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Sample records for replicate genetic associations

  1. Replication of genetic associations as pseudoreplication due to shared genealogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Noah A; Vanliere, Jenna M

    2009-09-01

    The genotypes of individuals in replicate genetic association studies have some level of correlation due to shared descent in the complete pedigree of all living humans. As a result of this genealogical sharing, replicate studies that search for genotype-phenotype associations using linkage disequilibrium between marker loci and disease-susceptibility loci can be considered as "pseudoreplicates" rather than true replicates. We examine the size of the pseudoreplication effect in association studies simulated from evolutionary models of the history of a population, evaluating the excess probability that both of a pair of studies detect a disease association compared to the probability expected under the assumption that the two studies are independent. Each of nine combinations of a demographic model and a penetrance model leads to a detectable pseudoreplication effect, suggesting that the degree of support that can be attributed to a replicated genetic association result is less than that which can be attributed to a replicated result in a context of true independence.

  2. On the replication of genetic associations: timing can be everything!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasky-Su, Jessica; Lyon, Helen N; Emilsson, Valur; Heid, Iris M; Molony, Cliona; Raby, Benjamin A; Lazarus, Ross; Klanderman, Barbara; Soto-Quiros, Manuel E; Avila, Lydiana; Silverman, Edwin K; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Kronenberg, Florian; Vollmert, Caren; Illig, Thomas; Fox, Caroline S; Levy, Daniel; Laird, Nan; Ding, Xiao; McQueen, Matt B; Butler, Johannah; Ardlie, Kristin; Papoutsakis, Constantina; Dedoussis, George; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Wichmann, H-Erich; Celedón, Juan C; Schadt, Eric; Hirschhorn, Joel; Weiss, Scott T; Stefansson, Kari; Lange, Christoph

    2008-04-01

    The failure of researchers to replicate genetic-association findings is most commonly attributed to insufficient statistical power, population stratification, or various forms of between-study heterogeneity or environmental influences.(1) Here, we illustrate another potential cause for nonreplications that has so far not received much attention in the literature. We illustrate that the strength of a genetic effect can vary by age, causing "age-varying associations." If not taken into account during the design and the analysis of a study, age-varying genetic associations can cause nonreplication. By using the 100K SNP scan of the Framingham Heart Study, we identified an age-varying association between a SNP in ROBO1 and obesity and hypothesized an age-gene interaction. This finding was followed up in eight independent samples comprising 13,584 individuals. The association was replicated in five of the eight studies, showing an age-dependent relationship (one-sided combined p = 3.92 x 10(-9), combined p value from pediatric cohorts = 2.21 x 10(-8), combined p value from adult cohorts = 0.00422). Furthermore, this study illustrates that it is difficult for cross-sectional study designs to detect age-varying associations. If the specifics of age- or time-varying genetic effects are not considered in the selection of both the follow-up samples and in the statistical analysis, important genetic associations may be missed.

  3. Replication of genetic association studies in aortic stenosis in adults.

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    Gaudreault, Nathalie; Ducharme, Valérie; Lamontagne, Maxime; Guauque-Olarte, Sandra; Mathieu, Patrick; Pibarot, Philippe; Bossé, Yohan

    2011-11-01

    Only a handful of studies have attempted to unravel the genetic architecture of calcific aortic valve stenosis (AS). The goal of this study was to validate genes previously associated with AS. Seven genes were assessed: APOB, APOE, CTGF, IL10, PTH, TGFB1, and VDR. Each gene was tested for a comprehensive set of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). SNPs were genotyped in 457 patients who underwent surgical aortic valve replacement, and allele frequencies were compared to 3,294 controls. A missense mutation in the APOB gene was significantly associated with AS (rs1042031, E4181K, p = 0.00001). A second SNP located 5.6 kilobases downstream of the APOB stop codon was also associated with the disease (rs6725189, p = 0.000013). Six SNPs surrounding the IL10 locus were strongly associated with AS (0.02 > p > 6.2 × 10⁻¹¹). The most compelling association for IL10 was found with a promoter polymorphism (rs1800872) well known to regulate the production of the encoded anti-inflammatory cytokine. The frequency of the low-producing allele was greater in cases compared to controls (30% vs 20%, p = 6.2 × 10⁻¹¹). SNPs in PTH, TGFB1, and VDR had nominal p values <0.05 but did not resist Bonferroni correction. In conclusion, this study suggests that subjects carrying specific polymorphisms in the IL10 and APOB genes are at higher risk for developing AS.

  4. [Replicative association analysis of genetic markers of cognitive traits with Alzheimer's disease in a Russian population].

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    Stepanov, V A; Bocharova, A V; Marusin, A V; Zhukova, N G; Alifirova, V M; Zhukova, I A

    2014-01-01

    Replicative association analysis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) with 15 genetic markers associated with cognitive traits in genome-wide association studies was performed. In a Russian populations associations of rs2616984 in CSMD1 gene with AD (OR = 1.50, 95% CI = 1.07-2.09, p-value = 0.018) and putative associations with the disease of rs3131296 in NOTCH4 gene (OR = 1.53, 95% CI = 0.98-2.39, p-value = 0.06) and rs2229741 of NRIP1 gene (OR = 1.35, CI = 0.99-1.85, p-value = 0.061) were revealed. Combinations of epistatic interacting genes (CSMD1 and NRIP1; NOTCH4, CSMD1 and NRIP1; TLR4, CSMD1 and NRIP1) were found, as well as their genotypes combinations significantly associated with AD and characterized by highest predictive values. Probable molecular mechanisms implicated in the relation of genes under study to AD pathogenesis are discussed. Bioinformatic analysis of biological processes, molecular functions and protein-protein interactions of BA genes demonstrated that genes under study may play modulating and modifying role by participation in various regulatory and signal pathways involved in a disease development.

  5. Genetic and epigenetic differences associated with environmental gradients in replicate populations of two salt marsh perennials.

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    Foust, C M; Preite, V; Schrey, A W; Alvarez, M; Robertson, M H; Verhoeven, K J F; Richards, C L

    2016-04-01

    While traits and trait plasticity are partly genetically based, investigating epigenetic mechanisms may provide more nuanced understanding of the mechanisms underlying response to environment. Using AFLP and methylation-sensitive AFLP, we tested the hypothesis that differentiation to habitats along natural salt marsh environmental gradients occurs at epigenetic, but not genetic loci in two salt marsh perennials. We detected significant genetic and epigenetic structure among populations and among subpopulations, but we found multilocus patterns of differentiation to habitat type only in epigenetic variation for both species. In addition, more epigenetic than genetic loci were correlated with habitat in both species. When we analysed genetic and epigenetic variation simultaneously with partial Mantel, we found no correlation between genetic variation and habitat and a significant correlation between epigenetic variation and habitat in Spartina alterniflora. In Borrichia frutescens, we found significant correlations between epigenetic and/or genetic variation and habitat in four of five populations when populations were analysed individually, but there was no significant correlation between genetic or epigenetic variation and habitat when analysed jointly across the five populations. These analyses suggest that epigenetic mechanisms are involved in the response to salt marsh habitats, but also that the relationships among genetic and epigenetic variation and habitat vary by species. Site-specific conditions may also cloud our ability to detect response in replicate populations with similar environmental gradients. Future studies analysing sequence data and the correlation between genetic variation and DNA methylation will be powerful to identify the contributions of genetic and epigenetic response to environmental gradients.

  6. Replication of recently identified systemic lupus erythematosus genetic associations : a case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suarez-Gestal, Marian; Calaza, Manuel; Endreffy, Emoeke; Pullmann, Rudolf; Ordi-Ros, Josep; Sebastiani, Gian Domenico; Ruzickova, Sarka; Santos, Maria Jose; Papasteriades, Chryssa; Marchini, Maurizio; Skopouli, Fotini N.; Suarez, Ana; Blanco, Francisco J.; D'Alfonso, Sandra; Bijl, Marc; Carreira, Patricia; Witte, Torsten; Migliaresi, Sergio; Gomez-Reino, Juan J.; Gonzalez, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Introduction We aimed to replicate association of newly identified systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) loci. Methods We selected the most associated SNP in 10 SLE loci. These 10 SNPs were analysed in 1,579 patients with SLE and 1,726 controls of European origin by single-base extension. Comparison of

  7. Genetic and epigenetic differences associated with environmental gradients in replicate populations of two salt marsh perennials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foust, C.M.; Preite, V.; Schrey, Aaron W.; Alvarez, M.; Robertson, M.H.; Verhoeven, K.J.F.; Richards, C.L.

    2016-01-01

    While traits and trait plasticity are partly genetically based, investigating epigenetic mechanisms may provide more nuanced understanding of the mechanisms underlying response to environment. Using AFLP and methylation-sensitive AFLP, we tested the hypothesis that differentiation to habitats along

  8. Using autonomous replication to physically and genetically define human origins of replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krysan, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    The author previously developed a system for studying autonomous replication in human cells involving the use of sequences from the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome to provide extrachromosomal plasmids with a nuclear retention function. Using this system, it was demonstrated that large fragments of human genomic DNA could be isolated which replicate autonomously in human cells. In this study the DNA sequences which function as origins of replication in human cells are defined physically and genetically. These experiments demonstrated that replication initiates at multiple locations distributed throughout the plasmid. Another line of experiments addressed the DNA sequence requirements for autonomous replication in human cells. These experiments demonstrated that human DNA fragments have a higher replication activity than bacterial fragments do. It was also found, however, that the bacterial DNA sequence could support efficient replication if enough copies of it were present on the plasmid. These findings suggested that autonomous replication in human cells does not depend on extensive, specific DNA sequences. The autonomous replication system which the author has employed for these experiments utilizes a cis-acting sequence from the EBV origin and the trans-acting EBNA-1 protein to provide plasmids with a nuclear retention function. It was therefore relevant to verify that the autonomous replication of human DNA fragments did not depend on the replication activity associated with the EBV sequences utilized for nuclear retention. To accomplish this goal, the author demonstrated that plasmids carrying the EBV sequences and large fragments of human DNA could support long-term autonomous replication in hamster cells, which are not permissive for EBV replication.

  9. GWAS for discovery and replication of genetic loci associated with sudden cardiac arrest in patients with coronary artery disease

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    Olgin Jeffrey E

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epidemiologic evidence suggests a heritable component to risk for sudden cardiac arrest independent of risk for myocardial infarction. Recent candidate gene association studies for community sudden cardiac arrests have focused on a limited number of biological pathways and yielded conflicting results. We sought to identify novel gene associations for sudden cardiac arrest in patients with coronary artery disease by performing a genome-wide association study. Methods Tagging SNPs (n = 338,328 spanning the genome were typed in a case-control study comparing 89 patients with coronary artery disease and sudden cardiac arrest due to ventricular tachycardia or ventricular fibrillation to 520 healthy controls. Results Fourteen SNPs including 7 SNPs among 7 genes (ACYP2, AP1G2, ESR1, DGES2, GRIA1, KCTD1, ZNF385B were associated with sudden cardiac arrest (all p -7, following Bonferroni correction and adjustment for population substructure, age, and sex; genetic variation in ESR1 (p = 2.62 × 10-8; Odds Ratio [OR] = 1.43, 95% confidence interval [CI]:1.277, 1.596 has previously been established as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. In tandem, the role of 9 genes for monogenic long QT syndrome (LQT1-9 was assessed, yielding evidence of association with CACNA1C (LQT8; p = 3.09 × 10-4; OR = 1.18, 95% CI:1.079, 1.290. We also assessed 4 recently published gene associations for sudden cardiac arrest, validating NOS1AP (p = 4.50 × 10-2, OR = 1.15, 95% CI:1.003, 1.326, CSMD2 (p = 6.6 × 10-3, OR = 2.27, 95% CI:1.681, 2.859, and AGTR1 (p = 3.00 × 10-3, OR = 1.13, 95% CI:1.042, 1.215. Conclusion We demonstrate 11 gene associations for sudden cardiac arrest due to ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation in patients with coronary artery disease. Validation studies in independent cohorts and functional studies are required to confirm these associations.

  10. Replicating Cardiovascular Condition-Birth Month Associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Boland, Mary Regina; Miotto, Riccardo; Tatonetti, Nicholas P.; Dudley, Joel T.

    2016-01-01

    Independent replication is vital for study findings drawn from Electronic Health Records (EHR). This replication study evaluates the relationship between seasonal effects at birth and lifetime cardiovascular condition risk. We performed a Season-wide Association Study on 1,169,599 patients from Mount Sinai Hospital (MSH) to compute phenome-wide associations between birth month and CVD. We then evaluated if seasonal patterns found at MSH matched those reported at Columbia University Medical Center. Coronary arteriosclerosis, essential hypertension, angina, and pre-infarction syndrome passed phenome-wide significance and their seasonal patterns matched those previously reported. Atrial fibrillation, cardiomyopathy, and chronic myocardial ischemia had consistent patterns but were not phenome-wide significant. We confirm that CVD risk peaks for those born in the late winter/early spring among the evaluated patient populations. The replication findings bolster evidence for a seasonal birth month effect in CVD. Further study is required to identify the environmental and developmental mechanisms. PMID:27624541

  11. Single nucleotide polymorphisms within LIPA (Lysosomal Acid Lipase A gene are associated with susceptibility to premature coronary artery disease. a replication in the genetic of atherosclerotic disease (GEA Mexican study.

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    Gilberto Vargas-Alarcón

    Full Text Available AIM: The rs1412444 and rs2246833 polymorphisms within the LIPA gene were recently found to be significantly associated with coronary artery disease (CAD in genome-wide association studies in Caucasian and Asian populations. The aim of the present study was to replicate this association in an independent population with a different genetic background. METHODS: The rs1412444 and rs2246833 polymorphisms of the LIPA gene were genotyped by 5' exonuclease TaqMan genotyping assays in a sample of 899 Mexican patients with premature CAD, 270 individuals with subclinical atherosclerosis, and 677 healthy unrelated controls. Haplotypes were constructed after linkage disequilibrium analysis. RESULTS: Under recessive and additive models, the rs1412444 T and rs2246833 T alleles were associated with an increased risk of premature CAD when compared to controls adjusting for age, gender, BMI, and total cholesterol (OR = 1.53, PRec = 0.0013 and OR = 1.34, PAdd = 5 × 10(-4 for rs1412444 and OR = 1.45, PRec = 0.0039 and OR = 1.28, PAdd = 0.0023 for rs2246833. The effect of the two polymorphisms on various metabolic cardiovascular risk factors was analyzed in premature CAD and controls (CAC score = 0. The T alleles in both polymorphisms after adjusting for age, gender, BMI, and medication were associated with hypo-α-lipoproteinemia, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes mellitus using recessive and additive models. The polymorphisms were in strong linkage disequilibrium and, based on SNP functional prediction software, only the rs1412444 polymorphism seemed to be functional. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that the rs1412444 and rs2246833 of the LIPA gene are shared susceptibility polymorphisms for CAD among different ethnicities.

  12. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms within LIPA (Lysosomal Acid Lipase A) Gene Are Associated with Susceptibility to Premature Coronary Artery Disease. A Replication in the Genetic of Atherosclerotic Disease (GEA) Mexican Study

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    Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Posadas-Romero, Carlos; Villarreal-Molina, Teresa; Alvarez-León, Edith; Angeles, Javier; Vallejo, Maite; Posadas-Sánchez, Rosalinda; Cardoso, Guillermo; Medina-Urrutia, Aida; Kimura-Hayama, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Aim The rs1412444 and rs2246833 polymorphisms within the LIPA gene were recently found to be significantly associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) in genome-wide association studies in Caucasian and Asian populations. The aim of the present study was to replicate this association in an independent population with a different genetic background. Methods The rs1412444 and rs2246833 polymorphisms of the LIPA gene were genotyped by 5′ exonuclease TaqMan genotyping assays in a sample of 899 Mexican patients with premature CAD, 270 individuals with subclinical atherosclerosis, and 677 healthy unrelated controls. Haplotypes were constructed after linkage disequilibrium analysis. Results Under recessive and additive models, the rs1412444 T and rs2246833 T alleles were associated with an increased risk of premature CAD when compared to controls adjusting for age, gender, BMI, and total cholesterol (OR = 1.53, PRec = 0.0013 and OR = 1.34, PAdd = 5 × 10-4 for rs1412444 and OR = 1.45, PRec = 0.0039 and OR = 1.28, PAdd = 0.0023 for rs2246833). The effect of the two polymorphisms on various metabolic cardiovascular risk factors was analyzed in premature CAD and controls (CAC score = 0). The T alleles in both polymorphisms after adjusting for age, gender, BMI, and medication were associated with hypo-α-lipoproteinemia, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes mellitus using recessive and additive models. The polymorphisms were in strong linkage disequilibrium and, based on SNP functional prediction software, only the rs1412444 polymorphism seemed to be functional. Conclusions These results indicate that the rs1412444 and rs2246833 of the LIPA gene are shared susceptibility polymorphisms for CAD among different ethnicities. PMID:24069331

  13. Uncovering the genetic signature of quantitative trait evolution with replicated time series data.

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    Franssen, S U; Kofler, R; Schlötterer, C

    2017-01-01

    The genetic architecture of adaptation in natural populations has not yet been resolved: it is not clear to what extent the spread of beneficial mutations (selective sweeps) or the response of many quantitative trait loci drive adaptation to environmental changes. Although much attention has been given to the genomic footprint of selective sweeps, the importance of selection on quantitative traits is still not well studied, as the associated genomic signature is extremely difficult to detect. We propose 'Evolve and Resequence' as a promising tool, to study polygenic adaptation of quantitative traits in evolving populations. Simulating replicated time series data we show that adaptation to a new intermediate trait optimum has three characteristic phases that are reflected on the genomic level: (1) directional frequency changes towards the new trait optimum, (2) plateauing of allele frequencies when the new trait optimum has been reached and (3) subsequent divergence between replicated trajectories ultimately leading to the loss or fixation of alleles while the trait value does not change. We explore these 3 phase characteristics for relevant population genetic parameters to provide expectations for various experimental evolution designs. Remarkably, over a broad range of parameters the trajectories of selected alleles display a pattern across replicates, which differs both from neutrality and directional selection. We conclude that replicated time series data from experimental evolution studies provide a promising framework to study polygenic adaptation from whole-genome population genetics data.

  14. Replication of SNP associations with keratoconus in a Czech cohort.

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    Liskova, Petra; Dudakova, Lubica; Krepelova, Anna; Klema, Jiri; Hysi, Pirro G

    2017-01-01

    Keratoconus is a relatively frequent disease leading to severe visual impairment. Existing therapies are imperfect and clinical management may benefit from improved understanding of mechanisms leading to this disease. We aim to investigate the replication of 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with keratoconus. SNPs from loci previously found in association with keratoconus were genotyped in 165 keratoconus cases of Caucasian Czech origin (108 males and 57 females) and 193 population and gender-matched controls. They included rs1536482 (COL5A1), rs4839200 (KCND3), rs757219 and rs214884 (IMMP2L), rs1328083 and rs1328089 (DAOA), rs2721051 (FOXO1), rs4894535 (FNDC3B), rs4954218 (MAP3K19, RAB3GAP1), rs9938149 (ZNF469) and rs1324183 (MPDZ). A case-control association analysis was assessed using Fisher's exact tests. The strongest association was found for rs1324183 (allelic test OR = 1.58; 95% CI, 1.10-2.24, p = 0.01). Statistically significant values were also obtained for rs2721051 (allelic test OR = 1.72; 95% CI, 1.07-2.77, p = 0.025) and rs4954218 (allelic test OR = 1.53; 95% CI, 1.01-2.34; p = 0.047) which showed an opposite effect direction compared to previously reported one. Independent replication of association between two SNPs and keratoconus supports the association of these loci with the risks for the disease development, while the effect of rs4954218 warrants further investigation. Understanding the role of the genetic factors involved in keratoconus etiopathogenesis may facilitate development of novel therapies and an early detection.

  15. Replication of SNP associations with keratoconus in a Czech cohort

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    Krepelova, Anna; Klema, Jiri; Hysi, Pirro G.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Keratoconus is a relatively frequent disease leading to severe visual impairment. Existing therapies are imperfect and clinical management may benefit from improved understanding of mechanisms leading to this disease. We aim to investigate the replication of 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with keratoconus. Methods SNPs from loci previously found in association with keratoconus were genotyped in 165 keratoconus cases of Caucasian Czech origin (108 males and 57 females) and 193 population and gender-matched controls. They included rs1536482 (COL5A1), rs4839200 (KCND3), rs757219 and rs214884 (IMMP2L), rs1328083 and rs1328089 (DAOA), rs2721051 (FOXO1), rs4894535 (FNDC3B), rs4954218 (MAP3K19, RAB3GAP1), rs9938149 (ZNF469) and rs1324183 (MPDZ). A case-control association analysis was assessed using Fisher’s exact tests. Results The strongest association was found for rs1324183 (allelic test OR = 1.58; 95% CI, 1.10–2.24, p = 0.01). Statistically significant values were also obtained for rs2721051 (allelic test OR = 1.72; 95% CI, 1.07–2.77, p = 0.025) and rs4954218 (allelic test OR = 1.53; 95% CI, 1.01–2.34; p = 0.047) which showed an opposite effect direction compared to previously reported one. Conclusion Independent replication of association between two SNPs and keratoconus supports the association of these loci with the risks for the disease development, while the effect of rs4954218 warrants further investigation. Understanding the role of the genetic factors involved in keratoconus etiopathogenesis may facilitate development of novel therapies and an early detection. PMID:28207827

  16. Replication of a genetic variant for prostate cancer-specific mortality.

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    Penney, K L; Shui, I M; Feng, Z; Sesso, H D; Stampfer, M J; Stanford, J L

    2015-09-01

    Few genetic variants have been confirmed as being associated with prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM). A recent study identified 22 candidate single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with PCSM in a Seattle-based patient cohort. Five of these associations were replicated in an independent Swedish cohort. We genotyped these 22 SNPs in Physicians' Health Study (PHS) participants diagnosed with prostate cancer (PCa). Using the same model that was found to be most significant in the Seattle cohort, we examined the association of these SNPs with lethal disease with Cox proportional hazards models. One SNP, rs5993891 in the ARVCF gene on chromosome 22q11, which had also replicated in the Swedish cohort, was also significantly associated with PCSM in the PHS cohort (hazard ratio (HR)=0.32; P=0.01). When we tested this SNP in an additional cohort (Health Professionals Follow-up Study, HPFS), the association was null (HR=0.95, P=0.90); however, a meta-analysis across all studies showed a statistically significant association with a HR of 0.52 (0.29-0.93, P=0.03). The association of rs5993891 with PCSM was further replicated in PHS and remains significant in a meta-analysis, though there was no association in HPFS. This SNP may contribute to a genetic panel of SNPs to determine at diagnosis whether a patient is more likely to exhibit an indolent or aggressive form of PCa. This study also emphasizes the importance of multiple rounds of replication.

  17. Genetic Loci Associated With Plasma Concentration of Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol, High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol, Triglycerides, Apolipoprotein A1, and Apolipoprotein B Among 6382 White Women in Genome-Wide Analysis With Replication

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chasman, Daniel I; Pare, Guillaume; Zee, Robert Y.L; Parker, Alex N; Cook, Nancy R; Buring, Julie E; Kwiatkowski, David J; Rose, Lynda M; Smith, Joshua D; Williams, Paul T; Rieder, Mark J; Rotter, Jerome I; Nickerson, Deborah A; Krauss, Ronald M; Miletich, Joseph P; Ridker, Paul M

    2008-01-01

    Genetic Loci Associated With Plasma Concentration of Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol, High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol, Triglycerides, Apolipoprotein A1, and Apolipoprotein B Among 6382 White...

  18. SNP CHARACTERISTICS PREDICT REPLICATION SUCCESS IN ASSOCIATION STUDIES

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    Gorlov, Ivan P.; Moore, Jason H.; Peng, Bo; Jin, Jennifer L.; Gorlova, Olga Y.; Amos, Christopher I.

    2014-01-01

    Successful independent replication is the most direct approach for distinguishing real genotype-disease associations from false discoveries in Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS). Selecting SNPs for replication has been primarily based on p-values from the discovery stage, although additional characteristics of SNPs may be used to improve replication success. We used disease-associated SNPs from more than 2,000 published GWASs to identify predictors of SNP reproducibility. SNP reproducibility was defined as a proportion of successful replications among all replication attempts. The study reporting association for the first time was considered to be discovery and all consequent studies targeting the same phenotype replications. We found that −Log(P), where P is a p-value from the discovery study, is the strongest predictor of the SNP reproducibility. Other significant predictors include type of the SNP (e.g. missense vs intronic SNPs) and minor allele frequency. Features of the genes linked to the disease-associated SNP also predict SNP reproducibility. Based on empirically defined rules, we developed a reproducibility score (RS) to predict SNP reproducibility independently of −Log(P). We used data from two lung cancer GWAS studies as well as recently reported disease-associated SNPs to validate RS. Minus Log(P) outperforms RS when the very top SNPs are selected, while RS works better with relaxed selection criteria. In conclusion, we propose an empirical model to predict SNP reproducibility, which can be used to select SNPs for validation and prioritization. PMID:25273843

  19. Analytical strategies for discovery and replication of genetic effects in pharmacogenomic studies

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    Kohler JR

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Jared R Kohler, Tobias Guennel, Scott L MarshallBioStat Solutions, Inc., Frederick, MD, USAAbstract: In the past decade, the pharmaceutical industry and biomedical research sector have devoted considerable resources to pharmacogenomics (PGx with the hope that understanding genetic variation in patients would deliver on the promise of personalized medicine. With the advent of new technologies and the improved collection of DNA samples, the roadblock to advancements in PGx discovery is no longer the lack of high-density genetic information captured on patient populations, but rather the development, adaptation, and tailoring of analytical strategies to effectively harness this wealth of information. The current analytical paradigm in PGx considers the single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP as the genomic feature of interest and performs single SNP association tests to discover PGx effects – ie, genetic effects impacting drug response. While it can be straightforward to process single SNP results and to consider how this information may be extended for use in downstream patient stratification, the rate of replication for single SNP associations has been low and the desired success of producing clinically and commercially viable biomarkers has not been realized. This may be due to the fact that single SNP association testing is suboptimal given the complexities of PGx discovery in the clinical trial setting, including: 1 relatively small sample sizes; 2 diverse clinical cohorts within and across trials due to genetic ancestry (potentially impacting the ability to replicate findings; and 3 the potential polygenic nature of a drug response. Subsequently, a shift in the current paradigm is proposed: to consider the gene as the genomic feature of interest in PGx discovery. The proof-of-concept study presented in this manuscript demonstrates that genomic region-based association testing has the potential to improve the power of detecting single SNP or

  20. Genome-wide association of bipolar disorder suggests an enrichment of replicable associations in regions near genes.

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    Erin N Smith

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Although a highly heritable and disabling disease, bipolar disorder's (BD genetic variants have been challenging to identify. We present new genotype data for 1,190 cases and 401 controls and perform a genome-wide association study including additional samples for a total of 2,191 cases and 1,434 controls. We do not detect genome-wide significant associations for individual loci; however, across all SNPs, we show an association between the power to detect effects calculated from a previous genome-wide association study and evidence for replication (P = 1.5×10(-7. To demonstrate that this result is not likely to be a false positive, we analyze replication rates in a large meta-analysis of height and show that, in a large enough study, associations replicate as a function of power, approaching a linear relationship. Within BD, SNPs near exons exhibit a greater probability of replication, supporting an enrichment of reproducible associations near functional regions of genes. These results indicate that there is likely common genetic variation associated with BD near exons (±10 kb that could be identified in larger studies and, further, provide a framework for assessing the potential for replication when combining results from multiple studies.

  1. Genome-wide association of bipolar disorder suggests an enrichment of replicable associations in regions near genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin N Smith

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Although a highly heritable and disabling disease, bipolar disorder's (BD genetic variants have been challenging to identify. We present new genotype data for 1,190 cases and 401 controls and perform a genome-wide association study including additional samples for a total of 2,191 cases and 1,434 controls. We do not detect genome-wide significant associations for individual loci; however, across all SNPs, we show an association between the power to detect effects calculated from a previous genome-wide association study and evidence for replication (P = 1.5×10(-7. To demonstrate that this result is not likely to be a false positive, we analyze replication rates in a large meta-analysis of height and show that, in a large enough study, associations replicate as a function of power, approaching a linear relationship. Within BD, SNPs near exons exhibit a greater probability of replication, supporting an enrichment of reproducible associations near functional regions of genes. These results indicate that there is likely common genetic variation associated with BD near exons (±10 kb that could be identified in larger studies and, further, provide a framework for assessing the potential for replication when combining results from multiple studies.

  2. Poor replication validity of biomedical association studies reported by newspapers

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    Smith, Andy; Boraud, Thomas; Gonon, François

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the replication validity of biomedical association studies covered by newspapers. Methods We used a database of 4723 primary studies included in 306 meta-analysis articles. These studies associated a risk factor with a disease in three biomedical domains, psychiatry, neurology and four somatic diseases. They were classified into a lifestyle category (e.g. smoking) and a non-lifestyle category (e.g. genetic risk). Using the database Dow Jones Factiva, we investigated the newspaper coverage of each study. Their replication validity was assessed using a comparison with their corresponding meta-analyses. Results Among the 5029 articles of our database, 156 primary studies (of which 63 were lifestyle studies) and 5 meta-analysis articles were reported in 1561 newspaper articles. The percentage of covered studies and the number of newspaper articles per study strongly increased with the impact factor of the journal that published each scientific study. Newspapers almost equally covered initial (5/39 12.8%) and subsequent (58/600 9.7%) lifestyle studies. In contrast, initial non-lifestyle studies were covered more often (48/366 13.1%) than subsequent ones (45/3718 1.2%). Newspapers never covered initial studies reporting null findings and rarely reported subsequent null observations. Only 48.7% of the 156 studies reported by newspapers were confirmed by the corresponding meta-analyses. Initial non-lifestyle studies were less often confirmed (16/48) than subsequent ones (29/45) and than lifestyle studies (31/63). Psychiatric studies covered by newspapers were less often confirmed (10/38) than the neurological (26/41) or somatic (40/77) ones. This is correlated to an even larger coverage of initial studies in psychiatry. Whereas 234 newspaper articles covered the 35 initial studies that were later disconfirmed, only four press articles covered a subsequent null finding and mentioned the refutation of an initial claim. Conclusion Journalists

  3. Replication of Prostate Cancer Risk Variants in a Danish Case-Control Association Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzon, Diem Nguyen; Nyegaard, Mette; Børglum, Anders

    2012-01-01

    assays and associations between SNPs, prostate cancer risk, and clinico-pathological variables were assessed. Results: Seventeen SNPs were successfully replicated in our case-control study and the association estimates were consistent with previous reports. Four markers were excluded from further...... (P = 0.045). In addition, variants rs6983267 (GG) and rs5759167 (GG/GT) were significantly associated with negative family history (P = 0.04 and P = 0.02, respectively). Conclusion: We replicated 17 previously identified prostate cancer-associated risk SNPs in a Danish case-control study and found...... developed to predict prostate cancer risk. The association between genetic markers and clinico-pathological tumor variables has, however, been inconsistent. Methods and Materials: A total of 32 previously identified prostate cancer-associated risk SNPs were genotyped in 648 prostate cancer cases and 526 age...

  4. A novel nucleoid-associated protein coordinates chromosome replication and chromosome partition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, James A; Panis, Gaël; Viollier, Patrick H; Marczynski, Gregory T

    2017-09-06

    We searched for regulators of chromosome replication in the cell cycle model Caulobacter crescentus and found a novel DNA-binding protein (GapR) that selectively aids the initiation of chromosome replication and the initial steps of chromosome partitioning. The protein binds the chromosome origin of replication (Cori) and has higher-affinity binding to mutated Cori-DNA that increases Cori-plasmid replication in vivo. gapR gene expression is essential for normal rapid growth and sufficient GapR levels are required for the correct timing of chromosome replication. Whole genome ChIP-seq identified dynamic DNA-binding distributions for GapR, with the strongest associations at the partitioning (parABS) locus near Cori. Using molecular-genetic and fluorescence microscopy experiments, we showed that GapR also promotes the first steps of chromosome partitioning, the initial separation of the duplicated parS loci following replication from Cori. This separation occurs before the parABS-dependent partitioning phase. Therefore, this early separation, whose mechanisms is not known, coincides with the poorly defined mechanism(s) that establishes chromosome asymmetry: C. crescentus chromosomes are partitioned to distinct cell-poles which develop into replicating and non-replicating cell-types. We propose that GapR coordinates chromosome replication with asymmetry-establishing chromosome separation, noting that both roles are consistent with the phylogenetic restriction of GapR to asymmetrically dividing bacteria. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. Replication study of 34 common SNPs associated with prostate cancer in the Romanian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinga, Viorel; Csiki, Irma Eva; Manolescu, Andrei; Iordache, Paul; Mates, Ioan Nicolae; Radavoi, Daniel; Rascu, Stefan; Badescu, Daniel; Badea, Paula; Mates, Dana

    2016-04-01

    Prostate cancer is the third-most common form of cancer in men in Romania. The Romanian unscreened population represents a good sample to study common genetic risk variants. However, a comprehensive analysis has not been conducted yet. Here, we report our replication efforts in a Romanian population of 979 cases and 1027 controls, for potential association of 34 literature-reported single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with prostate cancer. We also examined whether any SNP was differentially associated with tumour grade or stage at diagnosis, with disease aggressiveness, and with the levels of PSA (prostate specific antigen). In the allelic analysis, we replicated the previously reported risk for 19 loci on 4q24, 6q25.3, 7p15.2, 8q24.21, 10q11.23, 10q26.13, 11p15.5, 11q13.2, 11q13.3. Statistically significant associations were replicated for other six SNPs only with a particular disease phenotype: low-grade tumour and low PSA levels (rs1512268), high PSA levels (rs401681 and rs11649743), less aggressive cancers (rs1465618, rs721048, rs17021918). The strongest association of our tested SNP's with PSA in controls was for rs2735839, with 29% increase for each copy of the major allele G, consistent with previous results. Our results suggest that rs4962416, previously associated only with prostate cancer, is also associated with PSA levels, with 12% increase for each copy of the minor allele C. The study enabled the replication of the effect for the majority of previously reported genetic variants in a set of clinically relevant prostate cancers. This is the first replication study on these loci, known to associate with prostate cancer, in a Romanian population.

  6. Can genetic pleiotropy replicate common clinical constellations of cardiovascular disease and risk?

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    Omri Gottesman

    Full Text Available The relationship between obesity, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, kidney disease and cardiovascular disease (CVD is established when looked at from a clinical, epidemiological or pathophysiological perspective. Yet, when viewed from a genetic perspective, there is comparatively little data synthesis that these conditions have an underlying relationship. We sought to investigate the overlap of genetic variants independently associated with each of these commonly co-existing conditions from the NHGRI genome-wide association study (GWAS catalog, in an attempt to replicate the established notion of shared pathophysiology and risk. We used pathway-based analyses to detect subsets of pleiotropic genes involved in similar biological processes. We identified 107 eligible GWAS studies related to CVD and its established comorbidities and risk factors and assigned genes that correspond to the associated signals based on their position. We found 44 positional genes shared across at least two CVD-related phenotypes that independently recreated the established relationship between the six phenotypes, but only if studies representing non-European populations were included. Seven genes revealed pleiotropy across three or more phenotypes, mostly related to lipid transport and metabolism. Yet, many genes had no relationship to each other or to genes with established functional connection. Whilst we successfully reproduced established relationships between CVD risk factors using GWAS findings, interpretation of biological pathways involved in the observed pleiotropy was limited. Further studies linking genetic variation to gene expression, as well as describing novel biological pathways will be needed to take full advantage of GWAS results.

  7. Genetic variants associated with lung function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyagarajan, Bharat; Wojczynski, Mary; Minster, Ryan L

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reduced forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and the ratio of FEV1 to forced vital capacity (FVC) are strong predictors of mortality and lung function is higher among individuals with exceptional longevity. However, genetic factors associated with lung function in individuals...... with exceptional longevity have not been identified. METHOD: We conducted a genome wide association study (GWAS) to identify novel genetic variants associated with lung function in the Long Life Family Study (LLFS) (n = 3,899). Replication was performed using data from the CHARGE/SpiroMeta consortia...... used the residuals of the FEV1 and FEV1/FVC, adjusted for age, sex, height, ancestry principal components (PCs), smoking status, pack-years, and field center. RESULTS: We identified nine SNPs in strong linkage disequilibrium in the CYP2U1 gene to be associated with FEV1 and a novel SNP (rs889574...

  8. Ancient mtDNA genetic variants modulate mtDNA transcription and replication.

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    Sarit Suissa

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Although the functional consequences of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA genetic backgrounds (haplotypes, haplogroups have been demonstrated by both disease association studies and cell culture experiments, it is not clear which of the mutations within the haplogroup carry functional implications and which are "evolutionary silent hitchhikers". We set forth to study the functionality of haplogroup-defining mutations within the mtDNA transcription/replication regulatory region by in vitro transcription, hypothesizing that haplogroup-defining mutations occurring within regulatory motifs of mtDNA could affect these processes. We thus screened >2500 complete human mtDNAs representing all major populations worldwide for natural variation in experimentally established protein binding sites and regulatory regions comprising a total of 241 bp in each mtDNA. Our screen revealed 77/241 sites showing point mutations that could be divided into non-fixed (57/77, 74% and haplogroup/sub-haplogroup-defining changes (i.e., population fixed changes, 20/77, 26%. The variant defining Caucasian haplogroup J (C295T increased the binding of TFAM (Electro Mobility Shift Assay and the capacity of in vitro L-strand transcription, especially of a shorter transcript that maps immediately upstream of conserved sequence block 1 (CSB1, a region associated with RNA priming of mtDNA replication. Consistent with this finding, cybrids (i.e., cells sharing the same nuclear genetic background but differing in their mtDNA backgrounds harboring haplogroup J mtDNA had a >2 fold increase in mtDNA copy number, as compared to cybrids containing haplogroup H, with no apparent differences in steady state levels of mtDNA-encoded transcripts. Hence, a haplogroup J regulatory region mutation affects mtDNA replication or stability, which may partially account for the phenotypic impact of this haplogroup. Our analysis thus demonstrates, for the first time, the functional impact of particular mt

  9. Variants of the Coagulation and Inflammation Genes Are Replicably Associated with Myocardial Infarction and Epistatically Interact in Russians.

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    Rosa M Barsova

    Full Text Available In spite of progress in cardiovascular genetics, data on genetic background of myocardial infarction are still limited and contradictory. This applies as well to the genes involved in inflammation and coagulation processes, which play a crucial role in the disease etiopathogenesis.In this study we found genetic variants of TGFB1, FGB and CRP genes associated with myocardial infarction in discovery and replication groups of Russian descent from the Moscow region and the Republic of Bashkortostan (325/185 and 220/197 samples, correspondingly. We also found and replicated biallelic combinations of TGFB1 with FGB, TGFB1 with CRP and IFNG with PTGS1 genetic variants associated with myocardial infarction providing a detectable cumulative effect. We proposed an original two-component procedure for the analysis of nonlinear (epistatic interactions between the genes in biallelic combinations and confirmed the epistasis hypothesis for the set of alleles of IFNG with PTGS. The procedure is applicable to any pair of logical variables, e.g. carriage of two sets of alleles. The composite model that included three single gene variants and the epistatic pair has AUC of 0.66 both in discovery and replication groups.The genetic impact of TGFB1, FGB, CRP, IFNG, and PTGS and/or their biallelic combinations on myocardial infarction was found and replicated in Russians. Evidence of epistatic interactions between IFNG with PTGS genes was obtained both in discovery and replication groups.

  10. Variants of the Coagulation and Inflammation Genes Are Replicably Associated with Myocardial Infarction and Epistatically Interact in Russians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsova, Rosa M; Lvovs, Dmitrijs; Titov, Boris V; Matveeva, Natalia A; Shakhnovich, Roman M; Sukhinina, Tatiana S; Kukava, Nino G; Ruda, Mikhail Ya; Karamova, Irina M; Nasibullin, Timur R; Mustafina, Olga E; Osmak, German J; Tsareva, Ekaterina Yu; Kulakova, Olga G; Favorov, Alexander V; Favorova, Olga O

    2015-01-01

    In spite of progress in cardiovascular genetics, data on genetic background of myocardial infarction are still limited and contradictory. This applies as well to the genes involved in inflammation and coagulation processes, which play a crucial role in the disease etiopathogenesis. In this study we found genetic variants of TGFB1, FGB and CRP genes associated with myocardial infarction in discovery and replication groups of Russian descent from the Moscow region and the Republic of Bashkortostan (325/185 and 220/197 samples, correspondingly). We also found and replicated biallelic combinations of TGFB1 with FGB, TGFB1 with CRP and IFNG with PTGS1 genetic variants associated with myocardial infarction providing a detectable cumulative effect. We proposed an original two-component procedure for the analysis of nonlinear (epistatic) interactions between the genes in biallelic combinations and confirmed the epistasis hypothesis for the set of alleles of IFNG with PTGS. The procedure is applicable to any pair of logical variables, e.g. carriage of two sets of alleles. The composite model that included three single gene variants and the epistatic pair has AUC of 0.66 both in discovery and replication groups. The genetic impact of TGFB1, FGB, CRP, IFNG, and PTGS and/or their biallelic combinations on myocardial infarction was found and replicated in Russians. Evidence of epistatic interactions between IFNG with PTGS genes was obtained both in discovery and replication groups.

  11. Replication Validity of Initial Association Studies: A Comparison between Psychiatry, Neurology and Four Somatic Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas-Mallet, Estelle; Button, Katherine; Boraud, Thomas; Munafo, Marcus; Gonon, François

    2016-01-01

    Context There are growing concerns about effect size inflation and replication validity of association studies, but few observational investigations have explored the extent of these problems. Objective Using meta-analyses to measure the reliability of initial studies and explore whether this varies across biomedical domains and study types (cognitive/behavioral, brain imaging, genetic and “others”). Methods We analyzed 663 meta-analyses describing associations between markers or risk factors and 12 pathologies within three biomedical domains (psychiatry, neurology and four somatic diseases). We collected the effect size, sample size, publication year and Impact Factor of initial studies, largest studies (i.e., with the largest sample size) and the corresponding meta-analyses. Initial studies were considered as replicated if they were in nominal agreement with meta-analyses and if their effect size inflation was below 100%. Results Nominal agreement between initial studies and meta-analyses regarding the presence of a significant effect was not better than chance in psychiatry, whereas it was somewhat better in neurology and somatic diseases. Whereas effect sizes reported by largest studies and meta-analyses were similar, most of those reported by initial studies were inflated. Among the 256 initial studies reporting a significant effect (p<0.05) and paired with significant meta-analyses, 97 effect sizes were inflated by more than 100%. Nominal agreement and effect size inflation varied with the biomedical domain and study type. Indeed, the replication rate of initial studies reporting a significant effect ranged from 6.3% for genetic studies in psychiatry to 86.4% for cognitive/behavioral studies. Comparison between eight subgroups shows that replication rate decreases with sample size and “true” effect size. We observed no evidence of association between replication rate and publication year or Impact Factor. Conclusion The differences in reliability

  12. The SAPHO syndrome and genetics - discoveries in need of replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollheim, Frank A

    2013-01-01

    SAPHO and its relative CMRO are uncommon but not rare chronic conditions with unknown etiology. Environmental factors, perhaps related to microorganisms, may be important triggers, but there is no support for a septic nature. The monogenic animal models called cmo and Lupo with autosomal recessive transmission have not been replicated in human diease. Interesting but unconfirmed studies indicate impaired p53 formation, increased IL-10 production and decreased capacity to mount ROS responses in different patients whith SAPHO. There is more evidence supporting an autoinflammatory than an autoimmune pathogenesis of SAPHO. Susceptibility genes on chromosomes 1 and 18 need to be confirmed. More studies in larger numbers of patients are needed to confirm the often anecdotal observations reviewed here. It is hoped that this review may stimulate such work.

  13. Replication of the TNFSF4 (OX40L) Promoter Region Association with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Vega, Angélica M.; Abelson, Anna-Karin; Sánchez, Elena; Witte, Torsten; D’Alfonso, Sandra; Galeazzi, Mauro; Jiménez-Alonso, Juan; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.

    2013-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor ligand superfamily member 4 gene (TNFSF4) encodes the OX40 ligand (OX40L), a co-stimulatory molecule involved in T-cell activation. A recent study demonstrated the association ofTNFSF4 haplotypes located in the upstream region with risk for- or protection from Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) (Graham et al, 2008). In order to replicate this association, five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) tagging the previously associated haplotypes and passing the proper quality control filters were tested in 1312 cases and 1801 controls from Germany, Italy, Spain, and Argentina. The association of TNFSF4 with SLE was replicated in all the sets except Spain. There was a unique risk haplotype tagged by the minor alleles of the SNPs rs1234317 (pooled OR=1.39, p=0.0009) and rs12039904 (pooled OR=1.38, p=0.0012). We did not observe association to a single protective marker (rs844644) or haplotype as the first study reported; instead, we observed different protective haplotypes, all carrying the major alleles of both SNPs rs1234317 and rs12039904. Association analysis conditioning on the haplotypic background confirmed that these two SNPs explain the entire haplotype effect. This is the first replication study that confirms the association of genetic variation in the upstream region of TNFSF4 with susceptibility to SLE. PMID:19092840

  14. Reverse Genetics for Fusogenic Bat-Borne Orthoreovirus Associated with Acute Respiratory Tract Infections in Humans: Role of Outer Capsid Protein σC in Viral Replication and Pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Kawagishi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Nelson Bay orthoreoviruses (NBVs are members of the fusogenic orthoreoviruses and possess 10-segmented double-stranded RNA genomes. NBV was first isolated from a fruit bat in Australia more than 40 years ago, but it was not associated with any disease. However, several NBV strains have been recently identified as causative agents for respiratory tract infections in humans. Isolation of these pathogenic bat reoviruses from patients suggests that NBVs have evolved to propagate in humans in the form of zoonosis. To date, no strategy has been developed to rescue infectious viruses from cloned cDNA for any member of the fusogenic orthoreoviruses. In this study, we report the development of a plasmid-based reverse genetics system free of helper viruses and independent of any selection for NBV isolated from humans with acute respiratory infection. cDNAs corresponding to each of the 10 full-length RNA gene segments of NBV were cotransfected into culture cells expressing T7 RNA polymerase, and viable NBV was isolated using a plaque assay. The growth kinetics and cell-to-cell fusion activity of recombinant strains, rescued using the reverse genetics system, were indistinguishable from those of native strains. We used the reverse genetics system to generate viruses deficient in the cell attachment protein σC to define the biological function of this protein in the viral life cycle. Our results with σC-deficient viruses demonstrated that σC is dispensable for cell attachment in several cell lines, including murine fibroblast L929 cells but not in human lung epithelial A549 cells, and plays a critical role in viral pathogenesis. We also used the system to rescue a virus that expresses a yellow fluorescent protein. The reverse genetics system developed in this study can be applied to study the propagation and pathogenesis of pathogenic NBVs and in the generation of recombinant NBVs for future vaccines and therapeutics.

  15. Vehicles, Replicators, and Intercellular Movement of Genetic Information: Evolutionary Dissection of a Bacterial Cell

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    Matti Jalasvuori

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Prokaryotic biosphere is vastly diverse in many respects. Any given bacterial cell may harbor in different combinations viruses, plasmids, transposons, and other genetic elements along with their chromosome(s. These agents interact in complex environments in various ways causing multitude of phenotypic effects on their hosting cells. In this discussion I perform a dissection for a bacterial cell in order to simplify the diversity into components that may help approach the ocean of details in evolving microbial worlds. The cell itself is separated from all the genetic replicators that use the cell vehicle for preservation and propagation. I introduce a classification that groups different replicators according to their horizontal movement potential between cells and according to their effects on the fitness of their present host cells. The classification is used to discuss and improve the means by which we approach general evolutionary tendencies in microbial communities. Moreover, the classification is utilized as a tool to help formulating evolutionary hypotheses and to discuss emerging bacterial pathogens as well as to promote understanding on the average phenotypes of different replicators in general. It is also discussed that any given biosphere comprising prokaryotic cell vehicles and genetic replicators may naturally evolve to have horizontally moving replicators of various types.

  16. A genetic screen for replication initiation defective (rid mutants in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

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    Locovei Alexandra M

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In fission yeast the intra-S phase and DNA damage checkpoints are activated in response to inhibition of DNA replication or DNA damage, respectively. The intra-S phase checkpoint responds to stalled replication forks leading to the activation of the Cds1 kinase that both delays cell cycle progression and stabilizes DNA replication forks. The DNA damage checkpoint, that operates during the G2 phase of the cell cycle delays mitotic progression through activation of the checkpoint kinase, Chk1. Delay of the cell cycle is believed to be essential to allow time for either replication restart (in S phase or DNA damage repair (in G2. Previously, our laboratory showed that fission yeast cells deleted for the N-terminal half of DNA polymerase ε (Cdc20 are delayed in S phase, but surprisingly require Chk1 rather than Cds1 to maintain cell viability. Several additional DNA replication mutants were then tested for their dependency on Chk1 or Cds1 when grown under semi-permissive temperatures. We discovered that mutants defective in DNA replication initiation are sensitive only to loss of Chk1, whilst mutations that inhibit DNA replication elongation are sensitive to loss of both Cds1 and Chk1. To confirm that the Chk1-sensitive, Cds1-insensitive phenotype (rid phenotype is specific to mutants defective in DNA replication initiation, we completed a genetic screen for cell cycle mutants that require Chk1, but not Cds1 to maintain cell viability when grown at semi-permissive temperatures. Our screen identified two mutants, rid1-1 and rid2-1, that are defective in Orc1 and Mcm4, respectively. Both mutants show defects in DNA replication initiation consistent with our hypothesis that the rid phenotype is replication initiation specific. In the case of Mcm4, the mutation has been mapped to a highly conserved region of the protein that appears to be required for DNA replication initiation, but not elongation. Therefore, we conclude that the cellular

  17. Semiconservative replication, genetic repair, and many-gened genomes: Extending the quasispecies paradigm to living systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannenbaum, Emmanuel; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2005-12-01

    Quasispecies theory has emerged as an important tool for modeling the evolutionary dynamics of biological systems. We review recent advances in the field, with an emphasis on the quasispecies dynamics of semiconservatively replicating genomes. Applications to cancer and adult stem cell growth are discussed. Additional topics, such as genetic repair and many-gene genomes, are covered as well.

  18. Genetics in psychiatry: common variant association studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buxbaum Joseph D

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many psychiatric conditions and traits are associated with significant heritability. Genetic risk for psychiatric conditions encompass rare variants, identified due to major effect, as well as common variants, the latter analyzed by association analyses. We review guidelines for common variant association analyses, undertaking after assessing evidence of heritability. We highlight the importance of: suitably large sample sizes; an experimental design that controls for ancestry; careful data cleaning; correction for multiple testing; small P values for positive findings; assessment of effect size for positive findings; and, inclusion of an independent replication sample. We also note the importance of a critical discussion of any prior findings, biological follow-up where possible, and a means of accessing the raw data.

  19. Replication of association between ELAVL4 and Parkinson disease: the GenePD study

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeStefano, Anita L.; Latourelle, Jeanne; Lew, Mark F.; Suchowersky, Oksana; Klein, Christine; Golbe, Lawrence I.; Mark, Margery H.; Growdon, John H.; Wooten, G. Fredrick; Watts, Ray; Guttman, Mark; Racette, Brad A.; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Marlor, Lynn; Shill, Holly A.; Singer, Carlos; Goldwurm, Stefano; Pezzoli, Gianni; Saint-Hilaire, Marie H.; Hendricks, Audrey E.; Gower, Adam; Williamson, Sally; Nagle, Michael W.; Wilk, Jemma B.; Massood, Tiffany; Huskey, Karen W.; Baker, Kenneth B.; Itin, Ilia; Litvan, Irene; Nicholson, Garth; Corbett, Alastair; Nance, Martha; Drasby, Edward; Isaacson, Stuart; Burn, David J.; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Al-hinti, Jomana; Moller, Anette T.; Ostergaard, Karen; Sherman, Scott J.; Roxburgh, Richard; Snow, Barry; Slevin, John T.; Cambi, Franca; Gusella, James F.; Myers, Richard H.

    2009-01-01

    Genetic variants in embryonic lethal, abnormal vision, Drosophila-like 4 (ELAVL4) have been reported to be associated with onset age of Parkinson disease (PD) or risk for PD affection in Caucasian populations. In the current study we genotyped three single nucleotide polymorphisms in ELAVL4 in a Caucasian study sample consisting of 712 PD patients and 312 unrelated controls from the GenePD study. The minor allele of rs967582 was associated with increased risk of PD (odds ratio = 1.46, nominal P value = 0.011) in the GenePD population. The minor allele of rs967582 was also the risk allele for PD affection or earlier onset age in the previously studied populations. This replication of association with rs967582 in a third cohort further implicates ELAVL4 as a PD susceptibility gene. PMID:18587682

  20. Extended genetic effects of ADH cluster genes on the risk of alcohol dependence: from GWAS to replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byung Lae; Kim, Jee Wook; Cheong, Hyun Sub; Kim, Lyoung Hyo; Lee, Boung Chul; Seo, Cheong Hoon; Kang, Tae-Cheon; Nam, Young-Woo; Kim, Goon-Bo; Shin, Hyoung Doo; Choi, Ihn-Geun

    2013-06-01

    Alcohol dependence (AD) is a multifactorial and polygenic disorder involving complex gene-to-gene and gene-to-environment interactions. Several genome-wide association studies have reported numerous risk factors for AD, but replication results following these studies have been controversial. To identify new candidate genes, the present study used GWAS and replication studies in a Korean cohort with AD. Genome-wide association analysis revealed that two chromosome regions on Chr. 4q22-q23 (ADH gene cluster, including ADH5, ADH4, ADH6, ADH1A, ADH1B, and ADH7) and Chr. 12q24 (ALDH2) showed multiple association signals for the risk of AD. To investigate detailed genetic effects of these ADH genes on AD, a follow-up study of the ADH gene cluster on 4q22-q23 was performed. A total of 90 SNPs, including ADH1B rs1229984 (H47R), were genotyped in an additional 975 Korean subjects. In case-control analysis, ADH1B rs1229984 (H47R) showed the most significant association with the risk of AD (p = 2.63 × 10(-21), OR = 2.35). Moreover, subsequent conditional analyses revealed that all positive associations of other ADH genes in the cluster disappeared, which suggested that ADH1B rs1229984 (H47R) might be the sole functional genetic marker across the ADH gene cluster. Our findings could provide additional information on the ADH gene cluster regarding the risk of AD, as well as a new and important insight into the genetic factors associated with AD.

  1. Stearoyl coenzyme A desaturase 1 is associated with hepatitis C virus replication complex and regulates viral replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, LN; Lim, YS; Pham, Long

    2014-01-01

    exogenous supplementation of either oleate or palmitoleate, products of SCD1 activity, resurrected HCV replication in SCD1 knockdown cells. SCD1 was coimmunoprecipitated with HCV nonstructural proteins and colocalized with both double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and HCV nonstructural proteins, indicating that SCD1...... is associated with HCV replication complex. Moreover, SCD1 was fractionated and enriched with HCV nonstructural proteins at detergent-resistant membrane. Electron microscopy data showed that SCD1 is required for NS4B-mediated intracellular membrane rearrangement. These data further support the idea that SCD1...

  2. Genetic Syndromes Associated with Craniosynostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jung Min

    2016-05-01

    Craniosynostosis is defined as the premature fusion of one or more of the cranial sutures. It leads not only to secondary distortion of skull shape but to various complications including neurologic, ophthalmic and respiratory dysfunction. Craniosynostosis is very heterogeneous in terms of its causes, presentation, and management. Both environmental factors and genetic factors are associated with development of craniosynostosis. Nonsyndromic craniosynostosis accounts for more than 70% of all cases. Syndromic craniosynostosis with a certain genetic cause is more likely to involve multiple sutures or bilateral coronal sutures. FGFR2, FGFR3, FGFR1, TWIST1 and EFNB1 genes are major causative genes of genetic syndromes associated with craniosynostosis. Although most of syndromic craniosynostosis show autosomal dominant inheritance, approximately half of patients are de novo cases. Apert syndrome, Pfeiffer syndrome, Crouzon syndrome, and Antley-Bixler syndrome are related to mutations in FGFR family (especially in FGFR2), and mutations in FGFRs can be overlapped between different syndromes. Saethre-Chotzen syndrome, Muenke syndrome, and craniofrontonasal syndrome are representative disorders showing isolated coronal suture involvement. Compared to the other types of craniosynostosis, single gene mutations can be more frequently detected, in one-third of coronal synostosis patients. Molecular diagnosis can be helpful to provide adequate genetic counseling and guidance for patients with syndromic craniosynostosis.

  3. Genetic Associations with Gestational Duration and Spontaneous Preterm Birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Ge; Feenstra, Bjarke; Bacelis, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    Background Despite evidence that genetic factors contribute to the duration of gestation and the risk of preterm birth, robust associations with genetic variants have not been identified. We used large data sets that included the gestational duration to determine possible genetic associations....... Methods We performed a genomewide association study in a discovery set of samples obtained from 43,568 women of European ancestry using gestational duration as a continuous trait and term or preterm (birth as a dichotomous outcome. We used samples from three Nordic data sets (involving a total...... of association in the replication sets; these variants also showed genomewide significance in a joint analysis. Common variants in EBF1, EEFSEC, and AGTR2 showed association with preterm birth with genomewide significance. An analysis of mother-infant dyads suggested that these variants act at the level...

  4. Lack of replication for the myosin-18B association with mathematical ability in independent cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, K A; Fajutrao Valles, S F; Moll, K; Northstone, K; Ring, S; Pennell, C; Wang, C; Leavett, R; Hayiou-Thomas, M E; Thompson, P; Simpson, N H; Fisher, S E; Whitehouse, A J O; Snowling, M J; Newbury, D F; Paracchini, S

    2015-04-01

    Twin studies indicate that dyscalculia (or mathematical disability) is caused partly by a genetic component, which is yet to be understood at the molecular level. Recently, a coding variant (rs133885) in the myosin-18B gene was shown to be associated with mathematical abilities with a specific effect among children with dyslexia. This association represents one of the most significant genetic associations reported to date for mathematical abilities and the only one reaching genome-wide statistical significance. We conducted a replication study in different cohorts to assess the effect of rs133885 maths-related measures. The study was conducted primarily using the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC), (N = 3819). We tested additional cohorts including the York Cohort, the Specific Language Impairment Consortium (SLIC) cohort and the Raine Cohort, and stratified them for a definition of dyslexia whenever possible. We did not observe any associations between rs133885 in myosin-18B and mathematical abilities among individuals with dyslexia or in the general population. Our results suggest that the myosin-18B variant is unlikely to be a main factor contributing to mathematical abilities.

  5. Replication of an association of a promoter polymorphism of the dopamine transporter gene and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Christopher; Brookes, Keeley; Simpson, Jennifer; Park, Joanne; Scott, Sarah; Coghill, David R; Hawi, Ziarah; Kirley, Aiveen; Gill, Michael; Kent, Lindsey

    2009-09-22

    Genetic associations for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), a common highly heritable childhood behavioural disorder, require replication in order to establish whether they are true positive findings. The current study aims to replicate recent association findings from the International Multi-centre ADHD Genetics (IMAGE) project in one of the most studied genes related to ADHD, the dopamine transporter (DAT1) gene. In a family-based sample of 450 ADHD probands, three Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) markers have been genotyped using TaqMan assays. Transmission Disequilibrium Test analysis demonstrates that one of three SNP markers (rs11564750) in the 5' promoter region of the gene is significantly associated with ADHD (P=0.02). This provides further evidence that in addition to the well-known and investigated 3'UTR polymorphism associated with ADHD, there is potentially a further association signal emanating from the 5' promoter region of the gene. Further replication and functional studies are now required to fully understand the consequence of polymorphisms present at both the 5' and 3' ends of the DAT1 gene and their role in ADHD pathophysiology.

  6. Tests for the replication of an association between Egfr and natural variation in Drosophila melanogaster wing morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dodgson James

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantitative differences between individuals stem from a combination of genetic and environmental factors, with the heritable variation being shaped by evolutionary forces. Drosophila wing shape has emerged as an attractive system for genetic dissection of multi-dimensional traits. We utilize several experimental genetic methods to validation of the contribution of several polymorphisms in the Epidermal growth factor receptor (Egfr gene to wing shape and size, that were previously mapped in populations of Drosophila melanogaster from North Carolina (NC and California (CA. This re-evaluation utilized different genetic testcrosses to generate heterozygous individuals with a variety of genetic backgrounds as well as sampling of new alleles from Kenyan stocks. Results Only one variant, in the Egfr promoter, had replicable effects in all new experiments. However, expanded genotyping of the initial sample of inbred lines rendered the association non-significant in the CA population, while it persisted in the NC sample, suggesting population specific modification of the quantitative trait nucleotide QTN effect. Conclusion Dissection of quantitative trait variation to the nucleotide level can identify sites with replicable effects as small as one percent of the segregating genetic variation. However, the testcross approach to validate QTNs is both labor intensive and time-consuming, and is probably less useful than resampling of large independent sets of outbred individuals.

  7. Genetic differentiation and selection against migrants in evolutionarily replicated extreme environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plath, Martin; Pfenninger, Markus; Lerp, Hannes; Riesch, Rüdiger; Eschenbrenner, Christoph; Slattery, Patrick A; Bierbach, David; Herrmann, Nina; Schulte, Matthias; Arias-Rodriguez, Lenin; Rimber Indy, Jeane; Passow, Courtney; Tobler, Michael

    2013-09-01

    We investigated mechanisms of reproductive isolation in livebearing fishes (genus Poecilia) inhabiting sulfidic and nonsulfidic habitats in three replicate river drainages. Although sulfide spring fish convergently evolved divergent phenotypes, it was unclear if mechanisms of reproductive isolation also evolved convergently. Using microsatellites, we found strongly reduced gene flow between adjacent populations from different habitat types, suggesting that local adaptation to sulfidic habitats repeatedly caused the emergence of reproductive isolation. Reciprocal translocation experiments indicate strong selection against immigrants into sulfidic waters, but also variation among drainages in the strength of selection against immigrants into nonsulfidic waters. Mate choice experiments revealed the evolution of assortative mating preferences in females from nonsulfidic but not from sulfidic habitats. The inferred strength of sexual selection against immigrants (RI(s)) was negatively correlated with the strength of natural selection (RI(m)), a pattern that could be attributed to reinforcement, whereby natural selection strengthens behavioral isolation due to reduced hybrid fitness. Overall, reproductive isolation and genetic differentiation appear to be replicated and direct consequences of local adaptation to sulfide spring environments, but the relative contributions of different mechanisms of reproductive isolation vary across these evolutionarily independent replicates, highlighting both convergent and nonconvergent evolutionary trajectories of populations in each drainage. © 2013 The Author(s). Evolution © 2013 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  8. Replication of genome-wide association study (GWAS) susceptibility loci in a Latino bipolar disorder cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Suzanne; Gupta, Jayanta; Villa, Erika; Mallawaarachchi, Indika; Rodriguez, Marco; Ramirez, Mercedes; Zavala, Juan; Armas, Regina; Dassori, Albana; Contreras, Javier; Flores, Deborah; Jerez, Alvaro; Ontiveros, Alfonso; Nicolini, Humberto; Escamilla, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified numerous putative genetic polymorphisms associated with bipolar disorder (BD) and/or schizophrenia (SC). We hypothesized that a portion of these polymorphisms would also be associated with BD in the Latino American population. To identify such regions, we tested previously identified genetic variants associated with BD and/or SC and ancestral haploblocks containing these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a sample of Latino subjects with BD. A total of 2254 Latino individuals were genotyped for 91 SNPs identified in previous BD and/or SC GWASs, along with selected SNPs in strong linkage disequilibrium with these markers. Family-based single marker and haplotype association testing was performed using the PBAT software package. Empirical P-values were derived from 10 000 permutations. Associations of eight a priori GWAS SNPs with BD were replicated with nominal (P≤.05) levels of significance. These included SNPs within nuclear factor I A (NFIA), serologically defined colon cancer antigen 8 (SDCCAG8), lysosomal associated membrane protein 3 (LAMP3), nuclear factor kappa B subunit 1 (NFKB1), major histocompatibility complex, class I, B (HLA-B) and 5'-nucleotidase, cytosolic II (NT5C2) and SNPs within intragenic regions microRNA 6828 (MIR6828)-solute carrier family 7 member 14 (SLC7A14) and sonic hedgehog (SHH)-long intergenic non-protein coding RNA 1006 (LINC01006). Of the 76 ancestral haploblocks that were tested for associations with BD, our top associated haploblock was located in LAMP3; however, the association did not meet statistical thresholds of significance following Bonferroni correction. These results indicate that some of the gene variants found to be associated with BD or SC in other populations are also associated with BD risk in Latinos. Variants in six genes and two intragenic regions were associated with BD in our Latino sample and provide additional evidence for overlap in

  9. Cascades of genetic instability resulting from compromised break-induced replication.

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    Soumini Vasan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Break-induced replication (BIR is a mechanism to repair double-strand breaks (DSBs that possess only a single end that can find homology in the genome. This situation can result from the collapse of replication forks or telomere erosion. BIR frequently produces various genetic instabilities including mutations, loss of heterozygosity, deletions, duplications, and template switching that can result in copy-number variations (CNVs. An important type of genomic rearrangement specifically linked to BIR is half-crossovers (HCs, which result from fusions between parts of recombining chromosomes. Because HC formation produces a fused molecule as well as a broken chromosome fragment, these events could be highly destabilizing. Here we demonstrate that HC formation results from the interruption of BIR caused by a damaged template, defective replisome or premature onset of mitosis. Additionally, we document that checkpoint failure promotes channeling of BIR into half-crossover-initiated instability cascades (HCC that resemble cycles of non-reciprocal translocations (NRTs previously described in human tumors. We postulate that HCs represent a potent source of genetic destabilization with significant consequences that mimic those observed in human diseases, including cancer.

  10. AKT1 fails to replicate as a longevity-associated gene in Danish and German nonagenarians and centenarians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Marianne; Soerensen, Mette; Flachsbart, Friederike

    2013-01-01

    In addition to APOE and FOXO3, AKT1 has recently been suggested as a third consistent longevity gene, with variants in AKT1 found to be associated with human lifespan in two previous studies. Here, we evaluated AKT1 as a longevity-associated gene across populations by attempting to replicate the ...... not support AKT1 as a universal longevity-associated gene.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 29 August 2012; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2012.196....

  11. CD40: Novel Association with Crohn's Disease and Replication in Multiple Sclerosis Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcina, Antonio; Teruel, María; Díaz-Gallo, Lina M.; Gómez-García, María; López-Nevot, Miguel A.; Rodrigo, Luis; Nieto, Antonio; Cardeña, Carlos; Alcain, Guillermo; Díaz-Rubio, Manuel; de la Concha, Emilio G.; Fernandez, Oscar; Arroyo, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    Background A functional polymorphism located at −1 from the start codon of the CD40 gene, rs1883832, was previously reported to disrupt a Kozak sequence essential for translation. It has been consistently associated with Graves' disease risk in populations of different ethnicity and genetic proxies of this variant evaluated in genome-wide association studies have shown evidence of an effect in rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility. However, the protective allele associated with Graves' disease or rheumatoid arthritis has shown a risk role in MS, an effect that we aimed to replicate in the present work. We hypothesized that this functional polymorphism might also show an association with other complex autoimmune condition such as inflammatory bowel disease, given the CD40 overexpression previously observed in Crohn's disease (CD) lesions. Methodology Genotyping of rs1883832C>T was performed in 1564 MS, 1102 CD and 969 ulcerative colitis (UC) Spanish patients and in 2948 ethnically matched controls by TaqMan chemistry. Principal Findings The observed effect of the minor allele rs1883832T was replicated in our independent Spanish MS cohort [p = 0.025; OR (95% CI) = 1.12 (1.01–1.23)]. The frequency of the minor allele was also significantly higher in CD patients than in controls [p = 0.002; OR (95% CI) = 1.19 (1.06–1.33)]. This increased predisposition was not detected in UC patients [p = 0.5; OR (95% CI) = 1.04 (0.93–1.17)]. Conclusion The impact of CD40 rs1883832 on MS and CD risk points to a common signaling shared by these autoimmune conditions. PMID:20634952

  12. Genetic association studies in lumbar disc degeneration: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasi J Eskola

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Low back pain is associated with lumbar disc degeneration, which is mainly due to genetic predisposition. The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review to evaluate genetic association studies in lumbar disc degeneration as defined on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in humans. METHODS: A systematic literature search was conducted in MEDLINE, MEDLINE In-Process, SCOPUS, ISI Web of Science, The Genetic Association Database and The Human Genome Epidemiology Network for information published between 1990-2011 addressing genes and lumbar disc degeneration. Two investigators independently identified studies to determine inclusion, after which they performed data extraction and analysis. The level of cumulative genetic association evidence was analyzed according to The HuGENet Working Group guidelines. RESULTS: Fifty-two studies were included for review. Forty-eight studies reported at least one positive association between a genetic marker and lumbar disc degeneration. The phenotype definition of lumbar disc degeneration was highly variable between the studies and replications were inconsistent. Most of the associations presented with a weak level of evidence. The level of evidence was moderate for ASPN (D-repeat, COL11A1 (rs1676486, GDF5 (rs143383, SKT (rs16924573, THBS2 (rs9406328 and MMP9 (rs17576. CONCLUSIONS: Based on this first extensive systematic review on the topic, the credibility of reported genetic associations is mostly weak. Clear definition of lumbar disc degeneration phenotypes and large population-based cohorts are needed. An international consortium is needed to standardize genetic association studies in relation to disc degeneration.

  13. A Replication Study for Association of LBX1 locus with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis in French-Canadian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nada, Dina; Julien, Cédric; Samuels, Mark E; Moreau, Alain

    2017-06-09

    A case-control association study. To investigate the relationship between LBX1 polymorphisms and Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (AIS) in French-Canadian population. It is widely accepted that genetic factors contribute to AIS. Although the LBX1 locus is so far the most successfully replicated locus in different AIS cohorts, these associations were replicated mainly in Asian populations, with few studies in Caucasian populations of European descent. We recruited 1568 participants (667 AIS patients and 901 healthy controls) in the French-Canadian population. Genomic data was generated using the Illumina Human Omni 2.5 M BeadChip. An additional 121 AIS cases and 51 controls were genotyped for specific SNPs by multiplex PCR using standard procedures. BEAGLE 3 was used to impute the following markers: rs7893223, rs11190878 and rs678741 against the 1000-genomes European cohort phased genotypes given that they were absent in our GWAS panel. Resulting genotypes were combined then used for single marker and haplotyped-based association. Four markers showed association with AIS in our cohort at this locus; rs11190870 the most studied marker, rs7893223, rs594791, and rs11190878. When we restricted the analysis to severe cases only, four additional SNPs showed associations: rs11598177, rs1322331, rs670206 and rs678741. In addition, we analyzed the associations of the observed haplotypes and dihaplotypes formed by these SNPs. The haplotype TTAAGAAA and its homozygous dihaplotype showed the highest association with our severe group and was the highest risk haplotype. The haplotype CCGCAGGG was significantly more associated with the control group, and its homozygous or heterozygous dihaplotype was less frequent in the severe group compared to the control group, suggesting that CCGCAGGG may represent a protective haplotype. We have replicated the association of the LBX1 locus with AIS in French-Canadian population, a novel European descent cohort, which is known for its unique

  14. The Idea Is Good, but…: Failure to Replicate Associations of Oxytocinergic Polymorphisms with Face-Inversion in the N170.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisha J L Munk

    Full Text Available In event-related potentials, the N170 manifests itself especially in reaction to faces. In the healthy population, face-inversion leads to stronger negative amplitudes and prolonged latencies of the N170, effects not being present in patients with autism-spectrum-disorder (ASD. ASD has frequently been associated with differences in oxytocinergic neurotransmission. This ERP-study aimed to investigate the face-inversion effect in association with oxytocinergic candidate genes. It was expected that risk-allele-carriers of the oxytocin-receptor-gene-polymorphism (rs53576 and of CD38 (rs379863 responded similar to upright and inverted faces as persons with ASD. Additionally, reactions to different facial emotional expressions were studied. As there have been difficulties with replications of those molecular genetic association studies, we aimed to replicate our findings in a second study.Seventy-two male subjects in the first-, and seventy-eight young male subjects in the replication-study conducted a face-inversion-paradigm, while recording EEG. DNA was extracted from buccal cells.Results revealed stronger N170-amplitudes and longer latencies in reaction to inverted faces in comparison to upright ones. Furthermore, effects of emotion on N170 were evident. Those effects were present in the first and in the second study. Whereas we found molecular-genetic associations of oxytocinergic polymorphisms with the N170 in the first study, we failed to do so in the replication sample.Results indicate that a deeper theoretical understanding of this research-field is needed, in order to generate possible explanations for these findings. Results, furthermore, support the hypotheses that success of reproducibility is correlated with strength of lower original p-values and larger effect sizes in the original study.

  15. The Idea Is Good, but…: Failure to Replicate Associations of Oxytocinergic Polymorphisms with Face-Inversion in the N170

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munk, Aisha J. L.; Hermann, Andrea; El Shazly, Jasmin; Grant, Phillip; Hennig, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Background In event-related potentials, the N170 manifests itself especially in reaction to faces. In the healthy population, face-inversion leads to stronger negative amplitudes and prolonged latencies of the N170, effects not being present in patients with autism-spectrum-disorder (ASD). ASD has frequently been associated with differences in oxytocinergic neurotransmission. This ERP-study aimed to investigate the face-inversion effect in association with oxytocinergic candidate genes. It was expected that risk-allele-carriers of the oxytocin-receptor-gene-polymorphism (rs53576) and of CD38 (rs379863) responded similar to upright and inverted faces as persons with ASD. Additionally, reactions to different facial emotional expressions were studied. As there have been difficulties with replications of those molecular genetic association studies, we aimed to replicate our findings in a second study. Method Seventy-two male subjects in the first-, and seventy-eight young male subjects in the replication-study conducted a face-inversion-paradigm, while recording EEG. DNA was extracted from buccal cells. Results Results revealed stronger N170-amplitudes and longer latencies in reaction to inverted faces in comparison to upright ones. Furthermore, effects of emotion on N170 were evident. Those effects were present in the first and in the second study. Whereas we found molecular-genetic associations of oxytocinergic polymorphisms with the N170 in the first study, we failed to do so in the replication sample. Conclusion Results indicate that a deeper theoretical understanding of this research-field is needed, in order to generate possible explanations for these findings. Results, furthermore, support the hypotheses that success of reproducibility is correlated with strength of lower original p-values and larger effect sizes in the original study. PMID:27015428

  16. Mechanical Link between Cohesion Establishment and DNA Replication: Ctf7p/Eco1p, a Cohesion Establishment Factor, Associates with Three Different Replication Factor C Complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Kenna, Margaret A.; Skibbens, Robert V.

    2003-01-01

    CTF7/ECO1 is an essential yeast gene required for the establishment of sister chromatid cohesion. The findings that CTF7/ECO1, POL30 (PCNA), and CHL12/CTF18 (a replication factor C [RFC] homolog) genetically interact provided the first evidence that the processes of cohesion establishment and DNA replication are intimately coupled—a link now confirmed by other studies. To date, however, it is unknown how Ctf7p/Eco1p function is coupled to DNA replication or whether Ctf7p/Eco1p physically asso...

  17. Drosophila duplication hotspots are associated with late-replicating regions of the genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarida Cardoso-Moreira

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Duplications play a significant role in both extremes of the phenotypic spectrum of newly arising mutations: they can have severe deleterious effects (e.g. duplications underlie a variety of diseases but can also be highly advantageous. The phenotypic potential of newly arisen duplications has stimulated wide interest in both the mutational and selective processes shaping these variants in the genome. Here we take advantage of the Drosophila simulans-Drosophila melanogaster genetic system to further our understanding of both processes. Regarding mutational processes, the study of two closely related species allows investigation of the potential existence of shared duplication hotspots, and the similarities and differences between the two genomes can be used to dissect its underlying causes. Regarding selection, the difference in the effective population size between the two species can be leveraged to ask questions about the strength of selection acting on different classes of duplications. In this study, we conducted a survey of duplication polymorphisms in 14 different lines of D. simulans using tiling microarrays and combined it with an analogous survey for the D. melanogaster genome. By integrating the two datasets, we identified duplication hotspots conserved between the two species. However, unlike the duplication hotspots identified in mammalian genomes, Drosophila duplication hotspots are not associated with sequences of high sequence identity capable of mediating non-allelic homologous recombination. Instead, Drosophila duplication hotspots are associated with late-replicating regions of the genome, suggesting a link between DNA replication and duplication rates. We also found evidence supporting a higher effectiveness of selection on duplications in D. simulans than in D. melanogaster. This is also true for duplications segregating at high frequency, where we find evidence in D. simulans that a sizeable fraction of these mutations is

  18. QTL replication and targeted association highlight the nerve growth factor gene for nonverbal communication deficits in autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, A T-H; Yoon, J; Geschwind, D H; Cantor, R M

    2013-02-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) has a heterogeneous etiology that is genetically complex. It is defined by deficits in communication and social skills and the presence of restricted and repetitive behaviors. Genetic analyses of heritable quantitative traits that correlate with ASD may reduce heterogeneity. With this in mind, deficits in nonverbal communication (NVC) were quantified based on items from the Autism Diagnostic Interview Revised. Our previous analysis of 228 families from the Autism Genetics Research Exchange (AGRE) repository reported 5 potential quantitative trait loci (QTL). Here we report an NVC QTL replication study in an independent sample of 213 AGRE families. One QTL was replicated (PNVC with a P-value of 0.001. Three associated haplotype blocks were intronic to the Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) gene (P=0.001, 0.001, 0.002), and one was intronic to KCND3 (P=0.001). Individual haplotypes within the associated blocks drove the associations (0.003, 0.0004 and 0.0002) for NGF and 0.0001 for KCND3. Using the same methods, these genes were tested for association with NVC in an independent sample of 1517 families from an Autism Genome Project (AGP). NVC was associated with a haplotype in an adjacent NGF block (P=0.0005) and one 46 kb away from the associated block in KCND3 (0.008). These analyses illustrate the value of QTL and targeted association studies for genetically complex disorders such as ASD. NGF is a promising risk gene for NVC deficits.

  19. Replication of the Wellcome Trust genome-wide association study of essential hypertension: the Family Blood Pressure Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehret, Georg B; Morrison, Alanna C; O'Connor, Ashley A; Grove, Megan L; Baird, Lisa; Schwander, Karen; Weder, Alan; Cooper, Richard S; Rao, D C; Hunt, Steven C; Boerwinkle, Eric; Chakravarti, Aravinda

    2008-12-01

    Essential hypertension is a principal cardiovascular risk factor whose origin remains unknown. Classical genetic studies have shown that blood pressure is at least partially heritable, opening a window to understanding the pathophysiology of essential hypertension in the human using modern genetic tools. The Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium has recently published the results of screening the genomes of 2000 essential hypertension cases and 3000 controls using 500 000 genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). None of the variants proved to be genome-wide significant after correction for multiple tests but the most significantly associated SNPs (PFamily Blood Pressure Program comprising 11 433 individuals recruited by hypertensive families. The results suggest that only one of the six SNPs might be associated with essential hypertension in Americans of European origin. This SNP shows a significant but opposite effect in Americans of Hispanic origin and no association in African Americans. The significance of the opposing effect estimates is unclear. No replication could be shown for hypertension status, but there are differences in study design. This attempted replication highlights that essential hypertension studies will require more comprehensive and larger genetic screens.

  20. Genetic Loci Associated with Allergic Sensitization in Lithuanians.

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    Ingrida Šaulienė

    Full Text Available Allergic rhinitis (AR is a common and complex disease. It is associated with environmental as well as genetic factors. Three recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS reported altogether 47 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with AR or allergic sensitization (AS in Europeans and North Americans. Two follow up studies in Swedish and Chinese replicated 15 associations. In these studies individuals were selected based on the self-reported AR, or AR/AS diagnosed using blood IgE test or skin prick test (SPT, which were performed often without restriction to specific allergens. Here we performed third replication study in Lithuanians. We used SPT and carefully selected set of allergens prevalent in Lithuania, as well as Illumina Core Exome chip for SNP detection. We genotyped 270 SPT-positive individuals (137 Betulaceae -, 174 Poaceae-, 199 Artemisia-, 70 Helianthus-, 22 Alternaria-, 22 Cladosporium-, 140 mites-, 95 cat- and 97 dog dander-sensitive cases and 162 SPT-negative controls. We found altogether 13 known SNPs associated with AS (p ≤0.05. Three SNPs were found in Lithuanians sensitive to several allergens, and 10 SNPs were found in Lithuanians sensitive to a certain allergen. For the first time, SNP rs7775228:C was associated with patient sensitivity to dog allergens (F_A=0,269, F_U=0.180, P=0.008. Thus, careful assessment of AS allowed us to detect known genetic variants associated with AS/AR in relatively small cohort of Lithuanians.

  1. Genetic Loci Associated with Allergic Sensitization in Lithuanians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šaulienė, Ingrida; Greičiuvienė, Jūratė; Šukienė, Laura; Juškevičiūtė, Neringa; Benner, Christian; Zinkevičienė, Auksė; Ripatti, Samuli; Donner, Kati; Kainov, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis (AR) is a common and complex disease. It is associated with environmental as well as genetic factors. Three recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) reported altogether 47 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with AR or allergic sensitization (AS) in Europeans and North Americans. Two follow up studies in Swedish and Chinese replicated 15 associations. In these studies individuals were selected based on the self-reported AR, or AR/AS diagnosed using blood IgE test or skin prick test (SPT), which were performed often without restriction to specific allergens. Here we performed third replication study in Lithuanians. We used SPT and carefully selected set of allergens prevalent in Lithuania, as well as Illumina Core Exome chip for SNP detection. We genotyped 270 SPT-positive individuals (137 Betulaceae -, 174 Poaceae-, 199 Artemisia-, 70 Helianthus-, 22 Alternaria-, 22 Cladosporium-, 140 mites-, 95 cat- and 97 dog dander-sensitive cases) and 162 SPT-negative controls. We found altogether 13 known SNPs associated with AS (p ≤0.05). Three SNPs were found in Lithuanians sensitive to several allergens, and 10 SNPs were found in Lithuanians sensitive to a certain allergen. For the first time, SNP rs7775228:C was associated with patient sensitivity to dog allergens (F_A=0,269, F_U=0.180, P=0.008). Thus, careful assessment of AS allowed us to detect known genetic variants associated with AS/AR in relatively small cohort of Lithuanians.

  2. Replication of LDL GWAs hits in PROSPER/PHASE as validation for future (pharmaco)genetic analyses

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Trompet, Stella

    2011-10-06

    Abstract Background The PHArmacogenetic study of Statins in the Elderly at risk (PHASE) is a genome wide association study in the PROspective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at risk for vascular disease (PROSPER) that investigates the genetic variation responsible for the individual variation in drug response to pravastatin. Statins lower LDL-cholesterol in general by 30%, however not in all subjects. Moreover, clinical response is highly variable and adverse effects occur in a minority of patients. In this report we first describe the rationale of the PROSPER\\/PHASE project and second show that the PROSPER\\/PHASE study can be used to study pharmacogenetics in the elderly. Methods The genome wide association study (GWAS) was conducted using the Illumina 660K-Quad beadchips following manufacturer\\'s instructions. After a stringent quality control 557,192 SNPs in 5,244 subjects were available for analysis. To maximize the availability of genetic data and coverage of the genome, imputation up to 2.5 million autosomal CEPH HapMap SNPs was performed with MACH imputation software. The GWAS for LDL-cholesterol is assessed with an additive linear regression model in PROBABEL software, adjusted for age, sex, and country of origin to account for population stratification. Results Forty-two SNPs reached the GWAS significant threshold of p = 5.0e-08 in 5 genomic loci (APOE\\/APOC1; LDLR; FADS2\\/FEN1; HMGCR; PSRC1\\/CELSR5). The top SNP (rs445925, chromosome 19) with a p-value of p = 2.8e-30 is located within the APOC1 gene and near the APOE gene. The second top SNP (rs6511720, chromosome 19) with a p-value of p = 5.22e-15 is located within the LDLR gene. All 5 genomic loci were previously associated with LDL-cholesterol levels, no novel loci were identified. Replication in WOSCOPS and CARE confirmed our results. Conclusion With the GWAS in the PROSPER\\/PHASE study we confirm the previously found genetic associations with LDL-cholesterol levels. With this proof

  3. Genetically Distinct Subsets within ANCA-Associated Vasculitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Paul A.; Rayner, Tim F.; Trivedi, Sapna; Holle, Julia U.; Watts, Richard A.; Jayne, David R.W.; Baslund, Bo; Brenchley, Paul; Bruchfeld, Annette; Chaudhry, Afzal N.; Tervaert, Jan Willem Cohen; Deloukas, Panos; Feighery, Conleth; Gross, Wolfgang L.; Guillevin, Loic; Gunnarsson, Iva; P, Lorraine Harper M.R.C; Hrušková, Zdenka; Little, Mark A.; Martorana, Davide; Neumann, Thomas; Ohlsson, Sophie; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pusey, Charles D.; Salama, Alan D.; Sanders, Jan-Stephan F.; Savage, Caroline O.; Segelmark, Mårten; Stegeman, Coen A.; Tesař, Vladimir; Vaglio, Augusto; Wieczorek, Stefan; Wilde, Benjamin; Zwerina, Jochen; Rees, Andrew J.; Clayton, David G.; Smith, Kenneth G.C.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)–associated vasculitis is a severe condition encompassing two major syndromes: granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly known as Wegener’s granulomatosis) and microscopic polyangiitis. Its cause is unknown, and there is debate about whether it is a single disease entity and what role ANCA plays in its pathogenesis. We investigated its genetic basis. METHODS A genomewide association study was performed in a discovery cohort of 1233 U.K. patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis and 5884 controls and was replicated in 1454 Northern European case patients and 1666 controls. Quality control, population stratification, and statistical analyses were performed according to standard criteria. RESULTS We found both major-histocompatibility-complex (MHC) and non-MHC associations with ANCA-associated vasculitis and also that granulomatosis with polyangiitis and microscopic polyangiitis were genetically distinct. The strongest genetic associations were with the antigenic specificity of ANCA, not with the clinical syndrome. Anti–proteinase 3 ANCA was associated with HLA-DP and the genes encoding α1-antitrypsin (SERPINA1) and proteinase 3 (PRTN3) (P = 6.2×10−89, P = 5.6×10−12, and P = 2.6×10−7, respectively). Anti–myeloperoxidase ANCA was associated with HLA-DQ (P = 2.1×10−8). CONCLUSIONS This study confirms that the pathogenesis of ANCA-associated vasculitis has a genetic component, shows genetic distinctions between granulomatosis with polyangiitis and microscopic polyangiitis that are associated with ANCA specificity, and suggests that the response against the autoantigen proteinase 3 is a central pathogenic feature of proteinase 3 ANCA–associated vasculitis. These data provide preliminary support for the concept that proteinase 3 ANCA–associated vasculitis and myeloperoxidase ANCA–associated vasculitis are distinct autoimmune syndromes. (Funded by the British Heart Foundation and others.) PMID

  4. Recruitment of wild-type and recombinant adeno-associated virus into adenovirus replication centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzman, M D; Fisher, K J; Wilson, J M

    1996-03-01

    Replication of a human parvovirus, adeno-associated virus (AAV), is facilitated by coinfection with adeno-virus to provide essential helper functions. We have used the techniques of in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry to characterize the localization of AAV replication within infected cells, Previous studies have shown that adenovirus establishes foci called replication centers within the nucleus, where adenoviral replication and transcription occur. Our studies indicate that AAV is colocalized with the adenovirus replication centers, where it may utilize adenovirus and cellular proteins for its own replication. Expression of the AAV Rep protein inhibits the normal maturation of the adenovirus centers. Similar experiments were performed with recombinant AAV (rAAV) to establish a relationship between intranuclear localization and rAAV transduction. rAAV efficiently entered the cell, and its genome was faintly detectable in a perinuclear distribution and was mobilized to replication centers when the cell was infected with adenovirus. The recruitment of the replication-defective genome into the intranuclear adenovirus domains resulted in enhanced transduction. These studies illustrate the importance of intracellular compartmentalization for such complex interactions as the relationship between AAV and adenovirus.

  5. Identification, replication, and fine-mapping of Loci associated with adult height in individuals of african ancestry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amidou N'Diaye

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Adult height is a classic polygenic trait of high heritability (h(2 approximately 0.8. More than 180 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, identified mostly in populations of European descent, are associated with height. These variants convey modest effects and explain approximately10% of the variance in height. Discovery efforts in other populations, while limited, have revealed loci for height not previously implicated in individuals of European ancestry. Here, we performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association (GWA results for adult height in 20,427 individuals of African ancestry with replication in up to 16,436 African Americans. We found two novel height loci (Xp22-rs12393627, P = 3.4×10(-12 and 2p14-rs4315565, P = 1.2×10(-8. As a group, height associations discovered in European-ancestry samples replicate in individuals of African ancestry (P = 1.7×10(-4 for overall replication. Fine-mapping of the European height loci in African-ancestry individuals showed an enrichment of SNPs that are associated with expression of nearby genes when compared to the index European height SNPs (P<0.01. Our results highlight the utility of genetic studies in non-European populations to understand the etiology of complex human diseases and traits.

  6. Identification, Replication, and Fine-Mapping of Loci Associated with Adult Height in Individuals of African Ancestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Bing; Tayo, Bamidele; Mathias, Rasika A.; Ding, Jingzhong; Nalls, Michael A.; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Adoue, Véronique; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Atwood, Larry; Bandera, Elisa V.; Becker, Lewis C.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Bernstein, Leslie; Blot, William J.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Britton, Angela; Casey, Graham; Chanock, Stephen J.; Demerath, Ellen; Deming, Sandra L.; Diver, W. Ryan; Fox, Caroline; Harris, Tamara B.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Hu, Jennifer J.; Ingles, Sue A.; John, Esther M.; Johnson, Craig; Keating, Brendan; Kittles, Rick A.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Le Marchand, Loic; Lohman, Kurt; Liu, Jiankang; Millikan, Robert C.; Murphy, Adam; Musani, Solomon; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; North, Kari E.; Nyante, Sarah; Ogunniyi, Adesola; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Papanicolaou, George; Patel, Sanjay; Pettaway, Curtis A.; Press, Michael F.; Redline, Susan; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L.; Rotimi, Charles; Rybicki, Benjamin A.; Salako, Babatunde; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Signorello, Lisa B.; Singleton, Andrew B.; Stanford, Janet L.; Stram, Alex H.; Stram, Daniel O.; Strom, Sara S.; Suktitipat, Bhoom; Thun, Michael J.; Witte, John S.; Yanek, Lisa R.; Ziegler, Regina G.; Zheng, Wei; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Zmuda, Joseph M.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Evans, Michele K.; Liu, Yongmei; Becker, Diane M.; Cooper, Richard S.; Pastinen, Tomi; Henderson, Brian E.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Lettre, Guillaume; Haiman, Christopher A.

    2011-01-01

    Adult height is a classic polygenic trait of high heritability (h 2 ∼0.8). More than 180 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), identified mostly in populations of European descent, are associated with height. These variants convey modest effects and explain ∼10% of the variance in height. Discovery efforts in other populations, while limited, have revealed loci for height not previously implicated in individuals of European ancestry. Here, we performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association (GWA) results for adult height in 20,427 individuals of African ancestry with replication in up to 16,436 African Americans. We found two novel height loci (Xp22-rs12393627, P = 3.4×10−12 and 2p14-rs4315565, P = 1.2×10−8). As a group, height associations discovered in European-ancestry samples replicate in individuals of African ancestry (P = 1.7×10−4 for overall replication). Fine-mapping of the European height loci in African-ancestry individuals showed an enrichment of SNPs that are associated with expression of nearby genes when compared to the index European height SNPs (P<0.01). Our results highlight the utility of genetic studies in non-European populations to understand the etiology of complex human diseases and traits. PMID:21998595

  7. Identification, replication, and fine-mapping of Loci associated with adult height in individuals of african ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    N'Diaye, Amidou; Chen, Gary K; Palmer, Cameron D; Ge, Bing; Tayo, Bamidele; Mathias, Rasika A; Ding, Jingzhong; Nalls, Michael A; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Adoue, Véronique; Ambrosone, Christine B; Atwood, Larry; Bandera, Elisa V; Becker, Lewis C; Berndt, Sonja I; Bernstein, Leslie; Blot, William J; Boerwinkle, Eric; Britton, Angela; Casey, Graham; Chanock, Stephen J; Demerath, Ellen; Deming, Sandra L; Diver, W Ryan; Fox, Caroline; Harris, Tamara B; Hernandez, Dena G; Hu, Jennifer J; Ingles, Sue A; John, Esther M; Johnson, Craig; Keating, Brendan; Kittles, Rick A; Kolonel, Laurence N; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Le Marchand, Loic; Lohman, Kurt; Liu, Jiankang; Millikan, Robert C; Murphy, Adam; Musani, Solomon; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; North, Kari E; Nyante, Sarah; Ogunniyi, Adesola; Ostrander, Elaine A; Papanicolaou, George; Patel, Sanjay; Pettaway, Curtis A; Press, Michael F; Redline, Susan; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L; Rotimi, Charles; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Salako, Babatunde; Schreiner, Pamela J; Signorello, Lisa B; Singleton, Andrew B; Stanford, Janet L; Stram, Alex H; Stram, Daniel O; Strom, Sara S; Suktitipat, Bhoom; Thun, Michael J; Witte, John S; Yanek, Lisa R; Ziegler, Regina G; Zheng, Wei; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Zmuda, Joseph M; Zonderman, Alan B; Evans, Michele K; Liu, Yongmei; Becker, Diane M; Cooper, Richard S; Pastinen, Tomi; Henderson, Brian E; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Lettre, Guillaume; Haiman, Christopher A

    2011-10-01

    Adult height is a classic polygenic trait of high heritability (h(2) approximately 0.8). More than 180 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), identified mostly in populations of European descent, are associated with height. These variants convey modest effects and explain approximately10% of the variance in height. Discovery efforts in other populations, while limited, have revealed loci for height not previously implicated in individuals of European ancestry. Here, we performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association (GWA) results for adult height in 20,427 individuals of African ancestry with replication in up to 16,436 African Americans. We found two novel height loci (Xp22-rs12393627, P = 3.4×10(-12) and 2p14-rs4315565, P = 1.2×10(-8)). As a group, height associations discovered in European-ancestry samples replicate in individuals of African ancestry (P = 1.7×10(-4) for overall replication). Fine-mapping of the European height loci in African-ancestry individuals showed an enrichment of SNPs that are associated with expression of nearby genes when compared to the index European height SNPs (P<0.01). Our results highlight the utility of genetic studies in non-European populations to understand the etiology of complex human diseases and traits.

  8. Identification, replication, and fine-mapping of Loci associated with adult height in individuals of african ancestry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amidou N'Diaye

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Adult height is a classic polygenic trait of high heritability (h(2 approximately 0.8. More than 180 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, identified mostly in populations of European descent, are associated with height. These variants convey modest effects and explain approximately10% of the variance in height. Discovery efforts in other populations, while limited, have revealed loci for height not previously implicated in individuals of European ancestry. Here, we performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association (GWA results for adult height in 20,427 individuals of African ancestry with replication in up to 16,436 African Americans. We found two novel height loci (Xp22-rs12393627, P = 3.4×10(-12 and 2p14-rs4315565, P = 1.2×10(-8. As a group, height associations discovered in European-ancestry samples replicate in individuals of African ancestry (P = 1.7×10(-4 for overall replication. Fine-mapping of the European height loci in African-ancestry individuals showed an enrichment of SNPs that are associated with expression of nearby genes when compared to the index European height SNPs (P<0.01. Our results highlight the utility of genetic studies in non-European populations to understand the etiology of complex human diseases and traits.

  9. Genetically Thermo-Stabilised, Immunogenic Poliovirus Empty Capsids; a Strategy for Non-replicating Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Helen; Minor, Philip D.

    2017-01-01

    While wild type polio has been nearly eradicated there will be a need to continue immunisation programmes for some time because of the possibility of re-emergence and the existence of long term excreters of poliovirus. All vaccines in current use depend on growth of virus and most of the non-replicating (inactivated) vaccines involve wild type viruses known to cause poliomyelitis. The attenuated vaccine strains involved in the eradication programme have been used to develop new inactivated vaccines as production is thought safer. However it is known that the Sabin vaccine strains are genetically unstable and can revert to a virulent transmissible form. A possible solution to the need for virus growth would be to generate empty viral capsids by recombinant technology, but hitherto such particles are so unstable as to be unusable. We report here the genetic manipulation of the virus to generate stable empty capsids for all three serotypes. The particles are shown to be extremely stable and to generate high levels of protective antibodies in animal models. PMID:28103317

  10. Genome-wide association study identifies single nucleotide polymorphism in DYRK1A associated with replication of HIV-1 in monocyte-derived macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastiaan M Bol

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HIV-1 infected macrophages play an important role in rendering resting T cells permissive for infection, in spreading HIV-1 to T cells, and in the pathogenesis of AIDS dementia. During highly active anti-retroviral treatment (HAART, macrophages keep producing virus because tissue penetration of antiretrovirals is suboptimal and the efficacy of some is reduced. Thus, to cure HIV-1 infection with antiretrovirals we will also need to efficiently inhibit viral replication in macrophages. The majority of the current drugs block the action of viral enzymes, whereas there is an abundance of yet unidentified host factors that could be targeted. We here present results from a genome-wide association study identifying novel genetic polymorphisms that affect in vitro HIV-1 replication in macrophages. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Monocyte-derived macrophages from 393 blood donors were infected with HIV-1 and viral replication was determined using Gag p24 antigen levels. Genomic DNA from individuals with macrophages that had relatively low (n = 96 or high (n = 96 p24 production was used for SNP genotyping with the Illumina 610 Quad beadchip. A total of 494,656 SNPs that passed quality control were tested for association with HIV-1 replication in macrophages, using linear regression. We found a strong association between in vitro HIV-1 replication in monocyte-derived macrophages and SNP rs12483205 in DYRK1A (p = 2.16 × 10(-5. While the association was not genome-wide significant (p<1 × 10(-7, we could replicate this association using monocyte-derived macrophages from an independent group of 31 individuals (p = 0.0034. Combined analysis of the initial and replication cohort increased the strength of the association (p = 4.84 × 10(-6. In addition, we found this SNP to be associated with HIV-1 disease progression in vivo in two independent cohort studies (p = 0.035 and p = 0.0048. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that the kinase

  11. DNA ligase I and Nbs1 proteins associate in a complex and colocalize at replication factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vago, Riccardo; Leva, Valentina; Biamonti, Giuseppe; Montecucco, Alessandra

    2009-08-15

    DNA ligase I is the main DNA ligase activity involved in eukaryotic DNA replication acting in the joining of Okazaki fragments. This enzyme is also implicated in nucleotide excision repair and in the long-patch base excision repair while its role in the recombinational repair pathways is poorly understood. DNA ligase I is phosphorylated during cell cycle at several serine and threonine residues that regulate its participation in different DNA transactions by modulating the interaction with different protein partners. Here we use an antibody-based array method to identify novel DNA ligase-interacting partners. We show that DNA ligase I participates in several multiprotein complexes with proteins involved in DNA replication and repair, cell cycle control, and protein modification. In particular we demonstrate that DNA ligase I complexes with Nbs1, a core component of the MRN complex critical for detection, processing and repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. The analysis of epitope tagged DNA ligase I mutants demonstrates that the association is mediated by the catalytic fragment of the enzyme. DNA ligase I and Nbs1 colocalize at replication factories during unperturbed replication and after treatment with DNA damaging agents. Since MRN complex is involved in the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks by homologous recombination at stalled replication forks our data support the notion that DNA ligase I participates in homology dependent pathways that deal with replication-associated lesions generated when replication fork encounters DNA damage.

  12. Genetic association studies in lumbar disc degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskola, Pasi J; Lemmelä, Susanna; Kjaer, Per

    2012-01-01

    Low back pain is associated with lumbar disc degeneration, which is mainly due to genetic predisposition. The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review to evaluate genetic association studies in lumbar disc degeneration as defined on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in humans....

  13. Genetic associations in diabetic nephropathy: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooyaart, A L; Valk, E J J; van Es, L A; Bruijn, J A; de Heer, E; Freedman, B I; Dekkers, O M; Baelde, H J

    2011-03-01

    This meta-analysis assessed the pooled effect of each genetic variant reproducibly associated with diabetic nephropathy. PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science were searched for articles assessing the association between genes and diabetic nephropathy. All genetic variants statistically associated with diabetic nephropathy in an initial study, then independently reproduced in at least one additional study, were selected. Subsequently, all studies assessing these variants were included. The association between these variants and diabetic nephropathy (defined as macroalbuminuria/proteinuria or end-stage renal disease [ESRD]) was calculated at the allele level and the main measure of effect was a pooled odds ratio. Pre-specified subgroup analyses were performed, stratifying for type 1/type 2 diabetes mellitus, proteinuria/ESRD and ethnic group. The literature search yielded 3,455 citations, of which 671 were genetic association studies investigating diabetic nephropathy. We identified 34 replicated genetic variants. Of these, 21 remained significantly associated with diabetic nephropathy in a random-effects meta-analysis. These variants were in or near the following genes: ACE, AKR1B1 (two variants), APOC1, APOE, EPO, NOS3 (two variants), HSPG2, VEGFA, FRMD3 (two variants), CARS (two variants), UNC13B, CPVL and CHN2, and GREM1, plus four variants not near genes. The odds ratios of associated genetic variants ranged from 0.48 to 1.70. Additional variants were detected in subgroup analyses: ELMO1 (Asians), CCR5 (Asians) and CNDP1 (type 2 diabetes). This meta-analysis found 24 genetic variants associated with diabetic nephropathy. The relative contribution and relevance of the identified genes in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy should be the focus of future studies.

  14. Non-replication of genome-wide based associations between common variants in INSIG2 and PFKP and obesity in studies of 18,014 Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandholt, Camilla Helene; Mogensen, Mette S; Borch-Johnsen, Knut;

    2008-01-01

    -control studies and analyses of obesity-related quantitative traits. Moreover, since environmental and genetic factors may modulate the impact of a genetic variant, we wanted to perform such interaction analyses. We focused on physical activity as an environmental risk factor, and on the GWA identified obesity...... variants in FTO (rs9939609) and near MC4R (rs17782313) as genetic risk factors.......The INSIG2 rs7566605 and PFKP rs6602024 polymorphisms have been identified as obesity gene variants in genome-wide association (GWA) studies. However, replication has been contradictory for both variants. The aims of this study were to validate these obesity-associations through case...

  15. GWA study data mining and independent replication identify cardiomyopathy-associated 5 (CMYA5) as a risk gene for schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, X; Lee, G; Maher, B S

    2011-01-01

    We conducted data-mining analyses using the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness (CATIE) and molecular genetics of schizophrenia genome-wide association study supported by the genetic association information network (MGS-GAIN) schizophrenia data sets and performed...... bioinformatic prioritization for all the markers with P-values ¿0.05 in both data sets. In this process, we found that in the CMYA5 gene, there were two non-synonymous markers, rs3828611 and rs10043986, showing nominal significance in both the CATIE and MGS-GAIN samples. In a combined analysis of both the CATIE...... in our Irish samples and was dropped out without further investigation. The other two markers were verified in 23 other independent data sets. In a meta-analysis of all 23 replication samples (family samples, 912 families with 4160 subjects; case-control samples, 11¿380 cases and 15¿021 controls), we...

  16. Replication of obesity and diabetes-related SNP associations in individuals from Yucatan, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor M Hernandez-Escalante

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D is rising rapidly and in Mexicans is approximately 19%. T2D is affected by both environmental and genetic factors. Although specific genes have been implicated in T2D risk few of these findings are confirmed in studies of Mexican subjects. Our aim was to replicate associations of 39 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs from 10 genes with T2D-related phenotypes in a community-based Mexican cohort. Unrelated individuals (n = 259 living in southeastern Mexico were enrolled in the study based at the University of Yucatan School of Medicine in Merida. Phenotypes measured included anthropometric measurements, circulating levels of adipose tissue endocrine factors (leptin, adiponectin, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and insulin, glucose, and blood pressure. Association analyses were conducted by measured genotype analysis implemented in SOLAR, adapted for unrelated individuals. SNP Minor allele frequencies ranged from 2.2 to 48.6 %. Nominal associations were found for CNR1, SLC30A8, GCK and PCSK1 SNPs with systolic blood pressure, insulin and glucose, and for CNR1, SLC30A8, KCNJ11 and PCSK1 SNPs with adiponectin and leptin (p < 0.05. P values greater than 0.0014 were considered significant. Association of SNPs rs10485170 of CNR1 and rs5215 of KCNJ11 with adiponectin and leptin, respectively, reached near significance (p = 0.002. Significant association (p = 0.001 was observed between plasma leptin and rs5219 of KCNJ11.

  17. Polymorphisms in RYBP and AOAH genes are associated with chronic rhinosinusitis in a Chinese population: a replication study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The development of CRS is believed to be the result of combined interactions between the genetic background of the affected subject and environmental factors. OBJECTIVES: To replicate and extend our recent findings from genetic association studies in chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS performed in a Canadian Caucasian population in a Chinese population. METHODS: In a case-control replication study, DNA samples were obtained from CRS with (n  = 306; CRSwNP and without (n = 332; CRSsNP nasal polyps, and controls (n = 315 in a Chinese population. A total of forty-nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs selected from previous identified SNPs associated with CRS in Canadian population, and SNPs from the CHB HapMap dataset were individually genotyped. RESULTS: We identified two SNPs respectively in RYBP (rs4532099, p = 2.15E-06, OR = 2.59 and AOAH (rs4504543, p = 0.0001152, OR = 0.58 significantly associated with whole CRS cohort. Subgroup analysis for the presence of nasal polyps (CRSwNP and CRSsNP displayed significant association in CRSwNP cohorts regarding to one SNP in RYBP (P = 3.24(E-006, OR = 2.76. Evidence of association in the CRSsNP groups in terms of 2 SNPs (AOAH_rs4504543 and RYBP_rs4532099 was detected as well. Stratifying analysis by gender demonstrated that none of the selected SNPs were associated with CRSwNP as well as CRSsNP. Meanwhile 3 SNPs (IL1A_rs17561, P = 0.005778; IL1A_rs1800587, P = 0.009561; IRAK4_rs4251513, P = 0.03837 were associated with serum total IgE level. CONCLUSIONS: These genes are biologically plausible, with roles in regulation of transcription (RYBP and inflammatory response (AOAH. The present data suggests the potential common genetic basis in the development of CRS in Chinese and Caucasian population.

  18. Genetic characterization of an adapted pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza virus that reveals improved replication rates in human lung epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wörmann, Xenia [Department of Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Berlin (Germany); Lesch, Markus [Department of Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Berlin (Germany); Steinbeis Innovation gGmbH, Center for Systems Biomedicine, Falkensee (Germany); Welke, Robert-William [Department of Biology, Molecular Biophysics, IRI Life Sciences, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin (Germany); Okonechnikov, Konstantin; Abdurishid, Mirshat [Department of Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Berlin (Germany); Sieben, Christian [Department of Biology, Molecular Biophysics, IRI Life Sciences, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin (Germany); Geissner, Andreas [Department for Biomolecular Systems, Max Planck Institute for Colloids and Interfaces, Potsdam (Germany); Institute of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Free University, Berlin (Germany); Brinkmann, Volker [Department of Molecular Biology, Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology, Berlin (Germany); Kastner, Markus [Institute for Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University, Linz (Austria); Karner, Andreas [Center for Advanced Bioanalysis GmbH (CBL), Linz (Austria); Zhu, Rong; Hinterdorfer, Peter [Institute for Biophysics, Johannes Kepler University, Linz (Austria); Anish, Chakkumkal [Department for Biomolecular Systems, Max Planck Institute for Colloids and Interfaces, Potsdam (Germany); Seeberger, Peter H. [Department for Biomolecular Systems, Max Planck Institute for Colloids and Interfaces, Potsdam (Germany); Institute of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Free University, Berlin (Germany); Herrmann, Andreas [Department of Biology, Molecular Biophysics, IRI Life Sciences, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin (Germany); and others

    2016-05-15

    The 2009 influenza pandemic originated from a swine-origin H1N1 virus, which, although less pathogenic than anticipated, may acquire additional virulence-associated mutations in the future. To estimate the potential risk, we sequentially passaged the isolate A/Hamburg/04/2009 in A549 human lung epithelial cells. After passage 6, we observed a 100-fold increased replication rate. High-throughput sequencing of viral gene segments identified five dominant mutations, whose contribution to the enhanced growth was analyzed by reverse genetics. The increased replication rate was pinpointed to two mutations within the hemagglutinin (HA) gene segment (HA{sub 1} D130E, HA{sub 2} I91L), near the receptor binding site and the stem domain. The adapted virus also replicated more efficiently in mice in vivo. Enhanced replication rate correlated with increased fusion pH of the HA protein and a decrease in receptor affinity. Our data might be relevant for surveillance of pre-pandemic strains and development of high titer cell culture strains for vaccine production. - Highlights: • We observed a spontaneous mutation of a 2009-pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in vitro. • The adaptation led to a 100-fold rise in replication rate in human A549 cells. • Adaptation was caused by two mutations in the HA gene segment. • Adaptation correlates with increased fusion pH and decreased receptor affinity.

  19. Replication of the Association of BDNF and MC4R Variants With Dietary Intake in the Diabetes Prevention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffery, Jeanne M; Jablonski, Kathleen A; Franks, Paul W; Delahanty, Linda M; Aroda, Vanita; Marrero, David; Hamman, Richard F; Horton, Edward S; Dagogo-Jack, Samuel; Wylie-Rosett, Judith; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Kitabchi, Abbas; Knowler, William C; Wing, Rena R; Florez, Jose C

    Genomewide association studies (GWAS) have identified consistent associations with obesity, with a number of studies implicating eating behavior as a primary mechanism. Few studies have replicated genetic associations with dietary intake. This study evaluates the association between obesity susceptibility loci and dietary intake. Data were obtained as part of the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), a clinical trial of diabetes prevention in persons at high risk of diabetes. The association of 31 genomewide association studies identified obesity risk alleles with dietary intake, measured through a food frequency questionnaire, was investigated in 3,180 participants from DPP at baseline. The minor allele at BDNF, identified as protective against obesity, was associated with lower total caloric intake (β = -106.06, SE = 33.13; p = .0014) at experimentwide statistical significance (p = .0016), whereas association of MC4R rs571312 with higher caloric intake reached nominal significance (β = 61.32, SE = 26.24; p = .0194). Among non-Hispanic white participants, the association of BDNF rs2030323 with total caloric intake was stronger (β = -151.99, SE = 30.09; p < .0001), and association of FTO rs1421085 with higher caloric intake (β = 56.72, SE = 20.69; p = .0061) and percentage fat intake (β = 0.37, SE = 0.08; p = .0418) was also observed. These results demonstrate with the strength of independent replication that BDNF rs2030323 is associated with 100 to 150 greater total caloric intake per allele, with additional contributions of MC4R and, in non-Hispanic white individuals, FTO. As it has been argued that an additional 100 kcal/d could account for the trends in weight gain, prevention focusing on genetic profiles with high dietary intake may help to quell adverse obesity trends. Clinicaltrials.gov,NCT00004992.

  20. Disease-Concordant Twins Empower Genetic Association Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Qihua; Li, Weilong; Vandin, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies with moderate sample sizes are underpowered, especially when testing SNP alleles with low allele counts, a situation that may lead to high frequency of false-positive results and lack of replication in independent studies. Related individuals, such as twin pairs...... concordant for a disease, should confer increased power in genetic association analysis because of their genetic relatedness. We conducted a computer simulation study to explore the power advantage of the disease-concordant twin design, which uses singletons from disease-concordant twin pairs as cases...... and ordinary healthy samples as controls. We examined the power gain of the twin-based design for various scenarios (i.e., cases from monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs concordant for a disease) and compared the power with the ordinary case-control design with cases collected from the unrelated patient...

  1. Genetic association studies in drug-induced liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Ann K; Day, Chris P

    2009-11-01

    Genetic studies on drug-induced liver injury (DILI) have proved challenging, both because of their rarity and their difficulty in replicating observed effects. However, significant progress has now been achieved by both candidate-gene and genome-wide association studies. These two approaches are considered in detail, together with examples of DILI due to specific drugs where consistent associations have been reported. Particular consideration is given to associations between antituberculosis drug-related liver injury and the "slow acetylator" genotype for N-acetyltransferase 2, amoxicillin/clavulanate-related liver injury, and the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II DRB1*1501 allele and flucloxacillin-related injury and the HLA class I B*5701 allele. Although these associations are drug-specific, the possibility that additional, more general susceptibility genes for DILI exist requires further investigation, ideally by genome-wide association studies involving international collaboration. The possibility of interethnic variation in susceptibility to DILI also requires further study.

  2. Replicating function of the RS1 element associated with Vibrio cholerae CTX phi prophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, J; Fando, R; Silva, A; Rodriguez, B L; Benitez, J A

    1998-07-01

    The RS1 element associated with Vibrio cholerae CTX phi prophage was cloned from an E1 Tor biotype Vibrio cholerae strain. We used the recA- vaccine strain Peru-15, that lacks the target for RS-mediated site-specific integration, to show that RS1 promotes autonomous replication of a suicide vector. A linker insertion in the rstR open reading frame abolished autonomous replication in Peru-15 but not in a strain containing an RS1 in the chromosome. An AT-rich region containing cis-acting elements involved in autonomous replication was identified by deletion. This region was sufficient to support autonomous replication in a strain containing an RS1 in the chromosome. DNA sequence analysis of a region present in RS1 and not RS2 revealed the presence of putative binding sites for host proteins involved in plasmid replication. These results indicate that RS1 contains a replicon distinct from RS2 which could be involved in replicative recombination events associated with tandem amplification of the CTX element.

  3. Genome-wide association study and meta-analysis in Northern European populations replicate multiple colorectal cancer risk loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanskanen, Tomas; van den Berg, Linda; Välimäki, Niko; Aavikko, Mervi; Ness-Jensen, Eivind; Hveem, Kristian; Wettergren, Yvonne; Bexe Lindskog, Elinor; Tõnisson, Neeme; Metspalu, Andres; Silander, Kaisa; Orlando, Giulia; Law, Philip J; Tuupanen, Sari; Gylfe, Alexandra E; Hänninen, Ulrika A; Cajuso, Tatiana; Kondelin, Johanna; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Pukkala, Eero; Jousilahti, Pekka; Salomaa, Veikko; Ripatti, Samuli; Palotie, Aarno; Järvinen, Heikki; Renkonen-Sinisalo, Laura; Lepistö, Anna; Böhm, Jan; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Al-Tassan, Nada A; Palles, Claire; Martin, Lynn; Barclay, Ella; Tenesa, Albert; Farrington, Susan; Timofeeva, Maria N; Meyer, Brian F; Wakil, Salma M; Campbell, Harry; Smith, Christopher G; Idziaszczyk, Shelley; Maughan, Tim S; Kaplan, Richard; Kerr, Rachel; Kerr, David; Buchanan, Daniel D; Win, Aung K; Hopper, John; Jenkins, Mark; Newcomb, Polly A; Gallinger, Steve; Conti, David; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Casey, Graham; Cheadle, Jeremy P; Dunlop, Malcolm G; Tomlinson, Ian P; Houlston, Richard S; Palin, Kimmo; Aaltonen, Lauri A

    2017-09-28

    Genome-wide association studies have been successful in elucidating the genetic basis of colorectal cancer, but there remains unexplained variability in genetic risk. To identify new risk variants and to confirm reported associations, we conducted a genome-wide association study in 1,701 colorectal cancer cases and 14,082 cancer-free controls from the Finnish population. A total of 9,068,015 genetic variants were imputed and tested, and 30 promising variants were studied in additional 11,647 cases and 12,356 controls of European ancestry. The previously reported association between the single-nucleotide polymorphism rs992157 (2q35) and colorectal cancer was independently replicated (p=2.08x10(-4) ; OR, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.06-1.23), and it was genome-wide significant in combined analysis (p=1.50x10(-9) ; OR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.08-1.16). Variants at 2q35, 6p21.2, 8q23.3, 8q24.21, 10q22.3, 10q24.2, 11q13.4, 11q23.1, 14q22.2, 15q13.3, 18q21.1, 20p12.3, and 20q13.33 were associated with colorectal cancer in the Finnish population (false discovery rate <0.1), but new risk loci were not found. These results replicate the effects of multiple loci on the risk of colorectal cancer and identify shared risk alleles between the Finnish population isolate and outbred populations. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 UICC.

  4. Climate variables explain neutral and adaptive variation within salmonid metapopulations: the importance of replication in landscape genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Brian K; Muhlfeld, Clint C; Wade, Alisa A; Kovach, Ryan P; Whited, Diane C; Narum, Shawn R; Matala, Andrew P; Ackerman, Michael W; Garner, Brittany A; Kimball, John S; Stanford, Jack A; Luikart, Gordon

    2016-02-01

    Understanding how environmental variation influences population genetic structure is important for conservation management because it can reveal how human stressors influence population connectivity, genetic diversity and persistence. We used riverscape genetics modelling to assess whether climatic and habitat variables were related to neutral and adaptive patterns of genetic differentiation (population-specific and pairwise FST ) within five metapopulations (79 populations, 4583 individuals) of steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in the Columbia River Basin, USA. Using 151 putatively neutral and 29 candidate adaptive SNP loci, we found that climate-related variables (winter precipitation, summer maximum temperature, winter highest 5% flow events and summer mean flow) best explained neutral and adaptive patterns of genetic differentiation within metapopulations, suggesting that climatic variation likely influences both demography (neutral variation) and local adaptation (adaptive variation). However, we did not observe consistent relationships between climate variables and FST across all metapopulations, underscoring the need for replication when extrapolating results from one scale to another (e.g. basin-wide to the metapopulation scale). Sensitivity analysis (leave-one-population-out) revealed consistent relationships between climate variables and FST within three metapopulations; however, these patterns were not consistent in two metapopulations likely due to small sample sizes (N = 10). These results provide correlative evidence that climatic variation has shaped the genetic structure of steelhead populations and highlight the need for replication and sensitivity analyses in land and riverscape genetics.

  5. Climate variables explain neutral and adaptive variation within salmonid metapopulations: The importance of replication in landscape genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Brian K; Muhlfeld, Clint C.; Wade, Alisa A.; Kovach, Ryan; Whited, Diane C.; Narum, Shawn R.; Matala, Andrew P; Ackerman, Michael W.; Garner, B. A.; Kimball, John S; Stanford, Jack A.; Luikart, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how environmental variation influences population genetic structure is important for conservation management because it can reveal how human stressors influence population connectivity, genetic diversity and persistence. We used riverscape genetics modelling to assess whether climatic and habitat variables were related to neutral and adaptive patterns of genetic differentiation (population-specific and pairwise FST) within five metapopulations (79 populations, 4583 individuals) of steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in the Columbia River Basin, USA. Using 151 putatively neutral and 29 candidate adaptive SNP loci, we found that climate-related variables (winter precipitation, summer maximum temperature, winter highest 5% flow events and summer mean flow) best explained neutral and adaptive patterns of genetic differentiation within metapopulations, suggesting that climatic variation likely influences both demography (neutral variation) and local adaptation (adaptive variation). However, we did not observe consistent relationships between climate variables and FST across all metapopulations, underscoring the need for replication when extrapolating results from one scale to another (e.g. basin-wide to the metapopulation scale). Sensitivity analysis (leave-one-population-out) revealed consistent relationships between climate variables and FST within three metapopulations; however, these patterns were not consistent in two metapopulations likely due to small sample sizes (N = 10). These results provide correlative evidence that climatic variation has shaped the genetic structure of steelhead populations and highlight the need for replication and sensitivity analyses in land and riverscape genetics.

  6. Replication and Characterization of Association between ABO SNPs and Red Blood Cell Traits by Meta-Analysis in Europeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLachlan, Stela; Giambartolomei, Claudia; White, Jon; Charoen, Pimphen; Wong, Andrew; Finan, Chris; Engmann, Jorgen; Shah, Tina; Hersch, Micha; Podmore, Clara; Cavadino, Alana; Jefferis, Barbara J; Dale, Caroline E; Hypponen, Elina; Morris, Richard W; Casas, Juan P; Kumari, Meena; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Gaunt, Tom R; Drenos, Fotios; Langenberg, Claudia; Kuh, Diana; Kivimaki, Mika; Rueedi, Rico; Waeber, Gerard; Hingorani, Aroon D; Price, Jacqueline F; Walker, Ann P

    2016-01-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) traits are routinely measured in clinical practice as important markers of health. Deviations from the physiological ranges are usually a sign of disease, although variation between healthy individuals also occurs, at least partly due to genetic factors. Recent large scale genetic studies identified loci associated with one or more of these traits; further characterization of known loci and identification of new loci is necessary to better understand their role in health and disease and to identify potential molecular mechanisms. We performed meta-analysis of Metabochip association results for six RBC traits-hemoglobin concentration (Hb), hematocrit (Hct), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), mean corpuscular volume (MCV) and red blood cell count (RCC)-in 11 093 Europeans from seven studies of the UCL-LSHTM-Edinburgh-Bristol (UCLEB) Consortium. We identified 394 non-overlapping SNPs in five loci at genome-wide significance: 6p22.1-6p21.33 (with HFE among others), 6q23.2 (with HBS1L among others), 6q23.3 (contains no genes), 9q34.3 (only ABO gene) and 22q13.1 (with TMPRSS6 among others), replicating previous findings of association with RBC traits at these loci and extending them by imputation to 1000 Genomes. We further characterized associations between ABO SNPs and three traits: hemoglobin, hematocrit and red blood cell count, replicating them in an independent cohort. Conditional analyses indicated the independent association of each of these traits with ABO SNPs and a role for blood group O in mediating the association. The 15 most significant RBC-associated ABO SNPs were also associated with five cardiometabolic traits, with discordance in the direction of effect between groups of traits, suggesting that ABO may act through more than one mechanism to influence cardiometabolic risk.

  7. Differential association with cellular substructures of pseudorabies virus DNA during early and late phases of replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Porat, T.; Veach, R.A.; Blankenship, M.L.; Kaplan, A.S.

    1984-12-01

    Pseudorabies virus DNA synthesis can be divided into two phases, early and late, which can be distinguished from each other on the basis of the structures of the replicating DNA. The two types of replicating virus DNA can also be distinguished from each other on the basis of the cellular substructures with which each is associated. Analysis by electron microscopic autoradiography showed that during the first round of replication, nascent virus DNA was found in the vicinity of the nuclear membrane; during later rounds of replication the nascent virus DNA was located centrally within the nucleus. The degree of association of virus DNA synthesized at early and late phases with the nuclear matrix fractions also differed; a larger proportion of late than of early nascent virus DNA was associated with this fraction. While nascent cellular DNA only was associated in significant amounts with the nuclear matrix fraction, a large part (up to 40%) of all the virus DNA remained associated with this fraction. However, no retention of specific virus proteins in this fraction was observed. Except for two virus proteins, which were preferentially extracted from the nuclear matrix, approximately 20% of all virus proteins remained in the nuclear matrix fraction. The large proportion of virus DNA associated with the nuclear fraction indicated that virus DNA may be intimately associated with some proteins.

  8. Disease-Concordant Twins Empower Genetic Association Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Qihua; Li, Weilong; Vandin, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies with moderate sample sizes are underpowered, especially when testing SNP alleles with low allele counts, a situation that may lead to high frequency of false-positive results and lack of replication in independent studies. Related individuals, such as twin pairs concordant for a disease, should confer increased power in genetic association analysis because of their genetic relatedness. We conducted a computer simulation study to explore the power advantage of the disease-concordant twin design, which uses singletons from disease-concordant twin pairs as cases and ordinary healthy samples as controls. We examined the power gain of the twin-based design for various scenarios (i.e., cases from monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs concordant for a disease) and compared the power with the ordinary case-control design with cases collected from the unrelated patient population. Simulation was done by assigning various allele frequencies and allelic relative risks for different mode of genetic inheritance. In general, for achieving a power estimate of 80%, the sample sizes needed for dizygotic and monozygotic twin cases were one half and one fourth of the sample size of an ordinary case-control design, with variations depending on genetic mode. Importantly, the enriched power for dizygotic twins also applies to disease-concordant sibling pairs, which largely extends the application of the concordant twin design. Overall, our simulation revealed a high value of disease-concordant twins in genetic association studies and encourages the use of genetically related individuals for highly efficiently identifying both common and rare genetic variants underlying human complex diseases without increasing laboratory cost. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/University College London.

  9. Geographic differences in genetic susceptibility to IgA nephropathy: GWAS replication study and geospatial risk analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Kiryluk

    Full Text Available IgA nephropathy (IgAN, major cause of kidney failure worldwide, is common in Asians, moderately prevalent in Europeans, and rare in Africans. It is not known if these differences represent variation in genes, environment, or ascertainment. In a recent GWAS, we localized five IgAN susceptibility loci on Chr.6p21 (HLA-DQB1/DRB1, PSMB9/TAP1, and DPA1/DPB2 loci, Chr.1q32 (CFHR3/R1 locus, and Chr.22q12 (HORMAD2 locus. These IgAN loci are associated with risk of other immune-mediated disorders such as type I diabetes, multiple sclerosis, or inflammatory bowel disease. We tested association of these loci in eight new independent cohorts of Asian, European, and African-American ancestry (N = 4,789, followed by meta-analysis with risk-score modeling in 12 cohorts (N = 10,755 and geospatial analysis in 85 world populations. Four susceptibility loci robustly replicated and all five loci were genome-wide significant in the combined cohort (P = 5×10⁻³²-3×10⁻¹⁰, with heterogeneity detected only at the PSMB9/TAP1 locus (I² = 0.60. Conditional analyses identified two new independent risk alleles within the HLA-DQB1/DRB1 locus, defining multiple risk and protective haplotypes within this interval. We also detected a significant genetic interaction, whereby the odds ratio for the HORMAD2 protective allele was reversed in homozygotes for a CFHR3/R1 deletion (P = 2.5×10⁻⁴. A seven-SNP genetic risk score, which explained 4.7% of overall IgAN risk, increased sharply with Eastward and Northward distance from Africa (r = 0.30, P = 3×10⁻¹²⁸. This model paralleled the known East-West gradient in disease risk. Moreover, the prediction of a South-North axis was confirmed by registry data showing that the prevalence of IgAN-attributable kidney failure is increased in Northern Europe, similar to multiple sclerosis and type I diabetes. Variation at IgAN susceptibility loci correlates with differences in disease prevalence

  10. Aquareovirus NS80 Initiates Efficient Viral Replication by Retaining Core Proteins within Replication-Associated Viral Inclusion Bodies

    OpenAIRE

    Liming Yan; Jie Zhang; Hong Guo; Shicui Yan; Qingxiu Chen; Fuxian Zhang; Qin Fang

    2015-01-01

    Viral inclusion bodies (VIBs) are specific intracellular compartments for reoviruses replication and assembly. Aquareovirus nonstructural protein NS80 has been identified to be the major constituent for forming globular VIBs in our previous study. In this study, we investigated the role of NS80 in viral structural proteins expression and viral replication. Immunofluorescence assays showed that NS80 could retain five core proteins or inner-capsid proteins (VP1-VP4 and VP6), but not outer-capsi...

  11. Genetic and Phenotypic Characterization of a Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis Emerging Strain with Superior Intra-macrophage Replication Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shomer, Inna; Avisar, Alon; Desai, Prerak; Azriel, Shalhevet; Smollan, Gill; Belausov, Natasha; Keller, Nathan; Glikman, Daniel; Maor, Yasmin; Peretz, Avi; McClelland, Michael; Rahav, Galia; Gal-Mor, Ohad

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is one of the ubiquitous Salmonella serovars worldwide and a major cause of food-born outbreaks, which are often associated with poultry and poultry derivatives. Here we report a nation-wide S. Enteritidis clonal outbreak that occurred in Israel during the last third of 2015. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis and whole genome sequencing identified genetically related strains that were circulating in Israel as early as 2008. Global comparison linked this outbreak strain to several clinical and marine environmental isolates that were previously isolated in California and Canada, indicating that similar strains are prevalent outside of Israel. Phenotypic comparison between the 2015 outbreak strain and other clinical and reference S. Enteritidis strains showed only limited intra-serovar phenotypic variation in growth in rich medium, invasion into Caco-2 cells, uptake by J774.1A macrophages, and host cell cytotoxicity. In contrast, significant phenotypic variation was shown among different S. Enteritidis isolates when biofilm-formation, motility, invasion into HeLa cells and uptake by THP-1 human macrophages were studied. Interestingly, the 2015 outbreak clone was found to possess superior intra-macrophage replication ability within both murine and human macrophages in comparison to the other S. Enteritidis strains studied. This phenotype is likely to play a role in the virulence and host-pathogen interactions of this emerging clone. PMID:27695450

  12. Replication of genome‐wide association study (GWAS) susceptibility loci in a Latino bipolar disorder cohort

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez, Suzanne; Gupta, Jayanta; Villa, Erika; Mallawaarachchi, Indika; Rodriguez, Marco; Ramirez, Mercedes; Zavala, Juan; Armas, Regina; Dassori, Albana; Contreras, Javier; Flores, Deborah; Jerez, Alvaro; Ontiveros, Alfonso; Nicolini, Humberto; Escamilla, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Recent genome‐wide association studies (GWASs) have identified numerous putative genetic polymorphisms associated with bipolar disorder (BD) and/or schizophrenia (SC). We hypothesized that a portion of these polymorphisms would also be associated with BD in the Latino American population. To identify such regions, we tested previously identified genetic variants associated with BD and/or SC and ancestral haploblocks containing these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a sampl...

  13. Genetic networks controlled by the bacterial replication initiator and transcription factor DnaA in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Tracy A; Smith, Janet L; Grossman, Alan D

    2017-10-01

    DnaA is the widely conserved bacterial AAA+ ATPase that functions as both the replication initiator and a transcription factor. In many organisms, DnaA controls expression of its own gene and likely several others during growth and in response to replication stress. To evaluate the effects of DnaA on gene expression, separate from its role in replication initiation, we analyzed changes in mRNA levels in Bacillus subtilis cells with and without dnaA, using engineered strains in which dnaA is not essential. We found that dnaA was required for many of the changes in gene expression in response to replication stress. We also found that dnaA indirectly affected expression of several regulons during growth, including those controlled by the transcription factors Spo0A, AbrB, PhoP, SinR, RemA, Rok and YvrH. These effects were largely mediated by the effects of DnaA on expression of sda. DnaA activates transcription of sda, and Sda inhibits histidine protein kinases required for activation of the transcription factor Spo0A. We also found that loss of dnaA caused a decrease in the development of genetic competence. Together, our results indicate that DnaA plays an important role in modulating cell physiology, separate from its role in replication initiation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The HIV protease inhibitor nelfinavir inhibits Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus replication in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Soren; Carlsson, Jacquelyn; Ikoma, Minako; Gachelet, Eliora; Gray, Matthew; Geballe, Adam P; Corey, Lawrence; Casper, Corey; Lagunoff, Michael; Vieira, Jeffrey

    2011-06-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is the most common HIV-associated cancer worldwide and is associated with high levels of morbidity and mortality in some regions. Antiretroviral (ARV) combination regimens have had mixed results for KS progression and resolution. Anecdotal case reports suggest that protease inhibitors (PIs) may have effects against KS that are independent of their effect on HIV infection. As such, we evaluated whether PIs or other ARVs directly inhibit replication of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), the gammaherpesvirus that causes KS. Among a broad panel of ARVs tested, only the PI nelfinavir consistently displayed potent inhibitory activity against KSHV in vitro as demonstrated by an efficient quantitative assay for infectious KSHV using a recombinant virus, rKSHV.294, which expresses the secreted alkaline phosphatase. This inhibitory activity of nelfinavir against KSHV replication was confirmed using virus derived from a second primary effusion lymphoma cell line. Nelfinavir was similarly found to inhibit in vitro replication of an alphaherpesvirus (herpes simplex virus) and a betaherpesvirus (human cytomegalovirus). No activity was observed with nelfinavir against vaccinia virus or adenovirus. Nelfinavir may provide unique benefits for the prevention or treatment of HIV-associated KS and potentially other human herpesviruses by direct inhibition of replication.

  15. Replicating animal mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A. McKinney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA replication has been experiencing incredible progress in recent years, and yet little is certain about the mechanism(s used by animal cells to replicate this plasmid-like genome. The long-standing strand-displacement model of mammalian mtDNA replication (for which single-stranded DNA intermediates are a hallmark has been intensively challenged by a new set of data, which suggests that replication proceeds via coupled leading-and lagging-strand synthesis (resembling bacterial genome replication and/or via long stretches of RNA intermediates laid on the mtDNA lagging-strand (the so called RITOLS. The set of proteins required for mtDNA replication is small and includes the catalytic and accessory subunits of DNA polymerase y, the mtDNA helicase Twinkle, the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein, and the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (which most likely functions as the mtDNA primase. Mutations in the genes coding for the first three proteins are associated with human diseases and premature aging, justifying the research interest in the genetic, biochemical and structural properties of the mtDNA replication machinery. Here we summarize these properties and discuss the current models of mtDNA replication in animal cells.

  16. Genome-wide association study identifies genetic risk underlying primary rhegmatogenous retinal detachment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirin, M.; Chandra, A.; Charteris, D.G.; Hayward, C.; Campbell, S.; Celap, I.; Bencic, G.; Vatavuk, Z.; Kirac, I.; Richards, A.J.; Tenesa, A.; Snead, M.P.; Fleck, B.W.; Singh, J.; Harsum, S.; Maclaren, R.E.; Hollander, A.I. den; Dunlop, M.G.; Hoyng, C.B.; Wright, A.F.; Campbell, H.; Vitart, V.; Mitry, D.

    2013-01-01

    Rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) is an important cause of vision loss and can potentially lead to blindness. The underlying pathogenesis is complex and incompletely understood. We applied a two-stage genetic association discovery phase followed by a replication phase in a combined total of

  17. A unique epigenetic signature is associated with active DNA replication loci in human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing; Su, Trent; Ferrari, Roberto; Li, Jing-Yu; Kurdistani, Siavash K

    2014-02-01

    The cellular epigenetic landscape changes as pluripotent stem cells differentiate to somatic cells or when differentiated cells transform to a cancerous state. These epigenetic changes are commonly correlated with differences in gene expression. Whether active DNA replication is also associated with distinct chromatin environments in these developmentally and phenotypically diverse cell types has not been known. Here, we used BrdU-seq to map active DNA replication loci in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), normal primary fibroblasts and a cancer cell line, and correlated these maps to the epigenome. In all cell lines, the majority of BrdU peaks were enriched in euchromatin and at DNA repetitive elements, especially at microsatellite repeats, and coincided with previously determined replication origins. The most prominent BrdU peaks were shared between all cells but a sizable fraction of the peaks were specific to each cell type and associated with cell type-specific genes. Surprisingly, the BrdU peaks that were common to all cell lines were associated with H3K18ac, H3K56ac, and H4K20me1 histone marks only in hESCs but not in normal fibroblasts or cancer cells. Depletion of the histone acetyltransferases for H3K18 and H3K56 dramatically decreased the number and intensity of BrdU peaks in hESCs. Our data reveal a unique epigenetic signature that distinguishes active replication loci in hESCs from normal somatic or malignant cells.

  18. Replicated landscape genetic and network analyses reveal wide variation in functional connectivity for American pikas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Jessica A; Epps, Clinton W; Jeffress, Mackenzie R; Ray, Chris; Rodhouse, Thomas J; Schwalm, Donelle

    2016-09-01

    Landscape connectivity is essential for maintaining viable populations, particularly for species restricted to fragmented habitats or naturally arrayed in metapopulations and facing rapid climate change. The importance of assessing both structural connectivity (physical distribution of favorable habitat patches) and functional connectivity (how species move among habitat patches) for managing such species is well understood. However, the degree to which functional connectivity for a species varies among landscapes, and the resulting implications for conservation, have rarely been assessed. We used a landscape genetics approach to evaluate resistance to gene flow and, thus, to determine how landscape and climate-related variables influence gene flow for American pikas (Ochotona princeps) in eight federally managed sites in the western United States. We used empirically derived, individual-based landscape resistance models in conjunction with predictive occupancy models to generate patch-based network models describing functional landscape connectivity. Metareplication across landscapes enabled identification of limiting factors for dispersal that would not otherwise have been apparent. Despite the cool microclimates characteristic of pika habitat, south-facing aspects consistently represented higher resistance to movement, supporting the previous hypothesis that exposure to relatively high temperatures may limit dispersal in American pikas. We found that other barriers to dispersal included areas with a high degree of topographic relief, such as cliffs and ravines, as well as streams and distances greater than 1-4 km depending on the site. Using the empirically derived network models of habitat patch connectivity, we identified habitat patches that were likely disproportionately important for maintaining functional connectivity, areas in which habitat appeared fragmented, and locations that could be targeted for management actions to improve functional connectivity

  19. Human herpesvirus 8-associated neoplasms: the roles of viral replication and antiviral treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Soren; Casper, Corey

    2011-08-01

    In this review, we highlight the importance of human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) lytic replication and the potential for antiviral therapies to prevent or treat HHV-8-related neoplasms. Diseases caused by HHV-8 infection include Kaposi sarcoma, multicentric Castleman disease (MCD), and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), which occur primarily in patients with HIV infection. Kaposi sarcoma is the most common AIDS-associated malignancy worldwide. MCD and PEL occur less commonly but, like Kaposi sarcoma, are associated with poor treatment outcomes. Like all herpesviruses, HHV-8 is capable of either latent or lytic infection of cells. Although HHV-8 infection of tumor cells is predominately latent, accumulating data point to the importance of both lytic phase viral gene products and production of infectious virus. Antiviral agents that target herpesvirus DNA synthesis, such as ganciclovir, inhibit HHV-8 lytic replication and can prevent Kaposi sarcoma. Several HIV protease inhibitors may interfere with tumor growth and angiogenesis, and one protease inhibitor, nelfinavir, directly inhibits HHV-8 replication in vitro. Controlled trials are indicated to determine the clinical utility of antiviral suppression of HHV-8 replication, and identify the optimal antiretroviral regimens, for the prevention and treatment of Kaposi sarcoma.

  20. Identification of genomic loci associated with resting heart rate and shared genetic predictors with all-cause mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eppinga, Ruben N.; Hagemeijer, Yanick; Burgess, Stephen; Hinds, David A.; Stefansson, Kari; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Verweij, Niek; van der Harst, Pim

    2016-01-01

    Resting heart rate is a heritable trait correlated with life span. Little is known about the genetic contribution to resting heart rate and its relationship with mortality. We performed a genome-wide association discovery and replication analysis starting with 19.9 million genetic variants and study

  1. Genetic variants associated with increased risk of malignant pleural mesothelioma: a genome-wide association study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Matullo

    Full Text Available Asbestos exposure is the main risk factor for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM, a rare aggressive tumor. Nevertheless, only 5-17% of those exposed to asbestos develop MPM, suggesting the involvement of other environmental and genetic risk factors. To identify the genetic risk factors that may contribute to the development of MPM, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS; 370,000 genotyped SNPs, 5 million imputed SNPs in Italy, among 407 MPM cases and 389 controls with a complete history of asbestos exposure. A replication study was also undertaken and included 428 MPM cases and 1269 controls from Australia. Although no single marker reached the genome-wide significance threshold, several associations were supported by haplotype-, chromosomal region-, gene- and gene-ontology process-based analyses. Most of these SNPs were located in regions reported to harbor aberrant alterations in mesothelioma (SLC7A14, THRB, CEBP350, ADAMTS2, ETV1, PVT1 and MMP14 genes, causing at most a 2-3-fold increase in MPM risk. The Australian replication study showed significant associations in five of these chromosomal regions (3q26.2, 4q32.1, 7p22.2, 14q11.2, 15q14. Multivariate analysis suggested an independent contribution of 10 genetic variants, with an Area Under the ROC Curve (AUC of 0.76 when only exposure and covariates were included in the model, and of 0.86 when the genetic component was also included, with a substantial increase of asbestos exposure risk estimation (odds ratio, OR: 45.28, 95% confidence interval, CI: 21.52-95.28. These results showed that genetic risk factors may play an additional role in the development of MPM, and that these should be taken into account to better estimate individual MPM risk in individuals who have been exposed to asbestos.

  2. Genetic variants associated with increased risk of malignant pleural mesothelioma: a genome-wide association study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matullo, Giuseppe; Guarrera, Simonetta; Betti, Marta; Fiorito, Giovanni; Ferrante, Daniela; Voglino, Floriana; Cadby, Gemma; Di Gaetano, Cornelia; Rosa, Fabio; Russo, Alessia; Hirvonen, Ari; Casalone, Elisabetta; Tunesi, Sara; Padoan, Marina; Giordano, Mara; Aspesi, Anna; Casadio, Caterina; Ardissone, Francesco; Ruffini, Enrico; Betta, Pier Giacomo; Libener, Roberta; Guaschino, Roberto; Piccolini, Ezio; Neri, Monica; Musk, Arthur W B; de Klerk, Nicholas H; Hui, Jennie; Beilby, John; James, Alan L; Creaney, Jenette; Robinson, Bruce W; Mukherjee, Sutapa; Palmer, Lyle J; Mirabelli, Dario; Ugolini, Donatella; Bonassi, Stefano; Magnani, Corrado; Dianzani, Irma

    2013-01-01

    Asbestos exposure is the main risk factor for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), a rare aggressive tumor. Nevertheless, only 5-17% of those exposed to asbestos develop MPM, suggesting the involvement of other environmental and genetic risk factors. To identify the genetic risk factors that may contribute to the development of MPM, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS; 370,000 genotyped SNPs, 5 million imputed SNPs) in Italy, among 407 MPM cases and 389 controls with a complete history of asbestos exposure. A replication study was also undertaken and included 428 MPM cases and 1269 controls from Australia. Although no single marker reached the genome-wide significance threshold, several associations were supported by haplotype-, chromosomal region-, gene- and gene-ontology process-based analyses. Most of these SNPs were located in regions reported to harbor aberrant alterations in mesothelioma (SLC7A14, THRB, CEBP350, ADAMTS2, ETV1, PVT1 and MMP14 genes), causing at most a 2-3-fold increase in MPM risk. The Australian replication study showed significant associations in five of these chromosomal regions (3q26.2, 4q32.1, 7p22.2, 14q11.2, 15q14). Multivariate analysis suggested an independent contribution of 10 genetic variants, with an Area Under the ROC Curve (AUC) of 0.76 when only exposure and covariates were included in the model, and of 0.86 when the genetic component was also included, with a substantial increase of asbestos exposure risk estimation (odds ratio, OR: 45.28, 95% confidence interval, CI: 21.52-95.28). These results showed that genetic risk factors may play an additional role in the development of MPM, and that these should be taken into account to better estimate individual MPM risk in individuals who have been exposed to asbestos.

  3. No Reliable Association between Runs of Homozygosity and Schizophrenia in a Well-Powered Replication Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Emma C; Bjelland, Douglas W; Howrigan, Daniel P

    2016-01-01

    thresholds and procedures as Keller et al. (2012), we were unable to replicate the significant association between ROH burden and schizophrenia in the independent PGC phase II data, although the effect was in the predicted direction, and the combined (original + replication) dataset yielded an attenuated...... but significant relationship between Froh and schizophrenia (β = 4.86,CI(β) = [0.90,8.83],Z = 2.40,p = 0.02). Since Keller et al. (2012), several studies reported inconsistent association of ROH burden with complex traits, particularly in case-control data. These conflicting results might suggest that the effects...... of autozygosity are confounded by various factors, such as socioeconomic status, education, urbanicity, and religiosity, which may be associated with both real inbreeding and the outcome measures of interest....

  4. Statistical correction of the Winner's Curse explains replication variability in quantitative trait genome-wide association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron Palmer

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified hundreds of SNPs responsible for variation in human quantitative traits. However, genome-wide-significant associations often fail to replicate across independent cohorts, in apparent inconsistency with their apparent strong effects in discovery cohorts. This limited success of replication raises pervasive questions about the utility of the GWAS field. We identify all 332 studies of quantitative traits from the NHGRI-EBI GWAS Database with attempted replication. We find that the majority of studies provide insufficient data to evaluate replication rates. The remaining papers replicate significantly worse than expected (p < 10-14, even when adjusting for regression-to-the-mean of effect size between discovery- and replication-cohorts termed the Winner's Curse (p < 10-16. We show this is due in part to misreporting replication cohort-size as a maximum number, rather than per-locus one. In 39 studies accurately reporting per-locus cohort-size for attempted replication of 707 loci in samples with similar ancestry, replication rate matched expectation (predicted 458, observed 457, p = 0.94. In contrast, ancestry differences between replication and discovery (13 studies, 385 loci cause the most highly-powered decile of loci to replicate worse than expected, due to difference in linkage disequilibrium.

  5. GWA study data mining and independent replication identify cardiomyopathy-associated 5 (CMYA5) as a risk gene for schizophrenia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chen, X

    2011-11-01

    We conducted data-mining analyses using the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness (CATIE) and molecular genetics of schizophrenia genome-wide association study supported by the genetic association information network (MGS-GAIN) schizophrenia data sets and performed bioinformatic prioritization for all the markers with P-values ≤0.05 in both data sets. In this process, we found that in the CMYA5 gene, there were two non-synonymous markers, rs3828611 and rs10043986, showing nominal significance in both the CATIE and MGS-GAIN samples. In a combined analysis of both the CATIE and MGS-GAIN samples, rs4704591 was identified as the most significant marker in the gene. Linkage disequilibrium analyses indicated that these markers were in low LD (3 828 611-rs10043986, r(2)=0.008; rs10043986-rs4704591, r(2)=0.204). In addition, CMYA5 was reported to be physically interacting with the DTNBP1 gene, a promising candidate for schizophrenia, suggesting that CMYA5 may be involved in the same biological pathway and process. On the basis of this information, we performed replication studies for these three single-nucleotide polymorphisms. The rs3828611 was found to have conflicting results in our Irish samples and was dropped out without further investigation. The other two markers were verified in 23 other independent data sets. In a meta-analysis of all 23 replication samples (family samples, 912 families with 4160 subjects; case-control samples, 11 380 cases and 15 021 controls), we found that both markers are significantly associated with schizophrenia (rs10043986, odds ratio (OR)=1.11, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.04-1.18, P=8.2 × 10(-4) and rs4704591, OR=1.07, 95% CI=1.03-1.11, P=3.0 × 10(-4)). The results were also significant for the 22 Caucasian replication samples (rs10043986, OR=1.11, 95% CI=1.03-1.17, P=0.0026 and rs4704591, OR=1.07, 95% CI=1.02-1.11, P=0.0015). Furthermore, haplotype conditioned analyses indicated that the association

  6. Association Analysis of Genetic Variants with Type 2 Diabetes in a Mongolian Population in China

    OpenAIRE

    Haihua Bai; Haiping Liu; Suyalatu Suyalatu; Xiaosen Guo; Shandan Chu; Ying Chen; Tianming Lan; Burenbatu Borjigin; Orlov, Yuriy L.; Posukh, Olga L.; Xiuqin Yang; Guilan Guilan; Osipova, Ludmila P.; Qizhu Wu; Narisu Narisu

    2015-01-01

    The large scale genome wide association studies (GWAS) have identified approximately 80 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) conferring susceptibility to type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, most of these loci have not been replicated in diverse populations and much genetic heterogeneity has been observed across ethnic groups. We tested 28 SNPs previously found to be associated with T2D by GWAS in a Mongolian sample of Northern China (497 diagnosed with T2D and 469 controls) for association with...

  7. Antiviral effects of autologous CD4 T cells genetically modified with a conditionally replicating lentiviral vector expressing long antisense to HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebas, Pablo; Stein, David; Binder-Scholl, Gwendolyn; Mukherjee, Rithun; Brady, Troy; Rebello, Tessio; Humeau, Laurent; Kalos, Michael; Papasavvas, Emmanouil; Montaner, Luis J; Schullery, Daniel; Shaheen, Farida; Brennan, Andrea L; Zheng, Zhaohui; Cotte, Julio; Slepushkin, Vladimir; Veloso, Elizabeth; Mackley, Adonna; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Aberra, Faten; Zhan, Jenny; Boyer, Jean; Collman, Ronald G; Bushman, Frederic D; Levine, Bruce L; June, Carl H

    2013-02-28

    We report the safety and tolerability of 87 infusions of lentiviral vector–modified autologous CD4 T cells (VRX496-T; trade name, Lexgenleucel-T) in 17 HIV patients with well-controlled viremia. Antiviral effects were studied during analytic treatment interruption in a subset of 13 patients. VRX496-T was associated with a decrease in viral load set points in 6 of 8 subjects (P = .08). In addition, A → G transitions were enriched in HIV sequences after infusion, which is consistent with a model in which transduced CD4 T cells exert antisense-mediated genetic pressure on HIV during infection. Engraftment of vector-modified CD4 T cells was measured in gut-associated lymphoid tissue and was correlated with engraftment in blood. The engraftment half-life in the blood was approximately 5 weeks, with stable persistence in some patients for up to 5 years. Conditional replication of VRX496 was detected periodically through 1 year after infusion. No evidence of clonal selection of lentiviral vector–transduced T cells or integration enrichment near oncogenes was detected. This is the first demonstration that gene-modified cells can exert genetic pressure on HIV. We conclude that gene-modified T cells have the potential to decrease the fitness of HIV-1 and conditionally replicative lentiviral vectors have a promising safety profile in T cells.

  8. Genetic mutations associated with status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatnagar, M; Shorvon, S

    2015-08-01

    This paper reports the results of a preliminary search of the literature aimed at identifying the genetic mutations reported to be strongly associated with status epilepticus. Genetic mutations were selected for inclusion if status epilepticus was specifically mentioned as a consequence of the mutation in standard genetic databases or in a case report or review article. Mutations in 122 genes were identified. The genetic mutations identified were found in only rare conditions (sometimes vanishingly rare) and mostly in infants and young children with multiple other handicaps. Most of the genetic mutations can be subdivided into those associated with cortical dysplasias, inborn errors of metabolism, mitochondrial disease, or epileptic encephalopathies and childhood syndromes. There are no identified 'pure status epilepticus genes'. The range of genes underpinning status epilepticus differs in many ways from the range of genes underpinning epilepsy, which suggests that the processes underpinning status epilepticus differ from those underpinning epilepsy. It has been frequently postulated that status epilepticus is the result of a failure of 'seizure termination mechanisms', but the wide variety of genes affecting very diverse biochemical pathways identified in this survey makes any unitary cause unlikely. The genetic influences in status epilepticus are likely to involve a wide range of mechanisms, some related to development, some to cerebral energy production, some to diverse altered biochemical pathways, some to transmitter and membrane function, and some to defects in networks or systems. The fact that many of the identified genes are involved with cerebral development suggests that status epilepticus might often be a system or network phenomenon. To date, there are very few genes identified which are associated with adult-onset status epilepticus (except in those with preexisting neurological damage), and this is disappointing as the cause of many adult

  9. Complement genetics, deficiencies, and disease associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayilyan, Karine R

    2012-07-01

    The complement system is a key component of innate immunity. More than 45 genes encoding the proteins of complement components or their isotypes and subunits, receptors, and regulators have been discovered. These genes are distributed throughout different chromosomes, with 19 genes comprising three significant complement gene clusters in the human genome. Genetic deficiency of any early component of the classical pathway (C1q, C1r/s, C2, C4, and C3) is associated with autoimmune diseases due to the failure of clearance of immune complexes (IC) and apoptotic materials, and the impairment of normal humoral response. Deficiencies of mannan-binding lectin (MBL) and the early components of the alternative (factor D, properdin) and terminal pathways (from C3 onward components: C5, C6, C7, C8, C9) increase susceptibility to infections and their recurrence. While the association of MBL deficiency with a number of autoimmune and infectious disorders has been well established, the effects of the deficiency of other lectin pathway components (ficolins, MASPs) have been less extensively investigated due to our incomplete knowledge of the genetic background of such deficiencies and the functional activity of those components. For complement regulators and receptors, the consequences of their genetic deficiency vary depending on their specific involvement in the regulatory or signalling steps within the complement cascade and beyond. This article reviews current knowledge and concepts about the genetic load of complement component deficiencies and their association with diseases. An integrative presentation of genetic data with the latest updates provides a background to further investigations of the disease association investigations of the complement system from the perspective of systems biology and systems genetics.

  10. Identification of CSK as a systemic sclerosis genetic risk factor through Genome Wide Association Study follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jose-Ezequiel; Broen, Jasper C.; Carmona, F. David; Teruel, Maria; Simeon, Carmen P.; Vonk, Madelon C.; van ‘t Slot, Ruben; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Vicente, Esther; Fonollosa, Vicente; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; González-Gay, Miguel A.; García-Hernández, Francisco J.; de la Peña, Paloma García; Carreira, Patricia; Voskuyl, Alexandre E.; Schuerwegh, Annemie J.; van Riel, Piet L.C.M.; Kreuter, Alexander; Witte, Torsten; Riemekasten, Gabriella; Airo, Paolo; Scorza, Raffaella; Lunardi, Claudio; Hunzelmann, Nicolas; Distler, Jörg H.W.; Beretta, Lorenzo; van Laar, Jacob; Chee, Meng May; Worthington, Jane; Herrick, Ariane; Denton, Christopher; Tan, Filemon K.; Arnett, Frank C.; Assassi, Shervin; Fonseca, Carmen; Mayes, Maureen D.; Radstake, Timothy R.D.J.; Koeleman, Bobby P.C.; Martin, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is complex autoimmune disease affecting the connective tissue; influenced by genetic and environmental components. Recently, we performed the first successful genome-wide association study (GWAS) of SSc. Here, we perform a large replication study to better dissect the genetic component of SSc. We selected 768 polymorphisms from the previous GWAS and genotyped them in seven replication cohorts from Europe. Overall significance was calculated for replicated significant SNPs by meta-analysis of the replication cohorts and replication-GWAS cohorts (3237 cases and 6097 controls). Six SNPs in regions not previously associated with SSc were selected for validation in another five independent cohorts, up to a total of 5270 SSc patients and 8326 controls. We found evidence for replication and overall genome-wide significance for one novel SSc genetic risk locus: CSK [P-value = 5.04 × 10−12, odds ratio (OR) = 1.20]. Additionally, we found suggestive association in the loci PSD3 (P-value = 3.18 × 10−7, OR = 1.36) and NFKB1 (P-value = 1.03 × 10−6, OR = 1.14). Additionally, we strengthened the evidence for previously confirmed associations. This study significantly increases the number of known putative genetic risk factors for SSc, including the genes CSK, PSD3 and NFKB1, and further confirms six previously described ones. PMID:22407130

  11. Understanding Salesforce Behavior using Genetic Association Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.E. van den Berg (Wouter)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Using genetic association studies, this thesis aims to investigate the drivers of successful customer-salesperson interactions in a context where knowledge development has become crucial to the value creation process. Central to this thesis is the developing role of the

  12. Understanding Salesforce Behavior using Genetic Association Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.E. van den Berg (Wouter)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Using genetic association studies, this thesis aims to investigate the drivers of successful customer-salesperson interactions in a context where knowledge development has become crucial to the value creation process. Central to this thesis is the developing role of the

  13. New genetic variants associated with prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers have newly identified 23 common genetic variants -- one-letter changes in DNA known as single-nucleotide polymorphisms or SNPs -- that are associated with risk of prostate cancer. These results come from an analysis of more than 10 million SNP

  14. Replication of the LINGO1 gene association with essential tremor in a North American population

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Lorraine N.; Park, Naeun; Kisselev, Sergey; Rios, Eileen; Lee, Joseph H.; Louis, Elan D.

    2010-01-01

    A marker in the LINGO1 gene, rs9652490, showing significant genome-wide association with essential tremor (ET), was recently reported in an Icelandic population. To replicate this association in an independent population from North America, we genotyped 15 SNPs in the LINGO1 gene in 257 Caucasian ET cases (‘definite,' ‘probable' or ‘possible') and 265 controls enrolled in an epidemiological study at Columbia University. We observed a marginally significant association with allele G of the mar...

  15. Multiple genetic pathways for restarting DNA replication forks in Escherichia coli K-12.

    OpenAIRE

    Sandler, S J

    2000-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, the primosome assembly proteins, PriA, PriB, PriC, DnaT, DnaC, DnaB, and DnaG, are thought to help to restart DNA replication forks at recombinational intermediates. Redundant functions between priB and priC and synthetic lethality between priA2::kan and rep3 mutations raise the possibility that there may be multiple pathways for restarting replication forks in vivo. Herein, it is shown that priA2::kan causes synthetic lethality when placed in combination with either Delt...

  16. DNA replication stress: causes, resolution and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazouzi, Abdelghani; Velimezi, Georgia; Loizou, Joanna I

    2014-11-15

    DNA replication is a fundamental process of the cell that ensures accurate duplication of the genetic information and subsequent transfer to daughter cells. Various pertubations, originating from endogenous or exogenous sources, can interfere with proper progression and completion of the replication process, thus threatening genome integrity. Coordinated regulation of replication and the DNA damage response is therefore fundamental to counteract these challenges and ensure accurate synthesis of the genetic material under conditions of replication stress. In this review, we summarize the main sources of replication stress and the DNA damage signaling pathways that are activated in order to preserve genome integrity during DNA replication. We also discuss the association of replication stress and DNA damage in human disease and future perspectives in the field. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Power assessment for genetic association study of human longevity using offspring of long-lived subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Qihua; Zhao, Jing Hua; Li, Shuxia;

    2010-01-01

    Recently, an indirect genetic association approach that compares genotype frequencies in offspring of long-lived subjects and offspring from random families has been introduced to study gene-longevity associations. Although the indirect genetic association has certain advantages over the direct...... and the proportional hazard model for generating individual lifespan. Family genotype data is generated using a genetic linkage program for given SNP allele frequency. Power is estimated by setting the type I error rate at 0.05 and by calculating the Armitage's chi-squared test statistic for 200 replicate samples...... for each setting of the specified allele risk and frequency parameters under different modes of inheritance and for different sample sizes. The indirect genetic association analysis is a valid approach for studying gene-longevity association, but the sample size requirement is about 3-4 time larger than...

  18. Association between common variants near LBX1 and adolescent idiopathic scoliosis replicated in the Chinese Han population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjie Gao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS is one of the most common spinal deformities found in adolescent populations. Recently, a genome-wide association study (GWAS in a Japanese population indicated that three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, rs11190870, rs625039 and rs11598564, all located near the LBX1 gene, may be associated with AIS susceptibility [1]. This study suggests a novel AIS predisposition candidate gene and supports the hypothesis that somatosensory functional disorders could contribute to the pathogenesis of AIS. These findings warrant replication in other populations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: First, we conducted a case-control study consisting of 953 Chinese Han individuals from southern China (513 patients and 440 healthy controls, and the three SNPs were all found to be associated with AIS predisposition. The ORs were observed as 1.49 (95% CI 1.23-1.80, P = 5.09E-5, 1.70 (95% CI 1.42-2.04, P = 1.17E-8 and 1.52 (95% CI 1.27-1.83, P = 5.54E-6 for rs625039, rs11190870 and rs11598564, respectively. Second, a case-only study including a subgroup of AIS patients (N = 234 was performed to determine the effects of these variants on the severity of the condition. However, we did not find any association between these variants and the severity of curvature. CONCLUSION: This study shows that the genetic variants near the LBX1 gene are associated with AIS susceptibility in Chinese Han population. It successfully replicates the results of the GWAS, which was performed in a Japanese population.

  19. Genetic Manipulation of Glycogen Allocation Affects Replicative Lifespan in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Alex; Arnoldini, Markus; Bergmiller, Tobias; Röösli, Thomas; Bigosch, Colette; Ackermann, Martin

    2016-04-01

    In bacteria, replicative aging manifests as a difference in growth or survival between the two cells emerging from division. One cell can be regarded as an aging mother with a decreased potential for future survival and division, the other as a rejuvenated daughter. Here, we aimed at investigating some of the processes involved in aging in the bacterium Escherichia coli, where the two types of cells can be distinguished by the age of their cell poles. We found that certain changes in the regulation of the carbohydrate metabolism can affect aging. A mutation in the carbon storage regulator gene, csrA, leads to a dramatically shorter replicative lifespan; csrA mutants stop dividing once their pole exceeds an age of about five divisions. These old-pole cells accumulate glycogen at their old cell poles; after their last division, they do not contain a chromosome, presumably because of spatial exclusion by the glycogen aggregates. The new-pole daughters produced by these aging mothers are born young; they only express the deleterious phenotype once their pole is old. These results demonstrate how manipulations of nutrient allocation can lead to the exclusion of the chromosome and limit replicative lifespan in E. coli, and illustrate how mutations can have phenotypic effects that are specific for cells with old poles. This raises the question how bacteria can avoid the accumulation of such mutations in their genomes over evolutionary times, and how they can achieve the long replicative lifespans that have recently been reported.

  20. Genetic Manipulation of Glycogen Allocation Affects Replicative Lifespan in E. coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Boehm

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In bacteria, replicative aging manifests as a difference in growth or survival between the two cells emerging from division. One cell can be regarded as an aging mother with a decreased potential for future survival and division, the other as a rejuvenated daughter. Here, we aimed at investigating some of the processes involved in aging in the bacterium Escherichia coli, where the two types of cells can be distinguished by the age of their cell poles. We found that certain changes in the regulation of the carbohydrate metabolism can affect aging. A mutation in the carbon storage regulator gene, csrA, leads to a dramatically shorter replicative lifespan; csrA mutants stop dividing once their pole exceeds an age of about five divisions. These old-pole cells accumulate glycogen at their old cell poles; after their last division, they do not contain a chromosome, presumably because of spatial exclusion by the glycogen aggregates. The new-pole daughters produced by these aging mothers are born young; they only express the deleterious phenotype once their pole is old. These results demonstrate how manipulations of nutrient allocation can lead to the exclusion of the chromosome and limit replicative lifespan in E. coli, and illustrate how mutations can have phenotypic effects that are specific for cells with old poles. This raises the question how bacteria can avoid the accumulation of such mutations in their genomes over evolutionary times, and how they can achieve the long replicative lifespans that have recently been reported.

  1. Cis-Expression Quantitative Trait Loci Mapping Reveals Replicable Associations with Heroin Addiction in OPRM1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Dana B.; Levy, Joshua L.; Gaddis, Nathan C.; Glasheen, Cristie; Saccone, Nancy L.; Page, Grier P.; Hulse, Gary; Wildenauer, Dieter; Kelty, Erin; Schwab, Sibylle; Degenhardt, Louisa; Martin, Nicholas G.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; McEvoy, Mark; Scott, Rodney J.; Bierut, Laura J.; Nelson, Elliot C.; Kral, Alex; Johnson, Eric O.

    2015-01-01

    Background No opioid receptor, mu 1 (OPRM1) gene polymorphisms, including the functional single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs1799971, have been conclusively associated with heroin/other opioid addiction, despite their biological plausibility. We used evidence of polymorphisms altering OPRM1 expression in normal human brain tissue to nominate and then test associations with heroin addiction. Methods We tested 103 OPRM1 SNPs for association with OPRM1 mRNA expression in prefrontal cortex from 224 European Americans and African Americans of the BrainCloud cohort. We then tested the 16 putative cis-quantitative trait loci (cis-eQTL) SNPs for association with heroin addiction in the Urban Health Study and two replication cohorts, totaling 16,729 European Americans, African Americans, and Australians of European ancestry. Results Four putative cis-eQTL SNPs were significantly associated with heroin addiction in the Urban Health Study (smallest P=8.9×10−5): rs9478495, rs3778150, rs9384169, and rs562859. Rs3778150, located in OPRM1 intron 1, was significantly replicated (P=6.3×10−5). Meta-analysis across all case-control cohorts resulted in P=4.3×10−8: the rs3778150-C allele (frequency=16%-19%) being associated with increased heroin addiction risk. Importantly, the functional SNP allele rs1799971-A was associated with heroin addiction only in the presence of rs3778150-C (P=1.48×10−6 for rs1799971-A/rs3778150-C and P=0.79 for rs1799971-A/rs3778150-T haplotypes). Lastly, replication was observed for six other intron 1 SNPs which had prior suggestive associations with heroin addiction (smallest P=2.7×10−8 for rs3823010). Conclusions Our findings show that common OPRM1 intron 1 SNPs have replicable associations with heroin addiction. The haplotype structure of rs3778150 and nearby SNPs may underlie the inconsistent associations between rs1799971 and heroin addiction. PMID:25744370

  2. Transient suppression of hepatocellular replication in the mouse liver following transduction with recombinant adeno-associated virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dane, A P; Cunningham, S C; Kok, C Y; Logan, G J; Alexander, I E

    2015-11-01

    Recombinant vectors based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) are proving to be powerful tools for genetic manipulation of the liver, for both discovery and therapeutic purposes. The system can be used to deliver transgene cassettes for expression or, alternatively, DNA templates for genome editing via homologous recombination. The replicative state of target cells is known to influence the efficiency of these processes and knowledge of the host-vector interactions involved is required for optimally effective vector deployment. Here we show, for the first time in vivo, that in addition to the known effects of hepatocellular replication on AAV-mediated gene transfer, the vector itself exerts a potent, albeit transient suppressive effect on cell cycle progression that is relieved on a time course that correlates with the known rate of clearance of input single-stranded vector DNA. This finding requires further mechanistic investigation, delineates an excellent model system for such studies and further deepens our insight into the complexity of interactions between AAV vectors and the cell cycle in a clinically promising target tissue.

  3. Piper betle L. Modulates Senescence-Associated Genes Expression in Replicative Senescent Human Diploid Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Wati Durani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Piper betle (PB is a traditional medicine that is widely used to treat different diseases around Asian region. The leaf extracts contain various bioactive compounds, which were reported to have antidiabetic, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anticancer effects. In this study, the effect of PB aqueous extracts on replicative senescent human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs was investigated by determining the expressions of senescence-associated genes using quantitative PCR. Our results showed that PB extracts at 0.4 mg/ml can improve cell proliferation of young (143%, presenescent (127.3%, and senescent (157.3% HDFs. Increased expressions of PRDX6, TP53, CDKN2A, PAK2, and MAPK14 were observed in senescent HDFs compared to young and/or presenescent HDFs. Treatment with PB extracts modulates the transcriptional profile changes in senescent HDFs. By contrast, expressions of SOD1 increased, whereas GPX1, PRDX6, TP53, CDKN2A, PAK2, and MAPK14 were decreased in PB-treated senescent HDFs compared to untreated senescent HDFs. In conclusion, this study indicates the modulation of PB extracts on senescence-associated genes expression of replicative senescent HDFs. Further studies warrant determining the mechanism of PB in modulating replicative senescence of HDFs through these signaling pathways.

  4. Genetic variants associated with Crohn's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michail S

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Sonia Michail,1 Gilberto Bultron,1 R William DePaolo2 1The University of Southern California, Children's Hospital of Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Crohn's disease is an immune-related disorder characterized by inflammation of the gastrointestinal mucosa, which can occur in any area throughout the digestive tract. This life-long disease commonly presents with abdominal pain, diarrhea, vomiting, and weight loss. While the exact etiology of this disease is largely unknown, it is thought to arise from an interaction between microbial, immunological, and environmental factors in a genetically susceptible host, whereby the immune system attacks the intestine as it cross reacts against gut microbial antigens. The study of genetic variants associated with Crohn's disease has shed light on our understanding of disease pathophysiology. A large number of genetic variants identified in Crohn's disease are related to genes targeting microbial recognition and bacterial wall sensing, the most common being NOD2/CARD15 gene. This review will discuss the recent advance in our knowledge of genetic variants of this disease and how they influence the disease course and prognosis. Keywords: Crohn's disease, genetics, autophagy

  5. Recent advances in the study of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus replication and pathogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Denis; Avey; Brittany; Brewers; Fanxiu; Zhu

    2015-01-01

    It has now been over twenty years since a novel herpesviral genome was identified in Kaposi’s sarcoma biopsies. Since then, the cumulative research effort by molecular biologists, virologists, clinicians, and epidemiologists alike has led to the extensive characterization of this tumor virus, Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus(KSHV; also known as human herpesvirus 8(HHV-8)), and its associated diseases. Here we review the current knowledge of KSHV biology and pathogenesis, with a particular emphasis on new and exciting advances in the field of epigenetics. We also discuss the development and practicality of various cell culture and animal model systems to study KSHV replication and pathogenesis.

  6. Archaeal DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelman, Lori M; Kelman, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication is essential for all life forms. Although the process is fundamentally conserved in the three domains of life, bioinformatic, biochemical, structural, and genetic studies have demonstrated that the process and the proteins involved in archaeal DNA replication are more similar to those in eukaryal DNA replication than in bacterial DNA replication, but have some archaeal-specific features. The archaeal replication system, however, is not monolithic, and there are some differences in the replication process between different species. In this review, the current knowledge of the mechanisms governing DNA replication in Archaea is summarized. The general features of the replication process as well as some of the differences are discussed.

  7. Novel genetic loci associated with hippocampal volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Adams, Hieab H. H.; Jahanshad, Neda; Chauhan, Ganesh; Stein, Jason L.; Hofer, Edith; Renteria, Miguel E.; Bis, Joshua C.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Ikram, M. Kamran; Desrivières, Sylvane; Vernooij, Meike W.; Abramovic, Lucija; Alhusaini, Saud; Amin, Najaf; Andersson, Micael; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Axelsson, Tomas; Beecham, Ashley H.; Beiser, Alexa; Bernard, Manon; Blanton, Susan H.; Bohlken, Marc M.; Boks, Marco P.; Bralten, Janita; Brickman, Adam M.; Carmichael, Owen; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R. K.; Chouraki, Vincent; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Crivello, Fabrice; Den Braber, Anouk; Doan, Nhat Trung; Ehrlich, Stefan; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L.; Gottesman, Rebecca F.; Grimm, Oliver; Griswold, Michael E.; Guadalupe, Tulio; Gutman, Boris A.; Hass, Johanna; Haukvik, Unn K.; Hoehn, David; Holmes, Avram J.; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Jørgensen, Kjetil N.; Karbalai, Nazanin; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H.; Liewald, David C. M.; Lopez, Lorna M.; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Marquand, Andre F.; Matarin, Mar; Mather, Karen A.; Mattheisen, Manuel; McKay, David R.; Milaneschi, Yuri; Muñoz Maniega, Susana; Nho, Kwangsik; Nugent, Allison C.; Nyquist, Paul; Loohuis, Loes M. Olde; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Papmeyer, Martina; Pirpamer, Lukas; Pütz, Benno; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Richards, Jennifer S.; Risacher, Shannon L.; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rommelse, Nanda; Ropele, Stefan; Rose, Emma J.; Royle, Natalie A.; Rundek, Tatjana; Sämann, Philipp G.; Saremi, Arvin; Satizabal, Claudia L.; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J.; Shen, Li; Shin, Jean; Shumskaya, Elena; Smith, Albert V.; Sprooten, Emma; Strike, Lachlan T.; Teumer, Alexander; Tordesillas-Gutierrez, Diana; Toro, Roberto; Trabzuni, Daniah; Trompet, Stella; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Van der Grond, Jeroen; Van der Lee, Sven J.; Van der Meer, Dennis; Van Donkelaar, Marjolein M. J.; Van Eijk, Kristel R.; Van Erp, Theo G. M.; Van Rooij, Daan; Walton, Esther; Westlye, Lars T.; Whelan, Christopher D.; Windham, Beverly G.; Winkler, Anderson M.; Wittfeld, Katharina; Woldehawariat, Girma; Wolf, Christiane; Wolfers, Thomas; Yanek, Lisa R.; Yang, Jingyun; Zijdenbos, Alex; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Agartz, Ingrid; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Amouyel, Philippe; Andreassen, Ole A.; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A.; Barral, Sandra; Bastin, Mark E.; Becker, Diane M.; Becker, James T.; Bennett, David A.; Blangero, John; van Bokhoven, Hans; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Brodaty, Henry; Brouwer, Rachel M.; Brunner, Han G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Bulayeva, Kazima B.; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D.; Cannon, Dara M.; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Cichon, Sven; Cookson, Mark R.; Corvin, Aiden; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Curran, Joanne E.; Czisch, Michael; Dale, Anders M.; Davies, Gareth E.; De Craen, Anton J. M.; De Geus, Eco J. C.; De Jager, Philip L.; De Zubicaray, Greig I.; Deary, Ian J.; Debette, Stéphanie; DeCarli, Charles; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; DeStefano, Anita; Dillman, Allissa; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary; Drevets, Wayne C.; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D.; Enzinger, Christian; Erk, Susanne; Espeseth, Thomas; Fedko, Iryna O.; Fernández, Guillén; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fisher, Simon E.; Fleischman, Debra A.; Ford, Ian; Fornage, Myriam; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Fox, Peter T.; Francks, Clyde; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Glahn, David C.; Gollub, Randy L.; Göring, Harald H. H.; Green, Robert C.; Gruber, Oliver; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guelfi, Sebastian; Håberg, Asta K.; Hansell, Narelle K.; Hardy, John; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Hernandez, Dena G.; Heslenfeld, Dirk J.; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Albert; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hosten, Norbert; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Huentelman, Matthew; Pol, Hilleke E. Hulshoff; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack Jr, Clifford R.; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Jönsson, Erik G.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Kahn, René S.; Kanai, Ryota; Kloszewska, Iwona; Knopman, David S.; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B.; Lawrie, Stephen M.; Lemaître, Hervé; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Lovestone, Simon; Martinez, Oliver; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Mattay, Venkata S.; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; McMahon, Francis J.; McMahon, Katie L.; Mecocci, Patrizia; Melle, Ingrid; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Morris, Derek W.; Mosley, Thomas H.; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nalls, Michael A.; Nauck, Matthias; Nichols, Thomas E.; Niessen, Wiro J.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Nyberg, Lars; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Pandolfo, Massimo; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Pike, G. Bruce; Potkin, Steven G.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Roffman, Joshua L.; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rotter, Jerome I.; Ryten, Mina; Sacco, Ralph L.; Sachdev, Perminder S.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Schmidt, Reinhold; Schmidt, Helena; Schofield, Peter R.; Sigursson, Sigurdur; Simmons, Andrew; Singleton, Andrew; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Smith, Colin; Smoller, Jordan W.; Soininen, Hilkka; Steen, Vidar M.; Stott, David J.; Sussmann, Jessika E.; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Troncoso, Juan; Tsolaki, Magda; Tzourio, Christophe; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Hernández, Maria C. Valdés; Van der Brug, Marcel; van der Lugt, Aad; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; Van Haren, Neeltje E. M.; van 't Ent, Dennis; Van Tol, Marie-Jose; Vardarajan, Badri N.; Vellas, Bruno; Veltman, Dick J.; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Weale, Michael E.; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Weiner, Michael W.; Wen, Wei; Westman, Eric; White, Tonya; Wong, Tien Y.; Wright, Clinton B.; Zielke, Ronald H.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Wright, Margaret J.; Longstreth, W. T.; Schumann, Gunter; Grabe, Hans J.; Franke, Barbara; Launer, Lenore J.; Medland, Sarah E.; Seshadri, Sudha; Thompson, Paul M.; Ikram, M. Arfan

    2017-01-01

    The hippocampal formation is a brain structure integrally involved in episodic memory, spatial navigation, cognition and stress responsiveness. Structural abnormalities in hippocampal volume and shape are found in several common neuropsychiatric disorders. To identify the genetic underpinnings of hippocampal structure here we perform a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 33,536 individuals and discover six independent loci significantly associated with hippocampal volume, four of them novel. Of the novel loci, three lie within genes (ASTN2, DPP4 and MAST4) and one is found 200 kb upstream of SHH. A hippocampal subfield analysis shows that a locus within the MSRB3 gene shows evidence of a localized effect along the dentate gyrus, subiculum, CA1 and fissure. Further, we show that genetic variants associated with decreased hippocampal volume are also associated with increased risk for Alzheimer's disease (rg=−0.155). Our findings suggest novel biological pathways through which human genetic variation influences hippocampal volume and risk for neuropsychiatric illness. PMID:28098162

  8. The role of IREB2 and transforming growth factor beta-1 genetic variants in COPD: a replication case-control study

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chappell, Sally L

    2011-02-14

    Abstract Background Genetic factors are known to contribute to COPD susceptibility and these factors are not fully understood. Conflicting results have been reported for many genetic studies of candidate genes based on their role in the disease. Genome-wide association studies in combination with expression profiling have identified a number of new candidates including IREB2. A meta-analysis has implicated transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGFbeta1) as a contributor to disease susceptibility. Methods We have examined previously reported associations in both genes in a collection of 1017 white COPD patients and 912 non-diseased smoking controls. Genotype information was obtained for seven SNPs in the IREB2 gene, and for four SNPs in the TGFbeta1 gene. Allele and genotype frequencies were compared between COPD cases and controls, and odds ratios were calculated. The analysis was adjusted for age, sex, smoking and centre, including interactions of age, sex and smoking with centre. Results Our data replicate the association of IREB2 SNPs in association with COPD for SNP rs2568494, rs2656069 and rs12593229 with respective adjusted p-values of 0.0018, 0.0039 and 0.0053. No significant associations were identified for TGFbeta1. Conclusions These studies have therefore confirmed that the IREB2 locus is a contributor to COPD susceptibility and suggests a new pathway in COPD pathogenesis invoking iron homeostasis.

  9. The XNA world: progress towards replication and evolution of synthetic genetic polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Vitor B; Holliger, Philipp

    2012-08-01

    Life's diversity is built on the wide range of properties and functions that can be encoded in natural biopolymers such as polypeptides and nucleic acids. However, despite their versatility, the range of chemical functionalities is limited, particularly in the case of nucleic acids. Chemical modification of nucleic acids can greatly increase their functional diversity but access to the full phenotypic potential of such polymers requires a system of replication. Here we review progress in the chemical and enzymatic synthesis, replication and evolution of unnatural nucleic acid polymers, which promises to enable the exploration of a vast sequence space not accessible to nature and deliver ligands, catalysts and materials based on this new class of biopolymers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Jnk2 effects on tumor development, genetic instability and replicative stress in an oncogene-driven mouse mammary tumor model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peila Chen

    Full Text Available Oncogenes induce cell proliferation leading to replicative stress, DNA damage and genomic instability. A wide variety of cellular stresses activate c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK proteins, but few studies have directly addressed the roles of JNK isoforms in tumor development. Herein, we show that jnk2 knockout mice expressing the Polyoma Middle T Antigen transgene developed mammary tumors earlier and experienced higher tumor multiplicity compared to jnk2 wildtype mice. Lack of jnk2 expression was associated with higher tumor aneuploidy and reduced DNA damage response, as marked by fewer pH2AX and 53BP1 nuclear foci. Comparative genomic hybridization further confirmed increased genomic instability in PyV MT/jnk2-/- tumors. In vitro, PyV MT/jnk2-/- cells underwent replicative stress and cell death as evidenced by lower BrdU incorporation, and sustained chromatin licensing and DNA replication factor 1 (CDT1 and p21(Waf1 protein expression, and phosphorylation of Chk1 after serum stimulation, but this response was not associated with phosphorylation of p53 Ser15. Adenoviral overexpression of CDT1 led to similar differences between jnk2 wildtype and knockout cells. In normal mammary cells undergoing UV induced single stranded DNA breaks, JNK2 localized to RPA (Replication Protein A coated strands indicating that JNK2 responds early to single stranded DNA damage and is critical for subsequent recruitment of DNA repair proteins. Together, these data support that JNK2 prevents replicative stress by coordinating cell cycle progression and DNA damage repair mechanisms.

  11. No Reliable Association between Runs of Homozygosity and Schizophrenia in a Well-Powered Replication Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjelland, Douglas W.; Howrigan, Daniel P.; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Breen, Gerome; Borglum, Anders; Cichon, Sven; Degenhardt, Franziska; Forstner, Andreas J.; Genovese, Giulio; Heilmann-Heimbach, Stefanie; Hoffman, Per; Maier, Wolfgang; Mattheisen, Manuel; Morris, Derek; Mowry, Bryan; Müller-Mhysok, Betram; Neale, Benjamin; Nenadic, Igor; Nöthen, Markus M.; O’Dushlaine, Colm; Rietschel, Marcella; Ruderfer, Douglas M.; Rujescu, Dan; Schulze, Thomas G.; Simonson, Matthew A.; Stahl, Eli; Strohmaier, Jana; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Keller, Matthew C.

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that inbreeding increases the risk of recessive monogenic diseases, but it is less certain whether it contributes to the etiology of complex diseases such as schizophrenia. One way to estimate the effects of inbreeding is to examine the association between disease diagnosis and genome-wide autozygosity estimated using runs of homozygosity (ROH) in genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism arrays. Using data for schizophrenia from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (n = 21,868), Keller et al. (2012) estimated that the odds of developing schizophrenia increased by approximately 17% for every additional percent of the genome that is autozygous (β = 16.1, CI(β) = [6.93, 25.7], Z = 3.44, p = 0.0006). Here we describe replication results from 22 independent schizophrenia case-control datasets from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (n = 39,830). Using the same ROH calling thresholds and procedures as Keller et al. (2012), we were unable to replicate the significant association between ROH burden and schizophrenia in the independent PGC phase II data, although the effect was in the predicted direction, and the combined (original + replication) dataset yielded an attenuated but significant relationship between Froh and schizophrenia (β = 4.86,CI(β) = [0.90,8.83],Z = 2.40,p = 0.02). Since Keller et al. (2012), several studies reported inconsistent association of ROH burden with complex traits, particularly in case-control data. These conflicting results might suggest that the effects of autozygosity are confounded by various factors, such as socioeconomic status, education, urbanicity, and religiosity, which may be associated with both real inbreeding and the outcome measures of interest. PMID:27792727

  12. Melon necrotic spot virus Replication Occurs in Association with Altered Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Aix, Cristina; García-García, María; Aranda, Miguel A; Sánchez-Pina, María Amelia

    2015-04-01

    Melon necrotic spot virus (MNSV) (genus Carmovirus, family Tombusviridae) is a single-stranded, positive-sense RNA virus that has become an experimental model for the analysis of cell-to-cell virus movement and translation of uncapped viral RNAs, whereas little is known about its replication. Analysis of the cytopathology after MNSV infection showed the specific presence of modified organelles that resemble mitochondria. Immunolocalization of the glycine decarboxylase complex (GDC) P protein in these organelles confirmed their mitochondrial origin. In situ hybridization and immunolocalization experiments showed the specific localization of positive-sense viral RNA, capsid protein (CP), and double-stranded (ds)RNA in these organelles meaning that replication of the virus takes place in association with them. The three-dimensional reconstructions of the altered mitochondria showed the presence of large, interconnected, internal dilations which appeared to be linked to the outside cytoplasmic environment through pores and/or complex structures, and with lipid bodies. Transient expression of MNSV p29 revealed that its specific target is mitochondria. Our data document the extensive reorganization of host mitochondria induced by MNSV, which provides a protected environment to viral replication, and show that the MNSV p29 protein is the primary determinant of this effect in the host.

  13. Systematic analysis, comparison, and integration of disease based human genetic association data and mouse genetic phenotypic information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang S Alex

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genetic contributions to human common disorders and mouse genetic models of disease are complex and often overlapping. In common human diseases, unlike classical Mendelian disorders, genetic factors generally have small effect sizes, are multifactorial, and are highly pleiotropic. Likewise, mouse genetic models of disease often have pleiotropic and overlapping phenotypes. Moreover, phenotypic descriptions in the literature in both human and mouse are often poorly characterized and difficult to compare directly. Methods In this report, human genetic association results from the literature are summarized with regard to replication, disease phenotype, and gene specific results; and organized in the context of a systematic disease ontology. Similarly summarized mouse genetic disease models are organized within the Mammalian Phenotype ontology. Human and mouse disease and phenotype based gene sets are identified. These disease gene sets are then compared individually and in large groups through dendrogram analysis and hierarchical clustering analysis. Results Human disease and mouse phenotype gene sets are shown to group into disease and phenotypically relevant groups at both a coarse and fine level based on gene sharing. Conclusion This analysis provides a systematic and global perspective on the genetics of common human disease as compared to itself and in the context of mouse genetic models of disease.

  14. Identification of genetic elements associated with EPSPs gene amplification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd A Gaines

    Full Text Available Weed populations can have high genetic plasticity and rapid responses to environmental selection pressures. For example, 100-fold amplification of the 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS gene evolved in the weed species Amaranthus palmeri to confer resistance to glyphosate, the world's most important herbicide. However, the gene amplification mechanism is unknown. We sequenced the EPSPS gene and genomic regions flanking EPSPS loci in A. palmeri, and searched for mobile genetic elements or repetitive sequences. The EPSPS gene was 10,229 bp, containing 8 exons and 7 introns. The gene amplification likely proceeded through a DNA-mediated mechanism, as introns exist in the amplified gene copies and the entire amplified sequence is at least 30 kb in length. Our data support the presence of two EPSPS loci in susceptible (S A. palmeri, and that only one of these was amplified in glyphosate-resistant (R A. palmeri. The EPSPS gene amplification event likely occurred recently, as no sequence polymorphisms were found within introns of amplified EPSPS copies from R individuals. Sequences with homology to miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs were identified next to EPSPS gene copies only in R individuals. Additionally, a putative Activator (Ac transposase and a repetitive sequence region were associated with amplified EPSPS genes. The mechanism controlling this DNA-mediated amplification remains unknown. Further investigation is necessary to determine if the gene amplification may have proceeded via DNA transposon-mediated replication, and/or unequal recombination between different genomic regions resulting in replication of the EPSPS gene.

  15. Association of genetic variants with diabetic nephropathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Saliha; Rizvi; Syed; Tasleem; Raza; Farzana; Mahdi

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy accounts for the most serious microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus. It is suggested that the prevalence of diabetic nephropathy will continue to increase in future posing a major challenge to the healthcare system resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. It occurs as a result of interaction between both genetic and environmental factors in individuals with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Genetic susceptibility has been proposed as an important factor for the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy, and various research efforts are being executed worldwide to identify the susceptibility gene for diabetic nephropathy. Numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms have been found in various genes giving rise to various gene variants which have been found to play a major role in genetic susceptibility to diabetic nephropathy. The risk of developing diabetic nephropathy is increased several times by inheriting risk alleles at susceptibility loci of various genes like ACE, IL, TNF-α, COL4A1, e NOS, SOD2, APOE, GLUT, etc. The identification of these genetic variants at a biomarker level could thus, allow the detection of those individuals at high risk for diabetic nephropathy which could thus help in the treatment, diagnosis and early prevention of the disease. The present review discusses about the various gene variants found till date to be associated with diabetic nephropathy.

  16. Association of genetic variants with diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Saliha; Raza, Syed Tasleem; Mahdi, Farzana

    2014-12-15

    Diabetic nephropathy accounts for the most serious microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus. It is suggested that the prevalence of diabetic nephropathy will continue to increase in future posing a major challenge to the healthcare system resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. It occurs as a result of interaction between both genetic and environmental factors in individuals with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Genetic susceptibility has been proposed as an important factor for the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy, and various research efforts are being executed worldwide to identify the susceptibility gene for diabetic nephropathy. Numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms have been found in various genes giving rise to various gene variants which have been found to play a major role in genetic susceptibility to diabetic nephropathy. The risk of developing diabetic nephropathy is increased several times by inheriting risk alleles at susceptibility loci of various genes like ACE, IL, TNF-α, COL4A1, eNOS, SOD2, APOE, GLUT, etc. The identification of these genetic variants at a biomarker level could thus, allow the detection of those individuals at high risk for diabetic nephropathy which could thus help in the treatment, diagnosis and early prevention of the disease. The present review discusses about the various gene variants found till date to be associated with diabetic nephropathy.

  17. The spatiotemporal program of DNA replication is associated with specific combinations of chromatin marks in human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franck Picard

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The duplication of mammalian genomes is under the control of a spatiotemporal program that orchestrates the positioning and the timing of firing of replication origins. The molecular mechanisms coordinating the activation of about [Formula: see text] predicted origins remain poorly understood, partly due to the intrinsic rarity of replication bubbles, making it difficult to purify short nascent strands (SNS. The precise identification of origins based on the high-throughput sequencing of SNS constitutes a new methodological challenge. We propose a new statistical method with a controlled resolution, adapted to the detection of replication origins from SNS data. We detected an average of 80,000 replication origins in different cell lines. To evaluate the consistency between different protocols, we compared SNS detections with bubble trapping detections. This comparison demonstrated a good agreement between genome-wide methods, with 65% of SNS-detected origins validated by bubble trapping, and 44% of bubble trapping origins validated by SNS origins, when compared at the same resolution. We investigated the interplay between the spatial and the temporal programs of replication at fine scales. We show that most of the origins detected in regions replicated in early S phase are shared by all the cell lines investigated whereas cell-type-specific origins tend to be replicated in late S phase. We shed a new light on the key role of CpG islands, by showing that 80% of the origins associated with CGIs are constitutive. Our results further show that at least 76% of CGIs are origins of replication. The analysis of associations with chromatin marks at different timing of cell division revealed new potential epigenetic regulators driving the spatiotemporal activity of replication origins. We highlight the potential role of H4K20me1 and H3K27me3, the coupling of which is correlated with increased efficiency of replication origins, clearly identifying those

  18. Replication of 6 obesity genes in a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies from diverse ancestries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Jun Tan

    Full Text Available Obesity is a major public health problem with a significant genetic component. Multiple DNA polymorphisms/genes have been shown to be strongly associated with obesity, typically in populations of European descent. The aim of this study was to verify the extent to which 6 confirmed obesity genes (FTO, CTNNBL1, ADRB2, LEPR, PPARG and UCP2 genes could be replicated in 8 different samples (n = 11,161 and to explore whether the same genes contribute to obesity-susceptibility in populations of different ancestries (five Caucasian, one Chinese, one African-American and one Hispanic population. GWAS-based data sets with 1000 G imputed variants were tested for association with obesity phenotypes individually in each population, and subsequently combined in a meta-analysis. Multiple variants at the FTO locus showed significant associations with BMI, fat mass (FM and percentage of body fat (PBF in meta-analysis. The strongest association was detected at rs7185735 (P-value = 1.01×10(-7 for BMI, 1.80×10(-6 for FM, and 5.29×10(-4 for PBF. Variants at the CTNNBL1, LEPR and PPARG loci demonstrated nominal association with obesity phenotypes (meta-analysis P-values ranging from 1.15×10(-3 to 4.94×10(-2. There was no evidence of association with variants at ADRB2 and UCP2 genes. When stratified by sex and ethnicity, FTO variants showed sex-specific and ethnic-specific effects on obesity traits. Thus, it is likely that FTO has an important role in the sex- and ethnic-specific risk of obesity. Our data confirmed the role of FTO, CTNNBL1, LEPR and PPARG in obesity predisposition. These findings enhanced our knowledge of genetic associations between these genes and obesity-related phenotypes, and provided further justification for pursuing functional studies of these genes in the pathophysiology of obesity. Sex and ethnic differences in genetic susceptibility across populations of diverse ancestries may contribute to a more targeted prevention and

  19. Replication of 6 Obesity Genes in a Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies from Diverse Ancestries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Li-Jun; Zhu, Hu; He, Hao; Wu, Ke-Hao; Li, Jian; Chen, Xiang-Ding; Zhang, Ji-Gang; Shen, Hui; Tian, Qing; Krousel-Wood, Marie; Papasian, Christopher J.; Bouchard, Claude; Pérusse, Louis; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a major public health problem with a significant genetic component. Multiple DNA polymorphisms/genes have been shown to be strongly associated with obesity, typically in populations of European descent. The aim of this study was to verify the extent to which 6 confirmed obesity genes (FTO, CTNNBL1, ADRB2, LEPR, PPARG and UCP2 genes) could be replicated in 8 different samples (n = 11,161) and to explore whether the same genes contribute to obesity-susceptibility in populations of different ancestries (five Caucasian, one Chinese, one African-American and one Hispanic population). GWAS-based data sets with 1000 G imputed variants were tested for association with obesity phenotypes individually in each population, and subsequently combined in a meta-analysis. Multiple variants at the FTO locus showed significant associations with BMI, fat mass (FM) and percentage of body fat (PBF) in meta-analysis. The strongest association was detected at rs7185735 (P-value = 1.01×10−7 for BMI, 1.80×10−6 for FM, and 5.29×10−4 for PBF). Variants at the CTNNBL1, LEPR and PPARG loci demonstrated nominal association with obesity phenotypes (meta-analysis P-values ranging from 1.15×10−3 to 4.94×10−2). There was no evidence of association with variants at ADRB2 and UCP2 genes. When stratified by sex and ethnicity, FTO variants showed sex-specific and ethnic-specific effects on obesity traits. Thus, it is likely that FTO has an important role in the sex- and ethnic-specific risk of obesity. Our data confirmed the role of FTO, CTNNBL1, LEPR and PPARG in obesity predisposition. These findings enhanced our knowledge of genetic associations between these genes and obesity-related phenotypes, and provided further justification for pursuing functional studies of these genes in the pathophysiology of obesity. Sex and ethnic differences in genetic susceptibility across populations of diverse ancestries may contribute to a more targeted prevention and customized

  20. Replication of 6 obesity genes in a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies from diverse ancestries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Li-Jun; Zhu, Hu; He, Hao; Wu, Ke-Hao; Li, Jian; Chen, Xiang-Ding; Zhang, Ji-Gang; Shen, Hui; Tian, Qing; Krousel-Wood, Marie; Papasian, Christopher J; Bouchard, Claude; Pérusse, Louis; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a major public health problem with a significant genetic component. Multiple DNA polymorphisms/genes have been shown to be strongly associated with obesity, typically in populations of European descent. The aim of this study was to verify the extent to which 6 confirmed obesity genes (FTO, CTNNBL1, ADRB2, LEPR, PPARG and UCP2 genes) could be replicated in 8 different samples (n = 11,161) and to explore whether the same genes contribute to obesity-susceptibility in populations of different ancestries (five Caucasian, one Chinese, one African-American and one Hispanic population). GWAS-based data sets with 1000 G imputed variants were tested for association with obesity phenotypes individually in each population, and subsequently combined in a meta-analysis. Multiple variants at the FTO locus showed significant associations with BMI, fat mass (FM) and percentage of body fat (PBF) in meta-analysis. The strongest association was detected at rs7185735 (P-value = 1.01×10(-7) for BMI, 1.80×10(-6) for FM, and 5.29×10(-4) for PBF). Variants at the CTNNBL1, LEPR and PPARG loci demonstrated nominal association with obesity phenotypes (meta-analysis P-values ranging from 1.15×10(-3) to 4.94×10(-2)). There was no evidence of association with variants at ADRB2 and UCP2 genes. When stratified by sex and ethnicity, FTO variants showed sex-specific and ethnic-specific effects on obesity traits. Thus, it is likely that FTO has an important role in the sex- and ethnic-specific risk of obesity. Our data confirmed the role of FTO, CTNNBL1, LEPR and PPARG in obesity predisposition. These findings enhanced our knowledge of genetic associations between these genes and obesity-related phenotypes, and provided further justification for pursuing functional studies of these genes in the pathophysiology of obesity. Sex and ethnic differences in genetic susceptibility across populations of diverse ancestries may contribute to a more targeted prevention and customized

  1. Consistency of HLA associations between two independent measles vaccine cohorts: a replication study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovsyannikova, Inna G; Pankratz, V Shane; Vierkant, Robert A; Jacobson, Robert M; Poland, Gregory A

    2012-03-09

    Associations between HLA genotypes and measles vaccine humoral and cellular immune responses were examined to better understand immunogenetic drivers of vaccine response. Two independent study cohorts of healthy schoolchildren were examined: cohort one, 346 children between 12 and 18 years of age; and cohort two, 388 children between 11 and 19 years of age. All received two age-appropriate doses of measles-containing vaccine. The purpose of this study was to identify and replicate associations between HLA genes and immune responses following measles vaccination found in our first cohort. Associations of comparable magnitudes and with similar p-values were observed between B*3503 (1st cohort p=0.01; 2nd cohort p=0.07), DQA1*0201 (1st cohort p=0.03; 2nd cohort p=0.03), DQB1*0303 (1st cohort p=0.10; 2 cohort p=0.02), DQB1*0602 (1st cohort p=0.07; 2nd cohort p=0.10), and DRB1*0701 (1st cohort p=0.03; 2nd cohort p=0.07) alleles and measles-specific antibody levels. Suggestive, yet consistent, associations were observed between the B7 (1st cohort p=0.01; 2nd cohort p=0.08) supertype and higher measles antibody levels in both cohorts. Also, in both cohorts, the B*0801 and DRB1*0301 alleles, C*0802 and DPA1*0202 alleles, and DRB1*1303 alleles displayed consistent associations with variations in IFN-γ, IL-2 and IL-10 secretion, respectively. This study emphasizes the importance of replicating HLA associations with measles vaccine-induced humoral and cellular immune responses and increases confidence in the results. These data will inform strategies for functional studies and novel vaccine development, including epitope-based measles vaccines. This is the first HLA association replication study with measles vaccine-specific immune responses to date.

  2. Game Bozo – genetics: a didactic proposal as an alternative to DNA replication of teaching in high school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia de Oliveira Rosa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Today, despite hearing much talking about the DNA molecule in newspapers, magazines, news and TV programs, it is still perceived many difficulties for the students to assimilate the concepts and understand the gene processes. Faced with this reality is that the idea of creating a playful activity arose, as a methodological tool, in order to arouse the interest of students to study scientific concepts addressed in genetics education, including those involved in the DNA replication process. The game was developed by students of Biological Sciences Degree, the IFAM (Federal Institute of Science and Technology Amazon in Molecular Genetics discipline. Which, inspired by the traditional game Bozó, created the Bozó-genetic game, which consists of playing the dice, adding the numbers present on the faces of the dice and score according to the rules of the game. A simple, low cost and efficient alternative in transmission of scientific knowledge easily and interactively, with the possibility of aid student and teacher in the teaching-learning process.

  3. CRY2 genetic variants associate with dysthymia.

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    Leena Kovanen

    Full Text Available People with mood disorders often have disruptions in their circadian rhythms. Recent molecular genetics has linked circadian clock genes to mood disorders. Our objective was to study two core circadian clock genes, CRY1 and CRY2 as well as TTC1 that interacts with CRY2, in relation to depressive and anxiety disorders. Of these three genes, 48 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs whose selection was based on the linkage disequilibrium and potential functionality were genotyped in 5910 individuals from a nationwide population-based sample. The diagnoses of major depressive disorder, dysthymia and anxiety disorders were assessed with a structured interview (M-CIDI. In addition, the participants filled in self-report questionnaires on depressive and anxiety symptoms. Logistic and linear regression models were used to analyze the associations of the SNPs with the phenotypes. Four CRY2 genetic variants (rs10838524, rs7121611, rs7945565, rs1401419 associated significantly with dysthymia (false discovery rate q<0.05. This finding together with earlier CRY2 associations with winter depression and with bipolar type 1 disorder supports the view that CRY2 gene has a role in mood disorders.

  4. Genetic syndromes associated with overgrowth in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jung Min

    2013-09-01

    Overgrowth syndromes comprise a diverse group of conditions with unique clinical, behavioral and molecular genetic features. While considerable overlap in presentation sometimes exists, advances in identification of the precise etiology of specific overgrowth disorders continue to improve clinicians' ability to make an accurate diagnosis. Among them, this paper introduces two classic genetic overgrowth syndromes: Sotos syndrome and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. Historically, the diagnosis was based entirely on clinical findings. However, it is now understood that Sotos syndrome is caused by a variety of molecular genetic alterations resulting in haploinsufficiency of the NSD1 gene at chromosome 5q35 and that Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome is caused by heterogeneous abnormalities in the imprinting of a number of growth regulatory genes within chromosome 11p15 in the majority of cases. Interestingly, the 11p15 imprinting region is also associated with Russell-Silver syndrome which is a typical growth retardation syndrome. Opposite epigenetic alterations in 11p15 result in opposite clinical features shown in Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome and Russell-Silver syndrome. Although the exact functions of the causing genes have not yet been completely understood, these overgrowth syndromes can be good models to clarify the complex basis of human growth and help to develop better-directed therapies in the future.

  5. Power assessment for genetic association study of human longevity using offspring of long-lived subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Qihua; Zhao, Jing Hua; Li, Shuxia

    2010-01-01

    Recently, an indirect genetic association approach that compares genotype frequencies in offspring of long-lived subjects and offspring from random families has been introduced to study gene-longevity associations. Although the indirect genetic association has certain advantages over the direct...... association approach that compares genotype frequency between centenarians and young controls, the power has been of concern. This paper reports a power study performed on the indirect approach using computer simulation. We perform our simulation study by introducing the current Danish population life table...... and the proportional hazard model for generating individual lifespan. Family genotype data is generated using a genetic linkage program for given SNP allele frequency. Power is estimated by setting the type I error rate at 0.05 and by calculating the Armitage's chi-squared test statistic for 200 replicate samples...

  6. Born to Lead? A Twin Design and Genetic Association Study of Leadership Role Occupancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Neve, Jan-Emmanuel; Mikhaylov, Slava; Dawes, Christopher T; Christakis, Nicholas A; Fowler, James H

    2013-02-01

    We address leadership emergence and the possibility that there is a partially innate predisposition to occupy a leadership role. Employing twin design methods on data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, we estimate the heritability of leadership role occupancy at 24%. Twin studies do not point to specific genes or neurological processes that might be involved. We therefore also conduct association analysis on the available genetic markers. The results show that leadership role occupancy is associated with rs4950, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) residing on a neuronal acetylcholine receptor gene (CHRNB3). We replicate this family-based genetic association result on an independent sample in the Framingham Heart Study. This is the first study to identify a specific genotype associated with the tendency to occupy a leadership position. The results suggest that what determines whether an individual occupies a leadership position is the complex product of genetic and environmental influences; with a particular role for rs4950.

  7. Meta-analysis Followed by Replication Identifies Loci in or near CDKN1B, TET3, CD80, DRAM1, and ARID5B as Associated with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Asians

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Wanling; Tang, Huayang; Zhang, Yan; Tang, Xianfa; Zhang, Jing; Sun, Liangdan; Yang, Jing; Cui, Yong; Zhang, Lu; Hirankarn, Nattiya; Cheng, Hui; Pan, Hai-Feng; Gao, Jinping; Lee, Tsz Leung; Sheng, Yujun

    2013-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a prototype autoimmune disease with a strong genetic involvement and ethnic differences. Susceptibility genes identified so far only explain a small portion of the genetic heritability of SLE, suggesting that many more loci are yet to be uncovered for this disease. In this study, we performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies on SLE in Chinese Han populations and followed up the findings by replication in four additional Asian cohorts wit...

  8. DNA-PK/Ku complex binds to latency-associated nuclear antigen and negatively regulates Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus latent replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Seho [Department of Life Science, Dongguk Univ-Seoul, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Chunghun [Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Young [Department of Life Science, Dongguk Univ-Seoul, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Yoon-Jae [Department of Life Science, Kyungwon University, Seongnam-Si, Kyeonggi-Do 461-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Junsoo [Division of Biological Science and Technology, Yonsei University, Wonju 220-100 (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Joonho [Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Taegun, E-mail: tseo@dongguk.edu [Department of Life Science, Dongguk Univ-Seoul, Seoul 100-715 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-16

    During latent infection, latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) plays important roles in episomal persistence and replication. Several host factors are associated with KSHV latent replication. Here, we show that the catalytic subunit of DNA protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), Ku70, and Ku86 bind the N-terminal region of LANA. LANA was phosphorylated by DNA-PK and overexpression of Ku70, but not Ku86, impaired transient replication. The efficiency of transient replication was significantly increased in the HCT116 (Ku86 +/-) cell line, compared to the HCT116 (Ku86 +/+) cell line, suggesting that the DNA-PK/Ku complex negatively regulates KSHV latent replication.

  9. The Future of Association Studies: Gene-Based Analysis and Replication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BenjaminM.Neale[; PakC.Sham

    2005-01-01

    Historically, association tests were limited to single variants,so that the allele was considered the basic unit for association testing. As marker density increases and indirect approaches are used to assess association through linkage disequilibrium, association is now frequently considered- at the haplotypic level. We suggest that there are difficulties in replicating association findings at the single-nucleotide-polymorphism (SNP)or the haplotype level,and we propose a shift toward a gene-based approach in which all common variation within a candidate gene is considered jointly. Inconsistencies arising frompopulation differences are more readily resolved by use of a genebased approach rather than either a SNP-based or a haplotype-based approach. A gene-based approach captures all of the potential risk-conferring variations; thus, negative findings are subject only to the issue of power. In addition, chance findings due to multiple testing can be readily accounted for by use of a genewide-significance level. Meta-analysis procedures can be formalized for gene-based methods through the combination of P values. It is only a matter of time before all variation within genes is mapped, at which point the gene-based approach will become the natural end point tor association analysis and will intorm our search for functional variants relevantto disease etiology.

  10. Evidence for genetic association of RORB with bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mick Eric

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bipolar disorder, particularly in children, is characterized by rapid cycling and switching, making circadian clock genes plausible molecular underpinnings for bipolar disorder. We previously reported work establishing mice lacking the clock gene D-box binding protein (DBP as a stress-reactive genetic animal model of bipolar disorder. Microarray studies revealed that expression of two closely related clock genes, RAR-related orphan receptors alpha (RORA and beta (RORB, was altered in these mice. These retinoid-related receptors are involved in a number of pathways including neurogenesis, stress response, and modulation of circadian rhythms. Here we report association studies between bipolar disorder and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in RORA and RORB. Methods We genotyped 355 RORA and RORB SNPs in a pediatric cohort consisting of a family-based sample of 153 trios and an independent, non-overlapping case-control sample of 152 cases and 140 controls. Bipolar disorder in children and adolescents is characterized by increased stress reactivity and frequent episodes of shorter duration; thus our cohort provides a potentially enriched sample for identifying genes involved in cycling and switching. Results We report that four intronic RORB SNPs showed positive associations with the pediatric bipolar phenotype that survived Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons in the case-control sample. Three RORB haplotype blocks implicating an additional 11 SNPs were also associated with the disease in the case-control sample. However, these significant associations were not replicated in the sample of trios. There was no evidence for association between pediatric bipolar disorder and any RORA SNPs or haplotype blocks after multiple-test correction. In addition, we found no strong evidence for association between the age-at-onset of bipolar disorder with any RORA or RORB SNPs. Conclusion Our findings suggest that clock genes in

  11. Gene ontology analysis of pairwise genetic associations in two genome-wide studies of sporadic ALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Nora

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is increasingly clear that common human diseases have a complex genetic architecture characterized by both additive and nonadditive genetic effects. The goal of the present study was to determine whether patterns of both additive and nonadditive genetic associations aggregate in specific functional groups as defined by the Gene Ontology (GO. Results We first estimated all pairwise additive and nonadditive genetic effects using the multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR method that makes few assumptions about the underlying genetic model. Statistical significance was evaluated using permutation testing in two genome-wide association studies of ALS. The detection data consisted of 276 subjects with ALS and 271 healthy controls while the replication data consisted of 221 subjects with ALS and 211 healthy controls. Both studies included genotypes from approximately 550,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Each SNP was mapped to a gene if it was within 500 kb of the start or end. Each SNP was assigned a p-value based on its strongest joint effect with the other SNPs. We then used the Exploratory Visual Analysis (EVA method and software to assign a p-value to each gene based on the overabundance of significant SNPs at the α = 0.05 level in the gene. We also used EVA to assign p-values to each GO group based on the overabundance of significant genes at the α = 0.05 level. A GO category was determined to replicate if that category was significant at the α = 0.05 level in both studies. We found two GO categories that replicated in both studies. The first, ‘Regulation of Cellular Component Organization and Biogenesis’, a GO Biological Process, had p-values of 0.010 and 0.014 in the detection and replication studies, respectively. The second, ‘Actin Cytoskeleton’, a GO Cellular Component, had p-values of 0.040 and 0.046 in the detection and replication studies, respectively. Conclusions Pathway

  12. HLA alleles associated with the adaptive immune response to smallpox vaccine: a replication study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovsyannikova, Inna G; Pankratz, V Shane; Salk, Hannah M; Kennedy, Richard B; Poland, Gregory A

    2014-09-01

    We previously reported HLA allelic associations with vaccinia virus (VACV)-induced adaptive immune responses in a cohort of healthy individuals (n = 1,071 subjects) after a single dose of the licensed smallpox (Dryvax) vaccine. This study demonstrated that specific HLA alleles were significantly associated with VACV-induced neutralizing antibody (NA) titers (HLA-B*13:02, *38:02, *44:03, *48:01, and HLA-DQB1*03:02, *06:04) and cytokine (HLA-DRB1*01:03, *03:01, *10:01, *13:01, *15:01) immune responses. We undertook an independent study of 1,053 healthy individuals and examined associations between HLA alleles and measures of adaptive immunity after a single dose of Dryvax-derived ACAM2000 vaccine to evaluate previously discovered HLA allelic associations from the Dryvax study and determine if these associations are replicated with ACAM2000. Females had significantly higher NA titers than male subjects in both study cohorts [median ID50 discovery cohort 159 (93, 256) vs. 125 (75, 186), p smallpox vaccine-induced adaptive immune responses are significantly influenced by HLA gene polymorphisms. These data provide information for functional studies and design of novel candidate smallpox vaccines.

  13. Genome-Wide Pathway Analysis Identifies Genetic Pathways Associated with Psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aterido, Adrià; Julià, Antonio; Ferrándiz, Carlos; Puig, Lluís; Fonseca, Eduardo; Fernández-López, Emilia; Dauden, Esteban; Sánchez-Carazo, José Luís; López-Estebaranz, José Luís; Moreno-Ramírez, David; Vanaclocha, Francisco; Herrera, Enrique; de la Cueva, Pablo; Dand, Nick; Palau, Núria; Alonso, Arnald; López-Lasanta, María; Tortosa, Raül; García-Montero, Andrés; Codó, Laia; Gelpí, Josep Lluís; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Absher, Devin; Capon, Francesca; Myers, Richard M; Barker, Jonathan N; Marsal, Sara

    2016-03-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disease with a complex genetic architecture. To date, the psoriasis heritability is only partially explained. However, there is increasing evidence that the missing heritability in psoriasis could be explained by multiple genetic variants of low effect size from common genetic pathways. The objective of this study was to identify new genetic variation associated with psoriasis risk at the pathway level. We genotyped 598,258 single nucleotide polymorphisms in a discovery cohort of 2,281 case-control individuals from Spain. We performed a genome-wide pathway analysis using 1,053 reference biological pathways. A total of 14 genetic pathways (PFDR ≤ 2.55 × 10(-2)) were found to be significantly associated with psoriasis risk. Using an independent validation cohort of 7,353 individuals from the UK, a total of 6 genetic pathways were significantly replicated (PFDR ≤ 3.46 × 10(-2)). We found genetic pathways that had not been previously associated with psoriasis risk such as retinol metabolism (Pcombined = 1.84 × 10(-4)), the transport of inorganic ions and amino acids (Pcombined = 1.57 × 10(-7)), and post-translational protein modification (Pcombined = 1.57 × 10(-7)). In the latter pathway, MGAT5 showed a strong network centrality, and its association with psoriasis risk was further validated in an additional case-control cohort of 3,429 individuals (P psoriasis susceptibility.

  14. GENETIC FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH AMYOTROPHIC LATERAL SCLEROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Vrabec

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a rare complex neurodegenerative disease characterized by degeneration of motor neurons in the cerebral cortex, brainstem and spinal cord. The disease mainly occurs in adults, typically between 50. and 60. years and presents with symptoms like muscular weakness, atrophy and later on paralysis which lead to death due to respiratory failure within 2-5 years from onset and remains incurable. The symptoms typically start in the muscles of arms or legs (spinal onset or bulbary (bulbar onset. Most ALS cases are sporadic although about 5% are familiar. Genetic factors contribute to the disease in sporadic form as well as in familial form. Mutations have been found in 116 genes among which SOD1, TARDBP, FUS and C9ORF72 are represented in highest frequencies. Besides those four genes we are also describing 13 other genes involved in the disease process. Oligogenic model has been proposed for ALS that considers mutations in two or more genes in one patient. We emphasize the convergence between hereditary and sporadic form, which are clinically inseparable, and other neurodegenerative diseases that share with ALS genetic and clinical characteristics. Because about 2/3 of familial cases and only about 11% of sporadic cases are explained by mutations the research have been aimed at discovering new candidate genes using  genome –wide association studies and at the epigenetic causes of the disease. We have recently completed the first representative genetic analysis of patients with ALS in Slovenia and research on methylation and microRNAs is currently in progress.

  15. Genetic loci associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap with loci for lung function and pulmonary fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hobbs, Brian D.; de Jong, Kim; Lamontagne, Maxime; Bosse, Yohan; Shrine, Nick; Artigas, Maria Soler; Wain, Louise V.; Hall, Ian P.; Jackson, Victoria E.; Wyss, Annah B.; London, Stephanie J.; North, Kari E.; Franceschini, Nora; Strachan, David P.; Beaty, Terri H.; Hokanson, John E.; Crapo, James D.; Castaldi, Peter J.; Chase, Robert P.; Bartz, Traci M.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Gharib, Sina A.; Zanen, Pieter; Lammers, Jan W.; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Groen, H. J.; Locantore, Nicholas; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Rennard, Stephen I.; Vestbo, Jurgen; Timens, Wim; Pare, Peter D.; Latourelle, Jeanne C.; Dupuis, Josee; O'Connor, George T.; Wilk, Jemma B.; Kim, Woo Jin; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Vonk, Judith M.; de Koning, Harry J.; Leng, Shuguang; Belinsky, Steven A.; Tesfaigzi, Yohannes; Manichaikul, Ani; Wang, Xin-Qun; Rich, Stephen S.; Barr, R. Graham; Sparrow, David; Litonjua, Augusto A.; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; Lahousse, Lies; Brusselle, Guy G.; Stricker, Bruno H.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Ampleford, Elizabeth J.; Bleecker, Eugene R.; Woodruff, Prescott G.; Meyers, Deborah A.; Qiao, Dandi; Lomas, David A.; Yim, Jae-Joon; Kim, Deog Kyeom; Hawrylkiewicz, Iwona; Sliwinski, Pawel; Hardin, Megan; Fingerlin, Tasha E.; Schwartz, David A.; Postma, Dirkje S.; MacNee, William; Tobin, Martin D.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Boezen, H. Marike; Cho, Michael H.

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of mortality worldwide(1). We performed a genetic association study in 15,256 cases and 47,936 controls, with replication of select top results (P <5 x 10(-6)) in 9,498 cases and 9,748 controls. In the combined meta-analysis, we

  16. Genetic loci associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap with loci for lung function and pulmonary fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hobbs, Brian D; de Jong, Kim; Lamontagne, Maxime; Bossé, Yohan; Shrine, Nick; Artigas, María Soler; Wain, Louise V; Hall, Ian P; Jackson, Victoria E; Wyss, Annah B; London, Stephanie J; North, Kari E; Franceschini, Nora; Strachan, David P; Beaty, Terri H; Hokanson, John E; Crapo, James D; Castaldi, Peter J; Chase, Robert P; Bartz, Traci M; Heckbert, Susan R; Psaty, Bruce M; Gharib, Sina A; Zanen, Pieter; Lammers, Jan W; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Groen, H J; Locantore, Nicholas; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Rennard, Stephen I; Vestbo, Jørgen; Timens, Wim; Paré, Peter D; Latourelle, Jeanne C; Dupuis, Josée; O'Connor, George T; Wilk, Jemma B; Kim, Woo Jin; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Vonk, Judith M; de Koning, Harry J; Leng, Shuguang; Belinsky, Steven A; Tesfaigzi, Yohannes; Manichaikul, Ani; Wang, Xin-Qun; Rich, Stephen S; Barr, R Graham; Sparrow, David; Litonjua, Augusto A; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; Lahousse, Lies; Brusselle, Guy G; Stricker, Bruno H; Uitterlinden, André G; Ampleford, Elizabeth J; Bleecker, Eugene R; Woodruff, Prescott G; Meyers, Deborah A; Qiao, Dandi; Lomas, David A; Yim, Jae-Joon; Kim, Deog Kyeom; Hawrylkiewicz, Iwona; Sliwinski, Pawel; Hardin, Megan; Fingerlin, Tasha E; Schwartz, David A; Postma, Dirkje S; MacNee, William; Tobin, Martin D; Silverman, Edwin K; Boezen, H Marike; Cho, Michael H

    2017-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of mortality worldwide. We performed a genetic association study in 15,256 cases and 47,936 controls, with replication of select top results (P < 5 × 10(-6)) in 9,498 cases and 9,748 controls. In the combined meta-analysis, we identifie

  17. Low-Replicating Viruses and Strong Anti-Viral Immune Response Associated with Prolonged Disease Control in a Superinfected HIV-1 LTNP Elite Controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernas, María; Casado, Concepción; Arcones, Carolina; Llano, Anuska; Sánchez-Merino, Víctor; Mothe, Beatriz; Vicario, José L.; Grau, Eulalia; Ruiz, Lidia; Sánchez, Jorge; Telenti, Amalio; Yuste, Eloísa; Brander, Christian; Galíndez, Cecilio López-

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the causes for the lack of clinical progression in a superinfected HIV-1 LTNP elite controller patient. Methodology and Principal Findings We studied host genetic, virological and immunological factors associated with viral control in a SI long term non progressor elite controller (LTNP-EC). The individual contained both viruses and maintained undetectable viral loads for >20 years and he did not express any of the described host genetic polymorphisms associated with viral control. None of four full-length gp160 recombinants derived from the LTNP-EC replicated in heterologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells. CTL responses after SI were maintained in two samples separated by 9 years and they were higher in breadth and magnitude than responses seen in most of 250 treatment naïve patients and also 25 controller subjects. The LTNP-EC showed a neutralization response, against 4 of the 6 viruses analyzed, superior to other ECs. Conclusions The study demonstrated that a strong and sustained cellular and humoral immune response and low replicating viruses are associated with viral control in the superinfected LTNP-EC. PMID:22384103

  18. Genetics of homocysteine metabolism and associated disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Brustolin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Homocysteine is a sulfur-containing amino acid derived from the metabolism of methionine, an essential amino acid, and is metabolized by one of two pathways: remethylation or transsulfuration. Abnormalities of these pathways lead to hyperhomocysteinemia. Hyperhomocysteinemia is observed in approximately 5% of the general population and is associated with an increased risk for many disorders, including vascular and neurodegenerative diseases, autoimmune disorders, birth defects, diabetes, renal disease, osteoporosis, neuropsychiatric disorders, and cancer. We review here the correlation between homocysteine metabolism and the disorders described above with genetic variants on genes coding for enzymes of homocysteine metabolism relevant to clinical practice, especially common variants of the MTHFR gene, 677C>T and 1298A>C. We also discuss the management of hyperhomocysteinemia with folic acid supplementation and fortification of folic acid and the impact of a decrease in the prevalence of congenital anomalies and a decline in the incidence of stroke mortality.

  19. Replication of the association between CHRNA4 rs1044396 and harm avoidance in a large population-based sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bey, Katharina; Lennertz, Leonhard; Markett, Sebastian; Petrovsky, Nadine; Gallinat, Jürgen; Gründer, Gerhard; Spreckelmeyer, Katja N; Wienker, Thomas F; Mobascher, Arian; Dahmen, Norbert; Thuerauf, Norbert; Kornhuber, Johannes; Kiefer, Falk; Toliat, Mohammad R; Nürnberg, Peter; Winterer, Georg; Wagner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Harm avoidance is a personality trait characterized by excessive worrying and fear of uncertainty, which has repeatedly been related to anxiety disorders. Converging lines of research in rodents and humans point towards an involvement of the nicotinic cholinergic system in the modulation of anxiety. Most notably, the rs1044396 polymorphism in the CHRNA4 gene, which codes for the α4 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, has been linked to negative emotionality traits including harm avoidance in a recent study. Against this background, we investigated the association between harm avoidance and the rs1044396 polymorphism using data from N=1673 healthy subjects, which were collected in the context of the German multi-centre study ׳Genetics of Nicotine Dependence and Neurobiological Phenotypes׳. Homozygous carriers of the C-allele showed significantly higher levels of harm avoidance than homozygous T-allele carriers, with heterozygous subjects exhibiting intermediate scores. The effect was neither modulated by age or gender nor by smoking status. By replicating previous findings in a large population-based sample for the first time, the present study adds to the growing evidence suggesting an involvement of nicotinic cholinergic mechanism in anxiety and negative emotionality, which may pose an effective target for medical treatment.

  20. What Ideas Do Students Associate with "Biotechnology" and "Genetic Engineering"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Ruaraidh; Stanisstreet, Martin; Boyes, Edward

    2000-01-01

    Explores the ideas that students aged 16-19 associate with the terms 'biotechnology' and 'genetic engineering'. Indicates that some students see biotechnology as risky whereas genetic engineering was described as ethically wrong. (Author/ASK)

  1. Genome-wide association study identifies genetic loci associated with iron deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine E McLaren

    Full Text Available The existence of multiple inherited disorders of iron metabolism in man, rodents and other vertebrates suggests genetic contributions to iron deficiency. To identify new genomic locations associated with iron deficiency, a genome-wide association study (GWAS was performed using DNA collected from white men aged≥25 y and women≥50 y in the Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening (HEIRS Study with serum ferritin (SF≤12 µg/L (cases and iron replete controls (SF>100 µg/L in men, SF>50 µg/L in women. Regression analysis was used to examine the association between case-control status (336 cases, 343 controls and quantitative serum iron measures and 331,060 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP genotypes, with replication analyses performed in a sample of 71 cases and 161 controls from a population of white male and female veterans screened at a US Veterans Affairs (VA medical center. Five SNPs identified in the GWAS met genome-wide statistical significance for association with at least one iron measure, rs2698530 on chr. 2p14; rs3811647 on chr. 3q22, a known SNP in the transferrin (TF gene region; rs1800562 on chr. 6p22, the C282Y mutation in the HFE gene; rs7787204 on chr. 7p21; and rs987710 on chr. 22q11 (GWAS observed P<1.51×10(-7 for all. An association between total iron binding capacity and SNP rs3811647 in the TF gene (GWAS observed P=7.0×10(-9, corrected P=0.012 was replicated within the VA samples (observed P=0.012. Associations with the C282Y mutation in the HFE gene also were replicated. The joint analysis of the HEIRS and VA samples revealed strong associations between rs2698530 on chr. 2p14 and iron status outcomes. These results confirm a previously-described TF polymorphism and implicate one potential new locus as a target for gene identification.

  2. Power assessment for genetic association study of human longevity using offspring of long-lived subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Qihua; Zhao, Jing Hua; Li, Shuxia; Kruse, Torben A; Christensen, Kaare

    2010-07-01

    Recently, an indirect genetic association approach that compares genotype frequencies in offspring of long-lived subjects and offspring from random families has been introduced to study gene-longevity associations. Although the indirect genetic association has certain advantages over the direct association approach that compares genotype frequency between centenarians and young controls, the power has been of concern. This paper reports a power study performed on the indirect approach using computer simulation. We perform our simulation study by introducing the current Danish population life table and the proportional hazard model for generating individual lifespan. Family genotype data is generated using a genetic linkage program for given SNP allele frequency. Power is estimated by setting the type I error rate at 0.05 and by calculating the Armitage's chi-squared test statistic for 200 replicate samples for each setting of the specified allele risk and frequency parameters under different modes of inheritance and for different sample sizes. The indirect genetic association analysis is a valid approach for studying gene-longevity association, but the sample size requirement is about 3-4 time larger than the direct approach. It also has low power in detecting non-additive effect genes. Indirect genetic association using offspring from families with both parents as nonagenarians is nearly as powerful as using offspring from families with one centenarian parent. In conclusion, the indirect design can be a good choice for studying longevity in comparison with other alternatives, when relatively large sample size is available.

  3. Genetic Variants Associated With Glycine Metabolism and Their Role in Insulin Sensitivity and Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xie, W. J.; Wood, A. R.; Lyssenko, V.;

    2013-01-01

    . The top-ranking metabolites were in the glutathione and glycine biosynthesis pathways. We aimed to identify common genetic variants associated with metabolites in these pathways and test their role in insulin sensitivity and type 2 diabetes. With 1,004 nondiabetic individuals from the RISC study, we...... performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 14 insulin sensitivity-related metabolites and one metabolite ratio. We replicated our results in the Botnia study (n = 342). We assessed the association of these variants with diabetes-related traits in GWAS meta-analyses (GENESIS [including RISC, EUGENE2...... for association between these variants and insulin resistance or diabetes. Genetic variants associated with genes in the glycine biosynthesis pathways do not provide consistent evidence for a role of glycine in diabetes-related traits....

  4. Genetic susceptibility and genotype-phenotype association in 588 Danish children with inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, C; Cleynen, I; Andersen, Susanne Pia;

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association between known inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)-associated genetic variants and development of paediatric IBD, and specific clinical sub-phenotypes. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In this case-control study we included IBD patients ... retrieved and clinical information was extracted. DNA was obtained from Guthrie cards from the Danish National Neonatal Screening Biobank (PKU-biobanken) at Statens Serum Institut and from blood samples. RESULTS: A total of 588 IBD patients (244 Crohn's disease (CD), 318 ulcerative colitis (UC) and 26 IBD...... associated with disease localisation, medical treatment or surgery after correcting for multiple analyses. CONCLUSION: We found an association between CD and three previously published genetic variants and replicated the association with the paediatric specific ZMIZ1 gene. No Bonferroni corrected significant...

  5. 'Smoking genes': a genetic association study.

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    Zoraida Verde

    Full Text Available Some controversy exists on the specific genetic variants that are associated with nicotine dependence and smoking-related phenotypes. The purpose of this study was to analyse the association of smoking status and smoking-related phenotypes (included nicotine dependence with 17 candidate genetic variants: CYP2A6*1×2, CYP2A6*2 (1799T>A [rs1801272], CYP2A6*9 (-48T>G [rs28399433], CYP2A6*12, CYP2A13*2 (3375C>T [rs8192789], CYP2A13*3 (7520C>G, CYP2A13*4 (579G>A, CYP2A13*7 (578C>T [rs72552266], CYP2B6*4 (785A>G, CYP2B6*9 (516G>T, CHRNA3 546C>T [rs578776], CHRNA5 1192G>A [rs16969968], CNR1 3764C>G [rs6928499], DRD2-ANKK1 2137G>A (Taq1A [rs1800497], 5HTT LPR, HTR2A -1438A>G [rs6311] and OPRM1 118A>G [rs1799971]. We studied the genotypes of the aforementioned polymorphisms in a cohort of Spanish smokers (cases, N = 126 and ethnically matched never smokers (controls, N = 80. The results showed significant between-group differences for CYP2A6*2 and CYP2A6*12 (both PA (Taq1A polymorphisms was 3.60 (95%CI: 1.75, 7.44 and 2.63 (95%CI: 1.41, 4.89 respectively. Compared with the wild-type genotype, the OR for being a non-smoker in carriers of the minor CYP2A6*2 allele was 1.80 (95%CI: 1.24, 2.65. We found a significant genotype effect (all P≤0.017 for the following smoking-related phenotypes: (i cigarettes smoked per day and CYP2A13*3; (ii pack years smoked and CYP2A6*2, CYP2A6*1×2, CYP2A13*7, CYP2B6*4 and DRD2-ANKK1 2137G>A (Taq1A; (iii nicotine dependence (assessed with the Fagestrom test and CYP2A6*9. Overall, our results suggest that genetic variants potentially involved in nicotine metabolization (mainly, CYP2A6 polymorphisms are those showing the strongest association with smoking-related phenotypes, as opposed to genetic variants influencing the brain effects of nicotine, e.g., through nicotinic acetylcholine (CHRNA5, serotoninergic (HTR2A, opioid (OPRM1 or cannabinoid receptors (CNR1.

  6. A screen for genetic suppressor elements of hepatitis C virus identifies a supercharged protein inhibitor of viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeon, Rudo L; Chen, Zhilei

    2013-01-01

    Genetic suppressor elements (GSEs) are biomolecules derived from a gene or genome of interest that act as transdominant inhibitors of biological functions presumably by disruption of critical biological interfaces. We exploited a cell death reporter cell line for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, n4mBid, to develop an iterative selection/enrichment strategy for the identification of anti-HCV GSEs. Using this approach, a library of fragments of an HCV genome was screened for sequences that suppress HCV infection. A 244 amino acid gene fragment, B1, was strongly enriched after 5 rounds of selection. B1 derives from a single-base frameshift of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) which was used as a filler during fragment cloning. B1 has a very high net positive charge of 43 at neutral pH and a high charge-to-mass (kDa) ratio of 1.5. We show that B1 expression specifically inhibits HCV replication. In addition, five highly positively charged B1 fragments produced from progressive truncation at the C-terminus all retain the ability to inhibit HCV, suggesting that a high positive charge, rather than a particular motif in B1, likely accounts for B1's anti-HCV activity. Another supercharged protein, +36GFP, was also found to strongly inhibit HCV replication when added to cells at the time of infection. This study reports a new methodology for HCV inhibitor screening and points to the anti-HCV potential of positively charged proteins/peptides.

  7. Effects of adeno-associated virus on adenovirus replication and gene expression during coinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timpe, Jennifer M; Verrill, Kristin C; Trempe, James P

    2006-08-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is a nonpathogenic parvovirus that requires adenovirus (Ad) or another helper virus for a fully permissive infection. AAV-mediated inhibition of Ad is well documented, yet many details of this interaction remain unclear. In this study, we observed a maximum 50-fold decrease in infectious virus production and a 10- to 40-fold reduction in Ad DNA synthesis during coinfections with AAV. With the exception of the E3 gene, AAV decreased all steady-state Ad mRNA levels at 24 h postinfection (hpi) in a dose-dependent manner. However, not all transcription units were affected equally. E4 and late transcription were the most strongly inhibited, and E1A and E2A were the least affected. The temporal effects of AAV on Ad mRNA transcript levels also varied among the Ad genes. Ad protein expression paralleled mRNA levels at 24 hpi, suggesting that coinfecting AAV does not exert substantial effects on translation. In plasmid transfection assays, Rep78 protein most effectively limited Ad amplification, while Rep40 had no effect. Since E2a and E4 proteins are essential for efficient Ad DNA amplification, we examined the relationship between reduced E2A and E4 expression and decreased DNA amplification. Transfected Rep78 did not reduce E2A and E4 transcript levels prior to DNA replication. Also, AAV-induced inhibition of E2A and E4 mRNA production did not occur in the presence of hydroxyurea. It is therefore unlikely that decreased early gene expression is solely responsible for AAV's suppression of Ad DNA replication. Our results suggest that AAV amplification and/or Rep gene expression inhibits Ad DNA synthesis.

  8. Influence from genetic variability on opioid use for cancer pain: a European genetic association study of 2294 cancer pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klepstad, P; Fladvad, T; Skorpen, F;

    2011-01-01

    Cancer pain patients need variable opioid doses. Preclinical and clinical studies suggest that opioid efficacy is related to genetic variability. However, the studies have small samples, findings are not replicated, and several candidate genes have not been studied. Therefore, a study of genetic...... mechanisms. The patients' mean age was 62.5 years, and the average pain intensity was 3.5. The patients' primary opioids were morphine (n=830), oxycodone (n=446), fentanyl (n=699), or other opioids (n=234). Pain intensity, time on opioids, age, gender, performance status, and bone or CNS metastases predicted......C, HTR3D, HTR3E, HTR1, or CNR1 showed significant associations with opioid dose in both the development and the validation analyzes. These findings do not support the use of pharmacogenetic analyses for the assessed SNPs to guide opioid treatment. The study also demonstrates the importance...

  9. An ADAM33 polymorphism associates with progression of preschool wheeze into childhood asthma: a prospective case-control study with replication in a birth cohort study.

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    Ester M M Klaassen

    Full Text Available The influence of asthma candidate genes on the development from wheeze to asthma in young children still needs to be defined.To link genetic variants in asthma candidate genes to progression of wheeze to persistent wheeze into childhood asthma.In a prospective study, children with recurrent wheeze from the ADEM (Asthma DEtection and Monitoring study were followed until the age of six. At that age a classification (transient wheeze or asthma was based on symptoms, lung function and medication use. In 198 children the relationship between this classification and 30 polymorphisms in 16 asthma candidate genes was assessed by logistic regression. In case of an association based on a p<0.10, replication analysis was performed in an independent birth cohort study (KOALA study, n = 248 included for the present analysis.In the ADEM study, the minor alleles of ADAM33 rs511898 and rs528557 and the ORMDL3/GSDMB rs7216389 polymorphisms were negatively associated, whereas the minor alleles of IL4 rs2243250 and rs2070874 polymorphisms were positively associated with childhood asthma. When replicated in the KOALA study, ADAM33 rs528557 showed a negative association of the CG/GG-genotype with progression of recurrent wheeze into childhood asthma (0.50 (0.26-0.97 p = 0.04 and no association with preschool wheeze.Polymorphisms in ADAM33, ORMDL3/GSDMB and IL4 were associated with childhood asthma in a group of children with recurrent wheeze. The replication of the negative association of the CG/GG-genotype of rs528557 ADAM33 with childhood asthma in an independent birth cohort study confirms that a compromised ADAM33 gene may be implicated in the progression of wheeze into childhood asthma.

  10. Covariance Association Test (CVAT) Identifies Genetic Markers Associated with Schizophrenia in Functionally Associated Biological Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Palle Duun; Demontis, Ditte; Castro Dias Cuyabano, Beatriz;

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a psychiatric disorder with large personal and social costs, and understanding the genetic etiology is important. Such knowledge can be obtained by testing the association between a disease phenotype and individual genetic markers; however, such single-marker methods have limited...... power to detect genetic markers with small effects. Instead, aggregating genetic markers based on biological information might increase the power to identify sets of genetic markers of etiological significance. Several set test methods have been proposed: Here we propose a new set test derived from...... genomic best linear unbiased prediction (GBLUP), the covariance association test (CVAT). We compared the performance of CVAT to other commonly used set tests. The comparison was conducted using a simulated study population having the same genetic parameters as for schizophrenia. We found that CVAT...

  11. Periodontal disease associated to systemic genetic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nualart Grollmus, Zacy Carola; Morales Chávez, Mariana Carolina; Silvestre Donat, Francisco Javier

    2007-05-01

    A number of systemic disorders increase patient susceptibility to periodontal disease, which moreover evolves more rapidly and more aggressively. The underlying factors are mainly related to alterations in immune, endocrine and connective tissue status. These alterations are associated with different pathologies and syndromes that generate periodontal disease either as a primary manifestation or by aggravating a pre-existing condition attributable to local factors. This is where the role of bacterial plaque is subject to debate. In the presence of qualitative or quantitative cellular immune alterations, periodontal disease may manifest early on a severe localized or generalized basis--in some cases related to the presence of plaque and/or specific bacteria (severe congenital neutropenia or infantile genetic agranulocytosis, Chediak-Higiashi syndrome, Down syndrome and Papillon-Lefévre syndrome). In the presence of humoral immune alterations, periodontal damage may result indirectly as a consequence of alterations in other systems. In connective tissue disorders, bacterial plaque and alterations of the periodontal tissues increase patient susceptibility to gingival inflammation and alveolar resorption (Marfan syndrome and Ehler-Danlos syndrome). The management of periodontal disease focuses on the control of infection and bacterial plaque by means of mechanical and chemical methods. Periodontal surgery and even extraction of the most seriously affected teeth have also been suggested. There are variable degrees of consensus regarding the background systemic disorder, as in the case of Chediak-Higiashi syndrome, where antibiotic treatment proves ineffective; in severe congenital neutropenia or infantile genetic agranulocytosis, where antibiotic prophylaxis is suggested; and in Papillon-Lefévre syndrome, where an established treatment protocol is available.

  12. Genetic analyses of HIV-1 env sequences demonstrate limited compartmentalization in breast milk and suggest viral replication within the breast that increases with mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Soren; Carlsson, Jacquelyn; Heath, Laura; Bull, Marta E; Shetty, Avinash K; Mutsvangwa, Junior; Musingwini, Georgina; Woelk, Godfrey; Zijenah, Lynn S; Katzenstein, David A; Mullins, James I; Frenkel, Lisa M

    2010-10-01

    The concentration of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is generally lower in breast milk than in blood. Mastitis, or inflammation of the breast, is associated with increased levels of milk HIV-1 and risk of mother-to-child transmission through breastfeeding. We hypothesized that mastitis facilitates the passage of HIV-1 from blood into milk or stimulates virus production within the breast. HIV-1 env sequences were generated from single amplicons obtained from breast milk and blood samples in a cross-sectional study. Viral compartmentalization was evaluated using several statistical methods, including the Slatkin and Maddison (SM) test. Mastitis was defined as an elevated milk sodium (Na(+)) concentration. The association between milk Na(+) and the pairwise genetic distance between milk and blood viral sequences was modeled using linear regression. HIV-1 was compartmentalized within milk by SM testing in 6/17 (35%) specimens obtained from 9 women, but all phylogenetic clades included viral sequences from milk and blood samples. Monotypic sequences were more prevalent in milk samples than in blood samples (22% versus 13%; P = 0.012), which accounted for half of the compartmentalization observed. Mastitis was not associated with compartmentalization by SM testing (P = 0.621), but Na(+) was correlated with greater genetic distance between milk and blood HIV-1 populations (P = 0.041). In conclusion, local production of HIV-1 within the breast is suggested by compartmentalization of virus and a higher prevalence of monotypic viruses in milk specimens. However, phylogenetic trees demonstrate extensive mixing of viruses between milk and blood specimens. HIV-1 replication in breast milk appears to increase with inflammation, contributing to higher milk viral loads during mastitis.

  13. Factors Associated With the Control of Viral Replication and Virologic Breakthrough in a Recently Infected HIV-1 Controller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker-Sperling, Victoria E; Pohlmeyer, Christopher W; Veenhuis, Rebecca T; May, Megan; Luna, Krystle A; Kirkpatrick, Allison R; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Cox, Andrea L; Carrington, Mary; Bailey, Justin R; Arduino, Roberto C; Blankson, Joel N

    2017-02-01

    HIV-1 controllers are patients who control HIV-1 viral replication without antiretroviral therapy. Control is achieved very early in the course of infection, but the mechanisms through which viral replication is restricted are not fully understood. We describe a patient who presented with acute HIV-1 infection and was found to have an HIV-1 RNA level of <100copies/mL. She did not have any known protective HLA alleles, but significant immune activation of CD8+ T cells and natural killer (NK) cells was present, and both cell types inhibited viral replication. Virus cultured from this patient replicated as well in vitro as virus isolated from her partner, a patient with AIDS who was the source of transmission. Virologic breakthrough occurred 9months after her initial presentation and was associated with an increase in CD4+ T cell activation levels and a significant decrease in NK cell inhibitory capacity. Remarkably, CD8+ T cell inhibitory capacity was preserved and there were no new escape mutations in targeted Gag epitopes. These findings suggest that fully replication-competent virus can be controlled in acute HIV-1 infection in some patients without protective HLA alleles and that NK cell responses may contribute to this early control of viral replication.

  14. Factors Associated With the Control of Viral Replication and Virologic Breakthrough in a Recently Infected HIV-1 Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria E. Walker-Sperling

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 controllers are patients who control HIV-1 viral replication without antiretroviral therapy. Control is achieved very early in the course of infection, but the mechanisms through which viral replication is restricted are not fully understood. We describe a patient who presented with acute HIV-1 infection and was found to have an HIV-1 RNA level of <100 copies/mL. She did not have any known protective HLA alleles, but significant immune activation of CD8+ T cells and natural killer (NK cells was present, and both cell types inhibited viral replication. Virus cultured from this patient replicated as well in vitro as virus isolated from her partner, a patient with AIDS who was the source of transmission. Virologic breakthrough occurred 9 months after her initial presentation and was associated with an increase in CD4+ T cell activation levels and a significant decrease in NK cell inhibitory capacity. Remarkably, CD8+ T cell inhibitory capacity was preserved and there were no new escape mutations in targeted Gag epitopes. These findings suggest that fully replication-competent virus can be controlled in acute HIV-1 infection in some patients without protective HLA alleles and that NK cell responses may contribute to this early control of viral replication.

  15. Replicated evidence of absence of association between serum S100B and (risk of psychotic disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine van der Leeuw

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: S100B is a potential marker of neurological and psychiatric illness. In schizophrenia, increased S100B levels, as well as associations with acute positive and persisting negative symptoms, have been reported. It remains unclear whether S100B elevation, which possibly reflects glial dysfunction, is the consequence of disease or compensatory processes, or whether it is an indicator of familial risk. METHODS: Serum samples were acquired from two large independent family samples (n = 348 and n = 254 in the Netherlands comprising patients with psychotic disorder (n = 140 and n = 82, non-psychotic siblings of patients with psychotic disorder (n = 125 and n = 94 and controls (n = 83 and n = 78. S100B was analyzed with a Liaison automated chemiluminescence system. Associations between familial risk of psychotic disorder and S100B were examined. RESULTS: Results showed that S100B levels in patients (P and siblings (S were not significantly different from controls (C (dataset 1: P vs. C: B = 0.004, 95% CI -0.005 to 0.013, p = 0.351; S vs. C: B = 0.000, 95% CI -0.009 to 0.008, p = 0.926; and dataset 2: P vs. C: B = 0.008, 95% CI -0.011 to 0.028, p = 0.410; S vs. C: B = 0.002, 95% CI -0.016 to 0.021, p = 0.797. In patients, negative symptoms were positively associated with S100B (B = 0.001, 95% CI 0.000 to 0.002, p = 0.005 in one of the datasets, however with failure of replication in the other. There was no significant association between S100B and positive symptoms or present use or type of antipsychotic medication. CONCLUSIONS: S100B is neither an intermediate phenotype, nor a trait marker for psychotic illness.

  16. GWAS of 126,559 Individuals Identifies Genetic Variants Associated with Educational Attainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietveld, Cornelius A.; Medland, Sarah E.; Derringer, Jaime; Yang, Jian; Esko, Tõnu; Martin, Nicolas W.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Shakhbazov, Konstantin; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Agrawal, Arpana; Albrecht, Eva; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Amin, Najaf; Barnard, John; Baumeister, Sebastian E.; Benke, Kelly S.; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Boatman, Jeffrey A.; Boyle, Patricia A.; Davies, Gail; de Leeuw, Christiaan; Eklund, Niina; Evans, Daniel S.; Ferhmann, Rudolf; Fischer, Krista; Gieger, Christian; Gjessing, Håkon K.; Hägg, Sara; Harris, Jennifer R.; Hayward, Caroline; Holzapfel, Christina; Ibrahim-Verbaas, Carla A.; Ingelsson, Erik; Jacobsson, Bo; Joshi, Peter K.; Jugessur, Astanand; Kaakinen, Marika; Kanoni, Stavroula; Karjalainen, Juha; Kolcic, Ivana; Kristiansson, Kati; Kutalik, Zoltán; Lahti, Jari; Lee, Sang H.; Lin, Peng; Lind, Penelope A.; Liu, Yongmei; Lohman, Kurt; Loitfelder, Marisa; McMahon, George; Vidal, Pedro Marques; Meirelles, Osorio; Milani, Lili; Myhre, Ronny; Nuotio, Marja-Liisa; Oldmeadow, Christopher J.; Petrovic, Katja E.; Peyrot, Wouter J.; Polašek, Ozren; Quaye, Lydia; Reinmaa, Eva; Rice, John P.; Rizzi, Thais S.; Schmidt, Helena; Schmidt, Reinhold; Smith, Albert V.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Terracciano, Antonio; van der Loos, Matthijs J.H.M.; Vitart, Veronique; Völzke, Henry; Wellmann, Jürgen; Yu, Lei; Zhao, Wei; Allik, Jüri; Attia, John R.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bastardot, François; Beauchamp, Jonathan; Bennett, David A.; Berger, Klaus; Bierut, Laura J.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Bültmann, Ute; Campbell, Harry; Chabris, Christopher F.; Cherkas, Lynn; Chung, Mina K.; Cucca, Francesco; de Andrade, Mariza; De Jager, Philip L.; De Neve, Jan-Emmanuel; Deary, Ian J.; Dedoussis, George V.; Deloukas, Panos; Dimitriou, Maria; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Elderson, Martin F.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Evans, David M.; Faul, Jessica D.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Garcia, Melissa E.; Grönberg, Henrik; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hall, Per; Harris, Juliette M.; Harris, Tamara B.; Hastie, Nicholas D.; Heath, Andrew C.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Adriaan; Holle, Rolf; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Iacono, William G.; Illig, Thomas; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kähönen, Mika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kirkpatrick, Robert M.; Kowgier, Matthew; Latvala, Antti; Launer, Lenore J.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Li, Jingmei; Lichtenstein, Paul; Lichtner, Peter; Liewald, David C.; Madden, Pamela A.; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Mäkinen, Tomi E.; Masala, Marco; McGue, Matt; Metspalu, Andres; Mielck, Andreas; Miller, Michael B.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mukherjee, Sutapa; Nyholt, Dale R.; Oostra, Ben A.; Palmer, Lyle J.; Palotie, Aarno; Penninx, Brenda; Perola, Markus; Peyser, Patricia A.; Preisig, Martin; Räikkönen, Katri; Raitakari, Olli T.; Realo, Anu; Ring, Susan M.; Ripatti, Samuli; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Rustichini, Aldo; Salomaa, Veikko; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Schlessinger, David; Scott, Rodney J.; Snieder, Harold; Pourcain, Beate St; Starr, John M.; Sul, Jae Hoon; Surakka, Ida; Svento, Rauli; Teumer, Alexander; Tiemeier, Henning; Rooij, Frank JAan; Van Wagoner, David R.; Vartiainen, Erkki; Viikari, Jorma; Vollenweider, Peter; Vonk, Judith M.; Waeber, Gérard; Weir, David R.; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Widen, Elisabeth; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F.; Wright, Alan F.; Conley, Dalton; Davey-Smith, George; Franke, Lude; Groenen, Patrick J. F.; Hofman, Albert; Johannesson, Magnus; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Krueger, Robert F.; Laibson, David; Martin, Nicholas G.; Meyer, Michelle N.; Posthuma, Danielle; Thurik, A. Roy; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Uitterlinden, André G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Visscher, Peter M.; Benjamin, Daniel J.; Cesarini, David; Koellinger, Philipp D.

    2013-01-01

    A genome-wide association study of educational attainment was conducted in a discovery sample of 101,069 individuals and a replication sample of 25,490. Three independent SNPs are genome-wide significant (rs9320913, rs11584700, rs4851266), and all three replicate. Estimated effects sizes are small (R2 ≈ 0.02%), approximately 1 month of schooling per allele. A linear polygenic score from all measured SNPs accounts for ≈ 2% of the variance in both educational attainment and cognitive function. Genes in the region of the loci have previously been associated with health, cognitive, and central nervous system phenotypes, and bioinformatics analyses suggest the involvement of the anterior caudate nucleus. These findings provide promising candidate SNPs for follow-up work, and our effect size estimates can anchor power analyses in social-science genetics. PMID:23722424

  17. Non-replication of genome-wide based associations between common variants in INSIG2 and PFKP and obesity in studies of 18,014 Danes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla H Andreasen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The INSIG2 rs7566605 and PFKP rs6602024 polymorphisms have been identified as obesity gene variants in genome-wide association (GWA studies. However, replication has been contradictory for both variants. The aims of this study were to validate these obesity-associations through case-control studies and analyses of obesity-related quantitative traits. Moreover, since environmental and genetic factors may modulate the impact of a genetic variant, we wanted to perform such interaction analyses. We focused on physical activity as an environmental risk factor, and on the GWA identified obesity variants in FTO (rs9939609 and near MC4R (rs17782313 as genetic risk factors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The four variants were genotyped in a combined study sample comprising a total of 18,014 subject ascertained from, the population-based Inter99 cohort (n = 6,514, the ADDITION screening cohort (n = 8,662, a population-based study sample (n = 680 and a type 2 diabetic patient group (n = 2,158 from Steno Diabetes Center. RESULTS: No association with overweight, obesity or obesity-related measures was shown for either the INSIG2 rs7566605 or the PFKP rs6602024 variants. However, an interaction between the INSIG2 rs7566605 variant and the level of self-reported physical activity (p(Int = 0.004 was observed. A BMI difference of 0.53 (SE 0.42 kg/m(2 was found when comparing physically passive homozygous C-allele carriers with physically passive G-allele carriers. No interactions between the two variants and FTO rs9939609 and MC4R rs17782313 were observed. CONCLUSIONS: The INSIG2 rs7566605 and PFKP rs6602024 polymorphisms play no apparent role in the development of common forms of obesity in the Danish population. However, if replicated, the INSIG2 rs7566605 may influence the level of BMI in combination with the level of physical activity.

  18. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit variants are associated with blood pressure; findings in the Old Order Amish and replication in the Framingham Heart Study

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    Ott Sandy

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systemic blood pressure, influenced by both genetic and environmental factors, is regulated via sympathetic nerve activity. We assessed the role of genetic variation in three subunits of the neuromuscular nicotinic acetylcholine receptor positioned on chromosome 2q, a region showing replicated evidence of linkage to blood pressure. Methods We sequenced CHRNA1, CHRND and CHRNG in 24 Amish subjects from the Amish Family Diabetes Study (AFDS and identified 20 variants. We then performed association analysis of non-redundant variants (n = 12 in the complete AFDS cohort of 1,189 individuals, and followed by genotyping blood pressure-associated variants (n = 5 in a replication sample of 1,759 individuals from the Framingham Heart Study (FHS. Results The minor allele of a synonymous coding SNP, rs2099489 in CHRNG, was associated with higher systolic blood pressure in both the Amish (p = 0.0009 and FHS populations (p = 0.009 (minor allele frequency = 0.20 in both populations. Conclusion CHRNG is currently thought to be expressed only during fetal development. These findings support the Barker hypothesis, that fetal genotype and intra-uterine environment influence susceptibility to chronic diseases later in life. Additional studies of this variant in other populations, as well as the effect of this variant on acetylcholine receptor expression and function, are needed to further elucidate its potential role in the regulation of blood pressure. This study suggests for the first time in humans, a possible role for genetic variation in the neuromuscular nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, particularly the gamma subunit, in systolic blood pressure regulation.

  19. Functional relevance for associations between osteoporosis and genetic variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Li-Jun; Wang, Peng; Chen, Xiang-Ding; Zhu, Li-Hua; Zeng, Qin; Hu, Yuan; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2017-01-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by increased bone loss and deterioration of bone microarchitecture, which will lead to reduced bone strength and increased risk of fragility fractures. Previous studies have identified many genetic loci associated with osteoporosis, but functional mechanisms underlying the associations have rarely been explored. In order to explore the potential molecular functional mechanisms underlying the associations for osteoporosis, we performed integrative analyses by using the publically available datasets and resources. We searched 128 identified osteoporosis associated SNPs (Posteoporosis. This study may provide novel insights into the functional mechanisms underlying the osteoporosis associated genetic variants, which will help us to comprehend the potential mechanisms underlying the genetic association for osteoporosis. PMID:28369098

  20. Association between HTR2C gene polymorphisms and the metabolic syndrome in patients using antipsychotics : a replication study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Risselada, A. J.; Vehof, J.; Bruggeman, R.; Wilffert, B.; Cohen, D.; Al Hadithy, A. F.; Arends, J.; Mulder, H.

    2012-01-01

    In two previous studies we found an association between HTR2C polymorphisms and the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in patients using antipsychotics. In this study, we set out to replicate our findings in a third separate sample of patients. Data for this cross-sectional study came from the ong

  1. Association between HTR2C gene polymorphisms and the metabolic syndrome in patients using antipsychotics : a replication study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Risselada, A. J.; Vehof, J.; Bruggeman, R.; Wilffert, B.; Cohen, D.; Al Hadithy, A. F.; Arends, J.; Mulder, H.

    In two previous studies we found an association between HTR2C polymorphisms and the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in patients using antipsychotics. In this study, we set out to replicate our findings in a third separate sample of patients. Data for this cross-sectional study came from the

  2. Associations between Salivary Testosterone Levels, Androgen‐Related Genetic Polymorphisms, and Self‐Estimated Ejaculation Latency Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Jern, PhD

    2014-08-01

    Conclusions: We were unable to find support for the hypothesis suggesting an association between T levels and ELT, possibly because of the low number of phenotypically extreme cases (the sample used in the present study was population based. Our results concerning genetic associations should be interpreted with caution until replication studies have been conducted. Jern P, Westberg L, Ankarberg‐Lindgren C, Johansson A, Gunst A, Sandnabba NK, and Santtila P. Associations between salivary testosterone levels, androgen‐related genetic polymorphisms, and self‐estimated ejaculation latency time. Sex Med 2014;2:107–114.

  3. Chloroquine and its derivatives exacerbate B19V-associated anemia by promoting viral replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Bönsch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: An unexpectedly high seroprevalence and pathogenic potential of human parvovirus B19 (B19V have been observed in certain malaria-endemic countries in parallel with local use of chloroquine (CQ as first-line treatment for malaria. The aims of this study were to assess the effect of CQ and other common antimalarial drugs on B19V infection in vitro and the possible epidemiological consequences for children from Papua New Guinea (PNG. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Viral RNA, DNA and proteins were analyzed in different cell types following infection with B19V in the presence of a range of antimalarial drugs. Relationships between B19V infection status, prior 4-aminoquinoline use and anemia were assessed in 200 PNG children <10 years of age participating in a case-control study of severe infections. In CQ-treated cells, the synthesis of viral RNA, DNA and proteins was significantly higher and occurred earlier than in control cells. CQ facilitates B19V infection by minimizing intracellular degradation of incoming particles. Only amodiaquine amongst other antimalarial drugs had a similar effect. B19V IgM seropositivity was more frequent in 111 children with severe anemia (hemoglobin <50 g/L than in 89 healthy controls (15.3% vs 3.4%; P = 0.008. In children who were either B19V IgM or PCR positive, 4-aminoquinoline use was associated with a significantly lower admission hemoglobin concentration. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data strongly suggest that 4-aminoquinoline drugs and their metabolites exacerbate B19V-associated anemia by promoting B19V replication. Consideration should be given for choosing a non-4-aminoquinoline drug to partner artemisinin compounds in combination antimalarial therapy.

  4. Effects of genetic variants previously associated with fasting glucose and insulin in the Diabetes Prevention Program.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose C Florez

    Full Text Available Common genetic variants have been recently associated with fasting glucose and insulin levels in white populations. Whether these associations replicate in pre-diabetes is not known. We extended these findings to the Diabetes Prevention Program, a clinical trial in which participants at high risk for diabetes were randomized to placebo, lifestyle modification or metformin for diabetes prevention. We genotyped previously reported polymorphisms (or their proxies in/near G6PC2, MTNR1B, GCK, DGKB, GCKR, ADCY5, MADD, CRY2, ADRA2A, FADS1, PROX1, SLC2A2, GLIS3, C2CD4B, IGF1, and IRS1 in 3,548 Diabetes Prevention Program participants. We analyzed variants for association with baseline glycemic traits, incident diabetes and their interaction with response to metformin or lifestyle intervention. We replicated associations with fasting glucose at MTNR1B (P<0.001, G6PC2 (P = 0.002 and GCKR (P = 0.001. We noted impaired β-cell function in carriers of glucose-raising alleles at MTNR1B (P<0.001, and an increase in the insulinogenic index for the glucose-raising allele at G6PC2 (P<0.001. The association of MTNR1B with fasting glucose and impaired β-cell function persisted at 1 year despite adjustment for the baseline trait, indicating a sustained deleterious effect at this locus. We also replicated the association of MADD with fasting proinsulin levels (P<0.001. We detected no significant impact of these variants on diabetes incidence or interaction with preventive interventions. The association of several polymorphisms with quantitative glycemic traits is replicated in a cohort of high-risk persons. These variants do not have a detectable impact on diabetes incidence or response to metformin or lifestyle modification in the Diabetes Prevention Program.

  5. Effects of genetic variants previously associated with fasting glucose and insulin in the Diabetes Prevention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florez, Jose C; Jablonski, Kathleen A; McAteer, Jarred B; Franks, Paul W; Mason, Clinton C; Mather, Kieren; Horton, Edward; Goldberg, Ronald; Dabelea, Dana; Kahn, Steven E; Arakaki, Richard F; Shuldiner, Alan R; Knowler, William C

    2012-01-01

    Common genetic variants have been recently associated with fasting glucose and insulin levels in white populations. Whether these associations replicate in pre-diabetes is not known. We extended these findings to the Diabetes Prevention Program, a clinical trial in which participants at high risk for diabetes were randomized to placebo, lifestyle modification or metformin for diabetes prevention. We genotyped previously reported polymorphisms (or their proxies) in/near G6PC2, MTNR1B, GCK, DGKB, GCKR, ADCY5, MADD, CRY2, ADRA2A, FADS1, PROX1, SLC2A2, GLIS3, C2CD4B, IGF1, and IRS1 in 3,548 Diabetes Prevention Program participants. We analyzed variants for association with baseline glycemic traits, incident diabetes and their interaction with response to metformin or lifestyle intervention. We replicated associations with fasting glucose at MTNR1B (P<0.001), G6PC2 (P = 0.002) and GCKR (P = 0.001). We noted impaired β-cell function in carriers of glucose-raising alleles at MTNR1B (P<0.001), and an increase in the insulinogenic index for the glucose-raising allele at G6PC2 (P<0.001). The association of MTNR1B with fasting glucose and impaired β-cell function persisted at 1 year despite adjustment for the baseline trait, indicating a sustained deleterious effect at this locus. We also replicated the association of MADD with fasting proinsulin levels (P<0.001). We detected no significant impact of these variants on diabetes incidence or interaction with preventive interventions. The association of several polymorphisms with quantitative glycemic traits is replicated in a cohort of high-risk persons. These variants do not have a detectable impact on diabetes incidence or response to metformin or lifestyle modification in the Diabetes Prevention Program.

  6. Smoking and caffeine consumption: A genetic analysis of their association

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Treur, J.L.; Taylor, A.E.; Ware, J.J.; Nivard, M.G.; Neale, M.C.; McMahon, G.; Hottenga, J.J.; Baselmans, B.M.L.; Boomsma, D.I.; Munafò, M.R.; Vink, J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Smoking and caffeine consumption show a strong positive correlation, but the mechanism underlying this association is unclear. Explanations include shared genetic/environmental factors or causal effects. This study employed three methods to investigate the association between smoking and caffeine.

  7. Determining the pathogenicity of genetic variants associated with cardiac channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campuzano, Oscar; Allegue, Catarina; Fernandez, Anna; Iglesias, Anna; Brugada, Ramon

    2015-01-22

    Advancements in genetic screening have generated massive amounts of data on genetic variation; however, a lack of clear pathogenic stratification has left most variants classified as being of unknown significance. This is a critical limitation for translating genetic data into clinical practice. Genetic screening is currently recommended in the guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of cardiac channelopathies, which are major contributors to sudden cardiac death in young people. We propose to characterize the pathogenicity of genetic variants associated with cardiac channelopathies using a stratified scoring system. The development of this system was considered by using all of the tools currently available to define pathogenicity. The use of this scoring system could help clinicians to understand the limitations of genetic associations with a disease, and help them better define the role that genetics can have in their clinical routine.

  8. Novel genetic loci associated with hippocampal volume

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.P. Hibar (Derrek); H.H.H. Adams (Hieab); N. Jahanshad (Neda); G. Chauhan (Ganesh); J.L. Stein; E. Hofer (Edith); M.E. Rentería (Miguel); J.C. Bis (Joshua); A. Arias-Vásquez (Alejandro); Ikram, M.K. (M. Kamran); S. Desrivières (Sylvane); M.W. Vernooij (Meike); L. Abramovic; S. Alhusaini (Saud); N. Amin (Najaf); M. Andersson (Micael); K. Arfanakis (Konstantinos); B. Aribisala (Benjamin); N.J. Armstrong (Nicola J.); L. Athanasiu (Lavinia); T. Axelsson (Tomas); A.H. Beecham (Ashley); A. Beiser (Alexa); M. Bernard (Manon); S.H. Blanton (Susan H.); M.M. Bohlken (Marc M.); M.P.M. Boks (Marco); L.B.C. Bralten (Linda); A.M. Brickman (Adam M.); Carmichael, O. (Owen); M.M. Chakravarty (M. Mallar); Q. Chen (Qiang); C.R.K. Ching (Christopher); V. Chouraki (Vincent); G. Cuellar-Partida (Gabriel); F. Crivello (Fabrice); A. den Braber (Anouk); Doan, N.T. (Nhat Trung); S.M. Ehrlich (Stefan); S. Giddaluru (Sudheer); A.L. Goldman (Aaron L.); R.F. Gottesman (Rebecca); O. Grimm (Oliver); M.D. Griswold (Michael); T. Guadalupe (Tulio); Gutman, B.A. (Boris A.); J. Hass (Johanna); U.K. Haukvik (Unn); D. Hoehn (David); A.J. Holmes (Avram); M. Hoogman (Martine); D. Janowitz (Deborah); T. Jia (Tianye); Jørgensen, K.N. (Kjetil N.); N. Karbalai (Nazanin); D. Kasperaviciute (Dalia); S. Kim (Shinseog); M. Klein (Marieke); B. Kraemer (Bernd); P.H. Lee (Phil); D.C. Liewald (David C.); L.M. Lopez (Lorna); M. Luciano (Michelle); C. MacAre (Christine); Marquand, A.F. (Andre F.); M. Matarin (Mar); R. Mather; M. Mattheisen (Manuel); McKay, D.R. (David R.); Milaneschi, Y. (Yuri); S. Muñoz Maniega (Susana); K. Nho (Kwangsik); A.C. Nugent (Allison); P. Nyquist (Paul); Loohuis, L.M.O. (Loes M. Olde); J. Oosterlaan (Jaap); M. Papmeyer (Martina); Pirpamer, L. (Lukas); B. Pütz (Benno); A. Ramasamy (Adaikalavan); Richards, J.S. (Jennifer S.); S.L. Risacher (Shannon); R. Roiz-Santiañez (Roberto); N. Rommelse (Nanda); S. Ropele (Stefan); E.J. Rose (Emma); N.A. Royle (Natalie); T. Rundek (Tatjana); P.G. Sämann (Philipp); Saremi, A. (Arvin); C.L. Satizabal (Claudia L.); L. Schmaal (Lianne); N.J. Schork (Nicholas); Shen, L. (Li); J. Shin (Jean); Shumskaya, E. (Elena); A.V. Smith (Albert Vernon); R. Sprooten (Roy); V.M. Strike (Vanessa); A. Teumer (Alexander); D. Tordesillas-Gutierrez (Diana); R. Toro (Roberto); D. Trabzuni (Danyah); S. Trompet (Stella); D. Vaidya (Dhananjay); J. van der Grond (Jeroen); S. van der Lee (Sven); Van Der Meer, D. (Dennis); M.M.J. Van Donkelaar (Marjolein M. J.); K.R. van Eijk (Kristel); T.G.M. van Erp (Theo G.); Van Rooij, D. (Daan); E. Walton (Esther); L.T. Westlye (Lars); C.D. Whelan (Christopher); B.G. Windham (B Gwen); A.M. Winkler (Anderson); K. Wittfeld (Katharina); G. Woldehawariat (Girma); A. Björnsson (Asgeir); Wolfers, T. (Thomas); L.R. Yanek (Lisa); Yang, J. (Jingyun); A.P. Zijdenbos; M.P. Zwiers (Marcel); I. Agartz (Ingrid); L. Almasy (Laura); D. Ames (David); Amouyel, P. (Philippe); O.A. Andreassen (Ole A.); S. Arepalli (Sampath); A.A. Assareh; S. Barral (Sandra); M.E. Bastin (Mark); Becker, D.M. (Diane M.); J.T. Becker; D.A. Bennett (David A.); J. Blangero (John); H. van Bokhoven (Hans); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); H. Brodaty (Henry); R.M. Brouwer (Rachel); H.G. Brunner; M. Buckner; J.K. Buitelaar (Jan); K. Bulayeva (Kazima); W. Cahn (Wiepke); V.D. Calhoun Vince D. (V.); D.M. Cannon (Dara); G. Cavalleri (Gianpiero); Cheng, C.-Y. (Ching-Yu); S. Cichon (Sven); M.R. Cookson (Mark); A. Corvin (Aiden); B. Crespo-Facorro (Benedicto); J.E. Curran (Joanne); M. Czisch (Michael); A.M. Dale (Anders); G.E. Davies (Gareth); A.J. de Craen (Anton); E.J.C. de Geus (Eco); P.L. de Jager (Philip); G.I. de Zubicaray (Greig); I.J. Deary (Ian J.); S. Debette (Stéphanie); C. DeCarli (Charles); N. Delanty; C. Depondt (Chantal); A.L. DeStefano (Anita); A. Dillman (Allissa); S. Djurovic (Srdjan); D.J. Donohoe (Dennis); D.A. Drevets (Douglas); Duggirala, R. (Ravi); M.D. Dyer (Matthew); C. Enzinger (Christian); S. Erk; T. Espeseth (Thomas); Fedko, I.O. (Iryna O.); Fernández, G. (Guillén); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); S.E. Fisher (Simon); D. Fleischman (Debra); I. Ford (Ian); M. Fornage (Myriam); T. Foroud (Tatiana); P.T. Fox (Peter); C. Francks (Clyde); Fukunaga, M. (Masaki); Gibbs, J.R. (J. Raphael); D.C. Glahn (David); R.L. Gollub (Randy); H.H.H. Göring (Harald H.); R.C. Green (Robert C.); O. Gruber (Oliver); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); S. Guelfi (Sebastian); Håberg, A.K. (Asta K.); N.K. Hansell (Narelle); J. Hardy (John); C.A. Hartman (C.); Hashimoto, R. (Ryota); K. Hegenscheid (Katrin); J. Heinz (Judith); S. Le Hellard (Stephanie); D.G. Hernandez (Dena); D.J. Heslenfeld (Dirk); Ho, B.-C. (Beng-Choon); P.J. Hoekstra (Pieter); W. Hoffmann (Wolfgang); A. Hofman (Albert); F. Holsboer (Florian); G. Homuth (Georg); N. Hosten (Norbert); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); M.J. Huentelman (Matthew); H.H. Pol; Ikeda, M. (Masashi); Jack, C.R. (Clifford R.); S. Jenkinson (Sarah); R. Johnson (Robert); Jönsson, E.G. (Erik G.); J.W. Jukema; R. Kahn; Kanai, R. (Ryota); I. Kloszewska (Iwona); Knopman, D.S. (David S.); P. Kochunov (Peter); Kwok, J.B. (John B.); S. Lawrie (Stephen); H. Lemaître (Herve); X. Liu (Xinmin); D.L. Longo (Dan L.); O.L. Lopez (Oscar L.); S. Lovestone (Simon); Martinez, O. (Oliver); J.-L. Martinot (Jean-Luc); V.S. Mattay (Venkata S.); McDonald, C. (Colm); A.M. McIntosh (Andrew); McMahon, F.J. (Francis J.); McMahon, K.L. (Katie L.); P. Mecocci (Patrizia); I. Melle (Ingrid); Meyer-Lindenberg, A. (Andreas); S. Mohnke (Sebastian); Montgomery, G.W. (Grant W.); D.W. Morris (Derek W); T.H. Mosley (Thomas H.); T.W. Mühleisen (Thomas); B. Müller-Myhsok (B.); M.A. Nalls (Michael); M. Nauck (Matthias); T.E. Nichols (Thomas); W.J. Niessen (Wiro); M.M. Nöthen (Markus); L. Nyberg (Lars); Ohi, K. (Kazutaka); R.L. Olvera (Rene); R.A. Ophoff (Roel); M. Pandolfo (Massimo); T. Paus (Tomas); Z. Pausova (Zdenka); B.W.J.H. Penninx (Brenda); Pike, G.B. (G. Bruce); S.G. Potkin (Steven); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); S. Reppermund; M. Rietschel (M.); J.L. Roffman (Joshua); N. Seiferth (Nina); J.I. Rotter (Jerome I.); M. Ryten (Mina); Sacco, R.L. (Ralph L.); P.S. Sachdev (Perminder); A.J. Saykin (Andrew); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); Schmidt, H. (Helena); C.J. Schofield (Christopher); Sigursson, S. (Sigurdur); Simmons, A. (Andrew); A. Singleton (Andrew); S.M. Sisodiya (Sanjay); Smith, C. (Colin); J.W. Smoller; H. Soininen (H.); V.M. Steen (Vidar); D.J. Stott (David J.); J. Sussmann (Jessika); A. Thalamuthu (Anbupalam); A.W. Toga (Arthur W.); B. Traynor (Bryan); J.C. Troncoso (Juan); M. Tsolaki (Magda); C. Tzourio (Christophe); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); Hernández, M.C.V. (Maria C. Valdés); M.P. van der Brug (Marcel); A. van der Lugt (Aad); N.J. van der Wee (Nic); N.E.M. van Haren (Neeltje E.); D. van 't Ent (Dennis); M.J.D. van Tol (Marie-José); B.N. Vardarajan (Badri); B. Vellas (Bruno); D.J. Veltman (Dick); H. Völzke (Henry); H.J. Walter (Henrik); J. Wardlaw (Joanna); A.M.J. Wassink (Annemarie); M.E. Weale (Michael); Weinberger, D.R. (Daniel R.); Weiner, M.W. (Michael W.); Wen, W. (Wei); E. Westman (Eric); T.J.H. White (Tonya); Wong, T.Y. (Tien Y.); Wright, C.B. (Clinton B.); R.H. Zielke (Ronald H.); A.B. Zonderman; N.G. Martin (Nicholas); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); M.J. Wright (Margaret); W.T. Longstreth Jr; G. Schumann (Gunter); H.J. Grabe (Hans Jörgen); B. Franke (Barbara); L.J. Launer (Lenore); S.E. Medland (Sarah Elizabeth); S. Seshadri (Sudha); P.M. Thompson (Paul); M.K. Ikram (Kamran)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe hippocampal formation is a brain structure integrally involved in episodic memory, spatial navigation, cognition and stress responsiveness. Structural abnormalities in hippocampal volume and shape are found in several common neuropsychiatric disorders. To identify the genetic underpi

  9. Novel genetic loci associated with hippocampal volume

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hibar, Derrek P; Adams, Hieab H H; Jahanshad, Neda; Chauhan, Ganesh; Stein, Jason L; Hofer, Edith; Renteria, Miguel E; Bis, Joshua C; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Ikram, M Kamran; Desrivières, Sylvane; Vernooij, Meike W; Abramovic, Lucija|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/34549072X; Alhusaini, Saud; Amin, Najaf; Andersson, Micael; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Armstrong, Nicola J; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Axelsson, Tomas; Beecham, Ashley H; Beiser, Alexa; Bernard, Manon; Blanton, Susan H; Bohlken, Marc M; Boks, Marco P|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/286852071; Bralten, Janita; Brickman, Adam M; Carmichael, Owen; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R K; Chouraki, Vincent; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Crivello, Fabrice; Den Braber, Anouk; Doan, Nhat Trung; Ehrlich, Stefan; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Grimm, Oliver; Griswold, Michael E; Guadalupe, Tulio; Gutman, Boris A; Hass, Johanna; Haukvik, Unn K; Hoehn, David; Holmes, Avram J; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Jørgensen, Kjetil N; Karbalai, Nazanin; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H; Liewald, David C M; Lopez, Lorna M; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Marquand, Andre F; Matarin, Mar; Mather, Karen A; Mattheisen, Manuel; McKay, David R; Milaneschi, Yuri; Muñoz Maniega, Susana; Nho, Kwangsik; Nugent, Allison C; Nyquist, Paul; Loohuis, Loes M Olde; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Papmeyer, Martina; Pirpamer, Lukas; Pütz, Benno; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Richards, Jennifer S; Risacher, Shannon L; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rommelse, Nanda; Ropele, Stefan; Rose, Emma J; Royle, Natalie A; Rundek, Tatjana; Sämann, Philipp G; Saremi, Arvin; Satizabal, Claudia L; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J; Shen, Li; Shin, Jean; Shumskaya, Elena; Smith, Albert V; Sprooten, Emma; Strike, Lachlan T; Teumer, Alexander; Tordesillas-Gutierrez, Diana; Toro, Roberto; Trabzuni, Daniah; Trompet, Stella; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Van der Grond, Jeroen; Van der Lee, Sven J; Van der Meer, Dennis; Van Donkelaar, Marjolein M J; Van Eijk, Kristel R|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/344497569; Van Erp, Theo G M; Van Rooij, Daan; Walton, Esther; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Windham, Beverly G; Winkler, Anderson M; Wittfeld, Katharina; Woldehawariat, Girma; Wolf, Christiane; Wolfers, Thomas; Yanek, Lisa R; Yang, Jingyun; Zijdenbos, Alex; Zwiers, Marcel P; Agartz, Ingrid; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Amouyel, Philippe; Andreassen, Ole A; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A; Barral, Sandra; Bastin, Mark E; Becker, Diane M; Becker, James T; Bennett, David A; Blangero, John; van Bokhoven, Hans; Boomsma, Dorret I; Brodaty, Henry; Brouwer, Rachel M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304811432; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Buitelaar, Jan K; Bulayeva, Kazima B; Cahn, Wiepke|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/250566370; Calhoun, Vince D; Cannon, Dara M; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Cichon, Sven; Cookson, Mark R; Corvin, Aiden; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Curran, Joanne E; Czisch, Michael; Dale, Anders M; Davies, Gareth E; De Craen, Anton J M; De Geus, Eco J C; De Jager, Philip L; De Zubicaray, Greig I; Deary, Ian J; Debette, Stéphanie; DeCarli, Charles; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; DeStefano, Anita; Dillman, Allissa; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary; Drevets, Wayne C; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Enzinger, Christian; Erk, Susanne; Espeseth, Thomas; Fedko, Iryna O; Fernández, Guillén; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fisher, Simon E; Fleischman, Debra A; Ford, Ian; Fornage, Myriam; Foroud, Tatiana M; Fox, Peter T; Francks, Clyde; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J Raphael; Glahn, David C; Gollub, Randy L; Göring, Harald H H; Green, Robert C; Gruber, Oliver; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guelfi, Sebastian; Håberg, Asta K; Hansell, Narelle K; Hardy, John; Hartman, Catharina A; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Hernandez, Dena G; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Albert; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hosten, Norbert; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Huentelman, Matthew; Pol, Hilleke E Hulshoff|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/142348228; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Jönsson, Erik G; Jukema, J Wouter; Kahn, René S|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073778532; Kanai, Ryota; Kloszewska, Iwona; Knopman, David S; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B; Lawrie, Stephen M; Lemaître, Hervé; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L; Lopez, Oscar L; Lovestone, Simon; Martinez, Oliver; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Mattay, Venkata S; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; McMahon, Francis J; McMahon, Katie L; Mecocci, Patrizia; Melle, Ingrid; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W; Morris, Derek W; Mosley, Thomas H; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nalls, Michael A; Nauck, Matthias; Nichols, Thomas E; Niessen, Wiro J; Nöthen, Markus M; Nyberg, Lars; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L; Ophoff, Roel A; Pandolfo, Massimo; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Pike, G Bruce; Potkin, Steven G; Psaty, Bruce M; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Roffman, Joshua L; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rotter, Jerome I; Ryten, Mina; Sacco, Ralph L; Sachdev, Perminder S; Saykin, Andrew J; Schmidt, Reinhold; Schmidt, Helena; Schofield, Peter R; Sigursson, Sigurdur; Simmons, Andrew; Singleton, Andrew; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Smith, Colin; Smoller, Jordan W; Soininen, Hilkka; Steen, Vidar M; Stott, David J; Sussmann, Jessika E; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W; Traynor, Bryan J; Troncoso, Juan; Tsolaki, Magda; Tzourio, Christophe; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hernández, Maria C Valdés; Van der Brug, Marcel; van der Lugt, Aad; van der Wee, Nic J A; Van Haren, Neeltje E M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/271562161; van 't Ent, Dennis; Van Tol, Marie-Jose; Vardarajan, Badri N; Vellas, Bruno; Veltman, Dick J; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Wassink, Thomas H; Weale, Michael E; Weinberger, Daniel R; Weiner, Michael W; Wen, Wei; Westman, Eric; White, Tonya; Wong, Tien Y; Wright, Clinton B; Zielke, Ronald H; Zonderman, Alan B; Martin, Nicholas G; Van Duijn, Cornelia M; Wright, Margaret J; Longstreth, W T; Schumann, Gunter; Grabe, Hans J; Franke, Barbara; Launer, Lenore J; Medland, Sarah E; Seshadri, Sudha; Thompson, Paul M; Ikram, M Arfan

    2017-01-01

    The hippocampal formation is a brain structure integrally involved in episodic memory, spatial navigation, cognition and stress responsiveness. Structural abnormalities in hippocampal volume and shape are found in several common neuropsychiatric disorders. To identify the genetic underpinnings of hi

  10. Novel genetic loci associated with hippocampal volume

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.P. Hibar (Derrek); H.H.H. Adams (Hieab); N. Jahanshad (Neda); G. Chauhan (Ganesh); J.L. Stein; E. Hofer (Edith); M.E. Rentería (Miguel); J.C. Bis (Joshua); A. Arias-Vásquez (Alejandro); Ikram, M.K. (M. Kamran); S. Desrivières (Sylvane); M.W. Vernooij (Meike); L. Abramovic; S. Alhusaini (Saud); N. Amin (Najaf); M. Andersson (Micael); K. Arfanakis (Konstantinos); B. Aribisala (Benjamin); N.J. Armstrong (Nicola J.); L. Athanasiu (Lavinia); T. Axelsson (Tomas); A.H. Beecham (Ashley); A. Beiser (Alexa); M. Bernard (Manon); S.H. Blanton (Susan H.); M.M. Bohlken (Marc M.); M.P.M. Boks (Marco); L.B.C. Bralten (Linda); A.M. Brickman (Adam M.); Carmichael, O. (Owen); M.M. Chakravarty (M. Mallar); Q. Chen (Qiang); C.R.K. Ching (Christopher); V. Chouraki (Vincent); G. Cuellar-Partida (Gabriel); F. Crivello (Fabrice); A. den Braber (Anouk); Doan, N.T. (Nhat Trung); S.M. Ehrlich (Stefan); S. Giddaluru (Sudheer); A.L. Goldman (Aaron L.); R.F. Gottesman (Rebecca); O. Grimm (Oliver); M.D. Griswold (Michael); T. Guadalupe (Tulio); Gutman, B.A. (Boris A.); J. Hass (Johanna); U.K. Haukvik (Unn); D. Hoehn (David); A.J. Holmes (Avram); M. Hoogman (Martine); D. Janowitz (Deborah); T. Jia (Tianye); Jørgensen, K.N. (Kjetil N.); N. Karbalai (Nazanin); D. Kasperaviciute (Dalia); S. Kim (Shinseog); M. Klein (Marieke); B. Kraemer (Bernd); P.H. Lee (Phil); D.C. Liewald (David C.); L.M. Lopez (Lorna); M. Luciano (Michelle); C. MacAre (Christine); Marquand, A.F. (Andre F.); M. Matarin (Mar); R. Mather; M. Mattheisen (Manuel); McKay, D.R. (David R.); Milaneschi, Y. (Yuri); S. Muñoz Maniega (Susana); K. Nho (Kwangsik); A.C. Nugent (Allison); P. Nyquist (Paul); Loohuis, L.M.O. (Loes M. Olde); J. Oosterlaan (Jaap); M. Papmeyer (Martina); Pirpamer, L. (Lukas); B. Pütz (Benno); A. Ramasamy (Adaikalavan); Richards, J.S. (Jennifer S.); S.L. Risacher (Shannon); R. Roiz-Santiañez (Roberto); N. Rommelse (Nanda); S. Ropele (Stefan); E.J. Rose (Emma); N.A. Royle (Natalie); T. Rundek (Tatjana); P.G. Sämann (Philipp); Saremi, A. (Arvin); C.L. Satizabal (Claudia L.); L. Schmaal (Lianne); N.J. Schork (Nicholas); Shen, L. (Li); J. Shin (Jean); Shumskaya, E. (Elena); A.V. Smith (Albert Vernon); R. Sprooten (Roy); V.M. Strike (Vanessa); A. Teumer (Alexander); D. Tordesillas-Gutierrez (Diana); R. Toro (Roberto); D. Trabzuni (Danyah); S. Trompet (Stella); D. Vaidya (Dhananjay); J. van der Grond (Jeroen); S. van der Lee (Sven); Van Der Meer, D. (Dennis); M.M.J. Van Donkelaar (Marjolein M. J.); K.R. van Eijk (Kristel); T.G.M. van Erp (Theo G.); Van Rooij, D. (Daan); E. Walton (Esther); L.T. Westlye (Lars); C.D. Whelan (Christopher); B.G. Windham (B Gwen); A.M. Winkler (Anderson); K. Wittfeld (Katharina); G. Woldehawariat (Girma); A. Björnsson (Asgeir); Wolfers, T. (Thomas); L.R. Yanek (Lisa); Yang, J. (Jingyun); A.P. Zijdenbos; M.P. Zwiers (Marcel); I. Agartz (Ingrid); L. Almasy (Laura); D. Ames (David); Amouyel, P. (Philippe); O.A. Andreassen (Ole A.); S. Arepalli (Sampath); A.A. Assareh; S. Barral (Sandra); M.E. Bastin (Mark); Becker, D.M. (Diane M.); J.T. Becker; D.A. Bennett (David A.); J. Blangero (John); H. van Bokhoven (Hans); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); H. Brodaty (Henry); R.M. Brouwer (Rachel); H.G. Brunner; M. Buckner; J.K. Buitelaar (Jan); K. Bulayeva (Kazima); W. Cahn (Wiepke); V.D. Calhoun Vince D. (V.); D.M. Cannon (Dara); G. Cavalleri (Gianpiero); Cheng, C.-Y. (Ching-Yu); S. Cichon (Sven); M.R. Cookson (Mark); A. Corvin (Aiden); B. Crespo-Facorro (Benedicto); J.E. Curran (Joanne); M. Czisch (Michael); A.M. Dale (Anders); G.E. Davies (Gareth); A.J. de Craen (Anton); E.J.C. de Geus (Eco); P.L. de Jager (Philip); G.I. de Zubicaray (Greig); I.J. Deary (Ian J.); S. Debette (Stéphanie); C. DeCarli (Charles); N. Delanty; C. Depondt (Chantal); A.L. DeStefano (Anita); A. Dillman (Allissa); S. Djurovic (Srdjan); D.J. Donohoe (Dennis); D.A. Drevets (Douglas); Duggirala, R. (Ravi); M.D. Dyer (Matthew); C. Enzinger (Christian); S. Erk; T. Espeseth (Thomas); Fedko, I.O. (Iryna O.); Fernández, G. (Guillén); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); S.E. Fisher (Simon); D. Fleischman (Debra); I. Ford (Ian); M. Fornage (Myriam); T. Foroud (Tatiana); P.T. Fox (Peter); C. Francks (Clyde); Fukunaga, M. (Masaki); Gibbs, J.R. (J. Raphael); D.C. Glahn (David); R.L. Gollub (Randy); H.H.H. Göring (Harald H.); R.C. Green (Robert C.); O. Gruber (Oliver); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); S. Guelfi (Sebastian); Håberg, A.K. (Asta K.); N.K. Hansell (Narelle); J. Hardy (John); C.A. Hartman (C.); Hashimoto, R. (Ryota); K. Hegenscheid (Katrin); J. Heinz (Judith); S. Le Hellard (Stephanie); D.G. Hernandez (Dena); D.J. Heslenfeld (Dirk); Ho, B.-C. (Beng-Choon); P.J. Hoekstra (Pieter); W. Hoffmann (Wolfgang); A. Hofman (Albert); F. Holsboer (Florian); G. Homuth (Georg); N. Hosten (Norbert); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); M.J. Huentelman (Matthew); H.H. Pol; Ikeda, M. (Masashi); Jack, C.R. (Clifford R.); S. Jenkinson (Sarah); R. Johnson (Robert); Jönsson, E.G. (Erik G.); J.W. Jukema; R. Kahn; Kanai, R. (Ryota); I. Kloszewska (Iwona); Knopman, D.S. (David S.); P. Kochunov (Peter); Kwok, J.B. (John B.); S. Lawrie (Stephen); H. Lemaître (Herve); X. Liu (Xinmin); D.L. Longo (Dan L.); O.L. Lopez (Oscar L.); S. Lovestone (Simon); Martinez, O. (Oliver); J.-L. Martinot (Jean-Luc); V.S. Mattay (Venkata S.); McDonald, C. (Colm); A.M. McIntosh (Andrew); McMahon, F.J. (Francis J.); McMahon, K.L. (Katie L.); P. Mecocci (Patrizia); I. Melle (Ingrid); Meyer-Lindenberg, A. (Andreas); S. Mohnke (Sebastian); Montgomery, G.W. (Grant W.); D.W. Morris (Derek W); T.H. Mosley (Thomas H.); T.W. Mühleisen (Thomas); B. Müller-Myhsok (B.); M.A. Nalls (Michael); M. Nauck (Matthias); T.E. Nichols (Thomas); W.J. Niessen (Wiro); M.M. Nöthen (Markus); L. Nyberg (Lars); Ohi, K. (Kazutaka); R.L. Olvera (Rene); R.A. Ophoff (Roel); M. Pandolfo (Massimo); T. Paus (Tomas); Z. Pausova (Zdenka); B.W.J.H. Penninx (Brenda); Pike, G.B. (G. Bruce); S.G. Potkin (Steven); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); S. Reppermund; M. Rietschel (M.); J.L. Roffman (Joshua); N. Seiferth (Nina); J.I. Rotter (Jerome I.); M. Ryten (Mina); Sacco, R.L. (Ralph L.); P.S. Sachdev (Perminder); A.J. Saykin (Andrew); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); Schmidt, H. (Helena); C.J. Schofield (Christopher); Sigursson, S. (Sigurdur); Simmons, A. (Andrew); A. Singleton (Andrew); S.M. Sisodiya (Sanjay); Smith, C. (Colin); J.W. Smoller; H. Soininen (H.); V.M. Steen (Vidar); D.J. Stott (David J.); J. Sussmann (Jessika); A. Thalamuthu (Anbupalam); A.W. Toga (Arthur W.); B. Traynor (Bryan); J.C. Troncoso (Juan); M. Tsolaki (Magda); C. Tzourio (Christophe); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); Hernández, M.C.V. (Maria C. Valdés); M.P. van der Brug (Marcel); A. van der Lugt (Aad); N.J. van der Wee (Nic); N.E.M. van Haren (Neeltje E.); D. van 't Ent (Dennis); M.J.D. van Tol (Marie-José); B.N. Vardarajan (Badri); B. Vellas (Bruno); D.J. Veltman (Dick); H. Völzke (Henry); H.J. Walter (Henrik); J. Wardlaw (Joanna); A.M.J. Wassink (Annemarie); M.E. Weale (Michael); Weinberger, D.R. (Daniel R.); Weiner, M.W. (Michael W.); Wen, W. (Wei); E. Westman (Eric); T.J.H. White (Tonya); Wong, T.Y. (Tien Y.); Wright, C.B. (Clinton B.); R.H. Zielke (Ronald H.); A.B. Zonderman; N.G. Martin (Nicholas); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); M.J. Wright (Margaret); W.T. Longstreth Jr; G. Schumann (Gunter); H.J. Grabe (Hans Jörgen); B. Franke (Barbara); L.J. Launer (Lenore); S.E. Medland (Sarah Elizabeth); S. Seshadri (Sudha); P.M. Thompson (Paul); M.K. Ikram (Kamran)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe hippocampal formation is a brain structure integrally involved in episodic memory, spatial navigation, cognition and stress responsiveness. Structural abnormalities in hippocampal volume and shape are found in several common neuropsychiatric disorders. To identify the genetic underpi

  11. The p150 subunit of CAF-1 causes association of SUMO2/3 with the DNA replication foci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uwada, Junsuke [Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Global COE (Centers of Excellence) Program, Global Initiative Center for Pulsed Power Engineering, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Tanaka, Niina; Yamaguchi, Yutaro; Uchimura, Yasuhiro [Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Shibahara, Kei-ichi [Department of Integrated Genetics, National Institute of Genetics, Research Organization of Information and Systems, Mishima (Japan); Nakao, Mitsuyoshi [Department of Medical Cell Biology, Institute of Molecular Embryology and Genetics, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Saitoh, Hisato, E-mail: hisa@kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan); Global COE (Centers of Excellence) Program, Global Initiative Center for Pulsed Power Engineering, Kumamoto University, 2-39-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan)

    2010-01-01

    The small ubiquitin-related modifier 2/3 (SUMO2/3) can be post-translationally conjugated to a wide variety of proteins constituting chromatin, the platform for genetic and epigenetic regulation. Nevertheless, it is unclear how SUMO2/3 and SUMO2/3-modified proteins are delivered to the chromatin fibers. Here we report that the largest subunit of chromatin assembly factor 1 (CAF-1), human p150, interacts directly and preferentially with SUMO2/3. Amino acid residue of 98-105 in p150 is essential and sufficient for SUMO2/3 interaction. p150-SUMO2/3 interaction coincided with regions that replicate chromatin fibers, because accumulation of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) were detected at foci co-localized with both p150 and SUMO2/3 during the S-phase in a cell line expressing epitope-tagged p150. Although inhibition of SUMO2/3 expression had only a small effect on p150 deposition on the replication sites, depletion of p150 led to delocalization of SUMO2/3 from the replication foci. Furthermore, p150 mutants deficient in SUMO2/3 interaction, caused a major reduction of SUMO2/3 at the replication foci. Thus, our findings suggest an expanded role of p150 as a SUMO2/3-interacting factor, and raise the intriguing possibility that p150 plays a role in promoting delivery of SUMO2/3 or SUMO2/3-modified proteins (or both) on chromatin fibers during replication.

  12. Neither replication nor simulation supports a role for the axon guidance pathway in the genetics of Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghong Li

    Full Text Available Susceptibility to sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD is thought to be influenced by both genetic and environmental factors and their interaction with each other. Statistical models including multiple variants in axon guidance pathway genes have recently been purported to be capable of predicting PD risk, survival free of the disease and age at disease onset; however the specific models have not undergone independent validation. Here we tested the best proposed risk panel of 23 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in two PD sample sets, with a total of 525 cases and 518 controls. By single marker analysis, only one marker was significantly associated with PD risk in one of our sample sets (rs6692804: P = 0.03. Multi-marker analysis using the reported model found a mild association in one sample set (two sided P = 0.049, odds ratio for each score change = 1.07 but no significance in the other (two sided P = 0.98, odds ratio = 1, a stark contrast to the reported strong association with PD risk (P = 4.64x10(-38, odds ratio as high as 90.8. Following a procedure similar to that used to build the reported model, simulated multi-marker models containing SNPs from randomly chosen genes in a genome wide PD dataset produced P-values that were highly significant and indistinguishable from similar models where disease status was permuted (3.13x10(-23 to 4.90x10(-64, demonstrating the potential for overfitting in the model building process. Together, these results challenge the robustness of the reported panel of genetic markers to predict PD risk in particular and a role of the axon guidance pathway in PD genetics in general.

  13. Genetic variants in ABCG1 are associated with survival of nonsmall-cell lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanru; Liu, Hongliang; Ready, Neal E; Su, Li; Wei, Yongyue; Christiani, David C; Wei, Qingyi

    2016-06-01

    Cell membrane transporters and metabolic enzymes play a crucial role in the transportation of a wide variety of substrates that maintain homeostasis in biological processes. We explored associations between genetic variants in these genes and survival of nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients by reanalyzing two datasets from published genome-wide association studies (GWASs). In the discovery by using the GWAS dataset of the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial, we evaluated associations of 1,245 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes of four transporter families and two metabolic enzyme families with survival of 1,185 NSCLC patients. We then performed a replication analysis in the Harvard University Lung Cancer study (LCS) with 984 NSCLC patients. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression and false discovery rate (FDR) corrections were performed to evaluate the associations. We identified that 21 genotyped SNPs in eight gene regions were significantly associated with survival with FDR ≤ 0.1 in the discovery dataset. Subsequently, we confirmed six SNPs, which were putative functional, in ABCG1 of the ATP-binding cassette transporter family in the replication dataset. In the pooled analysis, two tagging (at r(2)  > 0.8 for linkage disequilibrium with other replicated SNPs)/functional SNPs were independently associated with survival: rs225388 G > A [adjusted hazards ratio (HR) = 1.12, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.03-1.20, Ptrend  = 4.6 × 10(-3)] and rs225390 A > G (adjusted HR = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.07-1.25, Ptrend  = 3.8 × 10(-4) ). Our results indicated that genetic variants of ABCG1 may be predictors of survival of NSCLC patients.

  14. Genetic variants associated with subjective well-being, depressive symptoms, and neuroticism identified through genome-wide analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okbay, Aysu; Baselmans, Bart M L; De Neve, Jan-Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Very few genetic variants have been associated with depression and neuroticism, likely because of limitations on sample size in previous studies. Subjective well-being, a phenotype that is genetically correlated with both of these traits, has not yet been studied with genome-wide data. We conducted...... genome-wide association studies of three phenotypes: subjective well-being (n = 298,420), depressive symptoms (n = 161,460), and neuroticism (n = 170,911). We identify 3 variants associated with subjective well-being, 2 variants associated with depressive symptoms, and 11 variants associated...... with neuroticism, including 2 inversion polymorphisms. The two loci associated with depressive symptoms replicate in an independent depression sample. Joint analyses that exploit the high genetic correlations between the phenotypes (|ρ^| ≈ 0.8) strengthen the overall credibility of the findings and allow us...

  15. Optimal Trend Tests for Genetic Association Studies of Heterogeneous Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wen-Chung

    2016-06-09

    The Cochran-Armitage trend test is a standard procedure in genetic association studies. It is a directed test with high power to detect genetic effects that follow the gene-dosage model. In this paper, the author proposes optimal trend tests for genetic association studies of heterogeneous diseases. Monte-Carlo simulations show that the power gain of the optimal trend tests over the conventional Cochran-Armitage trend test is striking when the genetic effects are heterogeneous. The easy-to-use R 3.1.2 software (R Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna, Austria) code is provided. The optimal trend tests are recommended for routine use.

  16. RecQL4 is required for the association of Mcm10 and Ctf4 with replication origins in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Jun-Sub; Park, Soon-Young; Cho, Won-Ho; Bae, Sung-Ho; Hurwitz, Jerard; Lee, Joon-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Though RecQL4 was shown to be essential for the initiation of DNA replication in mammalian cells, its role in initiation is poorly understood. Here, we show that RecQL4 is required for the origin binding of Mcm10 and Ctf4, and their physical interactions and association with replication origins are controlled by the concerted action of both CDK and DDK activities. Although RecQL4-dependent binding of Mcm10 and Ctf4 to chromatin can occur in the absence of pre-replicative complex, their association with replication origins requires the presence of the pre-replicative complex and CDK and DDK activities. Their association with replication origins and physical interactions are also targets of the DNA damage checkpoint pathways which prevent initiation of DNA replication at replication origins. Taken together, the RecQL4-dependent association of Mcm10 and Ctf4 with replication origins appears to be the first important step controlled by S phase promoting kinases and checkpoint pathways for the initiation of DNA replication in human cells.

  17. Association of activating KIR copy number variation of NK cells with containment of SIV replication in rhesus monkeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina Hellmann

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available While the contribution of CD8⁺ cytotoxic T lymphocytes to early containment of HIV-1 spread is well established, a role for NK cells in controlling HIV-1 replication during primary infection has been uncertain. The highly polymorphic family of KIR molecules expressed on NK cells can inhibit or activate these effector cells and might therefore modulate their activity against HIV-1-infected cells. In the present study, we investigated copy number variation in KIR3DH loci encoding the only activating KIR receptor family in rhesus monkeys and its effect on simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV replication during primary infection in rhesus monkeys. We observed an association between copy numbers of KIR3DH genes and control of SIV replication in Mamu-A*01⁻ rhesus monkeys that express restrictive TRIM5 alleles. These findings provide further evidence for an association between NK cells and the early containment of SIV replication, and underscore the potential importance of activating KIRs in stimulating NK cell responses to control SIV spread.

  18. The leukemia-associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor LARG is required for efficient replication stress signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beveridge, Ryan D; Staples, Christopher J; Patil, Abhijit A; Myers, Katie N; Maslen, Sarah; Skehel, J Mark; Boulton, Simon J; Collis, Spencer J

    2014-01-01

    We previously identified and characterized TELO2 as a human protein that facilitates efficient DNA damage response (DDR) signaling. A subsequent yeast 2-hybrid screen identified LARG; Leukemia-Associated Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor (also known as Arhgef12), as a potential novel TELO2 interactor. LARG was previously shown to interact with Pericentrin (PCNT), which, like TELO2, is required for efficient replication stress signaling. Here we confirm interactions between LARG, TELO2 and PCNT and show that a sub-set of LARG co-localizes with PCNT at the centrosome. LARG-deficient cells exhibit replication stress signaling defects as evidenced by; supernumerary centrosomes, reduced replication stress-induced γH2AX and RPA nuclear foci formation, and reduced activation of the replication stress signaling effector kinase Chk1 in response to hydroxyurea. As such, LARG-deficient cells are sensitive to replication stress-inducing agents such as hydroxyurea and mitomycin C. Conversely we also show that depletion of TELO2 and the replication stress signaling kinase ATR leads to RhoA signaling defects. These data therefore reveal a level of crosstalk between the RhoA and DDR signaling pathways. Given that mutations in both ATR and PCNT can give rise to the related primordial dwarfism disorders of Seckel Syndrome and Microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPDII) respectively, which both exhibit defects in ATR-dependent checkpoint signaling, these data also raise the possibility that mutations in LARG or disruption to RhoA signaling may be contributory factors to the etiology of a sub-set of primordial dwarfism disorders.

  19. Trans-ancestry genome-wide association study identifies 12 genetic loci influencing blood pressure and implicates a role for DNA methylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kato, Norihiro; Loh, Marie; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Verweij, Niek; Wang, Xu; Zhang, Weihua; Kelly, Tanika N.; Saleheen, Danish; Lehne, Benjamin; Leach, Irene Mateo; Drong, Alexander W.; Abbott, James; Wahl, Simone; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Scott, William R.; Campanella, Gianluca; Chadeau-Hyam, Marc; Afzal, Uzma; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.; Bonder, Marc Jan; Chen, Peng; Dehghan, Abbas; Edwards, Todd L.; Esko, Tonu; Go, Min Jin; Harris, Sarah E.; Hartiala, Jaana; Kasela, Silva; Kasturiratne, Anuradhani; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Kleber, Marcus E.; Li, Huaixing; Mok, Zuan Yu; Nakatochi, Masahiro; Sapari, Nur Sabrina; Saxena, Richa; Stewart, Alexandre F. R.; Stolk, Lisette; Tabara, Yasuharu; Teh, Ai Ling; Wu, Ying; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Zhang, Yi; Aits, Imke; Alves, Alexessander Da Silva Couto; Das, Shikta; Dorajoo, Rajkumar; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Kim, Yun Kyoung; Koivula, Robert W.; Luan, Jian'an; Lyytikainen, Leo-Pekka; Nguyen, Quang N.; Pereira, Mark A.; Postmus, Iris; Raitakari, Olli T.; Bryan, Molly Scannell; Scott, Robert A.; Sorice, Rossella; Tragante, Vinicius; Traglia, Michela; White, Jon; Yamamoto, Ken; Zhang, Yonghong; Adair, Linda S.; Ahmed, Alauddin; Akiyama, Koichi; Asif, Rasheed; Aung, Tin; Barroso, Ines; Bjonnes, Andrew; Braun, Timothy R.; Cai, Hui; Chang, Li-Ching; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Chong, Yap-Seng; Collins, Rory; Courtney, Regina; Davies, Gail; Delgado, Graciela; Do, Loi D.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Grammer, Tanja B.; Grarup, Niels; Grewal, Jagvir; Gu, Dongfeng; Wander, Gurpreet S.; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hazen, Stanley L.; He, Jing; Heng, Chew-Kiat; Hixson, James E.; Hofman, Albert; Hsu, Chris; Huang, Wei; Husemoen, Lise L. N.; Hwang, Joo-Yeon; Ichihara, Sahoko; Igase, Michiya; Isono, Masato; Justesen, Johanne M.; Katsuy, Tomohiro; Kibriya, Muhammad G.; Kim, Young Jin; Kishimoto, Miyako; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kohara, Katsuhiko; Kumari, Meena; Kwek, Kenneth; Lee, Nanette R.; Lee, Jeannette; Liao, Jiemin; Lieb, Wolfgang; Liewald, David C. M.; Matsubara, Tatsuaki; Matsushita, Yumi; Meitinger, Thomas; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Mills, Rebecca; Mononen, Nina; Mueller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nabika, Toru; Nakashima, Eitaro; Ng, Hong Kiat; Nikus, Kjell; Nutile, Teresa; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Ohnaka, Keizo; Parish, Sarah; Paternoster, Lavinia; Peng, Hao; Peters, Annette; Pham, Son T.; Pinidiyapathirage, Mohitha J.; Rahman, Mahfuzar; Rakugi, Hiromi; Rolandsson, Olov; Rozario, Michelle Ann; Ruggiero, Daniela; Sala, Cinzia F.; Sarju, Ralhan; Shimokawa, Kazuro; Snieder, Harold; Sparso, Thomas; Spiering, Wilko; Starr, John M.; Stott, David J.; Stram, Daniel O.; Sugiyama, Takao; Szymczak, Silke; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Tong, Lin; Trompet, Stella; Turjanmaa, Vaino; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Umemura, Satoshi; Vaarasmaki, Marja; van Dam, Rob M.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Viikari, Jorma S.; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wang, Yiqin; Wang, Aili; Wilson, Rory; Wong, Tien-Yin; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Yamaguchi, Shuhei; Ye, Xingwang; Young, Robin D.; Young, Terri L.; Yuan, Jian-Min; Zhou, Xueya; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Ciullo, Marina; Clarke, Robert; Deloukas, Panos; Franke, Andre; Franks, Paul W.; Franks, Steve; Friedlander, Yechiel; Gross, Myron D.; Guo, Zhirong; Hansen, Torben; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jorgensen, Torben; Jukema, J. Wouter; Kahonen, Mika; Kajio, Hiroshi; Kivimaki, Mika; Lee, Jong-Young; Lehtimaki, Terho; Linneberg, Allan; Miki, Tetsuro; Pedersen, Oluf; Samani, Nilesh J.; Sorensen, Thorkild I. A.; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Toniolo, Daniela; Ahsan, Habibul; Allayee, Hooman; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Danesh, John; Deary, Ian J.; Franco, Oscar H.; Franke, Lude; Heijman, Bastiaan T.; Holbrook, Joanna D.; Isaacs, Aaron; Kim, Bong-Jo; Lin, Xu; Liu, Jianjun; Maerz, Winfried; Metspalu, Andres; Mohlke, Karen L.; Sanghera, Dharambir K.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; van Meurs, Joyce B. J.; Vithana, Eranga; Wickremasinghe, Ananda R.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. W.; Yokota, Mitsuhiro; Zheng, Wei; Zhu, Dingliang; Vineis, Paolo; Kyrtopoulos, Soterios A.; Kleinjans, Jos C. S.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Soong, Richie; Gieger, Christian; Scott, James; Teo, Yik-Ying; He, Jiang; Elliott, Paul; Tai, E. Shyong; van der Harst, Pim; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Chambers, John C.; Doevendans, PAFM

    2015-01-01

    We carried out a trans-ancestry genome-wide association and replication study of blood pressure phenotypes among up to 320,251 individuals of East Asian, European and South Asian ancestry. We find genetic variants at 12 new loci to be associated with blood pressure (P = 3.9 x 10(-11) to 5.0 x 10(-21

  20. Trans-ancestry genome-wide association study identifies 12 genetic loci influencing blood pressure and implicates a role for DNA methylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Kato (Norihiro); M. Loh (Marie); F. Takeuchi (Fumihiko); N. Verweij (Niek); X. Wang (Xu); W. Zhang (Weihua); T. NKelly (Tanika); D. Saleheen; B. Lehne (Benjamin); I.M. Leach (Irene Mateo); A. Drong (Alexander); J. Abbott (James); S. Wahl (Simone); S.-T. Tan (Sian-Tsung); W.R. Scott (William R.); G. Campanella (Gianluca); M. Chadeau-Hyam (Marc); U. Afzal (Uzma); T.S. Ahluwalia (Tarunveer Singh); M.J. Bonder (Marc Jan); P. Chen (Ping); A. Dehghan (Abbas); T.L. Edwards (Todd L.); T. Esko (Tõnu); M.J. Go (Min Jin); S.E. Harris (Sarah); J. Hartiala (Jaana); S. Kasela (Silva); A. Kasturiratne (Anuradhani); C.C. Khor; M.E. Kleber (Marcus); H. Li (Huaixing); Z.Y. Mok (Zuan Yu); M. Nakatochi (Masahiro); N.S. Sapari (Nur Sabrina); R. Saxena (Richa); A.F. Stewart (Alexandre F.); L. Stolk (Lisette); Y. Tabara (Yasuharu); A.L. Teh (Ai Ling); Y. Wu (Ying); J.-Y. Wu (Jer-Yuarn); Y. Zhang (Yi); I. Aits (Imke); A. Da Silva Couto Alves (Alexessander); S. Das; R. Dorajoo (Rajkumar); J. CHopewell (Jemma); Y.K. Kim (Yun Kyoung); R. WKoivula (Robert); J. Luan (Jian'An); L.-P. Lyytikäinen (Leo-Pekka); Q. NNguyen (Quang); M.A. Pereira (Mark A); D. Postmus (Douwe); O. TRaitakari (Olli); M. Scannell Bryan (Molly); R.A. Scott (Robert); R. Sorice; V. Tragante (Vinicius); M. Traglia (Michela); J. White (Jon); K. Yamamoto (Ken); Y. Zhang (Yonghong); L.S. Adair (Linda); A. Ahmed (Alauddin); K. Akiyama (Koichi); R. Asif (Rasheed); T. Aung (Tin); I. Barroso (Inês); A. Bjonnes (Andrew); T.R. Braun (Timothy R.); H. Cai (Hui); L.-C. Chang (Li-Ching); C.-H. Chen; C-Y. Cheng (Ching-Yu); Y.-S. Chong (Yap-Seng); F.S. Collins (Francis); R. Courtney (Regina); G. Davies (Gail); G. Delgado; L.D. Do (Loi D.); P.A. Doevendans (Pieter); R.T. Gansevoort (Ron); Y. Gao; T.B. Grammer (Tanja B); N. Grarup (Niels); J. Grewal (Jagvir); D. Gu (D.); G. SWander (Gurpreet); A.L. Hartikainen; S.L. Hazen (Stanley); J. He (Jing); C.K. Heng (Chew-Kiat); E.J.A. Hixso (E. James Ames); A. Hofman (Albert); C. Hsu (Chris); W. Huang (Wei); L.L.N. Husemoen (Lise Lotte); J.-Y. Hwang (Joo-Yeon); S. Ichihara (Sahoko); M. Igase (Michiya); M. Isono (Masato); J.M. Justesen (Johanne M.); T. Katsuya (Tomohiro); M. GKibriya (Muhammad); Y.J. Kim; M. Kishimoto (Miyako); W.-P. Koh (Woon-Puay); K. Kohara (Katsuhiko); M. Kumari (Meena); K. Kwek (Kenneth); N.R. Lee (Nanette); J. Lee (Jeannette); J. Liao (Jie); W. Lieb (Wolfgang); D.C. Liewald (David C.); T. Matsubara (Tatsuaki); Y. Matsushita (Yumi); T. Meitinger (Thomas); E. Mihailov (Evelin); L. Milani (Lili); R. Mills (Rebecca); K. Mononen (Kari); M. Müller-Nurasyid (Martina); T. Nabika (Toru); E. Nakashima (Eitaro); H.K. Ng (Hong Kiat); K. Nikus (Kjell); T. Nutile; T. Ohkubo (Takayoshi); K. Ohnaka (Keizo); S. Parish (Sarah); L. Paternoster (Lavinia); H. Peng (Hao); A. Peters (Annette); S. TPham (Son); M.J. Pinidiyapathirage (Mohitha J.); M. Rahman (Mahfuzar); H. Rakugi (Hiromi); O. Rolandsson (Olov); M.A. Rozario (Michelle Ann); D. Ruggiero; C. Sala (Cinzia); R. Sarju (Ralhan); K. Shimokawa (Kazuro); H. Snieder (Harold); T. Sparsø (Thomas); W. Spiering (Wilko); J.M. Starr (John); D.J. Stott (David J.); D. OStram (Daniel); T. Sugiyama (Takao); S. Szymczak (Silke); W.H.W. Tang (W.H. Wilson); L. Tong (Lin); S. Trompet (Stella); V. Turjanmaa (Väinö); H. Ueshima (Hirotsugu); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); S. Umemura (Satoshi); M. Vaarasmaki (Marja); R.M. Dam (Rob Mvan); W.H. van Gilst (Wiek); D.J. van Veldhuisen (Dirk); J. Viikari (Jorma); M. Waldenberger (Melanie); Y. Wang (Yiqin); A. Wang (Aili); R. Wilson (Rory); T.-Y. Wong (Tien-Yin); Y.-B. Xiang (Yong-Bing); S. Yamaguchi (Shuhei); X. Ye (Xingwang); R. Young (Robin); T.L. Young (Terri); J.-M. Yuan (Jian-Min); X. Zhou (Xueya); F.W. Asselbergs (Folkert); M. Ciullo; R. Clarke (Robert); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); A. Franke (Andre); W.F. Paul (W. Frank); S. Franks (Steve); Y. Friedlander (Yechiel); M.D. Gross (Myron D.); Z. Guo (Zhirong); T. Hansen (T.); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); T. Jørgensen (Torben); J.W. Jukema (Jan Wouter); M. Kähönen (Mika); H. Kajio (Hiroshi); M. Kivimaki (Mika); J.-Y. Lee (Jong-Young); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); A. Linneberg (Allan); T. Miki (Tetsuro); O. Pedersen (Oluf); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); T.I.A. Sørensen (Thorkild); R. Takayanagi (Ryoichi); D. Toniolo (Daniela); H. Ahsan (Habibul); H. Allayee (Hooman); Y.-T. Chen (Yuan-Tsong); J. Danesh (John); I.J. Deary (Ian J.); O.H. Franco (Oscar); L. Franke (Lude); B. THeijman (Bastiaan); J.D. Holbrook (Joanna D.); A.J. Isaacs (Aaron); B.-J. Kim (Bong-Jo); X. Lin (Xu); J. Liu (Jianjun); W. März (Winfried); A. Metspalu (Andres); K.L. Mohlke (Karen); K. Sangher; D. Harambir (Dharambir); X.-O. Shu (Xiao-Ou); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); E.N. Vithana (Eranga); A.R. Wickremasinghe (Ananda); C. Wijmenga (Cisca); B.H.W. Wolffenbuttel (Bruce H.W.); M. Yokota (Mitsuhiro); W. Zheng (Wei); D. Zhu (Dingliang); P. Vineis (Paolo); S.A. Kyrtopoulos (Soterios A.); J.C.S. Kleinjans (Jos C.S.); M.I. McCarthy (Mark); R. Soong (Richie); C. Gieger (Christian); J. Scott (James); Y.Y. Teo (Yik Ying); J. He (Jiang); P. Elliott (Paul); E.S. Tai (Shyong); P. van der Harst (Pim); J.S. Kooner (Jaspal S.); J.C. Chambers (John)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractWe carried out a trans-ancestry genome-wide association and replication study of blood pressure phenotypes among up to 320,251 individuals of East Asian, European and South Asian ancestry. We find genetic variants at 12 new loci to be associated with blood pressure (P = 3.9 × 10 -11 to 5

  1. Trans-ancestry genome-wide association study identifies 12 genetic loci influencing blood pressure and implicates a role for DNA methylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Kato (Norihiro); M. Loh (Marie); F. Takeuchi (Fumihiko); N. Verweij (Niek); X. Wang (Xu); W. Zhang (Weihua); T. NKelly (Tanika); D. Saleheen; B. Lehne (Benjamin); I.M. Leach (Irene Mateo); A. Drong (Alexander); J. Abbott (James); S. Wahl (Simone); S.-T. Tan (Sian-Tsung); W.R. Scott (William R.); G. Campanella (Gianluca); M. Chadeau-Hyam (Marc); U. Afzal (Uzma); T.S. Ahluwalia (Tarunveer Singh); M.J. Bonder (Marc); P. Chen (Ping); A. Dehghan (Abbas); T.L. Edwards (Todd L.); T. Esko (Tõnu); M.J. Go (Min Jin); S.E. Harris (Sarah); J. Hartiala (Jaana); S. Kasela (Silva); A. Kasturiratne (Anuradhani); C.C. Khor; M.E. Kleber (Marcus); H. Li (Huaixing); Z.Y. Mok (Zuan Yu); M. Nakatochi (Masahiro); N.S. Sapari (Nur Sabrina); R. Saxena (Richa); A.F. Stewart (Alexandre F.); L. Stolk (Lisette); Y. Tabara (Yasuharu); A.L. Teh (Ai Ling); Y. Wu (Ying); J.-Y. Wu (Jer-Yuarn); Y. Zhang (Yi); I. Aits (Imke); A. Da Silva Couto Alves (Alexessander); S. Das (Shikta); R. Dorajoo (Rajkumar); J. CHopewell (Jemma); Y.K. Kim (Yun Kyoung); R. WKoivula (Robert); J. Luan (Jian'An); L.-P. Lyytikäinen (Leo-Pekka); Q. NNguyen (Quang); M.A. Pereira (Mark A); D. Postmus (Douwe); O. TRaitakari (Olli); M. Scannell Bryan (Molly); R.A. Scott (Robert); R. Sorice; V. Tragante (Vinicius); M. Traglia (Michela); J. White (Jon); K. Yamamoto (Ken); Y. Zhang (Yonghong); L.S. Adair (Linda); A. Ahmed (Alauddin); K. Akiyama (Koichi); R. Asif (Rasheed); T. Aung (Tin); I. Barroso (Inês); A. Bjonnes (Andrew); T.R. Braun (Timothy R.); H. Cai (Hui); L.-C. Chang (Li-Ching); C.-H. Chen; C-Y. Cheng (Ching-Yu); Y.-S. Chong (Yap-Seng); F.S. Collins (Francis); R. Courtney (Regina); G. Davies (Gail); G. Delgado; L.D. Do (Loi D.); P.A. Doevendans (Pieter); R.T. Gansevoort (Ron); Y. Gao; T.B. Grammer (Tanja B); N. Grarup (Niels); J. Grewal (Jagvir); D. Gu (D.); G. SWander (Gurpreet); A.L. Hartikainen; S.L. Hazen (Stanley); J. He (Jing); C.K. Heng (Chew-Kiat); E.J.A. Hixso (E. James Ames); A. Hofman (Albert); C. Hsu (Chris); W. Huang (Wei); L.L.N. Husemoen (Lise Lotte); J.-Y. Hwang (Joo-Yeon); S. Ichihara (Sahoko); M. Igase (Michiya); M. Isono (Masato); J.M. Justesen (Johanne M.); T. Katsuya (Tomohiro); M. GKibriya (Muhammad); Y.J. Kim; M. Kishimoto (Miyako); W.-P. Koh (Woon-Puay); K. Kohara (Katsuhiko); M. Kumari (Meena); K. Kwek (Kenneth); N.R. Lee (Nanette); J. Lee (Jeannette); J. Liao (Jie); W. Lieb (Wolfgang); D.C. Liewald (David C.); T. Matsubara (Tatsuaki); Y. Matsushita (Yumi); T. Meitinger (Thomas); E. Mihailov (Evelin); L. Milani (Lili); R. Mills (Rebecca); K. Mononen (Kari); M. Müller-Nurasyid (Martina); T. Nabika (Toru); E. Nakashima (Eitaro); H.K. Ng (Hong Kiat); K. Nikus (Kjell); T. Nutile; T. Ohkubo (Takayoshi); K. Ohnaka (Keizo); S. Parish (Sarah); L. Paternoster (Lavinia); H. Peng (Hao); A. Peters (Annette); S. TPham (Son); M.J. Pinidiyapathirage (Mohitha J.); M. Rahman (Mahfuzar); H. Rakugi (Hiromi); O. Rolandsson (Olov); M.A. Rozario (Michelle Ann); D. Ruggiero; C. Sala (Cinzia); R. Sarju (Ralhan); K. Shimokawa (Kazuro); H. Snieder (Harold); T. Sparsø (Thomas); W. Spiering (Wilko); J.M. Starr (John); D.J. Stott (David J.); D. OStram (Daniel); T. Sugiyama (Takao); S. Szymczak (Silke); W.H.W. Tang (W.H. Wilson); L. Tong (Lin); S. Trompet (Stella); V. Turjanmaa (Väinö); H. Ueshima (Hirotsugu); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); S. Umemura (Satoshi); M. Vaarasmaki (Marja); R.M. Dam (Rob Mvan); W.H. van Gilst (Wiek); D.J. van Veldhuisen (Dirk); J. Viikari (Jorma); M. Waldenberger (Melanie); Y. Wang (Yiqin); A. Wang (Aili); R. Wilson (Rory); T.-Y. Wong (Tien-Yin); Y.-B. Xiang (Yong-Bing); S. Yamaguchi (Shuhei); X. Ye (Xingwang); R. Young (Robin); T.L. Young (Terri); J.-M. Yuan (Jian-Min); X. Zhou (Xueya); F.W. Asselbergs (Folkert); M. Ciullo; R. Clarke (Robert); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); A. Franke (Andre); W.F. Paul (W. Frank); S. Franks (Steve); Y. Friedlander (Yechiel); M.D. Gross (Myron D.); Z. Guo (Zhirong); T. Hansen (T.); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); T. Jørgensen (Torben); J.W. Jukema (Jan Wouter); M. Kähönen (Mika); H. Kajio (Hiroshi); M. Kivimaki (Mika); J.-Y. Lee (Jong-Young); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); A. Linneberg (Allan); T. Miki (Tetsuro); O. Pedersen (Oluf); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); T.I.A. Sørensen (Thorkild); R. Takayanagi (Ryoichi); D. Toniolo (Daniela); H. Ahsan (Habibul); H. Allayee (Hooman); Y.-T. Chen (Yuan-Tsong); J. Danesh (John); I.J. Deary (Ian J.); O.H. Franco (Oscar); L. Franke (Lude); B. THeijman (Bastiaan); J.D. Holbrook (Joanna D.); A.J. Isaacs (Aaron)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractWe carried out a trans-ancestry genome-wide association and replication study of blood pressure phenotypes among up to 320,251 individuals of East Asian, European and South Asian ancestry. We find genetic variants at 12 new loci to be associated with blood pressure (P = 3.9 × 10 -11 to

  2. Trans-ancestry genome-wide association study identifies 12 genetic loci influencing blood pressure and implicates a role for DNA methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kato, Norihiro; Loh, Marie; Takeuchi, Fumihiko

    2015-01-01

    We carried out a trans-ancestry genome-wide association and replication study of blood pressure phenotypes among up to 320,251 individuals of East Asian, European and South Asian ancestry. We find genetic variants at 12 new loci to be associated with blood pressure (P = 3.9 × 10(-11) to 5.0 × 10(...

  3. MMS exposure promotes increased MtDNA mutagenesis in the presence of replication-defective disease-associated DNA polymerase γ variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey D Stumpf

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA encodes proteins essential for ATP production. Mutant variants of the mtDNA polymerase cause mutagenesis that contributes to aging, genetic diseases, and sensitivity to environmental agents. We interrogated mtDNA replication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with disease-associated mutations affecting conserved regions of the mtDNA polymerase, Mip1, in the presence of the wild type Mip1. Mutant frequency arising from mtDNA base substitutions that confer erythromycin resistance and deletions between 21-nucleotide direct repeats was determined. Previously, increased mutagenesis was observed in strains encoding mutant variants that were insufficient to maintain mtDNA and that were not expected to reduce polymerase fidelity or exonuclease proofreading. Increased mutagenesis could be explained by mutant variants stalling the replication fork, thereby predisposing the template DNA to irreparable damage that is bypassed with poor fidelity. This hypothesis suggests that the exogenous base-alkylating agent, methyl methanesulfonate (MMS, would further increase mtDNA mutagenesis. Mitochondrial mutagenesis associated with MMS exposure was increased up to 30-fold in mip1 mutants containing disease-associated alterations that affect polymerase activity. Disrupting exonuclease activity of mutant variants was not associated with increased spontaneous mutagenesis compared with exonuclease-proficient alleles, suggesting that most or all of the mtDNA was replicated by wild type Mip1. A novel subset of C to G transversions was responsible for about half of the mutants arising after MMS exposure implicating error-prone bypass of methylated cytosines as the predominant mutational mechanism. Exposure to MMS does not disrupt exonuclease activity that suppresses deletions between 21-nucleotide direct repeats, suggesting the MMS-induce mutagenesis is not explained by inactivated exonuclease activity. Further, trace amounts of CdCl2 inhibit mt

  4. Genetic associations in diabetic nephropathy: a meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Mooyaart, A. L.; Valk, E. J. J.; van Es, L A; Bruijn, J. A.; De Heer, E.; Freedman, B.I.; Dekkers, O.M.; Baelde, H. J.

    2010-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis This meta-analysis assessed the pooled effect of each genetic variant reproducibly associated with diabetic nephropathy. Methods PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science were searched for articles assessing the association between genes and diabetic nephropathy. All genetic variants statistically associated with diabetic nephropathy in an initial study, then independently reproduced in at least one additional study, were selected. Subsequently, all studies assessing these variants we...

  5. Genetic Association Analysis of Drusen Progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoffman, J.D.; Grinsven, M.J.J.P. van; Li, C.; Brantley, M., Jr.; McGrath, J.; Agarwal, A.; Scott, W.K.; Schwartz, S.G.; Kovach, J.; Pericak-Vance, M.; Sanchez, C.I.; Haines, J.L.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Age-related macular degeneration is a common form of vision loss affecting older adults. The etiology of AMD is multifactorial and is influenced by environmental and genetic risk factors. In this study, we examine how 19 common risk variants contribute to drusen progression, a hallmark of

  6. STrengthening the REporting of Genetic Association Studies (STREGA – An Extension of the STROBE Statement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Little

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Making sense of rapidly evolving evidence on genetic associations is crucial to making genuine advances in human genomics and the eventual integration of this information in the practice of medicine and public health. Assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of this evidence, and hence the ability to synthesize it, has been limited by inadequate reporting of results. The STrengthening the REporting of Genetic Association studies (STREGA initiative builds on the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE Statement and provides additions to 12 of the 22 items on the STROBE checklist. The additions concern population stratification, genotyping errors, modelling haplotype variation, Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, replication, selection of participants, rationale for choice of genes and variants, treatment effects in studying quantitative traits, statistical methods, relatedness, reporting of descriptive and outcome data, and the volume of data issues that are important to consider in genetic association studies. The STREGA recommendations do not prescribe or dictate how a genetic association study should be designed but seek to enhance the transparency of its reporting, regardless of choices made during design, conduct, or analysis.

  7. STrengthening the REporting of Genetic Association Studies (STREGA: an extension of the STROBE statement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Little

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Making sense of rapidly evolving evidence on genetic associations is crucial to making genuine advances in human genomics and the eventual integration of this information in the practice of medicine and public health. Assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of this evidence, and hence the ability to synthesize it, has been limited by inadequate reporting of results. The STrengthening the REporting of Genetic Association studies (STREGA initiative builds on the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE Statement and provides additions to 12 of the 22 items on the STROBE checklist. The additions concern population stratification, genotyping errors, modelling haplotype variation, Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, replication, selection of participants, rationale for choice of genes and variants, treatment effects in studying quantitative traits, statistical methods, relatedness, reporting of descriptive and outcome data, and the volume of data issues that are important to consider in genetic association studies. The STREGA recommendations do not prescribe or dictate how a genetic association study should be designed but seek to enhance the transparency of its reporting, regardless of choices made during design, conduct, or analysis.

  8. Replication Restart in Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Bénédicte; Sandler, Steven J

    2017-07-01

    In bacteria, replication forks assembled at a replication origin travel to the terminus, often a few megabases away. They may encounter obstacles that trigger replisome disassembly, rendering replication restart from abandoned forks crucial for cell viability. During the past 25 years, the genes that encode replication restart proteins have been identified and genetically characterized. In parallel, the enzymes were purified and analyzed in vitro, where they can catalyze replication initiation in a sequence-independent manner from fork-like DNA structures. This work also revealed a close link between replication and homologous recombination, as replication restart from recombination intermediates is an essential step of DNA double-strand break repair in bacteria and, conversely, arrested replication forks can be acted upon by recombination proteins and converted into various recombination substrates. In this review, we summarize this intense period of research that led to the characterization of the ubiquitous replication restart protein PriA and its partners, to the definition of several replication restart pathways in vivo, and to the description of tight links between replication and homologous recombination, responsible for the importance of replication restart in the maintenance of genome stability. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  9. Covariance Association Test (CVAT) Identifies Genetic Markers Associated with Schizophrenia in Functionally Associated Biological Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Palle Duun; Demontis, Ditte; Castro Dias Cuyabano, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a psychiatric disorder with large personal and social costs, and understanding the genetic etiology is important. Such knowledge can be obtained by testing the association between a disease phenotype and individual genetic markers; however, such single-marker methods have limited...... genomic best linear unbiased prediction (GBLUP), the covariance association test (CVAT). We compared the performance of CVAT to other commonly used set tests. The comparison was conducted using a simulated study population having the same genetic parameters as for schizophrenia. We found that CVAT...... was among the top performers. When extending CVAT to utilize a mixture of SNP effects, we found an increase in power to detect the causal sets. Applying the methods to a Danish schizophrenia case–control data set, we found genomic evidence for association of schizophrenia with vitamin A metabolism...

  10. Heritability and confirmation of genetic association studies for childhood asthma in twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullemar, V; Magnusson, P K E; Lundholm, C; Zettergren, A; Melén, E; Lichtenstein, P; Almqvist, C

    2016-02-01

    Although the genetics of asthma has been extensively studied using both quantitative and molecular genetic analysis methods, both approaches lack studies specific to the childhood phenotype and including other allergic diseases. This study aimed to give specific estimates for the heritability of childhood asthma and other allergic diseases, to attempt to replicate findings from genomewide association studies (GWAS) for childhood asthma and to test the same variants against other allergic diseases. In a cohort of 25 306 Swedish twins aged 9 or 12 years, data on asthma were available from parental interviews and population-based registers. The interviews also inquired about wheeze, hay fever, eczema, and food allergy. Through structural equation modeling, the heritability of all phenotypes was calculated. A subset of 10 075 twins was genotyped for 16 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) selected from previous GWAS; these were first tested for association with asthma and significant findings also against the other allergic diseases. The heritability of any childhood asthma was 0.82 (95% CI 0.79-0.85). For the other allergic diseases, the range was approximately 0.60-0.80. Associations for six SNPs with asthma were replicated, including rs2305480 in the GSDMB gene (OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.74-0.86, P = 1.5*10(-8) ; other significant associations all below P = 3.5*10(-4) ). Of these, only rs3771180 in IL1RL1 was associated with any other allergic disease (for hay fever, OR 0.64, 95% CI 0.53-0.77, P = 2.5*10(-6) ). Asthma and allergic diseases of childhood are highly heritable, and these high-risk genetic variants associated specifically with childhood asthma, except for one SNP shared with hay fever. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Dynamic Association of the Replication Initiator and Transcription Factor DnaA with the Bacillus subtilis Chromosome during Replication Stress ▿

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    DnaA functions as both a transcription factor and the replication initiator in bacteria. We characterized the DNA binding dynamics of DnaA on a genomic level. Based on cross-linking and chromatin immunoprecipitation data, DnaA binds at least 17 loci, 15 of which are regulated transcriptionally in response to inhibition of replication (replication stress). Six loci, each of which has a cluster of at least nine potential DnaA binding sites, had significant increases in binding by DnaA when repl...

  12. Regulation of beta cell replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Ying C; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2008-01-01

    Beta cell mass, at any given time, is governed by cell differentiation, neogenesis, increased or decreased cell size (cell hypertrophy or atrophy), cell death (apoptosis), and beta cell proliferation. Nutrients, hormones and growth factors coupled with their signalling intermediates have been...... suggested to play a role in beta cell mass regulation. In addition, genetic mouse model studies have indicated that cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases that determine cell cycle progression are involved in beta cell replication, and more recently, menin in association with cyclin-dependent kinase...... inhibitors has been demonstrated to be important in beta cell growth. In this review, we consider and highlight some aspects of cell cycle regulation in relation to beta cell replication. The role of cell cycle regulation in beta cell replication is mostly from studies in rodent models, but whether...

  13. Improving Phenotypic Prediction by Combining Genetic and Epigenetic Associations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shah, Sonia; Bonder, Marc J.; Marioni, Riccardo E.; Zhu, Zhihong; McRae, Allan F.; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Harris, Sarah E.; Liewald, Dave; Henders, Anjali K.; Mendelson, Michael M.; Liu, Chunyu; Joehanes, Roby; Liang, Liming; Levy, Daniel; Martin, Nicholas G.; Starr, John M.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wray, Naomi R.; Yang, Jian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Franke, Lude; Deary, Ian J.; Visscher, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    We tested whether DNA-methylation profiles account for inter-individual variation in body mass index (BMI) and height and whether they predict these phenotypes over and above genetic factors. Genetic predictors were derived from published summary results from the largest genome-wide association stud

  14. Spi-1/PU.1 oncogene accelerates DNA replication fork elongation and promotes genetic instability in the absence of DNA breakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimmelé, Pauline; Komatsu, Jun; Hupé, Philippe; Roulin, Christophe; Barillot, Emmanuel; Dutreix, Marie; Conseiller, Emmanuel; Bensimon, Aaron; Moreau-Gachelin, Françoise; Guillouf, Christel

    2010-09-01

    The multistage process of cancer formation is driven by the progressive acquisition of somatic mutations. Replication stress creates genomic instability in mammals. Using a well-defined multistep leukemia model driven by Spi-1/PU.1 overexpression in the mouse and Spi-1/PU.1-overexpressing human leukemic cells, we investigated the relationship between DNA replication and cancer progression. Here, using DNA molecular combing and flow cytometry methods, we show that Spi-1 increases the speed of replication by acting specifically on elongation rather than enhancing origin firing. This shortens the S-phase duration. Combining data from Spi-1 knockdown in murine cells with Spi-1 overexpression in human cells, we provide evidence that inappropriate Spi-1 expression is directly responsible for the replication alteration observed. Importantly, the acceleration of replication progression coincides with an increase in the frequency of genomic mutations without inducing DNA breakage. Thus, we propose that the hitherto unsuspected role for spi-1 oncogene in promoting replication elongation and genomic mutation promotes blastic progression during leukemic development.

  15. Impact of measurement error on testing genetic association with quantitative traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiemin Liao

    Full Text Available Measurement error of a phenotypic trait reduces the power to detect genetic associations. We examined the impact of sample size, allele frequency and effect size in presence of measurement error for quantitative traits. The statistical power to detect genetic association with phenotype mean and variability was investigated analytically. The non-centrality parameter for a non-central F distribution was derived and verified using computer simulations. We obtained equivalent formulas for the cost of phenotype measurement error. Effects of differences in measurements were examined in a genome-wide association study (GWAS of two grading scales for cataract and a replication study of genetic variants influencing blood pressure. The mean absolute difference between the analytic power and simulation power for comparison of phenotypic means and variances was less than 0.005, and the absolute difference did not exceed 0.02. To maintain the same power, a one standard deviation (SD in measurement error of a standard normal distributed trait required a one-fold increase in sample size for comparison of means, and a three-fold increase in sample size for comparison of variances. GWAS results revealed almost no overlap in the significant SNPs (p<10(-5 for the two cataract grading scales while replication results in genetic variants of blood pressure displayed no significant differences between averaged blood pressure measurements and single blood pressure measurements. We have developed a framework for researchers to quantify power in the presence of measurement error, which will be applicable to studies of phenotypes in which the measurement is highly variable.

  16. Genetic variants in the RELN gene are associated with otosclerosis in multiple European populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrauwen, Isabelle; Ealy, Megan; Fransen, Erik; Vanderstraeten, Kathleen; Thys, Melissa; Meyer, Nicole C; Cosgarea, Marcel; Huber, Alex; Mazzoli, Manuela; Pfister, Markus; Smith, Richard J H; Van Camp, Guy

    2010-02-01

    Otosclerosis is a common form of hearing loss characterized by abnormal bone remodeling in the otic capsule. It is considered a complex disease caused by both genetic and environmental factors. In a previous study, we identified a region on chr7q22.1 located in the RELN gene that is associated with otosclerosis in Belgian-Dutch and French populations. Evidence for allelic heterogeneity was found in this chromosomal region in the form of two independent signals. To confirm this finding, we have completed a replication study that includes four additional populations from Europe (1,141 total samples). Several SNPs in this region replicated in these populations separately. While the power to detect significant association in each population is small, when all four populations are combined, six of seven SNPs replicate and show an effect in the same direction as in the previous populations. We also confirmed the presence of allelic heterogeneity in this region. These data further implicate RELN in the pathogenesis of otosclerosis. Functional research is warranted to determine the pathways through which RELN acts in the pathogenesis of otosclerosis.

  17. Cancer genetic association studies in the genome-wide age

    OpenAIRE

    Savage, Sharon A

    2008-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies of hundreds of thousands of SNPs have led to a deluge of studies of genetic variation in cancer and other common diseases. Large case–control and cohort studies have identified novel SNPs as markers of cancer risk. Genome-wide association study SNP data have also advanced understanding of population-specific genetic variation. While studies of risk profiles, combinations of SNPs that may increase cancer risk, are not yet clinically applicable, future, large-sca...

  18. Genome-based genetic tool development for Bacillus methanolicus: theta- and rolling circle-replicating plasmids for inducible gene expression and application to methanol-based cadaverine production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Irla

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus methanolicus is a thermophilic methylotroph able to overproduce amino acids from methanol, a substrate not used for human or animal nutrition. Based on our previous RNA-seq analysis a mannitol inducible promoter and a putative mannitol activator gene mtlR were identified. The mannitol inducible promoter was applied for controlled gene expression using fluorescent reporter proteins and a flow cytometry analysis, and improved by changing the -35 promoter region and by co-expression of the mtlR regulator gene. For independent complementary gene expression control, the heterologous xylose-inducible system from B. megaterium was employed and a two-plasmid gene expression system was developed. Four different replicons for expression vectors were compared with respect to their copy number and stability. As an application example, methanol-based production of cadaverine was shown to be improved from 11.3 g/L to 17.5 g/L when a heterologous lysine decarboxylase gene cadA was expressed from a theta-replicating rather than a rolling-circle replicating vector. The current work on inducible promoter systems and compatible theta- or rolling circle-replicating vectors is an important extension of the poorly developed B. methanolicus genetic toolbox, valuable for genetic engineering and further exploration of this bacterium.

  19. DNA replication and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyer, Anne-Sophie; Walter, David; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2016-01-01

    A dividing cell has to duplicate its DNA precisely once during the cell cycle to preserve genome integrity avoiding the accumulation of genetic aberrations that promote diseases such as cancer. A large number of endogenous impacts can challenge DNA replication and cells harbor a battery of pathways...... causing DNA replication stress and genome instability. Further, we describe cellular and systemic responses to these insults with a focus on DNA replication restart pathways. Finally, we discuss the therapeutic potential of exploiting intrinsic replicative stress in cancer cells for targeted therapy....

  20. Distinguishing Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy-Associated Mutations from Background Genetic Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapplinger, Jamie D.; Landstrom, Andrew P.; Bos, J. Martijn; Salisbury, Benjamin A.; Callis, Thomas E.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the significant progress that has been made in identifying disease-associated mutations, the utility of the Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) genetic test is limited by a lack of understanding of the background genetic variation inherent to these sarcomeric genes in seemingly healthy subjects. This study represents the first comprehensive analysis of genetic variation in 427 ostensibly healthy individuals for the HCM genetic test using the “Gold Standard” Sanger sequencing method validating the background rate identified in the publically available exomes. While mutations are clearly over-represented in disease, a background rate as high as ~5% among healthy individuals prevents diagnostic certainty. To this end, we have identified a number of estimated predictive value-based associations including gene-specific, topology, and conservation methods generating an algorithm aiding in the probabilistic interpretation of an HCM genetic test. PMID:24510615

  1. The X gene of adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) is involved in viral DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Maohua; You, Hong; Hermonat, Paul L

    2014-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) (type 2) is a popular human gene therapy vector with a long active transgene expression period and no reported vector-induced adverse reactions. Yet the basic molecular biology of this virus has not been fully addressed. One potential gene at the far 3' end of the AAV2 genome, previously referred to as X (nt 3929 to 4393), overlapping the 3' end of the cap gene, has never been characterized, although we did previously identify a promoter just up-stream (p81). Computer analysis suggested that X was involved in replication and transcription. The X protein was identified during active AAV2 replication using a polyclonal antibody against a peptide starting at amino acid 98. Reagents for the study of X included an AAV2 deletion mutant (dl78-91), a triple nucleotide substitution mutant that destroys all three 5' AUG-initiation products of X, with no effect on the cap coding sequence, and X-positive-293 cell lines. Here, we found that X up-regulated AAV2 DNA replication in differentiating keratinocytes (without helper virus, autonomous replication) and in various forms of 293 cell-based assays with help from wild type adenovirus type 5 (wt Ad5) or Ad5 helper plasmid (pHelper). The strongest contribution by X was seen in increasing wt AAV2 DNA replication in keratinocytes and dl78-91 in Ad5-infected X-positive-293 cell lines (both having multi-fold effects). Mutating the X gene in pAAV-RC (pAAV-RC-3Xneg) yielded approximately a ∼33% reduction in recombinant AAV vector DNA replication and virion production, but a larger effect was seen when using this same X-knockout AAV helper plasmid in X-positive-293 cell lines versus normal 293 cells (again, multi-fold). Taken together these data strongly suggest that AAV2 X encodes a protein involved in the AAV life cycle, particularly in increasing AAV2 DNA replication, and suggests that further studies are warranted.

  2. P body-associated protein Mov10 inhibits HIV-1 replication at multiple stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdick, Ryan; Smith, Jessica L; Chaipan, Chawaree; Friew, Yeshitila; Chen, Jianbo; Venkatachari, Narasimhan J; Delviks-Frankenberry, Krista A; Hu, Wei-Shau; Pathak, Vinay K

    2010-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that APOBEC3G (A3G), a potent inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication, is localized to cytoplasmic mRNA-processing bodies (P bodies). However, the functional relevance of A3G colocalization with P body marker proteins has not been established. To explore the relationship between HIV-1, A3G, and P bodies, we analyzed the effects of overexpression of P body marker proteins Mov10, DCP1a, and DCP2 on HIV-1 replication. Our results show that overexpression of Mov10, a putative RNA helicase that was previously reported to belong to the DExD superfamily and was recently reported to belong to the Upf1-like group of helicases, but not the decapping enzymes DCP1a and DCP2, leads to potent inhibition of HIV-1 replication at multiple stages. Mov10 overexpression in the virus producer cells resulted in reductions in the steady-state levels of the HIV-1 Gag protein and virus production; Mov10 was efficiently incorporated into virions and reduced virus infectivity, in part by inhibiting reverse transcription. In addition, A3G and Mov10 overexpression reduced proteolytic processing of HIV-1 Gag. The inhibitory effects of A3G and Mov10 were additive, implying a lack of functional interaction between the two inhibitors. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of endogenous Mov10 by 80% resulted in a 2-fold reduction in virus production but no discernible impact on the infectivity of the viruses after normalization for the p24 input, suggesting that endogenous Mov10 was not required for viral infectivity. Overall, these results show that Mov10 can potently inhibit HIV-1 replication at multiple stages.

  3. Suppression of RNA interference increases alphavirus replication and virus-associated mortality in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes

    OpenAIRE

    Geiss Brian J; Phillips Aaron T; Scott Jaclyn C; Cirimotich Chris M; Olson Ken E

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) can persistently infect and cause limited damage to mosquito vectors. RNA interference (RNAi) is a mosquito antiviral response important in restricting RNA virus replication and has been shown to be active against some arboviruses. The goal of this study was to use a recombinant Sindbis virus (SINV; family Togaviridae; genus Alphavirus) that expresses B2 protein of Flock House virus (FHV; family Nodaviridae; genus Alphanodavirus), a pr...

  4. Multiple comparisons in genetic association studies: a hierarchical modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Nengjun; Xu, Shizhong; Lou, Xiang-Yang; Mallick, Himel

    2014-02-01

    Multiple comparisons or multiple testing has been viewed as a thorny issue in genetic association studies aiming to detect disease-associated genetic variants from a large number of genotyped variants. We alleviate the problem of multiple comparisons by proposing a hierarchical modeling approach that is fundamentally different from the existing methods. The proposed hierarchical models simultaneously fit as many variables as possible and shrink unimportant effects towards zero. Thus, the hierarchical models yield more efficient estimates of parameters than the traditional methods that analyze genetic variants separately, and also coherently address the multiple comparisons problem due to largely reducing the effective number of genetic effects and the number of statistically "significant" effects. We develop a method for computing the effective number of genetic effects in hierarchical generalized linear models, and propose a new adjustment for multiple comparisons, the hierarchical Bonferroni correction, based on the effective number of genetic effects. Our approach not only increases the power to detect disease-associated variants but also controls the Type I error. We illustrate and evaluate our method with real and simulated data sets from genetic association studies. The method has been implemented in our freely available R package BhGLM (http://www.ssg.uab.edu/bhglm/).

  5. Genetic variants associated with drugs-induced immediate hypersensitivity reactions: a PRISMA-compliant systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oussalah, A; Mayorga, C; Blanca, M; Barbaud, A; Nakonechna, A; Cernadas, J; Gotua, M; Brockow, K; Caubet, J-C; Bircher, A; Atanaskovic, M; Demoly, P; K Tanno, L; Terreehorst, I; Laguna, J J; Romano, A; Guéant, J-L

    2016-04-01

    Drug hypersensitivity includes allergic (AR) and nonallergic reactions (NARs) influenced by genetic predisposition. We performed a systematic review of genetic predictors of IgE-mediated AR and NAR with MEDLINE and PubMed search engine between January 1966 and December 2014. Among 3110 citations, the search selected 53 studies, 42 of which remained eligible. These eligible studies have evaluated genetic determinants of immediate reactions (IR) to beta-lactams (n = 19), NAR against aspirin (n = 12) and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (n = 8), and IR to biologics (n = 3). We reported two genomewide association studies and four case-control studies on candidate genes validated by replication. Genes involved in IR to beta-lactams belonged to HLA type 2 antigen processing, IgE production, atopy, and inflammation, including 4 genes validated by replications, HLA-DRA, ILR4, NOD2, and LGALS3. Genes involved in NAR to aspirin belonged to arachidonic acid pathway, membrane-spanning 4A gene family, histamine production pathway, and pro-inflammatory cytokines, while those involved in NAR to all NSAIDs belonged to arachidonic acid pathway and HLA antigen processing pathway. ALOX5 was a common predictor of studies on NAR to both aspirin and NSAIDs. Although these first conclusions could be drawn, this review highlights also the lack of reliable data and the need for replicating studies in contrasted populations, taking into account worldwide allele frequencies, gene-gene interactions, and contrasted situations of environmental exposure. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Identifying genetic predictors of depression risk: 5-HTTLPR and BDNF Val66Met polymorphisms are associated with rumination and co-rumination in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsey B Stone

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite research supporting moderate heritability of depression, efforts to replicate candidate gene associations to depression have yielded inconsistent results. We tested whether Val66Met and 5-HTTLPR exhibit utility as genetic markers of depression risk, testing for replicable associations to cognitive and interpersonal endophenotypes of depression (rumination and co-rumination, and further exploring developmental and sex moderation.Method: In Study I, 228 youth (ages 8-14 of mothers with or without a history of MDD during the child’s lifetime were recruited from the community. Replication tests were carried out in Study II, a sample of 87 youth with similar recruitment.Results: In Study I, the Val66Met SNP was associated with rumination in adolescents, but not children, such that adolescents homozygous for the Val allele reported higher rumination levels. Further, a cumulative genetic score (Val66Val and 5-HTTLPR predicted higher levels of co-rumination, specifically among adolescent girls. Both genetic associations maintained significance after covarying for current depressive symptomology, and the other endophenotype. Finally, both genetic associations exhibited similar effect sizes in Study II, although results did not reach statistical significance.Conclusions: Results replicate a previously reported association between the BDNF Val allele and rumination in adolescents, and provide preliminary support for a cumulative genetic score predictive of co-rumination in adolescent girls. The current study indicates that candidate genes may demonstrate utility as consistent genetic markers of depression risk when focused on specific phenotypes, and supports the need to explore potential differential effects of developmental stage and sex. However, given the small sample sizes and possibility of chance findings, these results should be interpreted with caution pending replication.

  7. Genome-wide Association Studies Identify Genetic Loci Associated With Albuminuria in Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tin, Adrienne; Sorice, Rossella; Gorski, Mathias; Yeo, Nan Cher; Chu, Audrey Y.; Li, Man; Li, Yong; Mijatovic, Vladan; Ko, Yi-An; Taliun, Daniel; Luciani, Alessandro; Chen, Ming-Huei; Yang, Qiong; Foster, Meredith C.; Olden, Matthias; Hiraki, Linda T.; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Fuchsberger, Christian; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Smith, Albert V.; Zappa, Allison M.; Lupo, Antonio; Kollerits, Barbara; Ponte, Belen; Stengel, Bénédicte; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Paulweber, Bernhard; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Hayward, Caroline; Helmer, Catherine; Meisinger, Christa; Gieger, Christian; Shaffer, Christian M.; Müller, Christian; Langenberg, Claudia; Ackermann, Daniel; Siscovick, David; Boerwinkle, Eric; Kronenberg, Florian; Ehret, Georg B.; Homuth, Georg; Waeber, Gerard; Navis, Gerjan; Gambaro, Giovanni; Malerba, Giovanni; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Li, Guo; Wichmann, H. Erich; Grallert, Harald; Wallaschofski, Henri; Völzke, Henry; Brenner, Herrmann; Kramer, Holly; Leach, I. Mateo; Rudan, Igor; Hillege, Hans L.; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Lambert, Jean Charles; Luan, Jian'an; Zhao, Jing Hua; Chalmers, John; Coresh, Josef; Denny, Joshua C.; Butterbach, Katja; Launer, Lenore J.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Haun, Margot; Metzger, Marie; Woodward, Mark; Hoffman, Matthew J.; Nauck, Matthias; Waldenberger, Melanie; Pruijm, Menno; Bochud, Murielle; Rheinberger, Myriam; Verweij, Niek; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Endlich, Nicole; Soranzo, Nicole; Polasek, Ozren; van der Harst, Pim; Pramstaller, Peter Paul; Vollenweider, Peter; Wild, Philipp S.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Rettig, Rainer; Biffar, Reiner; Carroll, Robert J.; Katz, Ronit; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Coassin, Stefan; Bergmann, Sven; Rosas, Sylvia E.; Stracke, Sylvia; Harris, Tamara B.; Corre, Tanguy; Zeller, Tanja; Illig, Thomas; Aspelund, Thor; Tanaka, Toshiko; Lendeckel, Uwe; Völker, Uwe; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Chouraki, Vincent; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kutalik, Zoltan; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Parsa, Afshin; Heid, Iris M.; Paterson, Andrew D.; de Boer, Ian H.; Devuyst, Olivier; Lazar, Jozef; Endlich, Karlhans; Susztak, Katalin; Tremblay, Johanne; Hamet, Pavel; Jacob, Howard J.; Böger, Carsten A.

    2016-01-01

    Elevated concentrations of albumin in the urine, albuminuria, are a hallmark of diabetic kidney disease and are associated with an increased risk for end-stage renal disease and cardiovascular events. To gain insight into the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying albuminuria, we conducted meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies and independent replication in up to 5,825 individuals of European ancestry with diabetes and up to 46,061 without diabetes, followed by functional studies. Known associations of variants in CUBN, encoding cubilin, with the urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) were confirmed in the overall sample (P = 2.4 × 10−10). Gene-by-diabetes interactions were detected and confirmed for variants in HS6ST1 and near RAB38/CTSC. Single nucleotide polymorphisms at these loci demonstrated a genetic effect on UACR in individuals with but not without diabetes. The change in the average UACR per minor allele was 21% for HS6ST1 (P = 6.3 × 10–7) and 13% for RAB38/CTSC (P = 5.8 × 10−7). Experiments using streptozotocin-induced diabetic Rab38 knockout and control rats showed higher urinary albumin concentrations and reduced amounts of megalin and cubilin at the proximal tubule cell surface in Rab38 knockout versus control rats. Relative expression of RAB38 was higher in tubuli of patients with diabetic kidney disease compared with control subjects. The loci identified here confirm known pathways and highlight novel pathways influencing albuminuria. PMID:26631737

  8. Cell-Associated Viral Burden Provides Evidence of Ongoing Viral Replication in Aviremic HIV-2-Infected Patients▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Rui S.; Tendeiro, Rita; Foxall, Russell B.; Baptista, António P.; Cavaleiro, Rita; Gomes, Perpétua; Camacho, Ricardo; Valadas, Emília; Doroana, Manuela; Lucas, Margarida; Antunes, Francisco; Victorino, Rui M. M.; Sousa, Ana E.

    2011-01-01

    Viremia is significantly lower in HIV-2 than in HIV-1 infection, irrespective of disease stage. Nevertheless, the comparable proviral DNA burdens observed for these two infections indicate similar numbers of infected cells. Here we investigated this apparent paradox by assessing cell-associated viral replication. We found that untreated HIV-1-positive (HIV-1+) and HIV-2+ individuals, matched for CD4 T cell depletion, exhibited similar gag mRNA levels, indicating that significant viral transcription is occurring in untreated HIV-2+ patients, despite the reduced viremia (undetectable to 2.6 × 104 RNA copies/ml). However, tat mRNA transcripts were observed at significantly lower levels in HIV-2+ patients, suggesting that the rate of de novo infection is decreased in these patients. Our data also reveal a direct relationship of gag and tat transcripts with CD4 and CD8 T cell activation, respectively. Antiretroviral therapy (ART)-treated HIV-2+ patients showed persistent viral replication, irrespective of plasma viremia, possibly contributing to the emergence of drug resistance mutations, persistent hyperimmune activation, and poor CD4 T cell recovery that we observed with these individuals. In conclusion, we provide here evidence of significant ongoing viral replication in HIV-2+ patients, further emphasizing the dichotomy between amount of plasma virus and cell-associated viral burden and stressing the need for antiretroviral trials and the definition of therapeutic guidelines for HIV-2 infection. PMID:21159859

  9. Methods for Analyzing Multivariate Phenotypes in Genetic Association Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiong Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multivariate phenotypes are frequently encountered in genetic association studies. The purpose of analyzing multivariate phenotypes usually includes discovery of novel genetic variants of pleiotropy effects, that is, affecting multiple phenotypes, and the ultimate goal of uncovering the underlying genetic mechanism. In recent years, there have been new method development and application of existing statistical methods to such phenotypes. In this paper, we provide a review of the available methods for analyzing association between a single marker and a multivariate phenotype consisting of the same type of components (e.g., all continuous or all categorical or different types of components (e.g., some are continuous and others are categorical. We also reviewed causal inference methods designed to test whether the detected association with the multivariate phenotype is truly pleiotropy or the genetic marker exerts its effects on some phenotypes through affecting the others.

  10. Hsp90 interacts specifically with viral RNA and differentially regulates replication initiation of Bamboo mosaic virus and associated satellite RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Wen Huang

    Full Text Available Host factors play crucial roles in the replication of plus-strand RNA viruses. In this report, a heat shock protein 90 homologue of Nicotiana benthamiana, NbHsp90, was identified in association with partially purified replicase complexes from BaMV-infected tissue, and shown to specifically interact with the 3' untranslated region (3' UTR of BaMV genomic RNA, but not with the 3' UTR of BaMV-associated satellite RNA (satBaMV RNA or that of genomic RNA of other viruses, such as Potato virus X (PVX or Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV. Mutational analyses revealed that the interaction occurs between the middle domain of NbHsp90 and domain E of the BaMV 3' UTR. The knockdown or inhibition of NbHsp90 suppressed BaMV infectivity, but not that of satBaMV RNA, PVX, or CMV in N. benthamiana. Time-course analysis further revealed that the inhibitory effect of 17-AAG is significant only during the immediate early stages of BaMV replication. Moreover, yeast two-hybrid and GST pull-down assays demonstrated the existence of an interaction between NbHsp90 and the BaMV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. These results reveal a novel role for NbHsp90 in the selective enhancement of BaMV replication, most likely through direct interaction with the 3' UTR of BaMV RNA during the initiation of BaMV RNA replication.

  11. [Genetic variants associated to male infertility in Mexican patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piña-Aguilar, Raúl Eduardo; Chima-Galán, María del Carmen; Yerena-de-vega, María de la Concepción A; Regalado-Hernández, Miguel Angel; Sánchez-Guerrero, Cecilia; García-Ortiz, Liliana; Santillán-Hernández, Yuritzi; Moreno-García, Jesús Daniel

    2013-05-01

    Recently Mexican Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecology Colleges (Federación Mexicana de Colegios de Obstetricia y Ginecologia, FEMECOG) published the Mexican guideline forthe management of male infertility, which suggests performing genetic laboratory tests as part of diagnosis and management of infertile patients and states that these should receive genetic counseling. This paper reviews the genetic approach proposed by Mexican guideline. A systematic review of medical literature was performed in Pubmed and Web of Knowledge from 1980 to 2012 in order to find reports of genetic variants associated to male infertility in Mexican patients. Also it is discussed the current knowledge of these variants, their clinical implications and finally the guidelines and recommendations for their molecular diagnosis. Most genetic variants in Mexican infertile patients are chromosome abnormalities. In relation to other variants there is only a report of Y chromosome microdeletions, repeated CAG in androgen receptor and more common mutations in CFTR, and other article reporting mutations in CFTR in patients with congenital absence of vas deferens. Little is known about the genetics of Mexican infertile patients apart from chromosome abnormalities. However, the contribution of genetics as etiology of male infertility is taking more relevance and currently the consensual management of infertile male should include the screening of genetic background. This review pretends to be a quick guide for clinicians who want to know about reports of genetic variants related to male infertility in Mexican population and how to approach their diagnosis.

  12. Systematic testing of literature reported genetic variation associated with coronary restenosis: results of the GENDER Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey J W Verschuren

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Coronary restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention still remains a significant problem, despite all medical advances. Unraveling the mechanisms leading to restenosis development remains challenging. Many studies have identified genetic markers associated with restenosis, but consistent replication of the reported markers is scarce. The aim of the current study was to analyze the joined effect of previously in literature reported candidate genes for restenosis in the GENetic DEterminants of Restenosis (GENDER databank. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Candidate genes were selected using a MEDLINE search including the terms 'genetic polymorphism' and 'coronary restenosis'. The final set included 36 genes. Subsequently, all single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the genomic region of these genes were analyzed in GENDER using set-based analysis in PLINK. The GENDER databank contains genotypic data of 2,571,586 SNPs of 295 cases with restenosis and 571 matched controls. The set, including all 36 literature reported genes, was, indeed, significantly associated with restenosis, p = 0.024 in the GENDER study. Subsequent analyses of the individual genes demonstrated that the observed association of the complete set was determined by 6 of the 36 genes. CONCLUSION: Despite overt inconsistencies in literature, with regard to individual candidate gene studies, this is the first study demonstrating that the joint effect of all these genes together, indeed, is associated with restenosis.

  13. Genetic and biochemical evidences reveal novel insights into the mechanism underlying Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sae2-mediated abrogation of DNA replication stress

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    INDRAJEET GHODKE; K MUNIYAPPA

    2016-12-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 (MRX) protein complex plays pivotal roles in double-strandbreak (DSB) repair, replication stress and telomere length maintenance. Another protein linked to DSB repair is Sae2,which regulates MRX persistence at DSBs. However, very little is known about its role in DNA replication stress andrepair. Here, we reveal a crucial role for Sae2 in DNA replication stress. We show that different mutant alleles of SAE2cause hypersensitivity to genotoxic agents, and when combined with Δmre11 or nuclease-defective mre11 mutantalleles, the double mutants are considerably more sensitive suggesting that the sae2 mutations synergize with mre11mutations. Biochemical studies demonstrate that Sae2 exists as a dimer in solution, associates preferentially withsingle-stranded and branched DNA structures, exhibits structure-specific endonuclease activity and cleaves thesesubstrates from the 5′ end. Furthermore, we show that the nuclease activity is indeed intrinsic to Sae2. Interestingly,sae2G270D protein possesses DNA-binding activity, but lacks detectable nuclease activity. Altogether, our data suggesta direct role for Sae2 nuclease activity in processing of the DNA structures that arise during replication and DNAdamage and provide insights into the mechanism underlying Mre11-Sae2-mediated abrogation of replication stress-relateddefects in S. cerevisiae.

  14. Genetics of homocysteine metabolism and associated disorders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brustolin, S; Giugliani, R; Félix, T.M

    2010-01-01

    .... Hyperhomocysteinemia is observed in approximately 5% of the general population and is associated with an increased risk for many disorders, including vascular and neurodegenerative diseases, autoimmune disorders, birth defects, diabetes, renal disease...

  15. Genetic pleiotropy explains associations between musical auditory discrimination and intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosing, Miriam A; Pedersen, Nancy L; Madison, Guy; Ullén, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    Musical aptitude is commonly measured using tasks that involve discrimination of different types of musical auditory stimuli. Performance on such different discrimination tasks correlates positively with each other and with intelligence. However, no study to date has explored these associations using a genetically informative sample to estimate underlying genetic and environmental influences. In the present study, a large sample of Swedish twins (N = 10,500) was used to investigate the genetic architecture of the associations between intelligence and performance on three musical auditory discrimination tasks (rhythm, melody and pitch). Phenotypic correlations between the tasks ranged between 0.23 and 0.42 (Pearson r values). Genetic modelling showed that the covariation between the variables could be explained by shared genetic influences. Neither shared, nor non-shared environment had a significant effect on the associations. Good fit was obtained with a two-factor model where one underlying shared genetic factor explained all the covariation between the musical discrimination tasks and IQ, and a second genetic factor explained variance exclusively shared among the discrimination tasks. The results suggest that positive correlations among musical aptitudes result from both genes with broad effects on cognition, and genes with potentially more specific influences on auditory functions.

  16. Replication and characterization of association between ABO SNPs and red blood cell traits by meta-analysis in Europeans

    OpenAIRE

    McLachlan, S; Giambartolomei, C.; White, J; Charoen, P; Wong, A; Finan, C; Engmann, J; Shah, T; Hersch, M; Podmore, C.; Cavadino, A; Jefferis, BJ; Dale, CE; Hypponen, E; Morris, RW

    2016-01-01

    This is the final version of the article. It first appeared from Public Library of Science (PLOS) via http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0156914 Red blood cell (RBC) traits are routinely measured in clinical practice as important markers of health. Deviations from the physiological ranges are usually a sign of disease, although variation between healthy individuals also occurs, at least partly due to genetic factors. Recent large scale genetic studies identified loci associated with on...

  17. Smoking and caffeine consumption: a genetic analysis of their association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treur, Jorien L; Taylor, Amy E; Ware, Jennifer J; Nivard, Michel G; Neale, Michael C; McMahon, George; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Baselmans, Bart M L; Boomsma, Dorret I; Munafò, Marcus R; Vink, Jacqueline M

    2017-07-01

    Smoking and caffeine consumption show a strong positive correlation, but the mechanism underlying this association is unclear. Explanations include shared genetic/environmental factors or causal effects. This study employed three methods to investigate the association between smoking and caffeine. First, bivariate genetic models were applied to data of 10 368 twins from the Netherlands Twin Register in order to estimate genetic and environmental correlations between smoking and caffeine use. Second, from the summary statistics of meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies on smoking and caffeine, the genetic correlation was calculated by LD-score regression. Third, causal effects were tested using Mendelian randomization analysis in 6605 Netherlands Twin Register participants and 5714 women from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children. Through twin modelling, a genetic correlation of r0.47 and an environmental correlation of r0.30 were estimated between current smoking (yes/no) and coffee use (high/low). Between current smoking and total caffeine use, this was r0.44 and r0.00, respectively. LD-score regression also indicated sizeable genetic correlations between smoking and coffee use (r0.44 between smoking heaviness and cups of coffee per day, r0.28 between smoking initiation and coffee use and r0.25 between smoking persistence and coffee use). Consistent with the relatively high genetic correlations and lower environmental correlations, Mendelian randomization provided no evidence for causal effects of smoking on caffeine or vice versa. Genetic factors thus explain most of the association between smoking and caffeine consumption. These findings suggest that quitting smoking may be more difficult for heavy caffeine consumers, given their genetic susceptibility. © 2016 The Authors.Addiction Biology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society for the Study of Addiction.

  18. Genetic associations with viral respiratory illnesses and asthma control in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loisel, D A; Du, G; Ahluwalia, T S;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Viral respiratory infections can cause acute wheezing illnesses in children and exacerbations of asthma. OBJECTIVE: We sought to identify variation in genes with known antiviral and pro-inflammatory functions to identify specific associations with more severe viral respiratory illnesses...... and the risk of virus-induced exacerbations during the peak fall season. METHODS: The associations between genetic variation at 326 SNPs in 63 candidate genes and 10 phenotypes related to viral respiratory infection and asthma control were examined in 226 children enrolled in the RhinoGen study. Replication...... of asthma control phenotypes was performed in 2128 children in the Copenhagen Prospective Study on Asthma in Childhood (COPSAC). Significant associations in RhinoGen were further validated using virus-induced wheezing illness and asthma phenotypes in an independent sample of 122 children enrolled...

  19. Intramolecular telomeric G-quadruplexes dramatically inhibit DNA synthesis by replicative and translesion polymerases, revealing their potential to lead to genetic change.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deanna N Edwards

    Full Text Available Recent research indicates that hundreds of thousands of G-rich sequences within the human genome have the potential to form secondary structures known as G-quadruplexes. Telomeric regions, consisting of long arrays of TTAGGG/AATCCC repeats, are among the most likely areas in which these structures might form. Since G-quadruplexes assemble from certain G-rich single-stranded sequences, they might arise when duplex DNA is unwound such as during replication. Coincidentally, these bulky structures when present in the DNA template might also hinder the action of DNA polymerases. In this study, single-stranded telomeric templates with the potential to form G-quadruplexes were examined for their effects on a variety of replicative and translesion DNA polymerases from humans and lower organisms. Our results demonstrate that single-stranded templates containing four telomeric GGG runs fold into intramolecular G-quadruplex structures. These intramolecular G quadruplexes are somewhat dynamic in nature and stabilized by increasing KCl concentrations and decreasing temperatures. Furthermore, the presence of these intramolecular G-quadruplexes in the template dramatically inhibits DNA synthesis by various DNA polymerases, including the human polymerase δ employed during lagging strand replication of G-rich telomeric strands and several human translesion DNA polymerases potentially recruited to sites of replication blockage. Notably, misincorporation of nucleotides is observed when certain translesion polymerases are employed on substrates containing intramolecular G-quadruplexes, as is extension of the resulting mismatched base pairs upon dynamic unfolding of this secondary structure. These findings reveal the potential for blockage of DNA replication and genetic changes related to sequences capable of forming intramolecular G-quadruplexes.

  20. REPLICATION OF NUCLEOLUS-ASSOCIATED DNA DURING "G2 PHASE" IN PHYSARUM POLYCEPHALUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttes, Edmund; Guttes, Sophie

    1969-01-01

    In the myxomycete, Physarum polycephalum, the bulk of nuclear DNA replication occurs during a period of a few hours immediately following upon mitosis. During the remainder of the intermitotic period, incorporation of thymidine-3H continues at a low rate in the region of the nucleolus (radioautographs). A few nuclei incorporated thymidine-3H into the extranucleolar chromatin at a high rate at all times of the intermitotic period. These nuclei were exceptionally large and they frequently contained several small nucleoli of different sizes rather than the one, central nucleolus which is characteristic of a normal interphase nucleus. PMID:5387995

  1. Replication of 13q31.1 Association in Nonsyndromic Cleft Lip with Cleft Palate in Europeans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Margaret E.; Butali, Azeez; Standley, Jennifer; Rigdon, Jennifer; Suzuki1, Satoshi; Gongorjav, Ayana; Shonkhuuz, T. Enkhtur; Natsume, Nagato; Shi, Bing; Marazita, Mary L.; Murray, Jeffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    Genome wide association (GWA) studies have successfully identified at least a dozen loci associated with orofacial clefts. However, these signals may be unique to specific populations and require replication to validate and extend findings as a prelude to etiologic SNP discovery. We attempted to replicate the findings of a recent meta-analysis of orofacial cleft GWA studies using four different ancestral populations. We studied 946 pedigrees (3436 persons) of European (US white and Danish) and Asian (Japanese and Mongolian) origin. We genotyped six SNPs which represented the most significant P value associations identified in published studies: rs742071 (1p36), rs7590268 (2p21), rs7632427 (3p11.1), rs12543318 (8q21.3), rs8001641 (13q31.1) and rs7179658 (15q22.2). We directly sequenced three non-coding conserved regions 200kb downstream of SPRY2 in 713 cases, 438 controls, and 485 trios from the US, Mongolia, and the Philippines. We found rs8001641 to be significantly associated with cleft lip with cleft palate (NSCLP) in Europeans (p-value=4 × 10−5, ORtransmission=1.86 with 95% confidence interval: 1.38-2.52). We also found several novel sequence variants in the conserved regions in Asian and European samples, which may help to localize common variants contributing directly to the risk for NSCLP. This study confirms the prior association between rs8001641 and NSCLP in European populations. PMID:25786657

  2. Non-replication of the association between 5HTTLPR and response to psychological therapy for child anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Kathryn J; Roberts, Susanna; Keers, Robert; Coleman, Jonathan R I; Breen, Gerome; Wong, Chloe C Y; Xu, Xiaohui; Arendt, Kristian; Blatter-Meunier, Judith; Bögels, Susan; Cooper, Peter; Creswell, Cathy; Heiervang, Einar R; Herren, Chantal; Hogendoorn, Sanne M; Hudson, Jennifer L; Krause, Karen; Lyneham, Heidi J; McKinnon, Anna; Morris, Talia; Nauta, Maaike H; Rapee, Ronald M; Rey, Yasmin; Schneider, Silvia; Schneider, Sophie C; Silverman, Wendy K; Smith, Patrick; Thastum, Mikael; Thirlwall, Kerstin; Waite, Polly; Wergeland, Gro Janne; Eley, Thalia C

    2016-02-01

    We previously reported an association between 5HTTLPR genotype and outcome following cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) in child anxiety (Cohort 1). Children homozygous for the low-expression short-allele showed more positive outcomes. Other similar studies have produced mixed results, with most reporting no association between genotype and CBT outcome. To replicate the association between 5HTTLPR and CBT outcome in child anxiety from the Genes for Treatment study (GxT Cohort 2, n = 829). Logistic and linear mixed effects models were used to examine the relationship between 5HTTLPR and CBT outcomes. Mega-analyses using both cohorts were performed. There was no significant effect of 5HTTLPR on CBT outcomes in Cohort 2. Mega-analyses identified a significant association between 5HTTLPR and remission from all anxiety disorders at follow-up (odds ratio 0.45, P = 0.014), but not primary anxiety disorder outcomes. The association between 5HTTLPR genotype and CBT outcome did not replicate. Short-allele homozygotes showed more positive treatment outcomes, but with small, non-significant effects. Future studies would benefit from utilising whole genome approaches and large, homogenous samples. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  3. Genetic changes associated with testicular cancer susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, Louise C; Nathanson, Katherine L

    2016-10-01

    Testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT) is a highly heritable cancer primarily affecting young white men. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been particularly effective in identifying multiple common variants with strong contribution to TGCT risk. These loci identified through association studies have implicated multiple genes as associated with TGCT predisposition, many of which are unique among cancer types, and regulate processes such as pluripotency, sex specification, and microtubule assembly. Together these biologically plausible genes converge on pathways involved in male germ cell development and maturation, and suggest that perturbation of them confers susceptibility to TGCT, as a developmental defect of germ cell differentiation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Genetic characterization of Greek population isolates reveals strong genetic drift at missense and trait-associated variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panoutsopoulou, Kalliope; Hatzikotoulas, Konstantinos; Xifara, Dionysia Kiara; Colonna, Vincenza; Farmaki, Aliki-Eleni; Ritchie, Graham R S; Southam, Lorraine; Gilly, Arthur; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Fatumo, Segun; Matchan, Angela; Rayner, Nigel W; Ntalla, Ioanna; Mezzavilla, Massimo; Chen, Yuan; Kiagiadaki, Chrysoula; Zengini, Eleni; Mamakou, Vasiliki; Athanasiadis, Antonis; Giannakopoulou, Margarita; Kariakli, Vassiliki-Eirini; Nsubuga, Rebecca N; Karabarinde, Alex; Sandhu, Manjinder; McVean, Gil; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Tsafantakis, Emmanouil; Karaleftheri, Maria; Xue, Yali; Dedoussis, George; Zeggini, Eleftheria

    2014-01-01

    Isolated populations are emerging as a powerful study design in the search for low-frequency and rare variant associations with complex phenotypes. Here we genotype 2,296 samples from two isolated Greek populations, the Pomak villages (HELIC-Pomak) in the North of Greece and the Mylopotamos villages (HELIC-MANOLIS) in Crete. We compare their genomic characteristics to the general Greek population and establish them as genetic isolates. In the MANOLIS cohort, we observe an enrichment of missense variants among the variants that have drifted up in frequency by more than fivefold. In the Pomak cohort, we find novel associations at variants on chr11p15.4 showing large allele frequency increases (from 0.2% in the general Greek population to 4.6% in the isolate) with haematological traits, for example, with mean corpuscular volume (rs7116019, P=2.3 × 10(-26)). We replicate this association in a second set of Pomak samples (combined P=2.0 × 10(-36)). We demonstrate significant power gains in detecting medical trait associations.

  5. How to create a public-private partnership: a replicable project associated with business continuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Daniel

    2010-07-01

    In an age of political turmoil and mistrust of governments, having an outlet for creative problem solving that involves all aspects of communities during disasters is critical. Additionally, there is a need for outlets that save taxpayer money for particular projects, such as road construction or infrastructure protection. Public-private partnerships are one way to accomplish these goals. Utilised correctly, a public-private partnership is a win-win situation for all participants. This paper will make the case for the continued support from all sectors for public-private partnerships. A description of public-private partnerships will be given to show the broad spectrum of opportunities for such a partnership. In addition, a case study of a public-private partnership called SAFER Santa Rosa is explored as the programme is oriented towards disasters, but keeps the community engaged all year round. Finally, an example is presented of an initiative that not only exemplifies the spirit of public-private partnerships, but has attracted international recognition because it is simple, replicable, cost-effective and valuable to both the private sector and the public sector. The Business Emergency Response Toolkit bag is a true public-private success story. It is hoped that the reader will be able to replicate the ideas discussed herein in their own community.

  6. MiRNA profile associated with replicative senescence, extended cell culture, and ectopic telomerase expression in human foreskin fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura N Bonifacio

    Full Text Available Senescence is a highly regulated process that limits cellular replication by enforcing a G1 arrest in response to various stimuli. Replicative senescence occurs in response to telomeric DNA erosion, and telomerase expression can offset replicative senescence leading to immortalization of many human cells. Limited data exists regarding changes of microRNA (miRNA expression during senescence in human cells and no reports correlate telomerase expression with regulation of senescence-related miRNAs. We used miRNA microarrays to provide a detailed account of miRNA profiles for early passage and senescent human foreskin (BJ fibroblasts as well as early and late passage immortalized fibroblasts (BJ-hTERT that stably express the human telomerase reverse transcriptase subunit hTERT. Selected miRNAs that were differentially expressed in senescence were assayed for expression in quiescent cells to identify miRNAs that are specifically associated with senescence-associated growth arrest. From this group of senescence-associated miRNAs, we confirmed the ability of miR-143 to induce growth arrest after ectopic expression in young fibroblasts. Remarkably, miR-143 failed to induce growth arrest in BJ-hTERT cells. Importantly, the comparison of late passage immortalized fibroblasts to senescent wild type fibroblasts reveals that miR-146a, a miRNA with a validated role in regulating the senescence associated secretory pathway, is also regulated during extended cell culture independently of senescence. The discovery that miRNA expression is impacted by expression of ectopic hTERT as well as extended passaging in immortalized fibroblasts contributes to a comprehensive understanding of the connections between telomerase expression, senescence and processes of cellular aging.

  7. Tocotrienol-Rich Fraction Ameliorates Antioxidant Defense Mechanisms and Improves Replicative Senescence-Associated Oxidative Stress in Human Myoblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shy Cian Khor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available During aging, oxidative stress affects the normal function of satellite cells, with consequent regeneration defects that lead to sarcopenia. This study aimed to evaluate tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF modulation in reestablishing the oxidative status of myoblasts during replicative senescence and to compare the effects of TRF with other antioxidants (α-tocopherol (ATF and N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC. Primary human myoblasts were cultured to young, presenescent, and senescent phases. The cells were treated with antioxidants for 24 h, followed by the assessment of free radical generation, lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzyme mRNA expression and activities, and the ratio of reduced to oxidized glutathione. Our data showed that replicative senescence increased reactive oxygen species (ROS generation and lipid peroxidation in myoblasts. Treatment with TRF significantly diminished ROS production and decreased lipid peroxidation in senescent myoblasts. Moreover, the gene expression of superoxide dismutase (SOD2, catalase (CAT, and glutathione peroxidase (GPX1 was modulated by TRF treatment, with increased activity of superoxide dismutase and catalase and reduced glutathione peroxidase in senescent myoblasts. In comparison to ATF and NAC, TRF was more efficient in heightening the antioxidant capacity and reducing free radical insults. These results suggested that TRF is able to ameliorate antioxidant defense mechanisms and improves replicative senescence-associated oxidative stress in myoblasts.

  8. Genetic Associations with Gestational Length and Spontaneous Preterm Birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ge; Feenstra, Bjarke; Bacelis, Jonas; Liu, Xueping; Muglia, Lisa M.; Juodakis, Julius; Miller, Daniel E.; Litterman, Nadia; Jiang, Pan-Pan; Russell, Laura; Hinds, David A.; Hu, Youna; Weirauch, Matthew T.; Chen, Xiaoting; Chavan, Arun R.; Wagner, Günter P.; Pavličev, Mihaela; Nnamani, Mauris C.; Maziarz, Jamie; Karjalainen, Minna K.; Rämet, Mika; Sengpiel, Verena; Geller, D Frank; Boyd, Heather A.; Palotie, Aarno; Momany, Allison; Bedell, Bruce; Ryckman, Kelli K.; Huusko, Johanna M.; Forney, Carmy R.; Kottyan, Leah C.; Hallman, Mikko; Teramo, Kari; Nohr, Ellen A.; Davey-Smith, George; Melbye, Mads; Jacobsson, Bo; Muglia, Louis J.

    2017-01-01

    BackgroundDespite evidence that genetic factors contribute to gestational length and preterm birth, robust associations with genetic variants have not been identified. We hypothesized that analyzing larger data sets with gestational length information by genomewide association would reveal trait-influencing variants.MethodsWe performed a genomewide association study in a discovery data set of 43,568 women of European ancestry from 23andMe, Inc., for gestational length as a continuous trait and for term or preterm (preterm birth with genomewide significance. Analysis of mother-infant dyads indicated that these findings likely resulted from maternal genome actions.ConclusionsOur study is the first to identify maternal genetic variants robustly associated with gestational length and preterm birth. Roles of these loci in uterine development, maternal nutrition, and vascular control support their mechanistic involvement and create opportunities to investigate new risk factors for prevention of preterm birth. PMID:28877031

  9. Analysis of Prostate Cancer Susceptibility Variants in South African Men: Replicating Associations on Chromosomes 8q24 and 10q11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Fernandez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have implicated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs on chromosomes 2p15, 6q25, 7p15.2, 7q21, 8q24, 10q11, 10q26, 11q13, 17q12, 17q24, 19q13, and Xp11, with prostate cancer (PCa susceptibility and/or tumour aggressiveness, in populations of African, European, and Asian ancestry. The objective of this study was to confirm these associations in South African Mixed Ancestry and White men. We evaluated 17 prioritised GWAS SNPs in South African cases (331 Mixed Ancestry and 155 White and controls (178 Mixed Ancestry and 145 White. The replicated SNP associations for the different South African ethnic groups were rs7008482 (8q24 (p=2.45×10-5, rs6983267 (8q24 (p=4.48×10-7, and rs10993994 (10q11 (p=1.40×10-3 in Mixed Ancestry men and rs10993994 (p=1.56×10-9 in White men. No significant associations were observed for the analyses stratified by disease aggressiveness in the individual and the combined population group analysis. The present study demonstrates that a number of known PCa susceptibility variants may contribute to disease susceptibility in South African men. Larger genetic investigations extended to other South African population groups are warranted to confirm the role of these and other SNPs in disease susceptibility.

  10. Biological insights from 108 schizophrenia-associated genetic loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ripke, Stephan; Neale, Benjamin M.; Corvin, Aiden; Walters, James T. R.; Farh, Kai-How; Holmans, Peter A.; Lee, Phil; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Collier, David A.; Huang, Hailiang; Pers, Tune H.; Agartz, Ingrid; Agerbo, Esben; Albus, Margot; Alexander, Madeline; Amin, Farooq; Bacanu, Silviu A.; Begemann, Martin; Belliveau, Richard A.; Bene, Judit; Bergen, Sarah E.; Bevilacqua, Elizabeth; Bigdeli, Tim B.; Black, Donald W.; Bruggeman, Richard; Buccola, Nancy G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Byerley, William; Cahn, Wiepke; Cai, Guiqing; Campion, Dominique; Cantor, Rita M.; Carr, Vaughan J.; Carrera, Noa; Catts, Stanley V.; Chambert, Kimberly D.; Chan, Raymond C. K.; Chen, Ronald Y. L.; Chen, Eric Y. H.; Cheng, Wei; Cheung, Eric F. C.; Chong, Siow Ann; Cloninger, C. Robert; Cohen, David; Cohen, Nadine; Cormican, Paul; Craddock, Nick; Crowley, James J.; Curtis, David; Davidson, Michael; Davis, Kenneth L.; Degenhardt, Franziska; Del Favero, Jurgen; Demontis, Ditte; Dikeos, Dimitris; Dinan, Timothy; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary; Drapeau, Elodie; Duan, Jubao; Dudbridge, Frank; Durmishi, Naser; Eichhammer, Peter; Eriksson, Johan; Escott-Price, Valentina; Essioux, Laurent; Fanous, Ayman H.; Farrell, Martilias S.; Frank, Josef; Franke, Lude; Freedman, Robert; Freimer, Nelson B.; Friedl, Marion; Friedman, Joseph I.; Fromer, Menachem; Genovese, Giulio; Georgieva, Lyudmila; Giegling, Ina; Giusti-Rodriguez, Paola; Godard, Stephanie; Goldstein, Jacqueline I.; Golimbet, Vera; Gopal, Srihari; Gratten, Jacob; de Haan, Lieuwe; Hammer, Christian; Hamshere, Marian L.; Hansen, Mark; Hansen, Thomas; Haroutunian, Vahram; Hartmann, Annette M.; Henskens, Frans A.; Herms, Stefan; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hoffmann, Per; Hofman, Andrea; Hollegaard, Mads V.; Hougaard, David M.; Ikeda, Masashi; Joa, Inge; Julia, Antonio; Kahn, Rene S.; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Karachanak-Yankova, Sena; Karjalainen, Juha; Kavanagh, David; Keller, Matthew C.; Kennedy, James L.; Khrunin, Andrey; Kim, Yunjung; Klovins, Janis; Knowles, James A.; Konte, Bettina; Kucinskas, Vaidutis; Kucinskiene, Zita Ausrele; Kuzelova-Ptackova, Hana; Kahler, Anna K.; Laurent, Claudine; Keong, Jimmy Lee Chee; Lee, S. Hong; Legge, Sophie E.; Lerer, Bernard; Li, Miaoxin; Li, Tao; Liang, Kung-Yee; Lieberman, Jeffrey; Limborska, Svetlana; Loughland, Carmel M.; Lubinski, Jan; Lonnqvist, Jouko; Macek, Milan; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Maher, Brion S.; Maier, Wolfgang; Mallet, Jacques; Marsal, Sara; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mattingsdal, Morten; McCarley, Robert W.; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Meier, Sandra; Meijer, Carin J.; Melegh, Bela; Melle, Ingrid; Mesholam-Gately, Raquelle I.; Metspalu, Andres; Michie, Patricia T.; Milani, Lili; Milanova, Vihra; Mokrab, Younes; Morris, Derek W.; Mors, Ole; Murphy, Kieran C.; Murray, Robin M.; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Mueller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nelis, Mari; Nenadic, Igor; Nertney, Deborah A.; Nestadt, Gerald; Nicodemus, Kristin K.; Nikitina-Zake, Liene; Nisenbaum, Laura; Nordin, Annelie; O'Callaghan, Eadbhard; O'Dushlaine, Colm; O'Neill, F. Anthony; Oh, Sang-Yun; Olincy, Ann; Olsen, Line; Van Os, Jim; Pantelis, Christos; Papadimitriou, George N.; Papiol, Sergi; Parkhomenko, Elena; Pato, Michele T.; Paunio, Tiina; Pejovic-Milovancevic, Milica; Perkins, Diana O.; Pietilainen, Olli; Pimm, Jonathan; Pocklington, Andrew J.; Powell, John; Price, Alkes; Pulver, Ann E.; Purcell, Shaun M.; Quested, Digby; Rasmussen, Henrik B.; Reichenberg, Abraham; Reimers, Mark A.; Richards, Alexander L.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Roussos, Panos; Ruderfer, Douglas M.; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R.; Schall, Ulrich; Schubert, Christian R.; Schulze, Thomas G.; Schwab, Sibylle G.; Scolnick, Edward M.; Scott, Rodney J.; Seidman, Larry J.; Shi, Jianxin; Sigurdsson, Engilbert; Silagadze, Teimuraz; Silverman, Jeremy M.; Sim, Kang; Slominsky, Petr; Smoller, Jordan W.; So, Hon-Cheong; Spencer, Chris C. A.; Stahl, Eli A.; Stefansson, Hreinn; Steinberg, Stacy; Stogmann, Elisabeth; Straub, Richard E.; Strengman, Eric; Strohmaier, Jana; Stroup, T. Scott; Subramaniam, Mythily; Suvisaari, Jaana; Svrakic, Dragan M.; Szatkiewicz, Jin P.; Soderman, Erik; Thirumalai, Srinivas; Toncheva, Draga; Tosato, Sarah; Veijola, Juha; Waddington, John; Walsh, Dermot; Wang, Dai; Wang, Qiang; Webb, Bradley T.; Weiser, Mark; Wildenauer, Dieter B.; Williams, Nigel M.; Williams, Stephanie; Witt, Stephanie H.; Wolen, Aaron R.; Wong, Emily H. M.; Wormley, Brandon K.; Xi, Hualin Simon; Zai, Clement C.; Zheng, Xuebin; Zimprich, Fritz; Wray, Naomi R.; Stefansson, Kari; Visscher, Peter M.; Adolfsson, Rolf; Andreassen, Ole A.; Blackwood, Douglas H. R.; Bramon, Elvira; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Borglum, Anders D.; Cichon, Sven; Darvasi, Ariel; Domenici, Enrico; Ehrenreich, Hannelore; Esko, Tonu; Gejman, Pablo V.; Gill, Michael; Gurling, Hugh; Hultman, Christina M.; Iwata, Nakao; Jablensky, Assen V.; Jonsson, Erik G.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Kirov, George; Knight, Jo; Lencz, Todd; Levinson, Douglas F.; Li, Qingqin S.; Liu, Jianjun; Malhotra, Anil K.; McCarroll, Steven A.; McQuillin, Andrew; Moran, Jennifer L.; Mortensen, Preben B.; Mowry, Bryan J.; Noethen, Markus M.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Owen, Michael J.; Palotie, Aarno; Pato, Carlos N.; Petryshen, Tracey L.; Posthuma, Danielle; Rietschel, Marcella; Riley, Brien P.; Rujescu, Dan; Sham, Pak C.; Sklar, Pamela; St Clair, David; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Wendland, Jens R.; Werge, Thomas; Daly, Mark J.; Sullivan, Patrick F.; O'Donovan, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a highly heritable disorder. Genetic risk is conferred by a large number of alleles, including common alleles of small effect that might be detected by genome-wide association studies. Here we report a multi-stage schizophrenia genome-wide association study of up to 36,989 cases and

  11. Biological insights from 108 schizophrenia-associated genetic loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ripke, Stephan; Neale, Benjamin M.; Corvin, Aiden; Walters, James T. R.; Farh, Kai-How; Holmans, Peter A.; Lee, Phil; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Collier, David A.; Huang, Hailiang; Pers, Tune H.; Agartz, Ingrid; Agerbo, Esben; Albus, Margot; Alexander, Madeline; Amin, Farooq; Bacanu, Silviu A.; Begemann, Martin; Belliveau, Richard A.; Bene, Judit; Bergen, Sarah E.; Bevilacqua, Elizabeth; Bigdeli, Tim B.; Black, Donald W.; Bruggeman, Richard; Buccola, Nancy G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Byerley, William; Cahn, Wiepke; Cai, Guiqing; Campion, Dominique; Cantor, Rita M.; Carr, Vaughan J.; Carrera, Noa; Catts, Stanley V.; Chambert, Kimberly D.; Chan, Raymond C. K.; Chen, Ronald Y. L.; Chen, Eric Y. H.; Cheng, Wei; Cheung, Eric F. C.; Chong, Siow Ann; Cloninger, C. Robert; Cohen, David; Cohen, Nadine; Cormican, Paul; Craddock, Nick; Crowley, James J.; Curtis, David; Davidson, Michael; Davis, Kenneth L.; Degenhardt, Franziska; Del Favero, Jurgen; Demontis, Ditte; Dikeos, Dimitris; Dinan, Timothy; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary; Drapeau, Elodie; Duan, Jubao; Dudbridge, Frank; Durmishi, Naser; Eichhammer, Peter; Eriksson, Johan; Escott-Price, Valentina; Essioux, Laurent; Fanous, Ayman H.; Farrell, Martilias S.; Frank, Josef; Franke, Lude; Freedman, Robert; Freimer, Nelson B.; Friedl, Marion; Friedman, Joseph I.; Fromer, Menachem; Genovese, Giulio; Georgieva, Lyudmila; Giegling, Ina; Giusti-Rodriguez, Paola; Godard, Stephanie; Goldstein, Jacqueline I.; Golimbet, Vera; Gopal, Srihari; Gratten, Jacob; de Haan, Lieuwe; Hammer, Christian; Hamshere, Marian L.; Hansen, Mark; Hansen, Thomas; Haroutunian, Vahram; Hartmann, Annette M.; Henskens, Frans A.; Herms, Stefan; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hoffmann, Per; Hofman, Andrea; Hollegaard, Mads V.; Hougaard, David M.; Ikeda, Masashi; Joa, Inge; Julia, Antonio; Kahn, Rene S.; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Karachanak-Yankova, Sena; Karjalainen, Juha; Kavanagh, David; Keller, Matthew C.; Kennedy, James L.; Khrunin, Andrey; Kim, Yunjung; Klovins, Janis; Knowles, James A.; Konte, Bettina; Kucinskas, Vaidutis; Kucinskiene, Zita Ausrele; Kuzelova-Ptackova, Hana; Kahler, Anna K.; Laurent, Claudine; Keong, Jimmy Lee Chee; Lee, S. Hong; Legge, Sophie E.; Lerer, Bernard; Li, Miaoxin; Li, Tao; Liang, Kung-Yee; Lieberman, Jeffrey; Limborska, Svetlana; Loughland, Carmel M.; Lubinski, Jan; Lonnqvist, Jouko; Macek, Milan; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Maher, Brion S.; Maier, Wolfgang; Mallet, Jacques; Marsal, Sara; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mattingsdal, Morten; McCarley, Robert W.; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Meier, Sandra; Meijer, Carin J.; Melegh, Bela; Melle, Ingrid; Mesholam-Gately, Raquelle I.; Metspalu, Andres; Michie, Patricia T.; Milani, Lili; Milanova, Vihra; Mokrab, Younes; Morris, Derek W.; Mors, Ole; Murphy, Kieran C.; Murray, Robin M.; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Mueller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nelis, Mari; Nenadic, Igor; Nertney, Deborah A.; Nestadt, Gerald; Nicodemus, Kristin K.; Nikitina-Zake, Liene; Nisenbaum, Laura; Nordin, Annelie; O'Callaghan, Eadbhard; O'Dushlaine, Colm; O'Neill, F. Anthony; Oh, Sang-Yun; Olincy, Ann; Olsen, Line; Van Os, Jim; Pantelis, Christos; Papadimitriou, George N.; Papiol, Sergi; Parkhomenko, Elena; Pato, Michele T.; Paunio, Tiina; Pejovic-Milovancevic, Milica; Perkins, Diana O.; Pietilainen, Olli; Pimm, Jonathan; Pocklington, Andrew J.; Powell, John; Price, Alkes; Pulver, Ann E.; Purcell, Shaun M.; Quested, Digby; Rasmussen, Henrik B.; Reichenberg, Abraham; Reimers, Mark A.; Richards, Alexander L.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Roussos, Panos; Ruderfer, Douglas M.; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R.; Schall, Ulrich; Schubert, Christian R.; Schulze, Thomas G.; Schwab, Sibylle G.; Scolnick, Edward M.; Scott, Rodney J.; Seidman, Larry J.; Shi, Jianxin; Sigurdsson, Engilbert; Silagadze, Teimuraz; Silverman, Jeremy M.; Sim, Kang; Slominsky, Petr; Smoller, Jordan W.; So, Hon-Cheong; Spencer, Chris C. A.; Stahl, Eli A.; Stefansson, Hreinn; Steinberg, Stacy; Stogmann, Elisabeth; Straub, Richard E.; Strengman, Eric; Strohmaier, Jana; Stroup, T. Scott; Subramaniam, Mythily; Suvisaari, Jaana; Svrakic, Dragan M.; Szatkiewicz, Jin P.; Soderman, Erik; Thirumalai, Srinivas; Toncheva, Draga; Tosato, Sarah; Veijola, Juha; Waddington, John; Walsh, Dermot; Wang, Dai; Wang, Qiang; Webb, Bradley T.; Weiser, Mark; Wildenauer, Dieter B.; Williams, Nigel M.; Williams, Stephanie; Witt, Stephanie H.; Wolen, Aaron R.; Wong, Emily H. M.; Wormley, Brandon K.; Xi, Hualin Simon; Zai, Clement C.; Zheng, Xuebin; Zimprich, Fritz; Wray, Naomi R.; Stefansson, Kari; Visscher, Peter M.; Adolfsson, Rolf; Andreassen, Ole A.

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a highly heritable disorder. Genetic risk is conferred by a large number of alleles, including common alleles of small effect that might be detected by genome-wide association studies. Here we report a multi-stage schizophrenia genome-wide association study of up to 36,989 cases and

  12. Non-replication study of a genome-wide association study for hypertension and blood pressure in African Americans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kidambi Srividya

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A recent genome wide association study in 1017 African Americans identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms that reached genome-wide significance for systolic blood pressure. We attempted to replicate these findings in an independent sample of 2474 unrelated African Americans in the Milwaukee metropolitan area; 53% were women and 47% were hypertensives. Methods We evaluated sixteen top associated SNPs from the above genome wide association study for hypertension as a binary trait or blood pressure as a continuous trait. In addition, we evaluated eight single nucleotide polymorphisms located in two genes (STK-39 and CDH-13 found to be associated with systolic and diastolic blood pressures by other genome wide association studies in European and Amish populations. TaqMan MGB-based chemistry with fluorescent probes was used for genotyping. We had an adequate sample size (80% power to detect an effect size of 1.2-2.0 for all the single nucleotide polymorphisms for hypertension as a binary trait, and 1% variance in blood pressure as a continuous trait. Quantitative trait analyses were performed both by excluding and also by including subjects on anti-hypertensive therapy (after adjustments were made for anti-hypertensive medications. Results For all 24 SNPs, no statistically significant differences were noted in the minor allele frequencies between cases and controls. One SNP (rs2146204 showed borderline association (p = 0.006 with hypertension status using recessive model and systolic blood pressure (p = 0.02, but was not significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons. In quantitative trait analyses, among normotensives only, rs12748299 was associated with SBP (p = 0.002. In addition, several nominally significant associations were noted with SBP and DBP among normotensives but none were statistically significant. Conclusions This study highlights the importance of replication to confirm the validity of genome wide

  13. A weighted U statistic for association analyses considering genetic heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Changshuai; Elston, Robert C; Lu, Qing

    2016-07-20

    Converging evidence suggests that common complex diseases with the same or similar clinical manifestations could have different underlying genetic etiologies. While current research interests have shifted toward uncovering rare variants and structural variations predisposing to human diseases, the impact of heterogeneity in genetic studies of complex diseases has been largely overlooked. Most of the existing statistical methods assume the disease under investigation has a homogeneous genetic effect and could, therefore, have low power if the disease undergoes heterogeneous pathophysiological and etiological processes. In this paper, we propose a heterogeneity-weighted U (HWU) method for association analyses considering genetic heterogeneity. HWU can be applied to various types of phenotypes (e.g., binary and continuous) and is computationally efficient for high-dimensional genetic data. Through simulations, we showed the advantage of HWU when the underlying genetic etiology of a disease was heterogeneous, as well as the robustness of HWU against different model assumptions (e.g., phenotype distributions). Using HWU, we conducted a genome-wide analysis of nicotine dependence from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environments dataset. The genome-wide analysis of nearly one million genetic markers took 7h, identifying heterogeneous effects of two new genes (i.e., CYP3A5 and IKBKB) on nicotine dependence. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Association between Maternal Fish Consumption and Gestational Weight Gain: Influence of Molecular Genetic Predisposition to Obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofus C Larsen

    Full Text Available Studies suggest that fish consumption can restrict weight gain. However, little is known about how fish consumption affects gestational weight gain (GWG, and whether this relationship depends on genetic makeup.To examine the association between fish consumption and GWG, and whether this relationship is dependent on molecular genetic predisposition to obesity.A nested case-cohort study based on the Danish National Birth Cohort (DNBC sampling the most obese women (n = 990 and a random sample of the remaining participants (n = 1,128. Replication of statistically significant findings was attempted in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC (n = 4,841. We included 32 body mass index (BMI associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and 5 SNPs found associated with GWG. BMI associated SNPs were combined in a genetic risk score (GRS. Associations between consumption of fish, GRS or individual variants and GWG were analysed, and interactions between fish and the GRS or individual variants were examined.In the DNBC, each portion/week (150 g of fatty fish was associated with a higher GWG of 0.58 kg (95% CI: 0.16, 0.99, P<0.01. For total fish and lean fish, similar patterns were observed, but these associations were not statistically significant. We found no association between GRS and GWG, and no interactions between GRS and dietary fish on GWG. However, we found an interaction between the PPARG Pro12Ala variant and dietary fish. Each additional Pro12Ala G-allele was associated with a GWG of -0.83 kg (95% CI: -1.29, -0.37, P<0.01 per portion/week of dietary fish, with the same pattern for both lean and fatty fish. In ALSPAC, we were unable to replicate these findings.We found no consistent evidence of association between fish consumption and GWG, and our results indicate that the association between dietary fish and GWG has little or no dependency on GRS or individual SNPs.

  15. A Survey of Association Rule Mining Using Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anubha Sharma

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Data mining is the analysis step of the "Knowledge Discovery in Databases" process, or KDD. It is the process that results in the discovery of new patterns in large data sets. It utilizes methods at the intersection of artificial intelligence, machine learning, statistics, and database systems. The overall goal of the data mining process is to extract knowledge from an existing data set and transform it into a human-understandable structure. In data mining, association rule learning is a popular and well researched method for discovering interesting relations between variables in large databases. Association rules are usually required to satisfy a user-specified minimum support and a user-specified minimum confidence at the same time. Genetic algorithm (GA is a search heuristic that mimics the process of natural evolution. This heuristic is routinely used to generate useful solutions to optimization and search problems. Genetic algorithms belong to the larger class of evolutionary algorithms, which generate solutions to optimization problems using techniques inspired by natural evolution, such as inheritance, mutation, selection, and crossover. In previous, many researchers have proposed Genetic Algorithms for mining interesting association rules from quantitative data. In this paper we represent a survey of Association Rule Mining Using Genetic Algorithm. The techniques are categorized based upon different approaches. This paper provides the major advancement in the approaches for association rule mining using genetic algorithms.

  16. Inhibition of herpes simplex virus type 1 replication by adeno-associated virus rep proteins depends on their combined DNA-binding and ATPase/helicase activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glauser, Daniel L; Seyffert, Michael; Strasser, Regina; Franchini, Marco; Laimbacher, Andrea S; Dresch, Christiane; de Oliveira, Anna Paula; Vogel, Rebecca; Büning, Hildegard; Salvetti, Anna; Ackermann, Mathias; Fraefel, Cornel

    2010-04-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has previously been shown to inhibit the replication of its helper virus herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), and the inhibitory activity has been attributed to the expression of the AAV Rep proteins. In the present study, we assessed the Rep activities required for inhibition of HSV-1 replication using a panel of wild-type and mutant Rep proteins lacking defined domains and activities. We found that the inhibition of HSV-1 replication required Rep DNA-binding and ATPase/helicase activities but not endonuclease activity. The Rep activities required for inhibition of HSV-1 replication precisely coincided with the activities that were responsible for induction of cellular DNA damage and apoptosis, suggesting that these three processes are closely linked. Notably, the presence of Rep induced the hyperphosphorylation of a DNA damage marker, replication protein A (RPA), which has been reported not to be normally hyperphosphorylated during HSV-1 infection and to be sequestered away from HSV-1 replication compartments during infection. Finally, we demonstrate that the execution of apoptosis is not required for inhibition of HSV-1 replication and that the hyperphosphorylation of RPA per se is not inhibitory for HSV-1 replication, suggesting that these two processes are not directly responsible for the inhibition of HSV-1 replication by Rep.

  17. Similarity solutions of a replicator dynamics equation associated with a continuum of pure strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassilis G. Papanicolaou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a nonlinear degenerate parabolic equation containing a nonlocal term. The equation serves as a replicator dynamics model where the set of strategies is a continuum. In our model the payoff operator (which is the continuous analog of the payoff matrix is nonsymmetric and, also, evolves with time. We are interested in solutions u(t, x of our equation which are positive and their integral (with respect to x over the whole space is 1, for any t > 0. These solutions, being probability densities, can serve as time-evolving mixed strategies of a player. We show that for our model there is an one-parameter family of self-similar such solutions $u(t, x$, all approaching the Dirac delta function $\\delta(x$ as $t \\to 0^+$.

  18. Replication and Relevance of Multiple Susceptibility Loci Discovered from Genome Wide Association Studies for Type 2 Diabetes in an Indian Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraja M Phani

    Full Text Available Several genetic variants for type 2 diabetes (T2D have been identified through genome wide association studies (GWAS from Caucasian population; however replication studies were not consistent across various ethnicities. Objective of the current study is to examine the possible correlation of 9 most significant GWAS single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs for T2D susceptibility as well as the interactive effect of these variants on the risk of T2D in an Indian population.Case-control cohorts of 1156 individuals were genotyped for 9 SNPs from an Indian population. Association analyses were performed using logistic regression after adjusting for covariates. Multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR analysis was adopted to determine gene-gene interactions and discriminatory power of combined SNP effect was assessed by grouping individuals based on the number of risk alleles and by calculating area under the receiver-operator characteristic curve (AUC.We confirm the association of TCF7L2 (rs7903146 and SLC30A8 (rs13266634 with T2D. MDR analysis showed statistically significant interactions among four SNPs of SLC30A8 (rs13266634, IGF2BP2 (rs4402960, HHEX (rs1111875 and CDKN2A (rs10811661 genes. Cumulative analysis showed an increase in odds ratio against the baseline group of individuals carrying 5 to 6 risk alleles and discriminatory power of genetic test based on 9 variants showed higher AUC value when analyzed along with body mass index (BMI.These results provide a strong evidence for independent association between T2D and SNPs for in TCF7L2 and SLC30A8. MDR analysis demonstrates that independently non-significant variants may interact with one another resulting in increased disease susceptibility in the population tested.

  19. Replication and Relevance of Multiple Susceptibility Loci Discovered from Genome Wide Association Studies for Type 2 Diabetes in an Indian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phani, Nagaraja M; Adhikari, Prabha; Nagri, Shivashankara K; D'Souza, Sydney C; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu; Rai, Padmalatha S

    2016-01-01

    Several genetic variants for type 2 diabetes (T2D) have been identified through genome wide association studies (GWAS) from Caucasian population; however replication studies were not consistent across various ethnicities. Objective of the current study is to examine the possible correlation of 9 most significant GWAS single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for T2D susceptibility as well as the interactive effect of these variants on the risk of T2D in an Indian population. Case-control cohorts of 1156 individuals were genotyped for 9 SNPs from an Indian population. Association analyses were performed using logistic regression after adjusting for covariates. Multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) analysis was adopted to determine gene-gene interactions and discriminatory power of combined SNP effect was assessed by grouping individuals based on the number of risk alleles and by calculating area under the receiver-operator characteristic curve (AUC). We confirm the association of TCF7L2 (rs7903146) and SLC30A8 (rs13266634) with T2D. MDR analysis showed statistically significant interactions among four SNPs of SLC30A8 (rs13266634), IGF2BP2 (rs4402960), HHEX (rs1111875) and CDKN2A (rs10811661) genes. Cumulative analysis showed an increase in odds ratio against the baseline group of individuals carrying 5 to 6 risk alleles and discriminatory power of genetic test based on 9 variants showed higher AUC value when analyzed along with body mass index (BMI). These results provide a strong evidence for independent association between T2D and SNPs for in TCF7L2 and SLC30A8. MDR analysis demonstrates that independently non-significant variants may interact with one another resulting in increased disease susceptibility in the population tested.

  20. Suppression of RNA interference increases alphavirus replication and virus-associated mortality in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes

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    Geiss Brian J

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses can persistently infect and cause limited damage to mosquito vectors. RNA interference (RNAi is a mosquito antiviral response important in restricting RNA virus replication and has been shown to be active against some arboviruses. The goal of this study was to use a recombinant Sindbis virus (SINV; family Togaviridae; genus Alphavirus that expresses B2 protein of Flock House virus (FHV; family Nodaviridae; genus Alphanodavirus, a protein that inhibits RNAi, to determine the effects of linking arbovirus infection with RNAi inhibition. Results B2 protein expression from SINV (TE/3'2J inhibited the accumulation of non-specific small RNAs in Aedes aegypti mosquito cell culture and virus-specific small RNAs both in infected cell culture and Ae. aegypti mosquitoes. More viral genomic and subgenomic RNA accumulated in cells and mosquitoes infected with TE/3'2J virus expressing B2 (TE/3'2J/B2 compared to TE/3'2J and TE/3'2J virus expressing GFP. TE/3'2J/B2 exhibited increased infection rates, dissemination rates, and infectious virus titers in mosquitoes following oral bloodmeal. Following infectious oral bloodmeal, significantly more mosquitoes died when TE/3'2J/B2 was ingested. The virus was 100% lethal following intrathoracic inoculation of multiple mosquito species and lethality was dose-dependent in Ae. aegypti. Conclusion We show that RNAi is active in Ae. aegypti cell culture and that B2 protein inhibits RNAi in mosquito cells when expressed by a recombinant SINV. Also, SINV more efficiently replicates in mosquito cells when RNAi is inhibited. Finally, TE/3'2J/B2 kills mosquitoes in a dose-dependent manner independent of infection route and mosquito species.

  1. Genetic variants associated with celiac disease and the risk for coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Henning; Willenborg, Christina; Schlesinger, Sabrina; Ferrario, Paola G; König, Inke R; Erdmann, Jeanette; Samani, Nilesh J; Lieb, Wolfgang; Schunkert, Heribert

    2015-10-01

    Epidemiological evidence suggests that patients with celiac disease are at increased risk for coronary artery disease (CAD). Genetic-epidemiological analyses identified many single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with celiac disease. If there is a causal relation between celiac disease and CAD, one might expect that risk alleles primarily associated with celiac disease also increase the risk of CAD. In this study we identified from literature 41 SNPs that have been previously described to be genome-wide associated with celiac disease (p DIsease Genome-wide Replication and Meta-analysis (CARDIoGRAM) dataset, a meta-analysis comprising genome-wide SNP association data from 22,233 CAD cases and 64,762 controls. 24 out of 41 (58.5 %) risk alleles for celiac disease displayed a positive association with CAD (CAD-OR range 1.001-1.081). The remaining risk alleles for celiac disease (n = 16) revealed CAD-ORs of ≤1.0 (range 0.951-1.0). The proportion of CAD associated alleles was greater but did not differ significantly from the proportion of 50 % expected by chance (p = 0.069). One SNP (rs653178 at the SH2B3/ATXN2 locus) displayed study-wise statistically significant association with CAD with directionality consistent effects on celiac disease and CAD. However, the effect of this locus is most likely driven by pleiotropic effects on multiple other diseases. In conclusion, this genetically based approach provided no convincing evidence that SNPs associated with celiac disease contribute to the risk of CAD. Hence, common non-genetic factors may play a more important role explaining the coincidence of these two complex disease conditions.

  2. Genetic aspects of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberici, Federico; Martorana, Davide; Vaglio, Augusto

    2015-04-01

    The genetics of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV) is a complex area of investigation because of the low frequency of AAVs, the rarity of familial cases and the complexity of disease phenotypes. However, recent studies have been able to gather significant numbers of patients, and multicentre collaborative efforts have allowed the performance of two genome-wide association studies (GWASs). Genetic association studies based on candidate gene approaches and the two GWASs have greatly contributed to our current understanding of the genetic basis of AAV. The central role of autoimmunity has been confirmed by the significant association with HLA polymorphisms; interestingly, the three main AAV subtypes are associated with distinct HLA variants, i.e. granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener's GPA) with HLA-DP1, microscopic polyangiitis with HLA-DQ and eosinophilic GPA (Churg-Strauss) with HLA-DRB4. GWASs also revealed that polymorphic variants of genes encoding proteinase 3 (PR3), the predominant antigenic target of ANCA in GPA, and its main inhibitor, alpha-1 antitrypsin, are highly associated with GPA and, even more significantly, with PR3-ANCA positivity (regardless of the clinical diagnosis); this emphasizes the central pathogenic role of PR3 and humoral autoimmunity in PR3-ANCA positive vasculitis. Finally, candidate gene approach studies have shown associations with other variants involved in autoimmunity, such as those belonging to the CTLA-4 and PTPN22 genes, although these findings warrant replication in larger studies. Additional studies are underway to better characterize disease associations within the AAV spectrum, which could provide new pathogenetic clues and possibly new treatment targets.

  3. Genetic polymorphisms in DPF3 associated with risk of breast cancer and lymph node metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoyal Carolyn R

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have identified rare genetic variations responsible for many cases of familial breast cancer but their contribution to total breast cancer incidence is relatively small. More common genetic variations with low penetrance have been postulated to account for a higher proportion of the population risk of breast cancer. Methods and Results In an effort to identify genes that influence non-familial breast cancer risk, we tested over 25,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs located within approximately 14,000 genes in a large-scale case-control study in 254 German women with breast cancer and 268 age-matched women without malignant disease. We identified a marker on chromosome 14q24.3-q31.1 that was marginally associated with breast cancer status (OR = 1.5, P = 0.07. Genotypes for this SNP were also significantly associated with indicators of breast cancer severity, including presence of lymph node metastases (P = 0.006 and earlier age of onset (P = 0.01. The association with breast cancer status was replicated in two independent samples (OR = 1.35, P = 0.05. High-density association fine mapping showed that the association spanned about 80 kb of the zinc-finger gene DPF3 (also known as CERD4. One SNP in intron 1 was found to be more strongly associated with breast cancer status in all three sample collections (OR = 1.6, P = 0.003 as well as with increased lymph node metastases (P = 0.01 and tumor size (P = 0.01. Conclusion Polymorphisms in the 5' region of DPF3 were associated with increased risk of breast cancer development, lymph node metastases, age of onset, and tumor size in women of European ancestry. This large-scale association study suggests that genetic variation in DPF3 contributes to breast cancer susceptibility and severity.

  4. Association of an HLA-G 14-bp Insertion/Deletion polymorphism with high HBV replication in chronic hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laaribi, A B; Zidi, I; Hannachi, N; Ben Yahia, H; Chaouch, H; Bortolotti, D; Zidi, N; Letaief, A; Yacoub, S; Boudabous, A; Rizzo, R; Boukadida, J

    2015-10-01

    Identification of an HLA-G 14-bp Insertion/Deletion (Ins/Del) polymorphism at the 3' untranslated region of HLA-G revealed its importance in HLA-G mRNA stability and HLA-G protein level variation. We evaluated the association between the HLA-G 14-bp Ins/Del polymorphism in patients with chronic Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in a case-control study. Genomic DNA was extracted from 263 patients with chronic HBV hepatitis and 246 control subjects and was examined for the HLA-G 14-bp Ins/Del polymorphism by PCR. The polymorphic variants were genotyped in chronic HBV seropositive cases stratified according to HBV DNA levels, fibrosis stages and in a control population. There was no statistical significant association between the 14-bp Ins/Del polymorphism and increased susceptibility to HBV infection neither for alleles (P = 0.09) nor for genotypes (P = 0.18). The stratification of HBV patients based on HBV DNA levels revealed an association between the 14-bp Ins/Del polymorphism and an enhanced HBV activity with high HBV DNA levels. In particular, the Ins allele was significantly associated with high HBV DNA levels (P = 0.0024, OR = 1.71, 95% CI 1.2-2.4). The genotype Ins/Ins was associated with a 2.5-fold (95% CI, 1.29-4.88) increased risk of susceptibility to high HBV replication compared with the Del/Del and Ins/Del genotypes. This susceptibility is linked to the presence of two Ins alleles. No association was observed between the 14-bp Ins/Del polymorphism and fibrosis stage of HBV infection. We observed an association between the 14-bp Ins/Del polymorphism and high HBV replication characterized by high HBV DNA levels in chronic HBV patients. These results suggest a potential prognostic value for disease outcome evaluation.

  5. Replication of an Association Between the Lymphoid Tyrosine Phosphatase Locus (LYP/PTPN22) With Type 1 Diabetes, and Evidence for Its Role as a General Autoimmunity Locus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Deborah Smyth; Jason D. Cooper; Joanne E. Collins; Joanne M. Heward; Jayne A. Franklyn; Joanna M.M. Howson; Adrian Vella; Sarah Nutland; Helen E. Rance; Lisa Maier; Bryan J. Barratt; Cristian Guja; Constantin Ionescu-Tı̂rgovişte; David A. Savage; David B. Dunger; Barry Widmer; David P. Strachan; Susan M. Ring; Neil Walker; David G. Clayton; Rebecca C.J. Twells; Stephen C.L. Gough; John A. Todd

    2004-01-01

    Replication of an Association Between the Lymphoid Tyrosine Phosphatase Locus ( LYP/PTPN22 ) With Type 1 Diabetes, and Evidence for Its Role as a General Autoimmunity Locus Deborah Smyth 1 , Jason D...

  6. A Validated Phenotyping Algorithm for Genetic Association Studies in Age-related Macular Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonett, Joseph M.; Sohrab, Mahsa A.; Pacheco, Jennifer; Armstrong, Loren L.; Rzhetskaya, Margarita; Smith, Maureen; Geoffrey Hayes, M.; Fawzi, Amani A.

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a multifactorial, neurodegenerative disease, is a leading cause of vision loss. With the rapid advancement of DNA sequencing technologies, many AMD-associated genetic polymorphisms have been identified. Currently, the most time consuming steps of these studies are patient recruitment and phenotyping. In this study, we describe the development of an automated algorithm to identify neovascular (wet) AMD, non-neovascular (dry) AMD and control subjects using electronic medical record (EMR)-based criteria. Positive predictive value (91.7%) and negative predictive value (97.5%) were calculated using expert chart review as the gold standard to assess algorithm performance. We applied the algorithm to an EMR-linked DNA bio-repository to study previously identified AMD-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), using case/control status determined by the algorithm. Risk alleles of three SNPs, rs1061170 (CFH), rs1410996 (CFH), and rs10490924 (ARMS2) were found to be significantly associated with the AMD case/control status as defined by the algorithm. With the rapid growth of EMR-linked DNA biorepositories, patient selection algorithms can greatly increase the efficiency of genetic association study. We have found that stepwise validation of such an algorithm can result in reliable cohort selection and, when coupled within an EMR-linked DNA biorepository, replicates previously published AMD-associated SNPs. PMID:26255974

  7. Effects of long-term averaging of quantitative blood pressure traits on the detection of genetic associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Santhi K; Chasman, Daniel I; Larson, Martin G; Guo, Xiuqing; Verwoert, Germain; Bis, Joshua C; Gu, Xiangjun; Smith, Albert V; Yang, Min-Lee; Zhang, Yan; Ehret, Georg; Rose, Lynda M; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Papanicolau, George J; Sijbrands, Eric J; Rice, Kenneth; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Pihur, Vasyl; Ridker, Paul M; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Raffel, Leslie J; Amin, Najaf; Rotter, Jerome I; Liu, Kiang; Launer, Lenore J; Xu, Ming; Caulfield, Mark; Morrison, Alanna C; Johnson, Andrew D; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Dehghan, Abbas; Li, Guo; Bouchard, Claude; Harris, Tamara B; Zhang, He; Boerwinkle, Eric; Siscovick, David S; Gao, Wei; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; Willer, Cristen J; Franco, Oscar H; Huo, Yong; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Munroe, Patricia B; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Palmas, Walter; van Duijn, Cornelia; Fornage, Myriam; Levy, Daniel; Psaty, Bruce M; Chakravarti, Aravinda

    2014-07-03

    Blood pressure (BP) is a heritable, quantitative trait with intraindividual variability and susceptibility to measurement error. Genetic studies of BP generally use single-visit measurements and thus cannot remove variability occurring over months or years. We leveraged the idea that averaging BP measured across time would improve phenotypic accuracy and thereby increase statistical power to detect genetic associations. We studied systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and pulse pressure (PP) averaged over multiple years in 46,629 individuals of European ancestry. We identified 39 trait-variant associations across 19 independent loci (p < 5 × 10(-8)); five associations (in four loci) uniquely identified by our LTA analyses included those of SBP and MAP at 2p23 (rs1275988, near KCNK3), DBP at 2q11.2 (rs7599598, in FER1L5), and PP at 6p21 (rs10948071, near CRIP3) and 7p13 (rs2949837, near IGFBP3). Replication analyses conducted in cohorts with single-visit BP data showed positive replication of associations and a nominal association (p < 0.05). We estimated a 20% gain in statistical power with long-term average (LTA) as compared to single-visit BP association studies. Using LTA analysis, we identified genetic loci influencing BP. LTA might be one way of increasing the power of genetic associations for continuous traits in extant samples for other phenotypes that are measured serially over time. Copyright © 2014 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Replication of a gene-environment interaction Via Multimodel inference: additive-genetic variance in adolescents' general cognitive ability increases with family-of-origin socioeconomic status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, Robert M; McGue, Matt; Iacono, William G

    2015-03-01

    The present study of general cognitive ability attempts to replicate and extend previous investigations of a biometric moderator, family-of-origin socioeconomic status (SES), in a sample of 2,494 pairs of adolescent twins, non-twin biological siblings, and adoptive siblings assessed with individually administered IQ tests. We hypothesized that SES would covary positively with additive-genetic variance and negatively with shared-environmental variance. Important potential confounds unaddressed in some past studies, such as twin-specific effects, assortative mating, and differential heritability by trait level, were found to be negligible. In our main analysis, we compared models by their sample-size corrected AIC, and base our statistical inference on model-averaged point estimates and standard errors. Additive-genetic variance increased with SES-an effect that was statistically significant and robust to model specification. We found no evidence that SES moderated shared-environmental influence. We attempt to explain the inconsistent replication record of these effects, and provide suggestions for future research.

  9. Genetic association analysis of LARS2 with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiling, E; Jafar-Mohammadi, B; van 't Riet, E;

    2010-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: LARS2 has been previously identified as a potential type 2 diabetes susceptibility gene through the low-frequency H324Q (rs71645922) variant (minor allele frequency [MAF] 3.0%). However, this association did not achieve genome-wide levels of significance. The aim of this study...... was to establish the true contribution of this variant and common variants in LARS2 (MAF > 5%) to type 2 diabetes risk. METHODS: We combined genome-wide association data (n = 10,128) from the DIAGRAM consortium with independent data derived from a tagging single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) approach in Dutch...... individuals (n = 999) and took forward two SNPs of interest to replication in up to 11,163 Dutch participants (rs17637703 and rs952621). In addition, because inspection of genome-wide association study data identified a cluster of low-frequency variants with evidence of type 2 diabetes association, we...

  10. Genome-wide assessment for genetic variants associated with ventricular dysfunction after primary coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda A Fox

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Postoperative ventricular dysfunction (VnD occurs in 9-20% of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG surgical patients and is associated with increased postoperative morbidity and mortality. Understanding genetic causes of postoperative VnD should enhance patient risk stratification and improve treatment and prevention strategies. We aimed to determine if genetic variants associate with occurrence of in-hospital VnD after CABG surgery. METHODS: A genome-wide association study identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with postoperative VnD in male subjects of European ancestry undergoing isolated primary CABG surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. VnD was defined as the need for ≥2 inotropes or mechanical ventricular support after CABG surgery. Validated SNPs were assessed further in two replication CABG cohorts and meta-analysis was performed. RESULTS: Over 100 SNPs were associated with VnD (P2.1 of developing in-hospital VnD after CABG surgery. However, three genetic loci identified by meta-analysis were more modestly associated with development of postoperative VnD. Studies of larger cohorts to assess these loci as well as to define other genetic mechanisms and related biology that link genetic variants to postoperative ventricular dysfunction are warranted.

  11. Contribution of large region joint associations to complex traits genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paré, Guillaume; Asma, Senay; Deng, Wei Q

    2015-04-01

    A polygenic model of inheritance, whereby hundreds or thousands of weakly associated variants contribute to a trait's heritability, has been proposed to underlie the genetic architecture of complex traits. However, relatively few genetic variants have been positively identified so far and they collectively explain only a small fraction of the predicted heritability. We hypothesized that joint association of multiple weakly associated variants over large chromosomal regions contributes to complex traits variance. Confirmation of such regional associations can help identify new loci and lead to a better understanding of known ones. To test this hypothesis, we first characterized the ability of commonly used genetic association models to identify large region joint associations. Through theoretical derivation and simulation, we showed that multivariate linear models where multiple SNPs are included as independent predictors have the most favorable association profile. Based on these results, we tested for large region association with height in 3,740 European participants from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) study. Adjusting for SNPs with known association with height, we demonstrated clustering of weak associations (p = 2x10-4) in regions extending up to 433.0 Kb from known height loci. The contribution of regional associations to phenotypic variance was estimated at 0.172 (95% CI 0.063-0.279; p < 0.001), which compared favorably to 0.129 explained by known height variants. Conversely, we showed that suggestively associated regions are enriched for known height loci. To extend our findings to other traits, we also tested BMI, HDLc and CRP for large region associations, with consistent results for CRP. Our results demonstrate the presence of large region joint associations and suggest these can be used to pinpoint weakly associated SNPs.

  12. Genetic Features of Aflatoxin-Associated Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weilong; He, Huan; Zang, Mengya; Wu, Qifeng; Zhao, Hong; Lu, Ling-Ling; Ma, Peiqing; Zheng, Hongwei; Wang, Nengjin; Zhang, Ying; He, Siyuan; Chen, Xiaoyan; Wu, Zhiyuan; Wang, Xiaoyue; Cai, Jianqiang; Liu, Zhihua; Sun, Zongtang; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Qu, Chunfeng; Jiao, Yuchen

    2017-07-01

    Dietary exposure to aflatoxin is an important risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, little is known about the genomic features and mutations of aflatoxin-associated HCCs compared with HCCs not associated with aflatoxin exposure. We investigated the genetic features of aflatoxin-associated HCC that can be used to differentiate them from HCCs not associated with this carcinogen. We obtained HCC tumor tissues and matched non-tumor liver tissues from 49 patients, collected from 1990 through 2016, at the Qidong Liver Cancer Hospital Institute in China-a high-risk region for aflatoxin exposure (38.2% of food samples test positive for aflatoxin contamination). Somatic variants were identified using GATK Best Practices Pipeline. We validated part of the mutations from whole-genome sequencing and whole-exome sequencing by Sanger sequencing. We also analyzed genomes of 1072 HCCs, obtained from 5 datasets from China, the United States, France, and Japan. Mutations in 49 aflatoxin-associated HCCs and 1072 HCCs from other regions were analyzed using the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute mutational signatures framework with non-negative matrix factorization. The mutation landscape and mutational signatures from the aflatoxin-associated HCC and HCC samples from general population were compared. We identified genetic features of aflatoxin-associated HCC, and used these to identify aflatoxin-associated HCCs in datasets from other regions. Tumor samples were analyzed by immunohistochemistry to determine microvessel density and levels of CD34 and CD274 (PD-L1). Aflatoxin-associated HCCs frequently contained C>A transversions, the sequence motif GCN, and strand bias. In addition to previously reported mutations in TP53, we found frequent mutations in the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor B1 gene (ADGRB1), which were associated with increased capillary density of tumor tissue. Aflatoxin-associated HCC tissues contained high-level potential mutation-associated

  13. Genetic heritability of ischemic stroke and the contribution of previously reported candidate gene and genomewide associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevan, Steve; Traylor, Matthew; Adib-Samii, Poneh; Malik, Rainer; Paul, Nicola L M; Jackson, Caroline; Farrall, Martin; Rothwell, Peter M; Sudlow, Cathie; Dichgans, Martin; Markus, Hugh S

    2012-12-01

    The contribution of genetics to stroke risk, and whether this differs for different stroke subtypes, remainsuncertain. Genomewide complex trait analysis allows heritability to be assessed from genomewide association study (GWAS) data. Previous candidate gene studies have identified many associations with stoke but whether these are important requires replication in large independent data sets. GWAS data sets provide a powerful resource to perform replication studies. We applied genomewide complex trait analysis to a GWAS data set of 3752 ischemic strokes and 5972 controls and determined heritability for all ischemic stroke and the most common subtypes: large-vessel disease, small-vessel disease, and cardioembolic stroke. By systematic review we identified previous candidate gene and GWAS associations with stroke and previous GWAS associations with related cardiovascular phenotypes (myocardial infarction, atrial fibrillation, and carotid intima-media thickness). Fifty associations were identified. For all ischemic stroke, heritability was 37.9%. Heritability varied markedly by stroke subtype being 40.3% for large-vessel disease and 32.6% for cardioembolic but lower for small-vessel disease (16.1%). No previously reported candidate gene was significant after rigorous correction for multiple testing. In contrast, 3 loci from related cardiovascular GWAS studies were significant: PHACTR1 in large-vessel disease (P=2.63e(-6)), PITX2 in cardioembolic stroke (P=4.78e(-8)), and ZFHX3 in cardioembolic stroke (P=5.50e(-7)). There is substantial heritability for ischemic stroke, but this varies for different stroke subtypes. Previous candidate gene associations contribute little to this heritability, but GWAS studies in related cardiovascular phenotypes are identifying robust associations. The heritability data, and data from GWAS, suggest detecting additional associations will depend on careful stroke subtyping.

  14. Whole genome association analysis shows that ACE is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease and fails to replicate most candidates from Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Jennifer; Reiman, Eric M; Zismann, Victoria L; Joshipura, Keta D; Pearson, John V; Hu-Lince, Diane; Huentelman, Matthew J; Craig, David W; Coon, Keith D; Beach, Thomas; Rohrer, Kristen C; Zhao, Alice S; Leung, Doris; Bryden, Leslie; Marlowe, Lauren; Kaleem, Mona; Mastroeni, Diego; Grover, Andrew; Rogers, Joseph; Heun, Reinhard; Jessen, Frank; Kölsch, Heike; Heward, Christopher B; Ravid, Rivka; Hutton, Michael L; Melquist, Stacey; Petersen, Ron C; Caselli, Richard J; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas; Stephan, Dietrich A; Hardy, John; Myers, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    For late onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD), the only confirmed, genetic association is with the apolipoprotein E (APOE) locus on chromosome 19. Meta-analysis is often employed to sort the true associations from the false positives. LOAD research has the advantage of a continuously updated meta-analysis of candidate gene association studies in the web-based AlzGene database. The top 30 AlzGene loci on May 1(st), 2007 were investigated in our whole genome association data set consisting of 1411 LOAD cases and neuropathoiogicaiiy verified controls genotyped at 312,316 SNPs using the Affymetrix 500K Mapping Platform. Of the 30 "top AlzGenes", 32 SNPs in 24 genes had odds ratios (OR) whose 95% confidence intervals that did not include 1. Of these 32 SNPs, six were part of the Affymetrix 500K Mapping panel and another ten had proxies on the Affymetrix array that had >80% power to detect an association with α=0.001. Two of these 16 SNPs showed significant association with LOAD in our sample series. One was rs4420638 at the APOE locus (uncorrected p-value=4.58E-37) and the other was rs4293, located in the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) locus (uncorrected p-value=0.014). Since this result was nominally significant, but did not survive multiple testing correction for 16 independent tests, this association at rs4293 was verified in a geographically distinct German cohort (p-value=0.03). We present the results of our ACE replication aiongwith a discussion of the statistical limitations of multiple test corrections in whole genome studies.

  15. Repeated measurement sampling in genetic association analysis with genotyping errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Renzhen; Zhang, Hong; Yang, Yaning

    2007-02-01

    Genotype misclassification occurs frequently in human genetic association studies. When cases and controls are subject to the same misclassification model, Pearson's chi-square test has the correct type I error but may lose power. Most current methods adjusting for genotyping errors assume that the misclassification model is known a priori or can be assessed by a gold standard instrument. But in practical applications, the misclassification probabilities may not be completely known or the gold standard method can be too costly to be available. The repeated measurement design provides an alternative approach for identifying misclassification probabilities. With this design, a proportion of the subjects are measured repeatedly (five or more repeats) for the genotypes when the error model is completely unknown. We investigate the applications of the repeated measurement method in genetic association analysis. Cost-effectiveness study shows that if the phenotyping-to-genotyping cost ratio or the misclassification rates are relatively large, the repeat sampling can gain power over the regular case-control design. We also show that the power gain is not sensitive to the genetic model, genetic relative risk and the population high-risk allele frequency, all of which are typically important ingredients in association studies. An important implication of this result is that whatever the genetic factors are, the repeated measurement method can be applied if the genotyping errors must be accounted for or the phenotyping cost is high.

  16. Short communication: Genetic association between schizophrenia and cannabis use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verweij, Karin J H; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Nivard, Michel G; Sainz Cort, Alberto; Ligthart, Lannie; Draisma, Harmen H M; Minică, Camelia C

    2017-02-01

    Previous studies have shown a relationship between schizophrenia and cannabis use. As both traits are substantially heritable, a shared genetic liability could explain the association. We use two recently developed genomics methods to investigate the genetic overlap between schizophrenia and cannabis use. Firstly, polygenic risk scores for schizophrenia were created based on summary statistics from the largest schizophrenia genome-wide association (GWA) meta-analysis to date. We analysed the association between these schizophrenia polygenic scores and multiple cannabis use phenotypes (lifetime use, regular use, age at initiation, and quantity and frequency of use) in a sample of 6,931 individuals. Secondly, we applied LD-score regression to the GWA summary statistics of schizophrenia and lifetime cannabis use to calculate the genome-wide genetic correlation. Polygenic risk scores for schizophrenia were significantly (αschizophrenia and lifetime cannabis use. Common genetic variants underlying schizophrenia and lifetime cannabis use are partly overlapping. Individuals with a stronger genetic predisposition to schizophrenia are more likely to initiate cannabis use, use cannabis more regularly, and consume more cannabis over their lifetime. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A post-GWAS replication study confirming the PTK2 gene associated with milk production traits in Chinese Holstein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haifei; Jiang, Li; Liu, Xuan; Yang, Jie; Wei, Julong; Xu, Jingen; Zhang, Qin; Liu, Jian-Feng

    2013-01-01

    Our initial genome-wide association study (GWAS) demonstrated that two SNPs (ARS-BFGL-NGS-33248, UA-IFASA-9288) within the protein tyrosine kinase 2 (PTK2) gene were significantly associated with milk production traits in Chinese Holstein dairy cattle. To further validate if the statistical evidence provided in GWAS were true-positive findings, a replication study was performed herein through genotype-phenotype associations. The two tested SNPs were found to show significant associations with milk production traits, which confirmed the associations observed in the original study. Specifically, SNPs lying in the PTK2 gene were also detected by sequencing 14 unrelated sires in Chinese Holsteins and a total of thirty-three novel SNPs were identified. Thirteen out of these identified SNPs were genotyped and tested for association with milk production traits in an independent resource population. After Bonferroni correction for multiple testing, twelve SNPs were statistically significant for more than two milk production traits. Analyses of pairwise D' measures of linkage disequilibrium (LD) between all SNPs were also explored. Two haplotype blocks were inferred and the association study at haplotype level revealed similar effects on milk production traits. In addition, the RNA expression analyses revealed that a non-synonymous coding SNP (g.4061098T>G) was involved in the regulation of gene expression. Thus the findings presented here provide strong evidence for associations of PTK2 variants with dairy production traits and may be applied in Chinese Holstein breeding program.

  18. In situ localization and tissue distribution of the replication-associated proteins of Cucumber mosaic virus in tobacco and cucumber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cillo, Fabrizio; Roberts, Ian M; Palukaitis, Peter

    2002-11-01

    The replication-associated proteins encoded by Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), the 1a and 2a proteins, were detected by immunogold labeling in two host species of this virus, tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and cucumber (Cucumis sativus). In both hosts, the 1a and 2a proteins colocalized predominantly to the vacuolar membranes, the tonoplast. While plus-strand CMV RNAs were found distributed throughout the cytoplasm by in situ hybridization, minus-strand CMV RNAs were barely detectable but were found associated with the tonoplast. In both cucumber and tobacco, 2a protein was detected at higher densities than 1a protein. The 1a and 2a proteins also showed quantitative differences with regard to tissue distributions in tobacco and cucumber. About three times as much 2a protein was detected in CMV-infected cucumber tissues as in CMV-infected tobacco tissues. In tobacco, high densities of these proteins were observed only in vascular bundle cells of minor veins. In contrast, in cucumber, high densities of 1a and 2a proteins were observed in mesophyll cells, followed by epidermis cells, with only low levels being observed in vascular bundle cells. Differences were also observed in the distributions of 2a protein and capsid protein in vascular bundle cells of the two host species. These observations may represent differences in the relative rates of tissue infection in different hosts or differences in the extent of virus replication in vascular tissues of different hosts.

  19. Lack of association between digit ratio (2D:4D) and assertiveness: replication in a large sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voracek, Martin

    2009-12-01

    Findings regarding within-sex associations of digit ratio (2D:4D), a putative pointer to long-lasting effects of prenatal androgen action, and sexually differentiated personality traits have generally been inconsistent or unreplicable, suggesting that effects in this domain, if any, are likely small. In contrast to evidence from Wilson's important 1983 study, a forerunner of modern 2D:4D research, two recent studies in 2005 and 2008 by Freeman, et al. and Hampson, et al. showed assertiveness, a presumably male-typed personality trait, was not associated with 2D:4D; however, these studies were clearly statistically underpowered. Hence this study examined this question anew, based on a large sample of 491 men and 627 women. Assertiveness was only modestly sexually differentiated, favoring men, and a positive correlate of age and education and a negative correlate of weight and Body Mass Index among women, but not men. Replicating the two prior studies, 2D:4D was throughout unrelated to assertiveness scores. This null finding was preserved with controls for correlates of assertiveness, also in nonparametric analysis and with tests for curvilinear relations. Discussed are implications of this specific null finding, now replicated in a large sample, for studies of 2D:4D and personality in general and novel research approaches to proceed in this field.

  20. Genetic variation in the epidermal transglutaminase genes is not associated with atopic dermatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agne Liedén

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Atopic dermatitis (AD is a common chronic inflammatory skin disorder where epidermal barrier dysfunction is a major factor in the pathogenesis. The identification of AD susceptibility genes related to barrier dysfunction is therefore of importance. The epidermal transglutaminases (TGM1, TGM3 and TGM5 encodes essential cross-linking enzymes in the epidermis. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether genetic variability in the epidermal transglutaminases contributes to AD susceptibility. METHODS: Forty-seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the TGM1, TGM3 and TGM5 gene region were tested for genetic association with AD, independently and in relation to FLG genotype, using a pedigree disequilibrium test (PDT in a Swedish material consisting of 1753 individuals from 539 families. In addition, a German case-control material, consisting of 533 AD cases and 1996 controls, was used for in silico analysis of the epidermal TGM regions. Gene expression of the TGM1, TGM3 and TGM5 gene was investigated by relative quantification with Real Time PCR (qRT-PCR. Immunohistochemical (IHC analysis was performed to detect TG1, TG3 and TG5 protein expression in the skin of patients and healthy controls. RESULTS: PDT analysis identified a significant association between the TGM1 SNP rs941505 and AD with allergen-specific IgE in the Swedish AD family material. However, the association was not replicated in the German case-control material. No significant association was detected for analyzed SNPs in relation to FLG genotype. TG1, TG3 and TG5 protein expression was detected in AD skin and a significantly increased TGM3 mRNA expression was observed in lesional skin by qRT-PCR. CONCLUSION: Although TGM1 and TGM3 may be differentially expressed in AD skin, the results from the genetic analysis suggest that genetic variation in the epidermal transglutaminases is not an important factor in AD susceptibility.

  1. Genetic variants on 3q21 and in the Sp8 transcription factor gene (SP8 as susceptibility loci for psychotic disorders: a genetic association study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Kondo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent genome-wide association studies (GWASs investigating bipolar disorder (BD have detected a number of susceptibility genes. These studies have also provided novel insight into shared genetic components between BD and schizophrenia (SCZ, two major psychotic disorders. To examine the replication of the risk variants for BD and the pleiotropic effect of the variants associated with BD, we conducted a genetic association study of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that were selected based upon previous BD GWASs, which targeted psychotic disorders (BD and SCZ in the Japanese population. METHODS: Forty-eight SNPs were selected based upon previous GWASs. A two-stage analysis was conducted using first-set screening (for all SNPs: BD = 1,012, SCZ = 1,032 and control = 993 and second-set replication samples (for significant SNPs in the screening analysis: BD = 821, SCZ = 1,808 and control = 2,149. We assessed allelic association between BD, SCZ, psychosis (BD+SCZ and the SNPs selected for the analysis. RESULTS: Eight SNPs revealed nominal association signals for all comparisons (Puncorrected<0.05. Among these SNPs, the top two SNPs (associated with psychosis: Pcorrected = 0.048 and 0.037 for rs2251219 and rs2709722, respectively were further assessed in the second-set samples, and we replicated the signals from the initial screening analysis (associated with psychosis: Pcorrected = 0.0070 and 0.033 for rs2251219 and rs2709722, respectively. The meta-analysis between the current and previous GWAS results showed that rs2251219 in Polybromo1 (PBRM1 was significant on genome-wide association level (P = 5×10(-8 only for BD (P = 9.4×10(-9 and psychosis (P = 2.0×10(-10. Although the association of rs2709722 in Sp8 transcription factor (SP8 was suggestive in the Asian population (P = 2.1×10(-7 for psychosis, this signal weakened when the samples size was increased by including data from a

  2. Genetic Variants on 3q21 and in the Sp8 Transcription Factor Gene (SP8) as Susceptibility Loci for Psychotic Disorders: A Genetic Association Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Kenji; Ikeda, Masashi; Kajio, Yusuke; Saito, Takeo; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Aleksic, Branko; Yamada, Kazuo; Toyota, Tomoko; Hattori, Eiji; Ujike, Hiroshi; Inada, Toshiya; Kunugi, Hiroshi; Kato, Tadafumi; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Ozaki, Norio; Iwata, Nakao

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent genome-wide association studies (GWASs) investigating bipolar disorder (BD) have detected a number of susceptibility genes. These studies have also provided novel insight into shared genetic components between BD and schizophrenia (SCZ), two major psychotic disorders. To examine the replication of the risk variants for BD and the pleiotropic effect of the variants associated with BD, we conducted a genetic association study of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were selected based upon previous BD GWASs, which targeted psychotic disorders (BD and SCZ) in the Japanese population. Methods Forty-eight SNPs were selected based upon previous GWASs. A two-stage analysis was conducted using first-set screening (for all SNPs: BD = 1,012, SCZ = 1,032 and control = 993) and second-set replication samples (for significant SNPs in the screening analysis: BD = 821, SCZ = 1,808 and control = 2,149). We assessed allelic association between BD, SCZ, psychosis (BD+SCZ) and the SNPs selected for the analysis. Results Eight SNPs revealed nominal association signals for all comparisons (Puncorrected<0.05). Among these SNPs, the top two SNPs (associated with psychosis: Pcorrected = 0.048 and 0.037 for rs2251219 and rs2709722, respectively) were further assessed in the second-set samples, and we replicated the signals from the initial screening analysis (associated with psychosis: Pcorrected = 0.0070 and 0.033 for rs2251219 and rs2709722, respectively). The meta-analysis between the current and previous GWAS results showed that rs2251219 in Polybromo1 (PBRM1) was significant on genome-wide association level (P = 5×10−8) only for BD (P = 9.4×10−9) and psychosis (P = 2.0×10−10). Although the association of rs2709722 in Sp8 transcription factor (SP8) was suggestive in the Asian population (P = 2.1×10−7 for psychosis), this signal weakened when the samples size was increased by including data from a

  3. Association of common genetic variants in GPCPD1 with scaling of visual cortical surface area in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakken, Trygve E; Roddey, J Cooper; Djurovic, Srdjan; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Amaral, David G; Bloss, Cinnamon S; Casey, B J; Chang, Linda; Ernst, Thomas M; Gruen, Jeffrey R; Jernigan, Terry L; Kaufmann, Walter E; Kenet, Tal; Kennedy, David N; Kuperman, Joshua M; Murray, Sarah S; Sowell, Elizabeth R; Rimol, Lars M; Mattingsdal, Morten; Melle, Ingrid; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A; Schork, Nicholas J; Dale, Anders M; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R; Jagust, William; Trojanowki, John Q; Toga, Arthur W; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C; Saykin, Andrew J; Morris, John; Liu, Enchi; Montine, Tom; Gamst, Anthony; Thomas, Ronald G; Donohue, Michael; Walter, Sarah; Gessert, Devon; Sather, Tamie; Harvey, Danielle; Kornak, John; Dale, Anders; Bernstein, Matthew; Felmlee, Joel; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Paul; Schuff, Norbert; Alexander, Gene; DeCarli, Charles; Bandy, Dan; Koeppe, Robert A; Foster, Norm; Reiman, Eric M; Chen, Kewei; Mathis, Chet; Cairns, Nigel J; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Trojanowki, J Q; Shaw, Les; Lee, Virginia M Y; Korecka, Magdalena; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Foroud, Tatiana M; Potkin, Steven; Shen, Li; Kachaturian, Zaven; Frank, Richard; Snyder, Peter J; Molchan, Susan; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Lind, Betty; Dolen, Sara; Schneider, Lon S; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Spann, Bryan M; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Heidebrink, Judith L; Lord, Joanne L; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S; Bell, Karen L; Morris, John C; Ances, Beau; Carroll, Maria; Leon, Sue; Mintun, Mark A; Schneider, Stacy; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; Romirowsky, Aliza; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Shah, Raj C; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; Kielb, Stephanie; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J; Glodzik, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Doraiswamy, P Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R; Coleman, R Edward; Arnold, Steven E; Karlawish, Jason H; Wolk, David; Smith, Charles D; Jicha, Greg; Hardy, Peter; Lopez, Oscar L; Oakley, MaryAnn; Simpson, Donna M; Porsteinsson, Anton P; Goldstein, Bonnie S; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M; Ismail, M Saleem; Brand, Connie; Mulnard, Ruth A; Thai, Gaby; Mc-Adams-Ortiz, Catherine; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; King, Richard; Weiner, Myron; Martin-Cook, Kristen; DeVous, Michael; Levey, Allan I; Lah, James J; Cellar, Janet S; Burns, Jeffrey M; Anderson, Heather S; Swerdlow, Russell H; Apostolova, Liana; Lu, Po H; Bartzokis, George; Silverman, Daniel H S; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Parfitt, Francine; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin R; Hake, Ann Marie; Matthews, Brandy R; Herring, Scott; van Dyck, Christopher H; Carson, Richard E; MacAvoy, Martha G; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Ging-Yuek; Hsiung, Robin; Feldman, Howard; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Kertesz, Andrew; Rogers, John; Trost, Dick; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Kerwin, Diana; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Lipowski, Kristina; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Johnson, Nancy; Sadowsky, Carl; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Turner, Raymond Scott; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Sperling, Reisa A; Johnson, Keith A; Marshall, Gad; Frey, Meghan; Yesavage, Jerome; Taylor, Joy L; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Sabbagh, Marwan; Belden, Christine; Jacobson, Sandra; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E; Norbash, Alexander; Johnson, Patricia Lynn; Obisesan, Thomas O; Wolday, Saba; Bwayo, Salome K; Lerner, Alan; Hudson, Leon; Ogrocki, Paula; Fletcher, Evan; Carmichael, Owen; Olichney, John; Kittur, Smita; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T-Y; Bartha, Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M; Potkin, Steven G; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre; Fleisher, Adam; Reeder, Stephanie; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Scharre, Douglas W; Kataki, Maria; Zimmerman, Earl A; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D; Pearlson, Godfrey D; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Santulli, Robert B; Schwartz, Eben S; Sink, Kaycee M; Williamson, Jeff D; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Rosen, Howard J; Miller, Bruce L; Mintzer, Jacobo; Longmire, Crystal Flynn; Spicer, Kenneth; Finger, Elizabether; Rachinsky, Irina; Drost, Dick; Jernigan, Terry; McCabe, Connor; Grant, Ellen; Ernst, Thomas; Kuperman, Josh; Chung, Yoon; Murray, Sarah; Bloss, Cinnamon; Darst, Burcu; Pritchett, Lexi; Saito, Ashley; Amaral, David; DiNino, Mishaela; Eyngorina, Bella; Sowell, Elizabeth; Houston, Suzanne; Soderberg, Lindsay; Kaufmann, Walter; van Zijl, Peter; Rizzo-Busack, Hilda; Javid, Mohsin; Mehta, Natasha; Ruberry, Erika; Powers, Alisa; Rosen, Bruce; Gebhard, Nitzah; Manigan, Holly; Frazier, Jean; Kennedy, David; Yakutis, Lauren; Hill, Michael; Gruen, Jeffrey; Bosson-Heenan, Joan; Carlson, Heatherly

    2012-03-06

    Visual cortical surface area varies two- to threefold between human individuals, is highly heritable, and has been correlated with visual acuity and visual perception. However, it is still largely unknown what specific genetic and environmental factors contribute to normal variation in the area of visual cortex. To identify SNPs associated with the proportional surface area of visual cortex, we performed a genome-wide association study followed by replication in two independent cohorts. We identified one SNP (rs6116869) that replicated in both cohorts and had genome-wide significant association (P(combined) = 3.2 × 10(-8)). Furthermore, a metaanalysis of imputed SNPs in this genomic region identified a more significantly associated SNP (rs238295; P = 6.5 × 10(-9)) that was in strong linkage disequilibrium with rs6116869. These SNPs are located within 4 kb of the 5' UTR of GPCPD1, glycerophosphocholine phosphodiesterase GDE1 homolog (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), which in humans, is more highly expressed in occipital cortex compared with the remainder of cortex than 99.9% of genes genome-wide. Based on these findings, we conclude that this common genetic variation contributes to the proportional area of human visual cortex. We suggest that identifying genes that contribute to normal cortical architecture provides a first step to understanding genetic mechanisms that underlie visual perception.

  4. Discovery of Genetic Variation on Chromosome 5q22 Associated with Mortality in Heart Failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gustav Smith

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Failure of the human heart to maintain sufficient output of blood for the demands of the body, heart failure, is a common condition with high mortality even with modern therapeutic alternatives. To identify molecular determinants of mortality in patients with new-onset heart failure, we performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies and follow-up genotyping in independent populations. We identified and replicated an association for a genetic variant on chromosome 5q22 with 36% increased risk of death in subjects with heart failure (rs9885413, P = 2.7x10-9. We provide evidence from reporter gene assays, computational predictions and epigenomic marks that this polymorphism increases activity of an enhancer region active in multiple human tissues. The polymorphism was further reproducibly associated with a DNA methylation signature in whole blood (P = 4.5x10-40 that also associated with allergic sensitization and expression in blood of the cytokine TSLP (P = 1.1x10-4. Knockdown of the transcription factor predicted to bind the enhancer region (NHLH1 in a human cell line (HEK293 expressing NHLH1 resulted in lower TSLP expression. In addition, we observed evidence of recent positive selection acting on the risk allele in populations of African descent. Our findings provide novel genetic leads to factors that influence mortality in patients with heart failure.

  5. Phenome Wide Association Studies demonstrating pleiotropy of genetic variants within FTO with and without adjustment for body mass index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Michael Cronin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Phenome-wide association studies (PheWAS have demonstrated utility in validating genetic associations derived from traditional genetic studies as well as identifying novel genetic associations. Here we used an electronic health record (EHR-based PheWAS to explore pleiotropy of genetic variants in the fat mass and obesity associated gene (FTO, some of which have been previously associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D. We used a population of 10,487 individuals of European ancestry with genome-wide genotyping from the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE Network and another population of 13,711 individuals of European ancestry from the BioVU DNA biobank at Vanderbilt genotyped using Illumina HumanExome BeadChip. A meta-analysis of the two study populations replicated the well-described associations between FTO variants and obesity (odds ratio [OR]=1.25, 95% Confidence Interval=1.11-1.24, p=2.10 x 10 9 and FTO variants and T2D (OR=1.14, 95% CI=1.08-1.21, p=2.34 x 10 6. The meta-analysis also demonstrated that FTO variant rs8050136 was significantly associated with sleep apnea (OR=1.14, 95% CI=1.07-1.22, p=3.33 x 10 5; however, the association was attenuated after adjustment for body mass index (BMI. Novel phenotype associations with obesity-associated FTO variants included fibrocystic breast disease (rs9941349, OR=0.81, 95% CI=0.74-0.91, p=5.41x10 5 and trends toward associations with nonalcoholic liver disease and gram-positive bacterial infections. FTO variants not associated with obesity demonstrated other potential disease associations including noninflammatory disorders of the cervix and chronic periodontitis. These results suggest that genetic variants in FTO may have pleiotropic associations, some of which are not mediated by obesity.

  6. Genetic contribution of catechol-O-methyltransferase variants in treatment outcome of low back pain: a prospective genetic association study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omair Ahmad

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment outcome of low back pain (LBP is associated with inter-individual variations in pain relief and functional disability. Genetic variants of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT gene have previously been shown to be associated with pain sensitivity and pain medication. This study examines the association between COMT polymorphisms and 7–11 year change in Oswestry Disability Index (ODI and Visual Analog Score (VAS for LBP as clinical outcome variables in patients treated with surgical instrumented lumbar fusion or cognitive intervention and exercise. Methods 93 unrelated patients with chronic LBP for duration of >1 year and lumbar disc degeneration (LDD were treated with lumbar fusion (N = 60 or cognitive therapy and exercises (N = 33. Standardised questionnaires assessing the ODI, VAS LBP, psychological factors and use of analgesics, were answered by patients both at baseline and at 7–11 years follow-up. Four SNPs in the COMT gene were successfully genotyped. Single marker as well as haplotype association with change in ODI and VAS LBP, were analyzed using Haploview, linear regression and R-package Haplostats. P-values were not formally corrected for multiple testing as this was an explorative study. Results Association analysis of individual SNPs adjusted for covariates revealed association of rs4633 and rs4680 with post treatment improvement in VAS LBP (p = 0.02, mean difference (β = 13.5 and p = 0.02, β = 14.2 respectively. SNPs, rs4633 and rs4680 were found to be genotypically similar and in strong linkage disequilibrium (LD. A significant association was found with covariates, analgesics (p = 0.001, β = 18.6; anxiety and depression (p = 0.008, β = 15.4 and age (p = 0.03, mean difference per year (β = 0.7 at follow-up. There was a tendency for better improvement among heterozygous patients compared to the homozygous. No association was observed for the

  7. Genetic association signal near NTN4 in Tourette syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paschou, Peristera; Yu, Dongmei; Gerber, Gloria; Evans, Patrick; Tsetsos, Fotis; Davis, Lea K; Karagiannidis, Iordanis; Chaponis, Jonathan; Gamazon, Eric; Mueller-Vahl, Kirsten; Stuhrmann, Manfred; Schloegelhofer, Monika; Stamenkovic, Mara; Hebebrand, Johannes; Noethen, Markus; Nagy, Peter; Barta, Csaba; Tarnok, Zsanett; Rizzo, Renata; Depienne, Christel; Worbe, Yulia; Hartmann, Andreas; Cath, Danielle C; Budman, Cathy L; Sandor, Paul; Barr, Cathy; Wolanczyk, Thomas; Singer, Harvey; Chou, I-Ching; Grados, Marco; Posthuma, Danielle; Rouleau, Guy A; Aschauer, Harald; Freimer, Nelson B; Pauls, David L; Cox, Nancy J; Mathews, Carol A; Scharf, Jeremiah M

    2014-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder with a complex genetic etiology. Through an international collaboration, we genotyped 42 single nucleotide polymorphisms (p < 10(-3) ) from the recent TS genomewide association study (GWAS) in 609 independent cases and 610 ancestry-matched cont

  8. Genetically distinct subsets within ANCA-associated vasculitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lyons, Paul A

    2012-07-19

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis is a severe condition encompassing two major syndromes: granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly known as Wegener\\'s granulomatosis) and microscopic polyangiitis. Its cause is unknown, and there is debate about whether it is a single disease entity and what role ANCA plays in its pathogenesis. We investigated its genetic basis.

  9. Genetic association signal near NTN4 in Tourette syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paschou, Peristera; Yu, Dongmei; Gerber, Gloria; Evans, Patrick; Tsetsos, Fotis; Davis, Lea K; Karagiannidis, Iordanis; Chaponis, Jonathan; Gamazon, Eric; Mueller-Vahl, Kirsten; Stuhrmann, Manfred; Schloegelhofer, Monika; Stamenkovic, Mara; Hebebrand, Johannes; Noethen, Markus; Nagy, Peter; Barta, Csaba; Tarnok, Zsanett; Rizzo, Renata; Depienne, Christel; Worbe, Yulia; Hartmann, Andreas; Cath, Danielle C; Budman, Cathy L; Sandor, Paul; Barr, Cathy; Wolanczyk, Thomas; Singer, Harvey; Chou, I-Ching; Grados, Marco; Posthuma, Danielle; Rouleau, Guy A; Aschauer, Harald; Freimer, Nelson B; Pauls, David L; Cox, Nancy J; Mathews, Carol A; Scharf, Jeremiah M

    2014-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder with a complex genetic etiology. Through an international collaboration, we genotyped 42 single nucleotide polymorphisms (p < 10(-3) ) from the recent TS genomewide association study (GWAS) in 609 independent cases and 610 ancestry-matched cont

  10. Anti-TNF treatment response in rheumatoid arthritis patients is associated with genetic variation in the NLRP3-inflammasome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sode, Jacob; Vogel, Ulla; Bank, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Many patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) benefit from tumor necrosis factor-α blocking treatment (anti-TNF), but about one third do not respond. The objective of this study was to replicate and extend previously found associations between anti-TNF treatment response and genetic...... (relDAS28) were used as secondary outcomes. Subgroup analyses were stratified according to smoking status, type of anti-TNF drug and IgM-Rheumatoid Factor (IgM-RF) status. False discovery rate (FDR) controlling was used to adjust for multiple testing. RESULTS: Statistically significant associations...

  11. Genetic predisposition to elevated levels of C-reactive protein is associated with a decreased risk for preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spracklen, Cassandra N; Smith, Caitlin J; Saftlas, Audrey F; Triche, Elizabeth W; Bjonnes, Andrew; Keating, Brendan J; Saxena, Richa; Breheny, Patrick J; Dewan, Andrew T; Robinson, Jennifer G; Hoh, Josephine; Ryckman, Kelli K

    2017-02-01

    To examine the association between genetic predisposition to elevated C-reactive protein (CRP)and risk for preeclampsia using validated genetic loci for C-reactive protein. Preeclampsia cases (n = 177) and normotensive controls (n = 116) were selected from live birth certificates to nulliparous Iowa women during the period August 2002-May 2005. Disease status was verified by the medical chart review. Genetic predisposition to CRP was estimated by a genetic risk score on the basis of established loci for CRP levels. Logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate the relationships between the genotype score and preeclampsia. Replication analyses were performed in an independent, US population of preeclampsia cases (n = 516) and controls (n = 1,097) of European ancestry. The genetic risk score (GRS) related to higher levels of CRP demonstrated a significantly decreased risk of preeclampsia (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.82-0.96). When the GRS was analyzed by quartile, an inverse linear trend was observed (p = 0.0006). The results were similar after adjustments for the body mass index (BMI), smoking, and leisure-time physical activity. In the independent replication population, the association with the CRP GRS was also marginally significant (OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.92, 1.02). Meta-analysis of the two studies was statistically significant (OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.90, 0.99). Our data suggest an inverse, counterintuitive association between the genetic predisposition to elevated levels of CRP and a decreased risk of preeclampsia. This suggests that the blood CRP level is a marker of preeclampsia, but it does not appear to be a factor on the causal pathway.

  12. Replication of a Genome-Wide Association Study of Birth Weight in Preterm Neonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryckman, Kelli K; Feenstra, Bjarke; Shaffer, John R.; Bream, Elise NA; Geller, Frank; Feingold, Eleanor; Weeks, Daniel E; Gadow, Enrique; Cosentino, Viviana; Saleme, Cesar; Simhan, Hyagriv N; Merrill, David; Fong, Chin-To; Busch, Tamara; Berends, Susan K; Comas, Belen; Camelo, Jorge L; Boyd, Heather; Laurie, Cathy; Crosslin, David; Zhang, Qi; Doheny, Kim F; Pugh, Elizabeth; Melbye, Mads; Marazita, Mary L; Dagle, John M; Murray, Jeffrey C

    2011-01-01

    Objective To examine associations in a preterm population between rs9883204 in ADCY5 and rs900400 near LEKR1 and CCNL1 with birth weight. Both markers were associated with birth weight in a term population in a recent genome-wide association (GWA) study by Freathy et al. Study design A meta-analysis of mother and infant samples was performed for associations of rs900400 and rs9883204 with birth weight in 393 families from the U.S., 265 families from Argentina and 735 mother-infant pairs from Denmark. Z scores adjusted for infant sex and gestational age were generated for each population separately and regressed on allele counts. Association evidence was combined across sites by inverse-variance weighted meta-analysis. Results Each additional C allele of rs900400 (LEKR1/CCNL1) in infants was marginally associated with a 0.069 standard deviation (SD) lower birth weight (95% CI = −0.159 – 0.022, P = 0.068). This result was slightly more pronounced after adjusting for smoking (P = 0.036). There were no significant associations identified with rs9883204 or in maternal samples. Conclusions These results indicate the potential importance of this marker on birth weight irrespective of gestational age. PMID:21885063

  13. Association of genetic loci with sleep apnea in European Americans and African-Americans: the Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay R Patel

    Full Text Available Although obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is known to have a strong familial basis, no genetic polymorphisms influencing apnea risk have been identified in cross-cohort analyses. We utilized the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI Candidate Gene Association Resource (CARe to identify sleep apnea susceptibility loci. Using a panel of 46,449 polymorphisms from roughly 2,100 candidate genes on a customized Illumina iSelect chip, we tested for association with the apnea hypopnea index (AHI as well as moderate to severe OSA (AHI≥15 in 3,551 participants of the Cleveland Family Study and two cohorts participating in the Sleep Heart Health Study.Among 647 African-Americans, rs11126184 in the pleckstrin (PLEK gene was associated with OSA while rs7030789 in the lysophosphatidic acid receptor 1 (LPAR1 gene was associated with AHI using a chip-wide significance threshold of p-value<2×10(-6. Among 2,904 individuals of European ancestry, rs1409986 in the prostaglandin E2 receptor (PTGER3 gene was significantly associated with OSA. Consistency of effects between rs7030789 and rs1409986 in LPAR1 and PTGER3 and apnea phenotypes were observed in independent clinic-based cohorts.Novel genetic loci for apnea phenotypes were identified through the use of customized gene chips and meta-analyses of cohort data with replication in clinic-based samples. The identified SNPs all lie in genes associated with inflammation suggesting inflammation may play a role in OSA pathogenesis.

  14. The Association between Pediatric NAFLD and Common Genetic Variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Rosaria Umano

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is one of the most common complications of obesity. Several studies have shown that genetic predisposition probably plays an important role in its pathogenesis. In fact, in the last few years a large number of genetic studies have provided compelling evidence that some gene variants, especially those in genes encoding proteins regulating lipid metabolism, are associated with intra-hepatic fat accumulation. Here we provide a comprehensive review of the gene variants that have affected the natural history of the disease.

  15. Genetic variant rs17225178 in the ARNT2 gene is associated with Asperger Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Napoli, Agnese; Warrier, Varun; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev

    2015-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC) are neurodevelopmental conditions characterized by difficulties in communication and social interaction, alongside unusually repetitive behaviours and narrow interests. Asperger Syndrome (AS) is one subgroup of ASC and differs from classic autism in that in AS there is no language or general cognitive delay. Genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors are implicated in ASC and genes involved in neural connectivity and neurodevelopment are good candidates for studying the susceptibility to ASC. The aryl-hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator 2 (ARNT2) gene encodes a transcription factor involved in neurodevelopmental processes, neuronal connectivity and cellular responses to hypoxia. A mutation in this gene has been identified in individuals with ASC and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been nominally associated with AS and autistic traits in previous studies. In this study, we tested 34 SNPs in ARNT2 for association with AS in 118 cases and 412 controls of Caucasian origin. P values were adjusted for multiple comparisons, and linkage disequilibrium (LD) among the SNPs analysed was calculated in our sample. Finally, SNP annotation allowed functional and structural analyses of the genetic variants in ARNT2. We tested the replicability of our result using the genome-wide association studies (GWAS) database of the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC). We report statistically significant association of rs17225178 with AS. This SNP modifies transcription factor binding sites and regions that regulate the chromatin state in neural cell lines. It is also included in a LD block in our sample, alongside other genetic variants that alter chromatin regulatory regions in neural cells. These findings demonstrate that rs17225178 in the ARNT2 gene is associated with AS and support previous studies that pointed out an involvement of this gene in the predisposition to ASC.

  16. Methods for Analyzing Multivariate Phenotypes in Genetic Association Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiong; Wang, Yuanjia

    2012-05-01

    This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Multivariate phenotypes are frequently encountered in genetic association studies. The purpose of analyzing multivariate phenotypes usually includes discovery of novel genetic variants of pleiotropy effects, that is, affecting multiple phenotypes, and the ultimate goal of uncovering the underlying genetic mechanism. In recent years, there have been new method development and application of existing statistical methods to such phenotypes. In this paper, we provide a review of the available methods for analyzing association between a single marker and a multivariate phenotype consisting of the same type of components (e.g., all continuous or all categorical) or different types of components (e.g., some are continuous and others are categorical). We also reviewed causal inference methods designed to test whether the detected association with the multivariate phenotype is truly pleiotropy or the genetic marker exerts its effects on some phenotypes through affecting the others.

  17. Association of Hepatitis C Virus Replication Complexes with Microtubules and Actin Filaments Is Dependent on the Interaction of NS3 and NS5A▿

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Chao-Kuen; Jeng, King-Song; Machida, Keigo; Lai, Michael M. C.

    2008-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA replication complex (RC), which is composed of viral nonstructural (NS) proteins and host cellular proteins, replicates the viral RNA genome in association with intracellular membranes. Two viral NS proteins, NS3 and NS5A, are essential elements of the RC. Here, by using immunoprecipitation and fluorescence resonance energy transfer assays, we demonstrated that NS3 and NS5A interact with tubulin and actin. Furthermore, immunofluorescence microscopy and electron...

  18. Cervical cancer isolate PT3, super-permissive for adeno-associated virus replication, over-expresses DNA polymerase δ, PCNA, RFC and RPA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melchert Russell B

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adeno-associated virus (AAV type 2 is an important virus due to its use as a safe and effective human gene therapy vector and its negative association with certain malignancies. AAV, a dependo-parvovirus, autonomously replicates in stratified squamous epithelium. Such tissue occurs in the nasopharynx and anogenitals, from which AAV has been clinically isolated. Related autonomous parvoviruses also demonstrate cell tropism and preferentially replicate in oncogenically transformed cells. Combining these two attributes of parvovirus tropism, squamous and malignant, we assayed if AAV might replicate in squamous cervical carcinoma cell isolates. Results Three primary isolates (PT1-3 and two established cervical cancer cell lines were compared to normal keratinocytes (NK for their ability to replicate AAV. One isolate, PT3, allowed for high levels of AAV DNA replication and virion production compared to others. In research by others, four cellular components are known required for in vitro AAV DNA replication: replication protein A (RPA, replication factor C (RFC, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, and DNA polymerase delta (POLD1. Thus, we examined PT3 cells for expression of these components by DNA microarray and real-time quantitative PCR. All four components were over-expressed in PT3 over two representative low-permissive cell isolates (NK and PT1. However, this super-permissiveness did not result in PT3 cell death by AAV infection. Conclusion These data, for the first time, provide evidence that these four cellular components are likely important for AAV in vivo DNA replication as well as in vitro. These data also suggest that PT3 will be a useful reagent for investigating the AAV-permissive transcriptome and AAV anti-cancer effect.

  19. Conserved genetic pathways associated with microphthalmia, anophthalmia, and coloboma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Linda M; Semina, Elena V

    2015-06-01

    The human eye is a complex organ whose development requires extraordinary coordination of developmental processes. The conservation of ocular developmental steps in vertebrates suggests possible common genetic mechanisms. Genetic diseases involving the eye represent a leading cause of blindness in children and adults. During the last decades, there has been an exponential increase in genetic studies of ocular disorders. In this review, we summarize current success in identification of genes responsible for microphthalmia, anophthalmia, and coloboma (MAC) phenotypes, which are associated with early defects in embryonic eye development. Studies in animal models for the orthologous genes identified overlapping phenotypes for most factors, confirming the conservation of their function in vertebrate development. These animal models allow for further investigation of the mechanisms of MAC, integration of various identified genes into common developmental pathways and finally, provide an avenue for the development and testing of therapeutic interventions.

  20. Genetic variation influences the risk of bleeding after cardiac surgery: novel associations and validation of previous findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiff, G; Pleym, H; Stenseth, R; Wahba, A; Videm, V

    2015-07-01

    Severe post-operative bleeding in cardiac surgery is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. We hypothesized that variation in genetic susceptibility contributes to post-operative bleeding in addition to clinical factors. We included 1036 adults undergoing cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Two different endpoints for excessive post-operative bleeding were used, either defined as blood loss exceeding 2 ml/kg/h the first 4 h post-operatively or a composite including bleeding, transfusions, and reoperations. Twenty-two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) central in the coagulation and fibrinolysis systems or in platelet membrane receptors were genotyped, focusing on replication of earlier non-replicated findings and exploration of potential novel associations. Using logistic regression, significant SNPs were added to a model with only clinical variables to evaluate whether the genetic variables provided additional information. Univariate tests identified rs1799809 (located in the promoter region of the PROC gene), rs27646 and rs1062535 (in the ITGA2 gene), rs630014 (in the ABO gene), and rs6048 (in the F9 gene) as significantly associated with excessive post-operative bleeding (P after adjustment with clinical variables, showing almost unchanged odds ratios except for rs1799809 (P = 0.06). Addition of the genetic covariates to a logistic regression model with clinical variables significantly improved the model (P bleeding after cardiac surgery, of which two validated previously published associations. Addition of genetic information to models with only clinical variables improved the models. Our results indicate that common genetic variations significantly influence post-operative bleeding after cardiac surgery. © 2015 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Genetic association study identifies HSPB7 as a risk gene for idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Stark

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM is a structural heart disease with strong genetic background. Monogenic forms of DCM are observed in families with mutations located mostly in genes encoding structural and sarcomeric proteins. However, strong evidence suggests that genetic factors also affect the susceptibility to idiopathic DCM. To identify risk alleles for non-familial forms of DCM, we carried out a case-control association study, genotyping 664 DCM cases and 1,874 population-based healthy controls from Germany using a 50K human cardiovascular disease bead chip covering more than 2,000 genes pre-selected for cardiovascular relevance. After quality control, 30,920 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP were tested for association with the disease by logistic regression adjusted for gender, and results were genomic-control corrected. The analysis revealed a significant association between a SNP in HSPB7 gene (rs1739843, minor allele frequency 39% and idiopathic DCM (p = 1.06 × 10⁻⁶, OR  = 0.67 [95% CI 0.57-0.79] for the minor allele T. Three more SNPs showed p < 2.21 × 10⁻⁵. De novo genotyping of these four SNPs was done in three independent case-control studies of idiopathic DCM. Association between SNP rs1739843 and DCM was significant in all replication samples: Germany (n =564, n = 981 controls, p = 2.07 × 10⁻³, OR = 0.79 [95% CI 0.67-0.92], France 1 (n = 433 cases, n = 395 controls, p =3.73 × 10⁻³, OR  = 0.74 [95% CI 0.60-0.91], and France 2 (n = 249 cases, n = 380 controls, p = 2.26 × 10⁻⁴, OR  = 0.63 [95% CI 0.50-0.81]. The combined analysis of all four studies including a total of n = 1,910 cases and n = 3,630 controls showed highly significant evidence for association between rs1739843 and idiopathic DCM (p = 5.28 × 10⁻¹³, OR= 0.72 [95% CI 0.65-0.78]. None of the other three SNPs showed significant results in the replication stage.This finding of the HSPB7 gene from a genetic search for idiopathic DCM using

  2. Genetic risks and familial associations of small bowel carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Santosh Shenoy

    2016-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma of small intestines(SBA) is a relatively rare malignancy with poor outcomes due to delayed diagnosis.Fifty percent of patients have metastases on presentation and therefore early detection and treatment offers the best long term outcomes.Certain genetic polyposis syndromes and familial diseases are associatedwith increased risks for SBA.These include familial adenomatous polyposis(FAP),Lynch syndromes(LS),Juvenile polyposis syndrome,Peutz-Jeghers syndrome,Crohn’s disease(CD) and celiac disease.Mutations in APC gene,Mismatch repair genes,STK11 gene,and SMAD4 gene have been implicated for the genetic diseases respectively.While there are no specific inherited genetic mutations for CD,genome-wide association studies have established over 140 loci associated with CD.CpG island mutations with defects in mismatch repair genes have been identified in celiac disease.Significant diagnostic advances have occurred in the past decade and intuitively,it would seem beneficial to use these advanced modalities for surveillance of these patients.At present it is debatable and no clear data exists to support this approach except for established guidelines to diagnose duodenal polyps in FAP,and LS.Here we discuss the genetic alterations,cancer risks,signaling mechanisms and briefly touch the surveillance modalities available for these genetic and clinical syndromes.English language articles from Pub Med/Medline and Embase was searched were collected using the phrases "small-bowel adenocarcinoma,genetics,surveillance,familial adenomatous polyposis,lynch syndromes,Peutz-Jeghers syndrome,juvenile polyposis syndrome,CD and celiac disease".Figures,tables and schematic diagram to illustrate pathways are included in the review.

  3. Association of STAT4 with rheumatoid arthritis: a replication study in three European populations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orozco, G.; Alizadeh, B.Z.; Delgado-Vega, A.M.; Gonzalez-Gay, M.A.; Balsa, A.; Pascual-Salcedo, D.; Fernandez-Gutierrez, B.; Gonzalez-Escribano, M.F.; Petersson, I.F.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van; Barrera, P.; Coenen, M.J.; Radstake, T.R.D.J.; Leeuwen, M.A. van; Wijmenga, C.; Koeleman, B.P.; Alarcon-Riquelme, M.; Martin, J.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study was undertaken to investigate the previously reported association of the STAT4 polymorphism rs7574865 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in 3 different European populations from Spain, Sweden, and The Netherlands, comprising a total of 2,072 patients and 2,474 controls. METHODS:

  4. Association of STAT4 with rheumatoid arthritis : a replication study in three European populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orozco, Gisela; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Delgado-Vega, Angélica M; González-Gay, Miguel A; Balsa, Alejandro; Pascual-Salcedo, Dora; Fernández-Gutierrez, Benjamín; González-Escribano, María F; Petersson, Ingemar F; van Riel, Piet L C M; Barrera, Pilar; Coenen, Marieke J H; Radstake, Timothy R D J; van Leeuwen, Miek A; Wijmenga, Cisca; Koeleman, Bobby P C; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta; Martín, Javier

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study was undertaken to investigate the previously reported association of the STAT4 polymorphism rs7574865 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in 3 different European populations from Spain, Sweden, and The Netherlands, comprising a total of 2,072 patients and 2,474 controls. METHODS: Th

  5. Association of CD247 polymorphisms with rheumatoid arthritis: a replication study and a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Teruel

    Full Text Available Given the role of CD247 in the response of the T cells, its entailment in autoimmune diseases and in order to better clarify the role of this gene in RA susceptibility, we aimed to analyze CD247 gene variants previously associated with other autoimmune diseases (rs1052237, rs2056626 and rs864537 in a large independent European Caucasian population. However, no evidence of association was found for the analyzed CD247 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs with RA and with the presence/absence of anti-cyclic citrullinated polypeptide. We performed a meta-analysis including previously published GWAS data from the rs864537 variant, revealing an overall genome-wide significant association between this CD247 SNP and RA with anti-CCP (OR = 0.90, CI 95% = 0.87-0.93, Poverall = 2.1×10(-10. Our results show for first time a GWAS-level association between this CD247 polymorphism and RA risk.

  6. Association of STAT4 with rheumatoid arthritis: a replication study in three European populations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orozco, G.; Alizadeh, B.Z.; Delgado-Vega, A.M.; Gonzalez-Gay, M.A.; Balsa, A.; Pascual-Salcedo, D.; Fernandez-Gutierrez, B.; Gonzalez-Escribano, M.F.; Petersson, I.F.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van; Barrera, P.; Coenen, M.J.; Radstake, T.R.D.J.; Leeuwen, M.A. van; Wijmenga, C.; Koeleman, B.P.; Alarcon-Riquelme, M.; Martin, J.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study was undertaken to investigate the previously reported association of the STAT4 polymorphism rs7574865 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in 3 different European populations from Spain, Sweden, and The Netherlands, comprising a total of 2,072 patients and 2,474 controls. METHODS: Th

  7. No Reliable Association between Runs of Homozygosity and Schizophrenia in a Well-Powered Replication Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Emma C; Bjelland, Douglas W; Howrigan, Daniel P

    2016-01-01

    but significant relationship between Froh and schizophrenia (β = 4.86,CI(β) = [0.90,8.83],Z = 2.40,p = 0.02). Since Keller et al. (2012), several studies reported inconsistent association of ROH burden with complex traits, particularly in case-control data. These conflicting results might suggest that the effects...

  8. Genetic factors associated with cancer male breast: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalia Maria Tomaz Silveira

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The male breast cancer is a rare neoplastic framework, covers 1% of cases of breast cancer worldwide, 1% of malignant tumors in men and has an annual incidence of 1 per 100,000 men. Information was gathered about the current studies related to genetic character in addressed condition, in which the goal was to analyze aspects of predisposition and association, using 16 original articles indexed in the period between January 2011 to February 2016, written in English and Spanish, with experimental design or observational, using male breast cancer descriptors, breast cancer and genetic factor for breast cancer, as well as their English translations male breast cancer, cancer treatment, breast cancer and genetic factors. It was mainly discussed the genetic influence on the occurrence of male breast cancer, such as changes in suppressors BRCA genes, relationships with CHECK2 checkpoint, family history and links with Klinefelter syndrome, among other factors. Environmental aspects are also suggested by the literature on the clinical neoplasic manifestation, but with less conclusive emphases. Although the literature on the subject still need growth and deepening, we observe scientific reassurances about the importance of genetic influence, especially the BRCA 1, about the Multifactorial etiology of the neoplasia.

  9. Anatomy of Mammalian Replication Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takebayashi, Shin-ichiro; Ogata, Masato; Okumura, Katsuzumi

    2017-01-01

    Genetic information is faithfully copied by DNA replication through many rounds of cell division. In mammals, DNA is replicated in Mb-sized chromosomal units called “replication domains.” While genome-wide maps in multiple cell types and disease states have uncovered both dynamic and static properties of replication domains, we are still in the process of understanding the mechanisms that give rise to these properties. A better understanding of the molecular basis of replication domain regulation will bring new insights into chromosome structure and function. PMID:28350365

  10. Genetic Determinants of Metabolism and Benign Prostate Enlargement: Associations with Prostate Volume.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayush Giri

    Full Text Available Prostate enlargement leading to clinical benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH is associated with metabolic dysregulation and obesity. The genetic basis of this association is unclear. Our objective was to evaluate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs previously associated with metabolic disorders are also associated with prostate volume (PV. Participants included 876 men referred for prostate biopsy and found to be prostate cancer free. PV was measured by transrectal ultrasound. Samples were genotyped using the Illumina Cardio-MetaboChip platform. Multivariable adjusted linear regression models were used to evaluate SNPs (additive coding in relation to natural-log transformed (log PV. We compared SNP-PV results from biopsy-negative men to 442 men with low-grade prostate cancer with similar levels of obesity and PV. Beta-coefficients from the discovery and replication samples were then aggregated with fixed effects inverse variance weighted meta-analysis. SNP rs11736129 (near the pseudo-gene LOC100131429 was significantly associated with log-PV (beta: 0.16, p-value 1.16x10(-8 after adjusting for multiple testing. Other noteworthy SNPs that were nominally associated (p-value < 1x10(-4 with log-PV included rs9583484 (intronic SNP in COL4A2, rs10146527 (intronic SNP in NRXN3, rs9909466 (SNP near RPL32P31, and rs2241606 (synonymous SNP in SLC12A7. We found several SNPs in metabolic loci associated with PV. Further studies are needed to confirm our results and elucidate the mechanism between these genetic loci, PV, and clinical BPH.

  11. Genetic Determinants of Metabolism and Benign Prostate Enlargement: Associations with Prostate Volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Ayush; Edwards, Todd L; Motley, Saundra S; Byerly, Susan H; Fowke, Jay H

    2015-01-01

    Prostate enlargement leading to clinical benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is associated with metabolic dysregulation and obesity. The genetic basis of this association is unclear. Our objective was to evaluate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously associated with metabolic disorders are also associated with prostate volume (PV). Participants included 876 men referred for prostate biopsy and found to be prostate cancer free. PV was measured by transrectal ultrasound. Samples were genotyped using the Illumina Cardio-MetaboChip platform. Multivariable adjusted linear regression models were used to evaluate SNPs (additive coding) in relation to natural-log transformed (log) PV. We compared SNP-PV results from biopsy-negative men to 442 men with low-grade prostate cancer with similar levels of obesity and PV. Beta-coefficients from the discovery and replication samples were then aggregated with fixed effects inverse variance weighted meta-analysis. SNP rs11736129 (near the pseudo-gene LOC100131429) was significantly associated with log-PV (beta: 0.16, p-value 1.16x10(-8)) after adjusting for multiple testing. Other noteworthy SNPs that were nominally associated (p-value < 1x10(-4)) with log-PV included rs9583484 (intronic SNP in COL4A2), rs10146527 (intronic SNP in NRXN3), rs9909466 (SNP near RPL32P31), and rs2241606 (synonymous SNP in SLC12A7). We found several SNPs in metabolic loci associated with PV. Further studies are needed to confirm our results and elucidate the mechanism between these genetic loci, PV, and clinical BPH.

  12. Replicated association between the European GWAS locus rs10503253 at CSMD1 and schizophrenia in Asian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weiqing; Liu, Fang; Xu, Xiufeng; Bai, Yan

    2017-04-24

    Schizophrenia is one of the most severe mental disorders with significant heritability. Recent genetic association studies including genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified multiple common variants conferring risk of schizophrenia. An intronic SNP within CSMD1, rs10503253, is one of the top risk SNPs for schizophrenia in Europeans discovered through large GWAS. However, whether rs10503253 is also a risk SNP for schizophrenia in other populations, such as Asians, is still unknown. To answer this question, we examined the association of rs10503253 with schizophrenia in a total of 7514 schizophrenia patients, 9058 healthy controls and 1115 nuclear families originated from Asia using a meta-analytic approach. In the meta-analysis of all the samples, we confirmed the association of rs10503253 A-allele with schizophrenia in Asian population (P-value=0.0093, odds ratio=1.062, 95% confidence interval=1.015-1.111), and no genetic heterogeneity between individual samples (P=0.810) was observed. Using the "Leave-one-out" sensitivity analysis, we further confirmed the association between rs10503253 and schizophrenia. These data show that rs10503253 is likely a common schizophrenia risk variant in multiple ethnic groups, and further studies regarding the underlying molecular mechanisms are needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Association of Triglyceride-Related Genetic Variants With Mitral Annular Calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshar, Mehdi; Luk, Kevin; Do, Ron; Dufresne, Line; Owens, David S; Harris, Tamara B; Peloso, Gina M; Kerr, Kathleen F; Wong, Quenna; Smith, Albert V; Budoff, Mathew J; Rotter, Jerome I; Cupples, L Adrienne; Rich, Stephen S; Engert, James C; Gudnason, Vilmundur; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Post, Wendy S; Thanassoulis, George

    2017-06-20

    Mitral annular calcium (MAC), commonly identified by cardiac imaging, is associated with cardiovascular events and predisposes to the development of clinically important mitral valve regurgitation and mitral valve stenosis. However, its biological determinants remain largely unknown. The authors sought to evaluate whether a genetic predisposition to elevations in plasma lipids is associated with the presence of MAC. The authors used 3 separate Mendelian randomization techniques to evaluate the associations of lipid genetic risk scores (GRS) with MAC in 3 large patient cohorts: the Framingham Health Study, MESA (Multiethnic European Study of Atherosclerosis), and the AGE-RS (Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility-Reykjavik Study). The authors provided cross-ethnicity replication in the MESA Hispanic-American participants. MAC was present in 1,149 participants (20.4%). In pooled analyses across all 3 cohorts, a triglyceride GRS was significantly associated with the presence of MAC (odds ratio [OR] per triglyceride GRS unit: 1.73; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.24 to 2.41; p = 0.0013). Neither low- nor high-density lipoprotein cholesterol GRS was significantly associated with MAC. Results were consistent in cross-ethnicity analyses among the MESA Hispanic-Americans cohort (OR per triglyceride GRS unit: 2.04; 95% CI: 1.03 to 4.03; p = 0.04). In joint meta-analysis across all included cohorts, the triglyceride GRS was associated with MAC (OR per triglyceride GRS unit: 1.79; 95% CI: 1.32 to 2.41; p = 0.0001). The results were robust to several sensitivity analyses that limit both known and unknown forms of genetic pleiotropy. Genetic predisposition to elevated triglyceride levels was associated with the presence of MAC, a risk factor for clinically significant mitral valve disease, suggesting a causal association. Whether reducing triglyceride levels can lower the incidence of clinically significant mitral valve disease requires further study. Copyright © 2017

  14. Shared genetics underlying epidemiological association between endometriosis and ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Yi; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Painter, Jodie N;

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated associations between endometriosis and certain histotypes of ovarian cancer, including clear cell, low-grade serous and endometrioid carcinomas. We aimed to determine whether the observed associations might be due to shared genetic aetiology. To address...... this, we used two endometriosis datasets genotyped on common arrays with full-genome coverage (3194 cases and 7060 controls) and a large ovarian cancer dataset genotyped on the customized Illumina Infinium iSelect (iCOGS) arrays (10 065 cases and 21 663 controls). Previous work has suggested...... that a large number of genetic variants contribute to endometriosis and ovarian cancer (all histotypes combined) susceptibility. Here, using the iCOGS data, we confirmed polygenic architecture for most histotypes of ovarian cancer. This led us to evaluate if the polygenic effects are shared across diseases. We...

  15. Genetic variants associated with warfarin dosage in Kuwaiti population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Sumi Elsa; Antony, Dinu; Eaaswarkhanth, Muthukrishnan; Hebbar, Prashantha; Alkayal, Fadi; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Alsmadi, Osama; Thanaraj, Thangavel Alphonse

    2017-06-01

    Assessing the distinct prevalence or absence of genetic variants associated with differential response to the anticoagulant medication of warfarin in different population groups is actively pursued by pharmacogenomics community. Populations from Arabian Peninsula are underrepresented in such studies. By way of examining exome- and genome-wide genotype data from 1395 Arab individuals in Kuwait, we report distinct occurrence of warfarin response-related variants rs12460590_A/CYP2A7, rs2108622_T/CYP4F2, rs2884737_C/VKORC1 and distinct absence of rs11150606_C/PRSS53 in Kuwaiti population. The presented results in conjunction with similar literature reports on Qatari population enhance the worldwide understanding on population-specific distributions of genetic variants associated with warfarin drug dosage.

  16. Eukaryotic DNA Replication Fork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgers, Peter M J; Kunkel, Thomas A

    2017-06-20

    This review focuses on the biogenesis and composition of the eukaryotic DNA replication fork, with an emphasis on the enzymes that synthesize DNA and repair discontinuities on the lagging strand of the replication fork. Physical and genetic methodologies aimed at understanding these processes are discussed. The preponderance of evidence supports a model in which DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε) carries out the bulk of leading strand DNA synthesis at an undisturbed replication fork. DNA polymerases α and δ carry out the initiation of Okazaki fragment synthesis and its elongation and maturation, respectively. This review also discusses alternative proposals, including cellular processes during which alternative forks may be utilized, and new biochemical studies with purified proteins that are aimed at reconstituting leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis separately and as an integrated replication fork.

  17. Web-based, participant-driven studies yield novel genetic associations for common traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Eriksson

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the recent rapid growth in genome-wide data, much of human variation remains entirely unexplained. A significant challenge in the pursuit of the genetic basis for variation in common human traits is the efficient, coordinated collection of genotype and phenotype data. We have developed a novel research framework that facilitates the parallel study of a wide assortment of traits within a single cohort. The approach takes advantage of the interactivity of the Web both to gather data and to present genetic information to research participants, while taking care to correct for the population structure inherent to this study design. Here we report initial results from a participant-driven study of 22 traits. Replications of associations (in the genes OCA2, HERC2, SLC45A2, SLC24A4, IRF4, TYR, TYRP1, ASIP, and MC1R for hair color, eye color, and freckling validate the Web-based, self-reporting paradigm. The identification of novel associations for hair morphology (rs17646946, near TCHH; rs7349332, near WNT10A; and rs1556547, near OFCC1, freckling (rs2153271, in BNC2, the ability to smell the methanethiol produced after eating asparagus (rs4481887, near OR2M7, and photic sneeze reflex (rs10427255, near ZEB2, and rs11856995, near NR2F2 illustrates the power of the approach.

  18. Web-based, participant-driven studies yield novel genetic associations for common traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Nicholas; Macpherson, J Michael; Tung, Joyce Y; Hon, Lawrence S; Naughton, Brian; Saxonov, Serge; Avey, Linda; Wojcicki, Anne; Pe'er, Itsik; Mountain, Joanna

    2010-06-24

    Despite the recent rapid growth in genome-wide data, much of human variation remains entirely unexplained. A significant challenge in the pursuit of the genetic basis for variation in common human traits is the efficient, coordinated collection of genotype and phenotype data. We have developed a novel research framework that facilitates the parallel study of a wide assortment of traits within a single cohort. The approach takes advantage of the interactivity of the Web both to gather data and to present genetic information to research participants, while taking care to correct for the population structure inherent to this study design. Here we report initial results from a participant-driven study of 22 traits. Replications of associations (in the genes OCA2, HERC2, SLC45A2, SLC24A4, IRF4, TYR, TYRP1, ASIP, and MC1R) for hair color, eye color, and freckling validate the Web-based, self-reporting paradigm. The identification of novel associations for hair morphology (rs17646946, near TCHH; rs7349332, near WNT10A; and rs1556547, near OFCC1), freckling (rs2153271, in BNC2), the ability to smell the methanethiol produced after eating asparagus (rs4481887, near OR2M7), and photic sneeze reflex (rs10427255, near ZEB2, and rs11856995, near NR2F2) illustrates the power of the approach.

  19. Methods for meta-analysis in genetic association studies: a review of their potential and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavvoura, Fotini K; Ioannidis, John P A

    2008-02-01

    Meta-analysis offers the opportunity to combine evidence from retrospectively accumulated or prospectively generated data. Meta-analyses may provide summary estimates and can help in detecting and addressing potential inconsistency between the combined datasets. Application of meta-analysis in genetic associations presents considerable potential and several pitfalls. In this review, we present basic principles of meta-analytic methods, adapted for human genome epidemiology. We describe issues that arise in the retrospective or the prospective collection of relevant data through various sources, common traps to consider in the appraisal of evidence and potential biases that may interfere. We describe the relative merits and caveats for common methods used to trace inconsistency across studies along with possible reasons for non-replication of proposed associations. Different statistical models may be employed to combine data and some common misconceptions may arise in the process. Several meta-analysis diagnostics are often applied or misapplied in the literature, and we comment on their use and limitations. An alternative to overcome limitations arising from retrospective combination of data from published studies is to create networks of research teams working in the same field and perform collaborative meta-analyses of individual participant data, ideally on a prospective basis. We discuss the advantages and the challenges inherent in such collaborative approaches. Meta-analysis can be a useful tool in dissecting the genetics of complex diseases and traits, provided its methods are properly applied and interpreted.

  20. Genetic variants in the CPNE5 gene are associated with alcohol dependence and obesity in Caucasian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke-Sheng; Zuo, Lingjun; Pan, Yue; Xie, Changchun; Luo, Xingguang

    2015-12-01

    Alcohol addiction may increase the risk of obesity due to shared genetic components. The Copine V (CPNE5) gene is involved in Ca(2+) binding and may play an important role in the development of the central nervous system. This study tested the genetic associations of 77 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the CPNE5 gene with alcohol dependence (AD) and obesity using a Caucasian sample - The Study of Addiction - Genetics and Environment (SAGE) sample (1066 AD cases and 1278 non-AD controls, 422 obese cases and 1395 non-obese controls). The Marshfield sample (1442 obese cases and 2122 non-obese controls) was used for replication of obesity. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed using the PLINK software. In the SAGE sample, we identified 10 SNPs associated with AD and 17 SNPs associated with obesity (p obesity (OR = 0.77, 0.77, 0.78, 0.77, 0.68 and 1.18, respectively; p = 2.74 × 10(-3), 2.69 × 10(-3), 2.45 × 10(-3), 1.01 × 10(-3), 5.18 × 10(-3) and 3.85 × 10(-2), respectively). In the Marshfield sample, rs3752480 was associated with obesity (p = 0.0379). In addition, four SNPs (rs9986517, rs10456444, rs7763347 and rs4714010) showed associations with obesity in the meta-analysis using both samples (p = 0.00493, 0.0274, 0.00346, and 0.0141, respectively). These findings provide the first evidence of common genetic variants in the CPNE5 gene influencing both the AD and obesity; and will serve as a resource for replication in other populations.

  1. A Novel Rrm3 Function in Restricting DNA Replication via an Orc5-Binding Domain Is Genetically Separable from Rrm3 Function as an ATPase/Helicase in Facilitating Fork Progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syed, Salahuddin; Madsen, Claus Desler; Rasmussen, Lene J.;

    2016-01-01

    In response to replication stress cells activate the intra-S checkpoint, induce DNA repair pathways, increase nucleotide levels, and inhibit origin firing. Here, we report that Rrm3 associates with a subset of replication origins and controls DNA synthesis during replication stress. The N......-terminal domain required for control of DNA synthesis maps to residues 186–212 that are also critical for binding Orc5 of the origin recognition complex. Deletion of this domain is lethal to cells lacking the replication checkpoint mediator Mrc1 and leads to mutations upon exposure to the replication stressor......-dependent error-free DNA damage bypass act as independent mechanisms on DNA lesions that arise when Rrm3 catalytic activity is disrupted whereas these mechanisms are dispensable for DNA damage tolerance when the replication function is disrupted, indicating that the DNA lesions generated by the loss of each...

  2. Differential Impact of Resistance-Associated Mutations to Protease Inhibitors and Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors on HIV-1 Replication Capacity

    OpenAIRE

    Hsieh, Szu-Min; Pan, Sung-Ching; Chang, Sui-Yuan; Hung, Chien-Ching; Sheng, Wang-Huei; Chen, Mao-Yuan; Chang, Shan-Chwen

    2013-01-01

    The effects of drug resistance on HIV-1 replication capacity have been studied, but data from clinical isolates are few. We accessed the patients with HIV-1 infection at the National Taiwan University Hospital who experienced virological failure. Genotypic susceptibility and replication capacity of clinical HIV-1 isolates were measured. There were 80 patients enrolled between September 2007 and August 2010. The HIV-1 replication capacity declined significantly with the increasing number of ma...

  3. An epigenome-wide association meta-analysis of prenatal maternal stress in neonates: A model approach for replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijlaarsdam, Jolien; Pappa, Irene; Walton, Esther; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J; Mileva-Seitz, Viara R; Rippe, Ralph C A; Roza, Sabine J; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Verhulst, Frank C; Felix, Janine F; Cecil, Charlotte A M; Relton, Caroline L; Gaunt, Tom R; McArdle, Wendy; Mill, Jonathan; Barker, Edward D; Tiemeier, Henning; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal maternal stress exposure has been associated with neonatal differential DNA methylation. However, the available evidence in humans is largely based on candidate gene methylation studies, where only a few CpG sites were evaluated. The aim of this study was to examine the association between prenatal exposure to maternal stress and offspring genome-wide cord blood methylation using different methods. First, we conducted a meta-analysis and follow-up pathway analyses. Second, we used novel region discovery methods [i.e., differentially methylated regions (DMRs) analyses]. To this end, we used data from two independent population-based studies, the Generation R Study (n = 912) and the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC, n = 828), to (i) measure genome-wide DNA methylation in cord blood and (ii) extract a prenatal maternal stress composite. The meta-analysis (ntotal = 1,740) revealed no epigenome-wide (meta P meta-analysis (meta P meta-analysis, the current study indicates that there are no large effects of prenatal maternal stress exposure on neonatal DNA methylation. Such replication efforts are essential in the search for robust associations, whether derived from candidate gene methylation or epigenome-wide studies.

  4. Common Genetic Variant in VIT Is Associated with Human Brain Asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadayon, Sayed H; Vaziri-Pashkam, Maryam; Kahali, Pegah; Ansari Dezfouli, Mitra; Abbassian, Abdolhossein

    2016-01-01

    Brain asymmetry varies across individuals. However, genetic factors contributing to this normal variation are largely unknown. Here we studied variation of cortical surface area asymmetry in a large sample of subjects. We performed principal component analysis (PCA) to capture correlated asymmetry variation across cortical regions. We found that caudal and rostral anterior cingulate together account for a substantial part of asymmetry variation among individuals. To find SNPs associated with this subset of brain asymmetry variation we performed a genome-wide association study followed by replication in an independent cohort. We identified one SNP (rs11691187) that had genome-wide significant association (P Combined = 2.40e-08). The rs11691187 is in the first intron of VIT. In a follow-up analysis, we found that VIT gene expression is associated with brain asymmetry in six donors of the Allen Human Brain Atlas. Based on these findings we suggest that VIT contributes to normal brain asymmetry variation. Our results can shed light on disorders associated with altered brain asymmetry.

  5. Genetic evidence for the association between the early growth response 3 (EGR3 gene and schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Zhang

    Full Text Available Recently, two genome scan meta-analysis studies have found strong evidence for the association of loci on chromosome 8p with schizophrenia. The early growth response 3 (EGR3 gene located in chromosome 8p21.3 was also found to be involved in the etiology of schizophrenia. However, subsequent studies failed to replicate this finding. To investigate the genetic role of EGR3 in Chinese patients, we genotyped four SNPs (average interval ∼2.3 kb in the chromosome region of EGR3 in 470 Chinese schizophrenia patients and 480 healthy control subjects. The SNP rs35201266 (located in intron 1 of EGR3 showed significant differences between cases and controls in both genotype frequency distribution (P = 0.016 and allele frequency distribution (P = 0.009. Analysis of the haplotype rs35201266-rs3750192 provided significant evidence for association with schizophrenia (P = 0.0012; a significant difference was found for the common haplotype AG (P = 0.0005. Furthermore, significant associations were also found in several other two-, and three-SNP tests of haplotype analyses. The meta-analysis revealed a statistically significant association between rs35201266 and schizophrenia (P = 0.0001. In summary, our study supports the association of EGR3 with schizophrenia in our Han Chinese sample, and further functional exploration of the EGR3 gene will contribute to the molecular basis for the complex network underlying schizophrenia pathogenesis.

  6. Choosing mates based on the diet of your ancestors: replication of non-genetic assortative mating in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Najarro

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Assortative mating has been a focus of considerable research because of its potential to influence biodiversity at many scales. Sharon et al. (2010 discovered that an inbred strain of Drosophila melanogaster mated assortatively based on the diet of previous generations, leading to initial reproductive isolation without genetic evolution. This behavior was reproduced by manipulating the microbiome independently of the diet, pointing to extracellular bacterial symbionts as the assortative mating cue. To further investigate the biological significance of this result, we attempted to reproduce this phenomenon in an independent laboratory using different genotypes and additional mating assays. Supporting the previous result, we found that a different inbred strain also mated assortatively based on the diets of previous generations. However, we were unable to generate assortative mating in an outbred strain from North Carolina. Our results support the potential for non-genetic mechanisms to influence reproductive isolation, but additional work is needed to investigate the importance of this mechanism in natural populations of Drosophila.

  7. Ankyrin 3: genetic association with bipolar disorder and relevance to disease pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leussis Melanie P

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bipolar disorder (BD is a multi-factorial disorder caused by genetic and environmental influences. It has a large genetic component, with heritability estimated between 59-93%. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS using large BD patient populations have identified a number of genes with strong statistical evidence for association with susceptibility for BD. Among the most significant and replicated genes is ankyrin 3 (ANK3, a large gene that encodes multiple isoforms of the ankyrin G protein. This article reviews the current evidence for genetic association of ANK3 with BD, followed by a comprehensive overview of the known biology of the ankyrin G protein, focusing on its neural functions and their potential relevance to BD. Ankyrin G is a scaffold protein that is known to have many essential functions in the brain, although the mechanism by which it contributes to BD is unknown. These functions include organizational roles for subcellular domains in neurons including the axon initial segment and nodes of Ranvier, through which ankyrin G orchestrates the localization of key ion channels and GABAergic presynaptic terminals, as well as creating a diffusion barrier that limits transport into the axon and helps define axo-dendritic polarity. Ankyrin G is postulated to have similar structural and organizational roles at synaptic terminals. Finally, ankyrin G is implicated in both neurogenesis and neuroprotection. ANK3 and other BD risk genes participate in some of the same biological pathways and neural processes that highlight several mechanisms by which they may contribute to BD pathophysiology. Biological investigation in cellular and animal model systems will be critical for elucidating the mechanism through which ANK3 confers risk of BD. This knowledge is expected to lead to a better understanding of the brain abnormalities contributing to BD symptoms, and to potentially identify new targets for treatment and intervention

  8. Association of a common rs9939609 variant in the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene with obesity and metabolic phenotypes in a Taiwanese population: a replication study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TUN-JEN HSIAO; LIN EUGENE

    2016-09-01

    It is a key challenge to conduct reproducibility in genetic research, especially association studies in obesity. While susceptibility of a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs9939609, in the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene to obesity has been reported in various populations, data from Asians is less conclusive. This replication study was carried out to test whether theFTO rs9939609 SNP is a predictive factor for obesity and obesity-related metabolic traits in a Taiwanese population. A total of 1188 Taiwanese subjects were recruited for this study. The FTO rs9939609 SNP was genotyped by theTaqman assay. Obesity-related metabolic traits such as triglyceride, waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, creatinine, alanine aminotransferase and fasting glucose were measured. Our data revealed that the FTO rs9939609 SNP exhibited a significant association with obesity (BMI >=30 kg/m ²) among the subjects ( P=0.026). However, the FTO rs9939609 SNP did not exhibit any significant association with obesity-related metabolic traits among the subjects. Our results indicated that the FTO rs9939609 SNP may be linked with the risk of obesity in Taiwanese subject

  9. Association of a common rs9939609 variant in the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene with obesity and metabolic phenotypes in a Taiwanese population: a replication study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Tun-Jen; Lin, Eugene

    2016-09-01

    It is a key challenge to conduct reproducibility in genetic research, especially association studies in obesity. While susceptibility of a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs9939609, in the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene to obesity has been reported in various populations, data from Asians is less conclusive. This replication study was carried out to test whether the FTO rs9939609 SNP is a predictive factor for obesity and obesity-related metabolic traits in a Taiwanese population. A total of 1188 Taiwanese subjects were recruited for this study. The FTO rs9939609 SNP was genotyped by the Taqman assay. Obesity-related metabolic traits such as triglyceride, waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, creatinine, alanine aminotransferase and fasting glucose were measured. Our data revealed that the FTO rs9939609 SNP exhibited a significant association with obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m²) among the subjects (P = 0.026). However, the FTO rs9939609 SNP did not exhibit any significant association with obesity-related metabolic traits among the subjects. Our results indicated that the FTO rs9939609 SNP may be linked with the risk of obesity in Taiwanese subjects.

  10. Screening of the Human Kinome Identifies MSK1/2-CREB1 as an Essential Pathway Mediating Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Lytic Replication during Primary Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fan; Sawant, Tanvee Vinod; Lan, Ke; Lu, Chun; Jung, Jae U.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Viruses often hijack cellular pathways to facilitate infection and replication. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is an oncogenic gammaherpesvirus etiologically associated with Kaposi's sarcoma, a vascular tumor of endothelial cells. Despite intensive studies, cellular pathways mediating KSHV infection and replication are still not well defined. Using an antibody array approach, we examined cellular proteins phosphorylated during primary KSHV infection of primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Enrichment analysis identified integrin/mitogen-activated protein kinase (integrin/MAPK), insulin/epidermal growth factor receptor (insulin/EGFR), and JAK/STAT as the activated networks during primary KSHV infection. The transcriptional factor CREB1 (cyclic AMP [cAMP]-responsive element-binding protein 1) had the strongest increase in phosphorylation. While knockdown of CREB1 had no effect on KSHV entry and trafficking, it drastically reduced the expression of lytic transcripts and proteins and the production of infectious virions. Chemical activation of CREB1 significantly enhanced viral lytic replication. In contrast, CREB1 neither influenced the expression of the latent gene LANA nor affected KSHV infectivity. Mechanistically, CREB1 was not activated through the classic cAMP/protein kinase A (cAMP/PKA) pathway or via the AKT, MK2, and RSK pathways. Rather, CREB1 was activated by the mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinases 1 and 2 (MSK1/2). Consequently, chemical inhibition or knockdown of MSKs significantly inhibited the KSHV lytic replication program; however, it had a minimal effect on LANA expression and KSHV infectivity. Together, these results identify the MSK1/2-CREB1 proteins as novel essential effectors of KSHV lytic replication during primary infection. The differential effect of the MSK1/2-CREB1 pathway on the expression of viral latent and lytic genes might control the robustness of viral lytic replication, and therefore the

  11. An Adaptive Genetic Association Test Using Double Kernel Machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Xiang; Epstein, Michael P; Ghosh, Debashis

    2015-10-01

    Recently, gene set-based approaches have become very popular in gene expression profiling studies for assessing how genetic variants are related to disease outcomes. Since most genes are not differentially expressed, existing pathway tests considering all genes within a pathway suffer from considerable noise and power loss. Moreover, for a differentially expressed pathway, it is of interest to select important genes that drive the effect of the pathway. In this article, we propose an adaptive association test using double kernel machines (DKM), which can both select important genes within the pathway as well as test for the overall genetic pathway effect. This DKM procedure first uses the garrote kernel machines (GKM) test for the purposes of subset selection and then the least squares kernel machine (LSKM) test for testing the effect of the subset of genes. An appealing feature of the kernel machine framework is that it can provide a flexible and unified method for multi-dimensional modeling of the genetic pathway effect allowing for both parametric and nonparametric components. This DKM approach is illustrated with application to simulated data as well as to data from a neuroimaging genetics study.

  12. Genetic variants in toll-like receptors are not associated with rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility or anti-tumour necrosis factor treatment outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke J H Coenen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several studies point to a role of Toll-like receptors (TLRs in the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. We investigated if genetic variants in TLR genes are associated with RA and response to tumour necrosis factor blocking (anti-TNF medication. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 22 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in seven TLR genes were genotyped in a Dutch cohort consisting of 378 RA patients and 294 controls. Significantly associated variants were investigated in replication cohorts from The Netherlands, United Kingdom and Sweden (2877 RA patients and 2025 controls. 182 of the Dutch patients were treated with anti-TNF medication. Using these patients and a replication cohort (269 Swedish patients we analysed if genetic variants in TLR genes were associated with anti-TNF outcome. In the discovery phase of the study we found a significant association of SNPs rs2072493 in TLR5 and rs3853839 in TLR7 with RA disease susceptibility. Meta-analysis of discovery and replication cohorts did not confirm these findings. SNP rs2072493 in TLR5 was associated with anti-TNF outcome in the Dutch but not in the Swedish population. CONCLUSION: We conclude that genetic variants in TLRs do not play a major role in susceptibility for developing RA nor in anti-TNF treatment outcome in a Caucasian population.

  13. Multiethnic genetic association studies improve power for locus discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara L Pulit

    Full Text Available To date, genome-wide association studies have focused almost exclusively on populations of European ancestry. These studies continue with the advent of next-generation sequencing, designed to systematically catalog and test low-frequency variation for a role in disease. A complementary approach would be to focus further efforts on cohorts of multiple ethnicities. This leverages the idea that population genetic drift may have elevated some variants to higher allele frequency in different populations, boosting statistical power to detect an association. Based on empirical allele frequency distributions from eleven populations represented in HapMap Phase 3 and the 1000 Genomes Project, we simulate a range of genetic models to quantify the power of association studies in multiple ethnicities relative to studies that exclusively focus on samples of European ancestry. In each of these simulations, a first phase of GWAS in exclusively European samples is followed by a second GWAS phase in any of the other populations (including a multiethnic design. We find that nontrivial power gains can be achieved by conducting future whole-genome studies in worldwide populations, where, in particular, African populations contribute the largest relative power gains for low-frequency alleles (<5% of moderate effect that suffer from low power in samples of European descent. Our results emphasize the importance of broadening genetic studies to worldwide populations to ensure efficient discovery of genetic loci contributing to phenotypic trait variability, especially for those traits for which large numbers of samples of European ancestry have already been collected and tested.

  14. Are genetic variants for tobacco smoking associated with cannabis involvement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Arpana; Lynskey, Michael T; Kapoor, Manav; Bucholz, Kathleen K; Edenberg, Howard J; Schuckit, Marc; Brooks, Andrew; Hesselbrock, Victor; Kramer, John; Saccone, Nancy; Tischfield, Jay; Bierut, Laura J

    2015-05-01

    Cannabis users are highly likely to also be tobacco cigarette smokers and a proportion of this comorbidity is attributable to shared genetic influences. Three large meta-analyses of genomewide association studies (GWAS) of tobacco smoking have identified multiple genomewide significant (psmoking and with cannabis involvement in an independent sample. Eleven SNPs associated with cigarettes per day (CPD), ever versus never smoking and current smoking/smoking cessation at psmoking measures in 2716 European-American subjects from the Study of Addictions Genes and Environment (SAGE) and with lifetime and current cannabis use and DSM-IV cannabis abuse/dependence. Cannabis use and tobacco smoking correlated at 0.54. Rs16969968 in CHRNA5 (and its proxy, rs1051730 in CHRNA3) and rs1451240, a proxy for rs13280604 in CHRNB3, were associated with CPD after Bonferroni correction (psmoking initiation, as in the original meta-analysis and also with lifetime cannabis use. Associations with cannabis involvement were no longer significant upon adjustment for the tobacco smoking measures. The modest associations between cannabis involvement and SNPs for tobacco smoking were not independent of the comorbidity between tobacco and cannabis involvement. Larger samples of individuals might be required to articulate the specific genetic architecture of cannabis involvement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A strategy analysis for genetic association studies with known inbreeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    del Giacco Stefano

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Association studies consist in identifying the genetic variants which are related to a specific disease through the use of statistical multiple hypothesis testing or segregation analysis in pedigrees. This type of studies has been very successful in the case of Mendelian monogenic disorders while it has been less successful in identifying genetic variants related to complex diseases where the insurgence depends on the interactions between different genes and the environment. The current technology allows to genotype more than a million of markers and this number has been rapidly increasing in the last years with the imputation based on templates sets and whole genome sequencing. This type of data introduces a great amount of noise in the statistical analysis and usually requires a great number of samples. Current methods seldom take into account gene-gene and gene-environment interactions which are fundamental especially in complex diseases. In this paper we propose to use a non-parametric additive model to detect the genetic variants related to diseases which accounts for interactions of unknown order. Although this is not new to the current literature, we show that in an isolated population, where the most related subjects share also most of their genetic code, the use of additive models may be improved if the available genealogical tree is taken into account. Specifically, we form a sample of cases and controls with the highest inbreeding by means of the Hungarian method, and estimate the set of genes/environmental variables, associated with the disease, by means of Random Forest. Results We have evidence, from statistical theory, simulations and two applications, that we build a suitable procedure to eliminate stratification between cases and controls and that it also has enough precision in identifying genetic variants responsible for a disease. This procedure has been successfully used for the beta-thalassemia, which is

  16. Enterovirus 71 virion-associated galectin-1 facilitates viral replication and stability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Huan Lee

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV71 infection causes a myriad of diseases from mild hand-foot-and-mouth disease or herpangina to fatal brain stem encephalitis complicated with pulmonary edema. Several severe EV71 endemics have occurred in Asia-Pacific region, including Taiwan, and have become a serious threat to children's health. EV71 infection is initiated by the attachment of the virion to the target cell surface. Although this process relies primarily upon interaction between viruses and cell surface receptors, soluble factors may also influence the binding of EV71 to host cells. Galectin-1 has been reported to participate in several virus infections, but is not addressed in EV71. In this study, we found that the serum levels of galectin-1 in EV71-infected children were higher than those in non-infected people. In EV71 infected cells, galectin-1 was found to be associated with the EV71 VP1 and VP3 via carbohydrate residues and subsequently released and bound to another cell surface along with the virus. EV71 propagated from galectin-1 knockdown SK-N-SH cells exhibited lower infectivity in cultured cells and less pathogenicity in mice than the virus propagated from parental cells. In addition, this galectin-1-free EV71 virus was sensitive to high temperature and lost its viability after long-term storage, which could be restored following supplement of recombinant galectin-1. Taken together, our findings uncover a new role of galectin-1 in facilitating EV71 virus infection.

  17. Replication of a rare protective allele in the noradrenaline transporter gene and ADHD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, X.; Hawi, Z.; Brookes, K.J.; Anney, R.; Bellgrove, M.; Franke, B.; Barry, E.; Chen, W.; Kuntsi, J.; Banaschewski, T.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Ebstein, R.; Fitzgerald, M.; Miranda, A.; Oades, R.D.; Roeyers, H.; Rothenberger, A.; Sergeant, J.A.; Sonuga-Barke, E.; Steinhausen, H.C.; Faraone, S.V.; Gill, M.; Asherson, P.

    2008-01-01

    Replication is a key to resolving whether a reported genetic association represents a false positive finding or an actual genetic risk factor. In a previous study screening 51 candidate genes for association with ADHD in a multi-centre European sample (the IMAGE project), two single nucleotide polym

  18. Database Replication

    CERN Document Server

    Kemme, Bettina

    2010-01-01

    Database replication is widely used for fault-tolerance, scalability and performance. The failure of one database replica does not stop the system from working as available replicas can take over the tasks of the failed replica. Scalability can be achieved by distributing the load across all replicas, and adding new replicas should the load increase. Finally, database replication can provide fast local access, even if clients are geographically distributed clients, if data copies are located close to clients. Despite its advantages, replication is not a straightforward technique to apply, and

  19. Genetic determinants of circulating interleukin-1 receptor antagonist levels and their association with glycemic traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herder, Christian; Nuotio, Marja-Liisa; Shah, Sonia; Blankenberg, Stefan; Brunner, Eric J; Carstensen, Maren; Gieger, Christian; Grallert, Harald; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kettunen, Johannes; Kivimäki, Mika; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kristiansson, Kati; Langenberg, Claudia; Lehtimäki, Terho; Luotola, Kari; Marzi, Carola; Müller, Christian; Peters, Annette; Prokisch, Holger; Raitakari, Olli; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Roden, Michael; Salmi, Marko; Schramm, Katharina; Swerdlow, Daniel; Tabak, Adam G; Thorand, Barbara; Wareham, Nick; Wild, Philipp S; Zeller, Tanja; Hingorani, Aroon D; Witte, Daniel R; Kumari, Meena; Perola, Markus; Salomaa, Veikko

    2014-12-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β is implicated in the development of insulin resistance and β-cell dysfunction, whereas higher circulating levels of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA), an endogenous inhibitor of IL-1β, has been suggested to improve glycemia and β-cell function in patients with type 2 diabetes. To elucidate the protective role of IL-1RA, this study aimed to identify genetic determinants of circulating IL-1RA concentration and to investigate their associations with immunological and metabolic variables related to cardiometabolic risk. In the analysis of seven discovery and four replication cohort studies, two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were independently associated with circulating IL-1RA concentration (rs4251961 at the IL1RN locus [n = 13,955, P = 2.76 × 10(-21)] and rs6759676, closest gene locus IL1F10 [n = 13,994, P = 1.73 × 10(-17)]). The proportion of the variance in IL-1RA explained by both SNPs combined was 2.0%. IL-1RA-raising alleles of both SNPs were associated with lower circulating C-reactive protein concentration. The IL-1RA-raising allele of rs6759676 was also associated with lower fasting insulin levels and lower HOMA insulin resistance. In conclusion, we show that circulating IL-1RA levels are predicted by two independent SNPs at the IL1RN and IL1F10 loci and that genetically raised IL-1RA may be protective against the development of insulin resistance. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  20. Evolutionary triangulation: informing genetic association studies with evolutionary evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Minjun; Graham, Britney E; Zhang, Ge; Harder, Reed; Kodaman, Nuri; Moore, Jason H; Muglia, Louis; Williams, Scott M

    2016-01-01

    Genetic studies of human diseases have identified many variants associated with pathogenesis and severity. However, most studies have used only statistical association to assess putative relationships to disease, and ignored other factors for evaluation. For example, evolution is a factor that has shaped disease risk, changing allele frequencies as human populations migrated into and inhabited new environments. Since many common variants differ among populations in frequency, as does disease prevalence, we hypothesized that patterns of disease and population structure, taken together, will inform association studies. Thus, the population distributions of allelic risk variants should reflect the distributions of their associated diseases. Evolutionary Triangulation (ET) exploits this evolutionary differentiation by comparing population structure among three populations with variable patterns of disease prevalence. By selecting populations based on patterns where two have similar rates of disease that differ substantially from a third, we performed a proof of principle analysis for this method. We examined three disease phenotypes, lactase persistence, melanoma, and Type 2 diabetes mellitus. We show that for lactase persistence, a phenotype with a simple genetic architecture, ET identifies the key gene, lactase. For melanoma, ET identifies several genes associated with this disease and/or phenotypes related to it, such as skin color genes. ET was less obviously successful for Type 2 diabetes mellitus, perhaps because of the small effect sizes in known risk loci and recent environmental changes that have altered disease risk. Alternatively, ET may have revealed new genes involved in conferring disease risk for diabetes that did not meet nominal GWAS significance thresholds. We also compared ET to another method used to filter for phenotype associated genes, population branch statistic (PBS), and show that ET performs better in identifying genes known to associate with

  1. Cycloviruses, gemycircularviruses and other novel replication-associated protein encoding circular viruses in Pacific flying fox (Pteropus tonganus) faeces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Male, Maketalena F; Kraberger, Simona; Stainton, Daisy; Kami, Viliami; Varsani, Arvind

    2016-04-01

    Viral metagenomic studies have demonstrated that animal faeces can be a good sampling source for exploring viral diversity associated with the host and its environment. As part of an continuing effort to identify novel circular replication-associated protein encoding single-stranded (CRESS) DNA viruses circulating in the Tongan archipelago, coupled with the fact that bats are a reservoir species of a large number of viruses, we used a metagenomic approach to investigate the CRESS DNA virus diversity in Pacific flying fox (Pteropus tonganus) faeces. Faecal matter from four roosting sites located in Ha'avakatolo, Kolovai, Ha'ateiho and Lapaha on Tongatapu Island was collected in April 2014 and January 2015. From these samples we identified five novel cycloviruses representing three putative species, 25 gemycircularviruses representing at least 14 putative species, 17 other CRESS DNA viruses (15 putative species), two circular DNA molecules and a putative novel multi-component virus for which we have identified three cognate molecules. This study demonstrates that there exists a large diversity of CRESS DNA viruses in Pacific flying fox faeces.

  2. Identification of Novel Genetic Loci Associated with Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies and Clinical Thyroid Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teumer, Alexander; Brown, Suzanne J.; Jensen, Richard A.; Rawal, Rajesh; Roef, Greet L.; Plantinga, Theo S.; Vermeulen, Sita H.; Lahti, Jari; Simmonds, Matthew J.; Husemoen, Lise Lotte N.; Freathy, Rachel M.; Shields, Beverley M.; Pietzner, Diana; Nagy, Rebecca; Broer, Linda; Chaker, Layal; Korevaar, Tim I. M.; Plia, Maria Grazia; Sala, Cinzia; Völker, Uwe; Richards, J. Brent; Sweep, Fred C.; Gieger, Christian; Corre, Tanguy; Kajantie, Eero; Thuesen, Betina; Taes, Youri E.; Visser, W. Edward; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Kratzsch, Jürgen; Hamilton, Alexander; Li, Wei; Homuth, Georg; Lobina, Monia; Mariotti, Stefano; Soranzo, Nicole; Cocca, Massimiliano; Nauck, Matthias; Spielhagen, Christin; Ross, Alec; Arnold, Alice; van de Bunt, Martijn; Liyanarachchi, Sandya; Heier, Margit; Grabe, Hans Jörgen; Masciullo, Corrado; Galesloot, Tessel E.; Lim, Ee M.; Reischl, Eva; Leedman, Peter J.; Lai, Sandra; Delitala, Alessandro; Bremner, Alexandra P.; Philips, David I. W.; Beilby, John P.; Mulas, Antonella; Vocale, Matteo; Abecasis, Goncalo; Forsen, Tom; James, Alan; Widen, Elisabeth; Hui, Jennie; Prokisch, Holger; Rietzschel, Ernst E.; Palotie, Aarno; Feddema, Peter; Fletcher, Stephen J.; Schramm, Katharina; Rotter, Jerome I.; Kluttig, Alexander; Radke, Dörte; Traglia, Michela; Surdulescu, Gabriela L.; He, Huiling; Franklyn, Jayne A.; Tiller, Daniel; Vaidya, Bijay; de Meyer, Tim; Jørgensen, Torben; Eriksson, Johan G.; O'Leary, Peter C.; Wichmann, Eric; Hermus, Ad R.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Ittermann, Till; Hofman, Albert; Bosi, Emanuele; Schlessinger, David; Wallaschofski, Henri; Pirastu, Nicola; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; de la Chapelle, Albert; Netea-Maier, Romana T.; Gough, Stephen C. L.; Meyer zu Schwabedissen, Henriette; Frayling, Timothy M.; Kaufman, Jean-Marc; Linneberg, Allan; Räikkönen, Katri; Smit, Johannes W. A.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, André G.; Walsh, John P.; Meisinger, Christa; den Heijer, Martin; Visser, Theo J.; Spector, Timothy D.; Wilson, Scott G.; Völzke, Henry; Cappola, Anne; Toniolo, Daniela; Sanna, Serena; Naitza, Silvia; Peeters, Robin P.

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) are common, affecting 2-5% of the general population. Individuals with positive thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAbs) have an increased risk of autoimmune hypothyroidism (Hashimoto's thyroiditis), as well as autoimmune hyperthyroidism (Graves' disease). As the possible causative genes of TPOAbs and AITD remain largely unknown, we performed GWAS meta-analyses in 18,297 individuals for TPOAb-positivity (1769 TPOAb-positives and 16,528 TPOAb-negatives) and in 12,353 individuals for TPOAb serum levels, with replication in 8,990 individuals. Significant associations (P<5×10−8) were detected at TPO-rs11675434, ATXN2-rs653178, and BACH2-rs10944479 for TPOAb-positivity, and at TPO-rs11675434, MAGI3-rs1230666, and KALRN-rs2010099 for TPOAb levels. Individual and combined effects (genetic risk scores) of these variants on (subclinical) hypo- and hyperthyroidism, goiter and thyroid cancer were studied. Individuals with a high genetic risk score had, besides an increased risk of TPOAb-positivity (OR: 2.18, 95% CI 1.68–2.81, P = 8.1×10−8), a higher risk of increased thyroid-stimulating hormone levels (OR: 1.51, 95% CI 1.26–1.82, P = 2.9×10−6), as well as a decreased risk of goiter (OR: 0.77, 95% CI 0.66–0.89, P = 6.5×10−4). The MAGI3 and BACH2 variants were associated with an increased risk of hyperthyroidism, which was replicated in an independent cohort of patients with Graves' disease (OR: 1.37, 95% CI 1.22–1.54, P = 1.2×10−7 and OR: 1.25, 95% CI 1.12–1.39, P = 6.2×10−5). The MAGI3 variant was also associated with an increased risk of hypothyroidism (OR: 1.57, 95% CI 1.18–2.10, P = 1.9×10−3). This first GWAS meta-analysis for TPOAbs identified five newly associated loci, three of which were also associated with clinical thyroid disease. With these markers we identified a large subgroup in the general population with a substantially increased risk of TPOAbs. The results provide

  3. Identification of novel genetic Loci associated with thyroid peroxidase antibodies and clinical thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medici, Marco; Porcu, Eleonora; Pistis, Giorgio; Teumer, Alexander; Brown, Suzanne J; Jensen, Richard A; Rawal, Rajesh; Roef, Greet L; Plantinga, Theo S; Vermeulen, Sita H; Lahti, Jari; Simmonds, Matthew J; Husemoen, Lise Lotte N; Freathy, Rachel M; Shields, Beverley M; Pietzner, Diana; Nagy, Rebecca; Broer, Linda; Chaker, Layal; Korevaar, Tim I M; Plia, Maria Grazia; Sala, Cinzia; Völker, Uwe; Richards, J Brent; Sweep, Fred C; Gieger, Christian; Corre, Tanguy; Kajantie, Eero; Thuesen, Betina; Taes, Youri E; Visser, W Edward; Hattersley, Andrew T; Kratzsch, Jürgen; Hamilton, Alexander; Li, Wei; Homuth, Georg; Lobina, Monia; Mariotti, Stefano; Soranzo, Nicole; Cocca, Massimiliano; Nauck, Matthias; Spielhagen, Christin; Ross, Alec; Arnold, Alice; van de Bunt, Martijn; Liyanarachchi, Sandya; Heier, Margit; Grabe, Hans Jörgen; Masciullo, Corrado; Galesloot, Tessel E; Lim, Ee M; Reischl, Eva; Leedman, Peter J; Lai, Sandra; Delitala, Alessandro; Bremner, Alexandra P; Philips, David I W; Beilby, John P; Mulas, Antonella; Vocale, Matteo; Abecasis, Goncalo; Forsen, Tom; James, Alan; Widen, Elisabeth; Hui, Jennie; Prokisch, Holger; Rietzschel, Ernst E; Palotie, Aarno; Feddema, Peter; Fletcher, Stephen J; Schramm, Katharina; Rotter, Jerome I; Kluttig, Alexander; Radke, Dörte; Traglia, Michela; Surdulescu, Gabriela L; He, Huiling; Franklyn, Jayne A; Tiller, Daniel; Vaidya, Bijay; de Meyer, Tim; Jørgensen, Torben; Eriksson, Johan G; O'Leary, Peter C; Wichmann, Eric; Hermus, Ad R; Psaty, Bruce M; Ittermann, Till; Hofman, Albert; Bosi, Emanuele; Schlessinger, David; Wallaschofski, Henri; Pirastu, Nicola; Aulchenko, Yurii S; de la Chapelle, Albert; Netea-Maier, Romana T; Gough, Stephen C L; Meyer Zu Schwabedissen, Henriette; Frayling, Timothy M; Kaufman, Jean-Marc; Linneberg, Allan; Räikkönen, Katri; Smit, Johannes W A; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, André G; Walsh, John P; Meisinger, Christa; den Heijer, Martin; Visser, Theo J; Spector, Timothy D; Wilson, Scott G; Völzke, Henry; Cappola, Anne; Toniolo, Daniela; Sanna, Serena; Naitza, Silvia; Peeters, Robin P

    2014-02-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) are common, affecting 2-5% of the general population. Individuals with positive thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAbs) have an increased risk of autoimmune hypothyroidism (Hashimoto's thyroiditis), as well as autoimmune hyperthyroidism (Graves' disease). As the possible causative genes of TPOAbs and AITD remain largely unknown, we performed GWAS meta-analyses in 18,297 individuals for TPOAb-positivity (1769 TPOAb-positives and 16,528 TPOAb-negatives) and in 12,353 individuals for TPOAb serum levels, with replication in 8,990 individuals. Significant associations (P<5×10(-8)) were detected at TPO-rs11675434, ATXN2-rs653178, and BACH2-rs10944479 for TPOAb-positivity, and at TPO-rs11675434, MAGI3-rs1230666, and KALRN-rs2010099 for TPOAb levels. Individual and combined effects (genetic risk scores) of these variants on (subclinical) hypo- and hyperthyroidism, goiter and thyroid cancer were studied. Individuals with a high genetic risk score had, besides an increased risk of TPOAb-positivity (OR: 2.18, 95% CI 1.68-2.81, P = 8.1×10(-8)), a higher risk of increased thyroid-stimulating hormone levels (OR: 1.51, 95% CI 1.26-1.82, P = 2.9×10(-6)), as well as a decreased risk of goiter (OR: 0.77, 95% CI 0.66-0.89, P = 6.5×10(-4)). The MAGI3 and BACH2 variants were associated with an increased risk of hyperthyroidism, which was replicated in an independent cohort of patients with Graves' disease (OR: 1.37, 95% CI 1.22-1.54, P = 1.2×10(-7) and OR: 1.25, 95% CI 1.12-1.39, P = 6.2×10(-5)). The MAGI3 variant was also associated with an increased risk of hypothyroidism (OR: 1.57, 95% CI 1.18-2.10, P = 1.9×10(-3)). This first GWAS meta-analysis for TPOAbs identified five newly associated loci, three of which were also associated with clinical thyroid disease. With these markers we identified a large subgroup in the general population with a substantially increased risk of TPOAbs. The results provide insight into why

  4. Identification of novel genetic Loci associated with thyroid peroxidase antibodies and clinical thyroid disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Medici

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD are common, affecting 2-5% of the general population. Individuals with positive thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAbs have an increased risk of autoimmune hypothyroidism (Hashimoto's thyroiditis, as well as autoimmune hyperthyroidism (Graves' disease. As the possible causative genes of TPOAbs and AITD remain largely unknown, we performed GWAS meta-analyses in 18,297 individuals for TPOAb-positivity (1769 TPOAb-positives and 16,528 TPOAb-negatives and in 12,353 individuals for TPOAb serum levels, with replication in 8,990 individuals. Significant associations (P<5×10(-8 were detected at TPO-rs11675434, ATXN2-rs653178, and BACH2-rs10944479 for TPOAb-positivity, and at TPO-rs11675434, MAGI3-rs1230666, and KALRN-rs2010099 for TPOAb levels. Individual and combined effects (genetic risk scores of these variants on (subclinical hypo- and hyperthyroidism, goiter and thyroid cancer were studied. Individuals with a high genetic risk score had, besides an increased risk of TPOAb-positivity (OR: 2.18, 95% CI 1.68-2.81, P = 8.1×10(-8, a higher risk of increased thyroid-stimulating hormone levels (OR: 1.51, 95% CI 1.26-1.82, P = 2.9×10(-6, as well as a decreased risk of goiter (OR: 0.77, 95% CI 0.66-0.89, P = 6.5×10(-4. The MAGI3 and BACH2 variants were associated with an increased risk of hyperthyroidism, which was replicated in an independent cohort of patients with Graves' disease (OR: 1.37, 95% CI 1.22-1.54, P = 1.2×10(-7 and OR: 1.25, 95% CI 1.12-1.39, P = 6.2×10(-5. The MAGI3 variant was also associated with an increased risk of hypothyroidism (OR: 1.57, 95% CI 1.18-2.10, P = 1.9×10(-3. This first GWAS meta-analysis for TPOAbs identified five newly associated loci, three of which were also associated with clinical thyroid disease. With these markers we identified a large subgroup in the general population with a substantially increased risk of TPOAbs. The results provide insight into why

  5. Genetic variation in LIN28B is associated with the timing of puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Ken K; Elks, Cathy E; Li, Shengxu; Zhao, Jing Hua; Luan, Jian'an; Andersen, Lars B; Bingham, Sheila A; Brage, Soren; Smith, George Davey; Ekelund, Ulf; Gillson, Christopher J; Glaser, Beate; Golding, Jean; Hardy, Rebecca; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kuh, Diana; Luben, Robert; Marcus, Michele; McGeehin, Michael A; Ness, Andrew R; Northstone, Kate; Ring, Susan M; Rubin, Carol; Sims, Matthew A; Song, Kijoung; Strachan, David P; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Waterworth, Dawn M; Wong, Andrew; Deloukas, Panagiotis; Barroso, Inês; Mooser, Vincent; Loos, Ruth J; Wareham, Nicholas J

    2009-06-01

    The timing of puberty is highly variable. We carried out a genome-wide association study for age at menarche in 4,714 women and report an association in LIN28B on chromosome 6 (rs314276, minor allele frequency (MAF) = 0.33, P = 1.5 × 10(-8)). In independent replication studies in 16,373 women, each major allele was associated with 0.12 years earlier menarche (95% CI = 0.08-0.16; P = 2.8 × 10(-10); combined P = 3.6 × 10(-16)). This allele was also associated with earlier breast development in girls (P = 0.001; N = 4,271); earlier voice breaking (P = 0.006, N = 1,026) and more advanced pubic hair development in boys (P = 0.01; N = 4,588); a faster tempo of height growth in girls (P = 0.00008; N = 4,271) and boys (P = 0.03; N = 4,588); and shorter adult height in women (P = 3.6 × 10(-7); N = 17,274) and men (P = 0.006; N = 9,840) in keeping with earlier growth cessation. These studies identify variation in LIN28B, a potent and specific regulator of microRNA processing, as the first genetic determinant regulating the timing of human pubertal growth and development.

  6. Genetic associations at 53 loci highlight cell types and biological pathways relevant for kidney function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattaro, Cristian; Teumer, Alexander; Gorski, Mathias; Chu, Audrey Y; Li, Man; Mijatovic, Vladan; Garnaas, Maija; Tin, Adrienne; Sorice, Rossella; Li, Yong; Taliun, Daniel; Olden, Matthias; Foster, Meredith; Yang, Qiong; Chen, Ming-Huei; Pers, Tune H; Johnson, Andrew D; Ko, Yi-An; Fuchsberger, Christian; Tayo, Bamidele; Nalls, Michael; Feitosa, Mary F; Isaacs, Aaron; Dehghan, Abbas; d'Adamo, Pio; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Zonderman, Alan B; Nolte, Ilja M; van der Most, Peter J; Wright, Alan F; Shuldiner, Alan R; Morrison, Alanna C; Hofman, Albert; Smith, Albert V; Dreisbach, Albert W; Franke, Andre; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Metspalu, Andres; Tonjes, Anke; Lupo, Antonio; Robino, Antonietta; Johansson, Åsa; Demirkan, Ayse; Kollerits, Barbara; Freedman, Barry I; Ponte, Belen; Oostra, Ben A; Paulweber, Bernhard; Krämer, Bernhard K; Mitchell, Braxton D; Buckley, Brendan M; Peralta, Carmen A; Hayward, Caroline; Helmer, Catherine; Rotimi, Charles N; Shaffer, Christian M; Müller, Christian; Sala, Cinzia; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Saint-Pierre, Aude; Ackermann, Daniel; Shriner, Daniel; Ruggiero, Daniela; Toniolo, Daniela; Lu, Yingchang; Cusi, Daniele; Czamara, Darina; Ellinghaus, David; Siscovick, David S; Ruderfer, Douglas; Gieger, Christian; Grallert, Harald; Rochtchina, Elena; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Boerwinkle, Eric; Salvi, Erika; Bottinger, Erwin P; Murgia, Federico; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Ernst, Florian; Kronenberg, Florian; Hu, Frank B; Navis, Gerjan J; Curhan, Gary C; Ehret, George B; Homuth, Georg; Coassin, Stefan; Thun, Gian-Andri; Pistis, Giorgio; Gambaro, Giovanni; Malerba, Giovanni; Montgomery, Grant W; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Jacobs, Gunnar; Li, Guo; Wichmann, H-Erich; Campbell, Harry; Schmidt, Helena; Wallaschofski, Henri; Völzke, Henry; Brenner, Hermann; Kroemer, Heyo K; Kramer, Holly; Lin, Honghuang; Leach, I Mateo; Ford, Ian; Guessous, Idris; Rudan, Igor; Prokopenko, Inga; Borecki, Ingrid; Heid, Iris M; Kolcic, Ivana; Persico, Ivana; Jukema, J Wouter; Wilson, James F; Felix, Janine F; Divers, Jasmin; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Stafford, Jeanette M; Gaspoz, Jean-Michel; Smith, Jennifer A; Faul, Jessica D; Wang, Jie Jin; Ding, Jingzhong; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Attia, John; Whitfield, John B; Chalmers, John; Viikari, Jorma; Coresh, Josef; Denny, Joshua C; Karjalainen, Juha; Fernandes, Jyotika K; Endlich, Karlhans; Butterbach, Katja; Keene, Keith L; Lohman, Kurt; Portas, Laura; Launer, Lenore J; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Yengo, Loic; Franke, Lude; Ferrucci, Luigi; Rose, Lynda M; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Rao, Madhumathi; Struchalin, Maksim; Kleber, Marcus E; Cavalieri, Margherita; Haun, Margot; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Ciullo, Marina; Pirastu, Mario; de Andrade, Mariza; McEvoy, Mark A; Woodward, Mark; Adam, Martin; Cocca, Massimiliano; Nauck, Matthias; Imboden, Medea; Waldenberger, Melanie; Pruijm, Menno; Metzger, Marie; Stumvoll, Michael; Evans, Michele K; Sale, Michele M; Kähönen, Mika; Boban, Mladen; Bochud, Murielle; Rheinberger, Myriam; Verweij, Niek; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Martin, Nicholas G; Hastie, Nick; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Soranzo, Nicole; Devuyst, Olivier; Raitakari, Olli; Gottesman, Omri; Franco, Oscar H; Polasek, Ozren; Gasparini, Paolo; Munroe, Patricia B; Ridker, Paul M; Mitchell, Paul; Muntner, Paul; Meisinger, Christa; Smit, Johannes H; Kovacs, Peter; Wild, Philipp S; Froguel, Philippe; Rettig, Rainer; Mägi, Reedik; Biffar, Reiner; Schmidt, Reinhold; Middelberg, Rita P S; Carroll, Robert J; Penninx, Brenda W; Scott, Rodney J; Katz, Ronit; Sedaghat, Sanaz; Wild, Sarah H; Kardia, Sharon L R; Ulivi, Sheila; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Enroth, Stefan; Kloiber, Stefan; Trompet, Stella; Stengel, Benedicte; Hancock, Stephen J; Turner, Stephen T; Rosas, Sylvia E; Stracke, Sylvia; Harris, Tamara B; Zeller, Tanja; Zemunik, Tatijana; Lehtimäki, Terho; Illig, Thomas; Aspelund, Thor; Nikopensius, Tiit; Esko, Tonu; Tanaka, Toshiko; Gyllensten, Ulf; Völker, Uwe; Emilsson, Valur; Vitart, Veronique; Aalto, Ville; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Chouraki, Vincent; Chen, Wei-Min; Igl, Wilmar; März, Winfried; Koenig, Wolfgang; Lieb, Wolfgang; Loos, Ruth J F; Liu, Yongmei; Snieder, Harold; Pramstaller, Peter P; Parsa, Afshin; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Susztak, Katalin; Hamet, Pavel; Tremblay, Johanne; de Boer, Ian H; Böger, Carsten A; Goessling, Wolfram; Chasman, Daniel I; Köttgen, Anna; Kao, W H Linda; Fox, Caroline S

    2016-01-21

    Reduced glomerular filtration rate defines chronic kidney disease and is associated with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), combining data across 133,413 individuals with replication in up to 42,166 individuals. We identify 24 new and confirm 29 previously identified loci. Of these 53 loci, 19 associate with eGFR among individuals with diabetes. Using bioinformatics, we show that identified genes at eGFR loci are enriched for expression in kidney tissues and in pathways relevant for kidney development and transmembrane transporter activity, kidney structure, and regulation of glucose metabolism. Chromatin state mapping and DNase I hypersensitivity analyses across adult tissues demonstrate preferential mapping of associated variants to regulatory regions in kidney but not extra-renal tissues. These findings suggest that genetic determinants of eGFR are mediated largely through direct effects within the kidney and highlight important cell types and biological pathways.

  7. Genetic associations at 53 loci highlight cell types and biological pathways relevant for kidney function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattaro, Cristian; Teumer, Alexander; Gorski, Mathias; Chu, Audrey Y.; Li, Man; Mijatovic, Vladan; Garnaas, Maija; Tin, Adrienne; Sorice, Rossella; Li, Yong; Taliun, Daniel; Olden, Matthias; Foster, Meredith; Yang, Qiong; Chen, Ming-Huei; Pers, Tune H.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Ko, Yi-An; Fuchsberger, Christian; Tayo, Bamidele; Nalls, Michael; Feitosa, Mary F.; Isaacs, Aaron; Dehghan, Abbas; d'Adamo, Pio; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Zonderman, Alan B.; Nolte, Ilja M.; van der Most, Peter J.; Wright, Alan F.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Hofman, Albert; Smith, Albert V.; Dreisbach, Albert W.; Franke, Andre; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Metspalu, Andres; Tonjes, Anke; Lupo, Antonio; Robino, Antonietta; Johansson, Åsa; Demirkan, Ayse; Kollerits, Barbara; Freedman, Barry I.; Ponte, Belen; Oostra, Ben A.; Paulweber, Bernhard; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Buckley, Brendan M.; Peralta, Carmen A.; Hayward, Caroline; Helmer, Catherine; Rotimi, Charles N.; Shaffer, Christian M.; Müller, Christian; Sala, Cinzia; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Saint-Pierre, Aude; Ackermann, Daniel; Shriner, Daniel; Ruggiero, Daniela; Toniolo, Daniela; Lu, Yingchang; Cusi, Daniele; Czamara, Darina; Ellinghaus, David; Siscovick, David S.; Ruderfer, Douglas; Gieger, Christian; Grallert, Harald; Rochtchina, Elena; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Salvi, Erika; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Murgia, Federico; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Ernst, Florian; Kronenberg, Florian; Hu, Frank B.; Navis, Gerjan J.; Curhan, Gary C.; Ehret, George B.; Homuth, Georg; Coassin, Stefan; Thun, Gian-Andri; Pistis, Giorgio; Gambaro, Giovanni; Malerba, Giovanni; Montgomery, Grant W.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Jacobs, Gunnar; Li, Guo; Wichmann, H-Erich; Campbell, Harry; Schmidt, Helena; Wallaschofski, Henri; Völzke, Henry; Brenner, Hermann; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Kramer, Holly; Lin, Honghuang; Leach, I. Mateo; Ford, Ian; Guessous, Idris; Rudan, Igor; Prokopenko, Inga; Borecki, Ingrid; Heid, Iris M.; Kolcic, Ivana; Persico, Ivana; Jukema, J. Wouter; Wilson, James F.; Felix, Janine F.; Divers, Jasmin; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Stafford, Jeanette M.; Gaspoz, Jean-Michel; Smith, Jennifer A.; Faul, Jessica D.; Wang, Jie Jin; Ding, Jingzhong; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Attia, John; Whitfield, John B.; Chalmers, John; Viikari, Jorma; Coresh, Josef; Denny, Joshua C.; Karjalainen, Juha; Fernandes, Jyotika K.; Endlich, Karlhans; Butterbach, Katja; Keene, Keith L.; Lohman, Kurt; Portas, Laura; Launer, Lenore J.; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Yengo, Loic; Franke, Lude; Ferrucci, Luigi; Rose, Lynda M.; Kedenko, Lyudmyla; Rao, Madhumathi; Struchalin, Maksim; Kleber, Marcus E.; Cavalieri, Margherita; Haun, Margot; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Ciullo, Marina; Pirastu, Mario; de Andrade, Mariza; McEvoy, Mark A.; Woodward, Mark; Adam, Martin; Cocca, Massimiliano; Nauck, Matthias; Imboden, Medea; Waldenberger, Melanie; Pruijm, Menno; Metzger, Marie; Stumvoll, Michael; Evans, Michele K.; Sale, Michele M.; Kähönen, Mika; Boban, Mladen; Bochud, Murielle; Rheinberger, Myriam; Verweij, Niek; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Martin, Nicholas G.; Hastie, Nick; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Soranzo, Nicole; Devuyst, Olivier; Raitakari, Olli; Gottesman, Omri; Franco, Oscar H.; Polasek, Ozren; Gasparini, Paolo; Munroe, Patricia B.; Ridker, Paul M.; Mitchell, Paul; Muntner, Paul; Meisinger, Christa; Smit, Johannes H.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Adair, Linda S.; Alexander, Myriam; Altshuler, David; Amin, Najaf; Arking, Dan E.; Arora, Pankaj; Aulchenko, Yurii; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barroso, Ines; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Beilby, John P.; Bergman, Richard N.; Bergmann, Sven; Bis, Joshua C.; Boehnke, Michael; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Bots, Michiel L.; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Brand, Eva; Braund, Peter S.; Brown, Morris J.; Burton, Paul R.; Casas, Juan P.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambers, John C.; Chandak, Giriraj R.; Chang, Yen-Pei C.; Charchar, Fadi J.; Chaturvedi, Nish; Shin Cho, Yoon; Clarke, Robert; Collins, Francis S.; Collins, Rory; Connell, John M.; Cooper, Jackie A.; Cooper, Matthew N.; Cooper, Richard S.; Corsi, Anna Maria; Dörr, Marcus; Dahgam, Santosh; Danesh, John; Smith, George Davey; Day, Ian N. M.; Deloukas, Panos; Denniff, Matthew; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Dong, Yanbin; Doumatey, Ayo; Elliott, Paul; Elosua, Roberto; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eyheramendy, Susana; Farrall, Martin; Fava, Cristiano; Forrester, Terrence; Fowkes, F. Gerald R.; Fox, Ervin R.; Frayling, Timothy M.; Galan, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Reduced glomerular filtration rate defines chronic kidney disease and is associated with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), combining data across 133,413 individuals with replication in up to 42,166 individuals. We identify 24 new and confirm 29 previously identified loci. Of these 53 loci, 19 associate with eGFR among individuals with diabetes. Using bioinformatics, we show that identified genes at eGFR loci are enriched for expression in kidney tissues and in pathways relevant for kidney development and transmembrane transporter activity, kidney structure, and regulation of glucose metabolism. Chromatin state mapping and DNase I hypersensitivity analyses across adult tissues demonstrate preferential mapping of associated variants to regulatory regions in kidney but not extra-renal tissues. These findings suggest that genetic determinants of eGFR are mediated largely through direct effects within the kidney and highlight important cell types and biological pathways. PMID:26831199

  8. Replication-associated gene dosage effects shape the genomes of fast-growing bacteria but only for transcription and translation genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couturier, Etienne; Rocha, Eduardo P C

    2006-03-01

    The bidirectional replication of bacterial genomes leads to transient gene dosage effects. Here, we show that such effects shape the chromosome organisation of fast-growing bacteria and that they correlate strongly with maximal growth rate. Surprisingly the predicted maximal number of replication rounds shows little if any phylogenetic inertia, suggesting that it is a very labile trait. Yet, a combination of theoretical and statistical analyses predicts that dozens of replication forks may be simultaneously present in the cells of certain species. This suggests a strikingly efficient management of the replication apparatus, of replication fork arrests and of chromosome segregation in such cells. Gene dosage effects strongly constrain the position of genes involved in translation and transcription, but not other highly expressed genes. The relative proximity of the former genes to the origin of replication follows the regulatory dependencies observed under exponential growth, as the bias is stronger for RNA polymerase, then rDNA, then ribosomal proteins and tDNA. Within tDNAs we find that only the positions of the previously proposed 'ubiquitous' tRNA, which translate the most frequent codons in highly expressed genes, show strong signs of selection for gene dosage effects. Finally, we provide evidence for selection acting upon genome organisation to take advantage of gene dosage effects by identifying a positive correlation between genome stability and the number of simultaneous replication rounds. We also show that gene dosage effects can explain the over-representation of highly expressed genes in the largest replichore of genomes containing more than one chromosome. Together, these results demonstrate that replication-associated gene dosage is an important determinant of chromosome organisation and dynamics, especially among fast-growing bacteria.

  9. Persistence of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance mutations associated with fitness costs and viral genetic backgrounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-Lin Yang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Transmission of drug-resistant pathogens presents an almost-universal challenge for fighting infectious diseases. Transmitted drug resistance mutations (TDRM can persist in the absence of drugs for considerable time. It is generally believed that differential TDRM-persistence is caused, at least partially, by variations in TDRM-fitness-costs. However, in vivo epidemiological evidence for the impact of fitness costs on TDRM-persistence is rare. Here, we studied the persistence of TDRM in HIV-1 using longitudinally-sampled nucleotide sequences from the Swiss-HIV-Cohort-Study (SHCS. All treatment-naïve individuals with TDRM at baseline were included. Persistence of TDRM was quantified via reversion rates (RR determined with interval-censored survival models. Fitness costs of TDRM were estimated in the genetic background in which they occurred using a previously published and validated machine-learning algorithm (based on in vitro replicative capacities and were included in the survival models as explanatory variables. In 857 sequential samples from 168 treatment-naïve patients, 17 TDRM were analyzed. RR varied substantially and ranged from 174.0/100-person-years;CI=[51.4, 588.8] (for 184V to 2.7/100-person-years;[0.7, 10.9] (for 215D. RR increased significantly with fitness cost (increase by 1.6[1.3,2.0] per standard deviation of fitness costs. When subdividing fitness costs into the average fitness cost of a given mutation and the deviation from the average fitness cost of a mutation in a given genetic background, we found that both components were significantly associated with reversion-rates. Our results show that the substantial variations of TDRM persistence in the absence of drugs are associated with fitness-cost differences both among mutations and among different genetic backgrounds for the same mutation.

  10. A genome-wide association study identifies a genetic variant in the SIAH2 locus associated with hormonal receptor-positive breast cancer in Japanese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgazzar, Seham; Zembutsu, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kubo, Michiaki; Aki, Fuminori; Hirata, Koichi; Takatsuka, Yuichi; Okazaki, Minoru; Ohsumi, Shozo; Yamakawa, Takashi; Sasa, Mitsunori; Katagiri, Toyomasa; Miki, Yoshio; Nakamura, Yusuke

    2012-12-01

    In Japan, breast cancer is the most common cancer among women and the second leading cause of cancer death among women worldwide. To identify genetic variants associated with the disease susceptibility, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) using a total of 1086 Japanese female patients with hormonal receptor-positive (HRP) breast cancer and 1816 female controls. We selected 33 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with suggestive associations in GWAS (P-value of rs3750817 in intron 2 of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 gene, which was reported to be associated with breast cancer susceptibility, was significantly replicated with P(combined) of 8.47 × 10(-8) with OR=1.22. Our results suggest a novel susceptibility locus on chromosome 3q25.1 for a HRP breast cancer.

  11. Variability, heritability and genetic association in vegetable amaranth (Amaranthus tricolor L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarker, U.; Islam, Md T.; Rabbani, Md G.; Oba, S.

    2015-07-01

    Forty three vegetable amaranth (Amaranthus tricolor L.) genotypes selected from different eco-geographic regions of Bangladesh were evaluated during 3 years (2012-2014) for genetic variability, heritability and genetic association among mineral elements and quality and agronomic traits in randomized complete block design (RCBD) with five replications. The analysis showed that vegetable amaranth is a rich source of K, Ca, Mg, proteins and dietary fibre with average values among the 43 genotypes (1.014%, 2.476%, 2.984, 1.258% and 7.81%, respectively). Six genotypes (VA13, VA14, VA16, VA18, VA26, VA27) showed a biological yield >2000 g/m2 and high mineral, protein and dietary fibre contents; eleven genotypes had high amount of minerals, protein and dietary fibre with above average biological yield; nine genotypes had below average biological yield but were rich in minerals, protein and dietary fibre. Biological yield exhibited a strong positive correlation with leaf area, shoot weight, shoot/root weight and stem base diameter. Insignificant genotypic correlation was observed among mineral, quality and agronomic traits, except K vs. Mg, protein vs. dietary fibre and stem base diameter vs. Ca. Some of these genotypes can be used for improvement of vegetable amaranth regarding mineral, protein and dietary fibre content without compromising yield loss. (Author)

  12. Variability, heritability and genetic association in vegetable amaranth (Amaranthus tricolorL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umakanta Sarker

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Forty three vegetable amaranth (Amaranthus tricolor L. genotypes selected from different eco-geographic regions of Bangladesh were evaluated during 3 years (2012-2014 for genetic variability, heritability and genetic association among mineral elements and quality and agronomic traits in randomized complete block design (RCBD with five replications. The analysis showed that vegetable amaranth is a rich source of K, Ca, Mg, proteins and dietary fibre with average values among the 43 genotypes (1.014%, 2.476%, 2.984, 1.258% and 7.81%, respectively. Six genotypes (VA13, VA14, VA16, VA18, VA26, VA27 showed a biological yield >2000 g/m2 and high mineral, protein and dietary fibre contents; eleven genotypes had high amount of minerals, protein and dietary fibre with above average biological yield; nine genotypes had below average biological yield but were rich in minerals, protein and dietary fibre. Biological yield exhibited a strong positive correlation with leaf area, shoot weight, shoot/root weight and stem base diameter. Insignificant genotypic correlation was observed among mineral, quality and agronomic traits, except K vs. Mg, protein vs. dietary fibre and stem base diameter vs. Ca. Some of these genotypes can be used for improvement of vegetable amaranth regarding mineral, protein and dietary fibre content without compromising yield loss.

  13. Genome-wide significant associations in schizophrenia to ITIH3/4, CACNA1C and SDCCAG8, and extensive replication of associations reported by the Schizophrenia PGC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamshere, M L; Walters, J T R; Smith, R;

    2013-01-01

    The Schizophrenia Psychiatric Genome-Wide Association Study Consortium (PGC) highlighted 81 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with moderate evidence for association to schizophrenia. After follow-up in independent samples, seven loci attained genome-wide significance (GWS), but multi-locus t...... interval (CI) 78-100%) of the original set of 78 SNPs represent true associations. We also provide strong evidence for overlap in genetic risk between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 22 May 2012; doi:10.1038/mp.2012.67....

  14. Association of corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 2 (CRHR2) genetic variants with acute bronchodilator response in asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Audrey H.; Tantisira, Kelan G.; Litonjua, Augusto A.; Lazarus, Ross; Xu, Jingsong; Lasky-Su, Jessica; Lima, John J.; Irvin, Charles G.; Hanrahan, John P.; Lange, Christoph; Weiss, Scott T.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Corticotropin - releasing hormone receptor 2 (CRHR2) participates in smooth muscle relaxation response and may influence acute airway bronchodilator response to short – acting β2 agonist treatment of asthma. We aim to assess associations between genetic variants of CRHR2 and acute bronchodilator response in asthma. Methods We investigated 28 single nucleotide polymorphisms in CRHR2 for associations with acute bronchodilator response to albuterol in 607 Caucasian asthmatic subjects recruited as part of the Childhood Asthma Management Program (CAMP). Replication was conducted in two Caucasian adult asthma cohorts – a cohort of 427 subjects enrolled in a completed clinical trial conducted by Sepracor Inc. (MA, USA) and a cohort of 152 subjects enrolled in the Clinical Trial of Low-Dose Theopylline and Montelukast (LODO) conducted by the American Lung Association Asthma Clinical Research Centers. Results Five variants were significantly associated with acute bronchodilator response in at least one cohort (p-value ≤ 0.05). Variant rs7793837 was associated in CAMP and LODO (p-value = 0.05 and 0.03, respectively) and haplotype blocks residing at the 5’ end of CRHR2 were associated with response in all three cohorts. Conclusion We report for the first time, at the gene level, replicated associations between CRHR2 and acute bronchodilator response. While no single variant was significantly associated in all three cohorts, the findings that variants at the 5’ end of CRHR2 are associated in each of three cohorts strongly suggest that the causative variants reside in this region and its genetic effect, although present, is likely to be weak. PMID:18408560

  15. Recommendations for using standardised phenotypes in genetic association studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naylor Melissa G

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Genetic association studies of complex traits often rely on standardised quantitative phenotypes, such as percentage of predicted forced expiratory volume and body mass index to measure an underlying trait of interest (eg lung function, obesity. These phenotypes are appealing because they provide an easy mechanism for comparing subjects, although such standardisations may not be the best way to control for confounders and other covariates. We recommend adjusting raw or standardised phenotypes within the study population via regression. We illustrate through simulation that optimal power in both population- and family-based association tests is attained by using the residuals from within-study adjustment as the complex trait phenotype. An application of family-based association analysis of forced expiratory volume in one second, and obesity in the Childhood Asthma Management Program data, illustrates that power is maintained or increased when adjusted phenotype residuals are used instead of typical standardised quantitative phenotypes.

  16. Insight into the Genetic Components of Community Genetics: QTL Mapping of Insect Association in a Fast-Growing Forest Tree

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeWoody, J.; Viger, M.; Lakatos, F.; Tuba, K.; Taylor, G.; Smulders, M.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Identifying genetic sequences underlying insect associations on forest trees will improve the understanding of community genetics on a broad scale. We tested for genomic regions associated with insects in hybrid poplar using quantitative trait loci (QTL) analyses conducted on data from a common gard

  17. Insight into the Genetic Components of Community Genetics: QTL Mapping of Insect Association in a Fast-Growing Forest Tree

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeWoody, J.; Viger, M.; Lakatos, F.; Tuba, K.; Taylor, G.; Smulders, M.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Identifying genetic sequences underlying insect associations on forest trees will improve the understanding of community genetics on a broad scale. We tested for genomic regions associated with insects in hybrid poplar using quantitative trait loci (QTL) analyses conducted on data from a common gard

  18. Replication of association study between type 2 diabetes mellitus and IGF2BP2 in Han Chinese population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Si-min; XIAO Jian-zhong; REN Qian; HAN Xue-yao; TANG Yong; YANG Wen-ying; JI Li-nong

    2013-01-01

    Background The association between IGF2BP2 and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has been repeatedly confirmed among different ethnic populations.However,in several genome-wide association studies (GWAS) from the Chinese Han population,the gene IGF2BP2 has not been replicated.The results of relevant studies for the association between IGF2BP2 and T2DM showed controversy in Chinese Han population.It is necessary to systematically evaluate the contribution of common variants in IGF2BP2 to T2DM in Chinese Han population.Methods Two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs,rs4402960 and rs1470579) in IGF2BP2 were genotyped in Chinese Han population (3807 controls/4531 T2DM cases) by Illumina GoldenGate Indexing assay.The association between SNPs and T2DM was evaluated by multiple Logistic Regression analysis.A meta-analysis was used to estimate the effects of IGF2BP2 in 20854 Chinese Han individuals.Results rs1470579 and rs4402960 were confirmed to have strong association with T2DM in the Chinese Han population (rs1470579 P=-1.80x10-7,OR (95% CI)=1.22 (1.14-1.32),rs4402960 P=7.46x10-9,OR (95% CI)=1.26 (1.17-1.37),respectively).Moreover,11 studies for rs4402960 were included in the meta-analysis and 7 studies for rs1470579.The meta-analysis also showed the association between T2DM and IGF2BP2 (rs1470579 OR of 1.15 (95% CI=1.10-1.19),P <0.0001 under an additive model and rs4402960 OR of 1.14 (95% CI=1.10-1.18),P <0.0001 under an additive model).Conclusion IGF2BP2 was strongly associated with the risk of T2DM in Chinese Han population.

  19. Are genetic risk factors for psychosis also associated with dimension-specific psychotic experiences in adolescence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominika Sieradzka

    Full Text Available Psychosis has been hypothesised to be a continuously distributed quantitative phenotype and disorders such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder represent its extreme manifestations. Evidence suggests that common genetic variants play an important role in liability to both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Here we tested the hypothesis that these common variants would also influence psychotic experiences measured dimensionally in adolescents in the general population. Our aim was to test whether schizophrenia and bipolar disorder polygenic risk scores (PRS, as well as specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs previously identified as risk variants for schizophrenia, were associated with adolescent dimension-specific psychotic experiences. Self-reported Paranoia, Hallucinations, Cognitive Disorganisation, Grandiosity, Anhedonia, and Parent-rated Negative Symptoms, as measured by the Specific Psychotic Experiences Questionnaire (SPEQ, were assessed in a community sample of 2,152 16-year-olds. Polygenic risk scores were calculated using estimates of the log of odds ratios from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium GWAS stage-1 mega-analysis of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. The polygenic risk analyses yielded no significant associations between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder PRS and the SPEQ measures. The analyses on the 28 individual SNPs previously associated with schizophrenia found that two SNPs in TCF4 returned a significant association with the SPEQ Paranoia dimension, rs17512836 (p-value = 2.57×10⁻⁴ and rs9960767 (p-value = 6.23×10⁻⁴. Replication in an independent sample of 16-year-olds (N = 3,427 assessed using the Psychotic-Like Symptoms Questionnaire (PLIKS-Q, a composite measure of multiple positive psychotic experiences, failed to yield significant results. Future research with PRS derived from larger samples, as well as larger adolescent validation samples, would improve the predictive power to test

  20. Genome-wide association reveals that common genetic variation in the kallikrein-kinin system is associated with serum L-arginine levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weihua; Jernerén, Fredrik; Lehne, Benjamin C; Chen, Ming-Huei; Luben, Robert N; Johnston, Carole; Elshorbagy, Amany; Eppinga, Ruben N; Scott, William R; Adeyeye, Elizabeth; Scott, James; Böger, Rainer H; Khaw, Kay-Tee; van der Harst, Pim; Wareham, Nicholas J; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Chambers, John C; Refsum, Helga; Kooner, Jaspal S

    2016-11-30

    L-arginine is the essential precursor of nitric oxide, and is involved in multiple key physiological processes, including vascular and immune function. The genetic regulation of blood L-arginine levels is largely unknown. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify genetic factors determining serum L-arginine levels, amongst 901 Europeans and 1,394 Indian Asians. We show that common genetic variations at the KLKB1 and F12 loci are strongly associated with serum L-arginine levels. The G allele of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs71640036 (T/G) in KLKB1 is associated with lower serum L-arginine concentrations (10 µmol/l per allele copy, p=1×10(-24)), while allele T of rs2545801 (T/C) near the F12 gene is associated with lower serum L-arginine levels (7 µmol/l per allele copy, p=7×10(-12)). Together these two loci explain 7 % of the total variance in serum L-arginine concentrations. The associations at both loci were replicated in independent cohorts with plasma L-arginine measurements (pL-arginine and its potential relationship with cardiovascular risk.

  1. Genetic association studies of glutamate, GABA and related genes in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: a decade of advance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherlyn, Suat Ying Tan; Woon, Puay San; Liu, Jian Jun; Ong, Wei Yi; Tsai, Guo Chuan; Sim, Kang

    2010-05-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD) are debilitating neurobehavioural disorders likely influenced by genetic and non-genetic factors and which can be seen as complex disorders of synaptic neurotransmission. The glutamatergic and GABAergic neurotransmission systems have been implicated in both diseases and we have reviewed extensive literature over a decade for evidence to support the association of glutamate and GABA genes in SZ and BD. Candidate-gene based population and family association studies have implicated some ionotrophic glutamate receptor genes (GRIN1, GRIN2A, GRIN2B and GRIK3), metabotropic glutamate receptor genes (such as GRM3), the G72/G30 locus and GABAergic genes (e.g. GAD1 and GABRB2) in both illnesses to varying degrees, but further replication studies are needed to validate these results. There is at present no consensus on specific single nucleotide polymorphisms or haplotypes associated with the particular candidate gene loci in these illnesses. The genetic architecture of glutamate systems in bipolar disorder need to be better studied in view of recent data suggesting an overlap in the genetic aetiology of SZ and BD. There is a pressing need to integrate research platforms in genomics, epistatic models, proteomics, metabolomics, neuroimaging technology and translational studies in order to allow a more integrated understanding of glutamate and GABAergic signalling processes and aberrations in SZ and BD as well as their relationships with clinical presentations and treatment progress over time.

  2. The Kaposi Sarcoma Herpesvirus Latency-associated Nuclear Antigen DNA Binding Domain Dorsal Positive Electrostatic Patch Facilitates DNA Replication and Episome Persistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shijun; Tan, Min; Juillard, Franceline; Ponnusamy, Rajesh; Correia, Bruno; Simas, J Pedro; Carrondo, Maria A; McVey, Colin E; Kaye, Kenneth M

    2015-11-20

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) has a causative role in several human malignancies. KSHV latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) mediates persistence of viral episomes in latently infected cells. LANA mediates KSHV DNA replication and segregates episomes to progeny nuclei. The structure of the LANA DNA binding domain was recently solved, revealing a positive electrostatic patch opposite the DNA binding surface, which is the site of BET protein binding. Here we investigate the functional role of the positive patch in LANA-mediated episome persistence. As expected, LANA mutants with alanine or glutamate substitutions in the central, peripheral, or lateral portions of the positive patch maintained the ability to bind DNA by EMSA. However, all of the substitution mutants were deficient for LANA DNA replication and episome maintenance. Mutation of the peripheral region generated the largest deficiencies. Despite these deficiencies, all positive patch mutants concentrated to dots along mitotic chromosomes in cells containing episomes, similar to LANA. The central and peripheral mutants, but not the lateral mutants, were reduced for BET protein interaction as assessed by co-immunoprecipitation. However, defects in BET protein binding were independent of episome maintenance function. Overall, the reductions in episome maintenance closely correlated with DNA replication deficiencies, suggesting that the replication defects account for the reduced episome persistence. Therefore, the electrostatic patch exerts a key role in LANA-mediated DNA replication and episome persistence and may act through a host cell partner(s) other than a BET protein or by inducing specific structures or complexes.

  3. Bayesian LASSO, scale space and decision making in association genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasanen, Leena; Holmström, Lasse; Sillanpää, Mikko J

    2015-01-01

    LASSO is a penalized regression method that facilitates model fitting in situations where there are as many, or even more explanatory variables than observations, and only a few variables are relevant in explaining the data. We focus on the Bayesian version of LASSO and consider four problems that need special attention: (i) controlling false positives, (ii) multiple comparisons, (iii) collinearity among explanatory variables, and (iv) the choice of the tuning parameter that controls the amount of shrinkage and the sparsity of the estimates. The particular application considered is association genetics, where LASSO regression can be used to find links between chromosome locations and phenotypic traits in a biological organism. However, the proposed techniques are relevant also in other contexts where LASSO is used for variable selection. We separate the true associations from false positives using the posterior distribution of the effects (regression coefficients) provided by Bayesian LASSO. We propose to solve the multiple comparisons problem by using simultaneous inference based on the joint posterior distribution of the effects. Bayesian LASSO also tends to distribute an effect among collinear variables, making detection of an association difficult. We propose to solve this problem by considering not only individual effects but also their functionals (i.e. sums and differences). Finally, whereas in Bayesian LASSO the tuning parameter is often regarded as a random variable, we adopt a scale space view and consider a whole range of fixed tuning parameters, instead. The effect estimates and the associated inference are considered for all tuning parameters in the selected range and the results are visualized with color maps that provide useful insights into data and the association problem considered. The methods are illustrated using two sets of artificial data and one real data set, all representing typical settings in association genetics.

  4. Bayesian LASSO, scale space and decision making in association genetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena Pasanen

    Full Text Available LASSO is a penalized regression method that facilitates model fitting in situations where there are as many, or even more explanatory variables than observations, and only a few variables are relevant in explaining the data. We focus on the Bayesian version of LASSO and consider four problems that need special attention: (i controlling false positives, (ii multiple comparisons, (iii collinearity among explanatory variables, and (iv the choice of the tuning parameter that controls the amount of shrinkage and the sparsity of the estimates. The particular application considered is association genetics, where LASSO regression can be used to find links between chromosome locations and phenotypic traits in a biological organism. However, the proposed techniques are relevant also in other contexts where LASSO is used for variable selection.We separate the true associations from false positives using the posterior distribution of the effects (regression coefficients provided by Bayesian LASSO. We propose to solve the multiple comparisons problem by using simultaneous inference based on the joint posterior distribution of the effects. Bayesian LASSO also tends to distribute an effect among collinear variables, making detection of an association difficult. We propose to solve this problem by considering not only individual effects but also their functionals (i.e. sums and differences. Finally, whereas in Bayesian LASSO the tuning parameter is often regarded as a random variable, we adopt a scale space view and consider a whole range of fixed tuning parameters, instead. The effect estimates and the associated inference are considered for all tuning parameters in the selected range and the results are visualized with color maps that provide useful insights into data and the association problem considered. The methods are illustrated using two sets of artificial data and one real data set, all representing typical settings in association genetics.

  5. Replication of honey bee-associated RNA viruses across multiple bee species in apple orchards of Georgia, Germany and Kyrgyzstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radzevičiūtė, Rita; Theodorou, Panagiotis; Husemann, Martin; Japoshvili, George; Kirkitadze, Giorgi; Zhusupbaeva, Aigul; Paxton, Robert J

    2017-06-01

    The essential ecosystem service of pollination is provided largely by insects, which are considered threatened by diverse biotic and abiotic global change pressures. RNA viruses are one such pressure, and have risen in prominence as a major threat for honey bees (Apis mellifera) and global apiculture, as well as a risk factor for other bee species through pathogen spill-over between managed honey bees and sympatric wild pollinator communities. Yet despite their potential role in global bee decline, the prevalence of honey bee-associated RNA viruses in wild bees is poorly known from both geographic and taxonomic perspectives. We screened members of pollinator communities (honey bees, bumble bees and other wild bees belonging to four families) collected from apple orchards in Georgia, Germany and Kyrgyzstan for six common honey bee-associated RNA virus complexes encompassing nine virus targets. The Deformed wing virus complex (DWV genotypes A and B) had the highest prevalence across all localities and host species and was the only virus complex found in wild bee species belonging to all four studied families. Based on amplification of negative-strand viral RNA, we found evidence for viral replication in wild bee species of DWV-A/DWV-B (hosts: Andrena haemorrhoa and several Bombus spp.) and Black queen cell virus (hosts: Anthophora plumipes, several Bombus spp., Osmia bicornis and Xylocopa spp.). Viral amplicon sequences revealed that DWV-A and DWV-B are regionally distinct but identical in two or more bee species at any one site, suggesting virus is shared amongst sympatric bee taxa. This study demonstrates that honey bee associated RNA viruses are geographically and taxonomically widespread, likely infective in wild bee species, and shared across bee taxa. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Web-based genome-wide association study identifies two novel loci and a substantial genetic component for Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuong B Do

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Although the causes of Parkinson's disease (PD are thought to be primarily environmental, recent studies suggest that a number of genes influence susceptibility. Using targeted case recruitment and online survey instruments, we conducted the largest case-control genome-wide association study (GWAS of PD based on a single collection of individuals to date (3,426 cases and 29,624 controls. We discovered two novel, genome-wide significant associations with PD-rs6812193 near SCARB2 (p = 7.6 × 10(-10, OR = 0.84 and rs11868035 near SREBF1/RAI1 (p = 5.6 × 10(-8, OR = 0.85-both replicated in an independent cohort. We also replicated 20 previously discovered genetic associations (including LRRK2, GBA, SNCA, MAPT, GAK, and the HLA region, providing support for our novel study design. Relying on a recently proposed method based on genome-wide sharing estimates between distantly related individuals, we estimated the heritability of PD to be at least 0.27. Finally, using sparse regression techniques, we constructed predictive models that account for 6%-7% of the total variance in liability and that suggest the presence of true associations just beyond genome-wide significance, as confirmed through both internal and external cross-validation. These results indicate a substantial, but by no means total, contribution of genetics underlying susceptibility to both early-onset and late-onset PD, suggesting that, despite the novel associations discovered here and elsewhere, the majority of the genetic component for Parkinson's disease remains to be discovered.

  7. Association of susceptible genetic markers and autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vasanth Konda Mohan; Nalini Ganesan; Rajasekhar Gopalakrishnan

    2014-08-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disorder of unknown aetiology resulting in inflammation of the synovium, cartilage and bone. The disease has a heterogeneous character, consisting of clinical subsets of anti-citrullinated protein antibody (ACPA)-positive and APCA-negative disease. Although, the pathogenesis of RA is incompletely understood, genetic factors play a vital role in susceptibility to RA as the heritability of RA is between 50 and 60%, with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) locus accounting for at least 30% of overall genetic risk. Non-HLA genes, i.e. tumour necrosis factor- (TNF-) within the MHC (major histocompatibility complex) have also been investigated for association with RA. Although, some contradictory results have originated from several studies on TNF- gene, the data published so far indicate the possible existence of TNF- gene promoter variants that act as markers for disease severity and response to treatment in RA. The correlation of HLA and non-HLA genes within MHC region is apparently interpreted. A considerable number of confirmed associations with RA and other autoimmune disease susceptibility loci including peptidylarginine deiminase type 4 (PADI4), protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22 (PTPN22), signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT4), cluster of differentiation 244 (CD244) and cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA4), located outside the MHC have been reported recently. In this review, we aim to give an update on recent progress in RA genetics, the importance of the combination of HLA-DRB1 alleles, non-HLA gene polymorphism, its detection and autoantibodies as susceptibility markers for early RA disease.

  8. Genetic Association Study of KCNQ5 Polymorphisms with High Myopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Liao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Identification of genetic variations related to high myopia may advance our knowledge of the etiopathogenesis of refractive error. This study investigated the role of potassium channel gene (KCNQ5 polymorphisms in high myopia. We performed a case-control study of 1563 unrelated Han Chinese subjects (809 cases of high myopia and 754 emmetropic controls. Five tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of KCNQ5 were genotyped, and association testing with high myopia was conducted using logistic regression analysis adjusted for sex and age to give Pasym values, and multiple comparisons were corrected by permutation test to give Pemp values. All five noncoding SNPs were associated with high myopia. The SNP rs7744813, previously shown to be associated with refractive error and myopia in two GWAS, showed an odds ratio of 0.75 (95% CI 0.63–0.90; Pemp = 0.0058 for the minor allele. The top SNP rs9342979 showed an odds ratio of 0.75 (95% CI 0.64–0.89; Pemp = 0.0045 for the minor allele. Both SNPs are located within enhancer histone marks and DNase-hypersensitive sites. Our data support the involvement of KCNQ5 gene polymorphisms in the genetic susceptibility to high myopia and further exploration of KCNQ5 as a risk factor for high myopia.

  9. Association of STAT4 with rheumatoid arthritis - A replication study in three European populations : a replication study in three European populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orozco, Gisela; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Delgado-Vega, Angelica M.; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A.; Balsa, Alejandro; Pascual-Salcedo, Dora; Fernandez-Gutierrez, Benjamin; Gonzalez-Escribano, Maria F.; Petersson, Ingemar F.; van Riel, Piet L. C. M.; Barrera, Pilar; Coenen, Marieke J. H.; Radstake, Timothy R. D. J.; van Leeuwen, Miek A.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Koeleman, Bobby P. C.; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta; Martin, Javier

    Objective. This study was undertaken to investigate the previously reported association of the STAT4 polymorphism rs7574865 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in 3 different European populations from Spain, Sweden, and The Netherlands, comprising a total of 2,072 patients and 2,474 controls. Methods.

  10. Association of STAT4 with rheumatoid arthritis - A replication study in three European populations : a replication study in three European populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orozco, Gisela; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Delgado-Vega, Angelica M.; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A.; Balsa, Alejandro; Pascual-Salcedo, Dora; Fernandez-Gutierrez, Benjamin; Gonzalez-Escribano, Maria F.; Petersson, Ingemar F.; van Riel, Piet L. C. M.; Barrera, Pilar; Coenen, Marieke J. H.; Radstake, Timothy R. D. J.; van Leeuwen, Miek A.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Koeleman, Bobby P. C.; Alarcon-Riquelme, Marta; Martin, Javier

    2008-01-01

    Objective. This study was undertaken to investigate the previously reported association of the STAT4 polymorphism rs7574865 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in 3 different European populations from Spain, Sweden, and The Netherlands, comprising a total of 2,072 patients and 2,474 controls. Methods. Th

  11. RNAseq expression analysis of resistant and susceptible mice after influenza A virus infection identifies novel genes associated with virus replication and important for host resistance to infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilk, Esther; Pandey, Ashutosh K; Leist, Sarah Rebecca; Hatesuer, Bastian; Preusse, Matthias; Pommerenke, Claudia; Wang, Junxi; Schughart, Klaus

    2015-09-02

    The host response to influenza A infections is strongly influenced by host genetic factors. Animal models of genetically diverse mouse strains are well suited to identify host genes involved in severe pathology, viral replication and immune responses. Here, we have utilized a dual RNAseq approach that allowed us to investigate both viral and host gene expression in the same individual mouse after H1N1 infection. We performed a detailed expression analysis to identify (i) correlations between changes in expression of host and virus genes, (ii) host genes involved in viral replication, and (iii) genes showing differential expression between two mouse strains that strongly differ in resistance to influenza infections. These genes may be key players involved in regulating the differences in pathogenesis and host defense mechanisms after influenza A infections. Expression levels of influenza segments correlated well with the viral load and may thus be used as surrogates for conventional viral load measurements. Furthermore, we investigated the functional role of two genes, Reg3g and Irf7, in knock-out mice and found that deletion of the Irf7 gene renders the host highly susceptible to H1N1 infection. Using RNAseq analysis we identified novel genes important for viral replication or the host defense. This study adds further important knowledge to host-pathogen-interactions and suggests additional candidates that are crucial for host susceptibility or survival during influenza A infections.

  12. Genetic variants associated with neurodegenerative Alzheimer disease in natural models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Claudia; Valdivia, Gonzalo; Ardiles, Álvaro O; Ewer, John; Palacios, Adrián G

    2016-02-26

    The use of transgenic models for the study of neurodegenerative diseases has made valuable contributions to the field. However, some important limitations, including protein overexpression and general systemic compensation for the missing genes, has caused researchers to seek natural models that show the main biomarkers of neurodegenerative diseases during aging. Here we review some of these models-most of them rodents, focusing especially on the genetic variations in biomarkers for Alzheimer diseases, in order to explain their relationships with variants associated with the occurrence of the disease in humans.

  13. Genetic polymorphisms associated with rubella virus-specific cellular immunity following MMR vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Richard B; Ovsyannikova, Inna G; Haralambieva, Iana H; Lambert, Nathaniel D; Pankratz, V Shane; Poland, Gregory A

    2014-11-01

    Rubella virus causes a relatively benign disease in most cases, although infection during pregnancy can result in serious birth defects. An effective vaccine has been available since the early 1970s and outbreaks typically do not occur among highly vaccinated (≥2 doses) populations. Nevertheless, considerable inter-individual variation in immune response to rubella immunization does exist, with single-dose seroconversion rates ~95 %. Understanding the mechanisms behind this variability may provide important insights into rubella immunity. In the current study, we examined associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in selected cytokine, cytokine receptor, and innate/antiviral genes and immune responses following rubella vaccination in order to understand genetic influences on vaccine response. Our approach consisted of a discovery cohort of 887 subjects aged 11-22 at the time of enrollment and a replication cohort of 542 older adolescents and young adults (age 18-40). Our data indicate that SNPs near the butyrophilin genes (BTN3A3/BTN2A1) and cytokine receptors (IL10RB/IFNAR1) are associated with variations in IFNγ secretion and that multiple SNPs in the PVR gene, as well as SNPs located in the ADAR gene, exhibit significant associations with rubella virus-specific IL-6 secretion. This information may be useful, not only in furthering our understanding immune responses to rubella vaccine, but also in identifying key pathways for targeted adjuvant use to boost immunity in those with weak or absent immunity following vaccination.

  14. Common genetic variants associated with thyroid function may be risk alleles for Hashimoto's disease and Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Purdey; Brix, Thomas H; Wilson, Scott G; Ward, Lynley C; Hui, Jennie; Beilby, John P; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Walsh, John P

    2015-02-14

    Recent studies have identified common genetic variants associated with TSH, free T4 and thyroid peroxidase antibodies, but it is unclear whether these differ between patients with Hashimoto's disease and Graves' disease. To examine whether 11 common genetic variants differ between Graves' disease and Hashimoto's disease. We genotyped 11 common variants in a discovery cohort of 203 Australian patients with autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). Two variants with significant or suggestive associations were analysed in a replication cohort of 384 Danish patients. For rs753760 (PDE10A), the minor allele frequency in Graves' disease and Hashimoto's disease was 0·38 vs. 0·23, respectively, (P = 6·42 × 10(-4) ) in the discovery cohort, 0·29 vs. 0·24 (P = 0·147) in the replication cohort and 0·32 vs. 0·24 in combined analysis (P = 0·0021; all analyses adjusted for sex). In healthy controls from Busselton, the frequency was 0·29, significantly different from Hashimoto's disease but not Graves' disease. For rs4889009 (MAF gene region), the frequency of the minor G-allele in Graves' disease and Hashimoto's disease was 0·48 vs. 0·36 (P = 0·0156) in the discovery cohort, 0·48 vs. 0·34 (P = 1·83 × 10(-4) ) in the replication cohort and 0·48 vs. 0·35 in the combined analysis (P = 7·53 × 10(-6) ); in controls, the frequency was 0·38, significantly different from Graves' disease but not Hashimoto's disease. After further adjustment for smoking, associations with rs4889009 remained significant, whereas those with rs753760 were not. Common variants in PDE10A and MAF gene regions may influence whether patients with AITD develop Graves' disease or Hashimoto's disease. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Biological Insights From 108 Schizophrenia-Associated Genetic Loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripke, Stephan; Neale, Benjamin M; Corvin, Aiden; Walters, James TR; Farh, Kai-How; Holmans, Peter A; Lee, Phil; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Collier, David A; Huang, Hailiang; Pers, Tune H; Agartz, Ingrid; Agerbo, Esben; Albus, Margot; Alexander, Madeline; Amin, Farooq; Bacanu, Silviu A; Begemann, Martin; Belliveau, Richard A; Bene, Judit; Bergen, Sarah E; Bevilacqua, Elizabeth; Bigdeli, Tim B; Black, Donald W; Bruggeman, Richard; Buccola, Nancy G; Buckner, Randy L; Byerley, William; Cahn, Wiepke; Cai, Guiqing; Campion, Dominique; Cantor, Rita M; Carr, Vaughan J; Carrera, Noa; Catts, Stanley V; Chambert, Kimberley D; Chan, Raymond CK; Chan, Ronald YL; Chen, Eric YH; Cheng, Wei; Cheung, Eric FC; Chong, Siow Ann; Cloninger, C Robert; Cohen, David; Cohen, Nadine; Cormican, Paul; Craddock, Nick; Crowley, James J; Curtis, David; Davidson, Michael; Davis, Kenneth L; Degenhardt, Franziska; Del Favero, Jurgen; Demontis, Ditte; Dikeos, Dimitris; Dinan, Timothy; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary; Drapeau, Elodie; Duan, Jubao; Dudbridge, Frank; Durmishi, Naser; Eichhammer, Peter; Eriksson, Johan; Escott-Price, Valentina; Essioux, Laurent; Fanous, Ayman H; Farrell, Martilias S; Frank, Josef; Franke, Lude; Freedman, Robert; Freimer, Nelson B; Friedl, Marion; Friedman, Joseph I; Fromer, Menachem; Genovese, Giulio; Georgieva, Lyudmila; Giegling, Ina; Giusti-Rodríguez, Paola; Godard, Stephanie; Goldstein, Jacqueline I; Golimbet, Vera; Gopal, Srihari; Gratten, Jacob; de Haan, Lieuwe; Hammer, Christian; Hamshere, Marian L; Hansen, Mark; Hansen, Thomas; Haroutunian, Vahram; Hartmann, Annette M; Henskens, Frans A; Herms, Stefan; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Hoffmann, Per; Hofman, Andrea; Hollegaard, Mads V; Hougaard, David M; Ikeda, Masashi; Joa, Inge; Julià, Antonio; Kahn, René S; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Karachanak-Yankova, Sena; Karjalainen, Juha; Kavanagh, David; Keller, Matthew C; Kennedy, James L; Khrunin, Andrey; Kim, Yunjung; Klovins, Janis; Knowles, James A; Konte, Bettina; Kucinskas, Vaidutis; Kucinskiene, Zita Ausrele; Kuzelova-Ptackova, Hana; Kähler, Anna K; Laurent, Claudine; Lee, Jimmy; Lee, S Hong; Legge, Sophie E; Lerer, Bernard; Li, Miaoxin; Li, Tao; Liang, Kung-Yee; Lieberman, Jeffrey; Limborska, Svetlana; Loughland, Carmel M; Lubinski, Jan; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Macek, Milan; Magnusson, Patrik KE; Maher, Brion S; Maier, Wolfgang; Mallet, Jacques; Marsal, Sara; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mattingsdal, Morten; McCarley, Robert W; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; Meier, Sandra; Meijer, Carin J; Melegh, Bela; Melle, Ingrid; Mesholam-Gately, Raquelle I; Metspalu, Andres; Michie, Patricia T; Milani, Lili; Milanova, Vihra; Mokrab, Younes; Morris, Derek W; Mors, Ole; Murphy, Kieran C; Murray, Robin M; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nelis, Mari; Nenadic, Igor; Nertney, Deborah A; Nestadt, Gerald; Nicodemus, Kristin K; Nikitina-Zake, Liene; Nisenbaum, Laura; Nordin, Annelie; O’Callaghan, Eadbhard; O’Dushlaine, Colm; O’Neill, F Anthony; Oh, Sang-Yun; Olincy, Ann; Olsen, Line; Van Os, Jim; Pantelis, Christos; Papadimitriou, George N; Papiol, Sergi; Parkhomenko, Elena; Pato, Michele T; Paunio, Tiina; Pejovic-Milovancevic, Milica; Perkins, Diana O; Pietiläinen, Olli; Pimm, Jonathan; Pocklington, Andrew J; Powell, John; Price, Alkes; Pulver, Ann E; Purcell, Shaun M; Quested, Digby; Rasmussen, Henrik B; Reichenberg, Abraham; Reimers, Mark A; Richards, Alexander L; Roffman, Joshua L; Roussos, Panos; Ruderfer, Douglas M; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R; Schall, Ulrich; Schubert, Christian R; Schulze, Thomas G; Schwab, Sibylle G; Scolnick, Edward M; Scott, Rodney J; Seidman, Larry J; Shi, Jianxin; Sigurdsson, Engilbert; Silagadze, Teimuraz; Silverman, Jeremy M; Sim, Kang; Slominsky, Petr; Smoller, Jordan W; So, Hon-Cheong; Spencer, Chris C A; Stahl, Eli A; Stefansson, Hreinn; Steinberg, Stacy; Stogmann, Elisabeth; Straub, Richard E; Strengman, Eric; Strohmaier, Jana; Stroup, T Scott; Subramaniam, Mythily; Suvisaari, Jaana; Svrakic, Dragan M; Szatkiewicz, Jin P; Söderman, Erik; Thirumalai, Srinivas; Toncheva, Draga; Tosato, Sarah; Veijola, Juha; Waddington, John; Walsh, Dermot; Wang, Dai; Wang, Qiang; Webb, Bradley T; Weiser, Mark; Wildenauer, Dieter B; Williams, Nigel M; Williams, Stephanie; Witt, Stephanie H; Wolen, Aaron R; Wong, Emily HM; Wormley, Brandon K; Xi, Hualin Simon; Zai, Clement C; Zheng, Xuebin; Zimprich, Fritz; Wray, Naomi R; Stefansson, Kari; Visscher, Peter M; Adolfsson, Rolf; Andreassen, Ole A; Blackwood, Douglas HR; Bramon, Elvira; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Børglum, Anders D; Cichon, Sven; Darvasi, Ariel; Domenici, Enrico; Ehrenreich, Hannelore; Esko, Tõnu; Gejman, Pablo V; Gill, Michael; Gurling, Hugh; Hultman, Christina M; Iwata, Nakao; Jablensky, Assen V; Jönsson, Erik G; Kendler, Kenneth S; Kirov, George; Knight, Jo; Lencz, Todd; Levinson, Douglas F; Li, Qingqin S; Liu, Jianjun; Malhotra, Anil K; McCarroll, Steven A; McQuillin, Andrew; Moran, Jennifer L; Mortensen, Preben B; Mowry, Bryan J; Nöthen, Markus M; Ophoff, Roel A; Owen, Michael J; Palotie, Aarno; Pato, Carlos N; Petryshen, Tracey L; Posthuma, Danielle; Rietschel, Marcella; Riley, Brien P; Rujescu, Dan; Sham, Pak C; Sklar, Pamela; St Clair, David; Weinberger, Daniel R; Wendland, Jens R; Werge, Thomas; Daly, Mark J; Sullivan, Patrick F; O’Donovan, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    Summary Schizophrenia is a highly heritable disorder. Genetic risk is conferred by a large number of alleles, including common alleles of small effect that might be detected by genome-wide association studies. Here, we report a multi-stage schizophrenia genome-wide association study of up to 36,989 cases and 113,075 controls. We identify 128 independent associations spanning 108 conservatively defined loci that meet genome-wide significance, 83 of which have not been previously reported. Associations were enriched among genes expressed in brain providing biological plausibility for the findings. Many findings have the potential to provide entirely novel insights into aetiology, but associations at DRD2 and multiple genes involved in glutamatergic neurotransmission highlight molecules of known and potential therapeutic relevance to schizophrenia, and are consistent with leading pathophysiological hypotheses. Independent of genes expressed in brain, associations were enriched among genes expressed in tissues that play important roles in immunity, providing support for the hypothesized link between the immune system and schizophrenia. PMID:25056061

  16. Phage phi 29 protein p1 promotes replication by associating with the FtsZ ring of the divisome in Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ballesteros-Plaza, David; Holguera, Isabel; Scheffers, Dirk-Jan; Salas, Margarita; Munoz-Espin, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    During evolution, viruses have optimized the interaction with host factors to increase the efficiency of fundamental processes such as DNA replication. Bacteriophage phi 29 protein p1 is a membrane-associated protein that forms large protofilament sheets that resemble eukaryotic tubulin and bacteria

  17. Dyslexia and language impairment associated genetic markers influence cortical thickness and white matter in typically developing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eicher, John D; Montgomery, Angela M; Akshoomoff, Natacha; Amaral, David G; Bloss, Cinnamon S; Libiger, Ondrej; Schork, Nicholas J; Darst, Burcu F; Casey, B J; Chang, Linda; Ernst, Thomas; Frazier, Jean; Kaufmann, Walter E; Keating, Brian; Kenet, Tal; Kennedy, David; Mostofsky, Stewart; Murray, Sarah S; Sowell, Elizabeth R; Bartsch, Hauke; Kuperman, Joshua M; Brown, Timothy T; Hagler, Donald J; Dale, Anders M; Jernigan, Terry L; Gruen, Jeffrey R

    2016-03-01

    Dyslexia and language impairment (LI) are complex traits with substantial genetic components. We recently completed an association scan of the DYX2 locus, where we observed associations of markers in DCDC2, KIAA0319, ACOT13, and FAM65B with reading-, language-, and IQ-related traits. Additionally, the effects of reading-associated DYX3 markers were recently characterized using structural neuroimaging techniques. Here, we assessed the neuroimaging implications of associated DYX2 and DYX3 markers, using cortical volume, cortical thickness, and fractional anisotropy. To accomplish this, we examined eight DYX2 and three DYX3 markers in 332 subjects in the Pediatrics Imaging Neurocognition Genetics study. Imaging-genetic associations were examined by multiple linear regression, testing for influence of genotype on neuroimaging. Markers in DYX2 genes KIAA0319 and FAM65B were associated with cortical thickness in the left orbitofrontal region and global fractional anisotropy, respectively. KIAA0319 and ACOT13 were suggestively associated with overall fractional anisotropy and left pars opercularis cortical thickness, respectively. DYX3 markers showed suggestive associations with cortical thickness and volume measures in temporal regions. Notably, we did not replicate association of DYX3 markers with hippocampal measures. In summary, we performed a neuroimaging follow-up of reading-, language-, and IQ-associated DYX2 and DYX3 markers. DYX2 associations with cortical thickness may reflect variations in their role in neuronal migration. Furthermore, our findings complement gene expression and imaging studies implicating DYX3 markers in temporal regions. These studies offer insight into where and how DYX2 and DYX3 risk variants may influence neuroimaging traits. Future studies should further connect the pathways to risk variants associated with neuroimaging/neurocognitive outcomes.

  18. A Generalized Genetic Random Field Method for the Genetic Association Analysis of Sequencing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; He, Zihuai; Zhang, Min; Zhan, Xiaowei; Wei, Changshuai; Elston, Robert C.; Lu, Qing

    2017-01-01

    With the advance of high-throughput sequencing technologies, it has become feasible to investigate the influence of the entire spectrum of sequencing variations on complex human diseases. Although association studies utilizing the new sequencing technologies hold great promise to unravel novel genetic variants, especially rare genetic variants that contribute to human diseases, the statistical analysis of high-dimensional sequencing data remains a challenge. Advanced analytical methods are in great need to facilitate high-dimensional sequencing data analyses. In this article, we propose a generalized genetic random field (GGRF) method for association analyses of sequencing data. Like other similarity-based methods (e.g., SIMreg and SKAT), the new method has the advantages of avoiding the need to specify thresholds for rare variants and allowing for testing multiple variants acting in different directions and magnitude of effects. The method is built on the generalized estimating equation framework and thus accommodates a variety of disease phenotypes (e.g., quantitative and binary phenotypes). Moreover, it has a nice asymptotic property, and can be applied to small-scale sequencing data without need for small-sample adjustment. Through simulations, we demonstrate that the proposed GGRF attains an improved or comparable power over a commonly used method, SKAT, under various disease scenarios, especially when rare variants play a significant role in disease etiology. We further illustrate GGRF with an application to a real dataset from the Dallas Heart Study. By using GGRF, we were able to detect the association of two candidate genes, ANGPTL3 and ANGPTL4, with serum triglyceride. PMID:24482034

  19. Genetics of glucocorticoid-associated osteonecrosis in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karol, Seth E; Yang, Wenjian; Van Driest, Sara L; Chang, Tamara Y; Kaste, Sue; Bowton, Erica; Basford, Melissa; Bastarache, Lisa; Roden, Dan M; Denny, Joshua C; Larsen, Eric; Winick, Naomi; Carroll, William L; Cheng, Cheng; Pei, Deqing; Fernandez, Christian A; Liu, Chengcheng; Smith, Colton; Loh, Mignon L; Raetz, Elizabeth A; Hunger, Stephen P; Scheet, Paul; Jeha, Sima; Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E; Devidas, Meenakshi; Mattano, Leonard A; Relling, Mary V

    2015-10-08

    Glucocorticoids are important therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and their major adverse effect is osteonecrosis. Our goal was to identify genetic and nongenetic risk factors for osteonecrosis. We performed a genome-wide association study of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a discovery cohort comprising 2285 children with ALL, treated on the Children's Oncology Group AALL0232 protocol (NCT00075725), adjusting for covariates. The minor allele at SNP rs10989692 (near the glutamate receptor GRIN3A locus) was associated with osteonecrosis (hazard ratio = 2.03; P = 3.59 × 10(-7)). The association was supported by 2 replication cohorts, including 361 children with ALL on St. Jude's Total XV protocol (NCT00137111) and 309 non-ALL patients from Vanderbilt University's BioVU repository treated with glucocorticoids (odds ratio [OR] = 1.87 and 2.26; P = .063 and .0074, respectively). In a meta-analysis, rs10989692 was also highest ranked (P = 2.68 × 10(-8)), and the glutamate pathway was the top ranked pathway (P = 9.8 × 10(-4)). Osteonecrosis-associated glutamate receptor variants were also associated with other vascular phenotypes including cerebral ischemia (OR = 1.64; P = 2.5 × 10(-3)), and arterial embolism and thrombosis (OR = 1.88; P = 4.2 × 10(-3)). In conclusion, osteonecrosis was associated with inherited variations near glutamate receptor genes. Further understanding this association may allow interventions to decrease osteonecrosis. These trials are registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00075725 and #NCT00137111.

  20. Psoriasis and cardiometabolic traits: modest association but distinct genetic architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Manja; Baurecht, Hansjörg; Ried, Janina S.; Rodriguez, Elke; Schlesinger, Sabrina; Volks, Natalie; Gieger, Christian; Rückert, Ina-Maria; Heinrich, Luise; Willenborg, Christina; Smith, Catherine; Peters, Annette; Thorand, Barbara; Koenig, Wolfgang; Lamina, Claudia; Jansen, Henning; Kronenberg, Florian; Seissler, Jochen; Thiery, Joachim; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Schunkert, Heribert; Erdmann, Jeanette; Barker, Jonathan; Nair, Rajan P; Tsoi, Lam C; Elder, James T; Mrowietz, Ulrich; Weichenthal, Michael; Mucha, Sören; Schreiber, Stefan; Franke, Andre; Schmitt, Jochen; Lieb, Wolfgang; Weidinger, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis has been linked to cardiometabolic diseases, but epidemiological findings are inconsistent. We investigated the association between psoriasis and cardiometabolic outcomes in a German cross-sectional study (n=4.185) and a prospective cohort of German Health Insurance beneficiaries (n=1.811.098). A potential genetic overlap was explored using genome-wide data from >22.000 coronary artery disease (CAD) and >4.000 psoriasis cases, and with a dense genotyping study of cardiometabolic risk loci on 927 psoriasis cases and 3.717 controls. Controlling for major confounders, in the cross-sectional analysis psoriasis was significantly associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D, adjusted odd’s ratio OR=2.36; 95% confidence interval CI=1.26–4.41) and myocardial infarction (MI, OR=2.26, 95% CI=1.03–4.96). In the longitudinal study, psoriasis slightly increased the risk for incident T2D (adjusted relative risk RR=1.11; 95%CI=1.08–1.14) and MI (RR=1.14; 95%CI=1.06–1.22), with highest risk increments in systemically treated psoriasis, which accounted for 11 and 17 excess cases of T2D and MI per 10,000 person-years. Except for weak signals from within the MHC, there was no evidence for genetic risk loci shared between psoriasis and cardiometabolic traits. Our findings suggest that psoriasis, in particular severe psoriasis, increases risk for T2D and MI, and that the genetic architecture of psoriasis and cardiometabolic traits is largely distinct. PMID:25599394

  1. Mapping genetic variants associated with beta-adrenergic responses in inbred mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micha Hersch

    Full Text Available β-blockers and β-agonists are primarily used to treat cardiovascular diseases. Inter-individual variability in response to both drug classes is well recognized, yet the identity and relative contribution of the genetic players involved are poorly understood. This work is the first genome-wide association study (GWAS addressing the values and susceptibility of cardiovascular-related traits to a selective β(1-blocker, Atenolol (ate, and a β-agonist, Isoproterenol (iso. The phenotypic dataset consisted of 27 highly heritable traits, each measured across 22 inbred mouse strains and four pharmacological conditions. The genotypic panel comprised 79922 informative SNPs of the mouse HapMap resource. Associations were mapped by Efficient Mixed Model Association (EMMA, a method that corrects for the population structure and genetic relatedness of the various strains. A total of 205 separate genome-wide scans were analyzed. The most significant hits include three candidate loci related to cardiac and body weight, three loci for electrocardiographic (ECG values, two loci for the susceptibility of atrial weight index to iso, four loci for the susceptibility of systolic blood pressure (SBP to perturbations of the β-adrenergic system, and one locus for the responsiveness of QTc (p<10(-8. An additional 60 loci were suggestive for one or the other of the 27 traits, while 46 others were suggestive for one or the other drug effects (p<10(-6. Most hits tagged unexpected regions, yet at least two loci for the susceptibility of SBP to β-adrenergic drugs pointed at members of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis. Loci for cardiac-related traits were preferentially enriched in genes expressed in the heart, while 23% of the testable loci were replicated with datasets of the Mouse Phenome Database (MPD. Altogether these data and validation tests indicate that the mapped loci are relevant to the traits and responses studied.

  2. Dissection of genetic factors associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblond, Claire S; Kaneb, Hannah M; Dion, Patrick A; Rouleau, Guy A

    2014-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal late onset neurological disorder characterized by motor neuron degeneration in the primary motor cortex, brainstem and spinal cord. The majority of cases are sporadic (SALS) and only 5-10% have a family history (FALS). FALS cases show a high heritability and this has enabled the identification of several genetic triggers, of which mutations in SOD1, FUS, TARDBP and C9ORF72 are the most frequent. While such advances have contributed to our current understanding of the causes of most cases of FALS and their underlying pathophysiological consequences, they only explain a small fraction of SALS with the etiology of most SALS cases remaining unexplained. Here, we review past and current methods used for the identification of FALS and SALS associated genes and propose a risk-based classification for these. We also discuss how the growing number of whole exome/genome sequencing datasets prepared from SALS cases, and control individuals, may reveal novel insights into the genetic etiology of SALS; for instance through revealing increased mutation burden rates across genes or genomic regions that were not previously associated with ALS or through allowing the examination of a potential "oligogenic" mechanism of the disease. Finally we summarize the three most recently discovered 'high risk' genes in ALS.

  3. Genetic Alterations in Gastric Cancer Associated with Helicobacter pylori Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Castillo-Rojas

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is a world health problem and depicts the fourth leading mortality cause from malignancy in Mexico. Causation of gastric cancer is not only due to the combined effects of environmental factors and genetic variants. Recent molecular studies have transgressed a number of genes involved in gastric carcinogenesis. The aim of this review is to understand the recent basics of gene expression in the development of the process of gastric carcinogenesis. Genetic variants, polymorphisms, desoxyribonucleic acid methylation, and genes involved in mediating inflammation have been associated with the development of gastric carcinogenesis. Recently, these genes (interleukin 10, Il-17, mucin 1, β-catenin, CDX1, SMAD4, SERPINE1, hypoxia-inducible factor 1 subunit alpha, GSK3β, CDH17, matrix metalloproteinase 7, RUNX3, RASSF1A, TFF1, HAI-2, and COX-2 have been studied in association with oncogenic activation or inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. All these mechanisms have been investigated to elucidate the process of gastric carcinogenesis, as well as their potential use as biomarkers and/or molecular targets to treatment of disease.

  4. Genetic association signal near NTN4 in Tourette Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschou, Peristera; Yu, Dongmei; Gerber, Gloria; Evans, Patrick; Tsetsos, Fotis; Davis, Lea K.; Karagiannidis, Iordanis; Chaponis, Jonathan; Gamazon, Eric; Mueller-Vahl, Kirsten; Stuhrmann, Manfred; Schloegelhofer, Monika; Stamenkovic, Mara; Hebebrand, Johannes; Noethen, Markus; Nagy, Peter; Barta, Csaba; Tarnok, Zsanett; Rizzo, Renata; Depienne, Christel; Worbe, Yulia; Hartmann, Andreas; Cath, Danielle C.; Budman, Cathy L.; Sandor, Paul; Barr, Cathy; Wolanczyk, Thomas; Singer, Harvey; Chou, I-Ching; Grados, Marco; Posthuma, Danielle; Rouleau, Guy A.; Aschauer, Harald; Freimer, Nelson B.; Pauls, David L.; Cox, Nancy J.; Mathews, Carol A.; Scharf, Jeremiah M.

    2014-01-01

    Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder with a complex genetic etiology. Through an international collaboration, we genotyped 42 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)(p<10−3) from the recent TS genome-wide association study (GWAS) in 609 independent cases and 610 ancestry-matched controls. Only rs2060546 on chromosome 12q22 (p=3.3×10−4) remained significant after Bonferroni correction. Meta-analysis with the original GWAS yielded the strongest association to date (p=5.8×10−7). Although its functional significance is unclear, rs2060546 lies closest to NTN4, an axon guidance molecule expressed in developing striatum. Risk score analysis significantly predicted case/control status (p=0.042), suggesting that many of these variants are true TS risk alleles. PMID:25042818

  5. Parvovirus B19 promoter at map unit 6 confers autonomous replication competence and erythroid specificity to adeno-associated virus 2 in primary human hematopoietic progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X S; Yoder, M C; Zhou, S Z; Srivastava, A

    1995-01-01

    The pathogenic human parvovirus B19 is an autonomously replicating virus with a remarkable tropism for human erythroid progenitor cells. Although the target cell specificity for B19 infection has been suggested to be mediated by the erythrocyte P-antigen receptor (globoside), a number of nonerythroid cells that express this receptor are nonpermissive for B19 replication. To directly test the role of expression from the B19 promoter at map unit 6 (B19p6) in the erythroid cell specificity of B19, we constructed a recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV), in which the authentic AAV promoter at map unit 5 (AAVp5) was replaced by the B19p6 promoter. Although the wild-type (wt) AAV requires a helper virus for its optimal replication, we hypothesized that inserting the B19p6 promoter in a recombinant AAV would permit autonomous viral replication, but only in erythroid progenitor cells. In this report, we provide evidence that the B19p6 promoter is necessary and sufficient to impart autonomous replication competence and erythroid specificity to AAV in primary human hematopoietic progenitor cells. Thus, expression from the B19p6 promoter plays an important role in post-P-antigen receptor erythroid-cell specificity of parvovirus B19. The AAV-B19 hybrid vector system may also prove to be useful in potential gene therapy of human hemoglobinopathies. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8618912

  6. Two non-synonymous markers in PTPN21, identified by genome-wide association study data-mining and replication, are associated with schizophrenia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chen, Jingchun

    2011-09-01

    We conducted data-mining analyses of genome wide association (GWA) studies of the CATIE and MGS-GAIN datasets, and found 13 markers in the two physically linked genes, PTPN21 and EML5, showing nominally significant association with schizophrenia. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis indicated that all 7 markers from PTPN21 shared high LD (r(2)>0.8), including rs2274736 and rs2401751, the two non-synonymous markers with the most significant association signals (rs2401751, P=1.10 × 10(-3) and rs2274736, P=1.21 × 10(-3)). In a meta-analysis of all 13 replication datasets with a total of 13,940 subjects, we found that the two non-synonymous markers are significantly associated with schizophrenia (rs2274736, OR=0.92, 95% CI: 0.86-0.97, P=5.45 × 10(-3) and rs2401751, OR=0.92, 95% CI: 0.86-0.97, P=5.29 × 10(-3)). One SNP (rs7147796) in EML5 is also significantly associated with the disease (OR=1.08, 95% CI: 1.02-1.14, P=6.43 × 10(-3)). These 3 markers remain significant after Bonferroni correction. Furthermore, haplotype conditioned analyses indicated that the association signals observed between rs2274736\\/rs2401751 and rs7147796 are statistically independent. Given the results that 2 non-synonymous markers in PTPN21 are associated with schizophrenia, further investigation of this locus is warranted.

  7. Association between genetic variants of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 3 (GRM3) and cognitive set shifting in healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baune, B T; Suslow, T; Beśte, C; Birosova, E; Domschke, K; Sehlmeyer, C; Konrad, C

    2010-07-01

    Set-shifting and maintenance are complex cognitive processes, which are often impaired in schizophrenia. The genetic basis of these processes is poorly understood. We aimed to investigate the association between genetic variants of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 3 (GRM3) and cognitive set-shifting in healthy individuals. The relationship between 14 selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the GRM3 gene and cognitive set-shifting as measured by perseverative errors using the modified card sorting test (MCST) was analysed in a sample of N = 98 young healthy individuals (mean age in years: 22.7 +/- 0.19). Results show that SNP rs17676277 is related to the performance on the MCST. Subjects with the TT genotype showed significantly less perseverative errors as compared with the AA (P = 0.025) and AT (P = 0.0005) and combined AA/AT genotypes (P = 0.0005). Haplotype analyses suggest the involvement of various SNPs of the GRM3 gene in perseverative error processing in a dominant model of inheritance. The findings strongly suggest that the genetic variation (rs17676277 and three haplotypes) in the metabotropic GRM3 is related to cognitive set-shifting in healthy individuals independent of working memory. However, because of a relatively small sample size for a genetic association study, the present results are tentative and require replication.

  8. Anti-TNF treatment response in rheumatoid arthritis patients is associated with genetic variation in the NLRP3-inflammasome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sode, Jacob; Vogel, Ulla; Bank, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Many patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) benefit from tumor necrosis factor-α blocking treatment (anti-TNF), but about one third do not respond. The objective of this study was to replicate and extend previously found associations between anti-TNF treatment response and genetic...... logistic regression analyses were performed to test associations between genotypes and treatment response at 3-6 months using the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) response criterion. American College of Rheumatology treatment response (ACR50) and relative change in 28-joint disease activity score...... (relDAS28) were used as secondary outcomes. Subgroup analyses were stratified according to smoking status, type of anti-TNF drug and IgM-Rheumatoid Factor (IgM-RF) status. False discovery rate (FDR) controlling was used to adjust for multiple testing. RESULTS: Statistically significant associations...

  9. Genetic variants associated with subjective well-being, depressive symptoms and neuroticism identified through genome-wide analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derringer, Jaime; Gratten, Jacob; Lee, James J; Liu, Jimmy Z; de Vlaming, Ronald; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Buchwald, Jadwiga; Cavadino, Alana; Frazier-Wood, Alexis C; Davies, Gail; Furlotte, Nicholas A; Garfield, Victoria; Geisel, Marie Henrike; Gonzalez, Juan R; Haitjema, Saskia; Karlsson, Robert; van der Laan, Sander W; Ladwig, Karl-Heinz; Lahti, Jari; van der Lee, Sven J; Miller, Michael B; Lind, Penelope A; Liu, Tian; Matteson, Lindsay; Mihailov, Evelin; Minica, Camelia C; Nolte, Ilja M; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O; van der Most, Peter J; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Qian, Yong; Raitakari, Olli; Rawal, Rajesh; Realo, Anu; Rueedi, Rico; Schmidt, Börge; Smith, Albert V; Stergiakouli, Evie; Tanaka, Toshiko; Taylor, Kent; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Wedenoja, Juho; Wellmann, Juergen; Westra, Harm-Jan; Willems, Sara M; Zhao, Wei; Amin, Najaf; Bakshi, Andrew; Bergmann, Sven; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Boyle, Patricia A; Cherney, Samantha; Cox, Simon R; Davis, Oliver S P; Ding, Jun; Direk, Nese; Eibich, Peter; Emeny, Rebecca T; Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Faul, Jessica D; Ferrucci, Luigi; Forstner, Andreas J; Gieger, Christian; Gupta, Richa; Harris, Tamara B; Harris, Juliette M; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; De Jager, Philip L; Kaakinen, Marika A; Kajantie, Eero; Karhunen, Ville; Kolcic, Ivana; Kumari, Meena; Launer, Lenore J; Franke, Lude; Li-Gao, Ruifang; Liewald, David C; Koini, Marisa; Loukola, Anu; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Montgomery, Grant W; Mosing, Miriam A; Paternoster, Lavinia; Pattie, Alison; Petrovic, Katja E; Pulkki-Råback, Laura; Quaye, Lydia; Räikkönen, Katri; Rudan, Igor; Scott, Rodney J; Smith, Jennifer A; Sutin, Angelina R; Trzaskowski, Maciej; Vinkhuyzen, Anna E; Yu, Lei; Zabaneh, Delilah; Attia, John R; Bennett, David A; Berger, Klaus; Bertram, Lars; Boomsma, Dorret I; Snieder, Harold; Chang, Shun-Chiao; Cucca, Francesco; Deary, Ian J; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Eriksson, Johan G; Bültmann, Ute; de Geus, Eco J C; Groenen, Patrick J F; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hansen, Torben; Hartman, Catharine A; Haworth, Claire M A; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Andrew C; Hinds, David A; Hyppönen, Elina; Iacono, William G; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kardia, Sharon L R; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa; Kraft, Peter; Kubzansky, Laura D; Lehtimäki, Terho; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Martin, Nicholas G; McGue, Matt; Metspalu, Andres; Mills, Melinda; de Mutsert, Renée; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Pedersen, Nancy L; Plomin, Robert; Polasek, Ozren; Power, Christine; Rich, Stephen S; Rosendaal, Frits R; den Ruijter, Hester M; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Helena; Svento, Rauli; Schmidt, Reinhold; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Spector, Tim D; Starr, John M; Stefansson, Kari; Steptoe, Andrew; Terracciano, Antonio; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Thurik, A Roy; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tiemeier, Henning; Uitterlinden, André G; Vollenweider, Peter; Wagner, Gert G; Weir, David R; Yang, Jian; Conley, Dalton C; Smith, George Davey; Hofman, Albert; Johannesson, Magnus; Laibson, David I; Medland, Sarah E; Meyer, Michelle N; Pickrell, Joseph K; Esko, Tõnu; Krueger, Robert F; Beauchamp, Jonathan P; Koellinger, Philipp D; Benjamin, Daniel J; Bartels, Meike; Cesarini, David

    2016-01-01

    We conducted genome-wide association studies of three phenotypes: subjective well-being (N = 298,420), depressive symptoms (N = 161,460), and neuroticism (N = 170,910). We identified three variants associated with subjective well-being, two with depressive symptoms, and eleven with neuroticism, including two inversion polymorphisms. The two depressive symptoms loci replicate in an independent depression sample. Joint analyses that exploit the high genetic correlations between the phenotypes (|ρ^| ≈ 0.8) strengthen the overall credibility of the findings, and allow us to identify additional variants. Across our phenotypes, loci regulating expression in central nervous system and adrenal/pancreas tissues are strongly enriched for association. PMID:27089181

  10. Family-Based Genetic Association for Molar-Incisor Hypomineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremias, Fabiano; Pierri, Ricardo A G; Souza, Juliana F; Fragelli, Camila Maria B; Restrepo, Manuel; Finoti, Livia S; Bussaneli, Diego G; Cordeiro, Rita C L; Secolin, Rodrigo; Maurer-Morelli, Claudia V; Scarel-Caminaga, Raquel M; Santos-Pinto, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    Despite some evidence of genetic and environmental factors on molar-incisor hypomineralization (MIH), its aetiology remains unclear. This family-based genetic association study aimed more comprehensively to investigate the genetic carriage potentially involved in MIH development. DNA was obtained from buccal cells of 391 individuals who were birth family members of 101 Brazilian nuclear families. Sixty-three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were investigated in 21 candidate genes related to amelogenesis using the TaqMan™ OpenArray™ Genotyping platform. All SNPs were genotyped in 165 birth family members unaffected by MIH, 96 with unknown MIH status and 130 affected individuals (50.7% with severe MIH). Association analysis was performed by the transmission/disequilibrium test (TDT), and statistical results were corrected using the false discovery rate. Significant results were obtained for SNPs rs7821494 (FAM83H gene, OR = 3.7; 95% CI = 1.75-7.78), rs34367704 (AMBN gene, OR = 2.7; 95% CI = 1.16-6.58), rs3789334 (BMP2 gene, OR = 2.9; 95% CI = 1.34-6.35), rs6099486 (BMP7 gene, OR = 2.2; 95% CI = 1.14-4.38), rs762642 (BMP4 gene, OR = 2.3; 95% CI = 1.38-3.65), rs7664896 (ENAM gene, OR = 2.1; 95% CI = 1.19-3.51), rs1711399 (MMP20 gene, OR = 0.4; 95% CI = 0.20-0.72), rs1711423 (MMP20 gene, OR = 2.1; 95% CI = 1.18-3.61), rs2278163 (DLX3 gene, OR = 2.8; 95% CI = 1.26-6.41), rs6996321 (FGFR1 gene, OR = 2.7; 95% CI = 1.20-5.88), and rs5979395 (AMELX gene, OR = 11.7; 95% CI = 1.63-84.74). Through this family-based association study, we concluded that variations in genes related to amelogenesis were associated with the susceptibility to develop MIH. This result is in agreement with the multifactorial idea of the MIH aetiology, but further studies are necessary to investigate more thoroughly the factors that could influence MIH.

  11. Genetic Variants in LRP1 and ULK4 Are Associated with Acute Aortic Dissections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Dong-Chuan; Grove, Megan L; Prakash, Siddharth K; Eriksson, Per; Hostetler, Ellen M; LeMaire, Scott A; Body, Simon C; Shalhub, Sherene; Estrera, Anthony L; Safi, Hazim J; Regalado, Ellen S; Zhou, Wei; Mathis, Michael R; Eagle, Kim A; Yang, Bo; Willer, Cristen J; Boerwinkle, Eric; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2016-09-01

    Acute aortic dissections are a preventable cause of sudden death if individuals at risk are identified and surgically repaired in a non-emergency setting. Although mutations in single genes can be used to identify at-risk individuals, the majority of dissection case subjects do not have evidence of a single gene disorder, but rather have the other major risk factor for dissections, hypertension. Initial genome-wide association studies (GWASs) identified SNPs at the FBN1 locus associated with both thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections. Here, we used the Illumina HumanExome array to genotype 753 individuals of European descent presenting specifically with non-familial, sporadic thoracic aortic dissection (STAD) and compared them to the genotypes of 2,259 control subjects from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study matched for age, gender, and, for the majority of cases, hypertension. SNPs in FBN1, LRP1, and ULK4 were identified to be significantly associated with STAD, and these results were replicated in two independent cohorts. Combining the data from all cohorts confirmed an inverse association between LRP1 rs11172113 and STAD (p = 2.74 × 10(-8); OR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.76-0.89) and a direct association between ULK4 rs2272007 and STAD (p = 1.15 × 10(-9); OR = 1.35, 95% CI = 1.23-1.49). Genomic copy-number variation analysis independently confirmed that ULK4 deletions were significantly associated with development of thoracic aortic disease. These results indicate that genetic variations in LRP1 and ULK4 contribute to risk for presenting with an acute aortic dissection.

  12. Multilocus genetic risk score associates with ischemic stroke in case-control and prospective cohort studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, R; Bevan, S; Nalls, MA; Holliday, EG; Devan, WJ; Cheng, YC; Ibrahim-Verbaas, CA; Verhaaren, BF; Bis, JC; Joon, AY; de Stefano, AL; Fornage, M; Psaty, BM; Ikram, MA; Launer, LJ; van Duijn, CM; Sharma, P; Mitchell, BD; Rosand, J; Meschia, JF; Levi, C; Rothwell, PM; Sudlow, C; Markus, HS; Seshadri, S; Dichgans, M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Genome-wide association studies have revealed multiple common variants associated with known risk factors for ischemic stroke (IS). However, their aggregate effect on risk is uncertain. We aimed to generate a multilocus genetic risk score (GRS) for IS based on genome-wide association studies data from clinical-based samples and to establish its external validity in prospective population-based cohorts. METHODS Three thousand five hundred forty-eight clinic-based IS cases and 6399 controls from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 2 were used for derivation of the GRS. Subjects from the METASTROKE consortium served as a replication sample. The validation sample consisted of 22 751 participants from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology consortium. We selected variants that had reached genome-wide significance in previous association studies on established risk factors for IS. RESULTS A combined GRS for atrial fibrillation, coronary artery disease, hypertension, and systolic blood pressure significantly associated with IS both in the case-control samples and in the prospective population-based studies. Subjects in the top quintile of the combined GRS had >2-fold increased risk of IS compared with subjects in the lowest quintile. Addition of the combined GRS to a simple model based on sex significantly improved the prediction of IS in the combined clinic-based samples but not in the population-based studies, and there was no significant improvement in net reclassification. CONCLUSIONS A multilocus GRS based on common variants for established cardiovascular risk factors was significantly associated with IS both in clinic-based samples and in the general population. However, the improvement in clinical risk prediction was found to be small. PMID:24436234

  13. Net replication of Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Choleraesuis in porcine intestinal mucosa and nodes is associated with their differential virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulin, Susan M; Jagannathan, Aparna; Campbell, June; Wallis, Timothy S; Stevens, Mark P

    2007-08-01

    Salmonella enterica is a facultative intracellular pathogen of worldwide importance and causes a spectrum of diseases depending on serovar- and host-specific factors. Oral infection of pigs with S. enterica serovar Typhimurium strain 4/74 produces acute enteritis but is rarely fatal, whereas serovar Choleraesuis strain A50 causes systemic disease with a high mortality rate. With a porcine ligated ileal loop model, we observed that systemic virulence of serovar Choleraesuis A50 is not associated with enhanced intestinal invasion, secretory responses, or neutrophil recruitment compared to serovar Typhimurium 4/74. The net growth in vivo of serovar Choleraesuis A50 and serovar Typhimurium 4/74 was monitored following oral inoculation of pigs with strains harboring pHSG422, which exhibits temperature-sensitive replication. Analysis of plasmid partitioning revealed that the enteric virulence of serovar Typhimurium 4/74 relative to that of serovar Choleraesuis A50 is associated with rapid replication in the intestinal wall, whereas systemic virulence of serovar Choleraesuis A50 is associated with enhanced persistence in intestinal mesenteric lymph nodes. Faster replication of serovar Typhimurium, compared to that of serovar Choleraesuis, in the intestinal mucosa was associated with greater induction of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-8 (IL-8), and IL-18 as detected by reverse transcriptase PCR analysis of transcripts from infected mucosa. During replication in batch culture and porcine alveolar macrophages, transcription of genes encoding components of type III secretion systems 1 (sipC) and 2 (sseC) was observed to be significantly higher in serovar Typhimurium 4/74 than in serovar Choleraesuis A50, and this may contribute to the differences in epithelial invasion and intracellular proliferation. The rapid induction of proinflammatory responses by strain 4/74 may explain why pigs confine serovar Typhimurium infection to the

  14. Meta-analysis Followed by Replication Identifies Loci in or near CDKN1B, TET3, CD80, DRAM1, and ARID5B as Associated with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Asians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wanling; Tang, Huayang; Zhang, Yan; Tang, Xianfa; Zhang, Jing; Sun, Liangdan; Yang, Jing; Cui, Yong; Zhang, Lu; Hirankarn, Nattiya; Cheng, Hui; Pan, Hai-Feng; Gao, Jinping; Lee, Tsz Leung; Sheng, Yujun; Lau, Chak Sing; Li, Yang; Chan, Tak Mao; Yin, Xianyong; Ying, Dingge; Lu, Qianjin; Leung, Alexander Moon Ho; Zuo, Xianbo; Chen, Xiang; Tong, Kwok Lung; Zhou, Fusheng; Diao, Qingchun; Tse, Niko Kei Chiu; Xie, Hongfu; Mok, Chi Chiu; Hao, Fei; Wong, Sik Nin; Shi, Bingjun; Lee, Ka Wing; Hui, Yan; Ho, Marco Hok Kung; Liang, Bo; Lee, Pamela Pui Wah; Cui, Hongzhou; Guo, Qing; Chung, Brian Hon-Yin; Pu, Xiongming; Liu, Qiji; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Change; Chong, Chun Yin; Fang, Hong; Wong, Raymond Woon Sing; Sun, Yonghu; Mok, Mo Yin; Li, Xiang-Pei; Avihingsanon, Yingyos; Zhai, Zhifang; Rianthavorn, Pornpimol; Deekajorndej, Thavatchai; Suphapeetiporn, Kanya; Gao, Fei; Shotelersuk, Vorasuk; Kang, Xiaojing; Ying, Shirley King Yee; Zhang, Lijuan; Wong, Wilfred Hing Sang; Zhu, Dingxian; Fung, Samuel Ka Shun; Zeng, Fanqin; Lai, Wai Ming; Wong, Chun-Ming; Ng, Irene Oi Lin; Garcia-Barceló, Maria-Mercè; Cherny, Stacey S.; Shen, Nan; Tam, Paul Kwong-Hang; Sham, Pak Chung; Ye, Dong-Qing; Yang, Sen; Zhang, Xuejun; Lau, Yu Lung

    2013-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a prototype autoimmune disease with a strong genetic involvement and ethnic differences. Susceptibility genes identified so far only explain a small portion of the genetic heritability of SLE, suggesting that many more loci are yet to be uncovered for this disease. In this study, we performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies on SLE in Chinese Han populations and followed up the findings by replication in four additional Asian cohorts with a total of 5,365 cases and 10,054 corresponding controls. We identified genetic variants in or near CDKN1B, TET3, CD80, DRAM1, and ARID5B as associated with the disease. These findings point to potential roles of cell-cycle regulation, autophagy, and DNA demethylation in SLE pathogenesis. For the region involving TET3 and that involving CDKN1B, multiple independent SNPs were identified, highlighting a phenomenon that might partially explain the missing heritability of complex diseases. PMID:23273568

  15. Genetic variants of CD209 associated with Kawasaki disease susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Chang Kuo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Kawasaki disease (KD is a systemic vasculitis with unknown etiology mainly affecting children in Asian countries. Dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN, CD209 in humans was showed to trigger an anti-inflammatory cascade and associated with KD susceptibility. This study was conducted to investigate the association between genetic polymorphisms of CD209 and the risk KD. METHODS: A total of 948 subjects (381 KD and 567 controls were recruited. Nine tagging SNPs (rs8112310, rs4804800, rs11465421, rs1544766, rs4804801, rs2287886, rs735239, rs735240, rs4804804 were selected for TaqMan allelic discrimination assay. Clinical phenotypes, coronary artery lesions (CAL and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG treatment outcomes were collected for analysis. RESULTS: Significant associations were found between CD209 polymorphisms (rs4804800, rs2287886, rs735240 and the risk of KD. Haplotype analysis for CD209 polymorphisms showed that A/A/G haplotype (P = 0.0002, OR = 1.61 and G/A/G haplotype (P = 0.0365, OR = 1.52 had higher risk of KD as compared with G/G/A haplotype in rs2287886/rs735239/rs735240 pairwise allele analysis. There were no significant association in KD with regards to CAL formation and IVIG treatment responses. CONCLUSION: CD209 polymorphisms were responsible for the susceptibility of KD, but not CAL formation and IVIG treatment responsiveness.

  16. Assessment of heterogeneity between European Populations: a Baltic and Danish replication case-control study of SNPs from a recent European ulcerative colitis genome wide association study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Ernst, Anja; Sventoraityte, Jurgita;

    2011-01-01

    the combined Baltic, Danish, and Norwegian panel versus the combined German, British, Belgian, and Greek panel (rs7520292 (P = 0.001), rs12518307 (P = 0.007), and rs2395609 (TCP11) (P = 0.01), respectively). No SNP reached genome-wide significance in the combined analyses of all the panels. Conclusions......: This replication study supports an important role for the studied rs5771069 (IL17REL) SNP, but not for rs7809799 (SMURF1/KPNA7), in UC etiology in the Danish, Baltic, and Norwegian populations. Significant genetic heterogeneity was suggested for rs7520292, rs12518307, and rs2395609 (TCP11) in UC etiology between...

  17. Hepatitis B virus replication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Hepadnaviruses, including human hepatitis B virus (HBV), replicate through reverse transcription of an RNA intermediate, the pregenomic RNA (pgRNA). Despite this kinship to retroviruses, there are fundamental differences beyond the fact that hepadnavirions contain DNA instead of RNA. Most peculiar is the initiation of reverse transcription: it occurs by protein-priming, is strictly committed to using an RNA hairpin on the pgRNA,ε, as template, and depends on cellular chaperones;moreover, proper replication can apparently occur only in the specialized environment of intact nucleocapsids.This complexity has hampered an in-depth mechanistic understanding. The recent successful reconstitution in the test tube of active replication initiation complexes from purified components, for duck HBV (DHBV),now allows for the analysis of the biochemistry of hepadnaviral replication at the molecular level. Here we review the current state of knowledge at all steps of the hepadnaviral genome replication cycle, with emphasis on new insights that turned up by the use of such cellfree systems. At this time, they can, unfortunately,not be complemented by three-dimensional structural information on the involved components. However, at least for the s RNA element such information is emerging,raising expectations that combining biophysics with biochemistry and genetics will soon provide a powerful integrated approach for solving the many outstanding questions. The ultimate, though most challenging goal,will be to visualize the hepadnaviral reverse transcriptase in the act of synthesizing DNA, which will also have strong implications for drug development.

  18. Genetic susceptibility variants associated with colorectal cancer prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulí, Anna; Lozano, Juan José; Rodríguez-Soler, María; Jover, Rodrigo; Bessa, Xavier; Muñoz, Jenifer; Esteban-Jurado, Clara; Fernández-Rozadilla, Ceres; Carracedo, Angel; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Cubiella, Joaquín; Balaguer, Francesc; Bujanda, Luis; Reñé, Josep M; Clofent, Juan; Morillas, Juan Diego; Nicolás-Pérez, David; Xicola, Rosa M; Llor, Xavier; Piqué, Josep M; Andreu, Montserrat; Castells, Antoni; Castellví-Bel, Sergi

    2013-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death among men and women in Western countries. Once a tumour develops, a differentiated prognosis could be determined by lifestyle habits or inherited and somatic genetic factors. Finding such prognostic factors will be helpful in order to identify cases with a shorter survival or at a higher risk of recurrence that may benefit from more intensive treatment and follow-up surveillance. Sixteen CRC genetic susceptibility variants were directly genotyped in a cohort of 1235 CRC patients recruited by the EPICOLON Spanish consortium. Univariate Cox and multivariate regression analyses were performed taking as primary outcomes overall survival (OS), disease-free survival and recurrence-free interval. Genetic variants rs9929218 at 16q22.1 and rs10795668 at 10p14 may have an effect on OS. The G allele of rs9929218 was linked with a better OS [GG genotype, genotypic model: hazard ratio (HR) = 0.65, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.45-0.93, P = 0.0179; GG/GA genotypes, dominant model: HR = 0.66, 95% CI 0.47-0.94, P = 0.0202]. Likewise, the G allele of rs10795668 was associated with better clinical outcome (GG genotype, genotypic model: HR = 0.73, 95% CI 0.53-1.01, P = 0.0570; GA genotype, genotypic model: HR = 0.66, 95% CI 0.47-0.92, P = 0.0137; GG/GA genotypes, dominant model: HR = 0.68, 95% CI 0.50-0.94, P = 0.0194). In conclusion, CRC susceptibility variants rs9929218 and rs10795668 may exert some influence in modulating patient's survival and they deserve to be further tested in additional CRC cohorts in order to confirm their potential as prognosis or predictive biomarkers.

  19. Association of established hypothyroidism-associated genetic variants with Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barić, A; Brčić, L; Gračan, S; Torlak Lovrić, V; Gunjača, I; Šimunac, M; Brekalo, M; Boban, M; Polašek, O; Barbalić, M; Zemunik, T; Punda, A; Boraska Perica, V

    2017-04-05

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) as a chronic autoimmune disease of the thyroid gland is the most common cause of hypothyroidism. Since HT and hypothyroidism are closely related, the main aim of this study was to explore the association of established hypothyroidism single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with HT. The case-control dataset included 200 HT cases and 304 controls. Diagnosis of HT cases was based on clinical examination, measurement of thyroid antibodies (TgAb, TPOAb), hormones (TSH and FT4) and ultrasound examination. We genotyped and analysed 11 known hypothyroidism-associated genetic variants. Case-control association analysis was performed in order to test each SNP for the association with HT using logistic regression model. Additionally, each SNP was tested for the association with thyroid-related quantitative traits (TPOAb levels, TgAb levels and thyroid volume) in HT cases only using linear regression. We identified two genetic variants nominally associated with HT rs3184504 in SH2B3 gene (P = 0.0135, OR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.57-0.95) and rs4704397 in PDE8B gene (P = 0.0383, OR = 1.32, 95% CI = 1.01-1.74). The SH2B3 genetic variant also showed nominal association with TPOAb levels (P = 0.0163, β = -0.46) and rs4979402 inside DFNB31 gene was nominally associated with TgAb levels (P = 0.0443, β = 0.41). SH2B3 gene has previously been associated with susceptibility to several autoimmune diseases, whereas PDE8B has been associated with TSH levels and suggested to modulate thyroid physiology that may influence the manifestation of thyroid disease. Identified loci are novel and biologically plausible candidates for HT development and represent good basis for further exploration of HT susceptibility.

  20. Genetic algorithm applied to hierarchically coupled associative memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Rogério Martins; Braga, Antônio Pádua; Borges, Henrique E

    2010-01-01

    Inspired by the theory of neuronal group selection (TNGS), we have carried out an analysis of the capacity of convergence of a multi-level associative memory based on coupled generalized-brain-state-in-a-box (GBSB) networks through evolutionary computation. The TNGS establishes that a memory process can be described as being organized functionally in hierarchical levels where higher levels coordinate sets of functions of lower levels. According to this theory, the most basic units in the cortical area of the brain are called neuronal groups or first-level blocks of memories and the higher-level memories are formed through selective strengthening or weakening of the synapses amongst the neuronal groups. In order to analyse this effect, we propose that the higher levels should emerge through a learning mechanism as correlations of lower level memories. According to this proposal, this paper describes a method of acquiring the inter-group synapses based on a genetic algorithm. Thus the results show that genetic algorithms are feasible as they allow the emergence of complex behaviours which could be potentially excluded in other learning process.