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Sample records for replenish glycogen stores

  1. Muscle glycogen stores and fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørtenblad, Niels; Westerblad, Håkan; Nielsen, Joachim

    2013-01-01

      Studies performed at the beginning of the last century revealed the importance of carbohydrate as a fuel during exercise, and the importance of muscle glycogen on performance has subsequently been confirmed in numerous studies. However, the link between glycogen depletion and impaired muscle...... function during fatigue is not well understood and a direct cause-and-effect relationship between glycogen and muscle function remains to be established. The use of electron microscopy has revealed that glycogen is not homogeneously distributed in skeletal muscle fibres, but rather localized in distinct...... pools being of key importance for SR Ca2+ release and thereby affecting muscle contractility and fatigability....

  2. Fat balance in obese subjects: role of glycogen stores.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrauwen, P.; van Marken Lichtenbelt, W.D.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1998-01-01

    Department of Human Biology, Maastricht University, 6200 MD Maastricht, The Netherlands. In a previous study, we showed that lean subjects are capable of rapidly adjusting fat oxidation to fat intake on a high-fat (HF) diet when glycogen stores are lowered by exhaustive exercise. However, it has bee

  3. THE EFFECT OF INSULIN AND CARBOHYDRATE SUPPLEMENTATION ON GLYCOGEN REPLENISHMENT AMONG DIFFERENT HINDLIMB MUSCLES IN RATS FOLLOWING PROLONGED SWIMMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Chich Hsu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we investigated the interactive effects of insulin and carbohydrate on glycogen replenishment in different rat hindlimb muscles. Forty male Sprague Dawley rats were assigned to 5 groups, including 1 sedentary control with carbohydrate supplement (2 g glucose · kg body wt-1, 2 sedentary rats with 16 hours recovery, carbohydrate and insulin (0.5 U · kg body wt-1, 3 swimming without recovery, 4 swimming with 16 hours recovery and carbohydrate supplement, and 5 swimming with 16 hours recovery, carbohydrate and insulin. The swimming protocol consisted of two 3 h swimming sections, which were separated by a 45 min rest. The insulin and carbohydrate were administered to the rats immediately after exercise. At the end of the experiment, the soleus (S, plantaris (P, quadriceps (Q and gastrocnemius (G were surgically excised to evaluate glycogen utilization and replenishment. We observed that glycogen utilization was significantly lower in G and Q than S and P during swimming (p <0.05, and S showed the greatest capacity of glycogen resynthesis after post-exercise recovery (p <0.05. In the sedentary state, the glycogen synthesis did not differ among hindlimb muscles during insulin and carbohydrate treatments. Interestingly, with insulin and carbohydrate, the glycogen resynthesis in S and P were significantly greater than in Q and G following post-exercise recovery (p <0.05. We therefore concluded that the soleus and plantaris are the primary working muscles during swimming, and the greatest glycogen replenishment capacity of the soleus during post-exercise recovery is likely due to its highest insulin sensitivity.

  4. DDeveloping and solving a bi-objective joint replenishment problem under storing space constraint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ommolbanin yousefi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In this research, a bi-objective joint replenishment problem has been developed and solved with the assumption of one restricted resource. The proposed model has a storing space constraint and tries to optimize two objective functions simultaneously. They include minimizing annual holding and setup costs and minimizing annual inventory investment. Then, for solving this problem, a multi-objective genetic algorithm (MOGA has been developed. In order to analyze the algorithm efficiency, its performance has been examined in solving 1600 randomly produced problems using parameters extracted from literature. The findings imply that the proposed algorithm is capable of producing a good set of Pareto optimal solutions. Finally, the application of the problem solving approach and the findings of the proposed algorithm have been illustrated for a special problem, which has been randomly produced.

  5. Post-exercise muscle glycogen repletion in the extreme: effect of food absence and active recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Paul A; Fairchild, Timothy J; Ferreira, Luis D; Bräu, Lambert

    2004-09-01

    Glycogen plays a major role in supporting the energy demands of skeletal muscles during high intensity exercise. Despite its importance, the amount of glycogen stored in skeletal muscles is so small that a large fraction of it can be depleted in response to a single bout of high intensity exercise. For this reason, it is generally recommended to ingest food after exercise to replenish rapidly muscle glycogen stores, otherwise one's ability to engage in high intensity activity might be compromised. But what if food is not available? It is now well established that, even in the absence of food intake, skeletal muscles have the capacity to replenish some of their glycogen at the expense of endogenous carbon sources such as lactate. This is facilitated, in part, by the transient dephosphorylation-mediated activation of glycogen synthase and inhibition of glycogen phosphorylase. There is also evidence that muscle glycogen synthesis occurs even under conditions conducive to an increased oxidation of lactate post-exercise, such as during active recovery from high intensity exercise. Indeed, although during active recovery glycogen resynthesis is impaired in skeletal muscle as a whole because of increased lactate oxidation, muscle glycogen stores are replenished in Type IIa and IIb fibers while being broken down in Type I fibers of active muscles. This unique ability of Type II fibers to replenish their glycogen stores during exercise should not come as a surprise given the advantages in maintaining adequate muscle glycogen stores in those fibers that play a major role in fight or flight responses. Key PointsEven in the absence of food intake, skeletal muscles have the capacity to replenish some of their glycogen at the expense of endogenous carbon sources such as lactate.During active recovery from exercise, skeletal muscles rich in type II fibers replenish part of their glycogen stores even in the absence of food intake.Post-exercise muscle glycogen synthesis in the

  6. POST-EXERCISE MUSCLE GLYCOGEN REPLETION IN THE EXTREME: EFFECT OF FOOD ABSENCE AND ACTIVE RECOVERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul A. Fournier

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Glycogen plays a major role in supporting the energy demands of skeletal muscles during high intensity exercise. Despite its importance, the amount of glycogen stored in skeletal muscles is so small that a large fraction of it can be depleted in response to a single bout of high intensity exercise. For this reason, it is generally recommended to ingest food after exercise to replenish rapidly muscle glycogen stores, otherwise one's ability to engage in high intensity activity might be compromised. But what if food is not available? It is now well established that, even in the absence of food intake, skeletal muscles have the capacity to replenish some of their glycogen at the expense of endogenous carbon sources such as lactate. This is facilitated, in part, by the transient dephosphorylation-mediated activation of glycogen synthase and inhibition of glycogen phosphorylase. There is also evidence that muscle glycogen synthesis occurs even under conditions conducive to an increased oxidation of lactate post-exercise, such as during active recovery from high intensity exercise. Indeed, although during active recovery glycogen resynthesis is impaired in skeletal muscle as a whole because of increased lactate oxidation, muscle glycogen stores are replenished in Type IIa and IIb fibers while being broken down in Type I fibers of active muscles. This unique ability of Type II fibers to replenish their glycogen stores during exercise should not come as a surprise given the advantages in maintaining adequate muscle glycogen stores in those fibers that play a major role in fight or flight responses

  7. Role of NADH/NAD+ transport activity and glycogen store on skeletal muscle energy metabolism during exercise: in silico studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanjun; Dash, Ranjan K; Kim, Jaeyeon; Saidel, Gerald M; Cabrera, Marco E

    2009-01-01

    Skeletal muscle can maintain ATP concentration constant during the transition from rest to exercise, whereas metabolic reaction rates may increase substantially. Among the key regulatory factors of skeletal muscle energy metabolism during exercise, the dynamics of cytosolic and mitochondrial NADH and NAD+ have not been characterized. To quantify these regulatory factors, we have developed a physiologically based computational model of skeletal muscle energy metabolism. This model integrates transport and reaction fluxes in distinct capillary, cytosolic, and mitochondrial domains and investigates the roles of mitochondrial NADH/NAD+ transport (shuttling) activity and muscle glycogen concentration (stores) during moderate intensity exercise (60% maximal O2 consumption). The underlying hypothesis is that the cytosolic redox state (NADH/NAD+) is much more sensitive to a metabolic disturbance in contracting skeletal muscle than the mitochondrial redox state. This hypothesis was tested by simulating the dynamic metabolic responses of skeletal muscle to exercise while altering the transport rate of reducing equivalents (NADH and NAD+) between cytosol and mitochondria and muscle glycogen stores. Simulations with optimal parameter estimates showed good agreement with the available experimental data from muscle biopsies in human subjects. Compared with these simulations, a 20% increase (or approximately 20% decrease) in mitochondrial NADH/NAD+ shuttling activity led to an approximately 70% decrease (or approximately 3-fold increase) in cytosolic redox state and an approximately 35% decrease (or approximately 25% increase) in muscle lactate level. Doubling (or halving) muscle glycogen concentration resulted in an approximately 50% increase (or approximately 35% decrease) in cytosolic redox state and an approximately 30% increase (or approximately 25% decrease) in muscle lactate concentration. In both cases, changes in mitochondrial redox state were minimal. In conclusion, the

  8. Metformin protects the skeletal muscle glycogen stores against alterations inherent to functional limitation

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    Paula Lima Bosi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the glycogen content (GC of the rat hind limb muscles submitted to joint immobilization, either associated with metformin treatment (M, 1,4mg.ml-1 or not. In the metformin group, there was a significant increase in the GC (soleus - S 65% , white gastrocnemius - WG 30.5%, red gastrocnemius- RG31.7%, extensor digitorum longus - EDL 44%, tibialis anterior- TA 77.4%. The immobilization significantly reduced the GC (S 31.6%, WG 56.6%, RG 39.1%, ELD 41.7%, TA 45.2% and weight (S 34.2% and ELD 27%, whereas in the group immobilized with the metformin, there was an increase in the GC of all the muscles (S 177%, WG 290%, RG 172%,ELD 47%, TA 217%, in addition to minimizing the weight loss of S (29.6% and ELD (27.8%.O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar o conteúdo de glicogênio (GLI da musculatura da pata posterior de ratos submetidos à imobilização articular, associado ou não ao tratamento com metformina (MET, 1,4 mg.ml -1 no período de sete dias. No grupo metformina, houve elevação significativa nas RG (65% no sóleo - S, 30.5% no gastrocnêmio branco - GB, 31.7% no gastrocnêmio vermelho - GV , 44% no extensor longo dos dedos - EDL e de 77.4% no tibial anterior - TA . A imobilização reduziu significativamente as RG (S 31,6%, GB 56,6%, GV 39,1%, ELD 41,7%, TA 45,2% e peso (S 34,2% e ELD 27%, já no grupo imobilizado com metformina houve o aumento das RG de todos os músculos (S 177%, GB 290%, GV 172%,EDL 47%, TA 217%, além de minimizar a perda de peso do S (29,6% e ELD (27,8%.

  9. The role of glycogen synthase in the development of hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes - 'To store or not to store glucose, that's the question'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck-Nielsen, Henning

    2012-01-01

    This review deals with the role of glycogen storage in skeletal muscle for the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Specifically, the role of the enzyme glycogen synthase, which seems to be locked in its hyperphosphorylated and inactivated state, is discussed. This defect seems...... to be secondary to ectopic lipid disposition in the muscle cells. These molecular defects are discussed in the context of the overall pathophysiology of hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetic subjects. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  10. Glycogen metabolism and the homeostatic regulation of sleep

    KAUST Repository

    Petit, Jean-Marie

    2014-11-16

    In 1995 Benington and Heller formulated an energy hypothesis of sleep centered on a key role of glycogen. It was postulated that a major function of sleep is to replenish glycogen stores in the brain that have been depleted during wakefulness which is associated to an increased energy demand. Astrocytic glycogen depletion participates to an increase of extracellular adenosine release which influences sleep homeostasis. Here, we will review some evidence obtained by studies addressing the question of a key role played by glycogen metabolism in sleep regulation as proposed by this hypothesis or by an alternative hypothesis named “glycogenetic” hypothesis as well as the importance of the confounding effect of glucocorticoïds. Even though actual collected data argue in favor of a role of sleep in brain energy balance-homeostasis, they do not support a critical and direct involvement of glycogen metabolism on sleep regulation. For instance, glycogen levels during the sleep-wake cycle are driven by different physiological signals and therefore appear more as a marker-integrator of brain energy status than a direct regulator of sleep homeostasis. In support of this we provide evidence that blockade of glycogen mobilization does not induce more sleep episodes during the active period while locomotor activity is reduced. These observations do not invalidate the energy hypothesis of sleep but indicate that underlying cellular mechanisms are more complex than postulated by Benington and Heller.

  11. Stores

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Following the introduction of Condensators, resistors and potentiometers from the Farnell electronic-catalogue into CERN Stores' catalogue, following products are now available: PRODUCT FAMILY GROUP SCEM Oscillators and quartz crystals 07.94.10 / 07.94.12 Diodes 08.51.14 / 08.51.54 Thyristors 08.51.60 / 08.51.66 Opto-electronics 08.52 Transistors 08.53 Integrated circuits 08.54 / 08.55 These articles can be procured in the same way as any other stores item, by completing a Material Request. N.B. Individual Farnell order codes can be used as keywords to facilitate searches in the CERN Stores Catalogue.

  12. REGULATION OF MUSCLE GLYCOGEN REPLETION, MUSCLE PROTEIN SYNTHESIS AND REPAIR FOLLOWING EXERCISE

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    John L. Ivy

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Recovery from prolonged strenuous exercise requires that depleted fuel stores be replenished, that damaged tissue be repaired and that training adaptations be initiated. Critical to these processes are the type, amount and timing of nutrient intake. Muscle glycogen is an essential fuel for intense exercise, whether the exercise is of an aerobic or anaerobic nature. Glycogen synthesis is a relatively slow process, and therefore the restoration of muscle glycogen requires special considerations when there is limited time between training sessions or competition. To maximize the rate of muscle glycogen synthesis it is important to consume a carbohydrate supplement immediately post exercise, to continue to supplement at frequent intervals and to consume approximately 1.2 g carbohydrate·kg-1 body wt·h-1. Maximizing glycogen synthesis with less frequent supplementation and less carbohydrate can be achieved with the addition of protein to the carbohydrate supplement. This will also promote protein synthesis and reduce protein degradation, thus having the added benefit of stimulating muscle tissue repair and adaptation. Moreover, recent research suggests that consuming a carbohydrate/protein supplement post exercise will have a more positive influence on subsequent exercise performance than a carbohydrate supplement.

  13. Brain glycogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obel, Linea Lykke Frimodt; Müller, Margit S; Walls, Anne B

    2012-01-01

    activity and memory formation. In line with the great spatiotemporal complexity of the brain and thereof derived focus on the basis for ensuring the availability of the right amount of energy at the right time and place, we here encourage a closer look into the molecular and subcellular mechanisms...... underlying glycogen metabolism. Based on (1) the compartmentation of the interconnected second messenger pathways controlling glycogen metabolism (calcium and cAMP), (2) alterations in the subcellular location of glycogen-associated enzymes and proteins induced by the metabolic status and (3) a sequential...

  14. Biomarker for Glycogen Storage Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-03

    Fructose Metabolism, Inborn Errors; Glycogen Storage Disease; Glycogen Storage Disease Type I; Glycogen Storage Disease Type II; Glycogen Storage Disease Type III; Glycogen Storage Disease Type IV; Glycogen Storage Disease Type V; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VI; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VII; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VIII

  15. An optimized histochemical method to assess skeletal muscle glycogen and lipid stores reveals two metabolically distinct populations of type I muscle fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prats Gavalda, Clara; Gomez-Cabello, Alba; Nordby, Pernille

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle energy metabolism has been a research focus of physiologists for more than a century. Yet, how the use of intramuscular carbohydrate and lipid energy stores are coordinated during different types of exercise remains a subject of debate. Controversy arises from contradicting data f...

  16. REVISITING GLYCOGEN CONTENT IN THE HUMAN BRAIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öz, Gülin; DiNuzzo, Mauro; Kumar, Anjali; Moheet, Amir; Seaquist, Elizabeth R.

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen provides an important glucose reservoir in the brain since the concentration of glucosyl units stored in glycogen is several fold higher than free glucose available in brain tissue. We have previously reported 3–4 µmol/g brain glycogen content using in vivo 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in conjunction with [1-13C]glucose administration in healthy humans, while higher levels were reported in the rodent brain. Due to the slow turnover of bulk brain glycogen in humans, complete turnover of the glycogen pool, estimated to take 3–5 days, was not observed in these prior studies. In an attempt to reach complete turnover and thereby steady state 13C labeling in glycogen, here we administered [1-13C]glucose to healthy volunteers for 80 hours. To eliminate any net glycogen synthesis during this period and thereby achieve an accurate estimate of glycogen concentration, volunteers were maintained at euglycemic blood glucose levels during [1-13C]glucose administration and 13C-glycogen levels in the occipital lobe were measured by 13C MRS approximately every 12 hours. Finally, we fitted the data with a biophysical model that was recently developed to take into account the tiered structure of the glycogen molecule and additionally incorporated blood glucose levels and isotopic enrichments as input function in the model. We obtained excellent fits of the model to the 13C-glycogen data, and glycogen content in the healthy human brain tissue was found to be 7.8 ± 0.3 µmol/g, a value substantially higher than previous estimates of glycogen content in the human brain. PMID:26202425

  17. THE ROLE OF POST-EXERCISE NUTRIENT ADMINISTRATION ON MUSCLE PROTEIN SYNTHESIS AND GLYCOGEN SYNTHESIS

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    Chris Poole

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Nutrient administration following an exercise bout vastly affects anabolic processes within the human body, irrespective of exercise mode. Of particular importance are protein and carbohydrates whereby these two macronutrients portray distinct functions as anabolic agents. It has been confirmed that protein and/or amino acid ingestion following resistance training is required to reach a positive protein/nitrogen balance, and carbohydrate intake during recovery is the most important consideration to replenish glycogen stores from an exhaustive exercise bout. Several factors play significant roles in determining the effectiveness of protein and carbohydrate supplementation on post-exercise protein and glycogen synthesis. Improper application of these factors can limit the body's ability to reach an anabolic status. The provided evidence clearly denotes the importance these two macronutrients have in regards to post-exercise nutrition and anabolism. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to discuss the impact of dietary protein and carbohydrate intake during the recovery state on muscle protein synthesis and glycogen synthesis

  18. Role of glycogen availability in sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ kinetics in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørtenblad, Niels; Nielsen, Joachim; Saltin, Bengt

    2011-01-01

    Glucose is stored as glycogen in skeletal muscle. The importance of glycogen as a fuel during exercise has been recognized since the 1960s; however, little is known about the precise mechanism that relates skeletal muscle glycogen to muscle fatigue. We show that low muscle glycogen is associated...... that links energy utilization, i.e. muscle contraction, with the energy content in the muscle, thereby inhibiting a detrimental depletion of the muscle energy store....

  19. The role of skeletal muscle glycogen breakdown for regulation of insulin sensitivity by exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jørgen eJensen

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Glycogen is the storage form of carbohydrates in mammals. In humans the majority of glycogen is stored in skeletal muscles (~500 g and the liver (~100 g. Food is supplied in larger meals, but the blood glucose concentration has to be kept within narrow limits to survive and stay healthy. Therefore, the body has to cope with periods of excess carbohydrates and periods without supplementation. Healthy persons remove blood glucose rapidly when glucose is in excess, but insulin-stimulated glucose disposal is reduced in insulin resistant and type 2 diabetic subjects. During a hyperinsulinemic euglycaemic clamp, 70-90 % of glucose disposal will be stored as muscle glycogen in healthy subjects. The glycogen stores in skeletal muscles are limited because an efficient feedback-mediated inhibition of glycogen synthase prevents accumulation. De novo lipid synthesis can contribute to glucose disposal when glycogen stores are filled. Exercise physiologists normally consider glycogen’s main function as energy substrate. Glycogen is the main energy substrate during exercise intensity above 70 % of maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max and fatigue develops when the glycogen stores are depleted in the active muscles. After exercise, the rate of glycogen synthesis is increased to replete glycogen stores, and blood glucose is the substrate. Indeed insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis is elevated after exercise, which, from an evolutional point of view, will favour glycogen repletion and preparation for new fight or flight events. In the modern society, the reduced glycogen stores in skeletal muscles after exercise allows carbohydrates to be stored as muscle glycogen and prevents that glucose is channelled to de novo lipid synthesis, which over time will causes ectopic fat accumulation and insulin resistance. The reduction of skeletal muscle glycogen after exercise allows a healthy storage of carbohydrates after meals and prevents development of type

  20. Glycogen metabolism in Schistosoma mansoni worms after their isolation from the host

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiolens, A.G.M.; Bergh, S.G. van den

    1987-01-01

    Adult Schistosoma mansoni worms rapidly degrade their endogenous glycogen stores immediately after isolation from the host. In NCTC 109 or in a diphasic culture medium the glycogen levels slowly recovered again after the initial decrease. The rapid degradation of glycogen could be prevented, even in

  1. Glycogen stability and glycogen phosphorylase activities in isolated skeletal muscles from rat and toad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, C A; Stephenson, G M

    2000-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that endogenous glycogen depletion may affect excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling events in vertebrate skeletal muscle. One approach employed in physiological investigations of E-C coupling involves the use of mechanically skinned, single fibre preparations obtained from tissues stored under paraffin oil, at room temperature (RT: 20-24 degrees C) and 4 degrees C for several hours. In the present study, we examined the effect of these storage conditions on the glycogen content in three muscles frequently used in research on E-C coupling: rat extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus (SOL) and toad iliofibularis (IF). Glycogen content was determined fluorometrically in homogenates prepared from whole muscles, stored under paraffin oil for up to 6 h at RT or 4 degrees C. Control muscles and muscles stored for 0.5 and 6 h were also analysed for total phosphorylase (Phos(total)) and phosphorylase a (Phos a) activities. No significant change was observed in the glycogen content of EDL and SOL muscles stored at RT for 0.5 h. In rat muscles stored at RT for longer than 0.5 h, the glycogen content decreased to 67.6% (EDL) and 78.7% (SOL) of controls after 3 h and 25.3% (EDL) and 37.4% (SOL) after 6 h. Rat muscles stored at 4 degrees C retained 79.0% (EDL) and 92.5% (SOL) of glycogen after 3 h and 75.2% (EDL) and 61.1% (SOL) after 6 h. The glycogen content of IF muscles stored at RT or 4 degrees C for 6 h was not significantly different from controls. Phos(total) was unchanged in all muscles over the 6 h period, at both temperatures. Phos a was also unchanged in the toad IF muscles, but in rat muscles it decreased rapidly, particularly in EDL (4.1-fold after 0.5 h at RT). Taken together these results indicate that storage under paraffin oil for up to 6 h at RT or 4 degrees C is accompanied by minimal glycogen loss in toad IF muscles and by a time- and temperature-dependent glycogen loss in EDL and SOL muscles of the rat.

  2. [Beneficial effect of swimming in thermal waters on muscle glycogen depletion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amelio, G; Boninsegna, A; Calzavara, M; Bertolini, M

    1991-05-01

    The effect of swimming in the termal water on muscle glycogen stores was studied. After 30 min the muscle glycogen results in a diminution, but it is not depleted. On the contrary, 30 min of swimming in normal water results in a depletion of muscle glycogene stores. The glycemic homeostasis is well maintained in thermal water, and hypoglicemia occurs only after swimming in normal water.

  3. Photocathode device that replenishes photoemissive coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moody, Nathan A.; Lizon, David C.

    2016-06-14

    A photocathode device may replenish its photoemissive coating to replace coating material that desorbs/evaporates during photoemission. A linear actuator system may regulate the release of a replenishment material vapor, such as an alkali metal, from a chamber inside the photocathode device to a porous cathode substrate. The replenishment material deposits on the inner surface of a porous membrane and effuses through the membrane to the outer surface, where it replenishes the photoemissive coating. The rate of replenishment of the photoemissive coating may be adjusted using the linear actuator system to regulate performance of the photocathode device during photoemission. Alternatively, the linear actuator system may adjust a plasma discharge gap between a cartridge containing replenishment material and a metal grid. A potential is applied between the cartridge and the grid, resulting in ejection of metal ions from the cartridge that similarly replenish the photoemissive coating.

  4. Glycogen distribution in adult and geriatric mice brains

    KAUST Repository

    Alrabeh, Rana

    2017-05-01

    Astrocytes, the most abundant glial cell type in the brain, undergo a number of roles in brain physiology; among them, the energetic support of neurons is the best characterized. Contained within astrocytes is the brain’s obligate energy store, glycogen. Through glycogenolysis, glycogen, a storage form of glucose, is converted to pyruvate that is further reduced to lactate and transferred to neurons as an energy source via MCTs. Glycogen is a multi-branched polysaccharide synthesized from the glucose uptaken in astrocytes. It has been shown that glycogen accumulates with age and contributes to the physiological ageing process in the brain. In this study, we compared glycogen distribution between young adults and geriatric mice to understand the energy consumption of synaptic terminals during ageing using computational tools. We segmented and densely reconstructed neuropil and glycogen granules within six (three 4 month old old and three 24 month old) volumes of Layer 1 somatosensory cortex mice brains from FIB-SEM stacks, using a combination of semi-automated and manual tools, ilastik and TrakEM2. Finally, the 3D visualization software, Blender, was used to analyze the dataset using the DBSCAN and KDTree Nearest neighbor algorithms to study the distribution of glycogen granules compared to synapses, using a plugin that was developed for this purpose. The Nearest Neighbors and clustering results of 6 datasets show that glycogen clusters around excitatory synapses more than inhibitory synapses and that, in general, glycogen is found around axonal boutons more than dendritic spines. There was no significant accumulation of glycogen with ageing within our admittedly small dataset. However, there was a homogenization of glycogen distribution with age and that is consistent with published literature. We conclude that glycogen distribution in the brain is not a random process but follows a function distribution.

  5. Muscle and liver glycogen, protein, and triglyceride in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Sonne, Bente; Joensen Mikines, Kari

    1984-01-01

    in skeletal muscle was accompanied by increased breakdown of triglyceride and/or protein. Thus, the effect of exhausting swimming and of running on concentrations of glycogen, protein, and triglyceride in skeletal muscle and liver were studied in rats with and without deficiencies of the sympatho......-adrenal system. In control rats, both swimming and running decreased the concentration of glycogen in fast-twitch red and slow-twitch red muscle whereas concentrations of protein and triglyceride did not decrease. In the liver, swimming depleted glycogen stores but protein and triglyceride concentrations did...... not decrease. In exercising rats, muscle glycogen breakdown was impaired by adrenodemedullation and restored by infusion of epinephrine. However, impaired glycogen breakdown during exercise was not accompanied by a significant net breakdown of protein or triglyceride. Surgical sympathectomy of the muscles did...

  6. Contributions of glycogen to astrocytic energetics during brain activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dienel, Gerald A; Cruz, Nancy F

    2015-02-01

    Glycogen is the major store of glucose in brain and is mainly in astrocytes. Brain glycogen levels in unstimulated, carefully-handled rats are 10-12 μmol/g, and assuming that astrocytes account for half the brain mass, astrocytic glycogen content is twice as high. Glycogen turnover is slow under basal conditions, but it is mobilized during activation. There is no net increase in incorporation of label from glucose during activation, whereas label release from pre-labeled glycogen exceeds net glycogen consumption, which increases during stronger stimuli. Because glycogen level is restored by non-oxidative metabolism, astrocytes can influence the global ratio of oxygen to glucose utilization. Compensatory increases in utilization of blood glucose during inhibition of glycogen phosphorylase are large and approximate glycogenolysis rates during sensory stimulation. In contrast, glycogenolysis rates during hypoglycemia are low due to continued glucose delivery and oxidation of endogenous substrates; rates that preserve neuronal function in the absence of glucose are also low, probably due to metabolite oxidation. Modeling studies predict that glycogenolysis maintains a high level of glucose-6-phosphate in astrocytes to maintain feedback inhibition of hexokinase, thereby diverting glucose for use by neurons. The fate of glycogen carbon in vivo is not known, but lactate efflux from brain best accounts for the major metabolic characteristics during activation of living brain. Substantial shuttling coupled with oxidation of glycogen-derived lactate is inconsistent with available evidence. Glycogen has important roles in astrocytic energetics, including glucose sparing, control of extracellular K(+) level, oxidative stress management, and memory consolidation; it is a multi-functional compound.

  7. Noninvasive measurement of brain glycogen by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and its application to the study of brain metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesfaye, Nolawit; Seaquist, Elizabeth R; Oz, Gülin

    2011-12-01

    Glycogen is the reservoir for glucose in the brain. Beyond the general agreement that glycogen serves as an energy source in the central nervous system, its exact role in brain energy metabolism has yet to be elucidated. Experiments performed in cell and tissue culture and animals have shown that glycogen content is affected by several factors, including glucose, insulin, neurotransmitters, and neuronal activation. The study of in vivo glycogen metabolism has been hindered by the inability to measure glycogen noninvasively, but, in the past several years, the development of a noninvasive localized (13) C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy method has allowed the study of glycogen metabolism in the conscious human. With this technique, (13) C-glucose is administered intravenously, and its incorporation into and washout from brain glycogen is tracked. One application of this method has been to the study of brain glycogen metabolism in humans during hypoglycemia: data have shown that mobilization of brain glycogen is augmented during hypoglycemia, and, after a single episode of hypoglycemia, glycogen synthesis rate is increased, suggesting that glycogen stores rebound to levels greater than baseline. Such studies suggest that glycogen may serve as a potential energy reservoir in hypoglycemia and may participate in the brain's adaptation to recurrent hypoglycemia and eventual development of hypoglycemia unawareness. Beyond this focused area of study, (13) C NMR spectroscopy has a broad potential for application in the study of brain glycogen metabolism and carries the promise of a better understanding of the role of brain glycogen in diabetes and other conditions.

  8. Conditional replenishment using motion prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, D. N.; Jones, H. W., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Conditional replenishment is an interframe video compression method that uses correlation in time to reduce video transmission rates. This method works by detecting and sending only the changing portions of the image and by having the receiver use the video data from the previous frame for the non-changing portion. The amount of compression that can be achieved through this technique depends to a large extent on the rate of change within the image, and can vary from 10 to 1 to less than 2 to 1. An additional 3 to 1 reduction in rate is obtained by the intraframe coding of data blocks using a 2-dimensional variable rate Hadamard transform coder. A further additional 2 to 1 rate reduction is achieved by using motion prediction. Motion prediction works by measuring the relative displacements of a subpicture from one frame to the next. The subpicture can then be transmitted by sending only the value of the 2-dimensional displacement. Computer simulations have demonstrated that data rates of 2 to 4 Mega-bits/second can be achieved while still retaining good fidelity in the image.

  9. [Volume replenishment in haemorrhage: caution advised].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooter, Albertus J; Zweegman, Sonja; Smulders, Yvo M

    2011-01-01

    Acute haemorrhage is a frequent problem in medicine. Patients with acute bleeding may present with signs of hypotension and reduced organ perfusion. The physician's reflex action is often to treat such patients with intravenous volume replenishment using colloid or cristalloid liquids. Intravenous volume replenishment has, however, a downside: it increases the tendency to bleed and therefore can increase blood loss. Previous clinical observations and experimental animal and human studies addressing volume replenishment in haemorrhagic shock have repeatedly shown that accepting hypotension favourably affects prognosis. However, relevant practice guidelines, such as for gastrointestinal bleeding, usually advise liberal intravenous volume replenishment if hypotension is present. In this article we advocate caution when considering intravenous blood volume adjustment in haemorrhage.

  10. Regulation of glucose and glycogen metabolism during and after exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas Elbenhardt; Richter, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Utilization of carbohydrate in the form of intramuscular glycogen stores and glucose delivered from plasma becomes an increasingly important energy substrate to the working muscle with increasing exercise intensity. This review gives an update on the molecular signals by which glucose transport...

  11. Crystal structure of glycogen debranching enzyme and insights into its catalysis and disease-causing mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Liting; Feng, Lingling; Xia, Lin; Yin, Huiyong; Xiang, Song

    2016-04-18

    Glycogen is a branched glucose polymer and serves as an important energy store. Its debranching is a critical step in its mobilization. In animals and fungi, the 170 kDa glycogen debranching enzyme (GDE) catalyses this reaction. GDE deficiencies in humans are associated with severe diseases collectively termed glycogen storage disease type III (GSDIII). We report crystal structures of GDE and its complex with oligosaccharides, and structure-guided mutagenesis and biochemical studies to assess the structural observations. These studies reveal that distinct domains in GDE catalyse sequential reactions in glycogen debranching, the mechanism of their catalysis and highly specific substrate recognition. The unique tertiary structure of GDE provides additional contacts to glycogen besides its active sites, and our biochemical experiments indicate that they mediate its recruitment to glycogen and regulate its activity. Combining the understanding of the GDE catalysis and functional characterizations of its disease-causing mutations provides molecular insights into GSDIII.

  12. Optimal dynamic pricing and replenishment policy for perishable items with inventory-level-dependent demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lihao; Zhang, Jianxiong; Tang, Wansheng

    2016-04-01

    An inventory system for perishable items with limited replenishment capacity is introduced in this paper. The demand rate depends on the stock quantity displayed in the store as well as the sales price. With the goal to realise profit maximisation, an optimisation problem is addressed to seek for the optimal joint dynamic pricing and replenishment policy which is obtained by solving the optimisation problem with Pontryagin's maximum principle. A joint mixed policy, in which the sales price is a static decision variable and the replenishment rate remains to be a dynamic decision variable, is presented to compare with the joint dynamic policy. Numerical results demonstrate the advantages of the joint dynamic one, and further show the effects of different system parameters on the optimal joint dynamic policy and the maximal total profit.

  13. Dietary tools to modulate glycogen storage in gilthead seabream muscle: glycerol supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Tomé S; Matos, Elisabete; Cordeiro, Odete D; Colen, Rita; Wulff, Tune; Sampaio, Eduardo; Sousa, Vera; Valente, Luisa M P; Gonçalves, Amparo; Silva, Joana M G; Bandarra, Narcisa; Nunes, Maria Leonor; Dinis, Maria Teresa; Dias, Jorge; Jessen, Flemming; Rodrigues, Pedro M

    2012-10-24

    The quality and shelf life of fish meat products depend on the skeletal muscle's energetic state at slaughter, as meat decomposition processes can be exacerbated by energy depletion. In this study, we tested dietary glycerol as a way of replenishing muscle glycogen reserves of farmed gilthead seabream. Two diets were tested in duplicate (n = 42/tank). Results show 5% inclusion of crude glycerol in gilthead seabream diets induces increased muscle glycogen, ATP levels and firmness, with no deleterious effects in terms of growth, proximate composition, fatty acid profile, oxidative state, and organoleptic properties (aroma and color). Proteomic analysis showed a low impact of glycerol-supplementation on muscle metabolism, with most changes probably reflecting increased stress coping capacity in glycerol-fed fish. This suggests inclusion of crude glycerol in gilthead seabream diets (particularly in the finishing phase) seems like a viable strategy to increase glycogen deposition in muscle without negatively impacting fish welfare and quality.

  14. Glycogen serves as an energy source that maintains astrocyte cell proliferation in the neonatal telencephalon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, Hitoshi; Nomura, Tadashi; Ono, Katsuhiko

    2017-06-01

    Large amounts of energy are required when cells undergo cell proliferation and differentiation for mammalian neuronal development. Early neonatal mice face transient starvation and use stored energy for survival or to support development. Glycogen is a branched polysaccharide that is formed by glucose, and serves as an astrocytic energy store for rapid energy requirements. Although it is present in radial glial cells and astrocytes, the role of glycogen during development remains unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated that glycogen accumulated in glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST)+ astrocytes in the subventricular zone and rostral migratory stream. Glycogen levels markedly decreased after birth due to the increase of glycogen phosphorylase, an essential enzyme for glycogen metabolism. In primary cultures and in vivo, the inhibition of glycogen phosphorylase decreased the proliferation of astrocytic cells. The number of cells in the G1 phase increased in combination with the up-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors or down-regulation of the phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (pRB), a determinant for cell cycle progression. These results suggest that glycogen accumulates in astrocytes located in specific areas during the prenatal stage and is used as an energy source to maintain normal development in the early postnatal stage.

  15. Role of glycogen-lowering exercise in the change of fat oxidation in response to a high-fat diet.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrauwen, P.; van Marken Lichtenbelt, W.D.; Saris, W.H.M.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1997-01-01

    Department of Human Biology, Maastricht University, The Netherlands. One of the candidate factors for determining the increase of fat oxidation after a switch from a reduced-fat diet to a high-fat diet is the size of the glycogen storage. Therefore, we studied the effect of low glycogen stores on fa

  16. Role of glycogen-lowering exercise in the change of fat oxidation in response to a high-fat diet.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrauwen, P.; van Marken Lichtenbelt, W.D.; Saris, W.H.M.; Westerterp, K.R.

    1997-01-01

    Department of Human Biology, Maastricht University, The Netherlands. One of the candidate factors for determining the increase of fat oxidation after a switch from a reduced-fat diet to a high-fat diet is the size of the glycogen storage. Therefore, we studied the effect of low glycogen stores on fa

  17. 32 CFR 707.5 - Underway replenishment contour lights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Underway replenishment contour lights. 707.5... RULES WITH RESPECT TO ADDITIONAL STATION AND SIGNAL LIGHTS § 707.5 Underway replenishment contour lights... underway replenishment operations, either red or blue lights at delivery-ship-deck-edge extremities....

  18. Source replenishment device for vacuum deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Ronald A.

    1988-01-01

    A material source replenishment device for use with a vacuum deposition apparatus. The source replenishment device comprises an intermittent motion producing gear arrangement disposed within the vacuum deposition chamber. An elongated rod having one end operably connected to the gearing arrangement is provided with a multiarmed head at the opposite end disposed adjacent the heating element of the vacuum deposition apparatus. An inverted U-shaped source material element is releasably attached to the outer end of each arm member whereby said multiarmed head is moved to locate a first of said material elements above said heating element, whereupon said multiarmed head is lowered to engage said material element with the heating element and further lowered to release said material element on the heating element. After vaporization of said material element, second and subsequent material elements may be provided to the heating element without the need for opening the vacuum deposition apparatus to the atmosphere.

  19. Analyzing Underway Replenishments Through Spatial Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    dimensions of 1x1 day transit time and using the Pythagorean Theorem, it would take a CLF ship at least 1.4 days of total transit time to replenish a...Business Tree Map. (Available from http://www.smartmoney.com, 2012). This is a snapshot of the stock market after closing on August 14, 2012. Boxes...represent companies nested under a listed industry. Size of box is directly proportional to the size of their respective market capitalization

  20. Automatic Replenishment Of Dopant In Silicon Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochka, E. L.

    1988-01-01

    Dopant incorporated feed pellets to maintain required concentration. Technique of continuous replenishment of dopant in silicon melt helps ensure correct resistivity in solid silicon grown from melt. Technique used in dendritic-web growth process in which ribbon of silicon continously pulled from molten material. Providing uniform doping and resistivity in ribbon technique enables production of high-quality silicon ribbon at high yields for use in semiconductor devices.

  1. Local depletion of glycogen with supramaximal exercise in human skeletal muscle fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gejl, Kasper D; Ørtenblad, Niels; Andersson, Erik; Plomgaard, Peter; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Nielsen, Joachim

    2017-05-01

    Glycogen is stored in local spatially distinct compartments within skeletal muscle fibres and is the main energy source during supramaximal exercise. Using quantitative electron microscopy, we show that supramaximal exercise induces a differential depletion of glycogen from these compartments and also demonstrate how this varies with fibre types. Repeated exercise alters this compartmentalized glycogen depletion. The results obtained in the present study help us understand the muscle metabolic dynamics of whole body repeated supramaximal exercise, and suggest that the muscle has a compartmentalized local adaptation to repeated exercise, which affects glycogen depletion. Skeletal muscle glycogen is heterogeneously distributed in three separated compartments (intramyofibrillar, intermyofibrillar and subsarcolemmal). Although only constituting 3-13% of the total glycogen volume, the availability of intramyofibrillar glycogen is of particular importance to muscle function. The present study aimed to investigate the depletion of these three subcellular glycogen compartments during repeated supramaximal exercise in elite athletes. Ten elite cross-country skiers (aged 25 ± 4 years, V̇O2 max : 65 ± 4 ml kg(-1)  min(-1) ; mean ± SD) performed four ∼4 min supramaximal sprint time trials (STT 1-4) with 45 min of recovery. The subcellular glycogen volumes in musculus triceps brachii were quantified from electron microscopy images before and after both STT 1 and 4. During STT 1, the depletion of intramyofibrillar glycogen was higher in type 1 fibres [-52%; (-89:-15%)] than type 2 fibres [-15% (-52:22%)] (P = 0.02), whereas the depletion of intermyofibrillar glycogen [main effect: -19% (-33:0%), P = 0.006] and subsarcolemmal glycogen [main effect: -35% (-66:0%), P = 0.03] was similar between fibre types. By contrast, only intermyofibrillar glycogen volume was significantly reduced during STT 4, in both fibre types [main effect: -31% (-50:-11%), P = 0

  2. Physiological aspects of the subcellular localization of glycogen in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Joachim; Ørtenblad, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Glucose is stored in skeletal muscle fibers as glycogen, a branched-chain polymer observed in electron microscopy images as roughly spherical particles (known as β-particles of 10-45 nm in diameter), which are distributed in distinct localizations within the myofibers and are physically associate...... of these phenomena may prove vital in elucidating the mechanisms that integrate basic cellular events with changing glycogen content....

  3. Brain glycogen – new perspectives on its metabolic function and regulation at the subcellular level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linea Frimodt Obel

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Glycogen is a complex glucose polymer found in a variety of tissues, including brain, where it is localized primarily in astrocytes. The small quantity found in brain compared to e.g. liver has led to the understanding that brain glycogen is merely used during hypoglycemia or ischemia. In this review evidence is brought forward highlighting what has been an emerging understanding in brain energy metabolism: that glycogen is more than just a convenient way to store energy for use in emergencies – it is a highly dynamic molecule with versatile implications in brain function, i.e. synaptic activity and memory formation. In line with the great spatiotemporal complexity of the brain and thereof derived focus on the basis for ensuring the availability of the right amount of energy at the right time and place, we here encourage a closer look into the molecular and subcellular mechanisms underlying glycogen metabolism. Based on i the compartmentation of the interconnected second messenger pathways controlling glycogen metabolism (calcium and cAMP, ii alterations in the subcellular location of glycogen-associated enzymes and proteins induced by the metabolic status and iii a sequential component in the intermolecular mechanisms of glycogen metabolism, we suggest that glycogen metabolism in astrocytes is compartmentalized at the subcellular level. As a consequence, the meaning and importance of conventional terms used to describe glycogen metabolism (e.g. turnover is challenged. Overall, this review represents an overview of contemporary knowledge about brain glycogen and its metabolism and function. However, it also has a sharp focus on what we do not know, which is perhaps even more important for the future quest of uncovering the roles of glycogen in brain physiology and pathology.

  4. Calcium regulates vesicle replenishment at the cone ribbon synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babai, Norbert; Bartoletti, Theodore M; Thoreson, Wallace B

    2010-11-24

    Cones release glutamate-filled vesicles continuously in darkness, and changing illumination modulates this release. Because sustained release in darkness is governed by vesicle replenishment rates, we analyzed how cone membrane potential regulates replenishment. Synaptic release from cones was measured by recording postsynaptic currents in Ambystoma tigrinum horizontal or OFF bipolar cells evoked by depolarization of simultaneously voltage-clamped cones. We measured replenishment after attaining a steady state between vesicle release and replenishment using trains of test pulses. Increasing Ca(2+) currents (I(Ca)) by changing the test step from -30 to -10 mV increased replenishment. Lengthening -30 mV test pulses to match the Ca(2+) influx during 25 ms test pulses to -10 mV produced similar replenishment rates. Reducing Ca(2+) driving force by using test steps to +30 mV slowed replenishment. Using UV flashes to reverse inhibition of I(Ca) by nifedipine accelerated replenishment. Increasing [Ca(2+)](i) by flash photolysis of caged Ca(2+) also accelerated replenishment. Replenishment, but not the initial burst of release, was enhanced by using an intracellular Ca(2+) buffer of 0.5 mm EGTA rather than 5 mm EGTA, and diminished by 1 mm BAPTA. This suggests that although release and replenishment exhibited similar Ca(2+) dependencies, release sites are replenishment sites are >200 nm away. Membrane potential thus regulates replenishment by controlling Ca(2+) influx, principally by effects on replenishment mechanisms but also by altering releasable pool size. This in turn provides a mechanism for converting changes in light intensity into changes in sustained release at the cone ribbon synapse.

  5. Brain Glycogen Decreases During Intense Exercise Without Hypoglycemia: The Possible Involvement of Serotonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Takashi; Soya, Shingo; Kawanaka, Kentaro; Soya, Hideaki

    2015-07-01

    Brain glycogen stored in astrocytes, a source of lactate as a neuronal energy source, decreases during prolonged exercise with hypoglycemia. However, brain glycogen dynamics during exercise without hypoglycemia remain unknown. Since intense exercise increases brain noradrenaline and serotonin as known inducers for brain glycogenolysis, we hypothesized that brain glycogen decreases with intense exercise not accompanied by hypoglycemia. To test this hypothesis, we employed a well-established acute intense exercise model of swimming in rats. Rats swam for fourteen 20 s bouts with a weight equal to 8 % of their body mass and were sacrificed using high-power (10 kW) microwave irradiation to inactivate brain enzymes for accurate detection of brain glycogen and monoamines. Intense exercise did not alter blood glucose, but did increase blood lactate levels. Immediately after exercise, brain glycogen decreased and brain lactate increased in the hippocampus, cerebellum, cortex, and brainstem. Simultaneously, serotonin turnover in the hippocampus and brainstem mutually increased and were associated with decreased brain glycogen. Intense swimming exercise that does not induce hypoglycemia decreases brain glycogen associated with increased brain lactate, implying an importance of glycogen in brain energetics during intense exercise even without hypoglycemia. Activated serotonergic regulation is a possible underlying mechanism for intense exercise-induced glycogenolysis at least in the hippocampus and brainstem.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: glycogen storage disease type 0

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... links) Genetic Testing Registry: Glycogen storage disease 0, muscle Genetic Testing Registry: Hypoglycemia with deficiency of glycogen synthetase in ... Sheet (PDF) Disease InfoSearch: Glycogen storage disease 0, ... Manual Consumer Version: Disorders of Carbohydrate Metabolism Orphanet: Glycogen ...

  7. Spontaneous calcium transients manifest in the regenerating muscle and are necessary for skeletal muscle replenishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Michelle Kim; Borodinsky, Laura Noemi

    2014-07-01

    Tissue regeneration entails replenishing of damaged cells, appropriate cell differentiation and inclusion of regenerated cells into functioning tissues. In adult humans, the capacity of the injured spinal cord and muscle to self-repair is limited. In contrast, the amphibian larva can regenerate its tail after amputation with complete recovery of muscle, notochord and spinal cord. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are still unclear. Here we show that upon injury muscle cell precursors exhibit Ca(2+) transients that depend on Ca(2+) release from ryanodine receptor-operated stores. Blockade of these transients impairs muscle regeneration. Furthermore, inhibiting Ca(2+) transients in the regenerating tail prevents the activation and proliferation of muscle satellite cells, which results in deficient muscle replenishment. These findings suggest that Ca(2+)-mediated activity is critical for the early stages of muscle regeneration, which may lead to developing effective therapies for tissue repair.

  8. Mechanism of store-operated calcium entry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Devkanya Dutta

    2000-12-01

    Activation of receptors coupled to the phospholipase C/IP3 signalling pathway results in a rapid release of calcium from its intracellular stores, eventually leading to depletion of these stores. Calcium store depletion triggers an influx of extracellular calcium across the plasma membrane, a mechanism known as the store-operated calcium entry or capacitative calcium entry. Capacitative calcium current plays a key role in replenishing calcium stores and activating various physiological processes. Despite considerable efforts, very little is known about the molecular nature of the capacitative channel and the signalling pathway that activates it. This review summarizes our current knowledge about store operated calcium entry and suggests possible hypotheses for its mode of activation.

  9. Calcium regulates vesicle replenishment at the cone ribbon synapse

    OpenAIRE

    Babai, Norbert; Bartoletti, Theodore M.; Thoreson, Wallace B.

    2010-01-01

    Cones release glutamate-filled vesicles continuously in darkness and changing illumination modulates this release. Because sustained release in darkness is governed by vesicle replenishment rates, we analyzed how cone membrane potential regulates replenishment. Synaptic release from cones was measured by recording post-synaptic currents in Ambystoma tigrinum horizontal or OFF bipolar cells evoked by depolarization of simultaneously voltage-clamped cones. We measured replenishment after attain...

  10. Replenishing Humic Acids in Agricultural Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Susic

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available For many decades, it was commonly believed that humic acids were formed in soils by the microbial conversion of plant lignins. However, an experiment to test whether these humic acids were formed prior to plant matter reaching the soil was never reported until the late 1980s (and then only as a side issue, even though humic acids were first isolated and reported in 1786. This was a serious omission, and led to a poor understanding of how the humic acid content of soils could be maintained or increased for optimum fertility. In this study, commercial sugar cane mulch and kelp extracts were extracted with alkali and analyzed for humic acid content. Humic acids in the extracts were positively identified by fluorescence spectrophotometry, and this demonstrated that humic acids are formed in senescent plant and algal matter before they reach the soil, where they are then strongly bound to the soil and are also resistant to microbial metabolism. Humic acids are removed from soils by wind and water erosion, and by water leaching, which means that they must be regularly replenished. This study shows that soils can be replenished or fortified with humic acids simply by recycling plant and algal matter, or by adding outside sources of decomposed plant or algal matter such as composts, mulch, peat, and lignite coals.

  11. 13C Mrs Studies of the Control of Hepatic Glycogen Metabolism at High Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Corin O.; Cao, Jin; Zhu, He; Chen, Li M.; Wilson, George; Kennan, Richard; Gore, John C.

    2017-06-01

    Introduction: Glycogen is the primary intracellular storage form of carbohydrates. In contrast to most tissues where stored glycogen can only supply the local tissue with energy, hepatic glycogen is mobilized and released into the blood to maintain appropriate circulating glucose levels, and is delivered to other tissues as glucose in response to energetic demands. Insulin and glucagon, two current targets of high interest in the pharmaceutical industry, are well known glucose-regulating hormones whose primary effect in liver is to modulate glycogen synthesis and breakdown. The purpose of these studies was to develop methods to measure glycogen metabolism in real time non-invasively both in isolated mouse livers, and in non-human primates (NHPs) using 13C MRS. Methods: Livers were harvested from C57/Bl6 mice and perfused with [1-13C] Glucose. To demonstrate the ability to measure acute changes in glycogen metabolism ex-vivo, fructose, glucagon, and insulin were administered to the liver ex-vivo. The C1 resonance of glycogen was measured in real time with 13C MRS using an 11.7T (500 MHz) NMR spectrometer. To demonstrate the translatability of this approach, NHPs (male rhesus monkeys) were studied in a 7 T Philips MRI using a partial volume 1H/13C imaging coil. NPHs were subjected to a variable IV infusion of [1-13C] glucose (to maintain blood glucose at 3-4x basal), along with a constant 1 mg/kg/min infusion of fructose. The C1 resonance of glycogen was again measured in real time with 13C MRS. To demonstrate the ability to measure changes in glycogen metabolism in vivo, animals received a glucagon infusion (1 μg/kg bolus followed by 40 ng/kg/min constant infusion) half way through the study on the second study session. Results: In both perfused mouse livers and in NHPs, hepatic 13C-glycogen synthesis (i.e. monotonic increases in the 13C-glycogen NMR signal) was readily detected. In both paradigms, addition of glucagon resulted in cessation of glycogen synthesis

  12. Glycogen storage diseases: New perspectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hasan (O)zen

    2007-01-01

    Glycogen storage diseases (GSD) are inherited metabolic disorders of glycogen metabolism. Different hormones,including insulin, glucagon, and cortisol regulate the relationship of glycolysis, gluconeogenesis and glycogen synthesis. The overall GSD incidence is estimated 1 case per 20 000-43 000 live births. There are over 12 types and they are classified based on the enzyme deficiency and the affected tissue. Disorders of glycogen degradation may affect primarily the liver, the muscle,or both. Type Ⅰ a involves the liver, kidney and intestine (and Ⅰ b also leukocytes), and the clinical manifestations are hepatomegaly, failure to thrive, hypoglycemia,hyperlactatemia, hyperuricemia and hyperlipidemia. Type Ⅲa involves both the liver and muscle, and Ⅲb solely the liver. The liver symptoms generally improve with age.Type Ⅳ usually presents in the first year of life, with hepatomegaly and growth retardation. The disease in general is progressive to cirrhosis. Type Ⅵ and Ⅸ are a heterogeneous group of diseases caused by a deficiency of the liver phosphorylase and phosphorylase kinase system. There is no hyperuricemia or hyperlactatemia.Type Ⅺ is characterized by hepatic glycogenosis and renal Fanconi syndrome. Type Ⅱ is a prototype of inborn lysosomal storage diseases and involves many organs but primarily the muscle. Types Ⅴ and Ⅶ involve only the muscle.

  13. Dietary Tools To Modulate Glycogen Storage in Gilthead Seabream Muscle: Glycerol Supplementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, Tomé S.; Matos, Elisabete; Cordeiro, Odete D.

    2012-01-01

    The quality and shelf life of fish meat products depend on the skeletal muscle’s energetic state at slaughter, as meat decomposition processes can be exacerbated by energy depletion. In this study, we tested dietary glycerol as a way of replenishing muscle glycogen reserves of farmed gilthead......, and organoleptic properties (aroma and color). Proteomic analysis showed a low impact of glycerol-supplementation on muscle metabolism, with most changes probably reflecting increased stress coping capacity in glycerol-fed fish. This suggests inclusion of crude glycerol in gilthead seabream diets (particularly...

  14. Protein targeting to glycogen is a master regulator of glycogen synthesis in astrocytes

    KAUST Repository

    Ruchti, E.

    2016-10-08

    The storage and use of glycogen, the main energy reserve in the brain, is a metabolic feature of astrocytes. Glycogen synthesis is regulated by Protein Targeting to Glycogen (PTG), a member of specific glycogen-binding subunits of protein phosphatase-1 (PPP1). It positively regulates glycogen synthesis through de-phosphorylation of both glycogen synthase (activation) and glycogen phosphorylase (inactivation). In cultured astrocytes, PTG mRNA levels were previously shown to be enhanced by the neurotransmitter noradrenaline. To achieve further insight into the role of PTG in the regulation of astrocytic glycogen, its levels of expression were manipulated in primary cultures of mouse cortical astrocytes using adenovirus-mediated overexpression of tagged-PTG or siRNA to downregulate its expression. Infection of astrocytes with adenovirus led to a strong increase in PTG expression and was associated with massive glycogen accumulation (>100 fold), demonstrating that increased PTG expression is sufficient to induce glycogen synthesis and accumulation. In contrast, siRNA-mediated downregulation of PTG resulted in a 2-fold decrease in glycogen levels. Interestingly, PTG downregulation strongly impaired long-term astrocytic glycogen synthesis induced by insulin or noradrenaline. Finally, these effects of PTG downregulation on glycogen metabolism could also be observed in cultured astrocytes isolated from PTG-KO mice. Collectively, these observations point to a major role of PTG in the regulation of glycogen synthesis in astrocytes and indicate that conditions leading to changes in PTG expression will directly impact glycogen levels in this cell type.

  15. Glucose balance and muscle glycogen during TPN in the early post-operative phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henneberg, S; Stjernström, H; Essén-Gustavsson, B

    1985-01-01

    In order to study how muscle glycogen is influenced by different nutritional regimens in the early post-operative period we took muscle biopsies from 20 patients preoperatively and on the fourth post-operative day after abdominal aortic surgery. Ten patients received 93% of non-protein energy......-production) were performed and from these data glucose balance was calculated as the difference between glucose intake and glucose expenditure. Muscle biopsies were analysed for glycogen, adenosine triphosphate, glucose-6-phosphate, lactate and citrate. We found that it was possible to maintain muscle...... glycogen stores at pre-operative levels with a glucose-insulin regimen. With the fat regimen there was a 31% decrease in muscle glycogen and two patients had a negative glucose balance despite the fact that 150 g of glucose were given. Average glucose balance throughout the study correlated positively...

  16. Generalized Solutions for the joint replenishment problem with correction factor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Porras Musalem (Eric); R. Dekker (Rommert)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we give a complete analysis of the joint replenishment problem (JRP) under constant demands and continuous time. We present a solution method for the JRP when a correction is made for empty replenishments, and we test the solution procedures with real data. We show that the

  17. Activity of glycogen synthase and glycogen phosphorylase in normal and cirrhotic rat liver during glycogen synthesis from glucose or fructose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezborodkina, Natalia N; Chestnova, Anna Yu; Okovity, Sergey V; Kudryavtsev, Boris N

    2014-03-01

    Cirrhotic patients often demonstrate glucose intolerance, one of the possible causes being a decreased glycogen-synthesizing capacity of the liver. At the same time, information about the rates of glycogen synthesis in the cirrhotic liver is scanty and contradictory. We studied the dynamics of glycogen accumulation and the activity of glycogen synthase (GS) and glycogen phosphorylase (GP) in the course of 120min after per os administration of glucose or fructose to fasted rats with CCl4-cirrhosis or fasted normal rats. Blood serum and liver pieces were sampled for examinations. In the normal rat liver administration of glucose/fructose initiated a fast accumulation of glycogen, while in the cirrhotic liver glycogen was accumulated with a 20min delay and at a lower rate. In the normal liver GS activity rose sharply and GPa activity dropped in the beginning of glycogen synthesis, but 60min later a high synthesis rate was sustained at the background of a high GS and GPa activity. Contrariwise, in the cirrhotic liver glycogen was accumulated at the background of a decreased GS activity and a low GPa activity. Refeeding with fructose resulted in a faster increase in the GS activity in both the normal and the cirrhotic liver than refeeding with glucose. To conclude, the rate of glycogen synthesis in the cirrhotic liver is lower than in the normal one, the difference being probably associated with a low GS activity.

  18. Multiple Glycogen-binding Sites in Eukaryotic Glycogen Synthase Are Required for High Catalytic Efficiency toward Glycogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baskaran, Sulochanadevi; Chikwana, Vimbai M.; Contreras, Christopher J.; Davis, Keri D.; Wilson, Wayne A.; DePaoli-Roach, Anna A.; Roach, Peter J.; Hurley, Thomas D. (Indiana-Med); (Des Moines U)

    2012-12-10

    Glycogen synthase is a rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of glycogen and has an essential role in glucose homeostasis. The three-dimensional structures of yeast glycogen synthase (Gsy2p) complexed with maltooctaose identified four conserved maltodextrin-binding sites distributed across the surface of the enzyme. Site-1 is positioned on the N-terminal domain, site-2 and site-3 are present on the C-terminal domain, and site-4 is located in an interdomain cleft adjacent to the active site. Mutation of these surface sites decreased glycogen binding and catalytic efficiency toward glycogen. Mutations within site-1 and site-2 reduced the V{sub max}/S{sub 0.5} for glycogen by 40- and 70-fold, respectively. Combined mutation of site-1 and site-2 decreased the V{sub max}/S{sub 0.5} for glycogen by >3000-fold. Consistent with the in vitro data, glycogen accumulation in glycogen synthase-deficient yeast cells ({Delta}gsy1-gsy2) transformed with the site-1, site-2, combined site-1/site-2, or site-4 mutant form of Gsy2p was decreased by up to 40-fold. In contrast to the glycogen results, the ability to utilize maltooctaose as an in vitro substrate was unaffected in the site-2 mutant, moderately affected in the site-1 mutant, and almost completely abolished in the site-4 mutant. These data show that the ability to utilize maltooctaose as a substrate can be independent of the ability to utilize glycogen. Our data support the hypothesis that site-1 and site-2 provide a 'toehold mechanism,' keeping glycogen synthase tightly associated with the glycogen particle, whereas site-4 is more closely associated with positioning of the nonreducing end during catalysis.

  19. Muscle and liver glycogen, protein, and triglyceride in the rat. Effect of exercise and of the sympatho-adrenal system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, E A; Sonne, B; Mikines, K J;

    1984-01-01

    in skeletal muscle was accompanied by increased breakdown of triglyceride and/or protein. Thus, the effect of exhausting swimming and of running on concentrations of glycogen, protein, and triglyceride in skeletal muscle and liver were studied in rats with and without deficiencies of the sympatho......-adrenal system. In control rats, both swimming and running decreased the concentration of glycogen in fast-twitch red and slow-twitch red muscle whereas concentrations of protein and triglyceride did not decrease. In the liver, swimming depleted glycogen stores but protein and triglyceride concentrations did...... not decrease. In exercising rats, muscle glycogen breakdown was impaired by adrenodemedullation and restored by infusion of epinephrine. However, impaired glycogen breakdown during exercise was not accompanied by a significant net breakdown of protein or triglyceride. Surgical sympathectomy of the muscles did...

  20. Influência das formas de carboidratos no treinamento físico e na supercompensação glicogênica de ratos Influence of carbohydrates forms of in physical training and glycogen overcompensation in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesses Marani Lima

    2003-06-01

    , observou-se o aumento gradual dos teores dos lipídios totais, a cada hora, independentemente da forma de CHO consumida pelos animais.Two carbohydrates forms, sucrose and corn starch, were utilized, in the physical training of rats, having as basis the “classic” method of overcompensation of glycogen which includes the depletion of tissue glycogen followed by carbohydrate load. The analyzed parameters were body weight gain, feed conversion, feed efficiency, tissue muscle and hepatic glycogen levels, plasma glucose and serum total lipids. Wistar male rats were utilized, consuming diets with simples carbohydrates (CHOs and complex carbohydrates (CHOc. The experiment consisted of three phases: 1st phase- adaptation to the liquid medium, 2nd Phase- training, where the physical training program was established, in these phases 1 and 2 the groups were fed diets containing 75% of carbohydrates and finally in the 3rd phase- of “glycogen overcompensation”, a shift in the concentration of carbohydrates was done. Proceeding this phase, the groups were submitted to one day called the “event”, where all the groups swam for about 2 and a half hours and at the end of this, the replenishment of the tissue stores of glycogen in the following times 0, 6, 12, 24, 48 and 72 hours was monitored. The main results point out that: (a the physical training for rats raised the tissue glycogen levels; (b the forms of carbohydrates simple (sucrose or complex (corn starch, did not intervene in tissue glycogen, plasma glucose and serum total lipids; (c the overcompensation of glycogen rise higher store of glycogen in tissue hepatic rats as compared with tissue muscle; (d the greatest replenishment of glycogen in all tissues occurred within 12 hours consuming diets with either simple or complex diets; (e the complex form did not provide reduced levels of serum glucose in the 9-hour post-fasting; (f With advancing time, the gradual increase of the contents of the total lipids every hour

  1. Determination of the glycogen content in cyanobacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porcellinis, Alice De; Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Sakuragi, Yumiko

    2017-01-01

    Cyanobacteria accumulate glycogen as a major intracellular carbon and energy storage during photosynthesis. Recent developments in research have highlighted complex mechanisms of glycogen metabolism, including the diel cycle of biosynthesis and catabolism, redox regulation, and the involvement...... of non-coding RNA. At the same time, efforts are being made to redirect carbon from glycogen to desirable products in genetically engineered cyanobacteria to enhance product yields. Several methods are used to determine the glycogen contents in cyanobacteria, with variable accuracies and technical...... complexities. Here, we provide a detailed protocol for the reliable determination of the glycogen content in cyanobacteria that can be performed in a standard life science laboratory. The protocol entails the selective precipitation of glycogen from the cell lysate and the enzymatic depolymerization...

  2. A whole-body model for glycogen regulation reveals a critical role for substrate cycling in maintaining blood glucose homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Xu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Timely, and sometimes rapid, metabolic adaptation to changes in food supply is critical for survival as an organism moves from the fasted to the fed state, and vice versa. These transitions necessitate major metabolic changes to maintain energy homeostasis as the source of blood glucose moves away from ingested carbohydrates, through hepatic glycogen stores, towards gluconeogenesis. The integration of hepatic glycogen regulation with extra-hepatic energetics is a key aspect of these adaptive mechanisms. Here we use computational modeling to explore hepatic glycogen regulation under fed and fasting conditions in the context of a whole-body model. The model was validated against previous experimental results concerning glycogen phosphorylase a (active and glycogen synthase a dynamics. The model qualitatively reproduced physiological changes that occur during transition from the fed to the fasted state. Analysis of the model reveals a critical role for the inhibition of glycogen synthase phosphatase by glycogen phosphorylase a. This negative regulation leads to high levels of glycogen synthase activity during fasting conditions, which in turn increases substrate (futile cycling, priming the system for a rapid response once an external source of glucose is restored. This work demonstrates that a mechanistic understanding of the design principles used by metabolic control circuits to maintain homeostasis can benefit from the incorporation of mathematical descriptions of these networks into "whole-body" contextual models that mimic in vivo conditions.

  3. Replenishment policy for an inventory model under inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vikramjeet; Saxena, Seema; Singh, Pushpinder; Mishra, Nitin Kumar

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of replenishment is to keep the flow of inventory in the system. To determine an optimal replenishment policy is a great challenge in developing an inventory model. Inflation is defined as the rate at which the prices of goods and services are rising over a time period. The cost parameters are affected by the rate of inflation. High rate of inflation affects the organizations financial conditions. Based on the above backdrop the present paper proposes the retailers replenishment policy for deteriorating items with different cycle lengths under inflation. The shortages are partially backlogged. At last numerical examples validate the results.

  4. Carbohydrate supercompensation and muscle glycogen utilization during exhaustive running in highly trained athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, K; Pedersen, P K; Rose, P

    1990-01-01

    regimen (Norm), the other after a diet and training programme intended to increase muscle glycogen levels (Carb). Muscle glycogen concentration in the gastrocnemius muscle increased by 25% (P less than 0.05) from 581 mmol.kg-1 dry weight, SEM 50 to 722 mmol.kg-1 dry weight, SEM 34 after Carb. Running time...... to exhaustion, however, was not significantly different in Carb and Norm, 77 min, SEM 13 vs 70 min, SEM 8, respectively. The average glycogen concentration following exhaustive running was 553 mmol.kg-1 dry weight, SEM 70 in Carb and 434 mmol.kg-1 dry weight, SEM 57 in Norm, indicating that in both tests muscle...... glycogen stores were decreased by about 25%. Periodic acid-Schiff staining for semi-quantitative glycogen determination in individual fibres confirmed that none of the fibres appeared to be glycogen-empty after exhaustive running. The steady-state respiratory exchange ratio was higher in Carb than in Norm...

  5. Power Replenishment Patch for Spacecraft Health Monitoring Sensors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Metis Design Corporation (MDC) proposes the development of a strain-based power replenishment technology to harvest energy for recharging remote sensors. MDC has...

  6. Managing periodic review inventory systems with capacitated replenishments

    OpenAIRE

    B. RAA; Dubois, T.; Dullaert, W

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies periodic review inventory systems in which replenishments are capacitated. This capacity restriction implies that the order-up-to level may not always be reached at each replenishment, such that additional safety stock is needed to achieve the same service level as in the uncapacitated case usually assumed in the existing literature. To determine the required level of safety stock, and hence the order-up-to level, an iterative procedure is proposed which can be adjusted to ...

  7. Refeeding-induced brown adipose tissue glycogen hyper-accumulation in mice is mediated by insulin and catecholamines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M Carmean

    Full Text Available Brown adipose tissue (BAT generates heat during adaptive thermogenesis through a combination of oxidative metabolism and uncoupling protein 1-mediated electron transport chain uncoupling, using both free-fatty acids and glucose as substrate. Previous rat-based work in 1942 showed that prolonged partial fasting followed by refeeding led to a dramatic, transient increase in glycogen stores in multiple fat depots. In the present study, the protocol was replicated in male CD1 mice, resulting in a 2000-fold increase in interscapular BAT (IBAT glycogen levels within 4-12 hours (hr of refeeding, with IBAT glycogen stores reaching levels comparable to fed liver glycogen. Lesser effects occurred in white adipose tissues (WAT. Over the next 36 hr, glycogen levels dissipated and histological analysis revealed an over-accumulation of lipid droplets, suggesting a potential metabolic connection between glycogenolysis and lipid synthesis. 24 hr of total starvation followed by refeeding induced a robust and consistent glycogen over-accumulation similar in magnitude and time course to the prolonged partial fast. Experimentation demonstrated that hyperglycemia was not sufficient to drive glycogen accumulation in IBAT, but that elevated circulating insulin was sufficient. Additionally, pharmacological inhibition of catecholamine production reduced refeeding-induced IBAT glycogen storage, providing evidence of a contribution from the central nervous system. These findings highlight IBAT as a tissue that integrates both canonically-anabolic and catabolic stimulation for the promotion of glycogen storage during recovery from caloric deficit. The preservation of this robust response through many generations of animals not subjected to food deprivation suggests that the over-accumulation phenomenon plays a critical role in IBAT physiology.

  8. Microfluorometric analyses of glycogen in freshly dissected, single skeletal muscle fibres of the cane toad using a mechanically skinned fibre preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, L T; Stephenson, D G; Stephenson, G M

    1998-08-01

    The main objective of this study was to analyse glycogen in single muscle fibres, using a recently developed microfluorometric method which detects subpicomol amounts of NADPH, glucose and glycogen (as glucosyl units) (detection limit 0.16-0.17 pmol in a 25 nl sample) without fluorochrome amplification. The fibres were freshly dissected from the twitch region of the iliofibularis muscle of the cane toad (Bufo marinus), and were mechanically skinned under paraffin oil to gain access to the intracellular compartments. The results show that (1) glycogen concentrations in toad skeletal muscle fibres range between 25.8 and 369 mmol glucosyl units/litre fibre volume; (2) there is a large variation in glycogen content between individual fibres from the iliofibularis muscle of one animal; (3) there are seasonal differences in the glycogen content of toad single muscle fibres; (4) the total amount of glycogen in single muscle fibres of the toad does not decrease significantly when storing the tissue, under paraffin oil, at 20-25 degree C for up to 6 h or at 4 degree C for up to 24 h; and (5) 15-26% of fibre glycogen can be washed in an aqueous solution at pH 5-7, within 5 min, while 74-85% of fibre glycogen remains associated with the washed skinned fibre, even after 40 min exposure of the skinned fibre preparation to the aqueous environment. The retention of most glycogen in the fibre preparation after mechanical removal of the plasma membrane and extensive washing indicates that in toad skeletal muscle fibres the largest proportion of glycogen is tightly bound to intracellular structures. The results also show that the skinned muscle fibre preparation is well suited for microfluorometric glycogen determination, since low molecular weight non-glycogen contributors to the fluorescence signal can be removed from the myoplasmic space prior to the glycogen hydrolysis step.

  9. Brain glycogen supercompensation following exhaustive exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Takashi; Ishikawa, Taro; Ito, Hitoshi; Okamoto, Masahiro; Inoue, Koshiro; Lee, Min-Chul; Fujikawa, Takahiko; Ichitani, Yukio; Kawanaka, Kentaro; Soya, Hideaki

    2012-02-01

    Brain glycogen localized in astrocytes, a critical energy source for neurons, decreases during prolonged exhaustive exercise with hypoglycaemia. However, it is uncertain whether exhaustive exercise induces glycogen supercompensation in the brain as in skeletal muscle. To explore this question, we exercised adult male rats to exhaustion at moderate intensity (20 m min(-1)) by treadmill, and quantified glycogen levels in several brain loci and skeletal muscles using a high-power (10 kW) microwave irradiation method as a gold standard. Skeletal muscle glycogen was depleted by 82-90% with exhaustive exercise, and supercompensated by 43-46% at 24 h after exercise. Brain glycogen levels decreased by 50-64% with exhaustive exercise, and supercompensated by 29-63% (whole brain 46%, cortex 60%, hippocampus 33%, hypothalamus 29%, cerebellum 63% and brainstem 49%) at 6 h after exercise. The brain glycogen supercompensation rates after exercise positively correlated with their decrease rates during exercise. We also observed that cortical and hippocampal glycogen supercompensation were sustained until 24 h after exercise (long-lasting supercompensation), and their basal glycogen levels increased with 4 weeks of exercise training (60 min day(-1) at 20 m min(-1)). These results support the hypothesis that, like the effect in skeletal muscles, glycogen supercompensation also occurs in the brain following exhaustive exercise, and the extent of supercompensation is dependent on that of glycogen decrease during exercise across brain regions. However, supercompensation in the brain preceded that of skeletal muscles. Further, the long-lasting supercompensation of the cortex and hippocampus is probably a prerequisite for their training adaptation (increased basal levels), probably to meet the increased energy demands of the brain in exercising animals.

  10. Glucose balance and muscle glycogen during TPN in the early post-operative phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henneberg, S; Stjernström, H; Essén-Gustavsson, B;

    1985-01-01

    In order to study how muscle glycogen is influenced by different nutritional regimens in the early post-operative period we took muscle biopsies from 20 patients preoperatively and on the fourth post-operative day after abdominal aortic surgery. Ten patients received 93% of non-protein energy...... as glucose, 7% as fat (Intralipid) and insulin was given to keep the blood glucose below 10 mmol/l. The remaining patients had 80% of non-protein energy as fat (Intralipid). Amino acids constituting 12 g of nitrogen daily were given to both groups. Daily measurements of gas exchange (oxygen uptake, CO2...... glycogen stores at pre-operative levels with a glucose-insulin regimen. With the fat regimen there was a 31% decrease in muscle glycogen and two patients had a negative glucose balance despite the fact that 150 g of glucose were given. Average glucose balance throughout the study correlated positively...

  11. Harvesting and replenishment policies for renewable natural resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Aaron J.; Johnson, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    The current paper links the optimal intertemporal use of renewable natural resources to the harvesting activities of various economic agents. Previous contributions cite market forces as a causative factor inducing the extirpation of renewable natural resources. The analysis given here discusses investment in the stock of renewable resources and cites important examples of this activity. By introducing joint harvesting and replenishment strategies into a model of renewable resource use, the analysis adds descriptive reality and relevance to positive and normative discussions of renewable natural resource use. A high price for the yield or a high discount rate tend to diminish the size of the optimum stationary stock of the resource with a non-replenishment harvesting strategy. Optimal non-replenishment harvesting strategies for renewable natural resources will exhaustion or extirpation of the resource if the price of the yield or the discount rate are sufficiently large. However, the availability of a replenishment technology and the use of replenishment activities tends to buffer the resource against exhaustion or extirpation.

  12. Glycogen metabolism in the rat retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffe, Víctor; Carbajal, Raymundo C; Salceda, Rocío

    2004-02-01

    It has been reported that glycogen levels in retina vary with retinal vascularization. However, the electrical activity of isolated retina depends on glucose supply, suggesting that it does not contain energetic reserves. We determined glycogen levels and pyruvate and lactate production under various conditions in isolated retina. Ex vivo retinas from light- and dark-adapted rats showed values of 44 +/- 0.3 and 19.5 +/- 0.4 nmol glucosyl residues/mg protein, respectively. The glycogen content of retinas from light-adapted animals was reduced by 50% when they were transferred to darkness. Glycogen levels were low in retinas incubated in glucose-free media and increased in the presence of glucose. The highest glycogen values were found in media containing 20 mm of glucose. A rapid increase in lactate production was observed in the presence of glucose. Surprisingly, glycogen levels were the lowest and lactate production was also very low in the presence of 30 mm glucose. Our results suggest that glycogen can be used as an immediate accessible energy reserve in retina. We speculate on the possibility that gluconeogenesis may play a protective role by removal of lactic acid.

  13. Glycogenotic hepatocellular carcinoma with glycogen-ground-glass hepatocytes: A heuristically highly relevant phenotype

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter Bannasch

    2012-01-01

    Glycogenotic hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with glycogen-ground-glass hepatocytes has recently been described as an allegedly "novel variant" of HCC,but neither the historical background nor the heuristic relevance of this observation were put in perspective.In the present contribution,the most important findings in animal models and human beings related to the emergence and further evolution of excessively glycogen storing (glycogenotic) hepatocytes with and without ground glass features during neoplastic development have been summarized.Glycogenotic HCCs with glycogen-ground-glass hepatocytes represent highly differentiated neoplasms which contain subpopulations of cells phenotypically resembling those of certain types of preneoplastic hepatic foci and benign hepatocellular neoplasms.It is questionable whether the occurrence of glycogen-ground-glass hepatocytes in a glycogenotic HCC justifies its classification as a specific entity.The typical appearance of ground-glass hepatocytes is due to a hypertrophy of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum,which is usually associated with an excessive storage of glycogen and frequently also with an expression of the hepatitis B surface antigen.Sequential studies in animal models and observations in humans indicate that glycogen-ground-glass hepatocytes are a facultative,integral part of a characteristic cellular sequence commencing with focal hepatic glycogenosis potentially progressing to benign and malignant neoplasms.During this process highly differentiated glycogenotic cells including ground-glass hepatocytes are gradually transformed via various intermediate stages into poorly differentiated glycogen-poor,basophilic (ribosome-rich) cancer cells.Histochemical,microbiochemical,and molecular biochemical studies on focal hepatic glycogenosis and advanced preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions in tissue sections and laser-dissected specimens in rat and mouse models have provided compelling evidence for an early insulinomimetic

  14. Postexercise cold-water immersion does not attenuate muscle glycogen resynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregson, Warren; Allan, Robert; Holden, Susan; Phibbs, Padraic; Doran, Dominic; Campbell, Iain; Waldron, Sarah; Joo, Chang Hwa; Morton, James P

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that postexercise cold-water immersion (CWI, via its associated reductions in skeletal muscle blood flow) attenuates muscle glycogen resynthesis during short-term recovery from exhaustive exercise. In a repeated-measures design, nine recreationally active men performed an exhaustive glycogen depleting cycling protocol (consisting of intermittent exercise the night before and steady-state exercise on the subsequent morning of the main trial) followed by 10 min of lower-limb CWI (8°C) or remained seated in normal ambient conditions (CONT). Subjects were fed carbohydrate (CHO) at an ingestion rate of 0.6 g·kg body mass at 30 min postexercise and at 1, 2, and 3 h postexercise. Reductions in thigh skin temperature and muscle temperature during postexercise recovery were greater in CWI compared with CONT (P muscle glycogen (CONT and CWI postexercise = 76 ± 43 and 77 ± 26 mmol·kg dry weight [dw], respectively; mean ± SD) progressively increased (P muscle glycogen resynthesis rates during short-term recovery even when CHO availability is considered suboptimal. Athletes who regularly incorporate CWI as a recovery strategy to alleviate symptoms of exercise-induced muscle damage should therefore not be concerned with potential negative effects of the associated reductions in muscle blood flow on the restoration of muscle glycogen stores.

  15. Posthemorrhage glycogen and lactate metabolism in the liver: an experimental study with postprandial rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boija, P.O.; Nylander, G.; Suhaili, A.; Ware, J.

    1988-06-01

    Glycogen and lactate metabolism was studied in livers from three groups of postprandial rats sustaining 70 mm Hg hemorrhagic hypotension for variable periods, 60 min (60H group), 120 min (120H group), and nonbled controls. The donor livers were investigated after completed hemorrhage using an in vitro perfusion system with L-lactate as substrate, together with U-/sup 14/C-lactate. The residual glycogen stores were determined after perfusions. The incorporation of labelled lactate to glucose was increased in the 120H group by 66.7% and 116.8% compared to the 60H group and controls (p less than 0.01), but glycogenolysis was still the main source of glucose released in the 120H group. Glycogen formation from labelled lactate was 46.6% higher in the 120H group compared to controls (p less than 0.05) and lactate oxidation was decreased by 67.5% (p less than 0.05). The data suggest that hepatocytes are capable of rapid change from glycolysis to gluconeogenesis during hemorrhagic hypovolemia. However, energy-sparing glycogen breakdown is given priority over gluconeogenesis as long as glycogen remains available.

  16. Homeostasis and the glycogen shunt explains aerobic ethanol production in yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, Robert G.; Rothman, Douglas L.

    2015-01-01

    Aerobic glycolysis in yeast and cancer cells produces pyruvate beyond oxidative needs, a paradox noted by Warburg almost a century ago. To address this question, we reanalyzed extensive measurements from 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy of yeast glycolysis and the coupled pathways of futile cycling and glycogen and trehalose synthesis (which we refer to as the glycogen shunt). When yeast are given a large glucose load under aerobic conditions, the fluxes of these pathways adapt to maintain homeostasis of glycolytic intermediates and ATP. The glycogen shunt uses glycolytic ATP to store glycolytic intermediates as glycogen and trehalose, generating pyruvate and ethanol as byproducts. This conclusion is supported by studies of yeast with a partial block in the glycogen shunt due to the cif mutation, which found that when challenged with glucose, the yeast cells accumulate glycolytic intermediates and ATP, which ultimately leads to cell death. The control of the relative fluxes, which is critical to maintain homeostasis, is most likely exerted by the enzymes pyruvate kinase and fructose bisphosphatase. The kinetic properties of yeast PK and mammalian PKM2, the isoform found in cancer, are similar, suggesting that the same mechanism may exist in cancer cells, which, under these conditions, could explain their excess lactate generation. The general principle that homeostasis of metabolite and ATP concentrations is a critical requirement for metabolic function suggests that enzymes and pathways that perform this critical role could be effective drug targets in cancer and other diseases. PMID:26283370

  17. Video compression using conditional replenishment and motion prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, D. N.; Ahmed, N.

    1984-01-01

    A study of a low-rate monochrome video compression system is presentd in this paper. This system is a conditional-replenishment coder that uses two-dimensional Walsh-transform coding within each video frame. The conditional-replenishment algorithm works by transmitting only the portions of an image that are changing in time. This system is augmented with a motn-prediction algorithm that measures spatial dispalcement parameters from frame to frame, and codes the data using these parameters. A comparison is made between the conditional-replenishment system with, and without, the motion-predictinalgorthm. Subsampling in time is ued to maintain the data rate rate at a fixed value. Average bit rates of 1 bit/picture element (pel) to 1/16 bit/pel are considered. The resultant performance of the compression simulations is presented in terms of the average frame rates produced.

  18. High glycogen levels enhance glycogen breakdown in isolated contracting skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Galbo, H

    1986-01-01

    The influence of supranormal muscle glycogen levels on glycogen breakdown in contracting muscle was investigated. Rats either rested or swam for 3 h and subsequently had their isolated hindquarters perfused after 21 h with access to food. Muscle glycogen concentrations were measured before and af...... by mechanisms exerted within the muscle cells. Intramuscular lipolysis and net protein breakdown are unaffected. There seems to be no close linkage between needs and mobilization of fuel within the working muscle....

  19. Carbohydrates, Muscle Glycogen, and Improved Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, W. Mike

    1987-01-01

    One way to improve athletic performance without harming the athlete's health is diet manipulation. This article explores the relationship between muscular endurance and muscle glycogen and discusses a diet and training approach to competition. (Author/MT)

  20. High liver glycogen in hereditary fructose intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, A R; Ryman, B E

    1971-11-01

    A case of hereditary fructose intolerance is reported in a girl aged 2 years at the time of her death. She had apparently progressed normally until the age of 14 months. At 19 months she was admitted to hospital with failure to thrive, hepatomegaly, and superficial infections. Investigations revealed hypoglycaemia, persistent acidosis, aminoaciduria, and a high liver glycogen level which suggested that she had glycogen storage disease. There was also some evidence of malabsorption. At necropsy the liver enzyme estimations showed that fructose 1-phosphate aldolase activity was absent and that fructose 1,6-diphosphate aldolase activity was reduced. Hereditary fructose intolerance and glycogen storage disease have been confused in the past on clinical grounds, but a high liver glycogen level has not previously been reported in hereditary fructose intolerance.

  1. Exercise in muscle glycogen storage diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, Nicolai Rasmus; Haller, Ronald G; Vissing, John

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen storage diseases (GSD) are inborn errors of glycogen or glucose metabolism. In the GSDs that affect muscle, the consequence of a block in skeletal muscle glycogen breakdown or glucose use, is an impairment of muscular performance and exercise intolerance, owing to 1) an increase in glyco......Glycogen storage diseases (GSD) are inborn errors of glycogen or glucose metabolism. In the GSDs that affect muscle, the consequence of a block in skeletal muscle glycogen breakdown or glucose use, is an impairment of muscular performance and exercise intolerance, owing to 1) an increase...... oxidation. Such changes may be detrimental for persons with GSD from a metabolic perspective. However, exercise may alter skeletal muscle substrate metabolism in ways that are beneficial for patients with GSD, such as improving exercise tolerance and increasing fatty acid oxidation. In addition, a regular...... exercise program has the potential to improve general health and fitness and improve quality of life, if executed properly. In this review, we describe skeletal muscle substrate use during exercise in GSDs, and how blocks in metabolic pathways affect exercise tolerance in GSDs. We review the studies...

  2. Characterization of the highly branched glycogen from the thermoacidophilic red microalga Galdieria sulphuraria and comparison with other glycogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Garcia, Marta; Stuart, Marc C A; van der Maarel, Marc J E C

    2016-08-01

    The thermoacidophilic red microalga Galdieria sulphuraria synthesizes glycogen when growing under heterotrophic conditions. Structural characterization revealed that G. sulphuraria glycogen is the most highly branched glycogen described to date, with 18% of α-(1→6) linkages. Moreover, it differs from other glycogens because it is composed of short chains only and has a substantially smaller molecular weight and particle size. The physiological role of this highly branched glycogen in G. sulphuraria is discussed.

  3. Joint pricing and inventory replenishment decisions with returns and expediting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Stuart X.

    2012-01-01

    We study a single-item periodic-review model for the joint pricing and inventory replenishment problem with returns and expediting. Demand in consecutive periods are independent random variables and their distributions are price sensitive. At the end of each period, after the demand is realized, a

  4. A different approach to the Joint Replenishment Problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nilsson, A.; Segerstedt, A.; van der Sluijs, E.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, a heuristic method is presented which gives a novel approach in solving joint replenishment problems. Our heuristics is from the beginning a basic spreadsheet model that solves the JRP in an iterative procedure. The principle of the recursion procedure is to find a balance between the

  5. An environmental assessment of water replenishment to a floodplain lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lóczy, Dénes; Dezső, József; Czigány, Szabolcs; Prokos, Hedvig; Tóth, Gabriella

    2017-01-20

    There are numerous wetland rehabilitation projects worldwide, but their efficiency is seldom assessed comprehensively. Oxbow lakes are wetlands of particular sensitivity. Within a large-scale floodplain rehabilitation project in Hungary, the Old Drava Programme, water replenishment was first carried out for the Cún-Szaporca oxbow lakes, a key area in the project. To assess its sustainability, the entire hydrological system has been monitored. From the data of hydrological monitoring (infiltration, soil moisture, groundwater/lakewater interaction) it is claimed that water replenishment involves significant losses through seepage (4.1 and 1.46 mm d(-1)) and evaporation (3.01 and 1.44 mm d(-1)) in the studied pre-intervention and replenishment periods, resp. Infiltration alone is insufficient to replenish groundwater and raise oxbow lake levels. In the critical summer half-year evaporation is intensive in the neighbouring agricultural fields. Groundwater table dynamics are controlled by hyporheic and groundwater flow. Major impact on the water balance of the oxbow lakes is exerted by the regime of the Drava River. A deepened lakebed is recommended to ensure more effective water retention in the oxbow lake. From the local study conclusions are drawn for the feasibility of rehabilitation at floodplain scale and in areas with similar hydromorphological conditions.

  6. Replenishment success linked to fluctuating asymmetry in larval fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemberget, Tove; McCormick, Mark I

    2009-02-01

    Fluctuating asymmetry (FA), defined as random deviations from perfect symmetry, has become a popular tool with which to examine the effects of stress during the development of bilaterally symmetrical organisms. Recent studies have suggested that FA in otoliths may serve as an indicator of stress in fish larvae. We examined the relationship between otolith asymmetry and temporal patterns in the occurrence of late-stage larvae to a tropical reef (i.e. replenishment) for the Caribbean lizardfish, Saurida suspicio (family Synodontidae). Late-stage larvae were collected in light traps over a period of 18 consecutive lunar months in the San Blas Archipelago, Panama. Asymmetry within otolith pairs was calculated from 24 variables: area, perimeter, longest and shortest axis of the otolith and 20 shape descriptors (Fourier harmonics). Otolith asymmetry was correlated strongly with fluctuations in lunar light trap catches. Two measured variables, otolith area and one of the 20 shape descriptors, accounted for 60% of the variability in lunar replenishment of S. suspicio. Individuals from small replenishment pulses exhibited higher levels of asymmetry compared to larvae from large pulses. When dry and wet seasons were analysed separately, otolith asymmetry explained a surprising 70 and 97% of the variation, respectively. Although the generality of these results remain to be tested among other populations and species, otolith asymmetry may be an important indicator, and potentially a predictor, of larval quality and replenishment success.

  7. Replenishment of the podocyte compartment by parietal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Jeffrey B

    2015-11-01

    While progressive podocytopenia is a characteristic feature of chronic glomerular disease, the visceral epithelial niche can be replenished from the parietal epithelium. Two new reports demonstrate this process in genetically engineered mice, using fate mapping, and in human renal biopsies manifesting segmental glomerulosclerosis in diverse settings, using cellular and extracellular matrix markers.

  8. Fresh groundwater resources in a large sand replenishment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizer, Sebastian; Oude Essink, G.H.P.; Bierkens, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The anticipation of sea-level rise and increases in extreme weather conditions has led to the initiation of an innovative coastal management project called the Sand Engine. In this pilot project a large volume of sand (21.5 million m3) – also called sand replenishment or nourishment – was placed on

  9. Computing replenishment cycle policy parameters for a perishable item

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossi, R.; Tarim, S.A.; Hnich, B.; Prestwich, S.

    2010-01-01

    In many industrial environments there is a significant class of problems for which the perishable nature of the inventory cannot be ignored in developing replenishment order plans. Food is the most salient example of a perishable inventory item. In this work, we consider the periodic-review,

  10. ATP, IMP, and glycogen in cod muscle at onset and during development of rigor mortis depend on the sampling location

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappeln, Gertrud; Jessen, Flemming

    2002-01-01

    Variation in glycogen, ATP, and IMP contents within individual cod muscles were studied in ice stored fish during the progress of rigor mortis. Rigor index was determined before muscle samples for chemical analyzes were taken at 16 different positions on the fish. During development of rigor, the...

  11. Regulation of glycogen resynthesis following exercise. Dietary considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, J E; Neufer, P D; Dohm, G L

    1991-04-01

    With the cessation of exercise, glycogen repletion begins to take place rapidly in skeletal muscle and can result in glycogen levels higher than those present before exercise. Understanding the rate-limiting steps that regulate glycogen synthesis will provide us with strategies to increase the resynthesis of glycogen during recovery from exercise, and thus improve performance. Given the importance of muscle glycogen to endurance performance, various factors which may optimise glycogen resynthesis rate and insure complete restoration have been of interest to both the scientist and athlete. The time required for complete muscle glycogen resynthesis after prolonged moderate intensity exercise is generally considered to be 24 hours provided approximately 500 to 700g of carbohydrate is ingested. Muscle glycogen synthesis rate is highest during the first 2 hours after exercise. Ingestion of 0.70g glucose/kg bodyweight every 2 hours appears to maximise glycogen resynthesis rate at approximately 5 to 6 mumol/g wet weight/h during the first 4 to 6 hours after exhaustive exercise. Further enhancement of glycogen resynthesis rate with ingestion of greater than 0.70g glucose/kg bodyweight appears to be limited by the constraints imposed by gastric emptying. Ingestion of glucose or sucrose results in similar muscle glycogen resynthesis rates while glycogen synthesis in liver is better served with the ingestion of fructose. Also, increases in muscle glycogen content during the first 4 to 6 hours after exercise are greater with ingestion of simple as compared with complex carbohydrate. Glycogen synthase activity is a key component in the regulation of glycogen resynthesis. Glycogen synthase enzyme exists in 2 states: the less active, more phosphorylated (D) form which is under allosteric control of glucose-6-phosphate, and the more active, less phosphorylated (I) form which is independent of glucose-6-phosphate. There is generally an inverse relationship between glycogen content

  12. 40 CFR 280.115 - Replenishment of guarantees, letters of credit, or surety bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Replenishment of guarantees, letters... Replenishment of guarantees, letters of credit, or surety bonds. (a) If at any time after a standby trust is... were drawn upon, replenishment shall occur by the earliest anniversary date among the mechanisms....

  13. 75 FR 62345 - Minimum Balance Requirement and Automatic Replenishment Option for Deposit Account Holders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-08

    ...-4] Minimum Balance Requirement and Automatic Replenishment Option for Deposit Account Holders AGENCY... account holders the option of automatic replenishment of their account via their bank account or credit... notify the account holder that replenishment of the account is needed, and places the pending...

  14. Replenishing data descriptors in a DMA injection FIFO buffer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Charles J [Rochester, MN; Blocksome, Michael A [Rochester, MN; Cernohous, Bob R [Rochester, MN; Heidelberger, Philip [Cortlandt Manor, NY; Kumar, Sameer [White Plains, NY; Parker, Jeffrey J [Rochester, MN

    2011-10-11

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for replenishing data descriptors in a Direct Memory Access (`DMA`) injection first-in-first-out (`FIFO`) buffer that include: determining, by a messaging module on an origin compute node, whether a number of data descriptors in a DMA injection FIFO buffer exceeds a predetermined threshold, each data descriptor specifying an application message for transmission to a target compute node; queuing, by the messaging module, a plurality of new data descriptors in a pending descriptor queue if the number of the data descriptors in the DMA injection FIFO buffer exceeds the predetermined threshold; establishing, by the messaging module, interrupt criteria that specify when to replenish the injection FIFO buffer with the plurality of new data descriptors in the pending descriptor queue; and injecting, by the messaging module, the plurality of new data descriptors into the injection FIFO buffer in dependence upon the interrupt criteria.

  15. The Economics of Groundwater Replenishment for Reliable Urban Water Supply

    OpenAIRE

    Lei Gao; Connor, Jeffery D.; Peter Dillon

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the potential economic benefits of water banking in aquifers to meet drought and emergency supplies for cities where the population is growing and changing climate has reduced the availability of water. A simplified case study based on the city of Perth, Australia was used to estimate the savings that could be achieved by water banking. Scenarios for investment in seawater desalination plants and groundwater replenishment were considered over a 20 year period of growing de...

  16. Partial podocyte replenishment in experimental FSGS derives from nonpodocyte sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaverina, Natalya V; Eng, Diana G; Schneider, Remington R S; Pippin, Jeffrey W; Shankland, Stuart J

    2016-06-01

    The current studies used genetic fate mapping to prove that adult podocytes can be partially replenished following depletion. Inducible NPHS2-rtTA/tetO-Cre/RS-ZsGreen-R reporter mice were generated to permanently label podocytes with the ZsGreen reporter. Experimental focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) was induced with a cytotoxic podocyte antibody. On FSGS day 7, immunostaining for the podocyte markers p57, synaptopodin, and podocin were markedly decreased by 44%, and this was accompanied by a decrease in ZsGreen fluorescence. The nuclear stain DAPI was absent in segments of reduced ZsGreen and podocyte marker staining, which is consistent with podocyte depletion. Staining for p57, synaptopodin, podocin, and DAPI increased at FSGS day 28 and was augmented by the ACE inhibitor enalapril, which is consistent with a partial replenishment of podocytes. In contrast, ZsGreen fluorescence did not return and remained significantly low at day 28, indicating replenishment was from a nonpodocyte origin. Despite administration of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) thrice weekly throughout the course of disease, BrdU staining was not detected in podocytes, which is consistent with an absence of proliferation. Although ZsGreen reporting was reduced in the tuft at FSGS day 28, labeled podocytes were detected along the Bowman's capsule in a subset of glomeruli, which is consistent with migration from the tuft. Moreover, more than half of the migrated podocytes coexpressed the parietal epithelial cell (PEC) proteins claudin-1, SSeCKS, and PAX8. These results show that although podocytes can be partially replenished following abrupt depletion, a process augmented by ACE inhibition, the source or sources are nonpodocyte in origin and are independent of proliferation. Furthermore, a subset of podocytes migrate to the Bowman's capsule and begin to coexpress PEC markers.

  17. Islet neogenesis: a possible pathway for beta-cell replenishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner-Weir, Susan; Guo, Lili; Li, Wan-Chun; Ouziel-Yahalom, Limor; Lysy, Philippe A; Weir, Gordon C; Sharma, Arun

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes, particularly type 1 diabetes, results from the lack of pancreatic β-cells. β-cell replenishment can functionally reverse diabetes, but two critical challenges face the field: 1. protection of the new β-cells from autoimmunity and allorejection, and 2. development of β-cells that are readily available and reliably functional. This chapter will examine the potential of endogenous replenishment of pancreatic β-cells as a possible therapeutic tool if autoimmunity could be blunted. Two pathways for endogenous replenishment exist in the pancreas: replication and neogenesis, defined as the formation of new islet cells from pancreatic progenitor/stem cells. These pathways of β-cell expansion are not mutually exclusive and both occur in embryonic development, in postnatal growth, and in response to some injuries. Since the β-cell population is dramatically reduced in the pancreas of type 1 diabetes patients, with only a small fraction of the β-cells surviving years after onset, replication of preexisting β-cells would not be a reasonable start for replenishment. However, induction of neogenesis could provide a starting population that could be further expanded by replication. It is widely accepted that neogenesis occurs in the initial embryonic formation of the endocrine pancreas, but its occurrence anytime after birth has become controversial because of discordant data from lineage tracing experiments. However, the concept was built upon many observations from different models and species over many years. Herein, we discuss the role of neogenesis in normal growth and regeneration, as learned from rodent models, followed by an analysis of what has been found in humans.

  18. Partial recovery of erythrocyte glycogen in diabetic rats treated with phenobarbital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    da-Silva C.A.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Erythrocytes may play a role in glucose homeostasis during the postprandial period. Erythrocytes from diabetic patients are defective in glucose transport and metabolism, functions that may affect glycogen storage. Phenobarbital, a hepatic enzyme inducer, has been used in the treatment of patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM, increasing the insulin-mediated glucose disposal. We studied the effects of phenobarbital treatment in vivo on glycemia and erythrocyte glycogen content in control and alloxan-diabetic rats during the postprandial period. In control rats (blood glucose, 73 to 111 mg/dl in femoral and suprahepatic veins the erythrocyte glycogen content was 45.4 ± 1.1 and 39.1 ± 0.8 µg/g Hb (mean ± SEM, N = 4-6 in the femoral artery and vein, respectively, and 37.9 ± 1.1 in the portal vein and 47.5 ± 0.9 in the suprahepatic vein. Diabetic rats (blood glucose, 300-350 mg/dl presented low (P<0.05 erythrocyte glycogen content, i.e., 9.6 ± 0.1 and 7.1 ± 0.7 µg/g Hb in the femoral artery and vein, respectively, and 10.0 ± 0.7 and 10.7 ± 0.5 in the portal and suprahepatic veins, respectively. After 10 days of treatment, phenobarbital (0.5 mg/ml in the drinking water did not change blood glucose or erythrocyte glycogen content in control rats. In diabetic rats, however, it lowered (P<0.05 blood glucose in the femoral artery (from 305 ± 18 to 204 ± 45 mg/dl and femoral vein (from 300 ± 11 to 174 ± 48 mg/dl and suprahepatic vein (from 350 ± 10 to 174 ± 42 mg/dl, but the reduction was not sufficient for complete recovery. Phenobarbital also stimulated the glycogen synthesis, leading to a partial recovery of glycogen stores in erythrocytes. In treated rats, erythrocyte glycogen content increased to 20.7 ± 3.8 µg/g Hb in the femoral artery and 30.9 ± 0.9 µg/g Hb in the suprahepatic vein (P<0.05. These data indicate that phenobarbital activated some of the insulin-stimulated glucose metabolism steps which were

  19. Design and development of an in vitro tear replenishment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Saman; Postnikoff, Cameron; Wright, Ann M; Gorbet, Maud

    2014-09-01

    Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms of the corneal tissue and translating them into effective therapies requires organotypic culture systems that can better model the physiological conditions of the front of the eye. Human corneal in vitro models currently exist, however, the lack of tear replenishment limits corneal in vitro models' ability to accurately simulate the physiological environment of the human cornea. The tear replenishment system (TRS), a micro-fluidic device, was developed to mimic the in vivo tear replenishment in the human eye in an in vitro corneal model. The TRS is capable of generating adjustable intermittent flow from 0.1 µL in every cycle. The TRS is a sterilizable device that is designed to fit standard 6-well cell culture plates. Experiments with the corneal models demonstrated that exposure to the TRS did not damage the integrity of the stratified cell culture. Contact lenses "worn" by the in vitro corneal model also remained moist at all times and the cytotoxicity of BAK could also be verified using this model. These in vitro results confirmed that the TRS presents novel avenues to assess lens-solution biocompatibility and drug delivery systems in a physiologically relevant milieu.

  20. Merchandise and Replenishment Planning Optimisation for Fashion Retail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Iannone

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The integration among different companies functions, collaborative planning and the elaboration of focused distribution plans are critical to the success of each kind of company working in the complex retail sector. In this contest, the present work proposes the description of a model able to support coordinated strategic choices continually made by Supply Chain (SC actors. The final objective is achievement of the full optimisation of Merchandise & Replenishment Planning phases, identifying the right replenishment quantities and periods. To test the proposed model’s effectiveness, it was applied to an important Italian fashion company in the complex field of fast-fashion, a sector in which promptness is a main competitive leverage and, therefore, the planning cannot exclude the time variable. The passage from a total push strategy, currently used by the company, to a push-pull one, suggested by the model, allowed us not only to estimate a reduction in goods quantities to purchase at the beginning of a sales period (with considerable economic savings, but also elaborate a focused replenishment plan that permits reduction and optimisation of departures from network warehouses to Points of Sale (POS.

  1. Fresh groundwater resources in a large sand replenishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huizer, Sebastian; Oude Essink, Gualbert H. P.; Bierkens, Marc F. P.

    2016-08-01

    The anticipation of sea-level rise and increases in extreme weather conditions has led to the initiation of an innovative coastal management project called the Sand Engine. In this pilot project a large volume of sand (21.5 million m3) - also called sand replenishment or nourishment - was placed on the Dutch coast. The intention is that the sand is redistributed by wind, current, and tide, reinforcing local coastal defence structures and leading to a unique, dynamic environment. In this study we investigated the potential effect of the long-term morphological evolution of the large sand replenishment and climate change on fresh groundwater resources. The potential effects on the local groundwater system were quantified with a calibrated three-dimensional (3-D) groundwater model, in which both variable-density groundwater flow and salt transport were simulated. Model simulations showed that the long-term morphological evolution of the Sand Engine results in a substantial growth of fresh groundwater resources, in all adopted climate change scenarios. Thus, the application of a local sand replenishment could provide coastal areas the opportunity to combine coastal protection with an increase of the local fresh groundwater availability.

  2. Glycogen resynthesis rate following cross-country skiing is closely correlated to skeletal muscle glycogen content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørtenblad, Niels; Nielsen, Joachim; Saltin, Bengt;

    -trial (classic style) on a competition cc track. During the first 4hrs of recovery, skiers received either water or carbohydrate (CHO), after which they all received CHO enriched food (1 g . kg-1 bw . h-1). Muscle biopsies were obtained in both arm and leg muscles before and immediately after the race, as well...... as 4h and 22h after the race and analyzed for glycogen content. Figure 1. Correlation between muscle glycogen resynthesis rate and glycogen content after and in the rocery period after exercise. Line indicate best fit of all the data points (r2 = 0.41, p

  3. Examination of liver and muscle glycogen and blood glucose levels ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... energy requirement is high and start to decrease after May when reproduction starts. In the summer, it was determined that glycogen and glucose reserves were at ... Glycogen and glucose reserves generally showed parallel changes with ...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: glycogen storage disease type VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Storage Disease (UK) The Association for Glycogen Storage Disease (US) University of Kansas Medical Center Resource List GeneReviews (1 link) Glycogen Storage Disease Type VI ClinicalTrials.gov (1 link) ClinicalTrials.gov ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: glycogen storage disease type III

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Storage Disease (UK) The Association for Glycogen Storage Disease (US) University of Kansas Medical Center Resource List GeneReviews (1 link) Glycogen Storage Disease Type III ClinicalTrials.gov (1 link) ClinicalTrials.gov ...

  6. Effects of beach replenishment on intertidal invertebrates: A 15-month, eight beach study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooldridge, Tyler; Henter, Heather J.; Kohn, Joshua R.

    2016-06-01

    Beach replenishment is an increasingly popular means to remediate coastal erosion, but no consensus exists regarding how long replenishment affects sandy beach intertidal invertebrates, key components of beach ecosystems. We monitored the intertidal invertebrate community for fifteen months following a replenishment project at eight beaches, each with replenished and control sections, across San Diego County. Nearly all taxa showed major declines in abundance immediately following replenishment. Populations of talitrid amphipods and the bean clam Donax gouldii recovered within one year, sooner than in previous studies. On some beaches, populations of the mole crab Emerita analoga bloomed four months after replenishment and were more numerous on replenished portions of beaches at that time. Mole crab populations subsequently declined and no longer differed by treatment. The polychaete community, composed of Scolelepis sp. and several other numerically important taxa, showed a strong replenishment-induced reduction in abundance that persisted through the end of the study. The large negative effect of replenishment on polychaetes, coupled with their overall importance to the invertebrate community, resulted in a more than twofold reduction in overall invertebrate abundance on replenished beaches at 15 months. Such reductions may have far reaching consequences for sandy beach ecosystems, as community declines can reduce prey availability for shorebirds and fish. As this and other recent studies have revealed longer times for the recovery of intertidal invertebrates than previously observed, longer study periods and more cautious estimates regarding the magnitude, variability, and duration of impacts of beach replenishment for management decision-making are warranted.

  7. Store Tours: Accessing Museums’ Stored Collections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucinda G. Caesar

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available In the Science Museum, London, it is envisioned that the future of the collection lies with the creation of an open storage centre, a means to ensure that its stored collections become a permanent way of engagement with the public. Access to stored collections is a topical subject, and open storage has been adopted by many museums as an access strategy. This report explores the use of a particular interpretation method: guided tours of the stores. Are store tours a worthwhile investment? Should store tours be used as an interpretative medium for accessing stored collections on a national level? Are store tours the best tool to engage the public in stored collections? What do store tours provide as a means of accessing or promoting engagement in museum’s stored collections? Are they indeed the access tool of the future? This paper reviews these questions, drawing on the data from a series of store tours hosted in 2004 and 2005 by the Science Museum, London.

  8. Effect of diabetes on glycogen metabolism in rat retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Chávez, Gustavo; Hernández-Berrones, Jethro; Luna-Ulloa, Luis Bernardo; Coffe, Víctor; Salceda, Rocío

    2008-07-01

    Glucose is the main fuel for energy metabolism in retina. The regulatory mechanisms that maintain glucose homeostasis in retina could include hormonal action. Retinopathy is one of the chemical manifestations of long-standing diabetes mellitus. In order to better understand the effect of hyperglycemia in retina, we studied glycogen content as well as glycogen synthase and phosphorylase activities in both normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat retina and compared them with other tissues. Glycogen levels in normal rat retina are low (46 +/- 4.0 nmol glucosyl residues/mg protein). However, high specific activity of glycogen synthase was found in retina, indicating a substantial capacity for glycogen synthesis. In diabetic rats, glycogen synthase activity increased between 50% and 100% in retina, brain cortex and liver of diabetic rats, but only retina exhibited an increase in glycogen content. Although, total and phosphorylated glycogen synthase levels were similar in normal and diabetic retina, activation of glycogen synthase by glucose-6-P was remarkable increased. Glycogen phosphorylase activity decreased 50% in the liver of diabetic animals; it was not modified in the other tissues examined. We conclude that the increase in glycogen levels in diabetic retina was due to alterations in glycogen synthase regulation.

  9. A 13CO2 breath test for liver glycogen oxidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A. Tanis

    2003-01-01

    textabstractIn conclusion we developed a model to monitor the oxidation of liver glycogen. Our studies showed that it was possible to label the liver glycogen with naturally 13C-enriched carbohydrate and to monitor its oxidation. 13C-enriched muscle glycogen did not interfere with the test within

  10. Relationship between single nucleotide polymorphism of glycogen synthase gene of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas and its glycogen content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Siwei; Li, Qi; Yu, Hong; Kong, Lingfeng

    2017-02-01

    Glycogen is important not only for the energy supplementary of oysters, but also for human consumption. High glycogen content can improve the stress survival of oyster. A key enzyme in glycogenesis is glycogen synthase that is encoded by glycogen synthase gene GYS. In this study, the relationship between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in coding regions of Crassostrea gigas GYS (Cg-GYS) and individual glycogen content was investigated with 321 individuals from five full-sib families. Single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) procedure was combined with sequencing to confirm individual SNP genotypes of Cg-GYS. Least-square analysis of variance was performed to assess the relationship of variation in glycogen content of C. gigas with single SNP genotype and SNP haplotype. As a consequence, six SNPs were found in coding regions to be significantly associated with glycogen content ( P polymorphism on the glycogen content and provided molecular biological information for the selective breeding of good quality traits of C. gigas.

  11. Molecular Structure of Human-Liver Glycogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Deng

    Full Text Available Glycogen is a highly branched glucose polymer which is involved in maintaining blood-sugar homeostasis. Liver glycogen contains large composite α particles made up of linked β particles. Previous studies have shown that the binding which links β particles into α particles is impaired in diabetic mice. The present study reports the first molecular structural characterization of human-liver glycogen from non-diabetic patients, using transmission electron microscopy for morphology and size-exclusion chromatography for the molecular size distribution; the latter is also studied as a function of time during acid hydrolysis in vitro, which is sensitive to certain structural features, particularly glycosidic vs. proteinaceous linkages. The results are compared with those seen in mice and pigs. The molecular structural change during acid hydrolysis is similar in each case, and indicates that the linkage of β into α particles is not glycosidic. This result, and the similar morphology in each case, together imply that human liver glycogen has similar molecular structure to those of mice and pigs. This knowledge will be useful for future diabetes drug targets.

  12. Molecular Structure of Human-Liver Glycogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Bin; Sullivan, Mitchell A.; Chen, Cheng; Li, Jialun; Powell, Prudence O.; Hu, Zhenxia; Gilbert, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen is a highly branched glucose polymer which is involved in maintaining blood-sugar homeostasis. Liver glycogen contains large composite α particles made up of linked β particles. Previous studies have shown that the binding which links β particles into α particles is impaired in diabetic mice. The present study reports the first molecular structural characterization of human-liver glycogen from non-diabetic patients, using transmission electron microscopy for morphology and size-exclusion chromatography for the molecular size distribution; the latter is also studied as a function of time during acid hydrolysis in vitro, which is sensitive to certain structural features, particularly glycosidic vs. proteinaceous linkages. The results are compared with those seen in mice and pigs. The molecular structural change during acid hydrolysis is similar in each case, and indicates that the linkage of β into α particles is not glycosidic. This result, and the similar morphology in each case, together imply that human liver glycogen has similar molecular structure to those of mice and pigs. This knowledge will be useful for future diabetes drug targets. PMID:26934359

  13. Pregnancies in glycogen storage disease type Ia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, Danielle H. J.; Rake, Jan Peter; Schwarz, Martin; Ullrich, Kurt; Weinstein, David A.; Merkel, Martin; Sauer, Pieter J. J.; Smit, G. Peter A.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Reports on pregnancies in women with glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia) are scarce. Because of improved life expectancy, pregnancy is becoming an important issue. We describe 15 pregnancies by focusing on dietary treatment, biochemical parameters, and GSD-Ia complications. STUDY DE

  14. Epinephrine-stimulated glycogen breakdown activates glycogen synthase and increases insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in epitrochlearis muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolnes, Anders J; Birk, Jesper B; Eilertsen, Einar; Stuenæs, Jorid T; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen F P; Jensen, Jørgen

    2015-02-01

    Epinephrine increases glycogen synthase (GS) phosphorylation and decreases GS activity but also stimulates glycogen breakdown, and low glycogen content normally activates GS. To test the hypothesis that glycogen content directly regulates GS phosphorylation, glycogen breakdown was stimulated in condition with decreased GS activation. Saline or epinephrine (0.02 mg/100 g rat) was injected subcutaneously in Wistar rats (∼130 g) with low (24-h-fasted), normal (normal diet), and high glycogen content (fasted-refed), and epitrochlearis muscles were removed after 3 h and incubated ex vivo, eliminating epinephrine action. Epinephrine injection reduced glycogen content in epitrochlearis muscles with high (120.7 ± 17.8 vs. 204.6 ± 14.5 mmol/kg, P < 0.01) and normal glycogen (89.5 ± 7.6 vs. 152 ± 8.1 mmol/kg, P < 0.01), but not significantly in muscles with low glycogen (90.0 ± 5.0 vs. 102.8 ± 7.8 mmol/kg, P = 0.17). In saline-injected rats, GS phosphorylation at sites 2+2a, 3a+3b, and 1b was higher and GS activity lower in muscles with high compared with low glycogen. GS sites 2+2a and 3a+3b phosphorylation decreased and GS activity increased in muscles where epinephrine decreased glycogen content; these parameters were unchanged in epitrochlearis from fasted rats where epinephrine injection did not decrease glycogen content. Incubation with insulin decreased GS site 3a+3b phosphorylation independently of glycogen content. Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake was increased in muscles where epinephrine injection decreased glycogen content. In conclusion, epinephrine stimulates glycogenolysis in epitrochlearis muscles with normal and high, but not low, glycogen content. Epinephrine-stimulated glycogenolysis decreased GS phosphorylation and increased GS activity. These data for the first time document direct regulation of GS phosphorylation by glycogen content. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Characterization of the highly branched glycogen from the thermoacidophilic red microalga Galdieria sulphuraria and comparison with other glycogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez-Garcia, Marta; Stuart, Marc C A; van der Maarel, Marc J E C

    2016-01-01

    The thermoacidophilic red microalga Galdieria sulphuraria synthesizes glycogen when growing under heterotrophic conditions. Structural characterization revealed that G. sulphuraria glycogen is the most highly branched glycogen described to date, with 18% of α-(1→6) linkages. Moreover, it differs fro

  16. Inhibiting Glycogen Synthesis Prevents Lafora Disease in a Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederson, Bartholomew A.; Turnbull, Julie; Epp, Jonathan R.; Weaver, Staci A.; Zhao, Xiaochu; Pencea, Nela; Roach, Peter J.; Frankland, Paul; Ackerley, Cameron A.; Minassian, Berge A.

    2013-01-01

    Lafora disease (LD) is a fatal progressive myoclonus epilepsy characterized neuropathologically by aggregates of abnormally structured glycogen and proteins (Lafora bodies, LB), and neurodegeneration. Whether LB could be prevented by inhibiting glycogen synthesis and whether they are pathogenic remain uncertain. We genetically eliminated brain glycogen synthesis in LD mice. This resulted in long-term prevention of LB formation, neurodegeneration, and seizure susceptibility. This study establishes that glycogen synthesis is requisite for LB formation and that LB are pathogenic. It opens a therapeutic window for potential treatments in LD with known and future small molecule inhibitors of glycogen synthesis. PMID:23913475

  17. Effect of oat bran on time to exhaustion, glycogen content and serum cytokine profile following exhaustive exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frollini Anelena B

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of oat bran supplementation on time to exhaustion, glycogen stores and cytokines in rats submitted to training. The animals were divided into 3 groups: sedentary control group (C, an exercise group that received a control chow (EX and an exercise group that received a chow supplemented with oat bran (EX-O. Exercised groups were submitted to an eight weeks swimming training protocol. In the last training session, the animals performed exercise to exhaustion, (e.g. incapable to continue the exercise. After the euthanasia of the animals, blood, muscle and hepatic tissue were collected. Plasma cytokines and corticosterone were evaluated. Glycogen concentrations was measured in the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles, and liver. Glycogen synthetase-α gene expression was evaluated in the soleus muscle. Statistical analysis was performed using a factorial ANOVA. Time to exhaustion of the EX-O group was 20% higher (515 ± 3 minutes when compared with EX group (425 ± 3 minutes (p = 0.034. For hepatic glycogen, the EX-O group had a 67% higher concentrations when compared with EX (p = 0.022. In the soleus muscle, EX-O group presented a 59.4% higher glycogen concentrations when compared with EX group (p = 0.021. TNF-α was decreased, IL-6, IL-10 and corticosterone increased after exercise, and EX-O presented lower levels of IL-6, IL-10 and corticosterone levels in comparison with EX group. It was concluded that the chow rich in oat bran increase muscle and hepatic glycogen concentrations. The higher glycogen storage may improve endurance performance during training and competitions, and a lower post-exercise inflammatory response can accelerate recovery.

  18. TO STORES USERS

    CERN Multimedia

    SPL Division

    2001-01-01

    Stores users are informed that the Stores (Central, Emergency window, Raw materials, Chemical products and Prévessin Self service stores) will be closed on Friday, 7 December owing to migration of the Stores computers to Windows 2000. Thank you for your understanding.

  19. Functional significance of brain glycogen in sustaining glutamatergic neurotransmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sickmann, Helle M; Walls, Anne B; Schousboe, Arne

    2009-01-01

    The involvement of brain glycogen in sustaining neuronal activity has previously been demonstrated. However, to what extent energy derived from glycogen is consumed by astrocytes themselves or is transferred to the neurons in the form of lactate for oxidative metabolism to proceed is at present...... in co-cultures of cerebellar neurons and astrocytes. In the astrocytes it was shown that uptake of the glutamate analogue D-[3H]aspartate was impaired when glycogen degradation was inhibited irrespective of the presence of glucose, signifying that energy derived from glycogen degradation is important...... for the astrocytic compartment. By inhibiting glycogen degradation in co-cultures it was evident that glycogen provides energy to sustain glutamatergic neurotransmission, i.e. release and uptake of glutamate. The relocation of glycogen derived lactate to the neuronal compartment was investigated by employing d...

  20. Glycogen and Glucose Metabolism Are Essential for Early Embryonic Development of the Red Flour Beetle Tribolium castaneum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, Amanda; Ribeiro, Lupis; Lobato, Mariana; Santos, Vitória; Silva, José Roberto; Gomes, Helga; da Cunha Moraes, Jorge Luiz; de Souza Menezes, Jackson

    2013-01-01

    Control of energy metabolism is an essential process for life. In insects, egg formation (oogenesis) and embryogenesis is dependent on stored molecules deposited by the mother or transcribed later by the zygote. In oviparous insects the egg becomes an isolated system after egg laying with all energy conversion taking place during embryogenesis. Previous studies in a few vector species showed a strong correlation of key morphogenetic events and changes in glucose metabolism. Here, we investigate glycogen and glucose metabolism in the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum, an insect amenable to functional genomic studies. To examine the role of the key enzymes on glycogen and glucose regulation we cloned and analyzed the function of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) and hexokinase (HexA) genes during T. castaneum embryogenesis. Expression analysis via in situ hybridization shows that both genes are expressed only in the embryonic tissue, suggesting that embryonic and extra-embryonic cells display different metabolic activities. dsRNA adult female injection (parental RNAi) of both genes lead a reduction in egg laying and to embryonic lethality. Morphological analysis via DAPI stainings indicates that early development is impaired in Tc-GSK-3 and Tc-HexA1 RNAi embryos. Importantly, glycogen levels are upregulated after Tc-GSK-3 RNAi and glucose levels are upregulated after Tc-HexA1 RNAi, indicating that both genes control metabolism during embryogenesis and oogenesis, respectively. Altogether our results show that T. castaneum embryogenesis depends on the proper control of glucose and glycogen. PMID:23750237

  1. Glycogen and glucose metabolism are essential for early embryonic development of the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, Amanda; Ribeiro, Lupis; Lobato, Mariana; Santos, Vitória; Silva, José Roberto; Gomes, Helga; da Cunha Moraes, Jorge Luiz; de Souza Menezes, Jackson; de Oliveira, Carlos Jorge Logullo; Campos, Eldo; da Fonseca, Rodrigo Nunes

    2013-01-01

    Control of energy metabolism is an essential process for life. In insects, egg formation (oogenesis) and embryogenesis is dependent on stored molecules deposited by the mother or transcribed later by the zygote. In oviparous insects the egg becomes an isolated system after egg laying with all energy conversion taking place during embryogenesis. Previous studies in a few vector species showed a strong correlation of key morphogenetic events and changes in glucose metabolism. Here, we investigate glycogen and glucose metabolism in the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum, an insect amenable to functional genomic studies. To examine the role of the key enzymes on glycogen and glucose regulation we cloned and analyzed the function of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) and hexokinase (HexA) genes during T. castaneum embryogenesis. Expression analysis via in situ hybridization shows that both genes are expressed only in the embryonic tissue, suggesting that embryonic and extra-embryonic cells display different metabolic activities. dsRNA adult female injection (parental RNAi) of both genes lead a reduction in egg laying and to embryonic lethality. Morphological analysis via DAPI stainings indicates that early development is impaired in Tc-GSK-3 and Tc-HexA1 RNAi embryos. Importantly, glycogen levels are upregulated after Tc-GSK-3 RNAi and glucose levels are upregulated after Tc-HexA1 RNAi, indicating that both genes control metabolism during embryogenesis and oogenesis, respectively. Altogether our results show that T. castaneum embryogenesis depends on the proper control of glucose and glycogen.

  2. Homogenization Theory for a Replenishing Passive Scalar Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter R.KRAMER; Shane R.KEATING

    2009-01-01

    Homogenization theory provides a rigorous framework for calculating the effective diffusivity of a decaying passive scalar field in a turbulent or complex flow.The authors extend this framework to the case where the passive scalar fluctuations ore continuously replenished by a source(and/or sink).The basic structure.of the homogenized equations carries over,but in some eases the homogenized source can involve a non-trivial coupling of the velocity field and the source.The authors derive expressions for the homogenized source term for various multiscale source structures and interpret them physically.

  3. Postexercise repletion of muscle energy stores with fructose or glucose in mixed meals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosset, Robin; Lecoultre, Virgile; Egli, Léonie; Cros, Jérémy; Dokumaci, Ayse Sila; Zwygart, Karin; Boesch, Chris; Kreis, Roland; Schneiter, Philippe; Tappy, Luc

    2017-03-01

    Background: Postexercise nutrition is paramount to the restoration of muscle energy stores by providing carbohydrate and fat as precursors of glycogen and intramyocellular lipid (IMCL) synthesis. Compared with glucose, fructose ingestion results in lower postprandial glucose and higher lactate and triglyceride concentrations. We hypothesized that these differences in substrate concentration would be associated with a different partition of energy stored as IMCLs or glycogen postexercise.Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of isocaloric liquid mixed meals containing fat, protein, and either fructose or glucose on the repletion of muscle energy stores over 24 h after a strenuous exercise session.Design: Eight male endurance athletes (mean ± SEM age: 29 ± 2 y; peak oxygen consumption: 66.8 ± 1.3 mL · kg(-1) · min(-1)) were studied twice. On each occasion, muscle energy stores were first lowered by a combination of a 3-d controlled diet and prolonged exercise. After assessment of glycogen and IMCL concentrations in vastus muscles, subjects rested for 24 h and ingested mixed meals providing fat and protein together with 4.4 g/kg fructose (the fructose condition; FRU) or glucose (the glucose condition; GLU). Postprandial metabolism was assessed over 6 h, and glycogen and IMCL concentrations were measured again after 24 h. Finally, energy metabolism was evaluated during a subsequent exercise session.Results: FRU and GLU resulted in similar IMCL [+2.4 ± 0.4 compared with +2.0 ± 0.6 mmol · kg(-1) wet weight · d(-1); time × condition (mixed-model analysis): P = 0.45] and muscle glycogen (+10.9 ± 0.9 compared with +12.3 ± 1.9 mmol · kg(-1) wet weight · d(-1); time × condition: P = 0.45) repletion. Fructose consumption in FRU increased postprandial net carbohydrate oxidation and decreased net carbohydrate storage (estimating total, muscle, and liver glycogen synthesis) compared with GLU (+117 ± 9 compared with +135 ± 9 g/6 h

  4. Glycogen synthesis is induced in hypoxia by the hypoxia-inducible factor and promotes cancer cell survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joffrey ePelletier

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1, in addition to genetic and epigenetic changes, is largely responsible for alterations in cell metabolism in hypoxic tumor cells. This transcription factor not only favors cell proliferation through the metabolic shift from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis and lactic acid production but also stimulates nutrient supply by mediating adaptive survival mechanisms. In this study we showed that glycogen synthesis is enhanced in non-cancer and cancer cells when exposed to hypoxia, resulting in a large increase in glycogen stores. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the mRNA and protein levels of the first enzyme of glycogenesis, phosphoglucomutase1 (PGM1, were increased in hypoxia. We showed that induction of glycogen storage as well as PGM1 expression were dependent on HIF-1 and HIF-2. We established that hypoxia-induced glycogen stores are rapidly mobilized in cells that are starved of glucose. Glycogenolysis allows these hypoxia-preconditioned cells to confront and survive glucose deprivation. In contrast normoxic control cells exhibit a high rate of cell death following glucose removal. These findings point to the important role of hypoxia and HIF in inducing mechanisms of rapid adaptation and survival in response to a decrease in oxygen tension. We propose that a decrease in pO2 acts as an alarm that prepares the cells to face subsequent nutrient depletion and to survive.

  5. Epinephrine-stimulated glycogen breakdown activates glycogen synthase and increases insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in epitrochlearis muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolnes, Anders J; Birk, Jesper Bratz; Eilertsen, Einar

    2015-01-01

    Adrenaline increases glycogen synthase (GS) phosphorylation and decreases GS activity but also stimulates glycogen breakdown and low glycogen content normally activates GS. To test the hypothesis that glycogen content directly regulates GS phosphorylation, glycogen breakdown was stimulated...... in condition with decreased GS activation. Saline or adrenaline (0.02mg/100g rat) was injected subcutaneously in Wistar rats (~130 g) with low (24 h fasted), normal (normal diet) and high glycogen content (fasted-refed) and epitrochlearis muscles were removed after 3 h and incubated ex vivo eliminating...... adrenaline action. Adrenaline injection reduced glycogen content in epitrochlearis muscles with high (120.7±17.8 vs 204.6±14.5 mmol•kg(-1); p

  6. Inventory Replenishment Policy with Time-Varying Demand and Shortages Considering Time-Varying Costs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, a generalized EOQ model is developed with time-varying demand and shortages considering time-varying costs. The solution procedure is shown for determining the op timal replenishment policy over a finite time horizon during which the replenishment periods are assumed to be constant. The existence and uniqueness of the optimal replenishment policy are pre sented. The procedure is illustrated with two special cases of linear and non-linear demands and costs. Two numerical examples are also given.

  7. Is replenishment of the readily releasable pool associated with vesicular movement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Loc; Glavinović, Mladen I

    2014-04-01

    At the excitatory synapse of rat hippocampus the short-term synaptic depression observed during long high-frequency stimulation is associated with slower replenishment of the readily-releasable pool. Given that the replenishment rate is also not [Ca(++)]o sensitive this puts into question a widely held notion that the vesicles-constrained by the cytoskeleton and rendered free from such constraints by Ca(++) entry that renders them more mobile-are important in the replenishment of the readily-releasable pool. This raises a question-Is vesicular replenishment of the readily releasable pool associated with significant movement? To answer this question we evaluated how okadaic acid and staurosporine (compounds known to affect vesicular mobility) influence the replenishment rate. We used patterned stimulation on the Schaffer collateral fiber pathway and recorded the excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCs) from rat CA1 neurons, in the absence and presence of these drugs. The parameters of a circuit model with two vesicular pools were estimated by minimizing the squared difference between the ESPC amplitudes and simulated model output. [Ca(2+)]o did not influence the progressive decrease of the replenishment rate during long, high frequency stimulation. Okadaic acid did not significantly affect any parameters of the vesicular storage and release system, including the replenishment rate. Staurosporine reduced the replenishment coupling, but not the replenishment rate, and this is owing to the fact that it also reduces the ability of the readily releasable pool to contain quanta. Moreover, these compounds were ineffective in influencing how the replenishment rate decreases during long, high frequency stimulation. In conclusion at the excitatory synapses of rat hippocampus the replenishment of the readily releasable pool does not appear to be associated with a significant vesicular movement, and during long high frequency stimulation [Ca(++)]o does not influence the

  8. BASD: SIRTF Telescope Instrument Changeout and Cryogen Replenishment (STICCR) study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mord, A. J.; Urbach, A. R.; Poyer, M. E.; Andreozzi, L. C.; Hermanson, L. A.; Snyder, H. A.; Blalock, W. R.; Haight, R. P.

    1985-01-01

    The Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) is a long-life cryogenically cooled space-based telescope for infrared astronomy from 2 micrometer to 700 miocrometers currently under study by NASA-ARC, and planned for launch in approximately the mid 90's. SIRTF will operate as a multi-user facility, initially carrying 3 instruments at the focal plane. It will be cooled to below 2 K by superfluid liquid helium to achieve radiometric sensitivity limited only by the statistical fluctuations in the natural infrared background radiation over most of its spectral range. The lifetime of the mission will be limited by the lifetime of the liquid helium supply, and is currently baselined to be 2 years. The telescope changes required to allow in-space replenishment of the 2,000 liter superfluid helium tank are investigated. A preliminary design for the space services equipment is also developed. The impacts of basing the equipment and servicing on the space station are investigated. Space replenishment and changeout of instruments requires changes to the telescope design and preliminary concepts are presented.

  9. Self-Replenishing Vascularized Fouling-Release Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, C; Vu, TL; Lin, JJ; Kolle, S; Juthani, N; Watson, E; Weaver, JC; Alvarenga, J; Aizenberg, J

    2014-08-13

    Inspired by the long-term effectiveness of living antifouling materials, we have developed a method for the self-replenishment of synthetic biofouling-release surfaces. These surfaces are created by either molding or directly embedding 3D vascular systems into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and filling them with a silicone oil to generate a nontoxic oil-infused material. When replenished with silicone oil from an outside source, these materials are capable of self-lubrication and continuous renewal of the interfacial fouling-release layer. Under accelerated lubricant loss conditions, fully infused vascularized samples retained significantly more lubricant than equivalent nonvascularized controls. Tests of lubricant-infused PDMS in static cultures of the infectious bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli as well as the green microalgae Botryococcus braunii, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Dunaliella sauna, and Nannochloropsis oculata showed a significant reduction in biofilm adhesion compared to PDMS and glass controls containing no lubricant. Further experiments on vascularized versus nonvascularized samples that had been subjected to accelerated lubricant evaporation conditions for up to 48 h showed significantly less biofilm adherence on the vascularized surfaces. These results demonstrate the ability of an embedded lubricant-filled vascular network to improve the longevity of fouling-release surfaces.

  10. SIRTF Telescope Instrument Changeout and Cryogen Replenishment (STICCR) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nast, T. C.; Frank, D.; Liu, C. K.; Parmley, R. T.; Jaekle, D.; Builteman, H.; Schmidt, J.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1985-01-01

    The Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) is a long-life cryogenically cooled space-based telescope for infrared astronomy from 2 to 700 micrometers. SIRTF is currently under study by NASA-ARC (Reference AP) and planned for launch in approximately the mid 1990s. SIRTF will operate as a multiuser facility, initially carrying three instruments at the focal plane. It will be cooled to below 2 K by superfluid liquid helium to achieve radiometric sensitivity limited only by the statistical fluctuations in the natural infrared background radiation over most of its spectral range. The lifetime of the mission will be limited by the lifetime of the liquid helium supply, and baseline is currently to be 2 years. The telescope changes required to allow in-space replenishment of the 4,000-L superfluid helium tank was investigated. A preliminary design for the space services equipment was also developed. The impacts of basing the equipment and servicing on the space station were investigated. Space replenishment and changeout of instruments required changes to the telescope design. Preliminary concepts are presented.

  11. Self-replenishing vascularized fouling-release surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Caitlin; Vu, Thy L; Lin, Jennifer J; Kolle, Stefan; Juthani, Nidhi; Watson, Emily; Weaver, James C; Alvarenga, Jack; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2014-08-13

    Inspired by the long-term effectiveness of living antifouling materials, we have developed a method for the self-replenishment of synthetic biofouling-release surfaces. These surfaces are created by either molding or directly embedding 3D vascular systems into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and filling them with a silicone oil to generate a nontoxic oil-infused material. When replenished with silicone oil from an outside source, these materials are capable of self-lubrication and continuous renewal of the interfacial fouling-release layer. Under accelerated lubricant loss conditions, fully infused vascularized samples retained significantly more lubricant than equivalent nonvascularized controls. Tests of lubricant-infused PDMS in static cultures of the infectious bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli as well as the green microalgae Botryococcus braunii, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Dunaliella salina, and Nannochloropsis oculata showed a significant reduction in biofilm adhesion compared to PDMS and glass controls containing no lubricant. Further experiments on vascularized versus nonvascularized samples that had been subjected to accelerated lubricant evaporation conditions for up to 48 h showed significantly less biofilm adherence on the vascularized surfaces. These results demonstrate the ability of an embedded lubricant-filled vascular network to improve the longevity of fouling-release surfaces.

  12. Desert shrub stemflow and its significance in soil moisture replenishment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X.-P. Wang

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Stemflow of xerophytic shrubs represents a significant component of water replenishment to the soil-root system influencing water utilization of plant roots at the stand scale, especially in water scarce desert ecosystems. In this study, stemflow of Caragana korshinskii was quantified by an aluminum foil collar collection method on re-vegetated sand dunes of the Shapotou restored desert ecosystem in northwestern China. Time domain reflectometry probes were inserted horizontally at 20 different soil profile depths under the C. korshinskii shrub to monitor soil moisture variation at hourly intervals. Results indicated that 2.2 mm precipitation was necessary for the generation of stemflow for C. korshinskii. Stemflow averaged 8% of the gross precipitation and the average funnelling ratio was as high as 90. The soil moisture in the uppermost soil profile was strongly correlated with individual rainfall and the stemflow strengthened this relationship. Therefore, it is favourable for the infiltrated water redistribution in the deeper soil profile of the root zone. Consequently, stemflow contributes significantly to a positive soil moisture balance in the root zone and the replenishment of soil moisture at deeper soil layers. This plays an important role in plant survival and the general ecology of arid desert environments.

  13. Sediment replenishment: Influence of the geometrical configuration on the morphological evolution of channel-bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battisacco, E.; Franca, M. J.; Schleiss, A. J.

    2016-11-01

    Dams trap sediment in the upstream reservoir, which may lead to river bed armoring, streambank erosion and failure, channel incision and reduction of the morphological diversity in the downstream river reaches. The replenishment of sediment is a mitigation measure for this problem to be applied in river reaches downstream of dams. Previously performed field experiments always used one single volume of sediment replenishment. To explore different alternatives, the replenished volume was here divided in four deposits with the motivation to influence also the morphological evolution downstream. Six different geometrical configurations together with three submergence conditions of sediment replenishment were tested for the first time in a laboratory experiment and are herein discussed. The results of the sediment replenishment mitigation technique are described in terms of occupied surface of the flume bed and the temporal evolution of erosion and transport of the introduced sediments. It is shown that, under our experimental conditions, complete submersion of the replenishment volume results in complete erosion of the placed sediment, with a high persistence of the added material along the channel length. The geometrical configuration of the replenishment volume plays a key role for the evolution of bed-forms downstream. Parallel configurations lead to a wider spread of material across the channel. Alternated configurations are suitable to produce sediment clustering and high persistence of placed material in the channel. Observed periodic mounds, considered as the initiating condition for alternate bars, follow a wavelength related to the length of the replenishment when the replenishment volumes are alternating.

  14. Predicting Commissary Store Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    goods, such as butter, flour , meat and cheese. Commissary pricing for some stores (Offut Air Force Base, Travis Air Force Base and Fort Belvoir...commissary stores worldwide with total sales of $5.9 billion. Commissary stores carry a wide selection of products including grocery, dry goods, meat

  15. NACS Store Planning Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    College Store Journal, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Topics discussed by the NACS Store Planning/Renovation Committees in this updated version of the college store renovation manual include: short- and long-range planning, financial considerations, professional planning assistance, the store's image and business character, location considerations, building requirements, space requirements, fixtures,…

  16. Qualitative and Quantitative Analyses of Glycogen in Human Milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui-Yatsuhashi, Hiroko; Furuyashiki, Takashi; Takata, Hiroki; Ishida, Miyuki; Takumi, Hiroko; Kakutani, Ryo; Kamasaka, Hiroshi; Nagao, Saeko; Hirose, Junko; Kuriki, Takashi

    2017-02-22

    Identification as well as a detailed analysis of glycogen in human milk has not been shown yet. The present study confirmed that glycogen is contained in human milk by qualitative and quantitative analyses. High-performance anion exchange chromatography (HPAEC) and high-performance size exclusion chromatography with a multiangle laser light scattering detector (HPSEC-MALLS) were used for qualitative analysis of glycogen in human milk. Quantitative analysis was carried out by using samples obtained from the individual milks. The result revealed that the concentration of human milk glycogen varied depending on the mother's condition-such as the period postpartum and inflammation. The amounts of glycogen in human milk collected at 0 and 1-2 months postpartum were higher than in milk collected at 3-14 months postpartum. In the milk from mothers with severe mastitis, the concentration of glycogen was about 40 times higher than that in normal milk.

  17. High glycogen levels in the hippocampus of patients with epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Mads K; Madsen, Flemming F; Secher, Niels H

    2006-01-01

    biopsies were obtained from pathologic hippocampus (n=19) and from apparently 'normal' cortical grey and white matter. We determined the in vivo brain glycogen level and the activity of glycogen phosphorylase and synthase. Regional differences in glycogen concentration were examined similarly in healthy...... pigs (n=5). In the patients, the glycogen concentration in 'normal' grey and white matter was 5 to 6 mmol/L, but much higher in the hippocampus, 13.1+/-4.3 mmol/L (mean+/-s.d.; P..., glycogen was similarly higher than in grey and white matter. Consequently, in human grey and white matter and, particularly, in the hippocampus of patients with temporal lope epilepsy, glycogen constitutes a large, active energy reserve, which may be of importance for energy provision during sustained...

  18. Human skeletal muscle glycogen utilization in exhaustive exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Joachim; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Schrøder, Henrik Daa

    2011-01-01

    to be influenced by fibre type prior to exercise, as well as carbohydrate availability during the subsequent period of recovery. These findings provide insight into the significance of fibre type-specific compartmentalization of glycogen metabolism in skeletal muscle during exercise and subsequent recovery. .......Although glycogen is known to be heterogeneously distributed within skeletal muscle cells, there is presently little information available about the role of fibre types, utilization and resynthesis during and after exercise with respect to glycogen localization. Here, we tested the hypothesis...... contained more intramyofibrillar and subsarcolemmal glycogen than the latter. In highly glycogen-depleted fibres, the remaining small intermyofibrillar and subsarcolemmal glycogen particles were often found to cluster in groupings. In the recovery period, when the athletes received either a carbohydrate...

  19. Dysfunctional muscle and liver glycogen metabolism in mdx dystrophic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David I Stapleton

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is a severe, genetic muscle wasting disorder characterised by progressive muscle weakness. DMD is caused by mutations in the dystrophin (dmd gene resulting in very low levels or a complete absence of the dystrophin protein, a key structural element of muscle fibres which is responsible for the proper transmission of force. In the absence of dystrophin, muscle fibres become damaged easily during contraction resulting in their degeneration. DMD patients and mdx mice (an animal model of DMD exhibit altered metabolic disturbances that cannot be attributed to the loss of dystrophin directly. We tested the hypothesis that glycogen metabolism is defective in mdx dystrophic mice.Dystrophic mdx mice had increased skeletal muscle glycogen (79%, (P<0.01. Skeletal muscle glycogen synthesis is initiated by glycogenin, the expression of which was increased by 50% in mdx mice (P<0.0001. Glycogen synthase activity was 12% higher (P<0.05 but glycogen branching enzyme activity was 70% lower (P<0.01 in mdx compared with wild-type mice. The rate-limiting enzyme for glycogen breakdown, glycogen phosphorylase, had 62% lower activity (P<0.01 in mdx mice resulting from a 24% reduction in PKA activity (P<0.01. In mdx mice glycogen debranching enzyme expression was 50% higher (P<0.001 together with starch-binding domain protein 1 (219% higher; P<0.01. In addition, mdx mice were glucose intolerant (P<0.01 and had 30% less liver glycogen (P<0.05 compared with control mice. Subsequent analysis of the enzymes dysregulated in skeletal muscle glycogen metabolism in mdx mice identified reduced glycogenin protein expression (46% less; P<0.05 as a possible cause of this phenotype.We identified that mdx mice were glucose intolerant, and had increased skeletal muscle glycogen but reduced amounts of liver glycogen.

  20. The 3T3-L1 adipocyte glycogen proteome

    OpenAIRE

    Stapleton, David; Nelson, Chad; Parsawar, Krishna; Flores-Opazo, Marcelo; McClain, Donald; Parker, Glendon

    2013-01-01

    Background Glycogen is a branched polysaccharide of glucose residues, consisting of α-1-4 glycosidic linkages with α-1-6 branches that together form multi-layered particles ranging in size from 30 nm to 300 nm. Glycogen spatial conformation and intracellular organization are highly regulated processes. Glycogen particles interact with their metabolizing enzymes and are associated with a variety of proteins that intervene in its biology, controlling its structure, particle size and sub-cellula...

  1. Self-Replenishable Anti-Waxing Organogel Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xi; Wu, Shuwang; Chen, Lie; Ju, Jie; Gu, Zhandong; Liu, Mingjie; Wang, Jianjun; Jiang, Lei

    2015-07-27

    Solid deposition, such as the formation of ice on outdoor facilities, the deposition of scale in water reservoirs, the sedimentation of fat, oil, and grease (FOG) in sewer systems, and the precipitation of wax in petroleum pipelines, cause a serious waste of resources and irreversible environmental pollution. Inspired by fish and pitcher plants, we present a self-replenishable organogel material which shows ultra-low adhesion to solidified paraffin wax and crude oil by absorption of low-molar-mass oil from its crude-oil environment. Adhesion of wax on the organogel surface was over 500 times lower than adhesion to conventional material surfaces and the wax was found to slide off under the force of gravity. This design concept of a gel with decreased adhesion to wax and oil can be extended to deal with other solid deposition problems.

  2. Self‐Replenishable Anti‐Waxing Organogel Materials†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xi; Wu, Shuwang; Chen, Lie; Ju, Jie; Gu, Zhandong; Liu, Mingjie; Jiang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Solid deposition, such as the formation of ice on outdoor facilities, the deposition of scale in water reservoirs, the sedimentation of fat, oil, and grease (FOG) in sewer systems, and the precipitation of wax in petroleum pipelines, cause a serious waste of resources and irreversible environmental pollution. Inspired by fish and pitcher plants, we present a self‐replenishable organogel material which shows ultra‐low adhesion to solidified paraffin wax and crude oil by absorption of low‐molar‐mass oil from its crude‐oil environment. Adhesion of wax on the organogel surface was over 500 times lower than adhesion to conventional material surfaces and the wax was found to slide off under the force of gravity. This design concept of a gel with decreased adhesion to wax and oil can be extended to deal with other solid deposition problems. PMID:26083324

  3. Optimal dynamic pricing and replenishment policies for deteriorating items

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Rabbani

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Marketing strategies and proper inventory replenishment policies are often incorporated by enterprises to stimulate demand and maximize profit. The aim of this paper is to represent an integrated model for dynamic pricing and inventory control of deteriorating items. To reflect the dynamic characteristic of the problem, the selling price is defined as a time-dependent function of the initial selling price and the discount rate. In this regard, the price is exponentially discounted to compensate negative impact of the deterioration. The planning horizon is assumed to be infinite and the deterioration rate is time-dependent. In addition to price, the demand rate is dependent on advertisement as a powerful marketing tool. Several theoretical results and an iterative solution algorithm are developed to provide the optimal solution. Finally, to show validity of the model and illustrate the solution procedure, numerical results are presented.

  4. Effects of Breakdown, Backlog and Rework on Replenishment Lot Size

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsu-Ming Yeh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This study studies the effects of machine breakdown, backlog and rework on the replenishment lot size. In real-life manufacturing systems, random defective rate and breakdown of equipment are inevitable. When backlogging is permitted during a production run, a random machine failure may take place either in backlog filling stage or in inventory piling time; this study focuses on the former situation and considers all defective items produced are repairable through a rework process. The objective of this study is to determine the optimal run time that minimizes the long-run average production-inventory costs. The result can be directly applied to the practical production planning and control field to assist practitioner in production management cost reduction.

  5. Larger female fish contribute disproportionately more to self-replenishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beldade, R; Holbrook, S J; Schmitt, R J; Planes, S; Malone, D; Bernardi, G

    2012-06-07

    While chance events, oceanography and selective pressures inject stochasticity into the replenishment of marine populations with dispersing life stages, some determinism may arise as a result of characteristics of breeding individuals. It is well known that larger females have higher fecundity, and recent laboratory studies have shown that maternal traits such as age and size can be positively associated with offspring growth, size and survival. Whether such fecundity and maternal effects translate into higher recruitment in marine populations remains largely unanswered. We studied a population of Amphiprion chrysopterus (orange-fin anemonefish) in Moorea, French Polynesia, to test whether maternal size influenced the degree of self-recruitment on the island through body size-fecundity and/or additional size-related maternal effects of offspring. We non-lethally sampled 378 adult and young juveniles at Moorea, and, through parentage analysis, identified the mothers of 27 self-recruits (SRs) out of 101 recruits sampled. We also identified the sites occupied by each mother of an SR and, taking into account variation in maternal size among sites, we found that females that produced SRs were significantly larger than those that did not (approx. 7% greater total length, approx. 20% greater biomass). Our analyses further reveal that the contribution of larger females to self-recruitment was significantly greater than expected on the basis of the relationship between body size and fecundity, indicating that there were important maternal effects of female size on traits of their offspring. These results show, for the first time in a natural population, that larger female fish contribute more to local replenishment (self-recruitment) and, more importantly, that size-specific fecundity alone could not explain the disparity.

  6. Muscle glycogen and cell function - Location, location, location

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørtenblad, N; Nielsen, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    , and immobilization. Furthermore, these defined pools may serve specific functions in the cell. Specifically, reduced levels of these pools of glycogen are associated with reduced SR Ca(2+) release, muscle relaxation rate, and membrane excitability. Collectively, the available literature strongly demonstrates...... that the subcellular localization of glycogen has to be considered to fully understand the role of glycogen metabolism and signaling in skeletal muscle function. Here, we propose that the effect of low muscle glycogen on excitation-contraction coupling may serve as a built-in mechanism, which links the energetic state...

  7. Intracellular compartmentalization of skeletal muscle glycogen metabolism and insulin signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prats Gavalda, Clara; Gomez-Cabello, Alba; Vigelsø Hansen, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The interest in skeletal muscle metabolism and insulin signalling has increased exponentially in recent years as a consequence of their role in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Despite this, the exact mechanisms involved in the regulation of skeletal muscle glycogen metabolism...... compartmentalization in the regulation of skeletal muscle glycogen metabolism and insulin signalling. As a result, a hypothetical regulatory mechanism is proposed by which cells could direct glycogen resynthesis towards different pools of glycogen particles depending on the metabolic needs. Furthermore, we discuss...... the role of skeletal muscle transverse tubules as potential modulators of tissue insulin responsiveness....

  8. Effect of carbohydrate-protein supplementation postexercise on rat muscle glycogen synthesis and phosphorylation of proteins controlling glucose storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Daisuke; Morrison, Paul J; Ding, Zhenping; Ivy, John L

    2011-10-01

    To examine whether addition of protein to a carbohydrate supplement enhances muscle glycogen synthesis, we compared the muscle glycogen concentrations of rats that had been depleted of their muscle glycogen stores with a 3-hour swim and immediately supplemented with a placebo (Con), carbohydrate (CHO), or carbohydrate plus protein supplement (C+P). Rats were given either 0.9 g carbohydrate per kilogram body mass for the CHO group or 0.9 g carbohydrate + 0.3 g protein per kilogram body mass for the C+P groups. Muscle samples of the red and white quadriceps were excised immediately, 30 minutes, or 90 minutes postexercise. Glycogen concentration of the C+P group was greater than that of the CHO group at 90 minutes postexercise in both red (C+P, 28.3 ± 2.6 µmol/g vs CHO, 22.4 ± 2.0 µmol/g; P Protein kinase B phosphorylation was greater in the C+P-30 group (the number following treatment group abbreviation refers to time [in minutes] of euthanasia following exercise) than the sedentary control and exercised control groups in red quadriceps at 30 minutes and in white quadriceps at 90 minutes postexercise. This difference was not observed in the CHO group. Phosphorylation of glycogen synthase was significantly reduced 30 minutes postexercise and returned to baseline levels by 90 minutes postexercise in both CHO- and C+P-supplemented groups, with no difference between supplements. These results demonstrated that the addition of protein to a carbohydrate supplement will enhance the rate of muscle glycogen restoration postexercise and may involve facilitation of the glucose transport process.

  9. Glutamate Cysteine Ligase—Modulatory Subunit Knockout Mouse Shows Normal Insulin Sensitivity but Reduced Liver Glycogen Storage

    KAUST Repository

    Lavoie, Suzie

    2016-04-21

    Glutathione (GSH) deficits have been observed in several mental or degenerative illness, and so has the metabolic syndrome. The impact of a decreased glucose metabolism on the GSH system is well-known, but the effect of decreased GSH levels on the energy metabolism is unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the sensitivity to insulin in the mouse knockout (KO) for the modulatory subunit of the glutamate cysteine ligase (GCLM), the rate-limiting enzyme of GSH synthesis. Compared to wildtype (WT) mice, GCLM-KO mice presented with reduced basal plasma glucose and insulin levels. During an insulin tolerance test, GCLM-KO mice showed a normal fall in glycemia, indicating normal insulin secretion. However, during the recovery phase, plasma glucose levels remained lower for longer in KO mice despite normal plasma glucagon levels. This is consistent with a normal counterregulatory hormonal response but impaired mobilization of glucose from endogenous stores. Following a resident-intruder stress, during which stress hormones mobilize glucose from hepatic glycogen stores, KO mice showed a lower hyperglycemic level despite higher plasma cortisol levels when compared to WT mice. The lower hepatic glycogen levels observed in GCLM-KO mice could explain the impaired glycogen mobilization following induced hypoglycemia. Altogether, our results indicate that reduced liver glycogen availability, as observed in GCLM-KO mice, could be at the origin of their lower basal and challenged glycemia. Further studies will be necessary to understand how a GSH deficit, typically observed in GCLM-KO mice, leads to a deficit in liver glycogen storage.

  10. Glutamate cysteine ligase – modulatory subunit knockout mouse shows normal insulin sensitivity but reduced liver glycogen storage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzie eLavoie

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione (GSH deficits have been observed in several mental or degenerative illness, and so has the metabolic syndrome. The impact of a decreased glucose metabolism on the GSH system is well known, but the effect of decreased GSH levels on the energy metabolism is unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the sensitivity to insulin in the mouse knockout (KO for the modulatory subunit of the glutamate cysteine ligase (GCLM, the rate-limiting enzyme of GSH synthesis. Compared to wildtype (WT mice, GCLM-KO mice presented with reduced basal plasma glucose and insulin levels. During an insulin tolerance test, GCLM-KO mice showed a normal fall in glycemia, indicating normal insulin secretion. However, during the recovery phase, plasma glucose levels remained lower for longer in KO mice despite normal plasma glucagon levels. This is consistent with a normal counterregulatory hormonal response but impaired mobilization of glucose from endogenous stores. Following a resident-intruder stress, during which stress hormones mobilize glucose from hepatic glycogen stores, KO mice showed a lower hyperglycemic level despite higher plasma cortisol levels when compared to WT mice. The lower hepatic glycogen levels observed in GCLM-KO mice could explain the impaired glycogen mobilisation following induced hypoglycemia. Altogether, our results indicate that reduced liver glycogen availability, as observed in GCLM-KO mice, could be at the origin of their lower basal and challenged glycemia. Further studies will be necessary to understand how a GSH deficit, typically observed in GCLM-KO mice, leads to a deficit in liver glycogen storage.

  11. An efficient optimal solution method for the joint replenishment problem with minimum order quantities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Porras Musalem (Eric); R. Dekker (Rommert)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractWe study the joint replenishment problem (JRP) for M items under deterministic demand, with a minimum order quantity constraint for each item in the replenishment order. We first study an iterative procedure that proves to be not efficient in this case. Further, we derive bounds on the b

  12. Computing the non-stationary replenishment cycle inventory policy under stochastic supplier lead-times

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossi, R.; Tarim, S.A.; Hnich, B.; Prestwich, S.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we address the general multi-period production/inventory problem with non-stationary stochastic demand and supplier lead-time under service level constraints. A replenishment cycle policy (Rn,Sn) is modeled, where Rn is the nth replenishment cycle length and Sn is the respective order-

  13. Glycogen synthesis in human gastrocnemius muscle is not representative of whole-body muscle glycogen synthesis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serlie, M.J.; Haan, J.H.A. de; Tack, C.J.J.; Verberne, H.J.; Ackermans, M.T.; Heerschap, A.; Sauerwein, H.P.

    2005-01-01

    The introduction of 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has enabled noninvasive measurement of muscle glycogen synthesis in humans. Conclusions based on measurements by the MRS technique assume that glucose metabolism in gastrocnemius muscle is representative for all skeletal muscles and thus

  14. Muscular glycogen storage diseases without increased glycogen content on histoplathological examination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksma, M.; den Dunnen, W. F. A.; Niezen-Koning, K. E.; van Diggelen, O. P.; van Spronsen, F. J.

    Histopathological findings of muscle biopsies from five patients with two different muscular glycogen storage diseases (mGSD) were presented. From these investigations it emerged that the yield of histopathology in mGSD is low. In only one of five patients histopathological findings gave a clue

  15. No effect of glycogen level on glycogen metabolism during high intensity exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandenberghe, Katleen; Hespel, P.; Eynde, Bart Vanden;

    1995-01-01

    , either for 1 min 45 s (protocol 1; N = 18) or to exhaustion (protocol 2; N = 14). The exercise tests were preceded by either 5 d on a controlled normal (N) diet, or by 2 d of glycogen-depleting exercise accompanied by the normal diet followed by 3 d on a carbohydrate-rich (CHR) diet. In protocol 1...

  16. Hearing requires otoferlin-dependent efficient replenishment of synaptic vesicles in hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangrsic, Tina; Lasarow, Livia; Reuter, Kirsten; Takago, Hideki; Schwander, Martin; Riedel, Dietmar; Frank, Thomas; Tarantino, Lisa M; Bailey, Janice S; Strenzke, Nicola; Brose, Nils; Müller, Ulrich; Reisinger, Ellen; Moser, Tobias

    2010-07-01

    Inner hair cell ribbon synapses indefatigably transmit acoustic information. The proteins mediating their fast vesicle replenishment (hundreds of vesicles per s) are unknown. We found that an aspartate to glycine substitution in the C(2)F domain of the synaptic vesicle protein otoferlin impaired hearing by reducing vesicle replenishment in the pachanga mouse model of human deafness DFNB9. In vitro estimates of vesicle docking, the readily releasable vesicle pool (RRP), Ca(2+) signaling and vesicle fusion were normal. Moreover, we observed postsynaptic excitatory currents of variable size and spike generation. However, mutant active zones replenished vesicles at lower rates than wild-type ones and sound-evoked spiking in auditory neurons was sparse and only partially improved during longer interstimulus intervals. We conclude that replenishment does not match the release of vesicles at mutant active zones in vivo and a sufficient standing RRP therefore cannot be maintained. We propose that otoferlin is involved in replenishing synaptic vesicles.

  17. Determining Replenishment Lot Size and Shipment Policy for an EPQ Inventory Model with Delivery and Rework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leopoldo Eduardo Cárdenas-Barrón

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The determination of production-shipment policies for a vendor-buyer system is dealt within this paper. The main objective is to derive the optimal replenishment lot size and shipment policy for an EPQ inventory model with multiple deliveries and rework. This inventory model contains two decision variables: the replenishment lot size and the number of deliveries. Previous researches solve this inventory model considering both variables to be continuous. However, the number of deliveries must be considered as a discrete variable. In this direction, this paper solves the inventory model considering two cases: Case 1: the replenishment lot size as a continuous variable and the number of shipments as a discrete variable and Case 2: the replenishment lot size and the number of shipments as discrete variables. The final results are two simple and easy-to-apply solution procedures to find the optimal values for the replenishment lot size and the number of deliveries for each case.

  18. Deficiency of a Glycogen Synthase-associated Protein, Epm2aip1, Causes Decreased Glycogen Synthesis and Hepatic Insulin Resistance*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Julie; Tiberia, Erica; Pereira, Sandra; Zhao, Xiaochu; Pencea, Nela; Wheeler, Anne L.; Yu, Wen Qin; Ivovic, Alexander; Naranian, Taline; Israelian, Nyrie; Draginov, Arman; Piliguian, Mark; Frankland, Paul W.; Wang, Peixiang; Ackerley, Cameron A.; Giacca, Adria; Minassian, Berge A.

    2013-01-01

    Glycogen synthesis is a major component of the insulin response, and defective glycogen synthesis is a major portion of insulin resistance. Insulin regulates glycogen synthase (GS) through incompletely defined pathways that activate the enzyme through dephosphorylation and, more potently, allosteric activation. We identify Epm2aip1 as a GS-associated protein. We show that the absence of Epm2aip1 in mice impairs allosteric activation of GS by glucose 6-phosphate, decreases hepatic glycogen synthesis, increases liver fat, causes hepatic insulin resistance, and protects against age-related obesity. Our work identifies a novel GS-associated GS activity-modulating component of insulin resistance. PMID:24142699

  19. Hepatic glycogen supercompensation activates AMP-activated protein kinase, impairs insulin signaling, and reduces glycogen deposition in the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winnick, Jason J; An, Zhibo; Ramnanan, Christopher J; Smith, Marta; Irimia, Jose M; Neal, Doss W; Moore, Mary Courtney; Roach, Peter J; Cherrington, Alan D

    2011-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine how increasing the hepatic glycogen content would affect the liver's ability to take up and metabolize glucose. During the first 4 h of the study, liver glycogen deposition was stimulated by intraportal fructose infusion in the presence of hyperglycemic-normoinsulinemia. This was followed by a 2-h hyperglycemic-normoinsulinemic control period, during which the fructose infusion was stopped, and a 2-h experimental period in which net hepatic glucose uptake (NHGU) and disposition (glycogen, lactate, and CO(2)) were measured in the absence of fructose but in the presence of a hyperglycemic-hyperinsulinemic challenge including portal vein glucose infusion. Fructose infusion increased net hepatic glycogen synthesis (0.7 ± 0.5 vs. 6.4 ± 0.4 mg/kg/min; P vs. 100 ± 3 mg/g; P fructose infusion group) did not alter NHGU, but it reduced the percent of NHGU directed to glycogen (79 ± 4 vs. 55 ± 6; P vs. 29 ± 5; P = 0.01) and oxidation (9 ± 3 vs. 16 ± 3; P = NS). This change was associated with increased AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation, diminished insulin signaling, and a shift in glycogenic enzyme activity toward a state discouraging glycogen accumulation. These data indicate that increases in hepatic glycogen can generate a state of hepatic insulin resistance, which is characterized by impaired glycogen synthesis despite preserved NHGU.

  20. Glucide metabolism disorders (excluding glycogen myopathies).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepper, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    Glucide metabolism comprises pathways for transport, intermediate metabolism, utilization, and storage of carbohydrates. Defects affect multiple organs and present as systemic diseases. Neurological symptoms result from hypoglycemia, lactic acidosis, or inadequate storage of complex glucide molecules in neurological tissues. In glycogen storage disorders hypoglycemia indicates hepatic involvement, weakness and muscle cramps muscle involvement. Hypoglycemia is also the leading neurological symptom in disorders of gluconeogenesis. Disorders of galactose and fructose metabolism are rare, detectable by neonatal screening, and manifest following dietary intake of these sugars. Rare defects within the pentose metabolism constitute a new area of inborn metabolic disorders and may present with neurological symptoms. Treatment of these disorders involves the avoidance of fasting, dietary treatment eliminating specific carbohydrates, and enzyme replacement therapy in individual glycogen storage diseases.GLUT1 deficiency syndrome, a specific disorder of glucose transport into brain, results in global developmental delay, early-onset epilepsy, and a complex movement disorder. Treatment with a high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet provides ketones as an alternative fuel to the brain and restores brain energy metabolism. Recently paroxysmal exertion-induced dyskinesia and stomatin-deficient cryohydrocytosis have been identified as an allelic disorder to GLUT1 deficiency equally responding to a ketogenic diet. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Information for Stores Users

    CERN Multimedia

    Logistics Group

    2004-01-01

    As the FARNELL Catalogue CAPACITORS, RESISTORS and POTENTIOMETERS have now been integrated into the CERN Stores Catalogue (SCEM Groups 10 and 11) they can now be obtained via an EDH 'Material Request' like any other Stores item. N.B. The Farnell 'Order code' is one of the key-words that make it easier to find items in the Stores Catalogue. Logistics Group FI Department

  2. Brain glucagon-like peptide–1 increases insulin secretion and muscle insulin resistance to favor hepatic glycogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauf, Claude; Cani, Patrice D.; Perrin, Christophe; Iglesias, Miguel A.; Maury, Jean François; Bernard, Elodie; Benhamed, Fadilha; Grémeaux, Thierry; Drucker, Daniel J.; Kahn, C. Ronald; Girard, Jean; Tanti, Jean François; Delzenne, Nathalie M.; Postic, Catherine; Burcelin, Rémy

    2005-01-01

    Intestinal glucagon-like peptide–1 (GLP-1) is a hormone released into the hepatoportal circulation that stimulates pancreatic insulin secretion. GLP-1 also acts as a neuropeptide to control food intake and cardiovascular functions, but its neural role in glucose homeostasis is unknown. We show that brain GLP-1 controlled whole-body glucose fate during hyperglycemic conditions. In mice undergoing a hyperglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp, icv administration of the specific GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin 9–39 (Ex9) increased muscle glucose utilization and glycogen content. This effect did not require muscle insulin action, as it also occurred in muscle insulin receptor KO mice. Conversely, icv infusion of the GLP-1 receptor agonist exendin 4 (Ex4) reduced insulin-stimulated muscle glucose utilization. In hyperglycemia achieved by i.v. infusion of glucose, icv Ex4, but not Ex9, caused a 4-fold increase in insulin secretion and enhanced liver glycogen storage. However, when glucose was infused intragastrically, icv Ex9 infusion lowered insulin secretion and hepatic glycogen levels, whereas no effects of icv Ex4 were observed. In diabetic mice fed a high-fat diet, a 1-month chronic i.p. Ex9 treatment improved glucose tolerance and fasting glycemia. Our data show that during hyperglycemia, brain GLP-1 inhibited muscle glucose utilization and increased insulin secretion to favor hepatic glycogen stores, preparing efficiently for the next fasting state. PMID:16322793

  3. Brain glucagon-like peptide-1 increases insulin secretion and muscle insulin resistance to favor hepatic glycogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauf, Claude; Cani, Patrice D; Perrin, Christophe; Iglesias, Miguel A; Maury, Jean François; Bernard, Elodie; Benhamed, Fadilha; Grémeaux, Thierry; Drucker, Daniel J; Kahn, C Ronald; Girard, Jean; Tanti, Jean François; Delzenne, Nathalie M; Postic, Catherine; Burcelin, Rémy

    2005-12-01

    Intestinal glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a hormone released into the hepatoportal circulation that stimulates pancreatic insulin secretion. GLP-1 also acts as a neuropeptide to control food intake and cardiovascular functions, but its neural role in glucose homeostasis is unknown. We show that brain GLP-1 controlled whole-body glucose fate during hyperglycemic conditions. In mice undergoing a hyperglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp, icv administration of the specific GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin 9-39 (Ex9) increased muscle glucose utilization and glycogen content. This effect did not require muscle insulin action, as it also occurred in muscle insulin receptor KO mice. Conversely, icv infusion of the GLP-1 receptor agonist exendin 4 (Ex4) reduced insulin-stimulated muscle glucose utilization. In hyperglycemia achieved by i.v. infusion of glucose, icv Ex4, but not Ex9, caused a 4-fold increase in insulin secretion and enhanced liver glycogen storage. However, when glucose was infused intragastrically, icv Ex9 infusion lowered insulin secretion and hepatic glycogen levels, whereas no effects of icv Ex4 were observed. In diabetic mice fed a high-fat diet, a 1-month chronic i.p. Ex9 treatment improved glucose tolerance and fasting glycemia. Our data show that during hyperglycemia, brain GLP-1 inhibited muscle glucose utilization and increased insulin secretion to favor hepatic glycogen stores, preparing efficiently for the next fasting state.

  4. Single fiber analyses of glycogen-related proteins reveal their differential association with glycogen in rat skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Robyn M; Xu, Hongyang; Latchman, Heidy; Larkins, Noni T; Gooley, Paul R; Stapleton, David I

    2012-12-01

    To understand how glycogen affects skeletal muscle physiology, we examined enzymes essential for muscle glycogen synthesis and degradation using single fibers from quiescent and stimulated rat skeletal muscle. Presenting a shift in paradigm, we show these proteins are differentially associated with glycogen granules. Protein diffusibility and/or abundance of glycogenin, glycogen branching enzyme (GBE), debranching enzyme (GDE), phosphorylase (GP), and synthase (GS) were examined in fibers isolated from rat fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and slow-twitch soleus (SOL) muscle. GDE and GP proteins were more abundant (~10- to 100-fold) in fibers from EDL compared with SOL muscle. GS and glycogenin proteins were similar between muscles while GBE had an approximately fourfold greater abundance in SOL muscle. Mechanically skinned fibers exposed to physiological buffer for 10 min showed ~70% total pools of GBE and GP were diffusible (nonbound), whereas GDE and GS were considerably less diffusible. Intense in vitro stimulation, sufficient to elicit a ~50% decrease in intracellular glycogen, increased diffusibility of GDE, GP, and GS (~15-60%) and decreased GBE diffusibility (~20%). Amylase treatment, which breaks α-1,4 linkages of glycogen, indicated differential diffusibilities and hence glycogen associations of GDE and GS. Membrane solubilization (1% Triton-X-100) allowed a small additional amount of GDE and GS to diffuse from fibers, suggesting the majority of nonglycogen-associated GDE/GS is associated with myofibrillar/contractile network of muscle rather than membranes. Given differences in enzymes required for glycogen metabolism, the current findings suggest glycogen particles have fiber-type-dependent structures. The greater catabolic potential of glycogen breakdown in fast-twitch fibers may account for different contraction induced rates of glycogen utilization.

  5. Glycogen-rich clear cell carcinoma of the breast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Paulsen, S M

    1987-01-01

    The light microscopic, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural features of a clear cell carcinoma of the breast have been studied. Both intraductal and invasive components were found. Histochemistry showed large amounts of intracytoplasmic glycogen and sparse neutral mucin in the tumour. The tumo...... was classified as a mucin-containing variant of glycogen-rich, clear cell carcinoma of the breast....

  6. RENAL COMPLICATIONS IN GLYCOGEN-STORAGE-DISEASE TYPE-I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    REITSMABIERENS, WCC

    1993-01-01

    Deficiency of the enzyme glucose-6-phosphatase is the biochemical defect in glycogen storage disease type I (GSD I). Normally this enzyme is present in the liver, intestine and kidneys. The lack of the enzyme in the kidney makes it obvious that glycogen storage will not be restricted to the liver bu

  7. Prolyl hydroxylase 2 inactivation enhances glycogen storage and promotes excessive neutrophilic responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadiku, Pranvera; Willson, Joseph A; Dickinson, Rebecca S; Murphy, Fiona; Harris, Alison J; Lewis, Amy; Sammut, David; Mirchandani, Ananda S; Ryan, Eilise; Watts, Emily R; Thompson, A A Roger; Marriott, Helen M; Dockrell, David H; Taylor, Cormac T; Schneider, Martin; Maxwell, Patrick H; Chilvers, Edwin R; Mazzone, Massimilliano; Moral, Veronica; Pugh, Chris W; Ratcliffe, Peter J; Schofield, Christopher J; Ghesquiere, Bart; Carmeliet, Peter; Whyte, Moira Kb; Walmsley, Sarah R

    2017-09-01

    Fully activated innate immune cells are required for effective responses to infection, but their prompt deactivation and removal are essential for limiting tissue damage. Here, we have identified a critical role for the prolyl hydroxylase enzyme Phd2 in maintaining the balance between appropriate, predominantly neutrophil-mediated pathogen clearance and resolution of the innate immune response. We demonstrate that myeloid-specific loss of Phd2 resulted in an exaggerated inflammatory response to Streptococcus pneumonia, with increases in neutrophil motility, functional capacity, and survival. These enhanced neutrophil responses were dependent upon increases in glycolytic flux and glycogen stores. Systemic administration of a HIF-prolyl hydroxylase inhibitor replicated the Phd2-deficient phenotype of delayed inflammation resolution. Together, these data identify Phd2 as the dominant HIF-hydroxylase in neutrophils under normoxic conditions and link intrinsic regulation of glycolysis and glycogen stores to the resolution of neutrophil-mediated inflammatory responses. These results demonstrate the therapeutic potential of targeting metabolic pathways in the treatment of inflammatory disease.

  8. GLYCOGEN IN BACILLUS-SUBTILIS - MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF AN OPERON ENCODING ENZYMES INVOLVED IN GLYCOGEN BIOSYNTHESIS AND DEGRADATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KIEL, JAKW; BOELS, JM; BELDMAN, G; VENEMA, G

    1994-01-01

    Although it has never been reported that Bacillus subtilis is capable of accumulating glycogen, we have isolated a region from the chromosome of B. subtilis containing a glycogen operon. The operon is located directly downstream from trnB, which maps at 275 degrees on the B. subtilis chromosome. It

  9. The Economics of Groundwater Replenishment for Reliable Urban Water Supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Gao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the potential economic benefits of water banking in aquifers to meet drought and emergency supplies for cities where the population is growing and changing climate has reduced the availability of water. A simplified case study based on the city of Perth, Australia was used to estimate the savings that could be achieved by water banking. Scenarios for investment in seawater desalination plants and groundwater replenishment were considered over a 20 year period of growing demand, using a Monte Carlo analysis that embedded the Markov model. An optimisation algorithm identified the minimum cost solutions that met specified criteria for supply reliability. The impact of depreciation of recharge credits was explored. The results revealed savings of more than A$1B (~US$1B or 37% to 33% of supply augmentation costs by including water banking in aquifers for 95% and 99.5% reliability of supply respectively. When the hypothetically assumed recharge credit depreciation rate was increased from 1% p.a. to 10% p.a. savings were still 33% to 31% for the same reliabilities. These preliminary results show that water banking in aquifers has potential to offer a highly attractive solution for efficiently increasing the security of urban water supplies where aquifers are suitable.

  10. Present and future cell therapies for pancreatic beta cell replenishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Bendala, Juan; Ricordi, Camillo

    2012-12-21

    If only at a small scale, islet transplantation has successfully addressed what ought to be the primary endpoint of any cell therapy: the functional replenishment of damaged tissue in patients. After years of less-than-optimal approaches to immunosuppression, recent advances consistently yield long-term graft survival rates comparable to those of whole pancreas transplantation. Limited organ availability is the main hurdle that stands in the way of the widespread clinical utilization of this pioneering intervention. Progress in stem cell research over the past decade, coupled with our decades-long experience with islet transplantation, is shaping the future of cell therapies for the treatment of diabetes. Here we review the most promising avenues of research aimed at generating an inexhaustible supply of insulin-producing cells for islet regeneration, including the differentiation of pluripotent and multipotent stem cells of embryonic and adult origin along the beta cell lineage and the direct reprogramming of non-endocrine tissues into insulin-producing cells.

  11. Parity Bit Replenishment for JPEG 2000-Based Video Streaming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François-Olivier Devaux

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper envisions coding with side information to design a highly scalable video codec. To achieve fine-grained scalability in terms of resolution, quality, and spatial access as well as temporal access to individual frames, the JPEG 2000 coding algorithm has been considered as the reference algorithm to encode INTRA information, and coding with side information has been envisioned to refresh the blocks that change between two consecutive images of a video sequence. One advantage of coding with side information compared to conventional closed-loop hybrid video coding schemes lies in the fact that parity bits are designed to correct stochastic errors and not to encode deterministic prediction errors. This enables the codec to support some desynchronization between the encoder and the decoder, which is particularly helpful to adapt on the fly pre-encoded content to fluctuating network resources and/or user preferences in terms of regions of interest. Regarding the coding scheme itself, to preserve both quality scalability and compliance to the JPEG 2000 wavelet representation, a particular attention has been devoted to the definition of a practical coding framework able to exploit not only the temporal but also spatial correlation among wavelet subbands coefficients, while computing the parity bits on subsets of wavelet bit-planes. Simulations have shown that compared to pure INTRA-based conditional replenishment solutions, the addition of the parity bits option decreases the transmission cost in terms of bandwidth, while preserving access flexibility.

  12. Present and future cell therapies for pancreatic beta cell replenishment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan Domínguez-Bendala; Camillo Ricordi

    2012-01-01

    If only at a small scale,islet transplantation has successfully addressed what ought to be the primary endpoint of any cell therapy:the functional replenishment of damaged tissue in patients.After years of less-thanoptimal approaches to immunosuppression,recent advances consistently yield long-term graft survival rates comparable to those of whole pancreas transplantation.Limited organ availability is the main hurdle that stands in the way of the widespread clinical utilization of this pioneering intervention.Progress in stem cell research over the past decade,coupled with our decades-long experience with islet transplantation,is shaping the future of cell therapies for the treatment of diabetes.Here we review the most promising avenues of research aimed at generating an inexhaustible supply of insulin-producing cells for islet regeneration,including the differentiation of pluripotent and multipotent stem cells of embryonic and adult origin along the beta cell lineage and the direct reprogramming of non-endocrine tissues into insulin-producing cells.

  13. TORC1 inhibition induces lipid droplet replenishment in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeira, Juliana B; Masuda, Claudio A; Maya-Monteiro, Clarissa M; Matos, Gabriel Soares; Montero-Lomelí, Mónica; Bozaquel-Morais, Bruno L

    2015-02-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are intracellular structures that regulate neutral lipid homeostasis. In mammals, LD synthesis is inhibited by rapamycin, a known inhibitor of the mTORC1 pathway. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, LD dynamics are modulated by the growth phase; however, the regulatory pathways involved are unknown. Therefore, we decided to study the role of the TORC1 pathway on LD metabolism in S. cerevisiae. Interestingly, rapamycin treatment resulted in a fast LD replenishment and growth inhibition. The discovery that osmotic stress (1 M sorbitol) also induced LD synthesis but not growth inhibition suggested that the induction of LDs in yeast is not a secondary response to reduced growth. The induction of LDs by rapamycin was due to increased triacylglycerol but not sterol ester synthesis. Induction was dependent on the TOR downstream effectors, the PP2A-related phosphatase Sit4p and the regulatory protein Tap42p. The TORC1-controlled transcriptional activators Gln3p, Gat1p, Rtg1p, and Rtg3p, but not Msn2p and Msn4p, were required for full induction of LDs by rapamycin. Furthermore, we show that the deletion of Gln3p and Gat1p transcription factors, which are activated in response to nitrogen availability, led to abnormal LD dynamics. These results reveal that the TORC1 pathway is involved in neutral lipid homeostasis in yeast.

  14. Information for stores users

    CERN Multimedia

    Logistics Group - FI Department

    2005-01-01

    The Farnell catalogue can now be accessed from the Material Request form on EDH in addition to the CERN Stores catalogue. Users can order Farnell equipment as well as standard Stores equipment at the same time using a single document, the EDH Materials Request form. The Materials Request form offers users items from both the internal 'Stores' catalogue and the external 'Farnell' catalogue, all of which may be ordered on the same form. The system automatically forwards orders for standard Stores equipment to the CERN Stores and those for Farnell equipment to Farnell. The delivery time is 48 hours in both cases. Requests for materials are routed for approval in accordance with the standard EDH routing procedures. Logistics Group FI Department

  15. Information for stores users

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The Farnell catalogue can now be accessed from the Material Request form on EDH in addition to the CERN Stores catalogue. Users can order Farnell equipment as well as standard Stores equipment at the same time using a single document, the EDH Materials Request form. The Materials Request form offers users items from both the internal 'Stores' catalogue and the external 'Farnell' catalogue, all of which may be ordered on the same form. The system automatically forwards orders for standard Stores equipment to the CERN Stores and those for Farnell equipment to Farnell. The delivery time is 48 hours in both cases. Requests for materials are routed for approval in accordance with the standard EDH routing procedures. Logistics Group FI Department

  16. Modelling and analysis of inventory replenishment for perishable agricultural products with buyer-seller collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Dongjie; Lai, K. K.; Leung, Stephen C. H.; Liang, Liang

    2011-07-01

    In this article, we study the inventory replenishment model for perishable agricultural products in a simple two-level supply chain. Collaborative forecasting is introduced into the inventory replenishment decisions to avoid overstocking and understocking of agricultural products, and to maximise profits. We analyse the model with ordering cost, holding cost, shortage cost, deterioration cost and opportunity lost cost of perishable agricultural products. Extensive numerical analysis is carried out to study the performance of the inventory policy. The optimal replenishment policy that minimises the total cost can be obtained from the model. It has demonstrated that the supply chain cost decreases with supplier and retailer's collaborative forecasting.

  17. Low birth weight and zygosity status is associated with defective muscle glycogen and glycogen synthase regulation in elderly twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Pernille; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen; Richter, Erik;

    2007-01-01

    AND METHODS: We measured the activities of glycogen synthase (GS), GS kinase (GSK)3 alpha, GS phosphorylation, and glycogen levels in muscle biopsies obtained from 184 young and elderly twins before and after a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. RESULTS: Elderly monozygotic twins had significantly lower...... fractional GS activity amidst higher glycogen and GS protein levels compared with dizygotic twins. In addition, we demonstrated strong nongenetic associations between birth weight and defect muscle glycogen metabolism in elderly--but not in younger--twins. Thus, for every 100 g increase in birth weight...... within pairs, GS fractional activity, GS protein level, and glycogen content was increased by 4.2, 8.7, and 4.5%, respectively, in elderly twins. Similarly, for every 100 g increase in birth weight, GSK3 alpha activity and GS phosphorylation at the sites 2, 2+2a, and 3a+3b were decreased by 3.1, 9.0, 10...

  18. Butyrate ingestion improves hepatic glycogen storage in the re-fed rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rigalleau Vincent

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Butyrate naturally produced by intestinal fiber fermentation is the main nutrient for colonocytes, but the metabolic effect of the fraction reaching the liver is not totally known. After glycogen hepatic depletion in the 48-hour fasting rat, we monitored the effect of (butyrate 1.90 mg + glucose 14.0 mg/g body weight versus isocaloric (glucose 18.2 mg/g or isoglucidic (glucose 14.0 mg/g control force-feeding on in vivo changes in hepatic glycogen and ATP contents evaluated ex vivo by NMR in the isolated and perfused liver. Results The change in glycogen was biphasic with (i an initial linear period where presence of butyrate in the diet increased (P = 0.05 the net synthesis rate (0.20 ± 0.01 μmol/min.g-1 liver wet weight, n = 15 versus glucose 14.0 mg/g only (0.16 ± 0.01 μmol/min.g-1 liver ww, n = 14, and (ii a plateau of glycogen store followed by a depletion. Butyrate delayed the establishment of the equilibrium between glycogenosynthetic and glycogenolytic fluxes from the 6th to 8th hour post-feeding. The maximal glycogen content was then 97.27 ± 10.59 μmol/g liver ww (n = 7 at the 8th hour, which was significantly higher than with the isocaloric control diet (64.34 ± 8.49 μmol/g, n = 12, P = 0.03 and the isoglucidic control one (49.11 ± 6.35 μmol/g liver ww, n = 6, P = 0.003. After butyrate ingestion, ATP content increased from 0.95 ± 0.29 to a plateau of 2.14 ± 0.23 μmol/g liver ww at the 8th hour post-feeding (n = 8 [P = 0.04 versus isoglucidic control diet (1.45 ± 0.19 μmol/g, n = 8 but was not different from the isocaloric control diet (1.70 ± 0.18 μmol/g, n = 12]. Conclusion The main hepatic effect of butyrate is a sparing effect on glycogen storage explained (i by competition between butyrate and glucose oxidation, glucose being preferentially directed to glycogenosynthesis during the post-prandial state; and (ii by a likely reduced glycogenolysis from the newly synthesized glycogen. This first

  19. Glycogen synthase from the parabasalian parasite Trichomonas vaginalis: An unusual member of the starch/glycogen synthase family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Wayne A; Pradhan, Prajakta; Madhan, Nayasha; Gist, Galen C; Brittingham, Andrew

    2017-07-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis, a parasitic protist, is the causative agent of the common sexually-transmitted infection trichomoniasis. The organism has long been known to synthesize substantial glycogen as a storage polysaccharide, presumably mobilizing this compound during periods of carbohydrate limitation, such as might be encountered during transmission between hosts. However, little is known regarding the enzymes of glycogen metabolism in T. vaginalis. We had previously described the identification and characterization of two forms of glycogen phosphorylase in the organism. Here, we measure UDP-glucose-dependent glycogen synthase activity in cell-free extracts of T. vaginalis. We then demonstrate that the TVAG_258220 open reading frame encodes a glycosyltransferase that is presumably responsible for this synthetic activity. We show that expression of TVAG_258220 in a yeast strain lacking endogenous glycogen synthase activity is sufficient to restore glycogen accumulation. Furthermore, when TVAG_258220 is expressed in bacteria, the resulting recombinant protein has glycogen synthase activity in vitro, transferring glucose from either UDP-glucose or ADP-glucose to glycogen and using both substrates with similar affinity. This protein is also able to transfer glucose from UDP-glucose or ADP-glucose to maltose and longer oligomers of glucose but not to glucose itself. However, with these substrates, there is no evidence of processivity and sugar transfer is limited to between one and three glucose residues. Taken together with our earlier work on glycogen phosphorylase, we are now well positioned to define both how T. vaginalis synthesizes and utilizes glycogen, and how these processes are regulated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  20. Change of Coagulation Factor Ⅷ and Antithrombin Ⅲ Activity in Bank-Stored Blood

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Coagulation factor Ⅷ and antithrombin Ⅲ activity were detected in 15 health donors. It was found that antithrombin Ⅲ activity decreased obviously 12 h after blood drawing. It lost 56 % of the activity at the 3rd day, and 70 % of the activity at the 7th day. FⅧ:c showed no obvious change after 24 h, until the 3rd day. It lost 40 %-60 % of the activity after 36 h and was reduced to the 30 % of the original activity at the 5th day. Our results suggested that at the 3rd day coagulation factor Ⅷ of bank-stored blood can be used to replenish antithrombin Ⅲ, while bank-stored blood in one day can be used to replenish FⅧ.

  1. Information for stores users

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The Radiospares Catalogue is now accessible from the Material Request page on EDH in the same way as the CERN Stores Catalogue. This means that users can order Radiospares equipment by completing an EDH Materials Request form. N.B.: The system will automatically forward orders for standard Stores equipment to the CERN Stores and those for Radiospares equipment to Radiospares. In both cases the delivery time will be a maximum of 48 hours. Requests for materials will be routed for approval in accordance with the standard EDH routing procedures. Logistics Group FI Department

  2. Information for stores users

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    From next week, the SFS UNIMARKET (tooling) catalogue will be accessible using the Material Request form on EDH in addition to the CERN Stores catalogue and those of existing suppliers. Users will now be able to place orders from the SFS catalogue using the Material Request form on EDH. Note: The system automatically forwards orders for standard Stores equipment and those for SFS equipment, placed using the same Material Request form, to the CERN Stores and SFS respectively. In both cases, the maximum delivery time will be 48 hours. Requests for equipment will be routed for approval in accordance with standard EDH routing procedures. Logistics Group FI Department

  3. INFORMATION FOR STORES USERS

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    From next week, the SFS UNIMARKET (tooling) catalogue will be accessible using the Material Request form on EDH in addition to the CERN Stores catalogue and those of existing suppliers. Users will now be able to place orders from the SFS catalogue using the Material Request form on EDH. Note: The system automatically forwards orders for standard Stores equipment and those for SFS equipment, placed using the same Material Request form, to the CERN Stores and SFS respectively. In both cases, the maximum delivery time will be 48 hours. Requests for equipment will be routed for approval in accordance with standard EDH routing procedures. Logistics Group FI Department

  4. Information for stores users

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The Radiospares Catalogue is now accessible from the Material Request page on EDH in the same way as the CERN Stores Catalogue. This means that users can order Radiospares equipment by completing an EDH Materials Request form. N.B.: The system will automatically forward orders for standard Stores equipment to the CERN Stores and those for Radiospares equipment to Radiospares. In both cases the delivery time will be a maximum of 48 hours. Requests for materials will be routed for approval in accordance with the standard EDH routing procedures. Logistics Group FI Department

  5. INFORMATION FOR STORES USERS

    CERN Multimedia

    SPL Division

    1999-01-01

    You can now make Material Request from CERN Stores over the WEB :CERN Home/Administrative Tools/EDH/Material Requestor https://edh.cern.ch/Document/MAGVia the Stores Catalogue : CERN Home/Administrative Tools/Stores Catalogueor http://edhcat.cern.ch/In both cases, you need to enter your EDH login and password.For more details, you can consult the Quick Reference Guide on :http://edh.cern.ch/doc/quickrefguides.htmlor obtain a printed version from AIS Support at tel: 79933or e-mail to: ais.support@cern.chSPL DivisionLogistics Group

  6. Glycogen and glucose metabolism are essential for early embryonic development of the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Fraga

    Full Text Available Control of energy metabolism is an essential process for life. In insects, egg formation (oogenesis and embryogenesis is dependent on stored molecules deposited by the mother or transcribed later by the zygote. In oviparous insects the egg becomes an isolated system after egg laying with all energy conversion taking place during embryogenesis. Previous studies in a few vector species showed a strong correlation of key morphogenetic events and changes in glucose metabolism. Here, we investigate glycogen and glucose metabolism in the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum, an insect amenable to functional genomic studies. To examine the role of the key enzymes on glycogen and glucose regulation we cloned and analyzed the function of glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3 and hexokinase (HexA genes during T. castaneum embryogenesis. Expression analysis via in situ hybridization shows that both genes are expressed only in the embryonic tissue, suggesting that embryonic and extra-embryonic cells display different metabolic activities. dsRNA adult female injection (parental RNAi of both genes lead a reduction in egg laying and to embryonic lethality. Morphological analysis via DAPI stainings indicates that early development is impaired in Tc-GSK-3 and Tc-HexA1 RNAi embryos. Importantly, glycogen levels are upregulated after Tc-GSK-3 RNAi and glucose levels are upregulated after Tc-HexA1 RNAi, indicating that both genes control metabolism during embryogenesis and oogenesis, respectively. Altogether our results show that T. castaneum embryogenesis depends on the proper control of glucose and glycogen.

  7. Low cost solar array project. Task 1: Silicon material, gaseous melt replenishment system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewett, D. N.; Bates, H. E.; Hill, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    A system to combine silicon formation, by hydrogen reduction of trichlorosilane, with the capability to replenish a crystal growth system is described. A variety of process parameters to allow sizing and specification of gas handling system components was estimated.

  8. Product Selection and Components Replenishment Model of ATO Manufacturer under Heterogeneous Demand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuyu Li

    2013-01-01

    their selling prices and qualities, as well as the purchase prices and holding costs of their components. This paper offers consultation for ATO manufacturers to make policies on product selection and components replenishment.

  9. Habitat degradation is threatening reef replenishment by making fish fearless.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lönnstedt, Oona M; McCormick, Mark I; Chivers, Douglas P; Ferrari, Maud C O

    2014-09-01

    Habitat degradation is one of the 'Big Five' drivers of biodiversity loss. However, the mechanisms responsible for this progressive loss of biodiversity are poorly understood. In marine ecosystems, corals play the role of ecosystem engineers, providing essential habitat for hundreds of thousands of species and hence their health is crucial to the stability of the whole ecosystem. Climate change is causing coral bleaching and degradation, and while this has been known for a while, little do we know about the cascading consequences of these events on the complex interrelationships between predators and their prey. The goal of our study was to investigate, under completely natural conditions, the effect of coral degradation on predator-prey interactions. Settlement stage ambon damselfish (Pomacentrus amboinensis), a common tropical fish, were released on patches of healthy or dead corals, and their behaviours in situ were measured, along with their response to injured conspecific cues, a common risk indicator. This study also explored the effect of habitat degradation on natural levels of mortality at a critical life-history transition. We found that juveniles in dead corals displayed risk-prone behaviours, sitting further away and higher up on the reef patch, and failed to respond to predation cues, compared to those on live coral patches. In addition, in situ survival experiments over 48 h indicated that juveniles on dead coral habitats had a 75% increase in predation-related mortality, compared to fish released on live, healthy coral habitats. Our results provide the first of many potential mechanisms through which habitat degradation can impact the relationship between prey and predators in the coral reef ecosystem. As the proportion of dead coral increases, the recruitment and replenishment of coral reef fishes will be threatened, and so will the level of diversity in these biodiversity hot spots.

  10. Uncovering Adiponectin Replenishing Property of Sujiaonori Algal Biomaterial in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngatu, Nlandu Roger; Ikeda, Mitsunori; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Mamoru; Inoue, Masataka; Kanbara, Sakiko; Nojima, Sayumi

    2017-01-01

    The replenishment of adiponectin—an adipocyte-derived hormone with salutary health effects—has recently been proposed as a new approach to treat hypertension, also ameliorate cardiovascular and metabolic risks. We conducted a prospective placebo-controlled, non-randomized and investigator-blinded dietary intervention study to evaluate the health effects of dietary intake of Sujiaonori (Ulva/Enteromorpha prolifera Müller) algal biomaterial (SBM), especially on adiponectin production, blood pressure (BP), and body mass index (BMI) in human subjects. Participants (N = 32) were divided into two equally sized groups (n = 16 for each group): SBM group (subjects supplemented with 3 g SBM powder twice a day during meal) and the control group (subjects who took 3 g of a supplement made of 70% corn starch powder and 30% spinach twice a day) for four weeks. Two health survey questionnaires (dietary and current health questionnaires) were completed anonymously, saliva sampling was done for adiponectin measurement by ELISA, and blood pressure (BP) and anthropometric parameters were measured at baseline and four weeks later. Student paired t-test was performed to compare baseline and post-intervention data on outcome variables between the two study groups. Results showed a 2.24-fold increase in adiponectin level in SBM group (2.81 and 6.26 ng/mL at baseline and at the end of study, respectively) (p 0.05). In SBM subjects, an improvement of BP profile was noted with a significant decrease in systolic BP (p < 0.01). A positive correlation was found between SBM supplementation and adiponectin level, whereas an inverse correlation was noted between SBM supplementation and blood pressure, and also BMI. These findings suggest that SBM-increased adiponectin level and improved BP in a sample of Japanese young adults, and has the potential to improve blood pressure in humans. PMID:28208744

  11. Cell therapies for pancreatic beta-cell replenishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okere, Bernard; Lucaccioni, Laura; Dominici, Massimo; Iughetti, Lorenzo

    2016-07-11

    The current treatment approach for type 1 diabetes is based on daily insulin injections, combined with blood glucose monitoring. However, administration of exogenous insulin fails to mimic the physiological activity of the islet, therefore diabetes often progresses with the development of serious complications such as kidney failure, retinopathy and vascular disease. Whole pancreas transplantation is associated with risks of major invasive surgery along with side effects of immunosuppressive therapy to avoid organ rejection. Replacement of pancreatic beta-cells would represent an ideal treatment that could overcome the above mentioned therapeutic hurdles. In this context, transplantation of islets of Langerhans is considered a less invasive procedure although long-term outcomes showed that only 10 % of the patients remained insulin independent five years after the transplant. Moreover, due to shortage of organs and the inability of islet to be expanded ex vivo, this therapy can be offered to a very limited number of patients. Over the past decade, cellular therapies have emerged as the new frontier of treatment of several diseases. Furthermore the advent of stem cells as renewable source of cell-substitutes to replenish the beta cell population, has blurred the hype on islet transplantation. Breakthrough cellular approaches aim to generate stem-cell-derived insulin producing cells, which could make diabetes cellular therapy available to millions. However, to date, stem cell therapy for diabetes is still in its early experimental stages. This review describes the most reliable sources of stem cells that have been developed to produce insulin and their most relevant experimental applications for the cure of diabetes.

  12. Uncovering Adiponectin Replenishing Property of Sujiaonori Algal Biomaterial in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngatu, Nlandu Roger; Ikeda, Mitsunori; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Mamoru; Inoue, Masataka; Kanbara, Sakiko; Nojima, Sayumi

    2017-02-08

    The replenishment of adiponectin-an adipocyte-derived hormone with salutary health effects-has recently been proposed as a new approach to treat hypertension, also ameliorate cardiovascular and metabolic risks. We conducted a prospective placebo-controlled, non-randomized and investigator-blinded dietary intervention study to evaluate the health effects of dietary intake of Sujiaonori (Ulva/Enteromorpha prolifera Müller) algal biomaterial (SBM), especially on adiponectin production, blood pressure (BP), and body mass index (BMI) in human subjects. Participants (N = 32) were divided into two equally sized groups (n = 16 for each group): SBM group (subjects supplemented with 3 g SBM powder twice a day during meal) and the control group (subjects who took 3 g of a supplement made of 70% corn starch powder and 30% spinach twice a day) for four weeks. Two health survey questionnaires (dietary and current health questionnaires) were completed anonymously, saliva sampling was done for adiponectin measurement by ELISA, and blood pressure (BP) and anthropometric parameters were measured at baseline and four weeks later. Student paired t-test was performed to compare baseline and post-intervention data on outcome variables between the two study groups. Results showed a 2.24-fold increase in adiponectin level in SBM group (2.81 and 6.26 ng/mL at baseline and at the end of study, respectively) (p 0.05). In SBM subjects, an improvement of BP profile was noted with a significant decrease in systolic BP (p adiponectin level, whereas an inverse correlation was noted between SBM supplementation and blood pressure, and also BMI. These findings suggest that SBM-increased adiponectin level and improved BP in a sample of Japanese young adults, and has the potential to improve blood pressure in humans.

  13. Infantile Onset Glycogen Storage Disease Type 2: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan Bilge Koca

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Glycogen storage disease type 2 (Pompe’s disease is an autosomal recessive, fatal glycogen storage disease presenting with hypotonia and muscle weakness. It is known that deficiency of lysosomal acid alpha-glucosidase (acid maltase leads to progressive generalised myopathy, cardiomyopathy and death in early infancy because of respiratory muscle weakness. Excessive undegradable intracellular glycogen deposition plays a role in the pathogenesis of the disease. Here we report a 3.5 month-old girl presenting with respiratory failure due to pneumonia and hypotonia, who was later diagnosed as Pompe disease.

  14. Model of inventory replenishment in periodic review accounting for the occurrence of shortages

    OpenAIRE

    Stanisław Krzyżaniak

    2014-01-01

    Background: Despite the development of alternative concepts of goods flow management, the inventory management under conditions of random variations of demand is still an important issue, both from the point of view of inventory keeping and replenishment costs and the service level measured as the level of inventory availability. There is a number of inventory replenishment systems used in these conditions, but they are mostly developments of two basic systems: reorder point-based and pe...

  15. Information for stores users

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The Bossard catalogue is now accessible alongside the CERN Stores catalogue from the Material Request form on EDH. Users will thus be able to order Bossard equipment using the EDH Materials Request form. As a reminder, the system automatically forwards orders for standard Stores equipment to the CERN Stores and those for Bossard equipment to Bossard. In both cases the delivery time will be a maximum of 48 hours. Requests for materials will be routed for approval in accordance with the standard EDH routing procedures. Some items will remain available from the emergency desk in the event of urgent requests. These items will be visible in the Stores catalogue even if they cannot be purchased via the EDH material request form. Logistics Group FI Department

  16. ON STORED GROUNDNUT

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2010-06-06

    Jun 6, 2010 ... Environmental and human health problems associated with the use of synthetic ... Mould contamination in stored groundnuts has .... Plastic lunch boxes (220 x 110 x 65 mm) with two compartments and a single cover for both ...

  17. Health food stores investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourdine, S P; Traiger, W W; Cohen, D S

    1983-09-01

    In accordance with the New York City Department of Consumer Affairs' mandate to educate consumers and to prevent fraud and deception in the marketplace, the agency conducted a three-month investigation of city health food stores. Twenty-three health food businesses located throughout the five boroughs were visited from September through November 1982 in order to ascertain what those stores sold and how their merchandise compared, in quality and price, with items sold by other businesses.

  18. Provenance Store Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulson, Patrick R.; Gibson, Tara D.; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Stephan, Eric G.

    2008-03-01

    Requirements for the provenance store and access API are developed. Existing RDF stores and APIs are evaluated against the requirements and performance benchmarks. The team’s conclusion is to use MySQL as a database backend, with a possible move to Oracle in the near-term future. Both Jena and Sesame’s APIs will be supported, but new code will use the Jena API

  19. A three-pool model dissecting readily releasable pool replenishment at the calyx of held.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jun; Ge, Jian-long; Hao, Mei; Sun, Zhi-cheng; Wu, Xin-sheng; Zhu, Jian-bing; Wang, Wei; Yao, Pan-tong; Lin, Wei; Xue, Lei

    2015-03-31

    Although vesicle replenishment is critical in maintaining exo-endocytosis recycling, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Previous studies have shown that both rapid and slow endocytosis recycle into a very large recycling pool instead of within the readily releasable pool (RRP), and the time course of RRP replenishment is slowed down by more intense stimulation. This finding contradicts the calcium/calmodulin-dependence of RRP replenishment. Here we address this issue and report a three-pool model for RRP replenishment at a central synapse. Both rapid and slow endocytosis provide vesicles to a large reserve pool (RP) ~42.3 times the RRP size. When moving from the RP to the RRP, vesicles entered an intermediate pool (IP) ~2.7 times the RRP size with slow RP-IP kinetics and fast IP-RRP kinetics, which was responsible for the well-established slow and rapid components of RRP replenishment. Depletion of the IP caused the slower RRP replenishment observed after intense stimulation. These results establish, for the first time, a realistic cycling model with all parameters measured, revealing the contribution of each cycling step in synaptic transmission. The results call for modification of the current view of the vesicle recycling steps and their roles.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: glycogen storage disease type I

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Wolfsdorf JI, Watson MS; American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics. Diagnosis and management of glycogen storage disease type ... practice guideline of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics. Genet Med. 2014 Nov;16(11):e1. Citation ...

  1. Intracellular compartmentalization of skeletal muscle glycogen metabolism and insulin signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prats Gavalda, Clara; Gomez-Cabello, Alba; Vigelsø Hansen, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    compartmentalization in the regulation of skeletal muscle glycogen metabolism and insulin signalling. As a result, a hypothetical regulatory mechanism is proposed by which cells could direct glycogen resynthesis towards different pools of glycogen particles depending on the metabolic needs. Furthermore, we discuss......The interest in skeletal muscle metabolism and insulin signalling has increased exponentially in recent years as a consequence of their role in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Despite this, the exact mechanisms involved in the regulation of skeletal muscle glycogen metabolism...... and insulin signalling transduction remain elusive. We believe that one of the reasons is that the role of intracellular compartmentalization as a regulator of metabolic pathways and signalling transduction has been rather ignored. This paper briefly reviews the literature to discuss the role of intracellular...

  2. Phosphorylation-dependent translocation of glycogen synthase to a novel structure during glycogen resynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prats, Clara; Cadefau, Joan A; Cussó, Roser;

    2005-01-01

    . Both enzymes are regulated by reversible phosphorylation and by allosteric effectors. However, evidence in the literature indicates that changes in muscle GS and GPh intracellular distribution may constitute a new regulatory mechanism of glycogen metabolism. Already in the 1960s, it was proposed...... structures that were not present in basal muscle, and we present evidence that indicate that they are products of actin cytoskeleton remodeling. Furthermore, for the first time, we show a phosphorylation-dependent intracellular distribution of GS. Here, we present evidence of a new regulatory mechanism...

  3. Nutrition to Promote Recovery from Exercise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Clyde Williams

    2006-01-01

    @@ KEY POINTS ·Recovery from strenuous daily training or competition is improved when athletes consume a high-carbohydrate diet. The most important effect of such a diet is to maximize the stores of glycogen in the muscles. Roughly 10 g carbohydrate per kg body weight should be sufficient to replenish glycogen stores after a tough training session.

  4. Synaptic activity slows vesicular replenishment at excitatory synapses of rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Loc; Glavinović, Mladen I

    2013-04-01

    Short-term synaptic depression mainly reflects the depletion of the readily releasable pool (RRP) of quanta. Its dynamics, and especially the replenishment rate of the RRP, are still not well characterized in spite of decades of investigation. Main reason is that the vesicular storage and release system is treated as time-independent. If it is time-dependent all parameters thus estimated become problematic. Indeed the reports about how prolonged stimulation affects the dynamics are contradictory. To study this, we used patterned stimulation on the Schaeffer collateral fiber pathway and model-fitting of the excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSC) recorded from CA1 neurons in rat hippocampal slices. The parameters of a vesicular storage and release model with two pools were estimated by minimizing the squared difference between the ESPC amplitudes and simulated model output. This yields the 'basic' parameters (release coupling, replenishment coupling and RRP size) that underlie the 'derived' and commonly used parameters (fractional release and replenishment rate). The fractional release increases when [Ca(++)]o is raised, whereas the replenishment rate is [Ca(++)]o independent. Fractional release rises because release coupling increases, and the RRP becomes less able to contain quanta. During prolonged stimulation, the fractional release remains generally unaltered, whereas the replenishment rate decreases down to ~10 % of its initial value with a decay time of ~15 s, and this decrease in the replenishment rate significantly contributes to synaptic depression. In conclusion, the fractional release is [Ca(++)]o-dependent and stimulation-independent, whereas the replenishment rate is [Ca(++)]o-independent and stimulation-dependent.

  5. Astrocyte glycogenolysis is triggered by store-operated calcium entry and provides metabolic energy for cellular calcium homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Margit S; Fox, Rebecca; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Bak, Lasse K

    2014-04-01

    Astrocytic glycogen, the only storage form of glucose in the brain, has been shown to play a fundamental role in supporting learning and memory, an effect achieved by providing metabolic support for neurons. We have examined the interplay between glycogenolysis and the bioenergetics of astrocytic Ca(2+) homeostasis, by analyzing interdependency of glycogen and store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE), a mechanism in cellular signaling that maintains high endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) concentration and thus provides the basis for store-dependent Ca(2+) signaling. We stimulated SOCE in primary cultures of murine cerebellar and cortical astrocytes, and determined glycogen content to investigate the effects of SOCE on glycogen metabolism. By blocking glycogenolysis, we tested energetic dependency of SOCE-related Ca(2+) dynamics on glycogenolytic ATP. Our results show that SOCE triggers astrocytic glycogenolysis. Upon inhibition of adenylate cyclase with 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine, glycogen content was no longer significantly different from that in unstimulated control cells, indicating that SOCE triggers astrocytic glycogenolysis in a cAMP-dependent manner. When glycogenolysis was inhibited in cortical astrocytes by 1,4-dideoxy-1,4-imino-D-arabinitol, the amount of Ca(2+) loaded into ER via sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2)-ATPase (SERCA) was reduced, which suggests that SERCA pumps preferentially metabolize glycogenolytic ATP. Our study demonstrates SOCE as a novel pathway in stimulating astrocytic glycogenolysis. We also provide first evidence for a new functional role of brain glycogen, in providing local ATP to SERCA, thus establishing the bioenergetic basis for astrocytic Ca(2+) signaling. This mechanism could offer a novel explanation for the impact of glycogen on learning and memory. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Information for Stores users

    CERN Multimedia

    FI Department

    2008-01-01

    The DISTRELEC catalogue (IT) is now available in EDH in addition to the CERN Stores catalogue and the catalogues of existing suppliers. Using an EDH materials request form, users can now order DISTRELEC equipment from amongst the following product groups: peripherals, multimedia, PC components, data media, communication and data cables and adapters. Non-authorised materials will be clearly indicated. As a reminder, the system automatically manages the distribution of standard Stores equipment and punch out equipment ordered on the same request form. In both cases, delivery will take a maximum of 48 hours. The approval of the EDH document will follow the usual EDH routing procedures. Logistics Group FI Department

  7. Den store skandinaviske redningsaktion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus Bundgård

    2015-01-01

    Historikeren Bo Lidegaard fortæller flot den store historie om den forbløffende og komplicerede skandinaviske redning af fanger fra Hitlers koncentrationslejre. En historie, der samtidig berører alvorlige moralske spørgsmål.......Historikeren Bo Lidegaard fortæller flot den store historie om den forbløffende og komplicerede skandinaviske redning af fanger fra Hitlers koncentrationslejre. En historie, der samtidig berører alvorlige moralske spørgsmål....

  8. Acid hydrolysis and molecular density of phytoglycogen and liver glycogen helps understand the bonding in glycogen α (composite particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prudence O Powell

    Full Text Available Phytoglycogen (from certain mutant plants and animal glycogen are highly branched glucose polymers with similarities in structural features and molecular size range. Both appear to form composite α particles from smaller β particles. The molecular size distribution of liver glycogen is bimodal, with distinct α and β components, while that of phytoglycogen is monomodal. This study aims to enhance our understanding of the nature of the link between liver-glycogen β particles resulting in the formation of large α particles. It examines the time evolution of the size distribution of these molecules during acid hydrolysis, and the size dependence of the molecular density of both glucans. The monomodal distribution of phytoglycogen decreases uniformly in time with hydrolysis, while with glycogen, the large particles degrade significantly more quickly. The size dependence of the molecular density shows qualitatively different shapes for these two types of molecules. The data, combined with a quantitative model for the evolution of the distribution during degradation, suggest that the bonding between β into α particles is different between phytoglycogen and liver glycogen, with the formation of a glycosidic linkage for phytoglycogen and a covalent or strong non-covalent linkage, most probably involving a protein, for glycogen as most likely. This finding is of importance for diabetes, where α-particle structure is impaired.

  9. Acid Hydrolysis and Molecular Density of Phytoglycogen and Liver Glycogen Helps Understand the Bonding in Glycogen α (Composite) Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Prudence O.; Sullivan, Mitchell A.; Sheehy, Joshua J.; Schulz, Benjamin L.; Warren, Frederick J.; Gilbert, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Phytoglycogen (from certain mutant plants) and animal glycogen are highly branched glucose polymers with similarities in structural features and molecular size range. Both appear to form composite α particles from smaller β particles. The molecular size distribution of liver glycogen is bimodal, with distinct α and β components, while that of phytoglycogen is monomodal. This study aims to enhance our understanding of the nature of the link between liver-glycogen β particles resulting in the formation of large α particles. It examines the time evolution of the size distribution of these molecules during acid hydrolysis, and the size dependence of the molecular density of both glucans. The monomodal distribution of phytoglycogen decreases uniformly in time with hydrolysis, while with glycogen, the large particles degrade significantly more quickly. The size dependence of the molecular density shows qualitatively different shapes for these two types of molecules. The data, combined with a quantitative model for the evolution of the distribution during degradation, suggest that the bonding between β into α particles is different between phytoglycogen and liver glycogen, with the formation of a glycosidic linkage for phytoglycogen and a covalent or strong non-covalent linkage, most probably involving a protein, for glycogen as most likely. This finding is of importance for diabetes, where α-particle structure is impaired. PMID:25799321

  10. Store Lagre 5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Åge, Jensen Niels; Leo, Holm; Mogens, Posvig

    1999-01-01

    A seasonal thermal storage, consisting of a pit store with gravel-sand fill and pipe heat exchanger is designed and conducted at the Central Solar Heating Plant in Marstal, Aeroe.The task, by DTU was to carrie out experiments to determine the heat transport from the polymer pipes to the storage...

  11. Information for stores users

    CERN Multimedia

    FI Department

    2008-01-01

    From the beginning of March onwards, the LYRECO (stationery) catalogue will be accessible from the Material Request form on EDH in the same way as the CERN Stores catalogue and the existing individual supplier catalogues. Items will be delivered within a maximum of 48 hours. Logistics Group FI Department

  12. Information for stores users

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    2008-01-01

    From the beginning of March onwards, the LYRECO (stationery) catalogue will be accessible from the Material Request form on EDH in the same way as the CERN Stores catalogue and the existing individual supplier catalogues. Items will be delivered within a maximum of 48 hours. Logistics Group FI Department

  13. Modeling Replenishment of Ultrathin Liquid Perfluoropolyether Z Films on Solid Surfaces Using Monte Carlo Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Mayeed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Applying the reptation algorithm to a simplified perfluoropolyether Z off-lattice polymer model an NVT Monte Carlo simulation has been performed. Bulk condition has been simulated first to compare the average radius of gyration with the bulk experimental results. Then the model is tested for its ability to describe dynamics. After this, it is applied to observe the replenishment of nanoscale ultrathin liquid films on solid flat carbon surfaces. The replenishment rate for trenches of different widths (8, 12, and 16 nms for several molecular weights between two films of perfluoropolyether Z from the Monte Carlo simulation is compared to that obtained solving the diffusion equation using the experimental diffusion coefficients of Ma et al. (1999, with room condition in both cases. Replenishment per Monte Carlo cycle seems to be a constant multiple of replenishment per second at least up to 2 nm replenished film thickness of the trenches over the carbon surface. Considerable good agreement has been achieved here between the experimental results and the dynamics of molecules using reptation moves in the ultrathin liquid films on solid surfaces.

  14. Continuous replenishment of molten semiconductor in a Czochralski-process, single-crystal-growing furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiegl, George (Inventor); Torbet, Walter (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A replenishment crucible is mounted adjacent the usual drawing crucible, from which a monocrystalline boule is drawn according to the Czochralski method. A siphon tube for molten semiconductor transfer extends from the replenishment crucible to the drawing crucible. Each crucible is enclosed within its own hermetic shell and is provided with its own heater. The siphon tube is initially filled with molten semiconductor by raising the inert atmospheric pressure in the shell surrounding the replenishment crucible above that surrounding the drawing crucible. Thereafter, adjustment of the level of molten semiconductor in the drawing crucible may be achieved by adjusting the level in either crucible, since the siphon tube will establish the same level in both crucibles. For continuous processing, solid semiconductor may be added to and melted in the replenishment crucible during the process of drawing crystals from the drawing crucible. A constant liquid level of melted semiconductor is maintained in the system by an optical monitoring device and any of several electromechanical controls of the rate of replenishment or crucible height.

  15. Beta cell dynamics: beta cell replenishment, beta cell compensation and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerf, Marlon E

    2013-10-01

    Type 2 diabetes, characterized by persistent hyperglycemia, arises mostly from beta cell dysfunction and insulin resistance and remains a highly complex metabolic disease due to various stages in its pathogenesis. Glucose homeostasis is primarily regulated by insulin secretion from the beta cells in response to prevailing glycemia. Beta cell populations are dynamic as they respond to fluctuating insulin demand. Beta cell replenishment and death primarily regulate beta cell populations. Beta cells, pancreatic cells, and extra-pancreatic cells represent the three tiers for replenishing beta cells. In rodents, beta cell self-replenishment appears to be the dominant source for new beta cells supported by pancreatic cells (non-beta islet cells, acinar cells, and duct cells) and extra-pancreatic cells (liver, neural, and stem/progenitor cells). In humans, beta cell neogenesis from non-beta cells appears to be the dominant source of beta cell replenishment as limited beta cell self-replenishment occurs particularly in adulthood. Metabolic states of increased insulin demand trigger increased insulin synthesis and secretion from beta cells. Beta cells, therefore, adapt to support their physiology. Maintaining physiological beta cell populations is a strategy for targeting metabolic states of persistently increased insulin demand as in diabetes.

  16. Digestion of glycogen by a glucosidase released by Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Ryan D; Nawrocki, Lauren D; Wilson, Wayne A; Brittingham, Andrew

    2015-12-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a protozoan parasite that is the causative agent of trichomoniasis, a widespread sexually transmitted disease. In vitro culture of T. vaginalis typically employs a medium supplemented with either maltose or glucose and carbohydrates are considered essential for growth. Although the nature of the carbohydrates utilized by T. vaginalis in vivo is undefined, the vaginal epithelium is rich in glycogen, which appears to provide a source of carbon for the vaginal microbiota. Here, we show that T. vaginalis grows equally well in growth media supplemented with simple sugars or with glycogen. Analysis of conditioned growth medium by thin layer chromatography indicates that growth on glycogen is accompanied by glycogen breakdown to a mixture of products including maltose, glucose, and oligosaccharides. Enzymatic assays with conditioned growth medium show that glycogen breakdown is accomplished via the release of a glucosidase activity having the properties of an α-amylase into the growth medium. Furthermore, we find that released glucosidase activity increases upon removal of carbohydrate from the growth medium, indicating regulation of synthesis and/or secretion in response to environmental cues. Lastly, we show that addition of T. vaginalis glucosidase activity to a growth medium containing glycogen generates sufficient simple sugar to support the growth of lactobacilli which, themselves, are unable to degrade glycogen. Thus, not only does the glucosidase activity likely play an important role in allowing T. vaginalis to secure simple sugars for its own use, it has the potential to impact the growth of other members of the vaginal microbiome.

  17. Glucose uptake and transport in contracting, perfused rat muscle with different pre-contraction glycogen concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hespel, P; Richter, Erik

    1990-01-01

    1. Glucose uptake and transport, muscle glycogen, free glucose and glucose-6-phosphate concentrations were studied in perfused resting and contracting rat skeletal muscle with different pre-contraction glycogen concentrations. Rats were pre-conditioned by a combination of swimming exercise and diet......, resulting in either low (glycogen-depleted rats), normal (control rats) or high (supercompensated rats) muscle glycogen concentrations at the time their hindlimbs were perfused. 2. Compared with control rats, pre-contraction muscle glycogen concentration was approximately 40% lower in glycogen-depleted rats......, whereas it was 40% higher in supercompensated rats. Muscle glycogen break-down correlated positively (r = 0.76; P less than 0.001) with pre-contraction muscle glycogen concentration. 3. Glucose uptake during contractions was approximately 50% higher in glycogen-depleted hindquarters than in control...

  18. Development of an In-Flight Refill Unit for Replenishing Research Animal Drinking Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, P. D.; Hines, M. I.; Barnes, R.

    1994-01-01

    The Spacelab Life Sciences 2 (SLS-2) mission became NASA's longest duration Shuttle mission, lasting fourteen days, when Columbia landed on 1 Nov. 1993. Located within the Spacelab were a total of 48 laboratory rats which were housed in two Research Animal Holding Facilities (RAHF's) developed by the Space Life Sciences Payloads Office (SLSPO) at Ames Research Center. In order to properly maintain the health and well-being of these important research animals, sufficient quantities of food and water had to be available for the duration of the mission. An inflight Refill Unit was developed by the SLSPO to replenish the animals' drinking water inflight using the Shuttle potable water system in the middeck galley as the source of additional water. The Inflight Refill Unit consists of two major subsystems, a Fluid Pumping Unit (FPU) and a Collapsible Water Reservoir (CWR). The FPU provides the system measurement and controls, pump, water lines, and plumbing necessary to collect water coming into the unit from the potable water system and pump it out and into the RAHF drinking water tanks. The CWR is a Kevlar(trademark) reinforced storage bladder, connected to the FPU, which has a capacity of 6 liters in its expanded volume and functions to store the water collected from the potable water system and allows for the transport of the water back to the Spacelab where it is pumped into each of two RAHFs. Additional components of the FPU system include the inlet and outlet fluid hoses, a power cable for providing 28 volt direct current spacecraft electrical power to the pump within the FPU, a tether system for the unit when in use in Spacelab, and an adapter for mating the unit to the orbiter waste collection system in order to dump excess water after use in Spacelab. This paper will present the design process and development approach for the lnflight Refill Unit, define some of the key design issues which had to be addressed, and summarize the inflight operational performance

  19. A systematic literature review on the joint replenishment problem solutions: 2006-2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo dos Santos Lourenço Bastos

    Full Text Available Abstract Among all existing inventory replenishment models, this research was dedicated to the Joint Replenishment Problem (JRP, which consists in the replenishment of multiple items simultaneously, aiming total cost reduction. Literature has presented several optimal and approximated solutions to this problem, with different applications and techniques, which results in a large quantity of solution proposals. Therefore, this research aimed to map existing solutions to the problem in 2006-2015 in order to provide a guide for interested parts in JRP and to update previous reviews. Hence, systematic review was used to assess papers from that period interval. From a total of 128 papers, a general trend for seeking JRP extensions and practical applications was verified. Furthermore, the heuristic and metaheuristic methods were the most used and considered the most suitable due to their simplicity in understanding and application.

  20. Vitamin D deficiency: appropriate replenishment therapies and the effects of vitamin D toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton, Sean; Clopton, David; Cappuzzo, Kimberly A

    2010-03-01

    An 84-year-old patient diagnosed with a vitamin D deficiency was given a prescription for ergocalciferol (vitamin D2) 50,000 units weekly. The prescription was incorrectly filled for ergocalciferol 50,000 units daily. Incorrect therapy continued for two months. The patient's vitamin D level increased from Replenishment using high-dose ergocalciferol is one common replenishment therapy. Patients also are able to supplement with nonprescription vitamin D products of varying strengths. While many older patients can be expected to have vitamin D deficiencies, pharmacists should be aware of appropriate replenishment therapies and correct dosing of different vitamin D products. Pharmacists also should be familiar with possible toxic effects of vitamin D, particularly as public awareness of benefits continues to increase.

  1. The lognormal perfusion model for disruption replenishment measurements of blood flow: in vivo validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, John M; Leung, Kogee; Burns, Peter N

    2011-10-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) is evolving as a promising tool to noninvasively quantify relative tissue perfusion in organs and solid tumours. Quantification using the method of disruption replenishment is best performed using a model that accurately describes the replenishment of microbubble contrast agents through the ultrasound imaging plane. In this study, the lognormal perfusion model was validated using an exposed in vivo rabbit kidney model. Compared against an implanted transit time flow meter, longitudinal relative flow measurement was (×3) less variable and correlated better when quantification was performed with the lognormal perfusion model (Spearman r = 0.90, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.05) vs. the prevailing mono-exponential model (Spearman r = 0.54, 95% CI = 0.18). Disruption-replenishment measurements using the lognormal perfusion model were reproducible in vivo to within 12%.

  2. Determining the Optimum Ordering Policy in Multi-Item Joint Replenishment Problem Using a Novel Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Tsung Ho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This work investigates the joint replenishment problem (JRP involving multiple items where economies exist for replenishing several items simultaneously. The demand rate for each item is known and constant. Shortages are not permitted and lead times are negligible. Many heuristic algorithms have been proposed to find quality solutions for the JRP. In this paper, cycle time division and recursive tightening methods are developed to calculate an efficient and optimal replenishment policy for JRP. Two theorems are demonstrated to guarantee that an optimal solution to the problem can be derived using cycle time division and recursive tightening methods. Restated, cycle time division and recursive tightening methods theoretically yield the optimal solution in 100% of instances. The complexity of cycle time division and recursive tightening methods is just O(NlogN, where N represents the number of items involved in the problem. Numerical examples are included to demonstrate the algorithmic procedures.

  3. Optimal pricing and replenishment policies for instantaneous deteriorating items with backlogging and trade credit under inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundara Rajan, R.; Uthayakumar, R.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper we develop an economic order quantity model to investigate the optimal replenishment policies for instantaneous deteriorating items under inflation and trade credit. Demand rate is a linear function of selling price and decreases negative exponentially with time over a finite planning horizon. Shortages are allowed and partially backlogged. Under these conditions, we model the retailer's inventory system as a profit maximization problem to determine the optimal selling price, optimal order quantity and optimal replenishment time. An easy-to-use algorithm is developed to determine the optimal replenishment policies for the retailer. We also provide optimal present value of profit when shortages are completely backlogged as a special case. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the algorithm provided to obtain optimal profit. And we also obtain managerial implications from numerical examples to substantiate our model. The results show that there is an improvement in total profit from complete backlogging rather than the items being partially backlogged.

  4. Stimulation of flower nectar replenishment by removal: A survey of eleven animal-pollinated plant species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Y Luo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the interaction between reward-seeking flower feeding animals and plants requires consideration of the dynamic nature of nectar secretion. Studies on several plants suggest that nectar secretion may increase in response to its removal, but it is not clear whether the phenomenon is widespread. We determined whether 11 species of Colorado mountain wildflowers showed removal-enhanced nectar replenishment (RENR. We measured floral phenology, nectar volumes, rate of replenishment, and compared the cumulative nectar produced following five hourly removals with that accumulated after five hours. Nectar replenishment occurred rapidly, within minutes; statistically significant RENR was observed in 9 of our 11 study species, with the strongest effects in bee-pollinated species. We discuss the implications of RENR in plant species on the measurement of nectar, the adaptive advantage of RENR, and the energetic costs of RENR.

  5. Replenishment Decision Making with Permissible Shortage, Repairable Nonconforming Products and Random Equipment Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huei-Hsin Chang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This study is concerned with replenishment decision making with repairable nonconforming products, backordering and random equipment failure during production uptime. In real world manufacturing systems, due to different factors generation of nonconforming items and unexpected machine breakdown are inevitable. Also, in certain business environments various situations between vendor and buyer, the backordering of shortage stocks sometimes is permissible with extra cost involved. This study incorporates backlogging, random breakdown and rework into a production system, with the objective of determination of the optimal replenishment lot size and optimal level of backordering that minimizes the long-run average system costs. Mathematical modeling along with the renewal reward theorem is employed for deriving system cost function. Hessian matrix equations are used to prove its convexity. Research result can be directly adopted by practitioners in the production planning and control field to assist them in making their own robust production replenishment decision.

  6. Adenosine diphosphate sugar pyrophosphatase prevents glycogen biosynthesis in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Bruna, Beatriz; Baroja-Fernández, Edurne; Muñoz, Francisco José; Bastarrica-Berasategui, Ainara; Zandueta-Criado, Aitor; Rodríguez-López, Milagros; Lasa, Iñigo; Akazawa, Takashi; Pozueta-Romero, Javier

    2001-01-01

    An adenosine diphosphate sugar pyrophosphatase (ASPPase, EC 3.6.1.21) has been characterized by using Escherichia coli. This enzyme, whose activities in the cell are inversely correlated with the intracellular glycogen content and the glucose concentration in the culture medium, hydrolyzes ADP-glucose, the precursor molecule of glycogen biosynthesis. ASPPase was purified to apparent homogeneity (over 3,000-fold), and sequence analyses revealed that it is a member of the ubiquitously distributed group of nucleotide pyrophosphatases designated as “nudix” hydrolases. Insertional mutagenesis experiments leading to the inactivation of the ASPPase encoding gene, aspP, produced cells with marginally low enzymatic activities and higher glycogen content than wild-type bacteria. aspP was cloned into an expression vector and introduced into E. coli. Transformed cells were shown to contain a dramatically reduced amount of glycogen, as compared with the untransformed bacteria. No pleiotropic changes in the bacterial growth occurred in both the aspP-overexpressing and aspP-deficient strains. The overall results pinpoint the reaction catalyzed by ASPPase as a potential step of regulating glycogen biosynthesis in E. coli. PMID:11416161

  7. Storing Blood Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute worked with Goddard Space Flight Center to propose a solution to the blood-cell freezing problem. White blood cells and bone marrow are stored for future use by leukemia patients as a result of Goddard and Jet Propulsion Laboratory expertise in electronics and cryogenics. White blood cell and bone marrow bank established using freezing unit. Freezing unit monitors temperature of cells themselves. Thermocouple placed against polyethylene container relays temperature signals to an electronic system which controls small heaters located outside container. Heaters allow liquid nitrogen to circulate at constant temperature and maintain consistent freezing rate. Ability to freeze, store, and thaw white cells and bone marrow without damage is important in leukemia treatment.

  8. Store and forward teledermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanthraj Garehatty

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Store and forward and real time or videoconferences are the two types of teledermatology services practiced. Dermatology and radio-diagnosis are visual specialties suited for store-and-forward teledermatology (SAFT. Advances in information technology, electronic instruments and biotechnology have revolutionized and brought changes in SAFT. Cellular phone, digital camera, personal digital assistants, Wi-Fi, Wi-Max and computer- aided-design software are incorporated to deliver the quality health care to remote geographic regions. Complete SAFT care equivalent to face-to-face consultation (Gold standard is essential. Health care providers in rural areas are the ′eyes′ for the consultants. Consultants to guide them should have a rapid periodic audit of visual parameters and dimensions of lesions. Given this background, this article reviews advances in 1 capture, store and transfer of images. 2 Computer Aided measurements of generalized and localized lesions and 3 the integration model to meet all the above two requirements in a centralized location. This process enables diagnosis, management, periodic assessment and complete follow-up care to achieve patient and physician satisfaction. Preservation of privacy and confidentiality of digital images is important. Uniform rules and regulations are required. Indian space research organization (ISRO, Government of India has demonstrated telemedicine pilot projects utilizing the satellite communication and mobile telemedicine units to be useful in meeting the health care needs of remote and rural India. we have to join hands with them to meet dermatology problems in rural areas.

  9. Store and forward teledermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanthraj, Garehatty Rudrappa; Srinivas, Chakravarty Rangachari

    2007-01-01

    Store and forward and real time or videoconferences are the two types of teledermatology services practiced. Dermatology and radio-diagnosis are visual specialties suited for store-and-forward teledermatology (SAFT). Advances in information technology, electronic instruments and biotechnology have revolutionized and brought changes in SAFT. Cellular phone, digital camera, personal digital assistants, Wi-Fi, Wi-Max and computer- aided-design software are incorporated to deliver the quality health care to remote geographic regions. Complete SAFT care equivalent to face-to-face consultation (Gold standard) is essential. Health care providers in rural areas are the 'eyes' for the consultants. Consultants to guide them should have a rapid periodic audit of visual parameters and dimensions of lesions. Given this background, this article reviews advances in 1) capture, store and transfer of images. 2) Computer Aided measurements of generalized and localized lesions and 3) the integration model to meet all the above two requirements in a centralized location. This process enables diagnosis, management, periodic assessment and complete follow-up care to achieve patient and physician satisfaction. Preservation of privacy and confidentiality of digital images is important. Uniform rules and regulations are required. Indian space research organization (ISRO), Government of India has demonstrated telemedicine pilot projects utilizing the satellite communication and mobile telemedicine units to be useful in meeting the health care needs of remote and rural India. we have to join hands with them to meet dermatology problems in rural areas.

  10. Model of inventory replenishment in periodic review accounting for the occurrence of shortages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisław Krzyżaniak

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite the development of alternative concepts of goods flow management, the inventory management under conditions of random variations of demand is still an important issue, both from the point of view of inventory keeping and replenishment costs and the service level measured as the level of inventory availability. There is a number of inventory replenishment systems used in these conditions, but they are mostly developments of two basic systems: reorder point-based and periodic review-based. The paper deals with the latter system. Numerous researches indicate the need to improve the classical models describing that system, the reason being mainly the necessity to adapt the model better to the actual conditions. This allows a correct selection of parameters that control the used inventory replenishment system and - as a result - to obtain expected economic effects. Methods: This research aimed at building a model of the periodic review system to reflect the relations (observed during simulation tests between the volume of inventory shortages and the degree of accounting for so-called deferred demand, and the service level expressed as the probability of satisfying the demand in the review and the inventory replenishment cycle. The following model building and testing method has been applied: numerical simulation of inventory replenishment - detailed analysis of simulation results - construction of the model taking into account the regularities observed during the simulations - determination of principles of solving the system of relations creating the model - verification of the results obtained from the model using the results from simulation. Results: Presented are selected results of calculations based on classical formulas and using the developed model, which describe the relations between the service level and the parameters controlling the discussed inventory replenishment system. The results are compared to the simulation

  11. Studies with the USF/NASA toxicity screening test method - Exercise wheels and oxygen replenishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilado, C. J.; Cumming, H. J.

    1977-01-01

    Continuing efforts to improve the University of San Francisco/NASA toxicity screening test method have included the addition of exercise wheels to provide a different measure of incapacitation, and oxygen replenishment to offset any effect of oxygen depletion by the test animals. The addition of exercise wheels limited the number of animals in each test and doubled the required number of tests without any significant improvement in reproducibility. Oxygen replenishment appears to have an effect on survival in the last 5 minutes of the 30-minute test, but the effect is expected to be similar for most materials.

  12. The source of replenishment of geothermal water around Xi’an

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶书华

    2001-01-01

    The meteoric origin of the geothermal water in Xi’an is evidenced by its H and O isotope composition. Based on the temperature dependence of isotopic composition, the temperature of meteoric water that replenishes the geothermal aquifers in Xi’an and its neighboring regions is calculated to be -13.28℃. The age of the geothermal water based on 14C dating method is 10-30 kaBP, belonging to a secondary glacial period in Late Quaternary. The source of replenishment is considered to have mainly derived from glacial snow melt water from elevations higher than 2,000m (ASL) in Qinling Mountains.

  13. A functional glycogen biosynthesis pathway in Lactobacillus acidophilus: expression and analysis of the glg operon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Yong Jun; Klaenhammer, Todd R

    2013-09-01

    Glycogen metabolism contributes to energy storage and various physiological functions in some prokaryotes, including colonization persistence. A role for glycogen metabolism is proposed on the survival and fitness of Lactobacillus acidophilus, a probiotic microbe, in the human gastrointestinal environment. L. acidophilus NCFM possesses a glycogen metabolism (glg) operon consisting of glgBCDAP-amy-pgm genes. Expression of the glg operon and glycogen accumulation were carbon source- and growth phase-dependent, and were repressed by glucose. The highest intracellular glycogen content was observed in early log-phase cells grown on trehalose, which was followed by a drastic decrease of glycogen content prior to entering stationary phase. In raffinose-grown cells, however, glycogen accumulation gradually declined following early log phase and was maintained at stable levels throughout stationary phase. Raffinose also induced an overall higher temporal glg expression throughout growth compared with trehalose. Isogenic ΔglgA (glycogen synthase) and ΔglgB (glycogen-branching enzyme) mutants are glycogen-deficient and exhibited growth defects on raffinose. The latter observation suggests a reciprocal relationship between glycogen synthesis and raffinose metabolism. Deletion of glgB or glgP (glycogen phosphorylase) resulted in defective growth and increased bile sensitivity. The data indicate that glycogen metabolism is involved in growth maintenance, bile tolerance and complex carbohydrate utilization in L. acidophilus.

  14. An inflight refill unit for replenishing research animal drinking water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, P. D.; Hines, M. L.; Barnes, R.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents the design process and development approach for a method of maintaining sufficient quantities of water for research animals during a Shuttle mission of long duration. An inflight refill unit (IRU) consisting of two major subsystems, a fluid pumping unit (FPU) and a collapsible water reservoir (CWR), were developed. The FPU provides the system measurement and controls, pump, water lines, and plumbing necessary to collect water coming into the unit from the potable water system and pump it out into the RAHF drinking water tanks. The CWR is a Kevlar (TM) reinforced storage bladder connected to the FPU, which has a capacity of 6 liters in its expanded volume and functions to store the water collected from the potable water system, allowing for transport of the water back to the Spacelab where it is pumped into each of two research animal holding facilities. Additional components of the IRU system include the inlet and outlet fluid hoses, a power cable for providing 29V direct current spacecraft electrical power to the pump within the FPU, a tether system for the unit when in use in Spacelab, and an adapter for mating the unit to the orbiter waste collection system in order to dump excess water after use in Spacelab.

  15. Glycogen availability and skeletal muscle adaptations with endurance and resistance exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knuiman, Pim; Hopman, Maria T.E.; Mensink, Marco

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that glycogen depletion affects endurance exercise performance negatively. Moreover, numerous studies have demonstrated that post-exercise carbohydrate ingestion improves exercise recovery by increasing glycogen resynthesis. However, recent research into the effects of glyc

  16. Glycogen availability and skeletal muscle adaptations with endurance and resistance exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knuiman, Pim; Hopman, Maria T.E.; Mensink, Marco

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that glycogen depletion affects endurance exercise performance negatively. Moreover, numerous studies have demonstrated that post-exercise carbohydrate ingestion improves exercise recovery by increasing glycogen resynthesis. However, recent research into the effects of

  17. Stored Luminescence Computed Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Ge

    2013-01-01

    The phosphor nanoparticles made of doped semiconductors, pre-excited by well-collimated X-ray radiation, were recently reported for their light emission upon NIR light stimulation. The characteristics of X-ray energy storage and NIR stimulated emission is highly desirable to design targeting probes and improve molecular and cellular imaging. Here we propose stored luminescence computed tomography (SLCT), perform realistic numerical simulation, and demonstrate a much-improved spatial resolution in a preclinical research context. The future opportunities are also discussed along this direction.

  18. 12 CFR 221.116 - Bank loans to replenish working capital used to purchase mutual fund shares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bank loans to replenish working capital used to... Bank loans to replenish working capital used to purchase mutual fund shares. (a) In a situation... period of time the result would be the same. Accordingly, the Board concluded that bank loans made...

  19. Evidence for HI replenishment in massive galaxies through gas accretion from the cosmic web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiner, Dane; Pimbblet, Kevin A.; Heath Jones, D.; Koribalski, Bärbel S.; Serra, Paolo

    2016-12-01

    We examine the HI -to-stellar mass ratio (HI fraction) for galaxies near filament backbones within the nearby Universe (d replenish some HI gas. This supports cold mode accretion where filament galaxies with a large gravitational potential can draw gas from the large scale structure.

  20. Self-regulatory depletion in dogs: insulin release is not necessary for the replenishment of persistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Holly C; Pattison, Kristina F; Laude, Jennifer R; Zentall, Thomas R

    2015-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that self-control is constrained by a limited energy resource that can be depleted through exertion. Once depleted, this resource can be replenished by the consumption or even the taste of glucose. For example, the need to inhibit reduces subsequent persistence at problem solving by humans and dogs, an effect that is not observed when a glucose drink (but not a placebo) is administered following initial inhibition. The mechanism for replenishment by glucose is currently unknown. Energy transfer is not necessary, although insulin secretion may be involved. This possibility was investigated in the current study by having dogs exert self-control (sit-stay) and subsequently giving them (1) glucose that causes the release of insulin, (2) fructose that does not result in the release of insulin nor does it affect glucose levels (but it is a carbohydrate), or (3) a calorie-free drink. Persistence measures indicated that both glucose and fructose replenished canine persistence, whereas the calorie-free drink did not. These results indicate that insulin release is probably not necessary for the replenishment that is presumed to be responsible for the increase in persistence. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Canine Behavior.

  1. A new iterative heuristic to solve the joint replenishment problem using a spreadsheet technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nilsson, A.; Segerstedt, A.; van der Sluis, E.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, a heuristic method is presented which gives a novel approach to solve joint replenishment problems (JRP) with strict cycle policies. The heuristic solves the JRP in an iterative procedure and is based on a spreadsheet technique. The principle of the recursion procedure is to find a ba

  2. Synaptotagmin 7 functions as a Ca2+-sensor for synaptic vesicle replenishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huisheng; Bai, Hua; Hui, Enfu; Yang, Lu; Evans, Chantell S; Wang, Zhao; Kwon, Sung E; Chapman, Edwin R

    2014-02-25

    Synaptotagmin (syt) 7 is one of three syt isoforms found in all metazoans; it is ubiquitously expressed, yet its function in neurons remains obscure. Here, we resolved Ca(2+)-dependent and Ca(2+)-independent synaptic vesicle (SV) replenishment pathways, and found that syt 7 plays a selective and critical role in the Ca(2+)-dependent pathway. Mutations that disrupt Ca(2+)-binding to syt 7 abolish this function, suggesting that syt 7 functions as a Ca(2+)-sensor for replenishment. The Ca(2+)-binding protein calmodulin (CaM) has also been implicated in SV replenishment, and we found that loss of syt 7 was phenocopied by a CaM antagonist. Moreover, we discovered that syt 7 binds to CaM in a highly specific and Ca(2+)-dependent manner; this interaction requires intact Ca(2+)-binding sites within syt 7. Together, these data indicate that a complex of two conserved Ca(2+)-binding proteins, syt 7 and CaM, serve as a key regulator of SV replenishment in presynaptic nerve terminals. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01524.001.

  3. AN OPTIMAL REPLENISHMENT POLICY FOR DETERIORATING ITEMS WITH RAMP TYPE DEMAND UNDER PERMISSIBLE DELAY IN PAYMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Sanjay Jain

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to develop an optimal replenishment policy for inventory models of deteriorating items with ramp type demand under permissible delay in payments. Deterioration of items begins on their arrival in stock.  An example is also presented to illustrate the application of developed model.

  4. On the efficiency of optimal algorithms for the joint replenishment problem: a comparative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Porras Musalem (Eric); R. Dekker (Rommert)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we proposed an efficient algorithm to solve the joint replenishment problem to optimality. We perform a computational study to compare the performance of the proposed algorithm with the best one reported in Viswanathan [6]. The study reveals that for large minor set-up cost

  5. A hybrid replenishment model, the best fit in fast growing industries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartevelt, R.

    2011-01-01

    During the design supply chain control processes, balancing cost versus service plays an important role. To select the most suitable replenishment strategy is the main enabler in reaching the goal of finding the optimal balance. In this article a framework is developed which will help to select the

  6. MILP for the Inventory and Routing for Replenishment Problem in the Car Assembly Line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Pulido

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The inbound logistic for feeding the workstation inside the factory represents a critical issue in the car manufacturing industry. Nowadays, this issue is even more critical than in the past since more types of car are being produced in the assembly lines. Consequently, as workstations have to install many types of components, they also need to have an inventory of different types of the component in a compact space.The replenishment is a critical issue since a lack of inventory could cause line stoppage or reworking. On the other hand, an excess of inventory could increase the holding cost or even block the replenishment paths. The decision of the replenishment routes cannot be made without taking into consideration the inventory needed by each station during the production time which will depend on the production sequence. This problem deals with medium-sized instances and it is solved using online solvers. The contribution of this paper is a MILP for the replenishment and inventory of the components in a car assembly line.

  7. Suboptimal and optimal order policies for fixed and varying replenishment interval with declining market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jonas C. P.; Wee, H. M.; Yang, P. C.; Wu, Simon

    2016-06-01

    One of the supply chain risks for hi-tech products is the result of rapid technological innovation; it results in a significant decline in the selling price and demand after the initial launch period. Hi-tech products include computers and communication consumer's products. From a practical standpoint, a more realistic replenishment policy is needed to consider the impact of risks; especially when some portions of shortages are lost. In this paper, suboptimal and optimal order policies with partial backordering are developed for a buyer when the component cost, the selling price, and the demand rate decline at a continuous rate. Two mathematical models are derived and discussed: one model has the suboptimal solution with the fixed replenishment interval and a simpler computational process; the other one has the optimal solution with the varying replenishment interval and a more complicated computational process. The second model results in more profit. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the two replenishment models. Sensitivity analysis is carried out to investigate the relationship between the parameters and the net profit.

  8. Value-based Q(s,S) policy for joint replenishments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Søren Glud; Thorstenson, Anders

    replenishment order is issued, if the expected cost of ordering immediately according to the (s, S) policy is less than the expected cost of deferring the order until the next demand or until the level Q is reached. We use simulation to evaluate our policy. Applying the value-based Q(s, S) policy to a standard...

  9. A hybrid replenishment model, the best fit in fast growing industries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartevelt, R.

    2011-01-01

    During the design supply chain control processes, balancing cost versus service plays an important role. To select the most suitable replenishment strategy is the main enabler in reaching the goal of finding the optimal balance. In this article a framework is developed which will help to select the

  10. Store manager performance and satisfaction: effects on store employee performance and satisfaction, store customer satisfaction, and store customer spending growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netemeyer, Richard G; Maxham, James G; Lichtenstein, Donald R

    2010-05-01

    Based on emotional contagion theory and the value-profit chain literatures, the present study posits a number of hypotheses that show how managers in the small store, small number of employees retail context may affect store employees, customers, and potentially store performance. With data from 306 store managers, 1,615 store customer-contact employees, and 57,656 customers of a single retail chain, the authors examined relationships among store manager job satisfaction and job performance, store customer-contact employee job satisfaction and job performance, customer satisfaction with the retailer, and a customer-spending-based store performance metric (customer spending growth over a 2-year period). Via path analysis, several hypothesized direct and interaction relations among these constructs are supported. The results suggest implications for academic researchers and retail managers. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  11. Acoustic Accessibility Investigation for Ultrasound Mediated Treatment of Glycogen Storage Disease Type la Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, S.; Raju, B.I.; Leyvi, E.; Weinstein, D.A.; Seip, R.

    2011-01-01

    GSD1a, the most prevalent type among the glycogen storage disease families, is caused by an inherited glycogen-6-phosphatase gene defectresulting in an impaired glycogen to glucose conversion pathway. Strict dietary management continues to be the only treatment for GSD1apatients. Recently, the adven

  12. Partly ordered synthesis and degradation of glycogen in cultured rat myotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsner, Peter; Quistorff, Bjørn; Hansen, Gert H;

    2001-01-01

    .81 and 1.39 h(-1), respectively. The degradation of glycogen largely followed the last-in-first-out principle, particularly in the initial period. Analysis of the size of the glycogen molecules and the beta-dextrin limit during glycogen accumulation and degradation showed that both synthesis...

  13. Differences between glycogen biogenesis in fast- and slow-twitch rabbit muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cussó, R; Lerner, L R; Cadefau, J;

    2003-01-01

    Skeletal muscle glycogen is an essential energy substrate for muscular activity. The biochemical properties of the enzymes involved in de novo synthesis of glycogen were analysed in two types of rabbit skeletal muscle fiber (fast- and slow-twitch). Glycogen concentration was higher in fast...

  14. Insights into glycogen metabolism in Lactobacillus acidophilus: impact on carbohydrate metabolism, stress tolerance and gut retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Yong Jun; Klaenhammer, Todd R

    2014-11-20

    In prokaryotic species equipped with glycogen metabolism machinery, the co-regulation of glycogen biosynthesis and degradation has been associated with the synthesis of energy storage compounds and various crucial physiological functions, including global cellular processes such as carbon and nitrogen metabolism, energy sensing and production, stress response and cell-cell communication. In addition, the glycogen metabolic pathway was proposed to serve as a carbon capacitor that regulates downstream carbon fluxes, and in some microorganisms the ability to synthesize intracellular glycogen has been implicated in host persistence. Among lactobacilli, complete glycogen metabolic pathway genes are present only in select species predominantly associated with mammalian hosts or natural environments. This observation highlights the potential involvement of glycogen biosynthesis in probiotic activities and persistence of intestinal lactobacilli in the human gastrointestinal tract. In this review, we summarize recent findings on (i) the presence and potential ecological distribution of glycogen metabolic pathways among lactobacilli, (ii) influence of carbon substrates and growth phases on glycogen metabolic gene expression and glycogen accumulation in L. acidophilus, and (iii) the involvement of glycogen metabolism on growth, sugar utilization and bile tolerance. Our present in vivo studies established the significance of glycogen biosynthesis on the competitive retention of L. acidophilus in the mouse intestinal tract, demonstrating for the first time that the ability to synthesize intracellular glycogen contributes to gut fitness and retention among probiotic microorganisms.

  15. The utilization of glycogen and accumulation of some intermediates during anaerobiosis in Mytilus edulis L.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaan, A.; Zandee, D.I.

    1972-01-01

    1. 1. Glycogen degradation in the mussel under anaerobic conditions was measured at two temperatures. Glycogen decrease at 6·6°C was about 3 mg and at 20°C about 6 mg/24 hr per mussel. A Pasteur effect was observed. 2. 2. The decrease of glycogen was almost entirely restricted to muscles, including

  16. Calmodulin enhances ribbon replenishment and shapes filtering of synaptic transmission by cone photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hook, Matthew J; Parmelee, Caitlyn M; Chen, Minghui; Cork, Karlene M; Curto, Carina; Thoreson, Wallace B

    2014-11-01

    At the first synapse in the vertebrate visual pathway, light-evoked changes in photoreceptor membrane potential alter the rate of glutamate release onto second-order retinal neurons. This process depends on the synaptic ribbon, a specialized structure found at various sensory synapses, to provide a supply of primed vesicles for release. Calcium (Ca(2+)) accelerates the replenishment of vesicles at cone ribbon synapses, but the mechanisms underlying this acceleration and its functional implications for vision are unknown. We studied vesicle replenishment using paired whole-cell recordings of cones and postsynaptic neurons in tiger salamander retinas and found that it involves two kinetic mechanisms, the faster of which was diminished by calmodulin (CaM) inhibitors. We developed an analytical model that can be applied to both conventional and ribbon synapses and showed that vesicle resupply is limited by a simple time constant, τ = 1/(Dρδs), where D is the vesicle diffusion coefficient, δ is the vesicle diameter, ρ is the vesicle density, and s is the probability of vesicle attachment. The combination of electrophysiological measurements, modeling, and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy of single synaptic vesicles suggested that CaM speeds replenishment by enhancing vesicle attachment to the ribbon. Using electroretinogram and whole-cell recordings of light responses, we found that enhanced replenishment improves the ability of cone synapses to signal darkness after brief flashes of light and enhances the amplitude of responses to higher-frequency stimuli. By accelerating the resupply of vesicles to the ribbon, CaM extends the temporal range of synaptic transmission, allowing cones to transmit higher-frequency visual information to downstream neurons. Thus, the ability of the visual system to encode time-varying stimuli is shaped by the dynamics of vesicle replenishment at photoreceptor synaptic ribbons.

  17. Liver transplantation in glycogen storage disease type I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boers, Susanna J. B.; Visser, Gepke; Smit, Peter G. P. A.; Fuchs, Sabine A.

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type I (GSDI), an inborn error of carbohydrate metabolism, is caused by defects in the glucose-6-transporter/glucose-6-phosphatase complex, which is essential in glucose homeostasis. Two types exist, GSDIa and GSDIb, each caused by different defects in the complex. GSDIa is

  18. Is glycogen storage disease 1a associated with atherosclerosis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ubels, FL; Rake, JP; Slaets, JPJ; Smit, Gerrit; Smit, Andries

    2002-01-01

    Deficiency of microsomal glucose-6-phosphatase in liver and kidney leads to glycogen storage disease type 1a (GSD 1a). Notwithstanding intensive dietary therapy, moderate to severe dyslipidaemia and microalbuminuria, both known atherosclerotic risk factors, remain present. Although more patients rea

  19. Reduced-size liver transplantation for glycogen storage disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao-Feng Ji; Wei-Lin Wang; Yan Shen; Min Zhang; Ting-Bo Liang; Jian Wu; Xiao Xu; Sheng Yan; Shu-Sen Zheng

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Glycogen storage disease (GSD) is an inherited metabolic disorder in which the concentration and/or structure of glycogen in tissues is abnormal. Essentially, abnormalities in all known enzymes involved in the synthesis or degradation of glycogen and glucose have been found to cause some type of GSD. Liver and muscle have abundant quantities of glycogen and are the most common and seriously affected tissues. This study was to assess reduced-size liver transplantation for the treatment of GSD. METHODS: The clinical data from one case of GSD typeⅠ with hepatic adenoma was retrospectively analyzed. The clinical manifestations were hepatomegaly, delayed puberty, growth retardation, sexual immaturity, hypoglycemia, and lactic acidosis, which made the young female patient eligible for reduced-size liver transplantation. RESULTS: The patient recovered uneventfully with satisfactory outcome, including 12 cm growth in height and 5 kg increase in weight during 16 months after successful reduced-size liver transplantation. She has been living a normal life for 4 years so far. CONCLUSIONS: Reduced-size liver transplantation is an effective treatment for GSD with hepatomegaly and hepatic adenoma. Delayed puberty, growth retardation, hypoglycemia and lactic acidosis can be cured by surgery.

  20. Effects of Petrol Exposure on Glucose, Liver and Muscle glycogen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    A total of 126 adult toads of either sex weighing between 70-100g were used for ... decrease in the liver and muscle glycogen levels at high concentrations. ... include season, sex, temperature, dietary status, and ... different systems of the body including the respiratory, ... effect of petrol on carbohydrate metabolism in.

  1. Glycogenic hepatopathy in young adults: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Silva

    Full Text Available Glycogenic hepatopathy is a rare and underecognized complication in long-standing poorly controlled type 1 diabetes mellitus patients. This is a distinct entity from other causes of hepatomegaly and elevated liver enzymes in diabetics, such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Glycogenic hepatopathy is characterized by the combination of poorly controlled diabetes, acute liver injury with marked elevation in serum aminotransferases, and the characteristic histological features on liver biopsy. It is important to distinguish this entity as it has the potential for resolution following improved glycemic control. In this report, we describe four cases of adult patients presenting elevated serum transaminases and hepatomegaly with a history of poorly controlled type I diabetes mellitus. One of the patients had also elevated amylase and lipase in the serum, without clinical or imagiologic evidence of acute pancreatitis. Liver biopsy was performed in all patients and revealed glycogenic hepatopathy. Clinician's awareness of glycogenic hepatopathy should prevent diagnostic delay or misdiagnosis and will provide better insight and management for this condition.

  2. Increased hepatic glycogen synthetase and decreased phosphorylase in trained rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galbo, H; Saugmann, P; Richter, Erik

    1979-01-01

    Rats were either physically trained by a 12 wk swimming program or were freely eating or weight matched, sedentary controls. Trained rats had a higher relative liver weight and total hepatic glycogen synthetase (EC 2.4.1.11) activity and a lower phosphorylase (EC 2.4.1.1) activity than the other...

  3. Queues, stores, and tableaux

    CERN Document Server

    Draief, Moez; O'Connell, Neil

    2005-01-01

    Consider the single server queue with an infinite buffer and a FIFO discipline, either of type M/M/1 or Geom/Geom/1. Denote by A the arrival process and by s the services. Assume the stability condition to be satisfied. Denote by D the departure process in equilibrium and by r the time spent by the customers at the very back of the queue. We prove that (D,r) has the same law as (A,s) which is an extension of the classical Burke Theorem. In fact, r can be viewed as the departures from a dual storage model. This duality between the two models also appears when studying the transient behavior of a tandem by means of the RSK algorithm: the first and last row of the resulting semi-standard Young tableau are respectively the last instant of departure in the queue and the total number of departures in the store.

  4. Quantification of the glycogen cascade system: the ultrasensitive responses of liver glycogen synthase and muscle phosphorylase are due to distinctive regulatory designs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesh KV

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signaling pathways include intricate networks of reversible covalent modification cycles. Such multicyclic enzyme cascades amplify the input stimulus, cause integration of multiple signals and exhibit sensitive output responses. Regulation of glycogen synthase and phosphorylase by reversible covalent modification cycles exemplifies signal transduction by enzyme cascades. Although this system for regulating glycogen synthesis and breakdown appears similar in all tissues, subtle differences have been identified. For example, phosphatase-1, a dephosphorylating enzyme of the system, is regulated quite differently in muscle and liver. Do these small differences in regulatory architecture affect the overall performance of the glycogen cascade in a specific tissue? We address this question by analyzing the regulatory structure of the glycogen cascade system in liver and muscle cells at steady state. Results The glycogen cascade system in liver and muscle cells was analyzed at steady state and the results were compared with literature data. We found that the cascade system exhibits highly sensitive switch-like responses to changes in cyclic AMP concentration and the outputs are surprisingly different in the two tissues. In muscle, glycogen phosphorylase is more sensitive than glycogen synthase to cyclic AMP, while the opposite is observed in liver. Furthermore, when the liver undergoes a transition from starved to fed-state, the futile cycle of simultaneous glycogen synthesis and degradation switches to reciprocal regulation. Under such a transition, different proportions of active glycogen synthase and phosphorylase can coexist due to the varying inhibition of glycogen-synthase phosphatase by active phosphorylase. Conclusion The highly sensitive responses of glycogen synthase in liver and phosphorylase in muscle to primary stimuli can be attributed to distinctive regulatory designs in the glycogen cascade system. The different

  5. The importance of store windows in creating store identity and store attractiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renko Sanda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available While choosing the store, customer first notices the store window and it plays an important role in retailing strategy. Store's window is what customers see first in meeting with the store. Store window design can lead customer to enter the store, and can give a lot of information about store brands and products. Besides the analysis of the way how specific elements of the window design affect customers and their perception, the explanation of their attraction and rejection to customers is given. If we consider the importance of the topics, we can point out the lack of literature about store windows as the communication tool which allow store to communicate with its customers and to create its retailing strategy as well. There is the scientific contribution of this paper. The paper gives theoretical comprehensions completed with the results of the study about the importance of store windows for retailers as well as for customers. Therefore, for the purpose of this paper, a two-phase research study, including a qualitative and a quantitative approach, was used: 1 the qualitative study among retailers which indicated the most important elements of store windows, the level of financial sources invested in the window design, the basis for the decisions about store window design, etc.; 2 the quantitative study on the sample of consumers conducted with on-line questionnaire. Findings suggest that store window attractiveness is the main motif for store visits. The results of the research confirm that by means of store window and its elements (with special emphasis on price and pricing actions retail store sends messages to its consumers.

  6. Consensus guidelines for management of glycogen storage disease type 1b - European Study on Glycogen Storage Disease Type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, G; Rake, JP; Labrune, P; Leonard, JV; Moses, S; Ullrich, K; Wendel, U; Smit, GPA

    2002-01-01

    Life expectancy in glycogen storage disease type 1 (GSD-1) has improved considerably. Its relative rarity implies that no metabolic centre has experience of large series of patients and therefore experience with long-term management and follow-up at each centre is limited. There is wide variation in

  7. Consensus guidelines for management of glycogen storage disease type 1b - European Study on Glycogen Storage Disease Type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, G; Rake, JP; Labrune, P; Leonard, JV; Moses, S; Ullrich, K; Wendel, U; Smit, GPA

    2002-01-01

    Life expectancy in glycogen storage disease type 1 (GSD-1) has improved considerably. Its relative rarity implies that no metabolic centre has experience of large series of patients and therefore experience with long-term management and follow-up at each centre is limited. There is wide variation in

  8. Local depletion of glycogen with supra-maximal exercise in human skeletal muscle fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gejl, K D; Ørtenblad, N; Andersson, E

    2017-01-01

    four ∼4-minute supra-maximal sprint time trials (STT 1-4) with 45 min recovery. The sub-cellular glycogen volumes in m. triceps brachii were quantified from electron microscopy images before and after both STT 1 and STT 4. During STT 1, the depletion of intramyofibrillar glycogen was higher in type I...... glycogen volume was significantly reduced during STT 4, in both fibre types (main effect: -31% [-50:-11%], P = 0.002). Furthermore, for each of the sub-cellular compartments, the depletion of glycogen during STT 1 was associated with the volumes of glycogen before STT 1. In conclusion, the depletion...

  9. The reproductive cycle, condition index, and glycogen reserves of the cockles Cerastoderma glaucum from the Gulf of Gabès (Tunisia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karray, Sahar; Smaoui-Damak, Wafa; Rebai, Tarek; Hamza-Chaffai, Amel

    2015-11-01

    The gametogenic cycle of the Cerastoderma glaucum was analyzed using both qualitative and semi-quantitative methods. The condition index and glycogen concentrations were determined in order to provide information on energy storage. The cockles were collected monthly from a Bayyadha site located 15 km south of Sfax City (Gulf of Gabès) between January 2007 and January 2008. From histological point of view, we applied two approaches: (i) the qualitative method describing the various stages of gamete development for males and females during a cycle of 13 months, and (ii) the semi-quantitative method concerning the estimation of different tissue surfaces. The results showed that there is evidence of three periods of reproduction in this population. A comparison between the surfaces occupied by the three organs showed that the foot and the gonad surfaces are higher than the surface of the adductor muscle. This could suggest that these two organs are more involved in the process of glycogen reserve storage. The results of the glycogen concentrations in the different tissues (gonad, adductor muscle, and "remainders") show that during the second and third periods of reproduction, glycogen was stored in the adductor muscle and in the remainder during sexual rest, and in the gonad during the gametogenesis phases in order to supply the reproductive effort. On the contrary, in the first period of reproduction, the low concentrations of glycogen recorded in the gonad coincided with its high degree of development. This fact could be related to environmental conditions (low temperature and food) recorded during this period.

  10. Patterns of variation in glycogen, free glucose and lactate in organs of supercooled hatchling painted turtles (Chrysemys picta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packard, Mary J; Packard, Gary C

    2005-08-01

    Hatchling painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) typically spend their first winter of life in a shallow, subterranean hibernaculum (the natal nest), where they may be exposed for extended periods to ice and cold. The key to their survival seems to be to avoid freezing and to sustain a state of supercooling. As temperature declines below 0 degrees C, however, the heart of an unfrozen turtle beats progressively slower, the diminished perfusion of peripheral tissues with blood induces a functional hypoxia, and anaerobic glycolysis assumes ever greater importance as a source of ATP. We hypothesized that diminished circulatory function in supercooled turtles also reduces the delivery of metabolic substrates to peripheral tissues from central stores in the liver, so that the tissues depend increasingly on endogenous stores to fuel their metabolism. We discovered in the current investigation that part of the glycogen reserve in hearts and brains of hatchlings is mobilized during the first 10 days of exposure to -6 degrees C but that glucose from hepatic glycogen supports metabolism of the organs thereafter. Hatchlings that were held at -6 degrees C for 10 days and then at +3 degrees C for another 10 days were able to reconstitute some of the reserve of glycogen in heart and liver but not the glycogen reserve in brain. Patterns of accumulation of lactate in individual organs were very similar to those reported for whole animals in a companion study, and point to a high degree of reliance on anaerobic metabolism at -6 degrees C and to a lesser degree of reliance on anaerobiosis at higher subzero temperatures. Lactate had returned to baseline levels in organs of animals that were held for 10 days at -6 degrees C and for another 10 days at +3 degrees C, but free glucose remained elevated. Indeed, carbohydrate metabolism probably does not return to the pre-exposure state in any of the major organs until well after the exposure to subzero temperatures has ended, circulatory

  11. Modeling of replenishment of sediments on a water-worked gravel bed channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juez, Carmelo; Battisacco, Elena; Schleiss, Anton J.; Franca, Mário J.

    2016-04-01

    The presence of dams causes a sediment deficit downstream. Hence, the surface structure of the riverbeds is altered by this interruption in the sediment continuity and The presence of dams causes a sediment deficit downstream. The surface structure of the riverbed is altered by this interruption in the sediment continuity and becoming water-worked. The main morphological effects verified in these cases are thus the generation of armored layers, bank instability, riverbed incision, changes in the channel width and coarsening of the bed particles. These results impact on the riverbed topographic variability and structure of the bedforms. Surface complexity is thus reduced with further ecological implications. The lack of fine material and surface complexity leads to the loss of aquatic and riparian habitats, limiting the possibilities for fish spawning. Nowadays, the revitalization of disturbed river reaches forms an integral part of river management. Sediment transport and associated channel morphology are understood as key processes for recreating and maintaining aquatic ecosystems. For this purpose several replenishment techniques have been considered in order to supply sediments lacking in the downstream reaches. The replenishment techniques can be seen as a pulse-like addition of sedimentary material that initially disturbs the channel. In this work, the response of the flow to the complementary material which is added in the channel is studied by means of the 2D shallow water equations in combination with the Exner equation. The numerical scheme is built by means of a weakly-coupled treatment between the hydrodynamic and morphodynamic equations leading to an efficient and robust solution. Computational outcomes are compared with experimental data obtained from several replenishment configurations studied in the laboratory. The results are analyzed by means of: (i) temporal evolution of the material spreading, (ii) occupational ratio along the channel which is

  12. Insoluble glycogen, a metabolizable internal adsorbent, decreases the lethality of endotoxin shock in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sipka

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Insoluble glycogen is an enzymatically modified form of naturally occurring soluble glycogen with a great adsorbing capacity. It can be metabolized by phagocytes to glucose. In this study we used insoluble glycogen intravenously in the experimental endotoxin shock of rats. Wistar male rats were sensitized to endotoxin by Pb acetate. The survival of rats were compared in groups of animals endotoxin shock treated and non-treated with insoluble glycogen. Furthermore, we have determined in vitro the binding capacity of insoluble glycogen for endotoxin, tumour necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1 and secretable phospholipase A2. Use of 10 mg/kg dose of insoluble glycogen could completely prevent the lethality of shock induced by LD50 quantity of endotoxin in rats. All animals treated survived. Insoluble glycogen is a form of ‘metabolizable internal adsorbents’. It can potentially be used for treatment of septic shock.

  13. Glycogen shortage during fasting triggers liver–brain–adipose neurocircuitry to facilitate fat utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumida, Yoshihiko; Yahagi, Naoya; Takeuchi, Yoshinori; Nishi, Makiko; Shikama, Akito; Takarada, Ayako; Masuda, Yukari; Kubota, Midori; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Iizuka, Yoko; Itaka, Keiji; Kataoka, Kazunori; Shioda, Seiji; Niijima, Akira; Yamada, Tetsuya; Katagiri, Hideki; Nagai, Ryozo; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Kadowaki, Takashi; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    During fasting, animals maintain their energy balance by shifting their energy source from carbohydrates to triglycerides. However, the trigger for this switch has not yet been entirely elucidated. Here we show that a selective hepatic vagotomy slows the speed of fat consumption by attenuating sympathetic nerve-mediated lipolysis in adipose tissue. Hepatic glycogen pre-loading by the adenoviral overexpression of glycogen synthase or the transcription factor TFE3 abolished this liver–brain–adipose axis activation. Moreover, the blockade of glycolysis through the knockdown of the glycogen phosphorylase gene and the resulting elevation in the glycogen content abolished the lipolytic signal from the liver, indicating that glycogen is the key to triggering this neurocircuitry. These results demonstrate that liver glycogen shortage activates a liver–brain–adipose neural axis that has an important role in switching the fuel source from glycogen to triglycerides under prolonged fasting conditions. PMID:23939267

  14. The optimal replenishment policy for time-varying stochastic demand under vendor managed inventory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Govindan, Kannan

    2015-01-01

    A Vendor Managed Inventory (VMI) partnership places the responsibility on the vendor (rather than on buyers) to schedule purchase orders for inventory replenishment in the supply chain system. In this research, the supply chain network considers the Silver-Meal heuristic with an augmentation...... quantity replenishment policy between both traditional and VMI systems. We consider time-varying stochastic demand in two-echelon (one vendor, multiple retailers) supply chains. This paper seeks to find the supply chain that minimizes system cost through comparing performance between traditional and VMI...... systems. A mathematical model is developed, and total supply chain cost is used as the measure of comparison. The models are applied in both traditional and VMI supply chains based on pharmaceutical industry data, and we focus on total cost difference compared through the use of Adjusted Silver-Meal (ASM...

  15. The optimal replenishment policy for time-varying stochastic demand under vendor managed inventory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Govindan, Kannan

    2015-01-01

    A Vendor Managed Inventory (VMI) partnership places the responsibility on the vendor (rather than on buyers) to schedule purchase orders for inventory replenishment in the supply chain system. In this research, the supply chain network considers the Silver-Meal heuristic with an augmentation...... quantity replenishment policy between both traditional and VMI systems. We consider time-varying stochastic demand in two-echelon (one vendor, multiple retailers) supply chains. This paper seeks to find the supply chain that minimizes system cost through comparing performance between traditional and VMI...... systems. A mathematical model is developed, and total supply chain cost is used as the measure of comparison. The models are applied in both traditional and VMI supply chains based on pharmaceutical industry data, and we focus on total cost difference compared through the use of Adjusted Silver-Meal (ASM...

  16. Ultrasound perfusion analysis combining bolus-tracking and burst-replenishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirik, Radovan; Nylund, Kim; Gilja, Odd H; Mezl, Martin; Harabis, Vratislav; Kolar, Radim; Standara, Michal; Taxt, Torfinn

    2013-02-01

    A new signal model and processing method for quantitative ultrasound perfusion analysis is presented, called bolus-and-burst. The method has the potential to provide absolute values of blood flow, blood volume, and mean transit time. Furthermore, it provides an estimate of the local arterial input function which characterizes the arterial tree, allowing accurate estimation of the bolus arrival time. The method combines two approaches to ultrasound perfusion analysis: bolus-tracking and burst-replenishment. A pharmacokinetic model based on the concept of arterial input functions and tissue residue functions is used to model both the bolus and replenishment parts of the recording. The pharmacokinetic model is fitted to the data using blind deconvolution. A preliminary assessment of the new perfusion-analysis method is presented on clinical recordings.

  17. A generalized multi-depot vehicle routing problem with replenishment based on LocalSolver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider the multi depot heterogeneous vehicle routing problem with time windows in which vehicles may be replenished along their trips. Using the modeling technique in a new-generation solver, we construct a novel formulation considering a rich series of constraint conditions and objective functions. Computation results are tested on an example comes from the real-world application and some cases obtained from the benchmark problems. The results show the good performance of local search method in the efficiency of replenishment system and generalization ability. The variants can be used to almost all kinds of vehicle routing problems, without much modification, demonstrating its possibility of practical use.

  18. Replenishment policy and inventory optimization for supply-hub with liability period consideration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李果; 黄焜; 姚琦; 马士华

    2013-01-01

    A replenishment decision-making model for supply-hub is firstly established from the angle of supplier, and optimal replenishment decision of the supplier is analyzed. Then, inventory optimization model for supply-hub is formulated from the angle of the manufacturer, and the optimization algorithm for obtaining optimal inventory levels is given. The result shows that liability period decides the share of the inventory cost between two sides in supply chain. With the increase of liability period, the service level has been quickly reduced even though the manufacturer’s cost has been cut down by transferring the inventory cost to the supplier. As to the safety inventory, if the lower bound of components safety inventory increases, the supplier’s cost will rise up more slowly than the liability period does, while the service levels increases as the safety inventory’s lower bound is raised.

  19. Prostaglandin E₂ promotes post-infarction cardiomyocyte replenishment by endogenous stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, Ying-Chang; Wu, Jasmine M F; Yu, Chun-Keung; Wu, Kenneth K; Hsieh, Patrick C H

    2014-04-01

    Although self-renewal ability of adult mammalian heart has been reported, few pharmacological treatments are known to promote cardiomyocyte regeneration after injury. In this study, we demonstrate that the critical period of stem/progenitor cell-mediated cardiomyocyte replenishment is initiated within 7 days and saturates on day 10 post-infarction. Moreover, blocking the inflammatory reaction with COX-2 inhibitors may also reduce the capability of endogenous stem/progenitor cells to repopulate lost cells. Injection of the COX-2 product PGE2 enhances cardiomyocyte replenishment in young mice and recovers cell renewal through attenuating TGF-β1 signaling in aged mice. Further analyses suggest that cardiac stem cells are PGE2-responsive and that PGE2 may regulate stem cell activity directly through the EP2 receptor or indirectly by modulating its micro-environment in vivo. Our findings provide evidence that PGE2 holds great potential for cardiac regeneration.

  20. Mexican immigrant replenishment and the continuing significance of ethnicity and race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Tomás R

    2008-05-01

    The literature on assimilation and ethnic identity formation largely assumes that the durability of ethnic boundaries is a function of the assimilation measures that sociologists commonly employ. But this literature fails to account adequately for the role of immigration patterns in explaining the durability and nature of ethnic boundaries. Using 123 in-depth interviews with later-generation Mexican Americans, this article shows that Mexican immigrant replenishment shapes ethnic boundaries and ethnic identity formation. The sizable immigrant population sharpens intergroup boundaries through the indirect effects of nativism and by contributing to the continuing significance of race in the lives of later-generation Mexican Americans. The presence of a large immigrant population also creates intragroup boundaries that run through the Mexican-origin population and that are animated by expectations about ethnic authenticity. The article illustrates the importance of immigrant replenishment to processes of assimilation and ethnic identity formation.

  1. An analytical study of the Q(s, S) policy applied to the joint replenishment problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christina; Larsen, Christian

    2005-01-01

    We evaluate the performance of a joint replenishment inventory control policy, called the Q(s,S) policy, which was first suggested and characterized by Viswanathan (1997). We argue why joint replenishment problems can be seen as one product, multiple location problems, and hence why they should...... be considered supply chain management problems. The paper uses Markov decision theory to work out an analytical solution procedure to evaluate the costs of a particular Q(s,S) policy, and thereby a method for computing the optimal Q(s,S) policy, under the assumption that demands follow a Poisson Process....... For a fixed order size Q, the problem can be decomposed for each item to find an optimal (s,S) policy with a stochastic review period. These subproblems can be solved by the algorithm of Zheng and Federgruen (1991). Thereafter it remains to find the optimal value of Q, which is done by systematic search over...

  2. Tobacco advertising in retail stores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, K M; Sciandra, R; Lawrence, J

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies have described tobacco advertising in the print media, on billboards, and through sponsorship of cultural and sporting events. However, little attention has been given to another common and unavoidable source of tobacco advertising, that which is encountered in retail stores. In July 1987, we conducted a survey of 61 packaged goods retail stores in Buffalo, NY, to assess the prevalence and type of point-of-sale tobacco advertising. In addition, store owners or managers were surveyed to determine their store's policy regarding tobacco advertising, receipt of monetary incentives from distributors for displaying tobacco ads, and willingness to display antitobacco ads. Six types of stores were involved in the study: 10 supermarkets, 10 privately owned grocery stores, 9 chain convenience food stores that do not sell gasoline, 11 chain convenience food stores that sell gasoline, 11 chain pharmacies, and 10 private pharmacies. Two-thirds of the stores displayed tobacco posters, and 87 percent had promotional items advertising tobacco products, primarily cigarettes. Larger stores, and those that were privately owned, tended to display more posters and promotional items. Eighty percent of tobacco product displays were for cigarettes, 16 percent for smokeless tobacco products, and 4 percent for cigars and pipe tobacco. Convenience stores selling gasoline had the most separate tobacco product displays. Of tobacco product displays, 24 percent were located adjacent to candy and snack displays. Twenty-nine of the 61 store owners or managers indicated that their store had a policy regulating the display of tobacco ads and tobacco product displays. Policies dealt primarily with the location of tobacco posters (for example, no ads in the window) and number of product displays. Only 14 shop owners or managers indicated that they had previously displayed antitobacco information; more than half (31 of 61) said that they would be willing to display antitobaccoads.In many

  3. Assessment of developmental potential of caprine cloned embryos with ooplasm replenishment under two culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishna, R; Kumar, Dharmendra; Singh, Ajay Pratap; Pandey, Saurabh Kumar; Ranjan, Rakesh; Sarkhel, B C

    2014-03-12

    The present study was designed to assess the developmental potential of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos, with and without replenishment of ooplasm into enucleated oocytes, by culturing separately in two culture media. The enucleated oocytes were replenished with exogenous matured ooplasm under replenished nuclear transfer (RNT) method and compared with conventional nuclear transfer (CNT) method without replenishment. The fusion efficiency in RNT group was found to be significantly higher (P < 0.05) than CNT group (59.39 ± 7.36 vs 45.57 ± 3.68%). The completely fused reconstructed oocytes from both groups were cultured separately in research vitro cleave medium (RVCL) and RVCL-Blast medium. The embryonic development of 2 cell, 4 cell, 8-16 cell and 16-32 cell stages in the RNT group was superior to the CNT group regardless of the culture media used (P < 0.05). The embryonic development of the 8-16 cell, 16-32 cell, morula, and blastocyst stages in the RVCL-Blast medium was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than the RVCL alone for both RNT as well as CNT groups. RNT method with RVCL-Blast produced highly significant (P < 0.01) embryonic development for 8-16 cell and 16-32 cell stage when compared to CNT with RVCL. Conclusively, the combination of RNT with RVCL-Blast culture media enabled an overall increase in the embryonic developmental potential.

  4. A task analysis of underway replenishment for virtual environment ship-handling simulator scenario development

    OpenAIRE

    Norris, Steven D.

    1998-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited While developing a Virtual Reality (VR) Ship handling simulator for the Surface Warfare Officer School (SWOS) in Newport, RI, researchers at the Naval Air Warfare Center Training Systems Division (NAWCTSD) in Orlando, FL discovered a need for a task analysis of a Conning Officer during an Underway Replenishment (UNREP). The purpose of this task analysis was to document the tasks the Conning Officer performs and cues used to accomplish ...

  5. Locating replenishment stations for electric vehicles: Application to Danish traffic data

    OpenAIRE

    Wen, Min; Laporte, Gilbert; Oli B G Madsen; Nørrelund, Anders Vedsted; Olsen, Allan

    2012-01-01

    Environment-friendly electric vehicles have gained substantial attention in governments, industry and universities. The deployment of a network of recharging stations is essential given their limited travel range. This paper considers the problem of locating electronic replenishment stations for electric vehicles on a traffic network with flow-based demand. The objective is to optimize the network performance, for example to maximize the flow covered by a prefixed number of stations, or to mi...

  6. The role of the geothermal gradient in the emplacement and replenishment of ground ice on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Stephen M.

    1993-01-01

    Knowledge of the mechanisms by which ground ice is emplaced, removed, and potentially replenished, are critical to understanding the climatic and hydrologic behavior of water on Mars, as well as the morphologic evolution of its surface. Because of the strong temperature dependence of the saturated vapor pressure of H2O, the atmospheric emplacement or replenishment of ground ice is prohibited below the depth at which crustal temperatures begin to monotonically increase due to geothermal heating. In contrast, the emplacement and replenishment of ground ice from reservoirs of H2O residing deep within the crust can occur by at least three different thermally-driven processes, involving all three phases of water. In this regard, Clifford has discussed how the presence of a geothermal gradient as small as 15 K/km can give rise to a corresponding vapor pressure gradient sufficient to drive the vertical transport of 1 km of water from a reservoir of ground water at depth to the base of the cryosphere every 10(exp 6) - 10(exp 7) years. This abstract expands on this earlier treatment by considering the influence of thermal gradients on the transport of H2O at temperatures below the freezing point.

  7. Direct costs and benefits of multiple mating: Are high female mating rates due to ejaculate replenishment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthington, Amy M; Kelly, Clint D

    2016-03-01

    Females often mate more than is necessary to ensure reproductive success even when they incur significant costs from doing so. Direct benefits are hypothesized to be the driving force of high female mating rates, yet species in which females only receive an ejaculate from their mate still realize increased fitness from multiple mating. Using the Texas field cricket, Gryllus texensis, we experimentally test the hypothesis that multiple mating via monandry or polyandry increases female fitness by replenishing ejaculates, thereby allowing females to produce more offspring for a longer period of time. We found that higher rates of female mating significantly increased lifetime fecundity and oviposition independent of whether females mated with one or two males. Further, although interactions with males significantly increased rates of injury or death, females that replenished ejaculates experienced an increased rate and duration of oviposition, demonstrating that the immediate benefits of multiple mating may greatly outweigh the long-term costs that mating poses to female condition and survival. We suggest that ejaculate replenishment is a driving factor of high mating rates in females that do not receive external direct benefits from mating and that a comparative study across taxa will provide additional insight into the role that ejaculate size plays in the evolution of female mating rates.

  8. Unconventional molecular regulation of synaptic vesicle replenishment in cochlear inner hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, Christian; Cooper, Benjamin H; Neef, Jakob; Wojcik, Sonja M; Reim, Kerstin; Reisinger, Ellen; Brose, Nils; Rhee, Jeong-Seop; Moser, Tobias; Wichmann, Carolin

    2015-02-15

    Ribbon synapses of cochlear inner hair cells (IHCs) employ efficient vesicle replenishment to indefatigably encode sound. In neurons, neuroendocrine and immune cells, vesicle replenishment depends on proteins of the mammalian uncoordinated 13 (Munc13, also known as Unc13) and Ca(2+)-dependent activator proteins for secretion (CAPS) families, which prime vesicles for exocytosis. Here, we tested whether Munc13 and CAPS proteins also regulate exocytosis in mouse IHCs by combining immunohistochemistry with auditory systems physiology and IHC patch-clamp recordings of exocytosis in mice lacking Munc13 and CAPS isoforms. Surprisingly, we did not detect Munc13 or CAPS proteins at IHC presynaptic active zones and found normal IHC exocytosis as well as auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) in Munc13 and CAPS deletion mutants. Instead, we show that otoferlin, a C2-domain protein that is crucial for vesicular fusion and replenishment in IHCs, clusters at the plasma membrane of the presynaptic active zone. Electron tomography of otoferlin-deficient IHC synapses revealed a reduction of short tethers holding vesicles at the active zone, which might be a structural correlate of impaired vesicle priming in otoferlin-deficient IHCs. We conclude that IHCs use an unconventional priming machinery that involves otoferlin.

  9. Dumping syndrome, a cause of acquired glycogenic hepatopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Jeffrey M; Zador, Ivan; Fish, Daryl L

    2011-01-01

    A 2-year-old boy, having undergone fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux disease and fed by gastrostomy, presented with recurrent emesis, syncope with hypoglycemia, and persistently elevated serum liver transaminase levels. Liver biopsy revealed hepatocellular glycogenosis by light and electron microscopy. Further evaluation showed no evidence of diabetes mellitus, glycogen storage disease, or corticosteroid use. Since the hyperglycemic-hyperinsulinemic state of dumping syndrome would provide a mechanism for hepatocellular glycogenosis, the biopsy findings prompted consideration of dumping syndrome. Metabolic evaluation confirmed the diagnosis of dumping syndrome, and appropriate dietary management led to sustained resolution of symptomatology and hypertransaminasemia. Dumping syndrome is proposed to be a cause of hepatocellular glycogenosis, the latter representing a form of acquired glycogenic hepatopathy.

  10. Hypohydration does not impair skeletal muscle glycogen resynthesis after exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufer, P D; Sawka, M N; Young, A J; Quigley, M D; Latzka, W A; Levine, L

    1991-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of moderate hypohydration (HY) on skeletal muscle glycogen resynthesis after exhaustive exercise. On two occasions, eight males completed 2 h of intermittent cycle ergometer exercise (4 bouts of 17 min at 60% and 3 min at 80% of maximal O2 consumption/10 min rest) to reduce muscle glycogen concentrations (control values 711 +/- 41 mumol/g dry wt). During one trial, cycle exercise was followed by several hours of light upper body exercise in the heat without fluid replacement to induce HY (-5% body wt); in the second trial, sufficient water was ingested during the upper body exercise and heat exposure to maintain euhydration (EU). In both trials, 400 g of carbohydrate were ingested at the completion of exercise and followed by 15 h of rest while the desired hydration level was maintained. Muscle biopsy samples were obtained from the vastus lateralis immediately after intermittent cycle exercise (T1) and after 15 h of rest (T2). During the HY trial, the muscle water content was lower (P less than 0.05) at T1 and T2 (288 +/- 9 and 265 +/- 5 ml/100 g dry wt, respectively; NS) than during EU (313 +/- 8 and 301 +/- 4 ml/100 g dry wt, respectively; NS). Muscle glycogen concentration was not significantly different during EU and HY at T1 (200 +/- 35 vs. 251 +/- 50 mumol/g dry wt) or T2 (452 +/- 34 vs. 491 +/- 35 mumol/g dry wt). These data indicate that, despite reduced water content during the first 15 h after heavy exercise, skeletal muscle glycogen resynthesis is not impaired.

  11. Impaired glycogen synthase activity and mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Kurt; Beck-Nielsen, Henning

    2006-01-01

    expression analysis and proteomics have pointed to abnormalities in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and cellular stress in muscle of type 2 diabetic subjects, and recent work suggests that impaired mitochondrial activity is another early defect in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. This review...... will discuss the latest advances in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying insulin resistance in human skeletal muscle in type 2 diabetes with focus on possible links between impaired glycogen synthase activity and mitochondrial dysfunction....

  12. Intraorgan differences of blood flow, oxygen supply and glycogen content in the multilobular liver of normal and hemorrhagic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, H P; Schywalsky, M

    1992-02-01

    In order to characterize intraorgan differences in blood supply of the rat liver, hepatic blood flow (HBF), surface oxygen tension (sPO2) and glycogen content of the largest and smallest lobi have been determined for normal and hemorrhagic rats (N = 68) in ketamin-xylazine anesthesia. 1. Mean HBF +/- SD of lobus sinister measured 1.07 +/- 0.23 ml/g min (n = 119 determinations, N = 9 rats); HBF of lob. caudatus dexter showed a left-shifted histogram (mean value = 0.77 ml/g.min, median = 0.72 ml/g.min, modul = 0.63 ml/g.min, p less than 0.005). 2. Mean sPO2 +/- SD of lob. sin. measured 23 +/- 6.8 mm Hg (n = 168, N = 16). The histograms of lob. caudat. dext. and sin. were left-shifted (mean value of l.c.d. = 9 mm Hg, median = 4 mm Hg, modul = 0 mm Hg, mean value of l.c.s. = 16 mm Hg, median = 17 mm Hg, modul = 0 mm Hg). Under hemorrhage sPO2 became almost zero in 91% of the measurements. 3. In response to an arterial bolus of fluorescence stained gamma-globulins, spreading of the dye showed a pronounced front and marked periportal area within lob. sin., while an irregular convective front and a much smaller area were detected within both of the lobi caudati. Under hemorrhage, intersinusoidal staining and undefined, irregular contours were observed within all lobes. 4. Compared with lob. sin. preferential glycogen depletion and partial centrilobular necrosis were detected within both of the lob. caudati while under hemorrhage the glycogen stores were empty and severe group necroses have been observed especially within the small lobi. From the data it is concluded that in comparison to lob. sin. an insufficient supply and pronounced vulnerability against hepatic ischemia exists within the small lobi caudati.

  13. Mechanisms limiting glycogen storage in muscle during prolonged insulin stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Erik; Hansen, S A; Hansen, B F

    1988-01-01

    increased muscle glycogen concentrations to maximal values 2, 3, and 3.5 times above normal fed levels in fast-twitch white, slow-twitch red, and fast-twitch red fibers, respectively. Glucose uptake decreased (mean +/- SE) from 34.9 +/- 1.2 mumol.g-1.h-1 at 0 h to 7.5 +/- 0.7 after 7 h of perfusion. During......The extent to which muscle glycogen concentrations can be increased during exposure to maximal insulin concentrations and abundant glucose was investigated in the isolated perfused rat hindquarter preparation. Perfusion for 7 h in the presence of 20,000 microU/ml insulin and 11-13 mM glucose...... the perfusion muscle glycogen synthase activity decreased and free intracellular glucose and glucose 6-phosphate increased indicating that glucose disposal was impaired. However, glucose transport as measured by the uptake of 3-O-[14C]methyl-D-glucose was also markedly decreased after 5 and 7 h of perfusion...

  14. Glycogen synthesis after road cycling in the fed state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinert, A; Slivka, D; Cuddy, J; Ruby, B

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of a recovery beverage immediately after exercise on rates of muscle glycogen resynthesis in response to road cycling when nutritional supplementation was supplied during exercise and a solid meal was served two hours after exercise. Eight trained male cyclists, (25+/-4 years, 69.3+/-5.2 kg, VO2 peak=4.5+/-0.4 L.min(-1)) performed two 62 km outdoor training rides in a double-blind, randomized cross-over experiment. Subjects received a food bar and a commercial sport drink during each ride. A recovery beverage (40 g CHO+20 g PRO) or a placebo (PL) was administered 30 min post-exercise. At 2 h post-exercise, a solid meal was provided for both trials. There was no difference between trials at any time point for glycogen (140+/-9, 56+/-8, and 70+/-8 mmol.kg(-1)wet wt.(-1).hr.(-1) for pre, post, and 4 h post, respectively). The addition of a supplemental recovery beverage ingested soon after exercise did not significantly increase the rate of muscle glycogen resynthesis after 4 h of recovery when nutritional supplementation is provided during exercise and a meal is consumed 2 h after exercise.

  15. Dietary Management of the Ketogenic Glycogen Storage Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaustuv Bhattacharya MBBS, MRCPCH, FRACP, MD

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The glycogen storage diseases (GSDs comprise a group of rare inherited disorders of glycogen metabolism. The hepatic glycogenolytic forms of these disorders are typically associated with hypoglycemia and hepatomegaly. For GSD I, secondary metabolic disturbances include fasting hyperlactatemia, hyperuricemia, and hyperlipidemia. Glycogen storage disease III is caused by reduced activity of the debrancher enzyme, GSD VI by phosphorylase, and GSD IX by phosphorylase kinase. It has often been reported that the non-GSD I group of disorders have a benign course. However, myopathy, cardiomyopathy, and cirrhosis have been reported significant clinical morbidities associated with GSD III and IX in particular. There have been a range of reports indicating high-protein diets, high-fat diets, medium chain triglyceride (MCT, modified Atkins diet, and therapeutic ketones as rescuing severe phenotypes of GSD III in particular. The etiology of these severe phenotypes has not been defined. Cases presented in this report indicate potential harm from excessive simple sugar use in GSD IX C. Review of the literature indicates that most interventions have reduced the glycemic load and provide alternate substrates for energy in rescue situations. Prevention of complications is most likely to occur with a mixed balanced low glycemic index diet potentially with relative increases in protein.

  16. Dietary Management of the Ketogenic Glycogen Storage Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaustuv Bhattacharya MBBS, MRCPCH, FRACP, MD

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The glycogen storage diseases (GSDs comprise a group of rare inherited disorders of glycogen metabolism. The hepatic glycogenolytic forms of these disorders are typically associated with hypoglycemia and hepatomegaly. For GSD I, secondary metabolic disturbances include fasting hyperlactatemia, hyperuricemia, and hyperlipidemia. Glycogen storage disease III is caused by reduced activity of the debrancher enzyme, GSD VI by phosphorylase, and GSD IX by phosphorylase kinase. It has often been reported that the non-GSD I group of disorders have a benign course. However, myopathy, cardiomyopathy, and cirrhosis have been reported significant clinical morbidities associated with GSD III and IX in particular. There have been a range of reports indicating high-protein diets, high-fat diets, medium chain triglyceride (MCT, modified Atkins diet, and therapeutic ketones as rescuing severe phenotypes of GSD III in particular. The etiology of these severe phenotypes has not been defined. Cases presented in this report indicate potential harm from excessive simple sugar use in GSD IX C. Review of the literature indicates that most interventions have reduced the glycemic load and provide alternate substrates for energy in rescue situations. Prevention of complications is most likely to occur with a mixed balanced low glycemic index diet potentially with relative increases in protein.

  17. Neonatally induced diabetes: liver glycogen storage in pregnant rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabela Lovizutto Iessi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this sstudy was to evaluate the liver glycogen storage in pregnant rats presenting neonatal streptozotocin-induced diabetes and to establish a relation with glycemia and insulin levels. Wistar rats were divided in to two groups: 1 Mild Diabetes (STZ - received streptozotocin (glycemia from 120 to 300 mg/dL, 2 Control - received vehicle (glycemia below 120 mg/dL. At days 0, 7, 14 and 21 of the pregnancy, body weight and glycemia were evaluated. At day 21 of the pregnancy, the rats were anesthetized for blood and liver collection so as to determine insulin and liver glycogen, which showed no changes in the STZ group as compared to the controls. In the STZ group, maternal weight gain were lower as compared to those in the control group. Significantly increased glycemia was observed at days 0 and 14 of the pregnancy in the STZ group. Therefore, neonatally induced diabetes in the rats did not cause metabolic changes that impaired insulin and liver glycogen relation in these rats.

  18. Metabolic correlation between polyol and energy-storing carbohydrate under osmotic and oxidative stress condition in Moniliella megachiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yosuke; Iwata, Hisashi; Yoshida, Junjiro; Ogihara, Jun; Kato, Jun; Kasumi, Takafumi

    2015-10-01

    Moniliella megachiliensis, the osmo-tolerant basidiomycetous yeast was found to accumulate intracellularly energy-storing carbohydrates (trehalose and glycogen) along with polyols (glycerol and erythritol) up to stationary growth phase. In trehalose-loaded cell, osmotic-stress resulted in the rapid generation of glycerol, and oxidative stress with menadione resulted in the rapid generation of erythritol. Under either of these conditions, the levels of the energy-storing carbohydrates were depleted, while little glucose uptake was observed. These results suggested that the intracellular pools of trehalose and glycogen were rapidly converted to glycerol in response to osmotic stress, and to erythritol in response to oxidative stress and altered redox balance. Expression of tps1 encoding trehalose synthetic enzymes paralleled trehalose accumulation in the cell during the culture in 2% glucose, in contrast, expression of tpp1 or tpp2 encoding trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase was little increased under the same condition. Expression of tre (tre1/tre2) encoding trehalose hydrolase (trehalase) increased with time associated with depletion of trehalose during oxidative stress. From these results, we concluded that glycerol and erythritol, the compatible solutes in M. megachiliensis were metabolically interrelated to energy-storing carbohydrates such as trehalose or glycogen during conditions of osmotic or oxidative stress. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Development of a quantitative 96-well method to image glycogen storage in primary rat hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilling, James; Garside, Helen; Ainscow, Edward

    2010-08-01

    Within the liver, hormonal control of glycogen metabolism allows for rapid release and uptake of glucose from the circulation, providing a reserve of glucose that can be utilised by other organs. Traditionally, cellular glycogen storage has been detected using Periodic acid Schiff (PAS) staining of histopathology samples or a biochemical assay. Colorimetric measurement of glycogen content using PAS staining is hard to quantify whilst biochemical techniques give limited information about events such as cytotoxicity or allow analysis of hepatic heterogeneity. Here, we describe the development of an imaging based method to quantify glycogen storage in 96-well cultures of primary rat hepatocytes using the inherent fluorescence properties of the Schiff reagent. PAS-stained hepatocytes were imaged using an automated fluorescent microscope, with the amount of glycogen present in each cell being quantified. Using this technique, we found an increase in glycogen storage in response to insulin (EC50 = 0.31 nM) that was in agreement with that determined using biochemical quantification (EC50 = 0.32 nM). Furthermore, a dose dependent increase in glycogen storage was also seen in response to glycogen synthase kinase inhibitors and glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors. This technique allows rapid assessment of cellular glycogen storage in response to hormones and small molecule inhibitors.

  20. Glycogen Repletion in Brown Adipose Tissue upon Refeeding Is Primarily Driven by Phosphorylation-Independent Mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M Carmean

    Full Text Available Glycogen storage in brown adipose tissue (BAT is generally thought to take place through passive, substrate-driven activation of glycogenesis rather than programmatic shifts favoring or opposing the storage and/or retention of glycogen. This perception exists despite a growing body of evidence suggesting that BAT glycogen storage is actively regulated by covalent modification of key glycogen-metabolic enzymes, protein turnover, and endocrine hormone signaling. Members of one such class of covalent-modification regulators, glycogen-binding Phosphoprotein Phosphatase-1 (PP1-regulatory subunits (PPP1Rs, targeting PP1 to glycogen-metabolic enzymes, were dynamically regulated in response to 24 hr of starvation and/or 24 hr of starvation followed by ad libitum refeeding. Over-expression of the PPP1R Protein Targeting to Glycogen (PTG, under the control of the aP2 promoter in mice, inactivated glycogen phosphorylase (GP and enhanced basal- and starvation-state glycogen storage. Total interscapular BAT glycogen synthase and the constitutive activity of GS were conditionally affected. During starvation, glucose-6-phosphate (G-6-P levels and the relative phosphorylation of Akt (p-Ser-473-Akt were both increased in PTG-overexpressing (Tg mice, suggesting that elevated glycogen storage during starvation modifies broader cellular metabolic pathways. During refeeding, Tg and WT mice reaccumulated glycogen similarly despite altered GS and GP activities. All observations during refeeding suggest that the phosphorylation states of GS and GP are not physiologically rate-controlling, despite there being a clear balance of endogenous kinase- and phosphatase activities. The studies presented here reveal IBAT glycogen storage to be a tightly-regulated process at all levels, with potential effects on nutrient sensing in vivo.

  1. Stochastic joint replenishment problem : a new policy and analysis for single location and two eclehon inventory systems

    OpenAIRE

    Özkaya, Banu Yüksel

    2005-01-01

    Cataloged from PDF version of article. In this study we examine replenishment coordination strategies for multiple item or multiple location inventory systems In particular we propose a new parsimonious control policy for the stochastic joint replenishment problem We rst study the single location setting with multiple items under this policy An extensive numerical study indicates that the proposed policy achieves signi cant cost improvements in comparison with the existing ...

  2. Small store presence in Japan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Carree (Martin); J.C.A. Potjes; A.R. Thurik (Roy)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractThe determinants of the development of small store presence in Japan are investigated using a fixed effects multinomial logit market share model. Large stores tend to have higher market shares in shop-types with increasing shares in consumer expenditures, increasing inventory turnover,

  3. Small store presence in Japan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Carree (Martin); J.C.A. Potjes; A.R. Thurik (Roy)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractThe determinants of the development of small store presence in Japan are investigated using a fixed effects multinomial logit market share model. Large stores tend to have higher market shares in shop-types with increasing shares in consumer expenditures, increasing inventory turnover, a

  4. Dysregulation of multiple facets of glycogen metabolism in a murine model of Pompe disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin M Taylor

    Full Text Available Pompe disease, also known as glycogen storage disease (GSD type II, is caused by deficiency of lysosomal acid α-glucosidase (GAA. The resulting glycogen accumulation causes a spectrum of disease severity ranging from a rapidly progressive course that is typically fatal by 1 to 2 years of age to a slower progressive course that causes significant morbidity and early mortality in children and adults. The aim of this study is to better understand the biochemical consequences of glycogen accumulation in the Pompe mouse. We evaluated glycogen metabolism in heart, triceps, quadriceps, and liver from wild type and several strains of GAA(-/- mice. Unexpectedly, we observed that lysosomal glycogen storage correlated with a robust increase in factors that normally promote glycogen biosynthesis. The GAA(-/- mouse strains were found to have elevated glycogen synthase (GS, glycogenin, hexokinase, and glucose-6-phosphate (G-6-P, the allosteric activator of GS. Treating GAA(-/- mice with recombinant human GAA (rhGAA led to a dramatic reduction in the levels of glycogen, GS, glycogenin, and G-6-P. Lysosomal glycogen storage also correlated with a dysregulation of phosphorylase, which normally breaks down cytoplasmic glycogen. Analysis of phosphorylase activity confirmed a previous report that, although phosphorylase protein levels are identical in muscle lysates from wild type and GAA(-/- mice, phosphorylase activity is suppressed in the GAA(-/- mice in the absence of AMP. This reduction in phosphorylase activity likely exacerbates lysosomal glycogen accumulation. If the dysregulation in glycogen metabolism observed in the mouse model of Pompe disease also occurs in Pompe patients, it may contribute to the observed broad spectrum of disease severity.

  5. Free glycogen in vaginal fluids is associated with Lactobacillus colonization and low vaginal pH.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paria Mirmonsef

    Full Text Available Lactobacillus dominates the lower genital tract microbiota of many women, producing a low vaginal pH, and is important for healthy pregnancy outcomes and protection against several sexually transmitted pathogens. Yet, factors that promote Lactobacillus remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that the amount of free glycogen in the lumen of the lower genital tract is an important determinant of Lactobacillus colonization and a low vaginal pH.Free glycogen in lavage samples was quantified. Pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene was used to identify microbiota from 21 African American women collected over 8-11 years.Free glycogen levels varied greatly between women and even in the same woman. Samples with the highest free glycogen had a corresponding median genital pH that was significantly lower (pH 4.4 than those with low glycogen (pH 5.8; p<0.001. The fraction of the microbiota consisting of Lactobacillus was highest in samples with high glycogen versus those with low glycogen (median = 0.97 vs. 0.05, p<0.001. In multivariable analysis, having 1 vs. 0 male sexual partner in the past 6 months was negatively associated, while BMI ≥30 was positively associated with glycogen. High concentrations of glycogen corresponded to higher levels of L. crispatus and L. jensenii, but not L. iners.These findings show that free glycogen in genital fluid is associated with a genital microbiota dominated by Lactobacillus, suggesting glycogen is important for maintaining genital health. Treatments aimed at increasing genital free glycogen might impact Lactobacillus colonization.

  6. Microchemostat array with small-volume fraction replenishment for steady-state microbial culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaewon; Wu, Jianzhang; Polymenis, Michael; Han, Arum

    2013-11-07

    A chemostat is a bioreactor in which microorganisms can be cultured at steady-state by controlling the rate of culture medium inflow and waste outflow, thus maintaining media composition over time. Even though many microbial studies could greatly benefit from studying microbes in steady-state conditions, high instrument cost, complexity, and large reagent consumption hamper the routine use of chemostats. Microfluidic-based chemostats (i.e. microchemostats) can operate with significantly smaller reagent consumption while providing accurate chemostatic conditions at orders of magnitude lower cost compared to conventional chemostats. Also, microchemostats have the potential to significantly increase the throughput by integrating arrays of microchemostats. We present a microchemostat array with a unique two-depth culture chamber design that enables small-volume fraction replenishment of culture medium as low as 1% per replenishment cycle in a 250 nl volume. A system having an array of 8 microchemostats on a 40 × 60 mm(2) footprint could be automatically operated in parallel by a single controller unit as a demonstration for potential high throughput microbial studies. The model organism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, successfully reached a stable steady-state of different cell densities as a demonstration of the chemostatic functionality by programming the dilution rates. Chemostatic functionality of the system was further confirmed by quantifying the budding index as a function of dilution rate, a strong indicator of growth-dependent cell division. In addition, the small-volume fraction replenishment feature minimized the cell density fluctuation during the culture. The developed system provides a robust, low-cost, and higher throughput solution to furthering studies in microbial physiology.

  7. Modulation of gene expression in precancerous rat esophagus by dietary zinc deficit and replenishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang-Gong; Zhang, Liang; Jiang, Yubao; Chatterjee, Devjani; Croce, Carlo M; Huebner, Kay; Fong, Louise Y Y

    2005-09-01

    Zinc deficiency in rats enhances esophageal cell proliferation, causes alteration in gene expression, and promotes esophageal carcinogenesis. Zinc replenishment rapidly induces apoptosis in the esophageal epithelium thereby reversing cell proliferation and carcinogenesis. To identify zinc-responsive genes responsible for these divergent effects, we did oligonucleotide array-based gene expression profiling analyses in the precancerous zinc-deficient esophagus and in zinc-replenished esophagi after treatment with intragastric zinc compared with zinc-sufficient esophagi. Thirty-three genes (21 up-regulated and 12 down-regulated) showed a > or = 2-fold change in expression in the hyperplastic zinc-deficient versus zinc-sufficient esophageal epithelia. Expression of genes involved in cell division, survival, adhesion, and tumorigenesis were markedly changed. The zinc-sensitive gene metallothionein-1 (MT-1 was up-regulated 7-fold, the opposite of results for small intestine and liver under zinc-deficient conditions. Keratin 14 (KRT14, a biomarker in esophageal tumorigenesis), carbonic anhydrase II (CAII, a regulator of acid-base homeostasis), and cyclin B were up-regulated >4-fold. Immunohistochemistry showed that metallothionein and keratin 14 proteins were overexpressed in zinc-deficient esophagus, as well as in lingual and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma from carcinogen-treated rats, emphasizing their roles in carcinogenesis. Calponin 1 (CNN1, an actin cross-linking regulator) was down-regulated 0.2-fold. Within hours after oral zinc treatment, the abnormal expression of 29 of 33 genes returned to near zinc-sufficient levels, accompanied by reversal of the precancerous phenotype. Thus, we have identified new molecular markers in precancerous esophagus and showed their restoration by zinc replenishment, providing insights into the interaction between zinc and gene expression in esophageal cancer development and prevention.

  8. A unified convergence theory of a numerical method,and applications to the replenishment policies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MI Xiang-jiang(宓湘江); WANG Xing-hua(王兴华)

    2004-01-01

    In determining the replenishment policy for an inventory system, some researchers advocated that the iterative method of Newton could be applied to the derivative of the total cost function in order to get the optimal solution. But this approach requires calculation of the second derivative of the function. Avoiding this complex computation we use another iterative method presented by the second author. One of the goals of this paper is to present a unified convergence theory of this method. Then we give a numerical example to show the application of our theory.

  9. Optimal Replenishment Policy for Weibull-Distributed Deteriorating Items with Trapezoidal Demand Rate and Partial Backlogging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianxia Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An inventory model for Weibull-distributed deteriorating items is considered so as to minimize the total cost per unit time in this paper. The model starts with shortage, allowed partial backlogging, and trapezoidal demand rate. By analyzing the model, an efficient solution procedure is proposed to determine the optimal replenishment and the optimal order quantity and the average total costs are also obtained. Finally, numerical examples are provided to illustrate the theoretical results and a sensitivity analysis of the major parameters with respect to the stability of optimal solution is also carried out.

  10. A unified convergence theory of a numerical method, and applications to the replenishment policies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宓湘江; 王兴华

    2004-01-01

    In determining the replenishment policy for an inventory system, some researchers advocated that the iterative method of Newton could be applied to the derivative of the total cost function in order to get the optimal solution. But this approach requires calculation of the second derivative of the function. Avoiding this complex computation we use another iterative method presented by the second author. One of the goals of this paper is to present a unified convergence theory of this method. Then we give a numerical example to show the application of our theory.

  11. An Innovative Heuristic in Multi-Item Replenishment Problem for One Warehouse and N Retailers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yugowati Praharsi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Joint replenishment problem (JRP is a type of inventory model which aims to minimize the total inventory cost consisting of major ordering cost, minor ordering cost and inventory holding cost. Different from previous papers, this study considers one warehouse, multi items and N retailers. An innovative heuristic approach is developed to solve the problem. In this paper, we consider a multi echelon inventory system and seek to find a balance between the order cost and the inventory holding costs at each installation. The computational results show that the innovative heuristic provides a near exact optimal solution, but is more efficient in terms of the computational time and the iteration number.

  12. Constraints on the Rates of Replenishment, Magma Mixing, and Crystal Recycling at Santorini Volcano, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, V. M.; Davidson, J. P.; Morgan, D. J.; Jerram, D. A.

    2007-12-01

    Santorini is a young, active volcano, which preserves abundant evidence for open-system processes such as magma replenishment and crystal recycling, and thus represents an ideal system in which to study magma chamber dynamics. Santorini is the largest volcanic centre in the Aegean arc, with an eruptive history spanning more than 250,000 years over two eruptive cycles. The cycles are dominated by extended periods of effusive shield-building activity with occasional large-magnitude explosive eruptions, the Minoan eruption of ~3600 years ago being the most recent. Current activity consists of a phase of post-caldera reconstruction, focused recently on the intra-caldera Kameni islands. Microsampling to measure 87Sr/86Sr ratios of plagioclase cores indicates the presence of a complex plumbing system beneath Santorini. Large rhyodacitic deposits typically contain a mafic component, interpreted as the eruption trigger. In some cases, the mafic magma groundmass and phenocrysts are isotopically similar to their rhyodacite host; other deposits show the opposite, implying the coexistence of isotopically distinct magma batches. To add further complexity, plagioclase phenocrysts are in some cases in equilibrium with their groundmass while others show the reverse, implying modification due to crystal recycling or shallow mixing processes prior to eruption. Mafic enclaves in the recent Kameni lavas, again interpreted as the probable eruption trigger, provide some constraints on the rates of these recycling, mixing, and triggering processes. Glomerocrysts and xenocrysts of recycled gabbroic cumulate material are present in a number of Kameni enclaves. Isotopic and chemical disequilibrium between the cumulate crystals and the host indicate that these fragments are derived from pre- existing crystal mush piles pervaded by the replenishing melts as they migrated to shallow levels, creating disequilibrium between the cumulate mineral cores and the replenishing melts. 87Sr/86Sr isotope

  13. A unified convergence theory of a numerical method, and applications to the replenishment policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Xiang-jiang; Wang, Xing-hua

    2004-01-01

    In determining the replenishment policy for an inventory system, some researchers advocated that the iterative method of Newton could be applied to the derivative of the total cost function in order to get the optimal solution. But this approach requires calculation of the second derivative of the function. Avoiding this complex computation we use another iterative method presented by the second author. One of the goals of this paper is to present a unified convergence theory of this method. Then we give a numerical example to show the application of our theory.

  14. Investigating whether it is optimal to make replenishments simultaneously in dual source model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abginehchi, Soheil; Larsen, Christian

    be relaxed. We study a dual source system with non-identical suppliers and model the problem as a semi-Markov decision model, allowing the decision maker the choice whether he will simultaneously issue two orders to both suppliers or he will issue the orders to suppliers at two different times.......In multiple sourcing, when supplier lead times are stochastic it makes sense to split any replenishment order into several smaller orders to pool lead time risks. In literature it is always assumed these orders are issued simultaneously to the suppliers. Here we let this simultaneousness assumption...

  15. Are You Storing Food Safely?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... should be stored in tight containers. With commercially frozen foods, it's important to follow the cooking instructions on ... It appears as grayish-brown leathery spots on frozen food. It can occur when food is not securely ...

  16. Information from the central stores

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2010-01-01

    All items sold in the CERN shop (Bldg. 33) are now available in the central stores (Bldg. 73) and can be purchased on-line via EDH “Material Request” or at the “Emergency Desk” of the stores on the ground floor of Bldg. 73. These items are visible in the CERN catalogue under the “SCEM” codes beginning with 92. Department of General Infrastructure Services (GS) GS-SEM Group

  17. Enzymatic description of the anhydrofructose pathway of glycogen degradation. I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Shukun; Refdahl, Charlotte; Lundt, Inge

    2004-01-01

    The anhydrofructose pathway describes the degradation of glycogen and starch to metabolites via 1,5-anhydro-D-fructose (1,5AnFru). The enzyme catalyzing the first reaction step of this pathway, i.e., a-1,4-glucan lyase (EC 4.2.1.13), has been purified, cloned and characterized from fungi and red...... algae in our laboratory earlier. In the present study, two 1,5AnFru metabolizing enzymes were discovered in the fungus Anthracobia melaloma for the formation of ascopyrone P (APP), a fungal secondary metabolite exhibiting antibacterial and antioxidant activity. These are 1,5AnFru dehydratase (AFDH...

  18. CORPORATE REBRANDING OF GRAMEDIA STORE (CORPORATE REBRANDING DI GRAMEDIA STORE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Helena Kairupan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The purposes of this research are to determine the stages of analysis, planning, and evaluation of corporate rebranding process of Gramedia Book Store to be Gramedia Store to rise stakeholder’s awareness. The method used is descriptive qualitative with positivism paradigm. The technique of collecting data through in-depth interview, observation, and literature study. The result of this research showed the analysis stage by analyzing the market through insights and foresights, brand audit through SWOT analysis, and identifying opportunities. The planning stage is by determine the purpose of the planning process and then determine the target audience, consist of external and internal customer. The planning of external customer by renaming and change of corporate identity, and marketing planning using communication channel (above the line and below the line. The planning of internal customer by Brand Induction, training, inspiration briefing at store, and innovation competition. The evaluation of rebranding process of Gramedia Store is having a focus group discussion with customer, media monitoring, and presentation to BOD. Keywords : Process, Corporate Rebranding, Stakeholder Awareness, Corporate Identity, Gramedia Store Abstrak.Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui bagaimana tahapan analisis, perencanaan, dan evaluasi proses corporate rebranding Gramedia Book Store menjadi Gramedia Store untuk meningkatkan stakeholder awareness. Pendekatan yang digunakan adalah kualitatif dengan paradigma positivisme dan jenis studi deksriptif. Teknik pengumpulan data yang dilakukan melalui wawancara mendalam, observasi, dan studi pustaka. Berdasarkan hasil penelitian, tahapan analisis dilakukan dengan menganalisis pasar melalui insights dan foresights, audit merek dengan analisis SWOT, dan mengidentifikasi peluang. Dalam tahapan perencanaan dengan menentukan tujuan kemudian menentukan target audiens, yaitu eksternal dan internal. Perencanaan

  19. Genetic connectivity among and self-replenishment within island populations of a restricted range subtropical reef fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Martin H; Hobbs, Jean-Paul A; Jones, Geoffrey P; van Herwerden, Lynne

    2012-01-01

    Marine protected areas (MPAs) are increasingly being advocated and implemented to protect biodiversity on coral reefs. Networks of appropriately sized and spaced reserves can capture a high proportion of species diversity, with gene flow among reserves presumed to promote long term resilience of populations to spatially variable threats. However, numerically rare small range species distributed among isolated locations appear to be at particular risk of extinction and the likely benefits of MPA networks are uncertain. Here we use mitochondrial and microsatellite data to infer evolutionary and contemporary gene flow among isolated locations as well as levels of self-replenishment within locations of the endemic anemonefish Amphiprion mccullochi, restricted to three MPA offshore reefs in subtropical East Australia. We infer high levels of gene flow and genetic diversity among locations over evolutionary time, but limited contemporary gene flow amongst locations and high levels of self-replenishment (68 to 84%) within locations over contemporary time. While long distance dispersal explained the species' integrity in the past, high levels of self-replenishment suggest locations are predominantly maintained by local replenishment. Should local extinction occur, contemporary rescue effects through large scale connectivity are unlikely. For isolated islands with large numbers of endemic species, and high local replenishment, there is a high premium on local species-specific management actions.

  20. Genetic connectivity among and self-replenishment within island populations of a restricted range subtropical reef fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin H van der Meer

    Full Text Available Marine protected areas (MPAs are increasingly being advocated and implemented to protect biodiversity on coral reefs. Networks of appropriately sized and spaced reserves can capture a high proportion of species diversity, with gene flow among reserves presumed to promote long term resilience of populations to spatially variable threats. However, numerically rare small range species distributed among isolated locations appear to be at particular risk of extinction and the likely benefits of MPA networks are uncertain. Here we use mitochondrial and microsatellite data to infer evolutionary and contemporary gene flow among isolated locations as well as levels of self-replenishment within locations of the endemic anemonefish Amphiprion mccullochi, restricted to three MPA offshore reefs in subtropical East Australia. We infer high levels of gene flow and genetic diversity among locations over evolutionary time, but limited contemporary gene flow amongst locations and high levels of self-replenishment (68 to 84% within locations over contemporary time. While long distance dispersal explained the species' integrity in the past, high levels of self-replenishment suggest locations are predominantly maintained by local replenishment. Should local extinction occur, contemporary rescue effects through large scale connectivity are unlikely. For isolated islands with large numbers of endemic species, and high local replenishment, there is a high premium on local species-specific management actions.

  1. National Defense: Department of Defense’s Waiver of Competitive Prototyping Requirement for the Navy’s Fleet Replenishment Oiler Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-08

    Defense: Department of Defense’s Waiver of Competitive Prototyping Requirement for the Navy’s Fleet Replenishment Oiler Program The Weapon Systems...Department of Defense’s Waiver of Competitive Prototyping Requirement for the Navy’s Fleet Replenishment Oiler Program 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...15, 2014, we received notice from DOD that it had waived the competitive prototyping requirement for the Fleet Replenishment Oiler (T-AO(X)) program

  2. Ethane's 12C/13C Ratio in Titan: Implications for Methane Replenishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Donald E.; Nixon, C. A.; Romani, P. N.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Sada, P. V.; Lunsford, A. W.; Boyle, R. J.; Hesman, B. E.; McCabe, G. H.

    2009-01-01

    As the .main destination of carbon in the destruction of methane in the atmosphere of Titan, ethane provides information about the carbon isotopic composition of the reservoir from which methane is replenished. If the amount of methane entering the atmosphere is presently equal to the amount converted to ethane, the 12C/13C ratio in ethane should be close to the ratio in the reservoir. We have measured the 12C/13C ratio in ethane both with Cassini CIRS(exp 1) and from the ground and find that it is very close to the telluric standard and outer planet values (89), consistent with a primordial origin for the methane reservoir. The lower 12C/13C ratio measured for methane by Huygens GCMS (82.3) can be explained if the conversion of CH4 to CH3 (and C2H6) favors 12C over 13C with a carbon kinetic isotope effect of 1.08. The time required for the atmospheric methane to reach equilibrium, i.e., for replenishment to equal destruction, is approximately 5 methane atmospheric lifetimes.

  3. Regulation of Dense-Core Granule Replenishment by Autocrine BMP Signalling in Drosophila Secondary Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redhai, Siamak; Hellberg, Josephine E E U; Wainwright, Mark; Perera, Sumeth W; Castellanos, Felix; Kroeger, Benjamin; Gandy, Carina; Leiblich, Aaron; Corrigan, Laura; Hilton, Thomas; Patel, Benjamin; Fan, Shih-Jung; Hamdy, Freddie; Goberdhan, Deborah C I; Wilson, Clive

    2016-10-01

    Regulated secretion by glands and neurons involves release of signalling molecules and enzymes selectively concentrated in dense-core granules (DCGs). Although we understand how many secretagogues stimulate DCG release, how DCG biogenesis is then accelerated to replenish the DCG pool remains poorly characterised. Here we demonstrate that each prostate-like secondary cell (SC) in the paired adult Drosophila melanogaster male accessory glands contains approximately ten large DCGs, which are loaded with the Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) ligand Decapentaplegic (Dpp). These DCGs can be marked in living tissue by a glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI) lipid-anchored form of GFP. In virgin males, BMP signalling is sporadically activated by constitutive DCG secretion. Upon mating, approximately four DCGs are typically released immediately, increasing BMP signalling, primarily via an autocrine mechanism. Using inducible knockdown specifically in adult SCs, we show that secretion requires the Soluble NSF Attachment Protein, SNAP24. Furthermore, mating-dependent BMP signalling not only promotes cell growth, but is also necessary to accelerate biogenesis of new DCGs, restoring DCG number within 24 h. Our analysis therefore reveals an autocrine BMP-mediated feedback mechanism for matching DCG release to replenishment as secretion rates fluctuate, and might explain why in other disease-relevant systems, like pancreatic β-cells, BMP signalling is also implicated in the control of secretion.

  4. Active gas replenishment and sensing of the wetting state in a submerged superhydrophobic surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Ben P; Bartlett, Philip N; Wood, Robert J K

    2017-02-15

    Previously superhydrophobic surfaces have demonstrated effective drag reduction by trapping a lubricious gas layer on the surface with micron-sized hydrophobic features. However, prolonged reduction of drag is hindered by the dissolution of the gas into the surrounding water. This paper demonstrates a novel combination of superhydrophobic surface design and electrochemical control methods which allow quick determination of the wetted area and a gas replenishment mechanism to maintain the desirable gas filled state. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy is used to measure the capacitance of the surface which is shown to be proportional to the solid/liquid interface area. To maintain a full gas coverage for prolonged periods the surface is held at an electrical potential which leads to hydrogen evolution. In the desired gas filled state the water does not touch the metallic area of the surface, however after gas has dissolved the water touches the metal which closes the electrochemical circuit causing hydrogen to be produced replenishing the gas in the surface and returning to the gas filled state; in this way the system is self-actuating. This type of surface and electrochemical control shows promise for applications where the gas filled state of superhydrophobic surfaces must be maintained when submerged for long periods of time.

  5. Enhanced Promoter Activity by Replenishment of Sigma Factor rpoE in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liuni; Li, Ying; Tian, Pingfang

    2016-06-01

    Plasmid-dependent overexpression of enzyme(s) aims to divert carbon flux toward a desired compound. One drawback of this strategy is compromise of growth due to massive consumption of host resources. Here we show that replenishment of sigma factor rpoE improves the growth of Klebsiella pneumoniae. The gene rpoE was expressed alone or coexpressed with Ald4 (an aldehyde dehydrogenase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae) in K. pneumoniae. We found that the Ald4 activity was higher in the strain coexpressing Ald4 and rpoE (32.3 U/mg) than that expressing Ald4 alone (29.9 U/mg). Additionally, under shake-flask conditions, the strain coexpressing Ald4 and rpoE produced 0.5 g 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3-HP) and 9.8 g 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PD) per liter in 24 h, which were 1.6- and 0.85-fold enhancement, respectively, compared to those expressing Ald4 alone. Notably, under non-optimized bioreactor conditions, the strain coexpressing Ald4 and rpoE produced 13.5 g 3-HP and 37.8 g 1,3-PD per liter with glycerol conversion ratio of 0.45 mol/mol. These results indicate that replenishment of rpoE enhanced promoter activity and stimulated glycerol consumption.

  6. Bassoon-disruption slows vesicle replenishment and induces homeostatic plasticity at a CNS synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza Schulz, Alejandro; Jing, Zhizi; Sánchez Caro, Juan María; Wetzel, Friederike; Dresbach, Thomas; Strenzke, Nicola; Wichmann, Carolin; Moser, Tobias

    2014-03-03

    Endbulb of Held terminals of auditory nerve fibers (ANF) transmit auditory information at hundreds per second to bushy cells (BCs) in the anteroventral cochlear nucleus (AVCN). Here, we studied the structure and function of endbulb synapses in mice that lack the presynaptic scaffold bassoon and exhibit reduced ANF input into the AVCN. Endbulb terminals and active zones were normal in number and vesicle complement. Postsynaptic densities, quantal size and vesicular release probability were increased while vesicle replenishment and the standing pool of readily releasable vesicles were reduced. These opposing effects canceled each other out for the first evoked EPSC, which showed unaltered amplitude. We propose that ANF activity deprivation drives homeostatic plasticity in the AVCN involving synaptic upscaling and increased intrinsic BC excitability. In vivo recordings from individual mutant BCs demonstrated a slightly improved response at sound onset compared to ANF, likely reflecting the combined effects of ANF convergence and homeostatic plasticity. Further, we conclude that bassoon promotes vesicular replenishment and, consequently, a large standing pool of readily releasable synaptic vesicles at the endbulb synapse.

  7. Real-time ultrasound brain perfusion imaging with analysis of microbubble replenishment in acute MCA stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Rolf; Diels, Anna; Pettenpohl, Johanna; Kablau, Micha; Brade, Joachim; Hennerici, Michael G; Meairs, Stephen

    2011-08-01

    Real-time ultrasound perfusion imaging (rt-UPI) allows visualization of microbubbles flowing through the cerebral microvasculature. We hypothesized that analysis of microbubble tissue replenishment would enable for characterization of perfusion deficits in acute middle cerebral artery (MCA) territory stroke. Twenty-three patients (mean age 70.2 ± 13.2 years, 9 weeks) were included. Sequential images of bubble replenishment were acquired by transcranial rt-UPI at low mechanical index immediately after microbubble destruction. Different parameters were calculated from regions of interest (ROIs): real-time time to peak (rt-TTP), rise rate (β), and plateau (A) of acoustic intensity, and A × β was used as an index of blood flow. Results were compared with diffusion-weighted and perfusion magnetic resonance imaging. Parameters of rt-UPI had lower values in ROIs of ischemic as compared with normal tissue (β=0.58 ± 0.40 versus 1.25 ± 0.83; P=0.001; A=1.44 ± 1.75 versus 2.63 ± 2.31; P=0.05; A × β=1.14 ± 2.25 versus 2.98 ± 2.70; P=0.01). Real-time time to peak was delayed in ischemic tissue (11.43 ± 2.67 versus 8.88 ± 1.66 seconds; Preplenishment correctly identifies ischemic brain tissue in acute MCA stroke.

  8. Modeling and optimization of the multiobjective stochastic joint replenishment and delivery problem under supply chain environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Qu, Hui; Liu, Shan; Dun, Cai-xia

    2013-01-01

    As a practical inventory and transportation problem, it is important to synthesize several objectives for the joint replenishment and delivery (JRD) decision. In this paper, a new multiobjective stochastic JRD (MSJRD) of the one-warehouse and n-retailer systems considering the balance of service level and total cost simultaneously is proposed. The goal of this problem is to decide the reasonable replenishment interval, safety stock factor, and traveling routing. Secondly, two approaches are designed to handle this complex multi-objective optimization problem. Linear programming (LP) approach converts the multi-objective to single objective, while a multi-objective evolution algorithm (MOEA) solves a multi-objective problem directly. Thirdly, three intelligent optimization algorithms, differential evolution algorithm (DE), hybrid DE (HDE), and genetic algorithm (GA), are utilized in LP-based and MOEA-based approaches. Results of the MSJRD with LP-based and MOEA-based approaches are compared by a contrastive numerical example. To analyses the nondominated solution of MOEA, a metric is also used to measure the distribution of the last generation solution. Results show that HDE outperforms DE and GA whenever LP or MOEA is adopted.

  9. Modeling and Optimization of the Multiobjective Stochastic Joint Replenishment and Delivery Problem under Supply Chain Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available As a practical inventory and transportation problem, it is important to synthesize several objectives for the joint replenishment and delivery (JRD decision. In this paper, a new multiobjective stochastic JRD (MSJRD of the one-warehouse and n-retailer systems considering the balance of service level and total cost simultaneously is proposed. The goal of this problem is to decide the reasonable replenishment interval, safety stock factor, and traveling routing. Secondly, two approaches are designed to handle this complex multi-objective optimization problem. Linear programming (LP approach converts the multi-objective to single objective, while a multi-objective evolution algorithm (MOEA solves a multi-objective problem directly. Thirdly, three intelligent optimization algorithms, differential evolution algorithm (DE, hybrid DE (HDE, and genetic algorithm (GA, are utilized in LP-based and MOEA-based approaches. Results of the MSJRD with LP-based and MOEA-based approaches are compared by a contrastive numerical example. To analyses the nondominated solution of MOEA, a metric is also used to measure the distribution of the last generation solution. Results show that HDE outperforms DE and GA whenever LP or MOEA is adopted.

  10. [Study on quality evaluation of Panax ginseng based on effects for replenishing qi and preventing exhaustion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liyan; Tian, Yixin; Li, Haitao; Wang, Li; Lv, Xiaojun

    2012-07-01

    Based on the effect for replenishing Qi and preventing exhaustion, this essay provides a method to rebuild the quality evaluation system of Panax ginseng. As an independent medical system, the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) science lacks enough credible evidences to support its theory and thereby wants more relevant studies. Current, it is a misunderstanding for experimental studies on TCM to prove TCM drugs from the angle of western medicine. Therefore, following study modes are recommended to researchers focusing on either the theory of the unique importance of class origin or the theory of the unique importance of techniques. Under the guidance of TCM theories, a new TCM assessment mode, consisting of clinical efficacy, pharmacological effect and effective components, is established in line with clinical application of TCMs. Studies on Chemical fingerprint or active ingredient are made on effective components. In-depth studies are worth to the viewpoint to rebuild the TCM quality reassessment system. On the basis of analysis on ancient herbal literatures and experience in clinical application of TCMs, the author proves the irreplaceable effect of P. ginseng. (pure ginseng decoction) is to replenish Qi and prevent exhaustion. Based on the major effect, a pharmacological model is established in combination with modern clinical efficacy to screen effective components of ginseng herbs and make a quality assessment on safety and efficiency of clinical application of P. ginseng, in order to provide theoretical and experimental basis for cultivation, development and utilization of P. ginseng resources on Changbai mountain.

  11. Optimizing Multi-Product Multi-Constraint Inventory Control Systems with Stochastic Replenishments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allah Taleizadeh, Ata; Aryanezhad, Mir-Bahador; Niaki, Seyed Taghi Akhavan

    Multi-periodic inventory control problems are mainly studied employing two assumptions. The first is the continuous review, where depending on the inventory level orders can happen at any time and the other is the periodic review, where orders can only happen at the beginning of each period. In this study, we relax these assumptions and assume that the periodic replenishments are stochastic in nature. Furthermore, we assume that the periods between two replenishments are independent and identically random variables. For the problem at hand, the decision variables are of integer-type and there are two kinds of space and service level constraints for each product. We develop a model of the problem in which a combination of back-order and lost-sales are considered for the shortages. Then, we show that the model is of an integer-nonlinear-programming type and in order to solve it, a search algorithm can be utilized. We employ a simulated annealing approach and provide a numerical example to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed methodology.

  12. Stemflow of desert shrub and its significance in soil moisture replenishment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X.-P. Wang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Stemflow of xerophytic shrubs represents a significant component of water replenishment to the soil-root systems influences water utilization of plant roots at the stand scale, especially for water scarce desert ecosystems. In this study, stemflow of Caragana korshinskii was quantified by aluminum foil collar collection method at re-vegetated sand dunes of the Shapotou restored desert ecosystem in Northwestern China. Meanwhile, time domain reflectometry probes were inserted horizontally at 20 different soil profile depths under the C. korshinskii shrub to monitor soil moisture variation at hourly intervals. Results indicated that 2.2 mm precipitation were necessary for the generation of stemflow for C. korshinskii. Stemflow averaged 8% of the gross precipitation, and the average funneling ratio was as high as 90. The soil moisture in the uppermost soil profile was strongly correlated with individual rainfall and the stemflow strengthened this relationship. Therefore, it is favorable for infiltrated water redistribution in the deeper soil profile of the root zone. We conclude that stemflow contributes significantly to a positive soil moisture balance in the root zone and the replenishment of soil moisture at deeper soil layers. This plays an important role in plant survival and the general ecology of arid desert environments.

  13. Glycogen storage disease type I: clinical and laboratory profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berenice L. Santos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To characterize the clinical, laboratory, and anthropometric profile of a sample of Brazilian patients with glycogen storage disease type I managed at an outpatient referral clinic for inborn errors of metabolism. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional outpatient study based on a convenience sampling strategy. Data on diagnosis, management, anthropometric parameters, and follow-up were assessed. RESULTS: Twenty-one patients were included (median age 10 years, range 1-25 years, all using uncooked cornstarch therapy. Median age at diagnosis was 7 months (range, 1-132 months, and 19 patients underwent liver biopsy for diagnostic confirmation. Overweight, short stature, hepatomegaly, and liver nodules were present in 16 of 21, four of 21, nine of 14, and three of 14 patients, respectively. A correlation was found between height-for-age and BMI-for-age Z-scores (r = 0.561; p = 0.008. CONCLUSIONS: Diagnosis of glycogen storage disease type I is delayed in Brazil. Most patients undergo liver biopsy for diagnostic confirmation, even though the combination of a characteristic clinical presentation and molecular methods can provide a definitive diagnosis in a less invasive manner. Obesity is a side effect of cornstarch therapy, and appears to be associated with growth in these patients.

  14. TruStore: Implementing a Trusted Store for Android

    OpenAIRE

    Yury, Zhauniarovich; Olga, Gadyatskaya; Bruno, Crispo

    2013-01-01

    In the Android ecosystem, the process of verifying the integrity of downloaded apps is left to the user. Different from other systems, e.g., Apple, App Store, Google does not provide any certified vetting process for the Android apps. This choice has a lot of advantages but it is also the open door to possible attacks as the recent one shown by Bluebox. To address this issue, we present how to enable the deployment of application certification service, we called TruStores, for the Android pla...

  15. Technical note: A method for isolating glycogen granules from ruminal protozoa for further characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evaluation of physical, compositional, and digestion characteristics of protozoal glycogen is best performed on a pure substrate in order to avoid interference from other cell components. A method for isolating protozoal glycogen without use of detergents was developed. Rumen inoculum was incubated ...

  16. Acoustically Accessible Window Determination for Ultrasound Mediated Treatment of Glycogen Storage Disease Type Ia Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, S.; Raju, B.I.; Leyvi, E.; Weinstein, D.; Seip, R.

    2012-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSDIa) is caused by an inherited single-gene defect resulting in an impaired glycogen to glucose conversion pathway. Targeted ultrasound mediated delivery (USMD) of plasmid DNA to liver in conjunction with microbubbles may provide a potential treatment for GSDIa pat

  17. Increases in glycogenin and glycogenin mRNA accompany glycogen resynthesis in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shearer, Jane; Wilson, Rhonda J.; Battram, Danielle S.

    2005-01-01

    Glycogenin is the self-glycosylating protein primer that initiates glycogen granule formation. To examine the role of this protein during glycogen resynthesis, eight male subjects exercised to exhaustion on a cycle ergometer at 75% VO2 max followed by five 30-s sprints at maximal capacity to furt...

  18. Glycogen accumulation and degradation by the trichomonads Trichomonas vaginalis and Trichomonas tenax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Tyler J; Pradhan, Prajakta; Brittingham, Andrew; Wilson, Wayne A

    2012-01-01

    Several species of trichomonad have been shown to accumulate significant quantities of glycogen during growth, suggesting an important role for this compound in cell physiology. We provide the first analysis of the changes in glycogen content and glycogen phosphorylase activity that occur during in vitro growth of two trichomonad species: Trichomonas vaginalis and Trichomonas tenax. Both species accumulated glycogen following inoculation into fresh medium and utilized this compound during logarithmic growth. Glycogen phosphorylase activity also varied during growth in a species-specific manner. The expression of phosphorylase genes in T. vaginalis remained constant during growth and thus transcriptional control did not explain the observed fluctuations in phosphorylase activity. After cloning, expression, and purification, two recombinant glycogen phosphorylases from T. vaginalis and one recombinant glycogen phosphorylase from T. tenax had robust activity and, in contrast to many other eukaryotic glycogen phosphorylases, did not appear to be regulated by reversible protein phosphorylation. Furthermore, allosteric regulation, if present, was not mediated by compounds known to impact the activity of better characterized phosphorylases. © 2012 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2012 International Society of Protistologists.

  19. Isoform-selective regulation of glycogen phosphorylase by energy deprivation and phosphorylation in astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Margit S; Pedersen, Sofie E; Walls, Anne B;

    2015-01-01

    by determination of glycogen content showing an increase in glycogen levels following knockdown of either GPMM or GPBB. NE triggered glycogenolysis within 15 min in control cells and after GPBB knockdown. However, astrocytes in which expression of GPMM had been silenced showed a delay in response to NE...

  20. Dual regulation of muscle glycogen synthase during exercise by activation and compartmentalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prats, Clara; Helge, Jørn W; Nordby, Pernille;

    2009-01-01

    lateralis muscle of the previously reported mechanism of glycogen metabolism regulation in rabbit tibialis anterior muscle. After overnight low muscle glycogen level and/or in response to exhausting exercise-induced glycogenolysis, GS is associated with spherical structures at the I-band of sarcomeres....

  1. Hormonal control of hepatic glycogen metabolism in food-deprived, continuously swimming coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayan, M.M.; Maule, A.G.; Schreck, C.B.; Moon, T.W.

    1993-01-01

    The plasma cortisol concentration and liver cytosolic glucocorticoid receptor activities of continuously swimming, food-deprived coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) did not differ from those of resting, fed fish. Plasma glucose concentration was significantly higher in the exercising, starved fish, but there were no significant differences in either hepatic glycogen concentration or hepatic activities of glycogen phosphorylase, glycogen synthase, pyruvate kinase, or lactate dehydrogenase between the two groups. Total glucose production by hepatocytes did not differ significantly between the two groups; glycogen breakdown accounted for all the glucose produced in the resting, fed fish whereas it explained only 59% of the glucose production in the exercised animals. Epinephrine and glucagon stimulation of glucose production by hepatocytes was decreased in the exercised fish without significantly affecting hepatocyte glycogen breakdown in either group. Insulin prevented glycogen breakdown and enhanced glycogen deposition in exercised fish. The results indicate that food-deprived, continuously swimming coho salmon conserve glycogen by decreasing the responsiveness of hepatocytes to catabolic hormones and by increasing the responsiveness to insulin (anabolic hormone).

  2. Glycogenic hepatopathy, an underdiagnosed cause of relapsing hepatitis in uncontrolled type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkhy, Ahmed A. Al; Zaidi, Zafar A.; Babiker, Amir M.

    2017-01-01

    Glycogenic hepatopathy is a rare condition that causes significant hepatomegaly and elevated liver enzyme levels in uncontrolled type 1 diabetic patients. It develops due to excessive accumulation of glycogen in the hepatocytes. It is typically reversible with good glycemic control and rarely progresses to mild fibrosis, but not cirrhosis. PMID:28042636

  3. Muscle Glycogen Content Modifies SR Ca2 + Release Rate in Elite Endurance Athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gejl, Kasper Degn; Hvid, Lars G; Frandsen, Ulrik

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of muscle glycogen content on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) function and peak power output (Wpeak) in elite endurance athletes.......The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of muscle glycogen content on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) function and peak power output (Wpeak) in elite endurance athletes....

  4. Cinnamon increases liver glycogen in an animal model of insulin resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinnamon, and aqueous polyphenol extracts of cinnamon, improve insulin sensitivity in vitro, and in animal and human studies. Given the relationship between the glucose/insulin system and glycogen metabolism, the objective of this study was to determine the effects of cinnamon on glycogen synthesis...

  5. Glycogen Supercompensation in the Rat Brain After Acute Hypoglycemia is Independent of Glucose Levels During Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, João M N; Morgenthaler, Florence D; Gruetter, Rolf

    2017-01-12

    Patients with diabetes display a progressive decay in the physiological counter-regulatory response to hypoglycemia, resulting in hypoglycemia unawareness. The mechanism through which the brain adapts to hypoglycemia may involve brain glycogen. We tested the hypothesis that brain glycogen supercompensation following hypoglycemia depends on blood glucose levels during recovery. Conscious rats were submitted to hypoglycemia of 2 mmol/L for 90 min and allowed to recover at different glycemia, controlled by means of i.v. glucose infusion. Brain glycogen concentration was elevated above control levels after 24 h of recovery in the cortex, hippocampus and striatum. This glycogen supercompensation was independent of blood glucose levels in the post-hypoglycemia period. In the absence of a preceding hypoglycemia insult, brain glycogen concentrations were unaltered after 24 h under hyperglycemia. In the hypothalamus, which controls peripheral glucose homeostasis, glycogen levels were unaltered. Overall, we conclude that post-hypoglycemia glycogen supercompensation occurs in several brain areas and its magnitude is independent of plasma glucose levels. By supporting brain metabolism during recurrent hypoglycemia periods, glycogen may have a role in the development of hypoglycemia unawareness.

  6. Seasonal Variation of the Glycogen Enzyme Activity in Diploid and Triploid Pacific Oyster Gonad During Sexual Maturation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The glycogen content and the activities of two key enzymes in glycogen metabolism, glycogen phosphorylase and glycogen synthetase, in the gonad of diploid and triploid Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) were compared during maturation. The glycogen content in the gonad of diploids decreased with gametogenesis (by 85.7%), but the glycogen content in the gonad of triploids did not vary significantly. Activity of glycogen phosphorylase (GP) in the gonad of diploids decreased with gametogenesis (by 55.5%), while GP activity of triploids did not vary significantly during maturation. Activity of glycogen synthetase (GS) in the gonad of diploids increased slightly with gametogenesis, reaching a peak in June. Activity of GS declined sharply from June to July, which might be due to gonad spawning. GS activity of triploid oysters in spawning time (July and August) was significantly higher than that

  7. Astrocyte glycogen metabolism is required for neural activity during aglycemia or intense stimulation in mouse white matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Angus M; Sickmann, Helle M; Fosgerau, Keld

    2005-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that inhibiting glycogen degradation accelerates compound action potential (CAP) failure in mouse optic nerve (MON) during aglycemia or high-intensity stimulation. Axon function was assessed as the evoked CAP, and glycogen content was measured biochemically. Isofagomine....... This is likely due to the inability of the tissue to metabolize glycogen in the presence of isofagomine, highlighting the importance of glycogen in sustaining neural function during aglycemia. The hypothesis that glycogen breakdown supports intense neural activity was tested by blocking glycogen breakdown during...... periods of high-frequency stimulation. The CAP area declined more rapidly when glycogen metabolism was inhibited by isofagomine, explicitly showing an important physiological role for glycogen metabolism during neural activity....

  8. Visualizing the store-operated channel complex assembly in real time: identification of SERCA2 as a new member.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampieri, Alicia; Zepeda, Angelica; Asanov, Alexander; Vaca, Luis

    2009-05-01

    Depletion of intracellular calcium stores leads to the activation of calcium influx via the so-called store-operated channels (SOCs). Recent evidence positions Orai proteins as the putative channels responsible for this process. The stromal interacting molecule (STIM1) has been recently identified as the calcium sensor located at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and responsible for communicating the deplete state of calcium stores to Orai at the plasma membrane (PM). However, recent experimental findings suggest that Orai and STIM1 are only part of a larger molecular complex required to modulate store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). In the present study we describe the assembly of the several of the components from the SOC complex in real-time, utilizing a novel imaging method. Using FRET imaging we show that under resting conditions (with calcium stores replenished) STIM1 travels continuously through the ER associated to the microtubule tracking protein, EB1. Upon depletion of the ER STIM1 dissociates from EB1 and aggregates into macromolecular complexes at the ER which includes the microsomal calcium ATPase. This association follows the assembly of Orai into macromolecular aggregates at the PM. We show that STIM1-Orai association follows a similar time course as that of Orai aggregation at the PM. During this last step of the process, calcium-selective, whole-cell inward currents developed, simultaneously. We show that this process is fully reversible. Replenishing intracellular calcium stores induces STIM1-Orai complex dissociation and shuts down inward currents. Under these conditions STIM1 re-associates to EB1, and reinitiates its travel through the ER.

  9. Restoration of anabolic deficit and muscle glycogen consumption in competitive orienteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, C; Tsai, L; Hultman, E; Tegelman, R; Pousette, A

    1990-06-01

    Consumption and restoration of muscle glycogen and changes in anabolic and catabolic steroid hormones were analyzed in five male elite orienteers during and after an orienteering competition. The magnitude of glycogen consumption and pronounced increase in serum-cortisol during the orienteering race reflect the great muscular output demands during forest running. The free testosterone/cortisol ratio was normalized to the initial level within four hours post-exercise. Synchronously, only 25% of the muscle glycogen loss was restored. Within 24 hours post-exercise all runners showed normalized levels of testosterone, cortisol and free testosterone/cortisol ratio. The glycogen content was also restored except in one of the runners. We conclude that daily orienteering competitions per se do not seem to create risks for developing a state of hormonal imbalance or significant decrease in glycogen when the carbohydrate supply is appropriate.

  10. FGF19 as a postprandial, insulin-independent activator of hepatic protein and glycogen synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kir, Serkan; Beddow, Sara A; Samuel, Varman T; Miller, Paul; Previs, Stephen F; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Xu, H Eric; Shulman, Gerald I; Kliewer, Steven A; Mangelsdorf, David J

    2011-03-25

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 19 is an enterokine synthesized and released when bile acids are taken up into the ileum. We show that FGF19 stimulates hepatic protein and glycogen synthesis but does not induce lipogenesis. The effects of FGF19 are independent of the activity of either insulin or the protein kinase Akt and, instead, are mediated through a mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway that activates components of the protein translation machinery and stimulates glycogen synthase activity. Mice lacking FGF15 (the mouse FGF19 ortholog) fail to properly maintain blood concentrations of glucose and normal postprandial amounts of liver glycogen. FGF19 treatment restored the loss of glycogen in diabetic animals lacking insulin. Thus, FGF19 activates a physiologically important, insulin-independent endocrine pathway that regulates hepatic protein and glycogen metabolism.

  11. Patterns of store patronage in urban China

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Uncles, Mark D; Kwok, Simon

    2009-01-01

    Reported is a formal investigation of store patronage in urban China. Using consumer panel data for sales of packaged goods through store types and named store chains, patterns of sales, loyalty and duplication are examined...

  12. Store Stokkavatn. Beskrivelse av forurensningssituasjonen

    OpenAIRE

    Holtan, H.

    1985-01-01

    Rapporten, som er et ledd i arbeidet med en vannbruksplan for Store Stokkavatn ved Stavanger, sammenstiller og diskuterer data som er samlet inn fra innsjøen og dens tilløp av Byveterinæretaten i Stavanger. Store Stokkavatnet er reservevannkilde for Stavanger og dessuten er innsjøen sentral i rekreasjonsmessig sammenheng. På bakgrunn av de foreliggende data, er innsjøens forurensningstilstand på grensen av det akseptable hva algeproduksjon (eutrofiering) og bakteriologiske forhold angår. Fler...

  13. Dichloroacetate Stimulates Glycogen Accumulation in Primary Hepatocytes through an Insulin-Independent Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lingohr, Melissa K.(Washington State University); Bull, Richard J.(SELF-EMPLOYED CONSULTANTS); Kato-Weinstein, Junko (UNIVERSITY PROGRAMS); Thrall, Brian D.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    2002-01-01

    Dichloroacetate (DCA), a by-product of water chlorination, causes liver cancer in B6C3F1 mice. A hallmark response observed in mice exposed to carcinogenic doses of DCA is an accumulation of hepatic glycogen content. To distinguish whether the in vivo glycogenic effect of DCA was dependent on insulin and insulin signaling proteins, experiments were conducted in isolated hepatocytes where insulin concentrations could be controlled. In hepatocytes isolated from male B6C3F1 mice, DCA increased glycogen levels in a dose-related manner, independently of insulin. The accumulation of hepatocellular glycogen induced by DCA was not the result of decreased glycogenolysis, since DCA had no effect on the rate of glucagon-stimulated glycogen breakdown. Glycogen accumulation caused by DCA treatment was not hindered by inhibitors of extracellular-regulated protein kinase kinase (Erk1/2 kinase or MEK) or p70 kDa S6 protein kinase (p70(S6K)), but was completely blocked by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors, LY294002 and wortmannin. Similarly, insulin-stimulated glycogen deposition was not influenced by the Erk1/2 kinase inhibitor, PD098509, or the p70(S6K) inhibitor, rapamycin. Unlike DCA-stimulated glycogen deposition, PI3K-inhibition only partially blocked the glycogenic effect of insulin. DCA did not cause phosphorylation of the downstream PI3K target protein, protein kinase B (PKB/Akt). The phosphorylation of PKB/Akt did not correlate to insulin-stimulated glycogenesis either. Similar to insulin, DCA in the medium decreased IR expression in isolated hepatocytes. The results indicate DCA increases hepatocellular glycogen accumulation through a PI3K-dependent mechanism that does not involve PKB/Akt and is, at least in part, different from the classical insulin-stimulated glycogenesis pathway. Somewhat surprisingly, insulin-stimulated glycogenesis also appears not to involve PKB/Akt in isolated murine hepatocytes.

  14. Munc18-1 phosphorylation by protein kinase C potentiates vesicle pool replenishment in bovine chromaffin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nili, U; de Wit, H; Gulyas-Kovacs, A; Toonen, R F; Sørensen, J B; Verhage, M; Ashery, U

    2006-12-01

    Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) after robust stimulation is necessary for vesicle pool replenishment in secretory cells. Here we studied the contribution of a prominent downstream PKC target, Munc18-1, to this process in bovine chromaffin cells. In these cells, both activation of endogenous PKC and overexpressing of Munc18-1 promote vesicle pool replenishment after an extensive stimulation. In order to study the physiological relevance of PKC-dependent Munc18-1 phosphorylation, we generated two Munc18-1 phospho-mutants; one that mimics a constitutively PKC-phosphorylated Munc18-1 (i.e. a phosphomimetic mutant; Munc18-1(S313D)) and a second that cannot be PKC-phosphorylated (Munc18-1(3A)). Overexpression of Munc18-1(3A) caused a significant decrease in vesicle pool replenishment following a depleting stimulation, while Munc18-1(S313D) caused a significant increase in vesicle pool replenishment. These findings suggested that the phosphorylation of Munc18-1 by PKC potentiates vesicle pool replenishment. This hypothesis was further strengthened by the finding that overexpression of wild type Munc18-1 in the presence of a PKC inhibitor caused a significant reduction in vesicle pool replenishment, similar to that observed with Munc18-1(3A). Moreover, overexpression of Munc18-1(S313D) in the presence of the PKC inhibitor partly alleviated this attenuation, elucidating Munc18-1's unique contribution to vesicle pool replenishment. Finally, we demonstrate that Munc18-1 promotes vesicle docking in a phosphorylation-independent manner. This is deduced from the findings that both the wild type and the two Munc18-1 phospho-mutants enhanced docking to the same extent in bovine chromaffin cells. We conclude that Munc18-1 facilitates docking in a PKC phosphorylation-independent manner, and that its phosphorylation by PKC potentiates vesicle pool replenishment following a depleting stimulation, at a post-docking stage.

  15. A Clinical Study on Treatment of Senile Psoriasis by Replenishing Qi to Activate Blood--A Report of 40 Cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪普; 谭奇纹; 刘华昌

    2004-01-01

    40 cases of senile psoriasis were treated by the therapeutic principle of replenishing qi to activate blood,and the changes of T lymphocyte subgroups and indexes of haemorheology were observed. The results showed that CD4 was significantly increased, CDs significantly decreased, and the CD4/CD8 ratio significantly raised; and that the specific viscosity of whole blood at high shearing rate, and at low shearing rate, the specific viscosity of plasma, packed cell volume, and fibrinogen all significantly decreased after treatment. It is therefore concluded that the therapeutic method of replenishing qi to activate blood can exert an effect of improving immunologic function and blood circulation.

  16. Store operations to maintain cache coherence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evangelinos, Constantinos; Nair, Ravi; Ohmacht, Martin

    2017-09-12

    In one embodiment, a computer-implemented method includes encountering a store operation during a compile-time of a program, where the store operation is applicable to a memory line. It is determined, by a computer processor, that no cache coherence action is necessary for the store operation. A store-without-coherence-action instruction is generated for the store operation, responsive to determining that no cache coherence action is necessary. The store-without-coherence-action instruction specifies that the store operation is to be performed without a cache coherence action, and cache coherence is maintained upon execution of the store-without-coherence-action instruction.

  17. Stores, Weight and Inertial System Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility provides stores weight, center of gravity, and inertia measurements in support of weapon/aircraft compatibility testing. System provides store weight...

  18. Store operations to maintain cache coherence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evangelinos, Constantinos; Nair, Ravi; Ohmacht, Martin

    2017-08-01

    In one embodiment, a computer-implemented method includes encountering a store operation during a compile-time of a program, where the store operation is applicable to a memory line. It is determined, by a computer processor, that no cache coherence action is necessary for the store operation. A store-without-coherence-action instruction is generated for the store operation, responsive to determining that no cache coherence action is necessary. The store-without-coherence-action instruction specifies that the store operation is to be performed without a cache coherence action, and cache coherence is maintained upon execution of the store-without-coherence-action instruction.

  19. A System for Managing Replenishment of a Nutrient Solution Using an Electrical Conductivity Controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, D.; Dogan, N.; Aglan, H.; Mortley, D.; Loretan, P.

    1998-01-01

    Control of nutrient solution parameters is very important for the growth and development of plants grown hydroponically. Protocols involving different nutrient solution replenishment times (e.g. one-week, two-week, or two-day replenishment) provide manual periodic control of the nutrient solution's electrical conductivity (EC). Since plants take-up nutrients as they grow, manual control has a drawback in that EC is not held constant between replenishments. In an effort to correct this problem the Center for Food and Environmental Systems for Human Exploration of Space at Tuskegee University has developed a system for managing and controlling levels of EC over a plant's entire growing cycle. A prototype system is being tested on sweetpotato production using the nutrient film technique (NFT), and it is being compared to a system in which sweetpotatoes are grown using NFT with manual control. NASA has played an important role in the development of environmental control systems. They have become a forerunner in growing plants hydroponically with some control systems through the use of networked data acquisition and control using environmental growth chambers. Data acquisition systems which involve the use of real-time, calibration, set points, user panel, and graphical representation programming provide a good method of controlling nutrient solution parameters such as EC and pH [Bledsoe, 19931]. In NASA's Biomass Production Chamber (BPC) at Kennedy Space Center, control is provided by a programmable logic controller (PLC). This is an industrial controller which combines ladder computer logic which has the ability to handle various levels of electrical power. The controller controls temperature, light and other parameters that affect the plant's environment, in the BPC, the Nutrient Delivery System (NIX), a sub-system of the PLC, controls nutrient solution parameters such as EC, pH, and solution levels. When the nutrient EC measurement goes outside a preset range (120

  20. Muscle energy stores and stroke rates of emperor penguins: implications for muscle metabolism and dive performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Cassondra L; Sato, Katsufumi; Shiomi, Kozue; Ponganis, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    In diving birds and mammals, bradycardia and peripheral vasoconstriction potentially isolate muscle from the circulation. During complete ischemia, ATP production is dependent on the size of the myoglobin oxygen (O(2)) store and the concentrations of phosphocreatine (PCr) and glycogen (Gly). Therefore, we measured PCr and Gly concentrations in the primary underwater locomotory muscle of emperor penguin and modeled the depletion of muscle O(2) and those energy stores under conditions of complete ischemia and a previously determined muscle metabolic rate. We also analyzed stroke rate to assess muscle workload variation during dives and evaluate potential limitations on the model. Measured PCr and Gly concentrations, 20.8 and 54.6 mmol kg(-1), respectively, were similar to published values for nondiving animals. The model demonstrated that PCr and Gly provide a large anaerobic energy store, even for dives longer than 20 min. Stroke rate varied throughout the dive profile, indicating muscle workload was not constant during dives as was assumed in the model. The stroke rate during the first 30 s of dives increased with increased dive depth. In extremely long dives, lower overall stroke rates were observed. Although O(2) consumption and energy store depletion may vary during dives, the model demonstrated that PCr and Gly, even at concentrations typical of terrestrial birds and mammals, are a significant anaerobic energy store and can play an important role in the emperor penguin's ability to perform long dives.

  1. Storing XML Documents in Databases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, A.R.; Manegold, S.; Kersten, M.L.; Rivero, L.C.; Doorn, J.H.; Ferraggine, V.E.

    2005-01-01

    The authors introduce concepts for loading large amounts of XML documents into databases where the documents are stored and maintained. The goal is to make XML databases as unobtrusive in multi-tier systems as possible and at the same time provide as many services defined by the XML standards as pos

  2. Myeloid Growth Factors Promote Resistance to Mycobacterial Infection by Curtailing Granuloma Necrosis through Macrophage Replenishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagán, Antonio J; Yang, Chao-Tsung; Cameron, James; Swaim, Laura E; Ellett, Felix; Lieschke, Graham J; Ramakrishnan, Lalita

    2015-07-08

    The mycobacterial ESX-1 virulence locus accelerates macrophage recruitment to the forming tuberculous granuloma. Newly recruited macrophages phagocytose previously infected apoptotic macrophages to become new bacterial growth niches. Granuloma macrophages can then necrose, releasing mycobacteria into the extracellular milieu, which potentiates their growth even further. Using zebrafish with genetic or pharmacologically induced macrophage deficiencies, we find that global macrophage deficits increase susceptibility to mycobacterial infection by accelerating granuloma necrosis. This is because reduction in the macrophage supply below a critical threshold decreases granuloma macrophage replenishment to the point where apoptotic infected macrophages, failing to get engulfed, necrose. Reducing macrophage demand by removing bacterial ESX-1 offsets the susceptibility of macrophage deficits. Conversely, increasing macrophage supply in wild-type fish by overexpressing myeloid growth factors induces resistance by curtailing necrosis. These findings may explain the susceptibility of humans with mononuclear cytopenias to mycobacterial infections and highlight the therapeutic potential of myeloid growth factors in tuberculosis.

  3. Using the Min/Max Method for Replenishment of Picking Locations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apsalons Raitis

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The irregularity of removing quantities from a definite picking location in a warehouse very often results in the stock out in the particular picking address. In practice, the Red Card principle is used to determine a critical level for each picking location when it is necessary to start the replenishment of stock in the picking address. The question is how to calculate an adequate critical level. The guidelines in this paper explain in detail the solution of the problem using the Min/Max stock control method and mathematical algorithms adjusted by authors. In order to check the validity of these mathematical algorithms of the Min/Max method, the simulation modelling has been also done and presented.

  4. Hyperactivity: glycogen synthase kinase-3 as a therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mines, Marjelo A

    2013-05-15

    The diagnosis of hyperactivity-associated disorders has increased within the past few years. The prevalence of hyperactivity-associated disorders is indicative of the need to more fully understand the underlying causes and to develop improved therapeutic interventions. There is increasing evidence that glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) mediates locomotor hyperactivity in a number of animal models, and therefore may be a potential target for therapeutic intervention in hyperactivity-associated behaviors. In this review, we discuss 1) the effect of manipulations of GSK3 in the absence of drugs and disorders on locomotor activity, 2) the role of GSK3 in drug-induced hyperactivity in rodents, and 3) regulation of locomotor activity by GSK3 in transgenic mouse models related to specific disorders. These studies link GSK3 regulation and activity to hyperactivity-associated behaviors and disease pathologies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Glycogen storage disease type III: modified Atkins diet improves myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorandan, Sebene; Meyer, Uta; Hartmann, Hans; Das, Anibh Martin

    2014-11-28

    Frequent feeds with carbohydrate-rich meals or continuous enteral feeding has been the therapy of choice in glycogen storage disease (Glycogenosis) type III. Recent guidelines on diagnosis and management recommend frequent feedings with high complex carbohydrates or cornstarch avoiding fasting in children, while in adults a low-carb-high-protein-diet is recommended. While this regimen can prevent hypoglycaemia in children it does not improve skeletal and heart muscle function, which are compromised in patients with glycogenosis IIIa. Administration of carbohydrates may elicit reactive hyperinsulinism, resulting in suppression of lipolysis, ketogenesis, gluconeogenesis, and activation of glycogen synthesis. Thus, heart and skeletal muscle are depleted of energy substrates. Modified Atkins diet leads to increased blood levels of ketone bodies and fatty acids. We hypothesize that this health care intervention improves the energetic balance of muscles. We treated 2 boys with glycogenosis IIIa aged 9 and 11 years with a modified Atkins diet (10 g carbohydrate per day, protein and fatty acids ad libitum) over a period of 32 and 26 months, respectively. In both patients, creatine kinase levels in blood dropped in response to Atkins diet. When diet was withdrawn in one of the patients he complained of chest pain, reduced physical strength and creatine kinase levels rapidly increased. This was reversed when Atkins diet was reintroduced. One patient suffered from severe cardiomyopathy which significantly improved under diet. Patients with glycogenosis IIIa benefit from an improved energetic state of heart and skeletal muscle by introduction of Atkins diet both on a biochemical and clinical level. Apart from transient hypoglycaemia no serious adverse effects were observed.

  6. Improved flow measurement using microbubble contrast agents and disruption-replenishment: clinical application to tumour monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, John M; Williams, Ross; Lloyd, Brendan; Atri, Mostafa; Kim, Tae Kyoung; Bjarnason, Georg; Burns, Peter N

    2011-08-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) and the method of disruption replenishment has been used for the past 10 years to measure flow noninvasively in the microcirculation. However, the method's perceived poor reproducibility remains a major impediment to widespread clinical acceptance. Poor reproducibility can be attributed, in part, to the curve fitting model that is used to quantify microbubble enhancement. Flow measurement in tumours is further complicated by the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of tumour blood flow. In this work, we evaluate three models of microbubble disruption and replenishment (mono-exponential, a simplified multivessel model by Krix and the lognormal perfusion model) using clinical data (11 patients, 41 sessions) from an antiangiogenic drug trial for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and evaluate their contribution to the measurement's variability. Compared with the mono-exponential model, the lognormal perfusion model decreased the variability of intra-session velocity and blood volume measurements by 33% and 34%, respectively. Blood volume assessment using the lognormal perfusion model was comparable to Krix's mutlivessel model. Flow velocity measurement was 18% less variable for the lognormal perfusion model compared with the multivessel model. To further decrease flow measurement variability, we examine a method that exploits microbubble flow dynamics to discard the contribution of flow in large arteries and isolate the portion of the tumour microvasculature that is most sensitive to vessel targeting therapies. The method is validated with an in vitro phantom study prior to its application to the RCC clinical data set. Combined with the lognormal perfusion model, this method decreased the inter-plane variability of clinical measurements of relative tumour blood volume, in some cases by up to 20%.

  7. Usefulness of intravenously administered fluid replenishment for detection of patent foramen ovale by transesophageal echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, Luis; Kottam, Anupama; Niraj, Ashutosh; Ganguly, Joya; Hari, Pawan; Simegn, Mengistu; Sudhakar, Rajeev; Jacob, Sony; Chaturvedi, Seemant; Ensing, Greg J; Abraham, Theodore P

    2010-10-01

    Patent foramen ovale (PFO) is associated with cryptogenic stroke, migraine headache, decompression sickness, and platypnea-orthodeoxia syndrome. Patients undergoing transesophageal echocardiography are often hypovolemic from preprocedural fasting and might not demonstrate right to left shunting owing to insufficient right atrial pressure generation, despite provocative maneuvers. We hypothesized that volume replenishment with saline loading could potentially unmask a PFO by favorably modulating the interatrial pressure gradient. Our study sought to examine the role of pre- or intraprocedural intravenous fluid replenishment on PFO detection during transesophageal echocardiography. A total of 103 patients were enrolled. An initial series of bubble injections was performed unprovoked and then with provocative maneuvers such as the Valsalva maneuver and coughing. The patients were then given a rapid 500 ml saline bolus, and the same sequence of bubble injections was repeated. The presence, type, and magnitude of the right to left shunts were noted before and after the saline bolus. The detection rate of PFO increased from 10.6% to 26.2% after saline loading without any provocative maneuvers. When combined with provocative maneuvers (Valsalva or cough), saline loading improved the detection rate from 17.4% to 32.0%. Overall, from amongst the 103 enrolled patients, saline bolusing resulted in a de novo diagnosis of PFO in 15 patients, atrial septal aneurysm in 15, PFO coexisting with an atrial septal aneurysm in 10, and pulmonary arteriovenous fistula in 5 patients. In conclusion, saline infusion in appropriately selected patients during transesophageal echocardiography significantly enhances the detection of PFOs and pulmonary arteriovenous fistulas.

  8. Long-term effect of beach replenishment on natural recovery of shallow Posidonia oceanica meadows

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Correa, José M.; Torquemada, Yolanda Fernández; Sánchez Lizaso, José Luis

    2008-03-01

    The recovery capacity of shallow Posidonia oceanica meadows degraded by beach replenishment eighteen years before was assessed in two impacted meadows and compared with other two undisturbed localities. Inside each locality, we selected randomly three sites separated by 500-1000 m. At site level we study the vitality of P. oceanica meadow assessing the vegetative growth, leaf characteristics, and non-structural carbohydrates of the plants. Additionally, at locality level, silt-clay fraction, organic matter, pH and light intensity incident on the sea bottom were measured to evaluate the environmental conditions. Covering of P. oceanica was significantly lower at the impacted localities while amount of dead "matte" was higher. Leaf production of horizontal rhizomes (14.6 ± 1.11 vs 19.47 ± 1.45 leaves y -1), net total rhizomes recruitment (2.33 ± 0.17 vs 4.3 ± 0.33 branches y -1) and starch concentration (43.625 ± 0.67 vs 54.45 ± 0.74 mg per g of rhizome) at impacted meadows were significantly lower than controls. Leaf features, epiphytes biomass, colonization, elongation and horizontal and vertical rhizome production did not show significant differences. Sediments at impacted localities contained higher silt-clay fraction and higher organic matter load while pH was lower. Light intensity on the sea bottom measured at all localities was over the minimum light requirements estimated for P. oceanica. Our results show that the press impact produced by beach replenishment was enduring in the time slowing natural recovery by 45%. This impact may be related with changes in the sediment features.

  9. ORM Promotes Skeletal Muscle Glycogen Accumulation via CCR5-Activated AMPK Pathway in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhen; Wan, Jing-Jing; Sun, Yang; Wang, Peng-Yuan; Su, Ding-Feng; Lei, Hong; Liu, Xia

    2016-01-01

    We found previously that acute phase protein orosomucoid reacts to fatigue and activates C-C chemokine receptor type 5 to increase muscle glycogen storage and enhance muscle endurance (Lei et al., 2016). To explore the underlying molecular mechanisms, we investigated the role of AMP-activated protein kinase, a critical fuel sensor in skeletal muscle, in C-C chemokine receptor type 5-mediated orosomucoid action. It was found orosomucoid increased skeletal muscle AMP-activated protein kinase activation in a time- and dose- dependent manner, which was largely prevented by pharmacological blocking or knockout of C-C chemokine receptor type 5. Administration of orosomucoid also significantly increased the de-phosphorylation and activity of muscle glycogen synthase, the rate-limiting enzyme for glycogen synthesis. The effect was largely absent in mice deficient in C-C chemokine receptor type 5−/− or AMP-activated protein kinase α2−/−, the predominant isoform in skeletal muscle. Moreover, deletion of AMP-activated protein kinase α2 abolished the effect of orosomucoid on fatigue and muscle glycogen. These findings indicate that orosomucoid may promote glycogen storage and enhance muscle function through C-C chemokine receptor type 5-mdiated activation of AMP-activated protein kinase, which in turn activates glycogen synthase and increases muscle glycogen. PMID:27679573

  10. [Glycogen content in gerbil's liver following the spacecraft Foton-M3 mission].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atiakshin, D A; Bykov, E G; Il'in, E A; Pashkov, A N

    2009-01-01

    Glycogen cytochemistry and distribution in hepatocytes of the classic liver lobules were studied in three groups of gerbils Meriones unguiculatus: vivarium, synchronous control and flown in the 12-d Foton-M3 mission. The control animals were shown to have the central glycogen distribution with a large pool of polysaccharides found in hepatocytes of the pericentral and intermediate lobules and a small pool in the periportal area. Glycogen in hepatocyte plasm was within the physiological norm in the alpha- and beta-granules, typically localized on the cell periphery. Exposure to the spaceflight conditions decreased significantly glycogen concentrations in each functional region of the hepatic lobules and reduced the gradient of polysaccharide distribution from the portal triads toward the central vein. In parallel, high glycogen heterogeneity formed in adjacent hepatocytes and loci. The presence of glycosomes evidenced disturbance of carbohydrates metabolism. In addition, intracellular topography of glycogen granules in cytoplasm was altered. Trends of glycogen in gerbils of the synchronous control were similar to the space flown animals but much less pronounced.

  11. Technical note: A method for isolating glycogen granules from ruminal protozoa for further characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Mary Beth

    2016-03-01

    Evaluation of physical, chemical, and enzymatic hydrolysis characteristics of protozoal glycogen is best performed on a pure substrate to avoid interference from other cell components. A method for isolating protozoal glycogen granules without use of detergents or other potentially contaminating chemicals was developed. Rumen inoculum was incubated anerobically in vitro with glucose. Glycogen-laden protozoa produced in the fermentation, primarily isotrichids, were allowed to sediment in a separatory funnel and were dispensed. The protozoa were processed through repeated centrifugations and sonication to isolate glycogen granules largely free of feed and cellular debris. The final water-insoluble lyophilized product analyzed as 98.3% α-glucan with very rare starch granules and 1.9% protein. Observed losses of glycogen granules during the clean-up process indicate that this procedure should not be used for quantitative assessment of protozoal glycogen from fermentations. Further optimization of this procedure to enhance the amount of glycogen obtained per fermentation may be possible. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Glycogen in honeybee queens, workers and drones (Apis mellifera carnica Pollm.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crailsheim, K; Panzenböck, U

    1997-02-21

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera carnica Pollm.) have low glycogen reserves in summer. Upon emergence drones have significantly larger amounts per unit weight when emerging, than workers; perhaps as adaption to the risk of not being fed as intensely as young workers. Maximum content was 0.23mg for workers (28d), and 0.59mg for drones (after emergence). Workers have relatively constant glycogen contents during their life, and very young drones have more glycogen than older ones. Young queens are similar to workers. In workers and queens in summer the greatest amounts of glycogen are found in the thorax. When the bees start flying (6th-8th day of life), drones have the highest amounts in the head (probably to supply their eyes), and upon maturity, drones have the least glycogen in the abdomen.Workers in winter show different glycogen values depending on whether they are active bees from the core area (0.23mg) or inactive ones from the outer surface of the winter cluster (0.37mg). They use glycogen from the thorax and the abdomen for their ongoing energy need.

  13. 槽车密相补气式气力输送系统的设计%Design of air conveying system of tank trailer dense phase replenish gas type

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    言仿雷; 罗宝东

    2001-01-01

    介绍密相气力输送的基本原理和技术,一种采用密相脉冲补气式气力输送PET切片的槽车贮罐运输、中转、卸料、仓贮的系统的建立,节约投资、降低能耗,提高了经济效益.%Basic principle and technology of dense phase air conve ying were introduced,a system was built which dense phase impluse replenish gas air conveying tank trailer storage was used to transport,transfer,discharge and store PET chip.The investment was saved,the energy consumption was reduced,the ecnomic benefit was improved.

  14. Dynamic replenishment, production, and pricing decisions in the face of supply disruption and random price-sensitive demand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Stuart X.

    2013-01-01

    We study a joint decision problem for replenishment, production, pricing strategies in the face of both supply and demand uncertainties. The supply of the raw material suffers from a potential supply disruption while the demand for the finished goods is price-sensitive and random. We assume that the

  15. An Inventory-Routing Problem with Pickups and Deliveries Arising in the Replenishment of Automated Teller Machines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Anholt, Roel G.; Coelho, Leandro C.; Laporte, Gilbert; Vis, Iris F. A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce, model, and solve a rich multiperiod inventory-routing problem with pickups and deliveries motivated by the replenishment of automated teller machines in the Netherlands. Commodities can be brought to and from the depot, as well as being exchanged among cust

  16. Micron-scale copper wires printed using femtosecond laser-induced forward transfer with automated donor replenishment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grant-Jacob, J.A.; Mills, B.; Feinaeugle, M.; Sones, C.L.; Oosterhuis, G.; Hoppenbrouwers, M.B.; Eason, R.W.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) in combination with a novel donor replenishment scheme to print continuous copper wires. Wires of mm length, a few microns wide and submicron in height have been printed using a 800 nm, 1 kHz repetition rate, 150 fs pulsed laser. A 120

  17. Micron-scale copper wires printed using femtosecond laser-induced forward transfer with automated donor replenishment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grant-Jacob, J.A.; Mills, B.; Feinaeugle, M.; Sones, C.L.; Oosterhuis, G.; Hoppenbrouwers, M.B.; Eason, R.W.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) in combination with a novel donor replenishment scheme to print continuous copper wires. Wires of mm length, a few microns wide and submicron in height have been printed using a 800 nm, 1 kHz repetition rate, 150 fs pulsed laser. A 120

  18. Decoupler pylon: wing/store flutter suppressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, W. H., III (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A device for suspending a store from a support such as an aircraft wing and more specifically for increasing the flutter speed of an aircraft flying with attached store and reducing the sensitivity of flutter to changes in the pitch inertia and center of gravity location of the store is described. It comprises softspring where the store pitch mode is decoupled from support modes and a low frequency active control mechanism which maintains store alignment. A pneumatic suspension system both isolates the store in pitch and, under conditions of changing mean load, aligns the store with the wing to which it is attached.

  19. Glycogen content regulates peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-∂ (PPAR-∂) activity in rat skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philp, Andrew; MacKenzie, Matthew G; Belew, Micah Y; Towler, Mhairi C; Corstorphine, Alan; Papalamprou, Angela; Hardie, D Grahame; Baar, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Performing exercise in a glycogen depleted state increases skeletal muscle lipid utilization and the transcription of genes regulating mitochondrial β-oxidation. Potential candidates for glycogen-mediated metabolic adaptation are the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and the transcription factor/nuclear receptor PPAR-∂. It was therefore the aim of the present study to examine whether acute exercise with or without glycogen manipulation affects PGC-1α and PPAR-∂ function in rodent skeletal muscle. Twenty female Wistar rats were randomly assigned to 5 experimental groups (n = 4): control [CON]; normal glycogen control [NG-C]; normal glycogen exercise [NG-E]; low glycogen control [LG-C]; and low glycogen exercise [LG-E]). Gastrocnemius (GTN) muscles were collected immediately following exercise and analyzed for glycogen content, PPAR-∂ activity via chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays, AMPK α1/α2 kinase activity, and the localization of AMPK and PGC-1α. Exercise reduced muscle glycogen by 47 and 75% relative to CON in the NG-E and LG-E groups, respectively. Exercise that started with low glycogen (LG-E) finished with higher AMPK-α2 activity (147%, pexercise. Our data would suggest that a factor associated with muscle contraction and/or glycogen depletion activates PPAR-∂ and initiates AMPK translocation in skeletal muscle in response to exercise.

  20. Glycogen depletion and resynthesis during 14 days of chronic low-frequency stimulation of rabbit muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prats, C; Bernal, C; Cadefau, J A;

    2002-01-01

    Electro-stimulation alters muscle metabolism and the extent of this change depends on application intensity and duration. The effect of 14 days of chronic electro-stimulation on glycogen turnover and on the regulation of glycogen synthase in fast-twitch muscle was studied. The results showed...... synthase was determined during electro-stimulation. The activity of this enzyme was measured at low UDPG concentration with either high or low Glu-6-P content. Western blots were performed against glycogen synthase over a range of stimulation periods. Activation of this enzyme was maximum before the net...

  1. Pathological glycogenesis through glycogen synthase 1 and suppression of excessive AMP kinase activity in myeloid leukemia cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonami, Atsushi; Weisberg, Ellen L.; Bonal, Dennis; Kirschmeier, Paul T.; Salgia, Sabrina; Podar, Klaus; Galinsky, Ilene; Chowdary, Tirumala K.; Neuberg, Donna; Tonon, Giovanni; Stone, Richard M.; Asara, John; Griffin, James D.; Sattler, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The rapid proliferation of myeloid leukemia cells is highly dependent on increased glucose metabolism. Through an unbiased metabolomics analysis of leukemia cells, we found that the glycogenic precursor UDP-D-glucose is pervasively upregulated, despite low glycogen levels. Targeting the rate-limiting glycogen synthase 1 (GYS1) not only decreased glycolytic flux but also increased activation of the glycogen-responsive AMPK (AMP kinase), leading to significant growth suppression. Further, genetic and pharmacological hyper-activation of AMPK was sufficient to induce the changes observed with GYS1 targeting. Cancer genomics data also indicate that elevated levels of the glycogenic enzymes GYS1/2 or GBE1 (glycogen branching enzyme 1) are associated with poor survival in AML. These results suggest a novel mechanism whereby leukemic cells sustain aberrant proliferation by suppressing excess AMPK activity through elevated glycogenic flux and provide a therapeutic entry point for targeting leukemia cell metabolism. PMID:25703587

  2. Store-Operated Calcium Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakriya, Murali; Lewis, Richard S

    2015-10-01

    Store-operated calcium channels (SOCs) are a major pathway for calcium signaling in virtually all metozoan cells and serve a wide variety of functions ranging from gene expression, motility, and secretion to tissue and organ development and the immune response. SOCs are activated by the depletion of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), triggered physiologically through stimulation of a diverse set of surface receptors. Over 15 years after the first characterization of SOCs through electrophysiology, the identification of the STIM proteins as ER Ca(2+) sensors and the Orai proteins as store-operated channels has enabled rapid progress in understanding the unique mechanism of store-operate calcium entry (SOCE). Depletion of Ca(2+) from the ER causes STIM to accumulate at ER-plasma membrane (PM) junctions where it traps and activates Orai channels diffusing in the closely apposed PM. Mutagenesis studies combined with recent structural insights about STIM and Orai proteins are now beginning to reveal the molecular underpinnings of these choreographic events. This review describes the major experimental advances underlying our current understanding of how ER Ca(2+) depletion is coupled to the activation of SOCs. Particular emphasis is placed on the molecular mechanisms of STIM and Orai activation, Orai channel properties, modulation of STIM and Orai function, pharmacological inhibitors of SOCE, and the functions of STIM and Orai in physiology and disease.

  3. Assessment of the performance of numerical modeling in reproducing a replenishment of sediments in a water-worked channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juez, C.; Battisacco, E.; Schleiss, A. J.; Franca, M. J.

    2016-06-01

    The artificial replenishment of sediment is used as a method to re-establish sediment continuity downstream of a dam. However, the impact of this technique on the hydraulics conditions, and resulting bed morphology, is yet to be understood. Several numerical tools have been developed during last years for modeling sediment transport and morphology evolution which can be used for this application. These models range from 1D to 3D approaches: the first being over simplistic for the simulation of such a complex geometry; the latter requires often a prohibitive computational effort. However, 2D models are computationally efficient and in these cases may already provide sufficiently accurate predictions of the morphology evolution caused by the sediment replenishment in a river. Here, the 2D shallow water equations in combination with the Exner equation are solved by means of a weak-coupled strategy. The classical friction approach considered for reproducing the bed channel roughness has been modified to take into account the morphological effect of replenishment which provokes a channel bed fining. Computational outcomes are compared with four sets of experimental data obtained from several replenishment configurations studied in the laboratory. The experiments differ in terms of placement volume and configuration. A set of analysis parameters is proposed for the experimental-numerical comparison, with particular attention to the spreading, covered surface and travel distance of placed replenishment grains. The numerical tool is reliable in reproducing the overall tendency shown by the experimental data. The effect of fining roughness is better reproduced with the approach herein proposed. However, it is also highlighted that the sediment clusters found in the experiment are not well numerically reproduced in the regions of the channel with a limited number of sediment grains.

  4. Caffeine-Induced Ca2+ Oscillations in Type I Horizontal Cells of the Carp Retina and the Contribution of the Store-Operated Ca2+ Entry Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Ting; Gong, Hai-Qing; Liang, Pei-Ji

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms of release, depletion, and refilling of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ were investigated in type I horizontal cells of the carp retina using a fluo-3-based Ca2+ imaging technique. Exogenous application of caffeine, a ryanodine receptor agonist, induced oscillatory intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) responses in a duration- and concentration-dependent manner. In Ca2+-free Ringer’s solution, [Ca2+]i transients could also be induced by a brief caffeine application, whereas subsequent caffeine application induced no [Ca2+]i increase, which implied that extracellular Ca2+ was required for ER refilling, confirming the necessity of a Ca2+ influx pathway for ER refilling. Depletion of ER Ca2+ by thapsigargin triggered a Ca2+ influx which could be blocked by the store-operated channel inhibitor 2-APB, which proved the existence of the store-operated Ca2+ entry pathway. Taken together, these results suggested that after being depleted by caffeine, the ER was replenished by Ca2+ influx via store-operated channels. These results reveal the fine modulation of ER Ca2+ signaling, and the activation of the store-operated Ca2+ entry pathway guarantees the replenishment of the ER so that the cell can be ready for response to the subsequent stimulus. PMID:24918937

  5. An investigation of Consumer Specialty Store and Multi-Brand Store loyalty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarabjot Singh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In the competitive era of retailing, retailers need to understand the importance of store format preferences. The study aimed to understand consumer store loyalty, in-depth interview is conducted to examine consumer store loyalty antecedents for two retail formats: specialty stores and multi brand stores. The study conceptualizes store loyalty factors like program loyalty, trust and brand commitment. Trust and brand commitment act as a mediating factors between storeimage and store loyalty formats, and also between brand image and store loyalty formats. The findings highlight how consumer store loyalty preference changes for these two formats.

  6. Annual replenishment of bed material by sediment transport in the Wind River near Riverton, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalley, M.L.; Emmett, W.W.; Wacker, A.M.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Wyoming Department of Transportation, conducted a study during 1985-87 to determine the annual replenishment of sand and gravel along a point bar in the Wind River near Riverton, Wyoming. Hydraulic- geometry relations determined from streamflow measurements; streamflow characteristics determined from 45 years of record at the study site; and analyses of suspended-sediment, bedload, and bed- material samples were used to describe river transport characteristics and to estimate the annual replenishment of sand and gravel. The Wind River is a perennial, snowmelt-fed stream. Average daily discharge at the study site is about 734 cubic feet per second, and bankfull discharge (recurrence interval about 1.5 years) is about 5,000 cubic feet per second. At bankfull discharge, the river is about 136 feet wide and has an average depth of about 5.5 feet and average velocity of about 6.7 feet per second. Streams slope is about 0.0010 foot per foot. Bed material sampled on the point bar before the 1986 high flows ranged from sand to cobbles, with a median diameter of about 22 millimeters. Data for sediment samples collected during water year 1986 were used to develop regression equations between suspended-sediment load and water discharge and between bedload and water discharge. Average annual suspended-sediment load was computed to be about 561,000 tons per year using the regression equation in combination with flow-duration data. The regression equation for estimating bedload was not used; instead, average annual bedload was computed as 1.5 percent of average annual suspended load about 8,410 tons per year. This amount of bedload material is estimated to be in temporary storage along a reach containing seven riffles--a length of approximately 1 river mile. On the basis of bedload material sampled during the 1986 high flows, about 75 percent (by weight) is sand (2 millimeters in diameter or finer); median particle size is

  7. Capsular glucan and intracellular glycogen of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: biosynthesis and impact on the persistence in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sambou, Tounkang; Dinadayala, Premkumar; Stadthagen, Gustavo;

    2008-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other pathogenic mycobacterial species produce large amounts of a glycogen-like alpha-glucan that represents the major polysaccharide of their outermost capsular layer. To determine the role of the surface-exposed glucan in the physiology and virulence...... of these bacteria, orthologues of the glg genes involved in the biosynthesis of glycogen in Escherichia coli were identified in M. tuberculosis H37Rv and inactivated by allelic replacement. Biochemical analyses of the mutants and complemented strains indicated that the synthesis of glucan and glycogen involves...... the alpha-1,4-glucosyltransferases Rv3032 and GlgA (Rv1212c), the ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase GlgC (Rv1213) and the branching enzyme GlgB (Rv1326c). Disruption of glgC reduced by half the glucan and glycogen contents of M. tuberculosis, whereas the inactivation of glgA and Rv3032 affected the production...

  8. Identification and Structural Basis of Binding to Host Lung Glycogen by Streptococcal Virulence Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lammerts van Bueren,A.; Higgins, M.; Wang, D.; Burke, R.; Boraston, A.

    2007-01-01

    The ability of pathogenic bacteria to recognize host glycans is often essential to their virulence. Here we report structure-function studies of previously uncharacterized glycogen-binding modules in the surface-anchored pullulanases from Streptococcus pneumoniae (SpuA) and Streptococcus pyogenes (PulA). Multivalent binding to glycogen leads to a strong interaction with alveolar type II cells in mouse lung tissue. X-ray crystal structures of the binding modules reveal a novel fusion of tandem modules into single, bivalent functional domains. In addition to indicating a structural basis for multivalent attachment, the structure of the SpuA modules in complex with carbohydrate provides insight into the molecular basis for glycogen specificity. This report provides the first evidence that intracellular lung glycogen may be a novel target of pathogenic streptococci and thus provides a rationale for the identification of the streptococcal {alpha}-glucan-metabolizing machinery as virulence factors.

  9. Lipids in hepatic glycogen storage diseases : pathophysiology, monitoring of dietary management and future directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derks, Terry G. J.; van Rijn, Margreet

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic glycogen storage diseases (GSD) underscore the intimate relationship between carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. The hyperlipidemias in hepatic GSD reflect perturbed intracellular metabolism, providing biomarkers in blood to monitor dietary management. In different types of GSD, hyperlipidemi

  10. Molecular mechanism by which AMP-activated protein kinase activation promotes glycogen accumulation in muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hunter, Roger W; Treebak, Jonas Thue; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE During energy stress, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) promotes glucose transport and glycolysis for ATP production, while it is thought to inhibit anabolic glycogen synthesis by suppressing the activity of glycogen synthase (GS) to maintain the energy balance in muscle. Paradoxically......, chronic activation of AMPK causes an increase in glycogen accumulation in skeletal and cardiac muscles, which in some cases is associated with cardiac dysfunction. The aim of this study was to elucidate the molecular mechanism by which AMPK activation promotes muscle glycogen accumulation. RESEARCH DESIGN...... AND METHODS We recently generated knock-in mice in which wild-type muscle GS was replaced by a mutant (Arg582Ala) that could not be activated by glucose-6-phosphate (G6P), but possessed full catalytic activity and could still be activated normally by dephosphorylation. Muscles from GS knock-in or transgenic...

  11. Errors in the isotopic estimations of hepatic glycogen synthesis and glucose output

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rognstad, R.

    1989-07-01

    Ignoring the reality of glucose in equilibrium glucose-6P cycling in the liver in vivo produces large potential errors in the isotopic quantitation of percentage contributions of direct and indirect pathways of glycogen synthesis and of hepatic glucose output.

  12. Adiponectin levels correlate with the severity of hypertriglyceridaemia in glycogen storage disease Ia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bandsma, R. H. J.; Smit, G. P. A.; Reijngoud, D. -J.; Kuipers, F.

    2009-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD Ia) is characterized by severe hypercholesterolaemia and hypertriglyceridaemia. Little is known about the aetiology of the hyperlipidaemia in GSD Ia. Adipokines play an important regulatory role in lipid metabolism. We investigated whether adipokine concentratio

  13. Chocolate milk and endurance exercise recovery: protein balance, glycogen, and performance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lunn, William R; Pasiakos, Stefan M; Colletto, Megan R; Karfonta, Kirstin E; Carbone, John W; Anderson, Jeffrey M; Rodriguez, Nancy R

    This study examined effects of fat-free chocolate milk (MILK) consumption on kinetic and cellular markers of protein turnover, muscle glycogen, and performance during recovery from endurance exercise...

  14. Body morphology, energy stores, and muscle enzyme activity explain cricket acoustic mate attraction signaling variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian R Thomson

    Full Text Available High mating success in animals is often dependent on males signalling attractively with high effort. Since males should be selected to maximize their reproductive success, female preferences for these traits should result in minimal signal variation persisting in the population. However, extensive signal variation persists. The genic capture hypothesis proposes genetic variation persists because fitness-conferring traits depend on an individual's basic processes, including underlying physiological, morphological, and biochemical traits, which are themselves genetically variable. To explore the traits underlying signal variation, we quantified among-male differences in signalling, morphology, energy stores, and the activities of key enzymes associated with signalling muscle metabolism in two species of crickets, Gryllus assimilis (chirper: 20 pulses/chirp. Chirping G. assimilis primarily fuelled signalling with carbohydrate metabolism: smaller individuals and individuals with increased thoracic glycogen stores signalled for mates with greater effort; individuals with greater glycogen phosphorylase activity produced more attractive mating signals. Conversely, the more energetic trilling G. texensis fuelled signalling with both lipid and carbohydrate metabolism: individuals with increased β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity and increased thoracic free carbohydrate content signalled for mates with greater effort; individuals with higher thoracic and abdominal carbohydrate content and higher abdominal lipid stores produced more attractive signals. Our findings suggest variation in male reproductive success may be driven by hidden physiological trade-offs that affect the ability to uptake, retain, and use essential nutrients, although the results remain correlational in nature. Our findings indicate that a physiological perspective may help us to understand some of the causes of variation in behaviour.

  15. Quantitative analysis of synaptic vesicle pool replenishment in cultured cerebellar granule neurons using FM dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Giselle; Cousin, Michael A

    2011-11-11

    After neurotransmitter release in central nerve terminals, SVs are rapidly retrieved by endocytosis. Retrieved SVs are then refilled with neurotransmitter and rejoin the recycling pool, defined as SVs that are available for exocytosis(1,2). The recycling pool can generally be subdivided into two distinct pools - the readily releasable pool (RRP) and the reserve pool (RP). As their names imply, the RRP consists of SVs that are immediately available for fusion while RP SVs are released only during intense stimulation(1,2). It is important to have a reliable assay that reports the differential replenishment of these SV pools in order to understand 1) how SVs traffic after different modes of endocytosis (such as clathrin-dependent endocytosis and activity-dependent bulk endocytosis) and 2) the mechanisms controlling the mobilisation of both the RRP and RP in response to different stimuli. FM dyes are routinely employed to quantitatively report SV turnover in central nerve terminals(3-8). They have a hydrophobic hydrocarbon tail that allows reversible partitioning in the lipid bilayer, and a hydrophilic head group that blocks passage across membranes. The dyes have little fluorescence in aqueous solution, but their quantum yield increases dramatically when partitioned in membrane(9). Thus FM dyes are ideal fluorescent probes for tracking actively recycling SVs. The standard protocol for use of FM dye is as follows. First they are applied to neurons and are taken up during endocytosis (Figure 1). After non-internalised dye is washed away from the plasma membrane, recycled SVs redistribute within the recycling pool. These SVs are then depleted using unloading stimuli (Figure 1). Since FM dye labelling of SVs is quantal(10), the resulting fluorescence drop is proportional to the amount of vesicles released. Thus, the recycling and fusion of SVs generated from the previous round of endocytosis can be reliably quantified. Here, we present a protocol that has been modified to

  16. Primary Neuronal Precursors in Adult Crayfish Brain: Replenishment from a Non-neuronal Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeman David C

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adult neurogenesis, the production and integration of new neurons into circuits in the brains of adult animals, is a common feature of a variety of organisms, ranging from insects and crustaceans to birds and mammals. In the mammalian brain the 1st-generation neuronal precursors, the astrocytic stem cells, reside in neurogenic niches and are reported to undergo self-renewing divisions, thereby providing a source of new neurons throughout an animal's life. In contrast, our work shows that the 1st-generation neuronal precursors in the crayfish (Procambarus clarkii brain, which also have glial properties and lie in a neurogenic niche resembling that of vertebrates, undergo geometrically symmetrical divisions and both daughters appear to migrate away from the niche. However, in spite of this continuous efflux of cells, the number of neuronal precursors in the crayfish niche continues to expand as the animals grow and age. Based on these observations we have hypothesized that (1 the neuronal stem cells in the crayfish brain are not self-renewing, and (2 a source external to the neurogenic niche must provide cells that replenish the stem cell pool. Results In the present study, we tested the first hypothesis using sequential double nucleoside labeling to track the fate of 1st- and 2nd-generation neuronal precursors, as well as testing the size of the labeled stem cell pool following increasing incubation times in 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU. Our results indicate that the 1st-generation precursor cells in the crayfish brain, which are functionally analogous to neural stem cells in vertebrates, are not a self-renewing population. In addition, these studies establish the cycle time of these cells. In vitro studies examining the second hypothesis show that Cell Tracker™ Green-labeled cells extracted from the hemolymph, but not other tissues, are attracted to and incorporated into the neurogenic niche, a phenomenon that appears to

  17. Effect of pH on Cleavage of Glycogen by Vaginal Enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg T Spear

    Full Text Available Glycogen expressed by the lower genital tract epithelium is believed to support Lactobacillus growth in vivo, although most genital isolates of Lactobacillus are not able to use glycogen as an energy source in vitro. We recently reported that α-amylase is present in the genital fluid of women and that it breaks down glycogen into small carbohydrates that support growth of lactobacilli. Since the pH of the lower genital tract can be very low, we determined how low pH affects glycogen processing by α-amylase. α-amylase in saliva degraded glycogen similarly at pH 6 and 7, but activity was reduced by 52% at pH 4. The glycogen degrading activity in nine genital samples from seven women showed a similar profile with an average reduction of more than 50% at pH 4. However, two samples collected from one woman at different times had a strikingly different pH profile with increased glycogen degradation at pH 4, 5 and 6 compared to pH 7. This second pH profile did not correlate with levels of human α-acid glucosidase or human intestinal maltase glucoamylase. High-performance anion-exchange chromatography showed that mostly maltose was produced from glycogen by samples with the second pH profile in contrast to genital α-amylase that yielded maltose, maltotriose and maltotetraose. These studies show that at low pH, α-amylase activity is reduced to low but detectable levels, which we speculate helps maintain Lactobacillus growth at a limited but sustained rate. Additionally, some women have a genital enzyme distinct from α-amylase with higher activity at low pH. Further studies are needed to determine the identity and distribution of this second enzyme, and whether its presence influences the makeup of genital microbiota.

  18. Glycogen synthesis correlates with androgen-dependent growth arrest in prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorin Frederic A

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Androgen withdrawal in normal prostate or androgen-dependent prostate cancer is associated with the downregulation of several glycolytic enzymes and with reduced glucose uptake. Although glycogen metabolism is known to regulate the intracellular glucose level its involvement in androgen response has not been studied. Methods We investigated the effects of androgen on glycogen phosphorylase (GP, glycogen synthase (GS and on glycogen accumulation in the androgen-receptor (AR reconstituted PC3 cell line containing either an empty vector (PC3-AR-V or vector with HPV-E7 (PC3-AR-E7 and the LNCaP cell line. Results Androgen addition in PC3 cells expressing the AR mimics androgen ablation in androgen-dependent prostate cells. Incubation of PC3-AR-V or PC3-AR-E7 cells with the androgen R1881 induced G1 cell cycle arrest within 24 hours and resulted in a gradual cell number reduction over 5 days thereafter, which was accompanied by a 2 to 5 fold increase in glycogen content. 24 hours after androgen-treatment the level of Glucose-6-P (G-6-P had increased threefold and after 48 hours the GS and GP activities increased twofold. Under this condition inhibition of glycogenolysis with the selective GP inhibitor CP-91149 enhanced the increase in glycogen content and further reduced the cell number. The androgen-dependent LNCaP cells that endogenously express AR responded to androgen withdrawal with growth arrest and increased glycogen content. CP-91149 further increased glycogen content and caused a reduction of cell number. Conclusion Increased glycogenesis is part of the androgen receptor-mediated cellular response and blockage of glycogenolysis by the GP inhibitor CP-91149 further increased glycogenesis. The combined use of a GP inhibitor with hormone therapy may increase the efficacy of hormone treatment by decreasing the survival of prostate cancer cells and thereby reducing the chance of cancer recurrence.

  19. L-alanine supplementation in late infantile glycogen storage disease type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodamer, Olaf A; Haas, Dorothea; Hermans, Monique M; Reuser, Arnold J; Hoffmann, Georg F

    2002-08-01

    We report a male with late infantile glycogen storage disease type II (Pompe's disease) who presented at 12 months of age with muscular hypotonia and developmental delay. Oral supplementation with L-alanine has been administered for 5 years. Progression of skeletal myopathy was slow, and cardiomyopathy resolved almost completely. L-alanine may be a valuable supplement for infants with glycogen storage disease type II.

  20. Glycogen accumulation in the pars recta of the proximal tubule in Fanconi syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendon, R W; Hug, G

    1986-01-01

    We reviewed the renal pathology in 10 cases of renal Fanconi syndrome. Five cases showed the Armanni-Ebstein lesion, i.e., clear glycogen-filled cells limited to the pars recta of the proximal tubules. The 5 cases included 2 siblings with a unique syndrome characterized by death in infancy, severe Fanconi syndrome, severe rickets, carnitine deficiency, and atrophy of the exocrine pancreas. Two other siblings had glycogen storage disease type XI. One of 4 cases of putative tyrosinemia had the lesion. The ultrastructure was studied in 2 cases. The Armanni-Ebstein lesion in these cases was morphologically indistinguishable from that seen in diabetic patients dying after prolonged hyperglycemia. Glycosuria is the only common factor in both diabetic hyperglycemia and the varied proximal tubular diseases studied. The mechanism of the glycogen accumulation in this short parts recta segment of the proximal renal tubule was further investigated by reviewing the renal histology in cases of glycogen storage disease types I, II, III, and VIII. None showed the Armanni-Ebstein lesion, but type I showed glycogen deposition throughout the proximal tubule. Thus, the Armanni-Ebstein lesion is not the result of an enzymatic deficiency for glycogen synthesis in the convoluted tubules.

  1. Creatine supplementation spares muscle glycogen during high intensity intermittent exercise in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa André

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effects of creatine (CR supplementation on glycogen content are still debatable. Thus, due to the current lack of clarity, we investigated the effects of CR supplementation on muscle glycogen content after high intensity intermittent exercise in rats. Methods First, the animals were submitted to a high intensity intermittent maximal swimming exercise protocol to ensure that CR-supplementation was able to delay fatigue (experiment 1. Then, the CR-mediated glycogen sparing effect was examined using a high intensity intermittent sub-maximal exercise test (fixed number of bouts; six bouts of 30-second duration interspersed by two-minute rest interval (experiment 2. For both experiments, male Wistar rats were given either CR supplementation or placebo (Pl for 5 days. Results As expected, CR-supplemented animals were able to exercise for a significant higher number of bouts than Pl. Experiment 2 revealed a higher gastrocnemius glycogen content for the CR vs. the Pl group (33.59%. Additionally, CR animals presented lower blood lactate concentrations throughout the intermittent exercise bouts compared to Pl. No difference was found between groups in soleus glycogen content. Conclusion The major finding of this study is that CR supplementation was able to spare muscle glycogen during a high intensity intermittent exercise in rats.

  2. Studies on glycogen autophagy: effects of phorbol myristate acetate, ionophore A23187, or phentolamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalamidas, S A; Kotoulas, O B; Hann, A C

    2002-06-15

    The effects of agents that could manipulate the lysosomal calcium such as phorbol myristate acetate, ionophore A23187, and phentolamine on the lysosomal glycogen degradation were studied by electron microscopy, morphometric analysis, and biochemical assays in newborn rat hepatocytes. Phorbol myristate acetate, which promotes the input of calcium to lysosomes, increased the total volume of autophagic vacuoles and the activity of lysosomal glycogen-hydrolyzing acid alpha 1,4 glucosidase and decreased the fractional volume of undigested glycogen inside the autophagic vacuoles and also decreased the activity of acid mannose 6-phosphatase. Ionophore A23187, which releases lysosomal calcium, produced opposite results in these enzyme activities. Phentolamine, an alpha-adrenergic blocking agent which interferes with the generation of phosphoinositides and may activate the lysosomal calcium uptake pump, increased the total volume of autophagic vacuoles and the activity of lysosomal glycogen-hydrolyzing acid glucosidase and decreased the fractional volume of undigested glycogen inside the autophagic vacuoles. The results of this study constitute evidence that changes in lysosomal calcium may influence certain aspects of autophagy, including the degradation of glycogen inside the autophagic vacuoles. They also support our previous postulate [Kalamidas and Kotoulas (2000a,b) Histol Histopathol 15:29-35, 1011-1018] that stimulation of autophagic mechanisms in newborn rat hepatocytes may be associated with acid mannose 6-phosphatase activity-deficient lysosomes.

  3. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae YPR184w gene encodes the glycogen debranching enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teste, M A; Enjalbert, B; Parrou, J L; François, J M

    2000-12-01

    The YPR184w gene encodes a 1536-amino acid protein that is 34-39% identical to the mammal, Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans glycogen debranching enzyme. The N-terminal part of the protein possesses the four conserved sequences of the alpha-amylase superfamily, while the C-terminal part displays 50% similarity with the C-terminal of other eukaryotic glycogen debranching enzymes. Reliable measurement of alpha-1,4-glucanotransferase and alpha-1, 6-glucosidase activity of the yeast debranching enzyme was determined in strains overexpressing YPR184w. The alpha-1, 4-glucanotransferase activity of a partially purified preparation of debranching enzyme preferentially transferred maltosyl units than maltotriosyl. Deletion of YPR184w prevents glycogen degradation, whereas overexpression had no effect on the rate of glycogen breakdown. In response to stress and growth conditions, the transcriptional control of YPR184w gene, renamed GDB1 (for Glycogen DeBranching gene), is strictly identical to that of other genes involved in glycogen metabolism.

  4. A noncanonical, GSK3-independent pathway controls postprandial hepatic glycogen deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Min; Leavens, Karla F; Hunter, Roger W; Koren, Shlomit; von Wilamowitz-Moellendorff, Alexander; Lu, Mingjian; Satapati, Santhosh; Chu, Qingwei; Sakamoto, Kei; Burgess, Shawn C; Birnbaum, Morris J

    2013-07-02

    Insulin rapidly suppresses hepatic glucose production and slowly decreases expression of genes encoding gluconeogenic proteins. In this study, we show that an immediate effect of insulin is to redirect newly synthesized glucose-6-phosphate to glycogen without changing the rate of gluconeogenesis. This process requires hepatic Akt2, as revealed by blunted insulin-mediated suppression of glycogenolysis in the perfused mouse liver, elevated hepatic glucose production during a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp, or diminished glycogen accumulation during clamp or refeeding in mice without hepatic Akt2. Surprisingly, the absence of Akt2 disrupted glycogen metabolism independent of GSK3α and GSK3β phosphorylation, which is thought to be an essential step in the pathway by which insulin regulates glycogen synthesis through Akt. These data show that (1) the immediate action of insulin to suppress hepatic glucose production functions via an Akt2-dependent redirection of glucose-6-phosphate to glycogen, and (2) insulin increases glucose phosphorylation and conversion to glycogen independent of GSK3.

  5. Regulation of glycogen breakdown and its consequences for skeletal muscle function after training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Abram; Westerblad, Håkan

    2014-10-01

    Repeated bouts of physical exercise, i.e., training, induce mitochondrial biogenesis and result in improved physical performance and attenuation of glycogen breakdown during submaximal exercise. It has been suggested that as a consequence of the increased mitochondrial volume, a smaller degree of metabolic stress (e.g., smaller increases in ADP and Pi) is required to maintain mitochondrial respiration in the trained state during exercise at the same absolute intensity. The lower degree of Pi accumulation is believed to account for the diminished glycogen breakdown, since Pi is a substrate for glycogen phosphorylase, the rate-limiting enzyme for glycogenolysis. However, in this review, we present an alternative explanation for the diminished glycogen breakdown. Thus, the lower degree of metabolic stress after training is also associated with smaller increases in AMP (free concentration during contraction at specific intracellular sites) and this results in less activation of phosphorylase b (the non-phosphorylated form of phosphorylase), resulting in diminished glycogen breakdown. Concomitantly, the smaller accumulation of Pi, which interferes with cross-bridge function and intracellular Ca(2+) handling, contributes to the increased fatigue resistance. The delay in glycogen depletion also contributes to enhanced performance during prolonged exercise by functioning as an energy reserve.

  6. Contribution of glycogen in supporting axon conduction in the peripheral and central nervous systems: the role of lactate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angus M Brown

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The role of glycogen in the central nervous system is intimately linked with the glycolytic pathway. Glycogen is synthesized from glucose, the primary substrate for glycolysis, and degraded to glucose-6-phosphate. The metabolic cost of shunting glucose via glycogen exceeds that of simple phosphorylation of glucose to glucose-6-phosphate by hexokinase; thus, there must be a metabolic advantage in utilizing this shunt pathway. The dogmatic view of glycogen as a storage depot persists, based on initial descriptions of glycogen supporting neural function in the face of aglycemia. The variable latency to conduction failure, dependent upon tissue glycogen levels, provided convincing evidence of the role played by glycogen in supporting neural function. Glycogen is located predominantly in astrocytes in the central nervous system, thus for glycogen to benefit neural elements, intercellular metabolic communication must exist in the form of astrocyte to neuron substrate transfer. Experimental evidence supports a model where glycogen is metabolized to lactate in astrocytes, with cellular expression of monocarboxylate transporters and enzymes appropriately located for lactate shuttling between astrocytes and neural elements, where lactate acts as a substrate for oxidative metabolism. Biosensor recordings have demonstrated a significant steady concentration of lactate present on the periphery of both central white matter and peripheral nerve under unstimulated baseline conditions, indicating continuous cellular efflux of lactate to the interstitium. The existence of this lactate pool argues we must reexamine the ‘on demand’ shuttling of lactate between cellular elements, and suggests continuous lactate efflux surplus to immediate neural requirements.

  7. Serum lipoproteins of patients with glycogen storage disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, E L; Chibisov, I V; Karmansky, I M; Tabolin, V A; Chistova, L V; Leontiev, A F

    1980-03-14

    Seventeen patients with different types of glycogen storage disease (GSD) were under observation. The type of the disease was defined from glucaemic and lactotaemic curves obtained in glucose, galactose and adrenaline tolerance tests and by biochemical analysis of liver biopsy specimens. Seven patients were found to have Type I; five patients, Type III; one patient, Type VI; and four patients, the Type IX (or X) of GSD. The serum lipoprotein (LP) content was determined in all patients using analytical ultracentrifugation. Hyperlipoproteinaemia (HLP) was found in virtually all patients. Patients with Type I of GSD were found to have Types 2b and 4 of HLP; and patients with Type III of GSD, 2b Type of HLP. 2a Type of HLP was diagnosed in patients with GSD of VI and IX (X) Types. Patients with Type III GSD, in contrast to those with GSD of other types, had enhanced levels of Sf 12-20 LP. The levels of Sf 100-400 and Sf 20-100 LP were greatly increased only in patients with Type I GSD.

  8. A simulation based approach to optimize inventory replenishment with RAND algorithm: An extended study of corrected demand using Holt's method for textile industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morshed, Mohammad Sarwar; Kamal, Mostafa Mashnoon; Khan, Somaiya Islam

    2016-07-01

    Inventory has been a major concern in supply chain and numerous researches have been done lately on inventory control which brought forth a number of methods that efficiently manage inventory and related overheads by reducing cost of replenishment. This research is aimed towards providing a better replenishment policy in case of multi-product, single supplier situations for chemical raw materials of textile industries in Bangladesh. It is assumed that industries currently pursue individual replenishment system. The purpose is to find out the optimum ideal cycle time and individual replenishment cycle time of each product for replenishment that will cause lowest annual holding and ordering cost, and also find the optimum ordering quantity. In this paper indirect grouping strategy has been used. It is suggested that indirect grouping Strategy outperforms direct grouping strategy when major cost is high. An algorithm by Kaspi and Rosenblatt (1991) called RAND is exercised for its simplicity and ease of application. RAND provides an ideal cycle time (T) for replenishment and integer multiplier (ki) for individual items. Thus the replenishment cycle time for each product is found as T×ki. Firstly, based on data, a comparison between currently prevailing (individual) process and RAND is provided that uses the actual demands which presents 49% improvement in total cost of replenishment. Secondly, discrepancies in demand is corrected by using Holt's method. However, demands can only be forecasted one or two months into the future because of the demand pattern of the industry under consideration. Evidently, application of RAND with corrected demand display even greater improvement. The results of this study demonstrates that cost of replenishment can be significantly reduced by applying RAND algorithm and exponential smoothing models.

  9. A Dual Function Energy Store

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron Tolmie

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Heat can be collected from local energy sources and concentrated into a relatively small volume, and at a useful working temperature, by using a heat pump as the concentrator. That heat can be stored and utilized at a later date for applications like space heating. The process is doing two things at the same time: storing heat and shifting the power demand. The concentration step can be done at night when there is normally a surplus of power and its timing can be directly controlled by the power grid operator to ensure that the power consumption occurs only when adequate power is available. The sources of heat can be the summer air, the heat extracted from buildings by their cooling systems, natural heat from the ground or solar heat, all of which are free, abundant and readily accessible. Such systems can meet the thermal needs of buildings while at the same time stabilizing the grid power demand, thus reducing the need for using fossil-fuelled peaking power generators. The heat pump maintains the temperature of the periphery at the ambient ground temperature so very little energy is lost during storage.

  10. NAD(+) Replenishment Improves Lifespan and Healthspan in Ataxia Telangiectasia Models via Mitophagy and DNA Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Evandro Fei; Kassahun, Henok; Croteau, Deborah L; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Marosi, Krisztina; Lu, Huiming; Shamanna, Raghavendra A; Kalyanasundaram, Sumana; Bollineni, Ravi Chand; Wilson, Mark A; Iser, Wendy B; Wollman, Bradley N; Morevati, Marya; Li, Jun; Kerr, Jesse S; Lu, Qiping; Waltz, Tyler B; Tian, Jane; Sinclair, David A; Mattson, Mark P; Nilsen, Hilde; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2016-10-11

    Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by progressive neurodegeneration and cerebellar ataxia. A-T is causally linked to defects in ATM, a master regulator of the response to and repair of DNA double-strand breaks. The molecular basis of cerebellar atrophy and neurodegeneration in A-T patients is unclear. Here we report and examine the significance of increased PARylation, low NAD(+), and mitochondrial dysfunction in ATM-deficient neurons, mice, and worms. Treatments that replenish intracellular NAD(+) reduce the severity of A-T neuropathology, normalize neuromuscular function, delay memory loss, and extend lifespan in both animal models. Mechanistically, treatments that increase intracellular NAD(+) also stimulate neuronal DNA repair and improve mitochondrial quality via mitophagy. This work links two major theories on aging, DNA damage accumulation, and mitochondrial dysfunction through nuclear DNA damage-induced nuclear-mitochondrial signaling, and demonstrates that they are important pathophysiological determinants in premature aging of A-T, pointing to therapeutic interventions. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. An ultrarobust high-performance triboelectric nanogenerator based on charge replenishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hengyu; Chen, Jun; Yeh, Min-Hsin; Fan, Xing; Wen, Zhen; Li, Zhaoling; Hu, Chenguo; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2015-05-26

    Harvesting ambient mechanical energy is a green route in obtaining clean and sustainable electric energy. Here, we report an ultrarobust high-performance triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) on the basis of charge replenishment by creatively introducing a rod rolling friction in the structure design. With a grating number of 30 and a free-standing gap of 0.5 mm, the fabricated TENG can deliver an output power of 250 mW/m(2) at a rotating rate of 1000 r/min. And it is capable of charging a 200 μF commercial capacitor to 120 V in 170 s, lighting up a G16 globe light as well as 16 spot lights connected in parallel. Moreover, the reported TENG holds an unprecedented robustness in harvesting rotational kinetic energy. After a continuous rotation of more than 14.4 million cycles, there is no observable electric output degradation. Given the superior output performance together with the unprecedented device robustness resulting from distinctive mechanism and novel structure design, the reported TENG renders an effective and sustainable technology for ambient mechanical energy harvesting. This work is a solid step in the development toward TENG-based self-sustained electronics and systems.

  12. New Roles of Syntaxin-1A in Insulin Granule Exocytosis and Replenishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Tao; Qin, Tairan; Xie, Li; Dolai, Subhankar; Zhu, Dan; Prentice, Kacey J; Wheeler, Michael; Kang, Youhou; Osborne, Lucy; Gaisano, Herbert Y

    2017-02-10

    In type-2 diabetes (T2D), severely reduced islet syntaxin-1A (Syn-1A) levels contribute to insulin secretory deficiency. We generated β-cell-specific Syn-1A-KO (Syn-1A-βKO) mice to mimic β-cell Syn-1A deficiency in T2D. Glucose tolerance tests showed that Syn-1A-βKO mice exhibited blood glucose elevation corresponding to reduced blood insulin levels. Perifusion of Syn-1A-βKO islets showed impaired first- and second-phase glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) resulting from reduction in readily releasable pool and granule pool refilling. To unequivocally determine the β-cell exocytotic defects caused by Syn-1A deletion, EM and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy showed that Syn-1A-KO β-cells had a severe reduction in the number of secretory granules (SGs) docked onto the plasma membrane (PM) at rest and reduced SG recruitment to the PM after glucose stimulation, the latter indicating defects in replenishment of releasable pools required to sustain second-phase GSIS. Whereas reduced predocked SG fusion accounted for reduced first-phase GSIS, selective reduction of exocytosis of short-dock (but not no-dock) newcomer SGs accounted for the reduced second-phase GSIS. These Syn-1A actions on newcomer SGs were partly mediated by Syn-1A interactions with newcomer SG VAMP8.

  13. Replenishment and mobilization of intracellular nitrogen pools decouples wine yeast nitrogen uptake from growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Alicia; Sancho, Marta; Beltran, Gemma; Guillamon, José Manuel; Warringer, Jonas

    2016-04-01

    Wine yeast capacity to take up nitrogen from the environment and catabolize it to support population growth, fermentation, and aroma production is critical to wine production. Under nitrogen restriction, yeast nitrogen uptake is believed to be intimately coupled to reproduction with nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR) suggested mediating this link. We provide a time- and strain-resolved view of nitrogen uptake, population growth, and NCR activity in wine yeasts. Nitrogen uptake was found to be decoupled from growth due to early assimilated nitrogen being used to replenish intracellular nitrogen pools rather than being channeled directly into reproduction. Internally accumulated nitrogen was later mobilized to support substantial population expansion after external nitrogen was depleted. On good nitrogen sources, the decoupling between nitrogen uptake and growth correlated well with relaxation of NCR repression, raising the potential that the latter may be triggered by intracellular build-up of nitrogen. No link between NCR activity and nitrogen assimilation or growth on poor nitrogen sources was found. The decoupling between nitrogen uptake and growth and its influence on NCR activity is of relevance for both wine production and our general understanding of nitrogen use.

  14. DMRT1 Is Required for Mouse Spermatogonial Stem Cell Maintenance and Replenishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Teng; Oatley, Jon; Bardwell, Vivian J; Zarkower, David

    2016-09-01

    Male mammals produce sperm for most of postnatal life and therefore require a robust germ line stem cell system, with precise balance between self-renewal and differentiation. Prior work established doublesex- and mab-3-related transcription factor 1 (Dmrt1) as a conserved transcriptional regulator of male sexual differentiation. Here we investigate the role of Dmrt1 in mouse spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) homeostasis. We find that Dmrt1 maintains SSCs during steady state spermatogenesis, where it regulates expression of Plzf, another transcription factor required for SSC maintenance. We also find that Dmrt1 is required for recovery of spermatogenesis after germ cell depletion. Committed progenitor cells expressing Ngn3 normally do not contribute to SSCs marked by the Id4-Gfp transgene, but do so when spermatogonia are chemically depleted using busulfan. Removal of Dmrt1 from Ngn3-positive germ cells blocks the replenishment of Id4-GFP-positive SSCs and recovery of spermatogenesis after busulfan treatment. Our data therefore reveal that Dmrt1 supports SSC maintenance in two ways: allowing SSCs to remain in the stem cell pool under normal conditions; and enabling progenitor cells to help restore the stem cell pool after germ cell depletion.

  15. The effect of motivation and positive affect on ego depletion: Replenishment versus release mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ze; Li, Jian; Zhang, Bo; Li, Ye; Zhang, Houcan

    2015-11-12

    In this study, 2 experiments were conducted to investigate whether motivation and positive affect can alleviate ego depletion and to elucidate their possible mechanisms. In Experiment 1, a crossing-out-letter task was adapted to reach an ego depletion state for Chinese participants. Participants were then randomly assigned to the extrinsic motivation group, the positive affect group or the depletion control group. After the experimental treatment, a dumbbell task was used to measure participants' remaining self-regulatory resources. The results showed that participants in the motivation and positive affect groups performed better on the dumbbell task than participants in the depletion control group. Experiment 2 was similar to Experiment 1 except that participants were asked to perform an additional unexpected dumbbell task after a neutral video following the above procedure. The results of Experiment 1 were replicated; however, participants' performance on the additional dumbbell task differed. The positive affect group performed better than the depletion control group, indicating an increase in self-regulatory resources and thus supporting the replenishment effect of positive affect. No significant difference was found between the motivation group and the depletion control group.

  16. Substrate replenishment and byproduct removal improve yeast cell-free protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoborg, Jennifer A; Hodgman, C Eric; Anderson, Mark J; Jewett, Michael C

    2014-05-01

    Cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) platforms are now considered a powerful tool for synthesizing a variety of proteins at scales from pL to 100 L with accelerated process development pipelines. We previously reported the advancement of a novel yeast-based CFPS platform. Here, we studied factors that cause termination of yeast CFPS batch reactions. Specifically, we characterized the substrate and byproduct concentrations in batch, fed-batch, and semi-continuous reaction formats through high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and chemical assays. We discovered that creatine phosphate, the secondary energy substrate, and nucleoside triphosphates were rapidly degraded during batch CFPS, causing a significant drop in the reaction's energy charge (E.C.) and eventual termination of protein synthesis. As a consequence of consuming creatine phosphate, inorganic phosphate accumulated as a toxic byproduct. Additionally, we measured amino acid concentrations and found that aspartic acid was rapidly consumed. By adopting a semi-continuous reaction format, where passive diffusion enables substrate replenishment and byproduct removal, we achieved over a 70% increase in active superfolder green fluorescent protein (sfGFP) as compared with the batch system. This study identifies targets for the future improvement of the batch yeast CFPS reaction. Moreover, it outlines a detailed, generalized method to characterize and improve other CFPS platforms.

  17. Optimization of Setup Frequency for TOC Supply Chain Replenishment Systems Based on Pareto Particle Swarm Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Yun Jiang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The theory of constraints (TOC supply chain replenishment system (TOC-SCRS is an effective solution for coping with conflicts during the management of supply chain inventories. When it is deployed in a plant or a central warehouse with capacity constraints, TOC-SCRS encounters a problem comprised of 2 parts: first, how to establish a sound setup frequency (SF that can meet production needs and prevent losses from stock-outs, meaning a SF that allows the plant to make full use of its existing capacity to achieve maximal effective output. Second, it must determine how to establish a sound SF that can help the plant minimize its inventory and cut costs to the greatest possible extent. To resolve the problem, a SF optimization model for TOC-SCRS with capacity constraints is constructed and is then used in combination with Pareto particle swarm optimization (PSO to obtain SF optimization schemes in this paper. An illustrative example is conducted to verify the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  18. A supplier-selection model with classification and joint replenishment of inventory items

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammaditabar, Davood; Hassan Ghodsypour, Seyed

    2016-06-01

    Since inventory costs are closely related to suppliers, many models in the literature have selected the suppliers and also allocated orders, simultaneously. Such models usually consider either a single inventory item or multiple inventory items which have independent holding and ordering costs. However, in practice, ordering multiple items from the same supplier leads to a reduction in ordering costs. This paper presents a model in capacity-constrained supplier-selection and order-allocation problem, which considers the joint replenishment of inventory items with a direct grouping approach. In such supplier-selection problems, the following items are considered: a fixed major ordering cost to each supplier, which is independent from the items in the order; a minor ordering cost for each item ordered to each supplier; and the inventory holding and purchasing costs. To solve the developed NP-hard problem, a simulated annealing algorithm was proposed and then compared to a modified genetic algorithm of the literature. The numerical example represented that the number of groups and selected suppliers were reduced when the major ordering cost increased in comparison to other costs. There were also more savings when the number of groups was determined by the model in comparison to predetermined number of groups or no grouping scenarios.

  19. Glutamine is required for snakehead fish vesiculovirus propagation via replenishing the tricarboxylic acid cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lindan; Yi, Lizhu; Zhang, Chi; Liu, Xiaodan; Feng, Shuangshuang; Chen, Wenjie; Lan, Jiangfeng; Zhao, Lijuan; Tu, Jiagang; Lin, Li

    2016-11-01

    Snakehead fish vesiculovirus (SHVV), a member of the family Rhabdoviridae, has caused mass mortality in snakehead fish culture in China. Previous transcriptomic sequencing of SHVV-infected and non-infected striped snakehead fish cells (SSN-1) showed that glutaminase (GLS), the critical enzyme of glutamine metabolism, was upregulated upon SHVV infection. It therefore drew our attention to investigating the role of glutamine in SHVV propagation. Glutamine deprivation significantly reduced the expression of the mRNAs and proteins of SHVV, and the production of virus particles, indicating that glutamine was required for SHVV propagation. Glutamine can be converted to glutamate by GLS, and then be converted to α-ketoglutarate, to join in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Addition of the TCA cycle intermediate α-ketoglutarate, oxaloacetic acid or pyruvate significantly restored SHVV propagation, indicating that the requirement of glutamine for SHVV propagation was due to its replenishment of the TCA cycle. Inhibiting the activity of GLS in SSN-1 cells by an inhibitor, bis-2-(5-phenylacetamido-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)ethyl sulfide, decreased SHVV propagation, while overexpression of GLS increased SHVV propagation. Taken together, our data have revealed the relationship between glutamine metabolism and SHVV propagation.

  20. Short-term effect of beach replenishment on a shallow Posidonia oceanica meadow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Correa, José M; Fernández-Torquemada, Yolanda; Sánchez-Lizaso, José Luis

    2009-09-01

    Putative perturbations on a Posidonia oceanica meadow produced by recent artificial beach nourishment were evaluated in relation to four undisturbed meadows. Temporal variations of putative impacted location vs. control locations of environmental (light availability and sediment features), plant (associated epiphytes, silt-clay fraction attached to epiphytes, herbivore attack, non-structural carbohydrate reserves) and structural parameters (cover and density) of meadows were tested by asymmetrical analysis of variance beyond BACI (Before/After, Control/Impact). Additionally, two asymmetrical analyses of variance were used to test for differences in vegetative growth of horizontal rhizomes (leaf production, horizontal rhizome growth, biomass production and net secondary rhizome recruitment) before and after beach replenishment. Environmental effects induced by dumping works were only detected in connection with a higher silt-clay deposition rate. This increase was consistent with the increase of silt-clay cover attached to epiphytes. As a consequence of silt-clay smothering, a decrease of filter feeding epiphytes, starch reserves, shoot surface and shoot biomass was observed. The sensitivity of plants to sediment inputs, leads us to recommend avoidance of dumping or sediment movement in the vicinity of P. oceanica meadows.

  1. An Optimization Framework for Combining the Petroleum Replenishment Problem with the Optimal Bidding in Combinatorial Auctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chefi Triki

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We address in this paper a periodic petroleum station replenishment problem (PPSRP that aims to plan the delivery of petroleum products to a set of geographically dispatched stations. It is assumed that each station is characterized by its weekly demand and by its frequency of service. The main objective of the delivery process is to minimize the total travelled distance by the vailable trucks over an extended planning horizon. The problem configuration is described through a set of trucks with several compartments each and a set of stations with demands and prefixed delivery frequencies. Given such input data, the minimization of the total distance is subject to assignment and routing constraints that express the capacity limitations of each truck's compartment in terms of the frequency and the pathways' restrictions. In this paper, we develop and solve the full space mathematical formulation for the PPSRP with application to the Omani context. Our ultimate aim is to include such a model into an integrated framework having the objective of advising petroleum distribution companies on how to prepare bids in case of participation in combinatorial auctions of the transportation procurement.

  2. Retail brand architecture and consumer store loyalty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunsø, Karen; Grunert, Klaus G.

    is to investigate the relationship between consumers perceived retail brand architecture, their store satisfaction and loyalty. Furthermore we use perceived store image as a mediating factor in our framework. In total 772 Danish households participated in a telephone interview and returned questionnaires by mail....... The major contribution of this research is to conceptualise and empirically investigate the role of brand architecture for perceived store image, store satisfaction and loyalty....

  3. Corner stores: the perspective of urban youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Sandra; Grode, Gabrielle; McCoy, Tara; Vander Veur, Stephanie S; Wojtanowski, Alexis; Sandoval, Brianna Almaguer; Foster, Gary D

    2015-02-01

    We examined the perspectives of low-income, urban youth about the corner store experience to inform the development of corner store interventions. Focus groups were conducted to understand youth perceptions regarding their early shopping experiences, the process of store selection, reasons for shopping in a corner store, parental guidance about corner stores, and what their ideal, or "dream corner store" would look like. Thematic analysis was employed to identify themes using ATLAS.ti (version 6.1, 2010, ATLAS.ti GmbH) and Excel (version 2010, Microsoft Corp). Focus groups were conducted in nine kindergarten-through-grade 8 (K-8) public schools in low-income neighborhoods with 40 fourth- to sixth-graders with a mean age of 10.9±0.8 years. Youth report going to corner stores with family members at an early age. By second and third grades, a growing number of youth reported shopping unaccompanied by an older sibling or adult. Youth reported that the products sold in stores were the key reason they choose a specific store. A small number of youth said their parents offered guidance on their corner store purchases. When youth were asked what their dream corner store would look like, they mentioned wanting a combination of healthy and less-healthy foods. These data suggest that, among low-income, urban youth, corner store shopping starts at a very young age and that product, price, and location are key factors that affect corner store selection. The data also suggest that few parents offer guidance about corner store purchases, and youth are receptive to having healthier items in corner stores. Corner store intervention efforts should target young children and their parents/caregivers and aim to increase the availability of affordable, healthier products. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Methodologies of tissue preservation and analysis of the glycogen content of the broiler chick liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, L W; Keirs, R W; Peebles, E D; Gerard, P D

    2007-12-01

    The current study was performed to develop convenient, rapid, reliable, and pragmatic methodologies by which to harvest and preserve liver tissue glycogen and to analyze its levels within reasonable limits of quantification and with extended chromophore stability. Absorbance values decreased by 2 h and again by 24 h after preparation of the iodine-potassium iodide chromophore, whereas absorbance values of the phenol-sulfuric acid chromophore remained constant over the same time period. These absorbance trends for each chromophore followed full color development within 5 min after combining the analyte with the respective chromophore reagent. Use of the phenol-sulfuric acid reagent allowed for a 10-fold reduction in assay limits of detection and quantification when compared with the iodine-potassium iodide reagent. Furthermore, glycogen concentration-absorbance relationships were affected by the source (i.e., rabbit liver vs. bovine liver) of glycogen standards when the iodine-potassium iodide chromophore was used, but the source of the standards had no influence when the phenol-sulfuric acid chromophore was used. The indifference of the phenol-sulfuric acid method to the glycogen source, as exhibited by similar linear regressions of absorbance, may be attributed to actual determination of glucose subunit concentrations after complete glycogen hydrolysis by sulfuric acid. This is in contrast to the actual measurement of whole glycogen, which may exhibit source- or time-related molecular structural differences. The iodine-potassium iodide methodology is a test of whole glycogen concentrations; therefore, it may be influenced by glycogen structural differences. Liver tissue sample weight (between 0.16 and 0.36 g) and processing, which included mincing, immediate freezing, or refrigeration in 10% perchloric acid for 1 wk prior to tissue grinding, had no effect on glycogen concentrations that were analyzed by using the phenol-sulfuric acid reagent. These results

  5. Identification of differentially expressed genes in chickens differing in muscle glycogen content and meat quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marthey Sylvain

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The processing ability of poultry meat is highly related to its ultimate pH, the latter being mainly determined by the amount of glycogen in the muscle at death. The genetic determinism of glycogen and related meat quality traits has been established in the chicken but the molecular mechanisms involved in variations in these traits remain to be fully described. In this study, Chicken Genome Arrays (20 K were used to compare muscle gene expression profiles of chickens from Fat (F and Lean (L lines that exhibited high and low muscle glycogen content, respectively, and of individuals exhibiting extremely high (G+ or low (G- muscle glycogen content originating from the F2 cross between the Fat and Lean lines. Real-time RT-PCR was subsequently performed to validate the differential expression of genes either selected from the microarray analysis or whose function in regulating glycogen metabolism was well known. Results Among the genes found to be expressed in chicken P. major muscle, 197 and 254 transcripts appeared to be differentially expressed on microarrays for the F vs. L and the G+ vs. G- comparisons, respectively. Some involved particularly in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism were selected for further validation studies by real-time RT-PCR. We confirmed that, as in mammals, the down-regulation of CEBPB and RGS2 coincides with a decrease in peripheral adiposity in the chicken, but these genes are also suggested to affect muscle glycogen turnover through their role in the cAMP-dependent signalling pathway. Several other genes were suggested to have roles in the regulation of glycogen storage in chicken muscle. PDK4 may act as a glycogen sensor in muscle, UGDH may compete for glycogen synthesis by using UDP-glucose for glucoronidation, and PRKAB1, PRKAG2, and PHKD may impact on glycogen turnover in muscle, through AMP-activated signalling pathways. Conclusions This study is the first stage in the understanding of molecular

  6. Relationship between starch and lipid accumulation induced by nutrient depletion and replenishment in the microalga Parachlorella kessleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Bruno; Teixeira, José; Dragone, Giuliano; Vicente, António A; Kawano, Shigeyuki; Bišová, Kateřina; Přibyl, Pavel; Zachleder, Vilém; Vítová, Milada

    2013-09-01

    Photosynthetic carbon partitioning into starch and neutral lipids, as well as the influence of nutrient depletion and replenishment on growth, pigments and storage compounds, were studied in the microalga, Parachlorella kessleri. Starch was utilized as a primary carbon and energy storage compound, but nutrient depletion drove the microalgae to channel fixed carbon into lipids as secondary storage compounds. Nutrient depletion inhibited both cellular division and growth and caused degradation of chlorophyll. Starch content decreased from an initial value of 25, to around 10% of dry weight (DW), while storage lipids increased from almost 0 to about 29% of DW. After transfer of cells into replenished mineral medium, growth, reproductive processes and chlorophyll content recovered within 2 days, while the content of both starch and lipids decreased markedly to 3 or less % of DW; this suggested that they were being used as a source of energy and carbon.

  7. Determining Inventory Replenishment Policy, Vehicle Type and Optimal Order Quantity in Critical Situation with Variable Lead Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadali Pirayesh Neghab

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In Iran Khodro Khorasan, inventory replenishment policy of some items is based on certain simple model (Wilson model. Sometimes because of some reasons, goods reception may not be achieved at the planned time. This state is called as critical situation because the production line is on the eve of stop. The purpose of this paper is to present different inventory replenishment policies in critical situation. For each policy, the cost function that includes cost of line stop, ordering cost, holding cost and transportation cost has been modeled and through its minimization, vehicle type and optimal order quantity have been determined. This model has been used numerically for two items of Iran Khodro Khorasan. Findings show that applying the proposed policy leads to saved cost compared to the current policy of Iran Khodro Khorasan.

  8. Nudging consumer behaviour in retail stores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adam, Abdulfatah

    2016-01-01

    -called “nudging”) theory popularized by Thaler and Sunstein (2008). Five stores were chosen for the intervention while five comparable stores acted as controls. Results based on total of 28 breakfast cereals showed a decline in calories at intervention stores relative to both pre-intervention period and control...

  9. EVALUATING FACTORS INFLUENCING GROCERY STORE CHOICE

    OpenAIRE

    Palma, Marco A.; Emerson, Robert D.; House, Lisa

    2003-01-01

    This paper analyzes consumer preferences toward grocery store choices given a set of attributes of stores. This information will then be used to make inferences on how the opening of a Wal-Mart supercenter would affect the other grocery stores in a small city.

  10. Using Complete Squares Method to Optimize Replenishment Policies in a Four-Stage Supply Chain with Planned Backorders

    OpenAIRE

    M. E. Seliaman

    2011-01-01

    We develop a four-stage, serial supply chain inventory model with planned backorders. This supply chain model is formulated for the integer multipliers coordination mechanism, where firms at the same stage of the supply chain use the same cycle time and the cycle time at each stage is an integer multiplier of the cycle time used at the adjacent downstream stage. We develop an optimal replenishment policy using a simple algebraic method to solve the problem without the use of differential calc...

  11. Quantifying hepatic glycogen synthesis by direct and indirect pathways in rats under normal ad libitum feeding conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Ana F; Viega, Francisco J; Carvalho, Rui A; Jones, John G

    2009-01-01

    Hepatic glycogen synthesis from intact hexose (direct pathway) relative to that from gluconeogenic precursors (indirect pathway) was quantified in ad libitum-fed rats. Following (2)H(2)O administration and overnight feeding, the livers were removed and glycogen (2)H-enrichment was measured by (2)H NMR. Six controls and six rats rendered hyperglycemic by streptozotocin (STZ; fasting blood glucose = 385 +/- 31 mg/dl) were studied. The indirect pathway contribution, estimated as glycogen hydrogen 5 relative to hydrogen 2 enrichment, was 54% +/- 4% for control rats-similar to values from healthy, meal-fed humans. In STZ-treated rats, the indirect pathway contribution was significantly higher (68% +/- 4%, P diabetic (T1D) patients. In conclusion, sources of hepatic glycogen synthesis in rats during ad libitum nocturnal feeding were quantified by analysis of glycogen enrichment from (2)H(2)O. STZ caused alterations resembling the pathophysiology of hepatic glycogen synthesis in T1D patients.

  12. The Optimal Replenishment Policy under Trade Credit Financing with Ramp Type Demand and Demand Dependent Production Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juanjuan Qin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the optimal replenishment policy for the retailer with the ramp type demand and demand dependent production rate involving the trade credit financing, which is not reported in the literatures. First, the two inventory models are developed under the above situation. Second, the algorithms are given to optimize the replenishment cycle time and the order quantity for the retailer. Finally, the numerical examples are carried out to illustrate the optimal solutions and the sensitivity analysis is performed. The results show that if the value of production rate is small, the retailer will lower the frequency of putting the orders to cut down the order cost; if the production rate is high, the demand dependent production rate has no effect on the optimal decisions. When the trade credit is less than the growth stage time, the retailer will shorten the replenishment cycle; when it is larger than the breakpoint of the demand, within the maturity stage of the products, the trade credit has no effect on the optimal order cycle and the optimal order quantity.

  13. Limited contemporary gene flow and high self-replenishment drives peripheral isolation in an endemic coral reef fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Martin H; Horne, John B; Gardner, Michael G; Hobbs, Jean-Paul A; Pratchett, Morgan; van Herwerden, Lynne

    2013-06-01

    Extensive ongoing degradation of coral reef habitats worldwide has lead to declines in abundance of coral reef fishes and local extinction of some species. Those most vulnerable are ecological specialists and endemic species. Determining connectivity between locations is vital to understanding recovery and long-term persistence of these species following local extinction. This study explored population connectivity in the ecologically-specialized endemic three-striped butterflyfish (Chaetodon tricinctus) using mt and msatDNA (nuclear microsatellites) to distinguish evolutionary versus contemporary gene flow, estimate self-replenishment and measure genetic diversity among locations at the remote Australian offshore coral reefs of Middleton Reef (MR), Elizabeth Reef (ER), Lord Howe Island (LHI), and Norfolk Island (NI). Mt and msatDNA suggested genetic differentiation of the most peripheral location (NI) from the remaining three locations (MR, ER, LHI). Despite high levels of mtDNA gene flow, there is limited msatDNA gene flow with evidence of high levels of self-replenishment (≥76%) at all four locations. Taken together, this suggests prolonged population recovery times following population declines. The peripheral population (NI) is most vulnerable to local extinction due to its relative isolation, extreme levels of self-replenishment (95%), and low contemporary abundance.

  14. Characterization of a canine model of glycogen storage disease type IIIa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiqing Yi

    2012-11-01

    Glycogen storage disease type IIIa (GSD IIIa is an autosomal recessive disease caused by deficiency of glycogen debranching enzyme (GDE in liver and muscle. The disorder is clinically heterogeneous and progressive, and there is no effective treatment. Previously, a naturally occurring dog model for this condition was identified in curly-coated retrievers (CCR. The affected dogs carry a frame-shift mutation in the GDE gene and have no detectable GDE activity in liver and muscle. We characterized in detail the disease expression and progression in eight dogs from age 2 to 16 months. Monthly blood biochemistry revealed elevated and gradually increasing serum alanine transaminase (ALT, aspartate transaminase (AST and alkaline phosphatase (ALP activities; serum creatine phosphokinase (CPK activity exceeded normal range after 12 months. Analysis of tissue biopsy specimens at 4, 12 and 16 months revealed abnormally high glycogen contents in liver and muscle of all dogs. Fasting liver glycogen content increased from 4 months to 12 months, but dropped at 16 months possibly caused by extended fibrosis; muscle glycogen content continually increased with age. Light microscopy revealed significant glycogen accumulation in hepatocytes at all ages. Liver histology showed progressive, age-related fibrosis. In muscle, scattered cytoplasmic glycogen deposits were present in most cells at 4 months, but large, lake-like accumulation developed by 12 and 16 months. Disruption of the contractile apparatus and fraying of myofibrils was observed in muscle at 12 and 16 months by electron microscopy. In conclusion, the CCR dogs are an accurate model of GSD IIIa that will improve our understanding of the disease progression and allow opportunities to investigate treatment interventions.

  15. A new diagnostic assay for glycogen storage disease type II in mixed leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumiya, Toshika; Keulemans, Joke L M; Kroos, Marian A; Van der Beek, Nadine M E; Boer, Marijke A; Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Van Diggelen, Otto P; Reuser, Arnold J J

    2006-05-01

    We have established a new method for the enzymatic diagnosis of glycogen storage disease type II (Pompe disease or acid maltase deficiency) using mixed leukocytes. The method employs glycogen and 4-methylumbelliferyl-alpha-D-glucopyranoside (4MU-alphaGlc) as substrates for measuring the lysosomal acid alpha-glucosidase (acid alphaGlu) activity, and incorporates acarbose to eliminate the interference of unrelated alpha-glucosidases (predominantly maltase-glucoamylase). It is shown that 3.0 micromol/L acarbose completely inhibits the maltase-glucoamylase activity at pH 4.0, but the lysosomal acid alphaGlu activity by less than 5%. With this method, we determined the acid alphaGlu activity in mixed leukocytes from 25 patients with glycogen storage disease type II (2 infantile and 23 late-onset cases), one GAA2/GAA2 homozygote and 30 healthy subjects. In the assay with glycogen as substrate, the addition of acarbose created a clear separation between the patient and the control ranges. In the assay with 4MU-alphaGlc as substrate, the two ranges were fully separated but remained very close despite the use of acarbose. The separation of the patient and normal ranges was improved considerably by taking the ratio of acarbose-inhibited over uninhibited activity. A GAA2/GAA2 homozygote was correctly diagnosed with 4MU-alphaGlc but misdiagnosed as patient when glycogen was used as substrate. We conclude that the inclusion of 3.0 micromol/L acarbose in the assays with glycogen and 4MU-alphaGlc substrates at pH 4.0 allows for the specific measurement of lysosomal acid alphaGlu activity in mixed leukocytes, thus enabling a reliable diagnosis of glycogen storage disease type II in this specimen.

  16. Differential regulation of glycogenolysis by mutant protein phosphatase-1 glycogen-targeting subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danos, Arpad M; Osmanovic, Senad; Brady, Matthew J

    2009-07-17

    PTG and G(L) are hepatic protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) glycogen-targeting subunits, which direct PP1 activity against glycogen synthase (GS) and/or phosphorylase (GP). The C-terminal 16 amino residues of G(L) comprise a high affinity binding site for GP that regulates bound PP1 activity against GS. In this study, a truncated G(L) construct lacking the GP-binding site (G(L)tr) and a chimeric PTG molecule containing the C-terminal site (PTG-G(L)) were generated. As expected, GP binding to glutathione S-transferase (GST)-G(L)tr was reduced, whereas GP binding to GST-PTG-G(L) was increased 2- to 3-fold versus GST-PTG. In contrast, PP1 binding to all proteins was equivalent. Primary mouse hepatocytes were infected with adenoviral constructs for each subunit, and their effects on glycogen metabolism were investigated. G(L)tr expression was more effective at promoting GP inactivation, GS activation, and glycogen accumulation than G(L). Removal of the regulatory GP-binding site from G(L)tr completely blocked the inactivation of GS seen in G(L)-expressing cells following a drop in extracellular glucose. As a result, G(L)tr expression prevented glycogen mobilization under 5 mm glucose conditions. In contrast, equivalent overexpression of PTG or PTG-G(L) caused a similar increase in glycogen-targeted PP1 levels and GS dephosphorylation. Surprisingly, GP dephosphorylation was significantly reduced in PTG-G(L)-overexpressing cells. As a result, PTG-G(L) expression permitted glycogenolysis under 5 mm glucose conditions that was prevented in PTG-expressing cells. Thus, expression of constructs that contained the high affinity GP-binding site (G(L) and PTG-G(L)) displayed reduced glycogen accumulation and enhanced glycogenolysis compared with their respective controls, albeit via different mechanisms.

  17. ²H enrichment distribution of hepatic glycogen from ²H₂O reveals the contribution of dietary fructose to glycogen synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Teresa C; Martins, Fátima O; Carvalho, Filipa; Gonçalves, Ana; Scott, Donald K; O'Doherty, Robert; Macedo, M Paula; Jones, John G

    2013-02-15

    Dietary fructose can benefit or hinder glycemic control, depending on the quantity consumed, and these contrasting effects are reflected by alterations in postprandial hepatic glycogen synthesis. Recently, we showed that ²H enrichment of glycogen positions 5 and 2 from deuterated water (²H₂O) informs direct and indirect pathway contributions to glycogenesis in naturally feeding rats. Inclusion of position 6(S) ²H enrichment data allows indirect pathway sources to be further resolved into triose phosphate and Krebs cycle precursors. This analysis was applied to six rats that had fed on standard chow (SC) and six rats that had fed on SC plus 35% sucrose in their drinking water (HS). After 2 wk, hepatic glycogenesis sources during overnight feeding were determined by ²H₂O administration and postmortem analysis of glycogen ²H enrichment at the conclusion of the dark period. Net overnight hepatic glycogenesis was similar between SC and HS rodents. Whereas direct pathway contributions were similar (403 ± 71 μmol/g dry wt HS vs. 578 ± 76 μmol/g dry wt SC), triose phosphate contributions were significantly higher for HS compared with SC (382 ± 61 vs. 87 ± 24 μmol/g dry wt, P vs. 197 ± 32 μmol/g dry wt, P glucose ²H enrichments at the end of the feeding period also revealed a significantly higher fractional contribution of triose phosphate to plasma glucose levels in HS vs. SC. Hence, the ²H enrichment distributions of hepatic glycogen and glucose from ²H₂O inform the contribution of dietary fructose to hepatic glycogen and glucose synthesis.

  18. Human α-amylase present in lower-genital-tract mucosal fluid processes glycogen to support vaginal colonization by Lactobacillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spear, Gregory T; French, Audrey L; Gilbert, Douglas; Zariffard, M Reza; Mirmonsef, Paria; Sullivan, Thomas H; Spear, William W; Landay, Alan; Micci, Sandra; Lee, Byung-Hoo; Hamaker, Bruce R

    2014-10-01

    Lactobacillus colonization of the lower female genital tract provides protection from the acquisition of sexually transmitted diseases, including human immunodeficiency virus, and from adverse pregnancy outcomes. While glycogen in vaginal epithelium is thought to support Lactobacillus colonization in vivo, many Lactobacillus isolates cannot utilize glycogen in vitro. This study investigated how glycogen could be utilized by vaginal lactobacilli in the genital tract. Several Lactobacillus isolates were confirmed to not grow in glycogen, but did grow in glycogen-breakdown products, including maltose, maltotriose, maltopentaose, maltodextrins, and glycogen treated with salivary α-amylase. A temperature-dependent glycogen-degrading activity was detected in genital fluids that correlated with levels of α-amylase. Treatment of glycogen with genital fluids resulted in production of maltose, maltotriose, and maltotetraose, the major products of α-amylase digestion. These studies show that human α-amylase is present in the female lower genital tract and elucidates how epithelial glycogen can support Lactobacillus colonization in the genital tract.

  19. Mitochondrial GSH replenishment as a potential therapeutic approach for Niemann Pick type C disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Torres

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Niemann Pick type C (NPC disease is a progressive lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in genes encoding NPC1/NPC2 proteins, characterized by neurological defects, hepatosplenomegaly and premature death. While the primary biochemical feature of NPC disease is the intracellular accumulation of cholesterol and gangliosides, predominantly in endolysosomes, mitochondrial cholesterol accumulation has also been reported. As accumulation of cholesterol in mitochondria is known to impair the transport of GSH into mitochondria, resulting in mitochondrial GSH (mGSH depletion, we investigated the impact of mGSH recovery in NPC disease. We show that GSH ethyl ester (GSH-EE, but not N-acetylcysteine (NAC, restored the mGSH pool in liver and brain of Npc1-/- mice and in fibroblasts from NPC patients, while both GSH-EE and NAC increased total GSH levels. GSH-EE but not NAC increased the median survival and maximal life span of Npc1-/- mice. Moreover, intraperitoneal therapy with GSH-EE protected against oxidative stress and oxidant-induced cell death, restored calbindin levels in cerebellar Purkinje cells and reversed locomotor impairment in Npc1-/- mice. High-resolution respirometry analyses revealed that GSH-EE improved oxidative phosphorylation, coupled respiration and maximal electron transfer in cerebellum of Npc1-/- mice. Lipidomic analyses showed that GSH-EE treatment had not effect in the profile of most sphingolipids in liver and brain, except for some particular species in brain of Npc1-/- mice. These findings indicate that the specific replenishment of mGSH may be a potential promising therapy for NPC disease, worth exploring alone or in combination with other options.

  20. Large-Scale Aquifer Replenishment and Seawater Intrusion Control Using Recycled Water in Southern California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herndon, R.; Markus, M.

    2014-10-01

    In 2008, eighteen years after determining that its Talbert Seawater Barrier required expansion, the Orange County Water District started up the worldss largest indirect potable reuse facility, the Groundwater Replenishment System (GWR System). The GWR System provides a reliable potable-quality water supply to the Talbert Barrier, which consists of 109 multi-depth injection wells. The Talbert Barrier began operation in 1976 with the completion of Water Factory 21, the first project in California permitted to inject recycled water into a potable-supply aquifer. By 1990, as groundwater pumping increased, it was evident that the barriers original injection wells were incapable of maintaining protective groundwater elevations to prevent seawater intrusion. Ten years of technical planning and public outreach culminated in the decision to demolish the undersized Water Factory 21 and build a state-of-the-art advanced recycled water treatment system and expanded barrier. Barrier expansion entailed construction of over 20 new injection wells in key areas where seawater intrusion was observed. Flow modeling indicated that average barrier injection needed to be doubled to 80 m{sup 3}/min (30 mgal/day). Based on seasonal groundwater pumping patterns, model simulations indicated that the barrier should inject up to 107 m{sup 3}/min (40 mgal/day) in the summer/fall months and one-half that rate in winter/spring months to maintain a protective hydraulic barrier. With a capacity of 187 m{sup 3}/min (70 mgd), the GWR System provides all of the high-quality water that the barrier requires, with the remainder conveyed to OCWDss infiltration basins in the city of Anaheim. Five years after start-up, the expanded seawater barrier has met all expectations in terms of capacity and groundwater elevation maintenance using a reliable locally-produced water supply. (Author)

  1. Coral assemblages in Tonga: spatial patterns, replenishment capacities, and implications for conservation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjeroud, Mehdi; Briand, Marine J; Kayal, Mohsen; Dumas, Pascal

    2013-07-01

    Coral reefs in Tonga have been confronted by multiple threats of various origins, including large-scale disturbances and human-induced stressors. These reef communities have been poorly studied, and efficient conservation actions are urgently needed. The aim of this study was to: (1) examine the spatial distribution of coral assemblages in the lagoon of Tongatapu; (2) determine the degree to which spatial heterogeneity of adult corals is influenced by recruitment processes; and (3) examine the implications of these results in terms of conservation actions. We recorded a total of 37 adult and 28 juvenile coral genera, a mean density of 11.6 adult and 5.5 juvenile colonies m(-2), and a dominance of Montipora, Acropora, and Porites. For seven of the 10 dominant genera, spatial patterns of adults were linked to the short-term recruitment pattern history. Despite a reduced diversity and abundance of adult corals in some areas, the lagoon of Tongatapu retains the potential for replenishment through recruitment of young corals. Consequently, we suggest that conservation actions should focus on reducing factors causing coral mortality and maintain suitable conditions for the establishment and growth of juvenile corals, thus increasing the probability that they will reach maturity and participate to the maintenance of local populations. Rather than establishing a large marine protected area, which will almost certainly suffer from a lack of control and poor enforcement, alternative conservation measures could be successfully implemented through the establishment of several small village-based marine reserves, as has been undertaken in other South Pacific islands with promising results.

  2. Mitochondrial GSH replenishment as a potential therapeutic approach for Niemann Pick type C disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Sandra; Matías, Nuria; Baulies, Anna; Nuñez, Susana; Alarcon-Vila, Cristina; Martinez, Laura; Nuño, Natalia; Fernandez, Anna; Caballeria, Joan; Levade, Thierry; Gonzalez-Franquesa, Alba; Garcia-Rovés, Pablo; Balboa, Elisa; Zanlungo, Silvana; Fabrías, Gemma; Casas, Josefina; Enrich, Carlos; Garcia-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernández-Checa, José C

    2017-04-01

    Niemann Pick type C (NPC) disease is a progressive lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in genes encoding NPC1/NPC2 proteins, characterized by neurological defects, hepatosplenomegaly and premature death. While the primary biochemical feature of NPC disease is the intracellular accumulation of cholesterol and gangliosides, predominantly in endolysosomes, mitochondrial cholesterol accumulation has also been reported. As accumulation of cholesterol in mitochondria is known to impair the transport of GSH into mitochondria, resulting in mitochondrial GSH (mGSH) depletion, we investigated the impact of mGSH recovery in NPC disease. We show that GSH ethyl ester (GSH-EE), but not N-acetylcysteine (NAC), restored the mGSH pool in liver and brain of Npc1(-/-) mice and in fibroblasts from NPC patients, while both GSH-EE and NAC increased total GSH levels. GSH-EE but not NAC increased the median survival and maximal life span of Npc1(-/-) mice. Moreover, intraperitoneal therapy with GSH-EE protected against oxidative stress and oxidant-induced cell death, restored calbindin levels in cerebellar Purkinje cells and reversed locomotor impairment in Npc1(-/-) mice. High-resolution respirometry analyses revealed that GSH-EE improved oxidative phosphorylation, coupled respiration and maximal electron transfer in cerebellum of Npc1(-/-) mice. Lipidomic analyses showed that GSH-EE treatment had not effect in the profile of most sphingolipids in liver and brain, except for some particular species in brain of Npc1(-/-) mice. These findings indicate that the specific replenishment of mGSH may be a potential promising therapy for NPC disease, worth exploring alone or in combination with other options.

  3. The evolution of glycogen and starch metabolism in eukaryotes gives molecular clues to understand the establishment of plastid endosymbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Steven; Colleoni, Christophe; Cenci, Ugo; Raj, Jenifer Nirmal; Tirtiaux, Catherine

    2011-03-01

    Solid semi-crystalline starch and hydrosoluble glycogen define two distinct physical states of the same type of storage polysaccharide. Appearance of semi-crystalline storage polysaccharides appears linked to the requirement of unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacteria to fuel nitrogenase and protect it from oxygen through respiration of vast amounts of stored carbon. Starch metabolism itself resulted from the merging of the bacterial and eukaryote pathways of storage polysaccharide metabolism after endosymbiosis of the plastid. This generated the three Archaeplastida lineages: the green algae and land plants (Chloroplastida), the red algae (Rhodophyceae), and the glaucophytes (Glaucophyta). Reconstruction of starch metabolism in the common ancestor of Archaeplastida suggests that polysaccharide synthesis was ancestrally cytosolic. In addition, the synthesis of cytosolic starch from the ADP-glucose exported from the cyanobacterial symbiont possibly defined the original metabolic flux by which the cyanobiont provided photosynthate to its host. Additional evidence supporting this scenario include the monophyletic origin of the major carbon translocators of the inner membrane of eukaryote plastids which are sisters to nucleotide-sugar transporters of the eukaryote endomembrane system. It also includes the extent of enzyme subfunctionalization that came as a consequence of the rewiring of this pathway to the chloroplasts in the green algae. Recent evidence suggests that, at the time of endosymbiosis, obligate intracellular energy parasites related to extant Chlamydia have donated important genes to the ancestral starch metabolism network.

  4. "Candidatus Propionivibrio aalborgensis": A Novel Glycogen Accumulating Organism Abundant in Full-Scale Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertsen, Mads; McIlroy, Simon J; Stokholm-Bjerregaard, Mikkel; Karst, Søren M; Nielsen, Per H

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is widely used to remove phosphorus from wastewater. The process relies on polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) that are able to take up phosphorus in excess of what is needed for growth, whereby phosphorus can be removed from the wastewater by wasting the biomass. However, glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) may reduce the EBPR efficiency as they compete for substrates with PAOs, but do not store excessive amounts of polyphosphate. PAOs and GAOs are thought to be phylogenetically unrelated, with the model PAO being the betaproteobacterial "Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis" (Accumulibacter) and the model GAO being the gammaproteobacterial "Candidatus Competibacter phosphatis". Here, we report the discovery of a GAO from the genus Propionivibrio, which is closely related to Accumulibacter. Propionivibrio sp. are targeted by the canonical fluorescence in situ hybridization probes used to target Accumulibacter (PAOmix), but do not store excessive amounts of polyphosphate in situ. A laboratory scale reactor, operated to enrich for PAOs, surprisingly contained co-dominant populations of Propionivibrio and Accumulibacter. Metagenomic sequencing of multiple time-points enabled recovery of near complete population genomes from both genera. Annotation of the Propionivibrio genome confirmed their potential for the GAO phenotype and a basic metabolic model is proposed for their metabolism in the EBPR environment. Using newly designed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probes, analyses of full-scale EBPR plants revealed that Propionivibrio is a common member of the community, constituting up to 3% of the biovolume. To avoid overestimation of Accumulibacter abundance in situ, we recommend the use of the FISH probe PAO651 instead of the commonly applied PAOmix probe set.

  5. “Candidatus Propionivibrio aalborgensis”: A Novel Glycogen Accumulating Organism Abundant in Full-Scale Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertsen, Mads; McIlroy, Simon J.; Stokholm-Bjerregaard, Mikkel; Karst, Søren M.; Nielsen, Per H.

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is widely used to remove phosphorus from wastewater. The process relies on polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) that are able to take up phosphorus in excess of what is needed for growth, whereby phosphorus can be removed from the wastewater by wasting the biomass. However, glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) may reduce the EBPR efficiency as they compete for substrates with PAOs, but do not store excessive amounts of polyphosphate. PAOs and GAOs are thought to be phylogenetically unrelated, with the model PAO being the betaproteobacterial “Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis” (Accumulibacter) and the model GAO being the gammaproteobacterial “Candidatus Competibacter phosphatis”. Here, we report the discovery of a GAO from the genus Propionivibrio, which is closely related to Accumulibacter. Propionivibrio sp. are targeted by the canonical fluorescence in situ hybridization probes used to target Accumulibacter (PAOmix), but do not store excessive amounts of polyphosphate in situ. A laboratory scale reactor, operated to enrich for PAOs, surprisingly contained co-dominant populations of Propionivibrio and Accumulibacter. Metagenomic sequencing of multiple time-points enabled recovery of near complete population genomes from both genera. Annotation of the Propionivibrio genome confirmed their potential for the GAO phenotype and a basic metabolic model is proposed for their metabolism in the EBPR environment. Using newly designed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probes, analyses of full-scale EBPR plants revealed that Propionivibrio is a common member of the community, constituting up to 3% of the biovolume. To avoid overestimation of Accumulibacter abundance in situ, we recommend the use of the FISH probe PAO651 instead of the commonly applied PAOmix probe set. PMID:27458436

  6. Glycogen content and excitation-contraction coupling in mechanically skinned muscle fibres of the cane toad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, D G; Nguyen, L T; Stephenson, G M

    1999-08-15

    1. Mechanically skinned skeletal muscle fibres from the twitch region of the iliofibularis muscle of cane toads were used to investigate the relationship between fibre glycogen content and fibre capacity to respond to transverse tubular (T-) system depolarization. 2. A large proportion of total fibre glycogen remained in mechanically skinned muscle fibres exposed to aqueous solutions. This glycogen pool (about 80% of total fibre glycogen) was very stable when the preparation was incubated in a rigor solution (pH 7.0) but decreased gradually at a rate of 0.59+/-0.20% min-1 in a relaxing solution (200 nM [Ca2+]). The rate was considerably higher (2.66+/-0.38% min(-1)) when the preparations were exposed to 30 microM [Ca2+]. An even greater rate of glycogen loss was found after T-system depolarization-induced contractions. The Ca2+-dependent loss of fibre glycogen was caused by endogenous glycogenolytic processes. 3. Silver stained SDS gels of components eluted into relaxing solution from single skinned fibres revealed a rapid (2 min) loss of parvalbumin and at least 10 other proteins varying in molecular mass between 10 and 80 kDa but there was essentially no loss of myosin heavy and light chains and actin. Subsequent elution for a further 30 min in either relaxing or maximally Ca2+-activating solution did not result in additional, appreciable detectable loss of fibre protein. 4. Depletion of fibre glycogen was associated with loss of fibre ability to respond to T-system depolarization even though the bathing solutions contained high levels of ATP (8 mM) and creatine phosphate (10 mM). 5. The capacity of mechanically skinned fibres to respond to T-system depolarization was highly positively correlated (Pmuscle to respond to T-system depolarization is related directly or indirectly to the non-washable glycogen pool in fibres, (ii) this relationship holds for conditions where glycogen is not required as a source of energy and (iii) the mechanically skinned fibre

  7. Monitoring of liver glycogen synthesis in diabetic patients using carbon-13 MR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomiyasu, Moyoko [Department of Biophysics, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage, Chiba city, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)], E-mail: moyo@fml.nirs.go.jp; Obata, Takayuki [Department of Biophysics, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage, Chiba city, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Nishi, Yukio; Nakamoto, Hiromitsu [Department of Biophysics, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage, Chiba city, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Pharmaceutical Division, Japan Tobacco Inc., Tokyo (Japan); Nonaka, Hiroi [Department of Biophysics, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage, Chiba city, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Takayama, Yukihisa [Department of Biophysics, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage, Chiba city, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Autio, Joonas; Ikehira, Hiroo; Kanno, Iwao [Department of Biophysics, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage, Chiba city, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2010-02-15

    To investigate the relationship between liver glucose, glycogen, and plasma glucose in diabetic patients, in vivo liver carbon-13 magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 13}C MRS) with a clinical 3.0 T MR system was performed. Subjects were healthy male volunteers (n = 5) and male type-2 diabetic patients (n = 5). Pre- and during oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT), {sup 13}C MR spectra without proton decoupling were acquired in a monitoring period of over 6 h, and in total seven spectra were obtained from each subject. For OGTT, 75 g of glucose, including 5 g of [1-{sup 13}C]glucose, was administered. The MR signals of liver [1-{sup 13}C]glucose and glycogen were detected and their time-course changes were assessed in comparison with the plasma data obtained at screening. The correlations between the fasting plasma glucose level and liver glycogen/glucose rate (Spearman: {rho} = -0.68, p < 0.05, n = 10) and the fasting plasma glucose level and liver glycogen peak/fasting rate (Spearman: {rho} = -0.67, p < 0.05, n = 10) indicated that {sup 13}C MRS can perform noninvasive measurement of glycogen storage/degradation ability in the liver individually and can assist in tailor-made therapy for diabetes. In conclusion, {sup 13}C MRS has a potential to become a powerful tool in diagnosing diabetes multilaterally.

  8. Nonlethal evaluation of the physiological health of unionid mussels: Method for biopsy and glycogen analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naimo, T.J.; Damschen, E.D.; Rada, R.G.; Monroe, E.M.

    1998-01-01

    In long-lived unionid mussels, many short-term measures of growth are of limited value. Changes in physiological condition may be an early indication of stress, because the increased energy demand associated with stress often results in a depletion of glycogen reserves, the principal storage form of carbohydrates in unionid mussels. Our goal was to nonlethally extract tissue from freshwater mussels and then to develop a rapid and dependable method for the analysis of glycogen in the tissue extracts. A biopsy technique was developed to remove between 5 and 10 mg of food tissue in Amblema plicata plicata. The survival rate did not differ between biopsied and non-biopsied mussels during a 581-d observation period, demonstrating that the biopsy technique will allow nonlethal evaluation of the physiological condition of individual mussels through measurement of changes in contaminant, genetic, and biochemical indicators in tissue. We also modified the standard alkaline digestion and phenol-sulfuric acid analysis of glycogen for use on the small samples of biopsied tissue and to reduce analysis time and cost. We present quality control data, including method detection limits and estimates of precision and bias. The modified analytical method is rapid and accurate and has a method detection limit of 0.014 mg glycogen. Glycogen content in the biopsied samples was well above the method detection limit; it ranged from 0.09 to 0.36 mg, indicating that the method should be applicable to native mussels.

  9. Glycogen phosphorylase is involved in stress endurance and biofilm formation in Azospirillum brasilense Sp7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, Anat; Castro-Sowinski, Susana; Lerner, Hadas; Okon, Yaacov; Burdman, Saul

    2009-11-01

    Here we report the identification of a glycogen phosphorylase (glgP) gene in the plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense, Sp7, and the characterization of a glgP marker exchange mutant of this strain. The glgP mutant showed a twofold reduction of glycogen phosphorylase activity and an increased glycogen accumulation as compared with wild-type Sp7, indicating that the identified gene indeed encodes a protein with glycogen phosphorylase activity. Interestingly, the glgP mutant had higher survival rates than the wild type after exposure to starvation, desiccation and osmotic pressure. The mutant was shown to be compromised in its biofilm formation ability. Analysis of the exopolysaccharide sugar composition of the glgP mutant revealed a decrease in the amount of glucose, accompanied by increases in rhamnose, fucose and ribose, as compared with the Sp7 exopolysaccharide. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that demonstrates GlgP activity in A. brasilense, and shows that glycogen accumulation may play an important role in the stress endurance of this bacterium.

  10. Consumer evaluations of store brands: effects of store image and product attributes

    OpenAIRE

    Semeijn, J.; van Riel, A.C.R.; Ambrosini, A.B.

    2003-01-01

    Store brands have grown in importance. Large numbers of products carrying a store label have been introduced in recent years, with varying degrees of success. It appears that retailers pay little attention to the multiple risks associated with adding new product categories to their store labels. In this study we investigate how attributes of store and product affect consumer evaluations of store branded products. A structural model is developed and tested, indicating the likelihood of success...

  11. Increased Laforin and Laforin Binding to Glycogen Underlie Lafora Body Formation in Malin-deficient Lafora Disease*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiberia, Erica; Turnbull, Julie; Wang, Tony; Ruggieri, Alessandra; Zhao, Xiao-Chu; Pencea, Nela; Israelian, Johan; Wang, Yin; Ackerley, Cameron A.; Wang, Peixiang; Liu, Yan; Minassian, Berge A.

    2012-01-01

    The solubility of glycogen, essential to its metabolism, is a property of its shape, a sphere generated through extensive branching during synthesis. Lafora disease (LD) is a severe teenage-onset neurodegenerative epilepsy and results from multiorgan accumulations, termed Lafora bodies (LB), of abnormally structured aggregation-prone and digestion-resistant glycogen. LD is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the EPM2A or EPM2B gene, encoding the interacting laforin phosphatase and malin E3 ubiquitin ligase enzymes, respectively. The substrate and function of malin are unknown; an early counterintuitive observation in cell culture experiments that it targets laforin to proteasomal degradation was not pursued until now. The substrate and function of laforin have recently been elucidated. Laforin dephosphorylates glycogen during synthesis, without which phosphate ions interfere with and distort glycogen construction, leading to LB. We hypothesized that laforin in excess or not removed following its action on glycogen also interferes with glycogen formation. We show in malin-deficient mice that the absence of malin results in massively increased laforin preceding the appearance of LB and that laforin gradually accumulates in glycogen, which corresponds to progressive LB generation. We show that increasing the amounts of laforin in cell culture causes LB formation and that this occurs only with glycogen binding-competent laforin. In summary, malin deficiency causes increased laforin, increased laforin binding to glycogen, and LB formation. Furthermore, increased levels of laforin, when it can bind glycogen, causes LB. We conclude that malin functions to regulate laforin and that malin deficiency at least in part causes LB and LD through increased laforin binding to glycogen. PMID:22669944

  12. Maintaining Stored Procedures in Database Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Kakade

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Stored procedure and triggers have an irreplaceable importance in any database application, as they provide a powerful way to code application logic that can be stored on the server and execute according to the need of application. Writing stored procedures for database application involves set of sql statements with an assigned name that's stored in the database in compiled form so that it can be shared by a number of programs. The use of stored procedures can be helpful in controlling access to data end-users may enter or change data but do not write procedures, preserving data integrity and improving productivity statements in a stored procedure only need to be written one time

  13. Impaired muscle glycogen resynthesis after a marathon is not caused by decreased muscle GLUT-4 content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asp, S; Rohde, T; Richter, Erik

    1997-01-01

    Our purpose was to investigate whether the slow rate of muscle glycogen resynthesis after a competitive marathon is associated with a decrease in the total muscle content of the muscle glucose transporter (GLUT-4). Seven well-trained marathon runners participated in the study, and muscle biopsies...... were obtained from the lateral head of the gastrocnemius muscle before, immediately after, and 1, 2, and 7 days after the marathon, as were venous blood samples. Muscle GLUT-4 content was unaltered over the experimental period. Muscle glycogen concentration was 758 +/- 53 mmol/kg dry weight before...... the marathon and decreased to 148 +/- 39 mmol/kg dry weight immediately afterward. Despite a carbohydrate-rich diet (containing at least 7 g carbohydrate.kg body mass-1.day-1), the muscle glycogen concentration remained 30% lower than before-race values 2 days after the race, whereas it had returned to before...

  14. Reduced glycogen availability is associated with an elevation in HSP72 in contracting human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Febbraio, Mark A; Steensberg, Adam; Walsh, Rory

    2002-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that a decrease in intramuscular glycogen availability may stimulate heat shock protein expression, seven men depleted one leg of muscle glycogen the day before performing 4-5 h of exhaustive, two-legged knee extensor exercise at 40 % of leg peak power output. Subjects...... then rested for a further 3 h. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the depleted and control leg before, immediately after and 3 h into recovery from exercise. These samples were analysed for muscle glycogen, and HSP72 gene and protein expression. In addition, catheters were placed in one femoral artery...... and both femoral veins and blood was sampled from these catheters prior to exercise and at 1 h intervals during exercise and into recovery for the measurement of arterial-venous differences in serum HSP72. Plasma creatine kinase (CK) was also measured from arterial blood samples. Pre-exercise muscle...

  15. A mutation in PRKAG3 associated with excess glycogen content in pig skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milan, D; Jeon, J T; Looft, C; Amarger, V; Robic, A; Thelander, M; Rogel-Gaillard, C; Paul, S; Iannuccelli, N; Rask, L; Ronne, H; Lundström, K; Reinsch, N; Gellin, J; Kalm, E; Roy, P L; Chardon, P; Andersson, L

    2000-05-19

    A high proportion of purebred Hampshire pigs carries the dominant RN- mutation, which causes high glycogen content in skeletal muscle. The mutation has beneficial effects on meat content but detrimental effects on processing yield. Here, it is shown that the mutation is a nonconservative substitution (R200Q) in the PRKAG3 gene, which encodes a muscle-specific isoform of the regulatory gamma subunit of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Loss-of-function mutations in the homologous gene in yeast (SNF4) cause defects in glucose metabolism, including glycogen storage. Further analysis of the PRKAG3 signaling pathway may provide insights into muscle physiology as well as the pathogenesis of noninsulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in humans, a metabolic disorder associated with impaired glycogen synthesis.

  16. Synthesis, screening and docking of small heterocycles as glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweiker, Stephanie S; Loughlin, Wendy A; Lohning, Anna S; Petersson, Maria J; Jenkins, Ian D

    2014-09-12

    A series of morpholine substituted amino acids (phenylalanine, leucine, lysine and glutamic acid) was synthesized. A fragment-based screening approach was then used to evaluate a series of small heterocycles, including morpholine, oxazoline, dihydro-1,3-oxazine, tetrahydro-1,3-oxazepine, thiazoline, tetrahydro-1,3-pyrimidine, tetrahydro-1,3-diazepine and hexahydro-1H-benzimidazole, as potential inhibitors of Glycogen Phosphorylase a. Thiazoline 7 displayed an improved potency (IC50 of 25 μM) and had good LE and LELP values, as compared to heterocycles 1, 5, 9-13 and 19 (IC50 values of 1.1 mM-23.9 mM). A docking study using the crystal structure of human liver Glycogen Phosphorylase, provided insight into the interactions of heterocycles 5, 7, 9-13 and 19 with Glycogen Phosphorylase.

  17. Signature-based store checking buffer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Vilas; Gurumurthi, Sudhanva

    2015-06-02

    A system and method for optimizing redundant output verification, are provided. A hardware-based store fingerprint buffer receives multiple instances of output from multiple instances of computation. The store fingerprint buffer generates a signature from the content included in the multiple instances of output. When a barrier is reached, the store fingerprint buffer uses the signature to verify the content is error-free.

  18. Mass Retailers' Advertising Strategies Against Commodity Stores.

    OpenAIRE

    Fabian Bergès; Sylvette Monier-Dilhan

    2013-01-01

    A retailer has different opportunities to advertise in the media: emphasizing the store image or promoting specifically its private label (PL). In the first option, advertising benefits all products sold, whereas in the alternative, only store brands are concerned by image improvement. We analyze the retailer's advertising campaign strategies when its competitor's format is a small commodity store. PL quality is endogenous and chosen according to the competitor's product range. We show the re...

  19. Business intelligence in-Store Media

    OpenAIRE

    Almiñana Pablo, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Aquest treball és un projecte d'ampliació d'un projecte de business intelligence ja disponible en la empresa in-Store Media. Este trabajo es un proyecto de ampliación de un proyecto de business intelligence ya disponible en la empresa in-Store Media. This work is an extension project of a BI project available on the company inStore Media.

  20. Store-operated Ca2+ entry in hippocampal neurons: Regulation by protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koss, David J; Riedel, Gernot; Bence, Kendra; Platt, Bettina

    2013-02-01

    Store operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) replenishes intracellular Ca(2+) stores and activates a number of intracellular signalling pathways. Whilst several molecular components forming store operated Ca(2+) channels (SOCC) have been identified, their modulation in neurons remains poorly understood. Here, we extend on our previous findings and show that neuronal SOCE is modulated by tyrosine phosphorylation. Cyclopiazonic acid induced SOCE was characterised in hippocampal cultures derived from forebrain specific protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B knockout (PTP1B KO) mice and wild type (WT) litter mates using Fura-2 Ca(2+) imaging. PTP1B KO cultures expressed elevated SOCE relative to WT cultures without changes in cytoplasmic Ca(2+) homeostasis or depolarisation-induced Ca(2+) influx. WT and PTP1B KO cultures displayed similar pharmacological sensitivities towards the SOCE inhibitors gadolinium and 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, as well as the tyrosine kinase inhibitor Ag126 indicating an augmentation of native SOCCs by PTP1B. Following store depletion WT culture homogenates showed heightened phospho-tyrosine levels, an increase in Src tyrosine kinase activation and two minor PTP1B species. These data suggest tyrosine phosphorylation gating SOCE, and implicate PTP1B as a key regulatory enzyme. The involvement of PTP1B in SOCE and its relation to SOCC components and mechanism of regulation are discussed.

  1. Postexercise Glycogen Recovery and Exercise Performance is Not Significantly Different Between Fast Food and Sport Supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Michael J; Dumke, Charles L; Hailes, Walter S; Cuddy, John S; Ruby, Brent C

    2015-10-01

    A variety of dietary choices are marketed to enhance glycogen recovery after physical activity. Past research informs recommendations regarding the timing, dose, and nutrient compositions to facilitate glycogen recovery. This study examined the effects of isoenergetic sport supplements (SS) vs. fast food (FF) on glycogen recovery and exercise performance. Eleven males completed two experimental trials in a randomized, counterbalanced order. Each trial included a 90-min glycogen depletion ride followed by a 4-hr recovery period. Absolute amounts of macronutrients (1.54 ± 0.27 g·kg-1 carbohydrate, 0.24 ± 0.04 g·kg fat-1, and 0.18 ±0.03g·kg protein-1) as either SS or FF were provided at 0 and 2 hr. Muscle biopsies were collected from the vastus lateralis at 0 and 4 hr post exercise. Blood samples were analyzed at 0, 30, 60, 120, 150, 180, and 240 min post exercise for insulin and glucose, with blood lipids analyzed at 0 and 240 min. A 20k time-trial (TT) was completed following the final muscle biopsy. There were no differences in the blood glucose and insulin responses. Similarly, rates of glycogen recovery were not different across the diets (6.9 ± 1.7 and 7.9 ± 2.4 mmol·kg wet weight- 1·hr-1 for SS and FF, respectively). There was also no difference across the diets for TT performance (34.1 ± 1.8 and 34.3 ± 1.7 min for SS and FF, respectively. These data indicate that short-term food options to initiate glycogen resynthesis can include dietary options not typically marketed as sports nutrition products such as fast food menu items.

  2. Distributed energy store railgun; The limiting case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, R.A. (WBM Stalker Pty. Ltd., 99 Leichardt Street, Brisbane, Qld. (AU))

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that when the limiting case of a distributed energy store railgun is analyzed, i.e., the case where the space between adjacent energy stores become indefinitely small, three important results are obtained. First, the shape of the current pulse delivered by each store is sinusoidal and an exponential tail. Second, the rail-to-rail voltage behind the rear-most active store approaches zero. Third, it is not possible to choose parameters in such a way that capacitor crowbars can be eliminated.

  3. Structure-Function Analysis of PPP1R3D, a Protein Phosphatase 1 Targeting Subunit, Reveals a Binding Motif for 14-3-3 Proteins which Regulates its Glycogenic Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Rubio-Villena, Carla; Sanz, Pascual; Garcia-Gimeno, Maria Adelaida

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is one of the major protein phosphatases in eukaryotic cells. It plays a key role in regulating glycogen synthesis, by dephosphorylating crucial enzymes involved in glycogen homeostasis such as glycogen synthase (GS) and glycogen phosphorylase (GP). To play this role, PP1 binds to specific glycogen targeting subunits that, on one hand recognize the substrates to be dephosphorylated and on the other hand recruit PP1 to glycogen particles. In this work we have analyz...

  4. Adaptations to a New Physical Training Program in the Combat Controller Training Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    hydrating, using sports drinks instead of water, maximizing glycogen stores by eating a diet rich in complex carbohydrates , and replenishing glycogen...training and hands- on practice on the most effective ways to physically train CCTs. Creation of the Combat Athlete Training Cell at STTS. Prior to our...truly comprehensive PT plan for the trainees. Following AFRL’s suggestion, the STTS formed the Combat Athlete Training Cell with two instructors

  5. Vascular endothelial growth factor in skeletal muscle following glycogen-depleting exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Line; Gejl, Kasper Degn; Ørtenblad, Niels

    2015-01-01

    unclear. However, as VEGF is also considered very important for the regulation of vascular permeability, it is possible that metabolic stress may trigger muscle VEGF release. PURPOSE: To study the role of metabolic stress induced by glycogen-depleting exercise on muscle VEGF expression. METHODS: Fifteen...... heavy chain II (MHC II) or HSP70 in muscle sections demonstrated a pronounced depletion of glycogen in type I fibers and concurrent increase of HSP70 also in type I fibers post and 4h after exercise. Baseline mRNA levels of VEGF, VEGFR-2 and HSP70 correlated positively with percentage of type I fibers...... homeostasis in response to metabolic stress....

  6. Changes in particular glycogen populations of the nerve terminals of Torpedo electric organ stimulated to fatigue in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constant, P; Goffinet, G; Schoffeniels, E

    1980-01-01

    Stimulation to fatigue of Torpedo electric organ fragments in partial anoxic conditions induces a loss of particular glycogen associated with the nerve terminals. These results show that the metabolic requirements imposed by the process of bioelectrogenesis in anoxia involve the utilisation glycogen.

  7. Ablation of PPP1R3G reduces glycogen deposition and mitigates high-fat diet induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongxian; Gu, Jin; Wang, Lin; Zhao, Zilong; Pan, Yi; Chen, Yan

    2017-01-05

    Glycogen and triglyceride are two major forms of energy storage in the body and provide the fuel during different phases of food deprivation. However, how glycogen metabolism is linked to fat deposition in adipose tissue has not been clearly characterized. We generated a mouse model with whole-body deletion of PPP1R3G, a glycogen-targeting subunit of protein phosphatase-1 required for glycogen synthesis. Upon feeding with high-fat diet, the body weight and fat composition are significantly reduced in the PPP1R3G(-/-) mice compared to the wild type controls. The metabolic rate of the mice as measured by O2 consumption and CO2 production is accelerated by PPP1R3G deletion. The high-fat diet-induced liver steatosis is also slightly relieved by PPP1R3G deletion. The glycogen level in adipose tissue is reduced by PPP1R3G deletion. In 3T3L1 cells, overexpression of PPP1R3G leads to increases of both glycogen and triglyceride levels. In conclusion, our study indicates that glycogen is actively involved in fat accumulation in adipose tissue and obesity development upon high-fat diet. Our study also suggests that PPP1R3G is an important player that links glycogen metabolism to lipid metabolism in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Human acid alpha-glucosidase from rabbit milk has therapeutic effect in mice with glycogen storage disease type II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.G.A. Bijvoet (Agnes); A.J.J. Reuser (Arnold); H. van Hirtum (Hans); M.A. Kroos (Marian); E.H. van de Kamp; O. Schoneveld; P. Visser (Pim); J.P. Brakenhoff (Just); M. Weggeman; E.J.J.M. van Corven (Emiel); A.T. van der Ploeg (Ans)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractPompe's disease or glycogen storage disease type II (GSDII) belongs to the family of inherited lysosomal storage diseases. The underlying deficiency of acid alpha-glucosidase leads in different degrees of severity to glycogen storage in heart, skeletal and s

  9. Functional importance of the astrocytic glycogen-shunt and glycolysis for maintenance of an intact intra/extracellular glutamate gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, Arne; Sickmann, Helle M; Walls, Anne B

    2010-01-01

    It has been proposed that a considerable fraction of glucose metabolism proceeds via the glycogen-shunt consisting of conversion of glucose units to glycogen residues and subsequent production of glucose-1-phosphate to be metabolized in glycolysis after conversion to glucose-6-phosphate...

  10. Sustained high plasma mannose less sensitive to fluctuating blood glucose in glycogen storage disease type Ia children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagasaka, Hironori; Yorifuji, Tohru; Bandsma, Robert H. J.; Takatani, Tomozumi; Asano, Hisaki; Mochizuki, Hiroshi; Takuwa, Mayuko; Tsukahara, Hirokazu; Inui, Ayano; Tsunoda, Tomoyuki; Komatsu, Haruki; Hiejima, Eitaro; Fujisawa, Tomoo; Hirano, Ken-ichi; Miida, Takashi; Ohtake, Akira; Taguchi, Tadao; Miwa, Ichitomo

    2013-01-01

    Plasma mannose is suggested to be largely generated from liver glycogen-oriented glucose-6-phosphate. This study examined plasma mannose in glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD Ia) lacking conversion of glucose-6-phosphate to glucose in the liver. We initially examined fasting-and postprandial 2 h-

  11. Muscle glycogen content and glucose uptake during exercise in humans: influence of prior exercise and dietary manipulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steensberg, Adam; van Hall, Gerrit; Keller, Charlotte

    2002-01-01

    There are many factors that can influence glucose uptake by contracting skeletal muscle during exercise and although one may be intramuscular glycogen content, this relationship is at present not fully elucidated. To test the hypothesis that muscle glycogen concentration influences glucose uptake...

  12. Skeletal muscle glycogen content and particle size of distinct subcellular localizations in the recovery period after a high-level soccer match

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Joachim; Krustrup, Peter; Nybo, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Whole muscle glycogen levels remain low for a prolonged period following a soccer match. The present study was conducted to investigate how this relates to glycogen content and particle size in distinct subcellular localizations. Seven high-level male soccer players had a vastus lateralis muscle...... biopsy collected immediately after and 24, 48, 72 and 120 h after a competitive soccer match. Transmission electron microscopy was used to estimate the subcellular distribution of glycogen and individual particle size. During the first day of recovery, glycogen content increased by ~60% in all...... subcellular localizations, but during the subsequent second day of recovery glycogen content located within the myofibrils (Intramyofibrillar glycogen, a minor deposition constituting 10-15% of total glycogen) did not increase further compared with an increase in subsarcolemmal glycogen (-7 vs. +25...

  13. Skeletal muscle glycogen content and particle size of distinct subcellular localizations in the recovery period after a high-level soccer match

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Joachim; Krustrup, Peter; Nybo, Lars;

    2012-01-01

    biopsy collected immediately after and 24, 48, 72 and 120 h after a competitive soccer match. Transmission electron microscopy was used to estimate the subcellular distribution of glycogen and individual particle size. During the first day of recovery, glycogen content increased by ~60% in all...... subcellular localizations, but during the subsequent second day of recovery glycogen content located within the myofibrils (Intramyofibrillar glycogen, a minor deposition constituting 10-15% of total glycogen) did not increase further compared with an increase in subsarcolemmal glycogen (-7 vs. +25......%, respectively, P = 0.047). Conversely, from the second to the fifth day of recovery, glycogen content increased (53%) within the myofibrils compared to no change in subsarcolemmal or intermyofibrillar glycogen (P ...

  14. Neuroprotective effect of ethyl pyruvate against Zn(2+) toxicity via NAD replenishment and direct Zn(2+) chelation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung-Woo; Lee, Hye-Kyung; Kim, Hyun-Ji; Yoon, Sung-Hwa; Lee, Ja-Kyeong

    2016-06-01

    Ethyl pyruvate (EP) is a simple aliphatic ester of pyruvic acid and has been shown to have robust protective effect in various pathological conditions. A variety of mechanisms have been reported to underlie the protective effects of EP, which include anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, and anti-apoptotic functions. Recently, we reported that EP suppressed high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) release from primary microglial cells via direct Ca(2+) chelation. In the present study, we investigated whether and how EP chelates Zn(2+) in neurons when it is present at toxic levels. In cortical neurons treated with 40 μM of Zn(2+) for 24 h, both EP and pyruvate significantly suppressed neuronal cell death, although the potency of pyruvate was greater than that of EP, and that NAD replenishment contributed to the neuroprotective effects of both pyruvate and EP. However, when cortical neurons were exposed to acute treatment of Zn(2+) (400 μM, 15 min), EP, but not pyruvate, significantly suppressed neuronal death, despite the fact that NAD replenishment by EP was weaker than that by pyruvate. Spectrophotometric studies revealed that EP directly chelates Zn(2+), and this was confirmed in physiological contexts, such as, NMDA-treated primary cortical cultures and OGD-subjected hippocampal slice cultures, in which EP suppressed intracellular Zn(2+) elevation and neuronal cell death. In addition, EP markedly reduced the expressions of PARP-1 and of the NADPH oxidase subunit in Zn(2+)-treated primary cortical neurons, well known Zn(2+)-induced downstream processes. Together, these results show EP suppresses Zn(2+) induced neurotoxicity via dual functions, chelating Zn(2+) and promoting NAD replenishment.

  15. Effects of dose rates on radiation-induced replenishment of intestinal stem cells determined by Lgr5 lineage tracing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Kensuke; Iwasaki, Toshiyasu

    2015-07-01

    An understanding of the dynamics of intestinal Lgr5(+) stem cells is important for elucidating the mechanism of colonic cancer development. We previously established a method for evaluating Lgr5(+) stem cells by tamoxifen-dependent Lgr5-lineage tracing and showed that high-dose-rate radiation stimulated replenishment of colonic stem cells. In this study, we evaluated the effects of low-dose-rate radiation on stem cell maintenance. Tamoxifen (4OHT)-injected Lgr5-EGFP-IRES-Cre(ERT2) × ROSA-LSL-LacZ mice were used, LacZ-labeled colonic crypts were enumerated, and the loss of LacZ(+) crypts under low-dose-rate radiation was estimated. After 4OHT treatment, the number of LacZ-labeled Lgr5(+) stem cells was higher in the colon of infant mice than in adult mice. The percentage of LacZ-labeled crypts in infant mice rapidly decreased after 4OHT treatment. However, the percentage of labeled crypts plateaued at ∼2% at 4 weeks post-treatment and remained unchanged for up to 7 months. Thus, it will be advantageous to evaluate the long-term effects of low-dose-rate radiation. Next, we determined the percentages of LacZ-labeled crypts irradiated with 1 Gy administered at different dose rates. As reported in our previous study, mice exposed to high-dose-rate radiation (30 Gy/h) showed a marked replenishment (P = 0.04). However, mice exposed to low-dose-rate radiation (0.003 Gy/h) did not exhibit accelerated stem-cell replenishment (P = 0.47). These findings suggest the percentage of labeled crypts can serve as a useful indicator of the effects of dose rate on the stem cell pool.

  16. Muscle ceramide content in man is higher in type I than type II fibers and not influenced by glycogen content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordby, P; Prats, C; Kristensen, D;

    2010-01-01

    Human muscle is studied during glycogen depletion and repletion to understand the influence of exercise and muscle glycogen on total ceramide content. In addition, fiber-type-specific ceramide storage is investigated. Ten healthy males (26.4 +/- 0.9 years, BMI 24.4 +/- 0.7 kg m(-2) and VO2max 57...... +/- 2 mL O2 min(-1) kg(-1)) participated in the study. On the first day, one leg was glycogen-depleted (DL) by exhaustive intermittent exercise followed by low carbohydrate diet. Next day, in the overnight fasted condition, muscle biopsies were excised from vastus lateralis before and after exhaustive...... exercise from both DL and control leg (CL). Muscle glycogen was analyzed biochemically and total muscle ceramide content by 2D quantitative lipidomic approach. Furthermore, fiber-type ceramide content was determined by fluorescence immunohistochemistry. Basal muscle glycogen was decreased (P

  17. Enhanced Glycogen Storage of a Subcellular Hot Spot in Human Skeletal Muscle during Early Recovery from Eccentric Contractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Joachim; Farup, Jean; Rahbek, Stine Klejs

    2015-01-01

    Unaccustomed eccentric exercise is accompanied by muscle damage and impaired glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis during subsequent recovery. Recently, it was shown that the role and regulation of glycogen in skeletal muscle are dependent on its subcellular localization, and that glycogen...... content during post-exercise recovery from eccentric contractions. Analysis was completed on five male subjects performing an exercise bout consisting of 15 x 10 maximal eccentric contractions. Carbohydrate-rich drinks were subsequently ingested throughout a 48 h recovery period and muscle biopsies...... in both type I and II fibers were lower in the exercise leg compared with the control leg, and this was associated with a smaller size of the glycogen particles. We conclude that in the carbohydrate-supplemented state, the effect of eccentric contractions on glycogen metabolism depends on the subcellular...

  18. Muscle ceramide content in man is higher in type I than type II fibers and not influenced by glycogen content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordby, P; Prats, C; Kristensen, D

    2010-01-01

    Human muscle is studied during glycogen depletion and repletion to understand the influence of exercise and muscle glycogen on total ceramide content. In addition, fiber-type-specific ceramide storage is investigated. Ten healthy males (26.4 +/- 0.9 years, BMI 24.4 +/- 0.7 kg m(-2) and VO2max 57...... +/- 2 mL O2 min(-1) kg(-1)) participated in the study. On the first day, one leg was glycogen-depleted (DL) by exhaustive intermittent exercise followed by low carbohydrate diet. Next day, in the overnight fasted condition, muscle biopsies were excised from vastus lateralis before and after exhaustive...... exercise from both DL and control leg (CL). Muscle glycogen was analyzed biochemically and total muscle ceramide content by 2D quantitative lipidomic approach. Furthermore, fiber-type ceramide content was determined by fluorescence immunohistochemistry. Basal muscle glycogen was decreased (P

  19. Using Complete Squares Method to Optimize Replenishment Policies in a Four-Stage Supply Chain with Planned Backorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Seliaman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We develop a four-stage, serial supply chain inventory model with planned backorders. This supply chain model is formulated for the integer multipliers coordination mechanism, where firms at the same stage of the supply chain use the same cycle time and the cycle time at each stage is an integer multiplier of the cycle time used at the adjacent downstream stage. We develop an optimal replenishment policy using a simple algebraic method to solve the problem without the use of differential calculus.

  20. Building Store Satisfaction Centred on Customer Retention in Clothing Retailing: Store Design and Ease of Shopping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulden Turhan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study’s research model suggests that store design and ease of shopping are associated with customer retention through a mediated pathway in which store design and ease of shopping influence perceived store satisfaction, which in turn, influences customer retention. This survey was administered to two separate clothing stores offered to either females or males (in total, 533 participants. Using structural equation modelling methodology, data was analysed to explain the interrelations among the variables in the model. The results of an empirical study of a sample of store shoppers revealed that store design and ease of shopping influence customer retention in an indirect way through customer perception of satisfaction with the store. In building store satisfaction that is centred on customer retention, store design and shopping ease differ in their relative influences. This difference is high for females, but for men as low as to be considered negligible in males. As a result, improving customers’ perceptions of store design and ease of shopping is a way to ensure store satisfaction support customer retention. The results of the study provide a new insight into the relationships by suggesting indirect effects of shopping ease and store design on consumer retention by their impacts on store satisfaction, rather than direct effects.

  1. Win-Win Strategies at Discount Stores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Deleersnyder (Barbara); M.G. Dekimpe (Marnik); J-B.E.M. Steenkamp (Jan-Benedict); O. Koll

    2005-01-01

    textabstractAn important development that contributes to store brands’ growing success in the grocery market is the increasing number of discount stores that sell predominantly own, private-label, brands. To fight private labels, manufacturers of national brands feel increasingly compelled to develo

  2. Consumers' store choice behavior for fresh food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulenberg, M.T.G.; Trijp, van J.C.M.

    1991-01-01

    Consumers' preference for fresh food stores is analyzed. In particular the choice between supermarkets and specialized shops for purchasing fresh food is analyzed. Attention is given to the factors influencing this choice. For this purpose a number of research questions with respect to store choice

  3. Influence of in situ progressive N-terminal is still controversial truncation of glycogen branching enzyme in Escherichia coli DH5α on glycogen structure, accumulation, and bacterial viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Regina, Ahmed; Butardo, Vito M; Kosar-Hashemi, Behjat; Larroque, Oscar; Kahler, Charlene M; Wise, Michael J

    2015-05-07

    Glycogen average chain length (ACL) has been linked with bacterial durability, but this was on the basis of observations across different species. We therefore wished to investigate the relationship between bacterial durability and glycogen ACL by varying glycogen average chain length in a single species. It has been shown that progressive shortening of the N-terminus of glycogen branching enzyme (GBE) leads to a lengthening of oligosaccharide inter-α-1,6-glycosidic chain lengths, so we sought to harness this to create a set of Escherichia coli DH5α strains with a range of glycogen average chain lengths, and assess these strains for durability related attributes, such as starvation, cold and desiccation stress resistance, and biofilm formation. A series of Escherichia coli DH5α mutants were created with glgB genes that were in situ progressively N-terminus truncated. N-terminal truncation shifted the distribution of glycogen chain lengths from 5-11 DP toward 13-50 DP, but the relationship between glgB length and glycogen ACL was not linear. Surprisingly, removal of the first 270 nucleotides of glgB (glgBΔ270) resulted in comparatively high glycogen accumulation, with the glycogen having short ACL. Complete knockout of glgB led to the formation of amylose-like glycogen containing long, linear α1,4-glucan chains with significantly reduced branching frequency. Physiologically, the set of mutant strains had reduced bacterial starvation resistance, while minimally increasing bacterial desiccation resistance. Finally, although there were no obvious changes in cold stress resistance or biofilm forming ability, one strain (glgBΔ180) had significantly increased biofilm formation in favourable media. Despite glgB being the first gene of an operon, it is clear that in situ mutation is a viable means to create more biologically relevant mutant strains. Secondly, there was the suggestion in the data that impairments of starvation, cold and desiccation resistance were

  4. Store-operate-coherence-on-value

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Dong; Heidelberger, Philip; Kumar, Sameer; Ohmacht, Martin; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard

    2014-11-18

    A system, method and computer program product for performing various store-operate instructions in a parallel computing environment that includes a plurality of processors and at least one cache memory device. A queue in the system receives, from a processor, a store-operate instruction that specifies under which condition a cache coherence operation is to be invoked. A hardware unit in the system runs the received store-operate instruction. The hardware unit evaluates whether a result of the running the received store-operate instruction satisfies the condition. The hardware unit invokes a cache coherence operation on a cache memory address associated with the received store-operate instruction if the result satisfies the condition. Otherwise, the hardware unit does not invoke the cache coherence operation on the cache memory device.

  5. Consumers' quality perception of national branded, national store branded, and imported store branded beef

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banovic, Marija; Grunert, Klaus G.; Barreira, Maria Madalena;

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the differences in the consumers' quality perception of national branded, national store branded, and imported store branded beef. Partial Least Squares analysis is used for modelling the quality perception process. Results show that consumers perceived national branded...

  6. Chromosomal mapping and mutational analysis of the coding region of the glycogen synthase kinase-3alpha and beta isoforms in patients with NIDDM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, L; Arden, K C; Rasmussen, S B

    1997-01-01

    Activation of glycogen synthesis in skeletal muscle in response to insulin results from the combined inactivation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) and activation of the protein phosphatase-1, changing the ratio between the inactive phosphorylated state of the glycogen synthase to the active ...

  7. Using a Virtual Store As a Research Tool to Investigate Consumer In-store Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploydanai, Kunalai; van den Puttelaar, Jos; van Herpen, Erica; van Trijp, Hans

    2017-07-24

    People's responses to products and/or choice environments are crucial to understanding in-store consumer behaviors. Currently, there are various approaches (e.g., surveys or laboratory settings) to study in-store behaviors, but the external validity of these is limited by their poor capability to resemble realistic choice environments. In addition, building a real store to meet experimental conditions while controlling for undesirable effects is costly and highly difficult. A virtual store developed by virtual reality techniques potentially transcends these limitations by offering the simulation of a 3D virtual store environment in a realistic, flexible, and cost-efficient way. In particular, a virtual store interactively allows consumers (participants) to experience and interact with objects in a tightly controlled yet realistic setting. This paper presents the key elements of using a desktop virtual store to study in-store consumer behavior. Descriptions of the protocol steps to: 1) build the experimental store, 2) prepare the data management program, 3) run the virtual store experiment, and 4) organize and export data from the data management program are presented. The virtual store enables participants to navigate through the store, choose a product from alternatives, and select or return products. Moreover, consumer-related shopping behaviors (e.g., shopping time, walking speed, and number and type of products examined and bought) can also be collected. The protocol is illustrated with an example of a store layout experiment showing that shelf length and shelf orientation influence shopping- and movement-related behaviors. This demonstrates that the use of a virtual store facilitates the study of consumer responses. The virtual store can be especially helpful when examining factors that are costly or difficult to change in real life (e.g., overall store layout), products that are not presently available in the market, and routinized behaviors in familiar

  8. Glycogen synthase kinase 3α regulates urine concentrating mechanism in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard, Rikke; Tao, Shixin; Nilsson, Line;

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)3 comprises GSK3α and GSK3β isoforms. GSK3β has been shown to play a role in the ability of kidneys to concentrate urine by regulating vasopressin-mediated water permeability of collecting ducts, whereas the role of GSK3α has yet to be discerned. To inves...

  9. Advanced glycation end products and the absence of premature atherosclerosis in glycogen storage disease Ia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hollander, N. C.; Mulder, Douwe J.; Graaff, R.; Thorpe, S. R.; Baynes, J. W.; Smit, Gerrit; Smit, Andries

    2007-01-01

    Introducton: Despite their unfavourable cardiovascular risk profile, patients with glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD Ia) do not develop premature atherosclerosis. We hypothesized that this paradox might be related to a decreased formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) resulting from

  10. Chloroquine stimulates glucose uptake and glycogen synthase in muscle cells through activation of Akt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halaby, Marie-Jo; Kastein, Brandon K; Yang, Da-Qing

    2013-06-14

    Chloroquine is a pharmaceutical agent that has been widely used to treat patients with malaria. Chloroquine has also been reported to have hypoglycemic effects on humans and animal models of diabetes. Despite many previous studies, the mechanism responsible for its hypoglycemic effect is still unclear. Chloroquine was recently reported to be an activator of ATM, the protein deficient in the Ataxia-telagiectasia (A-T) disease. Since ATM is also known as an insulin responsive protein that mediates Akt activation, we tested the effect of chloroquine on the activity of Akt and its downstream targets. In L6 muscle cells treated with insulin and chloroquine, the phosphorylation of Akt and glucose uptake were dramatically increased compared to cells treated with insulin alone, suggesting that chloroquine is a potent activator of Akt and glucose uptake in these cells. We also found that the reduction of insulin-mediated Akt activity in muscle tissues of insulin resistant rats was partially reversed by chloroquine treatment. Moreover, insulin-mediated phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β in L6 cells was greatly enhanced by chloroquine. A substantial decrease in phosphorylation of glycogen synthase was also observed in chloroquine-treated L6 cells, indicating enhanced activity of glycogen synthase. Taken together, our results not only show that chloroquine is a novel activator of Akt that stimulates glucose uptake and glycogen synthase, but also validate chloroquine as a potential therapeutic agent for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Subcellular distribution of glycogen and decreased tetanic Ca2+ in fatigued single intact mouse muscle fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Joachim; Cheng, Arthur J; Ørtenblad, Niels

    2014-01-01

    , 350 ms tetani given at 2 s (high-intensity fatigue, HIF) or 10 s (low-intensity fatigue, LIF) intervals, while force and [Ca(2+)]i were measured. Stimulation continued until force decreased to 30% of its initial value. Fibres were then prepared for analyses of subcellular glycogen distribution...

  12. A possible relationship between gluconeogenesis and glycogen metabolism in rabbits during myocardial ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAQUEL R. DE AGUIAR

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Ischemia is responsible for many metabolic abnormalities in the heart, causing changes in organ function. One of modifications occurring in the ischemic cell is changing from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism. This change causes the predominance of the use of carbohydrates as an energy substrate instead of lipids. In this case, the glycogen is essential to the maintenance of heart energy intake, being an important reserve to resist the stress caused by hypoxia, using glycolysis and lactic acid fermentation. In order to study the glucose anaerobic pathways utilization and understand the metabolic adaptations, New Zealand white rabbits were subjected to ischemia caused by Inflow occlusion technique. The animals were monitored during surgery by pH and lactate levels. Transcription analysis of the pyruvate kinase, lactate dehydrogenase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase enzymes were performed by qRT-PCR, and glycogen quantification was determined enzymatically. Pyruvate kinase transcription increased during ischemia, followed by glycogen consumption content. The gluconeogenesis increased in control and ischemia moments, suggesting a relationship between gluconeogenesis and glycogen metabolism. This result shows the significant contribution of these substrates in the organ energy supply and demonstrates the capacity of the heart to adapt the metabolism after this injury, sustaining the homeostasis during short-term myocardial ischemia.

  13. A possible relationship between gluconeogenesis and glycogen metabolism in rabbits during myocardial ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Raquel R DE; Vale, Daniela F; Silva, Renato M DA; Muniz, Yolanda P; Antunes, Fernanda; Logullo, Carlos; Oliveira, André L A; Almeida, Adriana J DE

    2017-08-31

    Ischemia is responsible for many metabolic abnormalities in the heart, causing changes in organ function. One of modifications occurring in the ischemic cell is changing from aerobic to anaerobic metabolism. This change causes the predominance of the use of carbohydrates as an energy substrate instead of lipids. In this case, the glycogen is essential to the maintenance of heart energy intake, being an important reserve to resist the stress caused by hypoxia, using glycolysis and lactic acid fermentation. In order to study the glucose anaerobic pathways utilization and understand the metabolic adaptations, New Zealand white rabbits were subjected to ischemia caused by Inflow occlusion technique. The animals were monitored during surgery by pH and lactate levels. Transcription analysis of the pyruvate kinase, lactate dehydrogenase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase enzymes were performed by qRT-PCR, and glycogen quantification was determined enzymatically. Pyruvate kinase transcription increased during ischemia, followed by glycogen consumption content. The gluconeogenesis increased in control and ischemia moments, suggesting a relationship between gluconeogenesis and glycogen metabolism. This result shows the significant contribution of these substrates in the organ energy supply and demonstrates the capacity of the heart to adapt the metabolism after this injury, sustaining the homeostasis during short-term myocardial ischemia.

  14. Lipid and glycogen contents in liver of high-yield dairy cows in peripartal period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đoković Radojica

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver tissue samples were taken by biopsy from Holstein cows in advanced stages of gravidity and in early lactation for pathological-histological examinations. Lipid content in hepatocytes was determined using the stereometric method by calculating volume density, and of glycogen using semi-quantitative microscopic examination of sections stained according to the method of Best. Pathological-histological examinations of liver tissue samples in healthy animals, gravid or peripartal cows did not reveal lipid infiltration or cell degeneration, and hepatocytes were completely or partly filled with glycogen. In ketotic cows, pathological-histological examinations of liver tissue samples showed lipid infiltration and hepatocyte degeneration of different intensity. In only one ketotic cow, we determined a slight degree of lipid infiltration, there was a medium degree of lipid infiltration and degeneration in six cows, and three cows were found to have a grave form of fatty liver. The quantity of glycogen in hepatocytes is in negative correlation with the degree of lipid infiltration and degeneration. In severe cases of fatty liver, glycogen is completely absent from hepatocyte cytoplasm.

  15. Liver transplantation for glycogen storage disease types I, III, and IV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matern, D; Starzl, TE; Arnaout, W; Barnard, J; Bynon, JS; Dhawan, A; Emond, J; Haagsma, EB; Hug, G; Lachaux, A; Smit, GPA; Chen, YT

    1999-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) types I, III, and IV can be associated with severe liver disease. The possible development of hepatocellular carcinoma and/or hepatic failure make these GSDs potential candidates for liver transplantation. Early diagnosis and initiation of effective dietary therapy hav

  16. Renal Function in Glycogen Storage Disease Type I, Natural Course, and Renopreservative Effects of ACE Inhibition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, Danielle H. J.; Rake, Jan Peter; Navis, Gerjan; Fidler, Vaclav; van Dael, Catharina M. L.; Smit, G. Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: Renal failure is a major complication in glycogen storage disease type I (GSD I). We studied the natural course of renal function in GSD I patients. We studied differences between patients in optimal and nonoptimal metabolic control and possible renoprotective effects of a

  17. Glycogen storage disease: report of two cases in the city of Cartagena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciro C. Alvear

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to report two cases of children with type Ia glycogen storage disease compatible with Von Gierke disease, suspected in the presence of findings such as hepatomegaly, nephromegaly, hypoglycemia, and stunted growth.Method: Presentation of the clinical records of two patients referred to the diagnostic unit of innate errors of metabolism of the Faculty of Medicine in Universidad de Cartagena.Results: The first case reported was a child who debuted with acute cyanosis without widespread neurological deficit when he was eleven months old, followed by hepatomegaly at two years of age. At 4 years of age, symptoms reappeared with similar characteristics: hypoglycemia, growth failure, and persistent hepatomegaly detected on physical examination. With the precedent that an older brother that presented similar symptoms was suspected of glycogen storage disease, a biopsy was performed and confirmed liver glycogen storage with normal structure. The patient’s treatment was modification of dietary habits (small, frequent feedings during the day and cornstarch. The second event was the older brother who consulted for the first time when he was 18 months old due to prolonged diarrhea. Hepatomegaly was documented by ultrasound study without kidney compromise and no hypoglycemia was found.Recommendations: It is necessary for the entire health team to be trained to detect rare diseases such as glycogen storage disease. If they make early diagnoses and establish support groups for interdisciplinary management of such diseases, they may change the prognosis and quality of life of these children.

  18. Glycogen storage disease: report of two cases in the city of Cartagena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciro C. Alvear

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to report two cases of children with type Ia glycogen storage disease compatible with Von Gierke disease, suspected in the presence of findings such as hepatomegaly, nephromegaly, hypoglycemia, and stunted growth. Method: Presentation of the clinical records of two patients referred to the diagnostic unit of innate errors of metabolism of the Faculty of Medicine in Universidad de Cartagena. Results: The first case reported was a child who debuted with acute cyanosis without widespread neurological deficit when he was eleven months old, followed by hepatomegaly at two years of age. At 4 years of age, symptoms reappeared with similar characteristics: hypoglycemia, growth failure, and persistent hepatomegaly detected on physical examination. With the precedent that an older brother that presented similar symptoms was suspected of glycogen storage disease, a biopsy was performed and confirmed liver glycogen storage with normal structure. The patient’s treatment was modification of dietary habits (small, frequent feedings during the day and cornstarch. The second event was the older brother who consulted for the first time when he was 18 months old due to prolonged diarrhea. Hepatomegaly was documented by ultrasound study without kidney compromise and no hypoglycemia was found. Recommendations: It is necessary for the entire health team to be trained to detect rare diseases such as glycogen storage disease. If they make early diagnoses and establish support groups for interdisciplinary management of such diseases, they may change the prognosis and quality of life of these children.

  19. Function of trehalose and glycogen in cell cycle progression and cell viability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silljé, H H; Paalman, J W; ter Schure, E G; Olsthoorn, S Q; Verkleij, A J; Boonstra, Johannes; Verrips, C T

    1999-01-01

    Trehalose and glycogen accumulate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae when growth conditions deteriorate. It has been suggested that aside from functioning as storage factors and stress protectants, these carbohydrates may be required for cell cycle progression at low growth rates under carbon limitation. B

  20. Pre- and posttranslational upregulation of muscle-specific glycogen synthase in athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, H; Andersen, P H; Lund, S

    1994-01-01

    by insulin. We conclude that athletes have increased whole body insulin-stimulated nonoxidative glucose metabolism associated with both pretranslational (mRNA) and posttranslational (enzyme activity) upregulation of GS. However, the immunoreactive mass of GS is normal, emphasizing that posttranslational...... regulation of the GS protein activity is important for the increased glycogen synthesis rate of muscle in endurance-trained individuals....