WorldWideScience

Sample records for replica fuel tank

  1. Dual Tank Fuel System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Richard William; Burkhard, James Frank; Dauer, Kenneth John

    1999-11-16

    A dual tank fuel system has primary and secondary fuel tanks, with the primary tank including a filler pipe to receive fuel and a discharge line to deliver fuel to an engine, and with a balance pipe interconnecting the primary tank and the secondary tank. The balance pipe opens close to the bottom of each tank to direct fuel from the primary tank to the secondary tank as the primary tank is filled, and to direct fuel from the secondary tank to the primary tank as fuel is discharged from the primary tank through the discharge line. A vent line has branches connected to each tank to direct fuel vapor from the tanks as the tanks are filled, and to admit air to the tanks as fuel is delivered to the engine.

  2. Fuel storage tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peehs, M.; Stehle, H.; Weidinger, H.

    1979-01-01

    The stationary fuel storage tank is immersed below the water level in the spent fuel storage pool. In it there is placed a fuel assembly within a cage. Moreover, the storage tank has got a water filling and a gas buffer. The water in the storage tank is connected with the pool water by means of a filter, a surge tank and a water purification facility, temperature and pressure monitoring being performed. In the buffer compartment there are arranged catalysts a glow plugs for recombination of radiolysis products into water. The supply of water into the storage tank is performed through the gas buffer compartment. (DG) [de

  3. Fuel tank integrity research : fuel tank analyses and test plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    The Federal Railroad Administrations Office of Research : and Development is conducting research into fuel tank : crashworthiness. Fuel tank research is being performed to : determine strategies for increasing the fuel tank impact : resistance to ...

  4. Fuel tank crashworthiness : loading scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-16

    The Federal Railroad Administrations Office of Research and Development is conducting research into fuel tank crashworthiness. The breaching of fuel tanks during passenger : rail collisions and derailments increases the potential of serious injury...

  5. Fuel tank tourism; Tanktourismus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, M.; Banfi, S.; Haan, P. de

    2000-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) presents the results of a study made of the extent of so-called 'tank tourism' in Switzerland. The report attempts to how much motor fuel is purchased in border-near filling stations by persons from the other side of the border as a result of price differences in the different countries. The two methods used to estimate the extent of tank tourism, an ex-post analysis and the analysis of filling station turnover, are explained. Only road-traffic is considered; tank tourism in the aviation area is not looked at in this study. The extent of tank tourism is estimated for petrol and diesel fuels. The individual figures produced by the two methods are compared and the difference between them discussed. The report also investigates the effect of changing prices on tank tourism and discusses the problem of estimating the figures for 'off-road' consumers such as tractors and construction machines.

  6. 49 CFR 238.423 - Fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fuel tanks. 238.423 Section 238.423 Transportation....423 Fuel tanks. (a) External fuel tanks. Each type of external fuel tank must be approved by FRA's Associate Administrator for Safety upon a showing that the fuel tank provides a level of safety at least...

  7. 49 CFR 229.217 - Fuel tank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fuel tank. 229.217 Section 229.217 Transportation... tank. (a) External fuel tanks. Locomotives equipped with external fuel tanks shall, at a minimum... to the fuel tank safety requirements of § 238.223 or § 238.423 of this chapter. The Director of the...

  8. Ecodesign of Liquid Fuel Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gicevska, Jana; Bazbauers, Gatis; Repele, Mara

    2011-01-01

    The subject of the study is a 10 litre liquid fuel tank made of metal and used for fuel storage and transportation. The study dealt with separate life cycle stages of this product, compared environmental impacts of similar fuel tanks made of metal and plastic, as well as analysed the product's end-of-life cycle stage, studying the waste treatment and disposal scenarios. The aim of this study was to find opportunities for improvement and to develop proposals for the ecodesign of 10 litre liquid fuel tank.

  9. 33 CFR 183.510 - Fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Equipment Standards § 183.510 Fuel tanks. (a) Each fuel tank in a boat must have been tested by its manufacturer under § 183.580 and not leak when...

  10. 49 CFR 238.223 - Locomotive fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Locomotive fuel tanks. 238.223 Section 238.223... Equipment § 238.223 Locomotive fuel tanks. Locomotive fuel tanks shall comply with either the following or....21: (a) External fuel tanks. External locomotive fuel tanks shall comply with the requirements...

  11. Blunt impact tests of retired passenger locomotive fuel tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The Transportation Technology Center, Inc. conducted impact tests on three locomotive fuel tanks as part of the Federal Railroad Administrations locomotive fuel tank crashworthiness improvement program. Three fuel tanks, two from EMD F40PH locomot...

  12. 14 CFR 121.316 - Fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tanks. 121.316 Section 121.316 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Instrument and Equipment Requirements § 121.316 Fuel tanks. Each...

  13. 14 CFR 121.229 - Location of fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Location of fuel tanks. 121.229 Section 121... of fuel tanks. (a) Fuel tanks must be located in accordance with § 121.255. (b) No part of the engine... the wall of an integral tank. (c) Fuel tanks must be isolated from personnel compartments by means of...

  14. 14 CFR 23.977 - Fuel tank outlet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank outlet. 23.977 Section 23.977... tank outlet. (a) There must be a fuel strainer for the fuel tank outlet or for the booster pump. This... damage any fuel system component. (b) The clear area of each fuel tank outlet strainer must be at least...

  15. 33 CFR 183.512 - Fuel tanks: Prohibited materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel tanks: Prohibited materials... tanks: Prohibited materials. (a) A fuel tank must not be constructed from terneplate. (b) Unless it has an inorganic sacrificial galvanic coating on the inside and outside of the tank, a fuel tank must not...

  16. LH2 fuel tank design for SSTO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Geoff

    1994-01-01

    This report will discuss the design of a liquid hydrogen fuel tank constructed from composite materials. The focus of this report is to recommend a design for a fuel tank which will be able to withstand all static and dynamic forces during manned flight. Areas of study for the design include material selection, material structural analysis, heat transfer, thermal expansion, and liquid hydrogen diffusion. A structural analysis FORTRAN program was developed for analyzing the buckling and yield characteristics of the tank. A thermal analysis Excel spreadsheet was created to determine a specific material thickness which will minimize heat transfer through the wall of the tank. The total mass of the tank was determined by the combination of both structural and thermal analyses. The report concludes with the recommendation of a layered material tank construction. The designed system will include exterior insulation, combination of metal and organize composite matrices and honeycomb.

  17. Temperature Stratification in a Cryogenic Fuel Tank

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A reduced dynamical model describing temperature stratification effects driven by natural convection in a liquid hydrogen cryogenic fuel tank has been developed. It...

  18. 46 CFR 58.50-5 - Gasoline fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gasoline fuel tanks. 58.50-5 Section 58.50-5 Shipping... AND RELATED SYSTEMS Independent Fuel Tanks § 58.50-5 Gasoline fuel tanks. (a) Construction—(1) Shape...) Installation. (1) Gasoline fuel tanks used for propulsion shall be located in water-tight compartments separate...

  19. 33 CFR 183.520 - Fuel tank vent systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Equipment Standards § 183.520 Fuel tank vent systems. (a) Each fuel tank must have a vent system that prevents pressure in the tank from exceeding 80... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel tank vent systems. 183.520...

  20. 46 CFR 182.435 - Integral fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Integral fuel tanks. 182.435 Section 182.435 Shipping...) MACHINERY INSTALLATION Specific Machinery Requirements § 182.435 Integral fuel tanks. (a) Gasoline fuel tanks must be independent of the hull. (b) Diesel fuel tanks may not be built integral with the hull of...

  1. 46 CFR 119.435 - Integral fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Integral fuel tanks. 119.435 Section 119.435 Shipping... Machinery Requirements § 119.435 Integral fuel tanks. (a) Diesel fuel tanks may not be built integral with... for certification of a vessel, integral fuel tanks must withstand a hydrostatic pressure test of 35 k...

  2. 33 CFR 183.518 - Fuel tank openings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel tank openings. 183.518...) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Equipment Standards § 183.518 Fuel tank openings. Each opening into the fuel tank must be at or above the topmost surface of the tank. ...

  3. 46 CFR 119.450 - Vent pipes for fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vent pipes for fuel tanks. 119.450 Section 119.450... Specific Machinery Requirements § 119.450 Vent pipes for fuel tanks. (a) Each unpressurized fuel tank must... area of the vent pipe for diesel fuel tanks must be as follows: (1) Not less than the cross sectional...

  4. 14 CFR 25.977 - Fuel tank outlet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank outlet. 25.977 Section 25.977... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 25.977 Fuel tank outlet. (a) There must be a fuel strainer for the fuel tank outlet or for the booster pump. This strainer must— (1) For...

  5. 14 CFR 27.975 - Fuel tank vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank vents. 27.975 Section 27.975... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 27.975 Fuel tank vents. (a) Each fuel tank... system must be designed to minimize spillage of fuel through the vents to an ignition source in the event...

  6. 14 CFR 29.977 - Fuel tank outlet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank outlet. 29.977 Section 29.977... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 29.977 Fuel tank outlet. (a) There must be a fuel strainer for the fuel tank outlet or for the booster pump. This strainer must— (1) For...

  7. 14 CFR 27.977 - Fuel tank outlet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank outlet. 27.977 Section 27.977... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 27.977 Fuel tank outlet. (a) There must be a fuel stainer for the fuel tank outlet or for the booster pump. This strainer must— (1) For...

  8. Locomotive fuel tank structural safety testing program : passenger locomotive fuel tank jackknife derailment load test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    This report presents the results of a passenger locomotive fuel tank load test simulating jackknife derailment (JD) load. The test is based on FRA requirements for locomotive fuel tanks in the Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 238, Ap...

  9. 46 CFR 182.450 - Vent pipes for fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vent pipes for fuel tanks. 182.450 Section 182.450... TONS) MACHINERY INSTALLATION Specific Machinery Requirements § 182.450 Vent pipes for fuel tanks. (a) Each unpressurized fuel tank must be fitted with a vent pipe connected to the highest point of the tank...

  10. Cryogenic Fuel Tank Draining Analysis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Donald

    1999-01-01

    One of the technological challenges in designing advanced hypersonic aircraft and the next generation of spacecraft is developing reusable flight-weight cryogenic fuel tanks. As an aid in the design and analysis of these cryogenic tanks, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been developed specifically for the analysis of flow in a cryogenic fuel tank. This model employs the full set of Navier-Stokes equations, except that viscous dissipation is neglected in the energy equation. An explicit finite difference technique in two-dimensional generalized coordinates, approximated to second-order accuracy in both space and time is used. The stiffness resulting from the low Mach number is resolved by using artificial compressibility. The model simulates the transient, two-dimensional draining of a fuel tank cross section. To calculate the slosh wave dynamics the interface between the ullage gas and liquid fuel is modeled as a free surface. Then, experimental data for free convection inside a horizontal cylinder are compared with model results. Finally, cryogenic tank draining calculations are performed with three different wall heat fluxes to demonstrate the effect of wall heat flux on the internal tank flow field.

  11. 14 CFR 125.127 - Location of fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Location of fuel tanks. 125.127 Section 125... Requirements § 125.127 Location of fuel tanks. (a) Fuel tanks must be located in accordance with § 125.153. (b... compartment may be used as the wall of an integral tank. (c) Fuel tanks must be isolated from personnel...

  12. 33 CFR 183.550 - Fuel tanks: Installation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Manufacturer Requirements § 183.550 Fuel tanks: Installation. (a) Each fuel tank must not be integral with any boat structure or mounted on an engine. (b) Each... the top surface of each metallic fuel tank when the boat is in its static floating position. (e) Each...

  13. 14 CFR 27.971 - Fuel tank sump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank sump. 27.971 Section 27.971 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 27.971 Fuel tank sump. (a) Each fuel tank...

  14. 14 CFR 25.971 - Fuel tank sump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank sump. 25.971 Section 25.971 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 25.971 Fuel tank sump. (a) Each fuel tank...

  15. 14 CFR 29.971 - Fuel tank sump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank sump. 29.971 Section 29.971 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 29.971 Fuel tank sump. (a) Each fuel tank...

  16. 14 CFR 29.965 - Fuel tank tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank tests. 29.965 Section 29.965 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 29.965 Fuel tank tests. (a) Each fuel tank...

  17. 14 CFR 27.965 - Fuel tank tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank tests. 27.965 Section 27.965 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 27.965 Fuel tank tests. (a) Each fuel tank...

  18. Conventional fuel tank blunt impact tests : test and analysis results

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-02

    The Federal Railroad Administrations Office of Research : and Development is conducting research into fuel tank : crashworthiness. A series of impact tests are planned to : measure fuel tank deformation under two types of dynamic : loading conditi...

  19. Test requirements of locomotive fuel tank blunt impact tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-15

    The Federal Railroad Administrations Office of Research : and Development is conducting research into passenger : locomotive fuel tank crashworthiness. A series of impact tests : are planned to measure fuel tank deformation under two types : of dy...

  20. Results of a conventional fuel tank blunt impact test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-23

    The Federal Railroad Administrations Office of Research : and Development is conducting research into passenger : locomotive fuel tank crashworthiness. A series of impact tests is : being conducted to measure fuel tank deformation under two : type...

  1. External Fuel Tank, Clouds and Earth Limb

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    It's fuel consumed, the expendable external fuel tank was jettisoned moments earlier from the Space Shuttle Atlantis and now begins its plunge back to Earth (20.5N, 36.0W). Backdropped against the void of space and the thin blue line of the Earth's airglow above the Earth Limb, the harshness of the blackness of space is softened by the fleeciness of Earth's cloud cover below.

  2. Impact resistance cryogenic bunker fuel tanks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voormeeren, L.O.; Atli-Veltin, B.; Vredeveldt, A.W.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing use of liquefied natural gas (LNG) as bunker fuel in ships, calls for an elaborate study regarding the risks involved. One particular issue is the vulnerability of cryogenic LNG storage tanks with respect to impact loadings, such as ship collisions and dropped objects. This requires

  3. 30 CFR 36.50 - Tests of fuel tank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tests of fuel tank. 36.50 Section 36.50 Mineral... Requirements § 36.50 Tests of fuel tank. The fuel tank shall be inspected and tested to determine whether: (a) It is fuel-tight, (b) the vent maintains atmospheric pressure within the tank, and (c) the vent and...

  4. 14 CFR 23.969 - Fuel tank expansion space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank expansion space. 23.969 Section 23.969 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT....969 Fuel tank expansion space. Each fuel tank must have an expansion space of not less than two...

  5. 14 CFR 121.1113 - Fuel tank system maintenance program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank system maintenance program. 121... Improvements § 121.1113 Fuel tank system maintenance program. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (g) of this... capacity of 7500 pounds or more. (b) For each airplane on which an auxiliary fuel tank is installed under a...

  6. 14 CFR 125.507 - Fuel tank system inspection program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank system inspection program. 125... Airworthiness and Safety Improvements § 125.507 Fuel tank system inspection program. (a) Except as provided in... fuel tank is installed under a field approval, before June 16, 2008, the certificate holder must submit...

  7. 14 CFR 129.113 - Fuel tank system maintenance program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank system maintenance program. 129... Continued Airworthiness and Safety Improvements § 129.113 Fuel tank system maintenance program. (a) Except... on which an auxiliary fuel tank is installed under a field approval, before June 16, 2008, the...

  8. 46 CFR 169.627 - Compartments containing diesel fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compartments containing diesel fuel tanks. 169.627... SCHOOL VESSELS Machinery and Electrical Ventilation § 169.627 Compartments containing diesel fuel tanks. Unless they are adequately ventilated, enclosed compartments or spaces containing diesel fuel tanks and...

  9. 14 CFR 91.1507 - Fuel tank system inspection program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank system inspection program. 91... Airworthiness and Safety Improvements § 91.1507 Fuel tank system inspection program. (a) Except as provided in... fuel tank is installed under a field approval, before June 16, 2008, the operator must submit to the...

  10. 49 CFR 229.97 - Grounding fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Grounding fuel tanks. 229.97 Section 229.97 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Equipment § 229.97 Grounding fuel tanks. Fuel tanks and related piping shall be electrically grounded. ...

  11. 33 CFR 183.552 - Plastic encased fuel tanks: Installation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Plastic encased fuel tanks... § 183.552 Plastic encased fuel tanks: Installation. (a) Each fuel tank encased in cellular plastic foam or in fiber reinforced plastic must have the connections, fittings, and labels accessible for...

  12. Temperature Stratification in a Cryogenic Fuel Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daigle, Matthew John; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Boschee, Jacob; Foygel, Michael Gregory

    2013-01-01

    A reduced dynamical model describing temperature stratification effects driven by natural convection in a liquid hydrogen cryogenic fuel tank has been developed. It accounts for cryogenic propellant loading, storage, and unloading in the conditions of normal, increased, and micro- gravity. The model involves multiple horizontal control volumes in both liquid and ullage spaces. Temperature and velocity boundary layers at the tank walls are taken into account by using correlation relations. Heat exchange involving the tank wall is considered by means of the lumped-parameter method. By employing basic conservation laws, the model takes into consideration the major multi-phase mass and energy exchange processes involved, such as condensation-evaporation of the hydrogen, as well as flows of hydrogen liquid and vapor in the presence of pressurizing helium gas. The model involves a liquid hydrogen feed line and a tank ullage vent valve for pressure control. The temperature stratification effects are investigated, including in the presence of vent valve oscillations. A simulation of temperature stratification effects in a generic cryogenic tank has been implemented in Matlab and results are presented for various tank conditions.

  13. 14 CFR 29.963 - Fuel tanks: general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tanks: general. 29.963 Section 29.963 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 29.963 Fuel tanks: general. (a) Each fuel...

  14. 14 CFR 25.963 - Fuel tanks: general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tanks: general. 25.963 Section 25.963 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 25.963 Fuel tanks: general. (a) Each fuel...

  15. 14 CFR 27.963 - Fuel tanks: general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tanks: general. 27.963 Section 27.963 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 27.963 Fuel tanks: general. (a) Each fuel...

  16. 14 CFR 25.981 - Fuel tank ignition prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 25.981 Fuel tank... system where catastrophic failure could occur due to ignition of fuel or vapors. This must be shown by... established, as necessary, to prevent development of ignition sources within the fuel tank system pursuant to...

  17. 33 CFR 183.564 - Fuel tank fill system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel tank fill system. 183.564...) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Manufacturer Requirements § 183.564 Fuel tank fill system. (a) Each fuel fill opening must be located so that a gasoline overflow of up to five...

  18. Separation of the Shuttle Columbia's external fuel tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Separation of the Shuttle Columbia's external fuel tank (ET), photographed by a camera in the umbilical bay. Camera was able to record the underside of the tank as the orbiter toward its earth-orbital mission and the fuel tank fell toward the earth.

  19. 14 CFR 27.969 - Fuel tank expansion space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank expansion space. 27.969 Section 27.969 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 27.969 Fuel tank expansion space...

  20. 14 CFR 25.969 - Fuel tank expansion space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank expansion space. 25.969 Section 25.969 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 25.969 Fuel tank expansion space...

  1. 14 CFR 29.969 - Fuel tank expansion space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank expansion space. 29.969 Section 29.969 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 29.969 Fuel tank expansion space...

  2. 14 CFR 25.973 - Fuel tank filler connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank filler connection. 25.973 Section 25.973 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 25.973 Fuel tank filler...

  3. 14 CFR 25.965 - Fuel tank tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank tests. 25.965 Section 25.965 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 25.965 Fuel tank tests. (a) It must be...

  4. 14 CFR 27.967 - Fuel tank installation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank installation. 27.967 Section 27.967 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 27.967 Fuel tank installation. (a...

  5. 14 CFR 29.967 - Fuel tank installation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank installation. 29.967 Section 29.967 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 29.967 Fuel tank installation...

  6. 14 CFR 27.973 - Fuel tank filler connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank filler connection. 27.973 Section 27.973 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 27.973 Fuel tank filler connection...

  7. 14 CFR 25.967 - Fuel tank installations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank installations. 25.967 Section 25.967 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 25.967 Fuel tank installations...

  8. 14 CFR 29.973 - Fuel tank filler connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank filler connection. 29.973 Section 29.973 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 29.973 Fuel tank filler...

  9. 14 CFR 23.967 - Fuel tank installation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the engine compartment may act as the wall of an integral tank. (d) Each fuel tank must be isolated... loads without permanent deformation or failure under the conditions of §§ 23.365 and 23.843 of this part. A bladder-type fuel cell, if used, must have a retaining shell at least equivalent to a metal fuel...

  10. Industrial thermoforming simulation of automotive fuel tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesche, Stefan aus der

    2004-01-01

    An industrial thermoforming simulation with regard to automotive plastic fuel tanks is presented including all relevant process stages. The radiative and conductive heat transfer during the reheat stage, the deformation and stress behaviour during the forming stage, and the final cooling stage are simulated. The modelling of the thermal and rheological behaviour of the involved material is investigated in greater detail. By means of experimental data it is found that modelling of the phase transition during the process is highly important for predicting correct wall thickness distributions

  11. Motorcycle fuel tanks and pelvic fractures: A motorcycle fuel tank syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Lauren; Baldock, Matthew; Fitzharris, Michael; Duflou, Johan; Dal Nevo, Ross; Griffiths, Michael; Brown, Julie

    2016-08-17

    Pelvic injuries are a serious and commonly occurring injury to motorcycle riders involved in crashes, yet there has been limited research investigating the mechanisms involved in these injuries. This study aimed to investigate the mechanisms involved in pelvic injuries to crashed motorcyclists. This study involved in-depth crash investigation and 2 convenience-based data sets were used. These data sets investigated motorcycle crashes in the Sydney, Newcastle, and Adelaide regions. Participants included motorcycle riders who had crashed either on a public road or private property within the study areas. The mechanism of injury and the type of injuries were investigated. The most frequent cause of pelvic injuries in crashed motorcyclists was due to contact with the motorcycle fuel tank during the crash (85%). For riders who had come into contact with the fuel tank, the injury types were able to be grouped into 3 categories based on the complexity of the injury. The complexity of the injury appeared to increase with impact speed but this was a nonsignificant trend. The pelvic injuries that did not occur from contact with the fuel tank in this sample differed in asymmetry of loading and did not commonly involve injury to the bladder. They were commonly one-sided injuries but this differed based on the point of loading; however, a larger sample of these injuries needs to be investigated. Overall improvements in road safety have not been replicated in the amelioration of pelvic injuries in motorcyclists and improvements in the design of crashworthy motorcycle fuel tanks appear to be required.

  12. 14 CFR 25.975 - Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 25.975 Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents. (a) Fuel tank vents. Each fuel tank must be vented from the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents...

  13. 14 CFR 29.975 - Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 29.975 Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents. (a) Fuel tank vents. Each fuel tank must be vented from the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents...

  14. 40 CFR 90.129 - Fuel tank permeation from handheld engines and equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel tank permeation from handheld... KILOWATTS Emission Standards and Certification Provisions § 90.129 Fuel tank permeation from handheld... equipment with respect to fuel tanks. For the purposes of this section, fuel tanks do not include fuel caps...

  15. In-service inspection of ET-RR-1 reactor vessels and spent fuel storage tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattab, M.; Shafy, M.; Konoplev, K.; Samodurve, YU.; Orlov, S.; Didenko, V.; Jackorev, O.

    1993-01-01

    Technical survey included in-service inspection are needed in order to investigate the structural integrity and to insure safe operation of the ET-R R-1 reactor after thirty years aging. An intensive work for the inspection of the inspection of the central tank, shield tank, horizontal channels, primary coolant circuit and spent fuel storage tank have been carried out. The inspection procedures were visual method using video camera and magnification optical as well as thickness measurements using ultrasonic gauge meter and replica for determining defect depth. Water chemical analysis of the primary cooling circuit and spent fuel storage were helpful in results explanation. The results showed that the reactor vessels have good surface conditions. The observed pitting did not affect the structural integrity. The majority of the defects were pits having maximum surface area of about 50 mm. Their depth does not exceed 2 mm. The pits depth rate penetration is of the order of 0.5% per year. Thickness measurements showed insignificant variation. Water status and its chemical properties are very important in controlling corrosion rate. 18 figs., 14 tabs

  16. Fluid Fuel Fluctuations in the Spherical Tank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. D. Nguyen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many authors tried to solve a task concerning small fluctuations of the incompressible ideal liquid, which partially fills a stationary tank of any shape. There is a long list of references to this subject. The article presents a task solution on own fluctuations of liquid in spherical capacity, with boundary conditions on a free surface and a surface with a resistance – drain surface. Relevance of problem consists in assessment of influence of intra tank devices (measuring, intaking, damping devices, etc. on the liquid fuel fluctuations. The special attention is paid to finding the own values and frequencies of the equations of disturbed flow fluctuations with dissipation available on the boundary surfaces. In contrast to the previous examples, the lowering speed and the free surface area at undisturbed state are variable.The article also considers a variation formulation of the auxiliary boundary tasks. In solution of variation tasks, the attached Legendre's functions were used as coordinate functions. Further, after substitution of the variation tasks solution in the boundary conditions and the subsequent mathematical operations the characteristic equation was obtained. To obtain solutions of the cubic characteristic equation Cardano formulas were used. The article also considers the task on the own motions of liquid filling a capacity between two concentric spheres and flowing out via the intake in case there is a free surface. Reliability of the obtained numerical results is confirmed by comparison with calculation results of frequencies resulting from solutions of a task on the own fluctuations of liquid in the spherical capacity with the constant depth of liquid. All numerical calculations were performed using the Matlab environment.

  17. 14 CFR 23.965 - Fuel tank tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank tests. 23.965 Section 23.965 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 23.965 Fuel...

  18. 14 CFR 23.971 - Fuel tank sump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank sump. 23.971 Section 23.971 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 23.971 Fuel...

  19. 14 CFR 23.963 - Fuel tanks: General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tanks: General. 23.963 Section 23.963 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 23.963 Fuel...

  20. Evaluation of Purging Solutions for Military Fuel Tanks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rhee, In-Sik

    2003-01-01

    .... It is also a biodegradable water based solvent. Because of this property, US Army has used this environmentally friendly solvent as a purging solution in all military fuel tanks including Heavy Expanded Mobility Truck (HEMTT...

  1. Spray sealing: A breakthrough in integral fuel tank sealing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Martin D.; Zadarnowski, J. H.

    1989-11-01

    In a continuing effort to increase readiness, a new approach to sealing integral fuel tanks is being developed. The technique seals potential leak sources by spraying elastomeric materials inside the tank cavity. Laboratory evaluations project an increase in aircraft supportability and reliability, an improved maintainability, decreasing acquisition and life cycle costs. Increased usable fuel volume and lower weight than conventional bladders improve performance. Concept feasibility was demonstrated on sub-scale aircraft fuel tanks. Materials were selected by testing sprayable elastomers in a fuel tank environment. Chemical stability, mechanical properties, and dynamic durability of the elastomer are being evaluated at the laboratory level and in sub-scale and full scale aircraft component fatigue tests. The self sealing capability of sprayable materials is also under development. Ballistic tests show an improved aircraft survivability, due in part to the elastomer's mechanical properties and its ability to damp vibrations. New application equipment, system removal, and repair methods are being investigated.

  2. 14 CFR Appendix M to Part 25 - Fuel Tank System Flammability Reduction Means

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel Tank System Flammability Reduction... 25—Fuel Tank System Flammability Reduction Means M25.1Fuel tank flammability exposure requirements. (a) The Fleet Average Flammability Exposure of each fuel tank, as determined in accordance with...

  3. Catalytic Reactor for Inerting of Aircraft Fuel Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-06-01

    Aluminum Panels After Triphase Corrosion Test 79 35 Inerting System Flows in Various Flight Modes 82 36 High Flow Reactor Parametric Data 84 37 System...AD/A-000 939 CATALYTIC REACTOR FOR INERTING OF AIRCRAFT FUEL TANKS George H. McDonald, et al AiResearch Manufacturing Company Prepared for: Air Force...190th Street 2b. GROUP Torrance, California .. REPORT TITLE CATALYTIC REACTOR FOR INERTING OF AIRCRAFT FUEL TANKS . OESCRIP TIVE NOTEs (Thpe of refpoft

  4. CFD analysis of aircraft fuel tanks thermal behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilio, C.; Longo, G. A.; Pernigotto, G.; Chiacchio, F.; Borrelli, P.; D'Errico, E.

    2017-11-01

    This work is carried out within the FP7 European research project TOICA (Thermal Overall Integrated Conception of Aircraft, http://www.toica-fp7.eu/). One of the tasks foreseen for the TOICA project is the analysis of fuel tanks as possible heat sinks for future aircrafts. In particular, in the present paper, commercial regional aircraft is considered as case study and CFD analysis with the commercial code STAR-CCM+ is performed in order to identify the potential capability to use fuel stored in the tanks as a heat sink for waste heat dissipated by other systems. The complex physical phenomena that characterize the heat transfer inside liquid fuel, at the fuel-ullage interface and inside the ullage are outlined. Boundary conditions, including the effect of different ground and flight conditions, are implemented in the numerical simulation approach. The analysis is implemented for a portion of aluminium wing fuel tank, including the leading edge effects. Effect of liquid fuel transfer among different tank compartments and the air flow in the ullage is included. According to Fuel Tank Flammability Assessment Method (FTFAM) proposed by the Federal Aviation Administration, the results are exploited in terms of exponential time constants and fuel temperature difference to the ambient for the different cases investigated.

  5. Design and Optimisation of Fuel Tanks for BWB Configurations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goraj Zdobyslaw

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes assumptions, goals, methods, results and conclusions related to fuel tank arrangement of a flying wing passenger airplane configuration. A short overview of various fuel tank systems in use today of different types of aircraft is treated as a starting point for designing a fuel tank system to be used on very large passenger airplanes. These systems may be used to move fuel around the aircraft to keep the centre of gravity within acceptable limits, to maintain pitch and lateral balance and stability. With increasing aircraft speed, the centre of lift moves aft, and for trimming the elevator or trimmer must be used thereby increasing aircraft drag. To avoid this, the centre of gravity can be shifted by pumping fuel from forward to aft tanks. The lesson learnt from this is applied to minimise trim drag by moving the fuel along the airplane. Such a task can be done within coming days if we know the minimum drag versus CG position and weight value. The main part of the paper is devoted to wing bending moment distribution. A number of arrangements of fuel in airplane tanks are investigated and a scenario of refuelling - minimising the root bending moments - is presented. These results were obtained under the assumption that aircraft is in long range flight (14 hours, CL is constant and equal to 0.279, Specific Fuel Consumption is also constant and that overall fuel consumption is equal to 20 tons per 1 hour. It was found that the average stress level in wing structure is lower if refuelling starts from fuel tanks located closer to longitudinal plane of symmetry. It can influence the rate of fatigue.

  6. 46 CFR 182.445 - Fill and sounding pipes for fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fill and sounding pipes for fuel tanks. 182.445 Section... pipes for fuel tanks. (a) Fill pipes for fuel tanks must be not less than 40 millimeters (1.5 inches) nominal pipe size. (b) There must be a means of accurately determining the amount of fuel in each fuel...

  7. 33 CFR 183.514 - Fuel tanks: Labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) BOATING SAFETY BOATS AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT Fuel Systems Equipment Standards § 183.514 Fuel tanks... accelerations the statement, “Must be installed aft of the boat's half length.” (c) Each letter and each number... water, oil, salt spray, direct sunlight, heat, cold, and wear expected in normal operation of the boat...

  8. 14 CFR 23.973 - Fuel tank filler connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank filler connection. 23.973 Section 23.973 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 23...

  9. 14 CFR 26.33 - Holders of type certificates: Fuel tank flammability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Holders of type certificates: Fuel tank... Tank Flammability § 26.33 Holders of type certificates: Fuel tank flammability. (a) Applicability. This... part 25 of this chapter. (2) Exception. This paragraph (b) does not apply to— (i) Fuel tanks for which...

  10. 14 CFR 26.39 - Newly produced airplanes: Fuel tank flammability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Newly produced airplanes: Fuel tank... Tank Flammability § 26.39 Newly produced airplanes: Fuel tank flammability. (a) Applicability: This... Series 767 Series (b) Any fuel tank meeting all of the criteria stated in paragraphs (b)(1), (b)(2) and...

  11. Saturn V First Stage S-1C LOX Fuel Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    1960-01-01

    This photograph shows the Saturn V assembled LOX (Liquid Oxygen) and fuel tanks ready for transport from the Manufacturing Engineering Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The tanks were then shipped to the launch site at Kennedy Space Center for a flight. The towering 363-foot Saturn V was a multi-stage, multi-engine launch vehicle standing taller than the Statue of Liberty. Altogether, the Saturn V engines produced as much power as 85 Hoover Dams.

  12. Experimental study of an aircraft fuel tank inerting system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai Yan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a simulated aircraft fuel tank inerting system has been successfully established based on a model tank. Experiments were conducted to investigate the influences of different operating parameters on the inerting effectiveness of the system, including flow rate of the inert gas (nitrogen-enriched air, inert gas concentration, fuel load of the tank and different inerting approaches. The experimental results show that under the same operating conditions, the time span of a complete inerting process decreased as the flow rate of inert gas was increased; the time span using the inert gas with 5% oxygen concentration was much longer than that using pure nitrogen; when the fuel tank was inerted using the ullage washing approach, the time span increased as the fuel load was decreased; the ullage washing approach showed the best inerting performance when the time span of a complete inerting process was the evaluation criterion, but when the decrease of dissolved oxygen concentration in the fuel was also considered to characterize the inerting effectiveness, the approach of ullage washing and fuel scrubbing at the same time was the most effective.

  13. Fuel tank for liquefied natural gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLay, Thomas K. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A storage tank is provided for storing liquefied natural gas on, for example, a motor vehicle such as a bus or truck. The storage tank includes a metal liner vessel encapsulated by a resin-fiber composite layer. A foam insulating layer, including an outer protective layer of epoxy or of a truck liner material, covers the composite layer. A non-conducting protective coating may be painted on the vessel between the composite layer and the vessel so as to inhibit galvanic corrosion.

  14. 14 CFR 23.975 - Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 23.975 Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents. (a) Each fuel tank must be vented... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel tank vents and carburetor vapor vents...

  15. 40 CFR 1051.515 - How do I test my fuel tank for permeation emissions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I test my fuel tank for... Procedures § 1051.515 How do I test my fuel tank for permeation emissions? Measure permeation emissions by weighing a sealed fuel tank before and after a temperature-controlled soak. (a) Preconditioning fuel soak...

  16. 49 CFR Appendix D to Part 238 - Requirements for External Fuel Tanks on Tier I Locomotives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements for External Fuel Tanks on Tier I..., App. D Appendix D to Part 238—Requirements for External Fuel Tanks on Tier I Locomotives The... properties of the locomotive fuel tank to reduce the risk of fuel spillage to acceptable levels under...

  17. 49 CFR 173.172 - Aircraft hydraulic power unit fuel tank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Aircraft hydraulic power unit fuel tank. 173.172... Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.172 Aircraft hydraulic power unit fuel tank. Aircraft hydraulic power unit fuel tanks containing a mixture of anhydrous hydrazine and monomethyl hydrazine (M86 fuel) and designed...

  18. Inflight fuel tank temperature survey data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasion, A. J.

    1979-01-01

    Statistical summaries of the fuel and air temperature data for twelve different routes and for different aircraft models (B747, B707, DC-10 and DC-8), are given. The minimum fuel, total air and static air temperature expected for a 0.3% probability were summarized in table form. Minimum fuel temperature extremes agreed with calculated predictions and the minimum fuel temperature did not necessarily equal the minimum total air temperature even for extreme weather, long range flights.

  19. Fuel storage tanks at FAA facilities : Order 1050.15A : executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-04-30

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has over 4,000 fuel storage tanks (FST) in its inventory. Most of these FSTs are underground storage tanks (UST) that contain fuel for emergency backup generators providing secondary power to air navigational...

  20. Results of a diesel multiple unit fuel tank blunt impact test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-04

    The Federal Railroad Administrations Office of Research and Development is conducting research into passenger locomotive fuel tank crashworthiness. A series of impact tests is being conducted to measure fuel tank deformation under two types of dyn...

  1. 49 CFR 393.67 - Liquid fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... a front tire in a straight ahead position. In determining whether a fuel tank on a truck or truck... this section. The specified tests are a measure of performance only. Alternative procedures which assure that equipment meets the required performance standards may be used. . (1) Safety venting system...

  2. Inerting of a Vented Aircraft Fuel Tank Test Article with Nitrogen-Enriched Air

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Burns, Michael

    2001-01-01

    ...) required to inert a vented aircraft fuel tank. NEA, generated by a hollow fiber membrane gas separation system, was used to inert a laboratory fuel tank with a single vent on top designed to simulate a transport category airplane fuel tank...

  3. 14 CFR Special Federal Aviation... - Fuel Tank System Fault Tolerance Evaluation Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel Tank System Fault Tolerance Evaluation..., SFAR No. 88 Special Federal Aviation Regulation No. 88—Fuel Tank System Fault Tolerance Evaluation... certificates that may affect the airplane fuel tank system, for turbine-powered transport category airplanes...

  4. 40 CFR 1060.520 - How do I test fuel tanks for permeation emissions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I test fuel tanks for... STATIONARY EQUIPMENT Test Procedures § 1060.520 How do I test fuel tanks for permeation emissions? Measure permeation emissions by weighing a sealed fuel tank before and after a temperature-controlled soak. (a...

  5. 46 CFR 119.470 - Ventilation of spaces containing diesel fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation of spaces containing diesel fuel tanks. 119... fuel tanks. (a) Unless provided with ventilation that complies with § 119.465 of this part, a space containing a diesel fuel tank and no machinery must meet one of the following requirements: (1) A space of 14...

  6. 46 CFR 177.620 - Ventilation of machinery and fuel tank spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation of machinery and fuel tank spaces. 177.620... fuel tank spaces. In addition to the requirements of this subpart, ventilation systems for spaces containing machinery or fuel tanks must comply with the requirements of part 182 of this chapter. ...

  7. 46 CFR 169.631 - Separation of machinery and fuel tank spaces from accommodation spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Separation of machinery and fuel tank spaces from accommodation spaces. 169.631 Section 169.631 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED... machinery and fuel tank spaces from accommodation spaces. (a) Machinery and fuel tank spaces must be...

  8. 46 CFR 116.620 - Ventilation of machinery and fuel tank spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation of machinery and fuel tank spaces. 116.620... AND ARRANGEMENT Ventilation § 116.620 Ventilation of machinery and fuel tank spaces. In addition to the requirements of this subpart, ventilation systems for spaces containing machinery or fuel tanks...

  9. 46 CFR 182.470 - Ventilation of spaces containing diesel fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation of spaces containing diesel fuel tanks. 182... Ventilation of spaces containing diesel fuel tanks. (a) Unless provided with ventilation that complies with § 182.465, a space containing a diesel fuel tank and no machinery must meet the requirements of this...

  10. 33 CFR 183.580 - Static pressure test for fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... pressure test for fuel tanks. A fuel tank is tested by performing the following procedures in the following... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Static pressure test for fuel tanks. 183.580 Section 183.580 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND...

  11. 46 CFR 169.629 - Compartments containing gasoline machinery or fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compartments containing gasoline machinery or fuel tanks. 169.629 Section 169.629 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL... gasoline machinery or fuel tanks. Spaces containing gasoline machinery or fuel tanks must have natural...

  12. 46 CFR 119.445 - Fill and sounding pipes for fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fill and sounding pipes for fuel tanks. 119.445 Section... INSTALLATION Specific Machinery Requirements § 119.445 Fill and sounding pipes for fuel tanks. (a) Fill pipes for fuel tanks must be not less than 40 millimeters (1.5 inches) nominal pipe size. (b) There must be...

  13. 14 CFR 26.37 - Pending type certification projects: Fuel tank flammability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pending type certification projects: Fuel tank flammability. 26.37 Section 26.37 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... AIRPLANES Fuel Tank Flammability § 26.37 Pending type certification projects: Fuel tank flammability. (a...

  14. Numerical modeling of a cryogenic fluid within a fuel tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Donald S.

    1994-01-01

    The computational method developed to study the cryogenic fluid characteristics inside a fuel tank in a hypersonic aircraft is presented. The model simulates a rapid draining of the tank by modeling the ullage vapor and the cryogenic liquid with a moving interface. A mathematical transformation was developed and applied to the Navier-Stokes equations to account for the moving interface. The formulation of the numerical method is a transient hybrid explicit-implicit technique where the pressure term in the momentum equations is approximated to first order in time by combining the continuity equation with an ideal equation of state.

  15. Exposures to jet fuel and benzene during aircraft fuel tank repair in the U.S. Air Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton, G N; Smith, L B

    2000-06-01

    Jet fuel and benzene vapor exposures were measured during aircraft fuel tank entry and repair at twelve U.S. Air Force bases. Breathing zone samples were collected on the fuel workers who performed the repair. In addition, instantaneous samples were taken at various points during the procedures with SUMMA canisters and subsequent analysis by mass spectrometry. The highest eight-hour time-weighted average (TWA) fuel exposure found was 1304 mg/m3; the highest 15-minute short-term exposure was 10,295 mg/m3. The results indicate workers who repair fuel tanks containing explosion suppression foam have a significantly higher exposure to jet fuel as compared to workers who repair tanks without foam (p fuel, absorbed by the foam, to volatilize during the foam removal process. Fuel tanks that allow flow-through ventilation during repair resulted in lower exposures compared to those tanks that have only one access port and, as a result, cannot be ventilated efficiently. The instantaneous sampling results confirm that benzene exposures occur during fuel tank repair; levels up to 49.1 mg/m3 were found inside the tanks during the repairs. As with jet fuel, these elevated benzene concentrations were more likely to occur in foamed tanks. The high temperatures associated with fuel tank repair, along with the requirement to wear vapor-permeable cotton coveralls for fire reasons, could result in an increase in the benzene body burden of tank entrants.

  16. Failure Analysis of a Helicopter External Fuel-Tank Pylon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, John A.; Piascik, Robert S.; Lindenberg, Richard A.

    2002-01-01

    An eight-inch-long (0.2 m) crack was found in an external fuel-tank pylon of a U.S. Coast Guard HH-60 helicopter. The damaged pylon was removed from service and destructively examined at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) to determine the cause of the crack. Results of the analysis revealed that crack initiation occurred at corrosion pits in a fastener hole and crack propagation was a result of cyclic loading.

  17. 46 CFR 28.340 - Ventilation of enclosed engine and fuel tank spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation of enclosed engine and fuel tank spaces. 28... of enclosed engine and fuel tank spaces. (a) Applicability. Each vessel with a gasoline outboard engine or gasoline storage tank must comply with the requirements of this section. (b) Ventilation of...

  18. Geodesic Monitoring of Settling in Vertical Fuel Tanks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Enrique Acosta-González

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of the settling in a vertical tank used for fuel storage was studied. Monitoring was conducted using the geodesic model for the geometric leveling of high accuracy category II. The original project varied during construction by replacing deep foundations with a surface one applying compaction techniques to improve soil resistance. The deformation values obtained provided valuable information on the implementation of the proposed foundation alternative depending on time and loads. The maximum settling was reported to be 132,6 mm. The displacements in the control points located in the perimeter of the tank had a distinct nature with a maximum of 44,2 mm, which caused the foundation structure to crack.

  19. 46 CFR 58.50-15 - Alternate material for construction of independent fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Alternate material for construction of independent fuel...) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Independent Fuel Tanks § 58.50-15 Alternate material for construction of independent fuel tanks. (a) Materials other than those specifically...

  20. 33 CFR 183.516 - Cellular plastic used to encase fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cellular plastic used to encase....516 Cellular plastic used to encase fuel tanks. (a) Cellular plastic used to encase metallic fuel...-polyurethane cellular plastic used to encase metallic fuel tanks must have a compressive strength of at least...

  1. Investigation of charge dissipation in jet fuel in a dielectric fuel tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitanin, E. L.; Kravtsov, P. A.; Trofimov, V. A.; Kitanina, E. E.; Bondarenko, D. A.

    2017-09-01

    The electrostatic charge dissipation process in jet fuel in a polypropylene tank was investigated experimentally. Groundable metallic terminals were installed in the tank walls to accelerate the dissipation process. Several sensors and an electrometer with a current measuring range from 10-11 to 10-3 A were specifically designed to study the dissipation rates. It was demonstrated that thanks to the sensors and the electrometer one can obtain reliable measurements of the dissipation rate and look at how it is influenced by the number and locations of the terminals. Conductivity of jet fuel and effective conductivity of the tank walls were investigated in addition. The experimental data agree well with the numerical simulation results obtained using COMSOL software package.

  2. Device for sealing and shielding a nuclear fuel storage tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masaki, Gengo.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To provide a shield device for opening and closing a great opening in a relay-storage-tank within a hot cell for temporarily storing a nuclear fuel, in which the device is simplified in construction and which can perform the opening and closing operation in simple, positive and quick manner. Structure: A biological shield is positioned upwardly of an opening of a nuclear fuel storage tank to render an actuator inoperative. A sealing plate, which is pivotally supported by a plurality of support rod devices from the biological shield for parallel movement with respect to the biological shield, comes in contact with a resilient seal disposed along the entire peripheral edge of the opening to form an air-tight seal therebetween. In order to release the opening, the actuator is first actuated and the end of the sealing plate is horizontally pressed by a piston rod thereof. Then, the sealing plate is moved along the line depicted by the end of the support rod in the support rod devices and as a consequence, the plate is moved away from the resilient seal in the peripheral edge of the opening. When a driving device is actuated to travel the plate along the aforesaid line while maintaining the condition as described, the biological device moves along the guide. (Kamimura, M.)

  3. Hybrid Composites for LH2 Fuel Tank Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimsley, Brian W.; Cano, Roberto J.; Johnston, Norman J.; Loos, Alfred C.; McMahon, William M.

    2001-01-01

    The application of lightweight carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) as structure for cryogenic fuel tanks is critical to the success of the next generation of Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLV). The recent failure of the X-33 composite fuel tank occurred in part due to microcracking of the polymer matrix, which allowed cryogen to permeate through the inner skin to the honeycomb core. As part of an approach to solve these problems, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) are working to develop and investigate polymer films that will act as a barrier to the permeation of LH2 through the composite laminate. In this study two commercially available films and eleven novel LaRC films were tested in an existing cryogenics laboratory at MSFC to determine the permeance of argon at room temperature. Several of these films were introduced as a layer in the composite to form an interleaved, or hybrid, composite to determine the effects on permeability. In addition, the effects of the interleaved layer thickness, number, and location on the mechanical properties of the composite laminate were investigated. In this initial screening process, several of the films were found to exhibit lower permeability to argon than the composite panels tested.

  4. Failure analysis of edge discoloration of galvanized fuel tank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra Mathur

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A peculiar type of edge discoloration defect on the surface of some galvanized fuel tank was observed, causing significant appearance problems. In the present study, the surface defect was characterized by visual inspection, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopic analysis to understand the source and mechanism of the defect. In the visual inspection, these peculiar surface appearances were observed in fuel tank at three distinct locations. The SEM examination exhibited two distinct regions on the surface apart from the normal galvanized surface: (1 galvannealed, (2 mixture of galvanized and galvannealed texture. The energy dispersive spectroscopic analysis of galvannealed region indicated enrichment of Zn and Al whereas in the region of galvanized majorly Zn was observed. Surface texture of galvannealed region showed majorly zeta crystals along with skin pass marks; whereas no such zeta crystals were observed in case of galvanized regions. Based on the preliminary results, the following hypothesis was made: Coil processed during galvanizing to galvannealing transition. Thickness and width changed to wider and thicker section, which resulted into lower line speed. Due to the lower Al content, lower speed and thicker section combination resulted in formation of partial GA in the coil owing to the internal heat content of the coil. This paper presents the results of the investigation.

  5. The Finite Element Modelling and Dynamic Characteristics Analysis about One Kind of Armoured Vehicles’ Fuel Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Ge, Zhishang; Zhai, Weihao; Tan, Shiwang; Zhang, Feng

    2018-01-01

    The static and dynamic characteristics of fuel tank are studied for the armoured vehicle in this paper. The CATIA software is applied to build the CAD model of the armoured vehicles’ fuel tank, and the finite element model is established in ANSYS Workbench. The finite element method is carried out to analyze the static and dynamic mechanical properties of the fuel tank, and the first six orders of mode shapes and their frequencies are also computed and given in the paper, then the stress distribution diagram and the high stress areas are obtained. The results of the research provide some references to the fuel tanks’ design improvement, and give some guidance for the installation of the fuel tanks on armoured vehicles, and help to improve the properties and the service life of this kind of armoured vehicles’ fuel tanks.

  6. 14 CFR Appendix N to Part 25 - Fuel Tank Flammability Exposure and Reliability Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., Definitions). A non-flammable ullage is one where the fuel-air vapor is too lean or too rich to burn or is... Office for approval the fuel tank flammability analysis, including the airplane-specific parameters...

  7. Approximate Pressure Distribution in an Accelerating Launch-Vehicle Fuel Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    A detailed derivation of the equations governing the pressure in a generic liquid-fuel launch vehicle tank subjected to uniformly accelerated motion is presented. The equations obtained are then for the Space Shuttle Superlightweight Liquid-Oxygen Tank at approximately 70 seconds into flight. This generic derivation is applicable to any fuel tank in the form of a surface of revolution and should be useful in the design of future launch vehicles

  8. Fluid-structure interaction analysis of the drop impact test for helicopter fuel tank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xianfeng; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Yang, Jialing; Sun, Yuxin

    2016-01-01

    The crashworthiness of helicopter fuel tank is vital to the survivability of the passengers and structures. In order to understand and improve the crashworthiness of the soft fuel tank of helicopter during the crash, this paper investigated the dynamic behavior of the nylon woven fabric composite fuel tank striking on the ground. A fluid-structure interaction finite element model of the fuel tank based on the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian method was constructed to elucidate the dynamic failure behavior. The drop impact tests were conducted to validate the accuracy of the numerical simulation. Good agreement was achieved between the experimental and numerical results of the impact force with the ground. The influences of the impact velocity, the impact angle, the thickness of the fuel tank wall and the volume fraction of water on the dynamic responses of the dropped fuel tank were studied. The results indicated that the corner of the fuel tank is the most vulnerable location during the impact with ground.

  9. Corrosion of aluminum alloy 2024 by microorganisms isolated from aircraft fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Christopher J; Perry, Thomas D; Leard, Ryan; Bearce, Ktisten; Dante, James; Mitchell, Ralph

    2005-01-01

    Microorganisms frequently contaminate jet fuel and cause corrosion of fuel tank metals. In the past, jet fuel contaminants included a diverse group of bacteria and fungi. The most common contaminant was the fungus Hormoconis resinae. However, the jet fuel community has been altered by changes in the composition of the fuel and is now dominated by bacterial contaminants. The purpose of this research was to determine the composition of the microbial community found in fuel tanks containing jet propellant-8 (JP-8) and to determine the potential of this community to cause corrosion of aluminum alloy 2024 (AA2024). Isolates cultured from fuel tanks containing JP-8 were closely related to the genus Bacillus and the fungi Aureobasidium and Penicillium. Biocidal activity of the fuel system icing inhibitor diethylene glycol monomethyl ether is the most likely cause of the prevalence of endospore forming bacteria. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and metallographic analysis of AA2024 exposed to the fuel tank environment indicated that the isolates caused corrosion of AA2024. Despite the limited taxonomic diversity of microorganisms recovered from jet fuel, the community has the potential to corrode fuel tanks.

  10. Hydrogen storage enhanced in Li-doped carbon replica of zeolites: a possible route to achieve fuel cell demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel, Thomas; Bichara, Christophe; Gubbins, Keith E; Pellenq, Roland J-M

    2009-05-07

    We first report the atomistic grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations of the synthesis of two realistic ordered microporous carbon replica in two siliceous forms of faujasite zeolite (cubic Y-FAU and hexagonal EMT). Atomistic simulations of hydrogen adsorption isotherms in these two carbon structures and their Li-doped composites were carried out to determine their storage capacities at 77 and 298 K. We found that these new forms of carbon solids and their Li-doped versions show very attractive hydrogen storage capacities at 77 and 298 K, respectively. However, for a filling pressure of 300 bars and at room temperature, bare carbons do not show advantageous performances compared to a classical gas cylinder despite of their crystalline micropore network. In comparison, Li-doped nanostructures provide reversible gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen storage capacities twice larger (3.75 wt % and 33.7 kg/m(3)). The extreme lattice stiffness of their skeleton will prevent them from collapsing under large external applied pressure, an interesting skill compared to bundle of carbon nanotubes, and metal organic frameworks (MOFs). These new ordered composites are thus very promising materials for hydrogen storage issues by contrast with MOFs.

  11. A distributed fluid level sensor suitable for monitoring fuel load on board a moving fuel tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkwright, John W.; Parkinson, Luke A.; Papageorgiou, Anthony W.

    2018-02-01

    A temperature insensitive fiber Bragg grating sensing array has been developed for monitoring fluid levels in a moving tank. The sensors are formed from two optical fibers twisted together to form a double helix with pairs of fiber Bragg gratings located above one another at the points where the fibers are vertically disposed. The sensing mechanism is based on a downwards deflection of the section of the double helix containing the FBGs which causes the tension in the upper FBG to decrease and the tension in the lower FBG to increase with concomitant changes in Bragg wavelength in each FBG. Changes in ambient temperature cause a common mode increase in Bragg wavelength, thus monitoring the differential change in wavelength provides a temperature independent measure of the applied pressure. Ambient temperature can be monitored simultaneously by taking the average wavelength of the upper and lower FBGs. The sensors are able to detect variations in pressure with resolutions better than 1 mmH2O and when placed on the bottom of a tank can be used to monitor fluid level based on the recorded pressure. Using an array of these sensors located along the bottom of a moving tank it was possible to monitor the fluid level at multiple points and hence dynamically track the total fluid volume in the tank. The outer surface of the sensing array is formed from a thin continuous Teflon sleeve, making it suitable for monitoring the level of volatile fluids such as aviation fuel and gasoline.

  12. 14 CFR 26.35 - Changes to type certificates affecting fuel tank flammability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... assessment of the fuel tank system, as modified by their design change. The assessment must identify any... and applicants subject to paragraph (a)(1) or (a)(3)(iii) of this section, if the assessment required... tanks. (c) Impact Assessment. By the times specified in paragraphs (c)(1) and (c)(2) of this section...

  13. Criticality safety considerations for MSRE fuel drain tank uranium aggregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollenbach, D.F.; Hopper, C.M.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a preliminary criticality safety study of some potential effects of uranium reduction and aggregation in the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) fuel drain tanks (FDTs) during salt removal operations. Since the salt was transferred to the FDTs in 1969, radiological and chemical reactions have been converting the uranium and fluorine in the salt to UF 6 and free fluorine. Significant amounts of uranium (at least 3 kg) and fluorine have migrated out of the FDTs and into the off-gas system (OGS) and the auxiliary charcoal bed (ACB). The loss of uranium and fluorine from the salt changes the chemical properties of the salt sufficiently to possibly allow the reduction of the UF 4 in the salt to uranium metal as the salt is remelted prior to removal. It has been postulated that up to 9 kg of the maximum 19.4 kg of uranium in one FDT could be reduced to metal and concentrated. This study shows that criticality becomes a concern when more than 5 kg of uranium concentrates to over 8 wt% of the salt in a favorable geometry

  14. Potential for Fuel Tank Fire and Hydrodynamic Ram from Uncontained Aircraft Engine Debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This report addresses the potential consequences of the impact and penetration of fuel tanks by debris from uncontained engine failures on commercial jet aircraft. The report presents a brief review of accident data and of the pertinent technical lit...

  15. Calculation notes that support accident scenario and consequence of the in-tank fuel fire/deflageration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowe, R.D. Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this calculation note is to provide the basis for In-Tank Fuel fire/Deflageration consequence for the Tank Farm Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). Tank Fuel Fire/Deflageration scenario is developed and details and description of the analysis methods are provided

  16. Calculation notes that support accident scenario and consequence of the in-tank fuel fire/deflagration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowe, R.D.

    1996-09-27

    The purpose of this calculation note is to provide the basis for In-Tank Fuel Fire/Deflageration consequence for the Tank Farm Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). Tank Fuel Fire/Deflageration scenario is developed and details and description of the analysis methods are provided.

  17. Experimental Study of an On-board Fuel Tank Inerting System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fei; Lin, Guiping; Zeng, Yu; Pan, Rui; Sun, Haoyang

    2017-03-01

    A simulated aircraft fuel tank inerting system was established and experiments were conducted to investigate the performance of the system. The system uses hollow fiber membrane which is widely used in aircraft as the air separation device and a simplified 20% scale multi compartment fuel tank as the inerting object. Experiments were carried out to investigate the influences of different operating parameters on the inerting effectiveness of the system, including NEA (nitrogen-enriched air) flow rate, NEA oxygen concentration, NEA distribution, pressure of bleeding air and fuel load of the tank. Results showed that for the multi compartment fuel tank, concentrated flow washing inerting would cause great differences throughout the distribution of oxygen concentration in the fuel tank, and inerting dead zone would exist. The inerting effectiveness was greatly improved and the ullage oxygen concentration of the tank would reduce to 12% successfully when NEA entered three compartments evenly. The time span of a complete inerting process reduced obviously with increasing NEA flow rate and decreasing NEA concentration, but the trend became weaker gradually. However, the reduction of NEA concentration will decrease the utilization efficiency of the bleeding air. In addition, the time span can also be reduced by raising the pressure of bleeding air, which will improve the bleeding air utilization efficiency at the same time. The time span decreases linearly as the fuel load increases.

  18. Evaluating and Addressing Potential Hazards of Fuel Tanks Surviving Atmospheric Reentry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Robert L.; Johnson, Nicholas L.

    2011-01-01

    In order to ensure reentering spacecraft do not pose an undue risk to the Earth's population it is important to design satellites and rocket bodies with end of life considerations in mind. In addition to considering the possible consequences of deorbiting a vehicle, consideration must also be given to the possible risks associated with a vehicle failing to become operational or reach its intended orbit. Based on recovered space debris and numerous reentry survivability analyses, fuel tanks are of particular concern in both of these considerations. Most spacecraft utilize some type of fuel tank as part of their propulsion system. These fuel tanks are most often constructed using stainless steel or titanium and are filled with potentially hazardous substances such as hydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide. For a vehicle which has reached its scheduled end of mission the contents of the tanks are typically depleted. In this scenario the use of stainless steel and titanium results in the tanks posing a risk to people and property do to the high melting point and large heat of ablation of these materials leading to likely survival of the tank during reentry. If a large portion of the fuel is not depleted prior to reentry, there is the added risk of hazardous substance being released when the tank impact the ground. This paper presents a discussion of proactive methods which have been utilized by NASA satellite projects to address the risks associated with fuel tanks reentering the atmosphere. In particular it will address the design of a demiseable fuel tank as well as the evaluation of off the shelf designs which are selected to burst during reentry.

  19. Thermal-fluid analysis of the fill and drain operations of a cryrogenic fuel tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Craig A.; Hanna, Gregory J.; Gong, Leslie

    1993-01-01

    The Generic Research Cryogenic Tank was designed to establish techniques for testing and analyzing the behavior of reusable fuel tank structures subjected to cryogenic fuels and aerodynamic heating. The Generic Research Cryogenic Tank tests will consist of filling a pressure vessel to a prescribed fill level, waiting for steady-state conditions, then draining the liquid while heating the external surface to simulate the thermal environment associated with hypersonic flight. Initial tests of the Generic Research Cryogenic Tank will use liquid nitrogen with future tests requiring liquid hydrogen. Two-dimensional finite-difference thermal-fluid models were developed for analyzing the behavior of the Generic Research Cryogenic Tank during fill and drain operations. The development and results of the two-dimensional fill and drain models, using liquid nitrogen, are provided, along with results and discussion on extrapolating the model results to the operation of the full-size Generic Research Cryogenic Tank. These numerical models provided a means to predict the behavior of the Generic Research Cryogenic Tank during testing and to define the requirements for the Generic Research Cryogenic Tank support systems such as vent, drain, pressurization, and instrumentation systems. In addition, the fill model provided insight into the unexpected role of circumferential conduction in cooling the Generic Research Cryogenic Tank pressure vessel during fill operations.

  20. 46 CFR 182.440 - Independent fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... for “Manufacturer's Standard Gage” for sheet steel thickness. 2 Tanks over 1514 liters (400 gallons... meters (11.5 feet) in height attached to the tank may be filled with water to accomplish the 35 kPa (5....330. (d) Alternative procedures. A vessel of not more than 19.8 meters (65 feet) in length carrying...

  1. Study on Calculation of Liquid Level And Storage of Tanks for LNG-fueled Vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Wang, Guoqing; Liu, Chang

    2018-01-01

    As the ongoing development of the application of LNG as a clean energy in waterborne transport industry, the fleet scale of LNG-fueled vessels enlarged and the safety operation has attracted more attention in the industry. Especially the accurate detection of liquid level of LNG tanks is regarded as an important issue to ensure a safe and stable operation of LNG-fueled ships and a key parameter to keep the proper functioning of marine fuel storage system, supply system and safety control system. At present, detection of LNG tank liquid level mainly adopts differential pressure detection method. Liquid level condition could be found from the liquid level reference tables. However in practice, since LNG-fueled vessels are generally not in a stationary state, liquid state within the LNG tanks will constantly change, the detection of storage of tanks only by reference to the tables will cause deviation to some extent. By analyzing the temperature under different pressure, the effects of temperature change on density and volume integration calculation, a method of calculating the liquid level and storage of LNG tanks is put forward making the calculation of liquid level and actual storage of LNG tanks more accurately and providing a more reliable basis for the calculation of energy consumption level and operation economy for LNG-fueled vessels.

  2. 46 CFR 58.50-10 - Diesel fuel tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the steel or iron shall not be galvanized on the interior. 5 Anodic to most common metals. Avoid... provided. (9) Iron or steel tanks shall not be galvanized on the interior. Galvanizing paint or other...

  3. Storage tank materials for biodiesel blends; the analysis of fuel property changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Komariah Leily

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fuel stability is one of major problem in biodiesel application. Some of the physical properties of biodiesel are commonly changed during storage. The change in physico-chemical properties is strongly correlated to the stability of the fuel. This study is objected to observe the potential materials for biodiesel storage. The test was conducted in three kinds of tank materials, such as glass, HDPE, and stainless steel. The fuel properties are monitored in 12 weeks, while the sample was analyzed every week. Biodiesel used is palm oil based. The storage tanks were placed in a confined indoor space with range of temperature 27–34 °C. The relative humidity and sunshine duration on the location was also evaluated. The observed properties of the fuel blends were density, viscosity and water content. During 12 weeks of storage, the average density of B20 was changed very slightly in all tanks, while the viscosity was tend to increase sharply, especially in polimerics tank. Water content of B20 was increased by the increase of storage time especially in HDPE tank. In short period of storage, the biodiesel blends is found more stable in glass tank due to its versatility to prohibit oxidation, degradation, and its chemical resistance.

  4. Nonlinear Analysis of the Space Shuttle Superlightweight External Fuel Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Michael P.; Britt, Vicki O.; Collins, Timothy J.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Results of buckling and nonlinear analyses of the Space Shuttle external tank superlightweight liquid-oxygen (LO2) tank are presented. Modeling details and results are presented for two prelaunch loading conditions and for two full-scale structural tests that were conducted on the original external tank. The results illustrate three distinctly different types of nonlinear response for thin-walled shells subjected to combined mechanical and thermal loads. The nonlinear response phenomena consist of bifurcation-type buckling, short-wavelength nonlinear bending, and nonlinear collapse associated with a limit point. For each case, the results show that accurate predictions of non- linear behavior generally require a large-scale, high-fidelity finite-element model. Results are also presented that show that a fluid-filled launch-vehicle shell can be highly sensitive to initial geometric imperfections. In addition, results presented for two full-scale structural tests of the original standard-weight external tank suggest that the finite-element modeling approach used in the present study is sufficient for representing the nonlinear behavior of the superlightweight LO2 tank.

  5. A Continuous Liquid-Level Sensor for Fuel Tanks Based on Surface Plasmon Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio M. Pozo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A standard problem in large tanks at oil refineries and petrol stations is that water and fuel usually occupy the same tank. This is undesirable and causes problems such as corrosion in the tanks. Normally, the water level in tanks is unknown, with the problems that this entails. We propose herein a method based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR to detect in real time the interfaces in a tank which can simultaneously contain water, gasoline (or diesel and air. The plasmonic sensor is composed of a hemispherical glass prism, a magnesium fluoride layer, and a gold layer. We have optimized the structural parameters of the sensor from the theoretical modeling of the reflectance curve. The sensor detects water-fuel and fuel-air interfaces and measures the level of each liquid in real time. This sensor is recommended for inflammable liquids because inside the tank there are no electrical or electronic signals which could cause explosions. The sensor proposed has a sensitivity of between 1.2 and 3.5 RIU−1 and a resolution of between 5.7 × 10−4 and 16.5 × 10−4 RIU.

  6. Microbial penetration and utilization of organic aircraft fuel-tank coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crum, M G; Reynolds, R J; Hedrick, H G

    1967-11-01

    Microorganisms have been found as contaminants in various types of aircraft fuel tanks. Their presence introduces problems in the operation of the aircraft, including destruction of components such as the organic coatings used as protective linings in the fuel tanks. Microbial penetration and utilization of the currently used organic coatings, EC 776, DV 1180, PR 1560, and DeSoto 1080, were determined by changes in electrical resistances of the coatings; mycelial weight changes; growth counts of the bacteria; and manometric determinations on Pseudomonas aeruginosa (GD-FW B-25) and Cladosporium resinae (QMC-7998). The results indicate EC 776 and DV 1180 to be less resistant to microbial degradation than the other coatings. Organic coatings, serving as a source of nutrition, would be conducive to population buildups in aircraft fuel tanks.

  7. Method of storing the fuel storage pot in a fuel storage tank for away-from-reactor-storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiguro, Jun-ichi.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent the contact of sodium in the away-from-reactor-storage fuel storage tank with sodium in a fuel storage pool having radioactivity ana always retain clean state therein. Method: Sodium is filled in a container body of the away-from-reactor-storage fuel storage tank, and a conduit, a cycling pump, and cooling means are disposed to form a sodium coolant cycling loop. The fuel storage pool is so stored in the container body that the heat of the pool is projected from the liquid surface of the sodium in the container. Therefore, the sodium in the container is isolated from the sodium in the pool containing strong radioactivity to prevent contact of the former sodium from the latter sodium. (Sekiya, K.)

  8. 46 CFR 182.460 - Ventilation of spaces containing machinery powered by, or fuel tanks for, gasoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ventilation of spaces containing machinery powered by, or fuel tanks for, gasoline. 182.460 Section 182.460 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND..., gasoline. (a) A space containing machinery powered by, or fuel tanks for, gasoline must have a ventilation...

  9. FIELD-PRODUCED JP-8 STANDARD FOR CALIBRATION OF LOWER EXPLOSIVE LIMIT METERS USED BY JET FUEL TANK MAINTENANCE PERSONNEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thousands of military personnel and tens of thousands of civilian workers perform jet fuel tank entry procedures. Before entering the confined space of a jet fuel tank, OSHA regulations (29CFR1910.146) require the internal atmosphere be tested with a calibrated, direct-reading...

  10. Design, fabrication and operating experience of Monju ex-vessel fuel storage tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokota, Yoshio; Yamagishi, Yoshiaki; Kuroha, Mitsuo; Inoue, Tatsuya

    1995-01-01

    In FBRs there are two methods of storing and cooling the spent fuel - the in-vessel storage and the ex-vessel storage. Because of the sodium leaks through the tank at the beginning of pre-operation, the utilization of the ex-vessel fuel storage tank (EVST) of some FBR plant has been changed from the ex-vessel fuel storage to the interim fuel transfer tank. This led to reactor designers focusing on the material, structure and fabrication of the carbon steel sodium storage tanks worldwide. The Monju EVST was at the final stage of the design, when the leaks occurred. The lesson learned from that experience and the domestic fabrication technology are reflected to the design and fabrication of the Monju EVST. This paper describes the design, fabrication and R and D results for the tank, and operating experience in functional test. The items to be examined are as follows: (1) Overall structure of the tank and design philosophy on the function, (2) Structure of the cover shielding plug and its design philosophy, (3) Structures of the rotating rack and its bearings, and their design philosophy, (4) Cooling method and its design philosophy, (5) Structure and fabrication of the cooling coil support inside EVST with comparison of leaked case, (6) R and D effort for items above. The fabrication of the Monju EVST started in August 1986 and it was shipped to the site in March 1990. Installation was completed in November 1990, and sodium fill after pre-heating started in 1991. The operation has been continued since September 1992. In 1996 when the first spent fuel is stored, its total functions will be examined. (author)

  11. Impact of an exploding LPG rail tank car onto a CASTOR spent fuel cask

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Droste, B.; Probst, U.; Heller, W

    1999-07-01

    On 27 April 1999 a fire test was performed with a 45 m{sup 3} rail tank car partially filled with 10 m3 pressurised liquid propane. A CASTOR THTR/AVR spent fuel transport cask was positioned beside the propane tank as to suffer maximum damage from any explosion. About 17 min after fire ignition the propane tank ruptured. This resulted in a BLEVE with an expanding fireball, heat radiation, explosion overpressure, and tank fragments projected towards the cask. This imposed severe mechanical and thermal impacts directly onto the CASTOR cask, moving it 17 m from its original position. This involved rotation of the cask with the lid end travelling 10 m before it crashed into the ground. Post-test investigations of the CASTOR cask demonstrated that no loss of leaktightness or containment and shielding integrity occurred. (author)

  12. Data quality objective to support resolution of the organic fuel rich tank safety issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckley, L.L.

    1995-01-01

    During years of Hanford process history, large quantities of complexants used in waste management operations as well as an unknown quantity of degradation products of the solvents used in fuel reprocessing and metal recovery were added to man of the 149 single-shell tanks. These waste tanks also contain a presumed stoichiometric excess of sodium nitrate/nitrite oxidizers, sufficient to exothermically oxidize the organic compounds if suitably initiated. This DQO identifies the questions that must be answered to appropriately disposition organic watchlist tanks, identifies a strategy to deal with false positive or negative judgements associated with analytical uncertainty, and list the analytes of concern to support dealing with organic watchlist concerns. Uncertainties associated with both assay limitations and matrix effects complicate selection of analytes. This results in requiring at least two independent measures of potential fuel reactivity

  13. 18 CFR 1304.405 - Fuel storage tanks and handling facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... used to contain a regulated substance (such as a petroleum product) and has 10 percent or more of its... or remedy pollution or violations of law, including removal of the UST system, with costs charged to... flammable and combustible liquids storage tanks at marine service stations. (d) Fuel handling on private...

  14. MATERIALS SCIENCE: New Tigers in the Fuel Cell Tank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Service, R F

    2000-06-16

    After decades of incremental advances, a spurt of findings suggests that fuel cells that run on good old fossil fuels are almost ready for prime time. Although conventional ceramic cells, known as solid oxide fuel cells, require expensive heat-resistant materials, a new generation of SOFCs, including one featured on page 2031, converts hydrocarbons directly into electricity at lower temperatures. And a recent demonstration of a system of standard SOFCs large enough to light up more than 200 homes showed that it is the most efficient large-scale electrical generator ever designed.

  15. Flashback Flame Arrester Devices for Fuel Cargo Tank Vapor Vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-01

    821711ff’erent fuiel/air mixtures: t pr duca-e f-ames with speedis representative :’ th ’se Or cc fuels that c, aid be carried as bulk car , ab atar -i typical...F w Physical Chemistry , Vol. ,o8, pp. 7-101h, 1977. 1 9 . PAPA/Lewis Research Stafl’, Ba.; i(’ si de tr irot tos ’ ly,]rocarbon Fuels with Air, NACA

  16. CFD Fuel Slosh Modeling of Fluid-Structure Interaction in Spacecraft Propellant Tanks with Diaphragms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sances, Dillon J.; Gangadharan, Sathya N.; Sudermann, James E.; Marsell, Brandon

    2010-01-01

    Liquid sloshing within spacecraft propellant tanks causes rapid energy dissipation at resonant modes, which can result in attitude destabilization of the vehicle. Identifying resonant slosh modes currently requires experimental testing and mechanical pendulum analogs to characterize the slosh dynamics. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques have recently been validated as an effective tool for simulating fuel slosh within free-surface propellant tanks. Propellant tanks often incorporate an internal flexible diaphragm to separate ullage and propellant which increases modeling complexity. A coupled fluid-structure CFD model is required to capture the damping effects of a flexible diaphragm on the propellant. ANSYS multidisciplinary engineering software employs a coupled solver for analyzing two-way Fluid Structure Interaction (FSI) cases such as the diaphragm propellant tank system. Slosh models generated by ANSYS software are validated by experimental lateral slosh test results. Accurate data correlation would produce an innovative technique for modeling fuel slosh within diaphragm tanks and provide an accurate and efficient tool for identifying resonant modes and the slosh dynamic response.

  17. Design of a reconfigurable liquid hydrogen fuel tank for use in the Genii unmanned aerial vehicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, Patrick; Leachman, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Long endurance flight, on the order of days, is a leading flight performance characteristic for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). Liquid hydrogen (LH2) is well suited to providing multi-day flight times with a specific energy 2.8 times that of conventional kerosene based fuels. However, no such system of LH2 storage, delivery, and use is currently available for commercial UAVs. In this paper, we develop a light weight LH2 dewar for integration and testing in the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell powered, student designed and constructed, Genii UAV. The fuel tank design is general for scaling to suit various UAV platforms. A cylindrical vacuum-jacketed design with removable end caps was chosen to incorporate various fuel level gauging, pressurizing, and slosh mitigation systems. Heat and mechanical loadings were modeled to compare with experimental results. Mass performance of the fuel tank is characterized by the fraction of liquid hydrogen to full tank mass, and the insulation performance was characterized by effective thermal conductivity and boil-off rate

  18. Design of a reconfigurable liquid hydrogen fuel tank for use in the Genii unmanned aerial vehicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, Patrick; Leachman, Jacob [HYdrogen Properties for Energy Research (HYPER) Laboratory, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-2920 (United States)

    2014-01-29

    Long endurance flight, on the order of days, is a leading flight performance characteristic for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). Liquid hydrogen (LH2) is well suited to providing multi-day flight times with a specific energy 2.8 times that of conventional kerosene based fuels. However, no such system of LH2 storage, delivery, and use is currently available for commercial UAVs. In this paper, we develop a light weight LH2 dewar for integration and testing in the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell powered, student designed and constructed, Genii UAV. The fuel tank design is general for scaling to suit various UAV platforms. A cylindrical vacuum-jacketed design with removable end caps was chosen to incorporate various fuel level gauging, pressurizing, and slosh mitigation systems. Heat and mechanical loadings were modeled to compare with experimental results. Mass performance of the fuel tank is characterized by the fraction of liquid hydrogen to full tank mass, and the insulation performance was characterized by effective thermal conductivity and boil-off rate.

  19. Thermal coupling of a high temperature PEM fuel cell with a complex hydride tank

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfeifer, P.; Wall, C.; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    2009-01-01

    the possibilities of a thermal coupling of a high temperature PEM fuel cell operating at 160-200 degrees C. The starting temperatures and temperature hold-times before starting fuel cell operation, the heat transfer characteristics of the hydride storage tanks, system temperature, fuel cell electrical power......Sodium alanate doped with cerium catalyst has been proven to have fast kinetics for hydrogen ab- and de-sorption as well as a high gravimetric storage density around 5 wt%. The kinetics of hydrogen sorption can be improved by preparing the alanate as nanocrystalline material. However, the second...... decomposition step, i.e. the decomposition of the hexahydride to sodium hydride and aluminium which refers to 1.8 wt% hydrogen is supposed to happen above 110 degrees C. The discharge of the material is thus limited by the level of heat supplied to the hydride storage tank. Therefore, we evaluated...

  20. Computational fluid dynamics application: slosh analysis of a fuel tank model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iu, H.S.; Cleghorn, W.L.; Mills, J.K.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the analysis of fluid slosh behaviour inside a fuel tank model. The fuel tank model was a simplified version of a stock fuel tank that has a sloshing noise problem. A commercial CFD software, FLOW-3D, was used to simulate the slosh behaviour. Slosh experiments were performed to verify the computer simulation results. High speed video equipment enhanced with a data acquisition system was used to record the slosh experiments and to obtain the instantaneous sound level of each video frame. Five baffle configurations including the no baffle configuration were considered in the computer simulations and the experiments. The simulation results showed that the best baffle configuration can reduce the mean kinetic energy by 80% from the no baffle configuration in a certain slosh situation. The experimental results showed that 15dB(A) noise reduction can be achieved by the best baffle configuration. The correlation analysis between the mean kinetic energy and the noise level showed that high mean kinetic energy of the fluid does not always correspond to high sloshing noise. High correlation between them only occurs for the slosh situations where the fluid hits the top of the tank and creates noise. (author)

  1. Experimental and Numerical Analyses of the Sloshing in a Fuel Tank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Frosina

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The sloshing of fuel inside the tank is an important issue in aerospace and automotive applications. This phenomenon, in fact, can cause various issues related to vehicle stability and safety, to component fatigue, audible noise, vibrations and to the level measurement of the fuel itself. The sloshing phenomenon can be defined as a highly nonlinear oscillatory movement of the free-surface of liquid inside a container, such as a fuel tank, under the effect of continuous or instantaneous forces. This paper is the result of a research collaboration between the Industrial Engineering Department of the University of Naples “Federico II” and the R&D department of Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (F.C.A. The activity is focused on the study of the sloshing in the fuel tank of vehicles. The goal is the optimization of the tank geometry in order to allow, for example, the correct fuel suction under all driving conditions and to prevent undesired noise and vibrations. This paper shows results obtained on a reference tank filled by water tinted with a dark blue food colorant. The geometry has been tested on a test bench designed by Moog Inc. on specification from Fiat Chrysler Automobiles with harmonic excitation of a 2D tank slice along one degree of freedom. The test bench consists of a hexapod with six independent actuators connecting the base to the top platform, allowing all six Degrees of Freedom (DOFs. On the top platform there are other two additional actuators to extend pitch and roll envelope, thus the name of “8-DOF bench”. The designed tank has been studied with a three-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD modeling approach, too. By the end, the numerical and experimental data have been compared with a post-processing analysis by means of Matlab® software. For this reason, the images have been reduced in two dimensions. In particular, the percentage gaps of the free surfaces and the center of gravity have been compared each other

  2. RF Coupling into the Fuel Tank of a Large Transport Aircraft from Intentionally Transmitting Peds in the Passenger Cabin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Truong X.; Dudley, Kenneth L.; Scearce, Stephen A.; Ely, Jay J.; Richardson, Robert E.; Hatfield, Michael O.

    2000-01-01

    An investigation was performed to study the potential for radio frequency (RF) power radiated from Portable Electronic Devices (PEDs) to create an arcing/sparking event within the fuel tank of a large transport aircraft. This paper describes the experimental methods used for measuring RF coupling to the fuel tank and Fuel Quantity Indication System (FQIS) wiring from PED sources located in the passenger cabin. To allow comparison of voltage/current data obtained in a laboratory chamber FQIS installation to an actual aircraft FQIS installation, aircraft fuel tank RF reverberation characteristics were also measured. Results from the measurements, along with a survey of threats from typical intentional transmitting PEDs are presented. The resulting worst-case power coupled onto fuel tank FQIS wiring is derived. The same approach can be applied to measure RF coupling into various other aircraft systems.

  3. Space shuttle with common fuel tank for liquid rocket booster and main engines (supertanker space shuttle)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Douglas G.

    1991-01-01

    An operation and schedule enhancement is shown that replaces the four-body cluster (Space Shuttle Orbiter (SSO), external tank, and two solid rocket boosters) with a simpler two-body cluster (SSO and liquid rocket booster/external tank). At staging velocity, the booster unit (liquid-fueled booster engines and vehicle support structure) is jettisoned while the remaining SSO and supertank continues on to orbit. The simpler two-bodied cluster reduces the processing and stack time until SSO mate from 57 days (for the solid rocket booster) to 20 days (for the liquid rocket booster). The areas in which liquid booster systems are superior to solid rocket boosters are discussed. Alternative and future generation vehicles are reviewed to reveal greater performance and operations enhancements with more modifications to the current methods of propulsion design philosophy, e.g., combined cycle engines, and concentric propellant tanks.

  4. Activity release from damaged fuel during the Paks-2 cleaning tank incident in the spent fuel storage pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hozer, Zoltan; Szabo, Emese; Pinter, Tamas; Varju, Ilona Baracska; Bujtas, Tibor; Farkas, Gabor; Vajda, Nora

    2009-01-01

    During crud removal operations the integrity of 30 fuel assemblies was lost at high temperature at the unit No. 2 of the Paks NPP. Part of the fission products was released from the damaged fuel into the coolant of the spent fuel storage pool. The gaseous fission products escaped through the chimney from the reactor hall. The volatile and non-volatile materials remained mainly in the coolant and were collected on the filters of water purification system. The activity release from damaged fuel rods during the Paks-2 cleaning tank incident was estimated on the basis of coolant activity concentration measurements and chimney activity data. The typical release rate of noble gases, iodine and caesium was 1-3%. The release of non-volatile fission products and actinides was also detected.

  5. Activity release from damaged fuel during the Paks-2 cleaning tank incident in the spent fuel storage pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hozer, Zoltan, E-mail: hozer@aeki.kfki.h [Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, H-1525 Budapest 114, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary); Szabo, Emese [Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, H-1525 Budapest 114, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary); Pinter, Tamas; Varju, Ilona Baracska; Bujtas, Tibor; Farkas, Gabor [Nuclear Power Plant Paks, H-7031 Paks, P.O. Box 71 (Hungary); Vajda, Nora [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, H-1521 Budapest, Muegyetem rakpart 9 (Hungary)

    2009-07-01

    During crud removal operations the integrity of 30 fuel assemblies was lost at high temperature at the unit No. 2 of the Paks NPP. Part of the fission products was released from the damaged fuel into the coolant of the spent fuel storage pool. The gaseous fission products escaped through the chimney from the reactor hall. The volatile and non-volatile materials remained mainly in the coolant and were collected on the filters of water purification system. The activity release from damaged fuel rods during the Paks-2 cleaning tank incident was estimated on the basis of coolant activity concentration measurements and chimney activity data. The typical release rate of noble gases, iodine and caesium was 1-3%. The release of non-volatile fission products and actinides was also detected.

  6. Feasibility of Carbon Fiber/PEEK Composites for Cryogenic Fuel Tank Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, K.; Doyle, A.; O Bradaigh, C. M.; Jaredson, D.

    2012-07-01

    This paper investigates the feasibility of CF/PEEK composites for manufacture of cryogenic fuel tanks for Next Generation Space Launchers. The material considered is CF/PEEK tape from Suprem SA and the proposed manufacturing process for the fuel tank is Automated Tape Placement. Material characterization was carried out on test laminates manufactured in an autoclave and also by Automated Tape Placement with in-situ consolidation. The results of the two processes were compared to establish if there is any knock down in properties for the automated tape placement process. A permeability test rig was setup with a helium leak detector and the effect of thermal cycling on the permeability properties of CF/PEEK was measured. A 1/10th scale demonstrator was designed and manufactured consisting of a cylinder manufactured by automated tape placement and an upper dome manufactured by autoclave processing. The assembly was achieved by Amorphous Interlayer Bonding with PEI.

  7. Conservatism in effective dose calculations for accident events involving fuel reprocessing waste tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevelacqua, J J

    2011-07-01

    Conservatism in the calculation of the effective dose following an airborne release from an accident involving a fuel reprocessing waste tank is examined. Within the regulatory constraints at the Hanford Site, deterministic effective dose calculations are conservative by at least an order of magnitude. Deterministic calculations should be used with caution in reaching decisions associated with required safety systems and mitigation philosophy related to the accidental release of airborne radioactive material to the environment.

  8. Application of Digital Radiography to Weld Inspection for the Space Shuttle External Fuel Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ussery, Warren

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews NASA's use of digital radiography to inspect the welds of the external tanks used to hold the cryogenic fuels for the Space Shuttle Main Engines. NASA has had a goal of replacing a significant portion of film used to inspect the welds, with digital radiography. The presentation reviews the objectives for converting to a digital system from film, the characteristics of the digital system, the Probability of detection study, the qualification and implementation of the system.

  9. In Situ Multi-Species (O2, N2, Fuel, Other) Fiber Optic Sensor for Fuel Tank Ullage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet

    2007-01-01

    A rugged and compact fiber optic sensor system for in situ real-time measurement of nitrogen (N2), oxygen (O2), hydrocarbon (HC) fuel vapors, and other gases has been developed over the past several years at Glenn Research Center. The intrinsically-safe, solid-state fiber optic sensor system provides a 1% precision measurement (by volume) of multiple gases in a 5-sec time window. The sensor has no consumable parts to wear out and requires less than 25 W of electrical power to operate. The sensor head is rugged and compact and is ideal for use in harsh environments such as inside an aircraft fuel tank, or as a feedback sensor in the vent-box of an on-board inert gas generation system (OBIGGS). Multiple sensor heads can be monitored with a single optical detection unit for a cost-effective multi-point sensor system. The present sensor technology is unique in its ability to measure N2 concentration directly, and in its ability to differentiate different types of HC fuels. The present sensor system provides value-added aircraft safety information by simultaneously and directly measuring the nitrogen-oxygen-fuel triplet, which provides the following advantages: (1) information regarding the extent of inerting by N2, (2) information regarding the chemical equivalence ratio, (3) information regarding the composition of the aircraft fuel, and (4) by providing a self-consistent calibration by utilizing a singular sensor for all species. Using the extra information made available by this sensor permits the ignitability of a fuel-oxidizer mixture to be more accurately characterized, which may permit a reduction in the amount of inerting required on a real-time basis, and yet still maintain a fire-safe fuel tank. This translates to an increase in fuel tank fire-safety through a better understanding of the physics of fuel ignition, and at the same time, a reduction in compressed bleed air usage and concomitant aircraft operational costs over the long-run. The present fiber

  10. An Investigation of EME as a Potential Cause of Fuel Tank Ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, Jay J.; Nguyen, Truong X.; Dudley, Kenneth L.; Scearce, Stephen A.; Beck, Fred B.; Deshpande, Manohar D.; Cockrell, C. R.

    2000-01-01

    NASA researchers were tasked to study the potential for radio signals to excite an aircraft fuel quantity indication system (FQIS) enough to cause arcing, sparking or excessive heating within a fuel tank. Computational techniques were used to determine the threat from external high intensity radiated field (HIRF) transmitters nearby, like shipboard and airborne RADAR systems. Experimental methods were used to determine the threat from Portable Electronic Devices (PEDs) carried aboard by passengers. To support this work, unique electromagnetic coupling measurements were performed on a retired Boeing 747 aircraft, and new test and analysis methods were developed that may be applied to other FQIS designs as well as other aircraft electronic systems.

  11. Concept of safe tank-type water cooled and moderated reactor with HTGR microparticle fuel compacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gol'tsev, A.O.; Kukharkin, N.E.; Mosevitskij, I.S.; Ponomarev-Stepnoj, N.N.; Popov, S.V.; Udyanskij, Yu.N.; Tsibul'skij, V.F.

    1993-01-01

    Concept of safe tank-type water-cooled and moderated reactor on the basis of HTGR fuel microparticles which enable to avoid environment contamination with radioactive products under severe accidents, is proposed. Results of neutron-physical and thermal-physical studies of water cooled and moderated reactor with HTGR microparticle compacts are presented. Characteristics of two reactors with thermal power of 500 and 1500 MW are indicated within the concept frames. The reactor behaviour under severe accident connected with complete loss of water coolant is considered. It is shown that under such an accident the fission products release from fuel microparticles does not occur

  12. Simulative technology for auxiliary fuel tank separation in a wind tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Xin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a simulative experimental system in wind tunnel conditions for the separation of auxiliary fuel tanks from an aircraft. The experimental system consists of a simulative release mechanism, a scaled model and a pose measuring system. A new release mechanism was designed to ensure stability of the separation. Scaled models of the auxiliary fuel tank were designed and their moment of inertia was adjusted by installing counterweights inside the model. Pose parameters of the scaled model were measured and calculated by a binocular vision system. Additionally, in order to achieve high brightness and high signal-to-noise ratio of the images in the dark enclosed wind tunnel, a new high-speed image acquisition method based on miniature self-emitting units was presented. Accuracy of the pose measurement system and repeatability of the separation mechanism were verified in the laboratory. Results show that the position precision of the pose measurement system can reach 0.1 mm, the precision of the pitch and yaw angles is less than 0.1° and that of the roll angle can be up to 0.3°. Besides, repeatability errors of models’ velocity and angular velocity controlled by the release mechanism remain small, satisfying the measurement requirements. Finally, experiments for the separation of auxiliary fuel tanks were conducted in the laboratory.

  13. Investigation of thermoelastic stresses induced at high altitudes on aircraft external fuel tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousseau, Stephanie Lynn Steber

    As composite technology has grown over the past several decades, the use of composite materials in military applications has become more feasible and widely accepted. Although composite materials provide many benefits, including strength optimization and reduced weight, damage and repair of these materials creates an additional challenge, especially when operating in a marine environment, such as on a carrier deck. This is evident within the Navy, as excessive damage often leads to the scrapping of F/A-18 External Fuel Tanks. This damage comes in many forms, the most elusive of which is delamination. Often the delamination found on the tanks is beyond repairable limits and the cause unknown, making it difficult to predict and prevent. The purpose of this investigation was to study the structure of the Navy's 330 gallon External Fuel Tanks and investigate one potential cause of delamination, stresses induced at high altitudes by cold temperatures. A stress analysis was completed using finite element software, and validation of the model was accomplished through testing of a scale model specimen. Due to the difficulties in modeling and predicting delamination, such as unknown presence of voids and understanding failure criteria, delamination was not modeled in Abaqus, rather stresses were observed and characteristics were studied to understand the potential for delamination within the layup. In addition, studies were performed to understand the effect of material properties and layup sequence on the stress distribution within the tank. Alternative design solutions are presented which could reduce the radial stresses within the tank, and recommendations are made for further study to understand the trade-offs between stress, cost, and manufacturability.

  14. Hyper-V Replica essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Krstevski, Vangel

    2013-01-01

    a in various deployment scenarios.Hyper-V Replica Essentials is for Windows Server administrators who want to improve their system availability and speed up disaster recovery. You will need experience in Hyper-V deployment because Hyper-V Replica is built in the Hyper-V platform.

  15. Smoking in diabetic nephropathy: sparks in the fuel tank?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakkarwar, Vishal Arvind

    2012-12-15

    Diabetic nephropathy is associated with high morbidity and mortality and the prevalence of this disease is continuously increasing worldwide. Long-term diabetes increases the likelihood of developing secondary complications like nephropathy, the most common cause of end stage renal disease. Usually, other factors like hypertension, alcoholism and smoking also partly contribute to the progression of diabetic nephropathy. Among this, cigarette smoking in diabetes has been repeatedly confirmed as an independent risk factor for the onset and progression of diabetic nephropathy. Various studies suggest that smoking is a major fuel in the development of high oxidative stress and subsequently hyperlipidemia, accumulation of advanced glycation end products, activation of the renin angiotensin system and Rho-kinase, which are observed to play a pathogenic role in the progression of diabetic nephropathy. Furthermore, cigarette smoking in diabetic patients with vascular complications produces a variety of pathological changes in the kidney, such as thickening of the glomerular basement membrane and mesangial expansion with progression in glomerulosclerosis and interstitial fibrosis, which ultimately results in end stage renal failure. Strong associations are consistently found between chronic cigarette smoking and diabetic microvascular complications. A diverse group of studies unveil potential mechanisms that may explain the role of cigarette smoking in the progression of diabetic nephropathy. Tremendous efforts are being made to control smoking mediated progression of diabetic nephropathy, but no promising therapy is yet available. The present review critically discusses the possible detrimental role of chronic cigarette smoking in the progression of diabetic nephropathy and various possible pharmacological interventions to attenuate the exacerbation of diabetic nephropathy.

  16. ULC/ORD-C80.1 : the standard for aboveground non-metallic tanks for fuel oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolic, G. [Underwriters' Lab. of Canada, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2001-09-01

    As a rule, flammable and combustible liquids were stored in aboveground tanks made of steel. Non-metallic materials are now being used for a new generation of aboveground tanks. Corrosion is a problem faced by most tank owners in many parts of Canada. Saltwater mist, sand blasting and bacteria growth formed in the condensation water at the bottom of the tank in the Maritimes affects an aboveground tank installed outdoors and close to the seashore. European non-metallic aboveground tanks for fuel oil first arrived on the North American market, and are now followed by designs from Canada. Requirements for these tanks were developed and tested by the Underwriters' Laboratories of Canada (ULC). It is a not-for-profit, independent organization accredited by the Standards Council of Canada to perform safety, certification, testing, quality registration, and standards development. The minimum criteria for non-metallic aboveground tank construction are contained in the ULC/ORD-C80.1 document. They can be constructed of fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP), single or double wall, or they can be double wall tanks consisting of primary plastic tanks within metallic secondary containment. Other tanks are made of the blow molded high-density polyethylene. To simulate an in-house installation, fire tests were performed where a tank filled with fuel was exposed to pool fire for 30 minutes. A successful test meant the tank had not ruptured nor leaked during and after the test. Testers had to observe that any collapse occurred above the liquid level, and that violent explosion of any part of the tank or its content did not occur. The design requirements were evaluated by performing an analysis of the temperature chart: maximum vapour temperature inside the tank was 358 Celsius, while the liquid reached a maximum temperature of 91 Celsius and the outside temperature reached 600 Celsius. Primary tank pressure did not exceed 17 kilo Pascal. Building simulation of venting installation

  17. A fuselage/tank structure study for actively cooled hypersonic cruise vehicles, summary. [aircraft design of aircraft fuel systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirrello, C. J.; Baker, A. H.; Stone, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    A detailed analytical study was made to investigate the effects of fuselage cross section (circular and elliptical) and the structural arrangement (integral and nonintegral tanks) on aircraft performance. The vehicle was a 200 passenger, liquid hydrogen fueled Mach 6 transport designed to meet a range goal of 9.26 Mn (5000 NM). A variety of trade studies were conducted in the area of configuration arrangement, structural design, and active cooling design in order to maximize the performance of each of three point design aircraft: (1) circular wing-body with nonintegral tanks, (2) circular wing-body with integral tanks and (3) elliptical blended wing-body with integral tanks. Aircraft range and weight were used as the basis for comparison. The resulting design and performance characteristics show that the blended body integral tank aircraft weights the least and has the greatest range capability, however, producibility and maintainability factors favor nonintegral tank concepts.

  18. Fiber-Optic Determination of N2, O2, and Fuel Vapor in the Ullage of Liquid-Fuel Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet

    2008-01-01

    A fiber-optic sensor system has been developed that can remotely measure the concentration of molecular oxygen (O2), nitrogen (N2), hydrocarbon vapor, and other gases (CO2, CO, H2O, chlorofluorocarbons, etc.) in the ullage of a liquid-fuel tank. The system provides an accurate and quantitative identification of the above gases with an accuracy of better than 1 percent by volume (for O2 or N2) in real-time (5 seconds). In an effort to prevent aircraft fuel tank fires or explosions similar to the tragic TWA Flight 800 explosion in 1996, OBIGGS are currently being developed for large commercial aircraft to prevent dangerous conditions from forming inside fuel tanks by providing an inerting gas blanket that is low in oxygen, thus preventing the ignition of the fuel/air mixture in the ullage. OBIGGS have been used in military aircraft for many years and are now standard equipment on some newer large commercial aircraft (such as the Boeing 787). Currently, OBIGGS are being developed for retrofitting to existing commercial aircraft fleets in response to pending mandates from the FAA. Most OBIGGS use an air separation module (ASM) that separates O2 from N2 to make nitrogen-enriched air from compressed air flow diverted from the engine (bleed air). Current OBIGGS systems do not have a closed-loop feedback control, in part, due to the lack of suitable process sensors that can reliably measure N2 or O2 and at the same time, do not constitute an inherent source of ignition. Thus, current OBIGGS operate with a high factor-of-safety dictated by process protocol to ensure adequate fuel-tank inerting. This approach is inherently inefficient as it consumes more engine bleed air than is necessary compared to a closed-loop controlled approach. The reduction of bleed air usage is important as it reduces fuel consumption, which translates to both increased flight range and lower operational costs. Numerous approaches to developing OBIGGS feedback-control sensors have been under

  19. Performance of a solid oxide fuel cell CHP system coupled with a hot water storage tank for single household

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liso, Vincenzo; Zhao, Yingru; Yang, Wenyuan

    2014-01-01

    In this paper a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system for cogeneration of heat and power integrated with a stratified heat storage tank is studied. Thermal stratification in the tank increases the heat recovery performance as it allows existence of a temperature gradient with the benefit of deliver......In this paper a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system for cogeneration of heat and power integrated with a stratified heat storage tank is studied. Thermal stratification in the tank increases the heat recovery performance as it allows existence of a temperature gradient with the benefit...... of delivering hot water for the household and returning the coldest fluid back to SOFC heat recovery heat-exchanger. A model of the SOFC system is developed to determine the energy required to meet the hourly average electric load of the residence. The model evaluates the amount of heat generated and the amount...... of heat used for thermal loads of the residence. Two fuels are considered, namely syngas and natural gas. The tank model considers the temperature gradients over the tank height. The results of the numerical simulation is used to size the SOFC system and storage heat tank to provide energy for a small...

  20. Ways of formation(training of water-fuel mixes both accumulation settling-vat water and their property in fuel tanks aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М. Д. Туз

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Investigated are the conditions and mechanisms of accumulation of free water in aircraft torsion-box fuel systems. Determined is a quantitative balance between phases and conditions in the torsion-box fuel tanks at every stage of operation

  1. Aircraft Wing Fuel Tank Environmental Simulator Tests for Evaluation of Antimisting Fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-10-01

    C.*: % _ _ _.__ _ o During boost pump operation, strands of a gel-like, semi-transparent material were observed on the free surface of the fuel and...Boeing Materials Technology (BMT) laboratory to measure the water content of the fuel samples is described in appendix C. 2.5.3 Water Ingestion Results...Jet A pump at 8 gpm 32 .. . . ... . . . . . . . -%tr. go*7 .*.**.*.*..* -*.... * . . recuroed for each fueling increment. From these data a height

  2. Nuclear fuel technology - Tank calibration and volume determination for nuclear materials accountancy - Part 2: Data standardization for tank calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of the volume and height of liquid in a process accountancy tank are often made in order to estimate or verify the tank's calibration or volume measurement equation. The calibration equation relates the response of the tank's measurement system to some independent measure of tank volume. The ultimate purpose of the calibration exercise is to estimate the tank's volume measurement equation (the inverse of the calibration equation), which relates tank volume to measurement system response. In this part of ISO 18213, it is assumed that the primary measurement-system response variable is liquid height and that the primary measure of liquid content is volume. This part of ISO 18213 presents procedures for standardizing a set of calibration data to a fixed set of reference conditions so as to minimize the effect of variations in ambient conditions that occur during the measurement process. The procedures presented herein apply generally to measurements of liquid height and volume obtained for the purpose of calibrating a tank (i.e. calibrating a tank's measurement system). When used in connection with other parts of ISO 18213, these procedures apply specifically to tanks equipped with bubbler probe systems for measuring liquid content. The standardization algorithms presented herein can be profitably applied when only estimates of ambient conditions, such as temperature, are available. However, the most reliable results are obtained when relevant ambient conditions are measured for each measurement of volume and liquid height in a set of calibration data. Information is provided on scope, physical principles, data required, calibration data, dimensional changes in the tank, multiple calibration runs and results on standardized calibration data. Four annexes inform about density of water, buoyancy corrections for mass determination, determination of tank heel volume and statistical method for aligning data from several calibration runs. A bibliography is

  3. CORROSION RESISTANCE OF ORGANOMETALLIC COATING APLICATED IN FUEL TANKS USING ELECTROCHEMICAL IMPEDANCE SPECTROSCOPY IN BIOFUEL – PART I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milene Adriane Luciano

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the industry has opted for more sustainable production processes, and the planet has also opted for new energy sources. From this perspective, automotive tanks with organometallic coatings as well as a partial substitution of fossil fuels by biofuels have been developed. These organometallic coated tanks have a zinc layer, deposited by a galvanizing process, formed between the steel and the organometallic coating. This work aims to characterize the organometallic coating used in metal automotive tanks and evaluate their corrosion resistance in contact with hydrated ethyl alcohol fuel (AEHC. For this purpose, the resistance of all layers formed between Zinc and EEP steel and also the tin coated steel, which has been used for over thirty years, were evaluated. The technique chosen was the Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy. The results indicated an increase on the corrosion resistance when organometallic coatings are used in AEHC medium. In addition to that, these coatings allow an estimated 25% reduction in tanks production costs.

  4. The Liquid Sustainer Build-up Time Impact on the Emptying Spacecraft Fuel Tank in Free Orbiting Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. B. Sapozhnikov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Trouble-free operation of liquid rocket engines (LRE depends, among other factors, on the nonstop supply of liquid rocket fuel components in the fuel tank feed line with continuous flow.This condition becomes especially relevant for the aerial vehicles (AV in orbital (suborbital environment. With a little filled fuel tanks discontinuity of flow may occur because of pressurizing gas blow-by in the feed line as a result of the funnel generation (with or without vortex formation and so-called phenomenon of dynamic failure of the interface "liquid-gas”.The paper presents a mathematical model of the process of emptying tank initially a little filled and having a reduced level of the gravity acceleration. Using the developed mathematical model a parametric study has been conducted to find how stabilization rate of liquid flow effects on the volume of drained liquid. The computational experiment defines gas blow-by points in the feed line and propellant residuals, depending on the flow rate, physical properties of the fuel components, residual value of the acceleration, and diameter of the feed line.As a result, an effect is discovered that previously has been never mentioned in publications on research of the emptying processes of the aircraft fuel tanks, namely: with abrupt bootstrap of the flow rate a blow-by of gas occurs at the initial stage of emptying tank. In this case, to ensure LRE trouble-free operation there is a need in a special inner-tank device to prevent premature blow-by of pressurizing gas in the tank feed line.

  5. Application of CFRP with High Hydrogen Gas Barrier Characteristics to Fuel Tanks of Space Transportation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonemoto, Koichi; Yamamoto, Yuta; Okuyama, Keiichi; Ebina, Takeo

    In the future, carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRPs) with high hydrogen gas barrier performance will find wide applications in all industrial hydrogen tanks that aim at weight reduction; the use of such materials will be preferred to the use of conventional metallic materials such as stainless steel or aluminum. The hydrogen gas barrier performance of CFRP will become an important issue with the introduction of hydrogen-fuel aircraft. It will also play an important role in realizing fully reusable space transportation system that will have high specific tensile CFRP structures. Such materials are also required for the manufacture of high-pressure hydrogen gas vessels for use in the fuel cell systems of automobiles. This paper introduces a new composite concept that can be used to realize CFRPs with high hydrogen gas barrier performance for applications in the cryogenic tanks of fully reusable space transportation system by the incorporation of a nonmetallic crystal layer, which is actually a dense and highly oriented clay crystal laminate. The preliminary test results show that the hydrogen gas barrier characteristics of this material after cryogenic heat shocks and cyclic loads are still better than those of other polymer materials by approximately two orders of magnitude.

  6. Full tanks - empty plates. The price for agrian fuels. Hunger, expulsion, environmental destruction; Volle Tanks - leere Teller. Der Preis fuer Agrokraftstoffe. Hunger, Vertreibung, Umweltzerstoerung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hees, W.; Mueller, O.; Schueth, M. (eds.)

    2007-07-01

    With the cereals, which is needed in order to fill a 100-Liter-tank of a jeep, one person can be nourished one year. Whether it ethically is justified to convert food into fuel, is one of the questions, which is discussed in the book under consideration. The agro fuels forced by the European Community and the U.S.A. have given rise to a gold-digger spirit in the agrarian industry. This also is applied to the Third World, where presently plantations of gigantic extent develop. The consequences are disastrous: loss of biodiversity, heating up of the world climate and hunger.

  7. Free-Spinning-Tunnel Investigation of a 1/28-Scale Model of the North American FJ-4 Airplane with External Fuel Tanks, TED No. NACA AD 3112

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Frederick M.

    1958-01-01

    A supplementary investigation to determine the effect of external fuel tanks on the spin and recovery characteristics of a l/28-scale model of the North American FJ-4 airplane has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel. The model had been extensively tested previously (NACA Research Memorandum SL38A29) and therefore only brief tests were made to evaluate the effect of tank installation. Erect spin tests of the model indicate that flat-type spins-are more prevalent with 200-gallon external fuel tanks than with tanks not installed. The recovery technique determined for spins without tanks, rudder reversal to full against the spin accompanied by simultaneous movement of ailerons to full with the spin, is recommended for spins encountered with external tanks installed. If inverted spins are encountered with external tanks installed, the tanks should be jettisoned and recovery attempted by rudder reversal to full against the spin with ailerons maintained at neutral.

  8. Combined cooling and purification system for nuclear reactor spent fuel pit, refueling cavity, and refueling water storage tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corletti, Michael M.; Lau, Louis K.; Schulz, Terry L.

    1993-01-01

    The spent fuel pit of a pressured water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant has sufficient coolant capacity that a safety rated cooling system is not required. A non-safety rated combined cooling and purification system with redundant branches selectively provides simultaneously cooling and purification for the spent fuel pit, the refueling cavity, and the refueling water storage tank, and transfers coolant from the refueling water storage tank to the refueling cavity without it passing through the reactor core. Skimmers on the suction piping of the combined cooling and purification system eliminate the need for separate skimmer circuits with dedicated pumps.

  9. Harvesting and consumption of fuel and timber wood in rural area of district tank, pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badshah, L.; Hussain, F.; Burni, T.

    2014-01-01

    The study revealed that 90% of the rural people with different age group of District Tank, Pakistan depended upon firewood for catering. The total annual wood consumption for fueling by brick brewers, food sellers and domestic utilization was 18371 metric tons in this remote region. The saw machines also convert 13650 metric tons of timber wood yearly into logs and boards of various grades. The total wood consumption exceeds the quantity of wood harvested by tree fellers, farmers and wood sellers. Therefore the balance of over 13000 metric tons is sourced from neighboring forest of Tehsil Kulachi and Dera Ismail Khan. The quantity of wood removed and consumed for various purposes did not show a significant difference at (0.05) among the six locations. However student t-test showed significant difference existed in the mean annual removal and consumption of wood in the area. The study also enumerated Acacia nilotica, Tamarix aphylla, and Sueda fruticosa as the best and preferred fuel species. While Acacia nilotica, Prosopis farcta and Dalbergia sisso as the frequently used timber species in the region. The criterion of firewood and lumber consumption was very conventional like durability in blaze and opposed to termite. Consequently, it is recommended scientific vegetation conservation strategies meant at improved burning of fuel wood and maximized used of timber products as a complimentary efforts to enforced tree planting for conservation of plant resources. (author)

  10. Analysis of simulated hypervelocity impacts on a titanium fuel tank from the Salyut 7 space station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jantou, V.; McPhail, D. S.; Chater, R. J.; Kearsley, A.

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this project was to gain a better understanding of the microstructural effects of hypervelocity impacts (HVI) in titanium alloys. We investigated a titanium fuel tank recovered from the Russian Salyut 7 space station, which was launched on April 19, 1982 before being destroyed during an un-controlled re-entry in 1991, reportedly scattering debris over parts of South America. Several sections were cut out from the tank in order to undergo HVI simulations using a two-stage light gas gun. In addition, a Ti-6Al-4V alloy was studied for further comparison. The crater morphologies produced were successfully characterised using microscope-based white light interferometry (Zygo ® Corp, USA), while projectile remnants were identified via secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Microstructural alterations were investigated using focused ion beam (FIB) milling and depth profiling, as well as transmission electron microscopy (TEM). There was evidence of a very high density of dislocations in the vicinity of the crater. The extent of the deformation was localised in a region of about one to two radii of the impact craters. No notable differences were observed between the titanium alloys used during the hypervelocity impact tests.

  11. Tensile behavior of humid aged advanced composites for helicopter external fuel tank development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Condruz Mihaela

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Influence of humid aging on tensile properties of two polymeric composites was studied. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the suitability of the materials for a naval helicopter external fuel tank. Due to the application, the humid environment was kerosene and saline solution to evaluate the sea water effect on the composite tensile strength. The composite samples were immersed in kerosene for 168 hours, respective 1752 hours and in saline solution for 168 hours. Tensile tests were performed after the immersion. The composite sample tensile tests showed that kerosene and saline solution had no influence on the elastic modulus of the materials, but it was observed a slight improvement of the tensile strength of the two polymeric composites.

  12. Impact Response Study on Covering Cap of Aircraft Big-Size Integral Fuel Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fusheng; Jia, Senqing; Wang, Yi; Yue, Zhufeng

    2016-10-01

    In order to assess various design concepts and choose a kind of covering cap design scheme which can meet the requirements of airworthiness standard and ensure the safety of fuel tank. Using finite element software ANSYS/LS- DYNA, the impact process of covering cap of aircraft fuel tank by projectile were simulated, in which dynamical characteristics of simple single covering cap and gland double-layer covering cap impacted by titanium alloy projectile and rubber projectile were studied, as well as factor effects on simple single covering cap and gland double-layer covering cap under impact region, impact angle and impact energy were also studied. Though the comparison of critical damage velocity and element deleted number of the covering caps, it shows that the external covering cap has a good protection effect on internal covering cap. The regions close to boundary are vulnerable to appear impact damage with titanium alloy projectile while the regions close to center is vulnerable to occur damage with rubber projectile. Equivalent strain in covering cap is very little when impact angle is less than 15°. Element deleted number in covering cap reaches the maximum when impact angle is between 60°and 65°by titanium alloy projectile. While the bigger the impact angle and the more serious damage of the covering cap will be when rubber projectile impact composite covering cap. The energy needed for occurring damage on external covering cap and internal covering cap is less than and higher than that when single covering cap occur damage, respectively. The energy needed for complete breakdown of double-layer covering cap is much higher than that of single covering cap.

  13. CFD simulations on the dynamics of liquid sloshing and its control in a storage tank for spent fuel applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanapala, V.S.; Velusamy, K.; Patnaik, B.S.V.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Dynamics of sloshing in partially filled spent fuel storage tanks is numerically simulated. • Two type of baffle plates were examined towards the control of slosh suppression. • An optimum baffles configuration was obtained, after carrying out systematic investigations. • This vertical baffle design was effective, when tested for a seismic excitation (El centro). - Abstract: Spent nuclear liquid waste is often kept in partially filled storage tanks. When such storage tanks are subjected to wind and/or earthquake induced excitations, this could lead to detrimental conditions. Therefore, storage tank designers should ensure safe design margins and develop methodologies to overcome a wide range of possible scenarios. In the present study, systematic numerical simulations are carried out to investigate the sloshing dynamics of liquid in a storage tank, subjected to seismic excitation. As a precursor, the influence of resonant harmonic excitation on the free surface displacement, pressure distribution, slosh forces etc. is studied. To suppress the free surface fluctuations and the associated slosh force, two types of baffles viz., ring and vertical baffle are examined. Based on the response to an imposed harmonic excitation, the vertical baffle plate in the middle of the tank, was found to be effective and its dimensions are systematically optimized. This baffle geometry was tested for a well known seismic excitation (El Centro) and it was observed to effectively suppress free surface fluctuations and the slosh forces.

  14. In situ investigation of tubular microbial fuel cells deployed in an aeration tank at a municipal wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fei; Ge, Zheng; Grimaud, Julien; Hurst, Jim; He, Zhen

    2013-05-01

    To examine the feasibility of integrating microbial fuel cells (MFCs) into an activated sludge process, three MFCs with different ion exchange membranes and/or cathode catalysts were installed in an aeration tank to treat primary effluent. Both contaminant treatment and electricity generation were studied during the operation for more than 400 days. The effects of membrane/catalysts on MFC performance were not observed, likely due to the low removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) (tank, unless the key problems such as biofouling are solved. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Biodegradation of international jet A-1 aviation fuel by microorganisms isolated from aircraft tank and joint hydrant storage systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itah, A Y; Brooks, A A; Ogar, B O; Okure, A B

    2009-09-01

    Microorganisms contaminating international Jet A-1 aircraft fuel and fuel preserved in Joint Hydrant Storage Tank (JHST) were isolated, characterized and identified. The isolates were Bacillus subtillis, Bacillus megaterium, Flavobacterium oderatum, Sarcina flava, Micrococcus varians, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus cereus and Bacillus brevis. Others included Candida tropicalis, Candida albicans, Saccharomyces estuari, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus fumigatus, Cladosporium resinae, Penicillium citrinum and Penicillium frequentans. The viable plate count of microorganisms in the Aircraft Tank ranged from 1.3 (+/-0.01) x 104 cfu/mL to 2.2 (+/-1.6) x 104 cfu/mL for bacteria and 102 cfu/mL to 1.68 (+/-0.32) x 103 cfu/mL for fungi. Total bacterial counts of 1.79 (+/-0.2) x 104 cfu/mL to 2.58 (+/-0.04) x 104 cfu/mL and total fungal count of 2.1 (+/-0.1) x 103 cfu/mL to 2.28 (+/-0.5) x 103 cfu/mL were obtained for JHST. Selected isolates were re-inoculated into filter sterilized aircraft fuels and biodegradation studies carried out. After 14 days incubation, Cladosporium resinae exhibited the highest degradation rate with a percentage weight loss of 66 followed by Candida albicans (60.6) while Penicillium citrinum was the least degrader with a weight loss of 41.6%. The ability of the isolates to utilize the fuel as their sole source of carbon and energy was examined and found to vary in growth profile between the isolates. The results imply that aviation fuel could be biodegraded by hydrocarbonoclastic microorganisms. To avert a possible deterioration of fuel quality during storage, fuel pipe clogging and failure, engine component damage, wing tank corrosion and aircraft disaster, efficient routine monitoring of aircraft fuel systems is advocated.

  16. Seal Analysis for the Ares-I Upper Stage Fuel Tank Manhole Covers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Dawn R.; Wingate, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Naflex seals have long history of use in launch vehicle components, including Saturn stages and Space Shuttle External Tank. Ares-I Upper Stage tank pressures are higher than ET pressures, requiring performance verification of heritage seal design in new manhole cover configurations. Heritage external tank analyses are reviewed for potential application to Upper Stage.

  17. Insulation systems for liquid methane fuel tanks for supersonic cruise aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, H. F.; Delduca, D.

    1972-01-01

    Two insulation systems for tanks containing liquid methane in supersonic cruise-type aircraft were designed and tested after an extensive materials investigation. One system is an external insulation and the other is an internal wet-type insulation system. Tank volume was maximized by making the tank shape approach a rectangular parallelopiped. One tank was designed to use the external insulation and the other tank to use the internal insulation. Performance of the external insulation system was evaluated on a full-scale tank under the temperature environment of -320 F to 700 F and ambient pressures of ground-level atmospheric to 1 psia. Problems with installing the internal insulation on the test tank prevented full-scale evaluation of performance; however, small-scale testing verified thermal conductivity, temperature capability, and installed density.

  18. Directly applicable microbial fuel cells in aeration tank for wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Jaehwan; Choi, Soojung; Yu, Hana; Kim, Hyosoo; Kim, Changwon

    2010-04-01

    The application of microbial fuel cell (MFC) for wastewater treatment is a promising strategy for the simultaneous treatment of pollutants and generation of electricity. However, for practical application, there are several limitations to the MFC that involve biological and engineering aspects. In this study, a single-chambered MFC able to submerge into the aeration tank of the activated sludge process was developed to optimize the cell configuration and electrode materials. Among four MFCs with different electrode materials, the MFC with a graphite felt (GF) anode and a GF cathode showed the highest power density of 16.7 W m(-3) and the lowest internal resistance of 17 Omega. When the blower was stopped to evaluate the effect of mixing intensity, the concentration of dissolved oxygen nevertheless remained at 8 mg O2 L(-1), and the cell voltage of MFCs dropped rapidly and reached 30 mV. However, the cell voltage immediately returned to around 200 mV after the blowing of air. The MFCs with a GF cathode were sensitive to mixing intensity. At the very low concentration of 0.2 mg O2 L(-1), the cell voltage remained at a high level of 200 mV when the oxygen close to the cathode remained and mixing was sufficient. 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Tank design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earle, F.A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that aboveground tanks can be designed with innovative changes to complement the environment. Tanks can be constructed to eliminate the vapor and odor emanating from their contents. Aboveground tanks are sometimes considered eyesores, and in some areas the landscaping has to be improved before they are tolerated. A more universal concern, however, is the vapor or odor that emanates from the tanks as a result of the materials being sorted. The assertive posture some segments of the public now take may eventually force legislatures to classify certain vapors as hazardous pollutants or simply health risks. In any case, responsibility will be leveled at the corporation and subsequent remedy could increase cost beyond preventive measures. The new approach to design and construction of aboveground tanks will forestall any panic which might be induced or perceived by environmentalists. Recently, actions by local authorities and complaining residents were sufficient to cause a corporation to curtail odorous emissions through a change in tank design. The tank design change eliminated the odor from fuel oil vapor thus removing the threat to the environment that the residents perceived. The design includes reinforcement to the tank structure and the addition of an adsorption section. This section allows the tanks to function without any limitation and their contents do not foul the environment. The vapor and odor control was completed successfully on 6,000,000 gallon capacity tanks

  20. Numerical Modeling of the Effect of Thawing of Soil in the Area of Placing Tanks for Storage Fuel of Thermal Power Plants and Boiler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polovnikov V.Yu.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the numerical modeling of heat transfer in the area placing of the tank for storage fuel of thermal power plant and boiler with considering the influence of thawing of the soil. We have established that the thawing of the soil in the area of placing of the tank for storage fuel of thermal power plant and boiler have little effect on the change of heat loss.

  1. Thermal Mode of Tanks for Storage Fuel of Thermal Power Plants and Boiler with the Influence of Engineering Facilities in the Area of their Placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polovnikov, V. Yu.; Makhsutbek, F. T.; Ozhikenova, Zh. F.

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes the numerical modeling of heat transfer in the area placing of the tank for storage fuel of thermal power plant and boiler with the influence of engineering construction. We have established that the presence of engineering structures in the area of placing of the tank for storage fuel of thermal power plant and boiler have little effect on the change of heat loss.

  2. Nuclear fuel technology - Tank calibration and volume determination for nuclear materials accountancy - Part 1: Procedural overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Accurate determinations of volume are a fundamental component of any measurement-based system of control and accountability in a facility that processes or stores nuclear materials in liquid form. Volume determinations are typically made with the aid of a calibration or volume measurement equation that relates the response of the tank's measurement system to some independent measure of tank volume. The ultimate purpose of the calibration exercise is to estimate the tank's volume measurement equation (the inverse of the calibration equation), which relates tank volume to measurement system response. The steps carried out to acquire data for estimating the tank's calibration or volume measurement equation are collectively described as the process of tank calibration. This part of ISO 18213 describes procedures for tank calibration and volume determination for nuclear process tanks equipped with pressure-measurement systems for determining liquid content. Specifically, overall guidance is provided for planning a calibration exercise undertaken to obtain the data required for the measurement equation to estimate a tank's volume. The key steps in the procedure are also presented for subsequently using the estimated volume-measurement equation to determine tank liquid volumes. The procedures presented apply specifically to tanks equipped with bubbler probe systems for measuring liquid content. Moreover, these procedures produce reliable results only for clear (i.e. without suspended solids), homogeneous liquids that are at both thermal and static equilibrium. The paper elaborates on scope, physical principles involved, the calibration model, equipment required, a typical tank calibration procedure, calibration planning and pre-calibration activities, and volume determination. A bibliography is provided

  3. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of bayonet cooling thimble in fuel drain tank of ORNL 10 MW MSRE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Lu; Sun Licheng; Yan Changqi

    2012-01-01

    The residual heat removal system of molten salt reactor designed by ORNL, using molten salt as fuel and draining the fuel into fuel drain tank after shutdown of the reactor, removes the decay heat by the circulation of water through the bayonet cooling thimbles in the fuel drain tank. According to structural features of the bayonet cooling thimbles in ORNL 10 MW molten salt reactor experiment (MSRE), this paper presents the analytical results of the influence of the width of gas gap and the width of steam riser on the heat removal ability and the natural circulation of the cooling water, etc. The analysis results show that, when the width of gas gap range from 3.1 mm to 5.1 mm, the change of heat dissipation power and natural circulation flow rate are both less than 5%; when the width of steam riser changes from 3.6 mm to 5.1 mm, the flow mass of the natural circulation change from 1.9 kg/s to 4.79 kg/s, with a slightly effect on the heat transfer efficiency of the system. (authors)

  4. NaBH4 (sodium borohydride) hydrogen generator with a volume-exchange fuel tank for small unmanned aerial vehicles powered by a PEM (proton exchange membrane) fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Taegyu

    2014-01-01

    A proton exchange membrane fuel cell system integrated with a NaBH 4 (sodium borohydride) hydrogen generator was developed for small UAVs (unmanned aerial vehicles). The hydrogen generator was composed of a catalytic reactor, liquid pump and volume-exchange fuel tank, where the fuel and spent fuel exchange the volume within a single fuel tank. Co–B catalyst supported on a porous ceramic material was used to generate hydrogen from the NaBH 4 solution. Considering the power consumption according to the mission profile of a UAV, the power output of the fuel cell and auxiliary battery was distributed passively as an electrical load. A blended wing-body was selected considering the fuel efficiency and carrying capability of fuel cell components. First, the fuel cell stack and hydrogen generator were evaluated under the operating conditions, and integrated into the airframe. The ground test of the complete fuel cell UAV was performed under a range of load conditions. Finally, the fuel cell powered flight test was made for 1 h. The volume-exchange fuel tank minimized the fuel sloshing and the change in center of gravity due to fuel consumption during the flight, so that much stable operation of the fuel cell system was validated at different flight modes. - Highlights: • PEMFC system with a NaBH 4 hydrogen source was developed for small UAVs. • Volume-exchange fuel tank was used to reduce the size of the fuel cell system. • Passive power management was used for a stable power output during the flight. • BWB UAV was selected by taking the fuel cell integration into consideration. • Stable operation of the fuel cell system was verified from the flight test

  5. File-based replica management

    CERN Document Server

    Kunszt, Peter Z; Stockinger, Heinz; Stockinger, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    Data replication is one of the best known strategies to achieve high levels of availability and fault tolerance, as well as minimal access times for large, distributed user communities using a world-wide Data Grid. In certain scientific application domains, the data volume can reach the order of several petabytes; in these domains, data replication and access optimization play an important role in the manageability and usability of the Grid. In this paper, we present the design and implementation of a replica management Grid middleware that was developed within the EDG project left bracket European Data Grid Project (EDG), http://www.eu-egee.org right bracket and is designed to be extensible so that user communities can adjust its detailed behavior according to their QoS requirements.

  6. Life-cycle analysis of energy and greenhouse gas emissions of automotive fuels in India: Part 1 – Tank-to-Wheel analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, S.; Patil, V.; Himabindu, M.; Ravikrishna, R.V.

    2016-01-01

    As part of a two-part life cycle efficiency and greenhouse gas emission analysis for various automotive fuels in the Indian context, this paper presents the first part, i.e., Tank-to-Wheel analysis of various fuel/powertrain configurations for a subcompact passenger car. The Tank-to-Wheel analysis was applied to 28 fuel/powertrain configurations using fuels such as gasoline, diesel, compressed natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas and hydrogen with various conventional and hybrid electric powertrains. The gasoline-equivalent fuel economy and carbon dioxide emission results for individual fuel/powertrain configuration are evaluated and compared. It is found that the split hybrid configuration is best among hybrids as it leads to fuel economy improvement and carbon dioxide emissions reduction by 20–40% over the Indian drive cycle. Further, the engine efficiency, engine on-off time and regenerative braking energy assessment is done to evaluate the causes for higher energy efficiency of hybrid electric vehicles. The hybridization increases average engine efficiency by 10–60% which includes 19–23% of energy recovered at wheel through regenerative braking over the drive cycle. Overall, the Tank-to-Wheel energy use and efficiency results are evaluated for all fuel/powertrain configurations which show Battery Electric Vehicle, fuel cell vehicles and diesel hybrids are near and long term energy efficient vehicle configurations. - Highlights: • Tank-to-Wheel energy use & CO_2 emissions for subcompact car on Indian driving cycle. • Gasoline, diesel, CNG, LPG, hydrogen and electric vehicles are evaluated in this study. • First comprehensive Tank-to-Wheel analysis for India on small passenger car platform. • Parallel, series and split hybrid electric vehicles with various fuels are analysed.

  7. Validation of the replica trick for simple models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinzato, Takashi

    2018-04-01

    We discuss the replica analytic continuation using several simple models in order to prove mathematically the validity of the replica analysis, which is used in a wide range of fields related to large-scale complex systems. While replica analysis consists of two analytical techniques—the replica trick (or replica analytic continuation) and the thermodynamical limit (and/or order parameter expansion)—we focus our study on replica analytic continuation, which is the mathematical basis of the replica trick. We apply replica analysis to solve a variety of analytical models, and examine the properties of replica analytic continuation. Based on the positive results for these models we propose that replica analytic continuation is a robust procedure in replica analysis.

  8. Nonlinear Analysis of the Space Shuttle Super-Lightweight External Fuel Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Michael P.; Britt, Vicki O.; Collins, Timothy J.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The results of buckling and nonlinear analyses of the Space Shuttle External Tank super-lightweight liquid oxygen (LOX) tank are presented. Modeling details and results are presented for two prelaunch loading conditions and for two full-scale structural tests conducted on the original external tank. These results illustrate three distinctly different types of nonlinear responses for thin-walled shells subjected to combined mechanical and thermal loads. These nonlinear response phenomena consist of bifurcation-type buckling, short-wavelength nonlinear bending, and nonlinear collapse associated with a limit point. For each case, the results show that accurate predictions of nonlinear behavior generally require a large scale high-fidelity finite element model. Results are also presented that show that a fluid filled launch vehicle shell can be highly sensitive to initial geometric imperfections. In addition, results presented for two full scale structural tests of the original standard weight external tank suggest that the finite element modeling approach used in the present study is sufficient for representing the nonlinear behavior of the super lightweight LOX tank.

  9. Seal Analysis for the Ares-I Upper Stage Fuel Tank Manhole Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Dawn R.; Wingate, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Techniques for studying the performance of Naflex pressure-assisted seals in the Ares-I Upper Stage liquid hydrogen tank manhole cover seal joint are explored. To assess the feasibility of using the identical seal design for the Upper Stage as was used for the Space Shuttle External Tank manhole covers, a preliminary seal deflection analysis using the ABAQUS commercial finite element software is employed. The ABAQUS analyses are performed using three-dimensional symmetric wedge finite element models. This analysis technique is validated by first modeling a heritage External Tank liquid hydrogen tank manhole cover joint and correlating the results to heritage test data. Once the technique is validated, the Upper Stage configuration is modeled. The Upper Stage analyses are performed at 1.4 times the expected pressure to comply with the Constellation Program factor of safety requirement on joint separation. Results from the analyses performed with the External Tank and Upper Stage models demonstrate the effects of several modeling assumptions on the seal deflection. The analyses for Upper Stage show that the integrity of the seal is successfully maintained.

  10. Replica Fourier Transform: Properties and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crisanti, A.; De Dominicis, C.

    2015-01-01

    The Replica Fourier Transform is the generalization of the discrete Fourier Transform to quantities defined on an ultrametric tree. It finds use in conjunction of the replica method used to study thermodynamics properties of disordered systems such as spin glasses. Its definition is presented in a systematic and simple form and its use illustrated with some representative examples. In particular we give a detailed discussion of the diagonalization in the Replica Fourier Space of the Hessian matrix of the Gaussian fluctuations about the mean field saddle point of spin glass theory. The general results are finally discussed for a generic spherical spin glass model, where the Hessian can be computed analytically

  11. Replica scale modelling of long rod tank penetrators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diederen, A.M.; Hoeneveld, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    Experiments and simulations have been conducted using scale size tungsten alloy penetrators at ordnance velocity against an oblique plate array consisting of an inert sandwich and a base armour. The penetrators are made from 2 types of tungsten alloy with different tensile strength. Two scale sizes

  12. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-D-9 Boiler Fuel Oil Tank Site. Attachment to Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-030

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dittmer, L.M.

    2006-01-01

    The 100-D-9 site is the former location of an underground storage tank used for holding fuel for the 184-DA Boiler House. Results of soil-gas samples taken from six soil-gas probes in a rectangle around the site the tank had been removed from concluded that there were no volatile organic compounds at detectable levels in the area. The 100-D-9 Boiler Fuel Oil Tank Site meets the remedial action objectives specified in the Remaining Sites ROD. The results demonstrated that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River

  13. Performance of electric forklift with low-temperature polymer exchange membrane fuel cell power module and metal hydride hydrogen storage extension tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lototskyy, Mykhaylo V.; Tolj, Ivan; Parsons, Adrian; Smith, Fahmida; Sita, Cordellia; Linkov, Vladimir

    2016-06-01

    We present test results of a commercial 3-tonne electric forklift (STILL) equipped with a commercial fuel cell power module (Plug Power) and a MH hydrogen storage tank (HySA Systems and TF Design). The tests included: (i) performance evaluation of "hybrid" hydrogen storage system during refuelling at low (fuel cell power module (alone) - power module with integrated MH tank; and (iii) performance tests of the forklift during its operation under working conditions. It was found that (a) the forklift with power module and MH tank can achieve 83% of maximum hydrogen storage capacity during 6 min refuelling (for full capacity 12-15 min); (b) heavy-duty operation of the forklift is characterised by 25% increase in energy consumption, and during system operation more uniform power distribution occurs when operating in the fuel cell powering mode with MH, in comparison to the battery powering mode; (c) use of the fully refuelled fuel cell power module with the MH extension tank allows for uninterrupted operation for 3 h 6 min and 7 h 15 min, for heavy- and light-duty operation, respectively.

  14. Replica consistency in a Data Grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domenici, Andrea; Donno, Flavia; Pucciani, Gianni; Stockinger, Heinz; Stockinger, Kurt

    2004-01-01

    A Data Grid is a wide area computing infrastructure that employs Grid technologies to provide storage capacity and processing power to applications that handle very large quantities of data. Data Grids rely on data replication to achieve better performance and reliability by storing copies of data sets on different Grid nodes. When a data set can be modified by applications, the problem of maintaining consistency among existing copies arises. The consistency problem also concerns metadata, i.e., additional information about application data sets such as indices, directories, or catalogues. This kind of metadata is used both by the applications and by the Grid middleware to manage the data. For instance, the Replica Management Service (the Grid middleware component that controls data replication) uses catalogues to find the replicas of each data set. Such catalogues can also be replicated and their consistency is crucial to the correct operation of the Grid. Therefore, metadata consistency generally poses stricter requirements than data consistency. In this paper we report on the development of a Replica Consistency Service based on the middleware mainly developed by the European Data Grid Project. The paper summarises the main issues in the replica consistency problem, and lays out a high-level architectural design for a Replica Consistency Service. Finally, results from simulations of different consistency models are presented

  15. Synthetic nanocomposite MgH2/5 wt. % TiMn2 powders for solid-hydrogen storage tank integrated with PEM fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Eskandarany, M Sherif; Shaban, Ehab; Aldakheel, Fahad; Alkandary, Abdullah; Behbehani, Montaha; Al-Saidi, M

    2017-10-16

    Storing hydrogen gas into cylinders under high pressure of 350 bar is not safe and still needs many intensive studies dedic ated for tank's manufacturing. Liquid hydrogen faces also severe practical difficulties due to its very low density, leading to larger fuel tanks three times larger than traditional gasoline tank. Moreover, converting hydrogen gas into liquid phase is not an economic process since it consumes high energy needed to cool down the gas temperature to -252.8 °C. One practical solution is storing hydrogen gas in metal lattice such as Mg powder and its nanocomposites in the form of MgH 2 . There are two major issues should be solved first. One related to MgH 2 in which its inherent poor hydrogenation/dehydrogenation kinetics and high thermal stability must be improved. Secondly, related to providing a safe tank. Here we have succeeded to prepare a new binary system of MgH 2 /5 wt. % TiMn 2 nanocomposite powder that show excellent hydrogenation/dehydrogenation behavior at relatively low temperature (250 °C) with long cycle-life-time (1400 h). Moreover, a simple hydrogen storage tank filled with our synthetic nanocomposite powders was designed and tested in electrical charging a battery of a cell phone device at 180 °C through a commercial fuel cell.

  16. Large Scale Shearography Inspection of the Space Shuttle External Fuel Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ussery, Warren; Scheurer, Phillip; Rivers, Joanna; Walker, James; Lovell, Donald

    2010-01-01

    Shearography was successfully used to inspect the damaged region of ET122 for nonvisible damage. The shearography inspection was extensive covering over 3100 square feet of foam and lasting 9 months. Most foam damage was visible and shearography results confirmed that foam damage in visibly impacted regions did not extend outside the area with visible damage. Of the 21 nonvisible defect indications detected with shearography, none were determined to be actual foam damage. Inspections were intentionally conservative since no experience base was available for debris damaged foam. Shearography results were used in conjunction with tactile and visual inspection to support the acceptance of the foam application allowing the tank to move forward for refurbishment.

  17. Tank Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    For NASA's Apollo program, McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company, Huntington Beach, California, developed and built the S-IVB, uppermost stage of the three-stage Saturn V moonbooster. An important part of the development task was fabrication of a tank to contain liquid hydrogen fuel for the stage's rocket engine. The liquid hydrogen had to be contained at the supercold temperature of 423 degrees below zero Fahrenheit. The tank had to be perfectly insulated to keep engine or solar heat from reaching the fuel; if the hydrogen were permitted to warm up, it would have boiled off, or converted to gaseous form, reducing the amount of fuel available to the engine. McDonnell Douglas' answer was a supereffective insulation called 3D, which consisted of a one-inch thickness of polyurethane foam reinforced in three dimensions with fiberglass threads. Over a 13-year development and construction period, the company built 30 tanks and never experienced a failure. Now, after years of additional development, an advanced version of 3D is finding application as part of a containment system for transporting Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) by ship.

  18. Corrosion of aluminum, uranium and plutonium in the presence of water in spent fuel storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grzetic, I.

    1997-01-01

    General problem associated with research reactor exploitation is safe storage of spent nuclear fuel. One of the possible solutions is its storage in aluminum containers filled and cooled with water. With time aluminum starts to corrode. The chemical corrosion of aluminum, as a heterogenous process, could be investigated in two ways. First, is direct investigation of Al corrosion per se, following hydrogen generation during the corrosion of Al in the presence of water. Both ways are based on available physico-chemical and thermodynamical data. Recent measurements of water quality in the Vinca Institute spent fuel pool clearly indicates that the particular case, corrosion is likely to be present. For the particular case, corrosion process could considered in two directions. The first one discusses the corrosion process of reactor fuel aluminum cladding in general. The second consideration is related with theoretically and empirically based calculations of hydrogen pressure in the closed aluminum containers in order to predict their resistance to the increased pressure. Finally, the corrosion of U, Pu and Cd is discussed with respect to solubility and influence of hydrogen on U and UO 2 under wet conditions. (author)

  19. 14 CFR 25.957 - Flow between interconnected tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant Fuel System § 25.957 Flow between interconnected tanks. If fuel can be pumped from one tank to another in flight, the fuel tank vents and the fuel transfer system must be designed so that no structural damage to the tanks can occur because of overfilling. ...

  20. Development of A 5,000 BBL, Rubberized Fabric Fuel Storage Tank, Collapsible,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-01

    Note l/ after soil burial. 6/ Reference fuel D is ASTM D-471, 60% iso-octane and 40% toluene. 7/ Retained after 56 days -25- i IGOODYEAR AEROSPACE 0 0...331.7) Pure. 9.I - 9.6 920 0() 09/O 0A) 2.7 ". paum Mese IEststa"t r.e ASIN 11-70 W1 I (ma) 7.3A -n-i I GAC 19-1337 Rev 2 USLE is (continmed) () The...the greater requirement. 5/ Method 5762 except that the specimens were prepared by Note 1/ after soil burial and the number of specimens was reduced

  1. Effects of temperature and wave conditions on chemical dispersion efficacy of heavy fuel oil in an experimental flow-through wave tank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhengkai; Lee, Kenneth; King, Thomas; Boufadel, Michel C; Venosa, Albert D

    2010-09-01

    The effectiveness of chemical dispersants (Corexit 9500 and SPC 1000) on heavy fuel oil (IFO180 as test oil) has been evaluated under different wave conditions in a flow-through wave tank. The dispersant effectiveness was determined by measuring oil concentrations and droplet size distributions. An analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) model indicated that wave type and temperature significantly (p or = 400 microm). Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Control of the integrity of the fuel elements and the 30 years old reactor tank at the Dalat nuclear research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hien, P.D.; Binh, N.T.; Ngo, N.T.; Nang, N.T.; Phuong, T.T.; Khang, N.P.; Bac, V.T.

    1992-01-01

    The aluminum tank of the Dalat nuclear research reactor is three decades old. Recent underwater optical inspection has revealed a number of corrosion spots, causing a certain concern about its longevity. Concerning the fuel assemblies of the Russian type VVR-M2 a regular radioactivity monitoring of air and reactor coolant water has not observed so far any anomaly related to the leakage of fission products. However, with more than 11,000 operating hours at nominal power since 1984 some fuel assemblies are now approaching the last stage of their lifetime and early detection of fuel failure must be paid due attention. Appropriate measures have been taken to maintain as good as possible the parameters of the primary coolant water during reactor shut-down periods, especially in the stagnant zones of the pool. Routine low-level measurements of fission products allow the early detection of anomaly leakage of the whole core as minor as 0.03 mCi/h of Xe-135 released into the pool water. Accurate account of the pool water loss and replenishment ensures the detection of invisible water leakage through the aluminum tank as low as 10 liters/week. Results of corrosion products monitoring show a slight increasing trend of corrosion rate of the whole primary coolant system. However from these data it is hard to conclude about the development status of the corrosion observed optically in the reactor tank.(Authors)(4 Fig. 4 Tables)

  3. Control of the integrity of the fuel elements and the 30-years old reactor tank at the Dalat nuclear research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham Zuy Hien; Nguyen Thanh Binh; Nguyen Trong Ngo; Nguyen Thi Nang; Tran Thu Phuong; Ngo Phu Khang; Vuong Thu Bac.

    1992-01-01

    The aluminum tank of the Dalat nuclear research reactor is three decades old. Recent underwater optical inspection has revealed a number of corrosion spots, causing a certain concern about its longevity. Concerning the fuel assemblies of the Russian type VVR-M2 a regular radioactivity monitoring of air and reactor coolant water has not observed so far any anomaly related to the leakage of fissio products. However, with more than 11,000 operating hours at nominal power since 1984 some fuel assemblies are now approaching the last stage of their lifetime and early detection of fuel failure must be paid due attention. Appropriate measures have been taken to maintain as good as possible the parameters of the primary coolant water during reactor shut-down periods, especially in the stagnant zones of the pool. Routine low-level measurements of fission products allow the early detection of anomal leakage of the whole core as minor as 0.03 mCi/h of Xe-135 released into the pool water. Accurate account of the pool water loss and replenishment ensures the detection of invisible water leakage through the aluminum tank as low as 10 liters/week. Results of corrosion products monitoring show a slight increasing trend of corrosion rate of the whole primary coolant system. However from these data it is hard to conclude about the development status of the corrosion observed optically in the reactor tank. (author). 4 refs, 4 tabs, 4 figs

  4. Replica methods for loopy sparse random graphs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coolen, ACC

    2016-01-01

    I report on the development of a novel statistical mechanical formalism for the analysis of random graphs with many short loops, and processes on such graphs. The graphs are defined via maximum entropy ensembles, in which both the degrees (via hard constraints) and the adjacency matrix spectrum (via a soft constraint) are prescribed. The sum over graphs can be done analytically, using a replica formalism with complex replica dimensions. All known results for tree-like graphs are recovered in a suitable limit. For loopy graphs, the emerging theory has an appealing and intuitive structure, suggests how message passing algorithms should be adapted, and what is the structure of theories describing spin systems on loopy architectures. However, the formalism is still largely untested, and may require further adjustment and refinement. (paper)

  5. Kinetics from Replica Exchange Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzl, Lukas S; Hummer, Gerhard

    2017-08-08

    Transitions between metastable states govern many fundamental processes in physics, chemistry and biology, from nucleation events in phase transitions to the folding of proteins. The free energy surfaces underlying these processes can be obtained from simulations using enhanced sampling methods. However, their altered dynamics makes kinetic and mechanistic information difficult or impossible to extract. Here, we show that, with replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD), one can not only sample equilibrium properties but also extract kinetic information. For systems that strictly obey first-order kinetics, the procedure to extract rates is rigorous. For actual molecular systems whose long-time dynamics are captured by kinetic rate models, accurate rate coefficients can be determined from the statistics of the transitions between the metastable states at each replica temperature. We demonstrate the practical applicability of the procedure by constructing master equation (Markov state) models of peptide and RNA folding from REMD simulations.

  6. 3D printed replicas for endodontic education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reymus, M; Fotiadou, C; Kessler, A; Heck, K; Hickel, R; Diegritz, C

    2018-06-14

    To assess the feasibility of producing artificial teeth for endodontic training using 3D printing technology, to analyse the accuracy of the printing process, and to evaluate the teeth by students when used during training. Sound extracted human teeth were selected, digitalized by cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and appropriate software and finally reproduced by a stereolithographic printer. The printed teeth were scanned and compared with the original ones (trueness) and to one another (precision). Undergraduate dental students in the third and fourth years performed root canal treatment on printed molars and were subsequently asked to evaluate their experience with these compared to real teeth. The workflow was feasible for manufacturing 3D printed tooth replicas. The absolute deviation after printing (trueness) ranged from 50.9μm to 104.3μm. The values for precision ranged from 43.5μm to 68.2μm. Students reported great benefits in the use of the replicated teeth for training purposes. The presented workflow is feasible for any dental educational institution who has access to a CBCT unit and a stereolithographic printer. The accuracy of the printing process is suitable for the production of tooth replicas for endodontic training. Undergraduate students favoured the availability of these replicas and the fairness they ensured in training due to standardization. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. A critical inventory of preoperative skull replicas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasel, J H D; Beinemann, J; Schaller, K; Gailloud, P

    2013-09-01

    Physical replicas of organs are used increasingly for preoperative planning. The quality of these models is generally accepted by surgeons. In view of the strong trend towards minimally invasive and personalised surgery, however, the aim of this investigation was to assess qualitatively the accuracy of such replicas, using skull models as an example. Skull imaging was acquired for three cadavers by computed tomography using clinical routine parameters. After digital three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction, physical replicas were produced by 3D printing. The facsimilia were analysed systematically and compared with the best gold standard possible: the macerated skull itself. The skull models were far from anatomically accurate. Non-conforming rendering was observed in particular for foramina, sutures, notches, fissures, grooves, channels, tuberosities, thin-walled structures, sharp peaks and crests, and teeth. Surgeons should be aware that preoperative models may not yet render the exact anatomy of the patient under consideration and are advised to continue relying, in specific conditions, on their own analysis of the native computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging.

  8. Robotic Manufacturing of 5.5 Meter Cryogenic Fuel Tank Dome Assemblies for the NASA Ares I Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ronald E.

    2012-01-01

    The Ares I rocket is the first launch vehicle scheduled for manufacture under the National Aeronautic and Space Administration's (NASA's) Constellation program. A series of full-scale Ares I development articles have been constructed on the Robotic Weld Tool at the NASA George C. Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The Robotic Weld Tool is a 100 ton, 7-axis, robotic manufacturing system capable of machining and friction stir welding large-scale space hardware. This presentation will focus on the friction stir welding of 5.5m diameter cryogenic fuel tank components; specifically, the liquid hydrogen forward dome (LH2 MDA), the common bulkhead manufacturing development articles (CBMDA) and the thermal protection system demonstration dome (TPS Dome). The LH2 MDA was the first full-scale, flight-like Ares I hardware produced under the Constellation Program. It is a 5.5m diameter elliptical dome assembly consisting of eight gore panels, a y-ring stiffener and a manhole fitting. All components are made from aluminumlithium alloy 2195. Conventional and self-reacting friction stir welding was used on this article. An overview of the manufacturing processes will be discussed. The LH2 MDA is the first known fully friction stir welded dome ever produced. The completion of four Common Bulkhead Manufacturing Development Articles (CBMDA) and the TPS Dome will also be highlighted. Each CBMDA and the TPS Dome consists of a 5.5m diameter spun-formed dome friction stir welded to a y-ring stiffener. The domes and y-rings are made of aluminum 2014 and 2219 respectively. The TPS Dome has an additional aluminum alloy 2195 barrel section welded to the y-ring. Manufacturing solutions will be discussed including "fixtureless" welding with self reacting friction stir welding.

  9. Manufacturing of 5.5 Meter Diameter Cryogenic Fuel Tank Domes for the NASA Ares I Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ronald E.; Carter, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    The Ares I rocket is the first launch vehicle scheduled for manufacture under the National Aeronautic and Space Administration s (NASA s) Constellation program. A series of full-scale Ares I development articles have been constructed on the Robotic Weld Tool at the NASA George C. Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The Robotic Weld Tool is a 100 ton, 7-axis, robotic manufacturing system capable of machining and friction stir welding large-scale space hardware. This presentation will focus on the friction stir welding of 5.5m diameter cryogenic fuel tank components; specifically, the liquid hydrogen forward dome (LH2 MDA) and the common bulkhead manufacturing development articles (CBMDA). The LH2 MDA was the first full-scale, flight-like Ares I hardware produced under the Constellation Program. It is a 5.5m diameter elliptical dome assembly consisting of eight gore panels, a y-ring stiffener and a manhole fitting. All components are made from aluminum-lithium alloy 2195. Conventional and self-reacting friction stir welding was used on this article. Manufacturing solutions will be discussed including the implementation of photogrammetry, an advanced metrology technique, as well as fixtureless welding. The LH2 MDA is the first known fully friction stir welded dome ever produced. The completion of four Common Bulkhead Manufacturing Development Articles (CBMDA) will also be highlighted. Each CBMDA consists of a 5.5m diameter spun-formed dome friction stir welded to a y-ring stiffener. The domes and y-rings are made of aluminum 2014 and 2219 respectively. An overview of CBMDA manufacturing processes and the effect of tooling on weld defect formation will be discussed.

  10. Nuclear fuel technology - Tank calibration and volume determination for nuclear materials accountancy - Part 6: Accurate in-tank determination of liquid density in accountancy tanks equipped with dip tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    ISO 18213 deals with the acquisition, standardization, analysis, and use of calibration data to determine liquid volumes in process tanks for accountability purposes. This part of ISO 18213 is complementary to the other parts, ISO 18213-1 (procedural overview), ISO 18213-2 (data standardization), ISO 18213-3 (statistical methods), ISO 18213-4 (slow bubbling rate), ISO 18213-5 (fast bubbling rate). The procedure described in this part of ISO 18213 is a two-step procedure. First, a liquid of known density is used to determine the vertical distance between the tips of the two probes (i.e. to calibrate their separation). The calibration step requires synchronous (or as nearly synchronous as possible) measurements of the pressure exerted at the tips of two probes by the calibration liquid in which they are submerged. The measurements obtained are used to make an accurate determination of probe separation. Second, the unknown density of the process liquid is determined with the aid of the probe separation calibration. The density-determination step also requires (nearly) synchronous measurements of the pressure exerted at the tips of two probes by the process liquid of unknown density. With careful technique, it is possible to make determinations of liquid density with in-tank measurements that approach the accuracy and precision of those made in the laboratory. Moreover, density determinations made with in-tank measurements are automatically made at the observed temperature of the tank liquid. Thus, no additional information about the liquid is required to infer its density at its tank temperature from determinations of its density at some other temperature. Except that the density of the process liquid is generally not well characterized, the steps involved in determining the height of process liquid in the tank are the same as those for determining the height of calibration liquid. Thus, the method of density determination given in this part of ISO 18213 is very

  11. Fuel Tank Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-11-01

    fact, some investigators opposed the approach because the acid breakdown product of the reversion process serves to catalvze further reversion. t2C 80...the detail parts of the wing box are 7074-T73 and 7075-T6 aluminum. After fabrication the parts are subjected to a chromic acid anodize surface... polymethacrylic imide rigid expanded plastic. The brand name is ROHACEL. This material is resistant to JP-4, JP-5 and JP-8. It can be used at temperatures

  12. Robotic Manufacturing of 18-ft (5.5m) Diameter Cryogenic Fuel Tank Dome Assemblies for the NASA Ares I Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ronald E.; Carter, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    The Ares I rocket was the first launch vehicle scheduled for manufacture under the National Aeronautic and Space Administration's Constellation program. A series of full-scale Ares I development articles were constructed on the Robotic Weld Tool at the NASA George C. Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The Robotic Weld Tool is a 100 ton, 7- axis, robotic manufacturing system capable of machining and friction stir welding large-scale space hardware. This paper will focus on the friction stir welding of 18-ft (5.5m) diameter cryogenic fuel tank components; specifically, the liquid hydrogen forward dome and two common bulkhead manufacturing development articles.

  13. A Validation Study of the Impression Replica Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segerström, Sofia; Wiking-Lima de Faria, Johanna; Braian, Michael; Ameri, Arman; Ahlgren, Camilla

    2018-04-17

    To validate the well-known and often-used impression replica technique for measuring fit between a preparation and a crown in vitro. The validation consisted of three steps. First, a measuring instrument was validated to elucidate its accuracy. Second, a specimen consisting of male and female counterparts was created and validated by the measuring instrument. Calculations were made for the exact values of three gaps between the male and female. Finally, impression replicas were produced of the specimen gaps and sectioned into four pieces. The replicas were then measured with the use of a light microscope. The values received from measuring the specimen were then compared with the values received from the impression replicas, and the technique was thereby validated. The impression replica technique overvalued all measured gaps. Depending on location of the three measuring sites, the difference between the specimen and the impression replicas varied from 47 to 130 μm. The impression replica technique overestimates gaps within the range of 2% to 11%. The validation of the replica technique enables the method to be used as a reference when testing other methods for evaluating fit in dentistry. © 2018 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  14. Screening of tank-to-wheel efficiencies for CNG, DME and methanol-ethanol fuel blends in road transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kappel, J.; Vad Mathiesen, B.

    2013-04-15

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate the fuel efficiency of selected alternative fuels based on vehicle performance in a standardised drive cycle test. All studies reviewed are either based on computer modelling of current or future vehicles or tests of just one alternative fuel, under different conditions and concentrations against either petrol or diesel. No studies were found testing more than one type of alternative fuel in the same setup. Due to this one should be careful when comparing results on several alternative fuels. Only few studies have been focused on vehicle energy efficiency. This screening indicates methanol, methanol-ethanol blends and CNG to be readily availability, economic feasible and with the introduction of the DISI engine not technologically challenging compared to traditional fuels. Studies across fuel types indicate a marginally better fuel utilization for methanol-ethanol fuel mixes. (Author)

  15. Risk-based determination of design pressure of LNG fuel storage tanks based on dynamic process simulation combined with Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, Yeelyong; Chang, Kwangpil; Seo, Yutaek; Chang, Daejun

    2014-01-01

    This study proposes a new methodology that combines dynamic process simulation (DPS) and Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) to determine the design pressure of fuel storage tanks on LNG-fueled ships. Because the pressure of such tanks varies with time, DPS is employed to predict the pressure profile. Though equipment failure and subsequent repair affect transient pressure development, it is difficult to implement these features directly in the process simulation due to the randomness of the failure. To predict the pressure behavior realistically, MCS is combined with DPS. In MCS, discrete events are generated to create a lifetime scenario for a system. The combination of MCS with long-term DPS reveals the frequency of the exceedance pressure. The exceedance curve of the pressure provides risk-based information for determining the design pressure based on risk acceptance criteria, which may vary with different points of view. - Highlights: • The realistic operation scenario of the LNG FGS system is estimated by MCS. • In repeated MCS trials, the availability of the FGS system is evaluated. • The realistic pressure profile is obtained by the proposed methodology. • The exceedance curve provides risk-based information for determining design pressure

  16. Important matter by confirmation of administrative office regarding repair of enriched uranium dissolution tanks in reprocessing plant of Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The Nuclear Safety Commission acknowledged the policy of handling this matter by Science and Technology Agency after having received a report from the Committee on Examination of Nuclear Fuel Safety on April 11, 1985, and carried out the deliberation. The investigation and deliberation of this matter were instructed by the NSC to the Committee on January 24, 1985. It was confirmed that the repair welding applied to the place of leak of the dissolution tanks would not hinder the expected test dissolution, and if the leak occurs, the measures to detect it properly have been taken. In order to confirm the soundness of the repair welding, the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp. is to carry out the test dissolution for about 400 hours per one tank dividing into three runs, and the observation of appearance is to be made after every run. The time of test dissolution, the items and contents of inspection were confirmed to be adequate. Moreover, the immersion corrosion test of test pieces and the long term corrosion test in a laboratory are to be carried out. (Kako, I.)

  17. Screening of tank-to-wheel efficiencies for CNG, DME and methanol-ethanol fuel blends in road transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kappel, Jannik; Mathiesen, Brian Vad

    efficiency. This screening indicates methanol, methanol-ethanol blends and CNG to be readily availability, economic feasible and with the introduction of the DISI engine not technologically challenging compared to traditional fuels. Studies across fuel types indicate a marginally better fuel utilization...

  18. COMPARISON OF SELECTED LOWER EXPLOSIVE LIMIT METERS USED BY USAF AND COMMERCIAL JET FUEL TANK ENTRY PERSONNEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thousands of military personnel and tens of thousands of civilian workers perform tank entry procedures. OSHA regulations (1910.146) require the internal atmosphere be tested, with a calibrated direct-reading instrument, for oxygen content, flammable gases and vapors, and poten...

  19. Modeling Vocal Fold Intravascular Flow using Synthetic Replicas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Aaron D.; Ricks, Matthew T.; Thomson, Scott L.

    2017-11-01

    Vocal fold vibration that is induced by air flowing from the lungs is believed to decrease blood flow through the vocal folds. This is important due to the critical role of blood flow in maintaining tissue health. However, the precise mechanical relationships between vocal fold vibration and blood perfusion remain understudied. A platform for studying liquid perfusion in a synthetic, life-size, self-oscillating vocal fold replica has recently been developed. The replicas are fabricated using molded silicone with material properties comparable to those of human vocal fold tissues and that include embedded microchannels through which liquid is perfused. The replicas are mounted on an air flow supply tube to initiate flow-induced vibration. A liquid reservoir is attached to the microchannel to cause liquid to perfuse through replica in the anterior-posterior direction. As replica vibration is initiated and amplitude increases, perfusion flow rate decreases. In this presentation, the replica design will be presented, along with data quantifying the relationships between parameters such as replica vibration amplitude, stiffness, microchannel diameter, and perfusion flow rate. This work was supported by Grant NIDCD R01DC005788 from the National Institutes of Health.

  20. Conception of a 3D Metamaterial-Based Foundation for Static and Seismic Protection of Fuel Storage Tanks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo La Salandra

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Fluid-filled tanks in tank farms of industrial plants can experience severe damage and trigger cascading effects in neighboring tanks due to large vibrations induced by strong earthquakes. In order to reduce these tank vibrations, we have explored an innovative type of foundation based on metamaterial concepts. Metamaterials are generally regarded as manmade structures that exhibit unusual responses not readily observed in natural materials. If properly designed, they are able to stop or attenuate wave propagation. Recent studies have shown that if locally resonant structures are periodically placed in a matrix material, the resulting metamaterial forms a phononic lattice that creates a stop band able to forbid elastic wave propagation within a selected band gap frequency range. Conventional phononic lattice structures need huge unit cells for low-frequency vibration shielding, while locally resonant metamaterials can rely on lattice constants much smaller than the longitudinal wavelengths of propagating waves. Along this line, we have investigated 3D structured foundations with effective attenuation zones conceived as vibration isolation systems for storage tanks. In particular, the three-component periodic foundation cell has been developed using two common construction materials, namely concrete and rubber. Relevant frequency band gaps, computed using the Floquet–Bloch theorem, have been found to be wide and in the low-frequency region. Based on the designed unit cell, a finite foundation has been conceived, checked under static loads and numerically tested on its wave attenuation properties. Then, by means of a parametric study we found a favorable correlation between the shear stiffness of foundation walls and wave attenuation. On this basis, to show the potential improvements of this foundation, we investigated an optimized design by means of analytical models and numerical analyses. In addition, we investigated the influence of cracks

  1. 14 CFR 29.957 - Flow between interconnected tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 29.957 Flow between interconnected tanks. (a) Where tank outlets are interconnected and allow fuel to flow between them due to gravity or flight accelerations, it must be impossible for fuel to flow between tanks in...

  2. Gamma-ray dosimetry measurements of the Little Boy replica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plassmann, E.A.; Pederson, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    We present the current status of our gamma-ray dosimetry results for the Little Boy replica. Both Geiger-Mueller and thermoluminescent detectors were used in the measurements. Future work is needed to test assumptions made in data analysis

  3. SRF Cavity Surface Topography Characterization Using Replica Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Xu, M.J. Kelley, C.E. Reece

    2012-07-01

    To better understand the roll of topography on SRF cavity performance, we seek to obtain detailed topographic information from the curved practical cavity surfaces. Replicas taken from a cavity interior surface provide internal surface molds for fine Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and stylus profilometry. In this study, we confirm the replica resolution both on surface local defects such as grain boundary and etching pits and compare the surface uniform roughness with the aid of Power Spectral Density (PSD) where we can statistically obtain roughness parameters at different scales. A series of sampling locations are at the same magnetic field chosen at the same latitude on a single cell cavity to confirm the uniformity. Another series of sampling locations at different magnetic field amplitudes are chosen for this replica on the same cavity for later power loss calculation. We also show that application of the replica followed by rinsing does not adversely affect the cavity performance.

  4. Patrol Detection for Replica Attacks on Wireless Sensor Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Liang-Min; Shi, Yang

    2011-01-01

    Replica attack is a critical concern in the security of wireless sensor networks. We employ mobile nodes as patrollers to detect replicas distributed in different zones in a network, in which a basic patrol detection protocol and two detection algorithms for stationary and mobile modes are presented. Then we perform security analysis to discuss the defense strategies against the possible attacks on the proposed detection protocol. Moreover, we show the advantages of the proposed protocol by d...

  5. Accuracy of three-dimensional printing for manufacturing replica teeth

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Keun-Young; Cho, Jin-Woo; Chang, Na-Young; Chae, Jong-Moon; Kang, Kyung-Hwa; Kim, Sang-Cheol; Cho, Jin-Hyoung

    2015-01-01

    Objective Three-dimensional (3D) printing is a recent technological development that may play a significant role in orthodontic diagnosis and treatment. It can be used to fabricate skull models or study models, as well as to make replica teeth in autotransplantation or tooth impaction cases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of fabrication of replica teeth made by two types of 3D printing technologies. Methods Fifty extracted molar teeth were selected as samples. They were sc...

  6. Well-to-tank energy use and greenhouse gas emissions of transportation fuels vol. 1, 2, 3.; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NONE

    2001-01-01

    There are differing yet strongly held views among the various ''stakeholders'' in the advanced fuel/propulsion system debate. In order for the introduction of advanced technology vehicles and their associated fuels to be successful, it seems clear that four important stakeholders must view their introduction as a ''win'': (1) Society, (2) Automobile manufacturers and their key suppliers, (3) Fuel providers and their key suppliers, and (4)Auto and energy company customers. If all four of these stakeholders, from their own perspectives, are not positive regarding the need for and value of these advanced fuels/vehicles, the vehicle introductions will fail. This study was conducted to help inform public and private decision makers regarding the impact of the introduction of such advanced fuel/propulsion system pathways from a societal point of view. The study estimates two key performance criteria of advanced fuel/propulsion systems on a total system basis, that is, ''well'' (production source of energy) to ''wheel'' (vehicle). These criteria are energy use and greenhouse gas emissions per unit of distance traveled. The study focuses on the U.S. light-duty vehicle market in 2005 and beyond, when it is expected that advanced fuels and propulsion systems could begin to be incorporated in a significant percentage of new vehicles. Given the current consumer demand for light trucks, the benchmark vehicle considered in this study is the Chevrolet Silverado full-size pickup

  7. Bayesian ensemble refinement by replica simulations and reweighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummer, Gerhard; Köfinger, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    We describe different Bayesian ensemble refinement methods, examine their interrelation, and discuss their practical application. With ensemble refinement, the properties of dynamic and partially disordered (bio)molecular structures can be characterized by integrating a wide range of experimental data, including measurements of ensemble-averaged observables. We start from a Bayesian formulation in which the posterior is a functional that ranks different configuration space distributions. By maximizing this posterior, we derive an optimal Bayesian ensemble distribution. For discrete configurations, this optimal distribution is identical to that obtained by the maximum entropy "ensemble refinement of SAXS" (EROS) formulation. Bayesian replica ensemble refinement enhances the sampling of relevant configurations by imposing restraints on averages of observables in coupled replica molecular dynamics simulations. We show that the strength of the restraints should scale linearly with the number of replicas to ensure convergence to the optimal Bayesian result in the limit of infinitely many replicas. In the "Bayesian inference of ensembles" method, we combine the replica and EROS approaches to accelerate the convergence. An adaptive algorithm can be used to sample directly from the optimal ensemble, without replicas. We discuss the incorporation of single-molecule measurements and dynamic observables such as relaxation parameters. The theoretical analysis of different Bayesian ensemble refinement approaches provides a basis for practical applications and a starting point for further investigations.

  8. Replica Fourier Tansforms on Ultrametric Trees, and Block-Diagonalizing Multi-Replica Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Dominicis, C.; Carlucci, D. M.; Temesvári, T.

    1997-01-01

    The analysis of objects living on ultrametric trees, in particular the block-diagonalization of 4-replica matrices M^{α β;γ^δ}, is shown to be dramatically simplified through the introduction of properly chosen operations on those objects. These are the Replica Fourier Transforms on ultrametric trees. Those transformations are defined and used in the present work. On montre que l'analyse d'objets vivant sur un arbre ultramétrique, en particulier, la diagonalisation par blocs d'une matrice M^{α β;γ^δ} dépendant de 4-répliques, se simplifie de façon dramatique si l'on introduit les opérations appropriées sur ces objets. Ce sont les Transformées de Fourier de Répliques sur un arbre ultramétrique. Ces transformations sont définies et utilisées dans le présent travail.

  9. Neurovascular Modeling: Small-Batch Manufacturing of Silicone Vascular Replicas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chueh, J.Y.; Wakhloo, A.K.; Gounis, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Realistic, population based cerebrovascular replicas are required for the development of neuroendovascular devices. The objective of this work was to develop an efficient methodology for manufacturing realistic cerebrovascular replicas. MATERIALS AND METHODS Brain MR angiography data from 20 patients were acquired. The centerline of the vasculature was calculated, and geometric parameters were measured to describe quantitatively the internal carotid artery (ICA) siphon. A representative model was created on the basis of the quantitative measurements. Using this virtual model, we designed a mold with core-shell structure and converted it into a physical object by fused-deposit manufacturing. Vascular replicas were created by injection molding of different silicones. Mechanical properties, including the stiffness and luminal coefficient of friction, were measured. RESULTS The average diameter, length, and curvature of the ICA siphon were 4.15 ± 0.09 mm, 22.60 ± 0.79 mm, and 0.34 ± 0.02 mm-1 (average ± standard error of the mean), respectively. From these image datasets, we created a median virtual model, which was transformed into a physical replica by an efficient batch-manufacturing process. The coefficient of friction of the luminal surface of the replica was reduced by up to 55% by using liquid silicone rubber coatings. The modulus ranged from 0.67 to 1.15 MPa compared with 0.42 MPa from human postmortem studies, depending on the material used to make the replica. CONCLUSIONS Population-representative, smooth, and true-to-scale silicone arterial replicas with uniform wall thickness were successfully built for in vitro neurointerventional device-testing by using a batch-manufacturing process. PMID:19321626

  10. Lightweight Tanks for Storing Liquefied Natural Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLay, Tom

    2008-01-01

    Single-walled, jacketed aluminum tanks have been conceived for storing liquefied natural gas (LNG) in LNG-fueled motor vehicles. Heretofore, doublewall steel tanks with vacuum between the inner and outer walls have been used for storing LNG. In comparison with the vacuum- insulated steel tanks, the jacketed aluminum tanks weigh less and can be manufactured at lower cost. Costs of using the jacketed aluminum tanks are further reduced in that there is no need for the vacuum pumps heretofore needed to maintain vacuum in the vacuum-insulated tanks.

  11. Accuracy of three-dimensional printing for manufacturing replica teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Keun-Young; Cho, Jin-Woo; Chang, Na-Young; Chae, Jong-Moon; Kang, Kyung-Hwa; Kim, Sang-Cheol; Cho, Jin-Hyoung

    2015-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is a recent technological development that may play a significant role in orthodontic diagnosis and treatment. It can be used to fabricate skull models or study models, as well as to make replica teeth in autotransplantation or tooth impaction cases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of fabrication of replica teeth made by two types of 3D printing technologies. Fifty extracted molar teeth were selected as samples. They were scanned to generate high-resolution 3D surface model stereolithography files. These files were converted into physical models using two types of 3D printing technologies: Fused deposition modeling (FDM) and PolyJet technology. All replica teeth were scanned and 3D images generated. Computer software compared the replica teeth to the original teeth with linear measurements, volumetric measurements, and mean deviation measurements with best-fit alignment. Paired t-tests were used to statistically analyze the measurements. Most measurements of teeth formed using FDM tended to be slightly smaller, while those of the PolyJet replicas tended to be slightly larger, than those of the extracted teeth. Mean deviation measurements with best-fit alignment of FDM and PolyJet group were 0.047 mm and 0.038 mm, respectively. Although there were statistically significant differences, they were regarded as clinically insignificant. This study confirms that FDM and PolyJet technologies are accurate enough to be usable in orthodontic diagnosis and treatment.

  12. Nuclear fuel technology - Tank calibration and volume determination for nuclear materials accountancy - Part 4: Accurate determination of liquid height in accountancy tanks equipped with dip tubes, slow bubbling rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    ISO 18213 deals with the acquisition, standardization, analysis, and use of calibration to determine liquid volumes in process tanks for the accountancy of nuclear materials. This part of ISO 18213 is complementary to the other parts, ISO 18213-1 (procedural overview), ISO 18213-2 (data standardization), ISO 18213-3 (statistical methods), ISO 18213-5 (fast bubbling rate) and ISO 18213-6 (in-tank determination of liquid density). The procedure presented herein for determining liquid height from measurements of induced pressure applies specifically when a very slow bubbling rate is employed. A similar procedure that is appropriate for a fast bubbling rate is given in ISO 18213-5. Measurements of the volume and height of liquid in a process accountancy tank are often made in order to estimate or verify the tank's calibration or volume measurement equation. The calibration equation relates the response of the tank's measurement system to some independent measure of tank volume. Beginning with an empty tank, calibration data are typically acquired by introducing a series of carefully measured quantities of some calibration liquid into the tank. The quantity of liquid added, the response of the tank's measurement system, and relevant ambient conditions such as temperature are measured for each incremental addition. Several calibration runs are made to obtain data for estimating or verifying a tank's calibration or measurement equation. A procedural overview of the tank calibration and volume measurement process is given in ISO 18213-1. An algorithm for standardizing tank calibration and volume measurement data to minimize the effects of variability in ambient conditions that prevail during the measurement period is given in ISO 18213-2. The procedure presented in this part of ISO 18213 for determining the height of calibration liquid in the tank from a measurement of the pressure it induces in the tank's measurement system is a vital component of that algorithm. In some

  13. Nuclear fuel technology - Tank calibration and volume determination for nuclear materials accountancy - Part 5: Accurate determination of liquid height in accountancy tanks equipped with dip tubes, fast bubbling rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    ISO 18213 deals with the acquisition, standardization, analysis, and use of calibration to determine liquid volumes in process tanks for the accountancy of nuclear materials. This part of ISO 18213 is complementary to the other parts, ISO 18213-1 (procedural overview), ISO 18213-2 (data standardization), ISO 18213-3 (statistical methods), ISO 18213-5 (fast bubbling rate) and ISO 18213-6 (in-tank determination of liquid density). The procedure presented herein for determining liquid height from measurements of induced pressure applies specifically when a very slow bubbling rate is employed. A similar procedure that is appropriate for a fast bubbling rate is given in ISO 18213-5. Measurements of the volume and height of liquid in a process accountancy tank are often made in order to estimate or verify the tank's calibration or volume measurement equation. The calibration equation relates the response of the tank's measurement system to some independent measure of tank volume. Beginning with an empty tank, calibration data are typically acquired by introducing a series of carefully measured quantities of some calibration liquid into the tank. The quantity of liquid added, the response of the tank's measurement system, and relevant ambient conditions such as temperature are measured for each incremental addition. Several calibration runs are made to obtain data for estimating or verifying a tank's calibration or measurement equation. A procedural overview of the tank calibration and volume measurement process is given in ISO 18213-1. An algorithm for standardizing tank calibration and volume measurement data to minimize the effects of variability in ambient conditions that prevail during the measurement period is given in ISO 18213-2. The procedure presented in this part of ISO 18213 for determining the height of calibration liquid in the tank from a measurement of the pressure it induces in the tank's measurement system is a vital component of that algorithm. In some

  14. Reconstruction of Monte Carlo replicas from Hessian parton distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Tie-Jiun [Department of Physics, Southern Methodist University,Dallas, TX 75275-0181 (United States); Gao, Jun [INPAC, Shanghai Key Laboratory for Particle Physics and Cosmology,Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao-Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory,Argonne, Illinois, 60439 (United States); Huston, Joey [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University,East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Nadolsky, Pavel [Department of Physics, Southern Methodist University,Dallas, TX 75275-0181 (United States); Schmidt, Carl; Stump, Daniel [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University,East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Wang, Bo-Ting; Xie, Ke Ping [Department of Physics, Southern Methodist University,Dallas, TX 75275-0181 (United States); Dulat, Sayipjamal [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University,East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); School of Physics Science and Technology, Xinjiang University,Urumqi, Xinjiang 830046 (China); Center for Theoretical Physics, Xinjiang University,Urumqi, Xinjiang 830046 (China); Pumplin, Jon; Yuan, C.P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University,East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2017-03-20

    We explore connections between two common methods for quantifying the uncertainty in parton distribution functions (PDFs), based on the Hessian error matrix and Monte-Carlo sampling. CT14 parton distributions in the Hessian representation are converted into Monte-Carlo replicas by a numerical method that reproduces important properties of CT14 Hessian PDFs: the asymmetry of CT14 uncertainties and positivity of individual parton distributions. The ensembles of CT14 Monte-Carlo replicas constructed this way at NNLO and NLO are suitable for various collider applications, such as cross section reweighting. Master formulas for computation of asymmetric standard deviations in the Monte-Carlo representation are derived. A correction is proposed to address a bias in asymmetric uncertainties introduced by the Taylor series approximation. A numerical program is made available for conversion of Hessian PDFs into Monte-Carlo replicas according to normal, log-normal, and Watt-Thorne sampling procedures.

  15. Standard practice for production and evaluation of field metallographic replicas

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2001-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers recognized methods for the preparation and evaluation of cellulose acetate or plastic film replicas which have been obtained from metallographically prepared surfaces. It is designed for the evaluation of replicas to ensure that all significant features of a metallographically prepared surface have been duplicated and preserved on the replica with sufficient detail to permit both LM and SEM examination with optimum resolution and sensitivity. 1.2 This practice may be used as a controlling document in commercial situations. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. Inch-pound units given in parentheses are for information only. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  16. 46 CFR 56.50-85 - Tank-vent piping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... of the tanks to vent pipes. (2) Tanks having a comparatively small surface, such as fuel oil settling... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tank-vent piping. 56.50-85 Section 56.50-85 Shipping... APPURTENANCES Design Requirements Pertaining to Specific Systems § 56.50-85 Tank-vent piping. (a) This section...

  17. Patrol Detection for Replica Attacks on Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Shi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Replica attack is a critical concern in the security of wireless sensor networks. We employ mobile nodes as patrollers to detect replicas distributed in different zones in a network, in which a basic patrol detection protocol and two detection algorithms for stationary and mobile modes are presented. Then we perform security analysis to discuss the defense strategies against the possible attacks on the proposed detection protocol. Moreover, we show the advantages of the proposed protocol by discussing and comparing the communication cost and detection probability with some existing methods.

  18. Creating technical heritage object replicas in a virtual environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorova, Olga; Shcherbinin, Dmitry

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents innovative informatics methods for creating virtual technical heritage replicas, which are of significant scientific and practical importance not only to researchers but to the public in general. By performing 3D modeling and animation of aircrafts, spaceships, architectural-engineering buildings, and other technical objects, the process of learning is achieved while promoting the preservation of the replicas for future generations. Modern approaches based on the wide usage of computer technologies attract a greater number of young people to explore the history of science and technology and renew their interest in the field of mechanical engineering.

  19. Tank characterization data report: Tank 241-C-112

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, B.C.; Borsheim, G.L.; Jensen, L.

    1993-09-01

    Tank 241-C-112 is a Hanford Site Ferrocyanide Watch List tank that was most recently sampled in March 1992. Analyses of materials obtained from tank 241-C-112 were conducted to support the resolution of the Ferrocyanide Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) and to support Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-10-00. Analysis of core samples obtained from tank 241-C-112 strongly indicates that the fuel concentration in the tank waste will not support a propagating exothermic reaction. Analysis of the process history of the tank as well as studies of simulants provided valuable information about the physical and chemical condition of the waste. This information, in combination with the analysis of the tank waste, sup ports the conclusion that an exothermic reaction in tank 241-C-112 is not plausible. Therefore, the contents of tank 241-C-112 present no imminent threat to the workers at the Hanford Site, the public, or the environment from its forrocyanide inventory. Because an exothermic reaction is not credible, the consequences of this accident scenario, as promulgated by the General Accounting Office, are not applicable

  20. Tank characterization data report: Tank 241-C-112

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, B.C.; Borsheim, G.L.; Jensen, L.

    1993-09-01

    Tank 241-C-112 is a Hanford Site Ferrocyanide Watch List tank that was most recently sampled in March 1992. Analyses of materials obtained from tank 241-C-112 were conducted to support the resolution of the Ferrocyanide Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) and to support Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-10-00. Analysis of core samples obtained from tank 241-C-112 strongly indicates that the fuel concentration in the tank waste will not support a propagating exothermic reaction. Analysis of the process history of the tank as well as studies of simulants provided valuable information about the physical and chemical condition of the waste. This information, in combination with the analysis of the tank waste, sup ports the conclusion that an exothermic reaction in tank 241-C-112 is not plausible. Therefore, the contents of tank 241-C-112 present no imminent threat to the workers at the Hanford Site, the public, or the environment from its forrocyanide inventory. Because an exothermic reaction is not credible, the consequences of this accident scenario, as promulgated by the General Accounting Office, are not applicable.

  1. The Temperature of the Dimethylhydrazine Drops Moving in the Atmosphere after Depressurization of the Fuel Tank Rockets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulba Elena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work includes the results of the numerical modeling of temperature changes process of the dimethylhydrazine (DMH drops, taking into account the radial temperature gradient in the air after the depressurization of the fuel compartments rockets at high altitude. There is formulated a mathematical model describing the process of DMH drops thermal state modifying when it's moving to the Earth's surface. There is the evaluation of the influence of the characteristic size of heptyl drops on the temperature distribution. It's established that the temperatures of the small size droplets practically completely coincide with the distribution of temperature in the atmosphere at altitudes of up to 40 kilometers.

  2. Decay tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, Seiichi; Tagishi, Akinori; Sakata, Yuji; Kontani, Koji; Sudo, Yukio; Kaminaga, Masanori; Kameyama, Iwao; Ando, Koei; Ishiki, Masahiko.

    1990-01-01

    The present invention concerns an decay tank for decaying a radioactivity concentration of a fluid containing radioactive material. The inside of an decay tank body is partitioned by partitioning plates to form a flow channel. A porous plate is attached at the portion above the end of the partitioning plate, that is, a portion where the flow is just turned. A part of the porous plate has a slit-like opening on the side close to the partitioning plate, that is, the inner side of the flow at the turning portion thereof. Accordingly, the primary coolants passed through the pool type nuclear reactor and flown into the decay tank are flow caused to uniformly over the entire part of the tank without causing swirling. Since a distribution in a staying time is thus decreased, the effect of decaying 16 N as radioactive nuclides in the primary coolants is increased even in a limited volume of the tank. (I.N.)

  3. Analysis of dissolved benzene plumes and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) plumes in ground water at leaking underground fuel tank (LUFT) sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Happel, A.M.; Rice, D.; Beckenbach, E.; Savalin, L.; Temko, H.; Rempel, R.; Dooher, B.

    1996-11-01

    The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments mandate the addition of oxygenates to gasoline products to abate air pollution. Currently, many areas of the country utilize oxygenated or reformulated fuel containing 15- percent and I I-percent MTBE by volume, respectively. This increased use of MTBE in gasoline products has resulted in accidental point source releases of MTBE containing gasoline products to ground water. Recent studies have shown MTBE to be frequently detected in samples of shallow ground water from urban areas throughout the United States (Squillace et al., 1995). Knowledge of the subsurface fate and transport of MTBE in ground water at leaking underground fuel tank (LUFT) sites and the spatial extent of MTBE plumes is needed to address these releases. The goal of this research is to utilize data from a large number of LUFT sites to gain insights into the fate, transport, and spatial extent of MTBE plumes. Specific goals include defining the spatial configuration of dissolved MTBE plumes, evaluating plume stability or degradation over time, evaluating the impact of point source releases of MTBE to ground water, and attempting to identify the controlling factors influencing the magnitude and extent of the MTBE plumes. We are examining the relationships between dissolved TPH, BTEX, and MTBE plumes at LUFT sites using parallel approaches of best professional judgment and a computer-aided plume model fitting procedure to determine plume parameters. Here we present our initial results comparing dissolved benzene and MTBE plumes lengths, the statistical significance of these results, and configuration of benzene and MTBE plumes at individual LUFT sites

  4. Evaluation of uncertainty in the well-to-tank and combustion greenhouse gas emissions of various transportation fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Lullo, Giovanni; Zhang, Hao; Kumar, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A Monte Carlo simulation is used to quantify uncertainty in the WTT + C emissions. • Gasoline WTT + C emissions ranged from 95.3 to 138.5 gCO_2 eq/MJ. • Saudi Arabia crude had the lowest emissions at 95.3–99.9 gCO_2 eq/MJ. • Venezuela crude had the highest emissions at 113.6–138.5 gCO_2 eq/MJ. • The largest source of uncertainty is the venting, fugitive, and flaring gas volumes. - Abstract: Growing concern over climate change has created pressure on the oil and gas industry to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions (GHG). There have been multiple well-to-tank + combustion (WTT + C) studies that have examined various crude oils in an attempt to determine their GHG emission intensities. The majority of these studies published deterministic point estimates with a limited sensitivity analysis. Due to the variation in results between studies and the lack of uncertainty analysis the usefulness of these studies to policy makers and industry representatives is limited. The goal of this study is to expand on the previous literature by identifying a range of WTT + C emissions for crude oils from Saudi Arabia, Venezuela, and Iran. First, the previously published FUNdamental ENgineering PrinciplEs-based ModeL for Estimation of GreenHouse Gases in Conventional Crude Oils (FUNNEL-GHG-CCO) was used to perform a WTT + C analysis of the crudes GHG emissions. Then a Monte Carlo simulation was carried out using existing literature to define input distributions for the key inputs. The resulting gasoline WTT + C GHG emission ranges are 113.6–138.5 (Venezuela High Steam), 101.6–109.9 (Venezuela Low Steam), 101.1–109.2 (Sirri, Iran), and 95.3–99.9 gCO_2eq/MJ (Saudi Arabia). This result indicates that even when uncertainty is taken into account the Venezuelan high steam crude clearly has higher emissions than the Saudi Arabia crude. The results of this study will give policy makers and industry representatives a better understanding of how the WTT + C

  5. Remote inspection of underground storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griebenow, B.L.; Martinson, L.M.

    1992-01-01

    Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company, Inc. (WINCO) operates the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the US Department of Energy. The ICPP's mission is to process government-owned spent nuclear fuel. The process involves dissolving the fuel, extracting off uranium, and calcining the waste to a solid form for storage, Prior to calcining, WINCO temporarily stores the liquid waste from this process in eleven 1,135,600-l(300,000-gal), 15,2-m (50-ft)-diam, high-level liquid waste tanks. Each of these stainless steel tanks is contained within an underground concrete vault. The only access to the interior of the tanks is through risers that extend from ground level to the dome of the tanks. WINCO is replacing these tanks because of their age and the fact that they do not meet all of the current design requirements. The tanks will be replaced in two phases. WINCO is now in the Title I design stage for four new tank and vault systems to replace five of the existing systems. The integrity of the six remaining tanks must be verified to continue their use until they can be replaced in the second phase. To perform any integrity analysis, the inner surface of the tanks must be inspected. The remote tank inspection (RTI) robotic system, designed by RedZone Robotics of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, was developed to access the interior of the tanks and position various end effectors required to perform tank wall inspections

  6. Replica-Based High-Performance Tuple Space Computing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andric, Marina; De Nicola, Rocco; Lluch Lafuente, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    of concurrency and data access. We investigate issues related to replica consistency, provide an operational semantics that guides the implementation of the language, and discuss the main synchronization mechanisms of our prototypical run-time framework. Finally, we provide a performance analysis, which includes...

  7. Replica scaling studies of hard missile impacts on reinforced concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, P.; Carter, P.G.; Howe, W.D.; Neilson, A.J.

    1982-01-01

    Missile and target combinations at three different liners scales have been used in an experimental assessment of the applicability of replica scaling to the dynamic behaviour of reinforced concrete structures impacted by rigid missiles. Experimental results are presented for models with relative linear scales of 1, 0.37 and 0.12. (orig.) [de

  8. Multiscale implementation of infinite-swap replica exchange molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tang-Qing; Lu, Jianfeng; Abrams, Cameron F; Vanden-Eijnden, Eric

    2016-10-18

    Replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) is a popular method to accelerate conformational sampling of complex molecular systems. The idea is to run several replicas of the system in parallel at different temperatures that are swapped periodically. These swaps are typically attempted every few MD steps and accepted or rejected according to a Metropolis-Hastings criterion. This guarantees that the joint distribution of the composite system of replicas is the normalized sum of the symmetrized product of the canonical distributions of these replicas at the different temperatures. Here we propose a different implementation of REMD in which (i) the swaps obey a continuous-time Markov jump process implemented via Gillespie's stochastic simulation algorithm (SSA), which also samples exactly the aforementioned joint distribution and has the advantage of being rejection free, and (ii) this REMD-SSA is combined with the heterogeneous multiscale method to accelerate the rate of the swaps and reach the so-called infinite-swap limit that is known to optimize sampling efficiency. The method is easy to implement and can be trivially parallelized. Here we illustrate its accuracy and efficiency on the examples of alanine dipeptide in vacuum and C-terminal β-hairpin of protein G in explicit solvent. In this latter example, our results indicate that the landscape of the protein is a triple funnel with two folded structures and one misfolded structure that are stabilized by H-bonds.

  9. 40 CFR 86.1246-96 - Fuel dispensing spitback procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) Evaporative Emission Test Procedures for New Gasoline-Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled, Liquefied Petroleum Gas... collecting spitback emissions to the nearest 0.01 gram. (d) Drain the fuel tank(s) and fill with test fuel, as specified in § 86.1213, to 10 percent of the reported nominal fuel tank capacity. The fuel cap(s...

  10. Nitrogen tank

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Wanted The technical file about the pressure vessel RP-270 It concerns the Nitrogen tank, 60m3, 22 bars, built in 1979, and installed at Point-2 for the former L3 experiment. If you are in possession of this file, or have any files about an equivalent tank (probably between registered No. RP-260 and -272), please contact Marc Tavlet, the ALICE Glimos.

  11. Simulated Tempering Distributed Replica Sampling, Virtual Replica Exchange, and Other Generalized-Ensemble Methods for Conformational Sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauscher, Sarah; Neale, Chris; Pomès, Régis

    2009-10-13

    Generalized-ensemble algorithms in temperature space have become popular tools to enhance conformational sampling in biomolecular simulations. A random walk in temperature leads to a corresponding random walk in potential energy, which can be used to cross over energetic barriers and overcome the problem of quasi-nonergodicity. In this paper, we introduce two novel methods: simulated tempering distributed replica sampling (STDR) and virtual replica exchange (VREX). These methods are designed to address the practical issues inherent in the replica exchange (RE), simulated tempering (ST), and serial replica exchange (SREM) algorithms. RE requires a large, dedicated, and homogeneous cluster of CPUs to function efficiently when applied to complex systems. ST and SREM both have the drawback of requiring extensive initial simulations, possibly adaptive, for the calculation of weight factors or potential energy distribution functions. STDR and VREX alleviate the need for lengthy initial simulations, and for synchronization and extensive communication between replicas. Both methods are therefore suitable for distributed or heterogeneous computing platforms. We perform an objective comparison of all five algorithms in terms of both implementation issues and sampling efficiency. We use disordered peptides in explicit water as test systems, for a total simulation time of over 42 μs. Efficiency is defined in terms of both structural convergence and temperature diffusion, and we show that these definitions of efficiency are in fact correlated. Importantly, we find that ST-based methods exhibit faster temperature diffusion and correspondingly faster convergence of structural properties compared to RE-based methods. Within the RE-based methods, VREX is superior to both SREM and RE. On the basis of our observations, we conclude that ST is ideal for simple systems, while STDR is well-suited for complex systems.

  12. Storing files in a parallel computing system using list-based index to identify replica files

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faibish, Sorin; Bent, John M.; Tzelnic, Percy; Zhang, Zhenhua; Grider, Gary

    2015-07-21

    Improved techniques are provided for storing files in a parallel computing system using a list-based index to identify file replicas. A file and at least one replica of the file are stored in one or more storage nodes of the parallel computing system. An index for the file comprises at least one list comprising a pointer to a storage location of the file and a storage location of the at least one replica of the file. The file comprises one or more of a complete file and one or more sub-files. The index may also comprise a checksum value for one or more of the file and the replica(s) of the file. The checksum value can be evaluated to validate the file and/or the file replica(s). A query can be processed using the list.

  13. Physical replicas and the Bose glass in cold atomic gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, S; Kantian, A; Daley, A J; Zoller, P; Katzgraber, H G; Lewenstein, M; Buechler, H P

    2008-01-01

    We study cold atomic gases in a disorder potential and analyse the correlations between different systems subjected to the same disorder landscape. Such independent copies with the same disorder landscape are known as replicas. While, in general, these are not accessible experimentally in condensed matter systems, they can be realized using standard tools for controlling cold atomic gases in an optical lattice. Of special interest is the overlap function which represents a natural order parameter for disordered systems and is a correlation function between the atoms of two independent replicas with the same disorder. We demonstrate an efficient measurement scheme for the determination of this disorder-induced correlation function. As an application, we focus on the disordered Bose-Hubbard model and determine the overlap function within the perturbation theory and a numerical analysis. We find that the measurement of the overlap function allows for the identification of the Bose-glass phase in certain parameter regimes

  14. Physical replicas and the Bose glass in cold atomic gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, S; Kantian, A; Daley, A J; Zoller, P [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Innsbruck, Technikerstr. 25, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Katzgraber, H G [Theoretische Physik, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Lewenstein, M [ICAO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, Parc Mediterrani de la Tecnologia, E-08860 Castelldefels, Barcelona (Spain); Buechler, H P [Institute for Theoretical Physics III, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, 70550 Stuttgart (Germany)], E-mail: sarah.morrison@uibk.ac.at

    2008-07-15

    We study cold atomic gases in a disorder potential and analyse the correlations between different systems subjected to the same disorder landscape. Such independent copies with the same disorder landscape are known as replicas. While, in general, these are not accessible experimentally in condensed matter systems, they can be realized using standard tools for controlling cold atomic gases in an optical lattice. Of special interest is the overlap function which represents a natural order parameter for disordered systems and is a correlation function between the atoms of two independent replicas with the same disorder. We demonstrate an efficient measurement scheme for the determination of this disorder-induced correlation function. As an application, we focus on the disordered Bose-Hubbard model and determine the overlap function within the perturbation theory and a numerical analysis. We find that the measurement of the overlap function allows for the identification of the Bose-glass phase in certain parameter regimes.

  15. Replica approach to mean-variance portfolio optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga-Haszonits, Istvan; Caccioli, Fabio; Kondor, Imre

    2016-12-01

    We consider the problem of mean-variance portfolio optimization for a generic covariance matrix subject to the budget constraint and the constraint for the expected return, with the application of the replica method borrowed from the statistical physics of disordered systems. We find that the replica symmetry of the solution does not need to be assumed, but emerges as the unique solution of the optimization problem. We also check the stability of this solution and find that the eigenvalues of the Hessian are positive for r  =  N/T  optimal in-sample variance is found to vanish at the critical point inversely proportional to the divergent estimation error.

  16. Platinum replica electron microscopy: Imaging the cytoskeleton globally and locally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svitkina, Tatyana M

    2017-05-01

    Structural studies reveal how smaller components of a system work together as a whole. However, combining high resolution of details with full coverage of the whole is challenging. In cell biology, light microscopy can image many cells in their entirety, but at a lower resolution, whereas electron microscopy affords very high resolution, but usually at the expense of the sample size and coverage. Structural analyses of the cytoskeleton are especially demanding, because cytoskeletal networks are unresolvable by light microscopy due to their density and intricacy, whereas their proper preservation is a challenge for electron microscopy. Platinum replica electron microscopy can uniquely bridge the gap between the "comfort zones" of light and electron microscopy by allowing high resolution imaging of the cytoskeleton throughout the entire cell and in many cells in the population. This review describes the principles and applications of platinum replica electron microscopy for studies of the cytoskeleton. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Difficult Sudoku Puzzles Created by Replica Exchange Monte Carlo Method

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    An algorithm to create difficult Sudoku puzzles is proposed. An Ising spin-glass like Hamiltonian describing difficulty of puzzles is defined, and difficult puzzles are created by minimizing the energy of the Hamiltonian. We adopt the replica exchange Monte Carlo method with simultaneous temperature adjustments to search lower energy states efficiently, and we succeed in creating a puzzle which is the world hardest ever created in our definition, to our best knowledge. (Added on Mar. 11, the ...

  18. Replica treatment of the Calogero-Sutherland model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangardt, Dimitry M.; Kamenev, Alex

    2001-01-01

    Employing Forrester-Ha method of Jack polynomials, we derive an integral identity connecting certain N-fold coordinate average of the Calogero-Sutherland model with the n-fold replica integral. Subsequent analytical continuation in n leads to asymptotic expressions for the (static and dynamic) density-density correlation function of the model as well as the Green's function for an arbitrary coupling constant λ

  19. History of Tank 23, 1962 through 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNatt, F.G.

    1979-04-01

    Tank 23 was placed in service in April 1964 receiving contaminated water from Buildings 244-H, the Receiving Basin for Off-Site Fuel (RBOF), and 245-H, the Resin Regeneration Facility (RRF). Tank 23 also provided emergency storage space for 500,000 gallons in the event of a severe contamination incident in Building 244-H. The tank has remained in this service since that time. The Tank 23 waste was processed initially by the 242-H evaporator, but since mid-1966 the waste has been processed through a zeolite bed to remove 137 C and other radioisotopes by ion exchange, and discarded to seepage basins. Inspections of the tank interior were made by using a 40-ft optical periscope and the thickness of the steel bottom of the tank was measured ultrasonically. Samples of the waste in the tank and liquid collected in the side wall and bottom sumps were analyzed. Several equipment modifications and repairs were made

  20. Underground Storage Tanks - Storage Tank Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — A Storage Tank Location is a DEP primary facility type, and its sole sub-facility is the storage tank itself. Storage tanks are aboveground or underground, and are...

  1. Computer simulation study of in-zeolites templated carbon replicas: structural and adsorption properties for hydrogen storage application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roussel, T.

    2007-05-01

    Hydrogen storage is the key issue to envisage this gas for instance as an energy vector in the field of transportation. Porous carbons are materials that are considered as possible candidates. We have studied well-controlled microporous carbon nano-structures, carbonaceous replicas of meso-porous ordered silica materials and zeolites. We realized numerically (using Grand Canonical Monte Carlo Simulations, GCMC) the atomic nano-structures of the carbon replication of four zeolites: AlPO 4 -5, silicalite-1, and Faujasite (FAU and EMT). The faujasite replicas allow nano-casting of a new form of carbon crystalline solid made of tetrahedrally or hexagonally interconnected single wall nano-tubes. The pore size networks are nano-metric giving these materials optimized hydrogen molecular storage capacities (for pure carbon phases). However, we demonstrate that these new carbon forms are not interesting for room temperature efficient storage compared to the void space of a classical gas cylinder. We showed that doping with an alkaline element, such as lithium, one could store the same quantities at 350 bar compared to a classical tank at 700 bar. This result is a possible route to achieve interesting performances for on-board docking systems for instance. (author)

  2. Replica exchange with solute tempering: A method for sampling biological systems in explicit water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pu; Kim, Byungchan; Friesner, Richard A.; Berne, B. J.

    2005-09-01

    An innovative replica exchange (parallel tempering) method called replica exchange with solute tempering (REST) for the efficient sampling of aqueous protein solutions is presented here. The method bypasses the poor scaling with system size of standard replica exchange and thus reduces the number of replicas (parallel processes) that must be used. This reduction is accomplished by deforming the Hamiltonian function for each replica in such a way that the acceptance probability for the exchange of replica configurations does not depend on the number of explicit water molecules in the system. For proof of concept, REST is compared with standard replica exchange for an alanine dipeptide molecule in water. The comparisons confirm that REST greatly reduces the number of CPUs required by regular replica exchange and increases the sampling efficiency. This method reduces the CPU time required for calculating thermodynamic averages and for the ab initio folding of proteins in explicit water. Author contributions: B.J.B. designed research; P.L. and B.K. performed research; P.L. and B.K. analyzed data; and P.L., B.K., R.A.F., and B.J.B. wrote the paper.Abbreviations: REST, replica exchange with solute tempering; REM, replica exchange method; MD, molecular dynamics.*P.L. and B.K. contributed equally to this work.

  3. 46 CFR 25.40-1 - Tanks and engine spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tanks and engine spaces. 25.40-1 Section 25.40-1...-1 Tanks and engine spaces. (a) All motorboats or motor vessels, except open boats and as provided in... from the bilges of every engine and fuel tank compartment. There shall be at least one exhaust duct...

  4. ICPP Tank Farm planning through 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, W.B.; Millet, C.B.; Staiger, M.D.; Ward, F.S.

    1998-01-01

    Historically, liquid high-level waste (HLW) generated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant has been stored in the Tank Farm after which it is calcined with the calcine being stored in stainless steel bins. Following the curtailment of spent nuclear fuel reprocessing in 1992, the HLW treatment methods were re-evaluated to establish a path forward for producing a final waste form from the liquid sodium bearing wastes (SBW) and the HLW calcine. Projections for significant improvements in waste generation, waste blending and evaporation, and calcination were incorporated into the Tank Farm modeling. This optimized modeling shows that all of the SBW can be calcined by the end of 2012 as required by the Idaho Settlement Agreement. This Tank Farm plan discusses the use of each of the eleven HLW tanks and shows that two tanks can be emptied, allowing them to be Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closed by 2006. In addition, it describes the construction of each tank and vault, gives the chemical concentrations of the contents of each tank, based on historical input and some sampling, and discusses the regulatory drivers important to Tank Farm operation. It also discusses new waste generation, the computer model used for the Tank Farm planning, the operating schedule for each tank, and the schedule for when each tank will be empty and closed

  5. Replica field theory for a polymer in random media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldschmidt, Yadin Y.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we revisit the problem of a (non-self-avoiding) polymer chain in a random medium which was previously investigated by Edwards and Muthukumar (EM) [J. Chem. Phys. 89, 2435 (1988)]. As noticed by Cates and Ball (CB) [J. Phys. (France) 49, 2009 (1988)] there is a discrepancy between the predictions of the replica calculation of EM and the expectation that in an infinite medium the quenched and annealed results should coincide (for a chain that is free to move) and a long polymer should always collapse. CB argued that only in a finite volume one might see a ''localization transition'' (or crossover) from a stretched to a collapsed chain in three spatial dimensions. Here we carry out the replica calculation in the presence of an additional confining harmonic potential that mimics the effect of a finite volume. Using a variational scheme with five variational parameters we derive analytically for d -1/(4-d) ∼(g ln V) -1/(4-d) , where R is the radius of gyration, g is the strength of the disorder, μ is the spring constant associated with the confining potential, and V is the associated effective volume of the system. Thus the EM result is recovered with their constant replaced by ln V as argued by CB. We see that in the strict infinite volume limit the polymer always collapses, but for finite volume a transition from a stretched to a collapsed form might be observed as a function of the strength of the disorder. For d V ' ∼exp(g 2/(2-d) L (4-d)/(2-d) ) the annealed results are recovered and R∼(Lg) 1/(d-2) , where L is the length of the polymer. Hence the polymer also collapses in the large L limit. The one-step replica symmetry breaking solution is crucial for obtaining the above results. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  6. Replica Approach for Minimal Investment Risk with Cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinzato, Takashi

    2018-06-01

    In the present work, the optimal portfolio minimizing the investment risk with cost is discussed analytically, where an objective function is constructed in terms of two negative aspects of investment, the risk and cost. We note the mathematical similarity between the Hamiltonian in the mean-variance model and the Hamiltonians in the Hopfield model and the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model, show that we can analyze this portfolio optimization problem by using replica analysis, and derive the minimal investment risk with cost and the investment concentration of the optimal portfolio. Furthermore, we validate our proposed method through numerical simulations.

  7. Replica Analysis for Portfolio Optimization with Single-Factor Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinzato, Takashi

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we use replica analysis to investigate the influence of correlation among the return rates of assets on the solution of the portfolio optimization problem. We consider the behavior of an optimal solution for the case where the return rate is described with a single-factor model and compare the findings obtained from our proposed methods with correlated return rates with those obtained with independent return rates. We then analytically assess the increase in the investment risk when correlation is included. Furthermore, we also compare our approach with analytical procedures for minimizing the investment risk from operations research.

  8. Application of extraction replicas and analytical electron microscopy to precipitate phase studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenik, E.A.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1984-01-01

    Extraction replicas provide a powerful extension of AEM techniques for analysis of fine precipitates. In many cases, replicas allow more accurate analyses to be performed and, in some cases, allow unique analyses which cannot be performed in-foil. However, there are limitations to the use of extraction replicas in AEM, of which the analyst must be aware. Many can be eliminated by careful preparation. Often, combined AEM studies of precipitates in-foil and on extraction replicas provide complementary and corroborative information for the fullest analysis of precipitate phases

  9. Replica calibration artefacts for optical 3D scanning of micro parts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo; Carmignato, S.; Cantatore, Angela

    2009-01-01

    This work deals with development of calibration artefacts produced by using hard replica materials, achieving high quality geometrical reproduction of suitable reference artefacts, high stability, and high surface cooperativeness. An investigation was carried out using a replica material for dental...... applications to reproduce the geometry of a step artefact, a miniature step gauge, and a curve standard for optical measuring machines. The replica artefacts were calibrated using a tactile coordinate measuring machine and measured on two different optical scanners. Replication quality and applicability...... of the artefacts to verify the accuracy of optical measurements as well as thermal expansion coefficient and stability of the replica artefacts over time were documented....

  10. The added value of the replica simulators in the exploitation of nuclear power plants; El valor anadido de los simuladores replica en la explotacion de las centrales nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz Giron, P. a.; Ortega, F.; Rivero, N.

    2011-07-01

    Nuclear power plants full scope replica simulators were in the past solely designed following operational personnel training criteria. Nevertheless, these simulators not only feature a high replica control room but also provide an accurate process response. Control room replica simulators are presently based on complex technological platforms permitting highest physical and functional fidelity, allowing to be used as versatile and value added tools in diverse plants operation and maintenance activities. In recent years. Tecnatom has extended the use of such simulators to different engineering applications. this article intends to identify the simulators use in training and other applications beyond training. (Author)

  11. Underground storage tank 431-D1U1, Closure Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancieri, S.

    1993-09-01

    This document contains information about the decommissioning of Tank 431-D1U1. This tank was installed in 1965 for diesel fuel storage. This tank will remain in active usage until closure procedures begin. Soils and ground water around the tank will be sampled to check for leakage. Appendices include; proof of proper training for workers, health and safety briefing record, task hazard analysis summary, and emergency plans.

  12. Feed tank transfer requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    This document presents a definition of tank turnover. Also, DOE and PC responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements are presented for two cases (i.e., tank modifications occurring before tank turnover and tank modification occurring after tank turnover). Finally, records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor are presented

  13. Feed tank transfer requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1998-09-16

    This document presents a definition of tank turnover. Also, DOE and PC responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements are presented for two cases (i.e., tank modifications occurring before tank turnover and tank modification occurring after tank turnover). Finally, records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor are presented.

  14. Tank Farms

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Afterirradiated fuel rods were taken from the nuclear reactors to the processing facilities at Hanford, they were exposed to a series of chemical processes designed...

  15. Broken symmetry in the mean field theory of the ising spin glass: replica way and no replica way

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Dominicis, C.

    1983-06-01

    We review the type of symmetry breaking involved in the solution discovered by Parisi and in the static derivation of the solution first introduced via dynamics by Sompolinsky. We turn to a formulation of the problem due to Thouless, Anderson and Palmer (TAP) that put a set of equations for the magnetization. A probability law for the magnetization is then built. We consider two cases: (i) a canonical distribution which is shown to give indentical results to the Hamiltonian formulation under a weak and physical assumption and (ii) a white distribution characterized by two matrices and a response. We show what symmetry breaking is necessary to recover Sompolinsky free energy. In section III we supplement replica indices in the Hamiltonian approach by ''time'' indices ans show in particular that the analytic continuation involved in Sompolinsky's equilibrium derivation, is trying to mimick a translational symmetry breaking in ''time'' that incorporates Sompolinsky's ansatz of a long time scale sequence. In section IV we apply the same treatment to the white average approach and show that, replicas can be altogether discorded and replaced by ''time''. Finally, we briefly discuss the attribution of distinct answers for the standard spin glass order parameter depending on the physical situation: equilibrium or non equilibrium associated with canonical or white (non canonical) initial conditions and density matrices

  16. 49 CFR 172.331 - Bulk packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bulk packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. 172.331 Section 172.331 Transportation Other Regulations... packagings other than portable tanks, cargo tanks, tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a) Each person...

  17. Fabrication of free-standing replicas of fragile, laminar, chitinous biotemplates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakhtakia, Akhlesh; Motyka, Michael A; MartIn-Palma, Raul J; Pantano, Carlo G

    2009-01-01

    The conformal-evaporated-film-by-rotation technique, followed by the dissolution of chitin in an aqueous solution of orthophosphoric acid, can be used to fabricate free-standing replicas of fragile, laminar, chitinous biotemplates. This novel approach was demonstrated using butterfly wings as biotemplates and GeSeSb chalcogenide glass for replicas. (communication)

  18. Fabrication of free-standing replicas of fragile, laminar, chitinous biotemplates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakhtakia, Akhlesh; Motyka, Michael A [Materials Research Institute and Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); MartIn-Palma, Raul J; Pantano, Carlo G [Materials Research Institute and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)], E-mail: akhlesh@psu.edu

    2009-09-01

    The conformal-evaporated-film-by-rotation technique, followed by the dissolution of chitin in an aqueous solution of orthophosphoric acid, can be used to fabricate free-standing replicas of fragile, laminar, chitinous biotemplates. This novel approach was demonstrated using butterfly wings as biotemplates and GeSeSb chalcogenide glass for replicas. (communication)

  19. A Novel General Chemistry Laboratory: Creation of Biomimetic Superhydrophobic Surfaces through Replica Molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbanic, Samuel; Brady, Owen; Sanda, Ahmed; Gustafson, Carolina; Donhauser, Zachary J.

    2014-01-01

    Biomimetic replicas of superhydrophobic lotus and taro leaf surfaces can be made using polydimethylsiloxane. These replicas faithfully reproduce the microstructures of the leaves' surface and can be analyzed using contact angle goniometry, self-cleaning experiments, and optical microscopy. These simple and adaptable experiments were used to…

  20. MCNP Simulations of Measurement of Insulation Compaction in the Cryogenic Rocket Fuel Tanks at Kennedy Space Center by Fast/Thermal Neutron Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, R. A.; Schweitzer, J. S.; Parsons, A. M.; Arens, E. E.

    2010-01-01

    MCNP simulations have been run to evaluate the feasibility of using a combination of fast and thermal neutrons as a nondestructive method to measure of the compaction of the perlite insulation in the liquid hydrogen and oxygen cryogenic storage tanks at John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Perlite is a feldspathic volcanic rock made up of the major elements Si, AI, Na, K and 0 along with some water. When heated it expands from four to twenty times its original volume which makes it very useful for thermal insulation. The cryogenic tanks at Kennedy Space Center are spherical with outer diameters of 69-70 feet and lined with a layer of expanded perlite with thicknesses on the order of 120 cm. There is evidence that some of the perlite has compacted over time since the tanks were built 1965, affecting the thermal properties and possibly also the structural integrity of the tanks. With commercially available portable neutron generators it is possible to produce simultaneously fluxes of neutrons in two energy ranges: fast (14 Me V) and thermal (25 me V). The two energy ranges produce complementary information. Fast neutrons produce gamma rays by inelastic scattering, which is sensitive to Fe and O. Thermal neutrons produce gamma rays by prompt gamma neutron activation (PGNA) and this is sensitive to Si, Al, Na, K and H. The compaction of the perlite can be measured by the change in gamma ray signal strength which is proportional to the atomic number densities of the constituent elements. The MCNP simulations were made to determine the magnitude of this change. The tank wall was approximated by a I-dimensional slab geometry with an 11/16" outer carbon steel wall, an inner stainless wall and 120 cm thick perlite zone. Runs were made for cases with expanded perlite, compacted perlite or with various void fractions. Runs were also made to simulate the effect of adding a moderator. Tallies were made for decay-time analysis from t=0 to 10 ms; total detected gamma

  1. Analysis of Adsorbed Natural Gas Tank Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Ernest; Schultz, Conrad; Rash, Tyler; Dohnke, Elmar; Stalla, David; Gillespie, Andrew; Sweany, Mark; Seydel, Florian; Pfeifer, Peter

    With gasoline being an ever decreasing finite resource and with the desire to reduce humanity's carbon footprint, there has been an increasing focus on innovation of alternative fuel sources. Natural gas burns cleaner, is more abundant, and conforms to modern engines. However, storing compressed natural gas (CNG) requires large, heavy gas cylinders, which limits space and fuel efficiency. Adsorbed natural gas (ANG) technology allows for much greater fuel storage capacity and the ability to store the gas at a much lower pressure. Thus, ANG tanks are much more flexible in terms of their size, shape, and weight. Our ANG tank employs monolithic nanoporous activated carbon as its adsorbent material. Several different configurations of this Flat Panel Tank Assembly (FPTA) along with a Fuel Extraction System (FES) were examined to compare with the mass flow rate demands of an engine.

  2. Replica analysis for the duality of the portfolio optimization problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinzato, Takashi

    2016-11-01

    In the present paper, the primal-dual problem consisting of the investment risk minimization problem and the expected return maximization problem in the mean-variance model is discussed using replica analysis. As a natural extension of the investment risk minimization problem under only a budget constraint that we analyzed in a previous study, we herein consider a primal-dual problem in which the investment risk minimization problem with budget and expected return constraints is regarded as the primal problem, and the expected return maximization problem with budget and investment risk constraints is regarded as the dual problem. With respect to these optimal problems, we analyze a quenched disordered system involving both of these optimization problems using the approach developed in statistical mechanical informatics and confirm that both optimal portfolios can possess the primal-dual structure. Finally, the results of numerical simulations are shown to validate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  3. Replica analysis for the duality of the portfolio optimization problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinzato, Takashi

    2016-11-01

    In the present paper, the primal-dual problem consisting of the investment risk minimization problem and the expected return maximization problem in the mean-variance model is discussed using replica analysis. As a natural extension of the investment risk minimization problem under only a budget constraint that we analyzed in a previous study, we herein consider a primal-dual problem in which the investment risk minimization problem with budget and expected return constraints is regarded as the primal problem, and the expected return maximization problem with budget and investment risk constraints is regarded as the dual problem. With respect to these optimal problems, we analyze a quenched disordered system involving both of these optimization problems using the approach developed in statistical mechanical informatics and confirm that both optimal portfolios can possess the primal-dual structure. Finally, the results of numerical simulations are shown to validate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  4. Beyond Virtual Replicas: 3D Modeling and Maltese Prehistoric Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Stanco

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, computer graphics have become strategic for the development of projects aimed at the interpretation of archaeological evidence and the dissemination of scientific results to the public. Among all the solutions available, the use of 3D models is particularly relevant for the reconstruction of poorly preserved sites and monuments destroyed by natural causes or human actions. These digital replicas are, at the same time, a virtual environment that can be used as a tool for the interpretative hypotheses of archaeologists and as an effective medium for a visual description of the cultural heritage. In this paper, the innovative methodology and aims and outcomes of a virtual reconstruction of the Borg in-Nadur megalithic temple, carried out by Archeomatica Project of the University of Catania, are offered as a case study for a virtual archaeology of prehistoric Malta.

  5. AX Tank Farm tank removal study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SKELLY, W.A.

    1999-02-24

    This report examines the feasibility of remediating ancillary equipment associated with the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. Ancillary equipment includes surface structures and equipment, process waste piping, ventilation components, wells, and pits, boxes, sumps, and tanks used to make waste transfers to/from the AX tanks and adjoining tank farms. Two remedial alternatives are considered: (1) excavation and removal of all ancillary equipment items, and (2) in-situ stabilization by grout filling, the 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a strawman in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tanks. This is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms.

  6. Tank 241-U-203: Tank Characterization Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathyanarayana, P.

    1995-01-01

    The revised Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order states that a tank characterization plan will be developed for each double-shell tank and single-shell tank using the data quality objective process. The plans are intended to allow users and regulators to ensure their needs will be met and resources are devoted to gaining only necessary information. This document satisfies that requirement for Tank 241-U-203 sampling activities

  7. 14 CFR 23.997 - Fuel strainer or filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel strainer or filter. 23.997 Section 23... Components § 23.997 Fuel strainer or filter. There must be a fuel strainer or filter between the fuel tank..., whichever is nearer the fuel tank outlet. This fuel strainer or filter must— (a) Be accessible for draining...

  8. Tank 241-BY-108 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1994-01-01

    The sampling and analytical needs associated with the 51 Hanford Site underground storage tanks classified on one or more of the four Watch Lists (ferrocyanide, organic, flammable gas, and high heat), and the safety screening of all 177 tanks have been identified through the Data Quality Objective (DQO) process. DQOs identity information needed by a program group in the Tank Waste Remediation System concerned with safety issues, regulatory requirements, or the transporting and processing of tank waste. This Tank Characterization Plan will identify characterization objectives for tank BY-108 pertaining to sample collection, sample preparation and analysis, and laboratory analytical evaluation and reporting requirements. In addition, an estimate of the current contents and status of the tank is given. Single-shell tank BY-108 is classified as a Ferrocyanide Watch List tank. The tank was declared an assumed leaker and removed from service in 1972; interim stabilized was completed in February 1985. Although not officially an Organic Watch List tank, restrictions have been placed on intrusive operations by Standing Order number-sign 94-16 (dated 09/08/94) since the tank is suspected to contain or to have contained a floating organic layer

  9. 49 CFR 172.330 - Tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. 172.330..., TRAINING REQUIREMENTS, AND SECURITY PLANS Marking § 172.330 Tank cars and multi-unit tank car tanks. (a... material— (1) In a tank car unless the following conditions are met: (i) The tank car must be marked on...

  10. Apparatus and method for grounding compressed fuel fueling operator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Joseph Perry; Farese, David John; Xu, Jianguo

    2002-06-11

    A safety system for grounding an operator at a fueling station prior to removing a fuel fill nozzle from a fuel tank upon completion of a fuel filling operation is provided which includes a fuel tank port in communication with the fuel tank for receiving and retaining the nozzle during the fuel filling operation and a grounding device adjacent to the fuel tank port which includes a grounding switch having a contact member that receives physical contact by the operator and where physical contact of the contact member activates the grounding switch. A releasable interlock is included that provides a lock position wherein the nozzle is locked into the port upon insertion of the nozzle into the port and a release position wherein the nozzle is releasable from the port upon completion of the fuel filling operation and after physical contact of the contact member is accomplished.

  11. Internal structure analysis of particle-double network gels used in a gel organ replica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Mei; Arai, Masanori; Saito, Azusa; Sakai, Kazuyuki; Kawakami, Masaru; Furukawa, Hidemitsu

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, the fabrication of patient organ replicas using 3D printers has been attracting a great deal of attention in medical fields. However, the cost of these organ replicas is very high as it is necessary to employ very expensive 3D printers and printing materials. Here we present a new gel organ replica, of human kidney, fabricated with a conventional molding technique, using a particle-double network hydrogel (P-DN gel). The replica is transparent and has the feel of a real kidney. It is expected that gel organ replicas produced this way will be a useful tool for the education of trainee surgeons and clinical ultrasonography technologists. In addition to developing a gel organ replica, the internal structure of the P-DN gel used is also discussed. Because the P-DN gel has a complex structure comprised of two different types of network, it has not been possible to investigate them internally in detail. Gels have an inhomogeneous network structure. If it is able to get a more uniform structure, it is considered that this would lead to higher strength in the gel. In the present study we investigate the structure of P-DN gel, using the gel organ replica. We investigated the internal structure of P-DN gel using Scanning Microscopic Light Scattering (SMILS), a non-contacting and non-destructive.

  12. Fabrication of the replica templated from butterfly wing scales with complex light trapping structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhiwu; Li, Bo; Mu, Zhengzhi; Yang, Meng; Niu, Shichao; Zhang, Junqiu; Ren, Luquan

    2015-11-01

    The polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) positive replica templated twice from the excellent light trapping surface of butterfly Trogonoptera brookiana wing scales was fabricated by a simple and promising route. The exact SiO2 negative replica was fabricated by using a synthesis method combining a sol-gel process and subsequent selective etching. Afterwards, a vacuum-aided process was introduced to make PDMS gel fill into the SiO2 negative replica, and the PDMS gel was solidified in an oven. Then, the SiO2 negative replica was used as secondary template and the structures in its surface was transcribed onto the surface of PDMS. At last, the PDMS positive replica was obtained. After comparing the PDMS positive replica and the original bio-template in terms of morphology, dimensions and reflectance spectra and so on, it is evident that the excellent light trapping structures of butterfly wing scales were inherited by the PDMS positive replica faithfully. This bio-inspired route could facilitate the preparation of complex light trapping nanostructure surfaces without any assistance from other power-wasting and expensive nanofabrication technologies.

  13. Tank 241-BY-111 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homi, C.S.

    1994-01-01

    The sampling and analytical needs associated with the 51 Hanford Site underground storage tanks classified on one or more of the four Watch Lists (ferrocyanide, organic, flammable gas, and high heat), and the safety screening of all 177 tanks have been identified through the Data Quality Objective (DQO) process. DQO's identify information needed by a program group in the Tank Waste Remediation System concerned with safety issues, regulatory requirements, or the transporting and processing of tank waste. This Tank Characterization Plan will identify characterization objectives for Tank BY-111 pertaining to sample collection, sample preparation and analysis, and laboratory analytical evaluation and reporting requirements. In addition, an estimate of the current contents and status of the tank is given

  14. AX Tank Farm tank removal study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SKELLY, W.A.

    1998-01-01

    This report considers the feasibility of exposing, demolishing, and removing underground storage tanks from the 241-AX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site. For the study, it was assumed that the tanks would each contain 360 ft 3 of residual waste (corresponding to the one percent residual Inventory target cited in the Tri-Party Agreement) at the time of demolition. The 241-AX Tank Farm is being employed as a ''strawman'' in engineering studies evaluating clean and landfill closure options for Hanford single-shell tank farms. The report is one of several reports being prepared for use by the Hanford Tanks Initiative Project to explore potential closure options and to develop retrieval performance evaluation criteria for tank farms

  15. The added value of the replica simulators in the exploitation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz Giron, P. a.; Ortega, F.; Rivero, N.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear power plants full scope replica simulators were in the past solely designed following operational personnel training criteria. Nevertheless, these simulators not only feature a high replica control room but also provide an accurate process response. Control room replica simulators are presently based on complex technological platforms permitting highest physical and functional fidelity, allowing to be used as versatile and value added tools in diverse plants operation and maintenance activities. In recent years. Tecnatom has extended the use of such simulators to different engineering applications. this article intends to identify the simulators use in training and other applications beyond training. (Author)

  16. Feasibility study for measurement of insulation compaction in the cryogenic rocket fuel storage tanks at Kennedy Space Center by fast/thermal neutron techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingston, R. A. [Materials Science and Engineering Dept., U. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Schweitzer, J. S. [Physics Dept., U. of Connecticut, Storrs (United States); Parsons, A. M. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt (United States); Arens, E. E. [John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL (United States)

    2014-02-18

    The liquid hydrogen and oxygen cryogenic storage tanks at John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) use expanded perlite as thermal insulation. Some of the perlite may have compacted over time, compromising the thermal performance and also the structural integrity of the tanks. Neutrons can readily penetrate through the 1.75 cm outer steel shell and through the entire 120 cm thick perlite zone. Neutrons interactions with materials produce characteristic gamma rays which are then detected. In compacted perlite the count rates in the individual peaks in the gamma ray spectrum will increase. Portable neutron generators can produce neutron simultaneous fluxes in two energy ranges: fast (14 MeV) and thermal (25 meV). Fast neutrons produce gamma rays by inelastic scattering which is sensitive to Si, Al, Fe and O. Thermal neutrons produce gamma rays by radiative capture in prompt gamma neutron activation (PGNA), which is sensitive to Si, Al, Na, K and H among others. The results of computer simulations using the software MCNP and measurements on a test article suggest that the most promising approach would be to operate the system in time-of-flight mode by pulsing the neutron generator and observing the subsequent die away curve in the PGNA signal.

  17. Hanford Tank Cleanup Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berriochoa, M.V.

    2011-01-01

    Access to Hanford's single-shell radioactive waste storage tank C-107 was significantly improved when workers completed the cut of a 55-inch diameter hole in the top of the tank. The core and its associated cutting equipment were removed from the tank and encased in a plastic sleeve to prevent any potential spread of contamination. The larger tank opening allows use of a new more efficient robotic arm to complete tank retrieval.

  18. Tank wall thinning -- Process and programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greer, S.D.; McBrine, W.J.

    1994-01-01

    In-service thinning of tank walls has occurred in the power industry and can pose a significant risk to plant safety and dependability. Appropriate respect for the energy stored in a high-pressure drain tank warrants a careful consideration of this possibility and appropriate action in order to assure the adequate safety margins against leakage or rupture. Although it has not proven to be a widespread problem, several cases of wall thinning and at least one recent tank rupture has highlighted this issue in recent years, particularly in nuclear power plants. However, the problem is not new or unique to the nuclear power industry. Severe wall thinning in deaerator tanks has been frequently identified at fossil-fueled power plants. There are many mechanisms which can contribute to tank wall thinning. Considerations for a specific tank are dictated by the system operating conditions, tank geometry, and construction material. Thinning mechanisms which have been identified include: Erosion/Corrosion Impingement Erosion Cavitation Erosion General Corrosion Galvanic Corrosion Microbial-induced Corrosion of course there are many other possible types of material degradation, many of which are characterized by pitting and cracking. This paper specifically addresses wall thinning induced by Erosion/Corrosion (also called Flow-Accelerated Corrosion) and Impingement Erosion of tanks in a power plant steam cycle. Many of the considerations presented are applicable to other types of vessels, such as moisture separators and heat exchangers

  19. Tank 241-C-103 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    The data quality objective (DQO) process was chosen as a tool to be used to identify the sampling analytical needs for the resolution of safety issues. A Tank Characterization Plant (TCP) will be developed for each double shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) using the DQO process. There are four Watch list tank classifications (ferrocyanide, organic salts, hydrogen/flammable gas, and high heat load). These classifications cover the six safety issues related to public and worker health that have been associated with the Hanford Site underground storage tanks. These safety issues are as follows: ferrocyanide, flammable gas, organic, criticality, high heat, and vapor safety issues. Tank C-103 is one of the twenty tanks currently on the Organic Salts Watch List. This TCP will identify characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, hot cell sample isolation, and laboratory analytical evaluation and reporting requirements in accordance with the appropriate DQO documents. In addition, the current contents and status of the tank are projected from historical information. The relevant safety issues that are of concern for tanks on the Organic Salts Watch List are: the potential for an exothermic reaction occurring from the flammable mixture of organic materials and nitrate/nitrite salts that could result in a release of radioactive material and the possibility that other safety issues may exist for the tank

  20. Tank 241-AW-101 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathyanarayana, P.

    1994-01-01

    The first section gives a summary of the available information for Tank AW-101. Included in the discussion are the process history and recent sampling events for the tank, as well as general information about the tank such as its age and the risers to be used for sampling. Tank 241-AW-101 is one of the 25 tanks on the Flammable Gas Watch List. To resolve the Flammable Gas safety issue, characterization of the tanks, including intrusive tank sampling, must be performed. Prior to sampling, however, the potential for the following scenarios must be evaluated: the potential for ignition of flammable gases such as hydrogen-air and/or hydrogen-nitrous oxide; and the potential for secondary ignition of organic-nitrate/nitrate mixtures in crust layer initiated by the burning of flammable gases or by a mechanical in-tank energy source. The characterization effort applicable to this Tank Characterization Plan is focused on the resolution of the crust burn flammable gas safety issue of Tank AW-101. To evaluate the potential for a crust burn of the waste material, calorimetry tests will be performed on the waste. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) will be used to determine whether an exothermic reaction exists

  1. Human skulls with turquoise inlays: pre hispanic origin or replicas?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva V, Y.; Castillo M, M.T.; Bautista M, J.P.; Arenas A, J.

    2006-01-01

    The lack of archaeological context determining if the manufacture of two human skulls adorned with turquoise inlays have pre-Columbian origin or not (replicas), led to perform other studies. Under these conditions, besides orthodox methodology commonly used to assign chronology and cultural aspects as form, style, decoration, iconography, etc., it was necessary to obtain more results based on the use of characterization techniques. The techniques employed were Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-Ray Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), in order to determine the manufacture techniques and chemical composition of the materials used for the cementant. SEM analysis showed the presence of zones composed by Ca, O, C and Al. In some cases Mg, Cl, Fe and Pb were identified. High concentration of Cu was present in all samples, due to residues of turquoise inlays (CuAI 6 (PO 4 ) 4 (OH) 8 (H 2 O) 4 ) with which the skulls were decorated. In the cementant was identified the Ca as base element of the cementant, as well as particles < 100 nm with irregular morphology and other amorphous zones. FTIR spectrums indicated the presence of organic substances that could be used as agglutinating in the cementant. The current work shows a progress identifying involved techniques in the manufacturing of two human skulls with turquoise inlays. (Author)

  2. Parylene C coating for high-performance replica molding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyries, Kevin A; Hansen, Carl L

    2011-12-07

    This paper presents an improvement to the soft lithography fabrication process that uses chemical vapor deposition of poly(chloro-p-xylylene) (parylene C) to protect microfabricated masters and to improve the release of polymer devices following replica molding. Chemical vapor deposition creates nanometre thick conformal coatings of parylene C on silicon wafers having arrays of 30 μm high SU8 pillars with densities ranging from 278 to 10,040 features per mm(2) and aspect ratios (height : width) from 1 : 1 to 6 : 1. A single coating of parylene C was sufficient to permanently promote poly(dimethyl)siloxane (PDMS) mold release and to protect masters for an indefinite number of molding cycles. We also show that the improved release properties of parylene treated masters allow for fabrication with hard polymers, such as poly(urethane), that would otherwise not be compatible with SU8 on silicon masters. Parylene C provides a robust and high performance mold release coating for soft lithography microfabrication that extends the life of microfabricated masters and improves the achievable density and aspect ratio of replicated features.

  3. Foundations and latest advances in replica exchange transition interface sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabriolu, Raffaela; Skjelbred Refsnes, Kristin M.; Bolhuis, Peter G.; van Erp, Titus S.

    2017-10-01

    Nearly 20 years ago, transition path sampling (TPS) emerged as an alternative method to free energy based approaches for the study of rare events such as nucleation, protein folding, chemical reactions, and phase transitions. TPS effectively performs Monte Carlo simulations with relatively short molecular dynamics trajectories, with the advantage of not having to alter the actual potential energy surface nor the underlying physical dynamics. Although the TPS approach also introduced a methodology to compute reaction rates, this approach was for a long time considered theoretically attractive, providing the exact same results as extensively long molecular dynamics simulations, but still expensive for most relevant applications. With the increase of computer power and improvements in the algorithmic methodology, quantitative path sampling is finding applications in more and more areas of research. In particular, the transition interface sampling (TIS) and the replica exchange TIS (RETIS) algorithms have, in turn, improved the efficiency of quantitative path sampling significantly, while maintaining the exact nature of the approach. Also, open-source software packages are making these methods, for which implementation is not straightforward, now available for a wider group of users. In addition, a blooming development takes place regarding both applications and algorithmic refinements. Therefore, it is timely to explore the wide panorama of the new developments in this field. This is the aim of this article, which focuses on the most efficient exact path sampling approach, RETIS, as well as its recent applications, extensions, and variations.

  4. Critiques, replicas and proposals for the New Urbanism Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaide Retana

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The new urbanism (NU is a vision of planning and urban design emerged in 1993, which finds its basis in the design of traditional communities. This trend has had various criticisms and replicas, which were reviewed in relation to urban sprawl, transportation, re-densifying, mix of uses of land, design, gentrification, pedestrianization and safety, which were analyzed in the neighborhood of Santa Barbara in Toluca, Mexico. This area was chosen for being traditional and forming part of the historical center of the city, which even though it was not designed under the guidelines of the NU, it has the quality of traditional, from which the NU would theoretically has taken its essence. The objective of this analysis is to establish whether the NU has the essence of a traditional Mexican neighborhood, as well as to check if the criticisms of the NU are informed when applied to a space belonging to a Mexican historic center that has been abandoned by problems of insecurity and degradation. The general conclusion is that the traditional neighborhoods have provided design elements to the NU, which will refute some of the criticisms, however, proposals for NU in neighborhoods of his-toric centers have to be based on the community, the architecture and existing urbanism, since these elements are those that give the identity.

  5. Preserving the Boltzmann ensemble in replica-exchange molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Ben; Schmidler, Scott C

    2008-10-28

    We consider the convergence behavior of replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) [Sugita and Okamoto, Chem. Phys. Lett. 314, 141 (1999)] based on properties of the numerical integrators in the underlying isothermal molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We show that a variety of deterministic algorithms favored by molecular dynamics practitioners for constant-temperature simulation of biomolecules fail either to be measure invariant or irreducible, and are therefore not ergodic. We then show that REMD using these algorithms also fails to be ergodic. As a result, the entire configuration space may not be explored even in an infinitely long simulation, and the simulation may not converge to the desired equilibrium Boltzmann ensemble. Moreover, our analysis shows that for initial configurations with unfavorable energy, it may be impossible for the system to reach a region surrounding the minimum energy configuration. We demonstrate these failures of REMD algorithms for three small systems: a Gaussian distribution (simple harmonic oscillator dynamics), a bimodal mixture of Gaussians distribution, and the alanine dipeptide. Examination of the resulting phase plots and equilibrium configuration densities indicates significant errors in the ensemble generated by REMD simulation. We describe a simple modification to address these failures based on a stochastic hybrid Monte Carlo correction, and prove that this is ergodic.

  6. Replica Exchange Simulations of the Thermodynamics of Aβ Fibril Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Takako; Klimov, Dmitri K.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Replica exchange molecular dynamics and an all-atom implicit solvent model are used to probe the thermodynamics of deposition of Alzheimer's Aβ monomers on preformed amyloid fibrils. Consistent with the experiments, two deposition stages have been identified. The docking stage occurs over a wide temperature range, starting with the formation of the first peptide-fibril interactions at 500 K. Docking is completed when a peptide fully adsorbs on the fibril edge at the temperature of 380 K. The docking transition appears to be continuous, and occurs without free energy barriers or intermediates. During docking, incoming Aβ monomer adopts a disordered structure on the fibril edge. The locking stage occurs at the temperature of ≈360 K and is characterized by the rugged free energy landscape. Locking takes place when incoming Aβ peptide forms a parallel β-sheet structure on the fibril edge. Because the β-sheets formed by locked Aβ peptides are typically off-registry, the structure of the locked phase differs from the structure of the fibril interior. The study also reports that binding affinities of two distinct fibril edges with respect to incoming Aβ peptides are different. The peptides bound to the concave edge have significantly lower free energy compared to those bound on the convex edge. Comparison with the available experimental data is discussed. PMID:19167295

  7. Stability and replica symmetry in the ising spin glass: a toy model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Dominicis, C.; Mottishaw, P.

    1986-01-01

    Searching for possible replica symmetric solutions in an Ising spin glass (in the tree approximation) we investigate a toy model whose bond distribution has two non vanishing cumulants (instead of one only as in a gaussian distribution)

  8. Corrective action baseline report for underground storage tanks 0439-U, 0440-U, 2073-U, 2074-U, and 2075-U at the East End Fuel Station, Buildings 9754 and 9754-2, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, Facility ID No. 0-010117

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide baseline geochemical and hydrogeologic data relative to corrective action for underground storage tanks (USTs) 0439-U, 0440-U, 2073-U, 2074-U, and 2075-U at the East End Fuel Station, Buildings 9754 and 9754-2 at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Progress in support of corrective action at the East End Fuel Station has included monitoring well installation, tank removal, and baseline groundwater sampling and analysis. This document represents the baseline report for corrective action at the East End Fuel Station and is organized into three sections. Section 1 presents introductory information relative to the site, including the regulatory initiative, site description, and progress to date. Section 2 includes a summary of additional monitoring well installation activities, the results of baseline groundwater sampling, a summary of tank removal activities, and the results of confirmatory soil sampling performed during tank removal. Section 3 presents the baseline hydrogeology and planned zone of influence for groundwater remediation

  9. Robotic system for remote inspection of underground storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griebenow, B.L.; Martinson, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company, Inc. (WINCO), operates the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). WINCO's mission is to process government owned spent nuclear fuel. The process involves dissolving the fuel and extracting off uranium. The waste from this process is temporarily stored at the ICPP in underground storage tanks. The tanks were put in service between 1953 and 1966 and are operating 10 to 15 years beyond their design life. Five of the tanks will be replaced by 1998. The integrity of the remaining six tanks must be verified to continue their use until they can be replaced at a later data. In order to verify the tank integrity, a complete corrosion analysis must be performed. This analysis will require a remote visual inspection of the tank surfaces

  10. Modelling and Designing Cryogenic Hydrogen Tanks for Future Aircraft Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Winnefeld

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the near future, the challenges to reduce the economic and social dependency on fossil fuels must be faced increasingly. A sustainable and efficient energy supply based on renewable energies enables large-scale applications of electro-fuels for, e.g., the transport sector. The high gravimetric energy density makes liquefied hydrogen a reasonable candidate for energy storage in a light-weight application, such as aviation. Current aircraft structures are designed to accommodate jet fuel and gas turbines allowing a limited retrofitting only. New designs, such as the blended-wing-body, enable a more flexible integration of new storage technologies and energy converters, e.g., cryogenic hydrogen tanks and fuel cells. Against this background, a tank-design model is formulated, which considers geometrical, mechanical and thermal aspects, as well as specific mission profiles while considering a power supply by a fuel cell. This design approach enables the determination of required tank mass and storage density, respectively. A new evaluation value is defined including the vented hydrogen mass throughout the flight enabling more transparent insights on mass shares. Subsequently, a systematic approach in tank partitioning leads to associated compromises regarding the tank weight. The analysis shows that cryogenic hydrogen tanks are highly competitive with kerosene tanks in terms of overall mass, which is further improved by the use of a fuel cell.

  11. Performances in Tank Cleaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanel-Viorel Panaitescu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available There are several operations which must do to maximize the performance of tank cleaning. The new advanced technologies in tank cleaning have raised the standards in marine areas. There are many ways to realise optimal cleaning efficiency for different tanks. The evaluation of tank cleaning options means to start with audit of operations: how many tanks require cleaning, are there obstructions in tanks (e.g. agitators, mixers, what residue needs to be removed, are cleaning agents required or is water sufficient, what methods can used for tank cleaning. After these steps, must be verify the results and ensure that the best cleaning values can be achieved in terms of accuracy and reliability. Technology advancements have made it easier to remove stubborn residues, shorten cleaning cycle times and achieve higher levels of automation. In this paper are presented the performances in tank cleaning in accordance with legislation in force. If tank cleaning technologies are effective, then operating costs are minimal.

  12. Designed-walk replica-exchange method for simulations of complex systems

    OpenAIRE

    Urano, Ryo; Okamoto, Yuko

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new implementation of the replica-exchange method (REM) in which replicas follow a pre-planned route in temperature space instead of a random walk. Our method satisfies the detailed balance condition in the proposed route. The method forces tunneling events between the highest and lowest temperatures to happen with an almost constant period. The number of tunneling counts is proportional to that of the random-walk REM multiplied by the square root of moving distance in temperatur...

  13. Utility of replica techniques for x-ray microanalysis of second phase particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentley, J.

    1984-01-01

    X-ray microanalysis of second phase particles in ion-milled or electropolished thin foils is often complicated by the presence of the matrix nearby. Extraction replica techniques provide a means to avoid many of the complications of thin-foil analyses. In this paper, three examples of the analysis of second phase particles are described and illustrate the improvement obtained by the use of extraction replicas for qualitative analysis, quantitative analysis, and analysis of radioactive specimens

  14. Tank 244A tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    The Double-Shell Tank (DST) System currently receives waste from the Single-Shell Tank (SST) System in support of SST stabilization efforts or from other on-site facilities which generate or store waste. Waste is also transferred between individual DSTs. The mixing or commingling of potentially incompatible waste types at the Hanford Site must be addressed prior to any waste transfers into the DSTs. The primary goal of the Waste Compatibility Program is to prevent the formation of an Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) as a result of improper waste management. Tank 244A is a Double Contained Receiver Tank (DCRT) which serves as any overflow tank for the East Area Farms. Waste material is able to flow freely between the underground storage tanks and tank 244A. Therefore, it is necessary to test the waste in tank 244A for compatibility purposes. Two issues related to the overall problem of waste compatibility must be evaluated: Assurance of continued operability during waste transfer and waste concentration and Assurance that safety problems are not created as a result of commingling wastes under interim storage. The results of the grab sampling activity prescribed by this Tank Characterization Plan shall help determine the potential for four kinds of safety problems: criticality, flammable gas accumulation, energetics, and corrosion and leakage

  15. Data Sets Replicas Placements Strategy from Cost-Effective View in the Cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuguo Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Replication technology is commonly used to improve data availability and reduce data access latency in the cloud storage system by providing users with different replicas of the same service. Most current approaches largely focus on system performance improvement, neglecting management cost in deciding replicas number and their store places, which cause great financial burden for cloud users because the cost for replicas storage and consistency maintenance may lead to high overhead with the number of new replicas increased in a pay-as-you-go paradigm. In this paper, towards achieving the approximate minimum data sets management cost benchmark in a practical manner, we propose a replicas placements strategy from cost-effective view with the premise that system performance meets requirements. Firstly, we design data sets management cost models, including storage cost and transfer cost. Secondly, we use the access frequency and the average response time to decide which data set should be replicated. Then, the method of calculating replicas’ number and their store places with minimum management cost is proposed based on location problem graph. Both the theoretical analysis and simulations have shown that the proposed strategy offers the benefits of lower management cost with fewer replicas.

  16. Calculation of absolute protein-ligand binding free energy using distributed replica sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodinger, Tomas; Howell, P Lynne; Pomès, Régis

    2008-10-21

    Distributed replica sampling [T. Rodinger et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2, 725 (2006)] is a simple and general scheme for Boltzmann sampling of conformational space by computer simulation in which multiple replicas of the system undergo a random walk in reaction coordinate or temperature space. Individual replicas are linked through a generalized Hamiltonian containing an extra potential energy term or bias which depends on the distribution of all replicas, thus enforcing the desired sampling distribution along the coordinate or parameter of interest regardless of free energy barriers. In contrast to replica exchange methods, efficient implementation of the algorithm does not require synchronicity of the individual simulations. The algorithm is inherently suited for large-scale simulations using shared or heterogeneous computing platforms such as a distributed network. In this work, we build on our original algorithm by introducing Boltzmann-weighted jumping, which allows moves of a larger magnitude and thus enhances sampling efficiency along the reaction coordinate. The approach is demonstrated using a realistic and biologically relevant application; we calculate the standard binding free energy of benzene to the L99A mutant of T4 lysozyme. Distributed replica sampling is used in conjunction with thermodynamic integration to compute the potential of mean force for extracting the ligand from protein and solvent along a nonphysical spatial coordinate. Dynamic treatment of the reaction coordinate leads to faster statistical convergence of the potential of mean force than a conventional static coordinate, which suffers from slow transitions on a rugged potential energy surface.

  17. Conformational sampling enhancement of replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations using swarm particle intelligence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamberaj, Hiqmet

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new method based on swarm particle social intelligence for use in replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations. In this method, the replicas (representing the different system configurations) are allowed communicating with each other through the individual and social knowledge, in additional to considering them as a collection of real particles interacting through the Newtonian forces. The new method is based on the modification of the equations of motion in such way that the replicas are driven towards the global energy minimum. The method was tested for the Lennard-Jones clusters of N = 4,  5, and 6 atoms. Our results showed that the new method is more efficient than the conventional replica exchange method under the same practical conditions. In particular, the new method performed better on optimizing the distribution of the replicas among the thermostats with time and, in addition, ergodic convergence is observed to be faster. We also introduce a weighted histogram analysis method allowing analyzing the data from simulations by combining data from all of the replicas and rigorously removing the inserted bias

  18. Theoretical comparison between solar combisystems based on bikini tanks and tank-in-tank solar combisystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazdanshenas, Eshagh; Furbo, Simon; Bales, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Theoretical investigations have shown that solar combisystems based on bikini tanks for low energy houses perform better than solar domestic hot water systems based on mantle tanks. Tank-in-tank solar combisystems are also attractive from a thermal performance point of view. In this paper......, theoretical comparisons between solar combisystems based on bikini tanks and tank-in-tank solar combisystems are presented....

  19. 14 CFR 25.997 - Fuel strainer or filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fuel strainer or filter. 25.997 Section 25... or filter. There must be a fuel strainer or filter between the fuel tank outlet and the inlet of... fuel tank outlet. This fuel strainer or filter must— (a) Be accessible for draining and cleaning and...

  20. 111-B Metal Examination Facility Concrete Tanks Characterization Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Encke, D.B.

    1997-08-01

    The 111-B Metal Examination Facility was a single-story, wood frame 'L'-shaped building built on a concrete floor slab. The facility served as a fuel failure inspection facility. Irradiated fuel pieces were stored and examined in two below grade concrete storage tanks filled with water. The tanks have been filled with grout to stabilize the contamination they contained, and overall dimensions are 5 ft 9 in. (1.5 m 22.8 cm ) wide, 9 ft 1 in. (2.7 m 2.54 cm ) deep, and 10 ft 8 in. (3.0 m 20.32 cm) long, and are estimated to weigh 39 tons. The tanks were used to store and examine failed fuel rods, using water as a radiation shield. The tanks were lined with stainless steel; however, drawings show the liner has been removed from at least one tank (south tank) and was partially filled with grout. The south tank was used to contain the Sample Storage Facility, a multi-level metal storage rack for failed nuclear fuel rods (shown in drawings H-1-2889 and -2890). Both tanks were completely grouted sometime before decontamination and demolition (D ampersand D) of the above ground facility in 1984. The 111-B Metal Examination Facility contained two concrete tanks located below floor level for storage and examination of failed fuel. The tanks were filled with concrete as part of decommissioning the facility prior to 1983 (see Appendix A for description of previous work). Funding for removal and disposal of the tanks ran out before they could be properly disposed

  1. Underground storage tank 291-D1U1: Closure plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancieri, S.; Giuntoli, N.

    1993-09-01

    The 291-D1U1 tank system was installed in 1983 on the north side of Building 291. It supplies diesel fuel to the Building 291 emergency generator and air compressor. The emergency generator and air compressor are located southwest and southeast, respectively, of the tank (see Appendix B, Figure 2). The tank system consists of a single-walled, 2,000- gallon, fiberglass tank and a fuel pump system, fill pipe, vent pipe, electrical conduit, and fuel supply and return piping. The area to be excavated is paved with asphalt and concrete. It is not known whether a concrete anchor pad is associated with this tank. Additionally, this closure plan assumes that the diesel tank is below the fill pad. The emergency generator and air compressor for Building 291 and its associated UST, 291-D1U1, are currently in use. The generator and air compressor will be supplied by a temporary above-ground fuel tank prior to the removal of 291-D1U1. An above-ground fuel tank will be installed as a permanent replacement for 291-D1U1. The system was registered with the State Water Resources Control Board on June 27, 1984, as 291-41D and has subsequently been renamed 291-D1U1. Figure 1 (see Appendix B) shows the location of the 291-D1U1 tank system in relation to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Figure 2 (see Appendix B) shows the 291-D1U1 tank system in relation to Building 291. Figure 3 (see Appendix B) shows a plan view of the 291-D1U1 tank system.

  2. Testing underground tanks for leak tightness at LLNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, R.K.; Sites, R.L.; Sledge, M.

    1986-01-01

    Two types of tank systems are present at the Livermore Site: tanks and associated piping for the storage of fuel (forty-three systems), and tanks or sumps and associated piping for the retention of potentially contaminated wastewater (forty systems). The fuel systems were tested using commercially available test methods: Petro-Tite, Hunter Leak Lokator, Ezy-Chek, and Associated Environmental Systems (A.E.S.). In contrast to fuel tank systems, wastewater systems have containers that are predominantly open at the top and not readily testable. Therefore, a project to test and evaluate all available testing methods was initiated and completed. The commercial method Tank Auditor was determined to be appropriate for testing open-top tanks and sumps and this was the method used to test the majority of the open-top containers. Of the 81 tanks tested, 61 were found to be leak tight, 9 were shown to have leaks, and 11 yielded inconclusive results. Two tanks have not yet been tested because of operational constraints; they are sheduled to be tested within the next two months. Schedules are being developed for the retesting of tanks and for remedial actions

  3. Tank 241-U-111 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1995-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-U-111

  4. Tank 241-T-111 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homi, C.S.

    1995-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-T-111

  5. Tank 241-U-103 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1995-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-U-103

  6. Tank 241-TX-118 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1994-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-TX-118

  7. Tank 241-BX-104 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1994-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-BX-104

  8. Tank 241-TY-101 Tank Characterization Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homi, C.S.

    1995-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-TY-101

  9. Tank 241-T-107 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homi, C.S.

    1995-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-T-107

  10. Tank 241-TX-105 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1995-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, WHC 222-S Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and PNL tank vapor program. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of vapor samples from tank 241-TX-105

  11. Tank car leaks gasoline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    On January 27, 1994, a Canadian National (CN) tank car loaded with gasoline began to leak from a crack in the tank shell on the end of the car near the stub sill. The tank car had been damaged from impact switching. A part of the tank car was sent for laboratory analysis which concluded that: (1) the fracture originated in two locations in welds, (2) the cracks propagated in a symmetrical manner and progressed into the tank plate, (3) the fracture surface revealed inadequate weld fusion. A stress analysis of the tank car was conducted to determine the coupling force necessary to cause the crack. It was noted that over the last decade several problems have occurred pertaining to stub sill areas of tank cars that have resulted in hazardous material spills. An advisory was sent to Transport Canada outlining many examples where tank cars containing serious defects had passed CN inspections that were specifically designed to identify such defects. 4 figs

  12. Tank Closure Progress at the Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Tank Farm Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butterworth, St.W.; Shaw, M.R.

    2009-01-01

    Significant progress continued at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho National Laboratory (INL) with the completion of the closure process to empty, clean and close radioactive liquid waste storage tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Tank Farm Facility (TFF). The TFF includes eleven 1,135.6-kL (300,000-gal) underground stainless steel storage tanks and four smaller, 113.5-kL (30,000-gal) stainless steel tanks, along with tank vaults, interconnecting piping, and ancillary equipment. The TFF tanks had historically been used to store a variety of radioactive liquid waste, including wastes associated with past spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. Four of the large storage tanks remain in use for waste storage while the other seven 1,135.6-kL (300,000-gal) tanks and the four 113.5-kL (30,000-gal) tanks have been emptied of waste, cleaned and filled with grout. Recent issuance of an Amended Record of Decision (ROD) in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act, and a Waste Determination complying with Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2005, allowed commencement of grouting activities on the cleaned tanks. The first three 113.5-kL (30,000-gal) tanks were grouted in the Fall of 2006 and the fourth tank and the seven 1,135.6-kL (300,000-gal) tanks were filled with grout in 2007 to provide long-term stability. During 2008 over seven miles of underground process piping along with associated tank valve boxes and secondary containment systems was stabilized with grout. Lessons learned were compiled and implemented during the closure process and will be utilized on the remaining four 1,135.6-kL (300,000-gal) underground stainless steel storage tanks. Significant progress has been made to clean and close emptied tanks at the INTEC TFF. Between 2002 and 2005, seven of the eleven 1,135.6-kL (300,000-gal) tanks and all four 113.5-kL (30,000-gal) tanks were cleaned and prepared

  13. Tank 241-AZ-101 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board has advised the DOE to concentrate the near-term sampling and analysis activities on identification and resolution of safety issues. The Data Quality Objective (DQO) process was chosen as a tool to be used in the resolution of safety issues. As a result, A revision in the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) milestone M-44 has been made, which states that ''A Tank Characterization Plan (TCP) will also be developed for each double-shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) using the DQO process. Development of TCPs by the DQO process is intended to allow users to ensure their needs will be met and that resources are devoted to gaining only necessary information''. This document satisfies that requirement for Tank 241-AZ-101 (AZ-101) sampling activities. Tank AZ-101 is currently a non-Watch List tank, so the only DQOs applicable to this tank are the safety screening DQO and the compatibility DQO, as described below. The contents of Tank AZ-101, as of October 31, 1994, consisted of 3,630 kL (960 kgal) of dilute non-complexed waste and aging waste from PUREX (NCAW, neutralized current acid waste). Tank AZ-101 is expected to have two primary layers. The bottom layer is composed of 132 kL of sludge, and the top layer is composed of 3,500 kL of supernatant, with a total tank waste depth of approximately 8.87 meters

  14. Tank 241-AZ-102 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board has advised the DOE to concentrate the near-term sampling and analysis activities on identification and resolution of safety issues. The Data Quality Objective (DQO) process was chosen as a tool to be used in the resolution of safety issues. As a result, a revision in the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) milestone M-44 has been made, which states that ''A Tank Characterization Plan (TCP) will also be developed for each double-shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) using the DQO process ... Development of TCPs by the DQO process is intended to allow users to ensure their needs will be met and that resources are devoted to gaining only necessary information''. This document satisfies that requirement for tank 241-AZ-102 (AZ-102) sampling activities. Tank AZ-102 is currently a non-Watch List tank, so the only DQOs applicable to this tank are the safety screening DQO and the compatibility DQO, as described below. The current contents of Tank AZ-102, as of October 31, 1994, consisted of 3,600 kL (950 kgal) of dilute non-complexed waste and aging waste from PUREX (NCAW, neutralized current acid waste). Tank AZ-102 is expected to have two primary layers. The bottom layer is composed of 360 kL of sludge, and the top layer is composed of 3,240 kL of supernatant, with a total tank waste depth of approximately 8.9 meters

  15. Think Tanks in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelstrup, Jesper Dahl

    in their national contexts. Questions regarding patterns and differences in think tank organisations and functions across countries have largely been left unanswered. This paper advances a definition and research design that uses different expert roles to categorise think tanks. A sample of 34 think tanks from...

  16. Feed tank transfer requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    This document presents a definition of tank turnover; DOE responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements; records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor for use during Phase 1B

  17. Underground storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Environmental contamination from leaking underground storage tanks poses a significant threat to human health and the environment. An estimated five to six million underground storage tanks containing hazardous substances or petroleum products are in use in the US. Originally placed underground as a fire prevention measure, these tanks have substantially reduced the damages from stored flammable liquids. However, an estimated 400,000 underground tanks are thought to be leaking now, and many more will begin to leak in the near future. Products released from these leaking tanks can threaten groundwater supplies, damage sewer lines and buried cables, poison crops, and lead to fires and explosions. As required by the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA), the EPA has been developing a comprehensive regulatory program for underground storage tanks. The EPA proposed three sets of regulations pertaining to underground tanks. The first addressed technical requirements for petroleum and hazardous substance tanks, including new tank performance standards, release detection, release reporting and investigation, corrective action, and tank closure. The second proposed regulation addresses financial responsibility requirements for underground petroleum tanks. The third addressed standards for approval of state tank programs

  18. Tank 241-B-103 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1995-01-01

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) has advised the US Department of Energy (DOE) to concentrate the near-term sampling and analysis activities on identification and resolution of safety issues. The data quality objective (DQO) process was chosen as a tool to be used to identify sampling and analytical needs for the resolution of safety issues. As a result, a revision in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement or TPA) milestone M-44-00 has been made, which states that ''A Tank Characterization Plan (TCP) will also be developed for each double-shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) using the DQO process... Development of TCPs by the DQO process is intended to allow users (e.g., Hanford Facility user groups, regulators) to ensure their needs will be met and that resources are devoted to gaining only necessary information.'' This document satisfies that requirement for Tank 241-B-103 (B-103) sampling activities. Tank B-103 was placed on the Organic Watch List in January 1991 due to review of TRAC data that predicts a TOC content of 3.3 dry weight percent. The tank was classified as an assumed leaker of approximately 30,280 liters (8,000 gallons) in 1978 and declared inactive. Tank B-103 is passively ventilated with interim stabilization and intrusion prevention measures completed in 1985

  19. Tank 241-A-104 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, WHC 222-S Laboratory, and PNL 325 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of auger samples from tank 241-A-104. This Tank Characterization Plan will identify characterization objectives pertaining to sample collection, hot cell sample isolation, and laboratory analytical evaluation and reporting requirements in addition to reporting the current contents and status of the tank as projected from historical information

  20. Synthesis and properties of ZnFe2O4 replica with biological hierarchical structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Hongyan; Guo, Yiping; Zhang, Yangyang; Wu, Fen; Liu, Yun; Zhang, Di

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • ZFO replica with hierarchical structure was synthesized from butterfly wings. • Biotemplate has a significant impact on the properties of ZFO material. • Our method opens up new avenues for the synthesis of spinel ferrites. -- Abstract: ZnFe 2 O 4 replica with biological hierarchical structure was synthesized from Papilio paris by a sol–gel method followed by calcination. The crystallographic structure and morphology of the obtained samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscope, and transmittance electron microscope. The results showed that the hierarchical structures were retained in the ZFO replica of spinel structure. The magnetic behavior of such novel products was measured by a vibrating sample magnetometer. A superparamagnetism-like behavior was observed due to nanostructuration size effects. In addition, the ZFO replica with “quasi-honeycomb-like structure” showed a much higher specific capacitance of 279.4 F g −1 at 10 mV s −1 in comparison with ZFO powder of 137.3 F g −1 , attributing to the significantly increased surface area. These results demonstrated that ZFO replica is a promising candidate for novel magnetic devices and supercapacitors

  1. A distance-aware replica adaptive data gathering protocol for Delay Tolerant Mobile Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yong; Gong, Haigang; Fan, Mingyu; Liu, Ming; Wang, Xiaomin

    2011-01-01

    In Delay Tolerant Mobile Sensor Networks (DTMSNs) that have the inherent features of intermitted connectivity and frequently changing network topology it is reasonable to utilize multi-replica schemes to improve the data gathering performance. However, most existing multi-replica approaches inject a large amount of message copies into the network to increase the probability of message delivery, which may drain each mobile node's limited battery supply faster and result in too much contention for the restricted resources of the DTMSN, so a proper data gathering scheme needs a trade off between the number of replica messages and network performance. In this paper, we propose a new data gathering protocol called DRADG (for Distance-aware Replica Adaptive Data Gathering protocol), which economizes network resource consumption through making use of a self-adapting algorithm to cut down the number of redundant replicas of messages, and achieves a good network performance by leveraging the delivery probabilities of the mobile sensors as main routing metrics. Simulation results have shown that the proposed DRADG protocol achieves comparable or higher message delivery ratios at the cost of the much lower transmission overhead than several current DTMSN data gathering schemes.

  2. WWTP Process Tank Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Jesper

    The present thesis considers numerical modeling of activated sludge tanks on municipal wastewater treatment plants. Focus is aimed at integrated modeling where the detailed microbiological model the Activated Sludge Model 3 (ASM3) is combined with a detailed hydrodynamic model based on a numerical...... solution of the Navier-Stokes equations in a multiphase scheme. After a general introduction to the activated sludge tank as a system, the activated sludge tank model is gradually setup in separate stages. The individual sub-processes that are often occurring in activated sludge tanks are initially...... hydrofoil shaped propellers. These two sub-processes deliver the main part of the supplied energy to the activated sludge tank, and for this reason they are important for the mixing conditions in the tank. For other important processes occurring in the activated sludge tank, existing models and measurements...

  3. Analysis of Tank PMD Rewetting Following Thrust Resettling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weislogel, M. M.; Sala, M. A.; Collicott, S. H.; Rame, Enrique (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Recent investigations have successfully demonstrated closed-form analytical solutions of spontaneous capillary flows in idealized cylindrical containers with interior corners. In this report, the theory is extended and applied to complex containers modeling spacecraft fuel tanks employing propellant management devices (PMDs). The specific problem investigated is one of spontaneous rewetting of a typical partially filled liquid fuel/cryogen tank with PMD after thrust resettling. The transients of this flow impact the logistics of orbital maneuvers and potentially tank thermal control. The general procedure to compute the initial condition (mean radius of curvature for the interface) for the closed-form transient flows is first outlined then solved for several 'complex' cylindrical tanks exhibiting symmetry. The utility and limitations of the technique as a design tool are discussed in a summary, which also highlights comparisons with NASA flight data of a model propellant tank with PMD.

  4. Tank 241-AP-104 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homi, C.S.

    1995-11-01

    This document is a plan that identifies the information needed to address relevant issues concerning short-term and long-term safe storage and long-term management of Double-Shell Tank (DST) 241-AP-104

  5. Fuel transporting device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiratori, Hirozo.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: In a liquid-metal cooled reactor, to reduce the waiting time of fuel handling apparatuses and shorten the fuel exchange time. Constitution: A fuel transporting machine is arranged between a reactor vessel and an out-pile storage tank, thereby dividing the transportation line of the pot for contracting fuel and transporting the same. By assuming such a construction, the flow of fuel transportation which has heretofore been carried out through fuel transportation pipes is not limited to one direction but the take-out of fuels from the reactor and the take-in thereof from the storage tank can be carried out constantly, and much time is not required for fuel exchange. (Kamimura, M.)

  6. Tank 241-C-107 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) has advised the US Department of Energy (DOE) to concentrate the near-term sampling and analysis activities on identification and resolution of safety issues. The data quality objective (DQO) process was chosen as a tool to be used to identify sampling and analytical needs for the resolution of safety issues. As a result, a revision in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement or TPA) milestone M-44-00 has been made, which states that ''A Tank Characterization Plan (TCP) will also be developed for each double-shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) using the DQO process... Development of TCPs by the DQO process is intended to allow users (e.g., Hanford Facility user groups, regulators) to ensure their needs will be met and that resources are devoted to gaining only necessary information.'' This document satisfies that requirement for the Tank 241-C-107 (C-107) sampling activities. Currently tank C-107 is categorized as a sound, low-heat load tank with partial isolation completed in December 1982. The tank is awaiting stabilization. Tank C-107 is expected to contain three primary layers of waste. The bottom layer should contain a mixture of the following wastes: ion exchange, concentrated phosphate waste from N-Reactor, Hanford Lab Operations, strontium semi-works, Battelle Northwest, 1C, TBP waste, cladding waste, and the hot semi-works. The middle layer should contain strontium recovery supernate. The upper layer should consist of non-complexed waste

  7. Implementation and performance analysis of the LHCb LFC replica using Oracle streams technology

    CERN Document Server

    Düllmann, D; Martelli, B; Peco, G; Bonifazzi, F; Da Fonte Perez, E; Baranowski, Z; Vagnoni, V

    2007-01-01

    The presentation will describe the architecture and the deployment of the LHCb read-only File Catalogue for the LHC Computing Grid (LFC) replica implemented at the Italian INFN National Centre for Telematics and Informatics (CNAF), and evaluate a series of tests on the LFC with replica. The LHCb computing model foresees the replication of the central LFC database in every Tier-1, in order to assure more scalability and fault tolerance to LHCb applications Scientific data intensive applications use a large collection of files for storing data. In particular, as regards the HEP community, data generated by large detectors will be managed and stored using databases. The intensive access to information stored in databases by the Grid computing applications requires a distributed database replication in order to guarantee the scalability and, in case of failure, redundancy. Besides the results of the tests will be an important reference for all the Grid users This talk will describe the replica implementation of L...

  8. Microlens fabrication by replica molding of frozen laser-printed droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surdo, Salvatore; Diaspro, Alberto; Duocastella, Martí

    2017-10-01

    In this work, we synergistically combine laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) and replica molding for the fabrication of microlenses with control of their geometry and size independent of the material or substrate used. Our approach is based on a multistep process in which liquid microdroplets of an aqueous solution are first printed on a substrate by LIFT. Following a freezing step, the microdroplets are used as a master to fabricate a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mold. A subsequent replica molding step enables the creation of microlenses and microlens arrays on arbitrary selected substrates and by using different curable polymers. Thus, our method combines the rapid fabrication capabilities of LIFT and the perfectively smooth surface quality of the generated microdroplets, with the advantages of replica molding in terms of parallelization and materials flexibility. We demonstrate our strategy by generating microlenses of different photocurable polymers and by characterizing their optical and morphological properties.

  9. Surgery planning and navigation by laser lithography plastic replica. Features, clinical applications, and advantages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kihara, Tomohiko; Tanaka, Yuuko; Furuhata, Kentaro

    1995-01-01

    The use of three-dimensional replicas created using laserlithography has recently become popular for surgical planning and intraoperative navigation in plastic surgery and oral maxillofacial surgery. In this study, we investigated many clinical applications that we have been involved in regarding the production of three-dimensional replicas. We have also analyzed the features, application classes, and advantages of this method. As a result, clinical applications are categorized into three classes, which are 'three-dimensional shape recognition', 'simulated surgery', and 'template'. The distinct features of three-dimensional replicas are 'direct recognition', 'fast manipulation', and 'free availability'. Meeting the requirements of surgical planning and intraoperative navigation, they have produced satisfactory results in clinical applications. (author)

  10. 49 CFR 179.400 - General specification applicable to cryogenic liquid tank car tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... liquid tank car tanks. 179.400 Section 179.400 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and... liquid tank car tanks. ...

  11. Acceleration of Lateral Equilibration in Mixed Lipid Bilayers Using Replica Exchange with Solute Tempering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kun; García, Angel E

    2014-10-14

    The lateral heterogeneity of cellular membranes plays an important role in many biological functions such as signaling and regulating membrane proteins. This heterogeneity can result from preferential interactions between membrane components or interactions with membrane proteins. One major difficulty in molecular dynamics simulations aimed at studying the membrane heterogeneity is that lipids diffuse slowly and collectively in bilayers, and therefore, it is difficult to reach equilibrium in lateral organization in bilayer mixtures. Here, we propose the use of the replica exchange with solute tempering (REST) approach to accelerate lateral relaxation in heterogeneous bilayers. REST is based on the replica exchange method but tempers only the solute, leaving the temperature of the solvent fixed. Since the number of replicas in REST scales approximately only with the degrees of freedom in the solute, REST enables us to enhance the configuration sampling of lipid bilayers with fewer replicas, in comparison with the temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics simulation (T-REMD) where the number of replicas scales with the degrees of freedom of the entire system. We apply the REST method to a cholesterol and 1,2-dipalmitoyl- sn -glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) bilayer mixture and find that the lateral distribution functions of all molecular pair types converge much faster than in the standard MD simulation. The relative diffusion rate between molecules in REST is, on average, an order of magnitude faster than in the standard MD simulation. Although REST was initially proposed to study protein folding and its efficiency in protein folding is still under debate, we find a unique application of REST to accelerate lateral equilibration in mixed lipid membranes and suggest a promising way to probe membrane lateral heterogeneity through molecular dynamics simulation.

  12. 30 CFR 36.27 - Fuel-supply system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel-supply system. 36.27 Section 36.27 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF... Construction and Design Requirements § 36.27 Fuel-supply system. (a) Fuel tank. (1) The fuel tank shall not...

  13. Replica analysis of partition-function zeros in spin-glass models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Kazutaka

    2011-01-01

    We study the partition-function zeros in mean-field spin-glass models. We show that the replica method is useful to find the locations of zeros in a complex parameter plane. For the random energy model, we obtain the phase diagram in the plane and find that there are two types of distributions of zeros: two-dimensional distribution within a phase and one-dimensional one on a phase boundary. Phases with a two-dimensional distribution are characterized by a novel order parameter defined in the present replica analysis. We also discuss possible patterns of distributions by studying several systems.

  14. FFTF vertical sodium storage tank preliminary thermal analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irwin, J.J.

    1995-01-01

    In the FFTF Shutdown Program, sodium from the primary and secondary heat transport loops, Interim Decay Storage (IDS), and Fuel Storage Facility (FSF) will be transferred to four large storage tanks for temporary storage. Three of the storage tanks will be cylindrical vertical tanks having a diameter of 28 feet, height of 22 feet and fabricated from carbon steel. The fourth tank is a horizontal cylindrical tank but is not the subject of this report. The storage tanks will be located near the FFTF in the 400 Area and rest on a steel-lined concrete slab in an enclosed building. The purpose of this work is to document the thermal analyses that were performed to ensure that the vertical FFTF sodium storage tank design is feasible from a thermal standpoint. The key criterion for this analysis is the time to heat up the storage tank containing frozen sodium at ambient temperature to 400 F. Normal operating conditions include an ambient temperature range of 32 F to 120 F. A key parameter in the evaluation of the sodium storage tank is the type of insulation. The baseline case assumed six inches of calcium silicate insulation. An alternate case assumed refractory fiber (Cerablanket) insulation also with a thickness of six inches. Both cases assumed a total electrical trace heat load of 60 kW, with 24 kW evenly distributed on the bottom head and 36 kW evenly distributed on the tank side wall

  15. Extended tank use analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeFigh-Price, C.; Green, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    The single-shell tanks at the Hanford Site were originally designed for open-quotes temporaryclose quotes use. The newer double-shell tanks were designed for 50 years of use. A number of single-shell tanks failed their original design criteria to contain liquid waste soon after they were constructed. These single-shell and double-shell tanks now will be required to contain semi-solid high-activity waste well beyond their design lives. It must be determined that the waste contained in these tanks will remain stable for up to an additional 30 years of storage. This paper describes the challenge of demonstrating that the tanks that have exceeded or will exceed their design lifetime can safely store high-level waste until planned disposal actions are taken. Considerations will include structural and chemical analyses

  16. Think tanks in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blach-Ørsten, Mark; Kristensen, Nete Nørgaard

    2016-01-01

    outside the media. The study shows that the two largest and oldest think tanks in Denmark, the liberal think tank CEPOS and the social democratic think tank ECLM, are very active and observable in the media; that the media’s distribution of attention to these think tanks, to some extent, confirms a re......-politicization of Danish newspapers; but also that the news media as an arena of influence is only one part of the equation, since some of the corporatist political networks are still intact and working outside the media...... half of the 2010s, because in this national setting think tanks are still a relatively new phenomenon. Based on theories of mediatization and de-corporatization, we present 1) an analysis of the visibility of selected Danish think tanks in the media and 2) an analysis of their political networks...

  17. A tank-to-wheel analysis tool for energy and emissions studies in road vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, C.M.; Goncalves, G.A.; Farias, T.L.; Mendes-Lopes, J.M.C.

    2006-01-01

    Currently, oil based fuels are the primary energy source of road transport. The growing need for oil independence and CO 2 mitigation has led to the increasing importance of alternative fuel usage. CO 2 is produced not only as the fuel is used in the vehicle (tank-to-wheel contribution), but also upstream, from the fuel extraction to the refueling station (well-to-tank contribution), and the life cycle of the fuel production (well-to-wheel contribution) must be considered in order to analyse the global impact of the fuel utilization. A road vehicle tank-to-wheel analysis tool that may be integrated with well-to-tank models was developed in the present study. The integration in a demonstration case study allowed to perform a life cycle assessment concerning the utilization of diesel and natural gas fuels in a specific network line of a bus transit company operating in the city of Porto, Portugal. (author)

  18. Hanford tanks initiative plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, K.E.

    1997-01-01

    Abstract: The Hanford Tanks Initiative (HTI) is a five-year project resulting from the technical and financial partnership of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Waste Management (EM-30) and Office of Science and Technology Development (EM-50). The HTI project accelerates activities to gain key technical, cost performance, and regulatory information on two high-level waste tanks. The HTI will provide a basis for design and regulatory decisions affecting the remainder of the Tank Waste Remediation System's tank waste retrieval Program

  19. 46 CFR 28.335 - Fuel systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fuel systems. 28.335 Section 28.335 Shipping COAST GUARD... Than 16 Individuals on Board § 28.335 Fuel systems. (a) Applicability. Except for the components of an...) Portable fuel systems. Portable fuel systems including portable tanks and related fuel lines and...

  20. Tank waste remediation system integrated technology plan. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eaton, B.; Ignatov, A.; Johnson, S.; Mann, M.; Morasch, L.; Ortiz, S.; Novak, P. [eds.] [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-02-28

    The Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington State, is operated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors. Starting in 1943, Hanford supported fabrication of reactor fuel elements, operation of production reactors, processing of irradiated fuel to separate and extract plutonium and uranium, and preparation of plutonium metal. Processes used to recover plutonium and uranium from irradiated fuel and to recover radionuclides from tank waste, plus miscellaneous sources resulted in the legacy of approximately 227,000 m{sup 3} (60 million gallons) of high-level radioactive waste, currently in storage. This waste is currently stored in 177 large underground storage tanks, 28 of which have two steel walls and are called double-shell tanks (DSTs) an 149 of which are called single-shell tanks (SSTs). Much of the high-heat-emitting nuclides (strontium-90 and cesium-137) has been extracted from the tank waste, converted to solid, and placed in capsules, most of which are stored onsite in water-filled basins. DOE established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) program in 1991. The TWRS program mission is to store, treat, immobilize and dispose, or prepare for disposal, the Hanford tank waste in an environmentally sound, safe, and cost-effective manner. Technology will need to be developed or improved to meet the TWRS program mission. The Integrated Technology Plan (ITP) is the high-level consensus plan that documents all TWRS technology activities for the life of the program.

  1. Tank waste remediation system integrated technology plan. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eaton, B.; Ignatov, A.; Johnson, S.; Mann, M.; Morasch, L.; Ortiz, S.; Novak, P.

    1995-01-01

    The Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington State, is operated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors. Starting in 1943, Hanford supported fabrication of reactor fuel elements, operation of production reactors, processing of irradiated fuel to separate and extract plutonium and uranium, and preparation of plutonium metal. Processes used to recover plutonium and uranium from irradiated fuel and to recover radionuclides from tank waste, plus miscellaneous sources resulted in the legacy of approximately 227,000 m 3 (60 million gallons) of high-level radioactive waste, currently in storage. This waste is currently stored in 177 large underground storage tanks, 28 of which have two steel walls and are called double-shell tanks (DSTs) an 149 of which are called single-shell tanks (SSTs). Much of the high-heat-emitting nuclides (strontium-90 and cesium-137) has been extracted from the tank waste, converted to solid, and placed in capsules, most of which are stored onsite in water-filled basins. DOE established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) program in 1991. The TWRS program mission is to store, treat, immobilize and dispose, or prepare for disposal, the Hanford tank waste in an environmentally sound, safe, and cost-effective manner. Technology will need to be developed or improved to meet the TWRS program mission. The Integrated Technology Plan (ITP) is the high-level consensus plan that documents all TWRS technology activities for the life of the program

  2. The Efficacy of Epidemic Algorithms on Detecting Node Replicas in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narasimha Shashidhar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A node replication attack against a wireless sensor network involves surreptitious efforts by an adversary to insert duplicate sensor nodes into the network while avoiding detection. Due to the lack of tamper-resistant hardware and the low cost of sensor nodes, launching replication attacks takes little effort to carry out. Naturally, detecting these replica nodes is a very important task and has been studied extensively. In this paper, we propose a novel distributed, randomized sensor duplicate detection algorithm called Discard to detect node replicas in group-deployed wireless sensor networks. Our protocol is an epidemic, self-organizing duplicate detection scheme, which exhibits emergent properties. Epidemic schemes have found diverse applications in distributed computing: load balancing, topology management, audio and video streaming, computing aggregate functions, failure detection, network and resource monitoring, to name a few. To the best of our knowledge, our algorithm is the first attempt at exploring the potential of this paradigm to detect replicas in a wireless sensor network. Through analysis and simulation, we show that our scheme achieves robust replica detection with substantially lower communication, computational and storage requirements than prior schemes in the literature.

  3. Replicas Strategy and Cache Optimization of Video Surveillance Systems Based on Cloud Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongheng Li

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of video surveillance technology, especially the popularity of cloud-based video surveillance applications, video data begins to grow explosively. However, in the cloud-based video surveillance system, replicas occupy an amount of storage space. Also, the slow response to video playback constrains the performance of the system. In this paper, considering the characteristics of video data comprehensively, we propose a dynamic redundant replicas mechanism based on security levels that can dynamically adjust the number of replicas. Based on the location correlation between cameras, this paper also proposes a data cache strategy to improve the response speed of data reading. Experiments illustrate that: (1 our dynamic redundant replicas mechanism can save storage space while ensuring data security; (2 the cache mechanism can predict the playback behaviors of the users in advance and improve the response speed of data reading according to the location and time correlation of the front-end cameras; and (3 in terms of cloud-based video surveillance, our proposed approaches significantly outperform existing methods.

  4. Three-Dimensional Interpretation of Sculptural Heritage with Digital and Tangible 3D Printed Replicas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saorin, José Luis; Carbonell-Carrera, Carlos; Cantero, Jorge de la Torre; Meier, Cecile; Aleman, Drago Diaz

    2017-01-01

    Spatial interpretation features as a skill to acquire in the educational curricula. The visualization and interpretation of three-dimensional objects in tactile devices and the possibility of digital manufacturing with 3D printers, offers an opportunity to include replicas of sculptures in teaching and, thus, facilitate the 3D interpretation of…

  5. Evaluation of creep damage development by the replica method; Utvaerdering av krypskadeutveckling med replikmetoden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storesund, Jan [Det Norske Veritas AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Roennholm, Markku [Fortum (Sweden)

    2002-04-01

    Creep damage development in high temperature components can be monitored by the replica method. Damage is classified and an experience based time period for safe operation is recommended where a re-inspection should be conducted. Original recommendations are still commonly used but there are also developed ones are mostly less conservative. A data base of more than 6000 replicas, collected from welded components in Swedish and Finnish power plants, has been evaluated with respect to damage development in the present project. The results are in general in good agreement to the existing developed recommendations for re-inspections. Important factors that should be considered for use of the recommendations are highlighted: Service history, Material, welding and heat treatment, Measure of pressure and temperature, System stresses, Geometrical stress concentrations, stress distributions, Design of components and welds, Creep crack growth, Starts and stops, Extent and performance of the replica method. These factors have been analysed with respect to the evaluated data resulting in comments to the existing recommendations. In addition, recommendations and conditions for a high reliability of the replica method are described. The comments and recommendations can be read in separate sections in the end of the report.

  6. Automated magnification calibration in transmission electron microscopy using Fourier analysis of replica images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laak, Jeroen A.W.M. van der; Dijkman, Henry B.P.M.; Pahlplatz, Martin M.M.

    2006-01-01

    The magnification factor in transmission electron microscopy is not very precise, hampering for instance quantitative analysis of specimens. Calibration of the magnification is usually performed interactively using replica specimens, containing line or grating patterns with known spacing. In the present study, a procedure is described for automated magnification calibration using digital images of a line replica. This procedure is based on analysis of the power spectrum of Fourier transformed replica images, and is compared to interactive measurement in the same images. Images were used with magnification ranging from 1,000x to 200,000x. The automated procedure deviated on average 0.10% from interactive measurements. Especially for catalase replicas, the coefficient of variation of automated measurement was considerably smaller (average 0.28%) compared to that of interactive measurement (average 3.5%). In conclusion, calibration of the magnification in digital images from transmission electron microscopy may be performed automatically, using the procedure presented here, with high precision and accuracy

  7. Systematic expansion in the order parameter for replica theory of the dynamical glass transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquin, Hugo; Zamponi, Francesco

    2013-03-28

    It has been shown recently that predictions from mode-coupling theory for the glass transition of hard-spheres become increasingly bad when dimensionality increases, whereas replica theory predicts a correct scaling. Nevertheless if one focuses on the regime around the dynamical transition in three dimensions, mode-coupling results are far more convincing than replica theory predictions. It seems thus necessary to reconcile the two theoretic approaches in order to obtain a theory that interpolates between low-dimensional, mode-coupling results, and "mean-field" results from replica theory. Even though quantitative results for the dynamical transition issued from replica theory are not accurate in low dimensions, two different approximation schemes--small cage expansion and replicated hyper-netted-chain (RHNC)--provide the correct qualitative picture for the transition, namely, a discontinuous jump of a static order parameter from zero to a finite value. The purpose of this work is to develop a systematic expansion around the RHNC result in powers of the static order parameter, and to calculate the first correction in this expansion. Interestingly, this correction involves the static three-body correlations of the liquid. More importantly, we separately demonstrate that higher order terms in the expansion are quantitatively relevant at the transition, and that the usual mode-coupling kernel, involving two-body direct correlation functions of the liquid, cannot be recovered from static computations.

  8. Fast Optimal Replica Placement with Exhaustive Search Using Dynamically Reconfigurable Processor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetoshi Takeshita

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new replica placement algorithm that expands the exhaustive search limit with reasonable calculation time. It combines a new type of parallel data-flow processor with an architecture tuned for fast calculation. The replica placement problem is to find a replica-server set satisfying service constraints in a content delivery network (CDN. It is derived from the set cover problem which is known to be NP-hard. It is impractical to use exhaustive search to obtain optimal replica placement in large-scale networks, because calculation time increases with the number of combinations. To reduce calculation time, heuristic algorithms have been proposed, but it is known that no heuristic algorithm is assured of finding the optimal solution. The proposed algorithm suits parallel processing and pipeline execution and is implemented on DAPDNA-2, a dynamically reconfigurable processor. Experiments show that the proposed algorithm expands the exhaustive search limit by the factor of 18.8 compared to the conventional algorithm search limit running on a Neumann-type processor.

  9. Leak detection for underground storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durgin, P.B.; Young, T.M.

    1993-01-01

    This symposium was held in New Orleans, Louisiana on January 29, 1992. The purpose of this conference was to provide a forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on leak detection for underground storage tanks that leaked fuel. A widespread concern was protection of groundwater supplies from these leaking tanks. In some cases, the papers report on research that was conducted two or three years ago but has never been adequately directed to the underground storage tank leak-detection audience. In other cases, the papers report on the latest leak-detection research. The symposium was divided into four sessions that were entitled: Internal Monitoring; External Monitoring; Regulations and Standards; and Site and Risk Evaluation. Individual papers have been cataloged separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases

  10. Heated Aluminum Tanks Resist Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L. E.

    1983-01-01

    Simple expedient of heating foam-insulated aluminum alloy tanks prevents corrosion by salt-laden moisture. Relatively-small temperature difference between such tank and surrounding air will ensure life of tank is extended by many years.

  11. Comparison of pulsed versus continuous oxygen delivery using realistic adult nasal airway replicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen JZ

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available John Z Chen,1 Ira M Katz,2 Marine Pichelin,2 Kaixian Zhu,3 Georges Caillibotte,2 Michelle L Noga,4 Warren H Finlay,1 Andrew R Martin1 1Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada; 2Medical R&D, Air Liquide Santé International, Centre de Recherche Paris-Saclay, Les Loges-en-Josas, 3Centre Explor!, Air Liquide Healthcare, Gentilly, France; 4Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada Background: Portable oxygen concentrators (POCs typically include pulse flow (PF modes to conserve oxygen. The primary aims of this study were to develop a predictive in vitro model for inhaled oxygen delivery using a set of realistic airway replicas, and to compare PF for a commercial POC with steady flow (SF from a compressed oxygen cylinder. Methods: Experiments were carried out using a stationary compressed oxygen cylinder, a POC, and 15 adult nasal airway replicas based on airway geometries derived from medical images. Oxygen delivery via nasal cannula was tested at PF settings of 2.0 and 6.0, and SF rates of 2.0 and 6.0 L/min. A test lung simulated three breathing patterns representative of a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patient at rest, during exercise, and while asleep. Volume-averaged fraction of inhaled oxygen (FiO2 was calculated by analyzing oxygen concentrations sampled at the exit of each replica and inhalation flow rates over time. POC pulse volumes were also measured using a commercial O2 conserver test system to attempt to predict FiO2 for PF. Results: Relative volume-averaged FiO2 using PF ranged from 68% to 94% of SF values, increasing with breathing frequency and tidal volume. Three of 15 replicas failed to trigger the POC when used with the sleep breathing pattern at the 2.0 setting, and four of 15 replicas failed to trigger at the 6.0 setting. FiO2 values estimated from POC pulse characteristics followed similar trends but were lower than those derived from

  12. Tank characterization reference guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Lorenzo, D.S.; DiCenso, A.T.; Hiller, D.B.; Johnson, K.W.; Rutherford, J.H.; Smith, D.J.; Simpson, B.C.

    1994-09-01

    Characterization of the Hanford Site high-level waste storage tanks supports safety issue resolution; operations and maintenance requirements; and retrieval, pretreatment, vitrification, and disposal technology development. Technical, historical, and programmatic information about the waste tanks is often scattered among many sources, if it is documented at all. This Tank Characterization Reference Guide, therefore, serves as a common location for much of the generic tank information that is otherwise contained in many documents. The report is intended to be an introduction to the issues and history surrounding the generation, storage, and management of the liquid process wastes, and a presentation of the sampling, analysis, and modeling activities that support the current waste characterization. This report should provide a basis upon which those unfamiliar with the Hanford Site tank farms can start their research

  13. Effect of cation nature of zeolite on carbon replicas and their electrochemical capacitance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Jin; Li, Wen; Zhang, Zhongshen; Wu, Xiaozhong; Xing, Wei; Zhuo, Shuping

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Cation nature of zeolite influences the porosity, surface chemical properties of carbon replicas of zeolite, resulting in different electrochemical capacitance. Highlights: ► The porosity of carbon replica strongly depends on zeolite's effective pore size. ► The surface chemical properties influence by the cation nature of zeolite. ► The N-doping introduces large pseudo-capacitance. ► The HYC800 carbon showed a high capacitance of up to 312 F g −1 in 1 M H 2 SO 4 . ► The prepared carbons show good durability of galvanostatic cycle. -- Abstract: N-doped carbon replicas of zeolite Y are prepared, and the effect of cation nature of zeolite (H + or Na + ) on the carbon replicas is studied. The morphology, structure and surface properties of the carbon materials are investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), N 2 adsorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The pore regularity, pore parameter and surface chemical properties of the carbons may strongly depend on the cation nature of the zeolite Y. The carbon replicas of zeolite HY (H-form of zeolite Y) possesses higher pore regularity and much larger surface area than those of zeolite NaY (Na-form of zeolite Y), while the latter carbons seem to possess higher carbonization degrees. Electrochemical measurements show a large faradaic capacitance related to the N- or O-containing groups for the prepared carbons. Owing to the large specific surface area, high pore regularity and heteroatom-doping, the HYC800 sample derived from zeolite HY presents very high gravimetric capacitance, up to 312.4 F g −1 in H 2 SO 4 electrolyte, and this carbon can operate at 1.2 V with good retention ratio in the range of 0.25 to 10 A g −1

  14. Coulomb replica-exchange method: handling electrostatic attractive and repulsive forces for biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Satoru G; Okumura, Hisashi

    2013-03-30

    We propose a new type of the Hamiltonian replica-exchange method (REM) for molecular dynamics (MD) and Monte Carlo simulations, which we refer to as the Coulomb REM (CREM). In this method, electrostatic charge parameters in the Coulomb interactions are exchanged among replicas while temperatures are exchanged in the usual REM. By varying the atom charges, the CREM overcomes free-energy barriers and realizes more efficient sampling in the conformational space than the REM. Furthermore, this method requires only a smaller number of replicas because only the atom charges of solute molecules are used as exchanged parameters. We performed Coulomb replica-exchange MD simulations of an alanine dipeptide in explicit water solvent and compared the results with those of the conventional canonical, replica exchange, and van der Waals REMs. Two force fields of AMBER parm99 and AMBER parm99SB were used. As a result, the CREM sampled all local-minimum free-energy states more frequently than the other methods for both force fields. Moreover, the Coulomb, van der Waals, and usual REMs were applied to a fragment of an amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) in explicit water solvent to compare the sampling efficiency of these methods for a larger system. The CREM sampled structures of the Aβ fragment more efficiently than the other methods. We obtained β-helix, α-helix, 3(10)-helix, β-hairpin, and β-sheet structures as stable structures and deduced pathways of conformational transitions among these structures from a free-energy landscape. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Efficient Round-Trip Time Optimization for Replica-Exchange Enveloping Distribution Sampling (RE-EDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidler, Dominik; Cristòfol-Clough, Michael; Riniker, Sereina

    2017-06-13

    Replica-exchange enveloping distribution sampling (RE-EDS) allows the efficient estimation of free-energy differences between multiple end-states from a single molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. In EDS, a reference state is sampled, which can be tuned by two types of parameters, i.e., smoothness parameters(s) and energy offsets, such that all end-states are sufficiently sampled. However, the choice of these parameters is not trivial. Replica exchange (RE) or parallel tempering is a widely applied technique to enhance sampling. By combining EDS with the RE technique, the parameter choice problem could be simplified and the challenge shifted toward an optimal distribution of the replicas in the smoothness-parameter space. The choice of a certain replica distribution can alter the sampling efficiency significantly. In this work, global round-trip time optimization (GRTO) algorithms are tested for the use in RE-EDS simulations. In addition, a local round-trip time optimization (LRTO) algorithm is proposed for systems with slowly adapting environments, where a reliable estimate for the round-trip time is challenging to obtain. The optimization algorithms were applied to RE-EDS simulations of a system of nine small-molecule inhibitors of phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT). The energy offsets were determined using our recently proposed parallel energy-offset (PEOE) estimation scheme. While the multistate GRTO algorithm yielded the best replica distribution for the ligands in water, the multistate LRTO algorithm was found to be the method of choice for the ligands in complex with PNMT. With this, the 36 alchemical free-energy differences between the nine ligands were calculated successfully from a single RE-EDS simulation 10 ns in length. Thus, RE-EDS presents an efficient method for the estimation of relative binding free energies.

  16. 40 CFR 86.1229-85 - Dynamometer load determination and fuel temperature profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... VEHICLES AND ENGINES (CONTINUED) Evaporative Emission Test Procedures for New Gasoline-Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled, Liquefied Petroleum Gas-Fueled and Methanol-Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1229-85 Dynamometer... has more than one fuel tank, a profile shall be established for each tank. Manufacturers may also...

  17. Tank 241-C-105 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, WHC 222-S Laboratory, and PNL 325 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of samples from tank 241-C-105

  18. Tank 241-BY-106 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, PNL 325 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, and WHC 222-S Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of samples for tank 241-BY-106

  19. Tank 241-AX-104 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathyanarayana, P.

    1994-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, WHC 222-S Laboratory, and PNL 325 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of auger samples from tank 241-AX-104

  20. Tank 241-AX-102 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carpenter, B.C.

    1994-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, WHC 222-S Laboratory, and PNL 325 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of auger samples from tank 241-AX-102

  1. Tank 241-C-101 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, WHC 222-S Laboratory, and PNL 325 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of samples from tank 241-C-101

  2. Tank 241-AP-107 tank characterization plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    This document is a plan which serves as the contractual agreement between the Characterization Program, Sampling Operations, WHC 222-S Laboratory, and PNL 325 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory. The scope of this plan is to provide guidance for the sampling and analysis of samples from tank 241-AP-107

  3. Tank Space Options Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOYLES, V.C.

    2001-01-01

    A risk-based priority for the retrieval of Hanford Site waste from the 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) has been adopted as a result of changes to the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (HFFACO) (Ecology et al. 1997) negotiated in 2000. Retrieval of the first three tanks in the retrieval sequence fills available capacity in the double-shell tanks (DSTs) by 2007. As a result, the HFFACO change established a milestone (M-45-12-TO1) requiring the determination of options that could increase waste storage capacity for single-shell tank waste retrieval. The information will be considered in future negotiations. This document fulfills the milestone requirement. This study presents options that were reviewed for the purpose of increasing waste storage capacity. Eight options are identified that have the potential for increasing capacity from 5 to 10 million gallons, thus allowing uninterrupted single-shell tank retrieval until the planned Waste Treatment Plant begins processing substantial volumes of waste from the double-shell tanks in 2009. The cost of implementing these options is estimated to range from less than $1 per gallon to more than $14 per gallon. Construction of new double-shell tanks is estimated to cost about $63 per gallon. Providing 5 to 10 million gallons of available double-shell tank space could enable early retrieval of 5 to 9 high-risk single-shell tanks beyond those identified for retrieval by 2007. These tanks are A-101, AX-101, AX-103, BY-102, C-107, S-105, S-106, S-108, and S-109 (Garfield et al. 2000). This represents a potential to retrieve approximately 14 million total curies, including 3,200 curies of long-lived mobile radionuclides. The results of the study reflect qualitative analyses conducted to identify promising options. The estimated costs are rough-order-of magnitude and, therefore, subject to change. Implementing some of the options would represent a departure from the current baseline and may adversely impact the

  4. 49 CFR 179.201 - Individual specification requirements applicable to non-pressure tank car tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... to non-pressure tank car tanks. 179.201 Section 179.201 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Non-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes... car tanks. ...

  5. 14 CFR 29.979 - Pressure refueling and fueling provisions below fuel level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Fuel System § 29.979 Pressure refueling and fueling provisions below fuel level. (a) Each fueling connection... from that tank in case of malfunction of the fuel entry valve. (b) For systems intended for pressure...

  6. Low-level tank waste simulant data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokken, R.O.

    1996-04-01

    The majority of defense wastes generated from reprocessing spent N- Reactor fuel at Hanford are stored in underground Double-shell Tanks (DST) and in older Single-Shell Tanks (SST) in the form of liquids, slurries, sludges, and salt cakes. The tank waste remediation System (TWRS) Program has the responsibility of safely managing and immobilizing these tank wastes for disposal. This report discusses three principle topics: the need for and basis for selecting target or reference LLW simulants, tanks waste analyses and simulants that have been defined, developed, and used for the GDP and activities in support of preparing and characterizing simulants for the current LLW vitrification project. The procedures and the data that were generated to characterized the LLW vitrification simulants were reported and are presented in this report. The final section of this report addresses the applicability of the data to the current program and presents recommendations for additional data needs including characterization and simulant compositional variability studies

  7. Corrosion Evaluation of INTEC Waste Storage Tank WM-182

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dirk, W. J.; Anderson, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    Irradiated nuclear fuel has been stored and reprocessed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory since 1953 using facilities located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). This reprocessing produced radioactive liquid waste which was stored in the Tank Farm. The INTEC Tank Farm consists of eleven vaulted 300,000-gallon underground tanks including Tank WM-182. Tank WM-182 was put into service in 1955, has been filled four times, and has contained aluminum and zirconium fuel reprocessing wastes as well as sodium bearing waste. A program to monitor corrosion in the waste tanks was initiated in 1953 when the first of the eleven Tank Farm tanks was placed in service. Austenitic stainless steel coupons representative of the materials of construction of the tanks are used to monitor internal tank corrosion. This report documents the final inspection of the WM-182 corrosion coupons. Physical examination of the welded corrosion test coupons exposed to the tank bottom conditions of Tank WM-182 revealed very light uniform corrosion. Examination of the external surfaces of the extruded pipe samples showed very light uniform corrosion with slight indications of preferential attack parallel to extrusion marks and start of end grain attack of the cut edges. These indications were only evident when examined under stereo microscope at magnifications of 20X and above. There were no definite indications of localized corrosion, such as cracking, pitting, preferential weld attack, or weld heat affected zone attack on either the welded or extruded coupons. Visual examination of the coupon support cables, where they were not encased in plastic, failed to reveal any indication of liquid-liquid interface attack of any crevice corrosion. Based on the WM-182 coupon evaluations, which have occurred throughout the life of the tank, the metal loss from the tank wall due to uniform corrosion is not expected to exceed 5.5 x 10-1 mil (0.00 055 inch

  8. TANK FARM ENVIRONMENTAL REQUIREMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TIFFT, S.R.

    2003-01-01

    Through regulations, permitting or binding negotiations, Regulators establish requirements, limits, permit conditions and Notice of Construction (NOC) conditions with which the Office of River Protection (ORP) and the Tank Farm Contractor (TFC) must comply. Operating Specifications are technical limits which are set on a process to prevent injury to personnel, or damage to the facility or environment, The main purpose of this document is to provide specification limits and recovery actions for the TFC Environmental Surveillance Program at the Hanford Site. Specification limits are given for monitoring frequencies and permissible variation of readings from an established baseline or previous reading. The requirements in this document are driven by environmental considerations and data analysis issues, rather than facility design or personnel safety issues. This document is applicable to all single-shell tank (SST) and double-shell tank (DST) waste tanks, and the associated catch tanks and receiver tanks, and transfer systems. This Tank Farm Environmental Specifications Document (ESD) implements environmental-regulatory limits on the configuration and operation of the Hanford Tank Farms facility that have been established by Regulators. This ESD contains specific field operational limits and recovery actions for compliance with airborne effluent regulations and agreements, liquid effluents regulations and agreements, and environmental tank system requirements. The scope of this ESD is limited to conditions that have direct impact on Operations/Projects or that Operations Projects have direct impact upon. This document does not supercede or replace any Department of Energy (DOE) Orders, regulatory permits, notices of construction, or Regulatory agency agreements binding on the ORP or the TFC. Refer to the appropriate regulation, permit, or Notice of Construction for an inclusive listing of requirements

  9. Reactor pressure tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorner, H.; Scholz, M.; Jungmann, A.

    1975-01-01

    In a reactor pressure tank for a nuclear reactor, self-locking hooks engage a steel ring disposed over the removable cover of the steel vessel. The hooks exert force upon the cover to maintain the cover in a closed position during operation of the reactor pressure tank. The force upon the removal cover is partly the result of the increasing temperature and thermal expansion of the steel vessel during operation. The steel vessel is surrounded by a reinforced-concrete tank. (U.S.)

  10. Fuel leak detection on large transport airplanes

    OpenAIRE

    Behbahani-Pour, M.J.; Radice, G.

    2016-01-01

    Fuel leakage has the risk of being ignited by external ignition sources, and therefore it is important to detect\\ud any fuel leakage before the departure of the aircraft. Currently, there are no fuel leak detection systems installed\\ud on commercial aircrafts, to detect fuel tank leakage, while only a small number of more recent aircraft, have a fuel\\ud monitoring system, that generates a fuel leak-warning message in cockpit in the case of fuel imbalance between the\\ud tanks. The approach pro...

  11. Zeolite-templated carbon replica: a Grand Canonical Monte-Carlo simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas Roussel; Roland J M Pellenq; Christophe Bichara; Roger Gadiou; Antoine Didion; Cathie Vix Guterl; Fabrice Gaslain; Julien Parmentier; Valentin Valtchev; Joel Patarin

    2005-01-01

    Microporous carbon materials are interesting for several applications such as hydrogen storage, catalysis or electrical double layer capacitors. The development of the negative templating method to obtain carbon replicas from ordered templates, has lead to the synthesis of several new materials which have interesting textural properties, attractive for energy storage. Among the possible templates, zeolites can be used to obtain highly microporous carbon materials. Nevertheless, the phenomena involved in the replica synthesis are not fully understood, and the relationships between the structure of the template, the carbon precursor and the resulting carbon material need to be investigated. Experimental results for carbon zeolite-templated nano-structures can be found in a series of papers; see for instance ref. [1] in which Wang et al describe a route to ultra-small Single Wall Carbon Nano-tubes (SWNTs) using the porosity of zeolite AlPO 4 -5. After matrix removal, the resulting structure is a free-standing bundle of 4 Angstroms large nano-tubes. However, it is highly desirable to obtain an ordered porous carbon structure that forms a real 3D network to be used for instance in gas storage applications. Carbon replica of faujasite and EMT zeolites can have these properties since these zeolites have a 3D porous network made of 10 Angstroms cages connected to each other through 7 Angstroms large windows. The first step of this study was to generate a theoretical carbon replica structure of various zeolites (faujasite, EMT, AlPO 4 -5, silicalite). For this purpose, we used the Grand Canonical Monte-Carlo (GCMC) technique in which the carbon-carbon interactions were described within the frame of a newly developed Tight Binding approach and the carbon-zeolite interactions assumed to be characteristic of physi-sorption. The intrinsic stability of the subsequent carbon nano-structures was then investigated after mimicking the removal of the inorganic phase by switching

  12. Analysis of temperature and pressure changes in liquefied natural gas (LNG) cryogenic tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Q.-S.; Wegrzyn, J.; Prasad, V.

    2004-10-01

    Liquefied natural gas (LNG) is being developed as a transportation fuel for heavy vehicles such as trucks and transit buses, to lessen the dependency on oil and to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The LNG stations are properly designed to prevent the venting of natural gas (NG) from LNG tanks, which can cause evaporative greenhouse gas emissions and result in fluctuations of fuel flow and changes of fuel composition. Boil-off is caused by the heat added into the LNG fuel during the storage and fueling. Heat can leak into the LNG fuel through the shell of tank during the storage and through hoses and dispensers during the fueling. Gas from tanks onboard vehicles, when returned to LNG tanks, can add additional heat into the LNG fuel. A thermodynamic and heat transfer model has been developed to analyze different mechanisms of heat leak into the LNG fuel. The evolving of properties and compositions of LNG fuel inside LNG tanks is simulated. The effect of a number of buses fueled each day on the possible total fuel loss rate has been analyzed. It is found that by increasing the number of buses, fueled each day, the total fuel loss rate can be reduced significantly. It is proposed that an electric generator be used to consume the boil-off gas or a liquefier be used to re-liquefy the boil-off gas to reduce the tank pressure and eliminate fuel losses. These approaches can prevent boil-off of natural gas emissions, and reduce the costs of LNG as transportation fuel.

  13. Tank farm potential ignition sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scaief, C.C. III.

    1996-01-01

    This document identifies equipment, instrumentation, and sensors that are located in-tank as well as ex-tank in areas that may have communication paths with the tank vapor space. For each item, and attempt is made to identify the potential for ignition of flammable vapors using a graded approach. The scope includes all 177 underground storage tanks

  14. Driving biofuels from field to fuel tank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gura, Trisha

    2009-07-10

    Rising oil prices, fears of global warming, and instability in oil-producing countries have ignited the rush to produce biofuels from plants. The science is progressing rapidly, driven by favorable policies and generous financing, but many hurdles remain before cars and trucks run on "gasohol" or "grassoline."

  15. Improving the Tank Scout

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Burton, R. L

    2006-01-01

    .... While the tank battalions recognize the importance and value of the scout platoon, they are restricted from employing scouts to their full potential due to the platoon's inflexible structure and limited capabilities...

  16. Tank waste treatment science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaFemina, J.P.; Blanchard, D.L.; Bunker, B.C.; Colton, N.G.; Felmy, A.R.; Franz, J.A.; Liu, J.; Virden, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    Remediation efforts at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site require that many technical and scientific principles be combined for effectively managing and disposing the variety of wastes currently stored in underground tanks. Based on these principles, pretreatment technologies are being studied and developed to separate waste components and enable the most suitable treatment methods to be selected for final disposal of these wastes. The Tank Waste Treatment Science Task at Pacific Northwest Laboratory is addressing pretreatment technology development by investigating several aspects related to understanding and processing the tank contents. The experimental work includes evaluating the chemical and physical properties of the alkaline wastes, modeling sludge dissolution, and evaluating and designing ion exchange materials. This paper gives some examples of results of this work and shows how these results fit into the overall Hanford waste remediation activities. This work is part of series of projects being conducted for the Tank Waste Remediation System

  17. Ocean Technology Development Tank

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The new SWFSC laboratory in La Jolla incorporates a large sea- and fresh-water Ocean Technology Development Tank. This world-class facility expands NOAA's ability to...

  18. Sonar Tank Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Sonar Tank Facility permits low cost initial 'wet' testing and check out prior to full scale deployment at sea. It can manage controlled conditions calibration...

  19. Improving the Tank Scout

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Burton, R. L

    2006-01-01

    Within the Marine Corps' tank battalions is a unique asset that is often improperly employed and not well known within the other components of the Marine Air Ground Task Force (MAGTF): the scout platoon...

  20. Modeling Propellant Tank Dynamics

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The main objective of my work will be to develop accurate models of self-pressurizing propellant tanks for use in designing hybrid rockets. The first key goal is to...

  1. Evaluation of generalized degrees of freedom for sparse estimation by replica method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, A.

    2016-12-01

    We develop a method to evaluate the generalized degrees of freedom (GDF) for linear regression with sparse regularization. The GDF is a key factor in model selection, and thus its evaluation is useful in many modelling applications. An analytical expression for the GDF is derived using the replica method in the large-system-size limit with random Gaussian predictors. The resulting formula has a universal form that is independent of the type of regularization, providing us with a simple interpretation. Within the framework of replica symmetric (RS) analysis, GDF has a physical meaning as the effective fraction of non-zero components. The validity of our method in the RS phase is supported by the consistency of our results with previous mathematical results. The analytical results in the RS phase are calculated numerically using the belief propagation algorithm.

  2. Neutron and gamma dose and spectra measurements on the Little Boy replica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoots, S.; Wadsworth, D.

    1984-01-01

    The radiation-measurement team of the Weapons Engineering Division at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) measured neutron and gamma dose and spectra on the Little Boy replica at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in April 1983. This assembly is a replica of the gun-type atomic bomb exploded over Hiroshima in 1945. These measurements support the National Academy of Sciences Program to reassess the radiation doses due to atomic bomb explosions in Japan. Specifically, the following types of information were important: neutron spectra as a function of geometry, gamma to neutron dose ratios out to 1.5 km, and neutron attenuation in the atmosphere. We measured neutron and gamma dose/fission from close-in to a kilometer out, and neutron and gamma spectra at 90 and 30 0 close-in. This paper describes these measurements and the results. 12 references, 13 figures, 5 tables

  3. Proactive replica checking to assure reliability of data in cloud storage with minimum replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murarka, Damini; Maheswari, G. Uma

    2017-11-01

    The two major issues for cloud storage systems are data reliability and storage costs. For data reliability protection, multi-replica replication strategy which is used mostly in current clouds acquires huge storage consumption, leading to a large storage cost for applications within the loud specifically. This paper presents a cost-efficient data reliability mechanism named PRCR to cut back the cloud storage consumption. PRCR ensures data reliability of large cloud information with the replication that might conjointly function as a price effective benchmark for replication. The duplication shows that when resembled to the standard three-replica approach, PRCR will scale back to consume only a simple fraction of the cloud storage from one-third of the storage, thence considerably minimizing the cloud storage price.

  4. Fabrication of micropillar substrates using replicas of alpha-particle irradiated and chemically etched PADC films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, C.K.M.; Chong, E.Y.W.; Roy, V.A.L.; Cheung, K.M.C.; Yeung, K.W.K.; Yu, K.N.

    2012-01-01

    We proposed a simple method to fabricate micropillar substrates. Polyallyldiglycol carbonate (PADC) films were irradiated by alpha particles and then chemically etched to form a cast with micron-scale spherical pores. A polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) replica of this PADC film gave a micropillar substrate with micron-scale spherical pillars. HeLa cells cultured on such a micropillar substrate had significantly larger percentage of cells entering S-phase, attached cell numbers and cell spreading areas. - Highlights: ► We proposed a simple method to fabricate micropillar substrates. ► Polyallyldiglycol carbonate films were irradiated and etched to form casts. ► Polydimethylsiloxane replica then formed the micropillar substrates. ► Attachment and proliferation of HeLa cells were enhanced on these substrates.

  5. Fabrication of micropillar substrates using replicas of alpha-particle irradiated and chemically etched PADC films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, C.K.M. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Chong, E.Y.W. [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Roy, V.A.L. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Cheung, K.M.C.; Yeung, K.W.K. [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Yu, K.N., E-mail: appetery@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong)

    2012-07-15

    We proposed a simple method to fabricate micropillar substrates. Polyallyldiglycol carbonate (PADC) films were irradiated by alpha particles and then chemically etched to form a cast with micron-scale spherical pores. A polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) replica of this PADC film gave a micropillar substrate with micron-scale spherical pillars. HeLa cells cultured on such a micropillar substrate had significantly larger percentage of cells entering S-phase, attached cell numbers and cell spreading areas. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We proposed a simple method to fabricate micropillar substrates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polyallyldiglycol carbonate films were irradiated and etched to form casts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polydimethylsiloxane replica then formed the micropillar substrates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Attachment and proliferation of HeLa cells were enhanced on these substrates.

  6. Neutron and gamma-ray dose-rates from the Little Boy replica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plassmann, E.A.; Pederson, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    We report dose-rate information obtained at many locations in the near vicinity of, and at distances out to 0.64 km from, the Little Boy replica while it was operated as a critical assembly. The measurements were made with modified conventional dosimetry instruments that used an Anderson-Braun detector for neutrons and a Geiger-Mueller tube for gamma rays with suitable electronic modules to count particle-induced pulses. Thermoluminescent dosimetry methods provide corroborative data. Our analysis gives estimates of both neutron and gamma-ray relaxation lengths in air for comparison with earlier calculations. We also show the neutron-to-gamma-ray dose ratio as a function of distance from the replica. Current experiments and further data analysis will refine these results. 7 references, 8 figures

  7. Impact of Channel Estimation Errors on Multiuser Detection via the Replica Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Husheng

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available For practical wireless DS-CDMA systems, channel estimation is imperfect due to noise and interference. In this paper, the impact of channel estimation errors on multiuser detection (MUD is analyzed under the framework of the replica method. System performance is obtained in the large system limit for optimal MUD, linear MUD, and turbo MUD, and is validated by numerical results for finite systems.

  8. Maximum surface level and temperature histories for Hanford waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flanagan, B.D.; Ha, N.D.; Huisingh, J.S.

    1994-01-01

    Radioactive defense waste resulting from the chemical processing of spent nuclear fuel has been accumulating at the Hanford Site since 1944. This waste is stored in underground waste-storage tanks. The Hanford Site Tank Farm Facilities Interim Safety Basis (ISB) provides a ready reference to the safety envelope for applicable tank farm facilities and installations. During preparation of the ISB, tank structural integrity concerns were identified as a key element in defining the safety envelope. These concerns, along with several deficiencies in the technical bases associated with the structural integrity issues and the corresponding operational limits/controls specified for conduct of normal tank farm operations are documented in the ISB. Consequently, a plan was initiated to upgrade the safety envelope technical bases by conducting Accelerated Safety Analyses-Phase 1 (ASA-Phase 1) sensitivity studies and additional structural evaluations. The purpose of this report is to facilitate the ASA-Phase 1 studies and future analyses of the single-shell tanks (SSTs) and double-shell tanks (DSTs) by compiling a quantitative summary of some of the past operating conditions the tanks have experienced during their existence. This report documents the available summaries of recorded maximum surface levels and maximum waste temperatures and references other sources for more specific data

  9. 46 CFR 28.835 - Fuel systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fuel systems. 28.835 Section 28.835 Shipping COAST GUARD... Aleutian Trade Act Vessels § 28.835 Fuel systems. (a) Portable fuel systems including portable tanks and... impurities from diesel fuel oil systems are permitted in the machinery space provided they are away from any...

  10. Replica Exchange Gaussian Accelerated Molecular Dynamics: Improved Enhanced Sampling and Free Energy Calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Ming M; McCammon, J Andrew; Miao, Yinglong

    2018-04-10

    Through adding a harmonic boost potential to smooth the system potential energy surface, Gaussian accelerated molecular dynamics (GaMD) provides enhanced sampling and free energy calculation of biomolecules without the need of predefined reaction coordinates. This work continues to improve the acceleration power and energy reweighting of the GaMD by combining the GaMD with replica exchange algorithms. Two versions of replica exchange GaMD (rex-GaMD) are presented: force constant rex-GaMD and threshold energy rex-GaMD. During simulations of force constant rex-GaMD, the boost potential can be exchanged between replicas of different harmonic force constants with fixed threshold energy. However, the algorithm of threshold energy rex-GaMD tends to switch the threshold energy between lower and upper bounds for generating different levels of boost potential. Testing simulations on three model systems, including the alanine dipeptide, chignolin, and HIV protease, demonstrate that through continuous exchanges of the boost potential, the rex-GaMD simulations not only enhance the conformational transitions of the systems but also narrow down the distribution width of the applied boost potential for accurate energetic reweighting to recover biomolecular free energy profiles.

  11. Biosynthesis of cathodoluminescent zinc oxide replicas using butterfly (Papilio paris) wing scales as templates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wang; Zhang Di; Fan Tongxiang; Ding Jian; Gu Jiajun; Guo Qixin; Ogawa, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Papilio paris butterflies have an iridescent blue color patch on their hind wings which is visible over a wide viewing angle. Optical and scanning electron microscopy observations of scales from the wings show that the blue color scales have very different microstructure to the matt black ones which also populate the wings. Scanning electron micrographs of the blue scales show that their surfaces comprise a regular two-dimensional array of concavities. By contrast the matt black scales have fine, sponge-like structure, between the ridges and the cross ribs in the scales. Using both types of scale as bio-templates, we obtain zinc oxide (ZnO) replicas of the microstructures of the original scales. Room temperature (T = 300 K) cathodoluminescence spectra of these ZnO replicas have also been studied. Both spectra show a similar sharp near-band-edge emission, but have different green emission, which we associate with the different microstructures of the ZnO replicas

  12. Biosynthesis of cathodoluminescent zinc oxide replicas using butterfly (Papilio paris) wing scales as templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Wang [State Key Lab of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 200240, Shanghai (China); Zhang Di [State Key Lab of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 200240, Shanghai (China)], E-mail: zhangdi@sjtu.edu.cn; Fan Tongxiang; Ding Jian; Gu Jiajun [State Key Lab of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 200240, Shanghai (China); Guo Qixin; Ogawa, Hiroshi [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Saga University, Saga 840-8502 (Japan)

    2009-01-01

    Papilio paris butterflies have an iridescent blue color patch on their hind wings which is visible over a wide viewing angle. Optical and scanning electron microscopy observations of scales from the wings show that the blue color scales have very different microstructure to the matt black ones which also populate the wings. Scanning electron micrographs of the blue scales show that their surfaces comprise a regular two-dimensional array of concavities. By contrast the matt black scales have fine, sponge-like structure, between the ridges and the cross ribs in the scales. Using both types of scale as bio-templates, we obtain zinc oxide (ZnO) replicas of the microstructures of the original scales. Room temperature (T = 300 K) cathodoluminescence spectra of these ZnO replicas have also been studied. Both spectra show a similar sharp near-band-edge emission, but have different green emission, which we associate with the different microstructures of the ZnO replicas.

  13. Replica sizing strategy for aortic valve replacement improves haemodynamic outcome of the epic supra valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Lopez, David; Faerber, Gloria; Diab, Mahmoud; Amorim, Paulo; Zeynalov, Natig; Doenst, Torsten

    2017-10-01

    Current sizing strategies suggest valve selection based on annulus diameter despite supra-annular placement of biological prostheses potentially allowing placement of a larger size. We assessed the frequency of selecting a larger prosthesis if prosthesis size was selected using a replica (upsizing) and evaluated its impact on haemodynamics. We analysed all discharge echocardiograms between June 2012 and June 2014, where a replica sizer was used for isolated aortic valve replacement (Epic Supra: 266 patients, Trifecta: 49 patients). Upsizing was possible in 71% of the Epic Supra valves (by 1 size: 168, by 2 sizes: 20) and in 59% of the Trifectas (by 1 size: 26, by 2 sizes: 3). Patients for whom upsizing was possible had the lowest pressure gradients within their annulus size groups. The difference was significant in annulus diameters of 21-22 or 25-26 mm (Epic Supra) and 23-24 mm (Trifecta). Trifecta gradients were the lowest. However, the ability to upsize the Epic Supra by 2 sizes eliminated the differences between Epic Supra and Trifecta. Upsizing did not cause intraoperative complications. Using replica sizers for aortic prosthesis size selection allows the implantation of bigger prostheses than recommended in most cases and reduces postoperative gradients, specifically for Epic Supra. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  14. Characterization of Nb SRF cavity materials by white light interferometry and replica techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Chen [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); The Applied Science Department, The College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23185 (United States); Reece, Charles [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Kelley, Michael, E-mail: mkelley@jlab.org [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); The Applied Science Department, The College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23185 (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Much work has shown that the topography of the interior surface is an important contributor to the performance of Nb superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) accelerator cavities. Micron-scale topography is implicated in non-linear loss mechanisms that limit the useful accelerating gradient range and impact cryogenic cost. Aggressive final chemical treatments in cavity production seek to reliably obtain “smoothest” surfaces with superior performance. Process development suffers because the cavity interior surface cannot be viewed directly without cutting out pieces, rendering the cavities unavailable for further study. Here we explore replica techniques as an alternative, providing imprints of cavity internal surface that can be readily examined. A second matter is the topography measurement technique used. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has proven successful, but too time intensive for routine use in this application. We therefore introduce white light interferometry (WLI) as an alternative approach. We examined real surfaces and their replicas, using AFM and WLI. We find that the replica/WLI is promising to provide the large majority of the desired information, recognizing that a trade-off is being made between best lateral resolution (AFM) and the opportunity to examine much more surface area (WLI).

  15. Tunable hydrodynamic characteristics in microchannels with biomimetic superhydrophobic (lotus leaf replica) walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Ranabir; Raj M, Kiran; Bhandaru, Nandini; Mukherjee, Rabibrata; Chakraborty, Suman

    2014-05-21

    The present work comprehensively addresses the hydrodynamic characteristics through microchannels with lotus leaf replica (exhibiting low adhesion and superhydrophobic properties) walls. The lotus leaf replica is fabricated following an efficient, two-step, soft-molding process and is then integrated with rectangular microchannels. The inherent biomimetic, superhydrophobic surface-liquid interfacial hydrodynamics, and the consequential bulk flow characteristics, are critically analyzed by the micro-particle image velocimetry technique. It is observed that the lotus leaf replica mediated microscale hydrodynamics comprise of two distinct flow regimes even within the low Reynolds number paradigm, unlike the commonly perceived solely apparent slip-stick dominated flows over superhydrophobic surfaces. While the first flow regime is characterized by an apparent slip-stick flow culminating in an enhanced bulk throughput rate, the second flow regime exhibits a complete breakdown of the aforementioned laminar and uni-axial flow model, leading to a predominantly no-slip flow. Interestingly, the critical flow condition dictating the transition between the two hydrodynamic regimes is intrinsically dependent on the micro-confinement effect. In this regard, an energetically consistent theoretical model is also proposed to predict the alterations in the critical flow condition with varying microchannel configurations, by addressing the underlying biomimetic surface-liquid interfacial conditions. Hence, the present research endeavour provides a new design-guiding paradigm for developing multi-functional microfluidic devices involving biomimetic, superhydrophobic surfaces, by judicious exploitation of the tunable hydrodynamic characteristics in the two regimes.

  16. Effect of roughness and material strength on the mechanical properties of fracture replicas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wibowo, J.; Amadei, B.; Sture, S.

    1995-08-01

    This report presents the results of 11 rotary shear tests conducted on replicas of three hollow cylinders of natural fractures with JRC values of 7.7, 9.4 and 12.0. The JRC values were determined from the results of laser profilometer measurements. The replicas were created from gypsum cement. By varying the water-to-gypsum cement ratio from 30 to 45%, fracture replicas with different values of compressive strength (JCS) were created. The rotary shear experiments were performed under constant normal (nominal) stresses ranging between 0.2 and 1.6 MPa. In this report, the shear test results are compared with predictions using Barton's empirical peak shear strength equation. observations during the experiments indicate that only certain parts of the fracture profiles influence fracture shear strength and dilatancy. Under relatively low applied normal stresses, the JCS does not seem to have a significant effect on shear behavior. As an alternative, a new procedure for predicting the shear behavior of fractures was developed. The approach is based on basic fracture properties such as fracture surface profile data and the compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, and Poisson's ratio of the fracture walls. Comparison between predictions and actual shear test results shows that the alternative procedure is a reliable method

  17. Disposal of Hanford site tank wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupfer, M.J.

    1993-09-01

    Between 1943 and 1986, 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) and 28 double-shell tanks (DSTs) were built and used to store radioactive wastes generated during reprocessing of irradiated uranium metal fuel elements at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site in Southeastern Washington state. The 149 SSTs, located in 12 separate areas (tank farms) in the 200 East and 200 West areas, currently contain about 1.4 x 10 5 m 3 of solid and liquid wastes. Wastes in the SSTs contain about 5.7 x 10 18 Bq (170 MCi) of various radionuclides including 90 Sr, 99 Tc, 137 Cs, and transuranium (TRU) elements. The 28 DSTs also located in the 200 East and West areas contain about 9 x 10 4 m 3 of liquid (mainly) and solid wastes; approximately 4 x 10 18 Bq (90 MCi) of radionuclides are stored in the DSTs. Important characteristics and features of the various types of SST and DST wastes are described in this paper. However, the principal focus of this paper is on the evolving strategy for final disposal of both the SST and DST wastes. Also provided is a chronology which lists key events and dates in the development of strategies for disposal of Hanford Site tank wastes. One of these strategies involves pretreatment of retrieved tank wastes to separate them into a small volume of high-level radioactive waste requiring, after vitrification, disposal in a deep geologic repository and a large volume of low-level radioactive waste which can be safely disposed of in near-surface facilities at the Hanford Site. The last section of this paper lists and describes some of the pretreatment procedures and processes being considered for removal of important radionuclides from retrieved tank wastes

  18. A Replica Detection Scheme Based on the Deviation in Distance Traveled Sliding Window for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alekha Kumar Mishra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Node replication attack possesses a high level of threat in wireless sensor networks (WSNs and it is severe when the sensors are mobile. A limited number of replica detection schemes in mobile WSNs (MWSNs have been reported till date, where most of them are centralized in nature. The centralized detection schemes use time-location claims and the base station (BS is solely responsible for detecting replica. Therefore, these schemes are prone to single point of failure. There is also additional communication overhead associated with sending time-location claims to the BS. A distributed detection mechanism is always a preferred solution to the above kind of problems due to significantly lower communication overhead than their counterparts. In this paper, we propose a distributed replica detection scheme for MWSNs. In this scheme, the deviation in the distance traveled by a node and its replica is recorded by the observer nodes. Every node is an observer node for some nodes in the network. Observers are responsible for maintaining a sliding window of recent time-distance broadcast of the nodes. A replica is detected by an observer based on the degree of violation computed from the deviations recorded using the time-distance sliding window. The analysis and simulation results show that the proposed scheme is able to achieve higher detection probability compared to distributed replica detection schemes such as Efficient Distributed Detection (EDD and Multi-Time-Location Storage and Diffusion (MTLSD.

  19. Ferrocyanide tank waste stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, K.D.

    1993-01-01

    Ferrocyanide wastes were generated at the Hanford Site during the mid to late 1950s as a result of efforts to create more tank space for the storage of high-level nuclear waste. The ferrocyanide process was developed to remove 137 CS from existing waste and newly generated waste that resulted from the recovery of valuable uranium in Hanford Site waste tanks. During the course of research associated with the ferrocyanide process, it was recognized that ferrocyanide materials, when mixed with sodium nitrate and/or sodium nitrite, were capable of violent exothermic reaction. This chemical reactivity became an issue in the 1980s, when safety issues associated with the storage of ferrocyanide wastes in Hanford Site tanks became prominent. These safety issues heightened in the late 1980s and led to the current scrutiny of the safety issues associated with these wastes, as well as current research and waste management programs. Testing to provide information on the nature of possible tank reactions is ongoing. This document supplements the information presented in Summary of Single-Shell Tank Waste Stability, WHC-EP-0347, March 1991 (Borsheim and Kirch 1991), which evaluated several issues. This supplement only considers information particular to ferrocyanide wastes

  20. Underground storage tanks containing hazardous chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, R.F.; Starr, J.W.; Maresca, J.W. Jr.; Hillger, R.W.; Tafuri, A.N.

    1991-01-01

    The regulations issued by the United States Environmental Protection Agency in 1988 require, with several exceptions, that underground storage tank systems containing petroleum fuels and hazardous chemicals be routinely tested for releases. This paper summarizes the release detection regulations for tank systems containing chemicals and gives a preliminary assessment of the approaches to release detection currently being used. To make this assessment, detailed discussions were conducted with providers and manufacturers of leak detection equipment and testing services, owners or operators of different types of chemical storage tank systems, and state and local regulators. While these discussions were limited to a small percentage of each type of organization, certain observations are sufficiently distinctive and important that they are reported for further investigation and evaluation. To make it clearer why certain approaches are being used, this paper also summarizes the types of chemicals being stored, the effectiveness of several leak detection testing systems, and the number and characteristics of the tank systems being used to store these products

  1. Calibrating the input accountancy tanks on THORP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whyte, C.G.; Hillier, A.P.; Temple, A.

    1995-01-01

    BNFL's Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant (THORP), at Sellafield in the UK, processes oxide fuels from customers around the world. The fuel moves through the plant from shearing and dissolution in the Head End and subsequently to solvent extraction in the Chemical Plant. Clarified dissolver liquor is accumulated in three large buffer storage tanks (each of approximately 75 m 3 capacity), in the Head End prior to feeding to the Chemical Plant. The amount of dissolver liquor being passed to these tanks is accurately measured in one of two Input Accountancy Tanks, which are each of 23 m 3 working capacity, and are equipped with high accuracy weight and level measurement systems. Several papers have been published which describe the principles applied to achieve the Safeguarding of THORP. This paper describes the setting to work of a key measurement point in the THORP process and details the complex trials that were begun during the early commissioning phases, to ensure that these accountancy systems would eventually be fully characterized

  2. Consolidated fuel reprocessing program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuban, D.P.; Noakes, M.W.; Bradley, E.C.

    1987-01-01

    The Advanced Servomanipulator (ASM) System consists of three major components: the ASM slave, the dual arm master controller or master, and the control system. The ASM is a remotely maintainable force-reflecting servomanipulator developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as part of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program of (CFRP). This new manipulator addresses requirements of advanced nuclear fuel reprocessing with emphasis on force reflection, remote maintainability, and reliability. It uses an all-gear force transmission system. The master arms were designed as a kinematic replica of ASM and use cable force transmission. Special digital control algorithms were developed to improve the system performance. The system is presently operational and undergoing evaluation. Preliminary testing has been completed and is reported. The system is now undergoing commercialization by transferring the technology to the private sector

  3. Inerting ballast tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baes, Gabriel L.; Bronneberg, Jos [SBM Offshore, AA Schiedam (Netherlands); Barros, Maria A.S.D. de [Universidade Estadual de Maringa (UEM), PR (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    This report expands upon the work conducted by SBM Offshore to develop a tank preservation treatment, which is intended to achieve a service life of 30 years. This work focuses on the corrosion problems, in the ballast tanks, based on new built hulls, both for the Gas Exploration Market, the FLNG - Floating Liquefied Natural Gas, and for the Oil Exploration market - FPSO's - Floating Production Storage and offloading Units. Herein, the corrosion rate input comes from the various references related to the process of nitrogen injection, which is expected to extend the vessel's time life. The essential elements of this solution comprise the deoxygenation process, corrosion models, coating effects, tests from laboratory, shipboard tests, corrosion institutes and regulations applicable to the operation. The best corrosion protection system for ballast tanks area combines a coating system and an inert gas system. The condition of the tanks will be dependent upon the level of protection applied to the steel structure, including, but not limited to coating, cathodic protection, etc. There is a need for products which extend the life time. It is not sufficient, only have good theoretical base for the corrosion and an excellent treatment system. In addition, the design of the ships structure must also eliminate the presence of local stress concentrations which can result in fatigue cracking and rupture of the protective coating barrier starting the corrosion. As a direct result of this, more problems in corrosion can be mitigated, vessels can have a better corrosion performance with less maintenance and repairs to coating systems in ballast tanks. Furthermore ships will be positively impacted operationally due to less frequent dry docking. There is a huge potential in the application of inert gas to combat the corrosion rate inside the ballast tanks, one of the most corrosive environments on earth. This application can have a direct impact on vessel structure

  4. Failure analysis of buried tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, R.K.

    1994-01-01

    Failure of a buried tank can be hazardous. Failure may be a leak through which product is lost from the tank; but also through which contamination can occur. Failures are epidemic -- because buried tanks are out of sight, but also because designers of buried tanks have adopted analyses developed for pressure tanks. So why do pressure tanks fail when they are buried? Most failures of buried tanks are really soil failures. Soil compresses, or slips, or liquefies. Soil is not only a load, it is a support without which the tank deforms. A high water table adds to the load on the tank. It also reduces the strength of the soil. Based on tests, structural analyses are proposed for empty tanks buried in soils of various quality, with the water table at various levels, and with internal vacuum. Failure may be collapse tank. Such collapse is a sudden, audible inversion of the cylinder when the sidefill soil slips. Failure may be flotation. Failure may be a leak. Most leaks are fractures in the welds in overlap seams at flat spots. Flat spots are caused by a hard bedding or a heavy surface wheel load. Because the tank wall is double thick at the overlap, shearing stress in the weld is increased. Other weld failures occur when an end plate shears down past a cylinder; or when the tank is supported only at its ends like a beam. These, and other, failures can be analyzed with justifiable accuracy using basic principles of mechanics of materials. 10 figs

  5. TANK SPACE OPTIONS REPORT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, W.L.; Ahrendt, M.R.

    2009-01-01

    Since this report was originally issued in 2001, several options proposed for increasing double-shell tank (DST) storage space were implemented or are in the process of implementation. Changes to the single-shell tank (SST) waste retrieval schedule, completion of DST space saving options, and the DST space saving options in progress have delayed the projected shortfall of DST storage space from the 2007-2011 to the 2018-2025 timeframe (ORP-11242, River Protection Project System Plan). This report reevaluates options from Rev. 0 and includes evaluations of new options for alleviating projected restrictions on SST waste retrieval beginning in 2018 because of the lack of DST storage space.

  6. An Approach for Developing Site-Specific Lateral and Vertical Inclusion Zones within which Structures Should be Evaluated for Petroleum Vapor Intrusion due to Releases of Motor Fuel from Underground Storage Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buildings may be at risk from Petroleum Vapor Intrusion (PVI) when they overlie petroleum hydrocarbon contamination in the unsaturated zone or dissolved in groundwater. The U.S. EPA Office of Underground Storage Tanks (OUST) is preparing Guidance for Addressing Petroleum Vapor I...

  7. Upgrading a 1950s tank farm to meet the environmental standards of the 1990S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, C.F.; Peterson, S.W.

    1995-01-01

    The Texaco Inc. Research and Development (Texaco) facility in Beacon, New York includes an above ground storage tank (AST) farm, known as Tank Farm No. 1, which consists of eighteen tanks with capacities ranging from 10,000 to 21,000 gallons. A second tank farm, at the Texaco, Beacon facility, designated as the Boiler House Tank Farm, includes three additional tanks with capacities from 10,000 to 44,900 gallons. The Tank Farm No. 1 AST systems are all vertical, carbon steel tanks which were initially installed in several phases in the 1950s. The Boiler House Tank Farm ASTs are also vertical, carbon steel tanks, including one riveted construction tank that was installed in 1931. Each of the Texaco ASTs are used to store a variety of petroleum products, including diesel fuel, stoddard solvent, used oil, and various grades of gasoline and gasoline components. The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) has established regulations for petroleum bulk storage in 6 NYCRR Parts 612 through 614. These regulations include requirements for monitoring and inspecting AST systems, including a rigorous ''out of service'' inspection, to be completed at least once every ten years. Although several revisions had been completed at Tank Farm No. 1 in recent years, including installation of a reinforced concrete secondary containment dike system and new above ground piping, the tank shells and most appurtenances (e.g. water drawoff valves), were unmodified since they were initially installed. On this basis, Texaco decided to upgrade the AST systems in conjunction with the NYSDEC ten-year inspections, by installing reinforced fiberglass liners in the tank floors, and by removing and/or replacing tank appurtenances to meet current industry standards and fire code requirements. This paper presents a summary of the program implemented to upgrade the Texaco, Beacon tank farm AST systems

  8. Ultra-Fine Bubble Distributions in a Plant Factory Observed by Transmission Electron Microscope with a Freeze-Fracture Replica Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsutomu Uchida

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Water containing ultra-fine bubbles (UFB may promote plant growth. But, as UFBs are too small to distinguish from other impurities in a nutrient solution, it is not known if UFBs survive transport from the water source to the rhizosphere. Here we use the freeze-fracture replica method and a transmission electron microscope (TEM to observe UFBs in the nutrient solutions used in a crop-growing system known as a plant factory. In this factory, TEM images taken from various points in the supply line indicate that the concentration of UFBs in the nutrient solution is conserved, starting from their addition to the nutrient solution in the buffer tank, through the peat-moss layer, all the way to the rhizosphere. Measurements also show that a thin film formed on the surface of UFBs in the nutrient solution, with greater film thickness at the rhizosphere. This film is considered to be made from the accumulation of impurities coming from solute and the peat-moss layer.

  9. Permanent Closure of MFC Biodiesel Underground Storage Tank 99ANL00013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerry L. Nisson

    2012-10-01

    This closure package documents the site assessment and permanent closure of the Materials and Fuels Complex biodiesel underground storage tank 99ANL00013 in accordance with the regulatory requirements established in 40 CFR 280.71, “Technical Standards and Corrective Action Requirements for Owners and Operators of Underground Storage Tanks: Out-of-Service UST Systems and Closure.”

  10. Analysis of the dynamic behaviour of tanks filled with a liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ousset, Y.; Marquand, D.

    1983-01-01

    The construction of nuclear power plants sets the problem of the resistance of fuel storage tank to seisms. The presence of fluid changes sensitively the dynamic behaviour of the tank, what involves to take it into account. The CETIM choosed the method of integral equations to solve the problem of the calculation of the added mass matrix [Msub(A)] [fr

  11. Zeolite-templated carbon replica: a grand canonical Monte-Carlo simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roussel, Th.; Pellenq, R.J.M.; Bichara, Ch.; Gadiou, R.; Didion, A.; Vix-Guterl, C.; Gaslain, F.; Parmentier, J.; Valtchev, V.; Patarin, J.

    2005-01-01

    Microporous carbon materials are interesting for several applications such as hydrogen storage, catalysis or electrical double layer capacitors. The development of the negative templating method to obtain carbon replicas from ordered templates, has lead to the synthesis of several new materials which have interesting textural properties, attractive for energy storage. Among the possible templates, zeolites can be used to obtain highly microporous carbon materials. Nevertheless, the phenomena involved in the replica synthesis are not fully understood, and the relationships between the structure of the template, the carbon precursor and the resulting carbon material need to be investigated. Experimental results for carbon zeolite-templated nano-structures can be found in a series of papers; see for instance ref. [1] in which Wang et al describe a route to ultra-small Single Wall Carbon Nano-tubes (SWNTs) using the porosity of zeolite AlPO 4 -5. After matrix removal, the resulting structure is a free-standing bundle of 4 Angstroms large nano-tubes. However, it is highly desirable to obtain an ordered porous carbon structure that forms a real 3D network to be used for instance in gas storage applications. Carbon replica of faujasite and EMT zeolites can have these properties since these zeolites have a 3D porous network made of 10 Angstroms cages connected to each other through 7 Angstroms large windows. The first step of this study was to generate a theoretical carbon replica structure of various zeolites (faujasite, EMT, AlPO 4 -5, silicalite). For this purpose, we used the Grand Canonical Monte-Carlo (GCMC) technique in which the carbon-carbon interactions were described within the frame of a newly developed Tight Binding approach and the carbon-zeolite interactions assumed to be characteristic of physisorption. The intrinsic stability of the subsequent carbon nano-structures was then investigated after mimicking the removal of the inorganic phase by switching

  12. Aboveground storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizzo, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    With the 1988 promulgation of the comprehensive Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations for underground storage of petroleum and hazardous substances, many existing underground storage tank (UST) owners have been considering making the move to aboveground storage. While on the surface, this may appear to be the cure-all to avoiding the underground leakage dilemma, there are many other new and different issues to consider with aboveground storage. The greatest misconception is that by storing materials above ground, there is no risk of subsurface environmental problems. it should be noted that with the aboveground storage tank (AGST) systems, there is still considerable risk of environmental contamination, either by the failure of onground tank bottoms or the spillage of product onto the ground surface where it subsequently finds its way to the ground water. In addition, there are added safety concerns that must be addressed. So what are the other specific areas of concern besides environmental to be addressed when making the decision between underground and aboveground tanks? The primary issues that will be addressed in this paper are: Safety, Product Losses, Cost Comparison of USTs vs AGSTs, Space Availability/Accessibility, Precipitation Handling, Aesthetics and Security, Pending and Existing Regulations

  13. Underground storage tank program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, M.W.

    1994-01-01

    Underground storage tanks, UST'S, have become a major component of the Louisville District's Environmental Support Program. The District's Geotechnical and Environmental Engineering Branch has spear-headed an innovative effort to streamline the time, effort and expense for removal, replacement, upgrade and associated cleanup of USTs at military and civil work installations. This program, called Yank-A-Tank, creates generic state-wide contracts for removal, remediation, installation and upgrade of storage tanks for which individual delivery orders are written under the basic contract. The idea is to create a ''JOC type'' contract containing all the components of work necessary to remove, reinstall or upgrade an underground or above ground tank. The contract documents contain a set of generic specifications and unit price books in addition to the standard ''boiler plate'' information. Each contract requires conformance to the specific regulations for the state in which it is issued. The contractor's bid consists of a bid factor which in the multiplier used with the prices in the unit price book. The solicitation is issued as a Request for Proposal (RPP) which allows the government to select a contractor based on technical qualification an well as bid factor. Once the basic contract is awarded individual delivery orders addressing specific areas of work are scoped, negotiated and awarded an modifications to the original contract. The delivery orders utilize the prepriced components and the contractor's factor to determine the value of the work

  14. Inferring predator behavior from attack rates on prey-replicas that differ in conspicuousness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoel E Stuart

    Full Text Available Behavioral ecologists and evolutionary biologists have long studied how predators respond to prey items novel in color and pattern. Because a predatory response is influenced by both the predator's ability to detect the prey and a post-detection behavioral response, variation among prey types in conspicuousness may confound inference about post-prey-detection predator behavior. That is, a relatively high attack rate on a given prey type may result primarily from enhanced conspicuousness and not predators' direct preference for that prey. Few studies, however, account for such variation in conspicuousness. In a field experiment, we measured predation rates on clay replicas of two aposematic forms of the poison dart frog Dendrobates pumilio, one novel and one familiar, and two cryptic controls. To ask whether predators prefer or avoid a novel aposematic prey form independently of conspicuousness differences among replicas, we first modeled the visual system of a typical avian predator. Then, we used this model to estimate replica contrast against a leaf litter background to test whether variation in contrast alone could explain variation in predator attack rate. We found that absolute predation rates did not differ among color forms. Predation rates relative to conspicuousness did, however, deviate significantly from expectation, suggesting that predators do make post-detection decisions to avoid or attack a given prey type. The direction of this deviation from expectation, though, depended on assumptions we made about how avian predators discriminate objects from the visual background. Our results show that it is important to account for prey conspicuousness when investigating predator behavior and also that existing models of predator visual systems need to be refined.

  15. Task 7c: Worm tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Worm tank has a unique shape. In the seismic design of a worm tank, it is desirable to clear the behavior of the worm tank under the seismic loading. We assumed that there are two phenomena in the seismic behavior of the worm tank same as the behavior of the cylindrical and rectangular tanks. One is a sloshing behavior of the water and another is the dynamic response of the worm tank. In this study, we investigate the dynamic characteristics of the worm tank during the strong earthquakes. We conducted the vibration tests to clarify the seismic behaviors of the worm tanks and obtained the valuable data to verify the analytical method. It was found that the natural frequency can be calculated using the eigenvalue formula of the cylindrical and rectangular tanks. Lower modes of the worm tank are identical with that of the rectangular tank. We can estimate the surface behavior and the impact mode using the data of the rectangular tank. (author)

  16. SRS Tank Structural Integrity Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maryak, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    The mission of the Structural Integrity Program is to ensure continued safe management and operation of the waste tanks for whatever period of time these tanks are required. Matthew Maryak provides an overview of the Structural Integrity Program to open Session 5 (Waste Storage and Tank Inspection) of the 2010 EM Waste Processing Technical Exchange.

  17. Anti-stiction coating of PDMS moulds for rapid microchannel fabrication by double replica moulding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhuang, Guisheng; Kutter, Jörg Peter

    2011-01-01

    ), which resulted in an anti-stiction layer for the improved release after PDMS casting. The deposition of FDTS on an O2 plasma-activated surface of PDMS produced a reproducible and well-performing anti-stiction monolayer of fluorocarbon, and we used the FDTS-coated moulds as micro-masters for rapid......In this paper, we report a simple and precise method to rapidly replicate master structures for fast microchannel fabrication by double replica moulding of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). A PDMS mould was surface-treated by vapour phase deposition of 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane (FDTS...

  18. A sequence of Clifford algebras and three replicas of Dirac particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krolikowski, W.; Warsaw Univ.

    1990-01-01

    The embedding of Dirac algebra into a sequence N=1, 2, 3,... of Clifford algebras is discussed, leading to Dirac equations with N=1 additional, electromagnetically ''hidden'' spins 1/2. It is shown that there are three and only three replicas N=1, 3, 5 of Dirac particle if the theory of relativity together with the probability interpretation of wave function is applied both to the ''visible'' spin and ''hidden'' spins, and a new ''hidden exclusion principle''is imposed on the wave function (then ''hidden'' spins add up to zero). It is appealing to explore this idea in order to explain the puzzle of three generations of lepton and quarks. (author)

  19. Enhanced Sampling in Molecular Dynamics Using Metadynamics, Replica-Exchange, and Temperature-Acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron Abrams

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We review a selection of methods for performing enhanced sampling in molecular dynamics simulations. We consider methods based on collective variable biasing and on tempering, and offer both historical and contemporary perspectives. In collective-variable biasing, we first discuss methods stemming from thermodynamic integration that use mean force biasing, including the adaptive biasing force algorithm and temperature acceleration. We then turn to methods that use bias potentials, including umbrella sampling and metadynamics. We next consider parallel tempering and replica-exchange methods. We conclude with a brief presentation of some combination methods.

  20. Time-reversal focusing of an expanding soliton gas in disordered replicas

    KAUST Repository

    Fratalocchi, Andrea

    2011-05-31

    We investigate the properties of time reversibility of a soliton gas, originating from a dispersive regularization of a shock wave, as it propagates in a strongly disordered environment. An original approach combining information measures and spin glass theory shows that time-reversal focusing occurs for different replicas of the disorder in forward and backward propagation, provided the disorder varies on a length scale much shorter than the width of the soliton constituents. The analysis is performed by starting from a new class of reflectionless potentials, which describe the most general form of an expanding soliton gas of the defocusing nonlinear Schrödinger equation.

  1. Time-reversal focusing of an expanding soliton gas in disordered replicas

    KAUST Repository

    Fratalocchi, Andrea; Armaroli, A.; Trillo, S.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the properties of time reversibility of a soliton gas, originating from a dispersive regularization of a shock wave, as it propagates in a strongly disordered environment. An original approach combining information measures and spin glass theory shows that time-reversal focusing occurs for different replicas of the disorder in forward and backward propagation, provided the disorder varies on a length scale much shorter than the width of the soliton constituents. The analysis is performed by starting from a new class of reflectionless potentials, which describe the most general form of an expanding soliton gas of the defocusing nonlinear Schrödinger equation.

  2. Storage Tanks - Selection Of Type, Design Code And Tank Sizing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shatla, M.N; El Hady, M.

    2004-01-01

    The present work gives an insight into the proper selection of type, design code and sizing of storage tanks used in the Petroleum and Process industries. In this work, storage tanks are classified based on their design conditions. Suitable design codes and their limitations are discussed for each tank type. The option of storage under high pressure and ambient temperature, in spherical and cigar tanks, is compared to the option of storage under low temperature and slight pressure (close to ambient) in low temperature and cryogenic tanks. The discussion is extended to the types of low temperature and cryogenic tanks and recommendations are given to select their types. A study of pressurized tanks designed according to ASME code, conducted in the present work, reveals that tanks designed according to ASME Section VIII DIV 2 provides cost savings over tanks designed according to ASME Section VIII DlV 1. The present work is extended to discuss the parameters that affect sizing of flat bottom cylindrical tanks. The analysis shows the effect of height-to-diameter ratio on tank instability and foundation loads

  3. Plan for dynamic testing of NFS tank and vault

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    (Nuclear Fuel Services) dynamic testing methodologies are described including the determination of resonant frequencies, mode shapes and the associated structural damping. The application of dynamic testing to the determination of the eigenparameters of the neutralized waste tanks 8D-2 and 8D-1 investigated and recommendations made

  4. Tank drive : ZCL takes its composite tank technology worldwide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byfield, M.

    2010-06-15

    Edmonton-based ZCL Composites Inc. is North America's largest manufacturer and supplier of fibreglass reinforced plastic (FRP) underground storage tanks. The company has aggressively pursued new markets in the oil sands, shale gas gas, and other upstream petroleum industries. The manufacturer also targets water and sewage applications, and provides customized corrosion solutions for a variety of industries. The company developed its double-walled FRP tanks in response to Canadian Environmental Protection Act rules requiring cathodic protection for steel tanks, leak detection, and secondary containment. ZCL supplies approximately 90 per cent of the new tanks installed by gasoline retailers in Canada. Future growth is expected to be strong, as many old tanks will soon need to be replaced. The company has also developed a method of transforming underground single wall tanks into secondarily contained systems without digging them out. The company has also recently signed licence agreements with tank manufacturers in China. 3 figs.

  5. Material selection for Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlos, W.C.

    1994-01-01

    This report briefly summarizes the history of the materials selection for the US Department of Energy's high-level waste carbon steel storage tanks. It also provide an evaluation of the materials for the construction of new tanks at the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility. The evaluation included a materials matrix that summarized the critical design, fabrication, construction, and corrosion resistance requirements; assessed each requirement; and cataloged the advantages and disadvantages of each material. This evaluation is based on the mission of the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility. On the basis of the compositions of the wastes stored in Hanford waste tanks, it is recommended that tanks for the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility be constructed of normalized ASME SA 516, Grade 70, carbon steel

  6. Replica Node Detection Using Enhanced Single Hop Detection with Clonal Selection Algorithm in Mobile Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. Sindhuja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Security of Mobile Wireless Sensor Networks is a vital challenge as the sensor nodes are deployed in unattended environment and they are prone to various attacks. One among them is the node replication attack. In this, the physically insecure nodes are acquired by the adversary to clone them by having the same identity of the captured node, and the adversary deploys an unpredictable number of replicas throughout the network. Hence replica node detection is an important challenge in Mobile Wireless Sensor Networks. Various replica node detection techniques have been proposed to detect these replica nodes. These methods incur control overheads and the detection accuracy is low when the replica is selected as a witness node. This paper proposes to solve these issues by enhancing the Single Hop Detection (SHD method using the Clonal Selection algorithm to detect the clones by selecting the appropriate witness nodes. The advantages of the proposed method include (i increase in the detection ratio, (ii decrease in the control overhead, and (iii increase in throughput. The performance of the proposed work is measured using detection ratio, false detection ratio, packet delivery ratio, average delay, control overheads, and throughput. The implementation is done using ns-2 to exhibit the actuality of the proposed work.

  7. Synthesis and properties of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} replica with biological hierarchical structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hongyan; Guo, Yiping, E-mail: ypguo@sjtu.edu.cn; Zhang, Yangyang; Wu, Fen; Liu, Yun; Zhang, Di, E-mail: zhangdi@sjtu.edu.cn

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: • ZFO replica with hierarchical structure was synthesized from butterfly wings. • Biotemplate has a significant impact on the properties of ZFO material. • Our method opens up new avenues for the synthesis of spinel ferrites. -- Abstract: ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} replica with biological hierarchical structure was synthesized from Papilio paris by a sol–gel method followed by calcination. The crystallographic structure and morphology of the obtained samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscope, and transmittance electron microscope. The results showed that the hierarchical structures were retained in the ZFO replica of spinel structure. The magnetic behavior of such novel products was measured by a vibrating sample magnetometer. A superparamagnetism-like behavior was observed due to nanostructuration size effects. In addition, the ZFO replica with “quasi-honeycomb-like structure” showed a much higher specific capacitance of 279.4 F g{sup −1} at 10 mV s{sup −1} in comparison with ZFO powder of 137.3 F g{sup −1}, attributing to the significantly increased surface area. These results demonstrated that ZFO replica is a promising candidate for novel magnetic devices and supercapacitors.

  8. Safe-geometry pneumatic nuclear fuel powder blender

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, W.L.

    1979-01-01

    The object of this invention is to provide a nuclear fuel powder mixing tank in which the powder can be rapidly and safely mixed and in which accumulation of critical amounts of fuel is prevented. (UK)

  9. Tank farm nuclear criticality review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bratzel, D.R.

    1996-01-01

    The technical basis for the nuclear criticality safety of stored wastes at the Hanford Site Tank Farm Complex was reviewed by a team of senior technical personnel whose expertise covered all appropriate aspects of fissile materials chemistry and physics. The team concluded that the detailed and documented nucleonics-related studies underlying the waste tanks criticality safety basis were sound. The team concluded that, under current plutonium inventories and operating conditions, a nuclear criticality accident is incredible in any of the Hanford single-shell tanks (SST), double-shell tanks (DST), or double-contained receiver tanks (DCRTS) on the Hanford Site

  10. The Effect of Sloshing on a Tank Pressure Build-up Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Banne, Håvard Bolstad

    2017-01-01

    This thesis work has aimed to identify how sloshing will affect a liquefied natural gas (LNG) fuel tank. The physical nature of LNG means it needs to be kept cooled and pressurized in order to remain in a liquid state. By implementing a pressure build-up unit (PBU) it is possible to pressurize the tank vaporizing the tank’s contents, for the vapour then to return to tank in a loop, building pressure in the process. A tank pressure build-up unit has been built in the laboratory ...

  11. An Investigation of the Free-Spinning and Recovery Characteristics of a 1/24-Scale Model of the Grumman F11F-1 Airplane with Alternate Nose Configurations with and without Wing Fuel Tanks, TED No. NACA AD 395

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, James S., Jr.

    1958-01-01

    A supplementary investigation has been conducted in the langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on a l/24-scale model of the Grumman F11F-1 airplane to determine the spin and recovery characteristics with alternate nose configurations, the production version and the elongated APS-67 version, with and without empty and full wing tanks. When spins were obtained with either alternate nose configuration, they were oscillatory and recovery characteristics were considered unsatisfactory on the basis of the fact that very slow recoveries were indicated to be possible. The simultaneous extension of canards near the nose of the model with rudder reversal was effective in rapidly terminating the spin. The addition of empty wing tanks had little effect on the developed spin and recovery characteristics. The model did not spin erect with full wing tanks. For optimum recovery from inverted spins, the rudder should be reversed to 22O against the spin and simultaneously the flaperons should be moved with the developed spin; the stick should be held at or moved to full forward longitudinally. The minimum size parachute required to insure satisfactory recoveries in an emergency was found to be 12 feet in diameter (laid out flat) with a drag coefficient of 0.64 (based on the laid-out-flat diameter) and a towline length of 32 feet.

  12. Do Fish Enhance Tank Mixing?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Michael R.; Laursen, Jesper; Craig, Steven R.

    2005-01-01

    The design of fish rearing tanks represents a critical stage in the development of optimal aquaculture systems, especially in the context of recirculating systems. Poor hydrodynamics can compromise water quality, waste management and the physiology and behaviour of fish, and thence, production...... potential and operational profitability. The hydrodynamic performance of tanks, therefore, represents an important parameter during the tank design process. Because there are significant complexities in combining the rigid principles of hydrodynamics with the stochastic behaviour of fish, however, most data...... upon tank hydrokinetics has been derived using tanks void of fish. Clearly, the presence of randomly moving objects, such as fish, in a water column will influence not only tank volumes by displacing water, but due to their activity, water dynamics and associated in-tank processes. In order...

  13. 49 CFR 179.101 - Individual specification requirements applicable to pressure tank car tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... to pressure tank car tanks. 179.101 Section 179.101 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT... tank car tanks. Editorial Note: At 66 FR 45186, Aug. 28, 2001, an amendment published amending a table...

  14. 49 CFR 179.301 - Individual specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-unit tank car tanks. 179.301 Section 179.301 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... MATERIALS REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) § 179.301 Individual specification requirements for multi-unit tank car tanks. (a) In...

  15. 49 CFR 179.500 - Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank car tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... car tanks. 179.500 Section 179.500 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... REGULATIONS SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specification for Cryogenic Liquid Tank Car Tanks and Seamless Steel Tanks (Classes DOT-113 and 107A) § 179.500 Specification DOT-107A * * * * seamless steel tank car tanks. ...

  16. Phonon replica dynamics in high quality GaN epilayers and AlGaN/GaN quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alderighi, D.; Vinattieri, A.; Colocci, M. [Ist. Nazionale Fisica della Materia, Firenze (Italy); Dipt. di Fisica and LENS, Firenze (Italy); Bogani, F. [Ist. Nazionale Fisica della Materia, Firenze (Italy); Dipt. di Energetica, Firenze (Italy); Gottardo, S. [Dipt. di Fisica and LENS, Firenze (Italy); Grandjean, N.; Massies, J. [Centre de Recherche sur l' Hetero-Epitaxie et ses Applications, CNRS, Valbonne (France)

    2001-01-01

    We present an experimental study of the exciton and phonon replica dynamics in high quality GaN epilayers and AlGaN/GaN quantum wells (QW) by means of picosecond time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) measurements. A non-exponential decay is observed both at the zero phonon line (ZPL) and at the n = 1 LO replica. Time-resolved spectra unambiguously assign the replica to the free exciton A recombination. Optical migration effects are detected both in the epilayer and the QWs samples and disappear as the temperature increases up to 60-90 K. Even though the sample quality is comparable to state-of-the-art samples, localization effects dominate the exciton dynamics at low temperature in the studied GaN based structures. (orig.)

  17. Dynamical self-arrest in symmetric and asymmetric diblock copolymer melts using a replica approach within a local theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sangwook

    2009-03-01

    We investigate dynamical self-arrest in a diblock copolymer melt using a replica approach within a self-consistent local method based on dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT). The local replica approach effectively predicts (chiN)_{A} for dynamical self-arrest in a block copolymer melt for symmetric and asymmetric cases. We discuss the competition of the cubic and quartic interactions in the Landau free energy for a block copolymer melt in stabilizing a glassy state depending on the chain length. Our local replica theory provides a universal value for the dynamical self-arrest in block copolymer melts with (chiN)_{A} approximately 10.5+64N;{-3/10} for the symmetric case.

  18. How could the replica method improve accuracy of performance assessment of channel coding?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabashima, Yoshiyuki [Department of Computational Intelligence and Systems Science, Tokyo Institute of technology, Yokohama 226-8502 (Japan)], E-mail: kaba@dis.titech.ac.jp

    2009-12-01

    We explore the relation between the techniques of statistical mechanics and information theory for assessing the performance of channel coding. We base our study on a framework developed by Gallager in IEEE Trans. Inform. Theory IT-11, 3 (1965), where the minimum decoding error probability is upper-bounded by an average of a generalized Chernoff's bound over a code ensemble. We show that the resulting bound in the framework can be directly assessed by the replica method, which has been developed in statistical mechanics of disordered systems, whereas in Gallager's original methodology further replacement by another bound utilizing Jensen's inequality is necessary. Our approach associates a seemingly ad hoc restriction with respect to an adjustable parameter for optimizing the bound with a phase transition between two replica symmetric solutions, and can improve the accuracy of performance assessments of general code ensembles including low density parity check codes, although its mathematical justification is still open.

  19. PHYSICAL DISABILITY, STIGMA, AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY IN CHILDREN: A REPLICA STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus GEBHARDT

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Stereotypes can be reduced through positive descriptions. A stigma that able-bodied adults have towards children with physical disability can be reduced when the child is portrayed as being active. The study found out that a sporty active child, who uses a wheelchair, is perceived as more competent than the sporty active able-bodied child. Objective: This study is a replica study to support the hypotheses and to examine the stereotypes of able-bodied adults towards children with and without (physical disabilities. Methods: This study presents two experimental replica studies using a 2 (physical activity x 2 (sporty activities. The dependent variables were the perception of competencies and warmth according to Stereotype Content Model (SCM. Study 1 is an online experiment with 355 students of the Open University of Hagen. Study 2 surveys 1176 participants (from Munich and Graz with a paper-pencil-questionnaire. Results: The significant interaction effect was not supported by our studies. The sporty able-bodied child was rated higher in competences than the sporty child, who use a wheelchair. Sporting activity only reduces the stigma towards children with a physical disability slightly. Conclusion: The stigma towards children with physical disability can be reduced when the child is portrayed as being active, but the effect was not strong enough to chance the original classification by the SCM.

  20. Nuclear research emulsion neutron spectrometry at the Little-Boy replica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.; Roberts, J.H.; Preston, C.C.

    1985-10-01

    Nuclear research emulsions (NRE) have been used to characterize the neutron spectrum emitted by the Little-Boy replica. NRE were irradiated at the Little-Boy surface as well as approximately 2 m from the center of the Little-Boy replica using polar angles of 0 0 , 30 0 , 60 0 and 90 0 . For the NRE exposed at 2 m, neutron background was determined using shadow shields of borated polyethylene. Emulsion scanning to date has concentrated exclusively on the 2-m, 0 0 and 2-m, 90 0 locations. Approximately 5000 proton-recoil tracks have been measured in NRE irradiated at each of these locations. Neutron spectra obtained from these NRE proton-recoil spectra are compared with both liquid scintillator neutron spectrometry and Monte Carlo calculations. NRE and liquid scintillator neutron spectra generally agree within experimental uncertainties at the 2-m, 90 0 location. However, at the 2-m, 0 0 location, the neutron spectra derived from these two independent experimental methods differ significantly. NRE spectra and Monte Carlo calculations exhibit general agreement with regard to both intensity as well as energy dependence. Better agreement is attained between theory and experiment at the 2-m, 90 0 location, where the neutron intensity is considerably higher. 14 refs., 18 figs., 11 tabs

  1. One step replica symmetry breaking and extreme order statistics of logarithmic REMs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyu Cao, Yan V. Fyodorov, Pierre Le Doussal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Building upon the one-step replica symmetry breaking formalism, duly understood and ramified, we show that the sequence of ordered extreme values of a general class of Euclidean-space logarithmically correlated random energy models (logREMs behave in the thermodynamic limit as a randomly shifted decorated exponential Poisson point process. The distribution of the random shift is determined solely by the large-distance ("infra-red", IR limit of the model, and is equal to the free energy distribution at the critical temperature up to a translation. the decoration process is determined solely by the small-distance ("ultraviolet", UV limit, in terms of the biased minimal process. Our approach provides connections of the replica framework to results in the probability literature and sheds further light on the freezing/duality conjecture which was the source of many previous results for log-REMs. In this way we derive the general and explicit formulae for the joint probability density of depths of the first and second minima (as well its higher-order generalizations in terms of model-specific contributions from UV as well as IR limits. In particular, we show that the second min statistics is largely independent of details of UV data, whose influence is seen only through the mean value of the gap. For a given log-correlated field this parameter can be evaluated numerically, and we provide several numerical tests of our theory using the circular model of $1/f$-noise.

  2. A new creep-strain-replica method for evaluating the remaining life time of components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joas, H.D.

    2001-01-01

    To realise a safe and economic operation of older power- or chemical plants a strategy for maintenance is necessary, which makes it possible to operate a component or the plant longer than 300,000 operating hours, this also for the situation that the mode of operation has changed meanwhile. In Germany a realistic evaluation of the remaining life-time is done by comparing the actual calculated test data of a component with the code TRD 301 and TRD 508 and additional non-destructive tests or other codes like ASME, Sec. II, BS 5500, AFCEN (1985). According to many boundary conditions, the calculated data are inaccurate and the measuring of creep-strain at temperatures of about 600 o C with capacitive strain-gauges very expensive. Description of the approach of the problems: spotwelding of two gauges to the surface of a component (in a defined distance), forming a gap, producing of replica of the gap after certain operating hours at shut-down conditions by trained personal, evaluation of the replica to gain the amount of creep-strain using a scanning electron microscope, assessment of the creep-strain data. (Author)

  3. Efficacy of independence sampling in replica exchange simulations of ordered and disordered proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kuo Hao; Chen, Jianhan

    2017-11-15

    Recasting temperature replica exchange (T-RE) as a special case of Gibbs sampling has led to a simple and efficient scheme for enhanced mixing (Chodera and Shirts, J. Chem. Phys., 2011, 135, 194110). To critically examine if T-RE with independence sampling (T-REis) improves conformational sampling, we performed T-RE and T-REis simulations of ordered and disordered proteins using coarse-grained and atomistic models. The results demonstrate that T-REis effectively increase the replica mobility in temperatures space with minimal computational overhead, especially for folded proteins. However, enhanced mixing does not translate well into improved conformational sampling. The convergences of thermodynamic properties interested are similar, with slight improvements for T-REis of ordered systems. The study re-affirms the efficiency of T-RE does not appear to be limited by temperature diffusion, but by the inherent rates of spontaneous large-scale conformational re-arrangements. Due to its simplicity and efficacy of enhanced mixing, T-REis is expected to be more effective when incorporated with various Hamiltonian-RE protocols. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Laboratory studies of groundwater degassing in replicas of natural fractured rock for linear flow geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geller, J.T.

    1998-02-01

    Laboratory experiments to simulate two-phase (gas and water) flow in fractured rock evolving from groundwater degassing were conducted in transparent replicas of natural rock fractures. These experiments extend the work by Geller et al. (1995) and Jarsjo and Geller (1996) that tests the hypothesis that groundwater degassing caused observed flow reductions in the Stripa Simulated Drift Experiment (SDE). Understanding degassing effects over a range of gas contents is needed due to the uncertainty in the gas contents of the water at the SDE. The main objectives of this study were to: (1) measure the effect of groundwater degassing on liquid flow rates for lower gas contents than the values used in Geller for linear flow geometry in the same fracture replicas of Geller; (2) provide a data set to develop a predictive model of two-phase flow in fractures for conditions of groundwater degassing; and (3) improve the certainty of experimental gas contents (this effort included modifications to the experimental system used by Geller et al. and separate gas-water equilibration tests). The Stripa site is being considered for a high-level radioactive waste repository

  5. Safety techniques of lightning rod and static electricity in oil tanks and oil trucks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilievska, Tatjana

    1999-01-01

    In this article the ways and examples of lightning rod installation of small tanks for storage of both oil and oil derivates used by petrol stations are presented (an example of some petrol stations in the wider region in Bitola is given ). Also, a lightning rod protection of big tanks and terminals as well as protection of static electricity of tank trucks during transportation of fuel is represented. Special review is given to the protection of static electricity during transforming (decanting) of the fuel. (Author)

  6. CFD Modelling of Adsorption Behaviour in AGN Tank with Polyethylene Terephthalate Plastic Waste Based Activated Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuliusman; Afdhol, M. K.; Sanal, Alristo; Nasruddin

    2018-03-01

    Indonesia imports fuel (fuel oil) in large quantities. Indonesia has reserves of methane gas in the form of natural gas in large numbers but has obstacles in the process of storage. To produce a storage tank to a safe condition then proclaimed to use ANG (Adsorbed Natural Gas) technology. Manufacture of activated PET based activated carbon for storage of natural gas where technology has been widely studied, but still has some shortcomings. Therefore to predict the performance of ANG technology, modeling of ANG tank with Fluent CFD program is done so the condition inside the ANG tank can be known and can be used to increased the performance of ANG technology. Therefore, in this experiment natural gas storage test is done at the ANG tank model using Fluent CFD program. This experiment is begin with preparation tools and material by characterize the natural gas and activated carbon followed by create the mesh and model of ANG tank. The next process is state the characteristic of activated carbon and fluid in this experiment. The last process is run the simulation using the condition that already been stated which is at 27°C and 35 bar during 15 minutes. The result is at adsorption contour we can see that adsorption is higher at the top of the tank because the input of the adsorbent is at the top of the ANG tank so the adsorbate distribution is uneven that cause the adsorbate concentration at the top of the ANG tank is higher than the bottom tank.

  7. A science think tank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devine, F [The Australian, (Australia)

    1999-07-01

    A journalist views on public perceptions on nuclear issues in Australia and Japan is presented. It is also emphasised that by not offering an undergraduate course in nuclear engineering, Australia have closed the door to the nuclear energy development in Australia and costed the country some depth of specialized knowledges. A scientific think tank with active participation of the nuclear scientists is thought to benefit Australia and be in the position to influence private industrial and governmental planning.

  8. A science think tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devine, F.

    1999-01-01

    A journalist views on public perceptions on nuclear issues in Australia and Japan is presented. It is also emphasised that by not offering an undergraduate course in nuclear engineering, Australia have closed the door to the nuclear energy development in Australia and costed the country some depth of specialized knowledges. A scientific think tank with active participation of the nuclear scientists is thought to benefit Australia and be in the position to influence private industrial and governmental planning

  9. 46 CFR 109.577 - Helicopter fueling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Helicopter fueling. 109.577 Section 109.577 Shipping... Miscellaneous § 109.577 Helicopter fueling. (a) The master or person in charge shall designate persons to conduct helicopter fueling operations. (b) Portable tanks are handled and stowed in accordance with...

  10. Tank type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Fumio.

    1989-01-01

    The present invention concerns a tank type reactor capable of securing reactor core integrity by preventing incorporation of gases to an intermediate heat exchanger, thgereby improving the reliability. In a conventional tank type reactor, since vortex flows are easily caused near the inlet of an intermediate heat exchanger, there is a fear that cover gases are involved into the coolant main streams to induce fetal accidents. In the present invention, a reactor core is suspended by way of a suspending body to the inside of a reactor vessel and an intermediate heat exchanger and a pump are disposed between the suspending body and the reactor vessel, in which a vortex current preventive plate is attached at the outside near the coolant inlet on the primary circuit of the intermediate heat exchanger. In this way vortex or turbulence near the inlet of the intermediate heata exchanger or near the surface of coolants can be prevented. Accordingly, the cover gases are no more involved, to insure the reactor core integrity and obtain a tank type nuclear reactor of high reliability. (I.S.)

  11. Theoretical study of solar combisystems based on bikini tanks and tank-in-tank stores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazdanshenas, Eshagh; Furbo, Simon

    2012-01-01

    . Originality/value - Many different Solar Combisystem designs have been commercialized over the years. In the IEA-SHC Task 26, twenty one solar combisystems have been described and analyzed. Maybe the mantle tank approach also for solar combisystems can be used with advantage? This might be possible...... if the solar heating system is based on a so called bikini tank. Therefore the new developed solar combisystems based on bikini tanks is compared to the tank-in-tank solar combisystems to elucidate which one is suitable for three different houses with low energy heating demand, medium and high heating demand.......Purpose - Low flow bikini solar combisystems and high flow tank-in-tank solar combisystems have been studied theoretically. The aim of the paper is to study which of these two solar combisystem designs is suitable for different houses. The thermal performance of solar combisystems based on the two...

  12. Tank type LMFBR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Hiroshi

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To detect the abnormality in the suspended body or reactor core supporting structures thereby improve the safety and reliability of tank type LMFBR reactors. Constitution: Upon inspection during reactor operation period, the top end of the gripper sensing rod of a fuel exchanger is abutted against a supporting bed and the position of the reactor core supporting structures from the roof slab is measured by a stroke measuring device. Then, the sensing rod is pulled upwardly to abut against the arm portion and the position is measured by the stroke measuring device. The measuring procedures are carried out for all of the sensing rods and the measured values are compared with a previously determined value at the initial stage of the reactor operation. As a result, it is possible to detect excess distortions and abnormal deformation in the suspended body or reactor core supporting structures. Furthermore, integrity of the suspended body against thermal stresses can be secured by always measuring the coolant liquid level by the level measuring sensor. (Kamimura, M.)

  13. Ex-vessel nuclear fuel transfer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade, E.E.

    1978-01-01

    A system for transferring fuel assemblies between a fuel transfer area and a fuel storage area while the fuel assemblies remain completely submerged in a continuous body of coolant is described. A fuel transfer area filled with reactor coolant communicating with the reactor vessel below the reactor coolant level provides a transfer area for fuel assemblies in transit to and from the reactor vessel. A positioning mechanism comprising at least one rotatable plug disposed on a fuel transfer tank located outside the reactor vessel cooperates with either the fuel transfer area or the fuel storage area to position a fuel assembly in transit. When in position, a transporting mechanism cooperating with the positioning mechanism lifts or lowers a chosen fuel assembly. The transporting mechanism together with the positioning mechanism are capable of transferring a fuel assembly between the fuel transfer area and the fuel storage area

  14. Initial tank calibration at NUCEF critical facility. 1. Measurement procedure and its result

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Hiroshi; Mineo, Hideaki; Tonoike, Kotaro; Takeshita, Isao; Hoshi, Katsuya; Hagiwara, Hiroyuki.

    1994-07-01

    Initial tank calibrations were carried out prior to hot operation of critical facilities in NUCEF: Nuclear Fuel Cycle Safety Engineering Research Facility, for the purpose of the nuclear material accountancy and control for the facility. Raw calibration data were collected from single run per one tank by measuring differential pressure with dip-tube systems, weight of calibration liquid (demineralized water) poured into the tank, temperature in the tank and so on, without operation of tank ventilation system. Volume and level data were obtained by applying density and buoyancy corrections to the raw data. As a result, the evaluated measurement errors of volume and level were small enough, e.g. within 0.2 lit. and 1.0 mm, respectively, for Pu accountancy tanks. This paper summarizes the above-mentioned measurement procedures, collected data, data correction procedures and evaluated measurement errors. (author)

  15. Monitoring of bunker fuel consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faber, J.; Nelissen, D.; Smit, M.

    2013-03-15

    Monitoring of fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions from international shipping is currently under discussion at the EU level as well as at the IMO (International Maritime Organization). There are several approaches to monitoring, each with different characteristics. Based on a survey of the literature and information from equipment suppliers, this report analyses the four main methods for monitoring emissions: (1) Bunker delivery notes (i.e. a note provided by the bunker fuel supplier specifying, inter alia, the amount of fuel bunkered); (2) Tank sounding (i.e. systems for measuring the amount of fuel in the fuel tanks); (3) Fuel flow meters (i.e. systems for measuring the amount of fuel supplied to the engines, generators or boilers); and (4) Direct emissions monitoring (i.e. measuring the exhaust emissions in the stack). The report finds that bunker delivery notes and tank soundings have the lowest investment cost. However, unless tank sounding is automated, these systems have higher operational costs than fuel flow meters or direct emissions monitoring because manual readings have to be entered in monitoring systems. Fuel flow meters have the highest potential accuracy. Depending on the technology selected, their accuracy can be an order of magnitude better than the other systems, which typically have errors of a few percent. By providing real-time feed-back on fuel use or emissions, fuel flow meters and direct emissions monitoring provide ship operators with the means to train their crew to adopt fuel-efficient sailing methods and to optimise their maintenance and hull cleaning schedules. Except for bunker delivery notes, all systems allow for both time-based and route-based (or otherwise geographically delineated) systems.

  16. Initial tank calibration at NUCEF critical facility. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Hiroshi

    1994-07-01

    Analyses on initial tank calibration data were carried out for the purpose of the nuclear material accountancy and control for critical facilities in NUCEF: Nuclear Fuel Cycle Safety Engineering Research Facility. Calibration functions to evaluate volume of nuclear material solution in accountancy tanks were determined by regression analysis on the data considering dimension and shape of the tank. The analyses on dip-tube separation (probe separation), which are necessary to evaluate solution density in the tanks, were also carried out. As a result, regression errors of volume calculated with the calibration functions were within 0.05 lit. (0.01%) at a nominal level of Pu accountancy tanks. Errors of the evaluated dip-tube separations were also small, e.g. within 0.2mm (0.11%). Therefore, it was estimated that systematic errors of bulk measurements would satisfy the target value of NUCEF critical facilities (0.3% for Pu accountancy tanks). This paper summarizes the data analysis methods, results of analysis and evaluated errors. (author)

  17. Mimicking the action of folding chaperones by Hamiltonian replica-exchange molecular dynamics simulations : Application in the refinement of de novo models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fan, Hao; Periole, Xavier; Mark, Alan E.

    The efficiency of using a variant of Hamiltonian replica-exchange molecular dynamics (Chaperone H-replica-exchange molecular dynamics [CH-REMD]) for the refinement of protein structural models generated de novo is investigated. In CH-REMD, the interaction between the protein and its environment,

  18. Technical evaluation and assessment of CNG/LPG bi-fuel and flex-fuel vehicle viability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinor, J. E.

    1994-05-01

    This report compares vehicles using compressed natural gas (CNG), liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and combinations of the two in bi-fuel or flex-fuel configurations. Evidence shows that environmental and energy advantages can be gained by replacing two-fuel CNG/gasoline vehicles with two-fuel or flex-fuel systems to be economically competitive, it is necessary to develop a universal CNG/LPG pressure-regulator-injector and engine control module to switch from one tank to the other. For flex-fuel CNG/LPG designs, appropriate composition sensors, refueling pumps, fuel tanks, and vaporizers are necessary.

  19. Tank characterization report for Single-Shell Tank B-111

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remund, K.M.; Tingey, J.M.; Heasler, P.G.; Toth, J.J.; Ryan, F.M.; Hartley, S.A.; Simpson, D.B.; Simpson, B.C.

    1994-09-01

    Tank 241-B-111 (hereafter referred to as B-111) is a 2,006,300 liter (530,000 gallon) single-shell waste tank located in the 200 East B tank farm at Hanford. Two cores were taken from this tank in 1991 and analysis of the cores was conducted by Battelle's 325-A Laboratory in 1993. Characterization of the waste in this tank is being done to support Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-44-05. Tank B-111 was constructed in 1943 and put into service in 1945; it is the second tank in a cascade system with Tanks B-110 and B-112. During its process history, B-111 received mostly second-decontamination-cycle waste and fission products waste via the cascade from Tank B-110. This tank was retired from service in 1976, and in 1978 the tank was assumed to have leaked 30,300 liters (8,000 gallons). The tank was interim stabilized and interim isolated in 1985. The tank presently contains approximately 893,400 liters (236,000 gallons) of sludge-like waste and approximately 3,800 liters (1,000 gallons) of supernate. Historically, there are no unreviewed safety issues associated with this tank and none were revealed after reviewing the data from the latest core sampling event in 1991. An extensive set of analytical measurements was performed on the core composites. The major constituents (> 0.5 wt%) measured in the waste are water, sodium, nitrate, phosphate, nitrite, bismuth, iron, sulfate and silicon, ordered from largest concentration to the smallest. The concentrations and inventories of these and other constituents are given. Since Tanks B-110 and B-111 have similar process histories, their sampling results were compared. The results of the chemical analyses have been compared to the dangerous waste codes in the Washington Dangerous Waste Regulations (WAC 173-303). This assessment was conducted by comparing tank analyses against dangerous waste characteristics 'D' waste codes; and against state waste codes

  20. Hydrogen vehicle fueling station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daney, D.E.; Edeskuty, F.J.; Daugherty, M.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Hydrogen fueling stations are an essential element in the practical application of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel, and a number of issues such as safety, efficiency, design, and operating procedures can only be accurately addressed by a practical demonstration. Regardless of whether the vehicle is powered by an internal combustion engine or fuel cell, or whether the vehicle has a liquid or gaseous fuel tank, the fueling station is a critical technology which is the link between the local storage facility and the vehicle. Because most merchant hydrogen delivered in the US today (and in the near future) is in liquid form due to the overall economics of production and delivery, we believe a practical refueling station should be designed to receive liquid. Systems studies confirm this assumption for stations fueling up to about 300 vehicles. Our fueling station, aimed at refueling fleet vehicles, will receive hydrogen as a liquid and dispense it as either liquid, high pressure gas, or low pressure gas. Thus, it can refuel any of the three types of tanks proposed for hydrogen-powered vehicles -- liquid, gaseous, or hydride. The paper discusses the fueling station design. Results of a numerical model of liquid hydrogen vehicle tank filling, with emphasis on no vent filling, are presented to illustrate the usefulness of the model as a design tool. Results of our vehicle performance model illustrate our thesis that it is too early to judge what the preferred method of on-board vehicle fuel storage will be in practice -- thus our decision to accommodate all three methods.