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Sample records for replicating herpes vectors

  1. Inhibitors of Nucleotidyltransferase Superfamily Enzymes Suppress Herpes Simplex Virus Replication

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Herpesviruses are large double-stranded DNA viruses that cause serious human diseases. Herpesvirus DNA replication depends on multiple processes typically catalyzed by nucleotidyltransferase superfamily (NTS) enzymes. Therefore, we investigated whether inhibitors of NTS enzymes would suppress replication of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2. Eight of 42 NTS inhibitors suppressed HSV-1 and/or HSV-2 replication by >10-fold at 5 μM, with suppression at 50 μM reaching ∼1 million-fold. Five...

  2. Histone deacetylase inhibitors improve the replication of oncolytic herpes simplex virus in breast cancer cells.

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    James J Cody

    Full Text Available New therapies are needed for metastatic breast cancer patients. Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV is an exciting therapy being developed for use against aggressive tumors and established metastases. Although oHSV have been demonstrated safe in clinical trials, a lack of sufficient potency has slowed the clinical application of this approach. We utilized histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors, which have been noted to impair the innate antiviral response and improve gene transcription from viral vectors, to enhance the replication of oHSV in breast cancer cells. A panel of chemically diverse HDAC inhibitors were tested at three different doses (LD50 for their ability to modulate the replication of oHSV in breast cancer cells. Several of the tested HDAC inhibitors enhanced oHSV replication at low multiplicity of infection (MOI following pre-treatment of the metastatic breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 and the oHSV-resistant cell line 4T1, but not in the normal breast epithelial cell line MCF10A. Inhibitors of class I HDACs, including pan-selective compounds, were more effective for increasing oHSV replication compared to inhibitors that selectively target class II HDACs. These studies demonstrate that select HDAC inhibitors increase oHSV replication in breast cancer cells and provides support for pre-clinical evaluation of this combination strategy.

  3. Herpes simplex virus type 1-derived recombinant and amplicon vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraefel, Cornel; Marconi, Peggy; Epstein, Alberto L

    2011-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a human pathogen whose lifestyle is based on a long-term dual interaction with the infected host, being able to establish both lytic and latent infections. The virus genome is a 153 kbp double-stranded DNA molecule encoding more than 80 genes. The interest of HSV-1 as gene transfer vector stems from its ability to infect many different cell types, both quiescent and proliferating cells, the very high packaging capacity of the virus capsid, the outstanding neurotropic adaptations that this virus has evolved, and the fact that it never integrates into the cellular chromosomes, thus avoiding the risk of insertional mutagenesis. Two types of vectors can be derived from HSV-1, recombinant vectors and amplicon vectors, and different methodologies have been developed to prepare large stocks of each type of vector. This chapter summarizes (1) the two approaches most commonly used to prepare recombinant vectors through homologous recombination, either in eukaryotic cells or in bacteria, and (2) the two methodologies currently used to generate helper-free amplicon vectors, either using a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-based approach or a Cre/loxP site-specific recombination strategy.

  4. Herpes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Herpes Testing Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Herpes Culture; Herpes Simplex Viral Culture; HSV DNA; HSV ...

  5. [Phosphoramidate derivatives of acyclovir--herpes virus replication inhibitors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakirova, N F; Shipitsyn, A V; Ias'ko, M V; Kochetkov, S N

    2011-01-01

    A number of new phosphoramidates of acyclovir--compounds of interest as anti-virals against resistant strains of virus herpes was synthesized. Several methods of synthesis of these compounds were suggested. Optimal method appeared to be the obtaining of phosphoramidates through the phosphomonocloride with its subsequent treatment with various amines. Two compounds have shown moderate activity against HSV-1.

  6. Oncolytic herpes simplex virus vectors for the treatment of human breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ren-bin; Samuel D.Rabkin

    2005-01-01

    Background Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (HSV) vectors can be used for cancer therapy as direct cytotoxic agents, inducers of anti-tumor immune responses, and as expressers of anti-cancer genes. In this study, the efficacy of HSV vectors, G47Δ and NV1023 were examined for the treatment of the human breast cancer.Methods Human breast cancer MDA-MB-435 cells were cultured or implanted subcutaneously in BALB/c nude mice. The cells or tumors were inoculated with G47Δ or NV1023, and cell killing or inhibition of tumor growth determined. Both viruses contained the LacZ gene and expression in infected cells was detected with X-gal histochemistry. Results G47Δ and NV1023 were highly cytotoxic to MDA-MB-435 cells in vitro at very low multiplicities of infection. X-gal staining of infected tumor cells in vitro and in vivo illustrated the replication and spread of both viruses. G47Δ and NV1023 inoculation inhibited tumor growth and prolonged mouse survival. Both vectors behaved similarly.Conclusions Oncolytic HSV vectors, G47Δ and NV1023, were extremely effective at killing human breast cancer cells in vitro and in tumor xenografts in vivo. This novel form of cancer therapy warrants further investigation and consideration of clinical application.

  7. SEARCH OF INHIBITORS OF HERPES VIRAL REPLICATION: 30 YEARS AFTER ACYCLOVIR

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    Korovina A. N.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of study and using of different chemical compounds as inhibitors of herpes virus replication is given in the review. However, it does not apply for full details of all the studies on active antiherpetic drugs finding. It’s been over 30 years since the discovery of the first antiherpetic drugs ? acyclovir. Meanwhile, lots of active chemical compounds appeared that have been brought to the antiviral drugs. An essential understanding of strategies for finding drugs came in, one of which was establishment of depot forms of antiherpetic drugs. On the basis of the vast published experimental material the authors concluded that the study of the herpes virus and search for inhibitors of its replication is still an important issue and requires the efforts of chemists, biologists, pharmacists.

  8. Identifying Cancer Driver Genes Using Replication-Incompetent Retroviral Vectors

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    Victor M. Bii

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Identifying novel genes that drive tumor metastasis and drug resistance has significant potential to improve patient outcomes. High-throughput sequencing approaches have identified cancer genes, but distinguishing driver genes from passengers remains challenging. Insertional mutagenesis screens using replication-incompetent retroviral vectors have emerged as a powerful tool to identify cancer genes. Unlike replicating retroviruses and transposons, replication-incompetent retroviral vectors lack additional mutagenesis events that can complicate the identification of driver mutations from passenger mutations. They can also be used for almost any human cancer due to the broad tropism of the vectors. Replication-incompetent retroviral vectors have the ability to dysregulate nearby cancer genes via several mechanisms including enhancer-mediated activation of gene promoters. The integrated provirus acts as a unique molecular tag for nearby candidate driver genes which can be rapidly identified using well established methods that utilize next generation sequencing and bioinformatics programs. Recently, retroviral vector screens have been used to efficiently identify candidate driver genes in prostate, breast, liver and pancreatic cancers. Validated driver genes can be potential therapeutic targets and biomarkers. In this review, we describe the emergence of retroviral insertional mutagenesis screens using replication-incompetent retroviral vectors as a novel tool to identify cancer driver genes in different cancer types.

  9. Rad51 and Rad52 are involved in homologous recombination of replicating herpes simplex virus DNA.

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    Ka-Wei Tang

    Full Text Available Replication of herpes simplex virus 1 is coupled to recombination, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this process are poorly characterized. The role of Rad51 and Rad52 recombinases in viral recombination was examined in human fibroblast cells 1BR.3.N (wild type and in GM16097 with replication defects caused by mutations in DNA ligase I. Intermolecular recombination between viruses, tsS and tsK, harboring genetic markers gave rise to ∼17% recombinants in both cell lines. Knock-down of Rad51 and Rad52 by siRNA reduced production of recombinants to 11% and 5%, respectively, in wild type cells and to 3% and 5%, respectively, in GM16097 cells. The results indicate a specific role for Rad51 and Rad52 in recombination of replicating herpes simplex virus 1 DNA. Mixed infections using clinical isolates with restriction enzyme polymorphisms in the US4 and US7 genes revealed recombination frequencies of 0.7%/kbp in wild type cells and 4%/kbp in GM16097 cells. Finally, tandem repeats in the US7 gene remained stable upon serial passage, indicating a high fidelity of recombination in infected cells.

  10. Engineering cell lines for production of replication defective HSV-1 gene therapy vectors.

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    Grant, Kyle G; Krisky, David M; Ataai, Mohammed M; Glorioso, Joseph C

    2009-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) represents an attractive vehicle for a variety of gene therapy applications. To render this virus safe for clinical use, its cytotoxic genes must be removed without losing its ability to express transgenes efficiently. Our vectors are deleted for the essential immediate early genes ICP4 and ICP27. These genes are controlled by unique promoters having enhancer elements responsive to a viral structural protein VP16. The expression of these genes occurs prior to the activation of all other lytic functions and is thus required to initiate and complete the virus replication cycle. For large scale manufacture of clinical grade vectors, efficient cell lines must be generated that express the essential viral gene products in trans during vector propagation. Here we describe methods for engineering HSV-1 production cell lines that improve vector growth by altering the kinetics of complementing gene expression. We examined the ability of Vero cells independently transduced with ICP4 and ICP27 under transcriptional control of their respective promoters to support the growth of a replication defective vector (JDTOZHE), deleted for ICP4, ICP27 and approximately 20 kb of internal elements that are not required for virus growth in Vero cells. Vector yield on this cell line was 3 logs lower than wild-type virus grown on Vero cells. To understand the mechanism underlying poor vector yield, we examined the expression of ICP4 and ICP27 during virus complementation. While ICP27 was expressed immediately on vector infection, the expression of ICP4 was considerably delayed by 8-10 h, suggesting that the ICP4 promoter was not adequately activated by VP16 delivered by the infectious vector particle. Use of the ICP0 promoter to express ICP4 from the cellular genome resulted in higher induction levels and faster kinetics of ICP4 expression and a 10-fold improvement in vector yield. This study suggests that vector complementation is highly dependent on the

  11. DNA replication catalyzed by herpes simplex virus type 1 proteins reveals trombone loops at the fork.

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    Bermek, Oya; Willcox, Smaranda; Griffith, Jack D

    2015-01-30

    Using purified replication factors encoded by herpes simplex virus type 1 and a 70-base minicircle template, we obtained robust DNA synthesis with leading strand products of >20,000 nucleotides and lagging strand fragments from 600 to 9,000 nucleotides as seen by alkaline gel electrophoresis. ICP8 was crucial for the synthesis on both strands. Visualization of the deproteinized products using electron microscopy revealed long, linear dsDNAs, and in 87%, one end, presumably the end with the 70-base circle, was single-stranded. The remaining 13% had multiple single-stranded segments separated by dsDNA segments 500 to 1,000 nucleotides in length located at one end. These features are diagnostic of the trombone mechanism of replication. Indeed, when the products were examined with the replication proteins bound, a dsDNA loop was frequently associated with the replication complex located at one end of the replicated DNA. Furthermore, the frequency of loops correlated with the fraction of DNA undergoing Okazaki fragment synthesis.

  12. An Autonomously Replicating Transforming Vector for Sulfolobus solfataricus

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    Cannio, Raffaele; Contursi, Patrizia; Rossi, Mosè; Bartolucci, Simonetta

    1998-01-01

    A plasmid able to transform and to be stably maintained both in Sulfolobus solfataricus and in Escherichia coli was constructed by insertion into an E. coli plasmid of the autonomously replicating sequence of the virus particle SSV1 and a suitable mutant of the hph (hygromycin phosphotransferase) gene as the transformation marker. The vector suffered no rearrangement and/or chromosome integration, and its copy number in Sulfolobus was increased by exposure of the cells to mitomycin C. PMID:9620978

  13. Utilizing ras signaling pathway to direct selective replication of herpes simplex virus-1.

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    Weihong Pan

    Full Text Available Re-engineering the tropism of viruses is an attractive translational strategy for targeting cancer cells. The Ras signal transduction pathway is a central hub for a variety of pro-oncogenic events with a fundamental role in normal and neoplastic physiology. In this work we were interested in linking Ras activation to HSV-1 replication in a direct manner in order to generate a novel oncolytic herpes virus which can target cancer cells. To establish such link, we developed a mutant HSV-1 in which the expression of ICP4 (infected cell protein-4, a viral protein necessary for replication is controlled by activation of ELK, a transcription factor down-stream of the Ras pathway and mainly activated by ERK (extracellular signal-regulated kinase, an important Ras effector pathway. This mutant HSV-1 was named as Signal-Smart 1 (SS1. A series of prostate cells were infected with the SS1 virus. Cells with elevated levels of ELK activation were preferentially infected by the SS1 virus, as demonstrated by increased levels of viral progeny, herpetic glycoprotein C and overall SS1 viral protein production. Upon exposure to SS1, the proliferation, invasiveness and colony formation capabilities of prostate cancer cells with increased ELK activation were significantly decreased (p<0.05, while the rate of apoptosis/necrosis in these cells was increased. Additionally, high Ras signaling cells infected with SS1 showed a prominent arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle as compared to cells exposed to parental HSV-1. The results of this study reveal the potential for re-modeling the host-herpes interaction to specifically interfere with the life of cancer cells with increased Ras signaling. SS1 also serves as a "prototype" for development of a family of signal-smart viruses which can target cancer cells on the basis of their signaling portfolio.

  14. DNA transformations of Candida tropicalis with replicating and integrative vectors.

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    Sanglard, D; Fiechter, A

    1992-12-01

    The alkane-assimilating yeast Candida tropicalis was used as a host for DNA transformations. A stable ade2 mutant (Ha900) obtained by UV-mutagenesis was used as a recipient for different vectors carrying selectable markers. A first vector, pMK16, that was developed for the transformation of C. albicans and carries an ADE2 gene marker and a Candida autonomously replicating sequence (CARS) element promoting autonomous replication, was compatible for transforming Ha900. Two transformant types were observed: (i) pink transformants which easily lose pMK16 under non-selective growth conditions; (ii) white transformants, in which the same plasmid exhibited a higher mitotic stability. In both cases pMK16 could be rescued from these cells in Escherichia coli. A second vector, pADE2, containing the isolated C. tropicalis ADE2, gene, was used to transform Ha900. This vector integrated in the yeast genome at homologous sites of the ade2 locus. Different integration types were observed at one or both ade2 alleles in single or in tandem repeats.

  15. Knockdown of DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 by RNA interference inhibits herpes simplex virus type I DNA replication.

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    Muylaert, Isabella; Elias, Per

    2007-04-13

    Herpes simplex virus has a linear double-stranded DNA genome with directly repeated terminal sequences needed for cleavage and packaging of replicated DNA. In infected cells, linear genomes rapidly become endless. It is currently a matter of discussion whether the endless genomes are circles supporting rolling circle replication or arise by recombination of linear genomes forming concatemers. Here, we have examined the role of mammalian DNA ligases in the herpes simplex virus, type I (HSV-1) life cycle by employing RNA interference (RNAi) in human 1BR.3.N fibroblasts. We find that RNAi-mediated knockdown of DNA ligase IV and its co-factor XRCC4 causes a hundred-fold reduction of virus yield, a small plaque phenotype, and reduced DNA synthesis. The effect is specific because RNAi against DNA ligase I or DNA ligase III fail to reduce HSV-1 replication. Furthermore, RNAi against DNA ligase IV and XRCC4 does not affect replication of adenovirus. In addition, high multiplicity infections of HSV-1 in human DNA ligase IV-deficient cells reveal a pronounced delay of production of infectious virus. Finally, we demonstrate that formation of endless genomes is inhibited by RNAi-mediated depletion of DNA ligase IV and XRCC4. Our results suggests that DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 serves an important role in the replication cycle of herpes viruses and is likely to be required for the formation of the endless genomes early during productive infection.

  16. HERP Binds TBK1 To Activate Innate Immunity and Repress Virus Replication in Response to Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Maolin; Luo, Zhen; Qiao, Zhi; Zhou, Yao; Cheng, Xin; Geng, Qibin; Cai, Yanyan; Wan, Pin; Xiong, Ying; Liu, Fang; Wu, Kailang; Liu, Yingle; Wu, Jianguo

    2017-09-27

    Host innate immunity is crucial for cellular responses against viral infection sensed by distinct pattern recognition receptors and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a causative agent of hand, foot, and mouth disease and neurological diseases. However, the exact mechanism underlying the link between ER stress induced by EV71 infection and host innate immunity is largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that EV71 infection induces the homocysteine-induced ER protein (HERP), a modulator of the ER stress response which is dependent on the participation of MAVS. Virus-induced HERP subsequently stimulates host innate immunity to repress viral replication by promoting type-I IFNs (IFN-α and IFN-β) and type-III IFN (IFN-λ1) expression. Through interacting with TANK-binding kinase 1, HERP amplifies the MAVS signaling and facilitates the phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of IFN regulatory factor 3 and NF-κB to enhance the expression of IFNs, which leads to a broad inhibition of the replication of RNA viruses, including EV71, Sendai virus, influenza A virus, and vesicular stomatitis virus. Therefore, we demonstrated that HERP plays an important role in the regulation of host innate immunity in response to ER stress during the infection of RNA viruses. These findings provide new insights into the mechanism underlying the replication of RNA viruses and the production of IFNs, and also demonstrate a new role of HERP in the regulation of host innate immunity in response to viral infection. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  17. Herpes simplex virus type 1-based amplicon vectors for fundamental research in neurosciences and gene therapy of neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerusalinsky, Diana; Baez, María Verónica; Epstein, Alberto Luis

    2012-01-01

    Somatic manipulation of the nervous system without the involvement of the germinal line appears as a powerful counterpart of the transgenic strategy. The use of viral vectors to produce specific, transient and localized knockout, knockdown, ectopic expression or overexpression of a gene, leads to the possibility of analyzing both in vitro and in vivo molecular basis of neural function. In this approach, viral particles engineered to carry transgenic sequences are delivered into discrete brain regions, to transduce cells that will express the transgenic products. Amplicons are replication-incompetent helper-dependent vectors derived from herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), with several advantages that potentiate their use in neurosciences: (1) minimal toxicity: amplicons do not encode any virus proteins, are neither toxic for the infected cells nor pathogenic for the inoculated animals and elicit low levels of adaptive immune responses; (2) extensive transgene capacity to carry up to 150-kb of foreign DNA; i.e., entire genes with regulatory sequences could be delivered; (3) widespread cellular tropism: amplicons can experimentally infect several cell types including glial cells, though naturally the virus infects mainly neurons and epithelial cells; (4) since the viral genome does not integrate into cellular chromosomes there is low probability to induce insertional mutagenesis. Recent investigations on gene transfer into the brain using these vectors, have focused on gene therapy of inherited genetic diseases affecting the nervous system, such as ataxias, or on neurodegenerative disorders using experimental models of Parkinson's or Alzheimer's disease. Another group of studies used amplicons to investigate complex neural functions such as neuroplasticity, anxiety, learning and memory. In this short review, we summarize recent data supporting the potential of HSV-1 based amplicon vector model for gene delivery and modulation of gene expression in primary cultures

  18. Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-derived recombinant vectors for gene transfer and gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marconi, Peggy; Fraefel, Cornel; Epstein, Alberto L

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 ) is a human pathogen whose lifestyle is based on a long-term dual interaction with the infected host, being able to establish both lytic and latent infections. The virus genome is a 153-kilobase pair (kbp) double-stranded DNA molecule encoding more than 80 genes. The interest of HSV-1 as gene transfer vector stems from its ability to infect many different cell types, both quiescent and proliferating cells, the very high packaging capacity of the virus capsid, the outstanding neurotropic adaptations that this virus has evolved, and the fact that it never integrates into the cellular chromosomes, thus avoiding the risk of insertional mutagenesis. Two types of vectors can be derived from HSV-1, recombinant vectors and amplicon vectors, and different methodologies have been developed to prepare large stocks of each type of vector. This chapter summarizes the approach most commonly used to prepare recombinant HSV-1 vectors through homologous recombination, either in eukaryotic cells or in bacteria.

  19. Antiviral Action of Synthetic Stigmasterol Derivatives on Herpes Simplex Virus Replication in Nervous Cells In Vitro

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    Erina Petrera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyfunctionalized stigmasterol derivatives, (22S,23S-22,23-dihydroxystigmast-4-en-3-one (compound 1 and (22S,23S-3β-bromo-5α,22,23-trihydroxystigmastan-6-one (compound 2, inhibit herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 replication and spreading in human epithelial cells derived from ocular tissues. Both compounds reduce the incidence and severity of lesions in a murine model of herpetic stromal keratitis when administered in different treatment modalities. Since encephalitis caused by HSV-1 is another immunopathology of viral origin, we evaluate here the antiviral effect of both compounds on HSV-1 infected nervous cell lines as well as their anti-inflammatory action. We found that both stigmasterol derivatives presented low cytotoxicity in the three nervous cell lines assayed. Regarding the antiviral activity, in all cases both compounds prevented HSV-1 multiplication when added after infection, as well as virus propagation. Additionally, both compounds were able to hinder interleukin-6 and Interferon-gamma secretion induced by HSV-1 infection in Neuro-2a cells. We conclude that compounds 1 and 2 have exerted a dual antiviral and anti-inflammatory effect in HSV-1 infected nervous cell lines, which makes them interesting molecules to be further studied.

  20. Role of a cdk5-associated protein, p35, in herpes simplex virus type 1 replication in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) replication is inhibited by the cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) inhibitor roscovitine. One roscovitine-sensitive cdk that functions in neurons is cdk5, which is activated in part by its binding partner, p35. Because HSV establishes latent infections in sensory neurons, we sought to determine the role p35 plays in HSV-1 replication in vivo. For these studies, wild-type (wt) and p35-/- mice were infected with HSV-1 using the mou...

  1. Targeting the central nervous system with herpes simplex virus / Sleeping Beauty hybrid amplicon vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Silva, Suresh; Bowers, William J

    2011-10-01

    The pursuits of sustainable treatments for diseases and disorders that afflict the central nervous system (CNS) have proven challenging for the field of viral vector-based gene therapy. However, recent advances in viral vector technology coupled with efficient delivery methods have opened up new avenues that show promise at the preclinical testing stage. The development of the Herpes Simplex Virus/Sleeping Beauty (HSV/SB) hybrid vector represents such an advance for devising treatments targeting the CNS with its potential for stably integrating large transgenomic segments of DNA within the genomes of transduced cells. In utero administration of this hybrid vector into the embryonic mouse brain has revealed the capacity for widespread transgene dissemination due to the targeting of a neuronal precursor cell population. This unique feature has provided the means to stably express a transgene throughout the brain for prolonged periods, which is a prerequisite for the treatment of progressive CNS disorders. In this review we provide a comprehensive breakdown of the characteristics of the HSV/SB vector system and how it can be efficiently employed in the derivation of CNS-targeted gene therapeutic strategies.

  2. Replication-Coupled Recruitment of Viral and Cellular Factors to Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Replication Forks for the Maintenance and Expression of Viral Genomes

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    Dembowski, Jill A.

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infects over half the human population. Much of the infectious cycle occurs in the nucleus of cells where the virus has evolved mechanisms to manipulate host processes for the production of virus. The genome of HSV-1 is coordinately expressed, maintained, and replicated such that progeny virions are produced within 4–6 hours post infection. In this study, we selectively purify HSV-1 replication forks and associated proteins from virus-infected cells and identify select viral and cellular replication, repair, and transcription factors that associate with viral replication forks. Pulse chase analyses and imaging studies reveal temporal and spatial dynamics between viral replication forks and associated proteins and demonstrate that several DNA repair complexes and key transcription factors are recruited to or near replication forks. Consistent with these observations we show that the initiation of viral DNA replication is sufficient to license late gene transcription. These data provide insight into mechanisms that couple HSV-1 DNA replication with transcription and repair for the coordinated expression and maintenance of the viral genome. PMID:28095497

  3. Cellular Cholesterol Facilitates the Postentry Replication Cycle of Herpes Simplex Virus 1.

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    Wudiri, George A; Nicola, Anthony V

    2017-07-15

    Cholesterol is an essential component of cell membranes and is required for herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) entry (1-3). Treatment of HSV-1-infected Vero cells with methyl beta-cyclodextrin from 2 to 9 h postentry reduced plaque numbers. Transport of incoming viral capsids to the nuclear periphery was unaffected by the cholesterol reduction, suggesting that cell cholesterol is important for the HSV-1 replicative cycle at a stage(s) beyond entry, after the arrival of capsids at the nucleus. The synthesis and release of infectious HSV-1 and cell-to-cell spread of infection were all impaired in cholesterol-reduced cells. Propagation of HSV-1 on DHCR24(-/-) fibroblasts, which lack the desmosterol-to-cholesterol conversion enzyme, resulted in the generation of infectious extracellular virions (HSV(des)) that lack cholesterol and likely contain desmosterol. The specific infectivities (PFU per viral genome) of HSV(chol) and HSV(des) were similar, suggesting cholesterol and desmosterol in the HSV envelope support similar levels of infectivity. However, infected DHCR24(-/-) fibroblasts released ∼1 log less infectious HSV(des) and ∼1.5 log fewer particles than release of cholesterol-containing particles (HSV(chol)) from parental fibroblasts, suggesting that the hydrocarbon tail of cholesterol facilitates viral synthesis. Together, the results suggest multiple roles for cholesterol in the HSV-1 replicative cycle.IMPORTANCE HSV-1 infections are associated with a wide range of clinical manifestations that are of public health importance. Cholesterol is a key player in the complex interaction between viral and cellular factors that allows HSV-1 to enter host cells and establish infection. Previous reports have demonstrated a role for cellular cholesterol in the entry of HSV-1 into target cells. Here, we employed both chemical treatment and cells that were genetically defined to synthesize only desmosterol to demonstrate that cholesterol is important at stages following the

  4. Adenovirus replication-competent vectors (KD1, KD3) complement the cytotoxicity and transgene expression from replication-defective vectors (Ad-GFP, Ad-Luc).

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    Habib, Nagy A; Mitry, Ragai; Seth, Prem; Kuppuswamy, Mohan; Doronin, Konstantin; Toth, Karoly; Krajcsi, Peter; Tollefson, Ann E; Wold, William S M

    2002-08-01

    The successful clinical application of adenovirus (Ad) in cancer control has been of limited success because of the current inability to infect the majority of cancer cells with a large amount of vector. In this study, we show that when human lung tumors growing in immunodeficient nude mice were coinfected with a replication-defective (RD) Ad vector expressing green fluorescent protein and a replication-competent (RC) Ad vector named KD3, KD3 enhanced the expression of green fluorescent protein throughout the tumor. Also, KD3 and another RC vector named KD1 complemented the expression of luciferase from a RD vector in a human liver tumor xenotransplant in nude mice. Altogether, these results suggest that the combination of a RD vector with a RC vector might be a more effective treatment for cancer than either vector alone due to more widespread dissemination of the virus.

  5. Role of a cdk5-associated protein, p35, in herpes simplex virus type 1 replication in vivo.

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    Haenchen, Steve D; Utter, Jeff A; Bayless, Adam M; Dobrowsky, Rick T; Davido, David J

    2010-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) replication is inhibited by the cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) inhibitor roscovitine. One roscovitine-sensitive cdk that functions in neurons is cdk5, which is activated in part by its binding partner, p35. Because HSV establishes latent infections in sensory neurons, we sought to determine the role p35 plays in HSV-1 replication in vivo. For these studies, wild-type (wt) and p35−/− mice were infected with HSV-1 using the mouse ocular model of HSV latency and reactivation. The current results indicate that p35 is an important determinant of viral replication in vivo.

  6. Silencing Status Epilepticus-Induced BDNF Expression with Herpes Simplex Virus Type-1 Based Amplicon Vectors.

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    Chiara Falcicchia

    Full Text Available Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF has been found to produce pro- but also anti-epileptic effects. Thus, its validity as a therapeutic target must be verified using advanced tools designed to block or to enhance its signal. The aim of this study was to develop tools to silence the BDNF signal. We generated Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 derived amplicon vectors, i.e. viral particles containing a genome of 152 kb constituted of concatameric repetitions of an expression cassette, enabling the expression of the gene of interest in multiple copies. HSV-1 based amplicon vectors are non-pathogenic and have been successfully employed in the past for gene delivery into the brain of living animals. Therefore, amplicon vectors should represent a logical choice for expressing a silencing cassette, which, in multiple copies, is expected to lead to an efficient knock-down of the target gene expression. Here, we employed two amplicon-based BDNF silencing strategies. The first, antisense, has been chosen to target and degrade the cytoplasmic mRNA pool of BDNF, whereas the second, based on the convergent transcription technology, has been chosen to repress transcription at the BDNF gene. Both these amplicon vectors proved to be effective in down-regulating BDNF expression in vitro, in BDNF-expressing mesoangioblast cells. However, only the antisense strategy was effective in vivo, after inoculation in the hippocampus in a model of status epilepticus in which BDNF mRNA levels are strongly increased. Interestingly, the knocking down of BDNF levels induced with BDNF-antisense was sufficient to produce significant behavioral effects, in spite of the fact that it was produced only in a part of a single hippocampus. In conclusion, this study demonstrates a reliable effect of amplicon vectors in knocking down gene expression in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, this approach may find broad applications in neurobiological studies.

  7. HSV-1-Based Vectors for Gene Therapy of Neurological Diseases and Brain Tumors: Part I. HSV-1 Structure, Replication and Pathogenesis

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    Andreas Jacobs

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available The design of effective gene therapy strategies for brain tumors and other neurological disorders relies on the understanding of genetic and pathophysiological alterations associated with the disease, on the biological characteristics of the target tissue, and on the development of safe vectors and expression systems to achieve efficient, targeted and regulated, therapeutic gene expression. The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 virion is one of the most efficient of all current gene transfer vehicles with regard to nuclear gene delivery in central nervous system-derived cells including brain tumors. HSV-1-related research over the past decades has provided excellent insight into the structure and function of this virus, which, in turn, facilitated the design of innovative vector systems. Here, we review aspects of HSV-1 structure, replication and pathogenesis, which are relevant for the engineering of HSV-1-based vectors.

  8. Rapid transient production in plants by replicating and non-replicating vectors yields high quality functional anti-HIV antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Sainsbury

    Full Text Available The capacity of plants and plant cells to produce large amounts of recombinant protein has been well established. Due to advantages in terms of speed and yield, attention has recently turned towards the use of transient expression systems, including viral vectors, to produce proteins of pharmaceutical interest in plants. However, the effects of such high level expression from viral vectors and concomitant effects on host cells may affect the quality of the recombinant product.To assess the quality of antibodies transiently expressed to high levels in plants, we have expressed and characterised the human anti-HIV monoclonal antibody, 2G12, using both replicating and non-replicating systems based on deleted versions of Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV RNA-2. The highest yield (approximately 100 mg/kg wet weight leaf tissue of affinity purified 2G12 was obtained when the non-replicating CPMV-HT system was used and the antibody was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Glycan analysis by mass-spectrometry showed that the glycosylation pattern was determined exclusively by whether the antibody was retained in the ER and did not depend on whether a replicating or non-replicating system was used. Characterisation of the binding and neutralisation properties of all the purified 2G12 variants from plants showed that these were generally similar to those of the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cell-produced 2G12.Overall, the results demonstrate that replicating and non-replicating CPMV-based vectors are able to direct the production of a recombinant IgG similar in activity to the CHO-produced control. Thus, a complex recombinant protein was produced with no apparent effect on its biochemical properties using either high-level expression or viral replication. The speed with which a recombinant pharmaceutical with excellent biochemical characteristics can be produced transiently in plants makes CPMV-based expression vectors an attractive option for

  9. Human gamma interferon and tumor necrosis factor exert a synergistic blockade on the replication of herpes simplex virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feduchi, E; Alonso, M A; Carrasco, L

    1989-03-01

    The replication of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is not inhibited in either HeLa or HEp-2 cells treated with human alpha interferon (HuIFN-alpha), particularly when high multiplicities of infection are used. However, HuIFN-gamma partially inhibits HSV-1 translation in HEp-2 cells infected at low multiplicities. Under these conditions, the transcription of genes alpha 22, TK, and gamma 0 is greatly diminished. The combined addition of human tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and HuIFN-gamma to HEp-2 cells exerts a synergistic inhibition of HSV-1 translation. Cells treated with both cytokines continue synthesizing cellular proteins, even 20 h after HSV-1 infection. As little as 10 U of IFN-gamma per ml blocked HSV-1 DNA replication, provided that TNF was also present in the medium. Analyses of HSV-1 gene transcription suggest that the action of both TNF and IFN-gamma blocked a step that comes at or prior to early HSV-1 gene expression. This early step in HSV-1 replication inhibited by TNF and IFN-gamma occurs after virus attachment and entry into cells, since the internalization of radioactive HSV-1 virion particles was not blocked by the presence of the two cytokines. Therefore, we conclude that the synergistic action of TNF plus IFN-gamma affects a step in HSV-1 replication that comes after virus entry but before or at the transcription of immediate-early genes.

  10. Tumor-selective replication herpes simplex virus-based technology significantly improves clinical detection and prognostication of viable circulating tumor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wen; Bao, Li; Yang, Shaoxing

    2016-01-01

    Detection of circulating tumor cells remains a significant challenge due to their vast physical and biological heterogeneity. We developed a cell-surface-marker-independent technology based on telomerase-specific, replication-selective oncolytic herpes-simplex-virus-1 that targets telomerase...

  11. Replication-competent, oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 1 mutants induce a bystander effect following ganciclovir treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Chenhong; Mori, Isamu; Goshima, Fumi; Ushijima, Yoko; Nawa, Akihiro; Kimura, Hiroshi; Nishiyama, Yukihiro

    2007-10-01

    Cells expressing herpes simplex virus (HSV) thymidine kinase (tk) are killed by ganciclovir (GCV). Adjacent cells without HSV-tk also die, a phenomenon known as the 'bystander effect'. However, there is no evidence that replication-competent HSV induces a bystander effect in the presence of GCV. Therefore, we investigated the bystander effect in HEp-2 cells infected with replication-competent, oncolytic HSV-1 mutants, hrR3 and HF10. In cells infected at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 3, GCV did not induce apoptosis. At low MOIs of 0.3 and 0.03, however, a number of adjacent, uninfected cells apoptosed following GCV treatment. Irrespective of GCV treatment, HEp-2 cells expressed minimal levels of connexin 43 (Cx43). However, Cx43 expression was enhanced by GCV in response to infection with HF10 at an MOI of 0.3, but not at an MOI of 3. Expression of other proteins involved in gap junctions, including Cx26 and Cx40, was not augmented under these conditions. The PKA and PI3K signal transduction pathways are likely involved in enhanced Cx43 expression as inhibitors of these pathways prevented Cx43 upregulation. These results suggest that infection with replication-competent HSV-1 induces the bystander effect in cells treated with GCV because of efficient intercellular transport of active GCV through abundant gap junctions. Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Mathematical analysis demonstrates that interferons-β and -γ Interact in a multiplicative manner to disrupt herpes simplex virus replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halford, William P.; Halford, Keith J.; Pierce, Amy T.

    2005-01-01

    Several studies suggest that the innate interferons (IFNs), IFN-α and IFN-β, can act in concert with IFN-γto synergistically inhibit the replication of cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). The significance of this observation is not yet agreed upon in large part because the nature and magnitude of the interaction between IFN-α/β and IFN-γ is not well defined. In the current study, we resolve this issue by demonstrating three points. First, the hyperbolic tangent function, tanh (x  ), can be used to describe the individual effects of IFN-β or IFN-γ on HSV-1 replication over a 320,000-fold range of IFN concentration. Second, pharmacological methods prove that IFN-β and IFN-γ interact in a greater-than-additive manner to inhibit HSV-1 replication. Finally, the potency with which combinations of IFN-β and IFN-γ inhibit HSV-1 replication is accurately predicted by multiplying the individual inhibitory effects of each cytokine. Thus, IFN-β and IFN-γ interact in a multiplicative manner. We infer that a primary antiviral function of IFN-γ lies in its capacity to multiply the potency with which IFN-α/β restricts HSV-1 replication in vivo. This hypothesis has important ramifications for understanding how T lymphocyte-secreted cytokines such as IFN-γ can force herpesviruses into a latent state without destroying the neurons or leukocytes that continue to harbor these viral infections for the lifetime of the host.

  13. Apple pomace, a by-product from the asturian cider industry, inhibits herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 in vitro replication: study of its mechanisms of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Angel L; Melón, Santiago; Dalton, Kevin P; Nicieza, Inés; Roque, Annele; Suárez, Belén; Parra, Francisco

    2012-06-01

    The anti-herpes simplex virus type 1 and anti-herpes simplex virus type 2 effects of apple pomace, a by-product from the cider-processing industry, were investigated. The mechanisms of antiviral action were assessed using a battery of experiments targeting sequential steps in the viral replication cycle. The anti-herpetic mechanisms of apple pomaces included the inhibition of virus attachment to the cell surface and the arrest of virus entry and uncoating. Quercitrin and procyanidin B2 were found to play a crucial role in the antiviral activity.

  14. Apple Pomace, a By-Product from the Asturian Cider Industry, Inhibits Herpes Simplex Virus Types 1 and 2 In Vitro Replication: Study of Its Mechanisms of Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melón, Santiago; Dalton, Kevin P.; Nicieza, Inés; Roque, Annele; Suárez, Belén; Parra, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The anti–herpes simplex virus type 1 and anti–herpes simplex virus type 2 effects of apple pomace, a by-product from the cider-processing industry, were investigated. The mechanisms of antiviral action were assessed using a battery of experiments targeting sequential steps in the viral replication cycle. The anti-herpetic mechanisms of apple pomaces included the inhibition of virus attachment to the cell surface and the arrest of virus entry and uncoating. Quercitrin and procyanidin B2 were found to play a crucial role in the antiviral activity. PMID:22424460

  15. Properties and use of novel replication-competent vectors based on Semliki Forest virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lulla Valeria

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Semliki Forest virus (SFV has a positive strand RNA genome and infects different cells of vertebrates and invertebrates. The 5' two-thirds of the genome encodes non-structural proteins that are required for virus replication and synthesis of subgenomic (SG mRNA for structural proteins. SG-mRNA is generated by internal initiation at the SG-promoter that is located at the complementary minus-strand template. Different types of expression systems including replication-competent vectors, which represent alphavirus genomes with inserted expression units, have been developed. The replication-competent vectors represent useful tools for studying alphaviruses and have potential therapeutic applications. In both cases, the properties of the vector, such as its genetic stability and expression level of the protein of interest, are important. Results We analysed 14 candidates of replication-competent vectors based on the genome of an SFV4 isolate that contained a duplicated SG promoter or an internal ribosomal entry site (IRES-element controlled marker gene. It was found that the IRES elements and the minimal -21 to +5 SG promoter were non-functional in the context of these vectors. The efficient SG promoters contained at least 26 residues upstream of the start site of SG mRNA. The insertion site of the SG promoter and its length affected the genetic stability of the vectors, which was always higher when the SG promoter was inserted downstream of the coding region for structural proteins. The stability also depended on the conditions used for vector propagation. A procedure based on the in vitro transcription of ligation products was used for generation of replication-competent vector-based expression libraries that contained hundreds of thousands of different genomes, and maintained genetic diversity and the ability to express inserted genes over five passages in cell culture. Conclusion The properties of replication-competent vectors

  16. Infected cell protein 0 functional domains and their coordination in herpes simplex virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Haidong

    2016-02-12

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a ubiquitous human pathogen that establishes latent infection in ganglia neurons. Its unique life cycle requires a balanced "conquer and compromise" strategy to deal with the host anti-viral defenses. One of HSV-1 α (immediate early) gene products, infected cell protein 0 (ICP0), is a multifunctional protein that interacts with and modulates a wide range of cellular defensive pathways. These pathways may locate in different cell compartments, which then migrate or exchange factors upon stimulation, for the purpose of a concerted and effective defense. ICP0 is able to simultaneously attack multiple host pathways by either degrading key restrictive factors or modifying repressive complexes. This is a viral protein that contains an E3 ubiquitin ligase, translocates among different cell compartments and interacts with major defensive complexes. The multiple functional domains of ICP0 can work independently and at the same time coordinate with each other. Dissecting the functional domains of ICP0 and delineating the coordination of these domains will help us understand HSV-1 pathogenicity as well as host defense mechanisms. This article focuses on describing individual ICP0 domains, their biochemical properties and their implication in HSV-1 infection. By putting individual domain functions back into the picture of host anti-viral defense network, this review seeks to elaborate the complex interactions between HSV-1 and its host.

  17. Inhibitory effect of herpes simplex virus type 1 on type 2 virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelená, D; Roubal, J; Vonka, V

    1976-11-01

    Simultaneous infection with herpes simplex type I and type 2 viruses of chick embryo fibroblasts (CEF), which are only permissive for type 2 virus, or rabbit embryo fibroblasts (REF), which are permissive for both virus types, resulted in a marked reduction of type 2 virus production. This effect was dependent on the m.o.i. of type I, being expressed at a high rather than a low m.o.i. The rate of interference decreased with the prolongation of the interval between infection with type 2 and type I viruses. No evidence suggestive of interferon involvement was obtained. Partial inactivation of type 2 virus by ultraviolet irradiation enhanced the inhibitory effect of type I virus. On the other hand, u.v. irradiation of type I virus resulted in a progressive loss of inhibitory activity. The results of the present experiments suggest that a type I genome function is responsible for the interfering effect, and that an early step in the growth of type 2 virus is sensitive to the particular type I virus product involved.

  18. Transgene stability for three replication-competent murine leukemia virus vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duch, Mogens R.; Carrasco, Maria L; Hansen, Bettina Dencker

    2004-01-01

    Retroviral vectors that are able to sustain multiple rounds of replication may find many applications. However, one critical feature of such vectors is the ability to maintain an intact transgene cassette during repeated rounds of replication. We here report on the stability of a translational...... cassette consisting of an internal ribosome entry site followed by the enhanced green fluorescent protein coding sequence inserted in different configurations into murine leukemia virus genomes. In two of the constructs, the insert was located in the upstream part of the U3 region while in the third...

  19. Constructing recombinant replication-defective adenoviral vectors that express glucose transporter-1 through in vitro ligation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fangcheng Li; Junliang Li; Ranyi Liu; Xinke Xu; Kaichang Yuan; Zhonghua Wu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We constructed a homologous recombination bacterial method based on the pAdEasy system, a widely used system, for generating recombinant adenoviral vectors that express glucose transporter-1 (GLUT1) in rats.OBJECTIVE: This study was designed to investigate the feasibility of generating recombinant replication-defective adenoviral vectors that express GLUT1 in rats by in vitro ligation based on the Adeno-XTM system. DESIGN: An in vitro cell-based experiment. SETTING: This study was performed at the Linbaixin Medical Research Center of the Second Hospital Affiliated to Sun Yat-sen University and Central Laboratory for Prevention and Treatment of Tumor, Sun Yat-sen University between January and August 2004. MATERIALS: Male, adult, Sprague Dawley rats were used to extract total RNA from brain tissue. E. coli DH5?and human embryonic kidney 293 cells (HEK293 cells) used in the present study were cryo-preserved by the Second Hospital Affiliated to Sun Yat-sen University. Rabbit anti-rat GLUT1 polyclonal antibody (Chemicon, U.S.A.) and primers (Shanghai Boya Bioengineering Co., Ltd) were also used. METHODS: E1/E3-deleted replication-defective adenoviral vectors were used. Using in vitro ligation, the target gene was first sub-cloned into a shuttle vector plasmid to obtain the fragment containing target gene expression cassettes by enzyme digestion. Subsequently, the fragment was co-transformed with linearized adenoviral backbone vector into the E. coli strain. The recombinant adenoviral plasmid was transfected into HEK293 cells to assembly recombinant adenoviral vectors with replication capabilities. The procedure was repeated several times for recombinant adenoviral vectors amplification. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Efficiency of recombinant adenoviral vectors to express the target gene was measured by gene and protein expression through polymerase chain reaction and Western Blot assays, respectively.RESULTS: Results demonstrated that recombinant adenoviral

  20. Inhibition of HIV-1 replication in alveolar macrophages by adenovirus gene transfer vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Joshua; Connor, Ruth; Worgall, Stefan; Moore, John P; Leopold, Philip L; Kaner, Robert J; Crystal, Ronald G

    2002-08-01

    To assess the hypothesis that infection of alveolar macrophages (AM) with adenovirus (Ad) gene transfer vectors might prevent subsequent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 replication in AM, AM isolated from normal volunteers were infected with increasing doses of first generation (E1(-)) Ad vectors, followed 72 h later by infection with HIV-1(JRFL), an R5/M-tropic strain that preferentially uses the CCR5 coreceptor. As a measure of HIV-1 replication, p24 Ag was quantified by enzyme-linked imunosorbent assay in supernatants on Days 4 to 14 after HIV-1infection. Pretreatment of the AM with an Ad vector resulted in a dose- and time-dependent suppression of subsequent HIV-1 replication. The Ad vector inhibition of HIV-1 replication was independent of the transgene in the Ad vector expression cassette and E4 genes in the Ad backbone. Moreover, it did not appear to be secondary to a soluble factor released by the AM, nor was it overridden by the concomitant transfer of the CCR5 or CXCR4 receptors to the AM before HIV-1 infection. These observations have implications regarding pulmonary host responses associated with HIV-1 infection, as well as possibly uncovering new therapeutic strategies against HIV-1 infection.

  1. Therapeutic efficacy of G207, a conditionally replicating herpes simplex virus type 1 mutant, for gallbladder carcinoma in immunocompetent hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, K; Todo, T; Chijiiwa, K; Tanaka, M

    2001-04-01

    Gallbladder cancer is an extremely difficult disease to cure once metastases occur. In this paper, we explored the potential of G207, an oncolytic, replication-competent herpes simplex virus type 1 mutant, as a new therapeutic means for gallbladder cancer. Gallbladder carcinoma cell lines (four human and one hamster) showed nearly total cell killing within 72 h of G207 infection at a m.o.i. of 0.25 to 2.5 in vitro. The susceptibility to G207 cytopathic activity correlated with the infection efficiency demonstrated by lacZ expression. Intraneoplastic inoculation of G207 (1 x 10(7) pfu) in immunocompetent hamsters bearing established subcutaneous KIGB-5 tumors caused a significant inhibition of tumor growth and prolongation of survival. Repeated inoculations (three times with 4-day intervals) were significantly more efficacious than a single inoculation. In hamsters with bilateral subcutaneous KIGB-5 tumors, inoculation of one tumor alone with G207 caused regression or growth reduction of uninoculated tumors as well as inoculated tumors. In athymic mice, however, the anti-tumor effect was largely reduced in inoculated tumors and completely abolished in remote tumors, suggesting large contribution of T-cell-mediated immune responses to both local and systemic anti-tumor effect of G207. These results indicate that G207 may be useful as a new strategy for gallbladder cancer treatment.

  2. Corneal replication is an interferon response-independent bottleneck for virulence of herpes simplex virus 1 in the absence of virion host shutoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasieka, Tracy Jo; Menachery, Vineet D; Rosato, Pamela C; Leib, David A

    2012-07-01

    Herpes simplex viruses lacking the virion host shutoff function (Δvhs) are avirulent and hypersensitive to type I and type II interferon (IFN). In this study, we demonstrate that even in the absence of IFN responses in AG129 (IFN-αβγR(-/-)) mice, Δvhs remains highly attenuated via corneal infection but is fully virulent via intracranial infection. The data demonstrate that the interferon-independent inherent replication defect of Δvhs has a significant impact upon peripheral replication and neuroinvasion.

  3. Inhibition of herpes simplex virus type 1 replication by adeno-associated virus rep proteins depends on their combined DNA-binding and ATPase/helicase activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glauser, Daniel L; Seyffert, Michael; Strasser, Regina; Franchini, Marco; Laimbacher, Andrea S; Dresch, Christiane; de Oliveira, Anna Paula; Vogel, Rebecca; Büning, Hildegard; Salvetti, Anna; Ackermann, Mathias; Fraefel, Cornel

    2010-04-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has previously been shown to inhibit the replication of its helper virus herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), and the inhibitory activity has been attributed to the expression of the AAV Rep proteins. In the present study, we assessed the Rep activities required for inhibition of HSV-1 replication using a panel of wild-type and mutant Rep proteins lacking defined domains and activities. We found that the inhibition of HSV-1 replication required Rep DNA-binding and ATPase/helicase activities but not endonuclease activity. The Rep activities required for inhibition of HSV-1 replication precisely coincided with the activities that were responsible for induction of cellular DNA damage and apoptosis, suggesting that these three processes are closely linked. Notably, the presence of Rep induced the hyperphosphorylation of a DNA damage marker, replication protein A (RPA), which has been reported not to be normally hyperphosphorylated during HSV-1 infection and to be sequestered away from HSV-1 replication compartments during infection. Finally, we demonstrate that the execution of apoptosis is not required for inhibition of HSV-1 replication and that the hyperphosphorylation of RPA per se is not inhibitory for HSV-1 replication, suggesting that these two processes are not directly responsible for the inhibition of HSV-1 replication by Rep.

  4. Inhibition of avian leukosis virus replication by vector-based RNA interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    RNAi has recently emerged as a promising antiviral technique in vertebrates. To date, most studies have used exogenous short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to inhibit viral replication, though vectors expressing short hairpin RNAs (shRNA-mirs) in the context of a modified endogenous micro-RNA (miRNA) are...

  5. Subversion of Host Responses to Energy Insufficiency by Us3 Supports Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Replication during Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vink, Elizabeth I; Smiley, James R; Mohr, Ian

    2017-07-15

    Cellular stress responses to energy insufficiency can impact virus reproduction. In particular, activation of the host AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) by low energy could limit protein synthesis by inhibiting mTORC1. Although many herpesviruses, including herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), stimulate mTORC1, how HSV-1-infected cells respond to energy availability, a physiological indicator regulating mTORC1, has not been investigated. In addition, the impact of low-energy stress on productive HSV-1 growth and viral genetic determinants potentially enabling replication under physiological stress remains undefined. Here, we demonstrate that mTORC1 activity in HSV-1-infected cells is largely insensitive to stress induced by simulated energy insufficiency. Furthermore, resistance of mTORC1 activity to low-energy-induced stress, while not significantly influenced by the HSV-1 UL46-encoded phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt activator, was dependent upon the Ser/Thr kinase activity of Us3. A Us3-deficient virus was hypersensitive to low-energy-induced stress as infected cell protein synthesis and productive replication were reduced compared to levels in cells infected with a Us3-expressing virus. Although Us3 did not detectably prevent energy stress-induced AMPK activation, it enforced mTORC1 activation despite the presence of activated AMPK. In the absence of applied low-energy stress, AMPK activity in infected cells was restricted in a Us3-dependent manner. This establishes that the Us3 kinase not only activated mTORC1 but also enabled sustained mTORC1 signaling during simulated energy insufficiency that would otherwise restrict protein synthesis and virus replication. Moreover, it identifies the alphaherpesvirus-specific Us3 kinase as an mTORC1 activator that subverts the host cell energy-sensing program to support viral productive growth irrespective of physiological stress.IMPORTANCE Like all viruses, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) reproduction relies upon

  6. Replication of Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus in Its Whitefly Vector, Bemisia tabaci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakkianathan, Britto Cathrin; Kontsedalov, Svetlana; Lebedev, Galina; Mahadav, Assaf; Zeidan, Muhammad; Czosnek, Henryk; Ghanim, Murad

    2015-10-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) is a begomovirus transmitted exclusively by the whitefly Bemisia tabaci in a persistent, circulative manner. Replication of TYLCV in its vector remains controversial, and thus far, the virus has been considered to be nonpropagative. Following 8 h of acquisition on TYLCV-infected tomato plants or purified virions and then transfer to non-TYLCV-host cotton plants, the amounts of virus inside whitefly adults significantly increased (>2-fold) during the first few days and then continuously decreased, as measured by the amounts of genes on both virus DNA strands. Reported alterations in insect immune and defense responses upon virus retention led us to hypothesize a role for the immune response in suppressing virus replication. After virus acquisition, stress conditions were imposed on whiteflies, and the levels of three viral gene sequences were measured over time. When whiteflies were exposed to TYLCV and treatment with two different pesticides, the virus levels continuously increased. Upon exposure to heat stress, the virus levels gradually decreased, without any initial accumulation. Switching of whiteflies between pesticide, heat stress, and control treatments caused fluctuating increases and decreases in virus levels. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis confirmed these results and showed virus signals inside midgut epithelial cell nuclei. Combining the pesticide and heat treatments with virus acquisition had significant effects on fecundity. Altogether, our results demonstrate for the first time that a single-stranded DNA plant virus can replicate in its hemipteran vector. Plant viruses in agricultural crops are of great concern worldwide. Many of them are transmitted from infected to healthy plants by insects. Persistently transmitted viruses often have a complex association with their vectors; however, most are believed not to replicate within these vectors. Such replication is important, as it contributes to the

  7. Coordinated leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis by using the herpes simplex virus 1 replication complex and minicircle DNA templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengel, Gudrun; Kuchta, Robert D

    2011-01-01

    The origin-specific replication of the herpes simplex virus 1 genome requires seven proteins: the helicase-primase (UL5-UL8-UL52), the DNA polymerase (UL30-UL42), the single-strand DNA binding protein (ICP8), and the origin-binding protein (UL9). We reconstituted these proteins, excluding UL9, on synthetic minicircular DNA templates and monitored leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis using the strand-specific incorporation of dTMP and dAMP. Critical features of the assays that led to efficient leading and lagging stand synthesis included high helicase-primase concentrations and a lagging strand template whose sequence resembled that of the viral DNA. Depending on the nature of the minicircle template, the replication complex synthesized leading and lagging strand products at molar ratios varying between 1:1 and 3:1. Lagging strand products (∼0.2 to 0.6 kb) were significantly shorter than leading strand products (∼2 to 10 kb), and conditions that stimulated primer synthesis led to shorter lagging strand products. ICP8 was not essential; however, its presence stimulated DNA synthesis and increased the length of both leading and lagging strand products. Curiously, human DNA polymerase α (p70-p180 or p49-p58-p70-p180), which improves the utilization of RNA primers synthesized by herpesvirus primase on linear DNA templates, had no effect on the replication of the minicircles. The lack of stimulation by polymerase α suggests the existence of a macromolecular assembly that enhances the utilization of RNA primers and may functionally couple leading and lagging strand synthesis. Evidence for functional coupling is further provided by our observations that (i) leading and lagging strand synthesis produce equal amounts of DNA, (ii) leading strand synthesis proceeds faster under conditions that disable primer synthesis on the lagging strand, and (iii) conditions that accelerate helicase-catalyzed DNA unwinding stimulate decoupled leading strand synthesis but not

  8. Antiviral Activity of Hatay Propolis Against Replication of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 and Type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Ayse; Duran, Gulay Gulbol; Duran, Nizami; Jenedi, Kemal; Bolgul, Behiye Sezgin; Miraloglu, Meral; Muz, Mustafa

    2016-02-09

    BACKGROUND Propolis is a bee product widely used in folk medicine and possessing many pharmacological properties. In this study we aimed to investigate: i) the antiviral activities of Hatay propolis samples against HSV-1 and HSV-2 in HEp-2 cell line, and ii) the presence of the synergistic effects of propolis with acyclovir against these viruses. MATERIAL AND METHODS All experiments were carried out in HEp-2 cell cultures. Proliferation assays were performed in 24-well flat bottom microplates. We inoculated 1x105 cells per ml and RPMI 1640 medium with 10% fetal calf serum into each well. Studies to determine cytotoxic effect were performed. To investigate the presence of antiviral activity of propolis samples, different concentrations of propolis (3200, 1600, 800, 400, 200, 100, 75, 50, and 25 μg/mL) were added into the culture medium. The amplifications of HSV-1 and HSV-2 DNA were performed by real-time PCR method. Acyclovir (Sigma, USA) was chosen as a positive control. Cell morphology was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). RESULTS The replication of HSV-1 and HSV-2 was significantly suppressed in the presence of 25, 50, and 100 μg/mL of Hatay propolis. We found that propolis began to inhibit HSV-1 replication after 24 h of incubation and propolis activity against HSV-2 was found to start at 48 h following incubation. The activity of propolis against both HSV-1 and HSV-2 was confirmed by a significant decrease in the number of viral copies. CONCLUSIONS We determined that Hatay propolis samples have important antiviral effects compared with acyclovir. In particular, the synergy produced by antiviral activity of propolis and acyclovir combined had a stronger effect against HSV-1 and HSV-2 than acyclovir alone.

  9. Interleukin 10 Mediated By Herpes Simplex Virus Vectors Suppresses Neuropathic Pain Induced by Human Immunodeficiency Virus gp120 in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wenwen; Huang, Wan; Liu, Shue; Levitt, Roy C.; Candiotti, Keith A.; Lubarsky, David A.; Hao, Shuanglin

    2014-01-01

    Background Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-associated sensory neuropathy is a common neurological complication of HIV infection affecting up to 30% of HIV-positive individuals. However, the exact neuropathological mechanisms remain unknown, which hinders our ability to develop effective treatments for HIV-neuropathic pain (NP). In this study, we tested the hypothesis that inhibition of proinflammatory factors with overexpression of interleukin (IL)-10 reduces HIV-related NP in a rat model. Methods NP was induced by the application of recombinant HIV-1 envelope protein gp120 into the sciatic nerve. The hindpaws of rats were inoculated with nonreplicating herpes simplex virus (HSV) vectors expressing antiinflammatory cytokine IL-10 or control vector. Mechanical threshold was tested using von Frey filaments before and after treatments with the vectors. The mechanical threshold response was assessed over time using the area under curves (AUC). The expression of phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated kinase, as tumor necrosis factor alpha, stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α), and C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 in both the lumbar spinal cord and the L4/5 dorsal root ganglia (DRG) was examined at 14 and 28 days after vector inoculation using Western blots. Results We found that in the gp120-induced NP model, IL-10 overexpression mediated by the HSV vector resulted in a significant elevation of the mechanical threshold that was apparent on day 3 after vector inoculation compared with the control vector (PIL-10 lasted more than 28 days. The AUC in the HSV vector expressing IL-10 was increased compared with that in the control vector (PIL-10 reversed the upregulation of phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated kinase, as tumor necrosis factor alpha, stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α), and C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 expression at 14 and/or 28 days in the DRG and/or the spinal dorsal horn. Conclusions Our studies demonstrate that blocking the signaling of these

  10. Common Structure of Rare Replication-Deficient E1-Positive Particles in Adenoviral Vector Batches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Pete; Havenga, Menzo; Fawaz, Farah; Vogels, Ronald; Marzio, Giuseppe; Pungor, Erno; Files, Jim; Do, Linh; Goudsmit, Jaap; McCaman, Michael

    2004-01-01

    The use of the PER.C6 adenovirus packaging cell line in combination with a designated vector plasmid system, whereby the cell line and vector with E1 deleted have no sequence overlap, eliminates the generation of replication-competent adenovirus during vector production. However, we have found cytopathic effect (CPE)-inducing particles in 2 out of more than 40 large-scale manufacturing lots produced in PER.C6 cells. The CPE inducer was detected at a frequency of 1 event in 7.5 × 1012 vector particles. Despite amplification, it was not readily purified, indicating that the agent itself is replication deficient and requires the parental recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (rAd5) vector for replication and packaging. Therefore, we designated the agent as a helper-dependent E1-positive region containing viral particle (HDEP). Here, we report the molecular structure of the HDEP genome, revealing an Ad comprised of E1 sequences derived from PER.C6 cells flanked by inverted terminal repeat, packaging signal, and transgene sequences. These sequences form a palindromic structure devoid of E2, E3, E4, and late genes. Since only 5 bp were shared between E1 sequences in the PER.C6 genome and viral vector sequences, the data strongly suggested that insertion of genomic DNA into an adenoviral genome had occurred essentially via nonhomologous recombination. HDEPs have been found in unrelated virus batches and appear to share a common structure that may explain their mechanism of generation. This finding allowed development of an HDEP assay to screen batches of rAd5 produced on the PER.C6 cell line and resulted in detection of seven HDEP agents from four different transgene-virus vector constructs in separate batches of Ad. PMID:15163713

  11. Inhibition of DNA virus: Herpes-1 (HSV-1 in cellular culture replication, through an antioxidant treatment extracted from rosemary spice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalva Assunção Portari Mancini

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to evaluate antiviral properties in antioxidants from spices. Phenolic compounds extracted from rosemary (Rosmarinus officinallis, L by hot water, had their antioxidant activity determined by spectrophotometry using β carotene/linoleic acid system. The rosemary extract was evaluated by antiviral assay of Herpes Virus type-1 (HSV-1 replication in VERO cells, in the presence or absence of the spice. 10,000 TCID50/mL of the HSV-1 was kept for 3 h at 4º C, with 300 ppm of rosemary extract, and 100 ppm of butyl hydroxyl toluene (BHT. Then, these viruses were inoculated in VERO cells incubated at 37º C in CO2-5 %, for seven days. Daily, they were examined and the end point was based on 100% of CPE in virus control (without antioxidants. The HSV-1 replication inhibition percentage (IP measured the antiviral action from antioxidants, showing viral reductions of the 82.0, 82.5%, in the presence of rosemary and rosemary + BHT, respectively. As an extension, cell test corresponded to the similar viral decrease (IP = 85.0 and 86.3% in both aforementioned situations. Results lead to conclude that phenolic compounds from rosemary revealed an antiviral action on herpesvirus-1.Neste estudo foi avaliada a ação antiviral de antioxidantes de especiaria. Extrato aquoso de alecrim (Rosmarinus officinalis, L, que apresentou atividade antioxidante através de espectrofotometria usando o sistema β caroteno/ácido linoléico, foi avaliado em ensaios com vírus herpes-1 na replicação em células VERO. Nestes ensaios foram utilizados 10.000 TCID50%/mL do vírus HSV-1, mantidos em contato com 300 ppm do extrato de alecrim e com 100 ppm de butil hidroxi tolueno (BHT, durante 3h a 4°C. Esses vírus, em seguida, foram inoculados em células VERO incubadas a 37 °C/5% de CO2 por sete dias. Pelo efeito citopático (ECP e o "end point" de ECP do controle de vírus (sem antioxidante, foi possível observar que houve reduções na replicação viral de 82

  12. A herpes simplex virus scaffold peptide that binds the portal vertex inhibits early steps in viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kui; Wills, Elizabeth; Baines, Joel D

    2013-06-01

    Previous experiments identified a 12-amino-acid (aa) peptide that was sufficient to interact with the herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) portal protein and was necessary to incorporate the portal into capsids. In the present study, cells were treated at various times postinfection with peptides consisting of a portion of the Drosophila antennapedia protein, previously shown to enter cells efficiently, fused to either wild-type HSV-1 scaffold peptide (YPYYPGEARGAP) or a control peptide that contained changes at positions 4 and 5. These 4-tyrosine and 5-proline residues are highly conserved in herpesvirus scaffold proteins and were previously shown to be critical for the portal interaction. Treatment early in infection with subtoxic levels of wild-type peptide reduced viral infectivity by over 1,000-fold, while the mutant peptide had little effect on viral yields. In cells infected for 3 h in the presence of wild-type peptide, capsids were observed to transit to the nuclear rim normally, as viewed by fluorescence microscopy. However, observation by electron microscopy in thin sections revealed an aberrant and significant increase of DNA-containing capsids compared to infected cells treated with the mutant peptide. Early treatment with peptide also prevented formation of viral DNA replication compartments. These data suggest that the antiviral peptide stabilizes capsids early in infection, causing retention of DNA within them, and that this activity correlates with peptide binding to the portal protein. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that the portal vertex is the conduit through which DNA is ejected to initiate infection.

  13. Pentacyclic triterpenes in birch bark extract inhibit early step of herpes simplex virus type 1 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidary Navid, M; Laszczyk-Lauer, M N; Reichling, J; Schnitzler, P

    2014-09-25

    Antiviral agents frequently applied for treatment of herpesvirus infections include acyclovir and its derivatives. The antiviral effect of a triterpene extract of birch bark and its major pentacyclic triterpenes, i.e. betulin, lupeol and betulinic acid against acyclovir-sensitive and acyclovir-resistant HSV type 1 strains was examined. The cytotoxic effect of a phytochemically defined birch bark triterpene extract (TE) as well as different pentacyclic triterpenes was analyzed in cell culture, and revealed a moderate cytotoxicity on RC-37 cells. TE, betulin, lupeol and betulinic acid exhibited high levels of antiviral activity against HSV-1 in viral suspension tests with IC50 values ranging between 0.2 and 0.5 μg/ml. Infectivity of acyclovir-sensitive and clinical isolates of acyclovir-resistant HSV-1 strains was significantly reduced by all tested compounds and a direct concentration- and time-dependent antiherpetic activity could be demonstrated. In order to determine the mode of antiviral action, TE and the compounds were added at different times during the viral infection cycle. Addition of these drugs to uninfected cells prior to infection or to herpesvirus-infected cells during intracellular replication had low effect on virus multiplication. Minor virucidal activity of triterpenes was observed, however both TE and tested compounds exhibited high anti-herpetic activity when viruses were pretreated with these drugs prior to infection. Pentacyclic triterpenes inhibit acyclovir-sensitive and acyclovir-resistant clinical isolates of HSV-1 in the early phase of infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Improvements in adenovirus-vector technology : aiming at replication specificity and vector integration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rademaker, Hendrik Jan

    2007-01-01

    Current generation adenoviral vectors (Ads) are not suitable for those gene therapy approaches that require long-term gene expression. This is due to their high immunogenicity and transient gene expression in fast dividing tissue. The development of gutless Ads, also known as helper-dependent Ads,

  15. Improvements in adenovirus-vector technology : aiming at replication specificity and vector integration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rademaker, Hendrik Jan

    2007-01-01

    Current generation adenoviral vectors (Ads) are not suitable for those gene therapy approaches that require long-term gene expression. This is due to their high immunogenicity and transient gene expression in fast dividing tissue. The development of gutless Ads, also known as helper-dependent Ads, i

  16. Replication-competent human adenovirus 11p vectors can propagate in Vero cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gokumakulapalle, Madhuri; Mei, Ya-Fang, E-mail: ya-fang.mei@umu.se

    2016-08-15

    The use of continuous cell lines derived from the African green monkey kidney (AGMK) has led to major advances in virus vaccine development. However, to date, these cells have not been used to facilitate the creation of human adenoviruses because most human adenoviruses undergo abortive infections in them. Here, we report the susceptibility of AGMK-derived cells to adenovirus 11p (Ad11p) infection. First, we showed that CD46 molecules, which act as receptors for Ad11p, are expressed in AGMK cells. We then monitored Ad11p replication by measuring GFP expression as an indicator of viral transcription. We found that AGMK-derived cells were as capable as carcinoma cells at propagating full-length replication-competent Ad11p (RCAd11p) DNA. Of the AGMK cell lines tested, Vero cells had the greatest capacity for adenovirus production. Thus, AGMK cells can be used to evaluate RCAd11p-mediated gene delivery, and Vero cells can be used for the production of RCAd11pGFP vectors at relatively high yields. - Highlights: • Africa green monkey cell lines were monitored for human adenovirus 11p GFP vector infection. • Human CD46 molecules were detectable in these monkey cell lines. • Adenovirus 11p GFP vector can be propagated in Vero cells increases the safety of Ad11p-based vectors for clinical trials. • To use Vero cells for preparation of Ad11p vector avoids the potential inclusion of oncogenes from tumor cells.

  17. Construction of the recombinant vector carrying herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase and cytokine genes expressed in cell line Tca8113

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Guang-hui; ZOU Jing-zhi; QU Le; YUE Ying; KUAI Jian-ke

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To construct expression vector containing fusion genes of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase(Hsv-tk), Interleukin-2(IL-2) with internal ribosome entry sites(IRES), and to assess their expression in cell lineTca8113. Methods: IL-2 cDNA was obtained by reverse transcription. Hsv-tk, IL-2 and IRES genes were amplified by PCR. The purified amplification products were inserted into pGEM-T-Easy, and transformed into E. coli JM109. The purified recombinant plasmids were identified by restriction endonucleases. The recombinant plasmids were digested and pEGFPN3 were linearized, DNA fragments of Hsv-tk, IRES and IL-2 were ligated into linearized pEGFP-N3, and then transferred into E. coli JM109. The recombinant tk-IL-2 genes were cloned separately and introduced into the expression vector pEGFPN3 containing GFP. The recombinant vectors were identified by their restriction sites through PCR. The plasmids pEGFP-TI was also transfected into Tca8113 cells by calcium phosphate method for the expression of fusion proteins. Fusion genes expressing vector PL(TI)SN was generated by the fusion of HSV-tk, IRES and IL-2 with the use of DNA recombination technology. The recombinant retroviruses were transferred into Tca8113 cells by lipofectamine. The positive clones were obtained after G418 selection and named Tca/TI respectively. Results: The pEGFP-TI pasmid was identified respectively by restriction endonucleases, and their fragment sizes were 1 120 bp and 450 bp. The pEGFP-TI pasmid as templates were amplified respectively by PCR, and their PCR products were 1 120 bp and 450 bp. The pEGFP-TI vectors were used to transfect Tca8113 cell, and the cells with fluorescence accounted for 60 % of the total amount. Conclusion: pFGFP- tk- IRES- IL-2 expressing vector is easy to assess the expression of tk-IRES-IL-2-GFP fusion protein localization in transfected cells. The successful construction of expressing vector containing fusion genes of Hsv-tk, IRES and IL-2 may be

  18. Physiological levels of HBB transgene expression from S/MAR element-based replicating episomal vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgourou, Argyro; Routledge, Samantha; Spathas, Dionysios; Athanassiadou, Aglaia; Antoniou, Michael N

    2009-08-20

    Replicating episomal vectors (REV) are in principle able to provide long-term transgene expression in the absence of integration into the target cell genome. The scaffold/matrix attachment region (S/MAR) located 5' of the human beta-interferon gene (IFNB1) has been shown to confer a stable episomal replication and retention function within plasmid vectors when stably transfected and selected in mammalian cells. The minimal requirement for the IFNB1 S/MAR to function in DNA replication and episomal retention is transcription through this element. We used the erythroid beta-globin locus control region-beta-globin gene (betaLCR-HBB) microlocus cassette as a model to assess tissue-specific expression from within an IFNB1 S/MAR-based plasmid REV. The betaLCR-HBB plus S/MAR combination constructs provided either high or low levels of transcription through the S/MAR element. Our results show that the betaLCR-HBB microlocus is able to reproducibly and stably express at full physiological levels on an episome copy number basis. In addition, our data show that even low levels of transcription from betaLCR-HBB through the S/MAR element are sufficient to allow efficient episomal replication and retention. These data provide the principles upon which generic and flexible expression cassette-S/MAR-based REVs can be designed for a wide range of applications.

  19. Vaccinia virus, herpes simplex virus, and carcinogens induce DNA amplification in a human cell line and support replication of a helpervirus dependent parvovirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlehofer, J.R.; Ehrbar, M.; zur Hausen, H.

    1986-07-15

    The SV40-transformed human kidney cell line, NB-E, amplifies integrated as well as episomal SV40 DNA upon treatment with chemical (DMBA) or physical (uv irradiation) carcinogens (initiators) as well as after infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 or with vaccinia virus. In addition it is shown that vaccinia virus induces SV40 DNA amplification also in the SV40-transformed Chinese hamster embryo cell line, CO631. These findings demonstrate that human cells similar to Chinese hamster cells amplify integrated DNA sequences after treatment with carcinogens or infection with specific viruses. Furthermore, a poxvirus--vaccinia virus--similar to herpes group viruses induces DNA amplification. As reported for other systems, the vaccinia virus-induced DNA amplification in NB-E cells is inhibited by coinfection with adeno-associated virus (AAV) type 5. This is in line with previous studies on inhibition of carcinogen- or HSV-induced DNA amplification in CO631 cells. The experiments also demonstrate that vaccinia virus, in addition to herpes and adenoviruses acts as a helper virus for replication and structural antigen synthesis of AAV-5 in NB-E cells.

  20. Yatein from Chamaecyparis obtusa suppresses herpes simplex virus type 1 replication in HeLa cells by interruption the immediate-early gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yuh-Chi; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Lin, Yuang-Lian; Tsai, Wei-Jern

    2006-07-01

    Inhibitory effects of methanolic extracts from nine Chinese herbs on herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) replication were studied. By a bioassay-guided fractionation procedure, yatein (C(22)H(23)O(7); M.W.399) was isolated from Chamaecyparis obtusa; yatein significantly suppressed HSV-1 multiplication in HeLa cells without apparent cytotoxicity. To further localize the point in the HSV-1 replication cycle where arrest occurred, a set of key regulatory events leading to the viral multiplication was examined, including viral immediate-early (alpha) and late (gamma) gene expression and DNA replication. Results indicated that levels of glycoprotein B (gB) and gC mRNA expression in HeLa cells were impeded by yatein. Data from polymerase chain reaction showed that replication of HSV-1 DNA in HeLa cells was arrested by yatein. Furthermore, yatein decreased ICP0 and ICP4 gene expression in HeLa cells. Results of an electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated that yatein interrupted the formation of alpha-trans-induction factor/C1/Oct-1/GARAT multiprotein complex. The mechanisms of antiviral action of yatein seem to be mediated, by inhibiting HSV-1 alpha gene expression, including expression of the ICP0 and ICP4 genes, and by arresting HSV-1 DNA synthesis and structural protein expression in HeLa cells. These results suggest that yatein is an antiviral agent against HSV-1 replication.

  1. Development of a replication-competent lentivirus assay for dendritic cell-targeting lentiviral vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel C Farley

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is a current regulatory requirement to demonstrate absence of detectable replication-competent lentivirus (RCL in lentiviral vector products prior to use in clinical trials. Immune Design previously described an HIV-1-based integration-deficient lentiviral vector for use in cancer immunotherapy (VP02. VP02 is enveloped with E1001, a modified Sindbis virus glycoprotein which targets dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN expressed on dendritic cells in vivo. Vector enveloped with E1001 does not transduce T-cell lines used in standard HIV-1-based RCL assays, making current RCL testing formats unsuitable for testing VP02. We therefore developed a novel assay to test for RCL in clinical lots of VP02. This assay, which utilizes a murine leukemia positive control virus and a 293F cell line expressing the E1001 receptor DC-SIGN, meets a series of evaluation criteria defined in collaboration with US regulatory authorities and demonstrates the ability of the assay format to amplify and detect a hypothetical RCL derived from VP02 vector components. This assay was qualified and used to test six independent GMP production lots of VP02, in which no RCL was detected. We propose that the evaluation criteria used to rationally design this novel method should be considered when developing an RCL assay for any lentiviral vector.

  2. Adenovirus vector-mediated RNA interference for the inhibition of human parvovirus B19 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Marius R G; Kirste, Ariane G; Pozzuto, Tanja; Schubert, Steffen; Kandolf, Reinhard; Fechner, Henry; Bock, C-Thomas; Kurreck, Jens

    2013-09-01

    Human parvovirus B19 (B19V) has been considered to cause acute and chronic myocarditis, which is accompanied by endothelial dysfunction. Currently, no causative treatment option for B19V-infections is available. Since RNA interference (RNAi) has proven to be a highly potent antiviral approach, the aim of the current study was to develop an RNAi-based strategy to inhibit B19V replication. Three B19V-VP2-specific short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) were designed and tested for their silencing activity in reporter assays and the expression cassette of the best one was introduced into an adenoviral shuttle vector (Ad5). B19V-permissive UT7/Epo-S1 cells were infected with B19V and the RNAi triggers were delivered by the adenoviral vector (Ad5shVP2) 24h thereafter. The shRNA targeting the B19V-VP2 gene significantly suppressed VP2 mRNA levels as determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Additionally, also the expression levels of the non-targeted non-structural B19V-NS1 mRNA were strongly reduced. Our results demonstrate that vector-mediated delivery of shRNA expression cassettes targeting the structural B19-VP2 gene is a suitable approach to inhibit B19V replication.

  3. Roles of conserved residues within the pre-NH2-terminal domain of herpes simplex virus 1 DNA polymerase in replication and latency in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrell, Shariya L; Pesola, Jean M; Coen, Donald M

    2014-04-01

    The catalytic subunit of the herpes simplex virus 1 DNA polymerase (HSV-1 Pol) is essential for viral DNA synthesis and production of infectious virus in cell culture. While mutations that affect 5'-3' polymerase activity have been evaluated in animal models of HSV-1 infection, mutations that affect other functions of HSV-1 Pol have not. In a previous report, we utilized bacterial artificial chromosome technology to generate defined HSV-1 pol mutants with lesions in the previously uncharacterized pre-NH2-terminal domain. We found that the extreme N-terminal 42 residues (deletion mutant polΔN43) were dispensable for replication in cell culture, while residues 44-49 (alanine-substitution mutant polA6) were required for efficient viral DNA synthesis and production of infectious virus. In this study, we sought to address the importance of these conserved elements in viral replication in a mouse corneal infection model. Mutant virus polΔN43 exhibited no meaningful defect in acute or latent infection despite strong conservation of residues 1-42 with HSV-2 Pol. The polA6 mutation caused a modest defect in replication at the site of inoculation, and was severely impaired for ganglionic replication, even at high inocula that permitted efficient corneal replication. Additionally, the polA6 mutation resulted in reduced latency establishment and subsequent reactivation. Moreover, we found that the polA6 replication defect in cultured cells was exacerbated in resting cells as compared to dividing cells. These results reveal an important role for the conserved motif at residues 44-49 of HSV-1 Pol for ganglionic viral replication.

  4. Tumor-selective replication herpes simplex virus-based technology significantly improves clinical detection and prognostication of viable circulating tumor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wen; Bao, Li; Yang, Shaoxing;

    2016-01-01

    Detection of circulating tumor cells remains a significant challenge due to their vast physical and biological heterogeneity. We developed a cell-surface-marker-independent technology based on telomerase-specific, replication-selective oncolytic herpes-simplex-virus-1 that targets telomerase......Search, our method detected significantly higher positive rates in 40 NSCLC in all stages, including N0M0, N+M0 and M1, and was less affected by chemotherapy. This simple, robust and clinically-applicable technology detects viable CTCs from solid and hematopoietic malignancies in early to late stages...... blood samples from patients with 6 different solid organ carcinomas and lymphomas. Significantly, CTC-positive rates increased remarkably with tumor progression from N0M0, N+M0 to M1 in each of 5 tested cancers (lung, colon, liver, gastric and pancreatic cancer, and glioma). Among 21 non-small cell lung...

  5. Replication-competent infectious hepatitis B virus vectors carrying substantially sized transgenes by redesigned viral polymerase translation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zihua Wang

    Full Text Available Viral vectors are engineered virus variants able to deliver nonviral genetic information into cells, usually by the same routes as the parental viruses. For several virus families, replication-competent vectors carrying reporter genes have become invaluable tools for easy and quantitative monitoring of replication and infection, and thus also for identifying antivirals and virus susceptible cells. For hepatitis B virus (HBV, a small enveloped DNA virus causing B-type hepatitis, such vectors are not available because insertions into its tiny 3.2 kb genome almost inevitably affect essential replication elements. HBV replicates by reverse transcription of the pregenomic (pg RNA which is also required as bicistronic mRNA for the capsid (core protein and the reverse transcriptase (Pol; their open reading frames (ORFs overlap by some 150 basepairs. Translation of the downstream Pol ORF does not involve a conventional internal ribosome entry site (IRES. We reasoned that duplicating the overlap region and providing artificial IRES control for translation of both Pol and an in-between inserted transgene might yield a functional tricistronic pgRNA, without interfering with envelope protein expression. As IRESs we used a 22 nucleotide element termed Rbm3 IRES to minimize genome size increase. Model plasmids confirmed its activity even in tricistronic arrangements. Analogous plasmids for complete HBV genomes carrying 399 bp and 720 bp transgenes for blasticidin resistance (BsdR and humanized Renilla green fluorescent protein (hrGFP produced core and envelope proteins like wild-type HBV; while the hrGFP vector replicated poorly, the BsdR vector generated around 40% as much replicative DNA as wild-type HBV. Both vectors, however, formed enveloped virions which were infectious for HBV-susceptible HepaRG cells. Because numerous reporter and effector genes with sizes of around 500 bp or less are available, the new HBV vectors should become highly useful tools to

  6. Genital Herpes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genital herpes is a sexually transmitted disease (STD) caused by a herpes simplex virus (HSV). It can cause sores on ... also infect their babies during childbirth. Symptoms of herpes are called outbreaks. You usually get sores near ...

  7. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate inhibits herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 replication, and its activity may be mediated through dysregulation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Min; Chen, Yu; Cheng, Lin; Chu, Ying; Song, Hong-Yong; Wu, Zhi-Wei

    2013-08-01

    Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) is widely used as an antioxidant or an NF-κB inhibitor. It has been reported to inhibit the replication of human rhinoviruses, poliovirus, coxsackievirus, and influenza virus. In this paper, we report that PDTC could inhibit the replication of herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2). PDTC suppressed the expression of HSV-1 and HSV-2 viral immediate early (IE) and late (membrane protein gD) genes and the production of viral progeny. This antiviral property was mediated by the dithiocarbamate moiety of PDTC and required the presence of Zn(2+). Although PDTC could potently block reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, it was found that this property did not contribute to its anti-HSV activity. PDTC showed no activity in disrupting the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway activation induced by viral infection that was vital for the virus's propagation. We found that PDTC modulated cellular ubiquitination and, furthermore, influenced HSV-2-induced IκB-α degradation to inhibit NF-κB activation and enhanced PML stability in the nucleus, resulting in the inhibition of viral gene expression. These results suggested that the antiviral activity of PDTC might be mediated by its dysregulation of the cellular ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS).

  8. Rapid transient production in plants by replicating and non-replicating vectors yields high quality functional anti-HIV antibody

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sainsbury, Frank; Sack, Markus; Stadlmann, Johannes; Quendler, Heribert; Fischer, Rainer; Lomonossoff, George P

    2010-01-01

    .... To assess the quality of antibodies transiently expressed to high levels in plants, we have expressed and characterised the human anti-HIV monoclonal antibody, 2G12, using both replicating and non...

  9. Non-viral S/MAR vectors replicate episomally in vivo when provided with a selective advantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, S P; Argyros, O; Coutelle, C; Harbottle, R P

    2011-01-01

    The ideal gene therapy vector should enable persistent expression without the limitations of safety and reproducibility. We previously reported that a prototype plasmid vector, containing a scaffold matrix attachment region (S/MAR) domain and the luciferase reporter gene, showed transgene expression for at least 6 months following a single administration to MF1 mice. Following partial hepatectomy of the animals, however, we found no detectable vector replication and subsequent propagation in vivo. To overcome this drawback, we have now developed an in vivo liver selection strategy by which liver cells transfected with an S/MAR plasmid are provided with a survival advantage over non-transfected cells. This allows an enrichment of vectors that are capable of replicating and establishing themselves as extra-chromosomal entities in the liver. Accordingly, a novel S/MAR plasmid encoding the Bcl-2 gene was constructed; Bcl-2 expression confers resistance against apoptosis-mediated challenges by the Fas-activating antibody Jo2. Following hydrodynamic delivery to the livers of mice and frequent Jo2 administrations, we demonstrate that this Bcl-luciferase S/MAR plasmid is indeed capable of providing sustained luciferase reporter gene expression for over 3 months and that this plasmid replicates as an episomal entity in vivo. These results provide proof-of-principle that S/MAR vectors are capable of preventing transgene silencing, are resistant to integration and are able to confer mitotic stability in vivo when provided with a selective advantage.

  10. In vitro inhibition of herpes simplex virus type 1 replication by Mentha suaveolens essential oil and its main component piperitenone oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civitelli, Livia; Panella, Simona; Marcocci, Maria Elena; De Petris, Alberto; Garzoli, Stefania; Pepi, Federico; Vavala, Elisabetta; Ragno, Rino; Nencioni, Lucia; Palamara, Anna Teresa; Angiolella, Letizia

    2014-05-15

    Several essential oils exert in vitro activity against bacteria and viruses and, among these latter, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is known to develop resistance to commonly used antiviral agents. Thus, the effects of the essential oil derived from Mentha suaveolens (EOMS) and its active principle piperitenone oxide (PEO) were tested in in vitro experimental model of infection with HSV-1. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) was determined at 5.1μg/ml and 1.4μg/ml for EOMS and PEO, respectively. Australian tea tree oil (TTO) was used as control, revealing an IC50 of 13.2μg/ml. Moreover, a synergistic action against HSV-1 was observed when each oil was added in combination with acyclovir. In order to find out the mechanism of action, EOMS, PEO and TTO were added to the cells at different times during the virus life-cycle. Results obtained by yield reduction assay indicated that the antiviral activity of both compounds was principally due to an effect after viral adsorption. Indeed, no reduction of virus yield was observed when cells were treated during viral adsorption or pre-treated before viral infection. In particular, PEO exerted a strong inhibitory effect by interfering with a late step of HSV-1 life-cycle. HSV-1 infection is known to induce a pro-oxidative state with depletion of the main intracellular antioxidant glutathione and this redox change in the cell is important for viral replication. Interestingly, the treatment with PEO corrected this deficit, thus suggesting that the compound could interfere with some redox-sensitive cellular pathways exploited for viral replication. Overall our data suggest that both EOMS and PEO could be considered good candidates for novel anti-HSV-1 strategies, and need further exploration to better characterize the targets underlying their inhibition.

  11. [Influence of Japanese enciphalitis virus capsid protein on the self-replicate ability of JEV replicon vectors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Liu, Shan; Yang, Peng; Wang, Chao; Du, Yun; Sun, Zhiwei; Yu, Weiyuan

    2010-08-01

    To optimize a self-replicate Japanese enciphalitis virus (JEV) replicon, and to make it as an efficient vector to express the heterologous protein, we constructed three JEV replicons by PCR-based shortening the length of capsid genes. The vectors remained full or part of C gene, based on the JEV replicon pCTCJEV. Lac Z was selected as the reporter gene to verify the self-replicate ability of these DNA-based replicons. While transfected into the cell lines CME-4, which continuously expressing the JEV structure proteins C-prM-E, the JEV replicons pCMW-2M-1LACZ, pCMW-2M-3LACZ, which remained the first 23aa and 68aa of C protein, can express the reporter protein as the same level as pCMW-2M-LACZ with the full-length C protein. These results illustrated that the JEV replicon vector with 69-nt of the C gene can retain the self-replicate ability, and provide valuable tools to construct a possible vector for a long-lasting JEV RNA virus expression system.

  12. Development of an equine-tropic replication-competent lentivirus assay for equine infectious anemia virus-based lentiviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Daniel C; Bannister, Richard; Leroux-Carlucci, Marie A; Evans, Nerys E; Miskin, James E; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A

    2012-10-01

    The release of lentiviral vectors for clinical use requires the testing of vector material, production cells, and, if applicable, ex vivo-transduced cells for the presence of replication-competent lentivirus (RCL). Vectors derived from the nonprimate lentivirus equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) have been directly administered to patients in several clinical trials, with no toxicity observed to date. Because EIAV does not replicate in human cells, and because putative RCLs derived from vector components within human vector production cells would most likely be human cell-tropic, we previously developed an RCL assay using amphotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV) as a surrogate positive control and human cells as RCL amplification/indicator cells. Here we report an additional RCL assay that tests for the presence of theoretical "equine-tropic" RCLs. This approach provides further assurance of safety by detecting putative RCLs with an equine cell-specific tropism that might not be efficiently amplified by the human cell-based RCL assay. We tested the ability of accessory gene-deficient EIAV mutant viruses to replicate in a highly permissive equine cell line to direct our choice of a suitable EIAV-derived positive control. In addition, we report for the first time the mathematical rationale for use of the Poisson distribution to calculate minimal infectious dose of positive control virus and for use in monitoring assay positive/spike control failures in accumulating data sets. No RCLs have been detected in Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP)-compliant RCL assays to date, further demonstrating that RCL formation is highly unlikely in contemporary minimal lentiviral vector systems.

  13. Coordinated Leading and Lagging Strand DNA Synthesis by Using the Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Replication Complex and Minicircle DNA Templates ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stengel, Gudrun; Kuchta, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    The origin-specific replication of the herpes simplex virus 1 genome requires seven proteins: the helicase-primase (UL5-UL8-UL52), the DNA polymerase (UL30-UL42), the single-strand DNA binding protein (ICP8), and the origin-binding protein (UL9). We reconstituted these proteins, excluding UL9, on synthetic minicircular DNA templates and monitored leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis using the strand-specific incorporation of dTMP and dAMP. Critical features of the assays that led to efficient leading and lagging stand synthesis included high helicase-primase concentrations and a lagging strand template whose sequence resembled that of the viral DNA. Depending on the nature of the minicircle template, the replication complex synthesized leading and lagging strand products at molar ratios varying between 1:1 and 3:1. Lagging strand products (∼0.2 to 0.6 kb) were significantly shorter than leading strand products (∼2 to 10 kb), and conditions that stimulated primer synthesis led to shorter lagging strand products. ICP8 was not essential; however, its presence stimulated DNA synthesis and increased the length of both leading and lagging strand products. Curiously, human DNA polymerase α (p70-p180 or p49-p58-p70-p180), which improves the utilization of RNA primers synthesized by herpesvirus primase on linear DNA templates, had no effect on the replication of the minicircles. The lack of stimulation by polymerase α suggests the existence of a macromolecular assembly that enhances the utilization of RNA primers and may functionally couple leading and lagging strand synthesis. Evidence for functional coupling is further provided by our observations that (i) leading and lagging strand synthesis produce equal amounts of DNA, (ii) leading strand synthesis proceeds faster under conditions that disable primer synthesis on the lagging strand, and (iii) conditions that accelerate helicase-catalyzed DNA unwinding stimulate decoupled leading strand synthesis but not

  14. Stimulation of the Replication of ICP0-Null Mutant Herpes Simplex Virus 1 and pp71-Deficient Human Cytomegalovirus by Epstein-Barr Virus Tegument Protein BNRF1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yongxu; Orr, Anne

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT It is now well established that several cellular proteins that are components of promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML NBs, also known as ND10) have restrictive effects on herpesvirus infections that are countered by viral proteins that are either present in the virion particle or are expressed during the earliest stages of infection. For example, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) immediate early (IE) protein ICP0 overcomes the restrictive effects of PML-NB components PML, Sp100, hDaxx, and ATRX while human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) IE protein IE1 targets PML and Sp100, and its tegument protein pp71 targets hDaxx and ATRX. The functions of these viral regulatory proteins are in part interchangeable; thus, both IE1 and pp71 stimulate the replication of ICP0-null mutant HSV-1, while ICP0 increases plaque formation by pp71-deficient HCMV. Here, we extend these studies by examining proteins that are expressed by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). We report that EBV tegument protein BNRF1, discovered by other investigators to target the hDaxx/ATRX complex, increases the replication of both ICP0-null mutant HSV-1 and pp71-deficient HCMV. In addition, EBV protein EBNA-LP, which targets Sp100, also augments ICP0-null mutant HSV-1 replication. The combination of these two EBV regulatory proteins had a greater effect than each one individually. These findings reinforce the concept that disruption of the functions of PML-NB proteins is important for efficient herpesvirus infections. IMPORTANCE Whether a herpesvirus initiates a lytic infection in a host cell or establishes quiescence or latency is influenced by events that occur soon after the viral genome has entered the host cell nucleus. Certain cellular proteins respond in a restrictive manner to the invading pathogen's DNA, while viral functions are expressed that counteract the cell-mediated repression. One aspect of cellular restriction of herpesvirus infections is mediated by components of nuclear structures known as

  15. Novel viral vectors utilizing intron splice-switching to activate genome rescue, expression and replication in targeted cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Andaloussi Samir

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The outcome of virus infection depends from the precise coordination of viral gene expression and genome replication. The ability to control and regulate these processes is therefore important for analysis of infection process. Viruses are also useful tools in bio- and gene technology; they can efficiently kill cancer cells and trigger immune responses to tumors. However, the methods for constructing tissue- or cell-type specific viruses typically suffer from low target-cell specificity and a high risk of reversion. Therefore novel and universal methods of regulation of viral infection are also important for therapeutic application of virus-based systems. Methods Aberrantly spliced introns were introduced into crucial gene-expression units of adenovirus vector and alphavirus DNA/RNA layered vectors and their effects on the viral gene expression, replication and/or the release of infectious genomes were studied in cell culture. Transfection of the cells with splice-switching oligonucleotides was used to correct the introduced functional defect(s. Results It was demonstrated that viral gene expression, replication and/or the release of infectious genomes can be blocked by the introduction of aberrantly spliced introns. The insertion of such an intron into an adenovirus vector reduced the expression of the targeted gene more than fifty-fold. A similar insertion into an alphavirus DNA/RNA layered vector had a less dramatic effect; here, only the release of the infectious transcript was suppressed but not the subsequent replication and spread of the virus. However the insertion of two aberrantly spliced introns resulted in an over one hundred-fold reduction in the infectivity of the DNA/RNA layered vector. Furthermore, in both systems the observed effects could be reverted by the delivery of splice-switching oligonucleotide(s, which corrected the splicing defects. Conclusions Splice-switch technology, originally developed for

  16. Herpes simplex virus/Sleeping Beauty vector-based embryonic gene transfer using the HSB5 mutant: loss of apparent transposition hyperactivity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Silva, Suresh; Mastrangelo, Michael A; Lotta, Louis T; Burris, Clark A; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Ivics, Zoltán; Bowers, William J

    2010-11-01

    The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system has been successfully used as a gene delivery tool in nonviral and viral vector platforms. Since its initial reconstruction, a series of hyperactive mutants of SB have been generated. Questions remain as to whether the enhanced in vitro activities of these SB transposase mutants translate to the in vivo setting, and whether such increased integration efficiencies will ultimately compromise the safety profile of the transposon platform by raising the risk of genomic insertional mutagenesis. Herein, we compared the in vivo impact of a herpes simplex virus (HSV) amplicon-vectored "wild-type" SB transposase (SB10) and a "hyperactive" SB mutant (HSB5), codelivered in utero with the HSVT-βgeo transposable reporter amplicon vector to embryonic day 14.5 C57BL/6 mice. The SB10 and HSB5 transposases do not disparately affect the viability and development of injected mouse embryos. Quantitation of brain-resident βgeo expression on postnatal day 21 revealed that mice receiving HSB5 exhibited only a trending increase in transgene expression compared with the SB10-infused group, an outcome that did not mirror the marked enhancement of HSB5-mediated transposition observed in vitro. These findings indicate that in vivo application of hyperactive SB mutants, although not differentially genotoxic to the developing mouse embryo, does not necessarily provide a significant therapeutic advantage over the employment of a lesser active SB when delivered in the context of the HSV/SB amplicon platform.

  17. A review study on the effect of Iranian herbal medicines against in vitro replication of herpes simplex virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad-Taghi Moradi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: There are a number of published data indicating in vitro anti-HSV activity of some of Iranian herbal extracts with no systematic review to discuss these results. Therefore, this article was aimed to review and discuss the methods carried out and the phytochemistry and bioactivity of the extracts used and also conclusions provided in these publications. Materials and Methods: Published articles both in English (from Medline, Science Direct, EMBASE, Scopus, Pro Quest, Google scholar, Cochrane Library and in Persian (from SID, Iran Medex and Magiran databases, from 1966 to October 2014 were incorporated in this review. The in vitro studies that lacked CC50, IC50, were excluded. Results: Only 42 published reports were found to examine Iranian herbs against HSV replication in vitro. Seventeen out of 42 studies in which 23 kinds of medicinal plants were subjected to crude extraction were included. The review of data showed that some of the herbal extracts including Hyssopus officinalis methanolic extract, Melissa officinalis aqueous extract, Quercus persica L. hydroalcoholic extract and Securigeras ecuridaca methanolic extract with selective index (SI of 234, 877, >778 and 250, respectively were highly effective against HSV in vitro. Conclusion: More comprehensive studies using more advanced methods are needed to be done to achieve promising anti-HSV agents from the bioactive compounds isolated from these herbs.

  18. A review study on the effect of Iranian herbal medicines against in vitro replication of herpes simplex virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Mohammad-Taghi; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Karimi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objective: There are a number of published data indicating in vitro anti-HSV activity of some of Iranian herbal extracts with no systematic review to discuss these results. Therefore, this article was aimed to review and discuss the methods carried out and the phytochemistry and bioactivity of the extracts used and also conclusions provided in these publications. Materials and Methods: Published articles both in English (from Medline, Science Direct, EMBASE, Scopus, Pro Quest, Google scholar, Cochrane Library) and in Persian (from SID, Iran Medex and Magiran) databases, from 1966 to October 2014 were incorporated in this review. The in vitro studies that lacked CC50, IC50, were excluded. Results: Only 42 published reports were found to examine Iranian herbs against HSV replication in vitro. Seventeen out of 42 studies in which 23 kinds of medicinal plants were subjected to crude extraction were included. The review of data showed that some of the herbal extracts including Hyssopus officinalis methanolic extract, Melissa officinalis aqueous extract, Quercus persica L. hydroalcoholic extract and Securigeras ecuridaca methanolic extract with selective index (SI) of 234, 877, >778 and 250, respectively were highly effective against HSV in vitro. Conclusion: More comprehensive studies using more advanced methods are needed to be done to achieve promising anti-HSV agents from the bioactive compounds isolated from these herbs.

  19. A review study on the effect of Iranian herbal medicines against in vitro replication of herpes simplex virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Mohammad-Taghi; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Karimi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    There are a number of published data indicating in vitro anti-HSV activity of some of Iranian herbal extracts with no systematic review to discuss these results. Therefore, this article was aimed to review and discuss the methods carried out and the phytochemistry and bioactivity of the extracts used and also conclusions provided in these publications. Published articles both in English (from Medline, Science Direct, EMBASE, Scopus, Pro Quest, Google scholar, Cochrane Library) and in Persian (from SID, Iran Medex and Magiran) databases, from 1966 to October 2014 were incorporated in this review. The in vitro studies that lacked CC50, IC50, were excluded. Only 42 published reports were found to examine Iranian herbs against HSV replication in vitro. Seventeen out of 42 studies in which 23 kinds of medicinal plants were subjected to crude extraction were included. The review of data showed that some of the herbal extracts including Hyssopus officinalis methanolic extract, Melissa officinalis aqueous extract, Quercus persica L. hydroalcoholic extract and Securigeras ecuridaca methanolic extract with selective index (SI) of 234, 877, >778 and 250, respectively were highly effective against HSV in vitro. More comprehensive studies using more advanced methods are needed to be done to achieve promising anti-HSV agents from the bioactive compounds isolated from these herbs.

  20. Herpes - oral

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000606.htm Herpes - oral To use the sharing features on this page, ... 374. Read More Atopic dermatitis Cancer Fever Genital herpes Mouth ulcers Vesicles Review Date 8/14/2015 Updated ...

  1. Immunogenicity and efficacy of intramuscular replication-defective and subunit vaccines against herpes simplex virus type 2 in the mouse genital model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Delagrave

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2 is a sexually transmitted virus that is highly prevalent worldwide, causing a range of symptoms that result in significant healthcare costs and human suffering. ACAM529 is a replication-defective vaccine candidate prepared by growing the previously described dl5-29 on a cell line appropriate for GMP manufacturing. This vaccine, when administered subcutaneously, was previously shown to protect mice from a lethal vaginal HSV-2 challenge and to afford better protection than adjuvanted glycoprotein D (gD in guinea pigs. Here we show that ACAM529 given via the intramuscular route affords significantly greater immunogenicity and protection in comparison with subcutaneous administration in the mouse vaginal HSV-2 challenge model. Further, we describe a side-by-side comparison of intramuscular ACAM529 with a gD vaccine across a range of challenge virus doses. While differences in protection against death are not significant, ACAM529 protects significantly better against mucosal infection, reducing peak challenge virus shedding at the highest challenge dose by over 500-fold versus 5-fold for gD. Over 27% (11/40 of ACAM529-immunized animals were protected from viral shedding while 2.5% (1/40 were protected by the gD vaccine. Similarly, 35% (7/20 of mice vaccinated with ACAM529 were protected from infection of their dorsal root ganglia while none of the gD-vaccinated mice were protected. These results indicate that measuring infection of the vaginal mucosa and of dorsal root ganglia over a range of challenge doses is more sensitive than evaluating survival at a single challenge dose as a means of directly comparing vaccine efficacy in the mouse vaginal challenge model. The data also support further investigation of ACAM529 for prophylaxis in human subjects.

  2. Development of conditionally replicating integrase defective lentiviral vectors for Epstein-Barr virus gene therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Blasi, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Integrase defective lentiviral vectors show promise for achieving gene expression without integration, preserving some benefits of LVs, whereas reducing the potentially detrimental risk of insertional mutagenesis. Numerous reports supported the ability of these vectors to confer long-term gene expression in slowly dividing cell types for potentially corrective gene expression. These reports also highlighted additional applications of these vectors as delivery platforms for alternate integrati...

  3. Highly efficient modification of bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) using novel shuttle vectors containing the R6Kgamma origin of replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Shiaoching; Yang, Xiangdong William; Li, Chenjian; Heintz, Nathaniel

    2002-12-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) mediated transgenesis has proven to be a highly reliable way to obtain accurate transgene expression for in vivo studies of gene expression and function. A rate-limiting step in use of this technology to characterize large numbers of genes has been the process with which BACs can be modified by homologous recombination in Escherichia coli. We report here a highly efficient method for modifying BACs by using a novel set of shuttle vectors that contain the R6Kgamma origin for DNA replication, the E. coli RecA gene for recombination, and the SacB gene for negative selection. These new vectors greatly increased the ease with which one can clone the shuttle vectors, as well as screen for co-integrated and resolved clones. Furthermore, we simplify the shuttle vector cloning to one step by incorporation of a "built-in" resolution cassette for rapid removal of the unwanted vector sequences. This new system has been used to modify a dozen BACs. It is well suited for efficient production of modified BACs for use in a variety of in vivo studies.

  4. Characterization of large deletions occurring during a single round of retrovirus vector replication: novel deletion mechanism involving errors in strand transfer.

    OpenAIRE

    Pulsinelli, G A; Temin, H M

    1991-01-01

    Retroviruses mutate at a high rate during replication. We used a spleen necrosis virus-based vector system and helper cell line to characterize mutations occurring during a single round of retrovirus replication. The vector used, JD216HyNeo, codes for two drug resistance genes, hygromycin resistance (hygro) and neomycin resistance (neo). The downstream neo gene is expressed only when a mutation alleviates a block to splicing which is located in the upstream hygro gene. The mutations allowing ...

  5. Expression of heterologous genes from an IRES translational cassette in replication competent murine leukemia virus vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Thomas; Duch, Mogens R.; Carrasco, M L

    1999-01-01

    We describe replication competent retroviruses capable of expressing heterologous genes during multiple rounds of infection. An internal ribosome entry site (IRES) from encephalomyocarditis virus was inserted in the U3 region of Akv- and SL3-3-murine leukemia viruses (MLV) to direct translation o...

  6. Vectores

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Documento que contiene la explicación sobre las temáticas de Sistemas coordenados, Cantidades vectoriales y escalares, Algunas propiedades de los vectores, Componentes de un vector y vectores unitarios

  7. Mucosal vaccination with heterologous viral vectored vaccine targeting subdominant SIV accessory antigens strongly inhibits early viral replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Huanbin; Andersson, Anne-Marie Carola; Ragonnaud, Emeline

    2017-01-01

    Conventional HIV T cell vaccine strategies have not been successful in containing acute peak viremia, nor in providing long-term control. We immunized rhesus macaques intramuscularly and rectally using a heterologous adenovirus vectored SIV vaccine regimen encoding normally weakly immunogenic tat......, vif, rev and vpr antigens fused to the MHC class II associated invariant chain. Immunizations induced broad T cell responses in all vaccinees. Following up to 10 repeated low-dose intrarectal challenges, vaccinees suppressed early viral replication (P=0.01) and prevented the peak viremia in 5....../6 animals. Despite consistently undetectable viremia in 2 out of 6 vaccinees, all animals showed evidence of infection induced immune responses indicating that infection had taken place. Vaccinees, with and without detectable viremia better preserved their rectal CD4+ T cell population and had reduced...

  8. Serum herpes simplex antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2. HSV-1 most often causes cold sores (oral herpes). HSV-2 causes genital herpes. How the Test ... whether a person has ever been infected with oral or genital herpes . It looks for antibodies to herpes simplex virus ...

  9. Genital Herpes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fetal scalp electrode (tiny wire used to check fetal heart rate). Cesarean birth may be recommended if you have an active herpes sore or prodromal symptoms such as pain or burning when you go into labor. After ...

  10. Genital herpes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious ... JT and Corey L. Herpes simplex virus. In: Mandell GL, Bennett JE, Dolin R, eds. Mandell, Douglas, ...

  11. Activation of PI3K/AKT and ERK MAPK signal pathways is required for the induction of lytic cycle replication of Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated herpesvirus by herpes simplex virus type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lv Zhigang

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV is causally linked to several acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related malignancies, including Kaposi's sarcoma (KS, primary effusion lymphoma (PEL and a subset of multicentric Castleman's disease. Regulation of viral lytic replication is critical to the initiation and progression of KS. Recently, we reported that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 was an important cofactor that activated lytic cycle replication of KSHV. Here, we further investigated the possible signal pathways involved in HSV-1-induced reactivation of KSHV. Results By transfecting a series of dominant negative mutants and protein expressing constructs and using pharmacologic inhibitors, we found that either Janus kinase 1 (JAK1/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 or JAK1/STAT6 signaling failed to regulate HSV-1-induced KSHV replication. However, HSV-1 infection of BCBL-1 cells activated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/protein kinase B (PKB, also called AKT pathway and inactivated phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β. PTEN/PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β pathway was found to be involved in HSV-1-induced KSHV reactivation. Additionally, extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway also partially contributed to HSV-1-induced KSHV replication. Conclusions HSV-1 infection stimulated PI3K/AKT and ERK MAPK signaling pathways that in turn contributed to KSHV reactivation, which provided further insights into the molecular mechanism controlling KSHV lytic replication, particularly in the context of HSV-1 and KSHV co-infection.

  12. Vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeriis, Morten; van Leeuwen, Theo

    2017-01-01

    This article revisits the concept of vectors, which, in Kress and van Leeuwen’s Reading Images (2006), plays a crucial role in distinguishing between ‘narrative’, action-oriented processes and ‘conceptual’, state-oriented processes. The use of this concept in image analysis has usually focused...... on the most salient vectors, and this works well, but many images contain a plethora of vectors, which makes their structure quite different from the linguistic transitivity structures with which Kress and van Leeuwen have compared ‘narrative’ images. It can also be asked whether facial expression vectors...... should be taken into account in discussing ‘reactions’, which Kress and van Leeuwen link only to eyeline vectors. Finally, the question can be raised as to whether actions are always realized by vectors. Drawing on a re-reading of Rudolf Arnheim’s account of vectors, these issues are outlined...

  13. In vivo gene therapy for pyridoxine-induced neuropathy by herpes simplex virus-mediated gene transfer of neurotrophin-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Munmun; Wolfe, Darren; Huang, Shaohua; Goss, James; Glorioso, Joseph C; Mata, Marina; Fink, David J

    2002-01-01

    Neurotrophic factors have been demonstrated to prevent the development of peripheral neuropathy in animal models, but the therapeutic use of these factors in human disease has been limited by the short serum half-life and dose-limiting side effects of these potent peptides. We used peripheral subcutaneous inoculation with a replication-incompetent, genomic herpes simplex virus-based vector containing the coding sequence for neurotrophin-3 to transduce sensory neurons of the rat dorsal root ganglion in vivo, and found that expression of neurotrophin-3 from the vector protected peripheral sensory axons from neuropathy induced by intoxication with pyridoxine assessed by electrophysiological (foot sensory response amplitude, and conduction velocity, and H-wave), histological (nerve morphology and morphometry), and behavioral measures of proprioceptive function. In vivo gene transfer using herpes simplex virus vectors provides a unique option for treatment of diseases of the sensory peripheral nervous system.

  14. Suppression of leaky expression of adenovirus genes by insertion of microRNA-targeted sequences in the replication-incompetent adenovirus vector genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahori Shimizu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Leaky expression of adenovirus (Ad genes occurs following transduction with a conventional replication-incompetent Ad vector, leading to an induction of cellular immunity against Ad proteins and Ad protein-induced toxicity, especially in the late phase following administration. To suppress the leaky expression of Ad genes, we developed novel Ad vectors by incorporating four tandem copies of sequences with perfect complementarity to miR-122a or miR-142-3p into the 3′-untranslated region (UTR of the E2A, E4, or pIX gene, which were mainly expressed from the Ad vector genome after transduction. These Ad vectors easily grew to high titers comparable to those of a conventional Ad vector in conventional 293 cells. The leaky expression of these Ad genes in mouse organs was significantly suppressed by 2- to 100-fold, compared with a conventional Ad vector, by insertion of the miRNA-targeted sequences. Notably, the Ad vector carrying the miR-122a–targeted sequences into the 3′-UTR of the E4 gene expressed higher and longer-term transgene expression and more than 20-fold lower levels of all the Ad early and late genes examined in the liver than a conventional Ad vector. miR-122a–mediated suppression of the E4 gene expression in the liver significantly reduced the hepatotoxicity which an Ad vector causes via both adaptive and non-adaptive immune responses.

  15. Transduction and oncolytic profile of a potent replication-competent adenovirus 11p vector (RCAd11pGFP in colon carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Silver

    Full Text Available Replication-competent adenovirus type 5 (Ad5 vectors promise to be more efficient gene delivery vehicles than their replication-deficient counterparts, and chimeric Ad5 vectors that are capable of targeting CD46 are more effective than Ad5 vectors with native fibers. Although several strategies have been used to improve gene transduction and oncolysis, either by modifying their tropism or enhancing their replication capacity, some tumor cells are still relatively refractory to infection by chimeric Ad5. The oncolytic effects of the vectors are apparent in certain tumors but not in others. Here, we report the biological and oncolytic profiles of a replication-competent adenovirus 11p vector (RCAd11pGFP in colon carcinoma cells. CD46 was abundantly expressed in all cells studied; however, the transduction efficiency of RCAd11pGFP varied. RCAd11pGFP efficiently transduced HT-29, HCT-8, and LS174T cells, but it transduced T84 cells, derived from a colon cancer metastasis in the lung, less efficiently. Interestingly, RCAd11p replicated more rapidly in the T84 cells than in HCT-8 and LS174T cells and as rapidly as in HT-29 cells. Cell toxicity and proliferation assays indicated that RCAd11pGFP had the highest cell-killing activities in HT29 and T84 cells, the latter of which also expressed the highest levels of glycoproteins of the carcinoma embryonic antigen (CEA family. In vivo experiments showed significant growth inhibition of T84 and HT-29 tumors in xenograft mice treated with either RCAd11pGFP or Ad11pwt compared to untreated controls. Thus, RCAd11pGFP has a potent cytotoxic effect on colon carcinoma cells.

  16. Retroviral Replicating Vectors Deliver Cytosine Deaminase Leading to Targeted 5-Fluorouracil-Mediated Cytotoxicity in Multiple Human Cancer Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twitty, Chris G; Diago, Oscar R; Hogan, Daniel J; Burrascano, Cindy; Ibanez, Carlos E; Jolly, Douglas J; Ostertag, Derek

    2016-02-01

    Toca 511 is a modified retroviral replicating vector based on Moloney γ-retrovirus with an amphotropic envelope. As an investigational cancer treatment, Toca 511 preferentially infects cancer cells without direct cell lysis and encodes an enhanced yeast cytosine deaminase that converts the antifungal drug 5-fluorocytosine to the anticancer drug, 5-fluorouracil. A panel of established human cancer cell lines, derived from glioblastoma, colon, and breast cancer tissue, was used to evaluate parameters critical for effective anticancer activity. Gene transfer, cytosine deaminase production, conversion of 5-fluorocytosine to 5-fluorouracil, and subsequent cell killing occurred in all lines tested. We observed >50% infection within 25 days in all lines and 5-fluorocytosine LD50 values between 0.02 and 6 μg/ml. Although we did not identify a small number of key criteria, these studies do provide a straightforward approach to rapidly gauge the probability of a Toca 511 and 5-fluorocytosine treatment effect in various cancer indications: a single MTS assay of maximally infected cancer cell lines to determine 5-fluorocytosine LD50. The data suggest that, although there can be variation in susceptibility to Toca 511 and 5-fluorocytosine because of multiple mechanistic factors, this therapy may be applicable to a broad range of cancer types and individuals.

  17. Herpes simplex type1:lacZ recombinant viruses. II. Microtiter plate-based colorimetric assays for the discovery of new antiherpes agents and the points at which such agents disrupt the viral replication cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicker, I B; Blasecki, J W; Seetharam, S

    1995-11-01

    A panel of microtiter plate-based colorimetric assays for monitoring HSV-1 growth has been made. The panel consists of 4 different HSV-1 (strain KOS) lacZ recombinant viruses which express beta-galactosidase under the control of different HSV-1 promoters derived from each class of herpes simplex gene expression: immediate-early (ICP4), early (TK), delayed early (gD) and late (gC). Inhibitors of HSV-1 growth were evaluated using differential effects on each of the reporter viruses as a measure of which points in the viral replication cycle an inhibitor was acting. Aphidicolin (DNA synthesis inhibitor) was studied as a model compound. At an m.o.i. of 0.05, at 24 h postinfection (h p.i.), aphidicolin inhibited 80% of viral growth at 1 micrograms/ml, as determined by a reduction in ICP4-driven activity within the second cycle of infection. At m.o.i. 5, within the first infectious cycle, aphidicolin had no effect on the signals from either the ICP4 or TK viruses at 3 micrograms/ml, while largely suppressing gD and fully inhibiting gC-driven signals at 2 micrograms/ml. This profile is consistent with the behavior expected of a DNA synthesis inhibitor. Five inhibitors of unknown mechanism were evaluated. Two compounds inhibited ICP4-driven activity within the first infectious cycle and were classified as potential inhibitors of viral entry, uncoating or IE gene expression (XF884, BT318). One compound inhibited gD and gC-driven activity without inhibiting signal from the ICP4 and TK viruses, and was classified as a potential DNA synthesis inhibitor (DS810). Two compounds (S5193, ER622) had effects on gD- and gC-driven activity which were somewhat different from aphidicolin and DS810, but which could be interpreted as inhibition of viral assembly and/or egress. The potency of XF884 varied with the time postinfection at which it was added to cells (IC50 3.7 to > 10 micrograms/ml) while the effects of BT318 were independent of time of addition (IC50 11.4 micrograms/ml). These

  18. Genital Herpes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... best way to prevent genital herpes is abstinence. Teens who do have sex must properly use a latex condom every time ... Date reviewed: February 2016 previous 1 • ... Boyfriend Has an STD Before We Have Sex? Telling Your Partner You Have an STD Contact ...

  19. Anal herpes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andre Goulart; Jose Pinto; Pedro Leão

    2017-01-01

    ... that irradiated to the buttocks and the physical examination revealed red bumps with ulceration ( figure 1 ). Anal herpes was suspected and the patient was treated with an antiviral (brivudine) and carbamazepine for symptomatic relief. Seven days after treatment the patient had complete resolution of his symptoms and there were no cut...

  20. Expression of biologically active atrial natriuretic factor following intrahepatic injection of a replication-defective adenoviral vector in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chetboul, V; Adam, M; Deprez, I; Ambriovic, A; Rosenberg, D; Crespeau, F; Saana, M; Pham, I; Eloit, M; Adnot, S; Pouchelon, J L

    1999-01-20

    Atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) is a potent natriuretic, diuretic, and vasoactive hormone produced and released by atrial cardiomyocytes. We investigated whether adenovirus-mediated ANF gene delivery to dogs leads to a sustained increase in circulating ANF levels resulting in long-lasting biological effects. An adenoviral vector containing the canine ANF cDNA under the control of the Rous sarcoma virus 3' long terminal repeat (AdRSV-ANF) was injected via the intrahepatic route to nonvaccinated 2-month-old dogs. In the first group of four dogs injected with AdRSV-ANF (10(10.2) TCID50), a short-lived increase in plasma ANF concentrations not associated with biological effects occurred 8-10 days after the injection, as compared with four control dogs injected with an adenovirus encoding a luciferase reporter gene (AdRSV-luc). In a second series of experiments, six dogs received AdRSV-ANF at a dose of 10(10) TCID50 and a replication-defective type 5 adenovirus harboring a modified VAI gene (Ad-VAr) at the same dose. Sustained increases in plasma ANF concentrations and urinary cGMP excretion starting on day 2 and persisting until day 20 were seen, as well as concomitant elevations in natriuresis and diuresis, a transient increase in cardiac output, and a delay in body weight gain, as compared with control dogs injected with AdRSV-luc/Ad-VAr. These results show that adenovirus-mediated ANF gene expression can lead to systemic biological effects in dogs, a finding of potential relevance for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases and sodium-retaining disorders.

  1. A novel bicistronic high-capacity gutless adenovirus vector that drives constitutive expression of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase and tet-inducible expression of Flt3L for glioma therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puntel, Mariana; Muhammad, A K M G; Candolfi, Marianela; Salem, Alireza; Yagiz, Kader; Farrokhi, Catherine; Kroeger, Kurt M; Xiong, Weidong; Curtin, James F; Liu, Chunyan; Bondale, Niyati S; Lerner, Jonathan; Pechnick, Robert N; Palmer, Donna; Ng, Philip; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Castro, Maria G

    2010-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a deadly primary brain tumor. Conditional cytotoxic/immune-stimulatory gene therapy (Ad-TK and Ad-Flt3L) elicits tumor regression and immunological memory in rodent GBM models. Since the majority of patients enrolled in clinical trials would exhibit adenovirus immunity, which could curtail transgene expression and therapeutic efficacy, we used high-capacity adenovirus vectors (HC-Ads) as a gene delivery platform. Herein, we describe for the first time a novel bicistronic HC-Ad driving constitutive expression of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) and inducible Tet-mediated expression of Flt3L within a single-vector platform. We achieved anti-GBM therapeutic efficacy with no overt toxicities using this bicistronic HC-Ad even in the presence of systemic Ad immunity. The bicistronic HC-Ad-TK/TetOn-Flt3L was delivered into intracranial gliomas in rats. Survival, vector biodistribution, neuropathology, systemic toxicity, and neurobehavioral deficits were assessed for up to 1 year posttreatment. Therapeutic efficacy was also assessed in animals preimmunized against Ads. We demonstrate therapeutic efficacy, with vector genomes being restricted to the brain injection site and an absence of overt toxicities. Importantly, antiadenoviral immunity did not inhibit therapeutic efficacy. These data represent the first report of a bicistronic vector platform driving the expression of two therapeutic transgenes, i.e., constitutive HSV1-TK and inducible Flt3L genes. Further, our data demonstrate no promoter interference and optimum gene delivery and expression from within this single-vector platform. Analysis of the efficacy, safety, and toxicity of this bicistronic HC-Ad vector in an animal model of GBM strongly supports further preclinical testing and downstream process development of HC-Ad-TK/TetOn-Flt3L for a future phase I clinical trial for GBM.

  2. Genital Herpes (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Genital Herpes KidsHealth > For Parents > Genital Herpes Print A A A What's in this article? Symptoms Contagiousness Treatment Prevention Getting Help Genital herpes is a sexually transmitted disease (STD) that's usually ...

  3. Herpes simplex virus type Ⅰ: A vector of gene therapy for chronic pain%单纯疱疹病毒Ⅰ型——慢性痛基因治疗的载体

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张红; 李伟彦

    2011-01-01

    Chronic unremitting pain is a major health concern and does not respond well to traditional pharmacotherapy. Hie neurotropic herpes simplex virus type I (HSV-1) based vector is suitable for gene transfer application in the nervous system. Subcutaneous inoculation of an HSV-I vector effectively delivers pain-modulating transgenes to sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglion, and the release of transgene-coded inhibitory neurotransmitters or anti-inflammatory peptides reduces pain-related behaviors in rodent models of chronic inflammatory and neuropathic pain. This novel approach, which alleviates pain without systemic side effects and can be used in combination with standard pain treatments, is of great potential interest. This article gives an overview on the development of the HSV-1-based vector in the treatment of chronic pain.%慢性顽固性疼痛严重危害人类健康,传统的药物治疗效果不佳.单纯疱疹病毒Ⅰ型(herpes simplex virus typeⅠ,HSV-Ⅰ)载体具有天然嗜神经性,适合神经系统转基因治疗.皮下接种HSV-Ⅰ载体,能有效传递疼痛调节基因至背根神经节(dorsal root ganglion,DRG)的感觉神经元,编码抑制性神经递质或抗炎递质,减轻了炎性和神经病理性疼痛.这种全新的止痛方法,没有全身用药的不良反应,能与标准的止痛治疗措施联合应用,显示了巨大的潜力.现就HSV-I在慢性疼痛治疗中的应用作一综述.

  4. Mutational library analysis of selected amino acids in the receptor binding domain of envelope of Akv murine leukemia virus by conditionally replication competent bicistronic vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahrami, Shervin; Pedersen, Finn Skou; Duch, Mogens R.

    2003-01-01

    envelope expression. This vector functions as a replication competent mini-virus in a culture of NIH 3T3 derived semi-packaging cells that express the viral Gag and Pol proteins. Titers comparable to those of wild type virus were achieved by this system. To test this vector system, we created a random......The envelope protein of retroviruses is responsible for viral entry into host cells. Here, we describe a mutational library approach to dissect functional domains of the envelope protein involving a retroviral vector, which expresses both the envelope protein of Akv murine leukemia virus (MLV...... mutational library of Arg 85 and Asp 86 in the first variable region of Akv envelope protein. Homologous amino acids to Asp 86 in Moloney and Friend murine leukemia viruses are thought to be directly involved in receptor binding. Subsequent selection of mutants capable of infecting murine NIH 3T3 cells...

  5. Inhibition of hepatitis B virus replication by helper dependent adenoviral vectors expressing artificial anti-HBV pri-miRs from a liver-specific promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowa, Mohube Betty; Crowther, Carol; Ely, Abdullah; Arbuthnot, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Research on applying RNA interference (RNAi) to counter HBV replication has led to identification of potential therapeutic sequences. However, before clinical application liver-specific expression and efficient delivery of these sequences remain an important objective. We recently reported short-term inhibition of HBV replication in vivo by using helper dependent adenoviral vectors (HD Ads) expressing anti-HBV sequences from a constitutively active cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter. To develop the use of liver-specific transcription regulatory elements we investigated the utility of the murine transthyretin (MTTR) promoter for expression of anti-HBV primary microRNAs (pri-miRs). HD Ads containing MTTR promoter effected superior expression of anti-HBV pri-miRs in mice compared to HD Ads containing the CMV promoter. MTTR-containing HD Ads resulted in HBV replication knockdown of up to 94% in mice. HD Ads expressing trimeric anti-HBV pri-miRs silenced HBV replication for 5 weeks. We previously showed that the product of the codelivered lacZ gene induces an immune response, and the duration of HBV silencing in vivo is likely to be attenuated by this effect. Nevertheless, expression of anti-HBV pri-miRs from MTTR promoter is well suited to countering HBV replication and development of HD Ads through attenuation of their immunostimulatory effects should advance their clinical utility.

  6. Inhibition of Hepatitis B Virus Replication by Helper Dependent Adenoviral Vectors Expressing Artificial Anti-HBV Pri-miRs from a Liver-Specific Promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohube Betty Mowa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on applying RNA interference (RNAi to counter HBV replication has led to identification of potential therapeutic sequences. However, before clinical application liver-specific expression and efficient delivery of these sequences remain an important objective. We recently reported short-term inhibition of HBV replication in vivo by using helper dependent adenoviral vectors (HD Ads expressing anti-HBV sequences from a constitutively active cytomegalovirus (CMV promoter. To develop the use of liver-specific transcription regulatory elements we investigated the utility of the murine transthyretin (MTTR promoter for expression of anti-HBV primary microRNAs (pri-miRs. HD Ads containing MTTR promoter effected superior expression of anti-HBV pri-miRs in mice compared to HD Ads containing the CMV promoter. MTTR-containing HD Ads resulted in HBV replication knockdown of up to 94% in mice. HD Ads expressing trimeric anti-HBV pri-miRs silenced HBV replication for 5 weeks. We previously showed that the product of the codelivered lacZ gene induces an immune response, and the duration of HBV silencing in vivo is likely to be attenuated by this effect. Nevertheless, expression of anti-HBV pri-miRs from MTTR promoter is well suited to countering HBV replication and development of HD Ads through attenuation of their immunostimulatory effects should advance their clinical utility.

  7. Effective inhibition of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV replication in vitro by vector-delivered microRNAs targeting the 3D gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai Xuepeng

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV causes an economically important and highly contagious disease of cloven-hoofed animals. RNAi triggered by small RNA molecules, including siRNAs and miRNAs, offers a new approach for controlling viral infections. There is no report available for FMDV inhibition by vector-delivered miRNA, although miRNA is believed to have more potential than siRNA. In this study, the inhibitory effects of vector-delivered miRNAs targeting the 3D gene on FMDV replication were examined. Results Four pairs of oligonucleotides encoding 3D-specific miRNA of FMDV were designed and selected for construction of miRNA expression plasmids. In the reporter assays, two of four miRNA expression plasmids were able to significantly silence the expression of 3D-GFP fusion proteins from the reporter plasmid, p3D-GFP, which was cotransfected with each miRNA expression plasmid. After detecting the silencing effects of the reporter genes, the inhibitory effects of FMDV replication were determined in the miRNA expression plasmid-transfected and FMDV-infected cells. Virus titration and real-time RT-PCR assays showed that the p3D715-miR and p3D983-miR plasmids were able to potently inhibit the replication of FMDV when BHK-21 cells were infected with FMDV. Conclusion Our results indicated that vector-delivered miRNAs targeting the 3D gene efficiently inhibits FMDV replication in vitro. This finding provides evidence that miRNAs could be used as a potential tool against FMDV infection.

  8. Construction of a stable replicating shuttle vector for Caldicellulosiruptor species: use for extending genetic methodologies to other members of this genus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daehwan Chung

    Full Text Available The recalcitrance of plant biomass is the most important barrier to its economic conversion by microbes to products of interest. Thermophiles have special advantages for biomass conversion and members of the genus Caldicellulosiruptor are the most thermophilic cellulolytic microbes known. In this study, we report the construction of a replicating shuttle vector for Caldicellulosiruptor species based on pBAS2, the smaller of two native C. bescii plasmids. The entire plasmid was cloned into an E. coli cloning vector containing a pSC101 origin of replication and an apramycin resistance cassette for selection in E. coli. The wild-type C. bescii pyrF locus was cloned under the transcriptional control of the regulatory region of the ribosomal protein S30EA (Cbes2105, and the resulting vector was transformed into a new spontaneous deletion mutant in the pyrFA locus of C. bescii that allowed complementation with the pyrF gene alone. Plasmid DNA was methylated in vitro with a recently described cognate methyltransferase, M.CbeI, and transformants were selected for uracil prototrophy. The plasmid was stably maintained in low copy with selection but rapidly lost without selection. There was no evidence of DNA rearrangement during transformation and replication in C. bescii. A similar approach was used to screen for transformability of other members of this genus using M.CbeI to overcome restriction as a barrier and was successful for transformation of C. hydrothermalis, an attractive species for many applications. Plasmids containing a carbohydrate binding domain (CBM and linker region from the C. bescii celA gene were maintained with selection and were structurally stable through transformation and replication in C. bescii and E. coli.

  9. Stable replication of the EBNA1/OriP-mediated baculovirus vector and its application to anti-HCV gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Myint OO

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV is one of the main causes of liver-related morbidity and mortality. Although combined interferon-α-ribavirin therapy is effective for about 50% of the patients with HCV, better therapies are needed and preventative vaccines have yet to be developed. Short-hairpin RNAs (shRNAs inhibit gene expression by RNA interference. The application of transient shRNA expression is limited, however, due to the inability of the shRNA to replicate in mammalian cells and its inefficient transduction. The duration of transgene (shRNA expression in mammalian cells can be significantly extended using baculovirus-based shRNA-expressing vectors that contain the latent viral protein Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1 and the origin of latent viral DNA replication (OriP sequences. These recombinant vectors contain compatible promoters and are highly effective for infecting primary hepatocyte and hepatoma cell lines, making them very useful tools for studies of hepatitis B and hepatitis C viruses. Here, we report the use of these baculovirus-based vector-derived shRNAs to inhibit core-protein expression in full-length hepatitis C virus (HCV replicon cells. Results We constructed a long-term transgene shRNA expression vector that contains the EBV EBNA1 and OriP sequences. We also designed baculovirus vector-mediated shRNAs against the highly conserved core-protein region of HCV. HCV core protein expression was inhibited by the EBNA1/OriP baculovirus vector for at least 14 days, which was considerably longer than the 3 days of inhibition produced by the wild-type baculovirus vector. Conclusion These findings indicate that we successfully constructed a long-term transgene (shRNA expression vector (Ac-EP-shRNA452 using the EBNA1/OriP system, which was propagated in Escherichia coli and converted into mammalian cells. The potential anti-HCV activity of the long-term transgene (shRNA expression vector was evaluated with the view

  10. Boundaries of the origin of replication: creation of a pET-28a-derived vector with p15A copy control allowing compatible coexistence with pET vectors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarmitha Sathiamoorthy

    Full Text Available During our studies involving protein-DNA interactions, we constructed plasmid pSAM to fulfill two requirements: 1 to facilitate transfer of cloned sequences from widely used expression vector pET-28a(+, and 2 to provide a vector compatible with pBR322-derived plasmids for use in cells harboring two different plasmids. Vector pSAM is a pET-28a(+-derived plasmid with the p15A origin of replication (ori; pET-28a(+ contains the pBR322 replicon that is incompatible with other pBR322-derived plasmids. By replacing the original pET-28a(+ replicon-comprising the ori, RNAI, RNAII, and Rom-with the p15A replicon, we generated pSAM, which contains the pET-28a(+ multiple cloning site and is now compatible with pBR322-derived vectors. Plasmid copy number was assessed using quantitative PCR: pSAM copy number was maintained at 18±4 copies per cell, consistent with that of other p15A-type vectors. Compatibility with pBR322-derived vectors was tested with pGEX-6p-1 and pSAM, which maintained their copy numbers of 49±10 and 14±4, respectively, when both were present within the same cell. Swapping of the ori is a common practice; however, it is vital that all regions of the original replicon be removed. Additional vector pSAMRNAI illustrated that incompatibility remains when portions of the replicon, such as RNAI and/or Rom, are retained; pSAMRNAI, which contains the intact RNAI but not ROM, lowered the copy number of pGEX-6p-1 to 18±2 in doubly transformed cells due to retention of the pET-28a(+-derived RNAI. Thus, pSAMRNAI is incompatible with vectors controlled by the pBR322 replicon and further demonstrates the need to remove all portions of the original replicon and to quantitatively assess copy number, both individually and in combination, to ensure vector compatibility. To our knowledge, this is the first instance where the nascent vector has been quantitatively assessed for both plasmid copy number and compatibility. New vector pSAM provides ease of

  11. Equine herpesvirus 1 gene 12 can substitute for vmw65 in the growth of herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1, allowing the generation of optimized cell lines for the propagation of HSV vectors with multiple immediate-early gene defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, S K; Lilley, C E; Latchman, D S; Coffin, R S

    1999-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) has often been suggested for development as a vector, particularly for the nervous system. Considerable evidence has shown that for use of HSV as a vector, immediate-early (IE) gene expression must be minimized or abolished, otherwise such vectors are likely to be highly cytotoxic. Mutations of vmw65 which abolish IE promoter transactivating activity may also be included to reduce IE gene expression generally. However, when vmw65 mutations are combined with an IE gene deletion, such viruses are hard to propagate, even on cells which otherwise complement the IE gene deletion effectively. We have found that vmw65 mutants can be effectively grown on cell lines expressing equine herpesvirus 1 gene 12, a non-HSV homologue of vmw65 with little sequence similarity to its HSV counterpart. This prevents repair by homologous recombination of vmw65 mutations in the virus, which would occur if mutations were complemented by vmw65 itself. The gene 12 protein is not packaged into HSV virions, which is important if viruses grown on such cells are to be used as vectors. These results not only further strengthen the evidence for direct functional homology between and similar modes of action of the two proteins but have allowed the generation of gene 12-containing cell lines in which ICP4 and ICP27 expression is induced by virus infection (probably by ICP0) and which give efficient growth of viruses deficient in ICP27, ICP4, and vmw65 (the viruses also have ICP34.5/ORFP deleted). Efficient growth of such viruses has not previously been possible. As these viruses are highly deficient in IE gene expression generally, such virus-cell line combinations may provide an alternative to HSV vectors with deletions of all four of the regulatory IE genes which, for optimal growth, require cell lines containing all four IE genes but which are hard to generate due to the intrinsic cytotoxicity of each of the proteins.

  12. Meet the Herps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naturescope, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Describes some of the characteristics of "herps" (amphibians and reptiles). Contains teaching activities dealing with ancient herps, learning stations that encourage sensory experiences with herps, and games, puzzles, and a dramatic play about herps. Includes reproducible handouts designed to be used with the activities, as well as a quiz. (TW)

  13. Herpes zoster and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Sanjay; Chawla, Aastha

    2016-08-01

    This review is a succinct description of the relationship between herpes zoster and diabetes. It makes a strong case for screening for diabetes in all patients of herpes zoster, and for using insulin to achieve optimal glycaemic control in persons with concomitant diabetes and herpes zoster. It highlights potential impact of dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitor therapy and statin usage on herpes zoster incidence.

  14. Construction and characterization of bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) containing herpes simplex virus full-length genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Claus-Henning; Pohlmann, Anja; Sodeik, Beate

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) are suitable vectors not only to maintain the large genomes of herpesviruses in Escherichia coli but also to enable the traceless introduction of any mutation using modern tools of bacterial genetics. To clone a herpes simplex virus genome, a BAC replication origin is first introduced into the viral genome by homologous recombination in eukaryotic host cells. As part of their nuclear replication cycle, genomes of herpesviruses circularize and these replication intermediates are then used to transform bacteria. After cloning, the integrity of the recombinant viral genomes is confirmed by restriction length polymorphism analysis and sequencing. The BACs may then be used to design virus mutants. Upon transfection into eukaryotic cells new herpesvirus strains harboring the desired mutations can be recovered and used for experiments in cultured cells as well as in animal infection models.

  15. Stable, high-level expression of reporter proteins from improved alphavirus expression vectors to track replication and dissemination during encephalitic and arthritogenic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chengqun; Gardner, Christina L; Watson, Alan M; Ryman, Kate D; Klimstra, William B

    2014-02-01

    Engineered alphavirus vectors expressing reporters of infection have been used for a number of years due to their relatively low costs for analysis of virus replication and the capacity to utilize imaging systems for longitudinal measurements of growth within single animals. In general, these vectors have been derived from Old World alphaviruses using a second viral subgenomic promoter to express the transgenes, placed either immediately after the nonstructural proteins or at the 3' end of the viral coding sequences. However, the relevance of these vectors to natural infections is questionable, as they have not been rigorously tested for virulence in vivo in comparison with parental viruses or for the retention of the reporter during replication. Here, we report construction of new expression vectors for two Old World arthritogenic alphaviruses (Sindbis and Chikungunya viruses) and two New World encephalitic alphaviruses (eastern and Venezuelan equine encephalitis viruses) based upon either fusion of the reporter protein in frame within nonstructural protein 3 (nsP3) or insertion of the reporter as a cleavable element between the capsid and PE2 structural proteins. We have compared these with a traditional 3' double subgenomic promoter virus expressing either a large, firefly luciferase (fLuc; 1,650 nucleotides), or small, NanoLuc (nLuc; 513 nucleotides), luminescent reporter protein. Results indicate that the nLuc is substantially more stable than fLuc during repeated rounds of infection regardless of the transgene location. However, the capsid-PE2 insertion and nsP3 fusion viruses exhibit the most authentic mimicking of parental virus infection regardless of expressed protein. IMPORTANCE As more antiviral therapeutics and vaccines are developed, rapid and accurate in vivo modeling of their efficacy will be required. However, current alphavirus vectors expressing reporters of infection have not been extensively tested for accurate mimicking of the infection

  16. An adenoviral vector-based expression and delivery system for the inhibition of wild-type adenovirus replication by artificial microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrišimović, Mirza; Kneidinger, Doris; Lion, Thomas; Klein, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    Human adenoviruses are rarely associated with life-threatening infections in healthy individuals. However, immunocompromised patients, and particularly allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, are at high risk of developing disseminated and potentially fatal disease. The efficacy of commonly used drugs to treat adenovirus infections (i.e., cidofovir in most cases) is limited, and alternative treatment options are needed. Artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs) are a class of synthetic RNAs resembling cellular miRNAs, and, similar to their natural relatives, can mediate the knockdown of endogenous gene expression. This process, termed RNA interference, can be harnessed to target and potentially silence both cellular and viral genes. In this study, we designed amiRNAs directed against adenoviral E1A, DNA polymerase, and preterminal protein (pTP) mRNAs in order to inhibit adenoviral replication in vitro. For the expression of amiRNA-encoding sequences, we utilized replication-deficient adenoviral vectors. In cells transduced with the recombinant vectors and infected with the wild-type (wt) adenovirus, one particular amiRNA that was directed against the pTP mRNA was capable of decreasing the output of infectious wt virus progeny by 2.6 orders of magnitude. This inhibition rate could be achieved by concatemerizing amiRNA-encoding sequences to allow for high intracellular amiRNA concentrations. Because superinfecting wt virus induces the replication and amplification of the recombinant adenoviral vector, amiRNA concentrations were increased in cells infected with wt adenovirus. Furthermore, a combination of amiRNA expression and treatment of infected cells with cidofovir resulted in additive effects that manifested as a total reduction of infectious virus progeny by greater than 3 orders of magnitude.

  17. Characterization of large deletions occurring during a single round of retrovirus vector replication: novel deletion mechanism involving errors in strand transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulsinelli, G A; Temin, H M

    1991-09-01

    Retroviruses mutate at a high rate during replication. We used a spleen necrosis virus-based vector system and helper cell line to characterize mutations occurring during a single round of retrovirus replication. The vector used, JD216HyNeo, codes for two drug resistance genes, hygromycin resistance (hygro) and neomycin resistance (neo). The downstream neo gene is expressed only when a mutation alleviates a block to splicing which is located in the upstream hygro gene. The mutations allowing splicing were large deletions, ranging in size from about 500 to about 2,000 bp. Most of the mutant proviruses lacked the encapsidation sequence, as shown by our inability to rescue the mutant proviruses with wild-type reticuloendotheliosis virus strain A and confirmed by Southern blotting and direct DNA sequence analysis. We therefore concluded that most of the deletions arose during reverse transcription in the target cell, rather than during transcription in the host cell. The sequence data also indicated that the deletions occurred by at least three different mechanisms: (i) misalignment of the growing point; (ii) incorrect synthesis and termination in the primer-binding sequence during synthesis of the plus-strand strong-stop DNA; and (iii) incorrect synthesis and termination before the primer-binding sequence during synthesis of the plus-strand strong-stop DNA. The second mechanism also led to the incorporation of cellular sequences into the proviral genome, pointing to a potential novel mechanism by which retroviruses can acquire cellular genes.

  18. Antiviral effects of autologous CD4 T cells genetically modified with a conditionally replicating lentiviral vector expressing long antisense to HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebas, Pablo; Stein, David; Binder-Scholl, Gwendolyn; Mukherjee, Rithun; Brady, Troy; Rebello, Tessio; Humeau, Laurent; Kalos, Michael; Papasavvas, Emmanouil; Montaner, Luis J; Schullery, Daniel; Shaheen, Farida; Brennan, Andrea L; Zheng, Zhaohui; Cotte, Julio; Slepushkin, Vladimir; Veloso, Elizabeth; Mackley, Adonna; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Aberra, Faten; Zhan, Jenny; Boyer, Jean; Collman, Ronald G; Bushman, Frederic D; Levine, Bruce L; June, Carl H

    2013-02-28

    We report the safety and tolerability of 87 infusions of lentiviral vector–modified autologous CD4 T cells (VRX496-T; trade name, Lexgenleucel-T) in 17 HIV patients with well-controlled viremia. Antiviral effects were studied during analytic treatment interruption in a subset of 13 patients. VRX496-T was associated with a decrease in viral load set points in 6 of 8 subjects (P = .08). In addition, A → G transitions were enriched in HIV sequences after infusion, which is consistent with a model in which transduced CD4 T cells exert antisense-mediated genetic pressure on HIV during infection. Engraftment of vector-modified CD4 T cells was measured in gut-associated lymphoid tissue and was correlated with engraftment in blood. The engraftment half-life in the blood was approximately 5 weeks, with stable persistence in some patients for up to 5 years. Conditional replication of VRX496 was detected periodically through 1 year after infusion. No evidence of clonal selection of lentiviral vector–transduced T cells or integration enrichment near oncogenes was detected. This is the first demonstration that gene-modified cells can exert genetic pressure on HIV. We conclude that gene-modified T cells have the potential to decrease the fitness of HIV-1 and conditionally replicative lentiviral vectors have a promising safety profile in T cells.

  19. Mucosal vaccination with heterologous viral vectored vaccine targeting subdominant SIV accessory antigens strongly inhibits early viral replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Huanbin; Andersson, Anne-Marie; Ragonnaud, Emeline

    2017-01-01

    Conventional HIV T cell vaccine strategies have not been successful in containing acute peak viremia, nor in providing long-term control. We immunized rhesus macaques intramuscularly and rectally using a heterologous adenovirus vectored SIV vaccine regimen encoding normally weakly immunogenic tat...

  20. Ectopic expression of AID in a non-B cell line triggers A:T and G:C point mutations in non-replicating episomal vectors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tihana Jovanic

    Full Text Available Somatic hypermutation (SHM of immunoglobulin genes is currently viewed as a two step process initiated by the deamination of deoxycytidine (C to deoxyuridine (U, catalysed by the activation induced deaminase (AID. Phase 1 mutations arise from DNA replication across the uracil residue or the abasic site, generated by the uracil-DNA glycosylase, yielding transitions or transversions at G:C pairs. Phase 2 mutations result from the recognition of the U:G mismatch by the Msh2/Msh6 complex (MutS Homologue, followed by the excision of the mismatched nucleotide and the repair, by the low fidelity DNA polymerase eta, of the gap generated by the exonuclease I. These mutations are mainly focused at A:T pairs. Whereas in activated B cells both G:C and A:T pairs are equally targeted, ectopic expression of AID was shown to trigger only G:C mutations on a stably integrated reporter gene. Here we show that when using non-replicative episomal vectors containing a GFP gene, inactivated by the introduction of stop codons at various positions, a high level of EGFP positive cells was obtained after transient expression in Jurkat cells constitutively expressing AID. We show that mutations at G:C and A:T pairs are produced. EGFP positive cells are obtained in the absence of vector replication demonstrating that the mutations are dependent only on the mismatch repair (MMR pathway. This implies that the generation of phase 1 mutations is not a prerequisite for the expression of phase 2 mutations.

  1. [Interaction of Dystamycin Dimeric Analog with Poly(dA) x poly(dT), Poly[d(A-T)] x poly[d(A-T)] and Duplex O23 at Origin of Replication of the Herpes Simplex Virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surovaya, A N; Bazhulina, N P; Lepehina, S Yu; Andronova, V L; Galegov, G A; Moiseeva, E D; Grokhovsky, S L; Gursky, G V

    2016-01-01

    The binding of distamycin dimeric analog (Pt-bis-Dst) to poly[d(A-T)] x poly[d(A-T)1, poly(dA) x poly(dT) and duplex O23 with the sequence 5'-GCCAATATATATATATTATTAGG-3' which is present at the origin of replication of herpes simplex virus OriS is investigated with the use of UV and CD spectroscopy. The distinction of the synthetic polyamide from a natural antibiotic lies in the fact that in the synthetic polyamide there are two distamycin moieties bound via a glycine cis-diamino platinum group. It was shown that the binding of Pt-bis-Dst to poly[d(A-T)] x poly[d(A-T)] and poly(dA) x poly(dT) reaches saturation if one molecule of the ligand occurs at approximately every 8 bp. With further increase in the ratio of the added ligand to the base pairs in CD spectra of complexes with poly[d(A-T)] x poly[d(A-T)], we observed that the maximum wavelength band tend to be shifted towards longer wavelengths, while in the spectral region of 290-310 nm a "shoulder", that was absent in the spectra of the complexes obtained at low polymer coverages by the ligand, appeared. At high molar concentration ratios of ligand to oligonucleotide Pt-bis-Dst can bind to poly[d(A-T)] x poly[d(A-T)] in the form of hairpins or may form associates by the interaction between the distamycin moieties of neighboring molecules of Pt-bis-Dst. The structure of the complexes is stabilized by interactions between pirrolcarboxamide moieties of two molecules of Pt-bis-Dst adsorbed on adjacent overlapping binding sites. These interactions are probably also responsible for the concentration-dependent spectral changes observed during the formation of a complex between Pt-bis-Dst and poly[d(A-T)] x poly[d(A-T)]. Spectral changes are almost absent in binding of Pt-bis-Dst to poly(dA) x poly(dT). Binding of Pt-bis-Dst to duplex O23 reaches saturation if two ligand molecules occur in a duplex that contains a cluster of 18 AT pairs. With increasing the molar concentration ratio of the ligand to the duplex CD

  2. Typical case: herpes zoster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Cristianini Baldivia

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary The varicella zoster virus is the causative agent of herpes zoster and varicella. In herpes zoster, the virus dormant within dorsal root ganglia is reactivated, resulting in painful vesicular lesions overlying an erythematous base.

  3. Recurrent zosteriform herpes simplex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inamadar Arun

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available A 25-year-old man had recurrent zosteriform herpes simplex for past 6 years. The attacks were precipitated by prolonged exposure to sunlight. Pain was mild and lesions used to subside each time in about 7 days. Clinical features which help in differentiating recurrent herpes simplex from recurrent herpes zoster are summarized.

  4. Herpes Zoster Oticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Page You are here Home » Disorders » All Disorders Herpes Zoster Oticus Information Page Herpes Zoster Oticus Information Page What research is being ... neurotropic viruses and development of neurological diseases including herpes simplex and varicella-zoster viruses. × What research is ...

  5. Development of a vector and host system and characterization of replication of plasmid pSQ10 in moderately halophilic Nocardiopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ana Zeng; Tao Wang; Haiyang Xia; Shiyuan Peng; Weihua Chen; Chenglin Jiang; Lihua Xu

    2011-01-01

    The genus of Nocardiopsis is a new source of antibiotics,chemicals,and enzymes.Here we reported the development of a vector and host system in moderately halophilic Nocardiopsis via an oriT-mediated conjugation.By screening about 80 Nocardiopsis strains,6 of them harbored 8 plasmids (18-80 kb).The complete nucleotide sequence of pSQ10 consisted of 18,219 bp,with 71.9% G + Ccontent,encoding 17 open reading frames,5 of them resembled those of Streptomyces plasmids.A rep locus (iteron within the gene) was identified for replication in Nocardiopsis sp.YIM 90083,and rep protein bound to its iteron sequence.This system may be useful for gene cloning and expression in Nocardiopsis.

  6. Adenovirus vectors lacking virus-associated RNA expression enhance shRNA activity to suppress hepatitis C virus replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Zheng; Shi, Guoli; Kondo, Saki; Ito, Masahiko; Maekawa, Aya; Suzuki, Mariko; Saito, Izumu; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Kanegae, Yumi

    2013-12-01

    First-generation adenovirus vectors (FG AdVs) expressing short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) effectively downregulate the expressions of target genes. However, this vector, in fact, expresses not only the transgene product, but also virus-associated RNAs (VA RNAs) that disturb cellular RNAi machinery. We have established a production method for VA-deleted AdVs lacking expression of VA RNAs. Here, we showed that the highest shRNA activity was obtained when the shRNA was inserted not at the popularly used E1 site, but at the E4 site. We then compared the activities of shRNAs against hepatitis C virus (HCV) expressed from VA-deleted AdVs or conventional AdVs. The VA-deleted AdVs inhibited HCV production much more efficiently. Therefore, VA-deleted AdVs were more effective than the currently used AdVs for shRNA downregulation, probably because of the lack of competition between VA RNAs and the shRNAs. These VA-deleted AdVs might enable more effective gene therapies for chronic hepatitis C.

  7. The Ozobranchus leech as a mechanical vector for the fibropapilloma-associated turtle herpes virus found latently infecting skin tumors on Hawaiian green turtles (Chelonia mydas)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenblatt, R.J.; Work, T.M.; Balazs, G.; Sutton, C.A.; Casey, R.N.; Casey, J.W.

    2004-01-01

    Fibropapillomatosis (FP) of marine turtles is a neoplastic disease of ecological concern. A fibropapilloma-associated turtle herpesvirus (FPTHV) is consistently present, usually at loads exceeding one virus copy per tumor cell. DNA from an array of parasites of green turtles (Chelonia mydas) was examined with quantitative PCR (qPCR) to determine whether any carried viral loads are sufficient to implicate them as vectors for FPTHV. Marine leeches (Ozobranchus spp.) were found to carry high viral DNA loads; some samples approached 10 million copies per leech. Isopycnic sucrose density gradient/qPCR analysis confirmed that some of these copies were associated with particles of the density of enveloped viruses. The data implicate the marine leech Ozobranchus as a mechanical vector for FPTHV. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of FPTHV gene expression indicated that most of the FPTHV copies in a fibropapilloma have restricted DNA polymerase expression, suggestive of latent infection.

  8. A novel replication-competent vaccinia vector MVTT is superior to MVA for inducing high levels of neutralizing antibody via mucosal vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoxing; Lu, Bin; Yu, Wenbo; Fang, Qing; Liu, Li; Zhuang, Ke; Shen, Tingting; Wang, Haibo; Tian, Po; Zhang, Linqi; Chen, Zhiwei

    2009-01-01

    Mucosal vaccination offers great advantage for inducing protective immune response to prevent viral transmission and dissemination. Here, we report our findings of a head-to-head comparison of two viral vectors modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) and a novel replication-competent modified vaccinia Tian Tan (MVTT) for inducing neutralizing antibodies (Nabs) via intramuscular and mucosal vaccinations in mice. MVTT is an attenuated variant of the wild-type VTT, which was historically used as a smallpox vaccine for millions of Chinese people. The spike glycoprotein (S) of SARS-CoV was used as the test antigen after the S gene was constructed in the identical genomic location of two vectors to generate vaccine candidates MVTT-S and MVA-S. Using identical doses, MVTT-S induced lower levels ( approximately 2-3-fold) of anti- SARS-CoV neutralizing antibodies (Nabs) than MVA-S through intramuscular inoculation. MVTT-S, however, was capable of inducing consistently 20-to-100-fold higher levels of Nabs than MVA-S when inoculated via either intranasal or intraoral routes. These levels of MVTT-S-induced Nab responses were substantially (approximately 10-fold) higher than that induced via the intramuscular route in the same experiments. Moreover, pre-exposure to the wild-type VTT via intranasal or intraoral route impaired the Nab response via the same routes of MVTT-S vaccination probably due to the pre-existing anti-VTT Nab response. The efficacy of intranasal or intraoral vaccination, however, was still 20-to-50-fold better than intramuscular inoculation despite the subcutaneous pre-exposure to wild-type VTT. Our data have implications for people who maintain low levels of anti-VTT Nabs after historical smallpox vaccination. MVTT is therefore an attractive live viral vector for mucosal vaccination.

  9. A novel replication-competent vaccinia vector MVTT is superior to MVA for inducing high levels of neutralizing antibody via mucosal vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxing Huang

    Full Text Available Mucosal vaccination offers great advantage for inducing protective immune response to prevent viral transmission and dissemination. Here, we report our findings of a head-to-head comparison of two viral vectors modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA and a novel replication-competent modified vaccinia Tian Tan (MVTT for inducing neutralizing antibodies (Nabs via intramuscular and mucosal vaccinations in mice. MVTT is an attenuated variant of the wild-type VTT, which was historically used as a smallpox vaccine for millions of Chinese people. The spike glycoprotein (S of SARS-CoV was used as the test antigen after the S gene was constructed in the identical genomic location of two vectors to generate vaccine candidates MVTT-S and MVA-S. Using identical doses, MVTT-S induced lower levels ( approximately 2-3-fold of anti- SARS-CoV neutralizing antibodies (Nabs than MVA-S through intramuscular inoculation. MVTT-S, however, was capable of inducing consistently 20-to-100-fold higher levels of Nabs than MVA-S when inoculated via either intranasal or intraoral routes. These levels of MVTT-S-induced Nab responses were substantially (approximately 10-fold higher than that induced via the intramuscular route in the same experiments. Moreover, pre-exposure to the wild-type VTT via intranasal or intraoral route impaired the Nab response via the same routes of MVTT-S vaccination probably due to the pre-existing anti-VTT Nab response. The efficacy of intranasal or intraoral vaccination, however, was still 20-to-50-fold better than intramuscular inoculation despite the subcutaneous pre-exposure to wild-type VTT. Our data have implications for people who maintain low levels of anti-VTT Nabs after historical smallpox vaccination. MVTT is therefore an attractive live viral vector for mucosal vaccination.

  10. Genital herpes - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herpes - genital -self-care; Herpes simplex - genital - self-care; Herpesvirus 2 - self-care; HSV-2 - self-care ... genital herpes can be treated. Follow your health care provider's instructions for treatment and follow-up.

  11. Prodrugs of herpes simplex thymidine kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanachkova, Milka; Xu, Wei-Chu; Dvoskin, Sofya; Dix, Edward J; Yanachkov, Ivan B; Focher, Federico; Savi, Lida; Sanchez, M Dulfary; Foster, Timothy P; Wright, George E

    2015-04-01

    Because guanine-based herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase inhibitors are not orally available, we synthesized various 6-deoxy prodrugs of these compounds and evaluated them with regard to solubility in water, oral bioavailability, and efficacy to prevent herpes simplex virus-1 reactivation from latency in a mouse model. Organic synthesis was used to prepare compounds, High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) to analyze hydrolytic conversion, Mass Spectrometry (MS) to measure oral bioavailability, and mouse latent infection and induced reactivation to evaluate the efficacy of a specific prodrug. Aqueous solubilities of prodrugs were improved, oxidation of prodrugs by animal cytosols occurred in vitro, and oral absorption of the optimal prodrug sacrovir™ (6-deoxy-mCF3PG) in the presence of the aqueous adjuvant Soluplus® and conversion to active compound N(2)-[3-(trifluoromethyl)pheny])guanine (mCF3PG) were accomplished in mice. Treatment of herpes simplex virus-1 latent mice with sacrovir™ in 1% Soluplus in drinking water significantly suppressed herpes simplex virus-1 reactivation and viral genomic replication. Ad libitum oral delivery of sacrovir™ was effective in suppressing herpes simplex virus-1 reactivation in ocularly infected latent mice as measured by the numbers of mice shedding infectious virus at the ocular surface, numbers of trigeminal ganglia positive for infectious virus, number of corneas that had detectable infectious virus, and herpes simplex virus-1 genome copy numbers in trigeminal ganglia following reactivation. These results demonstrate the statistically significant effect of the prodrug on suppressing herpes simplex virus-1 reactivation in vivo. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Herpes associated erythema multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K A Kamala

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Erythema multiforme is an acute and a self-limiting mucocutaneous hypersensitivity reaction triggered by certain infections and medications. One of the most common predisposing factors for erythema multiforme is infection with herpes simplex virus. Herpes associated erythema multiforme (HAEM is an acute exudative dermatic and mucosal disease caused by the infecting herpes simplex virus. It has recurrence and idiorestriction, characterized by increasing of CD4+T leukomonocyte. This article reports a case of HAEM in a 9-year-old girl, with a review of relevant literature, and discusses the pathophysiology and treatment of erythema multiforme triggered by herpes simplex virus

  13. Herp depletion inhibits zearalenone-induced cell death in RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fenglei; Lin, Pengfei; Wang, Nan; Yang, Diqi; Wen, Xin; Zhou, Dong; Wang, Aihua; Jin, Yaping

    2016-04-01

    Herp is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane protein and strongly induced by the ER stress that not only participates in the unfolded protein response (UPR) under the ER stress, but also in cell autophagy under glucose starvation (GS). However, we do not know whether Herp plays any roles in other responses, such as zearalenone (ZEA). In this study, we constructed recombinant lentiviral vectors for Herp shRNA expression and generated stable Herp knockdown RAW 264.7 macrophages. Flow cytometry analysis showed Herp depletion could inhibit cell death induced by ZEA. Western blot analysis revealed that Herp depletion could up-regulate autophagy-related protein LC3-I conversion into LC3-II and the expression of ER stress-related protein CHOP. These results suggest that Herp depletion inhibits cell death by up-regulating autophagy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. 人单纯疱疹病毒BDNF转基因重组体的构建表达及活性检测%Constrution of Human Single Herpes Virus Carried BDNF Gene Vector and Its Bioactivity Evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王盛兰; 但齐琴; 荣荣; 王廷华; 张云辉

    2012-01-01

    目的 构建人单纯疱疹病毒(HSV)脑源性神经营养因子(BDNF)转基因重组体(HSV-BDNF),转染大鼠皮质神经元后并检测其表达及生物活性.方法 用RT-PCR方法扩增人BDNF基因,克隆并构建HSV-BDNF转基因重组体.构建成功后将其转染培养大鼠皮质神经元,观察其对皮质神经元存活的影响;用ELISA、免疫组化检测皮质神经元中BDNF的表达水平.结果 成功构建了HSV-BDNF转基因重组体,皮质神经元转染HSV-BDNF后BDNF表达水平明显上调(P<0.05),且明显促进皮质神经元生长(P<0.05).结论 成功构建了HSV-BDNF,能有效转染大鼠皮质神经元并促进BDNF高表达,且具有生物活性.%Objective To construct the recombinant vector of human single herpes virus (HSV) carried brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene. Methods BDNF gene was acquired from rat brain tissue by RT-PCR, then was cloned into plasmid, and enveloped by HSV. The recombinant was used to transfer cultured cortical neurons. The number and neurite length of neurons were quantified. The BDNF level and subcellular localization were detected by ELISA and immunohistochemistry. Results HSV carried BDNF gene recombinant has been successfully constructed. The recombinant showed the bioactivity on the growth of cortical neurons. BDNF level was increased significantly in BDNF transferred group. Conclusion HSV carried BDNF gene recombinant. With the bioactivity, has been successfully constructed. This could provide the vector for the treatment of BDNF under disease condition base on transferring gene technique.

  15. Intranasal immunization with a replication-deficient adenoviral vector expressing the fusion glycoprotein of respiratory syncytial virus elicits protective immunity in BALB/c mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Yuanhui [Institute of Viral Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100052 (China); College of Life Sciences and Bioengineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, 3 Shangyuan Residence, Haidian District, Beijing, 100044 (China); He, Jinsheng, E-mail: jshhe@bjtu.edu.cn [College of Life Sciences and Bioengineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, 3 Shangyuan Residence, Haidian District, Beijing, 100044 (China); Department of Immunology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Zheng, Xianxian [Department of Immunology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Wu, Qiang [Department of Pathology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Zhang, Mei; Wang, Xiaobo [Department of Immunology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Wang, Yan [Department of Pathology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Xie, Can; Tang, Qian; Wei, Wei [Department of Immunology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, 230032 (China); Wang, Min; Song, Jingdong; Qu, Jianguo [Institute of Viral Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100052 (China); Zhang, Ying; Wang, Xin [College of Life Sciences and Bioengineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, 3 Shangyuan Residence, Haidian District, Beijing, 100044 (China); Hong, Tao [Institute of Viral Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100052 (China); College of Life Sciences and Bioengineering, Beijing Jiaotong University, 3 Shangyuan Residence, Haidian District, Beijing, 100044 (China)

    2009-04-17

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a serious pediatric pathogen of the lower respiratory tract worldwide. There is currently no clinically approved vaccine against RSV infection. Recently, it has been shown that a replication-deficient first generation adenoviral vector (FGAd), which encodes modified RSV attachment glycoprotein (G), elicits long-term protective immunity against RSV infection in mice. The major problem in developing such a vaccine is that G protein lacks MHC-I-restricted epitopes. However, RSV fusion glycoprotein (F) is a major cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitope in humans and mice, therefore, an FGAd-encoding F (FGAd-F) was constructed and evaluated for its potential as an RSV vaccine in a murine model. Intranasal (i.n.) immunization with FGAd-F generated serum IgG, bronchoalveolar lavage secretory IgA, and RSV-specific CD8+ T-cell responses in BALB/c mice, with characteristic balanced or mixed Th1/Th2 CD4+ T-cell responses. Serum IgG was significantly elevated after boosting with i.n. FGAd-F. Upon challenge, i.n. immunization with FGAd-F displayed an effective protective role against RSV infection. These results demonstrate FGAd-F is able to induce effective protective immunity and is a promising vaccine regimen against RSV infection.

  16. Comparative Immunization in BALB/c Mice with Recombinant Replication-Defective Adenovirus Vector and DNA Plasmid Expressing a SARS-CoV Nucleocapsid Protein Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunling Ma; Kun Yao; Feng Zhou; Minsheng Zhu

    2006-01-01

    In order to investigate immunogenicity in the induction of humoral and cellular immune responses, severe acute respiratory syndrome associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV)-N gene recombinant replication-defective adenoviral vector, rAd-N, was generated and immunized BALB/c mice in a pcDNA3.1-N prime-rAd-N boost regimen. After humoral and cellular immune response detection, different levels of SARS-CoV N protein specific antibodies and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) secretion are shown compared to controls. The humoral immune response was induced more effectively by the DNA priming and recombinant adenovirus boosting regimen. There is a significant difference between heterogeneous and homologous vaccinations. The heterogeneous combinations were all higher than those of the homologous combinations in the induction of anti-N antibody response. Among the three heterogeneous combinations, pcDNA3.1-N/pcDNA3.1-N/pcDNA3.1-N/rAd-N induced the strongest antibody response. In the induction of IFN-γ production, the homologous combination of rAd-N/rAd-N/rAd-N/rAd- N was significantly stronger than that of pcDNA3.1-N/pcDNA3. 1-N/pcDNA3.1-N/pcDNA3.1-N, but was relatively weaker than the heterogeneous combination of pcDAN3.1-N/pcDAN3.1-N/pcDAN3.1-N/rAd-N. This combination was a most efficient immunization regimen in induction of SARS-CoV-N-specific (IFN-γ) secretion just as the antibody response. These results suggest that DNA immunization followed by recombinant adenovirus boosting could be used as a potential SARS-CoV vaccine.

  17. Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Julie L; Amzat, Rianot; Martin, Nicolle

    2015-09-01

    Herpes zoster is a commonly encountered disorder. It is estimated that there are approximately 1 million new cases of herpes zoster in the United States annually, with an incidence of 3.2 per 1000 person-years. Patients with HIV have the greatest risk of developing herpes zoster ophthalmicus compared with the general population. Other risk factors include advancing age, use of immunosuppressive medications, and primary infection in infancy or in utero. Vaccination against the virus is a primary prevention modality. Primary treatments include antivirals, analgesics, and anticonvulsants. Management may require surgical intervention and comanagement with pain specialists, psychiatrists, and infectious disease specialists. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Human herpes simplex labialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatahzadeh, M; Schwartz, R A

    2007-11-01

    Humans are the natural host for eight of more than 80 known herpes viruses. Infections with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) are ubiquitous worldwide and highly transmissible. Herpes simplex labialis (HSL) is the best-recognized recrudescent infection of the lips and perioral tissues caused by HSV-1. Facial lesions of HSL may be unsightly, frequent outbreaks unpleasant, and the infection itself more severe locally and systemically in immunocompromised people. This article highlights the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnostic features and management issues for HSL.

  19. Designing herpes viruses as oncolytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Cole; Rabkin, Samuel D

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV) was one of the first genetically-engineered oncolytic viruses. Because HSV is a natural human pathogen that can cause serious disease, it is incumbent that it can be genetically-engineered or significantly attenuated for safety. Here, we present a detailed explanation of the functions of HSV-1 genes frequently mutated to endow oncolytic activity. These genes are nonessential for growth in tissue culture cells but are important for growth in postmitotic cells, interfering with intrinsic antiviral and innate immune responses or causing pathology, functions dispensable for replication in cancer cells. Understanding the function of these genes leads to informed creation of new oHSVs with better therapeutic efficacy. Virus infection and replication can also be directed to cancer cells through tumor-selective receptor binding and transcriptional- or post-transcriptional miRNA-targeting, respectively. In addition to the direct effects of oHSV on infected cancer cells and tumors, oHSV can be “armed” with transgenes that are: reporters, to track virus replication and spread; cytotoxic, to kill uninfected tumor cells; immune modulatory, to stimulate antitumor immunity; or tumor microenvironment altering, to enhance virus spread or to inhibit tumor growth. In addition to HSV-1, other alphaherpesviruses are also discussed for their oncolytic activity. PMID:26462293

  20. Designing herpes viruses as oncolytics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cole Peters

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV was one of the first genetically-engineered oncolytic viruses. Because HSV is a natural human pathogen that can cause serious disease, it is incumbent that it can be genetically-engineered or significantly attenuated for safety. Here, we present a detailed explanation of the functions of HSV-1 genes frequently mutated to endow oncolytic activity. These genes are nonessential for growth in tissue culture cells but are important for growth in postmitotic cells, interfering with intrinsic antiviral and innate immune responses or causing pathology, functions dispensable for replication in cancer cells. Understanding the function of these genes leads to informed creation of new oHSVs with better therapeutic efficacy. Virus infection and replication can also be directed to cancer cells through tumor-selective receptor binding and transcriptional- or post-transcriptional miRNA-targeting, respectively. In addition to the direct effects of oHSV on infected cancer cells and tumors, oHSV can be “armed” with transgenes that are: reporters, to track virus replication and spread; cytotoxic, to kill uninfected tumor cells; immune modulatory, to stimulate antitumor immunity; or tumor microenvironment altering, to enhance virus spread or to inhibit tumor growth. In addition to HSV-1, other alphaherpesviruses are also discussed for their oncolytic activity.

  1. Pregnancy and herpes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ill, treatment is often done in the hospital intensive care unit. Outlook (Prognosis) Infants with systemic herpes or ... 2016 Updated by: Daniel N. Sacks, MD, FACOG, obstetrics & gynecology in private practice, West Palm Beach, FL. ...

  2. On the mutation rate of herpes simplex virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, John W; Hwang, Charles B C

    2005-06-01

    All seven DNA-based microbes for which carefully established mutation rates and mutational spectra were previously available displayed a genomic mutation rate in the neighborhood of 0.003 per chromosome replication. The pathogenic mammalian DNA virus herpes simplex type 1 has an estimated genomic mutation rate compatible with that value.

  3. Pre-existing vector immunity does not prevent replication deficient adenovirus from inducing efficient CD8 T-cell memory and recall responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Abildgaard Steffensen

    Full Text Available Adenoviral vectors have shown a great potential for vaccine development due to their inherent ability to induce potent and protective CD8 T-cell responses. However, a critical issue regarding the use of these vectors is the existence of inhibitory immunity against the most commonly used Ad5 vector in a large part of the human population. We have recently developed an improved adenoviral vaccine vector system in which the vector expresses the transgene tethered to the MHC class II associated invariant chain (Ii. To further evaluate the potential of this system, the concept of pre-existing inhibitory immunity to adenoviral vectors was revisited to investigate whether the inhibition previously seen with the Ad5 vector also applied to the optimized vector system. We found this to be the case, and antibodies dominated as the mechanism underlying inhibitory vector immunity. However, presence of CD8 T cells directed against epitopes in the adenoviral vector seemed to correlate with repression of the induced response in re-vaccinated B-cell deficient mice. More importantly, despite a repressed primary effector CD8 T-cell response in Ad5-immune animals subjected to vaccination, memory T cells were generated that provided the foundation for an efficient recall response and protection upon subsequent viral challenge. Furthermore, the transgene specific response could be efficiently boosted by homologous re-immunization. Taken together, these studies indicate that adenoviral vectors can be used to induce efficient CD8 T-cell memory even in individuals with pre-existing vector immunity.

  4. Pre-existing vector immunity does not prevent replication deficient adenovirus from inducing efficient CD8 T-cell memory and recall responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffensen, Maria Abildgaard; Jensen, Benjamin Anderschou Holbech; Holst, Peter Johannes; Bassi, Maria Rosaria; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2012-01-01

    Adenoviral vectors have shown a great potential for vaccine development due to their inherent ability to induce potent and protective CD8 T-cell responses. However, a critical issue regarding the use of these vectors is the existence of inhibitory immunity against the most commonly used Ad5 vector in a large part of the human population. We have recently developed an improved adenoviral vaccine vector system in which the vector expresses the transgene tethered to the MHC class II associated invariant chain (Ii). To further evaluate the potential of this system, the concept of pre-existing inhibitory immunity to adenoviral vectors was revisited to investigate whether the inhibition previously seen with the Ad5 vector also applied to the optimized vector system. We found this to be the case, and antibodies dominated as the mechanism underlying inhibitory vector immunity. However, presence of CD8 T cells directed against epitopes in the adenoviral vector seemed to correlate with repression of the induced response in re-vaccinated B-cell deficient mice. More importantly, despite a repressed primary effector CD8 T-cell response in Ad5-immune animals subjected to vaccination, memory T cells were generated that provided the foundation for an efficient recall response and protection upon subsequent viral challenge. Furthermore, the transgene specific response could be efficiently boosted by homologous re-immunization. Taken together, these studies indicate that adenoviral vectors can be used to induce efficient CD8 T-cell memory even in individuals with pre-existing vector immunity.

  5. Herpes zoster (shingles) disseminated (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herpes zoster (shingles) normally occurs in a limited area that follows a dermatome (see the "dermatome" picture). In individuals with damaged immune systems, herpes zoster may be widespread (disseminated), causing serious illness. ...

  6. Herpes Simplex Virus (Cold Sores)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print Share Cold Sores in Children: About the Herpes Simplex Virus Page Content ​A child's toddler and ... Cold sores (also called fever blisters or oral herpes) start as small blisters that form around the ...

  7. Silencing of hepatitis C virus replication by a non-viral vector based on solid lipid nanoparticles containing a shRNA targeted to the internal ribosome entry site (IRES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrecilla, Josune; Del Pozo-Rodríguez, Ana; Solinís, María Ángeles; Apaolaza, Paola S; Berzal-Herranz, Beatriz; Romero-López, Cristina; Berzal-Herranz, Alfredo; Rodríguez-Gascón, Alicia

    2016-10-01

    Gene silencing mediated by RNAi has gained increasing interest as an alternative for the treatment of infectious diseases such as refractory hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. In this work we have designed and evaluated a non-viral vector based on solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) bearing hyaluronic acid, protamine and a short hairpin RNA (shRNA74) targeted to the Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES) of the HCV. The vector was able to inhibit the expression of the HCV IRES in Huh-7 cells, with the inhibition level dependent on the shRNA74 to SLN ratio and on the shRNA74 dose added to the culture cells. The nanocarrier was also able to inhibit the replication in human hepatoma cells supporting a subgenomic HCV replicon (Huh-7 NS3-3'). The vector was quickly and efficiently internalized by the cells, and endocytosis was the most productive uptake mechanism for silencing. Clathrin-mediated endocytosis and to a lesser extent caveolae/lipid raft-mediated endocytosis were identified as endocytic mechanisms involved in the cell uptake. Internalization via the CD44 receptor was also involved, although this entry route seems to be less productive for silencing than endocytosis. The vector did not induce either hemolysis or agglutination of red cells in vitro, which was indicative of good biocompatibility. In summary, we have shown for the first time the ability of a non-viral SLN-based vector to silence a HCV replicon.

  8. Genital herpes: Heisenberg revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldmeier, D.

    1998-01-01

    In the confirmation of recurrences of genital herpes, patient defined disease reactivation and virological data hold the scientific high ground. The influence of the psyche on recurrence rates and perception of recurrences has been largely neglected and marginalised up to the present, possibly because research work in that area has been and continues to be of poor calibre. However, neglected psychological variables may render otherwise relevant clinical trials uninterpretable. Psychological aspects of counselling before testing for serum herpes simplex type 2 antibodies are also discussed. 




 PMID:9849561

  9. Herpes zoster infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit Bansal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Herpes zoster (HZ or ′shingles′ results from reactivation of the varicella-zoster virus (VZV. Developmental anomalies, osteonecrosis of jaw bones, and facial scarring are the other complications associated with it. Primary VZV infections in sero-negative individuals are known as varicella or chicken pox. Secondary or reactivated disease is known as shingles or herpes zoster. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment of the disease in the prodromal phase by the use of antiviral agents should be the mainstay of its management. This paper presents a case report of such an infection and its management.

  10. Adenovirus DNA Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Hoeben, Rob C.; Uil, Taco G.

    2013-01-01

    Adenoviruses have attracted much attention as probes to study biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, splicing, and cellular transformation. More recently these viruses have been used as gene-transfer vectors and oncolytic agents. On the other hand, adenoviruses are notorious pathogens in people with compromised immune functions. This article will briefly summarize the basic replication strategy of adenoviruses and the key proteins involved and will deal with the new deve...

  11. Pre-existing vector immunity does not prevent replication deficient adenovirus from inducing efficient CD8 T-cell memory and recall responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Maria Abildgaard; Jensen, Benjamin Anderschou Holbech; Holst, Peter Johannes

    2012-01-01

    in a large part of the human population. We have recently developed an improved adenoviral vaccine vector system in which the vector expresses the transgene tethered to the MHC class II associated invariant chain (Ii). To further evaluate the potential of this system, the concept of pre-existing inhibitory...... directed against epitopes in the adenoviral vector seemed to correlate with repression of the induced response in re-vaccinated B-cell deficient mice. More importantly, despite a repressed primary effector CD8 T-cell response in Ad5-immune animals subjected to vaccination, memory T cells were generated......8 T-cell memory even in individuals with pre-existing vector immunity....

  12. Construction of Eukaryotic Coexpression Vector Containing Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Heat Shock Protein 70 and Herpes Simplex Virus Thymidine Kinase Genes%mtHSP70/HSV-TK双基因真核共表达质粒的构建

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾曙光; 刘启才; 王素文; 徐平平; 章锦才; 张积仁

    2011-01-01

    目的 构建结核杆菌热休克蛋白70(mycobacterium tuberculosis heat-shock proteins 70,mtHSP70)和自杀基因单纯疱疹病毒-胸苷激酶(herpes simplex virus-thymidinekinase,HSV-TK)双基因真核共表达质粒pCMV-mtHSP70-IRES-TK.方法 登录Genbank查询HSV-TK和mtHSP70基因mRNA序列,应用引物设计软件DNA club分别设计扩增HSV-TK和mtHSP70基因全长cDNA的特异引物.以pcDNA3-TK质粒或mtHSP70质粒DNA为模板,分别采用各自的引物,用prime STAR HS DNA Polymerase进行聚合酶链反应(polymerase chain reaction,PCR),获得HSV-TK和mtHSP70基因cDNA片断,连接到T载体pMD18-T上,转化大肠杆菌TG1后用HSV-TK和mtHSP70基因的特异引物进行菌落PCR,确定含有阳性mtHSP70或HSV-TK重组质粒并将阳性pMD18T-TK重组质粒和pMD18T-mtHSP70重组质粒进行上、下游测序,测序结果与基因序列进行同源比较.选定正确的质粒用于HSV-TK和mtHSP70基因的亚克隆,构建质粒PCMV-mtHSP70-IRES-TK,所得阳性克隆摇菌后少量提取质粒,分别用NotⅠ单酶切及EcoRⅠ和XhoⅠ双酶切进行酶切鉴定.结果 构建的pCMV-mtHSP70-IRES-TK质粒分别用NotⅠ单酶切及EcoRⅠ/XhoⅠ双酶切进行酶切鉴定,酶切产物电泳见特异酶切图谱,确定为重组质粒pCMV-mtHSP70-IRES-TK.结论 本实验为后续研究mtHSP70/HSV-TK双基因的协同抗肿瘤作用奠定了实验基础.%Objective To construct an eukaryotic plasmid PCMV-mtHSP70-IRES-TK that contains and expresses both mycobacterium tuberculosis heat shock protein 70 (mtHSP70) gene and suicide gene HSV-TK for the experiments. Methods Login on genbank and search for mRNA sequences of HSV-TK and mtHSP70 genes. Specific primers for the amplification of full length cDNA of HSV-TK and mtHSP70 were designed by primer designing software DNA club. pcDNA3-TK plasmid and mtHSP70 plasmid DNA were used as template. PCR was performed with respective primers and prime STAR HS DNA polymerase, cDNA segments of HSV-TK and mtHSP70

  13. A REVIEW ARTICLE ON HERPES SIMPLEX ENCEPHALITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Karimi MD

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:Herpes Simplex encephalitis (HSE is a life threatening outcome of Herpes simplex virus (HSV infection of the central nervous system (CNS. HSVaccounts for 2-5 percent of all cases of encephalitis. One third of cases occur in those younger than 20 years old and one half in those older than 50 years old.Clinical diagnosis is recommended in the encephalopathic, febrile patients with focal neurological signs. However, the clinical findings are not pathogonomic because numerous other diseases of CNS can mimic HSE. Diagnosis should be confirmed based on medical history, analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF for protein and glucose contents, the cellular analysis and identifying the pathogens by serology and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR amplification .The diagnostic gold standard is the detection of HSV DNA in the cerebrospinal fluid by PCR. But negative results need to be interpreted regarding thepatients clinical signs and symptoms and the time of CSF sampling. Spike and slow wave patterns is observed in Electroencephalogram (EEG.Neuroimaging, especially Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI is essential for evaluating the patients, which shows temporal lobe edema or hemorrhage.All patients with HSE should be treated by intravenous Acyclovir (10mg/kg q8hr for 14-21 days. After completing therapy, PCR of the CSF can confirmthe elimination of replicating virus, assisting further management of the patient.Keywords:Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV, Encephalitis, Children

  14. The virion host shutoff protein of herpes simplex virus 1 blocks the replication-independent activation of NF-κB in dendritic cells in the absence of type I interferon signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Christopher R; Kim, Won-keun; Nguyen, Marie L; Yount, Jacob S; López, Carolina B; Blaho, John A; Moran, Thomas M

    2011-12-01

    Immune evasion is a defining feature of the virus-host relationship. During infection, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) utilizes multiple proteins to manipulate the host immune response. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism by which the virion host shutoff (vhs) protein blocks the activation of dendritic cells (DCs). Previously, we found that coinfection of wild-type HSV-1 with a panel of RNA viruses resulted in a block to DC activation that was attributable to vhs. These observations led us to hypothesize that the vhs-mediated inhibition was dependent on signaling through the RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) signaling pathway. By examining DCs generated from MAVS (IPS-1) knockout (KO) mice, we determined that RLR/MAVS signaling is not essential for the DC response to HSV-1. We also evaluated the requirement for the type I interferon (IFN) signaling pathway in DC activation following infection with HSV-1 and found that stimulation of DCs with wild-type HSV-1 required intact type I IFN signaling for the production of cytokines, whereas the vhs deletion (vhs(-)) mutant virus activated DCs without the need for exogenous IFN signaling. Comparisons of transcription factor activation in DCs infected with wild-type HSV and the vhs(-) mutant virus revealed that NF-κB activation was inhibited by vhs in the early phase of the infection. In contrast, IRF3 activation was not influenced by vhs. In these studies, measurement of proinflammatory cytokines and type I IFN release from the infected DCs reflected the activation status of these transcription factors. Taken together, the work presented here (i) describes a novel role for the vhs protein as an inhibitor of the early activation of NF-κB during HSV-1 infection of DCs and (ii) offers a mechanistic explanation of how this protein interferes with DC activation.

  15. Construction of a novel oncolytic adenoviral vector and its biological characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingzhi; Zhang, Xudong; Han, Zhiqiang; Chen, Xinfeng; Yang, Li; Sheng, Yuqiao; Wen, Jianguo

    2013-02-01

    In this study, we aimed to construct an effective and safe oncolytic adenoviral vector for cancer treatment with gene therapy. First, the promoter of the catalytic subunit of human telomerase (hTERTp), adenovirus early region 1a gene (E1A) and thymidine kinase gene of human herpes virus type 1 (HSV-1-TK) were amplified by using PCR from genomic DNA of 293A cells and wild-type HSV-1 (wHSV-1). These specially-prepared elements were inserted into an adenoviral shuttle vector in the opposite and the same directions of left inverted terminal repeat (L-ITR), respectively, to construct pENTR-E1A-IRES-TK-hTERTp (pEITH) and pENTR-hTERTp-E1A-IRES-TK (pHEIT). LR reaction between adenoviral shuttle vectors (pEITH and pHEIT) and the backbone vector DEST was carried out to establish adenoviral expression vectors pAd-E1A-IRES-TK-hTERTp (pAd-EITH) and pAd-hTERTp-E1A-IRES-TK (pAd-HEIT). Recombinant adenovirus Ad-EITH and Ad-HEIT were produced by transfecting 293A cells and purified for the subsequent studies of titer measurement, replication capability with and without acyclovir (ACV) and antitumor ability with and without ganciclovir (GCV) to evaluate the biological characteristics. Adenoviral shuttle vectors pEITH and pHEIT and expression vectors pAd-EITH and pAd-HEIT were successfully constructed, and recombinant adenoviruses Ad-EITH and Ad-HEIT with high titer were produced. The results of replication and cytotoxicity assays showed that Ad-EITH and Ad-HEIT replicated in the hTERTp (+) human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell line CNE and expressed the TK gene effectively leading to the death of tumor cells. In addition, there were still some Ad-HEIT particles replicating in the hTERTp (-) human osteosarcoma U-2OS cells and human lung HFL-1 fibroblasts compared to Ad-EITH which was hardly able to replicate in U-2OS and HFL-1 cells. In addition, we also observed an interesting phenomenon, that the replication of Ad-EITH could be inhibited by antiviral drug ACV on account of the

  16. Herpes simplex-encefalitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Laura Krogh; Mogensen, Trine Hyrup

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is a rare disease, although it is the most common form of sporadic encephalitis worldwide. Recently, studies have provided important new insight into the genetic and immunological basis of HSE. However, even in the presence of antiviral treatment, mortality...

  17. Can You Get Genital Herpes from a Cold Sore?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lucy* Yes — it is possible to get genital herpes from oral sex. Genital herpes is caused by the herpes ... Genital herpes is usually caused by HSV-2; oral herpes (cold sores) is usually caused by HSV-1. ...

  18. Recrudescent herpes labialis mimicking primary herpes labialis in pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Shaveta Sood; Aneet Mahendra; Sanjeev Gupta; Shalu Chandna; Sarabjit Kaur

    2010-01-01

    Context: Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection is prevalent worldwide. Herpes labialis is caused predominantly by HSV-1, and herpes vulvo-vaginitis is caused predominantly by HSV-2. HSV-2 may result in significant morbidity and mortality for infected neonates exposed during delivery .Due to this fact, a large amount of literature exists for HSV-2 but data for HSV -1 is scanty. Case Report : We report two cases of recrudescent herpes labialis in 3 rd trimester of pregnancy with extensive peri-o...

  19. Sensitization of prostate cancer cell lines to 5-fluorocytosine induced by a replication incompetent adenoviral vector carrying a cytosine deaminase transcription unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the efficiency of cytosine deaminase adenoviral/5-fluorocytosine system on prostate cancer cell lines. METHODS: Cell culture, infectivity test and sensitivity test, observing the bystander effect and animal model experiment were carried out. RESULTS: All the established prostate cancer cell lines were eventually infectable, but ratio of vector/cell and time of exposed at which infection occurs was dependent on the cell lines. The expression of transfered cytosine deaminase gene peaked at different days, but persisted beyond 11 days. The prostate cell lines were sensitized to the 5-fluorocytosine by infection with the cytosine deaminase gene adenoviral vector, and only 5% of the LNCap and 10% of the RM-1 cells infected were required for 100% cell death. In the animal model, there was significant eradiation of tumor growth at the ratio of 400 vector particles/cell and with the systematic treatment of 5-fluorocytosine. CONCLUSION: The adenoviral vector carrying a cytosine deaminase transcription unit can sensitize the prostate cancer cell lines to 5-fluorocytosine, and the system can significantly inhibit the growth of prostatic tumor in mice.

  20. Genital herpes: Heisenberg revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Goldmeier, D

    1998-01-01

    In the confirmation of recurrences of genital herpes, patient defined disease reactivation and virological data hold the scientific high ground. The influence of the psyche on recurrence rates and perception of recurrences has been largely neglected and marginalised up to the present, possibly because research work in that area has been and continues to be of poor calibre. However, neglected psychological variables may render otherwise relevant clinical trials uninterpretable. Psycholog...

  1. Recrudescent herpes labialis mimicking primary herpes labialis in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaveta Sood

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Herpes simplex virus (HSV infection is prevalent worldwide. Herpes labialis is caused predominantly by HSV-1, and herpes vulvo-vaginitis is caused predominantly by HSV-2. HSV-2 may result in significant morbidity and mortality for infected neonates exposed during delivery .Due to this fact, a large amount of literature exists for HSV-2 but data for HSV -1 is scanty. Case Report : We report two cases of recrudescent herpes labialis in 3 rd trimester of pregnancy with extensive peri-oral lesions resembling primary herpes labialis. There was no obvious cause of immunosupression. The patients were followed up with a normal outcome of pregnancy and no fetal abnormality. Conclusions : The reasons for such extensive perioral lesions are uncertain. Immunosupression of pregnancy may be a factor in a sub group of patients.

  2. Recrudescent herpes labialis mimicking primary herpes labialis in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaveta Sood

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Context: Herpes simplex virus (HSV infection is prevalent worldwide. Herpes labialis is caused predominantly by HSV-1, and herpes vulvo-vaginitis is caused predominantly by HSV-2. HSV-2 may result in significant morbidity and mortality for infected neonates exposed during delivery. Due to this fact, a large amount of literature exists for HSV-2 but data for HSV -1 is scanty. Case Report: We report two cases of recrudescent herpes labialis in 3rd trimester of pregnancy with extensive peri-oral lesions resembling primary herpes labialis. There was no obvious cause of immunosupression. The patients were followed up with a normal outcome of pregnancy and no fetal abnormality. Conclusions: The reasons for such extensive perioral lesions are uncertain. Immunosupression of pregnancy may be a factor in a sub group of patients.

  3. Chronic herpes simplex virus encephalitis in childhood.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leen, W.G.; Weemaes, C.M.R.; Verbeek, M.M.; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.; Rotteveel, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    Although herpes simplex virus is a major cause of acute encephalitis in childhood, chronic herpes simplex virus encephalitis has only rarely been reported. This report presents a case of chronic herpes simplex virus encephalitis in a 6-year-old female. Diagnosis was based on the detection of herpes

  4. Neonatal herpes in Denmark 1977-1991

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To prevent neonatal herpes, women in labor with genital herpes infection are still delivered by Cesarean section. This policy is currently being debated. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of neonatal herpes in Denmark and to evaluate the prevention practice. METHODS......: All newborns with perinatal herpes in Denmark 1977-1991 were identified from hospital-records. RESULTS: Of 862,298 deliveries 136 possible cases were found but only 30 (22%) fulfilled the criteria for neonatal herpes. The incidence increased from 2.36 to 4.56 per 100,000 live births during 1977......-1984 through 1984-1991. Three mothers (10%) had recurrent herpes at delivery, three (10%) had primary herpes, and five (17%) had oral herpes. Seven infants (23%) were delivered by Cesarean section. Nine (30%) only had cutaneous herpes, four (13%) had CNS herpes, nine (30%) had disseminated disease. Six (20...

  5. Calcium spirulan derived from Spirulina platensis inhibits herpes simplex virus 1 attachment to human keratinocytes and protects against herpes labialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mader, Julia; Gallo, Antonio; Schommartz, Tim; Handke, Wiebke; Nagel, Claus-Henning; Günther, Patrick; Brune, Wolfram; Reich, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Chronic infections with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 are highly prevalent in populations worldwide and cause recurrent oral lesions in up to 40% of infected subjects. We investigated the antiviral activity of a defined Spirulina platensis microalga extract and of purified calcium spirulan (Ca-SP), a sulfated polysaccharide contained therein. The inhibitory effects of HSV-1 were assessed by using a plaque reduction assay and quantitative PCR in a susceptible mammalian epithelial cell line and confirmed in human keratinocytes. Time-of-addition and attachment experiments and fluorescence detection of the HSV-1 tegument protein VP16 were used to analyze the mechanism of HSV-1 inhibition. Effects of Ca-SP on Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus/human herpes virus 8 replication and uptake of the ORF45 tegument protein were tested in human retinal pigment epithelial cells. In an observational trial the prophylactic effects of topically applied Ca-SP were compared with those of systemic and topical nucleoside analogues in 198 volunteers with recurrent herpes labialis receiving permanent lip makeup. Ca-SP inhibited HSV-1 infection in vitro with a potency at least comparable to that of acyclovir by blocking viral attachment and penetration into host cells. Ca-SP also inhibited entry of Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus/human herpes virus 8. In the clinical model of herpes exacerbation, the prophylactic effect of a Ca-SP and microalgae extract containing cream was superior to that of acyclovir cream. These data indicate a potential clinical use of Ca-SP containing Spirulina species extract for the prophylactic treatment of herpes labialis and suggest possible activity of Ca-SP against infections caused by other herpesviruses. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Current management and recommendations for access to antiviral therapy of herpes labialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Anthony; Griffiths, Paul; Leone, Peter; Mindel, Adrian; Patel, Rajul; Stanberry, Lawrence; Whitley, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Herpes labialis is a common skin infective condition, worldwide, which is primarily caused by HSV-1. Recurrent episodes of herpes labialis, also known as cold sores, can be frequent, painful, long-lasting and disfiguring for infected patients. At present, there are two types of antivirals for the treatment of herpes labialis, topical and oral, which are available over the counter or as prescription-only. The aim of antiviral therapy is to block viral replication to enable shortening the duration of symptoms and to accelerate healing of the lesions associated with herpes labialis. This review examines the evidence for the effectiveness of current topical and oral antivirals in the management of recurrent episodes of herpes labialis. In most countries, oral antivirals for herpes labialis are available as prescription-only. However, in early 2010, the oral antiviral famciclovir was reclassified from prescription-only medicine to pharmacist-controlled status in New Zealand. The benefits and risks associated with moving an antiviral therapy for herpes labialis from prescription-only to pharmacist-controlled status are reviewed here, and the implications for patients, general physicians and pharmacists are considered.

  7. A REVIEW ARTICLE ON HERPES SIMPLEX ENCEPHALITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Karimi MD,

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Herpes Simplex encephalitis (HSE is a life threatening outcome of Herpes simplex virus (HSV infection of the central nervous system (CNS. HSVaccounts for 2-5 percent of all cases of encephalitis. One third of cases occur in those younger than 20 years old and one half in those older than 50 years old.Clinical diagnosis is recommended in the encephalopathic, febrile patients with focal neurological signs. However, the clinical findings are not pathogonomic because numerous other diseases of CNS can mimic HSE. Diagnosis should be confirmed based on medical history, analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF for protein and glucose contents, the cellular analysis and identifying the pathogens by serology and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR amplification .The diagnostic gold standard is the detection of HSV DNA in the cerebrospinal fluid by PCR. But negative results need to be interpreted regarding thepatients clinical signs and symptoms and the time of CSF sampling. Spike and slow wave patterns is observed in Electroencephalogram (EEG.Neuroimaging, especially Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI is essential for evaluating the patients, which shows temporal lobe edema or hemorrhage.All patients with HSE should be treated by intravenous Acyclovir (10mg/kg q8hr for 14-21 days. After completing therapy, PCR of the CSF can confirmthe elimination of replicating virus, assisting further management of the patient.

  8. Long-term neuroprotection achieved with latency-associated promoter-driven herpes simplex virus gene transfer to the peripheral nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Munmun; Wolfe, Darren; Mata, Marina; Huang, Shaohua; Glorioso, Joseph C; Fink, David J

    2005-08-01

    We examined the ability of the herpes simplex virus (HSV) latency-associated promoter (LAP2) to drive biologically relevant prolonged transgene expression in the peripheral nervous system. Rat dorsal root ganglia were transduced in vivo by subcutaneous inoculation of replication-incompetent HSV-based vectors containing nerve growth factor (NGF) or neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) under the control of LAP2 (vectors SLN and QLNT3, respectively) and vector SHN expressing NGF under the control of the human cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter. Twenty-four weeks later a pure sensory neuropathy was induced by overdose of pyridoxine (PDX), and the animals were assessed 6 months after inoculation. Inoculation of SLN, but not SHN, attenuated the nerve damage caused by PDX and protected foot sensory amplitude, H-wave amplitude, and behavioral measures of proprioceptive function. QLNT3 was more effective than SLN in preserving the largest myelinated fibers from degeneration. These results indicate that expression of NGF or NT-3 driven by LAP2 is sufficient to prevent the development of neuropathy 6 months after vector inoculation in rats.

  9. The Significance of Herpes Simplex for School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensor, Deirdre

    2005-01-01

    Herpes simplex is a common recurrent viral infection caused by the herpes simplex virus. The two closely related but distinct viruses that cause herpes simplex infections are herpes simplex 1 (HSV-1) and herpes simplex 2 (HSV-2). HSV-1 is commonly associated with infections around the oral mucosa and is the cause of herpes labialis, often referred…

  10. Pentyl Gallate Nanoemulsions as Potential Topical Treatment of Herpes Labialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelmann, Regina G; Colombo, Mariana; De Araújo Lopes, Sávia Caldeira; Nunes, Ricardo J; Pistore, Morgana; Dall Agnol, Daniele; Rigotto, Caroline; Silva, Izabella Thais; Roman, Silvane S; Teixeira, Helder F; Oliveira Simões, Cláudia M; Koester, Letícia S

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the antiherpes activity of pentyl gallate (PG), suggesting that it could be a promising candidate for the topical treatment of human herpes labialis. PG low aqueous solubility represents a major drawback to its incorporation in topical dosage forms. Hence, the feasibility of incorporating PG into nanoemulsions, the ability to penetrate the skin, to inhibit herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1 replication, and to cause dermal sensitization or toxicity were evaluated. Oil/water nanoemulsions containing 0.5% PG were prepared by spontaneous emulsification. The in vitro PG distribution into porcine ear skin after topical application of nanoemulsions was assessed, and the in vitro antiviral activity against HSV-1 replication was evaluated. Acute dermal toxicity and risk of dermal sensitization were evaluated in rat model. Nanoemulsions presented nanometric particle size (from 124.8 to 143.7 nm), high zeta potential (from -50.1 to -66.1 mV), loading efficiency above 99%, and adequate stability during 12 months. All formulations presented anti-HSV-1 activity. PG was able to reach deeper into the dermis more efficiently from the nanoemulsion F4. This formulation as well as PG were considered safe for topical use. Nanoemulsions seem to be a safe and effective approach for topically delivering PG in the treatment of human herpes labialis infection.

  11. Adenovirus-mediated shRNA interference against HSV-1 replication in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Bo; Liu, Xinjing; Wang, Qingzhi; Zhang, Rui; Yang, Ting; Han, Zhiqiang; Xu, Yuming

    2016-12-01

    The UL29 and UL28 proteins encoded by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) are critical for its replication and packaging, respectively. Research has demonstrated that synthesized siRNA molecules targeting the UL29 gene are able to suppress HSV-2 replication and the UL28-null HSV-1 gene cannot form infectious viruses in vitro. Silencing the UL28 and UL29 genes by RNAi might lead to the development of novel antiviral agents for the treatment of HSV-1 infections. Two kinds of short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) targeting the UL29 and UL28 genes were chemically synthesized and then delivered into cells by a replication-defective human adenovirus type 5 (Adv5) vector. (-) shRNAs targeting none of the genome of HSV-1 were used as the control. Vero cells were inoculated with Ad-UL28shRNA or Ad-UL29shRNA at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 100 and challenged 24 h later with HSV-1 at an MOI of 0.01 to inhibit HSV-1 replication, as measured by the level of the corresponding RNA and proteins. In addition, the amount of progeny virus was assessed at daily intervals. The antiviral effects of Ad-shRNAs at ongoing HSV-1 infection were explored at 12 h after inoculation of the HSV-1. The results showed that the shRNAs delivered by Adv5 significantly suppressed HSV-1 replication in vitro, as determined by the levels of viral RNA transcription, viral protein synthesis, and viral production. The Ad-UL28shRNA and Ad-UL29shRNA suppressed the replication of HSV-1, respectively, compared with the control group (P HSV-1 infection (P HSV-1 infection.

  12. Susceptibility of herpes simplex virus isolated from genital herpes lesions to ASP2151, a novel helicase-primase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsumata, Kiyomitsu; Weinberg, Adriana; Chono, Koji; Takakura, Shoji; Kontani, Toru; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2012-07-01

    ASP2151 (amenamevir) is a helicase-primase inhibitor against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), HSV-2, and varicella-zoster virus. To evaluate the anti-HSV activity of ASP2151, susceptibility testing was performed on viruses isolated from patients participating in a placebo- and valacyclovir-controlled proof-of-concept phase II study for recurrent genital herpes. A total of 156 HSV strains were isolated prior to the dosing of patients, and no preexisting variants with less susceptibility to ASP2151 or acyclovir (ACV) were detected. ASP2151 inhibited HSV-1 and HSV-2 replication with mean 50% effective concentrations (EC(50)s) of 0.043 and 0.069 μM, whereas ACV exhibited mean EC(50)s of 2.1 and 3.2 μM, respectively. Notably, the susceptibilities of HSV isolates to ASP2151 and ACV were not altered after dosing with the antiviral agents. Taken together, these results demonstrate that ASP2151 inhibits the replication of HSV clinical isolates more potently than ACV, and HSV resistant to this novel helicase-primase inhibitor as well as ACV may not easily emerge in short-term treatment for recurrent genital herpes patients.

  13. Database Replication

    CERN Document Server

    Kemme, Bettina

    2010-01-01

    Database replication is widely used for fault-tolerance, scalability and performance. The failure of one database replica does not stop the system from working as available replicas can take over the tasks of the failed replica. Scalability can be achieved by distributing the load across all replicas, and adding new replicas should the load increase. Finally, database replication can provide fast local access, even if clients are geographically distributed clients, if data copies are located close to clients. Despite its advantages, replication is not a straightforward technique to apply, and

  14. Herpes simplex virus type 1 ribonucleotide reductase null mutants induce lesions in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, S R; Kik, N A; Birch, G M; Chiego, D J; Shipman, C

    1989-12-01

    Two herpes simplex virus type 1 ribonucleotide reductase null mutants, hrR3 and ICP6 delta, produced cutaneous lesions in guinea pigs as severe as those of wild-type strains. The lesions induced by hrR3 resulted from in vivo replication of the mutant virus, suggesting that this virus-encoded enzyme is nonessential for virus replication in guinea pigs.

  15. Recurrent facial urticaria following herpes simplex labialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawar, Vijay; Godse, Kiran

    2012-03-01

    We describe recurrent acute right-sided facial urticaria associated with herpes labialis infection in a middle-aged female patient. Antiviral medications and antihistamines not only successfully cleared the herpes infection and urticaria but also prevented further recurrences.

  16. Recurrent facial urticaria following herpes simplex labialis

    OpenAIRE

    Vijay Zawar; Kiran Godse

    2012-01-01

    We describe recurrent acute right-sided facial urticaria associated with herpes labialis infection in a middle-aged female patient. Antiviral medications and antihistamines not only successfully cleared the herpes infection and urticaria but also prevented further recurrences.

  17. Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase and ganciclovir suicide gene therapy for human pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Wang; Xiao-Xuan Lu; Dao-Zhen Chen; Shu-Feng Li; Li-Shan Zhang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the in vitro effects of suicide gene therepy system of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene (HSV-TK) in combination with the treatment of nucleotide analog-ganciclovir (GCV) on human pancreatic cancer, and to provide a novel clinical therapeutic method for human pancreatic cancer.METHODS: We used a replication defective recombinant retrovirus vector GINaTK (bearing HSV-TK gene) to make packaging cell PA317 produce progeny virions. We then transferred the HSV-TK gene to target cells SW1990 using these progeny virions, and treated these gene-modified tumor cells with GCV to study the sensitivity of the cells to GCV and their bystander effects by routine MTT-method.RESULTS: Packaging cell PA317/TK was successfully constructed, and we acquired SW1990/TK through virus progeny infection. These gene-modified pancreatic cancer cells were sensitive to the treatment of GCV compared with unmodified tumor cells (t=4.15, n=10, P<0.0025). We also observed a remarkable bystander effect by mixing two kinds of cells at different ratio.CONCLUSION: Our data demonstrate that HSV-TK/GCV suicide gene therapy system is effective for treating experimental human pancreatic cancer, which is largely resistant to the common therapies, so the suicide gene therapy system may be a potential treatment approach for pancreatic cancer.

  18. Herpes zoster: A clinicocytopathological insight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snehal Shah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Herpes zoster or shingles is reactivation of the varicella zoster virus that had entered the cutaneous nerve endings during an earlier episode of chicken pox traveled to the dorsal root ganglia and remained in a latent form. This condition is characterized by occurrence of multiple, painful, unilateral vesicles and ulceration which shows a typical single dermatome involvement. In this case report, we present a patient with herpes zoster involving the mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve, with unilateral vesicles over the right side of lower third of face along the trigeminal nerve tract, with intraoral involvement of buccal mucosa, labial mucosa and the tongue of the same side. Cytopathology revealed classic features of herpes infection including inclusion bodies, perinuclear halo and multinucleated cells.

  19. [Herpes zoster and postherpetic neuralgia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollina, U; Machetanz, J

    2016-08-01

    Herpes zoster develops by endogenous reactivation of varizella zoster virus (VZV). Incidence increases with age. Females are more frequently affected than males. The reactivation rate in seropositive individuals is about 20 %. After a short prodromal stage, herpetiform-grouped vesicles appear in segmental arrangement. Pain and paresthesia are typical zoster symptoms. Complications like bacterial superinfections, vasculopathy, paresis, and oculopathy may occur. During pregnancy herpes zoster is a threat for mother and child. Among elderly patients, cardiovascular risk is increased during the first week of herpes zoster infection. Postherpetic neuropathy is feared. Diagnosis can be made clinically and by the use of polymerase chain reaction. First-line treatment is systemic antiviral drug therapy with either acyclovir or brivudine. Adjuvant therapies consist of pain management and topical treatment.

  20. Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus in HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boateng Wiafe MD MSc

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Herpes zoster is a common infection caused by the human herpes virus 3, the same virus that causes chickenpox. It is a member of herpes viridae, the same family as the herpes simplex virus, Epstein- Barr virus, and cytomegalovirus. Herpes zoster ophthalmicus occurs when a latent varicella zoster virus in the trigeminal ganglia involving the ophthalmic division of the nerve is reactivated. Of the three divisions of the fifth cranial nerve, the ophthalmic is involved 20 times more frequently than the other divisions.

  1. Angiogenesis inhibition using an oncolytic herpes simplex virus expressing endostatin in a murine lung cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Jonathan M; Schmitt, Anthony D; McGinn, Christopher M; Fuchs, Bryan C; Kuruppu, Darshini; Tanabe, Kenneth K; Lanuti, Michael

    2012-03-01

    Herpes-mediated viral oncolysis alone is not sufficient to completely eradicate tumors. In this study we used a replication conditional, endostatin-expressing herpes simplex virus-1 mutant (HSV-Endo) in a murine lung cancer model. We hypothesized that the anti-angiogenic action of endostatin would improve upon the oncolytic effect of HSV-1. HSV-Endo was evaluated in a pulmonary metastases and orthotopic flank model, where there was significantly less tumor burden and reduced microvessel density compared to a control virus. Endostatin expression appears to improve the anti-tumor effect of HSV-1 in a lung cancer model.

  2. Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Viral Therapy: A Stride toward Selective Targeting of Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchala, Dhaval S; Bhatt, Lokesh K; Prabhavalkar, Kedar S

    2017-01-01

    Oncolytic viral therapy, which makes use of replication-competent lytic viruses, has emerged as a promising modality to treat malignancies. It has shown meaningful outcomes in both solid tumor and hematologic malignancies. Advancements during the last decade, mainly genetic engineering of oncolytic viruses have resulted in improved specificity and efficacy of oncolytic viruses in cancer therapeutics. Oncolytic viral therapy for treating cancer with herpes simplex virus-1 has been of particular interest owing to its range of benefits like: (a) large genome and power to infiltrate in the tumor, (b) easy access to manipulation with the flexibility to insert multiple transgenes, (c) infecting majority of the malignant cell types with quick replication in the infected cells and (d) as Anti-HSV agent to terminate HSV replication. This review provides an exhaustive list of oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 along with their genetic alterations. It also encompasses the major developments in oncolytic herpes simplex-1 viral therapy and outlines the limitations and drawbacks of oncolytic herpes simplex viral therapy.

  3. An attenuated herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1 encoding the HIV-1 Tat protein protects mice from a deadly mucosal HSV1 challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariaconcetta Sicurella

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV1 and HSV2 are common infectious agents in both industrialized and developing countries. They cause recurrent asymptomatic and/or symptomatic infections, and life-threatening diseases and death in newborns and immunocompromised patients. Current treatment for HSV relies on antiviral medications, which can halt the symptomatic diseases but cannot prevent the shedding that occurs in asymptomatic patients or, consequently, the spread of the viruses. Therefore, prevention rather than treatment of HSV infections has long been an area of intense research, but thus far effective anti-HSV vaccines still remain elusive. One of the key hurdles to overcome in anti-HSV vaccine development is the identification and effective use of strategies that promote the emergence of Th1-type immune responses against a wide range of epitopes involved in the control of viral replication. Since the HIV1 Tat protein has several immunomodulatory activities and increases CTL recognition of dominant and subdominant epitopes of heterologous antigens, we generated and assayed a recombinant attenuated replication-competent HSV1 vector containing the tat gene (HSV1-Tat. In this proof-of-concept study we show that immunization with this vector conferred protection in 100% of mice challenged intravaginally with a lethal dose of wild-type HSV1. We demonstrate that the presence of Tat within the recombinant virus increased and broadened Th1-like and CTL responses against HSV-derived T-cell epitopes and elicited in most immunized mice detectable IgG responses. In sharp contrast, a similarly attenuated HSV1 recombinant vector without Tat (HSV1-LacZ, induced low and different T cell responses, no measurable antibody responses and did not protect mice against the wild-type HSV1 challenge. These findings strongly suggest that recombinant HSV1 vectors expressing Tat merit further investigation for their potential to prevent and/or contain HSV1

  4. First-in-Human Evaluation of the Safety and Immunogenicity of an Intranasally Administered Replication-Competent Sendai Virus-Vectored HIV Type 1 Gag Vaccine: Induction of Potent T-Cell or Antibody Responses in Prime-Boost Regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyombayire, Julien; Anzala, Omu; Gazzard, Brian; Karita, Etienne; Bergin, Philip; Hayes, Peter; Kopycinski, Jakub; Omosa-Manyonyi, Gloria; Jackson, Akil; Bizimana, Jean; Farah, Bashir; Sayeed, Eddy; Parks, Christopher L; Inoue, Makoto; Hironaka, Takashi; Hara, Hiroto; Shu, Tsugumine; Matano, Tetsuro; Dally, Len; Barin, Burc; Park, Harriet; Gilmour, Jill; Lombardo, Angela; Excler, Jean-Louis; Fast, Patricia; Laufer, Dagna S; Cox, Josephine H

    2017-01-01

     We report the first-in-human safety and immunogenicity assessment of a prototype intranasally administered, replication-competent Sendai virus (SeV)-vectored, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccine.  Sixty-five HIV-1-uninfected adults in Kenya, Rwanda, and the United Kingdom were assigned to receive 1 of 4 prime-boost regimens (administered at 0 and 4 months, respectively; ratio of vaccine to placebo recipients, 12:4): priming with a lower-dose SeV-Gag given intranasally, followed by boosting with an adenovirus 35-vectored vaccine encoding HIV-1 Gag, reverse transcriptase, integrase, and Nef (Ad35-GRIN) given intramuscularly (SLA); priming with a higher-dose SeV-Gag given intranasally, followed by boosting with Ad35-GRIN given intramuscularly (SHA); priming with Ad35-GRIN given intramuscularly, followed by boosting with a higher-dose SeV-Gag given intranasally (ASH); and priming and boosting with a higher-dose SeV-Gag given intranasally (SHSH).  All vaccine regimens were well tolerated. Gag-specific IFN-γ enzyme-linked immunospot-determined response rates and geometric mean responses were higher (96% and 248 spot-forming units, respectively) in groups primed with SeV-Gag and boosted with Ad35-GRIN (SLA and SHA) than those after a single dose of Ad35-GRIN (56% and 54 spot-forming units, respectively) or SeV-Gag (55% and 59 spot-forming units, respectively); responses persisted for ≥8 months after completion of the prime-boost regimen. Functional CD8(+) T-cell responses with greater breadth, magnitude, and frequency in a viral inhibition assay were also seen in the SLA and SHA groups after Ad35-GRIN boost, compared with those who received either vaccine alone. SeV-Gag did not boost T-cell counts in the ASH group. In contrast, the highest Gag-specific antibody titers were seen in the ASH group. Mucosal antibody responses were sporadic.  SeV-Gag primed functional, durable HIV-specific T-cell responses and boosted antibody responses. The prime

  5. HPV and Herpes Zoster Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Karabudak

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Genital warts and Herpes Zoster are relatively frequent encountered diseases in dermatology practice. Cervical cancers are also caused by some spesific types of human papillomaviruses. The purpose of this review is to give some knowledge about the vaccines which were developed for these diseases. (Turkderm 2008; 42: 108-12

  6. Herpes: Removing Fact from Fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Elbert D.

    1984-01-01

    Factual information dealing with the virus herpes is provided in hopes of allaying the public fears that have recently appeared because of misinformation presented by the media. Symptoms, types, and new developments in treatment are explored. Recommendations for obtaining additional information are offered. (DF)

  7. Acupuncture Treatment of Herpes Zoster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡金生

    2001-01-01

    @@Case History Song××, a male middle school teacher aged 58 years, paid his first visit on August 7, 2000, with the chief complaint of pain in the left hypochondrium for 20 days. The patient stated that he suddenly got a sharp burning pain in the left hypochondrium in mid July. The pain gradually radiated to the upper abdominal area, meanwhile red herpes appeared in the hypochondriac region. He had been diagnosed as having herpes zoster, and treated in several nearby hospitals with fluid infusion and medication. As a result, the herpes partly disappeared. But the sharp burning pain still remained, which could not be relieved by administration of analgetics. The patient was then recommended by his friends for treatment here. The patient used to be in a anxious state of mind, and had a wiry pulse and disorder of the liver-qi. The patients had been disturbed by problems of his students and worried about his aged mother's illness, and had poor sleep. Physical examination showed that the patient had a slightly fat figure and sickly complexion, but was in a clear mind. His blood pressure was 140/90 mmHg, and heart rate 75 times/min. No abnormal signs were found in the heart and lungs. Prominent dark red herpes with obvious local tenderness was found on the skin surface of the left hypochondrium and upper abdome.

  8. Construction of conditionally replicative adenovirus vector mediated by dual specific promoters%双特异性启动子调控条件复制腺病毒载体的构建

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李玮; 谭建

    2013-01-01

    Objective To construct and identify the conditionally replicative adenovirus vectors which may induce the human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) expression in the early region 1A (E1A) gene of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)promoter regions.Methods Immunoblotting assay was employed to detect the variation in GFAP and telomerase protein expression prior to and following viral infection of the cerebral stellar glioblastoma cells (U87),neuroglioma cells (U251) and human embryonic lung fibroblasts (MRC-5) cells.The hTERT and GFAP promoters and the hNIS genes were amplified by polymerase chain reaction for synthesis of adenoviral E1A genes.The recombinant plasmids containing hTERT and GFAP gene promoters were adopted for transfection into MRC-5,U251 and U87,which entailed assessment of the hTERT and GFAP promoter activity via fluorescent analysis after 24 h.This was followed by ligation with the E1A and hNIS genes and subsequent cloning into the plasmid pDC311 for construction of the recombinant plasmid pDC311-Tp-E1A-Gp-NIS that was identified by double enzyme digestion (EcoR Ⅰ and Sal Ⅰ) and gene sequencing.This recombinant plasmid was co-transfected with adenoviral genomic plasmid pBHGlox△E1-3Cre into the human embryonic kidney 293 cells forming the conditionally replicative recombinant adenovirus Ad-Tp-E1A-Gp-NIS.This Ad-Tp-E1A-Gp-NIS was employed to transfect the 293,MRC-5,U87 and U251 cells,whose conditional replicability was measured by plaque forming assay.The recombinant virus Ad-Tp-E1A-Gp-NIS and Ad-CMV-EGFP controls were used to transfect the U251,U87 and MRC-5 cells for detection of the capacity of 125I uptake by using a γ-ray counter.Results The expression of the 120 000 telomerase and 49 000 GFAP protein could be found in U87 and U251 cells,but not in MRC-5 cells.Glioma target gene expression could be induced by the GFAP and hTERT promoters,the efficiency of which was (62.10±6.26)

  9. Introducing Vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, John

    1997-01-01

    Suggests an approach to teaching vectors that promotes active learning through challenging questions addressed to the class, as opposed to subtle explanations. Promotes introducing vector graphics with concrete examples, beginning with an explanation of the displacement vector. Also discusses artificial vectors, vector algebra, and unit vectors.…

  10. Expression of herpes simplex virus type 1 recombinant thymidine kinase and its application to a rapid antiviral sensitivity assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, Tomoyuki; Lixin, Wang; Takayama-Ito, Mutsuyo; Iizuka, Itoe; Ogata, Momoko; Tsuji, Masanori; Nishimura, Hidekazu; Taniguchi, Shuichi; Morikawa, Shigeru; Kurane, Ichiro; Mizuguchi, Masashi; Saijo, Masayuki

    2011-08-01

    Antiviral-resistant herpesvirus infection has become a great concern for immunocompromised patients. Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infections are treated with viral thymidine kinase (vTK)-associated drugs such as acyclovir (ACV), and most ACV-resistance (ACV(r)) is due to mutations in the vTK. The standard drug sensitivity test is usually carried out by the plaque reduction assay-based method, which requires over 10 days. To shorten the time required, a novel system was developed by the concept, in which 293T cells transiently expressing recombinant vTK derived from the test sample by transfection of the cells with an expression vector were infected with vTK-deficient and ACV(r) HSV-1 (TAR), and then cultured in a maintenance medium with or without designated concentrations of ACV, ganciclovir (GCV) and brivudine (BVdU). The replication of TAR was strongly inhibited by ACV, GCV and BVdU in 293T cells expressing recombinant vTK of the ACV-sensitive HSV-1, whereas replication was not or slightly inhibited in cells expressing the recombinant vTK of highly resistant or intermediately resistant HSV-1, respectively. An inverse correlation was demonstrated in the 50% effective concentrations (EC(50)s) and inhibitory effects of these compounds on the replication of TAR among ACV(s) and ACV(r) HSV-1 clones. These results indicate that the EC(50)s of the vTK-associated drugs including ACV can be assumed by measuring the inhibitory effect of drugs in 293T cells expressing recombinant vTK of the target virus. The newly developed antiviral sensitivity assay system for HSV-1 makes it possible to estimate EC(50) for vTK-associated drugs, when whole vTK gene is available for use by gene amplification directly from lesion's samples or from virus isolates.

  11. [Role of Herpes simplex virus in the immune stromal keratitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinagre, C; Martínez, M J; Vogel, M; Traipe, L; Stoppel, J; Squella, O; Srur, M; Charlín, R

    2001-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection of the cornea is a leading cause of blindness in occidental countries and a common recurrent manifestation of it is the immune stromal keratitis (ISK). However, it is not known whether active viral replication occurs during the acute phase of the disease, because isolation of the virus by conventional culture techniques has not been accomplished. To establish the presence of HSV in patients with ISK. Fourteen corneal swabbing samples, from active diseased eyes of patients with clinical diagnosis of ISK, were submitted to Herpchek and PCR for the identification of HSV antigens and genome. All ISK samples were negative by both techniques. It was not possible to identify HSV antigens nor their genome by the methodology used. It is likely that, they can't be detected in corneal superficial layers or probably there is no viral replication at this stage of the disease, so antiviral therapy should be reconsidered.

  12. Herpes simplex virus infection during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson-Famy, Alyssa; Gardella, Carolyn

    2014-12-01

    Genital herpes in pregnancy continues to cause significant maternal morbidity, with an increasing number of infections being due to oral-labial transmission of herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1. Near delivery, primary infections with HSV-1 or HSV-2 carry the highest risk of neonatal herpes infection, which is a rare but potentially devastating disease for otherwise healthy newborns. Prevention efforts have been limited by lack of an effective intervention for preventing primary infections and the unclear role of routine serologic testing.

  13. TLR3 deficiency renders astrocytes permissive to herpes simplex virus infection and facilitates establishment of CNS infection in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinert, Line S; Harder, Louis; Holm, Christian K

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) are highly prevalent neurotropic viruses. While they can replicate lytically in cells of the epithelial lineage, causing lesions on mucocutaneous surfaces, HSVs also establish latent infections in neurons, which act as reservoirs of virus for subsequent reactivation ...

  14. Immunity and the burden of herpes zoster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won Suk; Kwon, Soon Sun; Lee, Jacob; Choi, Su-Mi; Lee, Jin Soo; Eom, Joong Sik; Sohn, Jang Wook; Choeng, Hee Jin

    2014-03-01

    The burden of herpes zoster may be related to patients' immunity, although this has not been studied extensively. This hypothesis was tested in a matched case-control study of patients with herpes zoster who sought treatment at one of seven university hospitals in Korea from January 1, 2007, to December 31, 2010. Patients diagnosed with herpes zoster were placed into three groups based on their immune status: severely immunocompromised, mild-to-moderately immunocompromised, and normal immunity. Each patient in the severely immunocompromised group was matched with one patient in the mild-to-moderately immunocompromised group and one patient in the normal immunity group in the same hospital based on age, sex, and date of herpes zoster onset. A total of 582 patients with herpes zoster were included in the analysis: 194 in each of the three groups. Patients in the severely immunocompromised group had the highest herpes zoster-related hospitalization rate as compared to patients in the mild-to-moderately immunocompromised and normal immune groups (P herpes zoster-related medical cost increased significantly with the deterioration of patients' immunity (P herpes zoster burden was observed as the patients' immunity decreased. Therefore, effective measures are necessary to prevent herpes zoster and reduce its burden in severely immunocompromised patients.

  15. Polyneuritis cranialis following herpes zoster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhakrishna H

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Herpes zoster is a common clinical condition involving cranial nerves. We encountered 3 cases in which multiple cranial nerves were involved besides the commoner ones. All the three cases were treated with acyclovir and oral steroids. Recovery of motor function was only partial in all three cases when reviewed 2 months after discharge. The clinical details and a brief review of literature are presented.

  16. Characterization of pMC11, a plasmid with dual origins of replication isolated from Lactobacillus casei MCJ and construction of shuttle vectors with each replicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Zhengjun; Lin, Jinzhong; Ma, Chengjie

    2014-01-01

    %. These vectors were employed to express a green fluorescent protein (GFP) using the promoter of S-layer protein SlpA from Lactobacillus acidophilus. And a growth-phase regulated expression of GFP was observed in different strains. In conclusion, these shuttle vectors provide efficient genetic tools for DNA...

  17. Recent advances in vaccine development for herpes simplex virus types I and II

    OpenAIRE

    Coleman, Jeffrey L.; Shukla, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Despite recent advances in vaccine design and strategies, latent infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV) remains a formidable challenge. Approaches involving live-attenuated viruses and inactivated viral preparations were popular throughout the twentieth century. In the past ten years, many vaccine types, both prophylactic or therapeutic, have contained a replication-defective HSV, viral DNA or glycoproteins. New research focused on the mechanism of immune evasion by the virus has involved ...

  18. Plasmid Rolling-Circle Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Masó, J A; MachóN, C; Bordanaba-Ruiseco, L; Espinosa, M; Coll, M; Del Solar, G

    2015-02-01

    Plasmids are DNA entities that undergo controlled replication independent of the chromosomal DNA, a crucial step that guarantees the prevalence of the plasmid in its host. DNA replication has to cope with the incapacity of the DNA polymerases to start de novo DNA synthesis, and different replication mechanisms offer diverse solutions to this problem. Rolling-circle replication (RCR) is a mechanism adopted by certain plasmids, among other genetic elements, that represents one of the simplest initiation strategies, that is, the nicking by a replication initiator protein on one parental strand to generate the primer for leading-strand initiation and a single priming site for lagging-strand synthesis. All RCR plasmid genomes consist of a number of basic elements: leading strand initiation and control, lagging strand origin, phenotypic determinants, and mobilization, generally in that order of frequency. RCR has been mainly characterized in Gram-positive bacterial plasmids, although it has also been described in Gram-negative bacterial or archaeal plasmids. Here we aim to provide an overview of the RCR plasmids' lifestyle, with emphasis on their characteristic traits, promiscuity, stability, utility as vectors, etc. While RCR is one of the best-characterized plasmid replication mechanisms, there are still many questions left unanswered, which will be pointed out along the way in this review.

  19. Optimal management of genital herpes: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sauerbrei A

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Andreas Sauerbrei Institute of Virology and Antiviral Therapy, German Consulting Laboratory for Herpes Simplex Virus and Varicella-Zoster Virus, Jena University Hospital, Friedrich-Schiller University of Jena, Jena, Germany Abstract: As one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases, genital herpes is a global medical problem with significant physical and psychological morbidity. Genital herpes is caused by herpes simplex virus type 1 or type 2 and can manifest as primary and/or recurrent infection. This manuscript provides an overview about the fundamental knowledge on the virus, its epidemiology, and infection. Furthermore, the current possibilities of antiviral therapeutic interventions and laboratory diagnosis of genital herpes as well as the present situation and perspectives for the treatment by novel antivirals and prevention of disease by vaccination are presented. Since the medical management of patients with genital herpes simplex virus infection is often unsatisfactory, this review aims at all physicians and health professionals who are involved in the care of patients with genital herpes. The information provided would help to improve the counseling of affected patients and to optimize the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of this particular disease. Keywords: herpes simplex virus, epidemiology, infection, antiviral therapy, laboratory diagnosis, prevention

  20. Recurrent facial urticaria following herpes simplex labialis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Zawar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe recurrent acute right-sided facial urticaria associated with herpes labialis infection in a middle-aged female patient. Antiviral medications and antihistamines not only successfully cleared the herpes infection and urticaria but also prevented further recurrences.

  1. Neonatal herpes in Denmark 1977-1991

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To prevent neonatal herpes, women in labor with genital herpes infection are still delivered by Cesarean section. This policy is currently being debated. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of neonatal herpes in Denmark and to evaluate the prevention practice. METHODS......: All newborns with perinatal herpes in Denmark 1977-1991 were identified from hospital-records. RESULTS: Of 862,298 deliveries 136 possible cases were found but only 30 (22%) fulfilled the criteria for neonatal herpes. The incidence increased from 2.36 to 4.56 per 100,000 live births during 1977......%) did not have any sequelae. Four (13%) died. Six (20%) had serious neurological sequelae. Seven (23%) only had cutaneous recurrences. In seven cases (23%) information was insufficient. CONCLUSIONS: During a 15 year period in Denmark only one neonate had serious sequelae following a recognized maternal...

  2. An updated approach to treating and preventing herpes zoster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrubba, Carl; Donkers, Kelly

    2013-12-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) causes chickenpox and herpes zoster. Herpes zoster is a common infection in older adults and can lead to potentially debilitating postherpetic neuralgia. This article reviews the diagnosis and management of herpes zoster, including strategies to reduce disease frequency and severity with the herpes zoster vaccine.

  3. Herpes simplex virus-mediated human hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene transfer into neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palella, T D; Silverman, L J; Schroll, C T; Homa, F L; Levine, M; Kelley, W N

    1988-01-01

    The virtually complete deficiency of the purine salvage enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) results in a devastating neurological disease, Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. Transfer of the HPRT gene into fibroblasts and lymphoblasts in vitro and into hematopoietic cells in vivo has been accomplished by other groups with retroviral-derived vectors. It appears to be necessary, however, to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal cells to correct the neurological dysfunction of this disorder. The neurotropic virus herpes simplex virus type 1 has features that make it suitable for use as a vector to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal tissue. This report describes the isolation of an HPRT-deficient rat neuroma cell line, designated B103-4C, and the construction of a recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 that contained human HPRT cDNA. These recombinant viruses were used to infect B103-4C cells. Infected cells expressed HPRT activity which was human in origin.

  4. Herpes simplex virus-mediated human hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene transfer into neuronal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palella, T.D.; Silverman, L.J.; Schroll, C.T.; Homa, F.L.; Levine, M.; Kelley, W.N.

    1988-01-01

    The virtually complete deficiency of the purine salvage enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) results in a devastating neurological disease, Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. Transfer of the HPRT gene into fibroblasts and lymphoblasts in vitro and into hematopoietic cells in vivo has been accomplished by other groups with retroviral-derived vectors. It appears to be necessary, however, to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal cells to correct the neurological dysfunction of this disorder. The neurotropic virus herpes simplex virus type 1 has features that make it suitable for use as a vector to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal tissue. This report describes the isolation of an HPRT-deficient rat neuroma cell line, designated B103-4C, and the construction of a recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 that contained human HPRT cDNA. These recombinant viruses were used to infect B103-4C cells. Infected cells expressed HPRT activity which was human in origin.

  5. Feasibility of herpes simplex virus type 1 mutants labeled with radionuclides for tumor treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Xia Mi; Ya-Hong Long; Yun-Chun Li

    2008-01-01

    For over one hundred years,viruses have been recognized as capable of killing tumor cells.At present,people are still researching and constructing more suitable oncolytic viruses for treating different malignant tumors.Although extensive studies have demonstrated that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is the most potential oncolytic virus,therapies based on herpes simplex virus type 1 vectors still arouse bio-safety and risk management issues.Researchers have therefore introduced the new idea of treating cancer with HSV-1 mutants labeled with radionuclides,combining radionuclide and oncolytic virus therapies.This overview briefly summarizes the status and mechanisms by which oncolytic viruses kill tumor cells,discusses the application of HSV-1 and HSV-1 derived vectors for tumor therapy,and demonstrates the feasibility and prospect of HSV-1 mutants labeled with radionuclides for treating tumors.

  6. Primary Genital Herpes Diseases in İnfancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevinç Gümüş Pekacar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Symptomatic primary genital herpes infection is very rare in early childhood. Herpes simplex virus 1 type is the infectious agent in 20-50% percent of primery infections. Sexual abuse should be considered when genital herpes is seen in a person before sexual active age. It is mild and self limiting unless the patient is immune compramised. In this paper we discussed a 17 months old patient with genital herpes and approach to genital herpes in children.

  7. Neonatal Herpes Simplex Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Scott H; Kimberlin, David W

    2015-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 and HSV-2 infections are highly prevalent worldwide and are characterized by establishing lifelong infection with periods of latency interspersed with periodic episodes of reactivation. Acquisition of HSV by an infant during the peripartum or postpartum period results in neonatal HSV disease, a rare but significant infection that can be associated with severe morbidity and mortality, especially if there is dissemination or central nervous system involvement. Diagnostic and therapeutic advances have led to improvements in mortality and, to a lesser extent, neurodevelopmental outcomes, but room exists for further improvement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Diagnostic and therapeutic strategy for acyclovir-resistant herpes encephalitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saijo, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    Acyclovir (ACV), which inhibits the replication of herpes simplex virus, is the standard drug for the treatment of herpes simplex encephalitis. Thanks to the introduction of ACV, the morbidity and mortality of HSE patients have significantly improved. However, the disease is still the severe infection, because it makes some patients with HSE suffer from severe consequences. The sensitivity test of the etiological HSV to ACV is very difficult due to the inability of isolation of the virus from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The cases of the ACV treatment-resistant HSE patients have been reported. However, these cases were not virologically confirmed. The first case of encephalitis in newborn baby with HSE caused by an ACV-resistant HSV-1, which was virologically confirmed, was reported by our group. According to the sensitivity profile of the causative viruses to antiviral drugs, the drugs of choice for HSE should be properly considered. Strategy for diagnoses of HSE including antiviral sensitivity assessment and selection of drugs in HSE is reviewed.

  9. Percutaneous Vaccination as an Effective Method of Delivery of MVA and MVA-Vectored Vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clement A Meseda

    Full Text Available The robustness of immune responses to an antigen could be dictated by the route of vaccine inoculation. Traditional smallpox vaccines, essentially vaccinia virus strains, that were used in the eradication of smallpox were administered by percutaneous inoculation (skin scarification. The modified vaccinia virus Ankara is licensed as a smallpox vaccine in Europe and Canada and currently undergoing clinical development in the United States. MVA is also being investigated as a vector for the delivery of heterologous genes for prophylactic or therapeutic immunization. Since MVA is replication-deficient, MVA and MVA-vectored vaccines are often inoculated through the intramuscular, intradermal or subcutaneous routes. Vaccine inoculation via the intramuscular, intradermal or subcutaneous routes requires the use of injection needles, and an estimated 10 to 20% of the population of the United States has needle phobia. Following an observation in our laboratory that a replication-deficient recombinant vaccinia virus derived from the New York City Board of Health strain elicited protective immune responses in a mouse model upon inoculation by tail scarification, we investigated whether MVA and MVA recombinants can elicit protective responses following percutaneous administration in mouse models. Our data suggest that MVA administered by percutaneous inoculation, elicited vaccinia-specific antibody responses, and protected mice from lethal vaccinia virus challenge, at levels comparable to or better than subcutaneous or intramuscular inoculation. High titers of specific neutralizing antibodies were elicited in mice inoculated with a recombinant MVA expressing the herpes simplex type 2 glycoprotein D after scarification. Similarly, a recombinant MVA expressing the hemagglutinin of attenuated influenza virus rgA/Viet Nam/1203/2004 (H5N1 elicited protective immune responses when administered at low doses by scarification. Taken together, our data suggest that

  10. Unusual presentation of herpes simplex virus infection in a boxer: 'Boxing glove herpes'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-García, Begoña; Galache-Osuna, Cristina; Coto-Segura, Pablo; Suárez-Casado, Héctor; Mallo-García, Susana; Jiménez, Jorge Santos-Juanes

    2013-02-01

    Herein, we describe a patient with lesions of cutaneous herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection over the knuckles of both hands in the context of an outbreak among boxers. Interestingly, the infection had an unusually long duration (4 weeks), and was not acquired directly through skin-to-skin contact, as it usually does among athletes (herpes gladiatorum). In our case, transmission was acquired through the use of shared boxing gloves contaminated by HSV-1. To the best of our knowledge, herpes gladiatorum, or wrestler's herpes, has not been described previously in boxers and infection over the knuckles is not commonly reported.

  11. About vectors

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffmann, Banesh

    1975-01-01

    From his unusual beginning in ""Defining a vector"" to his final comments on ""What then is a vector?"" author Banesh Hoffmann has written a book that is provocative and unconventional. In his emphasis on the unresolved issue of defining a vector, Hoffmann mixes pure and applied mathematics without using calculus. The result is a treatment that can serve as a supplement and corrective to textbooks, as well as collateral reading in all courses that deal with vectors. Major topics include vectors and the parallelogram law; algebraic notation and basic ideas; vector algebra; scalars and scalar p

  12. Vector analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Newell, Homer E

    2006-01-01

    When employed with skill and understanding, vector analysis can be a practical and powerful tool. This text develops the algebra and calculus of vectors in a manner useful to physicists and engineers. Numerous exercises (with answers) not only provide practice in manipulation but also help establish students' physical and geometric intuition in regard to vectors and vector concepts.Part I, the basic portion of the text, consists of a thorough treatment of vector algebra and the vector calculus. Part II presents the illustrative matter, demonstrating applications to kinematics, mechanics, and e

  13. Herpes Simplex Viruses and Induction of Interferon Responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yijie Ma; Dustin Vepooten; Bin He

    2008-01-01

    Herpes simplex viruses (HSV) are human pathogens responsible for a variety of diseases,including localized mucocutaneous lesions,encephalitis,and disseminated diseases.HSV infection leads to rapid induction of innate immune responses.A critical part of this host response is the type I IFN system including the induction of type I IFNs,IFN-mediated signaling and amplification of IFN response.This provides the host with immediate countermeasure during acute infection to limit initial viral replication and to facilitate an appropriate adaptive immune response.However,HSV has devised multiple strategies to evade and interfere with innate immunity.This review will focus on the induction of type I IFN response by HSV during acute infection and current knowledge of mechanisms by which HSV interferes with this induction process.

  14. Archaeal DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelman, Lori M; Kelman, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication is essential for all life forms. Although the process is fundamentally conserved in the three domains of life, bioinformatic, biochemical, structural, and genetic studies have demonstrated that the process and the proteins involved in archaeal DNA replication are more similar to those in eukaryal DNA replication than in bacterial DNA replication, but have some archaeal-specific features. The archaeal replication system, however, is not monolithic, and there are some differences in the replication process between different species. In this review, the current knowledge of the mechanisms governing DNA replication in Archaea is summarized. The general features of the replication process as well as some of the differences are discussed.

  15. West Nile Virus Mimicking Herpes Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available A 3-year-old male child with suspected herpes simplex virus encephalitis who asubsequently tested positive for West Nile virus is reported from Schneider Children’s Medical Center, Petah Tikva, Israel.

  16. Herpes zoster - typical and atypical presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayan, Roy Rafael; Peleg, Roni

    2017-08-01

    Varicella- zoster virus infection is an intriguing medical entity that involves many medical specialties including infectious diseases, immunology, dermatology, and neurology. It can affect patients from early childhood to old age. Its treatment requires expertise in pain management and psychological support. While varicella is caused by acute viremia, herpes zoster occurs after the dormant viral infection, involving the cranial nerve or sensory root ganglia, is re-activated and spreads orthodromically from the ganglion, via the sensory nerve root, to the innervated target tissue (skin, cornea, auditory canal, etc.). Typically, a single dermatome is involved, although two or three adjacent dermatomes may be affected. The lesions usually do not cross the midline. Herpes zoster can also present with unique or atypical clinical manifestations, such as glioma, zoster sine herpete and bilateral herpes zoster, which can be a challenging diagnosis even for experienced physicians. We discuss the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of Herpes Zoster, typical and atypical presentations.

  17. Disseminated Herpes Zoster in Association with HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuchabal D

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV infected individuals are susceptible to a wide variety of skin manifestations due to profound defect in cell-mediated immunity. We describe 2 patients with Disseminated Herpes Zoster, both the patients has associated HIV infection.

  18. Herpes zoster oticus: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muecke, M; Amedee, R G

    1993-08-01

    Herpes zoster oticus (Ramsay Hunt syndrome) is recognized as a polycranial neuritis caused by the DNA virus Herpes zoster and characterized by damage to sensory and motor nerves, including the audio-vestibular apparatus. Common presenting symptoms include cutaneous auricular vesicles, severe otalgia, inflammation of the pinna, and occasionally unilateral sudden facial paralysis. This article reviews the medical management of this disease, including the efficacy of antibiotics, corticosteroids, and acyclovir, along with the role of surgical decompression of the facial nerve.

  19. The Uncommon Localization of Herpes Zoster

    OpenAIRE

    Cukic, Vesna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Herpes zoster is an acute, cutaneous viral infection caused by the reactivation of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) that is the cause of varicella. It is an acute neurological disease which can often lead to serious postherpetic neuralgia (PHN). Different nerves can be included with the skin rash in the area of its enervation especially cranial nerves (CV) and intercostal nerves. Case report: In this report we present a patient with herpes zoster which involved ulnar nerve with skin...

  20. Therapeutic options for herpes labialis: experimental and natural therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elish, Diana; Singh, Fiza; Weinberg, Jeffrey M

    2005-07-01

    Herpes labialis, a common condition characterized by recurrent vesicular eruptions primarily on the lips and perioral skin, causes pain and discomfort for millions of adults each year. Over the past several years, the major focus of herpes research has been on the treatment of genital herpes. However, several studies have been conducted to evaluate the efficacy of therapies specifically for herpes labialis. Last year in Cutis, we reviewed oral and topical therapies for herpes labialis. In this final part of the series, we review experimental and natural treatments that are available for herpes labialis and its associated symptoms.

  1. Handling S/MAR vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, Claudia; Baiker, Armin; Postberg, Jan; Ehrhardt, Anja; Lipps, Hans J

    2012-06-01

    Nonviral episomal vectors represent attractive alternatives to currently used virus-based expression systems. In the late 1990s, it was shown that a plasmid containing an expression cassette linked to a scaffold/matrix attached region (S/MAR) replicates as a low copy number episome in all cell lines tested, as well as primary cells, and can be used for the genetic modification of higher animals. Once established in the cell, the S/MAR vector replicates early during S-phase and, in the absence of selection, is stably retained in the cells for an unlimited period of time. This vector can therefore be regarded as a minimal model system for studying the epigenetic regulation of replication and functional nuclear architecture. In theory, this construct represents an almost "ideal" expression system for gene therapy. In practice, S/MAR-based vectors stably modify mammalian cells with efficiencies far below those of virus-based constructs. Consequently, they have not yet found application in gene therapy trials. Furthermore, S/MAR vector systems are not trivial to handle and several critical technical issues have to be considered when modifying these vectors for various applications.

  2. A haploid HSV-1 genome platform for vector development: testing of the tetracycline-responsive switch shows interference by infected cell protein 0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalique, Hena; López Marco, Jorge; Lim, Filip

    2016-10-01

    Although herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) has outstanding properties for gene delivery vectors and its genome is available in bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) for mutagenesis studies, one impediment is the presence of approximately 15.4 kb of DNA sequences that are duplicated in the HSV-1 genome, complicating vector construction and stability. As a useful platform for building HSV-1 vectors, we have constructed a fully haploid HSV-1 genome BAC by deletion of one of these repeats, confirming that viral propagation in culture is not impaired. We used this ΔIR mutant to subsequently investigate whether the insertion of tetracycline-responsive tetO elements into the ICP34.5-ICP0 gene region can be used to control HSV-1 lytic replication. The results of the present study show that ΔIR mutants deleted for ICP34.5 are viable for replication but not when the ICP0 promoter is also disrupted, thus indicating that regulation of infected cell protein 0 (ICP0) levels in the absence of ICP34.5 could be a viable means for controlling growth of HSV-1 vectors. Surprisingly, however, the tetO elements inserted into the ICP0 promoter did not confer ligand responsiveness to growth or ICP0 expression. Further analysis by transfection experiments revealed that ICP0 itself interferes with the tetracycline switch and reduces the the inducibility of this system. Our new haploid HSV-1 BAC is a useful platform for building multiply deleted HSV-1 vectors. Deletion of the gene for ICP34.5 in this backbone renders viral growth dependent on ICP0, although ICP0 expression could not be regulated by tet-responsive transcriptional regulators. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Elementary vectors

    CERN Document Server

    Wolstenholme, E Œ

    1978-01-01

    Elementary Vectors, Third Edition serves as an introductory course in vector analysis and is intended to present the theoretical and application aspects of vectors. The book covers topics that rigorously explain and provide definitions, principles, equations, and methods in vector analysis. Applications of vector methods to simple kinematical and dynamical problems; central forces and orbits; and solutions to geometrical problems are discussed as well. This edition of the text also provides an appendix, intended for students, which the author hopes to bridge the gap between theory and appl

  4. Disseminated Neonatal Herpes Caused by Herpes Simplex Virus Types 1 and 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martic, Jelena; Stanojevic, Maja; Jankovic, Sasa; Nedeljkovic, Jasminka; Nikolic, Ljubica; Pasic, Srdjan; Jankovic, Borisav; Jovanovic, Tanja

    2007-01-01

    Disseminated neonatal herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection is characterized by progressive multiple organ failure and high mortality rates. It can result from infection with either HSV-1 or HSV-2. We report a case of disseminated neonatal herpes that was caused by HSV-1 and HSV-2. PMID:17479897

  5. Novel Mutant AAV2 Rep Proteins Support AAV2 Replication without Blocking HSV-1 Helpervirus Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyffert, Michael; Glauser, Daniel L.; Schraner, Elisabeth M.; de Oliveira, Anna-Paula; Mansilla-Soto, Jorge; Vogt, Bernd; Büning, Hildegard; Linden, R. Michael; Ackermann, Mathias; Fraefel, Cornel

    2017-01-01

    As their names imply, parvoviruses of the genus Dependovirus rely for their efficient replication on the concurrent presence of a helpervirus, such as herpesvirus, adenovirus, or papilloma virus. Adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) is such an example, which in turn can efficiently inhibit the replication of each helpervirus by distinct mechanisms. In a previous study we have shown that expression of the AAV2 rep gene is not compatible with efficient replication of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). In particular, the combined DNA-binding and ATPase/helicase activities of the Rep68/78 proteins have been shown to exert opposite effects on the replication of AAV2 and HSV-1. While essential for AAV2 DNA replication these protein activities account for the Rep-mediated inhibition of HSV-1 replication. Here, we describe a novel Rep mutant (Rep-D371Y), which displayed an unexpected phenotype. Rep-D371Y did not block HSV-1 replication, but still supported efficient AAV2 replication, at least when a double-stranded AAV2 genome template was used. We also found that the capacity of Rep-D371Y to induce apoptosis and a Rep-specific DNA damage response was significantly reduced compared to wild-type Rep. These findings suggest that AAV2 Rep-helicase subdomains exert diverging activities, which contribute to distinct steps of the AAV2 life cycle. More important, the novel AAV2 mutant Rep-D371Y may allow deciphering yet unsolved activities of the AAV2 Rep proteins such as DNA second-strand synthesis, genomic integration or packaging, which all involve the Rep-helicase activity. PMID:28125695

  6. Gene expression of herpes simplex virus. II. Uv radiological analysis of viral transcription units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millette, R. L.; Klaiber, R.

    1980-06-01

    The transcriptional organization of the genome of herpes simplex virus type 1 was analyzed by measuring the sensitivity of viral polypeptide synthesis to uv irradiation of the infecting virus. Herpes simplex virus type 1 was irradiated with various doses of uv light and used to infect xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts. Immediate early transcription units were analyzed by having cycloheximide present throughout the period of infection, removing the drug at 8 h postinfection, and pulse-labeling proteins with (355)methionine. Delayed early transcription units were analyzed in similar studies by having 9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyladenine present during the experiment to block replication of the input irradiated genome. The results indicate that none of the immediate early genes analyzed can be cotranscribed, whereas some of the delayed early genes might be cotranscribed. No evidence was found for the existence of large, multigene transcription units.

  7. Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus in a Healthy Nigerian Child

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... virus (HIV) I and II. Keywords: Healthy child, herpes zoster ophthalmicus, ocular complications ... screened and both of them tested negative to type I and II. HIV. Symptoms .... Analysis of varicella-zoster virus and herpes simplex virus in.

  8. Public awareness and knowledge of herpes labialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pica, Francesca; Volpi, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Between 20% and 40% of the population is estimated to suffer from episodes of recurrent herpes labialis, although few reports in the literature have addressed the public awareness of this infection in the general population. The aims of this study were to determine the existing level of awareness and knowledge of this disease and to assess the source of this knowledge, the ability of the public to recognize the characteristics of the disease and the behavior of patients with clinical cases of disease manifestation. To this end, 2,000 individuals (961 male and 1,039 female) of 14 years of age and older were surveyed using the ECOcapi system [Eurisko Consumer Omnibus-CAPI (computer-assisted personal interviewing) version]. Eighty-nine percent of those surveyed had some knowledge of herpes labialis; 92% were able to refer to at least one symptom of herpes labialis, 91% were able to identify correctly his infection from pictures, and 45% had experienced personally at least one episode of herpes labialis infection. The majority of the individuals suffering from herpes labialis self-medicated using a topical therapy. Women were found to be affected more commonly by herpes labialis than men [OR 1.42 (1.18-1.70)], and women were also more likely to recognize the disease [OR 1.65 (1.30-2.08)] and to seek medical advice for the condition [OR 1.38 (1.12-1.70)]. In conclusion, herpes labialis is a common and well-known condition, and it is often self-diagnosed correctly, as the prodromal phase and the use of self-medication are very common.

  9. Murine leukemia virus (MLV replication monitored with fluorescent proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bittner Alexandra

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer gene therapy will benefit from vectors that are able to replicate in tumor tissue and cause a bystander effect. Replication-competent murine leukemia virus (MLV has been described to have potential as cancer therapeutics, however, MLV infection does not cause a cytopathic effect in the infected cell and viral replication can only be studied by immunostaining or measurement of reverse transcriptase activity. Results We inserted the coding sequences for green fluorescent protein (GFP into the proline-rich region (PRR of the ecotropic envelope protein (Env and were able to fluorescently label MLV. This allowed us to directly monitor viral replication and attachment to target cells by flow cytometry. We used this method to study viral replication of recombinant MLVs and split viral genomes, which were generated by replacement of the MLV env gene with the red fluorescent protein (RFP and separately cloning GFP-Env into a retroviral vector. Co-transfection of both plasmids into target cells resulted in the generation of semi-replicative vectors, and the two color labeling allowed to determine the distribution of the individual genomes in the target cells and was indicative for the occurrence of recombination events. Conclusions Fluorescently labeled MLVs are excellent tools for the study of factors that influence viral replication and can be used to optimize MLV-based replication-competent viruses or vectors for gene therapy.

  10. 21 CFR 866.3305 - Herpes simplex virus serological assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Herpes simplex virus serological assays. 866.3305... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3305 Herpes simplex virus serological assays. (a) Identification. Herpes simplex virus serological assays are devices...

  11. Pathogenesis of herpes simplex virus infections of the cornea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Maertzdorf (Jeroen)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe identification of human herpes virus (HHV) infections can be traced back to ancient Greece where Herpes simplex vims (HSV) infections in humans were first documented. Hippocrates used the word "herpes", meaning to creep or crawl, to describe spreading skin lesions. Although the

  12. Lichen planus remission is associated with a decrease of human herpes virus type 7 protein expression in plasmacytoid dendritic cells

    OpenAIRE

    de Vries, H J C; Teunissen, M.B.M.; Zorgdrager, F.; Picavet, D.; Cornelissen, M

    2007-01-01

    The cause of lichen planus is still unknown. Previously we showed human herpes virus 7 (HHV-7) DNA and proteins in lesional lichen planus skin, and significantly less in non-lesional lichen planus, psoriasis or healthy skin. Remarkably, lesional lichen planus skin was infiltrated with plasmacytoid dendritic cells. If HHV-7 is associated with lichen planus, then HHV-7 replication would reduce upon lichen planus remission. HHV-7 DNA detection was performed by nested PCR and HHV-7 protein by imm...

  13. Vector analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Brand, Louis

    2006-01-01

    The use of vectors not only simplifies treatments of differential geometry, mechanics, hydrodynamics, and electrodynamics, but also makes mathematical and physical concepts more tangible and easy to grasp. This text for undergraduates was designed as a short introductory course to give students the tools of vector algebra and calculus, as well as a brief glimpse into these subjects' manifold applications. The applications are developed to the extent that the uses of the potential function, both scalar and vector, are fully illustrated. Moreover, the basic postulates of vector analysis are brou

  14. Herpes simplex ulcerative esophagitis in healthy children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahman A Al-Hussaini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus is a common cause of ulcerative esophagitis in the immunocompromised or debilitated host. Despite a high prevalence of primary and recurrent Herpes simplex virus infection in the general population, Herpes simplex virus esophagitis (HSVE appears to be rare in the immunocompetent host. We report three cases of endoscopically-diagnosed HSVE in apparently immunocompetent children; the presentation was characterized by acute onset of fever, odynophagia, and dysphagia. In two cases, the diagnosis was confirmed histologically by identification of herpes viral inclusions and culture of the virus in the presence of inflammation. The third case was considered to have probable HSVE based on the presence of typical cold sore on his lip, typical endoscopic finding, histopathological evidence of inflammation in esophageal biopsies and positive serologic evidence of acute Herpes simplex virus infection. Two cases received an intravenous course of acyclovir and one had self-limited recovery. All three cases had normal immunological workup and excellent health on long-term follow-up.

  15. [Lacrimal and salivatory glycoproteins in ophthalmic herpes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuk, S E; Terekhina, N A

    2016-01-01

    to compare tear, saliva, and plasma levels of acute phase proteins (APPs) of inflammation in patients with herpes keratitis and to use the RESULTS in treatment evaluation. APPs were measured in tears, oral fluid, and blood plasma from 22 adults and 34 children with ophthalmic herpes as well as 68 healthy controls using immunoturbidimetric and spectrophotometric methods of detection. High levels of C-reactive protein and orosomucoid, low levels of ceruloplasmin, α1-antitrypsin, and transferrin in tears from patients with herpes keratitis as well as abnormal tear, saliva, and plasma APPs levels at discharge are poor prognostic signs. They all indicate that corneal inflammation is still intense and that the treatment should not be ceased yet. Severity of APPs concentration changes in tear from patients with herpes keratitis correlates with the depth of corneal lesions, recurrence rate, and disease dynamics. Quantitative determination of acute phase proteins in tear and oral fluid is an early and sensitive inflammation test and may be also used for non-invasive monitoring and antiviral treatment evaluation. Oral fluid allows to extend the capabilities of non-invasive diagnostics of ophthalmic herpes.

  16. A Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Human Asymptomatic CD8+ T-Cell Epitopes-Based Vaccine Protects Against Ocular Herpes in a “Humanized” HLA Transgenic Rabbit Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Ruchi; Khan, Arif A.; Huang, Jiawei; Nesburn, Anthony B.; Wechsler, Steven L.; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. A clinical vaccine that protects from ocular herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection and disease still is lacking. In the present study, preclinical vaccine trials of nine asymptomatic (ASYMP) peptides, selected from HSV-1 glycoproteins B (gB), and tegument proteins VP11/12 and VP13/14, were performed in the “humanized” HLA–transgenic rabbit (HLA-Tg rabbit) model of ocular herpes. We recently reported that these peptides are highly recognized by CD8+ T cells from “naturally” protected HSV-1–seropositive healthy ASYMP individuals (who have never had clinical herpes disease). Methods. Mixtures of three ASYMP CD8+ T-cell peptides derived from either HSV-1 gB, VP11/12, or VP13/14 were delivered subcutaneously to different groups of HLA-Tg rabbits (n = 10) in incomplete Freund's adjuvant, twice at 15-day intervals. The frequency and function of HSV-1 epitope-specific CD8+ T cells induced by these peptides and their protective efficacy, in terms of survival, virus replication in the eye, and ocular herpetic disease were assessed after an ocular challenge with HSV-1 (strain McKrae). Results. All mixtures elicited strong and polyfunctional IFN-γ– and TNF-α–producing CD107+CD8+ cytotoxic T cells, associated with a significant reduction in death, ocular herpes infection, and disease (P herpes, and provide a prototype vaccine formulation that may be highly efficacious for preventing ocular herpes in humans. PMID:26098469

  17. DIAGNOSIS DAN TATA LAKSANA ENSEFALITIS HERPES SIMPLEKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Yuliantini

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Infeksi Herpes simpleks pada susunan saraf pusat (SSP merupakan infeksi SSP yang paling beratdan sering berakibat fatal. Angka kejadiannya diperkirakan 1 kasus per 250 000 sampai 500 000orang per tahun, sepertiganya terjadi pada anak-anak. Gejala dan tanda klinis pada fase awal sangattidak khas. Pemberian terapi yang terlambat membawa dampak terjadinya kecacatan permanen.Deteksi virus Herpes simpleks (VHS di dalam cairan serebrospinal dengan polymerase chain reactionmerupakan modalitas pilihan untuk diagnosis ensefalitis herpes simpleks (EHS. Asiklovir intravenamerupakan obat pilihan pertama. Pengobatan segera diberikan kepada pasien yang dicurigai menderitaEHS, kemudian pengobatan dapat dilanjutkan atau dihentikan sesuai konfirmasi laboratorium atauhasil biopsi otak. Pasien yang tidak diberikan antivirus atau pengobatannya terlambat angkakematiannya cukup tinggi.

  18. The Uncommon Localization of Herpes Zoster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukic, Vesna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Herpes zoster is an acute, cutaneous viral infection caused by the reactivation of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) that is the cause of varicella. It is an acute neurological disease which can often lead to serious postherpetic neuralgia (PHN). Different nerves can be included with the skin rash in the area of its enervation especially cranial nerves (CV) and intercostal nerves. Case report: In this report we present a patient with herpes zoster which involved ulnar nerve with skin rash in the region of ulnar innervations in women with no disease previously diagnosed. The failure of her immune system may be explained by great emotional stress and overwork she had been exposed to with neglecting proper nutrition in that period. Conclusion: Herpes zoster may involve any nerve with characteristic skin rash in the area of its innervations, and failure in immune system which leads reactivation of VZV may be caused by other factors besides the underlying illness. PMID:26980938

  19. Crinivirus replication and host interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsofia A Kiss

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Criniviruses comprise one of the genera within the family Closteroviridae. Members in this family are restricted to the phloem and rely on whitefly vectors of the genera Bemisia and/or Trialeurodes for plant-to-plant transmission. All criniviruses have bipartite, positive-sense ssRNA genomes, although there is an unconfirmed report of one having a tripartite genome. Lettuce infectious yellows virus (LIYV is the type species of the genus, the best studied so far of the criniviruses and the first for which a reverse genetics system was available. LIYV RNA 1 encodes for proteins predicted to be involved in replication, and alone is competent for replication in protoplasts. Replication results in accumulation of cytoplasmic vesiculated membranous structures which are characteristic of most studied members of the Closteroviridae. These membranous structures, often referred to as BYV-type vesicles, are likely sites of RNA replication. LIYV RNA 2 is replicated in trans when co-infecting cells with RNA 1, but is temporally delayed relative to RNA1. Efficient RNA 2 replication also is dependent on the RNA 1-encoded RNA binding protein, P34. No LIYV RNA 2-encoded proteins have been shown to affect RNA replication, but at least four, CP, CPm, Hsp70h, and p59 are virion structural components and CPm is a determinant of whitefly transmissibility. Roles of other LIYV RNA 2-encoded proteins are largely as yet unknown, but P26 is a non-virion protein that accumulates in cells as characteristic plasmalemma deposits which in plants are localized within phloem parenchyma and companion cells over plasmodesmata connections to sieve elements. The two remaining crinivirus-conserved RNA 2-encoded proteins are P5 and P9. P5 is 39 amino acid protein and is encoded at the 5’ end of RNA 2 as ORF1 and is part of the hallmark closterovirus gene array. The orthologous gene in BYV has been shown to play a role in cell-to-cell movement and indicated to be localized to the

  20. Therapeutic options for herpes labialis, I: Oral agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elish, Diana; Singh, Fiza; Weinberg, Jeffrey M

    2004-07-01

    Given the prevalence of herpes labialis, effective therapy has the potential to affect the lives of many and presents a challenge for clinicians. Over the last several years, most of the focus of herpes research has been on the treatment of genital herpes. Recently, however, several studies have been published examining the efficacy of therapies specifically for herpes labialis. Several therapeutic agents, both prescription and over-the-counter, are available for controlling and managing the disease. In this series of articles, we review oral and topical therapeutic agents that are available in the treatment of herpes labialis and its associated symptoms. This article will review oral treatment options.

  1. Replication Restart in Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Bénédicte; Sandler, Steven J

    2017-07-01

    In bacteria, replication forks assembled at a replication origin travel to the terminus, often a few megabases away. They may encounter obstacles that trigger replisome disassembly, rendering replication restart from abandoned forks crucial for cell viability. During the past 25 years, the genes that encode replication restart proteins have been identified and genetically characterized. In parallel, the enzymes were purified and analyzed in vitro, where they can catalyze replication initiation in a sequence-independent manner from fork-like DNA structures. This work also revealed a close link between replication and homologous recombination, as replication restart from recombination intermediates is an essential step of DNA double-strand break repair in bacteria and, conversely, arrested replication forks can be acted upon by recombination proteins and converted into various recombination substrates. In this review, we summarize this intense period of research that led to the characterization of the ubiquitous replication restart protein PriA and its partners, to the definition of several replication restart pathways in vivo, and to the description of tight links between replication and homologous recombination, responsible for the importance of replication restart in the maintenance of genome stability. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  2. Benzalkonium Chloride Intoxication Mimicking Herpes Zoster Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekrem Güler

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Benzalkonium chloride (BAC is a frequently used disinfectant and its most well-known side effect is contact dermatitis. In this report, two children who had vesicular dermatitis, headache, lethargy, fever and encephalopathy mimicking Herpes zoster encephalitis were presented. Their consciousness level improved on the second day. From the medical history it was understood that the mother had applied 20% BAC solution to the scalps of two children. The aim of the presentation of this report is to draw attention to the fact that BAC application to the scalp for treating pediculosis capitis may resemble the herpes encephalitis clinical picture.

  3. Cellular Players in the Herpes Simplex Virus Dependent Apoptosis Balancing Act

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A. Blaho

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is triggered as an intrinsic defense against numerous viral infections. Almost every virus encodes apoptotic modulators, and the herpes simplex viruses (HSV are no exception. During HSV infection, there is an intricate balance between pro- and anti-apoptotic factors that delays apoptotic death until the virus has replicated. Perturbations in the apoptotic balance can cause premature cell death and have the potential to dramatically alter the outcome of infection. Recently, certain cellular genes have been shown to regulate sensitivity to HSV-dependent apoptosis. This review summarizes current knowledge of the cellular genes that impact the apoptotic balance during HSV infection.

  4. Herpes simplex virus 1 counteracts viperin via its virion host shutoff protein UL41.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Guanghui; Wang, Kezhen; Wang, Shuai; Cai, Mingsheng; Li, Mei-li; Zheng, Chunfu

    2014-10-01

    The interferon (IFN)-inducible viperin protein restricts a broad range of viruses. However, whether viperin plays a role during herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection is poorly understood. In the present study, it was shown for the first time that wild-type (WT) HSV-1 infection couldn't induce viperin production, and ectopically expressed viperin inhibited the replication of UL41-null HSV-1 but not WT viruses. The underlying molecular mechanism is that UL41 counteracts viperin's antiviral activity by reducing its mRNA accumulation.

  5. Incorporation of a lambda phage recombination system and EGFP detection to simplify mutagenesis of Herpes simplex virus bacterial artificial chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weir Jerry P

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Targeted mutagenesis of the herpesvirus genomes has been facilitated by the use of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC technology. Such modified genomes have potential uses in understanding viral pathogenesis, gene identification and characterization, and the development of new viral vectors and vaccines. We have previously described the construction of a herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2 BAC and the use of an allele replacement strategy to construct HSV-2 recombinants. While the BAC mutagenesis procedure is a powerful method to generate HSV-2 recombinants, particularly in the absence of selective marker in eukaryotic culture, the mutagenesis procedure is still difficult and cumbersome. Results Here we describe the incorporation of a phage lambda recombination system into an allele replacement vector. This strategy enables any DNA fragment containing the phage attL recombination sites to be efficiently inserted into the attR sites of the allele replacement vector using phage lambda clonase. We also describe how the incorporation of EGFP into the allele replacement vector can facilitate the selection of the desired cross-over recombinant BACs when the allele replacement reaction is a viral gene deletion. Finally, we incorporate the lambda phage recombination sites directly into an HSV-2 BAC vector for direct recombination of gene cassettes using the phage lambda clonase-driven recombination reaction. Conclusion Together, these improvements to the techniques of HSV BAC mutagenesis will facilitate the construction of recombinant herpes simplex viruses and viral vectors.

  6. A novel and highly efficient production system for recombinant adeno-associated virus vector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU; Zhijian(伍志坚); WU; Xiaobing(吴小兵); CAO; Hui(曹晖); DONG; Xiaoyan(董小岩); WANG; Hong(王宏); HOU; Yunde(侯云德)

    2002-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus(rAAV) has proven to be a promising gene delivery vector for human gene therapy. However, its application has been limited by difficulty in obtaining enough quantities of high-titer vector stocks. In this paper, a novel and highly efficient production system for rAAV is described. A recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1(rHSV-1) designated HSV1-rc/△UL2, which expressed adeno-associated virus type2(AAV-2) Rep and Cap proteins, was constructed previously. The data confirmed that its functions were to support rAAV replication and packaging, and the generated rAAV was infectious. Meanwhile, an rAAV proviral cell line designated BHK/SG2, which carried the green fluorescent protein(GFP) gene expression cassette, was established by transfecting BHK-21 cells with rAAV vector plasmid pSNAV-2-GFP. Infecting BHK/SG2 with HSV1-rc/△UL2 at an MOI of 0.1 resulted in the optimal yields of rAAV, reaching 250 transducing unit(TU) or 4.28×104 particles per cell. Therefore, compared with the conventional transfection method, the yield of rAAV using this "one proviral cell line, one helper virus" strategy was increased by two orders of magnitude. Large-scale production of rAAV can be easily achieved using this strategy and might meet the demands for clinical trials of rAAV-mediated gene therapy.

  7. Attachment and penetration of acyclovir-resistant herpes simplex virus are inhibited by Melissa officinalis extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astani, Akram; Navid, Mojdeh Heidary; Schnitzler, Paul

    2014-10-01

    Medicinal plants are increasingly of interest as novel source of drugs for antiherpetic agents, because herpes simplex virus (HSV) might develop resistance to commonly used antiviral drugs. An aqueous extract of Melissa officinalis and the phenolic compounds caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid and rosmarinic acid were examined for their antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) acyclovir-sensitive and clinical isolates of acyclovir-resistant strains in vitro. When drugs were added during the intracellular replication of HSV-1 infected cells, no antiviral effect was observed by plaque reduction assay. However, Melissa extract interacted directly with free viral particles of two acyclovir-resistant HSV strains at low IC50 values of 0.13 and 0.23 µg/mL and high selectivity indices of 2692 and 1522, respectively. The Melissa extract and rosmarinic acid inhibited HSV-1 attachment to host cells in a dose-dependent manner for acyclovir-sensitive and acyclovir-resistant strains. These results indicate that mainly rosmarinic acid contributed to the antiviral activity of Melissa extract. Penetration of herpes viruses into cells was inhibited by Melissa extract at 80% and 96% for drug-sensitive and drug-resistant viruses, respectively. Melissa extract exhibits low toxicity and affects attachment and penetration of acyclovir-sensitive and acyclovir-resistant HSVs in vitro. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Cloning vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilfoyle, R.A.; Smith, L.M.

    1994-12-27

    A vector comprising a filamentous phage sequence containing a first copy of filamentous phage gene X and other sequences necessary for the phage to propagate is disclosed. The vector also contains a second copy of filamentous phage gene X downstream from a promoter capable of promoting transcription in a bacterial host. In a preferred form of the present invention, the filamentous phage is M13 and the vector additionally includes a restriction endonuclease site located in such a manner as to substantially inactivate the second gene X when a DNA sequence is inserted into the restriction site. 2 figures.

  9. Cloning vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilfoyle, Richard A.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    1994-01-01

    A vector comprising a filamentous phage sequence containing a first copy of filamentous phage gene X and other sequences necessary for the phage to propagate is disclosed. The vector also contains a second copy of filamentous phage gene X downstream from a promoter capable of promoting transcription in a bacterial host. In a preferred form of the present invention, the filamentous phage is M13 and the vector additionally includes a restriction endonuclease site located in such a manner as to substantially inactivate the second gene X when a DNA sequence is inserted into the restriction site.

  10. Interferon susceptibility of herpes simplex virus strains isolated from patients enrolled in clinical trials.

    OpenAIRE

    Armstrong, J. A.; Skicki-Mullen, M B; Breinig, M K; Ho, M

    1983-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 strains isolated from patients who had received interferon in a clinical trial were not more resistant to human leukocyte interferon than strains derived from recipients of a placebo. The susceptibility of herpes simplex virus type 2 strains isolated from herpes genitalis was slightly less than that of herpes simplex virus type 1 strains causing herpes genitalis.

  11. Increasing the Efficacy of Oncolytic Adenovirus Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William S. M. Wold

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic adenovirus (Ad vectors present a new modality to treat cancer. These vectors attack tumors via replicating in and killing cancer cells. Upon completion of the vector replication cycle, the infected tumor cell lyses and releases progeny virions that are capable of infecting neighboring tumor cells. Repeated cycles of vector replication and cell lysis can destroy the tumor. Numerous Ad vectors have been generated and tested, some of them reaching human clinical trials. In 2005, the first oncolytic Ad was approved for the treatment of head-and-neck cancer by the Chinese FDA. Oncolytic Ads have been proven to be safe, with no serious adverse effects reported even when high doses of the vector were injected intravenously. The vectors demonstrated modest anti-tumor effect when applied as a single agent; their efficacy improved when they were combined with another modality. The efficacy of oncolytic Ads can be improved using various approaches, including vector design, delivery techniques, and ancillary treatment, which will be discussed in this review.

  12. Antiviral drug resistance of herpes simplex virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stranska, Ruzena

    2004-01-01

    Infections with herpes simplex virus (HSV) usually have an asymptomatic or benign course. However, severe infections do occur, particularly in HIV/AIDS patients or transplant recipients, and may be life-threatening unless adequate antiviral therapy is given. Since its introduction in the early 1980

  13. Herpes zoster: klinik, diagnostik og behandling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Kristian; Rønholt, Finn; Gerstoft, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) is a painful vesicular rash localized to one dermatome. Post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN) is persistent pain three months after the rash started. In recent years several Cochrane reviews and clinical studies on how to treat HZ and PHN have been published. These studies show...

  14. Herpes Zoster and Post-Herpetic Neuralgia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijck, Albert J. M.; Wallace, Mark; Mekhail, Nagy; van Kleef, Maarten

    2011-01-01

    Herpes zoster infection is caused by a reactivation of the latent varicella zoster virus that causes chicken pox. It appears predominantly in older adults whose immunity for the virus has waned. The natural course of the disease is usually favorable, and the symptoms disappear spontaneously within a

  15. Risk Factors for Herpes Zoster Among Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Mona; Harpaz, Rafael; Zhang, John; Wollan, Peter C; Bialek, Stephanie R; Yawn, Barbara P

    2016-09-01

    Background.  The causes of varicella-zoster virus reactivation and herpes zoster (HZ) are largely unknown. We assessed potential risk factors for HZ, the data for which cannot be obtained from the medical sector. Methods.  We conducted a matched case-control study. We established active surveillance in Olmsted County, Minnesota to identify HZ occurring among persons age ≥50 years during 2010-2011. Cases were confirmed by medical record review. Herpes zoster-free controls were age- and sex-matched to cases. Risk factor data were obtained by telephone interview. Results.  We enrolled 389 HZ case patients and 511 matched controls; the median age was 65 and 66 years, respectively. Herpes zoster was associated with family history of HZ (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.65); association was highest with first-degree or multiple relatives (aOR = 1.87 and 3.08, respectively). Herpes zoster was also associated with prior HZ episodes (aOR = 1.82), sleep disturbance (aOR = 2.52), depression (aOR = 3.81), and recent weight loss (aOR = 1.95). Stress was a risk factor for HZ (aOR = 2.80), whereas a dose-response relationship was not noted. All associations indicated were statistically significant (P .1). Conclusions.  We identified several important risk factors for HZ; however, the key attributable causes of HZ remain unknown.

  16. Recurrent Herpes Zoster- A Marker of AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazumdar Gautam

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A 32 year old female presented to us with herpes zoster involving the T 8 to T 10 dermatomes. She had a scar involving the same dermatomes on the other half of the body. Investigations revealed that both the patient and her husband were HIV positive with CD4 cell count less than 200.

  17. Early Diagnosis of Herpes Simplex Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Records of 38 patients, 23 boys and 15 girls (ages 3 months to 16 years [42% ages 3-12 months], seen between 1990 and 1997 with proven herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE, were reviewed retrospectively to determine the diagnostic reliability of polymerase chain reaction (PCR results, in a study at the Neuropediatric Service, Hopital Saint Vincent de Paul, Paris, France.

  18. Antiviral drug resistance of herpes simplex virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stranska, Ruzena

    2004-01-01

    Infections with herpes simplex virus (HSV) usually have an asymptomatic or benign course. However, severe infections do occur, particularly in HIV/AIDS patients or transplant recipients, and may be life-threatening unless adequate antiviral therapy is given. Since its introduction in the early

  19. Forebyggelse af herpes zoster med vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Kristian; Rønholt, Finn; Gerstoft, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) and post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN) are frequently occurring diseases in elderly and in immuno-compromised persons. The live attenuated HZ vaccine boosts an existing immune response, so that the already established varicella-zoster virus infection is kept latent. Vaccination has...

  20. Herpes zoster: klinik, diagnostik og behandling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Kristian; Rønholt, Finn; Gerstoft, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) is a painful vesicular rash localized to one dermatome. Post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN) is persistent pain three months after the rash started. In recent years several Cochrane reviews and clinical studies on how to treat HZ and PHN have been published. These studies show...

  1. Therapeutic and prophylactic applications of alphavirus vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Gregory J; Fleeton, Marina N; Sheahan, Brian J

    2008-11-11

    Alphavirus vectors are high-level, transient expression vectors for therapeutic and prophylactic use. These positive-stranded RNA vectors, derived from Semliki Forest virus, Sindbis virus and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, multiply and are expressed in the cytoplasm of most vertebrate cells, including human cells. Part of the genome encoding the structural protein genes, which is amplified during a normal infection, is replaced by a transgene. Three types of vector have been developed: virus-like particles, layered DNA-RNA vectors and replication-competent vectors. Virus-like particles contain replicon RNA that is defective since it contains a cloned gene in place of the structural protein genes, and thus are able to undergo only one cycle of expression. They are produced by transfection of vector RNA, and helper RNAs encoding the structural proteins. Layered DNA-RNA vectors express the Semliki Forest virus replicon from a cDNA copy via a cytomegalovirus promoter. Replication-competent vectors contain a transgene in addition to the structural protein genes. Alphavirus vectors are used for three main applications: vaccine construction, therapy of central nervous system disease, and cancer therapy.

  2. Construction and characterization of replication-deficient adenoviral vector containing the cDNA for human VEGF165 in an antisense orientation%反义VEGF165腺病毒重组体的构建及鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王家宁; 黄永章; 王俊峰; 王卫民; 李瑞明; 张群林

    2001-01-01

    objective To construct the recombinant adenovirus vectorcontaining the cDNA for hVEGF165 in an antisense orientation for future study of tumor treatment by antisense hVEGF165 RNA strategy.Methods The VEGF165 cDNA has been extracted from pUCCAGGS/hVEGF165 with EcoRI and then inserted in an antisense orientation into the E1-deleted expression plasmid pHCMVsp1A shuttle vector, called pAd-ahVEGF165. pAd-ahVEGF165 was cotransfected with the plasmid pJM17 into the transformed human embryonic kidney cell line 293 cells by liposome-mediated method. Homologous recombination of the pAd-ahVEGF165 and pJM17 in 293 cells replaced the E1 region with the expression cassette from pAd-ahVEGF165. Ad-ahVEGF165 was confirmed by PCR.Ad-ahVEGF165 was propagated in 293 cells and then underwent CsCl density purification. subsequently, the preparations were didalyzed in dialysis buffer. The titer of each viral stock was determined by measuring the absorbance at 260nm. Results VEGF165 cDNA was successfully inserted into the shuttle vector pHCMVSPIA. pAd-ahVEGF165 was confirmed by NcoI and XhoI digestion. Ad-ahVEGF165 was characterized by PCR coamplification. The virus titer was 5.6×1011pfu/ml. Conclusions Ad-ahVEGF165 containing the antisense VEGF165 sequence was successfully constructd.This investigation provides the basis for future study of tumor treatment based on antisense VEGF RNA strategy.%目的:构建含人反义血管内皮生长因子165(VEGF165)基因的重组腺病毒载体,为采用反义VEGF165RNA防治肿瘤的研究奠定基础。方法:将人VEGF165 cDNA反向插入到穿梭质粒pHCMVSP1A的CMV启动子之下,即pAd-ahVEGF165。后者与pJM17通过脂质体共转染293细胞,经同源重组获得含人反义VEGF165基因的重组腺病毒Ad-ahVEGF165。通过PCR共扩增法鉴别Ad-ahVEGF165的正确与否。根据260nm的紫外光吸收值计算病毒滴度。结果:VEGF165 cDNA成功地反向插入了pHCMVSP1A载体,以重组病毒基因组DNA

  3. Oncolytic herpes viruses, chemotherapeutics, and other cancer drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braidwood L

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Lynne Braidwood,1 Sheila V Graham,2 Alex Graham,1 Joe Conner11Virttu Biologics Ltd, Department of Neurology, Southern General Hospital, Glasgow, UK; 2MRC-University of Glasgow Centre for Virus Research, Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, Jarrett Building, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UKAbstract: Oncolytic viruses are emerging as a potential new way of treating cancers. They are selectively replication-competent viruses that propagate only in actively dividing tumor cells but not in normal cells and, as a result, destroy the tumor cells by consequence of lytic infection. At least six different oncolytic herpes simplex viruses (oHSVs have undergone clinical trials worldwide to date, and they have demonstrated an excellent safety profile and intimations of efficacy. The first pivotal Phase III trial with an oHSV, talimogene laherparepvec (T-Vec [OncoVexGM-CSF], is almost complete, with extremely positive early results reported. Intuitively, therapeutically beneficial interactions between oHSV and chemotherapeutic and targeted therapeutic drugs would be limited as the virus requires actively dividing cells for maximum replication efficiency and most anticancer agents are cytotoxic or cytostatic. However, combinations of such agents display a range of responses, with antagonistic, additive, or, perhaps most surprisingly, synergistic enhancement of antitumor activity. When synergistic interactions in cancer cell killing are observed, chemotherapy dose reductions that achieve the same overall efficacy may be possible, resulting in a valuable reduction of adverse side effects. Therefore, the combination of an oHSV with “standard-of-care” drugs makes a logical and reasonable approach to improved therapy, and the addition of a targeted oncolytic therapy with “standard-of-care” drugs merits further investigation, both preclinically and in the clinic. Numerous publications report

  4. Safety considerations in vector development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappes, J C; Wu, X

    2001-11-01

    The inadvertent production of replication competent retrovirus (RCR) constitutes the principal safety concern for the use of lentiviral vectors in human clinical protocols. Because of limitations in animal models to evaluate lentiviral vectors for their potential to recombine and induce disease, the vector design itself should ensure against the emergence of RCR in vivo. Issues related to RCR generation and one approach to dealing with this problem are discussed in this chapter. To assess the risk of generating RCR, a highly sensitive biological assay was developed to specifically detect vector recombination in transduced cells. Analysis of lentiviral vector stocks has shown that recombination occurs during reverse transcription in primary target cells. Rejoining of viral protein-coding sequences of the packaging construct and cis-acting sequences of the vector was demonstrated to generate env-minus recombinants (LTR-gag-pol-LTR). Mobilization of recombinant lentiviral genomes was also demonstrated but was dependent on pseudotyping of the vector core with an exogenous envelope protein. 5' sequence analysis has demonstrated that recombinants consist of U3, R, U5, and the psi packaging signal joined with an open gag coding region. Analysis of the 3' end has mapped the point of vector recombination to the poly(A) tract of the packaging construct's mRNA. The state-of-the-art third generation packaging construct and SIN vector also have been shown to generate env-minus proviral recombinants capable of mobilizing retroviral DNA when pseudotyped with an exogenous envelope protein. A new class of HIV-based vector (trans-vector) was recently developed that splits the gag-pol component of the packaging construct into two parts: one that expresses Gag/Gag-Pro and another that expresses Pol (RT and IN) fused with Vpr. Unlike other lentiviral vectors, the trans-vector has not been shown to form recombinants capable of DNA mobilization. These results indicate the trans-vector

  5. DNA replication and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyer, Anne-Sophie; Walter, David; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2016-01-01

    A dividing cell has to duplicate its DNA precisely once during the cell cycle to preserve genome integrity avoiding the accumulation of genetic aberrations that promote diseases such as cancer. A large number of endogenous impacts can challenge DNA replication and cells harbor a battery of pathways...... causing DNA replication stress and genome instability. Further, we describe cellular and systemic responses to these insults with a focus on DNA replication restart pathways. Finally, we discuss the therapeutic potential of exploiting intrinsic replicative stress in cancer cells for targeted therapy....

  6. In vivo fitness and virulence of a drug-resistant herpes simplex virus 1 mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesola, Jean M; Coen, Donald M

    2007-05-01

    Two important issues regarding a virus mutant that is resistant to an antiviral drug are its ability to replicate in animal hosts (in vivo fitness) relative to other genetic variants, including wild type, and its ability to cause disease. These issues have been investigated for a herpes simplex virus 1 mutant that is resistant to thiourea compounds, which inhibit encapsidation of viral DNA. Following corneal inoculation of mice, the mutant virus replicated very similarly to its wild-type parent in the eye, trigeminal ganglion and brain. The mutant virus was as lethal to mice as its wild-type parent following this route of inoculation. Indeed, it exhibited increased virulence. Thus, unlike most drug-resistant virus mutants, this mutant retained in vivo fitness and virulence.

  7. High rate of mismatch extension during reverse transcription in a single round of retrovirus replication.

    OpenAIRE

    Pulsinelli, G A; Temin, H M

    1994-01-01

    We made spleen necrosis virus-based retroviral vectors with mutations at the 3' end of the primer binding site region to observe the effects of terminal mismatches on retroviral replication. These vectors, when compared to a vector with the wild-type primer binding sequence, allowed us to assay the effects of the mutations on the viral titer during a single cycle of replication. The mutant vectors had titers that were comparable to the wild-type vector, indicating that reverse transcriptase h...

  8. Herpes Zoster Vaccination: Controversies and Common Clinical Questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Epps, Puja; Schmader, Kenneth E; Canaday, David H

    2016-01-01

    Herpes zoster, clinically referred to as shingles, is an acute, cutaneous viral infection caused by reactivation of the varicella zoster virus, the same virus that causes chickenpox. The incidence of herpes zoster and its complications increase with decline in cell-mediated immunity, including age-associated decline. The most effective management strategy for herpes zoster is prevention of the disease through vaccination in those who are most vulnerable. Despite the demonstrated efficacy in reducing the incidence and severity of herpes zoster, the uptake of vaccine remains low. Here, we will discuss the controversies that surround the live herpes zoster vaccine and address the common clinical questions that arise. We will also discuss the new adjuvanted herpes zoster vaccine currently under investigation.

  9. Vector geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, Gilbert de B

    2011-01-01

    This brief undergraduate-level text by a prominent Cambridge-educated mathematician explores the relationship between algebra and geometry. An elementary course in plane geometry is the sole requirement for Gilbert de B. Robinson's text, which is the result of several years of teaching and learning the most effective methods from discussions with students. Topics include lines and planes, determinants and linear equations, matrices, groups and linear transformations, and vectors and vector spaces. Additional subjects range from conics and quadrics to homogeneous coordinates and projective geom

  10. Replicating animal mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A. McKinney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA replication has been experiencing incredible progress in recent years, and yet little is certain about the mechanism(s used by animal cells to replicate this plasmid-like genome. The long-standing strand-displacement model of mammalian mtDNA replication (for which single-stranded DNA intermediates are a hallmark has been intensively challenged by a new set of data, which suggests that replication proceeds via coupled leading-and lagging-strand synthesis (resembling bacterial genome replication and/or via long stretches of RNA intermediates laid on the mtDNA lagging-strand (the so called RITOLS. The set of proteins required for mtDNA replication is small and includes the catalytic and accessory subunits of DNA polymerase y, the mtDNA helicase Twinkle, the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein, and the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (which most likely functions as the mtDNA primase. Mutations in the genes coding for the first three proteins are associated with human diseases and premature aging, justifying the research interest in the genetic, biochemical and structural properties of the mtDNA replication machinery. Here we summarize these properties and discuss the current models of mtDNA replication in animal cells.

  11. Herpes zoster correlates with pyogenic liver abscesses in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei-Ling, Shen; Kuan-Fu, Liao; Sung-Mao, Tsai; Cheng-Li, Lin Ms; Shih-Wei, Lai

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of the paper was to explore the relationship between herpes zoster and pyogenic liver abscesses in Taiwan. This was a nationwide cohort study. Using the database of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program, there were 33049 subjects aged 20-84 years who were newly diagnosed with herpes zoster from 1998 to 2010 that were selected for our study, and they were our herpes zoster group. 131707 randomly selected subjects without herpes zoster were our non-herpes zoster group. Both groups were matched by sex, age, other comorbidities, and the index year of their herpes zoster diagnosis. The incidence of pyogenic liver abscesses at the end of 2011 was then estimated. The multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression model was used to estimate the hazard ratio and 95% confidence interval for pyogenic liver abscesses associated with herpes zoster and other comorbidities. The overall incidence rate was 1.38-fold higher in the herpes zoster group than in the non-herpes zoster group (4.47 vs. 3.25 per 10000 person-years, 95% confidence interval 1.32, 1.44). After controlling for potential confounding factors, the adjusted hazard ratio of pyogenic liver abscesses was 1.34 in the herpes zoster group (95% confidence interval 1.05, 1.72) when compared with the non-herpes zoster group. Sex (in this case male), age, presence of biliary stones, chronic kidney diseases, chronic liver diseases, cancers, and diabetes mellitus were also significantly associated with pyogenic liver abscesses. Patients with herpes zoster are associated with an increased hazard of developing pyogenic liver abscesses.

  12. Mucosal Herpes Immunity and Immunopathology to Ocular and Genital Herpes Simplex Virus Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chentoufi, Aziz Alami; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2012-01-01

    Herpes simplex viruses type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) are amongst the most common human infectious viral pathogens capable of causing serious clinical diseases at every stage of life, from fatal disseminated disease in newborns to cold sores genital ulcerations and blinding eye disease. Primary mucocutaneous infection with HSV-1 & HSV-2 is followed by a lifelong viral latency in the sensory ganglia. In the majority of cases, herpes infections are clinically asymptomatic. However, in symptomatic individuals, the latent HSV can spontaneously and frequently reactivate, reinfecting the muco-cutaneous surfaces and causing painful recurrent diseases. The innate and adaptive mucosal immunities to herpes infections and disease remain to be fully characterized. The understanding of innate and adaptive immune mechanisms operating at muco-cutaneous surfaces is fundamental to the design of next-generation herpes vaccines. In this paper, the phenotypic and functional properties of innate and adaptive mucosal immune cells, their role in antiherpes immunity, and immunopathology are reviewed. The progress and limitations in developing a safe and efficient mucosal herpes vaccine are discussed. PMID:23320014

  13. Herpes zoster laryngitis accompanied by Ramsay Hunt syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Yoon, Tae Mi; Lee, Joon Kyoo; Joo, Young Eun; Lim, Sang Chul

    2013-01-01

    The most common presentation of herpes zoster in the head and neck region is called Ramsay Hunt syndrome (RHS), which rarely accompanies multiple cranial neuropathy. Herpes zoster also involves the mucous membrane of the tongue, palate, pharynx, and larynx. Herpes zoster infection of the larynx accompanied by Ramsay Hunt syndrome with cranial polyneuropathy is extremely rare, with only few reported cases in the literature. At the time of this report, a review of the medical literature disclosed 4 reported cases of herpes zoster laryngitis accompanied by Ramsay Hunt syndrome. Herein, we present 2 additional cases and report the clinical outcome of cranial polyneuropathy with a review of the literature.

  14. Case of Herpes encephalitis followed-up by CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukui, Y.; Nagai, S.; Nishibayashi, Y.; Okamoto, H.; Goishi, J. (Matsuyama Red Cross Hospital, Ehime (Japan))

    1982-03-01

    A 9-month-old girl was admitted with lethargy, fever and convulsion. EGG showed localized slow waves in the right temporal region. CT showed a localized low density area accompanied by a hemorrhagic focus in the right frontal lobe. Herpes encephalitis was suspected, and cytosine arabinoside was administered. The antibody titers of the serum and cerebrospinal fluid against herpes simplex virus type I significantly rose. Clinically the patient recovered without serious sequelae. CT revealed marked cerebral atrophy and subdural hematoma which were surgically treated. The importance of CT in the diagnosis and prognosis of herpes encephalitis was argued, and CT findings of herpes encephalitis were discussed.

  15. Replication-selective oncolytic viruses in the treatment of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everts, Bart; van der Poel, Henk G

    2005-02-01

    In the search for novel strategies, oncolytic virotherapy has recently emerged as a viable approach to specifically kill tumor cells. Unlike conventional gene therapy, it uses replication competent viruses that are able to spread through tumor tissue by virtue of viral replication and concomitant cell lysis. Recent advances in molecular biology have allowed the design of several genetically modified viruses, such as adenovirus and herpes simplex virus that specifically replicate in, and kill tumor cells. On the other hand, viruses with intrinsic oncolytic capacity are also being evaluated for therapeutic purposes. In this review, an overview is given of the general mechanisms and genetic modifications by which these viruses achieve tumor cell-specific replication and antitumor efficacy. However, although generally the oncolytic efficacy of these approaches has been demonstrated in preclinical studies the therapeutic efficacy in clinical trails is still not optimal. Therefore, strategies are evaluated that could further enhance the oncolytic potential of conditionally replicating viruses. In this respect, the use of tumor-selective viruses in conjunction with other standard therapies seems most promising. However, still several hurdles regarding clinical limitations and safety issues should be overcome before this mode of therapy can become of clinical relevance.

  16. [Ocular hypertension in herpes simplex keratouveitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burcea, M; Avram, Corina-Ioana; Stamate, Alina-Cristina; Malciolu, R; Oprea, S; Zemba, M

    2014-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus is one of the most common pathogens in humans, who are seropositive for the virus in 90% of the cases at the adult age. It determines reccurent infections in more than a third of the population and these infections depend on the immune response of the host. Ocular infections of newborns are due to the herpes simplex virus type 2, meanwhile type 1 is found predominantly at adults; almost all ocular structures can be affected. HSV-1 in the most frequent etiologic agent in infectious anterior uveitis (with the varicelo-zosterian virus) and it is responsible for 6-10% of all cases of anterior uveitis. More than half of the keratouveitides due to HSV will develop intraocular hypertension and open-angle secondary glaucoma, during reccurences and most of them will resolve after proper control of inflammation.

  17. Herpes zoster post-herpetic neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, L; Jadwat, Y; Bouckaert, M

    2005-11-01

    Post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN) is the most frequent complication of herpes zoster and often results in significant morbidity and a reduction in the patient's quality of life. The peripheral nerve injury that occurs during the acute phase of herpes zoster (HZ) leads to an abnormal tonic impulse discharge from primary nociceptive afferent neurons which induce slow temporal summation. This "wind-up" phenomenon is responsible for continuous partial depolarisation of second-order neurons with increased spontaneous impulse discharge and expanded receptive fields within the dorsal horn nociceptive neurons. The abnormal central processing involves the activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors resulting in neuropathic pain, characterized by spontaneous pain, hyperalgesia and allodynia which is typical of PHN. In addition, tonic input from non-nociceptive AB afferent neurons, maintained by sympathetic efferent activity, contribute to the development and maintenance of neuropathic pain in general, and a burning sensation in particular.

  18. Decompressive craniectomy in herpes simplex encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Jasim Abdul Jalal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial hypertension is a common cause of morbidity in herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE. HSE is the most common form of acute viral encephalitis. Hereby we report a case of HSE in which decompressive craniectomy was performed to treat refractory intracranial hypertension. A 32-year-old male presented with headache, vomiting, fever, and focal seizures involving the right upper limb. Cerebrospinal fluid-meningoencephalitic profile was positive for herpes simplex. Magnetic resonance image of the brain showed swollen and edematous right temporal lobe with increased signal in gray matter and subcortical white matter with loss of gray, white differentiation in T2-weighted sequences. Decompressive craniectomy was performed in view of refractory intracranial hypertension. Decompressive surgery for HSE with refractory hypertension can positively affect patient survival, with good outcomes in terms of cognitive functions.

  19. Development history of herpes simplex encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-wei WANG

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE is an acute central nervous system infection caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV. Early clinical manifestations mainly include fever, headache and unconsciousness; when progressing, psychiatric symptoms can occur. Death or serious neurological sequelae will happen if not treated. With the development of laboratory tests and imaging techniques, the early diagnosis of HSE is possible. Even though imaging with temporal lobe abnormal signal has the implication to HSE, the application of polymerase chain reaction (PCR in detecting HSV DNA in cerebrospinal fluid is currently the "gold standard" to diagnose HSE. Once diagnosed, acyclovir must be given as soon as possible, as delayed treatment will result in a poor outcome. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.08.003

  20. Herpes encephalitis preceded by ipsilateral vestibular neuronitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpot, Stephen J; Archer, John S

    2005-11-01

    A 74-year-old woman developed vertigo and jerk nystagmus to the left with normal cerebral imaging. Three days later she developed fever, altered mental state and left medial temporal lobe hypodensity, confirmed on lumbar puncture to be due to herpes simplex type 1 encephalitis. We propose that the patient had vestibular neuronitis caused by HSV-1 that progressed to ipsilateral temporal lobe encephalitis.

  1. Benzalkonium Chloride Intoxication Mimicking Herpes Zoster Encephalitis

    OpenAIRE

    Güler, Ekrem; Olgar, Şeref; Davutoğlu, Mehmet; Garipardıç, Mesut; Karabiber, Hamza

    2011-01-01

    Benzalkonium chloride (BAC) is a frequently used disinfectant and its most well-known side effect is contact dermatitis. In this report, two children who had vesicular dermatitis, headache, lethargy, fever and encephalopathy mimicking Herpes zoster encephalitis were presented. Their consciousness level improved on the second day. From the medical history it was understood that the mother had applied 20% BAC solution to the scalps of two children. The aim of the presentation of this report is ...

  2. Benzalkonium Chloride Intoxication Mimicking Herpes Zoster Encephalitis

    OpenAIRE

    Ekrem Güler; Şeref Olgar; Mehmet Davutoğlu; Mesut Garipardıç; Hamza Karabiber

    2014-01-01

    Benzalkonium chloride (BAC) is a frequently used disinfectant and its most well-known side effect is contact dermatitis. In this report, two children who had vesicular dermatitis, headache, lethargy, fever and encephalopathy mimicking Herpes zoster encephalitis were presented. Their consciousness level improved on the second day. From the medical history it was understood that the mother had applied 20% BAC solution to the scalps of two children. The aim of the presentation of this report is...

  3. Herpes associated erythema multiforme annularis concentricum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuldeep C

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available A young man had large, concentric plaques over the back and extensors of forearms for eight weeks. Past history suggested recurrent herpes labialis. Serum anti HSV-1 IgG titre was raised to 32 micrograms/l and histopathology of an active lesion suggested erythema multiforme. Symptomatic treatment and oral zinc therapy subsided EM lesions but concentric depigmentation developed after healing

  4. Ramsay hunt syndrome (herpes zoster oticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Karthiga Kannan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ramsay Hunt syndrome (RHS is defined as an acute peripheral facial neuropathy caused by the reactivated latent varicella zoster virus (VZV in the geniculate ganglion; characterized with erythematous vesicular rash of the skin of the ear canal, auricle, facial skin, oral mucosa and facial palsy (also known as herpes zoster oticus. This article reports a case of Ramsay Hunt Syndrome (RHS in a 37-year-old male patient depicting the classical signs.

  5. Novel cloning vectors for Bacillus thuringiensis.

    OpenAIRE

    Baum, J A; Coyle, D M; Gilbert, M P; Jany, C S; Gawron-Burke, C

    1990-01-01

    Seven replication origins from resident plasmids of Bacillus thuringienis subsp. kurstaki HD263 and HD73 were cloned in Escherichia coli. Three of these replication origins, originating from plasmids of 43, 44, and 60 MDa, were used to construct a set of compatible shuttle vectors that exhibit structural and segregational stability in the Cry- strain B. thuringiensis HD73-26. These shuttle vectors, pEG597, pEG853, and pEG854, were designed with rare restriction sites that permit various adapt...

  6. Herpes zoster oticus: A rare clinical entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh Gondivkar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Herpes zoster oticus also known as Ramsay Hunt syndrome is a rare complication of herpes zoster in which reactivation of latent varicella zoster virus infection in the geniculate ganglion causes otalgia, auricular vesicles, and peripheral facial paralysis. Ramsay Hunt syndrome is rare in children and affects both sexes equally. Incidence and clinical severity increases when host immunity is compromised. Because these symptoms do not always present at the onset, this syndrome can be misdiagnosed. Although secondary to Bell′s palsy in terms of the cause of acute atraumatic peripheral facial paralysis, Ramsay Hunt syndrome, with incidence ranged from 0.3 to 18%, has a worse prognosis. Herpes zoster oticus accounts for about 12% cases of facial palsy, which is usually unilateral and complete and full recovery occurs in only about 20% of untreated patients. The most advisable method to treat Ramsay Hunt syndrome is the combination therapy with acyclovir and prednisone but still not promising, and several prerequisites are required for better results. We present a case of 32-year-old man suffering from Ramsay Hunt syndrome with grade V facial palsy treated effectively with rehabilitation program, after the termination of the combination therapy of acyclovir and prednisone.

  7. Stress responses and replication of plasmids in bacterial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wegrzyn Alicja

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Plasmids, DNA (or rarely RNA molecules which replicate in cells autonomously (independently of chromosomes as non-essential genetic elements, play important roles for microbes grown under specific environmental conditions as well as in scientific laboratories and in biotechnology. For example, bacterial plasmids are excellent models in studies on regulation of DNA replication, and their derivatives are the most commonly used vectors in genetic engineering. Detailed mechanisms of replication initiation, which is the crucial process for efficient maintenance of plasmids in cells, have been elucidated for several plasmids. However, to understand plasmid biology, it is necessary to understand regulation of plasmid DNA replication in response to different environmental conditions in which host cells exist. Knowledge of such regulatory processes is also very important for those who use plasmids as expression vectors to produce large amounts of recombinant proteins. Variable conditions in large-scale fermentations must influence replication of plasmid DNA in cells, thus affecting the efficiency of recombinant gene expression significantly. Contrary to extensively investigated biochemistry of plasmid replication, molecular mechanisms of regulation of plasmid DNA replication in response to various environmental stress conditions are relatively poorly understood. There are, however, recently published studies that add significant data to our knowledge on relations between cellular stress responses and control of plasmid DNA replication. In this review we focus on plasmids derived from bacteriophage λ that are among the best investigated replicons. Nevertheless, recent results of studies on other plasmids are also discussed shortly.

  8. The Replication Recipe: What makes for a convincing replication?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandt, M.J.; IJzerman, H.; Dijksterhuis, A.J.; Farach, F.J.; Geller, J.; Giner-Sorolla, R.; Grange, J.A.; Perugini, M.; Spies, J.R.; Veer, A. van 't

    2014-01-01

    Psychological scientists have recently started to reconsider the importance of close replications in building a cumulative knowledge base; however, there is no consensus about what constitutes a convincing close replication study. To facilitate convincing close replication attempts we have developed

  9. Retroviral Vector Biosafety: Lessons from Sheep

    OpenAIRE

    Van den Broeke Anne; Burny Arsène

    2003-01-01

    The safety of retroviral-based systems and the possible transmission of replication-competent virus to patients is a major concern associated with using retroviral vectors for gene therapy. While much effort has been put into the design of safe retroviral production methods and effective in vitro monitoring assays, there is little data evaluating the risks resulting from retroviral vector instability at post-transduction stages especially following in vivo gene delivery. Here, we briefly desc...

  10. Identification of conserved amino acids in the herpes simplex virus type 1 UL8 protein required for DNA synthesis and UL52 primase interaction in the virus replisome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muylaert, Isabella; Zhao, Zhiyuan; Andersson, Torbjörn; Elias, Per

    2012-09-28

    We have used oriS-dependent transient replication assays to search for species-specific interactions within the herpes simplex virus replisome. Hybrid replisomes derived from herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) failed to support DNA replication in cells. Moreover, the replisomes showed a preference for their cognate origin of replication. The results demonstrate that the herpesvirus replisome behaves as a molecular machine relying on functionally important interactions. We then searched for functional interactions in the replisome context by subjecting HSV-1 UL8 protein to extensive mutagenesis. 52 mutants were made by replacing single or clustered charged amino acids with alanines. Four mutants showed severe replication defects. Mutant A23 exhibited a lethal phenotype, and mutants A49, A52 and A53 had temperature-sensitive phenotypes. Mutants A49 and A53 did not interact with UL52 primase as determined by co-immunoprecipitation experiments. Using GFP-tagged UL8, we demonstrate that all mutants were unable to support formation of ICP8-containing nuclear replication foci. Extended mutagenesis suggested that a highly conserved motif corresponding to mutant A49 serves an important role for establishing a physical contact between UL8 and UL52. The replication-defective mutations affected conserved amino acids, and similar phenotypes were observed when the corresponding mutations were introduced into EHV-1 UL8.

  11. Herpes Viral Origin of the Parsonage-Turner Syndrome: Highlighting of Serological Immune Anti-Herpes Deficiency Cured by Anti-Herpes Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goaster, Jacqueline Le; Bourée, Patrice; Ifergan, Charles; Tangy, Frederic; Olivier, René; Haenni, Anne-Lise

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, a 50 year-old athletic male presented with weakness, pain and unilateral phrenic paralysis, followed by bilateral phrenic paralysis with deep dyspnea. In 2013, the Parsonage-Turner syndrome was diagnosed. When the patient was seen in September 2014 for the first time, he was facing phrenic neuromuscular failure, which led to the hypothesis of neurotropic herpes viruses. A control of the global serological anti-Herpes immunity to analyze his antibody (Ab) levels confirmed herpes immune genetic deficiency. An appropriate herpes chemotherapy treatment was proposed. Immediately, a spectacular recovery of the patient was observed, and after a few weeks, the respiratory function tests showed normal values. The hypothesis of the inductive role of viruses of the herpes family in the Parsonage-Turner syndrome was thus substantiated. The patient's immune deficiency covers the HSV2, HHV3, HHV4, HHV5 and HHV6 Ab levels. This led to the control of herpes in the family lineage: indeed, his daughter presented alterations of her serological herpes Ab levels.

  12. Herpes Viral Origin of the Parsonage-Turner Syndrome: Highlighting of Serological Immune Anti-Herpes Deficiency Cured by Anti-Herpes Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Le Goaster

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In 2012, a 50 year-old athletic male presented with weakness, pain and unilateral phrenic paralysis, followed by bilateral phrenic paralysis with deep dyspnea. In 2013, the Parsonage-Turner syndrome was diagnosed. When the patient was seen in September 2014 for the first time, he was facing phrenic neuromuscular failure, which led to the hypothesis of neurotropic herpes viruses. A control of the global serological anti-Herpes immunity to analyze his antibody (Ab levels confirmed herpes immune genetic deficiency. An appropriate herpes chemotherapy treatment was proposed. Immediately, a spectacular recovery of the patient was observed, and after a few weeks, the respiratory function tests showed normal values. The hypothesis of the inductive role of viruses of the herpes family in the Parsonage-Turner syndrome was thus substantiated. The patient's immune deficiency covers the HSV2, HHV3, HHV4, HHV5 and HHV6 Ab levels. This led to the control of herpes in the family lineage: indeed, his daughter presented alterations of her serological herpes Ab levels.

  13. Vector velocimeter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to a compact, reliable and low-cost vector velocimeter for example for determining velocities of particles suspended in a gas or fluid flow, or for determining velocity, displacement, rotation, or vibration of a solid surface, the vector velocimeter comprising a laser...... assembly for emission of a measurement beam for illumination of an object in a measurement volume with coherent light whereby a signal beam emanating from the object in the measurement volume is formed in response to illumination of the object by the measurement beam, a reference beam generator...... detector element signal when the fringe pattern formed by the interfering signal beam and reference beam moves across the first detector array; and a signal processor that is adapted for generation of a velocity signal corresponding to a first velocity component of movement of the object in the measurement...

  14. Vector velocimeter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    for generation of a reference beam, a detector system comprising a first detector arrangement arranged in such a way that the signal beam and the reference beam are incident upon the first detector arrangement with the reference beam propagating at an angle relative to a signal beam, and wherein the first......The present invention relates to a compact, reliable and low-cost vector velocimeter for example for determining velocities of particles suspended in a gas or fluid flow, or for determining velocity, displacement, rotation, or vibration of a solid surface, the vector velocimeter comprising a laser...... assembly for emission of a measurement beam for illumination of an object in a measurement volume with coherent light whereby a signal beam emanating from the object in the measurement volume is formed in response to illumination of the object by the measurement beam, a reference beam generator...

  15. Modeling DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Recommends the use of a model of DNA made out of Velcro to help students visualize the steps of DNA replication. Includes a materials list, construction directions, and details of the demonstration using the model parts. (DDR)

  16. Eukaryotic DNA Replication Fork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgers, Peter M J; Kunkel, Thomas A

    2017-06-20

    This review focuses on the biogenesis and composition of the eukaryotic DNA replication fork, with an emphasis on the enzymes that synthesize DNA and repair discontinuities on the lagging strand of the replication fork. Physical and genetic methodologies aimed at understanding these processes are discussed. The preponderance of evidence supports a model in which DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε) carries out the bulk of leading strand DNA synthesis at an undisturbed replication fork. DNA polymerases α and δ carry out the initiation of Okazaki fragment synthesis and its elongation and maturation, respectively. This review also discusses alternative proposals, including cellular processes during which alternative forks may be utilized, and new biochemical studies with purified proteins that are aimed at reconstituting leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis separately and as an integrated replication fork.

  17. Abiotic self-replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Adam J; Ellefson, Jared W; Ellington, Andrew D

    2012-12-18

    The key to the origins of life is the replication of information. Linear polymers such as nucleic acids that both carry information and can be replicated are currently what we consider to be the basis of living systems. However, these two properties are not necessarily coupled. The ability to mutate in a discrete or quantized way, without frequent reversion, may be an additional requirement for Darwinian evolution, in which case the notion that Darwinian evolution defines life may be less of a tautology than previously thought. In this Account, we examine a variety of in vitro systems of increasing complexity, from simple chemical replicators up to complex systems based on in vitro transcription and translation. Comparing and contrasting these systems provides an interesting window onto the molecular origins of life. For nucleic acids, the story likely begins with simple chemical replication, perhaps of the form A + B → T, in which T serves as a template for the joining of A and B. Molecular variants capable of faster replication would come to dominate a population, and the development of cycles in which templates could foster one another's replication would have led to increasingly complex replicators and from thence to the initial genomes. The initial genomes may have been propagated by RNA replicases, ribozymes capable of joining oligonucleotides and eventually polymerizing mononucleotide substrates. As ribozymes were added to the genome to fill gaps in the chemistry necessary for replication, the backbone of a putative RNA world would have emerged. It is likely that such replicators would have been plagued by molecular parasites, which would have been passively replicated by the RNA world machinery without contributing to it. These molecular parasites would have been a major driver for the development of compartmentalization/cellularization, as more robust compartments could have outcompeted parasite-ridden compartments. The eventual outsourcing of metabolic

  18. Interaction of herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) glycoprotein D with the host cell surface is sufficient to induce Chlamydia trachomatis persistence

    OpenAIRE

    Vanover, J.; Kintner, J.; Whittimore, J.; Schoborg, R. V.

    2010-01-01

    When presented with certain unfavourable environmental conditions, Chlamydia trachomatis reticulate bodies (RBs) enter into a viable, yet non-cultivable state called persistence. Previously, we established an in vitro C. trachomatis and herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) co-infection model. These data indicate that (i) viral co-infection stimulates chlamydial persistence, (ii) productive HSV replication is not required for persistence induction, and (iii) HSV-induced persistence is not media...

  19. Mitochondrial Haplogroups as a Risk Factor for Herpes Zoster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinson, Rebecca T; Hulgan, Todd; Kalams, Spyros A; Fessel, Joshua P; Samuels, David C

    2016-10-01

    Background.  Herpes zoster, or shingles, is a common, painful reactivation of latent varicella zoster virus infection. Understanding host factors that predispose to herpes zoster may permit development of more effective prevention strategies. Our objective was to examine mitochondrial haplogroups as a potential host factor related to herpes zoster incidence. Methods.  Study participants were drawn from BioVU, a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) biobank connected to deidentified electronic medical records (EMRs) from Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Our study used 9691 Caucasian individuals with herpes zoster status determined by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes 053-053.9. Cases and controls were matched on sex and date of birth within 5 years. Mitochondrial haplogroups were defined from mitochondrial DNA variants genotyped on the Illumina 660W or Illumina Infinium Human-Exome Beadchip. Sex and date of birth were extracted from the EMR. Results.  European mitochondrial haplogroup H had a protective association with herpes zoster status (odds ratio [OR] = .82; 95% confidence interval [CI], .71-.94; P = .005), whereas haplogroup clade IWX was a risk factor for herpes zoster status (OR = 1.38; 95% CI, 1.07-1.77; P = .01). Conclusions.  Mitochondrial haplogroup influences herpes zoster risk. Knowledge of a patient's mitochondrial haplogroup could allow for a precision approach to the management of herpes zoster risk through vaccination strategies and management of other modifiable risk factors.

  20. Herpes viruses, cytokines, and altered hemostasis in vital exhaustion.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ven, A.J.A.M. van der; Diest, R. van; Hamulyak, K.; Maes, M.; Bruggeman, C.A.; Appels, A.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Infections with herpes viruses have been implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. We tested the hypothesis that vital exhaustion (VE) is associated with multiple herpesvirus infections, such as herpes simplex virus, varicella-zoster virus, Epstein-Barr virus, and cytomegalovirus

  1. Update on recommendations for use of herpes zoster vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Craig M; Harpaz, Rafael; Ortega-Sanchez, Ismael; Bialek, Stephanie R

    2014-08-22

    Herpes zoster vaccine (Zostavax [Merck & Co., Inc.]) was licensed in 2006 and recommended by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) in 2008 for prevention of herpes zoster (shingles) and its complications among adults aged ≥60 years. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the use of Zostavax in 2011 for adults aged 50 through 59 years based on a large study of safety and efficacy in this age group. ACIP initially considered the use of herpes zoster vaccine among adults aged 50 through 59 years in June 2011, but declined to recommend the vaccine in this age group, citing shortages of Zostavax and limited data on long-term protection afforded by herpes zoster vaccine. In October 2013, ACIP reviewed the epidemiology of herpes zoster and its complications, herpes zoster vaccine supply, short-term vaccine efficacy in adults aged 50 through 59 years, short- and long- term vaccine efficacy and effectiveness in adults aged ≥60 years, an updated cost-effectiveness analysis, and deliberations of the ACIP herpes zoster work group, all of which are summarized in this report. No vote was taken, and ACIP maintained its current recommendation that herpes zoster vaccine be routinely recommended for adults aged ≥60 years. Meeting minutes are available at http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/acip/meetings/meetings-info.html.

  2. [Clinical presentations of Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus (diagnosis and therapy)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernakova, G M; Kleshcheva, E A; Semenova, T B

    Approximately a quarter of the world's population at some point in life is at risk of developing shingles (Herpes Zoster). In 10-20% of cases the first branch of the trigeminal nerve gets involved (Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus, HZO). Ophthalmic complications of HZO are able to cause a significant reduction in visual function.

  3. Clinical and morphological characteristics of herpes zoster in south India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubey Anand

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available One hundred and seven cases (6 children and 101 adults of herpes zoster were recruited over a period of two years. The frequency of herpes zoster amongst skin OPD cases was found to be 0.34 per cent. The male to female ratio was 1.74:1. The most common prodromal symptom seen was paresthesia in 25 (23.36% cases followed by itching in 21 (19.62% cases.Most common presenting complaint was pain in 97 (90.65% cases. Ninety nine cases had classical herpes zoster followed by necrotic / ulcerated herpes zoster in 5 cases and hemorrhagic herpes zoster in 3 cases. Thoracic dermatome was the most common dermatome involved in 64 (59.8% cases followed by cervical in 17 (15.8% cases. Unidermatomal involvement was seen in 81 (75.7% cases, followed by multidermatomal in 18 (16.8% cases and disseminated in 8 (7.4% cases. Forty six cases were screened for HIV, out of them; six cases (4 males, 2 females were seropositive for HIV. Classical herpes zoster was a feature in four cases; however, one case each also had necrotic and hemorrhagic form of herpes zoster. To conclude, herpes zoster commonly occurs in young adults in India with presenting symptoms such as pain, itching and fever.

  4. The incidence of neonatal herpes in The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poeran, J.; Wildschut, H.; Gaytant, M.; Galama, J.M.D.; Steegers, E.; Meijden, W.I. van der

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In The Netherlands the incidence of neonatal herpes was 2.0-2.9 per 100,000 live births during the period 1981-1998. The low incidence warranted a rather conservative prevention policy. OBJECTIVES: To monitor for potential changes in the incidence of neonatal herpes in The Netherlands

  5. Vector-mediated cancer gene therapy: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, Prem

    2005-05-01

    In recent years there has been a dramatic increase in developing gene therapy approaches for the treatment of cancer. The two events that have permitted the formulation of concept of cancer gene therapy are the new understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying oncogenesis, and the development of the DNA-delivery vehicles or vectors. Many approaches to cancer gene therapy have been proposed, and several viral and non-viral vectors have been utilized. The purpose of this review article is to describe the various strategies of cancer gene therapy (transfer of tumor suppressor genes, suicide genes-enzyme/pro-drug approach, inhibition of dominant oncogenes, immunomodulation approaches, expression of molecules that affect angiogenesis, tumor invasion and metastasis, chemosensitization and radiosensitization approaches, and chemoprotection of stem cells). The chapter also reviews the commonly used vectors (retroviral vectors, adenoviral vectors, adeno-associated viral vectors, pox viruses, herpes simplex viruses, HIV- vectors, non-viral vectors and targetable vectors) for cancer gene therapy. Some of the important issues in cancer gene therapy, and the potential future directions are also being discussed.

  6. Management of oral and genital herpes in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mell, Howard K

    2008-05-01

    The epidemiology of oral and genital herpes has dramatically changed over the past decade. Herpes simplex virus-1, traditionally associated with oral herpes, is now implicated in an increasing percentage of genital herpes cases. The possibility of "autoinoculation" (or self-infection) of anatomic sites other than that of the primary infection has been recognized. New methods of suppression therapy are being examined. These changes have led to a revision in the recommendations by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). This review discusses herpes infections of the oral and genital mucosa and the suggested approach to the infected patient who presents in the emergency department. Specific attention is given to the CDC's 2006 guidelines for the treatment of sexually transmitted diseases.

  7. Expression of RNA interference triggers from an oncolytic herpes simplex virus results in specific silencing in tumour cells in vitro and tumours in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anesti Anna-Maria

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA to tumours remains a major obstacle for the development of RNA interference (RNAi-based therapeutics. Following the promising pre-clinical and clinical results with the oncolytic herpes simplex virus (HSV OncoVEXGM-CSF, we aimed to express RNAi triggers from oncolytic HSV, which although has the potential to improve treatment by silencing tumour-related genes, was not considered possible due to the highly oncolytic properties of HSV. Methods To evaluate RNAi-mediated silencing from an oncolytic HSV backbone, we developed novel replicating HSV vectors expressing short-hairpin RNA (shRNA or artificial microRNA (miRNA against the reporter genes green fluorescent protein (eGFP and β-galactosidase (lacZ. These vectors were tested in non-tumour cell lines in vitro and tumour cells that are moderately susceptible to HSV infection both in vitro and in mice xenografts in vivo. Silencing was assessed at the protein level by fluorescent microscopy, x-gal staining, enzyme activity assay, and western blotting. Results Our results demonstrate that it is possible to express shRNA and artificial miRNA from an oncolytic HSV backbone, which had not been previously investigated. Furthermore, oncolytic HSV-mediated delivery of RNAi triggers resulted in effective and specific silencing of targeted genes in tumour cells in vitro and tumours in vivo, with the viruses expressing artificial miRNA being comprehensibly more effective. Conclusions This preliminary data provide the first demonstration of oncolytic HSV-mediated expression of shRNA or artificial miRNA and silencing of targeted genes in tumour cells in vitro and in vivo. The vectors developed in this study are being adapted to silence tumour-related genes in an ongoing study that aims to improve the effectiveness of oncolytic HSV treatment in tumours that are moderately susceptible to HSV infection and thus, potentially improve response rates seen

  8. Recidiverende erythema multiforme udløst af herpes simplex-virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergård Grejsen, Dorthe; Henningsen, Emil

    2012-01-01

    We describe two cases of recurrent erythema multiforme, both associated to infection with herpes simplex virus. The importance of subclinical herpes is illustrated. Antiviral and additional treatment is described.......We describe two cases of recurrent erythema multiforme, both associated to infection with herpes simplex virus. The importance of subclinical herpes is illustrated. Antiviral and additional treatment is described....

  9. New Conditionally Replicating Adenovirus Vectors for Breast Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    Baculovirus Construct Description of Mutation I664V Ad5 Pol – pAcgp67A Protein Production in SF9 insect cells I664M Ad5 Pol – pAcgp67A “” I664S...out in SF9 insect cells (Figure 3). Figure 3: Expression of Ad pol proteins in insect cells LEGEND: 3µg of recombinant baculovirus DNA was...transfected with Cellfectin (Invitrogen) in SF9 insect cells. Three days later the recombinant baculoviruses were collected and used for viral

  10. Replication-Defective Vector Based on a Chimpanzee Adenovirus

    OpenAIRE

    Farina, Steven F.; Gao, Guang-Ping; Xiang, Z. Q.; Rux, John J.; Burnett, Roger M.; Alvira, Mauricio R.; Marsh, Jonathan; Ertl, Hildegund C.J.; Wilson, James M.

    2001-01-01

    An adenovirus previously isolated from a mesenteric lymph node from a chimpanzee was fully sequenced and found to be similar in overall structure to human adenoviruses. The genome of this virus, called C68, is 36,521 bp in length and is most similar to subgroup E of human adenovirus, with 90% identity in most adenovirus type 4 open reading frames that have been sequenced. Substantial differences in the hexon hypervariable regions were noted between C68 and other known adenoviruses, including ...

  11. Minichromosome replication in vitro: inhibition of re-replication by replicatively assembled nucleosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krude, T; Knippers, R

    1994-08-19

    Single-stranded circular DNA, containing the SV40 origin sequence, was used as a template for complementary DNA strand synthesis in cytosolic extracts from HeLa cells. In the presence of the replication-dependent chromatin assembly factor CAF-1, defined numbers of nucleosomes were assembled during complementary DNA strand synthesis. These minichromosomes were then induced to semiconservatively replicate by the addition of the SV40 initiator protein T antigen (re-replication). The results indicate that re-replication of minichromosomes appears to be inhibited by two independent mechanisms. One acts at the initiation of minichromosome re-replication, and the other affects replicative chain elongation. To directly demonstrate the inhibitory effect of replicatively assembled nucleosomes, two types of minichromosomes were prepared: (i) post-replicative minichromosomes were assembled in a reaction coupled to replication as above; (ii) pre-replicative minichromosomes were assembled independently of replication on double-stranded DNA. Both types of minichromosomes were used as templates for DNA replication under identical conditions. Replicative fork movement was found to be impeded only on post-replicative minichromosome templates. In contrast, pre-replicative minichromosomes allowed one unconstrained replication cycle, but re-replication was inhibited due to a block in fork movement. Thus, replicatively assembled chromatin may have a profound influence on the re-replication of DNA.

  12. Herpes labialis among dental healthcare providers in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azodo, C C; Umoh, A O

    2015-01-01

    The epidemiology of herpes labialis has been relatively neglected. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors of self-reported herpes labialis among Nigerian dental health providers. This cross-sectional study of final year dental students and dentists undergoing postgraduate training at University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria was conducted in June, 2014. The demographic information, lifetime and period (previous year) experience of the herpes labialis, perceived triggers and action taken during the last episode were obtained using a self-administered questionnaire. The annual prevalence of herpes labialis was 7.4% while the lifetime prevalence was 22.1%. The lifetime prevalence was significantly associated with marital status, professional status and family history of herpes labialis. However, in binary regression, it was only marital status and family history of herpes labialis that emerged as the determinants of this lifetime prevalence. The most common trigger factors reported by the participants for the last episode of herpes labialis were fever, malaria, fatigue and stress. The actions taken by participants for the last episode of herpes labialis were using drugs without prescription (14.3%), application of lubricant (23.8%), nothing (57.1%) and could not remember (4.8%). Data from this study revealed that one out of fourteen and one out of five every studied dental healthcare providers had experienced herpes labialis in the last 12 months and their lifetime respectively. The reduction of fever inducing infections, stress and fatigue which were major triggers will help decrease herpes labialis among this studied group.

  13. 携带TRAIL基因的条件复制型腺病毒载体的构建及其辐射诱导表达%Construction of conditionally replicative adenovirus vector carrying TRAIL gene and its mRNA and protein expressions induced by ionizing radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宏芳; 吴嘉慧; 刘纯岩; 刘威武; 孙延红; 龚守良; 王志成; 刘扬

    2014-01-01

    Objective To construct the conditionally replicative adenovirus vector pAd-Egr1-TRAIL-hTERT-E1A-E1Bp-E1B55K carrying early growth response gene-1 (Egr1)promoter and tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL)gene, and to observe the effects of the vector combined with 2 Gy irradiation on the TRAIL expression in MDA-MB-231 cells.Methods Egr-1 promotor sequence was cloned from pMD18 T-Egr1, TRAIL was constructed the downstream of Egr1 promoter, pShuttle-Egr1-TRAIL-hTERT-E1A-E1Bp-E1B55K (CRAd.pEgr1-TRAIL)was constructed,after the adenovirus vector was packaged successfully,MDA-MB-231 cells were infected with them and irradiated with X-rays.Real time PCR method and ELISA were used to detect the expression levels of TRAIL mRNA and protein, respectively. Six groups in the experiment were set up:control, 2 Gy,CRAd.p,CRAd.pEgr1-TRAIL,CRAd.p + 2 Gy and CRAd.pEgr1-TRAIL + 2 Gy. Results The recombinant adenovirus vector pAd-Egr1-TRAIL-hTERT-E1A-E1Bp-E1B55K was constructed and packaged successfully.The expression level of TRAIL mRNA in MDA-MB-231 cells transfected with the vector of 5 MOI for 24 h following 2.0 Gy X-rays irradiation began to increase and arrived to the top 8 h later in various groups,then declined.The expression level of TRAIL protein in MDA-MB-231 cells began to increase 6 h after irradiation and reached to the peak 24 h later,then declined 48 h later.There were significant differences in the expression levels of TRAIL protein between CRAd.pEgr1-TRAIL + 2.0 Gy and other groups at the same time point (P<0.01). Conclusion The recombinant adenovirus vector is obtained successfully, and the TRAIL mRNA and protein expression levels in MDA-MB-231 cells can be increased significantly by the vector combined with 2.0 Gy X-rays irradiation.%目的:构建携带早期生长反应基因-1(Egr-1)启动子和肿瘤坏死因子相关的凋亡诱导配体(TRAIL)基因的条件复制型腺病毒载体 pAd-Egr1-TRAIL-hTERT-E1A-E1Bp-E1B55K

  14. Investigating variation in replicability: A "Many Labs" replication project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, R.A.; Ratliff, K.A.; Vianello, M.; Adams, R.B.; Bahnik, S.; Bernstein, M.J.; Bocian, K.; Brandt, M.J.; Brooks, B.; Brumbaugh, C.C.; Cemalcilar, Z.; Chandler, J.; Cheong, W.; Davis, W.E.; Devos, T.; Eisner, M.; Frankowska, N.; Furrow, D.; Galliani, E.M.; Hasselman, F.W.; Hicks, J.A.; Hovermale, J.F.; Hunt, S.J.; Huntsinger, J.R.; IJzerman, H.; John, M.S.; Joy-Gaba, J.A.; Kappes, H.B.; Krueger, L.E.; Kurtz, J.; Levitan, C.A.; Mallett, R.K.; Morris, W.L.; Nelson, A.J.; Nier, J.A.; Packard, G.; Pilati, R.; Rutchick, A.M.; Schmidt, K.; Skorinko, J.L.M.; Smith, R.; Steiner, T.G.; Storbeck, J.; Van Swol, L.M.; Thompson, D.; Veer, A.E. van 't; Vaughn, L.A.; Vranka, M.; Wichman, A.L.; Woodzicka, J.A.; Nosek, B.A.

    2014-01-01

    Although replication is a central tenet of science, direct replications are rare in psychology. This research tested variation in the replicability of 13 classic and contemporary effects across 36 independent samples totaling 6,344 participants. In the aggregate, 10 effects replicated consistently.

  15. Hepatitis B virus replication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Hepadnaviruses, including human hepatitis B virus (HBV), replicate through reverse transcription of an RNA intermediate, the pregenomic RNA (pgRNA). Despite this kinship to retroviruses, there are fundamental differences beyond the fact that hepadnavirions contain DNA instead of RNA. Most peculiar is the initiation of reverse transcription: it occurs by protein-priming, is strictly committed to using an RNA hairpin on the pgRNA,ε, as template, and depends on cellular chaperones;moreover, proper replication can apparently occur only in the specialized environment of intact nucleocapsids.This complexity has hampered an in-depth mechanistic understanding. The recent successful reconstitution in the test tube of active replication initiation complexes from purified components, for duck HBV (DHBV),now allows for the analysis of the biochemistry of hepadnaviral replication at the molecular level. Here we review the current state of knowledge at all steps of the hepadnaviral genome replication cycle, with emphasis on new insights that turned up by the use of such cellfree systems. At this time, they can, unfortunately,not be complemented by three-dimensional structural information on the involved components. However, at least for the s RNA element such information is emerging,raising expectations that combining biophysics with biochemistry and genetics will soon provide a powerful integrated approach for solving the many outstanding questions. The ultimate, though most challenging goal,will be to visualize the hepadnaviral reverse transcriptase in the act of synthesizing DNA, which will also have strong implications for drug development.

  16. EPIDEMIOLOGY OF THE HERPES SIMPLEX VIRUS INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljiljana Kostadinović

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Over 150 sorts of viruses are capable of causing diseases of the respiratory ways. The virus infections have become the cost to be paid for urbanization and industrialization. The acute virus infections jeopardize mankind by their complications with numerous consequences. They open up the way to super infections, they provoke endogenous infections and lead to insufficiency of the vital organs. The viruses penetrate the organism mainly through the respiratory ways, digestive and urinary-sexual organs and skin. Some viruses immediately at the place of their entrance into the organism find receptive cells in which they can multiply (herpes virus and etc.. Some viruses must get through the blood, through the lymph or the nerve fibers to the target organs that they have affinity for.The changes that primarily occur in the mouth with manifest lymphadenopathy of the surrounding area emerge with respect to the type of the acute infection dis-ease.The human herpes viruses are responsible for a great number of diseases in people; that is why it can be said that the infections they induce are a very frequent cause of people's diseases in the world. Man is natural and the only host for the types I and II of the herpes simplex virus (HSV; that is why the infected person is regarded as the source of infection. The infection transmission can be by direct contact or over the contaminated secretions during the sexual intercourse. The age and the socioeconomic status (living conditions, level of medical culture, habits, etc. affect to agreat extent epidemiology of the HSV infection. The HSV distribution in the region of Niš in the five-year period (from 1987 to 1992 was the highest in the early and late summer (June and September.

  17. Retroviral Vector Biosafety: Lessons from Sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van den Broeke Anne

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The safety of retroviral-based systems and the possible transmission of replication-competent virus to patients is a major concern associated with using retroviral vectors for gene therapy. While much effort has been put into the design of safe retroviral production methods and effective in vitro monitoring assays, there is little data evaluating the risks resulting from retroviral vector instability at post-transduction stages especially following in vivo gene delivery. Here, we briefly describe and discuss our observations in an in vivo experimental model based on the inoculation of retroviral vector-transduced tumor cells in sheep. Our data indicates that the in vivo generation of mosaic viruses is a dynamic process and that virus variants, generated by retroviral vector-mediated recombination, may be stored and persist in infected individuals prior to selection at the level of replication. Recombination may not only restore essential viral functions or provide selective advantages in a changing environment but also reestablish or enhance the pathogenic potential of the particular virus undergoing recombination. These observations in sheep break new ground in our understanding of how retroviral vectors may have an impact on the course of a preestablished disease or reactivate dormant or endogenous viruses. The in vivo aspects of vector stability raise important biosafety issues for the future development of safe retroviral vector-based gene therapy.

  18. Herpes simplex virus infections of women and their offspring: implications for a developed society.

    OpenAIRE

    Whitley, R J

    1994-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus infections of humans have been known since ancient times. Contemporary society has witnessed a series of devastating manifestations of herpes simplex virus infections--namely, genital herpes simplex virus infection and neonatal herpes simplex virus infection. With the evolution of society, particularly advances in birth control and increasing promiscuity, the seroprevalence of herpes simplex virus type 2 infections has increased worldwide, however, more so in developed so...

  19. Forebyggelse af herpes zoster med vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Kristian; Rønholt, Finn; Gerstoft, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) and post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN) are frequently occurring diseases in elderly and in immuno-compromised persons. The live attenuated HZ vaccine boosts an existing immune response, so that the already established varicella-zoster virus infection is kept latent. Vaccination has...... been shown to halve the risk of HZ, and the risk of PHN is reduced by two thirds in people = 60 years. The vaccine is approved for persons aged = 50 years. However, the clinical efficacy of the vaccine is best studied in people aged = 60 years. The vaccine has so far not shown any serious side-effects....

  20. Herpes simplex virus and the alimentary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavery, Eric A; Coyle, Walter J

    2008-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection is well known as a sexually transmitted disease. However, relatively little has been published concerning the presentations and treatment of HSV infection within the gastrointestinal tract, where HSV most commonly affects the esophagus in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients. HSV proctitis is not uncommon and occurs primarily in males having sex with males. In patients with normal immune systems, gastrointestinal HSV infections are generally self-limited and rarely require antiviral therapy. Treatment of infection is suggested for immunocompromised patients, though no large randomized controlled trials have been performed. This article reviews the manifestations of HSV infection within the luminal gastrointestinal tract and options for diagnosis and treatment.

  1. Managing recurrent genital herpes with acyclovir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bedi T

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Seventy five patients of recurrent genital herpes (RGH treated with oral or topical acyclovir and placebo were compared and followed for periods ranging 4 to 8 years in a prospective study. Oral acyclovir definitely helps RGH patients; it shortens healing time; postpones recurrences and instills confidence in the patients. There is sufficient evidence that RGH dies a natural death with time as seen after 8 years follow up in placebo group patients. Topical use of acyclovir cream is not as useful as believed.

  2. Update on oral herpes virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniam, Ramesh; Kuperstein, Arthur S; Stoopler, Eric T

    2014-04-01

    Oral herpes virus infections (OHVIs) are among the most common mucosal disorders encountered by oral health care providers. These infections can affect individuals at any age, from infants to the elderly, and may cause significant pain and dysfunction. Immunosuppressed patients may be at increased risk for serious and potential life-threatening complications caused by OHVIs. Clinicians may have difficulty in diagnosing these infections because they can mimic other conditions of the oral mucosa. This article provides oral health care providers with clinically relevant information regarding etiopathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of OHVIs.

  3. Residues of the UL25 Protein of Herpes Simplex Virus That Are Required for Its Stable Interaction with Capsids ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Cockrell, Shelley K.; Huffman, Jamie B.; Toropova, Katerina; James F Conway; Homa, Fred L.

    2011-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) UL25 gene product is a minor capsid component that is required for encapsidation, but not cleavage, of replicated viral DNA. UL25 is located on the capsid surface in a proposed heterodimer with UL17, where five copies of the heterodimer are found at each of the capsid vertices. Previously, we demonstrated that amino acids 1 to 50 of UL25 are essential for its stable interaction with capsids. To further define the UL25 capsid binding domain, we generated reco...

  4. Psychology, replication & beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, Keith R

    2016-06-01

    Modern psychology is apparently in crisis and the prevailing view is that this partly reflects an inability to replicate past findings. If a crisis does exists, then it is some kind of 'chronic' crisis, as psychologists have been censuring themselves over replicability for decades. While the debate in psychology is not new, the lack of progress across the decades is disappointing. Recently though, we have seen a veritable surfeit of debate alongside multiple orchestrated and well-publicised replication initiatives. The spotlight is being shone on certain areas and although not everyone agrees on how we should interpret the outcomes, the debate is happening and impassioned. The issue of reproducibility occupies a central place in our whig history of psychology.

  5. Alphavirus vectors for cancer gene therapy (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Ryuya

    2004-04-01

    Alphaviruses have several characteristics that make them attractive as gene therapy vectors such as transient and high-level expression of a heterologous gene. Alphavirus vectors, Semliki Forest virus (SFV), Sindbis virus (SIN) and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) have been developed as gene expression vectors. Alphaviruses are positive-strand RNA viruses that can mediate efficient cytoplasmic gene expression in mammalian cells. The alphavirus RNA replication machinery has been engineered for high level heterologous gene expression. Since an RNA virus vector cannot integrate into chromosomal DNA, concerns about cell transformation are reduced. Alphavirus vectors demonstrate promise for the safe tumor-killing and tumor-specific immune responses. Recombinant alphavirus RNA replicons may facilitate gene therapy of cancer.

  6. Environmental risk assessment of replication competent viral vectors in gene therapy trials. Supplementary document: Overview of replication competent viral vectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akker HCM van den; SEC

    2008-01-01

    Het RIVM heeft een methode uitgewerkt waarmee de risico's voor mens en milieu van replicatiecompetente virussen als kankertherapie kunnen worden beoordeeld. Zo'n methode bestond nog niet. De verwachting is dat de risicobeoordeling, en daarmee de vergunningverlening, van klinische studi

  7. Inhibition of Indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO in Glioblastoma Cells by Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnie Reinhart

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Successful oncolytic virus treatment of malignant glioblastoma multiforme depends on widespread tumor-specific lytic virus replication and escape from mitigating innate immune responses to infection. Here we characterize a new HSV vector, JD0G, that is deleted for ICP0 and the joint sequences separating the unique long and short elements of the viral genome. We observed that JD0G replication was enhanced in certain glioblastoma cell lines compared to HEL cells, suggesting that a vector backbone deleted for ICP0 may be useful for treatment of glioblastoma. The innate immune response to virus infection can potentially impede oncolytic vector replication in human tumors. Indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO is expressed in response to interferon γ (IFNγ and has been linked to both antiviral functions and to the immune escape of tumor cells. We observed that IFNγ treatment of human glioblastoma cells induced the expression of IDO and that this expression was quelled by infection with both wild-type and JD0G viruses. The role of IDO in inhibiting virus replication and the connection of this protein to the escape of tumor cells from immune surveillance suggest that IDO downregulation by HSV infection may enhance the oncolytic activity of vectors such as JD0G.

  8. A mariner transposon vector adapted for mutagenesis in oral streptococci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Martin; Christiansen, Natalia; Høiby, Niels

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the construction and characterization of a mariner-based transposon vector designed for use in oral streptococci, but with a potential use in other Gram-positive bacteria. The new transposon vector, termed pMN100, contains the temperature-sensitive origin of replication rep...

  9. Recent approval of Xerese in Canada: 5% acyclovir and 1% hydrocortisone topical cream in the treatment of herpes labialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, H P; Stiegel, K R; Downing, C; Stiegel, K R

    2014-01-01

    Herpes labialis is a frequently occurring viral infection of the lips and oral mucosa. Recurring lesions are induced by viral reactivation and replication, but the symptoms leading to morbidity, such as pain and inflammation, are immune-mediated. The introduction of 5% acyclovir/1% hydrocortisone in a topical cream (Xerese™) represents a therapeutic strategy directed at both of these pathogenic processes. Applied at the onset of prodromal symptoms, this combination treatment has a good safety profile and is more effective in reducing healing time than antiviral or anti-inflammatory agents alone. Although it was US FDA-approved for herpes labialis in 2009, Xerese™ has only recently been approved for use in Canada in October 2013. Herein, we review the basic science and clinical studies that support the efficacy of this topical combination acyclovir-hydrocortisone product in treating herpes labialis and examine its safety profile, as well as touch upon other therapies that have been shown to be effective in treating this common viral condition.

  10. [Latent infection of human herpes virus in hematopoietic system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ke-Fu; Ma, Xiao-Tong; Zheng, Guo-Guang; Song, Yu-Hua

    2008-12-01

    Up to date, eight types of human herpes viruses have been identified, all of which are ubiquitous, and usually establish latent infection in the host after primary infection. Since most of the herpes viruses are maintained in an asymptomatic form, they are often neglected. However, under some circumstances, these herpes viruses can cause fatal or severe diseases. Furthermore, the association of herpes viruses with hematopoietic malignancies is attracting researchers' attention. With the extensive development of hematopoietic stem cell and organ transplantation, reports regarding transplantation failure and complication caused by infection of human herpes virus has been increasing. Cytokine storm was firstly suggested as the mechanism of graft-versus-host diseases. In recent years, which has also been applied in the pathogenesis research of inflammation, and is supposed to play an important role in severe virus infection. In this paper, through discussing the possible role of latent infection of human herpes virus in the failure or complication of bone marrow or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and in refractory leukemia, the function and significance of latent infection of human herpes virus and the cytokine storm it caused were investigated.

  11. Vector nematicons

    CERN Document Server

    Horikis, Theodoros P

    2016-01-01

    Families of soliton pairs, namely vector solitons, are found within the context of a coupled nonlocal nonlinear Schrodinger system of equations, as appropriate for modeling beam propagation in nematic liquid crystals. In the focusing case, bright soliton pairs have been found to exist provided their amplitudes satisfy a specific condition. In our analytical approach, focused on the defocusing regime, we rely on a multiscale expansion methods, which reveals the existence of dark-dark and antidark-antidark solitons, obeying an effective Korteweg-de Vries equation, as well as dark-bright solitons, obeying an effective Mel'nikov system. These pairs are discriminated by the sign of a constant that links all physical parameters of the system to the amplitude of the stable continuous wave solutions, and, much like the focusing case, the solitons' amplitudes are linked leading to mutual guiding.

  12. Striated muscle involvement in experimental oral infection by herpes simplex virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, María Inés; Sanjuan, Norberto A

    2013-07-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 is one of the most frequent causes of oral infection in humans, especially during early childhood. Several experimental models have been developed to study the pathogenesis of this virus but all of them employed adult animals. In this work, we developed an experimental model that uses mice younger than 4 days old, to more closely resemble human infection. Mice were infected subcutaneously with the prototype strain McIntyre of Herpes simplex-1, and the progression of infection was studied by immunoperoxidase. All animals died within 24-72 h post-infection, while viral antigens were found in the oral epithelium, nerves and brain. The most striking result was the finding of viral antigens in the nucleus and cytoplasm of cells belonging to striated muscles. Organotypic cultures of striated muscles were performed, and viral replication was observed in them by immunocytochemistry, electron microscopy and viral isolation. We conclude that the infection of striated muscles is present from the onset of oral infection and, eventually, could explain some clinical observations in humans.

  13. Specific Inhibition of Herpes Simplex Virus DNA Polymerase by Helical Peptides Corresponding to the Subunit Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digard, Paul; Williams, Kevin P.; Hensley, Preston; Brooks, Ian S.; Dahl, Charles E.; Coen, Donald M.

    1995-02-01

    The herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase consists of two subunits-a catalytic subunit and an accessory subunit, UL42, that increases processivity. Mutations affecting the extreme C terminus of the catalytic subunit specifically disrupt subunit interactions and ablate virus replication, suggesting that new antiviral drugs could be rationally designed to interfere with polymerase heterodimerization. To aid design, we performed circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and analytical ultracentrifugation studies, which revealed that a 36-residue peptide corresponding to the C terminus of the catalytic subunit folds into a monomeric structure with partial α-helical character. CD studies of shorter peptides were consistent with a model where two separate regions of α-helix interact to form a hairpin-like structure. The 36-residue peptide and a shorter peptide corresponding to the C-terminal 18 residues blocked UL42-dependent long-chain DNA synthesis at concentrations that had no effect on synthesis by the catalytic subunit alone or by calf thymus DNA polymerase δ and its processivity factor. These peptides, therefore, represent a class of specific inhibitors of herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase that act by blocking accessory-subunit-dependent synthesis. These peptides or their structures may form the basis for the synthesis of clinically effective drugs.

  14. Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 infection: overview on relevant clinico-pathological features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arduino, Paolo G; Porter, Stephen R

    2008-02-01

    Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) is a nuclear replicating enveloped virus, usually acquired through direct contact with infected lesions or body fluids (typically saliva). The prevalence of HSV-1 infection increases progressively from childhood, the seroprevalence being inversely related to socioeconomic background. Primary HSV-1 infections in children are either asymptomatic or following an incubation period of about 1 week gives rise to mucocutaneous vesicular eruptions. Herpetic gingivostomatitis typically affects the tongue, lips, gingival, buccal mucosa and the hard and soft palate. Most primary oro-facial HSV infection is caused by HSV-1, infection by HSV-2 is increasingly common. Recurrent infections, which occur at variable intervals, typically give rise to vesiculo-ulcerative lesions at mucocutaneous junctions particularly the lips (herpes labialis). Recurrent HSV-1 infection within the mouth is uncommon in otherwise healthy patients, although in immunocompromised patients, recurrent infection can be more extensive and/or aggressive. The diagnosis of common herpetic infection can usually be based upon the clinical history and presenting features. Confirmatory laboratory diagnosis is, however, required when patients are, or may be, immunocompromised.

  15. DNA replication origins in archaea

    OpenAIRE

    Zhenfang eWu; Jingfang eLiu; Haibo eYang; Hua eXiang

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication initiation, which starts at specific chromosomal site (known as replication origins), is the key regulatory stage of chromosome replication. Archaea, the third domain of life, use a single or multiple origin(s) to initiate replication of their circular chromosomes. The basic structure of replication origins is conserved among archaea, typically including an AT-rich unwinding region flanked by several conserved repeats (origin recognition box, ORB) that are located adjacent to ...

  16. Characterizing human herpes virus 6 following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perissinotti, Anthony J; Gulbis, Alison; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Howell, Joshua

    2015-04-01

    Human herpes virus 6 reactivation occurs in approximately 50% of patients following hematopoietic stem cell transplant, however, the significance of human herpes virus 6 reactivation remains uncertain. A retrospective study was conducted analyzing clinical data of patients testing positive for human herpes virus 6 by quantitative polymerase chain reaction following hematopoietic stem cell transplant from 1 January 1998 to 1 October 2011. Data retrieved were used to describe the clinical course and outcome of human herpes virus 6 positive hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients. Sixty patients were identified who tested positive for human herpes virus 6 by polymerase chain reaction following hematopoietic stem cell transplant. A high proportion of patients were identified in this cohort with acute myeloid leukemia (28.3%), active disease (65%), transplanted with a matched unrelated donor (30%), ≥ 1 antigen mismatched (28.3%) matched unrelated donor, or an umbilical cord graft (25%), and those who received antithymocyte globulin (42.4%). Thirty-eight (63.3%) patients were treated for human herpes virus 6 with foscarnet alone or in combination with intravenous immunoglobulin, whereas 18 (30%) did not require treatment survival at Day 100 was 73.3%. This study suggests human herpes virus 6 reactivation occurs shortly after hematopoietic stem cell transplant (median of 25 days (interquartile range, 20-31.75) after hematopoietic stem cell transplant). Many potential risk factors are described in this report. Treatment of human herpes virus 6 predominately consisted of foscarnet with or without intravenous immunoglobulin; however, treatment of human herpes virus 6 was not always warranted. Furthermore, the effect of treatment on patient outcomes is uncertain. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  17. [Pain in herpes zoster: Prevention and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Mosquera, G; González-Cal, A; Calvo-Rodríguez, D; Primucci, C Y; Plamenov-Dipchikov, P

    Shingles is a painful rash that results from reactivation of latent varicella-zoster virus in the dorsal root ganglia or cranial nerves. In this article an update is presented on the prevention and pharmacological treatment of the secondary pain from the virus infection. The most effective way to prevent post-herpetic neuralgia and its consequences is the prevention of herpes itself. A live attenuated vaccine (the Oka strain varicella zoster virus) has been available for several years, and is approved in adults aged 50 years old. Although this vaccine has shown to be effective against herpes zoster and post-herpetic neuralgia, its effectiveness decreases with age and is contraindicated in patients with some form of immunosuppression. Today the recombinant vaccines provide an alternative, and may be administered to immunocompromised persons. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Herpes simplex virus encephalitis in hamadan, iran.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Sabouri Ghannad

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Encephalitis can cause a severe public health problem. The main aim of this research was to evaluate the medical laboratory results of patients with Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV encephalitis.Diagnosis of encephalitis for these patients was firstly based on a clinical profile for Herpes Simplex Encephalitis (HSE, plus either a detected HSV1&2-DNA by PCR in CSF or brain neuro-imaging results.Molecular testing on CSF showed that 15 patients (15% had HSV infection, 5 patients (5% had Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV and one case was positive for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-RNA in CSF. The cause of encephalitis in 79 out of 100 patients (79% was unknown. The comparison of CSF analysis in HSV positives and negatives showed a significant increase of glucose and protein levels in HSV positives than negatives. The mortality rate was 46.6% (7/15 in patients with HSV encephalitis compared to 11.4% (10/85 in non-HSV encephalitis (P = 0.003.In the current study, 15% of cases were diagnosed as having HSV.

  19. Replication studies in longevity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varcasia, O; Garasto, S; Rizza, T

    2001-01-01

    In Danes we replicated the 3'APOB-VNTR gene/longevity association study previously carried out in Italians, by which the Small alleles (less than 35 repeats) had been identified as frailty alleles for longevity. In Danes, neither genotype nor allele frequencies differed between centenarians and 20...

  20. Replication-Fork Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duderstadt, Karl E.; Reyes-Lamothe, Rodrigo; van Oijen, Antoine M.; Sherratt, David J.

    2014-01-01

    The proliferation of all organisms depends on the coordination of enzymatic events within large multiprotein replisomes that duplicate chromosomes. Whereas the structure and function of many core replisome components have been clarified, the timing and order of molecular events during replication re

  1. Coronavirus Attachment and Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-28

    synthesis during RNA replication of vesicular stomatitis virus. J. Virol. 49:303-309. Pedersen, N.C. 1976a. Feline infectious peritonitis: Something old...receptors on intestinal brush border membranes from normal host species were developed for canine (CCV), feline (FIPV), porcine (TGEV), human (HCV...gastroenteritis receptor on pig BBMs ...... ................. ... 114 Feline infectious peritonitis virus receptor on cat BBMs ... .............. 117 Human

  2. Effects of morphine on replication of herpes simplex virus type 1 and 2

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2009-05-17

    May 17, 2009 ... antigens in infected cells in presence of morphine by immunoflourescent staining showed that after the ... viral infections in human and causes an extended range .... After dehydration in serial dilutions of ethanol, they were.

  3. Antiviral Activity of Hatay Propolis Against Replication of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 and Type 2

    OpenAIRE

    Yildirim, Ayse; Duran, Gulay Gulbol; DURAN, Nizami; Jenedi, Kemal; Bolgul, Behiye Sezgin; Miraloglu, Meral; MUZ, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Background Propolis is a bee product widely used in folk medicine and possessing many pharmacological properties. In this study we aimed to investigate: i) the antiviral activities of Hatay propolis samples against HSV-1 and HSV-2 in HEp-2 cell line, and ii) the presence of the synergistic effects of propolis with acyclovir against these viruses. Material/Methods All experiments were carried out in HEp-2 cell cultures. Proliferation assays were performed in 24-well flat bottom microplates. We...

  4. A case report of abdominal distention caused by herpes zoster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su-Rong Zhou; Chuan-Yu Liu

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal complications caused by herpes zoster are extremely rare.Here,we described a case of abdominal distention caused by herpes zoster.The patient was a 59-year-old female who suffered from unexplained paroxysmal and a burning pain on the right part of her waist and abdomen,accompanied by abdominal distention.Intestinal pseudo-obstruction was diagnosed by abdominal radiography.Distention of the right abdominal wall was still apparent after one month.In this report,we found that recovery from abdominal distention caused by herpes zoster is difficult and may require surgical intervention.

  5. The role of topical 5% acyclovir and 1% hydrocortisone cream (Xerese™) in the treatment of recurrent herpes simplex labialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Christopher M; Brunton, Stephen

    2010-09-01

    Recurrent herpes simplex labialis (HSL), also known as orofacial herpes or cold sores, is a common clinical presentation of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection. It may manifest as painful, distressing, and cosmetically displeasing vesicles on the lips, nose, and nasal septum. Although oral or topical treatment with antiviral agents can reduce the replication of HSV-1, the primary benefits of antiviral therapies for recurrent HSL have been limited to modest reductions in healing time; they do not mitigate the accompanying immune-mediated response of the host to the virus. The addition of a topical corticosteroid to an antiviral cream has been hypothesized to improve the clinical outcome of HSL by decreasing the HSV-related immune-mediated inflammatory skin reaction. A recently developed topical cream containing 5% acyclovir and 1% hydrocortisone (AHC) in a novel cream vehicle has been shown to be safe and effective for the early treatment of recurrent HSL in immunocompetent adult and adolescent patients. In a well-controlled clinical trial, AHC cream significantly reduced the frequency of both ulcerative and nonulcerative recurrences (ie, the prevention of vesicular HSL lesions). Treatment was well tolerated, and there was no evidence of emergence of viral resistance to acyclovir with the addition of hydrocortisone. The AHC cream significantly reduced the recurrence of ulcerative and nonulcerative HSL lesions and shortened healing time with early treatment compared with acyclovir 5% cream and vehicle (placebo) cream. Herpes simplex labialis may not typically be considered a serious medical condition; however, the importance of treating HSL should not be overlooked, considering the continuous increase of the viral pool in the general population and the potential psychological and social consequences of the condition when left untreated.

  6. Overview of gene delivery into cells using HSV-1-based vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neve, Rachael L

    2012-10-01

    This overview describes the considerations involved in the preparation and use of a herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) amplicon as a vector for gene transfer into neurons. Strategies for gene delivery into neurons, either to study the molecular biology of brain function or for gene therapy, must utilize vectors that persist stably in postmitotic cells and that can be targeted both spatially and temporally in the nervous system in vivo. This unit describes the biology of HSV-1 along with a discussion covering development of amplicon and genomic HSV-1 vectors. Advantages and disadvantages of current HSV-1 vectors are presented, and HSV-1 vectors are compared with other vectors for gene transfer into neurons.

  7. Inhibition of herpes simplex virus multiplication by activated macrophages: a role for arginase?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildy, P; Gell, P G; Rhodes, J; Newton, A

    1982-01-01

    Proteose-peptone-activated mouse macrophages can prevent productive infection by herpes simplex virus in neighboring cells in vitro whether or not those cells belong to the same animal species. The effect does not require contact between the macrophages and the infected cells, may be prevented by adding extra arginine to the medium, and may be reversed when extra arginine is added 24 h after the macrophages. Arginase activity was found both intracellularly and released from the macrophages. The extracellular enzyme is quite stable; 64% activity was found after 48 h of incubation at 37 degrees C in tissue culture medium. No evidence was found that the inefficiency of virus replication in macrophages was due to self-starvation by arginase. As might be predicted macrophages can, by the same mechanism, limit productive infection by vaccinia virus. PMID:6286497

  8. T Cell Receptor Signaling Pathways:New Targets for Herpes Simplex Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You-jia CAO; Ya-peng LI; Ying-chi ZHANG; Cui-zhu ZHANG

    2008-01-01

    Herpes simplex viruses (HSV-1 and HSV-2) cause global morbidity and synergistically correlate with HIV infection.HSV exists life-long in a latent form in sensory neurons with intermittent reactivation,in despite of host immune surveillance.While abundant evidence for HSV interfering with innate immune responses so as to favor the replication and propagation of the virus,several lines of evidence declare that HSV attenuates adaptive immunity by various mechanisms,including but not limited to the ablation of antigen presentation,induction of apoptosis,and interruption of cellular signaling.In this review,we will focus on the perturbative role of HSV in Tcells signaling.

  9. Herpes simplex and human papillomavirus genital infections: controversy over obstetric management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, N G; Adelson, M D

    1990-12-01

    Plasma inhibitory factors, high levels of sex hormones, and depression of cell-mediated immunity may interfere with the natural host resistance to viral infections during pregnancy. It is apparent that hormonal, immunologic, and vascular changes in pregnancy may account for increased replication of herpes and for enhanced growth of condylomatous lesions. The challenge is to develop a rational plan of management for pregnant patients with herpes simplex or human papilloma virus infection. There has been a reevaluation of previous recommendations for the management of herpes in pregnancy. Although the consequences of neonatal infection are severe or fatal, the value of routine weekly screening is questionable. This regimen is a poor predictor of neonatal exposure to herpes since only one fourth of women shedding virus at the time of delivery can be identified by routine cultures. The mode of delivery should therefore be based on the presence or absence of lesions at the time of confinement. Cesarean section should be reserved for patients with lesions or with prodromal symptoms of recurrent disease at the time of delivery. Patients with ruptured membranes and active genital lesions should also be delivered by cesarean section. The spectrum of HPV-related diseases in pregnancy is poorly understood. Many questions remain unanswered. It may not be practical to treat very large or extensive genital warts during pregnancy. A cesarean section may be the best choice in these cases. It may be premature to recommend cesarean section for delivery of all pregnant women with symptomatic genital HPV infection. More data are needed. We recommend laser ablation of condylomatous lesions when discovered during pregnancy. Laser vaporization is associated with minimal morbidity when used by experienced surgeons. Trichloroacetic acid is excellent for minimal disease or for treatment of recurrences in pregnancy. Since the immune system seems to play an important role in control of viral

  10. Baculovirus DNA replication.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kool, M.

    1994-01-01

    Baculoviruses are attractive biological agents for the control of insect pests. They are highly specific for insects and cause a fatal disease (Granados and Federici, 1986). in addition, baculoviruses are successfully exploited as expression vectors for the production of heterologous proteins for va

  11. Further Characterization of the UL37 Protein of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 and its Interaction with ICP8, the Major DNA-Binding Protein of Herpes Simplex Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Diseases Produced by Herpes Simplex Viruses Disease Gingivostomatitis Pha ryngotonsill itis Herpes labialis Genital herpes Primary (P) or Recurrent... herpes simplex labialis : experimental induction of lesions with UV light. J. Clin. Micro. 22:366-368. Stanberry, L.R. 1986. Herpesvirus latency and...UL37 Protein of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 and its Interaction with [CPS, the Major DNA~Binding Protein of Herpes Simplex Virus" beyond brief

  12. The herpes simplex virus 2 UL21 protein is essential for virus propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Sage, Valerie; Jung, Masany; Alter, Jake D; Wills, Elizabeth G; Johnston, Susan M; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Baines, Joel D; Banfield, Bruce W

    2013-05-01

    Herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) is an important human pathogen that is the major cause of genital herpes infections and a significant contributor to the epidemic spread of human immunodeficiency virus infections. The UL21 gene is conserved throughout the Alphaherpesvirinae subfamily and encodes a tegument protein that is dispensable for HSV-1 and pseudorabies virus replication in cultured cells; however, its precise functions have not been determined. To investigate the role of UL21 in the HSV-2 replicative cycle, we constructed a UL21 deletion virus (HSV-2 ΔUL21) using an HSV-2 bacterial artificial chromosome, pYEbac373. HSV-2 ΔUL21 was unable to direct the production of infectious virus in noncomplementing cells, whereas the repaired HSV-2 ΔUL21 strain grew to wild-type (WT) titers, indicating that UL21 is essential for virus propagation. Cells infected with HSV-2 ΔUL21 demonstrated a 2-h delay in the kinetics of immediate early viral gene expression. However, this delay in gene expression was not responsible for the inability of cells infected with HSV-2 ΔUL21 to produce virus insofar as late viral gene products accumulated to WT levels by 24 h postinfection (hpi). Electron and fluorescence microscopy studies indicated that DNA-containing capsids formed in the nuclei of ΔUL21-infected cells, while significantly reduced numbers of capsids were located in the cytoplasm late in infection. Taken together, these data indicate that HSV-2 UL21 has an early function that facilitates viral gene expression as well as a late essential function that promotes the egress of capsids from the nucleus.

  13. Biosafety features of lentiviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schambach, Axel; Zychlinski, Daniela; Ehrnstroem, Birgitta; Baum, Christopher

    2013-02-01

    Over the past decades, lentiviral vectors have evolved as a benchmark tool for stable gene transfer into cells with a high replicative potential. Their relatively flexible genome and ability to transduce many forms of nondividing cells, combined with the potential for cell-specific pseudotyping, provides a rich resource for numerous applications in experimental platforms and therapeutic settings. Here, we give an overview of important biosafety features of lentiviral vectors, with detailed discussion of (i) the principles of the lentiviral split-genome design used for the construction of packaging cells; (ii) the relevance of modifications introduced into the lentiviral long terminal repeat (deletion of enhancer/promoter sequences and introduction of insulators); (iii) the basic features of mRNA processing, including the Rev/Rev-responsive element (RRE) interaction and the modifications of the 3' untranslated region of lentiviral vectors with various post-transcriptional regulatory elements affecting transcriptional termination, polyadenylation, and differentiation-specific degradation of mRNA; and (iv) the characteristic integration pattern with the associated risk of transcriptional interference with cellular genes. We conclude with considerations regarding the importance of cell targeting via envelope modifications. Along this course, we address canonical biosafety issues encountered with any type of viral vector: the risks of shedding, mobilization, germline transmission, immunogenicity, and insertional mutagenesis.

  14. Reversible Switching of Cooperating Replicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urtel, Georg C.; Rind, Thomas; Braun, Dieter

    2017-02-01

    How can molecules with short lifetimes preserve their information over millions of years? For evolution to occur, information-carrying molecules have to replicate before they degrade. Our experiments reveal a robust, reversible cooperation mechanism in oligonucleotide replication. Two inherently slow replicating hairpin molecules can transfer their information to fast crossbreed replicators that outgrow the hairpins. The reverse is also possible. When one replication initiation site is missing, single hairpins reemerge from the crossbreed. With this mechanism, interacting replicators can switch between the hairpin and crossbreed mode, revealing a flexible adaptation to different boundary conditions.

  15. Reactivation of herpes simplex virus-1 following epilepsy surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Monteiro de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The authors stress the potential risk of reactivation of HSV encephalitis after intracranial surgery. Herpes simplex virus encephalitis must be considered in neurosurgical patients who develop postoperative seizures and fever.

  16. Multiplex PCR for identification of herpes virus infections in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durzyńska, Julia; Pacholska-Bogalska, Joanna; Kaczmarek, Maria; Hanć, Tomasz; Durda, Magdalena; Skrzypczak, Magdalena; Goździcka-Józefiak, Anna

    2011-02-01

    The aim of the study was to develop a multiplex PCR (mPCR) for a rapid and simultaneous detection of herpes simplex 1 (HSV-1), herpes simplex 2 (HSV-2), and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) DNA in squamous oral cells obtained from adolescents. Accuracy of the method was tested in a group of 513 adolescents, almost 11% of subjects were positive for infection with herpes viruses. Correlations with gender, age, and place of residence were sought. A similar incidence of HSV-2 and HCMV was found (4.3% and 5.4%, respectively) and the incidence of HSV-1 was the lowest (1%) in the study group. Conversely to HSV-2, HCMV was detected mostly in the youngest individuals. The same occurrence of all viruses was observed in boys and girls. The mPCR method described is suggested as a useful tool for epidemiologic studies of active herpes infections.

  17. Oral shedding of herpes simplex virus type 2

    OpenAIRE

    Wald, A; Ericsson, M.; Krantz, E; Selke, S; Corey, L

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: Herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 and HSV-2 reactivate preferentially in the oral and genital area, respectively. We aimed to define frequency and characteristics associated with oral shedding of HSV-2.

  18. Maternal herpes labialis in pregnancy and neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nørgård, Bente; Nørgaard, Mette; Czeizel, Andrew E; Puhó, Erzsébet; Sørensen, Henrik T

    2006-08-01

    According to previous case reports, some congenital abnormalities (CAs) of the brain, such as microcephaly, are a result of intrauterine herpes simplex virus infection. A population-based case-control study was conducted to determine the risk of neural tube defects (NTDs) after maternal herpes labialis infection during pregnancy. Data were taken from the Hungarian Case-Control Surveillance of Congenital Abnormalities from 1980 to 1996, which included 1202 children with NTDs and 21641 comparison children with CAs other than NTDs. The adjusted relative risks (odds ratio [OR]) for NTDs associated with maternal herpes labialis in the first trimester of pregnancy was OR 1.19 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.68-2.06), and in the entire pregnancy was OR 0.94 (95% CI 0.61-1.44). Self-reported maternal herpes labialis during pregnancy was not associated with a substantially increased risk of NTDs in infants.

  19. Genital Herpes Vaccine Shows Promise in Animal Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 163137.html Genital Herpes Vaccine Shows Promise in Animal Trials Two-pronged approach tested on lab monkeys, guinea ... vaccines have not shown very robust protection in animal and human trials. Friedman and his colleagues decided that an effective ...

  20. Herpes zoster on the face in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Preeti; Gharote, Harshkant; Singh, Pooja; Jain-Choudhary, Palak

    2014-10-19

    Herpes zoster is a localised disease caused by reactivation of the varicella zoster virus that enters the cutaneous nerve endings during an earlier episode of chicken pox, travels to the dorsal root ganglia, and remains in latent form. The condition is characterised by occurrence of multiple, painful, unilateral vesicles and ulceration, and shows a typical single dermatome innervated by single dorsal root or cranial sensory ganglion. Involvement of three or more dermatomes is known as disseminated zoster and seen in immunocompromised individuals. Complications of herpes zoster include ocular sequelae, bacterial superinfection of the lesions, meningoencephalitis and postherpetic neuralgia. The incidence of herpes zoster increases with age and immunosuppression, therefore prompt management is necessary to avoid morbidity and mortality in these individuals. We present two case reports of herpes zoster, one involving the maxillary and mandibular branches of the trigeminal nerve while the other involves all branches of the trigeminal nerve.

  1. Herpes zoster on segmental vitiligo: Wolf’s isotopic response?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mankesh Lal Gambhir

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available “Wolf’s isotopic response” describes the occurrence of a new skin disorder at the site of another, unrelated and already healed skin disease. In most cases of isotopic response, the initial dermatosis is herpes zoster, herpes simplex, varicella, thrombophlebitis, scrofuloderma and striae distense. The most frequent second dermatoses are granulomatous reactions, particularly granuloma annulare, and lichenoid diseases. Various etiological reasons including viral, immunologic, neural and vascular have been put forth. We report here a case in which the second disease was herpes zoster that appeared over the same dermatomes of pre-existing segmental vitiligo. The occurrence of vitiligo as first and herpes zoster as second disease in the “Wolf’s isotopic response” has not, to the best of our knowledge, been reported previously.

  2. Recurrent herpes zoster with segmental paresis and postherpetic neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martić Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Postherpetic neuralgia and segmental paresis represent rare complications of herpes zoster infection. Recurrent herpes zoster is also rare and occurs within the first 3 years of the begining of the illness in only 1.4% of cases but it is generally higher in cases of chronic lymphatic leukemia (3.5%. Case report. We presented a patient with lymphatic leukemia who during the remission had 3 episodes of herpes zoster over a year. All of them took different parts of the body. One of these episodes was complicated by postherpetic neuralgia and segmental paresis. A complete recovery was seen in all the three episodes. Conclusion. As immunosuppression is one of mechanisms of virus reactivation, it is likely associated with the described rare complications of herpes zoster.

  3. Joint capsule treatment with enkephalin-encoding HSV-1 recombinant vector reduces inflammatory damage and behavioural sequelae in rat CFA monoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ying; McNearney, Terry A; Wilson, Steven P; Yeomans, David C; Westlund, Karin N

    2008-03-01

    This study assessed enkephalin expression induced by intra-articular application of recombinant, enkephalin-encoding herpes virus (HSV-1) and the impact of expression on nociceptive behaviours and synovial lining inflammation in arthritic rats. Replication-conditional HSV-1 recombinant vectors with cDNA encoding preproenkephalin (HSV-ENK), or control transgene beta-galactosidase cDNA (HSV-beta-gal; control) were injected into knee joints with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). Joint temperatures, circumferences and nociceptive behaviours were monitored on days 0, 7, 14 and 21 post CFA and vector treatments. Lumbar (L4-6) dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and spinal cords were immunostained for met-enkephalin (met-ENK), beta-gal, HSV-1 proteins and Fos. Joint tissues were immunostained for met-ENK, HSV-1 proteins, and inflammatory mediators Regulated on Activation, Normal T-cell Expressed and Secreted (RANTES) and cyclo-oxygenase-2, or stained with haematoxylin and eosin for histopathology. Compared to exuberant synovial hypertrophy and inflammatory cell infiltration seen in arthritic rats treated with CFA only or CFA and HSV-beta-gal, the CFA- and HSV-ENK-treated arthritic rats had: (i) striking preservation of synovial membrane cytoarchitecture with minimal inflammatory cell infiltrates; (ii) significantly improved nociceptive behavioural responses to mechanical and thermal stimuli; (iii) normalized Fos staining in lumbar dorsal horn; and (iv) significantly increased met-ENK staining in ipsilateral synovial tissue, lumbar DRG and spinal cord. The HSV-1 and transgene product expression were confined to ipsilateral lumbar DRG (HSV-1, met-ENK, beta-gal). Only transgene product (met-ENK and beta-gal) was seen in lumbar spinal cord sections. Targeted delivery of enkephalin-encoding HSV-1 vector generated safe, sustained opioid-induced analgesia with protective anti-inflammatory blunting in rat inflammatory arthritis.

  4. Noninvasive visualization of adenovirus replication with a fluorescent reporter in the E3 region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Hidetaka A; Le, Long P; Davydova, Julia G; Gavrikova, Tatyana; Yamamoto, Masato

    2005-11-15

    To overcome the inefficacy and undesirable side effects of current cancer treatment strategies, conditionally replicative adenoviruses have been developed to exploit the unique mechanism of oncolysis afforded by tumor-specific viral replication. Despite rapid translation into clinical trials and the established safety of oncolytic adenoviruses, the in vivo function of these agents is not well understood due to lack of a noninvasive detection system for adenovirus replication. To address this issue, we propose the expression of a reporter from the adenovirus E3 region as a means to monitor replication. Adenovirus replication reporter vectors were constructed with the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene placed in the deleted E3 region under the control of the adenoviral major late promoter while retaining expression of the adenovirus death protein to conserve the native oncolytic capability of the virus. Strong EGFP fluorescence was detected from these vectors in a replication-dependent manner, which correlated with viral DNA replication. Fluorescence imaging in vivo confirmed the ability to noninvasively detect fluorescent signal during replication, which generally corresponded with the underlying level of viral DNA replication. EGFP representation of viral replication was further confirmed by Western blot comparison with the viral DNA content in the tumors. Imaging reporter expression controlled by the adenoviral major late promoter provides a viable approach to noninvasively monitor adenovirus replication in preclinical studies and has the potential for human application with clinically relevant imaging reporters.

  5. [Immunopathological findings in herpes gestationis (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, R; Wolff, H H; Braun-Falco, O

    1977-08-12

    Herpes gestationis occurred in a 26-year-old woman during the last weeks of her second pregnancy. Within 8 days of the delivery the disease had progressed to such an extent that systemic treatment became necessary. Whereas pre-delivery treatment had consisted exclusively of local desinfection, and steroid and antibiotic ointments, treatment after delivery also included systemic use of prednisolone. After treatment for 3 weeks the skin changes had disappeared except for minimal pigmentation. Using immunofluorescent microscopy a complement activation in the dermo-epidermal junction and in adjacent clinically healthy skin could be demonstrated: There were massive linear depositions of C3, C1q and C4. In the basal membrane of the epidermis IgM could be demonstrated as an unusual finding. Further immunopathological features were found in the form of an immune complex vasculitis which could be shown during the active phase of the disease.

  6. Herpes zoster ophthalmicus associated with abducens palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nibrass Chaker

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The extraocular muscle palsies associated with herpes zoster ophthalmicus (HZO are transient, self-limiting conditions, usually seen in elderly patients. There are different treatment recommendations for paralytic complications, but prognosis has generally reported to be favorable. A 75-year-old male patient presented with diplopia. Clinical history revealed left facial vesicular eruptions and pain treated by oral aciclovir 1 week following symptom onset. On examination, we observed cicatricial lesions with crusts involving left hemiface, a limitation in abduction of the left eye, and a superficial punctuate keratitis (SPK with decreased visual acuity (4/10. Examination of the right eye was unremarkable. Hess screen test confirmed left six nerve palsy.

  7. [Herpes zoster-induced neuralgia (neuropathy)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimova, M Yu; Sineva, N A; Vodopyanov, N P

    2014-01-01

    Neuralgia (neuropathy) is the most common manifestation of herpes zoster (HZ). In spinal and cranial neuralgia, there are 3 types of pain: 1) spontaneous, persistent, burning pain; 2) intermittent sharp pain; 3) pain occurring with nonpainful stimulation. The skin exhibits areas of hypesthesia, anesthesia, and dysesthesia. Ophthalmic neuralgia (of the first branch of the trigeminal nerve) is encountered in 20% of HZ cases. HZ of the auricle and external auditory meatus concurrent with facial and vestibulocochlear neuropathy is diagnosed as Ramsay Hunt syndrome. Postherpetic neuralgia (neuropathy) is characterized by pain present for 3 months or more after the appearance of herpetic eruptions. Combined therapy involving the earlier use of antiviral agents, tricyclic antidepressants, analgesics, and neuromidine is the most effective option for HZ-induced neuralgia (neuropathy).

  8. Newer trends in the management of genital herpes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nath Amiya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of genital herpes is complex. Apart from using the standard antivirals, an ideal management protocol also needs to address various aspects of the disease, including the psychological morbidity. Oral acyclovir, valacyclovir or famciclovir are recommended for routine use. Long-term suppressive therapy is effective in reducing the number of recurrences and the risk of transmission to others. Severe or disseminated disease may require intravenous therapy. Resistant cases are managed with foscarnet or cidofovir. Genital herpes in human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals usually needs a longer duration of antiviral therapy along with continuation of highly active anti retroviral therapy (HAART. Genital herpes in late pregnancy increases the risk of neonatal herpes. Antiviral therapy and/or cesarean delivery are indicated depending on the clinical circumstance. Acyclovir appears to be safe in pregnancy. But, there is limited data regarding the use of valacyclovir and famciclovir in pregnancy. Neonatal herpes requires a higher dose of acyclovir given intravenously for a longer duration. Management of the sex partner, counseling and prevention advice are equally important in appropriate management of genital herpes. Vaccines till date have been marginally effective. Helicase-primase inhibitors, needle-free mucosal vaccine and a new microbicide product named VivaGel may become promising treatment options in the future.

  9. Chromatin replication and epigenome maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alabert, Constance; Groth, Anja

    2012-01-01

    initiates, whereas the replication process itself disrupts chromatin and challenges established patterns of genome regulation. Specialized replication-coupled mechanisms assemble new DNA into chromatin, but epigenome maintenance is a continuous process taking place throughout the cell cycle. If DNA...

  10. Chromatin replication and epigenome maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alabert, Constance; Groth, Anja

    2012-01-01

    initiates, whereas the replication process itself disrupts chromatin and challenges established patterns of genome regulation. Specialized replication-coupled mechanisms assemble new DNA into chromatin, but epigenome maintenance is a continuous process taking place throughout the cell cycle. If DNA...

  11. Baculovirus DNA replication.

    OpenAIRE

    Kool, M.

    1994-01-01

    Baculoviruses are attractive biological agents for the control of insect pests. They are highly specific for insects and cause a fatal disease (Granados and Federici, 1986). in addition, baculoviruses are successfully exploited as expression vectors for the production of heterologous proteins for various applications (Luckow and Summers, 1988; Luckow, 1991). In both cases large-scale systems for the production of baculoviruses are important. Production in insect larvae is difficult to scale u...

  12. Initiation of adenovirus DNA replication.

    OpenAIRE

    Reiter, T; Fütterer, J; Weingärtner, B; Winnacker, E L

    1980-01-01

    In an attempt to study the mechanism of initiation of adenovirus DNA replication, an assay was developed to investigate the pattern of DNA synthesis in early replicative intermediates of adenovirus DNA. By using wild-type virus-infected cells, it was possible to place the origin of adenovirus type 2 DNA replication within the terminal 350 to 500 base pairs from either of the two molecular termini. In addition, a variety of parameters characteristic of adenovirus DNA replication were compared ...

  13. Chromatin replication and epigenome maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alabert, Constance; Groth, Anja

    2012-01-01

    Stability and function of eukaryotic genomes are closely linked to chromatin structure and organization. During cell division the entire genome must be accurately replicated and the chromatin landscape reproduced on new DNA. Chromatin and nuclear structure influence where and when DNA replication...... initiates, whereas the replication process itself disrupts chromatin and challenges established patterns of genome regulation. Specialized replication-coupled mechanisms assemble new DNA into chromatin, but epigenome maintenance is a continuous process taking place throughout the cell cycle. If DNA...

  14. Association between recent herpes zoster but not herpes simplex infection and subsequent risk of malignancy in women: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buntinx, F; Bartholomeeusen, S; Belmans, A; Mathei, C; Opdenakker, G; Sweldens, K; Truyers, C; Van Ranst, M

    2014-05-01

    The association between herpes zoster and subsequent cancer risk is still unclear. Consequently, doubts remain regarding the need for investigation of herpes patients for co-existing or subsequent malignancy. This is a retrospective cohort study comparing cancer risk in patients after herpes zoster and age-/sex-matched non-herpes zoster patients, in a primary care-based continuous morbidity database. We tested for interaction by gender, age, diabetes, HRT use or antiviral therapy. Analyses were repeated for patients with and without herpes simplex. The hazard ratio (HR) comparing cancer risk in herpes zoster vs. control patients was significant in all women, women aged > 65 years and subgroups of breast and colorectal cancer (HRs 1·60, 1·82, 2·14, 2·19, respectively). For men, a significant association was found for haematological cancers (HR 2·92). No associations were found with herpes simplex. No interaction was identified with antiviral therapy, diabetes or HRT treatment. We concluded that there was a moderate significant association between herpes zoster and subsequent cancer risk in women aged > 65 years, without any influence of antiviral therapy. No association was found with herpes simplex. There is insufficient reason for extensively testing older patients with herpes zoster or herpes simplex for the presence of occult cancer.

  15. Replication Research and Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travers, Jason C.; Cook, Bryan G.; Therrien, William J.; Coyne, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Replicating previously reported empirical research is a necessary aspect of an evidence-based field of special education, but little formal investigation into the prevalence of replication research in the special education research literature has been conducted. Various factors may explain the lack of attention to replication of special education…

  16. Replication Research and Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travers, Jason C.; Cook, Bryan G.; Therrien, William J.; Coyne, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Replicating previously reported empirical research is a necessary aspect of an evidence-based field of special education, but little formal investigation into the prevalence of replication research in the special education research literature has been conducted. Various factors may explain the lack of attention to replication of special education…

  17. Replication data collection highlights value in diversity of replication attempts

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSoto, K. Andrew; Schweinsberg, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Researchers agree that replicability and reproducibility are key aspects of science. A collection of Data Descriptors published in Scientific Data presents data obtained in the process of attempting to replicate previously published research. These new replication data describe published and unpublished projects. The different papers in this collection highlight the many ways that scientific replications can be conducted, and they reveal the benefits and challenges of crucial replication research. The organizers of this collection encourage scientists to reuse the data contained in the collection for their own work, and also believe that these replication examples can serve as educational resources for students, early-career researchers, and experienced scientists alike who are interested in learning more about the process of replication. PMID:28291224

  18. Association of interferon lambda-1 with herpes simplex viruses-1 and -2, Epstein-Barr virus, and human cytomegalovirus in chronic periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzammil; Jayanthi, D; Faizuddin, Mohamed; Noor Ahamadi, H M

    2017-05-01

    Periodontal tissues facilitate the homing of herpes viruses that elicit the immune-inflammatory response releasing the interferons (IFN). IFN lambda-1 (λ1) can suppress the replication of viruses, and induces the antiviral mechanism. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between IFN-λ1 and periodontal herpes viruses in the immunoregulation of chronic periodontal disease. The cross-sectional study design included 30 chronic periodontitis patients with a mean age of 42.30 ± 8.63 years. Gingival crevicular fluid collected was assessed for IFN-λ1 using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and four herpes viruses were detected using multiplex polymerase chain reaction technique. IFN-λ1 levels were compared between virus-positive and -negative patients for individual and total viruses. Fifty per cent (n = 15) of patients were positive for the four herpes viruses together; 50% (n = 15), 30% (n = 9), 26.7% (n = 8), and 40% (n = 12) were positive for herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1, Epstein-Barr virus, HSV-2, and human cytomegalovirus, respectively. The mean concentrations of IFN-λ1 in virus-positive patients (14.38 ± 13.95) were lower than those of virus-negative patients (228.26 ± 215.35). INF-λ1 levels in individual virus groups were also lower in virus-positive patients compared to virus-negative patients, with P < 0.001. These results suggest that IFN-λ1 could have antiviral and therapeutic value against the viruses in the pathogenesis of chronic periodontitis. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Early steps of retrovirus replicative cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saïb Ali

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During the last two decades, the profusion of HIV research due to the urge to identify new therapeutic targets has led to a wealth of information on the retroviral replication cycle. However, while the late stages of the retrovirus life cycle, consisting of virus replication and egress, have been partly unraveled, the early steps remain largely enigmatic. These early steps consist of a long and perilous journey from the cell surface to the nucleus where the proviral DNA integrates into the host genome. Retroviral particles must bind specifically to their target cells, cross the plasma membrane, reverse-transcribe their RNA genome, while uncoating the cores, find their way to the nuclear membrane and penetrate into the nucleus to finally dock and integrate into the cellular genome. Along this journey, retroviruses hijack the cellular machinery, while at the same time counteracting cellular defenses. Elucidating these mechanisms and identifying which cellular factors are exploited by the retroviruses and which hinder their life cycle, will certainly lead to the discovery of new ways to inhibit viral replication and to improve retroviral vectors for gene transfer. Finally, as proven by many examples in the past, progresses in retrovirology will undoubtedly also provide some priceless insights into cell biology.

  20. MicroRNA-649 promotes HSV-1 replication by directly targeting MALT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Dai, Jun; Tang, Jinfeng; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Mengzhou

    2016-11-03

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), a member of the Herpes viridae, is associated with a wide variety of nervous system diseases including meningitis and encephalitis. The data presented here demonstrate that miR-649 promotes the replication of HSV-1 without affecting cell viability. Further mechanistic studies revealed that MALT1 (mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation gene 1) is directly targeted by miR-649. We then found that MALT1 and the downstream NF-κB signaling pathway, are involved in miR-649-induced HSV-1 replication. Interestingly, miR-649 levels were downregulated after HSV-1 infection, and miR-649 expression was negatively associated with MALT1 expression in HSV-1-infected HeLa cells. Taken together, this present study indicates that miR-649 promotes HSV-1 replication through regulation of the MALT1-mediated antiviral signaling pathway and suggests a promising target for antiviral therapies. J. Med. Virol. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Anatomy of Mammalian Replication Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takebayashi, Shin-ichiro; Ogata, Masato; Okumura, Katsuzumi

    2017-01-01

    Genetic information is faithfully copied by DNA replication through many rounds of cell division. In mammals, DNA is replicated in Mb-sized chromosomal units called “replication domains.” While genome-wide maps in multiple cell types and disease states have uncovered both dynamic and static properties of replication domains, we are still in the process of understanding the mechanisms that give rise to these properties. A better understanding of the molecular basis of replication domain regulation will bring new insights into chromosome structure and function. PMID:28350365

  2. Location and cloning of the herpes simplex virus type 2 thymidine kinase gene.

    OpenAIRE

    McDougall, J K; Masse, T H; Galloway, D A

    1980-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 2 thymidine kinase gene has been mapped to a position colinear with the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase gene and cloned within a 4.0-kilobase fragment in pBR 322.

  3. Rotations with Rodrigues' Vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pina, E.

    2011-01-01

    The rotational dynamics was studied from the point of view of Rodrigues' vector. This vector is defined here by its connection with other forms of parametrization of the rotation matrix. The rotation matrix was expressed in terms of this vector. The angular velocity was computed using the components of Rodrigues' vector as coordinates. It appears…

  4. Modeling inhomogeneous DNA replication kinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel G Gauthier

    Full Text Available In eukaryotic organisms, DNA replication is initiated at a series of chromosomal locations called origins, where replication forks are assembled proceeding bidirectionally to replicate the genome. The distribution and firing rate of these origins, in conjunction with the velocity at which forks progress, dictate the program of the replication process. Previous attempts at modeling DNA replication in eukaryotes have focused on cases where the firing rate and the velocity of replication forks are homogeneous, or uniform, across the genome. However, it is now known that there are large variations in origin activity along the genome and variations in fork velocities can also take place. Here, we generalize previous approaches to modeling replication, to allow for arbitrary spatial variation of initiation rates and fork velocities. We derive rate equations for left- and right-moving forks and for replication probability over time that can be solved numerically to obtain the mean-field replication program. This method accurately reproduces the results of DNA replication simulation. We also successfully adapted our approach to the inverse problem of fitting measurements of DNA replication performed on single DNA molecules. Since such measurements are performed on specified portion of the genome, the examined DNA molecules may be replicated by forks that originate either within the studied molecule or outside of it. This problem was solved by using an effective flux of incoming replication forks at the model boundaries to represent the origin activity outside the studied region. Using this approach, we show that reliable inferences can be made about the replication of specific portions of the genome even if the amount of data that can be obtained from single-molecule experiments is generally limited.

  5. Focused review: neuraxial morphine and oral herpes reactivation in the obstetric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauchat, Jeanette R

    2010-11-01

    Neuraxial morphine administration is a common strategy for providing postcesarean delivery analgesia. Morphine delivered via this route increases the risk of herpes labialis (oral herpes) reactivation, a disease common in women of childbearing age. A primary concern is risk of transmission to the neonate from maternal reactivation. The benefits to the mother of this form of analgesia outweigh the risk of neonatal herpes acquired postpartum from maternal recurrence because serious neonatal morbidity from recurrent herpes has not been described.

  6. Cold Sore, Cold Soul? An Examination of Orolabial Herpes in Film

    OpenAIRE

    Holliday, Alex C.; Salih, Amanda; Wagner, Richard F.Jr.

    2014-01-01

    [EN] The sociocultural phenomenon of herpes is attributed to two strains of the herpes simplex virus: herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) causes orolabial cold sores while herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is typically identified in genital lesions, though both viruses may cause clinically similar signs and symptoms anywhere in or on the body. While these infections are extremely prevalent and typically benign, media sources such as film have perpetuated a negative public percep...

  7. Tumores perianais provocados pelo herpes simples Perianal tumors provoked by herpes simplex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidney Roberto Nadal

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available O Herpes simplex (HSV é um DNA vírus que provoca afecções perianais, sendo considerada a causa mais comum das úlceras na região. Apesar da forma ulcerativa ser a mais conhecida, a literatura relata o aparecimento de lesões tumorais, nodulares ou hipertróficas relacionadas ao vírus. O exame proctológico mostra tumores dolorosos, achatados, com superfície recoberta por ulceração rasa e com bordas bem delimitadas, elevadas e lobuladas, localizados na margem anal e/ou no sulco interglúteo, algumas vezes imitando condilomas virais ou carcinoma. A anamnese revela instalação insidiosa com crescimento lento e progressivo, além da história de tratamentos anteriores para úlceras herpéticas. O diagnóstico diferencial com carcinoma impõe a realização de biópsia para confirmação histológica. Esse exame revela hiperplasia epitelial moderada e denso processo inflamatório com linfócitos e plasmócitos. Células gigantes e multinucleadas são observadas na epiderme. Os testes imunohistoquímicos sugerem o HSV. A opção terapêutica inicial deve ser o tratamento medicamentoso. Importante definir o diagnóstico etiológico para aliviar o desconforto e evitar operação radical desnecessária, e introduzir medicação anti-retroviral nos portadores do HIV para melhora da imunidade.Herpes simplex is a DNA virus which provokes perianal lesions, and it is the most frequent etiology of anal ulcer. Despite the ulcerative herpes being known worldwide, literature relates a tumoral, or nodular, or hypertrophic form related to this virus. Proctological examination showed nodules with a verrucous appearance and an ulcerated surface at the anal margin, sometimes mimicking viral condylomas or carcinomas. Anamnesis reveals insidious installation, slow growth and prior treatments for herpetic ulcers. The differential diagnoses with cancer allow us to perform biopsies for histological confirmation. This exam reveals mild epithelial hyperplasia and

  8. Plasmid P1 replication: negative control by repeated DNA sequences.

    OpenAIRE

    Chattoraj, D; Cordes, K.; Abeles, A

    1984-01-01

    The incompatibility locus, incA, of the unit-copy plasmid P1 is contained within a fragment that is essentially a set of nine 19-base-pair repeats. One or more copies of the fragment destabilizes the plasmid when present in trans. Here we show that extra copies of incA interfere with plasmid DNA replication and that a deletion of most of incA increases plasmid copy number. Thus, incA is not essential for replication but is required for its control. When cloned in a high-copy-number vector, pi...

  9. Antivirals reduce the formation of key Alzheimer's disease molecules in cell cultures acutely infected with herpes simplex virus type 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A Wozniak

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD afflicts around 20 million people worldwide and so there is an urgent need for effective treatment. Our research showing that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1 is a risk factor for AD for the brains of people who possess a specific genetic factor and that the virus causes accumulation of key AD proteins (β-amyloid (Aβ and abnormally phosphorylated tau (P-tau, suggests that anti-HSV1 antiviral agents might slow AD progression. However, currently available antiviral agents target HSV1 DNA replication and so might be successful in AD only if Aβ and P-tau accumulation depend on viral DNA replication. Therefore, we investigated firstly the stage(s of the virus replication cycle required for Aβ and P-tau accumulation, and secondly whether antiviral agents prevent these changes using recombinant strains of HSV1 that progress only partly through the replication cycle and antiviral agents that inhibit HSV1 DNA replication. By quantitative immunocytochemistry we demonstrated that entry, fusion and uncoating of HSV1, are insufficient to induce Aβ and P-tau production. We showed also that none of the "immediate early" viral proteins is directly responsible, and that Aβ and P-tau are produced at a subsequent stage of the HSV1 replication cycle. Importantly, the anti-HSV1 antiviral agents acyclovir, penciclovir and foscarnet reduced Aβ and P-tau accumulation, as well as HSV1, with foscarnet being less effective in each case. P-tau accumulation was found to depend on HSV1 DNA replication, whereas Aβ accumulation was not. The antiviral-induced decrease in Aβ is attributable to the reduced number of new viruses, and hence the reduction in viral spread. Since antiviral agents reduce greatly Aβ and P-tau accumulation in HSV1-infected cells, they would be suitable for treating AD with great advantage unlike current AD therapies, only the virus, not the host cell, would be targeted.

  10. Latent Herpes Viruses Reactivation in Astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Satish K.; Pierson, Duane L.

    2008-01-01

    Space flight has many adverse effects on human physiology. Changes in multiple systems, including the cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, neurovestibular, endocrine, and immune systems have occurred (12, 32, 38, 39). Alterations in drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics (12), nutritional needs (31), renal stone formation (40), and microbial flora (2) have also been reported. Evidence suggests that the magnitude of some changes may increase with time in space. A variety of changes in immunity have been reported during both short (.16 days) and long (>30 days) space missions. However, it is difficult to determine the medical significance of these immunological changes in astronauts. Astronauts are in excellent health and in superb physical condition. Illnesses in astronauts during space flight are not common, are generally mild, and rarely affect mission objectives. In an attempt to clarify this issue, we identified the latent herpes viruses as medically important indicators of the effects of space flight on immunity. This chapter demonstrates that space flight leads to asymptomatic reactivation of latent herpes viruses, and proposes that this results from marked changes in neuroendocrine function and immunity caused by the inherent stressfullness of human space flight. Astronauts experience uniquely stressful environments during space flight. Potential stressors include confinement in an unfamiliar, crowded environment, isolation, separation from family, anxiety, fear, sleep deprivation, psychosocial issues, physical exertion, noise, variable acceleration forces, increased radiation, and others. Many of these are intermittent and variable in duration and intensity, but variable gravity forces (including transitions from launch acceleration to microgravity and from microgravity to planetary gravity) and variable radiation levels are part of each mission and contribute to a stressful environment that cannot be duplicated on Earth. Radiation outside the Earth

  11. Herpes zoster eye complications: rates and trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yawn, Barbara P; Wollan, Peter C; St Sauver, Jennifer L; Butterfield, Linda C

    2013-06-01

    To provide population-based data on the risk, types, and outcomes of eye involvement in herpes zoster (HZ). A cohort study based on review of the medical records of patients in whom HZ was diagnosed between January 1, 1980, and December 31, 2007, was performed. Herpes zoster was confirmed by the presence of the typical rash and symptoms or by laboratory testing, and eye involvement was confirmed by ophthalmologists' evaluation. Information was collected on all eye diagnoses and on HZ eye-related visits, treatments, procedures, and outcomes. Of the 7370 individuals with HZ in any dermatome, 184 (2.5%) had eye involvement. The mean age of the 184 was 62.6 years, and 5 cases occurred in patients younger than 21. Overall, 6.5% (12) were immunosuppressed at the time of the eye complications. The rate of increase in HZ eye involvement was 23% by decade from 1980 to 2007. Common eye complications were keratitis (n=144, 76.2%), uveitis/iritis (n=88, 46.6%), and conjunctivitis (n=67, 35.4%). Recurrent keratitis and recurrent iritis/uveitis occurred in 6.9% (13) and 7.4% (14), respectively. Outcomes included 6 patients (3.3%) with new vision decrements to 20/200 or worse. Two individuals had successful corneal transplants. Another 6 individuals (3.3%) had lid ptosis that affected vision, including 1 elderly woman with permanent unilateral tarsorrhaphy. Severe HZ eye pain was reported to be directly responsible for 1 unsuccessful suicide attempt. Acute retinal necrosis did not develop in any individual. A mean of 10.8 eye visits per patient with HZ and eye involvement was reported to continue for a mean of 308 days. Eye complications are common and result in considerable health care use and permanent vision decrement in about 6.6% (6) of individuals with HZ eye involvement. Most health care use and long-term adverse outcomes occurred in patients in whom prevention of HZ with the zoster vaccine would be possible. Copyright © 2013 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and

  12. Case report: symptomatic oral herpes simplex virus type 2 and asymptomatic genital shedding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olin, Laura; Wald, Anna

    2006-05-01

    A 42-year-old bisexual man with a history of recurrent oral herpes and no history of genital herpes was noted to have antibody to herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) only. During a symptomatic oral recurrence, HSV-2 was found in a perioral lesion as well as in the genital area.

  13. Diaphragmatic paralysis associated with herpes zoster and HIV-tuberculosis co-infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benabdellah, A; Souhil, Touati; Farouk, Zaoui Omar

    2014-08-01

    Motor complications after herpes zoster are not uncommon. There have been reports of muscular paralysis following herpes zoster. The association between diaphragmatic paralysis and zoster was first reported in 1949 by Halpern. The case presented below showed diaphragmatic involvement following herpes zoster in a HIV-tuberculosis coinfected patient.

  14. Herpes Zoster in Healthy Children: A Retrospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgül Tepe

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Herpes zoster is an acute dermatomal viral infection caused by the reactivation of varicella zoster virus. While it is commonly seen among elderly and immunocompromised individuals, it is rare in healthy children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical features, treatment and complications of healthy children with herpes zoster. Methods: Thirty one patients aged between 0-16 years who were admitted to our clinic with the diagnosis of herpes zoster, between January 2014 and December 2014, were evaluated retrospectively for age, gender, month of admission, complaint, history of chickenpox infection or varicella vaccination, triggering factors, dermatomal involvement, complications and treatment. Results: Among 31 patients with diagnosis of herpes zoster, 19 were boys (61.3% and 12 were girls (38.7%. The mean of age was 9.12±4.4 years. Twenty patients had thoracic (64.5%, six had lumbar (19.4% and five had cervical involvements (16.2%. The most frequent symptoms were pruritus and pain, respectively. Six patients were administered topical treatment and 25 patients were treated with both systemic and topical treatments. Complication was not observed. Conclusion: Herpes zoster is also being encountered increasingly in healthy children nowadays. It is benign and generally no complications are observed. Incidence can vary because of geographic and socioeconomic differences like vaccination programs.

  15. Pityriasis Lichenoides Chronica Associated with Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2

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    Antonio Javier González Rodríguez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pityriasis lichenoides is a rare, acquired spectrum of skin conditions of an unknown etiology. Case Report. A 28-year-old man presented with recurrent outbreaks of herpes simplex virus associated with the onset of red-to-brown maculopapules located predominantly in trunk in each recurrence. Positive serologies to herpes simplex virus type 2 were detected. Histopathological examination of one of the lesions was consistent with a diagnosis of pityriasis lichenoides chronica. Discussion. Pityriasis lichenoides is a rare cutaneous entity of an unknown cause which includes different clinical presentations. A number of infectious agents have been implicated based on the clustering of multiple outbreaks and elevated serum titers to specific pathogens (human immunodeficiency virus, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, Toxoplasma gondii, and herpes simplex virus. In our patient, resolution of cutaneous lesions coincided with the administration of antiviral drugs and clinical improvement in each genital herpes recurrence. In conclusion, we report a case in which cutaneous lesions of pityriasis lichenoides chronica and a herpes simplex virus-type 2-mediated disease have evolved concomitantly.

  16. Replicated Spectrographs in Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, Gary J

    2014-01-01

    As telescope apertures increase, the challenge of scaling spectrographic astronomical instruments becomes acute. The next generation of extremely large telescopes (ELTs) strain the availability of glass blanks for optics and engineering to provide sufficient mechanical stability. While breaking the relationship between telescope diameter and instrument pupil size by adaptive optics is a clear path for small fields of view, survey instruments exploiting multiplex advantages will be pressed to find cost-effective solutions. In this review we argue that exploiting the full potential of ELTs will require the barrier of the cost and engineering difficulty of monolithic instruments to be broken by the use of large-scale replication of spectrographs. The first steps in this direction have already been taken with the soon to be commissioned MUSE and VIRUS instruments for the Very Large Telescope and the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, respectively. MUSE employs 24 spectrograph channels, while VIRUS has 150 channels. We compa...

  17. SUMO and KSHV Replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Pei-Ching [Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Kung, Hsing-Jien, E-mail: hkung@nhri.org.tw [Institute for Translational Medicine, College of Medical Science and Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); UC Davis Cancer Center, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Division of Molecular and Genomic Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, 35 Keyan Road, Zhunan, Miaoli County 35053, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-29

    Small Ubiquitin-related MOdifier (SUMO) modification was initially identified as a reversible post-translational modification that affects the regulation of diverse cellular processes, including signal transduction, protein trafficking, chromosome segregation, and DNA repair. Increasing evidence suggests that the SUMO system also plays an important role in regulating chromatin organization and transcription. It is thus not surprising that double-stranded DNA viruses, such as Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), have exploited SUMO modification as a means of modulating viral chromatin remodeling during the latent-lytic switch. In addition, SUMO regulation allows the disassembly and assembly of promyelocytic leukemia protein-nuclear bodies (PML-NBs), an intrinsic antiviral host defense, during the viral replication cycle. Overcoming PML-NB-mediated cellular intrinsic immunity is essential to allow the initial transcription and replication of the herpesvirus genome after de novo infection. As a consequence, KSHV has evolved a way as to produce multiple SUMO regulatory viral proteins to modulate the cellular SUMO environment in a dynamic way during its life cycle. Remarkably, KSHV encodes one gene product (K-bZIP) with SUMO-ligase activities and one gene product (K-Rta) that exhibits SUMO-targeting ubiquitin ligase (STUbL) activity. In addition, at least two viral products are sumoylated that have functional importance. Furthermore, sumoylation can be modulated by other viral gene products, such as the viral protein kinase Orf36. Interference with the sumoylation of specific viral targets represents a potential therapeutic strategy when treating KSHV, as well as other oncogenic herpesviruses. Here, we summarize the different ways KSHV exploits and manipulates the cellular SUMO system and explore the multi-faceted functions of SUMO during KSHV’s life cycle and pathogenesis.

  18. PrP(c) expression influences the establishment of herpes simplex virus type 1 latency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackray, Alana M; Bujdoso, Raymond

    2002-03-01

    PrP(c) is a glycophosphatidylinositol-linked cell-surface protein expressed principally by neural tissue. The normal function of this protein is unestablished, although a role in either transmembrane signaling, cell-cell adhesion, or copper metabolism has been proposed. In this study we have investigated the effect of the neurotropic virus herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in strains of mice which express different levels of PrP(c). Viral gene expression under the control of the HSV-1 early promoter IE110, detected either by in situ hybridization for RNA transcripts or by beta-galactosidase (beta-Gal) activity from an inserted lacZ gene, showed that the magnitude of HSV replication was retarded in PrP-/- mice. This was reflected in the lower level of acute viral titers in tissues from these virus-inoculated mice. However, HSV-inoculated PrP-/- mice contained higher levels of latent virus in both peripheral and central nervous tissue than those seen in mice which express PrP(c). Our observations show that lack of PrP(c) expression favors the establishment of HSV latency whereas HSV replication proceeds more efficiently in neuronal tissue that expresses this protein. The data further suggest that PrP(c) may be involved in a metabolic pathway that culminates in apoptosis of neurons that have been infected by neurotropic viruses.

  19. Functional analysis of transcriptional regulation of herpes simplex virus type 1 tegument protein VP22

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Xian; LI WeiZhong; LIU LongDing; CHE YanChun; CUN Wei; WU Wen Juan; HE ChunYan; SHAO CongWen; LI QiHan

    2008-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) tegument proteins have important functions in the viral repli-cation process. In order to investigate the role of the HSV-1 tegument protein VP22 in viral replication, its transcriptional regulation of viral promoters was investigated using the chloramphenicol acetyl-transferase (CAT) assay. The results indicate that VP22 exerts a dose-dependent transcriptional in-hibitory effect on the HSV-1 α4, TK, and gC gene promoters. VP22 had the capacity to repress tran-scriptional activation of promoters via different viral transcription regulatory factors such as VP16 and ICP0, as evidenced by the specific repression of the TK and gC gene promoters by ICP0. In addition, VP22 was capable of inhibiting the promotion of ICP0 transcriptional activation in the presence of HAT PCAF, which is even more remarkable than the VP22 repression of ICP0 transcriptional activation. Fi-nally, the transcriptional inhibitory effect of VP22 on other viral promoters was demonstrated by the analysis of β-galactosidase activities in internal controls.

  20. Effect of Repeat Dosing of Engineered Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus on Preclinical Models of Rhabdomyosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia M. Waters

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS, a tumor of skeletal muscle origin, is the most common sarcoma of childhood. Despite multidrug chemotherapy regimens, surgical intervention, and radiation treatment, outcomes remain poor, especially in advanced disease, and novel therapies are needed for the treatment of these aggressive malignancies. Genetically engineered oncolytic viruses, such as herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV, are currently being explored as treatments for pediatric tumors. M002, an oncolytic HSV, has both copies of the γ134.5 gene deleted, enabling replication in tumor cells but thwarting infection of normal, postmitotic cells. We hypothesized that M002 would infect human RMS tumor cells and lead to decreased tumor cell survival in vitro and impede tumor growth in vivo. In the current study, we demonstrated that M002 could infect, replicate in, and decrease cell survival in both embryonal (ERMS and alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS cells. Additionally, M002 reduced xenograft tumor growth and increased animal survival in both ARMS and ERMS. Most importantly, we showed for the first time that repeated dosing of oncolytic virus coupled with low-dose radiation provided improved tumor response in RMS. These findings provide support for the clinical investigation of oncolytic HSV in pediatric RMS.

  1. Screening and identification of host factors interacting with UL14 of herpes simplex virus 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fuqing; Xing, Junji; Wang, Shuai; Li, Meili; Zheng, Chunfu

    2011-08-01

    The UL14 protein of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is highly conserved in herpesvirus family. However, its exact function during the HSV-1 replication cycle is little known. In the present study, a high throughput yeast two-hybrid system was employed to screen the cellular factors interacting with UL14, and five target candidates were yielded: (1) TSC22 domain family protein 3 (TSC22D3); (2) Mediator of RNA polymerase II transcription subunit 8 isoform 1(MED8); (3) Runt-related transcription factor 3 (RUNX3); (4) Arrestin beta-2 (ARRB2); (5) Cereblon (CRBN). Indirect immunofluorescent assay showed that both TSC22D3 and MED8 co-localized with UL14. Co-immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that UL14 could be immunoprecipitated by TSC22D3, suggesting that UL14 interacted with TSC22D3 under physiological condition. In summary, this study opened up new avenues toward delineating the function and physiological significance of UL14 during the HSV-1 replication cycle.

  2. Herpes simplex virus 1 counteracts tetherin restriction via its virion host shutoff activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenner, Helen L; Mauricio, Rui; Banting, George; Crump, Colin M

    2013-12-01

    The interferon-inducible membrane protein tetherin (Bst-2, or CD317) is an antiviral factor that inhibits enveloped virus release by cross-linking newly formed virus particles to the producing cell. The majority of viruses that are sensitive to tetherin restriction appear to be those that acquire their envelopes at the plasma membrane, although many viruses, including herpesviruses, envelope at intracellular membranes, and the effect of tetherin on such viruses has been less well studied. We investigated the tetherin sensitivity and possible countermeasures of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). We found that overexpression of tetherin inhibits HSV-1 release and that HSV-1 efficiently depletes tetherin from infected cells. We further show that the virion host shutoff protein (Vhs) is important for depletion of tetherin mRNA and protein and that removal of tetherin compensates for defects in replication and release of a Vhs-null virus. Vhs is known to be important for HSV-1 to evade the innate immune response in vivo. Taken together, our data suggest that tetherin has antiviral activity toward HSV-1 and that the removal of tetherin by Vhs is important for the efficient replication and dissemination of HSV-1.

  3. Preclinical evaluation of engineered oncolytic herpes simplex virus for the treatment of neuroblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren A Gillory

    Full Text Available Despite intensive research efforts and therapeutic advances over the last few decades, the pediatric neural crest tumor, neuroblastoma, continues to be responsible for over 15% of pediatric cancer deaths. Novel therapeutic options are needed for this tumor. Recently, investigators have shown that mice with syngeneic murine gliomas treated with an engineered, neuroattenuated oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 (oHSV, M002, had a significant increase in survival. M002 has deletions in both copies of the γ 1 34.5 gene, enabling replication in tumor cells but precluding infection of normal neural cells. We hypothesized that M002 would also be effective in the neural crest tumor, neuroblastoma. We showed that M002 infected, replicated, and decreased survival in neuroblastoma cell lines. In addition, we showed that in murine xenografts, treatment with M002 significantly decreased tumor growth, and that this effect was augmented with the addition of ionizing radiation. Importantly, survival could be increased by subsequent doses of radiation without re-dosing of the virus. Finally, these studies showed that the primary entry protein for oHSV, CD111 was expressed by numerous neuroblastoma cell lines and was also present in human neuroblastoma specimens. We concluded that M002 effectively targeted neuroblastoma and that this oHSV may have potential for use in children with unresponsive or relapsed neuroblastoma.

  4. Preclinical evaluation of engineered oncolytic herpes simplex virus for the treatment of pediatric solid tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael L Megison

    Full Text Available Recently, investigators showed that mice with syngeneic murine gliomas that were treated with a neuroattenuated oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 (oHSV, M002, had a significant increase in survival. M002 has deletions in both copies of the γ134.5 gene, enabling replication in tumor cells but precluding infection of normal cells. Previous studies have shown antitumor effects of other oHSV against a number of adult tumors including hepatocellular carcinoma and renal cell carcinoma. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the oncolytic potential of M002 against difficult to treat pediatric liver and kidney tumors. We showed that the oHSV, M002, infected, replicated, and decreased cell survival in hepatoblastoma, malignant rhabdoid kidney tumor, and renal sarcoma cell lines. In addition, we showed that in murine xenografts, treatment with M002 significantly increased survival and decreased tumor growth. Finally, these studies showed that the primary entry protein for oHSV, CD111 (nectin-1 was present in human hepatoblastoma and malignant rhabdoid kidney tumor specimens. We concluded that M002 effectively targeted these rare aggressive tumor types and that M002 may have potential for use in children with unresponsive or relapsed pediatric solid tumors.

  5. Preclinical Evaluation of Engineered Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus for the Treatment of Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillory, Lauren A.; Megison, Michael L.; Stewart, Jerry E.; Mroczek-Musulman, Elizabeth; Nabers, Hugh C.; Waters, Alicia M.; Kelly, Virginia; Coleman, Jennifer M.; Markert, James M.; Gillespie, G. Yancey; Friedman, Gregory K.; Beierle, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite intensive research efforts and therapeutic advances over the last few decades, the pediatric neural crest tumor, neuroblastoma, continues to be responsible for over 15% of pediatric cancer deaths. Novel therapeutic options are needed for this tumor. Recently, investigators have shown that mice with syngeneic murine gliomas treated with an engineered, neuroattenuated oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 (oHSV), M002, had a significant increase in survival. M002 has deletions in both copies of the γ134.5 gene, enabling replication in tumor cells but precluding infection of normal neural cells. We hypothesized that M002 would also be effective in the neural crest tumor, neuroblastoma. We showed that M002 infected, replicated, and decreased survival in neuroblastoma cell lines. In addition, we showed that in murine xenografts, treatment with M002 significantly decreased tumor growth, and that this effect was augmented with the addition of ionizing radiation. Importantly, survival could be increased by subsequent doses of radiation without re-dosing of the virus. Finally, these studies showed that the primary entry protein for oHSV, CD111 was expressed by numerous neuroblastoma cell lines and was also present in human neuroblastoma specimens. We concluded that M002 effectively targeted neuroblastoma and that this oHSV may have potential for use in children with unresponsive or relapsed neuroblastoma. PMID:24130898

  6. Preclinical Evaluation of Engineered Oncolytic Herpes Simplex Virus for the Treatment of Pediatric Solid Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megison, Michael L.; Gillory, Lauren A.; Stewart, Jerry E.; Nabers, Hugh C.; Mroczek-Musulman, Elizabeth; Waters, Alicia M.; Coleman, Jennifer M.; Kelly, Virginia; Markert, James M.; Gillespie, G. Yancey; Friedman, Gregory K.; Beierle, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, investigators showed that mice with syngeneic murine gliomas that were treated with a neuroattenuated oncolytic herpes simplex virus-1 (oHSV), M002, had a significant increase in survival. M002 has deletions in both copies of the γ134.5 gene, enabling replication in tumor cells but precluding infection of normal cells. Previous studies have shown antitumor effects of other oHSV against a number of adult tumors including hepatocellular carcinoma and renal cell carcinoma. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the oncolytic potential of M002 against difficult to treat pediatric liver and kidney tumors. We showed that the oHSV, M002, infected, replicated, and decreased cell survival in hepatoblastoma, malignant rhabdoid kidney tumor, and renal sarcoma cell lines. In addition, we showed that in murine xenografts, treatment with M002 significantly increased survival and decreased tumor growth. Finally, these studies showed that the primary entry protein for oHSV, CD111 (nectin-1) was present in human hepatoblastoma and malignant rhabdoid kidney tumor specimens. We concluded that M002 effectively targeted these rare aggressive tumor types and that M002 may have potential for use in children with unresponsive or relapsed pediatric solid tumors. PMID:24497984

  7. Antiviral Effects of Blackberry Extract Against Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danaher, Robert J.; Wang, Chunmei; Dai, Jin; Mumper, Russell J.; Miller, Craig S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate antiviral properties of blackberry extract against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in vitro. Methods HSV-infected oral epithelial (OKF6) cells and cell-free virus suspensions were treated with blackberry extract (2.24 to 1400 μg/mL) and virus yield and infectivity were quantified by direct plaque assay. Results Blackberry extract ≥ 56 μg/ml inhibited HSV-1 replication in oral epithelial cells by > 99% (p < 0.005). Concentrations ≥ 280 μg/ml were antiviral when the extract was added after virus adsorption and entry. Exposure of cell-free virus to ≥ 280 μg/ml blackberry extract for 15 minutes at room temperature was virucidal (p = 0.0002). The virucidal effects were not due to pH changes at concentrations up to 1500 μg/ml. Conclusions Blackberry extract inhibited the early stages of HSV-1 replication and had potent virucidal activity. These properties suggest that this natural fruit extract could provide advantage as a topical prophylactic/therapeutic agent for HSV infections. PMID:21827957

  8. Herpes zoster is associated with herpes simplex and other infections in under 60 year-olds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunjimi, Benson; Buntinx, Frank; Bartholomeeusen, Stephaan; Terpstra, Ita; De Haes, Inke; Willem, Lander; Elli, Steven; Bilcke, Joke; Van Damme, Pierre; Coenen, Samuel; Beutels, Philippe

    2015-02-01

    We assessed the association between herpes zoster (HZ) and herpes simplex (HS) occurrence whilst controlling for risk factors of HZ. Using a Belgian general practitioner network, a retrospective cohort study with 3736 HZ patients and 14,076 age-gender-practice matched controls was performed, covering over 1.5 million patient-years. Multiple logistic regression was used with HZ as outcome and several diagnoses (malignancy, depression, diabetes mellitus, auto-immune diseases, asthma, multiple sclerosis, HIV, fractures), medications (systemic corticosteroids, biologicals, vaccination), HS and other infections as variables. HS was significantly associated with HZ for all analysed time intervals (up to five years) post HZ (OR of 3.51 [2.09 5.88] 95%CI one year post HZ) and to a lesser extent for time ranges pre HZ. Registration of other infections was significantly associated with HZ in all time intervals pre and post HZ (OR up to 1.37). Malignancy up to five years pre HZ, depression up to one year pre or post HZ, fractures up to two years pre HZ, asthma, auto-immune diseases, and immunosuppressive medication one year pre or post HZ were also associated with HZ. HZ and HS occurrences are significantly associated and potentially share a common susceptibility beyond the known risk factors. Copyright © 2014 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Charles Bonnet syndrome after herpes simplex encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Ömer Faruk; Ince, Hülya; Taşdemir, Haydar Ali; Özyürek, Hamit

    2012-04-01

    Visual impairment associated with Charles Bonnet syndrome is rarely reported in childhood. We describe a child who presented with visual hallucinations and postinfectious bilateral retrobulbar optic neuritis. The patient had undergone acyclovir therapy for 3 weeks because of herpes encephalitis. Four days after therapy was completed, he experienced visual impairment in both eyes. He manifested a bilateral decrease in visual acuity, with normal funduscopic findings. The patient experienced visual hallucinations for about 1 week, and then experienced total loss of vision. During his hallucinations, the patient did not exhibit behavioral changes or cognitive impairment. The visual hallucinations included unfamiliar children hiding under his bed, and he spoke to someone whom he did not know. Magnetic resonance imaging indicated bilateral optic nerve hyperintensity on T(2)-weighted and contrast-enhanced images. The patient received corticosteroid therapy for his retrobulbar optic neuritis, and his vision returned to normal after 1 month. Although rare, visual impairment can be associated with complex visual hallucinations indicative of Charles Bonnet syndrome.

  10. Clinical Presentation of Atypical Genital Herpes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李俊杰; 梁沛杨; 罗北京

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To make a clinical analysis on the basis of 36cases of atypical genital herpes (GH) patients. Methods: Thirty-six cases of atypical GH were diagnosedclinically, and their case histories, symptoms and signs wererecorded in detail and followed up. Polymerase chain reaction(PCR) was adopted for testing HSV2-DNA with cotton-tippedswabs. Enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA) forserum anti-HSV2-IgM was done to establish a definfiivediagnosis. Other diagnoses were excluded at the same time bytesting for related pathogens including fungi, Chlamydia,Mycoplasma, Treponema pallidum, gonococci, Trichomonas,etc. Results: The main clinical manifestations of atypical GHwere: (1) small genital ulcers; (2) inflammation of urethralmeatus; (3) nonspecific genital erythema; (4) papuloid noduleson the glands; (5) nonspecific vaginitis. Twenty-three cases(64%) tested by PCR were HSV2-DNA sera-positive, and 36cases (100 %) anti-HSV2-IgM sera-positive by ELISA. Conclusion: atypical HSV is difficult to be diagnosed. Butthe combination of PCR and ELIAS will be helpful to thediagnosis of atypical HSV.

  11. Herpes Zoster infection and radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, K.; Okazaki, A.; Mitsuhashi, N.; Ito, I.; Niibe, H. (Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1981-02-01

    Between 1970 and 1979, among 3,320 patients with malignant neoplasms, herpes zoster (HZ) occurred in 54 (1.6%) after radiation therapy. The incidence of HZ infection was increased in patients with epipharyngeal cancer (10.0%), malignant lymphoma (5.7%), ovarial tumor (3.7%) and testicular tumor (3.6%). Most of these patients received extensive radiation therapy along the spinal cord and/or nerve roots. The location of HZ infection was divided as follows; HZ infectious lesion located in the area of (I-A) innervated segment of the irradiated nerve root (75.9%), (I-B) irradiated dermatome (5.6%) and (II) not associated with radiation field (18.5%). In 44 patients of I-A and B, HZ infection developed within a year, particularly in three months (22 cases) after the completion of irradiation. This latent period between completing irradiation and the development of HZ infection was likely to be compatible with the period between radiation therapy and earlier radiation injury. Among 10 patients in Group II, 7 patients developed HZ infection more than a year after radiation therapy. The cumulative survival of these patients except for the patients with malignant lymphoma was 66.7% and so HZ infection was considered to have no prognostic significance.

  12. β-Amyloid peptides display protective activity against the human Alzheimer's disease-associated herpes simplex virus-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgade, Karine; Garneau, Hugo; Giroux, Geneviève; Le Page, Aurélie Y; Bocti, Christian; Dupuis, Gilles; Frost, Eric H; Fülöp, Tamàs

    2015-02-01

    Amyloid plaques, the hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD), contain fibrillar β-amyloid (Aβ) 1-40 and 1-42 peptides. Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) has been implicated as a risk factor for AD and found to co-localize within amyloid plaques. Aβ 1-40 and Aβ 1-42 display anti-bacterial, anti-yeast and anti-viral activities. Here, fibroblast, epithelial and neuronal cell lines were exposed to Aβ 1-40 or Aβ 1-42 and challenged with HSV-1. Quantitative analysis revealed that Aβ 1-40 and Aβ 1-42 inhibited HSV-1 replication when added 2 h prior to or concomitantly with virus challenge, but not when added 2 or 6 h after virus addition. In contrast, Aβ 1-40 and Aβ 1-42 did not prevent replication of the non-enveloped human adenovirus. In comparison, antimicrobial peptide LL-37 prevented HSV-1 infection independently of its sequence of addition. Our findings showed also that Aβ 1-40 and Aβ 1-42 acted directly on HSV-1 in a cell-free system and prevented viral entry into cells. The sequence homology between Aβ and a proximal transmembrane region of HSV-1 glycoprotein B suggested that Aβ interference with HSV-1 replication could involve its insertion into the HSV-1 envelope. Our data suggest that Aβ peptides represent a novel class of antimicrobial peptides that protect against neurotropic enveloped virus infections such as HSV-1. Overproduction of Aβ peptide to protect against latent herpes viruses and eventually against other infections, may contribute to amyloid plaque formation, and partially explain why brain infections play a pathogenic role in the progression of the sporadic form of AD.

  13. Transcriptional coactivator HCF-1 couples the histone chaperone Asf1b to HSV-1 DNA replication components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hua; Nogueira, Mauricio L; Vogel, Jodi L; Kristie, Thomas M

    2010-02-01

    The cellular transcriptional coactivator HCF-1 interacts with numerous transcription factors as well as other coactivators and is a component of multiple chromatin modulation complexes. The protein is essential for the expression of the immediate early genes of both herpes simplex virus (HSV) and varicella zoster virus and functions, in part, by coupling chromatin modification components including the Set1 or MLL1 histone methyltransferases and the histone demethylase LSD1 to promote the installation of positive chromatin marks and the activation of viral immediately early gene transcription. Although studies have investigated the role of HCF-1 in both cellular and viral transcription, little is known about other processes that the protein may be involved in. Here we demonstrate that HCF-1 localizes to sites of HSV replication late in infection. HCF-1 interacts directly and simultaneously with both HSV DNA replication proteins and the cellular histone chaperone Asf1b, a protein that regulates the progression of cellular DNA replication forks via chromatin reorganization. Asf1b localizes with HCF-1 in viral replication foci and depletion of Asf1b results in significantly reduced viral DNA accumulation. The results support a model in which the transcriptional coactivator HCF-1 is a component of the HSV DNA replication assembly and promotes viral DNA replication by coupling Asf1b to DNA replication components. This coupling provides a novel function for HCF-1 and insights into the mechanisms of modulating chromatin during DNA replication.

  14. Isolated, complete paralytic mydriasis secondary to herpes zoster ophthalmicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyz, Craig N; Bacon, Thomas S; Petrie, Thomas P; Justice, Joshua D; Cahill, Kenneth V

    2013-06-01

    Herpes zoster ophthalmicus is a manifestation of herpes zoster when the ophthalmic division of the trigeminal nerve becomes involved. Ocular symptoms are varied and mainly due to inflammatory mechanisms. Total, external and/or internal ophthalmoplegias, as well as isolated third, fourth and sixth cranial nerve palsies have all been reported as complications. In a minority of cases, concurrent pupillary paralysis has been documented. The presentation of complete paralytic mydriasis as the sole cranial nerve complication following herpes zoster ophthalmicus infection is a rare finding. The postulated pathophysiologic aetiology is a partial third nerve palsy with the pupillary fibres for light and accommodation-convergence affected and motor fibres spared. The mechanism responsible for the postulated lesion is speculative.

  15. Herpes Zoster Duplex Unilateralis: Two Cases and Brief Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Jee Hee; Chung, Bo Young; Kim, Hye One; Cho, Hee Jin

    2016-01-01

    Cases involving dermatomal herpes zoster in two or more locations are rare, especially in immunocompetent patients. When two noncontiguous dermatomes are involved, if affected unilaterally, it is called herpes zoster duplex unilateralis; if bilaterally, bilateralis. Here, we report two cases of herpes zoster duplex unilateralis. A 66-year-old man presented with painful erythematous grouped vesicles on his left scalp, forehead, trunk, and back (left [Lt.] V1, Lt. T8). Histologic findings were consistent with herpetic infection. A 33-year-old woman presented with painful erythematous grouped vesicles and crust on her left forehead and neck (Lt. V1, Lt. C5). Both patients were treated with oral administration of famcyclovir 750 mg/day for seven days. PMID:27904277

  16. Herpes Zoster Immunization in Older Adults Has Big Benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breivik, Harald

    2015-09-01

    A case of acute herpes zoster neuralgia (shingles) in a 78-year-old patient is described. The value and importance of immunizing against herpes zoster to decrease the incidence and severity of both acute herpes zoster neuralgia and postherpetic neuralgia are described. --This report is adapted from paineurope 2015: Issue 1, ©Haymarket Medical Publications Ltd., and is presented with permission. paineurope is provided as a service to pain management by Mundipharma International, Ltd., and is distributed free of charge to health care professionals in Europe. Archival issues can be viewed via the Web site: www.paineurope.com , at which health professionals can find links to the original articles and request copies of the quarterly publication and access additional pain education and pain management resources.

  17. Chronic Ulcerative Herpes Simplex Virus Infection of the Vulva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Griffith-Bauer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus infections in HIV-infected individuals can be clinically unusual and difficult to treat due to underlying problems with cell-mediated immunity and the occurrence of antiviral resistance. Additionally, partial or incomplete restoration of immune function may result in chronic ulcerations that require rotational treatments. In this report, we describe the case of a 38-year-old HIV-positive woman who developed the ulcerative form of chronic herpes simplex infection despite highly active antiretroviral therapy and valacyclovir prophylaxis. Repeated intravenous courses of foscarnet and topical cidofovir finally controlled her erosions as her cell-mediated immunity was slowly restored. This case highlights the challenges that still exist in diagnosing and managing this rare presentation of herpes simplex virus

  18. The theoretical basis of stigma as applied to genital herpes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitkopf, Carmen Radecki

    2004-04-01

    This paper defines stigma and its characteristics, outlines strategies and consequences of stigma management, describes the theoretical basis of stigma, and offers methodological considerations for those applying stigma theory to the domain of genital herpes. Stigma is an interactional process, defined within societies, in which particular social identities are collectively devalued. The subjective experience of stigma may vary due to features associated with the stigmatizing condition (e.g. concealability, course, strain, aesthetic qualities, cause and peril). The interpersonal management of stigma may include secrecy, withdrawal, covering, informing or disclosing. Future research addressing herpes-associated stigma should benefit from theoretical frameworks including attribution theory, social-cognitive theory, preoccupation model of secrecy and the illness intrusiveness framework, although the difficulty in identifying and recruiting stigmatized individuals and the lack of domain-specific measures of herpes-related stigma remain barriers to progress.

  19. Herpes Simplex Mastitis: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly Brown

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common sites of herpes simplex virus (HSV infection are around the oral cavity and the genitalia. However, HSV can infect any skin or mucous membrane surface. One uncommon site of HSV infection is the breast. Reports of herpetic breast infections are predominantly cases of transmission from a systemically HSV-infected neonate to the mother during breast-feeding. A review of the literature identified only six reports suggesting HSV breast lesions acquired by means other than through an infected infant. Of these, only one report suggests HSV transmission to the breast from a male sexual partner. A second case of clinically unsuspected symptomatic herpes mastitis presumably acquired from sexual contact in a 46-year-old woman is presented. Herpes simplex type 1 was isolated by using polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymerization techniques. The purpose of this report is to alert physicians to HSV mastitis.

  20. Recurrent herpes zoster in a child with SLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jain C

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available A 12-year-old girl had systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and type IV lupus nephritis since three-and-a-half years. She was treated with prednisolone and cyclophosphamide. She had first attack of herpes zoster (HZ involving eighth and ninth thoracic segments on right side at the age of nine years. Second attack occurred on the same segments on same side at the age of twelve years. The second attack of herpes zoster was treated with oral acyclovir 400 mg five times a day for seven days plus analgesics and multi-vitamins. Most probably this is the first case of recurrent herpes zoster (RHZ in a child in Indian literature.

  1. Herpes Zoster-Induced Ogilvie’s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan Masood

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ogilvie’s syndrome due to herpes zoster infection is a rare manifestation of VZV reactivation. The onset of rash of herpes zoster and the symptoms of intestinal obstruction can occur at different time intervals posing a significant diagnostic challenge resulting in avoidable surgical interventions. Herein, we describe a case of 35-year-old male who presented with 6-day history of constipation and colicky abdominal pain along with an exquisitely tender and vesicular skin eruption involving the T8–T11 dermatome. Abdominal X-ray and ultrasound revealed generalized gaseous distention of the large intestine with air up to the rectum consistent with paralytic ileus. Colonoscopy did not show any obstructing lesion. A diagnosis of Ogilvie’s syndrome associated with herpes zoster was made. He was conservatively managed with nasogastric decompression, IV fluids, and acyclovir. The patient had an uneventful recovery and was later discharged.

  2. Efficient usage of Adabas replication

    CERN Document Server

    Storr, Dieter W

    2011-01-01

    In today's IT organization replication becomes more and more an essential technology. This makes Software AG's Event Replicator for Adabas an important part of your data processing. Setting the right parameters and establishing the best network communication, as well as selecting efficient target components, is essential for successfully implementing replication. This book provides comprehensive information and unique best-practice experience in the field of Event Replicator for Adabas. It also includes sample codes and configurations making your start very easy. It describes all components ne

  3. Solving the Telomere Replication Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestroni, Laetitia; Matmati, Samah; Coulon, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    Telomeres are complex nucleoprotein structures that protect the extremities of linear chromosomes. Telomere replication is a major challenge because many obstacles to the progression of the replication fork are concentrated at the ends of the chromosomes. This is known as the telomere replication problem. In this article, different and new aspects of telomere replication, that can threaten the integrity of telomeres, will be reviewed. In particular, we will focus on the functions of shelterin and the replisome for the preservation of telomere integrity. PMID:28146113

  4. Concatemeric intermediates of equine herpesvirus type 1 DNA replication contain frequent inversions of adjacent long segments of the viral genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slobedman, B; Simmons, A

    1997-03-17

    In common with other alpha-herpesviruses, the genome of equine herpesvirus type-1 (EHV-1) comprises covalently linked long and short unique sequences of DNA, each flanked by inverted repeats. Equimolar amounts of two genomic isomers, generated by free inversion of the short segment, relative to the long segment, are packaged into EHV-1 virions. In contrast with herpes simplex virus (HSV), inversion of genomic long segments has not been described. In the current work, the structures of high molecular weight intermediates of EHV-1 DNA replication were studied by field inversion gel electrophoresis. It is shown that adjacent long segments of the viral genome are frequently inverted in concatemeric intermediates of EHV-1 DNA replication. Further, like HSV concatemers, high molecular weight intermediates of EHV-1 replication are flanked exclusively by the long segment of the viral genome. Hence, despite the fact that only two, rather than four, isomers of EHV-1 DNA are packaged into virions, the intermediates of EHV-1 DNA replication closely resemble those of herpes simplex virus type 1 in structure. These data have implications relating to the mechanisms involved in packaging of alpha-herpesvirus DNA.

  5. Concise vector analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Eliezer, C J; Maxwell, E A; Sneddon, I N

    1963-01-01

    Concise Vector Analysis is a five-chapter introductory account of the methods and techniques of vector analysis. These methods are indispensable tools in mathematics, physics, and engineering. The book is based on lectures given by the author in the University of Ceylon.The first two chapters deal with vector algebra. These chapters particularly present the addition, representation, and resolution of vectors. The next two chapters examine the various aspects and specificities of vector calculus. The last chapter looks into some standard applications of vector algebra and calculus.This book wil

  6. Light axial vector mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Kan; Liu, Xiang; Matsuki, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Inspired by the abundant experimental observation of axial vector states, we study whether the observed axial vector states can be categorized into the conventional axial vector meson family. In this paper we carry out analysis based on the mass spectra and two-body Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka-allowed decays. Besides testing the possible axial vector meson assignments, we also predict abundant information for their decays and the properties of some missing axial vector mesons, which are valuable to further experimental exploration of the observed and predicted axial vector mesons.

  7. Mechanism of herpes simplex virus type 2 suppression by propolis extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolkemper, Silke; Reichling, Jürgen; Sensch, Karl Heinz; Schnitzler, Paul

    2010-02-01

    Genital herpes caused by herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is a chronic, persistent infection spreading efficiently and silently as sexually transmitted disease through the population. Antiviral agents currently applied for the treatment of herpesvirus infections include acyclovir and derivatives. Aqueous and ethanolic extracts of propolis were phytochemically analysed, different polyphenols, flavonoids and phenylcarboxylic acids were identified as major constituents. The aqueous propolis extract revealed a relatively high amount of phenylcarboxylic acids and low concentrations flavonoids when compared to the ethanolic special extract GH 2002. The cytotoxic and antiherpetic effect of propolis extracts against HSV-2 was analysed in cell culture, and revealed a moderate cytotoxicity on RC-37 cells. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of aqueous and ethanolic GH 2002 propolis extracts for HSV-2 plaque formation was determined at 0.0005% and 0.0004%, respectively. Both propolis extracts exhibited high levels of antiviral activity against HSV-2 in viral suspension tests, infectivity was significantly reduced by >99% and a direct concentration- and time-dependent antiherpetic activity could be demonstrated for both extracts. In order to determine the mode of virus suppression by propolis, the extracts were added at different times during the viral infection cycle. Addition of these drugs to uninfected cells prior to infection or to herpesvirus-infected cells during intracellular replication had no effect on virus multiplication. However both propolis extracts exhibited high anti-herpetic activity when viruses were pretreated with these drugs prior to infection. Selectivity indices were determined at 80 and 42.5 for the aqueous and ethanolic extract, respectively, thus propolis extracts might be suitable for topical therapy in recurrent herpetic infection.

  8. Self-replicating alphavirus RNA vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljungberg, Karl; Liljeström, Peter

    2015-02-01

    Recombinant nucleic acids are considered as promising next-generation vaccines. These vaccines express the native antigen upon delivery into tissue, thus mimicking live attenuated vaccines without having the risk of reversion to pathogenicity. They also stimulate the innate immune system, thus potentiating responses. Nucleic acid vaccines are easy to produce at reasonable cost and are stable. During the past years, focus has been on the use of plasmid DNA for vaccination. Now mRNA and replicon vaccines have come into focus as promising technology platforms for vaccine development. This review discusses self-replicating RNA vaccines developed from alphavirus expression vectors. These replicon vaccines can be delivered as RNA, DNA or as recombinant virus particles. All three platforms have been pre-clinically evaluated as vaccines against a number of infectious diseases and cancer. Results have been very encouraging and propelled the first human clinical trials, the results of which have been promising.

  9. Purpuric herpes zoster in patients in therapy with clopidogrel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veraldi, S; Vaira, F; Nazzaro, G

    2015-08-01

    Clopidogrel is an adenosine diphosphate receptor antagonist used for the prevention of vascular events in patients with atherothrombotic diseases manifested by recent myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke or peripheral arterial disease. Diarrhoea, rash and pruritus are rather common side effects of clopidogrel. Other side effects include epistaxis, nausea, abdominal pain, vomiting, gastritis, gastric and duodenal ulcer. Thrombocytopenia is the most common laboratory abnormality. Leucopenia and neutropenia are rare. We report three cases of purpuric herpes zoster in patients in therapy with clopidogrel. To our knowledge, only one case of haemorrhagic herpes zoster has been published in a patient in therapy with this drug.

  10. GENIS: gene expression of sodium iodide symporter for noninvasive imaging of gene therapy vectors and quantification of gene expression in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Kenneth N; Tyson, Donald; Stricker, Hans; Lew, Young S; Heisey, Gregory; Koul, Sweaty; de la Zerda, Alberto; Yin, Fang-Fang; Yan, Hui; Nagaraja, Tavarekere N; Randall, Kelly Ann; Jin, Guk Kim; Fenstermacher, Joseph D; Jhiang, Sissy; Ho Kim, Jae; Freytag, Svend O; Brown, Stephen L

    2003-09-01

    With the goal of optimizing adenovirus-mediated suicide gene therapy for prostate cancer, we have developed a method based on the human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS) that allows for noninvasive monitoring of adenoviral vectors and quantification of gene expression magnitude and volume within the prostate. A replication-competent adenovirus (Ad5-yCD/mutTK(SR39)rep-hNIS) coexpressing a therapeutic yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD)/mutant herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (mutTK(SR39)) fusion gene and the hNIS gene was developed. Ad5-yCD/mutTK(SR39)rep-hNIS and a replication-defective hNIS adenovirus (rAd-CMV-FLhNIS) were injected into contralateral lobes of the dog prostate and hNIS activity was monitored in live animals following administration of Na(99m)TcO(4) using gamma camera scintigraphy. Despite the close proximity of the urinary bladder, (99m)TcO(4)(-) uptake was readily detected in the prostate using viral dose levels (10(10) to 10(12) viral particles) that have been safely administered to humans. Due to its rapid clearance and short physical half-life (6 h), it was possible to obtain daily measurements of (99m)TcO(4)(-) uptake in vivo, allowing for dynamic monitoring of reporter gene expression within the prostate as well as biodistribution throughout the body. High-resolution autoradiography of prostate sections coupled with 3D reconstruction of gene expression demonstrated that the magnitude and volume of gene expression could be quantified with submillimeter resolution. Implementation of the GENIS (gene expression of Na/I symporter) technology in the clinic will facilitate optimization of future human gene therapy trials.

  11. Novel cloning vectors for Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, J A; Coyle, D M; Gilbert, M P; Jany, C S; Gawron-Burke, C

    1990-11-01

    Seven replication origins from resident plasmids of Bacillus thuringienis subsp. kurstaki HD263 and HD73 were cloned in Escherichia coli. Three of these replication origins, originating from plasmids of 43, 44, and 60 MDa, were used to construct a set of compatible shuttle vectors that exhibit structural and segregational stability in the Cry- strain B. thuringiensis HD73-26. These shuttle vectors, pEG597, pEG853, and pEG854, were designed with rare restriction sites that permit various adaptations, including the construction of small recombinant plasmids lacking antibiotic resistance genes. The cryIA(c) and cryIIA insecticidal crystal protein genes were inserted into these vectors to demonstrate crystal protein production in B. thuringiensis. Introduction of a cloned cryIA(c) gene from strain HD263 into a B. thuringiensis subsp. aizawai strain exhibiting good insecticidal activity against Spodoptera exigua resulted in a recombinant strain with an improved spectrum of insecticidal activity. Shuttle vectors of this sort should be valuable in future genetic studies of B. thuringiensis as well as in the development of B. thuringiensis strains for use as microbial pesticides.

  12. The heat-shock DnaK protein is required for plasmid R1 replication and it is dispensable for plasmid ColE1 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo-Suárez, R; Fernández-Tresguerres, E; Díaz-Orejas, R; Malki, A; Kohiyama, M

    1993-01-01

    Plasmid R1 replication in vitro is inactive in extracts prepared from a dnaK756 strain but is restored to normal levels upon addition of purified DnaK protein. Replication of R1 in extracts of a dnaKwt strain can be specifically inhibited with polyclonal antibodies against DnaK. RepA-dependent replication of R1 in dnaK756 extracts supplemented with DnaKwt protein at maximum concentration is partially inhibited by rifampicin and it is severely inhibited at sub-optimal concentrations of DnaK protein. The copy number of a run-away R1 vector is reduced in a dnaK756 background at 30 degrees C and at 42 degrees C the amplification of the run-away R1 vector is prevented. However a runaway R1 vector containing dnaK gene allows the amplification of the plasmid at high temperature. These data indicate that DnaK is required for both in vitro and in vivo replication of plasmid R1 and show a partial compensation for the low level of DnaK by RNA polymerase. In contrast ColE1 replication is not affected by DnaK as indicated by the fact that ColE1 replicates with the same efficiency in extracts from dnaKwt and dnaK756 strains. Images PMID:8265367

  13. Replicon RNA Viral Vectors as Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Single-stranded RNA viruses of both positive and negative polarity have been used as vectors for vaccine development. In this context, alphaviruses, flaviviruses, measles virus and rhabdoviruses have been engineered for expression of surface protein genes and antigens. Administration of replicon RNA vectors has resulted in strong immune responses and generation of neutralizing antibodies in various animal models. Immunization of mice, chicken, pigs and primates with virus-like particles, naked RNA or layered DNA/RNA plasmids has provided protection against challenges with lethal doses of infectious agents and administered tumor cells. Both prophylactic and therapeutic efficacy has been achieved in cancer immunotherapy. Moreover, recombinant particles and replicon RNAs have been encapsulated by liposomes to improve delivery and targeting. Replicon RNA vectors have also been subjected to clinical trials. Overall, immunization with self-replicating RNA viruses provides high transient expression levels of antigens resulting in generation of neutralizing antibody responses and protection against lethal challenges under safe conditions. PMID:27827980

  14. Effect of ASP2151, a herpesvirus helicase-primase inhibitor, in a guinea pig model of genital herpes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsumata, Kiyomitsu; Chono, Koji; Sudo, Kenji; Shimizu, Yasuaki; Kontani, Toru; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2011-08-25

    ASP2151 is a herpesvirus helicase-primase inhibitor with antiviral activity against varicella zoster virus and herpes simplex virus types 1 (HSV-1) and 2 (HSV-2). Here, we examined the potency and efficacy of ASP2151 against HSV in vitro and in vivo. We found that ASP2151 was more potent in inhibiting the replication of HSV-1 and HSV-2 in Vero cells in the plaque reduction assay and had greater anti-HSV activity in a guinea pig model of genital herpes than did acyclovir and valacyclovir (VACV), respectively. Oral ASP2151 given from the day of infection reduced peak and overall disease scores in a dose-dependent manner, resulting in complete prevention of symptoms at the dose of 30 mg/kg. The 50% effective dose (ED(50)) values for ASP2151 and VACV were 0.37 and 68 mg/kg, respectively, indicating that ASP2151 was 184-fold more potent than VACV. When ASP2151 was administered after the onset of symptoms, the disease course of genital herpes was suppressed more effectively than by VACV, with a significant reduction in disease score observed one day after starting ASP2151 at 30 mg/kg, whereas the therapeutic effect of VACV was only evident three days after treatment at the highest dose tested (300 mg/kg). This indicated that ASP2151 possesses a faster onset of action and wider therapeutic time window than VACV. Further, virus shedding from the genital mucosa was significantly reduced with ASP2151 at 10 and 30 mg/kg but not with VACV, even at 300 mg/kg. Taken together, our present findings demonstrated the superior potency and efficacy of ASP2151 against HSV.

  15. Effect of ASP2151, a Herpesvirus Helicase-Primase Inhibitor, in a Guinea Pig Model of Genital Herpes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Kontani

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available ASP2151 is a herpesvirus helicase-primase inhibitor with antiviral activity against varicella zoster virus and herpes simplex virus types 1 (HSV-1 and 2 (HSV-2. Here, we examined the potency and efficacy of ASP2151 against HSV in vitro and in vivo. We found that ASP2151 was more potent in inhibiting the replication of HSV-1 and HSV-2 in Vero cells in the plaque reduction assay and had greater anti-HSV activity in a guinea pig model of genital herpes than did acyclovir and valacyclovir (VACV, respectively. Oral ASP2151 given from the day of infection reduced peak and overall disease scores in a dose-dependent manner, resulting in complete prevention of symptoms at the dose of 30 mg/kg. The 50% effective dose (ED50 values for ASP2151 and VACV were 0.37 and 68 mg/kg, respectively, indicating that ASP2151 was 184-fold more potent than VACV. When ASP2151 was administered after the onset of symptoms, the disease course of genital herpes was suppressed more effectively than by VACV, with a significant reduction in disease score observed one day after starting ASP2151 at 30 mg/kg, whereas the therapeutic effect of VACV was only evident three days after treatment at the highest dose tested (300 mg/kg. This indicated that ASP2151 possesses a faster onset of action and wider therapeutic time window than VACV. Further, virus shedding from the genital mucosa was significantly reduced with ASP2151 at 10 and 30 mg/kg but not with VACV, even at 300 mg/kg. Taken together, our present findings demonstrated the superior potency and efficacy of ASP2151 against HSV.

  16. Salivary production of IgA and IgG to human herpes virus 8 latent and lytic antigens by patients in whom Kaposi's sarcoma has regressed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbopi-Keou, Francois-Xavier; Legoff, Jerome; Piketty, Christophe; Hocini, Hakim; Malkin, Jean-Elie; Inoue, Naoki; Scully, Crispian M; Porter, Stephen R; Teo, Chong-Gee; Belec, Laurent

    2004-01-23

    IgG and IgA antibodies with specificities to a latent and a lytic antigen of human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8) were detectable in the saliva and serum of eight patients whose Kaposi's sarcoma had regressed, seven of whom were HIV-1 infected. The measurement of antibody-specific activity and secretion rate, and the detection of secretory IgA all indicate anti-HHV-8 antibody activity in saliva. The specific humoral responses possibly influence mucosal replication of HHV-8, and in turn, that of HIV.

  17. Dissection of the beta-globin replication-initiation region reveals specific requirements for replicator elements during gene amplification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoya Okada

    Full Text Available Gene amplification plays a pivotal role in malignant transformation of human cells. A plasmid with both a mammalian replication-initiation region (IR/origin/replicator and a nuclear matrix-attachment region (MAR is spontaneously amplified in transfected cells by a mechanism that involves amplification at the extrachromosomal site, followed by amplification at the chromosomal arm, ultimately generating a long homogeneously staining region (HSR. Several observations suggest that replication initiation from IR sequences might mediate amplification. To test this idea, we previously dissected c-myc and DHFR IRs to identify the minimum sequence required to support amplification. In this study, we applied an improved analysis that discriminates between two amplification steps to the ß-globin RepP IR, which contains separate elements already known to be essential for initiation on the chromosome arm. The IR sequence was required at least for the extrachromosomal amplification step. In addition to the vector-encoded MAR, amplification also required an AT-rich region and a MAR-like element, consistent with the results regarding replicator activity on the chromosome. However, amplification did not require the AG-rich tract necessary for replicator activity, but instead required a novel sequence containing another AG-rich tract. The differential sequence requirement might be a consequence of extrachromosomal replication.

  18. Antiviral and virucidal activity of Chelidonium majus L. extract compared with Acyclovir against Herpes simplex virus type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Sadeghpour Natanzi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: Herpes simplex virus is one of the most important human pathogenic viruses that may lead to oral herpes, keratoconjunctivitis and even encephalitis. A number of enzymes of the virus such as DNA polymerase can be targeted antiviral drugs. Acyclovir is used to treat infections of the virus, today due to drug resistance, need to do more research on finding new drugs, especially herbal medicines has increased. This study aimed to investigate the antiviral effect of methanol extract of Chelidonium majus compared with acyclovir against the virus in HeLa cell culture. Methods: In this experimental study, the toxicity of Chelidonium majus L. methanol extract and acyclovir on HeLa cell was determined with both MTT and Trypan blue methods. The antiviral effect of Chelidonium majus L. extract and acyclovir was evaluated in different concentration (1800- 1700- 1600- 1500- 1400 and 500- 100- 75- 50- 30-10 µg/ml and also in different times before, after and during of virus adsorption respectively.  The virus titer was measured by tissue culture infectious dose 50 TCID50(  method. The T-test method was used to comparing the effects of both compounds on virus. Results: The maximum non-toxic concentration of Chelidonium majus L. extract on HeLa cell was determined 1600 µg/ml that has the maximum inhibitory effect on HSV-1 replication. Acyclovir was shown low toxicity on HeLa cells.The 30 µg/ml concentration of acyclovir was considered for the next steps of the study.The highest inhibitory effect of the extract was observed 1 hour after absorption and the virus replication was suppressed completely by the acyclovir immediately after virus adsorption up to 8 hours after infection. Conclusion: The Chelidonium majus L. methanol extract has less effect than the acyclovir on inhibition of herpes simplex virus replication in a first few hours of infection. More research is needed to achieve effective compounds with antiviral activity of above

  19. Cold Sore, Cold Soul? An Examination of Orolabial Herpes in Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex C. HOLLIDAY

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The sociocultural phenomenon of herpes is attributed to two strains of the herpes simplex virus: herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 causes orolabial cold sores while herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2 is typically identified in genital lesions, though both viruses may cause clinically similar signs and symptoms anywhere in or on the body. While these infections are extremely prevalent and typically benign, media sources such as film have perpetuated a negative public perception of the disease. Thus, a large portion of society continues to associate these conditions with sexual misconduct and moral failing. Despite decades of available antiviral therapy to shorten and suppress outbreaks, movies continue to exploit herpes for degradation and for humor. Portrayal of genital herpes in films is avoided in order to avert unnecessary and grotesque nude scenes, so depictions of cold sores are preferred. This article analyzes the use of orolabial herpes lesions in selected English language films released from 1984-2012.

  20. Herpes Simplex Virus Infection Mimicking Bullous Disease in an Immunocompromised Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne L.Y. Lecluse

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Immunodeficient patients are at risk of developing extended or atypical herpes simplex virus infections, which can be easily misdiagnosed. We present the case of a 79-year-old, treatment-induced (oral corticosteroid, immunocompromised female with an extensive atypical herpes simplex virus infection. This patient presented with multiple erosions and vesicles on the trunk with a subacute onset. The clinical differential diagnosis was herpes simplex infection, herpes zoster infection, pemphigus vulgaris or bullous pemphigoid. Due to the atypical clinical presentation and negative Tzanck test, suspicion of viral infection was low. High-dose steroid treatment was initiated. Subsequent histopathology, however, showed a herpes simplex virus infection. After discontinuing steroid treatment and initiating antiviral treatment, the patient recovered within a week. Emphasis must be placed on the importance of clinical awareness of extended and clinically atypical herpes simplex infections in immunocompromised patients. A negative Tzanck test does not rule out the possibility of a herpes infection.

  1. VectorBase

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — VectorBase is a Bioinformatics Resource Center for invertebrate vectors. It is one of four Bioinformatics Resource Centers funded by NIAID to provide web-based...

  2. Alphavirus vectors: applications for DNA vaccine production and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstrom, K

    2000-01-01

    Replication-deficient alphavirus vectors have been developed for efficient high-level transgene expression. The broad host range of alphaviruses has allowed infection of a wide variety of mammalian cell lines and primary cultures. Particularly, G protein-coupled receptors have been expressed at high levels and subjected to binding and functional studies. Expression in suspension cultures has greatly facilitated production of large quantities of recombinant proteins for structural studies. Injection of recombinant alphavirus vectors into rodent brain resulted in local reporter gene expression. Highly neuron-specific expression was obtained in hippocampal slice cultures in vivo. Additionally, preliminary studies in animal models suggest that alphavirus vectors can be attractive candidates for gene therapy applications. Traditionally alphavirus vectors, either attenuated strains or replication-deficient particles, have been used to elicit efficient immune responses in animals. Recently, the application of alphaviruses has been extended to naked nucleic acids. Injection of DNA as well as RNA vectors has demonstrated efficient antigen production. In many cases, protection against lethal challenges has been obtained after immunization with alphavirus particles or nucleic acid vectors. Alphavirus vectors can therefore be considered as potentially promising vectors for vaccine production.

  3. Increasing trends of herpes zoster in Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raina MacIntyre

    Full Text Available Increasing trends in incidence of herpes zoster (HZ have been reported in Australia and internationally. This may reflect the impact of childhood VZV vaccination programs introduced universally in Australia in late 2005. The objective of this study was to evaluate changes in incidence of HZ and PHN in Australia over time, and associated healthcare resource utilisation.Australian data on general practice (GP encounters for HZ, specific antiviral prescribing data from the pharmaceutical benefits scheme, emergency department presentations from the states of NSW and Victoria and national hospitalisation data for HZ were analysed for time trends using regression models. Two time periods (2000-2006 and 2006-2013 were compared which correspond broadly with the pre- and post- universal VZV vaccination period.All data sources showed increasing rates of HZ with age and over time. The GP database showed a significant annual increase in encounters for HZ of 2.5 per 100,000 between 1998 and 2013, and the rates of prescriptions for HZ increased by 4.2% per year between 2002 and 2012. In the 60+ population HZ incidence was estimated to increase from 11.9 to 15.4 per 1,000 persons using GP data or from 12.8 to 14.2 per 1,000 persons using prescription data (p<0.05, between the two periods. Hospitalisation data did not show the same increasing trend over time, except for the age group ≥80 years. Most emergency visits for HZ were not admitted, and showed significant increases over time.The burden of HZ in Australia is substantial, and continues to increase over time. This increase is seen both pre- and post-universal VZV vaccination in 2005, and is most prominent in the older population. The substantial burden of HZ, along with ageing of the Australian population and the importance of healthy ageing, warrants consideration of HZ vaccination for the elderly.

  4. Latent Herpes Viral Reactivation in Astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, D. L.; Mehta, S. K.; Stowe, R.

    2008-01-01

    Latent viruses are ubiquitous and reactivate during stressful periods with and without symptoms. Latent herpes virus reactivation is used as a tool to predict changes in the immune status in astronauts and to evaluate associated health risks. Methods: Viral DNA was detected by real time polymerase chain reaction in saliva and urine from astronauts before, during and after short and long-duration space flights. Results and Discussion: EpsteinBarr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivated, and viral DNA was shed in saliva (EBV and VZV) or urine (CMV). EBV levels in saliva during flight were 10fold higher than baseline levels. Elevations in EBV specific CD8+ T-cells, viral antibody titers, and specific cytokines were consistent with viral reactivation. Intracellular levels of cytokines were reduced in EBVspecific Tcells. CMV, rarely present in urine of healthy individuals, was shed in urine of 27% of astronauts during all phases of spaceflight. VZV, not found in saliva of asymptomatic individuals, was found in saliva of 50% of astronauts during spaceflight and 35 days after flight. VZV recovered from astronaut saliva was found to be live, infectious virus. DNA sequencing demonstrated that the VZV recovered from astronauts was from the common European strain of VZV. Elevation of stress hormones accompanied viral reactivation indicating involvement of the hypothalmic-pituitary-adrenal and sympathetic adrenal-medullary axes in the mechanism of viral reactivation in astronauts. A study of 53 shingles patients found that all shingles patients shed VZV DNA in their saliva and the VZV levels correlated with the severity of the disease. Lower VZV levels in shingles patients were similar to those observed in astronauts. We proposed a rapid, simple, and cost-effective assay to detect VZV in saliva of patients with suspected shingles. Early detection of VZV infection allows early medical intervention.

  5. Zebrafish: modeling for herpes simplex virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoine, Thessicar Evadney; Jones, Kevin S; Dale, Rodney M; Shukla, Deepak; Tiwari, Vaibhav

    2014-02-01

    For many years, zebrafish have been the prototypical model for studies in developmental biology. In recent years, zebrafish has emerged as a powerful model system to study infectious diseases, including viral infections. Experiments conducted with herpes simplex virus type-1 in adult zebrafish or in embryo models are encouraging as they establish proof of concept with viral-host tropism and possible screening of antiviral compounds. In addition, the presence of human homologs of viral entry receptors in zebrafish such as 3-O sulfated heparan sulfate, nectins, and tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 14-like receptor bring strong rationale for virologists to test their in vivo significance in viral entry in a zebrafish model and compare the structure-function basis of virus zebrafish receptor interaction for viral entry. On the other end, a zebrafish model is already being used for studying inflammation and angiogenesis, with or without genetic manipulations, and therefore can be exploited to study viral infection-associated pathologies. The major advantage with zebrafish is low cost, easy breeding and maintenance, rapid lifecycle, and a transparent nature, which allows visualizing dissemination of fluorescently labeled virus infection in real time either at a localized region or the whole body. Further, the availability of multiple transgenic lines that express fluorescently tagged immune cells for in vivo imaging of virus infected animals is extremely attractive. In addition, a fully developed immune system and potential for receptor-specific knockouts further advocate the use of zebrafish as a new tool to study viral infections. In this review, we focus on expanding the potential of zebrafish model system in understanding human infectious diseases and future benefits.

  6. Herpes simplex virus virion host shutoff function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, A D; Kruper, J A; Frenkel, N

    1988-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) virions contain one or more functions which mediate the shutoff of host protein synthesis and the degradation of host mRNA. HSV type 1 (HSV-1) mutants deficient in the virion shutoff of host protein synthesis (vhs mutants) were isolated and were found to be defective in their ability to degrade host mRNA. Furthermore, it was found that viral mRNAs in cells infected with the vhs 1 mutant have a significantly longer functional half-life than viral mRNAs in wild-type virus-infected cells. In the present study we have mapped the vhs1 mutation affecting the virion shutoff of host protein synthesis to a 265-base-pair NruI-XmaIII fragment spanning map coordinates 0.604 to 0.606 of the HSV-1 genome. The mutation(s) affecting the functional half-lives of host mRNA as well as the alpha (immediate-early), beta (early), and gamma (late) viral mRNAs were also mapped within this 265-base-pair fragment. Thus, the shutoff of host protein synthesis is most likely mediated by the same function which decreases the half-life of viral mRNA. The shorter half-life of infected-cell mRNAs may allow a more rapid modulation of viral gene expression in response to changes in the transcription of viral genes. Interestingly, the vhs1 mutation of HSV-1 maps within a region which overlaps the Bg/II-N sequences of HSV-2 DNA shown previously to transform cells in culture. The possible relationship between the transformation and host shutoff functions are discussed.

  7. Latent Herpes Viral Reactivation in Astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, D. L.; Mehta, S. K.; Stowe, R.

    2008-01-01

    Latent viruses are ubiquitous and reactivate during stressful periods with and without symptoms. Latent herpes virus reactivation is used as a tool to predict changes in the immune status in astronauts and to evaluate associated health risks. Methods: Viral DNA was detected by real time polymerase chain reaction in saliva and urine from astronauts before, during and after short and long-duration space flights. Results and Discussion: EpsteinBarr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), and varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivated, and viral DNA was shed in saliva (EBV and VZV) or urine (CMV). EBV levels in saliva during flight were 10fold higher than baseline levels. Elevations in EBV specific CD8+ T-cells, viral antibody titers, and specific cytokines were consistent with viral reactivation. Intracellular levels of cytokines were reduced in EBVspecific Tcells. CMV, rarely present in urine of healthy individuals, was shed in urine of 27% of astronauts during all phases of spaceflight. VZV, not found in saliva of asymptomatic individuals, was found in saliva of 50% of astronauts during spaceflight and 35 days after flight. VZV recovered from astronaut saliva was found to be live, infectious virus. DNA sequencing demonstrated that the VZV recovered from astronauts was from the common European strain of VZV. Elevation of stress hormones accompanied viral reactivation indicating involvement of the hypothalmic-pituitary-adrenal and sympathetic adrenal-medullary axes in the mechanism of viral reactivation in astronauts. A study of 53 shingles patients found that all shingles patients shed VZV DNA in their saliva and the VZV levels correlated with the severity of the disease. Lower VZV levels in shingles patients were similar to those observed in astronauts. We proposed a rapid, simple, and cost-effective assay to detect VZV in saliva of patients with suspected shingles. Early detection of VZV infection allows early medical intervention.

  8. Charter School Replication. Policy Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhim, Lauren Morando

    2009-01-01

    "Replication" is the practice of a single charter school board or management organization opening several more schools that are each based on the same school model. The most rapid strategy to increase the number of new high-quality charter schools available to children is to encourage the replication of existing quality schools. This policy guide…

  9. On Double Vector Bundles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhuo CHEN; Zhang Ju LIU; Yun He SHENG

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we construct a category of short exact sequences of vector bundles and prove that it is equivalent to the category of double vector bundles. Moreover, operations on double vector bundles can be transferred to operations on the corresponding short exact sequences. In particular, we study the duality theory of double vector bundles in term of the corresponding short exact sequences. Examples including the jet bundle and the Atiyah algebroid are discussed.

  10. On Double Vector Bundles

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Zhuo; Liu, Zhangju; Sheng, Yunhe

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we construct a category of short exact sequences of vector bundles and prove that it is equivalent to the category of double vector bundles. Moreover, operations on double vector bundles can be transferred to operations on the corresponding short exact sequences. In particular, we study the duality theory of double vector bundles in term of the corresponding short exact sequences. Examples including the jet bundle and the Atiyah algebroid are discussed.

  11. The use of local concentrated heat versus topical acyclovir for a herpes labialis outbreak: results of a pilot study under real life conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wohlrab J

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Johannes Wohlrab,1 Franziska Voß,2 Christian Müller,2 Lars C Brenn21Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg, Halle, 2Department of Medical Science and Operations, Riemser Pharma GmbH, Greifswald, GermanyBackground: Frequent outbreak of herpes labialis can affect quality of life by prodromes like burning, itching, and swelling. Topical applied preparations aim to shorten the duration of symptoms, inhibit the virus replication and/or accelerate the healing process. Local concentrated heat (LCH can reduce burning, itching, or swelling of the skin by influence of mechano-heat sensitive afferent neurons.Patients and methods: To examine the effectiveness of two different topical applications (LCH versus topical acyclovir [TACV] under real life conditions, we conducted a prospective, observational, reference-controlled cohort pilot study with 103 patients. Occurrence of prodromal burning, itching, swelling, and quality of life were assessed.Results: The LCH observation group (OG showed a significantly faster improvement in all symptoms after 1-day of application than the TACV OG. The burden and duration of disease was lower and shorter in the LCH OG than in the TACV OG.Conclusions: The prodromal symptoms in recurrent herpes labialis were attenuated more effectively by LCH than by TACV.Keywords: herpes labialis, local concentrated heat, acyclovir

  12. LHCb experience with LFC replication

    CERN Document Server

    Bonifazi, F; Perez, E D; D'Apice, A; dell'Agnello, L; Düllmann, D; Girone, M; Re, G L; Martelli, B; Peco, G; Ricci, P P; Sapunenko, V; Vagnoni, V; Vitlacil, D

    2008-01-01

    Database replication is a key topic in the framework of the LHC Computing Grid to allow processing of data in a distributed environment. In particular, the LHCb computing model relies on the LHC File Catalog, i.e. a database which stores information about files spread across the GRID, their logical names and the physical locations of all the replicas. The LHCb computing model requires the LFC to be replicated at Tier-1s. The LCG 3D project deals with the database replication issue and provides a replication service based on Oracle Streams technology. This paper describes the deployment of the LHC File Catalog replication to the INFN National Center for Telematics and Informatics (CNAF) and to other LHCb Tier-1 sites. We performed stress tests designed to evaluate any delay in the propagation of the streams and the scalability of the system. The tests show the robustness of the replica implementation with performance going much beyond the LHCb requirements.

  13. DATABASE REPLICATION IN HETEROGENOUS PLATFORM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendro Nindito

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of diverse database technologies in enterprises today is increasingly a common practice. To provide high availability and survavibality of real-time information, a database replication technology that has capability to replicate databases under heterogenous platforms is required. The purpose of this research is to find the technology with such capability. In this research, the data source is stored in MSSQL database server running on Windows. The data will be replicated to MySQL running on Linux as the destination. The method applied in this research is prototyping in which the processes of development and testing can be done interactively and repeatedly. The key result of this research is that the replication technology applied, which is called Oracle GoldenGate, can successfully manage to do its task in replicating data in real-time and heterogeneous platforms.

  14. LHCb experience with LFC replication

    CERN Document Server

    Carbone, Angelo; Dafonte Perez, Eva; D'Apice, Antimo; dell'Agnello, Luca; Duellmann, Dirk; Girone, Maria; Lo Re, Giuseppe; Martelli, Barbara; Peco, Gianluca; Ricci, Pier Paolo; Sapunenko, Vladimir; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Vitlacil, Dejan

    2007-01-01

    Database replication is a key topic in the framework of the LHC Computing Grid to allow processing of data in a distributed environment. In particular, the LHCb computing model relies on the LHC File Catalog, i.e. database which stores information about files spread across the GRID, their logical names and the physical locations of all the replicas. The LHCb computing model requires the LFC to be replicated at Tier-1s. The LCG 3D project deals with the database replication issue and provides a replication service based on Oracle Streams technology. This paper describes the deployment of the LHC File Catalog replication to the INFN National Center for Telematics and Informations (CNAF) and to other LHCb Tier-1 sites. We performed stress tests designed to evaluate any delay in the propagation of the streams and the scalability of the system. The tests show the robustness of the replica implementation with performance going much beyond the LHCb requirements.

  15. Custodial vector model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becciolini, Diego; Franzosi, Diogo Buarque; Foadi, Roshan;

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) phenomenology of heavy vector resonances with a $SU(2)_L\\times SU(2)_R$ spectral global symmetry. This symmetry partially protects the electroweak S-parameter from large contributions of the vector resonances. The resulting custodial vector model spectrum...

  16. Custodial vector model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becciolini, Diego; Franzosi, Diogo Buarque; Foadi, Roshan

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) phenomenology of heavy vector resonances with a $SU(2)_L\\times SU(2)_R$ spectral global symmetry. This symmetry partially protects the electroweak S-parameter from large contributions of the vector resonances. The resulting custodial vector model spectrum...

  17. Delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol (THC inhibits lytic replication of gamma oncogenic herpesviruses in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedman Herman

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major psychoactive cannabinoid compound of marijuana, delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, has been shown to modulate immune responses and lymphocyte function. After primary infection the viral DNA genome of gamma herpesviruses persists in lymphoid cell nuclei in a latent episomal circular form. In response to extracellular signals, the latent virus can be activated, which leads to production of infectious virus progeny. Therefore, we evaluated the potential effects of THC on gamma herpesvirus replication. Methods Tissue cultures infected with various gamma herpesviruses were cultured in the presence of increasing concentrations of THC and the amount of viral DNA or infectious virus yield was compared to those of control cultures. The effect of THC on Kaposi's Sarcoma Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV replication was measured by the Gardella method and replication of herpesvirus saimiri (HVS of monkeys, murine gamma herpesvirus 68 (MHV 68, and herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1 was measured by yield reduction assays. Inhibition of the immediate early ORF 50 gene promoter activity was measured by the dual luciferase method. Results Micromolar concentrations of THC inhibit KSHV and EBV reactivation in virus infected/immortalized B cells. THC also strongly inhibits lytic replication of MHV 68 and HVS in vitro. Importantly, concentrations of THC that inhibit virus replication of gamma herpesviruses have no effect on cell growth or HSV-1 replication, indicating selectivity. THC was shown to selectively inhibit the immediate early ORF 50 gene promoter of KSHV and MHV 68. Conclusions THC specifically targets viral and/or cellular mechanisms required for replication and possibly shared by these gamma herpesviruses, and the endocannabinoid system is possibly involved in regulating gamma herpesvirus latency and lytic replication. The immediate early gene ORF 50 promoter activity was specifically inhibited by THC

  18. Adenovirus replication as an in vitro probe for drug sensitivity in human tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, P G; Maynard, K R; Little, J H; McLeod, G R

    1986-04-01

    The feasibility of using adenovirus 5 as an in vitro probe for chemosensitivity in short-term cultures of human tumors was evaluated using human melanoma cell lines and primary cultures of melanoma biopsies. A convenient immunoperoxidase method was developed for quantitating viral replication 2 days after infection. Two different approaches were explored: the host cell reactivation assay (HCR) using drug-treated virus; and the viral capacity assay using drug-treated cells. The HCR assay detected sensitivity to 5-(3-methyl-1-triazeno)imidazole-4-carboxamide (MTIC) in Mer- (methyl excision repair deficient) cell lines as decreased ability of the cells to replicate MTIC-treated virus. This test should be applicable to DNA-damaging agents and repair-deficient tumors. Adenovirus replicated readily in nonproliferating primary cultures of melanoma biopsies; application of the HCR assays to this material identified one Mer- sample of 11 tested. Herpes viruses were not suitable for use in HCR because herpes simplex virus type 1 failed to distinguish Mer- from Mer+ melanoma cells; and nonproductive infection of MTIC-sensitive lymphoid cells with Epstein-Barr virus yielded an MTIC-resistant cell line. The second assay (viral capacity) involved determination of the inhibition of replication of untreated virus in treated cells. This approach correctly predicted sensitivity to hydroxyurea and deoxyadenosine in melanoma cell lines when compared with clonogenic survival assay. Viral capacity was also inhibited by cytosine arabinoside, fluorouracil, vincristine, adriamycin, 6-mercaptopurine and ionising radiation, and may therefore be useful for detecting sensitivity to a wide range of antitumor agents.

  19. Use of DNA and recombinant canarypox viral (ALVAC) vectors for equine herpes virus vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minke, J M; Fischer, L; Baudu, Ph; Guigal, P M; Sindle, T; Mumford, J A; Audonnet, J C

    2006-05-15

    In this study, experimental canarypox virus (ALVAC) and plasmid DNA recombinant vaccines expressing the gB, gC and gD glycoproteins of EHV-1 were assessed for their ability to protect conventional ponies against a respiratory challenge with EHV-1. In addition, potential means of enhancing serological responses in horses to ALVAC and DNA vaccination were explored. These included co-administration of the antigen with conventional adjuvants, complexation with DMRIE-DOPE and co-expression of the antigen along with equine GM-CSF. Groups of EHV primed ponies were vaccinated twice intra-muscularly with one dose of the appropriate test vaccine at an interval of 5 weeks. Two to 3 weeks after the second vaccination, ponies were infected intra-nasally with the virulent Ab4 strain of EHV-1 after which they were observed clinically and sampled for virological investigations. The results demonstrated that DNA and ALVAC vaccination markedly reduced virus excretion after challenge in terms of duration and magnitude, but failed to protect against cell-associated viremia. Noteworthy was the almost complete absence of virus excretion in the group of ponies vaccinated with ALVAC-EHV in the presence of Carbopol adjuvant or DNA plasmid formulated with aluminium phosphate. The administration of the DNA vaccine in the presence of GM-CSF and formulated in DMRIE-DOPE and of the ALVAC vaccine in the presence of Carbopol adjuvant significantly improved virus neutralising antibody responses to EHV-1. These findings indicate that DNA and ALVAC vaccination is a promising approach for the immunological control of EHV-1 infection, but that more research is needed to identify the immunodominant protective antigens of EHV-1 and their interaction with the equine immune system.

  20. NACSA Charter School Replication Guide: The Spectrum of Replication Options. Authorizing Matters. Replication Brief 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Paul

    2010-01-01

    One of the most important and high-profile issues in public education reform today is the replication of successful public charter school programs. With more than 5,000 failing public schools in the United States, there is a tremendous need for strong alternatives for parents and students. Replicating successful charter school models is an…

  1. Genome Sequence of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Strain SC16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastrojo, Alberto; López-Muñoz, Alberto Domingo

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), also known as Human herpesvirus 1, is a highly prevalent human neurotropic pathogen that causes a variety of diseases, including lethal encephalitis. Here, we report the genome sequence of the HSV-1 strain SC16. PMID:28126930

  2. Computed tomography in young children with herpes simplex virus encephalitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugimoto, T.; Woo, M.; Okazaki, H.; Nishida, N.; Hara, T.; Yasuhara, A.; Kasahara, M.; Kobayashi, Y.

    1985-09-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) scans were obtained from eight infants and young children with herpes simplex virus encephalitis. In two cases the initial scan showed diffuse edematous changes as a mass effect without laterality. Unilateral localized low attenuation in the initial scan was evident 4 days after the onset in one patient, and high attenuation in the initial scan appeared on the 6th day in another patient, but in general, it was not possible to establish an early diagnosis of herpes simplex virus encephalitis from CT scan. In the longitudinal study the calcification with ventriculomegaly appeared in 3 of 5 survivors, and gyriform calcification in 2 of 3 patients, respectively. The appearance of multicystic encephalomalacia was evident in one patient 6 months after the onset of neonatal herpes simplex encephalitis. It is shown that the CT findings of neonates and young children with herpes simplex encephalitis are different from those of older children and adults, and the importance of longitudinal CT studies was stressed in clarifying the pathophysiology of the central nervous system involvement in survivors.

  3. Recurrence of bilateral herpes simplex virus keratitis following bimatoprost use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kothari Mihir

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A 76-year-old man presented with features of bilateral herpes simplex virus (HSV keratitis. It was found to be recurrence of bilateral HSV keratitis following the use of Bimatoprost eye drops for uncontrolled intraocular pressure in a case of bilateral primary open-angle glaucoma.

  4. Task Force: Routine Genital Herpes Screening Not Recommended

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160205.html Task Force: Routine Genital Herpes Screening Not Recommended Unless someone ... Aug. 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A U.S. federal task force is prepared to recommend that teens, adults and ...

  5. Cost-effectiveness of vaccination against herpes zoster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Pieter; Wilschut, Jan C.; Postma, Maarten J.

    2014-01-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) is a common disease among elderly, which may develop into a severe pain syndrome labeled postherpetic neuralgia (PHN). A live-attenuated varicella zoster virus vaccine has been shown to be effective in reducing the incidence and burden of illness of HZ and PHN, providing the oppor

  6. Occipital neuralgia evoked by facial herpes zoster infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Takeshi; Shimohama, Shun

    2006-01-01

    Occipital neuralgia is a pain syndrome which may usually be induced by spasms of the cervical muscles or trauma to the greater or lesser occipital nerves. We report a patient with occipital neuralgia followed by facial herpes lesion. A 74-year-old male experienced sudden-onset severe headache in the occipital area. The pain was localized to the distribution of the right side of the greater occipital nerve, and palpation of the right greater occipital nerve reproduces the pain. He was diagnosed with occipital neuralgia according to ICHD-II criteria. A few days later, the occipital pain was followed by reddening of the skin and the appearance, of varying size, of vesicles on the right side of his face (the maxillary nerve and the mandibular nerve region). This was diagnosed as herpes zoster. This case represents a combination of facial herpes lesions and pain in the C2 and C3 regions. The pain syndromes can be confusing, and the classic herpes zoster infection should be considered even when no skin lesions are established.

  7. The "Other" Venereal Diseases: Herpes Simplex, Trichomoniasis and Candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNab, Warren L.

    1979-01-01

    Although the term venereal disease has been synonymous with gonorrhea and syphilis, the Center for Disease Control now states that the number of new cases of herpes simplex, trichomoniasis, and candidiasis is rapidly approaching the number of cases of syphilis and gonorrhea. (MM)

  8. Breakthrough VZV infection after immunization, presenting as herpes zoster.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schade, R.P.; Bakkers, J.; Cornelissen, M.; Koster-Kamphuis, L.; Melchers, W.J.G.; Galama, J.M.D.

    2008-01-01

    An immunocompromized, VZV-vaccinated child had a breakthrough infection with VZV, acquired at a day-care centre during a chickenpox outbreak. Interestingly, the infection manifested as herpes zoster of 1 dermatome. Typing showed wild-type virus, which suggests that exogenous reinfection with a new s

  9. Herpes zoster in psoriasis patients treated with tofacitinib

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winthrop, Kevin L; Lebwohl, Mark; Cohen, Arnon D

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tofacitinib is an oral Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitor. Immunomodulatory therapies can increase the risk for herpes zoster (HZ) in patients with psoriasis. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relationship between tofacitinib use and HZ risk. METHODS: We used phases 2 and 3 and long-term extension...

  10. SD大鼠白细胞介素10复制缺陷型重组腺病毒的构建及鉴定术%Construction and identification of recombinant replication- defective adenovirus vector containing interleukin-10 in a rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李爽; 宋仁刚; 唐冰; 朱斌; 朱旭红; 朱家源; 毕良宽

    2009-01-01

    背景:重组腺病毒质粒的构建是重组腺病毒制备过程中的中枢环节,传统的细胞内同源重组法步骤多、成功率低、实验周期长.目的:构建含有大鼠白细胞介素10(rlL-10)基因的重组复制缺陷型腺病毒Ad.rlL-10,为真核表达及其动物模型的研究提供实验基础.设计、时间及地点:开放性实验,于2005-07/2006-04在中山大学附属第一医院完成.材料:SD大鼠1只.AdEasy系统由美国John Hopkins肿瘤研究中心惠赠.ThermoscriptTMRT kit 和Trizol 为Invitrogen产品;HEK-293保存于中山大学动物实验中心细胞库;克隆大鼠白细胞介素10基因引物合成及测序由上海博亚生物技术有限公司完成.方法:采用反转录聚合酶链反应的方法从健康SD大鼠脾脏新鲜组织中提取的总RNA中克隆rIL-10基因,采用AdEasy-1腺病毒载体系统经E.CoilBJ5183细菌内同源重组及HEK.293包装而获得重组腺病毒Ad.rlL-10.主要观察指标:用Western blot和RT-PCR的方法鉴定Ad.rlL-10并进行滴度测定.结果:自健康SD大鼠脾脏组织中克隆rIL-10基因,构建出重组腺病毒Ad.rlL-10.经PCR扩增、酶切鉴定、DNA 测序最终确定插入序列为rlL-1 0,Western blot和RT-PCR均检测出细胞内rlL-10基因及其蛋白表达.再通过扩增、纯化后获得滴度为1.0x1014pfu/mL的重组腺病毒.结论:采用AdEasy-1系统,经细HEK-293细胞包装、扩增,纯化后获得足够数量和质量的病毒,方法简便易行,结果稳定可靠.%BACKGROUND: Construction of recombinant adenovirus plasmid plays a central role in preparation of recombinant adenovirus.However, conventionally intracellular homologous recombination method is limited by complex procedures, low successful ratio,and long experimental cycle.OBJECTIVE: To construct the recombinant replication-defective adenovirus vector containing interleukin-10 (Ad.dL-10) in a SD rat, and to provide experimental evidences for eukaryotic expression and animat model studying

  11. The extreme carboxyl terminus of the equine herpesvirus 1 homolog of herpes simplex virus VP16 is essential for immediate-early gene activation.

    OpenAIRE

    Elliott, G D

    1994-01-01

    Gene 12 of equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1), the homolog of herpes simplex virus (HSV) VP16 (alpha TIF, Vmw65), was cloned into a eukaryotic expression vector by PCR and used in transactivation studies of both the EHV-1 and HSV-1 IE1 promoters. Results demonstrated that the product of gene 12 is a potent transactivator of immediate-early gene expression of both viruses, which requires sequences in the upstream HSV-1 promoter for activity. Mutational analysis of the gene 12 open reading frame indi...

  12. Bacterial vaginosis, human papilloma virus and herpes viridae do not predict vaginal HIV RNA shedding in women living with HIV in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessman, Maria; Thorsteinsson, Kristina; Jensen, Jørgen S; Storgaard, Merete; Rönsholt, Frederikke F; Johansen, Isik S; Pedersen, Gitte; Nørregård Nielsen, Lars; Bonde, Jesper; Katzenstein, Terese L; Weis, Nina; Lebech, Anne-Mette

    2017-05-31

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) has been found to be associated with HIV acquisition and transmission. This is suggested to be due to higher HIV RNA levels in cervicovaginal fluids in women living with HIV (WLWH) with BV, as bacteria associated with BV may induce viral replication and shedding in the genital tract despite undetectable HIV RNA plasma viral load. We examined the prevalence and diagnostic predictors of BV and HIV-1 RNA vaginal shedding in women living with HIV (WLWH) in Denmark, taking into account the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) and herpes viridae. WLWH between 18-51 years were recruited from six Departments of Infectious Diseases in Denmark during enrolment in the SHADE cohort; a prospective cohort study of WLWH attending regular outpatient care. BV was diagnosed by microscopy of vaginal swabs and PCR was used for detection of BV-associated bacteria, HPV, herpes viridae, and vaginal HIV viral load. Median age of the 150 included women was 41 years; ethnicity was predominantly White (35%) or Black (47%). The majority (96%) was on ART and had undetectable (85%) plasma HIV RNA (<40 copies/mL). BV was diagnosed in 32%. Overall, 11% had detectable vaginal HIV RNA. Both before and after adjustment for BV, age, ethnicity, plasma HIV RNA, CD4 cell count, herpes viridae and HPV, we found no significant predictors of HIV RNA vaginal shedding. In well-treated WLWH, BV, herpes viridae or HPV do not predict vaginal HIV RNA shedding. This implies that HIV shedding does not seem to be increased by BV.

  13. International Expansion through Flexible Replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsson, Anna; Foss, Nicolai Juul

    2011-01-01

    to local environments and under the impact of new learning. To illuminate these issues, we draw on a longitudinal in-depth study of Swedish home furnishing giant IKEA, involving more than 70 interviews. We find that IKEA has developed organizational mechanisms that support an ongoing learning process aimed......, etc.) are replicated in a uniform manner across stores, and change only very slowly (if at all) in response to learning (“flexible replication”). We conclude by discussing the factors that influence the approach to replication adopted by an international replicator....

  14. Herpes virus seroepidemiology in the adult Swedish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Jan; Kok, Eloise; Adolfsson, Rolf; Lövheim, Hugo; Elgh, Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    Herpes viruses establish a life-long latency and can cause symptoms during both first-time infection and later reactivation. The aim of the present study was to describe the seroepidemiology of Herpes simplex type 1 (HSV1), Herpes simplex type 2 (HSV2), Cytomegalovirus (CMV), Varicella Zoster virus (VZV) and Human herpes virus type 6 (HHV6) in an adult Swedish population (35-95 years of age). Presence of antibodies against the respective viruses in serum from individuals in the Betula study was determined with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Singular samples from 535 persons (53.9% women, mean age at inclusion 62.7 ± 14.4 years) collected 2003-2005 were analyzed for the five HHVs mentioned above. In addition, samples including follow-up samples collected 1988-2010 from 3,444 persons were analyzed for HSV. Prevalence of HSV1 was 79.4%, HSV2 12.9%, CMV 83.2%, VZV 97.9%, and HHV6 97.5%. Herpes virus infections were more common among women (p = 0.010) and a lower age-adjusted HSV seroprevalence was found in later birth cohorts (p < 0.001). The yearly incidence of HSV infection was estimated at 14.0/1000. Women are more often seropositive for HHV, especially HSV2. Age-adjusted seroprevalence for HSV was lower in later birth cohorts indicating a decreasing childhood and adolescent risk of infection.

  15. The dynamics of neopterin level in patients with herpes zoster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Yakubenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neopterin is a specific marker of cellular immunity and monocytes/macrophages activation. Correlation between serum neopterin levels and clinical features of herpes zoster is unknown.The objective of the study was to determine the concentration of serum neopterin in patients with herpes zoster.Methods: 55 patients with herpes zoster (30 HIV-positive and 25 HIV-negative were included. Serum neopterin levels were measured three times during the observation period (before onset of treatment with acyclovir, on the 3rd day of treatment and after healing of skin lesions. The clinical course and dynamics of laboratory data were also evaluated.Results: The study showed that elevated serum neopterin levels were found in all patients with herpes zoster. Neopterin concentrations were significantly reduced during acyclovir treatment (from 30 (17; 32 to 12 (11; 27 nmol/L (p = 0,0000001, but remained above the upper limit of normal by the time skin lesions were healed in most patients. Neopterin levels before and after treatment weren’t associated with HIV-status. Neopterin concentration was slightly higher in patients with HIV infection on the third day of observation only, that could reflect the abnormal immunoreactivity of this host. Neopterin levels in patients with varicella zoster viremia were higher compared to patients without viremia on the third day of treatment with acyclovir (23.5 (12,7; 30,0 and 12 (4,2, 24,5 nmol/L, respectively, p = 0,037.Conclusions: These results suggest that the dynamics of serum neopterin could be a marker of effectiveness of immune response in herpes zoster.

  16. Incidence of herpes zoster infections in juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmrich, S; Horneff, G

    2015-03-01

    The risk of herpes zoster among patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) exposed to biologics has not been evaluated. We determined incidence rates of herpes zoster among children with JIA in correlation with medication at time of occurrence and total drug exposure. The German biologics register database was used to identify patients with herpes zoster. Crude infection rates and incidence ratios (IRR) were compared to published rates. Demographics and overall exposure and particular exposure time to corticosteroids, immunosuppressive drugs and biologics were analyzed. The JIA cohort included 3,042 patients with 5,557.9 person-years of follow-up; 1,628 have used corticosteroids, 2,930 methotrexate and 1,685 etanercept. In total, 17 herpes zoster events have been documented [6/1,000 patients (3.5-9.0); 3.1/1,000 patient-years (1.9-4.9)]. Thus, the incidence rate in JIA patients was higher than expected [IRR 2.9 (1.8-4.5), p herpes zoster. Compared to the healthy population, a significant higher IRR is observed in JIA patients who received a monotherapy with etanercept or in combination with steroids and methotrexate, but not in JIA patients exposed to methotrexate without biologics. In comparison with our control group of patients treated with methotrexate, the IRR was higher for exposure to etanercept monotherapy and combination of etanercept and corticosteroids irrespective of methotrexate use. A generally higher incidence rate in JIA patients treated with etanercept was observed. No serious or refractory manifestations occurred.

  17. Neonatal herpes infections in The Netherlands in the period 2006-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemelaar, Steffannie J A L; Poeran, Jashvant; Steegers, Eric A P; van der Meijden, Willem I

    2015-05-01

    To monitor the incidence of neonatal herpes in The Netherlands between 2006 and 2011, as well as the adherence to the rather conservative Dutch prevention policy. Questionnaires were sent to all virology laboratories (n = 44), gynaecology and paediatrics departments of all hospitals in The Netherlands (n = 89). Questionnaires for the laboratories pertained to rates of proven cases of neonatal herpes; for the gynaecologists and paediatricians it pertained to rates of genital herpes during pregnancy and neonatal herpes, and their policy. For gynaecologists this concerned the risk of herpes simplex virus transmission in case of primary genital herpes during pregnancy or labour; for paediatricians it concerned the diagnostic policy in a neonate suspected of neonatal herpes. For the period 2006-2011 38 cases of neonatal herpes were reported, yielding an incidence of 4.7 per 100,000 births. The estimated annual number of pregnant women with primary or recurrent genital herpes was 278. Of the responding gynaecologists and paediatricians, only 59% and up to 39%, respectively, reported a policy in accordance with the national guideline. The incidence of neonatal herpes in The Netherlands seems to have increased in the period 2006-2011. Combined with suboptimal guideline adherence this warrants strategies to improve awareness and subsequent adherence.

  18. Increased risk of cardiovascular events in patients with herpes zoster: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Po-yuan; Lin, Cheng-Li; Sung, Fung-Chang; Chou, Tzu-Chieh; Lee, Yuan-Teh

    2014-05-01

    The association between herpes zoster and cardiovascular complications remains vague with limited study on the association between these two disorders. This study evaluated the risk of cardiovascular diseases in patients with herpes zoster. From insurance claims data of Taiwan, 19,483 patients with herpes zoster diagnosed in 1998-2008 and 77,932 subjects without herpes zoster were identified in this study. Both cohorts were followed up until the end of 2010 to measure the incidence of arrhythmia and coronary artery disease. The incidence rate ratio and adjusted hazard ratio (HR) of the cardiovascular complications with 95% confidence interval (CI) were estimated. The incidence of arrhythmia was 1.17-fold greater in the herpes zoster cohort than in the non-herpes zoster cohort (13.2 vs. 11.3 per 1,000 person-years), with an adjusted HR of 1.16 (P herpes zoster cohort was 1.16-fold higher than that in the non-herpes zoster cohort (9.02 vs. 7.83 per 1,000 person-years), with an adjusted HR of 1.11 (P herpes zoster diagnosis. The risk measured for these disorders declined over time. Comorbidities of hypertension, diabetes, and hyperlipidemia also contributed to these cardiovascular disorders with greater extent. It is concluded that the contribution of herpes zoster to the risk of arrhythmia and cardiovascular diseases is less strong than that of hypertension, diabetes, and hyperlipidemia.

  19. Alphavirus vectors as tools in neuroscience and gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2016-05-02

    Alphavirus-based vectors have been engineered for in vitro and in vivo expression of heterelogous genes. The rapid and easy generation of replication-deficient recombinant particles and the broad range of host cell infection have made alphaviruses attractive vehicles for applications in neuroscience and gene therapy. Efficient delivery to primary neurons and hippocampal slices has allowed localization studies of gene expression and electrophysiological recordings of ion channels. Alphavirus vectors have also been applied for in vivo delivery to rodent brain. Due to the strong local transient expression provided by alphavirus vectors a number of immunization and gene therapy approaches have demonstrated both therapeutic and prophylactic efficacy in various animal models.

  20. The Psychology of Replication and Replication in Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Gregory

    2012-11-01

    Like other scientists, psychologists believe experimental replication to be the final arbiter for determining the validity of an empirical finding. Reports in psychology journals often attempt to prove the validity of a hypothesis or theory with multiple experiments that replicate a finding. Unfortunately, these efforts are sometimes misguided because in a field like experimental psychology, ever more successful replication does not necessarily ensure the validity of an empirical finding. When psychological experiments are analyzed with statistics, the rules of probability dictate that random samples should sometimes be selected that do not reject the null hypothesis, even if an effect is real. As a result, it is possible for a set of experiments to have too many successful replications. When there are too many successful replications for a given set of experiments, a skeptical scientist should be suspicious that null or negative findings have been suppressed, the experiments were run improperly, or the experiments were analyzed improperly. This article describes the implications of this observation and demonstrates how to test for too much successful replication by using a set of experiments from a recent research paper.

  1. Regulation of Replication Recovery and Genome Integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colding, Camilla Skettrup

    Preserving genome integrity is essential for cell survival. To this end, mechanisms that supervise DNA replication and respond to replication perturbations have evolved. One such mechanism is the replication checkpoint, which responds to DNA replication stress and acts to ensure replication pausing...

  2. The product of the Herpes simplex virus 1 UL7 gene interacts with a mitochondrial protein, adenine nucleotide translocator 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawaguchi Yasushi

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 UL7 gene is highly conserved among herpesviridae. Since the construction of recombinant HSV-1 with a mutation in the UL7 gene has not been reported, the involvement of HSV-1 UL7 in viral replication has been unclear. In this study, we succeeded in generating a UL7 null HSV-1 mutant virus, MT102, and characterized it. Our results were as follows. (i In Vero cells, MT102 was replication-competent, but formed smaller plaques and yielded 10- to 100-fold fewer progeny than the wild-type virus, depending on the multiplicity of infection. (ii Using mass spectrometry-based proteomics technology, we identified a cellular mitochondrial protein, adenine nucleotide translocator 2 (ANT2, as a UL7-interacting partner. (iii When ANT2 was transiently expressed in COS-7 cells infected with HSV-1, ANT2 was specifically co-precipitated with UL7. (iv Cell fractionation experiments with HSV-1-infected cells detected the UL7 protein in both the mitochondrial and cytosolic fractions, whereas ANT2 was detected only in the mitochondrial fraction. These results indicate the importance of HSV-1 UL7's involvement in viral replication and demonstrate that it interacts with ANT2 in infected cells. The potential biological significance of the interaction between UL7 and ANT2 is discussed.

  3. The polysulfonated compound suramin blocks adsorption and lateral difusion of herpes simplex virus type-1 in vero cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, J S; Rice, M; Wagner, E K

    1999-05-25

    Several polysulfonate compounds have been shown to have the potential to inhibit the replication of herpesviruses by blocking binding and penetration of the host cell. We analyzed the actions of the polysulfonate compound suramin on the replication of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and compared them with the actions of heparin. We used the expression of a reporter gene (beta-galactosidase) recombined into the latency-associated transcript region of the 17syn+ strain of HSV-1 to quickly evaluate productive cycle activity and have shown that it can be directly correlated with virus replication under the conditions used. We find that suramin, like heparin, blocks the binding of HSV-1 to the cell membrane. Also, suramin efficiently blocks the cell-to-cell spread of the virus; this effect has not been previously reported. Our control experiments demonstrate that heparin also has some effect on intercellular spread of HSV-1 but to a significantly lesser degree than does suramin. We suggest that suramin and related polysulfonate compounds have potential for developing of antiherpes treatments.

  4. New tools to convert bacterial artificial chromosomes to a self-excising design and their application to a herpes simplex virus type 1 infectious clone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Alexsia L; Sollars, Patricia J; Smith, Gregory A

    2016-08-31

    Infectious clones are fundamental tools for the study of many viruses, allowing for efficient mutagenesis and reproducible production of genetically-defined strains. For the large dsDNA genomes of the herpesviridae, bacterial artificial chromosomes have become the cloning vector of choice due to their capacity to house full-length herpesvirus genomes as single contiguous inserts. Furthermore, while maintained as plasmids in Escherichia coli, the clones can be mutated using robust prokaryotic recombination systems. An important consideration in the design of these clones is the means by which the vector backbone is removed from the virus genome upon delivery into mammalian cells. A common approach to vector excision is to encode loxP sites flanking the vector sequences and rely on Cre recombinase expression from a transformed cell line. Here we examine the efficiency of vector removal using this method, and describe a "self-excising" infectious clone of HSV-1 strain F that offers enhancements in virus production and utility. Insertion of a fluorescent protein expression cassette into the vector backbone of the HSV-1 strain F clone, pYEbac102, demonstrated that 2 serial passages on cells expressing Cre recombinase was required to achieve > 95 % vector removal from the virus population, with 3 serial passages resulting in undetectable vector retention. This requirement was eliminated by replacing the reporter coding sequence with the CREin gene, which consists of a Cre coding sequence disrupted by a synthetic intron. This self-excising variant of the infectious clone produced virus that propagated with wild-type kinetics in culture and lacked vector attenuation in a mouse neurovirulence model. Conversion of a herpesvirus infectious clone into a self-excising variant enables rapid production of viruses lacking bacterial vector sequences, and removes the requirement to initially propagate viruses in cells that express Cre recombinase. The self-excising bacterial

  5. Amplified and Persistent Immune Responses Generated by Single-Cycle Replicating Adenovirus Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Catherine M.; Nehete, Pramod; Sastry, K. Jagannadha

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Replication-competent adenoviral (RC-Ad) vectors generate exceptionally strong gene-based vaccine responses by amplifying the antigen transgenes they carry. While they are potent, they also risk causing adenovirus infections. More common replication-defective Ad (RD-Ad) vectors with deletions of E1 avoid this risk but do not replicate their transgene and generate markedly weaker vaccine responses. To amplify vaccine transgenes while avoiding production of infectious progeny viruses, we engineered “single-cycle” adenovirus (SC-Ad) vectors by deleting the gene for IIIa capsid cement protein of lower-seroprevalence adenovirus serotype 6. In mouse, human, hamster, and macaque cells, SC-Ad6 still replicated its genome but prevented genome packaging and virion maturation. When used for mucosal intranasal immunization of Syrian hamsters, both SC-Ad and RC-Ad expressed transgenes at levels hundreds of times higher than that of RD-Ad. Surprisingly, SC-Ad, but not RC-Ad, generated higher levels of transgene-specific antibody than RD-Ad, which notably climbed in serum and vaginal wash samples over 12 weeks after single mucosal immunization. When RD-Ad and SC-Ad were tested by single sublingual immunization in rhesus macaques, SC-Ad generated higher gamma interferon (IFN-γ) responses and higher transgene-specific serum antibody levels. These data suggest that SC-Ad vectors may have utility as mucosal vaccines. IMPORTANCE This work illustrates the utility of our recently developed single-cycle adenovirus (SC-Ad6) vector as a new vaccine platform. Replication-defective (RD-Ad6) vectors produce low levels of transgene protein, which leads to minimal antibody responses in vivo. This study shows that replicating SC-Ad6 produces higher levels of luciferase and induces higher levels of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-specific antibodies than RD in a permissive Syrian hamster model. Surprisingly, although a replication-competent (RC-Ad6) vector produces more luciferase

  6. siRNA-mediated inhibition of HBV replication and expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Nan Zhang; Wei Xiong; Jia-Dong Wang; Yun-Wen Hu; Li Xiang; Zheng-Hong Yuan

    2004-01-01

    AIM: RNA interference (RNAi) is a newly discovered phenomenon provoked by dsRNA. The dsRNA is initially cleaved by Dicer into 21-23 nt small interfering RNA (siRNA)and can then specifically target homologous mRNA for degradation by cellular ribonucleases. RNAi has been successfully utilized to down-regulate the endogenous gene expression or suppress the replication of various pathogens in mammalian cells. In this study, we investigated whether vector-based siRNA promoted by U6 (pSilencer1.0-U6)could efficiently inhibit HBV replication in cell culture.METHODS: pSilencer vectors with inserts targeting on different regions of HBV genome were constructed. These plasmids were co-transfected with pHBV3.8 into Huh-7 cells via lipofection and viral antigens were measured by ELISA.Viral RNA was analyzed by Northern blot. The mRNA of MxA and 2′-5′OAS was reverse transcribed and quantified by real-time PCR.RESULTS: Vector-based siRNA could potently reduce hepatitis B virus antigen expression in transient replicative cell culture. Furthermore, Northern blot analysis showed that viral RNA was effectively degraded, thus eliminating the messengers for protein expression as well as template for reverse transcription. Real-time PCR analysis of cellular MxA and 2′-5′OAS gene expression revealed that vectorbased siRNA did not provoke the interferon pathway which reassured the specificity of the vector-based RNA interference technique.CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that RNA interference may be a potential tool to control HBV infection.

  7. Biomarkers of replicative senescence revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nehlin, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers of replicative senescence can be defined as those ultrastructural and physiological variations as well as molecules whose changes in expression, activity or function correlate with aging, as a result of the gradual exhaustion of replicative potential and a state of permanent cell cycle...... with their chronological age and present health status, help define their current rate of aging and contribute to establish personalized therapy plans to reduce, counteract or even avoid the appearance of aging biomarkers....

  8. Nucleotide Metabolism and DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Digby F; Evans, Joanna C; Mizrahi, Valerie

    2014-10-01

    The development and application of a highly versatile suite of tools for mycobacterial genetics, coupled with widespread use of "omics" approaches to elucidate the structure, function, and regulation of mycobacterial proteins, has led to spectacular advances in our understanding of the metabolism and physiology of mycobacteria. In this article, we provide an update on nucleotide metabolism and DNA replication in mycobacteria, highlighting key findings from the past 10 to 15 years. In the first section, we focus on nucleotide metabolism, ranging from the biosynthesis, salvage, and interconversion of purine and pyrimidine ribonucleotides to the formation of deoxyribonucleotides. The second part of the article is devoted to DNA replication, with a focus on replication initiation and elongation, as well as DNA unwinding. We provide an overview of replication fidelity and mutation rates in mycobacteria and summarize evidence suggesting that DNA replication occurs during states of low metabolic activity, and conclude by suggesting directions for future research to address key outstanding questions. Although this article focuses primarily on observations from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, it is interspersed, where appropriate, with insights from, and comparisons with, other mycobacterial species as well as better characterized bacterial models such as Escherichia coli. Finally, a common theme underlying almost all studies of mycobacterial metabolism is the potential to identify and validate functions or pathways that can be exploited for tuberculosis drug discovery. In this context, we have specifically highlighted those processes in mycobacterial DNA replication that might satisfy this critical requirement.

  9. Alpha interferon-induced antiviral response noncytolytically reduces replication defective adenovirus DNA in MDBK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ju-Tao; Zhou, Tianlun; Guo, Haitao; Block, Timothy M

    2007-12-01

    Although alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) is of benefit in the treatment of viral hepatitis B, HBV replication has been refractory to the cytokine in commonly used hepatocyte-derived cell lines. In search for a cell culture system to study the mechanism by which IFN-alpha inhibits HBV replication, we infected a variety of cell lines with an adenoviral vector containing a replication competent 1.3-fold genome length HBV DNA (AdHBV) and followed by incubation with IFN-alpha. We found that IFN-alpha efficiently decreased the level of HBV DNA replicative intermediates in AdHBV infected Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells. Further analysis revealed, surprisingly, that IFN-alpha did not directly inhibit HBV replication, rather the amount of adenovirus DNA in the nuclei of MDBK cells was reduced. As a consequence, HBV RNA transcription and DNA replication were inhibited. Experiments with adenoviral vector expressing a green fluorescent protein (GFP) further supported the notion that IFN-alpha treatment noncytolytically eliminated adenovirus DNA, but did not kill the vector infected MDBK cells. Our data suggest that IFN-alpha-induced antiviral program is able to discriminate host cellular DNA from episomal viral DNA and might represent a novel pathway of interferon mediate innate defense against DNA virus infections.

  10. Retrotransposon vectors for gene delivery in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou Yi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retrotransposons are abundant components of plant genomes, and although some plant retrotransposons have been used as insertional mutagens, these mobile genetic elements have not been widely exploited for plant genome manipulation. In vertebrates and yeast, retrotransposons and retroviruses are routinely altered to carry additional genes that are copied into complementary (cDNA through reverse transcription. Integration of cDNA results in gene delivery; recombination of cDNA with homologous chromosomal sequences can create targeted gene modifications. Plant retrotransposon-based vectors, therefore, may provide new opportunities for plant genome engineering. Results A retrotransposon vector system was developed for gene delivery in plants based on the Tnt1 element from Nicotiana tabacum. Mini-Tnt1 transfer vectors were constructed that lack coding sequences yet retain the 5' and 3' long terminal repeats (LTRs and adjacent cis sequences required for reverse transcription. The internal coding region of Tnt1 was replaced with a neomycin phosphotransferase gene to monitor replication by reverse transcription. Two different mini-Tnt1 s were developed: one with the native 5' LTR and the other with a chimeric 5' LTR that had the first 233 bp replaced by the CaMV 35 S promoter. After transfer into tobacco protoplasts, both vectors undergo retrotransposition using GAG and POL proteins provided in trans by endogenous Tnt1 elements. The transposition frequencies of mini-Tnt1 vectors are comparable with native Tnt1 elements, and like the native elements, insertion sites are within or near coding sequences. In this paper, we provide evidence that template switching occurs during mini-Tnt1 reverse transcription, indicating that multiple copies of Tnt1 mRNA are packaged into virus-like particles. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that mini-Tnt1 vectors can replicate efficiently in tobacco cells using GAG and POL proteins provided in trans by

  11. Vector Soliton Fiber Lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Han

    2011-01-01

    Solitons, as stable localized wave packets that can propagate long distance in dispersive media without changing their shapes, are ubiquitous in nonlinear physical systems. Since the first experimental realization of optical bright solitons in the anomalous dispersion single mode fibers (SMF) by Mollenauer et al. in 1980 and optical dark solitons in the normal dispersion SMFs by P. Emplit et al. in 1987, optical solitons in SMFs had been extensively investigated. In reality a SMF always supports two orthogonal polarization modes. Taking fiber birefringence into account, it was later theoretically predicted that various types of vector solitons, including the bright-bright vector solitons, dark-dark vector solitons and dark-bright vector solitons, could be formed in SMFs. However, except the bright-bright type of vector solitons, other types of vector solitons are so far lack of clear experimental evidence. Optical solitons have been observed not only in the SMFs but also in mode locked fiber lasers. It has be...

  12. Global transcriptional analysis reveals surface remodeling of anaplasma marginale in the tick vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Pathogens dependent upon vectors for transmission to new hosts undergo environment specific changes in gene transcription dependent on whether they are replicating in the vector or the mammalian host. Differential gene transcription, especially of potential vaccine candidates, is of inte...

  13. Vehicle Based Vector Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-28

    300001 1 of 16 VEHICLE-BASED VECTOR SENSOR STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The invention described herein may be manufactured and...unmanned underwater vehicle that can function as an acoustic vector sensor . (2) Description of the Prior Art [0004] It is known that a propagating...mechanics. An acoustic vector sensor measures the particle motion via an accelerometer and combines Attorney Docket No. 300001 2 of 16 the

  14. Implicit Real Vector Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-François Degbomont

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the symbolic representation of non-convex real polyhedra, i.e., sets of real vectors satisfying arbitrary Boolean combinations of linear constraints. We develop an original data structure for representing such sets, based on an implicit and concise encoding of a known structure, the Real Vector Automaton. The resulting formalism provides a canonical representation of polyhedra, is closed under Boolean operators, and admits an efficient decision procedure for testing the membership of a vector.

  15. Vectors and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Pettofrezzo, Anthony J

    2005-01-01

    Geared toward undergraduate students, this text illustrates the use of vectors as a mathematical tool in plane synthetic geometry, plane and spherical trigonometry, and analytic geometry of two- and three-dimensional space. Its rigorous development includes a complete treatment of the algebra of vectors in the first two chapters.Among the text's outstanding features are numbered definitions and theorems in the development of vector algebra, which appear in italics for easy reference. Most of the theorems include proofs, and coordinate position vectors receive an in-depth treatment. Key concept

  16. Complex Polynomial Vector Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dias, Kealey

    vector fields. Since the class of complex polynomial vector fields in the plane is natural to consider, it is remarkable that its study has only begun very recently. There are numerous fundamental questions that are still open, both in the general classification of these vector fields, the decomposition...... or meromorphic (allowing poles as singularities) functions. There already exists a well-developed theory for iterative holomorphic dynamical systems, and successful relations found between iteration theory and flows of vector fields have been one of the main motivations for the recent interest in holomorphic...

  17. Herpes zoster – available epidemiological data in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Sočan

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Herpes zoster results from reactivation of latent varicella zoster virus (VZV in dorsal nerve ganglia. Herpes zoster is characterized by a painful dermatomal vesicular rash. Reactivation results from impaired cell-mediated immunity. The determinants of reactivation in individuals with no underlying immunosuppression are poorly understood. The introduction of vaccination against varicella is expected to lower the incidence rate of chicken pox. The influence of vaccination on herpes zoster morbidity is not clear and demands enhanced surveillance. Before the introduction of vaccination, the available epidemiological data should be analyzed for the availability, value and shortcomings.Methods: The data from two electronic data-sets of Institute of Public Health of the Republic Slovenia were analysed: notified cases and number of consultations on primary level for herpes zoster – »ZUBSTAT« (data set of all first visits in primary care, Institute of Public Health of the Republic Slovenia. The data were stratified by age and sex. The hospitalization data were extracted from Eletronic data set for diseases which require hospitalization (entitled BOLOB, IPH. For notified and hospitalized cases also the month when shigles appeared was available.Results: The number of notified cases increased steadily from year 1995 when mandatory reporting has been implemented. In year 2005 the incidence rate rose to 74/100,000. Approximately a quarter of cases (23.4 % was 70 years of age or older. According to the second data-set, which encompasses first visits in primary care, 5891 to 6527 patients were coded as herpes zoster. The incidence rate increases with age, being highest after age of 65 years (675 to 760/100,000. Women have higher incidence rate of herpes zoster in almost all age groups. The distribution of notified cases suggests seasonal peak in summer. The highest number of admissions was in September and October.Conclusions: The number of

  18. Herpes zoster correlates with increased risk of Parkinson's disease in older people

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Shih-Wei; Lin, Chih-Hsueh; Lin, Hsien-Feng; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Liao, Kuan-Fu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Little is known on the relationship between herpes zoster and Parkinson's disease in older people. This study aimed to explore whether herpes zoster could be associated with Parkinson's disease in older people in Taiwan. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using the claim data of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program. There were 10,296 subjects aged 65 years and older with newly diagnosed herpes zoster as the herpes zoster group and 39,405 randomly selected subjects aged 65 years and older without a diagnosis of herpes zoster as the nonherpes zoster group from 1998 to 2010. Both groups were followed up until subjects received a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. This follow-up design would explore whether subjects with herpes zoster were at an increased risk of Parkinson's disease. Relative risks were estimated by adjusted hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) using the multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model. The incidence of Parkinson's disease was higher in the herpes zoster group than that in the nonherpes zoster group (4.86 vs 4.00 per 1000 person-years, 95% CI 1.14, 1.29). After adjustment for confounding factors, the multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model revealed that the adjusted HR of Parkinson's disease was 1.17 for the herpes zoster group (95% CI 1.10, 1.25), compared with the nonherpes zoster group. Older people with herpes zoster confer a slightly increased hazard of developing Parkinson's disease when compared to those without herpes zoster. We think that herpes zoster correlates with increased risk of Parkinson's disease in older people. When older people with herpes zoster seek help, clinicians should pay more attention to the development of the cardinal symptoms of Parkinson's disease. PMID:28207515

  19. Association of human endogenous retroviruses with multiple sclerosis and possible interactions with herpes viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tove

    2005-01-01

    may be members of the Herpesviridae. Several herpes viruses, such as HSV-1, VZV, EBV and HHV-6, have been associated with MS pathogenesis, and retroviruses and herpes viruses have complex interactions. The current understanding of HERVs, and specifically the investigations of HERV activation...... and expression in MS are the major subjects of this review, which also proposes to synergise the herpes and HERV findings, and presents several possible pathogenic mechanisms for HERVs in MS. Copyright (c) 2005 ...

  20. The HIV protease inhibitor nelfinavir inhibits Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus replication in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Soren; Carlsson, Jacquelyn; Ikoma, Minako; Gachelet, Eliora; Gray, Matthew; Geballe, Adam P; Corey, Lawrence; Casper, Corey; Lagunoff, Michael; Vieira, Jeffrey

    2011-06-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is the most common HIV-associated cancer worldwide and is associated with high levels of morbidity and mortality in some regions. Antiretroviral (ARV) combination regimens have had mixed results for KS progression and resolution. Anecdotal case reports suggest that protease inhibitors (PIs) may have effects against KS that are independent of their effect on HIV infection. As such, we evaluated whether PIs or other ARVs directly inhibit replication of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), the gammaherpesvirus that causes KS. Among a broad panel of ARVs tested, only the PI nelfinavir consistently displayed potent inhibitory activity against KSHV in vitro as demonstrated by an efficient quantitative assay for infectious KSHV using a recombinant virus, rKSHV.294, which expresses the secreted alkaline phosphatase. This inhibitory activity of nelfinavir against KSHV replication was confirmed using virus derived from a second primary effusion lymphoma cell line. Nelfinavir was similarly found to inhibit in vitro replication of an alphaherpesvirus (herpes simplex virus) and a betaherpesvirus (human cytomegalovirus). No activity was observed with nelfinavir against vaccinia virus or adenovirus. Nelfinavir may provide unique benefits for the prevention or treatment of HIV-associated KS and potentially other human herpesviruses by direct inhibition of replication.