WorldWideScience

Sample records for replaces time evolution

  1. Total ankle replacement. Design evolution and results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heuvel, Alexander; Van Bouwel, Saskia; Dereymaeker, Greta

    2010-04-01

    The ankle joint has unique anatomical, biomechanical and cartilaginous structural characteristics that allow the joint to withstand the very high mechanical stresses and strains over years. Any minor changes to any of these features predispose the joint to osteoarthritis. Total ankle replacement (TAR) is evolving as an alternative to ankle arthrodesis for the treatment of end-stage ankle osteoarthritis. Initial implant designs from the early 1970s had unacceptably high failure and complication rates. As a result many orthopaedic surgeons have restricted the use of TAR in favour of ankle arthrodesis. Long term follow-up studies following ankle arthrodesis show risks of developing adjacent joint osteoarthritis. Therefore research towards a successful ankle replacement continues. Newer designs and longer-term outcome studies have renewed the interest in ankle joint replacement. We present an overview of the evolution, results and current concepts of total ankle replacement.

  2. Evolution of high tooth replacement rates in sauropod dinosaurs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D D'Emic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tooth replacement rate can be calculated in extinct animals by counting incremental lines of deposition in tooth dentin. Calculating this rate in several taxa allows for the study of the evolution of tooth replacement rate. Sauropod dinosaurs, the largest terrestrial animals that ever evolved, exhibited a diversity of tooth sizes and shapes, but little is known about their tooth replacement rates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present tooth replacement rate, formation time, crown volume, total dentition volume, and enamel thickness for two coexisting but distantly related and morphologically disparate sauropod dinosaurs Camarasaurus and Diplodocus. Individual tooth formation time was determined by counting daily incremental lines in dentin. Tooth replacement rate is calculated as the difference between the number of days recorded in successive replacement teeth. Each tooth family in Camarasaurus has a maximum of three replacement teeth, whereas each Diplodocus tooth family has up to five. Tooth formation times are about 1.7 times longer in Camarasaurus than in Diplodocus (315 vs. 185 days. Average tooth replacement rate in Camarasaurus is about one tooth every 62 days versus about one tooth every 35 days in Diplodocus. Despite slower tooth replacement rates in Camarasaurus, the volumetric rate of Camarasaurus tooth replacement is 10 times faster than in Diplodocus because of its substantially greater tooth volumes. A novel method to estimate replacement rate was developed and applied to several other sauropodomorphs that we were not able to thin section. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Differences in tooth replacement rate among sauropodomorphs likely reflect disparate feeding strategies and/or food choices, which would have facilitated the coexistence of these gigantic herbivores in one ecosystem. Early neosauropods are characterized by high tooth replacement rates (despite their large tooth size, and derived titanosaurs and

  3. Factorizing the time evolution operator

    CERN Document Server

    Quijas, P C G

    2006-01-01

    There is a widespread belief in the quantum physical community, and in textbooks used to teach Quantum Mechanics, that it is a difficult task to apply the time evolution operator on an initial wave function. That is to say, because the hamiltonian operator generally is the sum of two operators, then it is a difficult task to apply the time evolution operator on an initial wave function, because it implies to apply terms like (A+B)^n. A possible solution of this problem is to factorize the time evolution operator and then apply successively the individual exponential operator on the initial wave function. However, the exponential operator does not directly factorize. In this work we present useful ways to factorizing the time evolution operator when the argument of the exponential is a sum of two operators which obey specific commutation relations. Then, we apply the exponential operator as an evolution operator for the case of elementary unidimensional potentials, like the harmonic oscillator. Also, we argue ...

  4. Time Evolution in Dynamical Spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Tiemblo, A

    1996-01-01

    We present a gauge--theoretical derivation of the notion of time, suitable to describe the Hamiltonian time evolution of gravitational systems. It is based on a nonlinear coset realization of the Poincaré group, implying the time component of the coframe to be invariant, and thus to represent a metric time. The unitary gauge fixing of the boosts gives rise to the foliation of spacetime along the time direction. The three supressed degrees of freedom correspond to Goldstone--like fields, whereas the remaining time component is a Higgs--like boson.

  5. Implications of human evolution and admixture for mitochondrial replacement therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rishishwar, Lavanya; Jordan, I. King

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial replacement (MR) therapy is a new assisted reproductive technology that allows women with mitochondrial disorders to give birth to healthy children by combining their nuclei with mitochondria from unaffected egg donors...

  6. Time evolution of cascade decay

    CERN Document Server

    Boyanovsky, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We study non-perturbatively the time evolution of cascade decay for generic fields $\\pi \\rightarrow \\phi_1\\phi_2\\rightarrow \\phi_2\\chi_1\\chi_2$ and obtain the time dependence of amplitudes and populations for the resonant and final states. We analyze in detail the different time scales and the manifestation of unitary time evolution in the dynamics of production and decay of resonant intermediate and final states. The probability of occupation (population) ``flows'' as a function of time from the initial to the final states. When the decay width of the parent particle $\\Gamma_\\pi$ is much larger than that of the intermediate resonant state $\\Gamma_{\\phi_1}$ there is a ``bottleneck'' in the flow, the population of resonant states builds up to a maximum at $t^* = \\ln[\\Gamma_\\pi/\\Gamma_{\\phi_1}]/(\\Gamma_\\pi-\\Gamma_{\\phi_1})$ nearly saturating unitarity and decays to the final state on the longer time scale $1/\\Gamma_{\\phi_1}$. As a consequence of the wide separation of time scales in this case the cascade decay ...

  7. Time evolution of quantum fractals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcik; Bialynicki-Birula; Zyczkowski

    2000-12-11

    We propose a general construction of wave functions of arbitrary prescribed fractal dimension, for a wide class of quantum problems, including the infinite potential well, harmonic oscillator, linear potential, and free particle. The box-counting dimension of the probability density P(t)(x) = |Psi(x,t)|(2) is shown not to change during the time evolution. We prove a universal relation D(t) = 1+Dx/2 linking the dimensions of space cross sections Dx and time cross sections D(t) of the fractal quantum carpets.

  8. Time Evolution of Quantum Fractals

    CERN Document Server

    Wójcik, D; Zyczkowski, K; Wojcik, Daniel; Bialynicki-Birula, Iwo; Zyczkowski, Karol

    2000-01-01

    We propose a general construction of wave functions of arbitrary prescribed fractal dimension, for a wide class of quantum problems, including the infinite potential well, harmonic oscillator, linear potential and free particle. The box-counting dimension of the probability density $P_t(x)=|\\Psi(x,t)|^2$ is shown not to change during the time evolution. We prove a universal relation $D_t=1+D_x/2$ linking the dimensions of space cross-sections $D_x$ and time cross-sections $D_t$ of the fractal quantum carpets.

  9. Significant mitral regurgitation left untreated at the time of aortic valve replacement: a comprehensive review of a frequent entity in the transcatheter aortic valve replacement era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nombela-Franco, Luis; Ribeiro, Henrique Barbosa; Urena, Marina; Allende, Ricardo; Amat-Santos, Ignacio; DeLarochellière, Robert; Dumont, Eric; Doyle, Daniel; DeLarochellière, Hugo; Laflamme, Jerôme; Laflamme, Louis; García, Eulogio; Macaya, Carlos; Jiménez-Quevedo, Pilar; Côté, Mélanie; Bergeron, Sebastien; Beaudoin, Jonathan; Pibarot, Philippe; Rodés-Cabau, Josep

    2014-06-24

    Significant mitral regurgitation (MR) is frequent in patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS). In these cases, concomitant mitral valve repair or replacement is usually performed at the time of surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR). Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has recently been considered as an alternative for patients at high or prohibitive surgical risk. However, concomitant significant MR in this setting is typically left untreated. Moderate to severe MR after aortic valve replacement is therefore a relevant entity in the TAVR era. The purpose of this review is to present the current knowledge on the clinical impact and post-procedural evolution of concomitant significant MR in patients with severe AS who have undergone aortic valve replacement (SAVR and TAVR). This information could contribute to improving both the clinical decision-making process in and management of this challenging group of patients.

  10. In this issue: Time to replace doctors’ judgement with computers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon de Lusignan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Informaticians continue to rise to the challenge, set by the English Health Minister, of trying to replace doctors’ judgement with computers. This issue describes successes and where there are barriers. However, whilst there is progress this tends to be incremental and there are grand challenges to be overcome before computers can replace clinician. These grand challenges include: (1 improving usability so it is possible to more readily incorporate technology into clinical workflow; (2 rigorous new analytic methods that make use of the mass of available data, ‘Big data’, to create real-world evidence; (3 faster ways of meeting regulatory and legal requirements including ensuring privacy; (4 provision of reimbursement models to fund innovative technology that can substitute for clinical time and (5 recognition that innovations that improve quality also often increase cost. Informatics more is likely to support and augment clinical decision making rather than replace clinicians.

  11. 4D porosity evolution during solid-solid replacement reaction in mineral system (KBr, KCl)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudoin, Nicolas; Hamilton, Andrea; Koehn, Daniel; Shipton, Zoe

    2017-04-01

    An extensive understanding of the controlling mechanisms of phase transformation is key in geosciences to better predicting the evolution of the physical parameters of rocks (porosity, permeability, and rheology) from centimetre-scale (e.g. fingering in siltstones) to kilometer-scale (e.g. Dolostone geobodies), in both the diagenetic and metamorphic domains. This contribution reports the 4D monitoring of a KBr crystal at different time steps during an experimental, fluid-mediated replacement reaction with KCl. Volumes are reconstructed based on density contrast using non-destructive X-ray Computed Tomography (XCT) at a resolution of 3 microns. A sample of KBr was immersed in a static bath of saturated KCl at room temperature and pressure. 5 scans were performed during the reaction at 5, 10, 20, 35 and 55 minutes, until 50% of the original crystal was replaced. As a control experiment, two samples reacted continuously for 15 and 55 minutes, respectively. Each 3D dataset was reconstructed to visualize and quantify the different mineral phases, the porosity distribution and connectivity, along with the reaction front morphology. In the case of successive baths, results show that the front morphology evolves from rough with small fingers to flat and thick during the reaction, suggesting a switch between advection and diffusion controlled reactant distribution through time. This switch is also reflected in the mass evolution and the rate of propagation of the replaced zone, being rapid in the first 20 minutes before reaching steady state. The porosity develops perpendicular to the crystal wall, suggesting a self-organization process governed by advection, before connecting laterally. While the reaction changes from advection controlled to diffusion controlled, the direction of the connected pores becomes parallel to the crystal walls. This phenomenon is not observed when the crystal is reacting discontinuously for 55 minutes. In the latter case, self

  12. Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Radhakrishnan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The fishmeal replaced with Spirulina platensis, Chlorella vulgaris and Azolla pinnata and the formulated diet fed to Macrobrachium rosenbergii postlarvae to assess the enhancement ability of non-enzymatic antioxidants (vitamin C and E, enzymatic antioxidants (superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT and lipid peroxidation (LPx were analysed. In the present study, the S. platensis, C. vulgaris and A. pinnata inclusion diet fed groups had significant (P < 0.05 improvement in the levels of vitamins C and E in the hepatopancreas and muscle tissue. Among all the diets, the replacement materials in 50% incorporated feed fed groups showed better performance when compared with the control group in non-enzymatic antioxidant activity. The 50% fishmeal replacement (best performance diet fed groups taken for enzymatic antioxidant study, in SOD, CAT and LPx showed no significant increases when compared with the control group. Hence, the present results revealed that the formulated feed enhanced the vitamins C and E, the result of decreased level of enzymatic antioxidants (SOD, CAT and LPx revealed that these feeds are non-toxic and do not produce any stress to postlarvae. These ingredients can be used as an alternative protein source for sustainable Macrobrachium culture.

  13. Ignition and timing a guide to rebuilding, repair and replacement

    CERN Document Server

    Beever, Colin

    2015-01-01

    An essential guide to ignition and timing, for classic car owners and restorers. Aimed at both keen amateurs and professionals alike, Ignition and Timing covers the history and evolution of the automotive ignition system, and how to fit, modify and maintain your system for optimum timing and maximum performance. Topics covered include understanding and fault-testing the coil ignition system; post-war distributors and aftermarket systems; how to fit electronic ignitions and modify the distributor, including twin-point distributors; rebuilding and maintenance; Lucas, Delco and Bosch systems

  14. Time evolution in the presence of gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Pulido, A; Tresguerres, R; Pulido, Antonio; Tiemblo, Alfredo; Tresguerres, Romualdo

    2001-01-01

    We present a suggestion on the interpretation of canonical time evolution when gravitation is present, based on the nonlinear gauge approach to gravity. Essentially, our proposal consists of an internal-time concept, with the time variable taken from the dynamical fields characteristic of the nonlinear realization of the internal time-translational symmetry. Physical time evolution requires the latter symmetry to be broken. After disregarding other breaking mechanisms, we appeal to the Jordan-Brans-Dicke action, conveniently interpreted, to achieve that goal. We show that nontrivial time evolution follows, the special relativistic limit being recovered in the absence of gravity.

  15. Is it time to replace propranolol with carvedilol for portalhypertension?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Beta-adrenergic receptor antagonists (β-blockers) havebeen well established for use in portal hypertensionfor more than three decades. Different Non-selectiveβ-blockers like propranolol, nadolol, timolol, atenolol,metoprolol and carvedilol have been in clinical practicein patients with cirrhosis. Carvedilol has proven 2-4times more potent than propranolol as a beta-receptorblocker in trials conducted testing its efficacy forheart failure. Whether the same effect extends to itspotency in the reduction of portal venous pressuresis a topic of on-going debate. The aim of this reviewis to compare the hemodynamic and clinical effectsof carvedilol with propranolol, and attempt assesswhether carvedilol can be used instead of propranolol inpatients with cirrhosis. Carvedilol is a promising agentamong the beta blockers of recent time that has shownsignificant effects in portal hypertension hemodynamics.It has also demonstrated an effective profile in itsclinical application specifically for the prevention ofvariceal bleeding. Carvedilol has more potent desiredphysiological effects when compared to Propranolol.However, it is uncertain at the present juncture whetherthe improvement in hemodynamics also translates into adecreased rate of disease progression and complicationswhen compared to propranolol. Currently Carvedilolshows promise as a therapy for portal hypertension butmore clinical trials need to be carried out before we canconsider it as a superior option and a replacement forpropranolol.

  16. Faster than Hermitian Time Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl M. Bender

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available For any pair of quantum states, an initial state $|I angle$ and afinal quantum state $|F angle$, in a Hilbert space, there are many Hamiltonians $H$ under which $|I angle$ evolves into $|F angle$. Let us impose the constraint that the difference between the largest and smallest eigenvalues of $H$, $E_{max}$ and $E_{min}$, is held fixed. We can then determine the Hamiltonian $H$ that satisfies this constraint and achieves the transformation from the initial state to the final state in the least possible time $au$. For Hermitian Hamiltonians, $au$ has a nonzero lower bound. However, amongnon-Hermitian ${cal PT}$-symmetric Hamiltonians satisfying the same energy constraint, $au$ can be made arbitrarily small without violating the time-energy uncertainty principle. The minimum value of $au$ can be made arbitrarily small because for ${cal PT}$-symmetric Hamiltonians the path from the vector $|I angle$ to the vector $|F angle$, as measured using the Hilbert-space metric appropriate for this theory, can be made arbitrarily short. The mechanism described here is similar to that in general relativity in whichthe distance between two space-time points can be made small if they are connected by a wormhole. This result may have applications in quantum computing.

  17. Time-dependent secular evolution in galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Weinberg, M D

    2004-01-01

    Lynden-Bell & Kalnajs (1972) presented a useful formula for computing the long-range torque between spiral arms and the disk at large. The derivation uses second-order perturbation theory and assumes that the perturbation slowly grows over a very long time: the time-asymptotic limit. This formula has been widely used to predict the angular momentum transport between spiral arms and stellar bars between disks and dark-matter halos. However, this paper shows that the LBK time-asymptotic limit is not appropriate because the characteristic evolution time for galaxies is too close to the relevant dynamical times. We demonstrate that transients, not present in the time-asymptotic formula, can play a major role in the evolution for realistic astronomical time scales. A generalisation for arbitrary time dependence is presented and illustrated by the bar--halo and satellite--halo interaction. The natural time dependence in bar-driven halo evolution causes quantitative differences in the overall torque and qualitat...

  18. Overestimation of the second time interval replaces time-shrinking when the difference between two adjacent time intervals increases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshitaka eNakajima

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available When the onsets of three successive sound bursts mark two adjacent time intervals, the second time interval can be underestimated when it is physically longer than the first time interval by up to 100 ms. This illusion, time-shrinking, is very stable when the first time interval is 200 ms or shorter (Nakajima et al., 2004, Perception, 33. Time-shrinking had been considered a kind of perceptual assimilation to make the first and the second time interval more similar to each other. Here we investigated whether the underestimation of the second time interval was replaced by an overestimation if the physical difference between the neighboring time intervals was too large for the assimilation to take place; this was a typical situation in which a perceptual contrast could be expected. Three experiments to measure the overestimation/underestimation of the second time interval by the method of adjustment were conducted. The first time interval was varied from 40 to 280 ms, and such overestimations indeed took place when the first time interval was 80-280 ms. The overestimations were robust when the second time interval was longer than the first time interval by 240 ms or more, and the magnitude of the overestimation was larger than 100 ms in some conditions. Thus, a perceptual contrast to replace time-shrinking was established. An additional experiment indicated that this contrast did not affect the perception of the first time interval substantially: The contrast in the present conditions seemed unilateral.

  19. Decoherence in time evolution of bound entanglement

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Z; Sun, C P; Wang, X; Sun, Zhe; Wang, Xiaoguang

    2007-01-01

    We study a dynamic process of disentanglement by considering the time evolution of bound entanglement for a quantum open system, two qutrits coupling to a common environment. Here, the initial quantum correlations of the two qutrits are characterized by the bound entanglement. In order to show the universality of the role of environment on bound entanglement, both bosonic and spin environments are considered. We found that the bound entanglement displays collapses and revivals, and it can be stable against small temperature and time change. The thermal fluctuation effects on bound entanglement are also considered.

  20. Randomness in Sequence Evolution Increases over Time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangyu Wang

    Full Text Available The second law of thermodynamics states that entropy, as a measure of randomness in a system, increases over time. Although studies have investigated biological sequence randomness from different aspects, it remains unknown whether sequence randomness changes over time and whether this change consists with the second law of thermodynamics. To capture the dynamics of randomness in molecular sequence evolution, here we detect sequence randomness based on a collection of eight statistical random tests and investigate the randomness variation of coding sequences with an application to Escherichia coli. Given that core/essential genes are more ancient than specific/non-essential genes, our results clearly show that core/essential genes are more random than specific/non-essential genes and accordingly indicate that sequence randomness indeed increases over time, consistent well with the second law of thermodynamics. We further find that an increase in sequence randomness leads to increasing randomness of GC content and longer sequence length. Taken together, our study presents an important finding, for the first time, that sequence randomness increases over time, which may provide profound insights for unveiling the underlying mechanisms of molecular sequence evolution.

  1. Optimal replacement time estimation for machines and equipment based on cost function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Šebo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with a multidisciplinary issue of estimating the optimal replacement time for the machines. Considered categories of machines, for which the optimization method is usable, are of the metallurgical and engineering production. Different models of cost function are considered (both with one and two variables. Parameters of the models were calculated through the least squares method. Models testing show that all are good enough, so for estimation of optimal replacement time is sufficient to use simpler models. In addition to the testing of models we developed the method (tested on selected simple model which enable us in actual real time (with limited data set to indicate the optimal replacement time. The indicated time moment is close enough to the optimal replacement time t*.

  2. Fast side chain replacement in proteins using a coarse-grained approach for evaluating the effects of mutation during evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grahnen, Johan A; Kubelka, Jan; Liberles, David A

    2011-08-01

    For high-throughput structural genomic and evolutionary bioinformatics approaches, there is a clear need for fast methods to evaluate substitutions structurally. Coarse-grained methods are both powerful and fast, and a coarse-grained approach to position the substituted side chains is presented. Through the application of a coarse-grained method, a speed-up on the single- residue replacement, of at least sevenfold is achieved compared with modern all-atom approaches. At the same time, this approach maintains a small median RMSD from the leading all-atom approach (as measured in coarse-grained space), and predicts the conformation of point mutants with similar accuracy and generates biologically realistic side chain angles. This method is also substantially more predictable in its run time, making it useful for high-throughput studies of protein structural evolution. To demonstrate the utility of this method, it has been implemented in a forward simulation of sequences threaded through the SH2 domains, with selective pressures to fold and bind specifically. The relative substitution rates across the protein structure and at the binding interface are reflective of those observed in SH2 domain evolution. The algorithm has been implemented in C++, with the source code and binaries (currently supported for Linux systems) freely available as SARA at http://www.wyomingbioinformatics.org/LiberlesGroup/SARA .

  3. Bone marrow involvement in Gaucher disease at MRI: what long-term evolution can we expect under enzyme replacement therapy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedida, Benjamin; Touraine, Sebastien; Laredo, Jean-Denis [Hopital Lariboisiere, AP-HP, Department of Musculoskeletal Imaging, Paris (France); Stirnemann, Jerome [Universite Paris-Diderot Hopital Bichat, AP-HP, Department of Biostatistics and Medical Data Processing, INSERM UMR 738, Paris (France); Geneva University Hospital, Division of General Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Geneva (Switzerland); Belmatoug, Nadia [Hopital Beaujon, AP-HP, Referral Center for Lysosomal Diseases (RCLD), Clichy (France); Hopital Beaujon, AP-HP, Department of Internal Medicine, Clichy (France); Petrover, David [Hopital Lariboisiere, AP-HP, Department of Musculoskeletal Imaging, Paris (France); Hopital Beaujon, AP-HP, Referral Center for Lysosomal Diseases (RCLD), Clichy (France)

    2015-10-15

    To study the long-term evolution of the bone marrow burden (BMB) score at MRI in patients with Gaucher disease (GD) under enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). Forty patients treated for GD were retrospectively studied in a referral centre. BMB scores were assessed on spine and femur MR examinations performed between January 2003 and June 2014. The long-term evolution of the BMB scores was analyzed using a linear mixed model. A total of 121 MRI examinations were performed during the study period with a mean follow-up of 7.1 years ± 5.6, an average rate of 3.1 MR examinations ± 1.7 per patient and an interval of 2.3 years ± 1.1 between examinations. Patients had received ERT during 12 years on average ± 6.7. The trend of BMB scores with time decreased significantly by 15 % (P = 0.008) during the total study period and 39 % (P = 0.01) during the first 5 years of treatment. No changes in BMB scores were observed after five years of treatment. In Gaucher patients, the trend of MRI BMB scores with time decreased significantly under ERT the first 5 years of treatment before a long-term stabilization. (orig.)

  4. In the queue for total joint replacement: patients' perspectives on waiting times. Ontario Hip and Knee Replacement Project Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llewellyn-Thomas, H A; Arshinoff, R; Bell, M; Williams, J I; Naylor, C D

    1998-02-01

    We assessed patients on the waiting lists of a purposive sample of orthopaedic surgeons in Ontario, Canada, to determine patients' attitudes towards time waiting for hip or knee replacement. We focused on 148 patients who did not have a definite operative date, obtaining complete information on 124 (84%). Symptom severity was assessed with the Western Ontario/McMaster Osteoarthritis Index and a disease-specific standard gamble was used to elicit patients' overall utility for their arthritic state. Next, in a trade-off task, patients considered a hypothetical choice between a 1-month wait for a surgeon who could provide a 2% risk of post-operative mortality, or a 6-month wait for joint replacement with a 1% risk of post-operative mortality. Waiting times were then shifted systematically until the patient abandoned his/her initial choice, generating a conditional maximal acceptable wait time. Patients were divided in their attitudes, with 57% initially choosing a 6-month wait with a 1% mortality risk. The overall distribution of conditional maximum acceptable wait time scores ranged from 1 to 26 months, with a median of 7 months. Utility values were independently but weakly associated with patients' tolerance of waiting times (adjusted R-square = 0.059, P = 0.004). After splitting the sample along the median into subgroups with a relatively 'low' and 'high' tolerance for waiting, the subgroup with the apparently lower tolerance for waiting reported lower utility scores (z = 2.951; P = 0.004) and shorter times since their surgeon first advised them of the need for surgery (z = 3.014; P = 0.003). These results suggest that, in the establishment and monitoring of a queue management system for quality-of-life-enhancing surgery, patients' own perceptions of their overall symptomatic burden and ability to tolerate delayed relief should be considered along with information derived from clinical judgements and pre-weighted health status instruments.

  5. Time evolution of Wikipedia network ranking

    CERN Document Server

    Eom, Young-Ho; Benczúr, András; Shepelyansky, Dima L

    2013-01-01

    We study the time evolution of ranking and spectral properties of the Google matrix of English Wikipedia hyperlink network during years 2003 - 2011. The statistical properties of ranking of Wikipedia articles via PageRank and CheiRank probabilities, as well as the matrix spectrum, are shown to be stabilized for 2007 - 2011. A special emphasis is done on ranking of Wikipedia personalities and universities. We show that PageRank selection is dominated by politicians while 2DRank, which combines PageRank and CheiRank, gives more accent on personalities of arts. The Wikipedia PageRank of universities recovers 80 percents of top universities of Shanghai ranking during the considered time period.

  6. Time evolution of Wikipedia network ranking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Young-Ho; Frahm, Klaus M.; Benczúr, András; Shepelyansky, Dima L.

    2013-12-01

    We study the time evolution of ranking and spectral properties of the Google matrix of English Wikipedia hyperlink network during years 2003-2011. The statistical properties of ranking of Wikipedia articles via PageRank and CheiRank probabilities, as well as the matrix spectrum, are shown to be stabilized for 2007-2011. A special emphasis is done on ranking of Wikipedia personalities and universities. We show that PageRank selection is dominated by politicians while 2DRank, which combines PageRank and CheiRank, gives more accent on personalities of arts. The Wikipedia PageRank of universities recovers 80% of top universities of Shanghai ranking during the considered time period.

  7. The thermodynamic evolution of the hurricane boundary layer during eyewall replacement cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gabriel J.

    2016-12-01

    Eyewall replacement cycles (ERCs) are frequently observed during the lifecycle of mature tropical cyclones. Although the kinematic structure and intensity changes during an ERC have been well-documented, comparatively little research has been done to examine the evolution of the tropical cyclone boundary layer (TCBL) during an ERC. This study will examine how the inner core thermal structure of the TCBL is affected by the presence of multiple concentric eyewalls using a high-resolution moist, hydrostatic, multilayer diagnostic boundary layer model. Within the concentric eyewalls above the cloud base, latent heat release and vertical advection (due to the eyewall updrafts) dominate the heat and moisture budgets, whereas vertical advection (due to subsidence) and vertical diffusion dominate the heat and moisture budgets for the moat region. Furthermore, it is shown that the development of a moat region within the TCBL depends sensitively on the moat width in the overlying atmosphere and the relative strength of the gradient wind field in the overlying atmosphere. These results further indicate that the TCBL contributes to outer eyewall formation through a positive feedback process between the vorticity in the nascent outer eyewall, boundary layer convergence, and boundary layer moist convection.

  8. Black-hole universe: time evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Chul-Moon; Okawa, Hirotada; Nakao, Ken-ichi

    2013-10-18

    Time evolution of a black hole lattice toy model universe is simulated. The vacuum Einstein equations in a cubic box with a black hole at the origin are numerically solved with periodic boundary conditions on all pairs of faces opposite to each other. Defining effective scale factors by using the area of a surface and the length of an edge of the cubic box, we compare them with that in the Einstein-de Sitter universe. It is found that the behavior of the effective scale factors is well approximated by that in the Einstein-de Sitter universe. In our model, if the box size is sufficiently larger than the horizon radius, local inhomogeneities do not significantly affect the global expansion law of the Universe even though the inhomogeneity is extremely nonlinear.

  9. Revisiting Waiting Times in DNA evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Nicodeme, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Transcription factors are short stretches of DNA (or $k$-mers) mainly located in promoters sequences that enhance or repress gene expression. With respect to an initial distribution of letters on the DNA alphabet, Behrens and Vingron consider a random sequence of length $n$ that does not contain a given $k$-mer or word of size $k$. Under an evolution model of the DNA, they compute the probability $\\mathfrak{p}_n$ that this $k$-mer appears after a unit time of 20 years. They prove that the waiting time for the first apparition of the $k$-mer is well approximated by $T_n=1/\\mathfrak{p}_n$. Their work relies on the simplifying assumption that the $k$-mer is not self-overlapping. They observe in particular that the waiting time is mostly driven by the initial distribution of letters. Behrens et al. use an approach by automata that relaxes the assumption related to words overlaps. Their numerical evaluations confirms the validity of Behrens and Vingron approach for non self-overlapping words, but provides up to 44...

  10. Repair of Physiologic Time Series: Replacement of Anomalous Data Points to Preserve Fractal Exponents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelhamer, Mark; Lowen, Steven B.

    2017-01-01

    Extraction of fractal exponents via the slope of the power spectrum is common in the analysis of many physiological time series. The fractal structure thus characterized is a manifestation of long-term correlations, for which the temporal order of the sample values is crucial. However, missing data points due to artifacts and dropouts are common in such data sets, which can seriously disrupt the computation of fractal parameters. We evaluated a number of methods for replacing missing data in time series to enable reliable extraction of the fractal exponent and make recommendations as to the preferred replacement method depending on the proportion of missing values and any a priori estimate of the fractal exponent. PMID:28271060

  11. Erratum for the time-like evolution in QCDNUM

    CERN Document Server

    Botje, M

    2016-01-01

    A recent comparison of the evolution programs QCDNUM and APFEL showed a discrepancy in the time-like evolution of the singlet fragmentation function at NLO. It was found that the splitting functions of this evolution were wrongly assigned in QCDNUM, and also that the fragmentation functions were not correctly matched at the flavour thresholds. These errors are corrected in a new release of the program.

  12. Evolution of glycated haemoglobin in adults on growth hormone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrea Parra R, Paola; Barquiel A, Beatriz; Fernández M, Alberto; Pérez F, Laura; Lecumberri S, Beatriz; Gaby Llaro C, Mary; Álvarez-Escolá, Cristina

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the effects of GH replacement therapy (GHR) for 3 years on glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and on the presence of dysglycaemia at any time during follow-up in Spanish adult patients with growth hormone deficiency (GHD). A retrospective study of 41 patients with GHD was conducted using baseline and long-term data. Changes in HbA1c values during the first 3 years of GHR were studied in both the overall population and patients with or without dysglycaemia during follow-up. Dysglycaemia was defined as FPG ≥ 100 mg/dl and/or HbA1c ≥ 5.7%. Mean HbA1c value (5.4 ± 0.4% at baseline) increased during the first and second years of GHR (HbA1c 5.5 ± 0.4%, p=0.05, and 5.5 ± 0.4%, p=0.006 respectively). This increase was not maintained during the third year (HbA1c 5.4 ± 0.3%, p=0.107) of GHR. Twenty-eight patients (68.2%) had dysglycaemia during follow-up, 9 of them since baseline. In the 19 patients without baseline dysglycaemia, HbA1c increased during the first year and remained stable in the next 2 years (mean HbA1c 5.2 ± 0.4% at baseline; 5.5 ± 0.4% at 1 year, p<0.050; 5.4 ± 0.4% at 2 years, p=0.004, and 5.4 ± 0.4% at 3 years, p=0.016). In the 9 patients with baseline dysglycaemia, HbA1c did not significantly change during the 3 years of GHR therapy. HbA1c values increased during the first 2 years of GHR therapy. In patients with no dysglycaemia before treatment, HbA1c steadily increased over the 3 years. However, it did not change in patients with baseline dysglycaemia. Copyright © 2014 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. A note on the time evolution of generalized coherent states

    OpenAIRE

    Stone, Michael

    2000-01-01

    I consider the time evolution of generalized coherent states based on non-standard fiducial vectors, and show that only for a restricted class of fiducial vectors does the associated classical motion determine the quantum evolution of the states. I discuss some consequences of this for path integral representations.

  14. Entropy, biological evolution and the psychological arrow of time

    CERN Document Server

    Heinrich, Torsten; Päs, Heinrich

    2014-01-01

    We argue that in Universes where future and past differ only by the entropy content a psychological arrow of time pointing in the direction of entropy increase can arise from natural selection in biological evolution. We show that this effect can be demonstrated in very simple toy computer simulations of evolution in an entropy increasing or decreasing environment.

  15. Immediate and long term evolution of valve replacement in children less than 12 years old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atik Fernando Antibas

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this work was the follow-up and evaluation of valve replacement in children under 12 years of age. METHODS: Forty-four children less than 12 years old were underwent valve replacement at INCOR-HCFMUSP between January 1986 and December 1992. Forty (91% were rheumatic, 39 (88.7% were in functional classes II or IV, 19 (43.2% were operated upon on an emergency basis, and 6 (13.6% had atrial fibrillation. Biological prostheses (BP were employed in 26 patients (59.1%, and mechanical prostheses (MP in 18 (40.9%. Mitral valves were replaced in 30 (68.7%, aortic valves in 8 (18.2%, a tricuspid valve in 1 (2.3%, and double (aortic and mitral valves in 5 (11.4 of the patients. RESULTS: Hospital mortality was of 4.5% (2 cases. The mean follow-up period was 5.8 years. Re-operations occurred in 63.3% of the patients with BP and in 12.5% of those with MP (p=0.002. Infectious endocarditis was present in 26.3% of the BP, but in none of the cases of MP (p=0.049. Thrombosis occurred in 2 (12.5% and hemorrhage in one (6.5% of the patients with a MP. Delayed mortality occurred in 5 (11.9% of the patients over a mean period of 2.6 years; four had had BP and one had a MP (NS. Actuarial survival and re-operation-free curves after 10 years were respectively, 82.5±7.7 (SD% and 20.6±15.9%. CONCLUSION: Patients with MP required fewer re-operation, had less infectious endocarditis and lower late mortality rates compared with patients with bioprostheses. The former, therefore, appear to be the best valve replacement for pediatric patients.

  16. On Reduced Time Evolution for Initially Correlated Pure States

    CERN Document Server

    Aniello, P; Marmo, G; Ventriglia, F; Vitale, P

    2009-01-01

    A new method to deal with reduced dynamics of open systems by means of the Schr\\"odinger equation is presented. It allows one to consider the reduced time evolution for correlated and uncorrelated initial conditions.

  17. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION: LITERATURE REVIEW AND TIME EVOLUTION.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pintea Mirela-Oana

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Performance evaluation of an economic entity requires approaching several criteria, such as industry and economic entity type, managerial and entrepreneurial strategy, competitive environment, human and material resources available, using a system of appropriate performance indicators for this purpose.The exigencies of communication occurred on the growing number of phenomena that marked the global economy in recent decades (internationalization and relocation of business crises and turmoil in financial markets, demand performance measurement to be made in a comprehensive way by financial and non-financial criteria. Indicators are measures of performance used by management to measure, report and improve performance of the economic entity. The relationship between indicators and management is ensured by the existence of performance measurement systems. Studies to date indicate that economic entities using balanced performance measurement systems as a key management tool registered superior performance compared to entities not using such systems. This study attempts to address the issue of performance evaluation by presenting opinions of different authors concerning the process of performance measurement and to present, after revising the literature, the evolution of the performance evaluation systems. We tried to do this literature review because sustainable development and, therefore, globalization require new standards of performance that exceeds the economic field, both for domestic companies as well as international ones. So, these standards should be integrated into corporate strategy development to ensure sustainability of activities undertaken by harmonizing the economic, social and environmental objectives. To assess the performance of economic entities it is required that performance evaluation to be done with a balanced multidimensional system, including both financial ratios and non-financial indicators in order to reduce the limits of

  18. Recurrence for discrete time unitary evolutions

    CERN Document Server

    Grünbaum, F A; Werner, A H; Werner, R F

    2012-01-01

    We consider quantum dynamical systems specified by a unitary operator U and an initial state vector \\phi. In each step the unitary is followed by a projective measurement checking whether the system has returned to the initial state. We call the system recurrent if this eventually happens with probability one. We show that recurrence is equivalent to the absence of an absolutely continuous part from the spectral measure of U with respect to \\phi. We also show that in the recurrent case the expected first return time is an integer or infinite, for which we give a topological interpretation. A key role in our theory is played by the first arrival amplitudes, which turn out to be the (complex conjugated) Taylor coefficients of the Schur function of the spectral measure. On the one hand, this provides a direct dynamical interpretation of these coefficients; on the other hand it links our definition of first return times to a large body of mathematical literature.

  19. Time inversion, Self-similar evolution, and Issue of time

    CERN Document Server

    Datta, D P

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the question, "how does time flow?" and show that time may change by inversions as well. We discuss its implications to a simple class of linear systems. Instead of introducing any unphysical behaviour, inversions can lead to a new multi- time scale evolutionary path for the linear system exhibiting late time stochastic fluctuations. We explain how stochastic behaviour is injected into the linear system as a combined effect of an uncertainty in the definition of inversion and the irrationality of the golden mean number. We also give an ansatz for the nonlinear stochastic behaviour of (fractal) time which facilitates us to estimate the late and short time limits of a two-time correlation function relevant for the stochastic fluctuations in linear systems. These fluctuations are shown to enjoy generic 1/f spectrum. The implicit functional definition of the fractal time is shown to satisfy the differential equation dx=dt. We also discuss the relevance of intrinsic time in the present formalism, st...

  20. Dynamic structure evolution of time-dependent network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Beibei; Zhou, Yadong; Xu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Dai; Guan, Xiaohong

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we research the long-voided problem of formulating the time-dependent network structure evolution scheme, it focus not only on finding new emerging vertices in evolving communities and new emerging communities over the specified time range but also formulating the complex network structure evolution schematic. Previous approaches basically applied to community detection on time static networks and thus failed to consider the potentially crucial and useful information latently embedded in the dynamic structure evolution process of time-dependent network. To address these problems and to tackle the network non-scalability dilemma, we propose the dynamic hierarchical method for detecting and revealing structure evolution schematic of the time-dependent network. In practice and specificity, we propose an explicit hierarchical network evolution uncovering algorithm framework originated from and widely expanded from time-dependent and dynamic spectral optimization theory. Our method yields preferable results compared with previous approaches on a vast variety of test network data, including both real on-line networks and computer generated complex networks.

  1. Total ankle replacement--evolution of the technology and future applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, John J; Sheskier, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Total ankle arthroplasty was developed to reduce pain and retain motion of the ankle joint in patients with osteoarthritis much like its total hip and knee counterparts. Orthopaedic surgeons are well equipped to evaluate and treat patients with end-stage hip or knee arthritis; however, the management of patients with ankle arthritis represents a challenge to both general orthopaedic surgeons and to the foot and ankle surgeons to whom these patients are often referred. Although techniques for both hip and knee arthroplasty have evolved to provide long-term pain relief and functional improvement, neither ankle arthrodesis nor arthroplasty has demonstrated comparably favorable outcomes in long-term follow-up studies. Early ankle arthroplasty designs with highly constrained cemented components were abandoned due to unacceptably high failure rates and complications. While arthrodesis is still considered the "gold standard" for treatment of end-stage ankle arthritis, progression of adjacent joint arthrosis and diminished gait efficiency has led to a resurgence of interest in ankle arthroplasty. Long-term outcome studies for total ankle replacement found excellent or good results in 82% of patients who received a newer generation ankle device compared with 72% if undergoing ankle fusion. Continued long-term follow-up studies are necessary, but total ankle arthroplasty has become a viable option for surgical treatment of ankle arthritis.

  2. Time Delay Evolution of Five Active Galactic Nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A. Kovačević; L. Č. Popović; A. I. Shapovalova; D. Ilić; A. N. Burenkov; V. H. Chavushyan

    2015-12-01

    Here we investigate light curves of the continuum and emission lines of five type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGN) from our monitoring campaign, to test time-evolution of their time delays. Using both modeled and observed AGN light curves, we apply Gaussian kernel-based estimator to capture variation of local patterns of their time evolving delays. The largest variations of time delays of all objects occur in the period when continuum or emission lines luminosity is the highest. However, Gaussian kernel-based method shows instability in the case of NGC 5548, 3C 390.3, E1821+643 and NGC 4051 possibly due to numerical discrepancies between damped random walk (DRW) time scale of light curves and sliding time windows of the method. The temporal variations of time lags of Arp 102B can correspond to the real nature of the time lag evolution.

  3. On the time delay evolution of five Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Kovacevic, Andjelka; Shapovalova, Alla I; Ilic, Dragana; Burenkov, Aleksandr N; Chavushyan, Vahram H

    2015-01-01

    Here we investigate light curves of the continuum and emission lines of five type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGN) from our monitoring campaign, to test time-evolution of their time delays.Using both modeled and observed AGN light curves we apply Gaussian-kernel based estimator to capture variation of local patterns of their time evolving delays. The largest variations of time delays of all objects occur in the period when continuum or emission lines luminosity is the highest. However, Gaussian kernel based method shows instability in the case of NGC 5548, 3C 390.3, E1821+643 and NGC 4051 possible due to numerical discrepancies between Damped Random Walk (DRW) time scale of light curves and sliding time windows of the method. The temporal variations of time lags of Arp 102B can correspond to the real nature of the time lag evolution.

  4. Time evolution of the wave equation using rapid expansion method

    KAUST Repository

    Pestana, Reynam C.

    2010-07-01

    Forward modeling of seismic data and reverse time migration are based on the time evolution of wavefields. For the case of spatially varying velocity, we have worked on two approaches to evaluate the time evolution of seismic wavefields. An exact solution for the constant-velocity acoustic wave equation can be used to simulate the pressure response at any time. For a spatially varying velocity, a one-step method can be developed where no intermediate time responses are required. Using this approach, we have solved for the pressure response at intermediate times and have developed a recursive solution. The solution has a very high degree of accuracy and can be reduced to various finite-difference time-derivative methods, depending on the approximations used. Although the two approaches are closely related, each has advantages, depending on the problem being solved. © 2010 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  5. Time rescaling and pattern formation in biological evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igamberdiev, Abir U

    2014-09-01

    Biological evolution is analyzed as a process of continuous measurement in which biosystems interpret themselves in the environment resulting in changes of both. This leads to rescaling of internal time (heterochrony) followed by spatial reconstructions of morphology (heterotopy). The logical precondition of evolution is the incompleteness of biosystem's internal description, while the physical precondition is the uncertainty of quantum measurement. The process of evolution is based on perpetual changes in interpretation of information in the changing world. In this interpretation the external biospheric gradients are used for establishment of new features of organization. It is concluded that biological evolution involves the anticipatory epigenetic changes in the interpretation of genetic symbolism which cannot generally be forecasted but can provide canalization of structural transformations defined by the existing organization and leading to predictable patterns of form generation.

  6. Clinical evolution of chronic renal patients with HIV infection in replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saracho, Ramón; Martín Escobar, Eduardo; Comas Farnés, Jordi; Arcos, Emma; Mazuecos Blanca, Auxiliadora; Gentil Govantes, Miguel Ángel; Castro de la Nuez, Pablo; Zurriaga, Óscar; Ferrer Alamar, Manuel; Bouzas Caamaño, Encarnación; García Falcón, Teresa; Portolés Pérez, José; Herrero Calvo, José A; Chamorro Jambrina, Carlos; Moina Eguren, Íñigo; Rodrigo de Tomás, María Teresa; Abad Díez, José María; Sánchez Miret, José I; Alvarez Lipe, Rafael; Díaz Tejeiro, Rafael; Moreno Alía, Inmaculada; Torres Guinea, Marta; Huarte Loza, Enma; Artamendi Larrañaga, Marta; Fernández Renedo, Carlos; González Fernández, Raquel; Sánchez Álvarez, Emilio; Alonso de la Torre, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    Patients on renal replacement therapy (RRT) infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are a special group with growing interest. In order to study the epidemiological data of HIV+ patients on RRT in Spain, we collected individual information from 2004-2011 (period of use of highly active antiretroviral therapy [HAART] in the Autonomous Communities of Andalusia, Aragon, Asturias, Catalonia, Valencia, Castilla la Mancha, Castilla León, Galicia, Madrid, La Rioja and the Basque Country, comprising 85% of the Spanish population. A total of 271 incident and 209 prevalent patients were analysed. They were compared with the remaining patients on RRT during the same period. The annual incidence was 0.8 patients per one million inhabitants, with a significant increase during the follow-up period. The proportion of prevalent HIV+ patients was 5.1 per 1,000 patients on RRT (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.4-5.8. Although glomerular diseases constituted the majority of cases (42%), diabetic nephropathy was the cause in 14% of patients. The nation-wide totals for these percentages were 13 and 25%, respectively. Compared to the total of patients in treatment, the risk of death was significantly higher in the HIV+ group: hazard ratio (HR) adjusted for age, sex and diabetes was 2.26 (95% CI 1.74 - 2.91). Hepatitis C coinfection increased the risk of death in the HIV+ group (HR 1.77; 95% CI 1.10 - 2.85). The probability of kidney transplantation in HIV+ was only 17% after 7 years, comparing with total RTT patients (HR 0.15; 95% CI: 0.10-0.24). Despite the use of HAART, the incidence of HIV+ patients on dialysis has increased; their mortality still exceeds non-HIV patients, and they have a very low rate of transplantation. It is necessary to further our knowledge of this disease in order to improve results. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Quantum Dynamics in Classical Time Evolution of Correlation Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Wetterich, C

    1997-01-01

    The time-dependence of correlation functions under the influence of cla= ssical equations of motion is described by an exact evolution equation. For conservative systems thermodynamic equilibrium is a fixed point of these equations. We show that this fixed point is not universally stable, since infinitely many conserved correlation functions obstruct the approach to equilibrium. Equilibrium can therefore be reached at most for suitably av= eraged quantities or for subsystems, similar to quantum statistics. The classica= l time evolution of correlation functions shows many dynamical features of quant= um mechanics.

  8. Time Evolution in the external field problem of Quantum Electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Lazarovici, Dustin

    2013-01-01

    A general problem of quantum field theories is the fact that the free vacuum and the vacuum for an interacting theory belong to different, non-equivalent representations of the canonical (anti-)commutation relations. In the external field problem of QED, we encounter this problem in the form that the Dirac time evolution for an external field with non-vanishing magnetic components will not satisfy the Shale-Stinespring condition, known to be necessary and sufficient for the existence of an implementation on the fermionic Fock space. Therefore, a second quantization of the time evolution in the usual way is impossible. In this thesis, we present several rigorous approaches to QED with time-dependent, external fields and analyze in what sense a time evolution can exist in the second quantized theory. We study different constructions of the fermionic Fock space and prove their equivalence. We study and compare the results of Deckert et. al. (2010), where the time evolution is realized as unitary transformations ...

  9. Unifying time evolution and optimization with matrix product states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haegeman, Jutho; Lubich, Christian; Oseledets, Ivan; Vandereycken, Bart; Verstraete, Frank

    2016-10-01

    We show that the time-dependent variational principle provides a unifying framework for time-evolution methods and optimization methods in the context of matrix product states. In particular, we introduce a new integration scheme for studying time evolution, which can cope with arbitrary Hamiltonians, including those with long-range interactions. Rather than a Suzuki-Trotter splitting of the Hamiltonian, which is the idea behind the adaptive time-dependent density matrix renormalization group method or time-evolving block decimation, our method is based on splitting the projector onto the matrix product state tangent space as it appears in the Dirac-Frenkel time-dependent variational principle. We discuss how the resulting algorithm resembles the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm for finding ground states so closely that it can be implemented by changing just a few lines of code and it inherits the same stability and efficiency. In particular, our method is compatible with any Hamiltonian for which ground-state DMRG can be implemented efficiently. In fact, DMRG is obtained as a special case of our scheme for imaginary time evolution with infinite time step.

  10. Hunter syndrome in an 11-year old girl on enzyme replacement therapy with idursulfase: brain magnetic resonance imaging features and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manara, Renzo; Rampazzo, Angelica; Cananzi, Mara; Salviati, Leonardo; Mardari, Rodica; Drigo, Paola; Tomanin, Rosella; Gasparotto, Nicoletta; Priante, Elena; Scarpa, Maurizio

    2010-12-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS-II, Hunter disease) is a X-linked recessive disorder. Affected females are extremely rare, mostly due to skewed X chromosome inactivation. A few papers outline MPS-II brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) "gestalt" in males, but neuroradiological reports on females are still lacking. We present an 11-year-old girl affected by the severe form of MPS-II who was followed up over a time span of 8 years, focusing on clinical and brain MRI evolution. In the last 2.5 years, the patient has been treated with enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with idursulfase (Elaprase™, Shire Human Genetic Therapies AB, Sweden). On brain and cervical MRI examination, abnormalities in our patient did not differ from those detected in male patients: J-shaped pituitary sella, enlargement of perivascular spaces, brain atrophy, mild T2-hyperintensity in the paratrigonal white matter, diffuse platyspondylia, and mild odontoid dysplasia with odontoid cup. Brain atrophy progressed despite ERT introduction, whereas perivascular space enlargement did not change significantly before and after ERT. Cognitive impairment worsened independently from the course of white matter abnormality. Despite a profound knowledge of genetic and biochemical aspects in MPS-II, neuroradiology is still poorly characterized, especially in female patients. Spinal and brain involvement and its natural course and evolution after ERT introduction still need to be clarified.

  11. The effect of timing of the first kidney transplantation on survival in children initiating renal replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Anneke; Stel, Vianda S; Geskus, Ronald B;

    2012-01-01

    Controversy exists concerning the timing of the first kidney transplantation for children who need to start renal replacement therapy (RRT). Our aim was to estimate the effect of timing of the first transplantation on patient survival in children, for the first time also taking into account...

  12. Time-dependent elastohydrodynamic lubrication analysis of total knee replacement under walking conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yonglin; Yang, Peiran; Fu, Zengliang; Jin, Zhongmin; Wang, Chengtao

    2011-06-01

    This work is concerned with the lubrication analysis of artificial knee joints, which plays an increasing significant role in clinical performance and longevity of components. Time-dependent elastohydrodynamic lubrication analysis for normal total knee replacement is carried out under the cyclic variation in both load and speed representative of normal walking. An equivalent ellipsoid-on-plane model is adopted to represent an actual artificial knee. A full numerical method is developed to simultaneously solve the Reynolds and elasticity equations using the multigrid technique. The elastic deformation is based on the constrained column model. Results show that, under the combined effect of entraining and squeeze-film actions throughout the walking cycle, the predicted central film thickness tends to decrease in the stance phase but keeps a relatively larger value at the swing phase. Furthermore, the geometry of knee joint implant is verified to play an important role under its lubrication condition, and the length of time period is a key point to influence the lubrication performance of joint components.

  13. Time evolution of damage in thermally induced creep rupture

    KAUST Repository

    Yoshioka, N.

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the time evolution of a bundle of fibers subject to a constant external load. Breaking events are initiated by thermally induced stress fluctuations followed by load redistribution which subsequently leads to an avalanche of breakings. We compare analytic results obtained in the mean-field limit to the computer simulations of localized load redistribution to reveal the effect of the range of interaction on the time evolution. Focusing on the waiting times between consecutive bursts we show that the time evolution has two distinct forms: at high load values the breaking process continuously accelerates towards macroscopic failure, however, for low loads and high enough temperatures the acceleration is preceded by a slow-down. Analyzing the structural entropy and the location of consecutive bursts we show that in the presence of stress concentration the early acceleration is the consequence of damage localization. The distribution of waiting times has a power law form with an exponent switching between 1 and 2 as the load and temperature are varied.

  14. Time-driven activity based costing of total knee replacement surgery at a London teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Alvin; Sabharwal, Sanjeeve; Akhtar, Kashif; Makaram, Navnit; Gupte, Chinmay M

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a time-driven activity based costing (TDABC) analysis of the clinical pathway for total knee replacement (TKR) and to determine where the major cost drivers lay. The in-patient pathway was prospectively mapped utilising a TDABC model, following 20 TKRs. The mean age for these patients was 73.4 years. All patients were ASA grade I or II and their mean BMI was 30.4. The 14 varus knees had a mean deformity of 5.32° and the six valgus knee had a mean deformity of 10.83°. Timings were prospectively collected as each patient was followed through the TKR pathway. Pre-operative costs including pre-assessment and joint school were £ 163. Total staff costs for admission and the operating theatre were £ 658. Consumables cost for the operating theatre were £ 1862. The average length of stay was 5.25 days at a total cost of £ 910. Trust overheads contributed £ 1651. The overall institutional cost of a 'noncomplex' TKR in patients without substantial medical co-morbidities was estimated to be £ 5422, representing a profit of £ 1065 based on a best practice tariff of £ 6487. The major cost drivers in the TKR pathway were determined to be theatre consumables, corporate overheads, overall ward cost and operating theatre staffing costs. Appropriate discounting of implant costs, reduction in length of stay by adopting an enhanced recovery programme and control of corporate overheads through the use of elective orthopaedic treatment centres are proposed approaches for reducing the overall cost of treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Testosterone replacement therapy in men with prostate cancer: a time-varying analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Alan L; Lenis, Andrew T; Shah, Adit; Rajfer, Jacob; Hu, Jim C

    2015-02-01

    The use of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) in men with prostate cancer is controversial given concerns of androgen-related cancer progression. Although emerging evidence suggests that TRT may be safe in this setting, no study has investigated dose-related effects. We used time-varying analysis to determine whether increasing TRT exposure is associated with worse outcomes. Using linked Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare data, we identified 149,354 men diagnosed with prostate cancer from 1991 to 2007. Subjects treated with TRT were stratified by duration of treatment. Weighted propensity score methods were used to adjust for differences between groups. A Cox proportional hazards model was constructed to assess the effect of injectable TRT exposure on outcomes. Overall mortality (OM), prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM), and use of salvage androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Men treated with TRT, regardless of duration, did not experience higher OM or PCSM (all hazard ratio [HR] <1.0, all P ≤ 0.002). We found no difference in use of salvage ADT in the ≤ 30-day and 31-60 day groups compared with no-TRT (HR 1.23 and 1.05, P=0.06 and 0.81, respectively), whereas it was lower for men on long-term TRT (HR 0.70, P=0.04). TRT following prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment does not increase mortality or the use of salvage ADT. Using time-varying analysis, we demonstrate that longer duration of TRT is not associated with adverse mortality or greater need for ADT. © 2014 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  16. Continuous Time Random Walks for the Evolution of Lagrangian Velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Dentz, Marco; Comolli, Alessandro; Borgne, Tanguy Le; Lester, Daniel R

    2016-01-01

    We develop a continuous time random walk (CTRW) approach for the evolution of Lagrangian velocities in steady heterogeneous flows based on a stochastic relaxation process for the streamwise particle velocities. This approach describes persistence of velocities over a characteristic spatial scale, unlike classical random walk methods, which model persistence over a characteristic time scale. We first establish the relation between Eulerian and Lagrangian velocities for both equidistant and isochrone sampling along streamlines, under transient and stationary conditions. Based on this, we develop a space continuous CTRW approach for the spatial and temporal dynamics of Lagrangian velocities. While classical CTRW formulations have non-stationary Lagrangian velocity statistics, the proposed approach quantifies the evolution of the Lagrangian velocity statistics under both stationary and non-stationary conditions. We provide explicit expressions for the Lagrangian velocity statistics, and determine the behaviors of...

  17. Time evolution of dimethyl carbinol in water vortex rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omocea, Ioana-Laura; Damian, Iulia-Rodica; Simionescu, Štefan-Mugur; Bǎlan, Corneliu; Mihǎilescu, Mona

    2015-02-01

    The paper is concerned with the experimental study of the time evolution of a single laminar vortex ring generated at the interface between water and dimethyl carbinol. The experiments were performed by the submerged injection with a constant rate of dimethyl carbinol (isopropyl alcohol) in a water tank. The dynamics of the vortex formation was recorded at 1000 fps with a Photron Fastcam SA1 camera, equipped with a microscopic Edmund Optics objective. A symmetrical buoyant vortex ring with an elongated topology was observed at the interface between the two immiscible liquids. The analyses of the time dependence of the vortex rings disclosed three regions for the evolution of the interface: one dominated by inertia force, a transition region and a third region, dominated by buoyancy force.

  18. Restudy on Time-Evolution of SUSY Dark Matter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Tai-Fu; LI Xue-Qian; MENG Qing-Wei; REN Zhen-Yu

    2002-01-01

    We restudy the Lee-Weinberg time-evolution equation including the R-parity violation. We carefullyanalyze the intluence of the boundary conditions, equation of state, SUSY parameters, especially the R-parity violation,and other factors on the time-evolution of the SUSY cold dark matter. Our numerical results show that without Rparity violation, only two ranges 20 < mx01 < 30 GeV and 75 < mx01 < 110 GeV can be consistent with data, if30 < mx01 < 75 GeV, there must be at least two kinds of heavy particles contributing to the cold dark matter. However,with the R-parity violation, the heavy neutralino can be dark matter constituent, but it must decay and the R-parityviolation parameter is constrained by the present data.

  19. Finite-time singularity in the evolution of hyperinflation episodes

    OpenAIRE

    Szybisz, Martin A.; Leszek Szybisz

    2008-01-01

    A model proposed by Sornette, Takayasu, and Zhou for describing hyperinflation regimes based on adaptive expectations expressed in terms of a power law which leads to a finite-time singularity is revisited. It is suggested to express the price index evolution explicitly in terms of the parameters introduced along the theoretical formulation avoiding any combination of them used in the original work. This procedure allows to study unambiguously the uncertainties of such parameters when an erro...

  20. Spectral functions and time evolution from the Chebyshev recursion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, F. Alexander; Justiniano, Jorge A.; McCulloch, Ian P.; Schollwöck, Ulrich

    2015-03-01

    We link linear prediction of Chebyshev and Fourier expansions to analytic continuation. We push the resolution in the Chebyshev-based computation of T =0 many-body spectral functions to a much higher precision by deriving a modified Chebyshev series expansion that allows to reduce the expansion order by a factor ˜1/6 . We show that in a certain limit the Chebyshev technique becomes equivalent to computing spectral functions via time evolution and subsequent Fourier transform. This introduces a novel recursive time-evolution algorithm that instead of the group operator e-i H t only involves the action of the generator H . For quantum impurity problems, we introduce an adapted discretization scheme for the bath spectral function. We discuss the relevance of these results for matrix product state (MPS) based DMRG-type algorithms, and their use within the dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT). We present strong evidence that the Chebyshev recursion extracts less spectral information from H than time evolution algorithms when fixing a given amount of created entanglement.

  1. Time Evolution of Entanglement Entropy from Black Hole Interiors

    CERN Document Server

    Hartman, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We compute the time-dependent entanglement entropy of a CFT which starts in relatively simple initial states. The initial states are the thermofield double for thermal states, dual to eternal black holes, and a particular pure state, dual to a black hole formed by gravitational collapse. The entanglement entropy grows linearly in time. This linear growth is directly related to the growth of the black hole interior measured along "nice" spatial slices. These nice slices probe the spacelike direction in the interior, at a fixed special value of the interior time. In the case of a two-dimensional CFT, we match the bulk and boundary computations of the entanglement entropy. We briefly discuss the long time behavior of various correlators, computed via classical geodesics or surfaces, and point out that their exponential decay comes about for similar reasons. We also present the time evolution of the wavefunction in the tensor network description.

  2. Time evolution of entanglement entropy from black hole interiors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Thomas; Maldacena, Juan

    2013-05-01

    We compute the time-dependent entanglement entropy of a CFT which starts in relatively simple initial states. The initial states are the thermofield double for thermal states, dual to eternal black holes, and a particular pure state, dual to a black hole formed by gravitational collapse. The entanglement entropy grows linearly in time. This linear growth is directly related to the growth of the black hole interior measured along "nice" spatial slices. These nice slices probe the spacelike direction in the interior, at a fixed special value of the interior time. In the case of a two-dimensional CFT, we match the bulk and boundary computations of the entanglement entropy. We briefly discuss the long time behavior of various correlators, computed via classical geodesics or surfaces, and point out that their exponential decay comes about for similar reasons. We also present the time evolution of the wavefunction in the tensor network description.

  3. Exact relativistic time evolution for a step potential barrier

    CERN Document Server

    Villavicencio, J

    2000-01-01

    We derive an exact analytic solution to a Klein-Gordon equation for a step potential barrier with cutoff plane wave initial conditions, in order to explore wave evolution in a classical forbidden region. We find that the relativistic solution rapidly evanesces within a depth $2x_p$ inside the potential, where $x_p$ is the penetration length of the stationary solution. Beyond the characteristic distance $2x_p$, a Sommerfeld-type precursor travels along the potential at the speed of light, $c$. However, no spatial propagation of a main wavefront along the structure is observed. We also find a non-causal time evolution of the wavefront peak. The effect is only an apparent violation of Einstein causality.

  4. The Black Hole Evolution and Space Time (BEST) Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Krawczynski, Henric; Barthelmy, Scott; Schnittman, Jeremy; Zhang, William; Krolik, Julian; Baring, Matthew G; Treister, Ezequiel; Mushotzky, Richard; Beilicke, Matthias; Buckley, James; Cowsik, Ram; Israel, Martin

    2012-01-01

    In this white paper, we discuss the concept of a next-generation X-ray mission called BEST (Black hole Evolution and Space Time). The mission concept uses a 3000 square centimeter effective area mirror (at 6 keV) to achieve unprecedented sensitivities for hard X-ray imaging spectrometry (5-70 keV) and for broadband X-ray polarimetry (2-70 keV). BEST can make substantial contributions to our understanding of the inner workings of accreting black holes, our knowledge about the fabric of extremely curved spacetime, and the evolution of supermassive black holes. BEST will allow for time resolved studies of accretion disks. With a more than seven times larger mirror area and a seven times wider bandpass than GEMS, BEST will take X-ray polarimetry to a new level: it will probe the time variability of the X-ray polarization from stellar mass and supermassive black holes, and it will measure the polarization properties in 30 independent energy bins. These capabilities will allow BEST to conduct tests of accretion dis...

  5. Postoperative pituitary hormonal disturbances and hormone replacement therapy time and dosage in children with craniopharyngiomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Gui-mei; SUN Xiao-jun; SHAO Peng

    2008-01-01

    BackgroundThe proliferative activity and penetration into the hypothalamic structures in children craniopharyngiomas (CP) often make radical resection difficult. Therefore, complete resection of CP often results in permanent multiple pituitary hormone deficiency (MPHD). This study aimed to elucidate the postoperative pituitary hormonal disturbances, and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) time and dosage in children with CP.Methods Twenty patients with growth retardation and CP after resection, comprising 14 boys and 6 girls, with a mean age of (10.63 3.18) years (Group A) and 10 male patients of group A aged >10 years (Group B) were entailed. Thirty age-, sex- and Tanner stage-matched normal children (control Group A), and 44 male older children >10 years (control Group B) served as controls. The serum concentrations of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), growth hormone (GH), free thyroxine (FT4), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), adrenocorticortropic hormone (ACTH), cortisol (COR), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), prolactin (PRL), testosterone (T) and estradiol (E2) were measured in the CP patients after resection and in controls. The appropriate time and dosage of HRT were investigated. Linear correlation analysis was made between levothyroxine (L-T4) dosage and primary FT4 in CP patients after resection. Results All cases had MPHD. The serum peak GH, IGF-1, FT4 and COR levels of Group A were significantly lower than that of the control Group A. The serum IGF-1 concentration increased to the normal level after 3 months of rhGH therapy; the serum FSH, LH, and T levels were significantly decreased (P <0.001); however, E2 and PRL were significantly increased (P <0.001) in Group B compared with the control Group B; 18 cases were found to have central diabetes insipidus (Dl) by water deprivation test and MRI. There was a significant negative linear regression (r= -0.8, P <0.001) between L-T4 and primary FT4 in Group A patients with CP

  6. Testing optimality with experimental evolution: lysis time in a bacteriophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heineman, Richard H; Bull, James J

    2007-07-01

    Optimality models collapse the vagaries of genetics into simple trade-offs to calculate phenotypes expected to evolve by natural selection. Optimality approaches are commonly criticized for this neglect of genetic details, but resolution of this disagreement has been difficult. The importance of genetic details may be tested by experimental evolution of a trait for which an optimality model exists and in which genetic details can be studied. Here we evolved lysis time in bacteriophage T7, a virus of Escherichia coli. Lysis time is equivalent to the age of reproduction in an organism that reproduces once and then dies. Delaying lysis increases the number of offspring but slows generation time, and this trade-off renders the optimum sensitive to environmental conditions: earlier lysis is favored when bacterial hosts are dense, later lysis is favored when hosts are sparse. In experimental adaptations, T7 evolved close to the optimum in conditions favoring early lysis but not in conditions favoring late lysis. One of the late lysis adaptations exhibited no detectable phenotypic evolution despite genetic evolution; the other evolved only partly toward the expected optimum. Overall, the lysis time of the adapted phages remained closer to their starting values than predicted by the model. From the perspective of the optimality model, the experimental conditions were expected to select changes only along the postulated trade-off, but a trait outside the trade-off evolved as well. Evidence suggests that the model's failure ultimately stems from a violation of the trade-off, rather than a paucity of mutations.

  7. There is No Deadline - Time Evolution of Wikipedia Discussions

    CERN Document Server

    Kaltenbrunner, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Wikipedia articles are by definition never finished. Many of them have associated talk pages, where their content is discussed by editors. Here we analyse the evolution of these discussions to unveil temporal patterns in the interactions in such a large production community. First, we investigate peaks in the discussion activity and their relation with peaks in edits to articles; furthermore we introduce a measure to account for how fast discussions grow in complexity. The results point out the high impact of time instant specific hot topics on the amount and speed of the discussions, suggesting them as a mirror of a collective stream of consciousness.

  8. Time Evolution of Electric Fields in CDMS Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Leman, S W; Brink, P L; Cabrera, B; Chagani, H; Cherry, M; Cushman, P; Silva, E Do Couto E; Doughty, T; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Mandic, V; McCarthy, K A; Mirabolfathi, N; Pyle, M; Reisetter, A; Resch, R; Sadoulet, B; Serfass, B; Sundqvist, K M; Tomada, A; Young, B A; Zhang, J

    2011-01-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) utilizes large mass, 3" diameter x 1" thick target masses as particle detectors. The target is instrumented with both phonon and ionization sensors, the later providing a $\\sim$1 V cm$^{-1}$ electric field in the detector bulk. Cumulative radiation exposure which creates $\\sim 200\\times 10^6$ electron-hole pairs is sufficient to produce a comparable reverse field in the detector thereby degrading the ionization channel performance. To study this, the existing CDMS detector Monte Carlo has been modified to allow for an event by event evolution of the bulk electric field, in three spatial dimensions. Our most resent results and interpretation are discussed.

  9. Space-time isogeometric analysis of parabolic evolution problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Ulrich; Moore, Stephen E.; Neumüller, Martin

    2016-07-01

    We present and analyze a new stable space-time Isogeometric Analysis (IgA) method for the numerical solution of parabolic evolution equations in fixed and moving spatial computational domains. The discrete bilinear form is elliptic on the IgA space with respect to a discrete energy norm. This property together with a corresponding boundedness property, consistency and approximation results for the IgA spaces yields an a priori discretization error estimate with respect to the discrete norm. The theoretical results are confirmed by several numerical experiments with low- and high-order IgA spaces.

  10. Non-Markovian time evolution of an accelerated qubit

    CERN Document Server

    Moustos, Dimitris

    2016-01-01

    We present a new method for evaluating the response of a moving qubit detector interacting with a scalar field in Minkowski spacetime. We treat the detector as an open quantum system, but we do not invoke the Markov approximation. The evolution equations for the qubit density matrix are valid at all times, for all qubit trajectories and they incorporate non-Markovian effects. We analyze in detail the case of uniform acceleration, providing a detailed characterization of all regimes where non-Markovian effects are significant. We argue that the most stable characterization of acceleration temperature refers to the late time behavior of the detector, because interaction with the field vacuum brings the qubit to a thermal state at the Unruh temperature. In contrast, the early-time transition rate, that is invoked in most discussions of acceleration temperature, does not exhibit a thermal behavior when non-Markovian effects are taken into account. Finally, we note that the non-Markovian evolution derived here als...

  11. Evolution of the notion of time in hydrogeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimhan, T. N.

    1986-10-01

    The AGU Hydrology Section sponsored a special session on History and Heritage of Hydrology between 8:30 A.M. and 12 noon on Monday, December 9, 1985, during the Fall Meeting at San Francisco. The session was chaired by T. N. Narasimhan of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (Berkeley, Calif.). The attendance of between 100 and 120 for each talk was indicative of a healthy interest among researchers on matters related to history.The first part of the session focused attention on the theme “The Evolution of the Notion of Time in Hydrogeology.” The last two speakers addressed topics outside of this theme. Simon Ince (University of Arizona, Tucson) presented a historical account of the contributions of 19th century French scientist Barre de Saint-Venant to transient flow of water in open channels. Olaf H. Pfannkuch (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis) presented a historical account of the Cult of Saint Barbara and the mining profession of medieval Europe. The following summary is restricted to an overview of those presentations that dealt with the evolution of the notion of time in hydrogeology.

  12. Inductive Pulsed Plasma Thruster Model with Time-Evolution of Energy and State Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Sankaran, Kamesh

    2012-01-01

    A model for pulsed inductive plasma acceleration is presented that consists of a set of circuit equations coupled to both a one-dimensional equation of motion and an equation governing the partitioning of energy. The latter two equations are obtained for the plasma current sheet by treating it as a single element of finite volume and integrating the governing equations over that volume. The integrated terms are replaced where necessary by physically-equivalent quantities that are calculated through the solution of other parts of the governing equation set. The model improves upon previous one-dimensional performance models by permitting the time-evolution of the energy and state properties of the plasma, the latter allowing for the tailoring of the model to different gases that may be chosen as propellants. The time evolution of the various energy modes in the system and the associated plasma properties, calculated for argon propellant, are presented to demonstrate the efficacy of the model. The model produces a result where efficiency is maximized at a given value of the electrodynamic scaling term known as the dynamic impedance parameter. Qualitatively and quantitatively, the model compares favorably with performance measured for two separate inductive pulsed plasma thrusters, with disagreements attributable to simplifying assumptions employed in the generation of the model solution.

  13. The Evolution of Galaxy Structure Over Cosmic Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conselice, Christopher J.

    2014-08-01

    I present a comprehensive review of the evolution of galaxy structure in the Universe from the first galaxies currently observable at z ˜ 6 down to galaxies observable in the local Universe. Observed changes in galaxy structures reveal formation processes that only galaxy structural analyses can provide. This pedagogical review provides a detailed discussion of the major methods used to study galaxies morphologically and structurally, including the well-established visual method for morphology; Sérsic fitting to measure galaxy sizes and surface brightness profile shapes; and nonparametric structural methods [such as the concentration (C), asymmetry (A), clumpiness (S) (CAS) method and the Gini/M20 parameters, as well as newer structural indices]. These structural indices measure fundamental properties of galaxies, such as their scale, star-formation rate, and ongoing merger activity. Extensive observational results demonstrate how broad galaxy morphologies and structures change with time up to z ˜ 3, from small, compact and peculiar systems in the distant Universe to the formation of the Hubble sequence, dominated by spirals and ellipticals. Structural methods accurately identify galaxies in mergers and allow measurements of the merger history out to z ˜ 3. I depict properties and evolution of internal structures of galaxies, such as bulges, disks, bars, and at z>1 large star-forming clumps. I describe the structure and morphologies of host galaxies of active galactic nuclei and starbursts/submillimeter galaxies, along with how morphological galaxy quenching occurs. The role of environment in producing structural changes in galaxies over cosmic time is also discussed. Galaxy sizes can also change with time, with measured sizes up to a factor of 2-5 smaller at high redshift at a given stellar mass. I conclude with a discussion of how the evolving trends, in sizes, structures, and morphologies, reveal the formation mechanisms behind galaxies and provides a new

  14. Evolution of the Ainu language in space and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sean; Hasegawa, Toshikazu

    2013-01-01

    Languages evolve over space and time. Illuminating the evolutionary history of language is important because it provides a unique opportunity to shed light on the population history of the speakers. Spatial and temporal aspects of language evolution are particularly crucial for understanding demographic history, as they allow us to identify when and where the languages originated, as well as how they spread across the globe. Here we apply Bayesian phylogeographic methods to reconstruct spatiotemporal evolution of the Ainu language: an endangered language spoken by an indigenous group that once thrived in northern Japan. The conventional dual-structure model has long argued that modern Ainu are direct descendants of a single, Pleistocene human lineage from Southeast Asia, namely the Jomon people. In contrast, recent evidence from archaeological, anthropological and genetic evidence suggest that the Ainu are an outcome of significant genetic and cultural contributions from Siberian hunter-gatherers, the Okhotsk, who migrated into northern Hokkaido around 900-1600 years ago. Estimating from 19 Ainu language varieties preserved five decades ago, our analysis shows that they are descendants of a common ancestor who spread from northern Hokkaido around 1300 years ago. In addition to several lines of emerging evidence, our phylogeographic analysis strongly supports the hypothesis that recent expansion of the Okhotsk to northern Hokkaido had a profound impact on the origins of the Ainu people and their culture, and hence calls for a refinement to the dual-structure model.

  15. On the Evolution of Memory: A Time for Clocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Robert Gerstner

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available What was the earliest engram? Biology has evolved to encode representations of past events, and in neuroscience, we are attempting to link experience-dependent changes in molecular signaling with cellular processes that ultimately lead to behavioral output. The theory of evolution has guided biological research for decades, and since phylogenetically conserved mechanisms drive circadian rhythms, these processes may serve as common predecessors underlying more complex behavioral phenotypes. For example, the cAMP/MAPK/CREB cascade is interwoven with the clock to trigger circadian output, and is also known to affect memory formation. Time-of-day dependent changes have been observed in long-term potentiation (LTP within the mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus and hippocampus, along with light-induced circadian phase resetting and fear conditioning behaviors. Together this suggests during evolution, similar processes underlying metaplasticity in more simple circuits may have been redeployed in higher-order brain regions. Therefore, this notion predicts a model that LTP and metaplasticity may exist in clock-forming circuits of lower-order species, through phylogenetically conserved pathways, leading to several testable hypotheses.

  16. Effect of Slip Time in Forming Neo-Esophageal Stenosis After Replacement of a Thoracic Esophagus With Nitinol Artificial Esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xian-Liang; Liang, Jian-Hui

    2015-07-01

    Attempts have been made to investigate the effect of slip time of nitinol artificial esophagus for forming neo-esophageal stenosis after replacement of a thoracic esophagus with nitinol artificial esophagus in 20 experimental pigs. The pigs whose slip time was less than 90 days postoperatively had severe dysphagia (Bown's III) immediately after they were fed, and the dysphagia aggravated gradually later on (Bown's III-IV). The pigs whose slip time was more than 90 days postoperatively had mild/moderate dysphagia (Bown's I-II) immediately after they were fed, and the dysphagia relieved gradually later on (Bown's II-I-0). The ratios between the diameter of neo-esophagus in different slip time and normal esophagus were 25% (at 2 months postoperatively), 58% (at 4 months postoperatively), and 93% (at 6 months postoperatively), respectively. The relationship between nitinol artificial esophagus slip time and neo-esophageal stenosis showed a positive correlation. After replacement of a thoracic esophagus with nitinol artificial esophagus, the artificial esophageal slip time not only affected the original diameter of the neo-esophagus immediately, but also affected the neo-esophageal scar stricture forming process later on. The narrowing of neo-esophagus is caused by overgrowth of scar tissue. But there is the positive correlation between artificial esophagus slip time and neo-esophageal stenosis, so this can be a way of overcoming neo-esophageal stenosis by delaying slip time of artificial esophagus.

  17. Time Evolution of Elemental Ratios in Solar Energetic Particle Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelina, P.; Dalla, S.; Cohen, C. M. S.; Mewaldt, R. A.

    2017-01-01

    Heavy ion ratio abundances in solar energetic particle (SEP) events, e.g., Fe/O, often exhibit decreases over time. Using particle instruments on the Advanced Composition Explorer, Solar and Heliospheric Observatory and Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory spacecraft, we analyzed heavy ion data from 4 SEP events taking place between 2006 December and 2014 December. We constructed 36 different ionic pairs and studied their time evolution in each event. We quantified the temporal behavior of abundant SEP ratios by fitting the data to derive a decay time constant B. We also considered the ratio of ionic mass-to-charge for each pair, the S value given, e.g., for Fe/O by {S}{Fe/{{O}}}={(M/Q)}{Fe}/{(M/Q)}{{O}}. We found that the temporal behavior of SEP ratios is ordered by the value of S: ratios with S> 1 showed decreases over time (i.e., B 0). We plotted B as a function of S and observed a clear monotonic dependence: ratios with a large S decayed at a higher rate. A prominent discontinuity at S = 2.0 (corresponding to He/H) was found in three of the four events, suggesting anomalous behavior of protons. The X/H ratios often show an initial increase followed by a decrease, and decay at a slower rate. We discuss possible causes of the observed B versus S trends within current understanding of SEP propagation.

  18. Gut microbiota may predict host divergence time during Glires evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huan; Qu, Jiapeng; Li, Tongtong; Yao, Minjie; Li, Jiaying; Li, Xiangzhen

    2017-03-01

    The gut microbial communities of animals play key roles in host evolution. However, the possible relationship between gut microbiota and host divergence time remains unknown. Here, we investigated the gut microbiota of eight Glires species (four lagomorph species and four rodent species) distributed throughout the Qinghai-Tibet plateau and Inner Mongolia grassland. Lagomorphs and rodents had distinct gut microbial compositions. Three out of four lagomorph species were dominated by Firmicutes, while rodents were dominated by Bacteroidetes in general. The alpha diversity values (Shannon diversity and evenness) exhibited significant differences between any two species within the lagomorphs, whereas there were no significant differences among rodents. The structure of the gut microbiota showed significant differences between lagomorphs and rodents. In addition, we calculated host phylogeny and divergence times, and used a phylogenetic approach to reconstruct how the animal gut microbiota has diverged from their ancestral species. Some core bacterial genera (e.g. Prevotella and Clostridium) shared by more than nine-tenths of all the Glires individuals associated with plant polysaccharide degradation showed marked changes within lagomorphs. Differences in Glires gut microbiota (based on weighted UniFrac and Bray-Curtis dissimilarity metrics) were positively correlated with host divergence time. Our results thus suggest the gut microbial composition is associated with host phylogeny, and further suggest that dissimilarity of animal gut microbiota may predict host divergence time. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Scalar field as a time variable during gravitational evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Nakonieczna, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Using a scalar field as an intrinsic 'clock' while investigating the dynamics of gravitational systems has been successfully pursued in various researches on the border between classical and quantum gravity. The objective of our research was to check explicitly whether the scalar field can serve as a time variable during dynamical evolution of the matter-geometry system, especially in regions of high curvature, which are essential from the perspective of quantum gravity. For this purpose, we analyzed a gravitational collapse of a self-interacting scalar field within the framework of general relativity. The obtained results indicated that the hypersurfaces of constant scalar field are spacelike in dynamical regions nearby the singularities formed during the investigated process. The scalar field values change monotonically in the areas, in which the constancy hypersurfaces are spacelike.

  20. Nonconvex evolution inclusions generated by time-dependent subdifferential operators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Arseni-Benou

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider nonlinear nonconvex evolution inclusions driven by time-varying subdifferentials ∂ϕ(t,x without assuming that ϕ(t,. is of compact type. We show the existence of extremal solutions and then we prove a strong relaxation theorem. Moreover, we show that under a Lipschitz condition on the orientor field, the solution set of the nonconvex problem is path-connected in C(T,H. These results are applied to nonlinear feedback control systems to derive nonlinear infinite dimensional versions of the “bang-bang principle.” The abstract results are illustrated by two examples of nonlinear parabolic problems and an example of a differential variational inequality.

  1. There’s plenty of time for evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilf, Herbert S.; Ewens, Warren J.

    2010-01-01

    Objections to Darwinian evolution are often based on the time required to carry out the necessary mutations. Seemingly, exponential numbers of mutations are needed. We show that such estimates ignore the effects of natural selection, and that the numbers of necessary mutations are thereby reduced to about K log L, rather than KL, where L is the length of the genomic “word,” and K is the number of possible “letters” that can occupy any position in the word. The required theory makes contact with the theory of radix-exchange sorting in theoretical computer science, and the asymptotic analysis of certain sums that occur there. PMID:21149677

  2. Time Evolution of Artificial Plasma Cloud in Atmospheric Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆启明; 杨维纮; 刘万东

    2004-01-01

    By analyzing the time evolution of artificial plasma cloud in the high altitude of atmospheric environment, we found that there are two zones, an exponential attenuation zone and a linearly attenuating zone, existing in the spatial distribution of electron density of the artificial plasma clouds. The plasma generator's particle flux density only contributes to the exponential attenuation zone, and has no effect on the linear attenuation zone. The average electron density in the linear attenuation zone is about 10-5 of neutral particle density, and can diffuse over a wider area. The conclusion will supply some valuable references to the research of electromagnetic wave and artificial plasma interaction, the plasma invisibleness research of missile and special aerocraft,and the design of artificial plasma source.

  3. Time evolution of the autocorrelation function in dynamical replica theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, A.

    2013-04-01

    Asynchronous dynamics given by the master equation in the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick (SK) spin-glass model is studied based on dynamical replica theory (DRT) with an extension to take into account the autocorrelation function. The dynamical behaviour of the system is approximately described by dynamical equations of the macroscopic quantities: magnetization, energy contributed by randomness and the autocorrelation function. The dynamical equations under the replica symmetry assumption are derived by introducing the subshell equipartitioning assumption and exploiting the replica method. The obtained dynamical equations are compared with Monte Carlo simulations, and it is demonstrated that the proposed formula describes well the time evolution of the autocorrelation function in some parameter regions. The study offers a reasonable description of the autocorrelation function in the SK spin-glass system.

  4. Hormone Replacement Therapy and Physical Function in Healthy Older Men. Time to Talk Hormones?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannoulis, Manthos G.; Martin, Finbarr C.; Nair, K. Sreekumaran; Umpleby, A. Margot

    2012-01-01

    Improving physical function and mobility in a continuously expanding elderly population emerges as a high priority of medicine today. Muscle mass, strength/power, and maximal exercise capacity are major determinants of physical function, and all decline with aging. This contributes to the incidence of frailty and disability observed in older men. Furthermore, it facilitates the accumulation of body fat and development of insulin resistance. Muscle adaptation to exercise is strongly influenced by anabolic endocrine hormones and local load-sensitive autocrine/paracrine growth factors. GH, IGF-I, and testosterone (T) are directly involved in muscle adaptation to exercise because they promote muscle protein synthesis, whereas T and locally expressed IGF-I have been reported to activate muscle stem cells. Although exercise programs improve physical function, in the long-term most older men fail to comply. The GH/IGF-I axis and T levels decline markedly with aging, whereas accumulating evidence supports their indispensable role in maintaining physical function integrity. Several studies have reported that the administration of T improves lean body mass and maximal voluntary strength in healthy older men. On the other hand, most studies have shown that administration of GH alone failed to improve muscle strength despite amelioration of the detrimental somatic changes of aging. Both GH and T are anabolic agents that promote muscle protein synthesis and hypertrophy but work through separate mechanisms, and the combined administration of GH and T, albeit in only a few studies, has resulted in greater efficacy than either hormone alone. Although it is clear that this combined approach is effective, this review concludes that further studies are needed to assess the long-term efficacy and safety of combined hormone replacement therapy in older men before the medical rationale of prescribing hormone replacement therapy for combating the sarcopenia of aging can be established

  5. Hormone replacement therapy and physical function in healthy older men. Time to talk hormones?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannoulis, Manthos G; Martin, Finbarr C; Nair, K Sreekumaran; Umpleby, A Margot; Sonksen, Peter

    2012-06-01

    Improving physical function and mobility in a continuously expanding elderly population emerges as a high priority of medicine today. Muscle mass, strength/power, and maximal exercise capacity are major determinants of physical function, and all decline with aging. This contributes to the incidence of frailty and disability observed in older men. Furthermore, it facilitates the accumulation of body fat and development of insulin resistance. Muscle adaptation to exercise is strongly influenced by anabolic endocrine hormones and local load-sensitive autocrine/paracrine growth factors. GH, IGF-I, and testosterone (T) are directly involved in muscle adaptation to exercise because they promote muscle protein synthesis, whereas T and locally expressed IGF-I have been reported to activate muscle stem cells. Although exercise programs improve physical function, in the long-term most older men fail to comply. The GH/IGF-I axis and T levels decline markedly with aging, whereas accumulating evidence supports their indispensable role in maintaining physical function integrity. Several studies have reported that the administration of T improves lean body mass and maximal voluntary strength in healthy older men. On the other hand, most studies have shown that administration of GH alone failed to improve muscle strength despite amelioration of the detrimental somatic changes of aging. Both GH and T are anabolic agents that promote muscle protein synthesis and hypertrophy but work through separate mechanisms, and the combined administration of GH and T, albeit in only a few studies, has resulted in greater efficacy than either hormone alone. Although it is clear that this combined approach is effective, this review concludes that further studies are needed to assess the long-term efficacy and safety of combined hormone replacement therapy in older men before the medical rationale of prescribing hormone replacement therapy for combating the sarcopenia of aging can be established.

  6. Molecular Fossils as Time Indicators for the Evolution of Diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampen, S. W.; Schouten, S.; Muyzer, G.; Abbas, B.; Rowland, S. J.; Moldowan, M.; Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.

    2004-12-01

    Bacillariophyta (diatoms) are one of the most abundant divisions of phytoplankton, and contribute to almost 50% of the primary productivity of today's oceans. However, their ecological dominance is relatively young and little is known about the exact pace of their rapid evolution. DNA analyses on diatoms and the use of molecular clock calculations can help to reconstruct their evolution, but this molecular clock rate needs to be calibrated against the fossil record to determine the mutation rate. Until now, diatom silica skeletons have been used for reconstructing the evolution of diatoms, but their use is limited due to destruction by diagenesis. Molecular fossils may prove to be more useful for time reconstruction. To search for suitable compounds, we have analyzed both the lipid composition and 18S rRNA sequences of ca. 100 marine diatoms. This revealed that some specific phylogenetic clusters within the diatoms produce specific organic compounds, so-called diatom biomarkers. One group of diatom biomarkers are the C25 highly branched isoprenoid (HBI) alkenes (1,2). HBI biosynthesis evolved independently at least twice in the diatoms. The first group of HBI producers consists of the centric diatoms of the genus Rhizosolenia, the second group comprises pennate diatoms of the genera Haslea, Navicula and Pleurosigma. Based on the constructed phylogenetic tree it is likely that the HBI biosynthesis evolved first in the older group of centric diatoms (i.e. the Rhizosolenia genus). The fossil record was studied to determine the geological occurrence of C25 HBI alkenes, and this data set shows that HBI biosynthesis evolved ca. 91.5 My ago, so we can date the evolution of the genus Rizosolenia to ca. 91.5 My. With this information, we can now accurately predict the mutation rate of the 18S rDNA gene to 1% per 14.8 My for Rhizosolenia, which is substantially faster than the 1% per 18-26 My reported previously for diatoms in general. Another specific biomarker is 24

  7. Influence of Noise on Time Evolution of Intensity Correlation Function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Using the linear approximation method, we have studied how the correlation function C(t) of the laser intensity changes with time in the loss-noise model of the single-mode laser driven by the colored pump noise with signal modulation and the quantum noise with cross-correlation between the real and imaginary parts. We have found that when the pump noise self-correlation time τ changes, (I) in the case ofτ 1, the curve only exhibits periodically surging with descending envelope. When τ < 1 and τ does not change, with the increase of the pump noise intensity P, the curve experiences a repeated changing process, that is, from the monotonous descending to the appearance of a maximum, then to monotonous rise, and finally to the appearance of a maximum again. With the increase of the quantum noise intensity Q, the curve experiences a changing process from the monotonous rise to the appearance of a maximum, and finally to the monotonous descending. The increase of the quantum noise with cross-correlation between the real and imaginary parts will lead to the fall of the whole curve, but not affect the form of the time evolution of C(t).

  8. Evolution over time of the Milky Way's disc shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amôres, E. B.; Robin, A. C.; Reylé, C.

    2017-06-01

    Context. Galactic structure studies can be used as a path to constrain the scenario of formation and evolution of our Galaxy. The dependence with the age of stellar population parameters would be linked with the history of star formation and dynamical evolution. Aims: We aim to investigate the structures of the outer Galaxy, such as the scale length, disc truncation, warp and flare of the thin disc and study their dependence with age by using 2MASS data and a population synthesis model (the so-called Besançon Galaxy Model). Methods: We have used a genetic algorithm to adjust the parameters on the observed colour-magnitude diagrams at longitudes 80° ≤ ℓ ≤ 280° for | b | ≤ 5.5°. We explored parameter degeneracies and uncertainties. Results: We identify a clear dependence of the thin disc scale length, warp and flare shapes with age. The scale length is found to vary between 3.8 kpc for the youngest to about 2 kpc for the oldest. The warp shows a complex structure, clearly asymmetrical with a node angle changing with age from approximately 165° for old stars to 195° for young stars. The outer disc is also flaring with a scale height that varies by a factor of two between the solar neighbourhood and a Galactocentric distance of 12 kpc. Conclusions: We conclude that the thin disc scale length is in good agreement with the inside-out formation scenario and that the outer disc is not in dynamical equilibrium. The warp deformation with time may provide some clues to its origin.

  9. Time evolution of morphology in mechanically alloyed Fe-Cu

    KAUST Repository

    Wille, Catharina Gabriele

    2011-05-01

    Being widely accessible as well as already utilised in many applications, Fe-Cu acts as an ideal binary model alloy to elaborate the enforced nonequilibrium enhanced solubility in such a solution system that shows a limited regime of miscibility and characterised by a large positive heat of mixing. In addition to the detailed analysis of ball milled Fe-Cu powders by means of Atom Probe Tomography (APT), site specific structural analysis has been performed in this study using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM).In this contribution results on powders with low Cu concentrations (2.5-10 at%) are presented. Combining a ductile element (Cu, fcc) and a brittle one (Fe, bcc), striking differences in morphology were expected and found on all length-scales, depending on the mixing ratio of the two elements. However, not only could the atomic mixing of Fe and Cu be evaluated, but also the distribution of impurities, mostly stemming from the fabrication procedure. The combination of APT and TEM enables a correlation between the structural evolution and the chemical mixing during the milling process. For the first time, a clear distinction can be drawn between the morphological evolution at the surface and in the interior of the powder particles. This became possible owing to the site specific sample preparation of TEM lamellae by Focussed Ion Beam (FIB). Surprisingly, the texture arising from the ball milling process can directly be related to the classical rolling texture of cold rolled Fe. In addition, full homogeneity can be achieved even on the nano-scale for this material as shown by APT, resulting in an extended miscibility region in comparison to the equilibrium phase diagram. Grain sizes were determined by means of XRD and TEM. The strain corrected XRD results are in very good agreement with the values derived by TEM, both confirming a truly nanocrystalline structure. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  10. The time evolution of gaps in tidal streams

    CERN Document Server

    Helmi, Amina

    2016-01-01

    We model the time evolution of gaps in tidal streams caused by the impact of a dark matter subhalo, while both orbit a spherical gravitational potential. To this end, we make use of the simple behaviour of orbits in action-angle space. A gap effectively results from the divergence of two nearby orbits whose initial phase-space separation is, for very cold thin streams, largely given by the impulse induced by the subhalo. We find that in a spherical potential the size of a gap increases linearly with time, while its density decreases as 1/t^2 for sufficiently long timescales. We have derived an analytic expression that shows how the growth rate depends on the mass of the perturbing subhalo, its scale and its relative velocity with respect to the stream. We have verified these scalings using N-body simulations and find excellent agreement. For example, a subhalo of mass 10^8 Msun directly impacting a very cold thin stream on an inclined orbit can induce a gap that may reach a size of several tens of kpc after a...

  11. Recovery of the Time-Evolution Equation of Time-Delay Systems from Time Series

    CERN Document Server

    Bünner, M J; Kittel, A; Parisi, J; Meyer, Th.

    1997-01-01

    We present a method for time series analysis of both, scalar and nonscalar time-delay systems. If the dynamics of the system investigated is governed by a time-delay induced instability, the method allows to determine the delay time. In a second step, the time-delay differential equation can be recovered from the time series. The method is a generalization of our recently proposed method suitable for time series analysis of {\\it scalar} time-delay systems. The dynamics is not required to be settled on its attractor, which also makes transient motion accessible to the analysis. If the motion actually takes place on a chaotic attractor, the applicability of the method does not depend on the dimensionality of the chaotic attractor - one main advantage over all time series analysis methods known until now. For demonstration, we analyze time series, which are obtained with the help of the numerical integration of a two-dimensional time-delay differential equation. After having determined the delay time, we recover...

  12. Conventional versus Transapical Aortic Valve Replacement: Is It Time for Shift in Indications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumbach, Hardy; Ahad, Samir; Rustenbach, Christian; Hill, Stephan; Schäufele, Tim; Wachter, Kristina; Franke, Ulrich Friedrich Wilhelm

    2016-08-12

    Background The incidence of degenerative aortic valve diseases has increased along with the life expectancy of our population. Although conventional aortic valve replacement (AVR) is the gold standard for symptomatic aortic stenosis, transcatheter procedures have proven to be a valid therapeutic option in high-risk patients. The aim of this study was to compare these procedures in a high-risk cohort. Methods We retrospectively analyzed all symptomatic (dyspnea or angina) high-risk patients (logistic EuroSCORE ≥ 15%) fulfilling the transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) indications. Most of the AVR patients (n = 180) were operated on before the implementation of TAVI. All TAVI procedures (n = 127) were performed transapically (TA). After matching for age, logistic EuroSCORE, and left ventricular ejection fraction, 82 pairs of patients were evaluated. Results When comparing AVR with TA-TAVI, there was no difference between groups in survival after 1 year (Kaplan-Meier analysis, 81.1% [95% CI: 72.5-89.7%] vs. 75.8% [95% CI: 66.2-75.9%], Log tank p = 0.660) and the complication rates (n for AVR vs. TA-TAVI: stroke, 2 vs. 0, p = 0.580; acute renal insufficiency, 8 vs. 12, p = 0.340; atrial fibrillation, 24 vs. 26, p = 0.813; pacemaker implantation, 4 vs. 4, p > 0.999). In addition, quality of life did not differ between groups. Patients in the TA-TAVI group had lower mean valvular gradients postoperatively compared with the AVR group (14.6 ± 6.6 vs. 10.2 ± 4.9 mm Hg, p < 0.001). Conclusion For high-risk patients, the TAVI procedure is comparable with conventional AVR, but is not advantageous. These results do not support the expansion of TAVI to low- or intermediate-risk patients.

  13. Time Curves: Folding Time to Visualize Patterns of Temporal Evolution in Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Benjamin; Shi, Conglei; Heulot, Nicolas; Madhyastha, Tara; Grabowski, Tom; Dragicevic, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    We introduce time curves as a general approach for visualizing patterns of evolution in temporal data. Examples of such patterns include slow and regular progressions, large sudden changes, and reversals to previous states. These patterns can be of interest in a range of domains, such as collaborative document editing, dynamic network analysis, and video analysis. Time curves employ the metaphor of folding a timeline visualization into itself so as to bring similar time points close to each other. This metaphor can be applied to any dataset where a similarity metric between temporal snapshots can be defined, thus it is largely datatype-agnostic. We illustrate how time curves can visually reveal informative patterns in a range of different datasets.

  14. The scope for replacing seclusion with time out in acute inpatient psychiatry in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Len; Ross, Jamie; Nijman, Henk; Muir-Cochrane, Eimear; Noorthoorn, Eric; Stewart, Duncan

    2012-04-01

    The use of seclusion is unpalatable to nurses and frequently unpleasant for patients. Time out is rated by nurses and patients as more acceptable. Several countries have initiated exercises to reduce the use of seclusion, but England has not. In this study, data were collected on the sequence of conflict (aggression, rule breaking, absconding etc.) and containment (coerced medication, restraint, special observation etc., including time out and seclusion) for the first 2 weeks of 522 acute admissions on 84 wards in 31 English hospitals between June 2009 and March 2010. Data were analysed to describe what preceded and followed time out and seclusion episodes in a nursing shift. Seclusion was used with 7·5% of patients, and time out with 15·5%. Both containment methods were used with similar patients in similar circumstances, and both brought disturbed behaviour to a close in half of the cases. Some seclusion appeared to follow less serious disturbed behaviour. There was an important variation in rates of seclusion between hospitals. Seclusion and time out had equally good outcomes in the management of physical violence to others. There is good evidence that seclusion rates can be reduced safely, and time out can sometimes be used as a substitute. A national registration and reporting system should be introduced in England, and serious efforts made to reduce seclusion use in hospitals where rates are high. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Collective Landmarks for Deep Time: A New Tool for Evolution Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Cesar

    2014-01-01

    Evolution is a fundamental, organising concept in biology, yet there is widespread resistance to evolution among US students and there are rising creationist challenges in Europe. Resistance to evolution is linked to lack of understanding of the age of the Earth. An understanding of deep time is thus essential for effective biology education.…

  16. The scope for replacing seclusion with time out in acute inpatient psychiatry in England

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bowers, L.; Ross, J.; Nijman, H.L.I.; Muir-Cochrane, E.; Noorthoorn, E.O.; Stewart, D.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The use of seclusion is unpalatable to nurses and frequently unpleasant for patients. Time out is rated by nurses and patients as more acceptable. Several countries have initiated exercises to reduce the use of seclusion, but England has not. Methods. In this study, data were collected

  17. Introduction to the Time Evolution of Open Quantum Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Rivas, Ángel

    2011-01-01

    We revise fundamental concepts in the dynamics of open quantum systems in the light of modern developments in the field. Our aim is to present a unified approach to the quantum evolution of open systems that incorporates the concepts and methods traditionally employed by different communities. We present in some detail the mathematical structure and the general properties of the dynamical maps underlying open system dynamics. We also discuss the microscopic derivation of dynamical equations, including both Markovian and non-Markovian evolutions.

  18. Time evolution of linearized gauge field fluctuations on a real-time lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Kurkela, Aleksi; Peuron, Jarkko

    2016-01-01

    Classical real-time lattice simulations play an important role in understanding non-equilibrium phenomena in gauge theories and are used in particular to model the prethermal evolution of heavy-ion collisions. Due to instabilities, small quantum fluctuations on top of the classical background may significantly affect the dynamics of the system. In this paper we argue for the need for a numerical calculation of a system of classical gauge fields and small linearized fluctuations in a way that keeps the separation between the two manifest. We derive and test an explicit algorithm to solve these equations on the lattice, maintaining gauge invariance and Gauss's law.

  19. Training Concept, Evolution Time, and the Maximum Entropy Production Principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey Bezryadin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The maximum entropy production principle (MEPP is a type of entropy optimization which demands that complex non-equilibrium systems should organize such that the rate of the entropy production is maximized. Our take on this principle is that to prove or disprove the validity of the MEPP and to test the scope of its applicability, it is necessary to conduct experiments in which the entropy produced per unit time is measured with a high precision. Thus we study electric-field-induced self-assembly in suspensions of carbon nanotubes and realize precise measurements of the entropy production rate (EPR. As a strong voltage is applied the suspended nanotubes merge together into a conducting cloud which produces Joule heat and, correspondingly, produces entropy. We introduce two types of EPR, which have qualitatively different significance: global EPR (g-EPR and the entropy production rate of the dissipative cloud itself (DC-EPR. The following results are obtained: (1 As the system reaches the maximum of the DC-EPR, it becomes stable because the applied voltage acts as a stabilizing thermodynamic potential; (2 We discover metastable states characterized by high, near-maximum values of the DC-EPR. Under certain conditions, such efficient entropy-producing regimes can only be achieved if the system is allowed to initially evolve under mildly non-equilibrium conditions, namely at a reduced voltage; (3 Without such a “training” period the system typically is not able to reach the allowed maximum of the DC-EPR if the bias is high; (4 We observe that the DC-EPR maximum is achieved within a time, Te, the evolution time, which scales as a power-law function of the applied voltage; (5 Finally, we present a clear example in which the g-EPR theoretical maximum can never be achieved. Yet, under a wide range of conditions, the system can self-organize and achieve a dissipative regime in which the DC-EPR equals its theoretical maximum.

  20. Management of moderate functional tricuspid valve regurgitation at the time of pulmonary valve replacement: is concomitant tricuspid valve repair necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogon, Brian; Patel, Manisha; Leong, Traci; McConnell, Michael; Book, Wendy

    2010-08-01

    Congenital heart defects with a component of pulmonary stenosis are often palliated in childhood by disrupting the pulmonary valve. Patients often undergo subsequent pulmonary valve replacement (PVR) to protect the heart from the consequences of pulmonary regurgitation. In the presence of associated moderate functional tricuspid valve (TV) regurgitation, it is unclear what factors contribute to persistent TV regurgitation following PVR. In particular, it is unknown whether PVR alone will reduce the right ventricular (RV) size and restore TV function or whether concomitant TV annuloplasty is required as well. Thirty-five patients were analyzed. Each patient underwent initial palliation of congenital pulmonary stenosis or tetralogy of Fallot, underwent subsequent PVR between 2002 and 2008, and had at least moderate TV regurgitation at the time of valve replacement. Serial echocardiograms were analyzed. Pulmonary and TV regurgitation, along with RV dilation and dysfunction, were scored (0, none; 1, mild; 2, moderate; 3, severe). RV volume and area were also calculated. Potential risk factors for persistent postoperative TV regurgitation were evaluated. One month following PVR, there was a significant reduction in pulmonary valve regurgitation (mean, 3 vs. 0.39; P regurgitation (mean, 2.33 vs. 1.3; P regurgitation postoperatively between those patients who underwent PVR alone and those who underwent concomitant tricuspid annuloplasty (mean, 1.29 vs. 1.31; P = 0.81). We conclude that following PVR, improvement in TV regurgitation and RV size occurs primarily in the first postoperative month. TV function improved to a similar degree with or without annuloplasty.

  1. Time evolution of the diffraction pattern of an ultrashort laser pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefrancois, M; Pereira, S

    2003-05-19

    An analytical expression for the time evolution of the diffraction pattern of an ultrashort laser pulse passing through a circular aperture is obtained in the Fresnel regime. The diffraction is not constant in time as the pulse travels through the aperture. This may have implications in experiments involving fast dynamics. Examples of the evolution of the diffraction pattern are given.

  2. Statistical behavior of time dynamics evolution of HIV infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Ramón E. R.; Santos, Iury A. X.; Nunes, Marcos G. P.; de Oliveira, Viviane M.; Barbosa, Anderson L. R.

    2017-09-01

    We use the tools of the random matrix theory (RMT) to investigate the statistical behavior of the evolution of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. By means of the nearest-neighbor spacing distribution we have identified four distinct regimes of the evolution of HIV infection. We verified that at the beginning of the so-called clinical latency phase the concentration of infected cells grows slowly and evolves in a correlated way. This regime is followed by another one in which the correlation is lost and that in turn leads the system to a regime in which the increase of infected cells is faster and correlated. In the final phase, the one in which acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is stablished, the system presents maximum correlation as demonstrated by GOE distribution.

  3. Long-time memory in non-Markovian evolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chruściński, Dariusz; Kossakowski, Andrzej; Pascazio, Saverio

    2010-03-01

    If the dynamics of an open quantum system is non-Markovian, its asymptotic state strongly depends on the initial conditions, even if the dynamics possesses an invariant state. This is the very essence of memory effects. In particular, the asymptotic state can remember and partially preserve its initial entanglement. Interestingly, even if the non-Markovian evolution relaxes to an equilibrium state, this state needs not be invariant. Therefore, the noninvariance of equilibrium becomes a clear sign of non-Markovianity.

  4. Time Evolution of Galaxy Scaling Relations in Cosmological Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Philip

    2016-01-01

    We predict the evolution of galaxy scaling relationships from cosmological, hydrodynamical simulations, that reproduce the scaling relations of present-day galaxies. Although we do not assume co-evolution between galaxies and black holes a priori, we are able to reproduce the black hole mass--velocity dispersion relation. This relation does not evolve, and black holes actually grow along the relation from significantly less massive seeds than have previously been used. AGN feedback does not very much affect the chemical evolution of our galaxies. In our predictions, the stellar mass--metallicity relation does not change its shape, but the metallicity significantly increases from $z\\sim2$ to $z\\sim1$, while the gas-phase mass-metallicity relation does change shape, having a steeper slope at higher redshifts ($z\\lesssim3$). Furthermore, AGN feedback is required to reproduce observations of the most massive galaxies at $z\\lesssim1$, specifically their positions on the star formation main sequence and galaxy mass...

  5. Replacement of a terminal cytochrome c oxidase by ubiquinol oxidase during the evolution of acetic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsutani, Minenosuke; Fukushima, Kota; Kayama, Chiho; Arimitsu, Misato; Hirakawa, Hideki; Toyama, Hirohide; Adachi, Osao; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Matsushita, Kazunobu

    2014-10-01

    The bacterial aerobic respiratory chain has a terminal oxidase of the heme-copper oxidase superfamily, comprised of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) and ubiquinol oxidase (UOX); UOX evolved from COX. Acetobacter pasteurianus, an α-Proteobacterial acetic acid bacterium (AAB), produces UOX but not COX, although it has a partial COX gene cluster, ctaBD and ctaA, in addition to the UOX operon cyaBACD. We expressed ctaB and ctaA genes of A. pasteurianus in Escherichia coli and demonstrated their function as heme O and heme A synthases. We also found that the absence of ctaD function is likely due to accumulated mutations. These COX genes are closely related to other α-Proteobacterial COX proteins. However, the UOX operons of AAB are closely related to those of the β/γ-Proteobacteria (γ-type UOX), distinct from the α/β-Proteobacterial proteins (α-type UOX), but different from the other γ-type UOX proteins by the absence of the cyoE heme O synthase. Thus, we suggest that A. pasteurianus has a functional γ-type UOX but has lost the COX genes, with the exception of ctaB and ctaA, which supply the heme O and A moieties for UOX. Our results suggest that, in AAB, COX was replaced by β/γ-Proteobacterial UOX via horizontal gene transfer, while the COX genes, except for the heme O/A synthase genes, were lost. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Time evolution of relativistic d + Au and Au + Au collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Wolschin, G; Mizoguchi, T; Suzuki, N; Biyajima, Minoru; Mizoguchi, Takuya; Suzuki, Naomichi; Wolschin, Georg

    2006-01-01

    The evolution of charged-particle production in collisions of heavy ions at relativistic energies is investigated as function of centrality in a nonequilibrium-statistical framework. Precise agreement with recent d + Au and Au + Au data at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV is found in a Relativistic Diffusion Model with three sources for particle production. Only the midrapidity source comes very close to local equilibrium, whereas the analyses of the overall pseudorapidity distributions show that the systems remain far from statistical equilibrium.

  7. A time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay for the measurement of testosterone in saliva: Monitoring of testosterone replacement therapy with testosterone buciclate

    OpenAIRE

    Tschöp, Matthias; Behre, Hermann M.; Nieschlag, Eberhard; Dressendorfer, Regina A.; Strasburger, Christian J.

    1998-01-01

    Monitoring of testosterone replacement therapy requires a reliable method for testosterone measurement. Determination of salivary testosterone, which reflects the hormone's biologically active plasma fraction, is a superior technique for this purpose. The aim of the present study was to establish a new sensitive time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay for the accurate measurement of testosterone levels in saliva and to validate it by monitoring testosterone replacement therapy in eight hypogon...

  8. Declining incidence of breast cancer after decreased use of hormone-replacement therapy: magnitude and time lags in different countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbuk, Kevin; Anand, Sonia S

    2012-01-01

    Throughout the latter half of the 20th century, hormone-replacement therapy (HRT) use steadily increased in the Western world. In 2002, the early termination of the Women's Health Initiative trial due to an excess of adverse events attributable to HRT, led to a precipitous decline in its use. Breast cancer incidence began to decline soon thereafter in the USA and several other countries. However, the magnitude of the decline in breast cancer incidence, and its timing with respect to HRT cessation, shows considerable variability between nations. The impact of HRT cessation appears most significant and immediate in countries with the largest absolute decline in HRT use. In countries in which peak prevalence of HRT use was high, several studies have convincingly excluded decreasing rates of mammographic screening as an explanation for the decline in breast cancer incidence. Conversely, in some countries, no decline in breast cancer incidence is apparent that can be readily attributed to declining trends in HRT use. In such cases, declines in breast cancer incidence may be related instead to saturation or decreased utilisation of mammographic screening programmes. In other cases, it is difficult to disentangle the respective influence of trends in HRT use, and the influence of changes relating to mammographic screening. However, irrespective of time lags and varying magnitudes of effect, the data convincingly support a direct association between decreasing HRT use and declining breast cancer incidence.

  9. The Evolution of Galaxy Clusters Across Cosmic Time

    CERN Document Server

    Arnaud, M; Jones, C; McNamara, B; Ohashi, T; Patnaude, D; Arnaud, K; Bautz, M; Blanchard, A; Bregman, J; Chartas, G; Croston, J; David, L; Donahue, M; Fabian, A; Finoguenov, A; Furuzawa, A; Gallagher, S; Haba, Y; Hornschemeier, A; Heinz, S; Kaastra, J; Kapferer, W; Lamer, G; Mahdavi, A; Makishima, K; Matsushita, K; Nakazawa, K; Nulsen, P; Ogle, P; Perlman, E; Ponman, T; Proga, D; Pratt, G; Randall, S; Richards, G; Romer, K; Ruszkowski, M; Schmidt, R; Smith, R; Tananbaum, H; Vrtilek, J; Worrall, D

    2009-01-01

    The large scale structure of the present Universe is determined by the growth of dark matter density fluctuations and by the dynamical action of dark energy and dark matter. While much progress has been made in recent years in constraining the cosmological parameters, and in reconstructing the evolution in the large--scale structure of the dark matter distribution, we still lack an understanding of the evolution of the baryonic component of the Universe. Located at nodes of the cosmic web, clusters of galaxies are the largest collapsed structures in the Universe with total masses up to 10$^{15}$ M$_{\\sun}$. Over 80% of their mass resides in the form of dark matter. The remaining mass is composed of baryons, most of which (about 85%) is a diffuse, hot plasma that radiates primarily in X-rays. X-ray observations of the evolving cluster population provide a unique opportunity to address such open and fundamental questions as: How do hot diffuse baryons dynamically evolve in dark matter potentials? How and when w...

  10. Evolution of Arbitrary States under Fock-Darwin Hamiltonian and a Time-Dependent Electric Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐晓飞; 杨涛; 翟智远; 潘孝胤

    2012-01-01

    The method of path integral is employed to calculate the time evolution of the eigenstates of a charged particle under the Fock-Darwin (FD) Hamiltonian subjected to a time-dependent electric field in the plane of the system. An exact analytical expression is established for the evolution of the eigenstates. This result then provides a general solution to the time-dependent Schrodinger equation.

  11. Ankle replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankle arthroplasty - total; Total ankle arthroplasty; Endoprosthetic ankle replacement; Ankle surgery ... You may not be able to have a total ankle replacement if you have had ankle joint infections in ...

  12. Knee Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knee replacement is surgery for people with severe knee damage. Knee replacement can relieve pain and allow you to ... Your doctor may recommend it if you have knee pain and medicine and other treatments are not ...

  13. THE LONG TIME BEHAVIORS OF NON-AUTONOMOUS EVOLUTION SYSTEM DESCRIBING GEOPHYSICAL FLOW WITHIN THE EARTH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Chunshan; LI Kaitai; HUANG Aixiang

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the long time behaviors of non-autonomous evolution system describing geophysical flow within the earth are studied. The uniqueness and existence of the solution to the evolution system and the existence of uniform attractor are proven.Moreover, the upper bounds of the uniform attractor's Hausdorff and Fractal dimensions are obtained.

  14. THE LONG TIME BEHAVIORS OF NON-AUTONOMOUS EVOLUTION SYSTEM DESCRIBING GEOPHYSICAL FLOW WITHIN THE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper,the long time behaviors of non-autonomous evolution system describing geophysical flow within the earth are studied.The uniqueness and existence of the solution to the evolution system and the existence of uniform attractor are proven.Moreover,the upper bounds of the uniform attractor's hausdorff and Fractal dimensions are obtained.

  15. Non-Markovian Quantum Evolution: Time-Local Generators and Memory Kernels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chruściński, Dariusz; Należyty, Paweł

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we provide a basic introduction to the topic of quantum non-Markovian evolution presenting both time-local and memory kernel approach to the evolution of open quantum systems. We start with the standard notion of a classical Markovian stochastic process and generalize it to classical Markovian stochastic evolution which in turn becomes a starting point of the quantum setting. Our approach is based on the notion of P-divisible, CP-divisible maps and their refinements to k-divisible maps. Basic methods enabling one to detect non-Markovianity of the quantum evolution are also presented. Our analysis is illustrated by several simple examples.

  16. Chimpocentrism and reconstructions of human evolution (a timely reminder).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaesen, Krist

    2014-03-01

    Chimpanzees, but very few other animals, figure prominently in (recent) attempts to reconstruct the evolution of uniquely human traits. In particular, the chimpanzee is used (i) to identify traits unique to humans, and thus in need of reconstruction; (ii) to initialize the reconstruction, by taking its state to reflect the state of the last common ancestor of humans and chimpanzees; (iii) as a baseline against which to test evolutionary hypotheses. Here I point out the flaws in this three-step procedure, and show how they can be overcome by taking advantage of much broader phylogenetic comparisons. More specifically, I explain how such comparisons yield more reliable estimations of ancestral states and how they help to resolve problems of underdetermination inherent to chimpocentric accounts. To illustrate my points, I use a recent chimpocentric argument by Kitcher. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A unified cosmic evolution: Inflation to late time acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborty, Subenoy; Saha, Subhajit

    2015-01-01

    The present work deals with a cosmological model having particle creation mechanism in the framework of irreversible thermodynamics. In the second order non-equilibrium thermodynamical prescription, the particle creation rate is treated as the dissipative effect. The non-equilibrium thermodynamical process is assumed to be isentropic, and, as a consequence, the entropy per particle is constant, and, hence, the dissipative pressure can be expressed linearly in terms of the particle creation rate in the background of the homogeneous and isotropic flat FLRW model. By proper choice of the particle creation rate as a function of the Hubble parameter, the model shows the evolution of the universe starting from the inflationary scenario to the present accelerating phase, considering the cosmic matter as normal perfect fluid with barotropic equation of state.

  18. Geochemical studies, magmatic evolution, microstructures and replacement mechanisms in Jebale-Barez granitoid Complex (East and Southeast Jiroft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Rasouli

    2017-08-01

    -related arc magmatism. The systematic variation for the major elements implies involvement of fractional crystallization in the evolution of JBPC. The trends are consistent with the fractionation of plagioclase feldspar and ferromagnesian minerals as indicated by decreasing MgO, CaO, FeOt and TiO2 with increasing SiO2 despie the content of (K2O+Na2O. It generally increases with increasing SiO2 for intermediate compositions (67 wt% SiO2 ≤ and then decreases for more felsic granitic rocks, indicating that sodic feldspar was a major fractionating phase for alkali-granite and granite suit (Rasouli, 2015. Overall REE abundances slightly decrease with increasing SiO2 consistent with plagioclase fractionation. The distribution of voluminous volcanic rocks in the studied area implies that the JBPC could be a part of the mature magmatic arc. The field petrography and geochemical studies indicated that the JPBC originated from both crustal and mantle derived magmas: The increase in temperature and excess fluid pressure caused by subduction trigged melting of mantle edge and formation of basaltic magma and its ascending and introducing into the crust was followed by partial melting (Rasouli, 2015. The juxtaposed series of mafic-felsic pulses formed a mixed magma. Finally this magma is emplaced at broad, shallow magma chamber (9-12 km, where the differentiation took place by fractional crystallization and produced a wide variety of rocks form quartz-diorite to alkali granite. In such shallow magma reservoirs, the emplacement of magma took place as sill (Fridrich et al, 1991. Combining field observations and petrofabric studies displayed a deep caldera as a feeder zone for Eocene volcanic rocks (Rasouli, 2015. The JBPC is located in a shear zone and multiple magmatic pulses were injected as sills. The magmatic fabrics show active tectonic controls on magmatism during and after magma emplacement. The transpressional tectonic regime is well compatible with our data. References Fridrich, C

  19. Hydration Heat Evolution of Cement and Its Relation With Setting Time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In order to veritably measure the first peak of hydration heat evolution that has been illustrated important in indicating cement behavior in early hydration, an improved way of water addition into cement in isothermally calorimetric experiment is put forward. The experimental results indicated that: the magnitude of first peak of heat evolution varies from sample to sample, correlation between heat evolution during first peak of heat evolution and initial (as well as final) setting time is unsatisfactory when samples are not classified; while groups of sample classified based on strength grade represent satisfactory correlations, which indicating the existence of close relation between hydration heat evolution in much earlier hydration age and setting property of cement in rather later age. Importance of first peak in hydration heat evolution for understanding cement setting property and reasons for sample classification are also discussed in this paper.

  20. Usefulness of maximal oxygen pulse in timing of pulmonary valve replacement in patients with isolated pulmonary regurgitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legendre, Antoine; Richard, Ruddy; Pontnau, Florence; Jais, Jean-Philippe; Dufour, Marc; Grenier, Olivier; Mousseaux, Elie; Ladouceur, Magalie; Iserin, Laurence; Bonnet, Damien

    2016-10-01

    Patients with pulmonary regurgitation after tetralogy of Fallot repair have impaired aerobic capacity; one of the reasons is the decreasing global ventricular performance at exercise, reflected by decreasing peak oxygen pulse. The aims of our study were to evaluate the impact of pulmonary valve replacement on peak oxygen pulse in a population with pure pulmonary regurgitation and with different degrees of right ventricular dilatation and to determine the predictors of peak oxygen pulse after pulmonary valve replacement. The mean and median age at pulmonary valve replacement was 27 years. Mean pre-procedural right ventricular end-diastolic volume was 182 ml/m2. Out of 24 patients, 15 had abnormal peak oxygen pulse before pulmonary valve replacement. We did not observe a significant increase in peak oxygen pulse after pulmonary valve replacement (p=0.76). Among cardiopulmonary test/MRI/historical pre-procedural parameters, peak oxygen pulse appeared to be the best predictor of peak oxygen pulse after pulmonary valve replacement (positive and negative predictive values, respectively, 0.94 and 1). After pulmonary valve replacement, peak oxygen pulse was well correlated with left ventricular stroke and end-diastolic volumes (r=0.67 and 0.68, respectively). Our study confirms the absence of an effect of pulmonary valve replacement on peak oxygen pulse whatever the initial right ventricular volume, reflecting possible irreversible right and/or left ventricle lesions. Pre-procedural peak oxygen pulse seemed to well predict post-procedural peak oxygen pulse. These results encourage discussions on pulmonary valve replacement in patients showing any decrease in peak oxygen pulse during their follow-up.

  1. Time to achieving therapeutic international normalized ratio increases hospital length of stay after heart valve replacement surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, Christopher J; Hong, Joon Hwa; Daly, Richard C; Scott, Christopher; Mehta, Ramila A; Bailey, Kent; Pathak, Jyotishman; Pereira, Naveen L

    2017-05-01

    Achieving a therapeutic international normalized ratio (INR) before hospital discharge is an important inpatient goal for patients undergoing mechanical cardiac valve replacement (MCVR). The use of clinical algorithms has reduced the time to achieve therapeutic INR (TTI) with warfarin therapy. Whether TTI prolongs length of stay (LOS) is unknown. Patients who underwent MCVR over a consecutive 42-month period were included. Clinical data were obtained from the Society of Thoracic Surgeons Adult Cardiac Surgery database and electronic medical records. Therapeutic INR was defined as per standard guidelines. Warfarin dose was prescribed using an inpatient pharmacy-managed algorithm and computer-based dosing tool. International normalized ratio trajectory, procedural needs, and drug interactions were included in warfarin dose determination. There were 708 patients who underwent MCVR, of which 159 were excluded for reasons that would preclude or interrupt warfarin use. Among the remainder of 549 patients, the average LOS was 6.4days and mean TTI was 3.5days. Landmark analysis showed that subjects in hospital on day 4 (n=542) who achieved therapeutic INR were more likely to be discharged by day 6 compared with those who did not achieve therapeutic INR (75% vs 59%, P<.001). Multivariable proportional hazards regression with TTI as a time-dependent effect showed a strong association with discharge (P=.0096, hazard ratio1.3) after adjustment for other significant clinical covariates. Time to achieve therapeutic INR is an independent predictor of LOS in patients requiring anticoagulation with warfarin after MCVR surgery. Alternative dosing and anticoagulation strategies will need to be adopted to reduce LOS in these patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Evolution of a Voltage-Time Model of Thermal Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-01

    MARK I1 VOLTAGE-TIME MODEL 7 6 MARKt III VOLTAGE-TIME MODEL 10 6.1 Capacity degradation II 6,2 Allowance ’for time-dependent polarisation If 6,3...period is sub- divided into two or more segments in the model input data, in all of which the TM MS 1163 13 same current or resistor value operates as

  3. Embeddings and time evolution of the Schwarzschild wormhole

    CERN Document Server

    Collas, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We show how to embed spacelike slices of the Schwarzschild wormhole (or Einstein-Rosen bridge) in R^3. Graphical images of embeddings are given, including depictions of the dynamics of this non-traversable wormhole at constant Kruskal times up to, and beyond, the "pinching off" at Kruskal times \\pm1.

  4. Steady States of Infinite-Size Dissipative Quantum Chains via Imaginary Time Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangat, Adil A.; I, Te; Kao, Ying-Jer

    2017-07-01

    Directly in the thermodynamic limit, we show how to combine local imaginary and real-time evolution of tensor networks to efficiently and accurately find the nonequilibrium steady states (NESSs) of one-dimensional dissipative quantum lattices governed by a local Lindblad master equation. The imaginary time evolution first bypasses any highly correlated portions of the real-time evolution trajectory by directly converging to the weakly correlated subspace of the NESS, after which, real-time evolution completes the convergence to the NESS with high accuracy. We demonstrate the power of the method with the dissipative transverse field quantum Ising chain. We show that a crossover of an order parameter shown to be smooth in previous finite-size studies remains smooth in the thermodynamic limit.

  5. Reference results for time-like evolution up to $\\mathcal{O}(\\alpha_s^3)$

    CERN Document Server

    Bertone, Valerio; Nocera, Emanuele R

    2015-01-01

    We present high-precision numerical results for time-like Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi evolution in the $\\overline{\\rm MS}$ factorisation scheme, for the first time up to next-to-next-to-leading order accuracy in quantum chromodynamics. First, we scrutinise the analytical expressions of the splitting functions available in the literature, in both x and N space, and check their mutual consistency. Second, we implement time-like evolution in two publicly available, entirely independent and conceptually different numerical codes, in x and N space respectively: the already existing APFEL code, which has been updated with time-like evolution, and the new MELA code, which has been specifically developed to perform the study in this work. Third, by means of a model for fragmentation functions, we provide results for the evolution in different factorisation schemes, for different ratios between renormalisation and factorisation scales and at different final scales. Our results are collected in the forma...

  6. Time-scale invariances in preseismic electromagnetic radiation, magnetization and damage evolution of rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kawada

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the time-scale invariant changes in electromagnetic and mechanical energy releases prior to a rock failure or a large earthquake. The energy release processes are caused by damage evolutions such as crack propagation, motion of charged dislocation, area-enlargement of sheared asperities and repetitive creep-rate changes. Damage mechanics can be used to represent the time-scale invariant evolutions of both brittle and plastic damages. Irreversible thermodynamics applied to the damage mechanics reveals that the damage evolution produces the variations in charge, dipole and electromagnetic signals in addition to mechanical energy release, and yields the time-scale invariant patterns of Benioff electromagnetic radiation and cumulative Benioff strain-release. The irreversible thermodynamic framework of damage mechanics is also applicable to the seismo-magnetic effect, and the time-scale invariance is recognized in the remanent magnetization change associated with damage evolution prior to a rock failure.

  7. Time-evolution of dense hadronic matter in high energy heavy ion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otuka, Naohiko; Ohnishi, Akira [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Nara, Yasushi; Maruyama, Tomoyuki; Niita, Koji

    1997-05-01

    Time evolution of hadronic resonance matter in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions are studied in the framework of cascade models. We investigate the role of higher baryonic resonances during the time evolution of hot and dense hadronic matter at AGS energies. Although final hadronic spectrum can reproduced well with and without higher baryonic resonances, the inclusion of higher resonances is shown to prevent the temperature from going beyond 200 MeV. (author)

  8. Time-scale invariances in preseismic electromagnetic radiation, magnetization and damage evolution of rocks

    OpenAIRE

    Kawada, Y.; H. Nagahama; Nakamura, N.

    2007-01-01

    International audience; We investigate the time-scale invariant changes in electromagnetic and mechanical energy releases prior to a rock failure or a large earthquake. The energy release processes are caused by damage evolutions such as crack propagation, motion of charged dislocation, area-enlargement of sheared asperities and repetitive creep-rate changes. Damage mechanics can be used to represent the time-scale invariant evolutions of both brittle and plastic damages. Irreversible thermod...

  9. Two-time-scale population evolution on a singular landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Song; Jiao, Shuyun; Jiang, Pengyao; Ao, Ping

    2014-01-01

    Under the effect of strong genetic drift, it is highly probable to observe gene fixation or gene loss in a population, shown by singular peaks on a potential landscape. The genetic drift-induced noise gives rise to two-time-scale diffusion dynamics on the bipeaked landscape. We find that the logarithmically divergent (singular) peaks do not necessarily imply infinite escape times or biological fixations by iterating the Wright-Fisher model and approximating the average escape time. Our analytical results under weak mutation and weak selection extend Kramers's escape time formula to models with B (Beta) function-like equilibrium distributions and overcome constraints in previous methods. The constructed landscape provides a coherent description for the bistable system, supports the quantitative analysis of bipeaked dynamics, and generates mathematical insights for understanding the boundary behaviors of the diffusion model.

  10. Evolution of the Australian-Antarctic discordance since Miocene time

    OpenAIRE

    Marks, Karen M.; Stock, Joann M.; Quinn, Katherine J.

    1999-01-01

    In this study we chronicle the development of the Australian-Antarctic discordance (AAD), the crenelated portion of the Southeast Indian Ridge between ∼120° and 128°E, since anomaly 6y time (19 Ma). We reconstruct satellite-derived marine gravity fields and depth anomalies at selected times by first removing anomalies overlying seafloor younger than the selected age, and then rotating the remaining anomalies through improved finite rotations based on a very detailed set of magnetic anomaly id...

  11. Discreteness of time in the evolution of the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faizal, Mir; Ali, Ahmed Farag; Das, Saurya

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we will first derive the Wheeler-DeWitt equation for the generalized geometry which occurs in M-theory. Then we will observe that M2-branes act as probes for this generalized geometry, and as M2-branes have an extended structure, their extended structure will limits the resolution to which this generalized geometry can be defined. We will demonstrate that this will deform the Wheeler-DeWitt equation for the generalized geometry. We analyze such a deformed Wheeler-DeWitt equation in the minisuperspace approximation, and observe that this deformation can be used as a solution to the problem of time. This is because this deformation gives rise to time crystals in our universe due to the spontaneous breaking of time reparametrization invariance.

  12. The gain in Thick GEM multipliers and its time-evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Alexeev, M; Bradamante, F; Bressan, A; Buechele, M; Chiosso, M; Ciliberti, P; Dalla Torre, S; Dasgupta, S; Denisov, O; Duic, V; Finger, M; Finger Jr, M; Fischer, H; Gobbo, B; Gregori, M; Herrmann, F; Koenigsmann, K; Levorato, S; Maggiora, A; Makke, N; Martin, A; Menon, G; Novakova, K; Novy, J; Panzieri, D; Pereira, F A; Santos, C A; Sbrizzai, G; Schiavon, P; Schopferer, S; Slunecka, M; Sozzi, F; Steiger, L; Sulc, M; Takekawa, S; Tessarotto, F; Veloso, J F C A

    2016-01-01

    In the context of a project to upgrade the gas photon detectors of COMPASS RICH-1, we have performed an R&D programme aimed to develop photon detectors based on multi-layer arrangements of thick GEM electron multipliers coupled to a CsI photoconverter. For this purpose, thick GEMs have been characterised in detail including the gain performance, its dependance on the geometrical parameters and its time-evolution, a feature exhibited by the gas detectors with open insulator surfaces. The variation due to this evolution drammatically depends on the parameters themselves. In the present article we summarise the outcomes of the studies dedicated to the thick GEM gain and its evolution versus time. We also include a qualitative model which accounts for the peculiar details of the observed thick GEM gain time-evolution.

  13. Evolution of Management Thought in the Medieval Times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, C. L.

    The medieval times witnessed progress toward the growth of larger and more complex organizations and the application of increasingly sophisticated management techniques. Feudalism contributed the concept of decentralization. The concepts evolved by the Catholic Church can scarcely be improved on and are very much pertinent to the management of…

  14. GrainGenes: Changing Times, Changing Databases, Digital Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The GrainGenes database is one of few agricultural databases that had an early start on the Internet and that has changed with the times. Initial goals were to collect a wide range of data relating to the developing maps and attributes of small grains crops, and to make them easily accessible. The ...

  15. Time Evolution of the Dynamical Variables of a Stochastic System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Pena, L.

    1980-01-01

    By using the method of moments, it is shown that several important and apparently unrelated theorems describing average properties of stochastic systems are in fact particular cases of a general law; this method is applied to generalize the virial theorem and the fluctuation-dissipation theorem to the time-dependent case. (Author/SK)

  16. Evolution of Management Thought in the Medieval Times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, C. L.

    The medieval times witnessed progress toward the growth of larger and more complex organizations and the application of increasingly sophisticated management techniques. Feudalism contributed the concept of decentralization. The concepts evolved by the Catholic Church can scarcely be improved on and are very much pertinent to the management of…

  17. The time evolution of the Bohmian Pilot Wave

    OpenAIRE

    Kozlowski, Miroslaw; Marciak-Kozlowska, Janina

    2004-01-01

    In this paper the Newton-Schrodinger-Bohm equation is solved for particles with m>M_P. It is shown that the Bohmian pilot wave for particles with m>M_P oscillates with frequency omega=tau^{-1}_P, where tau_P is the Planck time. Key words: Macroscopic particles; Pilot wave.

  18. Performances and recent evolutions of EMSC Real Time Information services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazet-Roux, G.; Godey, S.; Bossu, R.

    2009-04-01

    The EMSC (http://www.emsc-csem.org) operates Real Time Earthquake Information services for the public and the scientific community which aim at providing rapid and reliable information on the seismic-ity of the Euro-Mediterranean region and on significant earthquakes worldwide. These services are based on parametric data rapidly provided by 66 seismological networks which are automatically merged and processed at EMSC. A web page which is updated every minute displays a list and a map of the latest earthquakes as well as additional information like location maps, moment tensors solutions or past regional seismicity. Since 2004, the performances and the popularity of these services have dramatically increased. The number of messages received from the contributors and the number of published events have been multiplied by 2 since 2004 and by 1.6 since 2005 respectively. The web traffic and the numbers of users of the Earthquake Notification Service (ENS) have been multiplied by 15 and 7 respectively. In terms of performances of the ENS, the median dissemination time for Euro-Med events is minutes in 2008. In order to further improve its performances and especially the speed and robustness of the reception of real time data, EMSC has recently implemented a software named QWIDS (Quake Watch Information Distribution System) which provides a quick and robust data exchange system through permanent TCP connections. At the difference with emails that can sometimes be delayed or lost, QWIDS is an actual real time communication system that ensures the data delivery. In terms of hardware, EMSC imple-mented a high availability, dynamic load balancing, redundant and scalable web servers infrastructure, composed of two SUN T2000 and one F5 BIG-IP switch. This will allow coping with constantly increas-ing web traffic and the occurrence of huge peaks of traffic after widely felt earthquakes.

  19. Enhancements and Evolution of the Real Time Mission Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, M.; Blakeslee, R.; Hardin, D.; Hall, J.; He, Y.; Regner, K.

    2008-12-01

    The Real Time Mission Monitor (RTMM) is a visualization and information system that fuses multiple Earth science data sources, to enable real time decision-making for airborne and ground validation experiments. Developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center, RTMM is a situational awareness, decision-support system that integrates satellite imagery, radar, surface and airborne instrument data sets, model output parameters, lightning location observations, aircraft navigation data, soundings, and other applicable Earth science data sets. The integration and delivery of this information is made possible using data acquisition systems, network communication links, network server resources, and visualizations through the Google Earth virtual earth application. RTMM has proven extremely valuable for optimizing individual Earth science airborne field experiments. Flight planners, mission scientists, instrument scientists and program managers alike appreciate the contributions that RTMM makes to their flight projects. RTMM has received numerous plaudits from a wide variety of scientists who used RTMM during recent field campaigns including the 2006 NASA African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (NAMMA), 2007 Tropical Composition, Cloud, and Climate Coupling (TC4), 2008 Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) missions, the 2007-2008 NOAA-NASA Aerosonde Hurricane flights and the 2008 Soil Moisture Active-Passive Validation Experiment (SMAP-VEX). Improving and evolving RTMM is a continuous process. RTMM recently integrated the Waypoint Planning Tool, a Java-based application that enables aircraft mission scientists to easily develop a pre-mission flight plan through an interactive point-and-click interface. Individual flight legs are automatically calculated for altitude, latitude, longitude, flight leg distance, cumulative distance, flight leg time, cumulative time, and

  20. Floquet Topological Phases Driven by $\\mathcal{PT}$ Symmetric Nonunitary Time Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Dakyeong; Kawakami, Norio; Obuse, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    We study Floquet topological phases driven by $\\mathcal{PT}$ symmetric nonunitary time evolution in one dimension, based on an experimental setup of discrete-time quantum walks. We develop, for nonunitary time-evolution operators, a procedure to calculate topological invariants for Floquet topological phases and find that the bulk-edge correspondence gives correct predictions of the emergent edge states. These edge states make exponential growth of wavefunction amplitudes at specific positions with time controllable. Hereby, we propose that these phenomena inherent in open quantum systems are feasibly observed by present experiments of quantum walks in both classical and quantum regimes.

  1. Lie algebras for time evolution with applications from chaos studies to spintronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendler, Tim G.; Berrondo, Manuel; Beus, Ty; Sayer, Ryan T.; van Huele, Jean-Francois S.

    2012-10-01

    We illustrate the power of Lie algebras in computing the time evolution of quantum systems with time-dependent physical parameters. By factorizing the quantum mechanical time evolution operator and using the linear independence of the Lie algebra generators, we reduce the operator equations to systems of coupled ordinary differential equations of scalar functions applicable to a variety of dynamical systems. We use the results to explore the possibility of detecting chaos in quantum nonlinear oscillators based on criteria from classical chaos studies and to follow spin currents in time-dependent spin-orbit coupled media.

  2. Evolution, dispersal and replacement of American genotype dengue type 2 viruses in India (1956-2005): selection pressure and molecular clock analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep R P; Patil, Jayashri A; Cecilia, D; Cherian, Sarah S; Barde, Pradip V; Walimbe, Atul M; Yadav, Pragya D; Yergolkar, Prasanna N; Shah, Paresh S; Padbidri, Vasant S; Mishra, Akhilesh C; Mourya, Devendra T

    2010-03-01

    This study reports the phylogeny, selection pressure, genotype replacement and molecular clock analyses of many previously unstudied dengue type 2 virus (DENV-2) strains, isolated in India over a time span of almost 50 years (1956-2005). Analysis of complete envelope (E) gene sequences of 37 strains of DENV-2 from India, together with globally representative strains, revealed that the American genotype, which circulated predominantly in India during the pre-1971 period, was then replaced by the Cosmopolitan genotype. Two previously unreported amino acid residues, one in the American (402I) and one in the Cosmopolitan (126K) genotypes, known to be involved functionally in the cellular tropism of the virus, were shown to be under positive selection pressure. The rate of nucleotide substitution estimated for DENV-2 was 6.5x10(-4) substitutions per site year(-1), which is comparable with earlier estimates. The time to the most recent common ancestor of the pre-1971 Indian strains and the American genotype was estimated to be between 73 and 100 years (1905-1932), which correlates with the historical record of traffic between India and South America and suggests transportation of the virus from the Americas. Post-1971 Indian isolates formed a separate subclade within the Cosmopolitan genotype. The estimated time to the most recent common ancestor of the Indian Cosmopolitan strains was about 47 years, with further estimates indicating the migration of DENV-2 from India to countries across the Indian ocean between 1955 and 1966. Overall, the present study increases our understanding of the events leading to the establishment and dispersal of the two genotypes in India.

  3. Real-time evolution of quenched quantum systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeckel, Michael

    2009-06-24

    Detailed geometries in heterostructures allow for nonequilibrium transport measurements in correlated systems, pump-probe experiments for time-resolved study of many-body relaxation in molecules and solids and ultracold atom gases loaded onto optical lattices for high control of system parameters in real time. In all of these fields of research the nonequilibrium properties of a Fermi liquid can be relevant. A first approach to their understanding is the main content of this thesis. At the beginning I collect a variety of nonequilibrium phenomena and introduce to basic questions and concepts for their study. The key observation of this thesis, namely a characteristic mismatch of expectation values in equilibrium and nonequilibrium, is first illustrated for the squeezed oscillator. Afterwards, these observations are generalized to a larger class of one-particle models. Then the nonequilibrium behavior of a Fermi liquid is examined by analyzing the Fermi liquid phase of the Hubbard model in more than one dimension. After a sudden switch-on of a weak two-particle interaction to the noninteracting Fermi gas the relaxation of the many-body system is observed. For this purpose, the flow equation transformation is implemented for the Hubbard Hamiltonian. Then the discussion of the momentum distribution function and of the kinetic energy displays a three-step relaxation behavior of the Fermi liquid from the initial perturbation until thermalization is reached. In order to extend the study of sudden switching to arbitrary switching processes the calculation is repeated using the Keldysh perturbation theory. (orig.)

  4. Time in Redox Adaptation Processes: From Evolution to Hormesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mireille M. J. P. E. Sthijns

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Life on Earth has to adapt to the ever changing environment. For example, due to introduction of oxygen in the atmosphere, an antioxidant network evolved to cope with the exposure to oxygen. The adaptive mechanisms of the antioxidant network, specifically the glutathione (GSH system, are reviewed with a special focus on the time. The quickest adaptive response to oxidative stress is direct enzyme modification, increasing the GSH levels or activating the GSH-dependent protective enzymes. After several hours, a hormetic response is seen at the transcriptional level by up-regulating Nrf2-mediated expression of enzymes involved in GSH synthesis. In the long run, adaptations occur at the epigenetic and genomic level; for example, the ability to synthesize GSH by phototrophic bacteria. Apparently, in an adaptive hormetic response not only the dose or the compound, but also time, should be considered. This is essential for targeted interventions aimed to prevent diseases by successfully coping with changes in the environment e.g., oxidative stress.

  5. Plio-Pleistocene time evolution of the 100-ky cycle in marine paleoclimate records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeffrey; Maasch, Kirk A.

    1992-01-01

    To constrain theories for the dynamical evolution of global ice mass through the late Neogene, it is important to determine whether major changes in the record were gradual or rapid. Of particular interest is the evolution of the near 100-ky ice age cycle in the middle Pleistocene. We have applied a new technique based on multiple taper spectrum analysis which allows us to model the time evolution of quasi-periodic signals. This technique uses both phase and amplitude information, and enables us to address the question of abrupt versus gradual onset of the 100-ky periodicity in the middle Pleistocene.

  6. Entropy evolution of field with a time-varying frequency in the Jaynes-Cummings model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiu Changdong

    2012-01-01

    Following Jaynes-Cummings model, the evolution of the field entropy in the system of a two-level atom inter- acting with the single mode coherent field is investigated under rotating-wave approximation. The typical case -- the field frequency variance with time in the form of sine ω = ω0 + usin(wt) has been considered. The influences of the amplitude and angle frequency of the field frequency variance on entropy evolution of the field are discussed by numerical calculations. Calculation results indicate that the field frequency variance influences violently the behavior of field entropy evolution; the larger the amplitude of the field frequency variance is, the stronger the influence of the field frequency variance on the time evolution of field entropy is.

  7. Mineralization through geologic time: Evolution of continental crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veizer, Jan; Laznicka, Peter; Jansen, S. L.

    1988-01-01

    In analogy to living systems, geologic entities (e.g., rocks, mineral deposits, tectonic realms and domains) are involved in the process of perpetual generation and destruction (birth/death cycles). This results in time distribution patterns akin to age structures in living populations and the systematics is amenable to treatment by the concepts of population dynamics. Utilizing this theoretical approach, the survivorship patterns for major realms of the plate tectonic system, for consitutent rocks, and for the entombed mineral resources are predicted. The present inventory encompasses global economic accumulations of metals by geologic age. The deposits of these metals were assigned to nine broad genetic categories, with an attempt to relate each category to tectonic setting within the framework of global plate tectonics.

  8. Mineralization through geologic time: Evolution of continental crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veizer, Jan; Laznicka, Peter; Jansen, S. L.

    In analogy to living systems, geologic entities (e.g., rocks, mineral deposits, tectonic realms and domains) are involved in the process of perpetual generation and destruction (birth/death cycles). This results in time distribution patterns akin to age structures in living populations and the systematics is amenable to treatment by the concepts of population dynamics. Utilizing this theoretical approach, the survivorship patterns for major realms of the plate tectonic system, for consitutent rocks, and for the entombed mineral resources are predicted. The present inventory encompasses global economic accumulations of metals by geologic age. The deposits of these metals were assigned to nine broad genetic categories, with an attempt to relate each category to tectonic setting within the framework of global plate tectonics.

  9. Long Time Evolution of Populations under Selection and Vanishing Mutations

    KAUST Repository

    Raoul, Gaël

    2011-02-08

    In this paper, we consider a long time and vanishing mutations limit of an integro-differential model describing the evolution of a population structured with respect to a continuous phenotypic trait. We show that the asymptotic population is a steady-state of the evolution equation without mutations, and satisfies an evolutionary stability condition. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  10. A principal possibility for computer investigation of evolution of dynamical systems independent on time accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurzadyan, V.G. [Sapienza University of Rome, SIA, Rome (Italy); Alikhanian National Laboratory and Yerevan State University, Center for Cosmology and Astrophysics, Yerevan (Armenia); Harutyunyan, V.V. [Alikhanian National Laboratory and Yerevan State University, Center for Cosmology and Astrophysics, Yerevan (Armenia); Kocharyan, A.A. [Alikhanian National Laboratory and Yerevan State University, Center for Cosmology and Astrophysics, Yerevan (Armenia); Monash University, School of Mathematical Sciences, Clayton (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Extensive N-body simulations are among the key means for the study of numerous astrophysical and cosmological phenomena, so various schemes are developed for possibly higher accuracy computations. We demonstrate the principal possibility for revealing the evolution of a perturbed Hamiltonian system with an accuracy independent on time. The method is based on the Laplace transform and the derivation and analytical solution of an evolution equation in the phase space for the resolvent and using computer algebra. (orig.)

  11. Community replacement instead of drowning: Evolution of proto-North Atlantic carbonate-platform production in the run-up to of the Early Aptian OAE1a

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huck, Stefan; Stein, Melody; Adatte, Thierry; Föllmi, Karl B.; Immenhauser, Adrian; Heimhofer, Ulrich

    2014-05-01

    In the proto-North Atlantic realm (Lusitanian Basin, Portugal), carbonate platform production witnessed a major biotic turnover during the Early Aptian. Here, Urgonian-type rudist-nerinid dominated limestones were replaced by an orbitolinid-rich, oyster and serpulid-bearing marly facies. Integrated biostratigraphic-chemostratigraphic studies (Burla et al., 2008; Huck et al., 2012) provided evidence that this change coincides with the Early Aptian carbonate platform drowning episode in the run-up of oceanic anoxic event (OAE) 1a (transition D. forbesi to D. deshayesi ammonite zones), which has been recorded, from many localities in the Tethyan Ocean (Godet, 2013). Unlike Helvetic and Arabian carbonate platforms, which are characterised by a punctuated mass occurrence of orbitolinids marking the onset of the Aptian (Rawil and Hawar members, respectively), orbitolinids are an abundant constituent of the proto-North Atlantic carbonate platform community from the Late Barremian onwards. Orbitolinid-rich packstones and marls showing mass-occurrences of orbitolinids indicate repeated short-term installation of specific environmental conditions (eutrophication and/or deepening). In order to critically assess the influence of regional palaeoenvironmental against global palaeoclimatic and palaeoceanographic changes on the Proto-North Atlantic carbonate platform evolution, several outcrop successions in the Lusitanian Basin covering the critical interval have been investigated in detail with regard to facies and petrographic characteristics and geochemical (C-/O-isotopes, P content, bulk-rock and clay mineralogy,) inventory. The aims of the present study are three-fold: (1) to characterise proto-North Atlantic Lower Aptian shallow-water carbonates with respect to diagenetic history, microfacies, and distribution of fossils useful for the analysis of palaeoenvironments (corals, rudists and orbitolinids); (2) to evaluate the influence of sea-level and humidity changes

  12. Directed Replacement

    CERN Document Server

    Karttunen, L

    1996-01-01

    This paper introduces to the finite-state calculus a family of directed replace operators. In contrast to the simple replace expression, UPPER -> LOWER, defined in Karttunen (ACL-95), the new directed version, UPPER @-> LOWER, yields an unambiguous transducer if the lower language consists of a single string. It transduces the input string from left to right, making only the longest possible replacement at each point. A new type of replacement expression, UPPER @-> PREFIX ... SUFFIX, yields a transducer that inserts text around strings that are instances of UPPER. The symbol ... denotes the matching part of the input which itself remains unchanged. PREFIX and SUFFIX are regular expressions describing the insertions. Expressions of the type UPPER @-> PREFIX ... SUFFIX may be used to compose a deterministic parser for a ``local grammar'' in the sense of Gross (1989). Other useful applications of directed replacement include tokenization and filtering of text streams.

  13. The march of time and the "evolution" of change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. L. Van Tonder

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Change and organisational change are some of the most discussed topics of our time. Yet despite this, reported success rates for major organisational change initiatives remain exceptionally poor. Part of the problem is that contemporary change management practices assume a stable, unidimensional concept of organisational change. By contrast an analysis of organisational and systems thinking over the past five decades or so reveals an evolving concept of organisation and consequently invalidates the assumption of organisational change as a stable unidimensional concept. The evolving character of organisational change and its implications for change management practices are briefly indicated. Opsomming Verandering en organisasieverandering is van die mees besproke onderwerpe van ons tyd. Ten spyte hiervan bly die gerapporteerde sukseskoers vir primêre organisasieveranderingsinisiatiewe buitengewoon swak. Deel van die probleem is daarin geleë dat kontemporêre veranderingsbestuurspraktyke die aanname maak dat organisasieverandering ’n stabiele, een-dimensionele konsep is. In stryd hiermee toon ’n ontleding van organisasieen sisteemdenke oor die afgelope vyf of so dekades egter ’n ontwikkelende konsep van organisasie wat gevolglik die aanname van ’n stabiele en een-dimensionele organisasieveranderingskonsep ongeldig verklaar. Die ontwikkelende karakter van organisasieverandering en die implikasies daarvan vir veranderingsbestuurspraktyke word kortliks aangedui.

  14. Online evolution reconstruction from a single measurement record with random time intervals for quantum communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hua; Su, Yang; Wang, Rong; Zhu, Yong; Shen, Huiping; Pu, Tao; Wu, Chuanxin; Zhao, Jiyong; Zhang, Baofu; Xu, Zhiyong

    2017-10-01

    Online reconstruction of a time-variant quantum state from the encoding/decoding results of quantum communication is addressed by developing a method of evolution reconstruction from a single measurement record with random time intervals. A time-variant two-dimensional state is reconstructed on the basis of recovering its expectation value functions of three nonorthogonal projectors from a random single measurement record, which is composed from the discarded qubits of the six-state protocol. The simulated results prove that our method is robust to typical metro quantum channels. Our work extends the Fourier-based method of evolution reconstruction from the version for a regular single measurement record with equal time intervals to a unified one, which can be applied to arbitrary single measurement records. The proposed protocol of evolution reconstruction runs concurrently with the one of quantum communication, which can facilitate the online quantum tomography.

  15. Novel quantum description for nonadiabatic evolution of light wave propagation in time-dependent linear media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakehal, Halim; Maamache, Mustapha; Choi, Jeong Ryeol

    2016-02-01

    A simple elegant expression of nonadiabatic light wave evolution is necessary in order to have a deeper insight for complicated optical phenomena in light science as well as in everyday life. Light wave propagation in linear media which have time-dependent electromagnetic parameters is investigated by utilizing a quadratic invariant of the system. The time behavior of the nonadiabatic geometric phase of the waves that yield a cyclic nonadiabatic evolution is analyzed in detail. Various quantum properties of light waves in this situation, such as variances of electric and magnetic fields, uncertainty product, coherent and squeezed states, and their classical limits, are developed. For better understanding of our research, we applied our analysis in a particular case. The variances of the fields D and B are illustrated and their time behaviors are addressed. Equivalent results for the corresponding classical systems are deduced from the study of the time evolution of the appropriate coherent and squeezed states.

  16. Study of Simulation Method of Time Evolution of Atomic and Molecular Systems by Quantum Electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ichikawa, Kazuhide; Tachibana, Akitomo

    2014-01-01

    We discuss a method to follow step-by-step time evolution of atomic and molecular systems based on QED (Quantum Electrodynamics). Our strategy includes expanding the electron field operator by localized wavepackets to define creation and annihilation operators and following the time evolution using the equations of motion of the field operator in the Heisenberg picture. We first derive a time evolution equation for the excitation operator, the product of two creation or annihilation operators, which is necessary for constructing operators of physical quantities such as the electronic charge density operator. We then describe our approximation methods to obtain time differential equations of the electronic density matrix, which is defined as the expectation value of the excitation operator. By solving the equations numerically, we show "electron-positron oscillations", the fluctuations originated from virtual electron-positron pair creations and annihilations, appear in the charge density of a hydrogen atom an...

  17. Novel quantum description for nonadiabatic evolution of light wave propagation in time-dependent linear media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakehal, Halim; Maamache, Mustapha; Choi, Jeong Ryeol

    2016-02-05

    A simple elegant expression of nonadiabatic light wave evolution is necessary in order to have a deeper insight for complicated optical phenomena in light science as well as in everyday life. Light wave propagation in linear media which have time-dependent electromagnetic parameters is investigated by utilizing a quadratic invariant of the system. The time behavior of the nonadiabatic geometric phase of the waves that yield a cyclic nonadiabatic evolution is analyzed in detail. Various quantum properties of light waves in this situation, such as variances of electric and magnetic fields, uncertainty product, coherent and squeezed states, and their classical limits, are developed. For better understanding of our research, we applied our analysis in a particular case. The variances of the fields D and B are illustrated and their time behaviors are addressed. Equivalent results for the corresponding classical systems are deduced from the study of the time evolution of the appropriate coherent and squeezed states.

  18. Time evolution of electron structure in femtosecond heated warm dense molybdenum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recoules, V.; Dorchies, F.; Bouchet, J.; Fourment, C.; Leguay, P. M.; Cho, B. I.; Engelhorn, K.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Ozkan, C.; Tshentscher, T.; Harmand, M.; Toleikis, S.; Stormer, M.; Galtier, E.; Lee, H. J.; Nagler, B.; Heimann, P. A.; Gaudin, J.

    2015-11-01

    The time evolution of the electron structure is investigated in a molybdenum foil heated up to the warm dense matter regime by a femtosecond laser pulse, through time-resolved XANES spectroscopy. Spectra are measured with independent control of temperature and density. They are successfully compared with ab initio quantum molecular dynamic calculations and an analytical model. We demonstrate that the observed white line in the L3-edge reveals the time evolution of the electron density of state from the solid to the hot (a few eV) and expanding liquid.

  19. Timing and flux evolution of the galactic center magnetar SGR J1745–2900

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaspi, Victoria M.; Archibald, Robert F.; Bhalerao, Varun;

    2014-01-01

    We present the X-ray timing and spectral evolution of the Galactic Center magnetar SGR J1745–2900 for the first ∼4 months post-discovery using data obtained with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array and Swift observatories. Our timing analysis reveals a large increase in the magnetar spin-do...

  20. Usefulness of Time-Point Serum Cortisol and ACTH Measurements for the Adjustment of Glucocorticoid Replacement in Adrenal Insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Elise; Joubert, Michael; Trzepla, Géraldine; Parienti, Jean Jacques; Freret, Thomas; Vanthygem, Marie Christine; Desailloud, Rachel; Lefebvre, Hervé; Coquerel, Antoine; Reznik, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Adjustment of daily hydrocortisone dose on clinical criteria lacks sensitivity for fine tuning. Long term hydrocortisone (HC) over-replacement may lead to increased morbidity and mortality in patients with adrenal insufficiency (AI). Biochemical criteria may help detecting over- or under-replacement but have been poorly evaluated. Multicenter, institutional, pharmacokinetic study on ACTH and cortisol plasma profiles during HC replacement in 27 AI patients compared to 29 matched controls. All AI patients were administered HC thrice daily at doses of 6, 10 and 14 mg/m2/d. Blood samples were drawn hourly from 0800h to 1900h. The main outcome measures were: i) plasma peak cortisol and cortisol area under the curve (AUC) in AI patients compared to controls, ii) correlations between cortisol AUC vs single-point cortisol or ACTH decrease from baseline (ΔACTH) and iii) the predictive value of the two latters for obtaining AI patients' cortisol AUC in the control range. Cortisol peaks were observed 1h after each HC intake and a dose response was demonstrated for cortisol peak and cortisol AUC. The comparison of AI patients' cortisol AUC to controls showed that 81.5% AI patients receiving 6mg/m2/d were adequately replaced, whereas most patients receiving higher doses were over-replaced. The correlation coefficient between 1000h/1400h cortisol concentrations and 0800-1900h cortisol AUC were 0.93/0.88 respectively, whereas the 0800-1200h ΔACTH fairly correlated with 0800-1900h cortisol AUC (R = 0.57). ROC curve analysis indicated that the 1000h and 1400h cortisol concentrations best predicted over-replacement. Patients receiving a 6mg/m2 hydrocortisone daily dose exhibited the most physiological daytime cortisol profile. Single point plasma cortisol correlated with daytime cortisol AUC in AI patients. Although hydrocortisone dose should be currently determined on clinical grounds, our data suggest that single point plasma cortisol may be an adjunct for further hydrocortisone

  1. The Early-Time Evolution of the Cosmological Perturbations in f(R) Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Je-An; Wu, Yen-Ting; Chen, Pisin; Hwang, W-Y Pauchy

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of the linear cosmological perturbations in f(R) gravity, an alternative to dark energy for explaining the late-time cosmic acceleration. We numerically calculate the early-time evolution with an approximation we contrive to solve a problem that commonly appears when one solves the full evolution equations. With the approximate evolution equations we can fairly assess the effect of the gravity modification on the early-time evolution, thereby examining the validity of the general-relativity (GR) approximation that is widely used for the early universe. In particular, we compare the CMB photon density perturbation and the matter density perturbation obtained respectively by our approximation and the conventional GR approximation. We find that the effect of the gravity modification at early times in f(R) gravity may not be negligible. We conclude that to be self-consistent, in the f(R) theory one should employ the approximation presented in this paper instead of that of GR in the tr...

  2. Convergence for Imaginary Time Step evolution in the Fermi and Dirac seas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The convergence for the Imaginary Time Step (ITS) evolution with time step is investigated by performing the ITS evolution for the Schrdinger-like equation and the charge-conjugate Schrdinger-like equation deduced from Dirac equation for the single proton levels of 12C in both the Fermi and Dirac seas. For the guaranteed convergence of the ITS evolution to the "exact" results,the time step should be smaller than a "critical" time step Δtc for a given single-particle level. The "critical" time step Δtc is more sensitive to the quantum numbers |κ| than to the energy of the single-particle level. For the single-particle levels with the same κ,their "critical" time steps are in the same order. For the single-particle levels with similar energy,a relatively small (large) "critical" time step for larger (smaller) |κ| is needed. These conclusions can be used in the future self-consistent calculation to optimize the evolution procedure.

  3. Optical and Thermal Analysis of the Time Evolution of Curing in Resins by Photothermal Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Torres, P.; Zambrano-Arjona, M.; Aguilar, G.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.

    2012-11-01

    Four shades of a commercial visible-light curing dental resin are analyzed using photothermal techniques. The thermal effusivities of the dental resin shades before curing are measured using a variant of the conventional photoacoustic technique. The thermal diffusivities before and after curing are measured using infrared photothermal radiometry in the forward emission configuration. The time evolution process of the photocuring resin is monitored by photothermal radiometry in the forward and backward emission configurations. Inversion of the time evolution signal of the different configurations used permits one to obtain the time evolution of the thermal and optical properties during the photocuring. The thermal effusivity and thermal diffusivity exhibit exponential growth, while the optical absorption decreases exponentially due to the curing process. The relationship of these phenomena with the decrease of monomer concentration induced by the curing is discussed.

  4. Development of efficient time-evolution method based on three-term recurrence relation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akama, Tomoko, E-mail: a.tomo---s-b-l-r@suou.waseda.jp; Kobayashi, Osamu; Nanbu, Shinkoh, E-mail: shinkoh.nanbu@sophia.ac.jp [Department of Materials and Life Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Sophia University, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan)

    2015-05-28

    The advantage of the real-time (RT) propagation method is a direct solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation which describes frequency properties as well as all dynamics of a molecular system composed of electrons and nuclei in quantum physics and chemistry. Its applications have been limited by computational feasibility, as the evaluation of the time-evolution operator is computationally demanding. In this article, a new efficient time-evolution method based on the three-term recurrence relation (3TRR) was proposed to reduce the time-consuming numerical procedure. The basic formula of this approach was derived by introducing a transformation of the operator using the arcsine function. Since this operator transformation causes transformation of time, we derived the relation between original and transformed time. The formula was adapted to assess the performance of the RT time-dependent Hartree-Fock (RT-TDHF) method and the time-dependent density functional theory. Compared to the commonly used fourth-order Runge-Kutta method, our new approach decreased computational time of the RT-TDHF calculation by about factor of four, showing the 3TRR formula to be an efficient time-evolution method for reducing computational cost.

  5. Knee Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... need knee replacement surgery usually have problems walking, climbing stairs, and getting in and out of chairs. Some ... a total living space on one floor since climbing stairs can be difficult. Install safety bars or a ...

  6. Replacing penalties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaly Stepashin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available УДК 343.24The subject. The article deals with the problem of the use of "substitute" penalties.The purpose of the article is to identify criminal and legal criteria for: selecting the replacement punishment; proportionality replacement leave punishment to others (the formalization of replacement; actually increasing the punishment (worsening of legal situation of the convicted.Methodology.The author uses the method of analysis and synthesis, formal legal method.Results. Replacing the punishment more severe as a result of malicious evasion from serving accused designated penalty requires the optimization of the following areas: 1 the selection of a substitute punishment; 2 replacement of proportionality is serving a sentence other (formalization of replacement; 3 ensuring the actual toughening penalties (deterioration of the legal status of the convict. It is important that the first two requirements pro-vide savings of repression in the implementation of the replacement of one form of punishment to others.Replacement of punishment on their own do not have any specifics. However, it is necessary to compare them with the contents of the punishment, which the convict from serving maliciously evaded. First, substitute the punishment should assume a more significant range of restrictions and deprivation of certain rights of the convict. Second, the perfor-mance characteristics of order substitute the punishment should assume guarantee imple-mentation of the new measures.With regard to replacing all forms of punishment are set significant limitations in the application that, in some cases, eliminates the possibility of replacement of the sentence, from serving where there has been willful evasion, a stricter measure of state coercion. It is important in the context of the topic and the possibility of a sentence of imprisonment as a substitute punishment in cases where the original purpose of the strict measures excluded. It is noteworthy that the

  7. Application of generalized operator representation in the time evolution of quantum systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Rui; Liu, Xiangyuan; Song, Jun

    2016-10-01

    We have systematically explored the application of generalized operator representation including P-, W-, and Husimi representation in the time evolution of quantum systems. In particular, by using the method of differentiation within an ordered product of operators, we give the normally and antinormally ordered forms of the integral kernels of Husimi operator representations and its corresponding formulations. By making use of the generalized operator representation, we transform exponentially complex operator equations into tractable phase-space equations. As a simple application, the time evolution equation of Husimi function in the amplitude dissipative channel is clearly obtained.

  8. Space-time evolution of ultrarelativistic quantum dipoles in quantum electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blok, B.

    2004-09-01

    We discuss space-time evolution of ultrarelativistic quantum dipole in QED. We show that the space-time evolution can be described, in a certain approximation, by means of a regularized wave function, whose parameters are determined by the process of the dipole creation by a local current. Using these wave functions, we derive the dipole expansion law that is found to coincide parametrically in the leading order with the one suggested by G. R. Farrar et al. (G. R. Farrar, H. Liu, L. Frankfurt and M. Strikman, Phys. Rev. Lett, Vol.61, p.686, 1988).

  9. Towards investigation of evolution of dynamical systems with independence of time accuracy: more classes of systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurzadyan, V.G. [SIA, Sapienza University of Rome (Italy); Alikhanian National Laboratory and Yerevan State University, Center for Cosmology and Astrophysics, Yerevan (Armenia); Kocharyan, A.A. [Alikhanian National Laboratory and Yerevan State University, Center for Cosmology and Astrophysics, Yerevan (Armenia); Monash University, School of Mathematical Sciences, Clayton (Australia)

    2015-07-15

    The recently developed method (Paper 1) enabling one to investigate the evolution of dynamical systems with an accuracy not dependent on time is developed further. The classes of dynamical systems which can be studied by that method are much extended, now including systems that are: (1) non-Hamiltonian, conservative; (2) Hamiltonian with time-dependent perturbation; (3) non-conservative (with dissipation). These systems cover various types of N-body gravitating systems of astrophysical and cosmological interest, such as the orbital evolution of planets, minor planets, artificial satellites due to tidal, non-tidal perturbations and thermal thrust, evolving close binary stellar systems, and the dynamics of accretion disks. (orig.)

  10. Following the rapid evolution of the central star of the Stingray Nebula in real time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reindl, Nicole

    2014-10-01

    SAO 244567 is an unusually fast evolving star. Within twenty years only, it has turned from a B-type supergiant into the central star of the Stingray nebula. Space and ground-based observations obtained over the last decades have revealed that its spectrum changes noticeably over just a few years, showing stellar evolution in real time. Previous analysis indicates it must be a low mass star and thus the observed fast evolution is in strong contradiction with canonical post-asymptotic giant branch (AGB) evolution. A late He-shell flash is able to account for the rapid evolution. This scenario would predict an evolution back to the AGB, e.g. a decrease of the effective temperature (which is already indicated by the FUSE observations in 2006) and an increase of luminosity. With COS spectroscopy we want to follow the evolution of the surface properties of SAO 244567 to verify this thesis. The very compact nebula of SAO 244567 makes it impossible to derive these parameters from optical spectra, because most of the photospheric lines are blended by nebular emission lines thus they are not suitable for a spectral analysis. The derived surface parameters will establish constraints for late thermal pulse evolutionary calculations. With these calculations we aim not only to explain the nature of SAO 244567, but they also will provide a deeper insight in the formation process of hydrogen deficient stars, which make up 25% of the post AGB-stars and white dwarfs.

  11. Introducing time delay in the evolution of new technology: the case study of nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgalis, Evangelos E.; Aifantis, Elias C.

    2013-12-01

    Starting with Feynman's "There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom" prophetic lecture at Caltech in the 1960s, the term "nanotechnology" was first coined in the scientific literature in the 1980s. This was followed by the unprecedented growth in the corresponding scientific field in 2000 due to the financial incentive provided by President Clinton in the US, followed up by similar efforts in Europe, Japan, China and Russia. Today, nanotechnology has become a driving force for economic development, with applications in all fields of engineering, information technology, transport and energy, as well as biology and medicine. Thus, it is important to forecast its future growth and evolution on the basis of two different criteria: (1) the government and private capital invested in related activities, and (2) the number of scientific publications and popular articles dedicated to this field. This article aims to extract forecasts on the evolution of nanotechnology, using the standard logistic equation that result in familiar sigmoid curves, as well as to explore the effect of time delay on its evolution. Time delay is commonly known from previous biological and ecological models, in which time lag is either already known or can be experimentally measured. In contrast, in the case of a new technology, we must first define the method for determining time delay and then interpret its existence and role. Then we describe the implications that time delay may have on the stability of the sigmoidal behavior of nanotechnology evolution and on the related oscillations that may appear.

  12. On the magnetic field evolution time-scale in superconducting neutron star cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passamonti, Andrea; Akgün, Taner; Pons, José A.; Miralles, Juan A.

    2017-08-01

    We revisit the various approximations employed to study the long-term evolution of the magnetic field in neutron star cores and discuss their limitations and possible improvements. A recent controversy on the correct form of the induction equation and the relevant evolution time-scale in superconducting neutron star cores is addressed and clarified. We show that this ambiguity in the estimation of time-scales arises as a consequence of nominally large terms that appear in the induction equation, but which are, in fact, mostly irrotational. This subtlety leads to a discrepancy by many orders of magnitude when velocity fields are absent or ignored. Even when internal velocity fields are accounted for, only the solenoidal part of the electric field contributes to the induction equation, which can be substantially smaller than the irrotational part. We also argue that stationary velocity fields must be incorporated in the slow evolution of the magnetic field as the next level of approximation.

  13. The Optimum Replacement of Weapon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiao; ZHANG Jin-chun

    2002-01-01

    The theory of LCC (Life Cycle Cost) is applied in this paper. The relation between the economic life of weapon and the optimum replacement is analyzed. The method to define the optimum replacement time of weapon is discussed.

  14. Time evolution of chiral phase transition at finite temperature and density in the linear sigma model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, K.; Koide, Tomoi; Maruyama, Masahiro [Tohoku Univ., Faculty of Science, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan)

    1999-08-01

    There are various approaches to nonequilibrium system. We use the projection operator method investigated by F. Shibata and N. Hashitsume on the linear sigma model at finite temperature and density. We derive a differential equation of the time evolution for the order parameter and pion number density in chiral phase transition. (author)

  15. Esophageal replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunisaki, Shaun M; Coran, Arnold G

    2017-04-01

    This article focuses on esophageal replacement as a surgical option for pediatric patients with end-stage esophageal disease. While it is obvious that the patient׳s own esophagus is the best esophagus, persisting with attempts to retain a native esophagus with no function and at all costs are futile and usually detrimental to the overall well-being of the child. In such cases, the esophagus should be abandoned, and the appropriate esophageal replacement is chosen for definitive reconstruction. We review the various types of conduits used for esophageal replacement and discuss the unique advantages and disadvantages that are relevant for clinical decision-making. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Losing track of the time: the chemical clock of prestellar core evolution in hydrodynamic simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szucs, L.; Glover, S.; Caselli, P.

    2016-05-01

    The ortho:para ratio of H2D+ is a proposed observational indicator of prestellar core ages, and thus a possible tool to determine the typical star formation time scale. The conversion of the measured ratio to an age estimate requires modelling of the chemical evolution. Such models usually consider static, one zone models of physical conditions. The relevant chemical time scales, however, are comparable to the dynamic time scale, therefore the history of gas might affect the ratio. To investigate the significance of gas dynamics and history on the spin-state ratio, we analyse prestellar cores formed in various environment in a hydrodynamic simulation. The fully time dependent, spatially resolved chemical evolution of the cores are computed using a state-of-art ortho:para and deuteration chemical network. The true ages are compared to the once indicated by the ortho:para ratio.

  17. Lightweight concrete with Algerian limestone dust. Part II: study on 50% and 100% replacement to normal aggregate at timely age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kitouni

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A control lightweight concrete (LWC mixture made with 50% and 100% of limestone as a replacement of coarse aggregates in weight was prepared. Limestone is used for economical and environmental concern. The concrete samples were cured at 65% relative humidity at 20 ºC. The compressive and flexural tensile strengths, elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio of hardened concrete were measured. Laboratory compressive and tensile strength tests results showed that LWC can be produced by the use of limestone. The aim of this study is twofold: one is to design a lightweight concrete with the use of limestone that will provide an advantage of reduction in dead weight of a structure; and second is to obtain a more economical LWC mixture with the use of limestone.

  18. Well-Posedness and Output Regulation for Implicit Time-Varying Evolution Variational Inequalities

    OpenAIRE

    Tanwani, Aneel; Brogliato, Bernard; Prieur, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    A class of evolution variational inequalities (EVIs), which comprises ordinary differential equations (ODEs) coupled with variational inequalities (VIs) associated with time-varying set-valued mappings, is proposed in this paper. We first study the conditions for existence and uniqueness of solutions. The central idea behind the proof is to rewrite the system dynamics as a differential inclusion which can be decomposed into a single-valued Lipschitz map, and a time-dependent maximal monotone ...

  19. Quantum evolution of scalar fields in Robertson-Walker space-time

    CERN Document Server

    Éboli, Oscar J P

    1995-01-01

    We study the \\lambda \\phi^4 field theory in a flat Robertson-Walker space-time using the functional Sch\\"odinger picture. We introduce a simple Gaussian approximation to analyze the time evolution of pure states and we establish the renormalizability of the approximation. We also show that the energy-momentum tensor in this approximation is finite once we consider the usual mass and coupling constant renormalizations.

  20. Multifrequency Acoustic Emissions (AE) for Monitoring the Time Evolution of Microprocesses within Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paparo, Gabriele; Gregori, Giovanni P.

    2003-03-01

    Microprocesses occur like chain reactions where bonds progressively yield. The temporal evolution can be tracked by multifrequency AE. Two principle ideas. One relies on time series of AE of increasingly lower frequency. The second compares time histories of every AE event (fixed frequency) with a lognormal distribution: deviations reveal additional parameters, and the tail results modulated by external effects, envisaging what triggers every AE. Natural environmental phenomena are effective feasibility tests, for subsequent laboratory implementation.

  1. Streamflow forecast uncertainty evolution and its effect on real-time reservoir operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lu; Singh, Vijay P.; Lu, Weiwei; Zhang, Junhong; Zhou, Jianzhong; Guo, Shenglian

    2016-09-01

    When employing streamflow forecasting in practical applications, such as reservoir operation, one important issue is to deal with the uncertainty involved in forecasting. Traditional studies dealing with the uncertainty in streamflow forecasting have been limited in describing the evolution of forecast uncertainty. This paper proposes a copula-based uncertainty evolution (CUE) model to describe the evolution of streamflow forecast uncertainty. The generated forecast uncertainty series fits the observed series well in terms of observed mean, standard deviation and skewness. Daily flow with forecast uncertainty are simulated and used to determine the effect of forecast uncertainty on real-time reservoir operation of the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR), China. Results show that using the forecast inflow coupled with the pre-release module for reservoir operation of TGR in flood season cannot increase the flood risk.

  2. A VHDL Core for Intrinsic Evolution of Discrete Time Filters with Signal Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwaltney, David A.; Dutton, Kenneth

    2005-01-01

    Evolution of a novel low-pass filter design has been presented along with an assessment of its capabilities. (1) Performed well with the two added sines used as input during the evolution. (2) Also performs well when the input includes more sine at frequencies between the two used during evolution. (3) Fails to perform when input is a sine sweep with wider bandwidth. (4) This illustrates the importance of designing the evolutionary process to be representative of the environment that will be seen by the evolved design during deployment. The use of non-standard operators and fewer resources should allow the EMVCore to implement more compact representations of digital filters and to provide fault tolerance by implementing a new solution in the remaining tiles after some are damaged. The EMVCore can be used to implement standard discrete time filters in addition to evolved components.

  3. Time dependent couplings in the dark sector: from background evolution to nonlinear structure formation

    CERN Document Server

    Baldi, Marco

    2010-01-01

    We present a complete numerical study of cosmological models with a time dependent coupling between the dark energy component driving the present accelerated expansion of the Universe and the Cold Dark Matter (CDM) fluid. Depending on the functional form of the coupling strength, these models show a range of possible intermediate behaviors between the standard LCDM background evolution and the widely studied case of interacting dark energy models with a constant coupling. These different background evolutions play a crucial role in the growth of cosmic structures, and determine strikingly different effects of the coupling on the internal dynamics of nonlinear objects. By means of a suitable modification of the cosmological N-body code GADGET-2 we have performed a series of high-resolution N-body simulations of structure formation in the context of interacting dark energy models with variable couplings. Depending on the type of background evolution, the halo density profiles are found to be either less or more...

  4. Tracking Time Evolution of Collective Attention Clusters in Twitter: Time Evolving Nonnegative Matrix Factorisation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shota Saito

    Full Text Available Micro-blogging services, such as Twitter, offer opportunities to analyse user behaviour. Discovering and distinguishing behavioural patterns in micro-blogging services is valuable. However, it is difficult and challenging to distinguish users, and to track the temporal development of collective attention within distinct user groups in Twitter. In this paper, we formulate this problem as tracking matrices decomposed by Nonnegative Matrix Factorisation for time-sequential matrix data, and propose a novel extension of Nonnegative Matrix Factorisation, which we refer to as Time Evolving Nonnegative Matrix Factorisation (TENMF. In our method, we describe users and words posted in some time interval by a matrix, and use several matrices as time-sequential data. Subsequently, we apply Time Evolving Nonnegative Matrix Factorisation to these time-sequential matrices. TENMF can decompose time-sequential matrices, and can track the connection among decomposed matrices, whereas previous NMF decomposes a matrix into two lower dimension matrices arbitrarily, which might lose the time-sequential connection. Our proposed method has an adequately good performance on artificial data. Moreover, we present several results and insights from experiments using real data from Twitter.

  5. Tracking Time Evolution of Collective Attention Clusters in Twitter: Time Evolving Nonnegative Matrix Factorisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Shota; Hirata, Yoshito; Sasahara, Kazutoshi; Suzuki, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    Micro-blogging services, such as Twitter, offer opportunities to analyse user behaviour. Discovering and distinguishing behavioural patterns in micro-blogging services is valuable. However, it is difficult and challenging to distinguish users, and to track the temporal development of collective attention within distinct user groups in Twitter. In this paper, we formulate this problem as tracking matrices decomposed by Nonnegative Matrix Factorisation for time-sequential matrix data, and propose a novel extension of Nonnegative Matrix Factorisation, which we refer to as Time Evolving Nonnegative Matrix Factorisation (TENMF). In our method, we describe users and words posted in some time interval by a matrix, and use several matrices as time-sequential data. Subsequently, we apply Time Evolving Nonnegative Matrix Factorisation to these time-sequential matrices. TENMF can decompose time-sequential matrices, and can track the connection among decomposed matrices, whereas previous NMF decomposes a matrix into two lower dimension matrices arbitrarily, which might lose the time-sequential connection. Our proposed method has an adequately good performance on artificial data. Moreover, we present several results and insights from experiments using real data from Twitter.

  6. The effect of education and supervised exercise vs. education alone on the time to total hip replacement in patients with severe hip osteoarthritis. A randomized clinical trial protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Carsten; Roos, Ewa M.; Kjærsgaard-Andersen, Per

    2013-01-01

    measures are the five subscales of the Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, physical activity (UCLA activity score), and patient’s global perceived effect. Other measures include pain after exercise, joint-specific adverse events, exercise adherence, general health status (EQ-5D-5L), mechanical...... muscle function and performance in physical tests. A cost-effectiveness analysis will also be performed. Discussion: To our knowledge, this is the first randomized clinical trial comparing a patient education plus supervised exercise program to patient education alone in hip osteoarthritis patients...... replacement is considered. We hypothesize that the time to hip replacement can be postponed in patients with severe hip osteoarthritis following participation in a patient education and supervised exercise program when compared to patients receiving patient education alone. Methods/design: A prospective...

  7. On a link between a species survival time in an evolution model and the Bessel distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Guiol, Herve; Schinazi, Rinaldo B

    2011-01-01

    We consider a stochastic model for species evolution. A new species is born at rate lambda and a species dies at rate mu. A random number, sampled from a given distribution F, is associated with each new species at the time of birth. Every time there is a death event, the species that is killed is the one with the smallest fitness. We consider the (random) survival time of a species with a given fitness f. We show that the survival time distribution depends crucially on whether ff_c where f_c is a critical fitness that is computed explicitly.

  8. Time Evolution Caused by Hamiltonian Composed of Quadratic Combination of Canonical Operators and Time-Dependent Two-Mode Fresnel Operator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Hong-Yi; LU Hai-Liang

    2006-01-01

    We show that the time-dependent two-mode Fresnel operator is just the time-evolutional unitary operator governed by the Hamiltonian composed of quadratic combination of canonical operators in the way of exhibiting SU(1,1)algebra. This is an approach for obtaining the time-dependent Hamiltonian from the preassigned time evolution in classical phase space, an approach which is in contrast to Lewis-Riesenfeld's invariant operator theory of treating time-dependent harmonic oscillators.

  9. Aspects of late-time evolution in mimetic F(R) gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikonomou, V. K.

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate how to describe in an unified way early and late-time acceleration in the context of mimetic F(R) gravity. As we show, an exponential F(R) gravity model has appealing features, with regard to unification and we perform an analysis of the late-time evolution. The resulting picture is interesting since in the mimetic case, certain pathologies of some ordinary F(R) models are remedied in a consistent way, owing to the presence of the mimetic potential and the Lagrange multiplier. We quantify the late-time evolution analysis by studying the scaled dark energy density, the dark energy equation of state and the total effective equation of state, and as we show the late-time evolution is crucially affected by the functional form of the F(R) gravity. It is intriguing that the most appealing case corresponds to the exponential F(R) gravity which unifies late- and early-time acceleration. Finally, we study the behavior of the effective gravitational constant and the growth factor, and as we show, significant differences between the mimetic and ordinary F(R) exponential model are spotted in the growth factor.

  10. Evolution of localized states in Lieb lattices under time-dependent magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, J. D.; Maceira, I. A.; Dias, R. G.

    2016-11-01

    We study the slow time evolution of localized states of the open-boundary Lieb lattice when a magnetic flux is applied perpendicularly to the lattice and increased linearly in time. In this system, Dirac cones periodically disappear, reappear, and touch the flat band as the flux increases. We show that the slow time evolution of a localized state in this system is analogous to that of a zero-energy state in a three-level system whose energy levels intersect periodically and that this evolution can be mapped into a classical precession motion with a precession axis that rotates as times evolves. Beginning with a localized state of the Lieb lattice, as the magnetic flux is increased linearly and slowly, the evolving state precesses around a state with a small itinerant component and the amplitude of its localized component oscillates around a constant value (below but close to 1), except at multiples of the flux quantum where it may vary sharply. This behavior reflects the existence of an electric field (generated by the time-dependent magnetic field) which breaks the C4 symmetry of the constant flux Hamiltonian.

  11. Aspects of Late-time Evolution in Mimetic $F(R)$ Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Oikonomou, V K

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate how to describe in an unified way early and late-time acceleration in the context of mimetic $F(R)$ gravity. As we show, an exponential $F(R)$ gravity model has appealing features, with regard to unification, and we perform an analysis of the late-time evolution. The resulting picture is interesting since in the mimetic case, certain pathologies of some ordinary $F(R)$ models are remedied in a consistent way, owing to the presence of the mimetic potential and the Lagrange multiplier. We quantify the late-time evolution analysis by studying the scaled dark energy density, the dark energy equation of state and the total effective equation of state, and as we show the late-time evolution is crucially affected by the functional form of the $F(R)$ gravity. It is intriguing that the most appealing case corresponds to the exponential $F(R)$ gravity which unifies late and early-time acceleration. Finally, we study the behavior of the effective gravitational constant and the growth factor, and as we sho...

  12. Evolution of CO lines in time-dependent models of protostellar disk formation

    CERN Document Server

    Harsono, Daniel; Bruderer, Simon; van Dishoeck, Ewine F; Kristensen, Lars E

    2013-01-01

    (Abridged) Star and planet formation theories predict an evolution in the density, temperature, and velocity structure as the envelope collapses and forms an accretion disk. The aim of this work is to model the evolution of the molecular excitation, line profiles, and related observables during low-mass star formation. Specifically, the signatures of disks during the deeply embedded stage are investigated. Semi-analytic 2D axisymmetric models have been used to describe the evolution of the density, stellar mass, and luminosity from the pre-stellar to the T-Tauri phase. A full radiative transfer calculation is carried out to accurately determine the time-dependent dust temperatures and CO abundance structure. We present non-LTE near-IR, FIR, and submm lines of CO have been simulated at a number of time steps. In contrast to the dust temperature, the CO excitation temperature derived from submm/FIR lines does not vary during the protostellar evolution, consistent with C18O observations obtained with Herschel an...

  13. Faster convergence of imaginary time evolution tensor network algorithms by recycling the environment

    CERN Document Server

    Phien, Ho N; Vidal, Guifré

    2014-01-01

    We propose an environment recycling scheme to speed up a class of tensor network algorithms that produce an approximation to the ground state of a local Hamiltonian by simulating an evolution in imaginary time. Specifically, we consider the time-evolving block decimation (TEBD) algorithm applied to infinite systems in 1D and 2D, where the ground state is encoded, respectively, in a matrix product state (MPS) and in a projected entangled-pair state (PEPS). An important ingredient of the TEBD algorithm (and a main computational bottle-neck, especially with PEPS in 2D) is the computation of the so-called environment, which is used to determine how to optimally truncate the bond indices of the tensor network so that their dimension is kept constant. In current algorithms, the environment is computed at each step of the imaginary time evolution, to account for the changes that the time evolution introduces in the many-body state represented by the tensor network. Our key insight is that close to convergence, most ...

  14. Time of Initiating Enzyme Replacement Therapy Affects Immune Abnormalities and Disease Severity in Patients with Gaucher Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioanou, Chidima; Plassmeyer, Matthew; Ryherd, Mark; Kozhaya, Lina; Austin, Lauren; Abidoglu, Cem; Unutmaz, Derya; Alpan, Oral; Goker-Alpan, Ozlem

    2016-01-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) patients often present with abnormalities in immune response that may be the result of alterations in cellular and/or humoral immunity. However, how the treatment and clinical features of patients impact the perturbation of their immunological status remains unclear. To address this, we assessed the immune profile of 26 GD patients who were part of an enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) study. Patients were evaluated clinically for onset of GD symptoms, duration of therapy and validated outcome measures for ERT. According to DS3 disease severity scoring system criteria, they were assigned to have mild, moderate or severe GD. Flow cytometry based immunophenotyping was performed to analyze subsets of T, B, NK, NKT and dendritic cells. GD patients showed multiple types of immune abnormalities associated to T and B lymphocytes with respect to their subpopulations as well as memory and activation markers. Skewing of CD4 and CD8 T cell numbers resulting in lower CD4/CD8 ratio and an increase in overall T cell activation were observed. A decrease in the overall B cells and an increase in NK and NKT cells were noted in the GD patients compared to controls. These immune alterations do not correlate with GD clinical type or level of biomarkers. However, subjects with persistent immune alterations, especially in B cells and DCs correlate with longer delay in initiation of ERT (ΔTX). Thus, while ERT may reverse some of these immune abnormalities, the immune cell alterations become persistent if therapy is further delayed. These findings have important implications in understanding the immune disruptions before and after treatment of GD patients. PMID:27942037

  15. Holonomy Spin Foam Models: Boundary Hilbert spaces and Time Evolution Operators

    CERN Document Server

    Dittrich, Bianca; Kaminski, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    In this and the companion paper a novel holonomy formulation of so called Spin Foam models of lattice gauge gravity are explored. After giving a natural basis for the space of simplicity constraints we define a universal boundary Hilbert space, on which the imposition of different forms of the simplicity constraints can be studied. We detail under which conditions this Hilbert space can be mapped to a Hilbert space of projected spin networks or an ordinary spin network space. These considerations allow to derive the general form of the transfer operators which generates discrete time evolution. We will describe the transfer operators for some current models on the different boundary Hilbert spaces and highlight the role of the simplicity constraints determining the concrete form of the time evolution operators.

  16. Stellar evolution in real time: The exciting star of the Stingray nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reindl, N.; Rauch, T.; Parthasarathy, M.; Kruk, J. W.

    2014-04-01

    SAO 244567 (Hen 3-1357) was classified as a B-type supergiant in the 1970s. Within twenty years only, nebula emission lines became visible in the ultraviolet and optical wavelength range. Imaging in 1994 showed that SAO 244567 had become the central star of the bi-polar Stingray nebula. Prominent P-Cygni profiles that were exhibited in the first ultraviolet spectra from 1988 became weaker with time, but can still be seen in the FUSE spectrum in 2006. Recent observations show that the rapid evolution of this enigmatic star is still going on. For the first time, we performed a comprehensive spectral analysis by means of state-of-the NLTE models for static and expanding atmospheres based on all available spectra from 1988 until 2006. We determined the temporal evolution of its effective temperature, surface gravity, mass-loss rate, and photospheric abundances. We discuss possible single- and binary-star evolutionary scenarios.

  17. Time evolution of superradiant instabilities for charged black holes in a cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Degollado, Juan Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Frequency domain studies have recently demonstrated that charged scalar fields exhibit fast growing superradiant instabilities when interacting with charged black holes in a cavity. Here, we present a time domain analysis of the long time evolution of test charged scalar field configurations on the Reissner-Nordstr\\"om background, with or without a mirror-like boundary condition. Initial data is taken to be either a Gaussian wave packet or a regularised (near the horizon) quasi-bound state. Then, Fourier transforming the data obtained in the evolution confirms the results obtained in the frequency domain analysis, in particular for the fast growing modes. We show that spherically symmetric (l=0) modes have even faster growth rates than the l=1 modes for `small' field charge. Thus, our study confirms that this setup is particularly promising for considering the non-linear development of the superradiant instability, since the fast growth makes the signal overcome the numerical error that dominates for small gr...

  18. Real-time evolution of strongly coupled fermions driven by dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, E.; Banerjee, D.; Chandrasekharan, S.; Wiese, U.-J.

    2016-09-01

    We consider the real-time evolution of a strongly coupled system of lattice fermions whose dynamics is driven entirely by dissipative Lindblad processes, with linear or quadratic quantum jump operators. The fermion 2-point functions obey a closed set of differential equations, which can be solved with linear algebra methods. The staggered occupation order parameter of the t- V model decreases exponentially during the dissipative time evolution. The structure factor associated with the various Fourier modes shows the slowing down of low-momentum modes, which is due to particle number conservation. The processes with nearest-neighbor-dependent Lindblad operators have a decay rate that is proportional to the coordination number of the spatial lattice.

  19. Sobolev gradient approach for the time evolution related to energy minimization of Ginzburg-Landau functionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Nauman; Sial, Sultan; Siddiqi, Shahid S.

    2009-04-01

    The Sobolev gradient technique has been discussed previously in this journal as an efficient method for finding energy minima of certain Ginzburg-Landau type functionals [S. Sial, J. Neuberger, T. Lookman, A. Saxena, Energy minimization using Sobolev gradients: application to phase separation and ordering, J. Comput. Phys. 189 (2003) 88-97]. In this article a Sobolev gradient method for the related time evolution is discussed.

  20. Time Evolution of Thermo-Mechanically and Chemically Coupled Magma Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozimek, C.; Karlstrom, L.; Erickson, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Complexity in the volcanic eruption cycle reflects time variation both of magma inputs to the crustal plumbing system and of crustal melt storage zones (magma chambers). These data include timing and volumes of eruptions, as well as erupted compositions. Thus models must take into account the coupled nature of physical attributes. Here we combine a thermo-mechanical model for magma chamber growth and pressurization with a chemical model for evolving chamber compositions, in the limit of rapid mixing, to study controls on eruption cycles and compositions through time. We solve for the mechanical evolution of a 1D magma chamber containing melt, crystals and bubbles, in a thermally evolving and viscoelastic crust. This pressure and temperature evolution constrains the input values of a chemical box model (Lee et al., 2013) that accounts for recharge, eruption, assimilation and fractional crystallization (REAFC) within the chamber. We plan to study the influence of melt supply, input composition, and chamber depth eruptive fluxes and compositions. Ultimately we will explore multiple chambers coupled by elastic-walled dikes. We expect that this framework will facilitate self-consistent inversion of long-term eruptive histories in terms of magma transport physics. Lee, C.-T. A., Lee, T.-C., Wu, C.-T., 2013. Modeling the compositional evolution of recharging, evacuating, and fractionating (REFC) magma chambers: Implications for differentiationof arc magmas. Geochemica Cosmochimica Acta, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gca.2013.08.009.

  1. To Compare Time-Weighted Graphs to Evaluate the Inclination of the Acetabular Component of Patients Who Had Total Hip Replacement Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leman Tomak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Time-weighted graphs are used to detect small shifts in statistical process control. The aim of this study is to evaluate the inclination of the acetabular component with CUmulative SUM (CUSUM chart, Moving Average (MA chart, and Exponentially Weighted Moving Average (EWMA chart. The data were obtained directly from thirty patients who had undergone total hip replacement surgery at Ondokuz Mayis University, Faculty of Medicine. The inclination of the acetabular component of these people, after total hip replacement, was evaluated. CUSUM chart, Moving Average chart, and Exponentially Weighted Moving Average were used to evaluate the quality control process of acetabular component inclination. MINITAB Statistical Software 15.0 was used to generate these control charts. The assessment done with time-weighted charts revealed that the acetabular inclination angles were settled within control limits and the process was under control. It was determined that the change within the control limits had a random pattern. As a result of this study it has been obtained that time-weighted quality control charts which are used mostly in the field of industry can also be used in the field of medicine. It has provided us with a faster visual decision.

  2. Morphology evolution of gold nanoparticles as function of time, temperature, and Au(III)/sodium ascorbate molar ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priolisi, Ornella; Fabrizi, Alberto; Deon, Giovanna; Bonollo, Franco; Cattini, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    In this work the morphology evolution of Au nanoparticles (AuNPs), obtained by direct reduction, was studied as a function of time, temperature, and Au(III)/sodium ascorbate molar ratio. The NPs morphology was examined by transmission electron microscope with image analysis, while time evolution was investigated by visible and near-infrared absorption spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering. It is found that initially formed star-like NPs transform in more spheroidal particles and the evolution appears more rapid by increasing the temperature while a large amount of reducing agent prevents the remodeling of AuNPs. An explication of morphology evolution is proposed.

  3. Morphology evolution of gold nanoparticles as function of time, temperature, and Au(III)/sodium ascorbate molar ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priolisi, Ornella, E-mail: ornella.priolisi@depretto.gov.it [ITIS “De Pretto” (Italy); Fabrizi, Alberto, E-mail: fabrizi@gest.unipd.it [University of Padova, Department of Management and Engineering (Italy); Deon, Giovanna, E-mail: giovanna.deon@depretto-vi.it [ITIS “De Pretto” (Italy); Bonollo, Franco, E-mail: bonollo@gest.unipd.it [University of Padova, Department of Management and Engineering (Italy); Cattini, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.cattini@unimore.it [University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Department of Engineering Enzo Ferrari (Italy)

    2016-01-15

    In this work the morphology evolution of Au nanoparticles (AuNPs), obtained by direct reduction, was studied as a function of time, temperature, and Au(III)/sodium ascorbate molar ratio. The NPs morphology was examined by transmission electron microscope with image analysis, while time evolution was investigated by visible and near-infrared absorption spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering. It is found that initially formed star-like NPs transform in more spheroidal particles and the evolution appears more rapid by increasing the temperature while a large amount of reducing agent prevents the remodeling of AuNPs. An explication of morphology evolution is proposed.

  4. Stochastic analysis of the time evolution of laminar-turbulent bands of plane Couette flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland, Joran

    2015-11-01

    This article is concerned with the time evolution of the oblique laminar-turbulent bands of transitional plane Couette flow under the influence of turbulent noise. Our study is focused on the amplitude of modulation of turbulence (the bands). In order to guide the numerical study of the flow, we first perform an analytical and numerical analysis of a Stochastic Ginzburg-Landau (GL) equation for a complex order parameter. The modulus of this order parameter models the amplitude of modulation of turbulence. Firstly, we compute the autocorrelation function of said modulus once the band is established. Secondly, we perform a calculation of average and fluctuations around the exponential growth of the order parameter. This type of analysis is similar to the Stochastic Structural Stability Theory (S3T). We then perform numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations in order to confront these predictions with the actual behaviour of the bands. Computation of the autocorrelation function of the modulation of turbulence shows quantitative agreement with the model: in the established band regime, the amplitude of modulation follows an Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. In order to test the S3T predictions, we perform quench experiments, sudden decreases of the Reynolds number from uniform turbulence, in which modulation appears. We compute the average evolution of the amplitude of modulation and the fluctuations around it. We find good agreement between numerics and modeling. The average trajectory grows exponentially, at a rate clearly smaller than that of the formation of laminar holes. Meanwhile, the actual time evolution remains in a flaring envelope, centered on the average, and expanding at the same rate. These results provide further validation of the stochastic modeling for the time evolution of the bands for further studies. Besides, they stress on the difference between the oblique band formation and the formation of laminar holes.

  5. Best timing for replacement of membrane of ion-exchange membrane electrolyzer%离子膜电解槽的最佳换膜时机

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宏

    2012-01-01

    介绍了离子膜电解装置中离子膜的经济使用寿命,分析计算了更换离子膜的最佳时机。合理确定离子膜换膜时间,有利于离子膜制碱能源利用效率的提高,降低生产成本。%Introduced the economic life of the ion-exchange membrane in manufacture of ion-exchange membrane alkaline. Analyzed and calculated the best time to be replaced ion-exchange membrane in our company. The drop in market price of ion-exchange membrane causes changing ion-exchange membrane time ahead of time, improves energy utilization efficiency in manufacture of ion-exchange membrane caustic soda and reduces the production costs.

  6. Single-step propagators for calculation of time evolution in quantum systems with arbitrary interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonoskov, Ivan; Marklund, Mattias

    2016-05-01

    We propose and develop a general method of numerical calculation of the wave function time evolution in a quantum system which is described by Hamiltonian of an arbitrary dimensionality and with arbitrary interactions. For this, we obtain a general n-order single-step propagator in closed-form, which could be used for the numerical solving of the problem with any prescribed accuracy. We demonstrate the applicability of the proposed approach by considering a quantum problem with non-separable time-dependent Hamiltonian: the propagation of an electron in focused electromagnetic field with vortex electric field component.

  7. Real-time shape evolution of nanoimprinted polymer structures during thermal annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ronald L; Hu, Tengjiao; Soles, Christopher L; Lin, Eric K; Reano, Ronald M; Pang, Stella W; Casa, Diego M

    2006-08-01

    The real-time shape evolution of nanoimprinted polymer patterns is measured as a function of annealing time and temperature using critical dimension small-angle X-ray scattering (CD-SAXS). Periodicity, line width, line height, and sidewall angle are reported with nanometer resolution for parallel line/space patterns in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) both below and above the bulk glass transition temperature (T(G)). Heating these patterns below T(G) does not produce significant thermal expansion, at least to within the resolution of the measurement. However, above T(G) the fast rate of loss in pattern size at early times transitions to a reduced rate in longer time regimes. The time-dependent rate of polymer flow from the pattern into the underlying layer, termed pattern "melting", is consistent with a model of elastic recovery from stresses induced by the molding process.

  8. A note on voice timing and the evolution of connected speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourcin, Adrian

    2010-07-01

    Voice is a dominant component of everyday speech in all languages. The possibility is examined that its use may have evolved so that its timing in connected speech is ideal from the point of view of information theory-with voicing taking up 50% of the total speaking time. Initial measurements have been made of voice timing proportions using Laryngograph (EGG) signals as the basis of timing analyses. The results of these analyses for data from two groups of speakers are reported: single native speakers of each of 8 different languages; and 56 speakers of British English. The average 51% and 52% voice timing proportions that were found closely approximate the ideal of 50%. Implications of this finding for voice evolution are briefly discussed.

  9. Real-time evolution of a large-scale relativistic jet

    CERN Document Server

    Martí, Josep; Romero, Gustavo E; Sánchez-Sutil, Juan R; Muñoz-Arjonilla, Álvaro J

    2015-01-01

    Context. Astrophysical jets are ubiquitous in the Universe on all scales, but their large-scale dynamics and evolution in time are hard to observe since they usually develop at a very slow pace. Aims. We aim to obtain the first observational proof of the expected large-scale evolution and interaction with the environment in an astrophysical jet. Only jets from microquasars offer a chance to witness the real-time, full-jet evolution within a human lifetime, since they combine a 'short', few parsec length with relativistic velocities. Methods. The methodology of this work is based on a systematic recalibraton of interferometric radio observations of microquasars available in public archives. In particular, radio observations of the microquasar GRS 1758-258 over less than two decades have provided the most striking results. Results. Significant morphological variations in the extended jet structure of GRS 1758-258 are reported here that were previously missed. Its northern radio lobe underwent a major morphologi...

  10. The time evolution of cosmological redshift in non-standard dark energy models

    CERN Document Server

    Balbi, A

    2007-01-01

    The variation of the expansion rate of the universe with time produces an evolution in the cosmological redshift of distant sources (for example quasars), that might be directly observed (over a decade or so) by future ultra stable, high-resolution spectrographs (such as CODEX) coupled to extremely large telescopes (such as ESO's ELT). This would open a new window to explore the physical mechanism responsible for the current acceleration of the universe. We investigate the evolution of cosmological redshift from a variety of non-standard dark energy models, and compare it with simulated data based on realistic assumptions. We perform a Fisher matrix analysis, in order to estimate the expected constraints on the parameters of the models. We find that there are interesting prospects for constraining the parameters of non-standard dark energy models and for discriminating among competing candidates.

  11. Children of time: the extended synthesis and major metaphors of evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R. Brooks

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available It is time for an expansion and enrichment of evolutionary theory. The "back to the future" proposal contained herein is based on three postulates: 1 Neo-Darwinism is too impoverished for this task; 2 its predecessor, Darwinism, contained the necessary breadth of vision and metaphor to be the basis for an inclusive and unifying theory of biology; and 3 the necessary framework for this new stage in the evolution of evolutionary theory is largely in place. We make our case through the use of a number of metaphorical dualisms designed to help focus discussions toward a more cooperative and productive approach to the study of living systems. Along the way, we suggest a number of self-induced paradoxes in neo-Darwinian accounts of evolution that are resolved by our perspective.

  12. Electrocatalysts Prepared by Galvanic Replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Athanasios Papaderakis; Ioanna Mintsouli; Jenia Georgieva; Sotiris Sotiropoulos

    2017-01-01

    Galvanic replacement is the spontaneous replacement of surface layers of a metal, M, by a more noble metal, Mnoble, when the former is treated with a solution containing the latter in ionic form, according to the general replacement reaction: nM + mMnoblen+ → nMm+ + mMnoble. The reaction is driven by the difference in the equilibrium potential of the two metal/metal ion redox couples and, to avoid parasitic cathodic processes such as oxygen reduction and (in some cases) hydrogen evolution too...

  13. Educating My Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarter, Jill

    The search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) could succeed tomorrow, decades from now, or never. The nature of this scientific exploration is such that we cannot predict success on any timescale; we only know that if we do not search, we cannot succeed. Having spent my scientific career in this field, I know perhaps better than anyone that the researchers of tomorrow may hold the key. Thus I have an enormous and vested interest in trying to educate the next generation of scientists. Because SETI excites such enthusiasm in young and old alike, I have an excellent opportunity to capture hearts and minds and leverage this interest into science education at many levels. Astrobiology is the new banner for inter- and cross-disciplinary investigations aimed at answering the big question "Are we alone?" The story of cosmic evolution is one that scientists at the SETI Institute have been telling for decades. We have used it as the framework for developing supplementary materials for elementary and middle schools called Life In The Universe. Currently we are tackling a year-long curriculum called Voyages Through Time for ninth grade students. This curriculum is delivered on CD-ROM and supported by the web. It focuses on evolution as a theme and stresses the contributions made from all the traditionally isolated branches of science --- and by the way, it's fun! I am a product of the post-Sputnik era and the American emphasis on science and engineering education. In the New York City bedroom community where I grew up, every school bond issue passed at every election. So I am appalled at the difficulties, the impecuniousness, and bureaucratic nonsense our pilot and field test teachers encounter on a daily basis. I am also overjoyed that even under such unreasonable conditions, I meet enthusiastic teachers who care about their students and are dedicated to helping them achieve the best possible education. Not all students will become scientists, nor should they. However

  14. Time evolution of photon propagation in scattering and absorbing media: the Dynamic Radiative Transfer System

    CERN Document Server

    Georgakopoulos, A; Georgiou, E

    2016-01-01

    A new dynamic system approach to the problem of radiative transfer inside scattering and absorbing media is presented, directly based on firsthand physical principles. This method, the Dynamic Radiative Transfer System (DRTS), calculates accurately the time evolution of photon propagation in media of complex structure and shape. DRTS employs a dynamical system formality using a global sparse matrix which characterizes the physical, optical and geometrical properties of the material volume of interest. The new system state vector is generated by the above time-independent matrix, using simple matrix vector multiplication addition for each subsequent time step. DRTS simulation results are presented for 3D light propagation in different optical media, demonstrating greatly reduced computational cost and resource requirements compared to other methods. Flexibility of the method allows the integration of time-dependent sources, boundary conditions, different media and several optical phenomena like reflection and ...

  15. Space-time evolution of Gaussian wave packets through superlattices containing left-handed layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereyra, P; Romero-Serrano, M [Departamento de Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Azcapotzalco, Mexico DF (Mexico); Robledo-Martinez, A, E-mail: ppereyra@correo.azc.uam.m, E-mail: a.robledo@mailaps.or [Departamento de EnergIa, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Azcapotzalco, Mexico DF (Mexico)

    2009-05-01

    We study the space-time evolution of Gaussian electromagnetic wave packets moving through (L/R){sup n} superlattices, containing alternating layers of left and right-handed materials. We show that the time spent by the wave packet moving through arbitrary (L/R){sup n} superlattices are well described by the phase time. We show that in the particular case where the thicknesses d{sub L,R} and indices n{sub l,r} of the layers satisfy the condition d{sub L}|n{sub L}| = d{sub R}n{sub R}, the usual band structure becomes a sequence of isolated and equidistant peaks with negative phase times.

  16. Language at Three Timescales: The Role of Real-Time Processes in Language Development and Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurray, Bob

    2016-04-01

    Evolutionary developmental systems (evo-devo) theory stresses that selection pressures operate on entire developmental systems rather than just genes. This study extends this approach to language evolution, arguing that selection pressure may operate on two quasi-independent timescales. First, children clearly must acquire language successfully (as acknowledged in traditional evo-devo accounts) and evolution must equip them with the tools to do so. Second, while this is developing, they must also communicate with others in the moment using partially developed knowledge. These pressures may require different solutions, and their combination may underlie the evolution of complex mechanisms for language development and processing. I present two case studies to illustrate how the demands of both real-time communication and language acquisition may be subtly different (and interact). The first case study examines infant-directed speech (IDS). A recent view is that IDS underwent cultural to statistical learning mechanisms that infants use to acquire the speech categories of their language. However, recent data suggest is it may not have evolved to enhance development, but rather to serve a more real-time communicative function. The second case study examines the argument for seemingly specialized mechanisms for learning word meanings (e.g., fast-mapping). Both behavioral and computational work suggest that learning may be much slower and served by general-purpose mechanisms like associative learning. Fast-mapping, then, may be a real-time process meant to serve immediate communication, not learning, by augmenting incomplete vocabulary knowledge with constraints from the current context. Together, these studies suggest that evolutionary accounts consider selection pressure arising from both real-time communicative demands and from the need for accurate language development.

  17. Time evolution of snow regions and planet traps in an evolving protoplanetary disk

    CERN Document Server

    Baillié, Kévin; Pantin, Éric

    2015-01-01

    Aims. We track the time evolution of planet traps and snowlines in a viscously evolving protoplanetary disk using an opacity table that accounts for the composition of the dust material. Methods. We coupled a dynamical and thermodynamical disk model with a temperature-dependent opacity table (that accounts for the sublimation of the main dust components) to investigate the formation and evolution of snowlines and planet traps during the first million years of disk evolution. Results. Starting from a minimum mass solar nebula (MMSN), we find that the disk mid-plane temperature profile shows several plateaux (0.1-1 AU wide) at the different sublimation temperatures of the species that make up the dust. For water ice, the correspond- ing plateau can be larger than 1 AU, which means that this is a snow "region" rather than a snow "line". As a consequence, the surface density of solids in the snow region may increase gradually, not abruptly. Several planet traps and desert regions appear naturally as a result of a...

  18. On the definition of the time evolution operator for time-independent Hamiltonians in non-relativistic quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaku, Marcos; Coutinho, Francisco A. B.; Masafumi Toyama, F.

    2017-09-01

    The usual definition of the time evolution operator e-i H t /ℏ=∑n=0∞1/n ! (-i/ℏHt ) n , where H is the Hamiltonian of the system, as given in almost every book on quantum mechanics, causes problems in some situations. The operators that appear in quantum mechanics are either bounded or unbounded. Unbounded operators are not defined for all the vectors (wave functions) of the Hilbert space of the system; when applied to some states, they give a non-normalizable state. Therefore, if H is an unbounded operator, the definition in terms of the power series expansion does not make sense because it may diverge or result in a non-normalizable wave function. In this article, we explain why this is so and suggest, as an alternative, another definition used by mathematicians.

  19. Clues to the nature of SN 2009ip from photometric and spectroscopic evolution to late times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, M. L. [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Sand, D. J. [Physics Department, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States); Valenti, S.; Howell, D. A.; Parrent, J. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Halford, M.; Zaritsky, D. [Astronomy Department, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Bianco, F. [Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Rest, A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Dilday, B., E-mail: melissagraham@berkeley.edu [North Idaho College, 1000 W. Garden Avenue, Coeur d' Alene, ID 83814 (United States)

    2014-06-01

    We present time series photometric and spectroscopic data for the transient SN 2009ip from the start of its outburst in 2012 September until 2013 November. These data were collected primarily with the new robotic capabilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, a specialized facility for time domain astrophysics, and includes supporting high-resolution spectroscopy from the Southern Astrophysical Research Telescope, Kitt Peak National Observatory, and Gemini Observatory. Based on our nightly photometric monitoring, we interpret the strength and timing of fluctuations in the light curve as interactions between fast-moving ejecta and an inhomogeneous circumstellar material (CSM) produced by past eruptions of this massive luminous blue variable (LBV) star. Our time series of spectroscopy in 2012 reveals that, as the continuum and narrow Hα flux from CSM interactions declines, the broad component of Hα persists with supernova (SN)-like velocities that are not typically seen in LBVs or SN impostor events. At late times, we find that SN 2009ip continues to decline slowly, at ≲ 0.01 mag day{sup –1}, with small fluctuations in slope similar to Type IIn supernovae (SNe IIn) or SN impostors but no further LBV-like activity. The late-time spectrum features broad calcium lines similar to both late-time SNe and SN impostors. In general, we find that the photometric and spectroscopic evolution of SN 2009ip is more similar to SNe IIn than either continued eruptions of an LBV star or SN impostors but we cannot rule out a nonterminal explosion. In this context, we discuss the implications for episodic mass loss during the late stages of massive star evolution.

  20. An empirical study of cultural evolution: the development of European cooking from medieval to modern times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindenfors, Patrik

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We have carried out an empirical study of long-term change in European cookery to test if the development of this cultural phenomenon matches a general hypothesis about cultural evolution: that human cultural change is characterized by cumulativity. Data from seven cookery books, evenly spaced across time, the oldest one written in medieval times (~1200 and the most recent one dating from late modernity (1999, were compared. Ten recipes from each of the categories “poultry recipes”, “fish recipes” and “meat recipes” were arbitrarily selected from each cookery book by selecting the first ten recipes in each category, and the numbers (per recipe of steps, separate partial processes, methods, ingredients, semi-manufactured ingredients, compound semi-manufactured ingredients (defined as semi-manufactured ingredients containing no less than two raw products, and self-made semi-manufactured ingredients were counted. Regression analyses were used to quantitatively compare the cookery from different ages. We found a significant increase in the numbers (per recipe of steps, separate partial processes, methods, ingredients and semi-manufactured ingredients. These significant increases enabled us to identify the development of cookery as an example of the general trend of cumulativity in long-term cultural evolution. The number of self-made semi-manufactured ingredients per recipe, however, may have decreased somewhat over time, something which may reflect the cumulative characteristics of cultural evolution at the level of society, considering the accumulation of knowledge that is required to industrialize food production.

  1. Time evolution analysis of the electron distribution in Thomson/Compton back-scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrillo, V.; Bacci, A.; Curatolo, C.; Maroli, C.; Serafini, L.; Rossi, A. R. [INFN-Universitá degli Studi Milano, Via Celoria, 16 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2013-07-28

    We present the time evolution of the energy distribution of a relativistic electron beam after the Compton back-scattering with a counter-propagating laser field, performed in the framework of the Quantum Electrodynamics, by means of the code CAIN. As the correct angular distribution of the spontaneous emission is accounted, the main effect is the formation of few stripes, followed by the diffusion of the more energetic particles toward lower values in the longitudinal phase space. The Chapman-Kolmogorov master equation gives results in striking agreement with the numerical ones. An experiment on the Thomson source at SPARC-LAB is proposed.

  2. Time evolution analysis of the electron distribution in Thomson/Compton back-scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrillo, V.; Bacci, A.; Curatolo, C.; Maroli, C.; Serafini, L.; Rossi, A. R.

    2013-07-01

    We present the time evolution of the energy distribution of a relativistic electron beam after the Compton back-scattering with a counter-propagating laser field, performed in the framework of the Quantum Electrodynamics, by means of the code CAIN. As the correct angular distribution of the spontaneous emission is accounted, the main effect is the formation of few stripes, followed by the diffusion of the more energetic particles toward lower values in the longitudinal phase space. The Chapman-Kolmogorov master equation gives results in striking agreement with the numerical ones. An experiment on the Thomson source at SPARC-LAB is proposed.

  3. Evolution of perturbed dynamical systems: analytical computation with time independent accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurzadyan, A. V.; Kocharyan, A. A.

    2016-12-01

    An analytical method for investigation of the evolution of dynamical systems with independent on time accuracy is developed for perturbed Hamiltonian systems. The error-free estimation using of computer algebra enables the application of the method to complex multi-dimensional Hamiltonian and dissipative systems. It also opens principal opportunities for the qualitative study of chaotic trajectories. The performance of the method is demonstrated on perturbed two-oscillator systems. It can be applied to various non-linear physical and astrophysical systems, e.g. to long-term planetary dynamics.

  4. On the long term evolution of white dwarfs in cataclysmic variables and their recurrence times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sion, E. M.; Starrfield, S. G.

    1985-01-01

    The relevance of the long term quasi-static evolution of accreting white dwarfs to the outbursts of Z Andromeda-like symbiotics; the masses and accretion rates of classical nova white dwarfs; and the observed properties of white dwarfs detected optically and with IUE in low M dot cataclysmic variables is discussed. A surface luminosity versus time plot for a massive, hot white dwarf bears a remarkable similarity to the outburst behavior of the hot blue source in Z Andromeda. The long term quasi-static models of hot accreting white dwarfs provide convenient constraints on the theoretically permissible parameters to give a dynamical (nova-like) outburst of classic white dwarfs.

  5. Ex vivo Time Evolution of Thrombus Growth through Optical and Electrical Impedance data fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affanni, A.; Specogna, R.; Trevisan, F.

    2013-09-01

    We designed a novel sensor specifically aimed at ex vivo measurements of white thrombus volume growth; a white thrombus is induced within an artificial micro-channel where hemostasis takes place starting from whole blood under flow conditions. The advantage of the proposed methodology is to identify the time evolution of the thrombus volume by means of an original data fusion methodology based on 2D optical and electrical impedance data simultaneously processed. On the contrary, the present state of the art optical imaging methodologies allow the thrombus volume estimation only at the end of the hemostatic process.

  6. The mineralogic evolution of the Martian surface through time: Implications from chemical reaction path modeling studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumlee, G. S.; Ridley, W. I.; Debraal, J. D.; Reed, M. H.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical reaction path calculations were used to model the minerals that might have formed at or near the Martian surface as a result of volcano or meteorite impact driven hydrothermal systems; weathering at the Martian surface during an early warm, wet climate; and near-zero or sub-zero C brine-regolith reactions in the current cold climate. Although the chemical reaction path calculations carried out do not define the exact mineralogical evolution of the Martian surface over time, they do place valuable geochemical constraints on the types of minerals that formed from an aqueous phase under various surficial and geochemically complex conditions.

  7. Quantum state reduction and conditional time evolution of wave-particle correlations in cavity QED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, G T; Orozco, L A; Castro-Beltran, H M; Carmichael, H J

    2000-10-09

    We report measurements in cavity QED of a wave-particle correlation function which records the conditional time evolution of the field of a fraction of a photon. Detection of a photon prepares a state of well-defined phase that evolves back to equilibrium via a damped vacuum Rabi oscillation. We record the regression of the field amplitude. The recorded correlation function is nonclassical and provides an efficiency independent path to the spectrum of squeezing. Nonclassicality is observed even when the intensity fluctuations are classical.

  8. Evolution of perturbed dynamical systems: analytical computation with time independent accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurzadyan, A.V. [Russian-Armenian (Slavonic) University, Department of Mathematics and Mathematical Modelling, Yerevan (Armenia); Kocharyan, A.A. [Monash University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Clayton (Australia)

    2016-12-15

    An analytical method for investigation of the evolution of dynamical systems with independent on time accuracy is developed for perturbed Hamiltonian systems. The error-free estimation using of computer algebra enables the application of the method to complex multi-dimensional Hamiltonian and dissipative systems. It also opens principal opportunities for the qualitative study of chaotic trajectories. The performance of the method is demonstrated on perturbed two-oscillator systems. It can be applied to various non-linear physical and astrophysical systems, e.g. to long-term planetary dynamics. (orig.)

  9. Evolution of perturbed dynamical systems: analytical computation with time independent accuracy

    CERN Document Server

    Gurzadyan, A V

    2016-01-01

    An analytical method for investigation of the evolution of dynamical systems {\\it with independent on time accuracy} is developed for perturbed Hamiltonian systems. The error-free estimation using of computer algebra enables the application of the method to complex multi-dimensional Hamiltonian and dissipative systems. It also opens principal opportunities for the qualitative study of chaotic trajectories. The performance of the method is demonstrated on perturbed two-oscillator systems. It can be applied to various non-linear physical and astrophysical systems, e.g. to the long-term planetary dynamics.

  10. Perturbative evolution of particle orbits around Kerr black holes time domain calculation

    CERN Document Server

    López-Aleman, R; Pullin, J; Lopez-Aleman, Ramon; Khanna, Gaurav; Pullin, Jorge

    2003-01-01

    Treating the Teukolsky perturbation equation numerically as a 2+1 PDE and smearing the singularities in the particle source term by the use of narrow Gaussian distributions, we have been able to reproduce earlier results for equatorial circular orbits that were computed using the frequency domain formalism. A time domain prescription for a more general evolution of nearly geodesic orbits under the effects of radiation reaction is presented. This approach can be useful when tackling the more realistic problem of a stellar-mass black hole moving on a generic orbit around a supermassive black hole under the influence of radiation reaction forces.

  11. Evolution of the magnetospheric storm-ring current with a constant time delay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cluadegonzalez, A.L.; Gonzalez, W.D.; Detman, T.R.; Joselyn, J.A. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Using the energy balance equation for the ring current during magnetic storms, a theoretical study of the response of this current is done, for the case of a constant time decay tau. The input energy function for the balance equation is assumed to be described by a simple time variation during the injection time, such that an analytical response can be obtained. The model is used for 5 of the 10 intense storms in the interval August 1978-December 1979, for which the ISEE-3 interplanetary data are available. The energy input function for these 5 events (those with less data gaps) is assumed to be one of both, the azimuthal interplanetary electric field or the Akasofu`s coupling function. These input functions are approximated by one of the simple mentioned input functions and the solution obtained from the energy balance equation, for different values of tau, is compared to the actual evolution of the ring current (derived from the geomagnetic index Dst). The sets of input functions and tau values that better reproduce the observed storm evolution are adopted as the best approximation. As a conclusion, it is found that the more appropriate values of tau are longer than those determined in previous studies, especially for the case of more intense storms.

  12. Imitation, genetic lineages, and time influenced the morphological evolution of the violin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H Chitwood

    Full Text Available Violin design has been in flux since the production of the first instruments in 16th century Italy. Numerous innovations have improved the acoustical properties and playability of violins. Yet, other attributes of the violin affect its performance less, and with fewer constraints, are potentially more sensitive to historical vagaries unrelated to quality. Although the coarse shape of violins is integral to their design, details of the body outline can vary without significantly compromising sound quality. What can violin shapes tell us about their makers and history, including the degree that luthiers have influenced each other and the evolution of complex morphologies over time? Here, I provide an analysis of morphological evolution in the violin family, sampling the body shapes of over 9,000 instruments over 400 years of history. Specific shape attributes, which discriminate instruments produced by different luthiers, strongly correlate with historical time. Linear discriminant analysis reveals luthiers who likely copied the outlines of their instruments from others, which historical accounts corroborate. Clustering of averaged violin shapes places luthiers into four major groups, demonstrating a handful of discrete shapes predominate in most instruments. Violin shapes originating from multi-generational luthier families tend to cluster together, and familial origin is a significant explanatory factor of violin shape. Together, the analysis of four centuries of violin shapes demonstrates not only the influence of history and time leading to the modern violin, but widespread imitation and the transmission of design by human relatedness.

  13. Stellar evolution in real time: Period variations in galactic RR Lyr stars

    CERN Document Server

    Poretti, E; Vandenbroere, J; Paschke, A; Klotz, A; Boër, M; Damerdji, Y; Martignoni, M; Acerbi, F

    2007-01-01

    The times of maximum brightness collected in the GEOS RR Lyr database allowed us to trace the period variations of a sample of 123 galactic RRab variables. These data span a time baseline exceeding 100 years. Clear evidence of period increases or decreases at constant rates has been found, suggesting evolutionary effects. The observed rates are slightly larger than those predicted by theoretical models; moreover, there is an unexpected large percentage of RRab stars showing a period decrease. The new possibilities offered by the use of robotic telecopes (TAROTs, REM) and of data from satellite (CoRoT) are expected to speed up the project to measure stellar evolution in real time. It is noteworthy that the outlines of this project have been sketched during several GEOS meetings, where the different knowledge of amateur and professional astronomers found a very profitable synthesis.

  14. SANS investigation on evolution of pore morphology for varying sintering time in porous ceria

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Patra; S Ramanathan; D Sen; S Mazumder

    2004-08-01

    Precipitates of ceria were synthesized by homogeneous precipitation method using cerium nitrate and hexamethylenetetramine at 80°C. The precipitates were ground to fine particles of average size ∼0.7 m. Circular disks with 10 mm diameter, 2 and 3 mm thickness were prepared from the green compacts by sintering at 1300°C for three different sintering times. Evolution of the pore structures in these specimens with sintering time was investigated by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The results show that the peak of the pore size distribution shifts towards the larger size with increasing sintering time although the extent of porosity decreases. This indicates that finer pores are eliminated from the system at a faster rate than the coarser ones as sintering proceeds and some of the finer pores coalesce to form bigger ones.

  15. Study of Gutenberg-Richter coefficients considering time evolution for different mexican seismic regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrizales Velazquez, Carlos; Angulo Brown, Fernando

    2017-04-01

    In the present work, we propose a division of the Mexican Pacific coast and we study the time evolution of the Gutenberg-Richter coefficients ("a" and "b" values) along the 2006-2016 period by means of the sliding time window method. We observed that the sequences of a and b values obtained, are positively correlated as it must be, because otherwise it would represent a seismic dynamics incompatible with a self-organized critical system "the earth crust". Furthermore, we analyze the variation of the modal value "a/b" showing be a better estimator of seismic activity that only a or b parameters. Finally, we perform size window variation analysis to keep constant the seismic energy released by N-events into the time window.

  16. Two new fern chloroplasts and decelerated evolution linked to the long generation time in tree ferns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Bojian; Fong, Richard; Collins, Lesley J; McLenachan, Patricia A; Penny, David

    2014-04-30

    We report the chloroplast genomes of a tree fern (Dicksonia squarrosa) and a "fern ally" (Tmesipteris elongata), and show that the phylogeny of early land plants is basically as expected, and the estimates of divergence time are largely unaffected after removing the fastest evolving sites. The tree fern shows the major reduction in the rate of evolution, and there has been a major slowdown in the rate of mutation in both families of tree ferns. We suggest that this is related to a generation time effect; if there is a long time period between generations, then this is probably incompatible with a high mutation rate because otherwise nearly every propagule would probably have several lethal mutations. This effect will be especially strong in organisms that have large numbers of cell divisions between generations. This shows the necessity of going beyond phylogeny and integrating its study with other properties of organisms.

  17. Connections between abstract quantum theory and space-time structure. II. A model of cosmological evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goernitz, T.

    1988-06-01

    In the first part of the present work, I treated the global structure of space by ur-theoretic considerations and also introduced a smallest physically accessible length. This enterprise led to a cosmography, a description of a cosmic model at a fixed time. Of course, there must also be a description of its time development, of the change of the number of urs with time. There has been no a priori assumption for this process. Here an attempt is made to treat this evolution by means of general relativity and to compare the result with observations. This means that general relativity is used as an existing and adequate theory; it is hoped that general relativity can be reconstructed from ur theory.

  18. Time Evolution of Temperature and Entropy of a Gravitationally Collapsing de Sitter Schwarzschild Domain Wall

    CERN Document Server

    Halstead, Evan

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the time evolution of the temperature and entropy of a gravitationally collapsing de Sitter Schwarzschild domain wall as seen by an asymptotic observer. Recent work has completed this analysis for Schwarzschild and 3+1 BTZ domain walls. There were some striking qualitative differences between the two. Specifically, the BTZ domain wall exhibited a decrease in entropy over time. However, it contained both a cosmological constant and a different topology from the Schwarzschild domain wall, and we wish to isolate which of these is responsible for the qualitative differences. Hence, we will study the de Sitter Schwarzschild domain wall, as it has identical topology to the Schwarzschild domain wall yet also contains a cosmological constant. We utilize a wavefunctional approach where we couple a scalar field to the background of the collapsing domain wall and determine the spectrum of the radiation as a function of time. The fact that the distribution is thermal allows for the determination of the tem...

  19. Universal time-evolution of a Rydberg lattice gas with perfect blockade

    CERN Document Server

    Olmos, B; Lesanovsky, I; Velázquez, L

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a strongly interacting spin system that is motivated by current experimental realizations of strongly interacting Rydberg gases in lattices. In particular we are interested in the temporal evolution of quantities such as the density of Rydberg atoms and density-density correlations when the system is initialized in a fully polarized state without Rydberg excitations. We show that in the thermodynamic limit the expectation values of these observables converge at least logarithmically to universal functions and outline a method to obtain these functions. We prove that a finite one-dimensional system follows this universal behavior up to a given time. The length of this universal time period depends on the actual system size. This shows that already the study of small systems allows to make precise predictions about the thermodynamic limit provided that the observation time is sufficiently short. We discuss this for various observables and for systems with different dimensions, int...

  20. [Estrogen replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søgaard, A J; Berntsen, G K; Magnus, J H; Tollan, A

    1998-02-10

    Recent research on long-term postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT) indicates a positive effect on both total mortality and morbidity. This has raised the question of widespread preventive long-term use of HRT. Possible side-effects and ideological issues related to preventive HRT have led to debate and uncertainty among health professionals, in the media, and in the population at large. In order to evaluate the level of knowledge about and attitudes towards HRT, a randomly selected group of 737 Norwegian women aged 16-79 was interviewed by the Central Bureau of Statistics. One in three women had received information about HRT in the last two years, mainly through weekly magazines and physicians. The proportion who answered the questions on knowledge correctly varied from 36% to 47%. Those who had been given information by a physician possessed accurate knowledge, had more positive attitudes towards HRT and were more willing to use HRT than women who had reviewed information through other channels. Women with a higher level of education were better informed and more knowledgeable than others, but were nevertheless more reluctant to use HRT than those who were less educated. The limited number of women who actually receive information on HRT, the low level of knowledge and the ambivalent attitudes toward HRT are a major challenge to the public health service.

  1. Experimental palaeobiomechanics: What can engineering tell us about evolution in deep time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Philip

    2016-04-01

    What did Tyrannosaurus rex eat? This is the sort of question that immediately bombards any palaeontologist when interacting with the general public. Even among scientists, how extinct animals moved or fed is a major objective of the palaeobiological research agenda. The last decade has seen a sharp increase in the technology and experimental methods available for collecting biomechanical data, which has greatly improved out ability to examine the function of both live and extinct animals. With new technologies and methods come new pitfalls and opportunities. In this review, I address three aspects of experimental biomechanics that exemplify the challenges and opportunities it provides for addressing deep-time problems in palaeontology. 1) Interpretation: It has never been easier to acquire large amounts of high-quality biomechanical data on extinct animals. However, the lack of behavioural information means that interpreting this data can be problematic. We will never know precisely what a dinosaur ate, but we can explore what constraints there might have been on the mechanical function of its jaws. Palaeobiomechanics defines potential function and becomes especially effective when dealing with multiple examples. 2) Comparison: Understanding the potential function of one extinct animal is interesting; however, examining mechanical features across multiple taxa allows for a greater understanding of biomechanical variation. Comparative studies help identify common trends and underlying mechanical principles which can have long reaching influences on morphological evolution. 3) Evolution: The physical principles established through comparative biomechanical studies can be utilized in phylogenetic comparative methods in order to explore evolutionary morphology across clades. Comparative evolutionary biomechanics offers potential for exploring the evolution of functional systems in deep time utilizing experimental biomechanical data.

  2. Kinetics of methane-ethane gas replacement in clathrate-hydrates studied by time-resolved neutron diffraction and Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murshed, M Mangir; Schmidt, Burkhard C; Kuhs, Werner F

    2010-01-14

    The kinetics of CH(4)-C(2)H(6) replacement in gas hydrates has been studied by in situ neutron diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Deuterated ethane structure type I (C(2)H(6) sI) hydrates were transformed in a closed volume into methane-ethane mixed structure type II (CH(4)-C(2)H(6) sII) hydrates at 5 MPa and various temperatures in the vicinity of 0 degrees C while followed by time-resolved neutron powder diffraction on D20 at ILL, Grenoble. The role of available surface area of the sI starting material on the formation kinetics of sII hydrates was studied. Ex situ Raman spectroscopic investigations were carried out to crosscheck the gas composition and the distribution of the gas species over the cages as a function of structure type and compared to the in situ neutron results. Raman micromapping on single hydrate grains showed compositional and structural gradients between the surface and core of the transformed hydrates. Moreover, the observed methane-ethane ratio is very far from the one expected for a formation from a constantly equilibrated gas phase. The results also prove that gas replacement in CH(4)-C(2)H(6) hydrates is a regrowth process involving the nucleation of new crystallites commencing at the surface of the parent C(2)H(6) sI hydrate with a progressively shrinking core of unreacted material. The time-resolved neutron diffraction results clearly indicate an increasing diffusion limitation of the exchange process. This diffusion limitation leads to a progressive slowing down of the exchange reaction and is likely to be responsible for the incomplete exchange of the gases.

  3. Uncovering the genetic signature of quantitative trait evolution with replicated time series data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franssen, S U; Kofler, R; Schlötterer, C

    2017-01-01

    The genetic architecture of adaptation in natural populations has not yet been resolved: it is not clear to what extent the spread of beneficial mutations (selective sweeps) or the response of many quantitative trait loci drive adaptation to environmental changes. Although much attention has been given to the genomic footprint of selective sweeps, the importance of selection on quantitative traits is still not well studied, as the associated genomic signature is extremely difficult to detect. We propose 'Evolve and Resequence' as a promising tool, to study polygenic adaptation of quantitative traits in evolving populations. Simulating replicated time series data we show that adaptation to a new intermediate trait optimum has three characteristic phases that are reflected on the genomic level: (1) directional frequency changes towards the new trait optimum, (2) plateauing of allele frequencies when the new trait optimum has been reached and (3) subsequent divergence between replicated trajectories ultimately leading to the loss or fixation of alleles while the trait value does not change. We explore these 3 phase characteristics for relevant population genetic parameters to provide expectations for various experimental evolution designs. Remarkably, over a broad range of parameters the trajectories of selected alleles display a pattern across replicates, which differs both from neutrality and directional selection. We conclude that replicated time series data from experimental evolution studies provide a promising framework to study polygenic adaptation from whole-genome population genetics data.

  4. A QCD space-time analysis of quarkonium formation and evolution in hadronic collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Kinder-Geiger, Klaus

    1998-01-01

    The production of heavy quarkonium as QQbar bound-states in hadron-hadron collisions is considered within the framework of a space-time description, combining parton-cascade evolution with a coalescence model for bound-state formation. The `hard' production of the initial QQbar, directly or via gluon fragmentation and including both color-singlet and color-octet contributions, is calculated from the PQCD cross-sections. The subsequent development of the QQbar system is described within a space-time generalization of the DGLAP parton-evolution formalism in position- and momentum-space. The actual formation of the bound-states is accomplished through overlap of the QQbar pair and a spectrum of quarkonium wave-functions. This coalescence can only occur after sufficent gluon radiation reduces the QQbar relative velocity to a value commensurate with the non-relativistic kinematics of these bound systems. The presence of gluon participants in the cascade then is both necessary and leads to the natural inclusion of ...

  5. Time evolution of shear-induced particle margination and migration in a cellular suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Qin M.; Shaqfeh, Eric S. G.

    2016-11-01

    The inhomogeneous center-of-mass distributions of red blood cells and platelets normal to the flow direction in small vessels play a significant role in hemostasis and drug delivery. Under pressure-driven flow in channels, the migration of deformable red blood cells at steady state is characterized by a cell-free or Fahraeus-Lindqvist layer near the vessel wall. Rigid particles such as platelets, however, "marginate" and thus develop a near-wall excess concentration. In order to evaluate the role of branching and design suitable microfluidic devices, it is important to investigate the time evolution of particle margination and migration from a non-equilibrium state and determine the corresponding entrance lengths. From a mechanistic point of view, deformability-induced hydrodynamic lift and shear-induced diffusion are essential mechanisms for the cross-flow migration and margination. In this talk, we determine the concentration distribution of red blood cells and platelets by solving coupled Boltzmann advection-diffusion equations for both species and explore their time evolution. We verify our model by comparing with large-scale, multi-cell simulations and experiments. Our Boltzmann collision theory serves as a fast alternative to large-scale simulations.

  6. Isolation of table olive damage causes and bruise time evolution during fruit detachment with trunk shaker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez-Jimenez, F.; Castro-Garcia, S.; Blanco-Roldan, G. L.; Gonzalez-Sanchez, E. J.; Gil-Ribes, J. A.

    2013-05-01

    The high sensitivity of table olives to mechanical damage limits mechanical harvesting with trunk shakers. The objective of this study was the identification, evaluation and temporal evolution assessment of the sources of damage caused to the fruits. To do this, digital image analysis was used for the objective determination of damage produced to table olives. Harvesting tests were performed in an intensive olive orchard with trees of the Manzanilla variety in Seville, Spain. Mechanical harvesting with trunk shakers and subsequent detachment of the fruits to the ground produced a level of bruise 12 times greater than the levels obtained from manual harvesting. Fruit-fruit and fruit branch impacts and friction from the movement of the fruit in the tree canopy during vibration and detachment were the main causes of damage to the fruits. These causes represented a mean value of 60% of the damage produced to the fruits from mechanical harvesting. In addition, most bruising from mechanical damage occurred in the first hour after harvesting and followed an exponential tendency. The information obtained about table olive damage causes and bruise time evolution during fruit detachment with trunk shaker can be used by the producers to determine how to reduce and prevent bruising during harvesting operations. (Author) 34 refs.

  7. Metallicity gradients in Local Universe galaxies: time evolution and effects of radial migration

    CERN Document Server

    Magrini, L; Stanghellini, L; Casasola, V; Galli, D

    2016-01-01

    Our knowledge of the shape of radial metallicity gradients in disc galaxies has recently improved. Conversely, the understanding of their time evolution is more complex, since it requires analysis of stellar populations with different ages, or systematic studies of galaxies at different redshifts. In the Local Universe, Hii regions and planetary nebulae (PNe) are important tools to investigate it. We present an in-depth study of all nearby spiral galaxies (M33, M31, NGC300, and M81) with direct-method nebular abundances of both populations. For the first time, we also evaluate the radial migration of PN populations. We analyse Hii region and PN properties to: determine whether oxygen in PNe is a reliable tracer for past interstellar medium (ISM) composition; homogenise the published datasets; estimate the migration of the oldest stellar populations; determine the overall chemical enrichment and slope evolution. We confirm that oxygen in PNe is a reliable tracer for the past ISM metallicity. We find that PN gr...

  8. Timing and flux evolution of the galactic center magnetar SGR J1745–2900

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaspi, Victoria M.; Archibald, Robert F.; Dufour, François; An, Hongjun [Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2T8 (Canada); Bhalerao, Varun [Inter-University Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Post Bag 4, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Gotthelf, Eric V.; Beloborodov, Andrei M.; Hailey, Charles J.; Mori, Kaya [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Bachetti, Matteo [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse (France); Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Christensen, Finn E. [DTU Space, National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Grefenstette, Brian W.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Madsen, Kristin K. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kennea, Jamie A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Kouveliotou, Chryssa [Astrophysics Office, ZP 12, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Markwardt, Craig B. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Stern, Daniel, E-mail: vkaspi@physics.mcgill.ca [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); and others

    2014-05-10

    We present the X-ray timing and spectral evolution of the Galactic Center magnetar SGR J1745–2900 for the first ∼4 months post-discovery using data obtained with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array and Swift observatories. Our timing analysis reveals a large increase in the magnetar spin-down rate by a factor of 2.60 ± 0.07 over our data span. We further show that the change in spin evolution was likely coincident with a bright X-ray burst observed in 2013 June by Swift, and if so, there was no accompanying discontinuity in the frequency. We find that the source 3-10 keV flux has declined monotonically by a factor of ∼2 over an 80 day period post-outburst accompanied by a ∼20% decrease in the source's blackbody temperature, although there is evidence for both flux and kT having leveled off. We argue that the torque variations are likely to be magnetospheric in nature and will dominate over any dynamical signatures of orbital motion around Sgr A*.

  9. Stability of cylindrical thin shell wormhole during evolution of universe from inflation to late time acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setare, M.R. [Department of Science, Campus of Bijar, University of Kurdistan,Bijar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sepehri, A. [Faculty of Physics, Shahid Bahonar University,P.O. Box 76175, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-03-16

    In this paper, we consider the stability of cylindrical wormholes during evolution of universe from inflation to late time acceleration epochs. We show that there are two types of cylindrical wormholes. The first type is produced at the corresponding point where k black F-strings are transited to BIon configuration. This wormhole transfers energy from extra dimensions into our universe, causes inflation, loses it’s energy and vanishes. The second type of cylindrical wormhole is created by a tachyonic potential and causes a new phase of acceleration. We show that wormhole parameters grow faster than the scale factor in this era, overtake it at ripping time and lead to the destruction of universe at big rip singularity.

  10. Magnetars: Time Evolution, Superfluid Properties, and Mechanism of Magnetic Field Decay

    CERN Document Server

    Arras, P; Thompson, C; Wang, Bing; Tang, Huanwen; Guo, Chonghui; Xiu, Zhilong

    2004-01-01

    We calculate the coupled thermal evolution and magnetic field decay in relativistic model neutron stars threaded by superstrong magnetic fields (B > 10^{15} G). Our main goal is to evaluate how such ``magnetars'' evolve with time and how field decay modifies the transitions to core superfluidity and cooling dominated by surface X-ray emission. Observations of a thermal X-ray spectral component and fast timing noise place strong constraints on the presence of a superfluid core. We find that the transition to core superfluidity can be significantly delayed by field decay in the age range ~ 10^3-10^5 yrs. The mechanism of Hall drift is related to the stability of the core magnetic field, and to currents flowing outward through the crust. The heating effect is enhanced if it is continuous rather than spasmodic. Condensation of a heavy element layer at the surface is shown to cause only modest changes in the outward conduction of heat.

  11. Purity of Gaussian states: measurement schemes and time-evolution in noisy channels

    CERN Document Server

    Paris, M A G; Serafini, A; De Siena, S

    2003-01-01

    We present a systematic study of the purity for Gaussian states of single-mode continuous variable systems. We prove the connection of purity to observable quantities for these states, and show that the joint measurement of two conjugate quadratures is necessary and sufficient to determine the purity at any time. The statistical reliability and the range of applicability of the proposed measurement scheme is tested by means of Monte Carlo simulated experiments. We then consider the dynamics of purity in noisy channels. We derive an evolution equation for the purity of general Gaussian states both in thermal and squeezed thermal baths. We show that purity is maximized at any given time for an initial coherent state evolving in a thermal bath, or for an initial squeezed state evolving in a squeezed thermal bath whose asymptotic squeezing is orthogonal to that of the input state.

  12. A new time tree reveals Earth history's imprint on the evolution of modern birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claramunt, Santiago; Cracraft, Joel

    2015-12-01

    Determining the timing of diversification of modern birds has been difficult. We combined DNA sequences of clock-like genes for most avian families with 130 fossil birds to generate a new time tree for Neornithes and investigated their biogeographic and diversification dynamics. We found that the most recent common ancestor of modern birds inhabited South America around 95 million years ago, but it was not until the Cretaceous-Paleogene transition (66 million years ago) that Neornithes began to diversify rapidly around the world. Birds used two main dispersion routes: reaching the Old World through North America, and reaching Australia and Zealandia through Antarctica. Net diversification rates increased during periods of global cooling, suggesting that fragmentation of tropical biomes stimulated speciation. Thus, we found pervasive evidence that avian evolution has been influenced by plate tectonics and environmental change, two basic features of Earth's dynamics.

  13. [Some remarks on the evolution of medical language across the times].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledermann D, Walter

    2011-02-01

    The language employed by the physicians in their communications has been suffering a continuous evolution through the times, from the sober beauty that in their conciseness and accuracy had the Greek and the Latin, to the verbosity and flowery of the Middle Age and posterior centuries, for ended in the poverty and monotony characteristics of the today publications. A brief selection of different papers and book's extracts is presented in order to illustrate these changes, including words of Hippocrates, Celsus, Leonardo, Van Leeunwenhoek, Spallanzani, Jenner, Koch, Laveran, Manson, Grassi and other less conspicuous, ending with the assertion that the scarce time for read adduced by physicians must not serves like an excuse for ignorance and lack of culture.

  14. A new time tree reveals Earth history’s imprint on the evolution of modern birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claramunt, Santiago; Cracraft, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Determining the timing of diversification of modern birds has been difficult. We combined DNA sequences of clock-like genes for most avian families with 130 fossil birds to generate a new time tree for Neornithes and investigated their biogeographic and diversification dynamics. We found that the most recent common ancestor of modern birds inhabited South America around 95 million years ago, but it was not until the Cretaceous-Paleogene transition (66 million years ago) that Neornithes began to diversify rapidly around the world. Birds used two main dispersion routes: reaching the Old World through North America, and reaching Australia and Zealandia through Antarctica. Net diversification rates increased during periods of global cooling, suggesting that fragmentation of tropical biomes stimulated speciation. Thus, we found pervasive evidence that avian evolution has been influenced by plate tectonics and environmental change, two basic features of Earth’s dynamics. PMID:26824065

  15. Introducing the Illustris project: the evolution of galaxy populations across cosmic time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genel, Shy; Vogelsberger, Mark; Springel, Volker; Sijacki, Debora; Nelson, Dylan; Snyder, Greg; Rodriguez-Gomez, Vicente; Torrey, Paul; Hernquist, Lars

    2014-11-01

    We present an overview of galaxy evolution across cosmic time in the Illustris simulation. Illustris is an N-body/hydrodynamical simulation that evolves 2 × 18203 resolution elements in a (106.5 Mpc)3 box from cosmological initial conditions down to z = 0 using the AREPO moving-mesh code. The simulation uses a state-of-the-art set of physical models for galaxy formation that was tuned to reproduce the z = 0 stellar mass function and the history of the cosmic star formation rate density. We find that Illustris successfully reproduces a plethora of observations of galaxy populations at various redshifts, for which no tuning was performed, and provide predictions for future observations. In particular, we discuss (a) the buildup of galactic mass, showing stellar mass functions and the relations between stellar mass and halo mass from z = 7 to 0, (b) galaxy number density profiles around massive central galaxies out to z = 4, (c) the gas and total baryon content of both galaxies and their haloes for different redshifts, and as a function of mass and radius, and (d) the evolution of galaxy specific star formation rates up to z = 8. In addition, we (i) present a qualitative analysis of galaxy morphologies from z = 5 to 0, for the stellar as well as the gaseous components, and their appearance in Hubble Space Telescope mock observations, (ii) follow galaxies selected at z = 2 to their z = 0 descendants, and quantify their growth and merger histories, and (iii) track massive z = 0 galaxies to high redshift and study their joint evolution in star formation activity and compactness. We conclude with a discussion of several disagreements with observations, and lay out possible directions for future research.

  16. Correlations and Non-predictability in the Time Evolution of Earthquake Ruptures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkhoury, J. E.; Knopoff, L.

    2007-12-01

    The characterization of the time evolution of ruptures is one of the important aspects of the earthquake process. What makes a rupture, that starts small, to become a big one or end very quickly resulting in a small earthquake is central to understanding the physics of the time evolution of ruptures. Establishing whether there are any correlations in time, between the initiation of the rupture and its ultimate size, is a step in the right direction. Here, we analyze three source-time function data sets. The first is produced by the generation of repeated rupture events on a 2D heterogeneous, in-plane, dynamical model, while the second is produced by an-age dependent critical branching model. The third is the source-time function data base of Ruff [1]. We formulate the problem in terms of two questions. 1) Are there any correlations between the moment release at the beginning of the rupture and the total moment release during the entire rupture? 2) Can we predict the final size of an earthquake, once it has started and without any a posteriori information, by just knowing the moment release up to a certain time τ? Using the three data bases, the answer to the first question is yes and no to the second. The longer τ is, the stronger the correlations are between what goes on at the initiation and the final size. But, for τ fixed, and not a major fraction of the rupture time, there is no predictability of the rupture size. In particular, if a rupture starts with a very large moment release during time τ, it becomes a large earthquake. On the other hand, large earthquakes might start with very small moment release during τ; the non-predictability is due to the heterogeneities. The randomness in the critical branching model mimics the effect of the heterogeneities in the crust and in the 2D model. \\begin{thebibliography}{99} \\bibitem{ruff} Ruff, L. J., http://www.geo.lsa.umich.edu/SeismoObs/STF.html

  17. Use of erroneous wolf generation time in assessments of domestic dog and human evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mech, L. David; Barber-meyer, Shannon

    2017-01-01

    Scientific interest in dog domestication and parallel evolution of dogs and humans (Wang et al. 2013) has increased recently (Freedman et al. 2014, Larson and Bradley 2014, Franz et al. 2016,), and various important conclusions have been drawn based on how long ago the calculations show dogs were domesticated from ancestral wolves (Canis lupus). Calculation of this duration is based on “the most commonly assumed mutation rate of 1 x 10-8 per generation and a 3-year gray wolf generation time . . .” (Skoglund et al. 2015:3). It is unclear on what information the assumed generation time is based, but Ersmark et al. (2016) seemed to have based their assumption on a single wolf (Mech and Seal 1987). The importance of assuring that such assumptions are valid is obvious. Recently, two independent studies employing three large data sets and three methods from two widely separated areas have found that wolf generation time is 4.2-4.7 years. The first study, based on 200 wolves in Yellowstone National Park used age-specific birth and death rates to calculate a generation time of 4.16 years (vonHoldt et al. 2008). The second, using estimated first-breeding times of 86 female wolves in northeastern Minnesota found a generation time of 4.3 years and using uterine examination of 159 female wolves from throughout Minnesota yielded a generation time of 4.7 years (Mech et al. 2016). We suggest that previous studies using a 3-year generation time recalculate their figures and adjust their conclusions based on these generation times and publish revised results.

  18. Liquid-Mercury-Supported Langmuir Films of Ionic Liquids: Isotherms, Structure, and Time Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfassy, Eitan; Mastai, Yitzhak; Pontoni, Diego; Deutsch, Moshe

    2016-04-05

    Ionic liquids have been intensively developed for the last few decades and are now used in a wide range of applications, from electrochemistry to catalysis and nanotechnology. Many of these applications involve ionic liquid interfaces with other liquids and solids, the subnanometric experimental study of which is highly demanding, and has been little studied to date. We present here a study of mercury-supported Langmuir films of imidazolium-based ionic liquids by surface tensiometry and X-ray reflectivity. The charge-delocalized ionic liquids studied here exhibit no 2D lateral order but show diffuse surface-normal electron density profiles exhibiting gradual mercury penetration into the ionic liquid film, and surface-normal structure evolution over a period of hours. The effect of increasing the nonpolar alkyl chain length was also investigated. The results obtained provide insights into the interactions between these ionic liquids and liquid mercury and about the time evolution of the structure and composition of their interface.

  19. The galaxy stellar mass function and its evolution with time show no dependence on global environment

    CERN Document Server

    Vulcani, Benedetta; Oemler, August; Dressler, Alan; Aragon-Salamanca, Alfonso; De Lucia, Gabriella; Gladders, Mike; Abramson, Louis; Halliday, Claire

    2011-01-01

    We present the analysis of the galaxy stellar mass function in different environments at intermediate redshift (0.3 10^{10.5} M_sun, to study cluster, group, and field galaxies at z=0.3-0.45, and the ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS), at masses M_ast > 10^{10.2} M_sun, to investigate cluster and group galaxies at z=0.4-0.8. Therefore, in our analysis we include galaxies that are slightly less massive than the Milky Way. Having excluded the brightest cluster galaxies, we show that the mass distribution does not seem to depend on global environment. Our two main results are: (1) Galaxies in the virialized regions of clusters and in the field follow a similar mass distribution. (2) Comparing both ICBS and EDisCS mass functions to mass functions in the local Universe, we find evolution from z~0.4-0.6 to z~0.07. The population of low-mass galaxies has proportionally grown with time with respect to that of massive galaxies. This evolution is independent of environment -- the same for clusters and the field. Furth...

  20. Foreshocks and aftershocks of Pisagua 2014 earthquake: time and space evolution of megathrust event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuenzalida Velasco, Amaya; Rietbrock, Andreas; Wollam, Jack; Thomas, Reece; de Lima Neto, Oscar; Tavera, Hernando; Garth, Thomas; Ruiz, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    The 2014 Pisagua earthquake of magnitude 8.2 is the first case in Chile where a foreshock sequence was clearly recorded by a local network, as well all the complete sequence including the mainshock and its aftershocks. The seismicity of the last year before the mainshock include numerous clusters close to the epicentral zone (Ruiz et al; 2014) but it was on 16th March that this activity became stronger with the Mw 6.7 precursory event taking place in front of Iquique coast at 12 km depth. The Pisagua earthquake arrived on 1st April 2015 breaking almost 120 km N-S and two days after a 7.6 aftershock occurred in the south of the rupture, enlarging the zone affected by this sequence. In this work, we analyse the foreshocks and aftershock sequence of Pisagua earthquake, from the spatial and time evolution for a total of 15.764 events that were recorded from the 1st March to 31th May 2015. This event catalogue was obtained from the automatic analyse of seismic raw data of more than 50 stations installed in the north of Chile and the south of Peru. We used the STA/LTA algorithm for the detection of P and S arrival times on the vertical components and then a method of back propagation in a 1D velocity model for the event association and preliminary location of its hypocenters following the algorithm outlined by Rietbrock et al. (2012). These results were then improved by locating with NonLinLoc software using a regional velocity model. We selected the larger events to analyse its moment tensor solution by a full waveform inversion using ISOLA software. In order to understand the process of nucleation and propagation of the Pisagua earthquake, we also analysed the evolution in time of the seismicity of the three months of data. The zone where the precursory events took place was strongly activated two weeks before the mainshock and remained very active until the end of the analysed period with an important quantity of the seismicity located in the upper plate and having

  1. Nonunitary similarity transformation of conservative to dissipative evolutions: Intertwining without time operator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Fernando

    2007-04-01

    Reversible evolutions are usually expressed in terms of unitary groups on separable Hilbert spaces, whereas irreversible ones are described by contraction semigroups. In the theory of nonunitary similarity transformations intertwining unitary groups and contraction semigroups, proposed initially in the context of statistical mechanics as part of an exact theory of irreversibility, the unitary groups with such intertwining property have been qualified by the existence of an internal time operator. This work tackles the question of existence of internal time operators for unitary groups with the intertwining property. Equivalent conditions to the existence of internal time operators for such unitary groups are given on the basis of the Sz.-Nagy-Foiaş [Harmonic Analysis of Operators on Hilbert Spaces (North-Holland, Amsterdam, 1970)] dilation theory and the theory of shift invariant subspaces. These conditions permit us to solve the inverse intertwining problem in the negative: there are unitary groups with the intertwining property which do not admit internal time operator. A representative family of such unitary groups is given.

  2. Time evolution of entropy in a growth model: Dependence on the description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Segun; Choi, Jungzae; Choi, Moo Young; Yoon, Byung-Gook

    2017-01-01

    Entropy plays a key role in the statistical physics of complex systems, which in general exhibit diverse aspects of emergence on different scales. However, how entropy varies with the coarsegraining level and the description scale still remains not fully resolved. In this paper, we consider a Yule-type growth model, where each element is characterized by its size being either continuous or discrete. Entropy is then defined directly from the probability distribution of the states of all elements, as well as from the size distribution of the system. Probing in detail their relations and time evolutions, we find that heterogeneity, in addition to correlations between elements, can induce loss of information during the coarse-graining procedure. Another revelation is that the expansion of the size space domain depends on the description level, leading to a difference between the continuous and the discrete descriptions.

  3. Real-time oxide evolution of copper protected by graphene and boron nitride barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbiati, M.; Stoot, A. C.; MacKenzie, D. M. A.; Bøggild, P.; Camilli, L.

    2017-01-01

    Applying protective or barrier layers to isolate a target item from the environment is a common approach to prevent or delay its degradation. The impermeability of two-dimensional materials such as graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) has generated a great deal of interest in corrosion and material science. Owing to their different electronic properties (graphene is a semimetal, whereas hBN is a wide-bandgap insulator), their protection behaviour is distinctly different. Here we investigate the performance of graphene and hBN as barrier coatings applied on copper substrates through a real-time study in two different oxidative conditions. Our findings show that the evolution of the copper oxidation is remarkably different for the two coating materials.

  4. Storm-Time Evolution of Energetic Electron Pitch Angle Distributions by Wave-Particle Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Fuliang; HE Huiyong; ZHOU Qinghua; WU Guanhong; SHI Xianghua

    2008-01-01

    The quasi-pure pitch-angle scattering of energetic electrons driven by field-alignedpropagating whistler mode waves during the 9~15 October 1990 magnetic storm at L ≈ 3 ~ 4 is studied, and numerical calculations for energetic electrons in gyroresonance with a band of frequency of whistler mode waves distributed over a standard Gaussian spectrum is performed. It is found that the whistler.mode waves can efficiently drive energetic electrons from the larger pitch-angles into the loss cone, and lead to a flat-top distribution during the main phase of geomagnetic storms. This result perhaps presents a feasible interpretation for observation of time evolution of the quasi-isotropic pitch-angle distribution by Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) spacecraft at L ≈ 3 ~ 4.

  5. Time evolution of initial states that extend beyond the potential interaction region in quantum decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Calderón, Gastón; Villavicencio, Jorge; Hernández-Maldonado, Alberto; Romo, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the decay of initial states that possess a tail that extends beyond the interaction potential region, for potentials of arbitrary shape that vanish exactly after a distance. This is the case for a relevant class of artificial quantum structures. We obtain that along the internal interaction region, the time evolution of the decaying wave function is formed by two terms. The first one refers to the proper decay of the internal portion of the initial state, whereas the second one, that arises from the external tail, yields a transient contribution that tunnels into the internal region, builds up to a value, and then decays. We obtain that depending on the parameters of the initial state, the nonexponential tail decaying contribution may be larger than the contribution of the proper nonexponential term. These results are illustrated by an exactly solvable model and the Heidelberg potential for decay of ultracold atoms and open the possibility to control initial states in artificial decaying systems.

  6. Real-time oxide evolution of copper protected by graphene and boron nitride barriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galbiati, Miriam; Stoot, Adam Carsten; Mackenzie, David

    2017-01-01

    Applying protective or barrier layers to isolate a target item from the environment is a common approach to prevent or delay its degradation. The impermeability of two-dimensional materials such as graphene and hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) has generated a great deal of interest in corrosion...... and material science. Owing to their different electronic properties (graphene is a semimetal, whereas hBN is a wide-bandgap insulator), their protection behaviour is distinctly different. Here we investigate the performance of graphene and hBN as barrier coatings applied on copper substrates through a real......-time study in two different oxidative conditions. Our findings show that the evolution of the copper oxidation is remarkably different for the two coating materials....

  7. Time evolution and competing pathways in photodegradation of trifluralin and three of its major degradation products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagle, Martín G Sarmiento; Laura Salum, María; Buján, Elba I; Argüello, Gustavo A

    2005-11-01

    The herbicide trifluralin (I)(N,N-di-n-propyl-2,6-dinitro-4-trifluoromethylaniline) decomposes, by the action of UV-Vis light (lambda > 300 nm), to several products, the most important (because they give subsequent photochemical reactions) being N-n-propyl-2,6-dinitro-4-trifluoromethylaniline (VI), 2-ethyl-7-nitro-5-trifluoromethyl-1H-benzimidazole 3-oxide (VII) and 2,6-dinitro-4-trifluoromethylaniline (XII). The time evolution of degradation of trifluralin (I) and the aforementioned three main photoproducts was studied in water and acetonitrile as solvents. The pseudo-first order rate constants allow one to calculate the branching ratios for some of the reactions involved. The preference for either N-dealkylation or cyclization depends on the solvent employed. Dissolved oxygen accelerates the photodegradation, especially the dealkylation.

  8. Stochastic analysis of the time evolution of Laminar-Turbulent bands of plane Couette flow

    CERN Document Server

    Rolland, Joran

    2015-01-01

    This article is concerned with the time evolution of the oblique laminar-turbulent bands of transitional plane Couette flow under the influence of turbulent noise. Our study is focused on the amplitude of modulation of turbulence. In order to guide the numerical study of the flow, we first perform an analytical and numerical analysis of a Stochastic Ginzburg-Landau equation for a complex order parameter. The modulus of this order parameter models the amplitude of modulation of turbulence. Firstly, we compute the autocorrelation function of said modulus once the band is established. Secondly, we perform a calculation of average and fluctuations around the exponential growth of the order parameter. This type of analysis is similar to the Stochastic Structural Stability Theory. We then perform numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations in order to confront these predictions with the actual behaviour of the bands. Computation of the autocorrelation function of the modulation of turbulence shows quantita...

  9. Evolution of Safeguards over Time: Past, Present, and Projected Facilities, Material, and Budget

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kollar, Lenka; Mathews, Caroline E.

    2009-07-01

    This study examines the past trends and evolution of safeguards over time and projects growth through 2030. The report documents the amount of nuclear material and facilities under safeguards from 1970 until present, along with the corresponding budget. Estimates for the future amount of facilities and material under safeguards are made according to non-nuclear-weapons states’ (NNWS) plans to build more nuclear capacity and sustain current nuclear infrastructure. Since nuclear energy is seen as a clean and economic option for base load electric power, many countries are seeking to either expand their current nuclear infrastructure, or introduce nuclear power. In order to feed new nuclear power plants and sustain existing ones, more nuclear facilities will need to be built, and thus more nuclear material will be introduced into the safeguards system. The projections in this study conclude that a zero real growth scenario for the IAEA safeguards budget will result in large resource gaps in the near future.

  10. The development and validation of a multivariable model to predict whether patients referred for total knee replacement are suitable surgical candidates at the time of initial consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, Laura; Malian, Samuel J; Chesworth, Bert M; Bryant, Dianne; MacDonald, Steven J; Marsh, Jacquelyn D; Giffin, J Robert

    2016-12-01

    In previous studies, 50%-70% of patients referred to orthopedic surgeons for total knee replacement (TKR) were not surgical candidates at the time of initial assessment. The purpose of our study was to identify and cross-validate patient self-reported predictors of suitability for TKR and to determine the clinical utility of a predictive model to guide the timing and appropriateness of referral to a surgeon. We assessed pre-consultation patient data as well as the surgeon's findings and post-consultation recommendations. We used multivariate logistic regression to detect self-reported items that could identify suitable surgical candidates. Patients' willingness to undergo surgery, higher rating of pain, greater physical function, previous intra-articular injections and patient age were the factors predictive of patients being offered and electing to undergo TKR. The application of the model developed in our study would effectively reduce the proportion of nonsurgical referrals by 25%, while identifying the vast majority of surgical candidates (> 90%). Using patient-reported information, we can correctly predict the outcome of specialist consultation for TKR in 70% of cases. To reduce long waits for first consultation with a surgeon, it may be possible to use these items to educate and guide referring clinicians and patients to understand when specialist consultation is the next step in managing the patient with severe osteoarthritis of the knee.

  11. Electrocatalysts Prepared by Galvanic Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios Papaderakis

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Galvanic replacement is the spontaneous replacement of surface layers of a metal, M, by a more noble metal, Mnoble, when the former is treated with a solution containing the latter in ionic form, according to the general replacement reaction: nM + mMnoblen+ → nMm+ + mMnoble. The reaction is driven by the difference in the equilibrium potential of the two metal/metal ion redox couples and, to avoid parasitic cathodic processes such as oxygen reduction and (in some cases hydrogen evolution too, both oxygen levels and the pH must be optimized. The resulting bimetallic material can in principle have a Mnoble-rich shell and M-rich core (denoted as Mnoble(M leading to a possible decrease in noble metal loading and the modification of its properties by the underlying metal M. This paper reviews a number of bimetallic or ternary electrocatalytic materials prepared by galvanic replacement for fuel cell, electrolysis and electrosynthesis reactions. These include oxygen reduction, methanol, formic acid and ethanol oxidation, hydrogen evolution and oxidation, oxygen evolution, borohydride oxidation, and halide reduction. Methods for depositing the precursor metal M on the support material (electrodeposition, electroless deposition, photodeposition as well as the various options for the support are also reviewed.

  12. Fixation times in differentiation and evolution in the presence of bottlenecks, deserts, and oases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Tom; Wang, Yu

    2015-05-01

    Cellular differentiation and evolution are stochastic processes that can involve multiple types (or states) of particles moving on a complex, high-dimensional state-space or "fitness" landscape. Cells of each specific type can thus be quantified by their population at a corresponding node within a network of states. Their dynamics across the state-space network involve genotypic or phenotypic transitions that can occur upon cell division, such as during symmetric or asymmetric cell differentiation, or upon spontaneous mutation. Here, we use a general multi-type branching processes to study first passage time statistics for a single cell to appear in a specific state. Our approach readily allows for nonexponentially distributed waiting times between transitions, reflecting, e.g., the cell cycle. For simplicity, we restrict most of our detailed analysis to exponentially distributed waiting times (Poisson processes). We present results for a sequential evolutionary process in which L successive transitions propel a population from a "wild-type" state to a given "terminally differentiated," "resistant," or "cancerous" state. Analytic and numeric results are also found for first passage times across an evolutionary chain containing a node with increased death or proliferation rate, representing a desert/bottleneck or an oasis. Processes involving cell proliferation are shown to be "nonlinear" (even though mean-field equations for the expected particle numbers are linear) resulting in first passage time statistics that depend on the position of the bottleneck or oasis. Our results highlight the sensitivity of stochastic measures to cell division fate and quantify the limitations of using certain approximations (such as the fixed-population and mean-field assumptions) in evaluating fixation times.

  13. The early and late-time spectral and temporal evolution of GRB 050716

    CERN Document Server

    Rol, E; Page, K L; McGowan, K E; Beardmore, A P; O'Brien, P T; Levan, A J; Bersier, D; Guidorzi, C; Marshall, F; Fruchter, A S; Tanvir, N R; Monfardini, A; Gomboc, A; Barthelmy, S; Bannister, N P

    2006-01-01

    We report on a comprehensive set of observations of Gamma Ray Burst 050716, detected by the Swift satellite and subsequently followed-up rapidly in X-ray, optical and near infra-red wavebands. The prompt emission is typical of long-duration bursts, with two peaks in a time interval of T90 = 68 seconds (15 - 350 keV). The prompt emission continues at lower flux levels in the X-ray band, where several smaller flares can be seen, on top of a decaying light curve that exhibits an apparent break around 220 seconds post trigger. This temporal break is roughly coincident with a spectral break. The latter can be related to the extrapolated evolution of the break energy in the prompt gamma-ray emission, and is possibly the manifestation of the peak flux break frequency of the internal shock passing through the observing band. A possible 3 sigma change in the X-ray absorption column is also seen during this time. The late-time afterglow behaviour is relatively standard, with an electron distribution power-law index of ...

  14. A general stochastic model for studying time evolution of transition networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Choujun; Tse, Chi K.; Small, Michael

    2016-12-01

    We consider a class of complex networks whose nodes assume one of several possible states at any time and may change their states from time to time. Such networks represent practical networks of rumor spreading, disease spreading, language evolution, and so on. Here, we derive a model describing the dynamics of this kind of network and a simulation algorithm for studying the network evolutionary behavior. This model, derived at a microscopic level, can reveal the transition dynamics of every node. A numerical simulation is taken as an "experiment" or "realization" of the model. We use this model to study the disease propagation dynamics in four different prototypical networks, namely, the regular nearest-neighbor (RN) network, the classical Erdös-Renyí (ER) random graph, the Watts-Strogátz small-world (SW) network, and the Barabási-Albert (BA) scalefree network. We find that the disease propagation dynamics in these four networks generally have different properties but they do share some common features. Furthermore, we utilize the transition network model to predict user growth in the Facebook network. Simulation shows that our model agrees with the historical data. The study can provide a useful tool for a more thorough understanding of the dynamics networks.

  15. Geochemical modelling of groundwater evolution and residence time at the Kivetty site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitkaenen, P.; Luukkonen, A. [VTT Communities and Infrastructure, Espoo (Finland); Ruotsalainen, P. [Fintact Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Leino-Forsman, H.; Vuorinen, U. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1998-12-01

    groundwater are due to carbonate reactions: oxidising of organic carbon, and dissolution and precipitation of calcite. The carbonate reactions and slight hydrolysis of silicates stabilise the pH value at 8-9. In addition to aerobic oxidation of organic matter, oxidative dissolution of biotite seems to be an important oxygen consumer at shallow depth during recharge. The most important process controlling the redox state deeper in the bedrock was interpreted to be the microbially mediated sulphate reduction with simultaneous anaerobic respiration of organic carbon. This process buffers the redox level of about -200 - -300 mV depending on the pH. Even though the salinities of the groundwater samples and mass-transfer along flow paths remain low, the geochemical evolution was fully developed and has reached quite a stable thermodynamic state. The residence times of the groundwater samples cover the time span back to glaciation. Young ages seem to be limited to the upper part of bedrock, and any really dynamic natural flowpath with deep observed recently recharged water cannot be demonstrated. Deglacial or subglacial ages (over 9,700 years old at Kivetty) are typical below the 150-300m level in the bedrock. Subglacial waters are interpreted to derive from mixing of preglacial water and meltwater, the input of which is estimated to be about 20% at the most. Indications of elevated oxygen intrusion cannot be observed in groundwater having glacial signals. (orig.) 122 refs.

  16. Assessing spatial and temporal snowpack evolution and melt with time-lapse photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, C. E.; Ewers, B. E.; Beverly, D.; Speckman, H. N.; Hyde, K.; Ohara, N.

    2015-12-01

    Snowpack supplies and stores water for many ecosystems of the greater Rocky Mountain region. In Wyoming the snowpack supplies water to 18 states east and west of the Continental Divide. The spatial variability in physical and biological processes creates a heterogeneous pattern of snow evolution. Understanding these processes within individual plots and throughout the entire watershed increases the predictive power of snow distribution, melt rates and contribution to streamflow. However, on site sampling of snow can be an expensive and arduous process. The objective of this experiment was to quantify spatial and temporal patterns of snowpack evolution and melt rates while minimizing perturbations to snowpack through the use of time-lapse photography via trail cameras. Field cameras were assessed as a method to quantify snow depths throughout the 120 ha No Name watershed at approximately 3000 m elevation in central Wyoming. RGB trail cameras were installed at three systematically chosen sites within the watershed to correlate physical and biological drivers of snow distribution. Five stakes were placed in each site in heterogeneous spots that remained in the frame of the camera. Stakes were divided into five centimeter increments, alternating black and white bars, with red bars denoting each half meter. Images were then taken at two-hour intervals over a period of three-months and analyzed with the ImageJ program. Snowpack distributions, as well as melt rates, were variable at both the plot and watershed scales. Meteorological and physical drivers, primarily topography and radiation, accounted for the greatest variability when comparing among plot across the watershed; however, LAI and soil and air temperature were the most significant drivers within plots. Snow-melt rate increased as soils and course woody debris became exposed increasing ground and soil temperature. These data will improve process model predictions of streamflow from the watershed.

  17. Plutonium isotopes in the atmosphere of Central Europe: Isotopic composition and time evolution vs. circulation factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierepko, Renata; Mietelski, Jerzy W; Ustrnul, Zbigniew; Anczkiewicz, Robert; Wershofen, Herbert; Holgye, Zoltan; Kapała, Jacek; Isajenko, Krzysztof

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports evidence of Pu isotopes in the lower part of the troposphere of Central Europe. The data were obtained based on atmospheric aerosol fraction samples collected from four places in three countries (participating in the informal European network known as the Ring of Five (Ro5)) forming a cell with a surface area of about 200,000km(2). We compared our original data sets from Krakow (Poland, 1990-2007) and Bialystok (Poland, 1991-2007) with the results from two other locations, Prague (Czech Republic; 1997-2004) and Braunschweig (Germany; 1990-2003) to find time evolution of the Pu isotopes. The levels of the activity concentration for (238)Pu and for ((239+240))Pu were estimated to be a few and some tens of nBqm(-3), respectively. However, we also noted some results were much higher (even about 70 times higher) than the average concentration of (238)Pu in the atmosphere. The achieved complex data sets were used to test a new approach to the problem of solving mixing isotopic traces from various sources (here up to three) in one sample. Results of our model, supported by mesoscale atmospheric circulation parameters, suggest that Pu from nuclear weapon accidents or tests and nuclear burnt-up fuel are present in the air.

  18. [Reasearch on evolution and transition of processing method of fuzi in ancient and modern times].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chan-Chan; Cheng, Ming-En; Duan, Hai-Yan; Peng, Hua-Sheng

    2014-04-01

    Fuzi is a medicine used for rescuing from collapse by restoring yang as well as a famous toxic traditional Chinese medicine. In order to ensure the efficacy and safe medication, Fuzi has mostly been applied after being processed. There have been different Fuzi processing methods recorded by doctors of previous generations. Besides, there have also been differences in Fuzi processing methods recorded in modern pharmacopeia and ancient medical books. In this study, the authors traced back to medical books between the Han Dynasty and the period of Republic of China, and summarized Fuzi processing methods collected in ancient and modern literatures. According to the results, Fuzi processing methods and using methods have changed along with the evolution of dynasties, with differences in ancient and modern processing methods. Before the Tang Dynasty, Fuzi had been mostly processed and soaked. From Tang to Ming Dynasties, Fuzi had been mostly processed, soaked and stir-fried. During the Qing Dynasty, Fuzi had been mostly soaked and boiled. In the modem times, Fuzi is mostly processed by being boiled and soaked. Before the Tang Dynasty, a whole piece of Fuzi herbs or their fragments had been applied in medicines; Whereas their fragments are primarily used in the modern times. Because different processing methods have great impacts on the toxicity of Fuzi, it is suggested to study Fuzi processing methods.

  19. Reducing the time complexity of the derandomized evolution strategy with covariance matrix adaptation (CMA-ES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Nikolaus; Müller, Sibylle D; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a novel evolutionary optimization strategy based on the derandomized evolution strategy with covariance matrix adaptation (CMA-ES). This new approach is intended to reduce the number of generations required for convergence to the optimum. Reducing the number of generations, i.e., the time complexity of the algorithm, is important if a large population size is desired: (1) to reduce the effect of noise; (2) to improve global search properties; and (3) to implement the algorithm on (highly) parallel machines. Our method results in a highly parallel algorithm which scales favorably with large numbers of processors. This is accomplished by efficiently incorporating the available information from a large population, thus significantly reducing the number of generations needed to adapt the covariance matrix. The original version of the CMA-ES was designed to reliably adapt the covariance matrix in small populations but it cannot exploit large populations efficiently. Our modifications scale up the efficiency to population sizes of up to 10n, where n is the problem dimension. This method has been applied to a large number of test problems, demonstrating that in many cases the CMA-ES can be advanced from quadratic to linear time complexity.

  20. Modeling the time evolution of the nanoparticle-protein corona in a body fluid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Dell'Orco

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nanoparticles in contact with biological fluids interact with proteins and other biomolecules, thus forming a dynamic corona whose composition varies over time due to continuous protein association and dissociation events. Eventually equilibrium is reached, at which point the continued exchange will not affect the composition of the corona. RESULTS: We developed a simple and effective dynamic model of the nanoparticle protein corona in a body fluid, namely human plasma. The model predicts the time evolution and equilibrium composition of the corona based on affinities, stoichiometries and rate constants. An application to the interaction of human serum albumin, high density lipoprotein (HDL and fibrinogen with 70 nm N-iso-propylacrylamide/N-tert-butylacrylamide copolymer nanoparticles is presented, including novel experimental data for HDL. CONCLUSIONS: The simple model presented here can easily be modified to mimic the interaction of the nanoparticle protein corona with a novel biological fluid or compartment once new data will be available, thus opening novel applications in nanotoxicity and nanomedicine.

  1. Compositional evolution of the upper continental crust through time, as constrained by ancient glacial diamictites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaschnig, Richard M.; Rudnick, Roberta L.; McDonough, William F.; Kaufman, Alan J.; Valley, John W.; Hu, Zhaochu; Gao, Shan; Beck, Michelle L.

    2016-08-01

    The composition of the fine-grained matrix of glacial diamictites from the Mesoarchean, Paleoproterozoic, Neoproterozoic, and Paleozoic, collected from four modern continents, reflects the secular evolution of the average composition of the upper continental crust (UCC). The effects of localized provenance are present in some cases, but distinctive geochemical signatures exist in diamictites of the same age from different localities, suggesting that these are global signatures. Archean UCC, dominated by greenstone basalts and to a lesser extent komatiites, was more mafic, based on major elements and transition metal trace elements. Temporal changes in oxygen isotope ratios, rare earth elements, and high field strength elements indicate that the UCC became more differentiated and that tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite suites became less important with time, findings consistent with previous studies. We also document the concentrations of siderophile and chalcophile elements (Ga, Ge, Cd, In, Sn, Sb, W, Tl, Bi) and lithophile Be in the UCC through time, and use the data for the younger diamictites to construct a new estimate of average UCC along with associated uncertainties.

  2. Evolution of the solar radius during the solar cycle 24 rise time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meftah, Mustapha

    2015-08-01

    One of the real motivations to observe the solar radius is the suspicion that it might be variable. Possible temporal variations of the solar radius are important as an indicator of internal energy storage and as a mechanism for changes in the total solar irradiance. Measurements of the solar radius are of great interest within the scope of the debate on the role of the Sun in climate change. Solar energy input dominates the surface processes (climate, ocean circulation, wind, etc.) of the Earth. Thus, it appears important to know on what time scales the solar radius and other fundamental solar parameters, like the total solar irradiance, vary in order to better understand and assess the origin and mechanisms of the terrestrial climate changes. The current solar cycle is probably going to be the weakest in 100 years, which is an unprecedented opportunity for studying the variability of the solar radius during this period. This paper presents more than four years of solar radius measurements obtained with a satellite and a ground-based observatory during the solar cycle 24 rise time. Our measurements show the benefit of simultaneous measurements obtained from ground and space observatories. Space observations are a priori most favourable, however, space entails also technical challenges, a harsh environment, and a finite mission lifetime. The evolution of the solar radius during the rising phase of the solar cycle 24 show small variations that are out of phase with solar activity.

  3. Time evolution of interhemispheric coupling in a model of focal neocortical epilepsy in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallone, F.; Vannini, E.; Cintio, A.; Caleo, M.; Di Garbo, A.

    2016-09-01

    Epilepsy is characterized by substantial network rearrangements leading to spontaneous seizures and little is known on how an epileptogenic focus impacts on neural activity in the contralateral hemisphere. Here, we used a model of unilateral epilepsy induced by injection of the synaptic blocker tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) in the mouse primary visual cortex (V1). Local field potential (LFP) signals were simultaneously recorded from both hemispheres of each mouse in acute phase (peak of toxin action) and chronic condition (completion of TeNT effects). To characterize the neural electrical activities the corresponding LFP signals were analyzed with several methods of time series analysis. For the epileptic mice, the spectral analysis showed that TeNT determines a power redistribution among the different neurophysiological bands in both acute and chronic phases. Using linear and nonlinear interdependence measures in both time and frequency domains, it was found in the acute phase that TeNT injection promotes a reduction of the interhemispheric coupling for high frequencies (12 -30 Hz) and small time lag (40 ms). On the other hand, the chronic period is characterized by a partial or complete recovery of the interhemispheric interdependence level. Granger causality test and symbolic transfer entropy indicate a greater driving influence of the TeNT-injected side on activity in the contralateral hemisphere in the chronic phase. Lastly, based on experimental observations, we built a computational model of LFPs to investigate the role of the ipsilateral inhibition and exicitatory interhemispheric connections in the dampening of the interhemispheric coupling. The time evolution of the interhemispheric coupling in such a relevant model of epilepsy has been addressed here.

  4. Space-time evolution of ejected plasma for the triggering of gas switch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shanhong, E-mail: liushanhong108098@163.com; Liu, Xuandong; Shen, Xi; Feng, Lei; Zhang, Qiaogen [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, School of Electrical Engineering, Institute of High Voltage Technology, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Tie, Weihao [Xi' an Electrical Engineering Research Institute, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2016-06-15

    Ejected plasma has been widely applied to the discharge process of gas spark switches as a trigger technology, and the development process of ejected plasma has a direct and important effect on the discharge characteristics of gas switches. In this paper, both the injection characteristics and space-time evolution of ejected plasma for the triggering of gas spark switch with different stored energies, pulse polarities, and pressures are studied. The discharge characteristics and breakdown process of a gas switch ignited by ejected plasma under different working coefficients are also discussed briefly. The results show that stored energy has significant influence on the characteristics of ejected plasma. With the increase of stored energy, the propulsion mode of ejected plasma in the axial direction transforms from “plasmoid” to “plasma flow,” and the distribution of the ejected plasma goes through “cloud,” “core-cloud,” and “branch” in sequence. The velocity of ejected plasma under negative pulse polarity is obviously higher than that under positive pulse polarity, especially at the very beginning time. The radial dimensions of ejected plasma under two kinds of pulse polarities follow the similar varying pattern over time, which increase first and then decrease, assuming an inverted “U”-shaped curve. With the increase of pressure, the velocity of ejected plasma significantly decreases and the “branch” channels droop earlier. Applying the ejected plasma to the triggering of a gas switch, the switch can be triggered reliably in a much wide working coefficient range of 10%–90%. With the increase of working coefficient, the breakdown process of the switch translates from slow working mode to fast working mode, and the delay time reduces from tens of μs to hundreds of ns.

  5. Space-time evolution of ejected plasma for the triggering of gas switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shanhong; Liu, Xuandong; Shen, Xi; Feng, Lei; Tie, Weihao; Zhang, Qiaogen

    2016-06-01

    Ejected plasma has been widely applied to the discharge process of gas spark switches as a trigger technology, and the development process of ejected plasma has a direct and important effect on the discharge characteristics of gas switches. In this paper, both the injection characteristics and space-time evolution of ejected plasma for the triggering of gas spark switch with different stored energies, pulse polarities, and pressures are studied. The discharge characteristics and breakdown process of a gas switch ignited by ejected plasma under different working coefficients are also discussed briefly. The results show that stored energy has significant influence on the characteristics of ejected plasma. With the increase of stored energy, the propulsion mode of ejected plasma in the axial direction transforms from "plasmoid" to "plasma flow," and the distribution of the ejected plasma goes through "cloud," "core-cloud," and "branch" in sequence. The velocity of ejected plasma under negative pulse polarity is obviously higher than that under positive pulse polarity, especially at the very beginning time. The radial dimensions of ejected plasma under two kinds of pulse polarities follow the similar varying pattern over time, which increase first and then decrease, assuming an inverted "U"-shaped curve. With the increase of pressure, the velocity of ejected plasma significantly decreases and the "branch" channels droop earlier. Applying the ejected plasma to the triggering of a gas switch, the switch can be triggered reliably in a much wide working coefficient range of 10%-90%. With the increase of working coefficient, the breakdown process of the switch translates from slow working mode to fast working mode, and the delay time reduces from tens of μs to hundreds of ns.

  6. Why time matters: codon evolution and the temporal dynamics of dN/dS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugal, Carina F; Wolf, Jochen B W; Kaj, Ingemar

    2014-01-01

    The ratio of divergence at nonsynonymous and synonymous sites, dN/dS, is a widely used measure in evolutionary genetic studies to investigate the extent to which selection modulates gene sequence evolution. Originally tailored to codon sequences of distantly related lineages, dN/dS represents the ratio of fixed nonsynonymous to synonymous differences. The impact of ancestral and lineage-specific polymorphisms on dN/dS, which we here show to be substantial for closely related lineages, is generally neglected in estimation techniques of dN/dS. To address this issue, we formulate a codon model that is firmly anchored in population genetic theory, derive analytical expressions for the dN/dS measure by Poisson random field approximation in a Markovian framework and validate the derivations by simulations. In good agreement, simulations and analytical derivations demonstrate that dN/dS is biased by polymorphisms at short time scales and that it can take substantial time for the expected value to settle at its time limit where only fixed differences are considered. We further show that in any attempt to estimate the dN/dS ratio from empirical data the effect of the intrinsic fluctuations of a ratio of stochastic variables, can even under neutrality yield extreme values of dN/dS at short time scales or in regions of low mutation rate. Taken together, our results have significant implications for the interpretation of dN/dS estimates, the McDonald-Kreitman test and other related statistics, in particular for closely related lineages.

  7. A KMS-like state of Hadamard type on Robertson-Walker spacetimes and its time evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Trucks, M

    1998-01-01

    In this work we define a new state on the Weyl algebra of the free massive scalar Klein-Gordon field on a Robertson-Walker spacetime and prove that it is a Hadamard state. The state is supposed to approximate a thermal equilibrium state on a Robertson-Walker spacetime and we call it an adiabatic KMS state. This opens the possibility to do quantum statistical mechanics on Robertson-Walker spacetimes in the algebraic framework and the analysis of the free Bose gas on Robertson-Walker spacetimes. The state reduces to an adiabatic vacuum state if the temperature is zero and it reduces to the usual KMS state if the scaling factor in the metric of the Robertson-Walker spacetime is constant. In the second part of our work we discuss the time evolution of adiabatic KMS states. The time evolution is described in terms of semigroups. We prove the existence of a propagator on the classical phase space. This defines a time evolution on the one-particle Hilbert space. We use this time evolution to analyze the evolution of...

  8. Replacing sedentary time with sleep, light, or moderate-to-vigorous physical activity: effects on self-regulation and executive functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanning, J; Porter, G; Awick, E A; Ehlers, D K; Roberts, S A; Cooke, G; Burzynska, A Z; Voss, M W; Kramer, A F; McAuley, E

    2017-04-01

    sedentary time with sleep was associated with marginally faster reaction time on mixed-repeated task-switching blocks (B = -12.20, p = .07) and faster reaction time on mixed-switch blocks (B = 17.21, p = .05), as well as reduced global reaction time switch cost (B = -16.86, p = .01). Substitution for light intensity physical activity did not produce significant effects. By replacing sedentary time with sleep and MVPA, individuals may bolster several important domains of self-regulatory behavior and executive functioning. This has important implications for the design of long-lasting health behavior interventions. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00438347.

  9. The evolution of the magnetic inclination angle as an explanation of the long term red timing-noise of pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Yi, Shu-Xu

    2015-01-01

    We study the possibility that the long term red timing-noise in pulsars originates from the evolution of the magnetic inclination angle $\\chi$. The braking torque under consideration is a combination of the dipole radiation and the current loss. We find that the evolution of $\\chi$ can give rise to extra cubic and fourth-order polynomial terms in the timing residuals. These two terms are determined by the efficiency of the dipole radiation, the relative electric-current density in the pulsar tube and $\\chi$. The following observation facts can be explained with this model: a) young pulsars have positive $\\ddot{\

  10. Noncoplanar Beam Angle Class Solutions to Replace Time-Consuming Patient-Specific Beam Angle Optimization in Robotic Prostate Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, Linda, E-mail: l.rossi@erasmusmc.nl; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Aluwini, Shafak; Heijmen, Ben

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate development of a recipe for the creation of a beam angle class solution (CS) for noncoplanar prostate stereotactic body radiation therapy to replace time-consuming individualized beam angle selection (iBAS) without significant loss in plan quality, using the in-house “Erasmus-iCycle” optimizer for fully automated beam profile optimization and iBAS. Methods and Materials: For 30 patients, Erasmus-iCycle was first used to generate 15-, 20-, and 25-beam iBAS plans for a CyberKnife equipped with a multileaf collimator. With these plans, 6 recipes for creation of beam angle CSs were investigated. Plans of 10 patients were used to create CSs based on the recipes, and the other 20 to independently test them. For these tests, Erasmus-iCycle was also used to generate intensity modulated radiation therapy plans for the fixed CS beam setups. Results: Of the tested recipes for CS creation, only 1 resulted in 15-, 20-, and 25-beam noncoplanar CSs without plan deterioration compared with iBAS. For the patient group, mean differences in rectum D{sub 1cc}, V{sub 60GyEq}, V{sub 40GyEq}, and D{sub mean} between 25-beam CS plans and 25-beam plans generated with iBAS were 0.2 ± 0.4 Gy, 0.1% ± 0.2%, 0.2% ± 0.3%, and 0.1 ± 0.2 Gy, respectively. Differences between 15- and 20-beam CS and iBAS plans were also negligible. Plan quality for CS plans relative to iBAS plans was also preserved when narrower planning target volume margins were arranged and when planning target volume dose inhomogeneity was decreased. Using a CS instead of iBAS reduced the computation time by a factor of 14 to 25, mainly depending on beam number, without loss in plan quality. Conclusions: A recipe for creation of robust beam angle CSs for robotic prostate stereotactic body radiation therapy has been developed. Compared with iBAS, computation times decreased by a factor 14 to 25. The use of a CS may avoid long planning times without losses in plan quality.

  11. Galaxy Assembly and the Evolution of Structure over the First Third of Cosmic Time - III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Sandra

    2011-10-01

    This survey will document the first third of galactic evolution fromz=8 to 1.5 andtest for evolution in the properties of Type Ia supernovae to z 2 byimaging more than 250,000 galaxies with WFC3/IR and ACS. Five premiermulti-wavelength regions are selected from within the Spitzer SEDSsurvey, providing complementaryIRAC data down to 26.5 AB mag, a unique resource forstellar masses at high redshifts. The use of five widely separatedfields mitigates cosmic variance and yields statistically robustsamples of galaxies down to 10^9 M_Sun out to z 8.We adopt a two-tiered strategy with a "Wide" component {roughly 2orbits deep over 0.2 sq. degrees} and a "Deep" component {roughly 12orbits deep over 0.04 sq. degrees}. Combining these with ultra-deepimaging from the Cycle 17 HUDF09 program yields a three-tieredstrategy for efficient sampling of both rare/bright and faint/commonobjects.Three of the Wide-survey fields are located in COSMOS, EGS, andUKIDSS/UDS. Each of these consists of roughly 3x15 WFC3/IR tiles.Each WFC3 tile will be observed for 2 orbits, with single orbitsseparated in time to allow a search for high-redshift Type Ia SNe.The co-added exposure times will be approximately 2/3 orbit in J{F125W} and 4/3 orbit in H {F160W}. ACS parallels overlap most of theWFC3 area and will consist of roughly 2/3 orbits in V {F606W} and4/3 orbit in I {F814W}. Because of the larger area of ACS,this results in effective exposures that are twice as long {4/3 in V,8/3 in I}, making a very significant improvement to existing ACSmosaics in COSMOS and EGS and creating a new ACS mosaic in UDS/UKIDSSwhere none now exists. Other Wide-survey components are located inthe GOODS fields {North and South} surrounding the Deep-survey areas.The Deep-survey fields cover roughly half of each GOODS field, withexact areas and placements to be determined as part of the Phase-2process. Each WFC3/IR tile within the Deep regions will receiveapproximately 12 orbits of exposure time split between Y{F105W}, J

  12. Time-evolution of quantum systems via a complex nonlinear Riccati equation. I. Conservative systems with time-independent Hamiltonian

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, Hans, E-mail: hans@ciencias.unam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 70-543, 04510 México DF (Mexico); Schuch, Dieter [Institut für Theoretische Physik, JW Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Castaños, Octavio, E-mail: ocasta@nucleares.unam.mx [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 70-543, 04510 México DF (Mexico); Rosas-Ortiz, Oscar [Physics Department, Cinvestav, A. P. 14-740, 07000 México D. F. (Mexico)

    2015-09-15

    The sensitivity of the evolution of quantum uncertainties to the choice of the initial conditions is shown via a complex nonlinear Riccati equation leading to a reformulation of quantum dynamics. This sensitivity is demonstrated for systems with exact analytic solutions with the form of Gaussian wave packets. In particular, one-dimensional conservative systems with at most quadratic Hamiltonians are studied.

  13. [Animal experiment, can we replace?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combrisson, H

    2017-09-01

    Animal experiment is a subject of controversies. Some people, defenders of animals, think that it is not acceptable to use for scientific purposes at the risk of making them suffer or assert that the results obtained with animals are not transposable in the human beings. Others, in particular researchers in biology or medicine, think that the animal models are essential for the biomedical search. This confrontation of the opinions bases largely on an evolution of the place of animals in our society. The regulations authorize the use of animals for scientific purposes but oblige to make it under restrictive conditions. The application of 3Rs - replacement, reduction, and refinement - expressed in 1959 by Russel and Burch is an ethical guide to improve the welfare of animals in research. The alternative methods do not allow, in the present state of the knowledge, to answer all the scientific questions in biology and medicine research. They are, most of the time, complementary methods of the in vivo methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Time evolution towards q-Gaussian stationary states through unified Itô-Stratonovich stochastic equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, B Coutinho; Tsallis, C

    2010-12-01

    We consider a class of single-particle one-dimensional stochastic equations which include external field, additive, and multiplicative noises. We use a parameter θ ∊ [0,1] which enables the unification of the traditional Itô and Stratonovich approaches, now recovered, respectively, as the θ=0 and θ=1/2 particular cases to derive the associated Fokker-Planck equation (FPE). These FPE is a linear one, and its stationary state is given by a q-Gaussian distribution with q=(τ+2M(2-θ))/(τ+2M(1-θ)<3), where τ ≥ 0 characterizes the strength of the confining external field and M ≥ 0 is the (normalized) amplitude of the multiplicative noise. We also calculate the standard kurtosis κ(₁) and the q-generalized kurtosis κ(q) (i.e., the standard kurtosis but using the escort distribution instead of the direct one). Through these two quantities we numerically follow the time evolution of the distributions. Finally, we exhibit how these quantities can be used as convenient calibrations for determining the index q from numerical data obtained through experiments, observations, or numerical computations.

  15. Constraining the time evolution of dark energy, curvature and neutrino properties with cosmic chronometers

    CERN Document Server

    Moresco, Michele; Verde, Licia; Cimatti, Andrea; Pozzetti, Lucia; Maraston, Claudia; Thomas, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    We use the latest compilation of observational H(z) measurements obtained with cosmic chronometers in the redshift range $0time evolution of dark energy, yielding constraints competitive with those obtained using SNe and/or BAO. From late-Universe probes alone we find that $w_0=-0.9\\pm0.18$ and $w...

  16. The Illustris Simulation: the evolution of galaxy populations across cosmic time

    CERN Document Server

    Genel, Shy; Springel, Volker; Sijacki, Debora; Nelson, Dylan; Snyder, Greg; Rodriguez-Gomez, Vicente; Torrey, Paul; Hernquist, Lars

    2014-01-01

    We present an overview of galaxy evolution across cosmic time in the Illustris Simulation. Illustris is an N-body/hydrodynamical simulation that evolves 2*1820^3 resolution elements in a (106.5Mpc)^3 box from cosmological initial conditions down to z=0 using the AREPO moving-mesh code. The simulation uses a state-of-the-art set of physical models for galaxy formation that was tuned to reproduce the z=0 stellar mass function and the history of the cosmic star-formation rate density. We find that Illustris successfully reproduces a plethora of observations of galaxy populations at various redshifts, for which no tuning was performed, and provide predictions for future observations. In particular, we discuss (a) the buildup of galactic mass, showing stellar mass functions and the relations between stellar mass and halo mass from z=7 to z=0, (b) galaxy number density profiles around massive central galaxies out to z=4, (c) the gas and total baryon content of both galaxies and their halos for different redshifts, ...

  17. Restudy on Dark Matter Time-Evolution in the Littlest Higgs Model with T-Parity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAO Qing-Peng; TANG Jian; LI Xue-Qian

    2008-01-01

    Following previous study, in the littlest Higgs model (LHM), the heavy photon is supposed to be a possible dark matter candidate and its relic abundance of the heavy photon is estimated in terms of the Boltzman-Lee-Weinberg time-evolution equation. The effect of the T-parity violation is also considered. Our calculations show that when Higgs mass MH taken to be 300 GeV and do not considering T-parity violation, only two narrow ranges 133 < MAn < 135 GeV and 167MAH169 GeV are tolerable with the current astrophysical observation and if 135 < MAH < 167 GeV, there must at least exist another species of heavy particle contributing to the cold dark matter. As long as the T-parity can be violated, the heavy photon can decay into regular standard model particles and would affect the dark matter abundance in the universe, we discuss the constraint on the T-parity violation parameter based on the present data. Direct detection prospects are also discussed in some detail.

  18. THE TIME EVOLUTION OF HH 1 FROM FOUR EPOCHS OF HST IMAGES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raga, A. C.; Esquivel, A. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ap. 70-543, 04510 D.F., México (Mexico); Reipurth, B. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Bally, J., E-mail: raga@nucleares.unam.mx [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, UCB 389, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    We present an analysis of four epochs of Hα and [S ii] λλ 6716/6731 Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images of HH 1. For determining proper motions, we explore a new method based on the analysis of spatially degraded images obtained convolving the images with wavelet functions of chosen widths. With this procedure, we are able to generate maps of proper motion velocities along and across the outflow axis, as well as (angularly integrated) proper motion velocity distributions. From the four available epochs, we find the time evolution of the velocities, intensities, and spatial distribution of the line emission. We find that over the last two decades HH 1 shows a clear acceleration. Also, the Hα and [S ii] intensities first dropped and then recovered in the more recent (2014) images. Finally, we show a comparison between the two available HST epochs of [O iii] λ 5007 (1994 and 2014), in which we see a clear drop in the value of the [O iii]/Hα ratio.

  19. Climate change-driven cliff and beach evolution at decadal to centennial time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erikson, Li; O'Neill, Andrea; Barnard, Patrick; Vitousek, Sean; Limber, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Here we develop a computationally efficient method that evolves cross-shore profiles of sand beaches with or without cliffs along natural and urban coastal environments and across expansive geographic areas at decadal to centennial time-scales driven by 21st century climate change projections. The model requires projected sea level rise rates, extrema of nearshore wave conditions, bluff recession and shoreline change rates, and cross-shore profiles representing present-day conditions. The model is applied to the ~470-km long coast of the Southern California Bight, USA, using recently available projected nearshore waves and bluff recession and shoreline change rates. The results indicate that eroded cliff material, from unarmored cliffs, contribute 11% to 26% to the total sediment budget. Historical beach nourishment rates will need to increase by more than 30% for a 0.25 m sea level rise (~2044) and by at least 75% by the year 2100 for a 1 m sea level rise, if evolution of the shoreline is to keep pace with rising sea levels.

  20. The tail effect in gravitational radiation-reaction: time non-locality and renormalization group evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Galley, Chad R; Porto, Rafael A; Ross, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    We use the effective field theory (EFT) framework to calculate the tail effect in gravitational radiation reaction, which enters at 4PN order in the dynamics of a binary system. The computation entails a subtle interplay between the near (or potential) and far (or radiation) zones. In particular, we find that the tail contribution to the effective action is non-local in time, and features both a dissipative and a `conservative' term. The latter includes a logarithmic ultraviolet divergence, which we show cancels against an infrared singularity found in the (conservative) near zone. The origin of this behavior in the long-distance EFT is due to the point-particle limit --shrinking the binary to a point-- which transforms a would-be infrared singularity into an ultraviolet divergence. This is a common occurrence in an EFT approach, which furthermore allows us to use renormalization group (RG) techniques to resum the resulting logarithmic contributions. We then derive the RG evolution for the binding potential a...

  1. Time Evolution of Relativistic Force-Free Fields Connecting a Neutron Star and its Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Asano, E; Matsumoto, R; Asano, Eiji; Uchida, Toshio; Matsumoto, Ryoji

    2005-01-01

    We study the magnetic interaction between a neutron star and its disk by solving the time-dependent relativistic force-free equations. At the initial state, we assume that the dipole magnetic field of the neutron star connects the neutron star and its equatorial disk, which deeply enters into the magnetosphere of the neutron star. Magnetic fields are assumed to be frozen to the star and the disk. The rotation of the neutron star and the disk is imposed as boundary conditions. We apply Harten-Lax-van Leer (HLL) method to simulate the evolution of the star-disk system. We carry out simulations for (1) a disk inside the corotation radius, in which the disk rotates faster than the star, and (2) a disk outside the corotation radius, in which the neutron star rotates faster than the disk. Numerical results indicate that for both models, the magnetic field lines connecting the disk and the star inflate as they are twisted by the differential rotation between the disk and the star. When the twist angle exceeds pi rad...

  2. The Origin and Evolution of (Ultra)Luminous Infrared Galaxies Over Cosmic Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S.; CANDELS Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    In the local universe, Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies (ULIRGs, L_IR>10^12 L_sun) are all interacting and merging systems. To date, studies of ULIRGs at high redshift have found a variety of results due to their varying selection effects and small sample sizes. Some studies have found that mergers still dominate the galaxy morphology while others have found a high fraction of morphologically normal or clumpy star forming disks. Near-infrared imaging is crucial for interpreting galaxy structure at high redshift since it probes the rest frame optical light of a galaxy and thus we can compare directly to studies in the local universe. We explore the evolution of the morphological properties of (U)LIRGs over cosmic time using a large sample of galaxies from Herschel observations of the CANDELS fields (including GOODS, COSMOS, and UDS). In particular, we investigate whether the role of galaxy mergers has changed between 2 and now using the extensive visual classification catalogs produced by the CANDELS team. The combination of a selection from Herschel, near the peak of IR emission, and rest-frame optical morphologies from CANDELS, provides the ideal comparison to nearby (U)LIRGs. We then study the how role of galaxy mergers and the presence of AGN activity correspond to the galaxy's position in the star formation rate - stellar mass plane.

  3. Space–time evolution of heavy sterile neutrinos in cascade decays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Boyanovsky

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Heavy sterile-like neutrinos may be produced resonantly from the decay of pseudoscalar mesons and may decay into several different channels in a cascade Φ→Lανh; νh→{X}. In general these are rare events with displaced vertices. We provide a non-perturbative and manifestly unitary framework that describes the cascade decay and yields the space–time evolution of the probabilities for sterile neutrinos, final states and the total number of events at a far detector. The results are general, valid for Dirac or Majorana neutrinos and only input the total decay rates and branching ratios for the production and decay channels. We apply the results to two examples of “visible” decay: (i K+→e+νh→(e+e+e−νe via a standard model charged current vertex and (ii the radiative decay K+→μ+νh→(μ+νaγ. For this latter cascade process we find substantial corrections to previous assessments within the parameter space argued to solve the anomalous excess of electron-like events at MiniBooNE.

  4. Deep time perspective on turtle neck evolution: chasing the Hox code by vertebral morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhmer, Christine; Werneburg, Ingmar

    2017-08-21

    The unparalleled ability of turtle neck retraction is possible in three different modes, which characterize stem turtles, living side-necked (Pleurodira), and hidden-necked (Cryptodira) turtles, respectively. Despite the conservatism in vertebral count among turtles, there is significant functional and morphological regionalization in the cervical vertebral column. Since Hox genes play a fundamental role in determining the differentiation in vertebra morphology and based on our reconstruction of evolutionary genetics in deep time, we hypothesize genetic differences among the turtle groups and between turtles and other land vertebrates. We correlated anterior Hox gene expression and the quantifiable shape of the vertebrae to investigate the morphological modularity in the neck across living and extinct turtles. This permitted the reconstruction of the hypothetical ancestral Hox code pattern of the whole turtle clade. The scenario of the evolution of axial patterning in turtles indicates shifts in the spatial expression of HoxA-5 in relation to the reduction of cervical ribs in modern turtles and of HoxB-5 linked with a lower morphological differentiation between the anterior cervical vertebrae observed in cryptodirans. By comparison with the mammalian pattern, we illustrate how the fixed count of eight cervical vertebrae in turtles resulted from the emergence of the unique turtle shell.

  5. The time evolution of HH 1 from four epochs of HST images

    CERN Document Server

    Raga, A C; Esquivel, A; Bally, J

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of four epochs of H$\\alpha$ and [S II] $\\lambda\\lambda$ 6716/6731 HST images of HH 1. For determining proper motions we explore a new method based on analysis of spatially degraded images obtained convolving the images with wavelet functions of chosen widths. With this procedure we are able to generate maps of proper motion velocities along and across the outflow axis, as well as (angularly integrated) proper motion velocity distributions. From the four available epochs, we find the time evolution of the velocities, intensities and spatial distribution of the line emission. We find that over the last two decades HH 1 shows a clear acceleration. Also, the H$\\alpha$ and [S II] intensities have first dropped, and then recovered in the more recent (2014) images. Finally, we show a comparison between the two available HST epochs of [O III] $\\lambda$ 5007 (1994 and 2014), in which we see a clear drop in the value of the [O III]/H$\\alpha$ ratio.

  6. Long-time evolution of sequestered CO$_2$ in porous media

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, Yossi

    2014-01-01

    CO$_2$ sequestration in subsurface reservoirs is important for limiting atmospheric CO$_2$ concentrations. However, a complete physical picture able to predict the structure developing within the porous medium is lacking. We investigate theoretically reactive transport in the long-time evolution of carbon in the brine-rock environment. As CO$_2$ is injected into a brine-rock environment, a carbonate-rich region is created amid brine. Within the carbonate-rich region minerals dissolve and migrate from regions of high concentration to low concentration, along with other dissolved carbonate species. This causes mineral precipitation at the interface between the two regions. We argue that precipitation in a small layer reduces diffusivity, and eventually causes mechanical trapping of the CO$_2$. Consequently, only a small fraction of the CO$_2$ is converted to solid mineral; the remainder either dissolves in water or is trapped in its original form. We also study the case of a pure CO$_2$ bubble surrounded by bri...

  7. Origins Space Telescope: Galaxy and Black Hole Evolution over Cosmic Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Alexandra; Origins Space Telescope Study Team

    2017-01-01

    The Origins Space Telescope (OST) is the mission concept for the Far-Infrared Surveyor, a study in development by NASA in preparation for the 2020 Astronomy and Astrophysics Decadal Survey. Origins is planned to be a large aperture, actively-cooled telescope covering a wide span of the mid- to far-infrared spectrum. Its imagers and spectrographs will enable a variety of surveys of the sky that will discover and characterize the most distant galaxies, Milky-Way, exoplanets, and the outer reaches of our Solar system. Origins will enable flagship-quality general observing programs led by the astronomical community in the 2030s. The Science and Technology Definition Team (STDT) would like to hear your science needs and ideas for this mission. The team can be contacted at firsurveyor_info@lists.ipac.caltech.edu. This presentation will provide a summary of the science case related to galaxy formation and evolution. Origins will investigate the connection between black hole growth and star formation, understand the role of feedback from supernovae and active galactic nuclei, probe the multiphase interstellar medium, and chart the rise of metals over cosmic time.

  8. Three Dimensional Structure and Time Evolution of a Transition Region Explosive Event Observed in He II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, J. L.; Kankelborg, C. C.; Thomas, R. J.; Longcope, D.

    2007-12-01

    Transition Region Explosive Events (TREEs) have been observed with slit spectrographs since at least 1975, most commonly in lines of C IV (1548A,1550A) and Si IV (1393A, 1402A). We report what we believe to be the first observation of a TREE in He II 304A. With the MOSES sounding rocket, a novel type of imaging spectrograph, we are able to see the spatial and spectral structure of the event. It consists of a bright core expelling two jets, oppositely directed but not collinear, which curve away from the axis of the core. The jets have both line-of-sight and sky-plane motion. The core is a region of high non-thermal doppler broadening, characteristic of TREEs. It is possible to resolve the core broadening into red and blue line-of-sight components. MOSES captured approximately 150 sec of time evolution before the rocket flight ended. We see the beginning (core activation) and middle (jet ejection), but not the end. It is clear from our data-set that TREEs in He II 304A are much less common than observed in other wavelengths.

  9. Time-dependent evolution of rock slopes by a multi-modelling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzano, F.; Della Seta, M.; Martino, S.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a multi-modelling approach that incorporates contributions from morpho-evolutionary modelling, detailed engineering-geological modelling and time-dependent stress-strain numerical modelling to analyse the rheological evolution of a river valley slope over approximately 102 kyr. The slope is located in a transient, tectonically active landscape in southwestern Tyrrhenian Calabria (Italy), where gravitational processes drive failures in rock slopes. Constraints on the valley profile development were provided by a morpho-evolutionary model based on the correlation of marine and river strath terraces. Rock mass classes were identified through geomechanical parameters that were derived from engineering-geological surveys and outputs of a multi-sensor slope monitoring system. The rock mass classes were associated to lithotechnical units to obtain a high-resolution engineering-geological model along a cross section of the valley. Time-dependent stress-strain numerical modelling reproduced the main morpho-evolutionary stages of the valley slopes. The findings demonstrate that a complex combination of eustatism, uplift and Mass Rock Creep (MRC) deformations can lead to first-time failures of rock slopes when unstable conditions are encountered up to the generation of stress-controlled shear zones. The multi-modelling approach enabled us to determine that such complex combinations may have been sufficient for the first-time failure of the S. Giovanni slope at approximately 140 ka (MIS 7), even without invoking any trigger. Conversely, further reactivations of the landslide must be related to triggers such as earthquakes, rainfall and anthropogenic activities. This failure involved a portion of the slope where a plasticity zone resulted from mass rock creep that evolved with a maximum strain rate of 40% per thousand years, after the formation of a river strath terrace. This study demonstrates that the multi-modelling approach presented herein is a useful

  10. Timing and rates of long-term landscape evolution in Southern Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollenz, S.; Glasmacher, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    The eastern Argentina South Atlantic passive continental margin is distinguished by a very flat topography. Out of the so called Pampean flat two mountain ranges are arising. These mountain ranges, the Sierras Australes and the Sierras Septentrionales, are located in the State of Buenos Aires south of the capital Buenos Aires. North of the Sierras Septentrionales the Salado basin is located. The Sierras Septentrionales and the Sierras Australes are also divided by a smaller intracratonic basin. Further in the South the Colorado basin is located. The Sierras Australes is a variscian fold belt originated by strong phases of metamorphosis, but till now it is unclear by how many tectonic phases the area was influenced (Tomezzoli & Vilas, 1999). It consists of Proterozoic to Paleozoic rocks. The Sierras Septentrionales consists mainly of Precambrian crystalline rocks. The Precambrian sequences are overlain by younger Sediments (Cingolani, 2010). The aim is to understand the long-term landscape evolution of the area by quantifiying erosion- and exhumation-rates and by dating ancient rock-uplift-events. Another goal is to find out how the opening of the south atlantic took effect on this region. To fulfill this goal, thermochronological techniques, such as fission-track dating and (U-Th-Sm)/He dating has been applied to samples from the region. Because there was no low- temperature thermochronology done in this area, both techniques were applied on apatites and zircons. Furthermore, numerical modeling of the cooling history has provided the data base for the quantification of the exhumation rates. The data-set shows clusters of different ages which can be linked to tectonic activities during late Paleozoic times. Also the thermokinematic modeling is leading to new insights of the evolution of both mountain ranges and shows patterns of ongoing tectonic processes in this region. Caltculated exhumation rates show also varying cooling historys and the influence of tectonics

  11. Space and time damage evolution during the prenucleation of shear failure in rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Francois; Cordonnier, Benoit; Kandula, Neelima; Kobchenko, Maya; Weiss, Jérôme; Zhu, Wenlu; Dysthe, Dag

    2017-04-01

    Precursory signals to large earthquakes include foreshocks, increase or decrease of seismic velocities, or variations of the chemistry of spring waters. As stresses build-up at depth before rupture, these precursors may have different origins, from the formation of microfractures, to creep in the nucleation zone, or modifications of flow paths. However, these precursors are not observed for all earthquakes, making challenging their use to predict their occurrence. On the one hand, rocks show various degrees of heterogeneities at the microscale; on the other hand similar stress-strain curves are measured when approaching rupture under compression in laboratory experiments: an elastic domain is followed by a deviation from elasticity as stress is increased towards failure. Based on these field and laboratory observations, the question arises then why, despite similar stress-strain curves, rocks may show different precursors before failure. We have performed a series of laboratory experiments where various rocks (limestone, sandstone, monzonite, marble) where deformed until shear failure at conditions relevant for earthquake nucleation. Using an X-ray transparent triaxial rig installed at the European Synchrotron, the evolution of damage (microcracks, fractures, pore collapse) before failure can be imaged in-situ by X-ray microtomography. We show that, before failure, the density of these damage events can either increase, decrease, or remain constant. The reason is that two mechanisms are competing at the microscale: the formation of microcracks that decreases rock density due to dilatancy, and the collapse of pores or voids that increases rock density towards failure. The competition between these two mechanisms depends on the nature of the host rock and controls how seismic velocities and fluid flow paths evolve prior to failure. These data show, for the first time with high time and space resolution, the nature of the precursory signals before rupture, with

  12. Authigenic iron oxide proxies for marine zinc over geological time and implications for eukaryotic metallome evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, L J; Lalonde, S V; Saito, M A; Planavsky, N J; Mloszewska, A M; Pecoits, E; Scott, C; Dupont, C L; Kappler, A; Konhauser, K O

    2013-07-01

    Here, we explore enrichments in paleomarine Zn as recorded by authigenic iron oxides including Precambrian iron formations, ironstones, and Phanerozoic hydrothermal exhalites. This compilation of new and literature-based iron formation analyses track dissolved Zn abundances and constrain the magnitude of the marine reservoir over geological time. Overall, the iron formation record is characterized by a fairly static range in Zn/Fe ratios throughout the Precambrian, consistent with the shale record (Scott et al., 2013, Nature Geoscience, 6, 125-128). When hypothetical partitioning scenarios are applied to this record, paleomarine Zn concentrations within about an order of magnitude of modern are indicated. We couple this examination with new chemical speciation models to interpret the iron formation record. We present two scenarios: first, under all but the most sulfidic conditions and with Zn-binding organic ligand concentrations similar to modern oceans, the amount of bioavailable Zn remained relatively unchanged through time. Late proliferation of Zn in eukaryotic metallomes has previously been linked to marine Zn biolimitation, but under this scenario the expansion in eukaryotic Zn metallomes may be better linked to biologically intrinsic evolutionary factors. In this case, zinc's geochemical and biological evolution may be decoupled and viewed as a function of increasing need for genome regulation and diversification of Zn-binding transcription factors. In the second scenario, we consider Archean organic ligand complexation in such excess that it may render Zn bioavailability low. However, this is dependent on Zn-organic ligand complexes not being bioavailable, which remains unclear. In this case, although bioavailability may be low, sphalerite precipitation is prevented, thereby maintaining a constant Zn inventory throughout both ferruginous and euxinic conditions. These results provide new perspectives and constraints on potential couplings between the

  13. TIME EVOLUTION OF PLASMA PARAMETERS DURING THE RISE OF A SOLAR PROMINENCE INSTABILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orozco Suárez, D.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Trujillo Bueno, J. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Díaz, A. J., E-mail: dorozco@iac.es [Departament de Física, Universitat de les Illes Balears, E-07122 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    2014-04-10

    We present high-spatial resolution spectropolarimetric observations of a quiescent hedgerow prominence taken in the He I 1083.0 nm triplet. The observation consisted of a time series in sit-and-stare mode of ∼36 minutes duration. The spectrograph's slit crossed the prominence body and we recorded the time evolution of individual vertical threads. Eventually, we observed the development of a dark Rayleigh-Taylor plume that propagated upward with a velocity, projected onto the plane of the sky, of 17 km s{sup –1}. Interestingly, the plume apex collided with the prominence threads pushing them aside. We inferred Doppler shifts, Doppler widths, and magnetic field strength variations by interpreting the He I Stokes profiles with the HAZEL code. The Doppler shifts show that clusters of threads move coherently while individual threads have oscillatory patterns. Regarding the plume we found strong redshifts (∼9-12 km s{sup –1}) and large Doppler widths (∼10 km s{sup –1}) at the plume apex when it passed through the prominence body and before it disintegrated. We associate the redshifts with perspective effects while the Doppler widths are more likely due to an increase in the local temperature. No local variations of the magnetic field strength associated with the passage of the plume were found; this leads us to conclude that the plumes are no more magnetized than the surroundings. Finally, we found that some of the threads' oscillations are locally damped, what allowed us to apply prominence seismology techniques to infer additional prominence physical parameters.

  14. Geochemical modelling of groundwater evolution and residence time at the Olkiluoto site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitkaenen, P.; Luukkonen, A. [VTT Communities and Infrastructure, Espoo (Finland); Ruotsalainen, P. [Fintact Oy (Finland); Leino-Forsman, H.; Vuorinen, U. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-05-01

    An understanding of the geochemical evolution of groundwater is an essential part of the performance assessment and safety analysis of the final disposal of radioactive waste into the bedrock. The performance of technical barriers and migration of possibly released radionuclides depend on chemical conditions. A prerequisite for understanding these factors is the ability to specify the water-rock interactions which control chemical conditions in groundwater. The objective of this study is to interpret the processes and factors which control the hydrogeochemistry, such as pH and redox conditions. A model of the hydrogeochemical progress in different parts of the crystalline bedrock at Olkiluoto has been created and the significance of chemical reactions and groundwater mixing along different flowpaths calculated. Long term hydrodynamics have also been evaluated. The interpretation and modelling are based on water samples (63 altogether) obtained from precipitation, Baltic Sea, soil layer, shallow wells in the bedrock, and eight deep boreholes in the bedrock for which a comprehensive data set on dissolved chemical species and isotopes was available. Some analyses of dissolved gases and fracture calcite and their isotopic measurements were also utilised. The data covers the bedrock at Olkiluoto to a depth of 1000 m. The results from groundwater chemistry, isotopes, petrography, hydrogeology of the site, geomicrobial studies, and PCA and speciation calculations were used in the evaluation of evolutionary processes at the site. The geochemical interpretation of water-rock interaction, isotope-chemical evolution and mixing of palaeo water types were approached by mass-balance calculations (NETPATH). Reaction-path calculations (EQ3/6) were used to verify the thermodynamic feasibility of the reaction models obtained. The interpretation and calculation of hydrochemical data from Olkiluoto reveals the complex nature of hydrogeochemical evolution at the site. Changes in

  15. Initiation time of renal replacement therapy on patients with acute kidney injury: A systematic review and meta-analysis of 8179 participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Caixia; Lv, Lin-Sheng; Huang, Hui; Guan, Jianqiang; Ye, Zengchun; Li, Shaomin; Wang, Yanni; Lou, Tanqi; Liu, Xun

    2017-01-01

    The early initiation of renal replacement therapy has been recommended for patients with acute renal failure by some studies, but its effects on mortality and renal recovery are unknown. We conducted an updated meta-analysis to provide quantitative evaluations of the association between the early initiation of renal replacement therapy and mortality for patients with acute kidney injury. After applying inclusion/exclusion criteria, 51 studies, including 10 randomized controlled trials, with a total of 8179 patients were analyzed. Analysis of the included trials showed that patients receiving early renal replacement therapy had a 25% reduction in all-cause mortality compared to those receiving late renal replacement therapy (risk ratio [RR] 0.75, 95% CI [0.69, 0.82]). We also noted a 30% increase in renal recovery (RR 1.30, 95% CI [1.07, 1.56]), a reduction in hospitalization of 5.84 days (mean difference [MD], 95% CI [-10.27, -1.41]) and a reduction in the duration of mechanical ventilation of 2.33 days (MD, 95% CI [-3.40, -1.26]) in patients assigned to early renal replacement therapy. The early initiation of renal replacement therapy was associated with a decreased risk of all-cause mortality compared with the late initiation of RRT in patients with acute kidney injury. These findings should be interpreted with caution given the heterogeneity between studies. Further studies are needed to identify the causes of mortality and to assess whether mortality differs by dialysis dose.

  16. Teaching Evolution through the Hardy-Weinberg Principle: A Real-Time, Active-Learning Exercise Using Classroom Response Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Michael S.; Gardner, Grant E.

    2013-01-01

    Teaching population genetics provides a bridge between genetics and evolution by using examples of the mechanisms that underlie changes in allele frequencies over time. Existing methods of teaching these concepts often rely on computer simulations or hand calculations, which distract students from the material and are problematic for those with…

  17. Lie transformation method on quantum state evolution of a general time-dependent driven and damped parametric oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Weiping

    2016-10-01

    A variety of dynamics in nature and society can be approximately treated as a driven and damped parametric oscillator. An intensive investigation of this time-dependent model from an algebraic point of view provides a consistent method to resolve the classical dynamics and the quantum evolution in order to understand the time-dependent phenomena that occur not only in the macroscopic classical scale for the synchronized behaviors but also in the microscopic quantum scale for a coherent state evolution. By using a Floquet U-transformation on a general time-dependent quadratic Hamiltonian, we exactly solve the dynamic behaviors of a driven and damped parametric oscillator to obtain the optimal solutions by means of invariant parameters of Ks to combine with Lewis-Riesenfeld invariant method. This approach can discriminate the external dynamics from the internal evolution of a wave packet by producing independent parametric equations that dramatically facilitate the parametric control on the quantum state evolution in a dissipative system. In order to show the advantages of this method, several time-dependent models proposed in the quantum control field are analyzed in detail.

  18. Why time matters: codon evolution and the temporal dynamics of dN/dS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mugal, Carina F; Wolf, Jochen B W; Kaj, Ingemar

    2014-01-01

    The ratio of divergence at nonsynonymous and synonymous sites, dN/dS, is a widely used measure in evolutionary genetic studies to investigate the extent to which selection modulates gene sequence evolution...

  19. A Study of Neutral B Meson Time Evolution Using Exclusively Reconstructed Semileptonic Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, T

    2003-11-05

    The Standard Model of particle physics describes the fundamental building blocks of the Universe and their basic interactions. The model naturally describes the time evolution of the basic particles, of which lifetime and mixing are two examples. The neutral B meson, consisting of a bottom quark and an oppositely charged down quark, enjoys a lifetime of about 1.5 ps and the special property of mixing with its antiparticle partner, the {bar B}{sup 0}. That is, due to second order weak interactions, the B{sup 0} meson can change into a {bar B}{sup 0} meson and back again as it evolves through time. The details of this behavior offer an opportunity to closely examine the Standard Model. In this dissertation, I report on a measurement of the lifetime and mixing frequency of the neutral B meson. Using the semileptonic decay channel B{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}, we select more than 68,000 signal and background candidates from about 23 million B{bar B} pairs collected in 1999-2000 with the BABAR detector located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The other B in the event is reconstructed inclusively. By constructing a master probability density function that describes the distribution of decay time differences in the sample, we use a maximum likelihood technique to simultaneously extract the B{sup 0} lifetime and mixing parameters with precision comparable to the year 2000 world average. The results are {tau}{sub B{sup 0}} = (1.523{sub -0.023}{sup +0.024} {+-} 0.022) ps and {Delta}m{sub d} = (0.492 {+-} 0.018 {+-} 0.013) ps{sup -1}. The statistical correlation coefficient between {tau}{sub B{sup 0}} and {Delta}m{sub d} is -0.22. I describe in detail several cutting-edge strategies this analysis uses to study these phenomena, laying important groundwork for the future. I also discuss several extensions of this work to include possible measurements of higher order parameters such as {Delta}{Lambda}{sub d}.

  20. Genome dynamics explain the evolution of flowering time CCT domain gene families in the Poaceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Cockram

    Full Text Available Numerous CCT domain genes are known to control flowering in plants. They belong to the CONSTANS-like (COL and PREUDORESPONSE REGULATOR (PRR gene families, which in addition to a CCT domain possess B-box or response-regulator domains, respectively. Ghd7 is the most recently identified COL gene to have a proven role in the control of flowering time in the Poaceae. However, as it lacks B-box domains, its inclusion within the COL gene family, technically, is incorrect. Here, we show Ghd7 belongs to a larger family of previously uncharacterized Poaceae genes which possess just a single CCT domain, termed here CCT MOTIF FAMILY (CMF genes. We molecularly describe the CMF (and related COL and PRR gene families in four sequenced Poaceae species, as well as in the draft genome assembly of barley (Hordeum vulgare. Genetic mapping of the ten barley CMF genes identified, as well as twelve previously unmapped HvCOL and HvPRR genes, finds the majority map to colinear positions relative to their Poaceae orthologues. Combined inter-/intra-species comparative and phylogenetic analysis of CMF, COL and PRR gene families indicates they evolved prior to the monocot/dicot divergence ∼200 mya, with Poaceae CMF evolution described as the interplay between whole genome duplication in the ancestral cereal, and subsequent clade-specific mutation, deletion and duplication events. Given the proven role of CMF genes in the modulation of cereals flowering, the molecular, phylogenetic and comparative analysis of the Poaceae CMF, COL and PRR gene families presented here provides the foundation from which functional investigation can be undertaken.

  1. The Evolution of Gas in Protoplanetary Systems: The Herschel GASPS Open Time Key Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberge, Aki; Dent, W.; Herschel GASPS Team

    2010-01-01

    The Gas in Protoplanetary Systems (GASPS) Open Time Key Programme for the Herschel Space Observatory will be the first extensive, systematic survey of gas in circumstellar disks over the critical transition from gas-rich protoplanetary through to gas-poor debris. The brightest spectral lines from disks lie in the far-infrared and arise from radii spanning roughly 10 to 100 AU, where giant planets are expected to form. Herschel is uniquely able to observe this wavelength regime with the sensitivity to allow a large scale survey. We will execute a 2-phase study using the PACS instrument. Phase I is a spectroscopic survey about 250 young stars for fine structure emission lines of [CII] (at 157 microns) and [OI] (at 63 microns). In Phase II, the brightest sources will be followed up with additional PACS spectroscopy ([OI] at 145 microns and some rotational lines of water). We expect that the gas mass sensitivity will be more than an order of magnitude lower than that achieved by ISO and Spitzer or expected for SOFIA. We will also measure the dust continuum to an equivalent mass sensitivity. We will observe several nearby clusters with ages from 1 to 30 Myr, encompassing a wide range of disk masses and stellar luminosities. The sample covers disk evolution from protoplanetary disks through to young debris disks, i.e. the main epoch of planet formation. With this extensive dataset, the GASPS project will: 1) trace gas and dust in the planet formation region across a large multivariate parameter space, 2) provide the first definitive measurement of the gas dissipation timescale in disks, 3) elucidate the evolutionary link between protoplanetary and debris disks, 4) investigate water abundances in the planet-forming regions of disks, and 5) provide a huge database of disk observations and models with long-lasting legacy value for follow-up studies.

  2. Tail effect in gravitational radiation reaction: Time nonlocality and renormalization group evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galley, Chad R.; Leibovich, Adam K.; Porto, Rafael A.; Ross, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    We use the effective field theory (EFT) framework to calculate the tail effect in gravitational radiation reaction, which enters at the fourth post-Newtonian order in the dynamics of a binary system. The computation entails a subtle interplay between the near (or potential) and far (or radiation) zones. In particular, we find that the tail contribution to the effective action is nonlocal in time and features both a dissipative and a "conservative" term. The latter includes a logarithmic ultraviolet (UV) divergence, which we show cancels against an infrared (IR) singularity found in the (conservative) near zone. The origin of this behavior in the long-distance EFT is due to the point-particle limit—shrinking the binary to a point—which transforms a would-be infrared singularity into an ultraviolet divergence. This is a common occurrence in an EFT approach, which furthermore allows us to use renormalization group (RG) techniques to resum the resulting logarithmic contributions. We then derive the RG evolution for the binding potential and total mass/energy, and find agreement with the results obtained imposing the conservation of the (pseudo) stress-energy tensor in the radiation theory. While the calculation of the leading tail contribution to the effective action involves only one diagram, five are needed for the one-point function. This suggests logarithmic corrections may be easier to incorporate in this fashion. We conclude with a few remarks on the nature of these IR/UV singularities, the (lack of) ambiguities recently discussed in the literature, and the completeness of the analytic post-Newtonian framework.

  3. Genome dynamics explain the evolution of flowering time CCT domain gene families in the Poaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockram, James; Thiel, Thomas; Steuernagel, Burkhard; Stein, Nils; Taudien, Stefan; Bailey, Paul C; O'Sullivan, Donal M

    2012-01-01

    Numerous CCT domain genes are known to control flowering in plants. They belong to the CONSTANS-like (COL) and PREUDORESPONSE REGULATOR (PRR) gene families, which in addition to a CCT domain possess B-box or response-regulator domains, respectively. Ghd7 is the most recently identified COL gene to have a proven role in the control of flowering time in the Poaceae. However, as it lacks B-box domains, its inclusion within the COL gene family, technically, is incorrect. Here, we show Ghd7 belongs to a larger family of previously uncharacterized Poaceae genes which possess just a single CCT domain, termed here CCT MOTIF FAMILY (CMF) genes. We molecularly describe the CMF (and related COL and PRR) gene families in four sequenced Poaceae species, as well as in the draft genome assembly of barley (Hordeum vulgare). Genetic mapping of the ten barley CMF genes identified, as well as twelve previously unmapped HvCOL and HvPRR genes, finds the majority map to colinear positions relative to their Poaceae orthologues. Combined inter-/intra-species comparative and phylogenetic analysis of CMF, COL and PRR gene families indicates they evolved prior to the monocot/dicot divergence ∼200 mya, with Poaceae CMF evolution described as the interplay between whole genome duplication in the ancestral cereal, and subsequent clade-specific mutation, deletion and duplication events. Given the proven role of CMF genes in the modulation of cereals flowering, the molecular, phylogenetic and comparative analysis of the Poaceae CMF, COL and PRR gene families presented here provides the foundation from which functional investigation can be undertaken.

  4. Time Evolution of Activity Concentration of Natural Emitters in a Scenario Affected By Previous Phosphogypsum Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, M.; Mantero, J.; Mosqueda, F.; Hurtado, S.; Manjón, G.; Vaca, F.; García-Tenorio, R.

    2008-08-01

    The estuary formed by the confluence of Tinto and Odiel river-mouths is located in the South of Spain, close to Huelva town. This estuary has been deeply studied through the years because it has a double particularity. On one hand, since the beginning of the 1960s, the estuary has been affected by direct and indirect phosphogypsum (pg.) releases from two phosphoric acid and fertilizers factories that are working in the area. On the other hand, the pyrite mining operations upstream the Odiel and Tinto rivers has caused historically the formation of H2SO4, through oxidation of the natural sulphur deposits, the acidification of the waters and the consequent mobilisation of heavy metals from the mining area to the Huelva estuary. As a consequence, enhancement contamination levels in natural emitters from the 238U series were found in the surroundings of the factories in the previous years to 1998. However, in 1998 the management policy of waste releases drastically changed in the area, and direct discharges to Tinto and Odiel River had to be ceased. A thorough study of the affected zone is being carried out. Riverbed sediments and water samples have been analyzed from four different sampling campaigns in the estuary during the years 1999, 2001, 2002 and 2005. Different radioanalytical techniques have been employed to obtain the activity concentrations of U-isotopes, Th-isotopes, 226Ra, 210Pb and 210Po. Furthermore, the results for the rates of de-contamination of the area are presented. This data will be discussed in order to establish the present status of the contamination in the area, and moreover, to predict the time-evolution of the self-cleaning

  5. Solving the replacement paths problem for planar directed graphs in O(logn) time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff-Nilsen, Christian

    2010-01-01

    In a graph G with non-negative edge lengths, let P be a shortest path from a vertex s to a vertex t. We consider the problem of computing, for each edge e on P, the length of a shortest path in G from s to t that avoids e. This is known as the replacement paths problem. We give a linearspace algo...

  6. Total ankle joint replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Ankle arthritis results in a stiff and painful ankle and can be a major cause of disability. For people with end-stage ankle arthritis, arthrodesis (ankle fusion) is effective at reducing pain in the shorter term, but results in a fixed joint, and over time the loss of mobility places stress on other joints in the foot that may lead to arthritis, pain and dysfunction. Another option is to perform a total ankle joint replacement, with the aim of giving the patient a mobile and pain-free ankle. In this article we review the efficacy of this procedure, including how it compares to ankle arthrodesis, and consider the indications and complications.

  7. Dynamical Decomposition of Multifractal Time Series as Fractal Evolution and Long-Term Cycles: Applications to Foreign Currency Exchange Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turiel, A.; Perez-Vicente, C.

    The application of the multifractal formalism to the study of some time series with scale invariant evolution has given rise to a rich framework of models and processing tools for the analysis of these signals. The formalism has been successfully exploited in different ways and with different goals: to obtain the effective variables governing the evolution of the series, to predict its future evolution, to estimate in which regime the series are, etc. In this paper, we discuss on the capabilities of a new, powerful processing tool, namely the computation of dynamical sources. With the aid of the source field, we will separate the fast, chaotic dynamics defined by the multifractal structure from a new, so-far unknown slow dynamics which concerns long cycles in the series. We discuss the results on the perspective of detection of sharp dynamic changes and forecasting.

  8. The 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko nucleus spectroscopic properties and their evolution over time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornasier, S.

    2016-11-01

    Comets are primitive small bodies witness of the Solar System formation. Our knowledge on cometary nuclei and on their evolution over time is very limited because they are dark, small, and thus faint objects, spatially unresolved by groundbased telescopes and masked by their atmosphere when they become brighter close to the Sun. Before the Rosetta mission, only 5 cometary nuclei have been directly imaged and investigated by space missions during relatively short fly-bys, catching thus a small fraction of the comet lifetime in its orbit. The Rosetta mission is orbiting around the 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko comet since August 2014, and provides the unique opportunity to continuously investigate the 67P nucleus during about 2 years, from large heliocentric distances (about 4 AU) to its perihelion passage (1.24 AU) and beyond. The OSIRIS cameras and VIRTIS spectrometer have shown that the 67P nucleus has a red spectral behavior with spectral properties similar to those of bare cometary nuclei, of primitive D-type asteroids like the Jupiter Trojans, and of the moderately red Transneptunians population (Sierks et al., 2015, Capaccioni et al., 2015). The surface is globally dominated by dehydrated and organic-rich refractory materials (Capaccioni et al., 2015), and shows some color heterogeneities. Three kind of terrains, from the spectrally bluer and water ice enriched terrains to the redder ones, associated mostly to dusty regions, have been identified by visible spectrophotometry from the first resolved images acquired in July-August 2014 (Fornasier et al., 2015), covering mostly the northern hemisphere of the nucleus. The southern hemisphere has become visible from Rosetta only since March 2015, and it shows a lack of spectrally red regions compared to the northern one, associated to the absence of wide spread smooth or dust covered terrains. Although water is the dominant volatile observed in the coma, exposed water ice has been detected only in small amounts in

  9. Evolution of stratospheric ozone and water vapour time series studied with satellite measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jones

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The long term evolution of stratospheric ozone and water vapour has been investigated by extending satellite time series to April 2008. For ozone, we examine monthly average ozone values from various satellite data sets for nine latitude and altitude bins covering 60° S to 60° N and 20–45 km and covering the time period 1979–2008. Data are from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE I+II, the HALogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE, the Solar BackscatterUltraViolet-2 (SBUV/2 instrument, the Sub-Millimetre Radiometer (SMR, the Optical Spectrograph InfraRed Imager System (OSIRIS, and the SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartograpY (SCIAMACHY. Monthly ozone anomalies are calculated by utilising a linear regression model, which also models the solar, quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO, and seasonal cycle contributions. Individual instrument ozone anomalies are combined producing a weighted all instrument average. Assuming a turning point of 1997 and that the all instrument average is represented by good instrumental long term stability, the largest statistically significant ozone declines from 1979–1997 are seen at the mid-latitudes between 35 and 45 km, namely −7.7%/decade in the Northern Hemisphere and −7.8%/decade in the Southern Hemisphere. For the period 1997 to 2008 we find that the southern mid-latitudes between 35 and 45 km show the largest ozone recovery (+3.4%/decade compared to other global regions, although the estimated trend model error is of a similar magnitude (+2.1%/decade, at the 95% confidence level. An all instrument average is also constructed from water vapour anomalies during 1984–2008, using the SAGE II, HALOE, SMR, and the Microwave Limb Sounder (aura/MLS measurements. We report that the decrease in water vapour values after 2001 slows down around 2004 in the lower tropical stratosphere (20–25 km, and has even shown signs of increasing values in upper stratospheric mid

  10. Evolution of stratospheric ozone and water vapour time series studied with satellite measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jones

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The long term evolution of stratospheric ozone and water vapour has been investigated by extending satellite time series to April 2008. For ozone, we examine monthly average ozone values from various satellite data sets for nine latitude and altitude bins covering 60° S to 60° N and 20–45 km and covering the time period of 1979–2008. Data are from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE I+II, the HALogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE, the Solar BackscatterUltraViolet-2 (SBUV/2 instrument, the Sub-Millimetre Radiometer (SMR, the Optical Spectrograph InfraRed Imager System (OSIRIS, and the SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartograpY (SCIAMACHY. Monthly ozone anomalies are calculated by utilising a linear regression model, which also models the solar, quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO, and seasonal cycle contributions. Individual instrument ozone anomalies are combined producing an all instrument average. Assuming a turning point of 1997 and that the all instrument average is represented by good instrumental long term stability, the largest statistically significant ozone declines (at two sigma from 1979–1997 are seen at the mid-latitudes between 35 and 45 km, namely −7.2%±0.9%/decade in the Northern Hemisphere and −7.1%±0.9%/in the Southern Hemisphere. Furthermore, for the period 1997 to 2008 we find that the same locations show the largest ozone recovery (+1.4% and +0.8%/decade respectively compared to other global regions, although the estimated trend model errors indicate that the trend estimates are not significantly different from a zero trend at the 2 sigma level. An all instrument average is also constructed from water vapour anomalies during 1991–2008, using the SAGE II, HALOE, SMR, and the Microwave Limb Sounder (Aura/MLS measurements. We report that the decrease in water vapour values after 2001 slows down around 2004–2005 in the lower tropical stratosphere (20–25 km and has even

  11. Observed and simulated time evolution of HCl, ClONO2, and HF total column abundances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.-M. Sinnhuber

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Time series of total column abundances of hydrogen chloride (HCl, chlorine nitrate (ClONO2, and hydrogen fluoride (HF were determined from ground-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectra recorded at 17 sites belonging to the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC and located between 80.05° N and 77.82° S. By providing such a near-global overview on ground-based measurements of the two major stratospheric chlorine reservoir species, HCl and ClONO2, the present study is able to confirm the decrease of the atmospheric inorganic chlorine abundance during the last few years. This decrease is expected following the 1987 Montreal Protocol and its amendments and adjustments, where restrictions and a subsequent phase-out of the prominent anthropogenic chlorine source gases (solvents, chlorofluorocarbons were agreed upon to enable a stabilisation and recovery of the stratospheric ozone layer. The atmospheric fluorine content is expected to be influenced by the Montreal Protocol, too, because most of the banned anthropogenic gases also represent important fluorine sources. But many of the substitutes to the banned gases also contain fluorine so that the HF total column abundance is expected to have continued to increase during the last few years. The measurements are compared with calculations from five different models: the two-dimensional Bremen model, the two chemistry-transport models KASIMA and SLIMCAT, and the two chemistry-climate models EMAC and SOCOL. Thereby, the ability of the models to reproduce the absolute total column amounts, the seasonal cycles, and the temporal evolution found in the FTIR measurements is investigated and inter-compared. This is especially interesting because the models have different architectures. The overall agreement between the measurements and models for the total column abundances and the seasonal cycles is good. Linear trends of HCl, ClONO2, and HF are calculated from both

  12. [Aortic valve replacement as an independent predictive factor for later development of aortic dissection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Kodolitsch, Y; Simic, O; Bregenzer, T; Dresler, C; Haverich, A; Nienaber, C A

    1998-08-01

    Dissection of the ascending aorta (type A) following later after aortic valve replacement has been described with increasing frequency. This study analyzes the role of aortic valve replacement for the evolution of late dissection. In a series of 80 consecutive patients with type A dissection, a previous aortic valve replacement had been performed in 12 cases (15%). In addition to arterial hypertension (p syndrome (p factor for type A dissection. Dissection occurred 3 +/- 4 years after aortic valve replacement with a clinical and anatomical profile similar to classic dissection as proven by comparison to a group of 62 patients with classic dissection associated with arterial hypertension or Marfan syndrome. With 75% and 66%, respectively, 30 day and 1 year survival of patients with dissection following later after aortic valve replacement was similar to patients with classic type A dissection. Extensive thinning and/or fragility (p associated with a high risk for late dissection; this finding was substantiated by comparison to a control group of 10 consecutive patients with a similarly dilated aortic root but no dissection. Type and diameter of valve prostheses, cross-clamp time, NYHA functional class, and left ventricular ejection fraction were unrelated to late dissection. Previous aortic valve replacement is an independent predisposing factor for a dissection of the ascending aorta later. At the time of aortic valve replacement, prophylactic replacement or wrapping of the ascending aorta should be considered in patients with a thinned/fragile aortic wall even without a markedly dilated aortic root.

  13. OPTIMUM ORDERING POLICY FOR PREVENTIVE AGE REPLACEMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Young T.PARK; Jing SUN

    2009-01-01

    Most of the spare ordering policies treated up to now have assumed that preventive and corrective replacement costs are equal, which implies in essential that there is no significant need for preventive replacement. This paper presents an ordering policy for preventive age replacement with minimal repair. Introducing the replacement, repair, inventory holding and shortage costs, the expected cost rate is derived. A procedure to determine jointly the ordering time for a spare and the preventive replacement time for the operating unit so as to minimize the expected cost rate is proposed. To explain the ordering policy and the optimization procedure, a numerical example is also included.

  14. Real-Time Dynamics of Galvanic Replacement Reactions of Silver Nanocubes and Au Studied by Liquid-Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Shu Fen; Lin, Guanhua; Bosman, Michel; Mirsaidov, Utkur; Nijhuis, Christian A

    2016-08-23

    We study the galvanic replacement reaction of silver nanocubes in dilute, aqueous ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid disodium salt (EDTA)-capped gold aurate solutions using in situ liquid-cell electron microscopy. Au/Ag etched nanostructures with concave faces are formed via (1) etching that starts from the faces of the nanocubes, followed by (2) the deposition of an Au layer as a result of galvanic replacement, and (3) Au deposition via particle coalescence and monomer attachment where small nanoparticles are formed during the reaction as a result of radiolysis. Analysis of the Ag removal rate and Au deposition rate provides a quantitative picture of the growth process and shows that the morphology and composition of the final product are dependent on the stoichiometric ratio between Au and Ag.

  15. Faster Replacement Paths

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Virginia Vassilevska

    2010-01-01

    The replacement paths problem for directed graphs is to find for given nodes s and t and every edge e on the shortest path between them, the shortest path between s and t which avoids e. For unweighted directed graphs on n vertices, the best known algorithm runtime was \\tilde{O}(n^{2.5}) by Roditty and Zwick. For graphs with integer weights in {-M,...,M}, Weimann and Yuster recently showed that one can use fast matrix multiplication and solve the problem in O(Mn^{2.584}) time, a runtime which would be O(Mn^{2.33}) if the exponent \\omega of matrix multiplication is 2. We improve both of these algorithms. Our new algorithm also relies on fast matrix multiplication and runs in O(M n^{\\omega} polylog(n)) time if \\omega>2 and O(n^{2+\\eps}) for any \\eps>0 if \\omega=2. Our result shows that, at least for small integer weights, the replacement paths problem in directed graphs may be easier than the related all pairs shortest paths problem in directed graphs, as the current best runtime for the latter is \\Omega(n^{2.5...

  16. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foghsgaard, Signe; Schmidt, Thomas Andersen; Kjaergard, Henrik K

    2009-01-01

    In this descriptive prospective study, we evaluate the outcomes of surgery in 98 patients who were scheduled to undergo minimally invasive aortic valve replacement. These patients were compared with a group of 50 patients who underwent scheduled aortic valve replacement through a full sternotomy....... The 30-day mortality rate for the 98 patients was zero, although 14 of the 98 mini-sternotomies had to be converted to complete sternotomies intraoperatively due to technical problems. Such conversion doubled the operative time over that of the planned full sternotomies. In the group of patients whose...... is an excellent operation in selected patients, but its true advantages over conventional aortic valve replacement (other than a smaller scar) await evaluation by means of randomized clinical trial. The "extended mini-aortic valve replacement" operation, on the other hand, is a risky procedure that should...

  17. Evolution of Rosaceae Fruit Types Based on Nuclear Phylogeny in the Context of Geological Times and Genome Duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Yezi; Huang, Chien-Hsun; Hu, Yi; Wen, Jun; Li, Shisheng; Yi, Tingshuang; Chen, Hongyi; Xiang, Jun; Ma, Hong

    2017-02-01

    Fruits are the defining feature of angiosperms, likely have contributed to angiosperm successes by protecting and dispersing seeds, and provide foods to humans and other animals, with many morphological types and important ecological and agricultural implications. Rosaceae is a family with ∼3000 species and an extraordinary spectrum of distinct fruits, including fleshy peach, apple, and strawberry prized by their consumers, as well as dry achenetum and follicetum with features facilitating seed dispersal, excellent for studying fruit evolution. To address Rosaceae fruit evolution and other questions, we generated 125 new transcriptomic and genomic datasets and identified hundreds of nuclear genes to reconstruct a well-resolved Rosaceae phylogeny with highly supported monophyly of all subfamilies and tribes. Molecular clock analysis revealed an estimated age of ∼101.6 Ma for crown Rosaceae and divergence times of tribes and genera, providing a geological and climate context for fruit evolution. Phylogenomic analysis yielded strong evidence for numerous whole genome duplications (WGDs), supporting the hypothesis that the apple tribe had a WGD and revealing another one shared by fleshy fruit-bearing members of this tribe, with moderate support for WGDs in the peach tribe and other groups. Ancestral character reconstruction for fruit types supports independent origins of fleshy fruits from dry-fruit ancestors, including the evolution of drupes (e.g., peach) and pomes (e.g., apple) from follicetum, and drupetum (raspberry and blackberry) from achenetum. We propose that WGDs and environmental factors, including animals, contributed to the evolution of the many fruits in Rosaceae, which provide a foundation for understanding fruit evolution.

  18. Evolution and biogeography of Haemonchus contortus, linking faunal dynamics in space and time

    Science.gov (United States)

    History is the foundation that informs about the nuances of faunal assembly that are essential in understanding the dynamic nature of the host-parasite interface. All of our knowledge begins and ends with evolution, ecology and biogeography as these interacting facets determine the history of biodi...

  19. Clonal status of actionable driver events and the timing of mutational processes in cancer evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGranahan, Nicholas; Favero, Francesco; de Bruin, Elza C.

    2015-01-01

    and uncovered putative cancer genes involved in subclonal expansions, including CTNNA2 and ATXN1. Our results provide a pan-cancer census of driver events within the context of intratumor heterogeneity and reveal patterns of tumor evolution across cancers. The frequent presence of subclonal driver mutations...

  20. Real-Time Atomic Scale Imaging of Nanostructural Evolution in Aluminum Alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malladi, S.K.; Xu, X.; van Huis, M.A.; Tichelaar, F.D.; Batenburg, K.J.; Yücelen, E.; Dubiel, B.; Czyrska-Filemonowicz, A.; Zandbergen, H.W.

    2014-01-01

    We present a new approach to study the three- dimensional compositional and structural evolution of metal alloys during heat treatments such as commonly used for improving overall material properties. It relies on in situ heating in a high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM).

  1. Time constraints on the tectonic evolution of the eastern Sierras Pampeanas (Central Argentina)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siegesmund, Siegfried; Steenken, A; Martino, R D

    2010-01-01

    cycle in the neighbouring Sierra de San Luis and has not affected the titanite ages. The PTt evolution can be correlated with the plate tectonic processes responsible for the formation of the Pampean orogene, i.e., the accretion of the Pampean basement to the Río de La Plata craton (M2) and the later...

  2. Accelerated evolution after gene duplication: a time-dependent process affecting just one copy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegueroles, Cinta; Laurie, Steve; Albà, M Mar

    2013-08-01

    Gene duplication is widely regarded as a major mechanism modeling genome evolution and function. However, the mechanisms that drive the evolution of the two, initially redundant, gene copies are still ill defined. Many gene duplicates experience evolutionary rate acceleration, but the relative contribution of positive selection and random drift to the retention and subsequent evolution of gene duplicates, and for how long the molecular clock may be distorted by these processes, remains unclear. Focusing on rodent genes that duplicated before and after the mouse and rat split, we find significantly increased sequence divergence after duplication in only one of the copies, which in nearly all cases corresponds to the novel daughter copy, independent of the mechanism of duplication. We observe that the evolutionary rate of the accelerated copy, measured as the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitutions, is on average 5-fold higher in the period spanning 4-12 My after the duplication than it was before the duplication. This increase can be explained, at least in part, by the action of positive selection according to the results of the maximum likelihood-based branch-site test. Subsequently, the rate decelerates until purifying selection completely returns to preduplication levels. Reversion to the original rates has already been accomplished 40.5 My after the duplication event, corresponding to a genetic distance of about 0.28 synonymous substitutions per site. Differences in tissue gene expression patterns parallel those of substitution rates, reinforcing the role of neofunctionalization in explaining the evolution of young gene duplicates.

  3. Shoulder Joint Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Shoulder Replacement Options Shoulder replacement surgery is highly technical. It should be performed by a surgical team ... area and will meet a doctor from the anesthesia department. You, your anesthesiologist, and your surgeon will ...

  4. Partial knee replacement - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100225.htm Partial knee replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Knee Replacement A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited ...

  5. Time evolution of secondary electron emission and trapped charge accumulation in polyimide film under various primary electron irradiation currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Bai-Peng; Zhou, Run-Dong; Su, Guo-Qiang; Mu, Hai-Bao; Zhang, Guan-Jun; Bu, Ren-An

    2016-12-01

    Time-resolved evolution of secondary electron emission and trapped charge accumulation in polyimide film is investigated during two interval electrons bombardment, derived from the measurement of displacement current and secondary current via a hemispherical detector with the shielded grid. Under various irradiation current, secondary electron yield (SEY σ) at a certain injected energy decreases exponentially from initial amplitude σ0 to self-consistent steady value σ∞ close to 0.93. The time constant τ of charging process is characterized as a function of incident current Ip, and the results indicate that the formula Ip × τ is fitted by a hyperbolical law. The influence of Ip on the amount of trapped charge is studied and no significant change in its saturation value is observed. The evolution of SEY σ and trapped charge is dependent on incident dose Qp but not the incident rate Ip. Furthermore, the trap density and capture cross section are discussed.

  6. Variable Structure Controller with Time-Varying Switching Surface under the Bound of Input using Evolution Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Min Jung; Choi, Young Kiu [Pusan National University (Korea); Kim, Hyun Sik [Agency for Defense Development (Korea); Jeon, Seong Jeub [Pukyong National University (Korea)

    1999-04-01

    Variable structure control law is well known to be a robust control algorithm and evolution strategy is used as an effective search algorithm in optimization problems. In this paper, we propose a variable structure controller with time-varying switching surface. We calculate the maximum value of switching surface gradient under the bound of input. To enhance the robustness, we choose a time-varying switching surface gradient that is of the 3 rd order polynomial form. Evolution strategy is used to optimize the parameters of the switching surface gradient. Finally, the proposed method is applied to position tracking control for BLDC motor. Experimental results show that the proposed method is more useful than the conventional variable structure control. (author). 8 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  7. In-frame amber stop codon replacement mutagenesis for the directed evolution of proteins containing non-canonical amino acids: identification of residues open to bio-orthogonal modification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A J Arpino

    Full Text Available Expanded genetic code approaches are a powerful means to add new and useful chemistry to proteins at defined residues positions. One such use is the introduction of non-biological reactive chemical handles for site-specific biocompatible orthogonal conjugation of proteins. Due to our currently limited information on the impact of non-canonical amino acids (nAAs on the protein structure-function relationship, rational protein engineering is a "hit and miss" approach to selecting suitable sites. Furthermore, dogma suggests surface exposed native residues should be the primary focus for introducing new conjugation chemistry. Here we describe a directed evolution approach to introduce and select for in-frame codon replacement to facilitate engineering proteins with nAAs. To demonstrate the approach, the commonly reprogrammed amber stop codon (TAG was randomly introduced in-frame in two different proteins: the bionanotechnologically important cyt b(562 and therapeutic protein KGF. The target protein is linked at the gene level to sfGFP via a TEV protease site. In absence of a nAA, an in-frame TAG will terminate translation resulting in a non-fluorescent cell phenotype. In the presence of a nAA, TAG will encode for nAA incorporation so instilling a green fluorescence phenotype on E. coli. The presence of endogenously expressed TEV proteases separates in vivo target protein from its fusion to sfGFP if expressed as a soluble fusion product. Using this approach, we incorporated an azide reactive handle and identified residue positions amenable to conjugation with a fluorescence dye via strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition (SPAAC. Interestingly, best positions for efficient conjugation via SPAAC were residues whose native side chain were buried through analysis of their determined 3D structures and thus may not have been chosen through rational protein engineering. Molecular modeling suggests these buried native residues could become partially

  8. What Is the Effect on Obesity Indicators from Replacing Prolonged Sedentary Time with Brief Sedentary Bouts, Standing and Different Types of Physical Activity during Working Days? A Cross-Sectional Accelerometer-Based Study among Blue-Collar Workers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Gupta

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate if (a substituting total sedentary time or long sedentary bouts with standing or various types of physical activity and (b substituting long sedentary bouts with brief sedentary bouts; is associated with obesity indicators using a cross sectional isotemporal substitution approach among blue-collar workers.A total of 692 workers from transportation, manufacturing and cleaning sectors wore an Actigraph GT3X+ accelerometer on the thigh for 1-4 working days. The sedentary (sit and lie, standing, walking, and moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA time on working days was computed using validated Acti4 software. The total sedentary time and uninterrupted sedentary time spent in brief (≤5 mins, moderate (>5 and ≤30 mins, and long (>30mins bouts, were determined for the whole day and during work and non-work time separately. The obesity indicators, BMI (kg/m2, waist circumference (cm and fat percentage were objectively measured. Isotemporal substitution modelling was utilized to determine the linear association with obesity indicators of replacing 30 min of total sedentary time or long sedentary bouts with standing, walking or MVPA and separately replacing 30 min of long sedentary bouts with brief sedentary bouts.Workers [mean (standard deviation, SD; age = 45.1 (9.9 years, BMI = 27.5 (4.9 kg/m2, %BF = 29.6 (9.5, waist circumference = 94.4 (13.0 cm] sat for 2.4 hours (~32% of the measured time, SD = 1.8 hours across the day during work period and 5.5 hours (~62% of the measured time, SD = 1.5 hours during non-work period. Most of the sedentary time was accrued in moderate bouts [work = 1.40 (SD = 1.09 hours] during work and in long bouts during non-work [2.7 (SD = 1.4 hours], while least in long sedentary bouts during work [work = 0.5 (SD = 0.9] and in brief sedentary bouts [0.5 hours (SD = 0.3] during non-work. Significant associations with all obesity indicators were found when 30 min of total

  9. A transformation theory of stochastic evolution in Red Moon methodology to time evolution of chemical reaction process in the full atomistic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yuichi; Nagaoka, Masataka

    2017-05-01

    Atomistic information of a whole chemical reaction system, e.g., instantaneous microscopic molecular structures and orientations, offers important and deeper insight into clearly understanding unknown chemical phenomena. In accordance with the progress of a number of simultaneous chemical reactions, the Red Moon method (a hybrid Monte Carlo/molecular dynamics reaction method) is capable of simulating atomistically the chemical reaction process from an initial state to the final one of complex chemical reaction systems. In the present study, we have proposed a transformation theory to interpret the chemical reaction process of the Red Moon methodology as the time evolution process in harmony with the chemical kinetics. For the demonstration of the theory, we have chosen the gas reaction system in which the reversible second-order reaction H2 + I2 ⇌ 2HI occurs. First, the chemical reaction process was simulated from the initial configurational arrangement containing a number of H2 and I2 molecules, each at 300 K, 500 K, and 700 K. To reproduce the chemical equilibrium for the system, the collision frequencies for the reactions were taken into consideration in the theoretical treatment. As a result, the calculated equilibrium concentrations [H2]eq and equilibrium constants Keq at all the temperatures were in good agreement with their corresponding experimental values. Further, we applied the theoretical treatment for the time transformation to the system and have shown that the calculated half-life τ's of [H2] reproduce very well the analytical ones at all the temperatures. It is, therefore, concluded that the application of the present theoretical treatment with the Red Moon method makes it possible to analyze reasonably the time evolution of complex chemical reaction systems to chemical equilibrium at the atomistic level.

  10. Characterization of the ionization degree evolution of the PF-400J plasma sheath by means of time resolved optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avaria, G.; Cuadrado, O.; Moreno, J.; Pavez, C.; Soto, L.

    2016-05-01

    Spectral measurements in the visible range of the plasma sheath ionization degree evolution on the plasma focus device PF-400J are presented. The measurements were done with temporal and spatial resolution in a plasma focus device of low stored energy: PF-400J (176-539 J, 880 nF, 20-35 kV, quarter period ∼ 300ns) [1]. An ICCD was attached to a 0.5 m focal length visible spectrometer, which enabled the acquisition of time resolved spectrum with 20 ns integration time throughout the whole current pulse evolution. The spatial resolution was attained using a set of lenses which allowed the focusing of a small volume of the plasma sheath in different positions of the inter-electrode space. Discharges were carried out in mixtures of Hydrogen with gases in different proportions: 5% Neon, 5% Krypton and 2% Nitrogen. Discharges using Neon as an impurity showed no ionization of the gas, just a very low intensity emission of Ne I at times much larger than the maximum current. Nitrogen, on the other hand, showed a high ionization reaching N V (N 4+) at the end of the axial phase, with a distinctive evolution of the ionization degree as the plasma sheath moved towards the end of the electrodes. A mixed result was found when using Krypton, since the ionization degree only reached levels around Kr II/III, even though it has an ionization potential lower than Neon.

  11. RAPTOR: Optimization, real-time simulation and control of the tokamak q profile evolution using a simplified transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felici, Federico; Sauter, Olivier; Goodman, Timothy; Paley, James

    2010-11-01

    Control of the plasma current density and safety factor profile evolution in a tokamak is crucial for accessing advanced regimes. The evolution of the current density profile is steered by a combination of inductive voltage and auxiliary current drive actuators, and is nonlinearly coupled to the evolution of the (ion/electron) temperature and density profiles. Using appropriate simplifications, a model has been obtained which can be simulated on time scales faster than the tokamak discharge itself, but still retains the essential physics describing the nonlinear coupling between the profiles. This model, dubbed RAPTOR (Rapid Plasma Transport simulatOR) has been implemented in the new real-time control system on the TCV tokamak at CRPP, and can be used for real-time reconstruction and model-based control of the q profile. It can also be used off-line to determine optimal actuator trajectories in open loop simulations to steer the plasma profiles towards their required steady-state shapes while remaining within a constrained set of allowable profiles.

  12. Time evolution of high-altitude plasma bubbles imaged at geomagnetic conjugate points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Shiokawa

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Temporal and spatial evolution of two high-altitude plasma bubbles (evening and midnight was observed on 4 April 2002, at geomagnetic conjugate points at Sata, Japan (magnetic latitude 24° N, and Darwin, Australia (magnetic latitude 22° S, using two 630-nm airglow imagers. The apex height of the bubbles reached ~1500km. The upward velocity of the evolution was faster in the evening (~170m/s at 20:00-21:00 LT than around midnight (~28m/s at 23:00-00:00 LT. Bifurcating features of the bubbles into a smaller scale size of ~50km were clearly seen for both the evening and midnight bubbles, showing fairly good conjugacy between the Northern and Southern Hemispheres.

  13. A Linear Time Natural Evolution Strategy for Non-Separable Functions

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Yi; Schaul, Tom; Schmidhuber, Juergen

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel Natural Evolution Strategy (NES) variant, the Rank-One NES (R1-NES), which uses a low rank approximation of the search distribution covariance matrix. The algorithm allows computation of the natural gradient with cost linear in the dimensionality of the parameter space, and excels in solving high-dimensional non-separable problems, including the best result to date on the Rosenbrock function (512 dimensions).

  14. Time Evolution of Temperature Fluctuation in a Non-Equilibrated System

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharyya, Trambak; Sahoo, Raghunath; Samantray, Prasant

    2015-01-01

    The evolution equation for inhomogeneous and anisotropic temperature fluctuation inside a medium is derived within the ambit of Boltzmann Transport Equation for a hot gas of massless particles. Specializing to a situation created after heavy-ion collision (HIC), we analyze the Fourier space variation of temperature fluctuation for the medium. Further, the effect of viscosity on the variation of fluctuations is investigated and possible implications for early universe cosmology, and its connection with HICs are also explored.

  15. The XMM Cluster Survey: evolution of the velocity dispersion -- temperature relation over half a Hubble time

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Susan; Rooney, Philip J; Caldwell, Caroline; Kay, Scott T; Collins, Chris A; McCarthy, Ian G; Romer, A Kathy; Bermeo-Hernandez, Alberto; Bernstein, Rebecca; da Costa, Luiz; Gifford, Daniel; Hollowood, Devon; Hoyle, Ben; Jeltema, Tesla; Liddle, Andrew R; Maia, Marcio A G; Mann, Robert G; Mayers, Julian A; Mehrtens, Nicola; Miller, Christopher J; Nichol, Robert C; Ogando, Ricardo; Sahlén, Martin; Stahl, Benjamin; Stott, John P; Thomas, Peter A; Viana, Pedro T P; Wilcox, Harry

    2015-01-01

    We measure the evolution of the velocity dispersion--temperature ($\\sigma_{\\rm v}$--$T_{\\rm X}$) relation up to $z = 1$ using a sample of 38 galaxy clusters drawn from the \\textit{XMM} Cluster Survey. This work improves upon previous studies by the use of a homogeneous cluster sample and in terms of the number of high redshift clusters included. We present here new redshift and velocity dispersion measurements for 12 $z > 0.5$ clusters observed with the GMOS instruments on the Gemini telescopes. Using an orthogonal regression method, we find that the slope of the relation is steeper than that expected if clusters were self-similar, and that the evolution of the normalisation is slightly negative, but not significantly different from zero ($\\sigma_{\\rm v} \\propto T^{0.86 \\pm 0.14} E(z)^{-0.37 \\pm 0.33}$). We verify our results by applying our methods to cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. The lack of evolution seen from the data suggests that the feedback does not significantly heat the gas, a result that...

  16. Evolution and Biogeography of Haemonchus contortus: Linking Faunal Dynamics in Space and Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoberg, E P; Zarlenga, D S

    2016-01-01

    History is the foundation that informs about the nuances of faunal assembly that are essential in understanding the dynamic nature of the host-parasite interface. All of our knowledge begins and ends with evolution, ecology and biogeography, as these interacting facets determine the history of biodiverse systems. These components, relating to Haemonchus, can inform about the complex history of geographical distribution, host association and the intricacies of host-parasite associations that are played out in physiological and behavioural processes that influence the potential for disease and our capacity for effective control in a rapidly changing world. Origins and evolutionary diversification among species of the genus Haemonchus and Haemonchus contortus occurred in a complex crucible defined by shifts in environmental structure emerging from cycles of climate change and ecological perturbation during the late Tertiary and through the Quaternary. A history of sequential host colonization associated with waves of dispersal bringing assemblages of ungulates from Eurasia into Africa and processes emerging from ecosystems in collision and faunal turnover defined the arena for radiation among 12 recognized species of Haemonchus. Among congeners, the host range for H. contortus is exceptionally broad, including species among artiodactyls of 40 genera representing 5 families (and within 12 tribes of Bovidae). Broad host range is dramatically reflected in the degree to which translocation, introduction and invasion with host switching, has characterized an expanding distribution over time in North America, South America, southern Eurasia, Australia and New Zealand, coincidental with agriculture, husbandry and global colonization by human populations driven particularly by European exploration after the 1500s. African origins in xeric to mesic habitats of the African savannah suggest that historical constraints linked to ecological adaptations (tolerances and

  17. Electromagnetic effects on meson production: a new tool for studying the space-time evolution of heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Rybicki, Andrzej; Klusek-Gawenda, Mariola; Davis, Nikolaos; Ozvenchuk, Vitalii; Kielbowicz, Miroslaw

    2016-01-01

    We review our studies of spectator-induced electromagnetic (EM) effects on the emission of charged mesons in the final state of ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions. We argue that these effects offer sensitivity to the distance $d_E$ between the charged meson formation zone at freeze-out and the spectator system. As such, the can serve as an independent, new tool to probe the space time evolution and longitudinal of the system created in the collision. As a phenomenological application for this tool in the context of resonance production and decay, we obtain a first estimate of the pion decoupling time from EM effects.

  18. A Method for Measuring Fast Time Evolutions of the Plasma Potential by Means of a Simple Emissive Probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iizuka, S.; Michelsen, Poul; Juul Rasmussen, Jens;

    1981-01-01

    A method is presented for obtaining the temporal evolution of the plasma potential, which is assumed to be given by the floating potential of a simple emissive probe. The construction of the probe is also described. The method avoids the slow time response of the usual technique where the floating...... potential is measured across a high resistance. During each sweep of the probe voltage, the changing of the sign of the probe current, which is sampled at a specific time, gives rise to a negative pulse, driving the pen-lift of an X-Y recorder. Since the real floating potential is measured where the probe...

  19. Innovation of School-enterprise Cooperation in Vocational Education: Replacement Full-time Training%职业教育校企合作模式创新——置换脱产培训

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙泽平; 田书芹

    2011-01-01

    Based on the influential factors in enterprise participating in vocational education, the construction of the replacement full-time training mode is the driving force for the development of school-enterprise cooperation and the link to maintain healthy operation of school-enterprise cooperation. Replacement full-time training aims to meet the interests demands of vocational schools and establish a " school-enterprise win-win" operation mechanism with their own advantages and characteristics to provide effective service for enterprises. The implementation of replacement full-time training mode demands a rational and scientific effective mechanism.%基于企业参与职业教育的影响因素研究,构建科学合理的置换脱产培训模式是推动校企合作发展的动力和维系校企合作良性运转的纽带.置换脱产培训模式,旨在使职业院校能有的放矢地适应企业利益诉求,凭借自身优势与特色为企业提供有效服务,建立“校企双赢”的运行机制.置换脱产培训模式的实施必须有一套理性化和科学化的有效机制.

  20. Search for scalar-tensor gravity theories with a non-monotonic time evolution of the speed-up factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, A [Dept Fisica, Universidad de Murcia, E30071-Murcia (Spain); Serna, A [Dept Fisica, Computacion y Comunicaciones, Universidad Miguel Hernandez, E03202-Elche (Spain); Alimi, J-M [Lab. de l' Univers et de ses Theories (LUTH, CNRS FRE2462), Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, F92195-Meudon (France)

    2002-08-21

    We present a method to detect, in the framework of scalar-tensor gravity theories, the existence of stationary points in the time evolution of the speed-up factor. An attractive aspect of this method is that, once the particular scalar-tensor theory has been specified, the stationary points are found through a simple algebraic equation which does not contain any integration. By applying this method to the three classes of scalar-tensor theories defined by Barrow and Parsons, we have found several new cosmological models with a non-monotonic evolution of the speed-up factor. The physical interest of these models is that, as previously shown by Serna and Alimi, they predict the observed primordial abundance of light elements for a very wide range of baryon density. These models are then consistent with recent CMB and Lyman-{alpha} estimates of the baryon content of the universe.

  1. Constraints on Black Hole/Host Galaxy Co-evolution and Binary Stalling Using Pulsar Timing Arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Simon, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Pulsar timing arrays are now setting increasingly tight limits on the gravitational wave background from binary supermassive black holes. But as upper limits grow more constraining, what can be implied about galaxy evolution? We investigate which astrophysical parameters have the largest impact on strain spectrum predictions and provide a simple framework to directly translate between measured values for the parameters of galaxy evolution and PTA limits on the gravitational wave background of binary supermassive black holes. We find that the most influential observable is the relation between a host galaxy's central bulge and its central black hole, $\\mbox{$M_{\\bullet}$-$M_{\\rm bulge}$}$, which has the largest effect on the mean value of the characteristic strain amplitude. However, the variance of each prediction is dominated by uncertainties in the galaxy stellar mass function. Using this framework with the best published PTA limit, we can set limits on the shape and scatter of the $\\mbox{$M_{\\bullet}$-$M_{...

  2. Time-evolution of quantum systems via a complex nonlinear Riccati equation. II. Dissipative systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Hans; Schuch, Dieter; Castaños, Octavio; Rosas-Ortiz, Oscar

    2016-10-01

    In our former contribution (Cruz et al., 2015), we have shown the sensitivity to the choice of initial conditions in the evolution of Gaussian wave packets via the nonlinear Riccati equation. The formalism developed in the previous work is extended to effective approaches for the description of dissipative quantum systems. By means of simple examples we show the effects of the environment on the quantum uncertainties, correlation function, quantum energy contribution and tunnelling currents. We prove that the environmental parameter γ is strongly related with the sensitivity to the choice of initial conditions.

  3. Time evolution of temperature fluctuation in a non-equilibrated system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyya, Trambak; Garg, Prakhar; Sahoo, Raghunath [Indian Institute of Technology Indore, Discipline of Physics, School of Basic Sciences, Simrol (India); Samantray, Prasant [Indian Institute of Technology Indore, Centre of Astronomy, School of Basic Sciences, Simrol (India)

    2016-09-15

    The evolution equation for inhomogeneous and anisotropic temperature fluctuation inside a medium is derived within the ambit of Boltzmann Transport Equation (BTE) for a hot gas of massless particles. Also, specializing to a situation created after a heavy-ion collision (HIC), we analyze the Fourier space variation of temperature fluctuation of the medium using its temperature profile. The effect of viscosity on the variation of fluctuations in the latter case is investigated and possible implications for early universe cosmology, and its connection with HICs are also explored. (orig.)

  4. Timing the Evolution of Quiescent and Star-forming Local Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacifici, Camilla; Oh, Sree; Oh, Kyuseok; Lee, Jaehyun; Yi, Sukyoung K.

    2016-06-01

    Constraining the star formation histories (SFHs) of individual galaxies is crucial for understanding the mechanisms that regulate their evolution. Here, we combine multi-wavelength (ultraviolet, optical, and infrared) measurements of a very large sample of galaxies (˜230,000) at z motivated models of galaxy spectral energy distributions to extract constraints on galaxy physical parameters (such as stellar mass and star formation rate) as well as individual SFHs. In particular, we set constraints on the timescales in which galaxies form a certain percentage of their total stellar mass (namely, 10%, 50%, and 90%). The large statistics allows us to average such measurements over different populations of galaxies (quiescent and star-forming) and in narrow ranges of stellar mass. As in the downsizing scenario, we confirm that low-mass galaxies have more extended SFHs than high-mass galaxies. We also find that at the same observed stellar mass, galaxies that are now quiescent evolve more rapidly than galaxies that are currently still forming stars. This suggests that stellar mass is not the only driver of galaxy evolution, but plays along with other factors such as merger events and other environmental effects.

  5. Origin of a major infectious disease in vertebrates: The timing of Cryptosporidium evolution and its hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-R, Juan C; Hayman, David T S

    2016-11-01

    Protozoan parasites of the genus Cryptosporidium infect all vertebrate groups and display some host specificity in their infections. It is therefore possible to assume that Cryptosporidium parasites evolved intimately aside with vertebrate lineages. Here we propose a scenario of Cryptosporidium-Vertebrata coevolution testing the hypothesis that the origin of Cryptosporidium parasites follows that of the origin of modern vertebrates. We use calibrated molecular clocks and cophylogeny analyses to provide and compare age estimates and patterns of association between these clades. Our study provides strong support for the evolution of parasitism of Cryptosporidium with the rise of the vertebrates about 600 million years ago (Mya). Interestingly, periods of increased diversification in Cryptosporidium coincides with diversification of crown mammalian and avian orders after the Cretaceous-Palaeogene (K-Pg) boundary, suggesting that adaptive radiation to new mammalian and avian hosts triggered the diversification of this parasite lineage. Despite evidence for ongoing host shifts we also found significant correlation between protozoan parasites and vertebrate hosts trees in the cophylogenetic analysis. These results help us to understand the underlying macroevolutionary mechanisms driving evolution in Cryptosporidium and may have important implications for the ecology, dynamics and epidemiology of cryptosporidiosis disease in humans and other animals.

  6. Multiscale diffusion method for simulations of long-time defect evolution with application to dislocation climb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, K. L.; Curtin, W. A.

    2016-07-01

    In many problems of interest to materials scientists and engineers, the evolution of crystalline extended defects (dislocations, cracks, grain boundaries, interfaces, voids, precipitates) is controlled by the flow of point defects (interstitial/substitutional atoms and/or vacancies) through the crystal into the extended defect. Precise modeling of this behavior requires fully atomistic methods in and around the extended defect, but the flow of point defects entering the defect region can be treated by coarse-grained methods. Here, a multiscale algorithm is presented to provide this coupling. Specifically, direct accelerated molecular dynamics (AMD) of extended defect evolution is coupled to a diffusing point defect concentration field that captures the long spatial and temporal scales of point defect motion in the presence of the internal stress fields generated by the evolving defect. The algorithm is applied to study vacancy absorption into an edge dislocation in aluminum where vacancy accumulation in the core leads to nucleation of a double-jog that then operates as a sink for additional vacancies; this corresponds to the initial stages of dislocation climb modeled with explicit atomistic resolution. The method is general and so can be applied to many other problems associated with nucleation, growth, and reaction due to accumulation of point defects in crystalline materials.

  7. Hybrid Differential Evolution Optimisation for Earth Observation Satellite Scheduling with Time-Dependent Earliness-Tardiness Penalties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoliang Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the order acceptance and scheduling (OAS problem with time-dependent earliness-tardiness penalties in a single agile earth observation satellite environment where orders are defined by their release dates, available processing time windows ranging from earliest start date to deadline, processing times, due dates, sequence-dependent setup times, and revenues. The objective is to maximise total revenue, where the revenue from an order is a piecewise linear function of its earliness and tardiness with reference to its due date. We formulate this problem as a mixed integer linear programming model and develop a novel hybrid differential evolution (DE algorithm under self-adaptation framework to solve this problem. Compared with classical DE, hybrid DE employs two mutation operations, scaling factor adaptation and crossover probability adaptation. Computational tests indicate that the proposed algorithm outperforms classical DE in addition to two other variants of DE.

  8. General continuous-time Markov model of sequence evolution via insertions/deletions: are alignment probabilities factorable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezawa, Kiyoshi

    2016-08-11

    Insertions and deletions (indels) account for more nucleotide differences between two related DNA sequences than substitutions do, and thus it is imperative to develop a stochastic evolutionary model that enables us to reliably calculate the probability of the sequence evolution through indel processes. Recently, indel probabilistic models are mostly based on either hidden Markov models (HMMs) or transducer theories, both of which give the indel component of the probability of a given sequence alignment as a product of either probabilities of column-to-column transitions or block-wise contributions along the alignment. However, it is not a priori clear how these models are related with any genuine stochastic evolutionary model, which describes the stochastic evolution of an entire sequence along the time-axis. Moreover, currently none of these models can fully accommodate biologically realistic features, such as overlapping indels, power-law indel-length distributions, and indel rate variation across regions. Here, we theoretically dissect the ab initio calculation of the probability of a given sequence alignment under a genuine stochastic evolutionary model, more specifically, a general continuous-time Markov model of the evolution of an entire sequence via insertions and deletions. Our model is a simple extension of the general "substitution/insertion/deletion (SID) model". Using the operator representation of indels and the technique of time-dependent perturbation theory, we express the ab initio probability as a summation over all alignment-consistent indel histories. Exploiting the equivalence relations between different indel histories, we find a "sufficient and nearly necessary" set of conditions under which the probability can be factorized into the product of an overall factor and the contributions from regions separated by gapless columns of the alignment, thus providing a sort of generalized HMM. The conditions distinguish evolutionary models with

  9. Evolution of bone biomechanical properties at the micrometer scale around titanium implant as a function of healing time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vayron, Romain; Matsukawa, Mami; Tsubota, Ryo; Mathieu, Vincent; Barthel, Etienne; Haiat, Guillaume

    2014-03-01

    The characterization of the biomechanical properties of newly formed bone tissue around implants is important to understand the osseointegration process. The objective of this study is to investigate the evolution of elastic properties of newly formed bone tissue as a function of healing time. To do so, nanoindentation and micro-Brillouin scattering techniques are coupled following a multimodality approach using histological analysis. Coin-shaped implants were placed in vivo at a distance of 200 µm from the cortical bone surface, leading to an initially empty cavity. Two rabbits were sacrificed after 7 and 13 weeks of healing time. The histological analyses allow us to distinguish mature and newly formed bone tissue. The bone mechanical properties were measured in mature and newly formed bone tissue. Analysis of variance and Tukey-Kramer tests reveals a significant effect of healing time on the indentation modulus and ultrasonic velocities of bone tissue. The results show that bone mass density increases by 12.2% (2.2% respectively) between newly formed bone at 7 weeks (13 weeks respectively) and mature bone. The dependence of bone properties on healing time may be explained by the evolution of bone microstructure and mineralization.

  10. What Is the Effect on Obesity Indicators from Replacing Prolonged Sedentary Time with Brief Sedentary Bouts, Standing and Different Types of Physical Activity during Working Days?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gupta, Nidhi; Heiden, Marina; Aadahl, Mette;

    2016-01-01

    physical activity (MVPA) time on working days was computed using validated Acti4 software. The total sedentary time and uninterrupted sedentary time spent in brief (≤5 mins), moderate (>5 and ≤30 mins), and long (>30mins) bouts, were determined for the whole day and during work and non-work time separately...

  11. Wafer Replacement Cluster Tool (Presentation);

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branz, H. M.

    2008-04-01

    This presentation on wafer replacement cluster tool discusses: (1) Platform for advanced R and D toward SAI 2015 cost goal--crystal silicon PV at area costs closer to amorphous Si PV, it's 15% efficiency, inexpensive substrate, and moderate temperature processing (<800 C); (2) Why silicon?--industrial and knowledge base, abundant and environmentally benign, market acceptance, and good efficiency; and (3) Why replace wafers?--expensive, high embedded energy content, and uses 50-100 times more silicon than needed.

  12. Why does a trait evolve multiple times within a clade? Repeated evolution of snakelike body form in squamate reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, John J; Brandley, Matthew C; Reeder, Tod W

    2006-01-01

    Why does a trait evolve repeatedly within a clade? When examining the evolution of a trait, evolutionary biologists typically focus on the selective advantages it may confer and the genetic and developmental mechanisms that allow it to vary. Although these factors may be necessary to explain why a trait evolves in a particular instance, they may not be sufficient to explain phylogenetic patterns of repeated evolution or conservatism. Instead, other factors may also be important, such as biogeography and competitive interactions. In squamate reptiles (lizards and snakes) a dramatic transition in body form has occurred repeatedly, from a fully limbed, lizardlike body form to a limb-reduced, elongate, snakelike body form. We analyze this trait in a phylogenetic and biogeographic context to address why this transition occurred so frequently. We included 261 species for which morphometric data and molecular phylogenetic information were available. Among the included species, snakelike body form has evolved about 25 times. Most lineages of snakelike squamates belong to one of two "ecomorphs," either short-tailed burrowers or long-tailed surface dwellers. The repeated origins of snakelike squamates appear to be associated with the in situ evolution of these two ecomorphs on different continental regions (including multiple origins of the burrowing morph within most continents), with very little dispersal of most limb-reduced lineages between continental regions. Overall, the number of repeated origins of snakelike morphology seems to depend on large-scale biogeographic patterns and community ecology, in addition to more traditional explanations (e.g., selection, development).

  13. Finite time extinction for nonlinear fractional evolution equations and related properties.

    OpenAIRE

    Jesus Ildefonso Diaz; Teresa Pierantozzi; Luis Vazquez

    2016-01-01

    The finite time extinction phenomenon (the solution reaches an equilibrium after a finite time) is peculiar to certain nonlinear problems whose solutions exhibit an asymptotic behavior entirely different from the typical behavior of solutions associated to linear problems. The main goal of this work is twofold. Firstly, we extend some of the results known in the literature to the case in which the ordinary time derivative is considered jointly with a fractional time differentiation. Secondly,...

  14. A new fitting-function to describe the time evolution of a galaxy's gravitational potential

    CERN Document Server

    Buist, Hans J T

    2014-01-01

    We present a new simple functional form that may be used to model the evolution of a spherical mass distribution in a cosmological context. Two parameters control the growth of the system and this is modeled using a redshift dependent exponential for the scale mass and scale radius. In this new model, systems form inside out and the mass of a given shell can be set to never decrease, as generally expected. This feature makes it more suitable for studying the smooth growth of galactic potentials or cosmological halos than other parametrizations often used in the literature. This is further confirmed through a comparison to the growth of dark matter halos in the Aquarius simulations.

  15. Aeronautical Information System Replacement -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Aeronautical Information System Replacement is a web-enabled, automation means for the collection and distribution of Service B messages, weather information, flight...

  16. Plant F-box protein evolution is determined by lineage-specific timing of major gene family expansion waves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aura Navarro-Quezada

    Full Text Available F-box proteins (FBPs represent one of the largest and fastest evolving gene/protein families in the plant kingdom. The FBP superfamily can be divided in several subfamilies characterized by different C-terminal protein-protein interaction domains that recruit targets for proteasomal degradation. Hence, a clear picture of their phylogeny and molecular evolution is of special interest for the general understanding of evolutionary histories of multi-domain and/or large protein families in plants. In an effort to further understand the molecular evolution of F-box family proteins, we asked whether the largest subfamily in Arabidopsis thaliana, which carries a C-terminal F-box associated domain (FBA proteins shares evolutionary patterns and signatures of selection with other FBPs. To address this question, we applied phylogenetic and molecular evolution analyses in combination with the evaluation of transcriptional profiles. Based on the 2219 FBA proteins we de novo identified in 34 completely sequenced plant genomes, we compared their evolutionary patterns to a previously analyzed large subfamily carrying C-terminal kelch repeats. We found that these two large FBP subfamilies generally tend to evolve by massive waves of duplication, followed by sequence conservation of the F-box domain and sequence diversification of the target recruiting domain. We conclude that the earlier in evolutionary time a major wave of expansion occurred, the more pronounced these selection signatures are. As a consequence, when performing cross species comparisons among FBP subfamilies, significant differences will be observed in the selective signatures of protein-protein interaction domains. Depending on the species, the investigated subfamilies comprise up to 45% of the complete superfamily, indicating that other subfamilies possibly follow similar modes of evolution.

  17. Phylogenetic relationships of Amazonian anole lizards (Dactyloa): taxonomic implications, new insights about phenotypic evolution and the timing of diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prates, Ivan; Rodrigues, Miguel Trefaut; Melo-Sampaio, Paulo Roberto; Carnaval, Ana Carolina

    2015-01-01

    The ecology and evolution of Caribbean anoles are well described, yet little is known about mainland anole species. Lack of phylogenetic information limits our knowledge about species boundaries, morphological evolution, and the biogeography of anoles in South America. To help fill this gap, we provide an updated molecular phylogeny of the Dactyloa (Dactyloidae), with emphasis on the punctata species group. By sampling understudied Amazonian taxa, we (i) assess the phylogenetic placement of the 'odd anole', D. dissimilis; (ii) infer the relationships of the proboscis-bearing D. phyllorhina, testing the hypothesis of independent nasal appendage evolution within the anole radiation; and (iii) examine genetic and dewlap color variation in D. punctata and D. philopunctata. Combining multiple nuclear loci with a review of the fossil record, we also (iv) estimate divergence times within the pleurodont iguanian clade of lizards, including Amazonian representatives of Dactyloa and Norops (Dactyloidae) and of Polychrus (Polychrotidae). We recover the five Dactyloa clades previously referred to as the aequatorialis, heteroderma, latifrons, punctata and roquet species groups, as well as a sixth clade composed of D. dissimilis and the non-Amazonian D. neblinina and D. calimae. We find D. phyllorhina to be nested within the punctata group, suggesting independent evolution of the anole proboscis. We consistently recover D. philopunctata nested within D. punctata, and report limited genetic divergence between distinct dewlap phenotypes. The most recent common ancestor of Dactyloa, Anolis and Norops dates back to the Eocene. Most Amazonian taxa within both Dactyloa and Norops diverged in the Miocene, but some diversification events were as old as the late Eocene and late Oligocene. Amazonian Polychrus diverged in the Pliocene. Our findings have broad implications for anole biogeography, disputing recent suggestions that modern dactyloid genera were present in the Caribbean region

  18. Evidence for a convergent slowdown in primate molecular rates and its implications for the timing of early primate evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiper, Michael E; Seiffert, Erik R

    2012-04-17

    A long-standing problem in primate evolution is the discord between paleontological and molecular clock estimates for the time of crown primate origins: the earliest crown primate fossils are ~56 million y (Ma) old, whereas molecular estimates for the haplorhine-strepsirrhine split are often deep in the Late Cretaceous. One explanation for this phenomenon is that crown primates existed in the Cretaceous but that their fossil remains have not yet been found. Here we provide strong evidence that this discordance is better-explained by a convergent molecular rate slowdown in early primate evolution. We show that molecular rates in primates are strongly and inversely related to three life-history correlates: body size (BS), absolute endocranial volume (EV), and relative endocranial volume (REV). Critically, these traits can be reconstructed from fossils, allowing molecular rates to be predicted for extinct primates. To this end, we modeled the evolutionary history of BS, EV, and REV using data from both extinct and extant primates. We show that the primate last common ancestor had a very small BS, EV, and REV. There has been a subsequent convergent increase in BS, EV, and REV, indicating that there has also been a convergent molecular rate slowdown over primate evolution. We generated a unique timescale for primates by predicting molecular rates from the reconstructed phenotypic values for a large phylogeny of living and extinct primates. This analysis suggests that crown primates originated close to the K-Pg boundary and possibly in the Paleocene, largely reconciling the molecular and fossil timescales of primate evolution.

  19. Cobra Probes Containing Replaceable Thermocouples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, John; Redding, Adam

    2007-01-01

    A modification of the basic design of cobra probes provides for relatively easy replacement of broken thermocouples. Cobra probes are standard tube-type pressure probes that may also contain thermocouples and that are routinely used in wind tunnels and aeronautical hardware. They are so named because in side views, they resemble a cobra poised to attack. Heretofore, there has been no easy way to replace a broken thermocouple in a cobra probe: instead, it has been necessary to break the probe apart and then rebuild it, typically at a cost between $2,000 and $4,000 (2004 prices). The modified design makes it possible to replace the thermocouple, in minimal time and at relatively low cost, by inserting new thermocouple wire in a tube.

  20. Corresponding Relation Between the Space-time Evolution of Seismic Apparent Strain and the Region of Strong Earthquakes in Yunnan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of our predecessors' research, we study the distribution and the space-time evolution characteristics of the seismic apparent strain field in Yunnan since the 1970's using the seismic data of Yunnan and its surrounding areas. The result shows that there is arather strong corresponding relationship between the anomaly region of seismic apparent strain and strong earthquakes. In the nine earthquakes studied, anomaly areas of seismic apparent strain had appeared before eight earthquakes, including five occurring in the anomaly region and three on the edge. Finally, the investigative result is demonstrated primarily.

  1. Numerical analysis of a coupled problem: Time evolution of a tokamak plasma in contact with a conducting wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albanese, R.; Formisano, A.; Fresa, R.; Martone, R.; Rubinacci, G.; Villone, F. [Univ. degli Studi di Napoli Federico II (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria Elettrica

    1996-05-01

    In this paper the authors analyze the time evolution of a tokamak plasma after the failure of the vertical control system. In this case, the plasma eventually touches the conducting wall and gives rise to currents which flow partly in the wall, partly in the plasma. They show how, under simplifying assumptions, the problem can be analyzed by means of pure electromagnetic formulations. After a brief review of the state of the art in the analysis of this phenomenon, they propose and discuss three alternative Eulerian approaches: an evolutionary equilibrium formulation, a convection-diffusion model and a 3D error-based approach.

  2. Time-resolved X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of a Cobalt-Based Hydrogen Evolution System for Artificial Photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moonshiram, Dooshaye; Gimbert, Carolina; Lehmann, Carl; Southworth, Stephen; Llobet, Antoni; Argonne National Laboratory Team; Institut Català d'Investigació Química Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    Production of cost-effective hydrogen gas through solar power is an important challenge of the Department of Energy among other global industry initiatives. In natural photosynthesis, the oxygen evolving complex(OEC) can carry out four-electron water splitting to hydrogen with an efficiency of around 60%. Although, much progress has been carried out in determining mechanistic pathways of the OEC, biomimetic approaches have not duplicated Nature's efficiency in function. Over the past years, we have witnessed progress in developments of light harvesting modules, so called chromophore/catalytic assemblies. In spite of reportedly high catalytic activity of these systems, quantum yields of hydrogen production are below 40 % when using monochromatic light. Proper understanding of kinetics and bond making/breaking steps has to be achieved to improve efficiency of hydrogen evolution systems. This project shows the timing implementation of ultrafast X-ray absorption spectroscopy to visualize in ``real time'' the photo-induced kinetics accompanying a sequence of redox reactions in a cobalt-based molecular photocatalytic system. Formation of a Co(I) species followed by a Co(III) hydride species all the way towards hydrogen evolution is shown through time-resolved XANES.

  3. Biology of tooth replacement in amniotes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John A Whitlock; Joy M Richman

    2013-01-01

    Tooth replacement is a common trait to most vertebrates, including mammals. Mammals, however, have lost the capacity for continuous tooth renewal seen in most other vertebrates, and typically have only 1–2 generations of teeth. Here, we review the mechanisms of tooth replacement in reptiles and mammals, and discuss in detail the current and historical theories on control of timing and pattern of tooth replacement and development.

  4. Environmental and genetic sources of diversification in the timing of seed germination: implications for the evolution of bet hedging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Andrew M; Johnston, Mark O

    2006-11-01

    Environmental variation that is not predictably related to cues is expected to drive the evolution of bet-hedging strategies. The high variance observed in the timing of seed germination has led to it being the most cited diversification strategy in the theoretical bet-hedging literature. Despite this theoretical focus, virtually nothing is known about the mechanisms responsible for the generation of individual-level diversification. Here we report analyses of sources of variation in timing of germination within seasons, germination fraction over two generations and three sequential seasons, and the genetic correlation structure of these traits using almost 10,000 seeds from more than 100 genotypes of the monocarpic perennial Lobelia inflata. Microenvironmental analysis of time to germination suggests that extreme sensitivity to environmental gradients, or microplasticity, even within a homogeneous growth chamber, may act as an effective individual-level diversification mechanism and explains more than 30% of variance in time to germination. The heritability of within-season timing of germination was low (h(2) = 0.07) but significant under homogeneous conditions. Consistent with individual-level diversification, this low h(2) was attributable not to low additive genetic variance, but to an unusually high coefficient of residual variation in time to germination. Despite high power to detect additive genetic variance in within-season diversification, it was low and indistinguishable from zero. Restricted maximum likelihood detected significant genetic variation for germination fraction (h(2) = 0.18) under homogeneous conditions. Unexpectedly, this heritability was positive when measured within a generation by sibling analysis and negative when measured across generations by offspring-on-parent regression. The consistency of dormancy fraction over multiple delays, a major premise of Cohen's classic model, was supported by a strong genetic correlation (r = 0

  5. Finite time extinction for nonlinear fractional evolution equations and related properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Ildefonso Diaz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The finite time extinction phenomenon (the solution reaches an equilibrium after a finite time is peculiar to certain nonlinear problems whose solutions exhibit an asymptotic behavior entirely different from the typical behavior of solutions associated to linear problems. The main goal of this work is twofold. Firstly, we extend some of the results known in the literature to the case in which the ordinary time derivative is considered jointly with a fractional time differentiation. Secondly, we consider the limit case when only the fractional derivative remains. The latter is the most extraordinary case, since we prove that the finite time extinction phenomenon still appears, even with a non-smooth profile near the extinction time.

  6. Radiation Source Replacement Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Moran, Traci L.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2010-12-01

    This report summarizes a Radiation Source Replacement Workshop in Houston Texas on October 27-28, 2010, which provided a forum for industry and researchers to exchange information and to discuss the issues relating to replacement of AmBe, and potentially other isotope sources used in well logging.

  7. On statistical inference in time series analysis of the evolution of road safety.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Commandeur, J.J.F. Bijleveld, F.D. Bergel-Hayat, R. Antoniou, C. Yannis, G. & Papadimitriou, E.

    2013-01-01

    Data collected for building a road safety observatory usually include observations made sequentially through time. Examples of such data, called time series data, include annual (or monthly) number of road traffic accidents, traffic fatalities or vehicle kilometers driven in a country, as well as th

  8. Influence of seasonal timing on thermal ecology and thermal reaction norm evolution in Wyeomyia smithii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragland, G J; Kingsolver, J G

    2007-11-01

    Evolutionary changes in the seasonal timing of life-history events can alter a population's exposure to seasonally variable environmental factors. We illustrate this principle in Wyeomyia smithii by showing that: (1) geographic divergence in diapause timing reduces differences among populations in the thermal habitat experienced by nondiapause stages; and (2) the thermal habitat of the growing season is more divergent at high compared with low temperatures with respect to daily mean temperatures. Geographic variation in thermal reaction norms for development time was greater in a warm compared with a cool rearing treatment, mirroring the geographic trend in daily mean temperature. Geographic variation in body size was unrelated to geographic temperature variation, but was also unrelated to development time or fecundity. Our results suggest that proper interpretation of geographic trends may often require detailed knowledge of life-history timing.

  9. Clues To The Nature of SN 2009ip from Photometric and Spectroscopic Evolution to Late Times

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, M L; Valenti, S; Howell, D A; Parrent, J; Halford, M; Zaritsky, D; Bianco, F; Rest, A; Dilday, B

    2014-01-01

    We present time series photometric and spectroscopic data for the transient SN 2009ip from the start of its outburst in September 2012 until November 2013. This data was collected primarily with the new robotic capabilities of the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, a specialized facility for time domain astrophysics, and includes supporting high-resolution spectroscopy from the Southern Astrophysical Research Telescope, Kitt Peak National Observatory, and Gemini Observatory. Based on our nightly photometric monitoring, we interpret the strength and timing of fluctuations in the light curve as interactions between fast-moving ejecta and an inhomogeneous CSM produced by past eruptions of this massive luminous blue variable (LBV) star. Our time series of spectroscopy in 2012 reveals that, as the continuum and narrow H-alpha flux from CSM interactions declines, the broad component of H-alpha persists with SN-like velocities that are not typically seen in LBVs or SN Impostor events. At late times we...

  10. Les étapes de la littérature tamoule Tamil Literature: An Evolution in Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Annoussamy

    2009-03-01

    learned Tamilians. The first written works are lost for ever. What has been transmitted to us consists of an elaborate grammar, eight anthologies and ten long poems belonging to the first centuries before the Christian era. They have got a great documentary value by the picture of life at that time they give and by the details on the external relations of the Tamil land with Mediterranean countries. Their literary interest is no less important, because they reveal an already consummate art. The characteristic of that literature is its thematic division into agam works relating to love and puram works relating to all the rest. This literature developed itself according to its own spirit and gained in amplitude and diversity. For about five centuries the main preoccupation was ethics followed by mystical yearning in the course of the next five centuries.  From the 10th century Tamil literature gets enriched by several external influences, first the influence of Sanscrit, then that of Islam followed by that of Christianism. In the course of the 18th century English literature penetrates massively et gives birth to works of European model. Throughout this evolution the essentials of the tradition remained intact; From the 20th century, written Tamil literature caters for the common man. The agam is replaced by the puram as the main theme. This literature of two millennia bears the stamp of its universal aspirations, its specific literary  genres, its  expression to all faiths of the world and its openness to all kinds of thought.

  11. The Evolution of Main-Sequence and Starburst Galaxies Across Cosmic Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravena, Manuel

    2015-08-01

    In the last decade, significant progress has been achieved in the understanding of the evolution of star formation in galaxies as a function of redshift. Its is now clear that the majority of galaxies at zform a nearly linear correlation between their stellar mass and star formation rates and appear to create most of their stars in timescales of ~1 Gyr. At the highest luminosities, a significant fraction of galaxies deviate from this ‘main-sequence’, showing short duty cycles and thus producing most of their stars in a single burst of star formation (‘starburst’) within a few 100 Myr, being likely driven by major merger activity. Despite the large luminosities of starbursts, main-sequence galaxies appear to dominate the star formation density of the Universe at its peak.While progress has been impressive, a number of questions are still unanswered. In this talk, I will review our current observational understanding of this ‘main-sequence’ vs ‘starburst’ galaxy paradigm, and will address how future observations (e.g. with ALMA) will help us to have better insights into the fundamental properties of these galaxies.

  12. Timing the evolution of quiescent and star-forming local galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Pacifici, Camilla; Oh, Kyuseok; Lee, Jaehyun; Yi, Sukyoung K

    2016-01-01

    Constraining the star formation histories (SFHs) of individual galaxies is crucial to understanding the mechanisms that regulate their evolution. Here, we combine multi-wavelength (ultraviolet, optical, and infrared) measurements of a very large sample of galaxies (~230,000) at z<0.16, with physically motivated models of galaxy spectral energy distributions to extract constraints on galaxy physical parameters (such as stellar mass and star formation rate) as well as individual SFHs. In particular, we set constraints on the timescales in which galaxies form a certain percentage of their total stellar mass (namely, 10, 50 and 90%). The large statistics allows us to average such measurements over different populations of galaxies (quiescent and star-forming) and in narrow ranges of stellar mass. As in the downsizing scenario, we confirm that low-mass galaxies have more extended SFHs than high-mass galaxies. We also find that at the same observed stellar mass, galaxies that are now quiescent evolve more rapidl...

  13. Shear zone evolution and timing of deformation in the Neoproterozoic transpressional Dom Feliciano Belt, Uruguay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriolo, Sebastián; Oyhantçabal, Pedro; Wemmer, Klaus; Heidelbach, Florian; Pfänder, Jörg; Basei, Miguel A. S.; Hueck, Mathias; Hannich, Felix; Sperner, Blanka; Siegesmund, Siegfried

    2016-11-01

    New structural, microstructural and geochronological (U-Pb LA-ICP-MS, Ar/Ar, K-Ar, Rb-Sr) data were obtained for the Dom Feliciano Belt in Uruguay. The main phase of crustal shortening, metamorphism and associated exhumation is recorded between 630 and 600 Ma. This stage is related to the collision of the Río de la Plata and Congo cratons at ca. 630 Ma, which also involved crustal reworking of minor crustal blocks such as the Nico Pérez Terrane and voluminous post-collisional magmatism. Subsequent orogen-parallel sinistral shearing gave rise to further deformation up to ca. 584 Ma and resulted from the onset of the convergence of the Kalahari Craton and the Río de la Plata-Congo cratons. Sinistral shear zones underwent progressive strain localization and retrograde conditions of deformation during crustal exhumation. Dextral ENE-striking shear zones were subsequently active at ca. 550 Ma, coeval with further sinistral shearing along N- to NNE-striking shear zones. The tectonothermal evolution of the Dom Feliciano Belt thus recorded the collision of the Río de la Plata and Congo cratons, which comprised one of the first amalgamated nuclei of Gondwana, and the subsequent incorporation of the Kalahari Craton into Western Gondwana.

  14. Dead or Alive? Long-time evolution of SN 2015bh (SNhunt275)

    CERN Document Server

    Elias-Rosa, N; Benetti, S; Cappellaro, E; Taubenberger, S; Terreran, G; Fraser, M; Brown, P J; Tartaglia, L; Morales-Garoffolo, A; Harmanen, J; Tomasella, L; Margutti, R; Smartt, S J; Dennefeld, M; Turatto, M; Anupama, G C; Arbour, R; Berton, M; Boles, T; Chornock, R; Briganti, F; Ciabattari, F; Cortini, G; Dimai, A; Itagaki, K; Kamble, A; Kotak, R; Mancini, R; Martinelli, F; Milisavljevic, D; Misra, K; Ochner, P; Patnaude, D; Polshaw, J; Sahu, D K; Zaggia, S

    2016-01-01

    Supernova (SN) 2015bh (or SNhunt275) was discovered in NGC 2770 on 2015 February with an absolute magnitude of Mr ~ -13 mag, and was initially classified as a SN impostor. Here we present the photometric and spectroscopic evolution of SN 2015bh from discovery to late phases (~ 1 yr after). In addition, we inspect archival images of the host galaxy up to ~ 16 yr before discovery, finding a burst ~ 1 yr before discovery, and further signatures of stellar instability until late 2014. Later on, the luminosity of the transient slowly increases, and a broad light curve peak is reached after about three months. We propose that the transient discovered in early 2015 could be a core-collapse SN explosion. The pre-SN luminosity variability history, the long-lasting rise and faintness first light curve peak suggests that the progenitor was a very massive, unstable and blue star, which exploded as a faint SN because of severe fallback of material. Later on, the object experiences a sudden brightening of 3 mag, which resu...

  15. The Horizon-AGN simulation: evolution of galaxy properties over cosmic time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaviraj, S.; Laigle, C.; Kimm, T.; Devriendt, J. E. G.; Dubois, Y.; Pichon, C.; Slyz, A.; Chisari, E.; Peirani, S.

    2017-01-01

    We compare the predictions of Horizon-AGN, a hydro-dynamical cosmological simulation that uses an adaptive mesh refinement code, to observational data in the redshift range 0 formation main sequence, rest-frame UV-optical-near infrared colours and the cosmic star-formation history. We show that Horizon-AGN, which is not tuned to reproduce the local Universe, produces good overall agreement with these quantities, from the present day to the epoch when the Universe was 5% of its current age. By comparison to Horizon-noAGN, a twin simulation without AGN feedback, we quantify how feedback from black holes is likely to help shape galaxy stellar-mass growth in the redshift range 0 < z < 6, particularly in the most massive galaxies. Our results demonstrate that Horizon-AGN successfully captures the evolutionary trends of observed galaxies over the lifetime of the Universe, making it an excellent tool for studying the processes that drive galaxy evolution and making predictions for the next generation of galaxy surveys.

  16. Surgery of the mind and mood: a mosaic of issues in time and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, A Chris; Amar, Arun P; Liu, Charles Y; Apuzzo, Michael L J

    2008-06-01

    The prevalence and economic burden of neuropsychiatric disease are enormous. The surgical treatment of these psychiatric disorders, although potentially valuable, remains one of the most controversial subjects in medicine, as its concept and potential reality raises thorny issues of moral, ethical, and socioeconomic consequence. This article traces the roots of concept and surgical efforts in this turbulent area from prehistory to the 21st century. The details of the late 19th and 20th century evolution of approaches to the problem of intractable psychiatric diseases with scrutiny of the persona and contributions of the key individuals Gottlieb Burckhardt, John Fulton, Egas Moniz, Walter Freeman, James Watts, and William Scoville are presented as a foundation for the later, more logically refined approaches of Lars Leksell, Peter Lindstrom, Geoffrey Knight, Jean Talaraich, and Desmond Kelly. These refinements, characterized by progressive minimalism and founded on a better comprehension of underlying pathways of normal function and disease states, have been further explored with recent advances in imaging, which have allowed the emergence of less invasive and technology driven non-ablative surgical directives toward these problematical disorders of mind and mood. The application of therapies based on imaging comprehension of pathway and relay abnormalities, along with explorations of the notion of surgical minimalism, promise to serve as an impetus for revival of an active surgical effort in this key global health and socioeconomic problem. Eventual coupling of cellular and molecular biology and nanotechnology with surgical enterprise is on the horizon.

  17. Time-evolution of Peak Energy and Luminosity Relation within Pulses for GRB 061007: Probing Fireball Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ohno, Masanori; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Tashiro, Makoto; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Nakagawa, Yujin E

    2008-01-01

    We perform a time-resolved spectral analysis of bright, long Gamma-ray burst GRB 061007 using Suzaku/WAM and Swift/BAT. Thanks to the large effective area of the WAM, we can investigate the time evolution of the spectral peak energy, Et_peak and the luminosity Lt_iso with 1-sec time resolution, and we find that luminosity Lt_iso with 1-sec time resolution, and we find that the time-resolved pulses also satisfy the Epeak-Liso relation, which was found for the time-averaged spectra of other bursts, suggesting the same physical conditions in each pulse. Furthermore, the initial rising phase of each pulse could be an outlier of this relation with higher Et_peak value by about factor 2. This difference could suggest that the fireball radius expands by a factor of 2-4 and/or bulk Lorentz factor of the fireball is decelerated by a factor of 4 during the initial phase, providing a new probe of the fireball dynamics in real time.

  18. Effect of ageing in fibre bundle models on the evolution of acoustic and silent damage in time-dependent failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartz, S.; Main, I. G.; Zaiser, M.; Kun, F.

    2012-04-01

    The spatio-temporal evolution of damage in brittle materials is often modelled by fibre bundle models. In real fibre bundles (such as suspension bridge ropes), and in other composite materials such as rocks and ceramics, the evolution of damage as a function of stress and time can be recorded using acoustic emissions (AE), and used to asses the integrity of the sample and its lifetime. Such monitoring however tells only part of the story, since time-dependent, effectively 'silent' damage also occurs without AE, and small AE events may not be recorded below some recording threshold set by the background noise. The proportion of seismic to aseismic deformation is important for a number of applications, for example providing a strong constraint on plate boundary dynamics and estimates of earthquake hazard. Accordingly we have modified the usual fibre bundle model by introducing some additional ageing, which results in silent damage below a nominal threshold for more dynamic deformation. This enables us to model the effect of the model parameters on the ratio of acoustic to total damage, and how it evolves in time under a given stress history. We found that the silent damage dominates the process and that for a constant applied stress the ratio between acoustic and silent emissions is approximately constant over a wide range of time. The proportionality factor depends strongly on the applied stress and only weakly on the ageing parameter, while it is the other way around for the failure time which depends more on the ageing parameter than on the applied stress.

  19. A dynamical polynomial chaos approach for long-time evolution of SPDEs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozen, H. Cagan; Bal, Guillaume

    2017-08-01

    We propose a Dynamical generalized Polynomial Chaos (DgPC) method to solve time-dependent stochastic partial differential equations (SPDEs) with white noise forcing. The long-time simulation of SPDE solutions by Polynomial Chaos (PC) methods is notoriously difficult as the dimension of the stochastic variables increases linearly with time. Exploiting the Markovian property of white noise, DgPC [1] implements a restart procedure that allows us to expand solutions at future times in terms of orthogonal polynomials of the measure describing the solution at a given time and the future white noise. The dimension of the representation is kept minimal by application of a Karhunen-Loeve (KL) expansion. Using frequent restarts and low degree polynomials on sparse multi-index sets, the method allows us to perform long time simulations, including the calculation of invariant measures for systems which possess one. We apply the method to the numerical simulation of stochastic Burgers and Navier-Stokes equations with white noise forcing. Our method also allows us to incorporate time-independent random coefficients such as a random viscosity. We propose several numerical simulations and show that the algorithm compares favorably with standard Monte Carlo methods.

  20. On statistical inference in time series analysis of the evolution of road safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commandeur, Jacques J F; Bijleveld, Frits D; Bergel-Hayat, Ruth; Antoniou, Constantinos; Yannis, George; Papadimitriou, Eleonora

    2013-11-01

    Data collected for building a road safety observatory usually include observations made sequentially through time. Examples of such data, called time series data, include annual (or monthly) number of road traffic accidents, traffic fatalities or vehicle kilometers driven in a country, as well as the corresponding values of safety performance indicators (e.g., data on speeding, seat belt use, alcohol use, etc.). Some commonly used statistical techniques imply assumptions that are often violated by the special properties of time series data, namely serial dependency among disturbances associated with the observations. The first objective of this paper is to demonstrate the impact of such violations to the applicability of standard methods of statistical inference, which leads to an under or overestimation of the standard error and consequently may produce erroneous inferences. Moreover, having established the adverse consequences of ignoring serial dependency issues, the paper aims to describe rigorous statistical techniques used to overcome them. In particular, appropriate time series analysis techniques of varying complexity are employed to describe the development over time, relating the accident-occurrences to explanatory factors such as exposure measures or safety performance indicators, and forecasting the development into the near future. Traditional regression models (whether they are linear, generalized linear or nonlinear) are shown not to naturally capture the inherent dependencies in time series data. Dedicated time series analysis techniques, such as the ARMA-type and DRAG approaches are discussed next, followed by structural time series models, which are a subclass of state space methods. The paper concludes with general recommendations and practice guidelines for the use of time series models in road safety research. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Time evolution of negative ion profile in a large cesiated negative ion source applicable to fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, M., E-mail: yoshida.masafumi@jaea.go.jp; Hanada, M.; Kojima, A.; Kashiwagi, M.; Umeda, N.; Hiratsuka, J.; Ichikawa, M.; Watanabe, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1, Mukoyama, Naka 311-0193 (Japan); Grisham, L.R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Tsumori, K.; Kisaki, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5792 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    To understand the physics of the cesium (Cs) recycling in the large Cs-seeded negative ion sources relevant to ITER and JT-60SA with ion extraction area of 45-60 cm × 110-120 cm, the time evolution of the negative ion profile was precisely measured in JT-60SA where the ion extraction area is longitudinally segmented into 5. The Cs was seeded from the oven at 180 °C to the ion source. After 1 g of Cs input, surface production of the negative ions appeared only in the central segment where a Cs nozzle was located. Up to 2 g of Cs, the negative ion profile was longitudinally expanded over full ion extraction area. The measured time evolution of the negative ion profile has the similar tendency of distribution of the Cs atoms that is calculated. From the results, it is suggested that Cs atom distribution is correlated with the formation of the negative ion profile.

  2. Late-time evolution of cosmological models with fluids obeying a Shan-Chen-like equation of state

    CERN Document Server

    Bini, Donato; Geralico, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Classical as well as quantum features of the late-time evolution of cosmological models with fluids obeying a Shan-Chen-like equation of state are studied. The latter is of the type $p=w_{\\rm eff}(\\rho)\\,\\rho$, and has been used in previous works to describe, e.g., a possible scenario for the growth of the dark-energy content of the present Universe. At the classical level the fluid dynamics in a spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker background implies the existence of two possible equilibrium solutions depending on the model parameters, associated with (asymptotic) finite pressure and energy density. We show that no future cosmological singularity is developed during the evolution for this specific model. The corresponding quantum effects in the late-time behavior of the system are also investigated within the framework of quantum geometrodynamics, i.e., by solving the (minisuperspace) Wheeler-DeWitt equation in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, constructing wave-packets and analyzing their behavior.

  3. Time evolution of off-state degradation of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajo, M. Montes, E-mail: Miguel.Montes@icfo.es, E-mail: Martin.Kuball@bristol.ac.uk; Sun, H.; Uren, M. J.; Kuball, M., E-mail: Miguel.Montes@icfo.es, E-mail: Martin.Kuball@bristol.ac.uk [Center for Device Thermography and Reliability (CDTR), H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-02

    The evolution of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors under off-state stress conditions is studied by gate leakage current (I{sub g}) monitoring, electroluminescence (EL), and atomic force microscope (AFM) imaging at room temperature. It is found that the number of off-state failure sites as identified by EL increases over time during stress until it reaches a saturation value. I{sub g} increases accordingly during stress until this saturation number of failure sites is reached. AFM scanning of the device surface stripped of metal contacts and passivation reveals surface pits corresponding to the location of the EL spots. These pits have an elongated shape oriented towards the drain contact whose length is correlated with the distance to the adjacent pits and with the time since their appearance during the stress experiment. A model for the generation and evolution of the off-state stress-related failure sites is proposed consistent with the experimental results, bringing together surface migration of electrochemical species with trap-based leakage mechanisms and resulting in the formation of an exclusion zone around each failure site.

  4. Short-time evolution of Lagrangian velocity gradient correlations in isotropic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Le; Jin, G D

    2015-01-01

    We show by direct numerical simulation (DNS) that the Lagrangian cross correlation of velocity gradients in homogeneous isotropic turbulence increases at short times, whereas its auto-correlation decreases. Kinematic considerations allow to show that two invariants of the turbulent velocity field determine the short-time velocity gradient correlations. In order to get a more intuitive understanding of the dynamics for longer times, heuristic models are proposed involving the combined action of local shear and rotation. These models quantitatively reproduce the effects and disentangle the different physical mechanisms leading to the observations in the DNS.

  5. The Evolution of Television Criticism in the New York "Times": 1949-1977.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Richard C.

    1980-01-01

    Shows that "The New York Times" devoted a significant portion of its television-related articles to personality features from 1949 to 1977 and that only recently has this trend showed signs of changing. (FL)

  6. Space-time properties of Gram-Schmidt vectors in classical Hamiltonian evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jason R; Jellinek, Julius; Berry, R Stephen

    2009-12-01

    Not all tangent space directions play equivalent roles in the local chaotic motions of classical Hamiltonian many-body systems. These directions are numerically represented by basis sets of mutually orthogonal Gram-Schmidt vectors, whose statistical properties may depend on the chosen phase space-time domain of a trajectory. We examine the degree of stability and localization of Gram-Schmidt vector sets simulated with trajectories of a model three-atom Lennard-Jones cluster. Distributions of finite-time Lyapunov exponent and inverse participation ratio spectra formed from short-time histories reveal that ergodicity begins to emerge on different time scales for trajectories spanning different phase-space regions, in a narrow range of total energy and history length. Over a range of history lengths, the most localized directions were typically the most unstable and corresponded to atomic configurations near potential landscape saddles.

  7. Evolution of Photonic Time Stretch: From Analog to Digital Conversion to Blood Screening

    CERN Document Server

    Jalali, Bahram; Fard, Ali; Kim, Sang Hyup

    2011-01-01

    We show how the ability to slow down, amplify, and capture fast transient events can produce high-throughput real-time instruments ranging from digitizers to imaging flow cytometers for detection of rare diseased cells in blood.

  8. Geochemical modelling of groundwater evolution and residence time at the Haestholmen site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitkaenen, P.; Luukkonen, A. [VTT Communities and Infrastructure, Espoo (Finland); Ruotsalainen, P. [Fintact Oy, Helsinki (Finland); Leino- Forsman, H.; Vuorinen, U. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    2001-01-01

    An understanding of the geochemical evolution of groundwater is an essential part of the performance assessment and safety analysis of the geological final disposal of radioactive waste. The performance of technical barriers and migration of possibly released radionuclides depend on the geochemical conditions. A prerequisite for understanding these factors is the ability to specify the water-rock interactions that control chemical conditions in groundwater. The objective of this study is to interpret the processes and factors that control the hydrogeochemistry, such as pH and redox conditions. A model of the hydrogeochemical progress in different parts of the crystalline bedrock at Haestholmen has been created and the significance of geochemical reactions and groundwater mixing along different flow paths calculated. Long term hydrodynamics have also been evaluated. The interpretation and modelling are based on water samples (64 altogether) obtained from precipitation, the Baltic Sea, the soil layer, shallow wells in the bedrock, and 14 deep boreholes in the bedrock for which a comprehensive data set on dissolved chemical species and isotopes was available. Some analyses of dissolved gases and their isotopic measurements were also utilised. The data covers the bedrock at Haestholmen to a depth of 1000 m. The results from groundwater chemistry, isotopes, petrography, hydrogeology of the site, geomicrobial studies, and PCA and speciation calculations were used to evaluate evolutionary processes at the site. The geochemical interpretation of water-rock interaction, isotope-chemical evolution ({delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 34}S) and mixing of palaeo-water types were approached by mass-balance calculations (NETPATH). Reaction-path calculations (EQ3/6) were used to verify the thermodynamic feasibility of the reaction models obtained. The interpretation and calculation of hydrochemical data from Haestholmen suggest that changes in external conditions, such as glaciation

  9. What Is the effect on obesity indicators from replacing prolonged sedentary time with brief sedentary bouts, standing and different types of physical activity during working days?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gupta, Nidhi; Heiden, Marina; Aadahl, Mette

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The aim of the study was to investigate if (a) substituting total sedentary time or long sedentary bouts with standing or various types of physical activity and (b) substituting long sedentary bouts with brief sedentary bouts; is associated with obesity indicators using a cross...... sectional isotemporal substitution approach among blue-collar workers. METHODS: A total of 692 workers from transportation, manufacturing and cleaning sectors wore an Actigraph GT3X+ accelerometer on the thigh for 1-4 working days. The sedentary (sit and lie), standing, walking, and moderate to vigorous...... physical activity (MVPA) time on working days was computed using validated Acti4 software. The total sedentary time and uninterrupted sedentary time spent in brief (≤5 mins), moderate (>5 and ≤30 mins), and long (>30mins) bouts, were determined for the whole day and during work and non-work time separately...

  10. Evolution lignite mesopore structure during drying. Effect of temperature and heating time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmas, C.E.; Tsetsekou, A.H.; Hatzilyberis, K.S.; Androutsopoulos, G.P. [National Technical University of Athens, Athens (Greece). Chemical Process Engineering Lab.

    2001-07-01

    The knowledge of the intrinsic pore structure of coals is significant in elucidating the kinetics of mass transport and chemical reaction that leads to design of more efficient coal combustion and conversion equipment. The results of pore structure studies of Greek lignite are reported in this work. Isothermal drying of Greek lignite samples, under vacuum, caused mesopore structure evolution despite the severe (similar to 50%) particle size contraction due to heating. Mesopore volume and surface area were increased as the drying temperature was raised to 200{degree}C while further drying up to 250 {degree}C caused a mesopore volume and surface area decrease. Lignite drying at 100{degree}C for up to 3 h resulted in a monotonic increase of the mesopore structure properties while heating for a longer period i.e., 6 h, despite a slight increase of weight loss, caused pore volume and surface area reduction. Nitrogen sorption (77 K) hysteresis data obtained for partially dried samples have been processed to deduce BET surface area and pore size distributions (PSD) by using both the Roberts and a new method based on a Corrugated Pore Structure Model (CPSM-nitrogen) methods. Bimodal PSD have been detected with one peak at 3 nm and the second at 20 nm while surface area varied over the range 2.98-5.30 m{sup 2}/g, Dry Greek lignite has shown a higher mesopore volume than that of several American and Canadian coals of varying rank. Mesopore volume distribution of dry Greek lignite, obtained from nitrogen sorption data, agree well with those deduced from mercury penetration data corrected for coal compressibility.

  11. Equivalent construction of the infinitesimal time translation operator in algebraic dynamics algorithm for partial differential evolution equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    We give an equivalent construction of the infinitesimal time translation operator for partial differential evolution equation in the algebraic dynamics algorithm proposed by Shun-Jin Wang and his students. Our construction involves only simple partial differentials and avoids the derivative terms of δ function which appear in the course of computation by means of Wang-Zhang operator. We prove Wang’s equivalent theorem which says that our construction and Wang-Zhang’s are equivalent. We use our construction to deal with several typical equations such as nonlinear advection equation, Burgers equation, nonlinear Schrodinger equation, KdV equation and sine-Gordon equation, and obtain at least second order approximate solutions to them. These equations include the cases of real and complex field variables and the cases of the first and the second order time derivatives.

  12. Electromagnetic effects on meson production: a new tool for studying the space-time evolution of heavy ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybicki, Andrzej; Szczurek, Antoni; Kłusek-Gawenda, Mariola; Davis, Nikolaos; Ozvenchuk, Vitalii; Kiełbowicz, Mirosław

    2016-11-01

    We review our studies of spectator-induced electromagnetic (EM) effects on the emission of charged mesons in the final state of ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions. We argue that these effects offer sensitivity to the distance dE between the charged meson formation zone at freeze-out and the spectator system. As such, they can serve as an independent, new tool to probe the space-time and longitudinal evolution of the system created in the collision. As a phenomenological application for this tool in the context of resonance production and decay, we obtain a first estimate of the time of pion emission from EM effects. This we compare to existing HBT data.

  13. Equivalent construction of the infinitesimal time translation operator in algebraic dynamics algorithm for partial differential evolution equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chengshi

    2010-08-01

    We give an equivalent construction of the infinitesimal time translation operator for partial differential evolution equation in the algebraic dynamics algorithm proposed by Shun-Jin Wang and his students. Our construction involves only simple partial differentials and avoids the derivative terms of δ function which appear in the course of computation by means of Wang-Zhang operator. We prove Wang’s equivalent theorem which says that our construction and Wang-Zhang’s are equivalent. We use our construction to deal with several typical equations such as nonlinear advection equation, Burgers equation, nonlinear Schrodinger equation, KdV equation and sine-Gordon equation, and obtain at least second order approximate solutions to them. These equations include the cases of real and complex field variables and the cases of the first and the second order time derivatives.

  14. SMC in space and time: a project to study the evolution of the prototype interacting late-type dwarf galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Tosi, M; Sabbi, E; Glatt, K; Grebel, E K; Christian, C; Cignoni, M; Clementini, G; Cole, A; Da Costa, G; Harbeck, D; Marconi, M; Meixner, M; Nota, A; Sirianni, M; Smecker-Hane, T

    2008-01-01

    We introduce the SMC in space and time, a large coordinated space and ground-based program to study star formation processes and history, as well as variable stars, structure, kinematics and chemical evolution of the whole SMC. Here, we present the Colour-Magnitude Diagrams(CMDs) resulting from HST/ACS photometry, aimed at deriving the star formation history (SFH) in six fields of the SMC. The fields are located in the central regions, in the stellar halo, and in the wing toward the LMC. The CMDs are very deep, well beyond the oldest Main Sequence Turn-Off, and will allow us to derive the SFH over the entire Hubble time.

  15. Evolution of Emotional Symptoms Over Time Among Daughters of Patients With Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellisch, David K; Ormseth, Sarah R; Aréchiga, Adam E

    2015-01-01

    This study longitudinally profiled anxiety and depressive symptoms of daughters of patients with breast cancer and examined the mother׳s survival status, the daughter׳s age at the time of mother׳s diagnosis, and the style of family communication about breast cancer as moderators of change in symptomatology across participants׳ first 3 appointments at the University of California, Los Angeles Revlon Breast Center High Risk Clinic. We evaluated the effects of hypothesized predictors on change in anxiety and depressive symptoms, 3 (symptomatology at first, second, and third clinic visits) × 2 (mother survived or died) × 2 (<20 or ≥20y old at diagnosis) × 2 (open or closed family communication) repeated-measures analyses of variance were employed. There was a main effect for time of diagnosis on state anxiety, demonstrating a significant reduction in anxiety across clinic visits overall (p < 0.001). There were also significant 3-way interactions. For state anxiety, mother׳s survival status moderated the time of diagnosis × age at diagnosis and time of diagnosis × family communication interaction effects. For daughters whose mothers died, decreased anxiety was observed in those who were younger at the time of diagnosis (p = 0.001). For daughters whose mothers survived, anxiety was decreased for those with closed family communication styles (p = 0.001). The time of diagnosis × mother׳s survival × age at diagnosis interaction was also significant for depressive symptoms (p = 0.001). Among daughters whose mothers died, those who were younger showed decreases in symptoms (p = 0.004). These daughters appeared to benefit from the high-risk program as demonstrated by decreased symptomatology, particularly daughters whose mothers died who were younger at the time of diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Time-Dependent Photoionization in a Dusty Medium II Evolution of Dust Distributions and Optical Opacities

    CERN Document Server

    Perna, R; Fiore, F; Perna, Rosalba; Lazzati, Davide; Fiore, Fabrizio

    2003-01-01

    The interaction of a radiation field with a dusty medium is a relevant issue in several astrophysical contexts. We use the time-dependent photoionization code in a dusty medium developed by Perna & Lazzati (2002), to study the modifications in the dust distribution and the relative optical opacities when a strong X-ray UV radiation flux propagates into a medium. We find that silicates are preferentially destroyed with respect to graphite, and the extinction curve becomes significantly flatter (hence implying less reddening), with the characteristic bump at lambda 2175 A highly suppressed, due to the destruction of the small graphite grains. This could explain the observational lack of such a feature in GRB afterglow and AGN spectra. For a very intense and highly variable source irradiating a compact and dense region, time variability in the optical opacity resulting from dust destruction can be observed on a relatively short timescale. We show that, under these circumstances, monitoring the time variabili...

  17. [Inheritance and evolution of acupuncture manipulation techniques of Zhejiang acupuncture masters in modern times].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Daxiong; Ma, Ruijie; Fang, Jianqiao

    2015-05-01

    There are many eminent acupuncture masters in modern times in the regions of Zhejiang province, which has developed the acupuncture schools of numerous characteristics and induces the important impacts at home and abroad. Through the literature collection on the acupuncture schools in Zhejiang and the interviews to the parties involved, it has been discovered that the acupuncture manipulation techniques of acupuncture masters in modern times are specifically featured. Those techniques are developed on the basis of Neijing (Internal Classic), Jinzhenfu (Ode to Gold Needle) and Zhenjiu Dacheng (Great Compendium of Acupuncture and Moxibustion). No matter to obey the old maxim or study by himself, every master lays the emphasis on the research and interpretation of classical theories and integrates the traditional with the modern. In the paper, the acupuncture manipulation techniques of Zhejiang acupuncture masters in modern times are stated from four aspects, named needling techniques in Internal Classic, feijingzouqi needling technique, penetrating needling technique and innovation of acupuncture manipulation.

  18. The effect of rf pulse pattern on bremsstrahlung and ion current time evolution of an ECRIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ropponen, T.; Tarvainen, O.; Toivanen, V.; Peura, P.; Jones, P.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, Jyvaeskylae FI-40014 (Finland); Noland, J.; Leitner, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    Time-resolved helium ion production and bremsstrahlung emission from JYFL 14 GHz ECRIS is presented with different radio frequency pulse lengths. rf on times are varied from 5 to 50 ms and rf off times from 10 to 1000 ms between different measurement sets. It is observed that the plasma breakdown occurs a few milliseconds after launching the rf power into the plasma chamber, and in the beginning of the rf pulses a preglow transient is seen. During this transient the ion beam currents are increased by several factors compared to a steady state situation. By adjusting the rf pulse separation the maximum ion beam currents can be maintained during the so-called preglow regime while the amount of bremsstrahlung radiation is significantly decreased.

  19. Persistence of ICD indication at the time of replacement in patients with initial implant for primary prevention indication: Effect on subsequent ICD therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Dell’Era

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: In heart failure with reduced LVEF, ICD indication persisted at the time of GR in 69% of patients. However, even in the absence of persistent ICD indication at GR, the risk of recurrence of arrhythmic events was not null.

  20. Scientific reference on the long time evolution of spent fuels; Referentiel scientifique sur l'evolution a long terme des combustibles uses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferry, C.; Poinssot, Ch.; Broudic, V.; Jegou, Ch.; Roudil, D.; Poulesquen, A.; Miserque, F. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Physico-Chimie, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Cappelaere, Ch. [CEA Saclay, Dept. des Materiaux pour le Nucleaire, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Desgranges, L.; Garcia, Ph.; Piron, J.P. [CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. d' Etudes des Combustibles; Lovera, P.; Marimbeau, P. [CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France). Dept. d' Etudes des Reacteurs; Corbel, C. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Recherche sur l' Etat Condense, les Atomes et les Molecules, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2005-03-15

    This report is published in the framework of the 1991 French law for the nuclear waste management. The state of the art reported here concerns the long term evolution of spent fuel in the various environmental conditions corresponding to dry storage and geological disposal: closed system, air and water saturated medium. This review is based on the results of the french PRECCI project (Research Program on Long term Evolution of Spent Nuclear Fuel) and on literature data. (authors)

  1. Controls on the geochemical evolution of Prairie Pothole Region lakes and wetlands over decadal time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhaber, Martin B.; Mills, Christopher; Mushet, David M.; McCleskey, R. Blaine; Rover, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    One hundred sixty-seven Prairie Pothole lakes, ponds and wetlands (largely lakes) previously analyzed chemically during the late 1960’s and early to mid-1970’s were resampled and reanalyzed in 2011–2012. The two sampling periods differed climatically. The earlier sampling took place during normal to slightly dry conditions, whereas the latter occurred during and immediately following exceptionally wet conditions. As reported previously in Mushet et al. (2015), the dominant effect was expansion of the area of these lakes and dilution of their major ions. However, within that context, there were significant differences in the evolutionary pathways of major ions. To establish these pathways, we employed the inverse modeling computer code NetpathXL. This code takes the initial and final lake composition and, using mass balance constrained by the composition of diluting waters, and input and output of phases, calculates plausible geochemical evolution pathways. Despite the fact that in most cases major ions decreased, a subset of the lakes had an increase in SO42−. This distinction is significant because SO42− is the dominant anion in a majority of Prairie Pothole Region wetlands and lakes. For lakes with decreasing SO42−, the proportion of original lake water required for mass balance was subordinate to rainwater and/or overland flow. In contrast, lakes with increasing SO42− between the two sampling episodes tended to be dominated by original lake water. This suite of lakes tended to be smaller and have lower initial SO42−concentrations such that inputs of sulfur from dissolution of the minerals gypsum or pyrite had a significant impact on the final sulfur concentration given the lower dilution factors. Thus, our study provides context for how Prairie Pothole Region water bodies evolve geochemically as climate changes. Because wetland geochemistry in turn controls the ecology of these water bodies, this research contributes to the prediction of the

  2. Visualizing the evolution of image features in time-series: supporting the exploration of sensor data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turdukulov, U.D.

    2007-01-01

    Sensor image repositories are becoming the fastest growing archives of spatio-temporal information and they are only projected to grow through the twenty-first century. This continuous data flow leads to large time-series and accordingly, geoscientists are often confronted with the amount of data th

  3. The evolution of planetary nebulae. VIII. True expansion rates and visibility times

    CERN Document Server

    Jacob, R; Steffen, M

    2013-01-01

    The visibility time of planetary nebulae (PNe) in stellar systems is an essential quantity for estimating the size of a PN population in the context of general population studies. For instance, it enters directly into the PN death rate determination. The basic ingredient for determining visibility times is the typical nebular expansion velocity, as a suited average over all PN sizes of a PN population within a certain volume or stellar system. The true expansion speed of the outer nebular edge of a PN is, however, not accessible by spectroscopy -- a difficulty that we surmount by radiation-hydrodynamics modelling. We find a mean true expansion velocity of 42 km/s, i.e. nearly twice as high as the commonly adopted value to date. Accordingly, the time for a PN to expand to a radius of, say 0.9 pc, is only 21000 +/- 5000 years. This visibility time of a PN holds for all central star masses since a nebula does not become extinct as the central star fades. There is, however, a dependence on metallicity in the sens...

  4. Effect of Delay Time on Microstructural Evolution during Warm Rolling of Ti-Nb-IF Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.Najafi-zadeh; R.Ebrahimi

    2004-01-01

    The effect of delay time with constant first finishing pass temperature (800℃) has been investigated by means of multi-pass torsion tests on Ti-Nb-IF steel. All the tests have been carried out at a strain rate of 2 s-1 with 11 passes and 0.3 strain each pass. During the final pass, dynamic recrystallization occurs to a degree that depends on the delay time. In short interpass time (1 s) and at these temperatures (T≤800℃) there is not enough time to start static recrystallization, therefore, accumulation of strain occurs and after some passes, strain reaches a critical strain for starting dynamic recrystallization. In this study, the changes of mean flow stress during each pass and also the microstructural observation confirms that dynamic recrystallization occurs after some passes in ferrite phase of this steel. The stress-strain curves with constant temperature obtained by using a kinetic model and compensation of the increasing mean flow stress with decreasing temperature. Thus, this result also confirms that dynamic recrystallization occurs in warm rolling of this IF steel.

  5. Evolution of a Rippled Membrane during Phospholipase A2 Hydrolysis Studied by Time-Resolved AFM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leidy, Chad; Mouritsen, Ole G.; Jørgensen, Kent;

    2004-01-01

    The sensitivity of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) for lipid membrane curvature is explored by monitoring, through time-resolved atomic force microscopy, the hydrolysis of supported double bilayers in the ripple phase. The ripple phase presents a corrugated morphology. PLA2 is shown to have higher activi...

  6. Initial conditions, time evolution and BE correlations in e+e- annihilation

    CERN Document Server

    Novák, T; Kittel, W; Metzger, W J

    2009-01-01

    Bose-Einstein correlations of identical charged-pion pairs produced in hadronic Z decays are analyzed in terms of various parametrizations. The tau-model with a one-sided L\\'evy proper-time distribution provides a good description, enabling the source function to be reconstructed.

  7. Initial Conditions, Time Evolution and BE Correlations in e+e- Annihilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novák, T.; Csörgő, T.; Kittel, W.; Metzger, W. J.

    2009-04-01

    Bose-Einstein correlations of identical charged-pion pairs produced in hadronic Z decays are analyzed in terms of various parametrizations. The tau -model with a one-sided Lévy proper-time distribution provides a good description, enabling the source function to be reconstructed.

  8. New approach for deriving the exact time evolution of the density operator for a diffusive anharmonic oscillator and its Wigner distribution function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng Xiang-Guo; Wang Ji-Suo; Liang Bao-Long

    2013-01-01

    Using thermal entangled state representation,we solve the master equation of a diffusive anharmonic oscillator (AHO) to obtain the exact time evolution formula for the density operator in the infinitive operator-sum representation.We present a new evolution formula of the Wigner function (WF) for any initial state of the diffusive AHO by converting the WF calculation into an overlap between two pure states in an enlarged Fock space.It is found that this formula is very convenient in investigating the WF's evolution of any known initial state.As applications,this formula is used to obtain the evolution of the WF for a coherent state and the evolution of the photon-number distribution of diffusive AHOs.

  9. Observed and simulated time evolution of HCl, ClONO2, and HF total column abundances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.-M. Sinnhuber

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Time series of total column abundances of hydrogen chloride (HCl, chlorine nitrate (ClONO2, and hydrogen fluoride (HF were determined from ground-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectra recorded at 17 sites belonging to the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC and located between 80.05° N and 77.82° S. These measurements are compared with calculations from five different models: the two-dimensional Bremen model, the two chemistry-transport models KASIMA and SLIMCAT, and the two chemistry-climate models EMAC and SOCOL. The overall agreement between the measurements and models for the total column abundances and the seasonal cycles is good. Trends of HCl, ClONO2, and HF are calculated from both measurement and model time series data, with a focus on the time range 2000–2009. Their precision is estimated with the bootstrap resampling method. The sensitivity of the trend results with respect to the fitting function, the time of year chosen and time series length is investigated, as well as a bias due to the irregular sampling of the measurements. For the two chlorine species, a decrease is expected during this period because the emission of their prominent anthropogenic source gases (solvents, chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs was restricted by the Montreal Protocol 1987 and its amendments and adjustments. As most of the restricted source gases also contain fluorine, the HF total column abundance was also influenced by the above-mentioned regulations in the time period considered. The measurements and model results investigated here agree qualitatively on a decrease of the chlorine species by around −1 % yr−1. The models simulate an increase of HF of around +1 % yr−1. This also agrees well with most of the measurements, but some of the FTIR series in the Northern Hemisphere show a stabilisation or even a decrease in the last few years. In general, for all three gases, the measured trends vary more strongly with

  10. P-T-time-isotopic evolution of coesite-bearing eclogites: Implications for exhumation processes in SW Tianshan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhou; Agard, Philippe; Gao, Jun; John, Timm; Li, JiLei; Jiang, Tuo; Bayet, Léa; Wang, XinShui; Zhang, Xi

    2017-05-01

    The Chinese Southwestern Tianshan high- to ultra-high pressure low temperature (HP-UHP/LT) metamorphic belt exhibits well-preserved mafic layers, tectonic blocks/slices and boudins of different sizes and lithology embedded within dominant meta-volcanosedimentary rocks. Despite a wealth of previous studies on UHP relicts, P-T path estimates and age constraints for metamorphism, controversies still exist on P-T-t assessments and regional exhumation patterns (i.e., tectonic mélange versus internally coherent ;sub-belt; model). This study focuses on a group of coesite-bearing eclogite samples from a thick ( 5 m) layered metabasalt outcrop in order to unravel its detailed tectono-metamorphic evolution through space and time (both prograde, peak and exhumation). Using SIMS zircon U-Pb and oxygen isotope analyses, TIMS Sm-Nd multi-point isochron dating, in situ laser-ICP-MS trace-element analyses, classical thermobarometry and thermodynamic modeling, we link the multistage zircon growth to garnet growth and reconstruct a detailed P-T-time-isotopic evolution history for this UHP tectonic slice: from UHP peak burial 2.95 ± 0.2 GPa, 510 ± 20 °C around 318.0 ± 2.3 Ma to HP peak metamorphism 2.45 ± 0.2 GPa, 540 ± 20 °C at 316.8 ± 0.8 Ma, then, with eclogite-facies deformation 2.0 ± 0.15 GPa, 525 ± 25 °C at 312 ± 2.5 Ma, exhumed to near surface within ca. 303 to ca. 280 Ma. Our P-T-time-isotopic results combined with the compilation of regional radiometric data and P-T estimates notably point to the existence of a short-lived period of rock detachment and exhumation (< 10 Ma, i.e. at ca. 315 ± 5 Ma) with respect to subduction duration.

  11. From CoRoT 102899501 to the Sun. A time evolution model of chromospheric activity on the main sequence

    CERN Document Server

    Gondoin, P; Fridlund, M; Frasca, A; Guenther, E W; Hatzes, A; Deeg, H J; Parviainen, H; Eigmueller, P; Deleuil, M

    2012-01-01

    Using a model based on the rotational modulation of the visibility of active regions, we analyse the high-accuracy CoRoT lightcurve of the active young star CoRoT102899501. Spectroscopic follow-up observations are used to derive its fundamental parameters. We compare its chromospheric activity level with a model of chrosmospheric activity evolution established by combining relationships between the R'HK index and the Rossby number with a recent model of stellar rotation evolution on the main sequence. We measure the spot coverage of the stellar surface as a function of time, and find evidence for a tentative increase from 5-14% at the beginning of the observing run to 13-29% 35 days later. A high level of magnetic activity on CoRoT102899501 is corroborated by a strong emission in the Balmer and Ca II HK lines (logR'HK ~ -4). The starspots used as tracers of the star rotation constrain the rotation period to 1.625+/-0.002 days and do not show evidence for differential rotation. The effective temperature (Teff=...

  12. Microfossils, a Key to Unravel Cold-Water Carbonate Mound Evolution through Time: Evidence from the Eastern Alboran Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Stalder

    Full Text Available Cold-water coral (CWC ecosystems occur worldwide and play a major role in the ocean's carbonate budget and atmospheric CO2 balance since the Danian (~65 m.y. ago. However their temporal and spatial evolution against climatic and oceanographic variability is still unclear. For the first time, we combine the main macrofaunal components of a sediment core from a CWC mound of the Melilla Mounds Field in the Eastern Alboran Sea with the associated microfauna and we highlight the importance of foraminifera and ostracods as indicators of CWC mound evolution in the paleorecord. Abundances of macrofauna along the core reveal alternating periods dominated by distinct CWC taxa (mostly Lophelia pertusa, Madrepora oculata that correspond to major shifts in foraminiferal and ostracod assemblages. The period dominated by M. oculata coincides with a period characterized by increased export of refractory organic matter to the seafloor and rather unstable oceanographic conditions at the benthic boundary layer with periodically decreased water energy and oxygenation, variable bottom water temperature/density and increased sediment flow. The microfaunal and geochemical data strongly suggest that M. oculata and in particular Dendrophylliidae show a higher tolerance to environmental changes than L. pertusa. Finally, we show evidence for sustained CWC growth during the Alleröd-Younger-Dryas in the Eastern Alboran Sea and that this period corresponds to stable benthic conditions with cold/dense and well oxygenated bottom waters, high fluxes of labile organic matter and relatively strong bottom currents.

  13. Finite-time singularities in the dynamical evolution of contact lines

    CERN Document Server

    Pelinovsky, D E

    2013-01-01

    We study finite-time singularities in the linear advection-diffusion equation with a variable speed on a semi-infinite line. The variable speed is determined by an additional condition at the boundary, which models the dynamics of a contact line of a hydrodynamic flow at a 180 contact angle. Using apriori energy estimates, we derive conditions on variable speed that guarantee that a sufficiently smooth solution of the linear advection--diffusion equation blows up in a finite time. Using the class of self-similar solutions to the linear advection-diffusion equation, we find the blow-up rate of singularity formation. This blow-up rate does not agree with previous numerical simulations of the model problem.

  14. Gravitational-wave Limits from Pulsar Timing Constrain Supermassive Black Hole Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Shannon, R M; Coles, W A; Hobbs, G; Keith, M J; Manchester, R N; Wyithe, J S B; Bailes, M; Bhat, N D R; Burke-Spolaor, S; Khoo, J; Levin, Y; Osłowski, S; Sarkissian, J M; van Straten, W; Verbiest, J P W; Wang, J-B

    2013-01-01

    The formation and growth processes of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are not well constrained. SMBH population models, however, provide specific predictions for the properties of the gravitational-wave background (GWB) from binary SMBHs in merging galaxies throughout the Universe. Using observations from the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array, we constrain the fractional GWB energy density with 95% confidence to be ${\\Omega}_{GW}(H_0/73 {\\rm km} {\\rm s}^{-1} {\\rm Mpc}^{-1})^2 < 1.3 \\times 10^{-9}$ at a frequency of 2.8 nHz, which is approximately a factor of six more stringent than previous limits. We compare our limit to models of the SMBH population and find inconsistencies at confidence levels between 46% and 91%. For example, the standard galaxy formation model implemented in the Millennium simulations is inconsistent with our limit with 50% probability.

  15. Plio-Pleistocene time evolution of the 100-kyr cycle in marine paleoclimate records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeffrey; Maasch, Kirk A.

    1993-01-01

    A new time-series analysis technique (called envelope inversion), which is based on multiple taper spectral analysis, is used to address the question of an abrupt versus a gradual onset of the 100-kyr ice-age periodicity in the middle Pleistocene. Three long (greater than 2.6 m.y.) time series from Deep Sea Drilling Project site 607 (midlatitude Atlantic) and Ocean Drilling Program site 677 (equatorial Pacific) were analyzed using delta(O-18) records. Results do not yield compelling evidence for an abrupt change in the 100-kyr delta(O-18) signal. Rather, the results suggest that the 100-kyr delta(O-18) cycle is phase-locked with the 124-kyr eccentricity cycle some 300-400 kyr prior to its late Pleistocene growth in amplitude and phase lock with the 95-kyr eccentricity cycle.

  16. Evolution of angiosperm seed disperser mutualisms: the timing of origins and their consequences for coevolutionary interactions between angiosperms and frugivores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Ove

    2016-02-01

    , and many of the originations of fleshy fruits occurred well after the peak in the early Eocene. (vi) During periods associated with environmental change altering coevolutionary networks and opening of niche space, reciprocal coevolution may result in strong directional selection formative for both fruit and frugivore evolution. Further evidence is needed to test this hypothesis. Based on the abundance of plant lineages with various forms of fleshy fruits, and the diversity of frugivores, it is suggested that periods of rapid coevolution in angiosperms and frugivores occurred numerous times during the 80 million years of angiosperm-frugivore evolution. © 2014 The Authors. Biological Reviews published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  17. Soliton solutions of some nonlinear evolution equations with time-dependent coefficients

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hitender Kumar; Anand Malik; Fakir Chand

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we obtain exact soliton solutions of the modified KdV equation, inho-mogeneous nonlinear Schrödinger equation and (, ) equation with variable coefficients using solitary wave ansatz. The constraint conditions among the time-dependent coefficients turn out as necessary conditions for the solitons to exist. Numerical simulations for dark and bright soliton solutions for the mKdV equation are also given.

  18. Time-evolution of the holographic entanglement entropy and metric perturbationst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Nakwoo; Lee, Jung Hun

    2016-08-01

    We study the holographic entanglement entropy under small deformations of anti-de Sitter (AdS) spacetime, including its time-dependence. Through perturbative analysis, the divergent terms are found not to be affected, and the change appears only in the finite terms. We also consider the entanglement thermodynamic first law, calculate the entanglement temperature, and confirm that it is inversely proportional to the size of the entangling region.

  19. Galaxy Assembly and the Evolution of Structure over the First Third of Cosmic Time - I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, Sandra

    2010-09-01

    The Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey {CANDELS}is designed to document the |*|rst third of galactic evolution from z =8 to 1.5 via deep imaging of more than 250,000 galaxies with WFC3/IRand ACS. It will also find the first Type Ia SNe beyond z > 1.5 andestablish their accuracy as standard candles for cosmology. Fivepremier multi-wavelength sky regions are selected from the SpitzerExtragalactic Deep Survey {SEDS} to provide complementary IRAC imagingdata down to 26.5 AB mag, a unique resource for stellar masses at allredshifts. The use of |*|ve widely separated |*|elds mitigates cosmicvariance and yields statistically robust and complete samples ofgalaxies down to 10^9 solar masses out to z 8.The program merges two originally separate MCT proposals. The Faberprogram incorporates a |*|Wide|*| imaging survey in three separate fieldsto 2 orbit depth over 0.2 sq. degrees, plus a |*|Deep|*| imaging surveyto 12 orbit depth in the two GOODS regions over 0.04 sq. degrees.In combination with ultra-deep imaging from the Hubble Ultradeep Fieldprogram {GO 11563}, the result is a three-tiered strategy that ef|*|cientlysamples both bright/rare and faint/common extragalactic objects. TheFerguson program adds an extensive high-redshift Type Ia SNe search,plus ultraviolet "daytime" UVIS exposures in GOODS-N to exploit theCVZ opportunity in that field.This program, GO 12064, is part of the Wide mosaic survey, which has thefollowing field centers and sizes: Field ID RA{2000} Dec{2000} WFC3 Dim. PA on sky UDS 02 17 38 -05 12 02 4x11 270 COSMOS 10 00 31 +02 24 00 4x11 180 EGS 14 19 31 +52 54 10 3x15 41 Science highlights from the Wide program: * Underlying structural properties of galaxies as revealed by WFC3-IR images sensitive to older stars {beyond the 4000-A break} and less affected by dust than ACS. A key redshift is z 2, where star-formation peaks, QSOs are most abundant, and where restframe B-band is still accessible to WFC3. Sample questions include

  20. Replacing a Missing Tooth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vessels in the tooth pulps are rather large. Drilling down these teeth for crowns may expose the ... porcelain replacement tooth is held in place by metal extensions cemented to the backs of the adjacent ...

  1. Hormone Replacement Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... before and during menopause, the levels of female hormones can go up and down. This can cause ... hot flashes and vaginal dryness. Some women take hormone replacement therapy (HRT), also called menopausal hormone therapy, ...

  2. Knee joint replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of your kneecap. Your kneecap is called the patella. The replacement part is usually made from a ... long. Then your surgeon will: Move your kneecap (patella) out of the way, then cut the ends ...

  3. Knee joint replacement - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100088.htm Knee joint replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the ... to slide 4 out of 4 Overview The knee is a complex joint. It contains the distal ...

  4. Temporal evolution of oscillatory activity predicts performance in a choice-reaction time reaching task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfetti, Bernardo; Moisello, Clara; Landsness, Eric C; Kvint, Svetlana; Pruski, April; Onofrj, Marco; Tononi, Giulio; Ghilardi, M Felice

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we characterized the patterns and timing of cortical activation of visually guided movements in a task with critical temporal demands. In particular, we investigated the neural correlates of motor planning and on-line adjustments of reaching movements in a choice-reaction time task. High-density electroencephalography (EEG, 256 electrodes) was recorded in 13 subjects performing reaching movements. The topography of the movement-related spectral perturbation was established across five 250-ms temporal windows (from prestimulus to postmovement) and five frequency bands (from theta to beta). Nine regions of interest were then identified on the scalp, and their activity was correlated with specific behavioral outcomes reflecting motor planning and on-line adjustments. Phase coherence analysis was performed between selected sites. We found that motor planning and on-line adjustments share similar topography in a fronto-parietal network, involving mostly low frequency bands. In addition, activities in the high and low frequency ranges have differential function in the modulation of attention with the former reflecting the prestimulus, top-down processes needed to promote timely responses, and the latter the planning and control of sensory-motor processes.

  5. Vortex Clusters and Their Time Evolution in High- Reynolds-Number Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Takashi; Uno, Atsuya; Morishita, Koji; Yokokawa, Mitsuo; Kaneda, Yukio

    2016-11-01

    Time series data (with a time interval of 4τη) obtained by high-resolution direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of forced incompressible turbulence in a periodic box, with a maximum of 122883 grid points and Taylor micro-scale Reynolds numbers Rλ up to 2300, are used to study the vortex dynamics in high Reynolds number (Re) turbulent flows. Here τη is the Kolmogorov time scale. A visualization method to handle such large-scale data was developed for this study. In the high Re turbulence generated by the DNS, we observed the dynamics of tube-like vortex clusters of various sizes, which are constructed by strong micro vortices. For example, we observed the generation of the tube-like clusters of various sizes and the processes of their merging and breakdown. We also observed layer-like vortex clusters of the order of the integral length scale forming shear layers in the high Re turbulence. This research used computational resources of the K computer and other computers of the HPCI system provided by the AICS and the ITC of Nagoya University through the HPCI System Research Project (Project ID:hp150174, hp160102).

  6. Time evolution of atmospheric particle number concentration during high-intensity pyrotechnic events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Javier; Yubero, Eduardo; Nicolás, Jose F.; Caballero, Sandra; Galindo, Nuria

    2014-10-01

    The Mascletàs are high-intensity pyrotechnic events, typical of eastern Spanish festivals, in which thousands of firecrackers are burnt at ground level in an intense, short-time (festival in Alicante (southeastern Spain). Peak concentrations and dilution times observed throughout the Mascletàs have been compared to those measured when conventional aerial fireworks were launched 2 km away from the monitoring site. The impact of the Mascletàs on the total number concentration of particles larger than 0.3 μm was higher (maximum ˜2·104 cm-3) than that of fireworks (maximum ˜2·103 cm-3). The effect of fireworks depended on whether the dominant meteorological conditions favoured the transport of the plume to the measurement location. However, the time required for particle concentrations to return to background levels is longer and more variable for firework displays (minutes to hours) than for the Mascletàs (<25 min).

  7. The time evolution of HH~2 from four epochs of HST images

    CERN Document Server

    Raga, A C; Velázquez, P F; Esquivel, A; Bally, J

    2016-01-01

    We have analyzed four epochs of H$\\alpha$ and [S~II] HST images of the HH~1/2 outflow (covering a time interval from 1994 to 2014) to determine proper motions and emission line fluxes of the knots of HH~2. We find that our new proper motions agree surprisingly well with the motions measured by Herbig \\& Jones (1981), although there is partial evidence for a slight deceleration of the motion of the HH~2 knots from 1945 to 2014. We also measure the time-variability of the H$\\alpha$ intensities and the [S~II]/H$\\alpha$ line ratios, and find that knots H and A have the largest intensity variabilities (in $1994\\to 2014$). Knot H (which now dominates the HH~2 emission) has strengthened substantially, while keeping an approximately constant [S~II]/H$\\alpha$ ratio. Knot A has dramatically faded, and at the same time has had a substantial increase in its [S~II]/H$\\alpha$ ratio. Possible interpretations of these results are discussed.

  8. Product Platform Replacements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sköld, Martin; Karlsson, Christer

    2012-01-01

    Purpose – It is argued in this article that too little is known about product platforms and how to deal with them from a manager's point of view. Specifically, little information exists regarding when old established platforms are replaced by new generations in R&D and production environments...... originality and value is achieved by focusing on product platform replacements believed to represent a growing management challenge....

  9. Using Pulsar Timing observations to understand the formation and evolution of supermassive black hole binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornish, Neil; Sampson, Laura; McWilliams, Sean

    2015-04-01

    The astrophysical processes that form and harden supermassive black hole binaries impart distinct features that may be observed in the gravitational-wave spectrum within the sensitive frequency range of Pulsar Timing Arrays (PTA). We investigate how well the various formation and hardening mechanisms can be constrained by applying Bayesian inference to simulated PTA data sets. We find that even without strong priors on the merger rate, any detection of the signal will place interesting constraints on the astrophysical models. Folding in priors on the merger rate allows us to place interesting constraints on the astrophysical models even before a detection is made.

  10. Evolution of human posture and bipedal locomotion within a provisional time frame of harsh climate changes

    OpenAIRE

    Kurbel, Sven; Rapan, Saša

    2015-01-01

    In this review paper several emerging issues related to development of human posture and locomotion are arranged in a provisional time frame. Accumulated evidences show that the Eurasian climate was often cold and arid with abundant dust in the atmosphere during the last 500 Ky. These dusty periods of cold, aridity and low insolation lasted from 360 to 340 Kya, 270 to 255 Kya, 170 to 130 Kya, 80 to 60 and finally 40 to 10 Kya. They coincide with migrations of Neanderthals a...

  11. STRIDES: Galaxy Evolution over Cosmic Time from new samples of Gravitationally Lensed Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnello, Adriano; Treu, Tommaso

    2015-08-01

    When a quasar is gravitationally lensed by a galaxy, its multiple images show light-curves that are offset by awell defined time delay, which depends on the mass profile of the lens and on cosmological distances to the lens and the source. By measuring the time-delay and accurately modelling the deflector's mass profile, this provides one-step measurements of cosmological distances to objects at redshift $z\\sim1,$ whence the cosmological parameters (primarily $H_0$). One can turn this argument around and learn about galaxies instead, or even perform a joint (and less biased) inference. The joint modelling of the lens, the source structure and time-variability implies that the DM halos of lens galaxies at z~0.4-1 and the source properties of quasars and their hosts at z~1-2are inferred, besides information on cosmology that is complementary to other low-redshift probes such as SN Ia and BAO.A large (N~100) sample of lensed quasars will be transformative in this sense, as these systems are rare on the sky.I will describe our STRIDES[*] searches in the Dark Energy Survey, aiming at 120 previously unknown lensed quasars brighter than i=21. Candidates have been selected with a variety of data mining techniques and flagged for follow-up (on spectroscopy, high-resolution imaging and lightcurve variability), which will take place in the following months. I will also cover recent modelling development of already monitored lenses within our collaboration, including a sharp multi-band reconstruction of the sources and use of stellar kinematics to ensure unbiased uncertainties on the lens mass profiles.This will lead to: (i) percent-level uncertainties on cosmological parameters(ii) insight on the coevolution of quasars and their host galaxies throughout cosmic time, up to z~2(iii) a quantative description of dark matter density profiles and the substructure content in massive galaxies up to z~1.[*] strides.physics.ucsb.edu

  12. Late time cosmological phase transitions 1: Particle physics models and cosmic evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frieman, Joshua A.; Hill, Christopher T.; Watkins, Richard

    1991-01-01

    We described a natural particle physics basis for late-time phase transitions in the universe. Such a transition can seed the formation of large-scale structure while leaving a minimal imprint upon the microwave background anisotropy. The key ingredient is an ultra-light pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone boson with an astronomically large (O(kpc-Mpc)) Compton wavelength. We analyze the cosmological signatures of and constraints upon a wide class of scenarios which do not involve domain walls. In addition to seeding structure, coherent ultra-light bosons may also provide unclustered dark matter in a spatially flat universe, omega sub phi approx. = 1.

  13. Gravitational-wave limits from pulsar timing constrain supermassive black hole evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, R M; Ravi, V; Coles, W A; Hobbs, G; Keith, M J; Manchester, R N; Wyithe, J S B; Bailes, M; Bhat, N D R; Burke-Spolaor, S; Khoo, J; Levin, Y; Osłowski, S; Sarkissian, J M; van Straten, W; Verbiest, J P W; Wang, J-B

    2013-10-18

    The formation and growth processes of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) are not well constrained. SMBH population models, however, provide specific predictions for the properties of the gravitational-wave background (GWB) from binary SMBHs in merging galaxies throughout the universe. Using observations from the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array, we constrain the fractional GWB energy density (Ω(GW)) with 95% confidence to be Ω(GW)(H0/73 kilometers per second per megaparsec)(2) formation model implemented in the Millennium Simulation Project is inconsistent with our limit with 50% probability.

  14. Time-evolution of in vivo protein corona onto blood-circulating PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin (DOXIL) nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjidemetriou, Marilena; Al-Ahmady, Zahraa; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2016-03-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are instantly modified once injected in the bloodstream because of their interaction with the blood components. The spontaneous coating of NPs by proteins, once in contact with biological fluids, has been termed the `protein corona' and it is considered to be a determinant factor for the pharmacological, toxicological and therapeutic profile of NPs. Protein exposure time is thought to greatly influence the composition of protein corona, however the dynamics of protein interactions under realistic, in vivo conditions remain unexplored. The aim of this study was to quantitatively and qualitatively investigate the time evolution of in vivo protein corona, formed onto blood circulating, clinically used, PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin. Protein adsorption profiles were determined 10 min, 1 h and 3 h post-injection of liposomes into CD-1 mice. The results demonstrated that a complex protein corona was formed as early as 10 min post-injection. Even though the total amount of protein adsorbed did not significantly change over time, the fluctuation of protein abundances observed indicated highly dynamic protein binding kinetics.Nanoparticles (NPs) are instantly modified once injected in the bloodstream because of their interaction with the blood components. The spontaneous coating of NPs by proteins, once in contact with biological fluids, has been termed the `protein corona' and it is considered to be a determinant factor for the pharmacological, toxicological and therapeutic profile of NPs. Protein exposure time is thought to greatly influence the composition of protein corona, however the dynamics of protein interactions under realistic, in vivo conditions remain unexplored. The aim of this study was to quantitatively and qualitatively investigate the time evolution of in vivo protein corona, formed onto blood circulating, clinically used, PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin. Protein adsorption profiles were determined 10 min, 1 h and 3 h post

  15. Time evolutions of scalar field perturbations in $D$-dimensional Reissner-Nordstr\\"om Anti-de Sitter black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Ran; Zhao, Junkun

    2016-01-01

    Reissner-Nordstr\\"om Anti-de Sitter (RNAdS) black holes are unstable against the charged scalar field perturbations due to the well-known superradiance phenomenon. We present the time domain analysis of charged scalar field perturbations in the RNAdS black hole background in general dimensions. We show that the instabilities of charged scalar field can be explicitly illustrated from the time profiles of evolving scalar field. By using the Prony method to fit the time evolution data, we confirm the mode that dominates the long time behavior of scalar field is in accordance with the quasinormal mode from the frequency domain analysis. The superradiance origin of the instability can also be demonstrated by comparing the real part of the dominant mode with the superradiant condition of charged scalar field. It is shown that all the unstable modes are superradiant, which is consistent with the analytical result in the frequency domain analysis. Furthermore, we also confirm there exists the rapid exponential growin...

  16. On acceleration of Krylov-subspace-based Newton and Arnoldi iterations for incompressible CFD: replacing time steppers and generation of initial guess

    CERN Document Server

    Gelfgat, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We propose two techniques aimed at improving the convergence rate of steady state and eigenvalue solvers preconditioned by the inverse Stokes operator and realized via time-stepping. First, we suggest a generalization of the Stokes operator so that the resulting preconditioner operator depends on several parameters and whose action preserves zero divergence and boundary conditions. The parameters can be tuned for each problem to speed up the convergence of a Krylov-subspace-based linear algebra solver. This operator can be inverted by the Uzawa-like algorithm, and does not need a time-stepping. Second, we propose to generate an initial guess of steady flow, leading eigenvalue and eigenvector using orthogonal projection on divergence-free basis satisfying all boundary conditions. The approach, including the two proposed techniques, is illustrated on the solution of the linear stability problem for laterally heated square and cubic cavities.

  17. Hydrolysis evolution in a codigestion reactor at various hydraulic residence times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria González

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to study the influence of two different hydraulic residence times (HRT's, 5 and 10 days, on the process of hydrolysis-solubilization in a codigestion reactor. Tap water was used to simulate recirculation of a treated leachate. Organic solid waste (OSW from urban solid waste (USW and excess sludge from an urban wastewater treatment plant were first characterized and then treated together by anaerobic codigestion. This was done using a 27.2-L total volume pilot scale bioreactor, which was loaded with equal amounts (w/w of OSW and sludge to a total useful volume of 13-L. The bioreactor was filled with tap water to ensure high humidity. In order to assure suitable mixing and good microbial-substrate contact in the reactor, recirculation of treated effluent was maintained by continuous water flow. The influence of HRT on the process performance was determined through physicochemical characterization of the effluent. Results indicate that HRT is a determinant factor in the efficiency of the system. Reducing HRT increases hydrodynamics and solubilization kinetic rate of organic matter in the bioreactor. Stabilization time of solids is reduced from 20 to 10 days when HRT is shortened from 10 to 5 days.

  18. Astrophysical constraints on massive black hole binary evolution from Pulsar Timing Arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Middleton, Hannah; Farr, Will M; Sesana, Alberto; Vecchio, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    We consider massive black hole binary systems and information that can be derived about their population and formation history solely from current and possible future pulsar timing array (PTA) results. We use models of the stochastic gravitational-wave background from circular massive black hole binaries with chirp mass in the range $10^6 - 10^{11} M_\\odot$ evolving solely due to radiation reaction. Our parameterised models for the black hole merger history make only weak assumptions about the properties of the black holes merging over cosmic time. We show that current PTA results place a model-independent upper limit on the merger density of massive black hole binaries, but provide no information about their redshift or mass distribution. We show that even in the case of a detection resulting from a factor of 10 increase in amplitude sensitivity, PTAs will only put weak constraints on the source merger density as a function of mass, and will not provide any additional information on the redshift distribution...

  19. Divergence time estimates and the evolution of major lineages in the florideophyte red algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Eun Chan; Boo, Sung Min; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Saunders, Gary W; Knoll, Andrew H; Fredericq, Suzanne; Graf, Louis; Yoon, Hwan Su

    2016-02-19

    The Florideophyceae is the most abundant and taxonomically diverse class of red algae (Rhodophyta). However, many aspects of the systematics and divergence times of the group remain unresolved. Using a seven-gene concatenated dataset (nuclear EF2, LSU and SSU rRNAs, mitochondrial cox1, and plastid rbcL, psaA and psbA genes), we generated a robust phylogeny of red algae to provide an evolutionary timeline for florideophyte diversification. Our relaxed molecular clock analysis suggests that the Florideophyceae diverged approximately 943 (817-1,049) million years ago (Ma). The major divergences in this class involved the emergence of Hildenbrandiophycidae [ca. 781 (681-879) Ma], Nemaliophycidae [ca. 661 (597-736) Ma], Corallinophycidae [ca. 579 (543-617) Ma], and the split of Ahnfeltiophycidae and Rhodymeniophycidae [ca. 508 (442-580) Ma]. Within these clades, extant diversity reflects largely Phanerozoic diversification. Divergences within Florideophyceae were accompanied by evolutionary changes in the carposporophyte stage, leading to a successful strategy for maximizing spore production from each fertilization event. Our research provides robust estimates for the divergence times of major lineages within the Florideophyceae. This timeline was used to interpret the emergence of key morphological innovations that characterize these multicellular red algae.

  20. Evolution of Energy Efficiency Programs Over Time: The Case of Standby Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payne, Christopher; Chung, Iris [Hoi; Fisher, Emily

    2014-08-17

    Issued in 2001, Presidential Executive Order 13221 directed federal agencies to purchase products with low standby power, with the goal of 1) reducing energy consumption in federal facilities, and 2) drawing attention to the problem of high standby power consumption, with guidance provided by the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). At that time, standby power was newly recognized as an increasing building energy load. Since then, procurement of products with low standby power have been set in place in acquisition processes, and the purchasing power of the federal government continues to influence manufacturers design decisions related to standby power. In recent years, FEMP has shifted effort from direct manufacturer outreach for data collection, to integrating low standby requirement into broader acquisition programs including Energy Star and Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool (EPEAT). Another milestone has been the labeling of low standby products on the GSA Advantage website to simplify and enhance compliance. Looking forward into the program?s future, this question arises How do we design programs over time to reflect market and technology changes, by adjusting programmatic requirements while maintaining effectiveness? This paper discusses that question for the case of standby power, which transitioned from covering a single to multiple environmental attributes, both in the context of the program's past and future.

  1. Euglena in time: Evolution, control of central metabolic processes and multi-domain proteins in carbohydrate and natural product biochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellis C. O’Neill

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Euglena gracilis is a eukaryotic microalgae that has been the subject of scientific study for hundreds of years. It has a complex evolutionary history, with traces of at least four endosymbiotic genomes and extensive horizontal gene transfer. Given the importance of Euglena in terms of evolutionary cell biology and its unique taxonomic position, we initiated a de novo transcriptome sequencing project in order to understand this intriguing organism. By analysing the proteins encoded in this transcriptome, we can identify an extremely complex metabolic capacity, rivalling that of multicellular organisms. Many genes have been acquired from what are now very distantly related species. Herein we consider the biology of Euglena in different time frames, from evolution through control of cell biology to metabolic processes associated with carbohydrate and natural products biochemistry.

  2. Numerical Simulation of the Time Evolution of Small-Scale Irregularities in the F-Layer Ionospheric Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Mingalev

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamics of magnetic field-aligned small-scale irregularities in the electron concentration, existing in the F-layer ionospheric plasma, is investigated with the help of a mathematical model. The plasma is assumed to be a rarefied compound consisting of electrons and positive ions and being in a strong, external magnetic field. In the applied model, kinetic processes in the plasma are simulated by using the Vlasov-Poisson system of equations. The system of equations is numerically solved applying a macroparticle method. The time evolution of a plasma irregularity, having initial cross-section dimension commensurable with a Debye length, is simulated during the period sufficient for the irregularity to decay completely. The results of simulation indicate that the small-scale irregularity, created initially in the F-region ionosphere, decays accomplishing periodic damped vibrations, with the process being collisionless.

  3. Non-Markovian dynamical effects and time evolution of entanglement entropy of a dissipative two-state system

    CERN Document Server

    Lü, Zhiguo

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the dynamical information exchange between a two-state system and its environment which is measured by von Neumann entropy. It is found that in the underdamping regime, the entropy dynamics exhibits an extremely non-Markovian oscillation-hump feature, in which oscillations manifest quantum coherence and a hump of envelop demonstrates temporal memory of bath. It indicates that the process of entropy exchange is bidirectional. When the coupling strength increases a certain threshold, the hump along with ripple disappears, which is indicative of the coherent-incoherent dynamical crossover. The long-time limit of entropy evolution reaches the ground state value which agrees with that of numerical renormalization group.

  4. Multi Sensor Evolution Analysis (MEA): Land Use and Land Cover Analysis Applied to (A)ATSR Time Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beccati, Alan; Folegani, Marco; D'Elia, Sergio; Barboni, Damiano; Selmi, Stefano

    2010-12-01

    The problem of (better) exploiting long-term satellite image databases is not yet resolved. Meanwhile the continuous growth of satellite data is generating an unprecedented increase in data types and volume. All this makes unrealistic to proceed with the current, mainly manual, image processing. Therefore the upcoming challenge is to find new methods permitting in near real-time to store and access large data volumes and to simplify or even automate the extraction of meaningful information for application domains, such as Land Use / Land Cover Change (LU/LCC) mapping. In the framework of the ESA Support by Pre-classification to Specific Applications (SPA) project [1] a fully automatic LU/LCC application (initially named (A)ATSR Land Classification System (ALCS)) known as Multi sensor Evolution Analysis (MEA) system [2], has been implemented and tested. MEA data store is built using 15 years of ATSR2-AATSR data (C1P 4713, C1P 5016).

  5. Characterization of the relation between energy landscape and the time evolution of complex materials using kinetic ART

    Science.gov (United States)

    N'tsouaglo, Kokou; Joly, Jean-Francois; Beland, Laurent; Brommer, Peter; Mousseau, Normand

    2013-03-01

    In the last two decades, there has been a considerable interest in the development of accelerated numerical methods for sampling the energy landscape of complex materials. Many of these methods are based on the kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) algorithm introduced 40 years ago. This is the case of kinetic ART, for example, which uses a very efficient transition-state searching method, ART nouveau, coupled with a topological tool, NAUTY, to offer an off-lattice KMC method with on-the-fly catalog building to study complex systems, such as ion-bombarded and amorphous materials, on timescales of a second or more. Looking at two systems, vacancy aggregation in Fe and energy relaxation in ion-bombarded c-Si, we characterize the changes in the energy landscape and the relation to its time evolution with kinetic ART and its correspondence with the well-known Bell-Evans-Polanyi principle used in chemistry.

  6. Wavelength Selection Method Based on Differential Evolution for Precise Quantitative Analysis Using Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi; Chen, Weidong; Lian, Feiyu; Ge, Hongyi; Guan, Aihong

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of component mixtures is an important application of terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) and has attracted broad interest in recent research. Although the accuracy of quantitative analysis using THz-TDS is affected by a host of factors, wavelength selection from the sample's THz absorption spectrum is the most crucial component. The raw spectrum consists of signals from the sample and scattering and other random disturbances that can critically influence the quantitative accuracy. For precise quantitative analysis using THz-TDS, the signal from the sample needs to be retained while the scattering and other noise sources are eliminated. In this paper, a novel wavelength selection method based on differential evolution (DE) is investigated. By performing quantitative experiments on a series of binary amino acid mixtures using THz-TDS, we demonstrate the efficacy of the DE-based wavelength selection method, which yields an error rate below 5%.

  7. [Common paths of psychiatry and forensic medicine--history and evolution of insanity defense concept from antiquity to modern times].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolechała, Filip

    2009-01-01

    Forensic psychiatry and psychology were in their beginnings inseparably associated with the forensic medicine, constituting one of its related branches of knowledge. Progress and development of these disciplines, education and the practical application for the purposes of the law were a contribution of a several generations of forensic pathologists in the 19th and 20th centuries. One of the major issues of common interest was opinionating on the sanity of offenders. However, the problem of criminal responsibility of the mentally ill perpetrators dates back to much earlier times and has its roots in the distant beginnings of human civilization. In this paper, the history and evolution of the insanity concept (as a circumstance excluding the guilt of the offender) were presented, from the oldest theories to ideas underlying modern codifications.

  8. Study on the replacing time of water-sealed bottle of thoracic cavity drainage patients.%胸腔闭式引流一次性水封瓶更换时间的探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱晓艳; 张清媛; 邓艳芳

    2011-01-01

    目的:研究胸腔闭式引流一次性水封瓶更换时间与胸腔感染的相关性,探讨一次性水封瓶的最佳更换时间.方法:对240例行胸腔闭式引流且排除胸腔感染病人,使用随机数字表分为A、B、C、D 4组,每组60例,A组每天更换水封瓶1次,B组每3 d更换1次,C组每周更换1次,D组为使用超过1周至拔管.追踪监测一次性水封瓶内生理盐水和胸腔引流液,有细菌生长则对该病例停止实验,同时对此240例病人的胸腔积液或胸腔引流管前端2 cm进行细菌培养,最后进行统计学分析.结果:一次性水封瓶生理盐水的细菌培养均为阴性,4组水封瓶中胸腔引流液的细菌培养结果阳性16例,共检出细菌6种,各组培养阳性率比较,差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);对此240例病人的胸腔积液和胸腔引流管前端2 cm进行细菌培养,234例无细菌生长,6例细菌培养阳性.结论:在严格无菌操作下,对于胸腔引流管留置时间较长的病人,每周更换1次水封瓶并不会增加胸腔内感染及水封瓶内细菌定植的机会.%Objective : To investigate the relation between the replacing time of water - sealed bottle and the thoracic cavity infections , and determine the optional time for replacement . Methods : 240 patients with closed drainage of pleural cavity and without thoracic infections were randomly divided into 4groups. Group A : replacement of water - sealed bottle every day ; group B : replacement of bottle every 3 days ; group C : replacement of bottle every week ; group D : keeping water - sealed bottle over a week until the removal of chest tube. The normal saline and drainage fluid in the water - sealed bottle was cultured separately. When bacterium was found in the drainage fluid , the thoracic transudate and the fluid at the end of the tube was cultured simultaneously. Results Bacterium was not found in normal saline in the one - off water - sealed hottle. 6 species of hacteria were found from 16

  9. Geodynamic Evolution of Northeastern Tunisia During the Maastrichtian-Paleocene Time: Insights from Integrated Seismic Stratigraphic Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidi, Oussama; Inoubli, Mohamed Hédi; Sebei, Kawthar; Amiri, Adnen; Boussiga, Haifa; Nasr, Imen Hamdi; Salem, Abdelhamid Ben; Elabed, Mahmoud

    2016-12-01

    The Maastrichtian-Paleocene El Haria formation was studied and defined in Tunisia on the basis of outcrops and borehole data; few studies were interested in its three-dimensional extent. In this paper, the El Haria formation is reviewed in the context of a tectono-stratigraphic interval using an integrated seismic stratigraphic analysis based on borehole lithology logs, electrical well logging, well shots, vertical seismic profiles and post-stack surface data. Seismic analysis benefits from appropriate calibration with borehole data, conventional interpretation, velocity mapping, seismic attributes and post-stack model-based inversion. The applied methodology proved to be powerful for charactering the marly Maastrichtian-Paleocene interval of the El Haria formation. Migrated seismic sections together with borehole measurements are used to detail the three-dimensional changes in thickness, facies and depositional environment in the Cap Bon and Gulf of Hammamet regions during the Maastrichtian-Paleocene time. Furthermore, dating based on their microfossil content divulges local and multiple internal hiatuses within the El Haria formation which are related to the geodynamic evolution of the depositional floor since the Campanian stage. Interpreted seismic sections display concordance, unconformities, pinchouts, sedimentary gaps, incised valleys and syn-sedimentary normal faulting. Based on the seismic reflection geometry and terminations, seven sequences are delineated. These sequences are related to base-level changes as the combination of depositional floor paleo-topography, tectonic forces, subsidence and the developed accommodation space. These factors controlled the occurrence of the various parts of the Maastrichtian-Paleocene interval. Detailed examinations of these deposits together with the analysis of the structural deformation at different time periods allowed us to obtain a better understanding of the sediment architecture in depth and the delineation of

  10. On the space and time evolution of regular or irregular human heart or brain signals

    CERN Document Server

    Tuncay, Caglar

    2011-01-01

    A coupled map is suggested to investigate various spatial or temporal designs in biology: Several cells (or tissues) in an organ are considered as connected to each other in terms of some molecular diffusions or electrical potential differences and so on. The biological systems (groups of cells) start from various initial conditions for spatial designs (or initial signals for temporal designs) and they evolve in time in terms of the mentioned interactions (connections) besides some individual feedings. The basic aim of the present contribution is to mimic various empirical data for the heart (in normal, quasi-stable, unstable and post operative physiological conditions) or brain (regular or irregular; for epilepsy) signals. The mentioned empirical data are borrowed from various literatures which are cited. The suggested model (to be used besides or instead of the artificial network models) involves simple mathematics and the related software is easy. The results may be considered as in good agreement with the...

  11. Landsat-7 long-term acquisition plan radiometry - evolution over time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Brian L; Goward, Samuel; Arvidson, Terry; Barsi, Julia A.; Scaramuzza, Pat

    2006-01-01

    The Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus instrument has two selectable gains for each spectral band. In the acquisition plan, the gains were initially set to maximize the entropy in each scene. One unintended consequence of this strategy was that, at times, dense vegetation saturated band 4 and deserts saturated all bands. A revised strategy, based on a land-cover classification and sun angle thresholds, reduced saturation, but resulted in gain changes occurring within the same scene on multiple overpasses. As the gain changes cause some loss of data and difficulties for some ground processing systems, a procedure was devised to shift the gain changes to the nearest predicted cloudy scenes. The results are still not totally satisfactory as gain changes still impact some scenes and saturation still occurs, particularly in ephemerally snow-covered regions. A primary conclusion of our experience with variable gain on Landsat-7 is that such an approach should not be employed on future global monitoring missions.

  12. The Time Evolution of the Surface Segregation of Hyperbranched Molecules from a Linear Matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swader, Onome; Dadmun, Mark; Hutchings, Lian; Thompson, Richard

    2010-03-01

    Modification of a surface by the selective surface segregation of an additive in a mixture is a process with many commercial applications including biocompatibility, wettability, and anti-fouling in coatings. In a blend of branched and linear polymers, there exists an entropic driving force for the selective surface segregation of the branched polymer. Unfortunately, a systematic study of the impact of the branched copolymer structure on the dynamics and thermodynamics of this surface segregation is not currently available. Neutron reflectivity experiments that seek to fill this void have been completed and will be discussed. High molecular weight poly(styrene) (PS) hyperbranched molecules, hypermacs (HM) and dendrimacs (DM), with 10 % HM or DM and 90 % deuterated PS are the model systems studied. Reflectivity profiles for all blends were obtained as a function of annealing time from 30 minutes up to 48 hours.

  13. Numerical Evolution in time of curvature perturbations in Kerr black holes

    CERN Document Server

    López-Aleman, R

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews the basic features of the theory of curvature perturbations in Kerr spacetime, which is customarily written in terms of gauge invariant components of the Weyl tensor which satisfy a perturbation equation known as the Teukolsky equation. I will describe how to evolve generic perturbations about the Kerr metric and the separable form of the wave solutions that one obtains, and the relation of the Teukolsky function to the energy of gravitational waves emitted by the black hole. A discussion of a numerical scheme to evolve perturbations as a function of time and some preliminary results of our research project implementing it for matter sources falling into the black hole is included.

  14. Real-time near-IR imaging of laser-ablation crater evolution in dental enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2007-02-01

    We have shown that the enamel of the tooth is almost completely transparent near 1310-nm in the near-infrared and that near-IR (NIR) imaging has considerable potential for the optical discrimination of sound and demineralized tissue and for observing defects in the interior of the tooth. Lasers are now routinely used for many applications in dentistry including the ablation of dental caries. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that real-time NIR imaging can be used to monitor laser-ablation under varying conditions to assess peripheral thermal and transient-stress induced damage and to measure the rate and efficiency of ablation. Moreover, NIR imaging may have considerable potential for monitoring the removal of demineralized areas of the tooth during cavity preparations. Sound human tooth sections of approximately 3-mm thickness were irradiated by a CO II laser under varying conditions with and without a water spray. The incision area in the interior of each sample was imaged using a tungsten-halogen lamp with band-pass filter centered at 131--nm combined with an InGaAs focal plane array with a NIR zoom microscope in transillumination. Due to the high transparency of enamel at 1310-nm, laser-incisions were clearly visible to the dentin-enamel junction and crack formation, dehydration and irreversible thermal changes were observed during ablation. This study showed that there is great potential for near-IR imaging to monitor laser-ablation events in real-time to: assess safe laser operating parameters by imaging thermal and stress-induced damage, elaborate the mechanisms involved in ablation such as dehydration, and monitor the removal of demineralized enamel.

  15. Sheepskin effects and the relationship between earnings and education: analyzing their evolution over time in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Crespo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to analyze trends in sheepskin effects and in the relationship between earnings and education on the Brazilian labor Market from 1982 to 2004. Using data from the PNAD - the Brazilian National Household Sample Survey - earnings equations are estimated including linear years of schooling, and splines and discontinuous functions for completed degrees, as well as semiparametric regressions. Empirical evidence shows a reduction in sheepskin effects from 1982 to 2004, indicating that a diploma or degree completion in Brazil has been losing its value over time. At the same time, the relationship between log earnings and education has become more convex. Similar trends are verified when the analysis is carried out separately by region.Este artigo procura analisar tendências no efeito-diploma e na relação entre rendimentos e educação no mercado de trabalho brasileiro durante o período de 1982 até 2004. Usando dados da PNAD (Pesquisa Nacional por Amostra de Domicílios são estimadas equações de rendimentos usando, além de um termo linear para os anos de escolaridade, mudanças de inclinação e saltos para graus completos do ciclo educacional. Também são estimadas regressões semi-paramétricas, que flexibilizam a relação entre rendimentos e educação. As evidências empíricas mostram uma redução do efeito-diploma entre 1982 e 2004, indicando que a conclusão de um grau ou a obtenção de um diploma vem perdendo valor ao longo do tempo. Ao mesmo tempo, a relação entre o logaritmo dos rendimentos e os anos de escolaridade tem se tornado mais convexa. Tendências semelhantes são verificadas quando a análise é implementada separadamente por região.

  16. A Time-Critical Investigation of Parameter Tuning in Differential Evolution for Non-Linear Global Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Hui Ong

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Parameter searching is one of the most important aspects in getting favorable results in optimization problems. It is even more important if the optimization problems are limited by time constraints. In a limited time constraint problems, it is crucial for any algorithms to get the best results or near-optimum results. In a previous study, Differential Evolution (DE has been found as one of the best performing algorithms under time constraints. As this has help in answering which algorithm that yields results that are near-optimum under a limited time constraint. Hence to further enhance the performance of DE under time constraint evaluation, a throughout parameter searching for population size, mutation constant and f constant have been carried out. CEC 2015 Global Optimization Competition’s 15 scalable test problems are used as test suite for this study. In the previous study the same test suits has been used and the results from DE will be use as the benchmark for this study since it shows the best results among the previous tested algorithms. Eight different populations size are used and they are 10, 30, 50, 100, 150, 200, 300, and 500. Each of these populations size will run with mutation constant of 0.1 until 0.9 and from 0.1 until 0.9. It was found that population size 100, Cr = 0.9, F=0.5 outperform the benchmark results. It is also observed from the results that good higher Cr around 0.8 and 0.9 with low F around 0.3 to 0.4 yields good results for DE under time constraints evaluation

  17. High-Precision Timing of 5 Millisecond Pulsars: Space Velocities, Binary Evolution and Equivalence Principles

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, M E; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Nice, D J; Demorest, P B; Ransom, S M; Kramer, M; Camilo, F; Hobbs, G; Manchester, R N; Lyne, A G

    2011-01-01

    We present high-precision timing of five millisecond pulsars (MSPs) carried out for more than seven years; four pulsars are in binary systems and one is isolated. We are able to measure the pulsars' proper motions and derive an estimate for their space velocities. The measured two-dimensional velocities are in the range 70-210 km/s, consistent with those measured for other MSPs. We also use all the available proper motion information for isolated and binary MSPs to update the known velocity distribution for these populations. As found by earlier works, we find that the velocity distribution of binary and isolated MSPs are indistinguishable with the current data. Four of the pulsars in our observing program are highly recycled with low-mass white dwarf companions and we are able to derive accurate binary parameters for these systems. For three of these binary systems we are able to place initial constraints on the pulsar masses with best-fit values in the range 1.0-1.6 M_sun. The implications of the results pr...

  18. The Horizon-AGN simulation: evolution of galaxy properties over cosmic time

    CERN Document Server

    Kaviraj, S; Kimm, T; Devriendt, J E G; Dubois, Y; Pichon, C; Slyz, A; Chisari, E; Peirani, S

    2016-01-01

    We compare the predictions of Horizon-AGN, a hydro-dynamical cosmological simulation that uses an adaptive mesh refinement code, to observational data in the redshift range 0time: luminosity and stellar-mass functions, the star formation main sequence, rest-frame UV-optical-near infrared colours and the cosmic star-formation history. We show that Horizon-AGN, which is not tuned to reproduce the local Universe, produces good overall agreement with these quantities, from the present day to the epoch when the Universe was 5% of its current age. By comparison to Horizon-noAGN, a twin simulation without AGN feedback, we quantify how feedback from black holes is likely to help shape galaxy stellar-mass growth in the redshift range 0

  19. Time evolution of ground motion-dependent depolarisation at linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Bailey, I; Beckmann, M; Hartin, A; Helebrant, C; Kaefer, D; List, J; Moortgat-Pick, G

    2011-01-01

    Future linear colliders plan to collide polarised beams and the planned physics reach requires knowledge of the state of polarisation as precisely as possible. The polarised beams can undergo depolarisation due to various mechanisms. In order to quantify the uncertainty due to depolarisation, spin tracking simulations in the International Linear Collider (ILC) Beam Delivery System (BDS) and at the Interaction Point (IP) have been performed. Spin tracking in the BDS was achieved using the BMAD subroutine library, and the CAIN program was used to do spin tracking through the beam-beam collision. Assuming initially aligned beamline elements in the BDS, a ground motion model was applied to obtain realistic random misalignments over various time scales. Depolarisation at the level of 0.1% occurs within a day of ground motion at a noisy site. Depolarisation at the IP also exceeds 0.1% for the nominal parameter sets for both the ILC and for the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). Theoretical work is underway to include ...

  20. Time-dependent nonextensivity arising from the rotational evolution of solar-type stars

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, Jose R P; Soares, Braulio B; de Freitas, Daniel B

    2013-01-01

    The nonextensive formalism is a generalization of the Boltzmann-Gibbs Statistics. In this formalism the entropic index q is a quantity characterizing the degree of nonextensivity, and is interpreted as a parameter of long-memory or long-range interactions between the components of the system. Since its proposition in 1988, this formalism has been applied to investigate a wide spectrum of natural phenomena. In stellar astrophysics, theoretical distribution function based on nonextensive formalism (q-distributions) has been successfully applied to reproduce the distribution of stellar radial and rotational velocity data. In this paper, we investigate the time variation of the entropic index q obtained from the distribution of rotation, Vsini, for a sample of 254 rotational data for solar-type star from 11 open clusters aged between 35.5Myr and 2.6Gyr. As a result we have found an anti-correlation between the entropic index q and the age of clusters, and that the distribution of rotation Vsini for these stars be...

  1. X-ray Pulsars in the Magellanic Clouds: Time Evolution of their Luminosities and Spin Periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Laycock, Silas; Coe, Malcolm J.; Drake, Jeremy J.; Hong, JaeSub; Antoniou, Vallia; Zezas, Andreas; Ho, Wynn C. G.

    2017-08-01

    We have collected and analyzed the complete archive of XMM-Newton (116), Chandra (151), and RXTE (952) observations of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), spanning 1997-2014. The resulting observational library provides a comprehensive view of the physical, temporal and statistical properties of the SMC pulsar population across the luminosity range of L_X= 10^{31.2}-10^{38} erg/s. From a sample of 65 pulsars we report 1654 individual pulsar detections, yielding 1393 pulse period measurements. Our pipeline generates a suite of products for each pulsar detection: spin period, flux, event list, high time-resolution light-curve, pulse-profile, periodogram, and X-ray spectrum. Combining all three satellites, we generated complete histories of the spin periods, pulse amplitudes, pulsed fractions and X-ray luminosities. Many of the pulsars show variations in pulse period due to the combination of orbital motion and accretion torques. Long-term spin-up/down trends are seen in 28/25 pulsars respectively, pointing to sustained transfer of mass and angular momentum to the neutron star on decadal timescales. The distributions of pulse detection and flux as functions of spin period provide interesting findings: mapping boundaries of accretion-driven X-ray luminosity, and showing that fast pulsars (Psearch for optical counterparts to X-ray sources in the local dwarf galaxy IC 10 to form a comparison sample for Magellanic Cloud X-ray pulsars.

  2. Timing of ossification in duck, quail, and zebra finch: intraspecific variation, heterochronies, and life history evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitgutsch, Christian; Wimmer, Corinne; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R; Hahnloser, Richard; Schneider, Richard A

    2011-07-01

    Skeletogenic heterochronies have gained much attention in comparative developmental biology. The temporal appearance of mineralized individual bones in a species - the species ossification sequence - is an excellent marker in this kind of study. Several publications describe interspecific variation, but only very few detail intraspecific variation. In this study, we describe and analyze the temporal order of ossification of skeletal elements in the zebra finch, Taeniopygia guttata, the Japanese quail, Coturnix coturnix japonica, and the White Pekin duck, a domestic race of the mallard Anas platyrhynchos, and explore patterns of intraspecific variation in these events. The overall sequences were found to be conserved. In the duck, variability is present in the relative timing of ossification in the occipital, the basisphenoid and the otic regions of the skull and the phalanges in the postcranium. This variation appears generally in close temporal proximity. Comparison with previously published data shows differences in ossification sequence in the skull, the feet, and the pelvis in the duck, and especially the pelvis in the quail. This clearly documents variability among different breeds.

  3. A parallel code to calculate rate-state seismicity evolution induced by time dependent, heterogeneous Coulomb stress changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattania, C.; Khalid, F.

    2016-09-01

    The estimation of space and time-dependent earthquake probabilities, including aftershock sequences, has received increased attention in recent years, and Operational Earthquake Forecasting systems are currently being implemented in various countries. Physics based earthquake forecasting models compute time dependent earthquake rates based on Coulomb stress changes, coupled with seismicity evolution laws derived from rate-state friction. While early implementations of such models typically performed poorly compared to statistical models, recent studies indicate that significant performance improvements can be achieved by considering the spatial heterogeneity of the stress field and secondary sources of stress. However, the major drawback of these methods is a rapid increase in computational costs. Here we present a code to calculate seismicity induced by time dependent stress changes. An important feature of the code is the possibility to include aleatoric uncertainties due to the existence of multiple receiver faults and to the finite grid size, as well as epistemic uncertainties due to the choice of input slip model. To compensate for the growth in computational requirements, we have parallelized the code for shared memory systems (using OpenMP) and distributed memory systems (using MPI). Performance tests indicate that these parallelization strategies lead to a significant speedup for problems with different degrees of complexity, ranging from those which can be solved on standard multicore desktop computers, to those requiring a small cluster, to a large simulation that can be run using up to 1500 cores.

  4. Self-similarity in the chemical evolution of galaxies and the delay time distribution of SNe Ia

    CERN Document Server

    Walcher, C J; Minchev, I; Chiappini, C; Bergemann, M; Bruzual, G; Charlot, S; Coelho, P R T; Gallazzi, A; Martig, M

    2016-01-01

    Recent improvements in the age dating of stellar populations and single stars allow us to study the ages and abundance of stars and galaxies with unprecedented accuracy. We here compare the relation between age and \\alpha-element abundances for stars in the solar neighborhood to that of local, early-type galaxies. We find both relations to be very similar. Both fall into two regimes with a flat slope for ages younger than ~9 Gyr and a steeper slope for ages older than that value. This quantitative similarity seems surprising, given the different types of galaxies and scales involved. For the sample of early-type galaxies we also show that the data are inconsistent with literature delay time distributions of either single or double Gaussian shape. The data are consistent with a power law delay time distribution. We thus confirm that the delay time distribution inferred for the Milky Way from chemical evolution arguments also must apply to massive early-type galaxies. We also offer a tentative explanation for t...

  5. Radio monitoring of NGC 7469: Late time radio evolution of SN 2000ft and the circumnuclear starburst in NGC 7469

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez-Torres, M A; Colina, L; Torrelles, J M; Panagia, N; Wilson, A; Kankare, E; Mattila, S

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of an eight-year long monitoring of the radio emission from the Luminous Infrared Galaxy (LIRG) NGC 7469, using 8.4 GHz Very Large Array (VLA) observations at 0.3'' resolution. Our monitoring shows that the late time evolution of the radio supernova SN 2000ft follows a decline very similar to that displayed at earlier times of its optically thin phase. The late time radio emission of SN 2000ft is therefore still being powered by its interaction with the presupernova stellar wind, and not with the interstellar medium (ISM). Indeed, the ram pressure of the presupernova wind is \\rho_w v_w^2 \\approx 7.6E-9 dyn/cm^2, at a supernova age of approximately 2127 days, which is significantly larger than the expected pressure of the ISM around SN 2000ft. At this age, the SN shock has reached a distance r_{sh \\approx 0.06 pc, and our observations are probing the interaction of the SN with dense material that was ejected by the presupernova star about 5820 years prior to its explosion. From our VLA m...

  6. Time-evolution of in vivo protein corona onto blood-circulating PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin (DOXIL) nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjidemetriou, Marilena; Al-Ahmady, Zahraa; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2016-04-07

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are instantly modified once injected in the bloodstream because of their interaction with the blood components. The spontaneous coating of NPs by proteins, once in contact with biological fluids, has been termed the 'protein corona' and it is considered to be a determinant factor for the pharmacological, toxicological and therapeutic profile of NPs. Protein exposure time is thought to greatly influence the composition of protein corona, however the dynamics of protein interactions under realistic, in vivo conditions remain unexplored. The aim of this study was to quantitatively and qualitatively investigate the time evolution of in vivo protein corona, formed onto blood circulating, clinically used, PEGylated liposomal doxorubicin. Protein adsorption profiles were determined 10 min, 1 h and 3 h post-injection of liposomes into CD-1 mice. The results demonstrated that a complex protein corona was formed as early as 10 min post-injection. Even though the total amount of protein adsorbed did not significantly change over time, the fluctuation of protein abundances observed indicated highly dynamic protein binding kinetics.

  7. The evolution of the bacterial luciferase gene cassette (lux) as a real-time bioreporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Dan; Xu, Tingting; Smartt, Abby; Rogers, Alexandra; Crossley, Robert; Price, Sarah; Ripp, Steven; Sayler, Gary

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial luciferase gene cassette (lux) is unique among bioluminescent bioreporter systems due to its ability to synthesize and/or scavenge all of the substrate compounds required for its production of light. As a result, the lux system has the unique ability to autonomously produce a luminescent signal, either continuously or in response to the presence of a specific trigger, across a wide array of organismal hosts. While originally employed extensively as a bacterial bioreporter system for the detection of specific chemical signals in environmental samples, the use of lux as a bioreporter technology has continuously expanded over the last 30 years to include expression in eukaryotic cells such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and even human cell lines as well. Under these conditions, the lux system has been developed for use as a biomedical detection tool for toxicity screening and visualization of tumors in small animal models. As the technologies for lux signal detection continue to improve, it is poised to become one of the first fully implantable detection systems for intra-organismal optical detection through direct marriage to an implantable photon-detecting digital chip. This review presents the basic biochemical background that allows the lux system to continuously autobioluminesce and highlights the important milestones in the use of lux-based bioreporters as they have evolved from chemical detection platforms in prokaryotic bacteria to rodent-based tumorigenesis study targets. In addition, the future of lux imaging using integrated circuit microluminometry to image directly within a living host in real-time will be introduced and its role in the development of dose/response therapeutic systems will be highlighted.

  8. Real-time observation of drying kinetics and morphology evolution in organic bulk heterojunctions (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güldal, Nusret S.; Ameri, Tayebeh; Osvet, Andres; Brabec, Christoph J.

    2015-08-01

    In organic photovoltaics field, an optimized bulk heterojunction film consists of an electron-donating conjugated polymer and an electron-accepting fullerene derivative, which is organized in a well phase-separated, yet interconnected network. This sensitive morphology, affecting the light absorption, exciton dissociation and subsequent charge generation-extraction, is determined by the film formation during solution casting under certain processing conditions. Therefore, a number of previous studies focused on characterizing the thin film formation during solution casting, mainly with in-situ grazing-incidence X-ray scattering methods, accompanied by various optical methods, such as ellipsometry/reflectometry and UV-VIS absorption. Although these studies provided invaluable information on the matter, the development of nanoscale morphology is yet to be fully understood. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate a portable in-situ characterization chamber, which can characterize any organic/hybrid thin film during solution casting. The chamber is a miniature doctor blade under controlled atmosphere, equipped with white light reflectometry (WLR), photoluminescence (PL) and laser light scattering (LLS). WLR was used to monitor the thickness reduction of the thin film during the drying, enabling to establish a drying curve. LLS informed the time scale of aggregate/crystallite formation. PL monitored molecular arrangement and enabled the estimation of microstructure. The combined data is used to understand the competition between thermodynamics (e.g. solubility, miscibility) and kinetics of morphology formation. In this study, we measured different BHJ systems with binary and ternary solvent mixtures under different processing conditions, from which we built a roadmap for microstructure formation in organic thin films, used in organic photovoltaics.

  9. The Evolution of the Bacterial Luciferase Gene Cassette (lux) as a Real-Time Bioreporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Dan; Xu, Tingting; Smartt, Abby; Rogers, Alexandra; Crossley, Robert; Price, Sarah; Ripp, Steven; Sayler, Gary

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial luciferase gene cassette (lux) is unique among bioluminescent bioreporter systems due to its ability to synthesize and/or scavenge all of the substrate compounds required for its production of light. As a result, the lux system has the unique ability to autonomously produce a luminescent signal, either continuously or in response to the presence of a specific trigger, across a wide array of organismal hosts. While originally employed extensively as a bacterial bioreporter system for the detection of specific chemical signals in environmental samples, the use of lux as a bioreporter technology has continuously expanded over the last 30 years to include expression in eukaryotic cells such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and even human cell lines as well. Under these conditions, the lux system has been developed for use as a biomedical detection tool for toxicity screening and visualization of tumors in small animal models. As the technologies for lux signal detection continue to improve, it is poised to become one of the first fully implantable detection systems for intra-organismal optical detection through direct marriage to an implantable photon-detecting digital chip. This review presents the basic biochemical background that allows the lux system to continuously autobioluminesce and highlights the important milestones in the use of lux-based bioreporters as they have evolved from chemical detection platforms in prokaryotic bacteria to rodent-based tumorigenesis study targets. In addition, the future of lux imaging using integrated circuit microluminometry to image directly within a living host in real-time will be introduced and its role in the development of dose/response therapeutic systems will be highlighted. PMID:22368493

  10. The Evolution of the Bacterial Luciferase Gene Cassette (lux as a Real-Time Bioreporter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Sayler

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial luciferase gene cassette (lux is unique among bioluminescent bioreporter systems due to its ability to synthesize and/or scavenge all of the substrate compounds required for its production of light. As a result, the lux system has the unique ability to autonomously produce a luminescent signal, either continuously or in response to the presence of a specific trigger, across a wide array of organismal hosts. While originally employed extensively as a bacterial bioreporter system for the detection of specific chemical signals in environmental samples, the use of lux as a bioreporter technology has continuously expanded over the last 30 years to include expression in eukaryotic cells such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and even human cell lines as well. Under these conditions, the lux system has been developed for use as a biomedical detection tool for toxicity screening and visualization of tumors in small animal models. As the technologies for lux signal detection continue to improve, it is poised to become one of the first fully implantable detection systems for intra-organismal optical detection through direct marriage to an implantable photon-detecting digital chip. This review presents the basic biochemical background that allows the lux system to continuously autobioluminesce and highlights the important milestones in the use of lux-based bioreporters as they have evolved from chemical detection platforms in prokaryotic bacteria to rodent-based tumorigenesis study targets. In addition, the future of lux imaging using integrated circuit microluminometry to image directly within a living host in real-time will be introduced and its role in the development of dose/response therapeutic systems will be highlighted.

  11. Renal Replacement Therapy [version 1; referees: 4 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaccaria Ricci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last few years, due to medical and surgical evolution, patients with increasingly severe diseases causing multiorgan dysfunction are frequently admitted to intensive care units. Therapeutic options, when organ failure occurs, are frequently nonspecific and mostly directed towards supporting vital function. In these scenarios, the kidneys are almost always involved and, therefore, renal replacement therapies have become a common routine practice in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury. Recent technological improvement has led to the production of safe, versatile and efficient dialysis machines. In addition, emerging evidence may allow better individualization of treatment with tailored prescription depending on the patients’ clinical picture (e.g. sepsis, fluid overload, pediatric. The aim of the present review is to give a general overview of current practice in renal replacement therapies for critically ill patients. The main clinical aspects, including dose prescription, modality of dialysis delivery, anticoagulation strategies and timing will be addressed. In addition, some technical issues on physical principles governing blood purification, filters characteristics, and vascular access, will be covered. Finally, a section on current standard nomenclature of renal replacement therapy is devoted to clarify the “Tower of Babel” of critical care nephrology.

  12. Io: Eruptions at Pillan, and the time evolution of Pele and Pillan from 1996 to 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pater, Imke; Laver, Conor; Davies, Ashley Gerard; de Kleer, Katherine; Williams, David A.; Howell, Robert R.; Rathbun, Julie A.; Spencer, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Observations obtained with the near-infrared camera NIRC2, coupled to the adaptive optics system on the 10-m W.M. Keck II telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, on 14 August 2007 revealed an active and highly-energetic eruption at Pillan at 245.2 ± 0.7°W and 8.5 ± 0.5°S. A one-temperature blackbody fit to the data revealed a (blackbody) temperature of 840 ± 40 K over an area of 17 km2, with a total power output of ∼500 GW. Using Davies' (Davies, A.G. [1996]. Icarus 124(1), 45-61) Io Flow Model, we find that the oldest lava present is less than 1-2 h old, having cooled down from the eruption temperature of >1400 K to ∼710 K; this young hot lava suggests that an episode of lava fountaining was underway. In addition to an examination of this eruption, we present data of the Pele and Pillan volcanoes obtained with the same instrument and telescope from 2002 through 2015. These data reveal another eruption at Pillan on UT 28 June 2010. Model fits to this eruption yield a blackbody temperature of 600-700 K over an area of ∼60 km2, radiating over 600 GW. On UT 18 February 2015 an energetic eruption was captured by the InfraRed Telescope Facility (IRTF) via mutual event occultations. The eruption took place at 242.7 ± 1°W and 12.4 ± 1°S, i.e., in the eastern part of Pillan Patera. Subsequent observations showed a gradual decrease in the intensity of the eruption. Images obtained with the Keck telescope on 31 March and 5 May 2015 revealed that the locations of the eruption had shifted by 120-160 km to the NW. In contrast to the episodicity of Pillan, Pele has been persistent, observed in every appropriate 4.7 μm observation. Pele was remarkably consistent in its thermal emission from the Galileo era through February 2002, when a blackbody temperature of 940 ± 40 K and an area of 6.5 km2 was measured. Since that time, however, the radiant flux from what is likely a apparently large, overturning lava lake has gradually subsided over the next decade by a factor of

  13. Evolution prediction from tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominy, Jason M.; Venuti, Lorenzo Campos; Shabani, Alireza; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2017-03-01

    Quantum process tomography provides a means of measuring the evolution operator for a system at a fixed measurement time t. The problem of using that tomographic snapshot to predict the evolution operator at other times is generally ill-posed since there are, in general, infinitely many distinct and compatible solutions. We describe the prediction, in some "maximal ignorance" sense, of the evolution of a quantum system based on knowledge only of the evolution operator for finitely many times 0evolution at times away from the measurement times. Even if the original evolution is unitary, the predicted evolution is described by a non-unitary, completely positive map.

  14. Evolution of structure and electrical properties with annealing time in solution-based VO{sub 2} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Yuxian, E-mail: guo_yuxian@163.com [School of Mathematics and Physics, Anhui Jianzhu University, Hefei 230022, Anhui (China); Xu, Haiyan [School of Materials and Chemical Engineering, Anhui Jianzhu University, Hefei 230022, Anhui (China); Zou, Chongwen, E-mail: czou@ustc.edu.cn [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230029, Anhui (China); Yang, Zhiyun [School of Mathematics and Physics, Anhui Jianzhu University, Hefei 230022, Anhui (China); Tong, Bin [School of Materials and Chemical Engineering, Anhui Jianzhu University, Hefei 230022, Anhui (China); Yu, Jiangying; Zhang, Youjie; Zhao, Li; Wang, Yaling [School of Mathematics and Physics, Anhui Jianzhu University, Hefei 230022, Anhui (China)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • VO{sub 2} films were grown on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0 0 0 1) using sol-gel and vacuum annealing process. • The films transformed from V{sub 2}O{sub 3} to V{sub 3}O{sub 5}, and then to VO{sub 2} with prolonged annealing. • The VO{sub 2} films with longer annealing time showed higher film quality. • The lower phase transition temperature can be achieved by longer annealing. • A self-reduction mechanism was experimentally revealed in terms of Raman results. - Abstract: Vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}) thin films were prepared on c-sapphire substrates by using an easy sol-gel method and sequential vacuum annealing process. The effects of annealing time on the structure, morphology and phase transition properties were investigated. The results show that, with the extended annealing time from 1 h to 7 h, the films have transformed from V{sub 2}O{sub 3} to V{sub 3}O{sub 5}, and then VO{sub 2}. The VO{sub 2} thin films prepared with the annealing time of 4 h or 7 h display good phase transition property with the resistance change up to 3 orders of magnitude. Furthermore, the 7 h-sintered film has better growth orient, bigger grain size and lower phase transition temperature comparing with the 4 h-sintered film. It is suggested that, the prolonged annealing treatment will be in favor of the crystal film quality and enhance the related phase transition property for the solution-based VO{sub 2} films. Based on the Raman results, we have discussed the possible reactions and evolution mechanisms during the VO{sub 2} film preparation with different annealing time.

  15. [MINIMALLY INVASIVE AORTIC VALVE REPLACEMENT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabata, Minoru

    2016-03-01

    Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR) is defined as aortic valve replacement avoiding full sternotomy. Common approaches include a partial sternotomy right thoracotomy, and a parasternal approach. MIAVR has been shown to have advantages over conventional AVR such as shorter length of stay and smaller amount of blood transfusion and better cosmesis. However, it is also known to have disadvantages such as longer cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times and potential complications related to peripheral cannulation. Appropriate patient selection is very important. Since the procedure is more complex than conventional AVR, more intensive teamwork in the operating room is essential. Additionally, a team approach during postoperative management is critical to maximize the benefits of MIAVR.

  16. Testosterone replacement therapy and prostate health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polackwich, A Scott; Ostrowski, Kevin A; Hedges, Jason C

    2012-12-01

    There is an emerging evolution in the understanding of the relationship between the prostate and testosterone. It has long been generally believed that with testosterone replacement therapy (TRT), increasing serum testosterone levels led to prostatic growth and worsening of voiding dysfunction and associated complications. A new theory, the Saturation Model of Testosterone and its effect on the Prostate has gained attention. This theory suggests that the prostate's response to increasing levels of serum testosterone reaches a limit beyond which there is minimal effect. This model predicts that testosterone replacement therapy occurs above this saturation point, and replacing testosterone to eugonadal levels should not worsen prostate related benign disease. We evaluated the recent published data, with an emphasis on clinical studies done within the last 3 years, for the effects of testosterone supplementation on benign prostatic disease.

  17. Space-time evolution rules of acoustic emission location of unloaded coal sample at different loading rates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ai Ting; Zhang Ru; Liu Jianfeng; Ren Li

    2012-01-01

    By using MTS815 rock mechanics test system,a series of acoustic emission (AE) location experiments were performed under unloading confining pressure,increasing the axial stress.The AE space-time evolution regularities and energy releasing characteristics during deformation and failure process of coal of different loading rates are compared,the influence mechanism of loading rates on the microscopic crack evolution were studied,combining the AE characteristics and the macroscopic failure modes of the specimens,and the precursory characteristics of coal failure were also analyzed quantitatively.The results indicate that as the loading rate is higher,the AE activity and the main fracture will begin earlier.The destruction of coal body is mainly the function of shear strain at lower loading rate and tension strain at higher rate,and will transform from brittleness to ductility at critical velocities.When the deformation of the coal is mainly plasticity,the amplitude of the AE tinging counting rate increases largely and the AE energy curves appear an obvious "step",which can be defined as the first failure precursor point.Statics of AE information shows that the strongest AE activity begins when the axial stress level was 92-98%,which can be defined as the other failure precursor point.As the loading rate is smaller,the coal more easily reaches the latter precursor point after the first one,so attention should be aroused to prevent dynamic disaster in coal mining when the AE activity reaches the first precursor point.

  18. Space-time evolution rules of acoustic emission location of unloaded coal sample at different loading rates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ai; Ting; Zhang; Ru; Liu; Jianfeng; Ren; Li

    2012-01-01

    By using MTS815 rock mechanics test system,a series of acoustic emission(AE) location experiments were performed under unloading confining pressure,increasing the axial stress.The AE space-time evolution regularities and energy releasing characteristics during deformation and failure process of coal of different loading rates are compared,the influence mechanism of loading rates on the microscopic crack evolution were studied,combining the AE characteristics and the macroscopic failure modes of the specimens,and the precursory characteristics of coal failure were also analyzed quantitatively.The results indicate that as the loading rate is higher,the AE activity and the main fracture will begin earlier.The destruction of coal body is mainly the function of shear strain at lower loading rate and tension strain at higher rate,and will transform from brittleness to ductility at critical velocities.When the deformation of the coal is mainly plasticity,the amplitude of the AE ringing counting rate increases largely and the AE energy curves appear an obvious ''step'',which can be defined as the first failure precursor point.Statics of AE information shows that the strongest AE activity begins when the axial stress level was 92-98%,which can be defined as the other failure precursor point.As the loading rate is smaller,the coal more easily reaches the latter precursor point after the first one,so attention should be aroused to prevent dynamic disaster in coal mining when the AE activity reaches the first precursor point.

  19. Investigations on the time evolution of the plasma density in argon electron-beam plasma at intermediate pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaoyan, BAI; Chen, CHEN; Hong, LI; Wandong, LIU

    2017-03-01

    The time evolution of the argon electron-beam plasma at intermediate pressure and low electron beam intensity was presented. By applying the amplitude modulation with the frequency of 20 Hz on the stable beam current, the plasma evolution was studied. A Faraday cup was used for the measurement of the electron beam current and a single electrostatic probe was used for the measurement of the ion current. Experimental results indicated that the ion current was in phase with the electron beam current in the pressure range from 200 Pa to 3000 Pa and in the beam current range lower than 20 mA, the residual density increased approximately linearly with the maximum density in the log-log plot and the fitting coefficient was irrelative to the pressure. And then three kinds of kinetic models were developed and the simulated results given by the kinetic model, without the consideration of the excited atoms, mostly approached to the experimental results. This indicated that the effect of the excited atoms on the plasma density can be ignored at intermediate pressure and low electron beam current intensity, which can greatly simplify the kinetic model. In the end, the decrease of the plasma density when the beam current was suddenly off was studied based on the simplified model and it was found that the decease characteristic at intermediate pressure was approximate to the one at high pressure at low electron beam intensity, which was in good accordance with the experimental results. Supported by National Natural Science Foundations of China (No. 11375187) and the Foundation of State key Laboratory of China (No. SKLIPR1510).

  20. Fla. Panel's Evolution Vote Hailed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on how the compromise hammered out in Florida recently over the treatment of evolution in the state's science classrooms is winning praise from scientists and educators. The new science standards will refer to evolution as the "scientific theory of evolution." These changes will replace more-general language in the…