WorldWideScience

Sample records for replicate gel slabs

  1. Hybrid slab-microchannel gel electrophoresis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balch, Joseph W.; Carrano, Anthony V.; Davidson, James C.; Koo, Jackson C.

    1998-01-01

    A hybrid slab-microchannel gel electrophoresis system. The hybrid system permits the fabrication of isolated microchannels for biomolecule separations without imposing the constraint of a totally sealed system. The hybrid system is reusable and ultimately much simpler and less costly to manufacture than a closed channel plate system. The hybrid system incorporates a microslab portion of the separation medium above the microchannels, thus at least substantially reducing the possibility of non-uniform field distribution and breakdown due to uncontrollable leakage. A microslab of the sieving matrix is built into the system by using plastic spacer materials and is used to uniformly couple the top plate with the bottom microchannel plate.

  2. Optimization of separation and detection schemes for DNA with pulsed field slab gel and capillary electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGregor, David A. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1993-07-01

    The purpose of the Human Genome Project is outlined followed by a discussion of electrophoresis in slab gels and capillaries and its application to deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Techniques used to modify electroosmotic flow in capillaries are addressed. Several separation and detection schemes for DNA via gel and capillary electrophoresis are described. Emphasis is placed on the elucidation of DNA fragment size in real time and shortening separation times to approximate real time monitoring. The migration of DNA fragment bands through a slab gel can be monitored by UV absorption at 254 nm and imaged by a charge coupled device (CCD) camera. Background correction and immediate viewing of band positions to interactively change the field program in pulsed-field gel electrophoresis are possible throughout the separation. The use of absorption removes the need for staining or radioisotope labeling thereby simplifying sample preparation and reducing hazardous waste generation. This leaves the DNA in its native state and further analysis can be performed without de-staining. The optimization of several parameters considerably reduces total analysis time. DNA from 2 kb to 850 kb can be separated in 3 hours on a 7 cm gel with interactive control of the pulse time, which is 10 times faster than the use of a constant field program. The separation of ΦX174RF DNA-HaeIII fragments is studied in a 0.5% methyl cellulose polymer solution as a function of temperature and applied voltage. The migration times decreased with both increasing temperature and increasing field strength, as expected. The relative migration rates of the fragments do not change with temperature but are affected by the applied field. Conditions were established for the separation of the 271/281 bp fragments, even without the addition of intercalating agents. At 700 V/cm and 20°C, all fragments are separated in less than 4 minutes with an average plate number of 2.5 million per meter.

  3. Sol-gel replicated optics made from single point diamond turned masters exhibit fractal surface roughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernacki, B.E.; Miller, A.C. Jr.; Evans, B.M. III [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Moreshead, W.V.; Nogues, J.L.R. [GELTECH, Inc., Alachua, FL (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Deterministic optics manufacturing, notably single point diamond turning (SPDT) has matured such that the current generation of machines is capable of producing refractive and reflective optics for the visible wavelength region that are quite acceptable for many applications. However, spiral tool marks are still produced that result in unwanted diffractive scattering from grating-like features having a spatial frequency determined by the machine feed, tool radius, and other influences such as vibration and material removal effects. Such regular artifacts are the characteristic of deterministic manufacturing methods such as SPDT. The authors present some initial findings suggesting that fractal, or non-deterministic surfaces can be produced by SPDT through sol-gel replication. The key is the large isotropic shrinkage that occurs through monolithic sol-gel replication (a factor of 2.5) that results in all features, including tooling marks, being reduced by that amount. The large shrinkage itself would be a laudable-enough feature of the replication process. However, by an as-yet-not understood manner, the replication process itself seems to alter the roughness character of the replicated surface such that it appears to be fractal when analyzed using contact profilometry and the power spectrum approach.

  4. Detection of undeclared animal by-products in commercial canine canned foods: Comparative analyses by ELISA and PCR-RFLP coupled with slab gel electrophoresis or capillary gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ming-Kun; Shih, Pei-Yin; Wei, Chia-Fong; Vickroy, Thomas W; Chou, Chi-Chung

    2016-03-30

    The potential presence of undeclared animal by-products in pet foods is not subject to routine examination. Previously published methods for species-based identification of animal by-products have not been used routinely owing to inconsistent results. The present study evaluated the utility of several approaches for accurate identification of animal by-products in 11 commercial brands of canine canned foods. Canine canned foods from several countries were analysed by ELISA, PCR-RFLP coupled with slab-gel electrophoresis (SGE) and capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE) to test for evidence of by-products derived from cattle, chicken, sheep or pig. While CGE-based analysis detected all (24) animal-derived by-products that were reported for the 11 test samples, SGE and ELISA detected only 22/24 (92%) and 14/24 (58%) of labelled by-products, respectively. In addition, undeclared animal by-products were found using all three analytical approaches with CGE detecting more positives (19) than SGE (17) or ELISA (5). Significant disparities were evident between the labelled contents and the detected content of animal by-products. CGE-based testing for PCR products appears to provide greater sensitivity and accuracy than either SGE or ELISA-based methods. As testing of commercial products becomes more reliable and mainstream, manufacturers will need to develop more thorough and accurate labelling protocols. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Cost-effective fabrication of waveguides for PLCs by replication in UV-curable sol-gel material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimkiewicz, Christiane; Thiele, Hans D.; Zschokke, Christian; Mahmud-Skender, Sanida; Westenhofer, Susanne; Gale, Michael T.

    2004-08-01

    A new wafer-scale replication process for fabricating buried ridge waveguides for telecom/datacom applications using an uv-curable sol-gel material is proposed. Spin coating of the core material on the replication mould is used to form the waveguide cores with a smooth thin layer. The spin parameters allow an accurate control of the thickness and homogeneity. The bottom-cladding is uv-cast between a substrate and the mould, which is covered by the spun core layer. The ridge waveguide cores are demoulded and buried under a top cladding. This process allows the stacking of several layers of waveguides on top of each other to form two-dimensional waveguide arrays. A specially adapted SUSS mask aligner is used to control the cladding thickness between individual waveguide layers and to align them. A waveguide loss comparable to lithographically fabricated waveguides has been achieved.

  6. Replication of butterfly wing and natural lotus leaf structures by nanoimprint on silica sol-gel films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saison, Tamar; Peroz, Christophe; Chauveau, Vanessa; Sondergard, Elin; Arribart, Herve [Unite mixte CNRS/Saint Gobain Saint Gobain Recherche, BP135, 93303 Aubervilliers (France); Berthier, Serge [Institut des Nanosciences de Paris, UMR 7588, CNRS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, 140 rue Lourmel, 75015 Paris (France)], E-mail: cperoz@lbl.gov

    2008-12-01

    An original and low cost method for the fabrication of patterned surfaces bioinspired from butterfly wings and lotus leaves is presented. Silica-based sol-gel films are thermally imprinted from elastomeric molds to produce stable structures with superhydrophobicity values as high as 160 deg. water contact angle. The biomimetic surfaces are demonstrated to be tuned from superhydrophobic to superhydrophilic by annealing between 200 deg. C and 500 deg. C.

  7. Replication of butterfly wing and natural lotus leaf structures by nanoimprint on silica sol-gel films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saison, Tamar; Peroz, Christophe; Chauveau, Vanessa; Berthier, Serge; Sondergard, Elin; Arribart, Hervé

    2008-12-01

    An original and low cost method for the fabrication of patterned surfaces bioinspired from butterfly wings and lotus leaves is presented. Silica-based sol-gel films are thermally imprinted from elastomeric molds to produce stable structures with superhydrophobicity values as high as 160 degrees water contact angle. The biomimetic surfaces are demonstrated to be tuned from superhydrophobic to superhydrophilic by annealing between 200 degrees C and 500 degrees C.

  8. Formation of replicating saponite from a gel in the presence of oxalate: implications for the formation of clay minerals in carbonaceous chondrites and the origin of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Dirk; Hartman, Hyman; Eberl, Dennis D.; Sears, S. Kelly; Hesse, Reinhard; Vali, Hojatollah

    2012-01-01

    The potential role of clay minerals in the abiotic origin of life has been the subject of ongoing debate for the past several decades. At issue are the clay minerals found in a class of meteorites known as carbonaceous chondrites. These clay minerals are the product of aqueous alteration of anhydrous mineral phases, such as olivine and orthopyroxene, that are often present in the chondrules. Moreover, there is a strong correlation in the occurrence of clay minerals and the presence of polar organic molecules. It has been shown in laboratory experiments at low temperature and ambient pressure that polar organic molecules, such as the oxalate found in meteorites, can catalyze the crystallization of clay minerals. In this study, we show that oxalate is a robust catalyst in the crystallization of saponite, an Al- and Mg-rich, trioctahedral 2:1 layer silicate, from a silicate gel at 60°C and ambient pressure. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis of the saponite treated with octadecylammonium (n(C)=18) cations revealed the presence of 2:1 layer structures that have variable interlayer charge. The crystallization of these differently charged 2:1 layer silicates most likely occurred independently. The fact that 2:1 layer silicates with variable charge formed in the same gel has implications for our understanding of the origin of life, as these 2:1 clay minerals most likely replicate by a mechanism of template-catalyzed polymerization and transmit the charge distribution from layer to layer. If polar organic molecules like oxalate can catalyze the formation of clay-mineral crystals, which in turn promote clay microenvironments and provide abundant adsorption sites for other organic molecules present in solution, the interaction among these adsorbed molecules could lead to the polymerization of more complex organic molecules like RNA from nucleotides on early Earth.

  9. Formation of replicating saponite from a gel in the presence of oxalate: implications for the formation of clay minerals in carbonaceous chondrites and the origin of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Dirk; Hartman, Hyman; Eberl, Dennis D; Sears, S Kelly; Hesse, Reinhard; Vali, Hojatollah

    2012-06-01

    The potential role of clay minerals in the abiotic origin of life has been the subject of ongoing debate for the past several decades. At issue are the clay minerals found in a class of meteorites known as carbonaceous chondrites. These clay minerals are the product of aqueous alteration of anhydrous mineral phases, such as olivine and orthopyroxene, that are often present in the chondrules. Moreover, there is a strong correlation in the occurrence of clay minerals and the presence of polar organic molecules. It has been shown in laboratory experiments at low temperature and ambient pressure that polar organic molecules, such as the oxalate found in meteorites, can catalyze the crystallization of clay minerals. In this study, we show that oxalate is a robust catalyst in the crystallization of saponite, an Al- and Mg-rich, trioctahedral 2:1 layer silicate, from a silicate gel at 60°C and ambient pressure. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis of the saponite treated with octadecylammonium (n(C)=18) cations revealed the presence of 2:1 layer structures that have variable interlayer charge. The crystallization of these differently charged 2:1 layer silicates most likely occurred independently. The fact that 2:1 layer silicates with variable charge formed in the same gel has implications for our understanding of the origin of life, as these 2:1 clay minerals most likely replicate by a mechanism of template-catalyzed polymerization and transmit the charge distribution from layer to layer. If polar organic molecules like oxalate can catalyze the formation of clay-mineral crystals, which in turn promote clay microenvironments and provide abundant adsorption sites for other organic molecules present in solution, the interaction among these adsorbed molecules could lead to the polymerization of more complex organic molecules like RNA from nucleotides on early Earth.

  10. Electrostatics in Periodic Slab Geometries II

    OpenAIRE

    de Joannis, Jason; Arnold, Axel; Holm, Christian

    2002-01-01

    In a previous paper a method was developed to subtract the interactions due to periodically replicated charges (or other long-range entities) in one spatial dimension. The method constitutes a generalized "electrostatic layer correction" (ELC) which adapts any standard 3D summation method to slab-like conditions. Here the implementation of the layer correction is considered in detail for the standard Ewald (EW3DLC) and the PPPM mesh Ewald (PPPMLC) methods. In particular this method offers a s...

  11. Sample collection system for gel electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, Jose A.; Stark, Peter C.; Dunbar, John M.; Hill, Karen K.; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Roybal, Gustavo

    2004-09-21

    An automatic sample collection system for use with an electrophoretic slab gel system is presented. The collection system can be used with a slab gel have one or more lanes. A detector is used to detect particle bands on the slab gel within a detection zone. Such detectors may use a laser to excite fluorescently labeled particles. The fluorescent light emitted from the excited particles is transmitted to low-level light detection electronics. Upon the detection of a particle of interest within the detection zone, a syringe pump is activated, sending a stream of buffer solution across the lane of the slab gel. The buffer solution collects the sample of interest and carries it through a collection port into a sample collection vial.

  12. Slab Leaf Bowls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suitor, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    In science class, fourth graders investigate the structure of plants and leaves from trees and how the process of photosynthesis turns sunlight into sugar proteins. In this article, the author fuses art and science for a creative and successful clay slab project in her elementary art classroom. (Contains 1 online resource.)

  13. Slab Leaf Bowls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suitor, Cheryl

    2012-01-01

    In science class, fourth graders investigate the structure of plants and leaves from trees and how the process of photosynthesis turns sunlight into sugar proteins. In this article, the author fuses art and science for a creative and successful clay slab project in her elementary art classroom. (Contains 1 online resource.)

  14. Analysis of branched DNA replication and recombination intermediates from prokaryotic cells by two-dimensional (2D) native-native agarose gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Nicholas P

    2013-01-01

    Branched DNA molecules are generated by the essential processes of replication and recombination. Owing to their distinctive extended shapes, these intermediates migrate differently from linear double-stranded DNA under certain electrophoretic conditions. However, these branched species exist in the cell at much low abundance than the bulk linear DNA. Consequently, branched molecules cannot be visualized by conventional electrophoresis and ethidium bromide staining. Two-dimensional native-native agarose electrophoresis has therefore been developed as a method to facilitate the separation and visualization of branched replication and recombination intermediates. A wide variety of studies have employed this technique to examine branched molecules in eukaryotic, archaeal, and bacterial cells, providing valuable insights into how DNA is duplicated and repaired in all three domains of life.

  15. Topological Susceptibility from Slabs

    CERN Document Server

    Bietenholz, Wolfgang; Gerber, Urs

    2015-01-01

    In quantum field theories with topological sectors, a non-perturbative quantity of interest is the topological susceptibility chi_t. In principle it seems straightforward to measure chi_t by means of Monte Carlo simulations. However, for local update algorithms and fine lattice spacings, this tends to be difficult, since the Monte Carlo history rarely changes the topological sector. Here we test a method to measure chi_t even if data from only one sector are available. It is based on the topological charges in sub-volumes, which we denote as slabs. Assuming a Gaussian distribution of these charges, this method enables the evaluation of chi_t, as we demonstrate with numerical results for non-linear sigma-models.

  16. New Packaging for Amplifier Slabs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Thorsness, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Suratwala, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Steele, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rogowski, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-03-18

    The following memo provides a discussion and detailed procedure for a new finished amplifier slab shipping and storage container. The new package is designed to maintain an environment of <5% RH to minimize weathering.

  17. Optimization of reinforced concrete slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferritto, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    Reinforced concrete cells composed of concrete slabs and used to limit the effects of accidental explosions during hazardous explosives operations are analyzed. An automated design procedure which considers the dynamic nonlinear behavior of the reinforced concrete of arbitrary geometrical and structural configuration subjected to dynamic pressure loading is discussed. The optimum design of the slab is examined using an interior penalty function. The optimization procedure is presented and the results are discussed and compared with finite element analysis.

  18. Optimization of reinforced concrete slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferritto, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    Reinforced concrete cells composed of concrete slabs and used to limit the effects of accidental explosions during hazardous explosives operations are analyzed. An automated design procedure which considers the dynamic nonlinear behavior of the reinforced concrete of arbitrary geometrical and structural configuration subjected to dynamic pressure loading is discussed. The optimum design of the slab is examined using an interior penalty function. The optimization procedure is presented and the results are discussed and compared with finite element analysis.

  19. Analyzing genetic diversity in conifers...isozyme resolution by starch gel electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Thompson Conkle

    1972-01-01

    Enzymes in forest tree materials can be resolved by starch gel electrophoresis. A gel slab is prepared in a mold assembled from glass and plastic. Wicks containing an aqueous extract of macerated plant material are inserted in the gel and processed. The gel is sliced, stained, examined, and photographed. Isozyme bands produced by differential migration of enzymes...

  20. Rheological evolution of subducting slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirth, G.

    2016-12-01

    The mechanical behavior of subducting lithosphere depends on both the rheological evolution of the slab and how the slab is modified prior to subduction. Geophysical data demonstrate that the combination of thermal evolution and deformation lead to alteration of the slab at both mid-ocean ridges and the outer rise of subduction zones. In addition, the locations of earthquakes in these locations are generally consistent with both extrapolation of laboratory data that constrain the depth to the brittle-plastic transition, and deformation mechanisms inferred from microstructural analysis of mantle rocks recovered from the oceanic lithosphere. However, the frictional properties of both mantle aggregates and their alteration products suggest that linking the location of lithospheric earthquakes to regions that become hydrothermally altered is not straightforward. Furthermore, the inferred link between the location of intermediate-depth seismicity and the conditions of dehydration reactions is challenged by laboratory studies on dehydration embrittlement. In this presentation, I will introduce these apparent discrepancies; provide some possible resolutions for them based on scaling of laboratory data and discuss the implications for how an integrated understanding of slab rheology informs our understanding of the mechanical and geochemical evolution of the slab.

  1. How mantle slabs drive plate tectonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Clinton P; Lithgow-Bertelloni, Carolina

    2002-10-04

    The gravitational pull of subducted slabs is thought to drive the motions of Earth's tectonic plates, but the coupling between slabs and plates is not well established. If a slab is mechanically attached to a subducting plate, it can exert a direct pull on the plate. Alternatively, a detached slab may drive a plate by exciting flow in the mantle that exerts a shear traction on the base of the plate. From the geologic history of subduction, we estimated the relative importance of "pull" versus "suction" for the present-day plates. Observed plate motions are best predicted if slabs in the upper mantle are attached to plates and generate slab pull forces that account for about half of the total driving force on plates. Slabs in the lower mantle are supported by viscous mantle forces and drive plates through slab suction.

  2. ARC Code TI: SLAB Spatial Audio Renderer

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SLAB is a software-based, real-time virtual acoustic environment rendering system being developed as a tool for the study of spatial hearing. SLAB is designed to...

  3. Database Replication

    CERN Document Server

    Kemme, Bettina

    2010-01-01

    Database replication is widely used for fault-tolerance, scalability and performance. The failure of one database replica does not stop the system from working as available replicas can take over the tasks of the failed replica. Scalability can be achieved by distributing the load across all replicas, and adding new replicas should the load increase. Finally, database replication can provide fast local access, even if clients are geographically distributed clients, if data copies are located close to clients. Despite its advantages, replication is not a straightforward technique to apply, and

  4. Strain identification in Rhizobium by starch gel electrophoresis of isoenzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen; Nielsen, G.

    1985-01-01

    Sonieated extracts of rhizobia, especiaUy Rhizobium leguminosarum from pea and vetch, were run in horizontal starch gel electrophoresis in the cold. The rhizobia were grown on agar on a slime suppressing substrate of tryptone-yeast extract-CaCl2 with small amounts of mannitol, sorbitol...... and arabinose and other sugars as enzyme inducers. After electrophoresis the gels were separated into several slabs by a gel cutter. Each slab was stained for a particular enzyme. Among numerous enzyme systems tested we found useful variation in esterases (EC 3.1.1.1, EC 3.1.1.2), 3-hydroxybutyrate...

  5. Hyper alginate gel microbead formation by molecular diffusion at the hydrogel/droplet interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirama, Hirotada; Kambe, Taisuke; Aketagawa, Kyouhei; Ota, Taku; Moriguchi, Hiroyuki; Torii, Toru

    2013-01-15

    We report a simple method for forming monodispersed, uniformly shaped gel microbeads with precisely controlled sizes. The basis of our method is the placement of monodispersed sodium alginate droplets, formed by a microfluidic device, on an agarose slab gel containing a high-osmotic-pressure gelation agent (CaCl(2) aq.): (1) the droplets are cross-linked (gelated) due to the diffusion of the gelation agent from the agarose slab gel to the sodium alginate droplets and (2) the droplets simultaneously shrink to a fraction of their original size (gel. We verified the mass transfer mechanism between the droplet and the agarose slab gel. This method circumvents the limitations of gel microbead formation, such as the need to prepare microchannels of various sizes, microchannel clogging, and the deformation of the produced gel microbeads.

  6. Transient Temperature Analysis of Slab in Erdemir

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    (U)nal Camdali; Murat Tunc; Sedat Sisbot

    2008-01-01

    A transient thermal model was developed for slab furnaces in Eregli Iron and Steel Worlds (Erdemir) in Turkey and the model was solved using the FlexPDE computer program. This program uses the finite element method. Program codes were written to solve the temperature distribution of slabs that are put into furnace at 25℃ and removed at about 1 250℃. To obtain the optimum slab exit temperature variation, the necessary air temperature inside the furnace was calculated to be 1 390℃. The slab temperature versus time and the temperature variation inside the slab were depicted.

  7. Method for Bubbledeck Concrete Slab with Gaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergiu Călin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The composite slabs are made of BubbleDeck type slab elements with spherical gaps, poured in place on transversal and longitudinal directions. By introducing the gaps leads to a 30...50\\% lighter slab which reduces the loads on the columns, walls and foundations, and of course of the entire building. BubbleDeck slab elements are plates with ribs on two directions made of reinforced concrete or precast concrete with spherical shaped bubbles. These slab elements have a bottom and an upper concrete part connected with vertical ribs that go around the gaps.

  8. Metallurgical quality of CSP thin slabs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deguang Zhou; Jie Fu; Yonglin Kang; Zhongbing Wang; Jing Li; Zhongbo Xu

    2004-01-01

    The casting structure, chemical composition segregation, dendrite arm space, inclusiona and during the CSP (compact strip production) rolling process were investigated. The results show that the CSP thin slab has a feature of uniform fme grains, more columnar crystals, less central porosity and segregation etc. There is no great difference in macrostructure between the CSP thin slab and conventional slab; however, the fine dendrite structure of the CSP slab is more uniform. Moreover, the central porosity and segregation are obviously improved after the first pass; and the dendrite is bent along the rolling direction rather than broken into pieces.Small inclusions with the diameter less than 10 μm in the CSP slab are dominantly consisted of aluminates formed by A1 deoxidation and Ca treatment and not floating out of the melt. The large size inclusions found in the continuous casting slab are very few.

  9. Higher order modes in photonic crystal slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gansch, Roman; Kalchmair, Stefan; Detz, Hermann; Andrews, Aaron M; Klang, Pavel; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried

    2011-08-15

    We present a detailed investigation of higher order modes in photonic crystal slabs. In such structures the resonances exhibit a blue-shift compared to an ideal two-dimensional photonic crystal, which depends on the order of the slab mode and the polarization. By fabricating a series of photonic crystal slab photo detecting devices, with varying ratios of slab thickness to photonic crystal lattice constant, we are able to distinguish between 0th and 1st order slab modes as well as the polarization from the shift of resonances in the photocurrent spectra. This method complements the photonic band structure mapping technique for characterization of photonic crystal slabs. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  10. A slab expression in the Gibraltar arc?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijholt, Nicolai; Govers, Rob; Wortel, Rinus

    2017-04-01

    The present-day geodynamic setting of the Gibraltar arc region results from several Myrs of subduction rollback in the overall (oblique) convergence of Africa and Iberia. As for most rollback settings in a convergence zone, the interaction of these two components is complex and distinctly non-stationary. Gibraltar slab rollback is considered to have stalled, or at least diminished largely in magnitude, since the late Miocene/early Pliocene, suggesting that the effect of the slab on present-day surface motions is negligible. However, GPS measurements indicate that the Gibraltar arc region has an anomalous motion with respect to both Iberia and Africa, i.e., the Gibraltar arc region does not move as part of the rigid Iberian, or the rigid African plate. A key question is whether this surface motion is an expression of the Gibraltar slab. Seismic activity in the Gibraltar region is diffuse and considerable in magnitude, making it a region of high seismic risk. Unlike the North African margin to the east, where thrust earthquakes dominate the focal mechanism tables, a complex pattern is observed with thrust, normal and strike-slip earthquakes in a region stretching between the northern Moroccan Atlas across the Gibraltar arc and Alboran Sea (with the Trans-Alboran Shear Zone) to the Betics of southern Spain. Even though no large mega-thrust earthquakes have been observed in recent history, slab rollback may not have completely ceased. However, since no activity has been observed in the accretionary wedge, probably since the Pliocene, it is likely that the subduction interface is locked. In this study, we perform a series of numerical models in which we combine the relative plate convergence, variable magnitude of friction on fault segments, regional variations in gravitational potential energy and slab pull of the Gibraltar slab. We seek to reproduce the GPS velocities and slip sense on regional faults and thereby determine whether the Gibraltar slab has an effect on

  11. Slab stagnation and detachment under northeast China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Satoru

    2016-03-01

    Results of tomography models around the Japanese Islands show the existence of a gap between the horizontally lying (stagnant) slab extending under northeastern China and the fast seismic velocity anomaly in the lower mantle. A simple conversion from the fast velocity anomaly to the low-temperature anomaly shows a similar feature. This feature appears to be inconsistent with the results of numerical simulations on the interaction between the slab and phase transitions with temperature-dependent viscosity. Such numerical models predict a continuous slab throughout the mantle. I extend previous analyses of the tomography model and model calculations to infer the origins of the gap beneath northeastern China. Results of numerical simulations that take the geologic history of the subduction zone into account suggest two possible origins for the gap: (1) the opening of the Japan Sea led to a breaking off of the otherwise continuous subducting slab, or (2) the western edge of the stagnant slab is the previous subducted ridge, which was the plate boundary between the extinct Izanagi and the Pacific plates. Origin (2) suggesting the present horizontally lying slab has accumulated since the ridge subduction, is preferable for explaining the present length of the horizontally lying slab in the upper mantle. Numerical models of origin (1) predict a stagnant slab in the upper mantle that is too short, and a narrow or non-existent gap. Preferred models require rather stronger flow resistance of the 660-km phase change than expected from current estimates of the phase transition property. Future detailed estimates of the amount of the subducted Izanagi plate and the present stagnant slab would be useful to constrain models. A systematic along-arc variation of the slab morphology from the northeast Japan to Kurile arcs is also recognized, and its understanding may constrain the 3D mantle flow there.

  12. Turbulence in the cylindrical slab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentle, K. W.; Rowan, W. L.; Williams, C. B.; Brookman, M. W. [Institute of Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    The cylindrical slab was the first and simplest model of intrinsically unstable microturbulence. The Helimak is an experimental realization of this model. Although finite, it is sufficiently large to escape boundary effects, with dimensionless parameters similar to those of a tokamak edge or scrape off layer. The essential drive is interchange-like, a pressure gradient with unfavorable magnetic curvature, leading to a non-linearly saturated state of large-amplitude turbulence, Δn{sub rms}/n ∼ 0.5. The nonlinear processes governing this saturation are unique, unlike any of those posited for the much weaker turbulence typical of confined plasma, e.g., in a tokamak. Neither linear stability theory, quasi-linear theory, zonal flows, nor flow shear stabilization is consistent with the observations. The mechanisms determining the non-linearly saturated state constitute an important challenge to our understanding of strongly nonlinear systems.

  13. The simulation of the swelling and deswelling dynamics of gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaue, Tatsuya; Taniguchi, Takashi; Doi, Masao

    We have formulated the dynamics and the simulation scheme for large deformation of gels using the stress-diffusion coupling model [Yamaue, T., Taniguchi, T., and Doi, M., 2000, AIP Conference Proceedings, Vol. 519 (AIP), p. 584]. Using this model, we have simulated the deswelling process of 2D slab thermo-responsive gels undergoing spinodal decomposition, in comparison with the conventional collective diffusion model of gel networks. We reproduced the 'plateau period' due to the surface skin formation and the pattern formations in the inner region of gels by the stress-diffusion coupling model.

  14. Cretaceous Arctic magmatism: Slab vs. plume? Or slab and plume?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, E. S.; Miller, E. L.; Andronikov, A. V.; Brumley, K.; Mayer, L. A.; Mukasa, S. B.

    2010-12-01

    Tectonic models for the Cretaceous paleogeographic evolution of the Arctic Ocean and its adjacent landmasses propose that rifting in the Amerasia Basin (AB) began in Jura-Cretaceous time, accompanied by the development of the High Arctic Large Igneous Province (HALIP). During the same timespan, deformation and slab-related magmatism, followed by intra-arc rifting, took place along the Pacific side of what was to become the Arctic Ocean. A compilation and comparison of the ages, characteristics and space-time variation of circum-Arctic magmatism allows for a better understanding of the role of Pacific margin versus Arctic-Atlantic plate tectonics and the role of plume-related magmatism in the origin of the Arctic Ocean. In Jura-Cretaceous time, an arc built upon older terranes overthrust the Arctic continental margins of North America and Eurasia, shedding debris into foreland basins in the Brooks Range, Alaska, across Chukotka, Russia, to the Lena Delta and New Siberian Islands region of the Russian Arctic. These syn-tectonic sediments have some common sources (e.g., ~250-300 Ma magmatic rocks) as determined by U-Pb detrital zircon geochronology. They are as young as Valanginian-Berriasian (~136 Ma, Gradstein et al., 2004) and place a lower limit on the age of formation of the AB. Subsequent intrusions of granitoid plutons, inferred to be ultimately slab-retreat related, form a belt along the far eastern Russian Arctic continental margin onto Seward Peninsula and have yielded a continuous succession of zircon U-Pb ages from ~137-95 Ma (n=28) and a younger suite ~91-82 Ma (n=16). All plutons dated were intruded in an extensional tectonic setting based on their relations to wall-rock deformation. Regional distribution of ages shows a southward migration of the locus of magmatism during Cretaceous time. Basaltic lavas as old as 130 Ma and as young as 80 Ma (40Ar/39Ar)) erupted across the Canadian Arctic Islands, Svalbard and Franz Josef Land and are associated with

  15. Strain identification in Rhizobium by starch gel electrophoresis of isoenzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvild, Kjeld Christensen; Nielsen, G.

    1985-01-01

    Sonieated extracts of rhizobia, especiaUy Rhizobium leguminosarum from pea and vetch, were run in horizontal starch gel electrophoresis in the cold. The rhizobia were grown on agar on a slime suppressing substrate of tryptone-yeast extract-CaCl2 with small amounts of mannitol, sorbitol and arabin......Sonieated extracts of rhizobia, especiaUy Rhizobium leguminosarum from pea and vetch, were run in horizontal starch gel electrophoresis in the cold. The rhizobia were grown on agar on a slime suppressing substrate of tryptone-yeast extract-CaCl2 with small amounts of mannitol, sorbitol...... and arabinose and other sugars as enzyme inducers. After electrophoresis the gels were separated into several slabs by a gel cutter. Each slab was stained for a particular enzyme. Among numerous enzyme systems tested we found useful variation in esterases (EC 3.1.1.1, EC 3.1.1.2), 3-hydroxybutyrate...

  16. Sausage oscillations of coronal plasma slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornsey, C.; Nakariakov, V. M.; Fludra, A.

    2014-07-01

    Context. Sausage oscillations are observed in plasma non-uniformities of the solar corona as axisymmetric perturbations of the non-uniformity. Often, these non-uniformities can be modelled as field-aligned slabs of the density enhancement. Aims: We perform parametric studies of sausage oscillations of plasma slabs, aiming to determine the dependence of the oscillation period on its parameters, and the onset of leaky and trapped regimes of the oscillations. Methods: Slabs with smooth transverse profiles of the density of a zero-beta plasma are perturbed by an impulsive localised perturbation of the sausage symmetry. In particular, the slab can contain an infinitely thin current sheet in its centre. The initial value problem is then solved numerically. The numerical results are subject to spectral analysis. The results are compared with analytical solutions for a slab with a step-function profile and also with sausage oscillations of a plasma cylinder. Results: We established that sausage oscillations in slabs generally have the same properties as in plasma cylinders. In the trapped regime, the sausage oscillation period increases with the increase in the longitudinal wavelength. In the leaky regime, the dependence of the period on the wavelength experiences saturation, and the period becomes independent of the wavelength in the long-wavelength limit. In the leaky regime the period is always longer than in the trapped regime. The sausage oscillation period in a slab is always longer than in a cylinder with the same transverse profile. In slabs with steeper transverse profiles, sausage oscillations have longer periods. The leaky regime occurs at shorter wavelengths in slabs with smoother profiles.

  17. Radiation pressure of active dispersive chiral slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Maoyan; Li, Hailong; Gao, Dongliang; Gao, Lei; Xu, Jun; Qiu, Cheng-Wei

    2015-06-29

    We report a mechanism to obtain optical pulling or pushing forces exerted on the active dispersive chiral media. Electromagnetic wave equations for the pure chiral media using constitutive relations containing dispersive Drude models are numerically solved by means of Auxiliary Differential Equation Finite Difference Time Domain (ADE-FDTD) method. This method allows us to access the time averaged Lorentz force densities exerted on the magnetoelectric coupling chiral slabs via the derivation of bound electric and magnetic charge densities, as well as bound electric and magnetic current densities. Due to the continuously coupled cross-polarized electromagnetic waves, we find that the pressure gradient force is engendered on the active chiral slabs under a plane wave incidence. By changing the material parameters of the slabs, the total radiation pressure exerted on a single slab can be directed either along the propagation direction or in the opposite direction. This finding provides a promising avenue for detecting the chirality of materials by optical forces.

  18. Crust rheology, slab detachment and topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duretz, T.; Gerya, T. V.

    2012-04-01

    The collision between continents following the closure of an ocean can lead to the subduction of continental crust. The introduction of buoyant crust within subduction zones triggers the development of extensional stresses in slabs which eventually result in their detachment. The dynamic consequences of slab detachment affects the development of topography, the exhumation of high-pressure rocks and the geodynamic evolution of collision zones. We employ two-dimensional thermo-mechanical modelling in order to study the importance of crustal rheology on the evolution of spontaneous subduction-collision systems and the occurrence of slab detachment. The modelling results indicate that varying the rheological structure of the crust can results in a broad range of collisional evolutions involving slab detachment, delamination (associated to slab rollback), or the combination of both mechanisms. By enhancing mechanical coupling at the Moho, a strong crust leads to the deep subduction of the crust (180 km). These collisions are subjected to slab detachment and subsequent coherent exhumation of the crust accommodated by eduction (inversion of subduction sense) and thrusting. In these conditions, slab detachment promotes the development of a high (> 4.5 km) and narrow (delamination of the lithosphere, preventing slab detachment to occur. Further shortening leads to buckling and thickening of the crust resulting in the development of topographic bulging on the lower plate. Collisions involving rheologically layered crust are characterised by a decoupling level at mid-crustal depths. These initial condition favours the delamination of the upper crust as well as the deep subduction of the lower crust. These collisions are thus successively affected by delamination and slab detachment and both processes contribute to the exhumation of the subducted crust. A wide (> 200 km) topographic plateau develops as the results of the buoyant extrusion of the upper crust onto the foreland

  19. Moisture redistribution in screeded concrete slabs

    OpenAIRE

    Åhs, Magnus

    2007-01-01

    The principal objective for this licentiate thesis is to develop a methodology and evaluation model in order to make the future relative humidity in a screeded concrete slab predictable. Residual moisture in screeded concrete slabs may redistribute to the top screed surface under semi-permeable flooring, thus elevating the relative humidity, RH, and possibly exceed the critical humidity level. Passing the critical humidity level may result in material damages on the flooring and adhesive. ...

  20. Estimation of the Reliability of Plastic Slabs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirzada, G. B. : Ph.D.

    and the concrete but in this thesis these material properties are modelled by stochastic variables. The probabilistic analysis performed in this thesis is mainly based on work by Thoft-Christensen & Baker (9) and Thoft-Christensen & Murotsu (10). Since considerable information about these basic materials used...... in reinforced concrete slabs and the loading is available it is highly probable that other aspects of slab failure, i.e. the punching shear failure and buckling failure, can be included in the probabilistic approach....

  1. Mantle wedge serpentinization effects on slab dips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eh Tan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical coupling between a subducting slab and the overlying mantle wedge is an important factor in controlling the subduction dip angle and the flow in mantel wedge. This paper investigates the role of the amount of mantle serpentinization on the subduction zone evolution. With numerical thermos-mechanical models with elasto-visco-plastic rheology, we vary the thickness and depth extent of mantle serpentinization in the mantle wedge to control the degree of coupling between the slab and mantle wedge. A thin serpentinized mantle layer is required for stable subduction. For models with stable subduction, we find that the slab dip is affected by the down-dip extent and the mantle serpentinization thickness. A critical down-dip extent exists in mantle serpentinization, determined by the thickness of the overriding lithosphere. If the down-dip extent does not exceed the critical depth, the slab is partially coupled to the overriding lithosphere and has a constant dip angle regardless of the mantle serpentinization thickness. However, if the down-dip extent exceeds the critical depth, the slab and the base of the overriding lithosphere would be separated and decoupled by a thick layer of serpentinized peridotite. This allows further slab bending and results in steeper slab dip. Increasing mantle serpentinization thickness will also result in larger slab dip. We also find that with weak mantle wedge, there is no material flowing from the asthenosphere into the serpentinized mantle wedge. All of these results indicate that serpentinization is an important ingredient when studying the subduction dynamics in the mantle wedge.

  2. Photocatalytic, highly hydrophilic porcelain stoneware slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondo, M.; Guarini, G.; Zanelli, C.; Marani, F.; Fossa, L.; Dondi, M.

    2011-10-01

    Photocatalytic, highly hydrophilic industrial porcelain stoneware large slabs were realized by deposition of nanostructured TiO2 coatings. Different surface finishing and experimental conditions were considered in order to assess the industrial feasibility. Photocatalytic and wetting behaviour of functionalized slabs mainly depends on surface phase composition in terms of anatase/rutile ratio, this involving - as a key issue - the deposition of TiO2 on industrially sintered products with an additional annealing step to strengthen coatings' performances and durability.

  3. Replicative Intermediates of Human Papillomavirus Type 11 in Laryngeal Papillomas: Site of Replication Initiation and Direction of Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auborn, K. J.; Little, R. D.; Platt, T. H. K.; Vaccariello, M. A.; Schildkraut, C. L.

    1994-07-01

    We have examined the structures of replication intermediates from the human papillomavirus type 11 genome in DNA extracted from papilloma lesions (laryngeal papillomas). The sites of replication initiation and termination utilized in vivo were mapped by using neutral/neutral and neutral/alkaline two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis methods. Initiation of replication was detected in or very close to the upstream regulatory region (URR; the noncoding, regulatory sequences upstream of the open reading frames in the papillomavirus genome). We also show that replication forks proceed bidirectionally from the origin and converge 180circ opposite the URR. These results demonstrate the feasibility of analysis of replication of viral genomes directly from infected tissue.

  4. Effects of change in slab geometry on the mantle flow and slab fabric in Southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knezevic Antonijevic, Sanja; Wagner, Lara S.; Beck, Susan L.; Long, Maureen D.; Zandt, George; Tavera, Hernando

    2016-10-01

    The effects of complex slab geometries on the surrounding mantle flow field are still poorly understood. Here we combine shear wave velocity structure with Rayleigh wave phase anisotropy to examine these effects in southern Peru, where the slab changes its geometry from steep to flat. To the south, where the slab subducts steeply, we find trench-parallel anisotropy beneath the active volcanic arc that we attribute to the mantle wedge and/or upper portions of the subducting plate. Farther north, beneath the easternmost corner of the flat slab, we observe a pronounced low-velocity anomaly. This anomaly is caused either by the presence of volatiles and/or flux melting that could result from southward directed, volatile-rich subslab mantle flow or by increased temperature and/or decompression melting due to small-scale vertical flow. We also find evidence for mantle flow through the tear north of the subducting Nazca Ridge. Finally, we observe anisotropy patterns associated with the fast velocity anomalies that reveal along strike variations in the slab's internal deformation. The change in slab geometry from steep to flat contorts the subducting plate south of the Nazca Ridge causing an alteration of the slab petrofabric. In contrast, the torn slab to the north still preserves the primary (fossilized) petrofabric first established shortly after plate formation.

  5. Magnetohydrodynamic Waves in an Asymmetric Magnetic Slab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allcock, Matthew; Erdélyi, Robert

    2017-02-01

    Analytical models of solar atmospheric magnetic structures have been crucial for our understanding of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave behaviour and in the development of the field of solar magneto-seismology. Here, an analytical approach is used to derive the dispersion relation for MHD waves in a magnetic slab of homogeneous plasma enclosed on its two sides by non-magnetic, semi-infinite plasma with different densities and temperatures. This generalises the classic magnetic slab model, which is symmetric about the slab. The dispersion relation, unlike that governing a symmetric slab, cannot be decoupled into the well-known sausage and kink modes, i.e. the modes have mixed properties. The eigenmodes of an asymmetric magnetic slab are better labelled as quasi-sausage and quasi-kink modes. Given that the solar atmosphere is highly inhomogeneous, this has implications for MHD mode identification in a range of solar structures. A parametric analysis of how the mode properties (in particular the phase speed, eigenfrequencies, and amplitudes) vary in terms of the introduced asymmetry is conducted. In particular, avoided crossings occur between quasi-sausage and quasi-kink surface modes, allowing modes to adopt different properties for different parameters in the external region.

  6. Accidents due to falls from roof slabs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Alves Rudelli

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE Falls from the roof slabs of houses are accidents of high potential severity that occur in large Brazilian cities and often affect children and adolescents. The aims of this study were to characterize the factors that predispose towards this type of fall involving children and adolescents, quantify the severity of associated lesions and suggest preventive measures. DESIGN AND SETTING Descriptive observational prospective longitudinal study in two hospitals in the metropolitan region of São Paulo. METHODS Data were collected from 29 cases of falls from roof slabs involving children and adolescents between October 2008 and October 2009. RESULTS Cases involving males were more prevalent, accounting for 84%. The predominant age group was schoolchildren (7 to 12 years old; 44%. Leisure activities were most frequently being practiced on the roof slab at the time of the fall (86%, and flying a kite was the most prevalent game (37.9%. In 72% of the cases, the children were unaccompanied by an adult responsible for them. Severe conditions such as multiple trauma and traumatic brain injuries resulted from 79% of the accidents. CONCLUSION Falls from roof slabs are accidents of high potential severity, and preventive measures aimed towards informing parents and guardians about the dangers and risk factors associated with this type of accident are needed, along with physical protective measures, such as low walls around the slab and gates with locks to restrict free access to these places.

  7. Accidents due to falls from roof slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudelli, Bruno Alves; Silva, Marcelo Valerio Alabarce da; Akkari, Miguel; Santili, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE Falls from the roof slabs of houses are accidents of high potential severity that occur in large Brazilian cities and often affect children and adolescents. The aims of this study were to characterize the factors that predispose towards this type of fall involving children and adolescents, quantify the severity of associated lesions and suggest preventive measures. DESIGN AND SETTING Descriptive observational prospective longitudinal study in two hospitals in the metropolitan region of São Paulo. METHODS Data were collected from 29 cases of falls from roof slabs involving children and adolescents between October 2008 and October 2009. RESULTS Cases involving males were more prevalent, accounting for 84%. The predominant age group was schoolchildren (7 to 12 years old; 44%). Leisure activities were most frequently being practiced on the roof slab at the time of the fall (86%), and flying a kite was the most prevalent game (37.9%). In 72% of the cases, the children were unaccompanied by an adult responsible for them. Severe conditions such as multiple trauma and traumatic brain injuries resulted from 79% of the accidents. CONCLUSION Falls from roof slabs are accidents of high potential severity, and preventive measures aimed towards informing parents and guardians about the dangers and risk factors associated with this type of accident are needed, along with physical protective measures, such as low walls around the slab and gates with locks to restrict free access to these places.

  8. Archaeal DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelman, Lori M; Kelman, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication is essential for all life forms. Although the process is fundamentally conserved in the three domains of life, bioinformatic, biochemical, structural, and genetic studies have demonstrated that the process and the proteins involved in archaeal DNA replication are more similar to those in eukaryal DNA replication than in bacterial DNA replication, but have some archaeal-specific features. The archaeal replication system, however, is not monolithic, and there are some differences in the replication process between different species. In this review, the current knowledge of the mechanisms governing DNA replication in Archaea is summarized. The general features of the replication process as well as some of the differences are discussed.

  9. Slab tears and intermediate-depth seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meighan, Hallie E.; Ten Brink, Uri; Pulliam, Jay

    2013-01-01

    Active tectonic regions where plate boundaries transition from subduction to strike slip can take several forms, such as triple junctions, acute, and obtuse corners. Well-documented slab tears that are associated with high rates of intermediate-depth seismicity are considered here: Gibraltar arc, the southern and northern ends of the Lesser Antilles arc, and the northern end of Tonga trench. Seismicity at each of these locations occurs, at times, in the form of swarms or clusters, and various authors have proposed that each marks an active locus of tear propagation. The swarms and clusters start at the top of the slab below the asthenospheric wedge and extend 30–60 km vertically downward within the slab. We propose that these swarms and clusters are generated by fluid-related embrittlement of mantle rocks. Focal mechanisms of these swarms generally fit the shear motion that is thought to be associated with the tearing process.

  10. Novel Radon Sub-Slab Suctioning System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torben Valdbjørn

    2013-01-01

    the zone below the ground-floor construction. For this purpose a new system of prefabricated lightweight elements is introduced. The effectiveness of the system is demonstrated for the case of a ground-floor reinforced concrete slab situated on top of a rigid insulation layer (consisting of a thermal......A new principle for radon protection is currently presented which makes use of a system of horizontal pressurised air ducts located within the lower part of the rigid insulation layer of the ground-floor slab. The function of this system is based on the principles of pressure reduction within...... a grid of horizontal air ducts with low pressure which are able to remove air and radon from the ground. Results showed the system to be effective in preventing radon infiltrating from the ground through the ground-floor slab, avoiding high concentrations of radon being accumulated inside houses...

  11. Effect of acidulated phosphate fluoride gel application time on enamel demineralization of deciduous and permanent teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, A F B; Tabchoury, C P M; Del Bel Cury, A A; Tenuta, L M A; da Silva, W J; Cury, J A

    2012-01-01

    Although the effect of acidulated phosphate fluoride gel (APF gel) on caries reduction in permanent teeth is based on evidence, the relevance of the clinical application time is still under debate. Also, the effect of 4- versus 1-min application has not been evaluated in deciduous enamel. In a blind, crossover, in situ study of 14 days, 16 adult volunteers wore palatal appliances containing slabs of human permanent and deciduous enamel. At the beginning of each phase, the slabs were submitted to one of the following treatments: no APF application (negative control); APF gel (1.23% F) application for 1 or 4 min. Biofilm accumulation on the slab surface was allowed and the slabs were subjected eight times a day to 20% sucrose, simulating a high cariogenic challenge condition. On the 15th day of each phase, fluoride retained as CaF(2) and fluorapatite (FAp) was determined on the enamel of the slabs and demineralization was assessed by cross-sectional microhardness. Fluoride as CaF(2) and FAp, formed by APF gel application on the enamel slabs not subjected to the cariogenic challenge, was also determined. APF gel reduced demineralization in both enamel types (p 0.05). CaF(2) and FAp formed and retained on deciduous and permanent enamel was significantly higher in APF gel groups (p 0.05). The findings suggest that 1 min of APF gel application provides a similar effect on inhibition of demineralization as 4 min, for both permanent and deciduous enamel. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Photon transport in thin disordered slabs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Venkatesh Gopal; S Anantha Ramakrishna; A K Sood; N Kumar

    2001-06-01

    We examine using Monte Carlo simulations, photon transport in optically `thin’ slabs whose thickness is only a few times the transport mean free path *, with particles of different scattering anisotropies. The confined geometry causes an auto-selection of only photons with looping paths to remain within the slab. The results of the Monte Carlo simulations are borne out by our analytical treatment that incorporates directional persistence by the use of the Ornstein–Uhlenbeck process, which interpolates between the short time ballistic and long time diffusive regimes.

  13. Replicative intermediates of maize streak virus found during leaf development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, Julia B; Shepherd, Dionne N; Martin, Darren P; Varsani, Arvind; Rybicki, Edward P; Jeske, Holger

    2010-04-01

    Geminiviruses of the genera Begomovirus and Curtovirus utilize three replication modes: complementary-strand replication (CSR), rolling-circle replication (RCR) and recombination-dependent replication (RDR). Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, we now show for the first time that maize streak virus (MSV), the type member of the most divergent geminivirus genus, Mastrevirus, does the same. Although mastreviruses have fewer regulatory genes than other geminiviruses and uniquely express their replication-associated protein (Rep) from a spliced transcript, the replicative intermediates of CSR, RCR and RDR could be detected unequivocally within infected maize tissues. All replicative intermediates accumulated early and, to varying degrees, were already present in the shoot apex and leaves at different maturation stages. Relative to other replicative intermediates, those associated with RCR increased in prevalence during leaf maturation. Interestingly, in addition to RCR-associated DNA forms seen in other geminiviruses, MSV also apparently uses dimeric open circular DNA as a template for RCR.

  14. Mantle circulation and the lateral migration of subducted slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfunkel, Z.; Anderson, C. A.; Schubert, G.

    1986-01-01

    The geometry of transverse migration of subducted lithospheric slabs is examined, and the way in which this influences the flow in the mantle is studied. The migration of subducted slabs generally appears to be retrograde (at rates of 10-25 mm/yr), so that the descent of material is actually steeper than the slab dip. Retrograde slab migration is probably caused by the tendence of negatively buoyant slabs to sink in the surrounding mantle. The properties of the flow driven by such retrograde slab migration are explored in simple two-dimensional models. The results are used as a guide to infer the contribution of retrograde slab motion to the more complex mantle flow and to examine some consequences of the additional component of mantle flow. It is shown that slab migration is an important factor that causes mantle flow to be geometrically complex and time dependent.

  15. Lifetime Reliability Assessment of Concrete Slab Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    A procedure for lifetime assesment of the reliability of short concrete slab bridges is presented in the paper. Corrosion of the reinforcement is the deterioration mechanism used for estimating the reliability profiles for such bridges. The importance of using sensitivity measures is stressed. Fi...

  16. Retrofitting of RC Slabs Against Explosive Loads

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Chengqing; OEHLERS Deric John; XIA Shaohua

    2006-01-01

    With the increase of terrorist bomb attacks on buildings,there is a need to develop advanced retrofitting techniques to strengthen structures against blast loads.Currently,several guidelines including an Australian version for retrofitting reinforced concrete (RC) structures are available for the design of retrofitting systems against seismic and monotonic loads using steel or fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) plates that can be either adhesively bonded to the surface or near surface mounted to the concrete cover.However,none of these guidelines provide advice suitable for retrofitting structures subjected to blast loads.In this paper,numerical models are used to simulate the performance of retrofitted RC slabs subjected to blast loads.Airblast pressure distributions on the surface of the slabs estimated in a previous study are used as input in the analysis.A material damage model developedpreviously for concrete and an elastoplastic model for steel bars are employed in this research for modelling reinforced concrete behaviour due to explosive loads.The material models and blast loading are coded into a finite element computer program LS-DYNA3D to do the analysis.With the numerical model,parametric studies are conducted to investigate RC slabs retrofitted by either externally bonded or near-surface mounted plates or GFRP sheets subjected to blast loads.Discussion is made on the effectiveness of the retrofitting system for RC slabs against blast loads.

  17. Numerical Evaluations of Functionally Graded RC Slabs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mastali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, using fibrous materials is used widely in strengthening applications such as cross-section enlargement and using functionally graded reinforced concrete. Functionally graded reinforced concrete is used as multireinforced concrete layers that can be reinforced by different fiber types. The objective of this research was to address the structural benefits of functionally graded concrete materials by performing analytical simulations. In order to achieve this purpose, in the first stage of this study, three functionally graded reinforced concretes by steel and polypropylene (PP were experimentally tested under flexural loading. Inverse analysis was applied to obtain the used material properties of reinforced concrete by FEMIX software. After obtaining the material properties, to assess the performance of proposed slabs, some other cases were proposed and numerically evaluated under flexural and shear loading. The results showed that increasing steel fiber in reinforced entire cross section led to achieve better shear and flexural performance while the best performance of reinforced functionally graded slabs was achieved for slab at 1% fiber content. In the second stage, nineteen reinforced functionally graded RC slabs with steel bars were simulated and assessed and some other cases were considered which were not experimentally tested.

  18. Longitudinal shear resistance of composite slabs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurman, R.G.; Stark, J.W.B.

    1996-01-01

    Verification methods for longitudinal shear. currently in use, are empirical. This applies for both the m-k method as the Partial Shear Connection method. Parameters and mechanisms determining the behaviour of the shear connection in composite slabs are not directly considered in these methods. A

  19. Plastic design of continuous composite slabs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stark, J.W.B.; Brekelmans, J.W.P.M.

    1996-01-01

    Most current regulations for continuous composite slabs contain rules that limit the application of plastic analysis in the design process. In this paper, results of numerical studies for positive and negative bending and experimental results for negative bending are presented. From these

  20. Benchmark Experiment for Beryllium Slab Samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIE; Yang-bo; BAO; Jie; HAN; Rui; RUAN; Xi-chao; REN; Jie; HUANG; Han-xiong; ZHOU; Zu-ying

    2015-01-01

    In order to validate the evaluated nuclear data on beryllium,a benchmark experiment has been performed at China Institution of Atomic Energy(CIAE).Neutron leakage spectra from pure beryllium slab samples(10cm×10cm×11cm)were measured at 61°and 121°using timeof-

  1. All-polymer photonic crystal slab sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermannsson, Pétur Gordon; Sørensen, Kristian Tølbøl; Vannahme, Christoph;

    2015-01-01

    An all-polymer photonic crystal slab sensor is presented, and shown to exhibit narrow resonant reflection with a FWHM of less than 1 nm and a sensitivity of 31 nm/RIU when sensing media with refractive indices around that of water. This results in a detection limit of 4.5x10-6 RIU when measured...

  2. Effects of Edge Restraint on Slab Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-02-01

    manufactured limestone sand fine aggregate. Two batches were prepared, one for each of the different thickness slab groups. A total of thirty-eight 4...Building Code Require- ments" 1983; Detroit, Mich. 4. T. Takehira, A. T. Derecho , and M. Iqbal; "Design Criteria for De- flection Capacity of

  3. Cost analysis of reinforced concrete slabs and columns

    OpenAIRE

    Spuś, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    The construction industry is increasingly looking for solutions that are both simple and effective and that provide cost savings, speed and flexibility of execution. Two-way slabs are a form of construction unique to reinforced concrete comparing with the other major structural materials. It is an efficient, economical, and widely used structural system. The present dissertation aims to analyze and compare costs between four types of slabs: waffle slab with recuperate molds, flat slabs wit...

  4. Abrupt tectonics and rapid slab detachment with grain damage

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Subduction zones are delineated by Earth’s ocean trenches, and are where tectonic plates sink into the mantle as cold heavy slabs, which in turn drive plate motion. But slabs can detach from their surface plates, thus altering tectonic driving forces. Slab detachment can occur if thick crust from continents or oceanic plateaux is swept by plate motion into the subduction zone, thus plugging it up. Detachment is also accelerated because mineral grains in the slab become smaller during deformat...

  5. Reinforcement of the concrete base slab of the ATLAS cavern

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Photo 02: UX15 cavern, preparation for concreting of base slab first lift. Photo 05: UX15 cavern, placing of reinforcement for base slab first lift. Photo 07: UX15 cavern, preparation for concreting of base slab first lift. Photo 09: UX15 cavern, placing of reinforcement for base slab first lift. Photo 10: UX15 cavern, view into PX14 shaft above. Photo 12: UX15 cavern, temporary access platform of RB16 tunnel. Photo 15: UJ17 chamber, invert excavation.

  6. Modelling the Slab Failure of an Open Structure Acted by External Blast Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nica George Bogdan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The explosion of bombs near buildings generally yields severe damages to the structures. Explosion resistant standards and requirements are constantly being developed and upgraded. This paper focuses on the damages which occur toa RC slab due to blast action. The numerical model replicates a ¼ scale experiment. The analysis is conducted using a software based on the recently developed Applied Element Method. This numerical method is able to model accurately all the structural behavior stages up to failure. The results are compared to experimental data available in the literature. The analysis reveals that the slab failure due to uplift pressures may be avoided by some simple reinforcing details, as they are listed in the Romanian National Annex – accidental loads of the Eurocode EN 1991-1-7.

  7. Method for preparing hydrous zirconium oxide gels and spherules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Jack L.

    2003-08-05

    Methods for preparing hydrous zirconium oxide spherules, hydrous zirconium oxide gels such as gel slabs, films, capillary and electrophoresis gels, zirconium monohydrogen phosphate spherules, hydrous zirconium oxide spherules having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite sorbent, zirconium monohydrogen phosphate spherules having suspendable particles of at least one different sorbent homogeneously embedded within to form a composite sorbent having a desired crystallinity, zirconium oxide spherules having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite, hydrous zirconium oxide fiber materials, zirconium oxide fiber materials, hydrous zirconium oxide fiber materials having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite, zirconium oxide fiber materials having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite and spherules of barium zirconate. The hydrous zirconium oxide spherules and gel forms prepared by the gel-sphere, internal gelation process are useful as inorganic ion exchangers, catalysts, getters and ceramics.

  8. Thermoresponsive Gels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Joan Taylor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermoresponsive gelling materials constructed from natural and synthetic polymers can be used to provide triggered action and therefore customised products such as drug delivery and regenerative medicine types as well as for other industries. Some materials give Arrhenius-type viscosity changes based on coil to globule transitions. Others produce more counterintuitive responses to temperature change because of agglomeration induced by enthalpic or entropic drivers. Extensive covalent crosslinking superimposes complexity of response and the upper and lower critical solution temperatures can translate to critical volume temperatures for these swellable but insoluble gels. Their structure and volume response confer advantages for actuation though they lack robustness. Dynamic covalent bonding has created an intermediate category where shape moulding and self-healing variants are useful for several platforms. Developing synthesis methodology—for example, Reversible Addition Fragmentation chain Transfer (RAFT and Atomic Transfer Radical Polymerisation (ATRP—provides an almost infinite range of materials that can be used for many of these gelling systems. For those that self-assemble into micelle systems that can gel, the upper and lower critical solution temperatures (UCST and LCST are analogous to those for simpler dispersible polymers. However, the tuned hydrophobic-hydrophilic balance plus the introduction of additional pH-sensitivity and, for instance, thermochromic response, open the potential for coupled mechanisms to create complex drug targeting effects at the cellular level.

  9. Mantle Response to a Slab Gap and Three-dimensional Slab Interaction in Central America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadamec, M. A.; Fischer, K. M.

    2013-12-01

    Seismically constrained global slab geometries suggest the Middle America-South American subduction system contains a gap on the order of 500 km separating the east-dipping Cocos and Nazca slabs at depth (Gudmundsson and Sambridge, 1998; Syracuse and Abers, 2006; Hayes et al., 2012). The location of the gap correlates with tectonic features impinging on the Pacific side of the Middle America trench, in particular the incoming young buoyant oceanic lithosphere and oceanic ridges associated with the Galapagos hotspot and Cocos-Nazca spreading center (Protti et al., 1994; Mann et al., 2007; Muller et al., 2008). Moreover, geochemical studies focusing on the arc chemistry in the Central American volcanic front argue for a slab window of some kind in this region (Johnston and Thorkelson, 1997; Abratis and Worner, 2001; Hoernle et al., 2008). We use high-resolution, three-dimensional (3D) geodynamic modeling of the Middle America-South American subduction system to investigate the role of the incoming young oceanic lithosphere and a gap between the Cocos and Nazca slabs in controlling mantle flow velocity and geochemical signatures beneath Central America. The geodynamic models are geographically referenced with the geometry and thermal structure for the overriding and subducting plates based on geological and geophysical observables and constructed with the multi-plate subduction generator code, SlabGenerator (Jadamec and Billen, 2010; Jadamec et al., 2012; Jadamec and Billen, 2012). The viscous flow simulations are solved using the mantle convection finite-element code, CitcomCU (Zhong, 2006), modified by Jadamec and Billen (2010) to take into account the experimentally derived flow law for olivine and allow for variable 3D plate interface geometries and magnitudes of inter-plate coupling. The 3D numerical models indicate the gap between the Cocos and Nazca slabs serves as a conduit for Pacific-Cocos mantle to pass into the Caribbean, with toroidal flow around the

  10. HEAT TRANSFER ANALYSIS DURING ROLLING OF THIN SLAB IN CSP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W.F. Wu; Y.H. Feng; X.X. Zhang

    2006-01-01

    A mathematical model has been built to numerically predict the thermal history of thin slab during CSP (compact strip process) rolling. To estimate the temperature distribution in the slab more accurately, the mathematical model combines heat transfer in the slab, in the roll, and at the roll-slab interface during bite. The numerical results agree with on-site running data, which proves the reliability of the mathematical model. The results show that roll chilling has a significant effect on the temperature distribution in the slab.

  11. Thin-slab casting – New possibilities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amit Chatterjee; Sanjay Chandra

    2001-02-01

    Changes in the IT industry are known to proceed at a scorching pace. In sharp contrast, the rate of development in the steel industry is generally slow. Nonetheless, The impact of recent technical developments on the steel industry has been quite significant. The production chain from iron ore to final rolled steel is a long one and the shortening of this length has long been the endeavour of scientists and engineers. The initial development came in the form of speeding up the process of steelmaking by reducing the slow open-hearth process (8 h tap-to-tap time) with the 45 min tap-tp-tap time of the Basic Oxygen Furnace (BOF) process. Significant developments thereafter have been in the process of continuous production of billets and blooms from liquid steel thereby doing away with the large blooming mills needed for rolling ingots. For a fairly long time after the stabilisation of continuous casting. hot rolling involved reheating thick (200-250 mm) slabs and reducing them in a hot-strip mill. The advent of thin-slab casters has made even these large hot-strip mills redundant. The new installtion produce thin slabs (50-70 mm) that are directly rolled into strips without the need of an intermediate furnace for raising the stock temperature; the so-called tunnel furance prior to the rolling stands serving only to equalise stock temperatures. Additionally, what started as a step for reducing investment in hot rolling has, in fact, given new opportunity for direct hot rolling of thickness that were, for long, considered to be feasible only through the cold-rolling route. This article discuss the slow but steady encroachment of hot-rolled sheets into the domain of strip thickness hitherto produced by cold rolling and tries to show how the development of thin-slab casters has allowed this process to be accelerated. A techno-economic analysis of thin-slab casting has been presented along with the benefits that arise when a thin-slab caster is linked to the blast furnace

  12. Evidence of fire resistance of hollow-core slabs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Kristian Dahl; Sørensen, Lars Schiøtt; Giuliani, Luisa

    Hollow-core slabs have during the past 50 years comprised a variety of different structures with different cross-sections and reinforcement. At present the extruded hollow-core slabs without cross-reinforcement in the bottom flange and usually round or oval longitudinal channels (holes...... is therefore going on in the Netherlands about the fire resistance of hollow-core slabs. In 2014 the producers of hollow-core slabs have published a report of a project called Holcofire containing a collection of 162 fire tests on hollow-core slabs giving for the first time an overview of the fire tests made....... The present paper analyses the evidence now available for assessment of the fire resistance of extruded hollow-core slabs. The 162 fire tests from the Holcofire report are compared against the requirements for testing from the product standard for hollow-core slabs EN1168 and knowledge about the possible...

  13. Replication Restart in Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Bénédicte; Sandler, Steven J

    2017-07-01

    In bacteria, replication forks assembled at a replication origin travel to the terminus, often a few megabases away. They may encounter obstacles that trigger replisome disassembly, rendering replication restart from abandoned forks crucial for cell viability. During the past 25 years, the genes that encode replication restart proteins have been identified and genetically characterized. In parallel, the enzymes were purified and analyzed in vitro, where they can catalyze replication initiation in a sequence-independent manner from fork-like DNA structures. This work also revealed a close link between replication and homologous recombination, as replication restart from recombination intermediates is an essential step of DNA double-strand break repair in bacteria and, conversely, arrested replication forks can be acted upon by recombination proteins and converted into various recombination substrates. In this review, we summarize this intense period of research that led to the characterization of the ubiquitous replication restart protein PriA and its partners, to the definition of several replication restart pathways in vivo, and to the description of tight links between replication and homologous recombination, responsible for the importance of replication restart in the maintenance of genome stability. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  14. Radiative transfer model for contaminated rough slabs

    CERN Document Server

    Andrieu, François; Schmidt, Frédéric; Schmitt, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    We present a semi-analytical model to simulate bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) spectra of a rough slab layer containing impurities. This model has been optimized for fast computation in order to analyze hyperspectral data. We designed it for planetary surfaces ices studies but it could be used for other purposes. It estimates the bidirectional reflectance of a rough slab of material containing inclusions, overlaying an optically thick media (semi-infinite media or stratified media, for instance granular material). The inclusions are supposed to be close to spherical, and of any type of other material than the ice matrix. It can be any type of other ice, mineral or even bubbles, defined by their optical constants. We suppose a low roughness and we consider the geometrical optics conditions. This model is thus applicable for inclusions larger than the considered wavelength. The scattering on the inclusions is assumed to be isotropic. This model has a fast computation implementation and th...

  15. Subduction zone earthquakes and stress in slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliou, M. S.; Hager, B. H.

    1988-01-01

    Simple viscous fluid models of subducting slabs are used to explain observations of the distribution of earthquakes as a function of depth and the orientation of stress axes of deep (greater than 300 km) and intermediate (70-300 km) earthquakes. Results suggest the following features in the distribution of earthquakes with depth: (1) an exponential decrease from shallow depths down to 250 to 300 km, (2) a minimum near 250 to 300 km, and (3) a deep peak below 300 km. Many shallow subducting slabs show only the first characteristic, while deeper extending regions tend to show all three features, with the deep peak varying in position and intensity. These data, combined with the results on the stress orientations of various-depth earthquakes, are consistent with the existence of a barrier of some sort at 670-km depth and a uniform viscosity mantle above this barrier.

  16. Behavior of Partially Restrained Reinforced Concrete Slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-01

    Takehira, Derecho , and Iqbal [34] followed a similar approach to arrive at recommended design criteria for 1 the Naval Facilities Engineering Command...Datta, T. K., "Ultimate Strength of Reinforced Concrete Slab-Beam Systems: A New Approach," r Indian Concrete Journal, Bombay, India , Vol. 47, 1973, pp...Journal of Solids and Structures, Vol. 1, 1965, pp. 97-111. 34. Takehira, T., Derecho , A.T., and Iqbal, M., "Design Criteria for Deflection Capacity

  17. Continental underplating after slab break-off

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magni, V.; Allen, M. B.; van Hunen, J.; Bouilhol, P.

    2017-09-01

    We present three-dimensional numerical models to investigate the dynamics of continental collision, and in particular what happens to the subducted continental lithosphere after oceanic slab break-off. We find that in some scenarios the subducting continental lithosphere underthrusts the overriding plate not immediately after it enters the trench, but after oceanic slab break-off. In this case, the continental plate first subducts with a steep angle and then, after the slab breaks off at depth, it rises back towards the surface and flattens below the overriding plate, forming a thick horizontal layer of continental crust that extends for about 200 km beyond the suture. This type of behaviour depends on the width of the oceanic plate marginal to the collision zone: wide oceanic margins promote continental underplating and marginal back-arc basins; narrow margins do not show such underplating unless a far field force is applied. Our models show that, as the subducted continental lithosphere rises, the mantle wedge progressively migrates away from the suture and the continental crust heats up, reaching temperatures >900 °C. This heating might lead to crustal melting, and resultant magmatism. We observe a sharp peak in the overriding plate rock uplift right after the occurrence of slab break-off. Afterwards, during underplating, the maximum rock uplift is smaller, but the affected area is much wider (up to 350 km). These results can be used to explain the dynamics that led to the present-day crustal configuration of the India-Eurasia collision zone and its consequences for the regional tectonic and magmatic evolution.

  18. Benchmark Experiment for Beryllium Slab Samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIE; Yang-bo; BAO; Jie; HAN; Rui; RUAN; Xi-chao; REN; Jie; HUANG; Han-xiong; ZHOU; Zu-ying

    2013-01-01

    The neutron leakage spectra were measured at 60°from pure beryllium slab samples(10 cm×10 cm×5 cm and 10 cm×10 cm×11 cm)by TOF method.The experimental results were compared with the calculated ones by MCNP5 simulation,using the evaluated data of beryllium from CENDL3.1,

  19. Wave Scattering by Superluminal Spacetime Slab

    CERN Document Server

    Deck-Léger, Zoé-Lise

    2016-01-01

    Spacetime media offers new opportunities for wave manipulation. Here we study superluminal slabs, and show that the amplitudes of the reflected waves are controlled by the velocity of the medium. In addition, the backward wave continuously scans from the specular to the collinear angle. A diagrammatic method is provided for insight into the deflection angles. A fundamental symmetry between sub- and superluminal scattering is derived from this diagrammatic description.

  20. Convection in Slab and Spheroidal Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, David H.; Woodward, Paul R.; Jacobs, Michael L.

    2000-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of compressible turbulent thermally driven convection, in both slab and spheroidal geometries, are reviewed and analyzed in terms of velocity spectra and mixing-length theory. The same ideal gas model is used in both geometries, and resulting flows are compared. The piecewise-parabolic method (PPM), with either thermal conductivity or photospheric boundary conditions, is used to solve the fluid equations of motion. Fluid motions in both geometries exhibit a Kolmogorov-like k(sup -5/3) range in their velocity spectra. The longest wavelength modes are energetically dominant in both geometries, typically leading to one convection cell dominating the flow. In spheroidal geometry, a dipolar flow dominates the largest scale convective motions. Downflows are intensely turbulent and up drafts are relatively laminar in both geometries. In slab geometry, correlations between temperature and velocity fluctuations, which lead to the enthalpy flux, are fairly independent of depth. In spheroidal geometry this same correlation increases linearly with radius over the inner 70 percent by radius, in which the local pressure scale heights are a sizable fraction of the radius. The effects from the impenetrable boundary conditions in the slab geometry models are confused with the effects from non-local convection. In spheroidal geometry nonlocal effects, due to coherent plumes, are seen as far as several pressure scale heights from the lower boundary and are clearly distinguishable from boundary effects.

  1. Convection in Slab and Spheroidal Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, David H.; Woodward, Paul R.; Jacobs, Michael L.

    2000-01-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations of compressible turbulent thermally driven convection, in both slab and spheroidal geometries, are reviewed and analyzed in terms of velocity spectra and mixing-length theory. The same ideal gas model is used in both geometries, and resulting flows are compared. The piecewise-parabolic method (PPM), with either thermal conductivity or photospheric boundary conditions, is used to solve the fluid equations of motion. Fluid motions in both geometries exhibit a Kolmogorov-like k(sup -5/3) range in their velocity spectra. The longest wavelength modes are energetically dominant in both geometries, typically leading to one convection cell dominating the flow. In spheroidal geometry, a dipolar flow dominates the largest scale convective motions. Downflows are intensely turbulent and up drafts are relatively laminar in both geometries. In slab geometry, correlations between temperature and velocity fluctuations, which lead to the enthalpy flux, are fairly independent of depth. In spheroidal geometry this same correlation increases linearly with radius over the inner 70 percent by radius, in which the local pressure scale heights are a sizable fraction of the radius. The effects from the impenetrable boundary conditions in the slab geometry models are confused with the effects from non-local convection. In spheroidal geometry nonlocal effects, due to coherent plumes, are seen as far as several pressure scale heights from the lower boundary and are clearly distinguishable from boundary effects.

  2. Replication intermediate analysis confirms that chromosomal replication origin initiates from an unusual intergenic region in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassinga, A K; Marczynski, G T

    2001-11-01

    The alpha-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus possesses a developmental cell cycle that restricts chromosome replication to a stalked cell type. The proposed C.crescentus chromosome replication origin (Cori) lies between hemE and RP001, an unusual intergenic region not previously associated with bacterial replication origins, although a similar genomic arrangement is also present at the putative replication origin in the related bacterium Rickettsia prowazekii. The cloned Cori supports autonomous plasmid replication selectively in the stalked cell type implying that replication of the entire chromosome also initiates between hemE and RP001. To confirm this location, we applied the 2-D (N/N) agarose gel electrophoresis technique to resolve and identify chromosome replication intermediates throughout a 30 kb region spanning Cori. Replication initiation in Cori was uniquely characterized by an 'origin bubble and Y-arc' pattern and this observation was supported by simple replication fork 'Y-arc' patterns that characterized the regions flanking Cori. These replication forks originated bi-directionally from within Cori as determined by the fork direction assay. Therefore, chromosomal replication initiates from the unusual hemE/RP001 intergenic region that we propose represents a new class of replication origins.

  3. Viscous Dissipation and Criticality of Subducting Slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Mike; Karato, Shun; Yuen, Dave

    2016-04-01

    Rheology of subducting lithosphere appears to be complicated. In the shallow part, deformation is largely accomodated by brittle failure, whereas at greater depth, at higher confining pressures, ductile creep is expected to control slab strength. The amount of viscous dissipation ΔQ during subduction at greater depth, as constrained by experimental rock mechanics, can be estimated on the basis of a simple bending moment equation [1,2] 2ɛ˙0(z) ∫ +h/2 2 M (z) = h ṡ -h/2 4μ(y,z)y dy , (1) for a complex multi-phase rheology in the mantle transition zone, including the effects of a metastable phase transition as well as the pressure, temperature, grain-size and stress dependency of the relevant creep mechanisms; μ is here the effective viscosity and ɛ˙0(z) is a (reference) strain rate. Numerical analysis shows that the maximum bending moment, Mcrit, that can be sustained by a slab is of the order of 1019 Nm per m according to Mcrit˜=σp ∗h2/4, where σp is the Peierl's stress limit of slab materials and h is the slab thickness. Near Mcrit, the amount of viscous dissipation grows strongly as a consequence of a lattice instability of mantle minerals (dislocation glide in olivine), suggesting that thermo-mechanical instabilities become prone to occur at places where a critical shear-heating rate is exceeded, see figure. This implies that the lithosphere behaves in such cases like a perfectly plastic solid [3]. Recently available detailed data related to deep seismicity [4,5] seems to provide support to our conclusion. It shows, e.g., that thermal shear instabilities, and not transformational faulting, is likely the dominating mechanism for deep-focus earthquakes at the bottom of the transition zone, in accordance with this suggested "deep criticality" model. These new findings are therefore briefly outlined and possible implications are discussed. References [1] Riedel, M. R., Karato, S., Yuen, D. A. Criticality of Subducting Slabs. University of Minnesota

  4. Tectonic controls on earthquake size distribution and seismicity rate: slab buoyancy and slab bending

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, T.; Ide, S.

    2014-12-01

    There are clear variations in maximum earthquake magnitude among Earth's subduction zones. These variations have been studied extensively and attributed to differences in tectonic properties in subduction zones, such as relative plate velocity and subducting plate age [Ruff and Kanamori, 1980]. In addition to maximum earthquake magnitude, the seismicity of medium to large earthquakes also differs among subduction zones, such as the b-value (i.e., the slope of the earthquake size distribution) and the frequency of seismic events. However, the casual relationship between the seismicity of medium to large earthquakes and subduction zone tectonics has been unclear. Here we divide Earth's subduction zones into over 100 study regions following Ide [2013] and estimate b-values and the background seismicity rate—the frequency of seismic events excluding aftershocks—for subduction zones worldwide using the maximum likelihood method [Utsu, 1965; Aki, 1965] and the epidemic type aftershock sequence (ETAS) model [Ogata, 1988]. We demonstrate that the b-value varies as a function of subducting plate age and trench depth, and that the background seismicity rate is related to the degree of slab bending at the trench. Large earthquakes tend to occur relatively frequently (lower b-values) in shallower subduction zones with younger slabs, and more earthquakes occur in subduction zones with deeper trench and steeper dip angle. These results suggest that slab buoyancy, which depends on subducting plate age, controls the earthquake size distribution, and that intra-slab faults due to slab bending, which increase with the steepness of the slab dip angle, have influence on the frequency of seismic events, because they produce heterogeneity in plate coupling and efficiently inject fluid to elevate pore fluid pressure on the plate interface. This study reveals tectonic factors that control earthquake size distribution and seismicity rate, and these relationships between seismicity and

  5. A STUDY ON THE WHEELSET/SLAB TRACK VERTICAL INTERACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Traian MAZILU

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the interaction between a moving wheelset and a slab track due to the short-pitch corrugated rail. The wheelset is modeled using a free-free Timoshenko beam with attached rigid bodies as the axle boxes, wheels and brake discs. The slab track model consists of elastically supported double Euler-Bernoulli beams. In fact, both wheelset and slab track are symmetric structures and the issue of the wheelset/slab track interaction is reduced to the wheel/rail interaction. The nonlinear equations of motion describing the wheelset/slab track interaction due to the short-pitch corrugated rail are solved using the time-domain Green’s functions method and the convolution theorem. The wheelset/slab track interaction due to the short-pitch corrugated rail exhibits a critical velocity when the vibration reaches the maximum level

  6. Formation of Anisotropic Block Copolymer Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Chya Yan; Shull, Kenneth; Henderson, Kevin; Joester, Derk

    2011-03-01

    Anisotropic, fibrillar gels are important in a variety of processes. Biomineralization is one example, where the mineralization process often occurs within a matrix of collagen or chitin fibers that trap the mineral precursors and direct the mineralization process. We wish to replicate this type of behavior within block copolymer gels. Particularly, we are interested in employing gels composed of cylindrical micelles, which are anisotropic and closely mimic biological fibers. Micelle geometry is controlled in our system by manipulating the ratio of molecular weights of the two blocks and by controlling the detailed thermal processing history of the copolymer solutions. Small-Angle X-ray Scattering and Dynamic Light Scattering are used to determine the temperature dependence of the gel formation process. Initial experiments are based on a thermally-reversible alcohol-soluble system, that can be subsequently converted to a water soluble system by hydrolysis of a poly(t-butyl methacrylate) block to a poly (methacrylic acid) block. MRSEC.

  7. DNA replication and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyer, Anne-Sophie; Walter, David; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2016-01-01

    A dividing cell has to duplicate its DNA precisely once during the cell cycle to preserve genome integrity avoiding the accumulation of genetic aberrations that promote diseases such as cancer. A large number of endogenous impacts can challenge DNA replication and cells harbor a battery of pathways...... causing DNA replication stress and genome instability. Further, we describe cellular and systemic responses to these insults with a focus on DNA replication restart pathways. Finally, we discuss the therapeutic potential of exploiting intrinsic replicative stress in cancer cells for targeted therapy....

  8. Photonic crystal slab quantum well infrared photodetector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalchmair, S.; Detz, H.; Cole, G. D.; Andrews, A. M.; Klang, P.; Nobile, M.; Gansch, R.; Ostermaier, C.; Schrenk, W.; Strasser, G.

    2011-01-01

    In this letter we present a quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP), which is fabricated as a photonic crystal slab (PCS). With the PCS it is possible to enhance the absorption efficiency by increasing photon lifetime in the detector active region. To understand the optical properties of the device we simulate the PCS photonic band structure, which differs significantly from a real two-dimensional photonic crystal. By fabricating a PCS-QWIP with 100x less quantum well doping, compared to a standard QWIP, we are able to see strong absorption enhancement and sharp resonance peaks up to temperatures of 170 K.

  9. Photonic crystal slab quantum cascade detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reininger, Peter, E-mail: peter.reininger@tuwien.ac.at; Schwarz, Benedikt; Harrer, Andreas; Zederbauer, Tobias; Detz, Hermann; Maxwell Andrews, Aaron; Gansch, Roman; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried [Institute for Solid State Electronics and Center for Micro- and Nanostructures, Vienna University of Technology, Floragasse 7, Vienna 1040 (Austria)

    2013-12-09

    In this Letter, we demonstrate the design, fabrication, and characterization of a photonic crystal slab quantum cascade detector (PCS-QCD). By employing a specifically designed resonant cavity, the performance of the photodetector is improved in three distinct ways. The PCS makes the QCD sensitive to surface normal incident light. It resonantly enhances the photon lifetime inside the active zone, thus increasing the photocurrent significantly. And, the construction form of the device inherently decreases the noise. Finally, we compare the characteristics of the PCS-QCD to a PCS - quantum well infrared photodetector and outline the advantages for certain fields of applications.

  10. Automated inspection of hot steel slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ronald J.

    1985-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a real time digital image enhancement system for performing the image enhancement segmentation processing required for a real time automated system for detecting and classifying surface imperfections in hot steel slabs. The system provides for simultaneous execution of edge detection processing and intensity threshold processing in parallel on the same image data produced by a sensor device such as a scanning camera. The results of each process are utilized to validate the results of the other process and a resulting image is generated that contains only corresponding segmentation that is produced by both processes.

  11. Damage Function Rating Procedure for Flat Slab Basement Shelters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    with solid heads at the columns . These types of slabs are 33 I r~ Omm- D6U0St - m . -I ig. "-.TyiaaFalSasontucin 34 -4 called ribbed, or " waffle ", slabs ...and for design purposes are considered flat slabs with the solid heads at the columns performing the same function as the drop panels. Waffle flat...she:.ers, an upgrading method must be developed and verified by test for these critical stress areas adjacent to the column supports. Waffle Slabs

  12. CFRP strengthened openings in two-way concrete slabs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enochsson, O.; Lundqvist, J.; Täljsten, Björn

    2006-01-01

    Rehabilitation and strengthening of concrete structures with externally bonded fibre reinforced polymers (FRPs) has been a viable technique for at least a decade. An interesting and useful application is strengthening of slabs or walls where openings are introduced. In these situations, FRP sheets....... In this paper, laboratory tests on I I slabs with openings, loaded with a distributed load are presented together with analytical and numerical evaluations. Six slabs with openings have been strengthened with carbon fibre reinforced polymers (CFRPs) sheets. These slabs are compared with traditionally steel...

  13. Gain of double-slab Cherenkov free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, D. [Institute for laser Technology, suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)], E-mail: dazhi_li@hotmail.com; Huo, G. [Petroleum development center, Shengli Oilfield, SINOPEC, Dongying 257001 (China); Imasak, K. [Institute for laser Technology, suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Asakawa, M. [Department of pure and applied physics, Faculty of Engineering Science, Kansai University, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan)

    2009-07-21

    A formula is derived for the small-signal gain of a double-slab Cherenkov free-electron laser. The simplified model is composed of a rectangular wave-guide partially filled with two lined parallel dielectric slabs and a sheet electron beam. The theory describes the electron beam as a plasma dielectric moving between the two dielectric slabs. With the help of hydrodynamic approximation, we derived the dispersion equation and the formula of small-signal gain. Through numerical computing, we studied an ongoing experiment of double-slab Cherenkov free-electron laser, and worked out the synchronous frequency and single-pass gain.

  14. Evidence of fire resistance of hollow-core slabs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Kristian Dahl; Sørensen, Lars Schiøtt; Giuliani, Luisa

    Hollow-core slabs have during the past 50 years comprised a variety of different structures with different cross-sections and reinforcement. At present the extruded hollow-core slabs without cross-reinforcement in the bottom flange and usually round or oval longitudinal channels (holes) are predo......Hollow-core slabs have during the past 50 years comprised a variety of different structures with different cross-sections and reinforcement. At present the extruded hollow-core slabs without cross-reinforcement in the bottom flange and usually round or oval longitudinal channels (holes...

  15. A STUDY ON THE WHEELSET/SLAB TRACK VERTICAL INTERACTION

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the interaction between a moving wheelset and a slab track due to the short-pitch corrugated rail. The wheelset is modeled using a free-free Timoshenko beam with attached rigid bodies as the axle boxes, wheels and brake discs. The slab track model consists of elastically supported double Euler-Bernoulli beams. In fact, both wheelset and slab track are symmetric structures and the issue of the wheelset/slab track interaction is reduced to the wheel/rail interaction. The n...

  16. Control of exceptional points in photonic crystal slabs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaminski, Piotr Marek; Taghizadeh, Alireza; Breinbjerg, Olav

    2017-01-01

    Various ways of controlling the extent of the ring of exceptional points in photonic crystal slabs are investigated. The extent of the ring in photonic crystal slabs is found to vary with the thickness of the slab. This enables recovery of Dirac cones in open, non-Hermitian systems......, such as a photonic crystal slab. In this case, all three bands exhibit a bound state in the continuum in close proximity of the Γ point. These results may lead to new designs of small photonic-crystal-based lasers exhibiting high-quality factors....

  17. Impact of replicate types on proteomic expression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Natasha A; Spencer, Matthew; Lindsay, Helen; O'Dell, Kevin; Lilley, Kathryn S

    2005-01-01

    In expression proteomics, the samples utilized within an experimental design may include technical, biological, or pooled replicates. This manuscript discusses various experimental designs and the conclusions that can be drawn from them. Specifically, it addresses the impact of mixing replicate types on the statistical analysis which can be performed. This study focuses on difference gel electrophoresis (DiGE), but the issues are equally applicable to all quantitative methodologies assessing relative changes in protein expression.

  18. Agarose gel electrophoresis and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis for visualization of simple sequence repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James; Wright, Drew; Meksem, Khalid

    2013-01-01

    In the modern age of genetic research there is a constant search for ways to improve the efficiency of plant selection. The most recent technology that can result in a highly efficient means of selection and still be done at a low cost is through plant selection directed by simple sequence repeats (SSRs or microsatellites). The molecular markers are used to select for certain desirable plant traits without relying on ambiguous phenotypic data. The best way to detect these is the use of gel electrophoresis. Gel electrophoresis is a common technique in laboratory settings which is used to separate deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and ribonucleic acid (RNA) by size. Loading DNA and RNA onto gels allows for visualization of the size of fragments through the separation of DNA and RNA fragments. This is achieved through the use of the charge in the particles. As the fragments separate, they form into distinct bands at set sizes. We describe the ability to visualize SSRs on slab gels of agarose and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.

  19. Radiative transfer model for contaminated rough slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrieu, François; Douté, Sylvain; Schmidt, Frédéric; Schmitt, Bernard

    2015-11-01

    We present a semi-analytical model to simulate the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of a rough slab layer containing impurities. This model has been optimized for fast computation in order to analyze massive hyperspectral data by a Bayesian approach. We designed it for planetary surface ice studies but it could be used for other purposes. It estimates the bidirectional reflectance of a rough slab of material containing inclusions, overlaying an optically thick media (semi-infinite media or stratified media, for instance granular material). The inclusions are assumed to be close to spherical and constituted of any type of material other than the ice matrix. It can be any other type of ice, mineral, or even bubbles defined by their optical constants. We assume a low roughness and we consider the geometrical optics conditions. This model is thus applicable for inclusions larger than the considered wavelength. The scattering on the inclusions is assumed to be isotropic. This model has a fast computation implementation and thus is suitable for high-resolution hyperspectral data analysis.

  20. Replicating animal mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A. McKinney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA replication has been experiencing incredible progress in recent years, and yet little is certain about the mechanism(s used by animal cells to replicate this plasmid-like genome. The long-standing strand-displacement model of mammalian mtDNA replication (for which single-stranded DNA intermediates are a hallmark has been intensively challenged by a new set of data, which suggests that replication proceeds via coupled leading-and lagging-strand synthesis (resembling bacterial genome replication and/or via long stretches of RNA intermediates laid on the mtDNA lagging-strand (the so called RITOLS. The set of proteins required for mtDNA replication is small and includes the catalytic and accessory subunits of DNA polymerase y, the mtDNA helicase Twinkle, the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein, and the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (which most likely functions as the mtDNA primase. Mutations in the genes coding for the first three proteins are associated with human diseases and premature aging, justifying the research interest in the genetic, biochemical and structural properties of the mtDNA replication machinery. Here we summarize these properties and discuss the current models of mtDNA replication in animal cells.

  1. Shear and anchorage behaviour of fire exposed hollow core slabs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fellinger, J.H.H.; Stark, J.; Walraven, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    The fire resistance of hollow core slabs is currently assessed considering flexural failure only. However, fire tests showed that shear or anchorage failure can also govern the load bearing behaviour. As the shear and anchorage capacity of these slabs rely on the tensile strength of the concrete, th

  2. How to produce flat slabs: insights from numeric modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantin Manea, Vlad; Perez-Gussinye, Marta; Manea, Marina

    2010-05-01

    Flat slab subduction occurs at ~10% of the active convergent margins and it is assumed that subduction of oceanic aseismic ridges or seamount chains is the main mechanism to produce very low angle subduction slabs. However, recent numeric and analog modeling showed that ridges alone of moderate dimensions subducted perpendicular to the trench are not sufficient to produce flat-slab geometries. Therefore an alternative mechanism able to produce flat-slabs is required. In this paper we present dynamic numeric modeling results of subduction in the vicinity of thick continental lithosphere, as a craton for example. We tailored our modeling setup for the Chilean margins at ~31° and our models are integrated back in time 30 Myr. Modeling results show that a craton thickness of 200 km or more when approaching the trench is capable of blocking the asthenospheric flow in the mantle wedge and increasing considerably the suction force. We were able to produce a flat slab that fits well the flat slab geometry in Chile (based on seismicity) and stress distribution. We conclude that thick cratons located in the vicinity of subduction zones, are capable to produce very low angle slabs, and probable a combination of buoyant ridge subduction with a neighbor thick craton represent a better mechanism to produce flat slabs.

  3. Shear and Anchorage Behaviour of Fire Exposed Hollow Core Slabs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fellinger, J.H.H.

    2004-01-01

    Hollow core (HC) slabs are made of precast concrete with pretensioned strands. These slabs are popular as floor structures in offices and housing. At ambient conditions, the load bearing capacity can be dominated by four different failure modes, i.e. flexure, anchorage, shear compression and shear t

  4. Ultimate deformation capacity of reinforced concrete slabs underblast load

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doormaal, J.C.A.M. van; Weerheijm, J.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper a test method to determine the deformation capacity and the resistance-deformation curve of blast-loaded slabs is described. This method was developed at TNO-PML. The method has been used to determine the ultimate deformation capacity of some simply supported reinforced concrete slabs

  5. Shear and Anchorage Behaviour of Fire Exposed Hollow Core Slabs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fellinger, J.H.H.

    2004-01-01

    Hollow core (HC) slabs are made of precast concrete with pretensioned strands. These slabs are popular as floor structures in offices and housing. At ambient conditions, the load bearing capacity can be dominated by four different failure modes, i.e. flexure, anchorage, shear compression and shear

  6. Radon Sub-slab Suctioning System Integrated in Insulating Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torben Valdbjørn

    This poster presents a new radon sub-slab suctioning system. This system makes use of a grid of horizontal pressurised air ducts located within the lower part of the rigid insulation layer of the ground floor slab. For this purpose a new system of prefabricated lightweight elements is introduced...

  7. Superluminal pulse reflection from a weakly absorbing dielectric slab

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, L G; Wang, Li-Gang; Zhu, Shi-Yao

    2006-01-01

    Group delay for a reflected light pulse from a weakly absorbing dielectric slab is theoretically investigated, and large negative group delay is found for weak absorption near a resonance of the slab ($Re(kd)=m\\pi$). The group delays for both the reflected and transmitted pulses will be saturated with the increase of the absorption.

  8. Shear capacity of slabs under a combination of loads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lantsoght, E.O.L.; Van der Veen, C.; Walraven, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    Existing solid slab bridges under a combination of wheel loads and distributed traffic loads sometimes do not fulfil the code requirements for shear. However, reinforced concrete slabs loaded close to the support are subjected to shear stresses which might result in a failure mode of combined punchi

  9. Ultimate deformation capacity of reinforced concrete slabs underblast load

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doormaal, J.C.A.M. van; Weerheijm, J.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper a test method to determine the deformation capacity and the resistance-deformation curve of blast-loaded slabs is described. This method was developed at TNO-PML. The method has been used to determine the ultimate deformation capacity of some simply supported reinforced concrete slabs

  10. Shear and Anchorage Behaviour of Fire Exposed Hollow Core Slabs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fellinger, J.H.H.

    2004-01-01

    Hollow core (HC) slabs are made of precast concrete with pretensioned strands. These slabs are popular as floor structures in offices and housing. At ambient conditions, the load bearing capacity can be dominated by four different failure modes, i.e. flexure, anchorage, shear compression and shear t

  11. On Early Age Crack Formation in FRC Slabs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, John Forbes; Stang, Henrik

    1997-01-01

    The problem of early age crack formation in FRC slabs due to restrained temperature and shrinkage deformations, is given an analytical treatment. A model taking into account the ageing properties of the tensile softening curve and the continued development in the temperature and shrinkage...... deformations after crack initiation, is presented. Based on this model a design strategy for FRC slabs is outlined....

  12. Influence of weak layer heterogeneity and slab properties on slab tensile failure propensity and avalanche release area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gaume

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Dry-snow slab avalanches are generally caused by a sequence of fracture processes including failure initiation in a weak snow layer underlying a cohesive slab followed by crack propagation within the weak layer (WL and tensile fracture through the slab. During past decades, theoretical and experimental work has gradually improved our knowledge of the fracture process in snow. However, our limited understanding of crack propagation and fracture arrest propensity prevents the evaluation of avalanche release sizes and thus impedes hazard assessment. To address this issue, slab tensile failure propensity is examined using a mechanically-based statistical model of the slab–WL system based on the finite element method. This model accounts for WL heterogeneity, stress redistribution by elasticity of the slab and the slab possible tensile failure. Two types of avalanche release are distinguished in the simulations: (1 full-slope release if the heterogeneity is not sufficient to stop crack propagation and to trigger a tensile failure within the slab, (2 partial-slope release if fracture arrest and slab tensile failure occurs due to the WL heterogeneity. The probability of these two release types is presented as a function of the characteristics of WL heterogeneity and of the slab. One of the main outcomes is that, for realistic values of the parameters, the tensile failure propensity is mainly influenced by slab properties. Hard and thick snow slabs are more prone to wide-scale crack propagation and thus lead to larger avalanches (full-slope release. In this case, the avalanche size is mainly influenced by topographical and morphological features such as rocks, trees, slope curvature and the spatial variability of the snow depth as it is often claimed in the literature.

  13. Supramolecular Gel-Templated In Situ Synthesis and Assembly of CdS Quantum Dots Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lili; He, Jie; Wang, Xiaoliang; Li, Dawei; He, Haibing; Ren, Lianbing; Jiang, Biwang; Wang, Yong; Teng, Chao; Xue, Gi; Tao, Huchun

    2017-01-01

    Although many studies have attempted to develop strategies for spontaneously organizing nanoparticles (NPs) into three-dimensional (3D) geometries, it remains a fascinating challenge. In this study, a method for in situ synthesis and self-assembly of a CdS quantum dots (QDs) gel using a Cd supramolecular gel as a scaffold was demonstrated. During the QDs formation process, the Cd ions that constituted the Cd gels served as the precursors of the CdS QDs, and the oleic acid (OA) that ligated with the Cd in the supramolecular gels was capped on the surface of the CdS QDs in the form of carboxylate. The OA-stabilized CdS QDs were in situ synthesized in the entangled self-assembled fibrillar networks (SAFIN) of the Cd gels through reactions between the gelator and H2S. As a result, the QDs exactly replicated the framework of the SAFIN in the CdS QD gels instead of simply assembling along the SAFIN of the supramolecular gels. Moreover, the CdS QDs showed extraordinary sensitivity in the fluorescence detection of IO4 - anions. The facile one-step method developed here is a new approach to assembling nanostructured materials into 3D architectures and has general implications for the design of low molecular mass gelators to bring desired functionality to the developed supramolecular gels.

  14. Electromagnetic Tunneling and Resonances in Pseudochiral Omega Slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzaz, Faroq; Alkanhal, Majeed A. S.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents theoretical investigation of the electromagnetic wave tunneling and anomalous transmission around the trapped modes in a pseudochiral omega slab. The dispersion relation, the conditions of the trapped modes, and the evanescent wave coupling and tunneling in two different reciprocal pseudochiral omega slab structures are derived. The Berreman’s matrix method is applied to obtain the transmission coefficients across the pseudochiral omega slab. When the structure is perturbed, a resonance phenomenon is detected around the trapped modes. This resonance results in transmission anomalies (total transmission and total reflection) and dramatic field amplifications around the trapped modes. The number of the discrete trapped modes and then the resonance frequencies are prescribed by the parameters of the pseudochiral omega slab such as the value of the omega parameter and its orientation and the slab thickness. PMID:28165058

  15. Numerical Study of FRP Reinforced Concrete Slabs at Elevated Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Adelzadeh

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available One-way glass fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP reinforced concrete slabs at elevated temperatures are investigated through numerical modeling. Serviceability and strength requirements of ACI-440.1R are considered for the design of the slabs. Diagrams to determine fire endurance of slabs by employing “strength domain” failure criterion are presented. Comparisons between the existing “temperature domain” method with the more representative “strength domain” method show that the “temperature domain” method is conservative. Additionally, a method to increase the fire endurance of slabs by placing FRP reinforcement in two layers is investigated numerically. The amount of fire endurance gained by placing FRP in two layers increases as the thickness of slab increases.

  16. Punching strength of reinforced concrete flat slabs without shear reinforcement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. P. Sacramento

    Full Text Available Punching strength is a critical point in the design of flat slabs and due to the lack of a theoretical method capable of explaining this phenomenon, empirical formulations presented by codes of practice are still the most used method to check the bearing capacity of slab-column connections. This paper discusses relevant aspects of the development of flat slabs, the factors that influence the punching resistance of slabs without shear reinforcement and makes comparisons between the experimental results organized in a database with 74 slabs carefully selected with theoretical results using the recommendations of ACI 318, EUROCODE 2 and NBR 6118 and also through the Critical Shear Crack Theory, presented by Muttoni (2008 and incorporated the new fib Model Code (2010.

  17. Electromagnetic Tunneling and Resonances in Pseudochiral Omega Slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzaz, Faroq; Alkanhal, Majeed A S

    2017-02-06

    This paper presents theoretical investigation of the electromagnetic wave tunneling and anomalous transmission around the trapped modes in a pseudochiral omega slab. The dispersion relation, the conditions of the trapped modes, and the evanescent wave coupling and tunneling in two different reciprocal pseudochiral omega slab structures are derived. The Berreman's matrix method is applied to obtain the transmission coefficients across the pseudochiral omega slab. When the structure is perturbed, a resonance phenomenon is detected around the trapped modes. This resonance results in transmission anomalies (total transmission and total reflection) and dramatic field amplifications around the trapped modes. The number of the discrete trapped modes and then the resonance frequencies are prescribed by the parameters of the pseudochiral omega slab such as the value of the omega parameter and its orientation and the slab thickness.

  18. Drug release from slabs and the effects of surface roughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalosakas, George; Martini, Dimitra

    2015-12-30

    We discuss diffusion-controlled drug release from slabs or thin films. Analytical and numerical results are presented for slabs with flat surfaces, having a uniform thickness. Then, considering slabs with rough surfaces, the influence of a non-uniform slab thickness on release kinetics is numerically investigated. The numerical release profiles are obtained using Monte Carlo simulations. Release kinetics is quantified through the stretched exponential (or Weibull) function and the resulting dependence of the two parameters of this function on the thickness of the slab, for flat surfaces, and the amplitude of surface fluctuations (or the degree of thickness variability) in case of roughness. We find that a higher surface roughness leads to a faster drug release. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Characterizing wet slab and glide slab avalanche occurrence along the Going-to-the-Sun Road, Glacier National Park, Montana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peitzsch, Erich H.; Hendrikx, Jordy; Fagre, Daniel B.; Reardon, Blase

    2010-01-01

    Wet slab and glide slab snow avalanches are dangerous and yet can be particularly difficult to predict. Both wet slab and glide slab avalanches are thought to depend upon free water moving through the snowpack but are driven by different processes. In Glacier National Park, Montana, both types of avalanches can occur in the same year and affect the Going-to-the-Sun Road (GTSR). Both wet slab and glide slab avalanches along the GTSR from 2003-2010 are investigated. Meteorological data from two high-elevation weather stations and one SNOTEL site are used in conjunction with an avalanche database and snowpit profiles. These data were used to characterize years when only glide slab avalanches occurred and those years when both glide slab and wet slab avalanches occurred. Results of 168 glide slab and 57 wet slab avalanches along the GTSR suggest both types of avalanche occurrence depend on sustained warming periods with intense solar radiation (or rain on snow) to produce free water in the snowpack. Differences in temperature and net radiation metrics between wet slab and glide slab avalanches emerge as one moves from one day to seven days prior to avalanche occurrence. On average, a more rapid warming precedes wet slab avalanche occurrence. Glide slab and wet slab avalanches require a similar amount of net radiation. Wet slab avalanches do not occur every year, while glide slab avalanches occur annually. These results aim to enhance understanding of the required meteorological conditions for wet slab and glide slab avalanches and aid in improved wet snow avalanche forecasting.

  20. The Replication Recipe: What makes for a convincing replication?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandt, M.J.; IJzerman, H.; Dijksterhuis, A.J.; Farach, F.J.; Geller, J.; Giner-Sorolla, R.; Grange, J.A.; Perugini, M.; Spies, J.R.; Veer, A. van 't

    2014-01-01

    Psychological scientists have recently started to reconsider the importance of close replications in building a cumulative knowledge base; however, there is no consensus about what constitutes a convincing close replication study. To facilitate convincing close replication attempts we have developed

  1. Software sensor for slab reheating furnace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhihua Xiong; Guohong Huang; Huihe Shao

    2005-01-01

    It has long been thought that a reheating furnace, with its inherent measurement difficulties and complex dynamics, posed almost insurmountable problems to engineers in steel plants. A novel software sensor is proposed to make more effective use of those measurements that are already available, which has great importance both to slab quality and energy saving. The proposed method is based on the mixtures of Gaussian processes (GP) with the expectation maximization (EM) algorithm employed for parameter estimation of the mixture of models. The mixture model can alleviate the computational complexity of GP and also accords with the changes of operating condition in practical processes. It is demonstrated by on-line estimation of the furnace gas temperature in 1580 reheating furnace in Baosteel Corporation (Group).

  2. Laser applications in machining slab materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoping

    1990-10-01

    Since the invention of the laser back in 1960, laser technology has been extensively applied in many fields of science and technology. These has been a history of nearly two decades of using lasers as an energy source in machining materials, such as cutting, welding, ruling and boring, among other operations. With the development of flexible automation in production, the advantages of laser machining have has grown more and more obvious. The combination of laser technology and computer science further promotes the enhancement and upgrading of laser machining and related equipment. At present, many countries are building high quality laser equipment for machining slab materials, such as the Coherent and Spectra Physics corporations in the United States, the Trumpf Corporation in West Germany, the Amada Corporation in Japan, and the Bystronic Corporation in Switzerland, among other companies.

  3. Half-disordered photonic crystal slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beque, V; Keilman, J; Citrin, D S

    2016-08-10

    Optical transmission spectra of finite-thickness slabs of two-dimensional triangular-lattice photonic crystals of air holes in a dielectric matrix with various concentrations of randomly located vacancies (absent air holes) are studied. We focus on structures in which only one half of the structure-the incidence or transmission side-is disordered. We find vacancy-induced scattering gives rise to a strong difference in the two cases; for light incident on the disordered side, high transmission within the photonic pseudogap at normal incidence is predicted, in strong contrast to the opposite case, where low transmission is predicted throughout the pseudogap, as is observed in the case of an ideal structure with no defects.

  4. Testosterone Nasal Gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testosterone nasal gel is used to treat symptoms of low testosterone in men who have hypogonadism (a condition in which the ... does not produce enough natural testosterone). Testosterone nasal gel is used only for men with low testosterone ...

  5. Modeling DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Recommends the use of a model of DNA made out of Velcro to help students visualize the steps of DNA replication. Includes a materials list, construction directions, and details of the demonstration using the model parts. (DDR)

  6. Eukaryotic DNA Replication Fork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgers, Peter M J; Kunkel, Thomas A

    2017-06-20

    This review focuses on the biogenesis and composition of the eukaryotic DNA replication fork, with an emphasis on the enzymes that synthesize DNA and repair discontinuities on the lagging strand of the replication fork. Physical and genetic methodologies aimed at understanding these processes are discussed. The preponderance of evidence supports a model in which DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε) carries out the bulk of leading strand DNA synthesis at an undisturbed replication fork. DNA polymerases α and δ carry out the initiation of Okazaki fragment synthesis and its elongation and maturation, respectively. This review also discusses alternative proposals, including cellular processes during which alternative forks may be utilized, and new biochemical studies with purified proteins that are aimed at reconstituting leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis separately and as an integrated replication fork.

  7. Abiotic self-replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Adam J; Ellefson, Jared W; Ellington, Andrew D

    2012-12-18

    The key to the origins of life is the replication of information. Linear polymers such as nucleic acids that both carry information and can be replicated are currently what we consider to be the basis of living systems. However, these two properties are not necessarily coupled. The ability to mutate in a discrete or quantized way, without frequent reversion, may be an additional requirement for Darwinian evolution, in which case the notion that Darwinian evolution defines life may be less of a tautology than previously thought. In this Account, we examine a variety of in vitro systems of increasing complexity, from simple chemical replicators up to complex systems based on in vitro transcription and translation. Comparing and contrasting these systems provides an interesting window onto the molecular origins of life. For nucleic acids, the story likely begins with simple chemical replication, perhaps of the form A + B → T, in which T serves as a template for the joining of A and B. Molecular variants capable of faster replication would come to dominate a population, and the development of cycles in which templates could foster one another's replication would have led to increasingly complex replicators and from thence to the initial genomes. The initial genomes may have been propagated by RNA replicases, ribozymes capable of joining oligonucleotides and eventually polymerizing mononucleotide substrates. As ribozymes were added to the genome to fill gaps in the chemistry necessary for replication, the backbone of a putative RNA world would have emerged. It is likely that such replicators would have been plagued by molecular parasites, which would have been passively replicated by the RNA world machinery without contributing to it. These molecular parasites would have been a major driver for the development of compartmentalization/cellularization, as more robust compartments could have outcompeted parasite-ridden compartments. The eventual outsourcing of metabolic

  8. Adenovirus DNA Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Hoeben, Rob C.; Uil, Taco G.

    2013-01-01

    Adenoviruses have attracted much attention as probes to study biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, splicing, and cellular transformation. More recently these viruses have been used as gene-transfer vectors and oncolytic agents. On the other hand, adenoviruses are notorious pathogens in people with compromised immune functions. This article will briefly summarize the basic replication strategy of adenoviruses and the key proteins involved and will deal with the new deve...

  9. Behavior of FRP Link Slabs in Jointless Bridge Decks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Saber

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigated the use of fiberglass-reinforced plastic (FRP grid for reinforcement in link slabs for jointless bridge decks. The design concept of link slab was examined based on the ductility of the fiberglass-reinforced plastic grid to accommodate bridge deck deformations. The implementation of hybrid simulation assisted in combining the experimental results and the theoretical work. The numerical analyses and the experimental work investigated the behavior of the link slab and confirmed its feasibility. The results indicated that the technique would allow simultaneous achievement of structural need, lower flexural stiffness of the link slab approaching the behavior of a hinge, and sustainability need of the link slab. The outcome of the study supports the contention that jointless concrete bridge decks may be designed and constructed with fiberglass-reinforced plastic grid link slabs. This concept would also provide a solution to a number of deterioration problems associated with bridge deck joints and can be used during new construction of bridge decks. The federal highway administration provided funds to Louisiana Department of Transportation through the innovative bridge research and development program to implement the use of FRP grid as link slab.

  10. Power dissipation and temperature distribution in piezoelectric ceramic slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, D; Ebenezer, D D; Srinivasan, Sivakumar M

    2010-10-01

    A method is presented to determine power dissipation in one-dimensional piezoelectric slabs with internal losses and the resulting temperature distribution. The length of the slab is much greater than the lateral dimensions. Losses are represented using complex piezoelectric coefficients. It is shown that the spatially non-uniform power dissipation density in the slab can be determined by considering either hysteresis loops or the Poynting vector. The total power dissipated in the slab is obtained by integrating the power dissipation density over the slab and is shown to be equal to the power input to the slab for special cases of mechanically and electrically excited slabs. The one-dimensional heat equation that includes the effect of conduction and convection, and the boundary conditions, are then used to determine the temperature distribution. When the analytical expression for the power dissipation density is simple, direct integration is used. It is shown that a modified Fourier series approach yields the same results. For other cases, the temperature distribution is determined using only the latter approach. Numerical results are presented to illustrate the effects of internal losses, heat conduction and convection coefficients, and boundary conditions on the temperature distribution.

  11. Impact Resistance Behaviour of Banana Fiber Reinforced Slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che Muda, Zakaria; Syamsir, Agusril; Nasharuddin Mustapha, Kamal; Rifdy Samsudin, Muhamad; Thiruchelvam, Sivadass; Usman, Fathoni; Beddu, Salmia; Liyana Mohd Kamal, Nur; Ashraful Alam, Md; Birima, Ahmed H.; Zaroog, O. S.

    2016-03-01

    This paper investigate the performance of banana fibre reinforced slabs 300mm × 300mm size with varied thickness subjected to low impact projectile test. A self-fabricated drop-weight impact test rig with a steel ball weight of 1.25 kg drop at 1 m height has been used in this research work. The main variables for the study is to find the relationship of the impact resistance against the BF contents and slab thickness. A linear relationship has been established between first and ultimate crack resistance against BF contents and slab thickness by the experiment. The linear relationship has also been established between the service (first) crack and ultimate crack resistance against the BF contents for a constant spacing for various banana fibre reinforced slab thickness. The increment in BF content has more effect on the first crack resistance than the ultimate crack resistance. The linear relationship has also been established between the service (first) crack and ultimate crack resistance against the various slab thickness. Overall 1.5% BF content with slab thickness of 40 mm exhibit better first and ultimate crack resistance up to 16 times and up to 17 times respectively against control slab (without BF)

  12. Exact exchange plane-wave-pseudopotential calculations for slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Eberhard

    2014-05-14

    The exact exchange of density functional theory is applied to both free-standing graphene and a Si(111) slab, using the plane-wave pseudopotential (PWPP) approach and a periodic repetition of the supercell containing the slab. It is shown that (i) PWPP calculations with exact exchange for slabs in supercell geometry are basically feasible, (ii) the width of the vacuum required for a decoupling of the slabs is only moderately larger than in the case of the local-density approximation, and (iii) the resulting exchange potential vx shows an extended region, both far outside the surface of the slab and far from the middle of the vacuum region between the slabs, in which vx behaves as -e(2)/z, provided the width of the vacuum is chosen sufficiently large. This last result is corroborated by an analytical analysis of periodically repeated jellium slabs. The intermediate -e(2)/z behavior of vx can be used for an absolute normalization of vx and the total Kohn-Sham potential, which, in turn, allows the determination of the work function.

  13. A modularized pulse forming line using glass-ceramic slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Songsong; Shu, Ting; Yang, Hanwu

    2012-08-01

    In our lab, a kind of glass-ceramic slab has been chosen to study the issues of applying solid-state dielectrics to pulse forming lines (PFLs). Limited by the manufacture of the glass-ceramic bulk with large sizes, a single ceramic slab is hard to store sufficient power for the PFL. Therefore, a modularized PFL design concept is proposed in this paper. We regard a single ceramic slab as a module to form each single Blumlein PFL. We connect ceramic slabs in series to enlarge pulse width, and stack the ceramic Blumlein PFLs in parallel to increase the output voltage amplitude. Testing results of a single Blumlein PFL indicate that one ceramic slab contributes about 11 ns to the total pulse width which has a linear relation to the number of the ceramic slabs. We have developed a prototype facility of the 2-stage stacked Blumlein PFL with a length of 2 ceramic slabs. The PFL is dc charged up to 5 kV, and the output voltage pulse of 10 kV, 22 ns is measured across an 8 Ω load. Simulation and experiment results in good agreement demonstrate that the modularized design is reasonable.

  14. Comparison between Ribbed Slab Structure using Lightweight Foam Concrete and Solid Slab Structure using Normal Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Zailan Sulieman

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available

    The aim of this study is to demonstrate that one-way ribbed slab with lightweight foam concrete can be used to reduce the dead load on slab concrete structure. This would allow the structural designer to reduce the size of column, footing and other load

  15. Minichromosome replication in vitro: inhibition of re-replication by replicatively assembled nucleosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krude, T; Knippers, R

    1994-08-19

    Single-stranded circular DNA, containing the SV40 origin sequence, was used as a template for complementary DNA strand synthesis in cytosolic extracts from HeLa cells. In the presence of the replication-dependent chromatin assembly factor CAF-1, defined numbers of nucleosomes were assembled during complementary DNA strand synthesis. These minichromosomes were then induced to semiconservatively replicate by the addition of the SV40 initiator protein T antigen (re-replication). The results indicate that re-replication of minichromosomes appears to be inhibited by two independent mechanisms. One acts at the initiation of minichromosome re-replication, and the other affects replicative chain elongation. To directly demonstrate the inhibitory effect of replicatively assembled nucleosomes, two types of minichromosomes were prepared: (i) post-replicative minichromosomes were assembled in a reaction coupled to replication as above; (ii) pre-replicative minichromosomes were assembled independently of replication on double-stranded DNA. Both types of minichromosomes were used as templates for DNA replication under identical conditions. Replicative fork movement was found to be impeded only on post-replicative minichromosome templates. In contrast, pre-replicative minichromosomes allowed one unconstrained replication cycle, but re-replication was inhibited due to a block in fork movement. Thus, replicatively assembled chromatin may have a profound influence on the re-replication of DNA.

  16. Effect of 16% Carbamide Peroxide Bleaching Gel on Enamel and Dentin Surface Micromorphology and Roughness of Uremic Patients: An Atomic Force Microscopic Study

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the effect of 16% carbamide peroxide bleaching gel on surface micromorphology and roughness of enamel and root dentin of uremic patients receiving hemodialysis using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Methods: A total of 20 sound molars were collected from healthy individuals (n=10) and uremic patients (n=10). The roots were separated from their crowns at the cemento-enamel junction. Dental slabs (3 mm x 2 mm x 2 mm) were obtained from the buccal surface for enamel slab...

  17. Broadband high reflectivity in subwavelength-grating slab waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Cui, Xuan; Zhou, Zhongxiang

    2015-01-01

    We computationally study a subwavelength dielectric grating structure, show that slab waveguide modes can be used to obtain broadband high reflectivity, and analyze how slab waveguide modes influence reflection. A structure showing interference between Fabry-Perot modes, slab waveguide modes, and waveguide array modes is designed with ultra-broadband high reflectivity. Owing to the coupling of guided modes, the region with reflectivity R > 0.99 has an ultra-high bandwidth ( {\\Delta}f/f > 30%). The incident-angle region with R > 0.99 extends over a range greater than 40{\\deg}. Moreover, an asymmetric waveguide structure is studied using a semiconductor substrate.

  18. Fringe integral equation method for a truncated grounded dielectric slab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Erik; Maci, S.; Toccafondi, A.

    2001-01-01

    The problem of scattering by a semi-infinite grounded dielectric slab illuminated by an arbitrary incident TMz polarized electric field is studied by solving a new set of “fringe” integral equations (F-IEs), whose functional unknowns are physically associated to the wave diffraction processes...... occurring at the truncation. The F-IEs are obtained by subtracting from the surface/surface integral equations pertinent to the truncated slab, an auxiliary set of equations obtained for the canonical problem of an infinite grounded slab illuminated by the same source. The F-IEs are solved by the method...

  19. Performance and damages of R.C. slabs in fire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giuliani, Luisa; Gentili, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    slabs with complex geometry exposed to fire and assessing the entity of the damage on the basis of the decrement of the load bearing capacity at the end of the fire. By considering this quantity for different time of exposure to a standard fire, a curve is obtained that provides important information...... on the vulnerability of the slab to the fire action and can be used for optimizing the design on the basis of the required class of resistance or for choosing between different slab alternatives....

  20. Interaction of an ion bunch with a plasma slab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasovitskiy, V. B., E-mail: krasovit@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics (Russian Federation); Turikov, V. A. [Peoples’ Friendship University of Russia (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    Charge neutralization of a short ion bunch passing through a plasma slab is studied by means of numerical simulation. It is shown that a fraction of plasma electrons are trapped by the bunch under the action of the collective charge separation field. The accelerated electrons generated in this process excite beam−plasma instability, thereby violating the trapping conditions. The process of electron trapping is also strongly affected by the high-frequency electric field caused by plasma oscillations at the slab boundaries. It is examined how the degree of charge neutralization depends on the parameters of the bunch and plasma slab.

  1. Light-assisted templated self assembly using photonic crystal slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, Camilo A; Dutt, Avik; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2011-06-06

    We explore a technique which we term light-assisted templated self-assembly. We calculate the optical forces on colloidal particles over a photonic crystal slab. We show that exciting a guided resonance mode of the slab yields a resonantly-enhanced, attractive optical force. We calculate the lateral optical forces above the slab and predict that stably trapped periodic patterns of particles are dependent on wavelength and polarization. Tuning the wavelength or polarization of the light source may thus allow the formation and reconfiguration of patterns. We expect that this technique may be used to design all-optically reconfigurable photonic devices.

  2. Investigating variation in replicability: A "Many Labs" replication project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, R.A.; Ratliff, K.A.; Vianello, M.; Adams, R.B.; Bahnik, S.; Bernstein, M.J.; Bocian, K.; Brandt, M.J.; Brooks, B.; Brumbaugh, C.C.; Cemalcilar, Z.; Chandler, J.; Cheong, W.; Davis, W.E.; Devos, T.; Eisner, M.; Frankowska, N.; Furrow, D.; Galliani, E.M.; Hasselman, F.W.; Hicks, J.A.; Hovermale, J.F.; Hunt, S.J.; Huntsinger, J.R.; IJzerman, H.; John, M.S.; Joy-Gaba, J.A.; Kappes, H.B.; Krueger, L.E.; Kurtz, J.; Levitan, C.A.; Mallett, R.K.; Morris, W.L.; Nelson, A.J.; Nier, J.A.; Packard, G.; Pilati, R.; Rutchick, A.M.; Schmidt, K.; Skorinko, J.L.M.; Smith, R.; Steiner, T.G.; Storbeck, J.; Van Swol, L.M.; Thompson, D.; Veer, A.E. van 't; Vaughn, L.A.; Vranka, M.; Wichman, A.L.; Woodzicka, J.A.; Nosek, B.A.

    2014-01-01

    Although replication is a central tenet of science, direct replications are rare in psychology. This research tested variation in the replicability of 13 classic and contemporary effects across 36 independent samples totaling 6,344 participants. In the aggregate, 10 effects replicated consistently.

  3. Hepatitis B virus replication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Hepadnaviruses, including human hepatitis B virus (HBV), replicate through reverse transcription of an RNA intermediate, the pregenomic RNA (pgRNA). Despite this kinship to retroviruses, there are fundamental differences beyond the fact that hepadnavirions contain DNA instead of RNA. Most peculiar is the initiation of reverse transcription: it occurs by protein-priming, is strictly committed to using an RNA hairpin on the pgRNA,ε, as template, and depends on cellular chaperones;moreover, proper replication can apparently occur only in the specialized environment of intact nucleocapsids.This complexity has hampered an in-depth mechanistic understanding. The recent successful reconstitution in the test tube of active replication initiation complexes from purified components, for duck HBV (DHBV),now allows for the analysis of the biochemistry of hepadnaviral replication at the molecular level. Here we review the current state of knowledge at all steps of the hepadnaviral genome replication cycle, with emphasis on new insights that turned up by the use of such cellfree systems. At this time, they can, unfortunately,not be complemented by three-dimensional structural information on the involved components. However, at least for the s RNA element such information is emerging,raising expectations that combining biophysics with biochemistry and genetics will soon provide a powerful integrated approach for solving the many outstanding questions. The ultimate, though most challenging goal,will be to visualize the hepadnaviral reverse transcriptase in the act of synthesizing DNA, which will also have strong implications for drug development.

  4. Transport Phenomena in Gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Tokita

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Gel becomes an important class of soft materials since it can be seen in a wide variety of the chemical and the biological systems. The unique properties of gel arise from the structure, namely, the three-dimensional polymer network that is swollen by a huge amount of solvent. Despite the small volume fraction of the polymer network, which is usually only a few percent or less, gel shows the typical properties that belong to solids such as the elasticity. Gel is, therefore, regarded as a dilute solid because its elasticity is much smaller than that of typical solids. Because of the diluted structure, small molecules can pass along the open space of the polymer network. In addition to the viscous resistance of gel fluid, however, the substance experiences resistance due to the polymer network of gel during the transport process. It is, therefore, of importance to study the diffusion of the small molecules in gel as well as the flow of gel fluid itself through the polymer network of gel. It may be natural to assume that the effects of the resistance due to the polymer network of gel depends strongly on the network structure. Therefore, detailed study on the transport processes in and through gel may open a new insight into the relationship between the structure and the transport properties of gel. The two typical transport processes in and through gel, that is, the diffusion of small molecules due to the thermal fluctuations and the flow of gel fluid that is caused by the mechanical pressure gradient will be reviewed.

  5. Comparative Skeletal Muscle Proteomics Using Two-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Sandra; Dowling, Paul; Ohlendieck, Kay

    2016-09-09

    The pioneering work by Patrick H. O'Farrell established two-dimensional gel electrophoresis as one of the most important high-resolution protein separation techniques of modern biochemistry (Journal of Biological Chemistry1975, 250, 4007-4021). The application of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis has played a key role in the systematic identification and detailed characterization of the protein constituents of skeletal muscles. Protein changes during myogenesis, muscle maturation, fibre type specification, physiological muscle adaptations and natural muscle aging were studied in depth by the original O'Farrell method or slightly modified gel electrophoretic techniques. Over the last 40 years, the combined usage of isoelectric focusing in the first dimension and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide slab gel electrophoresis in the second dimension has been successfully employed in several hundred published studies on gel-based skeletal muscle biochemistry. This review focuses on normal and physiologically challenged skeletal muscle tissues and outlines key findings from mass spectrometry-based muscle proteomics, which was instrumental in the identification of several thousand individual protein isoforms following gel electrophoretic separation. These muscle-associated protein species belong to the diverse group of regulatory and contractile proteins of the acto-myosin apparatus that forms the sarcomere, cytoskeletal proteins, metabolic enzymes and transporters, signaling proteins, ion-handling proteins, molecular chaperones and extracellular matrix proteins.

  6. Comparative Skeletal Muscle Proteomics Using Two-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Murphy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The pioneering work by Patrick H. O’Farrell established two-dimensional gel electrophoresis as one of the most important high-resolution protein separation techniques of modern biochemistry (Journal of Biological Chemistry 1975, 250, 4007–4021. The application of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis has played a key role in the systematic identification and detailed characterization of the protein constituents of skeletal muscles. Protein changes during myogenesis, muscle maturation, fibre type specification, physiological muscle adaptations and natural muscle aging were studied in depth by the original O’Farrell method or slightly modified gel electrophoretic techniques. Over the last 40 years, the combined usage of isoelectric focusing in the first dimension and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide slab gel electrophoresis in the second dimension has been successfully employed in several hundred published studies on gel-based skeletal muscle biochemistry. This review focuses on normal and physiologically challenged skeletal muscle tissues and outlines key findings from mass spectrometry-based muscle proteomics, which was instrumental in the identification of several thousand individual protein isoforms following gel electrophoretic separation. These muscle-associated protein species belong to the diverse group of regulatory and contractile proteins of the acto-myosin apparatus that forms the sarcomere, cytoskeletal proteins, metabolic enzymes and transporters, signaling proteins, ion-handling proteins, molecular chaperones and extracellular matrix proteins.

  7. Psychology, replication & beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, Keith R

    2016-06-01

    Modern psychology is apparently in crisis and the prevailing view is that this partly reflects an inability to replicate past findings. If a crisis does exists, then it is some kind of 'chronic' crisis, as psychologists have been censuring themselves over replicability for decades. While the debate in psychology is not new, the lack of progress across the decades is disappointing. Recently though, we have seen a veritable surfeit of debate alongside multiple orchestrated and well-publicised replication initiatives. The spotlight is being shone on certain areas and although not everyone agrees on how we should interpret the outcomes, the debate is happening and impassioned. The issue of reproducibility occupies a central place in our whig history of psychology.

  8. Numerical Calculation of Concrete Slab Response to Blast Loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Xiaoqing; HAO Hong; KUZNETSOV Valerian A; WASCHL John

    2006-01-01

    In the present paper,a dynamic plastic damage model for concrete has been employed to estimate responses of a reinforced concrete slab subjected to blast loading.The interaction between the blast wave and the concrete slab is considered in 3D simulation.In the first stage,the initial detonation and blast wave propagation is modelled in 2D simulation before the blast wave reaches the concrete slab,then the results obtained from 2D calculation are remapped to a 3D model.The calculated blast load is compared with that obtained from TM5-1300.Numerical results of the concrete slab response are compared with the explosive test carried out in the Weapons System Division,Defence Science and Technology Organisation,Department of Defence,Australia.

  9. Active split-ring metamaterial slabs for magnetic resonance imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez, Marcos A; Freire, Manuel J; Behr, Volker C; Jakob, Peter M; Marques, Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    In this work, it is analyzed the ability of split-ring metamaterial slabs with zero/high permeability to reject/confine the radiofrequency magnetic field in magnetic resonance imaging systems. Using an homogenization procedure, split-ring slabs have been designed and fabricated to work in a 1.5T system. Active elements consisting of pairs of crossed diodes are inserted in the split-rings. With these elements, the permeability of the slabs can be automatically switched between a unity value when interacting with the strong excitation field of the transmitting body coil, and zero or high values when interacting with the weak field produced by protons in tissue. Experiments are shown for different configurations where these slabs can help to locally increase the signal-to-noise-ratio.

  10. Formation mechanism of internal cracks in continuously cast slab

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guosen Zhu; Xinhua Wang; Huixiang Yu; Jiongming Zhang; Wanjun Wang

    2004-01-01

    In order to make clear the formation mechanism of centerline cracks in continuously cast slabs, the form, distribution and other characteristics of the cracks were analyzed. The final solidification point, surface temperature of the slabs and strain in solidifying shell were investigated. The results were that: (1) Five relatively low temperature zones exist on slab surface below the three water spraying nozzles and near the two edges, respectively, which corresponds to the places of centerline cracks and triangle-zone cracks. (2) Centerline cracks and triangle-zone cracks occur because of weak secondary cooling, uneven cooling along slab width,and large variation of roll gap. (3) After minimizing the variation of roll gap and applying the new secondary cooling pattern, the occurring frequency of centerline and triangle-zone cracks minimizes to zero.

  11. Waveform effects of a metastable olivine tongue in subducting slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidale, John E.; Williams, Quentin; Houston, Heidi

    1991-01-01

    Velocity models of subducting slabs with a kinetically-depressed olivine to beta- and gamma-spinel transition are constructed, and the effect that such structures would have on teleseismic P waveforms are examined using a full-wave finite-difference method. These 2D calculations yielded waveforms at a range of distances in the downdip direction. The slab models included a wedge-shaped, low-velocity metastable olivine tongue (MOTO) to a depth of 670 km, as well as a plausible thermal anomaly; one model further included a 10-km-thick fast layer on the surface of the slab. The principal effect of MOTO is to produce grazing reflections at wide angles off the phase boundary, generating a secondary arrival 0 to 4 seconds after the initial arrival depending on the take-off angle. The amplitude and timing of this feature vary with the lateral location of the seismic source within the slab cross-section.

  12. Casimir effect for two lossy dispersive dielectric slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matloob, R.; Keshavarz, A.; Sedighi, D.

    1999-11-01

    The electromagnetic field is quantized using the Green's-function method for the geometry of a Fabry-Perot cavity, made up of two identical lossy dispersive slabs of finite thickness. The dielectric functions of the slabs are assumed to be an arbitrary complex function of frequency obeying causality requirements. The attractive Casimir force between the two slabs is calculated by the help of the latter field operators, via evaluating the difference between the vacuum pressures on both sides of each slab. Special attention is paid to the limiting case of the Casimir effect for two conducting plates. The Lorentz model of the dielectric function is used to demonstrate the variation of the force in terms of plasma frequency. The Casimir force expression is also related to the imaginary part of the response function. The latter expression is used to introduce the repulsive Casimir force between two conducting plates located inside a Fabry-Perot cavity.

  13. Innovation on RC Waffle and Ribbed Slab Analysis Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Hájek

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Waffle and ribbed reinforced concrete slabs are widely used in building constructions in view of the flexibility design and structural efficiency. The wide range of reinforced concrete and composite waffle and ribbed slabs has been theoretically analysed and tested from the point of view of structural behaviour within the research performed in the last years. The results of the experimental investigation, supported by theoretical conclusions, have confirmed significantly better structural properties of the composite waffle slabs (composed from RC and ceramic fillers than the assumptions usually considered in common analysis models. New analysis equivalent models for structural analysis RC and composite waffle and ribbed structures have been developed and compared with the test results. In the paper are presented some generalized conclusions as a basis for the formulation of principles of an optimized design of RC waffle and ribbed slab structures.

  14. Radiative Transfer Model for Translucent Slab Ice on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrieu, F.; Schmidt, F.; Douté, S.; Schmitt, B.; Brissaud, O.

    2016-09-01

    We developed a radiative transfer model that simulates in VIS/NIR the bidirectional reflectance of a contaminated slab layer of ice overlaying a granular medium, under geometrical optics conditions to study martian ices.

  15. Evaluation of precast concrete slabs using a heavy vehicle simulator

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kohler, E

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available -controlled conditions and that fully cured precast slabs can potentially be open to traffic almost immediately upon installation, making them attractive for use on heavily travelled highways. This paper describes an accelerated pavement testing experiment conducted...

  16. Fire resistance of extruded hollow-core slabs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Kristian Dahl; Sørensen, Lars Schiøtt; Giuliani, Luisa

    2017-01-01

    Purpose – Prefabricated extruded hollow-core slabs are preferred building components for floor structures in several countries. It is therefore important to be able to document the fire resistance of these slabs proving fulfilment of standard fire resistance requirements of 60 and 120 min found...... in most national building regulations. The paper aims to present a detailed analysis of the mechanisms responsible for the loss of loadbearing capacity of hollow-core slabs when exposed to fire. Design/methodology/approach – Furthermore, it compares theoretica calculation and assessment according...... to the structural codes with data derived from a standard fire test and from a thorough examination of the comprehensive test documentation available on fire exposed hollow-core slabs. Findings – Mechanisms for loss of load-bearing capacity are clarified, and evidence of the fire resistance is found. Originality...

  17. Hot dense magnetized ultrarelativistic spinor matter in a slab

    CERN Document Server

    Sitenko, Yu A

    2016-01-01

    Properties of hot dense ultrarelativistic spinor matter in a slab of finite width, placed in a transverse uniform magnetic field, are studied. The admissible set of boundary conditions is determined by the requirement that spinor matter be confined inside the slab. In thermal equilibrium, the chiral separation effect in the slab is shown to depend both on temperature and chemical potential; this is distinct from the unrealistic case of the magnetic field filling the unbounded (infinite) medium, when the effect is temperature-independent. In the realistic case of the slab, a stepwise behaviour of the axial current density at zero temperature is smoothed out as temperature increases, turning into a linear behaviour at infinitely large temperature. A choice of boundary conditions can facilitate either augmentation or attenuation of the chiral separation effect; in particular, the effect can persist even at zero chemical potential, if temperature is nonzero. Thus the boundary condition can serve as a source that ...

  18. Waveform effects of a metastable olivine tongue in subducting slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidale, John E.; Williams, Quentin; Houston, Heidi

    1991-01-01

    Velocity models of subducting slabs with a kinetically-depressed olivine to beta- and gamma-spinel transition are constructed, and the effect that such structures would have on teleseismic P waveforms are examined using a full-wave finite-difference method. These 2D calculations yielded waveforms at a range of distances in the downdip direction. The slab models included a wedge-shaped, low-velocity metastable olivine tongue (MOTO) to a depth of 670 km, as well as a plausible thermal anomaly; one model further included a 10-km-thick fast layer on the surface of the slab. The principal effect of MOTO is to produce grazing reflections at wide angles off the phase boundary, generating a secondary arrival 0 to 4 seconds after the initial arrival depending on the take-off angle. The amplitude and timing of this feature vary with the lateral location of the seismic source within the slab cross-section.

  19. Fire resistance of extruded hollow-core slabs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Kristian Dahl; Giuliani, Luisa; Sørensen, Lars Schiøtt

    2016-01-01

    Prefabricated extruded hollow-core slabs are preferred building components for floor structures in several countries. It is therefore important to be able to document the fire resistance of these slabs proving fulfilment of standard fire resistance requirements of 60- and 120 minutes found in most...... national building regulations. The paper presents a detailed analysis of the mechanisms responsible for the loss of load-bearing capacity of hollow-core slabs when exposed to fire. Furthermore, it compares theoretical calculation and assessment according to the structural codes with data derived from...... a standard fire test and from a thorough examination of the comprehensive test documentation available on fire exposed hollow-core slabs. Mechanisms for loss of load-bearing capacity are clarified, and evidence of the fire resistance is found. For the first time the mechanisms responsible for loss of load...

  20. Benchmark study for total enery electrons in thick slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, I.

    2002-01-01

    The total energy deposition profiles when highenergy electrons impinge on a thick slab of elemental aluminum, copper, and tungsten have been computed using representative Monte Carlo codes (NOVICE, TIGER, MCNP), and compared in this paper.

  1. Sol-Gel Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    Multicomponent homogeneous, ultrapure noncrystalline gels/gel derived glasses are promising batch materials for the containerless glass melting experiments in microgravity. Hence, ultrapure, homogeneous gel precursors could be used to: (1) investigate the effect of the container induced nucleation on the glass forming ability of marginally glass forming compositions; and (2) investigate the influence of gravity on the phase separation and coarsening behavior of gel derived glasses in the liquid-liquid immiscibility zone of the nonsilicate systems having a high density phase. The structure and crystallization behavior of gels in the SiO2-GeO2 as a function of gel chemistry and thermal treatment were investigated. As are the chemical principles involved in the distribution of a second network former in silica gel matrix being investigated. The procedures for synthesizing noncrystalline gels/gel-monoliths in the SiO2-GeO2, GeO2-PbO systems were developed. Preliminary investigations on the levitation and thermal treatment of germania silicate gel-monoliths in the Pressure Facility Acoustic Levitator were done.

  2. In vitro replication of cyanobacterial plasmids from Synechocystis PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X; Daniell, H; McFadden, B

    1994-09-01

    Little knowledge of DNA replication in cyanobacteria is available. In this study, we report the development and characterization of an in vitro system for studies of replication of the endogenous plasmids from the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803. This system (fraction III) was isolated at high salt concentrations and partially purified on a heparin-agarose column. DNA polymerases in Synechocystis 6803 appeared to be associated with membranes and could be released by the addition of ammonium sulfate to 20% saturation. DNA synthesis in fraction III was dependent on the addition of cyanobacterial plasmids isolated from the same strain. The in vitro replication products consist mostly of the supercoiled form of the plasmids. Unlike replication of many Escherichia coli plasmids, replication of cyanobacterial plasmids did not require added ATP, was not inhibited by omission of the ribonucleotides, and was insensitive to the RNA polymerase inhibitor rifampicin and the gyrase inhibitor novobiocin, but was inhibited by ethidium bromide. These data suggest that RNA may not be involved in the initiation of replication of cyanobacterial plasmids from Synechocystis 6803. In addition, intermediates of replication have been detected by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Density labeling experiments also indicate that cyanobacterial plasmid synthesis in vitro occurs by a semiconservative replication.

  3. Modification of gel architecture and TBE/TAE buffer composition to minimize heating during agarose gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Brian A; Araki, Naoko; Lilley, Jennifer L; Guerrero, Gilberto; Lewis, L Kevin

    2014-06-01

    Agarose gel electrophoresis of DNA and RNA is routinely performed using buffers containing either Tris, acetate, and EDTA (TAE) or Tris, borate, and EDTA (TBE). Gels are run at a low, constant voltage (∼10 V/cm) to minimize current and asymmetric heating effects, which can induce band artifacts and poor resolution. In this study, alterations of gel structure and conductive media composition were analyzed to identify factors causing higher electrical currents during horizontal slab gel electrophoresis. Current was reduced when thinner gels and smaller chamber buffer volumes were used, but was not influenced by agarose concentration or the presence of ethidium bromide. Current was strongly dependent on the amount and type of EDTA used and on the concentrations of the major acid-base components of each buffer. Interestingly, resolution and the mobilities of circular versus linear plasmid DNAs were also affected by the chemical form and amount of EDTA. With appropriate modifications to gel structure and buffer constituents, electrophoresis could be performed at high voltages (20-25 V/cm), reducing run times by up to 3-fold. The most striking improvements were observed with small DNAs and RNAs (10-100 bp): high voltages and short run times produced sharper bands and higher resolution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Flexural Behavior of Two-Way Sandwiched Slabs

    OpenAIRE

    Pachpande, Jivan Vilas

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation presents the details of the findings of a study focused on evaluating the structural behavior of three-dimensional (3D) cementitious sandwich panels with Expanded Polystyrene (EPS) foam core for two-way slab applications. In this study, both theoretical and finite element numerical analysis procedures were adopted to predict the performance of such slabs under out-of-plane loading conditions. The results from theoretical and finite element analysis were verified by compariso...

  5. Analysis of flat slab building with and without shear wall

    OpenAIRE

    Dhanaji R. Chavan; Mohite D. D.; Dr. C. P. Pise; Pawar Y. P; Kadam S.S.; Deshmukh C. M.

    2016-01-01

    The analytical research carried out to study the behaviour flat slab building with and without shear wall reported in the present work. For analysis 15 storied flat slab building is analyzed for seismic behaviour. Response spectrum method is used for analysis considering different shear wall positions using ETABS software. Five different positions of shear wall were studied for analysis. From this analysis shear wall at core having square shape is most suitable case for construction of shear ...

  6. Analysis of flat slab building with and without shear wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanaji R. Chavan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The analytical research carried out to study the behaviour flat slab building with and without shear wall reported in the present work. For analysis 15 storied flat slab building is analyzed for seismic behaviour. Response spectrum method is used for analysis considering different shear wall positions using ETABS software. Five different positions of shear wall were studied for analysis. From this analysis shear wall at core having square shape is most suitable case for construction of shear wall.

  7. Slab Tracking and Controlling on Hot Plate Rolling Line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚小兰; 邓波; 梁启宏; 李保奎

    2004-01-01

    By studying the slab moving in detail in the plate rolling process, the problem of slab tracking and controlling was solved by using the distributed control system. The problems of rhythm control for the big-complex system, the exchange of manual and automatic operations, the data exchange between the levelⅠ, TCS (technology control system) and levelⅡ, PCS (process control system), are solved. By this way, the automatic level of the plate production line is improved.

  8. Problem of punching shear in slabs on culumns

    OpenAIRE

    Bartol, Jože

    2007-01-01

    Existing technical solutions enabling sufficient punching resistance failure of flot slabs were analyzed. The reasons that ultimately lead to punching shear and the consequences of shear punching were examined as well. The main causes of punching shear are the condensed shear stresses in the part of the slab that is in contact with the columns. Symbols used at punching shear and an overlook of elements with appropriate reinforcement calculation were presented. The control exten...

  9. Repulsive Casimir forces with finite-thickness slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, R.; Koschny, Th.; Economou, E. N.; Soukoulis, C. M.

    2011-02-01

    We use the extended Lifshitz theory to study the behaviors of the Casimir forces between finite-thickness effective medium slabs. We first study the interaction between a semi-infinite Drude metal and a finite-thickness magnetic slab with or without substrate. For no substrate, the large distance d dependence of the force is repulsive and goes as 1/d5; for the Drude metal substrate, a stable equilibrium point appears at an intermediate distance that can be tuned by the thickness of the slab. We then study the interaction between two identical chiral metamaterial slabs, with and without substrate. For no substrate, the finite thickness of the slabs D does not significantly influence the repulsive character of the force at short distances, while the attractive character at large distances becomes weaker and behaves as 1/d6; for the Drude metal substrate, the finite thickness of the slabs D does not influence the repulsive force too much at short distances until D=0.05λ0.

  10. Seismic Evidence for Possible Slab Melting from Strong Scattering Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Horng Lin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Slab melting in young and hot subduction zones has been studied using geochemical observations and thermal modelling, but there are few data from seismic studies to confirm slab melting. Also the detailed geometry in the deep part of the melting slab is often ambiguous in that the intraslab earthquakes within the Wadati-Benioff zone are only limited to shallower depths. To improve our understanding of both the seismic features and geometry found in a young and hot subducted slab, I analyzed anomalous moonquake-like seismograms that were generated by an intermediate-depth earthquake recorded in central Japan. For this study, possible reflected (or scattered sources were examined using detailed analyses of particle motions and a grid search for travel-time differences between the direct and later P-waves. The results show that using strong seismic scattering, slab melting is likely occurring in the deeper, flexing part of the subducted Philippine Sea plate. Because the subducted Philippine Sea plate in central Japan is young and therefore hot, partial melting might have taken place to produce abundant melting spots in the subducted slab. Melting spots, identified as ¡§bright spots,¡¨ could efficiently reflect or scatter seismic energy and generate many later phases with large amplitudes.

  11. CYCLIC TEMPERATURE LOADING RESIDUAL FLEXURAL STRENGHT OF REFRACTORY SLABS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondřej Holčapek

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the effect of cyclic elevated temperature loading on refractory slabs made from high performance, fibre reinforced cement composite. Slabs were produced from aluminous cement-based composites, reinforced by different dosages of basalt fibres. The composite investigated in this study had self-compacting characteristics. The slabs used were exposed to different thermal loading – 600 °C, 1000 °C, six times applied 600 °C and 1000 °C. Then, flexural strength was investigated in all groups of slabs, including group reference slabs with no thermal loading. The results show that the appropriate combination of aluminous cement, natural basalt aggregate, fine filler and basalt fibres in dosage 1.00% of volume is able to successfully resist to cyclic temperature loading. Tensile strength in bending of these slabs (after cyclic temperature loading at 600 °C achieved 6.0 MPa. It was demonstrated that it is possible to use this composite for high extensive conditions in real industrial conditions.

  12. Strengthening of RC bridge slabs using CFRP sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahmy A. Fathelbab

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Many old structures became structurally insufficient to carry the new loading conditions requirements. Moreover, they suffer from structural degradation, reinforcement steel bars corrosion, bad weather conditions…etc. Many official authorities in several countries had recognized many old bridges and buildings as structurally deficient by today’s standards. Due to these reasons, structural strengthening became an essential requirement and different strengthening techniques appeared in market. Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP strengthening techniques established a good position among all other techniques, giving excellent structural results, low time required and moderate cost compared with the other techniques. The main purpose of this research is to study analytically the strengthening of a reinforced concrete bridge slabs due to excessive loads, using externally bonded FRP sheets technique. A commercial finite element program ANSYS was used to perform a structural linear and non-linear analysis for strengthened slab models using several schemes of FRP sheets. A parametric study was performed to evaluate analytically the effect of changing both FRP stiffness and FRP schemes in strengthening RC slabs. Comparing the results with control slab (reinforced concrete slab without strengthening it is obvious that attaching FRP sheets to the RC slab increases its capacity and enhances the ductility/toughness.

  13. Comparative Two-Dimensional Fluorescence Gel Electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Doreen; König, Simone

    2018-01-01

    Two-dimensional comparative fluorescence gel electrophoresis (CoFGE) uses an internal standard to increase the reproducibility of coordinate assignment for protein spots visualized on 2D polyacrylamide gels. This is particularly important for samples, which need to be compared without the availability of replicates and thus cannot be studied using differential gel electrophoresis (DIGE). CoFGE corrects for gel-to-gel variability by co-running with the sample proteome a standardized marker grid of 80-100 nodes, which is formed by a set of purified proteins. Differentiation of reference and analyte is possible by the use of two fluorescent dyes. Variations in the y-dimension (molecular weight) are corrected by the marker grid. For the optional control of the x-dimension (pI), azo dyes can be used. Experiments are possible in both vertical and horizontal (h) electrophoresis devices, but hCoFGE is much easier to perform. For data analysis, commercial software capable of warping can be adapted.

  14. DNA replication origins in archaea

    OpenAIRE

    Zhenfang eWu; Jingfang eLiu; Haibo eYang; Hua eXiang

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication initiation, which starts at specific chromosomal site (known as replication origins), is the key regulatory stage of chromosome replication. Archaea, the third domain of life, use a single or multiple origin(s) to initiate replication of their circular chromosomes. The basic structure of replication origins is conserved among archaea, typically including an AT-rich unwinding region flanked by several conserved repeats (origin recognition box, ORB) that are located adjacent to ...

  15. Replication studies in longevity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varcasia, O; Garasto, S; Rizza, T

    2001-01-01

    In Danes we replicated the 3'APOB-VNTR gene/longevity association study previously carried out in Italians, by which the Small alleles (less than 35 repeats) had been identified as frailty alleles for longevity. In Danes, neither genotype nor allele frequencies differed between centenarians and 20...

  16. Replication-Fork Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duderstadt, Karl E.; Reyes-Lamothe, Rodrigo; van Oijen, Antoine M.; Sherratt, David J.

    2014-01-01

    The proliferation of all organisms depends on the coordination of enzymatic events within large multiprotein replisomes that duplicate chromosomes. Whereas the structure and function of many core replisome components have been clarified, the timing and order of molecular events during replication re

  17. Coronavirus Attachment and Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-28

    synthesis during RNA replication of vesicular stomatitis virus. J. Virol. 49:303-309. Pedersen, N.C. 1976a. Feline infectious peritonitis: Something old...receptors on intestinal brush border membranes from normal host species were developed for canine (CCV), feline (FIPV), porcine (TGEV), human (HCV...gastroenteritis receptor on pig BBMs ...... ................. ... 114 Feline infectious peritonitis virus receptor on cat BBMs ... .............. 117 Human

  18. Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma-Kuinkel, Batu K; Rude, Thomas H; Fowler, Vance G

    2016-01-01

    Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) is a powerful genotyping technique used for the separation of large DNA molecules (entire genomic DNA) after digesting it with unique restriction enzymes and applying to a gel matrix under the electric field that periodically changes direction. PFGE is a variation of agarose gel electrophoresis that permits analysis of bacterial DNA fragments over an order of magnitude larger than that with conventional restriction enzyme analysis. It provides a good representation of the entire bacterial chromosome in a single gel with a highly reproducible restriction profile, providing clearly distinct and well-resolved DNA fragments.

  19. CONFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT USING GELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall S. Seright

    2003-09-01

    This report describes work performed during the second year of the project, ''Conformance Improvement Using Gels.'' The project has two objectives. The first objective is to identify gel compositions and conditions that substantially reduce flow through fractures that allow direct channeling between wells, while leaving secondary fractures open so that high fluid injection and production rates can be maintained. The second objective is to optimize treatments in fractured production wells, where the gel must reduce permeability to water much more than that to oil. Pore-level images from X-ray computed microtomography were re-examined for Berea sandstone and porous polyethylene. This analysis suggests that oil penetration through gel-filled pores occurs by a gel-dehydration mechanism, rather than a gel-ripping mechanism. This finding helps to explain why aqueous gels can reduce permeability to water more than to oil. We analyzed a Cr(III)-acetate-HPAM gel treatment in a production well in the Arbuckle formation. The availability of accurate pressure data before, during, and after the treatment was critical for the analysis. After the gel treatment, water productivity was fairly constant at about 20% of the pre-treatment value. However, oil productivity was stimulated by a factor of 18 immediately after the treatment. During the six months after the treatment, oil productivity gradually decreased to approach the pre-treatment value. To explain this behavior, we proposed that the fracture area open to oil flow was increased substantially by the gel treatment, followed by a gradual closing of the fractures during subsequent production. For a conventional Cr(III)-acetate-HPAM gel, the delay between gelant preparation and injection into a fracture impacts the placement, leakoff, and permeability reduction behavior. Formulations placed as partially formed gels showed relatively low pressure gradients during placement, and yet substantially reduced the

  20. Standing sausage modes in curved coronal slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoe, D. J.; Nakariakov, V. M.

    2016-09-01

    Context. Magnetohydrodynamic waveguides such as dense coronal loops can support standing modes. The ratios of the periods of oscillations for different longitudinal harmonics depend on the dispersive nature of the waveguide and so may be used as a seismological tool to determine coronal parameters. Aims: We extend models of standing sausage modes in low β coronal loops to include the effects of loop curvature. The behaviour of standing sausage modes in this geometry is used to explain the properties of observed oscillations that cannot be accounted for using straight loop models. Methods: We perform 2D numerical simulations of an oscillating coronal loop, modelled as a dense slab embedded in a potential magnetic field. The loop is field-aligned and so experiences expansion with height in addition to being curved. Standing sausage modes are excited by compressive perturbations of the loop and their properties are studied. Results: The spatial profiles of standing sausage modes are found to be modified by the expanding loop geometry typical for flaring loops and modelled by a potential magnetic field in our simulations. Longitudinal harmonics of order n > 1 have anti-nodes that are shifted towards the loop apex and the amplitude of anti-nodes near the loop apex is smaller than those near the loop footpoints. Conclusions: We find that the observation of standing sausage modes by the Nobeyama Radioheliograph in a flaring coronal loop on 12 January 2000 is consistent with interpretation in terms of the global mode (n = 1) and third harmonic (n = 3). This interpretation accounts for the period ratio and spatial structure of the observed oscillations.

  1. Mantle flow and dynamic topography associated with slab window opening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaume, Benjamin; Moroni, Monica; Funiciello, Francesca; Martinod, Joseph; Faccenna, Claudio

    2010-05-01

    A slab window is defined as an 'hole' in the subducting lithosphere. In the classical view, slab windows develop where a spreading ridge intersects a subduction zone. The main consequences of this phenomenon are the modifications of the physical, chemical and thermal conditions in the backarc mantle that in turn affect the tectonic and magmatic evolution of the overriding plate. In this work, we perform dynamically self-consistent mantle-scale laboratory models, to evaluate how the opening of a window in the subducting panel influences the geometry and the kinematics of the slab, the mantle circulation pattern and, finally, the overriding plate dynamic topography. The adopted setup consists in a two-layer linearly viscous system simulating the roll-back of a fixed subducting plate (simulated using silicone putty) into the upper mantle (simulated using glucose syrup). Our experimental setting is also characterized by a constant-width rectangular window located at the center of a laterally confined slab, modeling the case of the interaction of a trench-parallel spreading ridge with a wide subduction zone. We find that the geometry and the kinematics of the slab are only minorly affected by the opening of a slab window. On the contrary, slab induced mantle circulation, quantified using Feature Tracking image analysis technique, is strongly modified and produces a peculiar non-isostatic topographic signal on the overriding plate. Assuming that our modeling results can be representative of the natural behavior of subduction zones, we compare them to the Patagonian subduction zone finding that anomalous backarc volcanism that developed since middle Miocene could result from the lateral flowage of subslab mantle, and that part of the Patagonian uplift could be dynamically supported.

  2. Strength Behaviour Of Biomass Fiber-Reinforced Concrete Slab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chai Teck Jung

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the compressive strength and flexural strength of biomass fibre-reinforced concrete slab. The main objective of this study is to examine the effect of biomass aggregate and fibre glass on the concrete slab strength. The biomass aggregate is used to replace the natural aggregates. A total of 36 slab samples (250 mm x 600 mm x 50mm thick and 36 numbers of 150 mm cube samples containing 0%, 30%, 60% and 100% biomass aggregate were prepared.  The E-class fibre and Supracoat SP800 were added to increase the strength and to achieve the required workability. All the samples were cured in water with room temperature of around 27oC and tested at the age of 7, 14 and 28 days respectively. The result showed that cube specimens containing 30% biomass aggregate concrete achieved minimum strength of 15 MPa at 28 days. The flexural strength for slab specimens containing 30% biomass aggregate, Supracoat SP 800 and fibre glass gained higher strength compared with control specimens. The 100% biomass aggregate slab achieved 88% of the control specimen strength. The workability was between 150 mm to 170mm slump. The density of the specimens was reduced 20% for cube and 28% for slab compared with control specimens. It can be concluded that the biomass aggregate has good potential as partial aggregate replacement in slab construction when combined with the use of glass fibre and superplasticizer. However, more research needs to be carried out to self-compacting biomass aggregate concrete for sustainable construction

  3. Modeling the surface photovoltage of silicon slabs with varying thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazhappilly, Tijo; Kilin, Dmitri S; Micha, David A

    2015-04-10

    The variation with thickness of the energy band gap and photovoltage at the surface of a thin semiconductor film are of great interest in connection with their surface electronic structure and optical properties. In this work, the change of a surface photovoltage (SPV) with the number of layers of a crystalline silicon slab is extracted from models based on their atomic structure. Electronic properties of photoexcited slabs are investigated using generalized gradient and hybrid density functionals, and plane wave basis sets. Si(1 1 1) surfaces have been terminated by hydrogen atoms to compensate for dangling bonds and have been described by large supercells with periodic boundary conditions. Calculations of the SPV of the Si slabs have been done in terms of the reduced density matrix of the photoactive electrons including dissipative effects due to their interaction with medium phonons and excitons. Surface photovoltages have been calculated for model Si slabs with 4-12, and 16 layers, to determine convergence trends versus slab thickness. Band gaps and the inverse of the SPVs have been found to scale nearly linearly with the inverse thickness of the slab, while the electronic density of states increases quadratically with thickness. Our calculations show the same trends as experimental values indicating band gap reduction and absorption enhancement for Si films of increasing thickness. Simple arguments on confined electronic structures have been used to explain the main effects of changes with slab thickness. A procedure involving shifted electron excitation energies is described to improve results from generalized gradient functionals so they can be in better agreement with the more accurate but also more computer intensive values from screened exchange hybrid functionals.

  4. Reversible Switching of Cooperating Replicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urtel, Georg C.; Rind, Thomas; Braun, Dieter

    2017-02-01

    How can molecules with short lifetimes preserve their information over millions of years? For evolution to occur, information-carrying molecules have to replicate before they degrade. Our experiments reveal a robust, reversible cooperation mechanism in oligonucleotide replication. Two inherently slow replicating hairpin molecules can transfer their information to fast crossbreed replicators that outgrow the hairpins. The reverse is also possible. When one replication initiation site is missing, single hairpins reemerge from the crossbreed. With this mechanism, interacting replicators can switch between the hairpin and crossbreed mode, revealing a flexible adaptation to different boundary conditions.

  5. Tomographic imaging of the effects of Peruvian flat slab subduction on the Nazca slab and surrounding mantle under central and southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scire, A. C.; Zandt, G.; Beck, S. L.; Bishop, B.; Biryol, C. B.; Wagner, L. S.; Long, M. D.; Minaya, E.; Tavera, H.

    2014-12-01

    The modern central Peruvian Andes are dominated by a laterally extensive region of flat slab subduction. The Peruvian flat slab extends for ~1500 km along the strike of the Andes, correlating with the subduction of the Nazca Ridge in the south and the theorized Inca Plateau in the north. We have used data from the CAUGHT and PULSE experiments for finite frequency teleseismic P- and S-wave tomography to image the Nazca slab in the upper mantle below 95 km depth under central Peru between 10°S and 18°S as well as the surrounding mantle. Since the slab inboard of the subducting Nazca Ridge is mostly aseismic, our results provide important constraints on the geometry of the subducting Nazca slab in this region. Our images of the Nazca slab suggest that steepening of the slab inboard of the subducting Nazca Ridge locally occurs ~100 km further inland than was indicated in previous studies. The region where we have imaged the steepening of the Nazca slab inboard of the Nazca Ridge correlates with the location of the Fitzcarrald Arch, a long wavelength upper plate topographic feature which has been suggested to be a consequence of ridge subduction. When the slab steepens inboard of the flat slab region, it does so at a very steep (~70°) angle. The transition from the Peruvian flat slab to the more normally dipping slab south of 16°S below Bolivia is characterized by an abrupt bending of the slab anomaly in the mantle in response to the shift from flat to normal subduction. The slab anomaly appears to be intact south of the Nazca Ridge with no evidence for tearing of the slab in response to the abrupt change in slab dip. A potential tear in the slab is inferred from an observed offset in the slab anomaly north of the Nazca Ridge extending subparallel to the ridge axis between 130 and 300 km depth. A high amplitude (-5-6%) slow S-wave velocity anomaly is observed below the projection of the Nazca Ridge. This anomaly appears to be laterally confined to the mantle

  6. Method for preparing hydrous iron oxide gels and spherules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Jack L.; Lauf, Robert J.; Anderson, Kimberly K.

    2003-07-29

    The present invention is directed to methods for preparing hydrous iron oxide spherules, hydrous iron oxide gels such as gel slabs, films, capillary and electrophoresis gels, iron monohydrogen phosphate spherules, hydrous iron oxide spherules having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form composite sorbents and catalysts, iron monohydrogen phosphate spherules having suspendable particles of at least one different sorbent homogeneously embedded within to form a composite sorbent, iron oxide spherules having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite of hydrous iron oxide fiber materials, iron oxide fiber materials, hydrous iron oxide fiber materials having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite, iron oxide fiber materials having suspendable particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite, dielectric spherules of barium, strontium, and lead ferrites and mixtures thereof, and composite catalytic spherules of barium or strontium ferrite embedded with oxides of Mg, Zn, Pb, Ce and mixtures thereof. These variations of hydrous iron oxide spherules and gel forms prepared by the gel-sphere, internal gelation process offer more useful forms of inorganic ion exchangers, catalysts, getters, dielectrics, and ceramics.

  7. GelTouch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miruchna, Viktor; Walter, Robert; Lindlbauer, David

    2015-01-01

    We present GelTouch, a gel-based layer that can selectively transition between soft and stiff to provide tactile multi-touch feedback. It is flexible, transparent when not activated, and contains no mechanical, electromagnetic, or hydraulic components, resulting in a compact form factor (a 2mm thin...... touchscreen layer for our prototype). The activated areas can be morphed freely and continuously, without being limited to fixed, predefined shapes. GelTouch consists of a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) gel layer which alters its viscoelasticity when activated by applying heat (>32 C). We present three different...... a tablet with 6x4 tactile areas, enabling a tactile numpad, slider, and thumbstick. We show that the gel is up to 25 times stiffer when activated and that users detect tactile features reliably (94.8%)....

  8. Calibrating a large slab vessel: A battle of the bulge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, I.R. [Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Co., Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Safeguards and Security Section

    1993-12-31

    The accurate measurement of volume in slab vessels can be difficult because slab vessels expand--in spite of internal or external supports--as they are filled. One form of bulging is elastic deflection, a gradual expansion of the vessel wall resulting from an increased weight of contained solution. As part of an upgrade to the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, slab tanks were proposed as accountability measurement vessels. A 1960 liter slab tank prototype was set up for preliminary calibrations. Two series of calibrations were conducted: the first using water, and the second using aluminum nitrate. It was conjectured that the increased weight of aluminum nitrate would cause the vessel walls to deflect more than they did for an equal level of water, resulting in a greater volume. As expected, a significant expansion was observed with the aluminum nitrate, but some of the deflection proved to be permanent rather than elastic. The consequence is that considerably more effort will be required to calibrate slab vessels for uranium accountability. Not only must a calibration curve (or family of curves) be developed giving volume as a function of both liquid level and density, but, if possible, a determination must be made as to when the deflection is no longer temporary.

  9. The subduction dichotomy of strong plates and weak slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Robert I.; Stegman, Dave R.; Tackley, Paul J.

    2017-03-01

    A key element of plate tectonics on Earth is that the lithosphere is subducting into the mantle. Subduction results from forces that bend and pull the lithosphere into the interior of the Earth. Once subducted, lithospheric slabs are further modified by dynamic forces in the mantle, and their sinking is inhibited by the increase in viscosity of the lower mantle. These forces are resisted by the material strength of the lithosphere. Using geodynamic models, we investigate several subduction models, wherein we control material strength by setting a maximum viscosity for the surface plates and the subducted slabs independently. We find that models characterized by a dichotomy of lithosphere strengths produce a spectrum of results that are comparable to interpretations of observations of subduction on Earth. These models have strong lithospheric plates at the surface, which promotes Earth-like single-sided subduction. At the same time, these models have weakened lithospheric subducted slabs which can more easily bend to either lie flat or fold into a slab pile atop the lower mantle, reproducing the spectrum of slab morphologies that have been interpreted from images of seismic tomography.

  10. Investigations on Efficiently Interfaced Steel Concrete Composite Deck Slabs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. N. Lakshmikandhan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The strength of the composite deck slab depends mainly on the longitudinal shear transfer mechanism at the interface between steel and concrete. The bond strength developed by the cement paste is weak and causes premature failure of composite deck slab. This deficiency is effectively overcame by a shear transferring mechanism in the form of mechanical interlock through indentations, embossments, or fastening studs. Development of embossment patterns requires an advanced technology which makes the deck profile expensive. Fastening studs by welding weakens the joint strength and also escalates the cost. The present investigation is attempted to arrive at a better, simple interface mechanism. Three types of mechanical connector schemes are identified and investigated experimentally. All of the three shear connector schemes exhibited full shear interaction with negligible slip. The strength and stiffness of the composite slabs with shear connectors are superior about one and half time compared to these of the conventional reinforced concrete slabs and about twice compared to these of composite slabs without mechanical shear connectors. The scheme2 and scheme3 shear connector mechanisms integrate deck webs and improve strength and stiffness of the deck, which can effectively reduce the cost of formworks and supports efficiently.

  11. Fossil slabs attached to unsubducted fragments of the Farallon plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun; Forsyth, Donald W; Rau, Christina J; Carriero, Nina; Schmandt, Brandon; Gaherty, James B; Savage, Brian

    2013-04-02

    As the Pacific-Farallon spreading center approached North America, the Farallon plate fragmented into a number of small plates. Some of the microplate fragments ceased subducting before the spreading center reached the trench. Most tectonic models have assumed that the subducting oceanic slab detached from these microplates close to the trench, but recent seismic tomography studies have revealed a high-velocity anomaly beneath Baja California that appears to be a fossil slab still attached to the Guadalupe and Magdalena microplates. Here, using surface wave tomography, we establish the lateral extent of this fossil slab and show that it is correlated with the distribution of high-Mg andesites thought to derive from partial melting of the subducted oceanic crust. We also reinterpret the high seismic velocity anomaly beneath the southern central valley of California as another fossil slab extending to a depth of 200 km or more that is attached to the former Monterey microplate. The existence of these fossil slabs may force a reexamination of models of the tectonic evolution of western North America over the last 30 My.

  12. Chromatin replication and epigenome maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alabert, Constance; Groth, Anja

    2012-01-01

    initiates, whereas the replication process itself disrupts chromatin and challenges established patterns of genome regulation. Specialized replication-coupled mechanisms assemble new DNA into chromatin, but epigenome maintenance is a continuous process taking place throughout the cell cycle. If DNA...

  13. Chromatin replication and epigenome maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alabert, Constance; Groth, Anja

    2012-01-01

    initiates, whereas the replication process itself disrupts chromatin and challenges established patterns of genome regulation. Specialized replication-coupled mechanisms assemble new DNA into chromatin, but epigenome maintenance is a continuous process taking place throughout the cell cycle. If DNA...

  14. Initiation of adenovirus DNA replication.

    OpenAIRE

    Reiter, T; Fütterer, J; Weingärtner, B; Winnacker, E L

    1980-01-01

    In an attempt to study the mechanism of initiation of adenovirus DNA replication, an assay was developed to investigate the pattern of DNA synthesis in early replicative intermediates of adenovirus DNA. By using wild-type virus-infected cells, it was possible to place the origin of adenovirus type 2 DNA replication within the terminal 350 to 500 base pairs from either of the two molecular termini. In addition, a variety of parameters characteristic of adenovirus DNA replication were compared ...

  15. Chromatin replication and epigenome maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alabert, Constance; Groth, Anja

    2012-01-01

    Stability and function of eukaryotic genomes are closely linked to chromatin structure and organization. During cell division the entire genome must be accurately replicated and the chromatin landscape reproduced on new DNA. Chromatin and nuclear structure influence where and when DNA replication...... initiates, whereas the replication process itself disrupts chromatin and challenges established patterns of genome regulation. Specialized replication-coupled mechanisms assemble new DNA into chromatin, but epigenome maintenance is a continuous process taking place throughout the cell cycle. If DNA...

  16. Replication Research and Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travers, Jason C.; Cook, Bryan G.; Therrien, William J.; Coyne, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Replicating previously reported empirical research is a necessary aspect of an evidence-based field of special education, but little formal investigation into the prevalence of replication research in the special education research literature has been conducted. Various factors may explain the lack of attention to replication of special education…

  17. Replication Research and Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travers, Jason C.; Cook, Bryan G.; Therrien, William J.; Coyne, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Replicating previously reported empirical research is a necessary aspect of an evidence-based field of special education, but little formal investigation into the prevalence of replication research in the special education research literature has been conducted. Various factors may explain the lack of attention to replication of special education…

  18. Slab detachment of subducted Indo-Australian plate beneath Sunda arc, Indonesia

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bhaskar Kundu; V K Gahalaut

    2011-04-01

    Necking, tearing, slab detachment and subsequently slab loss complicate the subduction zone processes and slab architecture. Based on evidences which include patterns of seismicity, seismic tomography and geochemistry of arc volcanoes, we have identified a horizontal slab tear in the subducted Indo-Australian slab beneath the Sunda arc. It strongly reflects on trench migration, and causes along-strike variations in vertical motion and geochemically distinct subduction-related arc magmatism. We also propose a model for the geodynamic evolution of slab detachment.

  19. Replication data collection highlights value in diversity of replication attempts

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSoto, K. Andrew; Schweinsberg, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Researchers agree that replicability and reproducibility are key aspects of science. A collection of Data Descriptors published in Scientific Data presents data obtained in the process of attempting to replicate previously published research. These new replication data describe published and unpublished projects. The different papers in this collection highlight the many ways that scientific replications can be conducted, and they reveal the benefits and challenges of crucial replication research. The organizers of this collection encourage scientists to reuse the data contained in the collection for their own work, and also believe that these replication examples can serve as educational resources for students, early-career researchers, and experienced scientists alike who are interested in learning more about the process of replication. PMID:28291224

  20. IMPROVEMENT OF SLAB REHEATING PROCESS AT USIMINAS THROUGH MATHEMATICAL SIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Adel dos Santos

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Basic characteristics and application examples of the mathematical simulator for reheating process in walking-beam type furnaces, that has been developed and applied to Usiminas plate mill line at Ipatinga, are shown in this paper. This is a bi-dimensional mathematical model solved by the finite volume method, validated by temperature measurements inside the slab during heating and coded as a visual tool. Among these applications, the following can be highlighted: (i determination of suitable furnace zone temperatures and residence times for processing steels by accelerated cooling technology; (ii determination of slab average temperature at discharging as well as at each zone exit, supplying data to be fed to the automation system at the comissioning stage; (iii analyses of slab thermal distribution through the reheating process, enabling operational optimization

  1. Systematic effects induced by a flat isotropic dielectric slab

    CERN Document Server

    Macculi, C; Cortiglioni, S; Peverini, O A; Tascone, R; Zannoni, M; Carretti, Ettore; Cortiglioni, Stefano; Macculi, Claudio; Peverini, Oscar Antonio; Tascone, Riccardo; Zannoni, Mario

    2006-01-01

    The instrumental polarization induced by a flat isotropic dielectric slab in microwave frequencies is faced. We find that, in spite of its isotropic nature, such a dielectric can produce spurious polarization either by transmitting incoming anisotropic diffuse radiation or emitting when it is thermally inhomogeneous. We present evaluations of instrumental polarization generated by materials usually adopted in Radioastronomy, by using the Mueller matrix formalism. As an application, results for different slabs in front of a 32 GHz receiver are discussed. Such results are based on measurements of their complex dielectric constant. We evaluate that a 0.33 cm thick Teflon slab introduces negligible spurious polarization ($< 2.6 \\times 10^{-5}$ in transmission and $< 6 \\times 10^{-7}$ in emission), even minimizing the leakage ($< 10^{-8}$ from $Q$ to $U$ Stokes parameters, and viceversa) and the depolarization ($\\sim 1.3 \\times 10^{-3}$).

  2. Casimir Force on Real Materials - the Slab and Cavity Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Ellingsen, S A; Brevik, Iver; Ellingsen, Simen A.

    2006-01-01

    We analyse the potential of the geometry of a slab in a planar cavity for the purpose of Casimir force experiments. The force and its dependence on temperature, material properties and finite slab thickness are investigated both analytically and numerically for slab and walls made of aluminium and teflon FEP respectively. We conclude that such a setup is ideal for measurements of the temperature dependence of the Casimir force. By numerical calculation it is shown that temperature effects are dramatically larger for dielectrics, suggesting that a dielectric such as teflon FEP whose properties vary little within a moderate temperature range, should be considered for experimental purposes. We finally discuss the subtle but fundamental matter of the various Green's two-point function approaches present in the literature and show how they are different formulations describing the same phenomenon.

  3. Efficient Vortex Generation in Subwavelength Epsilon-Near-Zero Slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciattoni, Alessandro; Marini, Andrea; Rizza, Carlo

    2017-03-01

    We show that a homogeneous and isotropic slab, illuminated by a circularly polarized beam with no topological charge, produces vortices of order 2 in the opposite circularly polarized components of the reflected and transmitted fields, as a consequence of the transverse magnetic and transverse electric asymmetric response of the rotationally invariant system. In addition, in the epsilon-near-zero regime, we find that vortex generation is remarkably efficient in subwavelength thick slabs up to the paraxial regime. This physically stems from the fact that a vacuum paraxial field can excite a nonparaxial field inside an epsilon-near-zero slab since it hosts slowly varying fields over physically large portions of the bulk. Our theoretical predictions indicate that epsilon-near-zero media hold great potential as nanophotonic elements for manipulating the angular momentum of the radiation, since they are available without resorting to complicated micro- or nanofabrication processes and can operate even at very small (ultraviolet) wavelengths.

  4. Photonic-crystal slab for terahertz-wave technology platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Masayuki

    2016-03-01

    Photonic crystals manipulate photons in a manner analogous to solid-state crystals, and are composed of a dielectric material with a periodic refractive index distribution. In particular, two-dimensional photonic-crystal slabs with high index contrasts (semiconductor/air) are promising for practical applications, owing to the strong optical confinement in simple, thin planar structures. This paper presents the recent progress on a silicon photonic-crystal slab as a technology platform in the terahertz-wave region, which is located between the radio and light wave regions (0.1-10 THz). Extremely low-loss (edge effect are demonstrated. Terahertz photonic-crystal slabs hold the potential for developing ultralow-loss, compact terahertz components and integrated devices used in applications including wireless communication, spectroscopic sensing, and imaging.

  5. Can slabs melt beneath forearcs in hot subduction zones?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, J.; Maury, R.; Gregoire, M.

    2015-12-01

    At subduction zones, thermal modeling predict that the shallow part of the downgoing oceanic crust (test the hypothesis that adakites are pristine slab melts. We find that adakites from Baja California and Philippines formed by two distinct petrogenetic scenarios. In Baja California, hydrous mantle melts mixed/mingled with high-pressure (HP) adakite-type, slab melts within a lower crustal (~30 km depth) magma storage region before stalling into the upper arc crust (~7-15 km depth). In contrast, in the Philippines, primitive mantle melts stalled and crystallized within lower and upper crustal magma storage regions to produce silica-rich melts with an adakitic signature. Thereby, slab melting is not required to produce an adakitic geochemical fingerprint in hot subduction zones. However, our results also suggest that the downgoing crust potentially melted beneath Baja California.

  6. Requalification analysis of a circular composite slab for seismic load

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, M.G.; Kot, C.A.

    1992-11-01

    The circular roof slab of an existing facility was analyzed to requalify the structure for supporting a significant seismic load that it was not originally designed for. The slab has a clear span of 66 ft and consists of a 48 in thick reinforced concrete member and a steel liner plate. Besides a number of smaller penetrations, the slab contains two significant cutouts: a 9 ft square opening and a 3 ft dia hole. The issues that complicated the analysis of this non-typical structure, i.e., composite action and nonlinear stiffness of reinforced concrete (R. C.) sections, are discussed. It was possible to circumvent the difficulties by making conservative and simplifying assumptions. If codes incorporate guidelines on practical methods for dynamic analysis of R. C. structures, some of the unneeded conservatism could be eliminated in future designs.

  7. Dynamic triggering of deep earthquakes within a fossil slab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chen; Wiens, Douglas A.

    2016-09-01

    The 9 November 2009 Mw 7.3 Fiji deep earthquake is the largest event in a region west of the Tonga slab defined by scattered seismicity and velocity anomalies. The main shock rupture was compact, but the aftershocks were distributed along a linear feature at distances of up to 126 km. The aftershocks and some background seismicity define a sharp northern boundary to the zone of outboard earthquakes, extending westward toward the Vitiaz deep earthquake cluster. The northern earthquake lineament is geometrically similar to tectonic reconstructions of the relict Vitiaz subduction zone at 8-10 Ma, suggesting the earthquakes are occurring in the final portion of the slab subducted at the now inactive Vitiaz trench. A Coulomb stress change calculation suggests many of the aftershocks were dynamically triggered. We propose that fossil slabs contain material that is too warm for earthquake nucleation but may be near the critical stress susceptible to dynamic triggering.

  8. Efficient Vortex Generation in Subwavelength Epsilon-Near-Zero Slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciattoni, Alessandro; Marini, Andrea; Rizza, Carlo

    2017-03-10

    We show that a homogeneous and isotropic slab, illuminated by a circularly polarized beam with no topological charge, produces vortices of order 2 in the opposite circularly polarized components of the reflected and transmitted fields, as a consequence of the transverse magnetic and transverse electric asymmetric response of the rotationally invariant system. In addition, in the epsilon-near-zero regime, we find that vortex generation is remarkably efficient in subwavelength thick slabs up to the paraxial regime. This physically stems from the fact that a vacuum paraxial field can excite a nonparaxial field inside an epsilon-near-zero slab since it hosts slowly varying fields over physically large portions of the bulk. Our theoretical predictions indicate that epsilon-near-zero media hold great potential as nanophotonic elements for manipulating the angular momentum of the radiation, since they are available without resorting to complicated micro- or nanofabrication processes and can operate even at very small (ultraviolet) wavelengths.

  9. Numerical models of slab migration in continental collision zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Magni

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Continental collision is an intrinsic feature of plate tectonics. The closure of an oceanic basin leads to the onset of subduction of buoyant continental material, which slows down and eventually stops the subduction process. In natural cases, evidence of advancing margins has been recognized in continental collision zones such as India-Eurasia and Arabia-Eurasia. We perform a parametric study of the geometrical and rheological influence on subduction dynamics during the subduction of continental lithosphere. In our 2-D numerical models of a free subduction system with temperature and stress-dependent rheology, the trench and the overriding plate move self-consistently as a function of the dynamics of the system (i.e. no external forces are imposed. This setup enables to study how continental subduction influences the trench migration. We found that in all models the slab starts to advance once the continent enters the subduction zone and continues to migrate until few million years after the ultimate slab detachment. Our results support the idea that the advancing mode is favoured and, in part, provided by the intrinsic force balance of continental collision. We suggest that the advance is first induced by the locking of the subduction zone and the subsequent steepening of the slab, and next by the sinking of the deepest oceanic part of the slab, during stretching and break-off of the slab. These processes are responsible for the migration of the subduction zone by triggering small-scale convection cells in the mantle that, in turn, drag the plates. The amount of advance ranges from 40 to 220 km and depends on the dip angle of the slab before the onset of collision.

  10. Bayesian Inference for Structured Spike and Slab Priors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Michael Riis; Winther, Ole; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2014-01-01

    Sparse signal recovery addresses the problem of solving underdetermined linear inverse problems subject to a sparsity constraint. We propose a novel prior formulation, the structured spike and slab prior, which allows to incorporate a priori knowledge of the sparsity pattern by imposing a spatial...... Gaussian process on the spike and slab probabilities. Thus, prior information on the structure of the sparsity pattern can be encoded using generic covariance functions. Furthermore, we provide a Bayesian inference scheme for the proposed model based on the expectation propagation framework. Using...

  11. Tunneling properties of electromagnetic wave in slab superconducting material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khem B. Thapa; Sanjay Srivastava; Alka Vishwakarma; S. P. Ojha

    2011-01-01

    When the electromagnetic wave propagates through a slab superconducting material in microwave ranges, tunneling properties of the electromagnetic wave at critical temperature are investigated theoretically. The transmittance and the reflectance of the slab superconducting material vary with the thickness of material as well as the refractive index of substrates.The high transmittance is found for thin superconductor at low wavelength region.However, optical properties are strongly dependent upon temperature and incidence wavelength. The electromagnetic wave is totally transmitted without loss for incidence wavelength (λ = 5000 nm) due to the zero refractive index and infinite penetration depth of the superconductor at the critical temperature.

  12. Radon Sub-slab Suctioning System Integrated in Insulating Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torben Valdbjørn

    2013-01-01

    of prefabricated lightweight elements were introduced and demonstrated. The principle was demonstrated on a concrete ground slab floor with a concrete slab on top of a thermal insulation layer above a capillary-breaking layer mounted on stable ground. The thermal insulation and the capillary-breaking layer...... consisted of a rigid insulation material. The new solution integrates the capillary-breaking layer and a pressure reduction zone,denoted the radon–suctioning layer, in one element. The new solution introduces the radonsuctioning layer as a horizontal grid of air ducts with low pressure to catch air...

  13. Repulsive Casimir forces with finite-thickness slabs

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, R.; Koschny, Th.; Economou, E. N.; C M Soukoulis

    2010-01-01

    We use the extended Lifshitz theory to study the behaviors of the Casimir forces between finite-thickness effective medium slabs. We first study the interaction between a semi-infinite Drude metal and a finite-thickness magnetic slab with or without substrate. For no substrate, the large distance $d$ dependence of the force is repulsive and goes as $1/d^5$; for the Drude metal substrate, a stable equilibrium point appears at an intermediate distance which can be tuned by the thickness of the ...

  14. Three dimensional super-resolution in metamaterial slab lenses

    CERN Document Server

    Mesa, F; Freire, M; Baena, J D

    2005-01-01

    This letter presents a theoretical and experimental study on the viability of obtaining three dimensional super-resolution (i.e. resolution overcoming the diffraction limit for all directions in space) by means of metamaterial slab lenses. Although the source field cannot be actually reproduced at the back side of the lens with super-resolution in all space directions, the matching capabilities of metamaterial slabs does make it possible the detection of images with three-dimensional super-resolution. This imaging takes place because of the coupling between the evanescent space harmonic components of the field generated at both the source and the detector.

  15. Spalling of concrete: A synthesis of experimental tests on slabs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taillefer Nicolas

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews the results of many commercial or research tests carried out in CSTB on middle size concrete slabs. They concern 22 concrete slabs, made of normal and high strength concrete, for a rather wide range of thickness and compressive strength classes. Test procedures and a synthesis of main results are presented in order to provide deeper understanding of near-reality conditions of concrete structures. The tests concerned both new and existing tunnels. Results are detailed in relation with main parameters that are identified as impacting spalling in previous studies, such as concrete composition, concrete properties and specimen size.

  16. Spalling tests on embedded cores and slabs: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pimienta P.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A comparative analysis of the spalling of (a cores made of 3 concrete mixes embedded into 3 slabs made of the 3 same concrete mixes; and (b 3 reference slabs made again of the same 3 concrete mixes has been made. Samples have been exposed to the French Increased HydroCarbon temperature curve. Results confirm that concrete spalling phenomena is not only related to the material properties. Concrete spalling is also very much influenced by the geometry of the samples.

  17. Bayesian Inference for Structured Spike and Slab Priors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Michael Riis; Winther, Ole; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2014-01-01

    Sparse signal recovery addresses the problem of solving underdetermined linear inverse problems subject to a sparsity constraint. We propose a novel prior formulation, the structured spike and slab prior, which allows to incorporate a priori knowledge of the sparsity pattern by imposing a spatial...... Gaussian process on the spike and slab probabilities. Thus, prior information on the structure of the sparsity pattern can be encoded using generic covariance functions. Furthermore, we provide a Bayesian inference scheme for the proposed model based on the expectation propagation framework. Using...

  18. Links between fluid circulation, temperature, and metamorphism in subducting slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, G.A.; Wang, K.

    2009-01-01

    The location and timing of metamorphic reactions in subducting lithosph??re are influenced by thermal effects of fluid circulation in the ocean crust aquifer. Fluid circulation in subducting crust extracts heat from the Nankai subduction zone, causing the crust to pass through cooler metamorphic faci??s than if no fluid circulation occurs. This fluid circulation shifts the basalt-to-eclogite transition and the associated slab dehydration 14 km deeper (35 km farther landward) than would be predicted with no fluid flow. For most subduction zones, hydrothermal cooling of the subducting slab will delay eclogitization relative to estimates made without considering fluid circulation. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. Resonance-enhanced optical forces between coupled photonic crystal slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Victor; Povinelli, Michelle; Fan, Shanhui

    2009-11-23

    The behaviors of lateral and normal optical forces between coupled photonic crystal slabs are analyzed. We show that the optical force is periodic with displacement, resulting in stable and unstable equilibrium positions. Moreover, the forces are strongly enhanced by guided resonances of the coupled slabs. Such enhancement is particularly prominent near dark states of the system, and the enhancement effect is strongly dependent on the types of guided resonances involved. These structures lead to enhancement of light-induced pressure over larger areas, in a configuration that is directly accessible to externally incident, free-space optical beams.

  20. Anatomy of Mammalian Replication Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takebayashi, Shin-ichiro; Ogata, Masato; Okumura, Katsuzumi

    2017-01-01

    Genetic information is faithfully copied by DNA replication through many rounds of cell division. In mammals, DNA is replicated in Mb-sized chromosomal units called “replication domains.” While genome-wide maps in multiple cell types and disease states have uncovered both dynamic and static properties of replication domains, we are still in the process of understanding the mechanisms that give rise to these properties. A better understanding of the molecular basis of replication domain regulation will bring new insights into chromosome structure and function. PMID:28350365

  1. Effects of shape and size of agar gels on heating uniformity during pulsed microwave treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Reyes, Nohemí; Temis-Pérez, Ana L; López-Malo, Aurelio; Rojas-Laguna, Roberto; Sosa-Morales, María Elena

    2015-05-01

    Model gel systems with different shape (sphere, cylinder, and slab) and size (180 and 290 g) were prepared with agar (5%) and sucrose (5%). Dielectric constant (ε'), loss factor (ε"), thermophysical properties, and temperature distribution of the model system were measured. Each agar model system was immersed and suspended in water, and then, heated in a microwave oven with intermittent heating until the core temperature reached 50 °C. The ε' and ε" of agar gels decreased when frequency increased. The density and thermal conductivity values of the agar gels were 1033 kg/m(3) and 0.55 W/m °C, respectively. The temperature distribution of sphere, cylinder, and slab was different when similar power doses were applied. The slab reached 50 °C in less time (10 min) and showed a more uniform heating than spheres and cylinders in both sizes. Agar model systems of 180 g heated faster than those of 290 g. The coldest point was the center of the model systems in all studied cases. Shape and size are critical food factors that affect the heating uniformity during microwave heating processes.

  2. Pharmacodynamic activity of Dapivirine and Maraviroc single entity and combination topical gels for HIV-1 prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezzutti, Charlene S.; Yandura, Sarah; Wang, Lin; Moncla, Bernard; Teeple, Elizabeth A.; Devlin, Brid; Nuttall, Jeremy; Brown, Elizabeth R.; Rohan, Lisa C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Dapivirine (DPV), a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, and maraviroc (MVC), a CCR5 antagonist, were formulated into aqueous gels designed to prevent mucosal HIV transmission. Methods 0.05% DPV, 0.1% MVC, 0.05% DPV/0.1% MVC and placebo gels were evaluated for pH, viscosity, osmolality, and in vitro release. In vitro assays and mucosal tissues were used to evaluate anti-HIV activity. Viability (Lactobacilli only) and epithelial integrity in cell lines and mucosal tissues defined safety. Results The gels were acidic and viscous. DPV gel had an osmolality of 893 mOsm/kg while the other gels had an osmolality of <100 mOsm/kg. MVC release was similar from the single and combination gels (~5 μg/cm2/min1/2), while DPV release was 10-fold less from the single as compared to the combination gel (0.4331 μg/cm2/min1/2). Titrations of the gels showed 10-fold more drug was needed to protect ectocervical than colonic tissue. The combination gel showed ~10- and 100-fold improved activity as compared to DPV and MVC gel, respectively. All gels were safe. Conclusions The DPV/MVC gel showed a benefit blocking HIV infection of mucosal tissue compared to the single entity gels. Combination products with drugs affecting unique steps in the viral replication cycle would be advantageous for HIV prevention. PMID:26078001

  3. Punching Shear Behavior of Continuous Bubbled Reinforced Reactive Powder Concrete Slab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Redha K. Mahmood

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental investigation on punching shear behavior of continuous bubbled reinforced Reactive Powder Concrete (RPC slabs. Bubbled slab is one of the various types of voided slabs. It consists of bubbles placed inside a concrete slab which will reduce the self-weight of the structure by about 35% (Tina Lai 2009. On the other hand, using RPC make it possible for structural member to have smaller dimensions due to the great strength of this type of concrete. In this study, these two method to increase the building spaces dimensions by reducing self-weigh of the structure by using bubbled slabs and to decrease the structural members' dimensions by using RPC have been investigated together. To study the punching shear behavior of continuous bubbled flat slabs such as the ultimate load carrying capacity, central deflection and slabs crack pattern at the ultimate load, nine different types of slabs were tested. The parameters of the study were type of concrete (RPC and Normal Concrete (NC, bubbles diameter to slab thickness ratio (D/t of (0.6 and 0.7, bubbles location (at all slab area, started from distance D and 1.5D from the center slab and solid slab. The test results show that the crack pattern and ultimate load capacity as well as maximum deflection depends on all of the mentioned parameters, were by increasing (D/t ratio the ultimate load capacity increases about (6.49 and 9.58% for slabs with bubbles started at distance 2D and 3D, respectively. But in the slabs with bubbles at all slab area the ultimate load and the maximum deflection decreases about (6.63 and 9.47% and (7.96 and 6.84% for RPC and NC slabs, respectively. Also, the solid slab increases the ultimate load about (5.28% compare to bubbled slab at all area. It was found that by removing bubbles from center of the slab at distance 2D and 3D the ultimate load will increase about (14.72 and 8.76%, respectively for slabs with (D/t = 0.6 compare to slabs with

  4. Mechanically induced gel formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Herpt, Jochem T.; Stuart, Marc C. A.; Browne, Wesley R.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical triggering of gelation of an organic solution by a carbazole-based bisurea organogelator is described. Both the duration of the mechanical stimulation and the gelator concentration control the gelation process and the characteristics of the gel obtained.

  5. Conformance Improvement Using Gels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seright, Randall S.; Schrader, Richard; II Hagstrom, John; Wang, Ying; Al-Dahfeeri, Abdullah; Gary, Raven; Marin; Amaury; Lindquist, Brent

    2002-09-26

    This research project had two objectives. The first objective was to identify gel compositions and conditions that substantially reduce flow through fractures that allow direct channeling between wells, while leaving secondary fractures open so that high fluid injection and production rates can be maintained. The second objective was to optimize treatments in fractured production wells, where the gel must reduce permeability to water much more than that to oil.

  6. Crystallization from Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayana Kalkura, S.; Natarajan, Subramanian

    Among the various crystallization techniques, crystallization in gels has found wide applications in the fields of biomineralization and macromolecular crystallization in addition to crystallizing materials having nonlinear optical, ferroelectric, ferromagnetic, and other properties. Furthermore, by using this method it is possible to grow single crystals with very high perfection that are difficult to grow by other techniques. The gel method of crystallization provides an ideal technique to study crystal deposition diseases, which could lead to better understanding of their etiology. This chapter focuses on crystallization in gels of compounds that are responsible for crystal deposition diseases. The introduction is followed by a description of the various gels used, the mechanism of gelling, and the fascinating phenomenon of Liesegang ring formation, along with various gel growth techniques. The importance and scope of study on crystal deposition diseases and the need for crystal growth experiments using gel media are stressed. The various crystal deposition diseases, viz. (1) urolithiasis, (2) gout or arthritis, (3) cholelithiasis and atherosclerosis, and (4) pancreatitis and details regarding the constituents of the crystal deposits responsible for the pathological mineralization are discussed. Brief accounts of the theories of the formation of urinary stones and gallstones and the role of trace elements in urinary stone formation are also given. The crystallization in gels of (1) the urinary stone constituents, viz. calcium oxalate, calcium phosphates, uric acid, cystine, etc., (2) the constituents of the gallstones, viz. cholesterol, calcium carbonate, etc., (3) the major constituent of the pancreatic calculi, viz., calcium carbonate, and (4) cholic acid, a steroidal hormone are presented. The effect of various organic and inorganic ions, trace elements, and extracts from cereals, herbs, and fruits on the crystallization of major urinary stone and gallstone

  7. Preparation of chitosan gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lagerge S.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Aerogel conditioning of the chitosan makes it possible to prepare porous solids of significant specific surface. The increase in the chitosan concentration or the degree of acetylation decreases the specific surface of the synthesized chitosan gel. Whereas drying with supercritical CO2 more effectively makes it possible to preserve the volume of the spheres of gel and to have a more significant specific surface in comparison with evaporative drying.

  8. Modeling inhomogeneous DNA replication kinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel G Gauthier

    Full Text Available In eukaryotic organisms, DNA replication is initiated at a series of chromosomal locations called origins, where replication forks are assembled proceeding bidirectionally to replicate the genome. The distribution and firing rate of these origins, in conjunction with the velocity at which forks progress, dictate the program of the replication process. Previous attempts at modeling DNA replication in eukaryotes have focused on cases where the firing rate and the velocity of replication forks are homogeneous, or uniform, across the genome. However, it is now known that there are large variations in origin activity along the genome and variations in fork velocities can also take place. Here, we generalize previous approaches to modeling replication, to allow for arbitrary spatial variation of initiation rates and fork velocities. We derive rate equations for left- and right-moving forks and for replication probability over time that can be solved numerically to obtain the mean-field replication program. This method accurately reproduces the results of DNA replication simulation. We also successfully adapted our approach to the inverse problem of fitting measurements of DNA replication performed on single DNA molecules. Since such measurements are performed on specified portion of the genome, the examined DNA molecules may be replicated by forks that originate either within the studied molecule or outside of it. This problem was solved by using an effective flux of incoming replication forks at the model boundaries to represent the origin activity outside the studied region. Using this approach, we show that reliable inferences can be made about the replication of specific portions of the genome even if the amount of data that can be obtained from single-molecule experiments is generally limited.

  9. CONFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT USING GELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall S. Seright

    2004-09-30

    This report describes work performed during the third and final year of the project, ''Conformance Improvement Using Gels.'' Corefloods revealed throughput dependencies of permeability reduction by polymers and gels that were much more prolonged during oil flow than water flow. This behavior was explained using simple mobility ratio arguments. A model was developed that quantitatively fits the results and predicts ''clean up'' times for oil productivity when production wells are returned to service after application of a polymer or gel treatment. X-ray computed microtomography studies of gels in strongly water-wet Berea sandstone and strongly oil-wet porous polyethylene suggested that oil penetration through gel-filled pores occurs by a gel-dehydration mechanism, rather than gel-ripping or gel-displacement mechanisms. In contrast, analysis of data from the University of Kansas suggests that the gel-ripping or displacement mechanisms are more important in more permeable, strongly water-wet sandpacks. These findings help to explain why aqueous gels can reduce permeability to water more than to oil under different conditions. Since cement is the most commonly used material for water shutoff, we considered when gels are preferred over cements. Our analysis and experimental results indicated that cement cannot be expected to completely fill (top to bottom) a vertical fracture of any width, except near the wellbore. For vertical fractures with apertures less than 4 mm, the cement slurry will simply not penetrate very far into the fracture. For vertical fractures with apertures greater than 4 mm, the slurry may penetrate a substantial distance into the bottom part of the fracture. However, except near the wellbore, the upper part of the fracture will remain open due to gravity segregation. We compared various approaches to plugging fractures using gels, including (1) varying polymer content, (2) varying placement (extrusion) rate

  10. Post-tensioned concrete floor slab design of a shopping centre

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洋; 于霞

    2011-01-01

    Post-tensioned Concrete slab can provide large clear span, and also has better performance in crack control and deflection. The topic below introduced the design process of the post-tensioned floor slab of a shopping centre.

  11. Resolution Ability and Surface Bright Spots of a Lossy Left-handed Material Slab

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chao; LI Fang

    2006-01-01

    @@ The imaging quality of a lossy left-handed material (LHM) slab is studied. The exact solution is obtained for the interaction of a monochromatic source with a lossy LHM slab by Fourier integrals in wave number domain.

  12. Importance of bulk states for the electronic structure of semiconductor surfaces: implications for finite slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagisaka, Keisuke; Nara, Jun; Bowler, David

    2017-04-12

    We investigate the influence of slab thickness on the electronic structure of the Si(1 0 0)- p([Formula: see text]) surface in density functional theory (DFT) calculations, considering both density of states and band structure. Our calculations, with slab thicknesses of up to 78 atomic layers, reveal that the slab thickness profoundly affects the surface band structure, particularly the dangling bond states of the silicon dimers near the Fermi level. We find that, to precisely reproduce the surface bands, the slab thickness needs to be large enough to completely converge the bulk bands in the slab. In the case of the Si(1 0 0) surface, the dispersion features of the surface bands, such as the band shape and width, converge when the slab thickness is larger than 30 layers. Complete convergence of both the surface and bulk bands in the slab is only achieved when the slab thickness is greater than 60 layers.

  13. Shear and anchorage behaviour of fire exposed hollow core slabs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fellinger, J.

    2005-01-01

    The fire resistance of hollow core slabs is currently assessed considering flexural failure only. However, fire tests show that shear or anchorage failure can also govern the load bearing behaviour. This paper is based on the dissertation by the author1 and discusses existing and new fire tests. It

  14. Excitonic Doppler-Rabi Oscillations in a Moving Organic Slab

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    It is theoretically shown that excitonic Doppler-Rabi oscillations can occur in an organic slab moving along the axis of a high-Q cavity. Due to the √N enhancement of the vacuum Rabi frequency, this effect can be more easily observed than that in a moving two-level atom.

  15. CFRP strengthened openings in two-way concrete slabs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enochsson, O.; Lundqvist, J.; Täljsten, Björn

    2006-01-01

    Rehabilitation and strengthening of concrete structures with externally bonded fibre reinforced polymers (FRPs) has been a viable technique for at least a decade. An interesting and useful application is strengthening of slabs or walls where openings are introduced. In these situations, FRP sheet...

  16. Some consequences of the subduction of young slabs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    England, P.; Wortel, R.

    The negative buoyancy force exerted by a subducting oceanic slab depends on its descent velocity, and strongly on its age. For lithosphere close to thermal equilibrium, this force dominates by a large margin the resisting forces arising from friction on the plate boundary and compositional buoyancy.

  17. Electromagnetic fluctuation-induced interactions in randomly charged slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezvani, Vahid; Sarabadani, Jalal; Naji, Ali; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2012-09-01

    Randomly charged net-neutral dielectric slabs are shown to interact across a featureless dielectric continuum with long-range electrostatic forces that scale with the statistical variance of their quenched random charge distribution and inversely with the distance between their bounding surfaces. By accounting for the whole spectrum of electromagnetic field fluctuations, we show that this long-range disorder-generated interaction extends well into the retarded regime where higher order (non-zero) Matsubara frequencies contribute significantly. This occurs even for highly clean samples with only a trace amount of charge disorder and shows that disorder effects can be important down to the nanoscale. As a result, the previously predicted non-monotonic behavior for the total force between dissimilar slabs as a function of their separation distance is substantially modified by higher order contributions, and in almost all cases of interest, we find that the equilibrium inter-surface separation is shifted to substantially larger values compared to predictions based solely on the zero-frequency component. This suggests that the ensuing non-monotonic interaction is more easily amenable to experimental detection. The presence of charge disorder in the intervening dielectric medium between the two slabs is shown to lead to an additional force that can be repulsive or attractive depending on the system parameters and can, for instance, wash out the non-monotonic behavior of the total force when the intervening slab contains a sufficiently large amount of disorder charges.

  18. Eigenvalues of collective emission in multi-slice slab configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedberg, Richard [Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Manassah, Jamal T. [HMS Consultants, Inc., PO Box 592, New York, NY 10028 (United States)], E-mail: jmanassah@gmail.com

    2008-06-02

    We compute the eigenmodes of collective emission from multi-slice slab configurations, using the transfer matrix formalism. We elucidate within this formalism the phenomena of 'Invisible Gaps' in multiple-slice configuration and of 'Precocious Superradiance' in periodic structures previously observed in numerical solutions of Maxwell-Bloch equations.

  19. Topological optical Bloch oscillations in a deformed slab waveguide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhi, Stefano

    2007-09-15

    Spatial Bloch oscillations of light waves of purely topological origin are theoretically shown to exist in weakly deformed slab waveguides. As the optical rays trapped in the deformed waveguide can roll freely, wave diffraction is strongly affected by the topology of the deformed surface, which can be tailored to simulate the effect of a tilted periodic refractive index.

  20. Fire-exposed continuous span composite steel-concrete slabs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Both, C.

    1996-01-01

    From experimental evidence, it was concluded that existing rules for the calculation of the behaviour of fire-exposed composite beams and slabs often lead to conservative solutions. Furthermore, the range of common applications had grown beyond the limits of existing calculation mies. It was feit

  1. Fire-exposed continuous span composite steel-concrete slabs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Both, K.

    1996-01-01

    From experimental evidence, it was concluded that existing rules for the calculation of the behaviour of fire-exposed composite beams and slabs often lead to conservative solutions. Furthermore, the range of common applications had grown beyond the limits of existing calculation rules. It was felt

  2. Fire-exposed continuous span composite steel-concrete slabs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Both, K.

    1996-01-01

    From experimental evidence, it was concluded that existing rules for the calculation of the behaviour of fire-exposed composite beams and slabs often lead to conservative solutions. Furthermore, the range of common applications had grown beyond the limits of existing calculation rules. It was felt t

  3. Study of global stability of tall buildings with prestressed slabs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Feitosa

    Full Text Available The use of prestressed concrete flat slabs in buildings has been increasing in recent years in the Brazilian market. Since the implementation of tall and slender buildings a trend in civil engineering and architecture fields, arises from the use of prestressed slabs a difficulty in ensuring the overall stability of a building without beams. In order to evaluate the efficiency of the main bracing systems used in this type of building, namely pillars in formed "U" in elevator shafts and stairs, and pillars in which the lengths are significantly larger than their widths, was elaborated a computational models of fictional buildings, which were processed and analyzed using the software CAD/TQS. From the variation of parameters such as: geometry of the pillars, thick slabs, characteristic strength of the concrete, reduceofthe coefficient of inertia for consideration of non-linearities of the physical elements, stiffness of the connections between slabs and pillars, among others, to analyze the influence of these variables on the overall stability of the building from the facing of instability parameter Gama Z, under Brazilian standard NBR 6118, in addition to performing the processing of building using the P-Delta iterative calculation method for the same purpose.

  4. Designing Meta Material Slabs Exhibiting Negative Refraction Using Topology Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Rasmus Ellebæk; Sigmund, O.

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a topology optimization based approach for designing meta materials exhibiting a desired negative refraction with high transmission at a given angle of incidence and frequency. The approach considers a finite slab of meta material consisting of axis-symmetric designable unit...

  5. Lower Bound Limit Analysis Of Slabs With Nonlinear Yield Criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbenhøft, Kristian; Damkilde, Lars

    2002-01-01

    A finite element formulation of the limit analysis of perfectly plastic slabs is given. An element with linear moment fields for which equilibrium is satisfied exactly is used in connection with an optimization algorithm taking into account the full nonlinearity of the yield criteria. Both load...

  6. Electromagnetic fluctuation-induced interactions in randomly charged slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezvani, Vahid; Sarabadani, Jalal; Naji, Ali; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2012-09-21

    Randomly charged net-neutral dielectric slabs are shown to interact across a featureless dielectric continuum with long-range electrostatic forces that scale with the statistical variance of their quenched random charge distribution and inversely with the distance between their bounding surfaces. By accounting for the whole spectrum of electromagnetic field fluctuations, we show that this long-range disorder-generated interaction extends well into the retarded regime where higher order (non-zero) Matsubara frequencies contribute significantly. This occurs even for highly clean samples with only a trace amount of charge disorder and shows that disorder effects can be important down to the nanoscale. As a result, the previously predicted non-monotonic behavior for the total force between dissimilar slabs as a function of their separation distance is substantially modified by higher order contributions, and in almost all cases of interest, we find that the equilibrium inter-surface separation is shifted to substantially larger values compared to predictions based solely on the zero-frequency component. This suggests that the ensuing non-monotonic interaction is more easily amenable to experimental detection. The presence of charge disorder in the intervening dielectric medium between the two slabs is shown to lead to an additional force that can be repulsive or attractive depending on the system parameters and can, for instance, wash out the non-monotonic behavior of the total force when the intervening slab contains a sufficiently large amount of disorder charges.

  7. An Analytical Study on Deflection and Stress Resultants of Composite Floor Slabs

    OpenAIRE

    山川, 哲雄; 郝, 洪濤; 田中, 躍一; Yamakawa, Tetsuo; Hao, Hongtao; Tanaka, Youichi

    1993-01-01

    The composite floor slab, which is composed of cast-in-place concrete and casting floor formworks, is assumed to be a double layered floor slab. This floor slab is proposed as ARC (Automation-oriented Reinforced Concrete Constructions) floor systems.Using the equivalent flexural rigidity for the double layered floor slabs consisting of two different elastic moduli, analytical solutions expressed in Fourier series by thin plate theory and by elementary beam theory can be easily applied to the ...

  8. Replicated Spectrographs in Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, Gary J

    2014-01-01

    As telescope apertures increase, the challenge of scaling spectrographic astronomical instruments becomes acute. The next generation of extremely large telescopes (ELTs) strain the availability of glass blanks for optics and engineering to provide sufficient mechanical stability. While breaking the relationship between telescope diameter and instrument pupil size by adaptive optics is a clear path for small fields of view, survey instruments exploiting multiplex advantages will be pressed to find cost-effective solutions. In this review we argue that exploiting the full potential of ELTs will require the barrier of the cost and engineering difficulty of monolithic instruments to be broken by the use of large-scale replication of spectrographs. The first steps in this direction have already been taken with the soon to be commissioned MUSE and VIRUS instruments for the Very Large Telescope and the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, respectively. MUSE employs 24 spectrograph channels, while VIRUS has 150 channels. We compa...

  9. SUMO and KSHV Replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Pei-Ching [Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Kung, Hsing-Jien, E-mail: hkung@nhri.org.tw [Institute for Translational Medicine, College of Medical Science and Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); UC Davis Cancer Center, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Division of Molecular and Genomic Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, 35 Keyan Road, Zhunan, Miaoli County 35053, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-29

    Small Ubiquitin-related MOdifier (SUMO) modification was initially identified as a reversible post-translational modification that affects the regulation of diverse cellular processes, including signal transduction, protein trafficking, chromosome segregation, and DNA repair. Increasing evidence suggests that the SUMO system also plays an important role in regulating chromatin organization and transcription. It is thus not surprising that double-stranded DNA viruses, such as Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), have exploited SUMO modification as a means of modulating viral chromatin remodeling during the latent-lytic switch. In addition, SUMO regulation allows the disassembly and assembly of promyelocytic leukemia protein-nuclear bodies (PML-NBs), an intrinsic antiviral host defense, during the viral replication cycle. Overcoming PML-NB-mediated cellular intrinsic immunity is essential to allow the initial transcription and replication of the herpesvirus genome after de novo infection. As a consequence, KSHV has evolved a way as to produce multiple SUMO regulatory viral proteins to modulate the cellular SUMO environment in a dynamic way during its life cycle. Remarkably, KSHV encodes one gene product (K-bZIP) with SUMO-ligase activities and one gene product (K-Rta) that exhibits SUMO-targeting ubiquitin ligase (STUbL) activity. In addition, at least two viral products are sumoylated that have functional importance. Furthermore, sumoylation can be modulated by other viral gene products, such as the viral protein kinase Orf36. Interference with the sumoylation of specific viral targets represents a potential therapeutic strategy when treating KSHV, as well as other oncogenic herpesviruses. Here, we summarize the different ways KSHV exploits and manipulates the cellular SUMO system and explore the multi-faceted functions of SUMO during KSHV’s life cycle and pathogenesis.

  10. Slab melting and magma formation beneath the southern Cascade arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walowski, K. J.; Wallace, P. J.; Clynne, M. A.; Rasmussen, D. J.; Weis, D.

    2016-07-01

    The processes that drive magma formation beneath the Cascade arc and other warm-slab subduction zones have been debated because young oceanic crust is predicted to largely dehydrate beneath the forearc during subduction. In addition, geochemical variability along strike in the Cascades has led to contrasting interpretations about the role of volatiles in magma generation. Here, we focus on the Lassen segment of the Cascade arc, where previous work has demonstrated across-arc geochemical variations related to subduction enrichment, and H-isotope data suggest that H2O in basaltic magmas is derived from the final breakdown of chlorite in the mantle portion of the slab. We use naturally glassy, olivine-hosted melt inclusions (MI) from the tephra deposits of eight primitive (MgO > 7 wt%) basaltic cinder cones to quantify the pre-eruptive volatile contents of mantle-derived melts in this region. The melt inclusions have B concentrations and isotope ratios that are similar to mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB), suggesting extensive dehydration of the downgoing plate prior to reaching sub-arc depths and little input of slab-derived B into the mantle wedge. However, correlations of volatile and trace element ratios (H2O/Ce, Cl/Nb, Sr/Nd) in the melt inclusions demonstrate that geochemical variability is the result of variable addition of a hydrous subduction component to the mantle wedge. Furthermore, correlations between subduction component tracers and radiogenic isotope ratios show that the subduction component has less radiogenic Sr and Pb than the Lassen sub-arc mantle, which can be explained by melting of subducted Gorda MORB beneath the arc. Agreement between pMELTS melting models and melt inclusion volatile, major, and trace element data suggests that hydrous slab melt addition to the mantle wedge can produce the range in primitive compositions erupted in the Lassen region. Our results provide further evidence that chlorite-derived fluids from the mantle portion of the

  11. Influence of concrete slabs on lateral torsional buckling of steel beams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maljaars, J.; Snijder, H.H.; Hoenderkamp, J.C.D.

    2007-01-01

    The use of pre-cast concrete floor slabs in steel framed structures is quite common. In the de-sign of the steel beams, the lateral restraining effect of the pre-cast concrete slab is normally safely neglected. However, the concrete slab will provide some horizontal restraint, even without special p

  12. High-power diode-pumped Tm:YLF slab laser

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schellhorn, M

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim is to develop a high-power Tm:YLF slab laser which can be utilized to pump a Ho slab laser. A 68 W Tm:YLF slab laser was recently presented in [1] pumped from one end by a single 6-bar stack delivering ~300 W of pump power. In this work, we...

  13. Slab melting and magma generation beneath the southern Cascade Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walowski, K. J.; Wallace, P. J.; Clynne, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Magma formation in subduction zones is interpreted to be caused by flux melting of the mantle wedge by fluids derived from dehydration of the downgoing oceanic lithosphere. In the Cascade Arc and other hot-slab subduction zones, however, most dehydration reactions occur beneath the forearc, necessitating a closer investigation of magma generation processes in this setting. Recent work combining 2-D steady state thermal models and the hydrogen isotope composition of olivine-hosted melt inclusions from the Lassen segment of the Cascades (Walowski et al., 2014; in review) has shown that partial melting of the subducted basaltic crust may be a key part of the subduction component in hot arcs. In this model, fluids from the slab interior (hydrated upper mantle) rise through the slab and cause flux-melting of the already dehydrated MORB volcanics in the upper oceanic crust. In the Shasta and Lassen segments of the southern Cascades, support for this interpretation comes from primitive magmas that have MORB-like Sr isotope compositions that correlate with subduction component tracers (H2O/Ce, Sr/P) (Grove et al. 2002, Borg et al. 2002). In addition, mass balance calculations of the composition of subduction components show ratios of trace elements to H2O that are at the high end of the global arc array (Ruscitto et al. 2012), consistent with the role of a slab-derived melt. Melting of the subducted basaltic crust should contribute a hydrous dacitic or rhyolitic melt (e.g. Jego and Dasgupta, 2013) to the mantle wedge rather than an H2O-rich aqueous fluid. We are using pHMELTS and pMELTS to model the reaction of hydrous slab melts with mantle peridotite as the melts rise through the inverted thermal gradient in the mantle wedge. The results of the modeling will be useful for understanding magma generation processes in arcs that are associated with subduction of relatively young oceanic lithosphere.

  14. Design of Autonomous Gel Actuators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuji Hashimoto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce autonomous gel actuators driven by chemical energy. The polymer gels prepared here have cyclic chemical reaction networks. With a cyclic reaction, the polymer gels generate periodical motion. The periodic motion of the gel is produced by the chemical energy of the oscillatory Belouzov-Zhabotinsky (BZ reaction. We have succeeded in making synthetic polymer gel move autonomously like a living organism. This experimental fact represents the great possibility of the chemical robot.

  15. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of bacterial chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawer, Julia S P; Leach, David R F

    2013-01-01

    The separation of fragments of DNA by agarose gel electrophoresis is integral to laboratory life. Nevertheless, standard agarose gel electrophoresis cannot resolve fragments bigger than 50 kb. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis is a technique that has been developed to overcome the limitations of standard agarose gel electrophoresis. Entire linear eukaryotic chromosomes, or large fragments of a chromosome that have been generated by the action of rare-cutting restriction endonucleases, can be separated using this technique. As a result, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis has many applications, from karyotype analysis of microbial genomes, to the analysis of chromosomal strand breaks and their repair intermediates, to the study of DNA replication and the identification of origins of replication. This chapter presents a detailed protocol for the preparation of Escherichia coli chromosomal DNA that has been embedded in agarose plugs, digested with the rare-cutting endonuclease NotI, and separated by contour-clamped homogeneous field electrophoresis. The principles in this protocol can be applied to the separation of all fragments of DNA whose size range is between 40 kb and 1 Mb.

  16. Efficient usage of Adabas replication

    CERN Document Server

    Storr, Dieter W

    2011-01-01

    In today's IT organization replication becomes more and more an essential technology. This makes Software AG's Event Replicator for Adabas an important part of your data processing. Setting the right parameters and establishing the best network communication, as well as selecting efficient target components, is essential for successfully implementing replication. This book provides comprehensive information and unique best-practice experience in the field of Event Replicator for Adabas. It also includes sample codes and configurations making your start very easy. It describes all components ne

  17. Solving the Telomere Replication Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestroni, Laetitia; Matmati, Samah; Coulon, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    Telomeres are complex nucleoprotein structures that protect the extremities of linear chromosomes. Telomere replication is a major challenge because many obstacles to the progression of the replication fork are concentrated at the ends of the chromosomes. This is known as the telomere replication problem. In this article, different and new aspects of telomere replication, that can threaten the integrity of telomeres, will be reviewed. In particular, we will focus on the functions of shelterin and the replisome for the preservation of telomere integrity. PMID:28146113

  18. Gel electrolytes and electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleischmann, Sven; Bunte, Christine; Mikhaylik, Yuriy V.; Viner, Veronika G.

    2017-09-05

    Gel electrolytes, especially gel electrolytes for electrochemical cells, are generally described. In some embodiments, the gel electrolyte layers comprise components a) to c). Component a) may be at least one layer of at least one polymer comprising polymerized units of: a1) at least one monomer containing an ethylenically unsaturated unit and an amido group and a2) at least one crosslinker. Component b) may be at least one conducting salt and component c) may be at least one solvent. Electrodes may comprise the components a), d) and e), wherein component a) may be at least one layer of at least one polymer as described herein. Component d) may be at least one electroactive layer and component e) may be at least one ceramic layer. Furthermore, electrochemical cells comprising component a) which may be at least one layer of at least one polymer as described herein, are also provided.

  19. Active Polymer Gel Actuators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuji Hashimoto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Many kinds of stimuli-responsive polymer and gels have been developed and applied to biomimetic actuators or artificial muscles. Electroactive polymers that change shape when stimulated electrically seem to be particularly promising. In all cases, however, the mechanical motion is driven by external stimuli, for example, reversing the direction of electric field. On the other hand, many living organisms can generate an autonomous motion without external driving stimuli like self-beating of heart muscles. Here we show a novel biomimetic gel actuator that can walk spontaneously with a wormlike motion without switching of external stimuli. The self-oscillating motion is produced by dissipating chemical energy of oscillating reaction. Although the gel is completely composed of synthetic polymer, it shows autonomous motion as if it were alive.

  20. TESTS ON STRUCTURALLY DEFICIENT RC SLABS STRENGTHENED WITH FIBRE REINFORCED POLYMER (FRP) COMPOSITES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.T. Smith; S.J. Kim

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a series of tests on fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) strengthened reinforced concrete (RC) slabs, which were recently undertaken at the University of Technology,Sydney. The slabs were reinforced with high-strength low-ductile steel reinforcement and strengthened with either carbon FRP (CFRP) or glass FRP (GFRP) composites. The unstrengthened control slabs failed by fracture of the steel tension reinforcement while the FRP strengthened slabs failed by debonding of the FRP followed by rupture of the tension steel. The FRP-strengthened slabs were stronger than their unstrengthened counterparts and displayed considerable ductility.

  1. An investigation on the behaviour and stiffness of reinforced concrete slabs subjected to torsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, M. C. T.; Pham, P. T.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation on RC slab under torsion, by both experiment and finite element analysis. The torsion tests were done on three similar square RC slabs with dimensions of 1900×1900×150 mm. The behaviour of slabs at pre-cracking and post-cracking of concrete phases were investigated, via Load-displacement, twisting moment-curvature relationships, and torsional stiffness of slabs. The experimental results are compared with the FEA and the results in literatures. The torsional stiffness of slab at the phase of concrete cracked and steel yield is about 1/25 of the stiffness at the pre-cracking phase.

  2. Enhanced bandgap in annular photonic-crystal silicon-on-insulator asymmetric slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jin; Citrin, D S; Wu, Huaming; Gao, Dingshan; Zhou, Zhiping

    2011-06-15

    Photonic band structures of annular photonic-crystal (APC) silicon-on-insulator (SOI) asymmetric slabs with finite thickness were investigated by the three-dimensional plane-wave expansion method. The results show that for a broad range of air-volume filling factors, APC slabs can exhibit a significantly larger bandgap than conventional circular-hole photonic-crystal (PC) slabs. Bandgap enhancements over conventional air hole PC SOI slabs as large as twofold are predicted for low air-volume filling factors below 15%. This desirable behavior suggests a potential for APC SOI slabs to serve as the basis of various optical cavities, waveguides, and mirrors.

  3. Charter School Replication. Policy Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhim, Lauren Morando

    2009-01-01

    "Replication" is the practice of a single charter school board or management organization opening several more schools that are each based on the same school model. The most rapid strategy to increase the number of new high-quality charter schools available to children is to encourage the replication of existing quality schools. This policy guide…

  4. Permeability of eroded enamel following application of different fluoride gels and CO2 laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepri, Taísa Penazzo; Colucci, Vivian; Turssi, Cecília Pedroso; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the combined effect of fluoride compounds and CO(2) laser in controlling the permeability of eroded enamel. Bovine enamel slabs (3 × 2 mm) were cycled twice through an alternating erosion and remineralization regimen. Slabs were immersed in 20 ml of orange juice (pH 3.84) for 5 min under agitation, rinsed with deionized water, and stored in artificial saliva for 4 h to form erosive lesions. Specimens were then divided into four groups (n = 10), which were treated for 1 min with either a control or with one of the following gels: amine fluoride (AmF), titanium tetrafluoride (TiF(4)), or sodium fluoride (NaF). Half of the specimens were irradiated with a CO(2) laser (λ = 10.6 μm; 2.0 W). Specimens were cycled two more times through the aforementioned erosion-remineralization regimen and were subjected to permeability assessment. ANOVA demonstrated a significant interaction between fluoride and laser treatment (p = 0.0152). Tukey's test showed that when fluoride was applied alone, TiF(4) resulted in lower enamel permeability than that observed after application of the placebo gel. Intermediate permeability values were noted after NaF and AmF had been used. A significant reduction in enamel permeability was obtained when fluoride was combined with CO(2) laser treatment, with no difference between fluoride gels. Permeability of eroded enamel may be reduced by combining the application of fluoride gels with CO(2) laser irradiation.

  5. Analysis of the Behaviour of Composite Steel and Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete Slabs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mindaugas Petkevičius

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available There was a pending influence of steel fiber on the strength and stiffness of composite steel–concrete slabs under statical short–time load. Steel profiled sheeting and steel fiber reinforced concrete were used for specimens. Four composite slabs were made. Experimental investigations into the behaviour and influence of steel fiber reinforced concrete in composite slabs were conducted. Transverse, longitudinal, shear deformation and deflection of the slab were measured. The results indicated that the use of steel fiber in composite slabs was effective: strength was 20–24 % higher and the meanings of deflections under the action of the bending moment were 0,6MR (where MR is the bending moment at failure of the slabs and were 16–18 % lower for slabs with usual concrete. Article in Lithuanian

  6. Investigation of Effect of Slab Opening Location to the Shear Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burak Yön

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, it is investigated the effect of slab opening location in reinforced concrete building to the structural behavior. For investigation of slab irregularity, three multi storey irregular structures that have different slab opening locations in structure plans and one regular structure are designed. Linear dynamic analyses are performed for the structure models using Time History Analysis method. 13 March 1992 Erzincan Earthquake acceleration records are used for these analyses. It is assumed that slabs of selected structures are modeled as elastic diaphragm. SAP2000 Structural Analysis Program is used in the analyses. Values of slab that near space shear stress obtained from dynamic analyses of selected structures are comparatively evaluated. According to analyses results, it is determined that location of slab opening of structures reasonably both affects the behavior of structures and occurs great slab shear stress.

  7. Electron microscopic analysis of rotavirus assembly-replication intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudreaux, Crystal E.; Kelly, Deborah F. [Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine and Research Institute, Roanoke, VA (United States); McDonald, Sarah M., E-mail: mcdonaldsa@vtc.vt.edu [Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine and Research Institute, Roanoke, VA (United States); Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology, Virginia—Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Rotaviruses (RVs) replicate their segmented, double-stranded RNA genomes in tandem with early virion assembly. In this study, we sought to gain insight into the ultrastructure of RV assembly-replication intermediates (RIs) using transmission electron microscopy (EM). Specifically, we examined a replicase-competent, subcellular fraction that contains all known RV RIs. Three never-before-seen complexes were visualized in this fraction. Using in vitro reconstitution, we showed that ~15-nm doughnut-shaped proteins in strings were nonstructural protein 2 (NSP2) bound to viral RNA transcripts. Moreover, using immunoaffinity-capture EM, we revealed that ~20-nm pebble-shaped complexes contain the viral RNA polymerase (VP1) and RNA capping enzyme (VP3). Finally, using a gel purification method, we demonstrated that ~30–70-nm electron-dense, particle-shaped complexes represent replicase-competent core RIs, containing VP1, VP3, and NSP2 as well as capsid proteins VP2 and VP6. The results of this study raise new questions about the interactions among viral proteins and RNA during the concerted assembly–replicase process. - Highlights: • Rotaviruses replicate their genomes in tandem with early virion assembly. • Little is known about rotavirus assembly-replication intermediates. • Assembly-replication intermediates were imaged using electron microscopy.

  8. LHCb experience with LFC replication

    CERN Document Server

    Bonifazi, F; Perez, E D; D'Apice, A; dell'Agnello, L; Düllmann, D; Girone, M; Re, G L; Martelli, B; Peco, G; Ricci, P P; Sapunenko, V; Vagnoni, V; Vitlacil, D

    2008-01-01

    Database replication is a key topic in the framework of the LHC Computing Grid to allow processing of data in a distributed environment. In particular, the LHCb computing model relies on the LHC File Catalog, i.e. a database which stores information about files spread across the GRID, their logical names and the physical locations of all the replicas. The LHCb computing model requires the LFC to be replicated at Tier-1s. The LCG 3D project deals with the database replication issue and provides a replication service based on Oracle Streams technology. This paper describes the deployment of the LHC File Catalog replication to the INFN National Center for Telematics and Informatics (CNAF) and to other LHCb Tier-1 sites. We performed stress tests designed to evaluate any delay in the propagation of the streams and the scalability of the system. The tests show the robustness of the replica implementation with performance going much beyond the LHCb requirements.

  9. DATABASE REPLICATION IN HETEROGENOUS PLATFORM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendro Nindito

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of diverse database technologies in enterprises today is increasingly a common practice. To provide high availability and survavibality of real-time information, a database replication technology that has capability to replicate databases under heterogenous platforms is required. The purpose of this research is to find the technology with such capability. In this research, the data source is stored in MSSQL database server running on Windows. The data will be replicated to MySQL running on Linux as the destination. The method applied in this research is prototyping in which the processes of development and testing can be done interactively and repeatedly. The key result of this research is that the replication technology applied, which is called Oracle GoldenGate, can successfully manage to do its task in replicating data in real-time and heterogeneous platforms.

  10. LHCb experience with LFC replication

    CERN Document Server

    Carbone, Angelo; Dafonte Perez, Eva; D'Apice, Antimo; dell'Agnello, Luca; Duellmann, Dirk; Girone, Maria; Lo Re, Giuseppe; Martelli, Barbara; Peco, Gianluca; Ricci, Pier Paolo; Sapunenko, Vladimir; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Vitlacil, Dejan

    2007-01-01

    Database replication is a key topic in the framework of the LHC Computing Grid to allow processing of data in a distributed environment. In particular, the LHCb computing model relies on the LHC File Catalog, i.e. database which stores information about files spread across the GRID, their logical names and the physical locations of all the replicas. The LHCb computing model requires the LFC to be replicated at Tier-1s. The LCG 3D project deals with the database replication issue and provides a replication service based on Oracle Streams technology. This paper describes the deployment of the LHC File Catalog replication to the INFN National Center for Telematics and Informations (CNAF) and to other LHCb Tier-1 sites. We performed stress tests designed to evaluate any delay in the propagation of the streams and the scalability of the system. The tests show the robustness of the replica implementation with performance going much beyond the LHCb requirements.

  11. gonarthrosis; therapy; Karmolis gel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. V. Zavodovsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the efficacy, tolerance, and safety of Carmolis topical gel in patients with gonarthrosis. Subjects and methods. The investigation enrolled 60 patients with knee osteoarthrosis (OA who were divided into two groups: 1 40 patients received Carmolis topical gel in addition to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs; 2 20 patients took NSAIDS only (a control group. The treatment duration was 2 weeks. In both groups, therapeutic effectiveness was evaluated from changes in the WOMAC index, pain intensity at rest and during movement by the visual analog scale (VAS. The disease activity was also assessed by a physician and a patient (a Likert scale, local swelling and hyperthermia of the affected joint, the efficiency of treatment, and daily needs for NSAIDs were deter- mined. Results. The performed treatment in both patent groups showed positive clinical changes. Combination therapy involving Carmolis gel displayed greater reductions in WOMAC pain and resting and movement pain than in the con- trol group (as assessed by VAS. On completion of the investigation, considerable improvement was, in the physicians' opinion, noted in 38 (95% patients using Carmolis, which coincided with self-evaluations of the patients. During Carmolis application, the starting dose of NSAIDs could be reduced in 18 (45% patients. Adverse reactions occurred infrequently and required no therapy discontinuation. Conclusion. Carmolis topical gel is effective in relieving clinical symptoms in patients with gonarthrosis, well tolerated, and safe, which can recommend its use in the combination treatment of knee OA.

  12. Flexural Behavior of Continuous Bubbled Reinforced Reactive Powder Concrete Flat Slab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Redha K. Mahmood

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental investigation on flexural behavior of continuous bubbled reinforced Reactive Powder Concrete (RPC flat slabs. Bubbled slab is one of the various types of voided slabs. It consist of bubbles placed inside a concrete slab which will reduce the self-weight of the structure by about 35% (Tina Lai 2009. On the other hand, using RPC make it possible for structural member to have smaller dimensions due to the great strength of this type of concrete. In this study these two method are used to increase the building spaces dimensions by reducing self-weigh of the structure by using bubbled slabs and to decrease the structural members' dimensions by using RPC have been investigated together. To study the flexural behavior of continuous bubbled flat slabs such as the ultimate load carrying capacity, central deflection and slabs crack pattern at the ultimate load, seven types of slabs were tested. The parameters of the study were type of concrete (RPC and Normal Concrete (NC, bubbles diameter to slab thickness ratio (D/t of (0.6 and 0.7, type of loading (distributed and line load and solid slab. The test results show that the crack pattern and ultimate load capacity as well as maximum deflection depends on all of the mentioned parameters, were by increasing (D/t ratio the ultimate load capacity increases about (7.36%, 5.46% and 16.52% for RPC slabs under distributed load, line load and NC slabs, respectively. The solid slab increases the ultimate load about (4.05% compare to bubbled slab. Also, the line load decreases the ultimate load compare to distributed load by (3.45-5.16% for different (D/t ratio, and using the NC also decreases the ultimate load compare to RPC by (48-52.13% for different (D/t ratio

  13. Slab2 - Providing updated subduction zone geometries and modeling tools to the community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, G. P.; Hearne, M. G.; Portner, D. E.; Borjas, C.; Moore, G.; Flamme, H.

    2015-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey database of global subduction zone geometries (Slab1.0) combines a variety of geophysical data sets (earthquake hypocenters, moment tensors, active source seismic survey images of the shallow subduction zone, bathymetry, trench locations, and sediment thickness information) to image the shape of subducting slabs in three dimensions, at approximately 85% of the world's convergent margins. The database is used extensively for a variety of purposes, from earthquake source imaging, to magnetotelluric modeling. Gaps in Slab1.0 exist where input data are sparse and/or where slabs are geometrically complex (and difficult to image with an automated approach). Slab1.0 also does not include information on the uncertainty in the modeled geometrical parameters, or the input data used to image them, and provides no means to reproduce the models it described. Currently underway, Slab2 will update and replace Slab1.0 by: (1) extending modeled slab geometries to all global subduction zones; (2) incorporating regional data sets that may describe slab geometry in finer detail than do previously used teleseismic data; (3) providing information on the uncertainties in each modeled slab surface; (4) modifying our modeling approach to a fully-three dimensional data interpolation, rather than following the 2-D to 3-D steps of Slab1.0; (5) migrating the slab modeling code base to a more universally distributable language, Python; and (6) providing the code base and input data we use to create our models, such that the community can both reproduce the slab geometries, and add their own data sets to ours to further improve upon those models in the future. In this presentation we describe our vision for Slab2, and the first results of this modeling process.

  14. Dynamics of Mantle Circulation Associated with Slab Window Formation: Insights from 3D Laboratory Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaume, B.; Funiciello, F.; Moroni, M.; Faccenna, C.; Martinod, J.

    2009-12-01

    Slab window can form either by the intersection of a spreading ridge with a subduction zone or because of internal deformation of the slab that leads to its disruption. The main consequences of this phenomenon are the modifications of the physical, chemical and thermal conditions in the backarc mantle that in turn affect the tectonic and magmatic evolution of the overriding plate. We performed laboratory models of a two-layer linear viscous slab (silicone putty)-upper mantle (glucose syrup) system to quantitatively investigate the pattern of mantle circulation within the slab window (using Feature Tracking image analysis technique) and its influence on the kinematics of the system. Two different geometries have been tested considering a window located (a) at slab edges or (b) within the slab. Kinematic consequences of slab window have been explored to understand the dynamics of the mantle-slab interaction. Configuration (a) implies a reduction of the slab width (W) during subduction and is characterized by toroidal fluxes around the slab edges. The abrupt opening of lateral slab windows produces an acceleration of the trench retreat and subduction velocity, such as 40% for a three-fold width reduction. We interpret this behavior as mostly due to the decrease in the toroidal flow inside subduction windows, scaling with W2. Configuration (b) has been designed to explore the pattern of mantle flow within the window in the case of a laterally constrained subduction system. Slab window, which had a width (Ww) fixed to 15 % of the slab width, opened in the trench-perpendicular direction. It produced the formation of two toroidal mantle cells, centered on the slab midpoint and laterally growing as the slab window enlarged. Particles extruded through the slab window did not mix with particles located in the mantle wedge, the boundary between both reaching distances from the trench up to 3×Ww in the trench-perpendicular direction, and up to 1.5×Ww from the window edge in

  15. Optimal Material Layout - Applied on Reinforced Concrete Slabs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dollerup, Niels; Jepsen, Michael S.; Damkilde, Lars

    2015-01-01

    to determine the optimal material layout of a slab in the ultimate load state, based on simple inputs such as outer geometry, boundary conditions, multiple load cases and design domains. The material layout of the optimal design can either be fully orthotropic or isotropic, or a combination with a predefined......This paper introduces a general, finite-element-based optimisation tool for improving the material layout of concrete structures. The application presented is general and exemplified by material optimisation of reinforced concrete slabs. By utilising the optimisation tool, it is possible...... coupling between design domains and reinforcement directions. The implementation is a lower bound formulation, resulting in a convex optimisation problem that consists of a number of linear constraints from the equilibrium equations and a number of convex non-linear constraints from the yield criteria...

  16. Designing Meta Material Slabs Exhibiting Negative Refraction Using Topology Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Rasmus Ellebæk; Sigmund, O.

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a topology optimization based approach for designing meta materials exhibiting a desired negative refraction with high transmission at a given angle of incidence and frequency. The approach considers a finite slab of meta material consisting of axis-symmetric designable unit...... cells subjected to an exterior field. The unit cell is designed to achieve the desired properties based on tailoring the response of the meta material slab underthe exterior field. The approach is directly applicable to physical problems modeled by the Helmholtz equation, such as acoustic, elastic...... and electromagnetic wave problems. Acoustic meta materials with unit cell size on the order of half the wave length are considered as examples. Optimized designs are presented and their performance under varying frequency and angle of incidence is investigated....

  17. Characteristics of shell thickness in a slab continuous casting mold

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Di-feng Wu; Shu-sen Cheng; Zi-jian Cheng

    2009-01-01

    The key to reduce shell breakout in the continuous casting process is to control shell thickness in the mold.A numerical simulation on the turbulent flow and heat transfer coupled with solidification in the slab mold using the volume of fluid (VOF) model and the enthalpy-porosity scheme was conducted and the emphasis was put upon the flow effect on the shell thickness profiles in longitudinal and transverse directions.The results show that the jet acts a stronger impingement on the shell of narrow face,which causes a zero-increase of shell thickness in a certain range near the impingement point.The thinnest shell on the slab cross-section locates primarily in the center of the narrow face,and secondly near the comer of the wide face.Nozzle optimization can obviously increase the shell thickness and make it more uniform.

  18. Oscillating Casimir force between two slabs in a Fermi sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li-Wei, Chen; Guo-Zhen, Su; Jin-Can, Chen

    2012-01-01

    The Casimir effect for two parallel slabs immersed in an ideal Fermi sea is investigated at both zero and nonzero temperatures. It is found that the Casimir effect in a Fermi gas is distinctly different from that in an electromagnetic field or a massive Bose gas. In contrast to the familiar result...... that the Casimir force decreases monotonically with the increase of the separation L between two slabs in an electromagnetic field and a massive Bose gas, the Casimir force in a Fermi gas oscillates as a function of L. The Casimir force can be either attractive or repulsive, depending sensitively on the magnitude...... of L. In addition, it is found that the amplitude of the Casimir force in a Fermi gas decreases with the increase of the temperature, which also is contrary to the case in a Bose gas, since the bosonic Casimir force increases linearly with the increase of the temperature in the region T

  19. Non-Fourier heat conduction in an exponentially graded slab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raveshi, M. R.

    2016-03-01

    The present article investigates one-dimensional non-Fourier heat conduction in a functionally graded material by using the differential transformation method. The studied geometry is a finite functionally graded slab, which is initially at a uniform temperature and suddenly experiences a temperature rise at one side, while the other side is kept insulated. A general non-Fourier heat transfer equation related to the functionally graded slab is derived. The problem is solved in the Laplace domain analytically, and the final results in the time domain are obtained by using numerical inversion of the Laplace transform. The obtained results are compared with the exact solution to verify the accuracy of the proposed method, which shows excellent agreement.

  20. Bolometric detection of ferromagnetic resonance in YIG slab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Sa; Białek, Marcin; Zhang, Youguang; Zhao, Weisheng; Yu, Haiming; Ansermet, Jean-Philippe

    2017-10-01

    The resistance of the Pt bar deposited on the YIG slab was monitored while the magnetic field was ramped through the ferromagnetic resonance with the YIG slab facing a coplanar waveguide resonator excited at 4.3 GHz excitation. The resistance change provides detection of the ferromagnetic resonance with a high signal-to-noise ratio. It is ascribed to a change in the temperature of the Pt bars. The thermal origin of the signal is confirmed by the observation that the signal vanishes when field modulation is applied at frequencies above 6 Hz. The spin pumping effect was vanishingly small, and the anisotropic magnetoresistance of the Pt bar, though quite easily observed, would imply a rectification voltage that is much smaller than the bolometric effect.

  1. Laplace-Fourier analysis and instabilities of a gainy slab

    CERN Document Server

    Hågenvik, Hans Olaf

    2015-01-01

    The idealization of monochromatic plane waves leads to considerable simplifications in the analysis of electromagnetic systems. However, for active systems this idealization may be dangerous due to the presence of growing waves. Here we consider a gainy slab, and use a realistic incident beam, which is both causal and has finite width. This clarifies some apparent paradoxes arising from earlier analyses of this setup. In general it turns out to be necessary to involve complex frequencies $\\omega$ and/or complex transversal wavenumbers $k_x$. Simultaneously real $\\omega$ and $k_x$ cannot describe amplified waves in a slab which is infinite in the transversal direction. We also show that the only possibility to have an absolute instability for a finite width beam, is if a normally incident plane wave would experience an instability.

  2. Negotiating Multicollinearity with Spike-and-Slab Priors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ročková, Veronika; George, Edward I

    2014-08-01

    In multiple regression under the normal linear model, the presence of multicollinearity is well known to lead to unreliable and unstable maximum likelihood estimates. This can be particularly troublesome for the problem of variable selection where it becomes more difficult to distinguish between subset models. Here we show how adding a spike-and-slab prior mitigates this difficulty by filtering the likelihood surface into a posterior distribution that allocates the relevant likelihood information to each of the subset model modes. For identification of promising high posterior models in this setting, we consider three EM algorithms, the fast closed form EMVS version of Rockova and George (2014) and two new versions designed for variants of the spike-and-slab formulation. For a multimodal posterior under multicollinearity, we compare the regions of convergence of these three algorithms. Deterministic annealing versions of the EMVS algorithm are seen to substantially mitigate this multimodality. A single simple running example is used for illustration throughout.

  3. Factors affecting the deterioration of concrete pavement slabs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.M. Morozov

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of constructions under actual operating conditions is affected by exposure to the environment. It is important that concrete roads and airport pavings are resistant not only to mechanical damage, but also to the effects of alternate freezing and thawing. The causes of early failure in concrete have been shown using prefabricated road slabs as an example. The causes of loss of performance properties of the roadway have been established, which are primarily dependent on the quality of raw materials in the concrete. It was found that, aside from durability, uniformity and porosity are important factors in determining the frost resistance of concrete roadways. It was shown that high aluminate content in the cement leads to concrete destruction in the first year of structure use. The results may also indirectly indicate a violation of forming technology during slab production.

  4. Electromagnetic wave propagation through a slab of a dispersive medium

    CERN Document Server

    Ismail, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    A method is proposed for the analysis of the propagation of electromagnetic waves through a homogeneous slab of a medium with Drude-Lorentz dispersion behavior, and excited by a causal sinusoidal source. An expression of the time dependent field, free from branch-cuts in the plane of complex frequencies, is established. This method provides the complete temporal response in both the steady-state and transient regimes in terms of discrete poles contributions. The Sommerfeld and Brillouin precursors are retrieved and the corresponding set of poles are identified. In addition, the contribution in the transient field of the resonance frequency in the Drude-Lorentz model is exhybited, and the effect of reflections resulting from the refractive index mismatch at the interfaces of the slab are analyzed.

  5. Dichromatic nonlinear eigenmodes in slab waveguide with chi(2) nonlinearity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmanyan, S A; Nevière, M

    2001-03-01

    The existence of purely nonlinear eigenmodes in a waveguiding structure composed of a slab with quadratic nonlinearity surrounded by (non)linear claddings is reported. Modes having bright and dark solitonlike shapes and consisting of two mutually locked harmonics are identified. Asymmetrical modes are shown to exist in symmetrical environments. Constraints for the existence of the modes are derived in terms of parameters of guiding structure materials.

  6. Transverse Mode Formation in Longitudinally Pumped Miniature Slab Lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jian-Qiu; YE Xin; FANG Tao

    2006-01-01

    The formation of transverse modes in longitudinally pumped miniature slab lasers is investigated theoretically and experimentally. The longitudinally non-uniform gain-guiding is studied by expanding the electric field into the Hermite-Gaussian functions that satisfy boundary conditions of the resonator. Non-Gaussian transversal beam profiles in the near field are found and the beam diameter is reduced when the pump spot becomes smaller. The experimental observation agrees with the theoretical calculation.

  7. End-Pumped Tm:YAG Ceramic Slab Lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Xiao-Jin; XU Jian-Qiu; ZHANG Wen-Xin; JIANG Sen-Xue; PAN Yu-Bai

    2009-01-01

    Lasers from a Tm:YAG ceramic aare reported for the first time to our best knowledge. The Tm:YAG ceramic slab is end-pumped by a laser diode with central wavelength 792nm. At room temperature, the maximum continuous-wave output power is 4.5 W, and the sloping efficiency is obtained to be 20.5%. The laser spectrum of the Tm: YAG ceramic is centered at 2015 nm.

  8. Beam splitting by a plane-parallel absorptive slab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halevi, P

    1982-10-01

    A study of the transmission of inhomogeneous electromagnetic waves through an interface between a transparent and an absorbing medium leads to the prediction of a novel effect. A beam of unpolarized light passing through a dissipative plane-parallel slab splits into two parallel beams. The electric field in one beam is perpendicular to the plane of incidence, whereas in the other beam it is parallel to this plane.

  9. Oscillation modes and transmission into a Fibonacci slab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Arce, Lamberto; Molinar-Tabares, Martin; Campos-Garcia, Julio; Figueroa-Navarro, Carlos; Isasi-Siqueiros, Leonardo; Manzanares-Martinez, Betsabe

    In our contribution we developed a study on the behavior of the transmission modes and a Pt / Zn slab of a Fibonacci array of longitudinal and transverse acoustic waves. We have worked with arrangements from n = 1 to10 and has managed to find the energy bands and transmission, filling factor 0.4 observing the appearance of Pseudo-Gaps in the evolution of the study when the arrangement Fibonacci increases. We acknowledge the support of SNI CONACYT.

  10. Hydrogen sensor based on metallic photonic crystal slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nau, D; Seidel, A; Orzekowsky, R B; Lee, S-H; Deb, S; Giessen, H

    2010-09-15

    We present a hydrogen sensor based on metallic photonic crystal slabs. Tungsten trioxide (WO(3)) is used as a waveguide layer below an array of gold nanowires. Hydrogen exposure influences the optical properties of this photonic crystal arrangement by gasochromic mechanisms, where the photonic crystal geometry leads to sharp spectral resonances. Measurements reveal a change of the transmission depending on the hydrogen concentration. Theoretical limits for the detection range and sensitivity of this approach are discussed.

  11. An Incursion on Punching of Reinforced Concrete Flat Slabs

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Starting from the early 60s continuous studies have been made regarding punching of concrete flat slabs. The evolution of technology and calculus systems influenced this engineering branch. Nowadays is possible to account in structural analysis all the non-linear behaviour of reinforced and prestressed concrete and to get the most close structural response in comparison with the real behaviour. As a controversy matter, several tests and theories have been developed. Nowadays researchers try t...

  12. DESIGN METHOD OF BENDING CAPACITY OF CONTINUOUS COMPOSITE SLAB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Jin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a calculation method for predicting the ultimate loading capacity of continuous composite slabs. Only the small scale slide block test was needed to determine few mechanical parameters, and less cost had to be paid, in comparison to the conventional m-k method. Various load conditions and parameters were considered. Comparisons between test results and predicted results have shown that the proposed method has enough precision. Furthermore, the simplified method was also proposed for practical design.

  13. Temperature distribution of an infinite slab under point heat source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Zhao-Chun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature field in an infinite slab under an instantaneous or continuous point heat source is studied numerically. The numerical results reveal the temperature distribution and its change regularity, which are significant for the temperature control encountered in many practical manufacturing processes, such as the laser treatment processes on the surface of films, welding and cutting, and even the design of measuring devices for thermal properties of material.

  14. Project B: Improved Liquid Steel Feed For Slab Casters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brent S. Isaacson; Mike Slepian; Thomas Richter

    1998-10-01

    This report describes the completion of the development of an electromagnetic valve to control liquid steel flow for improved liquid steel feeding for slab casters. Achievements result from a joint research effort between Westinghouse Science and Technology Center, North American Refractories and U.S. Steel. This effort is part of the American Iron and Steel Institute's (AISI) Advanced Process Control Program, a collaboration between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and fifteen North American steel makers.

  15. Technical Report: Optimizing the Slab Yard Planning and Crane Scheduling Problem using a Two-Stage Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Dohn; Clausen, Jens

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present The Slab Yard Planning and Crane Scheduling Problem. The problem has its origin in steel production facilities with a large throughput. A slab yard is used as a buffer for slabs that are needed in the upcoming production. Slabs are transported by cranes and the problem c...

  16. NACSA Charter School Replication Guide: The Spectrum of Replication Options. Authorizing Matters. Replication Brief 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Paul

    2010-01-01

    One of the most important and high-profile issues in public education reform today is the replication of successful public charter school programs. With more than 5,000 failing public schools in the United States, there is a tremendous need for strong alternatives for parents and students. Replicating successful charter school models is an…

  17. Electromagnetic and ultrasonic investigations on a roman marble slab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capizzi, Patrizia; Cosentino, Pietro L.

    2010-05-01

    The archaeological Museum of Rome (Museo delle Terme di Diocleziano) asked our group about the physical consistency of a marble slab (II - III century AD) that has recently fallen down during the transportation for an exhibition. In fact, due to insurance conflict, it was necessary to control the new fractures due to the recent accident and distinguish them from the ancient ones. The sculptured slab (today's size is 1280 x 70 x 9 cm), cut at the ends for a re-use as an inscription in the rear face, was restored (assemblage of different broken parts and cleaning) in contemporary times. We used different methodologies to investigate the slab: namely a pacometer (Protovale Elcometer) to individuate internal coupling pins, GPR (2000 MHz) and Ultrasonic (55 kHz) tomographic high-density surveys to investigate the internal extension of all the visible fractures and to search for the unknown internal ones. For every methodology used the quality of the acquired data was relatively high. They have been processed and compared to give a set of information useful for the bureaucratic problems of the Museum. Later on, the data have been processed in depth, for studying how to improve the data processing and for extracting all the information contained in the whole set of experimental data. Finally, the results of such a study in depth are exposed in detail.

  18. Calibrating a large slab vessel: A battle of the bulge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, I.R.

    1993-10-01

    Slab tanks (critically-safe-by-geometry vessels) were proposed for the storage of concentrated, highly-enriched uranium solution in the design of the Fuel Processing Restoration (FPR) Facility at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). Currently, measurements of bulk mass in ICPP annular vessels have standard deviations on the order of 0.2%, or less. ICPP personnel felt that their inexperience with the aforementioned expansions would prevent them from attaining comparable precision with slab tanks. To help assess the measurement accuracy of slab vessels, a full-scale mockup of those proposed for the FPR Facility was installed for test calibrations. These calibrations were designed to detect vessel expansion under differing conditions. This paper will compare the base-line, water calibrations with those of the higher-density aluminum nitrate, and any observed deflection will be described using vessel calibration techniques. The calibration using water at an elevated temperature was not performed due to the difficulty of maintaining the elevated temperature. This calibration probably will not be conducted because the construction of the FPR Facility has been halted.

  19. Prediction of temperature distribution in the hot rolling of slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serajzadeh, S.; Karimi Taheri, A.; Mucciardi, F.

    2002-03-01

    In the process of continuous hot slab rolling, it is vital to know the temperature distribution within the slab along the length of the rolling mill because temperature is the dominant parameter controlling the kinetics of metallurgical transformations and the flow stress of the rolled metal. In other words, the microstructural changes, the mechanical properties as well as the final dimensions of the product and roll-force depend on the temperature distribution within the metal being rolled. In this paper, a mathematical model based on the finite element method is utilized to predict the temperature distribution and microstructural changes during the continuous hot slab rolling process. The effects of various parameters such as the heat of deformation, the work-roll temperature, the rolling speed, and the heat transfer coefficient between the work-roll and the metal are all taken into account in the analyses. To verify the validity of the model and the generated computer code, a comparison is carried out between the theoretical and plant-recorded results.

  20. Reducing Railway Noise with Porous Sound-Absorbing Concrete Slabs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caiyou Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of porous sound-absorbing concrete slabs on railway noise reduction is examined in this paper. First, the acoustical absorption coefficients of porous concrete materials with various aggregate types, gradations, fibre contents, and compaction indexes are measured in the laboratory. The laboratory results show that porous concrete that uses a composite of expanded perlite and slag as aggregate can not only obtain good acoustical absorption properties but also satisfy mechanical requirements. Also, the gradation of the combined aggregate has a significant effect on the acoustic absorption performance of the porous concrete, with an optimal aggregate gradation of 1~3 mm. Furthermore, the fibre content and compaction index affect both the strength and the acoustic absorption property of the porous concrete, with the optimum value of 0.3% and 1.6, respectively. Then, the findings from the laboratory studies are used to make porous sound-absorbing concrete slabs, which are applied in a test section. The measurements indicate that porous sound-absorbing concrete slabs can significantly reduce railway noise at different train speeds and that the amount of the noise reduction changes roughly linearly with speed when the train is traveling at less than 200 km/h. The maximum noise reduction is 4.05 dB at a speed of 200 km/h.

  1. High Performance Slab-on-Grade Foundation Insulation Retrofits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, Louise F. [NorthernSTAR, St. Paul, MN (United States); Mosiman, Garrett E. [NorthernSTAR, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    2015-09-01

    ?A more accurate assessment of SOG foundation insulation energy savings than traditionally possible is now feasible. This has been enabled by advances in whole building energy simulation with 3-dimensional foundation modelling integration at each time step together with an experimental measurement of the site energy savings of SOG foundation insulation. Ten SOG insulation strategies were evaluated on a test building to identify an optimum retrofit insulation strategy in a zone 6 climate (Minneapolis, MN). The optimum insulation strategy in terms of energy savings and cost effectiveness consisted of two components: (a) R-20 XPS insulation above grade, and, (b) R-20 insulation at grade (comprising an outer layer of R-10 insulation and an interior layer of R-12 poured polyurethane insulation) tapering to R-10 XPS insulation at half the below-grade wall height (the lower half of the stem wall was uninsulated). The optimum insulation strategy was applied to single and multi-family residential buildings in climate zone 4 - 7. The highest site energy savings of 5% was realized for a single family home in Duluth, MN, and the lowest savings of 1.4 % for a 4-unit townhouse in Richmond, VA. SOG foundation insulation retrofit simple paybacks ranged from 18 to 47 years. There are other benefits of SOG foundation insulation resulting from the increase in the slab surface temperatures. These include increased occupant thermal comfort, and a decrease in slab surface condensation particularly around the slab perimeter.

  2. Wet or dry bandages for plaster back-slabs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baliga, Santosh; Finlayson, D

    2012-12-01

    Cotton crêpe and stretch bandages are commonly used in back-slabs and casts in orthopaedic practice. In theory they allow swelling to occur after injury while splinting the fracture. The application of a wet bandage prevents the Plaster-of-Paris (POP) setting too rapidly, giving time to apply a mould or attain correct limb position. However, we hypothesised that a wet bandage contracts upon drying and may cause constriction of the splint. This study aimed at determining whether there was any significant change in length of commonly used bandages when wet as well as any further change when left to dry again. Two types of bandage were evaluated. 250 mm strips of bandage were dipped into water, gently squeezed and laid flat on a bench. The bandage was then immediately measured in length. The strips were then left to dry and re-measured. This experimental study shows that both cotton crepe and cling significantly shrink by around 7% when wet. This phenomenon has the potential to significantly increase the pressure exerted on the limb by a back-slab. We speculate that the application of wet bandages is why some back-slabs may need released. It is therefore recommended that bandages should be applied only in the dry form. Copyright © 2011 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. On the consistency of seismically imaged lower mantle slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shephard, G E; Matthews, K J; Hosseini, K; Domeier, M

    2017-09-08

    The geoscience community is increasingly utilizing seismic tomography to interpret mantle heterogeneity and its links to past tectonic and geodynamic processes. To assess the robustness and distribution of positive seismic anomalies, inferred as subducted slabs, we create a set of vote maps for the lower mantle with 14 global P-wave or S-wave tomography models. Based on a depth-dependent threshold metric, an average of 20% of any given tomography model depth is identified as a potential slab. However, upon combining the 14 models, the most consistent positive wavespeed features are identified by an increasing vote count. An overall peak in the most robust anomalies is found between 1000-1400 km depth, followed by a decline to a minimum around 2000 km. While this trend could reflect reduced tomographic resolution in the middle mantle, we show that it may alternatively relate to real changes in the time-dependent subduction flux and/or a mid-lower mantle viscosity increase. An apparent secondary peak in agreement below 2500 km depth may reflect the degree-two lower mantle slow seismic structures. Vote maps illustrate the potential shortcomings of using a limited number or type of tomography models and slab threshold criteria.

  4. Partial Purification of a Megadalton DNA Replication Complex by Free Flow Electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Caroline M.; Miao, Yunan; Lingeman, Robert G.; Hickey, Robert J.; Malkas, Linda H.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a gentle and rapid method to purify the intact multiprotein DNA replication complex using free flow electrophoresis (FFE). In particular, we applied FFE to purify the human cell DNA synthesome, which is a multiprotein complex that is fully competent to carry-out all phases of the DNA replication process in vitro using a plasmid containing the simian virus 40 (SV40) origin of DNA replication and the viral large tumor antigen (T-antigen) protein. The isolated native DNA synthesome can be of use in studying the mechanism by which mammalian DNA replication is carried-out and how anti-cancer drugs disrupt the DNA replication or repair process. Partially purified extracts from HeLa cells were fractionated in a native, liquid based separation by FFE. Dot blot analysis showed co-elution of many proteins identified as part of the DNA synthesome, including proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), DNA topoisomerase I (topo I), DNA polymerase δ (Pol δ), DNA polymerase ɛ (Pol ɛ), replication protein A (RPA) and replication factor C (RFC). Previously identified DNA synthesome proteins co-eluted with T-antigen dependent and SV40 origin-specific DNA polymerase activity at the same FFE fractions. Native gels show a multiprotein PCNA containing complex migrating with an apparent relative mobility in the megadalton range. When PCNA containing bands were excised from the native gel, mass spectrometric sequencing analysis identified 23 known DNA synthesome associated proteins or protein subunits. PMID:28036377

  5. Upper Mantle Flow Beneath the Subducted Nazca Plate: Slab Contortions and Flattening (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, R. M.

    2010-12-01

    The form of asthenospheric flow beneath subducted lithospheric slabs can be discerned using splitting of shear waves emanating from earthquakes in the slabs themselves. However, the subducted Nazca plate’s abrupt changes in morphology from a planar slab dipping 30° ENE beneath the central Andes to large areas of flat-lying slab beneath Peru, to the north, and Argentina, to the south, are a potential complication to the sub-slab mantle flow. S waves from earthquakes in the Nazca slab reveal details of the upper mantle flow field below and in the vicinity of the slab. Nazca slab earthquakes large enough to be well recorded (M > 5.4, typically), and deep enough to separate S from pS and sS (30-40 km or more), are suitable for such study, and, for events between 1990 and 2010, recording stations are mostly well-distributed azimuthally about the source event. The S waves were recorded at seismic stations at teleseismic distances from the events, and were corrected for known sub-station seismic anisotropy. Thus, the shear wave splitting engendered during their passage through the asthenospheric upper mantle beneath the slab was isolated, and asthenospheric deformation fabrics resulting from plastic flow beneath the slab mapped in some detail. Shear wave splitting fast directions and upper mantle flow beneath the Nazca plate are most often trench-parallel, consistent with trench-parallel upper mantle flow beneath the slab. Fast splitting polarizations at high angle to the strike of the slab occur in the transition regions from flat to normally dipping slab. Upper mantle flow beneath the slab in these regions appears to be channeled by the slab contortion. Upper mantle flow oceanward of the Nazca slab also appears to change abruptly from trends at a high angle to the Peru-Chile trench to trench-parallel as the top of the Nazca slab attains a depth of around 75 km. Trench-parallel sub-slab flow appears to develop once the asthenosphere beneath the Nazca plate is affected

  6. International Expansion through Flexible Replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsson, Anna; Foss, Nicolai Juul

    2011-01-01

    to local environments and under the impact of new learning. To illuminate these issues, we draw on a longitudinal in-depth study of Swedish home furnishing giant IKEA, involving more than 70 interviews. We find that IKEA has developed organizational mechanisms that support an ongoing learning process aimed......, etc.) are replicated in a uniform manner across stores, and change only very slowly (if at all) in response to learning (“flexible replication”). We conclude by discussing the factors that influence the approach to replication adopted by an international replicator....

  7. Numerical Modeling of Flat Slab Formation in Central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manea, M.; Perez-Gussinye, M.; Manea, V.; Fernandez, M.

    2009-12-01

    Subduction of oceanic plates beneath large continental masses is a rare process and at present it occurs only along western South America and Central Mexico. Likewise, flat subduction, understood here as where the slab enters at a normal angle and reverses its curvature to flatten at ~70-120 km depth, only occurs at present beneath South America. In general, the angle at which subduction occurs in the depth range of ~100 to ~200 km reflects the balance between negative buoyancy of the slab, elastic resistance of the slab to change the angle of subduction, and non-hydrostatic pressure forces induced by subduction-driven flow within the asthenosphere. The latter force, known as suction force, acts to prevent the slab from sinking into the mantle, and its magnitude increases with increasing subduction velocity, narrowness and viscosity decrease of the mantle wedge [Manea and Gurnis, 2007]. Recent observations show that the upper plate structure varies along the Andean margin, indicating that it is thicker and stronger above flat subduction zones and suggesting a correlation between upper plate structure and subduction angle [Pérez-Gussinyé et al., 2008; Booker et al., 2004]. In this study we use numerical models to explore the extent to which upper plate structure, through its influence on asthenospheric wedge shape and viscosity, can affect the angle of subduction. We test for which upper plate thickness and asthenospheric viscosity repeated cycles of steep and flat subduction are reproduced and compare our results to estimations of lithospheric thickness and the duration of flat and steep subduction cycles hypothesized along the Andean margin. Our models are constrained by realistic plate velocities in hot spot reference frame for both Nazca and South American plates [Muller et al., 2008], the Miocene-Present shortening for the Andes [Schelart et al., 2007] and realistic Nazca plate age distribution [Sdrolias and Muller, 2006]. Using the finite element package

  8. Design of energy efficient building with radiant slab cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhen

    2007-12-01

    Air-conditioning comprises a substantial fraction of commercial building energy use because of compressor-driven refrigeration and fan-driven air circulation. Core regions of large buildings require year-round cooling due to heat gains from people, lights and equipment. Negative environmental impacts include CO2 emissions from electric generation and leakage of ozone-depleting refrigerants. Some argue that radiant cooling simultaneously improves building efficiency and occupant thermal comfort, and that current thermal comfort models fail to reflect occupant experience with radiant thermal control systems. There is little field evidence to test these claims. The University of Calgary's Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Building, is a pioneering radiant slab cooling installation in North America. Thermal comfort and energy performance were evaluated. Measurements included: (1) heating and cooling energy use, (2) electrical energy use for lighting and equipment, and (3) indoor temperatures. Accuracy of a whole building energy simulation model was evaluated with these data. Simulation was then used to compare the radiant slab design with a conventional (variable air volume) system. The radiant system energy performance was found to be poorer mainly due to: (1) simultaneous cooling by the slab and heating by other systems, (2) omission of low-exergy (e.g., groundwater) cooling possible with the high cooling water temperatures possible with radiant slabs and (3) excessive solar gain and conductive heat loss due to the wall and fenestration design. Occupant thermal comfort was evaluated through questionnaires and concurrent measurement of workstation comfort parameters. Analysis of 116 sets of data from 82 occupants showed that occupant assessment was consistent with estimates based on current thermal comfort models. The main thermal comfort improvements were reductions in (1) local discomfort from draft and (2) vertical air temperature stratification. The

  9. Detecting lower-mantle slabs beneath Asia and the Aleutians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, L.; Thomas, C.

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the descend of subducted slabs we search for and analyse seismic arrivals that reflected off the surface of the slab. In order to distinguish between such arrivals and other seismic phases, we search for waves that reach a seismic array with a backazimuth deviating from the theoretical backazimuth of the earthquake. Source-receiver combinations are chosen in a way that their great circle paths do not intersect the slab region, hence the direct arrivals can serve as reference. We focus on the North and Northwest Pacific region by using earthquakes from Japan, the Philippines and the Hindu Kush area recorded at North American networks (e.g. USArray, Alaska and Canada). Using seismic array techniques for analysing the data and record information on slowness, backazimuth and traveltime of the observed out-of-plane arrivals we use these measurements to trace the wave back through a 1-D velocity model to its scattering/reflection location. We find a number of out-of-plane reflections. Assuming only single scattering, most out-of-plane signals have to travel as P-to-P phases and only a few as S-to-P phases, due to the length of the seismograms we processed. The located reflection points present a view of the 3-D structures within the mantle. In the upper mantle and the transition zone they correlate well with the edges of fast velocity regions in tomographic images. We also find reflection points in the mid- and lower mantle and their locations generally agree with fast velocities mapped by seismic tomography models suggesting that in the subduction regions we map, slabs enter the lower mantle. To validate our approach, we calculate and process synthetic seismograms for 3-D wave field propagation through a model containing a slab-like heterogeneity. We show, that depending on the source-receiver geometry relative to the reflection plane, it is indeed possible to observe and back-trace out-of-plane signals.

  10. The Psychology of Replication and Replication in Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Gregory

    2012-11-01

    Like other scientists, psychologists believe experimental replication to be the final arbiter for determining the validity of an empirical finding. Reports in psychology journals often attempt to prove the validity of a hypothesis or theory with multiple experiments that replicate a finding. Unfortunately, these efforts are sometimes misguided because in a field like experimental psychology, ever more successful replication does not necessarily ensure the validity of an empirical finding. When psychological experiments are analyzed with statistics, the rules of probability dictate that random samples should sometimes be selected that do not reject the null hypothesis, even if an effect is real. As a result, it is possible for a set of experiments to have too many successful replications. When there are too many successful replications for a given set of experiments, a skeptical scientist should be suspicious that null or negative findings have been suppressed, the experiments were run improperly, or the experiments were analyzed improperly. This article describes the implications of this observation and demonstrates how to test for too much successful replication by using a set of experiments from a recent research paper.

  11. Regulation of Replication Recovery and Genome Integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colding, Camilla Skettrup

    Preserving genome integrity is essential for cell survival. To this end, mechanisms that supervise DNA replication and respond to replication perturbations have evolved. One such mechanism is the replication checkpoint, which responds to DNA replication stress and acts to ensure replication pausing...

  12. First application of second-generation steel-free deck slabs for bridge rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eden, Ruth; Klowak, Chad; Mufti, Aftab A.; Tadros, Gamil; Bakht, Baidar; Loewen, Eric

    2004-07-01

    The arching action in concrete deck slabs for girder bridges is utilized fully in steel-free deck slabs. These concrete slabs, requiring no tensile reinforcement, are confined longitudinally by making them composite with the girders, and transversely by external steel straps connecting the top flanges of external girders. Between 1995 and 1999, five steel-free deck slabs without any tensile reinforcement were cast on Canadian bridges. All these slabs developed fairly wide full-depth cracks roughly midway between the girders. While extensive fatigue testing done in the past three years has confirmed that the presence of even wide cracks does not pose any danger to the safety of the structures, wide cracks are generally not acceptable to bridge engineers. The developers of the steel-free deck slabs have now conceded that these slabs should be reinforced with a crack-control mesh of nominal glass fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP) bars. Steel-free deck slabs with crack-control meshes are being referred as the second generation slabs. With the help of testing on full-scale models, it has been found that deck slabs with GFRP bars have the best fatigue resistance and those with steel bars the worst.

  13. Active Polymer Gel Actuators

    OpenAIRE

    Shuji Hashimoto; Ryo Yoshida; Yusuke Hara; Shingo Maeda

    2010-01-01

    Many kinds of stimuli-responsive polymer and gels have been developed and applied to biomimetic actuators or artificial muscles. Electroactive polymers that change shape when stimulated electrically seem to be particularly promising. In all cases, however, the mechanical motion is driven by external stimuli, for example, reversing the direction of electric field. On the other hand, many living organisms can generate an autonomous motion without external driving stimuli like self-beating of he...

  14. Biomarkers of replicative senescence revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nehlin, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers of replicative senescence can be defined as those ultrastructural and physiological variations as well as molecules whose changes in expression, activity or function correlate with aging, as a result of the gradual exhaustion of replicative potential and a state of permanent cell cycle...... with their chronological age and present health status, help define their current rate of aging and contribute to establish personalized therapy plans to reduce, counteract or even avoid the appearance of aging biomarkers....

  15. Nucleotide Metabolism and DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Digby F; Evans, Joanna C; Mizrahi, Valerie

    2014-10-01

    The development and application of a highly versatile suite of tools for mycobacterial genetics, coupled with widespread use of "omics" approaches to elucidate the structure, function, and regulation of mycobacterial proteins, has led to spectacular advances in our understanding of the metabolism and physiology of mycobacteria. In this article, we provide an update on nucleotide metabolism and DNA replication in mycobacteria, highlighting key findings from the past 10 to 15 years. In the first section, we focus on nucleotide metabolism, ranging from the biosynthesis, salvage, and interconversion of purine and pyrimidine ribonucleotides to the formation of deoxyribonucleotides. The second part of the article is devoted to DNA replication, with a focus on replication initiation and elongation, as well as DNA unwinding. We provide an overview of replication fidelity and mutation rates in mycobacteria and summarize evidence suggesting that DNA replication occurs during states of low metabolic activity, and conclude by suggesting directions for future research to address key outstanding questions. Although this article focuses primarily on observations from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, it is interspersed, where appropriate, with insights from, and comparisons with, other mycobacterial species as well as better characterized bacterial models such as Escherichia coli. Finally, a common theme underlying almost all studies of mycobacterial metabolism is the potential to identify and validate functions or pathways that can be exploited for tuberculosis drug discovery. In this context, we have specifically highlighted those processes in mycobacterial DNA replication that might satisfy this critical requirement.

  16. Plasmid Rolling-Circle Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Masó, J A; MachóN, C; Bordanaba-Ruiseco, L; Espinosa, M; Coll, M; Del Solar, G

    2015-02-01

    Plasmids are DNA entities that undergo controlled replication independent of the chromosomal DNA, a crucial step that guarantees the prevalence of the plasmid in its host. DNA replication has to cope with the incapacity of the DNA polymerases to start de novo DNA synthesis, and different replication mechanisms offer diverse solutions to this problem. Rolling-circle replication (RCR) is a mechanism adopted by certain plasmids, among other genetic elements, that represents one of the simplest initiation strategies, that is, the nicking by a replication initiator protein on one parental strand to generate the primer for leading-strand initiation and a single priming site for lagging-strand synthesis. All RCR plasmid genomes consist of a number of basic elements: leading strand initiation and control, lagging strand origin, phenotypic determinants, and mobilization, generally in that order of frequency. RCR has been mainly characterized in Gram-positive bacterial plasmids, although it has also been described in Gram-negative bacterial or archaeal plasmids. Here we aim to provide an overview of the RCR plasmids' lifestyle, with emphasis on their characteristic traits, promiscuity, stability, utility as vectors, etc. While RCR is one of the best-characterized plasmid replication mechanisms, there are still many questions left unanswered, which will be pointed out along the way in this review.

  17. Implications of Electrical Conductivity Structure Associated With the Nazca Slab Beneath Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booker, J. R.; Pomposiello, C.; Favetto, A.; Burd, A.

    2005-12-01

    From 1998 to 2005 we have collected more than 100 magnetotelluric (MT) sites in the Sierras Pampeanas of Argentina between 27°S and 33°S. The main targets of these investigations were initially active structures within this thick-skinned tectonics province. However, it became clear as we progressed that the subducted Nazca slab, which is anonymously flat under this area was generating observable electrical structures at mantle depth. The high resistivity of the crystalline crust and the generally thin, but conductive sedimentary cover of much of this area provide a favorable situation for the penetration of electromagnetic energy deep into the mantle. Our longest profile extends from near Chile to near Uruguay at 31.5°S, where the flat slab is widest. The flattest portion of the slab is both electrically conductive and seismically active. This seismic activity terminates eastward at almost the same place that the slab conductor ends and the overlying lithosphere becomes seismically active and electrically conductive. A unifying explanation is that as the slab descends to its flat portion at 100 km it dehydrates. The free water raises pore pressure and triggers earthquakes. As the slab progresses eastward, the fluids leak upward out of the slab into the lithosphere, the slab pore pressure drops, electrical pathways close and the slab becomes resistive and quiet. An intriguing possibility is that the wet lithosphere created in this process sets the stage for a massive volcanic flare-up if the slab dip increases and an asthenospheric wedge reforms. Further east, the slab plunges nearly vertically into the mantle when it meets the electrically resistive and presumably mechanically strong backstop of the root of the Rio de la Plata Craton. A near vertical conductor is found between the plunging slab and the resistive root. This conductor rises to the base of the lithosphere, but does not penetrate. It is almost certainly due to partial melt, but whether this melting

  18. Composition and formation of Palaeozoic Erlangping ophiolitic slab, North Qinling: Evidence from geology and geochemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙勇; 卢欣祥; 韩松; 张国伟

    1996-01-01

    The analyses based on the protolith formation, metamorphic and deformation reveal that the Erlangping Group is composed of different lithological slices, without any significance in stratigraphy. It is therefore to discard the Erlangping Group into the Damiao slab, the Erlangping ophiolitic slab and the Xiaozhai slab. The Erlangping ophiolitic slab only includes the former Huoshenmiao Formation and it is mainly composed of massive basalts, pillow basalts, sheet dikes, gabbro and a few of ultramafic intrusions with patches of plagiogranite, overlain by radiolarian silicolites. A lot of microfossils were discovered in the silicolites that mark the Erlangping ophiolitic slab mainly formed in the Early to Middle Ordovician. In geochemistry, most of the basalts and diabase dikes are consistent with N-MORB except a few of samples effected by alteration. The Erlangping ophiolitic slab represents a remnant piece of ancient ocean crust which is most suitable to a back-arc basin setting. A mean 207Pb/206Pb age of

  19. Numerical Analysis of Dynamic Behavior of RC Slabs Under Blast Loading

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Hao; LI Zhongxian

    2009-01-01

    In Order to reduce economic and life losses due to terrorism or accidental explosion threats,reinforced concrete(RC)slabs of buildings need to be designed or retrofitted to resist blast loading.In this paper the dynamic behavior Of RC slabs under blast loading and its influencing factors are studied.The numerical model of an RC slab subjected to blast loading is established using the explicit dynamic analysis software.Both the strain rate effect and the damage accumulation are taken into account in the material model.The dynamic responses of the RC slab subiected to blast loading are analyzed,and the influence of concrete strength,thickness and reinforcement ratio on the behavior of the RC slab under blast loading iS numerically investigated.Based on the numerical results.some principles for blast-resistant design and retrofitting are proposed to improve the behavior of the RC slab subjected to blast loading.

  20. Fabrication slab waveguide based polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) with spin coating method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriawan, Alan; Pramono, Yono Hadi; Masoed, Asnawi

    2016-11-01

    Fabrication and characterization slab waveguide based polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) has been carried out. Slab waveguide fabrication done by the spin coating method. Slab waveguide fabrication process carried out by the rotational speed of 1000, 2000, and 3000 rpm respectively played for 10 seconds. Then the slab waveguides heated using a hot plate. Heating process starting from room temperature then increased 5°C to 70°C with a 5 minute warm-up time interval. From the results of characterization fabricated slab waveguides to determine the film thickness is made. Then made observations on the waveguide by passing the light beam He-Ne laser on the thin layer through a single mode optical fiber. From the results of characterization is known that the fabrication of a slab waveguide with a layer thickness of 166 μm. From this research it is known that polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) can be used as a waveguide with a spin coating method.

  1. Extraordinary wavelength reduction in terahertz graphene-cladded photonic crystal slabs

    CERN Document Server

    Williamson, Ian A D; Wang, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Photonic crystal slabs have been widely used in nanophotonics for light confinement, dispersion engineering, nonlinearity enhancement, and other unusual effects arising from their structural periodicity. Sub-micron device sizes and mode volumes are routine for silicon-based photonic crystal slabs, however spectrally they are limited to operate in the near infrared. Here, we show that two single-layer graphene sheets allow silicon photonic crystal slabs with submicron periodicity to operate in the terahertz regime, with an extreme 100x wavelength reduction and excellent out-of-plane confinement. The graphene-cladded photonic crystal slabs exhibit band structures closely resembling those of ideal two-dimensional photonic crystals, with broad two-dimensional photonic band gaps even when the slab thickness approaches zero. The overall photonic band structure not only scales with the graphene Fermi level, but more importantly scales to lower frequencies with reduced slab thickness. Just like ideal 2D photonic crys...

  2. Behaviour Of Multi-Storied Flat Slab Building Considering Shear Walls: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanaji R. Chavan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently there has been a considerable increase in the number of tall buildings, both residential and commercial, and modern trend is towards taller structures. Flat slab is most widely used systems in reinforced concrete construction. Flat-slab building structures possesses major advantages over traditional slab-beam-column structures taking a advantages of reduced floor height, shorter construction time, architectural –functional and economical aspects. But in flat slab building columns are directly provides supports to slab with eliminating beams so there is requirement of provision of shear walls to increase the stiffness of building against lateral forces. Shear wall system are one of the most commonly used lateral load resisting in high rise building. Shear wall has high in plane stiffness and strength. The present paper reviews various research works carried out by several researchers on multi-storied buildings provided with flat slab and shear walls.

  3. Influence of Dog-Bone Apex on Shape During Slab Horizontal Rolling Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Hai-liang; LIU Xiang-hua; LI Chang-sheng; WANG Guo-dong

    2007-01-01

    The deformation of slab with dog-bone shape during the horizontal rolling process was simulated using FEM, and the influences of apical dislocation of dog-bone on the slab spread as well as the minimum crop end loss and the lost width at slab head and tail were analyzed. The results show that with the increase in the apical dislocation of dog-bone (LA), the slab spread and the minimum crop end loss at slab head and tail decrease, while the lost width at slab head and tail increases. Meanwhile, the relationships of S/LA-LA, LH/LA-LA, WH/LA-LA, LT/LA-LA, and WT/LA-LA were obtained.

  4. Cenozoic tectonics of western North America controlled by evolving width of Farallon slab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellart, W P; Stegman, D R; Farrington, R J; Freeman, J; Moresi, L

    2010-07-16

    Subduction of oceanic lithosphere occurs through two modes: subducting plate motion and trench migration. Using a global subduction zone data set and three-dimensional numerical subduction models, we show that slab width (W) controls these modes and the partitioning of subduction between them. Subducting plate velocity scales with W(2/3), whereas trench velocity scales with 1/W. These findings explain the Cenozoic slowdown of the Farallon plate and the decrease in subduction partitioning by its decreasing slab width. The change from Sevier-Laramide orogenesis to Basin and Range extension in North America is also explained by slab width; shortening occurred during wide-slab subduction and overriding-plate-driven trench retreat, whereas extension occurred during intermediate to narrow-slab subduction and slab-driven trench retreat.

  5. A Coupled Computational Scheme on Thermal and Phase Structures of Subducting Slabs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JING Zhi-Cheng; MNG Jie-Yuan

    2001-01-01

    The thermodynamic processes undergone by olivine, the chief mineral of subducting slabs, are important in studying the mechanisms of deep-focus earthquakes and the interaction between slabs and the surrounding mantle. We propose a modified coupling scheme to calculate the thermal and phase structures of slabs, which presents a high computational' accuracy at an accessible CPU expense. Using the new code of computation, we have calculated the thermal and phase structures of the Kurile subduction zone.

  6. Effect of aseismic ridge subduction on slab geometry and overriding plate deformation: Insights from analogue modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Martinod, Joseph; Guillaume, Benjamin; Espurt, Nicolas; Faccenna, Claudio; Funiciello, Francesca; Regard, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    International audience; We present analogue models simulating the subduction of a buoyant ridge beneath an advancing overriding plate whose velocity is imposed by lateral boundary conditions. We analyze the 3D geometry of the slab, the deformation and topography of the overriding plate. Ridge subduction diminishes the dip of the slab, eventually leading to the appearance of a horizontal slab segment. This result contrasts with that obtained in free subduction experiments, in which ridge subdu...

  7. Failure analysis of edge flat-slab column connections with shear reinforcement

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Flat-slab column connections are susceptible to brittle failure, which lead to the necessity of improving ductility and ultimate strength. In case of edge connections, the behaviour at ultimate state is highly influenced by nonsymmetrical distribution of stresses originated by a moment transfer between the slab and the column. The paper presents the test results of three full-scale reinforced concrete flat-slab edge connections with stud-rail shear reinforcement subjected to concentrated load...

  8. The dynamics of double slab subduction from numerical and semi-analytic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, A.; Royden, L.; Becker, T. W.

    2015-12-01

    Regional interactions between multiple subducting slabs have been proposed to explain enigmatic slab kinematics in a number of subduction zones, a pertinent example being the rapid pre-collisional plate convergence of India and Eurasia. However, dynamically consistent 3-D numerical models of double subduction have yet to be explored, and so the physics of such double slab systems remain poorly understood. Here we build on the comparison of a fully numerical finite element model (CitcomCU) and a time-dependent semi-analytic subduction models (FAST) presented for single subduction systems (Royden et. al., 2015 AGU Fall Abstract) to explore how subducting slab kinematics, particularly trench and plate motions, can be affected by the presence of an additional slab, with all of the possible slab dip direction permutations. A second subducting slab gives rise to a more complex dynamic pressure and mantle flow fields, and an additional slab pull force that is transmitted across the subduction zone interface. While the general relationships among plate velocity, trench velocity, asthenospheric pressure drop, and plate coupling modes are similar to those observed for the single slab case, we find that multiple subducting slabs can interact with each other and indeed induce slab kinematics that deviate significantly from those observed for the equivalent single slab models. References Jagoutz, O., Royden, L. H., Holt, A. F. & Becker, T. W., 2015, Nature Geo., 8, 10.1038/NGEO2418. Moresi, L. N. & Gurnis, M., 1996, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 138, 15-28. Royden, L. H. & Husson, L., 2006, Geophys. J. Int. 167, 881-905. Zhong, S., 2006, J. Geophys. Res., 111, doi: 10.1029/2005JB003972.

  9. Bending and Shear Experimental Tests and Numerical Analysis of Composite Slabs Made Up of Lightweight Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    F. P. Alvarez Rabanal; J. Guerrero-Muñoz; Alonso-Martinez, M.; J. E. Martinez-Martinez

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to understand the structural behaviour of composite slabs. These composite slabs are made of steel and different kinds of concrete. The methodology used in this paper combines experimental studies with advanced techniques of numerical simulations. In this paper, four types of concrete were used in order to study their different structural strengths in composite slabs. The materials used were three lightweight concretes, a normal concrete, and a cold conformed steel de...

  10. Large negative Goos-Hänchen shift from a weakly absorbing dielectric slab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Gang; Chen, Hong; Zhu, Shi-Yao

    2005-11-01

    It is theoretically shown that the negative Goos-Hänchen shifts near resonance, Re[k(z)d] = m pi, can be an order of magnitude larger than the wavelength for both TE- and TM-polarized beams reflected from a weakly absorbing dielectric slab if the absorption of the slab is sufficiently weak, which is different from the case for a lossless dielectric slab [Phys. Rev. Lett. 91, 133903 (2003)].

  11. Penelitian pengaruh plasticizer DOP terhadap sifat fisis slab kompon PVC untuk acuan sepatu

    OpenAIRE

    Kelompok Peneliti Proses Produksi Barang Plastik

    1984-01-01

    Abstract DOP Plasticizer is a chemical substance which its function is to increase the plasticity of PVC compound slab. By adding DOP plasticizer can imporoves the impact resistance properties and decrease the hardness of slab. The utilization of 30% DOP results the greatest impact resistance (6,1016 kg/cm), and the hardness 55 shore A of PVC coumpund slab produced by this experiment.

  12. Penelitian pengaruh plasticizer DOP terhadap sifat fisis slab kompon PVC untuk acuan sepatu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelompok Peneliti Proses Produksi Barang Plastik

    1984-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract DOP Plasticizer is a chemical substance which its function is to increase the plasticity of PVC compound slab. By adding DOP plasticizer can imporoves the impact resistance properties and decrease the hardness of slab. The utilization of 30% DOP results the greatest impact resistance (6,1016 kg/cm, and the hardness 55 shore A of PVC coumpund slab produced by this experiment.

  13. Ogive Nose Hard Missile Penetrating Concrete Slab Numerical Simulation Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qadir Bux

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Great demand exists for more efficient design to protect delicate and serious structures such as nuclear plants, Power plants, Weapon Industries, weapons storage places, water retaining structures, & etc, against impact of kinetic missiles generated both accidentally and deliberately such as dynamic loading, incident occurs in nuclear plants, terrorist attack, Natural disasters like tsunami and etc., in various impact and blast scenarios for both civilian and military activities. In many cases, projectiles can be treated as rigid bodies when their damage and erosion are not severe. Due to the intricacy of the local impact damages, investigations are generally based on experimental data. Conclusions of the experimental observations are then used to guide engineering models. Local damages studies normally fall into three categories, i.e. empirical formulae based on data fitting, idealised analytical models based on physic laws and numerical simulations based on computational mechanics and material models. In the present study, 2D asymmetrical numerical simulation have done on concrete slab against the impact of  ogive nose hard missile of 26.90mm and 76.20mm diameter with CRH ratio 2.0 and 6.0 respectively, for penetration by using Concrete Damaged Plasticity Model, and ABAQUS/Explicit dynamic analysis in ABAQUS. It is found that the strains/stresses are induced in the concrete slab and a very nicely propagation of the stresses inside the  concrete slab in the form of waves, which is a clear indication for vibrations of the concrete. The lack of failure criterion in concrete damaged plasticity model does not allow the removal of elements during the analyses. This means that spalling, scabbing, and perforation cannot be modelled with the Concrete Damage Plasticity Model. The penetration depth results shows that the deeper penetration requires higher critical impact kinetic energies, and comparison shows the simulation results are more accurate

  14. The study of the transition regime between slab and mixed slab-toroidal electron temperature gradient modes in a basic experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balbaky, Abed; Sokolov, Vladimir; Sen, Amiya K. [Plasma Research Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Electron temperature gradient (ETG) modes are suspected sources of anomalous electron thermal transport in magnetically confined plasmas as in tokamaks. Prior work in the Columbia Linear Machine (CLM) has been able to produce and identify slab ETG modes in a slab geometry [Wei et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 042108 (2010)]. Now by modifying CLM to introduce curvature to the confining axial magnetic field, we have excited mixed slab-toroidal modes. Linear theory predicts a transition between slab and toroidal ETG modes when (k{sub ∥}R{sub c})/(k{sub y}ρ) ∼1 [J. Kim and W. Horton, Phys. Fluids B 3, 1167 (1991)]. We observe changes in the mode amplitude for levels of curvature R{sub c}{sup −1}≪(k{sub ∥,slab})/(k{sub ⊥}ρ) , which may be explained by reductions in k{sub ∥} in the transition from slab to mixed slab-toroidal modes, as also predicted by theory. We present mode amplitude scaling as a function of magnetic field curvature. Over the range of curvature available in CLM experimentally we find a modest increase in saturated ETG potential fluctuations (∼1.5×), and a substantial increase in the power density of individual mode peaks (∼4–5×)

  15. Numerical Analysis of Secondary Cooling in Continuous Slab Casting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kee-Hyeon Cho; Byung-Moon Kim

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, a numerical optimization program has been developed for predicting the optimal secondary cooling patterns in a continuous slab caster. Optimization strategy using Broydon-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (BFGS) method is carried out by determining the constant heat transfer coefficients in each spray zone, which could satisfy the casting conditions and metallurgical criteria specified by the engineer. From the present results, it is found that even a slight variation in the pouring temperature, allowable surface temperature, and casting speed could give rise to the changes in the cooling pattern throughout the spray zones.

  16. Effect of Rotation in an Orthotropic Elastic Slab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santra S.

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The fundamental equations of the two dimensional generalized thermoelasticity (L-S model with one relaxation time parameter in orthotropic elastic slab has been considered under effect of rotation. The normal mode analysis is used to the basic equations of motion and heat conduction equation. Finally, the resulting equations are written in the form of a vector-matrix differential equation which is then solved by the eigenvalue approach. The field variables in the space time domain are obtained numerically. The results corresponding to the cases of conventional thermoelasticity CTE, extended thermoelasticity (ETE and temperature rate dependent thermoelasticity (TRDTE are compared by means of graphs.

  17. Second-harmonic generation from hyperbolic plasmonic nanorod metamaterial slab

    CERN Document Server

    Marino, Giuseppe; Krasavin, Alexey V; Ginzburg, Pavel; Olivier, Nicolas; Wurtz, Gregory A; Zayats, Anatoly V

    2015-01-01

    Hyperbolic plasmonic metamaterials provide numerous opportunities for designing unusual linear and nonlinear optical properties. We show that the modal overlap of fundamental and second-harmonic light in an anisotropic plasmonic metamaterial slab results in the broadband enhancement of radiated second-harmonic intensity by up to 2 and 11 orders of magnitudes for TM- and TE-polarized fundamental light, respectively, compared to a smooth Au film under TM-polarised illumination. The results open up possibilities to design tuneable frequency-doubling metamaterial with the goal to overcome limitations associated with classical phase matching conditions in thick nonlinear crystals.

  18. Development of Flexible Link Slabs using Ductile Fiber Reinforced Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lárusson, Lárus Helgi

    emphasis oncrack formation and development at the rebar-matrix interface during direct tensile loading. Utilizing a high definition DIC technique in a novel approach, detailed measurements of the crack formation and debonding process are obtained. It is found that ductile ECC, in contrast to conventional...... two adjacent bridge deck segments. The link slab element, composed of GFRP reinforced ECC,exhibited the same tension stiffening and tension strengthening behavior with limited crack widths as was observed in the reinforced prisms under monotonic and cyclic loading. The combination of ductile ECC...

  19. Inverse Estimation of Transient Heat Flux to Slab Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Miao; YANG Kai; LIU Yun-fei; GAO Xiao-wei

    2012-01-01

    The transient heat flux was calculated using a model for inverse heat conduction problems based on temper- ature measurements. The unknown heat flux was taken as an optimization variable and solved by minimizing the differences between the calculated temperatures and the measured ones. Several examples were given to show the ef- fectiveness and the accuracy of the inverse algorithm in estimating the transient heat flux to a slab surface. The re sults show that the inverse approach can be applied in the steel industry or in other areas where the target of investi- gation is inaccessible to direct measurements or difficult to be directly modeled.

  20. An Incursion on Punching of Reinforced Concrete Flat Slabs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan-Vasile Bompa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the early 60s continuous studies have been made regarding punching of concrete flat slabs. The evolution of technology and calculus systems influenced this engineering branch. Nowadays is possible to account in structural analysis all the non-linear behaviour of reinforced and prestressed concrete and to get the most close structural response in comparison with the real behaviour. As a controversy matter, several tests and theories have been developed. Nowadays researchers try to find the most accurate and economic formula for punching. This paper purpose is to make a survey on punching classical model and related nonlinear concrete behaviour regarded to this issue.

  1. The Slab Method to Measure the Topological Susceptibility

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    In simulations of a model with topological sectors, algorithms which proceed in small update steps tend to get stuck in one sector, especially on fine lattices. This distorts the numerical results; in particular it is not straightforward to measure the topological susceptibility chi_t. We test a method to measure chi_t even if configurations from only one sector are available. It is based on the topological charges in sub-volumes, which we denote as "slab". This enables the evaluation of chi_...

  2. The Slab Method to Measure the Topological Susceptibility

    CERN Document Server

    Bietenholz, Wolfgang; de Forcrand, Philippe; Dromard, Arthur; Gerber, Urs

    2016-01-01

    In simulations of a model with topological sectors, algorithms which proceed in small update steps tend to get stuck in one sector, especially on fine lattices. This distorts the numerical results, in particular it is not straightforward to measure the topological susceptibility chi_t. We test a method to measure chi_t even if configurations from only one sector are available. It is based on the topological charges in sub-volumes, which we denote as "slabs". This enables the evaluation of chi_t, as we demonstrate with numerical results for non-linear sigma-models and for 2-flavour QCD.

  3. Subwavelength electromagnetic dynamics in stacked complementary plasmonic crystal slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanaga, Masanobu

    2010-07-19

    Resonant electromagnetic fields in stacked complementary plasmonic crystal slabs (sc-PlCSs) are numerically explored in subwavelength dimensions. It is found that the local plasmon resonances in the sc-PlCSs are composite states of locally enhanced electric and magnetic fields. Two sc-PlCSs are analyzed in this paper and it is shown that each sc-PlCS realizes a resonant electromagnetic state suggested by one of Maxwell equations. It is moreover clarified that the local plasmons open efficient paths of Poynting flux, those result in high-contrast polarized transmission.

  4. CONCRETE PROPERTIES IMPROVEMENT OF SLAB TRACKS USING CHEMICAL ADDITIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Pristinskaya

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. On the Railways of Ukraine a very large number of slab tracks are operated with cracks. Many scientific works of previous years are dedicated to improving the design of slab tracks. The main causes of defects are: poor exploitation of the track; insufficient physic-mechanical characteristics of concrete; poor quality of initial materials. It is therefore necessary to develop an optimum concrete mix for the manufacture of these concrete products. Methodology. To assess the impact of individual factors and effects of their interactions on properties of concrete mix and concrete method of experimental and statistical modeling was used. At this, methodological fundamentals of mathematical experiment planning in concrete technology and modern methods of optimization of composite materials were taking into account. Based on the obtained data during the planned experiment conducting, including15 studies and using the computer program MathCad, were obtained the regression equations, which describe the relevant physical and mechanical properties of concrete. On the basis of the equations with the help of computer program MATLAB R2012b the graphs were drawn, illustrating the dependences of system response from the changes of two factors at a fixed value of the third factor. Findings. Firstly was the analysis of cracks that occur in the process of operation in the constructions of slab tracks. Further reasons of possible occurrence of these cracks were presented. In the process of the conducted research the author has concluded that for rational concrete mix development it is necessary to conduct the planned experiment with the use of quality materials. It was established that to increase the strength, chemical additives should be added in to concrete mix, it will let reduce cement amount. Originality. Experiments proved the usage of modern chemical additives in order to improve the properties of concrete. Models were developed, reflecting

  5. Effects of Reinforcement Configuration on Reserve Capacity of Concrete Slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-08-01

    Reinforced concreted Tensile membrane,, Buried shelters/ Shelters/ ..i, Civil defense, Slab capacity, 120. A34TlRACT rCcnhma in~ r aidit noe..era aad...CHAPTER 1 I XTPODLCT, CI At the- iiti it io., of this Study civil d~efense plwlgcalled for the .;evacuation of nonessenrt*I51 pezrsonnel to safe (lower...lqbal and Derecho (Reference 10). The reinforcement ratio, p , was 0.0062 in "Christianscn’s te,;tts and varied from 0.0023 to 0.0093 in Roberts’ tests

  6. Structure-based coarse-graining in liquid slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochum, Mara; Andrienko, Denis; Kremer, Kurt; Peter, Christine

    2012-08-14

    Structure-based coarse-graining relies on matching the pair correlation functions of a reference (atomistic) and a coarse-grained system. As such, it is designed for systems with uniform density distributions. Here, we demonstrate how it can be generalized for inhomogeneous systems by coarse-graining slabs of liquid water and methanol in vacuum, as well as a single benzene molecule at the water-vacuum interface. Our conclusion is that coarse-graining performed in inhomogeneous systems improves thermodynamic properties and the structure of interfaces without significant alterations to the local structure of the bulk liquid.

  7. Tomography of the subducting Pacific slab and the 2015 Bonin deepest earthquake (Mw 7.9)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dapeng; Fujisawa, Moeto; Toyokuni, Genti

    2017-01-01

    On 30 May 2015 an isolated deep earthquake (~670 km, Mw 7.9) occurred to the west of the Bonin Islands. To clarify its causal mechanism and its relationship to the subducting Pacific slab, we determined a detailed P-wave tomography of the deep earthquake source zone using a large number of arrival-time data. Our results show that this large deep event occurred within the subducting Pacific slab which is penetrating into the lower mantle. In the Izu-Bonin region, the Pacific slab is split at ~28° north latitude, i.e., slightly north of the 2015 deep event hypocenter. In the north the slab becomes stagnant in the mantle transition zone, whereas in the south the slab is directly penetrating into the lower mantle. This deep earthquake was caused by joint effects of several factors, including the Pacific slab’s fast deep subduction, slab tearing, slab thermal variation, stress changes and phase transformations in the slab, and complex interactions between the slab and the ambient mantle. PMID:28295018

  8. Cause Analysis on the Void under Slabs of Cement Concrete Pavement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Li; Zhu, Guo Xin; Baozhu

    2017-06-01

    This paper made a systematic analysis on the influence of the construction, environment, water and loads on the void beneath road slabs, and also introduced the formation process of structural void and pumping void, and summarizes the deep reasons for the bottom of the cement concrete pavement. Based on the analysis above, this paper has found out the evolution law of the void under slabs which claimed that the void usually appeared in the slab corners and then the cross joint, resulting void in the four sides with the void area under the front slab larger than the rear one.

  9. Displacement-based seismic design of flat slab-shear wall buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Subhajit; Singh, Yogendra

    2016-06-01

    Flat slab system is becoming widely popular for multistory buildings due to its several advantages. However, the performance of flat slab buildings under earthquake loading is unsatisfactory due to their vulnerability to punching shear failure. Several national design codes provide guidelines for designing flat slab system under gravity load only. Nevertheless, flat slab buildings are also being constructed in high seismicity regions. In this paper, performance of flat slab buildings of various heights, designed for gravity load alone according to code, is evaluated under earthquake loading as per ASCE/SEI 41 methodology. Continuity of slab bottom reinforcement through column cage improves the performance of flat slab buildings to some extent, but it is observed that these flat slab systems are not adequate in high seismicity areas and need additional primary lateral load resisting systems such as shear walls. A displacement-based method is proposed to proportion shear walls as primary lateral load resisting elements to ensure satisfactory performance. The methodology is validated using design examples of flat slab buildings with various heights.

  10. Flexural Strengthening of RC Slabs Using a Hybrid FRP-UHPC System Including Shear Connector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiho Moon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A polymeric hybrid composite system made of UHPC and CFRP was proposed as a retrofit system to enhance flexural strength and ductility of RC slabs. While the effectiveness of the proposed system was confirmed previously through testing three full-scale one-way slabs having two continuous spans, the slabs retrofitted with the hybrid system failed in shear. This sudden shear failure would stem from the excessive enhancement of the flexural strength over the shear strength. In this study, shear connectors were installed between the hybrid system and a RC slab. Using simple beam, only positive moment section was examined. Two full-scale RC slabs were cast and tested to failure: the first as a control and the second using this new strengthening technique. The proposed strengthening system increased the ultimate load carrying capacity of the slab by 70%, the stiffness by 60%, and toughness by 128%. The efficiency of shear connectors on ductile behavior of the retrofitted slab was also confirmed. After the UHPC top is separated from the slab, the shear connector transfer shear load and the slab system were in force equilibrium by compression in UHPC and tension in CFRP.

  11. Abnormal seismological and magmatic processes controlled by the tearing South American flat slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiashun; Liu, Lijun

    2016-09-01

    The influence of flat slab subduction on the formation of intra-slab earthquakes, volcanic activities and mantle seismic velocity anomalies remains unclear. We attempt to better understand these processes by simulating the two flat slabs in Peru and Chile using data-orientated geodynamic models. Our results successfully reproduce the observed flat slabs as mainly due to two subducting aseismic ridges. In contrast to the traditional view of flat-slab subduction, we find that these slabs are internally torn, as is due to the 3D nature of the subducting buoyancy features. This broken slab configuration, confirmed by regional tomography, naturally explains the abnormal distribution of and stress regimes associated with the intermediate-depth earthquakes. We further show that the slab tearing process could also better explain the formation of adakitic and ore-forming magmatism, the evolution of the magmatic arc, and the enigmatic mantle seismic structures beneath these regions. We propose that slab tearing may represent a common result of buoyancy feature subduction and that the resulting mantle processes could affect the long-term geodynamic evolution of continents.

  12. Optimising the Slab Yard Planning and Crane Scheduling Problem using a two-stage heuristic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Dohn; Clausen, Jens

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present the Slab Yard Planning and Crane Scheduling Problem. The problem has its origin in steel production facilities with a large throughput. A slab yard is used as a buffer for slabs that are needed in the upcoming production. Slabs are transported by cranes and the problem...... tests are run on a generic setup with simulated data. The test results are very promising. The production delays are reduced significantly in the new solutions compared with the corresponding delays observed in a simulation of manual planning....

  13. Tomography of the subducting Pacific slab and the 2015 Bonin deepest earthquake (Mw 7.9)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dapeng; Fujisawa, Moeto; Toyokuni, Genti

    2017-03-01

    On 30 May 2015 an isolated deep earthquake (~670 km, Mw 7.9) occurred to the west of the Bonin Islands. To clarify its causal mechanism and its relationship to the subducting Pacific slab, we determined a detailed P-wave tomography of the deep earthquake source zone using a large number of arrival-time data. Our results show that this large deep event occurred within the subducting Pacific slab which is penetrating into the lower mantle. In the Izu-Bonin region, the Pacific slab is split at ~28° north latitude, i.e., slightly north of the 2015 deep event hypocenter. In the north the slab becomes stagnant in the mantle transition zone, whereas in the south the slab is directly penetrating into the lower mantle. This deep earthquake was caused by joint effects of several factors, including the Pacific slab’s fast deep subduction, slab tearing, slab thermal variation, stress changes and phase transformations in the slab, and complex interactions between the slab and the ambient mantle.

  14. A Comparative Study of Strength of Two-Way Rectangular Slabs with and without Openings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindra, M.; Rakesh, V.; Rambabu, K.

    2016-09-01

    The present work uses yield-line theory to find the strength of uniformly loaded rectangular reinforced concrete slabs with and without rectangular openings. Five positions of openings are considered, i.e. the slab centre, the slab corner, the centre of a short side, the centre of a long side and the opening eccentric to the slab centre. All possible admissible yield line patterns are considered for all given configurations of the slab subjected to uniformly distributed load keeping in view the basic principles of yield line theory. The ratios of the corresponding lengths of the sides of the opening and the slab are different and sizes of opening up to 0.4× the length of the slab sides are considered. Symmetric edge conditions like continuous slab, simply supported, two long sides continuous and two short sides continuous are considered for various sizes of openings in order to plot the design charts for isotropic reinforcement coefficients only. Affine transformation is also performed for slab with openings.

  15. A generalized slab-wise framework for parallel transmit multiband RF pulse design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoping; Schmitter, Sebastian; Auerbach, Edward J.; Uğurbil, Kâmil; de Moortele, Pierre-François Van

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We propose a new slab-wise framework to design parallel transmit multi-band pulses for volumetric simultaneous multi-slice imaging with a large field of view along the slice direction (FOVs). Theory and Methods The slab-wise framework divides FOVs into a few contiguous slabs and optimizes pulses for each slab. Effects of relevant design parameters including slab number and transmit B1 (B1+) mapping slice placement were investigated for human brain imaging by designing pulses with global or local SAR control based on electromagnetic simulations of a 7T head RF array. Pulse design using in-vivo B1+ maps was demonstrated and evaluated with Bloch simulations. Results RF performance with respect to SAR reduction or B1+ homogenization across the entire human brain improved with increasing slabs; however, this improvement was non-linear and leveled off at ~12 slabs when the slab thickness reduced to ~12 mm. The impact of using different slice placements for B1+ mapping was small. Conclusion Compared to slice-wise approaches where each of the many imaging slices requires both B1+ mapping and pulse optimization, the proposed slab-wise design framework is shown to attain comparable RF performance while drastically reducing the number of required pulses; therefore, it can be used to increase time efficiency for B1+ mapping, pulse calculation and sequence preparation. PMID:25994797

  16. Factors influencing alginate gel biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Susan K; Dusseault, Julie; Bilodeau, Stéphanie; Langlois, Geneviève; Hallé, Jean-Pierre; Yahia, L'Hocine

    2011-07-01

    Alginate remains the most popular polymer used for cell encapsulation, yet its biocompatibility is inconsistent. Two commercially available alginates were compared, one with 71% guluronate (HiG), and the other with 44% (IntG). Both alginates were purified, and their purities were verified. After 2 days in the peritoneal cavity of C57BL/6J mice, barium (Ba)-gel and calcium (Ca)-gel beads of IntG alginate were clean, while host cells were adhered to beads of HiG alginate. IntG gel beads, however, showed fragmentation in vivo while HiG gel beads stayed firm. The physicochemical properties of the sodium alginates and their gels were thoroughly characterized. The intrinsic viscosity of IntG alginate was 2.5-fold higher than that of HiG alginate, suggesting a greater molecular mass. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated that both alginates were similar in elemental composition, including low levels of counterions in all gels. The wettabilities of the alginates and gels were also identical, as measured by contact angles of water on dry films. Ba-gel beads of HiG alginate resisted swelling and degradation when immersed in water, much more than the other gel beads. These results suggest that the main factors contributing to the biocompatibility of gels of purified alginate are the mannuronate/guluronate content and/or intrinsic viscosity.

  17. Defects of mitochondrial DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, William C

    2014-09-01

    Mitochondrial DNA is replicated by DNA polymerase γ in concert with accessory proteins such as the mitochondrial DNA helicase, single-stranded DNA binding protein, topoisomerase, and initiating factors. Defects in mitochondrial DNA replication or nucleotide metabolism can cause mitochondrial genetic diseases due to mitochondrial DNA deletions, point mutations, or depletion, which ultimately cause loss of oxidative phosphorylation. These genetic diseases include mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes such as Alpers or early infantile hepatocerebral syndromes, and mitochondrial DNA deletion disorders, such as progressive external ophthalmoplegia, ataxia-neuropathy, or mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy. This review focuses on our current knowledge of genetic defects of mitochondrial DNA replication (POLG, POLG2, C10orf2, and MGME1) that cause instability of mitochondrial DNA and mitochondrial disease.

  18. Regulation of beta cell replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Ying C; Nielsen, Jens Høiriis

    2008-01-01

    Beta cell mass, at any given time, is governed by cell differentiation, neogenesis, increased or decreased cell size (cell hypertrophy or atrophy), cell death (apoptosis), and beta cell proliferation. Nutrients, hormones and growth factors coupled with their signalling intermediates have been...... suggested to play a role in beta cell mass regulation. In addition, genetic mouse model studies have indicated that cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases that determine cell cycle progression are involved in beta cell replication, and more recently, menin in association with cyclin-dependent kinase...... inhibitors has been demonstrated to be important in beta cell growth. In this review, we consider and highlight some aspects of cell cycle regulation in relation to beta cell replication. The role of cell cycle regulation in beta cell replication is mostly from studies in rodent models, but whether...

  19. Shell Separation for Mirror Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    NASA's Space Optics Manufacturing Center has been working to expand our view of the universe via sophisticated new telescopes. The Optics Center's goal is to develop low-cost, advanced space optics technologies for the NASA program in the 21st century - including the long-term goal of imaging Earth-like planets in distant solar systems. To reduce the cost of mirror fabrication, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has developed replication techniques, the machinery, and materials to replicate electro-formed nickel mirrors. Optics replication uses reusable forms, called mandrels, to make telescope mirrors ready for final finishing. MSFC optical physicist Bill Jones monitors a device used to chill a mandrel, causing it to shrink and separate from the telescope mirror without deforming the mirror's precisely curved surface.

  20. Slab waveguide photobioreactors for microalgae based biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Erica Eunjung; Kalontarov, Michael; Doud, Devin F R; Ooms, Matthew D; Angenent, Largus T; Sinton, David; Erickson, David

    2012-10-07

    Microalgae are a promising feedstock for sustainable biofuel production. At present, however, there are a number of challenges that limit the economic viability of the process. Two of the major challenges are the non-uniform distribution of light in photobioreactors and the inefficiencies associated with traditional biomass processing. To address the latter limitation, a number of studies have demonstrated organisms that directly secrete fuels without requiring organism harvesting. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel optofluidic photobioreactor that can help address the light distribution challenge while being compatible with these chemical secreting organisms. Our approach is based on light delivery to surface bound photosynthetic organisms through the evanescent field of an optically excited slab waveguide. In addition to characterizing organism growth-rates in the system, we also show here, for the first time, that the photon usage efficiency of evanescent field illumination is comparable to the direct illumination used in traditional photobioreactors. We also show that the stackable nature of the slab waveguide approach could yield a 12-fold improvement in the volumetric productivity.

  1. IMPROVING THE EFFICIENCY OF MINERAL WOOL SLABS TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perfilov Vladimir Aleksandrovich

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of thermal insulation materials is an effective method to create an insulating envelope of a building, as well as to reduce energy costs and increase the durability of building structures. The properties of stone wool products and their operational durability is largely determined by the conditions of formation of the mineral wool carpet, uniform distribution of binder and its curing and the heat treatment conditions. Most domestic technologies are aimed at the production of mineral wool products with volume-oriented structure, which is formed using special units: spreader and corrugator placed in a production line. The next step to obtain the optimum structures is the production of dual density slabs. The denser upper layer receives mechanical loads caused by the operating conditions; the lower, less dense, but more thick layer performs the main function - insulation. The dual density slabs are produced on standard lines supplemented with a special unit, which is located in front of the heat treatment camera. Optimization of heat treatment parameters and prediction of the properties of materials is performed using software package.

  2. Trench migration, net rotation and slab mantle coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funiciello, F.; Faccenna, C.; Heuret, A.; Lallemand, S.; Di Giuseppe, E.; Becker, T. W.

    2008-07-01

    Laboratory models have been conducted to improve our understanding of the role that the resistance of the slab to bending and its coupling to the ambient mantle play in subduction dynamics over geological time scales. Our models are set up with a viscous plate of silicone (lithosphere) subducting under negative buoyancy in a viscous layer of glucose syrup (mantle). For our study, the lithosphere/upper mantle viscosity contrast has been systematically varied, from ~ 10 to ~ 10 5 in order to explore the parameter space between weak and strong slab dynamics. We found that subduction is characterized by a retreating mode for viscosity ratios > 10 4, by the coexistence of a retreating mode and an advancing mode for viscosity ratios between ~ 10 4 and ~ 10 2, and quasi-stationary, Rayleigh-Taylor like behaviour for ratios < 10 2. By combining our experimental results and kinematic data from current subduction zones in four reference frames which differ in the amount of net rotation, we infer that a lithosphere/upper mantle viscosity contrast of 150-500 is necessary to obtain realistic trench/subducting plate velocity ratios as well as the variability of subduction styles observed in nature.

  3. Spike-and-Slab Sparse Coding for Unsupervised Feature Discovery

    CERN Document Server

    Goodfellow, Ian J; Bengio, Yoshua

    2012-01-01

    We consider the problem of using a factor model we call {\\em spike-and-slab sparse coding} (S3C) to learn features for a classification task. The S3C model resembles both the spike-and-slab RBM and sparse coding. Since exact inference in this model is intractable, we derive a structured variational inference procedure and employ a variational EM training algorithm. Prior work on approximate inference for this model has not prioritized the ability to exploit parallel architectures and scale to enormous problem sizes. We present an inference procedure appropriate for use with GPUs which allows us to dramatically increase both the training set size and the amount of latent factors. We demonstrate that this approach improves upon the supervised learning capabilities of both sparse coding and the ssRBM on the CIFAR-10 dataset. We evaluate our approach's potential for semi-supervised learning on subsets of CIFAR-10. We demonstrate state-of-the art self-taught learning performance on the STL-10 dataset and use our m...

  4. ROBUST RVM BASED ON SPIKE-SLAB PRIOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ding Xinghao; Mi Zengyuan; Huang Yue; Jin Wenbo

    2012-01-01

    Although Relevance Vector Machine (RVM) is the most popular algorithms in machine learning and computer vision,outliers in the training data make the estimation unreliable.In the paper,a robust RVM model under non-parametric Bayesian framework is proposed.We decompose the noise term in the RVM model into two components,a Gaussian noise term and a spiky noise term.Therefore the observed data is assumed represented as:y=Dw+s+e,where Dw is the relevance vector component,of which D is the kernel function matrix and w is the weight matrix,s is the spiky term and e is the Gaussian noise term.A spike-slab sparse prior is imposed on the weight vector w,which gives a more intuitive constraint on the sparsity than the Student's t-distribution described in the traditional RVM.For the spiky component s,a spike-slab sparse prior is also introduced to recognize outliers in the training data effectively.Several experiments demonstrate the better performance over the RVM regression.

  5. Oscillating Casimir force between two slabs in a Fermi sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Li-Weia; Su Guo-Zhen; Chen Jin-Can; Andresen Bjarne

    2012-01-01

    The Casimir effect for two parallel slabs immersed in an ideal Fermi sea is investigated at both zero and nonzero temperatures.It is found that the Casimir effect in a Fermi gas is distinctly different from that in an electromagnetic field or a massive Bose gas.In contrast to the familiar result that the Casimir force decreases monotonically with the increase of the separation L between two slabs in an electromagnetic field and a massive Bose gas,the Casimir force in a Fermi gas oscillates as a function of L.The Casimir force can be either attractive or repulsive,depending sensitively on the magnitude of L. In addition,it is found that the amplitude of the Casimir force in a Fermi gas decreases with the increase of the temperature,which also is contrary to the case in a Bose gas,since the bosonic Casimir force increases linearly with the increase of the temperature in the region T < Tc,where Tc is the critical temperature of the Bose-Einstein condensation.

  6. MODELING OF TRANSIENT HEAT TRANSFER IN FOAMED CONCRETE SLAB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MD AZREE OTHUMAN MYDIN

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the basis of one-dimensional Finite Difference method to obtain thermal properties of foamed concrete in order to solve transient heat conduction problems in multi-layer panels. In addition, this paper also incorporates the implementation of the method and the validation of thermal properties model of foamed concrete. A one-dimensional finite difference heat conduction programme has been developed to envisage the temperature development through the thickness of the foamed concrete slab, based on an initial estimate of the thermal conductivity-temperature relationship as a function of porosity and radiation within the voids. The accuracy of the model was evaluated by comparing predicted and experimental temperature profiles obtained from small scale heat transfer test on foamed concrete slabs, so that the temperature history of the specimen calculated by the programme closely matches those recorded during the experiment. Using the thermal properties of foamed concrete, the validated heat transfer program predicts foamed concrete temperatures in close agreement with experimental results obtained from a number of high temperature tests. The proposed numerical and thermal properties are simple yet efficient and can be utilised to aid manufacturers to develop their products without having to conduct numerous large-scale fire tests.

  7. Descending lithosphere slab beneath the Northwest Dinarides from teleseismic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šumanovac, Franjo; Dudjak, Darko

    2016-12-01

    The area of study covers the marginal zone between the Adriatic microplate (African plate) and the Pannonian segment (Eurasian plate). We present a tomography model for this area, with special emphasis on the northwest Dinarides. A dense distribution of temporary seismic stations in the area of the Northern Dinarides along with permanent seismic stations located in the area, allowed us to construct this P-wave tomographic model. We assembled our travel-time dataset based on 26 seismic stations were used to collect the dataset. Teleseismic events were recorded for a period of 18 months and a set of 76 distant earthquakes were used to calculate the P-wave travel-time residuals. We calculated relative rather than absolute arrival-time residuals in the inversion to obtain depths of 0-400 km. We imaged a pronounced fast velocity anomaly below the NW Dinarides which directly indicates a lithosphere slab downgoing beneath the Dinarides. This fast anomaly extends towards the NW direction to at least 250 km depth, and we interpreted it as a descending lithosphere slab. The thrusting of the Adriatic microplate may be brought about by sub-lithosphere rising movement beneath the Pannonian region, along with a push from African plate. In our interpretation, the Adriatic lower lithosphere has been detached from the crust, and steeply sinks beneath the Dinarides. A lithosphere model of the contact between the Adriatic microplate and Pannonian tectonic segment was constructed based on the tomographic velocity model and results of previous crustal studies.

  8. Magnetohydrodynamic stability of natural convection in a vertical porous slab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, B. M.; Kumar, Jai; Shivakumara, I. S.

    2017-01-01

    The stability of the conduction regime of natural convection in an electrically conducting fluid saturated porous vertical slab is investigated in the presence of a uniform external transverse magnetic field. The flow in the porous medium is described by modified Brinkman-extended Darcy equation with fluid viscosity different from effective viscosity. The boundaries of the vertical porous slab are assumed to be rigid-isothermal and electrically non-conducting. The resulting stability equations are solved numerically using Galerkin method. The critical Grashof number Gc, the critical wave number αc and the critical wave speed cc are computed for a wide range of porous parameter σp, the ratio of effective viscosity to the fluid viscosity Λ, the Prandtl number Pr and the Hartmann number M. Based on these parameters, the stability characteristics of the system are discussed in detail. The presence of advective inertia is to instill instability on the flow in a porous medium and found that the magnetic field, porous parameter and ratio of viscosities have a stabilizing effect on both stationary and oscillatory wave instabilities. Besides, the value of Pr at which transition occurs from stationary to oscillatory mode of instability decreases with increasing M ,σp and Λ .

  9. Personality and Academic Motivation: Replication, Extension, and Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Martin H.; McMichael, Stephanie N.

    2015-01-01

    Previous work examines the relationships between personality traits and intrinsic/extrinsic motivation. We replicate and extend previous work to examine how personality may relate to achievement goals, efficacious beliefs, and mindset about intelligence. Approximately 200 undergraduates responded to the survey with a 150 participants replicating…

  10. THE PROPERTIES OF CARRAGEENAN GELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grubnik I.M., Gladukh Ye.V., Chernyaev S.V.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of studies on the functional properties of carrageenan, depending on the concentration of sodium chloride and xanthan in gels. It is established that the main factors in the syneresis of carrageenan gels are its concentration, the presence of ions and gums in solution. If using sodium chloride there is a change in the structure of mesh of the resulting gel, which leads to an increase in syneresis.

  11. A systematic approach to determine optimal composition of gel used in radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Yuan-Jen [Department of Management Information Systems, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Material Science, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, Bor-Tsung, E-mail: bthsieh@ctust.edu.tw [Department of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Liang, Ji-An [Department of Radiation Oncology, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2011-10-01

    The design of experiment was used to find the optimal composition of N-isopropyl acrylamide (NIPAM) gel. Optical computed tomography was used to scan the polymer gel dosimeter, which was irradiated from 0 to 20 Gy. The study was conducted following a statistical method using a two-level fractional factorial plan involving four variables (gelatin-5% and 6%, NIPAM-3% and 5%, Bis-2.5% and 3%, and THPC-5 and 10 mM). We produced three batches of gels of the same composition to replicate the experiments. Based on the statistical analysis, a regression model was built. The optimal gel composition for the dose range 0-15 Gy with linearity up to 1.000 is as follows: gelatin (5.67%), NIPAM (5%), Bis (2.56%), and THPC (10 mM). The dose response of the NIPAM polymer gel attains stability about 24 h after irradiation and remains stable up to 3 months.

  12. Mantle flow and dynamic topography associated with slab window opening: Insights from laboratory models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaume, Benjamin; Moroni, Monica; Funiciello, Francesca; Martinod, Joseph; Faccenna, Claudio

    2010-12-01

    We present dynamically self-consistent mantle-scale laboratory models that have been conducted to improve our understanding of the influence of slab window opening on subduction dynamics, mantle flow and associated dynamic topography over geological time scales. The adopted setup consists of a two-layer linearly viscous system simulating the subduction of a fixed plate of silicone (lithosphere) under negative buoyancy in a viscous layer of glucose syrup (mantle). Our experimental setting is also characterized by a constant-width rectangular window located at the center of a laterally confined slab, modeling the case of the interaction of a trench-parallel spreading ridge with a wide subduction zone. We found that the opening of a slab window does not produce consistent changes of the geometry and the kinematics of the slab. On the contrary, slab-induced mantle circulation, quantified both in the vertical and horizontal sections using the Feature Tracking image analysis technique, is strongly modified. In particular, rollback subduction and the opening of the slab window generate a complex mantle circulation pattern characterized by the presence of poloidal and toroidal components, with the importance of each evolving according to kinematic stages. Mantle coming from the oceanic domain floods through the slab window, indenting the supra-slab mantle zone and producing its deformation without any mixing between mantle portions. The opening of the slab window and the upwelling of sub-slab mantle produce a regional-scale non-isostatic topographic uplift of the overriding plate that would correspond to values ranging between ca. 1 and 5 km in nature. Assuming that our modeling results can be representative of the natural behavior of subduction zones, we compared them to the tectonics and volcanism of the Patagonian subduction zone. We found that the anomalous backarc volcanism that has been developing since the middle Miocene could result from the lateral flow of sub-slab

  13. The role of ridges in the formation and longevity of flat slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonijevic, Sanja Knezevic; Wagner, Lara S; Kumar, Abhash; Beck, Susan L; Long, Maureen D; Zandt, George; Tavera, Hernando; Condori, Cristobal

    2015-08-13

    Flat-slab subduction occurs when the descending plate becomes horizontal at some depth before resuming its descent into the mantle. It is often proposed as a mechanism for the uplifting of deep crustal rocks ('thick-skinned' deformation) far from plate boundaries, and for causing unusual patterns of volcanism, as far back as the Proterozoic eon. For example, the formation of the expansive Rocky Mountains and the subsequent voluminous volcanism across much of the western USA has been attributed to a broad region of flat-slab subduction beneath North America that occurred during the Laramide orogeny (80-55 million years ago). Here we study the largest modern flat slab, located in Peru, to better understand the processes controlling the formation and extent of flat slabs. We present new data that indicate that the subducting Nazca Ridge is necessary for the development and continued support of the horizontal plate at a depth of about 90 kilometres. By combining constraints from Rayleigh wave phase velocities with improved earthquake locations, we find that the flat slab is shallowest along the ridge, while to the northwest of the ridge, the slab is sagging, tearing, and re-initiating normal subduction. On the basis of our observations, we propose a conceptual model for the temporal evolution of the Peruvian flat slab in which the flat slab forms because of the combined effects of trench retreat along the Peruvian plate boundary, suction, and ridge subduction. We find that while the ridge is necessary but not sufficient for the formation of the flat slab, its removal is sufficient for the flat slab to fail. This provides new constraints on our understanding of the processes controlling the beginning and end of the Laramide orogeny and other putative episodes of flat-slab subduction.

  14. Processing and properties of large-sized ceramic slabs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fossa, L.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Large-sized ceramic slabs – with dimensions up to 360x120 cm2 and thickness down to 2 mm – are manufactured through an innovative ceramic process, starting from porcelain stoneware formulations and involving wet ball milling, spray drying, die-less slow-rate pressing, a single stage of fast drying-firing, and finishing (trimming, assembling of ceramic-fiberglass composites. Fired and unfired industrial slabs were selected and characterized from the technological, compositional (XRF, XRD and microstructural (SEM viewpoints. Semi-finished products exhibit a remarkable microstructural uniformity and stability in a rather wide window of firing schedules. The phase composition and compact microstructure of fired slabs are very similar to those of porcelain stoneware tiles. The values of water absorption, bulk density, closed porosity, functional performances as well as mechanical and tribological properties conform to the top quality range of porcelain stoneware tiles. However, the large size coupled with low thickness bestow on the slab a certain degree of flexibility, which is emphasized in ceramic-fiberglass composites. These outstanding performances make the large-sized slabs suitable to be used in novel applications: building and construction (new floorings without dismantling the previous paving, ventilated façades, tunnel coverings, insulating panelling, indoor furnitures (table tops, doors, support for photovoltaic ceramic panels.

    Se han fabricado piezas de gran formato, con dimensiones de hasta 360x120 cm, y menos de 2 mm, de espesor, empleando métodos innovadores de fabricación, partiendo de composiciones de gres porcelánico y utilizando, molienda con bolas por vía húmeda, atomización, prensado a baja velocidad sin boquilla de extrusión, secado y cocción rápido en una sola etapa, y un acabado que incluye la adhesión de fibra de vidrio al soporte cerámico y el rectificado de la pieza final. Se han

  15. Gel polymer electrolytes for batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsara, Nitash Pervez; Eitouni, Hany Basam; Gur, Ilan; Singh, Mohit; Hudson, William

    2014-11-18

    Nanostructured gel polymer electrolytes that have both high ionic conductivity and high mechanical strength are disclosed. The electrolytes have at least two domains--one domain contains an ionically-conductive gel polymer and the other domain contains a rigid polymer that provides structure for the electrolyte. The domains are formed by block copolymers. The first block provides a polymer matrix that may or may not be conductive on by itself, but that can soak up a liquid electrolyte, thereby making a gel. An exemplary nanostructured gel polymer electrolyte has an ionic conductivity of at least 1.times.10.sup.-4 S cm.sup.-1 at 25.degree. C.

  16. Regulation of Replication Recovery and Genome Integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colding, Camilla Skettrup

    facilitate replication recovery after MMS-induced replication stress. Our data reveal that control of Mrc1 turnover through the interplay between posttranslational modifications and INQ localization adds another layer of regulation to the replication checkpoint. We also add replication recovery to the list...... is mediated by Mrc1, which ensures Mec1 presence at the stalled replication fork thus facilitating Rad53 phosphorylation. When replication can be resumed safely, the replication checkpoint is deactivated and replication forks restart. One mechanism for checkpoint deactivation is the ubiquitin......-targeted proteasomal degradation of Mrc1. In this study, we describe a novel nuclear structure, the intranuclear quality control compartment (INQ), which regulates protein turnover and is important for recovery after replication stress. We find that upon methyl methanesulfonate (MMS)-induced replication stress, INQ...

  17. The impact of slab dip variations, gaps and rollback on mantle wedge flow: insights from fluids experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDougall, Julia G.; Kincaid, Chris; Szwaja, Sara; Fischer, Karen M.

    2014-05-01

    Observed seismic anisotropy and geochemical anomalies indicate the presence of 3-D flow around and above subducting slabs. To investigate how slab geometry and velocity affect mantle flow, we conducted a set of experiments using a subduction apparatus in a fluid-filled tank. Our models comprise two independently adjustable, continuous belts to represent discrete sections of subducting slabs that kinematically drive flow in the surrounding glucose syrup that represents the upper mantle. We analyse how slab dip (ranging from 30° to 80°), slab dip difference between slab segments (ranging from 20° to 50°), rates of subduction (4-8 cm yr-1) and slab/trench rollback (0-3 cm yr-1) affect mantle flow. Whiskers were used to approximate mineral alignment induced by the flow, as well as to predict directions of seismic anisotropy. We find that dip variations between slab segments generate 3-D flow in the mantle wedge, where the path lines of trenchward moving mantle material above the slab are deflected towards the slab segment with the shallower dip. The degree of path line deflection increases as the difference in slab dip between the segments increases, and, for a fixed dip difference, as slab dip decreases. In cases of slab rollback and large slab dip differences, we observe intrusion of subslab material through the gap and into the wedge. Flow through the gap remains largely horizontal before eventual downward entrainment. Whisker alignment in the wedge flow is largely trench-normal, except near the lateral edges of the slab where toroidal flow dominates. In addition, whisker azimuths located above the slab gap deviate most strongly from trench-normal orientations when slab rollback does not occur. Such flow field complexities are likely sufficient to affect deep melt production and shallow melt delivery. However, none of the experiments produced flow fields that explain the trench-parallel shear wave splitting fast directions observed over broad arc and backarc

  18. Hyperthermia stimulates HIV-1 replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdinand Roesch

    Full Text Available HIV-infected individuals may experience fever episodes. Fever is an elevation of the body temperature accompanied by inflammation. It is usually beneficial for the host through enhancement of immunological defenses. In cultures, transient non-physiological heat shock (42-45°C and Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs modulate HIV-1 replication, through poorly defined mechanisms. The effect of physiological hyperthermia (38-40°C on HIV-1 infection has not been extensively investigated. Here, we show that culturing primary CD4+ T lymphocytes and cell lines at a fever-like temperature (39.5°C increased the efficiency of HIV-1 replication by 2 to 7 fold. Hyperthermia did not facilitate viral entry nor reverse transcription, but increased Tat transactivation of the LTR viral promoter. Hyperthermia also boosted HIV-1 reactivation in a model of latently-infected cells. By imaging HIV-1 transcription, we further show that Hsp90 co-localized with actively transcribing provirus, and this phenomenon was enhanced at 39.5°C. The Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG abrogated the increase of HIV-1 replication in hyperthermic cells. Altogether, our results indicate that fever may directly stimulate HIV-1 replication, in a process involving Hsp90 and facilitation of Tat-mediated LTR activity.

  19. Hyperthermia stimulates HIV-1 replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch, Ferdinand; Meziane, Oussama; Kula, Anna; Nisole, Sébastien; Porrot, Françoise; Anderson, Ian; Mammano, Fabrizio; Fassati, Ariberto; Marcello, Alessandro; Benkirane, Monsef; Schwartz, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    HIV-infected individuals may experience fever episodes. Fever is an elevation of the body temperature accompanied by inflammation. It is usually beneficial for the host through enhancement of immunological defenses. In cultures, transient non-physiological heat shock (42-45°C) and Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs) modulate HIV-1 replication, through poorly defined mechanisms. The effect of physiological hyperthermia (38-40°C) on HIV-1 infection has not been extensively investigated. Here, we show that culturing primary CD4+ T lymphocytes and cell lines at a fever-like temperature (39.5°C) increased the efficiency of HIV-1 replication by 2 to 7 fold. Hyperthermia did not facilitate viral entry nor reverse transcription, but increased Tat transactivation of the LTR viral promoter. Hyperthermia also boosted HIV-1 reactivation in a model of latently-infected cells. By imaging HIV-1 transcription, we further show that Hsp90 co-localized with actively transcribing provirus, and this phenomenon was enhanced at 39.5°C. The Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG abrogated the increase of HIV-1 replication in hyperthermic cells. Altogether, our results indicate that fever may directly stimulate HIV-1 replication, in a process involving Hsp90 and facilitation of Tat-mediated LTR activity.

  20. Cellular Responses to Replication Problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Budzowska (Magdalena)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractDuring every S-phase cells need to duplicate their genomes so that both daughter cells inherit complete copies of genetic information. It is a tremendous task, given the large sizes of mammalian genomes and the required precision of DNA replication. A major threat to the accuracy and eff

  1. Covert Reinforcement: A Partial Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripstra, Constance C.; And Others

    A partial replication of an investigation of the effect of covert reinforcement on a perceptual estimation task is described. The study was extended to include an extinction phase. There were five treatment groups: covert reinforcement, neutral scene reinforcement, noncontingent covert reinforcement, and two control groups. Each subject estimated…

  2. MCNP5 CALCULATIONS REPLICATING ARH-600 NITRATE DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FINFROCK SH

    2011-10-25

    This report serves to extend the previous document: 'MCNP Calculations Replicating ARH-600 Data' by replicating the nitrate curves found in ARH-600. This report includes the MCNP models used, the calculated critical dimension for each analyzed parameter set, and the resulting data libraries for use with the CritView code. As with the ARH-600 data, this report is not meant to replace the analysis of the fissile systems by qualified criticality personnel. The M CNP data is presented without accounting for the statistical uncertainty (although this is typically less than 0.001) or bias and, as such, the application of a reasonable safety margin is required. The data that follows pertains to the uranyl nitrate and plutonium nitrate spheres, infinite cylinders, and infinite slabs of varying isotopic composition, reflector thickness, and molarity. Each of the cases was modeled in MCNP (version 5.1.40), using the ENDF/B-VI cross section set. Given a molarity, isotopic composition, and reflector thickness, the fissile concentration and diameter (or thicknesses in the case of the slab geometries) were varied. The diameter for which k-effective equals 1.00 for a given concentration could then be calculated and graphed. These graphs are included in this report. The pages that follow describe the regions modeled, formulas for calculating the various parameters, a list of cross-sections used in the calculations, a description of the automation routine and data, and finally the data output. The data of most interest are the critical dimensions of the various systems analyzed. This is presented graphically, and in table format, in Appendix B. Appendix C provides a text listing of the same data in a format that is compatible with the CritView code. Appendices D and E provide listing of example Template files and MCNP input files (these are discussed further in Section 4). Appendix F is a complete listing of all of the output data (i.e., all of the analyzed dimensions and

  3. Experimental validation of systematically designed acoustic hyperbolic meta material slab exhibiting negative refraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Rasmus Ellebæk; Sigmund, Ole

    2016-01-01

    This Letter reports on the experimental validation of a two-dimensional acoustic hyperbolic metamaterial slab optimized to exhibit negative refractive behavior. The slab was designed using a topology optimization based systematic design method allowing for tailoring the refractive behavior. The e...

  4. Internal deformation of the subducted Nazca slab inferred from seismic anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eakin, Caroline M.; Long, Maureen D.; Scire, Alissa; Beck, Susan L.; Wagner, Lara S.; Zandt, George; Tavera, Hernando

    2016-01-01

    Within oceanic lithosphere a fossilized fabric is often preserved originating from the time of plate formation. Such fabric is thought to form at the mid-ocean ridge when olivine crystals align with the direction of plate spreading. It is unclear, however, whether this fossil fabric is preserved within slabs during subduction or overprinted by subduction-induced deformation. The alignment of olivine crystals, such as within fossil fabrics, can generate anisotropy that is sensed by passing seismic waves. Seismic anisotropy is therefore a useful tool for investigating the dynamics of subduction zones, but it has so far proved difficult to observe the anisotropic properties of the subducted slab itself. Here we analyse seismic anisotropy in the subducted Nazca slab beneath Peru and find that the fast direction of seismic wave propagation aligns with the contours of the slab. We use numerical modelling to simulate the olivine fabric created at the mid-ocean ridge, but find it is inconsistent with our observations of seismic anisotropy in the subducted Nazca slab. Instead we find that an orientation of the olivine crystal fast axes aligned parallel to the strike of the slab provides the best fit, consistent with along-strike extension induced by flattening of the slab during subduction (A. Kumar et al., manuscript in preparation). We conclude that the fossil fabric has been overprinted during subduction and that the Nazca slab must therefore be sufficiently weak to undergo internal deformation.

  5. Juan de Fuca slab geometry and its relation to Wadati-Benioff zone seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrory, Patricia A.; Blair, J. Luke; Waldhause, Felix; Oppenheimer, David H.

    2012-01-01

    A new model of the subducted Juan de Fuca plate beneath western North America allows first-order correlations between the occurrence of Wadati-Benioff zone earthquakes and slab geometry, temperature, and hydration state. The geo-referenced 3D model, constructed from weighted control points, integrates depth information from earthquake locations and regional seismic velocity studies. We use the model to separate earthquakes that occur in the Cascadia forearc from those that occur within the underlying Juan de Fuca plate and thereby reveal previously obscured details regarding the spatial distribution of earthquakes. Seismicity within the slab is most prevalent where the slab is warped beneath northwestern California and western Washington suggesting that slab flexure, in addition to expected metamorphic dehydration processes, promotes earthquake occurrence within the subducted oceanic plate. Earthquake patterns beneath western Vancouver Island are consistent with slab dehydration processes. Conversely, the lack of slab earthquakes beneath western Oregon is consistent with an anhydrous slab. Double-differenced relocated seismicity resolves a double seismic zone within the slab beneath northwestern California that strongly constrains the location of the plate interface and delineates a cluster of seismicity 10 km above the surface that includes the 1992 M7.1 Mendocino earthquake. We infer that this earthquake ruptured a surface within the Cascadia accretionary margin above the Juan de Fuca plate. We further speculate that this earthquake is associated with a detached fragment of former Farallon plate. Other subsurface tectonic elements within the forearc may have the potential to generate similar damaging earthquakes.

  6. Calculation of shear strength of prestressed hollow core slabs by use of plastic theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoang, Linh Cao; Jørgensen, Henrik Brøner; Nielsen, Mogens Peter

    2014-01-01

    saw-cut into units with the desirable length. For this reason, hollow core slabs are usually not shear reinforced and anchorage of the prestressing strands has to be established by bond. Hollow core slabs may therefore be more critical to shear and Anchorage failure than ordinary two-way spanning...

  7. Calculation of shear strength of prestressed hollow core slabs by use of plastic theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoang, Linh Cao; Jørgensen, H.G.; Nielsen, Mogens Peter

    2014-01-01

    saw-cut into units with the desirable length. For this reason, hollow core slabs are usually not shear reinforced and anchorage of the prestressing strands has to be established by bond. Hollow core slabs may therefore be more critical to shear and anchorage failure than ordinary two-way spanning...

  8. Automated grading of wood-slabs. The development of a prototype system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær; Conradsen, Knut

    1992-01-01

    , etc. Based on the relative distribution of these detected defects on the surface of a given slab, the slab is further classified into 5 quality grades: prime, standard, flamy, extra flamy and rejects. As a result of this project, a prototype for the computer vision grading system has been built...

  9. Strong suppression of radiation states in a slab waveguide sandwiched between omnidirectional mirrors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, H.J.W.M.; Yudistira, D.; Stoffer, R.

    2005-01-01

    Structures in channel or slab waveguides, applied deliberately or due to imperfections, may lead to strong modal losses, corresponding to the excitation of radiation modes. As an example, losses are generally very large in slab photonic crystal (PhC) impurity waveguides (WGs) due to the combined eff

  10. Evidence for slab material under Greenland and links to Cretaceous High Arctic magmatism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shephard, G. E.; Trønnes, R. G.; Spakman, W.; Panet, I.; Gaina, C.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of extinct ocean basins through time and space demands the integration of surface kinematics and mantle dynamics. We explore the existence, origin, and implications of a proposed oceanic slab burial ground under Greenland through a comparison of seismic tomography, slab s

  11. Effect of CFRP strengthening on the response of RC slabs to hard projectile impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almusallam, Tarek; Al-Salloum, Yousef; Alsayed, Saleh; Iqbal, Rizwan; Abbas, Husain, E-mail: abbas_husain@hotmail.com

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Studied response of CFRP-strengthened RC slabs under the impact load. • Slabs were tested under the strike of hemispherical steel projectiles at varying impact. • The slabs were analyzed numerically using LS-DYNA. • Strengthening increased the ballistic limit velocity by 18% and perforation energy by 56.7%. • CFRP sheet reduced the crater damage and contained the flying concrete fragments. - Abstract: In this paper impact response of CFRP-strengthened RC panels under the impact of non-deformable projectiles has been presented. The control and CFRP-strengthened RC slab panels were tested under the strike of hemispherical nosed steel projectiles at varying impact velocities. The response of these panels was investigated experimentally as well as numerically. The damage of the slab panels was measured in terms of the penetration depth, formation of cracks, spalling and scabbing areas and fracture of CFRP sheet. This study presents a practical and efficient numerical method for analyzing the impact response of CFRP-strengthened RC structures using LS-DYNA. The CFRP strengthening was found to increase the ballistic limit velocity by 18%, perforation energy of RC slabs by 56.7%, reduce the front crater damage and contains the flying of concrete fragments from the rear face. The maximum impact force occurs at almost same penetration depth for the control and CFRP-strengthened slabs but the restraint provided by CFRP increased the penetration depth by about 1/19.3 of the thickness of slab.

  12. Effect of Oxide Scale on Interfacial Heat Transfer during Slab Hot Rolling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The hot rolling of slab was studied with the aid of elastic-plastic and thermomechanical couple FEM. On the basis of experiment and numerical analysis, the physical models for interfacial heat transfer during hot rolling were established. The results indicated that the deformation, cracking and decohesion behavior of the oxide scale have considerable effects on temperature distribution of slab during hot rolling.

  13. Bending and Shear Experimental Tests and Numerical Analysis of Composite Slabs Made Up of Lightweight Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. P. Alvarez Rabanal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to understand the structural behaviour of composite slabs. These composite slabs are made of steel and different kinds of concrete. The methodology used in this paper combines experimental studies with advanced techniques of numerical simulations. In this paper, four types of concrete were used in order to study their different structural strengths in composite slabs. The materials used were three lightweight concretes, a normal concrete, and a cold conformed steel deck which has embossments to increase the adherence between concrete and steel. Furthermore, two lengths of slabs were studied to compare structural behaviours between short and long slabs. m-k experimental tests were carried out to obtain the flexural behaviour of the composite slabs. These tests provide dimensionless coefficients to compare different sizes of slabs. Nonlinear numerical simulations were performed by means of the finite element method (FEM. Four different multilinear isotropic hardening laws were used to simulate the four concretes. Coulomb friction contact was used to model the coefficient of friction between steel and concrete. Finally, a chemical bond was included to consider sliding resistance in the contact surface between steel and concrete. Experimental and numerical results are in good agreement; therefore, numerical models can be used to improve and optimize lightweight composite slabs.

  14. Degradation and Mechanism of the Mechanics and Durability of Reinforced Concrete Slab in A Marine Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴胜兴; 刘冠国; 卞汉兵; 吕维波; 蒋建华

    2016-01-01

    An experimental research was conducted to determine the corrosion and bearing capacity of a reinforced concrete (RC) slab at different ages in a marine environment. Results showthat the development of corrosion-induced cracks on a slab in a marine environment can be divided into three stages according to crack morphology at the bottom of the slab. In the first stage, cracks appear. In the second stage, cracks develop from the edges to the middle of the slab. In the third stage, longitudinal and transverse corrosion-induced cracks coexist. The corrosion ratio of reinforcements nonlinearly increases with theage, and the relationship between the corrosion ratio of the reinforcements and the corrosion-induced crack width of the concrete is established. The flexural capacity of the corroded RC slab nonlinearly decreases with the age, and the model for the bearing capacity factor of the corroded RC slab is established. The mid-span deflection of the corroded RC slab that corresponds to the yield of the reinforcements linearly increases with the increase in corrosion ratio. Finally, the mechanisms of corrosion morphology and the degradation of the mechanical properties of an RC slab in a marine environment are discussed on the basis of the basic theories of steel corrosion in concrete and concrete structure design.

  15. Study of stratified dielectric slab medium structures using pseudo-spectral time domain (PSTD) algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tong, M.S.; Lu, Y.; Chen, Y.

    2005-01-01

    A planar stratified dielectric slab medium, which is an interesting problem in optics and geophysics, is studied using a pseudo-spectral time-domain (PSTD) algorithm. Time domain electric fields and frequency domain propagation characteristics of both single and periodic dielectric slab...

  16. Near-field imaging of out-of-plane light scattering in photonic crystal slabs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volkov, Valentyn; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey; Taillaert, Dirk

    2003-01-01

    A collection scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM) is used to image the propagating of light at telecommunication wavelengths (1520-1570 nm) along photonic crystal (PC) slabs, which combine slab waveguides with in-plane PCs consisting of one- and two-dimensional gratings. The efficient out...

  17. Cohesive cracked-hinge model for simulation of fracture in one-way slabs on grade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skar, Asmus; Poulsen, Peter Noe; Olesen, John Forbes

    2017-01-01

    Numerical analysis of slab on grade structures subjected to mechanical loads is a complex matter often requiring computationally expensive models. In order to develop a simplified and general concept for non-linear analysis of slab on grade structures, this paper presents a cohesive cracked...

  18. Degradation and mechanism of the mechanics and durability of reinforced concrete slab in a marine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sheng-xing; Liu, Guan-guo; Bian, Han-bing; Lv, Wei-bo; Jiang, Jian-hua

    2016-04-01

    An experimental research was conducted to determine the corrosion and bearing capacity of a reinforced concrete (RC) slab at different ages in a marine environment. Results show that the development of corrosion-induced cracks on a slab in a marine environment can be divided into three stages according to crack morphology at the bottom of the slab. In the first stage, cracks appear. In the second stage, cracks develop from the edges to the middle of the slab. In the third stage, longitudinal and transverse corrosion-induced cracks coexist. The corrosion ratio of reinforcements nonlinearly increases with the age, and the relationship between the corrosion ratio of the reinforcements and the corrosion-induced crack width of the concrete is established. The flexural capacity of the corroded RC slab nonlinearly decreases with the age, and the model for the bearing capacity factor of the corroded RC slab is established. The mid-span deflection of the corroded RC slab that corresponds to the yield of the reinforcements linearly increases with the increase in corrosion ratio. Finally, the mechanisms of corrosion morphology and the degradation of the mechanical properties of an RC slab in a marine environment are discussed on the basis of the basic theories of steel corrosion in concrete and concrete structure design.

  19. Crinivirus replication and host interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsofia A Kiss

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Criniviruses comprise one of the genera within the family Closteroviridae. Members in this family are restricted to the phloem and rely on whitefly vectors of the genera Bemisia and/or Trialeurodes for plant-to-plant transmission. All criniviruses have bipartite, positive-sense ssRNA genomes, although there is an unconfirmed report of one having a tripartite genome. Lettuce infectious yellows virus (LIYV is the type species of the genus, the best studied so far of the criniviruses and the first for which a reverse genetics system was available. LIYV RNA 1 encodes for proteins predicted to be involved in replication, and alone is competent for replication in protoplasts. Replication results in accumulation of cytoplasmic vesiculated membranous structures which are characteristic of most studied members of the Closteroviridae. These membranous structures, often referred to as BYV-type vesicles, are likely sites of RNA replication. LIYV RNA 2 is replicated in trans when co-infecting cells with RNA 1, but is temporally delayed relative to RNA1. Efficient RNA 2 replication also is dependent on the RNA 1-encoded RNA binding protein, P34. No LIYV RNA 2-encoded proteins have been shown to affect RNA replication, but at least four, CP, CPm, Hsp70h, and p59 are virion structural components and CPm is a determinant of whitefly transmissibility. Roles of other LIYV RNA 2-encoded proteins are largely as yet unknown, but P26 is a non-virion protein that accumulates in cells as characteristic plasmalemma deposits which in plants are localized within phloem parenchyma and companion cells over plasmodesmata connections to sieve elements. The two remaining crinivirus-conserved RNA 2-encoded proteins are P5 and P9. P5 is 39 amino acid protein and is encoded at the 5’ end of RNA 2 as ORF1 and is part of the hallmark closterovirus gene array. The orthologous gene in BYV has been shown to play a role in cell-to-cell movement and indicated to be localized to the

  20. Chromosome replication dynamics in the archaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggin, Iain G; McCallum, Simon A; Bell, Stephen D

    2008-10-28

    The "baby machine" provides a means of generating synchronized cultures of minimally perturbed cells. We describe the use of this technique to establish the key cell-cycle parameters of hyperthermophilic archaea of the genus Sulfolobus. The 3 DNA replication origins of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius were mapped by 2D gel analysis to near 0 (oriC2), 579 (oriC1), and 1,197 kb (oriC3) on the 2,226-kb circular genome, and we present a direct demonstration of their activity within the first few minutes of a synchronous cell cycle. We also detected X-shaped DNA molecules at the origins in log-phase cells, but these were not directly associated with replication initiation or ongoing chromosome replication in synchronized cells. Whole-genome marker frequency analyses of both synchronous and log-phase cultures showed that origin utilization was close to 100% for all 3 origins per round of replication. However, oriC2 was activated slightly later on average compared with oriC1 and oriC3. The DNA replication forks moved bidirectionally away from each origin at approximately 88 bp per second in synchronous culture. Analysis of the 3 Orc1/Cdc6 initiator proteins showed a uniformity of cellular abundance and origin binding throughout the cell cycle. In contrast, although levels of the MCM helicase were constant across the cell cycle, its origin localization was regulated, because it was strongly enriched at all 3 origins in early S phase.

  1. Slab stress field in the Hellenic subduction zone as inferred from intermediate depth earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rontogianni, S.; Konstantinou, K.; Melis, N. S.; Evangelidis, C.

    2010-12-01

    In this study we investigate the stress regime of the subducting slab beneath the Hellenic Arc aiming to answer two fundamental questions; a) How does the slab deformation vary horizontally and vertically along this large curvature arc? b) Which are the mechanisms inferred from global observations that can explain this deformation and have not been identified previously due to dataset limitations. The data are selected from various seismic networks, global and local seismic catalogues and the newly established Hellenic broadband seismic network (http://bbnet.gein.noa.gr/). An updated view of the geometry of the Hellenic Wadati-Benioff zone (WBZ) is gained by the spatial distribution of intermediate depth earthquakes (40 km≤ depth ≤ 180km). Stress tensor inversion is performed on 100 fault plane solutions of intermediate depth earthquakes after quality control has been applied. The stress field parameters are determined along the arc for several depth ranges. The slab is divided into four subsets, each containing enough focal mechanisms for stress inversion to be performed successfully. The Peloponnese segment shows for depths 50-80 km σ1 almost normal to the slab and σ3 steeper than the slab dip that might indicate suction force-the component of the slab pull force that is unbalanced by the subduction resistance. The Kithira-Western Crete segment shows for depths 50-100 km a biaxial deviatoric compression or a state of confined compression with the σ1 along strike. The stress regime in this section of the slab might be related to its complex shape and geometry (width, curvature) reflecting changes in the slab dip between the Peloponnese-Kithira strait and the Crete region as has also been identified by teleseimic receiver functions. The third segment below Crete shows σ1 along strike and σ3 almost subvertical to slab direction. The stress field for the forth segment below Karpathos and Rhodos has been divided into two depth ranges. The shallow subset (50

  2. Ambiguities in results obtained with 2D gel replicon mapping techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linskens, Maarten H.K.; Huberman, Joel A.

    1990-01-01

    Recently, two 2-dimensional (2D) gel techniques, termed neutral/neutral and neutral/alkaline, have been developed and employed to map replication origins in eukaryotic plasmids and chromosomal DNA. The neutral/neutral technique, which requires less DNA for analysis, has been preferentially used in r

  3. Study on the electromagnetic waves propagation characteristics in partially ionized plasma slabs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Bin Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Propagation characteristics of electromagnetic (EM waves in partially ionized plasma slabs are studied in this paper. Such features are significant to applications in plasma antennas, blackout of re-entry flying vehicles, wave energy injection to plasmas, and etc. We in this paper developed a theoretical model of EM wave propagation perpendicular to a plasma slab with a one-dimensional density inhomogeneity along propagation direction to investigate essential characteristics of EM wave propagation in nonuniform plasmas. Particularly, the EM wave propagation in sub-wavelength plasma slabs, where the geometric optics approximation fails, is studied and in comparison with thicker slabs where the geometric optics approximation applies. The influences of both plasma and collisional frequencies, as well as the width of the plasma slab, on the EM wave propagation characteristics are discussed. The results can help the further understanding of propagation behaviours of EM waves in nonuniform plasma, and applications of the interactions between EM waves and plasmas.

  4. Time delay in thin slabs with self-focusing Kerr-type nonlinearity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isić, G.; Milanović, V.; Radovanović, J.; Ikonić, Z.; Indjin, D.; Harrison, P.

    2008-03-01

    Time delays for an intense transverse electric (TE) wave propagating through a Kerr-type nonlinear slab are investigated. The relation between the bidirectional group delay and the dwell time is derived and it is shown that the difference between them can be separated into three terms. The first one is the familiar self-interference time, due to the dispersion of the medium surrounding the slab. The other two terms are caused by the nonlinearity and oblique incidence of the TE wave. It is shown that the electric field distribution along the slab may be expressed in terms of Jacobi elliptic functions while the phase difference introduced by the slab is given in terms of incomplete elliptic integrals. The expressions for the field-intensity-dependent complex reflection and transmission coefficients are derived and the multivalued oscillatory behavior of the delay times for the case of a thin slab is demonstrated.

  5. Highly efficient second-harmonic generation from indefinite epsilon-near-zero slabs of subwavelength thickness

    CERN Document Server

    Ciattoni, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    We theoretically predict efficient optical second-harmonic generation (SHG) from a few hundred nanometer thick slab consisting of a quadratic nonlinear anisotropic medium whose linear principal permittivities are, at the fundamental wavelength, very small and have different signs (indefinite medium). We show that, by illuminating the slab with a p-polarized fundamental wave (with intensity of a few MW/cm^2), a highly efficient scattering of the second-harmonic field occurs when the conditions of linear complete slab transparency for the fundamental wave are met. The high efficiency of the SHG process, stems from the large non-plasmonic enhancement of the longitudinal field, perpendicular to the slab surface, produced by the very small value of the slab dielectric permittivities. A suitable nano-structured composite is proposed and numerically designed for observing the novel non-phase-matched and highly efficient SHG process from nano-structures.

  6. Analysis of instability of tall buildings with prestressed and waffle slabs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Passos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The construction system of prestressed flat slabs has been gaining market in Brazil, since it eliminates the use of beams, allows you to perform structures under coluns by area and reduces the cycle of concrete slabs. Thus the analysis of global stability of buildings, takes into account the effects of 2nd order, and these additional effects to the structure obtained from the deformation thereof, calculated by the iterative method P-Delta. The Brazilian ABNT NBR 6118: 2014 [2] assesses the overall stability of reinforced concrete structures through practical parameters, which are the parameter a (Alpha and gz (Gamma z coefficient. In this research we seek to study the global stability of slender buildings consist of flat slabs, with slenderness (ratio of the smaller width with the height of the building approximately one to six, from the modeling of a building with prestressed slabs nonadherent and waffle slabs. To model will use the commercial software CAD / TQS.

  7. Experimental validation of systematically designed acoustic hyperbolic meta material slab exhibiting negative refraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Rasmus Ellebæk; Sigmund, Ole

    2016-01-01

    This Letter reports on the experimental validation of a two-dimensional acoustic hyperbolic metamaterial slab optimized to exhibit negative refractive behavior. The slab was designed using a topology optimization based systematic design method allowing for tailoring the refractive behavior....... The experimental results confirm the predicted refractive capability as well as the predicted transmission at an interface. The study simultaneously provides an estimate of the attenuation inside the slab stemming from the boundary layer effects—insight which can be utilized in the further design...... of the metamaterial slabs. The capability of tailoring the refractive behavior opens possibilities for different applications. For instance, a slab exhibiting zero refraction across a wide angular range is capable of funneling acoustic energy through it, while a material exhibiting the negative refractive behavior...

  8. Farallon slab detachment and deformation of the Magdalena Shelf, southern Baja California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brothers, Daniel S.; Harding, Alistair J.; Gonzalez-Fernandez, Antonio; Holbrook, W.S. Steven; Kent, Graham M.; Driscoll, Neal W.; Fletcher, John M.; Lizarralde, Daniel; Umhoefer, Paul J.; Axen, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Subduction of the Farallon plate beneath northwestern Mexico stalled by ~12 Ma when the Pacific-Farallon spreading-ridge approached the subduction zone. Coupling between remnant slab and the overriding North American plate played an important role in the capture of the Baja California (BC) microplate by the Pacific Plate. Active-source seismic reflection and wide-angle seismic refraction profiles across southwestern BC (~24.5°N) are used to image the extent of remnant slab and study its impact on the overriding plate. We infer that the hot, buoyant slab detached ~40 km landward of the fossil trench. Isostatic rebound following slab detachment uplifted the margin and exposed the Magdalena Shelf to wave-base erosion. Subsequent cooling, subsidence and transtensional opening along the shelf (starting ~8 Ma) starved the fossil trench of terrigenous sediment input. Slab detachment and the resultant rebound of the margin provide a mechanism for rapid uplift and exhumation of forearc subduction complexes.

  9. Determination of reinforcing bars for tests of hollow core slabs with continuity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Santos

    Full Text Available The structural designs of floors formed by hollow core slabs usually consider these as simply-supported slabs. In recent years there have been project changes and hollow core slabs with continuity are widely used. The objective of this study is to suggest a way to calculate the reinforcement bars to be used in tests with continuity provided by a structural topping. Thus, this paper presents a method based on the maximum positive resistance moment and maximum shear strength of a hollow core slab. The method is applied to a test in hollow core slab specimens which have the following dimensions: 2 m width, 6 m long, and 21 cm high. The results indicated that the method was satisfactory to the performed test, and can therefore be applied to the other test configurations or even designs.

  10. Rheology and structure of milk protein gels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, van T.; Lakemond, C.M.M.; Visschers, R.W.

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies on gel formation and rheology of milk gels are reviewed. A distinction is made between gels formed by aggregated casein, gels of `pure` whey proteins and gels in which both casein and whey proteins contribute to their properties. For casein' whey protein mixtures, it has been shown th

  11. Rheology and structure of milk protein gels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, van T.; Lakemond, C.M.M.; Visschers, R.W.

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies on gel formation and rheology of milk gels are reviewed. A distinction is made between gels formed by aggregated casein, gels of `pure` whey proteins and gels in which both casein and whey proteins contribute to their properties. For casein' whey protein mixtures, it has been shown

  12. Nanocrystal/sol-gel nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petruska, Melissa A.; Klimov, Victor L.

    2007-06-05

    The present invention is directed to solid composites including colloidal nanocrystals within a sol-gel host or matrix and to processes of forming such solid composites. The present invention is further directed to alcohol soluble colloidal nanocrystals useful in formation of sol-gel based solid composites.

  13. Method for preparing hydrous titanium oxide spherules and other gel forms thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, J.L.

    1998-10-13

    The present invention are methods for preparing hydrous titanium oxide spherules, hydrous titanium oxide gels such as gel slabs, films, capillary and electrophoresis gels, titanium monohydrogen phosphate spherules, hydrous titanium oxide spherules having suspendible particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite sorbent, titanium monohydrogen phosphate spherules having suspendible particles of at least one different sorbent homogeneously embedded within to form a composite sorbent having a desired crystallinity, titanium oxide spherules in the form of anatase, brookite or rutile, titanium oxide spherules having suspendible particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite, hydrous titanium oxide fiber materials, titanium oxide fiber materials, hydrous titanium oxide fiber materials having suspendible particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite, titanium oxide fiber materials having suspendible particles homogeneously embedded within to form a composite and spherules of barium titanate. These variations of hydrous titanium oxide spherules and gel forms prepared by the gel-sphere, internal gelation process offer more useful forms of inorganic ion exchangers, catalysts, getters and ceramics. 6 figs.

  14. Mechanisms controlling the modes of the sinking slab into the transition zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrusta, Roberto; Goes, Saskia; van Hunen, Jeroen

    2016-04-01

    It is generally accepted that subducting slabs can either sink into the lower mantle, lie down in the mantle transition zone, or even stagnate beneath it. Several studies have looked at correlations between subduction zone parameters and the ability of the slabs to penetrate into the lower mantle. These studies have suggested that the key parameters to control whether slabs stagnate or penetrate are trench motions, slab strength, buoyant features and/or the overriding plate. For example, there is evidence that older lithospheres show significant trench retreat, and tend to lie down flat above the transition zone (northwest Pacific), whereas younger lithospheres, less able to drive trench retreat, tend to sink into the lower mantle (central America). Moreover, numerical modelling studies have shown further correlations with parameters that cannot be directly observed. For example, slab penetration is inhibited by density and viscosity increases associated with post-spinel phase transition. Numerical modelling has been one of the key tools to investigate slab penetration, and a lot of insight has been gained from these studies. But most of these studies assume (statistical) steady ­state scenarios, in which slab stagnation or slab penetration is more or less a permanent feature. However, on Earth different modes of slab - transition zone interaction probably need to be able to change in time from penetrating to stagnant and also vice versa. In this study, using 2D self-consistent numerical subduction models, we test plausible mechanisms which may trigger different modes of slab deformation in the transition zone and may explain both spatial and temporal variability.

  15. Unusually deep Bonin earthquake of 30 May 2015: A precursory signal to slab penetration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obayashi, Masayuki; Fukao, Yoshio; Yoshimitsu, Junko

    2017-02-01

    An M7.9 earthquake occurred on 30 May 2015 at an unusual depth of 680 km downward and away from the well-defined Wadati-Benioff (WB) zone of the southern Bonin arc. To the north (northern Bonin), the subducted slab is stagnant above the upper-lower mantle boundary at 660-km depth, where the WB zone bends forward to sub-horizontal. To the south (northern Mariana), it penetrates the boundary, where the WB zone extends near-vertically down to the boundary. Thus, the southern Bonin slab can be regarded as being in a transitional state from slab stagnation to penetration. The transition is shown to happen rapidly within the northern half of the southern Bonin slab where the heel part of the shoe-like configured stagnant slab hits the significantly depressed 660-km discontinuity. The mainshock and aftershocks took place in this heel part where they are sub-vertically aligned in approximate parallel to their maximum compressional axes. Here, the dips of the compressional axes of WB zone earthquakes change rapidly across the thickness of the slab from the eastern to western side and along the strike of the slab from the northern to southern side, suggesting rapid switching of the downdip compression axis in the shoe-shaped slab. Elastic deformation associated with the WB zone seismicity is calculated by viewing it as an integral part of the slab deformation process. With this deformation, the heel part is deepened relative to the arch part and is compressed sub-vertically and stretched sub-horizontally, a tendency consistent with the idea of progressive decent of the heel part in which near-vertical compressional stress is progressively accumulated to generate isolated shocks like the 2015 event and eventually to initiate slab penetration.

  16. Insights on slab-driven mantle flow from advances in three-dimensional modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadamec, Margarete A.

    2016-10-01

    The wealth of seismic observations collected over the past 20 years has raised intriguing questions about the three-dimensional (3D) nature of the mantle flow field close to subduction zones and provided a valuable constraint for how the plate geometry may influence mantle flow proximal to the slab. In geodynamics, there has been a new direction of subduction zone modelling that has explored the 3D nature of slab-driven mantle flow, motivated in part by the observations from shear wave splitting, but also by the observed variations in slab geometries worldwide. Advances in high-performance computing are now allowing for an unprecedented level of detail to be incorporated into numerical models of subduction. This paper summarizes recent advances from 3D geodynamic models that reveal the complex nature of slab-driven mantle flow, including trench parallel flow, toroidal flow around slab edges, mantle upwelling at lateral slab edges, and small scale convection within the mantle wedge. This implies slab-driven mantle deformation zones occur in the asthenosphere proximal to the slab, wherein the mantle may commonly flow in a different direction and rate than the surface plates, implying laterally variable plate-mantle coupling. The 3D slab-driven mantle flow can explain, in part, the lateral transport of geochemical signatures in subduction zones. In addition, high-resolution geographically referenced models can inform the interpretation of slab structure, where seismic data are lacking. The incorporation of complex plate boundaries into high-resolution, 3D numerical models opens the door to a new avenue of research in model construction, data assimilation, and modelling workflows, and gives 3D immersive visualization a new role in scientific discovery.

  17. Slab detachment during continental collision: Influence of crustal rheology and interaction with lithospheric delamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duretz, T.; Gerya, T. V.

    2013-08-01

    Collision between continents can lead to the subduction of continental material. If the crust remains coupled to the downgoing slab, a large buoyancy force is generated. This force slows down convergence and promotes slab detachment. If the crust resists to subduction, it may decouple from the downgoing slab and be subjected to buoyant extrusion. We employ two-dimensional thermo-mechanical modelling to study the importance of crustal rheology on the evolution of subduction-collision systems. We propose simple quantifications of the mechanical decoupling between lithospheric levels (σ*) and the potential for buoyant extrusion of the crust (ξ*). The modelling results indicate that a variable crustal rheological structure results in slab detachment, delamination, or the combination of both mechanisms. A strong crust provides coupling at the Moho (low σ*) and remains coherent during subduction (low ξ). It promotes deep subduction of the crust (180 km) and slab detachment. Exhumation occurs in coherent manners via eduction and thrusting. Slab detachment triggers the development of topography (> 4.5 km) close to the suture. A contrasting style of collision occurs using a weak crustal rheology. Mechanical decoupling at the Moho (high σ*) promotes the extrusion of the crust (high ξ), disabling slab detachment. Ongoing shortening leads to buckling of the crust and development of topography on the lower plate. Collisions involving rheologically layered crust allow decoupling at mid-crustal depths. This structure favours both the extrusion of upper crust and the subduction of the lower crust. Such collisions are successively affected by delamination and slab detachment. Topography develops together with the buoyant extrusion of crust onto the foreland and is further amplified by slab detachment. Our results suggest that the occurrence of both delamination (Apennines) and slab detachment (Himalayas) in orogens may indicate differences in the initial crustal structure of

  18. Replication-Uncoupled Histone Deposition during Adenovirus DNA Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Komatsu, Tetsuro; Nagata, Kyosuke

    2012-01-01

    In infected cells, the chromatin structure of the adenovirus genome DNA plays critical roles in its genome functions. Previously, we reported that in early phases of infection, incoming viral DNA is associated with both viral core protein VII and cellular histones. Here we show that in late phases of infection, newly synthesized viral DNA is also associated with histones. We also found that the knockdown of CAF-1, a histone chaperone that functions in the replication-coupled deposition of his...

  19. Sucrose release from polysaccharide gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishinari, Katsuyoshi; Fang, Yapeng

    2016-05-18

    Sucrose release from polysaccharide gels has been studied extensively because it is expected to be useful in understanding flavour release from solid foods and to find a new processing method which produces more palatable and healthier foods. We provide an overview of the release of sucrose and other sugars from gels of agar and related polysaccharides. The addition of sucrose to agar solutions leads to the increase in transparency of the resulting gels and the decrease in syneresis, which is attributed to the decrease in mesh size in gels. The syneresis occurring in the quiescent condition and fluid release induced by compression is discussed. The relationship between the sugar release and the structural, rheological and thermal properties of gels is also discussed. Finally, the future research direction is proposed.

  20. Electrochemical Light-Emitting Gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki Itoh

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Light-emitting gel, a gel state electroluminescence material, is reported. It is composed of a ruthenium complex as the emitter, an ionic liquid as the electrolyte, and oxide nanoparticles as the gelation filler. Emitted light was produced via electrogenerated chemiluminescence. The light-emitting gel operated at low voltage when an alternating current was passed through it, regardless of its structure, which is quite thick. The luminescence property of the gel is strongly affected by nanoparticle materials. TiO2 nanoparticles were a better gelation filler than silica or ZnO was, with respect to luminescence stability, thus indicating a catalytic effect. It is demonstrated that the light-emitting gel device, with quite a simple fabrication process, flashes with the application of voltage.

  1. REPLICATION TOOL AND METHOD OF PROVIDING A REPLICATION TOOL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    structured master surface (3a, 3b, 3c, 3d) having a lateral master pattern and a vertical master profile. The microscale structured master surface (3a, 3b, 3c, 3d) has been provided by localized pulsed laser treatment to generate microscale phase explosions. A method for producing a part with microscale......The invention relates to a replication tool (1, 1a, 1b) for producing a part (4) with a microscale textured replica surface (5a, 5b, 5c, 5d). The replication tool (1, 1a, 1b) comprises a tool surface (2a, 2b) defining a general shape of the item. The tool surface (2a, 2b) comprises a microscale...... energy directors on flange portions thereof uses the replication tool (1, 1a, 1b) to form an item (4) with a general shape as defined by the tool surface (2a, 2b). The formed item (4) comprises a microscale textured replica surface (5a, 5b, 5c, 5d) with a lateral arrangement of polydisperse microscale...

  2. Hot-top electromagnetic casting research of Al thin slab

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The hot-top EMC (electromagnetic casting) method was put forward, namely, the shape of top liquid column was formed by the hot-top in the screen and the semi-suspended liquid column was formed by the electromagnetic force nearby the liquid-solid interface frontier. Using the numerical simulating technique, the temperature distribution was discussed, the effect of parameters such as upper-conduct distance (UCD), cool ing water rate of flow, pouring temperature and liquid column height on casting velocity were studied, the relationship among them was confirmed finally. According to the calculated results, the hot-top EMC shaping system was designed and a lot of experiments were performed. The pure Al thin slabs of 480 mm × 20 mm × 850 mm were made successfully. The result showed that the casting velocity curve obtained experimentally almost coincides to the calculated one.

  3. Modal formulation for diffraction by absorbing photonic crystal slabs

    CERN Document Server

    Dossou, Kokou B; Asatryan, Ara A; Sturmberg, Björn C P; Byrne, Michael A; Poulton, Christopher G; McPhedran, Ross C; de Sterke, C Martijn

    2016-01-01

    A finite element-based modal formulation of diffraction of a plane wave by an absorbing photonic crystal slab of arbitrary geometry is developed for photovoltaic applications. The semi-analytic approach allows efficient and accurate calculation of the absorption of an array with a complex unit cell. This approach gives direct physical insight into the absorption mechanism in such structures, which can be used to enhance the absorption. The verification and validation of this approach is applied to a silicon nanowire array and the efficiency and accuracy of the method is demonstrated. The method is ideally suited to studying the manner in which spectral properties (e.g., absorption) vary with the thickness of the array, and we demonstrate this with efficient calculations which can identify an optimal geometry.

  4. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF TEMPERATURE FIELDS IN ELECTROSLAG REMELTING SLAB INGOTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L.Z.Chang; B.Z.Li

    2008-01-01

    The method based on transient heat transfer model is adopted to simulate electro-slag remelting process.The calculated results of the model show that the process is in the quasi-steady state,and the shape of pool remains unchanged when the height of ingot is approximately 2.5-3 times the thickness of slab ingot.The change in the shape of pool is found to be strongly dependent on the pattern of melting rate,and hence,the power input;the depth of the molten pool increases with the increase in melting speed. It is concluded that a transient heat transfer model has to be used to obtain reliable input information for the entire operating time.

  5. Surface Waves in the paritally ionized solar plasma slab

    CERN Document Server

    Pandey, B P

    2013-01-01

    The properties of surface waves in the partially ionized, incompressible magnetized plasma slab are investigated in the present work. The waves are affected by the non ideal MHD effects which causes the finite drift of the magnetic field in the medium. When the finite drift of the magnetic field is ignored, the characteristics of the wave propagation in the partially ionized plasma fluid is similar to the ideal MHD except now the propagation properties depend on the fractional ionization of the medium. In the presence of Hall diffusion, the propagation of the sausage and kink surface waves depends on the level of fractional ionization of the medium. When both the Hall and Pedersen diffusion are present in the medium, the waves undergoes damping. For typical solar parameters, waves may damp over few minutes.

  6. High-Performance Slab-on-Grade Foundation Insulation Retrofits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, Louise F. [NorthernSTAR, St. Paul, MN (United States); Mosiman, Garrett E. [NorthernSTAR, St. Paul, MN (United States)

    2015-09-01

    A more accurate assessment of slab-on-grade foundation insulation energy savings than traditionally possible is now feasible. This has been enabled by advances in whole building energy simulation with 3-dimensional foundation modelling integration at each time step together with an experimental measurement of the site energy savings of SOG foundation insulation. Ten SOG insulation strategies were evaluated on a test building to identify an optimum retrofit insulation strategy in a zone 6 climate (Minneapolis, MN). The optimum insulation strategy in terms of energy savings and cost effectiveness consisted of two components: (a) R-20 XPS insulation above grade, and, (b) R-20 insulation at grade (comprising an outer layer of R-10 insulation and an interior layer of R-12 poured polyurethane insulation) tapering to R-10 XPS insulation at half the below-grade wall height (the lower half of the stem wall was uninsulated).

  7. Environmental Impact Optimization of Reinforced Concrete Slab Frame Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yavari, Majid Solat; Du, Guangli; Pacoste, Costin

    2017-01-01

    The main objective of this research is to integrate environmental impact optimization in the structural design of reinforced concrete slab frame bridges in order to determine the most environmental-friendly design. The case study bridge used in this work was also investigated in a previous paper...... focusing on the optimization of the investment cost, while the present study focuses on environmental impact optimization and comparing the results of both of these studies. Optimization technique based on the pattern search method was implemented. Moreover, a comprehensive Life Cycle Assessment (LCA......) methodology of ReCiPe and two monetary weighting systems were used to convert environmental impacts into monetary costs. The analysis showed that both monetary weighting systems led to the same results. Furthermore, optimization based on environmental impact generated models with thinner construction elements...

  8. Markov chain solution of photon multiple scattering through turbid slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying; Northrop, William F; Li, Xuesong

    2016-11-14

    This work introduces a Markov Chain solution to model photon multiple scattering through turbid slabs via anisotropic scattering process, i.e., Mie scattering. Results show that the proposed Markov Chain model agree with commonly used Monte Carlo simulation for various mediums such as medium with non-uniform phase functions and absorbing medium. The proposed Markov Chain solution method successfully converts the complex multiple scattering problem with practical phase functions into a matrix form and solves transmitted/reflected photon angular distributions by matrix multiplications. Such characteristics would potentially allow practical inversions by matrix manipulation or stochastic algorithms where widely applied stochastic methods such as Monte Carlo simulations usually fail, and thus enable practical diagnostics reconstructions such as medical diagnosis, spray analysis, and atmosphere sciences.

  9. Diffusive Propagation of Exciton-Polaritons through Thin Crystal Slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, D A; Il'ynskaya, N D; Koudinov, A V; Poletaev, N K; Nikitina, E V; Egorov, A Yu; Kavokin, A V; Seisyan, R P

    2015-06-19

    If light beam propagates through matter containing point impurity centers, the amount of energy absorbed by the media is expected to be either independent of the impurity concentration N or proportional to N, corresponding to the intrinsic absorption or impurity absorption, respectively. Comparative studies of the resonant transmission of light in the vicinity of exciton resonances measured for 15 few-micron GaAs crystal slabs with different values of N, reveal a surprising tendency. While N spans almost five decimal orders of magnitude, the normalized spectrally-integrated absorption of light scales with the impurity concentration as N(1/6). We show analytically that this dependence is a signature of the diffusive mechanism of propagation of exciton-polaritons in a semiconductor.

  10. Electron Beam Dosimetry in Heterogeneous Phantoms Using a MAGIC Normoxic Polymer Gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruhollah Ghahraman Asl

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nowadays radiosensitive polymer gels are used as a reliable dosimetry tool for verification of 3D dose distributions. Special characteristics of these dosimeters have made them useful for verification of complex dose distributions in clinical situations. The aim of this work was to evaluate the capability of a normoxic polymer gel to determine electron dose distributions in different slab phantoms in presence of small heterogeneities. Materials and Methods: Different cylindrical phantoms consisting gel were used under slab phantoms during each irradiation. MR images of irradiated gel phantoms were obtained to determine their R2 relaxation maps. 1D and 2D lateral dose profiles were acquired at depths of 1 cm for an 8 MeV beam and 1 and 4 cm for the 15 MeV energy, and then compared with the lateral dose profiles measured using a diode detector. In addition, 3D dose distributions around these heterogeneities for the same energies and depths were measured using a gel dosimeter. Results: Dose resolution for MR gel images at the range of 0-10 Gy was less than 1.55 Gy. Mean dose difference and distance to agreement (DTA for dose profiles were 2.6% and 2.2 mm, respectively. The results of the MAGIC-type polymer gel for bone heterogeneity at 8 MeV showed a reduction in dose of approximately 50%, and 30% and 10% at depths 1 and 4 cm at 15 MeV. However, for air heterogeneity increases in dose of approximately 50% at depth 1 cm under the heterogeneity at 8 MeV and 20% and 45% respectively at 15 MeV were observed. Discussion and Conclusion: Generally, electron beam distributions are significantly altered in the presence of tissue inhomogeneities such as bone and air cavities, this being related to mass stopping and mass scattering powers of heterogeneous materials. At the same time, hot and cold scatter lobes under heterogeneity regions due to scatter edge effects were also seen. However, these effects (increased dose, reduced dose, hot and

  11. IRC evaluates corrosion in repaired concrete bridge slabs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, S. [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2001-03-01

    The old two-lane Perley Bridge in Hawkesbury, Ontario, has been replaced by a four-lane bridge. The old bridge had a reinforced concrete deck supported by a steel structure. A research project aimed at evaluating the corrosion present in the steel reinforcement in repaired concrete on the old bridge was completed, and the results indicated that corrosion can be predicted in a more reliable manner by using several different corrosion monitoring techniques and analyzing the results. The exposure conditions and the age of the old bridge were known, which made it possible to obtain valuable information on the deterioration process and mechanisms, as well as their effect on the corrosion of the reinforcing steel by examining the slabs. Several factors play a role in the probability and rate of corrosion. They include carbon dioxide, sulphur dioxide, nitrous oxide, and chloride present in the atmosphere, and the amounts of oxygen at the interface of the steel reinforcement and the concrete. Half-cell potential measurements, which measure the potential difference between a standard portable half-cell and the reinforcing steel, have been used since the 1980s to identify the condition of concrete structures. This measurement provides only an indication of the likelihood of corrosion. In the case of the Perley Bridge, half-cell potential measurements, linear polarization, and concrete resistivity measurements were taken on four slabs of repaired concrete removed from the bridge. The results demonstrated that each method has benefits and limitations, which used in combination, provide a valid indication of active corrosion in the reinforcement. In the future, the reliability of different techniques will be assessed by considering environmental conditions.

  12. Investigation of compressive membrane action in ultra high performance concrete slab strips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foust, Bradley Wade

    Reinforced concrete slabs are found in very common structural systems in both civilian and military applications. The boundary conditions that support the slab play an important role in the response to a particular load. Specifically, the amount of lateral and rotational restraint dictates how a slab responds to a particular load. Compressive membrane (i.e., in-plane) forces are present in slabs when the boundaries are sufficiently stiff, therefore restricting the slab from both lateral translations and rotations. Advancements have been made to account for the additional capacity due to compressive membrane forces in conventional strength concrete. In today's world, concrete performance is improving because of increasing compressive strengths and additional ductility present in concrete members. As a result of this current improvement, there is an urgent need to investigate compressive membrane theory in ultra-high-performance concrete (UHPC) slabs to better understand their behavior. Existing compressive membrane theory should be revisited to determine if current theory is applicable, or if it is not, what modifications should be made. This study will provide insight into the validity of existing theory that is currently used to predict the ultimate capacity in conventional-strength concrete slabs and attempt to modify the existing equations to account for high-strength concrete materials. A matrix of 14 normal-strength concrete (NSC) and 13 UHPC slabs was tested both statically and dynamically to better understand the behavior of each material set and the effects that boundary conditions have on slab response. The results from these experiments were then compared to response calculations made from existing theory as well as finite element analyses. Valuable data sets on rigidly restrained UHPC slab response were obtained through an experimental research program. The experiments helped to validate the associated numerical analysis that was performed. It was

  13. Imaging variations in the central Andean mantle and the subducting Nazca slab with teleseismic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scire, Alissa

    The Nazca-South America convergent margin is marked by the presence of the Andean mountain belt, which stretches along the 8000-km long western margin of the South American plate. The subduction zone is characterized by significant along-strike changes in both upper plate structure and slab geometry that make it an ideal region to study the relationship between the subducting slab, the surrounding mantle, and the overriding plate. This dissertation summarizes the results of three finite frequency teleseismic tomography studies of the central Nazca-South America subduction zone which improve our understanding of how along-strike variations in the Andean mountain belt and the subducting Nazca plate interact with each other and with the surrounding mantle. This is accomplished by first focusing on two smaller adjacent regions of the central Andes to explore upper mantle variations and then by using a combined dataset, which covers a larger region, to image the deeply subducted Nazca slab to investigate the fate of the slab. The first study focuses on the central Andean upper mantle under the Altiplano-Puna Plateau where normally dipping subduction of the Nazca plate is occurring (18° to 28°S). The shallow mantle under the Eastern Cordillera is generally fast, consistent with either underthrusting of the Brazilian cratonic lithosphere from the east or a localized "curtain" of delaminating material. Additional evidence for delamination is seen in the form of high amplitude low velocities under the Puna Plateau, consistent with proposed asthenospheric influx following lithospheric removal. In the second study, we explore the transition between normal and flat subduction along the north edge of the Altiplano Plateau (8° to 21°S). We find that the Peruvian flat slab extends further inland along the projection of the Nazca Ridge than was previously proposed and that when re-steepening of the slab occurs, the slab dips very steeply (˜70°) down through the mantle

  14. Determination of Nazca slab geometry and state of stress beneath the southern Peru and northern Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, A.; Wagner, L. S.; Beck, S. L.; Young, B. E.; Zandt, G.; Long, M. D.; Tavera, H.; Minaya, E.

    2013-12-01

    Subduction of the Nazca plate in the north central Andes beneath southern Peru and northern Bolivia is of prime importance because of the role it plays in the evolution of topographic features since the late Eocene (~40 Ma). Previous studies based on slab event locations constrained only with teleseismic data defined a broad area of flat slab subduction in central and southern Peru, which transitions to a normally dipping slab beneath the northernmost Altiplano Plateau. We present earthquake locations and focal mechanisms using data from two temporary arrays: the network of 50 broadband seismic stations that were part of the NSF-Continental Dynamics-funded project 'CAUGHT' (Central Andean Uplift and the Geodynamics of High Topography) and the 40 station NSF- Geophysics funded 'PULSE' array (PerU Lithosphere and Slab Experiment). Our earthquake locations provide new information about the geometry of subducting Nazca slab between 13°S to 18°S. A significant clustering of intermediate depth earthquakes at ~15.5°S and 18°S suggests strong and localized release of tectonic stress in the slab perhaps due to bending and unbending. There are not enough intra-slab events at depth greater than 100 km to constrain the flat slab width north of 14°S. Our analyses indicate that the flat slab is at least 10 to 12 km shallower than the previous estimates (e.g. Cahill and Isacks, 1992; Ramos, 2009). Focal mechanisms and stress axis orientation of slab events at ~15.5°S indicate down-dip extension, where the dip changes from subhorizontal to steeply dipping slab. The continuity in the trend of stress suggests that the slab is deformed but not torn where it transitions from flat to steeply dipping. Data from local slab events will eventually be incorporated into a local tomographic body wave inversion to better constrain the velocity structure of the mantle lithosphere and asthenosphere below the Altiplano. This in turn will provide the valuable information on the process

  15. Replicator dynamics in value chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cantner, Uwe; Savin, Ivan; Vannuccini, Simone

    2016-01-01

    The pure model of replicator dynamics though providing important insights in the evolution of markets has not found much of empirical support. This paper extends the model to the case of firms vertically integrated in value chains. We show that i) by taking value chains into account, the replicator...... dynamics may revert its effect. In these regressive developments of market selection, firms with low fitness expand because of being integrated with highly fit partners, and the other way around; ii) allowing partner's switching within a value chain illustrates that periods of instability in the early...... stage of industry life-cycle may be the result of an 'optimization' of partners within a value chain providing a novel and simple explanation to the evidence discussed by Mazzucato (1998); iii) there are distinct differences in the contribution to market selection between the layers of a value chain...

  16. Therapeutic targeting of replicative immortality

    OpenAIRE

    Yaswen, Paul; MacKenzie, Karen L.; Keith, W. Nicol; Hentosh, Patricia; Rodier, Francis; Zhu, Jiyue; Firestone, Gary L.; Matheu, Ander; Carnero, Amancio; Bilsland, Alan; Sundin, Tabetha; Honoki, Kanya; Fujii, Hiromasa; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.; Amedei, Amedeo

    2015-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of malignant cell populations is the ability to undergo continuous proliferation. This property allows clonal lineages to acquire sequential aberrations that can fuel increasingly autonomous growth, invasiveness, and therapeutic resistance. Innate cellular mechanisms have evolved to regulate replicative potential as a hedge against malignant progression. When activated in the absence of normal terminal differentiation cues, these mechanisms can result in a state of persis...

  17. Alphavirus polymerase and RNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietilä, Maija K; Hellström, Kirsi; Ahola, Tero

    2017-01-16

    Alphaviruses are typically arthropod-borne, and many are important pathogens such as chikungunya virus. Alphaviruses encode four nonstructural proteins (nsP1-4), initially produced as a polyprotein P1234. nsP4 is the core RNA-dependent RNA polymerase but all four nsPs are required for RNA synthesis. The early replication complex (RC) formed by the polyprotein P123 and nsP4 synthesizes minus RNA strands, and the late RC composed of fully processed nsP1-nsP4 is responsible for the production of genomic and subgenomic plus strands. Different parts of nsP4 recognize the promoters for minus and plus strands but the binding also requires the other nsPs. The alphavirus polymerase has been purified and is capable of de novo RNA synthesis only in the presence of the other nsPs. The purified nsP4 also has terminal adenylyltransferase activity, which may generate the poly(A) tail at the 3' end of the genome. Membrane association of the nsPs is vital for replication, and alphaviruses induce membrane invaginations called spherules, which form a microenvironment for RNA synthesis by concentrating replication components and protecting double-stranded RNA intermediates. The RCs isolated as crude membrane preparations are active in RNA synthesis in vitro, but high-resolution structure of the RC has not been achieved, and thus the arrangement of viral and possible host components remains unknown. For some alphaviruses, Ras-GTPase-activating protein (Src-homology 3 (SH3) domain)-binding proteins (G3BPs) and amphiphysins have been shown to be essential for RNA replication and are present in the RCs. Host factors offer an additional target for antivirals, as only few alphavirus polymerase inhibitors have been described.

  18. Dynamic replication of Web contents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The phenomenal growth of the World Wide Web has brought huge increase in the traffic to the popular web sites.Long delays and denial of service experienced by the end-users,especially during the peak hours,continues to be the common problem while accessing popular sites.Replicating some of the objects at multiple sites in a distributed web-server environment is one of the possible solutions to improve the response time/Iatency. The decision of what and where to replicate requires solving a constraint optimization problem,which is NP-complete in general.In this paper, we consider the problem of placing copies of objects in a distributed web server system to minimize the cost of serving read and write requests when the web servers have Iimited storage capacity.We formulate the problem as a 0-1 optimization problem and present a polynomial time greedy algorithm with backtracking to dynamically replicate objects at the appropriate sites to minimize a cost function.To reduce the solution search space,we present necessary condi tions for a site to have a replica of an object jn order to minimize the cost function We present simulation resuIts for a variety of problems to illustrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed algorithms and compare them with those of some well-known algorithms.The simulation resuIts demonstrate the superiority of the proposed algorithms.

  19. sol-gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto A. Monreal

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo sintetizamos nanocilindros de dióxido de titanio de 30 a 400 nm por medio de ADN del plásmido pBR322 de 4,362 pares de bases y el uso de isopropóxido de titanio como precursor por medio del proceso sol-gel. Los geles resultantes fueron calcinados y los polvos caracterizados por medio de Microscopio Electrónico de Barrido (MEB, Espectroscopía de Energía Dispersiva, Microscopio Electrónico de Transmisión (MET y Difracción de Rayos X. Los resultados muestran que la síntesis in vitro de nanorods en presencia de ADN, puede ser activada. Muchas otras moléculas sintéticas pueden producirse por medio del uso de sistemas orgánicos, es así como reportamos la síntesis de híbridos hechos de ácidos nucleicos en materiales inorgánicos que pueden tener diversas aplicaciones en sistemas catalíticos, biomateriales y materiales nanoestructurados.

  20. DNA Replication Dynamics of the GGGGCC Repeat of the C9orf72 Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thys, Ryan Griffin; Wang, Yuh-Hwa

    2015-11-27

    DNA has the ability to form a variety of secondary structures in addition to the normal B-form DNA, including hairpins and quadruplexes. These structures are implicated in a number of neurological diseases and cancer. Expansion of a GGGGCC repeat located at C9orf72 is associated with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. This repeat expands from two to 24 copies in normal individuals to several hundreds or thousands of repeats in individuals with the disease. Biochemical studies have demonstrated that as little as four repeats have the ability to form a stable DNA secondary structure known as a G-quadruplex. Quadruplex structures have the ability to disrupt normal DNA processes such as DNA replication and transcription. Here we examine the role of GGGGCC repeat length and orientation on DNA replication using an SV40 replication system in human cells. Replication through GGGGCC repeats leads to a decrease in overall replication efficiency and an increase in instability in a length-dependent manner. Both repeat expansions and contractions are observed, and replication orientation is found to influence the propensity for expansions or contractions. The presence of replication stress, such as low-dose aphidicolin, diminishes replication efficiency but has no effect on instability. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analysis demonstrates a replication stall with as few as 20 GGGGCC repeats. These results suggest that replication of the GGGGCC repeat at C9orf72 is perturbed by the presence of expanded repeats, which has the potential to result in further expansion, leading to disease.

  1. Mechanical Failure in Colloidal Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodger, Thomas Edward

    When colloidal particles in a dispersion are made attractive, they aggregate into fractal clusters which grow to form a space-spanning network, or gel, even at low volume fractions. These gels are crucial to the rheological behavior of many personal care, food products and dispersion-based paints. The mechanical stability of these products relies on the stability of the colloidal gel network which acts as a scaffold to provide these products with desired mechanical properties and to prevent gravitational sedimentation of the dispersed components. Understanding the mechanical stability of such colloidal gels is thus of crucial importance to predict and control the properties of many soft solids. Once a colloidal gel forms, the heterogeneous structure bonded through weak physical interactions, is immediately subject to body forces, such as gravity, surface forces, such as adhesion to a container walls and shear forces; the interplay of these forces acting on the gel determines its stability. Even in the absence of external stresses, colloidal gels undergo internal rearrangements within the network that may cause the network structure to evolve gradually, in processes known as aging or coarsening or fail catastrophically, in a mechanical instability known as syneresis. Studying gel stability in the laboratory requires model colloidal system which may be tuned to eliminate these body or endogenous forces systematically. Using existing chemistry, I developed several systems to study delayed yielding by eliminating gravitational stresses through density matching and cyclic heating to induce attraction; and to study syneresis by eliminating adhesion to the container walls, altering the contact forces between colloids, and again, inducing gelation through heating. These results elucidate the varied yet concomitant mechanisms by which colloidal gels may locally or globally yield, but then reform due to the nature of the physical, or non-covalent, interactions which form

  2. Surface grafted chitosan gels. Part II. Gel formation and characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Chao; Thormann, Esben; Claesson, Per M.

    2014-01-01

    Responsive biomaterial hydrogels attract significant attention due to their biocompatibility and degradability. In order to make chitosan based gels, we first graft one layer of chitosan to silica, and then build a chitosan/poly(acrylic acid) multilayer using the layer-by-layer approach. After...... cross-linking the chitosan present in the polyelectrolyte multilayer, poly(acrylic acid) is partly removed by exposing the multilayer structure to a concentrated carbonate buffer solution at a high pH, leaving a surface-grafted cross-linked gel. Chemical cross-linking enhances the gel stability against......-linking density. The amount of poly(acrylic acid) trapped inside the surface grafted films was found to decrease with decreasing cross-linking density, as confirmed in situ using TIRR, and ex situ by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) measurements on dried films. The responsiveness of the chitosan-based gels...

  3. Low electrical resistivity associated with plunging of the Nazca flat slab beneath Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booker, John R; Favetto, Alicia; Pomposiello, M Cristina

    2004-05-27

    Beneath much of the Andes, oceanic lithosphere descends eastward into the mantle at an angle of about 30 degrees (ref. 1). A partially molten region is thought to form in a wedge between this descending slab and the overlying continental lithosphere as volatiles given off by the slab lower the melting temperature of mantle material. This wedge is the ultimate source for magma erupted at the active volcanoes that characterize the Andean margin. But between 28 degrees and 33 degrees S the subducted Nazca plate appears to be anomalously buoyant, as it levels out at about 100 km depth and extends nearly horizontally under the continent. Above this 'flat slab', volcanic activity in the main Andean Cordillera terminated about 9 million years ago as the flattening slab presumably squeezed out the mantle wedge. But it is unknown where slab volatiles go once this happens, and why the flat slab finally rolls over to descend steeply into the mantle 600 km further eastward. Here we present results from a magnetotelluric profile in central Argentina, from which we infer enhanced electrical conductivity along the eastern side of the plunging slab, indicative of the presence of partial melt. This conductivity structure may imply that partial melting occurs to at least 250 km and perhaps to more than 400 km depth, or that melt is supplied from the 410 km discontinuity, consistent with the transition-zone 'water-filter' model of Bercovici and Karato.

  4. The Effect of Mortar Grade and Thickness on the Impact Resistance of Ferrocement Slab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che Muda, Zakaria; Syamsir, Agusril; Nasharuddin Mustapha, Kamal; Sulleman, Sorefan; Beddu, Salmia; Thiruchelvam, Sivadass; Ismail, Firas B.; Usman, Fathoni; Liyana Mohd Kamal, Nur; Ashraful Alam, Md; Birima, Ahmed H.; Itam, Zarina; Zaroog, O. S.

    2016-03-01

    This paper investigate the effect of the thickness and mesh spacing on the impact of ferrocement for the concrete slab of 300mm × 300mm size reinforced subjected to low impact projectile test. A self-fabricated drop-weight impact test rig with a steel ball weight of 1.236 kg drop at height of 150 mm, 350mm, and 500mm has been used in this research work. The objective of this research is to study the relationship of impact resistance of ferrocement against the mortar grade and slab thickness. There is a good linear correlation between impact resistance of ferrocement against the mortar grade and the thickness of ferrocement slab. The first and ultimate crack impact resistance of mortar grade 43 (for 40 mm thick slab with mesh reinforcement) are 1.60 times and 1.53 times respectively against the mortar grade 17 slab (of same thickness with mesh reinforcement). The first and ultimate crack impact resistance for 40 mm thick slab (mortar grade 43 with mesh reinforcement) are 3.55 times and 4.49 times respectively against the 20 mm thick slab (of same mortar grade with mesh reinforcement).

  5. Behavior of steel-concrete composite slabs subjected to standard fire

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Finite element method is employed to calculate the temperature fields for two kinds of steel-concrete composite slabs: composite slab with profiled steel sheeting and LJMB composite slab.The calculated results are in good agreement with those of tests.Fire resistance of the two kinds of composite slabs is calculated by using a numeric method.The results show that: due to heat-absorbing of concrete,the performance of composite slabs under fire is better than that of unprotected steel structure,and fire resistance of composite slabs mentioned in this paper is at least 30 min subjected to standard fire.Parameters related to the fire-resistance are discussed.It was found that with increasing of concrete strength and thickness of slab,fire-resistance increases,and with increasing of steel strength and steel ratio,fire-resistance decreases.Also thickness of fire proof is calculated by a numeric method.The results obtained in this paper may be referenced for practical engineering.

  6. Snow instability evaluation in skier-triggered snow slab avalanches: combining failure initiation and crack propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaume, Johan; Reuter, Benjamin

    2017-04-01

    Dry-snow slab avalanches start with a local failure in a weak snowpack layer buried below cohesive snow slab layers. If the size of the failed zone exceeds a critical size, rapid crack propagation occurs possibly followed by slab release if the slope is steep enough. The probability of skier-triggering a slab avalanche is generally characterized by classical stability indices that do not account for crack propagation. In this study, we propose a new model to evaluate the conditions for the onset of crack propagation in skier-triggered slab avalanches. For a given weak layer, the critical crack length characterizing crack propagation propensity was compared to the size of the area where the skier-induced stress exceeds the shear strength of the weak layer. The ratio between both length scales yields a stability criterion combining the processes of failure initiation and crack propagation. The critical crack length was calculated from a recently developed model based on numerical simulations. The skier-induced stress was computed from analytical solutions and finite element simulations to account for slab layering. A detailed sensitivity analysis was performed for simplified snow profiles to characterize the influence of snowpack properties and slab layering on crack propagation propensity. Finally, we applied our approach for manually observed snow profiles and compared our results to rutschblock stability tests.

  7. Evidence for a coherent southeastern edge of the Farallon slab window from USArray tomography models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panessa, Alexander

    Before the San Andreas Fault developed, subduction of the ancient Farallon plate dominated North America's west coast. As the Pacific-Farallon ridge reached the continent and Farallon subduction became restricted to separate regions, an area with no slab formed under southwestern North America. The northern boundary of this "slab window" is well-defined in recent high-resolution tomography models derived from USArray data, but the geometry of the southeastern edge of the slab window has received less attention. I will show that this eastern edge exists as a coherent boundary separating the subducted Cocos plate from the slab window. I adapt stage pole data for the Cocos plate into a single surface slab model designed to track the motion of the plate through time. This model of the Cocos plate geometry is consistent with recently published tomography models derived from combinations of USArray and global seismic data. The tomography results suggest the subducted slab remains intact along the southeastern edge of the Farallon slab window.

  8. Effect of aseismic ridge subduction on slab geometry and overriding plate deformation: Insights from analogue modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinod, Joseph; Guillaume, Benjamin; Espurt, Nicolas; Faccenna, Claudio; Funiciello, Francesca; Regard, Vincent

    2013-03-01

    We present analogue models simulating the subduction of a buoyant ridge oriented perpendicularly or obliquely with respect to the trench, beneath an advancing overriding plate. The convergence velocity is imposed by lateral boundary conditions in this experimental set. We analyze the three-dimensional geometry of the slab, the deformation and topography of the overriding plate. Experiments suggest that ridge subduction diminishes the dip of the slab, eventually leading to the appearance of a horizontal slab segment in case boundary conditions impose a rapid convergence. This result contrasts with that obtained in free subduction experiments, in which ridge subduction diminishes the convergence velocity which, in turn, increases the dip of the slab beneath the ridge. The slab dip decrease is accompanied by the indentation of the overriding plate by the ridge, resulting in arc curvature. Experiments suggest that indentation is larger for small convergence velocity and large slab dip. Ridge subduction also uplifts the overriding plate. Uplift first occurs close to the trench (~ fore-arc area) and is accompanied by the flexural subsidence of the overriding plate behind the uplifted area (~ back-arc subsidence). The uplifted area migrates within the overriding plate interiors following the appearance of a horizontal slab segment. These results are compared with natural examples of ridge subduction in the circum-Pacific area. They explain why ridge subduction may have contrasted effects on the overriding plate dynamics depending on the global conditions that constrain the converging system.

  9. The Vibro-Acoustic Modelling of Slab Track with Embedded Rails

    Science.gov (United States)

    VAN LIER, S.

    2000-03-01

    The application of concrete slab track in railways has certain advantages compared with conventional ballasted track, but conventional slab track structures generally produce more noise than ballasted track. For this reason a “silent slab track” has been developed in the Dutch ICES “Stiller Treinverkeer” project (silent railway traffic) by optimizing the track. In the design, the rails are embedded in a cork-filled elastomeric material. The paper discusses the vibro-acoustic modelling of this track using the simulation package “TWINS”, combined with finite element techniques. The model evaluates the one-third octave band sound power spectrum radiated by train wheels and track, and provides for a tool to optimize the track design. Three track types are compared using the vibro-acoustic model: an existing slab track with embedded UIC54 rails, a newly designed, acoustically optimized slab track with a less stiff rail embedded in a stiffer elastomere, and, as a reference, a ballasted track. The models of the existing tracks have been validated with measurements. Calculations indicate that the optimized slab track will emit between 4 and 6 dB(A) less noise than the ballasted track. The existing slab track produces between 1·5 and 3 dB(A) more noise than the ballasted track; this is caused by resonances in the elastomeric moulding material in the frequency range determining the dB(A)-level.

  10. A review of the geodynamic evolution of flat slab subduction in Mexico, Peru, and Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manea, V. C.; Manea, M.; Ferrari, L.; Orozco-Esquivel, T.; Valenzuela, R. W.; Husker, A.; Kostoglodov, V.

    2017-01-01

    Subducting plates around the globe display a large variability in terms of slab geometry, including regions where smooth and little variation in subduction parameters is observed. While the vast majority of subduction slabs plunge into the mantle at different, but positive dip angles, the end-member case of flat-slab subduction seems to strongly defy this rule and move horizontally several hundreds of kilometers before diving into the surrounding hotter mantle. By employing a comparative assessment for the Mexican, Peruvian and Chilean flat-slab subduction zones we find a series of parameters that apparently facilitate slab flattening. Among them, trench roll-back, as well as strong variations and discontinuities in the structure of oceanic and overriding plates seem to be the most important. However, we were not able to find the necessary and sufficient conditions that provide an explanation for the formation of flat slabs in all three subduction zones. In order to unravel the origin of flat-slab subduction, it is probably necessary a numerical approach that considers also the influence of surrounding plates, and their corresponding geometries, on 3D subduction dynamics.

  11. Effects of Metamaterial Slabs Applied to Wireless Power Transfer at 13.56 MHz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunyoung Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the effects of a metamaterial slab (or a practical “perfect lens” with negative permeability applied to a two loop magnetically coupled wireless power transfer (WPT system at 13.56 MHz, based on theory, full-wave electromagnetic- (EM- simulations, and measurements. When using lossless slabs with ideal negative permeability in EM-simulations, the WPT efficiencies have been found to be enhanced close to 100% due to the magnetic field focusing. For the case of using a realistic slab made of ring resonators (RR μr=-1-j0.23 with s/d=0.5 (s: slab width, d: distance between the transmitting and receiving loops, the WPT efficiency has been found to significantly decrease to about 20%, even lower than that of a free space case (32% due to the heavy power absorption in the slab. However, some efficiency enhancement can be achieved when s/d is optimized between 0.1 and 0.3. Overall, the significant enhancement of efficiencies when using a lossless slab becomes moderate or only marginal when employing a realistic slab.

  12. Extraordinary wavelength reduction in terahertz graphene-cladded photonic crystal slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Ian A D; Mousavi, S Hossein; Wang, Zheng

    2016-05-04

    Photonic crystal slabs have been widely used in nanophotonics for light confinement, dispersion engineering, nonlinearity enhancement, and other unusual effects arising from their structural periodicity. Sub-micron device sizes and mode volumes are routine for silicon-based photonic crystal slabs, however spectrally they are limited to operate in the near infrared. Here, we show that two single-layer graphene sheets allow silicon photonic crystal slabs with submicron periodicity to operate in the terahertz regime, with an extreme 100× wavelength reduction from graphene's large kinetic inductance. The atomically thin graphene further leads to excellent out-of-plane confinement, and consequently photonic-crystal-slab band structures that closely resemble those of ideal two-dimensional photonic crystals, with broad band gaps even when the slab thickness approaches zero. The overall photonic band structure not only scales with the graphene Fermi level, but more importantly scales to lower frequencies with reduced slab thickness. Just like ideal 2D photonic crystals, graphene-cladded photonic crystal slabs confine light along line defects, forming waveguides with the propagation lengths on the order of tens of lattice constants. The proposed structure opens up the possibility to dramatically reduce the size of terahertz photonic systems by orders of magnitude.

  13. Evaluating replicability of laboratory experiments in economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camerer, Colin F; Dreber, Anna; Forsell, Eskil; Ho, Teck-Hua; Huber, Jürgen; Johannesson, Magnus; Kirchler, Michael; Almenberg, Johan; Altmejd, Adam; Chan, Taizan; Heikensten, Emma; Holzmeister, Felix; Imai, Taisuke; Isaksson, Siri; Nave, Gideon; Pfeiffer, Thomas; Razen, Michael; Wu, Hang

    2016-03-25

    The replicability of some scientific findings has recently been called into question. To contribute data about replicability in economics, we replicated 18 studies published in the American Economic Review and the Quarterly Journal of Economics between 2011 and 2014. All of these replications followed predefined analysis plans that were made publicly available beforehand, and they all have a statistical power of at least 90% to detect the original effect size at the 5% significance level. We found a significant effect in the same direction as in the original study for 11 replications (61%); on average, the replicated effect size is 66% of the original. The replicability rate varies between 67% and 78% for four additional replicability indicators, including a prediction market measure of peer beliefs.

  14. Metastability of Subducted Slabs in the Mantle Transition Zone: A Collaborative Geodynamic, Petrologic, and Seismological Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, J. M.; Billen, M. I.; Duncan, M. S.; Roy, C.; Ibourichene, A. S.; Olugboji, T.; Celine, C.; Rodríguez-González, J.; Grand, S. P.; Madrigal, P.; Sandiford, D.; Valencia-Cardona, J. J.

    2016-12-01

    Subducted slabs exhibit a range of geometries in the mantle transition zone. Studies of this phenomenon suggest that olivine and/or pyroxene metastability may profoundly alter the slab density profile, leading to slab flattening (e.g., King et al., 2015) and potentially yielding a resolvable seismological signature (e.g., Kawakatsu and Yoshioka, 2011; Yoshioka et al., 2015). Such metastability may also be critical for deep earthquake generation. Geodynamic modelling of this process is typically done with a simplified petrologic model of the downgoing slab, whereas petrologic studies of phase assemblages in subducted slabs typically impose an idealized geodynamic model with an unrealistic thermal structure. Connecting these two approaches should lead to a better understanding of the consequences of metastable assemblages on subducting slabs. Here, we present a new methodology that combines geodynamic, seismic and petrologic approaches to assess the impact of mineral metastability on dynamic subduction models, developed in a collaborative effort begun at the 2016 NSF CIDER summer program in Santa Barbara, CA. We use two parallel approaches to extrapolate equilibrium rock properties to metastable regions and impose these data on extracted time-slices from robust thermo-mechanical geodynamic models, allowing us to quantify the density and buoyancy changes in the slab that result from considering metastable phase assemblages. Our preliminary results suggest that metastable assemblages can yield a 10-30% density decrease over the subducted slab relative to an equilibrium reference model. We then generate a seismic velocity profile of the slab, and compute waveforms based on the 2D finite-difference method (e.g., Vidale & Helmberger, 1987) to determine whether metastable phases could reasonably be detected by different seismic approaches. Continuing analyses will be aimed at coupling the evolution of geodynamic models with phase metastability to model the feedback between

  15. Slab Contributions to Cascades Magmas: Constraints from Central Oregon and Northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscitto, D. M.; Wallace, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    The Cascades arc is the global end member, warm-slab subduction zone (slab thermal parameter ~200 km) resulting from the slow subduction of young oceanic crust beneath North America. Significant slab dehydration is predicted to occur beneath the forearc (high-Mg andesite (HMA) and primitive basaltic andesite (PBA) with 3.3 and 5.6 wt.% H2Omax, respectively. Three distinct primitive melt compositions were calculated using inclusions from Central Oregon: calc-alkaline basalt, Sr-rich basalt, and depleted basaltic andesite (1.6, 2.3, and 3.0 wt.% H2Omax, respectively). We calculated extents of mantle melting for each primitive magma composition using Ti, Y, Gd, Dy, Er, and Yb contents (i.e., assuming negligible contributions from the slab). Based on these calculations, we infer Central Oregon and Shasta magmas to represent 8-15% and 14-20% partial melts (respectively) of variably depleted sources. Major elements in preliminary slab components from Central Oregon are H2O (~39-45 wt.%), Na2O (~36-47 wt.%), K2O (~8-15 wt.%), and Cl (~1.0-3.8 wt.%) and similar to the slab component calculated for Shasta HMA. The slab component calculated for Shasta PBA is more volatile-rich with ~62 wt.% H2O, ~28 wt.% Na2O, ~5.3 wt.% K2O, and 4.6 wt.% Cl. Calculated slab components are similar to previously published estimates from the Shasta region and experimental high temperature (>800 °C) fluids/melts derived from altered oceanic crust and/or sediments. Compositional proxies for slab surface temperatures (H2O/K2O and H2O/Ce) are at the high temperature range of the global arc spectrum, corresponding to temperatures of 850-950 °C, and are consistent with a young, hot incoming plate.

  16. SU-D-213-06: Dosimetry of Modulated Electron Radiation Therapy Using Fricke Gel Dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gawad, M Abdel; Elgohary, M; Hassaan, M; Emam, M [Al Azhar University, Cairo Egypt (Egypt); Desouky, O [National center for radiation research and technology-Egyptian atomic energy, Cairo (Egypt); Eldib, A [Al Azhar University, Cairo Egypt (Egypt); Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Modulated electron radiation therapy (MERT) has been proposed as an effective modality for treatment of superficial targets. MERT utilizes multiple beams of different energies which are intensity modulated to deliver optimized dose distribution. Energy independent dosimeters are thus needed for quantitative evaluations of MERT dose distributions and measurements of absolute doses delivered to patients. Thus in the current work we study the feasibility of Fricke gel dosimeters in MERT dosimetry. Methods: Batches of radiation sensitive Fricke gel is fabricated and poured into polymethyl methacrylate cuvettes. The samples were irradiated in solid water phantom and a thick layer of bolus was used as a buildup. A spectrophotometer system was used for measuring the color changes (the absorbance) before and after irradiation and then we calculate net absorbance. We constructed calibration curves to relate the measured absorbance in terms of absorbed dose for all available electron energies. Dosimetric measurements were performed for mixed electron beam delivery and we also performed measurement for segmented field delivery with the dosimeter placed at the junction of two adjacent electron beams of different energies. Dose measured by our gel dosimetry is compared to that calculation from our precise treatment planning system. We also initiated a Monte Carlo study to evaluate the water equivalence of our dosimeters. MCBEAM and MCSIM codes were used for treatment head simulation and phantom dose calculation. PDDs and profiles were calculated for electron beams incident on a phantom designed with 1cm slab of Fricke gel. Results: The calibration curves showed no observed energy dependence with all studied electron beam energies. Good agreement was obtained between dose calculated and that obtained by gel dosimetry. Monte Carlo results illustrated the tissue equivalency of our Gel dosimeters. Conclusion: Fricke Gel dosimeters represent a good option for the dosimetric

  17. Fragmentation of bacteriophage S13 replicative from DNA by restriction endonucleases from Hemophilus influenzae and Hemophilus aegyptius.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.G. Grosveld (Frank); K.M. Ojamaa; J.H. Spencer

    1976-01-01

    textabstractThe restriction enzymes Hind from Hemophilus influenzae and HaeIII from Hemophilus aegyptius cleave bacteriophage S13 replicative form (RF) DNA into 13 and 10 specific fragments, respectively. The sizes of these fragments were estimated by gel electrophoresis, electron microscopy, and py

  18. Adenovirus sequences required for replication in vivo.

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, K.; Pearson, G D

    1985-01-01

    We have studied the in vivo replication properties of plasmids carrying deletion mutations within cloned adenovirus terminal sequences. Deletion mapping located the adenovirus DNA replication origin entirely within the first 67 bp of the adenovirus inverted terminal repeat. This region could be further subdivided into two functional domains: a minimal replication origin and an adjacent auxillary region which boosted the efficiency of replication by more than 100-fold. The minimal origin occup...

  19. Foundation Design for a High Bay Warehouse with a Steel Fibre Reinforced Concrete Slab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasper, T.; Sørensen, Carsten Steen; Nielsen, J. B.

    2008-01-01

    concrete slabs, while a 69 x 77 m and 40 cm thick steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) slab forms the inner part of the foundation. Steel fibre reinforcement has been chosen mainly due to approximately 15 % lower construction costs than a comparable solution with conventional rebar reinforcement......The high bay warehouse at the Carlsberg brewery in Fredericia, Denmark, is 40 m high and is founded with a 83 x 116 m foundation slab on clay till and sand layers. Due to the wind loads on the tall building, the edges of the foundation require 80 cm and 60 cm thick conventionally reinforced...

  20. The intensity distribution and thermal stability of InnoSlab laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Wang; Peng Shi; Yutian Lu

    2005-01-01

    Partially end-pumped slab laser is an innovative solid state laser, namely InnoSlab. Combining the hybrid resonator with partially end-pumping, the output power can be scaled with high beam quality. In this paper, the output intensity distributions are simulated by coordinate transformation fast Fourier transform(FFT) algorithm, comparing the thermal lens influence. As the simulated curves showed, the output mode is still good when the thermal lens effect is strong, indicatingthe good thermal stability of InnoSlab laser.Such a new kind of laser can be designed and optimized on the base of this simulation.

  1. Coupling characteristics between five-layer slab wave-guides including left-handed materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Lu-fa; WANG Zi-hua

    2008-01-01

    To obtain the coupling characteristics between slab wave-guides including lift-handed material, we modify the coupledwave equations by using Maxwell's equations. First, we obtain new-couplid wave equations and new-coupling coefficient.Second, the coupling between two identical five-layer slab wave-guides where their cores are left-haaded material, but theircladdings are right-handed materials is studied. The coupling coefficient for even TE mode which is more complex than thatof the riglt-handed material slab wave guides, is obtained.

  2. Optical characterization of photonic crystal slabs using orthogonally oriented polarization filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazirizadeh, Yousef; Müller, Jürgen; Geyer, Ulf; Schelle, Detlef; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard; Tünnermann, Andreas; Lemmer, Uli; Gerken, Martina

    2008-05-12

    We present an experimental method for direct analysis of guided-mode resonances in photonic crystal slab structures using transmission measurements. By positioning the photonic crystal slab between orthogonally oriented polarization filters light transmission is suppressed except for the guided-mode resonances. Angle resolved transmission measurements with crossed polarizers are performed to obtain the band structure around the Gamma-point. Results are compared to mode simulations. Spatially resolved measurements in a confocal microscope setup are used for homogeneity characterizations. Stitching errors and inhomogeneities in exposure dose down to 1.3% in photonic crystal slabs fabricated by electron beam lithography are observed using this method.

  3. Thermal effects of metamorphic reactions in a three-component slab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chemia, Zurab; Dolejš, David; Steinle-Neumann, Gerd

    2010-01-01

    or consumption can occur due to metamorphic reactions, including endothermic devolatilization. We investigate enthalpy budget in a subducting slab using a self-consistent thermodynamic model. Petrological model of a subducting slab consists of three layers: oceanic subducting sediment (GLOSS), oceanic basalt (OB......), and moderately serpentinized harzburgite (SHB). These layers are examined over the range of pressure-temperature conditions of interest by computing metamorphic phase diagrams and retrieving whole-rock thermodynamic properties. Our results suggest that metamorphic reactions consume a significant amount of slab...

  4. INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE BUILDING 3550 SLAB AT OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, Phyllis C.

    2012-05-08

    The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has completed the independent verification survey of the Building 3550 Slab. The results of this effort are provided. The objective of this verification survey is to provide independent review and field assessment of remediation actions conducted by Safety and Ecology Corporation (SEC) to document that the final radiological condition of the slab meets the release guidelines. Verification survey activities on the Building 3550 Slab that included scans, measurements, and the collection of smears. Scans for alpha, alpha plus beta, and gamma activity identified several areas that were investigated.

  5. Research of electromagnetic field in different length left-handed material slab

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is used to simulate the propagation of electromagnetic wave in left-handed material slab (LHMs) with cold plasma model The effects of optical propagation in the left-handed material compared to convex lens are discussed. The wider the LHMs is, the stronger electric field of focusing image in left-handed material slab is confirmed by the simulation with various slab length. However, the outer image point location would slightly moves to the LHMs side when the length of LHMs is reduced.

  6. Thermal effects of metamorphic reactions in a three-component slab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chemia, Zurab; Dolejš, David; Steinle-Neumann, Gerd

    2010-01-01

    or consumption can occur due to metamorphic reactions, including endothermic devolatilization. We investigate enthalpy budget in a subducting slab using a self-consistent thermodynamic model. Petrological model of a subducting slab consists of three layers: oceanic subducting sediment (GLOSS), oceanic basalt (OB......), and moderately serpentinized harzburgite (SHB). These layers are examined over the range of pressure-temperature conditions of interest by computing metamorphic phase diagrams and retrieving whole-rock thermodynamic properties. Our results suggest that metamorphic reactions consume a significant amount of slab...

  7. Punching shear capacity of reinforced concrete slabs with headed shear studs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoang, Linh Cao; Pop, Anamaria

    2015-01-01

    Punching shear in slabs is analogous to shear in beams. Despite this similarity, current design codes provide distinctly different methods for the design of shear reinforcement in the two situations. For example, the Eurocode method for beam shear design is founded on the theory of rigid plasticity....... To design shear reinforcement in slabs, on the other hand, the engineer must settle for an empirical equation. The aim of the study reported is to demonstrate that it is possible in a simple manner to design shear reinforcement in slabs based on the same rigid-plasticity foundation as for beam shear design...

  8. Out-of-plane resonances in terahertz photonic crystal slabs modulated by optical pumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yulei; Zhou, Qing-Li; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Cunlin

    2011-10-10

    This paper describes detailed optical-pump-terahertz-probe studies of two-dimensional photonic crystal slabs for propagation perpendicular to the slabs. When the slabs are excited by an 800 nm pump pulse and the effect of shielding by photocarriers is removed, we find that the decaying tail in the transmitted terahertz radiation is strikingly enhanced. The photocarriers weaken guided resonances, but they also greatly enhance the excitation efficiency of guided resonances and the ability of the guided resonances to transfer energy back to the radiation field. This increases the resonance-assisted contribution to transmitted field. The photoinduced resonant extremes agree well with the Fano model.

  9. Voltage-programming-based capillary gel electrophoresis for the fast detection of angiotensin-converting enzyme insertion/deletion polymorphism with high sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Nain; Kim, Su-Kang; Kang, Seong Ho

    2016-08-01

    A voltage-programming-based capillary gel electrophoresis method with a laser-induced fluorescence detector was developed for the fast and highly sensitive detection of DNA molecules related to angiotensin-converting enzyme insertion/deletion polymorphism, which has been reported to influence predisposition to various diseases such as cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, myocardial infarction, and Alzheimer's disease. Various voltage programs were investigated for fast detection of specific DNA molecules of angiotensin-converting enzyme insertion/deletion polymorphism as a function of migration time and separation efficiency to establish the effect of voltage strength to resolution. Finally, the amplified products of the angiotensin-converting enzyme insertion/deletion polymorphism (190 and 490 bp DNA) were analyzed in 3.2 min without losing resolution under optimum voltage programming conditions, which were at least 75 times faster than conventional slab gel electrophoresis. In addition, the capillary gel electrophoresis method also successfully applied to the analysis of real human blood samples, although no polymorphism genes were detected by slab gel electrophoresis. Consequently, the developed voltage-programming capillary gel electrophoresis method with laser-induced fluorescence detection is an effective, rapid analysis technique for highly sensitive detection of disease-related specific DNA molecules. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Replication Origin Specification Gets a Push.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plosky, Brian S

    2015-12-03

    During the gap between G1 and S phases when replication origins are licensed and fired, it is possible that DNA translocases could disrupt pre-replicative complexes (pre-RCs). In this issue of Molecular Cell, Gros et al. (2015) find that pre-RCs can be pushed along DNA and retain the ability to support replication.

  11. Exploiting replicative stress to treat cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobbelstein, Matthias; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication in cancer cells is accompanied by stalling and collapse of the replication fork and signalling in response to DNA damage and/or premature mitosis; these processes are collectively known as 'replicative stress'. Progress is being made to increase our understanding of the mechanisms...

  12. Fluoride Rinses, Gels and Foams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twetman, Svante; Keller, Mette K

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this conference paper was to systematically review the quality of evidence and summarize the findings of clinical trials published after 2002 using fluoride mouth rinses, fluoride gels or foams for the prevention of dental caries. METHODS: Relevant papers were selected after...... (6 on fluoride mouth rinse, 10 on fluoride gel and 3 on fluoride foam); 6 had a low risk of bias while 2 had a moderate risk. All fluoride measures appeared to be beneficial in preventing crown caries and reversing root caries, but the quality of evidence was graded as low for fluoride mouth rinse......, moderate for fluoride gel and very low for acidulated fluoride foam. No conclusions could be drawn on the cost-effectiveness. CONCLUSIONS: This review, covering the recent decade, has further substantiated the evidence for a caries-preventive effect of fluoride mouth rinse, fluoride gel and foam...

  13. Colloidal gels: Clay goes patchy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegel, Willem K.; Lekkerkerker, Henk N. W.

    2011-01-01

    Empty liquids and equilibrium gels have so far been only theoretical possibilities, predicted for colloids with patchy interactions. But evidence of both has now been found in Laponite, a widely studied clay.

  14. Three-dimensional Numerical Models of Mantle Flow Through the Cocos-Nazca Slab Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadamec, M.; Fischer, K. M.

    2013-05-01

    Global slab geometry models suggest a 350 km to 1000 km spacing between the southern extent of the Cocos slab and the northern extent of the Nazca slab (Gudmundsson and Sambridge, 1998; Syracuse and Abers, 2006; Hayes et al., 2012). The apparent gap between the east-dipping Cocos and Nazca slabs at depth correlates to several tectonic features on the Pacific side of Central and northern South America that may limit subduction, namely the (a) Panama Fault zone, (b) incoming young lithosphere associated with the Cocos-Nazca spreading center, and (c) the Cocos, Coiba, Malpelo, and Carnegie ridges associated with the Galapogos hotspot and Cocos-Nazca spreading center (Protti et al., 1994; Johnston and Thorkelson, 1997; Gutscher et al., 1999; Abratis and Worner, 2001; Sdrolias and Muller, 2006; Mann et al., 2007; Gazel et al., 2011). In addition, on the Caribbean side of Central and northern South America, seismic data suggest that part of the Caribbean plate is subducting and dipping in a direction opposite to the Cocos and Nazca slabs (van der Hilst and Mann, 1994; Camacho et al., 2010). We construct high-resolution three-dimensional numerical models of the Cocos-Nazca subduction system to test the effects of a slab gap and variable overriding plate thickness on surface plate motion and mantle flow. The 3D tectonic configuration is generated with SlabGenerator (Jadamec and Billen, 2010, 2012) and the mantle convection code CitcomCU is used to solve for the viscous flow (Moresi and Solomatov, 1995; Zhong, 2006). The negative thermal buoyancy of the slabs drive the flow. No driving velocities are applied to the plates or any of the slabs in the model. The detailed geometries of the Cocos and Nazca slabs are constructed from seismicity and seismic tomography (Protti et al., 1994; Colombo et al., 1997; Gudmundsson and Sambridge, 1998; Rogers et al., 2002; Husen et al., 2003; Syracuse and Abers, 2006; Syracuse et al., 2008; Dzierma et al., 2011). Seismic tomography

  15. Silica reinforced triblock copolymer gels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theunissen, E.; Overbergh, N.; Reynaers, H.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of silica and polymer coated silica particles as reinforcing agents on the structural and mechanical properties of polystyrene-poly(ethylene/butylene)-polystyrene (PS-PEB-PS) triblock gel has been investigated. Different types of chemically modified silica have been compared in order...... a viscoclastic rubber to a plastic fluid and from a plastic fluid to a viscoelastic liquid are shifted to more elevated temperatures when silica is added to the triblock copolymer gel. (C) 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  16. Structural vulnerability assessment using reliability of slabs in avalanche area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favier, Philomène; Bertrand, David; Eckert, Nicolas; Naaim, Mohamed

    2013-04-01

    Improvement of risk assessment or hazard zoning requires a better understanding of the physical vulnerability of structures. To consider natural hazard issue such as snow avalanches, once the flow is characterized, highlight on the mechanical behaviour of the structure is a decisive step. A challenging approach is to quantify the physical vulnerability of impacted structures according to various avalanche loadings. The main objective of this presentation is to introduce methodology and outcomes regarding the assessment of vulnerability of reinforced concrete buildings using reliability methods. Reinforced concrete has been chosen as it is one of the usual material used to build structures exposed to potential avalanche loadings. In avalanche blue zones, structures have to resist to a pressure up to 30kPa. Thus, by providing systematic fragility relations linked to the global failure of the structure, this method may serve the avalanche risk assessment. To do so, a slab was numerically designed. It represented the avalanche facing wall of a house. Different configuration cases of the element in stake have been treated to quantify numerical aspects of the problem, such as the boundary conditions or the mechanical behaviour of the structure. The structure is analysed according to four different limit states, semi-local and global failures are considered to describe the slab behaviour. The first state is attained when cracks appear in the tensile zone, then the two next states are described consistent with the Eurocode, the final state is the total collapse of the structure characterized by the yield line theory. Failure probability is estimated in accordance to the reliability framework. Monte Carlo simulations were conducted to quantify the fragility to different loadings. Sensitivity of models in terms of input distributions were defined with statistical tools such as confidence intervals and Sobol's indexes. Conclusion and discussion of this work are established to

  17. Surface grafted chitosan gels. Part II. Gel formation and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Thormann, Esben; Claesson, Per M; Tyrode, Eric

    2014-07-29

    Responsive biomaterial hydrogels attract significant attention due to their biocompatibility and degradability. In order to make chitosan based gels, we first graft one layer of chitosan to silica, and then build a chitosan/poly(acrylic acid) multilayer using the layer-by-layer approach. After cross-linking the chitosan present in the polyelectrolyte multilayer, poly(acrylic acid) is partly removed by exposing the multilayer structure to a concentrated carbonate buffer solution at a high pH, leaving a surface-grafted cross-linked gel. Chemical cross-linking enhances the gel stability against detachment and decomposition. The chemical reaction between gluteraldehyde, the cross-linking agent, and chitosan was followed in situ using total internal reflection Raman (TIRR) spectroscopy, which provided a molecular insight into the complex reaction mechanism, as well as the means to quantify the cross-linking density. The amount of poly(acrylic acid) trapped inside the surface grafted films was found to decrease with decreasing cross-linking density, as confirmed in situ using TIRR, and ex situ by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) measurements on dried films. The responsiveness of the chitosan-based gels with respect to pH changes was probed by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and TIRR. Highly cross-linked gels show a small and fully reversible behavior when the solution pH is switched between pH 2.7 and 5.7. In contrast, low cross-linked gels are more responsive to pH changes, but the response is fully reversible only after the first exposure to the acidic solution, once an internal restructuring of the gel has taken place. Two distinct pKa's for both chitosan and poly(acrylic acid), were determined for the cross-linked structure using TIRR. They are associated with populations of chargeable groups displaying either a bulk like dissociation behavior or forming ionic complexes inside the hydrogel film.

  18. Three and two-dimensional electrical conductivity of the mantle near the Chile-Argentina Nazca Flat Slab: insights into slab behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burd, A. I.; Booker, J. R.; Mackie, R. L.; Pomposiello, C.; Favetto, A.; Larsen, J. C.

    2010-12-01

    Near 31.5°S, the subducted Nazca slab beneath Chile and western Argentina levels out near 100 km depth and does not roll over to plunge steeply into the mantle for several hundred km to the east. This flat slab prevents formation of an asthenospheric wedge under the Andes and consequently there are no active volcanoes. To the south this slab returns to a dip of ~30°, an asthenospheric wedge forms and there are active volcanoes south of 33.3°S in the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ). The prevailing view is that the Nazca slab is warped continuously between its flat and dipping segments. Over the last decade, we have collected 83 magnetotelluric (MT) sites that form an array in Argentina from 60° - 70°W and 31.5° - 34°S. 18 sites extend this coverage along a profile near 31.5°S past where the flat slab plunges into the lower mantle. These data were initially collected as linear profiles. Eventually it became clear that the structure at mantle depth was 3D. The site geometry was thus expanded to its current 2D array. The final sites in this array were collected in late 2009. While each year’s data set was originally internally consistent, preparation of the complete data set required recalculation of the impedance tensor at each site so that all data are compatible and comparable. MT impedance tensor data (including vertical to horizontal magnetic field transfer functions) are being inverted for smoothest log conductivity using a 3D non-linear conjugate gradient (NLCG) algorithm. Initial results of this 3D study will be presented. Several conclusions have already emerged from 2D interpretations of subsets of the data. There is an asthenospheric wedge east of the flat slab. Its top at 100 km is probably at the base of the lithosphere through which it has not penetrated, presumably because of compressive stresses. This wedge is horizontally thin and is bounded to the east by the root of the Rio de la Plata Craton and to the west by the plunging slab. It

  19. Replication of micro and nano surface geometries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Hocken, R.J.; Tosello, Guido

    2011-01-01

    : manufacture of net-shape micro/nano surfaces, tooling (i.e. master making), and surface quality control (metrology, inspection). Replication processes and methods as well as the metrology of surfaces to determine the degree of replication are presented and classified. Examples from various application areas...... are given including replication for surface texture measurements, surface roughness standards, manufacture of micro and nano structured functional surfaces, replicated surfaces for optical applications (e.g. optical gratings), and process chains based on combinations of repeated surface replication steps....

  20. Replication of prions in differentiated muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, Allen; Aiken, Judd M; McKenzie, Debbie

    2014-01-01

    We have demonstrated that prions accumulate to high levels in non-proliferative C2C12 myotubes. C2C12 cells replicate as myoblasts but can be differentiated into myotubes. Earlier studies indicated that C2C12 myoblasts are not competent for prion replication. (1) We confirmed that observation and demonstrated, for the first time, that while replicative myoblasts do not accumulate PrP(Sc), differentiated post-mitotic myotube cultures replicate prions robustly. Here we extend our observations and describe the implication and utility of this system for replicating prions.

  1. Relating weak layer and slab properties to snow slope stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Schweizer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Snow slope stability evaluation requires considering weak layer as well as slab properties – and in particular their interaction. We developed a stability index from snow micro-penetrometer measurements and compared it to 129 concurrent point observations with the compression test (CT. The index considers the SMP-derived micro-structural strength and the additional load which depends on the hardness of the surface layers. The new quantitative measure of stability discriminated well between point observations rated as either "poor" or "fair" (CT < 19 and those rated as "good" (CT ≥ 19. However, discrimination power within the intermediate range was low. We then applied the index to gridded snow micro-penetrometer measurements from 11 snow slopes to explore the spatial structure and possibly relate it to slope stability. Stability distributions on the 11 slopes reflected various possible strength and load (stress distributions that naturally can occur. Their relation to slope stability was poor possibly because the index does not consider crack propagation. Hence, the relation between spatial patterns of point stability and slope stability remains elusive. Whereas this is the first attempt of a truly quantitative measure of stability, future developments should consider a better reference of stability and incorporate a measure of crack propagation.

  2. Thin slab processing of acicular ferrite steels with high toughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reip, Carl-Peter; Hennig, Wolfgang; Hagmann, Rolf [SMS Demag Aktiengesellschaft, Duesseldorf (Germany); Sabrudin, Bin Mohamad Suren; Susanta, Ghosh; Weng Lan Lee [Megasteel Sdn Bhd, Banting (Malaysia)

    2005-07-01

    Near-net-shape casting processes today represent an important option in steelmaking. High productivity and low production cost as well as the variety of steel grades that can be produced plus an excellent product quality are key factors for the acceptance of such processes in markets all over the world. Today's research focuses on the production of pipe steel with special requirements in terms of toughness at low temperatures. The subject article describes the production of hot strip made from acicular ferritic / bainitic steel grades using the CSP thin-slab technology. In addition, the resulting strength and toughness levels as a function of the alloying concepts are discussed. Optimal control of the CSP process allows the production of higher-strength hot-rolled steel grades with a fine-grain acicular-ferritic/bainitic microstructure. Hot strip produced in this way is characterized by a high toughness at low temperatures. In a drop weight tear test, transition temperatures of up to -50 deg C can be achieved with a shear-fracture share of 85%. (author)

  3. Settlement of a foundation slab, non-uniform in depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ter-Martirosyan Zaven

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the formulation and solution of problems for the quantitative evaluation of settlements and bearing capacity of rectangular and circular foundation slabs constructed on the base with deformation (K, G or E, ν properties of continuously varying heterogeneity in the depth due to the conditions of its formation. It is shown that the inhomogeneity of the deformation properties of the foundation soils over depths has a significant effect on the formation of additional stress and strain states under the influence of a uniformly distributed external load over the area of a rectangle and circle, where, with growth of loading area (A relative settlement (S/√A depends nonlinearly on √A and decreases with growth of √A up to two or more times. As a computational model for the soil base, the paper considers the nonlinear geomechanical Klein model, according to which the stress-strain modulus of soils increases with depth according to the law of a power function of the form: E(z = E1zn, where n≤1. The solution of the SSC problems for an inhomogeneous ground half-space under the influence of a local load was obtained by an analytical method using the Mathcad software complex on the basis of the Boussinesq-Frohlich concentrated force problem. The results of the solution are presented in tables and distribution diagrams σ(zand S(z, as well as S = f2(√A, n.

  4. Fragmentary and incidental behaviour of columns, slabs and crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteley, Walter

    2014-02-13

    Between the study of small finite frameworks and infinite incidentally periodic frameworks, we find the real materials which are large, but finite, fragments that fit into the infinite periodic frameworks. To understand these materials, we seek insights from both (i) their analysis as large frameworks with associated geometric and combinatorial properties (including the geometric repetitions) and (ii) embedding them into appropriate infinite periodic structures with motions that may break the periodic structure. A review of real materials identifies a number of examples with a local appearance of 'unit cells' which repeat under isometries but perhaps in unusual forms. These examples also refocus attention on several new classes of infinite 'periodic' frameworks: (i) columns--three-dimensional structures generated with one repeating isometry and (ii) slabs--three-dimensional structures with two independent repeating translations. With this larger vision of structures to be studied, we find some patterns and partial results that suggest new conjectures as well as many additional open questions. These invite a search for new examples and additional theorems.

  5. Maximizing Photoluminescence Extraction in Silicon Photonic Crystal Slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdavi, Ali; Sarau, George; Xavier, Jolly; Paraïso, Taofiq K; Christiansen, Silke; Vollmer, Frank

    2016-04-26

    Photonic crystal modes can be tailored for increasing light matter interactions and light extraction efficiencies. These PhC properties have been explored for improving the device performance of LEDs, solar cells and precision biosensors. Tuning the extended band structure of 2D PhC provides a means for increasing light extraction throughout a planar device. This requires careful design and fabrication of PhC with a desirable mode structure overlapping with the spectral region of emission. We show a method for predicting and maximizing light extraction from 2D photonic crystal slabs, exemplified by maximizing silicon photoluminescence (PL). Systematically varying the lattice constant and filling factor, we predict the increases in PL intensity from band structure calculations and confirm predictions in micro-PL experiments. With the near optimal design parameters of PhC, we demonstrate more than 500-fold increase in PL intensity, measured near band edge of silicon at room temperature, an enhancement by an order of magnitude more than what has been reported.

  6. Numerical Simulation of Linear Electromagnetic Stirring in Secondary Cooling Region of Slab Caster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Jun-tao; WANG En-gang; HE Ji-cheng

    2003-01-01

    According to the theory of alternating magnetohydrodynamics and magnetic boundary renewal method, mathematical models were proposed for electromagnetic stirring in secondary cooling region (SEMS) of slab caster. The magnetic fields and flow fields of melt were simulated with SEMS. It′s shown that the electromagnetic forces with inward and sidelong components produced by travel magnetic field at the wide faces of slab make the melt whirling in horizontal section, and the convection of the melt is strengthened obviously there. In addition, magnetic flux density attenuates from the edge to the center of slab, and the profile of the melt velocity along slab thickness in the center of the horizontal section takes a two-opposite-peak configuration. Ultimately, the stirring intensity and features are determined by the electromagnetic parameters, coil arrangement and stirring types.

  7. Geodetic constraint on the motion of a slab window: Implication for the Mendocino Crustal Conveyor model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Y.; Dong, D.; Yan, J.; Chen, W.

    2017-07-01

    The migration of the slab window in the Northern California Coast Ranges provides a unique setting to study the viscous coupling between crust and asthenosphere flow. The mechanisms of these dynamic processes are explained by the Mendocino Crustal Conveyor model, which predicts a 2-D "double-humped" surface uplift rate pattern on a 400 km long profile. To evaluate the Mendocino Crustal Conveyor (MCC) model using accurate geodetic measurements, we derive the vertical velocity field from 43 continuous GPS (CGPS) stations in the Coast Ranges region and project it onto the profile along three possible orientations of the slab window. The CGPS measured uplift rates are in good agreement with the MCC prediction, when the slab window orientation is parallel to the symmetry axis of the region of thickened crust. Thus, the CGPS solutions not only provide a complementary means to diagnose the MCC model but also provide an effective way to constrain the orientation of the slab window.

  8. Approximation of charge-deposition density in thin slabs irradiated by electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Alouani-Bibi, F; Rogov, Y V; Tabata, T

    2000-01-01

    Charge-deposition distributions in thin slabs irradiated by plane-parallel electron beams are studied. The slabs considered are made of elements with atomic numbers ranging from 4 to 79. The slab thicknesses are from 0.5 to 50 mg/cm sup 2 , and the electron beam energies are from 1 to 10 MeV. Using a new Monte Carlo method (called the trajectory translation method), data on the charge-deposition density have been obtained. Theoretical analysis of these data has been performed. Based on this analysis, a semiempirical model that describes charge-deposition distributions in thin slabs has been developed. The results obtained by the semiempirical model have been compared with those obtained by the PENELOPE Monte Carlo code and show moderate agreement.

  9. Flat slabs strengthened to punching with carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP dowels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helder Luiz da Silva Rodrigues

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results of punching tests carried out in four reinforced concrete flat slabs, one of them without shear reinforcement and others strengthened with CFRP dowels. Slabs were 1000 mm square meters and 60 mm thick and were subjected to mid span loadings until failure. The strengthening arrangements were radial and cruciform, varying the number of layers of CFRP dowels. The results presented include vertical displacements, strain on steel and concrete, ultimate loads and failure mode, as well as estimation of resistance based on the Brazilian standards. It was observed significant improvement on punching resistance of the strengthened slabs when compared to the reference slab, highlighting the good performance for the strengthening system evaluated.

  10. Influence of transverse reinforcement on perforation resistance of reinforced concrete slabs under hard missile impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orbovic, Nebojsa, E-mail: nebojsa.orbovic@cnsc-ccsn.gc.ca; Sagals, Genadijs; Blahoianu, Andrei

    2015-12-15

    This paper describes the work conducted by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) related to the influence of transverse reinforcement on perforation capacity of reinforced concrete (RC) slabs under “hard” missile impact (impact with negligible missile deformations). The paper presents the results of three tests on reinforced concrete slabs conducted at VTT Technical Research Centre (Finland), along with the numerical simulations as well as a discussion of the current code provisions related to impactive loading. Transverse reinforcement is widely used for improving the shear and punching strength of concrete structures. However, the effect of this reinforcement on the perforation resistance under localized missile impact is still unclear. The goal of this paper is to fill the gap in the current literature related to this topic. Based on similar tests designed by the authors with missile velocity below perforation velocity, it was expected that transverse reinforcement would improve the perforation resistance. Three slabs were tested under almost identical conditions with the only difference being the transverse reinforcement. One slab was designed without transverse reinforcement, the second one with the transverse reinforcement in form of conventional stirrups with hooks and the third one with the transverse reinforcement in form of T-headed bars. Although the transverse reinforcement reduced the overall damage of the slabs (the rear face scabbing), the conclusion from the tests is that the transverse reinforcement does not have important influence on perforation capacity of concrete slabs under rigid missile impact. The slab with T-headed bars presented a slight improvement compared to the baseline specimen without transverse reinforcement. The slab with conventional stirrups presented slightly lower perforation capacity (higher residual missile velocity) than the slab without transverse reinforcement. In conclusion, the performed tests show slightly

  11. Study of entropy generation in a slab with non-uniform internal heat generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Haj Assad Mamdouh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of entropy generation in a rectangular slab with a nonuniform internal heat generation is presented. Dimensionless local and total entropy generation during steady state heat conduction through the slab are obtained. Two different boundary conditions have been considered in the analysis, the first with asymmetric convection and the second with constant slab surface temperature. Temperature distribution within the slab is obtained analytically. The study investigates the effect of some relevant dimensionless heat transfer parameters on entropy generation. The results show that there exists a minimum local entropy generation but there does not exist a minimum total entropy generation for certain combinations of the heat transfer parameters. The results of calculations are presented graphically.

  12. Origin and consequences of western Mediterranean subduction, rollback, and slab segmentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hinsbergen, D.J.J.; Vissers, R.L.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068789203; Spakman, W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074103164

    2014-01-01

    The western Mediterranean recorded subduction rollback, slab segmentation and separation. Here we address the questions of what caused Oligocene rollback initiation, and how its subsequent evolution split up an originally coherent fore arc into circum-southwest Mediterranean segments. We

  13. Modified creep and shrinkage prediction model B3 for serviceability limit state analysis of composite slabs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gholamhoseini, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Relatively little research has been reported on the time-dependent in-service behavior of composite concrete slabs with profiled steel decking as permanent formwork and little guidance is available...

  14. Analytical and numerical treatment of resistive drift instability in a plasma slab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirnov, V. V., E-mail: vvmirnov@wisc.edu; Sauppe, J. P.; Hegna, C. C.; Sovinec, C. R. [University of Wisconsin-Madison and the Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas (United States)

    2016-05-15

    An analytic approach combining the effect of equilibrium diamagnetic flows and the finite ionsound gyroradius associated with electron−ion decoupling and kinetic Alfvén wave dispersion is derived to study resistive drift instabilities in a plasma slab. Linear numerical computations using the NIMROD code are performed with cold ions and hot electrons in a plasma slab with a doubly periodic box bounded by two perfectly conducting walls. A linearly unstable resistive drift mode is observed in computations with a growth rate that is consistent with the analytic dispersion relation. The resistive drift mode is expected to be suppressed by magnetic shear in unbounded domains, but the mode is observed in numerical computations with and without magnetic shear. In the slab model, the finite slab thickness and the perfectly conducting boundary conditions are likely to account for the lack of suppression.

  15. Nonlinear Goos–Hänchen shifts of reflected light from inhomogeneous Kerr-like slabs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Hongmin, E-mail: hongminmao@hotmail.com; Zang, Taocheng; Sun, Jian; Pan, Tao; Xu, Guoding

    2013-09-02

    We investigate the Goos–Hänchen (GH) shifts of reflected light from Kerr-like slabs, whose permittivities are inhomogeneous in space as well as light intensity dependent. The GH shifts exhibit bistable, multivalued properties or a more complicated hysteretic response to the input light intensity, and the different spatial dependences of the permittivity have a great effect on the hysteretic response. The bistable or multivalued GH shifts can be modulated by various parameters, such as the angle of incidence and the thickness of slab. - Highlights: • The Goos–Hänchen (GH) shifts of reflected light from inhomogeneous Kerr-like slabs are investigated. • The GH shifts exhibit bistable, multivalued properties or a more complicated hysteretic response to the input light intensity. • The bistable or multivalued GH shifts can be modulated by the angle of incidence and the thickness of slab.

  16. Simultaneous two-dimensional phononic and photonic band gaps in opto-mechanical crystal slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Saeed; Eftekhar, Ali A; Khelif, Abdelkrim; Adibi, Ali

    2010-04-26

    We demonstrate planar structures that can provide simultaneous two-dimensional phononic and photonic band gaps in opto-mechanical (or phoxonic) crystal slabs. Different phoxonic crystal (PxC) structures, composed of square, hexagonal (honeycomb), or triangular arrays of void cylindrical holes embedded in silicon (Si) slabs with a finite thickness, are investigated. Photonic band gap (PtBG) maps and the complete phononic band gap (PnBG) maps of PxC slabs with different radii of the holes and thicknesses of the slabs are calculated using a three-dimensional plane wave expansion code. Simultaneous phononic and photonic band gaps with band gap to midgap ratios of more than 10% are shown to be readily obtainable with practical geometries in both square and hexagonal lattices, but not for the triangular lattice.

  17. Automated grading of wood-slabs. The development of a prototype system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær; Conradsen, Knut

    1992-01-01

    This paper proposes a method for automatically grading small beechwood slabs. The method involves two classification steps: the first step detects defects based on local visual texture; the second step utilizes the relative distribution of defects to perform a final grading assessment. At a major......-based measures of 'lightness', 'speckle' and 'dark deviation'. These measures are calculated for each pixel in an image of a slab. The feature space is separated into 12 decision regions corresponding to 12 'defect types'; these 'defects' are labeled as clear wood, wavy grain, split, black knots, ingrown bark......, etc. Based on the relative distribution of these detected defects on the surface of a given slab, the slab is further classified into 5 quality grades: prime, standard, flamy, extra flamy and rejects. As a result of this project, a prototype for the computer vision grading system has been built...

  18. Imaging properties of finite-size left-handed material slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianbing J; Grzegorczyk, Tomasz M; Wu, Bae-Ian; Kong, Jin Au

    2006-10-01

    Finite-size left-handed material (LHM) slabs are studied both analytically and numerically. The analytical method is based on Huygens' principles using truncated current sheets that cover only the apertures of the slabs. It is shown that the main effects on the images' spectra due to the size of the slabs can be predicted by the proposed analytical method, which can, therefore, be used as a fast alternative to the numerical simulations. Furthermore, the property of negative-energy streams at the image plane is explained. This unique property is found to be due to the interactions between propagating and evanescent waves and can only occur with LHM slabs, both finite size and infinite.

  19. Experimental demonstration of near-infrared epsilon-near-zero multilayer metamaterial slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaodong; Hu, Changyu; Deng, Huixu; Rosenmann, Daniel; Czaplewski, David A; Gao, Jie

    2013-10-07

    Near-infrared epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) metamaterial slabs based on silver-germanium (Ag-Ge) multilayers are experimentally demonstrated. Transmission, reflection and absorption spectra are characterized and used to determine the complex refractive indices and the effective permittivities of the ENZ metamaterial slabs, which match the results obtained from both the numerical simulations and the optical nonlocalities analysis. A rapid post-annealing process is used to reduce the collision frequency of silver and therefore decrease the optical absorption loss of multilayer metamaterial slabs. Furthermore, multilayer grating structures are studied to enhance the optical transmission and also tune the location of ENZ wavelength. The demonstrated near-infrared ENZ multilayer metamaterial slabs are important for realizing many exotic applications, such as phase front shaping and engineering of photonic density of states.

  20. DNA replication stress: causes, resolution and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazouzi, Abdelghani; Velimezi, Georgia; Loizou, Joanna I

    2014-11-15

    DNA replication is a fundamental process of the cell that ensures accurate duplication of the genetic information and subsequent transfer to daughter cells. Various pertubations, originating from endogenous or exogenous sources, can interfere with proper progression and completion of the replication process, thus threatening genome integrity. Coordinated regulation of replication and the DNA damage response is therefore fundamental to counteract these challenges and ensure accurate synthesis of the genetic material under conditions of replication stress. In this review, we summarize the main sources of replication stress and the DNA damage signaling pathways that are activated in order to preserve genome integrity during DNA replication. We also discuss the association of replication stress and DNA damage in human disease and future perspectives in the field. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.