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Sample records for replication cell death

  1. Tumor cell death mediated by peptides that recognize branched intermediates of DNA replication and repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamon Dey

    Full Text Available Effective treatments for cancer are still needed, both for cancers that do not respond well to current therapeutics and for cancers that become resistant to available treatments. Herein we investigated the effect of a structure-selective d-amino acid peptide wrwycr that binds replication fork mimics and Holliday Junction (HJs intermediates of homologous recombination (HR in vitro, and inhibits their resolution by HJ-processing enzymes. We predicted that treating cells with HJ-binding compounds would lead to accumulation of DNA damage. As cells repair endogenous or exogenous DNA damage, collapsed replication forks and HJ intermediates will accumulate and serve as targets for the HJ-binding peptides. Inhibiting junction resolution will lead to further accumulation of DNA breaks, eventually resulting in amplification of the damage and causing cell death. Both peptide wrwycr and the related wrwyrggrywrw entered cancer cells and reduced cell survival in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Early markers for DNA damage, γH2AX foci and 53BP1 foci, increased with dose and/or time exposure to the peptides. DNA breaks persisted at least 48 h, and both checkpoint proteins Chk1 and Chk2 were activated. The passage of the cells from S to G2/M was blocked even after 72 h. Apoptosis, however, was not induced in either HeLa or PC3 cells. Based on colony-forming assays, about 35% peptide-induced cytotoxicity was irreversible. Finally, sublethal doses of peptide wrwycr (50-100 µM in conjunction with sublethal doses of several DNA damaging agents (etoposide, doxorubicin, and HU reduced cell survival at least additively and sometimes synergistically. Taken together, the results suggest that the peptides merit further investigation as proof-of-principle molecules for a new class of anti-cancer therapeutics, in particular in combination with other DNA damaging therapies.

  2. Tumor cell death mediated by peptides that recognize branched intermediates of DNA replication and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Mamon; Patra, Sukanya; Su, Leo Y; Segall, Anca M

    2013-01-01

    Effective treatments for cancer are still needed, both for cancers that do not respond well to current therapeutics and for cancers that become resistant to available treatments. Herein we investigated the effect of a structure-selective d-amino acid peptide wrwycr that binds replication fork mimics and Holliday Junction (HJs) intermediates of homologous recombination (HR) in vitro, and inhibits their resolution by HJ-processing enzymes. We predicted that treating cells with HJ-binding compounds would lead to accumulation of DNA damage. As cells repair endogenous or exogenous DNA damage, collapsed replication forks and HJ intermediates will accumulate and serve as targets for the HJ-binding peptides. Inhibiting junction resolution will lead to further accumulation of DNA breaks, eventually resulting in amplification of the damage and causing cell death. Both peptide wrwycr and the related wrwyrggrywrw entered cancer cells and reduced cell survival in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Early markers for DNA damage, γH2AX foci and 53BP1 foci, increased with dose and/or time exposure to the peptides. DNA breaks persisted at least 48 h, and both checkpoint proteins Chk1 and Chk2 were activated. The passage of the cells from S to G2/M was blocked even after 72 h. Apoptosis, however, was not induced in either HeLa or PC3 cells. Based on colony-forming assays, about 35% peptide-induced cytotoxicity was irreversible. Finally, sublethal doses of peptide wrwycr (50-100 µM) in conjunction with sublethal doses of several DNA damaging agents (etoposide, doxorubicin, and HU) reduced cell survival at least additively and sometimes synergistically. Taken together, the results suggest that the peptides merit further investigation as proof-of-principle molecules for a new class of anti-cancer therapeutics, in particular in combination with other DNA damaging therapies.

  3. Mitochondrial bioenergetic alterations in mouse neuroblastoma cells infected with Sindbis virus: implications to viral replication and neuronal death.

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    Leandro Silva da Costa

    Full Text Available The metabolic resources crucial for viral replication are provided by the host. Details of the mechanisms by which viruses interact with host metabolism, altering and recruiting high free-energy molecules for their own replication, remain unknown. Sindbis virus, the prototype of and most widespread alphavirus, causes outbreaks of arthritis in humans and serves as a model for the study of the pathogenesis of neurological diseases induced by alphaviruses in mice. In this work, respirometric analysis was used to evaluate the effects of Sindbis virus infection on mitochondrial bioenergetics of a mouse neuroblastoma cell lineage, Neuro 2a. The modulation of mitochondrial functions affected cellular ATP content and this was synchronous with Sindbis virus replication cycle and cell death. At 15 h, irrespective of effects on cell viability, viral replication induced a decrease in oxygen consumption uncoupled to ATP synthesis and a 36% decrease in maximum uncoupled respiration, which led to an increase of 30% in the fraction of oxygen consumption used for ATP synthesis. Decreased proton leak associated to complex I respiration contributed to the apparent improvement of mitochondrial function. Cellular ATP content was not affected by infection. After 24 h, mitochondria dysfunction was clearly observed as maximum uncoupled respiration reduced 65%, along with a decrease in the fraction of oxygen consumption used for ATP synthesis. Suppressed respiration driven by complexes I- and II-related substrates seemed to play a role in mitochondrial dysfunction. Despite the increase in glucose uptake and glycolytic flux, these changes were followed by a 30% decrease in ATP content and neuronal death. Taken together, mitochondrial bioenergetics is modulated during Sindbis virus infection in such a way as to favor ATP synthesis required to support active viral replication. These early changes in metabolism of Neuro 2a cells may form the molecular basis of neuronal

  4. Asthma and influenza virus infection:focusing on cell death and stress pathways in influenza virus replication.

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    Yeganeh, Behzad; Rezaei Moghadam, Adel; Tran, Ahn Thuy; Rahim, Mohammad Niaz; Ande, Sudu R; Hashemi, Mohammad; Coombs, Kevin M; Ghavami, Saeid

    2013-03-01

    Asthma is one of the fastest growing syndromes in many countries and is adding a huge cost to the health care system. Increasing reports have linked airway infectious diseases to asthma. Influenza is one of the most serious airway infectious diseases and in recent years there have been some serious influenza virus pandemics which caused increased fatality in numerous different populations. Diverse host response pathways during virus infection have been identified, including different cell death and survival pathways. These pathways include 1) programmed cell death I (apoptosis), 2) programmed cell death II (autophagy), and 3) endoplasmic reticulum stress with subsequent unfolded protein response (UPR). There has been extensive research on the regulatory roles of these pathways during the influenza virus life cycle. These studies address the benefits of enhancing or inhibiting these pathways on viral replication. Here we review the most recent and significant knowledge in this area for possible benefits to clinicians and basic scientist researchers in different areas of the respiratory and virology sciences.

  5. Asthma and influenza virus infection:focusing on cell death and stress pathways in influenza virus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Yeganeh

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is one of the fastest growing syndromes in many countries and is adding a huge cost to the health care system. Increasing reports have linked airway infectious diseases to asthma. Influenza is one of the most serious airway infectious diseases and in recent years there have been some serious influenza virus pandemics which caused increased fatality in numerous different populations. Diverse host response pathways during virus infection have been identified, including different cell death and survival pathways. These pathways include1 programmed cell death I (apoptosis, 2 programmed cell death II (autophagy, and 3 endoplasmic reticulum stress with subsequent unfolded protein response (UPR. There has been extensive research on the regulatory roles of these pathways during the influenza virus life cycle. These studies address the benefits of enhancing or inhibiting these pathways on viral replication. Here we review the most recent and significant knowledge in this area for possible  benefits  to  clinicians and  basic  scientist researchers  in  different  areas  of  the respiratory and virology sciences.

  6. Dengue-induced autophagy, virus replication and protection from cell death require ER stress (PERK) pathway activation.

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    Datan, E; Roy, S G; Germain, G; Zali, N; McLean, J E; Golshan, G; Harbajan, S; Lockshin, R A; Zakeri, Z

    2016-03-03

    A virus that reproduces in a host without killing cells can easily establish a successful infection. Previously, we showed that dengue-2, a virus that threatens 40% of the world, induces autophagy, enabling dengue to reproduce in cells without triggering cell death. Autophagy further protects the virus-laden cells from further insults. In this study, we evaluate how it does so; we show that dengue upregulates host pathways that increase autophagy, namely endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) signaling followed by production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Inhibition of ER stress or ATM signaling abrogates the dengue-conferred protection against other cell stressors. Direct inhibition of ER stress response in infected cells decreases autophagosome turnover, reduces ROS production and limits reproduction of dengue virus. Blocking ATM activation, which is an early response to infection, decreases transcription of ER stress response proteins, but ATM has limited impact on production of ROS and virus titers. Production of ROS determines only late-onset autophagy in infected cells and is not necessary for dengue-induced protection from stressors. Collectively, these results demonstrate that among the multiple autophagy-inducing pathways during infection, ER stress signaling is more important to viral replication and protection of cells than either ATM or ROS-mediated signaling. To limit virus production and survival of dengue-infected cells, one must address the earliest phase of autophagy, induced by ER stress.

  7. Effects of Cigarette Smoke Condensate on Oxidative Stress, Apoptotic Cell Death, and HIV Replication in Human Monocytic Cells.

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    Pss Rao

    Full Text Available While cigarette smoking is prevalent amongst HIV-infected patients, the effects of cigarette smoke constituents in cells of myeloid lineage are poorly known. Recently, we have shown that nicotine induces oxidative stress through cytochrome P450 (CYP 2A6-mediated pathway in U937 monocytic cells. The present study was designed to examine the effect of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC, which contains majority of tobacco constituents, on oxidative stress, cytotoxicity, expression of CYP1A1, and/or HIV-1 replication in HIV-infected (U1 and uninfected U937 cells. The effects of CSC on induction of CYP1 enzymes in HIV-infected primary macrophages were also analyzed. The results showed that the CSC-mediated increase in production of reactive oxygen species (ROS in U937 cells is dose- and time-dependent. Moreover, CSC treatment was found to induce cytotoxicity in U937 cells through the apoptotic pathway via activation of caspase-3. Importantly, pretreatment with vitamin C blocked the CSC-mediated production of ROS and induction of caspase-3 activity. In U1 cells, acute treatment of CSC increased ROS production at 6H (>2-fold and both ROS (>2 fold and HIV-1 replication (>3-fold after chronic treatment. The CSC mediated effects were associated with robust induction in the expression of CYP1A1 mRNA upon acute CSC treatment of U937 and U1 cells (>20-fold, and upon chronic CSC treatment to U1 cells (>30-fold. In addition, the CYP1A1 induction in U937 cells was mediated through the aromatic hydrocarbon receptor pathway. Lastly, CSC, which is known to increase viral replication in primary macrophages, was also found to induce CYP1 enzymes in HIV-infected primary macrophages. While mRNA levels of both CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 were elevated following CSC treatment, only CYP1B1 protein levels were increased in HIV-infected primary macrophages. In conclusion, these results suggest a possible association between oxidative stress, CYP1 expression, and viral replication in

  8. Regulation of beta cell replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Ying C; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2008-01-01

    Beta cell mass, at any given time, is governed by cell differentiation, neogenesis, increased or decreased cell size (cell hypertrophy or atrophy), cell death (apoptosis), and beta cell proliferation. Nutrients, hormones and growth factors coupled with their signalling intermediates have been...... suggested to play a role in beta cell mass regulation. In addition, genetic mouse model studies have indicated that cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases that determine cell cycle progression are involved in beta cell replication, and more recently, menin in association with cyclin-dependent kinase...... inhibitors has been demonstrated to be important in beta cell growth. In this review, we consider and highlight some aspects of cell cycle regulation in relation to beta cell replication. The role of cell cycle regulation in beta cell replication is mostly from studies in rodent models, but whether...

  9. Asthma and influenza virus infection:focusing on cell death and stress pathways in influenza virus replication.

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is one of the fastest growing syndromes in many countries and is adding a huge cost to the health care system. Increasing reports have linked airway infectious diseases to asthma. Influenza is one of the most serious airway infectious diseases and in recent years there have been some serious influenza virus pandemics which caused increased fatality in numerous different populations. Diverse host response pathways during virus infection have been identified, including different cell dea...

  10. FBH1 co-operates with MUS81 in inducing DNA double-strand breaks and cell death following replication stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fugger, Kasper; Chu, Wai Kit; Haahr, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The molecular events occurring following the disruption of DNA replication forks are poorly characterized, despite extensive use of replication inhibitors such as hydroxyurea in the treatment of malignancies. Here, we identify a key role for the FBH1 helicase in mediating DNA double-strand break...... formation following replication inhibition. We show that FBH1-deficient cells are resistant to killing by hydroxyurea, and exhibit impaired activation of the pro-apoptotic factor p53, consistent with decreased DNA double-strand break formation. Similar findings were obtained in murine ES cells carrying...... disrupted alleles of Fbh1. We also show that FBH1 through its helicase activity co-operates with the MUS81 nuclease in promoting the endonucleolytic DNA cleavage following prolonged replication stress. Accordingly, MUS81 and EME1-depleted cells show increased resistance to the cytotoxic effects...

  11. Programmed cell death

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    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this conference to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on the role programmed cell death plays in normal development and homeostasis of many organisms. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: invertebrate development; immunology/neurology; bcl-2 family; biochemistry; programmed cell death in viruses; oncogenesis; vertebrate development; and diseases.

  12. Programmed cell death: Superman meets Dr Death.

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    Meier, Pascal; Silke, John

    2003-12-01

    This year's Cold Spring Harbor meeting on programmed cell death (September 17-21, 2003), organised by Craig Thompson and Junying Yuan, was proof that the 'golden age' of research in this field is far from over. There was a flurry of fascinating insights into the regulation of diverse apoptotic pathways and unexpected non-apoptotic roles for some of the key apoptotic regulators and effectors. In addition to their role in cell death, components of the apoptotic molecular machinery are now known to also function in a variety of essential cellular processes, such as regulating glucose homeostasis, lipid metabolism, cell proliferation and differentiation.

  13. Parvovirus infection-induced cell death and cell cycle arrest

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    Chen, Aaron Yun; Qiu, Jianming

    2011-01-01

    The cytopathic effects induced during parvovirus infection have been widely documented. Parvovirus infection-induced cell death is often directly associated with disease outcomes (e.g., anemia resulting from loss of erythroid progenitors during parvovirus B19 infection). Apoptosis is the major form of cell death induced by parvovirus infection. However, nonapoptotic cell death, namely necrosis, has also been reported during infection of the minute virus of mice, parvovirus H-1 and bovine parvovirus. Recent studies have revealed multiple mechanisms underlying the cell death during parvovirus infection. These mechanisms vary in different parvoviruses, although the large nonstructural protein (NS)1 and the small NS proteins (e.g., the 11 kDa of parvovirus B19), as well as replication of the viral genome, are responsible for causing infection-induced cell death. Cell cycle arrest is also common, and contributes to the cytopathic effects induced during parvovirus infection. While viral NS proteins have been indicated to induce cell cycle arrest, increasing evidence suggests that a cellular DNA damage response triggered by an invading single-stranded parvoviral genome is the major inducer of cell cycle arrest in parvovirus-infected cells. Apparently, in response to infection, cell death and cell cycle arrest of parvovirus-infected cells are beneficial to the viral cell lifecycle (e.g., viral DNA replication and virus egress). In this article, we will discuss recent advances in the understanding of the mechanisms underlying parvovirus infection-induced cell death and cell cycle arrest. PMID:21331319

  14. Replication of prions in differentiated muscle cells.

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    Herbst, Allen; Aiken, Judd M; McKenzie, Debbie

    2014-01-01

    We have demonstrated that prions accumulate to high levels in non-proliferative C2C12 myotubes. C2C12 cells replicate as myoblasts but can be differentiated into myotubes. Earlier studies indicated that C2C12 myoblasts are not competent for prion replication. (1) We confirmed that observation and demonstrated, for the first time, that while replicative myoblasts do not accumulate PrP(Sc), differentiated post-mitotic myotube cultures replicate prions robustly. Here we extend our observations and describe the implication and utility of this system for replicating prions.

  15. Glutathione Efflux and Cell Death

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    2012-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Glutathione (GSH) depletion is a central signaling event that regulates the activation of cell death pathways. GSH depletion is often taken as a marker of oxidative stress and thus, as a consequence of its antioxidant properties scavenging reactive species of both oxygen and nitrogen (ROS/RNS). Recent Advances: There is increasing evidence demonstrating that GSH loss is an active phenomenon regulating the redox signaling events modulating cell death activation and progression. Critical Issues: In this work, we review the role of GSH depletion by its efflux, as an important event regulating alterations in the cellular redox balance during cell death independent from oxidative stress and ROS/RNS formation. We discuss the mechanisms involved in GSH efflux during cell death progression and the redox signaling events by which GSH depletion regulates the activation of the cell death machinery. Future Directions: The evidence summarized here clearly places GSH transport as a central mechanism mediating redox signaling during cell death progression. Future studies should be directed toward identifying the molecular identity of GSH transporters mediating GSH extrusion during cell death, and addressing the lack of sensitive approaches to quantify GSH efflux. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 17, 1694–1713. PMID:22656858

  16. Glutathione in Cancer Cell Death

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    Ortega, Angel L. [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, University of Valencia, 17 Av. Blasco Ibanez, 46010 Valencia (Spain); Mena, Salvador [Green Molecular SL, Pol. Ind. La Coma-Parc Cientific, 46190 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Estrela, Jose M., E-mail: jose.m.estrela@uv.es [Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine and Odontology, University of Valencia, 17 Av. Blasco Ibanez, 46010 Valencia (Spain)

    2011-03-11

    Glutathione (L-γ-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine; GSH) in cancer cells is particularly relevant in the regulation of carcinogenic mechanisms; sensitivity against cytotoxic drugs, ionizing radiations, and some cytokines; DNA synthesis; and cell proliferation and death. The intracellular thiol redox state (controlled by GSH) is one of the endogenous effectors involved in regulating the mitochondrial permeability transition pore complex and, in consequence, thiol oxidation can be a causal factor in the mitochondrion-based mechanism that leads to cell death. Nevertheless GSH depletion is a common feature not only of apoptosis but also of other types of cell death. Indeed rates of GSH synthesis and fluxes regulate its levels in cellular compartments, and potentially influence switches among different mechanisms of death. How changes in gene expression, post-translational modifications of proteins, and signaling cascades are implicated will be discussed. Furthermore, this review will finally analyze whether GSH depletion may facilitate cancer cell death under in vivo conditions, and how this can be applied to cancer therapy.

  17. Glutathione in Cancer Cell Death

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    Jose M. Estrela

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione (L-γ-glutamyl-L-cysteinyl-glycine; GSH in cancer cells is particularly relevant in the regulation of carcinogenic mechanisms; sensitivity against cytotoxic drugs, ionizing radiations, and some cytokines; DNA synthesis; and cell proliferation and death. The intracellular thiol redox state (controlled by GSH is one of the endogenous effectors involved in regulating the mitochondrial permeability transition pore complex and, in consequence, thiol oxidation can be a causal factor in the mitochondrion-based mechanism that leads to cell death. Nevertheless GSH depletion is a common feature not only of apoptosis but also of other types of cell death. Indeed rates of GSH synthesis and fluxes regulate its levels in cellular compartments, and potentially influence switches among different mechanisms of death. How changes in gene expression, post-translational modifications of proteins, and signaling cascades are implicated will be discussed. Furthermore, this review will finally analyze whether GSH depletion may facilitate cancer cell death under in vivo conditions, and how this can be applied to cancer therapy.

  18. Cell death in genome evolution.

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    Teng, Xinchen; Hardwick, J Marie

    2015-03-01

    Inappropriate survival of abnormal cells underlies tumorigenesis. Most discoveries about programmed cell death have come from studying model organisms. Revisiting the experimental contexts that inspired these discoveries helps explain confounding biases that inevitably accompany such discoveries. Amending early biases has added a newcomer to the collection of cell death models. Analysis of gene-dependent death in yeast revealed the surprising influence of single gene mutations on subsequent eukaryotic genome evolution. Similar events may influence the selection for mutations during early tumorigenesis. The possibility that any early random mutation might drive the selection for a cancer driver mutation is conceivable but difficult to demonstrate. This was tested in yeast, revealing that mutation of almost any gene appears to specify the selection for a new second mutation. Some human tumors contain pairs of mutant genes homologous to co-occurring mutant genes in yeast. Here we consider how yeast again provide novel insights into tumorigenesis.

  19. Cell death programs in Yersinia immunity and pathogenesis.

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    Philip, Naomi H; Brodsky, Igor E

    2012-01-01

    Cell death plays a central role in host-pathogen interactions, as it can eliminate the pathogen's replicative niche and provide pro-inflammatory signals necessary for an effective immune response; conversely, cell death can allow pathogens to eliminate immune cells and evade anti-microbial effector mechanisms. In response to developmental signals or cell-intrinsic stresses, the executioner caspases-3 and -7 mediate apoptotic cell death, which is generally viewed as immunologically silent or immunosuppressive. A proinflammatory form of cell death that requires caspase-1, termed pyroptosis, is activated in response to microbial products within the host cytosol or disruption of cellular membranes by microbial pathogens. Infection by the bacterial pathogen Yersinia has features of both apoptosis and pyroptosis. Cell death and caspase-1 processing in Yersinia-infected cells occur in response to inhibition of NF-κB and MAPK signaling by the Yersinia virulence factor YopJ. However, the molecular basis of YopJ-induced cell death, and the role of different death pathways in anti-Yersinia immune responses remain enigmatic. Here, we discuss the role that cell death may play in inducing specific pro-inflammatory signals that shape innate and adaptive immune responses against Yersinia infection.

  20. Cell death in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webb, J.S.; Thompson, L.S.; James, S.

    2003-01-01

    . However, key developmental processes regulating these events are poorly understood. A normal component of multicellular development is cell death. Here we report that a repeatable pattern of cell death and lysis occurs in biofilms of P. aeruginosa during the normal course of development. Cell death....... We propose that prophage-mediated cell death is an important mechanism of differentiation inside microcolonies that facilitates dispersal of a subpopulation of surviving cells....

  1. Programmed cell death in Giardia.

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    Bagchi, Susmita; Oniku, Abraham E; Topping, Kate; Mamhoud, Zahra N; Paget, Timothy A

    2012-06-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) has been observed in many unicellular eukaryotes; however, in very few cases have the pathways been described. Recently the early divergent amitochondrial eukaryote Giardia has been included in this group. In this paper we investigate the processes of PCD in Giardia. We performed a bioinformatics survey of Giardia genomes to identify genes associated with PCD alongside traditional methods for studying apoptosis and autophagy. Analysis of Giardia genomes failed to highlight any genes involved in apoptotic-like PCD; however, we were able to induce apoptotic-like morphological changes in response to oxidative stress (H2O2) and drugs (metronidazole). In addition we did not detect caspase activity in induced cells. Interestingly, we did observe changes resembling autophagy when cells were starved (staining with MDC) and genome analysis revealed some key genes associated with autophagy such as TOR, ATG1 and ATG 16. In organisms such as Trichomonas vaginalis, Entamoeba histolytica and Blastocystis similar observations have been made but no genes have been identified. We propose that Giardia possess a pathway of autophagy and a form of apoptosis very different from the classical known mechanism; this may represent an early form of programmed cell death.

  2. Polycation-mediated integrated cell death processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parhamifar, Ladan; Andersen, Helene; Wu, Linping

    2014-01-01

    standard. PEIs are highly efficient transfectants, but depending on their architecture and size they induce cytotoxicity through different modes of cell death pathways. Here, we briefly review dynamic and integrated cell death processes and pathways, and discuss considerations in cell death assay design...

  3. Porcine circovirus-2 capsid protein induces cell death in PK15 cells

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    Walia, Rupali; Dardari, Rkia, E-mail: rdardari@ucalgary.ca; Chaiyakul, Mark; Czub, Markus

    2014-11-15

    Studies have shown that Porcine circovirus (PCV)-2 induces apoptosis in PK15 cells. Here we report that cell death is induced in PCV2b-infected PK15 cells that express Capsid (Cap) protein and this effect is enhanced in interferon gamma (IFN-γ)-treated cells. We further show that transient PCV2a and 2b-Cap protein expression induces cell death in PK15 cells at rate similar to PCV2 infection, regardless of Cap protein localization. These data suggest that Cap protein may have the capacity to trigger different signaling pathways involved in cell death. Although further investigation is needed to gain deeper insights into the nature of the pathways involved in Cap-induced cell death, this study provides evidence that PCV2-induced cell death in kidney epithelial PK15 cells can be mapped to the Cap protein and establishes the need for future research regarding the role of Cap-induced cell death in PCV2 pathogenesis. - Highlights: • IFN-γ enhances PCV2 replication that leads to cell death in PK15 cells. • IFN-γ enhances nuclear localization of the PCV2 Capsid protein. • Transient PCV2a and 2b-Capsid protein expression induces cell death. • Cell death is not dictated by specific Capsid protein sub-localization.

  4. Programmed Cell Death in Neurospora crassa

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    A. Pedro Gonçalves

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death has been studied for decades in mammalian cells, but simpler organisms, including prokaryotes, plants, and fungi, also undergo regulated forms of cell death. We highlight the usefulness of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa as a model organism for the study of programmed cell death. In N. crassa, cell death can be triggered genetically due to hyphal fusion between individuals with different allelic specificities at het loci, in a process called “heterokaryon incompatibility.” Chemical induction of cell death can also be achieved upon exposure to death-inducing agents like staurosporine, phytosphingosine, or hydrogen peroxide. A summary of the recent advances made by our and other groups on the discovery of the mechanisms and mediators underlying the process of cell death in N. crassa is presented.

  5. Direct Visualization of DNA Replication Dynamics in Zebrafish Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriya, Kenji; Higashiyama, Eriko; Avşar-Ban, Eriko; Tamaru, Yutaka; Ogata, Shin; Takebayashi, Shin-ichiro; Ogata, Masato; Okumura, Katsuzumi

    2015-12-01

    Spatiotemporal regulation of DNA replication in the S-phase nucleus has been extensively studied in mammalian cells because it is tightly coupled with the regulation of other nuclear processes such as transcription. However, little is known about the replication dynamics in nonmammalian cells. Here, we analyzed the DNA replication processes of zebrafish (Danio rerio) cells through the direct visualization of replicating DNA in the nucleus and on DNA fiber molecules isolated from the nucleus. We found that zebrafish chromosomal DNA at the nuclear interior was replicated first, followed by replication of DNA at the nuclear periphery, which is reminiscent of the spatiotemporal regulation of mammalian DNA replication. However, the relative duration of interior DNA replication in zebrafish cells was longer compared to mammalian cells, possibly reflecting zebrafish-specific genomic organization. The rate of replication fork progression and ori-to-ori distance measured by the DNA combing technique were ∼ 1.4 kb/min and 100 kb, respectively, which are comparable to those in mammalian cells. To our knowledge, this is a first report that measures replication dynamics in zebrafish cells.

  6. Prevention of DNA re-replication in eukaryotic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lan N. Truong; Xiaohua Wu

    2011-01-01

    DNA replication is a highly regulated process involving a number of licensing and replication factors that function in a carefully orchestrated manner to faithfully replicate DNA during every cell cycle. Loss of proper licensing control leads to deregulated DNA replication including DNA re-replication, which can cause genome instability and tumorigenesis. Eukaryotic organisms have established several conserved mechanisms to prevent DNA re-replication and to counteract its potentially harmful effects. These mechanisms include tightly controlled regulation of licensing factors and activation of cell cycle and DNA damage checkpoints.Deregulated licensing control and its associated compromised checkpoints have both been observed in tumor cells, indicating that proper functioning of these pathways is essential for maintaining genome stability. In this review, we discuss the regulatory mechanisms of licensing control, the deleterious consequences when both licensing and checkpoints are compromised, and present possible mechanisms to prevent re-replication in order to maintain genome stability.

  7. Detection of Cell Death in Drosophila Tissues

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    Vasudevan, Deepika; Ryoo, Hyung Don

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila has served as a particularly attractive model to study cell death due to the vast array of tools for genetic manipulation under defined spatial and temporal conditions in vivo as well as in cultured cells. These genetic methods have been well supplemented by enzymatic assays and a panel of antibodies recognizing cell death markers. This chapter discusses reporters, mutants and assays used by various laboratories to study cell death in the context of development and in response to external insults. PMID:27108437

  8. Cell biology. Metabolic control of cell death.

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    Green, Douglas R; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kroemer, Guido

    2014-09-19

    Beyond their contribution to basic metabolism, the major cellular organelles, in particular mitochondria, can determine whether cells respond to stress in an adaptive or suicidal manner. Thus, mitochondria can continuously adapt their shape to changing bioenergetic demands as they are subjected to quality control by autophagy, or they can undergo a lethal permeabilization process that initiates apoptosis. Along similar lines, multiple proteins involved in metabolic circuitries, including oxidative phosphorylation and transport of metabolites across membranes, may participate in the regulated or catastrophic dismantling of organelles. Many factors that were initially characterized as cell death regulators are now known to physically or functionally interact with metabolic enzymes. Thus, several metabolic cues regulate the propensity of cells to activate self-destructive programs, in part by acting on nutrient sensors. This suggests the existence of "metabolic checkpoints" that dictate cell fate in response to metabolic fluctuations. Here, we discuss recent insights into the intersection between metabolism and cell death regulation that have major implications for the comprehension and manipulation of unwarranted cell loss.

  9. Autophagy facilitates Salmonella replication in HeLa cells.

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    Yu, Hong B; Croxen, Matthew A; Marchiando, Amanda M; Ferreira, Rosana B R; Cadwell, Ken; Foster, Leonard J; Finlay, B Brett

    2014-03-11

    Autophagy is a process whereby a double-membrane structure (autophagosome) engulfs unnecessary cytosolic proteins, organelles, and invading pathogens and delivers them to the lysosome for degradation. We examined the fate of cytosolic Salmonella targeted by autophagy and found that autophagy-targeted Salmonella present in the cytosol of HeLa cells correlates with intracellular bacterial replication. Real-time analyses revealed that a subset of cytosolic Salmonella extensively associates with autophagy components p62 and/or LC3 and replicates quickly, whereas intravacuolar Salmonella shows no or very limited association with p62 or LC3 and replicates much more slowly. Replication of cytosolic Salmonella in HeLa cells is significantly decreased when autophagy components are depleted. Eventually, hyperreplication of cytosolic Salmonella potentiates cell detachment, facilitating the dissemination of Salmonella to neighboring cells. We propose that Salmonella benefits from autophagy for its cytosolic replication in HeLa cells. IMPORTANCE As a host defense system, autophagy is known to target a population of Salmonella for degradation and hence restricting Salmonella replication. In contrast to this concept, a recent report showed that knockdown of Rab1, a GTPase required for autophagy of Salmonella, decreases Salmonella replication in HeLa cells. Here, we have reexamined the fate of Salmonella targeted by autophagy by various cell biology-based assays. We found that the association of autophagy components with cytosolic Salmonella increases shortly after initiation of intracellular bacterial replication. Furthermore, through a live-cell imaging method, a subset of cytosolic Salmonella was found to be extensively associated with autophagy components p62 and/or LC3, and they replicated quickly. Most importantly, depletion of autophagy components significantly reduced the replication of cytosolic Salmonella in HeLa cells. Hence, in contrast to previous reports, we propose

  10. Chk1 suppressed cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meuth Mark

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The role of Chk1 in the cellular response to DNA replication stress is well established. However recent work indicates a novel role for Chk1 in the suppression of apoptosis following the disruption of DNA replication or DNA damage. This review will consider these findings in the context of known pathways of Chk1 signalling and potential applications of therapies that target Chk1.

  11. YAP controls retinal stem cell DNA replication timing and genomic stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabochette, Pauline; Vega-Lopez, Guillermo; Bitard, Juliette; Parain, Karine; Chemouny, Romain; Masson, Christel; Borday, Caroline; Hedderich, Marie; Henningfeld, Kristine A; Locker, Morgane; Bronchain, Odile; Perron, Muriel

    2015-09-22

    The adult frog retina retains a reservoir of active neural stem cells that contribute to continuous eye growth throughout life. We found that Yap, a downstream effector of the Hippo pathway, is specifically expressed in these stem cells. Yap knock-down leads to an accelerated S-phase and an abnormal progression of DNA replication, a phenotype likely mediated by upregulation of c-Myc. This is associated with an increased occurrence of DNA damage and eventually p53-p21 pathway-mediated cell death. Finally, we identified PKNOX1, a transcription factor involved in the maintenance of genomic stability, as a functional and physical interactant of YAP. Altogether, we propose that YAP is required in adult retinal stem cells to regulate the temporal firing of replication origins and quality control of replicated DNA. Our data reinforce the view that specific mechanisms dedicated to S-phase control are at work in stem cells to protect them from genomic instability.

  12. Morphological classification of plant cell deaths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Doorn, W.G.; Beers, E.P.; Dangl, J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is an integral part of plant development and of responses to abiotic stress or pathogens. Although the morphology of plant PCD is, in some cases, well characterised and molecular mechanisms controlling plant PCD are beginning to emerge, there is still confusion about...... the classification of PCD in plants. Here we suggest a classification based on morphological criteria. According to this classification, the use of the term 'apoptosis' is not justified in plants, but at least two classes of PCD can be distinguished: vacuolar cell death and necrosis. During vacuolar cell death......, the cell contents are removed by a combination of autophagy-like process and release of hydrolases from collapsed lytic vacuoles. Necrosis is characterised by early rupture of the plasma membrane, shrinkage of the protoplast and absence of vacuolar cell death features. Vacuolar cell death is common during...

  13. Replication timing: a fingerprint for cell identity and pluripotency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyrone Ryba

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Many types of epigenetic profiling have been used to classify stem cells, stages of cellular differentiation, and cancer subtypes. Existing methods focus on local chromatin features such as DNA methylation and histone modifications that require extensive analysis for genome-wide coverage. Replication timing has emerged as a highly stable cell type-specific epigenetic feature that is regulated at the megabase-level and is easily and comprehensively analyzed genome-wide. Here, we describe a cell classification method using 67 individual replication profiles from 34 mouse and human cell lines and stem cell-derived tissues, including new data for mesendoderm, definitive endoderm, mesoderm and smooth muscle. Using a Monte-Carlo approach for selecting features of replication profiles conserved in each cell type, we identify "replication timing fingerprints" unique to each cell type and apply a k nearest neighbor approach to predict known and unknown cell types. Our method correctly classifies 67/67 independent replication-timing profiles, including those derived from closely related intermediate stages. We also apply this method to derive fingerprints for pluripotency in human and mouse cells. Interestingly, the mouse pluripotency fingerprint overlaps almost completely with previously identified genomic segments that switch from early to late replication as pluripotency is lost. Thereafter, replication timing and transcription within these regions become difficult to reprogram back to pluripotency, suggesting these regions highlight an epigenetic barrier to reprogramming. In addition, the major histone cluster Hist1 consistently becomes later replicating in committed cell types, and several histone H1 genes in this cluster are downregulated during differentiation, suggesting a possible instrument for the chromatin compaction observed during differentiation. Finally, we demonstrate that unknown samples can be classified independently using site

  14. Nonthermal-plasma-mediated animal cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Wanil; Woo, Kyung-Chul; Kim, Kyong-Tai [Department of Life Science, Division of Molecular and Life Science, Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31, Hyoja Dong, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gyoo-Cheon, E-mail: ktk@postech.ac.kr [Department of Oral Anatomy and Cell Biology, School of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Yangsan 626-810 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-12

    Animal cell death comprising necrosis and apoptosis occurred in a well-regulated manner upon specific stimuli. The physiological meanings and detailed molecular mechanisms of cell death have been continuously investigated over several decades. Necrotic cell death has typical morphological changes, such as cell swelling and cell lysis followed by DNA degradation, whereas apoptosis shows blebbing formation and regular DNA fragmentation. Cell death is usually adopted to terminate cancer cells in vivo. The current strategies against tumour are based on the induction of cell death by adopting various methods, including radiotherapy and chemotherapeutics. Among these, radiotherapy is the most frequently used treatment method, but it still has obvious limitations. Recent studies have suggested that the use of nonthermal air plasma can be a prominent method for inducing cancer cell death. Plasma-irradiated cells showed the loss of genomic integrity, mitochondrial dysfunction, plasma membrane damage, etc. Tumour elimination with plasma irradiation is an emerging concept in cancer therapy and can be accelerated by targeting certain tumour-specific proteins with gold nanoparticles. Here, some recent developments are described so that the mechanisms related to plasma-mediated cell death and its perspectives in cancer treatment can be understood. (topical review)

  15. The Cell Cycle Timing of Human Papillomavirus DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinson, Tormi; Henno, Liisi; Toots, Mart; Ustav, Mart; Ustav, Mart

    2015-01-01

    Viruses manipulate the cell cycle of the host cell to optimize conditions for more efficient viral genome replication. One strategy utilized by DNA viruses is to replicate their genomes non-concurrently with the host genome; in this case, the viral genome is amplified outside S phase. This phenomenon has also been described for human papillomavirus (HPV) vegetative genome replication, which occurs in G2-arrested cells; however, the precise timing of viral DNA replication during initial and stable replication phases has not been studied. We developed a new method to quantitate newly synthesized DNA levels and used this method in combination with cell cycle synchronization to show that viral DNA replication is initiated during S phase and is extended to G2 during initial amplification but follows the replication pattern of cellular DNA during S phase in the stable maintenance phase. E1 and E2 protein overexpression changes the replication time from S only to both the S and G2 phases in cells that stably maintain viral episomes. These data demonstrate that the active synthesis and replication of the HPV genome are extended into the G2 phase to amplify its copy number and the duration of HPV genome replication is controlled by the level of the viral replication proteins E1 and E2. Using the G2 phase for genome amplification may be an important adaptation that allows exploitation of changing cellular conditions during cell cycle progression. We also describe a new method to quantify newly synthesized viral DNA levels and discuss its benefits for HPV research.

  16. Protein synthesis persists during necrotic cell death.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saelens, X.; Festjens, N.; Parthoens, E.; Overberghe, I. van; Kalai, M.; Kuppeveld, F.J.M. van; Vandenabeele, P.

    2005-01-01

    Cell death is an intrinsic part of metazoan development and mammalian immune regulation. Whereas the molecular events orchestrating apoptosis have been characterized extensively, little is known about the biochemistry of necrotic cell death. Here, we show that, in contrast to apoptosis, the inductio

  17. Stress responses and replication of plasmids in bacterial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wegrzyn Alicja

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Plasmids, DNA (or rarely RNA molecules which replicate in cells autonomously (independently of chromosomes as non-essential genetic elements, play important roles for microbes grown under specific environmental conditions as well as in scientific laboratories and in biotechnology. For example, bacterial plasmids are excellent models in studies on regulation of DNA replication, and their derivatives are the most commonly used vectors in genetic engineering. Detailed mechanisms of replication initiation, which is the crucial process for efficient maintenance of plasmids in cells, have been elucidated for several plasmids. However, to understand plasmid biology, it is necessary to understand regulation of plasmid DNA replication in response to different environmental conditions in which host cells exist. Knowledge of such regulatory processes is also very important for those who use plasmids as expression vectors to produce large amounts of recombinant proteins. Variable conditions in large-scale fermentations must influence replication of plasmid DNA in cells, thus affecting the efficiency of recombinant gene expression significantly. Contrary to extensively investigated biochemistry of plasmid replication, molecular mechanisms of regulation of plasmid DNA replication in response to various environmental stress conditions are relatively poorly understood. There are, however, recently published studies that add significant data to our knowledge on relations between cellular stress responses and control of plasmid DNA replication. In this review we focus on plasmids derived from bacteriophage λ that are among the best investigated replicons. Nevertheless, recent results of studies on other plasmids are also discussed shortly.

  18. Intracellular growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis after macrophage cell death leads to serial killing of host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahamed, Deeqa; Boulle, Mikael; Ganga, Yashica; Mc Arthur, Chanelle; Skroch, Steven; Oom, Lance; Catinas, Oana; Pillay, Kelly; Naicker, Myshnee; Rampersad, Sanisha; Mathonsi, Colisile; Hunter, Jessica; Wong, Emily B; Suleman, Moosa; Sreejit, Gopalkrishna; Pym, Alexander S; Lustig, Gila; Sigal, Alex

    2017-01-28

    A hallmark of pulmonary tuberculosis is the formation of macrophage-rich granulomas. These may restrict Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) growth, or progress to central necrosis and cavitation, facilitating pathogen growth. To determine factors leading to Mtb proliferation and host cell death, we used live cell imaging to track Mtb infection outcomes in individual primary human macrophages. Internalization of Mtb aggregates caused macrophage death, and phagocytosis of large aggregates was more cytotoxic than multiple small aggregates containing similar numbers of bacilli. Macrophage death did not result in clearance of Mtb. Rather, it led to accelerated intracellular Mtb growth regardless of prior activation or macrophage type. In contrast, bacillary replication was controlled in live phagocytes. Mtb grew as a clump in dead cells, and macrophages which internalized dead infected cells were very likely to die themselves, leading to a cell death cascade. This demonstrates how pathogen virulence can be achieved through numbers and aggregation states.

  19. Lysosomal cell death at a glance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aits, Sonja; Jaattela, Marja

    2013-01-01

    Lysosomes serve as the cellular recycling centre and are filled with numerous hydrolases that can degrade most cellular macromolecules. Lysosomal membrane permeabilization and the consequent leakage of the lysosomal content into the cytosol leads to so-called "lysosomal cell death". This form...... of cell death is mainly carried out by the lysosomal cathepsin proteases and can have necrotic, apoptotic or apoptosis-like features depending on the extent of the leakage and the cellular context. This article summarizes our current knowledge on lysosomal cell death with an emphasis on the upstream...... mechanisms that lead to lysosomal membrane permeabilization....

  20. DNA breaks early in replication in B cell cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research by scientists at the NCI has identified a new class of DNA sites in cells that break early in the replication process. They found that these break sites correlate with damage often seen in B cell cancers, such as diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

  1. Programmed cell death in cereal aleurone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fath, A; Bethke, P; Lonsdale, J; Meza-Romero, R; Jones, R

    2000-10-01

    Progress in understanding programmed cell death (PCD) in the cereal aleurone is described. Cereal aleurone cells are specialized endosperm cells that function to synthesize and secrete hydrolytic enzymes that break down reserves in the starchy endosperm. Unlike the cells of the starchy endosperm, aleurone cells are viable in mature grain but undergo PCD when germination is triggered or when isolated aleurone layers or protoplasts are incubated in gibberellic acid (GA). Abscisic acid (ABA) slows down the process of aleurone cell death and isolated aleurone protoplasts can be kept alive in media containing ABA for up to 6 months. Cell death in barley aleurone occurs only after cells become highly vacuolated and is manifested in an abrupt loss of plasma membrane integrity. Aleurone cell death does not follow the apoptotic pathway found in many animal cells. The hallmarks of apoptosis, including internucleosomal DNA cleavage, plasma membrane and nuclear blebbing and formation of apoptotic bodies, are not observed in dying aleurone cells. PCD in barley aleurone cells is accompanied by the accumulation of a spectrum of nuclease and protease activities and the loss of organelles as a result of cellular autolysis.

  2. Epidermal cell death in frogs with chytridiomycosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Alexandra A.; Skerratt, Lee F.; Berger, Lee

    2017-01-01

    Background Amphibians are declining at an alarming rate, and one of the major causes of decline is the infectious disease chytridiomycosis. Parasitic fungal sporangia occur within epidermal cells causing epidermal disruption, but these changes have not been well characterised. Apoptosis (planned cell death) can be a damaging response to the host but may alternatively be a mechanism of pathogen removal for some intracellular infections. Methods In this study we experimentally infected two endangered amphibian species Pseudophryne corroboree and Litoria verreauxii alpina with the causal agent of chytridiomycosis. We quantified cell death in the epidermis through two assays: terminal transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labelling (TUNEL) and caspase 3/7. Results Cell death was positively associated with infection load and morbidity of clinically infected animals. In infected amphibians, TUNEL positive cells were concentrated in epidermal layers, correlating to the localisation of infection within the skin. Caspase activity was stable and low in early infection, where pathogen loads were light but increasing. In animals that recovered from infection, caspase activity gradually returned to normal as the infection cleared. Whereas, in amphibians that did not recover, caspase activity increased dramatically when infection loads peaked. Discussion Increased cell death may be a pathology of the fungal parasite, likely contributing to loss of skin homeostatic functions, but it is also possible that apoptosis suppression may be used initially by the pathogen to help establish infection. Further research should explore the specific mechanisms of cell death and more specifically apoptosis regulation during fungal infection. PMID:28168107

  3. Assembly of alphavirus replication complexes from RNA and protein components in a novel trans-replication system in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spuul, Pirjo; Balistreri, Giuseppe; Hellström, Kirsi; Golubtsov, Andrey V; Jokitalo, Eija; Ahola, Tero

    2011-05-01

    For positive-strand RNA viruses, the viral genomic RNA also acts as an mRNA directing the translation of the replicase proteins of the virus. Replication takes place in association with cytoplasmic membranes, which are heavily modified to create specific replication compartments. Here we have expressed by plasmid DNA transfection the large replicase polyprotein of Semliki Forest virus (SFV) in mammalian cells from a nonreplicating mRNA and provided a separate RNA containing the replication signals. The replicase proteins were able to efficiently and specifically replicate the template in trans, leading to accumulation of RNA and marker gene products expressed from the template RNA. The replicase proteins and double-stranded RNA replication intermediates localized to structures similar to those seen in SFV-infected cells. Using correlative light electron microscopy (CLEM) with fluorescent marker proteins to relocate those transfected cells, in which active replication was ongoing, abundant membrane modifications, representing the replication complex spherules, were observed both at the plasma membrane and in intracellular endolysosomes. Thus, replication complexes are faithfully assembled and localized in the trans-replication system. We demonstrated, using CLEM, that the replication proteins alone or a polymerase-negative polyprotein mutant together with the template did not give rise to spherule formation. Thus, the trans-replication system is suitable for cell biological dissection and examination in a mammalian cell environment, and similar systems may be possible for other positive-strand RNA viruses.

  4. Links between DNA Replication, Stem Cells and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Vassilev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancers can be categorized into two groups: those whose frequency increases with age, and those resulting from errors during mammalian development. The first group is linked to DNA replication through the accumulation of genetic mutations that occur during proliferation of developmentally acquired stem cells that give rise to and maintain tissues and organs. These mutations, which result from DNA replication errors as well as environmental insults, fall into two categories; cancer driver mutations that initiate carcinogenesis and genome destabilizing mutations that promote aneuploidy through excess genome duplication and chromatid missegregation. Increased genome instability results in accelerated clonal evolution leading to the appearance of more aggressive clones with increased drug resistance. The second group of cancers, termed germ cell neoplasia, results from the mislocation of pluripotent stem cells during early development. During normal development, pluripotent stem cells that originate in early embryos give rise to all of the cell lineages in the embryo and adult, but when they mislocate to ectopic sites, they produce tumors. Remarkably, pluripotent stem cells, like many cancer cells, depend on the Geminin protein to prevent excess DNA replication from triggering DNA damage-dependent apoptosis. This link between the control of DNA replication during early development and germ cell neoplasia reveals Geminin as a potential chemotherapeutic target in the eradication of cancer progenitor cells.

  5. Links between DNA Replication, Stem Cells and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilev, Alex; DePamphilis, Melvin L

    2017-01-25

    Cancers can be categorized into two groups: those whose frequency increases with age, and those resulting from errors during mammalian development. The first group is linked to DNA replication through the accumulation of genetic mutations that occur during proliferation of developmentally acquired stem cells that give rise to and maintain tissues and organs. These mutations, which result from DNA replication errors as well as environmental insults, fall into two categories; cancer driver mutations that initiate carcinogenesis and genome destabilizing mutations that promote aneuploidy through excess genome duplication and chromatid missegregation. Increased genome instability results in accelerated clonal evolution leading to the appearance of more aggressive clones with increased drug resistance. The second group of cancers, termed germ cell neoplasia, results from the mislocation of pluripotent stem cells during early development. During normal development, pluripotent stem cells that originate in early embryos give rise to all of the cell lineages in the embryo and adult, but when they mislocate to ectopic sites, they produce tumors. Remarkably, pluripotent stem cells, like many cancer cells, depend on the Geminin protein to prevent excess DNA replication from triggering DNA damage-dependent apoptosis. This link between the control of DNA replication during early development and germ cell neoplasia reveals Geminin as a potential chemotherapeutic target in the eradication of cancer progenitor cells.

  6. Induction of apoptotic cell death by putrescine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takao, Koichi; Rickhag, Karl Mattias; Hegardt, Cecilia

    2006-01-01

    of apoptosis was the finding that one of the key enzymes in the apoptotic process, caspase-3, was induced when DFMO was omitted from the growth medium. Furthermore, inhibition of the caspase activity significantly reduced the recruitment of cells to the sub-G1 fraction. In conclusion, deregulation of polyamine...... that overexpression of a metabolically stable ODC in CHO cells induced a massive cell death unless the cells were grown in the presence of the ODC inhibitor alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO). Cells overexpressing wild-type (unstable) ODC, on the other hand, were not dependent on the presence of DFMO...... for their growth. The induction of cell death was correlated with a dramatic increase in cellular putrescine levels. Analysis using flow cytometry revealed perturbed cell cycle kinetics, with a large accumulation of cells with sub-G1 amounts of DNA, which is a typical sign of apoptosis. Another strong indication...

  7. Permissiveness of human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines for hepatitis C virus entry and replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coto-Llerena, Mairene; Koutsoudakis, George; Boix, Loreto; López-Oliva, Juan Manuel; Caro-Pérez, Noelia; Fernández-Carrillo, Carlos; González, Patricia; Gastaminza, Pablo; Bruix, Jordi; Forns, Xavier; Pérez-Del-Pulgar, Sofía

    2017-07-24

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a globally prevalent pathogen and is associated with high death rates and morbidity. Since its discovery in 1989, HCV research has been impeded by the lack of a robust infectious cell culture system and thus in vitro studies on diverse genetic backgrounds are hampered because of the limited number of hepatoma cell lines which are able to support different aspects of the HCV life cycle. In the current study, we sought to expand the limited number of permissive cells capable of supporting the diverse phases of the HCV life cycle. Initially, we screened a panel of new hepatoma-derived cell lines, designated BCLC-1, -2, -3, -4, -5, -6, -9 and -10 cells, for their ability to express essential HCV receptors and subsequently to support HCV entry by using the well-characterized HCV pseudoparticle system (HCVpp). Apart from BCLC-9, all BCLC cell lines were permissive for HCVpp infection. Next, BCLC cells were subjected to short- and long-term HCV RNA replication studies using HCV subgenomic replicons. Interestingly, only BCLC-1, -5 and -9 cells, supported short-term HCV RNA replication, but the latter were excluded from further studies since they were refractory for HCV entry. BCLC-1, -5 were able to support long-term HCV replication too; yet BCLC-5 cells supported the highest long-term HCV RNA replication levels. Furthermore, cured BCLC-5 clones from HCV subgenomic replicon, showed increased permissiveness for HCV RNA replication. Strikingly, we were unable to detect endogenous BCLC-5 miR122 expression - an important HCV host factor- and as expected, the exogenous expression of miR122 in BCLC-5 cells increased their permissiveness for HCV RNA replication. However, this cell line was unable to produce HCV infectious particles despite ectopic expression of apolipoprotein E, which in other hepatoma cell lines has been shown to be sufficient to enable the HCV secretion process, suggesting a lack of other host cellular factor(s) and/or the presence of

  8. Ultrastructural study of Mayaro virus replication in BHK-21 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezencio, J M; de Souza, W; Fonseca, M E; Rebello, M A

    1990-01-01

    The replication of Mayaro virus in BHK-21 cells was studied by electron microscopy. The infected cells show an intense vacuolization and proliferation of membranous structures. At 5 h post-infection, precursor virus particles were seen in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Later, mature virus particles were found outside the cells and budding from the plasma membrane. Enveloped virus particles were also observed inside the vesicles and budding across their membrane. The release of virus particles into the extracellular space by exocytosis was also observed. In a later stage of the infection, inclusion bodies were sometimes present in the cytoplasm of infected cells. We conclude that in BHK-21 cells, budding from the plasma membrane is the main process of Mayaro virus maturation, and in this kind of cell replication differs significantly from that observed in Aedes albopictus cells.

  9. Programmed cell death and hybrid incompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, S A; Barr, C M

    2003-01-01

    We propose a new theory to explain developmental aberrations in plant hybrids. In our theory, hybrid incompatibilities arise from imbalances in the mechanisms that cause male sterility in hermaphroditic plants. Mitochondria often cause male sterility by killing the tapetal tissue that nurtures pollen mother cells. Recent evidence suggests that mitochondria destroy the tapetum by triggering standard pathways of programmed cell death. Some nuclear genotypes repress mitochondrial male sterility and restore pollen fertility. Normal regulation of tapetal development therefore arises from a delicate balance between the disruptive effects of mitochondria and the defensive countermeasures of the nuclear genes. In hybrids, incompatibilities between male-sterile mitochondria and nuclear restorers may frequently upset the regulatory control of programmed cell death, causing tapetal abnormalities and male sterility. We propose that hybrid misregulation of programmed cell death may also spill over into other tissues, explaining various developmental aberrations observed in hybrids.

  10. Chromosomal replication incompatibility in Dam methyltransferase deficient Escherichia coli cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freiesleben, Ulrik Von

    1996-01-01

    Dam methyltransferase deficient Escherichia coli cells containing minichromosomes were constructed. Free plasmid DNA could not be detected in these cells and the minichromosomes were found to be integrated in multiple copies in the origin of replication (oriC) region of the host chromosome...

  11. Aquatic viruses induce host cell death pathways and its application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshi, Latif; Wu, Jen-Leih; Wang, Hao-Ven; Hong, Jiann-Ruey

    2016-01-04

    Virus infections of mammalian and animal cells consist of a series of events. As intracellular parasites, viruses rely on the use of host cellular machinery. Through the use of cell culture and molecular approaches over the past decade, our knowledge of the biology of aquatic viruses has grown exponentially. The increase in aquaculture operations worldwide has provided new approaches for the transmission of aquatic viruses that include RNA and DNA viruses. Therefore, the struggle between the virus and the host for control of the cell's death machinery is crucial for survival. Viruses are obligatory intracellular parasites and, as such, must modulate apoptotic pathways to control the lifespan of their host to complete their replication cycle. This paper updates the discussion on the detailed mechanisms of action that various aquatic viruses use to induce cell death pathways in the host, such as Bad-mediated, mitochondria-mediated, ROS-mediated and Fas-mediated cell death circuits. Understanding how viruses exploit the apoptotic pathways of their hosts may provide great opportunities for the development of future potential therapeutic strategies and pathogenic insights into different aquatic viral diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Ribavirin Inhibits Parrot Bornavirus 4 Replication in Cell Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musser, Jeffrey M B; Heatley, J Jill; Koinis, Anastasia V; Suchodolski, Paulette F; Guo, Jianhua; Escandon, Paulina; Tizard, Ian R

    2015-01-01

    Parrot bornavirus 4 is an etiological agent of proventricular dilatation disease, a fatal neurologic and gastrointestinal disease of psittacines and other birds. We tested the ability of ribavirin, an antiviral nucleoside analog with antiviral activity against a range of RNA and DNA viruses, to inhibit parrot bornavirus 4 replication in duck embryonic fibroblast cells. Two analytical methods that evaluate different products of viral replication, indirect immunocytochemistry for viral specific nucleoprotein and qRT-PCR for viral specific phosphoprotein gene mRNA, were used. Ribavirin at concentrations between 2.5 and 25 μg/mL inhibited parrot bornavirus 4 replication, decreasing viral mRNA and viral protein load, in infected duck embryonic fibroblast cells. The addition of guanosine diminished the antiviral activity of ribavirin suggesting that one possible mechanism of action against parrot bornavirus 4 may likely be through inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase inhibition. This study demonstrates parrot bornavirus 4 susceptibility to ribavirin in cell culture.

  13. Ribavirin Inhibits Parrot Bornavirus 4 Replication in Cell Culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M B Musser

    Full Text Available Parrot bornavirus 4 is an etiological agent of proventricular dilatation disease, a fatal neurologic and gastrointestinal disease of psittacines and other birds. We tested the ability of ribavirin, an antiviral nucleoside analog with antiviral activity against a range of RNA and DNA viruses, to inhibit parrot bornavirus 4 replication in duck embryonic fibroblast cells. Two analytical methods that evaluate different products of viral replication, indirect immunocytochemistry for viral specific nucleoprotein and qRT-PCR for viral specific phosphoprotein gene mRNA, were used. Ribavirin at concentrations between 2.5 and 25 μg/mL inhibited parrot bornavirus 4 replication, decreasing viral mRNA and viral protein load, in infected duck embryonic fibroblast cells. The addition of guanosine diminished the antiviral activity of ribavirin suggesting that one possible mechanism of action against parrot bornavirus 4 may likely be through inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase inhibition. This study demonstrates parrot bornavirus 4 susceptibility to ribavirin in cell culture.

  14. The regulation of apoptotic cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.P. Amarante-Mendes

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is a fundamental biological phenomenon in which the death of a cell is genetically and biochemically regulated. Different molecules are involved in the regulation of the apoptotic process. Death receptors, coupled to distinct members of the caspases as well as other adapter molecules, are involved in the initiation of the stress signals (The Indictment. Members of the Bcl-2 family control at the mitochondrial level the decision between life and death (The Judgement. The effector caspases are responsible for all morphological and biochemical changes related to apoptosis including the "eat-me" signals perceived by phagocytes and neighboring cells (The Execution. Finally, apoptosis would have little biological significance without the recognition and removal of the dying cells (The Burial.

  15. The regulation of apoptotic cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarante-Mendes G.P.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is a fundamental biological phenomenon in which the death of a cell is genetically and biochemically regulated. Different molecules are involved in the regulation of the apoptotic process. Death receptors, coupled to distinct members of the caspases as well as other adapter molecules, are involved in the initiation of the stress signals (The Indictment. Members of the Bcl-2 family control at the mitochondrial level the decision between life and death (The Judgement. The effector caspases are responsible for all morphological and biochemical changes related to apoptosis including the "eat-me" signals perceived by phagocytes and neighboring cells (The Execution. Finally, apoptosis would have little biological significance without the recognition and removal of the dying cells (The Burial.

  16. The LMO2 oncogene regulates DNA replication in hematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sincennes, Marie-Claude; Humbert, Magali; Grondin, Benoît; Lisi, Véronique; Veiga, Diogo F T; Haman, André; Cazaux, Christophe; Mashtalir, Nazar; Affar, El Bachir; Verreault, Alain; Hoang, Trang

    2016-02-02

    Oncogenic transcription factors are commonly activated in acute leukemias and subvert normal gene expression networks to reprogram hematopoietic progenitors into preleukemic stem cells, as exemplified by LIM-only 2 (LMO2) in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Whether or not these oncoproteins interfere with other DNA-dependent processes is largely unexplored. Here, we show that LMO2 is recruited to DNA replication origins by interaction with three essential replication enzymes: DNA polymerase delta (POLD1), DNA primase (PRIM1), and minichromosome 6 (MCM6). Furthermore, tethering LMO2 to synthetic DNA sequences is sufficient to transform these sequences into origins of replication. We next addressed the importance of LMO2 in erythroid and thymocyte development, two lineages in which cell cycle and differentiation are tightly coordinated. Lowering LMO2 levels in erythroid progenitors delays G1-S progression and arrests erythropoietin-dependent cell growth while favoring terminal differentiation. Conversely, ectopic expression in thymocytes induces DNA replication and drives these cells into cell cycle, causing differentiation blockade. Our results define a novel role for LMO2 in directly promoting DNA synthesis and G1-S progression.

  17. ETosis: A Microbicidal Mechanism beyond Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson B. Guimarães-Costa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Netosis is a recently described type of neutrophil death occurring with the release to the extracellular milieu of a lattice composed of DNA associated with histones and granular and cytoplasmic proteins. These webs, initially named neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs, ensnare and kill microorganisms. Similarly, other cell types, such as eosinophils, mast cells, and macrophages, can also dye by this mechanism; thus, it was renamed as ETosis, meaning death with release of extracellular traps (ETs. Here, we review the mechanism of NETosis/etosis, emphasizing its role in diseases caused by protozoan parasites, fungi, and viruses.

  18. Viral subversion of immunogenic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepp, Oliver; Senovilla, Laura; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Panaretakis, Theocharis; Tesniere, Antoine; Schlemmer, Frederic; Madeo, Frank; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido

    2009-03-15

    While physiological cell death is non-immunogenic, pathogen induced cell death can be immunogenic and hence stimulate an immune response against antigens that derive from dying cells and are presented by dendritic cells (DCs). The obligate immunogenic "eat-me" signal generated by dying cells consists in the exposure of calreticulin (CRT) at the cell surface. This particular "eat-me" signal, which facilitates engulfment by DCs, can only be found on cells that succumb to immunogenic apoptosis, while it is not present on cells dying in an immunologically silent fashion. CRT normally resides in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), yet can translocate to the plasma membrane surface through a complex pathway that involves elements of the ER stress response (e.g., the eIF2alpha-phosphorylating kinase PERK), the apoptotic machinery (e.g., caspase-8 and its substrate BAP31, Bax, Bak), the anterograde transport from the ER to the Golgi apparatus, and SNARE-dependent exocytosis. A large panoply of viruses encodes proteins that inhibit eIF2alpha kinases, catalyze the dephosphorylation of eIF2alpha, bind to caspase-8, Bap31, Bax or Bak, or perturb exocytosis. We therefore postulate that obligate intracellular pathogens have developed a variety of strategies to subvert CRT exposure, thereby avoiding immunogenic cell death.

  19. The deaths of a cell: how language and metaphor influence the science of cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Andrew S

    2014-12-01

    Multicellular development and tissue maintenance involve the regular elimination of damaged and healthy cells. The science of this genetically regulated cell death is particularly rich in metaphors: 'programmed cell death' or 'cell suicide' is considered an 'altruistic' act on the part of a cell for the benefit of the organism as a whole. It is also considered a form of 'social control' exerted by the body/organism over its component cells. This paper analyzes the various functions of these metaphors and critical discussion about them within the scientific community. Bodies such as the Nomenclature Committee on Cell Death (NCCD) have been charged with bringing order to the language of cell death to facilitate scientific progress. While the NCCD recommends adopting more objective biochemical terminology to describe the mechanisms of cell death, the metaphors in question retain an important function by highlighting the broader context within which cell death occurs. Scientific metaphors act as conceptual 'tools' which fulfill various roles, from highlighting a phenomenon as of particular interest, situating it in a particular context, or suggesting explanatory causal mechanisms.

  20. Inducible cell death in plant immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofius, Daniel; Tsitsigiannis, Dimitrios I; Jones, Jonathan D G

    2006-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) occurs during vegetative and reproductive plant growth, as typified by autumnal leaf senescence and the terminal differentiation of the endosperm of cereals which provide our major source of food. PCD also occurs in response to environmental stress and pathogen attack,...

  1. Lysosomal cell death mechanisms in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Sintes, Raquel; Ledesma, María Dolores; Boya, Patricia

    2016-12-01

    Lysosomes are degradative organelles essential for cell homeostasis that regulate a variety of processes, from calcium signaling and nutrient responses to autophagic degradation of intracellular components. Lysosomal cell death is mediated by the lethal effects of cathepsins, which are released into the cytoplasm following lysosomal damage. This process of lysosomal membrane permeabilization and cathepsin release is observed in several physiopathological conditions and plays a role in tissue remodeling, the immune response to intracellular pathogens and neurodegenerative diseases. Many evidences indicate that aging strongly influences lysosomal activity by altering the physical and chemical properties of these organelles, rendering them more sensitive to stress. In this review we focus on how aging alters lysosomal function and increases cell sensitivity to lysosomal membrane permeabilization and lysosomal cell death, both in physiological conditions and age-related pathologies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of inducing or inhibiting apoptosis on Sindbis virus replication in mosquito cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua; Blair, Carol D; Olson, Ken E; Clem, Rollie J

    2008-11-01

    Sindbis virus (SINV) is a mosquito-borne virus in the genus Alphavirus, family Togaviridae. Like most alphaviruses, SINVs exhibit lytic infection (apoptosis) in many mammalian cell types, but are generally thought to cause persistent infection with only moderate cytopathic effects in mosquito cells. However, there have been several reports of apoptotic-like cell death in mosquitoes infected with alphaviruses or flaviviruses. Given that apoptosis has been shown to be an antiviral response in other systems, we have constructed recombinant SINVs that express either pro-apoptotic or anti-apoptotic genes in order to test the effects of inducing or inhibiting apoptosis on SINV replication in mosquito cells. Recombinant SINVs expressing the pro-apoptotic genes reaper (rpr) from Drosophila or michelob_x (mx) from Aedes aegypti caused extensive apoptosis in cells from the mosquito cell line C6/36, thus changing the normal persistent infection observed with SINV to a lytic infection. Although the infected cells underwent apoptosis, high levels of virus replication were still observed during the initial infection. However, virus production subsequently decreased compared with persistently infected cells, which continued to produce high levels of virus over the next several days. Infection of C6/36 cells with SINV expressing the baculovirus caspase inhibitor P35 inhibited actinomycin D-induced caspase activity and protected infected cells from actinomycin D-induced apoptosis, but had no observable effect on virus replication. This study is the first to test directly whether inducing or inhibiting apoptosis affects arbovirus replication in mosquito cells.

  3. Ribosome biogenesis in replicating cells: Integration of experiment and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earnest, Tyler M; Cole, John A; Peterson, Joseph R; Hallock, Michael J; Kuhlman, Thomas E; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida

    2016-10-01

    Ribosomes-the primary macromolecular machines responsible for translating the genetic code into proteins-are complexes of precisely folded RNA and proteins. The ways in which their production and assembly are managed by the living cell is of deep biological importance. Here we extend a recent spatially resolved whole-cell model of ribosome biogenesis in a fixed volume [Earnest et al., Biophys J 2015, 109, 1117-1135] to include the effects of growth, DNA replication, and cell division. All biological processes are described in terms of reaction-diffusion master equations and solved stochastically using the Lattice Microbes simulation software. In order to determine the replication parameters, we construct and analyze a series of Escherichia coli strains with fluorescently labeled genes distributed evenly throughout their chromosomes. By measuring these cells' lengths and number of gene copies at the single-cell level, we could fit a statistical model of the initiation and duration of chromosome replication. We found that for our slow-growing (120 min doubling time) E. coli cells, replication was initiated 42 min into the cell cycle and completed after an additional 42 min. While simulations of the biogenesis model produce the correct ribosome and mRNA counts over the cell cycle, the kinetic parameters for transcription and degradation are lower than anticipated from a recent analytical time dependent model of in vivo mRNA production. Describing expression in terms of a simple chemical master equation, we show that the discrepancies are due to the lack of nonribosomal genes in the extended biogenesis model which effects the competition of mRNA for ribosome binding, and suggest corrections to parameters to be used in the whole-cell model when modeling expression of the entire transcriptome. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 735-751, 2016.

  4. Hemoglobins, programmed cell death and somatic embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Robert D; Huang, Shuanglong; Stasolla, Claudio

    2013-10-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a universal process in all multicellular organisms. It is a critical component in a diverse number of processes ranging from growth and differentiation to response to stress. Somatic embryogenesis is one such process where PCD is significantly involved. Nitric oxide is increasingly being recognized as playing a significant role in regulating PCD in both mammalian and plant systems. Plant hemoglobins scavenge NO, and evidence is accumulating that events that modify NO levels in plants also affect hemoglobin expression. Here, we review the process of PCD, describing the involvement of NO and plant hemoglobins in the process. NO is an effector of cell death in both plants and vertebrates, triggering the cascade of events leading to targeted cell death that is a part of an organism's response to stress or to tissue differentiation and development. Expression of specific hemoglobins can alter this response in plants by scavenging the NO, thus, interrupting the death process. Somatic embryogenesis is used as a model system to demonstrate how cell-specific expression of different classes of hemoglobins can alter the embryogenic process, affecting hormone synthesis, cell metabolite levels and genes associated with PCD and embryogenic competence. We propose that plant hemoglobins influence somatic embryogenesis and PCD through cell-specific expression of a distinct plant hemoglobin. It is based on the premise that both embryogenic competence and PCD are strongly influenced by cellular NO levels. Increases in cellular NO levels result in elevated Zn(2+) and reactive-oxygen species associated with PCD, but they also result in decreased expression of MYC2, a transcription factor that is a negative effector of indoleacetic acid synthesis, a hormone that positively influences embryogenic competence. Cell-specific hemoglobin expression reduces NO levels as a result of NO scavenging, resulting in cell survival.

  5. Replication fork stability confers chemoresistance in BRCA-deficient cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chaudhuri, Arnab Ray; Callen, Elsa; Ding, Xia;

    2016-01-01

    Cells deficient in the Brca1 and Brca2 genes have reduced capacity to repair DNA double-strand breaks by homologous recombination and consequently are hypersensitive to DNA-damaging agents, including cisplatin and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. Here we show that loss of the MLL3....../4 complex protein, PTIP, protects Brca1/2-deficient cells from DNA damage and rescues the lethality of Brca2-deficient embryonic stem cells. However, PTIP deficiency does not restore homologous recombination activity at double-strand breaks. Instead, its absence inhibits the recruitment of the MRE11...... nuclease to stalled replication forks, which in turn protects nascent DNA strands from extensive degradation. More generally, acquisition of PARP inhibitors and cisplatin resistance is associated with replication fork protection in Brca2-deficient tumour cells that do not develop Brca2 reversion mutations...

  6. Involvement of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (Cyclin) in DNA replication in living cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuber, M.; Tan, E.M.; Ryoji, M.

    1989-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) (also called cyclin) is known to stimulate the activity of DNA polymerase /delta/ but not the other DNA polymerases in vitro. The authors injected a human autoimmune antibody against PCNA into unfertilized eggs of Xenopus laevis and examined the effects of this antibody on the replication of injected plasmid DNA as well as egg chromosomes. The anti-PCNA antibody inhibited plasmid replication by up to 67%, demonstrating that PCNA is involved in plasmid replication in living cells. This result further implies that DNA polymerase /delta/ is necessary for plasmid replication in vivo, Anti-PCNA antibody alone did not block plasmid replication completely, but the residual replication was abolished by coinjection of a monoclonal antibody against DNA polymerase /alpha/. Anti-DNA polymerase /alpha/ alone inhibited plasmid replication by 63%. Thus, DNA ploymerase /alpha/ is also required for plasmid replication in this system. In similar studies on the replication of egg chromosomes, the inhibition by anti-PCNA antibody was only 30%, while anti-DNA polymerase /alpha/ antibody blocked 73% of replication. They concluded that the replication machineries of chromosomes and plasmid differ in their relative content of DNA polymerase /delta/. In addition, they obtained evidence through the use of phenylbutyl deoxyguanosine, an inhibitor of DNA polymearse /alpha/, that the structure of DNA polymerase /alpha/ holoenzyme for chromosome replication is significantly different from that for plasmid replication.

  7. Chromosome replication, cell growth, division and shape: a personal perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arieh eZaritsky

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The origins of Molecular Biology and Bacterial Physiology are reviewed, from our personal standpoints, emphasizing the coupling between bacterial growth, chromosome replication and cell division, dimensions and shape. Current knowledge is discussed with historical perspective, summarizing past and present achievements and enlightening ideas for future studies. An interactive simulation program of the Bacterial Cell Division Cycle (BCD, described as The Central Dogma in Bacteriology, is briefly represented. The coupled process of transcription/translation of genes encoding membrane proteins and insertion into the membrane (so-called transertion is invoked as the functional relationship between the only two unique macromolecules in the cell, DNA and peptidoglycan embodying the nucleoid and the sacculus respectively. We envision that nucleoid complexity, defined as the weighted-mean DNA content associated with the replication terminus, is directly related to cell shape through the transertion process. Accordingly, the primary signal for cell division transmitted by DNA dynamics (replication, transcription and segregation to the peptidoglycan biosynthetic machinery is of a physico-chemical nature, eg stress in the plasma membrane, relieving nucleoid occlusion in the cell's center hence enabling the divisome to assemble and function between segregated daughter nucleoids.

  8. Cell death-independent activities of the death receptors CD95, TRAILR1, and TRAILR2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmund, Daniela; Lang, Isabell; Wajant, Harald

    2017-04-01

    Since their identification more than 20 years ago, the death receptors CD95, TRAILR1, and TRAILR2 have been intensively studied with respect to their cell death-inducing activities. These receptors, however, can also trigger a variety of cell death-independent cellular responses reaching from the activation of proinflammatory gene transcription programs over the stimulation of proliferation and differentiation to induction of cell migration. The cell death-inducing signaling mechanisms of CD95 and the TRAIL death receptors are well understood. In contrast, despite the increasing recognition of the biological and pathophysiological relevance of the cell death-independent activities of CD95, TRAILR1, and TRAILR2, the corresponding signaling mechanisms are less understood and give no fully coherent picture. This review is focused on the cell death-independent activities of CD95 and the TRAIL death receptors and addresses mainly three questions: (a) how are these receptors linked to noncell death pathways at the molecular level, (b) which factors determine the balance of cell death and cell death-independent activities of CD95 and the TRAIL death receptors at the cellular level, and (c) what are the consequences of the cell death-independent functions of these receptors for their role in cancer and inflammatory diseases. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  9. The bimodal lifestyle of intracellular Salmonella in epithelial cells: replication in the cytosol obscures defects in vacuolar replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Malik-Kale

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium invades and proliferates within epithelial cells. Intracellular bacteria replicate within a membrane bound vacuole known as the Salmonella containing vacuole. However, this bacterium can also replicate efficiently in the cytosol of epithelial cells and net intracellular growth is a product of both vacuolar and cytosolic replication. Here we have used semi-quantitative single-cell analyses to investigate the contribution of each of these replicative niches to intracellular proliferation in cultured epithelial cells. We show that cytosolic replication can account for the majority of net replication even though it occurs in less than 20% of infected cells. Consequently, assays for net growth in a population of infected cells, for example by recovery of colony forming units, are not good indicators of vacuolar proliferation. We also show that the Salmonella Type III Secretion System 2, which is required for SCV biogenesis, is not required for cytosolic replication. Altogether this study illustrates the value of single cell analyses when studying intracellular pathogens.

  10. Tumor cell "dead or alive": caspase and survivin regulate cell death, cell cycle and cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, A; Shiraki, K

    2001-04-01

    Cell death and cell cycle progression are two sides of the same coin, and these two different phenomenons are regulated moderately to maintain the cellular homeostasis. Tumor is one of the disease states produced as a result of the disintegrated regulation and is characterized as cells showing an irreversible progression of cell cycle and a resistance to cell death signaling. Several investigations have been performed for the understanding of cell death or cell cycle, and cell death research has remarkably progressed in these 10 years. Caspase is a nomenclature referring to ICE/CED-3 cysteine proteinase family and plays a central role during cell death. Recently, several investigations raised some possible hypotheses that caspase is also involved in cell cycle regulation. In this issue, therefore, we review the molecular basis of cell death and cell cycle regulated by caspase in tumor, especially hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

  11. Programmed cell death in the plant immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll, N S; Epple, P; Dangl, J L

    2011-08-01

    Cell death has a central role in innate immune responses in both plants and animals. Besides sharing striking convergences and similarities in the overall evolutionary organization of their innate immune systems, both plants and animals can respond to infection and pathogen recognition with programmed cell death. The fact that plant and animal pathogens have evolved strategies to subvert specific cell death modalities emphasizes the essential role of cell death during immune responses. The hypersensitive response (HR) cell death in plants displays morphological features, molecular architectures and mechanisms reminiscent of different inflammatory cell death types in animals (pyroptosis and necroptosis). In this review, we describe the molecular pathways leading to cell death during innate immune responses. Additionally, we present recently discovered caspase and caspase-like networks regulating cell death that have revealed fascinating analogies between cell death control across both kingdoms.

  12. Programmed cell death during quinoa perisperm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Fernández, María Paula; Maldonado, Sara

    2013-08-01

    At seed maturity, quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) perisperm consists of uniform, non-living, thin-walled cells full of starch grains. The objective of the present study was to study quinoa perisperm development and describe the programme of cell death that affects the entire tissue. A number of parameters typically measured during programmed cell death (PCD), such as cellular morphological changes in nuclei and cytoplasm, endoreduplication, DNA fragmentation, and the participation of nucleases and caspase-like proteases in nucleus dismantling, were evaluated; morphological changes in cytoplasm included subcellular aspects related to starch accumulation. This study proved that, following fertilization, the perisperm of quinoa simultaneously accumulates storage reserves and degenerates, both processes mediated by a programme of developmentally controlled cell death. The novel findings regarding perisperm development provide a starting point for further research in the Amaranthaceae genera, such as comparing seeds with and without perisperm, and specifying phylogeny and evolution within this taxon. Wherever possible and appropriate, differences between quinoa perisperm and grass starchy endosperm--a morphologically and functionally similar, although genetically different tissue--were highlighted and discussed.

  13. UV-Induced cell death in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawkar, Ganesh M; Maibam, Punyakishore; Park, Jung Hoon; Sahi, Vaidurya Pratap; Lee, Sang Yeol; Kang, Chang Ho

    2013-01-14

    Plants are photosynthetic organisms that depend on sunlight for energy. Plants respond to light through different photoreceptors and show photomorphogenic development. Apart from Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR; 400-700 nm), plants are exposed to UV light, which is comprised of UV-C (below 280 nm), UV-B (280-320 nm) and UV-A (320-390 nm). The atmospheric ozone layer protects UV-C radiation from reaching earth while the UVR8 protein acts as a receptor for UV-B radiation. Low levels of UV-B exposure initiate signaling through UVR8 and induce secondary metabolite genes involved in protection against UV while higher dosages are very detrimental to plants. It has also been reported that genes involved in MAPK cascade help the plant in providing tolerance against UV radiation. The important targets of UV radiation in plant cells are DNA, lipids and proteins and also vital processes such as photosynthesis. Recent studies showed that, in response to UV radiation, mitochondria and chloroplasts produce a reactive oxygen species (ROS). Arabidopsis metacaspase-8 (AtMC8) is induced in response to oxidative stress caused by ROS, which acts downstream of the radical induced cell death (AtRCD1) gene making plants vulnerable to cell death. The studies on salicylic and jasmonic acid signaling mutants revealed that SA and JA regulate the ROS level and antagonize ROS mediated cell death. Recently, molecular studies have revealed genes involved in response to UV exposure, with respect to programmed cell death (PCD).

  14. UV-Induced Cell Death in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Ho Kang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Plants are photosynthetic organisms that depend on sunlight for energy. Plants respond to light through different photoreceptors and show photomorphogenic development. Apart from Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR; 400–700 nm, plants are exposed to UV light, which is comprised of UV-C (below 280 nm, UV-B (280–320 nm and UV-A (320–390 nm. The atmospheric ozone layer protects UV-C radiation from reaching earth while the UVR8 protein acts as a receptor for UV-B radiation. Low levels of UV-B exposure initiate signaling through UVR8 and induce secondary metabolite genes involved in protection against UV while higher dosages are very detrimental to plants. It has also been reported that genes involved in MAPK cascade help the plant in providing tolerance against UV radiation. The important targets of UV radiation in plant cells are DNA, lipids and proteins and also vital processes such as photosynthesis. Recent studies showed that, in response to UV radiation, mitochondria and chloroplasts produce a reactive oxygen species (ROS. Arabidopsis metacaspase-8 (AtMC8 is induced in response to oxidative stress caused by ROS, which acts downstream of the radical induced cell death (AtRCD1 gene making plants vulnerable to cell death. The studies on salicylic and jasmonic acid signaling mutants revealed that SA and JA regulate the ROS level and antagonize ROS mediated cell death. Recently, molecular studies have revealed genes involved in response to UV exposure, with respect to programmed cell death (PCD.

  15. Programmed cell death in seeds of angiosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Fernández, María Paula; Maldonado, Sara

    2015-12-01

    During the diversification of angiosperms, seeds have evolved structural, chemical, molecular and physiologically developing changes that specially affect the nucellus and endosperm. All through seed evolution, programmed cell death (PCD) has played a fundamental role. However, examples of PCD during seed development are limited. The present review examines PCD in integuments, nucellus, suspensor and endosperm in those representative examples of seeds studied to date. © 2015 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  16. Coordination between chromosome replication, segregation, and cell division in Caulobacter crescentus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Bugge

    2006-01-01

    Progression through the Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle is coupled to a cellular differentiation program. The swarmer cell is replicationally quiescent, and DNA replication initiates at the swarmer-to-stalked cell transition. There is a very short delay between initiation of DNA replication......, and the completely replicated terminus regions stay associated with each other after chromosome replication is completed, disassociating very late in the cell cycle shortly before the final cell division event. Invagination of the cytoplasmic membrane occurs earlier than separation of the replicated terminus regions...

  17. TNF α and reactive oxygen species in necrotic cell death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael J Morgan; You-Sun Kim; Zheng-gang Liu

    2008-01-01

    Death receptors, including the TNF receptor-1 (TNF-RI), have been shown to be able to initiate caspase-independent cell death. This form of "necrotic cell death" appears to be dependent on the generation of reactive oxygen species. Recent data have indicated that superoxide generation is dependent on the activation of NADPH oxidases, which form a complex with the adaptor molecules RIP1 and TRADD. The mechanism of superoxide generation further establishes RIP1 as the central molecule in ROS production and cell death initiated by TNFa and other death receptors. A role for the sustained JNK activation in necrotic cell death is also suggested. The sensitization of virus-infected cells to TNFa indicates that necrotic cell death may represent an alternative cell death pathway for clearance of infected cells.

  18. Molecular cell death platforms and assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, Peter D; Riedl, Stefan J

    2010-12-01

    Multi-cellular animals have evolved a variety of mechanisms to respond to diverse apoptotic stimuli. In general these proceed through activation of apical caspases and culminate in executioner caspase activation and cell death. Because of the breadth of possible initiators, various molecular platforms are used to trigger different apical caspases. Although some common protein domains are used to assemble the apoptosome, the PIDDosome and death receptor complexes, an array of checks-and-balances are employed to ensure appropriate activation. Notwithstanding, these pathways share the underlying principle of proximity-dependent activation and post-translational modification. Here we will describe our current structural understanding of assembly and regulation of these signaling platforms.

  19. Targeting the replisome with transduced monoclonal antibodies triggers lethal DNA replication stress in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desplancq, Dominique; Freund, Guillaume; Conic, Sascha; Sibler, Annie-Paule; Didier, Pascal; Stoessel, Audrey; Oulad-Abdelghani, Mustapha; Vigneron, Marc; Wagner, Jérôme; Mély, Yves; Chatton, Bruno; Tora, Laszlo; Weiss, Etienne

    2016-03-15

    Although chemical inhibition of the DNA damage response (DDR) in cancer cells triggers cell death, it is not clear if the fork blockade achieved with inhibitors that neutralise proteins of the replisome is sufficient on its own to overcome the DDR. Monoclonal antibodies to PCNA, which block the DNA elongation process in vitro, have been developed. When these antibodies were transduced into cancer cells, they are able to inhibit the incorporation of nucleoside analogues. When co-delivered with anti-PCNA siRNA, the cells were flattened and the size of their nuclei increased by up to 3-fold, prior to cell death. Analysis of these nuclei by super-resolution microscopy revealed the presence of large numbers of phosphorylated histone H2AX foci. A senescence-like phenotype of the transduced cells was also observed upon delivery of the corresponding Fab molecules or following PCNA gene disruption or when the Fab fragment of an antibody that neutralises DNA polymerase alpha was used. Primary melanoma cells and leukaemia cells that are resistant to chemical inhibitors were similarly affected by these antibody treatments. These results demonstrate that transduced antibodies can trigger a lethal DNA replication stress, which kills cancer cells by abolishing the biological activity of several constituents of the replisome.

  20. Replicating vesicles as models of primitive cell growth and division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanczyc, Martin M; Szostak, Jack W

    2004-12-01

    Primitive cells, lacking the complex bio-machinery present in modern cells, would have had to rely on the self-organizing properties of their components and on interactions with their environment to achieve basic cellular functions such as growth and division. Many bilayer-membrane vesicles, depending on their composition and environment, can exhibit complex morphological changes such as growth, fusion, fission, budding, internal vesicle assembly and vesicle-surface interactions. The rich dynamic properties of these vesicles provide interesting models of how primitive cellular replication might have occurred in response to purely physical and chemical forces.

  1. T-705 (favipiravir) inhibition of arenavirus replication in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendenhall, Michelle; Russell, Andrew; Juelich, Terry; Messina, Emily L; Smee, Donald F; Freiberg, Alexander N; Holbrook, Michael R; Furuta, Yousuke; de la Torre, Juan-Carlos; Nunberg, Jack H; Gowen, Brian B

    2011-02-01

    A number of New World arenaviruses (Junín [JUNV], Machupo [MACV], and Guanarito [GTOV] viruses) can cause human disease ranging from mild febrile illness to a severe and often fatal hemorrhagic fever syndrome. These highly pathogenic viruses and the Old World Lassa fever virus pose a significant threat to public health and national security. The only licensed antiviral agent with activity against these viruses, ribavirin, has had mixed success in treating severe arenaviral disease and is associated with significant toxicities. A novel pyrazine derivative currently in clinical trials for the treatment of influenza virus infections, T-705 (favipiravir), has demonstrated broad-spectrum activity against a number of RNA viruses, including arenaviruses. T-705 has also been shown to be effective against Pichinde arenavirus infection in a hamster model. Here, we demonstrate the robust antiviral activity of T-705 against authentic highly pathogenic arenaviruses in cell culture. We show that T-705 disrupts an early or intermediate stage in viral replication, distinct from absorption or release, and that its antiviral activity in cell culture is reversed by the addition of purine bases and nucleosides, but not with pyrimidines. Specific inhibition of viral replication/transcription by T-705 was demonstrated using a lymphocytic choriomeningitis arenavirus replicon system. Our findings indicate that T-705 acts to inhibit arenavirus replication/transcription and may directly target the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase.

  2. Lymphatic endothelial cells are a replicative niche for Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Thomas R.; de Souza Carvalho-Wodarz, Cristiane; Repnik, Urska; Russell, Matthew R.G.; Borel, Sophie; Diedrich, Collin R.; Rohde, Manfred; Wainwright, Helen; Collinson, Lucy M.; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Griffiths, Gareth; Gutierrez, Maximiliano G.

    2016-01-01

    In extrapulmonary tuberculosis, the most common site of infection is within the lymphatic system, and there is growing recognition that lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) are involved in immune function. Here, we identified LECs, which line the lymphatic vessels, as a niche for Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the lymph nodes of patients with tuberculosis. In cultured primary human LECs (hLECs), we determined that M. tuberculosis replicates both in the cytosol and within autophagosomes, but the bacteria failed to replicate when the virulence locus RD1 was deleted. Activation by IFN-γ induced a cell-autonomous response in hLECs via autophagy and NO production that restricted M. tuberculosis growth. Thus, depending on the activation status of LECs, autophagy can both promote and restrict replication. Together, these findings reveal a previously unrecognized role for hLECs and autophagy in tuberculosis pathogenesis and suggest that hLECs are a potential niche for M. tuberculosis that allows establishment of persistent infection in lymph nodes. PMID:26901813

  3. Regulation of cell survival and death during Flavivirus infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sounak; Ghosh; Roy; Beata; Sadigh; Emmanuel; Datan; Richard; A; Lockshin; Zahra; Zakeri

    2014-01-01

    Flaviviruses, ss(+) RNA viruses, include many of mankind’s most important pathogens. Their pathogenicity derives from their ability to infect many types of cells including neurons, to replicate, and eventually to kill the cells. Flaviviruses can activate tumor necrosis factor α and both intrinsic(Bax-mediated) and extrinsic pathways to apoptosis. Thus they can use many approaches for activating these pathways. Infection can lead to necrosis if viral load is extremely high or to other types of cell death if routes to apoptosis are blocked. Dengue and Japanese Encephalitis Virus can also activate autophagy. In this case the autophagy temporarily spares the infected cell, allowing a longer period of reproduction for the virus, and the autophagy further protects the cell against other stresses such as those caused by reactive oxygen species. Several of the viral proteins have been shown to induce apoptosis or autophagy on their own, independent of the presence of other viral proteins. Given the versatility of these viruses to adapt to and manipulate the metabolism, and thus to control the survival of, the infected cells, we need to understand much better how the specific viral proteins affect the pathways to apoptosis and autophagy. Only in this manner will we be able to minimize the pathology that they cause.

  4. Programmed cell death in plants and caspase-like activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaussand, Gwénael Martial Daniel Jean-Marie

    2007-01-01

    The development of multicellular organisms involves an important balance between cell growth, cell division and cell death. In animals, programmed cell death (PCD) plays a key role by forming and deleting structures, controlling cell numbers and eliminating abnormal damaged cells. Caspases were foun

  5. Astrocyte Apoptosis and HIV Replication Are Modulated in Host Cells Coinfected with Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier M. Urquiza

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease. In immunosuppressed individuals, as it occurs in the coinfection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, the central nervous system may be affected. In this regard, reactivation of Chagas disease is severe and often lethal, and it accounts for meningoencephalitis. Astrocytes play a crucial role in the environment maintenance of healthy neurons; however, they can host HIV and T. cruzi. In this report, human astrocytes were infected in vitro with both genetically modified-pathogens to express alternative fluorophore. As evidenced by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry, HIV and T. cruzi coexist in the same astrocyte, likely favoring reciprocal interactions. In this context, lower rates of cell death were observed in both T. cruzi monoinfected-astrocytes and HIV-T. cruzi coinfection in comparison with those infected only with HIV. The level of HIV replication is significantly diminished under T. cruzi coinfection, but without affecting the infectivity of the HIV progeny. This interference with viral replication appears to be related to the T. cruzi multiplication rate or its increased intracellular presence but does not require their intracellular cohabitation or infected cell-to-cell contact. Among several Th1/Th2/Th17 profile-related cytokines, only IL-6 was overexpressed in HIV-T. cruzi coinfection exhibiting its cytoprotective role. This study demonstrates that T. cruzi and HIV are able to coinfect astrocytes thus altering viral replication and apoptosis.

  6. Programmed cell death and its role in inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Yang; Ge-Ning Jiang; Peng Zhang; Jie Fan

    2015-01-01

    Cell death plays an important role in the regulation of inflammation and may be the result of inflammation. The maintenance of tissue homeostasis necessitates both the recognition and removal of invading microbial pathogens as well as the clearance of dying cells. In the past few decades, emerging knowledge on cell death and inflammation has enriched our molecular understanding of the signaling pathways that mediate various programs of cell death and multiple types of inflammatory responses. This review provides an overview of the major types of cell death related to inflammation. Modification of cell death pathways is likely to be a logical therapeutic target for inflammatory diseases.

  7. Inhibition of Bim enhances replication of varicella-zoster virus and delays plaque formation in virus-infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xueqiao; Cohen, Jeffrey I

    2014-01-01

    Programmed cell death (apoptosis) is an important host defense mechanism against intracellular pathogens, such as viruses. Accordingly, viruses have evolved multiple mechanisms to modulate apoptosis to enhance replication. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) induces apoptosis in human fibroblasts and melanoma cells. We found that VZV triggered the phosphorylation of the proapoptotic proteins Bim and BAD but had little or no effect on other Bcl-2 family members. Since phosphorylation of Bim and BAD reduces their proapoptotic activity, this may prevent or delay apoptosis in VZV-infected cells. Phosphorylation of Bim but not BAD in VZV-infected cells was dependent on activation of the MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. Cells knocked down for Bim showed delayed VZV plaque formation, resulting in longer survival of VZV-infected cells and increased replication of virus, compared with wild-type cells infected with virus. Conversely, overexpression of Bim resulted in earlier plaque formation, smaller plaques, reduced virus replication, and increased caspase 3 activity. Inhibition of caspase activity in VZV-infected cells overexpressing Bim restored levels of virus production similar to those seen with virus-infected wild-type cells. Previously we showed that VZV ORF12 activates ERK and inhibits apoptosis in virus-infected cells. Here we found that VZV ORF12 contributes to Bim and BAD phosphorylation. In summary, VZV triggers Bim phosphorylation; reduction of Bim levels results in longer survival of VZV-infected cells and increased VZV replication.

  8. Intracellular growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis after macrophage cell death leads to serial killing of host cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahamed, Deeqa; Boulle, Mikael; Ganga, Yashica; Mc Arthur, Chanelle; Skroch, Steven; Oom, Lance; Catinas, Oana; Pillay, Kelly; Naicker, Myshnee; Rampersad, Sanisha; Mathonsi, Colisile; Hunter, Jessica; Sreejit, Gopalkrishna; Pym, Alexander S; Lustig, Gila; Sigal, Alex

    2017-01-01

    A hallmark of pulmonary tuberculosis is the formation of macrophage-rich granulomas. These may restrict Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) growth, or progress to central necrosis and cavitation, facilitating pathogen growth. To determine factors leading to Mtb proliferation and host cell death, we used live cell imaging to track Mtb infection outcomes in individual primary human macrophages. Internalization of Mtb aggregates caused macrophage death, and phagocytosis of large aggregates was more cytotoxic than multiple small aggregates containing similar numbers of bacilli. Macrophage death did not result in clearance of Mtb. Rather, it led to accelerated intracellular Mtb growth regardless of prior activation or macrophage type. In contrast, bacillary replication was controlled in live phagocytes. Mtb grew as a clump in dead cells, and macrophages which internalized dead infected cells were very likely to die themselves, leading to a cell death cascade. This demonstrates how pathogen virulence can be achieved through numbers and aggregation states. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22028.001 PMID:28130921

  9. A CRISPR-Based Screen Identifies Genes Essential for West-Nile-Virus-Induced Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongming; Dang, Ying; Wu, Yonggan; Jia, Gengxiang; Anaya, Edgar; Zhang, Junli; Abraham, Sojan; Choi, Jang-Gi; Shi, Guojun; Qi, Ling; Manjunath, N; Wu, Haoquan

    2015-07-28

    West Nile virus (WNV) causes an acute neurological infection attended by massive neuronal cell death. However, the mechanism(s) behind the virus-induced cell death is poorly understood. Using a library containing 77,406 sgRNAs targeting 20,121 genes, we performed a genome-wide screen followed by a second screen with a sub-library. Among the genes identified, seven genes, EMC2, EMC3, SEL1L, DERL2, UBE2G2, UBE2J1, and HRD1, stood out as having the strongest phenotype, whose knockout conferred strong protection against WNV-induced cell death with two different WNV strains and in three cell lines. Interestingly, knockout of these genes did not block WNV replication. Thus, these appear to be essential genes that link WNV replication to downstream cell death pathway(s). In addition, the fact that all of these genes belong to the ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD) pathway suggests that this might be the primary driver of WNV-induced cell death. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Colorectal Cancer Stem Cells and Cell Death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catalano, Veronica [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Gaggianesi, Miriam [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Department of Cellular and Molecular Oncology, IRCCS Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri, Via Salvatore Maugeri, 27100 Pavia, PV (Italy); Spina, Valentina; Iovino, Flora [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Dieli, Francesco [Departement of Biopathology and Medicine Biotechnologies, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Stassi, Giorgio, E-mail: giorgio.stassi@unipa.it [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Department of Cellular and Molecular Oncology, IRCCS Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri, Via Salvatore Maugeri, 27100 Pavia, PV (Italy); Todaro, Matilde [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy)

    2011-04-11

    Nowadays it is reported that, similarly to other solid tumors, colorectal cancer is sustained by a rare subset of cancer stem–like cells (CSCs), which survive conventional anticancer treatments, thanks to efficient mechanisms allowing escape from apoptosis, triggering tumor recurrence. To improve patient outcomes, conventional anticancer therapies have to be replaced with specific approaches targeting CSCs. In this review we provide strong support that BMP4 is an innovative therapeutic approach to prevent colon cancer growth increasing differentiation markers expression and apoptosis. Recent data suggest that in colorectal CSCs, protection from apoptosis is achieved by interleukin-4 (IL-4) autocrine production through upregulation of antiapoptotic mediators, including survivin. Consequently, IL-4 neutralization could deregulate survivin expression and localization inducing chemosensitivity of the colon CSCs pool.

  11. Determinative developmental cell lineages are robust to cell deaths.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Rong Yang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available All forms of life are confronted with environmental and genetic perturbations, making phenotypic robustness an important characteristic of life. Although development has long been viewed as a key component of phenotypic robustness, the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here we report that the determinative developmental cell lineages of two protostomes and one deuterostome are structured such that the resulting cellular compositions of the organisms are only modestly affected by cell deaths. Several features of the cell lineages, including their shallowness, topology, early ontogenic appearances of rare cells, and non-clonality of most cell types, underlie the robustness. Simple simulations of cell lineage evolution demonstrate the possibility that the observed robustness arose as an adaptation in the face of random cell deaths in development. These results reveal general organizing principles of determinative developmental cell lineages and a conceptually new mechanism of phenotypic robustness, both of which have important implications for development and evolution.

  12. Molecular Theories of Cell Life and Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-07-27

    effects on human health . useful numbers - 1) h (Planck’s constant) = 6.626 x 10-27 erg-sec = 1.58 x 10- 3 4 cal-sec 2) 1 eV = 23 kcal/mole 3) N...Information based on Theoretical Notions from Spin-Glass Physics" Prebiotic polymers that contain internal conformational strains (analogous to...essentialA ife on another level, and vice versa. Possible roles of . such programmed cell deaths in health and diseases are reviewed. *’ 16. J. R

  13. Cytolytic replication of echoviruses in colon cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gullberg Maria

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world, killing nearly 50% of patients afflicted. Though progress is being made within surgery and other complementary treatments, there is still need for new and more effective treatments. Oncolytic virotherapy, meaning that a cancer is cured by viral infection, is a promising field for finding new and improved treatments. We have investigated the oncolytic potential of several low-pathogenic echoviruses with rare clinical occurrence. Echoviruses are members of the enterovirus genus within the family Picornaviridae. Methods Six colon cancer cell lines (CaCo-2, HT29, LoVo, SW480, SW620 and T84 were infected by the human enterovirus B species echovirus 12, 15, 17, 26 and 29, and cytopathic effects as well as viral replication efficacy were investigated. Infectivity was also tested in spheroids grown from HT29 cells. Results Echovirus 12, 17, 26 and 29 replicated efficiently in almost all cell lines and were considered highly cytolytic. The infectivity of these four viruses was further evaluated in artificial tumors (spheroids, where it was found that echovirus 12, 17 and 26 easily infected the spheroids. Conclusions We have found that echovirus 12, 17 and 26 have potential as oncolytic agents against colon cancer, by comparing the cytolytic capacity of five low-pathogenic echoviruses in six colon cancer cell lines and in artificial tumors.

  14. Cell death in mammalian cell culture: molecular mechanisms and cell line engineering strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krampe, Britta; Al-Rubeai, Mohamed

    2010-07-01

    Cell death is a fundamentally important problem in cell lines used by the biopharmaceutical industry. Environmental stress, which can result from nutrient depletion, by-product accumulation and chemical agents, activates through signalling cascades regulators that promote death. The best known key regulators of death process are the Bcl-2 family proteins which constitute a critical intracellular checkpoint of apoptosis cell death within a common death pathway. Engineering of several members of the anti-apoptosis Bcl-2 family genes in several cell types has extended the knowledge of their molecular function and interaction with other proteins, and their regulation of cell death. In this review, we describe the various modes of cell death and their death pathways at molecular and organelle level and discuss the relevance of the growing knowledge of anti-apoptotic engineering strategies to inhibit cell death and increase productivity in mammalian cell culture.

  15. Cell death in mammalian cell culture: molecular mechanisms and cell line engineering strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Krampe, Britta; Al-Rubeai, Mohamed

    2010-01-01

    Cell death is a fundamentally important problem in cell lines used by the biopharmaceutical industry. Environmental stress, which can result from nutrient depletion, by-product accumulation and chemical agents, activates through signalling cascades regulators that promote death. The best known key regulators of death process are the Bcl-2 family proteins which constitute a critical intracellular checkpoint of apoptosis cell death within a common death pathway. Engineering of several members o...

  16. Active oxygen and cell death in cereal aleurone cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fath, Angelika; Bethke, Paul; Beligni, Veronica; Jones, Russell

    2002-05-01

    The cereal aleurone layer is a secretory tissue whose function is regulated by gibberellic acid (GA) and abscisic acid (ABA). Aleurone cells lack functional chloroplasts, thus excluding photosynthesis as a source of active oxygen species (AOS) in cell death. Incubation of barley aleurone layers or protoplasts in GA initiated the cell death programme, but incubation in ABA delays programmed cell death (PCD). Light, especially blue and UV-A light, and H(2)O(2) accelerate PCD of GA-treated aleurone cells, but ABA-treated aleurone cells are refractory to light and H(2)O(2) and are not killed. It was shown that light elevated intracellular H(2)O(2), and that the rise in H(2)O(2) was greater in GA-treated cells compared to cells in ABA. Experiments with antioxidants show that PCD in aleurone is probably regulated by AOS. The sensitivity of GA-treated aleurone to light and H(2)O(2) is a result of lowered amounts of enzymes that metabolize AOS. mRNAs encoding catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and superoxide dismutase are all reduced during 6-18 h of incubation in GA, but these mRNAs were present in higher amounts in cells incubated in ABA. The amounts of protein and enzyme activities encoded by these mRNAs were also dramatically reduced in GA-treated cells. Aleurone cells store and metabolize neutral lipids via the glyoxylate cycle in response to GA, and glyoxysomes are one potential source of AOS in the GA-treated cells. Mitochondria are another potential source of AOS in GA-treated cells. AOS generated by these organelles bring about membrane rupture and cell death.

  17. Conventional calpains and programmed cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łopatniuk, Paulina; Witkowski, Jacek M

    2011-01-01

    The evidence on the crucial role of a family of calcium-dependent cysteine proteases called calpains in programmed cell death is rich and still growing. However, understanding of the mechanisms of their functions in apoptosis is not full yet. Calpains have been implicated in both physiological and pathological cell death control, especially in various malignancies, but also in the immune system development and function. There is also growing evidence on calpain involvement in apoptosis execution in certain pathological conditions of the central nervous system, in cardiovascular diseases, etc. Understanding of the clinical significance of calpain activation pathways, after intense studies of the influence of calpain activity on drug-induced apoptosis, seems especially important lately, as calpains have become noticed as potential therapeutic targets. To allow pharmacological targeting of these enzymes, thorough knowledge of their patterns of activation and further interactions with already known apoptotic pathways is necessary. A comprehensive summary of both well established and recently obtained information in the field is an important step that may lead to future advances in the use of calpain-targeted agents in the clinic.

  18. Rpr- and hid-driven cell death in Drosophila photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Cheng Da; Adams, Sheila M; O'Tousa, Joseph E

    2002-02-01

    The reaper (rpr) and head involution defective (hid) genes mediate programmed cell death (PCD) during Drosophila development. We show that expression of either rpr or hid under control of a rhodopsin promoter induces rapid cell death of adult photoreceptor cells. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that the dying photoreceptor cells share morphological features with other cells undergoing PCD. The anti-apoptotic baculoviral P35 protein acts downstream of hid activity to suppress the photoreceptor cell death driven by rpr and hid. These results establish that the Drosophila photoreceptors are sensitive to the rpr- and hid-driven cell death pathways.

  19. Cell death signaling and anticancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo eGalluzzi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available For a long time, it was commonly believed that efficient anticancer regimens would either trigger the apoptotic demise of tumor cells or induce a permanent arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, i.e., senescence. The recent discovery that necrosis can occur in a regulated fashion and the increasingly more precise characterization of the underlying molecular mechanisms have raised great interest, as non-apoptotic pathways might be instrumental to circumvent the resistance of cancer cells to conventional, pro-apoptotic therapeutic regimens. Moreover, it has been shown that some anticancer regimens engage lethal signaling cascades that can ignite multiple oncosuppressive mechanisms, including apoptosis, necrosis and senescence. Among these signaling pathways is mitotic catastrophe, whose role as a bona fide cell death mechanism has recently been reconsidered. Thus, anticancer regimens get ever more sophisticated, and often distinct strategies are combined to maximize efficacy and minimize side effects. In this review, we will discuss the importance of apoptosis, necrosis and mitotic catastrophe in the response of tumor cells to the most common clinically employed and experimental anticancer agents.

  20. Genetic regulation of programmed cell death in Drosophila

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Programmed cell death plays an important role in maintaining homeostasis during animal development, and has been conserved in animals as different as nematodes and humans. Recent studies of Drosophila have provided valuable information toward our understanding of genetic regulation of death. Different signals trigger the novel death regulators rpr, hid, and grim, that utilize the evolutionarily conserved iap and ark genes to modulate caspase function. Subsequent removal of dying cells also appears to be accomplished by conserved mechanisms. The similarity between Drosophila and human in cell death signaling pathways illustrate the promise of fruit flies as a model system to elucidate the mechanisms underlying regulation of programmed cell death.

  1. Redox regulation in plant programmed cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pinto, M C; Locato, V; De Gara, L

    2012-02-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a genetically controlled process described both in eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. Even if it is clear that PCD occurs in plants, in response to various developmental and environmental stimuli, the signalling pathways involved in the triggering of this cell suicide remain to be characterized. In this review, the main similarities and differences in the players involved in plant and animal PCD are outlined. Particular attention is paid to the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as key inducers of PCD in plants. The involvement of different kinds of ROS, different sites of ROS production, as well as their interaction with other molecules, is crucial in activating PCD in response to specific stimuli. Moreover, the importance is stressed on the balance between ROS production and scavenging, in various cell compartments, for the activation of specific steps in the signalling pathways triggering this cell suicide process. The review focuses on the complexity of the interplay between ROS and antioxidant molecules and enzymes in determining the most suitable redox environment required for the occurrence of different forms of PCD. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Plant programmed cell death, ethylene and flower senescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woltering, E.J.; Jong, de A.; Hoeberichts, F.A.; Iakimova, E.T.; Kapchina, V.

    2005-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) applies to cell death that is part of the normal life of multicellular organisms. PCD is found throughout the animal and plant kingdoms; it is an active process in which a cell suicide pathway is activated resulting in controlled disassembly of the cell. Most cases of PCD

  3. Plant programmed cell death, ethylene and flower senescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woltering, E.J.; Jong, de A.; Hoeberichts, F.A.; Iakimova, E.T.; Kapchina, V.

    2005-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) applies to cell death that is part of the normal life of multicellular organisms. PCD is found throughout the animal and plant kingdoms; it is an active process in which a cell suicide pathway is activated resulting in controlled disassembly of the cell. Most cases of PCD

  4. Cell death pathways in directly irradiated cells and cells exposed to medium from irradiated cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jella, Kishore Kumar; Garcia, Amaya; McClean, Brendan; Byrne, Hugh J; Lyng, Fiona M

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare levels of apoptosis, necrosis, mitotic cell death and senescence after treatment with both direct radiation and irradiated cell conditioned medium. Human keratinocytes (HaCaT cell line) were irradiated (0.005, 0.05 and 0.5 Gy) using a cobalt 60 teletherapy unit. For bystander experiments, the medium was harvested from donor HaCaT cells 1 hour after irradiation and transferred to recipient HaCaT cells. Clonogenic assay, apoptosis, necrosis, mitotic cell death, senescence and cell cycle analysis were measured in both directly irradiated cells and bystander cells A reduction in cell survival was observed for both directly irradiated cells and irradiated cell conditioned medium (ICCM)-treated cells. Early apoptosis and necrosis was observed predominantly after direct irradiation. An increase in the number of cells in G2/M phase was observed at 6 and 12 h which led to mitotic cell death after 72 h following direct irradiation and ICCM treatment. No senescence was observed in the HaCaT cell line following either direct irradiation or treatment with ICCM. This study has shown that directly irradiated cells undergo apoptosis, necrosis and mitotic cell death whereas ICCM-treated cells predominantly undergo mitotic cell death.

  5. RNA interference targets arbovirus replication in Culicoides cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnettler, Esther; Ratinier, Maxime; Watson, Mick; Shaw, Andrew E; McFarlane, Melanie; Varela, Mariana; Elliott, Richard M; Palmarini, Massimo; Kohl, Alain

    2013-03-01

    Arboviruses are transmitted to vertebrate hosts by biting arthropod vectors such as mosquitoes, ticks, and midges. These viruses replicate in both arthropods and vertebrates and are thus exposed to different antiviral responses in these organisms. RNA interference (RNAi) is a sequence-specific RNA degradation mechanism that has been shown to play a major role in the antiviral response against arboviruses in mosquitoes. Culicoides midges are important vectors of arboviruses, known to transmit pathogens of humans and livestock such as bluetongue virus (BTV) (Reoviridae), Oropouche virus (Bunyaviridae), and likely the recently discovered Schmallenberg virus (Bunyaviridae). In this study, we investigated whether Culicoides cells possess an antiviral RNAi response and whether this is effective against arboviruses, including those with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) genomes, such as BTV. Using reporter gene-based assays, we established the presence of a functional RNAi response in Culicoides sonorensis-derived KC cells which is effective in inhibiting BTV infection. Sequencing of small RNAs from KC and Aedes aegypti-derived Aag2 cells infected with BTV or the unrelated Schmallenberg virus resulted in the production of virus-derived small interfering RNAs (viRNAs) of 21 nucleotides, similar to the viRNAs produced during arbovirus infections of mosquitoes. In addition, viRNA profiles strongly suggest that the BTV dsRNA genome is accessible to a Dicer-type nuclease. Thus, we show for the first time that midge cells target arbovirus replication by mounting an antiviral RNAi response mainly resembling that of other insect vectors of arboviruses.

  6. Xylem cell death: emerging understanding of regulation and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollhöner, Benjamin; Prestele, Jakob; Tuominen, Hannele

    2012-02-01

    Evolutionary, as well as genetic, evidence suggests that vascular development evolved originally as a cell death programme that allowed enhanced movement of water in the extinct protracheophytes, and that secondary wall formation in the water-conducting cells evolved afterwards, providing mechanical support for effective long-distance transport of water. The extant vascular plants possess a common regulatory network to coordinate the different phases of xylem maturation, including secondary wall formation, cell death, and finally autolysis of the cell contents, by the action of recently identified NAC domain transcription factors. Consequently, xylem cell death is an inseparable part of the xylem maturation programme, making it difficult to uncouple cell death mechanistically from secondary wall formation, and thus identify the key factors specifically involved in regulation of cell death. Current knowledge suggests that the necessary components for xylem cell death are produced early during xylem differentiation, and cell death is prevented through the action of inhibitors and storage of hydrolytic enzymes in inactive forms in compartments such as the vacuole. Bursting of the central vacuole triggers autolytic hydrolysis of the cell contents, which ultimately leads to cell death. This cascade of events varies between the different xylem cell types. The water-transporting tracheary elements rely on a rapid cell death programme, with hydrolysis of cell contents taking place for the most part, if not entirely, after vacuolar bursting, while the xylem fibres disintegrate cellular contents at a slower pace, well before cell death. This review includes a detailed description of cell morphology, function of plant growth regulators, such as ethylene and thermospermine, and the action of hydrolytic nucleases and proteases during cell death of the different xylem cell types.

  7. Methods for assessing autophagy and autophagic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasdemir, Ezgi; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Maiuri, M Chiara; Criollo, Alfredo; Vitale, Ilio; Hangen, Emilie; Modjtahedi, Nazanine; Kroemer, Guido

    2008-01-01

    Autophagic (or type 2) cell death is characterized by the massive accumulation of autophagic vacuoles (autophagosomes) in the cytoplasm of cells that lack signs of apoptosis (type 1 cell death). Here we detail and critically assess a series of methods to promote and inhibit autophagy via pharmacological and genetic manipulations. We also review the techniques currently available to detect autophagy, including transmission electron microscopy, half-life assessments of long-lived proteins, detection of LC3 maturation/aggregation, fluorescence microscopy, and colocalization of mitochondrion- or endoplasmic reticulum-specific markers with lysosomal proteins. Massive autophagic vacuolization may cause cellular stress and represent a frustrated attempt of adaptation. In this case, cell death occurs with (or in spite of) autophagy. When cell death occurs through autophagy, on the contrary, the inhibition of the autophagic process should prevent cellular demise. Accordingly, we describe a strategy for discriminating cell death with autophagy from cell death through autophagy.

  8. Endosulfan induced cell death in Sertoli-germ cells of male Wistar rat follows intrinsic mode of cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Divya; Narayan, R; Saxena, D K; Chowdhuri, D Kar

    2014-01-01

    Health of germ cells may affect production of quality gametes either due to endogenous or exogenous factors. Pesticides are among the exogenous factors that can enter the organisms through various routes of exposure and also can affect the reproductive system of an organism. Endosulfan is an organochlorine cyclodiene pesticide used widely for controlling agricultural pests. It has been shown to induce reproductive dysfunctions such as sperm abnormalities, reduced intracellular spermatid count in exposed organisms. Germ cells being the progenitor cells for male gametes and Sertoli cells as their nourishing cells, we examined whether endosulfan induces cell death in Sertoli-germ cells of male rats. Sertoli-germ cells, isolated from 28 d old male Wistar rats, were exposed to endosulfan (2.0, 20.0 and 40.0 μg mL(-1)) for 24-72 h. Cytotoxicity, endosulfan concentration, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, oxidative stress parameters were measured in these cells in the absence or presence of endosulfan for the above mentioned exposure periods and subsequently, cell death endpoints were measured. We detected endosulfan in the exposed cells and demonstrated increased cell death in exposed Sertoli-germ cells as evidenced by a significant increase in annexin-V staining, depolarization of mitochondrial membrane, caspase-9 and -3 activities and BAD and PARP cleavage activities and DNA ladder formation along with non-significant increase in autophagic cell death. The study suggests that endosulfan can cause cell death in exposed Sertoli-germ cells due to higher oxidative damage with the activation of intrinsic cell death pathway which may eventually affect the production of quality gametes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Replication Kinetics of Coxsackievirus A16 in Human Rhabdomyosarcoma Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Jin; Mingming Han; Lin Xu; Dong An; Wei Kong; Chunlai Jiang

    2012-01-01

    Coxsackievirns A16(CVA16),together with enterovirus type 71(EV71),is responsible for most cases of hand,foot and mouth disease(HFMD) worldwide.Recent findings suggest that the recombination between CVA16 and EV71,and the co-circulation of these two viruses may have contributed to the increase of HFMD cases in China over the past few years.It is therefore important to further understand the virology,epidemlology,virus-host interactions and host pathogeuesis of CVA16.In this study,we describe the viral kinetics of CVAI6 in human rhabdomyosarcoma(RD) cells by analyzing the cytopathic effect(CPE),viral RNA replication,viral protein expression,viral RNA package and viral particle secretion in RD cells.We show that CVA16 appears to first attach,uncoat and enter into the host cell after adsorption for 1 h.Later on,CVA16 undergoes rapid replication from 3 to 6 h at MOI 1 and until 9 h at MOI 0.1.At MOI 0.1,CVA16 initiates a secondary infection as the virions were secreted before 9 h p.i.CPE was observed after 12 h p.i.,and viral antigen was first detected at 6 h p.i.at MOI 1 and at 9 h p.i.at MOI 0.1.Thus,our study provides important information for further investigation of CVA16 in order to better understand and ultimately control infections with this virus.

  10. ATRX dysfunction induces replication defects in primary mouse cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Clynes

    Full Text Available The chromatin remodeling protein ATRX, which targets tandem repetitive DNA, has been shown to be required for expression of the alpha globin genes, for proliferation of a variety of cellular progenitors, for chromosome congression and for the maintenance of telomeres. Mutations in ATRX have recently been identified in tumours which maintain their telomeres by a telomerase independent pathway involving homologous recombination thought to be triggered by DNA damage. It is as yet unknown whether there is a central underlying mechanism associated with ATRX dysfunction which can explain the numerous cellular phenomena observed. There is, however, growing evidence for its role in the replication of various repetitive DNA templates which are thought to have a propensity to form secondary structures. Using a mouse knockout model we demonstrate that ATRX plays a direct role in facilitating DNA replication. Ablation of ATRX alone, although leading to a DNA damage response at telomeres, is not sufficient to trigger the alternative lengthening of telomere pathway in mouse embryonic stem cells.

  11. ATRX dysfunction induces replication defects in primary mouse cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clynes, David; Jelinska, Clare; Xella, Barbara; Ayyub, Helena; Taylor, Stephen; Mitson, Matthew; Bachrati, Csanád Z; Higgs, Douglas R; Gibbons, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    The chromatin remodeling protein ATRX, which targets tandem repetitive DNA, has been shown to be required for expression of the alpha globin genes, for proliferation of a variety of cellular progenitors, for chromosome congression and for the maintenance of telomeres. Mutations in ATRX have recently been identified in tumours which maintain their telomeres by a telomerase independent pathway involving homologous recombination thought to be triggered by DNA damage. It is as yet unknown whether there is a central underlying mechanism associated with ATRX dysfunction which can explain the numerous cellular phenomena observed. There is, however, growing evidence for its role in the replication of various repetitive DNA templates which are thought to have a propensity to form secondary structures. Using a mouse knockout model we demonstrate that ATRX plays a direct role in facilitating DNA replication. Ablation of ATRX alone, although leading to a DNA damage response at telomeres, is not sufficient to trigger the alternative lengthening of telomere pathway in mouse embryonic stem cells.

  12. Cell lineage and cell death: Caenorhabditis elegans and cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, Malia B; Cameron, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is a complex disease in which cells have circumvented normal restraints on tissue growth and have acquired complex abnormalities in their genomes, posing a considerable challenge to identifying the pathways and mechanisms that drive fundamental aspects of the malignant phenotype. Genetic analyses of the normal development of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans have revealed evolutionarily conserved mechanisms through which individual cells establish their fates, and how they make and execute the decision to survive or undergo programmed cell death. The pathways identified through these studies have mammalian counterparts that are co-opted by malignant cells. Effective cancer drugs now target some of these pathways, and more are likely to be discovered.

  13. Stroke and cardiac cell death: Two peas in a pod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales-Portillo, Chiara; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Shinozuka, Kazutaka; Tajiri, Naoki; Kaneko, Yuji; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2016-03-01

    A close pathological link between stroke brain and heart failure may exist. Here, we discuss relevant laboratory and clinical reports demonstrating neural and cardiac myocyte cell death following ischemic stroke. Although various overlapping risk factors exist between cerebrovascular incidents and cardiac incidents, stroke therapy has largely neglected the cardiac pathological consequences. Recent preclinical stroke studies have implicated an indirect cell death pathway, involving toxic molecules, that originates from the stroke brain and produces cardiac cell death. In concert, previous laboratory reports have revealed a reverse cell death cascade, in that cardiac arrest leads to ischemic cell death in the brain. A deeper understanding of the crosstalk of cell death pathways between stroke and cardiac failure will facilitate the development of novel treatments designed to arrest the global pathology of both diseases thereby improving the clinical outcomes of patients diagnosed with stroke and heart failure.

  14. Cell death sensitization of leukemia cells by opioid receptor activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Claudia; Roscher, Mareike; Hormann, Inis; Fichtner, Iduna; Alt, Andreas; Hilger, Ralf A.; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Miltner, Erich

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) regulates a number of cellular processes and modulates cell death induction. cAMP levels are altered upon stimulation of specific G-protein-coupled receptors inhibiting or activating adenylyl cyclases. Opioid receptor stimulation can activate inhibitory Gi-proteins which in turn block adenylyl cyclase activity reducing cAMP. Opioids such as D,L-methadone induce cell death in leukemia cells. However, the mechanism how opioids trigger apoptosis and activate caspases in leukemia cells is not understood. In this study, we demonstrate that downregulation of cAMP induced by opioid receptor activation using the opioid D,L-methadone kills and sensitizes leukemia cells for doxorubicin treatment. Enhancing cAMP levels by blocking opioid-receptor signaling strongly reduced D,L-methadone-induced apoptosis, caspase activation and doxorubicin-sensitivity. Induction of cell death in leukemia cells by activation of opioid receptors using the opioid D,L-methadone depends on critical levels of opioid receptor expression on the cell surface. Doxorubicin increased opioid receptor expression in leukemia cells. In addition, the opioid D,L-methadone increased doxorubicin uptake and decreased doxorubicin efflux in leukemia cells, suggesting that the opioid D,L-methadone as well as doxorubicin mutually increase their cytotoxic potential. Furthermore, we found that opioid receptor activation using D,L-methadone alone or in addition to doxorubicin inhibits tumor growth significantly in vivo. These results demonstrate that opioid receptor activation via triggering the downregulation of cAMP induces apoptosis, activates caspases and sensitizes leukemia cells for doxorubicin treatment. Hence, opioid receptor activation seems to be a promising strategy to improve anticancer therapies. PMID:23633472

  15. Senescence and programmed cell death : substance or semantics?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, van W.G.; Woltering, E.J.

    2004-01-01

    The terms senescence and programmed cell death (PCD) have led to some confusion. Senescence as visibly observed in, for example, leaf yellowing and petal wilting, has often been taken to be synonymous with the programmed death of the constituent cells. PCD also obviously refers to cells, which show

  16. Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Infection Increases Apoptosis and HIV-1 Replication in HIV-1 Infected Jurkat Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue; Tan, Jiying; Biswas, Santanu; Zhao, Jiangqin; Devadas, Krishnakumar; Ye, Zhiping; Hewlett, Indira

    2016-02-02

    Influenza virus infection has a significant impact on public health, since it is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. It is not well-known whether influenza virus infection affects cell death and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 replication in HIV-1-infected patients. Using a lymphoma cell line, Jurkat, we examined the in vitro effects of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus (pH1N1) infection on cell death and HIV-1 RNA production in infected cells. We found that pH1N1 infection increased apoptotic cell death through Fas and Bax-mediated pathways in HIV-1-infected Jurkat cells. Infection with pH1N1 virus could promote HIV-1 RNA production by activating host transcription factors including nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-ĸB), nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) and activator protein 1 (AP-1) through mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) pathways and T-cell antigen receptor (TCR)-related pathways. The replication of HIV-1 latent infection could be reactivated by pH1N1 infection through TCR and apoptotic pathways. These data indicate that HIV-1 replication can be activated by pH1N1 virus in HIV-1-infected cells resulting in induction of cell death through apoptotic pathways.

  17. Death of mitochondria during programmed cell death of leaf mesophyll cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selga, Tūrs; Selga, Maija; Pāvila, Vineta

    2005-12-01

    The role of plant mitochondria in the programmed cell death (PCD) is widely discussed. However, spectrum and sequence of mitochondrial structural changes during different types of PCD in leaves are poorly described. Pea, cucumber and rye plants were grown under controlled growing conditions. A part of them were sprinkled with ethylene releaser to accelerate cell death. During yellowing the palisade parenchyma mitochondria were attracted to nuclear envelope. Mitochondrial matrix became electron translucent. Mitochondria entered vacuole by invagination of tonoplast and formed multivesicular bodies. Ethephon treatment increased the frequency of sticking of mitochondria to the nuclear envelope or chloroplasts and peroxisomes. Mitochondria divided by different mechanisms and became enclosed in Golgi and ER derived authopagic vacuoles or in the central vacuole. Several fold increase of the diameter of cristae became typical. In all cases mitochondria were attached to nuclear envelope. It can be considered as structural mechanism of promoting of PCD.

  18. Deciphering DNA replication dynamics in eukaryotic cell populations in relation with their averaged chromatin conformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldar, A.; Arneodo, A.; Audit, B.; Argoul, F.; Rappailles, A.; Guilbaud, G.; Petryk, N.; Kahli, M.; Hyrien, O.

    2016-03-01

    We propose a non-local model of DNA replication that takes into account the observed uncertainty on the position and time of replication initiation in eukaryote cell populations. By picturing replication initiation as a two-state system and considering all possible transition configurations, and by taking into account the chromatin’s fractal dimension, we derive an analytical expression for the rate of replication initiation. This model predicts with no free parameter the temporal profiles of initiation rate, replication fork density and fraction of replicated DNA, in quantitative agreement with corresponding experimental data from both S. cerevisiae and human cells and provides a quantitative estimate of initiation site redundancy. This study shows that, to a large extent, the program that regulates the dynamics of eukaryotic DNA replication is a collective phenomenon that emerges from the stochastic nature of replication origins initiation.

  19. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells suppress HIV-1 replication but contribute to HIV-1 induced immunopathogenesis in humanized mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangming Li

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The role of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection and pathogenesis remains unclear. HIV-1 infection in the humanized mouse model leads to persistent HIV-1 infection and immunopathogenesis, including type I interferons (IFN-I induction, immune-activation and depletion of human leukocytes, including CD4 T cells. We developed a monoclonal antibody that specifically depletes human pDC in all lymphoid organs in humanized mice. When pDC were depleted prior to HIV-1 infection, the induction of IFN-I and interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs were abolished during acute HIV-1 infection with either a highly pathogenic CCR5/CXCR4-dual tropic HIV-1 or a standard CCR5-tropic HIV-1 isolate. Consistent with the anti-viral role of IFN-I, HIV-1 replication was significantly up-regulated in pDC-depleted mice. Interestingly, the cell death induced by the highly pathogenic HIV-1 isolate was severely reduced in pDC-depleted mice. During chronic HIV-1 infection, depletion of pDC also severely reduced the induction of IFN-I and ISGs, associated with elevated HIV-1 replication. Surprisingly, HIV-1 induced depletion of human immune cells including T cells in lymphoid organs, but not the blood, was reduced in spite of the increased viral replication. The increased cell number in lymphoid organs was associated with a reduced level of HIV-induced cell death in human leukocytes including CD4 T cells. We conclude that pDC play opposing roles in suppressing HIV-1 replication and in promoting HIV-1 induced immunopathogenesis. These findings suggest that pDC-depletion and IFN-I blockade will provide novel strategies for treating those HIV-1 immune non-responsive patients with persistent immune activation despite effective anti-retrovirus treatment.

  20. Caspase-3-dependent Cell Death in B lymphocyte Caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Pyocyanin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heni Susilowati

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate cellular responses of B lymphocyte to the exposure of pyocyanin and the role of caspase-3 in its molecular mechanism. Methods: B lymphocytes (Raji cells were cultured overnight prior to the experiments. Cell culture in five replications were then exposed to various concentrations of pyocyanin and incubated for 24 h in antibiotics-free medium. MTT assay was performed to analyze the cytotoxicity effect of pyocyanin. In separated experiments, the cells were cultured with pyocyanin and addressed for cell morphological analysis using phase contrast microscope. To study the mechanism involved in pyocyanin-induced cellular damage, immunocytochemical analysis was run for the identification of active caspase-3 protein expression. Results: The results of this study showed that cell viability was decreased in pcyocyanin-treated groups. Statistical analysis using ANOVA (p < 0.05 demonstrated significant different between groups with significant value of 0.000. Pyocyanin induced cell death on B lymphocyte in dose-dependent manner. Nuclear fragmentation was observed in pyocyanin-induced cell death; furthermore, caspase-3 was expressed clearly in cell cytoplasm after 24 h incubation. Conclusion: It is concluded that pyocyanin is capable of inducing cell death on B lymphocyte. Caspase-3 may play important role in the molecular mechanism of pyocyanin-induced cell death.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v22i2.403

  1. Patterns of cell death in the perinatal mouse forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosley, Morgan; Shah, Charisma; Morse, Kiriana A; Miloro, Stephen A; Holmes, Melissa M; Ahern, Todd H; Forger, Nancy G

    2017-01-01

    The importance of cell death in brain development has long been appreciated, but many basic questions remain, such as what initiates or terminates the cell death period. One obstacle has been the lack of quantitative data defining exactly when cell death occurs. We recently created a "cell death atlas," using the detection of activated caspase-3 (AC3) to quantify apoptosis in the postnatal mouse ventral forebrain and hypothalamus, and found that the highest rates of cell death were seen at the earliest postnatal ages in most regions. Here we have extended these analyses to prenatal ages and additional brain regions. We quantified cell death in 16 forebrain regions across nine perinatal ages from embryonic day (E) 17 to postnatal day (P) 11 and found that cell death peaks just after birth in most regions. We found greater cell death in several regions in offspring delivered vaginally on the day of parturition compared with those of the same postconception age but still in utero at the time of collection. We also found massive cell death in the oriens layer of the hippocampus on P1 and in regions surrounding the anterior crossing of the corpus callosum on E18 as well as the persistence of large numbers of cells in those regions in adult mice lacking the pro-death Bax gene. Together these findings suggest that birth may be an important trigger of neuronal cell death and identify transient cell groups that may undergo wholesale elimination perinatally. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:47-64, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Interleukin-8 enhances the effect of colchicine on cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Chikako; Yajima, Chika; Machida, Tetsuro; Kawahito, Yuji; Uchida, Marie; Hisatomi, Hisashi

    2017-03-25

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines are known to be generated in tumors and play important roles in angiogenesis, mitosis, and tumor progression. However, few studies have investigated the synergistic effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines and anticancer drugs on cell death. In the present study, we examined the combined effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines and colchicine on cell death of cancer cells. Colchicine induces G2/M arrest in the cell cycle by binding to tubulin, one of the main constituents of microtubules. SUIT-2 human pancreatic cancer cell line cells overexpressing pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, were treated with colchicine. The effect of colchicine on cell death was enhanced in cells overexpressing IL-8. Moreover, the effect of colchicine on cell death was enhanced in cells overexpressing two IL-8 up-regulators, NF-κB and IL-6, but not in cells overexpressing an IL-8 down-regulator, splicing factor proline/glutamine-rich (SFPQ). Synergistic effects of IL-8 and colchicine were also observed in cells overexpressing IL-8 isoforms lacking the signal peptide. Therefore, IL-8 appeared to function as an enhancer of cell death in cancer cells treated with colchicine. The present results suggest a new role for IL-8 related to cell death of cancer cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Role of Cellular Components of Mosquito Cells in Viral Replication and Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-17

    replicating in mosquito cells, experiments similar to those described above were conducted employing Eastern equine encephalitis virus ( alphavirus ...7 D-R126 612 ROLE OF CELLULAR COMPONENTS OF MOSQUITO CELLS IN VIRAL 1/1 REPLICATION AND TRANSMISSION(U) INDIANA UNIV AT INDIANAPOLIS SCHOOL OF...MOSQUITO CELLS IN VIRAL REPLICATION AND TRANSMISSION Annual Report Final Report Robert H. Schloemer March 17, 1981 Supported by U.S. Army Medical

  4. Programmed cell death and cell extrusion in rat duodenum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schauser, Kirsten; Larsson, Lars-Inge

    2005-01-01

    The small intestinal epithelium is continously renewed through a balance between cell division and cell loss. How this balance is achieved is uncertain. Thus, it is unknown to what extent programmed cell death (PCD) contributes to intestinal epithelial cell loss. We have used a battery...... of techniques detecting the events associated with PCD in order to better understand its role in the turnover of the intestinal epithelium, including modified double- and triple-staining techniques for simultaneously detecting multiple markers of PCD in individual cells. Only a partial correlation between TUNEL...... positivity for DNA fragmentation, c-jun phosphorylation on serine-63, positivity for activated caspase-3 and apoptotic morphology was observed. Our results show that DNA fragmentation does not invariable correlate to activation of caspase-3. Moreover, many cells were found to activate caspase-3 early...

  5. Mitochondrial dysfunction links ceramide activated HRK expression and cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhan Rizvi

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Cell death is an essential process in normal development and homeostasis. In eyes, corneal epithelial injury leads to the death of cells in underlying stroma, an event believed to initiate corneal wound healing. The molecular basis of wound induced corneal stromal cell death is not understood in detail. Studies of others have indicated that ceramide may play significant role in stromal cell death following LASIK surgery. We have undertaken the present study to investigate the mechanism of death induced by C6 ceramide in cultures of human corneal stromal (HCSF fibroblasts. METHODS: Cultures of HCSF were established from freshly excised corneas. Cell death was induced in low passage (p<4 cultures of HCSF by treating the cells with C6 ceramide or C6 dihydroceramide as a control. Cell death was assessed by Live/Dead cell staining with calcein AM and ethidium homodimer-1 as well as Annexin V staining, caspase activation and TUNEL staining Mitochondrial dysfunction was assessed by Mito Sox Red, JC-1 and cytochrome C release Gene expression was examined by qPCR and western blotting. RESULTS: Our data demonstrate ceramide caused mitochondrial dysfunction as evident from reduced MTT staining, cyto c release from mitochondria, enhanced generation of ROS, and loss in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm. Cell death was evident from Live -Dead Cell staining and the inability to reestablish cultures from detached cells. Ceramide induced the expression of the harikari gene(HRK and up-regulated JNK phosphorylation. In ceramide treated cells HRK was translocated to mitochondria, where it was found to interact with mitochondrial protein p32. The data also demonstrated HRK, p32 and BAD interaction. Ceramide-induced expression of HRK, mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death were reduced by HRK knockdown with HRK siRNA. CONCLUSION: Our data document that ceramide is capable of inducing death of corneal stromal fibroblasts through the induction of HRK

  6. Sphingolipid metabolism and programmed cell death in tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spassieva, Stefanka Diankova

    2003-01-01

    Programmed cell death is genetically determined. When the regulation of the process is disrupted it can have severe or lethal consequences for the organism. In mammals, cancer and neurodegenerative diseases are associated with abnormalities in programmed cell death. Development of an animal embryo

  7. Chemical- and pathogen-induced programmed cell death in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakimova, E.T.; Atanassov, A.; Woltering, E.J.

    2005-01-01

    This review focuses on recent update in the understanding of programmed cell death regarding the differences and similarities between the diverse types of cell death in animal and plant systems and describes the morphological and some biochemical determinants. The role of PCD in plant development an

  8. Chemical- and pathogen-induced programmed cell death in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakimova, E.T.; Atanassov, A.; Woltering, E.J.

    2005-01-01

    This review focuses on recent update in the understanding of programmed cell death regarding the differences and similarities between the diverse types of cell death in animal and plant systems and describes the morphological and some biochemical determinants. The role of PCD in plant development

  9. Activation-Induced Cell Death in T Cells and Autoimmunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Zhang; Xuemei Xu; Yong Liu

    2004-01-01

    Activation-induced cell death (AICD), which results from the interaction between Fas and Fas ligand, is responsible for maintaining tolerance to self-antigen. A defect in AICD may lead to development of autoimmunity. During the last several years, much progress has been made in understanding the mechanism(s) of AICD and its potential role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. In this review, we summarize the most recent progress on the regulation of the susceptibility of T cells to AICD and its possible involvement in autoimmune diseases.

  10. Chronic Replication Problems Impact Cell Morphology and Adhesion of DNA Ligase I Defective Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Cremaschi

    Full Text Available Moderate DNA damage resulting from metabolic activities or sub-lethal doses of exogenous insults may eventually lead to cancer onset. Human 46BR.1G1 cells bear a mutation in replicative DNA ligase I (LigI which results in low levels of replication-dependent DNA damage. This replication stress elicits a constitutive phosphorylation of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM checkpoint kinase that fails to arrest cell cycle progression or to activate apoptosis or cell senescence. Stable transfection of wild type LigI, as in 7A3 cells, prevents DNA damage and ATM activation. Here we show that parental 46BR.1G1 and 7A3 cells differ in important features such as cell morphology, adhesion and migration. Comparison of gene expression profiles in the two cell lines detects Bio-Functional categories consistent with the morphological and migration properties of LigI deficient cells. Interestingly, ATM inhibition makes 46BR.1G1 more similar to 7A3 cells for what concerns morphology, adhesion and expression of cell-cell adhesion receptors. These observations extend the influence of the DNA damage response checkpoint pathways and unveil a role for ATM kinase activity in modulating cell biology parameters relevant to cancer progression.

  11. Chronic Replication Problems Impact Cell Morphology and Adhesion of DNA Ligase I Defective Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremaschi, Paolo; Oliverio, Matteo; Leva, Valentina; Bione, Silvia; Carriero, Roberta; Mazzucco, Giulia; Palamidessi, Andrea; Scita, Giorgio; Biamonti, Giuseppe; Montecucco, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Moderate DNA damage resulting from metabolic activities or sub-lethal doses of exogenous insults may eventually lead to cancer onset. Human 46BR.1G1 cells bear a mutation in replicative DNA ligase I (LigI) which results in low levels of replication-dependent DNA damage. This replication stress elicits a constitutive phosphorylation of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) checkpoint kinase that fails to arrest cell cycle progression or to activate apoptosis or cell senescence. Stable transfection of wild type LigI, as in 7A3 cells, prevents DNA damage and ATM activation. Here we show that parental 46BR.1G1 and 7A3 cells differ in important features such as cell morphology, adhesion and migration. Comparison of gene expression profiles in the two cell lines detects Bio-Functional categories consistent with the morphological and migration properties of LigI deficient cells. Interestingly, ATM inhibition makes 46BR.1G1 more similar to 7A3 cells for what concerns morphology, adhesion and expression of cell-cell adhesion receptors. These observations extend the influence of the DNA damage response checkpoint pathways and unveil a role for ATM kinase activity in modulating cell biology parameters relevant to cancer progression.

  12. Heat stress induces ferroptosis-like cell death in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Ippólito, Sebastián; Colman, Silvana Lorena; Soto, Débora; Bartoli, Carlos Guillermo; Fiol, Diego Fernando

    2017-01-01

    In plants, regulated cell death (RCD) plays critical roles during development and is essential for plant-specific responses to abiotic and biotic stresses. Ferroptosis is an iron-dependent, oxidative, nonapoptotic form of cell death recently described in animal cells. In animal cells, this process can be triggered by depletion of glutathione (GSH) and accumulation of lipid reactive oxygen species (ROS). We investigated whether a similar process could be relevant to cell death in plants. Remarkably, heat shock (HS)–induced RCD, but not reproductive or vascular development, was found to involve a ferroptosis-like cell death process. In root cells, HS triggered an iron-dependent cell death pathway that was characterized by depletion of GSH and ascorbic acid and accumulation of cytosolic and lipid ROS. These results suggest a physiological role for this lethal pathway in response to heat stress in Arabidopsis thaliana. The similarity of ferroptosis in animal cells and ferroptosis-like death in plants suggests that oxidative, iron-dependent cell death programs may be evolutionarily ancient. PMID:28100685

  13. Replicatively senescent cells are arrested in G1 and G2 phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhiyong; Ke, Zhonghe; Gorbunova, Vera; Seluanov, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    Most human somatic cells do not divide indefinitely but enter a terminal growth arrest termed replicative senescence. Replicatively senescent cells are generally believed to arrest in G1 or G0 stage of the cell cycle. While doing cell cycle analysis on three different lines of normal human fibroblasts we observed that 36-60% of the replicatively senescent cells had 4N DNA content. Only up to 5% of senescent cells had more than one nucleus ruling out the possibility that the 4N cell population were G1-arrested bi-nucleated cells. Furthermore, it is unlikely that the 4N cells are tetraploids, because actively dividing pre-senescent cultures lacked the 8N tetraploid G2 population. Collectively these results suggest that the 4N population consists of G2 arrested cells. The notion that a large fraction of senescent cell population is arrested in G2 is important for understanding the biology of replicative senescence. PMID:22745179

  14. Mangiferin induces cell death against rhabdomyosarcoma through sustained oxidative stress

    OpenAIRE

    Vishwanadha Vijaya Padma; Palanisamy Kalaiselvi; Rangasamy Yuvaraj; M. Rabeeth

    2015-01-01

    Background: Embryonic rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) is the most prevalent type of cancer among children. The present study aimed to investigate cell death induced by mangiferin in RD cells. Methods: The Inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of mangiferin was determined by an MTT (3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide) assay. Cell death induced by mangiferin against RD cells was determined through lactate dehydrogenase and nitric oxide release, intracellular calcium levels, r...

  15. Deciphering DNA replication dynamics in eukaryotic cell populations in relation with their averaged chromatin conformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldar, A.; Arneodo, A.; Audit, B.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a non-local model of DNA replication that takes into account the observed uncertainty on the position and time of replication initiation in eukaryote cell populations. By picturing replication initiation as a two-state system and considering all possible transition configurations......, and by taking into account the chromatin's fractal dimension, we derive an analytical expression for the rate of replication initiation. This model predicts with no free parameter the temporal profiles of initiation rate, replication fork density and fraction of replicated DNA, in quantitative agreement...... with corresponding experimental data from both S. cerevisiae and human cells and provides a quantitative estimate of initiation site redundancy. This study shows that, to a large extent, the program that regulates the dynamics of eukaryotic DNA replication is a collective phenomenon that emerges from the stochastic...

  16. Chemical -induced apoptotic cell death in tomato cells : involvement of caspase-like proteases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, de A.J.; Hoeberichts, F.A.; Yakimova, E.T.; Maximova, E.; Woltering, E.J.

    2000-01-01

    A new system to study programmed cell death in plants is described. Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) suspension cells were induced to undergo programmed cell death by treatment with known inducers of apoptosis in mammalian cells. This chemical-induced cell death was accompanied by the characte

  17. ETosis: A Microbicidal Mechanism beyond Cell Death

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guimarães-Costa, Anderson B; Nascimento, Michelle T. C; Wardini, Amanda B; Pinto-da-Silva, Lucia H; Saraiva, Elvira M

    2012-01-01

    ...; thus, it was renamed as ETosis, meaning death with release of extracellular traps (ETs). Here, we review the mechanism of NETosis/etosis, emphasizing its role in diseases caused by protozoan parasites, fungi, and viruses.

  18. Once in a lifetime: strategies for preventing re-replication in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, Olaf; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2008-01-01

    Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Feb DNA replication is an extremely accurate process and cells have evolved intricate control mechanisms to ensure that each region of their genome is replicated only once during S phase. Here, we compare what is known about the processes that prevent re-replication in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells by using the model organisms Escherichia coli and Schizosaccharomyces pombe as examples. Although the underlying molecular details are different, the logic behind the con...

  19. Independent controls for neocortical neuron production and histogenetic cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verney, C.; Takahashi, T.; Bhide, P. G.; Nowakowski, R. S.; Caviness, V. S. Jr

    2000-01-01

    We estimated the proportion of cells eliminated by histogenetic cell death during the first 2 postnatal weeks in areas 1, 3 and 40 of the mouse parietal neocortex. For each layer and for the subcortical white matter in each neocortical area, the number of dying cells per mm(2) was calculated and the proportionate cell death for each day of the 2-week interval was estimated. The data show that cell death proceeds essentially uniformly across the neocortical areas and layers and that it does not follow either the spatiotemporal gradient of cell cycle progression in the pseudostratified ventricular epithelium of the cerebral wall, the source of neocortical neurons, or the 'inside-out' neocortical neuronogenetic sequence. Therefore, we infer that the control mechanisms of neocortical histogenetic cell death are independent of mechanisms controlling neuronogenesis or neuronal migration but may be associated with the ingrowth, expansion and a system-wide matching of neuronal connectivity. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Programmed Cell Death and Complexity in Microbial Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Pierre M; Sym, Stuart; Michod, Richard E

    2016-07-11

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is central to organism development and for a long time was considered a hallmark of multicellularity. Its discovery, therefore, in unicellular organisms presents compelling questions. Why did PCD evolve? What is its ecological effect on communities? To answer these questions, one is compelled to consider the impacts of PCD beyond the cell, for death obviously lowers the fitness of the cell. Here, we examine the ecological effects of PCD in different microbial scenarios and conclude that PCD can increase biological complexity. In mixed microbial communities, the mode of death affects the microenvironment, impacting the interactions between taxa. Where the population comprises groups of relatives, death has a more explicit effect. Death by lysis or other means can be harmful, while PCD can evolve by providing advantages to relatives. The synchronization of death between individuals suggests a group level property is being maintained and the mode of death also appears to have had an impact during the origin of multicellularity. PCD can result in the export of fitness from the cell to the group level via re-usable resources and PCD may also provide a mechanism for how groups beget new groups comprising kin. Furthermore, PCD is a means for solving a central problem of group living - the toxic effects of death - by making resources in dying cells beneficial to others. What emerges from the data reviewed here is that while PCD carries an obvious cost to the cell, it can be a driver of complexity in microbial communities.

  1. Stem cell death and survival in heart regeneration and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelwahid, Eltyeb; Kalvelyte, Audrone; Stulpinas, Aurimas; de Carvalho, Katherine Athayde Teixeira; Guarita-Souza, Luiz Cesar; Foldes, Gabor

    2016-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are major causes of mortality and morbidity. Cardiomyocyte apoptosis disrupts cardiac function and leads to cardiac decompensation and terminal heart failure. Delineating the regulatory signaling pathways that orchestrate cell survival in the heart has significant therapeutic implications. Cardiac tissue has limited capacity to regenerate and repair. Stem cell therapy is a successful approach for repairing and regenerating ischemic cardiac tissue; however, transplanted cells display very high death percentage, a problem that affects success of tissue regeneration. Stem cells display multipotency or pluripotency and undergo self-renewal, however these events are negatively influenced by upregulation of cell death machinery that induces the significant decrease in survival and differentiation signals upon cardiovascular injury. While efforts to identify cell types and molecular pathways that promote cardiac tissue regeneration have been productive, studies that focus on blocking the extensive cell death after transplantation are limited. The control of cell death includes multiple networks rather than one crucial pathway, which underlies the challenge of identifying the interaction between various cellular and biochemical components. This review is aimed at exploiting the molecular mechanisms by which stem cells resist death signals to develop into mature and healthy cardiac cells. Specifically, we focus on a number of factors that control death and survival of stem cells upon transplantation and ultimately affect cardiac regeneration. We also discuss potential survival enhancing strategies and how they could be meaningful in the design of targeted therapies that improve cardiac function.

  2. Once in a lifetime: strategies for preventing re-replication in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Olaf; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2008-02-01

    DNA replication is an extremely accurate process and cells have evolved intricate control mechanisms to ensure that each region of their genome is replicated only once during S phase. Here, we compare what is known about the processes that prevent re-replication in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells by using the model organisms Escherichia coli and Schizosaccharomyces pombe as examples. Although the underlying molecular details are different, the logic behind the control mechanisms is similar. For example, after initiation, crucial molecules required for the loading of replicative helicases in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes are inactivated until the next cell cycle. Furthermore, in both systems the beta-clamp of the replicative polymerase associates with enzymatic activities that contribute to the inactivation of the helicase loaders. Finally, recent studies suggest that the control mechanism that prevents re-replication in both systems also increases the synthesis of DNA building blocks.

  3. The Influence of Programmed Cell Death in Myeloid Cells on Host Resilience to Infection with Legionella pneumophila or Streptococcus pyogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamradt, Pia; Xu, Yun; Gratz, Nina; Duncan, Kellyanne; Kobzik, Lester; Högler, Sandra; Decker, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Pathogen clearance and host resilience/tolerance to infection are both important factors in surviving an infection. Cells of the myeloid lineage play important roles in both of these processes. Neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells all have important roles in initiation of the immune response and clearance of bacterial pathogens. If these cells are not properly regulated they can result in excessive inflammation and immunopathology leading to decreased host resilience. Programmed cell death (PCD) is one possible mechanism that myeloid cells may use to prevent excessive inflammation. Myeloid cell subsets play roles in tissue repair, immune response resolution, and maintenance of homeostasis, so excessive PCD may also influence host resilience in this way. In addition, myeloid cell death is one mechanism used to control pathogen replication and dissemination. Many of these functions for PCD have been well defined in vitro, but the role in vivo is less well understood. We created a mouse that constitutively expresses the pro-survival B-cell lymphoma (bcl)-2 protein in myeloid cells (CD68(bcl2tg), thus decreasing PCD specifically in myeloid cells. Using this mouse model we explored the impact that decreased cell death of these cells has on infection with two different bacterial pathogens, Legionella pneumophila and Streptococcus pyogenes. Both of these pathogens target multiple cell death pathways in myeloid cells, and the expression of bcl2 resulted in decreased PCD after infection. We examined both pathogen clearance and host resilience and found that myeloid cell death was crucial for host resilience. Surprisingly, the decreased myeloid PCD had minimal impact on pathogen clearance. These data indicate that the most important role of PCD during infection with these bacteria is to minimize inflammation and increase host resilience, not to aid in the clearance or prevent the spread of the pathogen. PMID:27973535

  4. ENERGY REQUIREMENT FOR THYMINELESS DEATH IN CELLS OF ESCHERICHIA COLI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FREIFELDER, D; MAALOE, O

    1964-10-01

    Freifelder, David (University of California, Berkeley), and Ole Maaløe. Energy requirement for thymineless death in cells of Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 88:987-990. 1964.-Thymineless death in thymine-requiring Escherichia coli is arrested immediately and reversibly by nitrogenation if the bacterial population is growing in a medium containing a carbon source that can only be metabolized aerobically. The mechanism of death, therefore, involves a metabolic process.

  5. Slow Replication Fork Velocity of Homologous Recombination-Defective Cells Results from Endogenous Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Therese; Ragu, Sandrine; Magdalou, Indiana; Machon, Christelle; Dardillac, Elodie; Técher, Hervé; Guitton, Jérôme; Debatisse, Michelle; Lopez, Bernard S

    2016-05-01

    Replications forks are routinely hindered by different endogenous stresses. Because homologous recombination plays a pivotal role in the reactivation of arrested replication forks, defects in homologous recombination reveal the initial endogenous stress(es). Homologous recombination-defective cells consistently exhibit a spontaneously reduced replication speed, leading to mitotic extra centrosomes. Here, we identify oxidative stress as a major endogenous source of replication speed deceleration in homologous recombination-defective cells. The treatment of homologous recombination-defective cells with the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine or the maintenance of the cells at low O2 levels (3%) rescues both the replication fork speed, as monitored by single-molecule analysis (molecular combing), and the associated mitotic extra centrosome frequency. Reciprocally, the exposure of wild-type cells to H2O2 reduces the replication fork speed and generates mitotic extra centrosomes. Supplying deoxynucleotide precursors to H2O2-exposed cells rescued the replication speed. Remarkably, treatment with N-acetyl-cysteine strongly expanded the nucleotide pool, accounting for the replication speed rescue. Remarkably, homologous recombination-defective cells exhibit a high level of endogenous reactive oxygen species. Consistently, homologous recombination-defective cells accumulate spontaneous γH2AX or XRCC1 foci that are abolished by treatment with N-acetyl-cysteine or maintenance at 3% O2. Finally, oxidative stress stimulated homologous recombination, which is suppressed by supplying deoxynucleotide precursors. Therefore, the cellular redox status strongly impacts genome duplication and transmission. Oxidative stress should generate replication stress through different mechanisms, including DNA damage and nucleotide pool imbalance. These data highlight the intricacy of endogenous replication and oxidative stresses, which are both evoked during tumorigenesis and senescence initiation

  6. Short Communication: HIV Controller T Cells Effectively Inhibit Viral Replication in Alveolar Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker-Sperling, Victoria E; Merlo, Christian A; Buckheit, Robert W; Lambert, Allison; Tarwater, Patrick; Kirk, Greg D; Drummond, M Bradley; Blankson, Joel N

    Macrophages are targets of HIV-1 infection, and control of viral replication within these cells may be an important component of a T-cell-based vaccine. Although several studies have analyzed the ability of CD8(+) T cells to inhibit viral replication in monocyte-derived macrophages, the effect of T cells on HIV-1-infected tissue macrophages is less clear. We demonstrate here that both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell effectors from HIV controllers are capable of suppressing viral replication in bronchoalveolar lavage-derived alveolar macrophages. These findings have implications for HIV-1 vaccine and eradication strategies.

  7. Mouse Testicular Cell Type-Specific Antiviral Response against Mumps Virus Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Han; Zhao, Xiang; Wang, Fei; Jiang, Qian; Shi, Lili; Gong, Maolei; Liu, Weihua; Gao, Bo; Song, Chengyi; Li, Qihan; Chen, Yongmei; Han, Daishu

    2017-01-01

    Mumps virus (MuV) infection has high tropism to the testis and usually leads to orchitis, an etiological factor in male infertility. However, MuV replication in testicular cells and the cellular antiviral responses against MuV are not fully understood. The present study showed that MuV infected the majority of testicular cells, including Leydig cells (LC), testicular macrophages, Sertoli cells (SC), and male germ cells (GC). MuV was replicated at relatively high efficiencies in SC compared with LC and testicular macrophages. In contrast, MuV did not replicate in male GC. Notably, testicular cells exhibited different innate antiviral responses against MuV replication. We showed that interferon β (IFN-β) inhibited MuV replication in LC, macrophages, and SC, which were associated with the upregulation of major antiviral proteins. We provided primary evidence that autophagy plays a role in blocking MuV replication in male GC. Autophagy was also involved in limiting MuV replication in testicular macrophages but not in Leydig and SC. These findings indicate the involvement of the innate defense against MuV replication in testicular cells. PMID:28239382

  8. Adenovirus E1A/E1B Transformed Amniotic Fluid Cells Support Human Cytomegalovirus Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natascha Krömmelbein

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV replicates to high titers in primary human fibroblast cell cultures. A variety of primary human cells and some tumor-derived cell lines do also support permissive HCMV replication, yet at low levels. Cell lines established by transfection of the transforming functions of adenoviruses have been notoriously resistant to HCMV replication and progeny production. Here, we provide first-time evidence that a permanent cell line immortalized by adenovirus type 5 E1A and E1B (CAP is supporting the full HCMV replication cycle and is releasing infectious progeny. The CAP cell line had previously been established from amniotic fluid cells which were likely derived from membranes of the developing fetus. These cells can be grown under serum-free conditions. HCMV efficiently penetrated CAP cells, expressed its immediate-early proteins and dispersed restrictive PML-bodies. Viral DNA replication was initiated and viral progeny became detectable by electron microscopy in CAP cells. Furthermore, infectious virus was released from CAP cells, yet to lower levels compared to fibroblasts. Subviral dense bodies were also secreted from CAP cells. The results show that E1A/E1B expression in transformed cells is not generally repressive to HCMV replication and that CAP cells may be a good substrate for dense body based vaccine production.

  9. Ceramide mediates caspase-independent programmed cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thon, Lutz; Möhlig, Heike; Mathieu, Sabine; Lange, Arne; Bulanova, Elena; Winoto-Morbach, Supandi; Schütze, Stefan; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia; Adam, Dieter

    2005-12-01

    Although numerous studies have implicated the sphingolipid ceramide in the induction of cell death, a causative function of ceramide in caspase-dependent apoptosis remains a highly debated issue. Here, we show that ceramide is a key mediator of a distinct route to programmed cell death (PCD), i.e., caspase-independent PCD. Under conditions where apoptosis is either not initiated or actively inhibited, TNF induces caspase-independent PCD in L929 fibrosarcoma cells, NIH3T3 fibroblasts, human leukemic Jurkat T cells, and lung fibroblasts by increasing intracellular ceramide levels prior to the onset of cell death. Survival is significantly enhanced when ceramide accumulation is prevented, as demonstrated in fibroblasts genetically deficient for acid sphingomyelinase, in L929 cells overexpressing acid ceramidase, by pharmacological intervention, or by RNA interference. Jurkat cells deficient for receptor-interacting protein 1 (RIP1) do not accumulate ceramide and therefore are fully resistant to caspase-independent PCD whereas Jurkat cells overexpressing the mitochondrial protein Bcl-2 are partially protected, implicating RIP1 and mitochondria as components of the ceramide death pathway. Our data point to a role of caspases (but not cathepsins) in suppressing the ceramide death pathway under physiological conditions. Moreover, clonogenic survival of tumor cells is clearly reduced by induction of the ceramide death pathway, promising additional options for the development of novel tumor therapies.

  10. Mechanical Stress Promotes Cisplatin-Induced Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Ziko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin (CisPt is a commonly used platinum-based chemotherapeutic agent. Its efficacy is limited due to drug resistance and multiple side effects, thereby warranting a new approach to improving the pharmacological effect of CisPt. A newly developed mathematical hypothesis suggested that mechanical loading, when coupled with a chemotherapeutic drug such as CisPt and immune cells, would boost tumor cell death. The current study investigated the aforementioned mathematical hypothesis by exposing human hepatocellular liver carcinoma (HepG2 cells to CisPt, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and mechanical stress individually and in combination. HepG2 cells were also treated with a mixture of CisPt and carnosine with and without mechanical stress to examine one possible mechanism employed by mechanical stress to enhance CisPt effects. Carnosine is a dipeptide that reportedly sequesters platinum-based drugs away from their pharmacological target-site. Mechanical stress was achieved using an orbital shaker that produced 300 rpm with a horizontal circular motion. Our results demonstrated that mechanical stress promoted CisPt-induced death of HepG2 cells (~35% more cell death. Moreover, results showed that CisPt-induced death was compromised when CisPt was left to mix with carnosine 24 hours preceding treatment. Mechanical stress, however, ameliorated cell death (20% more cell death.

  11. Apoptosis as form of natural ovarian cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovanović Anita M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Different hormones, cytokines, the absence of growth factors, and others, are some of the signals for initiating apoptosis in ovarian cells. Each of them in its own way, trigger apoptosis as a form of death in which the cell actively participates by precisely implementing a genetically programmed sequence of biochemical and morphological changes which lead to selfdestruction. Apoptosis is a physiological form of death, which helps establish a dynamic balance among proiliferation, differenciation, and death of ovarian cells. It has been confirmed so far that follicular cells oocytes, cells of the germinal epithelium, theca cells, and corpus luteum cells die through apoptosis. The physiological deaths of these cells are an integral part of normal ovarian function, both during intrauterine and postnatal life. Namely, during intrauterine ovarian development, about half the total number of germinative cells (future oocytes die through apoptosis and their population is gradually reduced after birth by so-called selection of follicles which will continue further growth (folliculogenesis and the apoptosis of cells of those follicles which will be subjected to atresion. Most ovarian cells die by apoptosis continuously until the end of the reproductive life period of healthy females, and some can continue dieing in this way until the death of the given individual (e.g. germinal epithelium cells.

  12. Programmed Cell Death and Postharvest Deterioration of Horticultural Produce

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woltering, E.J.; Iakimova, E.T.

    2010-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a process where cells or tissues are broken down in an orderly and predictable manner, whereby nutrients are re-used by other cells, tissues or plant parts. The process of (petal) senescence shows many similarities to autophagic PCD in animal cells including a massive

  13. Cell division and death inhibit glassy behaviour of confluent tissues

    CERN Document Server

    Matoz-Fernandez, D A; Sknepnek, Rastko; Barrat, J L; Henkes, S

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the effects of cell division and apopotosis on collective dynamics in two-dimensional epithelial tissues. Our model includes three key ingredients observed across many epithelia, namely cell-cell adhesion, cell death and a cell division process that depends on the surrounding environment. We show a rich non-equilibrium phase diagram depending on the ratio of cell death to cell division and on the adhesion strength. For large apopotosis rates, cells die out and the tissue disintegrates. As the death rate decreases, however, we show, consecutively, the existence of a gas-like phase, a gel-like phase, and a dense confluent (tissue) phase. Most striking is the observation that the tissue is self-melting through its own internal activity, ruling out the existence of any glassy phase.

  14. DNA adenine methylation is required to replicate both Vibrio cholerae chromosomes once per cell cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaëlle Demarre

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available DNA adenine methylation is widely used to control many DNA transactions, including replication. In Escherichia coli, methylation serves to silence newly synthesized (hemimethylated sister origins. SeqA, a protein that binds to hemimethylated DNA, mediates the silencing, and this is necessary to restrict replication to once per cell cycle. The methylation, however, is not essential for replication initiation per se but appeared so when the origins (oriI and oriII of the two Vibrio cholerae chromosomes were used to drive plasmid replication in E. coli. Here we show that, as in the case of E. coli, methylation is not essential for oriI when it drives chromosomal replication and is needed for once-per-cell-cycle replication in a SeqA-dependent fashion. We found that oriII also needs SeqA for once-per-cell-cycle replication and, additionally, full methylation for efficient initiator binding. The requirement for initiator binding might suffice to make methylation an essential function in V. cholerae. The structure of oriII suggests that it originated from a plasmid, but unlike plasmids, oriII makes use of methylation for once-per-cell-cycle replication, the norm for chromosomal but not plasmid replication.

  15. Effect of monensin on Mayaro virus replication in monkey kidney and Aedes albopictus cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Campos, R M; Ferreira, D F; Da Veiga, V F; Rebello, M A; Rebello, M C S

    2003-01-01

    The effect of a cationic ionophore, monensin, on the replication of Mayaro virus in monkey kidney TC7 and Aedes albopictus cells has been studied. Treatment of these cells with 1 micromol/l monensin during infection did not affect the virus protein synthesis but inhibited severely the virus replication. Electron microscopy of the cells infected with Mayaro virus and treated with monensin revealed that the morphogenesis of Mayaro virus was impaired in TC7 but not in A. albopictus cells.

  16. Adenovirus replication and transcription sites are spatially separated in the nucleus of infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pombo, A; Ferreira, J; Bridge, E; Carmo-Fonseca, M

    1994-11-01

    We have visualized the intranuclear topography of adenovirus replication and transcription in infected HeLa cells. The results show that viral DNA replication occurs in multiple foci that are highly organized in the nucleoplasm. Pulse-chase experiments indicate that newly synthesized viral double-stranded DNA molecules are displaced from the replication foci and spread throughout the nucleoplasm, while the single-stranded DNA replication intermediates accumulate in adjacent sites. Double-labelling experiments and confocal microscopy show that replication occurs in foci localized at the periphery of the sites where single-stranded DNA accumulates. The simultaneous visualization of viral replication and transcription reveals that the sites of transcription are predominantly separated from the sites of replication. Transcription is detected adjacent to the replication foci and extends around the sites of single-stranded DNA accumulation. These data indicate that newly synthesized double-stranded DNA molecules are displaced from the replication foci and spread in the surrounding nucleoplasm, where they are used as templates for transcription. Splicing snRNPs are shown to co-localize with the sites of transcription and to be excluded from the sites of replication. This provides evidence that splicing of viral RNAs occurs co-transcriptionally and that the sites of viral DNA replication are spatially distinct from the sites of RNA transcription and processing.

  17. Cell biology: Death drags down the neighbourhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Claudia G.; Martin, Adam C.

    2015-02-01

    An analysis of dying cells reveals that they play an active part in modifying tissue shape by pulling on neighbouring cells. This induces neighbouring cells to contract at their apices, which results in tissue folding. See Letter p.245

  18. Multiple regulatory systems coordinate DNA replication with cell growth in Bacillus subtilis.

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Author Summary DNA replication must be coordinated with cellular physiology to ensure proper genome inheritance. Model bacteria such as the soil-dwelling Bacillus subtilis can achieve a wide range of growth rates in response to nutritional and chemical signals. In order to match the rate of DNA synthesis to the rate of nutrient-mediated cell growth, bacteria regulate the initiation frequency of DNA replication. This control of bacterial DNA replication initiation was first observed over forty...

  19. Heme oxygenase-1 accelerates erastin-induced ferroptotic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Min-Young; Park, Eunhee; Lee, Seon-Jin; Chung, Su Wol

    2015-09-15

    The oncogenic RAS-selective lethal small molecule Erastin triggers a unique iron-dependent form of nonapoptotic cell death termed ferroptosis. Ferroptosis is dependent upon the production of intracellular iron-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS), but not other metals. However, key regulators remain unknown. The heme oxygenase (HO) is a major intracellular source of iron. In this study, the role of heme oxygenase in Erastin-triggered ferroptotic cancer cell death has been investigated. Zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP), a HO-1 inhibitor, prevented Erastin-triggered ferroptotic cancer cell death. Furthermore, Erastin induced the protein and mRNA levels of HO-1 in HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells. HO-1+/+ and HO-1-/- fibroblast, HO-1 overexpression, and chycloheximide-treated experiments revealed that the expression of HO-1 has a decisive effects in Erastin-triggered cell death. Hemin and CO-releasing molecules (CORM) promote Erastin-induced ferroptotic cell death, not by biliverdin and bilirubin. In addition, hemin and CORM accelerate the HO-1 expression in the presence of Erastin and increase membranous lipid peroxidation. Thus, HO-1 is an essential enzyme for iron-dependent lipid peroxidation during ferroptotic cell death.

  20. The Impact of Autophagy on Cell Death Modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan W. Ryter

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy represents a homeostatic cellular mechanism for the turnover of organelles and proteins, through a lysosome-dependent degradation pathway. During starvation, autophagy facilitates cell survival through the recycling of metabolic precursors. Additionally, autophagy can modulate other vital processes such as programmed cell death (e.g., apoptosis, inflammation, and adaptive immune mechanisms and thereby influence disease pathogenesis. Selective pathways can target distinct cargoes (e.g., mitochondria and proteins for autophagic degradation. At present, the causal relationship between autophagy and various forms of regulated or nonregulated cell death remains unclear. Autophagy can occur in association with necrosis-like cell death triggered by caspase inhibition. Autophagy and apoptosis have been shown to be coincident or antagonistic, depending on experimental context, and share cross-talk between signal transduction elements. Autophagy may modulate the outcome of other regulated forms of cell death such as necroptosis. Recent advances suggest that autophagy can dampen inflammatory responses, including inflammasome-dependent caspase-1 activation and maturation of proinflammatory cytokines. Autophagy may also act as regulator of caspase-1 dependent cell death (pyroptosis. Strategies aimed at modulating autophagy may lead to therapeutic interventions for diseases in which apoptosis or other forms of regulated cell death may play a cardinal role.

  1. The control and execution of programmed cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begum, R.; Pathak, N.; Hasnain, S.E.; Sah, N.K. [National Inst. of Immunology, New Delhi (India). Eukaryotic Gene Expression Lab.; Taneja, T.K.; Mohan, M. [National Inst. of Immunology, New Delhi (India). Eukaryotic Gene Expression Lab.]|[Dept. of Medical Elementology and Toxicology, New Delhi (India); Athar, M. [Dept. of Medical Elementology and Toxicology, New Delhi (India)

    1999-07-01

    Apoptosis or programmed cell death is a highly conserved genetically controlled response of metazoan cells to commit suicide. Non apoptotic programmed cell death seems to operate in single celled eukaryotes implying that evolution of PCD has preceded the evolution of multicellularity. PCD plays a crucial role in the regulation of cellular and tissue homeostasis and any aberrations in apoptosis leads to several diseases including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders and AIDS. The mechanisms by which apoptosis is controlled are varied. In some cells, members of bcl-2 family or p53 are crucial for regulating the apoptosis programme, whereas in other cells Fas ligand is more important. bcl-2 family members have a prime role in the regulation of cell death at all stages including development, whereas cell death during development is independent of p53. bcl-2 family members being localized on the outer mitochondrial membrane, control the mitochondrial homeostasis and cytochrome c redistribution and thereby regulate the cell death process. p53 promotes DNA damage mediated cell death after growth arrest and failed DNA repair. Caspases play a key role in the execution of cell death by mediating highly specific cleavages of crucial cellular proteins collectivley manifesting the apoptotic phenotype. Protein inhibitors like crm A, p35 and IAPs could prevent/control apoptosis induced by a broad array of cell death stimuli by several mechanisms specially interfering in caspase activation or caspase activity. Among endonucleases, caspase activated DNase (CAD) plays a crucial role in DNA fragmentation, a biochemical hallmark of apoptosis. As regulation of cell death seems to be as complex as regulation of cell proliferation, multiple kinase mediated regulatory mechanisms might control the apoptotic process. Thus, in spite of intensive research over the past few years, the field of apoptosis still remains fertile to unravel among others, the molecular mechanisms of cytochrome c

  2. Green tea polyphenol induces significant cell death in human lung ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Green tea polyphenol induces significant cell death in ... The dose-dependent effects of EGCG on H1155 xenograft tumor growth, as well as ..... of mitochondrial ROS and changes in .... ATM phosphorylates histone H2AX in response to DNA.

  3. The life and death of sponge cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sipkema, D.; Snijders, A.P.L.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.; Osinga, R.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2004-01-01

    Cell viability is an essential touchstone in the study of the effect of medium components on cell physiology. We developed a flow-cytometric assay to determine sponge-cell viability, based on the combined use of fluorescein diacetate (FDA) and propidium iodide (PI). Cell fluorescence measurements ba

  4. Acetylsalicylic acid induces programmed cell death in Arabidopsis cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Heredia, José M; Hervás, Manuel; De la Rosa, Miguel A; Navarro, José A

    2008-06-01

    Acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), a derivative from the plant hormone salicylic acid (SA), is a commonly used drug that has a dual role in animal organisms as an anti-inflammatory and anticancer agent. It acts as an inhibitor of cyclooxygenases (COXs), which catalyze prostaglandins production. It is known that ASA serves as an apoptotic agent on cancer cells through the inhibition of the COX-2 enzyme. Here, we provide evidences that ASA also behaves as an agent inducing programmed cell death (PCD) in cell cultures of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, in a similar way than the well-established PCD-inducing agent H(2)O(2), although the induction of PCD by ASA requires much lower inducer concentrations. Moreover, ASA is herein shown to be a more efficient PCD-inducing agent than salicylic acid. ASA treatment of Arabidopsis cells induces typical PCD-linked morphological and biochemical changes, namely cell shrinkage, nuclear DNA degradation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release from mitochondria and induction of caspase-like activity. However, the ASA effect can be partially reverted by jasmonic acid. Taking together, these results reveal the existence of common features in ASA-induced animal apoptosis and plant PCD, and also suggest that there are similarities between the pathways of synthesis and function of prostanoid-like lipid mediators in animal and plant organisms.

  5. LuIII parvovirus selectively and efficiently targets, replicates in, and kills human glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglino, Justin C; Ozduman, Koray; van den Pol, Anthony N

    2012-07-01

    Because productive infection by parvoviruses requires cell division and is enhanced by oncogenic transformation, some parvoviruses may have potential utility in killing cancer cells. To identify the parvovirus(es) with the optimal oncolytic effect against human glioblastomas, we screened 12 parvoviruses at a high multiplicity of infection (MOI). MVMi, MVMc, MVM-G17, tumor virus X (TVX), canine parvovirus (CPV), porcine parvovirus (PPV), rat parvovirus 1A (RPV1A), and H-3 were relatively ineffective. The four viruses with the greatest oncolytic activity, LuIII, H-1, MVMp, and MVM-G52, were tested for the ability, at a low MOI, to progressively infect the culture over time, causing cell death at a rate higher than that of cell proliferation. LuIII alone was effective in all five human glioblastomas tested. H-1 progressively infected only two of five; MVMp and MVM-G52 were ineffective in all five. To investigate the underlying mechanism of LuIII's phenotype, we used recombinant parvoviruses with the LuIII capsid replacing the MVMp capsid or with molecular alteration of the P4 promoter. The LuIII capsid enhanced efficient replication and oncolysis in MO59J gliomas cells; other gliomas tested required the entire LuIII genome to exhibit enhanced infection. LuIII selectively infected glioma cells over normal glial cells in vitro. In mouse models, human glioblastoma xenografts were selectively infected by LuIII when administered intratumorally; LuIII reduced tumor growth by 75%. LuIII also had the capacity to selectively infect subcutaneous or intracranial gliomas after intravenous inoculation. Intravenous or intracranial LuIII caused no adverse effects. Intracranial LuIII caused no infection of mature mouse neurons or glia in vivo but showed a modest infection of developing neurons.

  6. Targeting Cell Death Pathways for Therapeutic Intervention in Kidney Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Jay P; Vucic, Domagoj

    2016-05-01

    Precise regulation of cell death and survival is essential for proper maintenance of organismal homeostasis, development, and the immune system. Deregulated cell death can lead to developmental defects, neuropathies, infections, and cancer. Kidney diseases, especially acute pathologies linked to ischemia-reperfusion injury, are among illnesses that profoundly are affected by improper regulation or execution of cell death pathways. Attempts to develop medicines for kidney diseases have been impacted by the complexity of these pathologies given the heterogeneous patient population and diverse etiologies. By analyzing cell death pathways activated in kidney diseases, we attempt to differentiate their importance for these pathologies with a goal of identifying those that have more profound impact and the best therapeutic potential. Although classic apoptosis still might be important, regulated necrosis pathways including necroptosis, ferroptosis, parthanatos, and mitochondrial permeability transition-associated cell death play a significantly role in kidney diseases, especially in acute kidney pathologies. Although targeting receptor-interacting protein 1 kinase appears to be the best therapeutic strategy, combination with inhibitors of other cell death pathways is likely to bring superior benefit and possible cure to patients suffering from kidney diseases.

  7. Once in a lifetime: strategies for preventing re-replication in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Olaf; Løbner-Olesen, Anders

    2008-01-01

    DNA replication is an extremely accurate process and cells have evolved intricate control mechanisms to ensure that each region of their genome is replicated only once during S phase. Here, we compare what is known about the processes that prevent re-replication in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells...... prokaryotes and eukaryotes are inactivated until the next cell cycle. Furthermore, in both systems the beta-clamp of the replicative polymerase associates with enzymatic activities that contribute to the inactivation of the helicase loaders. Finally, recent studies suggest that the control mechanism...... by using the model organisms Escherichia coli and Schizosaccharomyces pombe as examples. Although the underlying molecular details are different, the logic behind the control mechanisms is similar. For example, after initiation, crucial molecules required for the loading of replicative helicases in both...

  8. Nitric oxide: promoter or suppressor of programmed cell death?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiqin; Chen, Chen; Loake, Gary J; Chu, Chengcai

    2010-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a short-lived gaseous free radical that predominantly functions as a messenger and effector molecule. It affects a variety of physiological processes, including programmed cell death (PCD) through cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent and - independent pathways. In this field, dominant discoveries are the diverse apoptosis networks in mammalian cells, which involve signals primarily via death receptors (extrinsic pathway) or the mitochondria (intrinsic pathway) that recruit caspases as effector molecules. In plants, PCD shares some similarities with animal cells, but NO is involved in PCD induction via interacting with pathways of phytohormones. NO has both promoting and suppressing effects on cell death, depending on a variety of factors, such as cell type, cellular redox status, and the flux and dose of local NO. In this article, we focus on how NO regulates the apoptotic signal cascade through protein S-nitrosylation and review the recent progress on mechanisms of PCD in both mammalian and plant cells.

  9. Visualization and measurement of ATP levels in living cells replicating hepatitis C virus genome RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomomi Ando

    Full Text Available Adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP is the primary energy currency of all living organisms and participates in a variety of cellular processes. Although ATP requirements during viral lifecycles have been examined in a number of studies, a method by which ATP production can be monitored in real-time, and by which ATP can be quantified in individual cells and subcellular compartments, is lacking, thereby hindering studies aimed at elucidating the precise mechanisms by which viral replication energized by ATP is controlled. In this study, we investigated the fluctuation and distribution of ATP in cells during RNA replication of the hepatitis C virus (HCV, a member of the Flaviviridae family. We demonstrated that cells involved in viral RNA replication actively consumed ATP, thereby reducing cytoplasmic ATP levels. Subsequently, a method to measure ATP levels at putative subcellular sites of HCV RNA replication in living cells was developed by introducing a recently-established Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET-based ATP indicator, called ATeam, into the NS5A coding region of the HCV replicon. Using this method, we were able to observe the formation of ATP-enriched dot-like structures, which co-localize with non-structural viral proteins, within the cytoplasm of HCV-replicating cells but not in non-replicating cells. The obtained FRET signals allowed us to estimate ATP concentrations within HCV replicating cells as ∼5 mM at possible replicating sites and ∼1 mM at peripheral sites that did not appear to be involved in HCV replication. In contrast, cytoplasmic ATP levels in non-replicating Huh-7 cells were estimated as ∼2 mM. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate changes in ATP concentration within cells during replication of the HCV genome and increased ATP levels at distinct sites within replicating cells. ATeam may be a powerful tool for the study of energy metabolism during replication of the viral genome.

  10. DNA replication defects delay cell division and disrupt cell polarity in early Caenorhabditis elegans embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encalada, S E; Martin, P R; Phillips, J B; Lyczak, R; Hamill, D R; Swan, K A; Bowerman, B

    2000-12-15

    In early Caenorhabditis elegans embryos, asymmetric cell divisions produce descendants with asynchronous cell cycle times. To investigate the relationship between cell cycle regulation and pattern formation, we have identified a collection of embryonic-lethal mutants in which cell divisions are delayed and cell fate patterns are abnormal. In div (for division delayed) mutant embryos, embryonic cell divisions are delayed but remain asynchronous. Some div mutants produce well-differentiated cell types, but they frequently lack the endodermal and mesodermal cell fates normally specified by a transcriptional activator called SKN-1. We show that mislocalization of PIE-1, a negative regulator of SKN-1, prevents the specification of endoderm and mesoderm in div-1 mutant embryos. In addition to defects in the normally asymmetric distribution of PIE-1, div mutants also exhibit other losses of asymmetry during early embryonic cleavages. The daughters of normally asymmetric divisions are nearly equal in size, and cytoplasmic P-granules are not properly localized to germline precursors in div mutant embryos. Thus the proper timing of cell division appears to be important for multiple aspects of asymmetric cell division. One div gene, div-1, encodes the B subunit of the DNA polymerase alpha-primase complex. Reducing the function of other DNA replication genes also results in a delayed division phenotype and embryonic lethality. Thus the other div genes we have identified are likely to encode additional components of the DNA replication machinery in C. elegans.

  11. Replication of Equine Infectious Anemia Virus in Engineered Mouse NIH 3T3 Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Baoshan; Montelaro, Ronald C.

    2008-01-01

    We employed the equine lentivirus equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) to investigate the cellular restrictions for lentivirus replication in murine NIH 3T3 cells. The results of these studies demonstrate that NIH 3T3 cells expressing the EIAV receptor ELR1 and equine cyclin T1 supported productive replication of EIAV and produced infectious virions at levels similar to those found in a reference permissive equine cell line. The studies presented here demonstrate, for the first time, differe...

  12. PDTC inhibits picornavirus polyprotein processing and RNA replication by transporting zinc ions into cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lanke, K.H.W.; Krenn, B.M.; Melchers, W.J.G.; Seipelt, J.; Kuppeveld, F.J.M. van

    2007-01-01

    Previously, it was shown that pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) inhibits proteolytic polyprotein processing and replication of human rhinovirus by transporting metal ions into cells. Here, it is shown that PDTC also inhibits replication of two other picornaviruses: coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3), a close

  13. Adenovirus DNA replication in vitro is stimulated by RNA from uninfected HeLa cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, P.C. van der; Dam, D. van; Kwant, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    Adenovirus DNA replication was studied in a partially reconstituted system consisting of purified viral proteins (DNA-binding protein, precursor terminal protein and Ad DNA polymerase) and a nuclear extract from uninfected HeLa cells. Optimal DNA replication required the presence of a heat-stable, r

  14. Centrality of host cell death in plant-microbe interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickman, Martin B; Fluhr, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is essential for proper growth, development, and cellular homeostasis in all eukaryotes. The regulation of PCD is of central importance in plant-microbe interactions; notably, PCD and features associated with PCD are observed in many host resistance responses. Conversely, pathogen induction of inappropriate cell death in the host results in a susceptible phenotype and disease. Thus, the party in control of PCD has a distinct advantage in these battles. PCD processes appear to be of ancient origin, as indicated by the fact that many features of cell death strategy are conserved between animals and plants; however, some of the details of death execution differ. Mammalian core PCD genes, such as caspases, are not present in plant genomes. Similarly, pro- and antiapoptotic mammalian regulatory elements are absent in plants, but, remarkably, when expressed in plants, successfully impact plant PCD. Thus, subtle structural similarities independent of sequence homology appear to sustain operational equivalence. The vacuole is emerging as a key organelle in the modulation of plant PCD. Under different signals for cell death, the vacuole either fuses with the plasmalemma membrane or disintegrates. Moreover, the vacuole appears to play a key role in autophagy; evidence suggests a prosurvival function for autophagy, but other studies propose a prodeath phenotype. Here, we describe and discuss what we know and what we do not know about various PCD pathways and how the host integrates signals to activate salicylic acid and reactive oxygen pathways that orchestrate cell death. We suggest that it is not cell death as such but rather the processes leading to cell death that contribute to the outcome of a given plant-pathogen interaction.

  15. Bromodomain protein Brd4 plays a key role in Merkel cell polyomavirus DNA replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Wang

    Full Text Available Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV or MCPyV is the first human polyomavirus to be definitively linked to cancer. The mechanisms of MCV-induced oncogenesis and much of MCV biology are largely unexplored. In this study, we demonstrate that bromodomain protein 4 (Brd4 interacts with MCV large T antigen (LT and plays a critical role in viral DNA replication. Brd4 knockdown inhibits MCV replication, which can be rescued by recombinant Brd4. Brd4 colocalizes with the MCV LT/replication origin complex in the nucleus and recruits replication factor C (RFC to the viral replication sites. A dominant negative inhibitor of the Brd4-MCV LT interaction can dissociate Brd4 and RFC from the viral replication complex and abrogate MCV replication. Furthermore, obstructing the physiologic interaction between Brd4 and host chromatin with the chemical compound JQ1(+ leads to enhanced MCV DNA replication, demonstrating that the role of Brd4 in MCV replication is distinct from its role in chromatin-associated transcriptional regulation. Our findings demonstrate mechanistic details of the MCV replication machinery; providing novel insight to elucidate the life cycle of this newly discovered oncogenic DNA virus.

  16. Understanding Cone Photoreceptor Cell Death in Achromatopsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Livia S; Vandenberghe, Luk H

    2016-01-01

    Colour vision is only achieved in the presence of healthy and functional cone photoreceptors found in the retina. It is an essential component of human vision and usually the first complaint patients undergoing vision degeneration have is the loss of daylight colour vision. Therefore, an understanding of the biology and basic mechanisms behind cone death under the degenerative state of retinal dystrophies and how the activation of the apoptotic pathway is triggered will provide valuable knowledge. It will also have broader applications for a spectrum of visual disorders and will be critical for future advances in translational research.

  17. Sleeping Beauty transposon-based system for rapid generation of HBV-replicating stable cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yong; Zhang, Tian-Ying; Fang, Lin-Lin; Chen, Zi-Xuan; Song, Liu-Wei; Cao, Jia-Li; Yang, Lin; Yuan, Quan; Xia, Ning-Shao

    2016-08-01

    The stable HBV-replicating cell lines, which carry replication-competent HBV genome stably integrated into the genome of host cell, are widely used to evaluate the effects of antiviral agents. However, current methods to generate HBV-replicating cell lines, which are mostly dependent on random integration of foreign DNA via plasmid transfection, are less-efficient and time-consuming. To address this issue, we constructed an all-in-one Sleeping Beauty transposon system (denoted pTSMP-HBV vector) for robust generation of stable cell lines carrying replication-competent HBV genome of different genotype. This vector contains a Sleeping Beauty transposon containing HBV 1.3-copy genome with an expression cassette of the SV40 promoter driving red fluorescent protein (mCherry) and self-cleaving P2A peptide linked puromycin resistance gene (PuroR). In addition, a PGK promoter-driven SB100X hyperactive transposase cassette is placed in the outside of the transposon in the same plasmid.The HBV-replicating stable cells could be obtained from pTSMP-HBV transfected HepG2 cells by red fluorescence-activated cell sorting and puromycin resistant cell selection within 4-week. Using this system, we successfully constructed four cell lines carrying replication-competent HBV genome of genotypes A-D. The replication and viral protein expression profiles of these cells were systematically characterized. In conclusion, our study provides a high-efficiency strategy to generate HBV-replicating stable cell lines, which may facilitate HBV-related virological study.

  18. THE PROGRAMED CELL DEATH REGULATORS OF ISOLATED MODEL SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Vatlitsov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The technology evolution creates the prerequisites for the emergence of new informational concept and approaches to the formation of a fundamentally new principles of biological objects understanding. The aim was to study the activators of the programmed cell death in an isolated system model. Cell culture aging parameters were performed on flow cytometer. It had formed the theory that the changes in the concentrations of metal ions and increase their extracellular concentration had formed a negative gradient into the cells.regulation of cell death. It was shown that the metals ions concentrations.

  19. Cbl negatively regulates JNK activation and cell death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrew A Sproul; Zhiheng Xu; Michael Wilhelm; Stephen Gire; Lloyd A Greene

    2009-01-01

    Here, we explore the role of Cbl proteins in regulation of neuronal apoptosis. In two paradigms of neuron apopto-sis--nerve growth factor (NGF) deprivation and DNA damage--cellular levels of c-Cbl and Cbl-b fell well before the onset of cell death. NGF deprivation also induced rapid loss of tyrosine phosphorylation (and most likely, activa-tion) of c-Cbl. Targeting e-Cbl and Cbl-b with siRNAs to mimic their loss/inactivation sensitized neuronal cells to death promoted by NGF deprivation or DNA damage. One potential mechanism by which Cbl proteins might affect neuronal death is by regulation of apoptotic c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling. We demonstrate that Cbl pro-teins interact with the JNK pathway components mixed lineage kinase (MLK) 3 and POSH and that knockdown of Cbl proteins is sufficient to increase JNK pathway activity. Furthermore, expression of c-Cbl blocks the ability of MLKs to signal to downstream components of the kinase cascade leading to JNK activation and protects neuronal cells from death induced by MLKs, but not from downstream JNK activators. On the basis of these findings, we propose that Cbls suppress cell death in healthy neurons at least in part by inhibiting the ability of MLKs to activate JNK signaling. Apoptotic stimuli lead to loss of Cbl protein/activity, thereby removing a critical brake on JNK acti-vation and on cell death.

  20. Acetaminophen induces human neuroblastoma cell death through NFKB activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inmaculada Posadas

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma resistance to apoptosis may contribute to the aggressive behavior of this tumor. Therefore, it would be relevant to activate endogenous cellular death mechanisms as a way to improve neuroblastoma therapy. We used the neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line as a model to study the mechanisms involved in acetaminophen (AAP-mediated toxicity by measuring CYP2E1 enzymatic activity, NFkB p65 subunit activation and translocation to the nucleus, Bax accumulation into the mitochondria, cytochrome c release and caspase activation. AAP activates the intrinsic death pathway in the SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cell line. AAP metabolism is partially responsible for this activation, because blockade of the cytochrome CYP2E1 significantly reduced but did not totally prevent, AAP-induced SH-SY5Y cell death. AAP also induced NFkB p65 activation by phosphorylation and its translocation to the nucleus, where NFkB p65 increased IL-1β production. This increase contributed to neuroblastoma cell death through a mechanism involving Bax accumulation into the mitochondria, cytochrome c release and caspase3 activation. Blockade of NFkB translocation to the nucleus by the peptide SN50 prevented AAP-mediated cell death and IL-1β production. Moreover, overexpression of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-x(L did not decrease AAP-mediated IL-1β production, but prevented both AAP and IL-1β-mediated cell death. We also confirmed the AAP toxic actions on SK-N-MC neuroepithelioma and U87MG glioblastoma cell lines. The results presented here suggest that AAP activates the intrinsic death pathway in neuroblastoma cells through a mechanism involving NFkB and IL-1β.

  1. Apoptotic-like programmed cell death in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reape, Theresa J; McCabe, Paul F

    2008-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is now accepted as a fundamental cellular process in plants. It is involved in defence, development and response to stress, and our understanding of these processes would be greatly improved through a greater knowledge of the regulation of plant PCD. However, there may be several types of PCD that operate in plants, and PCD research findings can be confusing if they are not assigned to a specific type of PCD. The various cell-death mechanisms need therefore to be carefully described and defined. This review describes one of these plant cell death processes, namely the apoptotic-like PCD (AL-PCD). We begin by examining the hallmark 'apoptotic-like' features (protoplast condensation, DNA degradation) of the cell's destruction that are characteristic of AL-PCD, and include examples of AL-PCD during the plant life cycle. The review explores the possible cellular 'executioners' (caspase-like molecules; mitochondria; de novo protein synthesis) that are responsible for the hallmark features of the cellular destruction. Finally, senescence is used as a case study to show that a rigorous definition of cell-death processes in plant cells can help to resolve arguments that occur in the scientific literature regarding the timing and control of plant cell death.

  2. Cell Death Mechanisms Induced by Cytotoxic Lymphocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ch(a)vez-Gal(a)n L; Arenas-Del Angel MC; Zenteno E; Ch(a)vez R; Lascurain R

    2009-01-01

    One of the functions of the immune system is to recognize and destroy abnormal or infected cells to maintain homeostasis. This is accomplished by cytotoxic lymphocytes. Cytotoxicity is a highly organized multifactor process. Here, we reviewed the apoptosis pathways induced by the two main cytotoxic lymphocyte subsets, natural killer (NK) cells and CD8+T cells. In base to recent experimental evidence, we reviewed NK receptors involved in recognition of target-cell, as well as lytic molecules such as perforin, granzymes-A and -B, and granulysin. In addition, we reviewed the Fas-FasL intercellular linkage mediated pathway, and briefly the cross-linking of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and TNF receptor pathway. We discussed three models of possible molecular interaction between lyric molecules from effector cytotoxic cells and target-cell membrane to induction of apoptosis.

  3. Spatial and Temporal Analysis of Alphavirus Replication and Assembly in Mammalian and Mosquito Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Jose

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Sindbis virus (SINV [genus Alphavirus, family Togaviridae] is an enveloped, mosquito-borne virus. Alphaviruses cause cytolytic infections in mammalian cells while establishing noncytopathic, persistent infections in mosquito cells. Mosquito vector adaptation of alphaviruses is a major factor in the transmission of epidemic strains of alphaviruses. Though extensive studies have been performed on infected mammalian cells, the morphological and structural elements of alphavirus replication and assembly remain poorly understood in mosquito cells. Here we used high-resolution live-cell imaging coupled with single-particle tracking and electron microscopy analyses to delineate steps in the alphavirus life cycle in both the mammalian host cell and insect vector cells. Use of dually labeled SINV in conjunction with cellular stains enabled us to simultaneously determine the spatial and temporal differences of alphavirus replication complexes (RCs in mammalian and insect cells. We found that the nonstructural viral proteins and viral RNA in RCs exhibit distinct spatial organization in mosquito cytopathic vacuoles compared to replication organelles from mammalian cells. We show that SINV exploits filopodial extensions for virus dissemination in both cell types. Additionally, we propose a novel mechanism for replication complex formation around glycoprotein-containing vesicles in mosquito cells that produced internally released particles that were seen budding from the vesicles by live imaging. Finally, by characterizing mosquito cell lines that were persistently infected with fluorescent virus, we show that the replication and assembly machinery are highly modified, and this allows continuous production of alphaviruses at reduced levels.

  4. The replication of beta cells in normal physiology, in disease and for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Peter C; Meier, Juris J; Butler, Alexandra E; Bhushan, Anil

    2007-11-01

    Replication of beta cells is an important source of beta-cell expansion in early childhood. The recent linkage of type 2 diabetes with several transcription factors involved in cell cycle regulation implies that growth of the beta-cell mass in early childhood might be an important determinant of risk for type 2 diabetes. Under some circumstances, including obesity and pregnancy, the beta-cell mass is adaptively increased in adult humans. The mechanisms by which this adaptive growth occurs and the relative contributions of beta-cell replication or of mechanisms independent of beta-cell replication are unknown. Also, although there is interest in the potential for beta-cell regeneration as a therapeutic approach in both type 1 and 2 diabetes, little is yet known about the potential sources of new beta cells in adult humans. In common with other cell types, replicating beta cells have an increased vulnerability to apoptosis, which is likely to limit the therapeutic value of inducing beta-cell replication in the proapoptotic environment of type 1 and 2 diabetes unless applied in conjunction with a strategy to suppress increased apoptosis.

  5. Spatial and Temporal Analysis of Alphavirus Replication and Assembly in Mammalian and Mosquito Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Joyce; Taylor, Aaron B.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sindbis virus (SINV [genus Alphavirus, family Togaviridae]) is an enveloped, mosquito-borne virus. Alphaviruses cause cytolytic infections in mammalian cells while establishing noncytopathic, persistent infections in mosquito cells. Mosquito vector adaptation of alphaviruses is a major factor in the transmission of epidemic strains of alphaviruses. Though extensive studies have been performed on infected mammalian cells, the morphological and structural elements of alphavirus replication and assembly remain poorly understood in mosquito cells. Here we used high-resolution live-cell imaging coupled with single-particle tracking and electron microscopy analyses to delineate steps in the alphavirus life cycle in both the mammalian host cell and insect vector cells. Use of dually labeled SINV in conjunction with cellular stains enabled us to simultaneously determine the spatial and temporal differences of alphavirus replication complexes (RCs) in mammalian and insect cells. We found that the nonstructural viral proteins and viral RNA in RCs exhibit distinct spatial organization in mosquito cytopathic vacuoles compared to replication organelles from mammalian cells. We show that SINV exploits filopodial extensions for virus dissemination in both cell types. Additionally, we propose a novel mechanism for replication complex formation around glycoprotein-containing vesicles in mosquito cells that produced internally released particles that were seen budding from the vesicles by live imaging. Finally, by characterizing mosquito cell lines that were persistently infected with fluorescent virus, we show that the replication and assembly machinery are highly modified, and this allows continuous production of alphaviruses at reduced levels. PMID:28196962

  6. Computerized video time-lapse (CVTL) analysis of cell death kinetics in human bladder carcinoma cells (EJ30) X-irradiated in different phases of the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Kenneth; Leonhardt, Edith A; Trinh, Maxine; Prieur-Carrillo, Geraldine; Lindqvist, Johan; Albright, Norman; Ling, C Clifton; Dewey, William C

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the modes and kinetics of cell death for EJ30 human bladder carcinoma cells irradiated in different phases of the cell cycle. Asynchronous human bladder carcinoma cells were observed in multiple fields by computerized video time-lapse (CVTL) microscopy for one to two cell divisions before irradiation (6 Gy) and for 6-11 days afterward. By analyzing time-lapse movies collected from these fields, pedigrees were constructed showing the behaviors of 231 cells irradiated in different phases of the cell cycle (i.e. at different times after mitosis). A total of 219 irradiated cells were determined to be non-colony-forming over the time spans of the experiments. In these nonclonogenic pedigrees, cells died primarily by necrosis either without entering mitosis or over 1 to 10 postirradiation generations. A total of 105 giant cells developed from the irradiated cells or their progeny, and 30% (31/105) divided successfully. Most nonclonogenic cells irradiated in mid-S phase (9-12 h after mitosis) died by the second generation, while those irradiated either before or after this short period in mid-S phase had cell deaths occurring over one to nine postirradiation generations. The nonclonogenic cells irradiated in mid-S phase also experienced the longest average delay before their first division. Clonogenic cells (11/12 cells) divided sooner after irradiation than the average nonclonogenic cells derived from the same phase of the cell cycle. The early death and long division delay observed for nonclonogenic cells irradiated in mid-S phase could possibly result from an increase in damage induced during the transition from the replication of euchromatin to the replication of heterochromatin.

  7. MMSET is dynamically regulated during cell-cycle progression and promotes normal DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Debra L; Zhang, Haoxing; Ham, Hyoungjun; Pei, Huadong; Lee, SeungBaek; Kim, JungJin; Billadeau, Daniel D; Lou, Zhenkun

    2016-01-01

    The timely and precise duplication of cellular DNA is essential for maintaining genome integrity and is thus tightly-regulated. During mitosis and G1, the Origin Recognition Complex (ORC) binds to future replication origins, coordinating with multiple factors to load the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) complex onto future replication origins as part of the pre-replication complex (pre-RC). The pre-RC machinery, in turn, remains inactive until the subsequent S phase when it is required for replication fork formation, thereby initiating DNA replication. Multiple myeloma SET domain-containing protein (MMSET, a.k.a. WHSC1, NSD2) is a histone methyltransferase that is frequently overexpressed in aggressive cancers and is essential for normal human development. Several studies have suggested a role for MMSET in cell-cycle regulation; however, whether MMSET is itself regulated during cell-cycle progression has not been examined. In this study, we report that MMSET is degraded during S phase in a cullin-ring ligase 4-Cdt2 (CRL4(Cdt2)) and proteasome-dependent manner. Notably, we also report defects in DNA replication and a decreased association of pre-RC factors with chromatin in MMSET-depleted cells. Taken together, our results suggest a dynamic regulation of MMSET levels throughout the cell cycle, and further characterize the role of MMSET in DNA replication and cell-cycle progression.

  8. Regulation of cell death receptor S-nitrosylation and apoptotic signaling by Sorafenib in hepatoblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Hernández, A; Navarro-Villarán, E; González, R; Pereira, S; Soriano-De Castro, L B; Sarrias-Giménez, A; Barrera-Pulido, L; Álamo-Martínez, J M; Serrablo-Requejo, A; Blanco-Fernández, G; Nogales-Muñoz, A; Gila-Bohórquez, A; Pacheco, D; Torres-Nieto, M A; Serrano-Díaz-Canedo, J; Suárez-Artacho, G; Bernal-Bellido, C; Marín-Gómez, L M; Barcena, J A; Gómez-Bravo, M A; Padilla, C A; Padillo, F J; Muntané, J

    2015-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays a relevant role during cell death regulation in tumor cells. The overexpression of nitric oxide synthase type III (NOS-3) induces oxidative and nitrosative stress, p53 and cell death receptor expression and apoptosis in hepatoblastoma cells. S-nitrosylation of cell death receptor modulates apoptosis. Sorafenib is the unique recommended molecular-targeted drug for the treatment of patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. The present study was addressed to elucidate the potential role of NO during Sorafenib-induced cell death in HepG2 cells. We determined the intra- and extracellular NO concentration, cell death receptor expression and their S-nitrosylation modifications, and apoptotic signaling in Sorafenib-treated HepG2 cells. The effect of NO donors on above parameters has also been determined. Sorafenib induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells. However, low concentration of the drug (10nM) increased cell death receptor expression, as well as caspase-8 and -9 activation, but without activation of downstream apoptotic markers. In contrast, Sorafenib (10 µM) reduced upstream apoptotic parameters but increased caspase-3 activation and DNA fragmentation in HepG2 cells. The shift of cell death signaling pathway was associated with a reduction of S-nitrosylation of cell death receptors in Sorafenib-treated cells. The administration of NO donors increased S-nitrosylation of cell death receptors and overall induction of cell death markers in control and Sorafenib-treated cells. In conclusion, Sorafenib induced alteration of cell death receptor S-nitrosylation status which may have a relevant repercussion on cell death signaling in hepatoblastoma cells.

  9. Connecting the dots of the bacterial cell cycle: Coordinating chromosome replication and segregation with cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajduk, Isabella V; Rodrigues, Christopher D A; Harry, Elizabeth J

    2016-05-01

    Proper division site selection is crucial for the survival of all organisms. What still eludes us is how bacteria position their division site with high precision, and in tight coordination with chromosome replication and segregation. Until recently, the general belief, at least in the model organisms Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli, was that spatial regulation of division comes about by the combined negative regulatory mechanisms of the Min system and nucleoid occlusion. However, as we review here, these two systems cannot be solely responsible for division site selection and we highlight additional regulatory mechanisms that are at play. In this review, we put forward evidence of how chromosome replication and segregation may have direct links with cell division in these bacteria and the benefit of recent advances in chromosome conformation capture techniques in providing important information about how these three processes mechanistically work together to achieve accurate generation of progenitor cells.

  10. Protease signaling in animal and plant-regulated cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvesen, Guy S; Hempel, Anne; Coll, Nuria S

    2016-07-01

    This review aims to highlight the proteases required for regulated cell death mechanisms in animals and plants. The aim is to be incisive, and not inclusive of all the animal proteases that have been implicated in various publications. The review also aims to focus on instances when several publications from disparate groups have demonstrated the involvement of an animal protease, and also when there is substantial biochemical, mechanistic and genetic evidence. In doing so, the literature can be culled to a handful of proteases, covering most of the known regulated cell death mechanisms: apoptosis, regulated necrosis, necroptosis, pyroptosis and NETosis in animals. In plants, the literature is younger and not as extensive as for mammals, although the molecular drivers of vacuolar death, necrosis and the hypersensitive response in plants are becoming clearer. Each of these death mechanisms has at least one proteolytic component that plays a major role in controlling the pathway, and sometimes they combine in networks to regulate cell death/survival decision nodes. Some similarities are found among animal and plant cell death proteases but, overall, the pathways that they govern are kingdom-specific with very little overlap. © 2015 FEBS.

  11. Host cell variations resulting from F plasmid-controlled replication of the Escherichia coli chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresguerres, E F; Nieto, C; Casquero, I; Cánovas, J L

    1986-01-01

    Cell size and DNA concentration were measured in Escherichia coli K-12 ET64. This strain carries a dnaA (Ts) mutation that has been suppressed by the insertion of the F plasmid into the chromosome. ET64 can grow in a balanced steady state of exponential growth at the restrictive temperature for its dnaA allele (39 degrees C), in which chromosome replication is controlled by the F plasmid, and at the permissive temperature (30 degrees C), in which chromosome replication is controlled by dnaA-oriC. When cells grown at the indicated temperatures were compared, it was observed that at 39 degrees C, the cell mass increased and the amount of cellular DNA decreased slightly; therefore, the DNA concentration was strongly reduced. These changes can neither be explained by the reduction of the generation time (which is only 10-15%) nor from observed changes in the replication time and in the time between DNA synthesis termination and cell division. Variations were mainly due to the increase in cell mass per origin of replication, at initiation, in cells grown at 39 degrees C. Control of chromosome replication by the F plasmid appears to be the reason for the increase in the initiation mass. Other possible causes, such as the modification of growth temperature, the generation time, or both, were discarded. These observations suggest that at one growth rate, the F plasmid replicates at a particular cell mass to F particle number ratio, and that this ratio is higher than the cell mass to oriC ratio at the initiation of chromosome replication. This fact might be significant to coordinate the replication of two different replicons in the same cell. PMID:3511032

  12. Legionella pneumophila Strain 130b Evades Macrophage Cell Death Independent of the Effector SidF in the Absence of Flagellin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speir, Mary; Vogrin, Adam; Seidi, Azadeh; Abraham, Gilu; Hunot, Stéphane; Han, Qingqing; Dorn, Gerald W.; Masters, Seth L.; Flavell, Richard A.; Vince, James E.; Naderer, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The human pathogen Legionella pneumophila must evade host cell death signaling to enable replication in lung macrophages and to cause disease. After bacterial growth, however, L. pneumophila is thought to induce apoptosis during egress from macrophages. The bacterial effector protein, SidF, has been shown to control host cell survival and death by inhibiting pro-apoptotic BNIP3 and BCL-RAMBO signaling. Using live-cell imaging to follow the L. pneumophila-macrophage interaction, we now demonstrate that L. pneumophila evades host cell apoptosis independent of SidF. In the absence of SidF, L. pneumophila was able to replicate, cause loss of mitochondria membrane potential, kill macrophages, and establish infections in lungs of mice. Consistent with this, deletion of BNIP3 and BCL-RAMBO did not affect intracellular L. pneumophila replication, macrophage death rates, and in vivo bacterial virulence. Abrogating mitochondrial cell death by genetic deletion of the effectors of intrinsic apoptosis, BAX, and BAK, or the regulator of mitochondrial permeability transition pore formation, cyclophilin-D, did not affect bacterial growth or the initial killing of macrophages. Loss of BAX and BAK only marginally limited the ability of L. pneumophila to efficiently kill all macrophages over extended periods. L. pneumophila induced killing of macrophages was delayed in the absence of capsase-11 mediated pyroptosis. Together, our data demonstrate that L. pneumophila evades host cell death responses independently of SidF during replication and can induce pyroptosis to kill macrophages in a timely manner. PMID:28261564

  13. Early cell death detection with digital holographic microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Pavillon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Digital holography provides a non-invasive measurement of the quantitative phase shifts induced by cells in culture, which can be related to cell volume changes. It has been shown previously that regulation of cell volume, in particular as it relates to ionic homeostasis, is crucially involved in the activation/inactivation of the cell death processes. We thus present here an application of digital holographic microscopy (DHM dedicated to early and label-free detection of cell death. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We provide quantitative measurements of phase signal obtained on mouse cortical neurons, and caused by early neuronal cell volume regulation triggered by excitotoxic concentrations of L-glutamate. We show that the efficiency of this early regulation of cell volume detected by DHM, is correlated with the occurrence of subsequent neuronal death assessed with the widely accepted trypan blue method for detection of cell viability. CONCLUSIONS: The determination of the phase signal by DHM provides a simple and rapid optical method for the early detection of cell death.

  14. The Apoptosome: Heart and Soul of the Cell Death Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arul M. Chinnaiyan

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is a fundamental biologic process by which metazoan cells orchestrate their own self-demise. Genetic analyses of the nematode C elegans identified three core components of the suicide apparatus which include CED-3, CED-4, and CED-9. An analogous set of core constituents exists in mammalian cells and includes caspase-9, Apaf-1, and bcl-2/xL, respectively. CED-3 and CED-4, along with their mammalian counterparts, function to kill cells, whereas CED-9 and its mammalian equivalents protect cells from death. These central components biochemically intermingle in a ternary complex recently dubbed the “apoptosome.” The C elegans protein EGL-1 and its mammalian counterparts, pro-apoptotic members of the bcl-2 family, induce cell death by disrupting apoptosome interactions. Thus, EGL-1 may represent a primordial signal integrator for the apoptosome. Various biochemical processes including oligomerization, adenosine triphosphate ATP/dATP binding, and cytochrome c interaction play a role in regulating the ternary death complex. Recent studies suggest that cell death receptors, such as CD95, may amplify their suicide signal by activating the apoptosome. These mutual associations by core components of the suicide apparatus provide a molecular framework in which diverse death signals likely interface. Understanding the apoptosome and its cellular connections will facilitate the design of novel therapeutic strategies for cancer and other disease states in which apoptosis plays a pivotal role.

  15. Asynchronous replication and autosome-pair non-equivalence in human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devkanya Dutta

    Full Text Available A number of mammalian genes exhibit the unusual properties of random monoallelic expression and random asynchronous replication. Such exceptional genes include genes subject to X inactivation and autosomal genes including odorant receptors, immunoglobulins, interleukins, pheromone receptors, and p120 catenin. In differentiated cells, random asynchronous replication of interspersed autosomal genes is coordinated at the whole chromosome level, indicative of chromosome-pair non-equivalence. Here we have investigated the replication pattern of the random asynchronously replicating genes in undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells, using fluorescence in situ hybridization based assay. We show that allele-specific replication of X-linked genes and random monoallelic autosomal genes occur in human embryonic stem cells. The direction of replication is coordinated at the whole chromosome level and can cross the centromere, indicating the existence of autosome-pair non-equivalence in human embryonic stem cells. These results suggest that epigenetic mechanism(s that randomly distinguish between two parental alleles are emerging in the cells of the inner cell mass, the source of human embryonic stem cells.

  16. The regulation of erythrocyte survival and suicidal cell death

    OpenAIRE

    Föller, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The life span of erythrocytes is tightly regulated. Therefore, a mechanism is required to remove senescent or damaged erythrocytes without rupture of the cell membrane resulting in the release of hemoglobin which may impair kidney function. The mechanism of suicidal erythrocyte death is called eryptosis and shares similarities with apoptosis of nucleated cells such as exposure of phosphatidylserine at the cell surface, increase in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, blebbing of the membrane, cell s...

  17. Entamoeba histolytica induces cell death of HT29 colonic epithelial cells via NOX1-derived ROS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyeong Ah; Kim, Ju Young; Lee, Young Ah; Min, Arim; Bahk, Young Yil; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2013-02-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, which causes amoebic colitis and occasionally liver abscess in humans, is able to induce host cell death. However, signaling mechanisms of colon cell death induced by E. histolytica are not fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the signaling role of NOX in cell death of HT29 colonic epithelial cells induced by E. histolytica. Incubation of HT29 cells with amoebic trophozoites resulted in DNA fragmentation that is a hallmark of apoptotic cell death. In addition, E. histolytica generate intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in a contact-dependent manner. Inhibition of intracellular ROS level with treatment with DPI, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidases (NOXs), decreased Entamoeba-induced ROS generation and cell death in HT29 cells. However, pan-caspase inhibitor did not affect E. histolytica-induced HT29 cell death. In HT29 cells, catalytic subunit NOX1 and regulatory subunit Rac1 for NOX1 activation were highly expressed. We next investigated whether NADPH oxidase 1 (NOX1)-derived ROS is closely associated with HT29 cell death induced by E. histolytica. Suppression of Rac1 by siRNA significantly inhibited Entamoeba-induced cell death. Moreover, knockdown of NOX1 by siRNA, effectively inhibited E. histolytica-triggered DNA fragmentation in HT29 cells. These results suggest that NOX1-derived ROS is required for apoptotic cell death in HT29 colon epithelial cells induced by E. histolytica.

  18. Replication of a hepatitis C virus replicon clone in mouse cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chisari Francis V

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C Virus (HCV is a significant public health burden and small animal models are needed to study the pathology and immunobiology of the virus. In effort to develop experimental HCV mouse models, we screened a panel of HCV replicons to identify clones capable of replicating in mouse hepatocytes. Results We report the establishment of stable HCV replication in mouse hepatocyte and fibroblast cell lines using replicons derived from the JFH-1 genotype 2a consensus sequence. Viral RNA replication efficiency in mouse cells was comparable to that observed in human Huh-7 replicon cells, with negative-strand HCV RNA and the viral NS5A protein being readily detected by Northern and Western Blot analysis, respectively. Although HCV replication was established in the absence of adaptive mutations that might otherwise compromise the in vitro infectivity of the JFH-1 clone, no infectious virus was detected when the culture medium from full length HCV RNA replicating mouse cells was titrated on Huh-7 cells, suggesting that the mouse cells were unable to support production of infectious progeny viral particles. Consistent with an additional block in viral entry, infectious JFH-1 particles produced in Huh-7 cells were not able to establish detectable HCV RNA replication in naïve mouse cells. Conclusion Thus, this report expands the repertoire of HCV replication systems and possibly represents a step toward developing mouse models of HCV replication, but it also highlights that other species restrictions might continue to make the development of a purely murine HCV infectious model challenging.

  19. Multiple regulatory systems coordinate DNA replication with cell growth in Bacillus subtilis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heath Murray

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In many bacteria the rate of DNA replication is linked with cellular physiology to ensure that genome duplication is coordinated with growth. Nutrient-mediated growth rate control of DNA replication initiation has been appreciated for decades, however the mechanism(s that connects these cell cycle activities has eluded understanding. In order to help address this fundamental question we have investigated regulation of DNA replication in the model organism Bacillus subtilis. Contrary to the prevailing view we find that changes in DnaA protein level are not sufficient to account for nutrient-mediated growth rate control of DNA replication initiation, although this regulation does require both DnaA and the endogenous replication origin. We go on to report connections between DNA replication and several essential cellular activities required for rapid bacterial growth, including respiration, central carbon metabolism, fatty acid synthesis, phospholipid synthesis, and protein synthesis. Unexpectedly, the results indicate that multiple regulatory systems are involved in coordinating DNA replication with cell physiology, with some of the regulatory systems targeting oriC while others act in a oriC-independent manner. We propose that distinct regulatory systems are utilized to control DNA replication in response to diverse physiological and chemical changes.

  20. Replication program of active and inactive multigene families in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatton, K.S.; Dhar, V.; Brown, E.H.; Iqbal, M.A.; Stuart, S.; Didamo, V.T.; Schildkraut, C.L.

    1988-05-01

    In a comprehensive study, the temporal replication of tissue-specific genes and flanking sequences was compared in nine cells lines exhibiting different tissue-specific functions. Some of the rules the authors determined for the replication of these tissue specific genes include the following. (i) Actively transcribed genes usually replicate during the first quarter of the S phase. (ii) Some immunoglobulin genes replicate during the first half of S phase even when no transcriptional activity is detected but appear to replicate even earlier in cell lines where they are transcribed. (iii) Nontranscribed genes can replicate during any interval of S phase. (iv) Multigene families arranged in clusters of 250 kilobases or less define a temporal compartment comprising approximately one-quarter of S phase. While these rules, and others that are discussed, apply to the tissue-specific genes studied here, all tissue-specific genes may not follow this pattern. In addition, housekeeping genes did not follow some of these rules. These results provide the first molecular evidence that the coordinate timing of replication of contiguous sequences within a multigene family is a general property of the mammalian genome. The relationship between replication very early during S phase and the transcriptional activity within a chromosomal domain is discussed.

  1. Multiple regulatory systems coordinate DNA replication with cell growth in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Heath; Koh, Alan

    2014-10-01

    In many bacteria the rate of DNA replication is linked with cellular physiology to ensure that genome duplication is coordinated with growth. Nutrient-mediated growth rate control of DNA replication initiation has been appreciated for decades, however the mechanism(s) that connects these cell cycle activities has eluded understanding. In order to help address this fundamental question we have investigated regulation of DNA replication in the model organism Bacillus subtilis. Contrary to the prevailing view we find that changes in DnaA protein level are not sufficient to account for nutrient-mediated growth rate control of DNA replication initiation, although this regulation does require both DnaA and the endogenous replication origin. We go on to report connections between DNA replication and several essential cellular activities required for rapid bacterial growth, including respiration, central carbon metabolism, fatty acid synthesis, phospholipid synthesis, and protein synthesis. Unexpectedly, the results indicate that multiple regulatory systems are involved in coordinating DNA replication with cell physiology, with some of the regulatory systems targeting oriC while others act in a oriC-independent manner. We propose that distinct regulatory systems are utilized to control DNA replication in response to diverse physiological and chemical changes.

  2. Cell death by mitotic catastrophe: a molecular definition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castedo, M.; Perfettini, J.-L.; Roumier, T.; Andreau, K.; Medema, R.H.; Kroemer, G.

    2004-01-01

    The current literature is devoid of a clearcut definition of mitotic catastrophe, a type of cell death that occurs during mitosis. Here, we propose that mitotic catastrophe results from a combination of deficient cell-cycle checkpoints (in particular the DNA structure checkpoints and the spindle ass

  3. Role of endonuclease G in senescence-associated cell death of human endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Mitotic cells in culture show a limited replicative potential and after extended subculturing undergo a terminal growth arrest termed cellular senescence. When cells reach the senescent phenotype, this is accompanied by a significant change in the cellular phenotype and massive changes in gene expression, including the upregulation of secreted factors. In human fibroblasts, senescent cells also acquire resistance to apoptosis. In contrary, in human endothelial cells, both replicative and stre...

  4. Jasmonic acid signaling modulates ozone-induced hypersensitive cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, M V; Lee, H; Creelman, R A; Mullet, J E; Davis, K R

    2000-09-01

    Recent studies suggest that cross-talk between salicylic acid (SA)-, jasmonic acid (JA)-, and ethylene-dependent signaling pathways regulates plant responses to both abiotic and biotic stress factors. Earlier studies demonstrated that ozone (O(3)) exposure activates a hypersensitive response (HR)-like cell death pathway in the Arabidopsis ecotype Cvi-0. We now have confirmed the role of SA and JA signaling in influencing O(3)-induced cell death. Expression of salicylate hydroxylase (NahG) in Cvi-0 reduced O(3)-induced cell death. Methyl jasmonate (Me-JA) pretreatment of Cvi-0 decreased O(3)-induced H(2)O(2) content and SA concentrations and completely abolished O(3)-induced cell death. Cvi-0 synthesized as much JA as did Col-0 in response to O(3) exposure but exhibited much less sensitivity to exogenous Me-JA. Analyses of the responses to O(3) of the JA-signaling mutants jar1 and fad3/7/8 also demonstrated an antagonistic relationship between JA- and SA-signaling pathways in controlling the magnitude of O(3)-induced HR-like cell death.

  5. Ganglion cell death in glaucoma: from mice to men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickells, Robert W

    2007-01-01

    Glaucoma results from the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells and their axons. Over the last 20 years several important advancements have been made in our understanding of the molecular pathology of this disease, particularly through the development of rat models of experimental glaucoma and the characterization of a spontaneous secondary form of glaucoma in DBA/2 substrains of inbred mice. One of these advances is the observation that ganglion cells die by apoptosis, an intrinsic molecular pathway of programmed cell death. An important aspect of this cell death process is the concept that these cells actually undergo compartmentalized self-destruction. Importantly, genetic evidence now suggests that axons die independently of the apoptotic program that executes the cell body or soma. This review briefly summarizes some of the most significant developments in glaucoma research, with respect to the process of ganglion cell degeneration.

  6. Alpha interferon-induced antiviral response noncytolytically reduces replication defective adenovirus DNA in MDBK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ju-Tao; Zhou, Tianlun; Guo, Haitao; Block, Timothy M

    2007-12-01

    Although alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) is of benefit in the treatment of viral hepatitis B, HBV replication has been refractory to the cytokine in commonly used hepatocyte-derived cell lines. In search for a cell culture system to study the mechanism by which IFN-alpha inhibits HBV replication, we infected a variety of cell lines with an adenoviral vector containing a replication competent 1.3-fold genome length HBV DNA (AdHBV) and followed by incubation with IFN-alpha. We found that IFN-alpha efficiently decreased the level of HBV DNA replicative intermediates in AdHBV infected Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells. Further analysis revealed, surprisingly, that IFN-alpha did not directly inhibit HBV replication, rather the amount of adenovirus DNA in the nuclei of MDBK cells was reduced. As a consequence, HBV RNA transcription and DNA replication were inhibited. Experiments with adenoviral vector expressing a green fluorescent protein (GFP) further supported the notion that IFN-alpha treatment noncytolytically eliminated adenovirus DNA, but did not kill the vector infected MDBK cells. Our data suggest that IFN-alpha-induced antiviral program is able to discriminate host cellular DNA from episomal viral DNA and might represent a novel pathway of interferon mediate innate defense against DNA virus infections.

  7. Mechanisms of developmentally controlled cell death in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Durme, Matthias; Nowack, Moritz K

    2016-02-01

    During plant development various forms of programmed cell death (PCD) are implemented by a number of cell types as inherent part of their differentiation programmes. Differentiation-induced developmental PCD is gradually prepared in concert with the other cell differentiation processes. As precocious or delayed PCD can have detrimental consequences for plant development, the actual execution of PCD has to be tightly controlled. Once triggered, PCD is irrevocably and rapidly executed accompanied by the breakdown of cellular compartments. In most developmental PCD forms, cell death is followed by cell corpse clearance. Devoid of phagocytic mechanisms, dying plant cells have to prepare their own demise in a cell-autonomous fashion before their deaths, ensuring the completion of cell clearance post mortem. Depending on the cell type, cell clearance can be complete or rather selective, and persistent corpses of particular cells accomplish vital functions in the plant body. The present review attempts to give an update on the molecular mechanisms that coordinate differentiation-induced PCD as vital part of plant development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Signal transduction events in aluminum-induced cell death in tomato suspension cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakimova, Elena T; Kapchina-Toteva, Veneta M; Woltering, Ernst J

    2007-06-01

    In this study, some of the signal transduction events involved in AlCl(3)-induced cell death in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) suspension cells were elucidated. Cells treated with 100 microM AlCl(3) showed typical features of programmed cell death (PCD) such as nuclear and cytoplasmic condensation. Cell death was effectively inhibited by protease and human caspase inhibitors indicating a cell death execution mechanism with similarities to animal apoptosis. Cell death was suppressed by application of antoxidants and by inhibitors of phospholipase C (PLC), phospholipase D (PLD) and ethylene signalling pathways. The results suggest that low concentrations of heavy metal ions stimulate both PLC and PLD signalling pathways leading to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent cell death executed by caspase-like proteases.

  9. Isolation, characterisation and reconstitution of cell death signalling complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Michelle A; Langlais, Claudia; Cain, Kelvin; MacFarlane, Marion

    2013-06-01

    Apoptosis and necroptosis are dependent on the formation/activation of distinct multi-protein complexes; these include the Death-Inducing Signalling Complex (DISC), apoptosome, piddosome, necrosome and ripoptosome. Despite intense research, the mechanisms that regulate assembly/function of several of these cell death signalling platforms remain to be elucidated. It is now increasingly evident that the composition and stoichiometry of components within these key signalling platforms not only determines the final signalling outcome but also the mode of cell death. Characterising these complexes can therefore provide new insights into how cell death is regulated and also how these cell death signalling platforms could potentially be targeted in the context of disease. Large multi-protein complexes can initially be separated according to their size by gel filtration or sucrose density gradient centrifugation followed by subsequent affinity-purification or immunoprecipitation. The advantage of combining these techniques is that you can assess the assembly of individual components into a complex and then assess the size and stoichiometric composition of the native functional signalling complex within a particular cell type. This, alongside reconstitution of a complex from its individual core components can therefore provide new insight into the mechanisms that regulate assembly/function of key multi-protein signalling complexes. Here, we describe the successful application of a range of methodologies that can be used to characterise the assembly of large multi-protein complexes such as the apoptosome, DISC and ripoptosome. Together with their subsequent purification and/or reconstitution, these approaches can provide novel insights into how cell death signalling platforms are regulated in both normal cell physiology and disease.

  10. Spatial and Temporal Analysis of Alphavirus Replication and Assembly in Mammalian and Mosquito Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Joyce; Taylor, Aaron B; Kuhn, Richard J

    2017-02-14

    Sindbis virus (SINV [genus Alphavirus, family Togaviridae]) is an enveloped, mosquito-borne virus. Alphaviruses cause cytolytic infections in mammalian cells while establishing noncytopathic, persistent infections in mosquito cells. Mosquito vector adaptation of alphaviruses is a major factor in the transmission of epidemic strains of alphaviruses. Though extensive studies have been performed on infected mammalian cells, the morphological and structural elements of alphavirus replication and assembly remain poorly understood in mosquito cells. Here we used high-resolution live-cell imaging coupled with single-particle tracking and electron microscopy analyses to delineate steps in the alphavirus life cycle in both the mammalian host cell and insect vector cells. Use of dually labeled SINV in conjunction with cellular stains enabled us to simultaneously determine the spatial and temporal differences of alphavirus replication complexes (RCs) in mammalian and insect cells. We found that the nonstructural viral proteins and viral RNA in RCs exhibit distinct spatial organization in mosquito cytopathic vacuoles compared to replication organelles from mammalian cells. We show that SINV exploits filopodial extensions for virus dissemination in both cell types. Additionally, we propose a novel mechanism for replication complex formation around glycoprotein-containing vesicles in mosquito cells that produced internally released particles that were seen budding from the vesicles by live imaging. Finally, by characterizing mosquito cell lines that were persistently infected with fluorescent virus, we show that the replication and assembly machinery are highly modified, and this allows continuous production of alphaviruses at reduced levels.IMPORTANCE Reemerging mosquito-borne alphaviruses cause serious human epidemics worldwide. Several structural and imaging studies have helped to define the life cycle of alphaviruses in mammalian cells, but the mode of virus replication and

  11. Cell death and autophagy: cytokines, drugs, and nutritional factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursch, Wilfried; Karwan, Anneliese; Mayer, Miriam; Dornetshuber, Julia; Fröhwein, Ulrike; Schulte-Hermann, Rolf; Fazi, Barbara; Di Sano, Federica; Piredda, Lucia; Piacentini, Mauro; Petrovski, Goran; Fésüs, László; Gerner, Christopher

    2008-12-30

    Cells may use multiple pathways to commit suicide. In certain contexts, dying cells generate large amounts of autophagic vacuoles and clear large proportions of their cytoplasm, before they finally die, as exemplified by the treatment of human mammary carcinoma cells with the anti-estrogen tamoxifen (TAM, < or = 1 microM). Protein analysis during autophagic cell death revealed distinct proteins of the nuclear fraction including GST-pi and some proteasomal subunit constituents to be affected during autophagic cell death. Depending on the functional status of caspase-3, MCF-7 cells may switch between autophagic and apoptotic features of cell death [Fazi, B., Bursch, W., Fimia, G.M., Nardacci R., Piacentini, M., Di Sano, F., Piredda, L., 2008. Fenretinide induces autophagic cell death in caspase-defective breast cancer cells. Autophagy 4(4), 435-441]. Furthermore, the self-destruction of MCF-7 cells was found to be completed by phagocytosis of cell residues [Petrovski, G., Zahuczky, G., Katona, K., Vereb, G., Martinet, W., Nemes, Z., Bursch, W., Fésüs, L., 2007. Clearance of dying autophagic cells of different origin by professional and non-professional phagocytes. Cell Death Diff. 14 (6), 1117-1128]. Autophagy also constitutes a cell's strategy of defense upon cell damage by eliminating damaged bulk proteins/organelles. This biological condition may be exemplified by the treatment of MCF-7 cells with a necrogenic TAM-dose (10 microM), resulting in the lysis of almost all cells within 24h. However, a transient (1h) challenge of MCF-7 cells with the same dose allowed the recovery of cells involving autophagy. Enrichment of chaperones in the insoluble cytoplasmic protein fraction indicated the formation of aggresomes, a potential trigger for autophagy. In a further experimental model HL60 cells were treated with TAM, causing dose-dependent distinct responses: 1-5 microM TAM, autophagy predominant; 7-9 microM, apoptosis predominant; 15 microM, necrosis. These phenomena

  12. A unique epigenetic signature is associated with active DNA replication loci in human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing; Su, Trent; Ferrari, Roberto; Li, Jing-Yu; Kurdistani, Siavash K

    2014-02-01

    The cellular epigenetic landscape changes as pluripotent stem cells differentiate to somatic cells or when differentiated cells transform to a cancerous state. These epigenetic changes are commonly correlated with differences in gene expression. Whether active DNA replication is also associated with distinct chromatin environments in these developmentally and phenotypically diverse cell types has not been known. Here, we used BrdU-seq to map active DNA replication loci in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), normal primary fibroblasts and a cancer cell line, and correlated these maps to the epigenome. In all cell lines, the majority of BrdU peaks were enriched in euchromatin and at DNA repetitive elements, especially at microsatellite repeats, and coincided with previously determined replication origins. The most prominent BrdU peaks were shared between all cells but a sizable fraction of the peaks were specific to each cell type and associated with cell type-specific genes. Surprisingly, the BrdU peaks that were common to all cell lines were associated with H3K18ac, H3K56ac, and H4K20me1 histone marks only in hESCs but not in normal fibroblasts or cancer cells. Depletion of the histone acetyltransferases for H3K18 and H3K56 dramatically decreased the number and intensity of BrdU peaks in hESCs. Our data reveal a unique epigenetic signature that distinguishes active replication loci in hESCs from normal somatic or malignant cells.

  13. Signal transduction events in aluminum-induced cell death in tomato suspension cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakimova, E.T.; Kapchina-Toteva, V.M.; Woltering, E.J.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, some of the signal transduction events involved in AlCl3-induced cell death in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) suspension cells were elucidated. Cells treated with 100 ¿M AlCl3 showed typical features of programmed cell death (PCD) such as nuclear and cytoplasmic condensation.

  14. Signal transduction events in aluminum-induced cell death in tomato suspension cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakimova, E.T.; Kapchina-Toteva, V.M.; Woltering, E.J.

    2007-01-01

    In this study, some of the signal transduction events involved in AlCl3-induced cell death in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) suspension cells were elucidated. Cells treated with 100 ¿M AlCl3 showed typical features of programmed cell death (PCD) such as nuclear and cytoplasmic condensation.

  15. Augmented cell death with Bloom syndrome helicase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Hideo; Fukao, Toshiyuki; Kasahara, Kimiko; Yamada, Taketo; Kondo, Naomi

    2011-01-01

    Bloom syndrome (BS) is a rare autosomal genetic disorder characterized by lupus-like erythematous telangi-ectasias of the face, sun sensitivity, infertility, stunted growth, upper respiratory infection, and gastrointestinal infections commonly associated with decreased immuno-globulin levels. The syndrome is associated with immuno-deficiency of a generalized type, ranging from mild and essentially asympto-matic to severe. Chromosomal abnormalities are hallmarks of the disorder, and high frequencies of sister chromatid exchanges and quadriradial configurations in lymphocytes and fibroblasts are diagnostic features. BS is caused by mutations in BLM, a member of the RecQ helicase family. We determined whether BLM deficiency has any effects on cell growth and death in BLM-deficient cells and mice. BLM-deficient EB-virus-transformed cell lines from BS patients and embryonic fibroblasts from BLM-/- mice showed slower growth than wild-type cells. BLM-deficient cells showed abnormal p53 protein expression after irradiation. In BLM-/- mice, small body size, reduced number of fetal liver cells and increased cell death were observed. BLM deficiency causes the up-regulation of p53, double-strand break and apoptosis, which are likely observed in irradiated control cells. Slow cell growth and increased cell death may be one of the causes of the small body size associated with BS patients.

  16. Vehicles, Replicators, and Intercellular Movement of Genetic Information: Evolutionary Dissection of a Bacterial Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matti Jalasvuori

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Prokaryotic biosphere is vastly diverse in many respects. Any given bacterial cell may harbor in different combinations viruses, plasmids, transposons, and other genetic elements along with their chromosome(s. These agents interact in complex environments in various ways causing multitude of phenotypic effects on their hosting cells. In this discussion I perform a dissection for a bacterial cell in order to simplify the diversity into components that may help approach the ocean of details in evolving microbial worlds. The cell itself is separated from all the genetic replicators that use the cell vehicle for preservation and propagation. I introduce a classification that groups different replicators according to their horizontal movement potential between cells and according to their effects on the fitness of their present host cells. The classification is used to discuss and improve the means by which we approach general evolutionary tendencies in microbial communities. Moreover, the classification is utilized as a tool to help formulating evolutionary hypotheses and to discuss emerging bacterial pathogens as well as to promote understanding on the average phenotypes of different replicators in general. It is also discussed that any given biosphere comprising prokaryotic cell vehicles and genetic replicators may naturally evolve to have horizontally moving replicators of various types.

  17. Accelerated Tumor Cell Death by Angiogenic Modifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-08-01

    cells was harvested and concentrated by ultrafiltration with a Centricon YAlO (Millipore, MA). The protein amount in CM was determined using BCA...kinase; HGF/SF, Hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor; IGF-1, insulin -like growth factor-I ;IL-6, interleukin-6; ITT, intention to treat; MMP...the growth of advanced prostate cancer. Studies using an anti-IL- 6 monoclonal antibody have shown tumoricidal effects in a murine model. The insulin

  18. Restriction of human adenovirus replication in Chinese hamster cell lines and their hybrids with human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radna, R L; Foellmer, B; Feldman, L A; Francke, U; Ozer, H L

    1987-11-01

    We have found that the replication of human adenovirus (Ad2) is restricted in multiple Chinese hamster cell lines including CHO and V79. The major site of restriction involves differential accumulation of late viral proteins as demonstrated by immunofluorescence assay and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with and without prior immunoprecipitation. Synthesis of fiber and penton base are markedly reduced, whereas others, such as the 100K polypeptide, are synthesized efficiently. This pattern of restriction is similar to that previously reported for Ad2 infection of several monkey cell lines; however, the restriction is more marked in the Chinese hamster cell lines. The restriction is most likely due to a deficient cellular function since stable cell hybrids between V79 or CHO and human cells are permissive for virus replication. By analysis of a series of hybrids with reduced numbers of human chromosomes, fiber synthesis was correlated with the presence of the short arm of human chromosome 3. More hybrids showed restoration of fiber synthesis than production of progeny virus, suggesting that more than one unlinked function is required for the latter.

  19. Methylglyoxal Induces Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Cell Death in Liver

    OpenAIRE

    Seo, Kyuhwa; Ki, Sung Hwan; Shin, Sang Mi

    2014-01-01

    Degradation of glucose is aberrantly increased in hyperglycemia, which causes various harmful effects on the liver. Methylglyoxal is produced during glucose degradation and the levels of methylglyoxal are increased in diabetes patients. In this study we investigated whether methylglyoxal induces mitochondrial impairment and apoptosis in HepG2 cells and induces liver toxicity in vivo. Methylglyoxal caused apoptotic cell death in HepG2 cells. Moreover, methylglyoxal significantly promoted the p...

  20. Sensory hair cell death and regeneration in fishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry D. Monroe

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sensory hair cells are specialized mechanotransductive receptors required for hearing and vestibular function. Loss of hair cells in humans and other mammals is permanent and causes reduced hearing and balance. In the early 1980’s, it was shown that hair cells continue to be added to the inner ear sensory epithelia in cartilaginous and bony fishes. Soon thereafter, hair cell regeneration was documented in the chick cochlea following acoustic trauma. Since then, research using chick and other avian models has led to great insights into hair cell death and regeneration. However, with the rise of the zebrafish as a model organism for studying disease and developmental processes, there has been an increased interest in studying sensory hair cell death and regeneration in its lateral line and inner ears. Advances derived from studies in zebrafish and other fish species include understanding the effect of ototoxins on hair cells and finding otoprotectants to mitigate ototoxin damage, the role of cellular proliferation versus direct transdifferentiation during hair cell regeneration, and elucidating cellular pathways involved in the regeneration process. This review will summarize research on hair cell death and regeneration using fish models, indicate the potential strengths and weaknesses of these models, and discuss several emerging areas of future studies.

  1. A Role of hIPI3 in DNA Replication Licensing in Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yining; Amin, Aftab; Qin, Yan; Wang, Ziyi; Jiang, Huadong; Liang, Lu; Shi, Linjing; Liang, Chun

    2016-01-01

    The yeast Ipi3p is required for DNA replication and cell viability in Sacharomyces cerevisiae. It is an essential component of the Rix1 complex (Rix1p/Ipi2p-Ipi1p-Ipi3p) that is required for the processing of 35S pre-rRNA in pre-60S ribosomal particles and for the initiation of DNA replication. The human IPI3 homolog is WDR18 (WD repeat domain 18), which shares significant homology with yIpi3p. Here we report that knockdown of hIPI3 resulted in substantial defects in the chromatin association of the MCM complex, DNA replication, cell cycle progression and cell proliferation. Importantly, hIPI3 silencing did not result in a reduction of the protein level of hCDC6, hMCM7, or the ectopically expressed GFP protein, indicating that protein synthesis was not defective in the same time frame of the DNA replication and cell cycle defects. Furthermore, the mRNA and protein levels of hIPI3 fluctuate in the cell cycle, with the highest levels from M phase to early G1 phase, similar to other pre-replicative (pre-RC) proteins. Moreover, hIPI3 interacts with other replication-initiation proteins, co-localizes with hMCM7 in the nucleus, and is important for the nuclear localization of hMCM7. We also found that hIPI3 preferentially binds to the origins of DNA replication including those at the c-Myc, Lamin-B2 and β-Globin loci. These results indicate that hIPI3 is involved in human DNA replication licensing independent of its role in ribosome biogenesis.

  2. Beneficial effect of (-)schisandrin B against 3-nitropropionic acid-induced cell death in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Philip Y; Ko, Kam Ming

    2012-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is characterized by the dysfunction of mitochondrial energy metabolism, which is associated with the functional impairment of succinate dehydrogenase (mitochondrial complex II), and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH). Treatment with 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP), a potent irreversible inhibitor of succinate dehydrogenase, replicates most of the pathophysiological features of HD. In the present study, we investigated the effect of (-)schisandrin B [(-)Sch B, a potent enantiomer of schisandrin B] on 3-NP-induced cell injury in rat differentiated neuronal PC12 cells. The 3-NP caused cell necrosis, as assessed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage, and mitochondrion-dependent cell apoptosis, as assessed by caspase-3 and caspase-9 activation, in differentiated PC12 cells. The cytotoxicity induced by 3-NP was associated with a depletion of cellular reduced glutathione (GSH) as well as the activation of redox-sensitive c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway and the inhibition of PDH. (-)Sch B pretreatment (5 and 15 μM) significantly reduced the extent of necrotic and apoptotic cell death in 3-NP-challenged cells. The cytoprotection afforded by (-)Sch B pretreatment was associated with the attenuation of 3-NP-induced GSH depletion as well as JNK activation and PDH inhibition. (-)Sch B pretreatment enhanced cellular glutathione redox status and ameliorated the 3-NP-induced cellular energy crisis, presumably by suppressing the activated JNK-mediated PDH inhibition, thereby protecting against necrotic and apoptotic cell death in differentiated PC12 cells.

  3. CD40 ligand induced cytotoxicity in carcinoma cells is enhanced by inhibition of metalloproteinase cleavage and delivery via a conditionally-replicating adenovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Lawrence S

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CD40 and its ligand (CD40L play a critical role in co-ordinating immune responses. CD40 is also expressed in lymphoid malignancies and a number of carcinomas. In carcinoma cells the physiological outcome of CD40 ligation depends on the level of receptor engagement with low levels promoting cell survival and high levels inducing cell death. The most profound induction of cell death in carcinoma cells is induced by membrane-bound rather than recombinant soluble CD40L, but like other TNF family ligands, it is cleaved from the membrane by matrix metalloproteinases. Results We have generated a replication-deficient adenovirus expressing a mutant CD40L that is resistant to metalloproteinase cleavage such that ligand expression is retained at the cell membrane. Here we show that the mutated, cleavage-resistant form of CD40L is a more potent inducer of apoptosis than wild-type ligand in CD40-positive carcinoma cell lines. Since transgene expression via replication-deficient adenovirus vectors in vivo is low, we have also engineered a conditionally replicating E1A-CR2 deleted adenovirus to express mutant CD40L, resulting in significant amplification of ligand expression and consequent enhancement of its therapeutic effect. Conclusions Combined with numerous studies demonstrating its immunotherapeutic potential, these data provide a strong rationale for the exploitation of the CD40-CD40L pathway for the treatment of solid tumours.

  4. Lipoxygenase inhibitors protect acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells from ferroptotic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, Lukas; Dächert, Jasmin; Schenk, Barbara; Fulda, Simone

    2017-09-15

    Ferroptosis has recently been identified as a mode of programmed cell death. However, little is yet known about the signaling mechanism. Here, we report that lipoxygenases (LOX) contribute to the regulation of RSL3-induced ferroptosis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells. We show that the glutathione (GSH) peroxidase 4 (GPX4) inhibitor RSL3 triggers lipid peroxidation, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell death in ALL cells. All these events are impeded in the presence of Ferrostatin-1 (Fer-1), a small-molecule inhibitor of lipid peroxidation. Also, lipid peroxidation and ROS production precede the induction of cell death, underscoring their contribution to cell death upon exposure to RSL3. Importantly, LOX inhibitors, including the selective 12/15-LOX inhibitor Baicalein and the pan-LOX inhibitor nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), protect ALL cells from RSL3-stimulated lipid peroxidation, ROS generation and cell death, indicating that LOX contribute to ferroptosis. RSL3 triggers lipid peroxidation and cell death also in FAS-associated Death Domain (FADD)-deficient cells which are resistant to death receptor-induced apoptosis indicating that the induction of ferroptosis may bypass apoptosis resistance. By providing new insights into the molecular regulation of ferroptosis, our study contributes to the development of novel treatment strategies to reactivate programmed cell death in ALL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Mechanisms by which Human Cells Bypass Damaged Bases during DNA Replication after Ultraviolet Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James E. Cleaver

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The replication of damaged DNA involves cascading mechanisms of increasing complexity but decreasing accuracy. The most accurate mechanism uses low-fidelity DNA polymerases, Pol H and Pol I, which have active sites sufficiently large to accommodate a pyrimidine dimer. Replicative bypass of DNA damage by these polymerases produces an accurately replicated, newly synthesized strand. Pol H negative cells (XP-V cell lines either adopt a proposed secondary bypass mechanism or a recombinational mode. The mechanism of the secondary bypass is unclear, but a number of experiments suggests roles for excision repair to remove damage ahead of replication forks, hRad6/18 proteolysis to clear the blocked forks, and the Rad17-RFC and 9-1-1 complexes to establish a new replication apparatus. This alternative pathway requires functional p53. In Pol H negative cells in which p53 is also inactive, the arrested fork fragments into DNA double strand breaks. Foci containing PCNA, Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1, and gamma-H2Ax can then be detected, along with chromosomal rearrangement and high frequencies of sister chromatid exchanges. The recruitment of recombination components to the arrested forks represents the ultimate failure of replication machinery to relieve the arrested state and bypass the damage. The resulting chromosomal instability in surviving cells will contribute to malignant transformation.

  6. Inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B activation reduces Coxsackievirus B3 replication in lymphoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobotta, Katharina; Wilsky, Steffi; Althof, Nadine; Wiesener, Nadine; Wutzler, Peter; Henke, Andreas

    2012-02-01

    Interactions between viral replication machineries and host cell metabolism display interesting information how certain viruses capitalize cellular pathways to support progeny production. Among those pathogens, Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) has been identified to manipulate intracellular signaling very comprehensively. Next to others, this human pathogenic virus causes acute and chronic forms of myocarditis, pancreatitis, and meningitis. Here, activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) signaling appears to be involved in successful infection. Viral replication is not restricted to solid organs but involves susceptible immune cells as well. In the present study, p65 phosphorylation as one aspect of NFκB activation and inhibition via BAY 11-7085 administration was analyzed in the context of CVB3 replication in lymphoid cells. During CVB3 infection, an up-regulation of p65 translation is detectable, which is accompanied by noticeable phosphorylation. Inhibition of NFκB signaling reduces viral replication in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Taken together, these results indicate that during CVB3 replication in human and murine lymphoid cells, NFκB signaling is activated and facilitates viral replication. Therefore, antiviral strategies to target such central cellular signaling pathways may represent potential possibilities for the development of new virostatica. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Real-time monitoring of cisplatin-induced cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Alborzinia

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of cisplatin more than 40 years ago and its clinical introduction in the 1970s an enormous amount of research has gone into elucidating the mechanism of action of cisplatin on tumor cells. With a novel cell biosensor chip system allowing continuous monitoring of respiration, glycolysis, and impedance we followed cisplatin treatment of different cancer cell lines in real-time. Our measurements reveal a first effect on respiration, in all cisplatin treated cell lines, followed with a significant delay by interference with glycolysis in HT-29, HCT-116, HepG2, and MCF-7 cells but not in the cisplatin-resistant cell line MDA-MB-231. Most strikingly, cell death started in all cisplatin-sensitive cell lines within 8 to 11 h of treatment, indicating a clear time frame from exposure, first response to cisplatin lesions, to cell fate decision. The time points of most significant changes were selected for more detailed analysis of cisplatin response in the breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Phosphorylation of selected signal transduction mediators connected with cellular proliferation, as well as changes in gene expression, were analyzed in samples obtained directly from sensor chips at the time points when changes in glycolysis and impedance occurred. Our online cell biosensor measurements reveal for the first time the time scale of metabolic response until onset of cell death under cisplatin treatment, which is in good agreement with models of p53-mediated cell fate decision.

  8. Herceptin conjugates linked by EDC boost direct tumor cell death via programmed tumor cell necrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiemiao Hu

    Full Text Available Tumor-targeted antibody therapy is one of the safest biological therapeutics for cancer patients, but it is often ineffective at inducing direct tumor cell death and is ineffective against resistant tumor cells. Currently, the antitumor efficacy of antibody therapy is primarily achieved by inducing indirect tumor cell death, such as antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity. Our study reveals that Herceptin conjugates, if generated via the crosslinker EDC (1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl carbodiimide hydrochloride, are capable of engendering human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2 positive tumor cells death. Using a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC system, three peaks with estimated molecular weights of antibody monomer, dimer, and trimer were isolated. Both Herceptin trimer and dimer separated by HPLC induced significant levels of necrotic tumor cell death, although the trimer was more effective than the dimer. Notably, the Herceptin trimer also induced Herceptin-resistant tumor cell death. Surprisingly different from the known cell death mechanism that often results from antibody treatment, the Herceptin trimer elicited effective and direct tumor cell death via a novel mechanism: programmed cell necrosis. In Her2-positive cells, inhibition of necrosis pathways significantly reversed Herceptin trimer-induced cell death. In summary, the Herceptin trimer reported herein harbors great potential for overcoming tumor cell resistance to Herceptin treatment.

  9. Lipid raft involvement in yeast cell growth and death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollinedo, Faustino

    2012-01-01

    The notion that cellular membranes contain distinct microdomains, acting as scaffolds for signal transduction processes, has gained considerable momentum. In particular, a class of such domains that is rich in sphingolipids and cholesterol, termed as lipid rafts, is thought to compartmentalize the plasma membrane, and to have important roles in survival and cell death signaling in mammalian cells. Likewise, yeast lipid rafts are membrane domains enriched in sphingolipids and ergosterol, the yeast counterpart of mammalian cholesterol. Sterol-rich membrane domains have been identified in several fungal species, including the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as well as the pathogens Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. Yeast rafts have been mainly involved in membrane trafficking, but increasing evidence implicates rafts in a wide range of additional cellular processes. Yeast lipid rafts house biologically important proteins involved in the proper function of yeast, such as proteins that control Na(+), K(+), and pH homeostasis, which influence many cellular processes, including cell growth and death. Membrane raft constituents affect drug susceptibility, and drugs interacting with sterols alter raft composition and membrane integrity, leading to yeast cell death. Because of the genetic tractability of yeast, analysis of yeast rafts could be an excellent model to approach unanswered questions of mammalian raft biology, and to understand the role of lipid rafts in the regulation of cell death and survival in human cells. A better insight in raft biology might lead to envisage new raft-mediated approaches to the treatment of human diseases where regulation of cell death and survival is critical, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. Lipid raft involvement in yeast cell growth and death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faustino eMollinedo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The notion that cellular membranes contain distinct microdomains, acting as scaffolds for signal transduction processes, has gained considerable momentum. In particular, a class of such domains that is rich in sphingolipids and cholesterol, termed as lipid rafts, is thought to compartmentalize the plasma membrane, and to have important roles in survival and cell death signaling in mammalian cells. Likewise, yeast lipid rafts are membrane domains enriched in sphingolipids and ergosterol, the yeast counterpart of mammalian cholesterol. Sterol-rich membrane domains have been identified in several fungal species, including the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as well as the pathogens Candida albicans and Crytococcus neoformans. Yeast rafts have been mainly involved in membrane trafficking, but increasing evidence implicates rafts in a wide range of additional cellular processes. Yeast lipid rafts house biologically important proteins involved in the proper function of yeast, such as proteins that control Na+, K+ and pH homeostasis, which influence many cellular processes, including cell growth and death. Membrane raft constituents affect drug susceptibility, and drugs interacting with sterols alter raft composition and membrane integrity, leading to yeast cell death. Because of the genetic tractability of yeast, analysis of yeast rafts could be an excellent model to approach unanswered questions of mammalian raft biology, and to understand the role of lipid rafts in the regulation of cell death and survival in human cells. A better insight in raft biology might lead to envisage new raft-mediated approaches to the treatment of human diseases where regulation of cell death and survival is critical, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. Activated Ras signaling pathways and reovirus oncolysis: an update on the mechanism of preferential reovirus replication in cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun eGong

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of wild-type, unmodified Type 3 Dearing (T3D strain reovirus as an anticancer agent has currently expanded to 32 clinical trials (both completed and ongoing involving reovirus in the treatment of cancer. It has been more than 30 years since the potential of reovirus as an anticancer agent was first identified in studies that demonstrated the preferential replication of reovirus in transformed cell lines but not in normal cells. Later investigations have revealed the involvement of activated Ras signaling pathways (both upstream and downstream and key steps of the reovirus infectious cycle in promoting preferential replication in cancer cells with reovirus-induced cancer cell death occurring through necrotic, apoptotic, and autophagic pathways. There is increasing evidence that reovirus-induced antitumor immunity involving both innate and adaptive responses also contributes to therapeutic efficacy though this discussion is beyond the scope of this article. Here we review our current understanding of the mechanism of oncolysis contributing to the broad anticancer activity of reovirus. Further understanding of reovirus oncolysis is critical in enhancing the clinical development and efficacy of reovirus.

  12. Histone deacetylase inhibitors improve the replication of oncolytic herpes simplex virus in breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J Cody

    Full Text Available New therapies are needed for metastatic breast cancer patients. Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV is an exciting therapy being developed for use against aggressive tumors and established metastases. Although oHSV have been demonstrated safe in clinical trials, a lack of sufficient potency has slowed the clinical application of this approach. We utilized histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors, which have been noted to impair the innate antiviral response and improve gene transcription from viral vectors, to enhance the replication of oHSV in breast cancer cells. A panel of chemically diverse HDAC inhibitors were tested at three different doses (LD50 for their ability to modulate the replication of oHSV in breast cancer cells. Several of the tested HDAC inhibitors enhanced oHSV replication at low multiplicity of infection (MOI following pre-treatment of the metastatic breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 and the oHSV-resistant cell line 4T1, but not in the normal breast epithelial cell line MCF10A. Inhibitors of class I HDACs, including pan-selective compounds, were more effective for increasing oHSV replication compared to inhibitors that selectively target class II HDACs. These studies demonstrate that select HDAC inhibitors increase oHSV replication in breast cancer cells and provides support for pre-clinical evaluation of this combination strategy.

  13. Control of cell proliferation, endoreduplication, cell size, and cell death by the retinoblastoma-related pathway in maize endosperm

    KAUST Repository

    Sabelli, Paolo A.

    2013-04-22

    The endospermof cereal grains is one of the most valuable products of modern agriculture. Cereal endosperm development comprises different phases characterized by mitotic cell proliferation, endoreduplication, the accumulation of storage compounds, and programmed cell death. Although manipulation of these processes could maximize grain yield, how they are regulated and integrated is poorly understood. We show that the Retinoblastoma-related (RBR) pathway controls key aspects of endosperm development in maize. Down-regulation of RBR1 by RNAi resulted in up-regulation of RBR3-type genes, as well as the MINICHROMOSOME MAINTENANCE 2-7 gene family and PROLIFERATING CELL NUCLEAR ANTIGEN, which encode essential DNA replication factors. Both the mitotic and endoreduplication cell cycles were stimulated. Developing transgenic endosperm contained 42-58% more cells and ~70% more DNA than wild type, whereas there was a reduction in cell and nuclear sizes. In addition, cell death was enhanced. The DNA content of mature endosperm increased 43% upon RBR1 downregulation, whereas storage protein content and kernel weight were essentially not affected. Down-regulation of both RBR1 and CYCLIN DEPENDENT KINASE A (CDKA);1 indicated that CDKA;1 is epistatic to RBR1 and controls endoreduplication through an RBR1- dependent pathway. However, the repressive activity of RBR1 on downstream targets was independent from CDKA;1, suggesting diversification of RBR1 activities. Furthermore, RBR1 negatively regulated CDK activity, suggesting the presence of a feedback loop. These results indicate that the RBR1 pathway plays a major role in regulation of different processes during maize endosperm development and suggest the presence of tissue/organlevel regulation of endosperm/seed homeostasis.

  14. Could oxidative stress initiate programmed cell death in HIV infection? A role for plant derived metabolites having synergistic antioxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenspan, H C; Aruoma, O I; Arouma, O

    1994-06-01

    Evidence supports the premise that a pro-oxidant condition exists in HIV-seropositive patients, a result of an overabundance in production of reactive oxygen forms combined with a multilevel deficiency in nutritional and metabolic sources of antioxidants. Apoptosis (a programmed cell death) is recognized as a possible pathway of immune cell loss in patients with HIV infection and AIDS. The cascade of events that results from 'oxidative stress' (OS) is markedly similar to that which can initiate apoptosis and includes oxidation of cellular membranes, alteration of metabolic pathways, disruption of electron transport systems, depletion of cellular ATP production, loss of Ca2+ homeostasis, endonuclease activation and DNA/chromatin fragmentation. Downstream events secondary to these effects may also play a role in activation of latent virus and subsequent viral replication. Primary and secondary metabolites found in plants act as synergistic antioxidants, and can protect plants from oxidation-induced cell death. Experiments have shown that some of these same metabolites can inhibit cell killing by HIV. Can these compounds be useful in inhibiting viral activation and the death of immune cells in HIV/AIDS through their synergistic antioxidant properties? A brief review of the evidence for OS in HIV is presented and the potential basis for OS playing a role in the initiation of cell death and viral replication is explored. The functional antioxidant activities of plant metabolites are illustrated and the use of these synergistic antioxidants from plants are proposed as a mechanism by which viral replication and cell killing in HIV infection can be inhibited.

  15. Hydrogen Peroxide-induced Cell Death in Arabidopsis : Transcriptional and Mutant Analysis Reveals a Role of an Oxoglutarate-dependent Dioxygenase Gene in the Cell Death Process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gechev, Tsanko S.; Minkov, Ivan N.; Hille, Jacques

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is a major regulator of plant programmed cell death (PCD) but little is known about the downstream genes from the H2O2-signaling network that mediate the cell death. To address this question, a novel system for studying H2O2-induced programmed cell death in Arabidopsis thaliana was

  16. Coordinate reduction in cell proliferation and cell death in mouse olfactory epithelium from birth to maturity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fung, KM; Peringa, J; Venkatachalam, S; Lee, VMY; Trojanowski, JQ

    1997-01-01

    We investigated cell proliferation and cell death in the olfactory epithelium (OE) of mice from birth to maturity using bromodeoxyuridine and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase nick end labeling. We show that cell death events and proliferative activity diminish concomitantly with age in the OE.

  17. Coordinate reduction in cell proliferation and cell death in mouse olfactory epithelium from birth to maturity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fung, KM; Peringa, J; Venkatachalam, S; Lee, VMY; Trojanowski, JQ

    1997-01-01

    We investigated cell proliferation and cell death in the olfactory epithelium (OE) of mice from birth to maturity using bromodeoxyuridine and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase nick end labeling. We show that cell death events and proliferative activity diminish concomitantly with age in the OE.

  18. Large heterogeneity of mitochondrial DNA transcription and initiation of replication exposed by single-cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatre, Laurent; Ricchetti, Miria

    2013-02-15

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication and transcription are crucial for cell function, but these processes are poorly understood at the single-cell level. We describe a novel fluorescence in situ hybridization protocol, called mTRIP (mitochondrial transcription and replication imaging protocol), that reveals simultaneously mtDNA and RNA, and that can also be coupled to immunofluorescence for in situ protein examination. mTRIP reveals mitochondrial structures engaged in initiation of DNA replication by identification of a specific sequence in the regulatory D-loop, as well as unique transcription profiles in single human cells. We observe and quantify at least three classes of mitochondrial structures: (i) replication initiation active and transcript-positive (Ia-Tp); (ii) replication initiation silent and transcript-positive (Is-Tp); and (iii) replication initiation silent and transcript-negative (Is-Tn). Thus, individual mitochondria are dramatically heterogeneous within the same cell. Moreover, mTRIP exposes a mosaic of distinct nucleic acid patterns in the D-loop, including H-strand versus L-strand transcripts, and uncoupled rRNA transcription and mtDNA initiation of replication, which might have functional consequences in the regulation of the mtDNA. Finally, mTRIP identifies altered mtDNA processing in cells with unbalanced mtDNA content and function, including in human mitochondrial disorders. Thus, mTRIP reveals qualitative and quantitative alterations that provide additional tools for elucidating the dynamics of mtDNA processing in single cells and mitochondrial dysfunction in diseases.

  19. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA): a key factor in DNA replication and cell cycle regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzalka, Wojciech; Ziemienowicz, Alicja

    2011-05-01

    PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) has been found in the nuclei of yeast, plant and animal cells that undergo cell division, suggesting a function in cell cycle regulation and/or DNA replication. It subsequently became clear that PCNA also played a role in other processes involving the cell genome. This review discusses eukaryotic PCNA, with an emphasis on plant PCNA, in terms of the protein structure and its biochemical properties as well as gene structure, organization, expression and function. PCNA exerts a tripartite function by operating as (1) a sliding clamp during DNA synthesis, (2) a polymerase switch factor and (3) a recruitment factor. Most of its functions are mediated by its interactions with various proteins involved in DNA synthesis, repair and recombination as well as in regulation of the cell cycle and chromatid cohesion. Moreover, post-translational modifications of PCNA play a key role in regulation of its functions. Finally, a phylogenetic comparison of PCNA genes suggests that the multi-functionality observed in most species is a product of evolution. Most plant PCNAs exhibit features similar to those found for PCNAs of other eukaryotes. Similarities include: (1) a trimeric ring structure of the PCNA sliding clamp, (2) the involvement of PCNA in DNA replication and repair, (3) the ability to stimulate the activity of DNA polymerase δ and (4) the ability to interact with p21, a regulator of the cell cycle. However, many plant genomes seem to contain the second, probably functional, copy of the PCNA gene, in contrast to PCNA pseudogenes that are found in mammalian genomes.

  20. p53 Activation following Rift Valley fever virus infection contributes to cell death and viral production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Austin

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV is an emerging viral zoonosis that is responsible for devastating outbreaks among livestock and is capable of causing potentially fatal disease in humans. Studies have shown that upon infection, certain viruses have the capability of utilizing particular cellular signaling pathways to propagate viral infection. Activation of p53 is important for the DNA damage signaling cascade, initiation of apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and transcriptional regulation of multiple genes. The current study focuses on the role of p53 signaling in RVFV infection and viral replication. These results show an up-regulation of p53 phosphorylation at several serine sites after RVFV MP-12 infection that is highly dependent on the viral protein NSs. qRT-PCR data showed a transcriptional up-regulation of several p53 targeted genes involved in cell cycle and apoptosis regulation following RVFV infection. Cell viability assays demonstrate that loss of p53 results in less RVFV induced cell death. Furthermore, decreased viral titers in p53 null cells indicate that RVFV utilizes p53 to enhance viral production. Collectively, these experiments indicate that the p53 signaling pathway is utilized during RVFV infection to induce cell death and increase viral production.

  1. Retinal Cell Death Caused by Sodium Iodate Involves Multiple Caspase-Dependent and Caspase-Independent Cell-Death Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin Balmer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we have investigated retinal cell-death pathways in response to the retina toxin sodium iodate (NaIO3 both in vivo and in vitro. C57/BL6 mice were treated with a single intravenous injection of NaIO3 (35 mg/kg. Morphological changes in the retina post NaIO3 injection in comparison to untreated controls were assessed using electron microscopy. Cell death was determined by TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL staining. The activation of caspases and calpain was measured using immunohistochemistry. Additionally, cytotoxicity and apoptosis in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells, primary retinal cells, and the cone photoreceptor (PRC cell line 661W were assessed in vitro after NaIO3 treatment using the ApoToxGlo™ assay. The 7-AAD/Annexin-V staining was performed and necrostatin (Nec-1 was administered to the NaIO3-treated cells to confirm the results. In vivo, degenerating RPE cells displayed a rounded shape and retracted microvilli, whereas PRCs featured apoptotic nuclei. Caspase and calpain activity was significantly upregulated in retinal sections and protein samples from NaIO3-treated animals. In vitro, NaIO3 induced necrosis in RPE cells and apoptosis in PRCs. Furthermore, Nec-1 significantly decreased NaIO3-induced RPE cell death, but had no rescue effect on treated PRCs. In summary, several different cell-death pathways are activated in retinal cells as a result of NaIO3.

  2. Mitochondrial and Cell Death Mechanisms in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee J. Martin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD, Parkinson’s disease (PD and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS are the most common human adult-onset neurodegenerative diseases. They are characterized by prominent age-related neurodegeneration in selectively vulnerable neural systems. Some forms of AD, PD, and ALS are inherited, and genes causing these diseases have been identified. Nevertheless, the mechanisms of the neuronal cell death are unresolved. Morphological, biochemical, genetic, as well as cell and animal model studies reveal that mitochondria could have roles in this neurodegeneration. The functions and properties of mitochondria might render subsets of selectively vulnerable neurons intrinsically susceptible to cellular aging and stress and overlying genetic variations, triggering neurodegeneration according to a cell death matrix theory. In AD, alterations in enzymes involved in oxidative phosphorylation, oxidative damage, and mitochondrial binding of Aβ and amyloid precursor protein have been reported. In PD, mutations in putative mitochondrial proteins have been identified and mitochondrial DNA mutations have been found in neurons in the substantia nigra. In ALS, changes occur in mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes and mitochondrial cell death proteins. Transgenic mouse models of human neurodegenerative disease are beginning to reveal possible principles governing the biology of selective neuronal vulnerability that implicate mitochondria and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. This review summarizes how mitochondrial pathobiology might contribute to neuronal death in AD, PD, and ALS and could serve as a target for drug therapy.

  3. Calcium and cell death signaling in neurodegeneration and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaili, Soraya; Hirata, Hanako; Ureshino, Rodrigo; Monteforte, Priscila T; Morales, Ana P; Muler, Mari L; Terashima, Juliana; Oseki, Karen; Rosenstock, Tatiana R; Lopes, Guiomar S; Bincoletto, Claudia

    2009-09-01

    Transient increase in cytosolic (Cac2+) and mitochondrial Ca2+ (Ca m2+) are essential elements in the control of many physiological processes. However, sustained increases in Ca c2+ and Ca m2+ may contribute to oxidative stress and cell death. Several events are related to the increase in Ca m2+, including regulation and activation of a number of Ca2+ dependent enzymes, such as phospholipases, proteases and nucleases. Mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) play pivotal roles in the maintenance of intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis and regulation of cell death. Several lines of evidence have shown that, in the presence of some apoptotic stimuli, the activation of mitochondrial processes may lead to the release of cytochrome c followed by the activation of caspases, nuclear fragmentation and apoptotic cell death. The aim of this review was to show how changes in calcium signaling can be related to the apoptotic cell death induction. Calcium homeostasis was also shown to be an important mechanism involved in neurodegenerative and aging processes.

  4. Autophagic components contribute to hypersensitive cell death in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofius, Daniel; Schultz-Larsen, Torsten; Joensen, Jan;

    2009-01-01

    Autophagy has been implicated as a prosurvival mechanism to restrict programmed cell death (PCD) associated with the pathogen-triggered hypersensitive response (HR) during plant innate immunity. This model is based on the observation that HR lesions spread in plants with reduced autophagy gene ex...... contributes to HR PCD and can function in parallel with other prodeath pathways....

  5. Mastoparan-Induced Cell Death Signalling in Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yordanova, Z.P.; Kapchina-Toteva, V.M.; Woltering, E.J.; Cristescu, S.M.; Harren, F.J.M.; Yakimova, E.T.

    2009-01-01

    The present study was focused on the elucidation of stress-induced cell death signaling events in the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii exposed to treatment with wasp venom mastoparan. By applying pharmacological approach with specific inhibitors, we have investigated the involvement of eth

  6. PROGRAMMED CELL DEATH IN EXTRAOCULAR MUSCLE TENDON/SCLERA PRECURSORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractPurpose: This study was designed to examine the occurrence of natural cell death in the periocular mesenchyme of mouse embryos. Methods: Vital staining with LysoTracker Red and Nile blue sulphate as well as terminal nick end labeling (TUNEL) were utiliz...

  7. PROGRAMMED CELL DEATH IN EXTRAOCULAR MUSCLE TENDON/SCLERA PRECURSORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractPurpose: This study was designed to examine the occurrence of natural cell death in the periocular mesenchyme of mouse embryos. Methods: Vital staining with LysoTracker Red and Nile blue sulphate as well as terminal nick end labeling (TUNEL) were utiliz...

  8. Bortezomib induces autophagic death in proliferating human endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belloni, Daniela; Veschini, Lorenzo [Myeloma Unit, Department of Oncology, IRCCS H San Raffaele, Milan (Italy); Foglieni, Chiara [Department of Cardiology, IRCCS H San Raffaele, Milan (Italy); Dell' Antonio, Giacomo [Department of Pathology, IRCCS H San Raffaele, Milan (Italy); Caligaris-Cappio, Federico [Myeloma Unit, Department of Oncology, IRCCS H San Raffaele, Milan (Italy); Universita Vita-Salute IRCCS H San Raffaele, Milan (Italy); Ferrarini, Marina [Myeloma Unit, Department of Oncology, IRCCS H San Raffaele, Milan (Italy); Ferrero, Elisabetta, E-mail: elisabetta.ferrero@hsr.it [Myeloma Unit, Department of Oncology, IRCCS H San Raffaele, Milan (Italy)

    2010-04-01

    The proteasome inhibitor Bortezomib has been approved for the treatment of relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma (MM), thanks to its ability to induce MM cell apoptosis. Moreover, Bortezomib has antiangiogenic properties. We report that endothelial cells (EC) exposed to Bortezomib undergo death to an extent that depends strictly on their activation state. Indeed, while quiescent EC are resistant to Bortezomib, the drug results maximally toxic in EC switched toward angiogenesis with FGF, and exerts a moderate effect on subconfluent HUVEC. Moreover, EC activation state deeply influences the death pathway elicited by Bortezomib: after treatment, angiogenesis-triggered EC display typical features of apoptosis. Conversely, death of subconfluent EC is preceded by ROS generation and signs typical of autophagy, including intense cytoplasmic vacuolization with evidence of autophagosomes at electron microscopy, and conversion of the cytosolic MAP LC3 I form toward the autophagosome-associated LC3 II form. Treatment with the specific autophagy inhibitor 3-MA prevents both LC3 I/LC3 II conversion and HUVEC cell death. Finally, early removal of Bortezomib is accompanied by the recovery of cell shape and viability. These findings strongly suggest that Bortezomib induces either apoptosis or autophagy in EC; interfering with the autophagic response may potentiate the antiangiogenic effect of the drug.

  9. Immunohistochemical Aspects of Cell Death in Diabetic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bălăşescu Elena

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Diabetes Mellitus causes ultrastructural changes triggered by partially clarified cellular mechanisms. Since cell death is an important mechanism in the appearance and progression of diabetic nephropathy, we studied alteration of several markers of apoptotic pathways signaling in renal tissue of diabetic or prediabetic patients.

  10. Using microfluidics to study programmed cell death: A new approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mark, Christina; Zor, Kinga; Heiskanen, Arto

    This project focuses on applying microfluidic tissue culture for electrochemical or optical measurements during programmed cell death (PCD) in barley aleurone layer to increase understanding of the underlying mechanisms of PCD in plants. Microfluidic tissue culture enables in vitro experiments to...

  11. Effect of host cell lipid metabolism on alphavirus replication, virion morphogenesis, and infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Ching G; Coppens, Isabelle; Govindarajan, Dhanasekaran; Pisciotta, John; Shulaev, Vladimir; Griffin, Diane E

    2008-10-21

    The alphavirus Sindbis virus (SINV) causes encephalomyelitis in mice. Lipid-containing membranes, particularly cholesterol and sphingomyelin (SM), play important roles in virus entry, RNA replication, glycoprotein transport, and budding. Levels of SM are regulated by sphingomyelinases (SMases). Acid SMase (ASMase) deficiency results in the lipid storage disease type A Niemann-Pick disease (NPD-A), mimicked in mice by interruption of the ASMase gene. We previously demonstrated that ASMase-deficient mice are more susceptible to fatal SINV encephalomyelitis, with increased viral replication, spread, and neuronal death. To determine the mechanisms by which ASMase deficiency enhances SINV replication, we compared NPD-A fibroblasts (NPAF) to normal human fibroblasts (NHF). NPAF accumulated cholesterol- and sphingolipid-rich late endosomes/lysosomes in the perinuclear region. SINV replication was faster and reached higher titer in NPAF than in NHF, and NPAF died more quickly. SINV RNA and protein synthesis was greater in NHF than in NPAF, but virions budding from NPAF were 26 times more infectious and were regular dense particles whereas virions from NHF were larger particles containing substantial amounts of CD63. Cellular regulation of alphavirus morphogenesis is a previously unrecognized mechanism for control of virus replication and spread.

  12. HIV-1 Nef is transferred from expressing T cells to hepatocytic cells through conduits and enhances HCV replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Woo Park

    Full Text Available HIV-1 infection enhances HCV replication and as a consequence accelerates HCV-mediated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. However, the precise molecular mechanism by which this takes place is currently unknown. Our data showed that infectious HIV-1 failed to replicate in human hepatocytic cell lines. No discernible virus replication was observed, even when the cell lines transfected with HIV-1 proviral DNA were co-cultured with Jurkat T cells, indicating that the problem of liver deterioration in the co-infected patient is not due to the replication of HIV-1 in the hepatocytes of the HCV infected host. Instead, HIV-1 Nef protein was transferred from nef-expressing T cells to hepatocytic cells through conduits, wherein up to 16% (average 10% of the cells harbored the transferred Nef, when the hepatocytic cells were co-cultured with nef-expressing Jurkat cells for 24 h. Further, Nef altered the size and numbers of lipid droplets (LD, and consistently up-regulated HCV replication by 1.5∼2.5 fold in the target subgenomic replicon cells, which is remarkable in relation to the initially indolent viral replication. Nef also dramatically augmented reactive oxygen species (ROS production and enhanced ethanol-mediated up-regulation of HCV replication so as to accelerate HCC. Taken together, these data indicate that HIV-1 Nef is a critical element in accelerating progression of liver pathogenesis via enhancing HCV replication and coordinating modulation of key intra- and extra-cellular molecules for liver decay.

  13. Activation-induced cell death in B lymphocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Upon encountering the antigen (Ag), the immune system can either develop a specific immune response or enter a specific state of unresponsiveness, tolerance. The response of B cells to their specific Ag can be activation and proliferation, leading to the immune response, or anergy and activation-induced cell death (AICD), leading to tolerance. AICD in B lymphocytes is a highly regulated event initiated by crosslinking of the B cell receptor (BCR). BCR engagement initiates several signaling events such as activation of PLCγ, Ras, and PI3K, which generally speaking, lead to survival However, in the absence of survival signals (CD40 or IL-4R engagement), BCR crosslinking can also promote apoptotic signal transduction pathways such as activation of effector caspases, expression of pro-apoptotic genes, and inhibition of pro-survival genes. The complex interplay between survival and death signals determines the B cell fate and, consequently, the immune response.

  14. Estrogen as Jekyll and Hyde: regulation of cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wen; Zhu, Xiaoxia

    2014-01-01

    Sustained estrogenic exposure increases the risk and/or the progression of various cancers, including those of the breast, endometrium and ovary. Unexpectedly, physiological level of estrogen together with a novel IKKα inhibitor BAY11-7082 could effectively induce cell apoptosis in ER-positive breast cancer cells, suggesting combining estrogen with IKKα inhibition may be beneficial for breast cancer patients. This opinion article touches upon the dual role estrogen played in inducing cancer cell death and asks whether use of estrogen in combination with IKKα-targeted therapy would be possible reconsider the newly identified crosstalk between ER and NFκB pathway which can be utilized to switch the effects of estrogen on cell death.

  15. Combinatorial strategies for the induction of immunogenic cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo eGalluzzi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The term immunogenic cell death (ICD is commonly employed to indicate a peculiar instance of regulated cell death (RCD that engages the adaptive arm of the immune system. The inoculation of cancer cells undergoing ICD into immunocompetent animals elicits a specific immune response associated with the establishment of immunological memory. Only a few agents are intrinsically endowed with the ability to trigger ICD. These include a few chemotherapeutics that are routinely employed in the clinic, like doxorubicin, mitoxantrone, oxaliplatin and cyclophosphamide, as well as some agents that have not yet been approved for use in humans. Accumulating clinical data indicate that the activation of adaptive immune responses against dying cancer cells is associated with improved disease outcome in patients affected by various neoplasms. Thus, novel therapeutic regimens that trigger ICD are urgently awaited. Here, we discuss current combinatorial approaches to convert otherwise non-immunogenic instances of RCD into bona fide ICD.

  16. The plant cell cycle: Pre-Replication complex formation and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasil, Juliana Nogueira; Costa, Carinne N Monteiro; Cabral, Luiz Mors; Ferreira, Paulo C G; Hemerly, Adriana S

    2017-01-01

    The multiplication of cells in all living organisms requires a tight regulation of DNA replication. Several mechanisms take place to ensure that the DNA is replicated faithfully and just once per cell cycle in order to originate through mitoses two new daughter cells that contain exactly the same information from the previous one. A key control mechanism that occurs before cells enter S phase is the formation of a pre-replication complex (pre-RC) that is assembled at replication origins by the sequential association of the origin recognition complex, followed by Cdt1, Cdc6 and finally MCMs, licensing DNA to start replication. The identification of pre-RC members in all animal and plant species shows that this complex is conserved in eukaryotes and, more importantly, the differences between kingdoms might reflect their divergence in strategies on cell cycle regulation, as it must be integrated and adapted to the niche, ecosystem, and the organism peculiarities. Here, we provide an overview of the knowledge generated so far on the formation and the developmental controls of the pre-RC mechanism in plants, analyzing some particular aspects in comparison to other eukaryotes.

  17. Cytosolic Ku70 regulates Bax-mediated cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, Manila; Subramanian, Chitra; Andrews, Phillip C; Kwok, Roland P S

    2016-10-01

    The first known function of Ku70 is as a DNA repair factor in the nucleus. Using neuronal neuroblastoma cells as a model, we have established that cytosolic Ku70 binds to the pro-apoptotic protein Bax in the cytosol and blocks Bax's cell death activity. Ku70-Bax binding is regulated by Ku70 acetylation in that when Ku70 is acetylated Bax dissociates from Ku70, triggering cell death. We propose that Ku70 may act as a survival factor in these cells such that Ku70 depletion triggers Bax-dependent cell death. Here, we addressed two fundamental questions about this model: (1) Does all Bax, which is a cytosolic protein, bind to all cytosolic Ku70? and (2) Is Ku70 a survival factor in cells types other than neuronal neuroblastoma cells? We show here that, in neuronal neuroblastoma cells, only a small fraction of Ku70 binds to a small fraction of Bax; most Bax is monomeric. Interestingly, there is no free or monomeric Ku70 in the cytosol; most cytosolic Ku70 is in complex with other factors forming several high molecular weight complexes. A fraction of cytosolic Ku70 also binds to cytosolic Ku80, Ku70's binding partner in the nucleus. Ku70 may not be a survival factor in some cell types (Ku70-depletion less sensitive) because Ku70 depletion does not affect survival of these cells. These results indicate that, in addition to Ku70 acetylation, other factors may be involved in regulating Ku70-Bax binding in the Ku70-depletion less sensitive cells because Ku70 acetylation in these cells is not sufficient to dissociate Bax from Ku70 or to activate Bax.

  18. Plant caspase-like proteases in plant programmed cell death

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Qixian; Zhang, Lingrui

    2009-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a genetically-controlled disassembly of the cell. In animal systems, the central core execution switch for apoptotic PCD is the activation of caspases (Cysteine-containing Aspartate-specific proteases). Accumulating evidence in recent years suggests the existence of caspase-like activity in plants and its functional involvement in various types of plant PCD, although no functional homologs of animal caspases were identified in plant genome. In this mini-review, ...

  19. Abnormal regulation of DNA replication and increased lethality in ataxia telangiectasia cells exposed to carcinogenic agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaspers, N.G.; de Wit, J.; Regulski, M.R.; Bootsma, D.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of different carcinogenic agents on the rate of semiconservative DNA replication in normal and ataxia telangiectasis (AT) cells was investigated. The rate of DNA synthesis in all AT cell strains tested was depressed to a significantly lesser extent than in normal cells after exposure to X-rays under oxia or hypoxia or to bleomycin, agents to which AT cells are hypersensitive. In contrast, inhibition of DNA replication in normal human and AT cells was similar after treatment with some DNA-methylating agents or mitomycin C. Colony-forming ability of AT cells treated with these agents was not different from normal cells. Treatment with 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide elicited a variable response in both AT and normal cell strains. In some strains, including those shown to be hypersensitive to the drug by other workers, the inhibition of DNA synthesis was more pronounced than in other cell strains, but no significant difference between AT and normal cells could be detected. The rejoining of DNA strand breaks induced by X-rays, measured by DNA elution techniques, occurred within l2 hr after treatment and could not be correlated with the difference in DNA synthesis inhibition in AT and normal cells. After low doses of X-rays, AT cells rejoined single-strand breaks slightly more slowly than did normal cells. The rate of DNA replication in X-irradiation AT and normal cells was not affected by nicotinamide, an inhibitor of poly(adenosine diphosphate ribose) synthesis. These data indicate that the diminished inhibition of DNA replication in carcinogen-treated AT cells (a) is a general characteristic of all AT cell strains, (b) correlates with AT cellular hypersensitivity, (c) is not directly caused by the bulk of the DNA strand breaks produced by carcinogenic agents, and (d) is not based on differences in the induction of poly(adenosine diphosphate ribose) synthesis between X-irradiated AT and normal cells.

  20. Internalization of NK cells into tumor cells requires ezrin and leads to programmed cell-in-cell death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan Wang; Zhen Guo; Peng Xia; Tingting Liu; Jufang Wang; Shan Li; Lihua Sun; Jianxin Lu; Qian Wen; Mingqian Zhou; Li Ma; Xia Ding; Xiaoning Wang; Xuebiao Yao

    2009-01-01

    Cytotoxic lymphocytes are key players in the orchestration of immune response and elimination of defective cells. We have previously reported that natural killer (NK) cells enter target tumor cells, leading to either target cell death or self-destruction within tumor cells. However, it has remained elusive as to the fate of NK cells after internaliza-tion and whether the heterotypic cell-in-cell process is different from that of the homotypic cell-in-cell event recently named entosis. Here, we show that NK cells undergo a cell-in-cell process with the ultimate fate of apoptosis within tumor cells and reveal that the internalization process requires the actin cytoskeletal regulator, ezrin. To visualize how NK cells enter into tumor cells, we carried out real-time dual color imaging analyses of NK cell internalization into tumor cells. Surprisingly, most NK cells commit to programmed cell death after their entry into tumor cells, which is distinctively different from entosis observed in the homotypic cell-in-cell process. The apoptotic cell death of the internalized NK cells was evident by activation of caspase 3 and DNA fragmentation. Furthermore, NK cell death after internalization is attenuated by the caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-FMK, confirming apoptosis as the mode of NK cell death within tumor cells. To determine protein factors essential for the entry of NK cells into tumor cells, we car-ried out siRNA-based knockdown analysis and discovered a critical role of ezrin in NK cell internalization. Impor-tantly, PKA-mediated phosphorylation of ezrin promotes the NK cell internalization process. Our findings suggest a novel regulatory mechanism by which ezrin governs NK cell internalization into tumor cells.

  1. Necrosis: a specific form of programmed cell death?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proskuryakov, Sergey Ya; Konoplyannikov, Anatoli G; Gabai, Vladimir L

    2003-02-01

    For a long time necrosis was considered as an alternative to programmed cell death, apoptosis. Indeed, necrosis has distinct morphological features and it is accompanied by rapid permeabilization of plasma membrane. However, recent data indicate that, in contrast to necrosis caused by very extreme conditions, there are many examples when this form of cell death may be a normal physiological and regulated (programmed) event. Various stimuli (e.g., cytokines, ischemia, heat, irradiation, pathogens) can cause both apoptosis and necrosis in the same cell population. Furthermore, signaling pathways, such as death receptors, kinase cascades, and mitochondria, participate in both processes, and by modulating these pathways, it is possible to switch between apoptosis and necrosis. Moreover, antiapoptotic mechanisms (e.g., Bcl-2/Bcl-x proteins, heat shock proteins) are equally effective in protection against apoptosis and necrosis. Therefore, necrosis, along with apoptosis, appears to be a specific form of execution phase of programmed cell death, and there are several examples of necrosis during embryogenesis, a normal tissue renewal, and immune response. However, the consequences of necrotic and apoptotic cell death for a whole organism are quite different. In the case of necrosis, cytosolic constituents that spill into extracellular space through damaged plasma membrane may provoke inflammatory response; during apoptosis these products are safely isolated by membranes and then are consumed by macrophages. The inflammatory response caused by necrosis, however, may have obvious adaptive significance (i.e., emergence of a strong immune response) under some pathological conditions (such as cancer and infection). On the other hand, disturbance of a fine balance between necrosis and apoptosis may be a key element in development of some diseases.

  2. Networked T cell death following macrophage infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen H-F Macdonald

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Depletion of T cells following infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb impairs disease resolution, and interferes with clinical test performance that relies on cell-mediated immunity. A number of mechanisms contribute to this T cell suppression, such as activation-induced death and trafficking of T cells out of the peripheral circulation and into the diseased lungs. The extent to which Mtb infection of human macrophages affects T cell viability however, is not well characterised. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that lymphopenia (<1.5 × 10(9 cells/l was prevalent among culture-positive tuberculosis patients, and lymphocyte counts significantly improved post-therapy. We previously reported that Mtb-infected human macrophages resulted in death of infected and uninfected bystander macrophages. In the current study, we sought to examine the influence of infected human alveolar macrophages on T cells. We infected primary human alveolar macrophages (the primary host cell for Mtb or PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells with Mtb H37Ra, then prepared cell-free supernatants. The supernatants of Mtb-infected macrophages caused dose-dependent, caspase-dependent, T cell apoptosis. This toxic effect of infected macrophage secreted factors did not require TNF-α or Fas. The supernatant cytotoxic signal(s were heat-labile and greater than 50 kDa in molecular size. Although ESAT-6 was toxic to T cells, other Mtb-secreted factors tested did not influence T cell viability; nor did macrophage-free Mtb bacilli or broth from Mtb cultures. Furthermore, supernatants from Mycobacterium bovis Bacille de Calmette et Guerin (BCG- infected macrophages also elicited T cell death suggesting that ESAT-6 itself, although cytotoxic, was not the principal mediator of T cell death in our system. CONCLUSIONS: Mtb-Infected macrophages secrete heat-labile factors that are toxic to T cells, and may contribute to the immunosuppression seen in tuberculosis as well as

  3. Potent inhibition of late stages of hepadnavirus replication by a modified cell penetrating peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdul, Fabien; Ndeboko, Bénédicte; Buronfosse, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    Cationic cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and their lipid domain-conjugates (CatLip) are agents for the delivery of (uncharged) biologically active molecules into the cell. Using infection and transfection assays we surprisingly discovered that CatLip peptides were able to inhibit replication...... been so far described for other enveloped viruses....

  4. A transgenic mouse marking live replicating cells reveals in vivo transcriptional program of proliferation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klochendler, Agnes; Weinberg-Corem, Noa; Moran, Maya;

    2012-01-01

    Most adult mammalian tissues are quiescent, with rare cell divisions serving to maintain homeostasis. At present, the isolation and study of replicating cells from their in vivo niche typically involves immunostaining for intracellular markers of proliferation, causing the loss of sensitive biolo...

  5. RAD51AP1-deficiency in vertebrate cells impairs DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parplys, Ann C; Kratz, Katja; Speed, Michael C; Leung, Stanley G; Schild, David; Wiese, Claudia

    2014-12-01

    RAD51-associated protein 1 (RAD51AP1) is critical for homologous recombination (HR) by interacting with and stimulating the activities of the RAD51 and DMC1 recombinases. In human somatic cells, knockdown of RAD51AP1 results in increased sensitivity to DNA damaging agents and to impaired HR, but the formation of DNA damage-induced RAD51 foci is unaffected. Here, we generated a genetic model system, based on chicken DT40 cells, to assess the phenotype of fully inactivated RAD51AP1 in vertebrate cells. Targeted inactivation of both RAD51AP1 alleles has no effect on either viability or doubling-time in undamaged cells, but leads to increased levels of cytotoxicity after exposure to cisplatin or to ionizing radiation. Interestingly, ectopic expression of GgRAD51AP1, but not of HsRAD51AP1 is able to fully complement in cell survival assays. Notably, in RAD51AP1-deficient DT40 cells the resolution of DNA damage-induced RAD51 foci is greatly slowed down, while their formation is not impaired. We also identify, for the first time, an important role for RAD51AP1 in counteracting both spontaneous and DNA damage-induced replication stress. In human and in chicken cells, RAD51AP1 is required to maintain wild type speed of replication fork progression, and both RAD51AP1-depleted human cells and RAD51AP1-deficient DT40 cells respond to replication stress by a slow-down of replication fork elongation rates. However, increased firing of replication origins occurs in RAD51AP1-/- DT40 cells, likely to ensure the timely duplication of the entire genome. Taken together, our results may explain why RAD51AP1 commonly is overexpressed in tumor cells and tissues, and we speculate that the disruption of RAD51AP1 function could be a promising approach in targeted tumor therapy.

  6. HIV integration sites in latently infected cell lines: evidence of ongoing replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symons, Jori; Chopra, Abha; Malatinkova, Eva; De Spiegelaere, Ward; Leary, Shay; Cooper, Don; Abana, Chike O; Rhodes, Ajantha; Rezaei, Simin D; Vandekerckhove, Linos; Mallal, Simon; Lewin, Sharon R; Cameron, Paul U

    2017-01-13

    Assessing the location and frequency of HIV integration sites in latently infected cells can potentially inform our understanding of how HIV persists during combination antiretroviral therapy. We developed a novel high throughput sequencing method to evaluate HIV integration sites in latently infected cell lines to determine whether there was virus replication or clonal expansion in these cell lines observed as multiple integration events at the same position. We modified a previously reported method using random DNA shearing and PCR to allow for high throughput robotic processing to identify the site and frequency of HIV integration in latently infected cell lines. Latently infected cell lines infected with intact virus demonstrated multiple distinct HIV integration sites (28 different sites in U1, 110 in ACH-2 and 117 in J1.1 per 150,000 cells). In contrast, cell lines infected with replication-incompetent viruses (J-Lat cells) demonstrated single integration sites. Following in vitro passaging of the ACH-2 cell line, we observed a significant increase in the frequency of unique HIV integration sites and there were multiple mutations and large deletions in the proviral DNA. When the ACH-2 cell line was cultured with the integrase inhibitor raltegravir, there was a significant decrease in the number of unique HIV integration sites and a transient increase in the frequency of 2-LTR circles consistent with virus replication in these cells. Cell lines latently infected with intact HIV demonstrated multiple unique HIV integration sites indicating that these cell lines are not clonal and in the ACH-2 cell line there was evidence of low level virus replication. These findings have implications for the use of latently infected cell lines as models of HIV latency and for the use of these cells as standards.

  7. Macrophages as target cells for Mayaro virus infection: involvement of reactive oxygen species in the inflammatory response during virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalheiro, Mariana G; Costa, Leandro Silva DA; Campos, Holmes S; Alves, Letícia S; Assunção-Miranda, Iranaia; Poian, Andrea T DA

    2016-09-01

    Alphaviruses among the viruses that cause arthritis, consisting in a public health problem worldwide by causing localized outbreaks, as well as large epidemics in humans. Interestingly, while the Old World alphaviruses are arthritogenic, the New World alphaviruses cause encephalitis. One exception is Mayaro virus (MAYV), which circulates exclusively in South America but causes arthralgia and is phylogenetically related to the Old World alphaviruses. Although MAYV-induced arthritis in humans is well documented, the molecular and cellular factors that contribute to its pathogenesis are completely unknown. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that macrophages, key players in arthritis development, are target cells for MAYV infection, which leads to cell death through apoptosis. We showed that MAYV replication in macrophage induced the expression of TNF, a cytokine that would contribute to pathogenesis of MAYV fever, since TNF promotes an inflammatory profile characteristic of arthritis. We also found a significant increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at early times of infection, which coincides with the peak of virus replication and precedes TNF secretion. Treatment of the cells with antioxidant agents just after infection completely abolished TNF secretion, indicating an involvement of ROS in inflammation induced during MAYV infection.

  8. Macrophages as target cells for Mayaro virus infection: involvement of reactive oxygen species in the inflammatory response during virus replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIANA G. CAVALHEIRO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Alphaviruses among the viruses that cause arthritis, consisting in a public health problem worldwide by causing localized outbreaks, as well as large epidemics in humans. Interestingly, while the Old World alphaviruses are arthritogenic, the New World alphaviruses cause encephalitis. One exception is Mayaro virus (MAYV, which circulates exclusively in South America but causes arthralgia and is phylogenetically related to the Old World alphaviruses. Although MAYV-induced arthritis in humans is well documented, the molecular and cellular factors that contribute to its pathogenesis are completely unknown. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that macrophages, key players in arthritis development, are target cells for MAYV infection, which leads to cell death through apoptosis. We showed that MAYV replication in macrophage induced the expression of TNF, a cytokine that would contribute to pathogenesis of MAYV fever, since TNF promotes an inflammatory profile characteristic of arthritis. We also found a significant increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS at early times of infection, which coincides with the peak of virus replication and precedes TNF secretion. Treatment of the cells with antioxidant agents just after infection completely abolished TNF secretion, indicating an involvement of ROS in inflammation induced during MAYV infection.

  9. Coinfection of tick cell lines has variable effects on replication of intracellular bacterial and viral pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moniuszko, Anna; Rückert, Claudia; Alberdi, M. Pilar; Barry, Gerald; Stevenson, Brian; Fazakerley, John K.; Kohl, Alain; Bell-Sakyi, Lesley

    2014-01-01

    Ticks transmit various human and animal microbial pathogens and may harbour more than one pathogen simultaneously. Both viruses and bacteria can trigger, and may subsequently suppress, vertebrate host and arthropod vector anti-microbial responses. Microbial coinfection of ticks could lead to an advantage or disadvantage for one or more of the microorganisms. In this preliminary study, cell lines derived from the ticks Ixodes scapularis and Ixodes ricinus were infected sequentially with 2 arthropod-borne pathogens, Borrelia burgdorferi s.s., Ehrlichia ruminantium, or Semliki Forest virus (SFV), and the effect of coinfection on the replication of these pathogens was measured. Prior infection of tick cell cultures with the spirochaete B. burgdorferi enhanced subsequent replication of the rickettsial pathogen E. ruminantium whereas addition of spirochaetes to cells infected with E. ruminantium had no effect on growth of the latter. Both prior and subsequent presence of B. burgdorferi also had a positive effect on SFV replication. Presence of E. ruminantium or SFV had no measurable effect on B. burgdorferi growth. In tick cells infected first with E. ruminantium and then with SFV, virus replication was significantly higher across all time points measured (24, 48, 72 h post infection), while presence of the virus had no detectable effect on bacterial growth. When cells were infected first with SFV and then with E. ruminantium, there was no effect on replication of either pathogen. The results of this preliminary study indicate that interplay does occur between different pathogens during infection of tick cells. Further study is needed to determine if this results from direct pathogen–pathogen interaction or from effects on host cell defences, and to determine if these observations also apply in vivo in ticks. If presence of one pathogen in the tick vector results in increased replication of another, this could have implications for disease transmission and incidence

  10. Coinfection of tick cell lines has variable effects on replication of intracellular bacterial and viral pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moniuszko, Anna; Rückert, Claudia; Alberdi, M Pilar; Barry, Gerald; Stevenson, Brian; Fazakerley, John K; Kohl, Alain; Bell-Sakyi, Lesley

    2014-06-01

    Ticks transmit various human and animal microbial pathogens and may harbour more than one pathogen simultaneously. Both viruses and bacteria can trigger, and may subsequently suppress, vertebrate host and arthropod vector anti-microbial responses. Microbial coinfection of ticks could lead to an advantage or disadvantage for one or more of the microorganisms. In this preliminary study, cell lines derived from the ticks Ixodes scapularis and Ixodes ricinus were infected sequentially with 2 arthropod-borne pathogens, Borrelia burgdorferi s.s., Ehrlichia ruminantium, or Semliki Forest virus (SFV), and the effect of coinfection on the replication of these pathogens was measured. Prior infection of tick cell cultures with the spirochaete B. burgdorferi enhanced subsequent replication of the rickettsial pathogen E. ruminantium whereas addition of spirochaetes to cells infected with E. ruminantium had no effect on growth of the latter. Both prior and subsequent presence of B. burgdorferi also had a positive effect on SFV replication. Presence of E. ruminantium or SFV had no measurable effect on B. burgdorferi growth. In tick cells infected first with E. ruminantium and then with SFV, virus replication was significantly higher across all time points measured (24, 48, 72h post infection), while presence of the virus had no detectable effect on bacterial growth. When cells were infected first with SFV and then with E. ruminantium, there was no effect on replication of either pathogen. The results of this preliminary study indicate that interplay does occur between different pathogens during infection of tick cells. Further study is needed to determine if this results from direct pathogen-pathogen interaction or from effects on host cell defences, and to determine if these observations also apply in vivo in ticks. If presence of one pathogen in the tick vector results in increased replication of another, this could have implications for disease transmission and incidence.

  11. Imipramine protects mouse hippocampus against tunicamycin-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Yoko; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Ishisaka, Mitsue; Oyagi, Atsushi; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Hara, Hideaki

    2012-12-05

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is implicated in various diseases. Recently, some reports have suggested that the sigma-1 receptor may play a role in ER stress, and many antidepressants have a high affinity for the sigma-1 receptor. In the present study, we focused on imipramine, a widely used antidepressant, and investigated whether it might protect against the neuronal cell death induced by tunicamycin, an ER stress inducer. In mouse cultured hippocampal HT22 cells, imipramine inhibited cell death and caspase-3 activation induced by tunicamycin, although it did not alter the elevated expressions of 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78) and C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP). Interestingly, in such cells application of imipramine normalized the expression of the sigma-1 receptor, which was decreased by treatment with tunicamycin alone. Additionally, NE-100, a selective sigma-1 receptor antagonist, abolished the protective effect of imipramine against such tunicamycin-induced cell death. Imipramine inhibited the reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential induced by tunicamycin, and NE-100 blocked this modulating effect of imipramine. Furthermore, in anesthetized mice intracerebroventricular administration of tunicamycin decreased the number of neuronal cells in the hippocampus, particularly in the CA1 and dentate gyrus (DG) areas, and 7 days' imipramine treatment (10mg/kg/day; i.p.) significantly suppressed these reductions in CA1 and DG. These findings suggest that imipramine protects against ER stress-induced hippocampal neuronal cell death both in vitro and in vivo. Such protection may be partly due to the sigma-1 receptor.

  12. HIV-1 Vpr increases HCV replication through VprBP in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yanling; Huang, Fang; Yuan, Ting; Sun, Binlian; Yang, Rongge

    2016-09-02

    Coinfection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) occurs at a high frequency, in which HIV shows a promotion of HCV-derived liver diseases. However, the mechanism of how this occurs is not well understood. Our previous work has demonstrated that the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpr enhances HCV RNA replication in cell culture. Because Vpr performs most of its functions through host protein VprBP (DCAF1), the role of VprBP in the regulation of HCV by Vpr was investigated in this study. We found that the Vpr mutant Q65R, which is deficient in VprBP binding, could not enhance HCV replication. Furthermore, Vpr-mediated enhancement of HCV replication was severely diminished in VprBP knockdown cells. In addition, an inhibitor of Cullin RING E3 ligases, MLN4924, impaired the function of Vpr during HCV replication. Together, these results suggest that Vpr promotes HCV replication in a VprBP-dependent manner, and that the activity of Cullin RING E3 ligases is essential to this process. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that HIV-1 Vpr makes the cellular environment more suitable for HCV replication, which might relate with the host ubiquitination system.

  13. High-throughput mapping of origins of replication in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Isabelle; Palakodeti, Aparna; Jiang, Yanwen; Young, David J; Jiang, Nan; Fernald, Anthony A; Le Beau, Michelle M

    2007-08-01

    Mapping origins of replication has been challenging in higher eukaryotes. We have developed a rapid, genome-wide method to map origins of replication in asynchronous human cells by combining the nascent strand abundance assay with a highly tiled microarray platform, and we validated the technique by two independent assays. We applied this method to analyse the enrichment of nascent DNA in three 50-kb regions containing known origins of replication in the MYC, lamin B2 (LMNB2) and haemoglobin beta (HBB) genes, a 200-kb region containing the rare fragile site, FRAXA, and a 1,075-kb region on chromosome 22; we detected most of the known origins and also 28 new origins. Surprisingly, the 28 new origins were small in size and located predominantly within genes. Our study also showed a strong correlation between origin replication timing and chromatin acetylation.

  14. Characteristics of HCV replication and expression in a cultured human liver carcinoma cell line in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Zhi-qing; HAO Fei; MIN Feng; LIU Dao-jian

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To establish a cell culture system to support HCV long-term replication in vitro. Methods: A human hepatoma cell line 7721 was tested for its susceptibility to HCV by incubating with a serum from chronic hepatitis C patient. Cells and supernatant of the culture medium were harvested at various time-phases during the culturing periods. The presence of HCV RNA, the expression of HCV antigens in cells and/or supematant were examined with RT-PCR, in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry respectively. Results: It was found that the intracellular HCV RNA was first detected on the 2nd day after culture, and then could be intermittently detected in both cells and supernatant over a period of at least 3 months after culture. HCV NS3, CP10 antigens were expressed in the cells. The fresh cells could be infected with the supernatant from cultured infected cells and the transmission of viral genome from HCV-infected 7721 cells to peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was also observed. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the human liver carcinoma cell line7721 is not only susceptible to HCV but also can support its long replication in vitro. This cell line with HCV infection in vitro can serve as a useful tool for the study of the mechanism of HCV infection and replication, the evaluation of antiviral agents, and the primary selection of neutralization assays and HCV vaccine development.

  15. Purification of replication factors using insect and mammalian cell expression systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Shuji; You, Zhiying; Masai, Hisao

    2012-06-01

    Purification of factors for DNA replication in an amount sufficient for detailed biochemical characterization is essential to elucidating its mechanisms. Insect cell expression systems are commonly used for purification of the factors proven to be difficult to deal with in bacteria. We describe first the detailed protocols for purification of mammalian Mcm complexes including the Mcm2/3/4/5/6/7 heterohexamer expressed in insect cells. We then describe a convenient and economical system in which large-sized proteins and multi-factor complexes can be transiently overexpressed in human 293T cells and be rapidly purified in a large quantity. We describe various expression vectors and detailed methods for transfection and purification of various replication factors which have been difficult to obtain in a sufficient amount in other systems. Availability of efficient methods to overproduce and purify the proteins that have been challenging would facilitate the enzymatic analyses of the processes of DNA replication.

  16. Mouse T-cells restrict replication of human immunodeficiency virus at the level of integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goffinet Christine

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of an immunocompetent, genetically modified mouse model to study HIV-1 pathogenesis and to test antiviral strategies has been hampered by the fact that cells from native mice do not or only inefficiently support several steps of the HIV-1 replication cycle. Upon HIV-1 infection, mouse T-cell lines fail to express viral proteins, but the underlying replication barrier has thus far not been unambiguously identified. Here, we performed a kinetic and quantitative assessment of consecutive steps in the early phase of the HIV-1 replication cycle in T-cells from mice and humans. Results Both T-cell lines and primary T-cells from mice harbor a severe post-entry defect that is independent of potential species-specTR transactivation. Reverse transcription occurred efficiently following VSV-G-mediated entry of virions into mouse T-cells, and abundant levels of 2-LTR circles indicated successful nuclear import of the pre-integration complex. To probe the next step in the retroviral replication cycle, i.e. the integration of HIV-1 into the host cell genome, we established and validated a nested real-time PCR to specifically quantify HIV-1 integrants exploiting highly repetitive mouse B1 elements. Importantly, we demonstrate that the frequency of integrant formation is diminished 18- to > 305-fold in mouse T-cell lines compared to a human counterpart, resulting in a largely abortive infection. Moreover, differences in transgene expression from residual vector integrants, the transcription off which is cyclin T1-independent, provided evidence for an additional, peri-integrational deficit in certain mouse T-cell lines. Conclusion In contrast to earlier reports, we find that mouse T-cells efficiently support early replication steps up to and including nuclear import, but restrict HIV-1 at the level of chromosomal integration.

  17. Molecular and Translational Classifications of DAMPs in Immunogenic Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek D Garg

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The immunogenicity of malignant cells has recently been acknowledged as a critical determinant of efficacy in cancer therapy. Thus, besides developing direct immunostimulatory regimens including dendritic cell-based vaccines, checkpoint-blocking therapies, and adoptive T-cell transfer, researchers have started to focus on the overall immunobiology of neoplastic cells. It is now clear that cancer cells can succumb to some anticancer therapies by undergoing a peculiar form of cell death that is characterized by an increased immunogenic potential, owing to the emission of so-called damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs. The emission of DAMPs and other immunostimulatory factors by cells succumbing to immunogenic cell death (ICD favors the establishment of a productive interface with the immune system. This results in the elicitation of tumor-targeting immune responses associated with the elimination of residual, treatment-resistant cancer cells, as well as with the establishment of immunological memory. Although ICD has been characterized with increased precision since its discovery, several questions remain to be addressed. Here, we summarize and tabulate the main molecular, immunological, preclinical and clinical aspects of ICD, in an attempt to capture the essence of this clinically relevant phenomenon, and identify future challenges for this rapidly expanding field of investigation.

  18. Restimulation-induced cell death: new medical and research perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lixin; Li, Jian; Lenardo, Michael

    2017-05-01

    In the periphery, homeostasis of the immune system depends on the equilibrium of expanding and contracting T lymphocytes during immune response. An important mechanism of lymphocyte contraction is clonal depletion of activated T cells by cytokine withdrawal induced death (CWID) and TCR restimulation induced cell death (RICD). Deficiencies in signaling components for CWID and RICD leads to autoimmunune lymphoproliferative disorders in mouse and human. The most important feature of CWID and RICD is clonal specificity, which lends great appeal as a strategy for targeted tolerance induction and treatment of autoimmune diseases, allergic disorders, and graft rejection by depleting undesired disease-causing T cells while keeping the overall host immunity intact. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  19. Proliferation of latently infected CD4+ T cells carrying replication-competent HIV-1: Potential role in latent reservoir dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosmane, Nina N.; Kwon, Kyungyoon J.; Bruner, Katherine M.; Capoferri, Adam A.; Rosenbloom, Daniel I.S.; Keele, Brandon F.; Ho, Ya-Chi

    2017-01-01

    A latent reservoir for HIV-1 in resting CD4+ T lymphocytes precludes cure. Mechanisms underlying reservoir stability are unclear. Recent studies suggest an unexpected degree of infected cell proliferation in vivo. T cell activation drives proliferation but also reverses latency, resulting in productive infection that generally leads to cell death. In this study, we show that latently infected cells can proliferate in response to mitogens without producing virus, generating progeny cells that can release infectious virus. Thus, assays relying on one round of activation underestimate reservoir size. Sequencing of independent clonal isolates of replication-competent virus revealed that 57% had env sequences identical to other isolates from the same patient. Identity was confirmed by full-genome sequencing and was not attributable to limited viral diversity. Phylogenetic and statistical analysis suggested that identical sequences arose from in vivo proliferation of infected cells, rather than infection of multiple cells by a dominant viral species. The possibility that much of the reservoir arises by cell proliferation presents challenges to cure. PMID:28341641

  20. A quantitative model of DNA replication in Xenopus embryos: reliable replication despite stochasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng-Hsin Yang, Scott; Bechhoefer, John

    2008-03-01

    DNA synthesis in Xenopus frog embryos initiates stochastically in time at many sites (origins) along the chromosome. Stochastic initiation implies fluctuations in the replication time and may lead to cell death if replication takes longer than the cell cycle time (˜ 25 min.). Surprisingly, although the typical replication time is about 20 min., in vivo experiments show that replication fails to complete only about 1 in 250 times. How is replication timing accurately controlled despite the stochasticity? Biologists have proposed two mechanisms: the first uses a regular spatial distribution of origins, while the second uses randomly located origins but increases their probability of initiation as the cell cycle proceeds. Here, we show that both mechanisms yield similar end-time distributions, implying that regular origin spacing is not needed for control of replication time. Moreover, we show that the experimentally inferred time-dependent initiation rate satisfies the observed low failure probability and nearly optimizes the use of replicative proteins.

  1. The cellular energy crisis: mitochondria and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterhouse, Nigel J

    2003-01-01

    Exploding nuclear reactors, environmental destruction, and global warming; the danger of energy production is clear. It is quite remarkable that in this modern age, where power usage is at a premium, we find that even on a cellular level, generation of large quantities of power comes at a cost. Mitochondria, which produce the majority of cellular energy in the form of ATP, have recently been shown to play an essential role in the death of a cell by a process known as apoptosis. During apoptosis, the integrity of mitochondria is compromised and various pro-apoptotic proteins are released into the cytoplasm. This results in activation of caspases, proteases that orchestrate the death of the cell. Cells in which apoptosis is inhibited upstream of mitochondria generally maintain the potential to proliferate, whereas inhibition of caspases downstream of mitochondria generally only delays cell death. Although breaches of the mitochondrial outer membrane result in the release of proteins that are important for respiration, mitochondria appear capable of maintaining at least some of their functions, including ATP production, even after this event. This has important implications both for the mechanism of outer-membrane permeabilization and the mechanism by which the cells eventually die in the absence of caspase activity. The events surrounding the breach of the mitochondrial outer membrane during apoptosis have therefore received much interest over the past few years.

  2. Chronic DNA Replication Stress Reduces Replicative Lifespan of Cells by TRP53-Dependent, microRNA-Assisted MCM2-7 Downregulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gongshi Bai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Circumstances that compromise efficient DNA replication, such as disruptions to replication fork progression, cause a state known as DNA replication stress (RS. Whereas normally proliferating cells experience low levels of RS, excessive RS from intrinsic or extrinsic sources can trigger cell cycle arrest and senescence. Here, we report that a key driver of RS-induced senescence is active downregulation of the Minichromosome Maintenance 2-7 (MCM2-7 factors that are essential for replication origin licensing and which constitute the replicative helicase core. Proliferating cells produce high levels of MCM2-7 that enable formation of dormant origins that can be activated in response to acute, experimentally-induced RS. However, little is known about how physiological RS levels impact MCM2-7 regulation. We found that chronic exposure of primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs to either genetically-encoded or environmentally-induced RS triggered gradual MCM2-7 repression, followed by inhibition of replication and senescence that could be accelerated by MCM hemizygosity. The MCM2-7 reduction in response to RS is TRP53-dependent, and involves a group of Trp53-dependent miRNAs, including the miR-34 family, that repress MCM expression in replication-stressed cells before they undergo terminal cell cycle arrest. miR-34 ablation partially rescued MCM2-7 downregulation and genomic instability in mice with endogenous RS. Together, these data demonstrate that active MCM2-7 repression is a physiologically important mechanism for RS-induced cell cycle arrest and genome maintenance on an organismal level.

  3. Huperzine A provides neuroprotection against several cell death inducers using in vitro model systems of motor neuron cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemendinger, Richelle A; Armstrong, Edward J; Persinski, Rafal; Todd, Julianne; Mougeot, Jean-Luc; Volvovitz, Franklin; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease resulting from the progressive loss of motor neurons in the spinal cord and brain. To date, clinically effective neuroprotective agents have not been available. The current study demonstrates for the first time that huperzine A, a potential neuroprotective agent, has the ability to protect a motor neuron-like cell line and motor neurons in spinal cord organotypic cultures from toxin-induced cell death. The neuroblastoma-spinal motor neuron fusion cell line, NSC34 and rat spinal cord organotypic cultures (OTC) were exposed to cell death inducers for 24 h or 14 d, respectively, with and without pre-treatment with huperzine A. The inducers used here include: staurosporine, thapsigargin, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (CCCP) and L-(-)-threo-3-hydroxyaspartic acid (THA). These agents were selected as they induce apoptosis/necrosis via mechanisms implicated in patients with generalized motor neuron disease. Cell death was determined in NSC34 cells by metabolic activity, caspase activity/expression and by nuclear morphology and in the OTCs, using immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. Nuclear staining of NSC34 cells revealed cell death induced by staurosporine, thapsigargin, H2O2 and CCCP. This induction was significantly reduced with 2 h pre-treatment with 10 microM huperzine A (maximum, 35% rescue; p 0.05) following exposure to staurosporine, thapsigargin and H2O2 but not with CCCP. These data were supported by the metabolic assays and caspase activity. In addition, pre-treatment with huperzine A dramatically improved motor neuron survival, based on choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) expression analysis in OTCs following exposure to THA, and compared to THA-treated control cultures. These studies are currently being extended to include other inducers and with additional compounds as potential drug therapies that could be used in combination for the treatment of

  4. The cell biology of Tobacco mosaic virus replication and movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chengke; Nelson, Richard S

    2013-01-01

    Successful systemic infection of a plant by Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) requires three processes that repeat over time: initial establishment and accumulation in invaded cells, intercellular movement, and systemic transport. Accumulation and intercellular movement of TMV necessarily involves intracellular transport by complexes containing virus and host proteins and virus RNA during a dynamic process that can be visualized. Multiple membranes appear to assist TMV accumulation, while membranes, microfilaments and microtubules appear to assist TMV movement. Here we review cell biological studies that describe TMV-membrane, -cytoskeleton, and -other host protein interactions which influence virus accumulation and movement in leaves and callus tissue. The importance of understanding the developmental phase of the infection in relationship to the observed virus-membrane or -host protein interaction is emphasized. Utilizing the latest observations of TMV-membrane and -host protein interactions within our evolving understanding of the infection ontogeny, a model for TMV accumulation and intracellular spread in a cell biological context is provided.

  5. Induction of necrotic cell death by oxidative stress in retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanus, J; Zhang, H; Wang, Z; Liu, Q; Zhou, Q; Wang, S

    2013-12-12

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a degenerative disease of the retina and the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell death and the resultant photoreceptor apoptosis are characteristic of late-stage dry AMD, especially geographic atrophy (GA). Although oxidative stress and inflammation have been associated with GA, the nature and underlying mechanism for RPE cell death remains controversial, which hinders the development of targeted therapy for dry AMD. The purpose of this study is to systematically dissect the mechanism of RPE cell death induced by oxidative stress. Our results show that characteristic features of apoptosis, including DNA fragmentation, caspase 3 activation, chromatin condensation and apoptotic body formation, were not observed during RPE cell death induced by either hydrogen peroxide or tert-Butyl hydroperoxide. Instead, this kind of cell death can be prevented by RIP kinase inhibitors necrostatins but not caspase inhibitor z-VAD, suggesting necrotic feature of RPE cell death. Moreover, ATP depletion, receptor interacting protein kinase 3 (RIPK3) aggregation, nuclear and plasma membrane leakage and breakdown, which are the cardinal features of necrosis, were observed in RPE cells upon oxidative stress. Silencing of RIPK3, a key protein in necrosis, largely prevented oxidative stress-induced RPE death. The necrotic nature of RPE death is consistent with the release of nuclear protein high mobility group protein B1 into the cytoplasm and cell medium, which induces the expression of inflammatory gene TNFα in healthy RPE and THP-1 cells. Interestingly, features of pyroptosis or autophagy were not observed in oxidative stress-treated RPE cells. Our results unequivocally show that necrosis, but not apoptosis, is a major type of cell death in RPE cells in response to oxidative stress. This suggests that preventing oxidative stress-induced necrotic RPE death may be a viable approach for late-stage dry

  6. Inhibition of Mayaro virus replication by prostaglandin A1 and B2 in Vero cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimaru, D; Marcicano, F G; Rebello, M A

    1998-09-01

    The effect of prostaglandins (PGA1 and PGB2) on the replication of Mayaro virus was studied in Vero cells. PGA1 and PGB2 antiviral activity was found to be dose-dependent. However, while 10 micrograms/ml PGB2 inhibited virus yield by 60%, at the same dose PGA1 suppressed virus replication by more than 90%. SDS-PAGE analysis of [35S]-methionine-labelled proteins showed that PGA1 did not alter cellular protein synthesis. In infected cells, PGA1 slightly inhibited the synthesis of protein C, while drastically inhibiting the synthesis of glycoproteins E1 and E2.

  7. Inhibition of Mayaro virus replication by prostaglandin A1 and B2 in Vero cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishimaru D.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of prostaglandins (PGA1 and PGB2 on the replication of Mayaro virus was studied in Vero cells. PGA1 and PGB2 antiviral activity was found to be dose-dependent. However, while 10 µg/ml PGB2 inhibited virus yield by 60%, at the same dose PGA1 suppressed virus replication by more than 90%. SDS-PAGE analysis of [35S]-methionine-labelled proteins showed that PGA1 did not alter cellular protein synthesis. In infected cells, PGA1 slightly inhibited the synthesis of protein C, while drastically inhibiting the synthesis of glycoproteins E1 and E2.

  8. Replication stress caused by low MCM expression limits fetal erythropoiesis and hematopoietic stem cell functionality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alvarez, Silvia; Díaz, Marcos; Flach, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    -chromosome maintenance (MCM)3 that limiting origin licensing in vivo affects the functionality of hematopoietic stem cells and the differentiation of rapidly-dividing erythrocyte precursors. Mcm3-deficient erythroblasts display aberrant DNA replication patterns and fail to complete maturation, causing lethal anemia. Our......' origins provide a backup in the presence of stalled forks and may confer flexibility to the replication program in specific cell types during differentiation, a role that has remained unexplored. Here we show, using a mouse strain with hypomorphic expression of the origin licensing factor mini...

  9. p53-Mediated Cellular Response to DNA Damage in Cells with Replicative Hepatitis B Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puisieux, Alain; Ji, Jingwei; Guillot, Celine; Legros, Yann; Soussi, Thierry; Isselbacher, Kurt; Ozturk, Mehmet

    1995-02-01

    Wild-type p53 acts as a tumor suppressor gene by protecting cells from deleterious effects of genotoxic agents through the induction of a G_1/S arrest or apoptosis as a response to DNA damage. Transforming proteins of several oncogenic DNA viruses inactivate tumor suppressor activity of p53 by blocking this cellular response. To test whether hepatitis B virus displays a similar effect, we studied the p53-mediated cellular response to DNA damage in 2215 hepatoma cells with replicative hepatitis B virus. We demonstrate that hepatitis B virus replication does not interfere with known cellular functions of p53 protein.

  10. Human PIF1 helicase supports DNA replication and cell growth under oncogenic-stress

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Unwinding duplex DNA is a critical processing step during replication, repair and transcription. Pif1 are highly conserved non-processive 5′->3′ DNA helicases with well-established roles in maintenance of yeast genome stability. However, the function of the sole member of Pif1 family in humans remains unclear. Human PIF1 is essential for tumour cell viability, particularly during replication stress, but is dispensable in non-cancerous cells and Pif1 deficient mice. Here we report that suppres...

  11. Immunohistochemistry of Programmed Cell Death in Archival Human Pathology Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takami Matsuyama

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Immunohistochemistry (IHC for detecting key signal molecules involved in programmed cell death (PCD in archival human pathology specimens is fairly well established. Detection of cleaved caspase-3 in lymphocytes in rheumatoid arthritis (RA and gastric surface foveolar glandular epithelia but not in synoviocytes in RA, gastric fundic glandular epithelia, or nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma (NKTCL cells suggests anti-apoptotic mechanisms in cell differentiation and in oncogenesis such as the induction of survivin. Enzymatically pretreated and ultra-super sensitive detection of beclin-1 in synoviocytes in RA and gastric fundic glandular epithelia suggests enhanced autophagy. The deposition of beclin-1 in fibrinoid necrosis in RA and expression of beclin-1 in detached gastric fundic glandular cells suggest that enhanced autophagy undergoes autophagic cell death (ACD. NKTCL exhibited enhanced autophagy through LC3 labeling and showed densely LC3 labeled cell-debris in regions of peculiar necrosis without deposition of beclin-1, indicating massive ACD in NKTCL and the alternative pathway enhancing autophagy following autophagic vesicle nucleation. Autophagy progression was monitored by labeling aggregated mitochondria and cathepsin D. The cell-debris in massive ACD in NKTCL were positive for 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, suggesting DNA oxidation occurred in ACD. Immunohistochemical autophagy and PCD analysis in archival human pathology specimens may offer new insights into autophagy in humans.

  12. Selective Induction of Cancer Cell Death by Targeted Granzyme B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. Jabulowsky

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The potential utility of immunotoxins for cancer therapy has convincingly been demonstrated in clinical studies. Nevertheless, the high immunogenicity of their bacterial toxin domain represents a critical limitation, and has prompted the evaluation of cell-death inducing proteins of human origin as a basis for less immunogenic immunotoxin-like molecules. In this review, we focus on the current status and future prospects of targeted fusion proteins for cancer therapy that employ granzyme B (GrB from cytotoxic lymphocytes as a cytotoxic moiety. Naturally, this serine protease plays a critical role in the immune defense by inducing apoptotic target cell death upon cleavage of intracellular substrates. Advances in understanding of the structure and function of GrB enabled the generation of chimeric fusion proteins that carry a heterologous cell binding domain for recognition of tumor-associated cell surface antigens. These hybrid molecules display high selectivity for cancer cells, with cell killing activities similar to that of corresponding recombinant toxins. Recent findings have helped to understand and circumvent intrinsic cell binding of GrB and susceptibility of the enzyme to inhibition by serpins. This now allows the rational design of optimized GrB derivatives that avoid sequestration by binding to non-target tissues, limit off-target effects, and overcome resistance mechanisms in tumor cells.

  13. Discrete gene replication events drive coupling between the cell cycle and circadian clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paijmans, Joris; Bosman, Mark; Ten Wolde, Pieter Rein; Lubensky, David K

    2016-04-12

    Many organisms possess both a cell cycle to control DNA replication and a circadian clock to anticipate changes between day and night. In some cases, these two rhythmic systems are known to be coupled by specific, cross-regulatory interactions. Here, we use mathematical modeling to show that, additionally, the cell cycle generically influences circadian clocks in a nonspecific fashion: The regular, discrete jumps in gene-copy number arising from DNA replication during the cell cycle cause a periodic driving of the circadian clock, which can dramatically alter its behavior and impair its function. A clock built on negative transcriptional feedback either phase-locks to the cell cycle, so that the clock period tracks the cell division time, or exhibits erratic behavior. We argue that the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus has evolved two features that protect its clock from such disturbances, both of which are needed to fully insulate it from the cell cycle and give it its observed robustness: a phosphorylation-based protein modification oscillator, together with its accompanying push-pull read-out circuit that responds primarily to the ratios of different phosphoform concentrations, makes the clock less susceptible to perturbations in protein synthesis; the presence of multiple, asynchronously replicating copies of the same chromosome diminishes the effect of replicating any single copy of a gene.

  14. Epigallocatechin gallate inhibits HBV DNA synthesis in a viral replication - inducible cell line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei He; Li-Xia Li; Qing-Jiao Liao; Chun-Lan Liu; Xu-Lin Chen

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the antiviral mechanism of Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) against hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication. METHODS: In this research, the HBV-replicating cell line HepG2.117 was used to investigate the antiviral mechanism of EGCG. Cytotoxicity of EGCG was analyzed by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Hepatitis B virus e antigen (HBeAg) and hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) in the supernatant were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Precore mRNA and pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) levels were determined by semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. The effect of EGCG on HBV core promoter activity was measured by dual luciferase reporter assay. HBV covalently closed circular DNA and replicative intermediates of DNA were quantified by real-time PCR assay. RESULTS: When HepG2.117 cells were grown in the presence of EGCG, the expression of HBeAg was suppressed, however, the expression of HBsAg was not affected. HBV precore mRNA level was also downregulated by EGCG, while the transcription of precore mRNA was not impaired. The synthesis of both HBV covalently closed circular DNA and replicative intermediates of DNA were reduced by EGCG treatment to a similar extent, however, HBV pgRNA transcripted from chromosome-integrated HBV genome was not affected by EGCG treatment, indicating that EGCG targets only replicative intermediates of DNA synthesis. CONCLUSION: In HepG2.117 cells, EGCG inhibits HBV replication by impairing HBV replicative intermediates of DNA synthesis and such inhibition results in reduced production of HBV covalently closed circular DNA.

  15. Analysis of spatial correlations between patterns of DNA damage response and DNA replication in nuclei of cells subjected to replication stress or oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernas, Tytus; Berniak, Krzysztof; Rybak, Paulina; Zarębski, Mirosław; Zhao, Hong; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Dobrucki, Jerzy W

    2013-10-01

    Sites of DNA replication (EdU incorporation) and DNA damage signaling (γH2AX) induced by camptothecin (Cpt) or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) form characteristic patterns of foci in cell nuclei. The overlap between these patterns is a function of the number of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) formed in replication sites. The goal of this study was to optimize a method of quantitative assessment of a degree of correlation between these two patterns. Such a correlation can be used to estimate a probability of inducing damage in sections of replicating DNA. The damage and replication foci are imaged in 3D with confocal microscopy and their respective positions within nuclei are determined with adaptive image segmentation. Using correlation functions spatial proximity of the resultant point patterns is quantified over the range of distances in cells in early-, mid- and late S-phase. As the numbers (and nuclear densities) of γH2AX and replication foci differ significantly in the subsequent substages of S phase, the detected association values were corrected for the expected random overlap between both classes of foci. Thus, the probability of their nonrandom association was estimated. Moreover, self association (clustering) of DNA replication sites in different stages of S-phase of the cell cycle was detected and accounted for. While the analysis revealed a strong correlation between the γH2AX foci and the sites of DNA replication in cells treated with Cpt, only a low correlation was apparent in cells exposed to H2O2. © 2013 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  16. Cyclic di-GMP acts as a cell cycle oscillator to drive chromosome replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lori, C; Ozaki, S; Steiner, S; Böhm, R; Abel, S; Dubey, B N; Schirmer, T; Hiller, S; Jenal, U

    2015-07-01

    Fundamental to all living organisms is the capacity to coordinate cell division and cell differentiation to generate appropriate numbers of specialized cells. Whereas eukaryotes use cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases to balance division with cell fate decisions, equivalent regulatory systems have not been described in bacteria. Moreover, the mechanisms used by bacteria to tune division in line with developmental programs are poorly understood. Here we show that Caulobacter crescentus, a bacterium with an asymmetric division cycle, uses oscillating levels of the second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) to drive its cell cycle. We demonstrate that c-di-GMP directly binds to the essential cell cycle kinase CckA to inhibit kinase activity and stimulate phosphatase activity. An upshift of c-di-GMP during the G1-S transition switches CckA from the kinase to the phosphatase mode, thereby allowing replication initiation and cell cycle progression. Finally, we show that during division, c-di-GMP imposes spatial control on CckA to install the replication asymmetry of future daughter cells. These studies reveal c-di-GMP to be a cyclin-like molecule in bacteria that coordinates chromosome replication with cell morphogenesis in Caulobacter. The observation that c-di-GMP-mediated control is conserved in the plant pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens suggests a general mechanism through which this global regulator of bacterial virulence and persistence coordinates behaviour and cell proliferation.

  17. Different types of cell death induced by enterotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chiou-Feng; Chen, Chia-Ling; Huang, Wei-Ching; Cheng, Yi-Lin; Hsieh, Chia-Yuan; Wang, Chi-Yun; Hong, Ming-Yuan

    2010-08-01

    The infection of bacterial organisms generally causes cell death to facilitate microbial invasion and immune escape, both of which are involved in the pathogenesis of infectious diseases. In addition to the intercellular infectious processes, pathogen-produced/secreted enterotoxins (mostly exotoxins) are the major weapons that kill host cells and cause diseases by inducing different types of cell death, particularly apoptosis and necrosis. Blocking these enterotoxins with synthetic drugs and vaccines is important for treating patients with infectious diseases. Studies of enterotoxin-induced apoptotic and necrotic mechanisms have helped us to create efficient strategies to use against these well-characterized cytopathic toxins. In this article, we review the induction of the different types of cell death from various bacterial enterotoxins, such as staphylococcal enterotoxin B, staphylococcal alpha-toxin, Panton-Valentine leukocidin, alpha-hemolysin of Escherichia coli, Shiga toxins, cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1, heat-labile enterotoxins, and the cholera toxin, Vibrio cholerae. In addition, necrosis caused by pore-forming toxins, apoptotic signaling through cross-talk pathways involving mitochondrial damage, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and lysosomal injury is discussed.

  18. Different Types of Cell Death Induced by Enterotoxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Yuan Hong

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The infection of bacterial organisms generally causes cell death to facilitate microbial invasion and immune escape, both of which are involved in the pathogenesis of infectious diseases. In addition to the intercellular infectious processes, pathogen-produced/secreted enterotoxins (mostly exotoxins are the major weapons that kill host cells and cause diseases by inducing different types of cell death, particularly apoptosis and necrosis. Blocking these enterotoxins with synthetic drugs and vaccines is important for treating patients with infectious diseases. Studies of enterotoxin-induced apoptotic and necrotic mechanisms have helped us to create efficient strategies to use against these well-characterized cytopathic toxins. In this article, we review the induction of the different types of cell death from various bacterial enterotoxins, such as staphylococcal enterotoxin B, staphylococcal alpha-toxin, Panton-Valentine leukocidin, alpha-hemolysin of Escherichia coli, Shiga toxins, cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1, heat-labile enterotoxins, and the cholera toxin, Vibrio cholerae. In addition, necrosis caused by pore-forming toxins, apoptotic signaling through cross-talk pathways involving mitochondrial damage, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and lysosomal injury is discussed.

  19. Glucose Levels in Culture Medium Determine Cell Death Mode in MPP(+)-treated Dopaminergic Neuronal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, So-Young; Oh, Young J

    2015-09-01

    We previously demonstrated that 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) causes caspase-independent, non-apoptotic death of dopaminergic (DA) neuronal cells. Here, we specifically examined whether change of glucose concentration in culture medium may play a role for determining cell death modes of DA neurons following MPP(+) treatment. By incubating MN9D cells in medium containing varying concentrations of glucose (5~35 mM), we found that cells underwent a distinct cell death as determined by morphological and biochemical criteria. At 5~10 mM glucose concentration (low glucose levels), MPP(+) induced typical of the apoptotic dell death accompanied with caspase activation and DNA fragmentation as well as cell shrinkage. In contrast, MN9D cells cultivated in medium containing more than 17.5 mM (high glucose levels) did not demonstrate any of these changes. Subsequently, we observed that MPP(+) at low glucose levels but not high glucose levels led to ROS generation and subsequent JNK activation. Therefore, MPP(+)-induced cell death only at low glucose levels was significantly ameliorated following co-treatment with ROS scavenger, caspase inhibitor or JNK inhibitor. We basically confirmed the quite similar pattern of cell death in primary cultures of DA neurons. Taken together, our results suggest that a biochemically distinct cell death mode is recruited by MPP(+) depending on extracellular glucose levels.

  20. Sensitization of gastric cancer cells to alkylating agents by glaucocalyxin B via cell cycle arrest and enhanced cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ur Rahman MS

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Muhammad Saif Ur Rahman,1 Ling Zhang,2 Lingyan Wu,1 Yuqiong Xie,1 Chunchun Li,1 Jiang Cao1 1Clinical Research Center, 2Cardiovascular Key Laboratory of Zhejiang Province, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Severe side effects are major problems with chemotherapy of gastric cancer (GC. These side effects can be reduced by using sensitizing agents in combination with therapeutic drugs. In this study, the low/nontoxic dosage of glaucocalyxin B (GLB was used with other DNA linker agents mitomycin C (MMC, cisplatin (DDP, or cyclophosphamide (CTX to treat GC cells. Combined effectiveness of GLB with drugs was determined by proliferation assay. The molecular mechanisms associated with cell proliferation, migration, invasion, cell cycle, DNA repair/replication, apoptosis, and autophagy were investigated by immunoblotting for key proteins involved. Cell cycle and apoptosis analysis were performed by flow cytometry. Reactive oxygen species level was also examined for identification of its role in apoptosis. Proliferation assay revealed that the addition of 5 µM GLB significantly sensitizes gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells to MMC, DDP, and CTX by decreasing half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 by up to 75.40%±5%, 45.10%±5%, and 52.10%±5%, respectively. GLB + drugs decreased the expression level of proteins involved in proliferation and migration, suggesting the anticancer potential of GLB + drugs. GLB + MMC, GLB + CTX, and GLB + DDP arrest the cells in G0/G1 and G1/S phase, respectively, which may be the consequence of significant decrease in the level of enzymes responsible for DNA replication and telomerase shortening. Combined use of GLB with these drugs also induces DNA damage and apoptosis by activating caspase/PARP pathways and increased production of reactive oxygen species and increased autophagy in GC cells. GLB dosage sensitizes GC

  1. A novel class of mutations that affect DNA replication in E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordman, Jared; Skovgaard, Ole; Wright, Andrew

    2007-01-01

    Over-initiation of DNA replication in cells containing the cold-sensitive dnaA(cos) allele has been shown to lead to extensive DNA damage, potentially due to head-to-tail replication fork collisions that ultimately lead to replication fork collapse, growth stasis and/or cell death. Based on the a...

  2. Comparative analysis of cell death induction by Taurolidine in different malignant human cancer cell lines

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    Ritter Peter R

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taurolidine (TRD represents an anti-infective substance with anti-neoplastic activity in many malignant cell lines. So far, the knowledge about the cell death inducing mechanisms and pathways activated by TRD is limited. The aim of this study was therefore, to perform a comparative analysis of cell death induction by TRD simultaneously in different malignant cell lines. Materials and methods Five different malignant cell lines (HT29/Colon, Chang Liver/Liver, HT1080/fibrosarcoma, AsPC-1/pancreas and BxPC-3/pancreas were incubated with increasing concentrations of TRD (100 μM, 250 μM and 1000 μM for 6 h and 24 h. Cell viability, apoptosis and necrosis were analyzed by FACS analysis (Propidiumiodide/AnnexinV staining. Additionally, cells were co-incubated with the caspase Inhibitor z-VAD, the radical scavenger N-Acetylcystein (NAC and the Gluthation depleting agent BSO to examine the contribution of caspase activation and reactive oxygen species in TRD induced cell death. Results All cell lines were susceptible to TRD induced cell death without resistance toward this anti-neoplastic agent. However, the dose response effects were varying largely between different cell lines. The effect of NAC and BSO co-treatment were highly different among cell lines - suggesting a cell line specific involvement of ROS in TRD induced cell death. Furthermore, impact of z-VAD mediated inhibition of caspases was differing strongly among the cell lines. Conclusion This is the first study providing a simultaneous evaluation of the anti-neoplastic action of TRD across several malignant cell lines. The involvement of ROS and caspase activation was highly variable among the five cell lines, although all were susceptible to TRD induced cell death. Our results indicate, that TRD is likely to provide multifaceted cell death mechanisms leading to a cell line specific diversity.

  3. The replication timing of the amplified dihydrofolate reductase genes in the Chinese hamster ovary cell line CHOC 400.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caddle, M S; Heintz, N H

    1990-07-16

    We have examined the timing of replication of the amplified dihydrofolate reductase genes in the methotrexate-resistant Chinese hamster ovary cell line CHOC 400 using two synchronization procedures. DNA replicated in the presence of 5-bromodeoxyuridine was collected from cells of various times during the DNA synthesis phase and the extent of replication for defined sequences was determined by Southern blotting analysis of CsCl density gradient fractions. We report that under these conditions the DHFR gene replicates throughout the course of S phase in a mode similar to the bulk of the replicated genomic DNA. This contrasts with previous data that shows the non-amplified DHFR gene replicates during the first quarter of S phase. Therefore, we conclude that gene amplification alters the replication timing of the DHFR gene in CHOC 400 cells.

  4. The cell biology of Tobacco mosaic virus replication and movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengke eLiu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Successful systemic infection of a plant by Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV requires three processes that repeat over time: initial establishment and accumulation in invaded cells, intercellular movement and systemic transport. Accumulation and intercellular movement of TMV necessarily involves intracellular transport by complexes containing virus and host proteins and virus RNA during a dynamic process that can be visualized. Multiple membranes appear to assist TMV accumulation, while membranes, microfilaments and microtubules appear to assist TMV movement. Here we review cell biological studies that describe TMV-membrane, -cytoskeleton and -other host protein interactions which influence virus accumulation and movement in leaves and callus tissue. The importance of understanding the developmental phase of the infection in relationship to the observed virus-membrane or -host protein interaction is emphasized. Utilizing the latest observations of TMV-membrane and -host protein interactions within our evolving understanding of the infection ontogeny, a model for TMV accumulation and intracellular spread in a cell biological context is provided.

  5. [Selective "death programs" or pleiotropic"life programs"? Looking for programmed cell death in the light of evolution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameisen, Jean-Claude

    2005-01-01

    "Nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution", wrote Theodosius Dobzhansky, one of the founders of the Modern Synthesis that led to the unification of evolutionary theory and genetics in the midst of the 20th century. Programmed cell death is a genetically regulated process of cell suicide that is central to the development, homeostasis and integrity of multicellular organisms. Conversely, the dysregulation of mechanisms controlling cell suicide plays a role in the pathogenesis of a wide range of diseases. While great progress has been achieved in the unveiling of the molecular mechanisms of programmed cell death, a new, and somehow puzzling level of complexity has recently begun to emerge, suggesting i) that several different self destruction pathways may exist and operate in parallel in our cells, and ii) that molecular effectors of cell suicide might also perform other functions unrelated to cell death induction and crucial to cell survival, such as cell differentiation, metabolism, and the regulation of the cell cycle. These new findings, with important physiopathological and therapeutic implications, seem at odds with the paradigm of programmed cell death derived from the studies of Caenorhabditis elegans, which led to the concept of the existence of selective, bona fide death genes that emerged and became selected for their sole capacity to execute or repress cell death. In this review, I will argue that this new level of complexity might only make sense and be understood when considered in a broader evolutionary context than that of our phylogenetic divergence from C. elegans. A new view of the regulated cell death pathways emerges when one attempts to ask the question of when and how they may have become selected during a timeline of 4 billion years, at the level of ancestral single-celled organisms, including the bacteria. I will argue that there may be no such thing as a bona fide genetic cell death program. Rather, in the framework of

  6. Spatial and Temporal Analysis of Alphavirus Replication and Assembly in Mammalian and Mosquito Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Joyce Jose; Aaron B. Taylor; Kuhn, Richard J.; Dermody, Terence S.

    2017-01-01

    Sindbis virus (SINV [genus Alphavirus, family Togaviridae]) is an enveloped, mosquito-borne virus. Alphaviruses cause cytolytic infections in mammalian cells while establishing noncytopathic, persistent infections in mosquito cells. Mosquito vector adaptation of alphaviruses is a major factor in the transmission of epidemic strains of alphaviruses. Though extensive studies have been performed on infected mammalian cells, the morphological and structural elements of alphavirus replication and ...

  7. A novel peptide inhibits the influenza virus replication by preventing the viral attachment to the host cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Rajik, Abdul Rahman Omar, Aini Ideris, Sharifah Syed Hassan, Khatijah Yusoff

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Avian influenza viruses (AIV, the causative agent of avian flu or bird flu, cause widespread morbidity and mortality in poultry. The symptoms of the disease range from mild flu like symptoms to death. These viruses possess two important surface glycoproteins, namely hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA against which neutralizing antibodies are produced. Due to the highly mutative nature of the genes which encode these proteins, the viruses often confer resistance to the current anti-viral drugs making the prevention and treatment of infection challenging. In our laboratory, we have recently identified a novel anti-viral peptide (P1 against the AIV H9N2 from a phage displayed peptide library. This peptide inhibits the replication of the virus in ovo and in vitro by its binding to the HA glycoprotein. In the current study, we demonstrate that the peptide inhibits the virus replication by preventing the attachment to the host cell but it does not have any effect on the viral fusion. The reduction in the viral nucleoprotein (NP expression inside the host cell has also been observed during the peptide (P1 treatment. This novel peptide may have the potential to be developed as a therapeutic agent for the treatment and control of avian influenza virus H9N2 infections.

  8. Steroid hormone control of cell death and cell survival: molecular insights using RNAi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suganthi Chittaranjan

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The insect steroid hormone ecdysone triggers programmed cell death of obsolete larval tissues during metamorphosis and provides a model system for understanding steroid hormone control of cell death and cell survival. Previous genome-wide expression studies of Drosophila larval salivary glands resulted in the identification of many genes associated with ecdysone-induced cell death and cell survival, but functional verification was lacking. In this study, we test functionally 460 of these genes using RNA interference in ecdysone-treated Drosophila l(2mbn cells. Cell viability, cell morphology, cell proliferation, and apoptosis assays confirmed the effects of known genes and additionally resulted in the identification of six new pro-death related genes, including sorting nexin-like gene SH3PX1 and Sox box protein Sox14, and 18 new pro-survival genes. Identified genes were further characterized to determine their ecdysone dependency and potential function in cell death regulation. We found that the pro-survival function of five genes (Ras85D, Cp1, CG13784, CG32016, and CG33087, was dependent on ecdysone signaling. The TUNEL assay revealed an additional two genes (Kap-alpha3 and Smr with an ecdysone-dependent cell survival function that was associated with reduced cell death. In vitro, Sox14 RNAi reduced the percentage of TUNEL-positive l(2mbn cells (p<0.05 following ecdysone treatment, and Sox14 overexpression was sufficient to induce apoptosis. In vivo analyses of Sox14-RNAi animals revealed multiple phenotypes characteristic of aberrant or reduced ecdysone signaling, including defects in larval midgut and salivary gland destruction. These studies identify Sox14 as a positive regulator of ecdysone-mediated cell death and provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the ecdysone signaling network governing cell death and cell survival.

  9. Neuronal cell death during metamorphosis of Hydractina echinata (Cnidaria, Hydrozoa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seipp, Stefanie; Schmich, Jürgen; Will, Britta; Schetter, Eva; Plickert, Günter; Leitz, Thomas

    2010-12-01

    In planula larvae of the invertebrate Hydractinia echinata (Cnidaria, Hydrozoa), peptides of the GLWamide and the RFamide families are expressed in distinct subpopulations of neurons, distributed in a typical spatial pattern through the larval body. However, in the adult polyp GLWamide or RFamide-expressing cells are located at body parts that do not correspond to the prior larval regions. Since we had shown previously that during metamorphosis a large number of cells are removed by programmed cell death (PCD), we aimed to analyze whether cells of the neuropeptide-expressing larval nerve net are among those sacrificed. By immunohistochemical staining and in situ hybridization, we labeled GLWamide- and RFamide-expressing cells. Double staining of neuropeptides and degraded DNA (TUNEL analysis) identified some neurosensory cells as being apoptotic. Derangement of the cytoplasm and rapid destruction of neuropeptide precursor RNA indicated complete death of these particular sensory cells in the course of metamorphosis. Additionally, a small group of RFamide-positive sensory cells in the developing mouth region of the primary polyp could be shown to emerge by proliferation. Our results support the idea that during metamorphosis, specific parts of the larval neuronal network are subject to neurodegeneration and therefore not used for construction of the adult nerve net. Most neuronal cells of the primary polyp arise by de novo differentiation of stem cells commited to neural differentiation in embryogenesis. At least some nerve cells derive from proliferation of progenitor cells. Clarification of how the nerve net of these basal eumetazoans degenerates may add information to the understanding of neurodegeneration by apoptosis as a whole in the animal kingdom.

  10. Cell cycle regulation and radiation-induced cell death; Regulation du cycle cellulaire et de la mort cellulaire radio-induite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favaudon, V. [Centre Universitaire d' Orsay, Institut Curie, Section de Recherche, Lab. Raymond-Latarjet, Unite 350 Inserm, 91 (France)

    2000-10-01

    Tight control of cell proliferation is mandatory to prevent cancer formation as well as to normal organ development and homeostasis. This occurs through checkpoints that operate in both time and space and are involved in the control of numerous pathways including DNA replication and transcription, cell cycle progression, signal transduction and differentiation. Moreover, evidence has accumulated to show that apoptosis is tightly connected with the regulation of cell cycle progression. In this paper we describe the main pathways that determine checkpoints in the cell cycle and apoptosis. It is also recalled that in solid tumors radiation-induced cell death occurs most frequently through non-apoptotic mechanisms involving oncosis, and mitotic or delayed cell death. (author)

  11. Oncogenic Herpesvirus Utilizes Stress-Induced Cell Cycle Checkpoints for Efficient Lytic Replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Balistreri

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV causes Kaposi's sarcoma and certain lymphoproliferative malignancies. Latent infection is established in the majority of tumor cells, whereas lytic replication is reactivated in a small fraction of cells, which is important for both virus spread and disease progression. A siRNA screen for novel regulators of KSHV reactivation identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase MDM2 as a negative regulator of viral reactivation. Depletion of MDM2, a repressor of p53, favored efficient activation of the viral lytic transcription program and viral reactivation. During lytic replication cells activated a p53 response, accumulated DNA damage and arrested at G2-phase. Depletion of p21, a p53 target gene, restored cell cycle progression and thereby impaired the virus reactivation cascade delaying the onset of virus replication induced cytopathic effect. Herpesviruses are known to reactivate in response to different kinds of stress, and our study now highlights the molecular events in the stressed host cell that KSHV has evolved to utilize to ensure efficient viral lytic replication.

  12. The V protein of canine distemper virus is required for virus replication in human epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriyuki Otsuki

    Full Text Available Canine distemper virus (CDV becomes able to use human receptors through a single amino acid substitution in the H protein. In addition, CDV strains possessing an intact C protein replicate well in human epithelial H358 cells. The present study showed that CDV strain 007Lm, which was isolated from lymph node tissue of a dog with distemper, failed to replicate in H358 cells, although it possessed an intact C protein. Sequence analyses suggested that a cysteine-to-tyrosine substitution at position 267 of the V protein caused this growth defect. Analyses using H358 cells constitutively expressing the CDV V protein showed that the V protein with a cysteine, but not that with a tyrosine, at this position effectively blocked the interferon-stimulated signal transduction pathway, and supported virus replication of 007Lm in H358 cells. Thus, the V protein as well as the C protein appears to be functional and essential for CDV replication in human epithelial cells.

  13. Oncogenic Herpesvirus Utilizes Stress-Induced Cell Cycle Checkpoints for Efficient Lytic Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balistreri, Giuseppe; Viiliäinen, Johanna; Turunen, Mikko; Diaz, Raquel; Lyly, Lauri; Pekkonen, Pirita; Rantala, Juha; Ojala, Krista; Sarek, Grzegorz; Teesalu, Mari; Denisova, Oxana; Peltonen, Karita; Julkunen, Ilkka; Varjosalo, Markku; Kainov, Denis; Kallioniemi, Olli; Laiho, Marikki; Taipale, Jussi; Hautaniemi, Sampsa; Ojala, Päivi M

    2016-02-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV) causes Kaposi's sarcoma and certain lymphoproliferative malignancies. Latent infection is established in the majority of tumor cells, whereas lytic replication is reactivated in a small fraction of cells, which is important for both virus spread and disease progression. A siRNA screen for novel regulators of KSHV reactivation identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase MDM2 as a negative regulator of viral reactivation. Depletion of MDM2, a repressor of p53, favored efficient activation of the viral lytic transcription program and viral reactivation. During lytic replication cells activated a p53 response, accumulated DNA damage and arrested at G2-phase. Depletion of p21, a p53 target gene, restored cell cycle progression and thereby impaired the virus reactivation cascade delaying the onset of virus replication induced cytopathic effect. Herpesviruses are known to reactivate in response to different kinds of stress, and our study now highlights the molecular events in the stressed host cell that KSHV has evolved to utilize to ensure efficient viral lytic replication.

  14. Replication, gene expression and particle production by a consensus Merkel Cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friederike Neumann

    Full Text Available Merkel Cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV genomes are clonally integrated in tumor tissues of approximately 85% of all Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC cases, a highly aggressive tumor of the skin which predominantly afflicts elderly and immunosuppressed patients. All integrated viral genomes recovered from MCC tissue or MCC cell lines harbor signature mutations in the early gene transcript encoding for the large T-Antigen (LT-Ag. These mutations selectively abrogate the ability of LT-Ag to support viral replication while still maintaining its Rb-binding activity, suggesting a continuous requirement for LT-Ag mediated cell cycle deregulation during MCC pathogenesis. To gain a better understanding of MCPyV biology, in vitro MCPyV replication systems are required. We have generated a synthetic MCPyV genomic clone (MCVSyn based on the consensus sequence of MCC-derived sequences deposited in the NCBI database. Here, we demonstrate that transfection of recircularized MCVSyn DNA into some human cell lines recapitulates efficient replication of the viral genome, early and late gene expression together with virus particle formation. However, serial transmission of infectious virus was not observed. This in vitro culturing system allows the study of viral replication and will facilitate the molecular dissection of important aspects of the MCPyV lifecycle.

  15. Canthin-6-one induces cell death, cell cycle arrest and differentiation in human myeloid leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira Torquato, Heron F; Ribeiro-Filho, Antonio C; Buri, Marcus V; Araújo Júnior, Roberto T; Pimenta, Renata; de Oliveira, José Salvador R; Filho, Valdir C; Macho, Antonio; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J; de Oliveira Martins, Domingos T

    2017-04-01

    Canthin-6-one is a natural product isolated from various plant genera and from fungi with potential antitumor activity. In the present study, we evaluate the antitumor effects of canthin-6-one in human myeloid leukemia lineages. Kasumi-1 lineage was used as a model for acute myeloid leukemia. Cells were treated with canthin-6-one and cell death, cell cycle and differentiation were evaluated in both total cells (Lin(+)) and leukemia stem cell population (CD34(+)CD38(-)Lin(-/low)). Among the human lineages tested, Kasumi-1 was the most sensitive to canthin-6-one. Canthin-6-one induced cell death with apoptotic (caspase activation, decrease of mitochondrial potential) and necrotic (lysosomal permeabilization, double labeling of annexin V/propidium iodide) characteristics. Moreover, canthin-6-one induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 (7μM) and G2 (45μM) evidenced by DNA content, BrdU incorporation and cyclin B1/histone 3 quantification. Canthin-6-one also promoted differentiation of Kasumi-1, evidenced by an increase in the expression of myeloid markers (CD11b and CD15) and the transcription factor PU.1. Furthermore, a reduction of the leukemic stem cell population and clonogenic capability of stem cells were observed. These results show that canthin-6-one can affect Kasumi-1 cells by promoting cell death, cell cycle arrest and cell differentiation depending on concentration used. Canthin-6-one presents an interesting cytotoxic activity against leukemic cells and represents a promising scaffold for the development of molecules for anti-leukemic applications, especially by its anti-leukemic stem cell activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Calorie restriction-mediated replicative lifespan extension in yeast is non-cell autonomous.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szu-Chieh Mei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In laboratory yeast strains with Sir2 and Fob1 function, wild-type NAD+ salvage is required for calorie restriction (CR to extend replicative lifespan. CR does not significantly alter steady state levels of intracellular NAD+ metabolites. However, levels of Sir2 and Pnc1, two enzymes that sequentially convert NAD+ to nicotinic acid (NA, are up-regulated during CR. To test whether factors such as NA might be exported by glucose-restricted mother cells to survive later generations, we developed a replicative longevity paradigm in which mother cells are moved after 15 generations on defined media. The experiment reveals that CR mother cells lose the longevity benefit of CR when evacuated from their local environment to fresh CR media. Addition of NA or nicotinamide riboside (NR allows a moved mother to maintain replicative longevity despite the move. Moreover, conditioned medium from CR-treated cells transmits the longevity benefit of CR to moved mother cells. Evidence suggests the existence of a longevity factor that is dialyzable but is neither NA nor NR, and indicates that Sir2 is not required for the longevity factor to be produced or to act. Data indicate that the benefit of glucose-restriction is transmitted from cell to cell in budding yeast, suggesting that glucose restriction may benefit neighboring cells and not only an individual cell.

  17. Ayanin diacetate-induced cell death is amplified by TRAIL in human leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrero, Maria Teresa; Estevez, Sara; Negrin, Gledy; Quintana, Jose [Departamento de Bioquimica, Unidad Asociada al Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Plaza Dr. Pasteur s/n, 35016 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Lopez, Mariana; Perez, Francisco J.; Triana, Jorge [Departamento de Quimica, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Instituto Canario de Investigacion del Cancer, 35017 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Leon, Francisco [Instituto de Productos Naturales y Agrobiologia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Avda. Astrofisico F. Sanchez 3, 38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Estevez, Francisco, E-mail: festevez@dbbf.ulpgc.es [Departamento de Bioquimica, Unidad Asociada al Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Plaza Dr. Pasteur s/n, 35016 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain)

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ayanin diacetate as apoptotic inducer in leukemia cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell death was prevented by caspase inhibitors and by the overexpression of Bcl-x{sub L}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The intrinsic and the extrinsic pathways are involved in the mechanism of action. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Death receptors are up-regulated and TRAIL enhances apoptotic cell death. -- Abstract: Here we demonstrate that the semi-synthetic flavonoid ayanin diacetate induces cell death selectively in leukemia cells without affecting the proliferation of normal lymphocytes. Incubation of human leukemia cells with ayanin diacetate induced G{sub 2}-M phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis which was prevented by the non-specific caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk and reduced by the overexpression of Bcl-x{sub L}. Ayanin diacetate-induced cell death was found to be associated with: (i) loss of inner mitochondrial membrane potential, (ii) the release of cytochrome c, (iii) the activation of multiple caspases, (iv) cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and (v) the up-regulation of death receptors for TRAIL, DR4 and DR5. Moreover, the combined treatment with ayanin diacetate and TRAIL amplified cell death, compared to single treatments. These results provide a basis for further exploring the potential applications of this combination for the treatment of cancer.

  18. Replication-competent human adenovirus 11p vectors can propagate in Vero cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gokumakulapalle, Madhuri; Mei, Ya-Fang, E-mail: ya-fang.mei@umu.se

    2016-08-15

    The use of continuous cell lines derived from the African green monkey kidney (AGMK) has led to major advances in virus vaccine development. However, to date, these cells have not been used to facilitate the creation of human adenoviruses because most human adenoviruses undergo abortive infections in them. Here, we report the susceptibility of AGMK-derived cells to adenovirus 11p (Ad11p) infection. First, we showed that CD46 molecules, which act as receptors for Ad11p, are expressed in AGMK cells. We then monitored Ad11p replication by measuring GFP expression as an indicator of viral transcription. We found that AGMK-derived cells were as capable as carcinoma cells at propagating full-length replication-competent Ad11p (RCAd11p) DNA. Of the AGMK cell lines tested, Vero cells had the greatest capacity for adenovirus production. Thus, AGMK cells can be used to evaluate RCAd11p-mediated gene delivery, and Vero cells can be used for the production of RCAd11pGFP vectors at relatively high yields. - Highlights: • Africa green monkey cell lines were monitored for human adenovirus 11p GFP vector infection. • Human CD46 molecules were detectable in these monkey cell lines. • Adenovirus 11p GFP vector can be propagated in Vero cells increases the safety of Ad11p-based vectors for clinical trials. • To use Vero cells for preparation of Ad11p vector avoids the potential inclusion of oncogenes from tumor cells.

  19. Cyclodextrins inhibit replication of scrapie prion protein in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Marguerite; Lehmann, Sylvain; Sy, Man-Sun; Molloy, Brendan; McMahon, Hilary E M

    2007-10-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders that are caused by the conversion of a normal host-encoded protein, PrP(C), to an abnormal, disease-causing form, PrP(Sc). This paper reports that cyclodextrins have the ability to reduce the pathogenic isoform of the prion protein PrP(Sc) to undetectable levels in scrapie-infected neuroblastoma cells. Beta-cyclodextrin removed PrP(Sc) from the cells at a concentration of 500 microM following 2 weeks of treatment. Structure activity studies revealed that antiprion activity was dependent on the size of the cyclodextrin. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) for beta-cyclodextrin was 75 microM, whereas alpha-cyclodextrin, which possessed less antiprion activity, had an IC(50) of 750 microM. This report presents cyclodextrins as a new class of antiprion compound. For decades, the pharmaceutical industry has successfully used cyclodextrins for their complex-forming ability; this ability is due to the structural orientation of the glucopyranose units, which generate a hydrophobic cavity that can facilitate the encapsulation of hydrophobic moieties. Consequently, cyclodextrins could be ideal candidates for the treatment of prion diseases.

  20. Infectivity and expression of the early adenovirus proteins are important regulators of wild-type and DeltaE1B adenovirus replication in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steegenga, W T; Riteco, N; Bos, J L

    1999-09-09

    An adenovirus mutant lacking the expression of the large E1B protein (DeltaE1B) has been reported to replicate selectively in cells lacking the expression of functionally wild-type (wt) p53. Based on these results the DeltaE1B or ONYX-015 virus has been proposed to be an oncolytic virus which might be useful to treat p53-deficient tumors. Recently however, contradictory results have been published indicating that p53-dependent cell death is required for productive adenovirus infection. Since there is an urgent need for new methods to treat aggressive, mutant p53-expressing primary tumors and their metastases we carefully examined adenovirus replication in human cells to determine whether or not the DeltaE1B virus can be used for tumor therapy. The results we present here show that not all human tumor cell lines take up adenovirus efficiently. In addition, we observed inhibition of the expression of adenovirus early proteins in tumor cells. We present evidence that these two factors rather than the p53 status of the cell determine whether adenovirus infection results in lytic cell death. Furthermore, the results we obtained by infecting a panel of different tumor cell lines show that viral spread of the DeltaE1B is strongly inhibited in almost all p53-proficient and -deficient cell lines compared to the wt virus. We conclude that the efficiency of the DeltaE1B virus to replicate efficiently in tumor cells is determined by the ability to infect cells and to express the early adenovirus proteins rather than the status of p53.

  1. Phenoxide-bridged Zinc(II)-Bis(dipicolylamine) Probes for Molecular Imaging of Cell Death

    OpenAIRE

    Clear, Kasey J.; Harmatys, Kara M.; Rice, Douglas R.; Wolter, William R.; Suckow, Mark A.; Wang, Yuzhen; Rusckowski, Mary; Smith, Bradley D.

    2015-01-01

    Cell death is involved in many pathological conditions, and there is a need for clinical and preclinical imaging agents that can target and report cell death. One of the best known biomarkers of cell death is exposure of the anionic phospholipid phosphatidylserine (PS) on the surface of dead and dying cells. Synthetic zinc(II)-bis(dipicolylamine) (Zn2BDPA) coordination complexes are known to selectively recognize PS-rich membranes and act as cell death molecular imaging agents. However, there...

  2. Mitochondria and cell death pathways in plants: Actions speak louder than words

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Iain; Logan, David C

    2008-01-01

    The mitochondrion has a central role during programmed cell death (PCD) in animals, acting as both a sensor of death signals, and as an initiator of the biochemical processes which lead to the controlled destruction of the cell. In contrast to our extensive knowledge of animal cell death, the part played by mitochondria in the death of plant cells has received relatively little attention. Using a combination of whole-organism and cell-based models, we recently demonstrated that changes in mit...

  3. Vacuolar processing enzyme in plant programmed cell death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriyuki eHatsugai

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Vacuolar processing enzyme (VPE is a cysteine proteinase originally identified as the proteinase responsible for the maturation and activation of vacuolar proteins in plants, and it is known to be an orthologue of animal asparaginyl endopeptidase (AEP/VPE/legumain. VPE has been shown to exhibit enzymatic properties similar to that of caspase 1, which is a cysteine protease that mediates the programmed cell death (PCD pathway in animals. Although there is limited sequence identity between VPE and caspase 1, their predicted three-dimensional structures revealed that the essential amino-acid residues for these enzymes form similar pockets for the substrate peptide YVAD. In contrast to the cytosolic localization of caspases, VPE is localized in vacuoles. VPE provokes vacuolar rupture, initiating the proteolytic cascade leading to PCD in the plant immune response. It has become apparent that the VPE-dependent PCD pathway is involved not only in the immune response, but also in the responses to a variety of stress inducers and in the development of various tissues. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the contribution of VPE to plant PCD and its role in vacuole-mediated cell death, and it also compares VPE with the animal cell death executor caspase 1.

  4. A dual-targeting approach to inhibit Brucella abortus replication in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyż, Daniel M.; Jain-Gupta, Neeta; Shuman, Howard A.; Crosson, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Brucella abortus is an intracellular bacterial pathogen and an etiological agent of the zoonotic disease known as brucellosis. Brucellosis can be challenging to treat with conventional antibiotic therapies and, in some cases, may develop into a debilitating and life-threatening chronic illness. We used multiple independent assays of in vitro metabolism and intracellular replication to screen a library of 480 known bioactive compounds for novel B. abortus anti-infectives. Eighteen non-cytotoxic compounds specifically inhibited B. abortus replication in the intracellular niche, which suggests these molecules function by targeting host cell processes. Twenty-six compounds inhibited B. abortus metabolism in axenic culture, thirteen of which are non-cytotoxic to human host cells and attenuate B. abortus replication in the intracellular niche. The most potent non-cytotoxic inhibitors of intracellular replication reduce B. abortus metabolism in axenic culture and perturb features of mammalian cellular biology including mitochondrial function and receptor tyrosine kinase signaling. The efficacy of these molecules as inhibitors of B. abortus replication in the intracellular niche suggests “dual-target” compounds that coordinately perturb host and pathogen are promising candidates for development of improved therapeutics for intracellular infections. PMID:27767061

  5. Targeted cancer cell death induced by biofunctionalized magnetic nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Contreras, Maria F.

    2014-02-01

    Magnetic micro and nanomaterials are increasingly interesting for biomedical applications since they possess many advantageous properties: they can become biocompatible, they can be functionalized to target specific cells and they can be remotely manipulated by magnetic fields. The goal of this study is to use antibody-functionalized nickel nanowires (Ab-NWs) as an alternative method in cancer therapy overcoming the limitations of current treatments that lack specificity and are highly cytotoxic. Ab-NWs have been incubated with cancer cells and a 12% drop on cell viability was observed for a treatment of only 10 minutes and an alternating magnetic field of low intensity and low frequency. It is believed that the Ab-NWs vibrate transmitting a mechanical force to the targeted cells inducing cell death. © 2014 IEEE.

  6. Antrodia camphorata extract induces replicative senescence in superficial TCC, and inhibits the absolute migration capability in invasive bladder carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Chiung-Chi; Chen, Kuan-Chou; Peng, Robert Y; Chyau, Charng-Cherng; Su, Ching-Hua; Hsieh-Li, Hsiu Mei

    2007-01-01

    The Antrodia camphorata crude extract (ACCE), an extract obtained from a precious traditional Chinese folkloric herbal medicine Zhan-Ku (a camphor tree mushroom) since the 18th century, has showed rather significant inhibitory effects on the growth and proliferation of the transitional cell carcinomas (TCC) cell lines RT4, TSGH-8301, and T24. On treatment with ACCE at 100 microg/mL, the p53-independent overexpression of p21 with simultaneous down alteration of pRb was observed in RT4, which was thus speculative of proceeding through a mechanism of replicative senescence. On the contrary treatment with ACCE, at 50 microg/mL, resulting in simultaneous down-regulations of Cdc2 and Cyclin B1, with suppression of the absolute migrating capability of the two cell lines TSGH-8301 and T24, and eventually the cell deaths. We conclude that ACCE can be rather effective and beneficial in suppression of both the superficial cancer cell line RT4 and the metastatic cell lines (TSGH-8301 and T24) through different mechanisms.

  7. Neurovirulence of H5N1 infection in ferrets is mediated by multifocal replication in distinct permissive neuronal cell regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer R Plourde

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic avian influenza A (HPAI, subtype H5N1, remains an emergent threat to the human population. While respiratory disease is a hallmark of influenza infection, H5N1 has a high incidence of neurological sequelae in many animal species and sporadically in humans. We elucidate the temporal/spatial infection of H5N1 in the brain of ferrets following a low dose, intranasal infection of two HPAI strains of varying neurovirulence and lethality. A/Vietnam/1203/2004 (VN1203 induced mortality in 100% of infected ferrets while A/Hong Kong/483/1997 (HK483 induced lethality in only 20% of ferrets, with death occurring significantly later following infection. Neurological signs were prominent in VN1203 infection, but not HK483, with seizures observed three days post challenge and torticollis or paresis at later time points. VN1203 and HK483 replication kinetics were similar in primary differentiated ferret nasal turbinate cells, and similar viral titers were measured in the nasal turbinates of infected ferrets. Pulmonary viral titers were not different between strains and pathological findings in the lungs were similar in severity. VN1203 replicated to high titers in the olfactory bulb, cerebral cortex, and brain stem; whereas HK483 was not recovered in these tissues. VN1203 was identified adjacent to and within the olfactory nerve tract, and multifocal infection was observed throughout the frontal cortex and cerebrum. VN1203 was also detected throughout the cerebellum, specifically in Purkinje cells and regions that coordinate voluntary movements. These findings suggest the increased lethality of VN1203 in ferrets is due to increased replication in brain regions important in higher order function and explains the neurological signs observed during H5N1 neurovirulence.

  8. Variable Inhibition of Zika Virus Replication by Different Wolbachia Strains in Mosquito Cell Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Michaela J; Isern, Sharon; Michael, Scott F; Corley, Ronald B; Connor, John H; Frydman, Horacio M

    2017-07-15

    Mosquito-borne arboviruses are a major source of human disease. One strategy to reduce arbovirus disease is to reduce the mosquito's ability to transmit virus. Mosquito infection with the bacterial endosymbiont Wolbachia pipientis wMel is a novel strategy to reduce Aedes mosquito competency for flavivirus infection. However, experiments investigating cyclic environmental temperatures have shown a reduction in maternal transmission of wMel, potentially weakening the integration of this strain into a mosquito population relative to that of other Wolbachia strains. Consequently, it is important to investigate additional Wolbachia strains. All Zika virus (ZIKV) suppression studies are limited to the wMel Wolbachia strain. Here we show ZIKV inhibition by two different Wolbachia strains: wAlbB (isolated from Aedes albopictus mosquitoes) and wStri (isolated from the planthopper Laodelphax striatellus) in mosquito cells. Wolbachia strain wStri inhibited ZIKV most effectively. Single-cycle infection experiments showed that ZIKV RNA replication and nonstructural protein 5 translation were reduced below the limits of detection in wStri-containing cells, demonstrating early inhibition of virus replication. ZIKV replication was rescued when Wolbachia was inhibited with a bacteriostatic antibiotic. We observed a partial rescue of ZIKV growth when Wolbachia-infected cells were supplemented with cholesterol-lipid concentrate, suggesting competition for nutrients as one of the possible mechanisms of Wolbachia inhibition of ZIKV. Our data show that wAlbB and wStri infection causes inhibition of ZIKV, making them attractive candidates for further in vitro mechanistic and in vivo studies and future vector-centered approaches to limit ZIKV infection and spread.IMPORTANCE Zika virus (ZIKV) has swiftly spread throughout most of the Western Hemisphere. This is due in large part to its replication in and spread by a mosquito vector host. There is an urgent need for approaches that limit

  9. Thymoquinone causes multiple effects, including cell death, on dividing plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanien, Sameh E; Ramadan, Ahmed M; Azeiz, Ahmed Z Abdel; Mohammed, Rasha A; Hassan, Sabah M; Shokry, Ahmed M; Atef, Ahmed; Kamal, Khalid B H; Rabah, Samar; Sabir, Jamal S M; Abuzinadah, Osama A; El-Domyati, Fotouh M; Martin, Gregory B; Bahieldin, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    Thymoquinone (TQ) is a major constituent of Nigella sativa oil with reported anti-oxidative activity and anti-inflammatory activity in animal cells. It also inhibits proliferation and induces programmed cell death (apoptosis) in human skin cancer cells. The present study sought to detect the influence of TQ on dividing cells of three plant systems and on expression of Bcl2-associated athanogene-like (BAG-like) genes that might be involved during the process of cell death. BAG genes are known for the regulation of diverse physiological processes in animals, including apoptosis, tumorigenesis, stress responses, and cell division. Synthetic TQ at 0.1mg/mL greatly reduced wheat seed germination rate, whereas 0.2mg/mL completely inhibited germination. An Evans blue assay revealed moderate cell death in the meristematic zone of Glycine max roots after 1h of TQ treatment (0.2mg/mL), with severe cell death occurring in this zone after 2h of treatment. Light microscopy of TQ-treated (0.2mg/mL) onion hairy root tips for 1h revealed anti-mitotic activity and also cell death-associated changes, including nuclear membrane disruption and nuclear fragmentation. Transmission electron microscopy of TQ-treated cells (0.2mg/mL) for 1h revealed shrinkage of the plasma membrane, leakage of cell lysate, degradation of cell walls, enlargement of vacuoles and condensation of nuclei. Expression of one BAG-like gene, previously associated with cell death, was induced 20 min after TQ treatment in Glycine max root tip cells. Thus, TQ has multiple effects, including cell death, on dividing plant cells and plants may serve as a useful system to further investigate the mechanisms underlying the response of eukaryotic cells to TQ.

  10. Two programmed cell death systems in Escherichia coli: an apoptotic-like death is inhibited by the mazEF-mediated death pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Erental

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, the classical form of programmed cell death (PCD is apoptosis, which has as its specific characteristics DNA fragmentation and membrane depolarization. In Escherichia coli a different PCD system has been reported. It is mediated by the toxin-antitoxin system module mazEF. The E. coli mazEF module is one of the most thoroughly studied toxin-antitoxin systems. mazF encodes a stable toxin, MazF, and mazE encodes a labile antitoxin, MazE, which prevents the lethal effect of MazF. mazEF-mediated cell death is a population phenomenon requiring the quorum-sensing pentapeptide NNWNN designated Extracellular Death Factor (EDF. mazEF is triggered by several stressful conditions, including severe damage to the DNA. Here, using confocal microscopy and FACS analysis, we show that under conditions of severe DNA damage, the triggered mazEF-mediated cell death pathway leads to the inhibition of a second cell death pathway. The latter is an apoptotic-like death (ALD; ALD is mediated by recA and lexA. The mazEF-mediated pathway reduces recA mRNA levels. Based on these results, we offer a molecular model for the maintenance of an altruistic characteristic in cell populations. In our model, the ALD pathway is inhibited by the altruistic EDF-mazEF-mediated death pathway.

  11. A stochastic step model of replicative senescence explains ROS production rate in ageing cell populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conor Lawless

    Full Text Available Increases in cellular Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS concentration with age have been observed repeatedly in mammalian tissues. Concomitant increases in the proportion of replicatively senescent cells in ageing mammalian tissues have also been observed. Populations of mitotic human fibroblasts cultured in vitro, undergoing transition from proliferation competence to replicative senescence are useful models of ageing human tissues. Similar exponential increases in ROS with age have been observed in this model system. Tracking individual cells in dividing populations is difficult, and so the vast majority of observations have been cross-sectional, at the population level, rather than longitudinal observations of individual cells.One possible explanation for these observations is an exponential increase in ROS in individual fibroblasts with time (e.g. resulting from a vicious cycle between cellular ROS and damage. However, we demonstrate an alternative, simple hypothesis, equally consistent with these observations which does not depend on any gradual increase in ROS concentration: the Stochastic Step Model of Replicative Senescence (SSMRS. We also demonstrate that, consistent with the SSMRS, neither proliferation-competent human fibroblasts of any age, nor populations of hTERT overexpressing human fibroblasts passaged beyond the Hayflick limit, display high ROS concentrations. We conclude that longitudinal studies of single cells and their lineages are now required for testing hypotheses about roles and mechanisms of ROS increase during replicative senescence.

  12. Curcumin induces apoptosis-independent death in oesophageal cancer cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan-Coyne, G

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Oesophageal cancer incidence is increasing and survival rates remain extremely poor. Natural agents with potential for chemoprevention include the phytochemical curcumin (diferuloylmethane). We have examined the effects of curcumin on a panel of oesophageal cancer cell lines. METHODS: MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyldiazol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assays and propidium iodide staining were used to assess viability and DNA content, respectively. Mitotic catastrophe (MC), apoptosis and autophagy were defined by both morphological criteria and markers such as MPM-2, caspase 3 cleavage and monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining. Cyclin B and poly-ubiquitinated proteins were assessed by western blotting. RESULTS: Curcumin treatment reduces viability of all cell lines within 24 h of treatment in a 5-50 muM range. Cytotoxicity is associated with accumulation in G2\\/M cell-cycle phases and distinct chromatin morphology, consistent with MC. Caspase-3 activation was detected in two out of four cell lines, but was a minor event. The addition of a caspase inhibitor zVAD had a marginal or no effect on cell viability, indicating predominance of a non-apoptotic form of cell death. In two cell lines, features of both MC and autophagy were apparent. Curcumin-responsive cells were found to accumulate poly-ubiquitinated proteins and cyclin B, consistent with a disturbance of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. This effect on a key cell-cycle checkpoint regulator may be responsible for the mitotic disturbances and consequent cytotoxicity of this drug. CONCLUSION: Curcumin can induce cell death by a mechanism that is not reliant on apoptosis induction, and thus represents a promising anticancer agent for prevention and treatment of oesophageal cancer.

  13. Curcumin induces apoptosis-independent death in oesophageal cancer cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan-Coyne, G

    2009-10-06

    Background:Oesophageal cancer incidence is increasing and survival rates remain extremely poor. Natural agents with potential for chemoprevention include the phytochemical curcumin (diferuloylmethane). We have examined the effects of curcumin on a panel of oesophageal cancer cell lines.Methods:MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyldiazol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assays and propidium iodide staining were used to assess viability and DNA content, respectively. Mitotic catastrophe (MC), apoptosis and autophagy were defined by both morphological criteria and markers such as MPM-2, caspase 3 cleavage and monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining. Cyclin B and poly-ubiquitinated proteins were assessed by western blotting.Results:Curcumin treatment reduces viability of all cell lines within 24 h of treatment in a 5-50 muM range. Cytotoxicity is associated with accumulation in G2\\/M cell-cycle phases and distinct chromatin morphology, consistent with MC. Caspase-3 activation was detected in two out of four cell lines, but was a minor event. The addition of a caspase inhibitor zVAD had a marginal or no effect on cell viability, indicating predominance of a non-apoptotic form of cell death. In two cell lines, features of both MC and autophagy were apparent. Curcumin-responsive cells were found to accumulate poly-ubiquitinated proteins and cyclin B, consistent with a disturbance of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. This effect on a key cell-cycle checkpoint regulator may be responsible for the mitotic disturbances and consequent cytotoxicity of this drug.Conclusion:Curcumin can induce cell death by a mechanism that is not reliant on apoptosis induction, and thus represents a promising anticancer agent for prevention and treatment of oesophageal cancer.British Journal of Cancer advance online publication, 6 October 2009; doi:10.1038\\/sj.bjc.6605308 www.bjcancer.com.

  14. Low zinc environment induces stress signaling, senescence and mixed cell death modalities in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolf, Emil; Rudolf, Kamil

    2015-12-01

    Currently it is not clear what type of the final cellular response (i.e. cell death modality or senescence) is induced upon chronic intracellular zinc depletion in colon cancer cells. To address this question, isogenic colon cancer lines SW480 and SW620 exposed to low zinc environment were studied over the period of 6 weeks. Low zinc environment reduced total as well as free intracellular zinc content in both cell lines. Decreased intracellular zinc content resulted in changes in cellular proliferation, cell cycle distribution and activation of stress signaling. In addition, colonocytes with low zinc content displayed increased levels of oxidative stress, changes in mitochondrial activity but in the absence of significant DNA damage. Towards the end of treatment (4th-6th week), exposed cells started to change morphologically, and typical markers of senescence as well as cell death appeared. Of two examined colon cancer cell lines, SW480 cells proved to activate predominantly senescent phenotype, with frequent form of demise being necrosis and mixed cell death modality but not apoptosis. Conversely, SW620 cells activated mostly cell death, with relatively equal distribution of apoptosis and mixed types, while senescent phenotypes and necrosis were present only in a small fraction of cell populations. Addition of zinc at the beginning of 4th week of treatment significantly suppressed cell death phenotypes in both cell lines but had no significant effect on senescence. In conclusion, presented results demonstrate variability of responses to chronic zinc depletion in colon cancer as modeled in vitro.

  15. Heat shock genes – integrating cell survival and death

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Richa Arya; Moushami Mallik; Subhash C Lakhotia

    2007-04-01

    Heat shock induced gene expression and other cellular responses help limit the damage caused by stress and thus facilitate cellular recovery. Cellular damage also triggers apoptotic cell death through several pathways. This paper briefly reviews interactions of the major heat shock proteins with components of the apoptotic pathways. Hsp90, which acts as a chaperone for unstable signal transducers to keep them poised for activation, interacts with RIP and Akt and promotes NF-B mediated inhibition of apoptosis; in addition it also blocks some steps in the apoptotic pathways. Hsp70 is mostly anti-apoptotic and acts at several levels like inhibition of translocation of Bax into mitochondria, release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, formation of apoptosome and inhibition of activation of initiator caspases. Hsp70 also modulates JNK, NF-B and Akt signaling pathways in the apoptotic cascade. In contrast, Hsp60 has both anti- and pro-apoptotic roles. Cytosolic Hsp60 prevents translocation of the pro-apoptotic protein Bax into mitochondria and thus promotes cell survival but it also promotes maturation of procaspase-3, essential for caspase mediated cell death. Our recent in vivo studies show that RNAi for the Hsp60D in Drosophila melanogaster prevents induced apoptosis. Hsp27 exerts its anti-apoptotic influence by inhibiting cytochrome c and TNF-mediated cell death. crystallin suppresses caspase-8 and cytochrome c mediated activation of caspase-3. Studies in our laboratory also reveal that absence or reduced levels of the developmentally active as well as stress induced non-coding hsr transcripts, which are known to sequester diverse hnRNPs and related nuclear RNA-binding proteins, block induced apoptosis in Drosophila. Modulation of the apoptotic pathways by Hsps reflects their roles as ``weak links” between various ``hubs” in cellular networks. On the other hand, non-coding RNAs, by virtue of their potential to bind with multiple proteins, can act as ``hubs” in

  16. Embryonic death and the creation of human embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Landry, Donald W.; Zucker, Howard A.

    2004-01-01

    The creation of human embryonic stem cells through the destruction of a human embryo pits the value of a potential therapeutic tool against that of an early human life. This contest of values has resulted in a polarized debate that neglects areas of common interest and perspective. We suggest that a common ground for pursuing research on human embryonic stem cells can be found by reconsidering the death of the human embryo and by applying to this research the ethical norms of essential organ ...

  17. Embryonic death and the creation of human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Donald W; Zucker, Howard A

    2004-11-01

    The creation of human embryonic stem cells through the destruction of a human embryo pits the value of a potential therapeutic tool against that of an early human life. This contest of values has resulted in a polarized debate that neglects areas of common interest and perspective. We suggest that a common ground for pursuing research on human embryonic stem cells can be found by reconsidering the death of the human embryo and by applying to this research the ethical norms of essential organ donation.

  18. Antisense oligonucleotide inhibition of hepatitis C virus genotype 4 replication in HepG2 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omran Moataza H

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C (HCV viral infection is a serious medical problem in Egypt and it has a devastating impact on the Egyptian economy. It is estimated that over 15% of Egyptians are infected by the virus and thus finding a cure for this disease is of utmost importance. Current therapies for hepatitis C virus (HCV genotype 4 with interferon/ribavirin have not been successful and thus the development of alternative therapy for this genotype is disparately needed. Results Although previous studies utilizing viral subgenomic or full cDNA fragments linked to reporter genes transfected into adhered cells or in a cell free system showed promise, demonstration of efficient viral replication was lacking. Thus, we utilized HepG2 cells infected with native HCV RNA genomes in a replication competent system and used antisense phosphorothioate Oligonucleotides (S-ODN against stem loop IIId and the AUG translation start site of the viral polyprotein precursor to monitor viral replication. We were able to show complete arrest of intracellular replication of HCV-4 at 1 uM S-ODN, thus providing a proof of concept for the potential antiviral activity of S-ODN on native genomic replication of HCV genotype 4. Conclusion We have successfully demonstrated that by using two S-ODNs [(S-ODN1 (nt 326–348 and S-ODN-2 (nt 264–282], we were able to completely inhibit viral replication in culture, thus confirming earlier reports on subgenomic constructs and suggesting a potential therapeutic value in HCV type 4.

  19. Involvement of ethylene and lipid signalling in cadmium-induced programmed cell death in tomato suspension cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakimova, E T; Kapchina-Toteva, V M; Laarhoven, L-J; Harren, F M; Woltering, E J

    2006-10-01

    Cadmium-induced cell death was studied in suspension-cultured tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cells (line MsK8) treated with CdSO(4). Within 24 h, cadmium treatment induced cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. Cell cultures showed recovery after 2-3 days which indicates the existence of an adaptation mechanism. Cadmium-induced cell death was alleviated by the addition of sub muM concentrations of peptide inhibitors specific to human caspases indicating that cell death proceeds through a mechanism with similarities to animal programmed cell death (PCD, apoptosis). Cadmium-induced cell death was accompanied by an increased production of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and simultaneous addition of antioxidants greatly reduced cell death. Inhibitors of phospholipase C (PLC) and phospholipase D (PLD) signalling pathway intermediates reduced cadmium-induced cell death. Treatment with the G-protein activator mastoparan and a cell permeable analogue of the lipid signal second messenger phosphatidic acid (PA) induced cell death. Ethylene, while not inducing cell death when applied alone, stimulated cadmium-induced cell death. Application of the ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor aminoethoxy vinylglycine (AVG) reduced cadmium-induced cell death, and this effect was alleviated by simultaneous treatment with ethylene. Together the results show that cadmium induces PCD exhibiting apoptotic-like features. The cell death process requires increased H(2)O(2) production and activation of PLC, PLD and ethylene signalling pathways.

  20. Inhibition of Cell Division and DNA Replication Impair Mouse-Naïve Pluripotency Exit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waisman, Ariel; Vazquez Echegaray, Camila; Solari, Claudia; Cosentino, María Soledad; Martyn, Iain; Deglincerti, Alessia; Ozair, Mohammad Zeeshan; Ruzo, Albert; Barañao, Lino; Miriuka, Santiago; Brivanlou, Ali; Guberman, Alejandra

    2017-09-01

    The cell cycle has gained attention as a key determinant for cell fate decisions, but the contribution of DNA replication and mitosis in stem cell differentiation has not been extensively studied. To understand if these processes act as "windows of opportunity" for changes in cell identity, we established synchronized cultures of mouse embryonic stem cells as they exit the ground state of pluripotency. We show that initial transcriptional changes in this transition do not require passage through mitosis and that conversion to primed pluripotency is linked to lineage priming in the G1 phase. Importantly, we demonstrate that impairment of DNA replication severely blocks transcriptional switch to primed pluripotency, even in the absence of p53 activity induced by the DNA damage response. Our data suggest an important role for DNA replication during mouse embryonic stem cell differentiation, which could shed light on why pluripotent cells are only receptive to differentiation signals during G1, that is, before the S phase. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Inhibition of Mayaro virus replication by cerulenin in Aedes albopictus cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, H S; Rebello, M A

    1998-12-01

    The antibiotic cerulenin, an inhibitor of lipid synthesis, was shown to suppress Mayaro virus replication in Aedes albopictus cells at non-cytotoxic doses. Cerulenin blocked the incorporation of [3H]glycerol into lipids when present at any time post infection (p.i.). Cerulenin added at the beginning of infection inhibited the synthesis of virus proteins. However, when this antibiotic was added at later stages of infection, it had only a mild effect on the virus protein synthesis. The possibility that cerulenin acts by blocking an initial step in the Mayaro virus replication after virus entry and before late viral translation is discussed.

  2. Hepatitis C virus induced a novel apoptosis-like death of pancreatic beta cells through a caspase 3-dependent pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Wang

    Full Text Available Epidemiological and experimental studies have suggested that Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is associated with the development of type 2 diabetes. Pancreatic beta cell failure is central to the progression of type 2 diabetes. Using virus infection system, we investigate the influence of HCV infection on the fate of the insulinoma cell line, MIN6. Our experiments demonstrate that the HCV virion itself is indispensable and has a dose- and time-dependent cytopathic effect on the cells. HCV infection inhibits cell proliferation and induces death of MIN6 cells with apoptotic characteristics, including cell surface exposure of phosphatidylserine, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, activation of caspase 3 and poly (ADP-ribose polymerase, and DNA fragmentation in the nucleus. However, the fact that HCV-infected cells exhibit a dilated, low-density nucleus with intact plasma and nuclear membrane indicates that a novel apoptosis-like death occurs. HCV infection also causes endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress. Further, HCV RNA replication was detected in MIN6 cells, although the infection efficiency is very low and no progeny virus particle generates. Taken together, our data suggest that HCV infection induces death of pancreatic beta cells through an ER stress-involved, caspase 3-dependent, special pathway.

  3. Temporomandibular joint in miniature pigs: anatomy, cell replication, and relation to loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, Susan W; Decker, Jay D; Liu, Zi-Jun; Ma, Tsun

    2002-03-01

    The mechanical environment is a regulator of growth and adaptation of the musculoskeletal system, including joints. Although pigs (Sus scrofa) are used frequently as models for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction, no systematic description of microanatomy exists for this species. We injected the thymidine analog 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) into 10- to 11-month-old miniature pigs that were undergoing measurements of TMJ bone strain. Ten hr later, the animals were sacrificed and their heads were perfused. Histological sections were used to map the distribution of replicating cells. Additional observations were made on gross dissections of jaw joints obtained from an abattoir. The pig TMJ is better supported than that of humans laterally and medially, but more vulnerable posteriorly. The posterior attachment area of the intra-articular disc is fibro-fatty rather than vascular, as in humans. Cartilage lines the articular eminence as well as the condylar surface. At the posterosuperior region of the condyle, the cartilage ends abruptly and is replaced by an invaginating, actively replicating periosteum. Almost all of the BrdU-labeled cells resided in the prechondroblastic zones. The condyle had more replicating cells than did the eminence (P < 0.02), but lateral and medial locations did not differ in either element. In sagittal sections, the condyle had more replicating cells posteriorly (P < 0.001), but no A-P differences were seen in the eminence. Comparisons of these data with data on bone strain indicate that increased loading is negatively associated with cell replication. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Replication of the resident Marek's Disease virus genome in synchronized nonproducer MKT-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, R Y; Nonoyama, M

    1980-02-01

    MKT-1, a virus nonproducer lymphoblastoid cell line established from a Marek's disease tumor, was synchronized by double thymidine block to determine the sequence of events in the synthesis of cellular and latent marek's disease virus DNA. Cellular DNA synthesis was measured by incorporation of [3H]thymidine, whereas viral DNA synthesis was determined by DNA-DNA reassociation kinetics. The results of these studies indicate that the resident Marek's disease viral DNA in MKT-1 cells replicates during the early S phase of the cell cycle, before the onset of active cellular DNA synthesis. This observation is similar to that seen in the replication of resident Epstein-Barr virus DNA in synchronized Raji cells.

  5. EFFECTS OF ETHANOL AND HYDROGEN PEROXIDE ON MOUSE LIMB BUD MESENCHYME DIFFERENTIATION AND CELL DEATH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many of the morphological defects associated with embryonic alcohol exposure are a result of cell death. During limb development, ethanol administration produces cell death in the limb and digital defects, including postaxial ectrodactyly. Because an accumulation of reactive oxyg...

  6. Novel DNA damage checkpoint in mitosis: Mitotic DNA damage induces re-replication without cell division in various cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Sun-Yi; Rosen, Eliot M; Jang, Young-Joo

    2012-07-06

    DNA damage induces multiple checkpoint pathways to arrest cell cycle progression until damage is repaired. In our previous reports, when DNA damage occurred in prometaphase, cells were accumulated in 4 N-DNA G1 phase, and mitosis-specific kinases were inactivated in dependent on ATM/Chk1 after a short incubation for repair. We investigated whether or not mitotic DNA damage causes cells to skip-over late mitotic periods under prolonged incubation in a time-lapse study. 4 N-DNA-damaged cells re-replicated without cell division and accumulated in 8 N-DNA content, and the activities of apoptotic factors were increased. The inhibition of DNA replication reduced the 8 N-DNA cell population dramatically. Induction of replication without cell division was not observed upon depletion of Chk1 or ATM. Finally, mitotic DNA damage induces mitotic slippage and that cells enter G1 phase with 4 N-DNA content and then DNA replication is occurred to 8 N-DNA content before completion of mitosis in the ATM/Chk1-dependent manner, followed by caspase-dependent apoptosis during long-term repair. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Cell line-specific accumulation of the baculovirus non-hr origin of DNA replication in infected insect cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijlman, G.P.; Vermeesch, A.M.G.; Vlak, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Successive Viral passage of Spodoptera exigua multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (SeMNPV) in the S. exigua cell line Se301 leads to the rapid accumulation of the non-hr origin of DNA replication (ori) as large concatemers. Passage of SeMNPV in two other S. exigua cell lines, SeUCR1 and SeIZD2109, did

  8. Cell line-specific accumulation of the baculovirus non-hr origin of DNA replication in infected insect cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijlman, G.P.; Vermeesch, A.M.G.; Vlak, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Successive Viral passage of Spodoptera exigua multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (SeMNPV) in the S. exigua cell line Se301 leads to the rapid accumulation of the non-hr origin of DNA replication (ori) as large concatemers. Passage of SeMNPV in two other S. exigua cell lines, SeUCR1 and SeIZD2109, did

  9. Destabilization of Akt Promotes the Death of Myeloma Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Constitutive activation of Akt is believed to be an oncogenic signal in multiple myeloma and is associated with poor patient prognosis and resistance to available treatment. The stability of Akt proteins is regulated by phosphorylating the highly conserved turn motif (TM of these proteins and the chaperone protein HSP90. In this study we investigate the antitumor effects of inhibiting mTORC2 plus HSP90 in myeloma cell lines. We show that chronic exposure of cells to rapamycin can inhibit mTORC2 pathway, and AKT will be destabilized by administration of the HSP90 inhibitor 17-allylamino-geldanamycin (17-AAG. Finally, we show that the rapamycin synergizes with 17-AAG and inhibits myeloma cells growth and promotes cell death to a greater extent than either drug alone. Our studies provide a clinical rationale of use mTOR inhibitors and chaperone protein inhibitors in combination regimens for the treatment of human blood cancers.

  10. Dormant origins licensed by excess Mcm2-7 are required for human cells to survive replicative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xin Quan; Jackson, Dean A; Blow, J Julian

    2007-12-15

    In late mitosis and early G1, Mcm2-7 complexes are loaded onto DNA to license replication origins for use in the upcoming S phase. However, the amount of Mcm2-7 loaded is in significant excess over the number of origins normally used. We show here that in human cells, excess chromatin-bound Mcm2-7 license dormant replication origins that do not fire during normal DNA replication, in part due to checkpoint activity. Dormant origins were activated within active replicon clusters if replication fork progression was inhibited, despite the activation of S-phase checkpoints. After lowering levels of chromatin-bound Mcm2-7 in human cells by RNA interference (RNAi), the use of dormant origins was suppressed in response to replicative stress. Although cells with lowered chromatin-bound Mcm2-7 replicated at normal rates, when challenged with replication inhibitors they had dramatically reduced rates of DNA synthesis and reduced viability. These results suggest that the use of dormant origins licensed by excess Mcm2-7 is a new and physiologically important mechanism that cells utilize to maintain DNA replication rates under conditions of replicative stress. We propose that checkpoint kinase activity can preferentially suppress initiation within inactive replicon clusters, thereby directing new initiation events toward active clusters that are experiencing replication problems.

  11. Functional redundancy between DNA ligases I and III in DNA replication in vertebrate cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Hiroshi; Bednar, Theresa; Wang, Minli; Paul, Katja; Mladenov, Emil; Bencsik-Theilen, Alena A.; Iliakis, George

    2012-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the three families of ATP-dependent DNA ligases are associated with specific functions in DNA metabolism. DNA ligase I (LigI) catalyzes Okazaki-fragment ligation at the replication fork and nucleotide excision repair (NER). DNA ligase IV (LigIV) mediates repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSB) via the canonical non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway. The evolutionary younger DNA ligase III (LigIII) is restricted to higher eukaryotes and has been associated with base excision (BER) and single strand break repair (SSBR). Here, using conditional knockout strategies for LIG3 and concomitant inactivation of the LIG1 and LIG4 genes, we show that in DT40 cells LigIII efficiently supports semi-conservative DNA replication. Our observations demonstrate a high functional versatility for the evolutionary new LigIII in DNA replication and mitochondrial metabolism, and suggest the presence of an alternative pathway for Okazaki fragment ligation. PMID:22127868

  12. Ex vivo detection of primary leukemia cells resistant to granule cytotoxin-induced cell death: a rapid isolation method to study granzyme-B-mediated cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grüllich, Carsten; Friske, Viktoria; Finke, Jürgen

    2008-09-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells (CTL/NK) induce cell death in leukemia cells by the granzyme B (grB)-dependent granule cytotoxin (GC) pathway. Resistance to GC may be involved in immune evasion of leukemia cells. The delivery of active grB into the cytoplasma is dependent on the presence of perforin (PFN) and grB complexes. We developed a rapid method for the isolation of GC to investigate GC-mediated cell death in primary leukemia cells. We isolated GC containing grB, grB complexes and PFN by detergent free hypotonic lysis of the human NK cell leukemia line YT. The GC induce grB-mediated, caspase-dependent apoptosis in live cells. The human leukemia cell lines KG-1, U937, K562 (myeloid leukemia), Jurkat, Daudi, and BV173 (lymphoblastic leukemia) treated with GC internalized grB and underwent cell death. In primary leukemia cells analyzed ex vivo, we found GC-resistant leukemia cells in three out of seven patients with acute myeloid leukemia and one out of six patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. We conclude that our method is fast (approximately 1 h) and yields active GC that induce grB-dependent cell death. Furthermore, resistance to GC can be observed in acute leukemias and may be an important mechanism contributing to leukemia cell immune evasion.

  13. Mitochondrial control of cell death induced by hyperosmotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criollo, Alfredo; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Maiuri, M Chiara; Tasdemir, Ezgi; Lavandero, Sergio; Kroemer, Guido

    2007-01-01

    HeLa and HCT116 cells respond differentially to sorbitol, an osmolyte able to induce hypertonic stress. In these models, sorbitol promoted the phenotypic manifestations of early apoptosis followed by complete loss of viability in a time-, dose-, and cell type-specific fashion, by eliciting distinct yet partially overlapping molecular pathways. In HCT116 but not in HeLa cells, sorbitol caused the mitochondrial release of the caspase-independent death effector AIF, whereas in both cell lines cytochrome c was retained in mitochondria. Despite cytochrome c retention, HeLa cells exhibited the progressive activation of caspase-3, presumably due to the prior activation of caspase-8. Accordingly, caspase inhibition prevented sorbitol-induced killing in HeLa, but only partially in HCT116 cells. Both the knock-out of Bax in HCT116 cells and the knock-down of Bax in A549 cells by RNA interference reduced the AIF release and/or the mitochondrial alterations. While the knock-down of Bcl-2/Bcl-X(L) sensitized to sorbitol-induced killing, overexpression of a Bcl-2 variant that specifically localizes to mitochondria (but not of the wild-type nor of a endoplasmic reticulum-targeted form) strongly inhibited sorbitol effects. Thus, hyperosmotic stress kills cells by triggering different molecular pathways, which converge at mitochondria where pro- and anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family exert their control.

  14. Topological defects in epithelia govern cell death and extrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Thuan Beng; Doostmohammadi, Amin; Nier, Vincent; Kocgozlu, Leyla; Thampi, Sumesh; Toyama, Yusuke; Marcq, Philippe; Lim, Chwee Teck; Yeomans, Julia M.; Ladoux, Benoit

    2017-04-01

    Epithelial tissues (epithelia) remove excess cells through extrusion, preventing the accumulation of unnecessary or pathological cells. The extrusion process can be triggered by apoptotic signalling, oncogenic transformation and overcrowding of cells. Despite the important linkage of cell extrusion to developmental, homeostatic and pathological processes such as cancer metastasis, its underlying mechanism and connections to the intrinsic mechanics of the epithelium are largely unexplored. We approach this problem by modelling the epithelium as an active nematic liquid crystal (that has a long range directional order), and comparing numerical simulations to strain rate and stress measurements within monolayers of MDCK (Madin Darby canine kidney) cells. Here we show that apoptotic cell extrusion is provoked by singularities in cell alignments in the form of comet-shaped topological defects. We find a universal correlation between extrusion sites and positions of nematic defects in the cell orientation field in different epithelium types. The results confirm the active nematic nature of epithelia, and demonstrate that defect-induced isotropic stresses are the primary precursors of mechanotransductive responses in cells, including YAP (Yes-associated protein) transcription factor activity, caspase-3-mediated cell death, and extrusions. Importantly, the defect-driven extrusion mechanism depends on intercellular junctions, because the weakening of cell-cell interactions in an α-catenin knockdown monolayer reduces the defect size and increases both the number of defects and extrusion rates, as is also predicted by our model. We further demonstrate the ability to control extrusion hotspots by geometrically inducing defects through microcontact printing of patterned monolayers. On the basis of these results, we propose a mechanism for apoptotic cell extrusion: spontaneously formed topological defects in epithelia govern cell fate. This will be important in predicting

  15. Inhibition of the checkpoint kinase Chk1 induces DNA damage and cell death in human Leukemia and Lymphoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Christopher; Scriven, Kirsten; Massey, Andrew J

    2014-06-10

    Chk1 forms a core component of the DNA damage response and small molecule inhibitors are currently being investigated in the clinic as cytotoxic chemotherapy potentiators. Recent evidence suggests that Chk1 inhibitors may demonstrate significant single agent activity in tumors with specific DNA repair defects, a constitutively activated DNA damage response or oncogene induced replicative stress. Growth inhibition induced by the small molecule Chk1 inhibitor V158411 was assessed in a panel of human leukemia and lymphoma cell lines and compared to cancer cell lines derived from solid tumors. The effects on cell cycle and DNA damage response markers were further evaluated. Leukemia and lymphoma cell lines were identified as particularly sensitive to the Chk1 inhibitor V158411 (mean GI50 0.17 μM) compared to colon (2.8 μM) or lung (6.9 μM) cancer cell lines. Chk1 inhibition by V158411 in the leukemia and lymphoma cell lines induced DNA fragmentation and cell death that was both caspase dependent and independent, and prevented cells undergoing mitosis. An analysis of in vitro pharmacodynamic markers identified a dose dependent decrease in Chk1 and cyclin B1 protein levels and Cdc2 Thr15 phosphorylation along with a concomitant increase in H2AX phosphorylation at Ser139 following V158411 treatment. These data support the further evaluation of Chk1 inhibitors in hematopoietic cancers as single agents as well as in combination with standard of care cytotoxic drugs.

  16. Adipocyte cell death, fatty liver disease and associated metabolic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, Akiko; Feldstein, Ariel E

    2014-01-01

    Obesity has reached epidemic proportions in the U.S.A. and many other parts of the world. Obesity increases the risk of a number of adverse health conditions including type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and hepatic steatosis. Adipocyte hypertrophy occurs during weight gain and is associated with recruitment of immune cells, mainly macrophages, into the adipose tissue (AT). These cells typically surround a dying or dead adipocyte with the formation of crown-like structures that are present in experimental models of obesity as well as obese humans. The immune infiltration of AT results in increased production of various adipokines, cytokines, and chemokines that play a crucial role in the development of insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis. The pathogenic mechanisms resulting in AT macrophage recruitment are under intense investigation and remain incompletely understood. Recent evidence suggests that various programmed cell death pathways are activated in stressed hypertrophied adipocytes and may result in cell death. These events appear to occur at early stages and be important in triggering the metabolic dysregulation associated with obesity.

  17. Statins and voriconazole induce programmed cell death in Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Navarro, Carmen M; López-Arencibia, Atteneri; Sifaoui, Ines; Reyes-Batlle, María; Valladares, Basilio; Martínez-Carretero, Enrique; Piñero, José E; Maciver, Sutherland K; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob

    2015-05-01

    Members of the genus Acanthamoeba are facultative pathogens of humans, causing a sight-threatening keratitis and a life-threatening encephalitis. In order to treat those infections properly, it is necessary to target the treatment not only to the trophozoite but also to the cyst. Furthermore, it may be advantageous to avoid parasite killing by necrosis, which may induce local inflammation. We must also avoid toxicity of host tissue. Many drugs which target eukaryotes are known to induce programmed cell death (PCD), but this process is poorly characterized in Acanthamoeba. Here, we study the processes of programmed cell death in Acanthamoeba, induced by several drugs, such as statins and voriconazole. We tested atorvastatin, fluvastatin, simvastatin, and voriconazole at the 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) and IC90s that we have previously established. In order to evaluate this phenomenon, we investigated the DNA fragmentation, one of the main characteristics of PCD, with quantitative and qualitative techniques. Also, the changes related to phosphatidylserine exposure on the external cell membrane and cell permeability were studied. Finally, because caspases are key to PCD pathways, caspase activity was evaluated in Acanthamoeba. All the drugs assayed in this study induced PCD in Acanthamoeba. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study where PCD induced by drugs is described quantitatively and qualitatively in Acanthamoeba.

  18. From DNA radiation damage to cell death: theoretical approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballarini, Francesca

    2010-10-05

    Some representative models of radiation-induced cell death, which is a crucial endpoint in radiobiology, were reviewed. The basic assumptions were identified, their consequences on predicted cell survival were analyzed, and the advantages and drawbacks of each approach were outlined. In addition to "historical" approaches such as the Target Theory, the Linear-Quadratic model, the Theory of Dual Radiation Action and Katz' model, the more recent Local Effect Model was discussed, focusing on its application in Carbon-ion hadrontherapy. Furthermore, a mechanistic model developed at the University of Pavia and based on the relationship between cell inactivation and chromosome aberrations was presented, together with recent results; the good agreement between model predictions and literature experimental data on different radiation types (photons, protons, alpha particles, and Carbon ions) supported the idea that asymmetric chromosome aberrations like dicentrics and rings play a fundamental role for cell death. Basing on these results, a reinterpretation of the TDRA was also proposed, identifying the TDRA "sublesions" and "lesions" as clustered DNA double-strand breaks and (lethal) chromosome aberrations, respectively.

  19. From DNA Radiation Damage to Cell Death: Theoretical Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Ballarini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Some representative models of radiation-induced cell death, which is a crucial endpoint in radiobiology, were reviewed. The basic assumptions were identified, their consequences on predicted cell survival were analyzed, and the advantages and drawbacks of each approach were outlined. In addition to “historical” approaches such as the Target Theory, the Linear-Quadratic model, the Theory of Dual Radiation Action and Katz' model, the more recent Local Effect Model was discussed, focusing on its application in Carbon-ion hadrontherapy. Furthermore, a mechanistic model developed at the University of Pavia and based on the relationship between cell inactivation and chromosome aberrations was presented, together with recent results; the good agreement between model predictions and literature experimental data on different radiation types (photons, protons, alpha particles, and Carbon ions supported the idea that asymmetric chromosome aberrations like dicentrics and rings play a fundamental role for cell death. Basing on these results, a reinterpretation of the TDRA was also proposed, identifying the TDRA “sublesions” and “lesions” as clustered DNA double-strand breaks and (lethal chromosome aberrations, respectively.

  20. Cell-to-Cell stochastic fluctuations in apoptotic signaling can decide between life and death

    CERN Document Server

    Raychaudhuri, S; Nguyen, T; Khan, E M; Goldkorn, T

    2007-01-01

    Apoptosis, or genetically programmed cell death, is a crucial cellular process that maintains the balance between life and death in cells. The precise molecular mechanism of apoptosis signaling and how these two pathways are differentially activated under distinct apoptotic stimuli is poorly understood. We developed a Monte Carlo-based stochastic simulation model that can characterize distinct signaling behaviors in the two major pathways of apoptotic signaling using a novel probability distribution-based approach. Specifically, we show that for a weak death signal, such as low levels of death ligand Fas (CD95) binding or under stress conditions, the type 2 mitochondrial pathway dominates apoptotic signaling. Our results also show signaling in the type 2 pathway is stochastic, where the population average over many cells does not capture the cell-to-cell fluctuations in the time course (~1 - 10 hours) of downstream caspase-3 activation. On the contrary, the probability distribution of caspase-3 activation for...

  1. Oral keratinocytes support non-replicative infection and transfer of harbored HIV-1 to permissive cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacaman Rodrigo A

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oral keratinocytes on the mucosal surface are frequently exposed to HIV-1 through contact with infected sexual partners or nursing mothers. To determine the plausibility that oral keratinocytes are primary targets of HIV-1, we tested the hypothesis that HIV-1 infects oral keratinocytes in a restricted manner. Results To study the fate of HIV-1, immortalized oral keratinocytes (OKF6/TERT-2; TERT-2 cells were characterized for the fate of HIV-specific RNA and DNA. At 6 h post inoculation with X4 or R5-tropic HIV-1, HIV-1gag RNA was detected maximally within TERT-2 cells. Reverse transcriptase activity in TERT-2 cells was confirmed by VSV-G-mediated infection with HIV-NL4-3Δenv-EGFP. AZT inhibited EGFP expression in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that viral replication can be supported if receptors are bypassed. Within 3 h post inoculation, integrated HIV-1 DNA was detected in TERT-2 cell nuclei and persisted after subculture. Multiply spliced and unspliced HIV-1 mRNAs were not detectable up to 72 h post inoculation, suggesting that HIV replication may abort and that infection is non-productive. Within 48 h post inoculation, however, virus harbored by CD4 negative TERT-2 cells trans infected co-cultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs or MOLT4 cells (CD4+ CCR5+ by direct cell-to-cell transfer or by releasing low levels of infectious virions. Primary tonsil epithelial cells also trans infected HIV-1 to permissive cells in a donor-specific manner. Conclusion Oral keratinocytes appear, therefore, to support stable non-replicative integration, while harboring and transmitting infectious X4- or R5-tropic HIV-1 to permissive cells for up to 48 h.

  2. Antiviral effects of artesunate on JC polyomavirus replication in COS-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Biswa Nath; Marschall, Manfred; Rinaldo, Christine Hanssen

    2014-11-01

    The human JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) causes the fatal demyelinating disease progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). A growing number of patients with induced or acquired immunosuppression are at risk for infection, and no effective antiviral therapy is presently available. The widely used antimalarial drug artesunate has shown broad antiviral activity in vitro but limited clinical success. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of artesunate on JCPyV replication in vitro. The permissivity for JCPyV MAD-4 was first compared in four cell lines, and the monkey kidney cell line COS-7 was selected. Artesunate caused a concentration-dependent decrease in the extracellular JCPyV DNA load 96 h postinfection, with a 50% effective concentration (EC50) of 2.9 μM. This effect correlated with a decreased expression of capsid protein VP1 and a reduced release of infectious viral progeny. For concentrations of <20 μM, transient reductions in cellular DNA replication and proliferation were seen, while for higher concentrations, some cytotoxicity was detected. A selective index of 16.6 was found when cytotoxicity was calculated based on cellular DNA replication in the mock-infected cells, but interestingly, cellular DNA replication in the JCPyV-infected cells was more strongly affected. In conclusion, artesunate is efficacious in inhibiting JCPyV replication at micromolar concentrations, which are achievable in plasma. The inhibition at EC50 probably reflects an effect on cellular proteins and involves transient cytostatic effects. Our results, together with the favorable distribution of the active metabolite dihydroartemisinin to the central nervous system, suggest a potential use for artesunate in patients with PML.

  3. Programmed cell death in C. elegans, mammals and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Christina E N; Gunawardena, Arunika H L A N

    2012-08-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is the regulated removal of cells within an organism and plays a fundamental role in growth and development in nearly all eukaryotes. In animals, the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) has aided in elucidating many of the pathways involved in the cell death process. Various analogous PCD processes can also be found within mammalian PCD systems, including vertebrate limb development. Plants and animals also appear to share hallmarks of PCD, both on the cellular and molecular level. Cellular events visualized during plant PCD resemble those seen in animals including: nuclear condensation, DNA fragmentation, cytoplasmic condensation, and plasma membrane shrinkage. Recently the molecular mechanisms involved in plant PCD have begun to be elucidated. Although few regulatory proteins have been identified as conserved across all eukaryotes, molecular features such as the participation of caspase-like proteases, Bcl-2-like family members and mitochondrial proteins appear to be conserved between plant and animal systems. Transgenic expression of mammalian and C. elegans pro- and anti-apoptotic genes in plants has been observed to dramatically influence the regulatory pathways of plant PCD. Although these genes often show little to no sequence similarity they can frequently act as functional substitutes for one another, thus suggesting that action may be more important than sequence resemblance. Here we present a summary of these findings, focusing on the similarities, between mammals, C. elegans, and plants. An emphasis will be placed on the mitochondria and its role in the cell death pathway within each organism. Through the comparison of these systems on both a cellular and molecular level we can begin to better understand PCD in plant systems, and perhaps shed light on the pathways, which are controlling the process. This manuscript adds to the field of PCD in plant systems by profiling apoptotic factors, to scale on a protein

  4. Oncolytic Group B Adenovirus Enadenotucirev Mediates Non-apoptotic Cell Death with Membrane Disruption and Release of Inflammatory Mediators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Dyer

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Enadenotucirev (EnAd is a chimeric group B adenovirus isolated by bioselection from a library of adenovirus serotypes. It replicates selectively in and kills a diverse range of carcinoma cells, shows effective anticancer activity in preclinical systems, and is currently undergoing phase I/II clinical trials. EnAd kills cells more quickly than type 5 adenovirus, and speed of cytotoxicity is dose dependent. The EnAd death pathway does not involve p53, is predominantly caspase independent, and appears to involve a rapid fall in cellular ATP. Infected cells show early loss of membrane integrity; increased exposure of calreticulin; extracellular release of ATP, HSP70, and HMGB1; and influx of calcium. The virus also causes an obvious single membrane blister reminiscent of ischemic cell death by oncosis. In human tumor biopsies maintained in ex vivo culture, EnAd mediated release of pro-inflammatory mediators such as TNF-α, IL-6, and HMGB1. In accordance with this, EnAd-infected tumor cells showed potent stimulation of dendritic cells and CD4+ T cells in a mixed tumor-leukocyte reaction in vitro. Whereas many viruses have evolved for efficient propagation with minimal inflammation, bioselection of EnAd for rapid killing has yielded a virus with a short life cycle that combines potent cytotoxicity with a proinflammatory mechanism of cell death.

  5. Parvovirus B19 Replication and Expression in Differentiating Erythroid Progenitor Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Bua

    Full Text Available The pathogenic Parvovirus B19 (B19V is characterized by a strict adaptation to erythroid progenitor cells (EPCs, a heterogeneous population of differentiating cells with diverse phenotypic and functional properties. In our work, we studied the dynamics of B19V infection in EPCs in dependence on the cell differentiation stage, in terms of distribution of infected cells, synthesis of viral nucleic acids and production of infectious virus. EPCs at early differentiation stage led to an abortive infection, without viral genome replication and a very low transcriptional activity. EPCs at later stages were permissive, with highest levels of viral replicative activity at day 9 (+3.0 Log from 2 to 48 hpi and lower levels at day 18 (+1.5 Log from 2 to 48 hpi. B19V DNA increment was in accordance with the percentage of cells positive to flow-FISH assay (41.4% at day 9, 1.1% at day 18. Quantitation of total RNA indicated a close association of genome replication and transcription with viral RNA accumulation within infected cells related to viral DNA increase during the course of infection. Analysis of the different classes of mRNAs revealed two distinct pattern of genome expression profile with a fine regulation in the frequency utilization of RNA processing signals: an early phase, when cleavage at the proximal site leading to a higher relative production of mRNA for NS protein, and a late phase, when cleavage at the distal site was more frequent leading to higher relative abundance of mRNA for VP and 11 kDA proteins. Infectious virus was released from cells at day 6-15, but not at day 18. Our results, providing a detailed description of B19V replication and expression profile in differentiating EPCs, highlight the very tight adaptation of B19V to a specific cellular target defined both by its erythroid lineage and its differentiation stage.

  6. Relief of preintegration inhibition and characterization of additional blocks for HIV replication in primary mouse T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-xin Zhang

    Full Text Available Development of a small animal model to study HIV replication and pathogenesis has been hampered by the failure of the virus to replicate in non-primate cells. Most studies aimed at achieving replication in murine cells have been limited to fibroblast cell lines, but generating an appropriate model requires overcoming blocks to viral replication in primary T cells. We have studied HIV-1 replication in CD4(+ T cells from human CD4/CCR5/Cyclin T1 transgenic mice. Expression of hCD4 and hCCR5 in mouse CD4(+ T cells enabled efficient entry of R5 strain HIV-1. In mouse T cells, HIV-1 underwent reverse transcription and nuclear import as efficiently as in human T cells. In contrast, chromosomal integration of HIV-1 proviral DNA was inefficient in activated mouse T cells. This process was greatly enhanced by providing a secondary T cell receptor (TCR signal after HIV-1 infection, especially between 12 to 24 h post infection. This effect was specific for primary mouse T cells. The pathways involved in HIV replication appear to be PKCtheta-, CARMA1-, and WASp-independent. Treatment with Cyclosporin A (CsA further relieved the pre-integration block. However, transcription of HIV-1 RNA was still reduced in mouse CD4(+ T cells despite expression of the hCyclin T1 transgene. Additional post-transcriptional defects were observed at the levels of Gag expression, Gag processing, Gag release and virus infectivity. Together, these post-integration defects resulted in a dramatically reduced yield of infectious virus (300-500 fold after a single cycle of HIV-1 replication. This study implies the existence of host factors, in addition to those already identified, that are critical for HIV-1 replication in mouse cells. This study also highlights the differences between primary T cells and cell lines regarding pre-integration steps in the HIV-1 replication cycle.

  7. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection induces non-apoptotic cell death of human dendritic cells

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, Ruth CM

    2011-10-24

    Abstract Background Dendritic cells (DCs) connect innate and adaptive immunity, and are necessary for an efficient CD4+ and CD8+ T cell response after infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). We previously described the macrophage cell death response to Mtb infection. To investigate the effect of Mtb infection on human DC viability, we infected these phagocytes with different strains of Mtb and assessed viability, as well as DNA fragmentation and caspase activity. In parallel studies, we assessed the impact of infection on DC maturation, cytokine production and bacillary survival. Results Infection of DCs with live Mtb (H37Ra or H37Rv) led to cell death. This cell death proceeded in a caspase-independent manner, and without nuclear fragmentation. In fact, substrate assays demonstrated that Mtb H37Ra-induced cell death progressed without the activation of the executioner caspases, 3\\/7. Although the death pathway was triggered after infection, the DCs successfully underwent maturation and produced a host-protective cytokine profile. Finally, dying infected DCs were permissive for Mtb H37Ra growth. Conclusions Human DCs undergo cell death after infection with live Mtb, in a manner that does not involve executioner caspases, and results in no mycobactericidal effect. Nonetheless, the DC maturation and cytokine profile observed suggests that the infected cells can still contribute to TB immunity.

  8. Prostaglandin A1 inhibits replication of Mayaro virus in Aedes albopictus cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, J A; Rebello, M A

    1995-01-01

    Prostaglandin A1 (PGA1) reduced Mayaro virus replication in Aedes albopictus (mosquito) cells in culture. The highest nontoxic dose of PGA1, 7.5 microM, decreased virus production by 90%. In Mayaro virus-infected cells, PGA1 inhibited virus-specific protein synthesis. However, in mock-infected cells the presence of PGA1 stimulated the synthesis of several proteins with molecular masses of 70, 57 and 23 kDa, respectively. The data obtained from this study show that PGA1 plays a role in the metabolic regulation of Aedes albopictus cells, blocking the synthesis of Mayaro virus and inducing the synthesis of cellular polypeptides.

  9. Studies on the replication of Mayaro virus grown in interferon treated cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebello, M C; Fonseca, M E; Marinho, J O; Rebello, M A

    1994-01-01

    Mayaro virus grown in interferon treated infected cells has been characterized with regard to its ability to replicate in vertebrate (TC7) and invertebrate (Aedes albopictus) cells. Virus purified from interferon treated TC7 cells adsorbs and penetrates to the same extent as the control virus. During infection, these virus particles caused inhibition of host protein synthesis and synthesized the same spectrum of viral proteins as normal virus. This population however, was apparently more sensitive to interferon treatment. Electron microscopy of TC7 cells showed the presence of numerous aberrant virus particles budding from the plasma membrane.

  10. Effect of brefeldin A on Mayaro virus replication in Aedes albopictus and Vero cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Costa, L J; Rebello, M A

    1999-12-01

    Brefeldin A (BFA), a fungal metabolite that blocks transport of newly synthesized proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum, was found to inhibit Mayaro virus replication. At the concentration of 0.05 microgram/ml, the yield of the virus was inhibited by 94% in Aedes albopictus cells and by 99.5% in Vero cells. Treatment of A. albopictus cells with BFA did not inhibit the virus protein synthesis. However, this compound drastically reduced viral protein synthesis in Vero cells. The inhibitory effect progressively declined when BFA was added at late times post infection (p.i.). The effect of BFA on protein glycosylation is discussed.

  11. Studies on the replication of Mayaro virus grown in interferon treated cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. S. Rebello

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available Mayaro virus grown in interferon treated infected cells has been characterized with regard to its ability to replicate in vertebrate (TC7 and invertebrate (Aedes albopictus cells. Virus purified from interferon treated TC7 cells adsorbs and penetrates to the same extent as the control virus. During infection, these virus particles caused inhibition of host protein synthesis and synthesized the same spectrum of viral proteins as normal virus. This population however, was apparently more sensitive to interferon treatment. Electron microscopy of TC7 cells showed the presence of numerous aberrant virus particles budding from the plasma membrane.

  12. Replicating DNA by cell factories: roles of central carbon metabolism and transcription in the control of DNA replication in microbes, and implications for understanding this process in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barańska, Sylwia; Glinkowska, Monika; Herman-Antosiewicz, Anna; Maciąg-Dorszyńska, Monika; Nowicki, Dariusz; Szalewska-Pałasz, Agnieszka; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz

    2013-05-29

    Precise regulation of DNA replication is necessary to ensure the inheritance of genetic features by daughter cells after each cell division. Therefore, determining how the regulatory processes operate to control DNA replication is crucial to our understanding and application to biotechnological processes. Contrary to early concepts of DNA replication, it appears that this process is operated by large, stationary nucleoprotein complexes, called replication factories, rather than by single enzymes trafficking along template molecules. Recent discoveries indicated that in bacterial cells two processes, central carbon metabolism (CCM) and transcription, significantly and specifically influence the control of DNA replication of various replicons. The impact of these discoveries on our understanding of the regulation of DNA synthesis is discussed in this review. It appears that CCM may influence DNA replication by either action of specific metabolites or moonlighting activities of some enzymes involved in this metabolic pathway. The role of transcription in the control of DNA replication may arise from either topological changes in nucleic acids which accompany RNA synthesis or direct interactions between replication and transcription machineries. Due to intriguing similarities between some prokaryotic and eukaryotic regulatory systems, possible implications of studies on regulation of microbial DNA replication on understanding such a process occurring in human cells are discussed.

  13. Autophagy sustains the replication of porcine reproductive and respiratory virus in host cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qinghao; Qin, Yixian; Zhou, Lei; Kou, Qiuwen; Guo, Xin; Ge, Xinna [Key Laboratory of Animal Epidemiology and Zoonosis of Ministry of Agriculture, College of Veterinary Medicine and State Key Laboratory of Agribiotechnology, China Agricultural University, Beijing (China); Yang, Hanchun, E-mail: yanghanchun1@cau.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Animal Epidemiology and Zoonosis of Ministry of Agriculture, College of Veterinary Medicine and State Key Laboratory of Agribiotechnology, China Agricultural University, Beijing (China); Hu, Hongbo, E-mail: hongbo@cau.edu.cn [College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing (China)

    2012-08-01

    In this study, we confirmed the autophagy induced by porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) in permissive cells and investigated the role of autophagy in the replication of PRRSV. We first demonstrated that PRRSV infection significantly results in the increased double-membrane vesicles, the accumulation of LC3 fluorescence puncta, and the raised ratio of LC3-II/{beta}-actin, in MARC-145 cells. Then we discovered that induction of autophagy by rapamycin significantly enhances the viral titers of PRRSV, while inhibition of autophagy by 3-MA and silencing of LC3 gene by siRNA reduces the yield of PRRSV. The results showed functional autolysosomes can be formed after PRRSV infection and the autophagosome-lysosome-fusion inhibitor decreases the virus titers. We also examined the induction of autophagy by PRRSV infection in pulmonary alveolar macrophages. These findings indicate that autophagy induced by PRRSV infection plays a role in sustaining the replication of PRRSV in host cells.

  14. The Acid Test for Biological Science: STAP Cells, Trust, and Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Cheryl

    2016-02-01

    In January 2014, a letter and original research article were published in Nature describing a process whereby somatic mouse cells could be converted into stem cells by subjecting them to stress. These "stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency" (STAP) cells were shown to be capable of contributing to all cell types of a developing embryo, and extra-embryonic tissues. The lead author of the publications, Haruko Obokata, became an overnight celebrity in Japan, where she was dubbed the new face of Japanese science. However, in the weeks that followed publication of the research, issues arose. Other laboratories and researchers (including authors on the original papers) found that they were unable to replicate Obokata et al.'s work. Closer scrutiny of the papers by the scientific community also suggested that there was manipulation of images that had been published, and Obokata was accused of misconduct. Those who should have been supervising her work (also her co-authors on the publications) were also heavily criticised. The STAP cell saga of 2014 is used as an example to highlight the importance of trust and replication in twenty-first century biological science. The role of trust in the scientific community is highlighted, and the effects on interactions between science and the public examined. Similarly, this essay aims to highlight the importance of replication, and how this is understood by researchers, the media, and the public. The expected behaviour of scientists in the twenty-first century is now more closely scrutinised.

  15. Activated microglia cause reversible apoptosis of pheochromocytoma cells, inducing their cell death by phagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornik, Tamara C; Vilalta, Anna; Brown, Guy C

    2016-01-01

    Some apoptotic processes, such as phosphatidylserine exposure, are potentially reversible and do not necessarily lead to cell death. However, phosphatidylserine exposure can induce phagocytosis of a cell, resulting in cell death by phagocytosis: phagoptosis. Phagoptosis of neurons by microglia might contribute to neuropathology, whereas phagoptosis of tumour cells by macrophages might limit cancer. Here, we examined the mechanisms by which BV-2 microglia killed co-cultured pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells that were either undifferentiated or differentiated into neuronal cells. We found that microglia activated by lipopolysaccharide rapidly phagocytosed PC12 cells. Activated microglia caused reversible phosphatidylserine exposure on and reversible caspase activation in PC12 cells, and caspase inhibition prevented phosphatidylserine exposur and decreased subsequent phagocytosis. Nitric oxide was necessary and sufficient to induce the reversible phosphatidylserine exposure and phagocytosis. The PC12 cells were not dead at the time they were phagocytised, and inhibition of their phagocytosis left viable cells. Cell loss was inhibited by blocking phagocytosis mediated by phosphatidylserine, MFG-E8, vitronectin receptors or P2Y6 receptors. Thus, activated microglia can induce reversible apoptosis of target cells, which is insufficient to cause apoptotic cell death, but sufficient to induce their phagocytosis and therefore cell death by phagoptosis.

  16. Enhanced Replication of Hepatitis E Virus Strain 47832c in an A549-Derived Subclonal Cell Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schemmerer, Mathias; Apelt, Silke; Trojnar, Eva; Ulrich, Rainer G.; Wenzel, Jürgen J.; Johne, Reimar

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a human pathogen with increasing importance. The lack of efficient cell culture systems hampers systematic studies on its replication cycle, virus neutralization and inactivation. Here, several cell lines were inoculated with the HEV genotype 3c strain 47832c, previously isolated from a chronically infected transplant patient. At 14 days after inoculation the highest HEV genome copy numbers were found in A549 cells, followed by PLC/PRF/5 cells, whereas HepG2/C3A, Huh-7 Lunet BLR and MRC-5 cells only weakly supported virus replication. Inoculation of A549-derived subclone cell lines resulted in most cases in reduced HEV replication. However, the subclone A549/D3 was susceptible to lower virus concentrations and resulted in higher virus yields as compared to parental A549 cells. Transcriptome analysis indicated a downregulation of genes for carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules (CEACAM) 5 and 6, and an upregulation of the syndecan 2 (SDC2) gene in A549/D3 cells compared to A549 cells. However, treatment of A549/D3 cells or A549 cells with CEACAM- or syndecan 2-specific antisera did not influence HEV replication. The results show that cells supporting more efficient HEV replication can be selected from the A549 cell line. The specific mechanisms responsible for the enhanced replication remain unknown. PMID:27690085

  17. Mutagen-mediated enhancement of HIV-1 replication in persistently infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Jiménez, Carmen; Olivares, Isabel; de Ávila Lucas, Ana Isabel; Toledano, Víctor; Gutiérrez-Rivas, Mónica; Lorenzo-Redondo, Ramón; Grande-Pérez, Ana; Domingo, Esteban; López-Galíndez, Cecilio

    2012-03-15

    Lethal mutagenesis, a new antiviral strategy to extinguish virus through elevated mutation rates, was explored in H61-D cells an HIV-1 persistently infected lymphoid cell line. Three mutagenic agents: 5-hydroxy-2(')-deoxycytidine (5-OHdC), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and 2,2(')-difluoro-2(')-deoxycytidine (gemcitabine) were used. After 54 passages, treatments with 5-FU and gemcitabine reduced virus infectivity, p24 and RT activity. Treatment with the pyrimidine analog 5-OHdC resulted in increases of p24 production, RT activity and infectivity. Rise in viral replication by 5-OHdC during HIV-1 persistence is in contrast with its inhibitory effect in acute infections. Viral replication enhancement by 5-OHdC was associated with an increase in intracellular HIV-1 RNA mutations. Mechanisms of HIV-1 replication enhancement by 5-OHdC are unknown but some potential factors are discussed. Increase of HIV-1 replication by 5-OHdC cautions against the use, without previous analyses, of mutagenic nucleoside analogs for AIDS treatment.

  18. Study of Vaccinia and Cowpox viruses' replication in Rac1-N17 dominant-negative cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Carneiro Salgado

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Interfering with cellular signal transduction pathways is a common strategy used by many viruses to create a propitious intracellular environment for an efficient replication. Our group has been studying cellular signalling pathways activated by the orthopoxviruses Vaccinia (VACV and Cowpox (CPXV and their significance to viral replication. In the present study our aim was to investigate whether the GTPase Rac1 was an upstream signal that led to the activation of MEK/ERK1/2, JNK1/2 or Akt pathways upon VACV or CPXV' infections. Therefore, we generated stable murine fibroblasts exhibiting negative dominance to Rac1-N17 to evaluate viral growth and the phosphorylation status of ERK1/2, JNK1/2 and Akt. Our results demonstrated that VACV replication, but not CPXV, was affected in dominant-negative (DN Rac1-N17 cell lines in which viral yield was reduced in about 10-fold. Viral late gene expression, but not early, was also reduced. Furthermore, our data showed that Akt phosphorylation was diminished upon VACV infection in DN Rac1-N17 cells, suggesting that Rac1 participates in the phosphoinositide-3 kinase pathway leading to the activation of Akt. In conclusion, our results indicate that while Rac1 indeed plays a role in VACV biology, perhaps another GTPase may be involved in CPXV replication.

  19. Control of DNA replication in a transformed lymphoid cell line: coexistence of activator and inhibitor activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, F D; Fresa, K L; Oglesby, I; Cohen, S

    1991-12-01

    Proliferating lymphocytes contain an intracellular factor, ADR (activator of DNA replication), which can initiate DNA synthesis in isolated quiescent nuclei. Resting lymphocytes lack ADR activity and contain an intracellular inhibitory factor that suppresses DNA synthesis in normal but not transformed nuclei. In this study we describe a MOLT-4 subline that produces both the activator and inhibitory activities which can be separated by ammonium sulfate fractionation. The inhibitor is heat stable and inhibits ADR-mediated DNA replication in a dose-dependent manner. It does not inhibit DNA polymerase alpha activity. The inhibitor must be present at the initiation of DNA replication to be effective, as it loses most of its effectiveness if it is added after replication has begun. The presence of inhibitory activity in proliferating MOLT-4 cells, taken with the previous observation that inhibitor derived from normal resting cells does not affect DNA synthesis by MOLT-4 nuclei, suggests that failure of a down-regulating signal may play an important role in proliferative disorder.

  20. Dual interaction of a geminivirus replication accessory factor with a viral replication protein and a plant cell cycle regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settlage, S B; Miller, A B; Gruissem, W; Hanley-Bowdoin, L

    2001-01-20

    Geminiviruses replicate their small, single-stranded DNA genomes through double-stranded DNA intermediates in plant nuclei using host replication machinery. Like most dicot-infecting geminiviruses, tomato golden mosaic virus encodes a protein, AL3 or C3, that greatly enhances viral DNA accumulation through an unknown mechanism. Earlier studies showed that AL3 forms oligomers and interacts with the viral replication initiator AL1. Experiments reported here established that AL3 also interacts with a plant homolog of the mammalian tumor suppressor protein, retinoblastoma (pRb). Analysis of truncated AL3 proteins indicated that pRb and AL1 bind to similar regions of AL3, whereas AL3 oligomerization is dependent on a different region of the protein. Analysis of truncated AL1 proteins located the AL3-binding domain between AL1 amino acids 101 and 180 to a region that also includes the AL1 oligomerization domain and the catalytic site for initiation of viral DNA replication. Interestingly, the AL3-binding domain was fully contiguous with the domain that mediates AL1/pRb interactions. The potential significance of AL3/pRb binding and the coincidence of the domains responsible for AL3, AL1, and pRb interactions are discussed.

  1. A personal reflection on the replicon theory: from R1 plasmid to replication timing regulation in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masai, Hisao

    2013-11-29

    Fifty years after the Replicon Theory was originally presented, detailed mechanistic insight into prokaryotic replicons has been obtained and rapid progress is being made to elucidate the more complex regulatory mechanisms of replicon regulation in eukaryotic cells. Here, I present my personal perspectives on how studies of model replicons have contributed to our understanding of the basic mechanisms of DNA replication as well as the evolution of replication regulation in human cells. I will also discuss how replication regulation contributes to the stable maintenance of the genome and how disruption of replication regulation leads to human diseases.

  2. Anhydrobiosis and programmed cell death in plants: Commonalities and Differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer Singh

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Anhydrobiosis is an adaptive strategy of certain organisms or specialised propagules to survive in the absence of water while programmed cell death (PCD is a finely tuned cellular process of the selective elimination of targeted cell during developmental programme and perturbed biotic and abiotic conditions. Particularly during water stress both the strategies serve single purpose i.e., survival indicating PCD may also function as an adaptive process under certain conditions. During stress conditions PCD cause targeted cells death in order to keep the homeostatic balance required for the organism survival, whereas anhydrobiosis suspends cellular metabolic functions mimicking a state similar to death until reestablishment of the favourable conditions. Anhydrobiosis is commonly observed among organisms that have ability to revive their metabolism on rehydration after removal of all or almost all cellular water without damage. This feature is widely represented in terrestrial cyanobacteria and bryophytes where it is very common in both vegetative and reproductive stages of life-cycle. In the course of evolution, with the development of advanced vascular system in higher plants, anhydrobiosis was gradually lost from the vegetative phase of life-cycle. Though it is retained in resurrection plants that primarily belong to thallophytes and a small group of vascular angiosperm, it can be mostly found restricted in orthodox seeds of higher plants. On the contrary, PCD is a common process in all eukaryotes from unicellular to multicellular organisms including higher plants and mammals. In this review we discuss physiological and biochemical commonalities and differences between anhydrobiosis and PCD.

  3. Ras and Rheb Signaling in Survival and Cell Death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrkamp, Anja [Molecular Neurobiochemistry, Ruhr University of Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Herrmann, Christian [Department of Physical Chemistry1, Protein Interaction, Ruhr University of Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Stoll, Raphael [Biomolecular NMR, Ruhr University of Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Heumann, Rolf, E-mail: rolf.heumann@rub.de [Molecular Neurobiochemistry, Ruhr University of Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2013-05-28

    One of the most obvious hallmarks of cancer is uncontrolled proliferation of cells partly due to independence of growth factor supply. A major component of mitogenic signaling is Ras, a small GTPase. It was the first identified human protooncogene and is known since more than three decades to promote cellular proliferation and growth. Ras was shown to support growth factor-independent survival during development and to protect from chemical or mechanical lesion-induced neuronal degeneration in postmitotic neurons. In contrast, for specific patho-physiological cases and cellular systems it has been shown that Ras may also promote cell death. Proteins from the Ras association family (Rassf, especially Rassf1 and Rassf5) are tumor suppressors that are activated by Ras-GTP, triggering apoptosis via e.g., activation of mammalian sterile 20-like (MST1) kinase. In contrast to Ras, their expression is suppressed in many types of tumours, which makes Rassf proteins an exciting model for understanding the divergent effects of Ras activity. It seems likely that the outcome of Ras signaling depends on the balance between the activation of its various downstream effectors, thus determining cellular fate towards either proliferation or apoptosis. Ras homologue enriched in brain (Rheb) is a protein from the Ras superfamily that is also known to promote proliferation, growth, and regeneration through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTor) pathway. However, recent evidences indicate that the Rheb-mTor pathway may switch its function from a pro-growth into a cell death pathway, depending on the cellular situation. In contrast to Ras signaling, for Rheb, the cellular context is likely to modulate the whole Rheb-mTor pathway towards cellular death or survival, respectively.

  4. Mechanisms of ethanol-induced death of cerebellar granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jia

    2012-03-01

    Maternal ethanol exposure during pregnancy may cause fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). FASD is the leading cause of mental retardation. The most deleterious effect of fetal alcohol exposure is inducing neuroapoptosis in the developing brain. Ethanol-induced loss of neurons in the central nervous system underlies many of the behavioral deficits observed in FASD. The cerebellum is one of the brain areas that are most susceptible to ethanol during development. Ethanol exposure causes a loss of both cerebellar Purkinje cells and granule cells. This review focuses on the toxic effect of ethanol on cerebellar granule cells (CGC) and the underlying mechanisms. Both in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that ethanol induces apoptotic death of CGC. The vulnerability of CGC to ethanol-induced death diminishes over time as neurons mature. Several mechanisms for ethanol-induced apoptosis of CGC have been suggested. These include inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, interference with signaling by neurotrophic factors, induction of oxidative stress, modulation of retinoid acid signaling, disturbance of potassium channel currents, thiamine deficiency, and disruption of translational regulation. Cultures of CGC provide an excellent system to investigate cellular/molecular mechanisms of ethanol-induced neurodegeneration and to evaluate interventional strategies. This review will also discuss the approaches leading to neuroprotection against ethanol-induced neuroapoptosis.

  5. Mitochondrial Extrusion through the cytoplasmic vacuoles during cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Akihito; Kurihara, Hidetake; Yagita, Hideo; Okumura, Ko; Nakano, Hiroyasu

    2008-08-29

    Under various conditions, noxious stimuli damage mitochondria, resulting in mitochondrial fragmentation; however, the mechanisms by which fragmented mitochondria are eliminated from the cells remain largely unknown. Here we show that cytoplasmic vacuoles originating from the plasma membrane engulfed fragmented mitochondria and subsequently extruded them into the extracellular spaces in undergoing acute tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced cell death in a caspase-dependent fashion. Notably, upon fusion of the membrane encapsulating mitochondria to the plasma membrane, naked mitochondria were released into the extracellular spaces in an exocytotic manner. Mitochondrial extrusion was specific to tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced cell death, because a genotoxic stress-inducing agent such as cisplatin did not elicit mitochondrial extrusion. Moreover, intact actin and tubulin cytoskeletons were required for mitochondrial extrusion as well as membrane blebbing. Furthermore, fragmented mitochondria were engulfed by cytoplasmic vacuoles and extruded from hepatocytes of mice injected with anti-Fas antibody, suggesting that mitochondrial extrusion can be observed in vivo under pathological conditions. Mitochondria are eliminated during erythrocyte maturation under physiological conditions, and anti-mitochondrial antibody is detected in some autoimmune diseases. Thus, elucidating the mechanism underlying mitochondrial extrusion will open a novel avenue leading to better understanding of various diseases caused by mitochondrial malfunction as well as mitochondrial biology.

  6. Down-regulation of BLIMP1α by the EBV oncogene, LMP-1, disrupts the plasma cell differentiation program and prevents viral replication in B cells: implications for the pathogenesis of EBV-associated B-cell lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrzalikova, Katerina; Vockerodt, Martina; Leonard, Sarah; Bell, Andrew; Wei, Wenbin; Schrader, Alexandra; Wright, Kenneth L; Kube, Dieter; Rowe, Martin; Woodman, Ciaran B; Murray, Paul G

    2011-06-02

    An important pathogenic event in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated lymphomas is the suppression of virus replication, which would otherwise lead to cell death. Because virus replication in B cells is intimately linked to their differentiation toward plasma cells, we asked whether the physiologic signals that drive normal B-cell differentiation are absent in EBV-transformed cells. We focused on BLIMP1α, a transcription factor that is required for plasma cell differentiation and that is inactivated in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. We show that BLIMP1α expression is down-regulated after EBV infection of primary germinal center B cells and that the EBV oncogene, latent membrane protein-1 (LMP-1), is alone capable of inducing this down-regulation in these cells. Furthermore, the down-regulation of BLIMP1α by LMP-1 was accompanied by a partial disruption of the BLIMP1α transcriptional program, including the aberrant induction of MYC, the repression of which is required for terminal differentiation. Finally, we show that the ectopic expression of BLIMP1α in EBV-transformed cells can induce the viral lytic cycle. Our results suggest that LMP-1 expression in progenitor germinal center B cells could contribute to the pathogenesis of EBV-associated lymphomas by down-regulating BLIMP1α, in turn preventing plasma cell differentiation and induction of the viral lytic cycle.

  7. New insights into HCV replication in original cells from Aedes mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallecker, Catherine; Caporossi, Alban; Rechoum, Yassine; Garzoni, Frederic; Larrat, Sylvie; François, Olivier; Fender, Pascal; Morand, Patrice; Berger, Imre; Petit, Marie-Anne; Drouet, Emmanuel

    2017-08-22

    The existing literature about HCV association with, and replication in mosquitoes is extremely poor. To fill this gap, we performed cellular investigations aimed at exploring (i) the capacity of HCV E1E2 glycoproteins to bind on Aedes mosquito cells and (ii) the ability of HCV serum particles (HCVsp) to replicate in these cell lines. First, we used purified E1E2 expressing baculovirus-derived HCV pseudo particles (bacHCVpp) so we could investigate their association with mosquito cell lines from Aedes aegypti (Aag-2) and Aedes albopictus (C6/36). We initiated a series of infections of both mosquito cells (Ae aegypti and Ae albopictus) with the HCVsp (Lat strain - genotype 3) and we observed the evolution dynamics of viral populations within cells over the course of infection via next-generation sequencing (NGS) experiments. Our binding assays revealed bacHCVpp an association with the mosquito cells, at comparable levels obtained with human hepatocytes (HepaRG cells) used as a control. In our infection experiments, the HCV RNA (+) were detectable by RT-PCR in the cells between 21 and 28 days post-infection (p.i.). In human hepatocytes HepaRG and Ae aegypti insect cells, NGS experiments revealed an increase of global viral diversity with a selection for a quasi-species, suggesting a structuration of the population with elimination of deleterious mutations. The evolutionary pattern in Ae albopictus insect cells is different (stability of viral diversity and polymorphism). These results demonstrate for the first time that natural HCV could really replicate within Aedes mosquitoes, a discovery which may have major consequences for public health as well as in vaccine development.

  8. MECHANISMS OF MANGANESE-INDUCED RAT PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA (PC12) CELL DEATH AND CELL DIFFERENTIATION. (R826248)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mn is a neurotoxin that leads to a syndrome resembling Parkinson's disease after prolonged exposure to high concentrations. Our laboratory has been investigating the mechanism by which Mn induces neuronal cell death. To accomplish this, we have utilized rat pheochromocytom...

  9. Bacterial Programmed Cell Death as a Population Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-11

    GFP), under the control of the lexA operator, lexO. In this system, under uninduced conditions, LexA represses gfp transcription by binding to the...host- associated prokaryotes . Nuc. Acids Res. 33, 966-976. 21) Davies, B.W. et al. (2009) Hydroxyurea induces hydroxyl radical-mediated cell death in...lambda: two genes under three-way control. Gene 20,11–24. 32) Hayes, S., Szybalski, W .(1973) Control of short leftward transcripts from the immunity

  10. Calcium and cell death signaling in neurodegeneration and aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraya Smaili

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Transient increase in cytosolic (Cac2+ and mitochondrial Ca2+ (Ca m2+ are essential elements in the control of many physiological processes. However, sustained increases in Ca c2+ and Ca m2+ may contribute to oxidative stress and cell death. Several events are related to the increase in Ca m2+, including regulation and activation of a number of Ca2+ dependent enzymes, such as phospholipases, proteases and nucleases. Mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER play pivotal roles in the maintenance of intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis and regulation of cell death. Several lines of evidence have shown that, in the presence of some apoptotic stimuli, the activation of mitochondrial processes maylead to the release of cytochrome c followed by the activation of caspases, nuclear fragmentation and apoptotic cell death. The aim of this review was to show how changes in calcium signaling can be related to the apoptotic cell death induction. Calcium homeostasis was also shown to be an important mechanism involved in neurodegenerative and aging processes.Aumentos transientes no cálcio citosólico (Ca c2+ e mitocondrial (Ca m2+ são elementos essenciais no controle de muitos processos fisiológicos. No entanto, aumentos sustentados do Ca c2+ e do Ca m2+ podem contribuir para o estresse oxidativo ea morte celular. Muitos eventos estão relacionados ao aumentono Ca c2+, incluindo a regulação e ativação de várias enzimas dependentes de Ca2+ como as fosfolipases, proteases e nucleases. A mitocôndria e o retículo endoplasmático têm um papel central na manutenção da homeostase intracellular de Ca c2+ e na regulação da morte celular. Várias evidências mostraram que, na presença de certos estímulos apoptóticos, a ativação dos processos mitocondriais pode promover a liberação de citocromo c, seguida da ativação de caspases, fragmentação nuclear e morte celular por apoptose. O objetivo desta revisão é mostrar como aumentos na sinalização de

  11. Cell death in the injured brain: roles of metallothioneins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mie Ø; Larsen, Agnete; Stoltenberg, Meredin;

    2009-01-01

    oxygen species (ROS). ROS promote oxidative stress, which leads to neurodegeneration and ultimately results in programmed cell death (secondary injury). Since this delayed, secondary tissue loss occurs days to months following the primary injury it provides a therapeutic window where potential......, and caspase inhibitors. However, most of the scientific efforts have failed in translating the experimental results into clinical trials. Despite intensive research, effective neuroprotective therapies are lacking in the clinic, and TBI continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality. This paper...

  12. High dose of ascorbic acid induces cell death in mesothelioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemura, Yukitoshi; Satoh, Motohiko; Satoh, Kiyotoshi; Hamada, Hironobu; Sekido, Yoshitaka; Kubota, Shunichiro

    2010-04-02

    Malignant mesothelioma is an asbestos-related fatal disease with no effective cure. Recently, high dose of ascorbate in cancer treatment has been reexamined. We studied whether high dose of ascorbic acid induced cell death of four human mesothelioma cell lines. High dose of ascorbic acid induced cell death of all mesothelioma cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. We further clarified the cell killing mechanism that ascorbic acid induced reactive oxygen species and impaired mitochondrial membrane potential. In vivo experiment, intravenous administration of ascorbic acid significantly decreased the growth rate of mesothelioma tumor inoculated in mice. These data suggest that ascorbic acid may have benefits for patients with mesothelioma.

  13. The DNA Replication Stress Hypothesis of Alzheimer’s Disease

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    Yuri B. Yurov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A well-recognized theory of Alzheimer’s disease (AD pathogenesis suggests ectopic cell cycle events to mediate neurodegeneration. Vulnerable neurons of the AD brain exhibit biomarkers of cell cycle progression and DNA replication suggesting a reentry into the cell cycle. Chromosome reduplication without proper cell cycle completion and mitotic division probably causes neuronal cell dysfunction and death. However, this theory seems to require some inputs in accordance with the generally recognized amyloid cascade theory as well as to explain causes and consequences of genomic instability (aneuploidy in the AD brain. We propose that unscheduled and incomplete DNA replication (replication stress destabilizes (epigenomic landscape in the brain and leads to DNA replication “catastrophe” causing cell death during the S phase (replicative cell death. DNA replication stress can be a key element of the pathogenetic cascade explaining the interplay between ectopic cell cycle events and genetic instabilities in the AD brain. Abnormal cell cycle reentry and somatic genome variations can be used for updating the cell cycle theory introducing replication stress as a missing link between cell genetics and neurobiology of AD.

  14. Peroxide-induced cell death and lipid peroxidation in C6 glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Arne; Gülden, Michael; Martin, Hans-Jörg; Maser, Edmund; Seibert, Hasso

    2008-08-01

    Peroxides are often used as models to induce oxidative damage in cells in vitro. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the role of lipid peroxidation in peroxide-induced cell death. To this end (i) the ability to induce lipid peroxidation in C6 rat astroglioma cells of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) and t-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BuOOH) (ii) the relation between peroxide-induced lipid peroxidation and cell death in terms of time and concentration dependency and (iii) the capability of the lipid peroxidation chain breaking alpha-tocopherol to prevent peroxide-induced lipid peroxidation and/or cell death were investigated. Lipid peroxidation was characterised by measuring thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and, by HPLC, malondialdehyde (MDA), 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and hexanal. Within 2 h CHP, t-BuOOH and H2O2 induced cell death with EC50 values of 59+/-9 microM, 290+/-30 microM and 12+/-1.1 mM, respectively. CHP and t-BuOOH, but not H2O2 induced lipid peroxidation in C6 cells with EC50 values of 15+/-14 microM and 130+/-33 microM, respectively. The TBARS measured almost exclusively consisted of MDA. 4-HNE was mostly not detectable. The concentration of hexanal slightly increased with increasing concentrations of organic peroxides. Regarding time and concentration dependency lipid peroxidation preceded cell death. Pretreatment with alpha-tocopherol (10 microM, 24 h) prevented both, peroxide-induced lipid peroxidation and cell death. The results strongly indicate a major role of lipid peroxidation in the killing of C6 cells by organic peroxides but also that lipid peroxidation is not involved in H2O2 induced cell death.

  15. Crayfish hematopoietic tissue cells but not hemocytes are permissive for white spot syndrome virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junjun; Li, Fang; Huang, Jiajun; Xu, Limei; Yang, Feng

    2015-03-01

    Hemocytes are the major immune cells of crustaceans which are believed to be essential for the pathogenesis of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection. Crayfish hemocytes and hematopoietic tissue (HPT) cells have been found to be susceptible to WSSV infection, but the procedure of WSSV infection to both cell types has not yet been carefully investigated. In this study, we analyzed the infection and proliferation of WSSV in crayfish hemocytes as well as HPT cells in detail through transmission electronic microscopy (TEM). The results showed that WSSV could enter both hemocytes and HPT cells through endocytosis, but the production of progeny virus was only achieved in HPT cells. Further investigation demonstrated that although WSSV could transcribe its genes in both cell types, viral genome replication and structural protein expression were unsuccessful in hemocytes, which may be responsible for the failure of progeny production. Therefore, we propose that both hemocytes and HPT cells are susceptible to WSSV infection but only HPT cells are permissive to WSSV replication. These findings will extend our knowledge of the interaction between WSSV and the host immune system.

  16. Multiple Modes of Cell Death Discovered in a Prokaryotic (Cyanobacterial Endosymbiont.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwen Zheng

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death (PCD is a genetically-based cell death mechanism with vital roles in eukaryotes. Although there is limited consensus on similar death mode programs in prokaryotes, emerging evidence suggest that PCD events are operative. Here we present cell death events in a cyanobacterium living endophytically in the fern Azolla microphylla, suggestive of PCD. This symbiosis is characterized by some unique traits such as a synchronized development, a vertical transfer of the cyanobacterium between plant generations, and a highly eroding cyanobacterial genome. A combination of methods was used to identify cell death modes in the cyanobacterium. Light- and electron microscopy analyses showed that the proportion of cells undergoing cell death peaked at 53.6% (average 20% of the total cell population, depending on the cell type and host developmental stage. Biochemical markers used for early and late programmed cell death events related to apoptosis (Annexin V-EGFP and TUNEL staining assays, together with visualization of cytoskeleton alterations (FITC-phalloidin staining, showed that all cyanobacterial cell categories were affected by cell death. Transmission electron microscopy revealed four modes of cell death: apoptotic-like, autophagic-like, necrotic-like and autolytic-like. Abiotic stresses further enhanced cell death in a dose and time dependent manner. The data also suggest that dynamic changes in the peptidoglycan cell wall layer and in the cytoskeleton distribution patterns may act as markers for the various cell death modes. The presence of a metacaspase homolog (domain p20 further suggests that the death modes are genetically programmed. It is therefore concluded that multiple, likely genetically programmed, cell death modes exist in cyanobacteria, a finding that may be connected with the evolution of cell death in the plant kingdom.

  17. Isogambogenic acid induces apoptosis-independent autophagic cell death in human non-small-cell lung carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianhong; Zhou, Yongzhao; Cheng, Xia; Fan, Yi; He, Shichao; Li, Shucai; Ye, Haoyu; Xie, Caifeng; Wu, Wenshuang; Li, Chunyan; Pei, Heying; Li, Luyuan; Wei, Zhe; Peng, Aihua; Wei, Yuquan; Li, Weimin; Chen, Lijuan

    2015-01-09

    To overcome drug resistance caused by apoptosis deficiency in patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), there is a need to identify other means of triggering apoptosis-independent cancer cell death. We are the first to report that isogambogenic acid (iso-GNA) can induce apoptosis-independent autophagic cell death in human NSCLC cells. Several features of the iso-GNA-treated NSCLC cells indicated that iso-GNA induced autophagic cell death. First, there was no evidence of apoptosis or cleaved caspase 3 accumulation and activation. Second, iso-GNA treatment induced the formation of autophagic vacuoles, increased LC3 conversion, caused the appearance of autophagosomes and increased the expression of autophagy-related proteins. These findings provide evidence that iso-GNA induces autophagy in NSCLC cells. Third, iso-GNA-induced cell death was inhibited by autophagic inhibitors or by selective ablation of Atg7 and Beclin 1 genes. Furthermore, the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin increased iso-GNA-induced cell death by enhancing autophagy. Finally, a xenograft model provided additional evidence that iso-GNA exhibited anticancer effect through inducing autophagy-dependent cell death in NSCLC cells. Taken together, our results demonstrated that iso-GNA exhibited an anticancer effect by inducing autophagy-dependent cell death in NSCLC cells, which may be an effective chemotherapeutic agent that can be used against NSCLC in a clinical setting.

  18. Combining 2-deoxy-D-glucose with fenofibrate leads to tumor cell death mediated by simultaneous induction of energy and ER stress

    OpenAIRE

    Kurtoğlu, Metin; Liu, Huaping; Lucia Leon; Annicchiarico, Clara; Munoz-Pinedo, Cristina; Barredo, Julio; Leclerc, Guy; Merchan, Jaime; Liu, Xiongfei; Lampidis, Theodore J.

    2016-01-01

    Unregulated growth and replication as well as an abnormal microenvironment, leads to elevated levels of stress which is a common trait of cancer. By inducing both energy and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, 2-Deoxy-glucose (2-DG) is particularly well-suited to take advantage of the therapeutic window that heightened stress in tumors provides. Under hypoxia, blocking glycolysis with 2-DG leads to significant lowering of ATP resulting in energy stress and cell death in numerous carcinoma cell...

  19. Atg3 Overexpression Enhances Bortezomib-Induced Cell Death in SKM-1 Cell.

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    Lin Zhuang

    Full Text Available Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS is a group of heterogeneous hematopoietic stem cell malignancies with a high risk of transformation into acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Clonal evolutions are significantly associated with transformation to AML. According to a gene expression microarray, atg3 is downregulated in MDS patients progressing to leukemia, but less is known about the function of Atg3 in the survival and death of MSD/AML cells. Moreover, the role of autophagy as a result of bortezomib treatment is controversial. The current study was designed to investigate the function of Atg3 in SKM-1 cells and to study the effect of Atg3 on cell viability and cell death following bortezomib treatment.Four leukemia cell lines (SKM-1, THP-1, NB4 and K562 and two healthy patients' bone marrow cells were analyzed for Atg3 expression via qRT-PCR and Western blotting analysis. The role of Atg3 in SKM-1 cell survival and cell death was analyzed by CCK-8 assay, trypan blue exclusion assay, DAPI staining and Annexin V/PI dual staining with or without bortezomib treatment. Western blotting analysis was used to detect proteins in autophagic and caspase signaling pathways. Electron microscopy was used to observe ultrastructural changes after Atg3 overexpression.Downregulation of Atg3 expression was detected in four leukemia cell lines compared with healthy bone marrow cells. Atg3 mRNA was significantly decreased in MDS patients' bone marrow cells. Overexpression of Atg3 in SKM-1 cells resulted in AKT-mTOR-dependent autophagy, a significant reduction in cell proliferation and increased cell death, which could be overcome by the autophagy inhibitor 3-MA. SKM-1 cells overexpressing Atg3 were hypersensitive to bortezomib treatment at different concentrations via autophagic cell death and enhanced sensitivity to apoptosis in the SKM-1 cell line. Following treatment with 3-MA, the sensitivity of Atg3-overexpressing cells to bortezomib treatment was reduced. Atg3 knockdown

  20. Modulating Innate Immunity Improves Hepatitis C Virus Infection and Replication in Stem Cell-Derived Hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoling Zhou

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, human embryonic stem cell-derived hepatocytes (hESC-Heps were investigated for their ability to support hepatitis C virus (HCV infection and replication. hESC-Heps were capable of supporting the full viral life cycle, including the release of infectious virions. Although supportive, hESC-Hep viral infection levels were not as great as those observed in Huh7 cells. We reasoned that innate immune responses in hESC-Heps may lead to the low level of infection and replication. Upon further investigation, we identified a strong type III interferon response in hESC-Heps that was triggered by HCV. Interestingly, specific inhibition of the JAK/STAT signaling pathway led to an increase in HCV infection and replication in hESC-Heps. Of note, the interferon response was not evident in Huh7 cells. In summary, we have established a robust cell-based system that allows the in-depth study of virus-host interactions in vitro.

  1. Porcine sapovirus replication is restricted by the type I interferon response in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosmillo, Myra; Sorgeloos, Frédéric; Hiraide, Rintaro; Lu, Jia; Goodfellow, Ian; Cho, Kyoung-Oh

    2015-01-01

    Porcine sapovirus (PSaV) of the family Caliciviridae, is the only member of the genus Sapovirus with cell culture and reverse genetics systems. When combined with the piglet model, these approaches provide a system to understand the molecular basis of sapovirus pathogenesis. The replication of PSaV in cell culture is, however, restricted, displaying an absolute requirement for bile acids and producing lower levels of infectious virus than other caliciviruses. The effect of bile acids has previously been linked to a reduction in the signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT1)-mediated signalling pathway. In the current study, we observed that even in the presence of bile acids, PSaV replication in cell culture was restricted by soluble factors produced from infected cells. This effect was at least partially due to secreted IFN because treatment of cells with recombinant porcine IFN-β resulted in significantly reduced viral replication. Moreover, IFN-mediated signalling pathways (IFN, STAT1 and the 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase) were activated during PSaV infection. Characterization of PSaV growth in cell lines deficient in their ability to induce or respond to IFN showed a 100-150-fold increase in infectious virus production, indicating that the primary role of bile acids was not the inactivation of the innate immune response. Furthermore, the use of IFN-deficient cell lines enabled more efficient recovery of PSaV from cDNA constructs. Overall, the highly efficient cell culture and reverse genetics system established here for PSaV highlighted the key role of the innate immune response in the restriction of PSaV infection and should greatly facilitate further molecular studies on sapovirus host-cell interactions. © 2015 The Authors.

  2. APOBEC3G-Augmented Stem Cell Therapy to Modulate HIV Replication: A Computational Study.

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    Iraj Hosseini

    Full Text Available The interplay between the innate immune system restriction factor APOBEC3G and the HIV protein Vif is a key host-retrovirus interaction. APOBEC3G can counteract HIV infection in at least two ways: by inducing lethal mutations on the viral cDNA; and by blocking steps in reverse transcription and viral integration into the host genome. HIV-Vif blocks these antiviral functions of APOBEC3G by impeding its encapsulation. Nonetheless, it has been shown that overexpression of APOBEC3G, or interfering with APOBEC3G-Vif binding, can efficiently block in vitro HIV replication. Some clinical studies have also suggested that high levels of APOBEC3G expression in HIV patients are correlated with increased CD4+ T cell count and low levels of viral load; however, other studies have reported contradictory results and challenged this observation. Stem cell therapy to replace a patient's immune cells with cells that are more HIV-resistant is a promising approach. Pre-implantation gene transfection of these stem cells can augment the HIV-resistance of progeny CD4+ T cells. As a protein, APOBEC3G has the advantage that it can be genetically encoded, while small molecules cannot. We have developed a mathematical model to quantitatively study the effects on in vivo HIV replication of therapeutic delivery of CD34+ stem cells transfected to overexpress APOBEC3G. Our model suggests that stem cell therapy resulting in a high fraction of APOBEC3G-overexpressing CD4+ T cells can effectively inhibit in vivo HIV replication. We extended our model to simulate the combination of APOBEC3G therapy with other biological activities, to estimate the likelihood of improved outcomes.

  3. Involvement of p53 in cell death following cell cycle arrest and mitotic catastrophe induced by rotenone

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalves, António Pedro; Máximo, Valdemar; Lima, Jorge; Keshav K Singh; Soares, Paula; Videira, Arnaldo

    2011-01-01

    In order to investigate the cell death-inducing effects of rotenone, a plant extract commonly used as a mitochondrial complex I inhibitor, we studied cancer cell lines with different genetic backgrounds. Rotenone inhibits cell growth through the induction of cell death and cell cycle arrest, associated with the development of mitotic catastrophe. The cell death inducer staurosporine potentiates the inhibition of cell growth by rotenone in a dose-dependent synergistic manner. The tumor suppres...

  4. Attenuation of oxidative neuronal cell death by coffee phenolic phytochemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Eun Sun; Jang, Young Jin [Department of Agricultural Biotechnology and Research Institute for Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Mun Kyung; Kang, Nam Joo [Department of Agricultural Biotechnology and Research Institute for Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Konkuk University, 1 Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ki Won [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Konkuk University, 1 Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: kiwon@konkuk.ac.kr; Lee, Hyong Joo [Department of Agricultural Biotechnology and Research Institute for Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: leehyjo@snu.ac.kr

    2009-02-10

    Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) are strongly associated with oxidative stress, which is induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) including hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). Recent studies suggest that moderate coffee consumption may reduce the risk of neurodegenerative diseases such as AD, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect remain to be clarified. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of chlorogenic acid (5-O-caffeoylquinic acid; CGA), a major phenolic phytochemical found in instant decaffeinated coffee (IDC), and IDC against oxidative PC12 neuronal cell death. IDC (1 and 5 {mu}g/ml) or CGA (1 and 5 {mu}M) attenuated H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced PC12 cell death. H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced nuclear condensation and DNA fragmentation were strongly inhibited by pretreatment with IDC or CGA. Pretreatment with IDC or CGA also inhibited the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), and downregulation of Bcl-X{sub L} and caspase-3. The accumulation of intracellular ROS in H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-treated PC12 cells was dose-dependently diminished by IDC or CGA. The activation of c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in PC12 cells was also inhibited by IDC or CGA. Collectively, these results indicate that IDC and CGA protect PC12 cells from H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced apoptosis by blocking the accumulation of intracellular ROS and the activation of MAPKs.

  5. Artesunate Reduces Proliferation, Interferes DNA Replication and Cell Cycle and Enhances Apoptosis in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the effect of artesunate (Art) on the proliferation, DNA replication, cell cycles and apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Primary cultures of VSMCs were established from aortas of mice and artesunate of different concentrations was added into the medium. The number of VSMCs was counted and the curve of cell growth was recorded.The activity of VSMCs was assessed by using MTT method and inhibitory rate was calculated.DNA replication was evaluated by [3 H]-TdR method and apoptosis by DNA laddering and HE staining. Flowmetry was used for simultaneous analysis of cell apoptosis and cell cycles. Compared with the control group, VSMCs proliferation in Art interfering groups were inhibited and [3H]-TdR incorprating rate were decreased as well as cell apoptosis was induced. The progress of cell cycle was blocked in G0/G1 by Art in a dose-dependent manner. It is concluded that Art inhibits VSMCs proliferation by disturbing DNA replication, inducing cell apoptosis and blocking cell cycle in G0/G1 phase.

  6. Apigenin induces autophagic cell death in human papillary thyroid carcinoma BCPAP cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Cheng, Xian; Gao, Yanyan; Zheng, Jie; Xu, Qiang; Sun, Yang; Guan, Haixia; Yu, Huixin; Sun, Zhen

    2015-11-01

    Apigenin, abundantly present in fruits and vegetables, is recognized as a flavonoid with anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anticancer properties. In this study, we first investigated the anti-neoplastic effects of apigenin on papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) cell line BCPAP cells. Our results show that apigenin inhibited the viability of BCPAP cells in a dose-dependent manner. A large body of evidence demonstrates that autophagy contributes to cell death in certain contexts. In the present study, autophagy was induced by apigenin treatment in BCPAP cells, as evidenced by Beclin-1 accumulation, conversion of LC3 protein, p62 degradation as well as the significantly increased formation of acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs) compared to the control group. 3-MA, an autophagy inhibitor, rescued the cells from apigenin-induced cell death. Notably, apigenin enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and subsequent induction of significant DNA damage as monitored by the TUNEL assay. In addition, apigenin treatment caused a significant accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase via down-regulation of Cdc25C expression. Our findings reveal that apigenin inhibits papillary thyroid cancer cell viability by the stimulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, induction of DNA damage, leading to G2/M cell cycle arrest followed by autophagic cell death. Thus, our results provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying apigenin-mediated autophagic cell death and suggest apigenin as a potential chemotherapeutic agent which is able to fight against papillary thyroid cancer.

  7. ROS-induced autophagy in cancer cells assists in evasion from determinants of immunogenic cell death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garg, A.D.; Dudek, A.M.D.; Ferreira, G.B.; Verfaillie, T.; Vandenabeele, P.; Krysko, D.V.; Mathieu, C.; Agostinis, P.

    2013-01-01

    Calreticulin surface exposure (ecto-CALR), ATP secretion, maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) and stimulation of T cells are prerequisites for anticancer therapy-induced immunogenic cell death (ICD). Recent evidence suggests that chemotherapy-induced autophagy may positively regulate ICD by favoring

  8. Maintenance of Genome Integrity: How Mammalian Cells Orchestrate Genome Duplication by Coordinating Replicative and Specialized DNA Polymerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Ryan; Eckert, Kristin

    2017-01-06

    Precise duplication of the human genome is challenging due to both its size and sequence complexity. DNA polymerase errors made during replication, repair or recombination are central to creating mutations that drive cancer and aging. Here, we address the regulation of human DNA polymerases, specifically how human cells orchestrate DNA polymerases in the face of stress to complete replication and maintain genome stability. DNA polymerases of the B-family are uniquely adept at accurate genome replication, but there are numerous situations in which one or more additional DNA polymerases are required to complete genome replication. Polymerases of the Y-family have been extensively studied in the bypass of DNA lesions; however, recent research has revealed that these polymerases play important roles in normal human physiology. Replication stress is widely cited as contributing to genome instability, and is caused by conditions leading to slowed or stalled DNA replication. Common Fragile Sites epitomize "difficult to replicate" genome regions that are particularly vulnerable to replication stress, and are associated with DNA breakage and structural variation. In this review, we summarize the roles of both the replicative and Y-family polymerases in human cells, and focus on how these activities are regulated during normal and perturbed genome replication.

  9. Impaired antiviral response of adenovirus-transformed cell lines supports virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Mandy; Breitwieser, Theresa; Lipps, Christoph; Wirth, Dagmar; Jordan, Ingo; Reichl, Udo; Frensing, Timo

    2016-02-01

    Activation of the innate immune response represents one of the most important cellular mechanisms to limit virus replication and spread in cell culture. Here, we examined the effect of adenoviral gene expression on the antiviral response in adenovirus-transformed cell lines; HEK293, HEK293SF and AGE1.HN. We demonstrate that the expression of the early region protein 1A in these cell lines impairs their ability to activate antiviral genes by the IFN pathway. This property may help in the isolation of newly emerging viruses and the propagation of interferon-sensitive virus strains.

  10. Cell death mechanisms vary with photodynamic therapy dose and photosensitizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jin; Oleinick, Nancy L.

    1995-03-01

    Mouse lymphoma L5178Y-R cells respond to photodynamic therapy (PDT) by undergoing rapid apoptosis, which is induced by PDT-activated signal transduction initiating in the damaged cellular membranes. To relate the level of PDT damage and photosensitizer to the mechanism of cell death, apoptosis has been detected by agarose gel electrophoresis of fragmented DNA and quantified by flow cytometry of cells after staining with Hoechst33342 and propidium iodide, a technique which can distinguish between live, apoptotic, and necrotic cells. When the silicon phthalocyanine Pc 4 or Pc 12 served as photosensitizer, lethal doses (as defined by clonogenic assay) of PDT induced apoptosis in essentially all cells, whereas supralethal doses prevented the characteristic degradation of DNA into oligonucleosomal fragments. In contrast with aluminum phthalocyanine (AlPc) cells died by apoptosis after all doses studied. It appears that high PDT doses with Pc 4 or Pc 12 damage enzymes needed to carry out the program of apoptosis; the absence of this effect with AlPc suggests either a different intracellular location or different photocytotoxic mechanism for the two photosensitizers.

  11. The tricyclic antidepressant imipramine induces autophagic cell death in U-87MG glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Seung-Hyun; Kim, Se Hyun; Kim, Yeni; Kim, Yong Sik; Lim, Yoongho; Lee, Young Han; Shin, Soon Young

    2011-09-23

    In this study, we investigated the antitumor effects of the tricyclic antidepressant 3-(10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[b,f]azepin-5-yl)-N,N-dimethylpropan-1-amine (imipramine) on glioma cells. We found that exposure of U-87MG cells to imipramine resulted in the inhibition of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling, reduction of clonogenicity, and induction of cell death. Imipramine stimulated the formation of acidic vesicular organelles, the conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II, and the redistribution of LC3 to autophagosomes, suggesting that it stimulates the progression of autophagy. It did not, however, induce apoptosis. We further showed that knockdown of Beclin-1 using siRNA abrogated imipramine-induced cell death. These results suggest that imipramine exerts antitumor effects on PTEN-null U-87MG human glioma cells by inhibiting PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling and by inducing autophagic cell death.

  12. Swelling and Replicative DNA Synthesis of Detergent-treated Mouse Ascites Sarcoma Cells

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    Seki,Shuji

    1978-04-01

    Full Text Available Previous investigation showed that mouse ascites sarcoma cells permeabilized with appropriate concentrations of detergents (Triton X-100, Nonidet P-40 and Brij 58 had high replicative DNA synthesis in the presence of the four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, ATP, Mg2+ and proper ionic environment. The present study showed the optimum detergent concentration for DNA synthesis coincided closely with the minimum detergent concentration for inducing cell swelling. Phase contrast microscopy and electron microscopy of Triton-permeabilized cells showed the characteristic swollen cytoplasms and nucleus. Autoradiographic study showed that the DNA synthesis in permeable cells was confined to the nucleus. Cell viability and [3H] deoxythymidine uptake were impaired at much lower concentrations of Triton X-100 than the optimum concentration for in vitro DNA synthesis. In Triton-permeabilized cells, the minimum Triton concentration that produced cell swelling also seemed to produce high repliative DNA synthesis, which reflects the in vivo state of DNA synthesis.

  13. Expression of Factor X in BHK-21 Cells Promotes Low Pathogenic Influenza Viruses Replication

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    Shahla Shahsavandi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A cDNA clone for factor 10 (FX isolated from chicken embryo inserted into the mammalian cell expression vector pCDNA3.1 was transfected into the baby hamster kidney (BHK-21 cell line. The generated BHK-21 cells with inducible expression of FX were used to investigate the efficacy of the serine transmembrane protease to proteolytic activation of influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA with monobasic cleavage site. Data showed that the BHK-21/FX stably expressed FX after ten serial passages. The cells could proteolytically cleave the HA of low pathogenic avian influenza virus at multiplicity of infection 0.01. Growth kinetics of the virus on BHK-21/FX, BHK-21, and MDCK cells were evaluated by titrations of virus particles in each culture supernatant. Efficient multicycle viral replication was markedly detected in the cell at subsequent passages. Virus titration demonstrated that BHK-21/FX cell supported high-titer growth of the virus in which the viral titer is comparable to the virus grown in BHK-21 or MDCK cells with TPCK-trypsin. The results indicate potential application for the BHK-21/FX in influenza virus replication procedure and related studies.

  14. RK2 plasmid dynamics in Caulobacter crescentus cells--two modes of DNA replication initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegrzyn, Katarzyna; Witosinska, Monika; Schweiger, Pawel; Bury, Katarzyna; Jenal, Urs; Konieczny, Igor

    2013-06-01

    Undisturbed plasmid dynamics is required for the stable maintenance of plasmid DNA in bacterial cells. In this work, we analysed subcellular localization, DNA synthesis and nucleoprotein complex formation of plasmid RK2 during the cell cycle of Caulobacter crescentus. Our microscopic observations showed asymmetrical distribution of plasmid RK2 foci between the two compartments of Caulobacter predivisional cells, resulting in asymmetrical allocation of plasmids to progeny cells. Moreover, using a quantitative PCR (qPCR) method, we estimated that multiple plasmid particles form a single fluorescent focus and that the number of plasmids per focus is approximately equal in both swarmer and predivisional Caulobacter cells. Analysis of the dynamics of TrfA-oriV complex formation during the Caulobacter cell cycle revealed that TrfA binds oriV primarily during the G1 phase, however, plasmid DNA synthesis occurs during the S and G2 phases of the Caulobacter cell cycle. Both in vitro and in vivo analysis of RK2 replication initiation in C. crescentus cells demonstrated that it is independent of the Caulobacter DnaA protein in the presence of the longer version of TrfA protein, TrfA-44. However, in vivo stability tests of plasmid RK2 derivatives suggested that a DnaA-dependent mode of plasmid replication initiation is also possible.

  15. The Synchronization of Replication and Division Cycles in Individual E. coli Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallden, Mats; Fange, David; Lundius, Ebba Gregorsson; Baltekin, Özden; Elf, Johan

    2016-07-28

    Isogenic E. coli cells growing in a constant environment display significant variability in growth rates, division sizes, and generation times. The guiding principle appears to be that each cell, during one generation, adds a size increment that is uncorrelated to its birth size. Here, we investigate the mechanisms underlying this "adder" behavior by mapping the chromosome replication cycle to the division cycle of individual cells using fluorescence microscopy. We have found that initiation of chromosome replication is triggered at a fixed volume per chromosome independent of a cell's birth volume and growth rate. Each initiation event is coupled to a division event after a growth-rate-dependent time. We formalize our findings in a model showing that cell-to-cell variation in division timing and cell size is mainly driven by variations in growth rate. The model also explains why fast-growing cells display adder behavior and correctly predict deviations from the adder behavior at slow growth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Biological character of human adipose-derived adult stem cells and influence of donor age on cell replication in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Lei; Liao, WeiMing; Sheng, PuYi; Fu, Ming; He, AiShan; Huang, Gang

    2007-06-01

    To investigate the biological character of human adipose-derived adult stem cells (hADAS cells) when cultured in vitro and the relationship between hADAS cell's replication activity and the donor's age factor, and to assess the stem cells as a new source for tissue engineering. hADAS cells are isolated from human adipose tissue of different age groups (from adolescents to olds: 61 years old groups). The protein markers (CD29, CD34, CD44, CD45, CD49d, HLA-DR, CD106) of hADAS cells were detected by flow cytometry (FCM) to identify the stem cell, and the cell cycle was examined for P20 hADAS cells to evaluate the safety of the subculture in vitro. The generative activity of hADAS cells in different age groups was also examined by MTT method. The formula "TD = t x log2/logNt - logN0" was used to get the time doubling (TD) of the cells. The results showed that the cells kept heredity stabilization by chromosome analysis for at least 20 passages. The TD of these cells increased progressively by ageing, and the TD of the 61 years old group (statistical analysis of variance (ANOVA), P=0.002, PhADAS cells replication activity was found in the younger donators, and they represent novel and valuable seed cells for studies of tissue engineering.

  17. Clozapine Induces Autophagic Cell Death in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chun Yin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Previous studies have shown that patients with schizophrenia have a lower incidence of cancer than the general population, and several antipsychotics have been demonstrated to have cytotoxic effects on cancer cells. However, the mechanisms underlying these results remain unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of clozapine, which is often used to treat patients with refractory schizophrenia, on the growth of non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines and to examine whether autophagy contributes to its effects. Methods: A549 and H1299 cells were treated with clozapine, and cell cytotoxicity, cell cycle and autophagy were then assessed. The autophagy inhibitor bafilomycin A1 and siRNA-targeted Atg7 were used to determine the role of autophagy in the effect of clozapine. Results: Clozapine inhibited A549 and H1299 proliferation and increased p21 and p27 expression levels, leading to cell cycle arrest. Clozapine also induced a high level of autophagy, but not apoptosis, in both cell lines, and the growth inhibitory effect of clozapine was blunted by treatment with the autophagy inhibitor bafilomycin A1 or with an siRNA targeting atg7. Conclusions: Clozapine inhibits cell proliferation by inducing autophagic cell death in two non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines. These findings may provide insights into the relationship between clozapine use and the lower incidence of lung cancer among patients with schizophrenia.

  18. Cell death versus cell survival instructed by supramolecular cohesion of nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomb, Christina J.; Sur, Shantanu; Ortony, Julia H.; Lee, One-Sun; Matson, John B.; Boekhoven, Job; Yu, Jeong Min; Schatz, George C.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2014-02-01

    Many naturally occurring peptides containing cationic and hydrophobic domains have evolved to interact with mammalian cell membranes and have been incorporated into materials for non-viral gene delivery, cancer therapy or treatment of microbial infections. Their electrostatic attraction to the negatively charged cell surface and hydrophobic interactions with the membrane lipids enable intracellular delivery or cell lysis. Although the effects of hydrophobicity and cationic charge of soluble molecules on the cell membrane are well known, the interactions between materials with these molecular features and cells remain poorly understood. Here we report that varying the cohesive forces within nanofibres of supramolecular materials with nearly identical cationic and hydrophobic structure instruct cell death or cell survival. Weak intermolecular bonds promote cell death through disruption of lipid membranes, while materials reinforced by hydrogen bonds support cell viability. These findings provide new strategies to design biomaterials that interact with the cell membrane.

  19. Ebola and Marburg Viruses Replicate in Monocyle- Derived Dendritic Cells without Inducing the Production of Cytokines and Full Maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    secretion in response to a second IFN-inducing stimulus ( replication -defective alphavirus ) was also potently inhibited by both viruses. From these data...1630 • JID 2003:188 (1 December) • Bosio et al. M A J O R A R T I C L E Ebola and Marburg Viruses Replicate in Monocyte- Derived Dendritic Cells...immune responses. We demonstrate that EBOV and MARV infected and replicated in primary human DCs without inducing cytokine secretion. Infected DC

  20. Replication of Alphaviruses: A Review on the Entry Process of Alphaviruses into Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Yat-Sing Leung

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Alphaviruses are small, enveloped viruses, ~70 nm in diameter, containing a single-stranded, positive-sense, RNA genome. Viruses belonging to this genus are predominantly arthropod-borne viruses, known to cause disease in humans. Their potential threat to human health was most recently exemplified by the 2005 Chikungunya virus outbreak in La Reunion, highlighting the necessity to understand events in the life-cycle of these medically important human pathogens. The replication and propagation of viruses is dependent on entry into permissive cells. Viral entry is initiated by attachment of virions to cells, leading to internalization, and uncoating to release genetic material for replication and propagation. Studies on alphaviruses have revealed entry via a receptor-mediated, endocytic pathway. In this paper, the different stages of alphavirus entry are examined, with examples from Semliki Forest virus, Sindbis virus, Chikungunya virus, and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus described.

  1. The role of mislocalized phototransduction in photoreceptor cell death of retinitis pigmentosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Nakao

    Full Text Available Most of inherited retinal diseases such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP cause photoreceptor cell death resulting in blindness. RP is a large family of diseases in which the photoreceptor cell death can be caused by a number of pathways. Among them, light exposure has been reported to induce photoreceptor cell death. However, the detailed mechanism by which photoreceptor cell death is caused by light exposure is unclear. In this study, we have shown that even a mild light exposure can induce ectopic phototransduction and result in the acceleration of rod photoreceptor cell death in some vertebrate models. In ovl, a zebrafish model of outer segment deficiency, photoreceptor cell death is associated with light exposure. The ovl larvae show ectopic accumulation of rhodopsin and knockdown of ectopic rhodopsin and transducin rescue rod photoreceptor cell death. However, knockdown of phosphodiesterase, the enzyme that mediates the next step of phototransduction, does not. So, ectopic phototransduction activated by light exposure, which leads to rod photoreceptor cell death, is through the action of transducin. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that forced activation of adenylyl cyclase in the inner segment leads to rod photoreceptor cell death. For further confirmation, we have also generated a transgenic fish which possesses a human rhodopsin mutation, Q344X. This fish and rd10 model mice show photoreceptor cell death caused by adenylyl cyclase. In short, our study indicates that in some RP, adenylyl cyclase is involved in photoreceptor cell death pathway; its inhibition is potentially a logical approach for a novel RP therapy.

  2. PDK2-mediated alternative splicing switches Bnip3 from cell death to cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Hongying; Dhingra, Rimpy; Lin, Junjun; Hai, Yan; Aviv, Yaron; Margulets, Victoria; Hamedani, Mohammad; Thanasupawat, Thatchawan; Leygue, Etienne; Klonisch, Thomas; Davie, James R; Kirshenbaum, Lorrie A

    2015-09-28

    Herein we describe a novel survival pathway that operationally links alternative pre-mRNA splicing of the hypoxia-inducible death protein Bcl-2 19-kD interacting protein 3 (Bnip3) to the unique glycolytic phenotype in cancer cells. While a full-length Bnip3 protein (Bnip3FL) encoded by exons 1-6 was expressed as an isoform in normal cells and promoted cell death, a truncated spliced variant of Bnip3 mRNA deleted for exon 3 (Bnip3Δex3) was preferentially expressed in several human adenocarcinomas and promoted survival. Reciprocal inhibition of the Bnip3Δex3/Bnip3FL isoform ratio by inhibiting pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isoform 2 (PDK2) in Panc-1 cells rapidly induced mitochondrial perturbations and cell death. The findings of the present study reveal a novel survival pathway that functionally couples the unique glycolytic phenotype in cancer cells to hypoxia resistance via a PDK2-dependent mechanism that switches Bnip3 from cell death to survival. Discovery of the survival Bnip3Δex3 isoform may fundamentally explain how certain cells resist Bnip3 and avert death during hypoxia.

  3. A Versatile Cell Death Screening Assay Using Dye-Stained Cells and Multivariate Image Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Tony J; Ylanko, Jarkko; Geng, Fei; Andrews, David W

    2015-11-01

    A novel dye-based method for measuring cell death in image-based screens is presented. Unlike conventional high- and medium-throughput cell death assays that measure only one form of cell death accurately, using multivariate analysis of micrographs of cells stained with the inexpensive mix, red dye nonyl acridine orange, and a nuclear stain, it was possible to quantify cell death induced by a variety of different agonists even without a positive control. Surprisingly, using a single known cytotoxic agent as a positive control for training a multivariate classifier allowed accurate quantification of cytotoxicity for mechanistically unrelated compounds enabling generation of dose-response curves. Comparison with low throughput biochemical methods suggested that cell death was accurately distinguished from cell stress induced by low concentrations of the bioactive compounds Tunicamycin and Brefeldin A. High-throughput image-based format analyses of more than 300 kinase inhibitors correctly identified 11 as cytotoxic with only 1 false positive. The simplicity and robustness of this dye-based assay makes it particularly suited to live cell screening for toxic compounds.

  4. Cell Death Pathways and Phthalocyanine as an Efficient Agent for Photodynamic Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Mfouo-Tynga

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of cell death can be predetermined (programmed or not and categorized into apoptotic, autophagic and necrotic pathways. The process of Hayflick limits completes the execution of death-related mechanisms. Reactive oxygen species (ROS are associated with oxidative stress and subsequent cytodamage by oxidizing and degrading cell components. ROS are also involved in immune responses, where they stabilize and activate both hypoxia-inducible factors and phagocytic effectors. ROS production and presence enhance cytodamage and photodynamic-induced cell death. Photodynamic cancer therapy (PDT uses non-toxic chemotherapeutic agents, photosensitizer (PS, to initiate a light-dependent and ROS-related cell death. Phthalocyanines (PCs are third generation and stable PSs with improved photochemical abilities. They are effective inducers of cell death in various neoplastic models. The metallated PCs localize in critical cellular organelles and are better inducers of cell death than other previous generation PSs as they favor mainly apoptotic cell death events.

  5. The Molecular Ecophysiology of Programmed Cell Death in Marine Phytoplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidle, Kay D.

    2015-01-01

    Planktonic, prokaryotic, and eukaryotic photoautotrophs (phytoplankton) share a diverse and ancient evolutionary history, during which time they have played key roles in regulating marine food webs, biogeochemical cycles, and Earth's climate. Because phytoplankton represent the basis of marine ecosystems, the manner in which they die critically determines the flow and fate of photosynthetically fixed organic matter (and associated elements), ultimately constraining upper-ocean biogeochemistry. Programmed cell death (PCD) and associated pathway genes, which are triggered by a variety of nutrient stressors and are employed by parasitic viruses, play an integral role in determining the cell fate of diverse photoautotrophs in the modern ocean. Indeed, these multifaceted death pathways continue to shape the success and evolutionary trajectory of diverse phytoplankton lineages at sea. Research over the past two decades has employed physiological, biochemical, and genetic techniques to provide a novel, comprehensive, mechanistic understanding of the factors controlling this key process. Here, I discuss the current understanding of the genetics, activation, and regulation of PCD pathways in marine model systems; how PCD evolved in unicellular photoautotrophs; how it mechanistically interfaces with viral infection pathways; how stress signals are sensed and transduced into cellular responses; and how novel molecular and biochemical tools are revealing the impact of PCD genes on the fate of natural phytoplankton assemblages.

  6. Photodynamic Efficiency: From Molecular Photochemistry to Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel O. L. Bacellar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a clinical modality used to treat cancer and infectious diseases. The main agent is the photosensitizer (PS, which is excited by light and converted to a triplet excited state. This latter species leads to the formation of singlet oxygen and radicals that oxidize biomolecules. The main motivation for this review is to suggest alternatives for achieving high-efficiency PDT protocols, by taking advantage of knowledge on the chemical and biological processes taking place during and after photosensitization. We defend that in order to obtain specific mechanisms of cell death and maximize PDT efficiency, PSes should oxidize specific molecular targets. We consider the role of subcellular localization, how PS photochemistry and photophysics can change according to its nanoenvironment, and how can all these trigger specific cell death mechanisms. We propose that in order to develop PSes that will cause a breakthrough enhancement in the efficiency of PDT, researchers should first consider tissue and intracellular localization, instead of trying to maximize singlet oxygen quantum yields in in vitro tests. In addition to this, we also indicate many open questions and challenges remaining in this field, hoping to encourage future research.

  7. Smac mimetic and oleanolic acid synergize to induce cell death in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liese, Juliane; Abhari, Behnaz Ahangarian; Fulda, Simone

    2015-08-28

    Chemotherapy resistance of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is still a major unsolved problem highlighting the need to develop novel therapeutic strategies. Here, we identify a novel synergistic induction of cell death by the combination of the Smac mimetic BV6, which antagonizes Inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins, and the triterpenoid oleanolic acid (OA) in human HCC cells. Importantly, BV6 and OA also cooperate to suppress long-term clonogenic survival as well as tumor growth in a preclinical in vivo model of HCC underscoring the clinical relevance of our findings. In contrast, BV6/OA cotreatment does not exert cytotoxic effects against normal primary hepatocytes, pointing to some tumor selectivity. Mechanistic studies show that BV6/OA cotreatment leads to DNA fragmentation and caspase-3 cleavage, while supply of the pan-caspase inhibitor N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone (zVAD.fmk) revealed a cell type-dependent requirement of caspases for BV6/OA-induced cell death. The receptor interacting protein (RIP)1 kinase Inhibitor Necrostatin-1 (Nec-1) or genetic knockdown of RIP1 fails to rescue BV6/OA-mediated cell death, indicating that BV6/OA cotreatment does not primarily engage necroptotic cell death. Notably, the addition of several reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers significantly decreases BV6/OA-triggered cell death, indicating that ROS production contributes to BV6/OA-induced cell death. In conclusion, cotreatment of Smac mimetic and OA represents a novel approach for the induction of cell death in HCC and implicates further studies.

  8. IAP family of cell death and signaling regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silke, John; Vucic, Domagoj

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins interface with, and regulate a large number of, cell signaling pathways. If there is a common theme to these pathways, it is that they are involved in the development of the immune system, immune responses, and unsurprisingly, given their name, cell death. Beyond that it is difficult to discover an underlying logic because sometimes IAPs are required to inhibit or prevent signaling, whereas in other cases they are required for signaling to take place. In whatever role they play, they are recruited into signaling complexes and function as ubiquitin E3 ligases, via their RING domains. This review discusses IAP regulation of signaling pathways and focuses on the mammalian IAPs, XIAP, c-IAP1, and c-IAP2, with a particular emphasis on techniques and methods that were used to uncover their roles. We also provide a perspective on targeting IAP proteins for therapeutic intervention and methods used to define the clinical relevance of IAP proteins.

  9. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Epigenetically Manipulate Host Cell Death Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengguo; Wang, Ming; Eisel, Florian; Tchatalbachev, Svetlin; Chakraborty, Trinad; Meinhardt, Andreas; Bhushan, Sudhanshu

    2016-04-01

    Urinary tract infections caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) pathovars belong to the most frequent infections in human. It is well established that UPEC can subvert innate immune responses, but the role of UPEC in interfering with host cell death pathways is not known. Here, we show that UPEC abrogates activation of the host cell prosurvival protein kinase B signaling pathway, which results in the activation of mammalian forkhead box O (FOXO) transcription factors. Although FOXOs were localized in the nucleus and showed increased DNA-binding activity, no change in the expression levels of FOXO target genes were observed. UPEC can suppress BIM expression induced by LY249002, which results in attenuation of caspase 3 activation and blockage of apoptosis. Mechanistically, BIM expression appears to be epigenetically silenced by a decrease in histone 4 acetylation at the BIM promoter site. Taken together, these results suggest that UPEC can epigenetically silence BIM expression, a molecular switch that prevents apoptosis.

  10. GSK-3: A Bifunctional Role in Cell Death Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith M. Jacobs

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK-3β was originally named for its ability to phosphorylate glycogen synthase and regulate glucose metabolism, this multifunctional kinase is presently known to be a key regulator of a wide range of cellular functions. GSK-3β is involved in modulating a variety of functions including cell signaling, growth metabolism, and various transcription factors that determine the survival or death of the organism. Secondary to the role of GSK-3β in various diseases including Alzheimer’s disease, inflammation, diabetes, and cancer, small molecule inhibitors of GSK-3β are gaining significant attention. This paper is primarily focused on addressing the bifunctional or conflicting roles of GSK-3β in both the promotion of cell survival and of apoptosis. GSK-3β has emerged as an important molecular target for drug development.

  11. GSK-3β: A Bifunctional Role in Cell Death Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Keith M.; Bhave, Sandeep R.; Ferraro, Daniel J.; Jaboin, Jerry J.; Hallahan, Dennis E.; Thotala, Dinesh

    2012-01-01

    Although glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK-3β) was originally named for its ability to phosphorylate glycogen synthase and regulate glucose metabolism, this multifunctional kinase is presently known to be a key regulator of a wide range of cellular functions. GSK-3β is involved in modulating a variety of functions including cell signaling, growth metabolism, and various transcription factors that determine the survival or death of the organism. Secondary to the role of GSK-3β in various diseases including Alzheimer's disease, inflammation, diabetes, and cancer, small molecule inhibitors of GSK-3β are gaining significant attention. This paper is primarily focused on addressing the bifunctional or conflicting roles of GSK-3β in both the promotion of cell survival and of apoptosis. GSK-3β has emerged as an important molecular target for drug development. PMID:22675363

  12. POSH misexpression induces caspase-dependent cell death in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, Ashley L; Stronach, Beth

    2010-02-01

    POSH (Plenty of SH3 domains) is a scaffold for signaling proteins regulating cell survival. Specifically, POSH promotes assembly of a complex including Rac GTPase, mixed lineage kinase (MLK), MKK7, and Jun kinase (JNK). In Drosophila, genetic analysis implicated POSH in Tak1-dependent innate immune response, in part through regulation of JNK signaling. Homologs of the POSH signaling complex components, MLK and MKK7, are essential in Drosophila embryonic dorsal closure. Using a gain-of-function approach, we tested whether POSH plays a role in this process. Ectopic expression of POSH in the embryo causes dorsal closure defects due to apoptosis of the amnioserosa, but ectodermal JNK signaling is normal. Phenotypic consequences of POSH expression were found to be dependent on Drosophila Nc, the caspase-9 homolog, but only partially on Tak1 and not at all on Slpr and Hep. These results suggest that POSH may use different signaling complexes to promote cell death in distinct contexts.

  13. Tumor-derived death receptor 6 modulates dendritic cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRosa, David C; Ryan, Paul J; Okragly, Angela; Witcher, Derrick R; Benschop, Robert J

    2008-06-01

    Studies in murine models of cancer as well as in cancer patients have demonstrated that the immune response to cancer is often compromised. This paradigm is viewed as one of the major mechanisms of tumor escape. Many therapies focus on employing the professional antigen presenting dendritic cells (DC) as a strategy to overcome immune inhibition in cancer patients. Death receptor 6 (DR6) is an orphan member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF21). It is overexpressed on many tumor cells and DR6(-/-) mice display altered immunity. We investigated whether DR6 plays a role in tumorigenesis by negatively affecting the generation of anti-tumor activity. We show that DR6 is uniquely cleaved from the cell surface of tumor cell lines by the membrane-associated matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-14, which is often overexpressed on tumor cells and is associated with malignancy. We also demonstrate that >50% of monocytes differentiating into DC die when the extracellular domain of DR6 is present. In addition, DR6 affects the cell surface phenotype of the resulting immature DC and changes their cytokine production upon stimulation with LPS/IFN-gamma. The effects of DR6 are mostly amended when these immature DC are matured with IL-1beta/TNF-alpha, as measured by cell surface phenotype and their ability to present antigen. These results implicate MMP-14 and DR6 as a mechanism tumor cells can employ to actively escape detection by the immune system by affecting the generation of antigen presenting cells.

  14. How Heme Oxygenase-1 Prevents Heme-Induced Cell Death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilibeth Lanceta

    Full Text Available Earlier observations indicate that free heme is selectively toxic to cells lacking heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 but how this enzyme prevents heme toxicity remains unexplained. Here, using A549 (human lung cancer and immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells incubated with exogenous heme, we find knock-down of HO-1 using siRNA does promote the accumulation of cell-associated heme and heme-induced cell death. However, it appears that the toxic effects of heme are exerted by "loose" (probably intralysosomal iron because cytotoxic effects of heme are lessened by pre-incubation of HO-1 deficient cells with desferrioxamine (which localizes preferentially in the lysosomal compartment. Desferrioxamine also decreases lysosomal rupture promoted by intracellularly generated hydrogen peroxide. Supporting the importance of endogenous oxidant production, both chemical and siRNA inhibition of catalase activity predisposes HO-1 deficient cells to heme-mediated killing. Importantly, it appears that HO-1 deficiency somehow blocks the induction of ferritin; control cells exposed to heme show ~10-fold increases in ferritin heavy chain expression whereas in heme-exposed HO-1 deficient cells ferritin expression is unchanged. Finally, overexpression of ferritin H chain in HO-1 deficient cells completely prevents heme-induced cytotoxicity. Although two other products of HO-1 activity--CO and bilirubin--have been invoked to explain HO-1-mediated cytoprotection, we conclude that, at least in this experimental system, HO-1 activity triggers the induction of ferritin and the latter is actually responsible for the cytoprotective effects of HO-1 activity.

  15. Primary observations of the existence of Fas-like cytoplasmic death factor in plant cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The main activity of Fas is to trigger cytoplasm death program in animal cells. In G2 pea, vacuole plays a pivotal role in inducing cell death in the cytoplasm of longday (LD) grown apical meristem cells. Expression patterns of the Fas in G2 pea cells revealed that the Fas is mainly localized in the vacuole of cells undergoing programmed cell death (PCD). The Fas expression is corresponding to the initiation of menadione-induced PCD in tobacco protoplasts.The results suggest the existence of the Fas-like mediated cytoplasmic death pathway in plant cells.``

  16. Inhibition of influenza virus replication by targeting broad host cell pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Marois

    Full Text Available Antivirals that are currently used to treat influenza virus infections target components of the virus which can mutate rapidly. Consequently, there has been an increase in the number of resistant strains to one or many antivirals in recent years. Here we compared the antiviral effects of lysosomotropic alkalinizing agents (LAAs and calcium modulators (CMs, which interfere with crucial events in the influenza virus replication cycle, against avian, swine, and human viruses of different subtypes in MDCK cells. We observed that treatment with LAAs, CMs, or a combination of both, significantly inhibited viral replication. Moreover, the drugs were effective even when they were administered 8 h after infection. Finally, analysis of the expression of viral acidic polymerase (PA revealed that both drugs classes interfered with early events in the viral replication cycle. This study demonstrates that targeting broad host cellular pathways can be an efficient strategy to inhibit influenza replication. Furthermore, it provides an interesting avenue for drug development where resistance by the virus might be reduced since the virus is not targeted directly.

  17. An extensive microarray analysis of AAL-toxin-induced cell death in Arabidopsis thaliana brings new insights into the complexity of programmed cell death in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gechev, T.S.; Gadjev, I.Z.; Hille, J.

    2004-01-01

    A T-DNA knockout of the Arabidopsis homologue of the tomato disease resistance gene Asc was obtained. The asc gene renders plants sensitive to programmed cell death (PCD) triggered by the fungal AAL toxin. To obtain more insights into the nature of AAL-toxin-induced cell death and to identify genes

  18. Statins induce differentiation and cell death in neurons and astroglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    März, Pia; Otten, Uwe; Miserez, André R

    2007-01-01

    Statins are potent inhibitors of the hydroxy-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, the rate limiting enzyme for cholesterol biosynthesis. Experimental and clinical studies with statins suggest that they have beneficial effects on neurodegenerative disorders. Thus, it was of interest to characterize the direct effects of statins on CNS neurons and glial cells. We have treated defined cultures of neurons and astrocytes of newborn rats with two lipophilic statins, atorvastatin and simvastatin, and analyzed their effects on morphology and survival. Treatment of astrocytes with statins induced a time- and dose-dependent stellation, followed by apoptosis. Similarly, statins elicited programmed cell death of cerebellar granule neurons but with a higher sensitivity. Analysis of different signaling cascades revealed that statins fail to influence classical pathways such as Akt or MAP kinases, known to be activated in CNS cells. In addition, astrocyte stellation triggered by statins resembled dibutryl-cyclic AMP (db-cAMP) induced morphological differentiation. However, in contrast to db-cAMP, statins induced upregulation of low-density lipoprotein receptors, without affecting GFAP expression, indicating separate underlying mechanisms. Analysis of the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway revealed that lack of mevalonate and of its downstream metabolites, mainly geranylgeranyl-pyrophosphate (GGPP), is responsible for the statin-induced apoptosis of neurons and astrocytes. Moreover, astrocytic stellation triggered by statins was inhibited by mevalonate and GGPP. Interestingly, neuronal cell death was significantly reduced in astrocyte/neuron co-cultures treated with statins. We postulate that under these conditions signals provided by astrocytes, e.g., isoprenoids play a key role in neuronal survival.

  19. DJ-1 Protects Pancreatic Beta Cells from Cytokine- and Streptozotocin-Mediated Cell Death

    OpenAIRE

    Deepak Jain; Gesine Weber; Daniel Eberhard; Mehana, Amir E; Jan Eglinger; Alena Welters; Barbara Bartosinska; Kay Jeruschke; Jürgen Weiss; Günter Päth; Hiroyoshi Ariga; Jochen Seufert; Eckhard Lammert

    2015-01-01

    A hallmark feature of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus is the progressive dysfunction and loss of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells, and inflammatory cytokines are known to trigger beta cell death. Here we asked whether the anti-oxidant protein DJ-1 encoded by the Parkinson's disease gene PARK7 protects islet cells from cytokine- and streptozotocin-mediated cell death. Wild type and DJ-1 knockout mice (KO) were treated with multiple low doses of streptozotocin (MLDS) to induce inflam...

  20. Death associated protein 1 (DAP 1) positively regulates virus replication and apoptosis of hemocytes in shrimp Marsupenaeus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Wen-Li; Kang, Li-Hua; Liu, Chang-Bin; Kang, Cui-Jie

    2017-04-01

    Death-associated protein 1 (DAP1) is a small proline-rich cytoplasmic protein that functions both in the apoptosis and autophage process of mammalian and in the clinical cancer of human. However, little knowledge is known about the homologue gene of DAP1 and its roles in the physiological process of invertebrates. In this paper, we report a novel function of DAP1 in the antivirus immunity of shrimp. A homologue gene of DAP1 was cloned from Marsupenaeus japonicus and named as Mjdap-1. The full-length of Mjdap-1 was 1761 bp with a 309 bp open reading frame that encoded 102 amino acids. Reverse transcription-PCR results showed that Mjdap-1 was expressed in all tested tissues, including hemocytes, gills, intestines, stomach, heart, hepatopancreas, testes, and ovaries. In shrimp, Mjdap-1 transcripts were up-regulated by white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection; Mjdap-1 knockdown decreased the virus copy in vivo and the mortality of M. japonicus to WSSV challenge. Conversely, injecting the purified recombinant MjDAP1 protein promoted the amplification of virus in shrimp. Flow cytometric assay showed, the virus infection-induced apoptosis of hemocytes was enhanced by MjDAP1 protein injection and inhibited in MjDAP1 knockdown shrimp. Furthermore, the expression of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) was regulated by Mjdap-1, but the caspase transcripts were not affected. Our results suggested that MjDAP1 facilitated the amplification of virus in shrimp, which may be attributed to the promotion of hemocyte apoptosis in an AIF-dependent manner. These results provided a new insight into the function of this protein that may be used for virus disease control. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Proteasome inhibitors induce apoptosis and reduce viral replication in primary effusion lymphoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saji, Chiaki [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokkaido University, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0812 (Japan); Higashi, Chizuka; Niinaka, Yasufumi [Faculty of Medicine, University of Yamanashi, Chuoh-shi 409-3898 (Japan); Yamada, Koji [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokkaido University, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-0812 (Japan); Noguchi, Kohji [Faculty of Pharmacy, Keio University, 1-5-30 Shiba-koen, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-8512 (Japan); Fujimuro, Masahiro, E-mail: fuji2@mb.kyoto-phu.ac.jp [Department of Cell Biology, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University, Misasagi-Shichonocho 1, Yamashinaku, Kyoto 607-8412 (Japan)

    2011-12-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Constitutive NF-{kappa}B signaling is essential for the survival and growth of PEL cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NF-{kappa}B signaling is upregulated by the proteasome-dependent degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proteasome inhibitors suppress NF-{kappa}B signaling and induce apoptosis in PEL cells through stabilization of I{kappa}B{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proteasome inhibitors suppress viral replication in PEL cells during lytic KSHV infection. -- Abstract: Primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) is an aggressive neoplasm caused by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). This study provides evidence that proteasomal activity is required for both survival of PEL cells stably harboring the KSHV genome and viral replication of KSHV. We evaluated the cytotoxic effects of proteasome inhibitors on PEL cells. The proteasome inhibitors MG132, lactacystin, and proteasome inhibitor I dramatically inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis of PEL cells through the accumulation of p21 and p27. Furthermore, proteasome inhibitors induced the stabilization of NF-{kappa}B inhibitory molecule (I{kappa}B{alpha}) and suppressed the transcriptional activity of NF-{kappa}B in PEL cells. The NF-{kappa}B specific inhibitor BAY11-7082 also induced apoptosis in PEL cells. The constitutive activation of NF-{kappa}B signaling is essential for the survival and growth of B cell lymphoma cells, including PEL cells. NF-{kappa}B signaling is upregulated by proteasome-dependent degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha}. The suppression of NF-{kappa}B signaling by proteasome inhibitors may contribute to the induction of apoptosis in PEL cells. In addition, proteasome activity is required for KSHV replication in KSHV latently infected PEL cells. MG132 reduced the production of progeny virus from PEL cells at low concentrations, which do not affect PEL cell growth. These findings suggest that proteasome

  2. Role of reactive oxygen species-mediated mitochondrial dysregulation in 3-bromopyruvate induced cell death in hepatoma cells : ROS-mediated cell death by 3-BrPA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Su; Ahn, Keun Jae; Kim, Jeong-Ah; Kim, Hye Mi; Lee, Jong Doo; Lee, Jae Myun; Kim, Se Jong; Park, Jeon Han

    2008-12-01

    Hexokinase type II (HK II) is the key enzyme for maintaining increased glycolysis in cancer cells where it is overexpressed. 3-bromopyruvate (3-BrPA), an inhibitor of HK II, induces cell death in cancer cells. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of 3-BrPA-induced cell death, we used the hepatoma cell lines SNU449 (low expression of HKII) and Hep3B (high expression of HKII). 3-BrPA induced ATP depletion-dependent necrosis and apoptosis in both cell lines. 3-BrPA increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to mitochondrial dysregulation. NAC (N-acetyl-L: -cysteine), an antioxidant, blocked 3-BrPA-induced ROS production, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and cell death. 3-BrPA-mediated oxidative stress not only activated poly-ADP-ribose (PAR) but also translocated AIF from the mitochondria to the nucleus. Taken together, 3-BrPA induced ATP depletion-dependent necrosis and apoptosis and mitochondrial dysregulation due to ROS production are involved in 3-BrPA-induced cell death in hepatoma cells.

  3. Effects of ethanol on hepatic cellular replication and cell cycle progression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Ethanol is a hepatotoxin. It appears that the liver is the target of ethanol induced toxicity primarily because it is the major site of ethanol metabolism. Metabolism of ethanol results in a number of biochemical changes that are thought to mediate the toxicity associated with ethanol abuse. These include the production of acetaldehyde and reactive oxygen species, as well as an accumulation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide(NADH). These biochemical changes are associated with the accumulation of fat and mitochondrial dysfunction in the liver. If these changes are severe enough they can themselves cause hepatotoxicity, or they can sensitize the liver to more severe damage by other hepatotoxins.Whether liver damage is the result of ethanol metabolism or some other hepatotoxin, recovery of the liver from damage requires replacement of cells that have been destroyed. It is now apparent that ethanol metabolism not only causes hepatotoxicity but also impairs the replication of normal hepatocytes. This impairment has been shown to occur at both the G1/S, and the G2/M transitions of the cell cycle. These impairments may be the result of activation of the checkpoint kinases, which can mediate cell cycle arrest at both of these transitions.Conversely, because ethanol metabolism results in a number of biochemical changes, there may be a number of mechanisms by which ethanol metabolism impairs cellular replication. It is the goal of this article to review the mechanisms by which ethanol metabolism mediates impairment of hepatic replication.

  4. Butyrate Induced Cell Cycle Arrest in Bovine Cells through Targeting Gene Expression relevance to DNA Replication Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using both real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analysis in bovine kidney epithelial cells, we systematically investigated the gene expression relevance to DNA replication apparatus targeted by butyrate. The real-time PCR and Western blot data generally confirmed the microarray analysis. From the quan...

  5. Genome-wide copy number profiling of single cells in S-phase reveals DNA-replication domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Aa, Niels; Cheng, Jiqiu; Mateiu, Ligia; Zamani Esteki, Masoud; Kumar, Parveen; Dimitriadou, Eftychia; Vanneste, Evelyne; Moreau, Yves; Vermeesch, Joris Robert; Voet, Thierry

    2013-04-01

    Single-cell genomics is revolutionizing basic genome research and clinical genetic diagnosis. However, none of the current research or clinical methods for single-cell analysis distinguishes between the analysis of a cell in G1-, S- or G2/M-phase of the cell cycle. Here, we demonstrate by means of array comparative genomic hybridization that charting the DNA copy number landscape of a cell in S-phase requires conceptually different approaches to that of a cell in G1- or G2/M-phase. Remarkably, despite single-cell whole-genome amplification artifacts, the log2 intensity ratios of single S-phase cells oscillate according to early and late replication domains, which in turn leads to the detection of significantly more DNA imbalances when compared with a cell in G1- or G2/M-phase. Although these DNA imbalances may, on the one hand, be falsely interpreted as genuine structural aberrations in the S-phase cell's copy number profile and hence lead to misdiagnosis, on the other hand, the ability to detect replication domains genome wide in one cell has important applications in DNA-replication research. Genome-wide cell-type-specific early and late replicating domains have been identified by analyses of DNA from populations of cells, but cell-to-cell differences in DNA replication may be important in genome stability, disease aetiology and various other cellular processes.

  6. Prune melanoidins protect against oxidative stress and endothelial cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posadino, Anna Maria; Cossu, Annalisa; Piga, Antonio; Madrau, Monica Assunta; Del Caro, Alessandra; Colombino, Maria; Paglietti, Bianca; Rubino, Salvatore; Iaccarino, Ciro; Crosio, Claudia; Sanna, Bastiano; Pintus, Gianfranco

    2011-06-01

    The health-promoting effects of fruit and vegetable consumption are thought to be due to phytochemicals contained in fresh plant material. Whether processed plant foods provide the same benefits as unprocessed ones is an open question. Melanoidins from heat-processed plums (prunes) were isolated and their presence confirmed by hydroxymethylfurfural content and browning index. Oxidative-induced endothelial cell (EC) damage is the trigger for the development of cardiovascular diseases (CVD); therefore the potential protective effect of prune melanoidins on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative cell damage was investigated on human endothelial ECV304 cells. Cytoplasmic and mitochondrial redox status was assessed by using the novel, redox-sensitive, ratiometric fluorescent protein sensor (roGFP), while mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) was investigated with the fluorescent dye, JC-1. Treatment of ECV304 cells with hydrogen peroxide dose-dependently induced both mitochondrial and cytoplasmic oxidation, in addition to MMP dissipation, with ensuing cell death. Pretreatment of ECV304 with prune melanoidins, significantly counteracted and ultimately abolished hydrogen peroxide elicited phenomena, clearly indicating that these polymers protect human EC against oxidative stress.

  7. Jak Inhibitors Modulate Production of Replication Competent Zika Virus in Human Hofbauer, Trophoblasts, and Neuroblastoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Gavegnano

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Zika Virus (ZIKV is a Flavivirus that has been implicated in brain deformations, birth defects, and microcephaly of unborn fetuses and associated with Guillain-Barre syndrome.  Mechanisms responsible for transmission of ZIKV across the placenta to the fetus are incompletely understood.  Herein, we define key events modulating infection in clinically relevant cells, including primary placental macrophages (human hofbauer cells; HC, trophoblasts, and neuroblastoma cells. Consistent with previous findings, HC and trophoblasts are permissive to ZIKV infection. Decrease of interferon signaling by Jak 1/2 inhibition (via ruxolitinib significantly increased ZIKV replicationin HC, trophoblasts, and neuroblasts. Enhanced ZIKV production in ruxolitinib treated HC was associated with increased expression of HLA-DR and DC-SIGN. Nucleoside analogs blocked ruxolitinib-mediated production of extracellular virus. Although low-level ZIKV infection occurred in untreated HC and trophoblasts, the produced virus was incapable of infecting naïve Vero cells.  These deficient virions from untreated HC present “thin-coats” suggesting immature virion structure. Blocking Jak 1/2 signaling (with ruxolitinib restored replication competence as virions produced under these conditions confer CPE in naïve Vero cells.  These data demonstrate that Jak-STAT signaling directly impacts the ability of primary placental cells to produce replication competent virus and is a key gatekeeper in production of mature virions in clinically relevant cells including HC and trophoblasts. Design of targeted agents to prevent ZIKV replication in the placenta should consider Jak 1/2 signaling and the impact of its block on ZIKV infection and subsequent transmission to the fetus.

  8. Activation of intracellular angiotensin AT2 receptors induces rapid cell death in human uterine leiomyosarcoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Yi; Lützen, Ulf; Fritsch, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The presence of AT2 receptors in mitochondria and their role in NO generation and cell aging were recently demonstrated in various human and mouse non-tumour cells. We investigated the intracellular distribution of AT2 receptors including their presence in mitochondria and the role in the induction...... densities in mitochondria. Activation of the cell membrane AT2 receptors by a concomitant treatment with angiotensin II and the AT1 receptor antagonist, losartan, induces apoptosis but does not affect the rate of cell death. We demonstrate for the first time that the high-affinity, non-peptide AT2 receptor...... of apoptosis and cell death in cultured human uterine leiomyosarcoma (SK-UT-1) cells and control human uterine smooth muscle cells (HutSMC). The intracellular levels of the AT2 receptor are low in proliferating SK-UT-1 cells but the receptor is substantially up-regulated in quiescent SK-UT-1 cells with high...

  9. Transcriptional profile of Mycobacterium tuberculosis replicating in type II alveolar epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle B Ryndak

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb infection is initiated by the few bacilli inhaled into the alveolus. Studies in lungs of aerosol-infected mice provided evidence for extensive replication of M. tb in non-migrating, non-antigen-presenting cells in the alveoli during the first 2-3 weeks post-infection. Alveoli are lined by type II and type I alveolar epithelial cells (AEC which outnumber alveolar macrophages by several hundred-fold. M. tb DNA and viable M. tb have been demonstrated in AEC and other non-macrophage cells of the kidney, liver, and spleen in autopsied tissues from latently-infected subjects from TB-endemic regions indicating systemic bacterial dissemination during primary infection. M. tb have also been demonstrated to replicate rapidly in A549 cells (type II AEC line and acquire increased invasiveness for endothelial cells. Together, these results suggest that AEC could provide an important niche for bacterial expansion and development of a phenotype that promotes dissemination during primary infection. In the current studies, we have compared the transcriptional profile of M. tb replicating intracellularly in A549 cells to that of M. tb replicating in laboratory broth, by microarray analysis. Genes significantly upregulated during intracellular residence were consistent with an active, replicative, metabolic, and aerobic state, as were genes for tryptophan synthesis and for increased virulence (ESAT-6, and ESAT-6-like genes, esxH, esxJ, esxK, esxP, and esxW. In contrast, significant downregulation of the DevR (DosR regulon and several hypoxia-induced genes was observed. Stress response genes were either not differentially expressed or were downregulated with the exception of the heat shock response and those induced by low pH. The intra-type II AEC M. tb transcriptome strongly suggests that AEC could provide a safe haven in which M. tb can expand dramatically and disseminate from the lung prior to the elicitation of adaptive immune

  10. Cyclosporin A inhibits programmed cell death and cytochrome c release induced by fusicoccin in sycamore cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contran, N; Cerana, R; Crosti, P; Malerba, M

    2007-01-01

    Programmed cell death plays a vital role in normal plant development, response to environmental stresses, and defense against pathogen attack. Different types of programmed cell death occur in plants and the involvement of mitochondria is still under investigation. In sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) cultured cells, the phytotoxin fusicoccin induces cell death that shows apoptotic features, including chromatin condensation, DNA fragmentation, and release of cytochrome c from mitochondria. In this work, we show that cyclosporin A, an inhibitor of the permeability transition pore of animal mitochondria, inhibits the cell death, DNA fragmentation, and cytochrome c release induced by fusicoccin. In addition, we show that fusicoccin induces a change in the shape of mitochondria which is not prevented by cyclosporin A. These results suggest that the release of cytochrome c induced by fusicoccin occurs through a cyclosporin A-sensitive system that is similar to the permeability transition pore of animal mitochondria and they make it tempting to speculate that this release may be involved in the phytotoxin-induced programmed cell death of sycamore cells.

  11. DNA damage-induced cell death: lessons from the central nervous system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Helena Lobo Borges; Rafael Linden; Jean YJ Wang

    2008-01-01

    DNA damage can, but does not always, induce cell death. While several pathways linking DNA damage signals to mitochondria-dependent and -independent death machineries have been elucidated, the connectivity of these pathways is subject to regulation by multiple other factors that are not well understood. We have proposed two conceptual models to explain the delayed and variable cell death response to DNA damage: integrative surveillance versus autonomous pathways. In this review, we discuss how these two models may explain the in vivo regulation of cell death induced by ionizing radiation (IR) in the developing central nervous system, where the death response is regulated by radiation dose, cell cycle status and neuronal development.

  12. N-Desmethyldauricine Induces Autophagic Cell Death in Apoptosis-Defective Cells via Ca(2+) Mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Betty Y K; Mok, Simon W F; Chen, Juan; Michelangeli, Francesco; Jiang, Zhi-Hong; Han, Yu; Qu, Yuan Q; Qiu, Alena C L; Xu, Su-Wei; Xue, Wei-Wei; Yao, Xiao-Jun; Gao, Jia Y; Javed, Masood-Ul-Hassan; Coghi, Paolo; Liu, Liang; Wong, Vincent K W

    2017-01-01

    Resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapy remains a significant problem in oncology. Mechanisms regulating programmed cell death, including apoptosis, autophagy or necrosis, in the treatment of cancers have been extensively investigated over the last few decades. Autophagy is now emerging as an important pathway in regulating cell death or survival in cancer therapy. Recent studies demonstrated variety of natural small-molecules could induce autophagic cell death in apoptosis-resistant cancer cells, therefore, discovery of novel autophagic enhancers from natural products could be a promising strategy for treatment of chemotherapy-resistant cancer. By computational virtual docking analysis, biochemical assays, and advanced live-cell imaging techniques, we have identified N-desmethyldauricine (LP-4), isolated from rhizoma of Menispermum dauricum DC as a novel inducer of autophagy. LP-4 was shown to induce autophagy via the Ulk-1-PERK and Ca(2+)/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ)-AMPK-mTOR signaling cascades, via mobilizing calcium release through inhibition of SERCA, and importantly, lead to autophagic cell death in a panel of cancer cells, apoptosis-defective and apoptosis-resistant cells. Taken together, this study provides detailed insights into the cytotoxic mechanism of a novel autophagic compound that targeting the apoptosis resistant cancer cells, and new implication on drug discovery from natural products for drug resistant cancer therapy.

  13. Effects of epigallocatechin gallate on ultra-violet-induced cell death in PC12 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Hideo; Seki, Sakiko; Sakamoto, Naotaka; Nakagawa, Shigeki [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-04-01

    We examined the effects of catechin on ultra-violet-induced cell death in PC12 cells. PC12 cells were irradiated by ultra-violet C (254 nm) (UVC). We found that the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities in culture media and lipid peroxide in PC12 cells, which indicate cell death and cell membrane damage, respectively, were increased by UVC irradiation in a time-dependent manner. Cell death was gradually stimulated for 9 hours of cultivation after a UVC irradiation period of 10 or 30 min. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), which is one of the main catechins found in green tea, suppressed the increase in LDH activity in culture medium and also inhibited the formation of lipid peroxide. I{kappa}B, a member of the cell death signaling system, was phosphorylated at 1 hour after 10 min of UVC irradiation. Stimulation of phosphorylation of I{kappa}B by UVC was suppressed by the addition of EGCG. We concluded that EGCG protects the PC12 cell from cell damage caused by UVC irradiation. (author)

  14. Photodynamic therapy-induced programmed cell death in carcinoma cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiao-Yan; Sikes, Robert A.; Thomsen, Sharon L.; Chung, L.; Jacques, Steven L.

    1993-06-01

    The mode of cell death following photodynamic therapy (PDT) was investigated from the perspective of programmed cell death (apoptosis). Human prostate carcinoma cells (PC3), human non-small cell lung carcinoma (H322a), and rat mammary carcinoma (MTF7) were treated by PDT following sensitization with dihematoporphyrin ether (DHE). The response of these carcinoma cell lines to PDT was variable. An examination of extracted cellular DNA by gel electrophoresis showed the characteristic DNA ladder pattern indicative of internucleosomal cleavage of DNA during apoptosis. MTF7 and PC3 responded to PDT by inducing apoptosis while H322a had no apoptotic response. The magnitude of the response and the PDT dosage required to induce the effect were different in PC3 and MTF7. MTF7 cells responded with rapid apoptosis at the dose of light and drug that yielded 50% cell death (LD50). In contrast, PC3 showed only marginal apoptosis at the LD50 but had a marked response at the LD85. Furthermore, the onset of apoptosis followed slower kinetics in PC3 (2 hr - 4 hr) than in MTF7 (cells were killed by PDT but failed to exhibit any apoptotic response. This study indicates that apoptosis may occur during PDT induced cell death, but this pathway is not universal for all cancer cell lines.

  15. Activation of intracellular angiotensin AT₂ receptors induces rapid cell death in human uterine leiomyosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yi; Lützen, Ulf; Fritsch, Jürgen; Zuhayra, Maaz; Schütze, Stefan; Steckelings, Ulrike M; Recanti, Chiara; Namsoleck, Pawel; Unger, Thomas; Culman, Juraj

    2015-05-01

    The presence of angiotensin type 2 (AT₂) receptors in mitochondria and their role in NO generation and cell aging were recently demonstrated in various human and mouse non-tumour cells. We investigated the intracellular distribution of AT₂ receptors including their presence in mitochondria and their role in the induction of apoptosis and cell death in cultured human uterine leiomyosarcoma (SK-UT-1) cells and control human uterine smooth muscle cells (HutSMC). The intracellular levels of the AT₂ receptor are low in proliferating SK-UT-1 cells but the receptor is substantially up-regulated in quiescent SK-UT-1 cells with high densities in mitochondria. Activation of the cell membrane AT₂ receptors by a concomitant treatment with angiotensin II and the AT₁ receptor antagonist, losartan, induces apoptosis but does not affect the rate of cell death. We demonstrate for the first time that the high-affinity, non-peptide AT₂ receptor agonist, Compound 21 (C21), penetrates the cell membrane of quiescent SK-UT-1 cells, activates intracellular AT₂ receptors and induces rapid cell death; approximately 70% of cells died within 24 h. The cells, which escaped cell death, displayed activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, i.e. down-regulation of the Bcl-2 protein, induction of the Bax protein and activation of caspase-3. All quiescent SK-UT-1 cells died within 5 days after treatment with a single dose of C21. C21 was devoid of cytotoxic effects in proliferating SK-UT-1 cells and in quiescent HutSMC. Our results point to a new, unique approach enabling the elimination non-cycling uterine leiomyosarcoma cells providing that they over-express the AT₂ receptor.

  16. Duck hepatitis B virus replication in primary bile duct epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J Y; Culvenor, J G; Angus, P; Smallwood, R; Nicoll, A; Locarnini, S

    2001-08-01

    Primary cultures of intrahepatic bile duct epithelial (IBDE) cells isolated from duckling livers were successfully grown for studies of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV). The primary IBDE cells were characterized by immunohistochemistry using CAM 5.2, a cytokeratin marker which was shown to react specifically to IBDE cells in duck liver tissue sections and in primary cultures of total duck liver cells. Immunofluorescence assay using anti-duck albumin, a marker for hepatocytes, revealed that these IBDE cultures did not appear to contain hepatocytes. A striking feature of these cultures was the duct-like structures present within each cell colony of multilayered IBDE cells. Normal duck serum in the growth medium was found to be essential for the development of these cells into duct-like structures. When the primary cultures of duck IBDE cells were acutely infected with DHBV, dual-labeled confocal microscopy using a combination of anti-DHBV core proteins and CAM 5.2 or a combination of anti-pre-S1 proteins and CAM 5.2 revealed that the IBDE cell colonies contained DHBV proteins. Immunoblot analysis of these cells showed that the DHBV pre-S1 and core proteins were similar to their counterparts in infected primary duck hepatocyte cultures. Southern blot analysis of infected IBDE preparations using a digoxigenin-labeled positive-sense DHBV riboprobe revealed the presence of hepadnavirus covalently closed circular (CCC) DNA, minus-sense single-stranded (SS) DNA, double-stranded linear DNA, and relaxed circular DNA. The presence of minus-sense SS DNA in the acutely infected IBDE cultures is indicative of DHBV reverse transcriptase activity, while the establishment of a pool of viral CCC DNA reveals the ability of these cells to maintain persistent infection. Taken collectively, the results from this study demonstrated that primary duck IBDE cells supported hepadnavirus replication as shown by the de novo synthesis of DHBV proteins and DNA replicative intermediates.

  17. Cadmium toxicity in cultured tomato cells--role of ethylene, proteases and oxidative stress in cell death signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iakimova, Elena T; Woltering, Ernst J; Kapchina-Toteva, Veneta M; Harren, Frans J M; Cristescu, Simona M

    2008-12-01

    Our aim was to investigate the ability of cadmium to induce programmed cell death in tomato suspension cells and to determine the involvement of proteolysis, oxidative stress and ethylene. Tomato suspension cells were exposed to treatments with CdSO(4) and cell death was calculated after fluorescein diacetate staining of the living cells. Ethylene was measured in a flow-through system using a laser-driven photo acoustic detector; hydrogen peroxide was determined by chemiluminescence in a ferricyanide-catalysed oxidation of luminol. We have demonstrated that cadmium induces cell death in tomato suspension cells involving caspase-like proteases, indicating that programmed cell death took place. Using range of inhibitors, we found that cysteine and serine peptidases, oxidative stress, calcium and ethylene are players in the cadmium-induced cell death signaling. Cadmium-induced cell death in tomato suspension cells exhibits morphological and biochemical similarities to plant hypersensitive response and to cadmium effects in animal systems.

  18. Inositol Hexakisphosphate Kinase 2 Promotes Cell Death in Cells with Cytoplasmic TDP-43 Aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Eiichiro; Nonaka, Takashi; Moriya, Yusuke; Fujii, Natsuko; Okada, Yoshinori; Tsukamoto, Hideo; Itoh, Johbu; Okada, Chisa; Satoh, Tadayuki; Arai, Tetsuaki; Hasegawa, Masato; Takizawa, Shunya

    2016-10-01

    TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) has been identified as a major component of ubiquitin-positive inclusions in the brains and spinal cords of patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitinated inclusions (FTLD-U) or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The phosphorylated C-terminal fragment of TDP-43 forms aggregates in the neuronal cytoplasm, possibly resulting in neuronal cell death in patients with FTLD-U or ALS. The inositol pyrophosphate known as diphosphoinositol pentakisphosphate (InsP7) contains highly energetic pyrophosphate bonds. We previously reported that inositol hexakisphosphate kinase type 2 (InsP6K2), which converts inositol hexakisphosphate (InsP6) to InsP7, mediates cell death in mammalian cells. Moreover, InsP6K2 is translocated from the nucleus to the cytosol during apoptosis. In this study, we verified that phosphorylated TDP-43 co-localized and co-bound with InsP6K2 in the cytoplasm of anterior horn cells of the spinal cord. Furthermore, we verified that cell death was augmented in the presence of cytoplasmic TDP-43 aggregations and activated InsP6K2. However, cells with only cytoplasmic TDP-43 aggregation survived because Akt activity increased. In the presence of both TDP-43 aggregation and activated InsP6K2 in the cytoplasm of cells, the expression levels of HSP90 and casein kinase 2 decreased, as the activity of Akt decreased. These conditions may promote cell death. Thus, InsP6K2 could cause neuronal cell death in patients with FTLD-U or ALS. Moreover, InsP6K2 plays an important role in a novel cell death pathway present in FTLD-U and ALS.

  19. Taxifolin synergizes Andrographolide-induced cell death by attenuation of autophagy and augmentation of caspase dependent and independent cell death in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzaharna, Mazen; Alqouqa, Iyad; Cheung, Hon-Yeung

    2017-01-01

    Andrographolide (Andro) has emerged recently as a potential and effective anticancer agent with induction of apoptosis in some cancer cell lines while induction of G2/M arrest with weak apoptosis in others. Few studies have proved that Andro is also effective in combination therapy. The flavonoid Taxifolin (Taxi) has showed anti-oxidant and antiproliferative effects against different cancer cells. Therefore, the present study investigated the cytotoxic effects of Andro alone or in combination with Taxi on HeLa cells. The combination of Andro with Taxi was synergistic at all tested concentrations and combination ratios. Andro alone induced caspase-dependent apoptosis which was enhanced by the combination with Taxi and attenuated partly by using Z-Vad-Fmk. Andro induced a protective reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent autophagy which was attenuated by Taxi. The activation of p53 was involved in Andro-induced autophagy where the use of Taxi or pifithrin-α (PFT-α) decreased it while the activation of JNK was involved in the cell death of HeLa cells but not in the induction of autophagy. The mitochondrial outer-membrane permeabilization (MOMP) plays an important role in Andro-induced cell death in HeLa cells. Andro alone increased the MOMP which was further increased in the case of combination. This led to the increase in AIF and cytochrome c release from