the design of a peptide-based replication system that can be detected by following its fluorescence quenching. This process is used to negate the signal of light-activated replication, and thus to prepare the first replication NAND gate.

  10. Fundamental and overtone vibrational spectroscopy, enthalpy of hydrogen bond formation and equilibrium constant determination of the methanol-dimethylamine complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lin; Mackeprang, Kasper; Kjaergaard, Henrik G

    2013-07-07

    We have measured gas phase vibrational spectra of the bimolecular complex formed between methanol (MeOH) and dimethylamine (DMA) up to about 9800 cm(-1). In addition to the strong fundamental OH-stretching transition we have also detected the weak second overtone NH-stretching transition. The spectra of the complex are obtained by spectral subtraction of the monomer spectra from spectra recorded for the mixture. For comparison, we also measured the fundamental OH-stretching transition in the bimolecular complex between MeOH and trimethylamine (TMA). The enthalpies of hydrogen bond formation (ΔH) for the MeOH-DMA and MeOH-TMA complexes have been determined by measurements of the fundamental OH-stretching transition in the temperature range from 298 to 358 K. The enthalpy of formation is found to be -35.8 ± 3.9 and -38.2 ± 3.3 kJ mol(-1) for MeOH-DMA and MeOH-TMA, respectively, in the 298 to 358 K region. The equilibrium constant (Kp) for the formation of the MeOH-DMA complex has been determined from the measured and calculated transition intensities of the OH-stretching fundamental transition and the NH-stretching second overtone transition. The transition intensities were calculated using an anharmonic oscillator local mode model with dipole moment and potential energy curves calculated using explicitly correlated coupled cluster methods. The equilibrium constant for formation of the MeOH-DMA complex was determined to be 0.2 ± 0.1 atm(-1), corresponding to a ΔG value of about 4.0 kJ mol(-1).

  11. Rearrangement of a P4 Butterfly Complex-The Formation of a Homoleptic Phosphorus-Iron Sandwich Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Julian; Heinl, Sebastian; Schwarzmaier, Christoph; Balázs, Gábor; Keilwerth, Martin; Meyer, Karsten; Scheer, Manfred

    2017-06-12

    The versatile coordination behavior of the P4 butterfly complex [{Cp'''Fe(CO)2 }2 (μ,η(1:1) -P4 )] (1, Cp'''=η(5) -C5 H2(t) Bu3 ) towards different iron(II) compounds is presented. The reaction of 1 with [FeBr2 ⋅dme] (dme=dimethoxyethane) leads to the chelate complex [{Cp'''Fe(CO)2 }2 (μ3 ,η(1:1:2) -P4 ){FeBr2 }] (2), whereas, in the reaction with [Fe(CH3 CN)6 ][PF6 ]2 , an unprecedented rearrangement of the P4 butterfly structural motif leads to the cyclo-P4 moiety in {(Cp'''Fe(CO)2 )2 (μ3 ,η(1:1:4) -P4 )}2 Fe][PF6 ]2 (3). Complex 3 represents the first fully characterized "carbon-free" sandwich complex containing cyclo-P4 R2 ligands in a homoleptic-like iron-phosphorus-containing molecule. Alternatively, 2 can be transformed into 3 by halogen abstraction and subsequent coordination of 1. The additional isolated side products, [{Cp'''Fe(CO)2 }2 (μ3 ,η(1:1:2) -P4 ){Cp'''Fe(CO)}][PF6 ] (4) and [{Cp'''Fe(CO)2 }2 (μ3 ,η(1:1:4) -P4 ){Cp'''Fe}][PF6 ] (5), give insight into the stepwise activation of the P4 butterfly moiety in 1. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. DNA replication and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyer, Anne-Sophie; Walter, David; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2016-01-01

    A dividing cell has to duplicate its DNA precisely once during the cell cycle to preserve genome integrity avoiding the accumulation of genetic aberrations that promote diseases such as cancer. A large number of endogenous impacts can challenge DNA replication and cells harbor a battery of pathways...... causing DNA replication stress and genome instability. Further, we describe cellular and systemic responses to these insults with a focus on DNA replication restart pathways. Finally, we discuss the therapeutic potential of exploiting intrinsic replicative stress in cancer cells for targeted therapy....

  13. Mechanism of chromosomal DNA replication initiation and replication fork stabilization in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, LiHong; Liu, Yang; Kong, DaoChun

    2014-05-01

    Chromosomal DNA replication is one of the central biological events occurring inside cells. Due to its large size, the replication of genomic DNA in eukaryotes initiates at hundreds to tens of thousands of sites called DNA origins so that the replication could be completed in a limited time. Further, eukaryotic DNA replication is sophisticatedly regulated, and this regulation guarantees that each origin fires once per S phase and each segment of DNA gets duplication also once per cell cycle. The first step of replication initiation is the assembly of pre-replication complex (pre-RC). Since 1973, four proteins, Cdc6/Cdc18, MCM, ORC and Cdt1, have been extensively studied and proved to be pre-RC components. Recently, a novel pre-RC component called Sap1/Girdin was identified. Sap1/Girdin is required for loading Cdc18/Cdc6 to origins for pre-RC assembly in the fission yeast and human cells, respectively. At the transition of G1 to S phase, pre-RC is activated by the two kinases, cyclindependent kinase (CDK) and Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK), and subsequently, RPA, primase-polα, PCNA, topoisomerase, Cdc45, polδ, and polɛ are recruited to DNA origins for creating two bi-directional replication forks and initiating DNA replication. As replication forks move along chromatin DNA, they frequently stall due to the presence of a great number of replication barriers on chromatin DNA, such as secondary DNA structures, protein/DNA complexes, DNA lesions, gene transcription. Stalled forks must require checkpoint regulation for their stabilization. Otherwise, stalled forks will collapse, which results in incomplete DNA replication and genomic instability. This short review gives a concise introduction regarding the current understanding of replication initiation and replication fork stabilization.

  14. Mechanism of Formation of Copper(II) Chloro Complexes Revealed by Transient Absorption Spectroscopy and DFT/TDDFT Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mereshchenko, Andrey S; Olshin, Pavel K; Karabaeva, Kanykey E; Panov, Maxim S; Wilson, R Marshall; Kochemirovsky, Vladimir A; Skripkin, Mikhail Yu; Tveryanovich, Yury S; Tarnovsky, Alexander N

    2015-07-16

    Copper(II) complexes are extremely labile with typical ligand exchange rate constants on the order of 10(6)-10(9) M(-1) s(-1). As a result, it is often difficult to identify the actual formation mechanism of these complexes. In this work, using UV-vis transient absorption when probing in a broad time range (20 ps to 8 μs) in conjunction with DFT/TDDFT calculations, we studied the dynamics and underlying reaction mechanisms of the formation of extremely labile copper(II) CuCl4(2-) chloro complexes from copper(II) CuCl3(-) trichloro complexes and chloride ions. These two species, produced via photochemical dissociation of CuCl4(2-) upon 420 nm excitation into the ligand-to-metal-charge-transfer electronic state, are found to recombine into parent complexes with bimolecular rate constants of (9.0 ± 0.1) × 10(7) and (5.3 ± 0.4) × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1) in acetonitrile and dichloromethane, respectively. In dichloromethane, recombination occurs via a simple one-step addition. In acetonitrile, where [CuCl3](-) reacts with the solvent to form a [CuCl3CH3CN](-) complex in less than 20 ps, recombination takes place via ligand exchange described by the associative interchange mechanism that involves a [CuCl4CH3CN](2-) intermediate. In both solvents, the recombination reaction is potential energy controlled.

  15. In vivo analysis of formation and endocytosis of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling complex in zebrafish embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemann, Anja I H; Kurz, Jennifer; Kauffeld, Silke; Chen, Qing; Reeves, Patrick M; Weber, Sabrina; Schindler, Simone; Davidson, Gary; Kirchhausen, Tomas; Scholpp, Steffen

    2014-09-15

    After activation by Wnt/β-Catenin ligands, a multi-protein complex assembles at the plasma membrane as membrane-bound receptors and intracellular signal transducers are clustered into the so-called Lrp6-signalosome [Corrected]. However, the mechanism of signalosome formation and dissolution is yet not clear. Our imaging studies of live zebrafish embryos show that the signalosome is a highly dynamic structure. It is continuously assembled by Dvl2-mediated recruitment of the transducer complex to the activated receptors and partially disassembled by endocytosis. We find that, after internalization, the ligand-receptor complex and the transducer complex take separate routes. The Wnt-Fz-Lrp6 complex follows a Rab-positive endocytic path. However, when still bound to the transducer complex, Dvl2 forms intracellular aggregates. We show that this endocytic process is not only essential for ligand-receptor internalization but also for signaling. The μ2-subunit of the endocytic Clathrin adaptor Ap2 interacts with Dvl2 to maintain its stability during endocytosis. Blockage of Ap2μ2 function leads to Dvl2 degradation, inhibiton of signalosome formation at the plasma membrane and, consequently, reduction of signaling. We conclude that Ap2μ2-mediated endocytosis is important to maintain Wnt/β-catenin signaling in vertebrates.

  16. Complex formation between the uncoupler carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP) and valinomycin in the presence of potassium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, T A; Nieva-Gomez, D; Gennis, R B

    1978-03-25

    Spectroscopic evidence is presented which indicates that the uncoupler carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP) and the peptide antibiotic valinomycin form a complex in the presence of potassium. Complex formation has been observed both in aqueous and nonaqueous media. Several techniques have been used to indicate the existence of a complex in aqueous solution. In the presence of valinomycin and K+, the absorption spectrum of FCCP is significantly perturbed, and there is also a large induced circular dichroism signal. In addition, the previously characterized complex which forms between valinomycin, K+, and the fluorescent probe 8-anilino-1-naphthalene-sulfonate (ANS) in aqueous solution is apparently disrupted by the addition of FCCP. The result is an effective quenching of the fluorescence due to the bound probe as it is displaced from the valinomycin.K+ by the uncoupler. In a nonpolar solvent, the absorption spectrum of FCCP is also perturbed by valinomycin in the presence of K+, again indicating the formation of a complex. These data point to the importance of considering the role of valinomycin.K+.uncoupler complex in interpreting physiological or ion transport data in which these substances have been used together.

  17. Formation of oil complex collectors in the Pripyatskiy trough. Formirovaniye kollektorov neftenosnykh kompleksov Pripyatskogo progiba

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demidovich, L.A.

    1979-01-01

    Based on a comprehensive study of sedimentary formations, the formation of capacitance and filtering properties of rocks is examined. In order to clarify the conditions of formation and dispersal of rock-collectors of oil and gas, tectonic-lithological geochemical method is used. Results are used from multiple-factor analysis. A general classification of the collectors is given. It was compiled with regard for rock lithogenesis. Possibilities are examined for predicting collectors using the data of geochemical studies.

  18. DNA replication origin activation in space and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragkos, Michalis; Ganier, Olivier; Coulombe, Philippe; Méchali, Marcel

    2015-06-01

    DNA replication begins with the assembly of pre-replication complexes (pre-RCs) at thousands of DNA replication origins during the G1 phase of the cell cycle. At the G1-S-phase transition, pre-RCs are converted into pre-initiation complexes, in which the replicative helicase is activated, leading to DNA unwinding and initiation of DNA synthesis. However, only a subset of origins are activated during any S phase. Recent insights into the mechanisms underlying this choice reveal how flexibility in origin usage and temporal activation are linked to chromosome structure and organization, cell growth and differentiation, and replication stress.

  19. A Photoluminescence Study of the Changes Induced in the Zinc White Pigment by Formation of Zinc Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artesani, Alessia; Gherardi, Francesca; Nevin, Austin; Valentini, Gianluca; Comelli, Daniela

    2017-03-25

    It is known that oil paintings containing zinc white are subject to rapid degradation. This is caused by the interaction between the active groups of binder and the metal ions of the pigment, which gives rise to the formation of new zinc complexes (metal soaps). Ongoing studies on zinc white paints have been limited to the chemical mechanisms that lead to the formation of zinc complexes. On the contrary, little is known of the photo-physical changes induced in the zinc oxide crystal structure following this interaction. Time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy has been applied to follow modifications in the luminescent zinc white pigment when mixed with binder. Significant changes in trap state photoluminescence emissions have been detected: the enhancement of a blue emission combined with a change of the decay kinetic of the well-known green emission. Complementary data from molecular analysis of paints using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirms the formation of zinc carboxylates and corroborates the mechanism for zinc complexes formation. We support the hypothesis that zinc ions migrate into binder creating novel vacancies, affecting the photoluminescence intensity and lifetime properties of zinc oxide. Here, we further demonstrate the advantages of a time-resolved photoluminescence approach for studying defects in semiconductor pigments.

  20. Complex formation between primycin and ergosterol: entropy-driven initiation of modification of the fungal plasma membrane structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virág, Eszter; Pesti, Miklós; Kunsági-Máté, Sándor

    2012-04-01

    The interaction of the antibiotic primycin with the main fungal sterol, ergosterol, was investigated in vitro in order to monitor the effect of primycin on the fungal plasma membrane at the molecular level. The thermodynamic parameters of complex formation were determined by measuring Rayleigh scattering as a signal sensitive to particle size. The Benesi-Hildebrand method validated the 1 : 1 stoichiometry of the primycin-ergosterol complexes. A very low enthalpy change (ΔH=-1.14 kJ mol(-1)) was measured during the complex formation, which itself cannot be responsible for the molecular association. However, the entropy production (ΔS=29.78 J mol K(-1)) observed during the complex formation can describe the molecular interaction. This effect is probably due to the partial destruction of the solvation shell of the interacting species before the interlinking of the molecules. The results highlight the importance of ergosterol as concerns the mode of effect of primycin in the treatment of fungal infections. As the entropy has a determinant role in the ergosterol-primycin interaction, this interaction exhibits a very high temperature dependence, with the important consequence that the effect exerted by primycin on the cell membranes increases with rising temperature, and the effect is therefore pronounced in fevered bodies.

  1. THE FORMATION OF DESIGN AND ORGANIZATIONAL AND TECHNOLOGICAL DECISIONS OF THE CONSTRUCTION OF HIGH-RISE MULTIPURPOSE COMPLEXES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BOLSHAKOV V. I.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The formation of the many ways the construction of high-rise multipurpose complexes. Methodology. The formation of system implementation variants of creation and functioning of high-rise multipurpose complexes using combinatorial morphological analysis and synthesis. Findings. Many life cycle options of high-rise multipurpose complexes. Originality. The developed method of formation of organizational and technological solutions adapted to the conditions of the construction of high-rise multipurpose complexes, which provides the opportunity for multi-variant conditions, taking into account regulatory requirements for fire safety, insolation of buildings and premises, protection against noise and vibration, energy efficiency, infrastructure and population density of a residential district with a full range of institutions and enterprises of local significance, within existing resource constraints, to ensure the commissioning of objects with specified technical and economic characteristics. Practical value. The proposed model and the methodology allow to determine a rational variant of high-rise building according to specified criteria and constraints.

  2. Complex Explosive Phonolitic Volcanism From Tenerife, Canary Islands: the Diego Hernandez Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olin, P. H.; Edgar, C. J.; Wolff, J. A.; Nichols, H. J.; Cas, R.; Marti, J.

    2001-12-01

    The Diego Hernandez Formation (DHF) consists of several phonolitic pyroclastic packages erupted between 0.53 and 0.196 Ma. Here we focus on the most intense period of DHF explosive phonolitic activity, from 0.32 - 0.28 Ma, during which three major plinian sequences with intraplinian ignimbrites, respectively the Aldea (0.320 +/- 0.008 Ma), Fasnia (0.309 +/- 0.012 Ma) and Poris Members (0.276 +/- 0.016 Ma) were emplaced. A minor disconformity, representing a pause of perhaps a few weeks' duration, separates lower and upper parts of the Fasnia Member. Volumes are difficult to estimate due to substantial offshore deposition, but each of the three has a minimum volume of a few cubic kilometers DRE. The dominant phonolite component in all three units shows broad chemical variations that suggest a similar magmatic lineage. However, details of trace element covariations do not support evolution of phonolite from a common parent, while the order of extraction of different compositions within a single eruption is complex. The Aldea and the lower Fasnia contain highly evolved phonolitic pumice (Zr up to 2,000 ppm), variably mixed with mafic and intermediate magmatic components. Plinian fall units in the upper Fasnia have little admixed mafic material yet are significantly less evolved than preceeding units (Zr = 850 - 1500 ppm), and show overall normal compositional zoning. However, highly evolved phonolite reappears towards the end of the Fasnia eruption sequence, and is more abundant in interbedded ignimbrites than in plinian fall units. The Poris Member contains phonolite similar to the least evolved compositions in the upper Fasnia, with a minor population of a much less differentiated phonolite (Zr = 600 - 650 ppm) that has little affinity with the the rest of the sequence, but resembles magmas erupted during a later DHF cycle. Both Poris phonolite types mingled with basaltic liquid. The repeated eruption of multiple felsic magmas with distinct trace element signatures

  3. Designing ancillary ligands for heteroleptic/homoleptic zinc complex formation: synthesis, structures and application in ROP of lactides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jędrzkiewicz, D; Ejfler, J; Gulia, N; John, Ł; Szafert, S

    2015-08-14

    Synthesis and characterization of a series of new amino-phenol/naphthol ligands (L(1,2)-H) have been developed and their respective zinc complexes ( 1 and 2-Zn ) have been synthesized. The molecular structures of L(1)-H and 1, 2-Zn were explored in detail by NMR, single-crystal X-ray studies and DFT calculations, which confirmed the existence of complexes as stabile dimers both in a solution and in the solid state. All complexes mediate the ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of lactide highly efficiently, at room temperature, in a controlled fashion. The influence of the architecture of the ligand on the desired homo/heteroleptic complex formation, as well as the relationship between the initiator design and the catalytic activity have been investigated.

  4. Replicating animal mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A. McKinney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA replication has been experiencing incredible progress in recent years, and yet little is certain about the mechanism(s used by animal cells to replicate this plasmid-like genome. The long-standing strand-displacement model of mammalian mtDNA replication (for which single-stranded DNA intermediates are a hallmark has been intensively challenged by a new set of data, which suggests that replication proceeds via coupled leading-and lagging-strand synthesis (resembling bacterial genome replication and/or via long stretches of RNA intermediates laid on the mtDNA lagging-strand (the so called RITOLS. The set of proteins required for mtDNA replication is small and includes the catalytic and accessory subunits of DNA polymerase y, the mtDNA helicase Twinkle, the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein, and the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (which most likely functions as the mtDNA primase. Mutations in the genes coding for the first three proteins are associated with human diseases and premature aging, justifying the research interest in the genetic, biochemical and structural properties of the mtDNA replication machinery. Here we summarize these properties and discuss the current models of mtDNA replication in animal cells.

  5. Epigenetically-inherited centromere and neocentromere DNA replicates earliest in S-phase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amnon Koren

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic centromeres are maintained at specific chromosomal sites over many generations. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, centromeres are genetic elements defined by a DNA sequence that is both necessary and sufficient for function; whereas, in most other eukaryotes, centromeres are maintained by poorly characterized epigenetic mechanisms in which DNA has a less definitive role. Here we use the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans as a model organism to study the DNA replication properties of centromeric DNA. By determining the genome-wide replication timing program of the C. albicans genome, we discovered that each centromere is associated with a replication origin that is the first to fire on its respective chromosome. Importantly, epigenetic formation of new ectopic centromeres (neocentromeres was accompanied by shifts in replication timing, such that a neocentromere became the first to replicate and became associated with origin recognition complex (ORC components. Furthermore, changing the level of the centromere-specific histone H3 isoform led to a concomitant change in levels of ORC association with centromere regions, further supporting the idea that centromere proteins determine origin activity. Finally, analysis of centromere-associated DNA revealed a replication-dependent sequence pattern characteristic of constitutively active replication origins. This strand-biased pattern is conserved, together with centromere position, among related strains and species, in a manner independent of primary DNA sequence. Thus, inheritance of centromere position is correlated with a constitutively active origin of replication that fires at a distinct early time. We suggest a model in which the distinct timing of DNA replication serves as an epigenetic mechanism for the inheritance of centromere position.

  6. TPR domain of NrfG mediates complex formation between heme lyase and formate-dependent nitrite reductase in Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dohyun; Kim, Kyunggon; Oh, Jongkil; Park, Jungeun; Kim, Youngsoo

    2008-02-15

    Escherichia coli synthesize C-type cytochromes only during anaerobic growth in media supplemented with nitrate and nitrite. The reduction of nitrate to ammonium in the periplasm of Escherichia coli involves two separate periplasmic enzymes, nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase. The nitrite reductase involved, NrfA, contains cytochrome C and is synthesized coordinately with a membrane-associated cytochrome C, NrfB, during growth in the presence of nitrite or in limiting nitrate concentrations. The genes NrfE, NrfF, and NrfG are required for the formate-dependent nitrite reduction pathway, which involves at least two C-type cytochrome proteins, NrfA and NrfB. The NrfE, NrfF, and NrfG genes (heme lyase complex) are involved in the maturation of a special C-type cytochrome, apocytochrome C (apoNrfA), to cytochrome C (NrfA) by transferring a heme to the unusual heme binding motif of the Cys-Trp-Ser-Cys-Lys sequence in apoNrfA protein. Thus, in order to further investigate the roles of NrfG in the formation of heme lyase complex (NrfEFG) and in the interaction between heme lyase complex and formate-dependent nitrite reductase (NrfA), we determined the crystal structure of NrfG at 2.05 A. The structure of NrfG showed that the contact between heme lyase complex (NrfEFG) and NrfA is accomplished via a TPR domain in NrfG which serves as a binding site for the C-terminal motif of NrfA. The portion of NrfA that binds to TPR domain of NrfG has a unique secondary motif, a helix followed by about a six-residue C-terminal loop (the so called "hook conformation"). This study allows us to better understand the mechanism of special C-type cytochrome assembly during the maturation of formate-dependent nitrite reductase, and also adds a new TPR binding conformation to the list of TPR-mediated protein-protein interactions.

  7. Unusual dimer formation of cyclometalated ruthenium NHC p-cymene complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleicher, David; Tronnier, Alexander; Leopold, Hendrik; Borrmann, Horst; Strassner, Thomas

    2016-02-28

    We present the synthesis and structural characterization of novel ruthenium complexes containing C^C* cyclometalated N-heterocyclic carbene ligands, η(6)-arene (p-cymene) ligands and one bridging chlorine ion. Complexes of the general formula [Ru(p-cymene)(C^C*)Cl] were prepared via a one-pot synthesis using in situ transmetalation from the correspondent silver NHC complexes. These complexes react with sodium tetrakis[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]borate (NaBAr(F)4) to form dinuclear complexes of the general structure [Ru(p-cymene)(C^C*)-μ-Cl-(p-cymene)(C^C*)Ru](+)[BAr(F)4](-). Solid-state structures confirm that the pseudo-tetrahedral coordination around the metal center with the η(6)-ligand aligned perpendicularly to the C^C* ligand and the i-Pr group "atop" is retained in the bimetallic complexes.

  8. Mixed-ligand complex formation equilibria of CuII with biguanide in presence of glycine as the auxiliary ligand

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tannistha Roy Barman; G N Mukherjee

    2006-09-01

    Equilibrium study on the mixed ligand complex formation of CuII with biguanide(Bg) and glycine (HG), indicated the formation of the complexes: Cu(Bg)2+, Cu(Bg)$_{2}^{2+}$, Cu(Bg-H)(Bg)+, Cu(Bg-H)2, Cu(Bg)(OH)+, Cu(Bg-H)(OH); Cu(G)+, Cu(G)(OH), Cu(G)2; Cu(G)(Bg)+, Cu(G)(Bg-H); (G)Cu(Bg)Cu(G)2+, (G)Cu(Bg-H)Cu(G)+, and (G)Cu(Bg-2H)Cu(G). From the deprotonation constants of coordinated biguanide (Bg) in the complexes Cu(Bg)(OH)+, Cu(Bg-H)(Bg)+ and Cu(G)(Bg)+, the Lewis basicities of the coordinated ligand species (Bg-H)-, OH- and glycinate (G-) were found to be of the order: (Bg-H)- >> OH- > G-. Bridging (N1-N4, N2-N5) tetradentate mode of coordination by biguanide species Bg, (Bg-H)- and (Bg-2H)2- was indicated from the occurrence of biguanide-bridged dinuclear mixed ligand complexes (G)Cu(Bg)Cu(G)2+, (G)Cu(Bg-H)Cu(G)+, (G)Cu(Bg-2H)Cu(G) in the complexation equilibria.

  9. Spontaneous Binding of Molecular Oxygen at the Qo-Site of the bc1 Complex Could Stimulate Superoxide Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husen, Peter; Solov'yov, Ilia A

    2016-01-01

    to drive ATP synthesis. This molecular machinery, however, is suspected to be a source of superoxide, which is toxic to the cell, even in minuscular quantities, and believed to be a factor in aging. Through molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate here the migration of molecular oxygen in the bc1...... complex in order to identify possible reaction sites that could lead to superoxide formation. It is found, in particular, that oxygen penetrates spontaneously the Qo binding site of the bc1 complex in the presence of an intermediate semiquinone radical, thus making the Qo-site a strong candidate for being...... a center of superoxide production....

  10. Improvement of the absorption of /sup 3/H-cholecalciferol by formation of its cyclodextrin complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szejtli, J.; Gerloczy, A. (Biochemical Research Laboratory of Chinoin Pharmaceutical and Chemical Works, Budapest (Hungary)); Fonagy, A. (Orszagos Frederic Joliot-Curie Sugarbiologiai es Sugaregeszseguegyi Kutato Intezet, Budapest (Hungary))

    1983-02-01

    Oral administration of ..beta..-cyclodextrin inclusion complex of /sup 3/H-labelled vitamin D/sub 3/ (cholecalciferol) to rats resulted in significantly higher blood radioactivity as with the non-complexed vitamin. Difference in the first 90 minutes was 2.3-2.8 fold, and it remained significantly higher up to the 6th h. After 24 h there was no difference between the blood radioactivity of animals treated with complexed and with non-complexed vitamin D/sub 3/.

  11. Microbial adhesion and biofilm formation on microfiltration membranes: a detailed characterization using model organisms with increasing complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanysacker, L; Denis, C; Declerck, P; Piasecka, A; Vankelecom, I F J

    2013-01-01

    Since many years, membrane biofouling has been described as the Achilles heel of membrane fouling. In the present study, an ecological assay was performed using model systems with increasing complexity: a monospecies assay using Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Escherichia coli separately, a duospecies assay using both microorganisms, and a multispecies assay using activated sludge with or without spiked P. aeruginosa. The microbial adhesion and biofilm formation were evaluated in terms of bacterial cell densities, species richness, and bacterial community composition on polyvinyldifluoride, polyethylene, and polysulfone membranes. The data show that biofouling formation was strongly influenced by the kind of microorganism, the interactions between the organisms, and the changes in environmental conditions whereas the membrane effect was less important. The findings obtained in this study suggest that more knowledge in species composition and microbial interactions is needed in order to understand the complex biofouling process. This is the first report describing the microbial interactions with a membrane during the biofouling development.

  12. HPV16E6-Dependent c-Fos Expression Contributes to AP-1 Complex Formation in SiHa Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feixin Liang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To date, the major role of HPV16E6 in cancer has been considered to be its ability to inhibit the p53 tumor-suppressor protein, thereby thwarting p53-mediated cytotoxic responses to cellular stress signals. Here, we show that HPV16E6-dependent c-fos oncogenic protein expression contributes to AP-1 complex formation under oxidative stress in SiHa cells (HPV16-positive squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. In addition, we examined the role of HPV16E6 in TGF-α-induced c-fos expression and found that the c-fos protein expression induced by TGF-α is HPV16E6 dependent. Thus, our results provide the first evidence that HPV16E6 contributes to AP-1 complex formation after both ligand-dependent and independent EGFR activation, suggesting a new therapeutic approach to the treatment of HPV-associated tumors.

  13. Unique behaviour of dinitrogen-bridged dimolybdenum complexes bearing pincer ligand towards catalytic formation of ammonia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Arashiba, Kazuya; Kuriyama, Shogo; Sasada, Akira; Nakajima, Kazunari; Yoshizawa, Kazunari; Nishibayashi, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    It is vital to design effective nitrogen fixation systems that operate under mild conditions, and to this end we recently reported an example of the catalytic formation of ammonia using a dinitrogen...

  14. Crown Ether Complexes with H3O+ and NH4+: Proton Localization and Proton Bridge Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hurtado, P.; Gamez, F.; Hamad, S.; Martinez-Haya, B.; Steill, J. D.; Oomens, J.

    2011-01-01

    The complexes formed by crown ethers with hydronium and ammonium cations are of key relevance for the understanding of their supramolecular behavior in protic solvents. In this work, the complexes of the 15-crown-5 (15c5) and 18-crown-6 (18c6) ethers with H3O+ and NH4+ and their deuterated variants

  15. Formation of inclusion complexes between high amylose starch and octadecyl ferulate via steam jet cooking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amylose can form inclusion complexes with guest molecules and represents an interesting approach to deliver bioactive molecules. However, ferulic acid has been shown not to form single helical inclusion complexes with amylose. To overcome this problem a ferulic acid ester, octadecyl ferulate, posses...

  16. Checkpoint responses to replication stalling: inducing tolerance and preventing mutagenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kai, Mihoko; Wang, Teresa S.-F

    2003-11-27

    Replication mutants often exhibit a mutator phenotype characterized by point mutations, single base frameshifts, and the deletion or duplication of sequences flanked by homologous repeats. Mutation in genes encoding checkpoint proteins can significantly affect the mutator phenotype. Here, we use fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) as a model system to discuss the checkpoint responses to replication perturbations induced by replication mutants. Checkpoint activation induced by a DNA polymerase mutant, aside from delay of mitotic entry, up-regulates the translesion polymerase DinB (Pol{kappa}). Checkpoint Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 (9-1-1) complex, which is loaded onto chromatin by the Rad17-Rfc2-5 checkpoint complex in response to replication perturbation, recruits DinB onto chromatin to generate the point mutations and single nucleotide frameshifts in the replication mutator. This chain of events reveals a novel checkpoint-induced tolerance mechanism that allows cells to cope with replication perturbation, presumably to make possible restarting stalled replication forks. Fission yeast Cds1 kinase plays an essential role in maintaining DNA replication fork stability in the face of DNA damage and replication fork stalling. Cds1 kinase is known to regulate three proteins that are implicated in maintaining replication fork stability: Mus81-Eme1, a hetero-dimeric structure-specific endonuclease complex; Rqh1, a RecQ-family helicase involved in suppressing inappropriate recombination during replication; and Rad60, a protein required for recombinational repair during replication. These Cds1-regulated proteins are thought to cooperatively prevent mutagenesis and maintain replication fork stability in cells under replication stress. These checkpoint-regulated processes allow cells to survive replication perturbation by preventing stalled replication forks from degenerating into deleterious DNA structures resulting in genomic instability and cancer development.

  17. Relationship between DNA damage response, initiated by camptothecin or oxidative stress, and DNA replication, analyzed by quantitative 3D image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berniak, K; Rybak, P; Bernas, T; Zarębski, M; Biela, E; Zhao, H; Darzynkiewicz, Z; Dobrucki, J W

    2013-10-01

    A method of quantitative analysis of spatial (3D) relationship between discrete nuclear events detected by confocal microscopy is described and applied in analysis of a dependence between sites of DNA damage signaling (γH2AX foci) and DNA replication (EdU incorporation) in cells subjected to treatments with camptothecin (Cpt) or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Cpt induces γH2AX foci, likely reporting formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), almost exclusively at sites of DNA replication. This finding is consistent with the known mechanism of induction of DSBs by DNA topoisomerase I (topo1) inhibitors at the sites of collisions of the moving replication forks with topo1-DNA "cleavable complexes" stabilized by Cpt. Whereas an increased level of H2AX histone phosphorylation is seen in S-phase of cells subjected to H2O2, only a minor proportion of γH2AX foci coincide with DNA replication sites. Thus, the increased level of H2AX phosphorylation induced by H2O2 is not a direct consequence of formation of DNA lesions at the sites of moving DNA replication forks. These data suggest that oxidative stress induced by H2O2 and formation of the primary H2O2-induced lesions (8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine) inhibits replication globally and triggers formation of γH2AX at various distances from replication forks. Quantitative analysis of a frequency of DNA replication sites and γH2AX foci suggests also that stalling of replicating forks by Cpt leads to activation of new DNA replication origins. © 2013 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  18. Mutual Interplay between the Human Cytomegalovirus Terminase Subunits pUL51, pUL56, and pUL89 Promotes Terminase Complex Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuber, Sebastian; Wagner, Karen; Goldner, Thomas; Lischka, Peter; Steinbrueck, Lars; Messerle, Martin; Borst, Eva Maria

    2017-06-15

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) genome encapsidation requires several essential viral proteins, among them pUL56, pUL89, and the recently described pUL51, which constitute the viral terminase. To gain insight into terminase complex assembly, we investigated interactions between the individual subunits. For analysis in the viral context, HCMV bacterial artificial chromosomes carrying deletions in the open reading frames encoding the terminase proteins were used. These experiments were complemented by transient-transfection assays with plasmids expressing the terminase components. We found that if one terminase protein was missing, the levels of the other terminase proteins were markedly diminished, which could be overcome by proteasome inhibition or providing the missing subunit in trans These data imply that sequestration of the individual subunits within the terminase complex protects them from proteasomal turnover. The finding that efficient interactions among the terminase proteins occurred only when all three were present together is reminiscent of a folding-upon-binding principle leading to cooperative stability. Furthermore, whereas pUL56 was translocated into the nucleus on its own, correct nuclear localization of pUL51 and pUL89 again required all three terminase constituents. Altogether, these features point to a model of the HCMV terminase as a multiprotein complex in which the three players regulate each other concerning stability, subcellular localization, and assembly into the functional tripartite holoenzyme.IMPORTANCE HCMV is a major risk factor in immunocompromised individuals, and congenital CMV infection is the leading viral cause for long-term sequelae, including deafness and mental retardation. The current treatment of CMV disease is based on drugs sharing the same mechanism, namely, inhibiting viral DNA replication, and often results in adverse side effects and the appearance of resistant virus strains. Recently, the HCMV terminase has emerged as

  19. Volcanostratigraphic Sequences of Kebo-Butak Formation at Bayat Geological Field Complex, Central Java Province and Yogyakarta Special Province, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Mulyaningsih

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Bayat Complex is usually used as a work field for students of geology and other geosciences. The study area is located in the southern part of the Bayat Complex. Administratively, it belongs to Central Java Province and Yogyakarta Special Province. The lithology of Bayat is very complex, composed of various kinds of igneous, sedimentary, metamorphic, and volcanic rocks. Most of previous researchers interpreted Bayat as a melange complex constructed within a subduction zone. Kebo-Butak is one of formations that forms the Bayat field complex. The formation is composed of basalt, layers of pumice, tuff, shale, and carbonaceous tuff. Most of them are known as volcanic rocks. These imply that volcanic activities are more probable to construct the geology of Bayat rather than the subducted melange complex. The geological mapping, supported by geomorphology, petrology, stratigraphy, and geological structures, had been conducted in a comprehensive manner using the deduction-induction method. The research encounters basalt, black pumice, tuff with basaltic glasses fragments, zeolite, argilic clay, as well as feldspathic- and pumice tuff. Petrographically, the basalt is composed of labradorite, olivine, clinopyroxene, and volcanic glass. Black pumice and tuff contain prismatic clinopyroxene, granular olivine, and volcanic glasses. Feldspathic tuff and pumice tuff are crystal vitric tuff due to more abundant feldspar, quartz, and amphibole than volcanic glass. Zeolite comprises chlorite and altered glasses as deep sea altered volcanic rocks. The geologic structure is very complex, the major structures are normal faults with pyrite in it. There were two deep submarine paleovolcanoes namely Tegalrejo and Baturagung. The first paleovolcano erupted effusively producing basaltic sequence, while the second one erupted explosively ejecting feldspathic-rich pyroclastic material. The two paleovolcanoes erupted simultaneously and repeatedly.

  20. In vitro complex formation and inhibition of hepatic cytochrome P450 activity by different macrolides and tiamulin in goats and cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zweers-Zeilmaker, W.M.; Miert, A.S.J.P.A.M. van; Horbach, G.J.; Witkamp, R.F.

    1998-01-01

    In humans, clinically relevant drug–drug interactions occur with some macrolide antibiotics via the formation of stable metabolic intermediate (MI) complexes with enzymes of the cytochrome P4503A (CYP3A) subfamily. The formation of such complexes can result in a decreased biotransformation rate of s

  1. In vitro complex formation and inhibition of hepatic cytochrome P450 activity by different macrolides and tiamulin in goats and cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zweers-Zeilmaker, W.M.; Miert, A.S.J.P.A.M. van; Horbach, G.J.; Witkamp, R.F.

    1998-01-01

    In humans, clinically relevant drug–drug interactions occur with some macrolide antibiotics via the formation of stable metabolic intermediate (MI) complexes with enzymes of the cytochrome P4503A (CYP3A) subfamily. The formation of such complexes can result in a decreased biotransformation rate of

  2. Replication and transcription on a collision course: eukaryotic regulation mechanisms and implications for DNA stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambati, Alessandra; Colosio, Arianna; Zardoni, Luca; Galanti, Lorenzo; Liberi, Giordano

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication and transcription are vital cellular processes during which the genetic information is copied into complementary DNA and RNA molecules. Highly complex machineries required for DNA and RNA synthesis compete for the same DNA template, therefore being on a collision course. Unscheduled replication-transcription clashes alter the gene transcription program and generate replication stress, reducing fork speed. Molecular pathways and mechanisms that minimize the conflict between replication and transcription have been extensively characterized in prokaryotic cells and recently identified also in eukaryotes. A pathological outcome of replication-transcription collisions is the formation of stable RNA:DNA hybrids in molecular structures called R-loops. Growing evidence suggests that R-loop accumulation promotes both genetic and epigenetic instability, thus severely affecting genome functionality. In the present review, we summarize the current knowledge related to replication and transcription conflicts in eukaryotes, their consequences on genome stability and the pathways involved in their resolution. These findings are relevant to clarify the molecular basis of cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. Replication and transcription on a collision course: eukaryotic regulation mechanisms and implications for DNA stability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra eBrambati