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Sample records for replace mouse interaction

  1. Replacing the computer mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Dernoncourt, Franck

    2014-01-01

    In a few months the computer mouse will be half-a-century-old. It is known to have many drawbacks, the main ones being: loss of productivity due to constant switching between keyboard and mouse, and health issues such as RSI. Like the keyboard, it is an unnatural human-computer interface. However the vast majority of computer users still use computer mice nowadays. In this article, we explore computer mouse alternatives. Our research shows that moving the mouse cursor can be done efficiently ...

  2. Enzyme replacement therapy in a mouse model of aspartylglycosaminuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunder, U; Kaartinen, V; Valtonen, P; Väänänen, E; Kosma, V M; Heisterkamp, N; Groffen, J; Mononen, I

    2000-02-01

    Aspartylglycosaminuria (AGU), the most common lysosomal disorder of glycoprotein degradation, is caused by deficient activity of glycosylasparaginase (AGA). AGA-deficient mice share most of the clinical, biochemical and histopathologic characteristics of human AGU disease. In the current study, recombinant human AGA administered i.v. to adult AGU mice disappeared from the systemic circulation of the animals in two phases predominantly into non-neuronal tissues, which were rapidly cleared from storage compound aspartylglucosamine. Even a single AGA injection reduced the amount of aspartylglucosamine in the liver and spleen of AGU mice by 90% and 80%, respectively. Quantitative biochemical analyses along with histological and immunohistochemical studies demonstrated that the pathophysiologic characteristics of AGU were effectively corrected in non-neuronal tissues of AGU mice during 2 wk of AGA therapy. At the same time, AGA activity increased to 10% of that in normal brain tissue and the accumulation of aspartylglucosamine was reduced by 20% in total brain of the treated animals. Immunohistochemical studies suggested that the corrective enzyme was widely distributed within the brain tissue. These findings suggest that AGU may be correctable by enzyme therapy.-Dunder, U., Kaartinen, V., Valtonen, P., Väänänen, E., Kosma, V.-M., Heisterkamp, N., Groffen, J., Mononen, I. Enzyme replacement therapy in a mouse model of aspartylglycosaminuria.

  3. Contribution of V(H replacement products in mouse antibody repertoire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Huang

    Full Text Available VH replacement occurs through RAG-mediated recombination between the cryptic recombination signal sequence (cRSS near the 3' end of a rearranged VH gene and the 23-bp RSS from an upstream unrearranged VH gene. Due to the location of the cRSS, VH replacement leaves a short stretch of nucleotides from the previously rearranged VH gene at the newly formed V-D junction, which can be used as a marker to identify VH replacement products. To determine the contribution of VH replacement products to mouse antibody repertoire, we developed a Java-based VH Replacement Footprint Analyzer (VHRFA program and analyzed 17,179 mouse IgH gene sequences from the NCBI database to identify VH replacement products. The overall frequency of VH replacement products in these IgH genes is 5.29% based on the identification of pentameric VH replacement footprints at their V-D junctions. The identified VH replacement products are distributed similarly in IgH genes using most families of VH genes, although different families of VH genes are used differentially. The frequencies of VH replacement products are significantly elevated in IgH genes derived from several strains of autoimmune prone mice and in IgH genes encoding autoantibodies. Moreover, the identified VH replacement footprints in IgH genes from autoimmune prone mice or IgH genes encoding autoantibodies preferentially encode positively charged amino acids. These results revealed a significant contribution of VH replacement products to the diversification of antibody repertoire and potentially, to the generation of autoantibodies in mice.

  4. VH Replacement Footprint Analyzer-I, a Java-Based Computer Program for Analyses of Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain Genes and Potential VH Replacement Products in Human and Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lin; Lange, Miles D; Zhang, Zhixin

    2014-01-01

    VH replacement occurs through RAG-mediated secondary recombination between a rearranged VH gene and an upstream unrearranged VH gene. Due to the location of the cryptic recombination signal sequence (cRSS, TACTGTG) at the 3' end of VH gene coding region, a short stretch of nucleotides from the previous rearranged VH gene can be retained in the newly formed VH-DH junction as a "footprint" of VH replacement. Such footprints can be used as markers to identify Ig heavy chain (IgH) genes potentially generated through VH replacement. To explore the contribution of VH replacement products to the antibody repertoire, we developed a Java-based computer program, VH replacement footprint analyzer-I (VHRFA-I), to analyze published or newly obtained IgH genes from human or mouse. The VHRFA-1 program has multiple functional modules: it first uses service provided by the IMGT/V-QUEST program to assign potential VH, DH, and JH germline genes; then, it searches for VH replacement footprint motifs within the VH-DH junction (N1) regions of IgH gene sequences to identify potential VH replacement products; it can also analyze the frequencies of VH replacement products in correlation with publications, keywords, or VH, DH, and JH gene usages, and mutation status; it can further analyze the amino acid usages encoded by the identified VH replacement footprints. In summary, this program provides a useful computation tool for exploring the biological significance of VH replacement products in human and mouse.

  5. Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A specific cell-based potency assay to replace the mouse bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Salas, Ester; Wang, Joanne; Molina, Yanira; Nelson, Jeremy B; Jacky, Birgitte P S; Aoki, K Roger

    2012-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A), a potent therapeutic used to treat various disorders, inhibits vesicular neurotransmitter exocytosis by cleaving SNAP25. Development of cell-based potency assays (CBPAs) to assess the biological function of BoNT/A have been challenging because of its potency. CBPAs can evaluate the key steps of BoNT action: receptor binding, internalization-translocation, and catalytic activity; and therefore could replace the current mouse bioassay. Primary neurons possess appropriate sensitivity to develop potential replacement assays but those potency assays are difficult to perform and validate. This report describes a CBPA utilizing differentiated human neuroblastoma SiMa cells and a sandwich ELISA that measures BoNT/A-dependent intracellular increase of cleaved SNAP25. Assay sensitivity is similar to the mouse bioassay and measures neurotoxin biological activity in bulk drug substance and BOTOX® product (onabotulinumtoxinA). Validation of a version of this CBPA in a Quality Control laboratory has led to FDA, Health Canada, and European Union approval for potency testing of BOTOX®, BOTOX® Cosmetic, and Vistabel®. Moreover, we also developed and optimized a BoNT/A CBPA screening assay that can be used for the discovery of novel BoNT/A inhibitors to treat human disease.

  6. Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Radhakrishnan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The fishmeal replaced with Spirulina platensis, Chlorella vulgaris and Azolla pinnata and the formulated diet fed to Macrobrachium rosenbergii postlarvae to assess the enhancement ability of non-enzymatic antioxidants (vitamin C and E, enzymatic antioxidants (superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT and lipid peroxidation (LPx were analysed. In the present study, the S. platensis, C. vulgaris and A. pinnata inclusion diet fed groups had significant (P < 0.05 improvement in the levels of vitamins C and E in the hepatopancreas and muscle tissue. Among all the diets, the replacement materials in 50% incorporated feed fed groups showed better performance when compared with the control group in non-enzymatic antioxidant activity. The 50% fishmeal replacement (best performance diet fed groups taken for enzymatic antioxidant study, in SOD, CAT and LPx showed no significant increases when compared with the control group. Hence, the present results revealed that the formulated feed enhanced the vitamins C and E, the result of decreased level of enzymatic antioxidants (SOD, CAT and LPx revealed that these feeds are non-toxic and do not produce any stress to postlarvae. These ingredients can be used as an alternative protein source for sustainable Macrobrachium culture.

  7. BMPs functionally replace Klf4 and support efficient reprogramming of mouse fibroblasts by Oct4 alone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiekai Chen; Duanqing Pei; Jing Liu; Jiaqi Yang; You Chen; Jing Chen; Su Ni; Hong Song; Lingwen Zeng; Ke Ding

    2011-01-01

    Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells by defined factors has become a useful model to investigate the mechanism of reprogramming and cell fate determination.However,the precise mechanism of factor-based reprogramming remains unclear.Here,we show that Klf4 mainly acts at the initial phase of reprogramming to initiate mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition and can be functionally replaced by bone morphogenetic proteins(BMPs).BMPs boosted the efficiency of Oct4/Sox2-mediated reprogramming of mouse embryonic fibroblasts(MEFs)to~1%.BMPs also promoted single-factor Oct4-based reprogramming of MEFs and tail tibiai fihroblasts.Our studies clarify the contribution of Klf4 in reprogramming and establish Oct4 as a singular setter of pluripotency in differentiated cells.

  8. Managerial Insights into the Effects of Interactions on Replacing Members of a Team

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Solow; George Vairaktarakis; Sandy Kristin Piderit; Ming-chi Tsai

    2002-01-01

    A mathematical model is presented for studying the effects of interactions among team members on the process of replacing members of a team in an organization. The model provides the ability to control the number of members that interact with each individual on the team. Through the use of analysis and computer simulations, it is shown how the amount of interaction affects the tradeoff between the expected performance and the number of replacements and interviews needed to find a good team us...

  9. Mixing Board Versus Mouse Interaction In Value Adjustment Tasks

    CERN Document Server

    Bergner, Steven; Kirkpatrick, Arthur E; Möller, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    We present a controlled, quantitative study with 12 participants comparing interaction with a haptically enhanced mixing board against interaction with a mouse in an abstract task that is motivated by several practical parameter space exploration settings. The study participants received 24 sets of one to eight integer values between 0 and 127, which they had to match by making adjustments with physical or graphical sliders. Based on recorded slider motion path data, we developed an analysis algorithm that identifies and measures different types of activity intervals, including error time moving irrelevant sliders and end time in breaks after completing each trial item. Our results showed a significant increase in speed of the mixing board interaction accompanied by reduced perceived cognitive load when compared with the traditional mouse-based GUI interaction. The gains in speed are largely due to the improved times required for the hand to reach for the first slider (acquisition time) and also when moving b...

  10. Exploring pathway interactions in insulin resistant mouse liver

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    Kelder Thomas

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complex phenotypes such as insulin resistance involve different biological pathways that may interact and influence each other. Interpretation of related experimental data would be facilitated by identifying relevant pathway interactions in the context of the dataset. Results We developed an analysis approach to study interactions between pathways by integrating gene and protein interaction networks, biological pathway information and high-throughput data. This approach was applied to a transcriptomics dataset to investigate pathway interactions in insulin resistant mouse liver in response to a glucose challenge. We identified regulated pathway interactions at different time points following the glucose challenge and also studied the underlying protein interactions to find possible mechanisms and key proteins involved in pathway cross-talk. A large number of pathway interactions were found for the comparison between the two diet groups at t = 0. The initial response to the glucose challenge (t = 0.6 was typed by an acute stress response and pathway interactions showed large overlap between the two diet groups, while the pathway interaction networks for the late response were more dissimilar. Conclusions Studying pathway interactions provides a new perspective on the data that complements established pathway analysis methods such as enrichment analysis. This study provided new insights in how interactions between pathways may be affected by insulin resistance. In addition, the analysis approach described here can be generally applied to different types of high-throughput data and will therefore be useful for analysis of other complex datasets as well.

  11. Proteomic interactions in the mouse vitreous-retina complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica M Skeie

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Human vitreoretinal diseases are due to presumed abnormal mechanical interactions between the vitreous and retina, and translational models are limited. This study determined whether nonstructural proteins and potential retinal biomarkers were expressed by the normal mouse vitreous and retina. METHODS: Vitreous and retina samples from mice were collected by evisceration and analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Identified proteins were further analyzed for differential expression and functional interactions using bioinformatic software. RESULTS: We identified 1,680 unique proteins in the retina and 675 unique proteins in the vitreous. Unbiased clustering identified protein pathways that distinguish retina from vitreous including oxidative phosphorylation and neurofilament cytoskeletal remodeling, whereas the vitreous expressed oxidative stress and innate immunology pathways. Some intracellular protein pathways were found in both retina and vitreous, such as glycolysis and gluconeogenesis and neuronal signaling, suggesting proteins might be shuttled between the retina and vitreous. We also identified human disease biomarkers represented in the mouse vitreous and retina, including carbonic anhydrase-2 and 3, crystallins, macrophage inhibitory factor, glutathione peroxidase, peroxiredoxins, S100 precursors, and von Willebrand factor. CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis suggests the vitreous expresses nonstructural proteins that functionally interact with the retina to manage oxidative stress, immune reactions, and intracellular proteins may be exchanged between the retina and vitreous. This novel proteomic dataset can be used for investigating human vitreoretinopathies in mouse models. Validation of vitreoretinal biomarkers for human ocular diseases will provide a critical tool for diagnostics and an avenue for therapeutics.

  12. Effects and patients' experiences of interactive video-based physiotherapy at home after shoulder joint replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Lisbeth

    2009-01-01

    Physiotherapy is essential to optimize the results of shoulder joint replacement, but requires a close monitoring and co-operation between patient and physiotherapist. The development of telerehabilitation brings opportunities for distance-spanning and home-based physiotherapy interventions. The aim of this thesis is to explore effects and to describe experiences among patients participating in interactive video-based physiotherapy at home after shoulder joint replacement. A series of 22 pati...

  13. Two Y genes can replace the entire Y chromosome for assisted reproduction in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Riel, Jonathan M; Stoytcheva, Zoia; Ward, Monika A

    2014-01-03

    The Y chromosome is thought to be important for male reproduction. We have previously shown that, with the use of assisted reproduction, live offspring can be obtained from mice lacking the entire Y chromosome long arm. Here, we demonstrate that live mouse progeny can also be generated by using germ cells from males with the Y chromosome contribution limited to only two genes, the testis determinant factor Sry and the spermatogonial proliferation factor Eif2s3y. Sry is believed to function primarily in sex determination during fetal life. Eif2s3y may be the only Y chromosome gene required to drive mouse spermatogenesis, allowing formation of haploid germ cells that are functional in assisted reproduction. Our findings are relevant, but not directly translatable, to human male infertility cases.

  14. Interaction of ethanol and mercury body burden in the mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, J.D.

    1978-01-01

    The interaction of ethanol with mercury in the body resulting in increased exhalation of the metal was studied in the mouse. A persistent elimination of the metal in the breath was demonstrated after single, sublethal (<1 mgHg/Kg body weight) exposures to mercury vapor (Hg/sup 0/) or mercury II chloride (HgCl/sub 2/). The amount of mercury exhaled per unit time was enhanced by oral or parenteral administration of ethanol solutions. These modifications were investigated in dose-response studies in which the drug was administered in doses ranging from 0.2g to 5.5g/Kg to mice pretreated with mercury. The EC/sub 50/ for blood ethanol with respect to mercury exhalation was determined to be approximately 200 mg/dl corresponding to an output rate of approximately 0.1% of the simultaneous body burden in 30 min several days after mercury. A hypothesis that mercury expired by these animals was proportional to the body burden after mercury administration was addressed in experiments whereby mice given one of several doses of mercuric chloride (0.16 to 500 ..mu..g/Kg) were monitored for pulmonary mercury elimination for a fifteen day period. The high correlation obtained between the amount of mercury exhaled in a standard time period and the body burden by group indicated that breath sampling could be applied as an indicator of the mercury body burden which may not be limited to the mouse.

  15. Growth versus metabolic tissue replacement in mouse tissues determined by stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macavoy, S. E.; Jamil, T.; Macko, S. A.; Arneson, L. S.

    2003-12-01

    Stable isotope analysis is becoming an extensively used tool in animal ecology. The isotopes most commonly used for analysis in terrestrial systems are those of carbon and nitrogen, due to differential carbon fractionation in C3 and C4 plants, and the approximately 3‰ enrichment in 15N per trophic level. Although isotope signatures in animal tissues presumably reflect the local food web, analysis is often complicated by differential nutrient routing and fractionation by tissues, and by the possibility that large organisms are not in isotopic equilibrium with the foods available in their immediate environment. Additionally, the rate at which organisms incorporate the isotope signature of a food through both growth and metabolic tissue replacement is largely unknown. In this study we have assessed the rate of carbon and nitrogen isotopic turnover in liver, muscle and blood in mice following a diet change. By determining growth rates, we were able to determine the proportion of tissue turnover caused by growth versus that caused by metabolic tissue replacement. Growth was found to account for approximately 10% of observed tissue turnover in sexually mature mice (Mus musculus). Blood carbon was found to have the shortest half-life (16.9 days), followed by muscle (24.7 days). Liver carbon turnover was not as well described by the exponential decay equations as other tissues. However, substantial liver carbon turnover was observed by the 28th day after diet switch. Surprisingly, these tissues primarily reflect the carbon signature of the protein, rather than carbohydrate, source in their diet. The nitrogen signature in all tissues was enriched by 3 - 5‰ over their dietary protein source, depending on tissue type, and the isotopic turnover rates were comparable to those observed in carbon.

  16. Environmental enrichment modulates cortico-cortical interactions in the mouse.

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    Angelo Di Garbo

    Full Text Available Environmental enrichment (EE is an experimental protocol based on a complex sensorimotor stimulation that dramatically affects brain development. While it is widely believed that the effects of EE result from the unique combination of different sensory and motor stimuli, it is not known whether and how cortico-cortical interactions are shaped by EE. Since the primary visual cortex (V1 is one of the best characterized targets of EE, we looked for direct cortico-cortical projections impinging on V1, and we identified a direct monosynaptic connection between motor cortex and V1 in the mouse brain. To measure the interactions between these areas under standard and EE rearing conditions, we used simultaneous recordings of local field potentials (LFPs in awake, freely moving animals. LFP signals were analyzed by using different methods of linear and nonlinear analysis of time series (cross-correlation, mutual information, phase synchronization. We found that EE decreases the level of coupling between the electrical activities of the two cortical regions with respect to the control group. From a functional point of view, our results indicate, for the first time, that an enhanced sensorimotor experience impacts on the brain by affecting the functional crosstalk between different cortical areas.

  17. Strain typing of classical scrapie by transgenic mouse bioassay using protein misfolding cyclic amplification to replace primary passage.

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    Katy E Beck

    Full Text Available According to traditional murine bioassay methodology, prions must be serially passaged within a new host before a stable phenotype, and therefore a strain, can be assigned. Prions often transmit with difficulty from one species to another; a property termed the transmission barrier. Transgenic mouse lines that over express prion protein (PrP genes of different species can circumvent the transmission barrier but serial passages may still be required, particularly if unknown strains are encountered. Here we sought to investigate whether protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA, an in-vitro method of PrP(Sc replication, could be used to replace serial passage of VRQ/VRQ classical scrapie isolates undergoing strain typing in ovine transgenic tg338 mice. Two classical scrapie field isolates that do not readily transmit to wild-type mice underwent bioassay in tg338 mice pre- and post- PMCA and the phenotype of disease in inoculated mice was compared. For one of the sources investigated, the PMCA product gave rise to the same disease phenotypes in tg338 mice as traditional bioassay, as indicated by lesion profile, IHC analysis and Western blot, whilst the second source produced phenotypic characteristics which were not identical with those that arose through traditional bioassay. These data show that differences in the efficiency of PMCA as a strain-typing tool may vary between ovine classical scrapie isolates and therefore suggest that the ability of PMCA to replace serial passage of classical scrapie in tg338 mice may depend on the strain present in the initial source.

  18. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in a Patient With a Previous Bioprosthetic Mitral Valve Replacement: Report of a Delayed Fatal Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, Frédéric; Lamarche, Yoan; Le, Van Hoai Viet; Doucet, Michel; Roméo, Philippe; Généreux, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    We report on a man with bioprosthetic mitral valve perforation who presented late after transcatheter aortic valve replacement with a balloon-expandable transcatheter heart valve (THV). The protrusion of the commissural strut of the bioprosthetic mitral valve coupled with the low implanted THV resulted in repetitive trauma leading to rupture of a mitral leaflet. Potential preventive strategies are discussed. This case illustrates the importance of preprocedural imaging screening and cautious THV deployment in patients with a bioprosthetic mitral valve.

  19. A Hilbert Space setting for higher spin interactions which replaces Gauge Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Schroer, Bert

    2014-01-01

    The recently discovered Hilbert space description of renormalizable interactions of higher spin (equal or bigger than 1) fields requires to replace the pointlocal s=1 vectorpotentials of indefinite metric (Krein space) BRST gauge theory by their stringlike counterpart in Hilbert space. It is shown that the Hilbert space positivity leads to new properties outside the conceptual range of the gauge theoretic description: topological aspects of Wilson loops, induced normalization terms (in particular Mexican hat type potentials for massive vectormesons coupled to Hermitian scalar field) and a possible role of string-localization in confinerment and "darkness".

  20. Does interaction matter? Testing whether a confidence heuristic can replace interaction in collective decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Dan; Fusaroli, Riccardo; Tylén, Kristian; Olsen, Karsten; Latham, Peter E; Lau, Jennifer Y F; Roepstorff, Andreas; Rees, Geraint; Frith, Chris D; Bahrami, Bahador

    2014-05-01

    In a range of contexts, individuals arrive at collective decisions by sharing confidence in their judgements. This tendency to evaluate the reliability of information by the confidence with which it is expressed has been termed the 'confidence heuristic'. We tested two ways of implementing the confidence heuristic in the context of a collective perceptual decision-making task: either directly, by opting for the judgement made with higher confidence, or indirectly, by opting for the faster judgement, exploiting an inverse correlation between confidence and reaction time. We found that the success of these heuristics depends on how similar individuals are in terms of the reliability of their judgements and, more importantly, that for dissimilar individuals such heuristics are dramatically inferior to interaction. Interaction allows individuals to alleviate, but not fully resolve, differences in the reliability of their judgements. We discuss the implications of these findings for models of confidence and collective decision-making.

  1. Interaction of Mouse Pem Protein and Cell Division Cycle 37 Homolog

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fen GUO; Yue-Qin LI; Shi-Qian LI; Zhi-Wen LUO; Xin ZHANG; Dong-Sheng TANG; Tian-Hong ZHOU

    2005-01-01

    Mouse Pem, a homeobox gene, encodes a protein consisting of 210 amino acid residues. To study the function of mouse Pem protein, we used the yeast two-hybrid system to screen the library of 7-day mouse embryo with full-length mouse Pem eDNA. Fifty-two colonies were obtained after 1.57×108 colonies were screened by nutrition limitation and β-galactosidase assay. Seven individual insert fragments were obtained from the library, and three of them were identified, one of which was confirmed to be the cell division cycle 37 (Cdc37) homolog gene by sequencing. The interaction between mouse Pem and Cdc37homolog was then confirmed by glutathione S-transferase pull-down assay, and the possible interaction model was suggested.

  2. A replacement of the active-site aspartic acid residue 293 in mouse cathepsin D affects its intracellular stability, processing and transport in HEK-293 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partanen, Sanna; Storch, Stephan; Löffler, Hans-Gerhard; Hasilik, Andrej; Tyynelä, Jaana; Braulke, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    The substitution of an active-site aspartic acid residue by asparagine in the lysosomal protease cathepsin D (CTSD) results in a loss of enzyme activity and severe cerebrocortical atrophy in a novel form of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis in sheep [Tyynelä, Sohar, Sleat, Gin, Donnelly, Baumann, Haltia and Lobel (2000) EMBO J. 19, 2786-2792]. In the present study we have introduced the corresponding mutation by replacing aspartic acid residue 293 with asparagine (D293N) into the mouse CTSD cDNA to analyse its effect on synthesis, transport and stability in transfected HEK-293 cells. The complete inactivation of mutant D293N mouse CTSD was confirmed by a newly developed fluorimetric quantification system. Moreover, in the heterologous overexpression systems used, mutant D293N mouse CTSD was apparently unstable and proteolytically modified during early steps of the secretory pathway, resulting in a loss of mass by about 1 kDa. In the affected sheep, the endogenous mutant enzyme was stable but also showed the shift in its molecular mass. In HEK-293 cells, the transport of the mutant D293N mouse CTSD to the lysosome was delayed and associated with a low secretion rate compared with wild-type CTSD. These data suggest that the mutation may result in a conformational change which affects stability, processing and transport of the enzyme. PMID:12350228

  3. Inhibition of β-catenin/p300 interaction proximalizes mouse embryonic lung epithelium

    OpenAIRE

    Sasaki, Tomoyo; Kahn, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been suggested to regulate proximal-distal determination of embryonic lung epithelium based upon genetically modified mouse models. The previously identified and characterized small molecule inhibitor IQ1 can pharmacologically decrease the interaction between β-catenin and its transcriptional coactivator p300, thereby enhancing the β-catenin/CBP interaction. Inhibition of the β-catenin/p300 interaction by IQ1 blocks the differentiation of embryonic stem ...

  4. Interaction of HEPES buffer with glass-ceramic scaffold: Can HEPES replace TRIS in SBF?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohanová, Dana; Horkavcová, Diana; Paidere, Laine; Boccaccini, Aldo Roberto; Bozděchová, Pavlína; Bezdička, Petr

    2016-11-27

    An international standard (ISO: 23317:2014) exists for the in vitro testing of inorganic biomaterials in simulated body fluid (SBF). This standard uses TRIS buffer to maintain neutral pH in SBF, but in our previous paper, we showed that the interaction of a tested glass-ceramic material with TRIS can produce false-positive results. In this study, we evaluated whether the HEPES buffer, which also belongs to the group of Good's buffers, would be more suitable for SBF. We compared its suitability in two media: SBF with HEPES and demineralized water with HEPES. The tested scaffold (45S5 bioactive glass-based) was exposed to the media under a static-dynamic arrangement (solutions were replaced on a daily basis) for 15 days. Leachate samples were collected daily for the analysis of Ca(2+) ions and Si (AAS), (PO4 )(3-) ions (UV-VIS), and to measure pH. The glass-ceramic scaffold was analyzed by SEM/EDS, XRD, and WD-XRF before and after 0.3, 1, 3, 7, 11, and 15 days of exposure. Our results confirmed the rapid selective dissolution of the glass-ceramic crystalline phase (Combeite) containing Ca(2+) ions due to the presence of HEPES, hydroxyapatite supersaturation being reached within 24 h in both solutions. These new results suggest that, like TRIS, HEPES buffer is not suitable for the in vitro testing of highly reactive inorganic biomaterials (glass, glass-ceramics). The ISO standard for such tests requires revision, but HEPES is not a viable alternative to TRIS buffer. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2016.

  5. Analysis of Presenilin 1 and 2 interacting proteins in mouse cerebral cortex during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashish; Thakur, M K

    2014-11-01

    In our previous report, we showed that Presenilin (PS)1 and 2 have differential expression profile from early embryonic stages till adulthood in mouse cerebral cortex, suggesting that both of these proteins are crucial for brain development. Genetic manipulation studies have also shown the involvement of PS1 in brain development, but PS2 remains largely unexplored. In order to understand how PS1 and 2 mediate developmental functions, we have investigated the interaction of PS1 and 2 with proteins of mouse cerebral cortex during development. Co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) combined with MALDI-MS/MS analysis revealed 12 interacting partners of PS1 and 11 partners of PS2. The interacting proteins were different for PS1 and 2, and involved in cell division, glycolysis, cell adhesion and protein trafficking. Densitometric analysis of protein bands visualized after SDS-PAGE separation of Co-IP proteins revealed variation in their amount and degree of interaction during different developmental stages of mice. Further, immunoblot based validation of PS1 interacting protein Notch-1 showed maximum interaction at embryonic day (E) 12.5, decline at E18.5, upregulation from postnatal day 0 (P0) to P20 and thereafter reduction at P45 and 20 weeks. In-silico analysis of PS and its interacting proteins indicated conformation based interaction through common type of secondary structures having alpha helical, extended beta strand and random coil, and CK2, PKC phosphorylation and myristoylation motifs. Taken together, our study showed that PS1 and PS2 interact to varying extent with different proteins of mouse cerebral cortex and suggests their interaction based on specific conformation and involvement in diverse functions essential for the brain development.

  6. Beyond Mouse and Keyboard: Expanding Design Considerations for Information Visualization Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bongshin; Isenberg, P; Riche, N H; Carpendale, S

    2012-12-01

    The importance of interaction to Information Visualization (InfoVis) and, in particular, of the interplay between interactivity and cognition is widely recognized [12, 15, 32, 55, 70]. This interplay, combined with the demands from increasingly large and complex datasets, is driving the increased significance of interaction in InfoVis. In parallel, there have been rapid advances in many facets of interaction technologies. However, InfoVis interactions have yet to take full advantage of these new possibilities in interaction technologies, as they largely still employ the traditional desktop, mouse, and keyboard setup of WIMP (Windows, Icons, Menus, and a Pointer) interfaces. In this paper, we reflect more broadly about the role of more "natural" interactions for InfoVis and provide opportunities for future research. We discuss and relate general HCI interaction models to existing InfoVis interaction classifications by looking at interactions from a novel angle, taking into account the entire spectrum of interactions. Our discussion of InfoVis-specific interaction design considerations helps us identify a series of underexplored attributes of interaction that can lead to new, more "natural," interaction techniques for InfoVis.

  7. Cone outer segment morphology and cone function in the Rpe65-/- Nrl-/- mouse retina are amenable to retinoid replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunchithapautham, Kannan; Coughlin, Beth; Crouch, Rosalie K; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2009-10-01

    RPE65, a major retinal pigment epithelium protein, is essential in generating 11-cis retinal, the chromophore for all opsins. Without chromophore, cone opsins are mislocalized and cones degenerate rapidly (e.g., Rpe65(-/-) mouse). Function, survival, and correct targeting of opsins is increased in Rpe65(-/-) cones on supplying 11-cis retinal. Here, we determine the consequences of 11-cis retinal withdrawal and supplementation on cone development in the all-cone Nrl(-/-) retina. Rpe65(-/-) Nrl(-/-), Nrl(-/-), and wild-type mice were examined. Cone structure was analyzed by using TUNEL assay, electron microscopy, and cone-specific antibodies. Cone function was assessed with light-adapted single-flash ERGs. Rpe65(-/-)Nrl(-/-) mice had an increased number of TUNEL-positive photoreceptors during programmed cell death compared with Nrl(-/-) mice, in addition to accelerated age-related degeneration. Cone function in Rpe65(-/-)Nrl(-/-) mice was minimal, and opsins were mislocalized. Treatment with 11-cis retinal restored cone function, promoted outer segment formation, and enabled opsin trafficking to outer segments. Eliminating Rpe65 prevented rosette formation in Nrl(-/-) retinas; supplementation of Rpe65(-/-)Nrl(-/-) mice with 11-cis retinal resulted in their reoccurrence. Taken together, function and opsin trafficking in Nrl(-/-) and wild-type cones are comparable, confirming and extending our findings that cone maturation and outer segment development are dependent on the presence of chromophore. The data on age-related cone death in Rpe65(-/-)Nrl(-/-) mice and the reintroduction of rosettes after 11-cis retinal injections confirm that outer segments, which for steric reasons appear to introduce rosettes in an all-cone retina, are essential for cell survival. These results are important for understanding and treating chromophore-related cone dystrophies.

  8. Hi-C Chromatin Interaction Networks Predict Co-expression in the Mouse Cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sepideh Babaei

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The three dimensional conformation of the genome in the cell nucleus influences important biological processes such as gene expression regulation. Recent studies have shown a strong correlation between chromatin interactions and gene co-expression. However, predicting gene co-expression from frequent long-range chromatin interactions remains challenging. We address this by characterizing the topology of the cortical chromatin interaction network using scale-aware topological measures. We demonstrate that based on these characterizations it is possible to accurately predict spatial co-expression between genes in the mouse cortex. Consistent with previous findings, we find that the chromatin interaction profile of a gene-pair is a good predictor of their spatial co-expression. However, the accuracy of the prediction can be substantially improved when chromatin interactions are described using scale-aware topological measures of the multi-resolution chromatin interaction network. We conclude that, for co-expression prediction, it is necessary to take into account different levels of chromatin interactions ranging from direct interaction between genes (i.e. small-scale to chromatin compartment interactions (i.e. large-scale.

  9. DISC1 mouse models as a tool to decipher gene-environment interactions in psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler eCash-Padgett

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available DISC1 was discovered in a Scottish pedigree in which a chromosomal translocation that breaks this gene segregates with psychiatric disorders, mainly depression and schizophrenia. Linkage and association studies in diverse populations support DISC1 as a susceptibility gene to a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders. Many Disc1 mouse models have been generated to study its neuronal functions. These mouse models display variable phenotypes, some of them relevant to schizophrenia, others to depression.The Disc1 mouse models are popular genetic models for studying gene-environment interactions in schizophrenia. Five different Disc1 models have been combined with environmental factors. The environmental stressors employed can be classified as either early immune activation or later social paradigms. These studies cover major time points along the neurodevelopmental trajectory: prenatal, early postnatal, adolescence, and adulthood. Various combinations of molecular, anatomical and behavioral methods have been used to assess the outcomes. Additionally, three of the studies sought to rescue the resulting abnormalities.Here we provide background on the environmental paradigms used, summarize the results of these studies combining Disc1 mouse models with environmental stressors and discuss what we can learn and how to proceed. A major question is how the genetic and environmental factors determine which psychiatric disorder will be clinically manifested. To address this we can take advantage of the many Disc1 models available and expose them to the same environmental stressor. The complementary experiment would be to expose the same model to different environmental stressors. DISC1 is an ideal gene for this approach, since in the Scottish pedigree the same chromosomal translocation results in different psychiatric conditions.

  10. Interactions of stiripentol with clobazam and valproate in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luszczki, Jarogniew J; Trojnar, Michal K; Ratnaraj, Neville; Patsalos, Philip N; Czuczwar, Stanislaw J

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the anticonvulsant effects of stiripentol (STP) in combination with clobazam [CLB], and valproate [VPA]) in the mouse maximal electroshock (MES)-induced seizure model using the type I isobolographic analysis for parallel and non-parallel dose-response relationship curves (DRRCs). Potential adverse-effect profiles of interactions of STP with CLB and VPA at the fixed-ratio of 1:1 in the MES test with respect to motor performance, long-term memory and skeletal muscular strength were measured along with total brain antiepileptic drug concentrations. In the mouse MES model, STP administered singly had its DRRC non-parallel to that for CLB and, simultaneously, parallel to that for VPA. With type I isobolography for parallel DRRCs, the combinations of STP with VPA at three fixed-ratios of 1:3, 1:1 and 3:1 exerted sub-additive (antagonistic) interaction. Isobolography for non-parallel DRRCs revealed that the combination of STP with CLB at the fixed-ratio of 1:1 produced additive interaction. For all combinations, neither motor coordination, long-term memory nor muscular strength was affected. Total brain antiepileptic drug concentrations revealed bi-direction changes with the most profound being an 18.6-fold increase in CLB by STP and a 2.3-fold increase in STP by VPA. In conclusion, the additive interaction between STP and CLB was associated with a concurrent pharmacokinetic interaction and these data may explain the clinical efficacy seen with this combination. In contrast, the antagonism between STP and VPA was surprising since synergism is observed clinically.

  11. Direct interaction of the mouse cytomegalovirus m152/gp40 immunoevasin with RAE-1 isoforms†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Li; Mans, Janet; Paskow, Michael J.; Brown, Patrick H.; Schuck, Peter; Jonjić, Stipan; Natarajan, Kannan; Margulies, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Cytomegaloviruses (CMVs) are ubiquitous species-specific viruses that establish acute, persistent, and latent infections. Both human and mouse CMVs encode proteins that inhibit the activation of natural killer (NK) cells by downregulating cellular ligands for the NK cell activating receptor, NKG2D. The MCMV glycoprotein m152/gp40 downregulates the surface expression of RAE-1 in order to avoid NK cell control in vivo. So far it is unclear if there is a direct interaction between m152 and RAE-1, and if so, if m152 interacts differentially with the five identified RAE-1 isoforms, which are expressed as two groups in MCMV-susceptible or resistant mouse strains. To address these questions, we expressed and purified the extracellular domains of RAE-1 and m152, and performed size exclusion chromatography binding assays as well as analytical ultracentrifugation and isothermal titration calorimetry to characterize these interactions quantitatively. We further evaluated the role of full-length and naturally glycosylated m152 and RAE-1 in cotransfected HEK293T cells. Our results confirmed that m152 binds RAE-1 directly, relatively tightly (Kd RAE-1 isoforms, corresponding to the susceptibility to downregulation by m152. A PLWY motif found in RAE-1β, although contributing to its affinity for m152, does not influence the affinity of RAE-1 γ or δ, suggesting that other differences contribute to the RAE-1/m152 interaction. Molecular modeling of the different RAE-1 isoforms suggests a potential site for the m152 interaction. PMID:20166740

  12. Direct interaction of the mouse cytomegalovirus m152/gp40 immunoevasin with RAE-1 isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Li; Mans, Janet; Paskow, Michael J; Brown, Patrick H; Schuck, Peter; Jonjić, Stipan; Natarajan, Kannan; Margulies, David H

    2010-03-23

    Cytomegaloviruses (CMVs) are ubiquitous species-specific viruses that establish acute, persistent, and latent infections. Both human and mouse CMVs encode proteins that inhibit the activation of natural killer (NK) cells by downregulating cellular ligands for the NK cell activating receptor, NKG2D. The MCMV glycoprotein m152/gp40 downregulates the surface expression of RAE-1 to prevent NK cell control in vivo. So far, it is unclear if there is a direct interaction between m152 and RAE-1 and, if so, if m152 interacts differentially with the five identified RAE-1 isoforms, which are expressed as two groups in MCMV-susceptible or -resistant mouse strains. To address these questions, we expressed and purified the extracellular domains of RAE-1 and m152 and performed size exclusion chromatography binding assays as well as analytical ultracentrifugation and isothermal titration calorimetry to characterize these interactions quantitatively. We further evaluated the role of full-length and naturally glycosylated m152 and RAE-1 in cotransfected HEK293T cells. Our results confirmed that m152 binds RAE-1 directly, relatively tightly (K(d) RAE-1 isoforms, corresponding to the susceptibility to downregulation by m152. A PLWY motif found in RAE-1beta, although contributing to its affinity for m152, does not influence the affinity of RAE-1gamma or RAE-1delta, suggesting that other differences contribute to the RAE-1-m152 interaction. Molecular modeling of the different RAE-1 isoforms suggests a potential site for the m152 interaction.

  13. Cognitive deficits and disruption of neurogenesis in a mouse model of apolipoprotein E4 domain interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeosun, Samuel O; Hou, Xu; Zheng, Baoying; Stockmeier, Craig; Ou, Xiaoming; Paul, Ian; Mosley, Thomas; Weisgraber, Karl; Wang, Jun Ming

    2014-01-31

    Apolipoprotein E4 (apoE4) allele is the major genetic risk factor for sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD) due to the higher prevalence and earlier onset of AD in apoE4 carriers. Accumulating data suggest that the interaction between the N- and the C-terminal domains in the protein may be the main pathologic feature of apoE4. To test this hypothesis, we used Arg-61 mice, a model of apoE4 domain interaction, by introducing the domain interaction feature of human apoE4 into native mouse apoE. We carried out hippocampus-dependent learning and memory tests and related cellular and molecular assays on 12- and 3-month-old Arg-61 and age-matched background C57BL/6J mice. Learning and memory task performance were impaired in Arg-61 mice at both old and young ages compared with C57BL/6J mice. Surprisingly, young Arg-61 mice had more mitotic doublecortin-positive cells in the subgranular zone; mRNA levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and TrkB were also higher in 3-month-old Arg-61 hippocampus compared with C57BL/6J mice. These early-age neurotrophic and neurogenic (proliferative) effects in the Arg-61 mouse may be an inadequate compensatory but eventually detrimental attempt by the system to "repair" itself. This is supported by the higher cleaved caspase-3 levels in the young animals that not only persisted, but increased in old age, and the lower levels of doublecortin at old age in the hippocampus of Arg-61 mice. These results are consistent with human apoE4-dependent cognitive and neuro-pathologic changes, supporting the principal role of domain interaction in the pathologic effect of apoE4. Domain interaction is, therefore, a viable therapeutic/prophylactic target for cognitive impairment and AD in apoE4 subjects.

  14. Mouse Social Interaction Test (MoST): a quantitative computer automated analysis of behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanos, Panayotis K; Restif, Christophe; O'Rourke, Joseph R; Lam, Chiu Yin; Metaxas, Dimitris

    2017-01-01

    Rodents are the most commonly used preclinical model of human disease assessing the mechanism(s) involved as well as the role of genetics, epigenetics, and pharmacotherapy on this disease as well as identifying vulnerability factors and risk assessment for disease critical in the development of improved treatment strategies. Unfortunately, the majority of rodent preclinical studies utilize single housed approaches where animals are either entirely housed and tested in solitary environments or group housed but tested in solitary environments. This approach, however, ignores the important contribution of social interaction and social behavior. Social interaction in rodents is found to be a major criterion for the ethological validity of rodent species-specific behavioral characteristics (Zurn et al. 2007; Analysis 2011). It is also well established that there is significant and growing number of reports, which illustrates the important role of social environment and social interaction in all diseases, with particularly significance in all neuropsychiatric diseases. Thus, it is imperative that research studies be able to add large-scale evaluations of social interaction and behavior in mice and benefit from automated tracking of behaviors and measurements by removing user bias and by quantifying aspects of behaviors that cannot be assessed by a human observer. Single mouse setups have been used routinely, but cannot be easily extended to multiple-animal studies where social behavior is key, e.g., autism, depression, anxiety, substance and non-substance addictive disorders, aggression, sexual behavior, or parenting. While recent efforts are focusing on multiple-animal tracking alone, a significant limitation remains the lack of insightful measures of social interactions. We present a novel, non-invasive single camera-based automated tracking method described as Mouse Social Test (MoST) and set of measures designed for estimating the interactions of multiple mice at the

  15. Investigation on Molecular Non-covalent Interaction in the Sodium Dodecyl Benzene Sulfonatepolychrome Blue B-protein Replacement Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO,Hong-Wen(郜洪文); WU,Ji-Rong(邬继荣); SHEN,Rong(沈荣)

    2004-01-01

    The molecular non-covalent interaction often originates from the electrostatic attraction and accords with the Langmuir isothermal adsorption. The sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS)-polychrome blue B (PCB)-protein [bovine serum albumin (BSA), ovalbumin (OVA) and myoglobin (MB)] ternary reaction has been investigated at Ph 3.88. Protein to replace PCB from the PCB-SDBS binding product was used to characterize the assembly of an invisible-spectral compound, SDBS, on proteins by measuring the variation of PCB light-absorption by the microsurface adsorption-spectral correction (MSASC) technique. The effect of ionic strength and temperature on the aggregation was studied. Results showed that the aggregates SDBS92·BSA, SDBS58·OVA and SDBS15·MB at 30 ℃ and SDBS83·BSA, SDBS39·OVA and SDBS10·MB at 50 ℃ are formed.

  16. Genetic variation in mu-opioid-receptor-interacting proteins and smoking cessation in a nicotine replacement therapy trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Riju; Jepson, Christopher; Wileyto, E Paul; Dahl, John P; Patterson, Freda; Rukstalis, Margaret; Pinto, Angela; Berrettini, Wade; Lerman, Caryn

    2007-11-01

    Extending a previous finding of an association between functional genetic variation in the mu-opioid receptor gene and response to nicotine replacement therapy, we explored the role of genetic variants in two genes encoding mu-opioid-receptor-interacting proteins, namely ARRB2 and HINT1. Participants were 374 smokers treated for nicotine dependence with either transdermal nicotine or nicotine nasal spray for 8 weeks in an open-label randomized trial. In a logistic regression model controlling for OPRM1 genotype, treatment type, and other covariates, we found no significant main effect of ARRB2 genotype on abstinence at either end of treatment or 6-month follow-up. Participants with the HINT1 TT genotype had significantly higher abstinence rates at 6-month follow-up, but this may not be a pharmacogenetic effect, given that the participants were drug free during this time. Haplotype analysis did not reveal any significant associations for either gene. We found an interaction of ARRB2 and OPRM1 genotype on abstinence at 6 months that approached significance; however, interpretation of this finding is limited by the small number of participants with the minor alleles for both genes. Although these data do not provide support for the role of genetic variation in these mu-opioid-receptor-interacting proteins and smoking cessation, further exploration of opioid pathway genes in larger prospective pharmacogenetic trials may be warranted.

  17. Dyadic social interaction of C57BL/6 mice versus interaction with a toy mouse: conditioned place preference/aversion, substrain differences, and no development of a hierarchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Barbara S; Seidl, Simon S; Habazettl, Eva; Gruber, Bernadette E; Bregolin, Tanja; Zernig, Gerald

    2016-04-01

    Impaired social interaction is a hallmark symptom of many psychiatric diseases, including dependence syndromes (substance use disorders). Helping the addict reorient her/his behavior away from the drug of abuse toward social interaction would be of considerable therapeutic benefit. To study the neural basis of such a reorientation, we have developed several animal models in which the attractiveness of a dyadic (i.e. one-to-one) social interaction (DSI) can be compared directly with that of cocaine as a prototypical drug of abuse. Our models are based on the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm. In an ongoing effort to validate our experimental paradigms in C57BL/6 mice to make use of the plethora of transgenic models available in this genus, we found the following: (a) DSI with a live mouse produced CPP, whereas an interaction with an inanimate mouse-like object (i.e. a 'toy mouse'; toy mouse interaction) led to conditioned place aversion - but only in the Jackson substrain (C57BL/6J). (b) In the NIH substrain (C57BL/6N), both DSI and toy mouse interaction produced individual aversion in more than 50% of the tested mice. (c) Four 15 min DSI episodes did not result in the development of an observable hierarchy, that is, dominance/subordination behavior in the overwhelming majority (i.e. 30 of 32) of the tested Jackson mouse pairs. Therefore, dominance/subordination does not seem to be a confounding variable in our paradigm, at least not in C57BL/6J mice. Respective data for NIH mice were too limited to allow any conclusion. The present findings indicate that (a) DSI with a live mouse produces CPP to a greater degree than an interaction with an inanimate object resembling a mouse and that (b) certain substrain differences with respect to CPP/aversion to DSI do exist between the Jax and NIH substrain of C57BL/6 mice. These differences have to be considered when choosing a proper mouse substrain model for investigating the neural basis of DSI reward versus

  18. Coordination of tooth morphogenesis and neuronal development through tissue interactions: lessons from mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luukko, Keijo; Kettunen, Päivi

    2014-07-15

    In addition to being an advantageous model to investigate general molecular mechanisms of organ formation, the tooth is a distinct target organ for peripheral nerve innervation. These nerves are required for the function and protection of the teeth and, as shown in fish, also for their regeneration. This review focuses on recent findings of the local tissue interactions and molecular signaling mechanisms that regulate the early nerve arrival and patterning of mouse mandibular molar tooth sensory innervation. Dental sensory nerve growth and patterning is a stepwise process that is intimately linked to advancing tooth morphogenesis. In particular, nerve growth factor and semaphorin 3A serve as essential functions during and are iteratively used at different stages of tooth innervation. The tooth germ controls development of its own nerve supply, and similar to the development of the tooth organ proper, tissue interactions between dental epithelial and mesenchymal tissues control the establishment of tooth innervation. Tgf-β, Wnt, and Fgf signaling, which regulate tooth formation, are implicated to mediate these interactions. Therefore, tissue interactions mediated by conserved signal families may constitute key mechanism for the integration of tooth organogenesis and development of its peripheral nerve supply. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Gabapentin synergistically interacts with topiramate in the mouse maximal electroshock seizure model: an isobolographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luszczki, Jarogniew J; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2006-01-01

    The anticonvulsant effects produced by topiramate (TPM) and gabapentin (GBP)--two second-generation antiepileptic drugs, in numerous fixed-ratio combinations of 8:1, 4:1, 2:1, 1:1, 1:2, 1:4 and 1:8 were examined by isobolographic analysis in the mouse maximal electroshock seizure (MES) model. Results indicate that the combinations of TPM and GBP at the fixed-ratios of 2:1, 1:1, 1:2, 1:4 and 1:8 resulted in supra-additive (synergistic) interaction against MES-induced seizures. Moreover, the combinations of TPM and GBP (at their median effective doses) did not affect motor performance of animals challenged with the chimney test and had no impact on neuromuscular tone in the grip-strength test. Additionally, GBP had no impact on total brain TPM concentrations, and simultaneously, TPM did not alter brain GBP concentrations, indicating that the interaction between drugs was pharmacodynamic in nature. In conclusion, supra-additive interaction of TPM with GBP against MES-induced seizures, lack of motor coordination and neuromuscular tone impairments as well as lack of pharmacokinetic interactions between TPM and GBP in preclinical study, strongly support the combined application of both antiepileptic drugs in patients with refractory partial epilepsy.

  20. Isobolographic Analysis of the Interaction Between Tapentadol and Ketorolac in a Mouse Model of Visceral Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata-Morales, Juan R; Aragon-Martinez, Othoniel H; Adriana Soto-Castro, Tely; Alonso-Castro, Ángel J; Castañeda-Santana, Demian I; Isiordia-Espinoza, Mario A

    2016-06-01

    Preclinical Research The aim of this experimental assay was to assess the antinociceptive interaction between tapentadol and ketorolac in the acetic acid-induced writhing model in mice. Tapentadol (5.62-31.6 mg/kg ip) or ketorolac (5.62-31.6 mg/kg ip) were administered 15 min before the acetic acid administration. The ED50 values of the individual drugs were determined and different proportions (tapentadol-ketorolac in 1:1, 3:1, and 1:3) were assayed in combination in the writhing test. Isobolographic analysis and the interaction index demonstrated an antinociceptive synergistic interaction between tapentadol and ketorolac in all combination. Thus, the experimental ED50 values were lower when compared with their theoretical ED50 values. These data suggest that the tapentadol-ketorolac combination produces an antinociceptive synergistic interaction in the mouse acetic acid-induced writhing model. Drug Dev Res 77 : 187-191, 2016.   © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Inverse association of female hormone replacement therapy with age-related macular degeneration and interactions with ARMS2 polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Digna R Velez; Gallins, Paul; Polk, Monica; Ayala-Haedo, Juan; Schwartz, Stephen G; Kovach, Jaclyn L; Spencer, Kylee; Wang, Gaofeng; Agarwal, Anita; Postel, Eric A; Haines, Jonathan L; Pericak-Vance, Margaret; Scott, William K

    2010-04-01

    Purpose. To investigate whether female reproductive history and hormone replacement therapy (HRT) or birth control pills (BCPs) influence risk for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and whether genetic factors interact with HRT to modulate AMD risk. Methods. Related and unrelated female participants (n = 799) were examined and data were analyzed with generalized estimating equations with adjustment for age and smoking. Individuals with AMD grades 1 to 2 were considered to be unaffected (n = 239) and those with grades 3 to 5 were considered affected (n = 560). Results. When comparing all cases with controls, significant inverse associations were observed for HRT (odds ratio [OR] = 0.65, 95% CI 0.48-0.90, P = 0.008) and BCPs (OR = 0.60, 95% CI 0.36-0.10, P = 0.048). When analyses were stratified by AMD severity (early versus geographic atrophy versus neovascular), the inverse association remained significant (HRT OR = 0.45, 95% CI 0.30-0.66, P control. All pair-wise HRT-genotype and BCP-genotype interactions were examined, to determine whether HRT or BCP modifies the effect of established genetic risk factors. The strongest interactions were observed for HRT x ARMS2 coding SNP (R73H) rs10490923 (P = 0.007) and HRT x ARMS2 intronic SNP rs17623531 (P = 0.019). Conclusions. These findings provide the first evidence suggesting that ARMS2 interacts with HRT to modulate AMD risk and are consistent with previous reports demonstrating a protective relationship between exogenous estrogen use and neovascular AMD. These results highlight the genetic and environmental complexity of the etiologic architecture of AMD; however, further replication is necessary to validate them.

  2. Mouse Models of Hepatitis B Virus Infection Comprising Host-Virus Immunologic Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadashi Inuzuka

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV infection is one of the most prevalent infectious diseases associated with various human liver diseases, including acute, fulminant and chronic hepatitis; liver cirrhosis; and hepatocellular carcinoma. Despite the availability of an HBV vaccine and the development of antiviral therapies, there are still more than 350 million chronically infected people worldwide, approximately 5% of the world population. To understand the virus biology and pathogenesis in HBV-infected patients, several animal models have been developed to mimic hepatic HBV infection and the immune response against HBV, but the narrow host range of HBV infection and lack of a full immune response spectrum in animal models remain significant limitations. Accumulating evidence obtained from studies using a variety of mouse models that recapitulate hepatic HBV infection provides several clues for understanding host-virus immunologic interactions during HBV infection, whereas the determinants of the immune response required for HBV clearance are poorly defined. Therefore, adequate mouse models are urgently needed to elucidate the mechanism of HBV elimination and identify novel targets for antiviral therapies.

  3. Macroglia-Microglia Interactions via TSPO Signaling Regulates Microglial Activation in the Mouse Retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Minhua; Wang, Xu; Zhao, Lian; Ma, Wenxin; Rodriguez, Ignacio R.; Fariss, Robert N.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic retinal inflammation in the form of activated microglia and macrophages are implicated in the etiology of neurodegenerative diseases of the retina, including age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma. However, molecular biomarkers and targeted therapies for immune cell activation in these disorders are currently lacking. To address this, we investigated the involvement and role of translocator protein (TSPO), a biomarker of microglial and astrocyte gliosis in brain degeneration, in the context of retinal inflammation. Here, we find that TSPO is acutely and specifically upregulated in retinal microglia in separate mouse models of retinal inflammation and injury. Concomitantly, its endogenous ligand, diazepam-binding inhibitor (DBI), is upregulated in the macroglia of the mouse retina such as astrocytes and Müller cells. In addition, we discover that TSPO-mediated signaling in microglia via DBI-derived ligands negatively regulates features of microglial activation, including reactive oxygen species production, TNF-α expression and secretion, and microglial proliferation. The inducibility and effects of DBI-TSPO signaling in the retina reveal a mechanism of coordinated macroglia-microglia interactions, the function of which is to limit the magnitude of inflammatory responses after their initiation, facilitating a return to baseline quiescence. Our results indicate that TSPO is a promising molecular marker for imaging inflammatory cell activation in the retina and highlight DBI-TSPO signaling as a potential target for immodulatory therapies. PMID:24599476

  4. AMPAKINE enhancement of social interaction in the BTBR mouse model of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, J L; Oliver, C F; Karras, M N; Gastrell, P T; Crawley, J N

    2013-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder in which the first diagnostic symptom is unusual reciprocal social interactions. Approximately half of the children diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder also have intellectual impairments. General cognitive abilities may be fundamental to many aspects of social cognition. Cognitive enhancers could conceivably be of significant benefit to children and adults with autism. AMPAKINE compounds are a novel class of pharmacological agents that act as positive modulators of AMPA receptors to enhance excitatory glutamatergic neurotransmission. This class of compounds was reported to improve learning and memory in several rodent and non-human primate tasks, and to normalize respiratory abnormalities in a mouse model of Rett syndrome. Here we evaluate the actions of AMPA compounds in adult male and female BTBR mice, a well characterized mouse model of autism. Acute treatment with CX1837 and CX1739 reversed the deficit in sociability in BTBR mice on the most sensitive parameter, time spent sniffing a novel mouse as compared to time spent sniffing a novel object. The less sensitive parameter, time in the chamber containing the novel mouse versus time in the chamber containing the novel object, was not rescued by CX1837 or CX1739 treatment. Preliminary data with CX546, in which β-cyclodextrin was the vehicle, revealed behavioral effects of the acute intraperitoneal and oral administration of vehicle alone. To circumvent the artifacts introduced by the vehicle administration, we employed a novel treatment regimen using pellets of peanut butter for drug delivery. Absence of vehicle treatment effects when CX1837 and CX1739 were given in the peanut butter pellets, to multiple cohorts of BTBR and B6 control mice, confirmed that the pharmacologically-induced improvements in sociability in BTBR were not confounded by the administration procedures. The highest dose of CX1837 improved the cognitive deficit in novel object recognition in BTBR

  5. Cell interactions in concanavalin A activated cation flux and DNA synthesis of mouse lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T; Kaplan, J G

    1980-01-01

    Co-culture at constant cell density of nude mouse spleen cells (by themselves unresponsive to the T-cell mitogen concanavalin A (Con A)), with congenic T-enriched lymphocyte suspensions and Con A caused anomalously high activation of K+ transport (measured by 86Rb uptake) and of incorporation...... of thymidine into DNA; the expected dilution of these two responses by nude spleen cells did not occur. However, if the nude splenocytes were added immediately prior to assay to the enriched T cells that had been precultured in presence of Con A, the expected dilution of the activated T-cell responses occurred......; both 86Rb uptake and thymidine incorporation were reduced proportionally to the degree of dilution of the T cells by the nonresponding cells. These data indicate that during co-culture in presence of Con A there is interaction between the T cells, capable of responding to mitogens, and the nude spleen...

  6. Functional interaction between TRP4 and CFTR in mouse aorta endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Droogmans Guy

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study describes the functional interaction between the putative Ca2+ channel TRP4 and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, CFTR, in mouse aorta endothelium (MAEC. Results MAEC cells express CFTR transcripts as shown by RT-PCR analysis. Application of a phosphorylating cocktail activated a Cl- current with characteristics similar to those of CFTR mediated currents in other cells types (slow activation by cAMP, absence of rectification, block by glibenclamide. The current is present in trp4 +/+ MAEC, but not in trp4 -/- cells, although the expression of CFTR seems unchanged in the trp4 deficient cells as judged from RT-PCR analysis. Conclusions It is concluded that TRP4 is necessary for CFTR activation in endothelium, possibly by providing a scaffold for the formation of functional CFTR channels.

  7. Proteins involved in motility and sperm-egg interaction evolve more rapidly in mouse spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicens, Alberto; Lüke, Lena; Roldan, Eduardo R S

    2014-01-01

    Proteomic studies of spermatozoa have identified a large catalog of integral sperm proteins. Rapid evolution of these proteins may underlie adaptive changes of sperm traits involved in different events leading to fertilization, although the selective forces underlying such rapid evolution are not well understood. A variety of selective forces may differentially affect several steps ending in fertilization, thus resulting in a compartmentalized adaptation of sperm proteins. Here we analyzed the evolution of genes associated to various events in the sperm's life, from sperm formation to sperm-egg interaction. Evolutionary analyses were performed on gene sequences from 17 mouse strains whose genomes have been sequenced. Four of these are derived from wild Mus musculus, M. domesticus, M. castaneus and M. spretus. We found a higher proportion of genes exhibiting a signature of positive selection among those related to sperm motility and sperm-egg interaction. Furthermore, sperm proteins involved in sperm-egg interaction exhibited accelerated evolution in comparison to those involved in other events. Thus, we identified a large set of candidate proteins for future comparative analyses of genotype-phenotype associations in spermatozoa of species subjected to different sexual selection pressures. Adaptive evolution of proteins involved in motility could be driven by sperm competition, since this selective force is known to increase the proportion of motile sperm and their swimming velocity. On the other hand, sperm proteins involved in gamete interaction could be coevolving with their egg partners through episodes of sexual selection or sexual conflict resulting in species-specific sperm-egg interactions and barriers preventing interspecies fertilization.

  8. Genetic mapping of social interaction behavior in B6/MSM consomic mouse strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Aki; Tomihara, Kazuya; Shiroishi, Toshihiko; Koide, Tsuyoshi

    2010-05-01

    Genetic studies are indispensable for understanding the mechanisms by which individuals develop differences in social behavior. We report genetic mapping of social interaction behavior using inter-subspecific consomic strains established from MSM/Ms (MSM) and C57BL/6J (B6) mice. Two animals of the same strain and sex, aged 10 weeks, were introduced into a novel open-field for 10 min. Social contact was detected by an automated system when the distance between the centers of the two animals became less than approximately 12 cm. In addition, detailed behavioral observations were made of the males. The wild-derived mouse strain MSM showed significantly longer social contact as compared to B6. Analysis of the consomic panel identified two chromosomes (Chr 6 and Chr 17) with quantitative trait loci (QTL) responsible for lengthened social contact in MSM mice and two chromosomes (Chr 9 and Chr X) with QTL that inhibited social contact. Detailed behavioral analysis of males identified four additional chromosomes associated with social interaction behavior. B6 mice that contained Chr 13 from MSM showed more genital grooming and following than the parental B6 strain, whereas the presence of Chr 8 and Chr 12 from MSM resulted in a reduction of those behaviors. Longer social sniffing was observed in Chr 4 consomic strain than in B6 mice. Although the frequency was low, aggressive behavior was observed in a few pairs from consomic strains for Chrs 4, 13, 15 and 17, as well as from MSM. The social interaction test has been used as a model to measure anxiety, but genetic correlation analysis suggested that social interaction involves different aspects of anxiety than are measured by open-field test.

  9. Interaction between mouse adenovirus type 1 and cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liesbeth Lenaerts

    Full Text Available Application of human adenovirus type 5 (Ad5 derived vectors for cancer gene therapy has been limited by the poor cell surface expression, on some tumor cell types, of the primary Ad5 receptor, the coxsackie-adenovirus-receptor (CAR, as well as the accumulation of Ad5 in the liver following interaction with blood coagulation factor X (FX and subsequent tethering of the FX-Ad5 complex to heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG on liver cells. As an alternative vector, mouse adenovirus type 1 (MAV-1 is particularly attractive, since this non-human adenovirus displays pronounced endothelial cell tropism and does not use CAR as a cellular attachment receptor. We here demonstrate that MAV-1 uses cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs as primary cellular attachment receptor. Direct binding of MAV-1 to heparan sulfate-coated plates proved to be markedly more efficient compared to that of Ad5. Experiments with modified heparins revealed that the interaction of MAV-1 to HSPGs depends on their N-sulfation and, to a lesser extent, 6-O-sulfation rate. Whereas the interaction between Ad5 and HSPGs was enhanced by FX, this was not the case for MAV-1. A slot blot assay demonstrated the ability of MAV-1 to directly interact with FX, although the amount of FX complexed to MAV-1 was much lower than observed for Ad5. Analysis of the binding of MAV-1 and Ad5 to the NCI-60 panel of different human tumor cell lines revealed the preference of MAV-1 for ovarian carcinoma cells. Together, the data presented here enlarge our insight into the HSPG receptor usage of MAV-1 and support the development of an MAV-1-derived gene vector for human cancer therapy.

  10. Best practices for the use of itraconazole as a replacement for ketoconazole in drug-drug interaction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lichuan; Bello, Akintunde; Dresser, Mark J; Heald, Donald; Komjathy, Steven Ferenc; O'Mara, Edward; Rogge, Mark; Stoch, S Aubrey; Robertson, Sarah M

    2016-02-01

    Ketoconazole has been widely used as a strong cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A (CYP3A) inhibitor in drug-drug interaction (DDI) studies. However, the US Food and Drug Administration has recommended limiting the use of ketoconazole to cases in which no alternative therapies exist, and the European Medicines Agency has recommended the suspension of its marketing authorizations because of the potential for serious safety concerns. In this review, the Innovation and Quality in Pharmaceutical Development's Clinical Pharmacology Leadership Group (CPLG) provides a compelling rationale for the use of itraconazole as a replacement for ketoconazole in clinical DDI studies and provides recommendations on the best practices for the use of itraconazole in such studies. Various factors considered in the recommendations include the choice of itraconazole dosage form, administration in the fasted or fed state, the dose and duration of itraconazole administration, the timing of substrate and itraconazole coadministration, and measurement of itraconazole and metabolite plasma concentrations, among others. The CPLG's recommendations are based on careful review of available literature and internal industry experiences.

  11. What does a mouse tell us about neuregulin 1 – cannabis interactions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim eKarl

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The link between cannabis and psychosis has been debated although there is substantial epidemiological evidence showing that cannabis increases the risk of psychosis. It has been hypothesized that schizophrenia patients carrying particular risk genes might be more sensitive to the psychosis-inducing effects of cannabis than other patients and healthy test subjects. Here we review the effects of cannabinoids on a mutant mouse model for the schizophrenia candidate gene neuregulin 1 (Nrg1. The studies suggest a complex interaction between cannabis and Nrg1: the neuro-behavioural effects of cannabinoids were different in Nrg1 mutant and control mice and depended on exposure time, sex and age of test animals. This research provides the first evidence of complex cannabis-Nrg1 interactions suggesting Nrg1 as a prime target for future clinical investigations. Furthermore, it highlights that animal model research can broaden our understanding of the complex multi-factorial aetiology of schizophrenia. Finally, the findings are important to preventive psychiatry: if the genes that confer genetic vulnerability to cannabis-induced psychosis were identified patients at-high risk could be forewarned of the potential dangers of cannabis abuse.

  12. Lipid droplet remodeling and interaction with mitochondria in mouse brown adipose tissue during cold treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jinhai; Zhang, Shuyan; Cui, Liujuan; Wang, Weiyi; Na, Huimin; Zhu, Xiaotong; Li, Linghai; Xu, Guoheng; Yang, Fuquan; Christian, Mark; Liu, Pingsheng

    2015-05-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) maintains animal body temperature by non-shivering thermogenesis, which is through uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) that uncouples oxidative phosphorylation and utilizes β-oxidation of fatty acids released from triacylglycerol (TAG) in lipid droplets (LDs). Increasing BAT activity and "browning" other tissues such as white adipose tissue (WAT) can enhance the expenditure of excess stored energy, and in turn reduce prevalence of metabolic diseases. Although many studies have characterized the biology of BAT and brown adipocytes, BAT LDs especially their activation induced by cold exposure remain to be explored. We have isolated LDs from mouse interscapular BAT and characterized the full proteome using mass spectrometry. Both morphological and biochemical experiments showed that the LDs could tightly associate with mitochondria. Under cold treatment mouse BAT started expressing LD structure protein PLIN-2/ADRP and increased expression of PLIN1. Both hormone sensitive lipase (HSL) and adipose TAG lipase (ATGL) were increased in LDs. In addition, isolated BAT LDs showed increased levels of the mitochondrial protein UCP1, and prolonged cold exposure could stimulate BAT mitochondrial cristae biogenesis. These changes were in agreement with the data from transcriptional analysis. Our results provide the BAT LD proteome for the first time and show that BAT LDs facilitate heat production by coupling increasing TAG hydrolysis through recruitment of ATGL and HSL to the organelle and expression of another LD resident protein PLIN2/ADRP, as well as by tightly associating with activated mitochondria. These findings will benefit the study of BAT activation and the interaction between LDs and mitochondria.

  13. Interactions between parents and parents and pups in the monogamous California mouse (Peromyscus californicus.

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    Cheryl S Rosenfeld

    Full Text Available The California mouse (Peromyscuscalifornicus may be a valuable animal model to study parenting as it is one of the few monogamous and biparental rodent species. By using automated infra-red imaging and video documentation of established pairs spanning two days prior to birth of the litter until d 5 of post natal development (PND, it was possible to follow interactions between parents and between parents and pups. The paired males were attentive to their partners in the form of grooming and sniffing throughout the time period studied. Both these and other activities of the partners, such as eating and drinking, peaked during late light/ mid-dark period. Beginning the day before birth, and most significantly on PND 0, the female made aggressive attempts to exclude the male from nest-attending, acts that were not reciprocated by the male, although he made repeated attempts to mate his partner during that period. By PND 1, males were permitted to return to the nest, where they initiated grooming, licking, and huddling over the litter, although time spent by the male on parental care was still less than that of the female. Male and female pups were of similar size and grew at the same rate. Pups, which are believed to be exothermic for at least the first two weeks post-natally, maintained a body temperature higher than that of their parents until PND 16. Data are consistent with the inference that the male California mouse parent is important in helping retain pup body heat and permit dams increased time to procure food to accommodate her increased energy needs for lactation. These assessments provide indices that may be used to assess the effects of extrinsic factors, such as endocrine disrupting chemicals, on biparental behaviors and offspring development.

  14. Pseudomorphic replacement of diopside during interaction with (Ni,Mg)Cl2 aqueous solutions : Implications for the Ni-enrichment mechanism in talc- and serpentine-type phases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Majumdar, Alik S.; King, Helen E.; John, Timm; Kusebauch, Christof; Putnis, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    A hydrothermal experimental study of diopside interaction with (Ni,Mg)Cl2 aqueous solutions has been carried out to clarify the replacement mechanism and pattern of element mobilization and its relevance to peridotite alteration. Three different solution compositions were used with Ni/Mg ratios of 0

  15. The 6-OHDA mouse model of Parkinson's disease - Terminal striatal lesions provide a superior measure of neuronal loss and replacement than median forebrain bundle lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagga, V; Dunnett, S B; Fricker, R A

    2015-07-15

    Unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions of the nigrostriatal pathway produce side-biased motor impairments that reflect the motor deficits seen in Parkinson's disease (PD). This toxin-induced model in the rat has been used widely, to evaluate possible therapeutic strategies, but has not been well established in mice. With the advancements in mouse stem cell research we believe the requirement for a mouse model is essential for the therapeutic potential of these and other mouse-derived cells to be efficiently assessed. This aim of this study focused on developing a mouse model of PD using the 129 P2/OLA Hsd mouse strain as this is widely used in the generation of mouse embryonic stem cells. Both unilateral 6-OHDA medial forebrain bundle (MFB) and striatal lesion protocols were compared, with mice analysed for appropriate drug-induced rotational bias. Results demonstrated that lesioned mice responded to d-amphetamine with peak rotation dose at 5mg/kg and 10mg/kg for MFB and striatal lesions respectively. Apomorphine stimulation produced no significant rotational responses, at any dose, in either the MFB or striatal 6-OHDA lesioned mice. Analysis of dopamine neuron loss revealed that the MFB lesion was unreliable with little correlation between dopamine neuron loss and rotational asymmetry. Striatal lesions however were more reliable, with a strong correlation between dopamine neuron loss and rotational asymmetry. Functional recovery of d-amphetamine-induced rotational bias was shown following transplantation of E13 mouse VM tissue into the lesioned striatum; confirming the validity of this mouse model.

  16. Bisphenol S Interacts with Catalase and Induces Oxidative Stress in Mouse Liver and Renal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Liu, Rutao; Zong, Wansong

    2016-08-31

    Bisphenol S (BPS) is present in multitudinous consumer products and detected in both food and water. It also has been a main substitute for bisphenol A (BPA) in the food-packaging industry. Yet, the toxicity of BPS is not fully understood. The present study of the toxicity of BPS was divided into two parts. First, oxidative stress, cell viability, apoptosis level, and catalase (CAT) activity in mouse hepatocytes and renal cells were investigated after BPS exposure. After 12 h of incubation with BPS, all of these parameters of hepatocytes and renal cells changed by >15% as the concentration of BPS ranged from 0.1 to 1 mM. Second, the direct interaction between BPS and CAT on the molecule level was investigated by multiple spectral methods and molecular docking investigations. BPS changed the structure and the activity of CAT through binding to the Gly 117 residue on the substrate channel of the enzyme. The main binding forces were hydrogen bond and hydrophobic force.

  17. Ultrastructural Interactions and Genotoxicity Assay of Cerium Dioxide Nanoparticles on Mouse Oocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blandine Courbiere

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Cerium dioxide nanoparticles (CeO2 ENPs are on the priority list of nanomaterials requiring evaluation. We performed in vitro assays on mature mouse oocytes incubated with CeO2 ENPs to study (1 physicochemical biotransformation of ENPs in culture medium; (2 ultrastructural interactions with follicular cells and oocytes using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM; (3 genotoxicity of CeO2 ENPs on follicular cells and oocytes using a comet assay. DNA damage was quantified as Olive Tail Moment. We show that ENPs aggregated, but their crystal structure remained stable in culture medium. TEM showed endocytosis of CeO2 ENP aggregates in follicular cells. In oocytes, CeO2 ENP aggregates were only observed around the zona pellucida (ZP. The comet assay revealed significant DNA damage in follicular cells. In oocytes, the comet assay showed a dose-related increase in DNA damage and a significant increase only at the highest concentrations. DNA damage decreased significantly both in follicular cells and in oocytes when an anti-oxidant agent was added in the culture medium. We hypothesise that at low concentrations of CeO2 ENPs oocytes could be protected against indirect oxidative stress due to a double defence system composed of follicular cells and ZP.

  18. c-Fos expression in the paternal mouse brain induced by communicative interaction with maternal mates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jing; Liang, Mingkun; Akther, Shirin; Higashida, Chiharu; Tsuji, Takahiro; Higashida, Haruhiro

    2014-09-11

    Appropriate parental care by fathers greatly facilitates health in human family life. Much less is known from animal studies regarding the factors and neural circuitry that affect paternal behavior compared with those affecting maternal behavior. We recently reported that ICR mouse sires displayed maternal-like retrieval behavior when they were separated from pups and caged with their mates (co-housing) because the sires receive communicative interactions via ultrasonic and pheromone signals from the dams. We investigated the brain structures involved in regulating this activity by quantifying c-Fos-immunoreactive cells as neuronal activation markers in the neural pathway of male parental behavior. c-Fos expression in the medial preoptic area (mPOA) was significantly higher in sires that exhibited retrieval behavior (retrievers) than those with no such behavior (non-retrievers). Identical increased expression was found in the mPOA region in the retrievers stimulated by ultrasonic vocalizations or pheromones from their mates. Such increases in expression were not observed in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), nucleus accumbens (NAcc) or ventral palladium (VP). On the following day that we identified the families of the retrievers or non-retrievers, c-Fos expression in neuronal subsets in the mPOA, VTA, NAcc and VP was much higher in the retriever sires when they isolated together with their mates in new cages. This difference was not observed in the singly isolated retriever sires in new cages. The non-retriever sires did not display expression changes in the four brain regions that were assessed. The mPOA neurons appeared to be activated by direct communicative interactions with mate dams, including ultrasonic vocalizations and pheromones. The mPOA-VTA-NAcc-VP neural circuit appears to be involved in paternal retrieval behavior.

  19. Inhibition of chemokine-glycosaminoglycan interactions in donor tissue reduces mouse allograft vasculopathy and transplant rejection.

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    Erbin Dai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Binding of chemokines to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs is classically described as initiating inflammatory cell migration and creating tissue chemokine gradients that direct local leukocyte chemotaxis into damaged or transplanted tissues. While chemokine-receptor binding has been extensively studied during allograft transplantation, effects of glycosaminoglycan (GAG interactions with chemokines on transplant longevity are less well known. Here we examine the impact of interrupting chemokine-GAG interactions and chemokine-receptor interactions, both locally and systemically, on vascular disease in allografts. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Analysis of GAG or CC chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2 deficiency were coupled with the infusion of viral chemokine modulating proteins (CMPs in mouse aortic allograft transplants (n = 239 mice. Inflammatory cell invasion and neointimal hyperplasia were significantly reduced in N-deacetylase-N-sulfotransferase-1 (Ndst1(f/fTekCre(+ heparan sulfate (GAG-deficient (Ndst1(-/-, p<0.044 and CCR2-deficient (Ccr2(-/-, p<0.04 donor transplants. Donor tissue GAG or CCR2 deficiency markedly reduced inflammation and vasculopathy, whereas recipient deficiencies did not. Treatment with three CMPs was also investigated; Poxviral M-T1 blocks CC chemokine receptor binding, M-T7 blocks C, CC, and CXC GAG binding, and herpesviral M3 binds receptor and GAG binding for all classes. M-T7 reduced intimal hyperplasia in wild type (WT (Ccr2(+/+, p< or =0.003 and Ccr2(-/-, pinteractions, even in the absence of chemokine

  20. Expression of mRNA and protein-protein interaction of the antiviral endoribonuclease RNase L in mouse spleen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ankush; Rath, Pramod C

    2014-08-01

    The interferon-inducible, 2',5'-oligoadenylate (2-5A)-dependent endoribonuclease, RNase L is a unique antiviral RNA-degrading enzyme involved in RNA-metabolism, translational regulation, stress-response besides its anticancer/tumor-suppressor and antibacterial functions. RNase L represents complex cellular RNA-regulations in mammalian cells but diverse functions of RNase L are not completely explained by its 2-5A-regulated endoribonuclease activity. We hypothesized that RNase L has housekeeping function(s) through interaction with cellular proteins. We investigated RNase L mRNA expression in mouse tissues by RT-PCR and its protein-protein interaction in spleen by GST-pulldown and immunoprecipitation assays followed by proteomic analysis. RNase L mRNA is constitutively and differentially expressed in nine different mouse tissues, its level is maximum in immunological tissues (spleen, thymus and lungs), moderate in reproductive tissues (testis and prostate) and low in metabolic tissues (kidney, brain, liver and heart). Cellular proteins from mouse spleen [fibronectin precursor, β-actin, troponin I, myosin heavy chain 9 (non-muscle), growth-arrest specific protein 11, clathrin light chain B, a putative uncharacterized protein (Ricken cDNA 8030451F13) isoform (CRA_d) and alanyl tRNA synthetase] were identified as cellular RNase L-interacting proteins. Thus our results suggest for more general cellular functions of RNase L through protein-protein interactions in the spleen for immune response in mammals.

  1. Functional Characteristics of Tumor-Associated Protein Spot14 and Interacting Proteins in Mouse Mammary Epithelial and Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    Interacting Proteins in Mouse Mammary Epithelial and Breast Cancer Cell Lines PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Michael C. Rudolph, B.A...Spot14 and Interacting Proteins in Mouse Mammary Epithelial and 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-08-1-0596 Breast Cancer Cell Lines 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...S14 and to identify potential S14 interacting proteins that confer its function. Body The overarching goals of this proposal are to examine the

  2. p53 interaction with JMJD3 results in its nuclear distribution during mouse neural stem cell differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Solá

    Full Text Available Conserved elements of apoptosis are also integral components of cellular differentiation. In this regard, p53 is involved in neurogenesis, being required for neurite outgrowth in primary neurons and for axonal regeneration in mice. Interestingly, demethylases regulate p53 activity and its interaction with co-activators by acting on non-histone proteins. In addition, the histone H3 lysine 27-specific demethylase JMJD3 induces ARF expression, thereby stabilizing p53 in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. We hypothesized that p53 interacts with key regulators of neurogenesis to redirect stem cells to differentiation, as an alternative to cell death. Specifically, we investigated the potential cross-talk between p53 and JMJD3 during mouse neural stem cell (NSC differentiation. Our results demonstrated that JMJD3 mRNA and protein levels were increased early in mouse NSC differentiation, when JMJD3 activity was readily detected. Importantly, modulation of JMJD3 in NSCs resulted in changes of total p53 protein, coincident with increased ARF mRNA and protein expression. ChIP analysis revealed that JMJD3 was present at the promoter and exon 1 regions of ARF during neural differentiation, although without changes in H3K27me3. Immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated a direct interaction between p53 and JMJD3, independent of the C-terminal region of JMJD3, and modulation of p53 methylation by JMJD3-demethylase activity. Finally, transfection of mutant JMJD3 showed that the demethylase activity of JMJD3 was crucial in regulating p53 cellular distribution and function. In conclusion, JMJD3 induces p53 stabilization in mouse NSCs through ARF-dependent mechanisms, directly interacts with p53 and, importantly, causes nuclear accumulation of p53. This suggests that JMJD3 and p53 act in a common pathway during neurogenesis.

  3. Chronic exposure to chlorpyrifos triggered body weight increase and memory impairment depending on human apoE polymorphisms in a targeted replacement mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peris-Sampedro, Fiona; Basaure, Pia; Reverte, Ingrid; Cabré, Maria; Domingo, José L; Colomina, Maria Teresa

    2015-05-15

    Despite restrictions on their use, humans are still constantly exposed to organophosphates (OPs). A huge number of studies have ratified the neurotoxic effects of chlorpyrifos (CPF) and suggested its association with neurodegenerative diseases, but data are still scarce. Human apolipoprotein E (apoE) plays an important role in lipid transport and distribution. In humans, the apoE4 isoform has been linked to an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). ApoE3 is the most prevalent isoform worldwide, and has been often established as the healthful one. The current study, performed in targeted replacement (TR) adult male mice, aimed to inquire whether genetic variations of the human apoE respond differently to a chronic dietary challenge with CPF. At four/five months of age, mice carrying apoE2, apoE3 or apoE4 were pair-fed a diet supplemented with CPF at 0 or 2mg/kg body weight/day for 13weeks. Cholinergic signs were monitored daily and body weight changes weekly. In the last week of treatment, learning and memory were assessed in a Barnes maze task. Dietary CPF challenge increased body weight only in apoE3 mice. Differences in the acquisition and retention of the Barnes maze were attributed to apoE genetic differences. Our results showed that apoE4 mice performed worse than apoE2 and apoE3 carriers in the acquisition period of the spatial task, and that apoE2 mice had poorer retention than the other two genotypes. On the other hand, CPF increased the search velocity of apoE2 subjects during the acquisition period. Retention was impaired only in CPF-exposed apoE3 mice. These results underline that gene×environment interactions need to be taken into account in epidemiological studies. Given that apoE3, the most common polymorphism in humans, has proved to be the most sensitive to CPF, the potential implications for human health merit serious thought.

  4. Ankle replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankle arthroplasty - total; Total ankle arthroplasty; Endoprosthetic ankle replacement; Ankle surgery ... You may not be able to have a total ankle replacement if you have had ankle joint infections in ...

  5. Knee Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knee replacement is surgery for people with severe knee damage. Knee replacement can relieve pain and allow you to ... Your doctor may recommend it if you have knee pain and medicine and other treatments are not ...

  6. Redirection of Human Cancer Cells upon the Interaction with the Regenerating Mouse Mammary Gland Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia M. Rosenfield

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumorigenesis is often described as a result of accumulated mutations that lead to growth advantage and clonal expansion of mutated cells. There is evidence in the literature that cancer cells are influenced by the microenvironment. Our previous studies demonstrated that the mouse mammary gland is capable of redirecting mouse cells of non-mammary origins as well as Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV-neu transformed cells toward normal mammary epithelial cell fate during gland regeneration. Interestingly, the malignant phenotype of MMTV-neu transformed cells was suppressed during serial transplantation experiments. Here, we discuss our studies that demonstrated the potential of the regenerating mouse mammary gland to redirect cancer cells of different species into a functional tumor-free mammary epithelial cell progeny. Immunochemistry for human specific CD133, mitochondria, cytokeratins as well as milk proteins and FISH for human specific probe identified human epithelial cell progeny in ducts, lobules, and secretory acini. Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH for human centromeric DNA and FACS analysis of propidium iodine staining excluded the possibility of mouse-human cell fusion. To our knowledge this is the first evidence that human cancer cells of embryonic or somatic origins respond to developmental signals generated by the mouse mammary gland microenvironment during gland regeneration in vivo.

  7. Synergistic interaction of levetiracetam with gabapentin in the mouse 6 Hz psychomotor seizure model – a type II isobolographic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wlaz Aleksandra

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed at characterizing the anticonvulsant effects of levetiracetam in combination with gabapentin, in the mouse 6 Hz psychomotor seizure model. Herein, psychomotor seizures were evoked in male albino Swiss mice by a current (32 mA, 6 Hz, 3 s stimulus duration delivered via ocular electrodes. Type II isobolographic analysis was used to characterize the anticonvulsant interactions between the drugs in combination, for fixed-ratios of 1:1, 1:2, 1:5 and 1:10. The type II isobolographic analysis revealed that the combinations of levetiracetam with gabapentin for the fixed-ratios of 1:5 and 1:10 were supra-additive (synergistic; P<0.05 in terms of seizure suppression, while the combinations for the fixed-ratios of 1:1 and 1:2 were additive in the mouse 6 Hz psychomotor seizure model. We conclude that, as the combinations of levetiracetam with gabapentin for the fixed-ratios of 1:5 and 1:10 exerted supra-additive (synergistic interaction in the mouse 6 Hz psychomotor seizure model, this may be considered as particularly favorable combinations in further clinical practice.

  8. microPIR2: a comprehensive database for human-mouse comparative study of microRNA-promoter interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piriyapongsa, Jittima; Bootchai, Chaiwat; Ngamphiw, Chumpol; Tongsima, Sissades

    2014-01-01

    microRNA (miRNA)-promoter interaction resource (microPIR) is a public database containing over 15 million predicted miRNA target sites located within human promoter sequences. These predicted targets are presented along with their related genomic and experimental data, making the microPIR database the most comprehensive repository of miRNA promoter target sites. Here, we describe major updates of the microPIR database including new target predictions in the mouse genome and revised human target predictions. The updated database (microPIR2) now provides ∼80 million human and 40 million mouse predicted target sites. In addition to being a reference database, microPIR2 is a tool for comparative analysis of target sites on the promoters of human-mouse orthologous genes. In particular, this new feature was designed to identify potential miRNA-promoter interactions conserved between species that could be stronger candidates for further experimental validation. We also incorporated additional supporting information to microPIR2 such as nuclear and cytoplasmic localization of miRNAs and miRNA-disease association. Extra search features were also implemented to enable various investigations of targets of interest. Database URL: http://www4a.biotec.or.th/micropir2

  9. Induction of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and -2 activity in mouse blastocyst by fibronectin-integrin interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Fibronectin, a major extracellular matrix, plays an important role in embryo implantation by mediating embryo adhesion and outgrowth. In this work, mouse blastocysts produced pro-matrix metalloproteinase-9, pro-matrix metalloproteinase-2 and 64 ku matrix metalloproteinase-2 when they were co-cultured with fibronectin. In contrast, mouse blastocysts did not produce these proteinases without fibronectin. Focal adhesion kinase is a fundamental molecule of integrin signaling pathway and its antisense oligodeoxynucleiotide inhibited blastocyst matrix metalloproteinases expression induced by fibronectin. The results indicated that fibronectin triggered matrix metalloproteinase-9 and -2 expression in mouse blastocyst through its integrin receptors and subsequent signaling pathway, which enhanced the synchronization of blastocyst invasiveness and uterine receptivity and ensured the accuracy of events relative to implantation in timing and spatiality.

  10. A Case Study of MasterMind Chess: Comparing Mouse/Keyboard Interaction with Kinect-Based Gestural Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Alves Mendes Vasiljevic

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As gestural interfaces emerged as a new type of user interface, their use has been vastly explored by the entertainment industry to better immerse the player in games. Despite being mainly used in dance and sports games, little use was made of gestural interaction in more slow-paced genres, such as board games. In this work, we present a Kinect-based gestural interface for an online and multiplayer chess game and describe a case study with users with different playing skill levels. Comparing the mouse/keyboard interaction with the gesture-based interaction, the results of the activity were synthesized into lessons learned regarding general usability and design of game control mechanisms. These results could be applied to slow-paced board games like chess. Our findings indicate that gestural interfaces may not be suitable for competitive chess matches, yet it can be fun to play while using them in casual matches.

  11. Expression of SPEF2 During Mouse Spermatogenesis and Identification of IFT20 as an Interacting Protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sironen, Anu; Hansen, Jeanette; Thomsen, Bo

    2010-01-01

    during mouse spermatogenesis. SPEF2 mRNA and protein products appear to be localized both in germ cells and in Sertoli cells. In differentiating germ cells SPEF2 protein is localized in the Golgi complex, manchette, basal body, and midpiece of the sperm tail. In mature murine sperm SPEF2 is present...

  12. Differences in Oral Structure and Tissue Interactions during Mouse vs. Human Palatogenesis: Implications for the Translation of Findings from Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kai; Deng, Mei; Naluai-Cecchini, Theresa; Glass, Ian A.; Cox, Timothy C.

    2017-01-01

    Clefting of the secondary palate is one of the most common human birth defects and results from failure of the palatal shelves to fuse during embryonic development. Palatogenesis is traditionally considered to be a highly conserved developmental process among mammalian species. However, cleft palate phenotypes in humans are considerably more variable than those seen in mice, the most common animal model for studying palatal development and pathogenesis of cleft palate. In this investigation, we utilized macroscopic observations, histology and 3D imaging techniques to directly compare palate morphology and the oral-nasal cavity during palate closure in mouse embryos and human conceptuses. We showed that mouse and human palates display distinct morphologies attributable to the structural differences of the oral-nasal cavity. We further showed that the palatal shelves interact differently with the primary palate and nasal septum in the hard palate region and with pharyngeal walls in the soft palate region during palate closure in mice and humans. Knowledge of these morphological differences is important for improved translation of findings in mouse models of human cleft lip/palate and, as such, should ultimately enhance our understanding of human palatal morphogenesis and the pathogenesis of cleft lip/palate in humans. PMID:28360863

  13. Synergistic interaction of levetiracetam with gabapentin in the mouse 6 Hz psychomotor seizure model – a type II isobolographic analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Wlaz Aleksandra; Kondrat-Wrobel Maria W.; Zaluska Katarzyna; Kochman Ewelina; Rekas Anna R.; Luszczki Jarogniew J.

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed at characterizing the anticonvulsant effects of levetiracetam in combination with gabapentin, in the mouse 6 Hz psychomotor seizure model. Herein, psychomotor seizures were evoked in male albino Swiss mice by a current (32 mA, 6 Hz, 3 s stimulus duration) delivered via ocular electrodes. Type II isobolographic analysis was used to characterize the anticonvulsant interactions between the drugs in combination, for fixed-ratios of 1:1, 1:2, 1:5 and 1:10. The type II isobolog...

  14. Directed Replacement

    CERN Document Server

    Karttunen, L

    1996-01-01

    This paper introduces to the finite-state calculus a family of directed replace operators. In contrast to the simple replace expression, UPPER -> LOWER, defined in Karttunen (ACL-95), the new directed version, UPPER @-> LOWER, yields an unambiguous transducer if the lower language consists of a single string. It transduces the input string from left to right, making only the longest possible replacement at each point. A new type of replacement expression, UPPER @-> PREFIX ... SUFFIX, yields a transducer that inserts text around strings that are instances of UPPER. The symbol ... denotes the matching part of the input which itself remains unchanged. PREFIX and SUFFIX are regular expressions describing the insertions. Expressions of the type UPPER @-> PREFIX ... SUFFIX may be used to compose a deterministic parser for a ``local grammar'' in the sense of Gross (1989). Other useful applications of directed replacement include tokenization and filtering of text streams.

  15. Interaction of NANOS2 and NANOS3 with different components of the CNOT complex may contribute to the functional differences in mouse male germ cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Suzuki

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available NANOS2 and NANOS3 belong to the Nanos family of proteins that contain a conserved zinc finger domain, which consists of two consecutive CCHC-type zinc finger motifs, and contribute to germ cell development in mice. Previous studies indicate that there are redundant and distinct functions of these two proteins. NANOS2 rescues NANOS3 functions in the maintenance of primordial germ cells, whereas NANOS3 fails to replace NANOS2 functions in the male germ cell pathway. However, the lack of a conditional allele of Nanos3 has hampered delineation of each contribution of NANOS2 and NANOS3 to the male germ cell pathway. In addition, the molecular mechanism underlying the distinct functions of these proteins remains unexplored. Here, we report an unexpected observation of a transgenic mouse line expressing a NANOS2 variant harboring mutations in the zinc finger domain. Transcription of Nanos2 and Nanos3 was strongly compromised in the presence of this transgene, which resulted in the mimicking of the Nanos2/Nanos3 double-null condition in the male gonad. In these transgenic mice, P-bodies involved in RNA metabolism had disappeared and germ cell differentiation was more severely affected than that in Nanos2-null mice, indicating that NANOS3 partially substitutes for NANOS2 functions. In addition, similar to NANOS2, we found that NANOS3 associated with the CCR4-NOT deadenylation complex but via a direct interaction with CNOT8, unlike CNOT1 in the case of NANOS2. This alternate interaction might account for the molecular basis of the functional redundancy and differences in NANOS2 and NANOS3 functions.

  16. The antipsychotic olanzapine interacts with the gut microbiome to cause weight gain in mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew P Morgan

    Full Text Available The second-generation antipsychotic olanzapine is effective in reducing psychotic symptoms but can cause extreme weight gain in human patients. We investigated the role of the gut microbiota in this adverse drug effect using a mouse model. First, we used germ-free C57BL/6J mice to demonstrate that gut bacteria are necessary and sufficient for weight gain caused by oral delivery of olanzapine. Second, we surveyed fecal microbiota before, during, and after treatment and found that olanzapine potentiated a shift towards an "obesogenic" bacterial profile. Finally, we demonstrated that olanzapine has antimicrobial activity in vitro against resident enteric bacterial strains. These results collectively provide strong evidence for a mechanism underlying olanzapine-induced weight gain in mouse and a hypothesis for clinical translation in human patients.

  17. The effects of replacing the water model while decoupling water-water and water-solute interactions on computed properties of simple salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jicun; Wang, Feng

    2016-07-01

    The effects of decoupling the water-water and water-solute interactions are studied with selected mono-valent ions as the solute. Using the ion-water cross terms developed for the BLYPSP-4F water model, we replaced the water potential with WAIL, TIP4P, and TIP3P without changing the ion-water parameters. When the adaptive force matching (AFM) derived BLYPSP-4F model is replaced by the other AFM derived WAIL model, the difference in ion properties, such as hydration free energies, radial distribution functions, relative diffusion constants, is negligible, demonstrating the feasibility for combining AFM parameters from different sources. Interestingly, when the AFM-derived ion-water cross-terms are used with a non-AFM based water model, only small changes in the ion properties are observed. The final combined models with TIP3P or TIP4P water reproduce the salt hydration free energies within 6% of experiments. The feasibility of combining AFM models with other non-AFM models is of significance since such combinations allow more complex systems to be studied without specific parameterization. In addition, the study suggests an interesting prospect of reusing the cross-terms when a part of a general force field is replaced with a different model. The prevailing practice, which is to re-derive all cross-terms with combining rules, may not have been optimal.

  18. Antitopoisomerase I monoclonal autoantibodies from scleroderma patients and tight skin mouse interact with similar epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muryoi, T; Kasturi, K N; Kafina, M J; Cram, D S; Harrison, L C; Sasaki, T; Bona, C A

    1992-04-01

    We have generated for the first time monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific for topoisomerase I (topo I) from scleroderma patients, and tight skin mice which develop a scleroderma-like syndrome. The epitope specificity of these antibodies has been determined using a series of fusion proteins containing contiguous portions of topo I polypeptide. Western blot analysis demonstrated that both human and mouse mAbs bound strongly to fusion protein C encompassing the NH2-terminal portion of the enzyme, and weakly to fusion proteins F and G containing regions close to the COOH-terminal end of the molecule. This crossreactivity is related to a tripeptide sequence homology in F, G, and C fusion proteins. It is interesting that a pentapeptide sequence homologous to that in fusion protein C was identified in the UL70 protein of cytomegalovirus, suggesting that activation of autoreactive B cell clones by molecular mimicry is possible. Both human and mouse mAbs exhibiting the same antigen specificity, also share an interspecies cross-reactive idiotope. These data suggest that B cell clones producing antitopo autoantibodies present in human and mouse repertoire are conserved during phylogeny, and are activated during the development of scleroderma disease.

  19. A Preliminary Study on the Use of Haptic Feedback to Assist Users with Impaired Arm Coordination During Mouse Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. G. Tsagarakis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Physical movement impairments caused by central nervous system dysfunction or by muscle spasms generated from other neurological damage or dysfunction can often make it difficult or impossible for affected individuals to interact with computer generated environments using the conventional mouse interfaces. This work investigates the use of a 2 dimensional haptic device as an assistive robotic aid to minimize the effects of the pathological absence of motor control on the upper limb in impaired users while using a mouse interface. The haptic system used in this research is a two degree of freedom (DOF Pantograph planar device. To detect the intended user motion, the device is equipped with force sensing allowing the monitoring of the user applied loads. Impedance based techniques are used to develop a “clumsy” motion suppression control system. The erratic motion suppression techniques and the experimental system setup are evaluated in two dimensional tracking tasks using a human subject with failure of the gross coordination of the upper limb muscle movements resulting from a disorder called ‘Muscle Ataxia’. The results presented demonstrate the ability of the system to improve the tracking performance of the impaired user while interacting with a simple computer generated 2D space.

  20. The interaction of laminin and its membrane receptor on mouse macrophage membrane studied by STM and FRAP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEIXINHUA; YONGZHAO; XIAOMINGDONG; YAXIANSU; ZILIMA; CHANGXINZHU; SHIJINPANG

    1993-01-01

    The variation of membrane surface and lateral diffusion of membrane protein was studied after the interaction of laminin with its membrane receptor in mouse macrophages. A pattern of membrane surface which showed smaller and bigger peaks was obtained by scanning tunneling microscope(STM), looking like the domains of lipid groups and proteins in the model of fluid mosaic biomembraoe. Some even more higher and wider peaks projected out from the membrane surface in STM im-age after the interacting of laminin with membrane receptor were probably, tile complexes of laminin and membraue receptor. Furthermore. the deeceasad lateral diffusion coofficeent value(D_) was obtained by Huorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) after the laminin was reacted with membrane receptor. This phenomenon provides an evidence that the complexes of laminin and its membrane receptor were located on the membrane of macrophages. So we could consider that the laminin is combined with membrane receptor leading to the variation in the properties of membrane surface.

  1. Knee Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... need knee replacement surgery usually have problems walking, climbing stairs, and getting in and out of chairs. Some ... a total living space on one floor since climbing stairs can be difficult. Install safety bars or a ...

  2. Replacing penalties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaly Stepashin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available УДК 343.24The subject. The article deals with the problem of the use of "substitute" penalties.The purpose of the article is to identify criminal and legal criteria for: selecting the replacement punishment; proportionality replacement leave punishment to others (the formalization of replacement; actually increasing the punishment (worsening of legal situation of the convicted.Methodology.The author uses the method of analysis and synthesis, formal legal method.Results. Replacing the punishment more severe as a result of malicious evasion from serving accused designated penalty requires the optimization of the following areas: 1 the selection of a substitute punishment; 2 replacement of proportionality is serving a sentence other (formalization of replacement; 3 ensuring the actual toughening penalties (deterioration of the legal status of the convict. It is important that the first two requirements pro-vide savings of repression in the implementation of the replacement of one form of punishment to others.Replacement of punishment on their own do not have any specifics. However, it is necessary to compare them with the contents of the punishment, which the convict from serving maliciously evaded. First, substitute the punishment should assume a more significant range of restrictions and deprivation of certain rights of the convict. Second, the perfor-mance characteristics of order substitute the punishment should assume guarantee imple-mentation of the new measures.With regard to replacing all forms of punishment are set significant limitations in the application that, in some cases, eliminates the possibility of replacement of the sentence, from serving where there has been willful evasion, a stricter measure of state coercion. It is important in the context of the topic and the possibility of a sentence of imprisonment as a substitute punishment in cases where the original purpose of the strict measures excluded. It is noteworthy that the

  3. Virally mediated Kcnq1 gene replacement therapy in the immature scala media restores hearing in a mouse model of human Jervell and Lange-Nielsen deafness syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Qing; Wang, Jianjun; Li, Qi; Kim, Yeunjung; Zhou, Binfei; Wang, Yunfeng; Li, Huawei; Lin, Xi

    2015-06-17

    Mutations in the potassium channel subunit KCNQ1 cause the human severe congenital deafness Jervell and Lange-Nielsen (JLN) syndrome. We applied a gene therapy approach in a mouse model of JLN syndrome (Kcnq1(-/-) mice) to prevent the development of deafness in the adult stage. A modified adeno-associated virus construct carrying a Kcnq1 expression cassette was injected postnatally (P0-P2) into the endolymph, which resulted in Kcnq1 expression in most cochlear marginal cells where native Kcnq1 is exclusively expressed. We also found that extensive ectopic virally mediated Kcnq1 transgene expression did not affect normal cochlear functions. Examination of cochlear morphology showed that the collapse of the Reissner's membrane and degeneration of hair cells (HCs) and cells in the spiral ganglia were corrected in Kcnq1(-/-) mice. Electrophysiological tests showed normal endocochlear potential in treated ears. In addition, auditory brainstem responses showed significant hearing preservation in the injected ears, ranging from 20 dB improvement to complete correction of the deafness phenotype. Our results demonstrate the first successful gene therapy treatment for gene defects specifically affecting the function of the stria vascularis, which is a major site affected by genetic mutations in inherited hearing loss.

  4. Virally mediated Kcnq1 gene replacement therapy in the immature scala media restores hearing in a mouse model of human Jervell and Lange-Nielsen deafness syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Qing; Wang, Jianjun; Li, Qi; Kim, Yeunjung; Zhou, Binfei; Wang, Yunfeng; Li, Huawei; Lin, Xi

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the potassium channel subunit KCNQ1 cause the human severe congenital deafness Jervell and Lange-Nielsen (JLN) syndrome. We applied a gene therapy approach in a mouse model of JLN syndrome (Kcnq1−/− mice) to prevent the development of deafness in the adult stage. A modified adeno-associated virus construct carrying a Kcnq1 expression cassette was injected postnatally (P0–P2) into the endolymph, which resulted in Kcnq1 expression in most cochlear marginal cells where native Kcnq1 is exclusively expressed. We also found that extensive ectopic virally mediated Kcnq1 transgene expression did not affect normal cochlear functions. Examination of cochlear morphology showed that the collapse of the Reissner’s membrane and degeneration of hair cells (HCs) and cells in the spiral ganglia were corrected in Kcnq1−/− mice. Electrophysiological tests showed normal endocochlear potential in treated ears. In addition, auditory brainstem responses showed significant hearing preservation in the injected ears, ranging from 20 dB improvement to complete correction of the deafness phenotype. Our results demonstrate the first successful gene therapy treatment for gene defects specifically affecting the function of the stria vascularis, which is a major site affected by genetic mutations in inherited hearing loss. PMID:26084842

  5. Protein replacement therapy partially corrects the cholesterol-storage phenotype in a mouse model of Niemann-Pick type C2 disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gitte Krogh Nielsen

    Full Text Available Niemann-Pick type C2 (NPC2 disease is a fatal autosomal recessive neurovisceral degenerative disorder characterized by late endosomal-lysosomal sequestration of low-density lipoprotein derived cholesterol. The breach in intracellular cholesterol homeostasis is caused by deficiency of functional NPC2, a soluble sterol binding protein targeted to the lysosomes by binding the mannose-6-phosphate receptor. As currently there is no effective treatment for the disorder, we have investigated the efficacy of NPC2 replacement therapy in a murine gene-trap model of NPC2-disease generated on the 129P2/OlaHsd genetic background. NPC2 was purified from bovine milk and its functional competence assured in NPC2-deficient fibroblasts using the specific cholesterol fluorescent probe filipin. For evaluation of phenotype correction in vivo, three-week-old NPC2(-/- mice received two weekly intravenous injections of 5 mg/kg NPC2 until trial termination 66 days later. Whereas the saline treated NPC2(-/- mice exhibited massive visceral cholesterol storage as compared to their wild-type littermates, administration of NPC2 caused a marked reduction in cholesterol build up. The histological findings, indicating an amelioration of the disease pathology in liver, spleen, and lungs, corroborated the biochemical results. Little or no difference in the overall cholesterol levels was observed in the kidneys, blood, cerebral cortex and hippocampus when comparing NPC2(-/- and wild type mice. However, cerebellum cholesterol was increased about two fold in NPC2(-/- mice compared with wild-type littermates. Weight gain performance was slightly improved as a result of the NPC2 treatment but significant motor coordination deficits were still observed. Accordingly, ultrastructural cerebellar abnormalities were detected in both saline treated and NPC2 treated NPC2(-/- animals 87 days post partum. Our data indicate that protein replacement may be a beneficial therapeutic approach in the

  6. Isobolographic analysis of interactions between remacemide and conventional antiepileptic drugs in the mouse model of maximal electroshock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowicz, Kinga K; Malek, Robert; Luszczki, Jarogniew J; Ratnaraj, Neville; Patsalos, Philip N; Czuczwar, Stanislaw J

    2007-08-01

    Using the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model, indicative of tonic-clonic seizures in humans, the present study was aimed at characterizing the interaction between remacemide and valproate, carbamazepine, phenytoin, and phenobarbital. Isobolographic analysis indicated additive interactions between remacemide and valproate, carbamazepine, and phenytoin (for all fixed ratios of tested drugs: 1:3, 1:1, and 3:1). Additivity was also observed between remacemide and phenobarbital applied in proportions of 1:1 and 3:1. In contrast, the combination of remacemide and phenobarbital at the fixed-ratio of 1:3 resulted in antagonism. Neither motor performance nor long-term memory was impaired by remacemide or by carbamazepine, phenobarbital, phenytoin, and valproate whether or not these drugs were administered singly or in combination. In combination with remacemide, brain concentrations of carbamazepine, phenobarbital, and phenytoin were increased by 71, 21, and 16%, respectively. Although brain valproate concentrations were unaffected by remacemide co-administration, brain concentrations of remacemide and its active metabolite, desglycinyl-remacemide, were increased by 68 and 162%, respectively. In contrast, phenobarbital co-administration was associated with decreases in brain remacemide (27%) and desglycinyl-remacemide (9%) concentrations, whereas only remacemide concentrations (increased by 131%) were affected by carbamazepine co-administration. In conclusion, significant and desirable pharmacodynamic interactions were observed between remacemide and valproate, carbamazepine, phenytoin, and phenobarbital. However, the concurrent pharmacokinetic interactions associated with remacemide complicate these observations and do not make remacemide a good candidate for adjunctive treatment of epilepsy.

  7. Esophageal replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunisaki, Shaun M; Coran, Arnold G

    2017-04-01

    This article focuses on esophageal replacement as a surgical option for pediatric patients with end-stage esophageal disease. While it is obvious that the patient׳s own esophagus is the best esophagus, persisting with attempts to retain a native esophagus with no function and at all costs are futile and usually detrimental to the overall well-being of the child. In such cases, the esophagus should be abandoned, and the appropriate esophageal replacement is chosen for definitive reconstruction. We review the various types of conduits used for esophageal replacement and discuss the unique advantages and disadvantages that are relevant for clinical decision-making. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Site of fidget gene action and its interaction with the ocular retardation gene in cultured mouse embryo retinas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koniukhov, B V; Ugol'kova, T S

    1978-01-01

    The eye rudiments of 10 and 11 days old mouse embryos of the genotypes +/+ +/+, fi/fi +/+, +/+ or/or, fi/fi or/or and 11 days old embryos of the genotype fi/+ or/+ were cultivated in vitro during 24, 48 and 72 hrs. The expression of the fi gene was shown in the cells of the cultivated fi/fi +/+ retina: its proliferative activity was inhibited. The fi gene was not active in the cells of the developing lens and the anomalies of the latter in homozygotes arose secondarily, due to the inhibition of growth of the retinal rudiment. The fi and or genes interacted synergically in the cultivated fi/fi or/or retina, thus resulting in the marked inhibition of its mitotic activity. This suggests that both the genes act in the retinal cells and, apparently, affect different links of the biochemical chain of events in the preparation of DNA replication.

  9. Genome-wide mapping in a house mouse hybrid zone reveals hybrid sterility loci and Dobzhansky-Muller interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Leslie M; Harr, Bettina

    2014-12-09

    Mapping hybrid defects in contact zones between incipient species can identify genomic regions contributing to reproductive isolation and reveal genetic mechanisms of speciation. The house mouse features a rare combination of sophisticated genetic tools and natural hybrid zones between subspecies. Male hybrids often show reduced fertility, a common reproductive barrier between incipient species. Laboratory crosses have identified sterility loci, but each encompasses hundreds of genes. We map genetic determinants of testis weight and testis gene expression using offspring of mice captured in a hybrid zone between M. musculus musculus and M. m. domesticus. Many generations of admixture enables high-resolution mapping of loci contributing to these sterility-related phenotypes. We identify complex interactions among sterility loci, suggesting multiple, non-independent genetic incompatibilities contribute to barriers to gene flow in the hybrid zone.

  10. Preventing the Androgen Receptor N/C Interaction Delays Disease Onset in a Mouse Model of SBMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori Zboray

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA is a neurodegenerative disease caused by a polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor (AR and is associated with misfolding and aggregation of the mutant AR. We investigated the role of an interdomain interaction between the amino (N-terminal FxxLF motif and carboxyl (C-terminal AF-2 domain in a mouse model of SBMA. Male transgenic mice expressing polyQ-expanded AR with a mutation in the FxxLF motif (F23A to prevent the N/C interaction displayed substantially improved motor function compared with N/C-intact AR-expressing mice and showed reduced pathological features of SBMA. Serine 16 phosphorylation was substantially enhanced by the F23A mutation; moreover, the protective effect of AR F23A was dependent on this phosphorylation. These results reveal an important role for the N/C interaction on disease onset in mice and suggest that targeting AR conformation could be a therapeutic strategy for patients with SBMA.

  11. Preventing the Androgen Receptor N/C Interaction Delays Disease Onset in a Mouse Model of SBMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zboray, Lori; Pluciennik, Anna; Curtis, Dana; Liu, Yuhong; Berman-Booty, Lisa D; Orr, Christopher; Kesler, Cristina T; Berger, Tamar; Gioeli, Daniel; Paschal, Bryce M; Merry, Diane E

    2015-12-15

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by a polyglutamine expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) and is associated with misfolding and aggregation of the mutant AR. We investigated the role of an interdomain interaction between the amino (N)-terminal FxxLF motif and carboxyl (C)-terminal AF-2 domain in a mouse model of SBMA. Male transgenic mice expressing polyQ-expanded AR with a mutation in the FxxLF motif (F23A) to prevent the N/C interaction displayed substantially improved motor function compared with N/C-intact AR-expressing mice and showed reduced pathological features of SBMA. Serine 16 phosphorylation was substantially enhanced by the F23A mutation; moreover, the protective effect of AR F23A was dependent on this phosphorylation. These results reveal an important role for the N/C interaction on disease onset in mice and suggest that targeting AR conformation could be a therapeutic strategy for patients with SBMA.

  12. Insight into hypoxic preconditioning and ischemic injury through determination of nPKCε-interacting proteins in mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Sujuan; Li, Dongguo; Li, Yun; Yang, Xuan; Han, Song; Li, Junfa

    2013-08-01

    Cerebral hypoxic preconditioning (HPC) provides neuroprotection by intracellular signaling pathways. We previously demonstrated that novel protein kinase Cε (nPKCε) activation participated in cerebral HPC development. In this study, we explore the role of nPKCε in HPC-induced neuroprotection against middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO)-induced ischemic injury and identify its possible signaling molecules. A total of 131 adult male BALB/c mice were divided into eight groups: normoxic control (n=9), HPC (n=9), HPC+εV1-2 (n=13), Sham (n=19), HPC+sham (n=6), Ischemia (I, 6h MCAO, n=31), HPC+I (n=25) and HPC+εV1-2+I (n=19). nPKCε specific inhibitor εV1-2 was administered via intracerebroventricular injection. Western blot, 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling were applied to determine nPKCε membrane translocation, infarction volume and programmed cell death (PCD), respectively. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-De) and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) were used to identify nPKCε-interacting proteins, followed by bioinformatics analysis of genee ontology (GO) to predict nPKCε-specific signaling pathways. Our results showed that HPC attenuates MCAO-induced brain injuries and stabilized nPKCεmembrane translocation in peri-infarct region, which was abolished by nPKCε-speecific inhibitor εV1-2. Proteomics analysis revealed 8 up- and 3 down-regulated nPKCε-interacting proteins both in cytosolic and particulate fractions of HPC mouse brain. GO analysis predicted 25 significant nPKCε-specific signaling pathways among the 16 identified nPKCε-interacting proteins in brain of HPC mice. This study is the first to report multiple nPKCε-interacting proteins and their signaling pathways in HPC mouse brain, suggesting that nPKCε signaling molecules is responsible for HPC-induced neuroprotection against cerebral ischemic

  13. Mir-660 is downregulated in lung cancer patients and its replacement inhibits lung tumorigenesis by targeting MDM2-p53 interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortunato, O; Boeri, M; Moro, M; Verri, C; Mensah, M; Conte, D; Caleca, L; Roz, L; Pastorino, U; Sozzi, G

    2014-12-11

    Lung cancer represents the leading cause of cancer-related death in developed countries. Despite the advances in diagnostic and therapeutic techniques, the 5-year survival rate remains low. The research for novel therapies directed to biological targets has modified the therapeutic approach, but the frequent engagement of resistance mechanisms and the substantial costs, limit the ability to reduce lung cancer mortality. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs with known regulatory functions in cancer initiation and progression. In this study we found that mir-660 expression is downregulated in lung tumors compared with adjacent normal tissues and in plasma samples of lung cancer patients with poor prognosis, suggesting a potential functional role of this miRNA in lung tumorigenesis. Transient and stable overexpression of mir-660 using miRNA mimics reduced migration, invasion, and proliferation properties and increased apoptosis in p53 wild-type lung cancer cells (NCI-H460, LT73, and A549). Furthermore, stable overexpression using lentiviral vectors in NCI-H460 and A549 cells inhibited tumor xenograft growth in immunodeficient mice (95 and 50% reduction compared with control, respectively), whereas the effects of mir-660 overexpression were absent in H1299, a lung cancer cell line lacking p53 locus, both in in vitro and in vivo assays. We identified and validated mouse double minute 2 (MDM2) gene, a key regulator of the expression and function of p53, as a new direct target of mir-660. In addition, mir-660 expression reduced both mRNA and protein expression of MDM2 in all cell lines and stabilized p53 protein levels resulting in an upregulation of p21(WAF1/CIP1) in p53 wild-type cells. Our finding supports that mir-660 acts as a tumor suppressor miRNA and we suggest the replacement of mir-660 as a new therapeutic approach for p53 wild-type lung cancer treatment.

  14. Interaction between PGE2 and EGF receptor through MAPKs in mouse embryonic stem cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, S P; Lee, M Y; Ryu, J M; Han, H J

    2009-05-01

    Identifying the small molecules that permit precise regulation of embryonic stem (ES) cell proliferation should further support our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms of self renewal. In the present study, we showed that PGE(2) increased [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation in a time and dose dependent manner. In addition, PGE(2) increased the expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins, the percentage of cells in S phase and the total number of cells. PGE(2) obviously increased E-type prostaglandin (EP) receptor 1 mRNA expression level compare to 2, 3, 4 subtypes. EP1 antagonist also blocked PGE(2)-induced cell cycle regulatory protein expression and thymidine incorporation. PGE(2) caused phosphorylation of protein kinase C, Src, epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt phosphorylation, and p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), which were blocked by each inhibitors. In conclusion, PGE(2)-stimulated proliferation is mediated by MAPK via EP1 receptor-dependent PKC and EGF receptor-dependent PI3K/Akt signaling pathways in mouse ES cells.

  15. Reciprocal interactions of Fgf10/Fgfr2b modulate the mouse tongue epithelial differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Wern-Joo; Jung, Hye-In; Choi, Min-A; Han, Jin-Hyun; Gwon, Gi-Jeong; Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Lee, Sanggyu; Ryoo, Zae Young; Park, Eui-Kyun; Shin, Hong-In; Jung, Han-Sung; Kim, Jae-Young

    2011-08-01

    The molecular mechanisms for epithelial differentiation have been studied by observing skin development in embryogenesis, but the early signaling modulations involved in tongue epithelial differentiation are not completely understood. Based on the gene expression patterns of the Fgf signaling molecules and previous results from Fgf10 and Fgfr2b knockout mice, it was hypothesized that there would be fundamental signaling interactions through the epithelial Fgfr2b and its mesenchymal ligand Fgf10 to regulate tongue epithelium differentiation. To elucidate these reciprocal interactions in tongue epithelial differentiation, this study employed an in vitro tongue organ culture system with antisense-oligodeoxynucleotides (AS-ODNs) and recombinant protein-soaked bead implantation for the loss-of-function and gain-of-function studies. Functional analysis of Fgf signaling revealed precise reciprocal interactions, which showed that mesenchymal Fgf10 rather than Fgf7 modulates tongue epithelial differentiation via Fgfr2b in a temporal- and spatial-specific manner.

  16. Gene × Environment Interactions in Schizophrenia: Evidence from Genetic Mouse Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, Julia; Bock, Gavin; Desbonnet, Lieve; Waddington, John

    2016-01-01

    The study of gene × environment, as well as epistatic interactions in schizophrenia, has provided important insight into the complex etiopathologic basis of schizophrenia. It has also increased our understanding of the role of susceptibility genes in the disorder and is an important consideration as we seek to translate genetic advances into novel antipsychotic treatment targets. This review summarises data arising from research involving the modelling of gene × environment interactions in schizophrenia using preclinical genetic models. Evidence for synergistic effects on the expression of schizophrenia-relevant endophenotypes will be discussed. It is proposed that valid and multifactorial preclinical models are important tools for identifying critical areas, as well as underlying mechanisms, of convergence of genetic and environmental risk factors, and their interaction in schizophrenia. PMID:27725886

  17. Virtual Mouse Somatosensory Interaction Based on Kinect%基于 K inect 的虚拟鼠标体感交互

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱耀麟; 王晓雨; 汤汶; 武桐

    2015-01-01

    针对传统鼠标键盘人机交互中交互感不强的问题 ,提出了人体骨骼点控制模拟鼠标的体感交互方法 ,采用人体自然交互代替传统鼠标键盘交互 .使用Kinect体感摄像头追踪人体骨骼点,将特定骨骼点的移动范围映射到整个电脑屏幕上并传递给虚拟鼠标 ,控制鼠标在整个电脑屏幕内的移动 ,能够实现鼠标触发事件和人体与应用自然交互 .%To solve the problem of lacking participation sense during the traditional human-computer interaction ,a new human-computer interaction method is presented , w hich uses the human skeleton point instead of the traditional interaction with mouse and keyboard to control the virtual mouse .The human skeleton point is traced with Kinect camera .The range of one specific point ' s movement is mapped on to the entire computer screen ,and then passed to the virtual mouse to control the virtual mouse's movement in the screen .This method can realize the trigger event ,and the interaction befween humanbody and application .

  18. Hi-C Chromatin Interaction Networks Predict Co-expression in the Mouse Cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babaei, S.; Mahfouz, A.M.E.T.A.; Hulsman, M.; Lelieveldt, B.P.F.; De Ridder, J.; Reinders, M.J.T.

    2015-01-01

    The three dimensional conformation of the genome in the cell nucleus influences important biological processes such as gene expression regulation. Recent studies have shown a strong correlation between chromatin interactions and gene co-expression. However, predicting gene co-expression from frequen

  19. Isobolographic analysis of interactions between loreclezole and conventional antiepileptic drugs in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luszczki, Jarogniew J; Ratnaraj, Neville; Patsalos, Philip N; Czuczwar, Stanislaw J

    2006-05-01

    This study examined the interaction characteristics between loreclezole (LCZ) and various conventional antiepileptic drugs (phenytoin--PHT, carbamazepine--CBZ, valproate--VPA and phenobarbital--PB) in the mouse maximal electroshock (MES)-induced seizure model using isobolographic analysis. Drug-related adverse effects were ascertained by use of the chimney test (motor impairment) and the step-through passive avoidance task (learning and retrieval). It was observed that the combination of LCZ with VPA or PB, at the fixed ratio of 1:1, was supra-additive (synergistic) and the combination of LCZ with CBZ, at all fixed ratios tested (1:3, 1:1 and 3:1), was supra-additive against electroconvulsions. The remaining combinations evaluated, i.e., LCZ with PB or VPA at fixed ratios of 1:3 and 3:1, as well as all fixed-ratio combinations between LCZ and PHT, were additive in the MES test in mice. Pharmacokinetic characterization revealed that LCZ significantly increased both free plasma and brain concentrations of CBZ and PHT, but was without effect on PB. Moreover, a bi-directional pharmacokinetic interaction between LCZ and VPA was observed in that while LCZ increased free plasma, but not total brain VPA concentrations, VPA increased the total brain, but not free plasma LCZ concentrations. Adverse-effect testing revealed that for all antiepileptic drug combinations neither motor performance nor long-term memory was altered. Of the drug combinations investigated, only that of LCZ and PB at the fixed ratio of 1:1 was not associated with any pharmacokinetic interactions, and thus it may be concluded that the supra-additive (synergistic) isobolographic interaction was pharmacodynamic in nature. Furthermore, the fact that LCZ and PB have similar mechanisms of action would suggest that drugs with similar mechanisms of action may provide rational polytherapy regimens.

  20. Crystal structure of the PDZ domain of mouse Dishevelled 1 and its interaction with CXXC5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Inhwan; Choi, Sooho; Yun, Ji-Hye; Seo, Seolhwa; Choi, Sehee; Choi, Kang-Yell; Lee, Weontae

    2016-12-05

    Dishevelled (Dvl) plays a crucial role in Wnt signaling by interacting with membrane-bound receptors and downstream molecules through its PDZ domain. CXXC5 is one of the key molecules that interacts with Dvl and negatively regulates the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in osteoblast differentiation. Recently, the Dvl-CXXC5 interaction has been identified as an excellent target for osteoporosis treatment. Therefore, it is desirable to have detailed structural information for the Dvl-CXXC5 interaction. Although solution structures of the Dvl1 PDZ domain have been reported, a high-resolution crystal structure would provide detailed sidechain information that is essential for drug development. Here, we determined the first crystal structure of the Dvl-1 PDZ domain at a resolution of 1.76 Å, and compared it with its previously reported solution structure. The Dvl1 PDZ domain crystal belonged to the space group H32 with unit-cell parameters a = b = 72.837, c = 120.616, α = ß = 90.00, γ = 120.00. The crystal structure of Dvl1 PDZ shared its topology with the previously reported structure determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR); however, the crystal structure was quite different from the solution structure in both the secondary structural region and the ligand-binding pocket. Molecular modeling based on NMR and X-ray crystallographic data yielded detailed information about the Dvl1/CXXC5 interaction, which will be useful for designing inhibitors.

  1. Synergistic interaction of gabapentin and oxcarbazepine in the mouse maximal electroshock seizure model--an isobolographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luszczki, Jarogniew J; Andres, Marta M; Czuczwar, Stanislaw J

    2005-05-16

    The anticonvulsant effects produced by mixtures of oxcarbazepine and gabapentin (two second-generation antiepileptic drugs) in numerous fixed-ratio combinations of 1:1, 1:2, 1:5, 1:10, 1:15, and 1:20 were examined isobolographically in the mouse maximal electroshock seizure model. Results displayed that mixtures of both drugs at the fixed-ratios of 1:2, 1:5, 1:10, 1:15, and 1:20 exerted supra-additive (synergistic) interactions against electroconvulsions. Only a fixed-ratio of 1:1 was indifferent with isobolography, although the combination displayed the trend towards supra-additivity. Furthermore, the combinations of oxcarbazepine with gabapentin, administered at their median effective doses (ED(50 mix)s), did not alter motor performance of animals challenged with the chimney test. Additionally, neither gabapentin nor oxcarbazepine affected total brain concentrations of co-administered drug, indicating a pharmacodynamic nature of interaction between these antiepileptics. Finally, based on preclinical data presented here the combination of oxcarbazepine and gabapentin is of particular importance for further therapy in patients with refractory partial seizures.

  2. Displays of paternal mouse pup retrieval following communicative interaction with maternal mates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong-Xiang; Lopatina, Olga; Higashida, Chiharu; Fujimoto, Hiroko; Akther, Shirin; Inzhutova, Alena; Liang, Mingkun; Zhong, Jing; Tsuji, Takahiro; Yoshihara, Toru; Sumi, Kohei; Ishiyama, Mizuho; Ma, Wen-Jie; Ozaki, Mitsunori; Yagitani, Satoshi; Yokoyama, Shigeru; Mukaida, Naofumi; Sakurai, Takeshi; Hori, Osamu; Yoshioka, Katsuji; Hirao, Atsushi; Kato, Yukio; Ishihara, Katsuhiko; Kato, Ichiro; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Cherepanov, Stanislav M; Salmina, Alla B; Hirai, Hirokazu; Asano, Masahide; Brown, David A; Nagano, Isamu; Higashida, Haruhiro

    2013-01-01

    Compared with the knowledge of maternal care, much less is known about the factors required for paternal parental care. Here we report that new sires of laboratory mice, though not spontaneously parental, can be induced to show maternal-like parental care (pup retrieval) using signals from dams separated from their pups. During this interaction, the maternal mates emit 38-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations to their male partners, which are equivalent to vocalizations that occur following pheromone stimulation. Without these signals or in the absence of maternal mates, the sires do not retrieve their pups within 5 min. These results show that, in mice, the maternal parent communicates to the paternal parent to encourage pup care. This new paradigm may be useful in the analysis of the parental brain during paternal care induced by interactive communication.

  3. Synergistic antinociceptive interaction between palmitoylethanolamide and tramadol in the mouse formalin test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Déciga-Campos, Myrna; Ramírez-Marín, Pamela Moncerrat; López-Muñoz, Francisco Javier

    2015-10-15

    Pharmacological synergism has been used to obtain a higher efficacy using drug concentrations at which side effects are minimal. In this study, the pharmacological antinociceptive interaction between N-palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) and tramadol was investigated. The individual concentration-response curves for PEA (0.1-56.2 μg/paw) and tramadol (1-56.2 μg/paw) were evaluated in mice in which nociception was induced by an intraplantar injection of 2% formalin. Isobolographic analysis was used to evaluate the pharmacological interaction between PEA (EC50=23.7±1.6 μg/paw) and tramadol (EC50=26.02±2.96 μg/paw) using the EC50 and a fixed 1:1 ratio combination. The isobologram demonstrated that the combinations investigated in this study produced a synergistic interaction; the experimental values (Zexp=9.5±0.2 μg/paw) were significantly smaller than those calculated theoretically (Zadd=24.8±0.2 μg/paw). The antinociceptive mechanisms of the PEA and tramadol combination involved the opioid receptor, transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 1 (TRPV1), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR-α). The sedative effect of the combination of PEA and tramadol was less than that generated by individual treatments. These findings suggest that the PEA and tramadol combination produced enhanced antinociceptive efficacy at concentrations at which side effects are minimal.

  4. Isobolographic analysis of interactions between losigamone and conventional antiepileptic drugs in the mouse maximal electroshock model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowicz, Kinga K; Kimber-Trojnar, Zaneta; Ratnaraj, Neville; Patsalos, Philip N; Luszczki, Jarogniew J; Czuczwar, Stanislaw J

    2007-01-15

    The aim of this study was the isobolographic evaluation of interactions between losigamone (LSG), valproate (VPA), carbamazepine (CBZ), phenytoin (PHT), and phenobarbital (PB) in the maximal electroshock (MES) test in mice. Electroconvulsions were produced by means of an alternating current (ear-clip electrodes, 0.2-s stimulus duration, and tonic hindlimb extension taken as the endpoint). Adverse effects were evaluated in the chimney test (motor coordination) and the passive avoidance task (long-term memory). Brain concentrations of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) were measured by immunofluorescence or high-performance liquid chromatography. Isobolographic analysis indicated synergistic interactions between LSG and VPA. For example, in the proportion of 1:1 the theoretically calculated 50% effective dose for additivity (ED(50add)) was 138 mg/kg, while the experimentally derived ED(50) for the mixture (ED(50mix)) was 85.2 mg/kg. The difference was significant at p<0.001. LSG combined with CBZ or PHT showed additivity, whereas the combinations of LSG with PB were either additive, for the fixed ratios of 1:3 and 1:1, or antagonistic for the ratio of 3:1 (ED(50add)=18.4 mg/kg versus ED(50mix)=26.7 mg/kg, p<0.05). Impairment of long-term memory was noted only in the case of VPA given at its ED(50), however this AED did not affect motor performance. LSG, CBZ, PHT and PB (applied at their ED(50) values) and co-administration of LSG with conventional AEDs (including VPA) impaired neither motor performance nor long-term memory. LSG did not affect the brain concentration of VPA or PB, but significantly elevated the brain concentrations of CBZ and PHT. In contrast, VPA, CBZ and PHT significantly increased the brain concentration of LSG, indicating a pharmacokinetic contribution to the observed pharmacodynamic interactions. Although LSG exhibited some favorable pharmacodynamic interactions with various AEDs, these were complicated by pharmacokinetic interactions and emphasize the

  5. Genetic interactions between Shox2 and Hox genes during the regional growth and development of the mouse limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, Stanley J; Wang, Fan; Cobb, John

    2014-11-01

    The growth and development of the vertebrate limb relies on homeobox genes of the Hox and Shox families, with their independent mutation often giving dose-dependent effects. Here we investigate whether Shox2 and Hox genes function together during mouse limb development by modulating their relative dosage and examining the limb for nonadditive effects on growth. Using double mRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in single embryos, we first show that Shox2 and Hox genes have associated spatial expression dynamics, with Shox2 expression restricted to the proximal limb along with Hoxd9 and Hoxa11 expression, juxtaposing the distal expression of Hoxa13 and Hoxd13. By generating mice with all possible dosage combinations of mutant Shox2 alleles and HoxA/D cluster deletions, we then show that their coordinated proximal limb expression is critical to generate normally proportioned limb segments. These epistatic interactions tune limb length, where Shox2 underexpression enhances, and Shox2 overexpression suppresses, Hox-mutant phenotypes. Disruption of either Shox2 or Hox genes leads to a similar reduction in Runx2 expression in the developing humerus, suggesting their concerted action drives cartilage maturation during normal development. While we furthermore provide evidence that Hox gene function influences Shox2 expression, this regulation is limited in extent and is unlikely on its own to be a major explanation for their genetic interaction. Given the similar effect of human SHOX mutations on regional limb growth, Shox and Hox genes may generally function as genetic interaction partners during the growth and development of the proximal vertebrate limb.

  6. Gene-Environment Interaction Research and Transgenic Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Chouliaras

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of the sporadic form of Alzheimer's disease (AD remains largely unknown. Recent evidence has suggested that gene-environment interactions (GxE may play a crucial role in its development and progression. Whereas various susceptibility loci have been identified, like the apolipoprotein E4 allele, these cannot fully explain the increasing prevalence of AD observed with aging. In addition to such genetic risk factors, various environmental factors have been proposed to alter the risk of developing AD as well as to affect the rate of cognitive decline in AD patients. Nevertheless, aside from the independent effects of genetic and environmental risk factors, their synergistic participation in increasing the risk of developing AD has been sparsely investigated, even though evidence points towards such a direction. Advances in the genetic manipulation of mice, modeling various aspects of the AD pathology, have provided an excellent tool to dissect the effects of genes, environment, and their interactions. In this paper we present several environmental factors implicated in the etiology of AD that have been tested in transgenic animal models of the disease. The focus lies on the concept of GxE and its importance in a multifactorial disease like AD. Additionally, possible mediating mechanisms and future challenges are discussed.

  7. Metallothionein transfers zinc to mitochondrial aconitase through a direct interaction in mouse hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wenke; Cai, Jian; Pierce, William M; Franklin, Renty B; Maret, Wolfgang; Benz, Frederick W; Kang, Y James

    2005-07-08

    Previous studies have shown that in a cell-free system, metallothionein (MT) releases zinc when the environment becomes oxidized and the released zinc is transferred to a zinc-binding protein if such a protein is present. However, it is unknown whether and how zinc transfers from MT to other proteins in vivo. The present study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that if zinc transfer from MT to other proteins occurs in vivo, the transfer would proceed through a direct interaction between MT and a specific group of proteins. The heart extract obtained from MT-null mice was incubated with 65Zn-MT or 65ZnCl2 and the proteins receiving 65Zn were separated by blue-native PAGE (BN-PAGE) or sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE (SDS-PAGE), and detected by autoradiography. A unique 65Zn-binding band was observed from the 65Zn-MT-incubated, but not the 65ZnCl2-incubated preparation. The analysis using matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry revealed that mitochondrial aconitase (m-aconitase) was among the proteins accepting Zn directly from Zn-MT. The m-aconitase, not the cytosolic aconitase (c-aconitase), was co-immunoprecipitated with MT. This study demonstrates that MT transfers zinc to m-aconitase through a direct interaction.

  8. Immunoendocrine interactions during chronic cysticercosis determine male mouse feminization: role of IL-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Montor, J; Baig, S; Mitchell, R; Deway, K; Hallal-Calleros, C; Damian, R T

    2001-10-15

    Taenia crassiceps cysticercosis results in an impressive feminization in male mice during chronic infection, characterized by increased serum estradiol levels 100 times their normal values, while those of testosterone and dihydrotestosterone are decreased by 85 and 95% respectively. Concomitantly, the levels of follicle-stimulating hormone and IL-6 are increased 70 and 90 times their normal values in the infected male mice. Since a specific Th1/Th2 shift of the immune response has been previously reported during the chronic infection, and this shift may be associated with the feminization process, we proposed that this shift is induced by immunoendocrine interactions during the disease, and this gives way to a change in the initial resistance to the infection in the male mice, which become as susceptible as female mice. To confirm this hypothesis, we depleted immune system activity in two different ways: total body irradiation and neonatal thymectomy. Our results show that when immune system activity is depleted using either strategy, the male mice do not feminize, and the levels of follicle-stimulating hormone and IL-6 are inhibited. Depletion of IL-6 using IL-6(-/-) knockout mice does not produce the feminization process stated above, while restitution of the IL-6(-/-) knockout, irradiated, and thymectomized mice with murine recombinant IL-6 restores the feminization process. Expression of the IL-6 gene was found only in the testes and spleen of infected animals. Our results illustrate the importance of immunoendocrine interactions during a parasitic disease and show a possible new mechanism of parasite establishment in an initially resistant host.

  9. Interleukin-1 Interacts with Ethanol Effects on GABAergic Transmission in the Mouse Central Amygdala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal eBajo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuroinflammation is hypothesized to enhance alcohol consumption and contribute to the development of alcoholism. GABAergic transmission in the central amygdala (CeA plays an important role in the transition to alcohol dependence. Therefore, we studied the effects of interleukin-1β (IL-1β a proinflammatory cytokine mediating ethanol-induced neuroinflammation, and its interaction with ethanol on CeA GABAegic transmission in B6129SF2/J mice. We also assessed ethanol intake in B6129SF2/J mice. Intake with unlimited (24 hours ethanol access was 9.2-12.7 g/kg (3-15% ethanol, while limited (2 hours access produced an intake of 4.1±0.5 g/kg (15% ethanol. In our electrophysiology experiments, we found that recombinant IL-1β (50 and 100 ng/ml significantly decreased the amplitude of evoked inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (eIPSPs, with no significant effects on paired-pulse facilitation (PPF. IL-1beta (50 ng/ml had dual effects on spontaneous miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs: increasing mIPSC frequencies in most CeA neurons, but decreasing both mIPSC frequencies and amplitudes in a few cells. The IL-1β receptor antagonist (IL-1ra; 100 ng/ml also had dual effects on mIPSCs and prevented the actions of IL-1β on mIPSC frequencies. These results suggest that IL-1β can alter CeA GABAergic transmission at pre- and postsynaptic sites. Ethanol (44 mM significantly increased eIPSP amplitudes, decreased PPFs, and increased mIPSC frequencies. IL-1β did not alter ethanol’s enhancement of the eIPSP amplitude, but, in IL-1β-responsive neurons, the ethanol effects on mIPSC frequencies were lost. Overall, our data suggest that the IL-1 system is involved in basal GABAergic transmission and that IL-1β interacts with the ethanol-induced facilitation of CeA GABAergic transmission.

  10. Interaction between fidgetin and protein kinase A-anchoring protein AKAP95 is critical for palatogenesis in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan; Mahaffey, Connie L; Bérubé, Nathalie; Frankel, Wayne N

    2006-08-01

    The gene defective in fidget mice encodes fidgetin, a member of the AAA (ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities) family of ATPases. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we identified cAMP-dependent protein kinase A anchoring protein 95 kDa (AKAP95) as a potential fidgetin-binding protein. Epitope-tagged fidgetin co-localized with endogenous AKAP95 in the nuclear matrix, and the physical interaction between fidgetin and AKAP95 was further confirmed by reciprocal immunoprecipitation. To evaluate the biological significance of the fidgetin-AKAP95 binding, we created AKAP95 mutant mice through a gene trap strategy. Akap95 mutant mice are surprisingly viable with no overt phenotype. However, a significant number of mice carrying both Akap95 and fidget mutations die soon after birth due to cleft palate, consistent with the overlapping expression of AKAP95 and fidgetin in the branchial arches during mouse embryogenesis. These results expand the spectrum of the pleiotropic phenotypes of fidget mice and provide new leads on the in vivo function of AKAP95.

  11. Intravital two-photon microscopy of host-pathogen interactions in a mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus skin abscess formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liese, Jan; Rooijakkers, Suzan H M; van Strijp, Jos A G; Novick, Richard P; Dustin, Michael L

    2013-06-01

    Staphylococcus (S.) aureus is a frequent cause of severe skin infections. The ability to control the infection is largely dependent on the rapid recruitment of neutrophils (PMN). To gain more insight into the dynamics of PMN migration and host-pathogen interactions in vivo, we used intravital two-photon (2-P) microscopy to visualize S. aureus skin infections in the mouse. Reporter S. aureus strains expressing fluorescent proteins were developed, which allowed for detection of the bacteria in vivo. By employing LysM-EGFP mice to visualize PMN, we observed the rapid appearance of PMN in the extravascular space of the dermis and their directed movement towards the focus of infection, which led to the delineation of an abscess within 1 day. Moreover, tracking of transferred labelled bone-marrow neutrophils showed that PMN localization to the site of infection is dependent on the presence of G-protein-coupled receptors on the PMN, whereas Interleukin-1 receptor was required on host cells other than PMN. Furthermore, the S. aureus complement inhibitor Ecb could block PMN accumulation at thesite of infection. Our results establish that 2-P microscopy is a powerful tool to investigate the orchestration of the immune cells, S. aureus location and gene expression in vivo on a single cell level.

  12. A growth-dependent transcription initiation factor (TIF-IA) interacting with RNA polymerase I regulates mouse ribosomal RNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnapp, A; Pfleiderer, C; Rosenbauer, H; Grummt, I

    1990-09-01

    Control of mouse ribosomal RNA synthesis in response to extracellular signals is mediated by TIF-IA, a regulatory factor whose amount or activity correlates with cell proliferation. Factor TIF-IA interacts with RNA polymerase I (pol I), thus converting it into a transcriptionally active holoenzyme, which is able to initiate specifically at the rDNA promoter in the presence of the other auxiliary transcription initiation factors, designated TIF-IB, TIF-IC and UBF. With regard to several criteria, the growth-dependent factor TIF-IA behaves like a bacterial sigma factor: (i) it associates physically with pol I, (ii) it is required for initiation of transcription, (iii) it is present in limiting amounts and (iv) under certain salt conditions, it is chromatographically separable from the polymerase. In addition, evidence is presented that dephosphorylation of pol I abolishes in vitro transcription initiation from the ribosomal gene promoter without significantly affecting the polymerizing activity of the enzyme at nonspecific templates. The involvement of both a regulatory factor and post-translational modification of the transcribing enzyme provides an efficient and versatile mechanism of rDNA transcription regulation which enables the cell to adapt ribosome synthesis rapidly to a variety of extracellular signals.

  13. Temporospatial tissue interactions regulating the regeneration of the enamel knot in the developing mouse tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung-Won; Kim, Jae-Young; Cai, Jinglei; Lee, Jong-Min; Kim, Eun-Jung; Lee, Hyun-A; Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Jung, Han-Sung

    2007-02-01

    The enamel knot (EK), which is a transient signaling center in the tooth germ, regulates both the differential growth of the dental epithelium and the tooth shape. In this study, the regeneration of the EK was evaluated. The EK regions were removed from the E14 and E16 dental epithelia, and the remaining epithelia were recombined with their original dental mesenchymes. All these tooth germs could develop into calcified teeth after being transplanted into the kidney capsule for 3 weeks. One primary EK was regenerated earlier, and two or three secondary EKs were regenerated later in culture. When simply recombined without removing the EK, the tooth germ, which had four secondary EKs and four cuspal areas of the dental papilla, generated one primary EK first and subsequent secondary EKs. These results indicate that the patterning of the EK in all tooth germs always starts from a primary EK independent of the direct epithelial or mesenchymal control. This suggests that neither the dental epithelium nor the dental mesenchyme can dictate the pattern or number of the EK formation, but the interaction between the dental epithelium and the dental mesenchyme is essential for the regeneration and patterning of the EKs.

  14. Ryanodine Receptors Selectively Interact with L Type Calcium Channels in Mouse Taste Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle R Rebello

    Full Text Available WE REPORTED THAT RYANODINE RECEPTORS ARE EXPRESSED IN TWO DIFFERENT TYPES OF MAMMALIAN PERIPHERAL TASTE RECEPTOR CELLS: Type II and Type III cells. Type II cells lack voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs and chemical synapses. In these cells, ryanodine receptors contribute to the taste-evoked calcium signals that are initiated by opening inositol trisphosphate receptors located on internal calcium stores. In Type III cells that do have VGCCs and chemical synapses, ryanodine receptors contribute to the depolarization-dependent calcium influx.The goal of this study was to establish if there was selectivity in the type of VGCC that is associated with the ryanodine receptor in the Type III taste cells or if the ryanodine receptor opens irrespective of the calcium channels involved. We also wished to determine if the ryanodine receptors and VGCCs require a physical linkage to interact or are simply functionally associated with each other. Using calcium imaging and pharmacological inhibitors, we found that ryanodine receptors are selectively associated with L type VGCCs but likely not through a physical linkage.Taste cells are able to undergo calcium induced calcium release through ryanodine receptors to increase the initial calcium influx signal and provide a larger calcium response than would otherwise occur when L type channels are activated in Type III taste cells.

  15. [Estrogen replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søgaard, A J; Berntsen, G K; Magnus, J H; Tollan, A

    1998-02-10

    Recent research on long-term postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy (HRT) indicates a positive effect on both total mortality and morbidity. This has raised the question of widespread preventive long-term use of HRT. Possible side-effects and ideological issues related to preventive HRT have led to debate and uncertainty among health professionals, in the media, and in the population at large. In order to evaluate the level of knowledge about and attitudes towards HRT, a randomly selected group of 737 Norwegian women aged 16-79 was interviewed by the Central Bureau of Statistics. One in three women had received information about HRT in the last two years, mainly through weekly magazines and physicians. The proportion who answered the questions on knowledge correctly varied from 36% to 47%. Those who had been given information by a physician possessed accurate knowledge, had more positive attitudes towards HRT and were more willing to use HRT than women who had reviewed information through other channels. Women with a higher level of education were better informed and more knowledgeable than others, but were nevertheless more reluctant to use HRT than those who were less educated. The limited number of women who actually receive information on HRT, the low level of knowledge and the ambivalent attitudes toward HRT are a major challenge to the public health service.

  16. Gaze beats mouse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mateo, Julio C.; San Agustin, Javier; Hansen, John Paulin

    2008-01-01

    Facial EMG for selection is fast, easy and, combined with gaze pointing, it can provide completely hands-free interaction. In this pilot study, 5 participants performed a simple point-and-select task using mouse or gaze for pointing and a mouse button or a facial-EMG switch for selection. Gaze...... pointing was faster than mouse pointing, while maintaining a similar error rate. EMG and mouse-button selection had a comparable performance. From analyses of completion time, throughput and error rates, we concluded that the combination of gaze and facial EMG holds potential for outperforming the mouse....

  17. Gene-environment interaction during early development in the heterozygous reeler mouse: clues for modelling of major neurobehavioral syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laviola, Giovanni; Ognibene, Elisa; Romano, Emilia; Adriani, Walter; Keller, Flavio

    2009-04-01

    Autism and schizophrenia are multifactorial disorders with increasing prevalence in the young population. Among candidate molecules, reelin (RELN) is a protein of the extracellular matrix playing a key role in brain development and synaptic plasticity. The heterozygous (HZ) reeler mouse provides a model for studying the role of reelin deficiency for the onset of these syndromes. We investigated whether early indices of neurobehavioral disorders can be identified in the infant reeler, and whether the consequences of ontogenetic adverse experiences may question or support the suitability of this model. A first study focused on the link between early exposure to Chlorpyryfos and its enduring neurobehavioral consequences. Our data are interesting in view of recently discovered cholinergic abnormalities in autism and schizophrenia, and may suggest new avenues for early pharmacological intervention. In a second study, we analyzed the consequences of repeated maternal separation early in ontogeny. The results provide evidence of how unusual stress early in development are converted into altered behavior in some, but not all, individuals depending on gender and genetic background. A third study aimed to verify the reliability of the model at critical age windows. Data suggest reduced anxiety, increased impulsivity and disinhibition, and altered pain threshold in response to morphine for HZ, supporting a differential organization of brain dopaminergic, serotonergic and opioid systems in this genotype. In conclusion, HZ exhibited a complex behavioral and psycho-pharmacological phenotype, and differential responsivity to ontogenetic adverse conditions. HZ may be used to disentangle interactions between genetic vulnerability and environmental factors. Such an approach could help to model the pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental psychiatric diseases.

  18. A truncated Kv1.1 protein in the brain of the megencephaly mouse: expression and interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Århem Peter

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The megencephaly mouse, mceph/mceph, is epileptic and displays a dramatically increased brain volume and neuronal count. The responsible mutation was recently revealed to be an eleven base pair deletion, leading to a frame shift, in the gene encoding the potassium channel Kv1.1. The predicted MCEPH protein is truncated at amino acid 230 out of 495. Truncated proteins are usually not expressed since nonsense mRNAs are most often degraded. However, high Kv1.1 mRNA levels in mceph/mceph brain indicated that it escaped this control mechanism. Therefore, we hypothesized that the truncated Kv1.1 would be expressed and dysregulate other Kv1 subunits in the mceph/mceph mice. Results We found that the MCEPH protein is expressed in the brain of mceph/mceph mice. MCEPH was found to lack mature (Golgi glycosylation, but to be core glycosylated and trapped in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Interactions between MCEPH and other Kv1 subunits were studied in cell culture, Xenopus oocytes and the brain. MCEPH can form tetramers with Kv1.1 in cell culture and has a dominant negative effect on Kv1.2 and Kv1.3 currents in oocytes. However, it does not retain Kv1.2 in the ER of neurons. Conclusion The megencephaly mice express a truncated Kv1.1 in the brain, and constitute a unique tool to study Kv1.1 trafficking relevant for understanding epilepsy, ataxia and pathologic brain overgrowth.

  19. Novel frem1-related mouse phenotypes and evidence of genetic interactions with gata4 and slit3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler F Beck

    Full Text Available The FRAS1-related extracellular matrix 1 (FREM1 gene encodes an extracellular matrix protein that plays a critical role in the development of multiple organ systems. In humans, recessive mutations in FREM1 cause eye defects, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, renal anomalies and anorectal malformations including anteriorly placed anus. A similar constellation of findings-microphthalmia, cryptophthalmos, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, renal agenesis and rectal prolapse-have been described in FREM1-deficient mice. In this paper, we identify a homozygous Frem1 missense mutation (c.1687A>T, p.Ile563Phe in an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU-derived mouse strain, crf11, with microphthalmia, cryptophthalmos, renal agenesis and rectal prolapse. This mutation affects a highly conserved residue in FREM1's third CSPG domain. The p.Ile563Phe change is predicted to be deleterious and to cause decreased FREM1 protein stability. The crf11 allele also fails to complement the previously described eyes2 allele of Frem1 (p.Lys826* providing further evidence that the crf11 phenotype is due to changes affecting Frem1 function. We then use mice bearing the crf11 and eyes2 alleles to identify lung lobulation defects and decreased anogenital distance in males as novel phenotypes associated with FREM1 deficiency in mice. Due to phenotypic overlaps between FREM1-deficient mice and mice that are deficient for the retinoic acid-responsive transcription factor GATA4 and the extracellular matrix protein SLIT3, we also perform experiments to look for in vivo genetic interactions between the genes that encode these proteins. These experiments reveal that Frem1 interacts genetically with Gata4 in the development of lung lobulation defects and with Slit3 in the development of renal agenesis. These results demonstrate that FREM1-deficient mice faithfully recapitulate many of the phenotypes seen in individuals with FREM1 deficiency and that variations in GATA4 and SLIT3 expression

  20. Interactions of pregabalin with gabapentin, levetiracetam, tiagabine and vigabatrin in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model: a type II isobolographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luszczki, Jarogniew J; Filip, Damian; Florek-Luszczki, Magdalena

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the anticonvulsant effects of pregabalin in combination with four second-generation antiepileptic drugs (i.e., gabapentin, levetiracetam, tiagabine, and vigabatrin) in the mouse maximal electroshock (MES)-induced seizure model by using the type II isobolographic analysis. Tonic hind limb extension (seizure activity) was evoked in adult male albino Swiss mice by a current (sine-wave, 25 mA, 500 V, 50 Hz, 0.2 s stimulus duration) delivered via auricular electrodes. The combination of pregabalin with gabapentin at the fixed-ratio of 1:1 was supra-additive (synergistic) in terms of seizure suppression while the combinations at the fixed-ratios of 2:1 and 4:1 were additive in the mouse MES model. Similarly, the combination of pregabalin with tiagabine at the fixed-ratio of 25:1 was supra-additive, whereas the combinations at the fixed-ratios of 100:1 and 50:1 were additive in the mouse MES model. Pregabalin with levetiracetam and vigabatrin at the fixed-ratios of 1:1, 2:1 and 4:1 were additive in this seizure model. The combinations of pregabalin with gabapentin (1:1) and pregabalin with tiagabine (25:1) appear to be favorable combinations exerting supra-additive interaction in suppressing MES-induced seizures. Pregabalin in combination with levetiracetam and vigabatrin appears to be neutral producing only additivity in the mouse MES model.

  1. Function of Jam-B/Jam-C interaction in homing and mobilization of human and mouse hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcangeli, Marie-Laure; Bardin, Florence; Frontera, Vincent; Bidaut, Ghislain; Obrados, Elodie; Adams, Ralf H; Chabannon, Christian; Aurrand-Lions, Michel

    2014-04-01

    The junctional adhesion molecules Jam-b and Jam-c interact together at interendothelial junctions and have been involved in the regulation of immune response, inflammation, and leukocyte migration. More recently, Jam-c has been found to be expressed by hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) in mouse. Conversely, we have reported that Jam-b is present on bone marrow stromal cells and that Jam-b-deficient mice have defects in the regulation of hematopoietic stem cell pool. In this study, we have addressed whether interaction between Jam-b and Jam-c participates to HSPC mobilization or hematopoietic reconstitution after irradiation. We show that a blocking monoclonal antibody directed against Jam-c inhibits hematopoietic reconstitution, progenitor homing to the bone marrow, and induces HSPC mobilization in a Jam-b dependent manner. In the latter setting, antibody treatment over a period of 3 days does not alter hematopoietic differentiation nor induce leukocytosis. Results are translated to human hematopoietic system in which a functional adhesive interaction between JAM-B and JAM-C is found between human HSPC and mesenchymal stem cells. Such an interaction does not occur between HSPC and human endothelial cells or osteoblasts. It is further shown that anti-JAM-C blocking antibody interferes with CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor homing in mouse bone marrow suggesting that monoclonal antibodies inhibiting JAM-B/JAM-C interaction may represent valuable therapeutic tools to improve stem cell mobilization protocols.

  2. Interactions of levetiracetam with carbamazepine, phenytoin, topiramate and vigabatrin in the mouse 6Hz psychomotor seizure model - a type II isobolographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florek-Luszczki, Magdalena; Wlaz, Aleksandra; Luszczki, Jarogniew J

    2014-01-15

    The aim of the presented study was to characterize the anticonvulsant effects of levetiracetam in combination with various antiepileptic drugs (carbamazepine, phenytoin, topiramate and vigabatrin) in the mouse 6Hz psychomotor seizure model. Limbic (psychomotor) seizure activity was evoked in albino Swiss mice by a current (32mA, 6Hz, 3s stimulus duration) delivered via ocular electrodes; type II isobolographic analysis was used to characterize the consequent anticonvulsant interactions between the various drug combinations for fixed-ratios of 1:1, 1:2, 1:5 and 1:10. With type II isobolographic analysis, the combinations of levetiracetam with carbamazepine and phenytoin for the fixed-ratios of 1:5 and 1:10 were supra-additive (synergistic; P<0.01) in terms of seizure suppression, while the combinations for the fixed-ratios of 1:1 and 1:2 were additive. Levetiracetam combined with topiramate and vigabatrin for the fixed-ratio of 1:10 exerted supra-additive interaction (P<0.05), and simultaneously, the two-drug combinations for the fixed-ratios of 1:1, 1:2 and 1:5 produced additive interaction in the mouse 6Hz psychomotor seizure model. The combinations of levetiracetam with carbamazepine and phenytoin for the fixed-ratios of 1:5 and 1:10, as well as the combinations of levetiracetam with topiramate and vigabatrin for the fixed-ratio of 1:10 appear to be particularly favorable combinations exerting supra-additive interaction in the mouse 6Hz psychomotor seizure model. Finally, it may be concluded that because of the synergistic interactions between levetiracetam and carbamazepine, phenytoin, topiramate and vigabatrin, the combinations might be useful in clinical practice.

  3. GSK3 influences social preference and anxiety-related behaviors during social interaction in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome and autism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjelo A Mines

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nearly 1% of children in the United States exhibit autism spectrum disorders, but causes and treatments remain to be identified. Mice with deletion of the fragile X mental retardation 1 (Fmr1 gene are used to model autism because loss of Fmr1 gene function causes Fragile X Syndrome (FXS and many people with FXS exhibit autistic-like behaviors. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3 is hyperactive in brains of Fmr1 knockout mice, and inhibition of GSK3 by lithium administration ameliorates some behavioral impairment in these mice. We extended our studies of this association by testing whether GSK3 contributes to socialization behaviors. This used two mouse models with disrupted regulation of GSK3, Fmr1 knockout mice and GSK3 knockin mice, in which inhibitory serines of the two isoforms of GSK3, GSK3alpha and GSK3beta, are mutated to alanines, leaving GSK3 fully active. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To assess sociability, test mice were introduced to a restrained stimulus mouse (S1 for 10 min, followed by introduction of a second restrained stimulus mouse (S2 for 10 min, which assesses social preference. Fmr1 knockout and GSK3 knockin mice displayed no deficit in sociability with the S1 mouse, but unlike wild-type mice neither demonstrated social preference for the novel S2 mouse. Fmr1 knockout mice displayed more anxiety-related behaviors during social interaction (grooming, rearing, and digging than wild-type mice, which was ameliorated by inhibition of GSK3 with chronic lithium treatment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that impaired inhibitory regulation of GSK3 in Fmr1 knockout mice may contribute to some socialization deficits and that lithium treatment can ameliorate certain socialization impairments. As discussed in the present work, these results suggest a role for GSK3 in social behaviors and implicate inhibition of GSK3 as a potential therapeutic.

  4. A Map of General and Specialized Chromatin Readers in Mouse Tissues Generated by Label-free Interaction Proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eberl, H.C.; Mann, M.; Spruijt, C.G.;

    2013-01-01

    . Here we describe a sensitive, label-free histone peptide pull-down technology with extracts of different mouse tissues. Applying this workflow to the classical activating and repressive epigenetic marks on histone H3, H3K4me3, and H3K9me3, we identified known and putative readers in extracts from brain...

  5. Disruption of the 5S RNP-Mdm2 interaction significantly improves the erythroid defect in a mouse model for Diamond-Blackfan anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaako, P; Debnath, S; Olsson, K; Zhang, Y; Flygare, J; Lindström, M S; Bryder, D; Karlsson, S

    2015-11-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a congenital erythroid hypoplasia caused by haploinsufficiency of genes encoding ribosomal proteins (RPs). Perturbed ribosome biogenesis in DBA has been shown to induce a p53-mediated ribosomal stress response. However, the mechanisms of p53 activation and its relevance for the erythroid defect remain elusive. Previous studies have indicated that activation of p53 is caused by the inhibition of mouse double minute 2 (Mdm2), the main negative regulator of p53, by the 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP). Meanwhile, it is not clear whether this mechanism solely mediates the p53-dependent component found in DBA. To approach this question, we crossed our mouse model for RPS19-deficient DBA with Mdm2(C305F) knock-in mice that have a disrupted 5S RNP-Mdm2 interaction. Upon induction of the Rps19 deficiency, Mdm2(C305F) reversed the p53 response and improved expansion of hematopoietic progenitors in vitro, and ameliorated the anemia in vivo. Unexpectedly, disruption of the 5S RNP-Mdm2 interaction also led to selective defect in erythropoiesis. Our findings highlight the sensitivity of erythroid progenitor cells to aberrations in p53 homeostasis mediated by the 5S RNP-Mdm2 interaction. Finally, we provide evidence indicating that physiological activation of the 5S RNP-Mdm2-p53 pathway may contribute to functional decline of the hematopoietic system in a cell-autonomous manner over time.

  6. ADAM2 interactions with mouse eggs and cell lines expressing α4/α9 (ITGA4/ITGA9 integrins: implications for integrin-based adhesion and fertilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulyana V Desiderio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Integrins are heterodimeric cell adhesion molecules, with 18 α (ITGA and eight β (ITGB subunits forming 24 heterodimers classified into five families. Certain integrins, especially the α(4/α(9 (ITGA4/ITGA9 family, interact with members of the ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease family. ADAM2 is among the better characterized and also of interest because of its role in sperm function. Having shown that ITGA9 on mouse eggs participates in mouse sperm-egg interactions, we sought to characterize ITGA4/ITGA9-ADAM2 interactions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An anti-β(1/ITGB1 function-blocking antibody that reduces sperm-egg binding significantly inhibited ADAM2 binding to mouse eggs. Analysis of integrin subunit expression indicates that mouse eggs could express at least ten different integrins, five in the RGD-binding family, two in the laminin-binding family, two in the collagen-binding family, and ITGA9-ITGB1. Adhesion assays to characterize ADAM2 interactions with ITGA4/ITGA9 family members produced the surprising result that RPMI 8866 cell adhesion to ADAM2 was inhibited by an anti-ITGA9 antibody, noteworthy because ITGA9 has only been reported to dimerize with ITGB1, and RPMI 8866 cells lack detectable ITGB1. Antibody and siRNA studies demonstrate that ITGB7 is the β subunit contributing to RPMI 8866 adhesion to ADAM2. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data indicate that a novel integrin α-β combination, ITGA9-ITGB7 (α(9β(7, in RPMI 8866 cells functions as a binding partner for ADAM2. ITGA9 had previously only been reported to dimerize with ITGB1. Although ITGA9-ITGB7 is unlikely to be a widely expressed integrin and appears to be the result of "compensatory dimerization" occurring in the context of little/no ITGB1 expression, the data indicate that ITGA9-ITGB7 functions as an ADAM binding partner in certain cellular contexts, with implications for mammalian fertilization and integrin function.

  7. Targeted disruption of the heat shock protein 20–phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D) interaction protects against pathological cardiac remodelling in a mouse model of hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Tamara P.; Hortigon-Vinagre, Maria P.; Findlay, Jane E.; Elliott, Christina; Currie, Susan; Baillie, George S.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorylated heat shock protein 20 (HSP20) is cardioprotective. Using human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs) and a mouse model of pressure overload mediated hypertrophy, we show that peptide disruption of the HSP20–phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D) complex results in attenuation of action potential prolongation and protection against adverse cardiac remodelling. The later was evidenced by improved contractility, decreased heart weight to body weight ratio, and reduced interstitial and perivascular fibrosis. This study demonstrates that disruption of the specific HSP20–PDE4D interaction leads to attenuation of pathological cardiac remodelling. PMID:25426411

  8. Targeted disruption of the heat shock protein 20-phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D) interaction protects against pathological cardiac remodelling in a mouse model of hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Tamara P; Hortigon-Vinagre, Maria P; Findlay, Jane E; Elliott, Christina; Currie, Susan; Baillie, George S

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorylated heat shock protein 20 (HSP20) is cardioprotective. Using human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs) and a mouse model of pressure overload mediated hypertrophy, we show that peptide disruption of the HSP20-phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D) complex results in attenuation of action potential prolongation and protection against adverse cardiac remodelling. The later was evidenced by improved contractility, decreased heart weight to body weight ratio, and reduced interstitial and perivascular fibrosis. This study demonstrates that disruption of the specific HSP20-PDE4D interaction leads to attenuation of pathological cardiac remodelling.

  9. Targeted disruption of the heat shock protein 20–phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D interaction protects against pathological cardiac remodelling in a mouse model of hypertrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara P. Martin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorylated heat shock protein 20 (HSP20 is cardioprotective. Using human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs and a mouse model of pressure overload mediated hypertrophy, we show that peptide disruption of the HSP20–phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D complex results in attenuation of action potential prolongation and protection against adverse cardiac remodelling. The later was evidenced by improved contractility, decreased heart weight to body weight ratio, and reduced interstitial and perivascular fibrosis. This study demonstrates that disruption of the specific HSP20–PDE4D interaction leads to attenuation of pathological cardiac remodelling.

  10. Development of a Bioengineered Skin-Humanized Mouse Model for Psoriasis : Dissecting Epidermal-Lymphocyte Interacting Pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Guerrero-Aspizua, Sara; García, Marta; Murillas, Rodolfo; Retamosa, Luisa; Illera, Nuria; Duarte, Blanca; Holguín, Almudena; Puig, Susana; Hernández, Maria Isabel; Meana, Alvaro; Jorcano, Jose Luis; Larcher, Fernando; Carretero, Marta; del Río, Marcela

    2010-01-01

    Over the past few years, whole skin xenotransplantation models that mimic different aspects of psoriasis have become available. However, these models are strongly constrained by the lack of skin donor availability and homogeneity. We present in this study a bioengineering-based skin-humanized mouse model for psoriasis, either in an autologous version using samples derived from psoriatic patients or, more importantly, in an allogeneic context, starting from skin biopsies and blood samples from...

  11. Short Communication: HIV-1 Variants That Use Mouse CCR5 Reveal Critical Interactions of gp120's V3 Crown with CCR5 Extracellular Loop 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Emily J; Durnin, James P; Kabat, David

    2015-10-01

    The CCR5 coreceptor amino terminus and extracellular (ECL) loops 1 and 2 have been implicated in HIV-1 infections, with species differences in these regions inhibiting zoonoses. Interactions of gp120 with CD4 and CCR5 reduce constraints on metastable envelope subunit gp41, enabling gp41 conformational changes needed for infection. We previously selected HIV-1JRCSF variants that efficiently use CCR5(Δ18) with a deleted amino terminus or CCR5(HHMH) with ECL2 from an NIH/Swiss mouse. Unexpectedly, the adaptive gp120 mutations were nearly identical, suggesting that they function by weakening gp120's grip on gp41 and/or by increasing interactions with ECL1. To analyze this and further wean HIV-1 from human CCR5, we selected variants using CCR5(HMMH) with murine ECL1 and 2 sequences. HIV-1JRCSF mutations adaptive for CCR5(Δ18) and CCR5(HHMH) were generally maladaptive for CCR5(HMMH), whereas the converse was true for CCR5(HMMH) adaptations. The HIV-1JRCSF variant adapted to CCR5(HMMH) also weakly used intact NIH/Swiss mouse CCR5. Our results strongly suggest that HIV-1JRCSF makes functionally critical contacts with human ECL1 and that adaptation to murine ECL1 requires multiple mutations in the crown of gp120's V3 loop.

  12. Isobolographic analysis of interactions between 1-methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline and four conventional antiepileptic drugs in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luszczki, Jarogniew J; Antkiewicz-Michaluk, Lucyna; Czuczwar, Stanislaw J

    2009-01-14

    The anticonvulsant activity of 1-methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline (MeTHIQ--an endogenous parkinsonism-preventing substance) administered alone and in combination with four conventional antiepileptic drugs (carbamazepine, phenytoin, phenobarbital and valproate) was determined in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model. The types of interactions of MeTHIQ with the antiepileptic drugs were characterized using isobolographic analysis. The isobolographic analysis revealed that the combination of MeTHIQ with phenobarbital at the fixed-ratios of 1:3, 1:1 and 3:1 exerted supra-additive (synergistic) interaction in the maximal electroshock-induced seizure test. In contrast, the combinations of MeTHIQ with carbamazepine, phenytoin and valproate exerted additive interaction for all three fixed-ratios (1:3, 1:1 and 3:1) tested in the maximal electroshock-induced seizure test. In conclusion, MeTHIQ produces a clear-cut anticonvulsant effect in the maximal electroshock-induced seizure test in mice. The supra-additive interaction of MeTHIQ with phenobarbital against maximal electroshock-induced seizures makes their combination of pivotal importance from a clinical viewpoint.

  13. CASK interacts with PMCA4b and JAM-A on the mouse sperm flagellum to regulate Ca2+ homeostasis and motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravindan, Rolands G; Fomin, Victor P; Naik, Ulhas P; Modelski, Mark J; Naik, Meghna U; Galileo, Deni S; Duncan, Randall L; Martin-Deleon, Patricia A

    2012-08-01

    Deletion of the highly conserved gene for the major Ca(2+) efflux pump, Plasma membrane calcium/calmodulin-dependent ATPase 4b (Pmca4b), in the mouse leads to loss of progressive and hyperactivated sperm motility and infertility. Here we first demonstrate that compared to wild-type (WT), Junctional adhesion molecule-A (Jam-A) null sperm, previously shown to have motility defects and an abnormal mitochondrial phenotype reminiscent of that seen in Pmca4b nulls, exhibit reduced (P JAM-A on the proximal principal piece, acts as a common interacting partner of both. Importantly, CASK binds alternatively and non-synergistically with each of these molecules via its single PDZ (PDS-95/Dlg/ZO-1) domain to either inhibit or promote efflux. In the absence of CASK-JAM-A interaction in Jam-A null sperm, CASK-PMCA4b interaction is increased, resulting in inhibition of PMCA4b's enzymatic activity, consequent Ca(2+) accumulation, and a ∼6-fold over-expression of constitutively ATP-utilizing CASK, compared to WT. Thus, CASK negatively regulates PMCA4b by directly binding to it and JAM-A positively regulates it indirectly through CASK. The decreased motility is likely due to the collateral net deficit in ATP observed in nulls. Our data indicate that Ca(2+) homeostasis in sperm is maintained by the relative ratios of CASK-PMCA4b and CASK-JAM-A interactions.

  14. Mutual interactions of the presynaptic histamine H3 and prostaglandin EP3 receptors on the noradrenergic terminals in the mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlicker, E; Marr, I

    1997-07-01

    We studied whether interactions between the presynaptic histamine H3 and prostaglandin EP3 receptors on the noradrenergic neurons of the mouse brain cortex occur. Cerebral cortex slices from the mouse (and, in few experiments, from the rat) were preincubated with [3H]noradrenaline and then superfused with a physiological salt solution. Tritium overflow was evoked electrically, either at 0.3 or 3 Hz (2 min) (standard stimulation protocol) or at 100 Hz (eight pulses) (stimulation protocol under which almost no activation of the presynaptic alpha2-adrenoceptors by endogenous noradrenaline occurs). In another set of experiments, Ca2+ ions were introduced into Ca2+-free K+-rich medium containing tetrodotoxin to evoke tritium overflow. The electrically-evoked tritium overflow (0.3 Hz) was inhibited by histamine or the H3 receptor agonist imetit, acting via H3 receptors. and by prostaglandin E2 or the EP3 receptor agonist sulprostone, acting via EP3 receptors. When histamine or imetit was given first (at concentrations causing the maximum effect at H3 receptors), the effect of prostaglandin E2 on the evoked tritium overflow was attenuated by 5-10%. When prostaglandin E2 or sulprostone was given first (at concentrations causing the maximum effect at EP3 receptors), the effect of histamine or imetit on the evoked overflow was attenuated by almost 50%. The previous administration of prostaglandin E2 also blunted the effect of histamine on the evoked tritium overflow evoked at 3 Hz; the degree of attenuation was identical when the current strength was 25 mA or was increased to 100 or 200 mA in order to partially compensate for the inhibitory effect of prostaglandin E2 on the evoked overflow. In addition, prostaglandin E2 attenuated the effect of histamine when tritium overflow was evoked (i) by 100 Hz, eight pulses or (ii) by Ca2+ ions or (iii) when rat (instead of mouse) brain cortex slices were used. An interaction of prostaglandin E2 or sulprostone with the H3 receptor

  15. Simultaneous determination of trimethylamine and trimethylamine N-oxide in mouse plasma samples by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Si; Zhao, Yuan-Yuan; Jacobs, René L; Curtis, Jonathan M

    2017-02-01

    A method was developed that applies hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry in the multiple reaction monitoring mode to separate and accurately quantify trimethylamine and trimethylamine N-oxide in a single chromatographic run. This was achieved by converting trimethylamine to ethyl betaine, which is less volatile and hence results in greatly improved quantitation. Ethyl betaine also gives a similar response to trimethylamine N-oxide using positive-ion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. It is readily separated from trimethylamine N-oxide by hydrophilic liquid chromatography in a 5 min run and with improved peak shape compared to underivatized trimethylamine. Validation of the method yielded a limit of detection (S/N ≥ 3) of 0.5 ng/mL for trimethylamine and 0.25 ng/mL for trimethylamine N-oxide. Method accuracies of 91.4-105.3% with precisions of 0.4-5.5% were obtained for standard mixtures over the range of 2.5-500 ng/mL. Recoveries measured for the extraction of trimethylamine and trimethylamine N-oxide spikes into mouse plasma were both >90%. The method, which simultaneously measures trimethylamine and trimethylamine N-oxide, was successfully applied to mouse plasma samples and could be adapted for use with other biological fluids.

  16. Oncogene interactions are required for glioma development and progression as revealed by a tissue specific transgenic mouse model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lynette M. Moore; Kristen M. Holmes; Gregory N. Fuller; Wei Zhang

    2011-01-01

    The aggressive and invasive nature of brain tumors has hampered progress in the design and implementation of efficacious therapies. The recent success of targeted therapies in other tumor types makes this an attractive area for research yet complicating matters is the ability of brain tumors to circumvent the targeted pathways to develop drug resistance. Effective therapies will likely need to target more than one signaling pathway or target multiple nodes within a given pathway. Key to identifying these targets is the elucidation of the driver and passenger molecules within these pathways. Animal models provide a useful tool with many advantages in the study of these pathways. These models provide a means to dissect the critical components of tumorigenesis, as well as serve as agents for preclinical testing. This review focuses on the use of the RCAS/tv-a mouse model of brain tumors and describes their unique ability to provide insight into the role of oncogene cooperation in tumor development and progression.

  17. Shoulder Joint Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Shoulder Replacement Options Shoulder replacement surgery is highly technical. It should be performed by a surgical team ... area and will meet a doctor from the anesthesia department. You, your anesthesiologist, and your surgeon will ...

  18. Partial knee replacement - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100225.htm Partial knee replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Knee Replacement A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited ...

  19. Proteomic analysis of wild-type and mutant huntingtin-associated proteins in mouse brains identifies unique interactions and involvement in protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culver, Brady P; Savas, Jeffrey N; Park, Sung K; Choi, Jeong H; Zheng, Shuqiu; Zeitlin, Scott O; Yates, John R; Tanese, Naoko

    2012-06-22

    Huntington disease is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat amplification in the gene huntingtin (HTT) that is reflected by a polyglutamine expansion in the Htt protein. Nearly 20 years of research have uncovered roles for Htt in a wide range of cellular processes, and many of these discoveries stemmed from the identification of Htt-interacting proteins. However, no study has employed an impartial and comprehensive strategy to identify proteins that differentially associate with full-length wild-type and mutant Htt in brain tissue, the most relevant sample source to the disease condition. We analyzed Htt affinity-purified complexes from wild-type and HTT mutant juvenile mouse brain from two different biochemical fractions by tandem mass spectrometry. We compared variations in protein spectral counts relative to Htt to identify those proteins that are the most significantly contrasted between wild-type and mutant Htt purifications. Previously unreported Htt interactions with Myo5a, Prkra (PACT), Gnb2l1 (RACK1), Rps6, and Syt2 were confirmed by Western blot analysis. Gene Ontology analysis of these and other Htt-associated proteins revealed a statistically significant enrichment for proteins involved in translation among other categories. Furthermore, Htt co-sedimentation with polysomes in cytoplasmic mouse brain extracts is dependent upon the presence of intact ribosomes. Finally, wild-type or mutant Htt overexpression inhibits cap-dependent translation of a reporter mRNA in an in vitro system. Cumulatively, these data support a new role for Htt in translation and provide impetus for further study into the link between protein synthesis and Huntington disease pathogenesis.

  20. Structure and function of ameloblastin as an extracellular matrix protein: adhesion, calcium binding, and CD63 interaction in human and mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Diekwisch, Thomas G H; Luan, Xianghong

    2011-12-01

    The functional significance of extracellular matrix proteins in the life of vertebrates is underscored by a high level of sequence variability in tandem with a substantial degree of conservation in terms of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion interactions. Many extracellular matrix proteins feature multiple adhesion domains for successful attachment to substrates, such as integrin, CD63, and heparin. Here we have used homology and ab initio modeling algorithms to compare mouse ameloblastin (mAMBN) and human ameloblastin (hABMN) isoforms and to analyze their potential for cell adhesion and interaction with other matrix molecules as well as calcium binding. Sequence comparison between mAMBN and hAMBN revealed a 26-amino-acid deletion in mAMBN, corresponding to a helix-loop-helix frameshift. The human AMBN domain (174Q-201G), homologous to the mAMBN 157E-178I helix-loop-helix region, formed a helix-loop motif with an extended loop, suggesting a higher degree of flexibility of hAMBN compared with mAMBN, as confirmed by molecular dynamics simulation. Heparin-binding domains, CD63-interaction domains, and calcium-binding sites in both hAMBN and mAMBN support the concept of AMBN as an extracellular matrix protein. The high level of conservation between AMBN functional domains related to adhesion and differentiation was remarkable when compared with only 61% amino acid sequence homology.

  1. The interaction of l-cysteine/H2S pathway and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) in mouse corpus cavernosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydinoglu, Fatma; Dalkir, Fatma Tugce; Demirbag, Hatice Oruc; Ogulener, Nuran

    2017-08-25

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible interaction of l-cysteine/H2S pathway and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) in the mouse corpus cavernosum (CC). l-cysteine (endogenous H2S substrate; 10(-6)-10(-3) M), sodium hydrogen sulfide (NaHS; exogenous H2S; 10(-6)-10(-3) M) and acetylcholine (10(-9)-10(-4) M) produced concentration-dependent relaxation in isolated mouse CC tissues. Relaxations to endogenous and exogenous H2S were reduced by non-selective mAChR antagonist atropine (5 × 10(-5) M), selective M1 mAChR antagonist pirenzepine (5 × 10(-5) M) and selective M3 mAChR antagonist 4-DAMP (10(-7) M) but not by selective M2 mAChR antagonist AF-DX 116 (10(-6) M). Also, acetylcholine-induced relaxations were reduced by atropine, pirenzepine, 4-DAMP and AF-DX 116, confirming the selective effects of mAChR antagonists. Furthermore, acetylcholine-induced relaxations were attenuated by cystathionine-gamma-lyase (CSE) inhibitor d,l-propargylglycine (PAG, 10(-2) M) and cystathionine-β-synthase inhibitor (CBS) aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA, 10(-3) M). l-nitroarginine, nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, augmented the inhibitory effects of mAChR antagonists and H2S enzyme inhibitors on acetylcholine-induced relaxations. In addition, the existence and localization of CSE, CBS and 3-MST were demonstrated in mouse CC. Furthermore, tissue acetylcholine release was significantly increased by l-cysteine but not by exogenous H2S. The increase in acetylcholine level was completely inhibited by AOAA and PAG. These results suggest that M1 and M3 mAChRs contributes to relaxant effect mediated by endogenous H2S but at same time l-cysteine triggers acetylcholine release from cavernosal tissue. Also, the role of NO in the interaction of l-cysteine/H2S pathway and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) could not be excluded. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic interaction profiles of levetiracetam in combination with gabapentin, tiagabine and vigabatrin in the mouse pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure model: an isobolographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudra-Jastrzebska, Monika; Andres-Mach, Marta M; Sielski, Marcin; Ratnaraj, Neville; Patsalos, Philip N; Czuczwar, Stanislaw J; Luszczki, Jarogniew J

    2009-03-01

    To characterize the interactions between levetiracetam and the antiepileptic drugs gabapentin, tiagabine, and vigabatrin in suppressing pentylenetetrazole-induced clonic seizures in mice, type II isobolographic analysis was used. Clonic seizures were evoked in Albino Swiss mice by subcutaneous injection of pentylenetetrazole at its CD(97)(98 mg/kg). Adverse-effect profiles with respect to motor performance, long-term memory and skeletal muscular strength were measured along with total brain antiepileptic drug concentrations. The combination of gabapentin with levetiracetam at the fixed-ratios of 2:1, 1:1, 1:2, and 1:4 were supra-additive (synergistic) in terms of seizure suppression whilst the combination at the fixed-ratio of 4:1 was additive. Tiagabine with levetiracetam and vigabatrin with levetiracetam at the fixed-ratios of 1:25, 1:50, 1:100, 1:200, and 1:400 and at 2:1, 3:1, 4:1, 6:1, 8:1, and 16:1 were additive, respectively. No acute adverse effects were observed. Measurement of total brain antiepileptic drug concentrations revealed that levetiracetam in combination with gabapentin at the fixed-ratio of 1:4 significantly elevated (21%) total brain gabapentin concentrations. In contrast, levetiracetam was without affect on tiagabine or vigabatrin concentrations and co-administration with gabapentin, tiagabine or vigabatrin had no effect on levetiracetam brain concentrations, indicating the pharmacodynamic nature of interaction between these antiepileptic drugs in the mouse pentylenetetrazole model. The combination of gabapentin with levetiracetam at the fixed-ratios of 2:1, 1:1, 1:2, and 1:4 appears to be particularly favorable combination exerting supra-additive interaction in suppressing pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures, although there is a pharmacokinetic contribution to the interaction between levetiracetam and gabapentin at the fixed-ratio of 1:4. Levetiracetam in combination with tiagabine and vigabatrin appear to be neutral combinations producing

  3. Identification of two Amino Acids in the C-terminal Domain of Mouse CRY2 Essential for PER2 Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozber Natali

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cryptochromes (CRYs are a class of flavoprotein blue-light signaling receptors found in plants and animals, and they control plant development and the entrainment of circadian rhythms. They also act as integral parts of the central circadian oscillator in humans and other animals. In mammals, the CLOCK-BMAL1 heterodimer activates transcription of the Per and Cry genes as well as clock-regulated genes. The PER2 proteins interact with CRY and CKIε, and the resulting ternary complexes translocate into the nucleus, where they negatively regulate the transcription of Per and Cry core clock genes and other clock-regulated output genes. Recent studies have indicated that the extended C-termini of the mammalian CRYs, as compared to photolyase proteins, interact with PER proteins. Results We identified a region on mCRY2 (between residues 493 and 512 responsible for direct physical interaction with mPER2 by mammalian two-hybrid and co-immunoprecipitation assays. Moreover, using oligonucleotide-based degenerate PCR, we discovered that mutation of Arg-501 and Lys-503 of mCRY2 within this C-terminal region totally abolishes interaction with PER2. Conclusions Our results identify mCRY2 amino acid residues that interact with the mPER2 binding region and suggest the potential for rational drug design to inhibit CRYs for specific therapeutic approaches.

  4. Interaction Between Emotion and Memory: Importance of Mammillary Bodies Damage in a Mouse Model of the Alcoholic Korsakoff Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Béracochéa

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic alcohol consumption (CAC can lead to the Korsakoff syndrome (KS, a memory deficiency attributed to diencephalie damage and/or to medial temporal or cortical related dysfunction. The etiology of KS remains unclear. Most animal models of KS involve thiaminedeficient diets associated with pyrithiamine treatment. Here we present a mouse model of CAC-induced KS. We demonstrate that CAC-generated retrieval memory deficits in working/ episodic memory tasks, together with a reduction of fear reactivity, result from damage to the mammillary bodies (MB. Experimental lesions of MB in non-alcoholic mice produced the same memory and emotional impairments. Drugs having anxiogenic-like properties counteract such impairments produced by CAC or by MB lesions. We suggest (a that MB are the essential components of a brain network underlying emotional processes, which would be critically important in the retrieval processes involved in working/ episodic memory tasks, and (b that failure to maintain emotional arousal due to MB damage can be a main factor of CAC-induced memory deficits. Overall, our animal model fits well with general neuropsychological and anatomic impairments observed in KS.

  5. The co-transcriptome of uropathogenic Escherichia coli-infected mouse macrophages reveals new insights into host-pathogen interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavromatis, Charalampos Harris; Bokil, Nilesh J; Totsika, Makrina; Kakkanat, Asha; Schaale, Kolja; Cannistraci, Carlo V; Ryu, Taewoo; Beatson, Scott A; Ulett, Glen C; Schembri, Mark A; Sweet, Matthew J; Ravasi, Timothy

    2015-05-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are among the most common infections in humans. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) can invade and replicate within bladder epithelial cells, and some UPEC strains can also survive within macrophages. To understand the UPEC transcriptional programme associated with intramacrophage survival, we performed host-pathogen co-transcriptome analyses using RNA sequencing. Mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) were challenged over a 24 h time course with two UPEC reference strains that possess contrasting intramacrophage phenotypes: UTI89, which survives in BMMs, and 83972, which is killed by BMMs. Neither of these strains caused significant BMM cell death at the low multiplicity of infection that was used in this study. We developed an effective computational framework that simultaneously separated, annotated and quantified the mammalian and bacterial transcriptomes. Bone marrow-derived macrophages responded to the two UPEC strains with a broadly similar gene expression programme. In contrast, the transcriptional responses of the UPEC strains diverged markedly from each other. We identified UTI89 genes up-regulated at 24 h post-infection, and hypothesized that some may contribute to intramacrophage survival. Indeed, we showed that deletion of one such gene (pspA) significantly reduced UTI89 survival within BMMs. Our study provides a technological framework for simultaneously capturing global changes at the transcriptional level in co-cultures, and has generated new insights into the mechanisms that UPEC use to persist within the intramacrophage environment.

  6. The co-transcriptome of uropathogenic Escherichia coli-infected mouse macrophages reveals new insights into host-pathogen interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Mavromatis, Charalampos Harris

    2015-01-24

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are among the most common infections in humans. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) can invade and replicate within bladder epithelial cells, and some UPEC strains can also survive within macrophages. To understand the UPEC transcriptional programme associated with intramacrophage survival, we performed host–pathogen co-transcriptome analyses using RNA sequencing. Mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) were challenged over a 24 h time course with two UPEC reference strains that possess contrasting intramacrophage phenotypes: UTI89, which survives in BMMs, and 83972, which is killed by BMMs. Neither of these strains caused significant BMM cell death at the low multiplicity of infection that was used in this study. We developed an effective computational framework that simultaneously separated, annotated and quantified the mammalian and bacterial transcriptomes. Bone marrow-derived macrophages responded to the two UPEC strains with a broadly similar gene expression programme. In contrast, the transcriptional responses of the UPEC strains diverged markedly from each other. We identified UTI89 genes up-regulated at 24 h post-infection, and hypothesized that some may contribute to intramacrophage survival. Indeed, we showed that deletion of one such gene (pspA) significantly reduced UTI89 survival within BMMs. Our study provides a technological framework for simultaneously capturing global changes at the transcriptional level in co-cultures, and has generated new insights into the mechanisms that UPEC use to persist within the intramacrophage environment.

  7. Target replacement and subtractive SELEX selection of DNA aptamers against the Fc region of mouse IgG%靶标替换消减SELEX技术筛选小鼠IgG Fc片段的DNA配基及其活性鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈桦; 张洁瑜; 王晓清; 葛廷; 王小琦; 廖世奇; 马瑾; 王黎; 庞鑫; 张宁; 张丽琼

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to establish a quicker and flexible method to select much higher specificity and affinity aptemers against Fc region of mouse IgG. Using the mouse immunoglobulin G (IgG) subclasses (anti-HBV IgG, mouse IgG Fc, IgG1, IgG2a as target molecules, the aptamers were selected by target replacement and subtractive hybridization via SELEX. And the activity of the aptamers was analyzed by dot-blot,chromatography and EMAS. After sixteen rounds of selection, the novel DNA aptamers bound with mouse IgG Fc region were obtained. The assay of specificity indicated that the selected aptamers only combined with the mouse IgG, but not with the trypsin, solcoseryl albumin and human serum. Chromatography and EMSA assay suggested that the aptamers and the targets were combined. The novel kind DNA aptamers bound with mouse IgG Fc region with higher specificity and affinity, which were obtained by target replacement and subtractive hybridization via SELEX. This method could have the potential for studying the active mechanism of the same region in different molecules.%建立高特异性和亲和力的小鼠IgG Fc片段DNA配基筛选方法.采用几种小鼠IgG亚类(鼠抗HBV-IgG、小鼠IgG的Fc,IgG1,IgG2a)作为靶分子,利用靶标替换消减SELEX筛选方法进行16轮筛选.利用dot-blot,高压液相色谱以及凝胶阻滞(EMSA)方法对所得配基进行活性鉴定.经过16轮筛选,得到了与小鼠IgG不同亚类相同Fc片段特异性结合的寡核苷酸配基(IgG的Fc配基).特异性分析显示,此配基只与小鼠IgG特异性结合,与胰蛋白酶、小牛血清白蛋向、人血清均无明显结合.高压液桐色谱和凝胶阻滞结果均说明了配基和靶蛋白具有特异结合.通过使用靶标替换消减SELEX技术可以有效得到小鼠IgG不同亚型相同部分Fc片段的特异性结合配基,为不同分子相同部位的分子作用机制,以及应用于小鼠抗体亲和层析的研究奠定基础.

  8. LAT alleviates Th2/Treg imbalance in an OVA-induced allergic asthma mouse model through LAT-PLC-γ1 interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Li, Xiao-Ming; Gu, Wen; Wang, Di; Chen, Yi; Guo, Xue-Jun

    2017-03-01

    Low expression of linker for activation of T cells (LAT) is observed in asthma. LAT and its downstream regulator, phospholipase C-gamma 1 (PLC-γ1) play important roles in the T cell antigen receptor signaling pathway, and their interaction is associated with CD4(+) cell polarization. Here, we investigated whether LAT can alleviate the imbalance among CD4(+) cell subgroups and the possible mechanism. An ovalbumin-induced allergic asthma mouse model was established and LAT plasmid was delivered. The pathological changes in lung were evaluated by hematoxylin and eosin and periodic acid-Schiff staining. The typical cytokines released by T helper 2 (Th2) and regulatory T (Treg) cells were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and the number of Th1, Th2, and Treg cells were determined using flow cytometry. Lung CD4(+) T cells were isolated by magnetic isolation. The mRNA expression of LAT and PLC-γ1 was determined by real-time PCR. Co-Immunoprecipitation was performed to confirm the interaction between LAT and PLC-γ1. The protein expression of LAT, PLC-γ1 and corresponding downstream signaling factors were determined by western blotting. The delivery of LAT DNA to the lung could suppress an overactive Th2 response by decreasing allergic response and Th2 cytokine secretion, and by increasing Treg cytokine secretion. The Th2/Treg imbalance in lung and decreased phosphorylated PLC-γ1 expression in lung CD4(+) T cells were rectified by LAT DNA delivery. Excessive activation of the Raf-MEK-ERK and PI3K-AKT-CREB pathways after asthma is attenuated by LAT. The site-specific delivery of LAT DNA to the lung could suppress an overactive Th2 response and rectify the Th2/Treg imbalance in asthmatic mouse model. LAT-PLC-γ1 interaction may contribute to LAT activity in vivo and LAT protects against asthma partly via Raf-MEK-ERK and PI3K-AKT-CREB pathways. The delivery of LAT DNA could offer a novel and safe strategy for asthma prevention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B

  9. In-vitro interactions of human chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells, and of mouse macrophages with phospholipid-covered metallic implant materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Willumeit

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Phospholipid-coatings on metallic implant surfaces were evaluated in terms of adhesion, proliferation and matrix production of skeletal cells, and of macrophage stimulation. The working hypothesis is that mimicking a model biomembrane by phospholipids on surfaces to which cells adhere, the surface recognition by surrounding cells is altered. In this study, 1 mirror-like polished Ti-6Al-7Nb and 2 porous Ti-6Al-4V specimens were covered with the phospholipids POPE (palmitoyl-oleoyl phosphatidyl-ethanolamine and POPC (palmitoyl-oleoyl phosphatidyl-choline, and the interactions of a human articular chondrocytes (HAC, b human mesenchymal stem cells (HMSC, and c mouse macrophages (RAW 264.7 were tested in vitro. On POPE-covered polished surfaces adherence of HAC (42% of seeded cells after 2 hrs and metabolic activity (MTT after 3 days were reduced, while on porous surfaces 99% HAC adhered, and metabolic activity was significantly increased, compared to respective native surfaces. On both POPE-covered surfaces the chondrocyte phenotype was present. After 3 weeks of chondrogenic differentiation, cartilage matrix production (measuring chondroitin sulphate per HAC number was significantly increased by about 30% on both POPE-covered metallic surfaces. On both POPC-covered surfaces nearly no adhering and surviving HAC were found. HMSC grown on POPE-covered porous substrates showed osteogenic differentiation by improved osteopontin and collagen I expression in RT-PCR, and osteocalcin fluorescence and bone nodule formation was only detectable on POPE-covered porous surfaces. In contrast to POPC and other phospholipids used as positive controls, POPE did not stimulate the NO production in mouse macrophage cultures. We therefore conclude that a phospholipid coating by POPE shows potential as surface modification for metallic implant materials.

  10. Mechanism of relaxation and interaction with nitric oxide of the soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator BAY 41-2272 in mouse gastric fundus and colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosyns, Sarah M R; Lefebvre, Romain A

    2012-07-05

    BAY 41-2272 is a heme-dependent nitric oxide-independent soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) stimulator, but its relaxant effect in vascular, respiratory and urogenital tissue is only partially dependent on sGC activation. As its mechanism of action has not been studied in the gastrointestinal tract, it was investigated in mouse gastric fundus and colon. Circular smooth muscle strips were mounted in organ baths under non-adrenergic non-cholinergic (NANC) conditions for isometric force recording and cGMP levels were determined using an enzyme immunoassay kit. BAY 41-2272 induced concentration-dependent relaxation in both tissues and increased cGMP levels. The sGC inhibitor ODQ totally inhibited this BAY 41-2272-induced increase of cGMP, but only partially reduced the corresponding relaxation. The PDE-5 inhibitor sildenafil had no effect on BAY 41-2272-induced responses. The NO synthase inhibitor L-NAME caused a significant decrease in BAY 41-2272-induced responses in colonic strips. Electrical field stimulation in the presence of BAY 41-2272 induced increased NANC relaxation in fundus, while in colon, rebound contraction at the end of the stimulation train was no longer visible. This suggests synergy with endogenously released NO. Responses to BAY 41-2272 were not significantly influenced by apamin, charybdotoxin or ouabain, excluding interaction with small, intermediate and large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels and with Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase. Under depletion of intracellular calcium, CaCl(2)-induced contractions were significantly reduced by BAY 41-2272 in an ODQ-insensitive way. The present study demonstrates that BAY 41-2272 exerts its relaxing effect in mouse gastric fundus and colon partially through a cGMP-dependent mechanism and at least one additional cGMP-independent mechanism involving Ca(2+)-entry blockade.

  11. Leucocyte interactions with the mouse cremaster muscle microcirculation in vivo in response to tumour-conditioned medium

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, N.J.; Reed, M.W.R.

    1997-01-01

    Leucocyte interactions with the cremaster muscle microcirculation in vivo were investigated in response to culture medium conditioned with different cell types in 25 adult male Swiss mice. Animals were divided into five groups. Three groups received ex vivo fluorescently labelled lymphokine activated killer (LAK) cells systemically and had either tumour (murine melanoma K1735)-conditioned medium (TCM), fibroblast (murine 3T3)-conditioned medium (FCM) or fresh culture medium administered topic...

  12. Protein tyrosine kinase signaling in the mouse oocyte cortex during sperm-egg interactions and anaphase resumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinnis, Lynda K; Luo, Jinping; Kinsey, William H

    2013-04-01

    Fertilization triggers activation of a series of pre-programmed signal transduction pathways in the oocyte that establish a block to polyspermy, induce meiotic resumption, and initiate zygotic development. Fusion between sperm and oocyte results in rapid changes in oocyte intracellular free-calcium levels, which in turn activate multiple protein kinase cascades in the ooplasm. The present study examined the possibility that sperm-oocyte interaction involves localized activation of oocyte protein tyrosine kinases, which could provide an alternative signaling mechanism to that triggered by the fertilizing sperm. Confocal immunofluorescence analysis with antibodies to phosphotyrosine and phosphorylated protein tyrosine kinases allowed detection of minute signaling events localized to the site of sperm-oocyte interaction that were not amenable to biochemical analysis. The results provide evidence for localized accumulation of phosphotyrosine at the site of sperm contact, binding, or fusion, which suggests active protein tyrosine kinase signaling prior to and during sperm incorporation. The PYK2 kinase was found to be concentrated and activated at the site of sperm-oocyte interaction, and likely participates in this response. Widespread activation of PYK2 and FAK kinases was subsequently observed within the oocyte cortex, indicating that sperm incorporation is followed by more global signaling via these kinases during meiotic resumption. The results demonstrate an alternate signaling pathway triggered in mammalian oocytes by sperm contact, binding, or fusion with the oocyte.

  13. Interactions between two enantiomers of losigamone and conventional antiepileptic drugs in the mouse maximal electroshock model--an isobolographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowicz, Kinga K; Jaszczyk, Bozena; Luszczki, Jarogniew J; Czuczwar, Stanislaw J

    2007-07-12

    The aim of this study was the isobolographic evaluation of interactions between two enantiomers of losigamone, AO-242 [(+)-5(R)-alpha(S)-5-(2-chlorophenylhydroxymethyl)-4-methoxy-2(5H)-furanone] and AO-294 [(-)-5(S)-alpha(R)-5-(2-chlorophenylhydroxymethyl)-4-methoxy-2(5H)-furanone], and valproate, carbamazepine, phenytoin, or phenobarbital in the maximal electroshock test in mice. Both enantiomers interacted additively with conventional antiepileptic drugs at all studied fixed dose ratios (1:3, 1:1, 3:1). Furthermore, AO-242, AO-294 and antiepileptics applied alone, as well as combinations of enantiomers and antiepileptics did not affect motor performance in the chimney test. Significant impairment of long-term memory (passive-avoidance task) was noted only in the case of valproate alone, given at the dose equal to its median effective dose (ED(50)) against maximal electroshock. All other antiepileptics and their combinations with AO-242 or AO-294 did not impair memory of mice. Enantiomers did not affect the brain concentrations of antiepileptic drugs, indicating a pharmacodynamic nature of the observed interactions. In conclusion, the present results suggest both AO-242 and AO-294 as promising candidate drugs in the add-on therapy of refractory epilepsy.

  14. Gli2 gene-environment interactions contribute to the etiological complexity of holoprosencephaly: evidence from a mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galen W. Heyne

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Holoprosencephaly (HPE is a common and severe human developmental abnormality marked by malformations of the forebrain and face. Although several genetic mutations have been linked to HPE, phenotypic outcomes range dramatically, and most cases cannot be attributed to a specific cause. Gene-environment interaction has been invoked as a premise to explain the etiological complexity of HPE, but identification of interacting factors has been extremely limited. Here, we demonstrate that mutations in Gli2, which encodes a Hedgehog pathway transcription factor, can cause or predispose to HPE depending upon gene dosage. On the C57BL/6J background, homozygous GLI2 loss of function results in the characteristic brain and facial features seen in severe human HPE, including midfacial hypoplasia, hypotelorism and medial forebrain deficiency with loss of ventral neurospecification. Although normally indistinguishable from wild-type littermates, we demonstrate that mice with single-allele Gli2 mutations exhibit increased penetrance and severity of HPE in response to low-dose teratogen exposure. This genetic predisposition is associated with a Gli2 dosage-dependent attenuation of Hedgehog ligand responsiveness at the cellular level. In addition to revealing a causative role for GLI2 in HPE genesis, these studies demonstrate a mechanism by which normally silent genetic and environmental factors can interact to produce severe outcomes. Taken together, these findings provide a framework for the understanding of the extreme phenotypic variability observed in humans carrying GLI2 mutations and a paradigm for reducing the incidence of this morbid birth defect.

  15. Gli2 gene-environment interactions contribute to the etiological complexity of holoprosencephaly: evidence from a mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyne, Galen W.; Everson, Joshua L.; Ansen-Wilson, Lydia J.; Melberg, Cal G.; Fink, Dustin M.; Parins, Kia F.; Doroodchi, Padydeh; Ulschmid, Caden M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is a common and severe human developmental abnormality marked by malformations of the forebrain and face. Although several genetic mutations have been linked to HPE, phenotypic outcomes range dramatically, and most cases cannot be attributed to a specific cause. Gene-environment interaction has been invoked as a premise to explain the etiological complexity of HPE, but identification of interacting factors has been extremely limited. Here, we demonstrate that mutations in Gli2, which encodes a Hedgehog pathway transcription factor, can cause or predispose to HPE depending upon gene dosage. On the C57BL/6J background, homozygous GLI2 loss of function results in the characteristic brain and facial features seen in severe human HPE, including midfacial hypoplasia, hypotelorism and medial forebrain deficiency with loss of ventral neurospecification. Although normally indistinguishable from wild-type littermates, we demonstrate that mice with single-allele Gli2 mutations exhibit increased penetrance and severity of HPE in response to low-dose teratogen exposure. This genetic predisposition is associated with a Gli2 dosage-dependent attenuation of Hedgehog ligand responsiveness at the cellular level. In addition to revealing a causative role for GLI2 in HPE genesis, these studies demonstrate a mechanism by which normally silent genetic and environmental factors can interact to produce severe outcomes. Taken together, these findings provide a framework for the understanding of the extreme phenotypic variability observed in humans carrying GLI2 mutations and a paradigm for reducing the incidence of this morbid birth defect. PMID:27585885

  16. Aeronautical Information System Replacement -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Aeronautical Information System Replacement is a web-enabled, automation means for the collection and distribution of Service B messages, weather information, flight...

  17. Cloning and characterization of GRIPE, a novel interacting partner of the transcription factor E12 in developing mouse forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Julian Ik Tsen; Tan, Seong-Seng

    2002-11-08

    The helix-loop-helix (HLH) family of transcription factors are key contributors to a wide array of developmental processes, including neurogenesis and hematopoiesis. These factors are thought to exert their regulatory influences by binding to cognate promoter-DNA sequences as dimers. Although studies in mice have convincingly demonstrated that neurogenic HLH proteins such as NeuroD are intimately involved in neuronal fate determination, the role of the ubiquitously expressed HLH protein, E12, in mammalian neurogenesis remains ambiguous. To address this, a yeast two-hybrid interaction screen was employed to identify dimerization partners to E12. Screening of an embryonic day 11.5 forebrain library resulted in the cloning of GRIPE, a novel GAP-related interacting protein to E12. GRIPE binds to the HLH region of E12 and may require E12 for nuclear import. Furthermore, GRIPE may negatively regulate E12-dependent target gene transcription. High levels of GRIPE and E12 mRNA were coincidentally detected during embryogenesis, but only GRIPE mRNA levels remained high in adult brain, particularly in neurons of the cortex and hippocampus. These observations were recapitulated through an in vitro model of neurogenesis. Taken together, these results indicate that GRIPE is a novel protein dimerization of which with E12 has important consequences for cells undergoing neuronal differentiation.

  18. NMR shows hydrophobic interactions replace glycine packing in the triple helix at a natural break in the (Gly-X-Y)n repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingjie; Brodsky, Barbara; Baum, Jean

    2007-08-03

    Little is known about the structural consequences of the more than 20 breaks in the (Gly-X-Y)(n) repeating sequence found in the long triple helix domain of basement membrane type IV collagen. NMR triple resonance studies of doubly labeled residues within a set of collagen model peptides provide distance and dihedral angle restraints that allow determination of model structures of both a standard triple helix and of a triple helix with a break in solution. Although the standard triple helix cannot continue when Gly is not every third residue, the NMR data support rod-like molecules that have standard triple-helical structures on both sides of a well defined and highly localized perturbation. The GAAVM break region may be described as a "pseudo triple helix," because it preserves the standard one-residue stagger of the triple helix but introduces hydrophobic interactions at the position normally occupied by the much smaller and hydrogen-bonded Gly residue of the repeating (Gly-X-Y)(n) sequence. This structure provides a rationale for the consensus presence of hydrophobic residues in breaks of similar length and defines a novel variant of a triple helix that could be involved in recognition.

  19. Radiation Source Replacement Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Moran, Traci L.; Bond, Leonard J.

    2010-12-01

    This report summarizes a Radiation Source Replacement Workshop in Houston Texas on October 27-28, 2010, which provided a forum for industry and researchers to exchange information and to discuss the issues relating to replacement of AmBe, and potentially other isotope sources used in well logging.

  20. Assisting People with Multiple Disabilities and Minimal Motor Behavior to Control Environmental Stimulation through a Mouse Wheel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Ching-Hsiang; Shih, Ching-Tien; Lin, Kun-Tsan; Chiang, Ming-Shan

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed whether two people with profound multiple disabilities and minimal motor behavior would be able to control environmental stimulation using thumb poke ability with a mouse wheel and a newly developed mouse driver (i.e., a new mouse driver replacing standard mouse driver, and turning a mouse into a precise thumb poke detector).…

  1. Assisting People with Multiple Disabilities and Minimal Motor Behavior to Control Environmental Stimulation through a Mouse Wheel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Ching-Hsiang; Shih, Ching-Tien; Lin, Kun-Tsan; Chiang, Ming-Shan

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed whether two people with profound multiple disabilities and minimal motor behavior would be able to control environmental stimulation using thumb poke ability with a mouse wheel and a newly developed mouse driver (i.e., a new mouse driver replacing standard mouse driver, and turning a mouse into a precise thumb poke detector).…

  2. Sex differences in social interaction behavior following social defeat stress in the monogamous California mouse (Peromyscus californicus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian C Trainor

    Full Text Available Stressful life experiences are known to be a precipitating factor for many mental disorders. The social defeat model induces behavioral responses in rodents (e.g. reduced social interaction that are similar to behavioral patterns associated with mood disorders. The model has contributed to the discovery of novel mechanisms regulating behavioral responses to stress, but its utility has been largely limited to males. This is disadvantageous because most mood disorders have a higher incidence in women versus men. Male and female California mice (Peromyscus californicus aggressively defend territories, which allowed us to observe the effects of social defeat in both sexes. In two experiments, mice were exposed to three social defeat or control episodes. Mice were then behaviorally phenotyped, and indirect markers of brain activity and corticosterone responses to a novel social stimulus were assessed. Sex differences in behavioral responses to social stress were long lasting (4 wks. Social defeat reduced social interaction responses in females but not males. In females, social defeat induced an increase in the number of phosphorylated CREB positive cells in the nucleus accumbens shell after exposure to a novel social stimulus. This effect of defeat was not observed in males. The effects of defeat in females were limited to social contexts, as there were no differences in exploratory behavior in the open field or light-dark box test. These data suggest that California mice could be a useful model for studying sex differences in behavioral responses to stress, particularly in neurobiological mechanisms that are involved with the regulation of social behavior.

  3. Cell-autonomous defects in thymic epithelial cells disrupt endothelial-perivascular cell interactions in the mouse thymus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerrod L Bryson

    Full Text Available The thymus is composed of multiple stromal elements comprising specialized stromal microenvironments responsible for the development of self-tolerant and self-restricted T cells. Here, we investigated the ontogeny and maturation of the thymic vasculature. We show that endothelial cells initially enter the thymus at E13.5, with PDGFR-β(+ mesenchymal cells following at E14.5. Using an allelic series of the thymic epithelial cell (TEC specific transcription factor Foxn1, we showed that these events are delayed by 1-2 days in Foxn1 (Δ/Δ mice, and this phenotype was exacerbated with reduced Foxn1 dosage. At subsequent stages there were fewer capillaries, leaky blood vessels, disrupted endothelium - perivascular cell interactions, endothelial cell vacuolization, and an overall failure of vascular organization. The expression of both VEGF-A and PDGF-B, which are both primarily expressed in vasculature-associated mesenchyme or endothelium in the thymus, were reduced at E13.5 and E15.5 in Foxn1 (Δ/Δ mice compared with controls. These data suggest that Foxn1 is required in TECs both to recruit endothelial cells and for endothelial cells to communicate with thymic mesenchyme, and for the differentiation of vascular-associated mesenchymal cells. These data show that Foxn1 function in TECs is required for normal thymus size and to generate the cellular and molecular environment needed for normal thymic vascularization. These data further demonstrate a novel TEC-mesenchyme-endothelial interaction required for proper fetal thymus organogenesis.

  4. AT1a Receptor Has Interacted with Angiotensin-converting Enzymes 2 mRNA Expression in Mouse Brainstem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhanyi Lin; Shuguang Lin

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To examine in vivo interactions between angiotensin Ⅱ(Ang Ⅱ) AT1a receptor (AT1aR),angiotensin-converting enzymes (ACE) and ACE2 using small hairpin RNA (shRNA) gene-silencing methods in mice brainstem nucleus ttactus solitarius (NTS).Methods C57BL mice (n=8) were used as animal model.Method of microinjection in the nucleus of NTS was adopted.After ten days,mice were killed and their brain tissue were fixed and sectioned.The expression levels of AT1 aR,ACE and ACE2 mRNA at both sides of NTS were examined by in situ hybridization.Based on compared t-test,the changing for mRNA expression was examined.Results After the expression of AT1aR mRNA was significantly inhibited (61.6%±6.8% ) by AT1aR-shRNA,it was associated with decreases in ACE2 mRNA expression from (1.05±0.12) μCi/mg to (0.74±0.09) μCi/mg (29.0%±14.5%,P<0.01) on the same side of the brainstem.ACE mRNA expression was consistent at both sides (0.50 μCi/mg±0.09 μCi/mg and 0.53 μCi/mg±0.08 μCi/mg),with insignificant difference (P>0.05).Condusions The gene silencing result showed that there were interactions between brainstem AT1aR and ACE2.ACE mRNA expression was not altered by RNA interference treatment at AT1aR.

  5. Paternal Retrieval Behavior Regulated by Brain Estrogen Synthetase (Aromatase) in Mouse Sires that Engage in Communicative Interactions with Pairmates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akther, Shirin; Huang, Zhiqi; Liang, Mingkun; Zhong, Jing; Fakhrul, Azam A K M; Yuhi, Teruko; Lopatina, Olga; Salmina, Alla B; Yokoyama, Shigeru; Higashida, Chiharu; Tsuji, Takahiro; Matsuo, Mie; Higashida, Haruhiro

    2015-01-01

    Parental behaviors involve complex social recognition and memory processes and interactive behavior with children that can greatly facilitate healthy human family life. Fathers play a substantial role in child care in a small but significant number of mammals, including humans. However, the brain mechanism that controls male parental behavior is much less understood than that controlling female parental behavior. Fathers of non-monogamous laboratory ICR mice are an interesting model for examining the factors that influence paternal responsiveness because sires can exhibit maternal-like parental care (retrieval of pups) when separated from their pups along with their pairmates because of olfactory and auditory signals from the dams. Here we tested whether paternal behavior is related to femininity by the aromatization of testosterone. For this purpose, we measured the immunoreactivity of aromatase [cytochrome P450 family 19 (CYP19)], which synthesizes estrogen from androgen, in nine brain regions of the sire. We observed higher levels of aromatase expression in these areas of the sire brain when they engaged in communicative interactions with dams in separate cages. Interestingly, the number of nuclei with aromatase immunoreactivity in sires left together with maternal mates in the home cage after pup-removing was significantly larger than that in sires housed with a whole family. The capacity of sires to retrieve pups was increased following a period of 5 days spent with the pups as a whole family after parturition, whereas the acquisition of this ability was suppressed in sires treated daily with an aromatase inhibitor. The results demonstrate that the dam significantly stimulates aromatase in the male brain and that the presence of the pups has an inhibitory effect on this increase. These results also suggest that brain aromatization regulates the initiation, development, and maintenance of paternal behavior in the ICR male mice.

  6. TcoF-DB v2: update of the database of human and mouse transcription co-factors and transcription factor interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Schmeier, Sebastian

    2016-10-17

    Transcription factors (TFs) play a pivotal role in transcriptional regulation, making them crucial for cell survival and important biological functions. For the regulation of transcription, interactions of different regulatory proteins known as transcription co-factors (TcoFs) and TFs are essential in forming necessary protein complexes. Although TcoFs themselves do not bind DNA directly, their influence on transcriptional regulation and initiation, although indirect, has been shown to be significant, with the functionality of TFs strongly influenced by the presence of TcoFs. In the TcoF-DB v2 database, we collect information on TcoFs. In this article, we describe updates and improvements implemented in TcoF-DB v2. TcoF-DB v2 provides several new features that enables exploration of the roles of TcoFs. The content of the database has significantly expanded, and is enriched with information from Gene Ontology, biological pathways, diseases and molecular signatures. TcoF-DB v2 now includes many more TFs; has substantially increased the number of human TcoFs to 958, and now includes information on mouse (418 new TcoFs). TcoF-DB v2 enables the exploration of information on TcoFs and allows investigations into their influence on transcriptional regulation in humans and mice. TcoF-DB v2 can be accessed at http://tcofdb.org/.

  7. Fat1 interacts with Fat4 to regulate neural tube closure, neural progenitor proliferation and apical constriction during mouse brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badouel, Caroline; Zander, Mark A; Liscio, Nicole; Bagherie-Lachidan, Mazdak; Sopko, Richelle; Coyaud, Etienne; Raught, Brian; Miller, Freda D; McNeill, Helen

    2015-08-15

    Mammalian brain development requires coordination between neural precursor proliferation, differentiation and cellular organization to create the intricate neuronal networks of the adult brain. Here, we examined the role of the atypical cadherins Fat1 and Fat4 in this process. We show that mutation of Fat1 in mouse embryos causes defects in cranial neural tube closure, accompanied by an increase in the proliferation of cortical precursors and altered apical junctions, with perturbations in apical constriction and actin accumulation. Similarly, knockdown of Fat1 in cortical precursors by in utero electroporation leads to overproliferation of radial glial precursors. Fat1 interacts genetically with the related cadherin Fat4 to regulate these processes. Proteomic analysis reveals that Fat1 and Fat4 bind different sets of actin-regulating and junctional proteins. In vitro data suggest that Fat1 and Fat4 form cis-heterodimers, providing a mechanism for bringing together their diverse interactors. We propose a model in which Fat1 and Fat4 binding coordinates distinct pathways at apical junctions to regulate neural progenitor proliferation, neural tube closure and apical constriction.

  8. An organotypic slice model for ex vivo study of neural, immune, and microbial interactions of mouse intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwerdtfeger, Luke A; Ryan, Elizabeth P; Tobet, Stuart A

    2016-02-15

    Organotypic tissue slices provide seminatural, three-dimensional microenvironments for use in ex vivo study of specific organs and have advanced investigative capabilities compared with isolated cell cultures. Several characteristics of the gastrointestinal tract have made in vitro models for studying the intestine challenging, such as maintaining the intricate structure of microvilli, the intrinsic enteric nervous system, Peyer's patches, the microbiome, and the active contraction of gut muscles. In the present study, an organotypic intestinal slice model was developed that allows for functional investigation across regions of the intestine. Intestinal tissue slices were maintained ex vivo for several days in a physiologically relevant environment that preserved normal enterocyte structure, intact and proliferating crypt cells, submucosal organization, and muscle wall composure. Cell death was measured by a membrane-impermeable DNA binding indicator, ethidium homodimer, and less than 5% of cells were labeled in all regions of the villi and crypt epithelia at 24 h ex vivo. This tissue slice model demonstrated intact myenteric and submucosal neuronal plexuses and functional interstitial cells of Cajal to the extent that nonstimulated, segmental contractions occurred for up to 48 h ex vivo. To detect changes in physiological responses, slices were also assessed for segmental contractions in the presence and absence of antibiotic treatment, which resulted in slices with lesser or greater amounts of commensal bacteria, respectively. Segmental contractions were significantly greater in slices without antibiotics and increased native microbiota. This model renders mechanisms of neuroimmune-microbiome interactions in a complex gut environment available to direct observation and controlled perturbation.

  9. Synchronization of circadian Per2 rhythms and HSF1-BMAL1:CLOCK interaction in mouse fibroblasts after short-term heat shock pulse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teruya Tamaru

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are the general physiological processes of adaptation to daily environmental changes, such as the temperature cycle. A change in temperature is a resetting cue for mammalian circadian oscillators, which are possibly regulated by the heat shock (HS pathway. The HS response (HSR is a universal process that provides protection against stressful conditions, which promote protein-denaturation. Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1 is essential for HSR. In the study presented here, we investigated whether a short-term HS pulse can reset circadian rhythms. Circadian Per2 rhythm and HSF1-mediated gene expression were monitored by a real-time bioluminescence assay for mPer2 promoter-driven luciferase and HS element (HSE; HSF1-binding site-driven luciferase activity, respectively. By an optimal duration HS pulse (43°C for approximately 30 minutes, circadian Per2 rhythm was observed in the whole mouse fibroblast culture, probably indicating the synchronization of the phases of each cell. This rhythm was preceded by an acute elevation in mPer2 and HSF1-mediated gene expression. Mutations in the two predicted HSE sites adjacent (one of them proximally to the E-box in the mPer2 promoter dramatically abolished circadian mPer2 rhythm. Circadian Per2 gene/protein expression was not observed in HSF1-deficient cells. These findings demonstrate that HSF1 is essential to the synchronization of circadian rhythms by the HS pulse. Importantly, the interaction between HSF1 and BMAL1:CLOCK heterodimer, a central circadian transcription factor, was observed after the HS pulse. These findings reveal that even a short-term HS pulse can reset circadian rhythms and cause the HSF1-BMAL1:CLOCK interaction, suggesting the pivotal role of crosstalk between the mammalian circadian and HSR systems.

  10. Th17 Cells Induce Dopaminergic Neuronal Death via LFA-1/ICAM-1 Interaction in a Mouse Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhan; Huang, Yan; Cao, Bei-Bei; Qiu, Yi-Hua; Peng, Yu-Ping

    2016-11-14

    T helper (Th)17 cells, a subset of CD4(+) T lymphocytes, have strong pro-inflammatory property and appear to be essential in the pathogenesis of many inflammatory diseases. However, the involvement of Th17 cells in Parkinson's disease (PD) that is characterized by a progressive degeneration of dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons in the nigrostriatal system is unclear. Here, we aimed to demonstrate that Th17 cells infiltrate into the brain parenchyma and induce neuroinflammation and DAergic neuronal death in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)- or 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+))-induced PD models. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption in the substantia nigra (SN) was assessed by the signal of FITC-labeled albumin that was injected into blood circulation via the ascending aorta. Live cell imaging system was used to observe a direct contact of Th17 cells with neurons by staining these cells using the two adhesion molecules, leukocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1 and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, respectively. Th17 cells invaded into the SN where BBB was disrupted in MPTP-induced PD mice. Th17 cells exacerbated DAergic neuronal loss and pro-inflammatory/neurotrophic factor disorders in MPP(+)-treated ventral mesencephalic (VM) cell cultures. A direct contact of LFA-1-stained Th17 cells with ICAM-1-stained VM neurons was dynamically captured. Either blocking LFA-1 in Th17 cells or blocking ICAM-1 in VM neurons with neutralizing antibodies abolished Th17-induced DAergic neuronal death. These results establish that Th17 cells infiltrate into the brain parenchyma of PD mice through lesioned BBB and exert neurotoxic property by promoting glial activation and importantly by a direct damage to neurons depending on LFA-1/ICAM-1 interaction.

  11. Cytodifferentiation of the postnatal mouse stomach in normal and Huntingtin-interacting protein 1-related-deficient mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, Theresa M.

    2010-01-01

    Huntingtin-interacting protein 1-related (Hip1r) is highly expressed in gastric parietal cells, where it participates in vesicular trafficking associated with acid secretion. Hip1r-deficient mice have a progressive remodeling of the mucosa, including apoptotic loss of parietal cells, glandular hypertrophy, mucous cell metaplasia, and reduced numbers of zymogenic cells. In this study, we characterized gastric gland development in wild-type and Hip1r-deficient mice to define normal development, as well as the timing and sequence of the cellular transformation events in the mutant stomach. Postnatal (newborn to 8-wk-old) stomachs were examined by histological and gene expression analysis. At birth, gastric glands in wild-type and mutant mice were rudimentary and mature gastric epithelial cells were not apparent, although marker expression was detected for most cell lineages. Interestingly, newborns exhibited unusual cell types, including a novel surface cell filled with lipid and cells that coexpressed markers of mature mucous neck and zymogenic cells. Glandular morphogenesis proceeded rapidly in both genotypes, with gastric glands formed by weaning at 3 wk of age. In the Hip1r-deficient stomach, epithelial cell remodeling developed in a progressive manner. Initially, in the perinatal stomach, cellular changes were limited to parietal cell apoptosis. Other epithelial cell changes, including apoptotic loss of zymogenic cells and expansion of metaplastic mucous cells, emerged several weeks later when the glands were morphologically mature. Thus, parietal cell loss appeared to be the initiating event in Hip1r-deficient mice, with secondary remodeling of the other gastric epithelial cells. PMID:20813912

  12. Serotonin/dopamine interactions in a hyperactive mouse: reduced serotonin receptor 1B activity reverses effects of dopamine transporter knockout.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Scott Hall

    Full Text Available Knockout (KO mice that lack the dopamine transporter (SL6A3; DAT display increased locomotion that can be attenuated, under some circumstances, by administration of drugs that normally produce psychostimulant-like effects, such as amphetamine and methylphenidate. These results have led to suggestions that DAT KO mice may model features of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD and that these drugs may act upon serotonin (5-HT systems to produce these unusual locomotor decreasing effects. Evidence from patterns of brain expression and initial pharmacologic studies led us to use genetic and pharmacologic approaches to examine the influence of altered 5-HT1B receptor activity on hyperactivity in DAT KO mice. Heterozygous 5-HT1B KO and pharmacologic 5-HT1B antagonism both attenuated locomotor hyperactivity in DAT KO mice. Furthermore, DAT KO mice with reduced, but not eliminated, 5-HT1B receptor expression regained cocaine-stimulated locomotion, which was absent in DAT KO mice with normal levels of 5-HT1B receptor expression. Further experiments demonstrated that the degree of habituation to the testing apparatus determined whether cocaine had no effect on locomotion in DAT KO or reduced locomotion, helping to resolve differences among prior reports. These findings of complementation of the locomotor effects of DAT KO by reducing 5-HT1B receptor activity underscore roles for interactions between specific 5-HT receptors and dopamine (DA systems in basal and cocaine-stimulated locomotion and support evaluation of 5-HT1B antagonists as potential, non-stimulant ADHD therapeutics.

  13. Interaction of mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) spike glycoprotein with receptor glycoprotein MHVR is required for infection with an MHV strain that expresses the hemagglutinin-esterase glycoprotein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gagneten, S; Gout, O; Dubois-Dalcq, M; Rottier, P; Rossen, J; Holmes, K V

    1995-01-01

    In addition to the spike (S) glycoprotein that binds to carcinoembryonic antigen-related receptors on the host cell membrane, some strains of mouse coronavirus (mouse hepatitis virus [MHV]) express a hemagglutinin esterase (HE) glycoprotein with hemagglutinating and acetylesterase activity. Virions

  14. Mapping of the Co-Transcriptomes of UPEC-Infected Macrophages Reveals New Insights into the Molecular Basis of Host-Pathogen Interactions in Human and Mouse

    KAUST Repository

    Mavromatis, Charalampos Harris

    2014-01-01

    provides both a unique co-culture approach to study infection in vitro and a technological framework for simultaneously capturing global changes in hostpathogen interactions at the transcriptional level in co-cultures. In conclusion, this work has generated new insights into the mechanisms that UPEC strains exploit to persist within the mouse intramacrophage environment, as well as differences in the transcriptional repertoire of HMDM and BMM challenged with the same UPEC strain.

  15. Interactions of hearing loss and diabetes mellitus in the middle age CBA/CaJ mouse model of presbycusis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilyeva, Olga N; Frisina, Susan T; Zhu, Xiaoxia; Walton, Joseph P; Frisina, Robert D

    2009-03-01

    Recently, we characterized the more severe nature of hearing loss in aged Type 2 diabetic human subjects [Frisina, S.T., Mapes, F., Kim, S., Frisina, D.R., Frisina, R.D., 2006. Characterization of hearing loss in aged type II diabetics. Hear. Res. 211, 103-113]. The current study prospectively assessed hearing abilities in middle age CBA/CaJ mice with Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) (STZ injection) or Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) (high fat diet), for a period of 6 months. Blood glucose, body weight and auditory tests (Auditory Brainstem Response-ABR, Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions-DPOAE) were evaluated at baseline and every 2 months. Tone and broad-band noise-burst responses in the inferior colliculus were obtained at 6 months. Body weights of controls did not change over 6 months (approximately 32 g), but there was a significant (approximately 5 g) decline in the T1DM, while T2DM exhibited approximately 10 g weight gain. Blood glucose levels significantly increased: 3-fold for T1DM, 1.3-fold for T2DM; with no significant changes in controls. ABR threshold elevations were found for both types of diabetes, but were most pronounced in the T2DM, starting as early as 2 months after induction of diabetes. A decline of mean DPOAE amplitudes was observed in both diabetic groups at high frequencies, and for the T2DM at low frequencies. In contrast to ABR thresholds, tone and noise thresholds in the inferior colliculus were lower for both diabetic groups. Induction of diabetes in middle-aged CBA/CaJ mice promotes amplification of age-related peripheral hearing loss which makes it a suitable model for studying the interaction of age-related hearing loss and diabetes. On the other hand, initial results of effects from very high blood glucose level (T1DM) on the auditory midbrain showed disruption of central inhibition, increased response synchrony or enhanced excitation in the inferior colliculus.

  16. Replacing a Missing Tooth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vessels in the tooth pulps are rather large. Drilling down these teeth for crowns may expose the ... porcelain replacement tooth is held in place by metal extensions cemented to the backs of the adjacent ...

  17. Hormone Replacement Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... before and during menopause, the levels of female hormones can go up and down. This can cause ... hot flashes and vaginal dryness. Some women take hormone replacement therapy (HRT), also called menopausal hormone therapy, ...

  18. Knee joint replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of your kneecap. Your kneecap is called the patella. The replacement part is usually made from a ... long. Then your surgeon will: Move your kneecap (patella) out of the way, then cut the ends ...

  19. Knee joint replacement - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100088.htm Knee joint replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the ... to slide 4 out of 4 Overview The knee is a complex joint. It contains the distal ...

  20. Product Platform Replacements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sköld, Martin; Karlsson, Christer

    2012-01-01

    Purpose – It is argued in this article that too little is known about product platforms and how to deal with them from a manager's point of view. Specifically, little information exists regarding when old established platforms are replaced by new generations in R&D and production environments...... originality and value is achieved by focusing on product platform replacements believed to represent a growing management challenge....

  1. Developmental analysis of Lingo-1/Lern1 protein expression in the mouse brain: interaction of its intracellular domain with Myt1l.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorens, Franc; Gil, Vanesa; Iraola, Susana; Carim-Todd, Laura; Martí, Eulàlia; Estivill, Xavier; Soriano, Eduardo; del Rio, José Antonio; Sumoy, Lauro

    2008-03-01

    Lingo-1 (also known as Lern1) is a component of the Nogo receptor complex that mediates intracellular signaling in response to myelin associated inhibitors (MAIs): NogoA, MAG, and Omgp. Signaling through Nogo receptor extends to more than its well known role in preventing axon regeneration after lesion in the CNS, being implicated in neuronal functional maturation. Using Lingo-1-deficient mice, it has been demonstrated that Lingo-1 plays relevant roles in oligodendrocyte differentiation during brain development, and that treatment with Lingo-1 antagonists can improve axon regeneration after lesion in adult mice by decreasing MAI mediated signaling. However, a detailed description of the pattern of expression of Lingo-1 protein in correlation with the other partners of Nogo receptor is missing. Here, we show that components of the Nogo receptor complex, Lingo-1, NgR1, p75, and TROY coexist in mouse brain in a defined time window only at later postnatal stages. We have also determined the Lingo-1 distribution showing expression in particular subsets of neurons, but not in myelinating mature oligodendrocytes. Surprisingly, Lingo-1 is expressed at early developmental stages without NgR1, which supports the notion that Lingo-1 may participate in other activities in developing neurons different from oligodendrocyte maturation or axon extension inhibition in the adult. Finally, we propose that the intracellular domain of Lingo-1 contributes to signaling and show that it interacts with the postmitotic neuronal specific zinc finger protein Myt1l, suggesting that Lingo-1 may regulate Myt1l transcription factor activity by affecting its subcellular localization.

  2. Synergistic Interaction of Light Alcohol Administration in the Presence of Mild Iron Overload in a Mouse Model of Liver Injury: Involvement of Triosephosphate Isomerase Nitration and Inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wanxia; Zhao, Jie; Gao, Zhonghong

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that iron overload promotes alcoholic liver injury, but the doses of iron or alcohol used in studies are usually able to induce liver injury independently. Little attention has been paid to the coexistence of low alcohol consumption and mild iron overload when either of them is insufficient to cause obvious liver damage, although this situation is very common among some people. We studied the interactive effects and the underlining mechanism of mild doses of iron and alcohol on liver injury in a mouse model. Forty eight male Kunming mice were randomly divided into four groups: control, iron (300 mg/kg iron dextran, i.p.), alcohol (2 g/kg/day ethanol for four weeks i.g.), and iron plus alcohol group. After 4 weeks of treatment, mice were sacrificed and blood and livers were collected for biochemical analysis. Protein nitration level in liver tissue was determined by immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis. Although neither iron overload nor alcohol consumption at our tested doses can cause severe liver injury, it was found that co-administration of the same doses of alcohol and iron resulted in liver injury and hepatic dysfunction, accompanied with elevated ratio of NADH/NAD+, reduced antioxidant ability, increased oxidative stress, and subsequent elevated protein nitration level. Further study revealed that triosephosphate isomerase, an important glycolytic enzyme, was one of the targets to be oxidized and nitrated, which was responsible for its inactivation. These data indicate that even under low alcohol intake, a certain amount of iron overload can cause significant liver oxidative damage, and the modification of triosephosphate isomerasemight be the important underlining mechanism of hepatic dysfunction. PMID:28103293

  3. Microglia in the mouse retina alter the structure and function of retinal pigmented epithelial cells: a potential cellular interaction relevant to AMD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxin Ma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a leading cause of legal blindness in the elderly in the industrialized word. While the immune system in the retina is likely to be important in AMD pathogenesis, the cell biology underlying the disease is incompletely understood. Clinical and basic science studies have implicated alterations in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE layer as a locus of early change. Also, retinal microglia, the resident immune cells of the retina, have been observed to translocate from their normal position in the inner retina to accumulate in the subretinal space close to the RPE layer in AMD eyes and in animal models of AMD. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we examined the effects of retinal microglia on RPE cells using 1 an in vitro model where activated retinal microglia are co-cultured with primary RPE cells, and 2 an in vivo mouse model where retinal microglia are transplanted into the subretinal space. We found that retinal microglia induced in RPE cells 1 changes in RPE structure and distribution, 2 increased expression and secretion of pro-inflammatory, chemotactic, and pro-angiogenic molecules, and 3 increased extent of in vivo choroidal neovascularization in the subretinal space. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings share similarities with important pathological features found in AMD and suggest the relevance of microglia-RPE interactions in AMD pathogenesis. We speculate that the migration of retinal microglia into the subretinal space in early stages of the disease induces significant changes in RPE cells that perpetuate further microglial accumulation, increase inflammation in the outer retina, and fosters an environment conducive for the formation of neovascular changes responsible for much of vision loss in advanced AMD.

  4. Prdm1 functions in the mesoderm of the second heart field, where it interacts genetically with Tbx1, during outflow tract morphogenesis in the mouse embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Stéphane D; Mayeuf-Louchart, Alicia; Watanabe, Yusuke; Brzezinski, Joseph A; Miyagawa-Tomita, Sachiko; Kelly, Robert G; Buckingham, Margaret

    2014-10-01

    Congenital heart defects affect at least 0.8% of newborn children and are a major cause of lethality prior to birth. Malformations of the arterial pole are particularly frequent. The myocardium at the base of the pulmonary trunk and aorta and the arterial tree associated with these great arteries are derived from splanchnic mesoderm of the second heart field (SHF), an important source of cardiac progenitor cells. These cells are controlled by a gene regulatory network that includes Fgf8, Fgf10 and Tbx1. Prdm1 encodes a transcriptional repressor that we show is also expressed in the SHF. In mouse embryos, mutation of Prdm1 affects branchial arch development and leads to persistent truncus arteriosus (PTA), indicative of neural crest dysfunction. Using conditional mutants, we show that this is not due to a direct function of Prdm1 in neural crest cells. Mutation of Prdm1 in the SHF does not result in PTA, but leads to arterial pole defects, characterized by mis-alignment or reduction of the aorta and pulmonary trunk, and abnormalities in the arterial tree, defects that are preceded by a reduction in outflow tract size and loss of caudal pharyngeal arch arteries. These defects are associated with a reduction in proliferation of progenitor cells in the SHF. We have investigated genetic interactions with Fgf8 and Tbx1, and show that on a Tbx1 heterozygote background, conditional Prdm1 mutants have more pronounced arterial pole defects, now including PTA. Our results identify PRDM1 as a potential modifier of phenotypic severity in TBX1 haploinsufficient DiGeorge syndrome patients.

  5. Regulation of activin receptor-interacting protein 2 expression in mouse hepatoma Hepal-6 cells and its relationship with collagen type Ⅳ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the regulation of activin receptor-interacting protein 2 (ARIP2) expression and its possible relationships with collagen type Ⅳ (collagen Ⅳ) in mouse hepatoma cell line Hepal-6 cells.METHODS: The ARIP2 mRNA expression kinetics in Hepal-6 cells was detected by RT-PCR, and its regulation factors were analyzed by treatment with signal transduction activators such as phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), forskolin and A23187. After pcDNA3-ARIP2 was transfected into Hepal-6 cells, the effects of ARIP2 overexpression on activin type Ⅱ receptor (ActRII)and collagen Ⅳ expression were evaluated.RESULTS: The expression levels of ARIP2 mRNA in Hapel-6 cells were elevated in time-dependent manner 12 h after treatment with activin A and endotoxin LPS, but not changed evidently in the early stage of stimulation (2 or 4 h). TheARIP2 mRNA expression was increased after stimulated with signal transduction activators such as PMA and forskolin in Hepal-6 cells, whereas decreased after treatment with A23187 (25.3% ± 5.7% vS 48.1% ± 3.6%, P < 0.01). ARIP2 overexpression could remarkably suppress the expression of ActRIIA mRNA in dose-dependent manner, but has no effect on ActRIIB in Hepal-6 cells induced by activin A. Furthermore, we have found that overexpression of ARIP2 could inhibit collagen Ⅳ mRNA and protein expressions induced by activin A in Hapel-6 cells.CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that ARIP2 expression can be influenced by various factors. ARIP2 may participate in the negative feedback regulation of signal transduction in the late stage by affecting the expression of ActRIIA and play an important role in regulation of development of liver fibrosis induced by activin.

  6. Expression of Cbl-interacting protein of 85 kDa in MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-pyridinium ion-treated dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minjuan Bian; Mei Yu; Shanzheng Yang; Hui Gao; Yalin Huang; Chunguang Deng; Yanqin Gao; Fengyan Sun; Fang Huang

    2008-01-01

    The newly discovered Cbl-interacting protein of 85 kDa (CIN85) is involved in many cellular processes, but its functions in the brain and in neurodegenerative diseases remain unclear. In this paper, we investigated the distribution of CIN85 protein in different regions of adult mouse brain using Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry, and found that CIN85 was ubiquitously expressed in mouse brain. In the striatum and substantia nigra, two regions most deeply affected in Parkinson's disease, the level of CIN85 protein was relatively high. In the MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease, the expression of CIN85 in the striatum and substantia nigra was complicated. But in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-pyridinium ion-treated human dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells, the expression of CIN85 increased dramatically. Knocking down of CIN85 by short hairpin RNA reduced SH-SY5Y cell death. Therefore, CIN85 might play different roles in the dopaminergic cell line and in the nigrostriatum of mouse brain under neurotoxin challenge.

  7. Zscan4 is regulated by PI3-kinase and DNA-damaging agents and directly interacts with the transcriptional repressors LSD1 and CtBP2 in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Storm

    Full Text Available The Zscan4 family of genes, encoding SCAN-domain and zinc finger-containing proteins, has been implicated in the control of early mammalian embryogenesis as well as the regulation of pluripotency and maintenance of genome integrity in mouse embryonic stem cells. However, many features of this enigmatic family of genes are poorly understood. Here we show that undifferentiated mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC lines simultaneously express multiple members of the Zscan4 gene family, with Zscan4c, Zscan4f and Zscan4-ps2 consistently being the most abundant. Despite this, between only 0.1 and 0.7% of undifferentiated mouse pluripotent stem cells express Zscan4 protein at a given time, consistent with a very restricted pattern of Zscan4 transcripts reported previously. Herein we demonstrate that Zscan4 expression is regulated by the p110α catalytic isoform of phosphoinositide 3-kinases and is induced following exposure to a sub-class of DNA-damage-inducing agents, including Zeocin and Cisplatin. Furthermore, we observe that Zscan4 protein expression peaks during the G2 phase of the cell cycle, suggesting that it may play a critical role at this checkpoint. Studies with GAL4-fusion proteins suggest a role for Zscan4 in transcriptional regulation, further supported by the fact that protein interaction analyses demonstrate that Zscan4 interacts with both LSD1 and CtBP2 in ESC nuclei. This study advances and extends our understanding of Zscan4 expression, regulation and mechanism of action. Based on our data we propose that Zscan4 may regulate gene transcription in mouse ES cells through interaction with LSD1 and CtBP2.

  8. VH replacement in primary immunoglobulin repertoire diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Amy; Novobrantseva, Tatiana I; Coffre, Maryaline; Hewitt, Susannah L; Jensen, Kari; Skok, Jane A; Rajewsky, Klaus; Koralov, Sergei B

    2015-02-01

    The genes encoding the variable (V) region of the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) are assembled from V, D (diversity), and J (joining) elements through a RAG-mediated recombination process that relies on the recognition of recombination signal sequences (RSSs) flanking the individual elements. Secondary V(D)J rearrangement modifies the original Ig rearrangement if a nonproductive original joint is formed, as a response to inappropriate signaling from a self-reactive BCR, or as part of a stochastic mechanism to further diversify the Ig repertoire. VH replacement represents a RAG-mediated secondary rearrangement in which an upstream VH element recombines with a rearranged VHDHJH joint to generate a new BCR specificity. The rearrangement occurs between the cryptic RSS of the original VH element and the conventional RSS of the invading VH gene, leaving behind a footprint of up to five base pairs (bps) of the original VH gene that is often further obscured by exonuclease activity and N-nucleotide addition. We have previously demonstrated that VH replacement can efficiently rescue the development of B cells that have acquired two nonproductive heavy chain (IgH) rearrangements. Here we describe a novel knock-in mouse model in which the prerearranged IgH locus resembles an endogenously rearranged productive VHDHJH allele. Using this mouse model, we characterized the role of VH replacement in the diversification of the primary Ig repertoire through the modification of productive VHDHJH rearrangements. Our results indicate that VH replacement occurs before Ig light chain rearrangement and thus is not involved in the editing of self-reactive antibodies.

  9. Mouse models in oncoimmunology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitvogel, Laurence; Pitt, Jonathan M; Daillère, Romain; Smyth, Mark J; Kroemer, Guido

    2016-12-01

    Fundamental cancer research and the development of efficacious antineoplastic treatments both rely on experimental systems in which the relationship between malignant cells and immune cells can be studied. Mouse models of transplantable, carcinogen-induced or genetically engineered malignancies - each with their specific advantages and difficulties - have laid the foundations of oncoimmunology. These models have guided the immunosurveillance theory that postulates that evasion from immune control is an essential feature of cancer, the concept that the long-term effects of conventional cancer treatments mostly rely on the reinstatement of anticancer immune responses and the preclinical development of immunotherapies, including currently approved immune checkpoint blockers. Specific aspects of pharmacological development, as well as attempts to personalize cancer treatments using patient-derived xenografts, require the development of mouse models in which murine genes and cells are replaced with their human equivalents. Such 'humanized' mouse models are being progressively refined to characterize the leukocyte subpopulations that belong to the innate and acquired arms of the immune system as they infiltrate human cancers that are subjected to experimental therapies. We surmise that the ever-advancing refinement of murine preclinical models will accelerate the pace of therapeutic optimization in patients.

  10. Robotic mitral valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senay, Sahin; Gullu, Ahmet Umit; Kocyigit, Muharrem; Degirmencioglu, Aleks; Karabulut, Hasan; Alhan, Cem

    2014-01-01

    Robotic surgical techniques allow surgeons to perform mitral valve surgery. This procedure has gained acceptance, particularly for mitral valve repair in degenerative mitral disease. However, mitral repair may not always be possible, especially in severely calcified mitral valve of rheumatic origin. This study demonstrates the basic concepts and technique of robotic mitral valve replacement for valve pathologies that are not suitable for repair.

  11. Replacing America's Job Bank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollman, Jim

    2009-01-01

    The Job Central National Labor Exchange (www.jobcentral.com) has become the effective replacement for America's Job Bank with state workforce agencies and, increasingly, with community colleges throughout the country. The American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) has formed a partnership with Job Central to promote its use throughout the…

  12. Replacing America's Job Bank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollman, Jim

    2009-01-01

    The Job Central National Labor Exchange (www.jobcentral.com) has become the effective replacement for America's Job Bank with state workforce agencies and, increasingly, with community colleges throughout the country. The American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) has formed a partnership with Job Central to promote its use throughout the…

  13. Genome-wide analysis of the mouse lung transcriptome reveals novel molecular gene interaction networks and cell-specific expression signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Robert W

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The lung is critical in surveillance and initial defense against pathogens. In humans, as in mice, individual genetic differences strongly modulate pulmonary responses to infectious agents, severity of lung disease, and potential allergic reactions. In a first step towards understanding genetic predisposition and pulmonary molecular networks that underlie individual differences in disease vulnerability, we performed a global analysis of normative lung gene expression levels in inbred mouse strains and a large family of BXD strains that are widely used for systems genetics. Our goal is to provide a key community resource on the genetics of the normative lung transcriptome that can serve as a foundation for experimental analysis and allow predicting genetic predisposition and response to pathogens, allergens, and xenobiotics. Methods Steady-state polyA+ mRNA levels were assayed across a diverse and fully genotyped panel of 57 isogenic strains using the Affymetrix M430 2.0 array. Correlations of expression levels between genes were determined. Global expression QTL (eQTL analysis and network covariance analysis was performed using tools and resources in GeneNetwork http://www.genenetwork.org. Results Expression values were highly variable across strains and in many cases exhibited a high heri-tability factor. Several genes which showed a restricted expression to lung tissue were identified. Using correlations between gene expression values across all strains, we defined and extended memberships of several important molecular networks in the lung. Furthermore, we were able to extract signatures of immune cell subpopulations and characterize co-variation and shared genetic modulation. Known QTL regions for respiratory infection susceptibility were investigated and several cis-eQTL genes were identified. Numerous cis- and trans-regulated transcripts and chromosomal intervals with strong regulatory activity were mapped. The Cyp1a1 P

  14. Mouse phenotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Adler, Thure; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Becker, Lore; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Da Silva-Buttkus, Patricia; Neff, Frauke; Götz, Alexander; Hans, Wolfgang; Hölter, Sabine M; Horsch, Marion; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Kemter, Elisabeth; Lengger, Christoph; Maier, Holger; Matloka, Mikolaj; Möller, Gabriele; Naton, Beatrix; Prehn, Cornelia; Puk, Oliver; Rácz, Ildikó; Rathkolb, Birgit; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Rozman, Jan; Wang-Sattler, Rui; Schrewe, Anja; Stöger, Claudia; Tost, Monica; Adamski, Jerzy; Aigner, Bernhard; Beckers, Johannes; Behrendt, Heidrun; Busch, Dirk H; Esposito, Irene; Graw, Jochen; Illig, Thomas; Ivandic, Boris; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Mempel, Martin; Neschen, Susanne; Ollert, Markus; Schulz, Holger; Suhre, Karsten; Wolf, Eckhard; Wurst, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Andreas; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin

    2011-02-01

    Model organisms like the mouse are important tools to learn more about gene function in man. Within the last 20 years many mutant mouse lines have been generated by different methods such as ENU mutagenesis, constitutive and conditional knock-out approaches, knock-down, introduction of human genes, and knock-in techniques, thus creating models which mimic human conditions. Due to pleiotropic effects, one gene may have different functions in different organ systems or time points during development. Therefore mutant mouse lines have to be phenotyped comprehensively in a highly standardized manner to enable the detection of phenotypes which might otherwise remain hidden. The German Mouse Clinic (GMC) has been established at the Helmholtz Zentrum München as a phenotyping platform with open access to the scientific community (www.mousclinic.de; [1]). The GMC is a member of the EUMODIC consortium which created the European standard workflow EMPReSSslim for the systemic phenotyping of mouse models (http://www.eumodic.org/[2]). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Mouse Gives Birth to Pups Using 3-D Printed Ovary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_165622.html Mouse Gives Birth to Pups Using 3-D Printed Ovary Breakthrough ... to use hormone replacement therapies in order to trigger puberty," explained co-researcher Monica Laronda. She's a ...

  16. Urban chaos and replacement dynamics in nature and society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanguang

    2014-11-01

    Replacements resulting from competition are ubiquitous phenomena in both nature and society. The evolution of a self-organized system is always a physical process substituting one type of components for another type of components. A logistic model of replacement dynamics has been proposed in terms of technical innovation and urbanization, but it fails to arouse widespread attention in the academia. This paper is devoted to laying the foundations of general replacement principle by using analogy and induction. The empirical base of this study is urban replacement, including urbanization and urban growth. The sigmoid functions can be employed to model various processes of replacement. Many mathematical methods such as allometric scaling and head/tail breaks can be applied to analyzing the processes and patterns of replacement. Among varied sigmoid functions, the logistic function is the basic and the simplest model of replacement dynamics. A new finding is that replacement can be associated with chaos in a nonlinear system, e.g., urban chaos is just a part of replacement dynamics. The aim of developing replacement theory is at understanding complex interaction and conversion. This theory provides a new way of looking at urbanization, technological innovation and diffusion, Volterra-Lotka’s predator-prey interaction, man-land relation, and dynastic changes resulting from peasant uprising, and all that. Especially, the periodic oscillations and chaos of replacement dynamics can be used to explain and predict the catastrophic occurrences in the physical and human systems.

  17. The Mouse Replaces the Pencil: TOEFL Goes Electronic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, Effie Papatzikou

    1998-01-01

    Describes the conversion of the Test of English as a Foreign Language to computer-based testing (CBT), explaining the impetus for change and answering questions about benefits of CBT, introduction of CBT into the U.S. and internationally, test scoring and reporting, effects of computer literacy on test scores, preparing test-takers for CBT, and…

  18. Assisting People with Multiple Disabilities and Minimal Motor Behavior to Improve Computer Pointing Efficiency through a Mouse Wheel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Ching-Hsiang; Chang, Man-Ling; Shih, Ching-Tien

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated whether two people with multiple disabilities and minimal motor behavior would be able to improve their pointing performance using finger poke ability with a mouse wheel through a Dynamic Pointing Assistive Program (DPAP) and a newly developed mouse driver (i.e., a new mouse driver replaces standard mouse driver, changes a…

  19. Ulnar head replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Timothy J; van Schoonhoven, Joerg

    2007-03-01

    Recent years have seen an increasing awareness of the anatomical and biomechanical significance of the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ). With this has come a more critical approach to surgical management of DRUJ disorders and a realization that all forms of "excision arthroplasty" can only restore forearm rotation at the expense of forearm stability. This, in turn, has led to renewed interest in prosthetic replacement of the ulnar head, a procedure that had previously fallen into disrepute because of material failures with early implants, in particular, the Swanson silicone ulnar head replacement. In response to these early failures, a new prosthesis was developed in the early 1990s, using materials designed to withstand the loads across the DRUJ associated with normal functional use of the upper limb. Released onto the market in 1995 (Herbert ulnar head prosthesis), clinical experience during the last 10 years has shown that this prosthesis is able to restore forearm function after ulnar head excision and that the materials (ceramic head and noncemented titanium stem), even with normal use of the limb, are showing no signs of failure in the medium to long term. As experience with the use of an ulnar head prosthesis grows, so does its acceptance as a viable and attractive alternative to more traditional operations, such as the Darrach and Sauve-Kapandji procedures. This article discusses the current indications and contraindications for ulnar head replacement and details the surgical procedure, rehabilitation, and likely outcomes.

  20. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions...... interaction between a human operator and an artificial actor or agent. We can apply insights from puppetry to develop culturally-aware robots. Here we describe the development of a robotic marionette theatre wherein robotic controllers assume the role of human puppeteers. The system has been built, tested...

  1. Additive interactions of pregabalin with lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine and topiramate in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model: a type I isobolographic analysis for non-parallel dose-response relationship curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luszczki, Jarogniew J; Filip, Damian; Czuczwar, Stanislaw J

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the anticonvulsant effects of pregabalin (PGB-a third-generation antiepileptic drug) in combination with three second-generation antiepileptic drugs (i.e., lamotrigine [LTG], oxcarbazepine [OXC] and topiramate [TPM]) in the mouse maximal electroshock (MES)-induced seizure model by using the type I isobolographic analysis for non-parallel dose-response relationship curves (DRRCs). Tonic hind limb extension (seizure activity) was evoked in adult male albino Swiss mice by a current (sine-wave, 25mA, 500V, 50Hz, 0.2s stimulus duration) delivered via auricular electrodes. Potential adverse-effect profiles of interactions of PGB with LTG, OXC and TPM at the fixed-ratio of 1:1 in the MES test with respect to motor performance, long-term memory and skeletal muscular strength were measured. In the mouse MES model, PGB administered singly had its DRRC non-parallel to that for LTG, OXC and TPM. With type I isobolography for non-parallel DRRCs, the combinations of PGB with LTG, OXC and TPM at the fixed-ratio of 1:1 exerted additive interaction. In all combinations, neither motor coordination, long-term memory nor muscular strength were affected. In conclusion, the additive interactions between PGB and LTG, OXC and TPM are worthy of consideration while extrapolating the results from this study to clinical settings.

  2. Gene replacement therapy rescues photoreceptor degeneration in a murine model of Leber congenital amaurosis lacking RPGRIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlyk, Basil S; Smith, Alexander J; Buch, Prateek K; Adamian, Michael; Hong, Dong-Hyun; Sandberg, Michael A; Ali, Robin R; Li, Tiansen

    2005-09-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) is a photoreceptor protein anchored in the connecting cilia by an RPGR-interacting protein (RPGRIP). Loss of RPGRIP causes Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), a severe form of photoreceptor degeneration. The current study was an investigation of whether somatic gene replacement could rescue degenerating photoreceptors in a murine model of LCA due to a defect in RPGRIP. An RPGRIP expression cassette, driven by a mouse opsin promoter, was packaged into recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV). The AAV vector was delivered into the right eyes of RPGRIP(-/-) mice by a single subretinal injection into the superior hemisphere. The left eyes received a saline injection as a control. Full-field electroretinograms (ERGs) were recorded from both eyes at 2, 3, 4, and 5 months after injection. After the final follow-up, retinas were analyzed by immunostaining or by light and electron microscopy. Delivery of the AAV vector led to RPGRIP expression and restoration of normal RPGR localization at the connecting cilia. Photoreceptor preservation was evident by a thicker cell layer and well-developed outer segments in the treated eyes. Rescue was more pronounced in the superior hemisphere coincident with the site of delivery. Functional preservation was demonstrated by ERG. AAV-mediated RPGRIP gene replacement preserves photoreceptor structure and function in a mouse model of LCA, despite ongoing cell loss at the time of intervention. These results indicate that gene replacement therapy may be effective in patients with LCA due to a defect in RPGRIP and suggest that further preclinical development of gene therapy for this disorder is warranted.

  3. Aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kapetanakis, Emmanouil I; Athanasiou, Thanos; Mestres, Carlos A

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS OF THE STUDY: Prompted by anecdotal evidence and observations by surgeons, an investigation was undertaken into the potential differences in implanted aortic valve prosthesis sizes, during aortic valve replacement (AVR) procedures, between northern and southern European...... countries. METHODS: A multi-institutional, non-randomized, retrospective analysis was conducted among 2,932 patients who underwent AVR surgery at seven tertiary cardiac surgery centers throughout Europe. Demographic and perioperative variables including valve size and type, body surface area (BSA) and early...

  4. Total ankle joint replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Ankle arthritis results in a stiff and painful ankle and can be a major cause of disability. For people with end-stage ankle arthritis, arthrodesis (ankle fusion) is effective at reducing pain in the shorter term, but results in a fixed joint, and over time the loss of mobility places stress on other joints in the foot that may lead to arthritis, pain and dysfunction. Another option is to perform a total ankle joint replacement, with the aim of giving the patient a mobile and pain-free ankle. In this article we review the efficacy of this procedure, including how it compares to ankle arthrodesis, and consider the indications and complications.

  5. The Optimum Replacement of Weapon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiao; ZHANG Jin-chun

    2002-01-01

    The theory of LCC (Life Cycle Cost) is applied in this paper. The relation between the economic life of weapon and the optimum replacement is analyzed. The method to define the optimum replacement time of weapon is discussed.

  6. RIKEN mouse genome encyclopedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2003-01-01

    We have been working to establish the comprehensive mouse full-length cDNA collection and sequence database to cover as many genes as we can, named Riken mouse genome encyclopedia. Recently we are constructing higher-level annotation (Functional ANnoTation Of Mouse cDNA; FANTOM) not only with homology search based annotation but also with expression data profile, mapping information and protein-protein database. More than 1,000,000 clones prepared from 163 tissues were end-sequenced to classify into 159,789 clusters and 60,770 representative clones were fully sequenced. As a conclusion, the 60,770 sequences contained 33,409 unique. The next generation of life science is clearly based on all of the genome information and resources. Based on our cDNA clones we developed the additional system to explore gene function. We developed cDNA microarray system to print all of these cDNA clones, protein-protein interaction screening system, protein-DNA interaction screening system and so on. The integrated database of all the information is very useful not only for analysis of gene transcriptional network and for the connection of gene to phenotype to facilitate positional candidate approach. In this talk, the prospect of the application of these genome resourced should be discussed. More information is available at the web page: http://genome.gsc.riken.go.jp/.

  7. Power Plant Replacement Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Gary

    2010-09-30

    This report represents the final report for the Eastern Illinois University power plant replacement study. It contains all related documentation from consideration of possible solutions to the final recommended option. Included are the economic justifications associated with the chosen solution along with application for environmental permitting for the selected project for construction. This final report will summarize the results of execution of an EPC (energy performance contract) investment grade audit (IGA) which lead to an energy services agreement (ESA). The project includes scope of work to design and install energy conservation measures which are guaranteed by the contractor to be self‐funding over its twenty year contract duration. The cost recovery is derived from systems performance improvements leading to energy savings. The prime focus of this EPC effort is to provide a replacement solution for Eastern Illinois University’s aging and failing circa 1925 central steam production plant. Twenty‐three ECMs were considered viable whose net impact will provide sufficient savings to successfully support the overall project objectives.

  8. Total disc replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vital, J-M; Boissière, L

    2014-02-01

    Total disc replacement (TDR) (partial disc replacement will not be described) has been used in the lumbar spine since the 1980s, and more recently in the cervical spine. Although the biomechanical concepts are the same and both are inserted through an anterior approach, lumbar TDR is conventionally indicated for chronic low back pain, whereas cervical TDR is used for soft discal hernia resulting in cervicobrachial neuralgia. The insertion technique must be rigorous, with precise centering in the disc space, taking account of vascular anatomy, which is more complex in the lumbar region, particularly proximally to L5-S1. All of the numerous studies, including prospective randomized comparative trials, have demonstrated non-inferiority to fusion, or even short-term superiority regarding speed of improvement. The main implant-related complication is bridging heterotopic ossification with resulting loss of range of motion and increased rates of adjacent segment degeneration, although with an incidence lower than after arthrodesis. A sufficiently long follow-up, which has not yet been reached, will be necessary to establish definitively an advantage for TDR, particularly in the cervical spine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. REPLACEMENT OF FRENCH CARDS

    CERN Multimedia

    HR/SOC

    2001-01-01

    The French Ministry of Foreign Affairs has informed the Organization that it is shortly to replace all diplomatic cards, special cards and employment permits ('attestations de fonctions') now held by members of the personnel and their families. Between 2 July and 31 December 2001, these cards are to be replaced by secure, computerized equivalents. The old cards may continue to be used until 31 December 2001. For the purposes of the handover, members of the personnel must go personally to the cards office (33/1-015), in order to fill in a 'fiche individuelle' form, taking the following documents for themselves and members of their families already in possession of a French card : A recent identity photograph in 4.5 cm x 3.5 cm format. The French card in their possession. An A4 photocopy of the same French card, certified by the cards office as being a true copy. Those members of the personnel whose cards (and/or cards belonging to members of their families) are shortly due to expire, or have recently done...

  10. REPLACEMENT OF FRENCH CARDS

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division; Cards.Service@cern.ch

    2001-01-01

    The French Ministry of Foreign Affairs is currently replacing all diplomatic cards, special cards and employment permits («attestations de fonctions») held by members of the personnel and their families. These cards are replaced by secure, computerized equivalents. The old cards may no longer be used after 31 December 2001. For the purposes of the handover, members of the personnel must go personally to the cards office (33/1-015) between 8h30 and 12h30, in order to fill in a «fiche individuelle» form, taking the following documents for themselves and members of their families already in possession of a French card : A recent identity photograph in 4.5 cm x 3.5 cm format, the French card in their possession, an A4 photocopy of the same French card, certified by the cards office as being a true copy. Those members of the personnel whose cards (and/or cards belonging to members of their families) are shortly due to expire, or have recently done so, are also requested...

  11. REPLACEMENT OF FRENCH CARDS

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2001-01-01

    The French Ministry of Foreign Affairs has informed the Organization that it is shortly to replace all diplomatic cards, special cards and employment permits ('attestations de fonctions') now held by members of the personnel and their families. Between 2 July and 31 December 2001, these cards are to be replaced by secure, computerized equivalents. The old cards may continue to be used until 31 December 2001. For the purposes of the handover, members of the personnel are asked to go to the cards office (33/1-015), taking the following documents for themselves and members of their families already in possession of a French card : A recent identity photograph in 4.5 cm x 3.5 cm format, The French card in their possession, an A4 photocopy of the same French card, certified by the cards office as being a true copy. Those members of the personnel whose cards (and/or cards belonging to members of their families) are shortly due to expire, or have recently done so, are also requested to take these items to the c...

  12. REPLACEMENT OF FRENCH CARDS

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2001-01-01

    The French Ministry of Foreign Affairs has informed the Organization that it is shortly to replace all diplomatic cards, special cards and employment permits ('attestations de fonctions') now held by members of the personnel and their families. Between 2 July and 31 December 2001, these cards are to be replaced by secure, computerized equivalents. A 'personnel office' stamped photocopy of the old cards may continue to be used until 31 December 2001. For the purposes of the handover, members of the personnel must go personally to the cards office (33/1-015), between 8:30 and 12:30, in order to fill a 'fiche individuelle' form (in black ink only), which has to be personally signed by themselves and another separately signed by members of their family, taking the following documents for themselves and members of their families already in possession of a French card : A recent identity photograph in 4.5 cm x 3.5 cm format (signed on the back) The French card in their possession an A4 photocopy of the same Fre...

  13. Power Plant Replacement Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Gary

    2010-09-30

    This report represents the final report for the Eastern Illinois University power plant replacement study. It contains all related documentation from consideration of possible solutions to the final recommended option. Included are the economic justifications associated with the chosen solution along with application for environmental permitting for the selected project for construction. This final report will summarize the results of execution of an EPC (energy performance contract) investment grade audit (IGA) which lead to an energy services agreement (ESA). The project includes scope of work to design and install energy conservation measures which are guaranteed by the contractor to be self-funding over its twenty year contract duration. The cost recovery is derived from systems performance improvements leading to energy savings. The prime focus of this EPC effort is to provide a replacement solution for Eastern Illinois University's aging and failing circa 1925 central steam production plant. Twenty-three ECMs were considered viable whose net impact will provide sufficient savings to successfully support the overall project objectives.

  14. Faster Replacement Paths

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Virginia Vassilevska

    2010-01-01

    The replacement paths problem for directed graphs is to find for given nodes s and t and every edge e on the shortest path between them, the shortest path between s and t which avoids e. For unweighted directed graphs on n vertices, the best known algorithm runtime was \\tilde{O}(n^{2.5}) by Roditty and Zwick. For graphs with integer weights in {-M,...,M}, Weimann and Yuster recently showed that one can use fast matrix multiplication and solve the problem in O(Mn^{2.584}) time, a runtime which would be O(Mn^{2.33}) if the exponent \\omega of matrix multiplication is 2. We improve both of these algorithms. Our new algorithm also relies on fast matrix multiplication and runs in O(M n^{\\omega} polylog(n)) time if \\omega>2 and O(n^{2+\\eps}) for any \\eps>0 if \\omega=2. Our result shows that, at least for small integer weights, the replacement paths problem in directed graphs may be easier than the related all pairs shortest paths problem in directed graphs, as the current best runtime for the latter is \\Omega(n^{2.5...

  15. Power Plant Replacement Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Gary

    2010-09-30

    This report represents the final report for the Eastern Illinois University power plant replacement study. It contains all related documentation from consideration of possible solutions to the final recommended option. Included are the economic justifications associated with the chosen solution along with application for environmental permitting for the selected project for construction. This final report will summarize the results of execution of an EPC (energy performance contract) investment grade audit (IGA) which lead to an energy services agreement (ESA). The project includes scope of work to design and install energy conservation measures which are guaranteed by the contractor to be self-funding over its twenty year contract duration. The cost recovery is derived from systems performance improvements leading to energy savings. The prime focus of this EPC effort is to provide a replacement solution for Eastern Illinois University’s aging and failing circa 1925 central steam production plant. Twenty-three ECMs were considered viable whose net impact will provide sufficient savings to successfully support the overall project objectives.

  16. Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The main theme of this anthology is the unique interaction between mathematics, physics and philosophy during the beginning of the 20th century. Seminal theories of modern physics and new fundamental mathematical structures were discovered or formed in this period. Significant physicists...... such as Lorentz and Einstein as well as mathematicians such as Poincare, Minkowski, Hilbert and Weyl contributed to this development. They created the new physical theories and the mathematical disciplines that play such paramount roles in their mathematical formulations. These physicists and mathematicians were...

  17. Interactions of 1-methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline with lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, pregabalin, and topiramate in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model: a type I isobolographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luszczki, Jarogniew J; Antkiewicz-Michaluk, Lucyna; Raszewski, Grzegorz; Czuczwar, Stanislaw J

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the anticonvulsant effects of 1-methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline (MeTHIQ--an endogenous parkinsonism-preventing substance) in combination with four second-generation antiepileptic drugs (AEDs: lamotrigine [LTG], oxcarbazepine [OXC], pregabalin [PGB], and topiramate [TPM]) in the mouse maximal electroshock (MES)-induced seizure model by using the type I isobolographic analysis for parallel and non-parallel dose-response relationship curves (DRRCs). Potential adverse-effect profiles of interactions of MeTHIQ with LTG, OXC, PGB and TPM at the fixed-ratio of 1:1 from the MES test with respect to motor performance, long-term memory and skeletal muscular strength were measured along with total brain concentrations of MeTHIQ and TPM. In the mouse MES model, MeTHIQ administered singly had its DRRC parallel to those for OXC and TPM, and simultaneously, non-parallel to those for LTG and PGB. With type I isobolography for parallel DRRCs, the combination of MeTHIQ with TPM at three fixed-ratios of 1:3, 1:1 and 3:1 exerted supra-additive (synergistic) interaction, whereas the combination of MeTHIQ with OXC at the fixed-ratios of 1:3, 1:1 and 3:1 produced additive interaction. Similarly, the type I isobolography for non-parallel DRRCs revealed that the combination of MeTHIQ with LTG and PGB at the fixed-ratio of 1:1 produced additive interaction. For all combinations, neither motor coordination, long-term memory nor muscular strength were affected. Total brain concentrations of MeTHIQ and TPM revealed no significant changes in their concentrations when the drugs were combined at the fixed-ratios of 1:3, 1:1 and 3:1. In conclusion, the synergistic interaction of MeTHIQ with TPM at the fixed-ratios of 1:3, 1:1 and 3:1 against MES-induced seizures was pharmacodynamic in nature and thus, it is worthy of consideration in further clinical settings. The combinations of MeTHIQ with LTG, OXC and PGB were neutral in the mouse MES model.

  18. Toleration, Synthesis or Replacement?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtermann, Jakob v. H.; Madsen, Mikael Rask

    2016-01-01

    to have considerable problems keeping a clear focus on the key question: What are the implications of this empirical turn in terms of philosophy of legal science, of the social understanding of IL, and, not least, of the place of doctrinal scholarship after the alleged Wende? What is needed, we argue......, in order to answer is not yet another partisan suggestion, but rather an attempt at making intelligible both the oppositions and the possibilities of synthesis between normative and empirical approaches to law. Based on our assessment and rational reconstruction of current arguments and positions, we...... therefore outline a taxonomy consisting of the following three basic, ideal-types in terms of the epistemological understanding of the interface of law and empirical studies: toleration, synthesis and replacement. This tripartite model proves useful with a view to teasing out and better articulating...

  19. Emowars: Interactive Game Input Menggunakan Ekspresi Wajah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andry Chowanda

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Research in the affective game has received attention from the research communities over this lustrum. As a crucial aspect of a game, emotions play an important role in user experience as well as to emphasize the user’s emotions state on game design. This will improve the user’s interactivity while they playing the game. This research aims to discuss and analyze whether emotions can replace traditional user game inputs (keyboard, mouse, and others. The methodology used in this research is divided into two main phases: game design and facial expression recognition. The results of this research indicate that users preferred to use a traditional input such as mouse. Moreover, user’s interactivities with game are still slightly low. However, this is a great opportunity for researchers in affective game with a more interactive game play as well as rich and complex story. Hopefully this will improve the user affective state and emotions in game. The results of this research imply that happy emotion obtains 78% of detection, meanwhile the anger emotion has the lowest detection of44.4%. Moreover, users prefer mouse and FER (face expression recognition as the best input for this game.

  20. Iron replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ole Haagen; Coskun, Mehmet; Weiss, Günter

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Approximately, one-third of the world's population suffers from anemia, and at least half of these cases are because of iron deficiency. With the introduction of new intravenous iron preparations over the last decade, uncertainty has arisen when these compounds should be admini...... treatment, when to follow-up for relapse, which dosage and type of therapy should be recommended or not recommended, and if some patients should not be treated....... be administered and under which circumstances oral therapy is still an appropriate and effective treatment. RECENT FINDINGS: Numerous guidelines are available, but none go into detail about therapeutic start and end points or how iron-deficiency anemia should be best treated depending on the underlying cause...... of iron deficiency or in regard to concomitant underlying or additional diseases. SUMMARY: The study points to major issues to be considered in revisions of future guidelines for the true optimal iron replacement therapy, including how to assess the need for treatment, when to start and when to stop...

  1. Using your shoulder after replacement surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joint replacement surgery - using your shoulder; Shoulder replacement surgery - after ... You have had shoulder replacement surgery to replace the bones of your shoulder joint with artificial parts. The parts include a stem made of metal and a ...

  2. Educating My Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarter, Jill

    , in partnership with the dedicated teachers out there, I think I can help promote the critical thinking skills and scientific literacy of the next generation of voters. Hopefully, I can also help train my replacement to be a better scientist, capable of seizing all the opportunities generated by advances in technology and our improved understanding of the universe to craft search strategies with greater probability of success than those I have initiated.

  3. [Ascending aorta replacement late after aortic valve replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yasunari; Ito, Toshiaki; Maekawa, Atsuo; Sawaki, Sadanari; Fujii, Genyo; Hoshino, Satoshi; Tokoro, Masayoshi; Yanagisawa, Junji

    2013-07-01

    Replacement of the asceding aorta is indicated in patients undergoing aortic valve replacement( AVR), if the diameter of the ascending aorta is greater than 5.0 cm. If the diameter of the asceding aorta is from 4.0 to 5.0 cm, it was arguable whether replacement of the ascending aorta should be performed. Nine patients who underwent reoperative ascending aorta replacement after AVR were reviewed retrospectively. Reoperation on the asending aorta replacement was performed 11.8±7.2 years (range 1y5m~23y3m) after AVR. Mean patient age was 69.9±6.3 (range 60~81). In 2 cases, reoperations were performed early year after AVR. Although ascending aorta was dilated at the 1st operation, replacement wasn't performed for the age and minimally invasive cardiac surgery (MICS). In 3 cases, reoperations were performed more than 10 years later. On these cases, ascending aorta aneurysm and dissection occurred with no pain and were pointed out by computed tomography(CT) or ultrasonic cardiogram(UCG). We think that patients with dilatation of the ascending aorta should undergo AVR and aorta replacement at the 1st operation regardness of age. It is important that patients who underwent AVR should undergo a regular checkup on the ascending aorta.

  4. Genetic interaction between Tmprss2-ERG gene fusion and Nkx3.1-loss does not enhance prostate tumorigenesis in mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, Douglas E; Bronson, Roderick T; Li, Zhe

    2015-01-01

    Gene fusions involving ETS family transcription factors (mainly TMPRSS2-ERG and TMPRSS2-ETV1 fusions) have been found in ~50% of human prostate cancer cases. Although expression of TMPRSS2-ERG or TMPRSS2-ETV1 fusion alone is insufficient to initiate prostate tumorigenesis, they appear to sensitize prostate epithelial cells for cooperation with additional oncogenic mutations to drive frank prostate adenocarcinoma. To search for such ETS-cooperating oncogenic events, we focused on a well-studied prostate tumor suppressor NKX3.1, as loss of NKX3.1 is another common genetic alteration in human prostate cancer. Previous studies have shown that deletions at 8p21 (harboring NKX3.1) and 21q22 (resulting in TMPRSS2-ERG fusion) were both present in a subtype of prostate cancer cases, and that ERG can lead to epigenetic silencing of NKX3.1 in prostate cancer cells, whereas NKX3.1 can in turn negatively regulate TMPRSS2-ERG fusion expression via suppression of the TMPRSS2 promoter activity. We recently generated knockin mouse models for TMPRSS2-ERG and TMPRSS2-ETV1 fusions, utilizing the endogenous Tmprss2 promoter. We crossed these knockin models to an Nkx3.1 knockout mouse model. In Tmprss2-ERG;Nkx3.1+/- (or -/-) male mice, although we observed a slight but significant upregulation of Tmprss2-ERG fusion expression upon Nkx3.1 loss, we did not detect any significant cooperation between these two genetic events to enhance prostate tumorigenesis in vivo. Furthermore, retrospective analysis of a previously published human prostate cancer dataset revealed that within ERG-overexpressing prostate cancer cases, NKX3.1 loss or deletion did not predict biochemical relapse after radical prostatectomy. Collectively, these data suggest that although TMPRSS2-ERG fusion and loss of NKX3.1 are among the most common mutational events found in prostate cancer, and although each of them can sensitize prostate epithelial cells for cooperating with other oncogenic events, these two events

  5. Genetic interaction between Tmprss2-ERG gene fusion and Nkx3.1-loss does not enhance prostate tumorigenesis in mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas E Linn

    Full Text Available Gene fusions involving ETS family transcription factors (mainly TMPRSS2-ERG and TMPRSS2-ETV1 fusions have been found in ~50% of human prostate cancer cases. Although expression of TMPRSS2-ERG or TMPRSS2-ETV1 fusion alone is insufficient to initiate prostate tumorigenesis, they appear to sensitize prostate epithelial cells for cooperation with additional oncogenic mutations to drive frank prostate adenocarcinoma. To search for such ETS-cooperating oncogenic events, we focused on a well-studied prostate tumor suppressor NKX3.1, as loss of NKX3.1 is another common genetic alteration in human prostate cancer. Previous studies have shown that deletions at 8p21 (harboring NKX3.1 and 21q22 (resulting in TMPRSS2-ERG fusion were both present in a subtype of prostate cancer cases, and that ERG can lead to epigenetic silencing of NKX3.1 in prostate cancer cells, whereas NKX3.1 can in turn negatively regulate TMPRSS2-ERG fusion expression via suppression of the TMPRSS2 promoter activity. We recently generated knockin mouse models for TMPRSS2-ERG and TMPRSS2-ETV1 fusions, utilizing the endogenous Tmprss2 promoter. We crossed these knockin models to an Nkx3.1 knockout mouse model. In Tmprss2-ERG;Nkx3.1+/- (or -/- male mice, although we observed a slight but significant upregulation of Tmprss2-ERG fusion expression upon Nkx3.1 loss, we did not detect any significant cooperation between these two genetic events to enhance prostate tumorigenesis in vivo. Furthermore, retrospective analysis of a previously published human prostate cancer dataset revealed that within ERG-overexpressing prostate cancer cases, NKX3.1 loss or deletion did not predict biochemical relapse after radical prostatectomy. Collectively, these data suggest that although TMPRSS2-ERG fusion and loss of NKX3.1 are among the most common mutational events found in prostate cancer, and although each of them can sensitize prostate epithelial cells for cooperating with other oncogenic events, these

  6. REPLACEMENT CONTROL OF INNOVATION MANAGERS: ORGANIZATIONAL AND ECONOMIC ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Gurina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper substantiates phases of specialists’ replacement ensuring innovation development of the national economy in Belarus, i.e. managers of innovation activity. Realization of replacement phases is presented within the system consisting of four blocks – objective, managing, controllable and providing. Analysis results of the current state of the innovation activity managers replacement system reveal main problems in interaction of its basic agents. The paper considers solution of specified problems in the context of formation of organizational and economic approaches to managing the innovation activity managers replacement system which presupposes modernization of organizational interrelations between state- run public authorities in the managing block and micro-incentive structures in the controllable block as well as the usage of the process approach in every phase of the replacement process. 

  7. GENE KICKED MOUSE: KNOCK OUT MOUSE AND ITS APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajashekar B

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A knockout mouse is a laboratory mouse in which genes are inactivated, or "knocked out," an existing gene by replacing it or disrupting it with an artificial piece of DNA. The 2007 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine is awarded to Drs Mario R. Capecchi, Martin J. Evans and Oliver Smithies for their discoveries of principles for introducing specific gene modifications in mice by using embryonic stem cells. Progress to gene targeting using embryonic cell was developed by Evans and his co-workers. Ingenious development of gene targeting has been made by introducing recognition sites for the enzyme Cre recombinase, called loxP sites, into existing genes. When mice carrying such "floxed" genes are mated with transgenic mice expressing Cre recombinase, the target gene of the offspring is modified through Cre action. Gene targeting has transformed scientific medicine by permitting experimental testing of hypotheses regarding the function of specific genes. The first area to which experimental geneticists turned their attention after the birth of gene targeting in mammals was monogenic diseases. Gene targeting has been exceptionally useful in cancer research. A large number of protooncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, angiogenetic factors etc have been targeted in different tissues in mice to shed light on the induction and spreading of tumours. Gene-targeted mouse models have also become increasingly important in studies of host defense against pathogens. Gene targeted mice have become indispensable in virtually all aspects of medical research.

  8. Electrocatalysts Prepared by Galvanic Replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Athanasios Papaderakis; Ioanna Mintsouli; Jenia Georgieva; Sotiris Sotiropoulos

    2017-01-01

    Galvanic replacement is the spontaneous replacement of surface layers of a metal, M, by a more noble metal, Mnoble, when the former is treated with a solution containing the latter in ionic form, according to the general replacement reaction: nM + mMnoblen+ → nMm+ + mMnoble. The reaction is driven by the difference in the equilibrium potential of the two metal/metal ion redox couples and, to avoid parasitic cathodic processes such as oxygen reduction and (in some cases) hydrogen evolution too...

  9. Interactions of tiagabine with ethosuximide in the mouse pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure model: an isobolographic analysis for non-parallel dose-response relationship curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luszczki, Jarogniew J

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the interaction between tiagabine (TGB) and ethosuximide (ETS), two antiepileptic drugs, in pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced clonic seizures in mice using isobolographic analysis. The nature of the interaction between the drugs administered in combination was ascertained by estimating plasma and brain concentrations of ETS and TGB using fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results indicated that both drugs produced clear anticonvulsant effects against PTZ-induced clonic seizures in mice, but that their dose-response relationship curves (DRRCs) were not parallel, consequently necessitating the isobolographic analysis for non-parallel DRRCs. The isobolographic analysis revealed that the combination of TGB with ETS at the fixed-ratio of 1:1 exerted an additive interaction against PTZ-induced clonic seizures in mice. FPIA documented that TGB significantly elevated brain ETS concentrations (by 64%), while having no effect on plasma ETS concentrations in experimental animals. In contrast, ETS had no significant impact on plasma and brain concentrations of TGB in mice, as measured by HPLC. It can be concluded that the additive interaction between TGB and ETS at the fixed-ratio of 1:1 in the PTZ test was complicated by a significant pharmacokinetic increase in total brain ETS concentrations. At present, there are no recommendations to use this drug combination in epileptic patients.

  10. Biphasic characteristic of interactions between stiripentol and carbamazepine in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model: a three-dimensional isobolographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luszczki, Jarogniew J; Czuczwar, Stanislaw J

    2006-10-01

    The anticonvulsant effects produced by stiripentol (STP), carbamazepine (CBZ), and their combination in the maximal electroshock (MES)-induced seizures in mice were investigated using three-dimensional (3D) isobolographic analysis. With 3D isobolography, the combinations of both drugs at the fixed-ratios of 1:3, 1:1, and 3:1 for 16%, 50% and 84% antiseizure effects, respectively, were examined in order to evaluate the preclinical characteristics of the interactions between STP and CBZ. Additionally, to characterize precisely the types of interactions observed in the MES test, free plasma and total brain CBZ concentrations were estimated for all fixed-ratios tested. The 3D isobolographic analysis showed that STP and CBZ combined at the fixed-ratio of 1:3 produced supra-additive (synergistic) interactions in the MES test for the anticonvulsant effects ranging between 16% and 84%. In contrast, the combination of STP with CBZ at the fixed-ratio of 3:1 exerted sub-additive (antagonistic) interactions in 3D isobolography for all antiseizure effects examined in the MES test. Only the combination of STP and CBZ at the fixed-ratio of 1:1 was additive for the investigated effects (16%, 50% and 84%) in 3D isobolography. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of CBZ concentrations revealed that STP increased both free plasma and total brain CBZ concentrations for all fixed-ratio combinations tested (1:3, 1:1 and 3:1). In conclusion, the 3D isobolographic findings suggest that the combination of STP with CBZ exerted biphasic characteristics of interactions in the MES test, despite the pharmacokinetic increase in CBZ content in plasma and brains of experimental animals.

  11. The interactions between the stimulatory effect of follicle-stimulating hormone and the inhibitory effect of estrogen on mouse primordial folliculogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Lei; Jin, Shiying; Mayo, Kelly E; Woodruff, Teresa K

    2010-01-01

    The murine primordial follicle pool develops largely within 3 days after birth through germline nest breakdown and enclosure of oocytes within pregranulosa cells. The mechanisms that trigger primordial follicle formation likely are influenced by a transition from the maternal to fetal hormonal milieu at the time of birth. High levels of maternal estrogen maintain intact germline nest in fetal ovary, and decrease of estrogen after birth is permissive of follicle formation. In the present study, we measured an increase in neonatal serum follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), which corresponded to falling estradiol (E(2)) levels during the critical window of primordial follicle formation (Postnatal Days 1-3). To determine whether fetal hormones contribute in an active manner to primordial follicle formation, mouse fetal ovaries (17.5 days postcoitus) were cultured in vitro at two concentrations of E(2) (meant to reflect maternal and fetal levels of E(2)) and FSH for 6 days. High levels of E(2) (10(-6) M) inhibited germline nest breakdown, and this effect was significantly reduced when fetal ovaries were cultured in the low E(2) concentration (10(-10) M). FSH facilitated germline nest breakdown and primordial follicle formation under both high and low E(2) culture conditions. Low E(2) was identified as being more permissive for the effects of FSH on primordial follicle formation by stimulating the up-regulation of Fshr and activin beta A subunit (Inhba) expression, pregranulosa cell proliferation, and oocyte survival. The decrease of E(2) plus the presence of FSH after birth are critical for primordial follicle formation and the expression of oocyte-specific transcription factors (Figla and Nobox) in that inappropriate exposure to FSH or E(2) during follicle formation resulted in premature or delayed primordial folliculogenesis. In conclusion, with the drop of E(2) level after birth, FSH promotes primordial follicle formation in mice by stimulating local activin signaling

  12. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foghsgaard, Signe; Schmidt, Thomas Andersen; Kjaergard, Henrik K

    2009-01-01

    In this descriptive prospective study, we evaluate the outcomes of surgery in 98 patients who were scheduled to undergo minimally invasive aortic valve replacement. These patients were compared with a group of 50 patients who underwent scheduled aortic valve replacement through a full sternotomy....... The 30-day mortality rate for the 98 patients was zero, although 14 of the 98 mini-sternotomies had to be converted to complete sternotomies intraoperatively due to technical problems. Such conversion doubled the operative time over that of the planned full sternotomies. In the group of patients whose...... is an excellent operation in selected patients, but its true advantages over conventional aortic valve replacement (other than a smaller scar) await evaluation by means of randomized clinical trial. The "extended mini-aortic valve replacement" operation, on the other hand, is a risky procedure that should...

  13. Clarification of Interaction Mechanism of Mouse Hepatitis Virus (MHV) N and nsp3 Protein with Homology Modeling and Protein-Protein Docking Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatar, Gizem; Tok, Tugba Taskin

    2016-02-26

    The coronavirus nucleocapsid (N) plays an important role in the virus structure, the replication, and the transcription of CoV. This protein, which has a helix and flexible structure, and capable of binding on to the viral genomic RNA, is a non-structural protein (nsp3). Many studies suggest that the N protein interaction with nsp3 plays a critical role in the virus replication early in infection. Therefore, it is necessary to know the definition of the interaction mechanism of N and nsp3 protein in terms of the CoV replication transcription mechanism. We report on the homology modeling, molecular dynamics simulation, and docking studies to explain the structure-function relationship and the interaction mechanism. In addition, the prototype MHV is preferred in the wet experiment, so we also based our study on the MHV N and nsp3 proteins that belong to the experimental study. The amino acid sequences of MHV N and nsp3 proteins have similarity between human and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus. Therefore, the 3D structure models of these proteins were built with using the crystal structure of the CoV family members as a template. By following these models, molecular dynamics simulations were applied to attain the most stable conformation. Finally, protein-protein docking was performed to prove accuracy of model structures of the MHV N and to clarify the interaction with nsp3. As a result, Lys 113, Arg 125, Tyr 127, Glu 173, Tyr 190 residues that play an important role in virus replication were determined.

  14. Gene expression profiling reveals the heterogeneous transcriptional activity of Oct3/4 and its possible interaction with Gli2 in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanzhen; Drnevich, Jenny; Akraiko, Tatiana; Band, Mark; Li, Dong; Wang, Fei; Matoba, Ryo; Tanaka, Tetsuya S

    2013-01-01

    We examined the transcriptional activity of Oct3/4 (Pou5f1) in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) maintained under standard culture conditions to gain a better understanding of self-renewal in mESCs. First, we built an expression vector in which the Oct3/4 promoter drives the monocistronic transcription of Venus and a puromycin-resistant gene via the foot-and-mouth disease virus self-cleaving peptide T2A. Then, a genetically-engineered mESC line with the stable integration of this vector was isolated and cultured in the presence or absence of puromycin. The cultures were subsequently subjected to Illumina expression microarray analysis. We identified approximately 4600 probes with statistically significant differential expression. The genes involved in nucleic acid synthesis were overrepresented in the probe set associated with mESCs maintained in the presence of puromycin. In contrast, the genes involved in cell differentiation were overrepresented in the probe set associated with mESCs maintained in the absence of puromycin. Therefore, it is suggested with these data that the transcriptional activity of Oct3/4 fluctuates in mESCs and that Oct3/4 plays an essential role in sustaining the basal transcriptional activities required for cell duplication in populations with equal differentiation potential. Heterogeneity in the transcriptional activity of Oct3/4 was dynamic. Interestingly, we found that genes involved in the hedgehog signaling pathway showed unique expression profiles in mESCs and validated this observation by RT-PCR analysis. The expression of Gli2, Ptch1 and Smo was consistently detected in other types of pluripotent stem cells examined in this study. Furthermore, the Gli2 protein was heterogeneously detected in mESC nuclei by immunofluorescence microscopy and this result correlated with the detection of the Oct3/4 protein. Finally, forced activation of Gli2 in mESCs increased their proliferation rate. Collectively, it is suggested with these results

  15. Cd hyperfine interactions in DNA bases and DNA of mouse strains infected with Trypanosoma cruzi investigated by perturbed angular correlation spectroscopy and ab initio calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Philippe A D; Silva, Andreia S; Gonçalves, Marcos B; Lapolli, André L; Ferreira, Ana Maria C; Carbonari, Artur W; Petrilli, Helena M

    2014-06-01

    In this work, perturbed angular correlation (PAC) spectroscopy is used to study differences in the nuclear quadrupole interactions of Cd probes in DNA molecules of mice infected with the Y-strain of Trypanosoma cruzi. The possibility of investigating the local genetic alterations in DNA, which occur along generations of mice infected with T. cruzi, using hyperfine interactions obtained from PAC measurements and density functional theory (DFT) calculations in DNA bases is discussed. A comparison of DFT calculations with PAC measurements could determine the type of Cd coordination in the studied molecules. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to use DFT calculations and PAC measurements to investigate the local environment of Cd ions bound to DNA bases in mice infected with Chagas disease. The obtained results also allowed the detection of local changes occurring in the DNA molecules of different generations of mice infected with T. cruzi, opening the possibility of using this technique as a complementary tool in the characterization of complicated biological systems.

  16. Knee Replacement: What you can Expect

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... improves function lessen with each additional surgery. Artificial knees can wear out Another risk of knee replacement ... replacement surgery to last about two hours. After knee replacement surgery After surgery, you're wheeled to ...

  17. Homologous gene replacement in Physarum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burland, T.G. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Pallotta, D. [Laval Univ., Quebec (Canada)

    1995-01-01

    The protist Physarum polycephalum is useful for analysis of several aspects of cellular and developmental biology. To expand the opportunities for experimental analysis of this organism, we have developed a method for gene replacement. We transformed Physarum amoebae with plasmid DNA carrying a mutant allele, ardD{Delta}1, of the ardD actin gene; ardD{Delta}1 mutates the critical carboxy-terminal region of the gene product. Because ardD is not expressed in the amoeba, replacement of ardD{sup +} with ardD{Delta}1 should not be lethal for this cell type. Transformants were obtained only when linear plasmid DNA was used. Most transformants carried one copy of ardD{Delta}1 in addition to ardD{sup +}, but in two (5%), ardD{sup +} was replaced by a single copy of ardD{Delta}1. This is the first example of homologous gene replacement in Physarum. ardD{Delta}1 was stably maintained in the genome through growth, development and meiosis. We found no effect of ardD{Delta}l on viability, growth, or development of any of the various cell types of Physarum. Thus, the carboxy-terminal region of the ardD product appears not to perform a unique essential role in growth or development. Nevertheless, this method for homologous gene replacement can be applied to analyze the function of any cloned gene. 38 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Urban chaos and replacement dynamics in nature and society

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yanguang

    2011-01-01

    Many growing phenomena in both nature and society can be predicted with sigmoid function. The growth curve of the level of urbanization is a typical S-shaped one, and can be described by using logistic function. The logistic model implies a replacement process, and the logistic substitution suggests non-linear dynamical behaviors such as bifurcation and chaos. Using mathematical transform and numerical computation, we can demonstrate that the 1-dimensional map comes from a 2-dimensional two-group interaction map. By analogy with urbanization, a general theory of replacement dynamics is presented in this paper, and the replacement process can be simulated with the 2-dimansional map. If the rate of replacement is too high, periodic oscillations and chaos will arise, and the system maybe breaks down. The replacement theory can be used to interpret various complex interaction and conversion in physical and human systems. The replacement dynamics provides a new way of looking at Volterra-Lotka's predator-prey inte...

  19. Cobra Probes Containing Replaceable Thermocouples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, John; Redding, Adam

    2007-01-01

    A modification of the basic design of cobra probes provides for relatively easy replacement of broken thermocouples. Cobra probes are standard tube-type pressure probes that may also contain thermocouples and that are routinely used in wind tunnels and aeronautical hardware. They are so named because in side views, they resemble a cobra poised to attack. Heretofore, there has been no easy way to replace a broken thermocouple in a cobra probe: instead, it has been necessary to break the probe apart and then rebuild it, typically at a cost between $2,000 and $4,000 (2004 prices). The modified design makes it possible to replace the thermocouple, in minimal time and at relatively low cost, by inserting new thermocouple wire in a tube.

  20. The Mouse Genome Database (MGD): facilitating mouse as a model for human biology and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Bult, Carol J; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2015-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD, http://www.informatics.jax.org) serves the international biomedical research community as the central resource for integrated genomic, genetic and biological data on the laboratory mouse. To facilitate use of mouse as a model in translational studies, MGD maintains a core of high-quality curated data and integrates experimentally and computationally generated data sets. MGD maintains a unified catalog of genes and genome features, including functional RNAs, QTL and phenotypic loci. MGD curates and provides functional and phenotype annotations for mouse genes using the Gene Ontology and Mammalian Phenotype Ontology. MGD integrates phenotype data and associates mouse genotypes to human diseases, providing critical mouse-human relationships and access to repositories holding mouse models. MGD is the authoritative source of nomenclature for genes, genome features, alleles and strains following guidelines of the International Committee on Standardized Genetic Nomenclature for Mice. A new addition to MGD, the Human-Mouse: Disease Connection, allows users to explore gene-phenotype-disease relationships between human and mouse. MGD has also updated search paradigms for phenotypic allele attributes, incorporated incidental mutation data, added a module for display and exploration of genes and microRNA interactions and adopted the JBrowse genome browser. MGD resources are freely available to the scientific community. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. Renal replacement therapy in ICU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Deepa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosing and managing critically ill patients with renal dysfunction is a part of the daily routine of an intensivist. Acute kidney insufficiency substantially contributes to the morbidity and mortality of critically ill patients. Renal replacement therapy (RRT not only does play a significant role in the treatment of patients with renal failure, acute as well as chronic, but also has spread its domains to the treatment of many other disease conditions such as myaesthenia gravis, septic shock and acute on chronic liver failure. This article briefly outlines the role of renal replacement therapy in ICU.

  2. Prioritization methodology for chemical replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Ben; Cruit, Wendy; Schutzenhofer, Scott

    1995-01-01

    This methodology serves to define a system for effective prioritization of efforts required to develop replacement technologies mandated by imposed and forecast legislation. The methodology used is a semi quantitative approach derived from quality function deployment techniques (QFD Matrix). QFD is a conceptual map that provides a method of transforming customer wants and needs into quantitative engineering terms. This methodology aims to weight the full environmental, cost, safety, reliability, and programmatic implications of replacement technology development to allow appropriate identification of viable candidates and programmatic alternatives.

  3. Wafer Replacement Cluster Tool (Presentation);

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branz, H. M.

    2008-04-01

    This presentation on wafer replacement cluster tool discusses: (1) Platform for advanced R and D toward SAI 2015 cost goal--crystal silicon PV at area costs closer to amorphous Si PV, it's 15% efficiency, inexpensive substrate, and moderate temperature processing (<800 C); (2) Why silicon?--industrial and knowledge base, abundant and environmentally benign, market acceptance, and good efficiency; and (3) Why replace wafers?--expensive, high embedded energy content, and uses 50-100 times more silicon than needed.

  4. Diet × genotype interactions in hepatic cholesterol and lipoprotein metabolism in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) in response to replacement of dietary fish oil with vegetable oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Sofia; Pratoomyot, Jarunan; Torstensen, Bente E; Taggart, John B; Guy, Derrick R; Bell, J Gordon; Tocher, Douglas R

    2011-11-01

    The present study investigates the effects of genotype on responses to alternative feeds in Atlantic salmon. Microarray analysis of the liver transcriptome of two family groups, lean or fat, fed a diet containing either a fish oil (FO) or a vegetable oil (VO) blend indicated that pathways of cholesterol and lipoprotein metabolism might be differentially affected by the diet depending on the genetic background of the fish, and this was further investigated by real-time quantitative PCR, plasma and lipoprotein biochemical analysis. Results indicate a reduction in VLDL and LDL levels, with no changes in HDL, when FO is replaced by VO in the lean family group, whereas in fat fish fed FO, levels of apoB-containing lipoproteins were low and comparable with those fed VO in both family groups. Significantly lower levels of plasma TAG and LDL-TAG were measured in the fat group that was independent of diet, whereas plasma cholesterol was significantly higher in fish fed the FO diet in both groups. Hepatic expression of genes involved in cholesterol homeostasis, β-oxidation and lipoprotein metabolism showed relatively subtle changes. A significantly lower expression of genes considered anti-atherogenic in mammals (ATP-binding cassette transporter A1, apoAI, scavenger receptor class B type 1, lipoprotein lipase (LPL)b (TC67836) and LPLc (TC84899)) was found in lean fish, compared with fat fish, when fed VO. Furthermore, the lean family group appeared to show a greater response to diet composition in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway, mediated by sterol-responsive element-binding protein 2. Finally, the presence of three different transcripts for LPL, with differential patterns of nutritional regulation, was demonstrated.

  5. Regulation of VH replacement by B cell receptor-mediated signaling in human immature B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Lange, Miles D; Hong, Sang Yong; Xie, Wanqin; Xu, Kerui; Huang, Lin; Yu, Yangsheng; Ehrhardt, Götz R A; Zemlin, Michael; Burrows, Peter D; Su, Kaihong; Carter, Robert H; Zhang, Zhixin

    2013-06-01

    VH replacement provides a unique RAG-mediated recombination mechanism to edit nonfunctional IgH genes or IgH genes encoding self-reactive BCRs and contributes to the diversification of Ab repertoire in the mouse and human. Currently, it is not clear how VH replacement is regulated during early B lineage cell development. In this article, we show that cross-linking BCRs induces VH replacement in human EU12 μHC(+) cells and in the newly emigrated immature B cells purified from peripheral blood of healthy donors or tonsillar samples. BCR signaling-induced VH replacement is dependent on the activation of Syk and Src kinases but is inhibited by CD19 costimulation, presumably through activation of the PI3K pathway. These results show that VH replacement is regulated by BCR-mediated signaling in human immature B cells, which can be modulated by physiological and pharmacological treatments.

  6. Investigations into the origin of the high pressure neurological syndrome: the interaction between pressure, strychnine and 1,2-propandiols in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowser-Riley, F.; Daniels, S.; Smith, E. B.

    1988-01-01

    1. The effects of a variety of structural isomers of the centrally acting muscle relaxant mephenesin on the high pressure neurological syndrome have been investigated. Threshold pressures for the onset of the behavioural signs, tremors and convulsions, were established. The effects of these compounds on the response to pressure were also compared with their ability to antagonize the convulsive action of strychnine. 2. The dose-response relationships for strychnine and picrotoxin were investigated at fixed pressures. Additionally, the dose-response relationship of strychnine, in the presence of mephenesin, at pressure was investigated. 3. All the isomers of mephenesin protected against the effects of both pressure and strychnine. The relative potency was found to be identical with respect to both. Mephenesin was clearly the most effective; it raised the threshold pressure for tremors by 2.5 times, that for convulsions elicited by pressure by 1.5 and the ED50 for strychnine convulsions by 1.6 times. Strychnine was found to be strictly additive with pressure whereas picrotoxin exhibited gross deviations from additivity. Mephenesin ameliorated the combined effects of pressure and strychnine equally. 4. The marked dependence on structure of the anticonvulsant activity of the mephenesin isomers can be interpreted as evidence that pressure acts not by some general perturbation of the membranes of excitable cells but rather via some specific interaction. The finding that strychnine and pressure are strictly additive supports the idea of specificity and also indicates that they may share a common mechanism in the production of convulsions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3207974

  7. Investigation of gene effects and epistatic interactions between Akt1 and neuregulin 1 in the regulation of behavioral phenotypes and social functions in genetic mouse models of schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Hsun eHuang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence from human genetic studies has suggested several functional candidate genes that might contribute to susceptibility to schizophrenia, including AKT1 and neuregulin 1 (NRG1. Recent findings also revealed that NRG1 stimulates the PI3-kinase/AKT signaling pathway, which might be involved in the functional outcomes of some schizophrenic patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Akt1-deficiency and Nrg1-deficiency alone or in combination in the regulation of behavioral phenotypes, cognition, and social functions using genetically modified mice as a model. Male Akt1+/-, Nrg1+/-, and double mutant mice were bred and compared with their wild-type littermate controls. In experiment 1, general physical examination revealed that all mutant mice displayed a normal profile of body weight during development and a normal brain activity with microPET scan. In experiment 2, no significant genotypic differences were found in our basic behavioral phenotyping, including locomotion, anxiety-like behavior, and sensorimotor gating. However, both Nrg1+/- and double mutant mice exhibited impaired episodic-like memory. Double mutant mice also had impaired sociability. In experiment 3, a synergistic epistasis between Akt1 and Nrg1 was further confirmed in double mutant mice in that they had impaired social interaction compared to the other 3 groups, especially encountering with a novel male or an ovariectomized female. Double mutant and Nrg1+/- mice also emitted fewer female urine-induced ultrasonic vocalization calls. Collectively, our results indicate that double deficiency of Akt1 and Nrg1 can result in the impairment of social cognitive functions, which might be pertinent to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia-related social cognition.

  8. Inhibition of Receptor-Interacting Protein Kinase 1 with Necrostatin–1s ameliorates disease progression in elastase-induced mouse abdominal aortic aneurysm model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiwei; Zhou, Ting; Liu, Zhenjie; Ren, Jun; Phan, Noel; Gupta, Kartik; Stewart, Danielle M.; Morgan, Stephanie; Assa, Carmel; Kent, K. Craig; Liu, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a common aortic disease with a progressive nature. There is no approved pharmacological treatment to effectively slow aneurysm growth or prevent rupture. Necroptosis is a form of programmed necrosis that is regulated by receptor-interacting protein kinases (RIPs). We have recently demonstrated that the lack of RIP3 in mice prevented aneurysm formation. The goal of the current study is to test whether perturbing necroptosis affects progression of existing aneurysm using the RIP1 inhibitors Necrostatin-1 (Nec-1) and an optimized form of Nec-1, 7-Cl-O-Nec-1 (Nec-1s). Seven days after aneurysm induction by elastase perfusion, mice were randomly administered DMSO, Nec-1 (3.2 mg/kg/day) and Nec-1s (1.6 mg/kg/day) via intraperitoneal injection. Upon sacrifice on day 14 postaneurysm induction, the aortic expansion in the Nec-1s group (64.12 ± 4.80%) was significantly smaller than that of the DMSO group (172.80 ± 13.68%) (P aortic diameter of Nec-1 treated mice appeared to be smaller (121.60 ± 10.40%) than the DMSO group, though the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.1). Histologically, the aortic structure of Nec-1s-treated mice appeared normal, with continuous and organized elastin laminae and abundant αActin-expressing SMCs. Moreover, Nect-1s treatment diminished macrophage infiltration and MMP9 accumulation and increased aortic levels of tropoelastin and lysyl oxidase. Together, our data suggest that pharmacological inhibition of necroptosis with Nec-1s stabilizes pre-existing aneurysms by diminishing inflammation and promoting connective tissue repair. PMID:28186202

  9. Double emulsions as fat replacers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oppermann, Anika

    2017-01-01

    The use of double (w1/o/w2) emulsions, in which part of the oil is replaced by small water droplets, is a promising strategy to reduce oil content in food products. For successful applications, (1) significant levels of fat reduction (i.e. significant amounts of water inside the oil droplets) have

  10. Replacement policies for dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Relund

    In a recent paper a hierarchical Markov decision processes (MDP) with finite state and action space was formulated for the dairy cow replacement problem with stage lengths of 1 d. Bayesian updating was used to predict the performance of each cow in the herd and economic decisions were based...

  11. Electrocatalysts Prepared by Galvanic Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios Papaderakis

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Galvanic replacement is the spontaneous replacement of surface layers of a metal, M, by a more noble metal, Mnoble, when the former is treated with a solution containing the latter in ionic form, according to the general replacement reaction: nM + mMnoblen+ → nMm+ + mMnoble. The reaction is driven by the difference in the equilibrium potential of the two metal/metal ion redox couples and, to avoid parasitic cathodic processes such as oxygen reduction and (in some cases hydrogen evolution too, both oxygen levels and the pH must be optimized. The resulting bimetallic material can in principle have a Mnoble-rich shell and M-rich core (denoted as Mnoble(M leading to a possible decrease in noble metal loading and the modification of its properties by the underlying metal M. This paper reviews a number of bimetallic or ternary electrocatalytic materials prepared by galvanic replacement for fuel cell, electrolysis and electrosynthesis reactions. These include oxygen reduction, methanol, formic acid and ethanol oxidation, hydrogen evolution and oxidation, oxygen evolution, borohydride oxidation, and halide reduction. Methods for depositing the precursor metal M on the support material (electrodeposition, electroless deposition, photodeposition as well as the various options for the support are also reviewed.

  12. Bonding over Dentin Replacement Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meraji, Naghmeh; Camilleri, Josette

    2017-08-01

    Dentin replacement materials are necessary in large cavities to protect the pulp and reduce the bulk of filling material. These materials are layered with a composite resin restorative material. Microleakage caused by poor bonding of composite resin to underlying dentin replacement material will result in pulp damage. The aim of this study was to characterize the interface between dentin replacement materials and composite resin and to measure the shear bond strength after dynamic aging. Biodentine (Septodont, Saint Maur-des-Fosses, France), Theracal LC (Bisco, Schaumburg, IL), and Fuji IX (GC, Tokyo, Japan) were used as dentin replacement materials. They were then overlaid with a total-etch and bonding agent or a self-etch primer and composite resin or a glass ionomer cement. All combinations were thermocycled for 3000 cycles. The interface was characterized using scanning electron microscopy and elemental mapping. Furthermore, the shear bond strength was assessed. The Biodentine surface was modified by etching. The Theracal LC and Fuji IX microstructure was unchanged upon the application of acid etch. The Biodentine and glass ionomer interface showed an evident wide open space, and glass particles from the glass ionomer adhered to the Biodentine surface. Elemental migration was shown with aluminum, barium, fluorine, and ytterbium present in Biodentine from the overlying composite resin. Calcium was more stable. The bond strength between Theracal LC and composite using a total-etch technique followed by self-etch primer achieved the best bond strength values. Biodentine exhibited the weakest bond with complete failure of bonding shown after demolding and thermocycling. Dynamic aging is necessary to have clinically valid data. Bonding composite resin to water-based dentin replacement materials is still challenging, and further alternatives for restoration of teeth using such materials need to be developed. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists

  13. The German Mouse Clinic: a platform for systemic phenotype analysis of mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, H; Gailus-Durner, V; Adler, T; Pimentel, J A Aguilar; Becker, L; Bolle, I; Brielmeier, M; Calzada-Wack, J; Dalke, C; Ehrhardt, N; Fasnacht, N; Ferwagner, B; Frischmann, U; Hans, W; Hölter, S M; Hölzlwimmer, G; Horsch, M; Javaheri, A; Kallnik, M; Kling, E; Lengger, C; Maier, H; Mossbrugger, I; Mörth, C; Naton, B; Nöth, U; Pasche, B; Prehn, C; Przemeck, G; Puk, O; Racz, I; Rathkolb, B; Rozman, J; Schäble, K; Schreiner, R; Schrewe, A; Sina, C; Steinkamp, R; Thiele, F; Willershäuser, M; Zeh, R; Adamski, J; Busch, D H; Beckers, J; Behrendt, H; Daniel, H; Esposito, I; Favor, J; Graw, J; Heldmaier, G; Höfler, H; Ivandic, B; Katus, H; Klingenspor, M; Klopstock, T; Lengeling, A; Mempel, M; Müller, W; Neschen, S; Ollert, M; Quintanilla-Martinez, L; Rosenstiel, P; Schmidt, J; Schreiber, S; Schughart, K; Schulz, H; Wolf, E; Wurst, W; Zimmer, A; Hrabé de Angelis, M

    2009-02-01

    The German Mouse Clinic (GMC) is a large scale phenotyping center where mouse mutant lines are analyzed in a standardized and comprehensive way. The result is an almost complete picture of the phenotype of a mouse mutant line--a systemic view. At the GMC, expert scientists from various fields of mouse research work in close cooperation with clinicians side by side at one location. The phenotype screens comprise the following areas: allergy, behavior, clinical chemistry, cardiovascular analyses, dysmorphology, bone and cartilage, energy metabolism, eye and vision, host-pathogen interactions, immunology, lung function, molecular phenotyping, neurology, nociception, steroid metabolism, and pathology. The German Mouse Clinic is an open access platform that offers a collaboration-based phenotyping to the scientific community (www.mouseclinic.de). More than 80 mutant lines have been analyzed in a primary screen for 320 parameters, and for 95% of the mutant lines we have found new or additional phenotypes that were not associated with the mouse line before. Our data contributed to the association of mutant mouse lines to the corresponding human disease. In addition, the systemic phenotype analysis accounts for pleiotropic gene functions and refines previous phenotypic characterizations. This is an important basis for the analysis of underlying disease mechanisms. We are currently setting up a platform that will include environmental challenge tests to decipher genome-environmental interactions in the areas nutrition, exercise, air, stress and infection with different standardized experiments. This will help us to identify genetic predispositions as susceptibility factors for environmental influences.

  14. Urbanization, Ikization, and Replacement Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yanguang

    2015-01-01

    The phenomenon of Iks was first found by anthropologists and biologists, but it is actually a problem of human geography. However, it has not yet drawn extensive attention of geographers. In this paper, a hypothesis of ikization is presented that sudden and violent change of geographical environments results in dismantling of traditional culture, which then result in collective depravity of a nationality. By quantitative analysis and mathematical modeling, the causality between urbanization and ikization is discussed, and the theory of replacement dynamics is employed to interpret the process of ikization. Urbanization is in essence a nonlinear process of population replacement. Urbanization may result in ikization because that the migration of population from rural regions to urban regions always give rise to abrupt changes of geographical environments and traditional culture. It is necessary to protect the geographical environment against disruption, and to inherit and develop traditional culture in order t...

  15. [MINIMALLY INVASIVE AORTIC VALVE REPLACEMENT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabata, Minoru

    2016-03-01

    Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR) is defined as aortic valve replacement avoiding full sternotomy. Common approaches include a partial sternotomy right thoracotomy, and a parasternal approach. MIAVR has been shown to have advantages over conventional AVR such as shorter length of stay and smaller amount of blood transfusion and better cosmesis. However, it is also known to have disadvantages such as longer cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times and potential complications related to peripheral cannulation. Appropriate patient selection is very important. Since the procedure is more complex than conventional AVR, more intensive teamwork in the operating room is essential. Additionally, a team approach during postoperative management is critical to maximize the benefits of MIAVR.

  16. Mitochondrial Replacement: Ethics And Identity

    OpenAIRE

    Wrigley, Anthony; Wilkinson, Stephen; Appleby, John B

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial replacement techniques (MRTs) have the potential to allow prospective parents who are at risk of passing on debilitating or even life-threatening mitochondrial disorders to have healthy children to whom they are genetically related. Ethical concerns have however been raised about these techniques. This article focuses on one aspect of the ethical debate, the question of whether there is any moral difference between the two types of MRT proposed: Pronuclear Transfer (PNT) and Mat...

  17. Replacing magnets at the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    LHC, LSI2, Point 4

    2013-01-01

    CERN engineers have been working through the night this week to move the final replacement dipole magnets into position on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Though there are several still to go, the teams expect to have completed the task by the end of this month. Dipole magnets bend the paths of particles as they travel around the circular accelerator. Of the LHC's 1232 dipoles – each 15 metres long and weighing 35 tonnes – 15 are being replaced as part of the long shutdown of CERN's accelerator complex. These 15 magnets suffered wear and tear during the LHC's first 4-year run. Three quadrupole-magnet assemblies – which help to focus particles into a tight beam – have also been replaced. Moving such heavy magnets requires specially adapted cranes and trailers both above and below ground. There are several access points on the LHC. Some, such as the 100-metre vertical access shaft down to the ALICE experiment, are equipped with lifts to allow technical personnel and visitors down to the caverns. Other ...

  18. Results of Austin Moore replacement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadhav A

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available Forty cases of Austin Moore Replacement done for transcervical fractures of the femur in patients were reviewed after a period of 12 to 48 months postoperatively (mean 26 mth. 30 cases (75% had mild to severe pain of non-infective origin, starting as early as 6 months postoperatively. This was irrespective of the make, size or position (varus/valgus of the prosthesis. Though the Aufranc and Sweet clinical scoring was satisfactory in 65% cases, radiological evidence of complications like sinking, protrusion, etc. were seen in majority of the cases. Calcar resorption was seen in 34 cases (85% as early as 4 months postoperatively. Results of THR and bipolar replacement done for transcervical fractures in recent literature show 85% pain-free cases at 5 years. We feel that Austin Moore Replacement should be reserved for patients more than 65 years of age and those who are less active or debilitated because of other factors, because of increased acetabular wear with time in the younger individual. This is corroborated by unsatisfactory results in patients less than 65 years of age (p < 0.05.

  19. The caudal septum replacement graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, Hossam M T

    2008-01-01

    To describe a technique for reconstructing the lost tip support in cases involving caudal septal and premaxillary deficiencies. The study included 120 patients with aesthetic and functional nasal problems resulting from the loss of caudal septal and premaxillary support. An external rhinoplasty approach was performed to reconstruct the lost support using a cartilaginous caudal septum replacement graft and premaxillary augmentation with Mersilene mesh. The majority of cases (75%) involved revisions in patients who had previously undergone 1 or more nasal surgical procedures. A caudal septum replacement graft was combined with premaxillary augmentation in 93 patients (77.5%). The mean follow-up period was 3 years (range, 1-12 years). The technique succeeded in correcting the external nasal deformities in all patients and resulted in a significant improvement in breathing in 74 patients (86%) with preoperative nasal obstruction. There were no cases of infection, displacement, or extrusion. The caudal septum replacement graft proved to be very effective in restoring the lost tip support in patients with caudal septal deficiency. Combining the graft with premaxillary augmentation using Mersilene mesh helped increase support and stability over long-term follow-up.

  20. 激活素受体相互作用蛋白1及2在小鼠巨噬细胞中的表达%Expression of activin receptor-interacting proteins 1, 2 in mouse macrophages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔雪玲; 葛敬岩; 李晨光; 孙洋; 牛立慢; 刘海岩; 柳忠辉; 王轶楠

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression and role of activin receptor-interacting proteins 1, 2 (ARIP1, 2) in mouse macrophages. Methods The expression of ARIP1, 2 was determined by immunocytochemical staining. RAW264. 7 cells were co-transfected with plasmids CAGA-lux and CMV-gal, plus plasmids pcDNA3-ARIPl, pcDNA3-ARIP2 or empty plasmid pcDNA3, respectively, then stimulated with activin A, and determined for transcription activity of report gene. The expression of ActR II A mRNA was determined by RT-PCR. Results Immunocytochemical staining proved that ARIP1,2 were expressed in RAW264. 7 cells. The overexpressions of ARIP1, 2 inhibited the transcription of specific gene induced by activin A. The overexpression of ARIP2 inhibited, while that of ARIP1 showed no significant effect on the expression of ActR II A mRNA in RAW264. 7 cells. Conclusion ARIP1, 2 were coexpressed in mouse macrophages, which down-regulated the signal transduction of activin by different action modes.%目的 探讨激活素受体相互作用蛋白(Activin receptor-interacting protein,ARIP)1及2(ARIP1,2)在小鼠巨噬细胞RAW264.7中的表达及作用.方法 采用免疫细胞化学染色法检测RAW264.7细胞中ARIP1,2的表达;将质粒CAGA-lux、CMV-gal分别与表达质粒pcDNA3-ARIP1、pcDNA3-ARIP2或空质粒pcDNA3共转染RAW264.7细胞,应用激活素A刺激,检测细胞内报告基因转录荧光素酶的活性;实时定量RT-PCR检测ActRⅡA mRNA的表达.结果 免疫细胞化学染色结果显示,小鼠巨噬细胞系RAW264.7细胞表达ARIP1,2;RAW264.7细胞过表达ARIP1,2均能抑制Activin A诱导的特异基因转录;过表达ARIP2可抑制RAW264.7细胞ActRⅡA mRNA的表达,而过表达ARIP1对ActRⅡA mRNA的表达无明显影响.结论 ARIP1,2在小鼠巨噬细胞中共表达,并具有下调激活素信号传导的作用,但其作用方式不同.

  1. The Knockout Mouse Project

    OpenAIRE

    Austin, Christopher P.; Battey, James F.; Bradley, Allan; Bucan, Maja; Capecchi, Mario; Collins, Francis S; Dove, William F.; Duyk, Geoffrey; Dymecki, Susan; Eppig, Janan T.; Grieder, Franziska B.; Heintz, Nathaniel; Hicks, Geoff; Insel, Thomas R; Joyner, Alexandra

    2004-01-01

    Mouse knockout technology provides a powerful means of elucidating gene function in vivo, and a publicly available genome-wide collection of mouse knockouts would be significantly enabling for biomedical discovery. To date, published knockouts exist for only about 10% of mouse genes. Furthermore, many of these are limited in utility because they have not been made or phenotyped in standardized ways, and many are not freely available to researchers. It is time to harness new technologies and e...

  2. Fusion following failed total ankle replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wünschel, Markus; Leichtle, Ulf G; Leichtle, Carmen I; Walter, Christian; Mittag, Falk; Arlt, Eva; Suckel, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Although mid- to long-term results after total ankle replacement have improved because of available second- and third-generation devices, failure of total ankle replacement is still more common compared with total hip replacement and total knee replacement. The portfolio of available total ankle replacement revision component options is small. Furthermore, the bone stock of the tibiotalar region is scarce making it difficult and in some situations impossible to perform revision total ankle replacement. In these cases tibiotalar and tibiotalocalcaneal fusions are valuable options. This article describes which surgical procedures should be performed depending on the initial situation and gives detailed advice on surgical technique, postoperative care, and clinical results.

  3. Mouse Models of Hrs Nf2 Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    degeneration. These abnormalities, however, occurred in all genotypes. Only one malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor ( MPNST ) was seen in 125...36 wt +/- N MPNST N Hyperostosis 43 wt +/- N N N N 45 wt +/- N N N N 52 wt +/- N N N N 60 wt +/- N N N N 62 wt +/- Calcifications Basal...to 18 months) and tissue decomposition MPNST : Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor W81XWH-05-1-0188 13 Table 2: Other Tumors Number HRS NF2

  4. An encyclopedia of mouse DNA elements (Mouse ENCODE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Snyder, Michael; Hardison, Ross; Ren, Bing; Gingeras, Thomas; Gilbert, David M; Groudine, Mark; Bender, Michael; Kaul, Rajinder; Canfield, Theresa; Giste, Erica; Johnson, Audra; Zhang, Mia; Balasundaram, Gayathri; Byron, Rachel; Roach, Vaughan; Sabo, Peter J; Sandstrom, Richard; Stehling, A Sandra; Thurman, Robert E; Weissman, Sherman M; Cayting, Philip; Hariharan, Manoj; Lian, Jin; Cheng, Yong; Landt, Stephen G; Ma, Zhihai; Wold, Barbara J; Dekker, Job; Crawford, Gregory E; Keller, Cheryl A; Wu, Weisheng; Morrissey, Christopher; Kumar, Swathi A; Mishra, Tejaswini; Jain, Deepti; Byrska-Bishop, Marta; Blankenberg, Daniel; Lajoie, Bryan R; Jain, Gaurav; Sanyal, Amartya; Chen, Kaun-Bei; Denas, Olgert; Taylor, James; Blobel, Gerd A; Weiss, Mitchell J; Pimkin, Max; Deng, Wulan; Marinov, Georgi K; Williams, Brian A; Fisher-Aylor, Katherine I; Desalvo, Gilberto; Kiralusha, Anthony; Trout, Diane; Amrhein, Henry; Mortazavi, Ali; Edsall, Lee; McCleary, David; Kuan, Samantha; Shen, Yin; Yue, Feng; Ye, Zhen; Davis, Carrie A; Zaleski, Chris; Jha, Sonali; Xue, Chenghai; Dobin, Alex; Lin, Wei; Fastuca, Meagan; Wang, Huaien; Guigo, Roderic; Djebali, Sarah; Lagarde, Julien; Ryba, Tyrone; Sasaki, Takayo; Malladi, Venkat S; Cline, Melissa S; Kirkup, Vanessa M; Learned, Katrina; Rosenbloom, Kate R; Kent, W James; Feingold, Elise A; Good, Peter J; Pazin, Michael; Lowdon, Rebecca F; Adams, Leslie B

    2012-08-13

    To complement the human Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project and to enable a broad range of mouse genomics efforts, the Mouse ENCODE Consortium is applying the same experimental pipelines developed for human ENCODE to annotate the mouse genome.

  5. Radiology of total hip replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, H.J.; Lovelock, J.E.; McCollister Evarts, C.; Geyer, D.

    1984-06-01

    The radiology of total hip replacement (THR) and its complications is reviewed in conjunction with a long-term follow-up study on 402 patients with 501 prostheses. The indications, contraindications, biomechanics, and operative management of these patients is discussed. Clinical complications such as deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and hemorrhage are mentioned. Postoperative infections including granulomatous pseudotumors, dislocations and fractures, true loosening of the prosthesis, and heterotopic bone formation (HBF) are discussed and illustrated. The importance of differentiating the lucent line from true loosening is stressed. Mechanical and other clinical complications which are largely ignored by radiologists are also discussed. The uses of arthrography and bone scanning are included.

  6. [Proximal and total femur replacement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennekamp, P H; Wirtz, D C; Dürr, H R

    2012-07-01

    Reconstruction of segmental bone defects of the proximal femur following wide tumor resection or revision arthroplasty. Aggressive benign or primary malignant bone tumors of the proximal femur; destructive metastases; massive segmental bone defects of the proximal femur; periprosthetic fractures. Local infection; very short life expectancy (acetabular bone stock. Anterolateral approach. Exposure and detachment of the iliopsoas and gluteus medius muscle from the proximal femur with a sufficient safety margin to the bone; distal transsection of the vastus lateralis/intermedius and rectus femoris muscle according to the extraosseous tumor extension; distal femur osteotomy al least 3 cm beyond the farthest point of tumor extension; in case of total femur replacement, additional lateral arthrotomy of the knee with resection of the ligaments and menisci; reaming of the medullary canal after securing the shaft with a Verbrugge clamp; trial assembly and reduction followed by the definitive implantation of the prosthesis with adjustment of the femoral neck anteversion in 5° increments; soft tissue reconstruction and fixation to an attachment tube covering the prosthesis; in case of total femur replacement, the preparation of the tibia is followed by the coupling of the tibial and femoral components. Infection prophylaxis, 20 kg partial weight bearing, continuous passive motion. A total of 20  patients with proximal femur replacement and 2 patients with total femur replacement implanted between June 2007 and December 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. Three patients had primary malignant bone tumors, while 19 patients underwent resection for metastatic disease. The mean age at surgery was 62.0 ± 18.1 years (18-82 years). Fifteen patients with a mean follow-up of 20.3 ± 17.2 months (4-51 months) were studied. Among the 22 cases, periprosthetic infection occurred in 3 patients (13.6%), dislocation in 2 patients (9.1%). Evaluation of the functional

  7. An Atlas of Combinatorial Transcriptional Regulation in Mouse and Man

    KAUST Repository

    Ravasi, Timothy

    2010-03-01

    Combinatorial interactions among transcription factors are critical to directing tissue-specific gene expression. To build a global atlas of these combinations, we have screened for physical interactions among the majority of human and mouse DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs). The complete networks contain 762 human and 877 mouse interactions. Analysis of the networks reveals that highly connected TFs are broadly expressed across tissues, and that roughly half of the measured interactions are conserved between mouse and human. The data highlight the importance of TF combinations for determining cell fate, and they lead to the identification of a SMAD3/FLI1 complex expressed during development of immunity. The availability of large TF combinatorial networks in both human and mouse will provide many opportunities to study gene regulation, tissue differentiation, and mammalian evolution.

  8. B Plant process piping replacement feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howden, G.F.

    1996-02-07

    Reports on the feasibility of replacing existing embedded process piping with new more corrosion resistant piping between cells and between cells and a hot pipe trench of a Hanford Site style canyon facility. Provides concepts for replacement piping installation, and use of robotics to replace the use of the canyon crane as the primary means of performing/supporting facility modifications (eg, cell lining, pipe replacement, equipment reinstallation) and operational maintenenace.

  9. REMINDER REPLACEMENT OF FRENCH CARDS

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division; Cards.Service@cern.ch

    2001-01-01

    The French Ministry of Foreign Affairs is currently replacing all diplomatic cards, special cards and employment permits («attestations de fonctions») held by members of the personnel and their families. These cards are replaced by secure, computerized equivalents. The old cards may no longer be used after 31 December 2001. For the purposes of the handover, members of the personnel must go personally to the cards office (33/1-015) between 8h30 and 12h30, in order to fill in a «fiche individuelle» form, taking the following documents for themselves and members of their families already in possession of a French card : A recent identity photograph in 4.5 cm x 3.5 cm format, the French card in their possession, an A4 photocopy of the same French card, certified by the cards office as being a true copy. Those members of the personnel whose cards (and/or cards belonging to members of their families) are shortly due to expire, or have recently done so, are also requested...

  10. Total hip replacement in dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyls, Inge R A E; Rietveld, A B M Boni; Ourila, Tiia; Emerton, Mark E; Bird, H A

    2013-04-01

    A case report of a professional contemporary dancer who successfully returned to the stage after bilateral total hip replacements (THR) for osteoarthritis is presented, together with her own commentary and a retrospective cohort study of total hip replacements in dancers. In the presented cohort, there were no post-operative dislocations or infections, the original pain had been relieved, rehabilitation was objectively normal and all resumed their dance (teaching) activities. Nevertheless, they were disappointed about the prolonged rehabilitation. Due to their high demands as professional dancers, post-operative expectations were too optimistic in view of the usual quick and favourable results of THR in the older and less physically active, general population. In all dancers with unilateral osteoarthritis, the left hip was involved, which may reflect the tendency to use the left leg as standing leg and be suggestive that strenuous physical activity may lead to osteoarthritis. Better rehabilitation guidelines are needed for dancer patients undergoing THR, especially drawing their attention to realistic post-operative expectations.

  11. The MOUSE Squad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borja, Rhea R.

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a New York city after-school program started by MOUSE (Making Opportunities for Upgrading Schools and Education), a national nonprofit group that teaches students how to fix computers, and equips them with the communication and problem-solving skills to help them in the working world. The MOUSE program is part of a trend…

  12. Mouse genome database 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bult, Carol J; Eppig, Janan T; Blake, Judith A; Kadin, James A; Richardson, Joel E

    2016-01-01

    The Mouse Genome Database (MGD; http://www.informatics.jax.org) is the primary community model organism database for the laboratory mouse and serves as the source for key biological reference data related to mouse genes, gene functions, phenotypes and disease models with a strong emphasis on the relationship of these data to human biology and disease. As the cost of genome-scale sequencing continues to decrease and new technologies for genome editing become widely adopted, the laboratory mouse is more important than ever as a model system for understanding the biological significance of human genetic variation and for advancing the basic research needed to support the emergence of genome-guided precision medicine. Recent enhancements to MGD include new graphical summaries of biological annotations for mouse genes, support for mobile access to the database, tools to support the annotation and analysis of sets of genes, and expanded support for comparative biology through the expansion of homology data.

  13. Face-specific Replacement of Calcite by Amorphous Silica Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liesegang, M.; Milke, R.; Neusser, G.; Mizaikoff, B.

    2016-12-01

    Amorphous silica, composed of nanoscale spheres, is an important biomineral, alteration product of silicate rocks on the Earth's surface, and precursor material for stable silicate minerals. Despite constant progress in silica sphere synthesis, fundamental knowledge of natural silica particle interaction and ordering processes leading to colloidal crystals is absent so far. To understand the formation pathways of silica spheres in a geologic environment, we investigated silicified Cretaceous mollusk shell pseudomorphs from Coober Pedy (South Australia) using focused ion beam (FIB)-SEM tomography, petrographic microscopy, µ-XRD, and EMPA. The shells consist of replaced calcite crystals (product, the advancement of synchronized dissolution and precipitation fronts along lattice planes is essential. We assume that the volume-preserving replacement process proceeds via a face-specific dissolution-precipitation mechanism with intermediate subparticle aggregation and subsequent layer-by-layer deposition of spheres along a planar surface. Porosity created during the replacement reaction allows permanent fluid access to the propagating reaction interface. Fluid pH and ionic strength remain constant throughout the replacement process, permitting continuous silica nanoparticle formation and diffusion-limited colloid aggregation. Our study provides a natural example of the transformation of an atomic crystal to an amorphous, mesoscale ordered material; thus, links the research fields of natural colloidal crystal formation, carbonate-silica replacement, and crystallization by oriented particle aggregation (CPA).

  14. Th1、Th17细胞对小鼠视网膜星形细胞的杀伤作用%Interaction between mouse retinal astrocyte and antigen specific Th1 and Th17 Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔彦; 毕宏生; Deming Sun

    2012-01-01

    light for mouse after immunization whereas it is prominent for B10R Ⅲ. Objective This study was to observe the killing effect of interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein (IRBP) 1-20-specific T cells on mouse retinal astrocyte.Th1 and Th17 cells effect in the EAU mechanism was discussed.Methods B10RllⅢ mice and C57BL/6 mice were immunized with IRBP 161-180 and IRBP 1-20 in complete Freund adjuvant (CFA).The infiltrating cells of diseased B10R Ⅲ eyes were analyzed by flow cytometry.IRBP 1-20-specific T cells were isolated from the drainage lymph node and spleen and cultured in IL-2 or IL-23 for Th1 and Th17 cells polarization,respectively.Th1 and Th17 cells cultured for 5 days were seeded on the mouse retinal astrocyte monolayer pretreated with gamma interferon.Cell interaction was observed and the quantity of TNF-α was tested by ELISA.Every test was repeated 6 times and the mean was calculated.The maintenance of experimental animals complied with the Statement of ARVO. Results There were lots of infiltrating cells in the eyes of B10Rm mice after immunization,including 9.5% IFNγ+ cells,5.1% IL-17+cells and 41.4% CD45+ cells.Six days after IRBP1-20 stimulation and cultured by IL-2 and IL-23,44.0% and 8.0% cells were IFNγ+,and 1.0% and 26.0% cells were IL17+.Twentyfour hours after the interaction between Th1 or Th17 and retinal astrocyte,retinal astrocyte died and detached.The killing effect of Th17 was stronger than Th1.48 hours after co-culture of Th1 or Th17T cells with astrocytes,the concentrations of TNF-α were ( 500± 10 ) and ( 801 ±24 μg/L) μg/L,respectively,with a significant statistical difference (t =-20.36,P =0.00). Conclusions Both Th1 and Th17 can kill retinal astrocyte,but Th17 plays a key role in the EAU pathogenesis process.The killing effect is caused by intercellular contact and interaction under the induction of cytokines.

  15. OPTIMUM ORDERING POLICY FOR PREVENTIVE AGE REPLACEMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Young T.PARK; Jing SUN

    2009-01-01

    Most of the spare ordering policies treated up to now have assumed that preventive and corrective replacement costs are equal, which implies in essential that there is no significant need for preventive replacement. This paper presents an ordering policy for preventive age replacement with minimal repair. Introducing the replacement, repair, inventory holding and shortage costs, the expected cost rate is derived. A procedure to determine jointly the ordering time for a spare and the preventive replacement time for the operating unit so as to minimize the expected cost rate is proposed. To explain the ordering policy and the optimization procedure, a numerical example is also included.

  16. Competition, coinfection and strain replacement in models of Bordetella pertussis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoli, Emily J; Ayabina, Diepreye; Trotter, Caroline L; Turner, Katherine M E; Colijn, Caroline

    2015-08-01

    Pertussis, or whooping cough, is an important respiratory infection causing considerable infant mortality worldwide. Recently, incidence has risen in countries with strong vaccine programmes and there are concerns about antigenic shift resulting in vaccine evasion. Interactions between pertussis and non-vaccine-preventable strains will play an important role in the evolution and population dynamics of pertussis. In particular, if we are to understand the role strain replacement plays in vaccinated settings, it will be essential to understand how strains or variants of pertussis interact. Here we explore under what conditions we would expect strain replacement to be of concern in pertussis. We develop a dynamic transmission model that allows for coinfection between Bordetella pertussis (the main causative agent of pertussis) and a strain or variant unaffected by the vaccine. We incorporate both neutrality (in the sense of ecological/population genetic neutrality) and immunity into the model, leaving the specificity of the immune response flexible. We find that strain replacement may be considerable when immunity is non-specific. This is in contrast to previous findings where neutrality was not considered. We conclude that the extent to which models reflect ecological neutrality can have a large impact on conclusions regarding strain replacement. This will likely have onward consequences for estimates of vaccine efficacy and cost-effectiveness.

  17. The Riken mouse genome encyclopedia project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2003-01-01

    The Riken mouse genome encyclopedia a comprehensive full-length cDNA collection and sequence database. High-level functional annotation is based on sequence homology search, expression profiling, mapping and protein-protein interactions. More than 1000000 clones prepared from 163 tissues were end-sequenced and classified into 128000 clusters, and 60000 representative clones were fully sequenced representing 24000 clear protein-encoding genes. The application of the mouse genome database for positional cloning and gene network regulation analysis is reported.

  18. CRP-ductin, the mouse homologue of gp-340/deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 (DMBT1), binds gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria and interacts with lung surfactant protein D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jens; Tornøe, Ida; Nielsen, Ole

    2003-01-01

    CRP-ductin is a protein expressed mainly by mucosal epithelial cells in the mouse. Sequence homologies indicate that CRP-ductin is the mouse homologue of human gp-340, a glycoprotein that agglutinates microorganisms and binds the lung mucosal collectin surfactant protein-D (SP-D). Here we report......-ductin and SP-D expression by reverse transcription-PCR. The pancreas was the main site of synthesis of CRP-ductin, but transcripts were also readily amplified from salivary gland, the gastrointestinal tract, liver, testis, uterus and lung. Lung was the main site of synthesis of SP-D, but transcripts were also...... amplified from uterus, salivary gland, thymus, thyroid gland, pancreas and testis. We conclude that CRP-ductin is the mouse homologue of human gp-340 and that its capacity to bind SP-D as well as gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria suggests a role in mucosal immune defense....

  19. ORO. The physical developer replacement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Michael A; James, Tim

    2009-12-01

    In the process of fingerprint development Physical Developer has been largely the method of choice on porous surfaces after coming into contact with wet environments. It is only recently that a new technique has been identified which could replace this standard technique. This study aims to build on previous research and expand knowledge regarding the technique. The study built on previous research and compared Physical Developer to Oil Red O, testing both on four paper types, while being placed in three different water types and an accelerant for various amounts of time. Marks were placed with both heavily 'loaded' sebaceous fingers and 'normal' un-washed fingers. Results show that Oil Red O consistently produced clearer more detailed marks from the 'loaded' fingers, but neither technique proved to work better on the 'normal' marks. Neither technique developed any prints from the accelerant.

  20. Optimal randomized scheduling by replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saias, I.

    1996-05-01

    In the replacement scheduling problem, a system is composed of n processors drawn from a pool of p. The processors can become faulty while in operation and faulty processors never recover. A report is issued whenever a fault occurs. This report states only the existence of a fault but does not indicate its location. Based on this report, the scheduler can reconfigure the system and choose another set of n processors. The system operates satisfactorily as long as, upon report of a fault, the scheduler chooses n non-faulty processors. We provide a randomized protocol maximizing the expected number of faults the system can sustain before the occurrence of a crash. The optimality of the protocol is established by considering a closely related dual optimization problem. The game-theoretic technical difficulties that we solve in this paper are very general and encountered whenever proving the optimality of a randomized algorithm in parallel and distributed computation.

  1. Controversies in hormone replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Baziad

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Deficiency of estrogen hormone will result in either long-term or short-term health problems which may reduce the quality of life. There are numerous methods by which the quality of female life can be achieved. Since the problems occuring are due to the deficiency of estrogen hormone, the appropriate method to tackle the problem is by administration of estrogen hormone. The administration of hormone replacement therapy (HRT with estrogen may eliminate climacteric complaints, prevent osteoporosis, coronary heart disease, dementia, and colon cancer. Although HRT has a great deal of advantage, its use is still low and may result in controversies. These controversies are due to fact that both doctor and patient still hold on to the old, outmoded views which are not supported by numerous studies. Currently, the use of HRT is not only based on experience, or temporary observation, but more on evidence based medicine. (Med J Indones 2001; 10: 182-6Keywords: controversies, HRT

  2. Replacement reactor to revolutionise magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, G

    2002-01-01

    Electric motors, hearing aids and magnetic resonance imaging are only some of the applications that will benefit from the first advances in magnets in a quarter of a century. Magnets achieve their characteristics when electrons align themselves to produce a unified magnetic field. Neutrons can probe these magnetic structures. The focus is not just on making more powerful magnets, but also identifying the characteristics that make magnets cheaper and easier for industry to manufacture. Staff from the ANSTO's Neutron Scattering Group have already performed a number of studies on the properties of magnets using using HIFAR, but the Replacement Research Reactor that will produce cold neutrons would allow scientists to investigate the atomic properties of materials with large molecules. A suite of equipment will enable studies at different temperatures, pressures and magnetic fields

  3. Renal replacement therapy in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noordzij, Marlies; Kramer, Anneke; Abad Diez, José M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This article provides a summary of the 2011 ERA-EDTA Registry Annual Report (available at www.era-edta-reg.org). METHODS: Data on renal replacement therapy (RRT) for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) from national and regional renal registries in 30 countries in Europe and bordering the .......6-47.0], and on dialysis 39.3% (95% CI 39.2-39.4). The unadjusted 5-year patient survival after the first renal transplantation performed between 2002 and 2006 was 86.7% (95% CI 86.2-87.2) for kidneys from deceased donors and 94.3% (95% CI 93.6-95.0) for kidneys from living donors....

  4. Leptin replacement improves cognitive development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto J Paz-Filho

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leptin changes brain structure, neuron excitability and synaptic plasticity. It also regulates the development and function of feeding circuits. However, the effects of leptin on neurocognitive development are unknown. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of leptin on neurocognitive development. METHODOLOGY: A 5-year-old boy with a nonconservative missense leptin gene mutation (Cys-to-Thr in codon 105 was treated with recombinant methionyl human leptin (r-metHuLeptin at physiologic replacement doses of 0.03 mg/kg/day. Cognitive development was assessed using the Differential Ability Scales (DAS, a measure of general verbal and nonverbal functioning; and selected subtests from the NEPSY, a measure of neuropsychological functioning in children. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Prior to treatment, the patient was morbidly obese, hypertensive, dyslipidemic, and hyperinsulinemic. Baseline neurocognitive tests revealed slower than expected rates of development (developmental age lower than chronological age in a majority of the areas assessed. After two years, substantial increases in the rates of development in most neurocognitive domains were apparent, with some skills at or exceeding expectations based on chronological age. We also observed marked weight loss and resolution of hypertension, dyslipidemia and hyperinsulinemia. CONCLUSIONS: We concluded that replacement with r-metHuLeptin is associated with weight loss and changes in rates of development in many neurocognitive domains, which lends support to the hypothesis that, in addition to its role in metabolism, leptin may have a cognitive enhancing role in the developing central nervous system. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00659828.

  5. Cell Competition Promotes Phenotypically Silent Cardiomyocyte Replacement in the Mammalian Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Villa del Campo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous anabolic capacity in cell populations can trigger a phenomenon known as cell competition, through which less active cells are eliminated. Cell competition has been induced experimentally in stem/precursor cell populations in insects and mammals and takes place endogenously in early mouse embryonic cells. Here, we show that cell competition can be efficiently induced in mouse cardiomyocytes by mosaic overexpression of Myc during both gestation and adult life. The expansion of the Myc-overexpressing cardiomyocyte population is driven by the elimination of wild-type cardiomyocytes. Importantly, this cardiomyocyte replacement is phenotypically silent and does not affect heart anatomy or function. These results show that the capacity for cell competition in mammals is not restricted to stem cell populations and suggest that stimulated cell competition has potential as a cardiomyocyte-replacement strategy.

  6. Mouse Simulation Using Two Coloured Tapes

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Vikram; Mahe, Swapnil; Vyawahare, Swapnil; 10.5121/ijist.2012.2206

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel approach for Human Computer Interaction (HCI) where, we control cursor movement using a real-time camera. Current methods involve changing mouse parts such as adding more buttons or changing the position of the tracking ball. Instead, our method is to use a camera and computer vision technology, such as image segmentation and gesture recognition, to control mouse tasks (left and right clicking, double-clicking, and scrolling) and we show how it can perform everything as current mouse devices can. The software will be developed in JAVA language. Recognition and pose estimation in this system are user independent and robust as we will be using colour tapes on our finger to perform actions. The software can be used as an intuitive input interface to applications that require multi-dimensional control e.g. computer games etc.

  7. Conjecture: Can continuous regeneration lead to immortality? Studies in the MRL mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heber-Katz, Ellen; Leferovich, John; Bedelbaeva, Khamilia; Gourevitch, Dmitri; Clark, Lise

    2006-01-01

    A particular mouse strain, the MRL mouse, has been shown to have unique healing properties that show normal replacement of tissue without scarring. The serendipitous discovery that the MRL mouse has a profound capacity for regeneration in some ways rivaling the classic newt and axolotl species raises the possibility that humans, too, may have an innate regenerative ability. We propose this mouse as a model for continuous regeneration with possible life-extending properties. We will use the classical "immortal" organism, the hydra, for comparison and examine those key phenotypes that contribute to their immortality as they are expressed in the MRL mouse versus control mouse strains. The phenotypes to be examined include the rate of proliferation and the rate of cell death, which leads to a continual turnover in cells without an increase in mass.

  8. Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — MGI is the international database resource for the laboratory mouse, providing integrated genetic, genomic, and biological data to facilitate the study of human...

  9. Mouse Phenome Database (MPD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Mouse Phenome Database (MPD) has characterizations of hundreds of strains of laboratory mice to facilitate translational discoveries and to assist in selection...

  10. Gene replacement in Penicillium roqueforti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goarin, Anne; Silar, Philippe; Malagnac, Fabienne

    2015-05-01

    Most cheese-making filamentous fungi lack suitable molecular tools to improve their biotechnology potential. Penicillium roqueforti, a species of high industrial importance, would benefit from functional data yielded by molecular genetic approaches. This work provides the first example of gene replacement by homologous recombination in P. roqueforti, demonstrating that knockout experiments can be performed in this fungus. To do so, we improved the existing transformation method to integrate transgenes into P. roqueforti genome. In the meantime, we cloned the PrNiaD gene, which encodes a NADPH-dependent nitrate reductase that reduces nitrate to nitrite. Then, we performed a deletion of the PrNiaD gene from P. roqueforti strain AGO. The ΔPrNiaD mutant strain is more resistant to chlorate-containing medium than the wild-type strain, but did not grow on nitrate-containing medium. Because genomic data are now available, we believe that generating selective deletions of candidate genes will be a key step to open the way for a comprehensive exploration of gene function in P. roqueforti.

  11. VNR CMS Pixel detector replacement

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    Joel Butler, spokesperson of the CMS collaboration explains how a team from many different partner institutes installed a new detector in CMS. This detector is the silicon pixel detector and they’ve been working on it for about five years, to replace one of our existing detectors. This detectors measures particles closer to the beam than any of the other components of this huge detector behind me. It gives us the most precise picture of tracks as they come out of the collisions and expand and travel through the detector. This particular device has twice as many pixels, 120 million, as opposed to about 68 million in the old detector and it can take data faster and pump it out to the analysis more quickly. 00’53’’ Images of the descent, insertion and installation of first piece of the Pixel detector on Tue Feb 28. Images of the descent, insertion and installation of second piece of the Pixel and the two cylinders being joined.

  12. Orthogonal Matching Pursuit with Replacement

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Prateek; Dhillon, Inderjit S

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of compressed sensing where the goal is to recover almost all the sparse vectors using a small number of fixed linear measurements. For this problem, we propose a novel partial hard-thresholding operator that leads to a general family of iterative algorithms. While one extreme of the family yields well known hard thresholding algorithms like ITI (Iterative Thresholding with Inversion) and HTP (Hard Thresholding Pursuit), the other end of the spectrum leads to a novel algorithm that we call Orthogonal Matching Pursuit with Replacement (OMPR). OMPR, like the classic greedy algorithm OMP, adds exactly one coordinate to the support at each iteration, based on the correlation with the current residual. However, unlike OMP, OMPR also removes one coordinate from the support. This simple change allows us to prove that OMPR has the best known guarantees for sparse recovery in terms of the Restricted Isometry Property (a condition on the measurement matrix). In contrast, OMP is kn...

  13. Visual Image Sensor Organ Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maluf, David A.

    2014-01-01

    This innovation is a system that augments human vision through a technique called "Sensing Super-position" using a Visual Instrument Sensory Organ Replacement (VISOR) device. The VISOR device translates visual and other sensors (i.e., thermal) into sounds to enable very difficult sensing tasks. Three-dimensional spatial brightness and multi-spectral maps of a sensed image are processed using real-time image processing techniques (e.g. histogram normalization) and transformed into a two-dimensional map of an audio signal as a function of frequency and time. Because the human hearing system is capable of learning to process and interpret extremely complicated and rapidly changing auditory patterns, the translation of images into sounds reduces the risk of accidentally filtering out important clues. The VISOR device was developed to augment the current state-of-the-art head-mounted (helmet) display systems. It provides the ability to sense beyond the human visible light range, to increase human sensing resolution, to use wider angle visual perception, and to improve the ability to sense distances. It also allows compensation for movement by the human or changes in the scene being viewed.

  14. [Animal experiment, can we replace?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combrisson, H

    2017-09-01

    Animal experiment is a subject of controversies. Some people, defenders of animals, think that it is not acceptable to use for scientific purposes at the risk of making them suffer or assert that the results obtained with animals are not transposable in the human beings. Others, in particular researchers in biology or medicine, think that the animal models are essential for the biomedical search. This confrontation of the opinions bases largely on an evolution of the place of animals in our society. The regulations authorize the use of animals for scientific purposes but oblige to make it under restrictive conditions. The application of 3Rs - replacement, reduction, and refinement - expressed in 1959 by Russel and Burch is an ethical guide to improve the welfare of animals in research. The alternative methods do not allow, in the present state of the knowledge, to answer all the scientific questions in biology and medicine research. They are, most of the time, complementary methods of the in vivo methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Biology of tooth replacement in amniotes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John A Whitlock; Joy M Richman

    2013-01-01

    Tooth replacement is a common trait to most vertebrates, including mammals. Mammals, however, have lost the capacity for continuous tooth renewal seen in most other vertebrates, and typically have only 1–2 generations of teeth. Here, we review the mechanisms of tooth replacement in reptiles and mammals, and discuss in detail the current and historical theories on control of timing and pattern of tooth replacement and development.

  16. Licensing of the Australian replacement research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garea, Veronica B. [INVAP S.E., San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina)

    2002-07-01

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO)'s Replacement Research Reactor has been submitted to a comprehensive licensing process of which peer review has been a fundamental part. Following Australian Regulation, an application for a site licence was the first step supported by an Environmental Impact Statement approved by The Minister for the Environment and Heritage, and a Reference Accident Analysis. After the site licence had been granted and the contract awarded to the Designer and Constructor, INVAP S.E:, a 2500 page Preliminary Safety Analysis Report was submitted by ANSTO to the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA), which conducted its review. ARPANSA requested that the PSAR be also reviewed by an experts mission from the International Atomic Energy Agency. The PSAR was also reviewed by the Argentine Regulatory Body, it was submitted to public examination in Australia and it was reviewed by international experts hired as consultants by several Australian organisations. A public forum was also held in Sydney. The Regulator, the applicant and the Designer-Constructor maintained constant interaction during the whole process, so that questions, comments and observations that arose from the review of the PSAR were fed back to the designers. This process allowed for a robust, safe design enriched by the results of the safety analysis and review process. (author)

  17. Comparative Culturing of 3T3 Swiss J2 Mouse Embryo Fibroblasts on Modified Chitosan Matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekhin, A I; Gaenko, G P

    2016-07-01

    Comparative culturing of mouse embryo fibroblasts on chitosan matrices and culture plastic was carried out. During the first 2 h of culturing (lag phase), cell adhesion to chitosan and chitosan-gelatin matrices was 20-30% higher than adhesion to culture plastic (control). During the stationary phase, 80% cells adhered to chitosan matrices (vs. 60% in the control). Cell culturing on chitosan matrices was carried out without medium replacement with fresh portions. The cells remained viable within 5 days of culturing. Cell death phase was observed on day 6 of culturing on chitosan matrices: cell adhesion dropped to 50%. Culturing on culture plastic was carried out with daily medium replacement with a fresh portion. Cell death phase (50% decrease in the number of adherent cell) under these condition was observed on day 5. It seems that the observed effect was a result of contact interactions of cell integrins and chitosan ligands, modulation of transmembrane signal, eventually modifying the expression of cell genes. This effect can be required in regenerative medicine for production of primary cell culture.

  18. Ethical Considerations in Mouse Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baertschi, Bernard; Gyger, Marcel

    2011-03-01

    Mice count morally because they can be harmed. This raises a moral issue in animal experimentation. Three main ethical attitudes towards animals are reviewed here. The Kantian view denies moral value to animals because they lack reason. The second view, by Singer, considers animals as sentient creatures (i.e., able to suffer). Finally, Regan considers that animals are subjects of their own life; they are autonomous and therefore have moral rights. Singer is a reformist and allows animal experimentation under certain conditions. Regan is abolitionist, saying that animals have moral rights that cannot be negotiated. Current animal protection legislation strives to put in balance the human and animal interests to decide whether an animal experiment is morally justified or not. An ethical evaluation process is conducted based on the harm-benefit assessment of the experiment. The researcher has to implement the 3Rs (Replacement, Reduction, Refinement) to minimize the harms to the animals and make sure that the outcomes are scientifically significant and that the quality of the science is high, in order to maximize benefits to humans and animals. Curr. Protoc. Mouse Biol. 1:155-167. © 2011 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  19. Aortic valve replacement in octogenarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dark John H

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Aims As our population ages and life expectancy increases the number of people aged over 80 and more referred for cardiac surgery is growing. This study sought to identify the outcome of aortic valve replacement (AVR in octogenarians. Methods 68 patients aged 80 years or more underwent AVR at the Freeman Hospital, between April 2001 and April 2004. A retrospective review of the notes and outcomes from the patients' GP and the NHS strategic tracking service was performed. 54% (37 underwent isolated AVR whilst 46% (31 underwent combined AVR and CABG. Results Follow up was 100% complete. The mean age was 83.1 ± s.d. 2.9 years, a mean gradient of 83 ± s.d. 31 mmHg and mean AVA of 0.56 cm2. The mean additive EuroSCORE was 8.6 ± s.d. 1.2, the logistic EuroSCORE mean 12.0 ± s.d. 5.9. In hospital 30 day mortality was 13 %. Survival was 80% at 1 year and 78% at 2 years. Median follow up was for 712 days. Stepwise logistic regression identified chronic obstructive airways disease as an independent predictor of mortality (p Conclusion Our study demonstrates that the operative mortality for AVR in the over eighties is good, whilst the mid to long term outcome is excellent There is a very low attrition rate with those undergoing the procedure living as long than their age matched population. This study confirms AVR is a safe, acceptable treatment for octogenarians with excellent mid term outcomes.

  20. Menopause and hormone replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Baziad

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The global population in the 21st century has reached 6.2 billion people, by the year 2025 it is to be around 8.3-8.5 billion, and will increase further. Elderly people are expected to grow rapidly than other groups. The fastest increase in the elderly population will take place in Asia. Life expectancy is increasing steadily throughout developed and developing countries. For many  menopausal women, increased life expectancy will accompanied by many health problems. The consequences of estrogen deficiency are the menopausal symptoms. The treatment of menopause related complaints and diseases became an  important socioeconomic and medical issue. Long term symptoms, such as the increase in osteoporosis fractures, cardio and cerebrovascular disesses and dementia, created a large financial burden on individuals and society. All these health problems can be lreated or prevented by hormone replacement therapy (HRT. Natural HRT is usually prefened. Synthetic  estrogen in oral contraceptives (oc are not recommended for HRT. Many contra-indications for oc, but now it is widely usedfor HRT. The main reasons for discontinuing HRT are unwanted bleeding, fear of cancer, and negative side effects. Until now there are sill debates about the rebrtonship between HRT and the incidence of breast cancer. Many data showed that there were no clear relationship between the use of HRT and breast cancer. ThereÎore, nwny experts advocate the use of HRTfrom the first sign of climacteric complaints until death. (Med J Indones 2001;10: 242-51Keywords: estrogen deficiency, climacteric phases, tibolone.

  1. Total joint replacement preadmission programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messer, B

    1998-01-01

    Patients begin to formulate their expectations of the postoperative hospitalization during the preadmission program. The challenge is to better understand the factors patients consider when formulating judgments about the quality of preadmission education. For example, it may be that perceptions of the preadmission program are influenced by what patients believe about their postoperative pain and functional abilities. Specific attention needs to be given both preoperatively and postoperatively to instructing patients on realistic expectations for recovery. One other method of measuring patient outcomes is with the Health Status Profile (SF-36) (Response Healthcare Information Management, 1995). The SF-36 approach emphasizes the outcome of medical care as the patient sees it, in addition to a clinical evaluation of successful health care. This form is currently initiated in the physician's office and returned for scanning at the preadmission class. The patient then completes another SF-36 at 6 months and every year thereafter to compare measurable outcomes. Patients intending to have elective total joint replacements experience anxiety and require much support and education. An effective preadmission program is a major investment in a patient's recovery, as well as a unique marketing tool to customers. Preadmission programs can be viewed as an opportunity to enhance customer satisfaction. Preadmission clinics are an excellent means for nurses to improve the quality of patient care through patient education. the overall goal of preadmission testing programs is to ensure patient preparedness while increasing quality health care and overall customer satisfaction. To enhance program effectiveness, health care providers must lead collaborative efforts to improve the efficiency of systems.

  2. Collaborative study for the calibration of a replacement International Standard for Tetanus Toxoid Adsorbed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Rob; Stickings, Paul; Hockley, Jason; Rigsby, Peter; Iwaki, Masaaki; Sesardic, Dorothea

    2011-11-01

    We present the results of a collaborative study for the establishment of a replacement International Standard (IS) for Tetanus Toxoid Adsorbed. Two candidate preparations were included in the study, one of which was established as the 4th IS for Tetanus Toxoid Adsorbed at the WHO Expert Committee on Biological Standardization meeting in October 2010. This preparation was found to have a unitage of 490 IU/ampoule, based on calibration in guinea pig challenge assays. Results from mouse challenge assays suggest that the relative performance of two candidate preparations may differ significantly between guinea pigs and mice. The authors note that the number of laboratories that performed guinea pig challenge assays, which are used to calibrate and assign IU, is much lower than in previous collaborative studies and this may have implications for calibration of replacement standards in the future. The issue of assigning separate units to the IS for guinea pig and mouse assays is discussed. The study also assessed performance of the replacement standard in serological assays which are used as alternative procedures to challenge assays for tetanus potency testing. Results suggest that the replacement standard is suitable for use as the reference vaccine in serological assays.

  3. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mylotte, Darren; Osnabrugge, Ruben L J; Windecker, Stephan;

    2013-01-01

    The authors sought to examine the adoption of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in Western Europe and investigate factors that may influence the heterogeneous use of this therapy.......The authors sought to examine the adoption of transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) in Western Europe and investigate factors that may influence the heterogeneous use of this therapy....

  4. Development of neural precursor cells from mouse embryonic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Xuan; LI Hai-di; Li Shu-nong; XU Hai-wei; XU Ling

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To explore the serum-free culture conditions for differentiating mouse embryonic stem cells (ES cells)into neural precursor cells (NPC) and compare the effects of human embryonic fibroblasts (HEF) as the feeder layer of ES with that of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF)in vitro. Methods: Mouse ES cells were cultured in or not in feeder layer cells medium containing or not leukemia inhibitory factor to suppress their differentiation. Immunocytochemical method was used to identify NPC by detecting nestin antigen and alkaline phosphatase. Results: The ES cells cultured in HEF were positive to alkaline phosphatase. Serum-free medium allowed the differentiation of ES cells into NPC. Conclusion:HEF could replace MEF and keep the undifferentiated condition of ES cells with more benefits. NPC of high purity could be cultured from ES cells by serum-free culture method.

  5. Mouse embryos' fusion for the tetraploid complementation assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gertsenstein, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Production of the germline-competent chimeras using genetically modified ES cell lines is an essential step in the establishment of novel mouse models. In addition chimeras provide a powerful tool to study the cell lineage and to analyze complex phenotypes of mutant mice. Mouse chimeras with tetraploid embryos are used to rescue extraembryonic defects, to analyze an impact of gene function on specific lineage, to study the interaction between embryonic and extraembryonic tissues, and to produce mutant embryos and mice for the phenotype analysis. Tetraploid embryos are generated by the fusion of two blastomeres of the mouse embryo. The applications of tetraploid complementation assay and the protocol are described below.

  6. Mouse bladder wall injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chi-Ling; Apelo, Charity A; Torres, Baldemar; Thai, Kim H; Hsieh, Michael H

    2011-07-12

    Mouse bladder wall injection is a useful technique to orthotopically study bladder phenomena, including stem cell, smooth muscle, and cancer biology. Before starting injections, the surgical area must be cleaned with soap and water and antiseptic solution. Surgical equipment must be sterilized before use and between each animal. Each mouse is placed under inhaled isoflurane anesthesia (2-5% for induction, 1-3% for maintenance) and its bladder exposed by making a midline abdominal incision with scissors. If the bladder is full, it is partially decompressed by gentle squeezing between two fingers. The cell suspension of interest is intramurally injected into the wall of the bladder dome using a 29 or 30 gauge needle and 1 cc or smaller syringe. The wound is then closed using wound clips and the mouse allowed to recover on a warming pad. Bladder wall injection is a delicate microsurgical technique that can be mastered with practice.

  7. Replacing lactose from calf milk replacers : effects on digestion and post-absorptive metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilbert, M.S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary PhD thesis Myrthe S. Gilbert Replacing lactose from calf milk replacers – Effects on digestion and post-absorptive metabolism Veal calves are fed milk replacer (MR) and solid feed. The largest part of the energy provided to veal calves originates from

  8. Aortic valve replacement with the Nicks annulus enlargement procedure 12 years after mitral valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazama, S; Kurata, A; Yamashita, Y

    1999-10-01

    An aortic valve replacement was successfully performed employing the Nicks annulus enlargement procedure in a case of aortic valve stenosis with small annulus 12 years after mitral valve replacement. Previous mitral valve replacement does not preclude feasibility of the Nicks procedure.

  9. Sweet proteins – Potential replacement for artificial low calorie sweeteners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kant Ravi

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Exponential growth in the number of patients suffering from diseases caused by the consumption of sugar has become a threat to mankind's health. Artificial low calorie sweeteners available in the market may have severe side effects. It takes time to figure out the long term side effects and by the time these are established, they are replaced by a new low calorie sweetener. Saccharine has been used for centuries to sweeten foods and beverages without calories or carbohydrate. It was also used on a large scale during the sugar shortage of the two world wars but was abandoned as soon as it was linked with development of bladder cancer. Naturally occurring sweet and taste modifying proteins are being seen as potential replacements for the currently available artificial low calorie sweeteners. Interaction aspects of sweet proteins and the human sweet taste receptor are being investigated.

  10. Complex patterns of tooth replacement revealed in the fruit bat (Eidolon helvum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, Elena M; Anthwal, Neal; Tucker, Abigail S

    2016-12-01

    How teeth are replaced during normal growth and development has long been an important question for comparative and developmental anatomy. Non-standard model animals have become increasingly popular in this field due to the fact that the canonical model laboratory mammal, the mouse, develops only one generation of teeth (monophyodonty), whereas the majority of mammals possess two generations of teeth (diphyodonty). Here we used the straw-coloured fruit bat (Eidolon helvum), an Old World megabat, which has two generations of teeth, in order to observe the development and replacement of tooth germs from initiation up to mineralization stages. Our morphological study uses 3D reconstruction of histological sections to uncover differing arrangements of the first and second-generation tooth germs during the process of tooth replacement. We show that both tooth germ generations develop as part of the dental lamina, with the first generation detaching from the lamina, leaving the free edge to give rise to a second generation. This separation was particularly marked at the third premolar locus, where the primary and replacement teeth become positioned side by side, unconnected by a lamina. The position of the replacement tooth, with respect to the primary tooth, varied within the mouth, with replacements forming posterior to or directly lingual to the primary tooth. Development of replacement teeth was arrested at some tooth positions and this appeared to be linked to the timing of tooth initiation and the subsequent rate of development. This study adds an additional species to the growing body of non-model species used in the study of tooth replacement, and offers a new insight into the development of the diphyodont condition. © 2016 Anatomical Society.

  11. Conceptual Design Plan SM-43 Replacement Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    University of California, Los Alamos National Laboratory, SCC Project Office

    2000-11-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory Conceptual Design Plan for the SM-43 Replacement Project outlines plans for replacing the SM-43 Administration Building. Topics include the reasons that replacement is considered a necessity; the roles of the various project sponsors; and descriptions of the proposed site and facilities. Also covered in this proposal is preliminary information on the project schedule, cost estimates, acquisition strategy, risk assessment, NEPA strategy, safety strategy, and safeguards and security. Spreadsheets provide further detail on space requirements, project schedules, and cost estimates.

  12. Percutaneous tricuspid valve replacement in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Emmel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneous replacement of the tricuspid valve with a bovine jugular venous valve (melody valve was successfully undertaken in a 9-year-old boy. The patient had a previous history of bacterial endocarditis of the native tricuspid valve in infancy. Initially, a pericardial patch valve was created, followed by surgical replacement of the valve using a biological tissue valve at 4 years of age. Progressive stenosis and regurgitation of the biological valve, with severe venous congestion and resulting hepatic dysfunction prompted percutaneous valve replacement.

  13. Colonization, mouse-style

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Searle Jeremy B

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Several recent papers, including one in BMC Evolutionary Biology, examine the colonization history of house mice. As well as background for the analysis of mouse adaptation, such studies offer a perspective on the history of movements of the humans that accidentally transported the mice. See research article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2148/10/325

  14. Mouse Leydig Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Syong Pan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cordycepin is a natural pure compound extracted from Cordyceps sinensis (CS. We have demonstrated that CS stimulates steroidogenesis in primary mouse Leydig cell and activates apoptosis in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells. It is highly possible that cordycepin is the main component in CS modulating Leydig cell functions. Thus, our aim was to investigate the steroidogenic and apoptotic effects with potential mechanism of cordycepin on MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells. Results showed that cordycepin significantly stimulated progesterone production in dose- and time-dependent manners. Adenosine receptor (AR subtype agonists were further used to treat MA-10 cells, showing that A1, A 2A , A 2B , and A3, AR agonists could stimulate progesterone production. However, StAR promoter activity and protein expression remained of no difference among all cordycepin treatments, suggesting that cordycepin might activate AR, but not stimulated StAR protein to regulate MA-10 cell steroidogenesis. Meanwhile, cordycepin could also induce apoptotic cell death in MA-10 cells. Moreover, four AR subtype agonists induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner, and four AR subtype antagonists could all rescue cell death under cordycepin treatment in MA-10 cells. In conclusion, cordycepin could activate adenosine subtype receptors and simultaneously induce steroidogenesis and apoptosis in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells.

  15. The Mouse SAGE Site: database of public mouse SAGE libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divina, Petr; Forejt, Jirí

    2004-01-01

    The Mouse SAGE Site is a web-based database of all available public libraries generated by the Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE) from various mouse tissues and cell lines. The database contains mouse SAGE libraries organized in a uniform way and provides web-based tools for browsing, comparing and searching SAGE data with reliable tag-to-gene identification. A modified approach based on the SAGEmap database is used for reliable tag identification. The Mouse SAGE Site is maintained on an ongoing basis at the Institute of Molecular Genetics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic and is accessible at the internet address http://mouse.biomed.cas.cz/sage/.

  16. Severe non-valve-related hemolytic anemia following aortic root replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanger, Olaf; Hammerer, Matthias; Datz, Lidwina

    2010-12-01

    Aortic interposition grafting combined with aortic root replacement (conduit) is widely performed to manage thoracic aortic aneurysms. Intravascular hemolysis without clinical significance is occasionally observed as a complication after prosthetic valve replacement. Symptomatic lysis of red blood cells (RBCs) is rare and primarily attributed to mechanical damage as result of high shear stress, turbulent flow, and physical interaction. We report a case of severe hemolytic anemia shortly after mechanical conduit implantation. The RBC damage was not related to the valve prosthesis and resolved completely after replacement of a section of the kinked Dacron tube graft to correct a fold.

  17. Comparison of gene expression regulation in mouse- and human embryonic stem cell assays during neural differentiation and in response to valproic acid exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulpen, Sjors H. W.; Theunissen, Peter T.; Pennings, Jeroen L. A.; Piersma, Aldert H.

    2015-01-01

    Embryonic stem cell tests (EST) are considered promising alternative assays for developmental toxicity testing. Classical mouse derived assays (mEST) are being replaced by human derived assays (hEST), in view of their relevance for human hazard assessment. We have compared mouse and human neural EST

  18. Trials and Tribulations with VH Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenzhao eMeng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available VH replacement is a type of antibody gene rearrangement in which an upstream heavy chain variable gene segment (VH invades a pre-existing rearrangement (VDJ. In this Hypothesis and Theory article, we begin by reviewing the mechanism of VH replacement, its developmental timing and its potential biological consequences. Then we explore the hypothesis that specific sequence motifs called footprints reflect VH replacement vs. other processes. We provide a compilation of footprint sequences from different regions of the antibody heavy chain, include data from the literature and from a high throughput sequencing experiment to evaluate the significance of footprint sequences. We conclude by discussing the difficulties of attributing footprints to VH replacement.

  19. Gyrator-type circuits replace ungrounded inductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deboo, G. J.

    1968-01-01

    Gyrator circuits using only transistors, capacitors, and resistors which can replace both grounded and ungrounded inductors have been developed to permit complete microminiaturization of circuitry by integration of the components.

  20. Total ankle replacement. Design evolution and results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heuvel, Alexander; Van Bouwel, Saskia; Dereymaeker, Greta

    2010-04-01

    The ankle joint has unique anatomical, biomechanical and cartilaginous structural characteristics that allow the joint to withstand the very high mechanical stresses and strains over years. Any minor changes to any of these features predispose the joint to osteoarthritis. Total ankle replacement (TAR) is evolving as an alternative to ankle arthrodesis for the treatment of end-stage ankle osteoarthritis. Initial implant designs from the early 1970s had unacceptably high failure and complication rates. As a result many orthopaedic surgeons have restricted the use of TAR in favour of ankle arthrodesis. Long term follow-up studies following ankle arthrodesis show risks of developing adjacent joint osteoarthritis. Therefore research towards a successful ankle replacement continues. Newer designs and longer-term outcome studies have renewed the interest in ankle joint replacement. We present an overview of the evolution, results and current concepts of total ankle replacement.

  1. Minimally Invasive Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Watch a Broward Health surgeon perform a minimally invasive Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) Click Here to view the BroadcastMed, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2017 BroadcastMed, Inc. ...

  2. Total ankle replacement - surgical treatment and rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prusinowska, Agnieszka; Krogulec, Zbigniew; Turski, Piotr; Przepiórski, Emil; Małdyk, Paweł; Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Functions of the ankle joint are closely connected with the gait and ability to maintain an upright position. Degenerative lesions of the joint directly contribute to postural disorders and greatly restrict propulsion of the foot, thus leading to abnormal gait. Development of total ankle replacement is connected with the use of the method as an efficient treatment of joint injuries and continuation of achievements in hip and knee surgery. The total ankle replacement technique was introduced as an alternative to arthrodesis, i.e. surgical fixation, which made it possible to preserve joint mobility and to improve gait. Total ankle replacement is indicated in post-traumatic degenerative joint disease and joint destruction secondary to rheumatoid arthritis. In this paper, total ankle replacement and various types of currently used endoprostheses are discussed. The authors also describe principles of early postoperative rehabilitation as well as rehabilitation in the outpatient setting.

  3. 47 CFR 13.17 - Replacement license.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMERCIAL RADIO OPERATORS General § 13.17 Replacement... Operator License, Marine Radio Operator Permit, First Class Radiotelegraph Operator's Certificate, Second... Radio Operator's License, Restricted GMDSS Radio Operator License, GMDSS Radio Maintainer's License,...

  4. Renal replacement therapy for acute renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, E; Bouchard, J; Mehta, R L

    2009-09-01

    Renal replacement therapy became a common clinical tool to treat patients with severe acute kidney injury (AKI) since the 1960s. During this time dialytic options have expanded considerably; biocompatible membranes, bicarbonate dialysate and dialysis machines with volumetric ultrafiltration control have improved the treatment for acute kidney injury. Along with advances in methods of intermittent hemodialysis, continuous renal replacement therapies have gained widespread acceptance in the treatment of dialysis-requiring AKI. However, many of the fundamental aspects of the renal replacement treatment such as indication, timing of dialytic intervention, and choice of dialysis modality are still controversial and may influence AKI patient's outcomes. This review outlines current concepts in the use of dialysis techniques for AKI and suggests an approach for selecting the optimal method of renal replacement therapy.

  5. Minimally Invasive Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Watch a Broward Health surgeon perform a minimally invasive Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) Click Here to view the BroadcastMed, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2017 BroadcastMed, Inc. ...

  6. SYNERGISTIC WOOD PRESERVATIVES FOR REPLACEMENT OF CCA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this project was to evaluate the potential synergistic combinations of environmentally-safe biocides as wood preservatives. These wood preservatives could be potential replacements for the heavy-metal based CCA.Didecyldimethylammonium chloride [DDAC] was...

  7. Bone Marrow Transplantation (BMT) and Gene Replacement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bone Marrow Transplantation (BMT) and Gene Replacement Therapy (GRT) In Sickle Cell Anemia. ... manifesting clinical disease, while the heterozygoste(AS) are clinically ... medicine, we argue here the case for Bone marrow transplantation

  8. A Toll/interleukin (IL)-1 receptor domain protein from Yersinia pestis interacts with mammalian IL-1/Toll-like receptor pathways but does not play a central role in the virulence of Y. pestis in a mouse model of bubonic plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spear, Abigail M; Rana, Rohini R; Jenner, Dominic C; Flick-Smith, Helen C; Oyston, Petra C F; Simpson, Peter; Matthews, Stephen J; Byrne, Bernadette; Atkins, Helen S

    2012-06-01

    The Toll/interleukin (IL)-1 receptor (TIR) domain is an essential component of eukaryotic innate immune signalling pathways. Interaction between TIR domains present in Toll-like receptors and associated adaptors initiates and propagates an immune signalling cascade. Proteins containing TIR domains have also been discovered in bacteria. Studies have subsequently shown that these proteins are able to modulate mammalian immune signalling pathways dependent on TIR interactions and that this may represent an evasion strategy for bacterial pathogens. Here, we investigate a TIR domain protein from the highly virulent bacterium Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague. When overexpressed in vitro this protein is able to downregulate IL-1β- and LPS-dependent signalling to NFκB and to interact with the TIR adaptor protein MyD88. This interaction is dependent on a single proline residue. However, a Y. pestis knockout mutant lacking the TIR domain protein was not attenuated in virulence in a mouse model of bubonic plague. Minor alterations in the host cytokine response to the mutant were indicated, suggesting a potential subtle role in pathogenesis. The Y. pestis mutant also showed increased auto-aggregation and reduced survival in high-salinity conditions, phenotypes which may contribute to pathogenesis or survival.

  9. Infective endocarditis following percutaneous pulmonary valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheung, Gary; Vejlstrup, Niels; Ihlemann, Nikolaj;

    2013-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) following percutaneous pulmonary valve replacement (PPVR) with the Melody valve is rarely reported. Furthermore, there are challenges in this diagnosis; especially echocardiographic evidence of vegetation within the prosthesis may be difficult.......Infective endocarditis (IE) following percutaneous pulmonary valve replacement (PPVR) with the Melody valve is rarely reported. Furthermore, there are challenges in this diagnosis; especially echocardiographic evidence of vegetation within the prosthesis may be difficult....

  10. [Replacement of tracheo-esophageal Provox prosthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biacabe, B; Laccourreye, O; Ménard, M; Hans, S; Brasnu, D

    2000-02-01

    To compare anesthesic techniques used between 1992 and 1997 at Laënnec Hospital for replacement by tracheo-esophageal Provox prosthesis: local and general anesthesia. Theoretical financial cost for replacement was estimated according to anaesthetic techniques. Provox in situ lifetime was calculated in 58 patients who underwent 115 and 49 replacements under general and local anaesthesia respectively. Age, sex, surgical and radiotherapy backgrounds, complications and anaesthetic techniques were studied as potential factors correlated with Provox in situ lifetime. Theoretical financial cost for replacement was estimated according to anaesthetic techniques. In 1992, 12% of Provox prosthesis were inserted under local anaesthesia and 54% in 1997. Provox in situ lifetime was either not influenced by anaesthetic techniques or other factors under analysis. The theoretical financial cost was estimated at 14, 341 FFrs and 6,048 FFrs for replacement under general and local anaesthesia respectively. Due to increased control of health care costs, we advocated local anaesthesia for Provox prosthesis replacement if control endoscopy is not required.

  11. Strategic vehicle fleet management - the replacement problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Redmer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fleets constitute the most important production means in transportation. Their appropriate management is crucial for all companies having transportation duties. The paper is the third one of a series of three papers that the author dedicates to the strategic vehicle fleet management topic. Material and methods: The paper discusses ways of building replacement strategies for companies' fleets of vehicles. It means deciding for how long to exploit particular vehicles in a fleet (the fleet replacement problem - FR. The essence of this problem lies in the minimization of vehicle / fleet exploitation costs by balancing ownership and utilization costs and taking into account budget limitations. In the paper an original mathematical model (an optimization method allowing for the FR analysis is proposed. Results: An application of the proposed optimization method in a real-life decision situation (the case study within the Polish environment and the obtained solution are presented. The solution shows that there exist optimal exploitation periods of particular vehicles in a fleet. However, combination of them gives a replacement plan for an entire fleet violating budget constraints. But it is possible to adjust individual age to replacement of particular vehicles to fulfill budget constraints without losing economical optimality of a developed replacement plan for an entire fleet. Conclusions: The paper is the last one of a series of three papers that the author dedicated to the strategic vehicle fleet management topic including the following managerial decision problems: MAKE-or-BUY, sizing / composition and replacement.

  12. Effect of Duplicate Genes on Mouse Genetic Robustness: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixi Su

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to S. cerevisiae and C. elegans, analyses based on the current knockout (KO mouse phenotypes led to the conclusion that duplicate genes had almost no role in mouse genetic robustness. It has been suggested that the bias of mouse KO database toward ancient duplicates may possibly cause this knockout duplicate puzzle, that is, a very similar proportion of essential genes (PE between duplicate genes and singletons. In this paper, we conducted an extensive and careful analysis for the mouse KO phenotype data and corroborated a strong effect of duplicate genes on mouse genetics robustness. Moreover, the effect of duplicate genes on mouse genetic robustness is duplication-age dependent, which holds after ruling out the potential confounding effect from coding-sequence conservation, protein-protein connectivity, functional bias, or the bias of duplicates generated by whole genome duplication (WGD. Our findings suggest that two factors, the sampling bias toward ancient duplicates and very ancient duplicates with a proportion of essential genes higher than that of singletons, have caused the mouse knockout duplicate puzzle; meanwhile, the effect of genetic buffering may be correlated with sequence conservation as well as protein-protein interactivity.

  13. Adiposity, hormone replacement therapy use and breast cancer risk by age and hormone receptor status : a large prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritte, Rebecca; Lukanova, Annekatrin; Berrino, Franco; Dossus, Laure; Tjonneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Overvad, Thure Filskov; Overvad, Kim; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Fournier, Agnes; Fagherazzi, Guy; Rohrmann, Sabine; Teucher, Birgit; Boeing, Heiner; Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Palli, Domenico; Sieri, Sabina; Panico, Salvatore; Tumino, Rosario; Vineis, Paolo; Ramon Quiros, Jose; Buckland, Genevieve; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Amiano, Pilar; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Ardanaz, Eva; Sund, Malin; Lenner, Per; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; van Gils, Carla H.; Peeters, Petra H. M.; Krum-Hansen, Sanda; Gram, Inger Torhild; Lund, Eiliv; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nick; Allen, Naomi E.; Key, Timothy J.; Romieu, Isabelle; Rinaldi, Sabina; Siddiq, Afshan; Cox, David; Riboli, Elio; Kaaks, Rudolf

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Associations of hormone-receptor positive breast cancer with excess adiposity are reasonably well characterized; however, uncertainty remains regarding the association of body mass index (BMI) with hormone-receptor negative malignancies, and possible interactions by hormone replacement

  14. Non-animal Replacements for Acute Toxicity Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker-Treasure, Carol; Coll, Kevin; Belot, Nathalie; Longmore, Chris; Bygrave, Karl; Avey, Suzanne; Clothier, Richard

    2015-07-01

    Current approaches to predicting adverse effects in humans from acute toxic exposure to cosmetic ingredients still heavily necessitate the use of animals under EU legislation, particularly in the context of the REACH system, when cosmetic ingredients are also destined for use in other industries. These include the LD50 test, the Up-and-Down Procedure and the Fixed Dose Procedure, which are regarded as having notable scientific deficiencies and low transferability to humans. By expanding on previous in vitro tests, such as the animal cell-based 3T3 Neutral Red Uptake (NRU) assay, this project aims to develop a truly animal-free predictive test for the acute toxicity of cosmetic ingredients in humans, by using human-derived cells and a prediction model that does not rely on animal data. The project, funded by Innovate UK, will incorporate the NRU assay with human dermal fibroblasts in animal product-free culture, to generate an in vitro protocol that can be validated as an accepted replacement for the currently available in vivo tests. To date, the project has successfully completed an assessment of the robustness and reproducibility of the method, by using sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) as a positive control, and displaying analogous results to those of the original studies with mouse 3T3 cells. Currently, the testing of five known ingredients from key groups (a surfactant, a preservative, a fragrance, a colour and an emulsifier) is under way. The testing consists of initial range-finding runs followed by three valid runs of a main experiment with the appropriate concentration ranges, to generate IC50 values. Expanded blind trials of 20 ingredients will follow. Early results indicate that this human cell-based test holds the potential to replace aspects of in vivo animal acute toxicity testing, particularly with reference to cosmetic ingredients. 2015 FRAME.

  15. A series of N-terminal epitope tagged Hdh knock-in alleles expressing normal and mutant huntingtin: their application to understanding the effect of increasing the length of normal huntingtin’s polyglutamine stretch on CAG140 mouse model pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Shuqiu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Huntington’s disease (HD is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease that is caused by the expansion of a polyglutamine (polyQ stretch within Huntingtin (htt, the protein product of the HD gene. Although studies in vitro have suggested that the mutant htt can act in a potentially dominant negative fashion by sequestering wild-type htt into insoluble protein aggregates, the role of the length of the normal htt polyQ stretch, and the adjacent proline-rich region (PRR in modulating HD mouse model pathogenesis is currently unknown. Results We describe the generation and characterization of a series of knock-in HD mouse models that express versions of the mouse HD gene (Hdh encoding N-terminal hemaglutinin (HA or 3xFlag epitope tagged full-length htt with different polyQ lengths (HA7Q-, 3xFlag7Q-, 3xFlag20Q-, and 3xFlag140Q-htt and substitution of the adjacent mouse PRR with the human PRR (3xFlag20Q- and 3xFlag140Q-htt. Using co-immunoprecipitation and immunohistochemistry analyses, we detect no significant interaction between soluble full-length normal 7Q- htt and mutant (140Q htt, but we do observe N-terminal fragments of epitope-tagged normal htt in mutant htt aggregates. When the sequences encoding normal mouse htt’s polyQ stretch and PRR are replaced with non-pathogenic human sequence in mice also expressing 140Q-htt, aggregation foci within the striatum, and the mean size of htt inclusions are increased, along with an increase in striatal lipofuscin and gliosis. Conclusion In mice, soluble full-length normal and mutant htt are predominantly monomeric. In heterozygous knock-in HD mouse models, substituting the normal mouse polyQ and PRR with normal human sequence can exacerbate some neuropathological phenotypes.

  16. The Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement and the ideal biomechanical requirements of ankle replacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robati, Shibby; Salih, Alan; Ghosh, Koushik; Vinayakam, Parthiban

    2016-03-01

    The complex anatomy of the articular bone surfaces, ligaments, tendon attachments and muscles makes the ankle joint difficult to replicate in prosthetic replacements. Ever since the early 1970s, which saw the dawn of the first total ankle replacements, there have been numerous other attempts at replicating the joint, often with poor clinical outcomes. The anatomy of the ankle is discussed, followed by evidence of the normal ankle biomechanics and the ideal requirements of an ankle replacement. We focus on the Scandinavian Total Ankle Replacement and evaluate whether these requirements have been met.

  17. Isolation of Mouse Neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swamydas, Muthulekha; Luo, Yi; Dorf, Martin E; Lionakis, Michail S

    2015-08-03

    Neutrophils represent the first line of defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Indeed, patients with inherited and acquired qualitative and quantitative neutrophil defects are at high risk for developing bacterial and fungal infections and suffering adverse outcomes from these infections. Therefore, research aiming at defining the molecular factors that modulate neutrophil effector function under homeostatic conditions and during infection is essential for devising strategies to augment neutrophil function and improve the outcome of infected individuals. This unit describes a reproducible density gradient centrifugation-based protocol that can be applied in any laboratory to harvest large numbers of highly enriched and highly viable neutrophils from the bone marrow of mice both at the steady state and following infection with Candida albicans as described in UNIT. In another protocol, we also present a method that combines gentle enzymatic tissue digestion with a positive immunomagnetic selection technique or Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) to harvest highly pure and highly viable preparations of neutrophils directly from mouse tissues such as the kidney, the liver or the spleen. Finally, methods for isolating neutrophils from mouse peritoneal fluid and peripheral blood are included. Mouse neutrophils isolated by these protocols can be used for examining several aspects of cellular function ex vivo including pathogen binding, phagocytosis and killing, neutrophil chemotaxis, oxidative burst, degranulation and cytokine production, and for performing neutrophil adoptive transfer experiments.

  18. Integrating 2D Mouse Emulation with 3D Manipulation for Visualizations on a Multi-Touch Table

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlaming, Luc; Collins, Christopher; Hancock, Mark; Nacenta, Miguel; Isenberg, Tobias; Carpendale, Sheelagh

    2010-01-01

    We present the Rizzo, a multi-touch virtual mouse that has been designed to provide the fine grained interaction for information visualization on a multi-touch table. Our solution enables touch interaction for existing mouse-based visualizations. Previously, this transition to a multi-touch environm

  19. Testosterone replacement therapy and prostate health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polackwich, A Scott; Ostrowski, Kevin A; Hedges, Jason C

    2012-12-01

    There is an emerging evolution in the understanding of the relationship between the prostate and testosterone. It has long been generally believed that with testosterone replacement therapy (TRT), increasing serum testosterone levels led to prostatic growth and worsening of voiding dysfunction and associated complications. A new theory, the Saturation Model of Testosterone and its effect on the Prostate has gained attention. This theory suggests that the prostate's response to increasing levels of serum testosterone reaches a limit beyond which there is minimal effect. This model predicts that testosterone replacement therapy occurs above this saturation point, and replacing testosterone to eugonadal levels should not worsen prostate related benign disease. We evaluated the recent published data, with an emphasis on clinical studies done within the last 3 years, for the effects of testosterone supplementation on benign prostatic disease.

  20. Postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy--clinical implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, S H; Rosenberg, J; Bostofte, E

    1994-01-01

    in the urogenital tract. Women at risk of osteoporosis will benefit from hormone replacement therapy. The treatment should start as soon after menopause as possible and it is possible that it should be maintained for life. The treatment may be supplemented with extra calcium intake, vitamin D, and maybe calcitonin....... Physical activity should be promoted, and cigarette smoking reduced if possible. Women at risk of cardiovascular disease will also benefit from hormone replacement therapy. There is overwhelming evidence that hormone therapy will protect against both coronary heart disease and stroke...... suggest that every woman showing any signs of hormone deprivation should be treated with hormone replacement therapy. This includes women with subjective or objective vaso-motor symptoms, genito-urinary symptoms, women at risk of osteoporosis (fast bone losers), and women at risk of cardiovascular...

  1. Double Valve Replacement for Lupus Valvulitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, Victor A.; Hawksley, Vaughn C.; Rabinowitz, Max; Coyne, Carolyn M.; Sullivan, Thomas J.; Sprague, Merle S.

    1990-01-01

    Hemodynamically significant lupus valvulitis, requiring valve replacement, is rare: 21 cases have been reported so far in the literature, and only 2 of these have involved double valve replacement. We describe an additional case of double valve replacement in a patient with systemic lupus erythematosus. The histopathologic and clinical features of this case suggest that valvular involvement resulted from both acute and chronic disease processes. Medical success in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus, especially that achieved through prolonged or high-dose steroid therapy, may cause chronic valvular disease to become a more common surgical problem. A review of the literature supports this contention. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1990;17:56-60) Images PMID:15227191

  2. Renal function after elective total hip replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perregaard, Helene; Damholt, Mette B; Solgaard, Søren

    2016-01-01

    and the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in an elective population of orthopedic patients undergoing primary total hip replacement, hypothesizing that chronic kidney disease predisposes to AKI. Patients and methods - This was a single-center, population-based, retrospective, registry-based cohort study...... involving all primary elective total hip replacements performed from January 2003 through December 2012. Patient demographics and creatinine values were registered. We evaluated the presence of CKD and AKI according to the international guidelines for kidney disease (KDIGO Acute Kidney Injury Workgroup 2013...... ). Results - 3,416 patients were included (2,064 females (60%)). AKI (according to KDIGO criteria) was seen in 75 patients (2.2%, 95% CI: 1.7-2.7) in the course of primary total hip replacement. Of these, 26 had pre-existing CKD of class 3-5. Pre-existing CKD of class 3-5, indicating moderately to severely...

  3. OPTIMAL MAINTENANCE AND REPLACEMENT OF EXTRACTION MACHINERY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suresh P.SETHI; Hong-Mo YEH; Rong ZHANG; Andrew K.S.JARDINE

    2008-01-01

    This paper considers a problem of optimal preventive maintenance and replacement schedule ofequipment devoted to extracting resources from known deposits. Typical examples are oil drills, mine shovels, etc. At most one replacement of the existing machinery by a new one is allowed. The problem is formulated as an optimal control problem subject to the state constraint that the remaining deposit at any given time is nonnegative. We show that the optimal preventive maintenance, production rates, and the replacement and salvage times of the existing machinery and the new one, if required, can be obtained by solving sequentially a series of free-end-point optimal control problems. Moreover, an algorithm based on this result is developed and used to solve two illustrative examples.

  4. Dead pixel replacement in LWIR microgrid polarimeters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratliff, Bradley M; Tyo, J Scott; Boger, James K; Black, Wiley T; Bowers, David L; Fetrow, Matthew P

    2007-06-11

    LWIR imaging arrays are often affected by nonresponsive pixels, or "dead pixels." These dead pixels can severely degrade the quality of imagery and often have to be replaced before subsequent image processing and display of the imagery data. For LWIR arrays that are integrated with arrays of micropolarizers, the problem of dead pixels is amplified. Conventional dead pixel replacement (DPR) strategies cannot be employed since neighboring pixels are of different polarizations. In this paper we present two DPR schemes. The first is a modified nearest-neighbor replacement method. The second is a method based on redundancy in the polarization measurements.We find that the redundancy-based DPR scheme provides an order-of-magnitude better performance for typical LWIR polarimetric data.

  5. Hip or knee replacement - after - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... replacement Hip pain Knee joint replacement Knee pain Osteoarthritis ... Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, ...

  6. Hip or knee replacement - before - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... replacement Hip pain Knee joint replacement Knee pain Osteoarthritis ... Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, ...

  7. Precise and in situ genetic humanization of 6 Mb of mouse immunoglobulin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Lynn E; Karow, Margaret; Stevens, Sean; Auerbach, Wojtek; Poueymirou, William T; Yasenchak, Jason; Frendewey, David; Valenzuela, David M; Giallourakis, Cosmas C; Alt, Frederick W; Yancopoulos, George D; Murphy, Andrew J

    2014-04-01

    Genetic humanization, which involves replacing mouse genes with their human counterparts, can create powerful animal models for the study of human genes and diseases. One important example of genetic humanization involves mice humanized for their Ig genes, allowing for human antibody responses within a mouse background (HumAb mice) and also providing a valuable platform for the generation of fully human antibodies as therapeutics. However, existing HumAb mice do not have fully functional immune systems, perhaps because of the manner in which they were genetically humanized. Heretofore, most genetic humanizations have involved disruption of the endogenous mouse gene with simultaneous introduction of a human transgene at a new and random location (so-called KO-plus-transgenic humanization). More recent efforts have attempted to replace mouse genes with their human counterparts at the same genetic location (in situ humanization), but such efforts involved laborious procedures and were limited in size and precision. We describe a general and efficient method for very large, in situ, and precise genetic humanization using large compound bacterial artificial chromosome-based targeting vectors introduced into mouse ES cells. We applied this method to genetically humanize 3-Mb segments of both the mouse heavy and κ light chain Ig loci, by far the largest genetic humanizations ever described. This paper provides a detailed description of our genetic humanization approach, and the companion paper reports that the humoral immune systems of mice bearing these genetically humanized loci function as efficiently as those of WT mice.

  8. Mouse genetics: Catalogue and scissors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Woong Lee

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypic analysis of gene-specific knockout (KO mice hasrevolutionized our understanding of in vivo gene functions. Asthe use of mouse embryonic stem (ES cells is inevitable forconventional gene targeting, the generation of knockout miceremains a very time-consuming and expensive process. Toaccelerate the large-scale production and phenotype analyses ofKO mice, international efforts have organized global consortiasuch as the International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMCand International Mouse Phenotype Consortium (IMPC, andthey are persistently expanding the KO mouse catalogue that ispublicly available for the researches studying specific genes ofinterests in vivo. However, new technologies, adoptingzinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs or Transcription Activator-LikeEffector (TALE Nucleases (TALENs to edit the mouse genome,are now emerging as valuable and effective shortcuts alternativefor the conventional gene targeting using ES cells. Here, weintroduce the recent achievement of IKMC, and evaluate thesignificance of ZFN/TALEN technology in mouse genetics.

  9. Mouse genetics: catalogue and scissors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Young Hoon; Baek, In-Jeoung; Seong, Je Kyung; Kim, Jin Soo; Lee, Han-Woong

    2012-12-01

    Phenotypic analysis of gene-specific knockout (KO) mice has revolutionized our understanding of in vivo gene functions. As the use of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells is inevitable for conventional gene targeting, the generation of knockout mice remains a very time-consuming and expensive process. To accelerate the large-scale production and phenotype analyses of KO mice, international efforts have organized global consortia such as the International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMC) and International Mouse Phenotype Consortium (IMPC), and they are persistently expanding the KO mouse catalogue that is publicly available for the researches studying specific genes of interests in vivo. However, new technologies, adopting zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) or Transcription Activator-Like Effector (TALE) Nucleases (TALENs) to edit the mouse genome, are now emerging as valuable and effective shortcuts alternative for the conventional gene targeting using ES cells. Here, we introduce the recent achievement of IKMC, and evaluate the significance of ZFN/TALEN technology in mouse genetics.

  10. A Cell Model for Conditional Profiling of Androgen-Receptor-Interacting Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Mooslehner

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS is associated with impaired male genital development and can be transmitted through mutations in the androgen receptor (AR. The aim of this study is to develop a cell model suitable for studying the impact AR mutations might have on AR interacting proteins. For this purpose, male genital development relevant mouse cell lines were genetically modified to express a tagged version of wild-type AR, allowing copurification of multiprotein complexes under native conditions followed by mass spectrometry. We report 57 known wild-type AR-interacting proteins identified in cells grown under proliferating and 65 under nonproliferating conditions. Of those, 47 were common to both samples suggesting different AR protein complex components in proliferating and proliferation-inhibited cells from the mouse proximal caput epididymus. These preliminary results now allow future studies to focus on replacing wild-type AR with mutant AR to uncover differences in protein interactions caused by AR mutations involved in PAIS.

  11. Comprehensive and Holistic Analysis of HT-29 Colorectal Cancer Cells and Tumor-Bearing Nude Mouse Model: Interactions Among Fractions Derived From the Chinese Medicine Formula Tian Xian Liquid in Effects on Human Colorectal Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, Annballaw Bridget; Cheung, Ho Pan; Lin, Li-Zhu; Ng, Tzi Bun; Lao, Lixing; Zhang, Yanbo; Zhang, Zhang-Jin; Tong, Yao; Sze, Stephen Cho Wing

    2016-06-03

    The Chinese medicine formula Tian Xian Liquid (TXL) has been used clinically for cancer therapy in China for more than 25 years. However, the comprehensive and holistic effects of its bioactive fractions for various antitumor therapeutic effects have not been unraveled. This is the first study to scientifically elucidate the holistic effect of Chinese medicine formula for treating colon cancer, hence allowing a better understanding of the essence of Chinese medicine formula, through the comparison of the actions of TXL and its functional constituent fractions, including ethyl acetate (EA), butanol (BU), and aqueous (WA) fractions. Tissue-specific proliferative/antiproliferative effects of these fractions on human colorectal carcinoma HT-29 cells and splenocytes were studied by using the MTT assay. Their modulations on the expression of markers of antiproliferation, antimetastasis, reversion of multidrug resistance in treated HT-29 cells were examined with real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis, and their modulations in a xenografted nude mouse model were examined by Western blot analysis. Results revealed that EA fraction slightly inhibited the proliferation of HT-29 cells, but tissue-specifically exerted the most potent antiproliferative effect on splenocytes. On the contrary, only TXL and BU fraction tissue-specifically contributed to the proliferation of splenocytes, but inhibited the proliferation of HT-29 cells. WA fraction exerted the most potent antiproliferative effect on HT-29 cells and also the strongest inhibitory action on tumor size in the nude mouse model in our previous study. In the HT-29 model, TXL and WA fraction exerted the most pronounced effect on upregulation of p21 mRNA and protein; TXL, and EA and WA fractions exerted the effect on downregulation of G1 phase cell cycle protein, cyclin D1 mRNA and protein; EA and BU fractions exerted the most prominent anti-invasive effect on anti-invasion via downregulation of MMP-1 m

  12. The echocardiography of replacement heart valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    This is a practical description of how replacement valves are assessed using echocardiography. Normal transthoracic appearances including normal variants are described. The problem of differentiating normal function, patient–prosthesis mismatch and pathological obstruction in aortic replacement valves with high gradients is discussed. Obstruction and abnormal regurgitation is described for valves in the aortic, mitral and right-sided positions and when to use echocardiography in suspected infective endocarditis. The roles of transoesophageal and stress echocardiography are described and finally when other imaging techniques may be useful. PMID:27600454

  13. Transcriptional changes during neuronal death and replacement in the olfactory epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Ranjit S; Bose, Soma C; Nickell, Melissa D; McIntyre, Jeremy C; Hardin, Debra H; Harris, Andrew M; McClintock, Timothy S

    2005-12-01

    The olfactory epithelium has the unusual ability to replace its neurons.We forced replacement of mouse olfactory sensory neurons by bulbectomy. Microarray, bioinformatics, and in situ hybridization techniques detected a rapid shift in favor of pro-apoptotic proteins, a progressive immune response by macrophages and dendritic cells, and identified or predicted 439 mRNAs enriched in olfactory sensory neurons, including gene silencing factors and sperm flagellar proteins. Transcripts encoding cell cycle regulators, axonogenesis proteins, and transcription factors and signaling proteins that promote proliferation and differentiation were increased at 5-7 days after bulbectomy and were expressed by basal progenitor cells or immature neurons. The transcription factors included Nhlhl, Hes6, Lmycl, c-Myc, Mxd4, Idl,Nmycl, Cited2, c-Myb, Mybll, Tead2, Dpl, Gata2, Lmol, and Soxll. The data reveal significant similarities with embryonic neurogenesis and make several mechanistic predictions, including the roles of the transcription factors in the olfactory sensory neuron lineage.

  14. Upgrade or replace?: The effect of the EPBD on the choice between improvement or replacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomsen, A.F.; Van der Flier, C.L.

    2010-01-01

    What is better: improvement or replacement by new construction? The choice between life cycle extension and replacement of existing buildings is at itself a vital but very difficult decision, involving a wide range of different aspects and affecting several contrary and often conflicting interests.

  15. Electromagnetic interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Bosanac, Slobodan Danko

    2016-01-01

    This book is devoted to theoretical methods used in the extreme circumstances of very strong electromagnetic fields. The development of high power lasers, ultrafast processes, manipulation of electromagnetic fields and the use of very fast charged particles interacting with other charges requires an adequate theoretical description. Because of the very strong electromagnetic field, traditional theoretical approaches, which have primarily a perturbative character, have to be replaced by descriptions going beyond them. In the book an extension of the semi-classical radiation theory and classical dynamics for particles is performed to analyze single charged atoms and dipoles submitted to electromagnetic pulses. Special attention is given to the important problem of field reaction and controlling dynamics of charges by an electromagnetic field.

  16. Electromagnetic interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosanac, Slobodan Danko [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia). Physical Chemistry

    2016-07-01

    This book is devoted to theoretical methods used in the extreme circumstances of very strong electromagnetic fields. The development of high power lasers, ultrafast processes, manipulation of electromagnetic fields and the use of very fast charged particles interacting with other charges requires an adequate theoretical description. Because of the very strong electromagnetic field, traditional theoretical approaches, which have primarily a perturbative character, have to be replaced by descriptions going beyond them. In the book an extension of the semi-classical radiation theory and classical dynamics for particles is performed to analyze single charged atoms and dipoles submitted to electromagnetic pulses. Special attention is given to the important problem of field reaction and controlling dynamics of charges by an electromagnetic field.

  17. Human anti-mouse antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klee, G G

    2000-06-01

    Human anti-mouse antibodies (HAMA) are human immunoglobulins with specificity for mouse immunoglobulins. This topic currently is of interest because of the increased use of monoclonal mouse antibodies as diagnostic reagents both for in vitro laboratory measurements and for in vivo imaging studies. Monoclonal mouse antibodies also are being used therapeutically. This short article reviews the production of HAMA in patients receiving monoclonal antibodies and illustrates the potential ways that HAMA can interfere with immunoassay measurements. Methods for measuring and neutralizing HAMA also are discussed.

  18. Esophageal tissue engineering: A new approach for esophageal replacement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giorgia Totonelli; Panagiotis Maghsoudlou; Jonathan M Fishman; Giuseppe Orlando; Tahera Ansari; Paul Sibbons; Martin A Birchall

    2012-01-01

    A number of congenital and acquired disorders require esophageal tissue replacement.Various surgical techniques,such as gastric and colonic interposition,are standards of treatment,but frequently complicated by stenosis and other problems.Regenerative medicine approaches facilitate the use of biological constructs to replace or regenerate normal tissue function.We review the literature of esophageal tissue engineering,discuss its implications,compare the methodologies that have been employed and suggest possible directions for the future.Medline,Embase,the Cochrane Library,National Research Register and ClinicalTrials.gov databases were searched with the following search terms:stem cell and esophagus,esophageal replacement,esophageal tissue engineering,esophageal substitution.Reference lists of papers identified were also examined and experts in this field contacted for further information.All full-text articles in English of all potentially relevant abstracts were reviewed.Tissue engineering has involved acellular scaffolds that were either transplanted with the aim of being repopulated by host cells or seeded prior to transplantation.When acellular scaffolds were used to replace patch and short tubular defects they allowed epithelial and partial muscular migration whereas when employed for long tubular defects the results were poor leading to an increased rate of stenosis and mortality.Stenting has been shown as an effective means to reduce stenotic changes and promote cell migration,whilst omental wrapping to induce vascularization of the construct has an uncertain benefit.Decellularized matrices have been recently suggested as the optimal choice for scaffolds,but smart polymers that will incorporate signalling to promote cell-scaffold interaction may provide a more reproducible and available solution.Results in animal models that have used seeded scaffolds strongly suggest that seeding of both muscle and epithelial cells on scaffolds prior to implantation is a

  19. Mouse models of medulloblastoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaochong Wu; Paul A. Northcott; Sidney Croul; Michael D. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor. Despite its prevalence and importance in pediatric neuro-oncology, the genes and pathways responsible for its initiation, maintenance,and progression remain poorly understood. Genetically engineered mouse models are an essential tool for uncovering the molecular and cellular basis of human diseases, including cancer, and serve a valuable role as preclinical models for testing targeted therapies. In this review, we summarize how such models have been successfully applied to the study of medulloblastoma over the past decade and what we might expect in the coming years.

  20. Potential of Microbubbles as Fat Replacer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rovers, T.A.M.; Sala, Guido; Linden, Van der Erik; Meinders, M.B.J.

    2016-01-01

    The potential of microbubbles as fat replacers and texture modifiers was assessed by comparison of the rheological and tribological properties of model food systems that contained (1) microbubbles, (2) emulsion droplets or (3) no added colloidal structures. We used (a) liquids with thickener, (b)

  1. Predictors of mortality after aortic valve replacement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjang, Yanto Sandy; van Hees, Yvonne; Koerfer, Reiner; Grobbee, Diederick E.; van der Heijden, Geert J. M. G.

    Aortic valve replacement (AVR) is recommended as a standard surgical procedure for aortic valve disease. Still the evidence for commonly claimed predictors of post-AVR prognosis, in particular mortality, appears scant. This systematic review reports on the evidence for predictors of post-AVR

  2. Is physiological glucocorticoid replacement important in children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, John; Blair, Joanne; Ross, Richard J

    2017-01-01

    Cortisol has a distinct circadian rhythm with low concentrations at night, rising in the early hours of the morning, peaking on waking and declining over the day to low concentrations in the evening. Loss of this circadian rhythm, as seen in jetlag and shift work, is associated with fatigue in the short term and diabetes and obesity in the medium to long term. Patients with adrenal insufficiency on current glucocorticoid replacement with hydrocortisone have unphysiological cortisol concentrations being low on waking and high after each dose of hydrocortisone. Patients with adrenal insufficiency complain of fatigue, a poor quality of life and there is evidence of poor health outcomes including obesity potentially related to glucocorticoid replacement. New technologies are being developed that deliver more physiological glucocorticoid replacement including hydrocortisone by subcutaneous pump, Plenadren, a once-daily modified-release hydrocortisone and Chronocort, a delayed and sustained absorption hydrocortisone formulation that replicates the overnight profile of cortisol. In this review, we summarise the evidence regarding physiological glucocorticoid replacement with a focus on relevance to paediatrics. PMID:27582458

  3. 25 CFR 700.53 - Dwelling, replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... § 700.55. (b) May include existing dwellings for resale, new construction, modular homes, mobile homes... person if, after he receives a replacement housing payment and any available housing assistance payments... supplemental income payments received from public agencies. If the person's monthly income pattern is...

  4. Prosthesis infections after orthopedic joint replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Zhijun; Borgwardt, Lotte; Høiby, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Prosthesis-related infection is a serious complication for patients after orthopedic joint replacement, which is currently difficult to treat with antibiotic therapy. Consequently, in most cases, removal of the infected prosthesis is the only solution to cure the infection. It is, therefore...

  5. Criteria for the replacement of restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, Nairn; Lynch, Christopher; Brunton, Paul Brunton

    2016-01-01

    The replacement of a restoration is one of the most common procedures in dentistry. However, the criteria for such intervention, excluding catastrophic failure and persistent discomfort and pain, continue to be the subject of considerable debate. The decision-making process remains subjective...

  6. Measure Guideline: Window Repair, Rehabilitation, and Replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, P.

    2012-12-01

    This measure guideline provides information and guidance on rehabilitating, retrofitting, and replacing existing window assemblies in residential construction. The intent is to provide information regarding means and methods to improve the energy and comfort performance of existing wood window assemblies in a way that takes into consideration component durability, in-service operation, and long term performance of the strategies.

  7. Segmental blood pressure after total hip replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebuhr, Peter Henrik; Soelberg, M; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1992-01-01

    Twenty-nine patients due to have a total hip replacement had their systemic systolic and segmental blood pressures measured prior to operation and 1 and 6 weeks postoperatively. No patients had signs of ischemia. The segmental blood pressure was measured at the ankle and at the toes. A significant...

  8. Method of replacing corrupted audio data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stemerdink, J.; Meijerink, Arjan

    2006-01-01

    A decoding method for coded data representing original data. Corrupted data is detected and replaced with buffered data. The buffered data is stored in the buffer a time interval corresponding to an estimated periodicity or an integer multiple thereof before the corrupted data was received. The esti

  9. Analogue Assessment of the Replacement Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipani, Ennio

    2008-01-01

    The use of experimental analyses in determining behavioral function for problems behaviors is well established. Such analyses lead to functional treatment prescriptions for the target problem behavior. However, data indicative of the strength of the replacement behavior are often not collected during a functional behavioral assessment. I examine…

  10. Hormone replacement therapy and risk of glioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lene; Friis, Søren; Hallas, Jesper;

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Several studies indicate that use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is associated with an increased risk of intracranial meningioma, while associations between HRT use and risk of other brain tumors have been less explored. We investigated the influence of HRT use on the risk of glioma...

  11. Aggression Replacement Training and Childhood Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amendola, A. Mark; Oliver, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    Aggression Replacement Training (ART) was developed by the late Arnold Goldstein of Syracuse University to teach positive alternatives to children and youth with emotional and behavioral problems (Glick & Gibbs, 2011; Goldstein, Glick, & Gibbs, 1998). ART provides cognitive, affective, and behavioral interventions to build competence in…

  12. Probability Issues in without Replacement Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joarder, A. H.; Al-Sabah, W. S.

    2007-01-01

    Sampling without replacement is an important aspect in teaching conditional probabilities in elementary statistics courses. Different methods proposed in different texts for calculating probabilities of events in this context are reviewed and their relative merits and limitations in applications are pinpointed. An alternative representation of…

  13. [Acute renal replacement therapy in pediatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillot, T; Ozanne, B; Bétrémieux, P; Tirel, O; Ecoffey, C

    2013-12-01

    In pediatric intensive care unit, the available modalities of acute renal replacement therapy include intermittent hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis and continuous renal replacement therapies. No prospective studies have evaluated to date the effect of dialysis modality on the outcomes of children. The decision about dialysis modality should therefore be based on local expertise, resources available, and the patient's clinical status. Poor hemodynamic tolerance of intermittent hemodialysis is a common problem in critically ill patients. Moreover, many pediatric intensive care units are not equipped with dedicated water circuit. Peritoneal dialysis, a simple and inexpensive alternative, is the most widely available form of acute renal replacement therapy. However, its efficacy may be limited in critically ill patients. The use of continuous renal replacement therapy permits usually to reach a greater estimated dialysis dose, a better control of fluid balance, and additionally, to provide adequate nutrition. Copyright © 2013 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Revision Total Hip Replacement: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Hafizur Rahman

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Total hip replacement is a reconstructive procedure that has improved the management of those diseases of the hip joint that have responded poorly to conventional medical therapy. Conventional, primary total hip replacement is a durable operation in the majority of patients. A hip replacement is a mechanical device with parts that are assembled before and during the operation. But the possible complications of total hip arthroplasty, and its clinical performance over time, is a challenging occasion to the surgeons, and such a challenge we faced with our presenting patient. A 68 year old lady with history of cemented bipolar hemiarthroplasty done in a tertiary care hospital, due to fracture neck of the left femur having the history of diabetes, chronic kidney disease, heart disease, anaemia, and mental disorders presented with loosened prosthesis, thinning of medial proximal cortex of the femur which had broken within few months after surgery. She complained of painful walking at left hip joint. There was also evidence of chronic infective and degenerative arthritis of acetabular component of the affected hip joint. Cemented revision total hip replacement surgery was performed with expert multidisciplinary involvement. On 2nd postoperative day the patient was allowed to walk on operated limb with the aid of walker. On 12th postoperative day all the stitches were removed and wound was found healthy.

  15. [Hormone replacement therapy: curse or blessing?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, M; Fink, D; Lang, U; Kimmig, R

    2006-01-01

    There is a controversial discussion on the risks and benefits of hormonal replacement therapy (HRT), and many women and doctors have revised their opinions of HRT over the last few years. Complementary and alternative therapies can be considered an option to treat menopausal symptoms. The following issue summarizes the actual knowledge of treatment options of menopausal symptoms.

  16. Enzyme replacement therapy for alpha-mannosidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgwardt, Line Gutte; Dali, Christine I.; Fogh, J

    2013-01-01

    Alpha-mannosidosis (OMIM 248500) is a rare lysosomal storage disease (LSD) caused by alpha-mannosidase deficiency. Manifestations include intellectual disabilities, facial characteristics and hearing impairment. A recombinant human alpha-mannosidase (rhLAMAN) has been developed for weekly intrave...... intravenous enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). We present the preliminary data after 12 months of treatment....

  17. Evaluation of OPEN zinc finger nucleases for direct gene targeting of the ROSA26 locus in mouse embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Hermann

    Full Text Available Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs enable precise genome modification in a variety of organisms and cell types. Commercial ZFNs were reported to enhance gene targeting directly in mouse zygotes, whereas similar approaches using publicly available resources have not yet been described. Here we report precise targeted mutagenesis of the mouse genome using Oligomerized Pool Engineering (OPEN ZFNs. OPEN ZFN can be constructed using publicly available resources and therefore provide an attractive alternative for academic researchers. Two ZFN pairs specific to the mouse genomic locus gt(ROSA26Sor were generated by OPEN selections and used for gene disruption and homology-mediated gene replacement in single cell mouse embryos. One specific ZFN pair facilitated non-homologous end joining (NHEJ-mediated gene disruption when expressed in mouse zygotes. We also observed a single homologous recombination (HR-driven gene replacement event when this ZFN pair was co-injected with a targeting vector. Our experiments demonstrate the feasibility of achieving both gene ablation through NHEJ and gene replacement by HR by using the OPEN ZFN technology directly in mouse zygotes.

  18. Influence of Total Knee Arthroplasty on Gait Mechanics of the Replaced and Non-Replaced Limb During Stair Negotiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standifird, Tyler W; Saxton, Arnold M; Coe, Dawn P; Cates, Harold E; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A; Zhang, Songning

    2016-01-01

    This study compared biomechanics during stair ascent in replaced and non-replaced limbs of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) patients with control limbs of healthy participants. Thirteen TKA patients and fifteen controls performed stair ascent. Replaced and non-replaced knees of TKA patients were less flexed at contact compared to controls. The loading response peak knee extension moment was greater in control and non-replaced knees compared with replaced. The push-off peak knee abduction moment was elevated in replaced limbs compared to controls. Loading and push-off peak hip abduction moments were greater in replaced limbs compared to controls. The push-off peak hip abduction moment was greater in non-replaced limbs compared to controls. Future rehabilitation protocols should consider the replaced knee and also the non-replaced knee and surrounding joints.

  19. Burn mouse models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calum, Henrik; Høiby, Niels; Moser, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Severe thermal injury induces immunosuppression, involving all parts of the immune system, especially when large fractions of the total body surface area are affected. An animal model was established to characterize the burn-induced immunosuppression. In our novel mouse model a 6 % third-degree b......Severe thermal injury induces immunosuppression, involving all parts of the immune system, especially when large fractions of the total body surface area are affected. An animal model was established to characterize the burn-induced immunosuppression. In our novel mouse model a 6 % third......-degree burn injury was induced with a hot-air blower. The third-degree burn was confirmed histologically. At 48 h, a decline in the concentration of peripheral blood leucocytes was observed in the group of mice with burn wound. The reduction was ascribed to the decline in concentration of polymorphonuclear...... neutrophil leucocytes and monocytes. When infecting the skin with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a dissemination of bacteria was observed only in the burn wound group. Histological characterization of the skin showed an increased polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes dominated inflammation in the group of mice...

  20. 25 CFR 700.183 - Determination of replacement housing benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Determination of replacement housing benefit. 700.183... RELOCATION PROCEDURES Replacement Housing Payments § 700.183 Determination of replacement housing benefit. (a) Amount of benefit. The replacement housing benefit for a certified eligible head-of-household is...

  1. Gankyrin expression during mouse embryogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦建民; 刘淑琴; 曾锦章; 李慎菁; 付晓勇; 邱秀华; 吴孟超; 王红阳

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To observe the gene expression of Gankyrin during mouse embryogenesis and reveal the gene biological significance during organs and tissues formation. Methods: The expressions of Gankyrin mRNA in various organs and tissues were detected by in situ hybridization at indicated times during embryogenesis. Results: The expression of Gankyrin mRNA in mouse day 12.5 embryo was mainly in midbrain, interbrain and endbrain; in mouse day 14.5 embryo mainly in midbrain, aorta, liver, gonad, cranium and rib; in mouse day 16.5 embryo mainly in cranium, rib and vertebra;and in mouse day 18.5 embryo mainly in cranium, rib and intestinal mucosa. Conclusion: Gankyrin gene probably participates in the development of the neural tissues (such as midbrain, interbrain and endbrain etc. ), aorta, liver and gonad, intestinal mucosa and bone tissues, which may be closely associated with the function of the organs and tissues.

  2. Effects of replacing lactose from milk replacer by glucose, fructose, or glycerol on energy partitioning in veal calves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilbert, M. S.; Pantophlet, A. J.; van den Borne, J. J. G. C.; Hendriks, W. H.; Schols, H. A.; Gerrits, W. J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Calf milk replacers contain 40 to 50% lactose. Fluctuating dairy prices are a major economic incentive to replace lactose from milk replacers by alternative energy sources. Our objective was, therefore, to determine the effects of replacement of lactose with glucose, fructose, or glycerol on energy

  3. Effects of replacing lactose from milk replacer by glucose, fructose, or glycerol on energy partitioning in veal calves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilbert, M.S.; Pantophlet, A.J.; Borne, van den J.J.G.C.; Hendriks, W.H.; Schols, H.A.; Gerrits, W.J.J.

    2016-01-01

    Calf milk replacers contain 40 to 50% lactose. Fluctuating dairy prices are a major economic incentive to replace lactose from milk replacers by alternative energy sources. Our objective was, therefore, to determine the effects of replacement of lactose with glucose, fructose, or glycerol on

  4. Effects of replacing lactose from milk replacer by glucose, fructose, or glycerol on energy partitioning in veal calves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilbert, M. S.; Pantophlet, A. J.; van den Borne, J. J. G. C.; Hendriks, W. H.; Schols, H. A.; Gerrits, W. J. J.

    Calf milk replacers contain 40 to 50% lactose. Fluctuating dairy prices are a major economic incentive to replace lactose from milk replacers by alternative energy sources. Our objective was, therefore, to determine the effects of replacement of lactose with glucose, fructose, or glycerol on energy

  5. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement in elderly patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dimytri Siqueira; Alexandre Abizaid; Magaly Arrais J.; Eduardo Sousa

    2012-01-01

    Aortic stenosis is the most common native valve disease, affecting up to 5% of the elderly population. Surgical aortic valve replacement reduces symptoms and improves survival, and is the definitive therapy in patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis. However, despite the good results of classic surgery, risk is markedly increased in elderly patients with co-morbidities. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) allows implantation of a prosthetic heart valve within the diseased native aortic valve without the need for open heart surgery and cardiopulmonary bypass, offering a new therapeutic option to elderly patients considered at high surgical risk or with contraindications to surgery. To date, several multicenter registries and a randomized trial have confirmed the safety and efficacy of TAVR in those patients. In this chapter, we review the background and clinical applications of TAVR in elderly patients.

  6. Mitochondrial replacement therapy in reproductive medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Don P; Mitalipov, Nargiz; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat

    2015-02-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is implicated in disease and age-related infertility. Mitochondrial replacement therapies (MRT) in oocytes or zygotes, such as pronuclear (PNT), spindle (ST), or polar body (PBT) transfer, could prevent second-generation transmission of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) defects. PNT, associated with high levels of mtDNA carryover in mice but low levels in human embryos, carries ethical issues secondary to donor embryo destruction. ST, developed in primates, supports normal development to adults and low mtDNA carryover. PBT in mice, coupled with PN or ST, may increase the yield of reconstructed embryos with low mtDNA carryover. MRT also offers replacement of the deficient cytoplasm in oocytes from older patients, with the expectation of high pregnancy rates following in vitro fertilization.

  7. Nicotine replacement therapies: patient safety and persistence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferguson SG

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Stuart G Ferguson1,2, Saul Shiffman3,4, Joseph G Gitchell51School of Pharmacy, 2Menzies Research Institute Tasmania, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Australia; 3Pinney Associates, 4University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 5Pinney Associates, Bethesda, MD, USAAbstract: Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT has become a central part of the treatment of nicotine dependence. However, NRT’s potential efficacy is limited to some extent by patient adherence and persistence. Here we review the relationship between NRT compliance and adherence, and overall treatment outcome. We then examine the factors that likely impact on treatment compliance and persistence, with a special focus on users’ perceptions of treatment safety and efficacy as possible mediators. Potential clinical strategies for improving suboptimal medication use are also discussed.Keywords: nicotine replacement therapy, compliance, safety

  8. Replacements For Ozone-Depleting Foaming Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blevins, Elana; Sharpe, Jon B.

    1995-01-01

    Fluorinated ethers used in place of chlorofluorocarbons and hydrochlorofluorocarbons. Replacement necessary because CFC's and HCFC's found to contribute to depletion of ozone from upper atmosphere, and manufacture and use of them by law phased out in near future. Two fluorinated ethers do not have ozone-depletion potential and used in existing foam-producing equipment, designed to handle liquid blowing agents soluble in chemical ingredients that mixed to make foam. Any polyurethane-based foams and several cellular plastics blown with these fluorinated ethers used in processes as diverse as small batch pours, large sprays, or double-band lamination to make insulation for private homes, commercial buildings, shipping containers, and storage tanks. Fluorinated ethers proved useful as replacements for CFC refrigerants and solvents.

  9. The pure relationship and below replacement fertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Hall

    2003-12-01

    interest from demographers. Despite the fact that researchers have extensively modeled recent demographic changes such as skyrocketing divorce rates, rising common-law union formation, delayed childbearing, and the decline to belowreplacement fertility levels, our understanding of the causes of these trends, and the possible connections between them remains theoretically fragmented and incomplete. The goal of this paper is to advance our understanding in this area by exploring the insights on modern family formation of prominent sociologist Anthony Giddens. Specifically, this study examines whether Giddens’ “pure relationship” concept can shed light on the trend toward very low fertility. The results of this inquiry suggest that couples in both marriages and common-law unions who conform to key aspects of Giddens pure relationship are more likely to have uncertain or below-replacement fertility intentions, and less likely to embrace above-replacement fertility goals.

  10. Autogenous Transplantation for Replacing a Hopeless Tooth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakershahrak, Mehrsa; Moshari, Amirabbas; Vatanpour, Mehdi; Khalilak, Zohreh; Jalali Ara, Afsoon

    2017-01-01

    Autogenous tooth transplantation (ATT) is a simple and reasonable choice for replacing the missing teeth when a proper donor tooth is available. This report presents a case of successful ATT of a maxillary right third molar for replacement of mandibular right second molar with a concomitant endodontic-periodontal disease. The mandibular second molar was believed to be hopeless due to a severe damage to coronal tooth structure, inappropriate root canal treatment and apical radiolucency. After extraction of mandibular second molar and maxillary third molar (the donor), the tooth was re-implanted into the extracted socket of second molar site. Root canal therapy was then performed. After 3 years, clinical and radiographic examinations revealed satisfying results, with no signs and symptoms. The patient is asymptomatic and the transplanted tooth is still functional with no signs of marginal periodontal pathosis. Radiographies showed bone regeneration in the site of previous extensive periapical lesion, normal periodontal ligament with no signs of root resorption. PMID:28179939

  11. Liver replacement for alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Charles W.; Porter, Kendrick A.; Peters, Robert L.; Ashcavai, Mary; Redeker, Allan G.; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    A 16-year-old girl with advanced cirrhosis and severe alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency of the homozygous PiZZ phenotype was treated by orthotopic liver transplantation. After replacement of the liver with a homograft from a donor with the normal PiMM phenotype, the alpha1-antitrypsin concentration in the recipient’s serum rose to normal; it had the PiMM phenotype. Two and a third years later, chronic rejection necessitated retransplantation. Insertion of a homograft from a heterozygous PiMZ donar was followed by the identification of that phenotype in the recipient’s serum. Neither liver graft developed the alpha1-antitrypsin glycoprotein deposits seen with the deficiency state. These observations confirm that this hepatic- based inborn error metabolism is metabolically cured by liver replacement. PMID:320694

  12. Current practice in primary total hip replacement: results from the National Hip Replacement Outcome Project

    OpenAIRE

    Best, A. J.; Fender, D.; Harper, W. M.; McCaskie, A. W.; Oliver, K; Gregg, P J

    1999-01-01

    As part of the National Study of Primary Hip Replacement Outcome, 402 consultant orthopaedic surgeons from three regions were contacted by postal questionnaire which covered all aspects of total hip replacement (THR). There was a 70% response rate of which 71 did not perform hip surgery, a further 33 refused to take part, leaving 181 valid responses. Preoperative assessment clinics were used by 89% of surgeons, but anaesthetists and rehabilitation services were rarely involved at this stage. ...

  13. Affective imagery and acceptance of replacing nuclear power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Carmen; Visschers, Vivianne; Siegrist, Michael

    2012-03-01

    This study examined the relationship between the content of spontaneous associations with nuclear power plants and the acceptance of using new-generation nuclear power plants to replace old ones. The study also considered gender as a variable. A representative sample of the German- and French-speaking population of Switzerland (N= 1,221) was used. Log-linear models revealed significant two-way interactions between the association content and acceptance, association content and gender, and gender and acceptance. Correspondence analysis revealed that participants who were opposed to nuclear power plants mainly associated nuclear power plants with risk, negative feelings, accidents, radioactivity, waste disposal, military use, and negative consequences for health and environment; whereas participants favoring nuclear power plants mainly associated them with energy, appearance descriptions of nuclear power plants, and necessity. Thus, individuals opposing nuclear power plants had both more concrete and more diverse associations with them than people who were in favor of nuclear power plants. In addition, participants who were undecided often mentioned similar associations to those participants who were in favor. Males more often expressed associations with energy, waste disposal, and negative health effects. Females more often made associations with appearance descriptions, negative feelings, and negative environmental effects. The results further suggest that acceptance of replacing nuclear power plants was higher in the German-speaking part of the country, where all of the Swiss nuclear power plants are physically located. Practical implications for risk communication are discussed.

  14. Demyelination determinants map to the spike glycoprotein gene of coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das Sarma, J; Fu, L; Tsai, J C; Weiss, S R; Lavi, E

    2000-10-01

    Demyelination is the pathologic hallmark of the human immune-mediated neurologic disease multiple sclerosis, which may be triggered or exacerbated by viral infections. Several experimental animal models have been developed to study the mechanism of virus-induced demyelination, including coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) infection in mice. The envelope spike (S) glycoprotein of MHV contains determinants of properties essential for virus-host interactions. However, the molecular determinants of MHV-induced demyelination are still unknown. To investigate the mechanism of MHV-induced demyelination, we examined whether the S gene of MHV contains determinants of demyelination and whether demyelination is linked to viral persistence. Using targeted RNA recombination, we replaced the S gene of a demyelinating virus (MHV-A59) with the S gene of a closely related, nondemyelinating virus (MHV-2). Recombinant viruses containing an S gene derived from MHV-2 in an MHV-A59 background (Penn98-1 and Penn98-2) exhibited a persistence-positive, demyelination-negative phenotype. Thus, determinants of demyelination map to the S gene of MHV. Furthermore, viral persistence is insufficient to induce demyelination, although it may be a prerequisite for the development of demyelination.

  15. High affinity mouse-human chimeric Fab against Hepatitis B surface antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Biplab Bose; Navin Khanna; Subrat K Acharya; Subrata Sinha

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Passive immunotherapy using antibody against hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) has been advocated in certain cases of Hepatitis B infection. We had earlier reported on the cloning and expression of a high affinity scFv derived from a mouse monoclonal (5S) against HBsAg. However this mouse antibody cannot be used for therapeutic purposes as it may elicit anti-mouse immune responses. Chimerization by replacing mouse constant domains with human ones can reduce the immunogenicity of this antibody.METHODS: We cloned the VH and VL genes of this mouse antibody; and fused them with CH1 domain of human IgG1 and CL domain of human kappa chain respectively. These chimeric genes were cloned into a phagemid vector. After initial screening using the phage display system, the chimeric Fab was expressed in soluble form in E. Coli.RESULTS: The chimeric Fab was purified from the bacterial periplasmic extract. We characterized the chimeric Fab using several in vitro techniques and it was observed that the chimeric molecule retained the high affinity and specificity of the original mouse monoclonal.This chimeric antibody fragment was further expressed in different strains of E> coli to increase the yield.CONCLUSION: We have generated a mouse-human chimeric Fab against HBsAg without any significant loss in binding and epitope specificity. This chimeric Fab fragment can be further modified to generate a fulllength chimeric antibody for therapeutic uses.

  16. Risks of testosterone replacement therapy in men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Charles Osterberg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Testosterone replacement therapy (TRT is a widely used treatment for men with symptomatic hypogonadism. The benefits seen with TRT, such as increased libido and energy level, beneficial effects on bone density, strength and muscle as well as cardioprotective effects, have been well-documented. TRT is contraindicated in men with untreated prostate and breast cancer. Men on TRT should be monitored for side-effects such as polycythemia, peripheral edema, cardiac and hepatic dysfunction.

  17. Alternatives to testosterone replacement: testosterone restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The European Male Aging Study has demonstrated that the hypogonadism of male aging is predominantly secondary. Theoretically with appropriate stimulation from the pituitary, the aging testis should be able to produce eugonadal levels of testosterone. The strategies for the treatment of late onset hypogonadism (LOH) have focused on replacement with exogenous testosterone versus restoration of endogenous production. The purpose of this article is to review existing peer-reviewed literature supporting the concept of restoration of endogenous testosterone in the treatment of LOH.

  18. Alternatives to testosterone replacement: testosterone restoration

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew McCullough

    2014-01-01

    The European Male Aging Study has demonstrated that the hypogonadism of male aging is predominantly secondary. Theoretically with appropriate stimulation from the pituitary, the aging testis should be able to produce eugonadal levels of testosterone. The strategies for the treatment of late onset hypogonadism (LOH) have focused on replacement with exogenous testosterone versus restoration of endogenous production. The purpose of this article is to review existing peer-reviewed literature supp...

  19. Current concepts in total femoral replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Ramanathan, Deepak; Siqueira, Marcelo BP; Klika, Alison K.; Higuera, Carlos A.; Barsoum, Wael K.; Joyce, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Total femoral replacement (TFR) is a salvage arthroplasty procedure used as an alternative to lower limb amputation. Since its initial description in the mid-20th century, this procedure has been used in a variety of oncologic and non-oncologic indications. The most compelling advantage of TFR is the achievement of immediate fixation which permits early mobilization. It is anticipated that TFR will be increasingly performed as the rate of revision arthroplasty rises worldwide. The existing li...

  20. Mitochondrial Replacement Therapy in Reproductive Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Wolf, Don P; Mitalipov, Nargiz; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is implicated in disease and in age-related infertility. Mitochondrial replacement therapies (MRT) in oocytes or zygotes such as pronuclear (PNT), spindle (ST) or polar body (PBT) transfer could prevent second generation transmission of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) defects. PNT, associated with high levels of mtDNA carryover in mice but low levels in human embryos, carries ethical issues secondary to donor embryo destruction. ST, developed in primates, supports normal d...

  1. Mineralogical correlation between primary and replacement dolomites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄志诚; 杨守业; 陈智娜

    1997-01-01

    Primary dolostones occur in the Upper Sinian Dengying Formation. Based on mineralogieal study the indicators for correlation between the primary dolomites which are not influenced by the diagenesis and the replacement dolomites of different periods have been obtained. It is shown that the primary dolomites are characterized by crystal forms precipitated and deposited directly from sea water, stable and homogeneous distribution of Mg and Ca, ideal chemical composition, regular modulated microstructures, low positive δ13C and low negative δ18O.

  2. Drug Dosing During Continuous Renal Replacement Therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, A. Jill

    2008-01-01

    Continuous renal replacement therapies (CRRT) are used to manage fluid overload and/or renal failure. The continuous nature of the fluid and solute removal has less impact on hemodynamic variables in critically ill patients, making CRRT preferred over intermittent hemodialysis for some patients in the intensive care arena. The impact of CRRT on drug removal is variable depending on the CRRT modality, the ultrafiltrate and dialysate flow rates, the filter, and the patient's residual renal func...

  3. Mouse anesthesia and analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Sean; Pacharinsak, Cholawat

    2015-03-02

    Providing anesthesia and analgesia for mouse subjects is a common and critical practice in the laboratory setting. These practices are necessary for performing invasive procedures, achieving prolonged immobility for sensitive imaging modalities (magnetic resonance imaging for instance), and providing intra- and post-procedural pain relief. In addition to facilitating the procedures performed by the investigator, the provision of anesthesia and analgesia is crucial for the preservation of animal welfare and for humane treatment of animals used in research. Furthermore, anesthesia and analgesia are important components of animal use protocols reviewed by Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees, requiring careful consideration and planning for the particular animal model. In this article, we provide technical outlines for the investigator covering the provision of anesthesia by two routes (injectable and inhalant), guidelines for monitoring anesthesia, current techniques for recognition of pain, and considerations for administering preventative analgesia. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  4. Transdermal testosterone replacement therapy in men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ullah MI

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available M Iftekhar Ullah,1 Daniel M Riche,1,2 Christian A Koch1,31Department of Medicine, University of Mississippi Medical Center, 2Department of Pharmacy Practice, The University of Mississippi, 3GV (Sonny Montgomery VA Medical Center, Jackson, MS, USAAbstract: Androgen deficiency syndrome in men is a frequently diagnosed condition associated with clinical symptoms including fatigue, decreased libido, erectile dysfunction, and metabolic syndrome. Serum testosterone concentrations decline steadily with age. The prevalence of androgen deficiency syndrome in men varies depending on the age group, known and unknown comorbidities, and the respective study group. Reported prevalence rates may be underestimated, as not every man with symptoms of androgen deficiency seeks treatment. Additionally, men reporting symptoms of androgen deficiency may not be correctly diagnosed due to the vagueness of the symptom quality. The treatment of androgen deficiency syndrome or male hypogonadism may sometimes be difficult due to various reasons. There is no consensus as to when to start treating a respective man or with regards to the best treatment option for an individual patient. There is also lack of familiarity with treatment options among general practitioners. The formulations currently available on the market are generally expensive and dose adjustment protocols for each differ. All these factors add to the complexity of testosterone replacement therapy. In this article we will discuss the general indications of transdermal testosterone replacement therapy, available formulations, dosage, application sites, and recommended titration schedule.Keywords: hypogonadism, transdermal, testosterone, sexual function, testosterone replacement therapy, estradiol

  5. The pure relationship and below replacement fertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hall, David R.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Of the many changes which have characterized the second demographic transition, shifts in fertility and union formation have attracted a great deal of interest from demographers. Despite the fact that researchers have extensively modeled recent demographic changes such as skyrocketing divorce rates, rising common-law union formation, delayed childbearing, and the decline to below-replacement fertility levels, our understanding of the causes of these trends, and the possible connections between them remains theoretically fragmented and incomplete. The goal of this paper is to advance our understanding in this area by exploring the insights on modern family formation of prominent sociologist Anthony Giddens. Specifically, this study examines whether Giddens' "pure relationship" concept can shed light on the trend toward very low fertility. The results of this inquiry suggest that couples in both marriages and common-law unions who conform to key aspects of Giddens pure relationship are morel likely to have uncertain or below-replacement fertility intentions, and less likely to embrace above-replacement fertility goals.

  6. Flow boiling test of GDP replacement coolants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S.H. [comp.

    1995-08-01

    The tests were part of the CFC replacement program to identify and test alternate coolants to replace CFC-114 being used in the uranium enrichment plants at Paducah and Portsmouth. The coolants tested, C{sub 4}F{sub 10} and C{sub 4}F{sub 8}, were selected based on their compatibility with the uranium hexafluoride process gas and how well the boiling temperature and vapor pressure matched that of CFC-114. However, the heat of vaporization of both coolants is lower than that of CFC-114 requiring larger coolant mass flow than CFC-114 to remove the same amount of heat. The vapor pressure of these coolants is higher than CFC-114 within the cascade operational range, and each coolant can be used as a replacement coolant with some limitation at 3,300 hp operation. The results of the CFC-114/C{sub 4}F{sub 10} mixture tests show boiling heat transfer coefficient degraded to a minimum value with about 25% C{sub 4}F{sub 10} weight mixture in CFC-114 and the degree of degradation is about 20% from that of CFC-114 boiling heat transfer coefficient. This report consists of the final reports from Cudo Technologies, Ltd.

  7. Retention Benefit Based Intelligent Cache Replacement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李凌达; 陆俊林; 程旭

    2014-01-01

    The performance loss resulting from different cache misses is variable in modern systems for two reasons: 1) memory access latency is not uniform, and 2) the latency toleration ability of processor cores varies across different misses. Compared with parallel misses and store misses, isolated fetch and load misses are more costly. The variation of cache miss penalty suggests that the cache replacement policy should take it into account. To that end, first, we propose the notion of retention benefit. Retention benefits can evaluate not only the increment of processor stall cycles on cache misses, but also the reduction of processor stall cycles due to cache hits. Then, we propose Retention Benefit Based Replacement (RBR) which aims to maximize the aggregate retention benefits of blocks reserved in the cache. RBR keeps track of the total retention benefit for each block in the cache, and it preferentially evicts the block with the minimum total retention benefit on replacement. The evaluation shows that RBR can improve cache performance significantly in both single-core and multi-core environment while requiring a low storage overhead. It also outperforms other state-of-the-art techniques.

  8. Experimental replacement of an obligate insect symbiont.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Nancy A; Yun, Yueli

    2015-02-17

    Symbiosis, the close association of unrelated organisms, has been pivotal in biological diversification. In the obligate symbioses found in many insect hosts, organisms that were once independent are permanently and intimately associated, resulting in expanded ecological capabilities. The primary model for this kind of symbiosis is the association between the bacterium Buchnera and the pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum). A longstanding obstacle to efforts to illuminate genetic changes underlying obligate symbioses has been the inability to experimentally disrupt and reconstitute symbiont-host partnerships. Our experiments show that Buchnera can be experimentally transferred between aphid matrilines and, furthermore, that Buchnera replacement has a massive effect on host fitness. Using a recipient pea aphid matriline containing Buchnera that are heat sensitive because of an allele eliminating the heat shock response of a small chaperone, we reduced native Buchnera through heat exposure and introduced a genetically distinct Buchnera from another matriline, achieving complete replacement and stable inheritance. This transfer disrupted 100 million years (∼ 1 billion generations) of continuous maternal transmission of Buchnera in its host aphids. Furthermore, aphids with the Buchnera replacement enjoyed a dramatic increase in heat tolerance, directly demonstrating a strong effect of symbiont genotype on host ecology.

  9. MouseCyc: a curated biochemical pathways database for the laboratory mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Evsikov, Alexei V.; Dolan, Mary E.; Genrich, Michael P; Patek, Emily; Bult, Carol J.

    2009-01-01

    Linking biochemical genetic data to the reference genome for the laboratory mouse is important for comparative physiology and for developing mouse models of human biology and disease. We describe here a new database of curated metabolic pathways for the laboratory mouse called MouseCyc . MouseCyc has been integrated with genetic and genomic data for the laboratory mouse available from the Mouse Genome Informatics database and with pathway data from other organisms, including human.

  10. Whole mouse cryo-imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David; Roy, Debashish; Steyer, Grant; Gargesha, Madhusudhana; Stone, Meredith; McKinley, Eliot

    2008-03-01

    The Case cryo-imaging system is a section and image system which allows one to acquire micron-scale, information rich, whole mouse color bright field and molecular fluorescence images of an entire mouse. Cryo-imaging is used in a variety of applications, including mouse and embryo anatomical phenotyping, drug delivery, imaging agents, metastastic cancer, stem cells, and very high resolution vascular imaging, among many. Cryo-imaging fills the gap between whole animal in vivo imaging and histology, allowing one to image a mouse along the continuum from the mouse -> organ -> tissue structure -> cell -> sub-cellular domains. In this overview, we describe the technology and a variety of exciting applications. Enhancements to the system now enable tiled acquisition of high resolution images to cover an entire mouse. High resolution fluorescence imaging, aided by a novel subtraction processing algorithm to remove sub-surface fluorescence, makes it possible to detect fluorescently-labeled single cells. Multi-modality experiments in Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Cryo-imaging of a whole mouse demonstrate superior resolution of cryo-images and efficiency of registration techniques. The 3D results demonstrate the novel true-color volume visualization tools we have developed and the inherent advantage of cryo-imaging in providing unlimited depth of field and spatial resolution. The recent results continue to demonstrate the value cryo-imaging provides in the field of small animal imaging research.

  11. Hormone Replacement Therapy, Iron, and Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-01

    pH ( TRIZMA ®, pH 8.1). Ferrous ions added to the serum bind specifically to transferrin at unsaturated iron-binding sites and then the remaining...mouse antibody (Cell Signaling, Beverly, MA), cell lysis M-Per buffer (Pierce, Rockford, IL), PrempoTM 0.625mg/2.5 mg tablet containing 0.625 mg...rubber policeman, lysed with M-Per lysis buffer (Pierce). Cell lysates (30 µg protein) were subjected to 12% SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and

  12. mNos2 deletion and human NOS2 replacement in Alzheimer disease models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colton, Carol A; Wilson, Joan G; Everhart, Angela; Wilcock, Donna M; Puoliväli, Jukka; Heikkinen, Taneli; Oksman, Juho; Jääskeläinen, Olli; Lehtimäki, Kimmo; Laitinen, Teemu; Vartiainen, Nina; Vitek, Michael P

    2014-08-01

    Understanding the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying Alzheimer disease relies on knowledge of disease onset and the sequence of development of brain pathologies. We present a comprehensive analysis of early and progressive changes in a mouse model that demonstrates a full spectrum of characteristic Alzheimer disease-like pathologies. This model demonstrates an altered immune redox state reminiscent of the human disease and capitalizes on data indicating critical differences between human and mouse immune responses, particularly in nitric oxide levels produced by immune activation of the NOS2 gene. Using the APPSwDI(+)/(+)mNos2(-/-) (CVN-AD) mouse strain, we show a sequence of pathologic events leading to neurodegeneration,which include pathologically hyperphosphorylated tau in the perforant pathway at 6 weeks of age progressing to insoluble tau, early appearance of β-amyloid peptides in perivascular deposits around blood vessels in brain regions known to be vulnerable to Alzheimer disease, and progression to damage and overt loss in select vulnerable neuronal populations in these regions. The role of species differences between hNOS2 and mNos2 was supported by generating mice in which the human NOS2 gene replaced mNos2. When crossed with CVN-AD mice, pathologic characteristics of this new strain (APPSwDI(+)/(-)/HuNOS2(tg+)/(+)/mNos2(-/-)) mimicked the pathologic phenotypes found in the CVN-AD strain.

  13. Cyclosporin promotes neurorestoration and cell replacement therapy in pre-clinical models of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburrino, Anna; Churchill, Madeline J; Wan, Oi W; Colino-Sanguino, Yolanda; Ippolito, Rossana; Bergstrand, Sofie; Wolf, Daniel A; Herz, Niculin J; Sconce, Michelle D; Björklund, Anders; Meshul, Charles K; Decressac, Mickael

    2015-12-14

    The early clinical trials using fetal ventral mesencephalic (VM) allografts in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients have shown efficacy (albeit not in all cases) and have paved the way for further development of cell replacement therapy strategies in PD. The preclinical work that led to these clinical trials used allografts of fetal VM tissue placed into 6-OHDA lesioned rats, while the patients received similar allografts under cover of immunosuppression in an α-synuclein disease state. Thus developing models that more faithfully replicate the clinical scenario would be a useful tool for the translation of such cell-based therapies to the clinic. Here, we show that while providing functional recovery, transplantation of fetal dopamine neurons into the AAV-α-synuclein rat model of PD resulted in smaller-sized grafts as compared to similar grafts placed into the 6-OHDA-lesioned striatum. Additionally, we found that cyclosporin treatment was able to promote the survival of the transplanted cells in this allografted state and surprisingly also provided therapeutic benefit in sham-operated animals. We demonstrated that delayed cyclosporin treatment afforded neurorestoration in three complementary models of PD including the Thy1-α-synuclein transgenic mouse, a novel AAV-α-synuclein mouse model, and the MPTP mouse model. We then explored the mechanisms for this benefit of cyclosporin and found it was mediated by both cell-autonomous mechanisms and non-cell autonomous mechanisms. This study provides compelling evidence in favor for the use of immunosuppression in all grafted PD patients receiving cell replacement therapy, regardless of the immunological mismatch between donor and host cells, and also suggests that cyclosporine treatment itself may act as a disease-modifying therapy in all PD patients.

  14. Human mammary microenvironment better regulates the biology of human breast cancer in humanized mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ming-Jie; Wang, Jue; Xu, Lu; Zha, Xiao-Ming; Zhao, Yi; Ling, Li-Jun; Wang, Shui

    2015-02-01

    During the past decades, many efforts have been made in mimicking the clinical progress of human cancer in mouse models. Previously, we developed a human breast tissue-derived (HB) mouse model. Theoretically, it may mimic the interactions between "species-specific" mammary microenvironment of human origin and human breast cancer cells. However, detailed evidences are absent. The present study (in vivo, cellular, and molecular experiments) was designed to explore the regulatory role of human mammary microenvironment in the progress of human breast cancer cells. Subcutaneous (SUB), mammary fat pad (MFP), and HB mouse models were developed for in vivo comparisons. Then, the orthotopic tumor masses from three different mouse models were collected for primary culture. Finally, the biology of primary cultured human breast cancer cells was compared by cellular and molecular experiments. Results of in vivo mouse models indicated that human breast cancer cells grew better in human mammary microenvironment. Cellular and molecular experiments confirmed that primary cultured human breast cancer cells from HB mouse model showed a better proliferative and anti-apoptotic biology than those from SUB to MFP mouse models. Meanwhile, primary cultured human breast cancer cells from HB mouse model also obtained the migratory and invasive biology for "species-specific" tissue metastasis to human tissues. Comprehensive analyses suggest that "species-specific" mammary microenvironment of human origin better regulates the biology of human breast cancer cells in our humanized mouse model of breast cancer, which is more consistent with the clinical progress of human breast cancer.

  15. Failure of the cultivated mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) to induce tumors in the A/J mouse lung tumor model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Kirsten; Kristiansen, E.; Meyer, Otto A.

    1997-01-01

    We studied whether the cultivated mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) or 4-(carboxy)phenylhydrazine (CP) induce lung adenomas in the A/J mouse lung tumor model. For 26 weeks female mice were fed a semisynthetic diet where 11 or 22% of the diet was replaced by freeze-dried mushrooms. The intake...

  16. Experimental replacement of aragonite by hydroxyapatite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasioptas, A.; Perdikouri, C.; Geisler, T.; Putnis, A.

    2009-04-01

    Hydrothermal treatment of aragonite with (NH4)2HPO4 solution has been shown to produce hydroxyapatite (HAP) with an overall identical and thus pre-determined morphology (Kasioptas et al, 2008). The preservation of the morphology is an outcome of the pseudomorphic nature of this particular reaction. We have investigated the mechanism of the replacement of aragonite by HAP using single, natural, inorganic aragonite crystals. Isothermal experiments were carried out with small crystals placed and sealed in autoclaves with (NH4)2HPO4 solution. After the experiments the aragonite crystals are partly replaced by a new phase. X-ray powder diffraction confirmed that the product phase is indeed HAP; however electron microprobe measurements revealed that the HAP is probably non-stoichiometric. Even when completely converted to HAP, scanning electron microscopy showed that the fine-structure of the aragonite has perfectly been retained. It was also observed that the HAP product phase exhibited a high porosity and was separated from the aragonite parent phase by a sharp interface (on the micrometer scale). The replacement of aragonite by HAP in an aqueous solution can be described in terms of a coupled dissolution-reprecipitation mechanism that takes place at an inward moving reaction front (Putnis& Putnis, 2007). The porosity in the HAP product phase allows the solution to reach the reaction interface. In addition, we have performed experiments with (NH4)2HPO4 solutions prepared with H2O enriched with 97 at.% 18O. The solutions were pre-heated separately to equilibrate the oxygen isotopes in the solution. Raman spectroscopy of the HAP product was used to identify the different vibration modes in the PO43-molecule due to the exchange of 16O with 18O atoms. Apart from the main ?1(PO4) band located near 962 cm-1, we observed four new bands near 945, 931, 919 and 908 cm-1. We have attributed the generation of these new bands to four different degrees of 18O atomic substitutions in

  17. Lower limb joint replacement in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clement Nicholas D

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction There is limited literature regarding the peri-operative and surgical management of patients with rheumatoid disease undergoing lower limb arthroplasty. This review article summarises factors involved in the peri-operative management of major lower limb arthroplasty surgery for patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Methods We performed a search of the medical literature, using the PubMed search engine (http://www.pubmed.gov. We used the following terms: ‘rheumatoid’ ‘replacement’ ‘arthroplasty’ and ‘outcome’. Findings The patient should be optimised pre-operatively using a multidisciplinary approach. The continued use of methotrexate does not increase infection risk, and aids recovery. Biologic agents should be stopped pre-operatively due the increased infection rate. Patients should be made aware of the increased risk of infection and periprosthetic fracture rates associated with their disease. The surgical sequence is commonly hip, knee and then ankle. Cemented total hip replacement (THR and total knee replacement (TKR have superior survival rates over uncemented components. The evidence is not clear regarding a cruciate sacrificing versus retaining in TKR, but a cruciate sacrificing component limits the risk early instability and potential revision. Patella resurfacing as part of a TKR is associated with improved outcomes. The results of total ankle replacement remain inferior to THR and TKR. RA patients achieve equivalent pain relief, but their rehabilitation is slower and their functional outcome is not as good. However, the key to managing these complicated patients is to work as part of a multidisciplinary team to optimise their outcome.

  18. Mactaquac intake tendons removal and replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, I. [NB Power Generation Corp., Mactaquac Generating Station, Keswick Ridge, NB (Canada); Mee, A. [Hatch Energy, Niagara Falls, ON (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    In 1988 and 1989, multi-strand tendons were installed in the intake structure of the Mactaquac generating station. In order to control displacements caused by alkali aggregate reaction (AAR), they were installed in preparation for a slot cutting program in the intake structure to guard against the possibility of a sliding failure of a section of the structure along a plane coincident with the bottom of the water passage. Unique problems for the designers were present in the expansion affect of AAR that were compounded by field conditions that resulted in further difficulties. For example, concrete expansion required the installation of a thick shim pack under the upper anchor head and the periodic testing of the tendons. Once tested, shims could be gradually removed to maintain the correct load over the life of the tendon. However, during the first round of testing and de-stressing five years after the original installation, it was found that some of the tendons had already failed. Over half of the tendons have been replaced in the 20 years since the installation. This paper discussed the original design considerations and examined the conditions that contributed to the premature failure of the tendons. It outlined the history of tendon testing procedures, tendon failure modes and tendon replacement methods. Specifically, the paper discussed the remedial techniques that were employed and the iterations that lead to the current repair approach, while considering the unique field conditions. The application of various corrosion protection schemes and installation and testing methodologies were discussed. It was concluded that tendons were successfully installed in numerous concrete dams around the world but have needed replacement for a variety of reasons. 1 ref., 10 figs.

  19. Mouse models for cancer research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Lynette Moore; Ping Ji

    2011-01-01

    Mouse models of cancer enable researchers to leamn about tumor biology in complicated and dynamic physiological systems. Since the development of gene targeting in mice, cancer biologists have been among the most frequent users of transgenic mouse models, which have dramatically increased knowledge about how cancers form and grow. The Chinese Joumnal of Cancer will publish a series of papers reporting the use of mouse models in studying genetic events in cancer cases. This editorial is an overview of the development and applications of mouse models of cancer and directs the reader to upcoming papers describing the use of these models to be published in coming issues, beginning with three articles in the current issue.

  20. Computer Workstation: Pointer/Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safety and Health Program Recommendations It's the Law Poster REGULATIONS Law and Regulations Standard Interpretations Training Requirements ... when evaluating your computer workstation. Pointer Placement Pointer Size, Shape, and Settings Pointer/Mouse Quick Tips Keep ...

  1. Alternatives to testosterone replacement: testosterone restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew McCullough

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The European Male Aging Study has demonstrated that the hypogonadism of male aging is predominantly secondary. Theoretically with appropriate stimulation from the pituitary, the aging testis should be able to produce eugonadal levels of testosterone. The strategies for the treatment of late onset hypogonadism (LOH have focused on replacement with exogenous testosterone versus restoration of endogenous production. The purpose of this article is to review existing peer-reviewed literature supporting the concept of restoration of endogenous testosterone in the treatment of LOH.

  2. Sex hormone replacement in Turner syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trolle, Christian; Hjerrild, Britta; Cleemann, Line Hartvig

    2012-01-01

    osteoporosis seen in Turner syndrome. But sex hormone insufficiency is also involved in the increased cardiovascular risk, state of physical fitness, insulin resistance, body composition, and may play a role in the increased incidence of autoimmunity. Severe morbidity and mortality affects females with Turner...... syndrome. Recent research emphasizes the need for proper sex hormone replacement therapy (HRT) during the entire lifespan of females with TS and new hypotheses concerning estrogen receptors, genetics and the timing of HRT offers valuable new information. In this review, we will discuss the effects...

  3. Immunoglobulin Replacement Therapy for Primary Immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriaroon, Panida; Ballow, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Immunoglobulin replacement therapy has been standard treatment in patients with primary immunodeficiency diseases for the past 3 decades. The goal of therapy is to reduce serious bacterial infections in individuals with antibody function defects. Approximately one-third of patients receiving intravenous immunoglobulin treatment experience adverse reactions. Recent advances in manufacturing processes have resulted in products that are safer and better tolerated. Self-infusion by the subcutaneous route has become popular and resulted in better quality of life. This review summarizes the use of immunoglobulin therapy in primary immunodeficiency diseases including its properties, dosing, adverse effects, and different routes of administration.

  4. Segmental blood pressure after total hip replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebuhr, Peter Henrik; Soelberg, M; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1992-01-01

    Twenty-nine patients due to have a total hip replacement had their systemic systolic and segmental blood pressures measured prior to operation and 1 and 6 weeks postoperatively. No patients had signs of ischemia. The segmental blood pressure was measured at the ankle and at the toes. A significant...... drop was found in all pressures 1 week postoperatively. The decrease followed the systemic pressure and was restored to normal after 6 weeks. In a group of six patients with preoperatively decreased ankle pressure, a significant transient further decrease in the ankle-toe gradient pressure was found...

  5. To learn more about BHT replacement

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Following the article 'An improved financial tool to replace BHT' which appeared in Bulletin No 41/2002, dates of 4 general presentations were published. Please note that the time of the first presentation has changed from 16.00 hrs to 14.00 hrs. The dates/times are now as follows: Wednesday 16 October 14.00 hrs* IT Auditorium (English) *note change of time. Friday 18 October 16.00 hrs, SL Auditorium (French) Monday 21 October 10.00 hrs, LHC Auditorium (French) Wednesday 23 October 10.00 hrs, Council Chamber (English)

  6. Trials and Tribulations with VH Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Wenzhao; Jayaraman, Sahana; Zhang, Bochao; Schwartz, Gregory W; Daber, Robert D; Hershberg, Uri; Garfall, Alfred L; Carlson, Christopher S; Luning Prak, Eline T

    2014-01-01

    VH replacement (VHR) is a type of antibody gene rearrangement in which an upstream heavy chain variable gene segment (VH) invades a pre-existing rearrangement (VDJ). In this Hypothesis and Theory article, we begin by reviewing the mechanism of VHR, its developmental timing and its potential biological consequences. Then we explore the hypothesis that specific sequence motifs called footprints reflect VHR versus other processes. We provide a compilation of footprint sequences from different regions of the antibody heavy chain, and include data from the literature and from a high throughput sequencing experiment to evaluate the significance of footprint sequences. We conclude by discussing the difficulties of attributing footprints to VHR.

  7. Infective endocarditis following transcatheter aortic valve replacement-

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loh, Poay Huan; Bundgaard, Henning; S�ndergaard, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) can improve the symptoms and prognosis of patients with severe aortic stenosis who, due to a high expected operative risk, would not have otherwise been treated surgically. If these patients develop prosthetic valve endocarditis, their presentations may...... be atypical causing a delay in the diagnosis and treatment. The management is also complicated by their comorbidities, and surgical treatment may not be feasible leading to a significant morbidity and mortality. We describe a case of an 85-year-old man with TAVI prosthetic valve endocarditis successfully...

  8. Aortic Annular Enlargement during Aortic Valve Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selman Dumani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the surgery of aortic valve replacement is always attempted, as much as possible, to implant the larger prosthesis with the mains goals to enhance the potential benefits, to minimise transvalvular gradient, decrease left ventricular size and avoid the phenomenon of patient-prosthesis mismatch. Implantation of an ideal prosthesis often it is not possible, due to a small aortic annulus. A variety of aortic annulus enlargement techniques is reported to avoid patient-prosthesis mismatch. We present the case that has submitted four three times open heart surgery. We used Manouguian technique to enlarge aortic anulus with excellent results during the fourth time of surgery.

  9. Can electronic stability control replace studded tyres?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvik, Rune

    2015-12-01

    Based on recent studies, this paper examines whether an increased use of electronic stability control can replace studded tyres. A re-analysis of a study that evaluated the effects on accidents of changes in the use of studded tyres in major cities in Norway is presented. It is found that if all cars have electronic stability control, the use of studded tyres can be reduced to about 15 percent before any increase in the number of accidents occurs. Even if studded tyres were eliminated entirely, any increase in the number of accidents is likely to be considerably smaller than it would have been if electronic stability control had never been invented.

  10. Replacing the Beam Dump at the Booster

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The PS Booster Dump, designed in the 1960’s to cope with beam energies in the order of 800 MeV, has been dismantled and replaced with a new one, capable of withstanding the 2 GeV beam provided by the upcoming LINAC4 at CERN. This video shows the installation of that new dump core inside a one-metre diameter cavity, surrounded by five shielding rings made of concrete and steel. It is the culmination of months of preparation, an interdisciplinary work involving several teams from the Engineering, Beams and Technology Departments, as well as the collaboration and supervision of radio-protection experts.

  11. Replacing the Beam Dump at the Booster

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The PS Booster Dump, designed in the 1960’s to cope with beam energies in the order of 800 MeV, has been dismantled and replaced with a new one, capable of withstanding the 2 GeV beam provided by the upcoming LINAC4 at CERN. This video shows the installation of that new dump core inside a one-metre diameter cavity, surrounded by five shielding rings made of concrete and steel. It is the culmination of months of preparation, an interdisciplinary work involving several teams from the Engineering, Beams and Technology Departments, as well as the collaboration and supervision of radio-protection experts.

  12. Hand gestures mouse cursor control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian-Avram Vincze

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the implementation of a human-computer interface for controlling the mouse cursor. The test reveal the fact: a low-cost web camera some processing algorithms are quite enough to control the mouse cursor on computers. Even if the system is influenced by the illuminance level on the plane of the hand, the current study may represent a start point for some studies on the hand tracking and gesture recognition field.

  13. A provisional gene regulatory atlas for mouse heart development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailin Chen

    Full Text Available Congenital Heart Disease (CHD is one of the most common birth defects. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying normal cardiac development is an important step towards early identification of abnormalities during the developmental program and towards the creation of early intervention strategies. We developed a novel computational strategy for leveraging high-content data sets, including a large selection of microarray data associated with mouse cardiac development, mouse genome sequence, ChIP-seq data of selected mouse transcription factors and Y2H data of mouse protein-protein interactions, to infer the active transcriptional regulatory network of mouse cardiac development. We identified phase-specific expression activity for 765 overlapping gene co-expression modules that were defined for obtained cardiac lineage microarray data. For each co-expression module, we identified the phase of cardiac development where gene expression for that module was higher than other phases. Co-expression modules were found to be consistent with biological pathway knowledge in Wikipathways, and met expectations for enrichment of pathways involved in heart lineage development. Over 359,000 transcription factor-target relationships were inferred by analyzing the promoter sequences within each gene module for overrepresentation against the JASPAR database of Transcription Factor Binding Site (TFBS motifs. The provisional regulatory network will provide a framework of studying the genetic basis of CHD.

  14. The effect of fat replacers on batter and cake properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psimouli, Vassiliki; Oreopoulou, Vassiliki

    2013-10-01

    Fat was replaced at 35% to 100% in cakes by maltodextrin (dextrose equivalent = 3), inulin (high performance and granulated), oligofructose, citrus pectin, and microparticulated protein. Fat replacement by 35% did not induce significant differences in general. Above 65% fat replacement resulted in statistically significant (P < 0.05) decreased viscosity (except for pectin) that was followed by statistically significant decrease in air incorporation and broader bubble size distribution. The starch gelatinization temperature showed a statistically significant increase when fat was replaced by fructose oligosaccharides. The cakes presented statistically significant increase of hardness, elasticity, and decrease of volume development as fat replacement increased above 65%. Also cakes with increased fat replacement received lower scores on taste and flavor, whereas at total fat replacement they were evaluated as not acceptable. Nevertheless, at 65% fat replacement, the samples presented acceptable textural, physical, and sensorial attributes. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  15. The use of limestone powder as an alternative cement replacement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of limestone powder as an alternative cement replacement material: An ... The laboratory test results revealed that up to 15% replacement of clinker by fine ... Early strength, Limestone filler, Loss on ignition, Portland limestone cement ...

  16. Protein Replacement Therapy Shows Promise in Treating Rare Skin Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1999 Spotlight on Research 2014 February 2014 (historical) Protein Replacement Therapy Shows Promise in Treating Rare Skin Disorder Replacing a protein that is crucial to ensuring that the skin’s ...

  17. Apixaban versus enoxaparin for thromboprophylaxis after knee replacement (ADVANCE-2): a randomised double-blind trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Michael Rud; Raskob, Gary E; Gallus, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low-molecular-weight heparins such as enoxaparin are preferred for prevention of venous thromboembolism after major joint replacement. Apixaban, an orally active factor Xa inhibitor, might be as effective, have lower bleeding risk, and be easier to use than is enoxaparin. We assessed......, patients, statisticians, adjudicators, and steering committee were masked to allocation. Apixaban was started 12-24 h after wound closure and enoxaparin 12 h before surgery; both drugs were continued for 10-14 days, when bilateral ascending venography was scheduled. Primary outcome was the composite...... efficacy and safety of these drugs after elective total knee replacement. METHODS: In ADVANCE-2, a multicentre, randomised, double-blind phase 3 study, patients undergoing elective unilateral or bilateral total knee replacement were randomly allocated through an interactive central telephone system...

  18. Cardiovascular implantable electronic device replacement infections and prevention: results from the REPLACE Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uslan, Daniel Z; Gleva, Marye J; Warren, David K; Mela, Theofanie; Chung, Mina K; Gottipaty, Venkateshwar; Borge, Richard; Dan, Dan; Shinn, Timothy; Mitchell, Kevin; Holcomb, Richard G; Poole, Jeanne E

    2012-01-01

    Infection following cardiovascular implantable electronic device (CIED) replacement is a serious complication, and rates of infection have increased. Analysis of procedural and clinical data from device replacement procedures collected by the REPLACE Registry may provide insights into infection prevention strategies and outcomes. We prospectively evaluated procedural complications in patients undergoing CIED replacement over 6 months from 72 U.S. sites. Major and minor infections were predefined and adjudicated by an independent blinded clinical events committee. Data regarding infection prevention strategies and infectious outcomes were analyzed for their potential relationships. A total of 1,744 patients were included in REPLACE. All patients received preoperative intravenous antibiotics and 68.7% received postoperative systemic antibiotic therapy. CIED infection developed in 22 patients (1.3%), of which 14 cases were major (0.8%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.4%-1.3%) and eight were minor (0.5%, 95% CI 0.2%-0.9%). Patients with infections were more likely to have had postoperative hematomas (five of 22 [22.7%] vs 17 of 1,722 [0.98%], P = 0.002). Participating sites experiencing infection rates >5% were more likely to use povidone-iodine for topical antisepsis, had lower implantation volume, and had patients with higher Charlson Comorbidity Index (2.79 vs 2.32, 95% CI for difference 0.08-0.86, P = 0.019). In this multicenter prospective study with 6 months of follow-up, infections associated with CIED replacements were surprisingly infrequent, possibly due to the use of preoperative antibiotics. Patients with infections were more likely to have had a postoperative hematoma, and sites with higher infection rates had sicker patients and lower overall procedural volume. ©2011, The Authors. Journal compilation ©2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Property Assessment of Sponge Cake Added with Egg Replacer

    OpenAIRE

    Yaqiang He; Linlin Wang; Qian Lu

    2015-01-01

    Chicken egg which is always used in sponge cake production is likely to deteriorate during storage or transportation. This weakness prevents the wide use of chicken egg in sponge cake making. In order to solve this problem, egg replacer has been developed. In this study, effect of egg replacer on the property of sponge cake was analyzed. The result indicated egg replacer could improve the yield rate and specific volume of sponge cake. However, high content of egg replacer would negatively imp...

  20. Transdermal testosterone replacement therapy in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, M Iftekhar; Riche, Daniel M; Koch, Christian A

    2014-01-01

    Androgen deficiency syndrome in men is a frequently diagnosed condition associated with clinical symptoms including fatigue, decreased libido, erectile dysfunction, and metabolic syndrome. Serum testosterone concentrations decline steadily with age. The prevalence of androgen deficiency syndrome in men varies depending on the age group, known and unknown comorbidities, and the respective study group. Reported prevalence rates may be underestimated, as not every man with symptoms of androgen deficiency seeks treatment. Additionally, men reporting symptoms of androgen deficiency may not be correctly diagnosed due to the vagueness of the symptom quality. The treatment of androgen deficiency syndrome or male hypogonadism may sometimes be difficult due to various reasons. There is no consensus as to when to start treating a respective man or with regards to the best treatment option for an individual patient. There is also lack of familiarity with treatment options among general practitioners. The formulations currently available on the market are generally expensive and dose adjustment protocols for each differ. All these factors add to the complexity of testosterone replacement therapy. In this article we will discuss the general indications of transdermal testosterone replacement therapy, available formulations, dosage, application sites, and recommended titration schedule.

  1. Testosterone replacement therapy in obese males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewa, Tomasz; Olszewska-Słonina, Dorota; Chlosta, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    Controversy surrounds testosterone replacement therapy in obese ageing due to no generally accepted lower limits of normal testosterone level and high prevalence of hypogonadal symptoms in the ageing male population and the non-specific nature of these symptoms. Late onset hypogonadism is a clinical and biochemical syndrome associated with advancing age, often coexisting with obesity and metabolic syndrome. High fat and carbohydrates (fructose) consumption is responsible for development of obesity and metabolic syndrome which is one of risk factors for hypogonadism in older men. High fructose intake has been shown to cause dyslipidemia and to impair hepatic insulin sensitivity. Obesity and lack of physical activity negatively influence testosterone level. Low testosterone level should be regarded as an effect of obesity, but reverse relationship has not been proved yet. The management of late-onset hypogonadism symptoms has to be treated by a change of a life style and prevented with healthy nutrition and physical activity. The question related to rational indications for testosterone replacement therapy in obese males seems to be still actual.

  2. An improved financial tool to replace BHT

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    In November, the BHT tool used to control financial data will be replaced by an improved and more powerful system, called CET for CERN Expenditure Tracking. The team in charge of CET. From left to right, sitting, Martyn Rankin, David McGlashan, standing, Per Gunnar Jonsson, James Purvis and Mikael Angberg. After 10 years of BHT at CERN, in order to face the challenges of the LHC era, and following the recommendations of the External Review Committee, the BHT application will be replaced by an improved and more powerful expenditure tracking tool called CET for CERN Expenditure Tracking. For those who are not familiar with it, the BHT, Budget Holders Toolkit, is a utility that provides a way to view CERN financial data. It is available for users who have access to at least one budget code. The new CET represents a tool that not only allows powerful analysis of the past, but also assists in forecasting the future. CET will offer significantly more functionality than BHT, including extended contract analysis, ...

  3. LS1 Report: Replacing an antique

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2013-01-01

    At the PS Booster, the old beam dump and the shielding blocks surrounding it have been removed (see here). Installation of the new beam dump is now under way (see video).   The new PSB beam dump during its installation. At the PS, replacement of the old cooling and ventilation system, which dated back to 1957, is progressing well. The dismantling phase has just been completed and the tunnel is being prepared to receive a brand new ventilation system offering more efficient aeration of radioactive areas. At the same time, testing of the newly installed access system is under way. At the SPS, all the equipment of the Long Straight Section 1 (LSS1) has been removed to make way for the campaign to replace the irradiated cables, which started this week. In the LHC, the Radiation to Electronics (R2E) campaign is still progressing at a good clip, especially at Point 1, where the teams are two and a half months ahead of schedule. The Superconducting Magnets and Circuits Consolidation (SMACC) proje...

  4. Toward replacement fertility in Egypt and Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltigani, Eltigani E

    2009-09-01

    Egypt and Tunisia began their fertility transition at almost identical fertility levels and at roughly the same time period, yet the difference in the pace of decline has been such that the total fertility rate (TFR) in Tunisia reached replacement level by the year 2001, whereas the TFR in Egypt remains above three live births per woman. This article draws on the secondary literature and on several nationally representative surveys from the two countries between 1978 and 2005 to provide empirical evidence of the difference in the pace of fertility decline and to analyze the determinants of the differential. Findings include (a) variation across the two countries in the consistency of fertility decline among the segments of the population leading the transition; (b) that the success of each country's family planning program was influenced by the role of political leaders and the extent of the program's integration within socioeconomic development objectives; (c) that the impact of contraception on TFR decline became an important factor in the mid-1980s; and (d) that the greatest determinant of the discrepancy in the pace of fertility decline is the disparity in age at marriage, which rose more significantly in Tunisia than in Egypt. The latter finding indicates that reaching replacement fertility in Egypt hinges primarily on further declines in marital fertility, resulting from reduction of wanted fertility and from an expansion of family planning program coverage and improved efficiency of service delivery and use.

  5. Hypoparathyroidism: Replacement Therapy with Parathyroid Hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Rejnmark

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Hypoparathyroidism (HypoPT is characterized by low serum calcium levels caused by an insufficient secretion of parathyroid hormone (PTH. Despite normalization of serum calcium levels by treatment with activated vitamin D analogues and calcium supplementation, patients are suffering from impaired quality of life (QoL and are at increased risk of a number of comorbidities. Thus, despite normalization of calcium levels in response to conventional therapy, this should only be considered as an apparent normalization, as patients are suffering from a number of complications and calcium-phosphate homeostasis is not normalized in a physiological manner. In a number of recent studies, replacement therapy with recombinant human PTH (rhPTH(1-84 as well as therapy with the N-terminal PTH fragment (rhPTH(1-34 have been investigated. Both drugs have been shown to normalize serum calcium while reducing needs for activated vitamin D and calcium supplements. However, once a day injections cause large fluctuations in serum calcium. Twice a day injections diminish fluctuations, but don't restore the normal physiology of calcium homeostasis. Recent studies using pump-delivery have shown promising results on maintaining normocalcemia with minimal fluctuations in calcium levels. Further studies are needed to determine whether this may improve QoL and lower risk of complications. Such data are needed before replacement with the missing hormone can be recommended as standard therapy.

  6. Concomitant aortic valve replacement and myocardial revascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craver, J M; Jones, E L; Hatcher, C R; Farmer, J H

    1977-01-01

    Twenty-six consecutive patients underwent combined aortic valve replacement and myocardial revascularization at the Emory University Affiliated Hospitals between May, 1973 and March, 1976. Acute myocardial infarction resulted in two operative deaths (8%). There have been four late deaths, all Class IV preoperative. The age range was 37 to 79 years with an average age of 60. Preoperatively all patients were Class IV or late Class III. Twenty-three patients had symptoms of angina pectoris; congestive heart failure was evident in 56%. Postoperatively, 70% are now Class 1 or II. Single coronary bypass was performed in 16 patients, double in 6, and triple in three. Double bypass plus mitral valve replacement was required in two with aneurysmectomy in one. The rate of intraoperative infarction was 27% for the series but only 7% in the last year. The methods of intraoperative myocardial preservation and the technical approach for the operative procedures were variable. Results with each method are correlated, and currently preferred techniques are presented and discussed. Best results were obtained in patients who presented early in their symptomatic course with isolated proximal coronary lesions and good renoff vessels. Excellent results could be achieved despite advanced age of patients, requirement for multiple bypass grafts, and correction of other associated cardiac lesions. Poorest results were obtained when long-standing ventricular failure was combined with poor vessels distal to coronary stenoses. PMID:860881

  7. BABAR IFR Replacement R and D

    CERN Document Server

    Berry, M

    2003-01-01

    The Instrumented Flux Return (IFR) of the BaBar detector will soon need to be replaced by a more robust muon detection system. Scintillator bars with embedded Wavelength Shifting (WLS) fibers and Limited Streamer Tubes are two replacement technology options. The scintillator bars are tested for attenuation length; and causes for the large width of the Photo Multiplier Tube (PMT) signal are analyzed by Monte Carlo simulation. Cooling techniques for Avalanche Photo Diodes (APD) are investigated. The fairly high attenuation length coupled with the narrow PMT signal make the scintillator a viable option for a muon detecting system. Continuing work will focus on increasing timing resolution using an APD to read the signal from the WLS fibers, and investigating the lifetime of the APD. The ability to read a signal from the LST on external copper strips is tested and signals are found to be clearly distinguishable from noise. The voltage is compared to count rate to find that the optimal operating voltage for the LS...

  8. Limitations to fluid replacement during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maughan, R J; Leiper, J B

    1999-04-01

    Fluid replacement during exercise is essential for endurance exercise performance and reducing the risk of heat illness. Fluids supply water, which ameliorates dehydration, and also substrate for the working muscles. Absorption of water and nutrients occurs in the upper part of the small intestine, and replacement may be limited by the rate at which fluid is emptied from the stomach or absorbed in the intestine. Gastric emptying of liquids is influenced primarily by the volume of fluid in the stomach and by its energy density. Increasing the volume will speed emptying, but increasing the nutrient content will slow emptying. Osmolality, temperature, and pH of drinks, as well as exercise intensity, are of minor importance. Intestinal water absorption is a passive process: water follows osmotic gradients but will also follow the active absorption of nutrients, especially glucose, which is actively co-transported with sodium. Water transport is maximised by the presence in the intestine of hypotonic solutions of glucose and sodium. Hypertonic solutions promote net water secretion into the intestinal lumen, resulting in a temporary net loss of water from the body. The amount of fluid ingested by athletes is normally much less than can be tolerated, therefore issues such as palatability and practising drinking during training are important.

  9. Neutron scattering at Australia's replacement research reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, R. A.; Kennedy, S. J.

    2002-01-01

    On August 25 1999, the Australian government gave final approval to build a research reactor to replace the existing HIFAR reactor at Lucas Heights. The replacement reactor, which will commence operation in 2005, will be multipurpose in function, with capabilities for both neutron-beam research and radioisotope production. Regarding beams, cold and thermal neutron sources are to be installed and the intent is to use supermirror guides, with coatings with critical angles up to 3 times that of natural Ni, to transport cold and thermal neutron beams into a large modern guide hall. The reactor and all the associated infrastructure, with the exception of the neutron beam instruments, is to be built by INVAP, SE and subcontractors in a turnkey contract. The goal is to have at least eight leading-edge neutron-beam instruments ready in 2005, and they will be developed by ANSTO and other contracted organisations, in consultation with the Australian user community and interested overseas parties. A review of the planned scientific capabilities, a description of the facility and a status report on the activities so far is given.

  10. Postoperative Autologous Reinfusion in Total Knee Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Crescibene

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgeries for total knee replacement (TKR are increasing and in this context there is a need to develop new protocols for management and use of blood transfusion therapy. Autologous blood reduces the need for allogeneic blood transfusion and the aim of the present study was to verify the safety and the clinical efficacy. An observational retrospective study has been conducted on 124 patients, undergoing cemented total knee prosthesis replacement. Observed population was stratified into two groups: the first group received reinfusion of autologous blood collected in the postoperative surgery and the second group did not receive autologous blood reinfusion. Analysis of data shows that patients undergoing autologous blood reinfusion received less homologous blood bags (10.6% versus 30%; p=0.08 and reduced days of hospitalization (7.88 ± 0.7 days versus 8.96 ± 2.47 days for the control group; p=0.03. Microbiological tests were negative in all postoperatively salvaged and reinfused units. Our results emphasize the effectiveness of this procedure and have the characteristics of simplicity, low cost (€97.53 versus €103.79; p<0.01, and easy reproducibility. Use of autologous drainage system postoperatively is a procedure that allows reducing transfusion of homologous blood bags in patients undergoing TKR.

  11. Recombinant Enzyme Replacement Therapy in Hypophosphatasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Christine; Jakob, Franz; Seefried, Lothar; Mentrup, Birgit; Graser, Stephanie; Plotkin, Horacio; Girschick, Hermann J; Liese, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Hypophosphatasia (HPP) is a rare monogenetic and multisystemic disease with involvement of different organs, including bone, muscle, kidney, lung, gastrointestinal tract and the nervous system. The exact metabolic mechanisms of the effects of TNAP deficiency in different tissues are not understood in detail. There is no approved specific treatment for HPP; therefore symptomatic treatment in order to improve the clinical features is of major interest. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is a relatively new type of treatment based on the principle of administering a medical treatment replacing a defective or absent enzyme. Recently ERT with a bone targeted recombinant human TNAP molecule has been reported to be efficient in ten severely affected patients and improved survival of life threatening forms. These results are very promising especially with regard to the skeletal phenotype but it is unclear whether ERT also has beneficial effects for craniosynostosis and in other affected tissues in HPP such as brain and kidney. Long-term data are not yet available and further systematic clinical trials are needed. It is also necessary to establish therapeutic approaches to help patients who are affected by less severe forms of HPP but also suffer from a significant reduction in quality of life. Further basic research on TNAP function and role in different tissues and on its physiological substrates is critical to gain a better insight in the pathogenesis in HPP. This and further experiences in new therapeutic strategies may improve the prognosis and quality of life of patients with all forms of HPP.

  12. Facilitating interaction, communication and collaboration in online courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Sara G.; Robin, Bernard R.; Miller, Robert M.

    2000-07-01

    As the Internet evolves into a truly world wide communications medium, the roles of faculty and students at institutions of higher learning are changing. Traditional face-to-face classes are being converted to an online setting, where materials from syllabi to lectures to assignments are available at the click of a mouse. New technological options are challenging and changing the very nature of teaching as faculty migrate from being deliverers of information to facilitators and mentors. Students are also undergoing a transformation from passive recipients to participants in an active learning environment. Interactions are at the heart of this revolution as students and faculty create new methodologies for the online classroom. New types of interactions are emerging between faculty and students, between students and other students and between students and the educational resources they are exploring. As the online teaching and learning environment expands and matures, new social and instructional interactions are replacing the traditional occurrences in face-to-face classrooms. New communication options are also evolving as a critical component of the online classroom. The shift from a synchronous to an asynchronous communication structure has also had a significant impact on the way students and faculty interact. The use of e-mail, listservs and web-based conferencing has given teachers and learners new flexibility and has fostered a climate where learning takes place wherever and whenever it is convenient. HyperGroups, a communication tool that was developed at the University of Houston, allows students and faculty to seamlessly participate in course-related discussions and easily share multimedia resources. This article explores the many issues associated with facilitating interaction, communication and collaboration in online courses.

  13. Long-term treatment with L-DOPA or pramipexole affects adult neurogenesis and corresponding non-motor behavior in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, W-H; Depboylu, C; Hermanns, G; Maurer, L; Windolph, A; Oertel, W H; Ries, V; Höglinger, G U

    2015-08-01

    Non-motor symptoms such as hyposmia and depression are often observed in Parkinson's disease (PD) and can precede the onset of motor symptoms for years. The underlying pathological alterations in the brain are not fully understood so far. Dysregulation of adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and the olfactory bulb has been recently suggested to be implicated in non-motor symptoms of PD. However, there is so far no direct evidence to support the relationship of non-motor symptoms and the modulation of adult neurogenesis following dopamine depletion and/or dopamine replacement. In this study, we investigated the long-term effects of l-DOPA and pramipexole, a dopamine agonist, in a mouse model of bilateral intranigral 6-OHDA lesion, in order to assess the impact of adult neurogenesis on non-motor behavior. We found that l-DOPA and pramipexole can normalize decreased neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and the periglomerular layer of the olfactory bulb caused by a 6-OHDA lesion. Interestingly, pramipexole showed an antidepressant and anxiolytic effect in the forced swim test and social interaction test. However, there was no significant change in learning and memory function after dopamine depletion and dopamine replacement, respectively.

  14. 48 CFR 908.7101-4 - Replacement of motor vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Replacement of motor....7101-4 Replacement of motor vehicles. (a) The replacement of motor vehicles shall be in accordance with... Heads of Contracting Activities may arrange to sell, as exchange sales, used motor vehicles...

  15. 21 CFR 874.3450 - Partial ossicular replacement prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Partial ossicular replacement prosthesis. 874.3450 Section 874.3450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... replacement prosthesis. (a) Identification. A partial ossicular replacement prosthesis is a device intended...

  16. 21 CFR 874.3495 - Total ossicular replacement prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Total ossicular replacement prosthesis. 874.3495 Section 874.3495 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... replacement prosthesis. (a) Identification. A total ossicular replacement prosthesis is a device intended...

  17. 21 CFR 870.3710 - Pacemaker repair or replacement material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pacemaker repair or replacement material. 870.3710... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3710 Pacemaker repair or replacement material. (a) Identification. A pacemaker repair or replacement material is an...

  18. 14 CFR 21.9 - Replacement and modification articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Replacement and modification articles. 21.9... CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS General § 21.9 Replacement and modification articles. (a) If a person knows, or should know, that a replacement or modification article is reasonably likely to...

  19. A humanoid mouse model of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takumi, Toru

    2010-10-01

    Even now fruit of the human genome project is available, we have difficulties to approach neuropsychiatric disorders at the molecular level. Autism is a complex psychiatric illness but has received considerable attention as a developmental brain disorder not only from basic researchers but also from society. Substantial evidence suggests that chromosomal abnormalities contribute to autism risk. The duplication of human chromosome 15q11-13 is known to be the most frequent cytogenetic abnormality in autism. We succeeded to generate mice with a 6.3-Mb-wide interstitial duplication in mouse chromosome 7c that is highly syntenic to human 15q11-13 by using a Cre-loxP-based chromosome-engineering technique. The only paternally duplicated mice display autistic behavioral features such as poor social interaction and stereotypical behavior, and exhibit a developmental abnormality in ultrasonic vocalizations as well as anxiety. The detailed analysis focusing on a non-coding small nucleolar RNA, MBII52, within the duplicated region, revealed that the paternally duplicated mice alter the editing ratio of serotonin (5-HT) 2c receptor pre-mRNA and intracellular calcium responses by a 5-HT2c receptor specific agonist are changed in neurons. This result may explain one of molecular mechanisms of abnormal behaviors in the paternal duplicated mice. The first chromosome-engineered mouse model for human chromosome 15q11-13 duplication fulfills not only face validity of human autistic phenotypes but also construct validity based on human chromosome abnormality. This model will be a founder mouse for forward genetics of autistic disease and an invaluable tool for its therapeutic development.

  20. Fate of the molar dental lamina in the monophyodont mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosedělová, Hana; Dumková, Jana; Lesot, Hervé; Glocová, Kristýna; Kunová, Michaela; Tucker, Abigail S; Veselá, Iva; Krejčí, Pavel; Tichý, František; Hampl, Aleš; Buchtová, Marcela

    2015-01-01

    The successional dental lamina (SDL) plays an essential role in the development of replacement teeth in diphyodont and polyphyodont animals. A morphologically similar structure, the rudimental successional dental lamina (RSDL), has been described in monophyodont (only one tooth generation) lizards on the lingual side of the developing functional tooth. This rudimentary lamina regresses, which has been proposed to play a role in preventing the formation of future generations of teeth. A similar rudimentary lingual structure has been reported associated with the first molar in the monophyodont mouse, and we show that this structure is common to all murine molars. Intriguingly, a lingual lamina is also observed on the non-replacing molars of other diphyodont mammals (pig and hedgehog), initially appearing very similar to the successional dental lamina on the replacing teeth. We have analyzed the morphological as well as ultrastructural changes that occur during the development and loss of this molar lamina in the mouse, from its initiation at late embryonic stages to its disappearance at postnatal stages. We show that loss appears to be driven by a reduction in cell proliferation, down-regulation of the progenitor marker Sox2, with only a small number of cells undergoing programmed cell death. The lingual lamina was associated with the dental stalk, a short epithelial connection between the tooth germ and the oral epithelium. The dental stalk remained in contact with the oral epithelium throughout tooth development up to eruption when connective tissue and numerous capillaries progressively invaded the dental stalk. The buccal side of the dental stalk underwent keratinisation and became part of the gingival epithelium, while most of the lingual cells underwent programmed cell death and the tissue directly above the erupting tooth was shed into the oral cavity.

  1. Fate of the molar dental lamina in the monophyodont mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Dosedělová

    Full Text Available The successional dental lamina (SDL plays an essential role in the development of replacement teeth in diphyodont and polyphyodont animals. A morphologically similar structure, the rudimental successional dental lamina (RSDL, has been described in monophyodont (only one tooth generation lizards on the lingual side of the developing functional tooth. This rudimentary lamina regresses, which has been proposed to play a role in preventing the formation of future generations of teeth. A similar rudimentary lingual structure has been reported associated with the first molar in the monophyodont mouse, and we show that this structure is common to all murine molars. Intriguingly, a lingual lamina is also observed on the non-replacing molars of other diphyodont mammals (pig and hedgehog, initially appearing very similar to the successional dental lamina on the replacing teeth. We have analyzed the morphological as well as ultrastructural changes that occur during the development and loss of this molar lamina in the mouse, from its initiation at late embryonic stages to its disappearance at postnatal stages. We show that loss appears to be driven by a reduction in cell proliferation, down-regulation of the progenitor marker Sox2, with only a small number of cells undergoing programmed cell death. The lingual lamina was associated with the dental stalk, a short epithelial connection between the tooth germ and the oral epithelium. The dental stalk remained in contact with the oral epithelium throughout tooth development up to eruption when connective tissue and numerous capillaries progressively invaded the dental stalk. The buccal side of the dental stalk underwent keratinisation and became part of the gingival epithelium, while most of the lingual cells underwent programmed cell death and the tissue directly above the erupting tooth was shed into the oral cavity.

  2. Fate of the Molar Dental Lamina in the Monophyodont Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosedělová, Hana; Dumková, Jana; Lesot, Hervé; Glocová, Kristýna; Kunová, Michaela; Tucker, Abigail S.; Veselá, Iva; Krejčí, Pavel; Tichý, František; Hampl, Aleš; Buchtová, Marcela

    2015-01-01

    The successional dental lamina (SDL) plays an essential role in the development of replacement teeth in diphyodont and polyphyodont animals. A morphologically similar structure, the rudimental successional dental lamina (RSDL), has been described in monophyodont (only one tooth generation) lizards on the lingual side of the developing functional tooth. This rudimentary lamina regresses, which has been proposed to play a role in preventing the formation of future generations of teeth. A similar rudimentary lingual structure has been reported associated with the first molar in the monophyodont mouse, and we show that this structure is common to all murine molars. Intriguingly, a lingual lamina is also observed on the non-replacing molars of other diphyodont mammals (pig and hedgehog), initially appearing very similar to the successional dental lamina on the replacing teeth. We have analyzed the morphological as well as ultrastructural changes that occur during the development and loss of this molar lamina in the mouse, from its initiation at late embryonic stages to its disappearance at postnatal stages. We show that loss appears to be driven by a reduction in cell proliferation, down-regulation of the progenitor marker Sox2, with only a small number of cells undergoing programmed cell death. The lingual lamina was associated with the dental stalk, a short epithelial connection between the tooth germ and the oral epithelium. The dental stalk remained in contact with the oral epithelium throughout tooth development up to eruption when connective tissue and numerous capillaries progressively invaded the dental stalk. The buccal side of the dental stalk underwent keratinisation and became part of the gingival epithelium, while most of the lingual cells underwent programmed cell death and the tissue directly above the erupting tooth was shed into the oral cavity. PMID:26010446

  3. Transplantation of mouse embryonic stem cell after middle cerebral artery occlusion

    OpenAIRE

    Lee Tae-Hoon; Lee Yoon-Seok

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Stem cell transplantation has been extensively studied as individual therapies for ischemic stroke. The present investigation is an initial effort to combine these methods to achieve increased therapeutic effects after brain ischemia. Cell transplantation may recover massive neuronal loss by replacing damaged brain cells. METHODS: Undifferentiated mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells were used to induce differentiation in vitro into neuron-like cells with good cell viability for use a gr...

  4. Orthodontic retraction of autotransplanted premolar to replace ankylosed maxillary incisor with replacement resorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon Jeong; Shin, Sujung; Kim, Kyung-Ho; Chung, Chooryung J

    2014-04-01

    This case report describes the successful treatment of an adult with lip protrusion and a previously traumatized maxillary central incisor that had experienced replacement root resorption. An extracted premolar was transplanted into the incisor space and retracted orthodontically. Autotransplantation was successful with complete root formation and, combined with orthodontic treatment, provided a satisfying esthetic outcome.

  5. Candida albicans escapes from mouse neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermert, David; Niemiec, Maria J; Röhm, Marc; Glenthøj, Andreas; Borregaard, Niels; Urban, Constantin F

    2013-08-01

    Candida albicans, the most commonly isolated human fungal pathogen, is able to grow as budding yeasts or filamentous forms, such as hyphae. The ability to switch morphology has been attributed a crucial role for the pathogenesis of C. albicans. To mimic disseminated candidiasis in humans, the mouse is the most widely used model organism. Neutrophils are essential immune cells to prevent opportunistic mycoses. To explore potential differences between the rodent infection model and the human host, we compared the interactions of C. albicans with neutrophil granulocytes from mice and humans. We revealed that murine neutrophils exhibited a significantly lower ability to kill C. albicans than their human counterparts. Strikingly, C. albicans yeast cells formed germ tubes upon internalization by murine neutrophils, eventually rupturing the neutrophil membrane and thereby, killing the phagocyte. On the contrary, growth and subsequent escape of C. albicans are blocked inside human neutrophils. According to our findings, this blockage in human neutrophils might be a result of higher levels of MPO activity and the presence of α-defensins. We therefore outline differences in antifungal immune defense between humans and mouse strains, which facilitates a more accurate interpretation of in vivo results.

  6. Revision of the aseptic and septic total ankle replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Norman; Wirth, Stephan Hermann

    2013-04-01

    Total ankle replacement has become a popular treatment of symptomatic end-stage ankle osteoarthritis. Contemporary total ankle replacement systems provide more anatomic and biomechanically sound function. However, longevity is still limited and long-term results of modern total ankle replacement designs are not available. In the case of failure, conversion into arthrodesis has remained the treatment of choice but at the cost of hindfoot function and potential degeneration of the adjacent joints. Thus, revision total ankle replacement by exchange of the prosthetic components represents an attractive solution. This article focuses on revision total ankle replacement and conversion to ankle arthrodesis.

  7. Testosterone Replacement Therapy and the Cardiovascular System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi, Sahar

    2016-04-01

    As testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) has emerged as a commonly prescribed therapy for symptomatic low testosterone, conflicting data have been reported in terms of both its efficacy and potential adverse outcomes. One of the most controversial associations has been that of TRT and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This review briefly provides background on the history of TRT, the indications for TRT, and the data behind TRT for symptomatic low testosterone. It then specifically delves into the rather limited data for cardiovascular outcomes of those with low endogenous testosterone and those who receive TRT. The available body of literature strongly suggests that more work, by way of clinical trials, needs to be done to better understand the impact of testosterone and TRT on the cardiovascular system.

  8. Segmental blood pressure after total hip replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebuhr, Peter Henrik; Soelberg, M; Henriksen, Jens Henrik

    1992-01-01

    drop was found in all pressures 1 week postoperatively. The decrease followed the systemic pressure and was restored to normal after 6 weeks. In a group of six patients with preoperatively decreased ankle pressure, a significant transient further decrease in the ankle-toe gradient pressure was found......Twenty-nine patients due to have a total hip replacement had their systemic systolic and segmental blood pressures measured prior to operation and 1 and 6 weeks postoperatively. No patients had signs of ischemia. The segmental blood pressure was measured at the ankle and at the toes. A significant...... on the operated side. None of the patients had symptoms from the lowered pressure. We conclude that in patients without signs of ischemia, the postoperative segmental pressure decrease is reversible and therefore not dangerous....

  9. [Interventional mitral valve replacement. Current status].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutter, G; Frank, D

    2016-02-01

    Approximately 30 % of patients suffering from severe valvular heart disease, such as mitral valve regurgitation are non-compliant to the gold standard of minimally invasive surgery, reconstruction or valve replacement. The number of these mostly old patients with severe comorbidities is increasing; therefore, transcatheter interventions have been developed to address an unmet clinical need and may be an alternative therapeutic option to the reference standard. Apart from the successful MitraClip therapy, alternative transcatheter reconstruction technologies are being developed. As with transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) procedures, the off-pump implantation of a valved stent into the mitral position mainly via a transapical approach will be of great benefit. Recently, the feasibility of transcatheter mitral valved stent implantation in high-risk patients has already been reported.

  10. Strategies for Revision Total Ankle Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas S. Roukis, DPM, PhD, FACFAS

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available As the frequency of primary total ankle replacement (TAR continues to build, revision will become more commonplace. At present there are no “standard principles” associated with revision TAR. What is clear is that the current approaches are technically complex, fraught with complications and no one approach represents the only answer. Exchange of TAR metallic components to the same system standard or dedicated revision components are viable options with limited occurrence of complications. Explantation and conversion to custom-design long stemmed components has limited availability. Explantation and conversion to another TAR system is high-risk and has strong potential for complications. The use of metal reinforced polymethylmethacrylate cement augmentation of failed TAR systems and tibio-talo-calcaneal arthrodesis should be reserved for very select situations where other options are not possible. There is a real need for long-term survivorship following revision TAR and future efforts ought to be directed in this area.

  11. The cost of standing strong for replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Katy

    2015-03-01

    The testimonies of these individuals largely speak for themselves. The responses point to the importance of specific institutions or research groups that focus on the development and use of alternatives, and these should, of course, be better supported. Those who find themselves outside such institutions or teams, are more likely to feel stranded and isolated. Then again, Liz did have the support of a research group dedicated to replacement, but she has still had a significant struggle to find funding. The interviews with some of these particular young researchers indeed pointed toward a tangible ‘cost’ in terms of having to steer their career on the often difficult path toward the use of non-animal based methods.

  12. Stationary populations with below-replacement fertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carl Schmertmann

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND A population with sustained below-replacement fertility and constant immigration eventually becomes stationary. Stationary-through-immigration (SI populations have unusual age structures that depend on the distribution of immigrants' arrival ages. OBJECTIVE I summarize known formal relationships between the distribution of immigrants' entry ages and the long-run size and structure of SI populations. I clarify a previously published result about SI dependency ratios. RESULTS The long-run size and age structure of an SI population depend on the remaining life expectancies of arriving immigrants, but are also sensitive to the expected numbers of native children born after arrival. Numerical calculations with contemporary Austrian data show (1 contrary to previously published results, immigration flows need not be concentrated in early working ages in order to ensure low overall dependency, and (2 the SI dependency ratio is minimized when all immigrants are in their mid-30s.

  13. Replacement collision sequence studies in iron

    CERN Document Server

    Hou, M; Becquart, C S

    2002-01-01

    The properties of replacement collision sequences (RCS) in iron and their contribution to radiation damage are studied as they are generated in atomic collision cascades with the binary collision approximation Marlowe. Length distributions of RCS in collision cascades generated by primaries with a couple of ten keV kinetic energies are predicted short. Whatever the interatomic potential employed, at least 90% of the generated RCS have a length of no more than three successive collisions, whatever the directions. This property was found for all the known phases of iron at standard pressure (bcc and fcc). The RCS length distributions are not significantly influenced by the temperature nor by the accurate form of the model describing the energy loss in RCS. Close to 50% of the stable Frenkel pairs (FP) created result from RCS that are shorter than the vacancy-interstitial recombination distance estimated on the basis of molecular dynamics calculations. The other half results from longer RCS (about five successiv...

  14. Replacement of Swiss "Attestations de fonctions"

    CERN Multimedia

    DG Unit

    2009-01-01

    The Swiss Permanent Mission has informed CERN that the "attestations de fonctions" issued to certain members of the personnel and the "attestations" issued to their family members will gradually be replaced by P-type "cartes de légitimation" (see specimen copies below). This card’s name, together with its more contemporary design compared with old-style "Attestations" issued in the 1970s, will make the holder’s daily life much easier, e.g. when crossing borders, renting accommodation or setting up a telephone line. The Users Office (PH Department) and the Cards Office (HR Department), which are responsible for handling requests for "cartes de légitimation", will provide information in due course on how they intend to organise the exchange of "attestations" (priority will be given to residents of Switzerland, in parti...

  15. The Research of Artificial Cervical Disc Replacement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Zhua; Qiang Shenb

    2008-01-01

    Cervical arthroplasty after anterior decompression with insertion of a prosthetic total disc replacement has been suggested as an alternate to anterior cervical fusion. It develops quickly during recent years. Currently there are several cervical arthroplasty devices. Each device varies in terms of materials, range of motion and constraint. Early studies suggest that in the short term, the complication rate and efficacy is no worse than fusion surgery. Long-term results have not yet been reported. This review examines the current prostheses as well as discussing issues regarding indications and technique. It is hoped that an improvement of cervical arthroplasty occurs in terms of materials and design as spinal surgeons enter a new dines of the management of cervical spine disease.

  16. Growth hormone replacement therapy in Costello syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantafyllou, Panagiota; Christoforidis, Athanasios; Vargiami, Euthymia; Zafeiriou, Dimitrios I

    2014-12-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) is considered an overgrowth disorder given the macrosomia that is present at birth .However, shortly after birth the weight drops dramatically and the patients are usually referred for failure to thrive. Subsequently, affected patients develop the distinctive coarse facial appearance and are at risk for cardiac anomalies and solid tumor malignancies. Various endocrine disorders, although not very often, have been reported in patients with CS, including growth hormone deficiency, hypoglycemia, ACTH deficiency, cryptorchidism and hypothyroidism. We report a case of Costello syndrome with hypothyroidism, cryptorchidism and growth hormone deficiency and we evaluate the long-term safety and efficacy of growth hormone replacement therapy. The index patient is a paradigm of successful and safe treatment with growth hormone for almost 7 years. Since patients with CS are at increased risk for cardiac myopathy and tumor development they deserve close monitoring during treatment.

  17. Renal Replacement Therapy in Austere Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina M. Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Myoglobinuric renal failure is the classically described acute renal event occurring in disaster environments—commonly after an earthquake—which most tests the ingenuity and flexibility of local and regional nephrology resources. In recent decades, several nephrology organizations have developed response teams and planning protocols to address disaster events, largely focusing on patients at risk for, or with, acute kidney injury (AKI. In this paper we briefly review the epidemiology and outcomes of patients with dialysis-requiring AKI after such events, while providing greater focus on the management of the end-stage renal disease population after a disaster which incapacitates a pre-existing nephrologic infrastructure (if it existed at all. “Austere” dialysis, as such, is defined as the provision of renal replacement therapy in any setting in which traditional, first-world therapies and resources are limited, incapacitated, or nonexistent.

  18. Testosterone replacement therapy for older men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen E Borst

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Stephen E Borst, Thomas MulliganGeriatrics Research, Education, and Clinical Center, North Florida/South Georgia Veterans Health System, Gainesville, FL, USAAbstract: Despite intensive research on testosterone therapy for older men, important questions remain unanswered. The evidence clearly indicates that many older men display a partial androgen deficiency. In older men, low circulating testosterone is correlated with low muscle strength, with high adiposity, with insulin resistance and with poor cognitive performance. Testosterone replacement in older men has produced benefits, but not consistently so. The inconsistency may arise from differences in the dose and duration of testosterone treatment, as well as selection of the target population. Generally, studies reporting anabolic responses to testosterone have employed higher doses of testosterone for longer treatment periods and have targeted older men whose baseline circulating bioavailable testosterone levels were low. Most studies of testosterone replacement have reported anabolic that are modest compared to what can be achieved with resistance exercise training. However, several strategies currently under evaluation have the potential to produce greater anabolic effects and to do so in a safe manner. At this time, testosterone therapy can not be recommended for the general population of older men. Older men who are hypogonadal are at greater risk for the catabolic effects associated with a number of acute and chronic medical conditions. Future research is likely to reveal benefits of testosterone therapy for some of these special populations. Testosterone therapy produces a number of adverse effects, including worsening of sleep apnea, gynecomastia, polycythemia and elevation of PSA. Efficacy and adverse effects should be assessed frequently throughout the course of therapy.Keywords: aging, testosterone, hypogonadism, physical function

  19. Renal replacement therapy in Korea, 2012

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    Dong Chan Jin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Korean Society of Nephrology (KSN launched the official end-stage renal disease (ESRD patient registry in 1985, and an Internet online registry program was opened in 2001 and revised in 2013. The ESRD Registry Committee of KSN has collected data on dialysis therapy in Korea through the online registry program in the KSN Internet website. The status of renal replacement therapy in Korea at the end of 2012 is described in the following. The total number of ESRD patients was 70,211 at the end of 2012, which included 48,531 hemodialysis (HD patients, 7,552 peritoneal dialysis (PD patients, and 14,128 functioning kidney transplant (KT patients. The prevalence of ESRD was 1,353.3 patients per million population (PMP, and the distribution of renal replacement therapy among ESRD patients was as follows: HD, 69.1%; PD, 10.8%; and KT, 20.2%. The number of new ESRD patients in 2012 was 11,742 (HD, 8,811; PD, 923; and KT, 1,738; the incidence rate was 221.1 PMP. The primary causes of ESRD were diabetic nephropathy (50.6%, hypertensive nephrosclerosis (18.5%, and chronic glomerulonephritis (18.1%. The mean urea reduction ratio was 67.9% in male and 74.1% in female HD patients. The mean Kt/V was 1.382 in male and 1.652 in female HD patients. The 5-year survival rates of male and female dialysis patients were 70.6% and 73.5%, respectively.

  20. Neonatal varicella pneumonia, surfactant replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousa Ahmadpour-kacho

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chickenpox is a very contagious viral disease that caused by varicella-zoster virus, which appears in the first week of life secondary to transplacental transmission of infection from the affected mother. When mother catches the disease five days before and up to two days after the delivery, the chance of varicella in neonate in first week of life is 17%. A generalized papulovesicular lesion is the most common clinical feature. Respiratory involvement may lead to giant cell pneumonia and respiratory failure. The mortality rate is up to 30% in the case of no treatment, often due to pneumonia. Treatment includes hospitalization, isolation and administration of intravenous acyclovir. The aim of this case report is to introduce the exogenous surfactant replacement therapy after intubation and mechanical ventilation for respiratory failure in neonatal chickenpox pneumonia and respiratory distress. Case Presentation: A seven-day-old neonate boy was admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Amirkola Children’s Hospital, Babol, north of Iran, with generalized papulovesicular lesions and respiratory distress. His mother has had a history of Varicella 4 days before delivery. He was isolated and given supportive care, intravenous acyclovir and antibiotics. On the second day, he was intubated and connected to mechanical ventilator due to severe pneumonia and respiratory failure. Because of sever pulmonary involvement evidenced by Chest X-Ray and high ventilators set-up requirement, intratracheal surfactant was administered in two doses separated by 12 hours. He was discharged after 14 days without any complication with good general condition. Conclusion: Exogenous surfactant replacement therapy can be useful as an adjunctive therapy for the treatment of respiratory failure due to neonatal chickenpox.

  1. Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement: A Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A Siordia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR is a novel therapeutic intervention for the replacement of severely stenotic aortic valves in high-risk patients for standard surgical procedures. Since the initial PARTNER trial results, use of TAVR has been on the rise each year. New delivery methods and different valves have been developed and modified in order to promote the minimally invasive procedure and reduce common complications, such as stroke. This review article focuses on the current data on the indications, risks, benefits, and future directions of TAVR. Recently, TAVR has been considered as a standard-of-care procedure. While this technique is used frequently in high-risk surgical candidates, studies have been focusing on the application of this method for younger patients with lower surgical risk. Moreover, several studies have proposed promising results regarding the use of valve-in-valve technique or the procedure in which the valve is placed within a previously implemented bioprosthetic valve. However, ischemic strokes and paravalvular leak remain a matter of debate in these surgeries. New methods and devices have been developed to reduce the incidence of post-procedural stroke. While the third generation of TAVR valves (i.e., Edwards Sapien 3 and Medtronic Evolut R addresses the issue of paravalvular leak structurally, results on their efficacy in reducing the risk of paravalvular leak are yet to be obtained. Furthermore, TAVR enters the field of hybrid methods in the treatment of cardiac issues via both surgical and catheter-based approaches. Finally, while TAVR is primarily performed on cases with aortic stenosis, new valves and methods have been proposed regarding the application of this technique in aortic regurgitation, as well as other aortic pathologies. TAVR is a suitable therapeutic approach for the treatment of aortic stenosis in high-risk patients. Considering the promising results in the current patient population

  2. Property Assessment of Sponge Cake Added with Egg Replacer

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    Yaqiang He

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Chicken egg which is always used in sponge cake production is likely to deteriorate during storage or transportation. This weakness prevents the wide use of chicken egg in sponge cake making. In order to solve this problem, egg replacer has been developed. In this study, effect of egg replacer on the property of sponge cake was analyzed. The result indicated egg replacer could improve the yield rate and specific volume of sponge cake. However, high content of egg replacer would negatively impact the internal structure and sensory property of sponge cake. Based on the result of this research, optimum content of egg replacer in sponge cake is 3.6 g. In the industrial production of sponge cake, different types of wheat flour and additives would be used. The optimum content of egg replacer may be different from the result of this research. Therefore, in the industrial production, the optimum content of egg replacer should be determined based on experiment.

  3. Evolution of high tooth replacement rates in sauropod dinosaurs.

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    Michael D D'Emic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tooth replacement rate can be calculated in extinct animals by counting incremental lines of deposition in tooth dentin. Calculating this rate in several taxa allows for the study of the evolution of tooth replacement rate. Sauropod dinosaurs, the largest terrestrial animals that ever evolved, exhibited a diversity of tooth sizes and shapes, but little is known about their tooth replacement rates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present tooth replacement rate, formation time, crown volume, total dentition volume, and enamel thickness for two coexisting but distantly related and morphologically disparate sauropod dinosaurs Camarasaurus and Diplodocus. Individual tooth formation time was determined by counting daily incremental lines in dentin. Tooth replacement rate is calculated as the difference between the number of days recorded in successive replacement teeth. Each tooth family in Camarasaurus has a maximum of three replacement teeth, whereas each Diplodocus tooth family has up to five. Tooth formation times are about 1.7 times longer in Camarasaurus than in Diplodocus (315 vs. 185 days. Average tooth replacement rate in Camarasaurus is about one tooth every 62 days versus about one tooth every 35 days in Diplodocus. Despite slower tooth replacement rates in Camarasaurus, the volumetric rate of Camarasaurus tooth replacement is 10 times faster than in Diplodocus because of its substantially greater tooth volumes. A novel method to estimate replacement rate was developed and applied to several other sauropodomorphs that we were not able to thin section. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Differences in tooth replacement rate among sauropodomorphs likely reflect disparate feeding strategies and/or food choices, which would have facilitated the coexistence of these gigantic herbivores in one ecosystem. Early neosauropods are characterized by high tooth replacement rates (despite their large tooth size, and derived titanosaurs and

  4. Short communication: Effects of increasing protein and energy in the milk replacer with or without direct-fed microbial supplementation on growth and performance of preweaned Holstein calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, A J; Ward, S H; Williams, C C; Rude, B J; Cabrera, C J; Kalestch, K N; Voelz, B E

    2014-11-01

    Forty-four Holstein calves were fed a direct-fed microbial (DFM) and 1 of 2 milk replacers to evaluate calf performance and growth. Treatments were (1) a control milk replacer [22:20; 22% crude protein (CP) and 20% fat], (2) an accelerated milk replacer (27:10; 27% CP and 10% fat), (3) the control milk replacer with added DFM (22:20+D), and (4) the accelerated milk replacer with added DFM (27:10+D). Dry matter intake, rectal temperatures, respiration scores and rates, and fecal scores were collected daily. Body weight, hip and withers height, heart girth, blood, and rumen fluid samples were collected weekly. Effects of treatment, sex, week, and their interactions were analyzed. Calves fed an accelerated milk replacer, regardless of DFM supplementation, consumed more CP and metabolizable energy in the milk replacer. No treatment differences were found for starter intake or intake of neutral detergent fiber or acid detergent fiber in the starter. Calves fed the accelerated milk replacer had greater preweaning and weaning body weight compared with calves fed the control milk replacer. Average daily gain was greater during the preweaning period for calves fed the accelerated milk replacer, but the same pattern did not hold true during the postweaning period. Feed efficiency did not differ among treatments. Hip height tended to be and withers height and heart girth were greater at weaning for calves fed the accelerated milk replacer compared with calves fed the control milk replacer. Fecal scores were greatest in calves fed DFM. Overall acetate, propionate, butyrate, and n-valerate concentrations were lower in calves fed the accelerated milk replacer, but DFM did not have an effect. Rumen pH was not different. Blood metabolites were unaffected by DFM supplementation, but calves fed the accelerated milk replacer had increased partial pressure of CO2, bicarbonate, and total bicarbonate in the blood. Direct-fed microbial supplementation did not appear to benefit the calf

  5. Neuronal mechanisms and circuits underlying repetitive behaviors in mouse models of autism spectrum disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hyopil; Lim, Chae-Seok; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) refers to a broad spectrum of neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by three central behavioral symptoms: impaired social interaction, impaired social communication, and restricted and repetitive behaviors. However, the symptoms are heterogeneous among patients and a number of ASD mouse models have been generated containing mutations that mimic the mutations found in human patients with ASD. Each mouse model was found to display a unique set of repetitive b...

  6. Mouse models of Fanconi anemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parmar, Kalindi; D' Andrea, Alan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, 44 Binney Street, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Niedernhofer, Laura J., E-mail: niedernhoferl@upmc.edu [Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and Cancer Institute, 5117 Centre Avenue, Hillman Cancer Center, Research Pavilion 2.6, Pittsburgh, PA 15213-1863 (United States)

    2009-07-31

    Fanconi anemia is a rare inherited disease characterized by congenital anomalies, growth retardation, aplastic anemia and an increased risk of acute myeloid leukemia and squamous cell carcinomas. The disease is caused by mutation in genes encoding proteins required for the Fanconi anemia pathway, a response mechanism to replicative stress, including that caused by genotoxins that cause DNA interstrand crosslinks. Defects in the Fanconi anemia pathway lead to genomic instability and apoptosis of proliferating cells. To date, 13 complementation groups of Fanconi anemia were identified. Five of these genes have been deleted or mutated in the mouse, as well as a sixth key regulatory gene, to create mouse models of Fanconi anemia. This review summarizes the phenotype of each of the Fanconi anemia mouse models and highlights how genetic and interventional studies using the strains have yielded novel insight into therapeutic strategies for Fanconi anemia and into how the Fanconi anemia pathway protects against genomic instability.

  7. 10. international mouse genome conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meisler, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    Ten years after hosting the First International Mammalian Genome Conference in Paris in 1986, Dr. Jean-Louis Guenet presided over the Tenth Conference at the Pasteur Institute, October 7--10, 1996. The 1986 conference was a satellite to the Human Gene Mapping Workshop and had approximately 50 attendees. The 1996 meeting was attended by 300 scientists from around the world. In the interim, the number of mapped loci in the mouse increased from 1,000 to over 20,000. This report contains a listing of the program and its participants, and two articles that review the meeting and the role of the laboratory mouse in the Human Genome project. More than 200 papers were presented at the conference covering the following topics: International mouse chromosome committee meetings; Mutant generation and identification; Physical and genetic maps; New technology and resources; Chromatin structure and gene regulation; Rate and hamster genetic maps; Informatics and databases; and Quantitative trait analysis.

  8. Teratology studies in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Edward; Leroy, Mariline

    2013-01-01

    The rat is the routine species of choice as the rodent model for regulatory safety testing of xenobiotics such as medicinal products, food additives, and other chemicals. However, the rat is not always suitable for pharmacological, toxicological, immunogenic, pharmacokinetic, or even practical reasons. Under such circumstances, the mouse offers an alternative for finding a suitable rodent model acceptable to the regulatory authorities. Since all essential routes of administration are possible, the short reproductive cycle and large litter size of the mouse make it a species well adapted for use in teratology studies. Given that good quality animals, including virgin mated females, can be acquired relatively easily and inexpensively, the mouse has been used in reproductive toxicity studies for decades and study protocols are well established.

  9. Gesture Recognition Based Mouse Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachit Puri

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the maneuver of mouse pointer a nd performs various mouse operations such as left click, right click, double click, drag etc using ge stures recognition technique. Recognizing gestures is a complex task which involves many aspects such as mo tion modeling, motion analysis, pattern recognition and machine learning. Keeping all the essential factors in mind a system has been created which recognizes the movement of fingers and various patterns formed by them. Color caps have been used for fingers to distinguish it f rom the background color such as skin color. Thus recog nizing the gestures various mouse events have been performed. The application has been created on MATL AB environment with operating system as windows 7.

  10. An Improved Clearing and Mounting Solution to Replace Chloral Hydrate in Microscopic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas S. Villani

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: This study presents Visikol™, a new proprietary formulation that can be used as an efficient replacement for chloral hydrate as a clearing agent for microscopic examination. In the United States, chloral hydrate is regulated and therefore difficult to acquire. Methods and Results: Fresh and dry samples of the following plants: ginger (Zingiber officinale, maté (Ilex paraguariensis, lime basil (Ocimum americanum, oregano (Origanum vulgare, and mouse-ear cress (Arabidopsis thaliana, were cleared using Visikol or chloral hydrate solution and compared using a light microscope. Conclusions: This new method can be used successfully to clear specimens, allowing identification of diagnostic characteristics for the identification of plant materials. Visikol is as effective as chloral hydrate in providing clarity and resolution of all tissues examined. Tissues become transparent, allowing observation of deeper layers of cells and making it effective in research, botanical and quality control, and for educational applications.

  11. Surfactant replacement therapy--economic impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pejaver, R K; al Hifzi, I; Aldussari, S

    2001-06-01

    Surfactant replacement is an effective treatment for neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. (RDS). As widespread use of surfactant is becoming a reality, it is important to assess the economic implications of this new form of therapy. A comparison study was carried out at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) of Northwest Armed Forces Hospital, Saudi Arabia. Among 75 infants who received surfactant for RDS and similar number who were managed during time period just before the surfactant was available, but by set criteria would have made them eligible for surfactant. All other management modalities except surfactant were the same for all these babies. Based on the intensity of monitoring and nursing care required by the baby, the level of care was divided as: Level IIIA, IIIB, Level II, Level I. The cost per day per bed for each level was calculated, taking into account the use of hospital immovable equipment, personal salaries of nursing, medical, ancillary staff, overheads and maintenance, depreciation and replacement costs. Medications used, procedures done, TPN, oxygen, were all added to individual patient's total expenditure. 75 infants in the Surfactant group had 62 survivors. They spent a total of 4300 days in hospital. (av 69.35) Out of which 970 d (av 15.65 per patient) were ventilated days. There were 56 survivors in the non-surfactant group of 75. They had spent a total of 5023 days in the hospital (av 89.69/patient) out of which 1490 were ventilated days (av 26.60 d). Including the cost of surfactant (two doses), cost of hospital stay for each infant taking the average figures of stay would be SR 118, 009.75 per surfactant treated baby and SR 164, 070.70 per non-surfactant treated baby. The difference of 46,061 SR is 39.03% more in non-surfactant group. One Saudi rial = 8 Rs (approx at the time study was carried out.) Medical care cost varies from place to place. However, it is definitely cost-effective where surfactant is concerned. Quality adjusted

  12. Mineral replacement reactions and element mobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnis, Christine V.; Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion; King, Helen E.; Hövelmann, Jörn; Renard, François

    2016-04-01

    When a mineral is out of equilibrium with an aqueous fluid, reactions will take place in an attempt to reach a new equilibrium. Commonly in the Earth dissolution at a mineral-fluid interface initiates a coupled reaction involving dissolution and precipitation (Ruiz-Agudo et al., 2014). This is a ubiquitous reaction during such processes as metamorphism, metasomatism and weathering. When rock-forming minerals such as feldspars, olivine, pyroxenes are in contact with aqueous fluids (typically NaCl-rich) resultant new phases are formed and elements present in the parent mineral are released to the fluid and therefore mobilized for transport elsewhere. This has been shown in a number of systems such as the albitisation of feldspars (Hövelmann et al., 2010) when a Ca-bearing plagioclase is replaced by albite (NaAlSi3O8). However during this reaction not only is Ca released to the fluid but most other minor elements, such as Mg, Pb, rare earth elements amongst others, are almost totally mobilized and removed in solution. This interface-coupled dissolution-precipitation reaction has many implications for the redistributon of elements in the crust of the Earth. It is also of note that albitisation occurs often in areas of high mineralization, such as in the Curnamona Province in S. Australia (Au-Cu and Ag-Pb-Zn deposits) and the Bamble District of S. Norway. Secondly atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to image these reactions at a nanoscale, especially at the calcite-fluid interface, such as the formation of apatite from phosphate-bearing solutions, and the sequestration of toxic elements, eg., Se and As. References Ruiz-Agudo E., Putnis C.V., Putnis A. (2014) Coupled dissolution and precipitation at mineral-fluid interfaces. Chemical Geology, 383, 132-146. Putnis C.V. and Ruiz-Agudo E. (2013) The mineral-water interface: where minerals react with the environment. Elements, 9, 177-182. Hövelmann J., Putnis A., Geisler T., Schmidt B.C., Golla-Schindler U. (2009

  13. Delivering enhanced testosterone replacement therapy through nanochannels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrati, Silvia; Nicolov, Eugenia; Bansal, Shyam; Zabre, Erika; Geninatti, Thomas; Ziemys, Arturas; Hudson, Lee; Ferrari, Mauro; Goodall, Randal; Khera, Mohit; Palapattu, Ganesh; Grattoni, Alessandro

    2015-02-18

    Primary or secondary hypogonadism results in a range of signs and symptoms that compromise quality of life and requires life-long testosterone replacement therapy. In this study, an implantable nanochannel system is investigated as an alternative delivery strategy for the long-term sustained and constant release of testosterone. In vitro release tests are performed using a dissolution set up, with testosterone and testosterone:2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (TES:HPCD) 1:1 and 1:2 molar ratio complexes release from the implantable nanochannel system and quantify by HPLC. 1:2 TES:HPCD complex stably achieve 10-15 times higher testosterone solubility with 25-30 times higher in vitro release. Bioactivity of delivered testosterone is verified by LNCaP/LUC cell luminescence. In vivo evaluation of testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH), and follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) levels by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and multiplex assay is performed in castrated Sprague-Dawley rats over 30 d. Animals are treated with the nanochannel implants or degradable testosterone pellets. The 1:2 TES:HPCD nanochannel implant exhibits sustained and clinically relevant in vivo release kinetics and attains physiologically stable plasma levels of testosterone, LH, and FSH. In conclusion, it is demonstrated that by providing long-term steady release 1:2 TES:HPCD nanochannel implants may represent a major breakthrough for the treatment of male hypogonadism.

  14. Acute Renal Replacement Therapy in Pediatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajit K. Basu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury (AKI independently increases morbidity and mortality in children admitted to the hospital. Renal replacement therapy (RRT is an essential therapy in the setting of AKI and fluid overload. The decision to initiate RRT is complex and often complicated by concerns related to patient hemodynamic and thermodynamic instability. The choice of which RRT modality to use depends on numerous criteria that are both patient and treatment center specific. Surprisingly, despite decades of use, no randomized, controlled trial study involving RRT in pediatrics has been performed. Because of these factors, clear-cut consensus is lacking regarding key questions surrounding RRT delivery. In this paper, we will summarize existing data concerning RRT use in children. We discuss the major modalities and the data-driven specifics of each, followed by controversies in RRT. As no standard of care is in widespread use for RRT in AKI or in multiorgan disease, we conclude in this paper that prospective studies of RRT are needed to identify best practice guidelines.

  15. Current concepts in total femoral replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Deepak; Siqueira, Marcelo Bp; Klika, Alison K; Higuera, Carlos A; Barsoum, Wael K; Joyce, Michael J

    2015-12-18

    Total femoral replacement (TFR) is a salvage arthroplasty procedure used as an alternative to lower limb amputation. Since its initial description in the mid-20(th) century, this procedure has been used in a variety of oncologic and non-oncologic indications. The most compelling advantage of TFR is the achievement of immediate fixation which permits early mobilization. It is anticipated that TFR will be increasingly performed as the rate of revision arthroplasty rises worldwide. The existing literature is mainly composed of a rather heterogeneous mix of retrospective case series and a wide assortment of case reports. Numerous TFR prostheses are currently available and the surgeon must understand the unique implications of each implant design. Long-term functional outcomes are dependent on adherence to proper technique and an appropriate physical therapy program for postoperative rehabilitation. Revision TFR is mainly performed for periprosthetic infection and the severe femoral bone loss associated with aseptic revisions. Depending on the likelihood of attaining infection clearance, it may sometimes be advisable to proceed directly to hip disarticulation without attempting salvage of the TFR. Other reported complications of TFR include hip joint instability, limb length discrepancy, device failure, component loosening, patellar maltracking and delayed wound healing. Further research is needed to better characterize the long-term functional outcomes and complications associated with this complex procedure.

  16. Can Smartwatches Replace Smartphones for Posture Tracking?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobak Mortazavi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a human posture tracking platform to identify the human postures of sitting, standing or lying down, based on a smartwatch. This work develops such a system as a proof-of-concept study to investigate a smartwatch’s ability to be used in future remote health monitoring systems and applications. This work validates the smartwatches’ ability to track the posture of users accurately in a laboratory setting while reducing the sampling rate to potentially improve battery life, the first steps in verifying that such a system would work in future clinical settings. The algorithm developed classifies the transitions between three posture states of sitting, standing and lying down, by identifying these transition movements, as well as other movements that might be mistaken for these transitions. The system is trained and developed on a Samsung Galaxy Gear smartwatch, and the algorithm was validated through a leave-one-subject-out cross-validation of 20 subjects. The system can identify the appropriate transitions at only 10 Hz with an F-score of 0.930, indicating its ability to effectively replace smart phones, if needed.

  17. Can smartwatches replace smartphones for posture tracking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Bobak; Nemati, Ebrahim; VanderWall, Kristina; Flores-Rodriguez, Hector G; Cai, Jun Yu Jacinta; Lucier, Jessica; Naeim, Arash; Sarrafzadeh, Majid

    2015-10-22

    This paper introduces a human posture tracking platform to identify the human postures of sitting, standing or lying down, based on a smartwatch. This work develops such a system as a proof-of-concept study to investigate a smartwatch's ability to be used in future remote health monitoring systems and applications. This work validates the smartwatches' ability to track the posture of users accurately in a laboratory setting while reducing the sampling rate to potentially improve battery life, the first steps in verifying that such a system would work in future clinical settings. The algorithm developed classifies the transitions between three posture states of sitting, standing and lying down, by identifying these transition movements, as well as other movements that might be mistaken for these transitions. The system is trained and developed on a Samsung Galaxy Gear smartwatch, and the algorithm was validated through a leave-one-subject-out cross-validation of 20 subjects. The system can identify the appropriate transitions at only 10 Hz with an F-score of 0.930, indicating its ability to effectively replace smart phones, if needed.

  18. TOTAL ANKLE REPLACEMENT: WHY, WHEN AND HOW?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonasia, Davide Edoardo; Dettoni, Federico; Femino, John E; Phisitkul, Phinit; Germano, Margherita; Amendola, Annunziato

    2010-01-01

    Total ankle replacement (TAR) was first attempted in the 1970s, but poor results led to its being considered inferior to ankle fusion until the late 1980s and early 1990s. By that time, newer designs which more closely replicated the natural anatomy of the ankle, showed improved clinical outcomes.1 Currently, even though controversy still exists about the effectiveness of TAR compared to ankle fusion, TAR has shown promising mid-term results and should no longer be considered an experimental procedure. Factors related to improved TAR outcomes include: 1) better patient selection, 2) more precise knowledge and replication of ankle biomechanics, 3) the introduction of less-constrained designs with reduced bone resection and no need for cementation, and 4) greater awareness of soft-tissue balance and component alignment. When TAR is performed, a thorough knowledge of ankle anatomy, pathologic anatomy and biomechanics is needed along with a careful pre-operative plan. These are fundamental in obtaining durable and predictable outcomes. The aim of this paper is to outline these aspects through a literature review. PMID:21045984

  19. Total ankle replacement for posttraumatic arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weme, Rebecca A Nieuwe; van Solinge, Guido; N Doornberg, Job; Sierevelt, Inger; Haverkamp, Daniël; Doets, H Cornelis

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Most studies on total ankle replacement (TAR) have used a case mix of patients. We evaluated the outcome of TAR performed for end-stage arthritis either because of fracture or ligamentous injury. Patients and methods We prospectively followed 88 consecutive patients (50 postfracture ankles and 40 ankles with instability arthritis (2 bilateral)) who underwent TAR between 2001 and 2009. Mean follow-up for both groups was 5 years. Results Preoperative varus deformity of 10° or more was present in 23 ankles in the instability group. At 6 years, survival with revision or salvage fusion as an endpoint was 87% (95% CI: 74–99) in the postfracture group and 79% (95% CI: 63–94) in the instability group. Progressive periprosthetic osteolysis was seen in 23 ankles, and required salvage fusion in 6. The number of reoperations was similar in both groups. Clinical outcome, as assessed with 2 ankle scores and 2 questionnaires, showed good results and was similar at the latest follow-up. Interpretation The outcome was similar in the postfracture and instability groups and also similar to that reported in series including a case mix of patients. In contrast to earlier reports, preoperative frontal plane deformity in this series was not identified as a risk factor for failure. PMID:25772269

  20. Ulnar Head Replacement and Related Biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerbier, Michael; Arsalan-Werner, Annika; Enderle, Elena; Vetter, Miriam; Vonier, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    A stable distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) is mandatory for the function and load transmission in the wrist and forearm. Resectional salvage procedures such as the Darrach procedure, Bowers arthroplasty, and Sauvé-Kapandji procedure include the potential risk of radioulnar instability and impingement, which can lead to pain and weakness. Soft tissue stabilizing techniques have only limited success rates in solving these problems. In an attempt to stabilize the distal forearm mechanically following ulnar head resection, various endoprostheses have been developed to replace the ulnar head. The prostheses can be used for secondary treatment of failed ulnar head resection, but they can also achieve good results in the primary treatment of osteoarthritis of the DRUJ. Our experience consists of twenty-five patients (follow-up 30 months) with DRUJ osteoarthritis who were treated with an ulnar head prosthesis, with improvement in pain, range of motion, and grip strength. An ulnar head prosthesis should be considered as a treatment option for a painful DRUJ. PMID:24436786