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Sample records for repetitive oscillatory bursts

  1. Understanding the Generation of Network Bursts by Adaptive Oscillatory Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanguy Fardet

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Experimental and numerical studies have revealed that isolated populations of oscillatory neurons can spontaneously synchronize and generate periodic bursts involving the whole network. Such a behavior has notably been observed for cultured neurons in rodent's cortex or hippocampus. We show here that a sufficient condition for this network bursting is the presence of an excitatory population of oscillatory neurons which displays spike-driven adaptation. We provide an analytic model to analyze network bursts generated by coupled adaptive exponential integrate-and-fire neurons. We show that, for strong synaptic coupling, intrinsically tonic spiking neurons evolve to reach a synchronized intermittent bursting state. The presence of inhibitory neurons or plastic synapses can then modulate this dynamics in many ways but is not necessary for its appearance. Thanks to a simple self-consistent equation, our model gives an intuitive and semi-quantitative tool to understand the bursting behavior. Furthermore, it suggests that after-hyperpolarization currents are sufficient to explain bursting termination. Through a thorough mapping between the theoretical parameters and ion-channel properties, we discuss the biological mechanisms that could be involved and the relevance of the explored parameter-space. Such an insight enables us to propose experimentally-testable predictions regarding how blocking fast, medium or slow after-hyperpolarization channels would affect the firing rate and burst duration, as well as the interburst interval.

  2. High repetition rate burst-mode spark gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faltens, A.; Reginato, L.; Hester, R.; Chesterman, A.; Cook, E.; Yokota, T.; Dexter, W.

    1978-01-01

    Results are presented on the design and testing of a pressurized gas blown spark gap switch capable of high repetition rates in a burst mode of operation. The switch parameters which have been achieved are as follows: 220-kV, 42-kA, a five pulse burst at 1-kHz, 12-ns risetime, 2-ns jitter at a pulse width of 50-ns

  3. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation induces oscillatory power changes in chronic tinnitus

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    Martin eSchecklmann

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic tinnitus is associated with neuroplastic changes in auditory and non-auditory cortical areas. About ten years ago, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS of auditory and prefrontal cortex was introduced as potential treatment for tinnitus. The resulting changes in tinnitus loudness are interpreted in the context of rTMS induced activity changes (neuroplasticity. Here, we investigate the effect of single rTMS sessions on oscillatory power to probe the capacity of rTMS to interfere with tinnitus-specific cortical plasticity. We measured 20 patients with bilateral chronic tinnitus and 20 healthy controls comparable for age, sex, handedness, and hearing level with a 63-channel EEG system. Educational level, intelligence, depressivity and hyperacusis were controlled for by analysis of covariance. Different rTMS protocols were tested: Left and right temporal and left and right prefrontal cortices were each stimulated with 200 pulses at 1Hz and with an intensity of 60% stimulator output. Stimulation of central parietal cortex with 6-fold reduced intensity (inverted passive-cooled coil served as sham condition. Before and after each rTMS protocol five minutes of resting state EEG were recorded. The order of rTMS protocols was randomized over two sessions with one week interval in between.Analyses on electrode level showed that people with and without tinnitus differed in their response to left temporal and right frontal stimulation. In tinnitus patients left temporal rTMS decreased frontal theta and delta and increased beta2 power, whereas right frontal rTMS decreased right temporal beta3 and gamma power. No changes or increases were observed in the control group. Only non-systematic changes in tinnitus loudness were induced by single sessions of rTMS.This is the first study to show tinnitus-related alterations of neuroplasticity that were specific to stimulation site and oscillatory frequency. The observed effects can be interpreted

  4. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation induces oscillatory power changes in chronic tinnitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schecklmann, Martin; Lehner, Astrid; Gollmitzer, Judith; Schmidt, Eldrid; Schlee, Winfried; Langguth, Berthold

    2015-01-01

    Chronic tinnitus is associated with neuroplastic changes in auditory and non-auditory cortical areas. About 10 years ago, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of auditory and prefrontal cortex was introduced as potential treatment for tinnitus. The resulting changes in tinnitus loudness are interpreted in the context of rTMS induced activity changes (neuroplasticity). Here, we investigate the effect of single rTMS sessions on oscillatory power to probe the capacity of rTMS to interfere with tinnitus-specific cortical plasticity. We measured 20 patients with bilateral chronic tinnitus and 20 healthy controls comparable for age, sex, handedness, and hearing level with a 63-channel electroencephalography (EEG) system. Educational level, intelligence, depressivity and hyperacusis were controlled for by analysis of covariance. Different rTMS protocols were tested: Left and right temporal and left and right prefrontal cortices were each stimulated with 200 pulses at 1 Hz and with an intensity of 60% stimulator output. Stimulation of central parietal cortex with 6-fold reduced intensity (inverted passive-cooled coil) served as sham condition. Before and after each rTMS protocol 5 min of resting state EEG were recorded. The order of rTMS protocols was randomized over two sessions with 1 week interval in between. Analyses on electrode level showed that people with and without tinnitus differed in their response to left temporal and right frontal stimulation. In tinnitus patients left temporal rTMS decreased frontal theta and delta and increased beta2 power, whereas right frontal rTMS decreased right temporal beta3 and gamma power. No changes or increases were observed in the control group. Only non-systematic changes in tinnitus loudness were induced by single sessions of rTMS. This is the first study to show tinnitus-related alterations of neuroplasticity that were specific to stimulation site and oscillatory frequency. The observed effects can be

  5. Facilitation of speech repetition accuracy by theta burst stimulation of the left posterior inferior frontal gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restle, Julia; Murakami, Takenobu; Ziemann, Ulf

    2012-07-01

    The posterior part of the inferior frontal gyrus (pIFG) in the left hemisphere is thought to form part of the putative human mirror neuron system and is assigned a key role in mapping sensory perception onto motor action. Accordingly, the pIFG is involved in motor imitation of the observed actions of others but it is not known to what extent speech repetition of auditory-presented sentences is also a function of the pIFG. Here we applied fMRI-guided facilitating intermittent theta burst transcranial magnetic stimulation (iTBS), or depressant continuous TBS (cTBS), or intermediate TBS (imTBS) over the left pIFG of healthy subjects and compared speech repetition accuracy of foreign Japanese sentences before and after TBS. We found that repetition accuracy improved after iTBS and, to a lesser extent, after imTBS, but remained unchanged after cTBS. In a control experiment, iTBS was applied over the left middle occipital gyrus (MOG), a region not involved in sensorimotor processing of auditory-presented speech. Repetition accuracy remained unchanged after iTBS of MOG. We argue that the stimulation type and stimulation site specific facilitating effect of iTBS over left pIFG on speech repetition accuracy indicates a causal role of the human left-hemispheric pIFG in the translation of phonological perception to motor articulatory output for repetition of speech. This effect may prove useful in rehabilitation strategies that combine repetitive speech training with iTBS of the left pIFG in speech disorders, such as aphasia after cerebral stroke. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Bilateral somatosensory evoked potentials following intermittent theta-burst repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premji, Azra; Ziluk, Angela; Nelson, Aimee J

    2010-08-05

    Intermittent theta-burst stimulation (iTBS) is a form of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation that may alter cortical excitability in the primary somatosensory cortex (SI). The present study investigated the effects of iTBS on subcortical and early cortical somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) recorded over left, iTBS stimulated SI and the right-hemisphere non-stimulated SI. SEPs were recorded before and at 5, 15, and 25 minutes following iTBS. Compared to pre-iTBS, the amplitude of cortical potential N20/P25 was significantly increased for 5 minutes from non-stimulated SI and for 15 to 25 minutes from stimulated SI. Subcortical potentials recorded bilaterally remained unaltered following iTBS. We conclude that iTBS increases the cortical excitability of SI bilaterally and does not alter thalamocortical afferent input to SI. ITBS may provide one avenue to induce cortical plasticity in the somatosensory cortex.

  7. Bilateral somatosensory evoked potentials following intermittent theta-burst repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation

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    Ziluk Angela

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intermittent theta-burst stimulation (iTBS is a form of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation that may alter cortical excitability in the primary somatosensory cortex (SI. The present study investigated the effects of iTBS on subcortical and early cortical somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs recorded over left, iTBS stimulated SI and the right-hemisphere non-stimulated SI. SEPs were recorded before and at 5, 15, and 25 minutes following iTBS. Results Compared to pre-iTBS, the amplitude of cortical potential N20/P25 was significantly increased for 5 minutes from non-stimulated SI and for 15 to 25 minutes from stimulated SI. Subcortical potentials recorded bilaterally remained unaltered following iTBS. Conclusion We conclude that iTBS increases the cortical excitability of SI bilaterally and does not alter thalamocortical afferent input to SI. ITBS may provide one avenue to induce cortical plasticity in the somatosensory cortex.

  8. DC-driven plasma gun: self-oscillatory operation mode of atmospheric-pressure helium plasma jet comprised of repetitive streamer breakdowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingxing; Shashurin, Alexey

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents and studies helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet comprised of a series of repetitive streamer breakdowns, which is driven by pure DC high voltage (self-oscillatory behavior). The repetition frequency of the breakdowns is governed by the geometry of discharge electrodes/surroundings and gas flow rate. Each next streamer is initiated when the electric field on the anode tip recovers after the previous breakdown and reaches the breakdown threshold value of about 2.5 kV cm-1. One type of the helium plasma gun designed using this operational principle is demonstrated. The gun operates on about 3 kV DC high voltage and is comprised of the series of the repetitive streamer breakdowns at a frequency of about 13 kHz.

  9. Fast-ion transport during repetitive burst phenomena of toroidal Alfven eigenmodes in the Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiura, M.; Isobe, M.; Yamamoto, S.

    2008-10-01

    Alfven instabilities induced fast-ion losses have been directly observed for the first time by a newly developed scintillator lost ion probe (SLIP) in the Large Helical Device (LHD). The SLIP can measure the pitch angle and gyro radius of escaped fast ions toward loss region. Neutral beam driven Alfven Eigenmodes (AEs) are excited under the reactor relevant conditions: the ratio of fast ion (beam) speed υ b and Alfven speed υ A is more than 0.3 - 4.0. The beta value for fast ions is considered roughly to be ∼10%. Non-linear phenomena related to Alfven instabilities are observed under such conditions. During repetitive Toroidal Alfven Eigenmode (TAE) bursts, synchronized fast ion losses are observed by SLIP. From the orbit calculation the measured fast ion with pitch angle of 130 degrees and beam energy of 150 keV surely pass through the locations of TAE gaps. The orbit analysis found that the observed fast ions interact strongly with the excited TAEs. This result becomes the first experimental evidence of radial transport of fast ions predicted theoretically during TAE activities. In addition, from the correlation between stored energy degradation and fast-ion loss rate, it is found that fast-ion losses induced by TAE activities with low toroidal mode numbers categorize two phenomena without and with fast- ion loss enhancements, which indicate the fast-ion redistribution and loss. (author)

  10. Stimulus-dependent state transition between synchronized oscillation and randomly repetitive burst in a model cerebellar granular layer.

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    Takeru Honda

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Information processing of the cerebellar granular layer composed of granule and Golgi cells is regarded as an important first step toward the cerebellar computation. Our previous theoretical studies have shown that granule cells can exhibit random alternation between burst and silent modes, which provides a basis of population representation of the passage-of-time (POT from the onset of external input stimuli. On the other hand, another computational study has reported that granule cells can exhibit synchronized oscillation of activity, as consistent with observed oscillation in local field potential recorded from the granular layer while animals keep still. Here we have a question of whether an identical network model can explain these distinct dynamics. In the present study, we carried out computer simulations based on a spiking network model of the granular layer varying two parameters: the strength of a current injected to granule cells and the concentration of Mg²⁺ which controls the conductance of NMDA channels assumed on the Golgi cell dendrites. The simulations showed that cells in the granular layer can switch activity states between synchronized oscillation and random burst-silent alternation depending on the two parameters. For higher Mg²⁺ concentration and a weaker injected current, granule and Golgi cells elicited spikes synchronously (synchronized oscillation state. In contrast, for lower Mg²⁺ concentration and a stronger injected current, those cells showed the random burst-silent alternation (POT-representing state. It is suggested that NMDA channels on the Golgi cell dendrites play an important role for determining how the granular layer works in response to external input.

  11. Observation of repetitive bursts in emission of fast ions and neutrons in sub-nanosecond laser-solid experiments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krása, Josef; Klír, D.; Velyhan, Andriy; Margarone, Daniele; Krouský, Eduard; Jungwirth, Karel; Skála, Jiří; Pfeifer, Miroslav; Kravárik, J.; Kubeš, P.; Řezáč, K.; Ullschmied, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 3 (2013), s. 395-401 ISSN 0263-0346 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0279; GA ČR GAP205/12/0454; GA MŠk LM2010014 Grant - others:OPVK 3 Laser Zdroj(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0279 Program:EE Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389021 Keywords : laser-plasma interactions * neutron yield scaling * bursts in ion emission Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers; BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics (UFP-V) Impact factor: 1.701, year: 2013

  12. Continuous theta-burst stimulation to primary motor cortex reveals asymmetric compensation for sensory attenuation in bimanual repetitive force production.

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    Therrien, Amanda S; Lyons, James; Balasubramaniam, Ramesh

    2013-08-01

    Studies of fingertip force production have shown that self-produced forces are perceived as weaker than externally generated forces. This is due to mechanisms of sensory reafference where the comparison between predicted and actual sensory feedback results in attenuated perceptions of self-generated forces. Without an external reference to calibrate attenuated performance judgments, a compensatory overproduction of force is exhibited. It remains unclear whether the force overproduction seen in the absence of visual reference stimuli differs when forces are produced bimanually. We studied performance of two versions of a bimanual sequential force production task compared with each hand performing the task unimanually. When the task goal was shared, force series produced by each hand in bimanual conditions were found to be uncorrelated. When the bimanual task required each hand to reach a target force level, we found asymmetries in the degree of force overproduction between the hands following visual feedback removal. Unilateral continuous theta-burst stimulation of the left primary motor cortex yielded a selective reduction of force overproduction in the hand contralateral to stimulation by disrupting sensory reafference processes. While variability was lower in bimanual trials when the task goal was shared, this influence of hand condition disappeared when the target force level was to be reached by each hand simultaneously. Our findings strengthen the notion that force control in bimanual action is less tightly coupled than other mechanisms of bimanual motor control and show that this effector specificity may be extended to the processing and compensation for mechanisms of sensory reafference.

  13. Reduced Performance During a Sentence Repetition Task by Continuous Theta-Burst Magnetic Stimulation of the Pre-supplementary Motor Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Susanne; Hertrich, Ingo; Müller-Dahlhaus, Florian; Ackermann, Hermann; Belardinelli, Paolo; Desideri, Debora; Seibold, Verena C.; Ziemann, Ulf

    2018-01-01

    The pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA) is engaged in speech comprehension under difficult circumstances such as poor acoustic signal quality or time-critical conditions. Previous studies found that left pre-SMA is activated when subjects listen to accelerated speech. Here, the functional role of pre-SMA was tested for accelerated speech comprehension by inducing a transient “virtual lesion” using continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS). Participants were tested (1) prior to (pre-baseline), (2) 10 min after (test condition for the cTBS effect), and (3) 60 min after stimulation (post-baseline) using a sentence repetition task (formant-synthesized at rates of 8, 10, 12, 14, and 16 syllables/s). Speech comprehension was quantified by the percentage of correctly reproduced speech material. For high speech rates, subjects showed decreased performance after cTBS of pre-SMA. Regarding the error pattern, the number of incorrect words without any semantic or phonological similarity to the target context increased, while related words decreased. Thus, the transient impairment of pre-SMA seems to affect its inhibitory function that normally eliminates erroneous speech material prior to speaking or, in case of perception, prior to encoding into a semantically/pragmatically meaningful message. PMID:29896086

  14. Reduced Performance During a Sentence Repetition Task by Continuous Theta-Burst Magnetic Stimulation of the Pre-supplementary Motor Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Dietrich

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA is engaged in speech comprehension under difficult circumstances such as poor acoustic signal quality or time-critical conditions. Previous studies found that left pre-SMA is activated when subjects listen to accelerated speech. Here, the functional role of pre-SMA was tested for accelerated speech comprehension by inducing a transient “virtual lesion” using continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS. Participants were tested (1 prior to (pre-baseline, (2 10 min after (test condition for the cTBS effect, and (3 60 min after stimulation (post-baseline using a sentence repetition task (formant-synthesized at rates of 8, 10, 12, 14, and 16 syllables/s. Speech comprehension was quantified by the percentage of correctly reproduced speech material. For high speech rates, subjects showed decreased performance after cTBS of pre-SMA. Regarding the error pattern, the number of incorrect words without any semantic or phonological similarity to the target context increased, while related words decreased. Thus, the transient impairment of pre-SMA seems to affect its inhibitory function that normally eliminates erroneous speech material prior to speaking or, in case of perception, prior to encoding into a semantically/pragmatically meaningful message.

  15. A nonlinear oscillatory problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Qingqing.

    1991-10-01

    We have studied the nonlinear oscillatory problem of orthotropic cylindrical shell, we have analyzed the character of the oscillatory system. The stable condition of the oscillatory system has been given. (author). 6 refs

  16. High Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AC Bryan

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available High frequency oscillatory (HFO ventilation using low tidal volume and peak airway pressures is extremely efficient at eliminating carbon dioxide and raising pH in the newborn infant with acute respiratory failure. Improvement in oxygenation requires a strategy of sustained or repetitive inflations to 25 to 30 cm H2O in order to place the lung on the deflation limb of the pressure-volume curve. This strategy has also been shown to decrease the amount of secondary lung injury in animal models. Experience of the use of HFO ventilation as a rescue therapy as well as several published controlled trials have shown improved outcomes and a decrease in the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation when it has been used in newborns.

  17. Effectiveness of theta burst versus high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with depression (THREE-D): a randomised non-inferiority trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumberger, Daniel M; Vila-Rodriguez, Fidel; Thorpe, Kevin E; Feffer, Kfir; Noda, Yoshihiro; Giacobbe, Peter; Knyahnytska, Yuliya; Kennedy, Sidney H; Lam, Raymond W; Daskalakis, Zafiris J; Downar, Jonathan

    2018-04-28

    Treatment-resistant major depressive disorder is common; repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) by use of high-frequency (10 Hz) left-side dorsolateral prefrontal cortex stimulation is an evidence-based treatment for this disorder. Intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) is a newer form of rTMS that can be delivered in 3 min, versus 37·5 min for a standard 10 Hz treatment session. We aimed to establish the clinical effectiveness, safety, and tolerability of iTBS compared with standard 10 Hz rTMS in adults with treatment-resistant depression. In this randomised, multicentre, non-inferiority clinical trial, we recruited patients who were referred to specialty neurostimulation centres based at three Canadian university hospitals (Centre for Addiction and Mental Health and Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, ON, and University of British Columbia Hospital, Vancouver, BC). Participants were aged 18-65 years, were diagnosed with a current treatment-resistant major depressive episode or could not tolerate at least two antidepressants in the current episode, were receiving stable antidepressant medication doses for at least 4 weeks before baseline, and had an HRSD-17 score of at least 18. Participants were randomly allocated (1:1) to treatment groups (10 Hz rTMS or iTBS) by use of a random permuted block method, with stratification by site and number of adequate trials in which the antidepressants were unsuccessful. Treatment was delivered open-label but investigators and outcome assessors were masked to treatment groups. Participants were treated with 10 Hz rTMS or iTBS to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, administered on 5 days a week for 4-6 weeks. The primary outcome measure was change in 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD-17) score, with a non-inferiority margin of 2·25 points. For the primary outcome measure, we did a per-protocol analysis of all participants who were randomly allocated to groups and who attained the primary

  18. Oscillatory systems in mitochondria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gooch, V D; Packer, L

    1974-01-01

    Comparison of known mitochondrial oscillatory systems suggest that they all have a common mechanism. Investigation of the requirements of these various systems reveals a common set of basic features that indicate ion-transport processes to be the key components mediating oscillatory behavior. These ion-transport processes include (a) a diffusional transport of a cation and a H/sup +/, (b) a diffusional, non-ionic, coupled transport of a H/sup +/ with a weak acid anion, and (c) an energy-linked H/sup +/ transport. To adequately describe the oscillatory phenomenon, however, it is necessary to consider also the presence of (a) nonlinear concentration profiles of one or more ions within the membrane and its unstirred layers, and (b) feedback loops developed as a result of molecular conformational changes or membrane structural changes affecting ionic flows, each having a major influence on the other.

  19. Strobes: An oscillatory combustion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corbel, J.M.L.; Lingen, J.N.J. van; Zevenbergen, J.F.; Gijzeman, O.L.J.; Meijerink, A.

    2012-01-01

    Strobe compositions belong to the class of solid combustions. They are mixtures of powdered ingredients. When ignited, the combustion front evolves in an oscillatory fashion, and flashes of light are produced by intermittence. They have fascinated many scientists since their discovery at the

  20. Emergence of Oscillatory Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugesen, Jakob Lund; Mosekilde, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Besides their systems nature, as described in the preceding chapters, the single most characteristic feature of a living organism is the self-sustained activity it displays in the form of a wide variety of different oscillatory processes [25, 9, 22, 23]. The respiratory cycle and the beating...

  1. Efficacy of intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation (iTBS) and 10-Hz high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in treatment-resistant unipolar depression: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulteau, Samuel; Sébille, Veronique; Fayet, Guillemette; Thomas-Ollivier, Veronique; Deschamps, Thibault; Bonnin-Rivalland, Annabelle; Laforgue, Edouard; Pichot, Anne; Valrivière, Pierre; Auffray-Calvier, Elisabeth; Fortin, June; Péréon, Yann; Vanelle, Jean-Marie; Sauvaget, Anne

    2017-01-13

    The treatment of depression remains a challenge since at least 40% of patients do not respond to initial antidepressant therapy and 20% present chronic symptoms (more than 2 years despite standard treatment administered correctly). Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is an effective adjuvant therapy but still not ideal. Intermittent Theta Burst Stimulation (iTBS), which has only been used recently in clinical practice, could have a faster and more intense effect compared to conventional protocols, including 10-Hz high-frequency rTMS (HF-rTMS). However, no controlled study has so far highlighted the superiority of iTBS in resistant unipolar depression. This paper focuses on the design of a randomised, controlled, double-blind, single-centre study with two parallel arms, carried out in France, in an attempt to assess the efficacy of an iTBS protocol versus a standard HF- rTMS protocol. Sixty patients aged between 18 and 75 years of age will be enrolled. They must be diagnosed with major depressive disorder persisting despite treatment with two antidepressants at an effective dose over a period of 6 weeks during the current episode. The study will consist of two phases: a treatment phase comprising 20 sessions of rTMS to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, localised via a neuronavigation system and a 6-month longitudinal follow-up. The primary endpoint will be the number of responders per group, defined by a decrease of at least 50% in the initial score on the Montgomery and Asberg Rating Scale (MADRS) at the end of rTMS sessions. The secondary endpoints will be: response rate 1 month after rTMS sessions; number of remissions defined by a MADRS score of iTBS superiority in the management of unipolar depression and we will discuss its effect over time. In case of a significant increase in the number of therapeutic responses with a prolonged effect, the iTBS protocol could be considered a first-line protocol in resistant unipolar depression

  2. Synchronization in oscillatory networks

    CERN Document Server

    Osipov, Grigory V; Zhou, Changsong

    2007-01-01

    The formation of collective behavior in large ensembles or networks of coupled oscillatory elements is one of the oldest and most fundamental aspects of dynamical systems theory. Potential and present applications span a vast spectrum of fields ranging from physics, chemistry, geoscience, through life- and neurosciences to engineering, the economic and the social sciences. This work systematically investigates a large number of oscillatory network configurations that are able to describe many real systems such as electric power grids, lasers or the heart muscle - to name but a few. This book is conceived as an introduction to the field for graduate students in physics and applied mathematics as well as being a compendium for researchers from any field of application interested in quantitative models.

  3. Oscillatory processes in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallin, E.

    1980-01-01

    The oscillatory process play an important part in plasma evolution, In hot plasma in particular, the interactions between the oscillation modes are preponderant in relation to the binary collisions between particles. The nonlineary interactions between collective plasma oscillations can generate, in this case, a non-balanced steady state of plasma (steady turbulence). The paper elucidates some aspects of the oscillatory phenomena which contribute to the plasma state evolution, especially of hot plasma. A major part of the paper is devoted to the study of parametric instabilities in plasma and their role in increasing the temperature of plasma components (electrons, ions). Both parametric instabilities in plasma in the vicinity of thermodynamic balance and parametric processes is steady turbulent plasma are analysed - in relation to additional heating of hot plasma. An important result of the thesis refers to the drowing-up of a non-lineary interaction model between the oscillation modes in turbulent plasma, being responsible for the electromagnetic radiation in hot plasma. On the basis of the model suggested in the paper the existence of a low frequency radiative mode in hot plasma in a turbulent state, can be demonstrated. Its frequency could be even lower than plasma frequency in the field of long waves be even lower than plasma frequency in the field of long waves. Such a radiative mode was detected experimentally in focussed plasma installations. (author)

  4. Oscillatory flow chemical reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavnić Danijela S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Global market competition, increase in energy and other production costs, demands for high quality products and reduction of waste are forcing pharmaceutical, fine chemicals and biochemical industries, to search for radical solutions. One of the most effective ways to improve the overall production (cost reduction and better control of reactions is a transition from batch to continuous processes. However, the reactions of interests for the mentioned industry sectors are often slow, thus continuous tubular reactors would be impractically long for flow regimes which provide sufficient heat and mass transfer and narrow residence time distribution. The oscillatory flow reactors (OFR are newer type of tube reactors which can offer solution by providing continuous operation with approximately plug flow pattern, low shear stress rates and enhanced mass and heat transfer. These benefits are the result of very good mixing in OFR achieved by vortex generation. OFR consists of cylindrical tube containing equally spaced orifice baffles. Fluid oscillations are superimposed on a net (laminar flow. Eddies are generated when oscillating fluid collides with baffles and passes through orifices. Generation and propagation of vortices create uniform mixing in each reactor cavity (between baffles, providing an overall flow pattern which is close to plug flow. Oscillations can be created by direct action of a piston or a diaphragm on fluid (or alternatively on baffles. This article provides an overview of oscillatory flow reactor technology, its operating principles and basic design and scale - up characteristics. Further, the article reviews the key research findings in heat and mass transfer, shear stress, residence time distribution in OFR, presenting their advantages over the conventional reactors. Finally, relevant process intensification examples from pharmaceutical, polymer and biofuels industries are presented.

  5. Repetitive Stress Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Repetitive Stress Injuries KidsHealth / For Teens / Repetitive Stress Injuries What's ... t had any problems since. What Are Repetitive Stress Injuries? Repetitive stress injuries (RSIs) are injuries that ...

  6. Encapsulation Efficiency, Oscillatory Rheometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Mohammad Hassani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoliposomes are one of the most important polar lipid-based nanocarriers which can be used for encapsulation of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic active compounds. In this research, nanoliposomes based on lecithin-polyethylene glycol-gamma oryzanol were prepared by using a modified thermal method. Only one melting peak in DSC curve of gamma oryzanol bearing liposomes was observed which could be attributed to co-crystallization of both compounds. The addition of gamma oryzanol, caused to reduce the melting point of 5% (w/v lecithin-based liposome from 207°C to 163.2°C. At high level of lecithin, increasing of liposome particle size (storage at 4°C for two months was more obvious and particle size increased from 61 and 113 to 283 and 384 nanometers, respectively. The encapsulation efficiency of gamma oryzanol increased from 60% to 84.3% with increasing lecithin content. The encapsulation stability of oryzanol in liposome was determined at different concentrations of lecithin 3, 5, 10, 20% (w/v and different storage times (1, 7, 30 and 60 days. In all concentrations, the encapsulation stability slightly decreased during 30 days storage. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM images showed relatively spherical to elliptic particles which indicated to low extent of particles coalescence. The oscillatory rheometry showed that the loss modulus of liposomes were higher than storage modulus and more liquid-like behavior than solid-like behavior. The samples storage at 25°C for one month, showed higher viscoelastic parameters than those having been stored at 4°C which were attributed to higher membrane fluidity at 25°C and their final coalescence.Nanoliposomes are one of the most important polar lipid based nanocarriers which can be used for encapsulation of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic active compounds. In this research, nanoliposomes based on lecithin-polyethylene glycol-gamma oryzanol were prepared by using modified thermal method. Only one

  7. Oscillatory integration windows in neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nitin; Singh, Swikriti Saran; Stopfer, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Oscillatory synchrony among neurons occurs in many species and brain areas, and has been proposed to help neural circuits process information. One hypothesis states that oscillatory input creates cyclic integration windows: specific times in each oscillatory cycle when postsynaptic neurons become especially responsive to inputs. With paired local field potential (LFP) and intracellular recordings and controlled stimulus manipulations we directly test this idea in the locust olfactory system. We find that inputs arriving in Kenyon cells (KCs) sum most effectively in a preferred window of the oscillation cycle. With a computational model, we show that the non-uniform structure of noise in the membrane potential helps mediate this process. Further experiments performed in vivo demonstrate that integration windows can form in the absence of inhibition and at a broad range of oscillation frequencies. Our results reveal how a fundamental coincidence-detection mechanism in a neural circuit functions to decode temporally organized spiking. PMID:27976720

  8. High repetition rate intense ion beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, D.A.; Glidden, S.C.; Noonan, B.

    1992-01-01

    This final report describes a ≤ 150kV, 40kA, 100ns high repetition rate pulsed power system and intense ion beam source which is now in operation at Cornell University. Operation of the Magnetically-controlled Anode Plasma (MAP) ion diode at > 100Hz (burst mode for up to 10 pulse bursts) provides an initial look at repetition rate limitations of both the ion diode and beam diagnostics. The pulsed power systems are capable of ≥ 1kHz operation (up to 10 pulse bursts), but ion diode operation was limited to ∼100Hz because of diagnostic limitations. By varying MAP diode operating parameters, ion beams can be extracted at a few 10s of keV or at up to 150keV, the corresponding accelerating gap impedance ranging from about 1Ω to about 10Ω. The ability to make hundreds of test pulses per day at an average repetition rate of about 2 pulses per minute permits statistical analysis of diode operation as a function of various parameters. Most diode components have now survived more than 10 4 pulses, and the design and construction of the various pulsed power components of the MAP diode which have enabled us to reach this point are discussed. A high speed data acquisition system and companion analysis software capable of acquiring pulse data at 1ms intervals (in bursts of up to 10 pulses) and processing it in ≤ min is described

  9. Repetition and the Concept of Repetition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne Grøn

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper offers a description of the meaning of the category of repetition. Firstly, it is pointed out that Constantin uses repetition as a concept that means the creation of epochs; the passing from Greece to Modernity is accomplished distinguishing between recollection, a concept that looks back to the past, and repetition, a concept that looks forward to future. Secondly, it is showed that the category of repetition, as a religious category, relates with what Climacus calls “ethic despair” and with what Vigilius calls “second ethics”; it is through repetition that it can be understood that sin finds its place in ethics and these shows the tension between it and dogmatics. And thirdly, it is showed that the descovery of the new category of repetition is a rediscovery of what Kierkegaard calls category of spirit; repetition has for its object the individuality, and coming to be oneself is what Kierkegaard undertands as liberty. At the end of the paper it is questioned if the category of repetition is inconsistent with the book Repetition.

  10. Spontaneous oscillatory rhythms in the degenerating mouse retina modulate retinal ganglion cell responses to electrical stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Sook eGoo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of the electrical activity of the retina in the animal models of retinal degeneration has been carried out in part to understand the progression of retinal degenerative diseases like age-related macular degeneration (AMD and retinitis pigmentosa (RP, but also to determine optimum stimulus paradigms for use with retinal prosthetic devices. The models most studied in this regard have been the two lines of mice deficient in the β-subunit of phosphodiesterase (rd1 and rd10 mice, where the degenerating retinas exhibit characteristic spontaneous hyperactivity and oscillatory local field potentials (LFPs. Additionally, there is a robust ~10 Hz rhythmic burst of retinal ganglion cell (RGC spikes on the trough of the oscillatory LFP. In rd1 mice, the rhythmic burst of RGC spikes is always phase-locked with the oscillatory LFP and this phase-locking property is preserved regardless of postnatal ages. However, in rd10 mice, the frequency of the oscillatory rhythm changes according to postnatal age, suggesting that this rhythm might be a marker of the stage of degeneration. Furthermore when a biphasic current stimulus is applied to rd10 mice degenerate retina, distinct RGC response patterns that correlate with the stage of degeneration emerge. This review also considers the significance of these response properties.

  11. Cosmic gamma bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehstulin, I.V.

    1980-01-01

    A brief consideration is being given to the history of cosmic gamma burst discovery and modern knowledge of their properties. The time dependence of gamma bursts is described and their possible sources are discussed

  12. Oscillatory Reinstatement Enhances Declarative Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, Amir-Homayoun; Glen, James C; Halkiopoulos, Sara; Schulz, Mei; Spiers, Hugo J

    2017-10-11

    Declarative memory recall is thought to involve the reinstatement of neural activity patterns that occurred previously during encoding. Consistent with this view, greater similarity between patterns of activity recorded during encoding and retrieval has been found to predict better memory performance in a number of studies. Recent models have argued that neural oscillations may be crucial to reinstatement for successful memory retrieval. However, to date, no causal evidence has been provided to support this theory, nor has the impact of oscillatory electrical brain stimulation during encoding and retrieval been assessed. To explore this we used transcranial alternating current stimulation over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of human participants [ n = 70, 45 females; age mean (SD) = 22.12 (2.16)] during a declarative memory task. Participants received either the same frequency during encoding and retrieval (60-60 or 90-90 Hz) or different frequencies (60-90 or 90-60 Hz). When frequencies matched there was a significant memory improvement (at both 60 and 90 Hz) relative to sham stimulation. No improvement occurred when frequencies mismatched. Our results provide support for the role of oscillatory reinstatement in memory retrieval. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Recent neurobiological models of memory have argued that large-scale neural oscillations are reinstated to support successful memory retrieval. Here we used transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) to test these models. tACS has recently been shown to induce neural oscillations at the frequency stimulated. We stimulated over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex during a declarative memory task involving learning a set of words. We found that tACS applied at the same frequency during encoding and retrieval enhances memory. We also find no difference between the two applied frequencies. Thus our results are consistent with the proposal that reinstatement of neural oscillations during retrieval

  13. Oscillatory serotonin function in depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, Ronald M; Cowan, Ronald L

    2013-11-01

    Oscillations in brain activities with periods of minutes to hours may be critical for normal mood behaviors. Ultradian (faster than circadian) rhythms of mood behaviors and associated central nervous system activities are altered in depression. Recent data suggest that ultradian rhythms in serotonin (5HT) function also change in depression. In two separate studies, 5HT metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were measured every 10 min for 24 h before and after chronic antidepressant treatment. Antidepressant treatments were associated with enhanced ultradian amplitudes of CSF metabolite levels. Another study used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure amplitudes of dorsal raphé activation cycles following sham or active dietary depletions of the 5HT precursor (tryptophan). During depletion, amplitudes of dorsal raphé activation cycles increased with rapid 6 s periods (about 0.18 Hz) while functional connectivity weakened between dorsal raphé and thalamus at slower periods of 20 s (0.05 Hz). A third approach studied MDMA (ecstasy, 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine) users because of their chronically diminished 5HT function compared with non-MDMA polysubstance users (Karageorgiou et al., 2009). Compared with a non-MDMA using cohort, MDMA users showed diminished fMRI intra-regional coherence in motor regions along with altered functional connectivity, again suggesting effects of altered 5HT oscillatory function. These data support a hypothesis that qualities of ultradian oscillations in 5HT function may critically influence moods and behaviors. Dysfunctional 5HT rhythms in depression may be a common endpoint and biomarker for depression, linking dysfunction of slow brain network oscillators to 5HT mechanisms affected by commonly available treatments. 5HT oscillatory dysfunction may define illness subtypes and predict responses to serotonergic agents. Further studies of 5HT oscillations in depression are indicated. Copyright

  14. Brain oscillatory substrates of visual short-term memory capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauseng, Paul; Klimesch, Wolfgang; Heise, Kirstin F; Gruber, Walter R; Holz, Elisa; Karim, Ahmed A; Glennon, Mark; Gerloff, Christian; Birbaumer, Niels; Hummel, Friedhelm C

    2009-11-17

    The amount of information that can be stored in visual short-term memory is strictly limited to about four items. Therefore, memory capacity relies not only on the successful retention of relevant information but also on efficient suppression of distracting information, visual attention, and executive functions. However, completely separable neural signatures for these memory capacity-limiting factors remain to be identified. Because of its functional diversity, oscillatory brain activity may offer a utile solution. In the present study, we show that capacity-determining mechanisms, namely retention of relevant information and suppression of distracting information, are based on neural substrates independent of each other: the successful maintenance of relevant material in short-term memory is associated with cross-frequency phase synchronization between theta (rhythmical neural activity around 5 Hz) and gamma (> 50 Hz) oscillations at posterior parietal recording sites. On the other hand, electroencephalographic alpha activity (around 10 Hz) predicts memory capacity based on efficient suppression of irrelevant information in short-term memory. Moreover, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation at alpha frequency can modulate short-term memory capacity by influencing the ability to suppress distracting information. Taken together, the current study provides evidence for a double dissociation of brain oscillatory correlates of visual short-term memory capacity.

  15. The Drift Burst Hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Kim; Oomen, Roel; Renò, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The Drift Burst Hypothesis postulates the existence of short-lived locally explosive trends in the price paths of financial assets. The recent US equity and Treasury flash crashes can be viewed as two high profile manifestations of such dynamics, but we argue that drift bursts of varying magnitude are an expected and regular occurrence in financial markets that can arise through established mechanisms such as feedback trading. At a theoretical level, we show how to build drift bursts into the...

  16. Roles of repetitive sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, G.I.

    1991-12-31

    The DNA of higher eukaryotes contains many repetitive sequences. The study of repetitive sequences is important, not only because many have important biological function, but also because they provide information on genome organization, evolution and dynamics. In this paper, I will first discuss some generic effects that repetitive sequences will have upon genome dynamics and evolution. In particular, it will be shown that repetitive sequences foster recombination among, and turnover of, the elements of a genome. I will then consider some examples of repetitive sequences, notably minisatellite sequences and telomere sequences as examples of tandem repeats, without and with respectively known function, and Alu sequences as an example of interspersed repeats. Some other examples will also be considered in less detail.

  17. On the non-Poissonian repetition pattern of FRB121102

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppermann, Niels; Yu, Hao-Ran; Pen, Ue-Li

    2018-04-01

    The Fast Radio Burst FRB121102 has been observed to repeat in an irregular fashion. Using published timing data of the observed bursts, we show that Poissonian statistics are not a good description of this random process. As an alternative, we suggest to describe the intervals between bursts with a Weibull distribution with a shape parameter smaller than one, which allows for the clustered nature of the bursts. We quantify the amount of clustering using the parameters of the Weibull distribution and discuss the consequences that it has for the detection probabilities of future observations and for the optimization of observing strategies. Allowing for this generalization, we find a mean repetition rate of r=5.7^{+3.0}_{-2.0} per day and index k=0.34^{+0.06}_{-0.05} for a correlation function ξ(t) = (t/t0)k - 1.

  18. Disk partition function and oscillatory rolling tachyons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jokela, Niko; Jaervinen, Matti; Keski-Vakkuri, Esko; Majumder, Jaydeep

    2008-01-01

    An exact cubic open string field theory rolling tachyon solution was recently found by Kiermaier et al and Schnabl. This oscillatory solution has been argued to be related by a field redefinition to the simple exponential rolling tachyon deformation of boundary conformal theory. In the latter approach, the disk partition function takes a simple form. Out of curiosity, we compute the disk partition function for an oscillatory tachyon profile, and find that the result is nevertheless almost the same

  19. Characterization of Oscillatory Lift in MFC Airfoils

    OpenAIRE

    Lang Jr, Joseph Reagle

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to characterize the response of an airfoil with an oscillatory morphing, Macro-fiber composite (MFC) trailing edge. Correlation of the airfoil lift with the oscillatory input is presented. Modal analysis of the test airfoil and apparatus is used to determine the frequency response function. The effects of static MFC inputs on the FRF are presented and compared to the unactuated airfoil. The transfer function is then used to determine the lift component du...

  20. Repetition and Translation Shifts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Zupan

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Repetition manifests itself in different ways and at different levels of the text. The first basic type of repetition involves complete recurrences; in which a particular textual feature repeats in its entirety. The second type involves partial recurrences; in which the second repetition of the same textual feature includes certain modifications to the first occurrence. In the article; repetitive patterns in Edgar Allan Poe’s short story “The Fall of the House of Usher” and its Slovene translation; “Konec Usherjeve hiše”; are compared. The author examines different kinds of repetitive patterns. Repetitions are compared at both the micro- and macrostructural levels. As detailed analyses have shown; considerable microstructural translation shifts occur in certain types of repetitive patterns. Since these are not only occasional; sporadic phenomena; but are of a relatively high frequency; they reduce the translated text’s potential for achieving some of the gothic effects. The macrostructural textual property particularly affected by these shifts is the narrator’s experience as described by the narrative; which suffers a reduction in intensity.

  1. Advantages of Oscillatory Hydraulic Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitanidis, P. K.; Bakhos, T.; Cardiff, M. A.; Barrash, W.

    2012-12-01

    Characterizing the subsurface is significant for most hydrogeologic studies, such as those involving site remediation and groundwater resource explo¬ration. A variety of hydraulic and geophysical methods have been developed to estimate hydraulic conductivity and specific storage. Hydraulic methods based on the analysis of conventional pumping tests allow the estimation of conductivity and storage without need for approximate petrophysical relations, which is an advantage over most geophysical methods that first estimate other properties and then infer values of hydraulic parameters. However, hydraulic methods have the disadvantage that the head-change signal decays with distance from the pumping well and thus becomes difficult to separate from noise except in close proximity to the source. Oscillatory hydraulic tomography (OHT) is an emerging technology to im¬age the subsurface. This method utilizes the idea of imposing sinusoidally varying pressure or discharge signals at several points, collecting head observations at several other points, and then processing these data in a tomographic fashion to estimate conductivity and storage coefficients. After an overview of the methodology, including a description of the most important potential advantages and challenges associated with this approach, two key promising features of the approach will be discussed. First, the signal at an observation point is orthogonal to and thus can be separated from nuisance inputs like head fluctuation from production wells, evapotranspiration, irrigation, and changes in the level of adjacent streams. Second, although the signal amplitude may be weak, one can extract the phase and amplitude of the os¬cillatory signal by collecting measurements over a longer time, thus compensating for the effect of large distance through longer sampling period.

  2. Gamma Ray Bursts - Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, N.; Cannizzo, J. K.

    2010-01-01

    We are in an exciting period of discovery for gamma-ray bursts. The Swift observatory is detecting 100 bursts per year, providing arcsecond localizations and sensitive observations of the prompt and afterglow emission. The Fermi observatory is observing 250 bursts per year with its medium-energy GRB instrument and about 10 bursts per year with its high-energy LAT instrument. In addition, rapid-response telescopes on the ground are providing new capabilities to study optical emission during the prompt phase and spectral signatures of the host galaxies. The combined data set is enabling great advances in our understanding of GRBs including afterglow physics, short burst origin, and high energy emission.

  3. Bursting in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky Reaction added with Phenol in a Batch Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadena, Ariel; Agreda, Jesus; Barragan, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The classic Belousov-Zhabotinski reaction was modified by adding phenol as a second organic substrate that kinetically competes with the malonic acid in the reduction of Ce 4+ to Ce 3+ and in the removal of molecular bromine of the reaction mixture. The oscillating reaction of two substrates exhibited burst firing and an oscillatory period of long duration. Analysis of experimental data shows an increasing of the bursting phenomenon, with a greater spiking in the burst firing and with a longer quiescent state, as a function of the initial phenol concentration increase. It was hypothesized that the bursting phenomenon can be explained introducing a redox cycle between the reduced phenolic species (hydroxyphenols) and the oxidized ones (quinones). The hypothesis was experimentally and numerically tested and from the results it is possible to conclude that the bursting phenomenon exhibited by the oscillating reaction of two substrates is mainly driven by a p-di-hydroxy-benzene/p-benzoquinone redox cycle (author)

  4. Repetitive Questioning Exasperates Caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Hamdy MD

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Repetitive questioning is due to an impaired episodic memory and is a frequent, often presenting, problem in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (amnestic type. It is due to the patients’ difficulties learning new information, retaining it, and recalling it, and is often aggravated by a poor attention span and easy distractibility. A number of factors may trigger and maintain repetitive questioning. Caregivers should try to identify and address these triggers. In the case discussion presented, it is due to the patient’s concerns about her and her family’s safety triggered by watching a particularly violent movie aired on TV. What went wrong in the patient/caregiver interaction and how it could have been avoided or averted are explored. Also reviewed are the impact of repetitive questioning, the challenges it raises for caregivers, and some effective intervention strategies that may be useful to diffuse the angst that caregivers experience with repetitive questioning.

  5. Soap films burst like flapping flags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhuissier, Henri; Villermaux, Emmanuel

    2009-07-31

    When punctured, a flat soap film bursts by opening a hole driven by liquid surface tension. The hole rim does not, however, remain smooth but soon develops indentations at the tip of which ligaments form, ultimately breaking and leaving the initially connex film into a mist of disjointed drops. We report on original observations showing that these indentations result from a flaglike instability between the film and the surrounding atmosphere inducing an oscillatory motion out of its plane. Just like a flag edge flaps in the wind, the film is successively accelerated on both sides perpendicularly to its plane, inducing film thickness modulations and centrifuging liquid ligaments that finally pinch off to form the observed spray. This effect exemplifies how the dynamics of fragile objects such as thin liquid films is sensitive to their embedding medium.

  6. Design principles for robust oscillatory behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Hair, Sebastian M; Villota, Elizabeth R; Coronado, Alberto M

    2015-09-01

    Oscillatory responses are ubiquitous in regulatory networks of living organisms, a fact that has led to extensive efforts to study and replicate the circuits involved. However, to date, design principles that underlie the robustness of natural oscillators are not completely known. Here we study a three-component enzymatic network model in order to determine the topological requirements for robust oscillation. First, by simulating every possible topological arrangement and varying their parameter values, we demonstrate that robust oscillators can be obtained by augmenting the number of both negative feedback loops and positive autoregulations while maintaining an appropriate balance of positive and negative interactions. We then identify network motifs, whose presence in more complex topologies is a necessary condition for obtaining oscillatory responses. Finally, we pinpoint a series of simple architectural patterns that progressively render more robust oscillators. Together, these findings can help in the design of more reliable synthetic biomolecular networks and may also have implications in the understanding of other oscillatory systems.

  7. Microfluidic mixing through oscillatory transverse perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J. W.; Xia, H. M.; Zhang, Y. Y.; Zhu, P.

    2018-05-01

    Fluid mixing in miniaturized fluidic devices is a challenging task. In this work, the mixing enhancement through oscillatory transverse perturbations coupling with divergent circular chambers is studied. To simplify the design, an autonomous microfluidic oscillator is used to produce the oscillatory flow. It is then applied to four side-channels that intersect with a central channel of constant flow. The mixing performance is tested at high fluid viscosities of up to 16 cP. Results show that the oscillatory flow can cause strong transverse perturbations which effectively enhance the mixing. The influence of a fluidic capacitor in the central channel is also examined, which at low viscosities can intensify the perturbations and further improve the mixing.

  8. Catalyst Initiation in the Oscillatory Carbonylation Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Novakovic

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Palladium(II iodide is used as a catalyst in the phenylacetylene oxidative carbonylation reaction that has demonstrated oscillatory behaviour in both pH and heat of reaction. In an attempt to extract the reaction network responsible for the oscillatory nature of this reaction, the system was divided into smaller parts and they were studied. This paper focuses on understanding the reaction network responsible for the initial reactions of palladium(II iodide within this oscillatory reaction. The species researched include methanol, palladium(II iodide, potassium iodide, and carbon monoxide. Several chemical reactions were considered and applied in a modelling study. The study revealed the significant role played by traces of water contained in the standard HPLC grade methanol used.

  9. Inferring oscillatory modulation in neural spike trains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Kensuke; Kass, Robert E

    2017-10-01

    Oscillations are observed at various frequency bands in continuous-valued neural recordings like the electroencephalogram (EEG) and local field potential (LFP) in bulk brain matter, and analysis of spike-field coherence reveals that spiking of single neurons often occurs at certain phases of the global oscillation. Oscillatory modulation has been examined in relation to continuous-valued oscillatory signals, and independently from the spike train alone, but behavior or stimulus triggered firing-rate modulation, spiking sparseness, presence of slow modulation not locked to stimuli and irregular oscillations with large variability in oscillatory periods, present challenges to searching for temporal structures present in the spike train. In order to study oscillatory modulation in real data collected under a variety of experimental conditions, we describe a flexible point-process framework we call the Latent Oscillatory Spike Train (LOST) model to decompose the instantaneous firing rate in biologically and behaviorally relevant factors: spiking refractoriness, event-locked firing rate non-stationarity, and trial-to-trial variability accounted for by baseline offset and a stochastic oscillatory modulation. We also extend the LOST model to accommodate changes in the modulatory structure over the duration of the experiment, and thereby discover trial-to-trial variability in the spike-field coherence of a rat primary motor cortical neuron to the LFP theta rhythm. Because LOST incorporates a latent stochastic auto-regressive term, LOST is able to detect oscillations when the firing rate is low, the modulation is weak, and when the modulating oscillation has a broad spectral peak.

  10. Oscillatory regime of avalanche particle detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukin, K.A.; Cerdeira, H.A.; Colavita, A.A.

    1995-06-01

    We describe the model of an avalanche high energy particle detector consisting of two pn-junctions, connected through an intrinsic semiconductor with a reverse biased voltage applied. We show that this detector is able to generate the oscillatory response on the single particle passage through the structure. The possibility of oscillations leading to chaotic behaviour is pointed out. (author). 15 refs, 7 figs

  11. Novel porcine repetitive elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nonneman Dan J

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Repetitive elements comprise ~45% of mammalian genomes and are increasingly known to impact genomic function by contributing to the genomic architecture, by direct regulation of gene expression and by affecting genomic size, diversity and evolution. The ubiquity and increasingly understood importance of repetitive elements contribute to the need to identify and annotate them. We set out to identify previously uncharacterized repetitive DNA in the porcine genome. Once found, we characterized the prevalence of these repeats in other mammals. Results We discovered 27 repetitive elements in 220 BACs covering 1% of the porcine genome (Comparative Vertebrate Sequencing Initiative; CVSI. These repeats varied in length from 55 to 1059 nucleotides. To estimate copy numbers, we went to an independent source of data, the BAC-end sequences (Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, covering approximately 15% of the porcine genome. Copy numbers in BAC-ends were less than one hundred for 6 repeat elements, between 100 and 1000 for 16 and between 1,000 and 10,000 for 5. Several of the repeat elements were found in the bovine genome and we have identified two with orthologous sites, indicating that these elements were present in their common ancestor. None of the repeat elements were found in primate, rodent or dog genomes. We were unable to identify any of the replication machinery common to active transposable elements in these newly identified repeats. Conclusion The presence of both orthologous and non-orthologous sites indicates that some sites existed prior to speciation and some were generated later. The identification of low to moderate copy number repetitive DNA that is specific to artiodactyls will be critical in the assembly of livestock genomes and studies of comparative genomics.

  12. iTBS-induced LTP-like plasticity parallels oscillatory activity changes in the primary sensory and motor areas of macaque monkeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odysseas Papazachariadis

    Full Text Available Recently, neuromodulation techniques based on the use of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS have been proposed as a non-invasive and efficient method to induce in vivo long-term potentiation (LTP-like aftereffects. However, the exact impact of rTMS-induced perturbations on the dynamics of neuronal population activity is not well understood. Here, in two monkeys, we examine changes in the oscillatory activity of the sensorimotor cortex following an intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS protocol. We first probed iTBS modulatory effects by testing the iTBS-induced facilitation of somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP. Then, we examined the frequency information of the electrocorticographic signal, obtained using a custom-made miniaturised multi-electrode array for electrocorticography, after real or sham iTBS. We observed that iTBS induced facilitation of SEPs and influenced spectral components of the signal, in both animals. The latter effect was more prominent on the θ band (4-8 Hz and the high γ band (55-90 Hz, de-potentiated and potentiated respectively. We additionally found that the multi-electrode array uniformity of β (13-26 Hz and high γ bands were also afflicted by iTBS. Our study suggests that enhanced cortical excitability promoted by iTBS parallels a dynamic reorganisation of the interested neural network. The effect in the γ band suggests a transient local modulation, possibly at the level of synaptic strength in interneurons. The effect in the θ band suggests the disruption of temporal coordination on larger spatial scales.

  13. iTBS-induced LTP-like plasticity parallels oscillatory activity changes in the primary sensory and motor areas of macaque monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papazachariadis, Odysseas; Dante, Vittorio; Verschure, Paul F M J; Del Giudice, Paolo; Ferraina, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Recently, neuromodulation techniques based on the use of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) have been proposed as a non-invasive and efficient method to induce in vivo long-term potentiation (LTP)-like aftereffects. However, the exact impact of rTMS-induced perturbations on the dynamics of neuronal population activity is not well understood. Here, in two monkeys, we examine changes in the oscillatory activity of the sensorimotor cortex following an intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) protocol. We first probed iTBS modulatory effects by testing the iTBS-induced facilitation of somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP). Then, we examined the frequency information of the electrocorticographic signal, obtained using a custom-made miniaturised multi-electrode array for electrocorticography, after real or sham iTBS. We observed that iTBS induced facilitation of SEPs and influenced spectral components of the signal, in both animals. The latter effect was more prominent on the θ band (4-8 Hz) and the high γ band (55-90 Hz), de-potentiated and potentiated respectively. We additionally found that the multi-electrode array uniformity of β (13-26 Hz) and high γ bands were also afflicted by iTBS. Our study suggests that enhanced cortical excitability promoted by iTBS parallels a dynamic reorganisation of the interested neural network. The effect in the γ band suggests a transient local modulation, possibly at the level of synaptic strength in interneurons. The effect in the θ band suggests the disruption of temporal coordination on larger spatial scales.

  14. The Drift Burst Hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kim; Oomen, Roel; Renò, Roberto

    are an expected and regular occurrence in financial markets that can arise through established mechanisms such as feedback trading. At a theoretical level, we show how to build drift bursts into the continuous-time Itô semi-martingale model in such a way that the fundamental arbitrage-free property is preserved......, currencies and commodities. We find that the majority of identified drift bursts are accompanied by strong price reversals and these can therefore be regarded as “flash crashes” that span brief periods of severe market disruption without any material longer term price impacts....

  15. Repetitive Questioning II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Hamdy MD

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Repetitive questioning is a major problem for caregivers, particularly taxing if they are unable to recognize and understand the reasons why their loved one keeps asking the same question over and over again. Caregivers may be tempted to believe that the patient does not even try to remember the answer given or is just getting obnoxious. This is incorrect. Repetitive questioning is due to the underlying disease: The patient’s short term memory is impaired and he is unable to register, encode, retain and retrieve the answer. If he is concerned about a particular topic, he will keep asking the same question over and over again. To the patient each time she asks the question, it is as if she asked it for the first time. Just answering repetitive questioning by providing repeatedly the same answer is not sufficient. Caregivers should try to identify the underlying cause for this repetitive questioning. In an earlier case study, the patient was concerned about her and her family’s safety and kept asking whether the doors are locked. In this present case study, the patient does not know how to handle the awkward situation he finds himself in. He just does not know what to do. He is not able to adjust to the new unexpected situation. So he repeatedly wants to reassure himself that he is not intruding by asking the same question over and over again. We discuss how the patient’s son-in-law could have avoided this situation and averted the catastrophic ending.

  16. Cosmic gamma-ray burst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagami, Takamasa

    1985-01-01

    Ballon experiments for searching gamma-ray burst were carried out by employing rotating-cross modulation collimators. From a very long observation of total 315 hours during 1975 to 1979, three gamma-ray intensity anomalies were observed which were speculated as a gamma-ray burst. As for the first gamma-ray intensity anomaly observed in 1975, the burst source could be located precisely but the source, heavenly body, could not be specified. Gamma-ray burst source estimation was made by analyzing distribution of burst source in the celestial sphere, burst size distribution, and burst peak. Using the above-mentioned data together with previously published ones, apparent inconsistency was found between the observed results and the adopted theory that the source was in the Galaxy, and this inconsistency was found due to the different time profiles of the burst observed with instruments of different efficiency. It was concluded by these analysis results that employment of logN - logP (relation between burst frequency and burst count) was better than that of logN - logS (burst size) in the examination of gamma-ray burst because the former was less uncertain than the latter. Analyzing the author's observed gamma-ray burst data and the related published data, it was clarified that the burst distribution was almost P -312 for the burst peak value larger than 10 -6 erg/cm 2 .sec. The author could indicate that the calculated celestial distribution of burst source was consistent with the observed results by the derivation using the logN - logP relationship and that the burst larger than 10 -6 erg/cm 2 .sec happens about one thousand times a year, about ten times of the previous value. (Takagi, S.)

  17. Preliminary spatial analysis of combined BATSE/Ulysses gamma-ray burst locations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kippen, R. Marc; Hurley, Kevin; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.

    1998-01-01

    We present the preliminary spatial analysis of 278 bursts that have been localized by BATSE and the two-spacecraft Compton/Ulysses Interplanetary Network. The large number and superior accuracy of the combined BATSE/Ulysses locations provides improved sensitivity to small-angle source properties. We find that the locations are consistent with large- and small-scale isotropy, with no significant small-angle clustering. We constrain the fraction of sources in clusters and discuss the implications for burst repetition

  18. Nanolensed Fast Radio Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, David

    2017-12-01

    It is suggested that fast radio bursts can probe gravitational lensing by clumpy dark matter objects that range in mass from 10-3 M ⊙-102 M ⊙. They may provide a more sensitive probe than observations of lensings of objects in the Magellanic Clouds, and could find or rule out clumpy dark matter with an extended mass spectrum.

  19. Stability of Armour Units in Oscillatory Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Thompson, A. C.

    Despite numerous breakwater model tests very little is known today about the various phenomena and parameters that determine the hydraulic stability characteristics of different types of armour. This is because separation of parameters is extremely difficult in traditional tests.With the object...... of separating some of the factors a deterministic test, in which horizontal beds of armour units were exposed to oscillatory flow, was performed in a pulsating water tunnel....

  20. Oscillatory Convection in Rotating Liquid Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, Vincent; Grannan, Alex; Aurnou, Jonathan

    2016-11-01

    We have performed laboratory experiments in a aspect ratio Γ = 2 cylinder using liquid gallium (Pr = 0 . 023) as the working fluid. The Ekman number varies from E = 4 ×10-5 to 4 ×10-6 and the Rayleigh number varies from Ra = 3 ×105 to 2 ×107 . Using heat transfer and temperature measurements within the fluid, we characterize the different styles of low Pr rotating convective flow. The convection threshold is first overcome in the form of a container scale inertial oscillatory mode. At stronger forcing, wall-localized modes develop, coexisting with the inertial oscillatory modes in the bulk. When the strength of the buoyancy increases further, the bulk flow becomes turbulent while the wall modes remain. Our results imply that rotating convective flows in liquid metals do not develop in the form of quasi-steady columns, as in Pr = 1 planetary and stellar dynamo models, but in the form of oscillatory motions. Therefore, convection driven dynamo action in low Pr fluids can differ substantively than that occurring in typical Pr = 1 numerical models. Our results also suggest that low wavenumber, wall modes may be dynamically and observationally important in liquid metal dynamo systems. We thank the NSF Geophysics Program for support of this project.

  1. Repetition or Reconfiguration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kristina Vaarst

    , the cognitive quality of knowledge held by individual professionals is the key microfoundation for project level performance. This paper empirically tests effects of project participants with and without knowledge diversity for project level performance for projects aiming for varying degrees of repetition...... and reconfiguration. The results indicate that project performance benefits form contributions from individuals holding diverse knowledge only when projects aim for high differentiation levels. This positive association is not just moderated, it may even be reversed in the case of professionals participating in low...

  2. MIMICRY, DIFFERENCE AND REPETITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Mendes de Souza

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses Homi K. Bhabha’s concept of mimicry in a broader context, other than that of cultural studies and post-colonial studies, bringing together other concepts, such as that of Gilles Deleuze in Difference and repetition, among other texts, and other names, such as Silviano Santiago, Jorge Luís Borges, Franz Kafka and Giorgio Agamben. As a partial conclusion, the article intends to oppose Bhabha’s freudian-marxist view to Five propositions on Psychoanalysis (1973, Gilles Deleuze’s text about Psychoanalysis published right after his book The Anti-Oedipus.

  3. Design and implementation of fast charging circuit for repetitive compact torus injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onchi, T.; McColl, D.; Dreval, M.; Wolfe, S.; Xiao, C.; Hirose, A.

    2014-01-01

    A novel circuit for compact torus (CT) injector operated at high repetition rates has been developed. The core technology adopted in the present work is to charge a large storage capacitor bank and quickly charge the CT capacitor bank through a stack of insulated-gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs). A system consisting of IGBTs and slow banks for the repetitive operation has been developed and installed for each discharge circuit of the University of Saskatchewan Compact Torus Injector (USCTI). A repetition rate up to 1.7 Hz and a burst of 8 CTs have been achieved

  4. A repeating fast radio burst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitler, L G; Scholz, P; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-03-10

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star.

  5. Gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Wijers, Ralph A M J; Woosley, Stan

    2012-01-01

    Cosmic gamma ray bursts (GRBs) have fascinated scientists and the public alike since their discovery in the late 1960s. Their story is told here by some of the scientists who participated in their discovery and, after many decades of false starts, solved the problem of their origin. Fourteen chapters by active researchers in the field present a detailed history of the discovery, a comprehensive theoretical description of GRB central engine and emission models, a discussion of GRB host galaxies and a guide to how GRBs can be used as cosmological tools. Observations are grouped into three sets from the satellites CGRO, BeppoSAX and Swift, and followed by a discussion of multi-wavelength observations. This is the first edited volume on GRB astrophysics that presents a fully comprehensive review of the subject. Utilizing the latest research, Gamma-ray Bursts is an essential desktop companion for graduate students and researchers in astrophysics.

  6. Are There Multiple Populations of Fast Radio Bursts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaniswamy, Divya; Li, Ye; Zhang, Bing

    2018-02-01

    The repeating FRB 121102 (the “repeater”) shows repetitive bursting activities and was localized in a host galaxy at z = 0.193. On the other hand, despite dozens of hours of telescope time spent on follow-up observations, no other fast radio bursts (FRBs) have been observed to repeat. Yet, it has been speculated that the repeater is the prototype of FRBs, and that other FRBs should show similar repeating patterns. Using the published data, we compare the repeater with other FRBs in the observed time interval (Δt)–flux ratio (S i /S i+1) plane. We find that whereas other FRBs occupy the upper (large S i /S i+1) and right (large Δt) regions of the plane due to the non-detections of other bursts, some of the repeater bursts fall into the lower left region of the plot (short interval and small flux ratio) excluded by the non-detection data of other FRBs. The trend also exists even if one only selects those bursts detectable by the Parkes radio telescope. If other FRBs were similar to the repeater, our simulations suggest that the probability that none of them have been detected to repeat with the current searches would be ∼(10‑4–10‑3). We suggest that the repeater is not representative of the entire FRB population, and that there is strong evidence of more than one population of FRBs.

  7. Bidirectional Frontoparietal Oscillatory Systems Support Working Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Elizabeth L; Dewar, Callum D; Solbakk, Anne-Kristin; Endestad, Tor; Meling, Torstein R; Knight, Robert T

    2017-06-19

    The ability to represent and select information in working memory provides the neurobiological infrastructure for human cognition. For 80 years, dominant views of working memory have focused on the key role of prefrontal cortex (PFC) [1-8]. However, more recent work has implicated posterior cortical regions [9-12], suggesting that PFC engagement during working memory is dependent on the degree of executive demand. We provide evidence from neurological patients with discrete PFC damage that challenges the dominant models attributing working memory to PFC-dependent systems. We show that neural oscillations, which provide a mechanism for PFC to communicate with posterior cortical regions [13], independently subserve communications both to and from PFC-uncovering parallel oscillatory mechanisms for working memory. Fourteen PFC patients and 20 healthy, age-matched controls performed a working memory task where they encoded, maintained, and actively processed information about pairs of common shapes. In controls, the electroencephalogram (EEG) exhibited oscillatory activity in the low-theta range over PFC and directional connectivity from PFC to parieto-occipital regions commensurate with executive processing demands. Concurrent alpha-beta oscillations were observed over parieto-occipital regions, with directional connectivity from parieto-occipital regions to PFC, regardless of processing demands. Accuracy, PFC low-theta activity, and PFC → parieto-occipital connectivity were attenuated in patients, revealing a PFC-independent, alpha-beta system. The PFC patients still demonstrated task proficiency, which indicates that the posterior alpha-beta system provides sufficient resources for working memory. Taken together, our findings reveal neurologically dissociable PFC and parieto-occipital systems and suggest that parallel, bidirectional oscillatory systems form the basis of working memory. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Oscillatory magneto-convection under magnetic field modulation

    OpenAIRE

    Kiran, Palle; Bhadauria, B.S.; Narasimhulu, Y.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we investigate an oscillatory mode of nonlinear magneto-convection under time dependant magnetic field. The time dependant magnetic field consists steady and oscillatory parts. The oscillatory part of the imposed magnetic field is assumed to be of third order. An externally imposed vertical magnetic field in an electrically conducting horizontal fluid layer is considered. The finite amplitude analysis is discussed while perturbing the system. The complex Ginzburg-Landau model is...

  9. Enhancing Rotational Diffusion Using Oscillatory Shear

    KAUST Repository

    Leahy, Brian D.

    2013-05-29

    Taylor dispersion - shear-induced enhancement of translational diffusion - is an important phenomenon with applications ranging from pharmacology to geology. Through experiments and simulations, we show that rotational diffusion is also enhanced for anisotropic particles in oscillatory shear. This enhancement arises from variations in the particle\\'s rotation (Jeffery orbit) and depends on the strain amplitude, rate, and particle aspect ratio in a manner that is distinct from the translational diffusion. This separate tunability of translational and rotational diffusion opens the door to new techniques for controlling positions and orientations of suspended anisotropic colloids. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  10. Power System Oscillatory Behaviors: Sources, Characteristics, & Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Follum, James D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tuffner, Francis K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dosiek, Luke A. [Union College, Schenectady, NY (United States); Pierre, John W. [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States)

    2017-05-17

    This document is intended to provide a broad overview of the sources, characteristics, and analyses of natural and forced oscillatory behaviors in power systems. These aspects are necessarily linked. Oscillations appear in measurements with distinguishing characteristics derived from the oscillation’s source. These characteristics determine which analysis methods can be appropriately applied, and the results from these analyses can only be interpreted correctly with an understanding of the oscillation’s origin. To describe oscillations both at their source within a physical power system and within measurements, a perspective from the boundary between power system and signal processing theory has been adopted.

  11. SEARCH FOR GRAVITATIONAL WAVE BURSTS FROM SIX MAGNETARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Anderson, S. B.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Abernathy, M.; Accadia, T.; Acernese, F.; Adams, C.; Affeldt, C.; Allen, B.; Allen, G. S.; Amador Ceron, E.; Anderson, W. G.; Amariutei, D.; Arain, M. A.; Amin, R. S.; Antonucci, F.

    2011-01-01

    Soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) and anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) are thought to be magnetars: neutron stars powered by extreme magnetic fields. These rare objects are characterized by repeated and sometimes spectacular gamma-ray bursts. The burst mechanism might involve crustal fractures and excitation of non-radial modes which would emit gravitational waves (GWs). We present the results of a search for GW bursts from six galactic magnetars that is sensitive to neutron star f-modes, thought to be the most efficient GW emitting oscillatory modes in compact stars. One of them, SGR 0501+4516, is likely ∼1 kpc from Earth, an order of magnitude closer than magnetars targeted in previous GW searches. A second, AXP 1E 1547.0-5408, gave a burst with an estimated isotropic energy >10 44 erg which is comparable to the giant flares. We find no evidence of GWs associated with a sample of 1279 electromagnetic triggers from six magnetars occurring between 2006 November and 2009 June, in GW data from the LIGO, Virgo, and GEO600 detectors. Our lowest model-dependent GW emission energy upper limits for band- and time-limited white noise bursts in the detector sensitive band, and for f-mode ringdowns (at 1090 Hz), are 3.0 x 10 44 d 2 1 erg and 1.4 x 10 47 d 2 1 erg, respectively, where d 1 = (d 0501 )/1 kpc and d 0501 is the distance to SGR 0501+4516. These limits on GW emission from f-modes are an order of magnitude lower than any previous, and approach the range of electromagnetic energies seen in SGR giant flares for the first time.

  12. Learning in AN Oscillatory Cortical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpetta, Silvia; Li, Zhaoping; Hertz, John

    We study a model of generalized-Hebbian learning in asymmetric oscillatory neural networks modeling cortical areas such as hippocampus and olfactory cortex. The learning rule is based on the synaptic plasticity observed experimentally, in particular long-term potentiation and long-term depression of the synaptic efficacies depending on the relative timing of the pre- and postsynaptic activities during learning. The learned memory or representational states can be encoded by both the amplitude and the phase patterns of the oscillating neural populations, enabling more efficient and robust information coding than in conventional models of associative memory or input representation. Depending on the class of nonlinearity of the activation function, the model can function as an associative memory for oscillatory patterns (nonlinearity of class II) or can generalize from or interpolate between the learned states, appropriate for the function of input representation (nonlinearity of class I). In the former case, simulations of the model exhibits a first order transition between the "disordered state" and the "ordered" memory state.

  13. Cracking the code of oscillatory activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe G Schyns

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Neural oscillations are ubiquitous measurements of cognitive processes and dynamic routing and gating of information. The fundamental and so far unresolved problem for neuroscience remains to understand how oscillatory activity in the brain codes information for human cognition. In a biologically relevant cognitive task, we instructed six human observers to categorize facial expressions of emotion while we measured the observers' EEG. We combined state-of-the-art stimulus control with statistical information theory analysis to quantify how the three parameters of oscillations (i.e., power, phase, and frequency code the visual information relevant for behavior in a cognitive task. We make three points: First, we demonstrate that phase codes considerably more information (2.4 times relating to the cognitive task than power. Second, we show that the conjunction of power and phase coding reflects detailed visual features relevant for behavioral response--that is, features of facial expressions predicted by behavior. Third, we demonstrate, in analogy to communication technology, that oscillatory frequencies in the brain multiplex the coding of visual features, increasing coding capacity. Together, our findings about the fundamental coding properties of neural oscillations will redirect the research agenda in neuroscience by establishing the differential role of frequency, phase, and amplitude in coding behaviorally relevant information in the brain.

  14. Three-dimensional Oscillatory Magnetic Reconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thurgood, Jonathan O.; McLaughlin, James A.; Pontin, David I.

    2017-01-01

    Here we detail the dynamic evolution of localized reconnection regions about 3D magnetic null points using numerical simulation. We demonstrate for the first time that reconnection triggered by the localized collapse of a 3D null point that is due to an external magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave involves a self-generated oscillation, whereby the current sheet and outflow jets undergo a reconnection reversal process during which back-pressure formation at the jet heads acts to prise open the collapsed field before overshooting the equilibrium into an opposite-polarity configuration. The discovery that reconnection at fully 3D nulls can proceed naturally in a time-dependent and periodic fashion suggests that oscillatory reconnection mechanisms may play a role in explaining periodicity in astrophysical phenomena associated with magnetic reconnection, such as the observed quasi-periodicity of solar and stellar flare emission. Furthermore, we find that a consequence of oscillatory reconnection is the generation of a plethora of freely propagating MHD waves that escape the vicinity of the reconnection region.

  15. Oscillatory mechanisms of process binding in memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimesch, Wolfgang; Freunberger, Roman; Sauseng, Paul

    2010-06-01

    A central topic in cognitive neuroscience is the question, which processes underlie large scale communication within and between different neural networks. The basic assumption is that oscillatory phase synchronization plays an important role for process binding--the transient linking of different cognitive processes--which may be considered a special type of large scale communication. We investigate this question for memory processes on the basis of different types of oscillatory synchronization mechanisms. The reviewed findings suggest that theta and alpha phase coupling (and phase reorganization) reflect control processes in two large memory systems, a working memory and a complex knowledge system that comprises semantic long-term memory. It is suggested that alpha phase synchronization may be interpreted in terms of processes that coordinate top-down control (a process guided by expectancy to focus on relevant search areas) and access to memory traces (a process leading to the activation of a memory trace). An analogous interpretation is suggested for theta oscillations and the controlled access to episodic memories. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Three-dimensional Oscillatory Magnetic Reconnection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurgood, Jonathan O.; McLaughlin, James A. [Department of Mathematics, Physics and Electrical Engineering, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 1ST (United Kingdom); Pontin, David I., E-mail: jonathan.thurgood@northumbria.ac.uk [Division of Mathematics, University of Dundee, Dundee, DD1 4HN (United Kingdom)

    2017-07-20

    Here we detail the dynamic evolution of localized reconnection regions about 3D magnetic null points using numerical simulation. We demonstrate for the first time that reconnection triggered by the localized collapse of a 3D null point that is due to an external magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wave involves a self-generated oscillation, whereby the current sheet and outflow jets undergo a reconnection reversal process during which back-pressure formation at the jet heads acts to prise open the collapsed field before overshooting the equilibrium into an opposite-polarity configuration. The discovery that reconnection at fully 3D nulls can proceed naturally in a time-dependent and periodic fashion suggests that oscillatory reconnection mechanisms may play a role in explaining periodicity in astrophysical phenomena associated with magnetic reconnection, such as the observed quasi-periodicity of solar and stellar flare emission. Furthermore, we find that a consequence of oscillatory reconnection is the generation of a plethora of freely propagating MHD waves that escape the vicinity of the reconnection region.

  17. Human spinal locomotor control is based on flexibly organized burst generators

    OpenAIRE

    Danner, Simon M.; Hofstoetter, Ursula S.; Freundl, Brigitta; Binder, Heinrich; Mayr, Winfried; Rattay, Frank; Minassian, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the organisation of human spinal locomotor circuitry after severe CNS damage is essential for improving neurorehabilitation strategies. Danner et al. present evidence of flexibly organised burst-generating elements within the functionally isolated human lumbosacral spinal cord that generate rhythmic patterns in response to constant, repetitive epidural stimulation.

  18. Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellizza, L. J.

    Gamma-ray bursts are the brightest transient sources in the gamma-ray sky. Since their discovery in the late 1960s, the investigation of the astrophysical sys- tems in which these phenomena take place, and the physical mechanisms that drive them, has become a vast and prolific area of modern astrophysics. In this work I will briefly describe the most relevant observations of these sources, and the models that describe their nature, emphasizing on the in- vestigations about the progenitor astrophysical systems. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  19. Gamma Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil; Meszaros, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma-rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day ,last typically lOs of seconds and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this review we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglows.

  20. Gamma-ray burst spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teegarden, B.J.

    1982-01-01

    A review of recent results in gamma-ray burst spectroscopy is given. Particular attention is paid to the recent discovery of emission and absorption features in the burst spectra. These lines represent the strongest evidence to date that gamma-ray bursts originate on or near neutron stars. Line parameters give information on the temperature, magnetic field and possibly the gravitational potential of the neutron star. The behavior of the continuum spectrum is also discussed. A remarkably good fit to nearly all bursts is obtained with a thermal-bremsstrahlung-like continuum. Significant evolution is observed of both the continuum and line features within most events

  1. UWB dual burst transmit driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallum, Gregory E [Livermore, CA; Pratt, Garth C [Discovery Bay, CA; Haugen, Peter C [Livermore, CA; Zumstein, James M [Livermore, CA; Vigars, Mark L [Livermore, CA; Romero, Carlos E [Livermore, CA

    2012-04-17

    A dual burst transmitter for ultra-wideband (UWB) communication systems generates a pair of precisely spaced RF bursts from a single trigger event. An input trigger pulse produces two oscillator trigger pulses, an initial pulse and a delayed pulse, in a dual trigger generator. The two oscillator trigger pulses drive a gated RF burst (power output) oscillator. A bias driver circuit gates the RF output oscillator on and off and sets the RF burst packet width. The bias driver also level shifts the drive signal to the level that is required for the RF output device.

  2. Neural dynamics during repetitive visual stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoneva, Tsvetomira; Garcia-Molina, Gary; Desain, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs), the brain responses to repetitive visual stimulation (RVS), are widely utilized in neuroscience. Their high signal-to-noise ratio and ability to entrain oscillatory brain activity are beneficial for their applications in brain-computer interfaces, investigation of neural processes underlying brain rhythmic activity (steady-state topography) and probing the causal role of brain rhythms in cognition and emotion. This paper aims at analyzing the space and time EEG dynamics in response to RVS at the frequency of stimulation and ongoing rhythms in the delta, theta, alpha, beta, and gamma bands. Approach.We used electroencephalography (EEG) to study the oscillatory brain dynamics during RVS at 10 frequencies in the gamma band (40-60 Hz). We collected an extensive EEG data set from 32 participants and analyzed the RVS evoked and induced responses in the time-frequency domain. Main results. Stable SSVEP over parieto-occipital sites was observed at each of the fundamental frequencies and their harmonics and sub-harmonics. Both the strength and the spatial propagation of the SSVEP response seem sensitive to stimulus frequency. The SSVEP was more localized around the parieto-occipital sites for higher frequencies (>54 Hz) and spread to fronto-central locations for lower frequencies. We observed a strong negative correlation between stimulation frequency and relative power change at that frequency, the first harmonic and the sub-harmonic components over occipital sites. Interestingly, over parietal sites for sub-harmonics a positive correlation of relative power change and stimulation frequency was found. A number of distinct patterns in delta (1-4 Hz), theta (4-8 Hz), alpha (8-12 Hz) and beta (15-30 Hz) bands were also observed. The transient response, from 0 to about 300 ms after stimulation onset, was accompanied by increase in delta and theta power over fronto-central and occipital sites, which returned to baseline

  3. One central oscillatory drive is compatible with experimental motor unit behaviour in essential and Parkinsonian tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dideriksen, Jakob L.; Gallego, Juan A.; Holobar, Ales; Rocon, Eduardo; Pons, Jose L.; Farina, Dario

    2015-08-01

    Objective. Pathological tremors are symptomatic to several neurological disorders that are difficult to differentiate and the way by which central oscillatory networks entrain tremorogenic contractions is unknown. We considered the alternative hypotheses that tremor arises from one oscillator (at the tremor frequency) or, as suggested by recent findings from the superimposition of two separate inputs (at the tremor frequency and twice that frequency). Approach. Assuming one central oscillatory network we estimated analytically the relative amplitude of the harmonics of the tremor frequency in the motor neuron output for different temporal behaviors of the oscillator. Next, we analyzed the bias in the relative harmonics amplitude introduced by superimposing oscillations at twice the tremor frequency. These findings were validated using experimental measurements of wrist angular velocity and surface electromyography (EMG) from 22 patients (11 essential tremor, 11 Parkinson’s disease). The ensemble motor unit action potential trains identified from the EMG represented the neural drive to the muscles. Main results. The analytical results showed that the relative power of the tremor harmonics in the analytical models of the neural drive was determined by the variability and duration of the tremor bursts and the presence of the second oscillator biased this power towards higher values. The experimental findings accurately matched the analytical model assuming one oscillator, indicating a negligible functional role of secondary oscillatory inputs. Furthermore, a significant difference in the relative power of harmonics in the neural drive was found across the patient groups, suggesting a diagnostic value of this measure (classification accuracy: 86%). This diagnostic power decreased substantially when estimated from limb acceleration or the EMG. Signficance. The results indicate that the neural drive in pathological tremor is compatible with one central network

  4. Neutron stars as X-ray burst sources. II. Burst energy histograms and why they burst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baan, W.A.

    1979-01-01

    In this work we explore some of the implications of a model for X-ray burst sources where bursts are caused by Kruskal-Schwarzschild instabilities at the magnetopause of an accreting and rotating neutron star. A number of simplifying assumptions are made in order to test the model using observed burst-energy histograms for the rapid burster MXB 1730--335. The predicted histograms have a correct general shape, but it appears that other effects are important as well, and that mode competition, for instance, may suppress the histograms at high burst energies. An explanation is ventured for the enhancement in the histogram at the highest burst energies, which produces the bimodal shape in high accretion rate histograms. Quantitative criteria are given for deciding when accreting neutron stars are steady sources or burst sources, and these criteria are tested using the X-ray pulsars

  5. Automatic control of oscillatory penetration apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucon, Peter A

    2015-01-06

    A system and method for controlling an oscillatory penetration apparatus. An embodiment is a system and method for controlling a sonic drill having a displacement and an operating range and operating at a phase difference, said sonic drill comprising a push-pull piston and eccentrics, said method comprising: operating the push-pull piston at an initial push-pull force while the eccentrics are operated at a plurality of different operating frequencies within the operating range of the sonic drill and measuring the displacement at each operating frequency; determining an efficient operating frequency for the material being drilled and operating the eccentrics at said efficient operating frequency; determining the phase difference at which the sonic drill is operating; and if the phase difference is not substantially equal to minus ninety degrees, operating the push-pull piston at another push-pull force.

  6. Localized Oscillatory Energy Conversion in Magnetopause Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, J. L.; Ergun, R. E.; Cassak, P. A.; Webster, J. M.; Torbert, R. B.; Giles, B. L.; Dorelli, J. C.; Rager, A. C.; Hwang, K.-J.; Phan, T. D.; Genestreti, K. J.; Allen, R. C.; Chen, L.-J.; Wang, S.; Gershman, D.; Le Contel, O.; Russell, C. T.; Strangeway, R. J.; Wilder, F. D.; Graham, D. B.; Hesse, M.; Drake, J. F.; Swisdak, M.; Price, L. M.; Shay, M. A.; Lindqvist, P.-A.; Pollock, C. J.; Denton, R. E.; Newman, D. L.

    2018-02-01

    Data from the NASA Magnetospheric Multiscale mission are used to investigate asymmetric magnetic reconnection at the dayside boundary between the Earth's magnetosphere and the solar wind. High-resolution measurements of plasmas and fields are used to identify highly localized ( 15 electron Debye lengths) standing wave structures with large electric field amplitudes (up to 100 mV/m). These wave structures are associated with spatially oscillatory energy conversion, which appears as alternatingly positive and negative values of J · E. For small guide magnetic fields the wave structures occur in the electron stagnation region at the magnetosphere edge of the electron diffusion region. For larger guide fields the structures also occur near the reconnection X-line. This difference is explained in terms of channels for the out-of-plane current (agyrotropic electrons at the stagnation point and guide field-aligned electrons at the X-line).

  7. Production of oscillatory flow in wind tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Asmi, K.; Castro, I. P.

    1993-06-01

    A method for producing oscillatory flow in open-circuit wind tunnels driven by centrifugal fans is described. Performance characteristics of a new device installed on two such tunnels of greatly differing size are presented. It is shown that sinusoidal variations of the working section flow, having peak-to-peak amplitudes up to at least 30 percent of the mean flow speed and frequencies up to, typically, that corresponding to the acoustic quarter-wave-length frequency determined by the tunnel size, can be obtained with negligible harmonic distortion or acoustic noise difficulties. A brief review of the various methods that have been used previously is included, and the advantages and disadvantages of these different techniques are highlighted. The present technique seems to represent a significant improvement over many of them.

  8. Multiphase patterns in periodically forced oscillatory systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elphick, C.; Hagberg, A.; Meron, E.

    1999-01-01

    Periodic forcing of an oscillatory system produces frequency locking bands within which the system frequency is rationally related to the forcing frequency. We study extended oscillatory systems that respond to uniform periodic forcing at one quarter of the forcing frequency (the 4:1 resonance). These systems possess four coexisting stable states, corresponding to uniform oscillations with successive phase shifts of π/2. Using an amplitude equation approach near a Hopf bifurcation to uniform oscillations, we study front solutions connecting different phase states. These solutions divide into two groups: π fronts separating states with a phase shift of π and π/2 fronts separating states with a phase shift of π/2. We find a type of front instability where a stationary π front 'decomposes' into a pair of traveling π/2 fronts as the forcing strength is decreased. The instability is degenerate for an amplitude equation with cubic nonlinearities. At the instability point a continuous family of pair solutions exists, consisting of π/2 fronts separated by distances ranging from zero to infinity. Quintic nonlinearities lift the degeneracy at the instability point but do not change the basic nature of the instability. We conjecture the existence of similar instabilities in higher 2n:1 resonances (n=3,4,hor-ellipsis) where stationary π fronts decompose into n traveling π/n fronts. The instabilities designate transitions from stationary two-phase patterns to traveling 2n-phase patterns. As an example, we demonstrate with a numerical solution the collapse of a four-phase spiral wave into a stationary two-phase pattern as the forcing strength within the 4:1 resonance is increased. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  9. Saccadic reaction times to audiovisual stimuli show effects of oscillatory phase reset.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adele Diederich

    Full Text Available Initiating an eye movement towards a suddenly appearing visual target is faster when an accessory auditory stimulus occurs in close spatiotemporal vicinity. Such facilitation of saccadic reaction time (SRT is well-documented, but the exact neural mechanisms underlying the crossmodal effect remain to be elucidated. From EEG/MEG studies it has been hypothesized that coupled oscillatory activity in primary sensory cortices regulates multisensory processing. Specifically, it is assumed that the phase of an ongoing neural oscillation is shifted due to the occurrence of a sensory stimulus so that, across trials, phase values become highly consistent (phase reset. If one can identify the phase an oscillation is reset to, it is possible to predict when temporal windows of high and low excitability will occur. However, in behavioral experiments the pre-stimulus phase will be different on successive repetitions of the experimental trial, and average performance over many trials will show no signs of the modulation. Here we circumvent this problem by repeatedly presenting an auditory accessory stimulus followed by a visual target stimulus with a temporal delay varied in steps of 2 ms. Performing a discrete time series analysis on SRT as a function of the delay, we provide statistical evidence for the existence of distinct peak spectral components in the power spectrum. These frequencies, although varying across participants, fall within the beta and gamma range (20 to 40 Hz of neural oscillatory activity observed in neurophysiological studies of multisensory integration. Some evidence for high-theta/alpha activity was found as well. Our results are consistent with the phase reset hypothesis and demonstrate that it is amenable to testing by purely psychophysical methods. Thus, any theory of multisensory processes that connects specific brain states with patterns of saccadic responses should be able to account for traces of oscillatory activity in observable

  10. Quantum key based burst confidentiality in optical burst switched networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balamurugan, A M; Sivasubramanian, A

    2014-01-01

    The optical burst switching (OBS) is an emergent result to the technology concern that could achieve a feasible network in future. They are endowed with the ability to meet the bandwidth requirement of those applications that require intensive bandwidth. There are more domains opening up in the OBS that evidently shows their advantages and their capability to face the future network traffic. However, the concept of OBS is still far from perfection facing issues in case of security threat. The transfer of optical switching paradigm to optical burst switching faces serious downfall in the fields of burst aggregation, routing, authentication, dispute resolution, and quality of service (QoS). This paper deals with employing RC4 (stream cipher) to encrypt and decrypt bursts thereby ensuring the confidentiality of the burst. Although the use of AES algorithm has already been proposed for the same issue, by contrasting the two algorithms under the parameters of burst encryption and decryption time, end-to-end delay, it was found that RC4 provided better results. This paper looks to provide a better solution for the confidentiality of the burst in OBS networks.

  11. Quantum Key Based Burst Confidentiality in Optical Burst Switched Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Balamurugan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The optical burst switching (OBS is an emergent result to the technology concern that could achieve a feasible network in future. They are endowed with the ability to meet the bandwidth requirement of those applications that require intensive bandwidth. There are more domains opening up in the OBS that evidently shows their advantages and their capability to face the future network traffic. However, the concept of OBS is still far from perfection facing issues in case of security threat. The transfer of optical switching paradigm to optical burst switching faces serious downfall in the fields of burst aggregation, routing, authentication, dispute resolution, and quality of service (QoS. This paper deals with employing RC4 (stream cipher to encrypt and decrypt bursts thereby ensuring the confidentiality of the burst. Although the use of AES algorithm has already been proposed for the same issue, by contrasting the two algorithms under the parameters of burst encryption and decryption time, end-to-end delay, it was found that RC4 provided better results. This paper looks to provide a better solution for the confidentiality of the burst in OBS networks.

  12. Emotional response to musical repetition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingstone, Steven R; Palmer, Caroline; Schubert, Emery

    2012-06-01

    Two experiments examined the effects of repetition on listeners' emotional response to music. Listeners heard recordings of orchestral music that contained a large section repeated twice. The music had a symmetric phrase structure (same-length phrases) in Experiment 1 and an asymmetric phrase structure (different-length phrases) in Experiment 2, hypothesized to alter the predictability of sensitivity to musical repetition. Continuous measures of arousal and valence were compared across music that contained identical repetition, variation (related), or contrasting (unrelated) structure. Listeners' emotional arousal ratings differed most for contrasting music, moderately for variations, and least for repeating musical segments. A computational model for the detection of repeated musical segments was applied to the listeners' emotional responses. The model detected the locations of phrase boundaries from the emotional responses better than from performed tempo or physical intensity in both experiments. These findings indicate the importance of repetition in listeners' emotional response to music and in the perceptual segmentation of musical structure.

  13. Solar microwave bursts - A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, M. R.; Vlahos, L.

    1982-01-01

    Observational and theoretical results on the physics of microwave bursts that occur in the solar atmosphere are reviewed. Special attention is given to the advances made in burst physics over the last few years with the great improvement in spatial and time resolution, especially with instruments like the NRAO three-element interferometer, the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope, and more recently the Very Large Array. Observations made on the preflare build-up of an active region at centimeter wavelengths are reviewed. Three distinct phases in the evolution of cm bursts, namely the impulsive phase, the post-burst phase, and the gradual rise and fall, are discussed. Attention is also given to the flux density spectra of centimeter bursts. Descriptions are given of observations of fine structures with temporal resolution of 10-100 ms in the intensity profiles of cm-wavelength bursts. High spatial resolution observations are analyzed, with special reference to the one- and two-dimensional maps of cm burst sources.

  14. Oscillatory solutions of the Cauchy problem for linear differential equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gro Hovhannisyan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We consider the Cauchy problem for second and third order linear differential equations with constant complex coefficients. We describe necessary and sufficient conditions on the data for the existence of oscillatory solutions. It is known that in the case of real coefficients the oscillatory behavior of solutions does not depend on initial values, but we show that this is no longer true in the complex case: hence in practice it is possible to control oscillatory behavior by varying the initial conditions. Our Proofs are based on asymptotic analysis of the zeros of solutions, represented as linear combinations of exponential functions.

  15. Low frequency oscillatory flow in a rotating curved pipe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈华军; 章本照; 苏霄燕

    2003-01-01

    The low frequency oscillatory flow in a rotating curved pipe was studied by using the method of bi-parameter perturbation. Perturbation solutions up to the second order were obtained and the effects of rotationon the low frequency oscillatory flow were examined in detail, The results indicated that there exists evident difference between the low frequency oscillatory flow in a rotating curved pipe and in a curved pipe without ro-tation. During a period, four secondary vortexes may exist on the circular cross-section and the distribution of axial velocity and wall shear stress are related to the ratio of the Coriolis foree to centrifugal foree and the axial pressure gradient.

  16. Low frequency oscillatory flow in a rotating curved pipe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈华军; 章本照; 苏霄燕

    2003-01-01

    The low frequency oscillatory flow in a rotating curved pipe was studied by using the method of bi-parameter perturbation. Perturbation solutions up to the second order were obtained and the effects of rotation on the low frequency oscillatory flow were examined in detail. The results indicated that there exists evident difference between the low frequency oscillatory flow in a rotating curved pipe and in a curved pipe without rotation. During a period, four secondary vortexes may exist on the circular cross-section and the distribution of axial velocity and wall shear stress are related to the ratio of the Coriolis force to centrifugal force and the axial pressure gradient.

  17. Detection of artifacts from high energy bursts in neonatal EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sourya; Biswas, Arunava; Mukherjee, Jayanta; Majumdar, Arun Kumar; Majumdar, Bandana; Mukherjee, Suchandra; Singh, Arun Kumar

    2013-11-01

    Detection of non-cerebral activities or artifacts, intermixed within the background EEG, is essential to discard them from subsequent pattern analysis. The problem is much harder in neonatal EEG, where the background EEG contains spikes, waves, and rapid fluctuations in amplitude and frequency. Existing artifact detection methods are mostly limited to detect only a subset of artifacts such as ocular, muscle or power line artifacts. Few methods integrate different modules, each for detection of one specific category of artifact. Furthermore, most of the reference approaches are implemented and tested on adult EEG recordings. Direct application of those methods on neonatal EEG causes performance deterioration, due to greater pattern variation and inherent complexity. A method for detection of a wide range of artifact categories in neonatal EEG is thus required. At the same time, the method should be specific enough to preserve the background EEG information. The current study describes a feature based classification approach to detect both repetitive (generated from ECG, EMG, pulse, respiration, etc.) and transient (generated from eye blinking, eye movement, patient movement, etc.) artifacts. It focuses on artifact detection within high energy burst patterns, instead of detecting artifacts within the complete background EEG with wide pattern variation. The objective is to find true burst patterns, which can later be used to identify the Burst-Suppression (BS) pattern, which is commonly observed during newborn seizure. Such selective artifact detection is proven to be more sensitive to artifacts and specific to bursts, compared to the existing artifact detection approaches applied on the complete background EEG. Several time domain, frequency domain, statistical features, and features generated by wavelet decomposition are analyzed to model the proposed bi-classification between burst and artifact segments. A feature selection method is also applied to select the

  18. A Unified Model for Repeating and Non-repeating Fast Radio Bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagchi, Manjari

    2017-01-01

    The model that fast radio bursts (FRBs) are caused by plunges of asteroids onto neutron stars can explain both repeating and non-repeating bursts. If a neutron star passes through an asteroid belt around another star, there would be a series of bursts caused by a series of asteroid impacts. Moreover, the neutron star would cross the same belt repetitively if it were in a binary with the star hosting the asteroid belt, leading to a repeated series of bursts. I explore the properties of neutron star binaries that could lead to the only known repeating FRB so far (FRB121102). In this model, the next two epochs of bursts are expected around 2017 February 27 and 2017 December 18. On the other hand, if the asteroid belt is located around the neutron star itself, then a chance fall of an asteroid from that belt onto the neutron star would lead to a non-repeating burst. Even a neutron star grazing an asteroid belt can lead to a non-repeating burst caused by just one asteroid plunge during the grazing. This is possible even when the neutron star is in a binary with the asteroid-hosting star, if the belt and the neutron star orbit are non-coplanar.

  19. A Unified Model for Repeating and Non-repeating Fast Radio Bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagchi, Manjari, E-mail: manjari@imsc.res.in [The Institute of Mathematical Sciences (IMSc-HBNI), 4th Cross Road, CIT Campus, Taramani, Chennai 600113 (India)

    2017-04-01

    The model that fast radio bursts (FRBs) are caused by plunges of asteroids onto neutron stars can explain both repeating and non-repeating bursts. If a neutron star passes through an asteroid belt around another star, there would be a series of bursts caused by a series of asteroid impacts. Moreover, the neutron star would cross the same belt repetitively if it were in a binary with the star hosting the asteroid belt, leading to a repeated series of bursts. I explore the properties of neutron star binaries that could lead to the only known repeating FRB so far (FRB121102). In this model, the next two epochs of bursts are expected around 2017 February 27 and 2017 December 18. On the other hand, if the asteroid belt is located around the neutron star itself, then a chance fall of an asteroid from that belt onto the neutron star would lead to a non-repeating burst. Even a neutron star grazing an asteroid belt can lead to a non-repeating burst caused by just one asteroid plunge during the grazing. This is possible even when the neutron star is in a binary with the asteroid-hosting star, if the belt and the neutron star orbit are non-coplanar.

  20. Inertial particle manipulation in microscale oscillatory flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Siddhansh; Rallabandi, Bhargav; Raju, David; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    2017-11-01

    Recent work has shown that inertial effects in oscillating flows can be exploited for simultaneous transport and differential displacement of microparticles, enabling size sorting of such particles on extraordinarily short time scales. Generalizing previous theory efforts, we here derive a two-dimensional time-averaged version of the Maxey-Riley equation that includes the effect of an oscillating interface to model particle dynamics in such flows. Separating the steady transport time scale from the oscillatory time scale results in a simple and computationally efficient reduced model that preserves all slow-time features of the full unsteady Maxey-Riley simulations, including inertial particle displacement. Comparison is made not only to full simulations, but also to experiments using oscillating bubbles as the driving interfaces. In this case, the theory predicts either an attraction to or a repulsion from the bubble interface due to inertial effects, so that versatile particle manipulation is possible using differences in particle size, particle/fluid density contrast and streaming strength. We also demonstrate that these predictions are in agreement with experiments.

  1. Oscillatory Stokes Flow Past a Slip Cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaniappan, D.

    2013-11-01

    Two-dimensional transient slow viscous flow past a circular cylinder with Navier slip boundary conditions is considered in the limit of low-Reynolds number. The oscillatory Stokes flow problem around a cylinder is solved using the stream function method leading to an analytic solution in terms of modified Bessel functions of the second kind. The corresponding steady-state behavior yields the familiar paradoxical result first detected by Stokes. It is noted that the two key parameters, viz., the frequency λ, and the slip coefficient ξ have a significant impact on the flow field in the vicinity of the cylinder contour. In the limit of very low frequency, the flow is dominated by a term containing a well-known biharmonic function found by Stokes that has a singular behavior at infinity. Local streamlines for small times show interesting flow patterns. Attached eddies due to flow separation - observed in the no-slip case - either get detached or pushed away from the cylinder surface as ξ is varied. Computed asymptotic results predict that the flow exhibits inviscid behavior far away from the cylinder in the frequency range 0 < λ << 1 . Although the frequency of oscillations is finite, our exact solutions reveal fairly rapid transitions in the flow domain. Research Enhancement grant, TAMUCC.

  2. Oscillatory exchange coupling in magnetic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevincli, H; Senger, R T; Durgun, E; Ciraci, S

    2007-01-01

    Recently, first-principles calculations based on the spin-dependent density functional theory (DFT) have revealed that the magnetic ground state of a finite linear carbon chain capped by two transition metal (TM) atoms alternates between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic configurations depending on the number of carbon atoms. The character of indirect exchange coupling in this nanoscale, quasi-zero-dimensional system is different from those analogous extended structures consisting of magnetic layers separated by a non-magnetic spacer (or magnetic impurities in a non-magnetic host material) and a formulation based on an atomic picture is needed. We present a tight-binding model which provides a theoretical framework to the underlying mechanism of the exchange coupling in molecular structures. The model calculations are capable of reproducing the essential features of the DFT results for the indirect exchange coupling and the atomic magnetic moments in the TM-C n -TM structures as functions of the number of carbon atoms. In nanostructures consisting of a few atoms the concepts of extended wavefunctions and the band theory lose their validity, and hence the oscillatory exchange coupling turns out to be a consequence of quantum interference effects due to the spin-dependent onsite and hopping energies

  3. Turbulent shear control with oscillatory bubble injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyun Jin; Oishi, Yoshihiko; Tasaka, Yuji; Murai, Yuichi; Takeda, Yasushi

    2009-01-01

    It is known that injecting bubbles into shear flow can reduce the frictional drag. This method has advantages in comparison to others in simplicity of installation and also in environment. The amount of drag reduction by bubbles depends on the void fraction provided in the boundary layer. It means, however, that certain power must be consumed to generate bubbles in water, worsening the total power-saving performance. We propose oscillatory bubble injection technique to improve the performance in this study. In order to prove this idea of new type of drag reduction, velocity vector field and shear stress profile in a horizontal channel flow are measured by ultrasonic velocity profiler (UVP) and shear stress transducer, respectively. We measure the gas-liquid interface from the UVP signal, as well. This compound measurement with different principles leads to deeper understanding of bubble-originated drag reduction phenomena, in particular for unsteady process of boundary layer alternation. At these experiments, the results have demonstrated that the intermittency promotes the drag reduction more than normal continuous injection for the same void fraction supplied.

  4. Processing oscillatory signals by incoherent feedforward loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Carolyn; Wu, Feilun; Tsoi, Ryan; Shats, Igor; You, Lingchong

    From the timing of amoeba development to the maintenance of stem cell pluripotency,many biological signaling pathways exhibit the ability to differentiate between pulsatile and sustained signals in the regulation of downstream gene expression.While networks underlying this signal decoding are diverse,many are built around a common motif, the incoherent feedforward loop (IFFL),where an input simultaneously activates an output and an inhibitor of the output.With appropriate parameters,this motif can generate temporal adaptation,where the system is desensitized to a sustained input.This property serves as the foundation for distinguishing signals with varying temporal profiles.Here,we use quantitative modeling to examine another property of IFFLs,the ability to process oscillatory signals.Our results indicate that the system's ability to translate pulsatile dynamics is limited by two constraints.The kinetics of IFFL components dictate the input range for which the network can decode pulsatile dynamics.In addition,a match between the network parameters and signal characteristics is required for optimal ``counting''.We elucidate one potential mechanism by which information processing occurs in natural networks with implications in the design of synthetic gene circuits for this purpose. This work was partially supported by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship (CZ).

  5. Phenomenological vessel burst investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hippelein, K.W.; Julisch, P.; Muz, J.; Schiedermaier, J.

    1985-07-01

    Fourteen burst experiments have been carried out using vessels with circumferential and longitudinal flaws, for investigation of the fracture behaviour, i.e. the time-related fracture opening. The vessels had dimensions (outer diameter x wall thickness = 800 x 47 mm) which correspond to the dimensions of the main coolant piping of a 1300 MW e PWR. The test specimens had been made of the base-safe material 20 MnMoNi 55 and of a special, 22 NiMoCr 37 base alloy. The experimental conditions with regard to pressure and temperature have been chosen so as to correspond to normal operating conditions of a PWR (p∝17.5 MPa, T∝300 0 C), i.e. the flaws have been so dimensioned that failure was to be expected at a pressure of p∝17.5 MPa. As a rule, water has been used as the pressure medium, or in some cases air, in order to influence the time-dependent pressure decrease. Fluid and structural dynamics calculations have also been made. In order to determine the impact of a fast propagating crack on the leak-to-fracture curve, which normally is defined by quasistationary experiments, suitable tests have been made with large-volume, cylindrical vessels (outer diameter x wall thickness x length = 3000 x 21 x 14000 mm) made of the material WSt E 43. The leak-before-fracture criterion has been confirmed. (orig./HP) [de

  6. Bursting in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky Reaction added with Phenol in a Batch Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadena, Ariel; Agreda, Jesus, E-mail: jaagredab@unal.edu.co [Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia); Barragan, Daniel [Escuela de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Medellin (Colombia)

    2013-12-01

    The classic Belousov-Zhabotinski reaction was modified by adding phenol as a second organic substrate that kinetically competes with the malonic acid in the reduction of Ce{sup 4+} to Ce{sup 3+} and in the removal of molecular bromine of the reaction mixture. The oscillating reaction of two substrates exhibited burst firing and an oscillatory period of long duration. Analysis of experimental data shows an increasing of the bursting phenomenon, with a greater spiking in the burst firing and with a longer quiescent state, as a function of the initial phenol concentration increase. It was hypothesized that the bursting phenomenon can be explained introducing a redox cycle between the reduced phenolic species (hydroxyphenols) and the oxidized ones (quinones). The hypothesis was experimentally and numerically tested and from the results it is possible to conclude that the bursting phenomenon exhibited by the oscillating reaction of two substrates is mainly driven by a p-di-hydroxy-benzene/p-benzoquinone redox cycle (author)

  7. Solar X-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urnov, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    In the popular form the consideration is given to the modern state tasks and results of X-ray spectrometry of solar bursts. The operation of X-ray spectroheliograph is described. Results of spectral and polarization measurings of X-ray radiation of one powerful solar burst are presented. The conclusion has been drawn that in the process of burst development three characteristic stages may be distingwished: 1) the initial phase; just in this period processes which lead to observed consequences-electromagnetic and corpuscular radiation are born; 2) the impulse phase, or the phase of maximum, is characterised by sharp increase of radiation flux. During this phase the main energy content emanates and some volumes of plasma warm up to high temperatures; 3) the phase of burst damping, during which plasma cools and reverts to the initial condition

  8. Oscillatory ripples, evaluation of ancient wave climates and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oscillatory ripples, evaluation of ancient wave climates and epierogeny in the Anambra ... conditions, epierogenic patterns and paleogeographic history of the basins. ... shallow and marked by low to moderate hydrodynamic energy conditions.

  9. Resting-state oscillatory brain dynamics in Alzheimer disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haan, W.; Stam, C.J.; Jones, B.F.; Zuiderwijk, I.M.; van Dijk, B.W.; Scheltens, P.

    2008-01-01

    Altered oscillatory brain activity in Alzheimer disease (AD) may reflect underlying neuropathological changes, and its characterization might lead to new diagnostic possibilities. The present study using quantitative magnetoencephalography was set up to examine power spectrum changes in AD patients,

  10. Synchronization enhancement via an oscillatory bath in a network of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-02-05

    Feb 5, 2015 ... 2Monell Chemical Senses Center, 3500 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA ... The robustness of synchronization strategy is tested using a local and global ..... enhancement effect that the oscillatory bath has in the ...

  11. 30 CFR 57.3461 - Rock bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rock bursts. 57.3461 Section 57.3461 Mineral...-Underground Only § 57.3461 Rock bursts. (a) Operators of mines which have experienced a rock burst shall— (1) Within twenty four hours report to the nearest MSHA office each rock burst which: (i) Causes persons to...

  12. Chimera states in bursting neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Bera, Bidesh K.; Ghosh, Dibakar; Lakshmanan, M.

    2015-01-01

    We study the existence of chimera states in pulse-coupled networks of bursting Hindmarsh-Rose neurons with nonlocal, global and local (nearest neighbor) couplings. Through a linear stability analysis, we discuss the behavior of stability function in the incoherent (i.e. disorder), coherent, chimera and multi-chimera states. Surprisingly, we find that chimera and multi-chimera states occur even using local nearest neighbor interaction in a network of identical bursting neurons alone. This is i...

  13. Enhanced Gamma Oscillatory Activity in Rats with Chronic Inflammatory Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jing; Wang, Jing; Xing, Guo-Gang; Li, Xiaoli; Wan, You

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that oscillatory gamma activity participates in brief acute pain and tonic ongoing pain. It is of great interest to determine whether the gamma activity is involved in chronic pain since chronic pain is a more severe pathological condition characterized by pain persistency. To investigate the oscillatory gamma activity in chronic pain, in the present study, we recorded spontaneous electrocorticogram (ECoG) signals during chronic pain development in rats with chronic infla...

  14. Detection circuit for gamma-ray burst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Hiroyuki; Yamagami, Takamasa; Mori, Kunishiro; Uchiyama, Sadayuki.

    1982-01-01

    A new gamma-ray burst detection system is described. The system was developed as an environmental monitor of an accelerator, and can be used as the burst detection system. The system detects the arrival time of burst. The difference between the arrival times detected at different places will give information on the burst source. The frequency of detecting false burst was estimated, and the detection limit under the estimated frequency of false burst was also calculated. Decision whether the signal is false or true burst was made by the statistical treatment. (Kato, T.)

  15. Gamma-ray burst models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Andrew

    2007-05-15

    I consider various possibilities for making gamma-ray bursts, particularly from close binaries. In addition to the much-studied neutron star+neutron star and black hole+neutron star cases usually considered good candidates for short-duration bursts, there are also other possibilities. In particular, neutron star+massive white dwarf has several desirable features. These systems are likely to produce long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), in some cases definitely without an accompanying supernova, as observed recently. This class of burst would have a strong correlation with star formation and occur close to the host galaxy. However, rare members of the class need not be near star-forming regions and could have any type of host galaxy. Thus, a long-duration burst far from any star-forming region would also be a signature of this class. Estimates based on the existence of a known progenitor suggest that this type of GRB may be quite common, in agreement with the fact that the absence of a supernova can only be established in nearby bursts.

  16. Solar Drift-Pair Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanislavsky, A.; Volvach, Ya.; Konovalenko, A.; Koval, A.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper a new sight on the study of solar bursts historically called drift pairs (DPs) is presented. Having a simple morphology on dynamic spectra of radio records (two short components separated in time, and often they are very similar) and discovered at the dawn of radio astronomy, their features remain unexplained totally up to now. Generally, the DPs are observed during the solar storms of type III bursts, but not every storm of type III bursts is linked with DPs. Detected by ground-based instruments at decameter and meter wavelengths, the DP bursts are limited in frequency bandwidth. They can drift from high frequencies to low ones and vice versa. Their frequency drift rate may be both lower and higher than typical rates of type III bursts at the same frequency range. The development of low-frequency radio telescopes and data processing provide additional possibilities in the research. In this context the fresh analysis of DPs, made from recent observations in the summer campaign of 2015, are just considered. Their study was implemented by updated tools of the UTR-2 radio telescope at 9-33 MHz. During 10-12 July of 2015, DPs forming the longest patterns on dynamic spectra are about 7% of the total number of recorded DPs. Their marvelous resemblance in frequency drift rates with the solar S-bursts is discussed.

  17. Oscillatory magneto-convection under magnetic field modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palle Kiran

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigate an oscillatory mode of nonlinear magneto-convection under time dependant magnetic field. The time dependant magnetic field consists steady and oscillatory parts. The oscillatory part of the imposed magnetic field is assumed to be of third order. An externally imposed vertical magnetic field in an electrically conducting horizontal fluid layer is considered. The finite amplitude analysis is discussed while perturbing the system. The complex Ginzburg-Landau model is used to derive an amplitude of oscillatory convection for weakly nonlinear mode. Heat transfer is quantified in terms of the Nusselt number, which is governed by the Landau equation. The variation of the modulation excitation of the magnetic field alternates heat transfer in the layer. The modulation excitation of the magnetic field is used either to enhance or diminish the heat transfer in the system. Further, it is found that, oscillatory mode of convection enhances the heat transfer and than stationary convection. The results have possible technological applications in magnetic fluid based systems involving energy transmission. Keywords: Weakly nonlinear theory, Oscillatory convection, Complex Ginzburg Landau model, Magnetic modulation

  18. Repetition and lag effects in movement recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, C R; Buckolz, E

    1982-03-01

    Whether repetition and lag improve the recognition of movement patterns was investigated. Recognition memory was tested for one repetition, two-repetitions massed, and two-repetitions distributed with movement patterns at lags of 3, 5, 7, and 13. Recognition performance was examined both immediately afterwards and following a 48 hour delay. Both repetition and lag effects failed to be demonstrated, providing some support for the claim that memory is unaffected by repetition at a constant level of processing (Craik & Lockhart, 1972). There was, as expected, a significant decrease in recognition memory following the retention interval, but this appeared unrelated to repetition or lag.

  19. An optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier for seeding high repetition rate free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Höppner, H; Hage, A; Tanikawa, T; Schulz, M; Faatz, B; Riedel, R; Prandolini, M J; Teubner, U; Tavella, F

    2015-01-01

    High repetition rate free-electron lasers (FEL), producing highly intense extreme ultraviolet and x-ray pulses, require new high power tunable femtosecond lasers for FEL seeding and FEL pump-probe experiments. A tunable, 112 W (burst mode) optical parametric chirped-pulse amplifier (OPCPA) is demonstrated with center frequencies ranging from 720–900 nm, pulse energies up to 1.12 mJ and a pulse duration of 30 fs at a repetition rate of 100 kHz. Since the power scalability of this OPCPA is limited by the OPCPA-pump amplifier, we also demonstrate a 6.7–13.7 kW (burst mode) thin-disk OPCPA-pump amplifier, increasing the possible OPCPA output power to many hundreds of watts. Furthermore, third and fourth harmonic generation experiments are performed and the results are used to simulate a seeded FEL with high-gain harmonic generation. (paper)

  20. High energy high repetition-rate thin-disk amplifier for OPCPA pumping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, Michael

    2013-08-15

    The development of a pump laser system for a high power and high repetition rate optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification (OPCPA) is presented in this thesis. The OPCPA system requires pump pulse energies in the range of tens of millijoules at high repetition rates with sub-picosecond pulse durations. This can be achieved to some extend with Innoslab amplifier technology. However, scaling to higher pulse energies at high repetition rates may be problematic. With the thin-disk amplifier presented in this thesis, output energies of 140 mJ at 100 kHz repetition rate could be achieved in burst-mode operation, which is a world record for this type of laser amplifier. Due to its material and spectral properties, ytterbium doped YAG (Yb:YAG) is used as a gain medium for the high power amplifier stages. The low quantum defect and the comparatively large emission bandwidth makes this material the choice for high power operation and sub-picosecond compressed pulse durations. The output beam profile as well as the shape of the output bursts is ideal to pump an OPCPA system. An OPCPA output energy in the millijoule range with repetition rates of 100 kHz to 1 MHz is needed to generate seed pulses for the FEL and for the application as pump-probe laser at the FEL facility. Since the development of this laser system needs to meet requirements set by the Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH), the amplifier is conceived for burst-mode operation. The main requirement is a high intra-burst pulse repetition rate of more than 100 kHz and a uniform pulse train (burst) with equal properties for every pulse. The burst-mode is an operation mode where the laser never reaches a lasing equilibrium, which means that the behavior of the amplifier is similar to a switch-on of the laser system for every burst. This makes the development of the amplifier system difficult. Therefore, an analytical model has been developed to study the amplification process during the burst. This includes the

  1. High energy high repetition-rate thin-disk amplifier for OPCPA pumping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, Michael

    2013-08-01

    The development of a pump laser system for a high power and high repetition rate optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification (OPCPA) is presented in this thesis. The OPCPA system requires pump pulse energies in the range of tens of millijoules at high repetition rates with sub-picosecond pulse durations. This can be achieved to some extend with Innoslab amplifier technology. However, scaling to higher pulse energies at high repetition rates may be problematic. With the thin-disk amplifier presented in this thesis, output energies of 140 mJ at 100 kHz repetition rate could be achieved in burst-mode operation, which is a world record for this type of laser amplifier. Due to its material and spectral properties, ytterbium doped YAG (Yb:YAG) is used as a gain medium for the high power amplifier stages. The low quantum defect and the comparatively large emission bandwidth makes this material the choice for high power operation and sub-picosecond compressed pulse durations. The output beam profile as well as the shape of the output bursts is ideal to pump an OPCPA system. An OPCPA output energy in the millijoule range with repetition rates of 100 kHz to 1 MHz is needed to generate seed pulses for the FEL and for the application as pump-probe laser at the FEL facility. Since the development of this laser system needs to meet requirements set by the Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH), the amplifier is conceived for burst-mode operation. The main requirement is a high intra-burst pulse repetition rate of more than 100 kHz and a uniform pulse train (burst) with equal properties for every pulse. The burst-mode is an operation mode where the laser never reaches a lasing equilibrium, which means that the behavior of the amplifier is similar to a switch-on of the laser system for every burst. This makes the development of the amplifier system difficult. Therefore, an analytical model has been developed to study the amplification process during the burst. This includes the

  2. X-ray bursts: Observation versus theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, W. H. G.

    1981-01-01

    Results of various observations of common type I X-ray bursts are discussed with respect to the theory of thermonuclear flashes in the surface layers of accreting neutron stars. Topics covered include burst profiles; irregular burst intervals; rise and decay times and the role of hydrogen; the accuracy of source distances; accuracy in radii determination; radius increase early in the burst; the super Eddington limit; temperatures at burst maximum; and the role of the magnetic field.

  3. Repetitive transient extraction for machinery fault diagnosis using multiscale fractional order entropy infogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xuefang; Qiao, Zijian; Lei, Yaguo

    2018-03-01

    The presence of repetitive transients in vibration signals is a typical symptom of local faults of rotating machinery. Infogram was developed to extract the repetitive transients from vibration signals based on Shannon entropy. Unfortunately, the Shannon entropy is maximized for random processes and unable to quantify the repetitive transients buried in heavy random noise. In addition, the vibration signals always contain multiple intrinsic oscillatory modes due to interaction and coupling effects between machine components. Under this circumstance, high values of Shannon entropy appear in several frequency bands or high value of Shannon entropy doesn't appear in the optimal frequency band, and the infogram becomes difficult to interpret. Thus, it also becomes difficult to select the optimal frequency band for extracting the repetitive transients from the whole frequency bands. To solve these problems, multiscale fractional order entropy (MSFE) infogram is proposed in this paper. With the help of MSFE infogram, the complexity and nonlinear signatures of the vibration signals can be evaluated by quantifying spectral entropy over a range of scales in fractional domain. Moreover, the similarity tolerance of MSFE infogram is helpful for assessing the regularity of signals. A simulation and two experiments concerning a locomotive bearing and a wind turbine gear are used to validate the MSFE infogram. The results demonstrate that the MSFE infogram is more robust to the heavy noise than infogram and the high value is able to only appear in the optimal frequency band for the repetitive transient extraction.

  4. Heterogeneity in Short Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Jay P.; Gehrels Neil; Scargle, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the Swift/BAT sample of short gamma-ray bursts, using an objective Bayesian Block procedure to extract temporal descriptors of the bursts' initial pulse complexes (IPCs). The sample comprises 12 and 41 bursts with and without extended emission (EE) components, respectively. IPCs of non-EE bursts are dominated by single pulse structures, while EE bursts tend to have two or more pulse structures. The medians of characteristic timescales - durations, pulse structure widths, and peak intervals - for EE bursts are factors of approx 2-3 longer than for non-EE bursts. A trend previously reported by Hakkila and colleagues unifying long and short bursts - the anti-correlation of pulse intensity and width - continues in the two short burst groups, with non-EE bursts extending to more intense, narrower pulses. In addition we find that preceding and succeeding pulse intensities are anti-correlated with pulse interval. We also examine the short burst X-ray afterglows as observed by the Swift/XRT. The median flux of the initial XRT detections for EE bursts (approx 6 X 10(exp -10) erg / sq cm/ s) is approx > 20 x brighter than for non-EE bursts, and the median X-ray afterglow duration for EE bursts (approx 60,000 s) is approx 30 x longer than for non-EE bursts. The tendency for EE bursts toward longer prompt-emission timescales and higher initial X-ray afterglow fluxes implies larger energy injections powering the afterglows. The longer-lasting X-ray afterglows of EE bursts may suggest that a significant fraction explode into more dense environments than non-EE bursts, or that the sometimes-dominant EE component efficiently p()wers the afterglow. Combined, these results favor different progenitors for EE and non-EE short bursts.

  5. HETEROGENEITY IN SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, Jay P.; Gehrels, Neil; Scargle, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the Swift/BAT sample of short gamma-ray bursts, using an objective Bayesian Block procedure to extract temporal descriptors of the bursts' initial pulse complexes (IPCs). The sample is comprised of 12 and 41 bursts with and without extended emission (EE) components, respectively. IPCs of non-EE bursts are dominated by single pulse structures, while EE bursts tend to have two or more pulse structures. The medians of characteristic timescales-durations, pulse structure widths, and peak intervals-for EE bursts are factors of ∼2-3 longer than for non-EE bursts. A trend previously reported by Hakkila and colleagues unifying long and short bursts-the anti-correlation of pulse intensity and width-continues in the two short burst groups, with non-EE bursts extending to more intense, narrower pulses. In addition, we find that preceding and succeeding pulse intensities are anti-correlated with pulse interval. We also examine the short burst X-ray afterglows as observed by the Swift/X-Ray Telescope (XRT). The median flux of the initial XRT detections for EE bursts (∼6x10 -10 erg cm -2 s -1 ) is ∼>20x brighter than for non-EE bursts, and the median X-ray afterglow duration for EE bursts (∼60,000 s) is ∼30x longer than for non-EE bursts. The tendency for EE bursts toward longer prompt-emission timescales and higher initial X-ray afterglow fluxes implies larger energy injections powering the afterglows. The longer-lasting X-ray afterglows of EE bursts may suggest that a significant fraction explode into denser environments than non-EE bursts, or that the sometimes-dominant EE component efficiently powers the afterglow. Combined, these results favor different progenitors for EE and non-EE short bursts.

  6. Transient Beneficial Effects of Excitatory Theta Burst Stimulation in a Patient with Phonological Agraphia after Left Supramarginal Gyrus Infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardone, Raffaele; De Blasi, Pierpaolo; Zuccoli, Giulio; Tezzon, Frediano; Golaszewski, Stefan; Trinka, Eugen

    2012-01-01

    We report a patient showing isolated phonological agraphia after an ischemic stroke involving the left supramarginal gyrus (SMG). In this patient, we investigated the effects of focal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) given as theta burst stimulation (TBS) over the left SMG, corresponding to the Brodmann area (BA) 40. The patient…

  7. Global Repetition Influences Contextual Cueing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Xuelian; Zinchenko, Artyom; Jia, Lina; Li, Hong

    2018-01-01

    Our visual system has a striking ability to improve visual search based on the learning of repeated ambient regularities, an effect named contextual cueing. Whereas most of the previous studies investigated contextual cueing effect with the same number of repeated and non-repeated search displays per block, the current study focused on whether a global repetition frequency formed by different presentation ratios between the repeated and non-repeated configurations influence contextual cueing effect. Specifically, the number of repeated and non-repeated displays presented in each block was manipulated: 12:12, 20:4, 4:20, and 4:4 in Experiments 1–4, respectively. The results revealed a significant contextual cueing effect when the global repetition frequency is high (≥1:1 ratio) in Experiments 1, 2, and 4, given that processing of repeated displays was expedited relative to non-repeated displays. Nevertheless, the contextual cueing effect reduced to a non-significant level when the repetition frequency reduced to 4:20 in Experiment 3. These results suggested that the presentation frequency of repeated relative to the non-repeated displays could influence the strength of contextual cueing. In other words, global repetition statistics could be a crucial factor to mediate contextual cueing effect. PMID:29636716

  8. Repetitive elements in parasitic protozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clayton Christine

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A recent paper published in BMC Genomics suggests that retrotransposition may be active in the human gut parasite Entamoeba histolytica. This adds to our knowledge of the various types of repetitive elements in parasitic protists and the potential influence of such elements on pathogenicity. See research article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2164/11/321

  9. Optical observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hjorth, J.; Pian, E.; Fynbo, J.P.U.

    2004-01-01

    We briefly review the status and recent progress in the field of optical observations of gamma-ray burst afterglows. We will focus on the fundamental observational evidence for the relationship between gamma-ray bursts and the final evolutionary phases of massive stars. In particular, we will address (i) gamma-ray burst host galaxies, (ii) optically dark gamma-ray burst afterglows, (iii) the gamma-ray burst-supernova connection, and (iv) the relation between X-ray flashes, gamma-ray bursts, and supernovae

  10. Cosmic gamma-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurley, K.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reviews the essential aspects of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) phenomenon, with emphasis on the more recent results. GRBs are introduced by their time histories, which provide some evidence for a compact object origin. The energy spectra of bursts are presented and they are seen to demonstrate practically unambiguously that the origin of some GRBs involves neutron stars. Counterpart searches are reviewed briefly and the statistical properties of bursters treated. This paper presents a review of the three known repeating bursters (the Soft Gamma Repeaters). Extragalactic and galactic models are discussed and future prospects are assessed

  11. Assessment of oscillatory stability constrained available transfer capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, T.; Singh, S.N.; Srivastava, S.C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper utilizes a bifurcation approach to compute oscillatory stability constrained available transfer capability (ATC) in an electricity market having bilateral as well as multilateral transactions. Oscillatory instability in non-linear systems can be related to Hopf bifurcation. At the Hopf bifurcation, one pair of the critical eigenvalues of the system Jacobian reaches imaginary axis. A new optimization formulation, including Hopf bifurcation conditions, has been developed in this paper to obtain the dynamic ATC. An oscillatory stability based contingency screening index, which takes into account the impact of transactions on severity of contingency, has been utilized to identify critical contingencies to be considered in determining ATC. The proposed method has been applied for dynamic ATC determination on a 39-bus New England system and a practical 75-bus Indian system considering composite static load as well as dynamic load models. (author)

  12. Two-scale approach to oscillatory singularly perturbed transport equations

    CERN Document Server

    Frénod, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    This book presents the classical results of the two-scale convergence theory and explains – using several figures – why it works. It then shows how to use this theory to homogenize ordinary differential equations with oscillating coefficients as well as oscillatory singularly perturbed ordinary differential equations. In addition, it explores the homogenization of hyperbolic partial differential equations with oscillating coefficients and linear oscillatory singularly perturbed hyperbolic partial differential equations. Further, it introduces readers to the two-scale numerical methods that can be built from the previous approaches to solve oscillatory singularly perturbed transport equations (ODE and hyperbolic PDE) and demonstrates how they can be used efficiently. This book appeals to master’s and PhD students interested in homogenization and numerics, as well as to the Iter community.

  13. Burst firing in a motion-sensitive neural pathway correlates with expansion properties of looming objects that evoke avoidance behaviours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glyn Allan McMillan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The locust visual system contains a well-defined motion-sensitive pathway that transfers visual input to motor centers involved in predator evasion and collision avoidance. One interneuron in this pathway, the descending contralateral movement detector (DCMD, is typically described as using rate coding; edge expansion of approaching objects causes an increased rate of neuronal firing that peaks after a certain retinal threshold angle is exceeded. However, evidence of intrinsic DCMD bursting properties combined with observable oscillations in mean firing rates and tight clustering of spikes in raw traces, suggest that bursting may be important for motion detection. Sensory neuron bursting provides important timing information about dynamic stimuli in many model systems, yet no studies have rigorously investigated if bursting occurs in the locust DCMD during object approach. We presented repetitions of 30 looming stimuli known to generate behavioural responses to each of 20 locusts in order to identify and quantify putative bursting activity in the DCMD. Overall, we found a bimodal distribution of inter-spike intervals (ISI with peaks of more frequent and shorter ISIs occurring from 1-8 ms and longer less frequent ISIs occurring from 40-50 ms. Subsequent analysis identified bursts and isolated single spikes from the responses. Bursting frequency increased in the latter phase of an approach and peaked at the time of collision, while isolated spiking was predominant during the beginning of stimulus approach. We also found that the majority of inter-burst intervals occurred at 40-50 ms (or 20-25 bursts/s. Bursting also occurred across varied stimulus parameters and suggests that burst timing may be a key component of looming detection. Our findings suggest that the DCMD uses two modes of coding to transmit information about looming stimuli and that these modes change dynamically with a changing stimulus at a behaviourally-relevant time.

  14. Repetition code of 15 qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootton, James R.; Loss, Daniel

    2018-05-01

    The repetition code is an important primitive for the techniques of quantum error correction. Here we implement repetition codes of at most 15 qubits on the 16 qubit ibmqx3 device. Each experiment is run for a single round of syndrome measurements, achieved using the standard quantum technique of using ancilla qubits and controlled operations. The size of the final syndrome is small enough to allow for lookup table decoding using experimentally obtained data. The results show strong evidence that the logical error rate decays exponentially with code distance, as is expected and required for the development of fault-tolerant quantum computers. The results also give insight into the nature of noise in the device.

  15. Computer-Related Repetitive Stress Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Computer-Related Repetitive Stress Injuries KidsHealth / For Parents / Computer-Related Repetitive Stress Injuries What's in this article? ...

  16. Luminescent chemical waves in the Cu(II)-catalyzed oscillatory oxidation of SCN- ions with hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekala, Katarzyna; Jurczakowski, Rafał; Lewera, Adam; Orlik, Marek

    2007-05-10

    The oscillatory oxidation of thiocyanate ions with hydrogen peroxide, catalyzed by Cu2+ ions in alkaline media, was so far observed as occurring simultaneously in the entire space of the batch or flow reactor. We performed this reaction for the first time in the thin-layer reactor and observed the spatiotemporal course of the above process, in the presence of luminol as the chemiluminescent indicator. A series of luminescent patterns periodically starting from the random reaction center and spreading throughout the entire solution layer was reported. For a batch-stirred system, the bursts of luminescence were found to correlate with the steep decreases of the oscillating Pt electrode potential. These novel results open possibilities for further experimental and theoretical investigations of those spatiotemporal patterns, including studies of the mechanism of this chemically complex process.

  17. Excito-oscillatory dynamics as a mechanism of ventricular fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Richard A; Huelsing, Delilah J

    2008-04-01

    The instabilities associated with reentrant spiral waves are of paramount importance to the initiation and maintenance of tachyarrhythmias, especially ventricular fibrillation (VF). In addition to tissue heterogeneities, there are only a few basic purported mechanisms of spiral wave breakup, most notably restitution. We test the hypothesis that oscillatory membrane properties act to destabilize spiral waves. We recorded transmembrane potential (V(m)) from isolated rabbit myocytes using a constant current stimulation protocol. We developed a mathematical model that included both the stable excitable equilibrium point at resting V(m) (-80 mV) and the unstable oscillatory equilibrium point at elevated V(m) (-10 mV). Spiral wave dynamics were studied in 2-dimensional grids using variants of the model. All models showed restitution and reproduced the experimental values of transmembrane resistance at rest and during the action potential plateau. Stable spiral waves were observed when the model showed only 1 equilibrium point. However, spatio-temporal complexity was observed if the model showed both excitable and oscillatory equilibrium points (i.e., excito-oscillatory models). The initial wave breaks resulted from oscillatory waves expanding in all directions; after a few beats, the patterns were characterized by a combination of unstable spiral waves and target patterns consistent with the patterns observed on the heart surface during VF. In our model, this VF-like activity only occurred when the single cell period of V(m) oscillations was within a specific range. The VF-like patterns observed in our excito-oscillatory models could not be explained by the existing proposed instability mechanisms. Our results introduce the important suggestion that membrane dynamics responsible for V(m) oscillations at elevated V(m) levels can destabilize spiral waves and thus may be a novel therapeutic target for preventing VF.

  18. BATSE/OSSE Rapid Burst Response

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Matz, S. M; Grove, J. E; Johnson, W. N; Kurfess, J. D; Share, G. H; Fishman, G. J; Meegan, Charles A

    1995-01-01

    ...) slew the OSSE detectors to burst locations determined on-board by BATSE. This enables OSSE to make sensitive searches for prompt and delayed post-burst line and continuum emission above 50 keV...

  19. US Army Nuclear Burst Detection System (NBDS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaser, R.F.

    1980-07-01

    The Nuclear Burst Detection System (NBDS) was developed to meet the Army requirements of an unattended, automatic nuclear burst reporting system. It provides pertinent data for battlefield commanders on a timely basis with high reliability

  20. Control of bursting synchronization in networks of Hodgkin-Huxley-type neurons with chemical synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, C A S; Viana, R L; Ferrari, F A S; Lopes, S R; Batista, A M; Coninck, J C P

    2013-04-01

    Thermally sensitive neurons present bursting activity for certain temperature ranges, characterized by fast repetitive spiking of action potential followed by a short quiescent period. Synchronization of bursting activity is possible in networks of coupled neurons, and it is sometimes an undesirable feature. Control procedures can suppress totally or partially this collective behavior, with potential applications in deep-brain stimulation techniques. We investigate the control of bursting synchronization in small-world networks of Hodgkin-Huxley-type thermally sensitive neurons with chemical synapses through two different strategies. One is the application of an external time-periodic electrical signal and another consists of a time-delayed feedback signal. We consider the effectiveness of both strategies in terms of protocols of applications suitable to be applied by pacemakers.

  1. Short duration gamma ray bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Observations have revealed that long bursts, with recorded afterglow, tend to reside in the star forming regions of normal galaxies. Moreover, GRB 980425 ... observer is negligible due to the special relativistic time dilation. However, because of deceleration, eventually Γ−1 > θj and thereafter, sideways expansion becomes.

  2. Optothermally actuated capillary burst valve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Johan; Bilenberg, Brian; Kristensen, Anders

    2017-01-01

    be burst by raising the temperature due to the temperature dependence of the fluid surface tension. We address individual valves by using a local heating platform based on a thin film of near infrared absorber dye embedded in the lid used to seal the microfluidic device [L. H. Thamdrup et al., Nano Lett...

  3. Dark gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brdar, Vedran; Kopp, Joachim; Liu, Jia

    2017-03-01

    Many theories of dark matter (DM) predict that DM particles can be captured by stars via scattering on ordinary matter. They subsequently condense into a DM core close to the center of the star and eventually annihilate. In this work, we trace DM capture and annihilation rates throughout the life of a massive star and show that this evolution culminates in an intense annihilation burst coincident with the death of the star in a core collapse supernova. The reason is that, along with the stellar interior, also its DM core heats up and contracts, so that the DM density increases rapidly during the final stages of stellar evolution. We argue that, counterintuitively, the annihilation burst is more intense if DM annihilation is a p -wave process than for s -wave annihilation because in the former case, more DM particles survive until the supernova. If among the DM annihilation products are particles like dark photons that can escape the exploding star and decay to standard model particles later, the annihilation burst results in a flash of gamma rays accompanying the supernova. For a galactic supernova, this "dark gamma-ray burst" may be observable in the Čerenkov Telescope Array.

  4. Energy coupling to the plasma in repetitive nanosecond pulse discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamovich, Igor V.; Nishihara, Munetake; Choi, Inchul; Uddi, Mruthunjaya; Lempert, Walter R.

    2009-01-01

    A new analytic quasi-one-dimensional model of energy coupling to nanosecond pulse discharge plasmas in plane-to-plane geometry has been developed. The use of a one-dimensional approach is based on images of repetitively pulsed nanosecond discharge plasmas in dry air demonstrating that the plasma remains diffuse and uniform on a nanosecond time scale over a wide range of pressures. The model provides analytic expressions for the time-dependent electric field and electron density in the plasma, electric field in the sheath, sheath boundary location, and coupled pulse energy. The analytic model predictions are in very good agreement with numerical calculations. The model demonstrates that (i) the energy coupled to the plasma during an individual nanosecond discharge pulse is controlled primarily by the capacitance of the dielectric layers and by the breakdown voltage and (ii) the pulse energy coupled to the plasma during a burst of nanosecond pulses decreases as a function of the pulse number in the burst. This occurs primarily because of plasma temperature rise and resultant reduction in breakdown voltage, such that the coupled pulse energy varies approximately proportionally to the number density. Analytic expression for coupled pulse energy scaling has been incorporated into the air plasma chemistry model, validated previously by comparing with atomic oxygen number density measurements in nanosecond pulse discharges. The results of kinetic modeling using the modified air plasma chemistry model are compared with time-resolved temperature measurements in a repetitively pulsed nanosecond discharge in air, by emission spectroscopy, and purely rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy showing good agreement.

  5. Repetitive learning control of continuous chaotic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Maoyin; Shang Yun; Zhou Donghua

    2004-01-01

    Combining a shift method and the repetitive learning strategy, a repetitive learning controller is proposed to stabilize unstable periodic orbits (UPOs) within chaotic attractors in the sense of least mean square. If nonlinear parts in chaotic systems satisfy Lipschitz condition, the proposed controller can be simplified into a simple proportional repetitive learning controller

  6. Stellar Sources of Gamma-ray Bursts

    OpenAIRE

    Luchkov, B. I.

    2011-01-01

    Correlation analysis of Swift gamma-ray burst coordinates and nearby star locations (catalog Gliese) reveals 4 coincidences with good angular accuracy. The random probability is 4\\times 10^{-5}, so evidencing that coincident stars are indeed gamma-ray burst sources. Some additional search of stellar gamma-ray bursts is discussed.

  7. Detecting pipe bursts by monitoring water demand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.; Vreeburg, J.H.G.; Van der Roer, M.; Sperber, V.

    2012-01-01

    An algorithm which compares measured and predicted water demands to detect pipe bursts was developed and tested on three data sets of water demand and reported pipe bursts of three years. The algorithm proved to be able to detect bursts where the water loss exceeds 30% of the average water demand in

  8. Fine structure in fast drift storm bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, D.; Ellis, G.R.A.

    1981-01-01

    Recent observations with high time resolution of fast drift storm (FDS) solar bursts are described. A new variety of FDS bursts characterised by intensity maxima regularly placed in the frequency domain is reported. Possible interpretations of this are mentioned and the implications of the short duration of FDS bursts are discussed. (orig.)

  9. On oscillatory microstructure during cellular growth of directionally solidified Sn-36at.%Ni peritectic alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Peng; Li, Xinzhong; Li, Jiangong; Su, Yanqing; Guo, Jingjie

    2016-04-12

    An oscillatory microstructure has been observed during deep-cellular growth of directionally solidified Sn-36at.%Ni hyperperitectic alloy containing intermetallic compounds with narrow solubility range. This oscillatory microstructure with a dimension of tens of micrometers has been observed for the first time. The morphology of this wave-like oscillatory structure is similar to secondary dendrite arms, and can be observed only in some local positions of the sample. Through analysis such as successive sectioning of the sample, it can be concluded that this oscillatory microstructure is caused by oscillatory convection of the mushy zone during solidification. And the influence of convection on this oscillatory microstructure was characterized through comparison between experimental and calculations results on the wavelength. Besides, the change in morphology of this oscillatory microstructure has been proved to be caused by peritectic transformation during solidification. Furthermore, the melt concentration increases continuously during solidification of intermetallic compounds with narrow solubility range, which helps formation of this oscillatory microstructure.

  10. Synchronization enhancement via an oscillatory bath in a network of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-02-05

    Feb 5, 2015 ... The possibility of using a dynamic environment to achieve and optimize phase synchronization in a network of self-excited cells with free-end boundary conditions is addressed in this paper. The dynamic environment is an oscillatory bath coupled linearly to a network of four cells. The boundaries of the ...

  11. An extended discrete gradient formula for oscillatory Hamiltonian systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Kai; Shi Wei; Wu Xinyuan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, incorporating the idea of the discrete gradient method into the extended Runge–Kutta–Nyström integrator, we derive and analyze an extended discrete gradient formula for the oscillatory Hamiltonian system with the Hamiltonian H(p,q)= 1/2 p T p+ 1/2 q T Mq+U(q), where q:R→R d represents generalized positions, p:R→R d represents generalized momenta and M is an element of R dxd is a symmetric and positive semi-definite matrix. The solution of this system is a nonlinear oscillator. Basically, many nonlinear oscillatory mechanical systems with a partitioned Hamiltonian function lend themselves to this approach. The extended discrete gradient formula presented in this paper exactly preserves the energy H(p, q). We derive some properties of the new formula. The convergence is analyzed for the implicit schemes based on the discrete gradient formula, and it turns out that the convergence of the implicit schemes based on the extended discrete gradient formula is independent of ‖M‖, which is a significant property for the oscillatory Hamiltonian system. Thus, it transpires that a larger step size can be chosen for the new energy-preserving schemes than that for the traditional discrete gradient methods when applied to the oscillatory Hamiltonian system. Illustrative examples show the competence and efficiency of the new schemes in comparison with the traditional discrete gradient methods in the scientific literature. (paper)

  12. Oscillatory and electrohydrodynamic instabilities in flow over a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of fluid flow past flexible surfaces is qualitatively different from the flow over rigid .... work. Oscillatory flows are unsteady, and it is important to precisely define the ..... from 5 to 16, though there is less variation in the critical stress for a steady ...

  13. Dark chocolate’s compositional effects revealed by oscillatory rheology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vaart, K.; Depypere, F.; De Graef, V.; Schall, P.; Fall, A.; Bonn, D.; Dewettinck, K.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, two types of oscillatory shear rheology are applied on dark chocolate with varying volume fraction, particle size distribution, and soy lecithin concentration. The first, a conventional strain sweep, allows for the separation of the elastic and viscous properties during the yielding.

  14. On stellar collapse: continual or oscillatory. A short comment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, P.T.

    1980-01-01

    We comment on a previously published paper on the oscillatory dynamics of stellar collapse and conclude that the Schwarzschild interior solution applied to the 'inflection points' can never give rise to a 'turning back' motion, in spite of the fact that the geodesic equation really does not always describe an attractive gravitational acceleration

  15. Oscillatory behaviour of solutions of linear neutral differential ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper considers the contribution of space-time noise to the oscillatory behaviour of solutions of a linear neutral stochastic delay differential equation. It was established that under certain conditions on the time lags and their speed of adjustments, the presence of noise generates oscillation in the solution of the equation ...

  16. Large Amplitude Oscillatory Extension of Soft Polymeric Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bejenariu, Anca Gabriela; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2010-01-01

    sing a filament stretching rheometer (FSR) surrounded by a thermostatic chamber and equipped with a micrometric laser it is possible to measure large amplitude oscillatory elongation (LAOE) on elastomeric based networks with no base flow as in the LAOE method for polymer melts. Poly(dimethylsilox...

  17. New insights into strobe reactions: An intriguing oscillatory combustion phenomenon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corbel, J.M.L.

    2013-01-01

    Strobes are self-sustained oscillatory combustions that have various applications in the fireworks industry and also in the military area (signaling, missile decoys and crowd control). However, most of the strobe compositions were discovered using trial and error methods. The fundamentals mechanisms

  18. Oscillatory magnetoconductance of quantum double-well channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojo, A.G.; Kumar, N.; Balseiro, C.A.

    1988-07-01

    The recently observed flux-periodic interference effect between parallel quantum double-well channels is theoretically studied in a discrete model that takes into account tunneling between channels. We obtain oscillatory magnetoconductance with small modulations which is attributable to the tunneling. Our treatment includes the effect of evanescent modes. (author). 7 refs, 2 figs

  19. Unstable oscillatory Pierce modes of neutralized electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cary, J.R.; Lemons, D.S.

    1982-01-01

    Oscillatory modes of the Pierce system have been calculated. These modes are found to have growth rates comparable to the previously investigated purely growing modes. When these modes are included, it is found that the Pierce system is unstable for most values of ω/sub p/ L/V 0 >π

  20. On the effect of a longitudinal magnetic field on oscillatory ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . The frequency, ... dinal magnetic field on the oscillatory characteristics of a subnormal region it is proposed to study the variation of ... earth to provide a signal to the oscilloscope (60 MHz digital storage, PM 3350, Phillips). A current meter ...

  1. Non-Steady Oscillatory Flow in Coarse Granular Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, O. H.; Gent, M. R. A. van; Meer, J. W. van der

    1992-01-01

    Stationary and oscillatory flow through coarse granular materials have been investigated experimentally at Delft Hydraulics in their oscillating water tunnel with the objective of determining the coefficients of the extended Forchheimer equation. Cylinders, spheres and different types of rock have....... Further, for the non-stationary term, the virtual mass coefficient will be derived....

  2. Resting-State Oscillatory Activity in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornew, Lauren; Roberts, Timothy P. L.; Blaskey, Lisa; Edgar, J. Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Neural oscillatory anomalies in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) suggest an excitatory/inhibitory imbalance; however, the nature and clinical relevance of these anomalies are unclear. Whole-cortex magnetoencephalography data were collected while 50 children (27 with ASD, 23 controls) underwent an eyes-closed resting-state exam. A Fast Fourier…

  3. Haben repetitive DNA-Sequenzen biologische Funktionen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Maliyakal E.; Knöchel, Walter

    1983-05-01

    By DNA reassociation kinetics it is known that the eucaryotic genome consists of non-repetitive DNA, middle-repetitive DNA and highly repetitive DNA. Whereas the majority of protein-coding genes is located on non-repetitive DNA, repetitive DNA forms a constitutive part of eucaryotic DNA and its amount in most cases equals or even substantially exceeds that of non-repetitive DNA. During the past years a large body of data on repetitive DNA has accumulated and these have prompted speculations ranging from specific roles in the regulation of gene expression to that of a selfish entity with inconsequential functions. The following article summarizes recent findings on structural, transcriptional and evolutionary aspects and, although by no means being proven, some possible biological functions are discussed.

  4. Repetitively pulsed material testing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucker, O.; Bostick, W.; Gullickson, R; Long, J.; Luce, J.; Sahlin, H.

    1975-01-01

    A continuously operated, 1 pps, dense-plasma-focus device capable of delivering a minimum of 10 15 neutrons per pulse for material testing purposes is described. Moderate scaling from existing results is sufficient to provide 2 x 10 13 n/cm 2 .s to a suitable target. The average power consumption, which has become a major issue as a result of the energy crisis, is analyzed with respect to other plasma devices and is shown to be highly favorable. A novel approach to the capacitor bank and switch design allowing repetitive operation is discussed. (U.S.)

  5. Repetitively pulsed material testing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zucker, O.; Bostick, W.; Gullickson, R.; Long, J.; Luce, J.; Sahlin, H.

    1975-01-01

    A continuously operated, 1 pps, dense-plasma-focus device capable of delivering a minimum of 10 15 neutrons per pulse for material testing purposes is described. Moderate scaling from existing results is sufficient to provide 2 x 10 13 n/cm 2 . s to a suitable target. The average power consumption, which has become a major issue as a result of the energy crisis, is analyzed with respect to other plasma devices and is shown to be highly favorable. A novel approach to the capacitor bank and switch design allowing repetitive operation is discussed

  6. Solar Radio Bursts and Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, Natchimuthuk,

    2012-01-01

    Radio bursts from the Sun are produced by electron accelerated to relativistic energies by physical processes on the Sun such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The radio bursts are thus good indicators of solar eruptions. Three types of nonthermal radio bursts are generally associated with CMEs. Type III bursts due to accelerated electrons propagating along open magnetic field lines. The electrons are thought to be accelerated at the reconnection region beneath the erupting CME, although there is another view that the electrons may be accelerated at the CME-driven shock. Type II bursts are due to electrons accelerated at the shock front. Type II bursts are also excellent indicators of solar energetic particle (SEP) events because the same shock is supposed accelerate electrons and ions. There is a hierarchical relationship between the wavelength range of type /I bursts and the CME kinetic energy. Finally, Type IV bursts are due to electrons trapped in moving or stationary structures. The low frequency stationary type IV bursts are observed occasionally in association with very fast CMEs. These bursts originate from flare loops behind the erupting CME and hence indicate tall loops. This paper presents a summary of radio bursts and their relation to CMEs and how they can be useful for space weather predictions.

  7. Some polarization features of solar microwave bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uralov, A M; Nefed' ev, V P [AN SSSR, Irkutsk. Sibirskij Inst. Zemnogo Magnetizma Ionosfery i Rasprostraneniya Radiovoln

    1977-01-01

    Consequences of the thermal microwave burst model proposed earlier have been considered. According to the model the centimeter burst is generated at the heat propagation to the upper atmosphere. The polarization features of the burst are explained: a change of the polarization sign in a frequency range, a rapid change of the polarization sign in the development of a burst at a fixed frequency, a lack of time coincidence of the moments of the burst maximum of the polarization and of the total flux. From the model the consequences are obtained, which are still not confirmed by experiment. An ordinary-type wave prevails in the burst radiation, in the course of which the polarization degree falls on the ascending branch of bursts development. At the change of the polarization sign at the fixed frequency prior to the sign change an ordinary-type wave should be present in excess and later an extreordinary type wave.

  8. Stimulus induced bursts in severe postanoxic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjepkema-Cloostermans, Marleen C; Wijers, Elisabeth T; van Putten, Michel J A M

    2016-11-01

    To report on a distinct effect of auditory and sensory stimuli on the EEG in comatose patients with severe postanoxic encephalopathy. In two comatose patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) with severe postanoxic encephalopathy and burst-suppression EEG, we studied the effect of external stimuli (sound and touch) on the occurrence of bursts. In patient A bursts could be induced by either auditory or sensory stimuli. In patient B bursts could only be induced by touching different facial regions (forehead, nose and chin). When stimuli were presented with relatively long intervals, bursts persistently followed the stimuli, while stimuli with short intervals (encephalopathy can be induced by external stimuli, resulting in stimulus-dependent burst-suppression. Stimulus induced bursts should not be interpreted as prognostic favourable EEG reactivity. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Oscillations during observations: Dynamic oscillatory networks serving visuospatial attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesman, Alex I; Heinrichs-Graham, Elizabeth; Proskovec, Amy L; McDermott, Timothy J; Wilson, Tony W

    2017-10-01

    The dynamic allocation of neural resources to discrete features within a visual scene enables us to react quickly and accurately to salient environmental circumstances. A network of bilateral cortical regions is known to subserve such visuospatial attention functions; however the oscillatory and functional connectivity dynamics of information coding within this network are not fully understood. Particularly, the coding of information within prototypical attention-network hubs and the subsecond functional connections formed between these hubs have not been adequately characterized. Herein, we use the precise temporal resolution of magnetoencephalography (MEG) to define spectrally specific functional nodes and connections that underlie the deployment of attention in visual space. Twenty-three healthy young adults completed a visuospatial discrimination task designed to elicit multispectral activity in visual cortex during MEG, and the resulting data were preprocessed and reconstructed in the time-frequency domain. Oscillatory responses were projected to the cortical surface using a beamformer, and time series were extracted from peak voxels to examine their temporal evolution. Dynamic functional connectivity was then computed between nodes within each frequency band of interest. We find that visual attention network nodes are defined functionally by oscillatory frequency, that the allocation of attention to the visual space dynamically modulates functional connectivity between these regions on a millisecond timescale, and that these modulations significantly correlate with performance on a spatial discrimination task. We conclude that functional hubs underlying visuospatial attention are segregated not only anatomically but also by oscillatory frequency, and importantly that these oscillatory signatures promote dynamic communication between these hubs. Hum Brain Mapp 38:5128-5140, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Electrophysiological signatures of phonological and semantic maintenance in sentence repetition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, Jed A; Kielar, Aneta; Panamsky, Lilia; Links, Kira A; Deschamps, Tiffany; Leigh, Rosie C

    2017-08-01

    Verbal short-term memory comprises resources for phonological rehearsal, which have been characterized anatomically, and for maintenance of semantic information, which are less understood. Sentence repetition tasks tap both processes interactively. To distinguish brain activity involved in phonological vs. semantic maintenance, we recorded magnetoencephalography during a sentence repetition task, incorporating three manipulations emphasizing one mechanism over the other. Participants heard sentences or word lists and attempted to repeat them verbatim after a 5-second delay. After MEG, participants completed a cued recall task testing how much they remembered of each sentence. Greater semantic engagement relative to phonological rehearsal was hypothesized for 1) sentences vs. word lists, 2) concrete vs. abstract sentences, and 3) well recalled vs. poorly recalled sentences. During auditory perception and the memory delay period, we found highly left-lateralized activation in the form of 8-30 Hz event-related desynchronization. Compared to abstract sentences, concrete sentences recruited posterior temporal cortex bilaterally, demonstrating a neural signature for the engagement of visual imagery in sentence maintenance. Maintenance of arbitrary word lists recruited right hemisphere dorsal regions, reflecting increased demands on phonological rehearsal. Sentences that were ultimately poorly recalled in the post-test also elicited extra right hemisphere activation when they were held in short-term memory, suggesting increased demands on phonological resources. Frontal midline theta oscillations also reflected phonological rather than semantic demand, being increased for word lists and poorly recalled sentences. These findings highlight distinct neural resources for phonological and semantic maintenance, with phonological maintenance associated with stronger oscillatory modulations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Predicting rock bursts in mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spall, H.

    1979-01-01

    In terms of lives lost, rock bursts in underground mines can be as hazardous as earthquakes on the surface. So it is not surprising that fo the last 40 years the U.S Bureau of Mines has been using seismic methods for detecting areas in underground mines where there is a high differential stress which could lead to structural instability of the rock mass being excavated.

  12. Cortical gamma activity during auditory tone omission provides evidence for the involvement of oscillatory activity in top-down processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurtubay, I G; Alegre, M; Valencia, M; Artieda, J

    2006-11-01

    Perception is an active process in which our brains use top-down influences to modulate afferent information. To determine whether this modulation might be based on oscillatory activity, we asked seven subjects to detect a silence that appeared randomly in a rhythmic auditory sequence, counting the number of omissions ("count" task), or responding to each omission with a right index finger extension ("move" task). Despite the absence of physical stimuli, these tasks induced a 'non-phase-locked' gamma oscillation in temporal-parietal areas, providing evidence of intrinsically generated oscillatory activity during top-down processing. This oscillation is probably related to the local neural activation that takes place during the process of stimulus detection, involving the functional comparison between the tones and the absence of stimuli as well as the auditory echoic memory processes. The amplitude of the gamma oscillations was reduced with the repetition of the tasks. Moreover, it correlated positively with the number of correctly detected omissions and negatively with the reaction time. These findings indicate that these oscillations, like others described, may be modulated by attentional processes. In summary, our findings support the active and adaptive concept of brain function that has emerged over recent years, suggesting that the match of sensory information with memory contents generates gamma oscillations.

  13. The Relationship Between Brain Oscillatory Activity and Therapeutic Effectiveness of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in the Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Francis Leuchter

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Major Depressive Disorder (MDD is marked by disturbances in brain functional connectivity. This connectivity is modulated by rhythmic oscillations of brain electrical activity, which enable coordinated functions across brain regions. Oscillatory activity plays a central role in regulating thinking and memory, mood, cerebral blood flow, and neurotransmitter levels, and restoration of normal oscillatory patterns is associated with effective treatment of MDD. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS is a robust treatment for MDD, but the mechanism of action (MOA of its benefits for mood disorders remains incompletely understood. Benefits of rTMS have been tied to enhanced neuroplasticity in specific brain pathways. We summarize here the evidence that rTMS entrains and resets thalamocortical oscillators, normalizes regulation and facilitates reemergence of intrinsic cerebral rhythms, and through this mechanism restores normal brain function. This entrainment and resetting may be a critical step in engendering neuroplastic changes and the antidepressant effects of rTMS. It may be possible to modify the method of rTMS administration to enhance this mechanism of action and achieve better antidepressant effectiveness. We propose that rTMS can be administered: 1 synchronized to a patient’s individual alpha rhythm (IAF, or synchronized rTMS (sTMS; 2 as a low magnetic field strength sinusoidal wave form; and, 3 broadly to multiple brain areas simultaneously. We present here the theory and evidence indicating that these modifications could enhance the therapeutic effectiveness of rTMS for the treatment of MDD.

  14. NICER Eyes on Bursting Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2018-03-01

    What happens to a neutron stars accretion disk when its surface briefly explodes? A new instrument recently deployed at the International Space Station (ISS) is now watching bursts from neutron stars and reporting back.Deploying a New X-Ray MissionLaunch of NICER aboard a Falcon 9 rocket in June 2017. [NASA/Tony Gray]In early June of 2017, a SpaceX Dragon capsule on a Falcon 9 rocket launched on a resupply mission to the ISS. The pressurized interior of the Dragon contained the usual manifest of crew supplies, spacewalk equipment, and vehicle hardware. But the unpressurized trunk of the capsule held something a little different: the Neutron star Interior Composition Explorer (NICER).In the two weeks following launch, NICER was extracted from the SpaceX Dragon capsule and installed on the ISS. And by the end of the month, the instrument was already collecting its first data set: observations of a bright X-ray burst from Aql X-1, a neutron star accreting matter from a low-mass binary companion.Impact of BurstsNICERs goal is to provide a new view of neutron-star physics at X-ray energies of 0.212 keV a window that allows us to explore bursts of energy that neutron stars sometimes emit from their surfaces.Artists impression of an X-ray binary, in which a compact object accretes material from a companion star. [ESA/NASA/Felix Mirabel]In X-ray burster systems, hydrogen- and helium-rich material from a low-mass companion star piles up in an accretion disk around the neutron star. This material slowly funnels onto the neutron stars surface, forming a layer that gravitationally compresses and eventually becomes so dense and hot that runaway nuclear fusion ignites.Within seconds, the layer of material is burned up, producing a burst of emission from the neutron star that outshines even the inner regions of the hot accretion disk. Then more material funnels onto the neutron star and the process begins again.Though we have a good picture of the physics that causes these bursts

  15. Bubble bursting at an interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Varun; Sajjad, Kumayl; Anand, Sushant; Fezzaa, Kamel

    2017-11-01

    Bubble bursting is crucial to understanding the life span of bubbles at an interface and more importantly the nature of interaction between the bulk liquid and the outside environment from the point of view of chemical and biological material transport. The dynamics of the bubble as it rises from inside the liquid bulk to its disappearance on the interface after bursting is an intriguing process, many aspects of which are still being explored. In our study, we make detailed high speed imaging measurements to examine carefully the hole initiation and growth in bursting bubbles that unearth some interesting features of the process. Previous analyses available in literature are revisited based on our novel experimental visualizations. Using a combination of experiments and theory we investigate the role of various forces during the rupturing process. This work aims to further our current knowledge of bubble dynamics at an interface with an aim of predicting better the bubble evolution from its growth to its eventual integration with the liquid bulk.

  16. Repetitive trauma and nerve compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carragee, E J; Hentz, V R

    1988-01-01

    Repetitive movement of the upper extremity, whether recreational or occupational, may result in various neuropathies, the prototype of which is the median nerve neuropathic in the carpal canal. The pathophysiology of this process is incompletely understood but likely involves both mechanical and ischemic features. Experimentally increased pressures within the carpal canal produced reproducible progressive neuropathy. Changes in vibratory (threshold-type) sensibility appears to be more sensitive than two-point (innervation density-type) sensibility. The specific occupational etiologies of carpal neuropathy are obscured by methodologic and sociological difficulties, but clearly some occupations have high incidences of CTS. History and physical examination are usually sufficient for the diagnosis, but diagnostic assistance when required is available through electrophysiological testing, CT scanning, and possibly MRI. Each of these tests has limitations in both sensitivity and specificity. Treatment by usual conservative means should be combined with rest from possible provocative activities. Surgical release of the carpal canal is helpful in patients failing conservative therapy. Occupational modifications are important in both treatment and prevention of median neuropathy due to repetitive trauma.

  17. Fuzzy-Based Adaptive Hybrid Burst Assembly Technique for Optical Burst Switched Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abubakar Muhammad Umaru

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The optical burst switching (OBS paradigm is perceived as an intermediate switching technology for future all-optical networks. Burst assembly that is the first process in OBS is the focus of this paper. In this paper, an intelligent hybrid burst assembly algorithm that is based on fuzzy logic is proposed. The new algorithm is evaluated against the traditional hybrid burst assembly algorithm and the fuzzy adaptive threshold (FAT burst assembly algorithm via simulation. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm outperforms the hybrid and the FAT algorithms in terms of burst end-to-end delay, packet end-to-end delay, and packet loss ratio.

  18. HOW SOFT GAMMA REPEATERS MIGHT MAKE FAST RADIO BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katz, J. I., E-mail: katz@wuphys.wustl.edu [Department of Physics and McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences, Washington University, St. Louis, Mo. 63130 (United States)

    2016-08-01

    There are several phenomenological similarities between soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) and fast radio bursts (FRBs), including duty factors, timescales, and repetition. The sudden release of magnetic energy in a neutron star magnetosphere, as in popular models of SGRs, can meet the energy requirements of FRBs, but requires both the presence of magnetospheric plasma, in order for dissipation to occur in a transparent region, and a mechanism for releasing much of that energy quickly. FRB sources and SGRs are distinguished by long-lived (up to thousands of years) current-carrying coronal arches remaining from the formation of the young neutron star, and their decay ends the phase of SGR/AXP/FRB activity even though “magnetar” fields may persist. Runaway increases in resistance when the current density exceeds a threshold, releases magnetostatic energy in a sudden burst, and produces high brightness GHz emission of FRB by a coherent process. SGRs are produced when released energy thermalizes as an equlibrium pair plasma. The failures of some alternative FRB models and the non-detection of SGR 1806-20 at radio frequencies are discussed in the appendices.

  19. HOW SOFT GAMMA REPEATERS MIGHT MAKE FAST RADIO BURSTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, J. I.

    2016-01-01

    There are several phenomenological similarities between soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) and fast radio bursts (FRBs), including duty factors, timescales, and repetition. The sudden release of magnetic energy in a neutron star magnetosphere, as in popular models of SGRs, can meet the energy requirements of FRBs, but requires both the presence of magnetospheric plasma, in order for dissipation to occur in a transparent region, and a mechanism for releasing much of that energy quickly. FRB sources and SGRs are distinguished by long-lived (up to thousands of years) current-carrying coronal arches remaining from the formation of the young neutron star, and their decay ends the phase of SGR/AXP/FRB activity even though “magnetar” fields may persist. Runaway increases in resistance when the current density exceeds a threshold, releases magnetostatic energy in a sudden burst, and produces high brightness GHz emission of FRB by a coherent process. SGRs are produced when released energy thermalizes as an equlibrium pair plasma. The failures of some alternative FRB models and the non-detection of SGR 1806-20 at radio frequencies are discussed in the appendices.

  20. Transitions to Synchrony in Coupled Bursting Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhamala, Mukeshwar; Jirsa, Viktor K.; Ding, Mingzhou

    2004-01-01

    Certain cells in the brain, for example, thalamic neurons during sleep, show spike-burst activity. We study such spike-burst neural activity and the transitions to a synchronized state using a model of coupled bursting neurons. In an electrically coupled network, we show that the increase of coupling strength increases incoherence first and then induces two different transitions to synchronized states, one associated with bursts and the other with spikes. These sequential transitions to synchronized states are determined by the zero crossings of the maximum transverse Lyapunov exponents. These results suggest that synchronization of spike-burst activity is a multi-time-scale phenomenon and burst synchrony is a precursor to spike synchrony.

  1. Transitions to synchrony in coupled bursting neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhamala, Mukeshwar; Jirsa, Viktor K.; Ding Mingzhou

    2004-01-01

    Certain cells in the brain, for example, thalamic neurons during sleep, show spike-burst activity. We study such spike-burst neural activity and the transitions to a synchronized state using a model of coupled bursting neurons. In an electrically coupled network, we show that the increase of coupling strength increases incoherence first and then induces two different transitions to synchronized states, one associated with bursts and the other with spikes. These sequential transitions to synchronized states are determined by the zero crossings of the maximum transverse Lyapunov exponents. These results suggest that synchronization of spike-burst activity is a multi-time-scale phenomenon and burst synchrony is a precursor to spike synchrony

  2. Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) Instrument Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsons, A.; Barthelmy, S.; Cummings, J.; Gehrels, N.; Hullinger, D.; Krimm, H.; Markwardt, C.; Tueller, J.; Fenimore, E.; Palmer, D.; Sato, G.; Takahashi, T.; Nakazawa, K.; Okada, Y.; Takahashi, H.; Suzuki, M.; Tashiro, M.

    2004-01-01

    The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT), a large coded aperture instrument with a wide field-of-view (FOV), provides the gamma-ray burst triggers and locations for the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer. In addition to providing this imaging information, BAT will perform a 15 keV - 150 keV all-sky hard x-ray survey based on the serendipitous pointings resulting from the study of gamma-ray bursts, and will also monitor the sky for transient hard x-ray sources. For BAT to provide spectral and photometric information for the gamma-ray bursts, the transient sources and the all-sky survey, the BAT instrument response must be determined to an increasingly greater accuracy. This paper describes the spectral models and the ground calibration experiments used to determine the BAT response to an accuracy suitable for gamma-ray burst studies

  3. The evolution of a horizontal scale for oscillatory magnetoconvection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, J O [Monash Univ., Clayton (Australia). Dept. of Mathematics; Lopez, J M [Aeronautical Research Labs., Port Melbourne (Australia). Aerodynamics Div.

    1989-01-01

    Oscillatory convective motions have been observed in the umbrae of sunspots and, in the past, the linear theory of overstability has been used for sunspot models. Here a non-linear model for oscillatory convection has been used to investigate the possibility of a preferred horizontal cell size for these motions, in the presence of a magnetic field. The integration forward in time, from the conductive state, of the non-linear multimode equations governing magnetoconvection when the magnetic Prandtl number is less than one portrays a complex interaction between the evolving magnetic and vertical velocity horizontal scales. Preferred horizontal scales for the convective cells have been established by identifying the modes that substantially contribute to the overall convective heat transport. All other modes, although initially perturbed, in time essentially decay to zero through self interaction. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Disturbed oscillatory brain dynamics in subcortical ischemic vascular dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Straaten Elisabeth CW

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background White matter hyperintensities (WMH can lead to dementia but the underlying physiological mechanisms are unclear. We compared relative oscillatory power from electroencephalographic studies (EEGs of 17 patients with subcortical ischemic vascular dementia, based on extensive white matter hyperintensities (SIVD-WMH with 17 controls to investigate physiological changes underlying this diagnosis. Results Differences between the groups were large, with a decrease of relative power of fast activity in patients (alpha power 0.25 ± 0.12 versus 0.38 ± 0.13, p = 0.01; beta power 0.08 ± 0.04 versus 0.19 ± 0.07; p Conclusions This pattern of disturbance in oscillatory brain activity indicate loss of connections between neurons, providing a first step in the understanding of cognitive dysfunction in SIVD-WMH.

  5. Bifurcations of propellant burning rate at oscillatory pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novozhilov, Boris V. [N. N. Semenov Institute of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Science, 4 Kosygina St., Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2006-06-15

    A new phenomenon, the disparity between pressure and propellant burning rate frequencies, has revealed in numerical studies of propellant burning rate response to oscillatory pressure. As is clear from the linear approximation, under small pressure amplitudes, h, pressure and propellant burning rate oscillations occur with equal period T (T-solution). In the paper, however, it is shown that at a certain critical value of the parameter h the system in hand undergoes a bifurcation so that the T-solution converts to oscillations with period 2T (2T-solution). When the bifurcation parameter h increases, the subsequent behavior of the system becomes complicated. It is obtained a sequence of period doubling to 4T-solution and 8T-solution. Beyond a certain value of the bifurcation parameter h an apparently fully chaotic solution is found. These effects undoubtedly should be taken into account in studies of oscillatory processes in combustion chambers. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  6. Bias-dependent oscillatory electron transport of monatomic sulfur chains

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Jing-Xin; Cheng, Yan; Sanvito, Stefano; Chen, Xiang-Rong

    2012-01-01

    The bias-dependent oscillatory electron transport of monatomic sulfur chains sandwiched between gold electrodes is investigated with density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function method. At zero bias, in contrast to the typical odd-even oscillations observed in most metallic chains, we find that the conductance oscillates with a period of four atoms. However, as the bias voltage is increased the current displays a two-atom periodicity. This emerges gradually, first for the longer chains and then, at voltages larger than 0.7 V, for lengths. The oscillatory behaviors are analyzed by the density of states and the energy-dependent and bias-dependent transmission coefficients. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  7. Oscillatory wake potential with exchange-correlation in plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Arroj A.; Zeba, I.; Jamil, M.; Asif, M.

    2017-12-01

    The oscillatory wake potential of a moving test charge is studied in quantum dusty plasmas. The plasma system consisting of electrons, ions and negatively charged dust species is embedded in an ambient magnetic field. The modified equation of dispersion is derived using a Quantum Hydrodynamic Model for magnetized plasmas. The quantum effects are inculcated through Fermi degenerate pressure, the tunneling effect and exchange-correlation effects. The study of oscillatory wake is important to know the existence of silence zones in space and astrophysical objects as well as for crystal formation. The graphical description of the potential depicts the significance of the exchange and correlation effects arising through spin and other variables on the wake potential.

  8. A simple mechanical system for studying adaptive oscillatory neural networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jouffroy, Guillaume; Jouffroy, Jerome

    Central Pattern Generators (CPG) are oscillatory systems that are responsible for generating rhythmic patterns at the origin of many biological activities such as for example locomotion or digestion. These systems are generally modelled as recurrent neural networks whose parameters are tuned so...... that the network oscillates in a suitable way, this tuning being a non trivial task. It also appears that the link with the physical body that these oscillatory entities control has a fundamental importance, and it seems that most bodies used for experimental validation in the literature (walking robots, lamprey...... a brief description of the Roller-Racer, we present as a preliminary study an RNN-based feed-forward controller whose parameters are obtained through the well-known teacher forcing learning algorithm, extended to learn signals with a continuous component....

  9. Bias-dependent oscillatory electron transport of monatomic sulfur chains

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Jing-Xin

    2012-01-01

    The bias-dependent oscillatory electron transport of monatomic sulfur chains sandwiched between gold electrodes is investigated with density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green\\'s function method. At zero bias, in contrast to the typical odd-even oscillations observed in most metallic chains, we find that the conductance oscillates with a period of four atoms. However, as the bias voltage is increased the current displays a two-atom periodicity. This emerges gradually, first for the longer chains and then, at voltages larger than 0.7 V, for lengths. The oscillatory behaviors are analyzed by the density of states and the energy-dependent and bias-dependent transmission coefficients. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  10. Role of synchronized oscillatory brain activity for human pain perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauck, Michael; Lorenz, Jürgen; Engel, Andreas K

    2008-01-01

    The understanding of cortical pain processing in humans has significantly improved since the development of modern neuroimaging techniques. Non-invasive electrophysiological approaches such as electro- and magnetoencephalography have proven to be helpful tools for the real-time investigation of neuronal signals and synchronous communication between cortical areas. In particular, time-frequency decomposition of signals recorded with these techniques seems to be a promising approach because different pain-related oscillatory changes can be observed within different frequency bands, which are likely to be linked to specific sensory and motor functions. In this review we discuss the latest evidence on pain-induced time-frequency signals and propose that changes in oscillatory activity reflect an essential communication mechanism in the brain that is modulated during pain processing. The importance of synchronization processes for normal and pathological pain processing, such as chronic pain states, is discussed.

  11. Fast Radio Burst/Gamma-Ray Burst Cosmography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, He; Li, Zhuo; Zhang, Bing

    2014-06-01

    Recently, both theoretical arguments and observational evidence suggested that a small fraction of fast radio bursts (FRBs) could be associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). If such FRB/GRB association systems are commonly detected in the future, the combination of dispersion measures (DM) derived from FRBs and redshifts derived from GRBs makes these systems a plausible tool to conduct cosmography. We quantify uncertainties in deriving the redshift-dependent DM_{IGM} as a function of z and test how well dark energy models can be constrained with Monte Carlo simulations. We show that with several tens of FRB/GRB systems potentially detected in a decade or so, one may reach reasonable constraints on wCDM models. When combined with Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) data, unprecedented constraints on the dark energy equation of state may be achieved, thanks to the prospects of detecting FRB/GRB systems at relatively high redshifts. The ratio between the mean value \\lt {DM_IGM} (z)\\gt and luminosity distance (D L(z)) is insensitive to dark energy models. This gives the prospect of applying SN Ia data to calibrate \\lt {DM_IGM} (z)\\gt using a relatively small sample of FRB/GRB systems, allowing a reliable constraint on the baryon inhomogeneity distribution as a function of redshift. The methodology developed in this paper can also be applied if the FRB redshifts can be measured by other means. Some caveats of putting this method into practice are also discussed.

  12. Fast radio burst/gamma-ray burst cosmography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, He; Zhang, Bing; Li, Zhuo

    2014-01-01

    Recently, both theoretical arguments and observational evidence suggested that a small fraction of fast radio bursts (FRBs) could be associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). If such FRB/GRB association systems are commonly detected in the future, the combination of dispersion measures (DM) derived from FRBs and redshifts derived from GRBs makes these systems a plausible tool to conduct cosmography. We quantify uncertainties in deriving the redshift-dependent DM IGM as a function of z and test how well dark energy models can be constrained with Monte Carlo simulations. We show that with several tens of FRB/GRB systems potentially detected in a decade or so, one may reach reasonable constraints on wCDM models. When combined with Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) data, unprecedented constraints on the dark energy equation of state may be achieved, thanks to the prospects of detecting FRB/GRB systems at relatively high redshifts. The ratio between the mean value and luminosity distance (D L (z)) is insensitive to dark energy models. This gives the prospect of applying SN Ia data to calibrate using a relatively small sample of FRB/GRB systems, allowing a reliable constraint on the baryon inhomogeneity distribution as a function of redshift. The methodology developed in this paper can also be applied if the FRB redshifts can be measured by other means. Some caveats of putting this method into practice are also discussed.

  13. Fast radio burst/gamma-ray burst cosmography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, He; Zhang, Bing [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States); Li, Zhuo, E-mail: gaohe@physics.unlv.edu, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu, E-mail: zhuo.li@pku.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-06-20

    Recently, both theoretical arguments and observational evidence suggested that a small fraction of fast radio bursts (FRBs) could be associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). If such FRB/GRB association systems are commonly detected in the future, the combination of dispersion measures (DM) derived from FRBs and redshifts derived from GRBs makes these systems a plausible tool to conduct cosmography. We quantify uncertainties in deriving the redshift-dependent DM{sub IGM} as a function of z and test how well dark energy models can be constrained with Monte Carlo simulations. We show that with several tens of FRB/GRB systems potentially detected in a decade or so, one may reach reasonable constraints on wCDM models. When combined with Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) data, unprecedented constraints on the dark energy equation of state may be achieved, thanks to the prospects of detecting FRB/GRB systems at relatively high redshifts. The ratio between the mean value and luminosity distance (D {sub L}(z)) is insensitive to dark energy models. This gives the prospect of applying SN Ia data to calibrate using a relatively small sample of FRB/GRB systems, allowing a reliable constraint on the baryon inhomogeneity distribution as a function of redshift. The methodology developed in this paper can also be applied if the FRB redshifts can be measured by other means. Some caveats of putting this method into practice are also discussed.

  14. Changes of spontaneous oscillatory activity to tonic heat pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Weiwei; Hu, Li; Zhang, Zhiguo; Hu, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Transient painful stimuli could induce suppression of alpha oscillatory activities and enhancement of gamma oscillatory activities that also could be greatly modulated by attention. Here, we attempted to characterize changes in cortical activities during tonic heat pain perception and investigated the influence of directed/distracted attention on these responses. We collected 5-minute long continuous Electroencephalography (EEG) data from 38 healthy volunteers during four conditions presented in a counterbalanced order: (A) resting condition; (B) innoxious-distracted condition; (C) noxious-distracted condition; (D) noxious-attended condition. The effects of tonic heat pain stimulation and selective attention on oscillatory activities were investigated by comparing the EEG power spectra among the four experimental conditions and assessing the relationship between spectral power difference and subjective pain intensity. The change of oscillatory activities in condition D was characterized by stable and persistent decrease of alpha oscillation power over contralateral-central electrodes and widespread increase of gamma oscillation power, which were even significantly correlated with subjective pain intensity. Since EEG responses in the alpha and gamma frequency band were affected by attention in different manners, they are likely related to different aspects of the multidimensional sensory experience of pain. The observed contralateral-central alpha suppression (conditions D vs. B and D vs. C) may reflect primarily a top-down cognitive process such as attention, while the widespread gamma enhancement (conditions D vs. A) may partly reflect tonic pain processing, representing the summary effects of bottom-up stimulus-related and top-down subject-driven cognitive processes.

  15. Changes of spontaneous oscillatory activity to tonic heat pain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Peng

    Full Text Available Transient painful stimuli could induce suppression of alpha oscillatory activities and enhancement of gamma oscillatory activities that also could be greatly modulated by attention. Here, we attempted to characterize changes in cortical activities during tonic heat pain perception and investigated the influence of directed/distracted attention on these responses. We collected 5-minute long continuous Electroencephalography (EEG data from 38 healthy volunteers during four conditions presented in a counterbalanced order: (A resting condition; (B innoxious-distracted condition; (C noxious-distracted condition; (D noxious-attended condition. The effects of tonic heat pain stimulation and selective attention on oscillatory activities were investigated by comparing the EEG power spectra among the four experimental conditions and assessing the relationship between spectral power difference and subjective pain intensity. The change of oscillatory activities in condition D was characterized by stable and persistent decrease of alpha oscillation power over contralateral-central electrodes and widespread increase of gamma oscillation power, which were even significantly correlated with subjective pain intensity. Since EEG responses in the alpha and gamma frequency band were affected by attention in different manners, they are likely related to different aspects of the multidimensional sensory experience of pain. The observed contralateral-central alpha suppression (conditions D vs. B and D vs. C may reflect primarily a top-down cognitive process such as attention, while the widespread gamma enhancement (conditions D vs. A may partly reflect tonic pain processing, representing the summary effects of bottom-up stimulus-related and top-down subject-driven cognitive processes.

  16. Chaotic bursting in semiconductor lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruschel, Stefan; Yanchuk, Serhiy

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the dynamic mechanisms for low frequency fluctuations in semiconductor lasers subjected to delayed optical feedback, using the Lang-Kobayashi model. This system of delay differential equations displays pronounced envelope dynamics, ranging from erratic, so called low frequency fluctuations to regular pulse packages, if the time scales of fast oscillations and envelope dynamics are well separated. We investigate the parameter regions where low frequency fluctuations occur and compute their Lyapunov spectra. Using the geometric singular perturbation theory, we study this intermittent chaotic behavior and characterize these solutions as bursting slow-fast oscillations.

  17. Helium bubble bursting in tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sefta, Faiza; Juslin, Niklas; Wirth, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to systematically study the pressure evolution and bursting behavior of sub-surface helium bubbles and the resulting tungsten surface morphology. This study specifically investigates how bubble shape and size, temperature, tungsten surface orientation, and ligament thickness above the bubble influence bubble stability and surface evolution. The tungsten surface is roughened by a combination of adatom “islands,” craters, and pinholes. The present study provides insight into the mechanisms and conditions leading to various tungsten topology changes, which we believe are the initial stages of surface evolution leading to the formation of nanoscale fuzz

  18. Abnormal language-related oscillatory responses in primary progressive aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kielar

    Full Text Available Patients with Primary Progressive Aphasia (PPA may react to linguistic stimuli differently than healthy controls, reflecting degeneration of language networks and engagement of compensatory mechanisms. We used magnetoencephalography (MEG to evaluate oscillatory neural responses in sentence comprehension, in patients with PPA and age-matched controls. Participants viewed sentences containing semantically and syntactically anomalous words that evoke distinct oscillatory responses. For age-matched controls, semantic anomalies elicited left-lateralized 8–30 Hz power decreases distributed along ventral brain regions, whereas syntactic anomalies elicited bilateral power decreases in both ventral and dorsal regions. In comparison to controls, patients with PPA showed altered patterns of induced oscillations, characterized by delayed latencies and attenuated amplitude, which were correlated with linguistic impairment measured offline. The recruitment of right hemisphere temporo-parietal areas (also found in controls was correlated with preserved semantic processing abilities, indicating that preserved neural activity in these regions was able to support successful semantic processing. In contrast, syntactic processing was more consistently impaired in PPA, regardless of neural activity patterns, suggesting that this domain of language is particularly vulnerable to the neuronal loss. In addition, we found that delayed peak latencies of oscillatory responses were associated with lower accuracy for detecting semantic anomalies, suggesting that language deficits observed in PPA may be linked to delayed or slowed information processing. Keywords: MEG oscillations, Primary progressive aphasia (PPA, Sentence comprehension

  19. Effects from Unsaturated Zone Flow during Oscillatory Hydraulic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, D.; Zhou, Y.; Cardiff, M. A.; Barrash, W.

    2014-12-01

    In analyzing pumping tests on unconfined aquifers, the impact of the unsaturated zone is often neglected. Instead, desaturation at the water table is often treated as a free-surface boundary, which is simple and allows for relatively fast computation. Richards' equation models, which account for unsaturated flow, can be compared with saturated flow models to validate the use of Darcy's Law. In this presentation, we examine the appropriateness of using fast linear steady-periodic models based on linearized water table conditions in order to simulate oscillatory pumping tests in phreatic aquifers. We compare oscillatory pumping test models including: 1) a 2-D radially-symmetric phreatic aquifer model with a partially penetrating well, simulated using both Darcy's Law and Richards' Equation in COMSOL; and 2) a linear phase-domain numerical model developed in MATLAB. Both COMSOL and MATLAB models are calibrated to match oscillatory pumping test data collected in the summer of 2013 at the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site (BHRS), and we examine the effect of model type on the associated parameter estimates. The results of this research will aid unconfined aquifer characterization efforts and help to constrain the impact of the simplifying physical assumptions often employed during test analysis.

  20. [Recent results in research on oscillatory chemical reactions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poros, Eszter; Kurin-Csörgei, Krisztina

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms of the complicated periodical phenomenas in the nature (e.g. hearth beat, sleep cycle, circadian rhythms, etc) could be understood with using the laws of nonlinear chemical systems. In this article the newest result in the research of the subfield of nonlinear chemical dynamics aimed at constructing oscillatory chemical reactions, which are novel either in composition or in configuration, are presented. In the introductory part the concept of chemical periodicity is defined, then the forms as it can appear in time and space and the methods of their study are discussed. Detailed description of the experimental work that has resulted in two significant discoveries is provided. A method was developed to design pH-oscillators which are capable of operating under close conditions. The batch pH-oscillators are more convenient to use in some proposed applications than the equivalent CSTR variant. A redox oscillator that is new in composition was found. The permanganate oxidation of some amino acids was shown to take place according to oscillatory kinetics in a narrow range of the experimental parameters. The KMnO4 - glycine - Na2HPO4 system represents the first example in the family of manganese based oscillators where amino acids is involved. In the conclusion formal analogies between the simple chemical and some more complicated biological oscillatory phenomena are mentioned and the possibility of modeling periodic processes with the use of information gained from the studies of chemical oscillations is pointed out.

  1. Cerebral oscillatory activity during simulated driving using MEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotoe eSakihara

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to examine cerebral oscillatory differences associated with psychological processes during simulated car driving. We recorded neuromagnetic signals in 14 healthy volunteers using magnetoencephalography (MEG during simulated driving. MEG data were analyzed using synthetic aperture magnetometry to detect the spatial distribution of cerebral oscillations. Group effects between subjects were analyzed statistically using a nonparametric permutation test. Oscillatory differences were calculated by comparison between passive viewing and active driving. Passive viewing was the baseline, and oscillatory differences during active driving showed an increase or decrease in comparison with a baseline. Power increase in the theta band was detected in the superior frontal gyrus (SFG during active driving. Power decreases in the alpha, beta, and low gamma bands were detected in the right inferior parietal lobe (IPL, left postcentral gyrus (PoCG, middle temporal gyrus (MTG, and posterior cingulate gyrus (PCiG during active driving. Power increase in the theta band in the SFG may play a role in attention. Power decrease in the right IPL may reflect selectively divided attention and visuospatial processing, whereas that in the left PoCG reflects sensorimotor activation related to driving manipulation. Power decreases in the MTG and PCiG may be associated with object recognition.

  2. Bray–Liebhafsky oscillatory reaction in the radiofrequency electromagnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanisavljev, Dragomir R., E-mail: dragisa@ffh.bg.ac.rs [Faculty of Physical Chemistry, University of Belgrade, Studentski trg 12-16, P.O. Box 473, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia); Velikić, Zoran [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, Zemun (Serbia); Veselinović, Dragan S.; Jacić, Nevena V.; Milenković, Maja C. [Faculty of Physical Chemistry, University of Belgrade, Studentski trg 12-16, P.O. Box 473, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • Oscillatory Bray–Liebhafsky reaction is coupled with the radiofrequency radiation. • The effects of radiofrequency field on oscillatory parameters are investigated. • Radiofrequency power of up to the 0.2 W did not produced observable changes. • The explanation related with dissipative and capacitive effects is given. • Open the possibility of investigations of reactive effects on biological systems. - Abstract: Oscillatory Bray–Liebhafsky (BL) reaction is capacitively coupled with the electromagnetic radiation in the frequency range 60–110 MHz. Because of the specific reaction dynamics characterized by several characteristic parameters (induction period, period between chemical oscillations and their amplitude) it served as a good model system for the investigation of the effects of radiofrequent (RF) radiation. RF power of up to 0.2 W did not produce observable changes of the BL reaction parameters in the limit of the experiment reproductivity. Results indicate that, under the given experimental conditions, both dissipative and reactive properties of the solution are not considerably coupled with the RF electrical field.

  3. Neutrino burst identification in underground detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fulgione, W.; Mengotti-Silva, N.; Panaro, L.

    1996-01-01

    We discuss the problem of neutrino burst identification in underground ν-telescopes. First the usual statistical analysis based on the time structure of the events is reviewed, with special attention to the statistical significance of burst candidates. Next, we propose a second level analysis that can provide independent confirmation of burst detection. This exploits the spatial distribution of the single events of a burst candidate, and uses the formalism of the entropy of information. Examples of both techniques are shown, based on the LVD experiment at Gran Sasso. (orig.)

  4. A Nonword Repetition Task for Speakers with Misarticulations: The Syllable Repetition Task (SRT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriberg, Lawrence D.; Lohmeier, Heather L.; Campbell, Thomas F.; Dollaghan, Christine A.; Green, Jordan R.; Moore, Christopher A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Conceptual and methodological confounds occur when non(sense) word repetition tasks are administered to speakers who do not have the target speech sounds in their phonetic inventories or who habitually misarticulate targeted speech sounds. In this article, the authors (a) describe a nonword repetition task, the Syllable Repetition Task…

  5. Analysis of historic bursts and burst detection in water supply areas of different size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.; Trietsch, E.A.; Vreeburg, J.H.G.; Rietveld, L.C.

    2014-01-01

    Pipe bursts in water distribution networks lead to water losses and a risk of damaging the urban environment. We studied hydraulic data and customer contact records of 44 real bursts for a better understanding of the phenomena. We found that most bursts were reported to the water company shortly

  6. The Developmental Trajectory of Nonword Repetition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiat, Shula

    2006-01-01

    In line with the original presentation of nonword repetition as a measure of phonological short-term memory (Gathercole & Baddeley, 1989), the theoretical account Gathercole (2006) puts forward in her Keynote Article focuses on phonological storage as the key capacity common to nonword repetition and vocabulary acquisition. However, evidence that…

  7. Grade Repetition in Queensland State Prep Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Robyn

    2012-01-01

    The current study considers grade repetition rates in the early years of schooling in Queensland state schools with specific focus on the pre-schooling year, Prep. In particular, it provides empirical evidence of grade repetition in Queensland state schools along with groups of students who are more often repeated. At the same time, much of the…

  8. REPETITIVE STRENGTH AMONG STUDENTS OF AGE 14

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Besim Halilaj

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The study involved 82 male students of the primary school “Qamil Ilazi” in Kaçanik-Kosovo.Four movement tests, which test the repetitive strength, were conducted: 1. Pull-up, 2. Sit-Up, 3. Back extension, 4. Push-up.The main goal of this study was to verify the actual motor status, respectively the component of the repetitive strength among students of age 14 of masculine gender. In addition to verifying the actual motor status, another objective was to verify the relationship between the variables employed.Basic statistical parameters show a distribution which is not significantly different from the normal distribution, yielded highly correlative values among the repetitive strength tests. Space factorization resulted in extracting two latent squares defined as repetitive strength of arms factor, and repetitive strength of body factor.

  9. Multifrequency Observations of Gamma-Ray Burst

    OpenAIRE

    Greiner, J.

    1995-01-01

    Neither a flaring nor a quiescent counterpart to a gamma-ray burst has yet been convincingly identified at any wavelength region. The present status of the search for counterparts of classical gamma-ray bursts is given. Particular emphasis is put on the search for flaring counterparts, i.e. emission during or shortly after the gamma-ray emission.

  10. Observations of short gamma-ray bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Derek B; Roming, Peter W A

    2007-05-15

    We review recent observations of short-hard gamma-ray bursts and their afterglows. The launch and successful ongoing operations of the Swift satellite, along with several localizations from the High-Energy Transient Explorer mission, have provoked a revolution in short-burst studies: first, by quickly providing high-quality positions to observers; and second, via rapid and sustained observations from the Swift satellite itself. We make a complete accounting of Swift-era short-burst localizations and proposed host galaxies, and discuss the implications of these observations for the distances, energetics and environments of short bursts, and the nature of their progenitors. We then review the physical modelling of short-burst afterglows: while the simplest afterglow models are inadequate to explain the observations, there have been several notable successes. Finally, we address the case of an unusual burst that threatens to upset the simple picture in which long bursts are due to the deaths of massive stars, and short bursts to compact-object merger events.

  11. Neutrino bursts and gravitational waves experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castagnoli, C; Galeotti, P; Saavedra, O [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Turin (Italy). Lab. di Cosmo-Geofisica

    1978-05-01

    Several experiments have been performed in many countries to observe gravitational waves or neutrino bursts. Since their simultaneous emission may occur in stellar collapse, the authors evaluate the effect of neutrino bursts on gravitational wave antennas and suggest the usefulness of a time correlation among the different detectors.

  12. Polarization of a periodic solar microwave burst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufmann, P [Universidade Mackenzie, Sao Paulo (Brazil). Centro de Radio-Astronomia e Astrofisica

    1976-09-01

    No fluctuations in polarization have been found during a 7 GHz solar burst showing 17s periodic pulses in intensity. Polarization effects can be produced by the propagation media in the active centre, which are not affected directly by the burst source, but situated more deeply than the observed heights at that microwave frequency.

  13. A high repetition rate XUV seeding source for FLASH2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willner, Arik

    2012-05-01

    Improved performance of free-electron laser (FEL) light sources in terms of timing stability, pulse shape and spectral properties of the amplified FEL pulses is of interest in material science, the fields of ultrafast dynamics, biology, chemistry and even special branches in industry. A promising scheme for such an improvement is direct seeding with high harmonic generation (HHG) in a noble gas target. A free-electron laser seeded by an external extreme ultraviolet (XUV) source is planned for FLASH2 at DESY in Hamburg. The requirements for the XUV/soft X-ray source can be summarized as follows: A repetition rate of at least 100 kHz in a 10 Hz burst is needed at variable wavelengths from 10 to 40 nm and pulse energies of several nJ within a single laser harmonic. This application requires a laser amplifier system with exceptional parameters, mJ-level pulse energy, 10-15 fs pulse duration at 100 kHz (1 MHz) burst repetition rate. A new optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification (OPCPA) system is under development in order to meet these requirements, and very promising results have been achieved in the last three years. In parallel to this development, a new HHG concept is necessary to sustain high average power of the driving laser system and to generate harmonics with high conversion efficiencies. Currently, the highest conversion efficiency with HHG has been demonstrated using gas-filled capillary targets. For our application, only a free-jet target can be used for HHG, in order to overcome damage threshold limitations of HHG target optics at a high repetition rate. A novel dual-gas multijet gas target has been developed and first experiments show remarkable control of the degree of phase matching forming the basis for improved control of the harmonic photon flux and the XUV pulse characteristics. The basic idea behind the dual-gas concept is the insertion of matching zones in between multiple HHG sources. These matching sections are filled with hydrogen which

  14. A high repetition rate XUV seeding source for FLASH2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willner, Arik

    2012-05-15

    Improved performance of free-electron laser (FEL) light sources in terms of timing stability, pulse shape and spectral properties of the amplified FEL pulses is of interest in material science, the fields of ultrafast dynamics, biology, chemistry and even special branches in industry. A promising scheme for such an improvement is direct seeding with high harmonic generation (HHG) in a noble gas target. A free-electron laser seeded by an external extreme ultraviolet (XUV) source is planned for FLASH2 at DESY in Hamburg. The requirements for the XUV/soft X-ray source can be summarized as follows: A repetition rate of at least 100 kHz in a 10 Hz burst is needed at variable wavelengths from 10 to 40 nm and pulse energies of several nJ within a single laser harmonic. This application requires a laser amplifier system with exceptional parameters, mJ-level pulse energy, 10-15 fs pulse duration at 100 kHz (1 MHz) burst repetition rate. A new optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification (OPCPA) system is under development in order to meet these requirements, and very promising results have been achieved in the last three years. In parallel to this development, a new HHG concept is necessary to sustain high average power of the driving laser system and to generate harmonics with high conversion efficiencies. Currently, the highest conversion efficiency with HHG has been demonstrated using gas-filled capillary targets. For our application, only a free-jet target can be used for HHG, in order to overcome damage threshold limitations of HHG target optics at a high repetition rate. A novel dual-gas multijet gas target has been developed and first experiments show remarkable control of the degree of phase matching forming the basis for improved control of the harmonic photon flux and the XUV pulse characteristics. The basic idea behind the dual-gas concept is the insertion of matching zones in between multiple HHG sources. These matching sections are filled with hydrogen which

  15. Burst suppression probability algorithms: state-space methods for tracking EEG burst suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemali, Jessica; Ching, ShiNung; Purdon, Patrick L.; Solt, Ken; Brown, Emery N.

    2013-10-01

    Objective. Burst suppression is an electroencephalogram pattern in which bursts of electrical activity alternate with an isoelectric state. This pattern is commonly seen in states of severely reduced brain activity such as profound general anesthesia, anoxic brain injuries, hypothermia and certain developmental disorders. Devising accurate, reliable ways to quantify burst suppression is an important clinical and research problem. Although thresholding and segmentation algorithms readily identify burst suppression periods, analysis algorithms require long intervals of data to characterize burst suppression at a given time and provide no framework for statistical inference. Approach. We introduce the concept of the burst suppression probability (BSP) to define the brain's instantaneous propensity of being in the suppressed state. To conduct dynamic analyses of burst suppression we propose a state-space model in which the observation process is a binomial model and the state equation is a Gaussian random walk. We estimate the model using an approximate expectation maximization algorithm and illustrate its application in the analysis of rodent burst suppression recordings under general anesthesia and a patient during induction of controlled hypothermia. Main result. The BSP algorithms track burst suppression on a second-to-second time scale, and make possible formal statistical comparisons of burst suppression at different times. Significance. The state-space approach suggests a principled and informative way to analyze burst suppression that can be used to monitor, and eventually to control, the brain states of patients in the operating room and in the intensive care unit.

  16. Bursting synchronization in scale-free networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista, C.A.S.; Batista, A.M.; Pontes, J.C.A. de; Lopes, S.R.; Viana, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    Neuronal networks in some areas of the brain cortex present the scale-free property, i.e., the neuron connectivity is distributed according to a power-law, such that neurons are more likely to couple with other already well-connected ones. Neuron activity presents two timescales, a fast one related to action-potential spiking, and a slow timescale in which bursting takes place. Some pathological conditions are related with the synchronization of the bursting activity in a weak sense, meaning the adjustment of the bursting phase due to coupling. Hence it has been proposed that an externally applied time-periodic signal be applied in order to control undesirable synchronized bursting rhythms. We investigated this kind of intervention using a two-dimensional map to describe neurons with spiking-bursting activity in a scale-free network.

  17. X-Ray Bursts from NGC 6652

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Edward

    The possibly transient X-ray Source in the globular cluster NGC 6652 has been seen by BeppoSax and the ASM on RXTE to undergo X-ray bursts, possibly Type I. Very little is known about this X-ray source, and confirmation of its bursts type-I nature would identify it as a neutron star binary. Type I bursts in 6 other sources have been shown to exhibit intervals of millisecond ocsillation that most likely indicate the neutron star spin period. Radius-expansion bursts can reveal information about the mass and size of the neutron star. We propose to use the ASM to trigger an observation of this source to maximize the probability of catching a burst in the PCA.

  18. Spatiotemporal chaos from bursting dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berenstein, Igal; De Decker, Yannick

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we study the emergence of spatiotemporal chaos from mixed-mode oscillations, by using an extended Oregonator model. We show that bursting dynamics consisting of fast/slow mixed mode oscillations along a single attractor can lead to spatiotemporal chaotic dynamics, although the spatially homogeneous solution is itself non-chaotic. This behavior is observed far from the Hopf bifurcation and takes the form of a spatiotemporal intermittency where the system locally alternates between the fast and the slow phases of the mixed mode oscillations. We expect this form of spatiotemporal chaos to be generic for models in which one or several slow variables are coupled to activator-inhibitor type of oscillators

  19. The emergence of two anti-phase oscillatory neural populations in a computational model of the Parkinsonian globus pallidus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert John Merrison-Hort

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Experiments in rodent models of Parkinson's Disease have demonstrated a prominent increase of oscillatory firing patterns in neurons within the Parkinsonian globus pallidus (GP which may underlie some of the motor symptoms of the disease. There are two main pathways from the cortex to GP: via the striatum and via the subthalamic nucleus (STN, but it is not known how these inputs sculpt the pathological pallidal firing patterns. To study this we developed a novel neural network model of conductance-based spiking pallidal neurons with cortex-modulated input from STN neurons. Our results support the hypothesis that entrainment occurs primarily via the subthalamic pathway. We find that as a result of the interplay between excitatory input from the STN and mutual inhibitory coupling between GP neurons, a homogeneous population of GP neurons demonstrates a self-organising dynamical behaviour where two groups of neurons emerge: one spiking in-phase with the cortical rhythm and the other in anti-phase. This finding mirrors what is seen in recordings from the GP of rodents that have had Parkinsonism induced via brain lesions. Our model also includes downregulation of Hyperpolarization-activated Cyclic Nucleotide-gated (HCN channels in response to burst firing of GP neurons, since this has been suggested as a possible mechanism for the emergence of Parkinsonian activity. We found that the downregulation of HCN channels provides even better correspondence with experimental data but that it is not essential in order for the two groups of oscillatory neurons to appear. We discuss how the influence of inhibitory striatal input will strengthen our results.

  20. The hyperbolic effect of density and strength of inter beta-cell coupling on islet bursting: a theoretical investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xujing

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insulin, the principal regulating hormone of blood glucose, is released through the bursting of the pancreatic islets. Increasing evidence indicates the importance of islet morphostructure in its function, and the need of a quantitative investigation. Recently we have studied this problem from the perspective of islet bursting of insulin, utilizing a new 3D hexagonal closest packing (HCP model of islet structure that we have developed. Quantitative non-linear dependence of islet function on its structure was found. In this study, we further investigate two key structural measures: the number of neighboring cells that each β-cell is coupled to, nc, and the coupling strength, gc. Results β-cell clusters of different sizes with number of β-cells nβ ranging from 1–343, nc from 0–12, and gc from 0–1000 pS, were simulated. Three functional measures of islet bursting characteristics – fraction of bursting β-cells fb, synchronization index λ, and bursting period Tb, were quantified. The results revealed a hyperbolic dependence on the combined effect of nc and gc. From this we propose to define a dimensionless cluster coupling index or CCI, as a composite measure for islet morphostructural integrity. We show that the robustness of islet oscillatory bursting depends on CCI, with all three functional measures fb, λ and Tb increasing monotonically with CCI when it is small, and plateau around CCI = 1. Conclusion CCI is a good islet function predictor. It has the potential of linking islet structure and function, and providing insight to identify therapeutic targets for the preservation and restoration of islet β-cell mass and function.

  1. Subjective duration distortions mirror neural repetition suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariyadath, Vani; Eagleman, David M

    2012-01-01

    Subjective duration is strongly influenced by repetition and novelty, such that an oddball stimulus in a stream of repeated stimuli appears to last longer in duration in comparison. We hypothesize that this duration illusion, called the temporal oddball effect, is a result of the difference in expectation between the oddball and the repeated stimuli. Specifically, we conjecture that the repeated stimuli contract in duration as a result of increased predictability; these duration contractions, we suggest, result from decreased neural response amplitude with repetition, known as repetition suppression. Participants viewed trials consisting of lines presented at a particular orientation (standard stimuli) followed by a line presented at a different orientation (oddball stimulus). We found that the size of the oddball effect correlates with the number of repetitions of the standard stimulus as well as the amount of deviance from the oddball stimulus; both of these results are consistent with a repetition suppression hypothesis. Further, we find that the temporal oddball effect is sensitive to experimental context--that is, the size of the oddball effect for a particular experimental trial is influenced by the range of duration distortions seen in preceding trials. Our data suggest that the repetition-related duration contractions causing the oddball effect are a result of neural repetition suppression. More generally, subjective duration may reflect the prediction error associated with a stimulus and, consequently, the efficiency of encoding that stimulus. Additionally, we emphasize that experimental context effects need to be taken into consideration when designing duration-related tasks.

  2. Three-Wave Resonance Modulation and Fine Structures in the Solar Short Centimeter Wave Bursts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王德焴; 吴洪敖; 秦至海

    1994-01-01

    A theoretical model is presented. We propose that when the radiation of solar radio bursts propagates outward as a pump wave through the conora, the three-wave resonance interaction would occur if the radio emission interacts with the MHD wave and scattering wave in the conora. This process induces a nonlinear modulation in the emission flux S. The statistical relations between the repetition rates R and S and between the modulation amplitude △S and S, observed from 1.36cm, 2cm and 3.2cm solar radio bursts could be well interpreted by this model under the conditions of imperfect matching and k2≠0. The appreciable difference in the modulation periods among the 2cm, 3.2cm and 1.36cm waves might be caused by the differences in the MHD waves joining in the modulation. Several theoretical expectations have been made from this model, which may be inspected in further observation.

  3. Abnormal Task Modulation of Oscillatory Neural Activity in Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa C Dias

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia patients have deficits in cognitive function that are a core feature of the disorder. AX-CPT is commonly used to study cognition in schizophrenia, and patients have characteristic pattern of behavioral and ERP response. In AX-CPT subjects respond when a flashed cue A is followed by a target X, ignoring other letter combinations. Patients show reduced hit rate to go trials, and increased false alarms to sequences that require inhibition of a prepotent response. EEG recordings show reduced sensory (P1/N1, as well as later cognitive components (N2, P3, CNV. Behavioral deficits correlate most strongly with sensory dysfunction. Oscillatory analyses provide critical information regarding sensory/cognitive processing over and above standard ERP analyses. Recent analyses of induced oscillatory activity in single trials during AX-CPT in healthy volunteers showed characteristic response patterns in theta, alpha and beta frequencies tied to specific sensory and cognitive processes. Alpha and beta modulated during the trials and beta modulation over the frontal cortex correlated with reaction time. In this study, EEG data was obtained from 18 schizophrenia patients and 13 controls during AX-CPT performance, and single trial decomposition of the signal yielded power in the target wavelengths.Significant task-related event-related desynchronization (ERD was observed in both alpha and beta frequency bands over parieto-occipital cortex related to sensory encoding of the cue. This modulation was reduced in patients for beta, but not for alpha. In addition, significant beta ERD was observed over motor cortex, related to motor preparation for the response, and was also reduced in patients. These findings demonstrate impaired dynamic modulation of beta frequency rhythms in schizophrenia, and suggest that failures of oscillatory activity may underlie impaired sensory information processing in schizophrenia that in turn contributes to cognitive deficits.

  4. The Oscillatory Nature of Rotating Convection in Liquid Metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurnou, J. M.; Bertin, V. L.; Grannan, A. M.

    2016-12-01

    Earth's magnetic field is assumed to be generated by fluid motions in its liquid metal core. In this fluid, the heat diffuses significantly more than momentum and thus, the ratio of these two diffusivities, the Prandtl number Pr=ν/Κ, is well below unity. The convective flow dynamics of liquid metal is very different from Pr ≈ 1 fluids like water and those used in current dynamo simulations. In order to characterize rapidly rotating thermal convection in low Pr number fluids, we have performed laboratory experiments in a cylinder using liquid gallium (Pr ≈ 0.023) as the working fluid. The Ekman number, which characterizes the effect of rotation, varies from E = 4 10-5 to 4 10-6 and the dimensionless buoyancy forcing (Rayleigh number, Ra) varies from Ra =3 105 to 2 107. Using heat transfer measurements (Nusselt number, Nu) as well as temperature measurements within the fluid, we characterize the different styles of low Pr rotating convective flow. The convection threshold is first overcome in the form of a container scale inertial oscillatory mode. At stronger forcing, wall-localized modes are identified for the first time in liquid metal laboratory experiments. These wall modes coexist with the bulk inertial oscillatory modes. When the strengh of the buoyancy increases, the bulk flow becomes turbulent while the wall modes remain. Our results imply that rotating convective flows in liquid metals do not develop in the form of quasi-steady columns, as in Pr ≈ 1 dynamo models, but in the form of oscillatory motions. Therefore, the flows that drive thermally-driven dynamo action in low Pr geophysical and astrophysical fluids can differ substantively than those occuring in current-day Pr ≈ 1 numerical models. In addition, our results suggest that relatively low wavenumber, wall-attached modes may be dynamically important in rapidly-rotating convection in liquid metals.

  5. Characterization of vertical mixing in oscillatory vegetated flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolahpour, M.; Ghisalberti, M.; Lavery, P.; McMahon, K.

    2016-02-01

    Seagrass meadows are primary producers that provide important ecosystem services, such as improved water quality, sediment stabilisation and trapping and recycling of nutrients. Most of these ecological services are strongly influenced by the vertical exchange of water across the canopy-water interface. That is, vertical mixing is the main hydrodynamic process governing the large-scale ecological and environmental impact of seagrass meadows. The majority of studies into mixing in vegetated flows have focused on steady flow environments whereas many coastal canopies are subjected to oscillatory flows driven by surface waves. It is known that the rate of mass transfer will vary greatly between unidirectional and oscillatory flows, necessitating a specific investigation of mixing in oscillatory canopy flows. In this study, we conducted an extensive laboratory investigation to characterise the rate of vertical mixing through a vertical turbulent diffusivity (Dt,z). This has been done through gauging the evolution of vertical profiles of concentration (C) of a dye sheet injected into a wave-canopy flow. Instantaneous measurement of the variance of the vertical concentration distribution ( allowed the estimation of a vertical turbulent diffusivity (). Two types of model canopies, rigid and flexible, with identical heights and frontal areas, were subjected to a wide and realistic range of wave height and period. The results showed two important mechanisms that dominate vertical mixing under different conditions: a shear layer that forms at the top of the canopy and wake turbulence generated by the stems. By allowing a coupled contribution of wake and shear layer mixing, we present a relationship that can be used to predict the rate of vertical mixing in coastal canopies. The results further showed that the rate of vertical mixing within flexible vegetation was always lower than the corresponding rigid canopy, confirming the impact of plant flexibility on canopy

  6. A design method of oscillatory De-Qing circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Wenquan

    1988-01-01

    With some particular advantages the oscillatory De-Qing circuit now is widely used. However its design is very complex. By means of a quantitative analysis for this circuit a group of design formulas is obtained. According to these design formulas the maximum allowable charging inductance L c , the De-Qing network resistance R and capacitance C can easily be determined, if the PFN capacitance C N , the maximum pulse frequency F max , and percentage regulation η are given. Simple and direct formulas for specific situation are listed. Finally, a design example is given and a comparison with experimental result is made, which shows that the design method is feasible and reliable

  7. Chaotic wave trains in an oscillatory/excitable medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabinovitch, A.; Gutman, M.; Biton, Y.; Aviram, I.

    2006-01-01

    We study the chaotic dynamics of a heterogeneous reaction-diffusion medium composed of two uniform regions: one oscillatory, and the other excitable. It is shown that, by altering the diffusion coefficient, local chaotic oscillations can be induced at the interface between regions, which in turn, generate different chaotic sequences of pulses traveling in the excitable region. We analyze the properties of the local chaotic driver, as well as the diffusion-induced transitions. A procedure based on the abnormal frequency-locking phenomenon is proposed for controlling such sequences. Relevance of the obtained results to cardiac dynamics is briefly discussed

  8. Dynamics of a population of oscillatory and excitable elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keeffe, Kevin P; Strogatz, Steven H

    2016-06-01

    We analyze a variant of a model proposed by Kuramoto, Shinomoto, and Sakaguchi for a large population of coupled oscillatory and excitable elements. Using the Ott-Antonsen ansatz, we reduce the behavior of the population to a two-dimensional dynamical system with three parameters. We present the stability diagram and calculate several of its bifurcation curves analytically, for both excitatory and inhibitory coupling. Our main result is that when the coupling function is broad, the system can display bistability between steady states of constant high and low activity, whereas when the coupling function is narrow and inhibitory, one of the states in the bistable regime can show persistent pulsations in activity.

  9. Oscillatory squeeze flow for the study of linear viscoelastic behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wingstrand, Sara Lindeblad; Alvarez, Nicolas J.; Hassager, Ole

    2016-01-01

    of molten polymers and suspensions. The principal advantage of squeeze flow rheometer over rotational devices is the simplicity of the apparatus. It has no air bearing and is much less expensive and easier to use. Accuracy may be somewhat reduced, but for quality control purposes, it could be quite useful....... It might also find application as the central component of a high-throughput rheometer for evaluating experimental materials. The deformation is not simple shear, but equations have been derived to show that the oscillatory compressive (normal) force that is measured can serve as a basis for calculating...

  10. Molecular dynamics simulations of oscillatory flows in microfluidic channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J.S.; Ottesen, Johnny T.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we apply the direct non-equilibrium molecular dynamics technique to oscillatory flows of fluids in microscopic channels. Initially, we show that the microscopic simulations resemble the macroscopic predictions based on the Navier–Stokes equation very well for large channel width, high...... density and low temperature. Further simulations for high temperature and low density show that the non-slip boundary condition traditionally used in the macroscopic equation is greatly compromised when the fluid–wall interactions are the same as the fluid–fluid interactions. Simulations of a system...

  11. Ultrafine grained Cu processed by compression with oscillatory torsion

    OpenAIRE

    K. Rodak

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work is a study of Cu microstructure after severe plastic deformation process by usingcompression with oscillatory torsion test.Design/methodology/approach: Cu samples were deformed at torsion frequency (f) changed from 0 Hz(compression) to 1.8 Hz under a constant torsion angle (α) ≈8° and compression speed (v)=0.1mm/s. Structuralinvestigations were conducted by using light microscopy (LM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).Findings: The structural analysis ma...

  12. Observing a Burst with Sunglasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-11-01

    Unique Five-Week VLT Study of the Polarisation of a Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow "Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs)" are certainly amongst the most dramatic events known in astrophysics. These short flashes of energetic gamma-rays, first detected in the late 1960's by military satellites, last from less than one second to several minutes. GRBs have been found to be situated at extremely large ("cosmological") distances. The energy released in a few seconds during such an event is larger than that of the Sun during its entire lifetime of more than 10,000 million years. The GRBs are indeed the most powerful events since the Big Bang known in the Universe, cf. ESO PR 08/99 and ESO PR 20/00. During the past years circumstantial evidence has mounted that GRBs signal the collapse of extremely massive stars, the so-called hypernovae. This was finally demonstrated some months ago when astronomers, using the FORS instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), documented in unprecedented detail the changes in the spectrum of the light source ("the optical afterglow") of the gamma-ray burst GRB 030329 (cf. ESO PR 16/03). A conclusive and direct link between cosmological gamma-ray bursts and explosions of very massive stars was provided on this occasion. Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 030329 was discovered on March 29, 2003 by NASA's High Energy Transient Explorer spacecraft. Follow-up observations with the UVES spectrograph at the 8.2-m VLT KUEYEN telescope at the Paranal Observatory (Chile) showed the burst to have a redshift of 0.1685 [1]. This corresponds to a distance of about 2,650 million light-years, making GRB 030329 the second-nearest long-duration GRB ever detected. The proximity of GRB 030329 resulted in very bright afterglow emission, permitting the most extensive follow-up observations of any afterglow to date. A team of astronomers [2] led by Jochen Greiner of the Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany) decided to make use of this unique opportunity to study the

  13. Multiple energetic injections in a strong spike-like solar burst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, P.; Correia, E.; Costa, J.E.R.; Dennis, B.R.; Brown, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    An intense and fast spike-like solar burst was observed with high sensitivity in microwaves and hard X-rays, on December 18, 1980, at 19h 21m 20s U.T. It is shown that the burst was built up of short time scale structures superimposed on an underlying gradual emission, the time evolution of which showed remarkable proportionality between hard X-ray and microwave fluxes. The finer time structures were best defined at mm-microwaves. At the peak of the event the finer structures repeat energy 30-60 ms, (displaying an equivalent repetition rate of 16-20 s -1 ). The more showly varying component with a time scale of about 1 second was identified in microwaves and hard X-rays throughout the burst duration. Similarly to what has been found for mm-microwave burst emission, it is suggested that X-ray fluxes might also be proportional to the repetition rate of basic units of energy injection (quasi-quantized). It is estimated that one such injection produces a pulse of hard X-ray photons with about 4 x 10 21 erg, for epsilon > or aprox. 25 KeV. This figure is used to estimate the relevant parameters of one primary energy release site both in the case where hard X-rays are produced primarily by thick-target bremsstrahlung, and when they are purely thermal, and also discuss the relation of this figure to global energy considerations. It is found, in particular, that a thick-target interpretation only becomes possible if individual pulses have durations larger than 0.2s. (Author) [pt

  14. Swift: A gamma ray burst MIDEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthelmy, Scott

    2001-01-01

    Swift is a first of its kind multiwavelength transient observatory for gamma-ray burst astronomy. It has the optimum capabilities for the next breakthroughs in determining the origin of gamma-ray bursts and their afterglows as well as using bursts to probe the early Universe. Swift will also perform the first sensitive hard X-ray survey of the sky. The mission is being developed by an international collaboration and consists of three instruments, the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT), the X-ray Telescope (XRT), and the Ultraviolet and Optical Telescope (UVOT). The BAT, a wide-field gamma-ray detector, will detect ∼1 gamma-ray burst per day with a sensitivity 5 times that of BATSE. The sensitive narrow-field XRT and UVOT will be autonomously slewed to the burst location in 20 to 70 seconds to determine 0.3-5.0 arcsec positions and perform optical, UV, and X-ray spectrophotometry. On-board measurements of redshift will also be done for hundreds of bursts. Swift will incorporate superb, low-cost instruments using existing flight-spare hardware and designs. Strong education/public outreach and follow-up programs will help to engage the public and astronomical community. Swift has been selected by NASA for development and launch in late 2003

  15. The repetition timing of high frequency afferent stimulation drives the bidirectional plasticity at central synapses in the rat medial vestibular nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarduzio, M; Panichi, R; Pettorossi, V E; Grassi, S

    2012-10-25

    In this study we show that high frequency stimulation (HFS, 100Hz) of afferent fibers to the medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) can induce opposite long-term modifications of synaptic responses in the type B neurons depending upon the stimulation pattern. Long burst stimulation (LBS: 2s) and short burst stimulation (SBS: 0.55s) were applied with different burst number (BN) and inter-burst intervals (IBI). It results that both LBS and SBS can induce either N-methyl-d aspartate receptors (NMDARs)-mediated long-term potentiation (LTP) or long-term depression (LTD), depending on temporal organization of repetitive bursts. In particular, the IBI plays a relevant role in guiding the shift from LTP to LTD since by using both LBS and SBS LTP is induced by shorter IBI than LTD. By contrast, the sign of long-term effect does not depend on the mean impulse frequency evaluated within the entire stimulation period. Therefore, the patterns of repetitive vestibular activation with different ratios between periods of increased activity and periods of basal activity may lead to LTP or LTD probably causing different levels of postsynaptic Ca(2+). On the whole, this study demonstrates that glutamatergic vestibular synapse in the MVN can undergo NMDAR-dependent bidirectional plasticity and puts forward a new aspect for understanding the adaptive and compensatory plasticity of the oculomotor responses. Copyright © 2012 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Repetitive Bibliographical Information in Relational Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Terrence A.

    1988-01-01

    Proposes a solution to the problem of loading repetitive bibliographic information in a microcomputer-based relational database management system. The alternative design described is based on a representational redundancy design and normalization theory. (12 references) (Author/CLB)

  17. Possible galactic origin of. gamma. -ray bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manchanda, R K; Ramsden, D [Southampton Univ. (UK). Dept. of Physics

    1977-03-31

    It is stated that extragalactic models for the origin of non-solar ..gamma..-ray bursts include supernova bursts in remote galaxies, and the collapse of the cores of active stars, whilst galactic models are based on flare stars, thermonuclear explosions in neutron stars and the sudden accretion of cometary gas on to neutron stars. The acceptability of any of these models may be tested by the observed size spectrum of the ..gamma..-ray bursts. The extragalactic models predict a power law spectrum with number index -1.5, whilst for the galactic models the number index will be -1. Experimental data on ..gamma..-ray bursts is, however, still meagre, and so far only 44 confirmed events have been recorded by satellite-borne instruments. The number spectrum of the observed ..gamma..-ray bursts indicates that the observed distribution for events with an energy < 10/sup -4/ erg/cm/sup 2/ is flat; this makes the choice of any model completely arbitrary. An analysis of the observed ..gamma..-ray events is here presented that suggests very interesting possibilities for their origin. There appears to be a preferred mean energy for ..gamma..-ray bursts; some 90% of the recorded events show a mean energy between 5 x 10/sup -5/ and 5 x 10/sup -4/ erg/cm/sup 2/, contrary to the predicted characteristics of the number spectrum of various models. A remarkable similarity is found between the distribution of ..gamma..-ray bursts and that of supernova remnants, suggesting a genetic relationship between the two and the galactic origin of the ..gamma..-ray bursts, and the burst source could be identified with completely run down neutron stars, formed during supernova explosions.

  18. Bursting neurons and ultrasound avoidance in crickets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary eMarsat

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Decision making in invertebrates often relies on simple neural circuits composed of only a few identified neurons. The relative simplicity of these circuits makes it possible to identify the key computation and neural properties underlying decisions. In this review, we summarize recent research on the neural basis of ultrasound avoidance in crickets, a response that allows escape from echolocating bats. The key neural property shaping behavioral output is high-frequency bursting of an identified interneuron, AN2, which carries information about ultrasound stimuli from receptor neurons to the brain. AN2's spike train consists of clusters of spikes –bursts– that may be interspersed with isolated, non-burst spikes. AN2 firing is necessary and sufficient to trigger avoidance steering but only high-rate firing, such as occurs in bursts, evokes this response. AN2 bursts are therefore at the core of the computation involved in deciding whether or not to steer away from ultrasound. Bursts in AN2 are triggered by synaptic input from nearly synchronous bursts in ultrasound receptors. Thus the population response at the very first stage of sensory processing –the auditory receptor- already differentiates the features of the stimulus that will trigger a behavioral response from those that will not. Adaptation, both intrinsic to AN2 and within ultrasound receptors, scales the burst-generating features according to the stimulus statistics, thus filtering out background noise and ensuring that bursts occur selectively in response to salient peaks in ultrasound intensity. Furthermore AN2’s sensitivity to ultrasound varies adaptively with predation pressure, through both developmental and evolutionary mechanisms. We discuss how this key relationship between bursting and the triggering of avoidance behavior is also observed in other invertebrate systems such as the avoidance of looming visual stimuli in locusts or heat avoidance in beetles.

  19. A learning algorithm for oscillatory cellular neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, C Y.; Kurokawa, H

    1999-07-01

    We present a cellular type oscillatory neural network for temporal segregation of stationary input patterns. The model comprises an array of locally connected neural oscillators with connections limited to a 4-connected neighborhood. The architecture is reminiscent of the well-known cellular neural network that consists of local connection for feature extraction. By means of a novel learning rule and an initialization scheme, global synchronization can be accomplished without incurring any erroneous synchrony among uncorrelated objects. Each oscillator comprises two mutually coupled neurons, and neurons share a piecewise-linear activation function characteristic. The dynamics of traditional oscillatory models is simplified by using only one plastic synapse, and the overall complexity for hardware implementation is reduced. Based on the connectedness of image segments, it is shown that global synchronization and desynchronization can be achieved by means of locally connected synapses, and this opens up a tremendous application potential for the proposed architecture. Furthermore, by using special grouping synapses it is demonstrated that temporal segregation of overlapping gray-level and color segments can also be achieved. Finally, simulation results show that the learning rule proposed circumvents the problem of component mismatches, and hence facilitates a large-scale integration.

  20. Bistable flapping of flexible flyers in oscillatory flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yangyang; Kanso, Eva

    2016-11-01

    Biological and bio-inspired flyers move by shape actuation. The direct control of shape variables for locomotory purposes is well studied. Less is known about indirect shape actuation via the fluid medium. Here, we consider a flexible Λ-flyer in oscillatory flow that is free to flap and rotate around its fixed apex. We study its motion in the context of the inviscid vortex sheet model. We first analyze symmetric flapping about the vertical axis of gravity. We find that there is a finite value of the flexibility that maximizes both the flapping amplitude and elastic energy storage. Our results show that rather than resonance, the flyer relies on fluidic effects to optimize these two quantities. We then perturb the flyer away from the vertical and analyze its stability. Four distinct types of rolling behavior are identified: mono-stable, bistable, bistable oscillatory rotations and chaotic dynamics. We categorize these types of behavior in terms of the flyer's and flow parameters. In particular, the transition from mono-stable to bistable behavior occurs at a constant value of the product of the flow amplitude and acceleration. This product can be interpreted as the ratio of fluidic drag to gravity, confirming the fluid role in this transition.

  1. Evidence of nonuniqueness and oscillatory solutions in computational fluid mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunziato, J.W.; Gartling, D.K.; Kipp, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    We will review some of our recent experiences in computing solutions for nonlinear fluids in relatively simple, two-dimensional geometries. The purpose of this discussion will be to display by example some of the interesting but difficult questions that arise when ill-behaved solutions are obtained numerically. We will consider two examples. As the first example, we will consider a nonlinear elastic (compressible) fluid with chemical reactions and discuss solutions for detonation and detonation failure in a two-dimensional cylinder. In this case, the numerical algorithm utilizes a finite-difference method with artificial viscosity (von Neumann-Richtmyer method) and leads to two, distinctly different, stable solutions depending on the time step criterion used. The second example to be considered involves the convection of a viscous fluid in a rectangular container as a result of an exothermic polymerization reaction. A solidification front develops near the top of the container and propagates down through the fluid, changing the aspect ratio of the region ahead of the front. Using a Galerkin-based finite element method, a numerical solution of the partial differential equations is obtained which tracks the front and correctly predicts the fluid temperatures near the walls. However, the solution also exhibits oscillatory behavior with regard to the number of cells in the fluid ahead of the front and in the strength of the cells. More definitive experiments and analysis are required to determine whether this oscillatory phenomena is a numerical artifact or a physical reality. 20 refs., 14 figs

  2. Propulsion of a microsubmarine using a thermally oscillatory approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao, Lei; Luo, Cheng

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, motivated by the driving mechanism of a putt-putt toy boat, we explore the feasibility to propel a microsubmarine using a thermally oscillatory approach, which only requires a simple design and does not involve any complicated propulsive systems. We investigate the design, fabrication, actuation and horizontal motions of the corresponding microsubmarines. Based on the understanding gained through preliminary tests on two manually fabricated putt-putt boats, we designed and fabricated the prototype of a microsubmarine. Similar to a putt-putt boat, the prototype also uses a thermally oscillatory process for propulsion. In a cyclic period of this process, due to the expansion and shrinkage of a vapor bubble inside the reservoir of the submarine, liquid is first ejected outside and then sucked into the reservoir. Due to the difference in liquid flow directions between ejection and suction stages, a thrust is produced to propel the submarine. At an applied voltage of 16 V and pulse frequency of 100 Hz, the submarine was found to have the highest speed of 1.8 mm s −1 and longest travel distance of 12.6 mm. The corresponding thrust was estimated to be 67.6 nN. (paper)

  3. Frequency-dependent oscillatory neural profiles during imitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugata, Hisato; Hirata, Masayuki; Tamura, Yuichi; Onishi, Hisao; Goto, Tetsu; Araki, Toshihiko; Yorifuji, Shiro

    2017-04-10

    Imitation is a complex process that includes higher-order cognitive and motor function. This process requires an observation-execution matching system that transforms an observed action into an identical movement. Although the low-gamma band is thought to reflect higher cognitive processes, no studies have focused on it. Here, we used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to examine the neural oscillatory changes including the low-gamma band during imitation. Twelve healthy, right-handed participants performed a finger task consisting of four conditions (imitation, execution, observation, and rest). During the imitation and execution conditions, significant event-related desynchronizations (ERDs) were observed at the left frontal, central, and parietal MEG sensors in the alpha, beta, and low-gamma bands. Functional connectivity analysis at the sensor level revealed an imitation-related connectivity between a group of frontal sensors and a group of parietal sensors in the low-gamma band. Furthermore, source reconstruction with synthetic aperture magnetometry showed significant ERDs in the low-gamma band in the left sensorimotor area and the middle frontal gyrus (MFG) during the imitation condition when compared with the other three conditions. Our results suggest that the oscillatory neural activities of the low-gamma band at the sensorimotor area and MFG play an important role in the observation-execution matching system related to imitation.

  4. Reflood modeling under oscillatory flow conditions with Cathare

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, J M; Bartak, J; Janicot, A

    1994-12-31

    The problems and the current status in oscillatory reflood modelling with the CATHARE code are presented. The physical models used in CATHARE for reflood modelling predicted globally very well the forced reflood experiments. Significant drawbacks existed in predicting experiments with oscillatory flow (both forced and gravity driven). First, the more simple case of forced flow oscillations was analyzed. Modelling improvements within the reflooding package resolved the problem of quench front blockages and unphysical oscillations. Good agreements with experiment for the ERSEC forced oscillations reflood tests is now obtained. For gravity driven reflood, CATHARE predicted sustained flow oscillations during 100-150 s after the start of the reflood, whereas in the experiment flow oscillations were observed only during 25-30 s. Possible areas of modeling improvements are identified and several new correlations are suggested. The first test calculations of the BETHSY test 6.7A4 have shown that the oscillations are mostly sensitive to heat flux modeling downstream of the quench front. A much better agreement between CATHARE results and the experiment was obtained. However, further effort is necessary to obtain globally satisfactory predictions of gravity driven system reflood tests. (authors) 6 figs., 35 refs.

  5. Cellular and oscillatory substrates of fear extinction learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Patrick; Zaki, Yosif; Maguire, Jamie; Reijmers, Leon G

    2017-11-01

    The mammalian brain contains dedicated circuits for both the learned expression and suppression of fear. These circuits require precise coordination to facilitate the appropriate expression of fear behavior, but the mechanisms underlying this coordination remain unclear. Using a combination of chemogenetics, activity-based neuronal-ensemble labeling and in vivo electrophysiology, we found that fear extinction learning confers on parvalbumin-expressing (PV) interneurons in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) a dedicated role in the selective suppression of a previously encoded fear memory and BLA fear-encoding neurons. In addition, following extinction learning, PV interneurons enable a competing interaction between a 6-12 Hz oscillation and a fear-associated 3-6 Hz oscillation within the BLA. Loss of this competition increases a 3-6 Hz oscillatory signature, with BLA→medial prefrontal cortex directionality signaling the recurrence of fear expression. The discovery of cellular and oscillatory substrates of fear extinction learning that critically depend on BLA PV interneurons could inform therapies aimed at preventing the pathological recurrence of fear following extinction learning.

  6. Reflood modeling under oscillatory flow conditions with Cathare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.M.; Bartak, J.; Janicot, A.

    1993-01-01

    The problems and the current status in oscillatory reflood modelling with the CATHARE code are presented. The physical models used in CATHARE for reflood modelling predicted globally very well the forced reflood experiments. Significant drawbacks existed in predicting experiments with oscillatory flow (both forced and gravity driven). First, the more simple case of forced flow oscillations was analyzed. Modelling improvements within the reflooding package resolved the problem of quench front blockages and unphysical oscillations. Good agreements with experiment for the ERSEC forced oscillations reflood tests is now obtained. For gravity driven reflood, CATHARE predicted sustained flow oscillations during 100-150 s after the start of the reflood, whereas in the experiment flow oscillations were observed only during 25-30 s. Possible areas of modeling improvements are identified and several new correlations are suggested. The first test calculations of the BETHSY test 6.7A4 have shown that the oscillations are mostly sensitive to heat flux modeling downstream of the quench front. A much better agreement between CATHARE results and the experiment was obtained. However, further effort is necessary to obtain globally satisfactory predictions of gravity driven system reflood tests. (authors) 6 figs., 35 refs

  7. Frequency-dependent oscillatory neural profiles during imitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugata, Hisato; Hirata, Masayuki; Tamura, Yuichi; Onishi, Hisao; Goto, Tetsu; Araki, Toshihiko; Yorifuji, Shiro

    2017-01-01

    Imitation is a complex process that includes higher-order cognitive and motor function. This process requires an observation-execution matching system that transforms an observed action into an identical movement. Although the low-gamma band is thought to reflect higher cognitive processes, no studies have focused on it. Here, we used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to examine the neural oscillatory changes including the low-gamma band during imitation. Twelve healthy, right-handed participants performed a finger task consisting of four conditions (imitation, execution, observation, and rest). During the imitation and execution conditions, significant event-related desynchronizations (ERDs) were observed at the left frontal, central, and parietal MEG sensors in the alpha, beta, and low-gamma bands. Functional connectivity analysis at the sensor level revealed an imitation-related connectivity between a group of frontal sensors and a group of parietal sensors in the low-gamma band. Furthermore, source reconstruction with synthetic aperture magnetometry showed significant ERDs in the low-gamma band in the left sensorimotor area and the middle frontal gyrus (MFG) during the imitation condition when compared with the other three conditions. Our results suggest that the oscillatory neural activities of the low-gamma band at the sensorimotor area and MFG play an important role in the observation-execution matching system related to imitation. PMID:28393878

  8. Improved discrimination of visual stimuli following repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael L Waterston

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS at certain frequencies increases thresholds for motor-evoked potentials and phosphenes following stimulation of cortex. Consequently rTMS is often assumed to introduce a "virtual lesion" in stimulated brain regions, with correspondingly diminished behavioral performance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we investigated the effects of rTMS to visual cortex on subjects' ability to perform visual psychophysical tasks. Contrary to expectations of a visual deficit, we find that rTMS often improves the discrimination of visual features. For coarse orientation tasks, discrimination of a static stimulus improved consistently following theta-burst stimulation of the occipital lobe. Using a reaction-time task, we found that these improvements occurred throughout the visual field and lasted beyond one hour post-rTMS. Low-frequency (1 Hz stimulation yielded similar improvements. In contrast, we did not find consistent effects of rTMS on performance in a fine orientation discrimination task. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Overall our results suggest that rTMS generally improves or has no effect on visual acuity, with the nature of the effect depending on the type of stimulation and the task. We interpret our results in the context of an ideal-observer model of visual perception.

  9. Relativistic motion in gamma-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krolik, J.H.; Pier, E.A.

    1991-01-01

    Three fundamental problems affect models of gamma-ray bursts, i.e., the energy source, the ability of high-energy photons to escape the radiation region, and the comparative weakness of X-ray emission. It is indicated that relativistic bulk motion of the gamma-ray-emitting plasma generically provides a solution to all three of these problems. Results show that, if the plasma that produces gamma-ray bursts has a bulk relativistic velocity with Lorentz factor gamma of about 10, several of the most troubling problems having to do with gamma-ray bursts are solved. 42 refs

  10. Frequency chirping during a fishbone burst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchenko, V.S.; Reznik, S.N.

    2011-01-01

    It is shown that frequency chirping during fishbone activity can be attributed to the reactive torque exerted on the plasma during the instability burst, which slows down plasma rotation inside the q = 1 surface and reduces the mode frequency in the lab frame. Estimates show that the peak value of this torque can exceed the neutral beam torque in modern tokamaks. The simple line-broadened quasilinear burst model (Berk et al 1995 Nucl. Fusion 35 1661), properly adapted for the fishbone case, is capable of reproducing the key features of the bursting mode. (letter)

  11. Ballerina - pirouettes in search of gamma bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren Kristian; Lund, Niels; Pedersen, Henrik

    1999-01-01

    The cosmological origin of gamma ray bursts has now been established with reasonable certainty, Many more bursts will need to be studied to establish the typical distance scale, and to map out the large diversity in properties which have been indicated by the first handful of events. We are propo...... are proposing Ballerina, a small satellite to provide accurate positions and new data on the gamma-ray bursts. We anticipate a detection rate an order of magnitude larger than obtained from Beppo-SAX....

  12. Document retrieval on repetitive string collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagie, Travis; Hartikainen, Aleksi; Karhu, Kalle; Kärkkäinen, Juha; Navarro, Gonzalo; Puglisi, Simon J; Sirén, Jouni

    2017-01-01

    Most of the fastest-growing string collections today are repetitive, that is, most of the constituent documents are similar to many others. As these collections keep growing, a key approach to handling them is to exploit their repetitiveness, which can reduce their space usage by orders of magnitude. We study the problem of indexing repetitive string collections in order to perform efficient document retrieval operations on them. Document retrieval problems are routinely solved by search engines on large natural language collections, but the techniques are less developed on generic string collections. The case of repetitive string collections is even less understood, and there are very few existing solutions. We develop two novel ideas, interleaved LCPs and precomputed document lists , that yield highly compressed indexes solving the problem of document listing (find all the documents where a string appears), top- k document retrieval (find the k documents where a string appears most often), and document counting (count the number of documents where a string appears). We also show that a classical data structure supporting the latter query becomes highly compressible on repetitive data. Finally, we show how the tools we developed can be combined to solve ranked conjunctive and disjunctive multi-term queries under the simple [Formula: see text] model of relevance. We thoroughly evaluate the resulting techniques in various real-life repetitiveness scenarios, and recommend the best choices for each case.

  13. 3D LDV Measurements in Oscillatory Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mier, J. M.; Garcia, M. H.

    2012-12-01

    The oscillatory boundary layer represents a particular case of unsteady wall-bounded flows in which fluid particles follow a periodic sinusoidal motion. Unlike steady boundary layer flows, the oscillatory flow regime and bed roughness character change in time along the period for every cycle, a characteristic that introduces a high degree of complexity in the analysis of these flows. Governing equations can be derived from the general Navier-Stokes equations for the motion of fluids, from which the exact solution for the laminar oscillatory boundary layer is obtained (also known as the 2nd Stokes problem). No exact solution exists for the turbulent case, thus, understanding of the main flow characteristics comes from experimental work. Several researchers have reported experimental work in oscillatory boundary layers since the 1960's; however, larger scale facilities and the development of newer measurement techniques with improved temporal and spatial resolution in recent years provides a unique opportunity to achieve a better understanding about this type of flows. Several experiments were performed in the Large Oscillatory Water and Sediment Tunnel (LOWST) facility at the Ven Te Chow Hydrosystems Laboratory, for a range of Reynolds wave numbers between 6x10^4 3D Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) system was used to measure instantaneous flow velocities with a temporal resolution up to ~ 1,000 Hz. It was mounted on a 3-axis traverse with a spatial resolution of 0.01 mm in all three directions. The closest point to the bottom was measured at z = 0.2 mm (z+ ≈ 4), which allowed to capture boundary layer features with great detail. In order to achieve true 3D measurements, 2 probes were used on a perpendicular configuration, such that u and w components were measured from a probe on the side of the flume and v component was measured from a probe pointing down through and access window on top of the flume. The top probe was submerged in a water container, such that the

  14. The genesis of period-adding bursting without bursting-chaos in the Chay model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhuoqin; Lu Qishao; Li Li

    2006-01-01

    According to the period-adding firing patterns without chaos observed in neuronal experiments, the genesis of the period-adding 'fold/homoclinic' bursting sequence without bursting-chaos is explored by numerical simulation, fast/slow dynamics and bifurcation analysis of limit cycle in the neuronal Chay model. It is found that each periodic bursting, from period-1 to period-7, is separately generated by the corresponding periodic spiking pattern through two period-doubling bifurcations, except for the period-1 bursting occurring via a Hopf bifurcation. Consequently, it can be revealed that this period-adding bursting bifurcation without chaos has a compound bifurcation structure with transitions from spiking to bursting, which is closely related to period-doubling bifurcations of periodic spiking in essence

  15. The genesis of period-adding bursting without bursting-chaos in the Chay model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Zhuoqin; Lu Qishao; Li Li

    2006-01-01

    According to the period-adding firing patterns without chaos observed in neuronal experiments, the genesis of the period-adding 'fold/homoclinic' bursting sequence without bursting-chaos is explored by numerical simulation, fast/slow dynamics and bifurcation analysis of limit cycle in the neuronal Chay model. It is found that each periodic bursting, from period-1 to 7, is separately generated by the corresponding periodic spiking pattern through two period-doubling bifurcations, except for the period-1 bursting occurring via a Hopf bifurcation. Consequently, it can be revealed that this period-adding bursting bifurcation without chaos has a compound bifurcation structure with transitions from spiking to bursting, which is closely related to period-doubling bifurcations of periodic spiking in essence

  16. On Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Ruffini, Remo; Bianco, Carlo Luciano; Caito, Letizia; Chardonnet, Pascal; Cherubini, Christian; Dainotti, Maria Giovanna; Fraschetti, Federico; Geralico, Andrea; Guida, Roberto; Patricelli, Barbara; Rotondo, Michael; Hernandez, Jorge Armando Rueda; Vereshchagin, Gregory; Xue, She-Sheng

    2008-01-01

    (Shortened) We show by example how the uncoding of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) offers unprecedented possibilities to foster new knowledge in fundamental physics and in astrophysics. After recalling some of the classic work on vacuum polarization in uniform electric fields by Klein, Sauter, Heisenberg, Euler and Schwinger, we summarize some of the efforts to observe these effects in heavy ions and high energy ion collisions. We then turn to the theory of vacuum polarization around a Kerr-Newman black hole, leading to the extraction of the blackholic energy, to the concept of dyadosphere and dyadotorus, and to the creation of an electron-positron-photon plasma. We then present a new theoretical approach encompassing the physics of neutron stars and heavy nuclei. It is shown that configurations of nuclear matter in bulk with global charge neutrality can exist on macroscopic scales and with electric fields close to the critical value near their surfaces. These configurations may represent an initial condition for the...

  17. Complex transitions between spike, burst or chaos synchronization states in coupled neurons with coexisting bursting patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Hua-Guang; Chen Sheng-Gen; Li Yu-Ye

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the synchronization dynamics of a coupled neuronal system composed of two identical Chay model neurons. The Chay model showed coexisting period-1 and period-2 bursting patterns as a parameter and initial values are varied. We simulated multiple periodic and chaotic bursting patterns with non-(NS), burst phase (BS), spike phase (SS), complete (CS), and lag synchronization states. When the coexisting behavior is near period-2 bursting, the transitions of synchronization states of the coupled system follows very complex transitions that begins with transitions between BS and SS, moves to transitions between CS and SS, and to CS. Most initial values lead to the CS state of period-2 bursting while only a few lead to the CS state of period-1 bursting. When the coexisting behavior is near period-1 bursting, the transitions begin with NS, move to transitions between SS and BS, to transitions between SS and CS, and then to CS. Most initial values lead to the CS state of period-1 bursting but a few lead to the CS state of period-2 bursting. The BS was identified as chaos synchronization. The patterns for NS and transitions between BS and SS are insensitive to initial values. The patterns for transitions between CS and SS and the CS state are sensitive to them. The number of spikes per burst of non-CS bursting increases with increasing coupling strength. These results not only reveal the initial value- and parameter-dependent synchronization transitions of coupled systems with coexisting behaviors, but also facilitate interpretation of various bursting patterns and synchronization transitions generated in the nervous system with weak coupling strength. (paper)

  18. Relativistic effects in gamma-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksen, Erik; Groen, Oeyvind

    1999-01-01

    According to recent models of the sources of gamma-ray bursts the extremely energetic emission is caused by shells expanding with ultrarelativistic velocity. With the recent identification of optical sources at the positions of some gamma-ray bursts these ''fireball'' models have acquired an actuality that invites to use them as a motivating application when teaching special relativity. We demonstrate several relativistic effects associated with these models which are very pronounced due to the great velocity of the shell. For example a burst lasting for a month in the rest frame of an element of the shell lasts for a few seconds only, in the rest frame of our detector. It is shown how the observed properties of a burst are modified by aberration and the Doppler effect. The apparent luminosity as a function of time is calculated. Modifications due to the motion of the star away from the observer are calculated. (Author)

  19. Solar energetic particles and radio burst emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miteva Rositsa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a statistical study on the observed solar radio burst emission associated with the origin of in situ detected solar energetic particles. Several proton event catalogs in the period 1996–2016 are used. At the time of appearance of the particle origin (flare and coronal mass ejection we identified radio burst signatures of types II, III and IV by inspecting dynamic radio spectral plots. The information from observatory reports is also accounted for during the analysis. The occurrence of solar radio burst signatures is evaluated within selected wavelength ranges during the solar cycle 23 and the ongoing 24. Finally, we present the burst occurrence trends with respect to the intensity of the proton events and the location of their solar origin.

  20. Bursts from the very early universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silk, J.; Stodolsky, L.

    2006-01-01

    Bursts of weakly interacting particles such as neutrinos or even more weakly interacting particles such as wimps and gravitons from the very early universe would offer a much deeper 'look back time' to early epochs than is possible with photons. We consider some of the issues related to the existence of such bursts and their detectability. Characterizing the burst rate by a probability P per Hubble four-volume we find, for events in the radiation-dominated era, that the natural unit of description is the present intensity of the CMB times P. The existence of such bursts would make the observation of phenomena associated with very early times in cosmology at least conceptually possible. One might even hope to probe the transplanckian epoch if complexes more weakly interacting than the graviton can exist. Other conceivable applications include the potential detectability of the formation of 'pocket universes' in a multiverse

  1. Bursts from the very early universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silk, J. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Stodolsky, L. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Foehringer Ring 6, 80805 Munich (Germany)]. E-mail: les@mppmu.mpg.de

    2006-07-27

    Bursts of weakly interacting particles such as neutrinos or even more weakly interacting particles such as wimps and gravitons from the very early universe would offer a much deeper 'look back time' to early epochs than is possible with photons. We consider some of the issues related to the existence of such bursts and their detectability. Characterizing the burst rate by a probability P per Hubble four-volume we find, for events in the radiation-dominated era, that the natural unit of description is the present intensity of the CMB times P. The existence of such bursts would make the observation of pheno associated with very early times in cosmology at least conceptually possible. One might even hope to probe the transplanckian epoch if complexes more weakly interacting than the graviton can exist. Other conceivable applications include the potential detectability of the formation of 'pocket universes' in a multiverse.

  2. Observations of gamma-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strong, I.B.; Klebesadel, R.W.; Evans, W.D.

    1975-01-01

    Observational data on gamma-ray bursts are reviewed. Information is grouped into temporal properties, energy fluxes and spectral properties, and directions and distributions of the sources in space. (BJG)

  3. Damping of type III solar radio bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, B.N.

    1982-01-01

    The meter- and decameter-wavelength damping of type III bursts may be attributable to stabilization of the Langmuir-wave instability of the fast-electron streams through excitation of cyclotron-branch plasma waves

  4. Optimal Codes for the Burst Erasure Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamkins, Jon

    2010-01-01

    Deep space communications over noisy channels lead to certain packets that are not decodable. These packets leave gaps, or bursts of erasures, in the data stream. Burst erasure correcting codes overcome this problem. These are forward erasure correcting codes that allow one to recover the missing gaps of data. Much of the recent work on this topic concentrated on Low-Density Parity-Check (LDPC) codes. These are more complicated to encode and decode than Single Parity Check (SPC) codes or Reed-Solomon (RS) codes, and so far have not been able to achieve the theoretical limit for burst erasure protection. A block interleaved maximum distance separable (MDS) code (e.g., an SPC or RS code) offers near-optimal burst erasure protection, in the sense that no other scheme of equal total transmission length and code rate could improve the guaranteed correctible burst erasure length by more than one symbol. The optimality does not depend on the length of the code, i.e., a short MDS code block interleaved to a given length would perform as well as a longer MDS code interleaved to the same overall length. As a result, this approach offers lower decoding complexity with better burst erasure protection compared to other recent designs for the burst erasure channel (e.g., LDPC codes). A limitation of the design is its lack of robustness to channels that have impairments other than burst erasures (e.g., additive white Gaussian noise), making its application best suited for correcting data erasures in layers above the physical layer. The efficiency of a burst erasure code is the length of its burst erasure correction capability divided by the theoretical upper limit on this length. The inefficiency is one minus the efficiency. The illustration compares the inefficiency of interleaved RS codes to Quasi-Cyclic (QC) LDPC codes, Euclidean Geometry (EG) LDPC codes, extended Irregular Repeat Accumulate (eIRA) codes, array codes, and random LDPC codes previously proposed for burst erasure

  5. Nature of gamma-ray burst sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventura, J.

    1983-01-01

    Observational evidence suggests that gamma ray bursts have a local galactic origin involving neutron stars. In this light we make a critical review of physics of the thermonuclear runaway model placing emphasis on self-consistency. We further show that some of the proposed models can be observationally excluded in the light of existing data from the Einstein Observatory. The possibility of gamma bursts arising in low mass binaries is finally discussed in the light of evolutionary scenarios leading to low luminosity systems

  6. A Fast Radio Burst Host Galaxy

    OpenAIRE

    Keane, E. F.; Johnston, S.; Bhandari, S.; Barr, E.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Burgay, M.; Caleb, M.; Flynn, C.; Jameson, A.; Kramer, M.; Petroff, E.; Possenti, A.; van Straten, W.; Bailes, M.; Burke-Spolaor, S.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, millisecond duration radio signals originating from distant galaxies appear to have been discovered in the so-called Fast Radio Bursts. These signals are dispersed according to a precise physical law and this dispersion is a key observable quantity which, in tandem with a redshift measurement, can be used for fundamental physical investigations. While every fast radio burst has a dispersion measurement, none before now have had a redshift measurement, due to the difficulty in...

  7. Subjective duration distortions mirror neural repetition suppression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vani Pariyadath

    Full Text Available Subjective duration is strongly influenced by repetition and novelty, such that an oddball stimulus in a stream of repeated stimuli appears to last longer in duration in comparison. We hypothesize that this duration illusion, called the temporal oddball effect, is a result of the difference in expectation between the oddball and the repeated stimuli. Specifically, we conjecture that the repeated stimuli contract in duration as a result of increased predictability; these duration contractions, we suggest, result from decreased neural response amplitude with repetition, known as repetition suppression.Participants viewed trials consisting of lines presented at a particular orientation (standard stimuli followed by a line presented at a different orientation (oddball stimulus. We found that the size of the oddball effect correlates with the number of repetitions of the standard stimulus as well as the amount of deviance from the oddball stimulus; both of these results are consistent with a repetition suppression hypothesis. Further, we find that the temporal oddball effect is sensitive to experimental context--that is, the size of the oddball effect for a particular experimental trial is influenced by the range of duration distortions seen in preceding trials.Our data suggest that the repetition-related duration contractions causing the oddball effect are a result of neural repetition suppression. More generally, subjective duration may reflect the prediction error associated with a stimulus and, consequently, the efficiency of encoding that stimulus. Additionally, we emphasize that experimental context effects need to be taken into consideration when designing duration-related tasks.

  8. On oscillatory microstructure during cellular growth of directionally solidified Sn–36at.%Ni peritectic alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Peng; Li, Xinzhong; Li, Jiangong; Su, Yanqing; Guo, Jingjie

    2016-01-01

    An oscillatory microstructure has been observed during deep-cellular growth of directionally solidified Sn–36at.%Ni hyperperitectic alloy containing intermetallic compounds with narrow solubility range. This oscillatory microstructure with a dimension of tens of micrometers has been observed for the first time. The morphology of this wave-like oscillatory structure is similar to secondary dendrite arms, and can be observed only in some local positions of the sample. Through analysis such as successive sectioning of the sample, it can be concluded that this oscillatory microstructure is caused by oscillatory convection of the mushy zone during solidification. And the influence of convection on this oscillatory microstructure was characterized through comparison between experimental and calculations results on the wavelength. Besides, the change in morphology of this oscillatory microstructure has been proved to be caused by peritectic transformation during solidification. Furthermore, the melt concentration increases continuously during solidification of intermetallic compounds with narrow solubility range, which helps formation of this oscillatory microstructure. PMID:27066761

  9. Experimental study of the turbulent boundary layer in acceleration-skewed oscillatory flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der A, D.A.; O' Donoghue, T.; Davies, A.G; Ribberink, Jan S.

    2011-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted in a large oscillatory flow tunnel to investigate the effects of acceleration skewness on oscillatory boundary layer flow over fixed beds. As well as enabling experimental investigation of the effects of acceleration skewness, the new experiments add substantially to

  10. Modelling and measurements of sand transport processes over full-scale ripples in oscillatory flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Werf, Jebbe J.; Ribberink, Jan S.; O'Donoghue, Tom; Doucette, Jeffrey C.

    2006-01-01

    A new series of laboratory experiments was performed in the Aberdeen Oscillatory Flow Tunnel (AOFT) and the Large Oscillating Water Tunnel (LOWT) to investigate time-averaged suspended sand concentrations and transport rates over rippled beds in regular and irregular oscillatory flow. The

  11. Study on boiling heat transfer of subcooled flow under oscillatory flow condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtake, Hiroyasu; Yamazaki, Satoshi; Koizumi, Yasuo

    2004-01-01

    The Onset of Nucleate Boiling, the point of Net Vapor Generation and Critical Heat Flux on subcooled flow boiling under oscillatory flow, focusing on liquid velocity, amplitude and frequency of oscillatory flow were investigated experimentally and analytically. Experiments were conducted using a copper thin-film and subcooled water in a range of the liquid velocity from 0.27 to 4.07 m/s at 0.10MPa. The liquid subcooling was 20K. Frequency of oscillatory flow was 2 and 4 Hz, respectively; amplitude of oscillatory flow was 25 and 50% in a ratio of main flow rate, respectively. Temperatures at Onset of Nuclear Boiling and Critical Heat Flux obtained in the experiments decreased with the oscillatory flow. The decrease of liquid velocity by oscillatory flow caused the ONB and the CHF to decrease. On the other hand, heat flux at Net Vapor Generation decreased with oscillatory flow; the increase of liquid velocity by oscillatory flow caused the NVG to decrease. (author)

  12. Biological timing and the clock metaphor: oscillatory and hourglass mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rensing, L; Meyer-Grahle, U; Ruoff, P

    2001-05-01

    Living organisms have developed a multitude of timing mechanisms--"biological clocks." Their mechanisms are based on either oscillations (oscillatory clocks) or unidirectional processes (hourglass clocks). Oscillatory clocks comprise circatidal, circalunidian, circadian, circalunar, and circannual oscillations--which keep time with environmental periodicities--as well as ultradian oscillations, ovarian cycles, and oscillations in development and in the brain, which keep time with biological timescales. These clocks mainly determine time points at specific phases of their oscillations. Hourglass clocks are predominantly found in development and aging and also in the brain. They determine time intervals (duration). More complex timing systems combine oscillatory and hourglass mechanisms, such as the case for cell cycle, sleep initiation, or brain clocks, whereas others combine external and internal periodicities (photoperiodism, seasonal reproduction). A definition of a biological clock may be derived from its control of functions external to its own processes and its use in determining temporal order (sequences of events) or durations. Biological and chemical oscillators are characterized by positive and negative feedback (or feedforward) mechanisms. During evolution, living organisms made use of the many existing oscillations for signal transmission, movement, and pump mechanisms, as well as for clocks. Some clocks, such as the circadian clock, that time with environmental periodicities are usually compensated (stabilized) against temperature, whereas other clocks, such as the cell cycle, that keep time with an organismic timescale are not compensated. This difference may be related to the predominance of negative feedback in the first class of clocks and a predominance of positive feedback (autocatalytic amplification) in the second class. The present knowledge of a compensated clock (the circadian oscillator) and an uncompensated clock (the cell cycle), as well

  13. Balloon observation of gamma-ray burst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Jun; Fujii, Masami; Yamagami, Takamasa; Oda, Minoru; Ogawara, Yoshiaki

    1978-01-01

    Cosmic gamma-ray burst is an interesting high energy astrophysical phenomenon, but the burst mechanism has not been well understood. Since 1975, long duration balloon flight has been conducted to search for gamma-ray bursts and to determine the source locations. A rotating cross-modulation collimator was employed to determine the locations of sources, and four NaI(Tl) scintillation counters were employed to detect hard X-ray with energy from 20 to 200 keV. The balloon light was performed at altitude of 8.3 mb from September 28, 1977, and the observation time of 79 hours was achieved. In this experiment, the monitor counter was not mounted. The count increase was observed at 16 h 22 m 31 s JST on October 1, 1977. The event disappeared after 1 sec. The total flux is estimated to be 1.6 x 10 -6 erg/cm 2 sec at the top of the atmosphere. When this event was observed, the solar-terrestrial environment was also quiet. Thus, this event was attributed to a small gamma-ray burst. Unfortunately, the duration of the burst was so short that the position of the burst source was not able to be determined. (Yoshimori, M.)

  14. Gamma Ray Bursts-Afterglows and Counterparts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Gerald J

    1998-01-01

    Several breakthrough discoveries were made last year of x-ray, optical and radio afterglows and counterparts to gamma-ray bursts, and a redshift has been associated with at least one of these. These discoveries were made possible by the fast, accurate gamma-ray burst locations of the BeppoSAX satellite. It is now generally believed that the burst sources are at cosmological distances and that they represent the most powerful explosions in the Universe. These observations also open new possibilities for the study of early star formation, the physics of extreme conditions and perhaps even cosmology. This session will concentrate on recent x-ray, optical and radio afterglow observations of gamma-ray bursts, associated redshift measurements, and counterpart observations. Several review and theory talks will also be presented, along with a summary of the astrophysical implications of the observations. There will be additional poster contributions on observations of gamma-ray burst source locations at wavelengths other than gamma rays. Posters are also solicited that describe new observational capabilities for rapid follow-up observations of gamma-ray bursts.

  15. Separation of transient and oscillatory cerebral activities using over-complete rational dilation wavelet transforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaibi, S.; Lajnef, T.; Samet, M.; Kachouri, A.

    2011-01-01

    Many natural signals EEG are comprised frequency overlapping of oscillatory and transient components. In our study the intracranial EEG signals of epilepsy are composed of the superposition of oscillatory signals (HFOs: High Frequency oscillations) and a transient signals (spikes and sharp waves, etc.). The oscillatory components (HFOs) exist in the frequency band 80-500Hz. The transient components comes from nonrhythmic brain activities (spikes, sharp waves and vertex waves of varying amplitude, shape and duration) and cover a continuous wide bandwidth from low to high frequencies and resemble an HFOs events when filtered using a band pass classical filter. The classical filtering methods based on FIR filters, Wavelet transforms and the Matching Pursuit cannot separate the oscillatory from transient activities. This paper describes an approach for decomposing an iEEG signals of epilepsy into the sum of oscillatory components and a transient components based on overcomplete rational dilation wavelet transforms (overcomplete RADWT) in conjunction with morphological component analysis (MCA).

  16. Oscillatory instabilities in the electrooxidation of borohydride on platinum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, Eduardo G.; Varela, Hamilton, E-mail: varela@iqsc.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Quimica

    2014-03-15

    The borohydride ion has been pointed as a promising alternative fuel. Most of the investigation on its electrochemistry is devoted to the electrocatalytic aspects of its electrooxidation on platinum and gold surfaces. Besides the known kinetic limitations and intricate mechanism, our Group has recently found the occurrence of two regions of bi-stability and autocatalysis in the electrode potential during the open circuit interaction of borohydride and oxidized platinum surfaces. Following this previous contribution, the occurrence of more complicated phenomena is here presented: namely the presence of electrochemical oscillations during the electrooxidation of borohydride on platinum in alkaline media. Current oscillations were found to be associated to two distinct instability windows and characterized in the resistance-potential parameter plane. The dynamic features of such oscillations suggest the existence of distinct mechanisms according to the potential region. Previously published results obtained under non-oscillatory regime were used to give some hints on the surface chemistry behind the observed dynamics. (author)

  17. Model of oscillatory instability in vertically-homogeneous atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. B. Rutkevich

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Existence and repeatability of tornadoes could be straightforwardly explained if there existed instability, responsible for their formation. However, it is well known that convection is the only instability in initially stable air, and the usual convective instability is not applicable for these phenomena. In the present paper we describe an instability in the atmosphere, which can be responsible for intense vortices. This instability appears in a fluid with Coriolis force and dissipation and has oscillatory behaviour, where the amplitude growth is accompanied by oscillations with frequency comparable to the growth rate of the instability. In the paper, both analytical analysis of the linear phase of the instability and nonlinear simulation of the developed stage of the air motion are addressed. This work was supported by the RFBR grant no. 09-05-00374-a.

  18. Structure-preserving algorithms for oscillatory differential equations II

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Xinyuan; Shi, Wei

    2015-01-01

    This book describes a variety of highly effective and efficient structure-preserving algorithms for second-order oscillatory differential equations. Such systems arise in many branches of science and engineering, and the examples in the book include systems from quantum physics, celestial mechanics and electronics. To accurately simulate the true behavior of such systems, a numerical algorithm must preserve as much as possible their key structural properties: time-reversibility, oscillation, symplecticity, and energy and momentum conservation. The book describes novel advances in RKN methods, ERKN methods, Filon-type asymptotic methods, AVF methods, and trigonometric Fourier collocation methods.  The accuracy and efficiency of each of these algorithms are tested via careful numerical simulations, and their structure-preserving properties are rigorously established by theoretical analysis. The book also gives insights into the practical implementation of the methods. This book is intended for engineers and sc...

  19. An analytic data analysis method for oscillatory slug tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Shyun

    2006-01-01

    An analytical data analysis method is developed for slug tests in partially penetrating wells in confined or unconfined aquifers of high hydraulic conductivity. As adapted from the van der Kamp method, the determination of the hydraulic conductivity is based on the occurrence times and the displacements of the extreme points measured from the oscillatory data and their theoretical counterparts available in the literature. This method is applied to two sets of slug test response data presented by Butler et al.: one set shows slow damping with seven discernable extremities, and the other shows rapid damping with three extreme points. The estimates of the hydraulic conductivity obtained by the analytic method are in good agreement with those determined by an available curve-matching technique.

  20. Introduction to the oscillatory movement based on the rediscovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concari, S.B.; Carreri, R.A.; Giorgi, S.M.; Camara, C.N.; Alzugaray, G.E.; Pozzo, R.L.

    1997-01-01

    In this work we present a proposal of a classroom in treating the them oscillatory movement for a basic university physics course for engineering students at university. The proposal is based on the rediscovery strategy and the active participation of the students. It is oriented to promote in the students the development of his/her operating capacities through the systematic application of a scientific method to the study of the dynamics of different types of pendulums. The criteria used to design the proposal have their fundament in the identification of psychological, didactic and epistemological variables that determine the way the student makes his/her learning process. The epistemological Gowin's V was applied as a tool to determine goals and to organizer activities. (Author) 23 refs

  1. Coherent structures in wave boundary layers. Part 1. Oscillatory motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Stefan; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2010-01-01

    This work concerns oscillatory boundary layers over smooth beds. It comprises combined visual and quantitative techniques including bed shear stress measurements. The experiments were carried out in an oscillating water tunnel. The experiments reveal two significant coherent flow structures: (i......) Vortex tubes, essentially two-dimensional vortices close to the bed extending across the width of the boundary-layer flow, caused by an inflectional-point shear layer instability. The imprint of these vortices in the bed shear stress is a series of small, insignificant kinks and dips. (ii) Turbulent...... spots, isolated arrowhead-shaped areas close to the bed in an otherwise laminar boundary layer where the flow ‘bursts’ with violent oscillations. The emergence of the turbulent spots marks the onset of turbulence. Turbulent spots cause single or multiple violent spikes in the bed shear stress signal...

  2. Inhomogeneous oscillatory electric field time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrico, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    The mass-to-charge ratio of an ion can be determined from the measurement of its flight time in an inhomogeneous, oscillatory electric field produced by the potential distribution V(x, y, t) = Vsub(DC) + Vsub(AC) cos ωt) (αsub(x)X 2 + αsub(y)Y 2 + αsub(z)Z 2 ). The governing equation of motion is the Mathieu equation. The principle of operation of this novel mass spectrometer is described and results of computer calculations of the flight time and resolution are reported. An experimental apparatus and results and results demonstrating the feasibility of this mass spectrometer principle are described. (author)

  3. Rapid production of biodiesel in mesoscale oscillatory baffled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phan, A.N.; Harvey, A.P.; Eze, V. [School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials, Newcastle Upon Tyne (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-15

    Continuous alkali-catalyzed transesterification of rapeseed oil with methanol was carried out in three mesoreactor designs. The induction time decreased with oscillatory Reynolds number for all three reactors. Stable steady states were achieved within induction times of 1.5, 2.5, and 4.0 residence times for the integral, wire wool, and helical baffle designs, respectively. Both experimental and simulated results indicated that under the given conditions there is an optimal residence time for homogeneous transesterification. Higher residence times resulted in reduced fatty acid methyl ester content due to the saponification side reaction. The results demonstrate that biodiesel can be produced at an industrially acceptable level of conversion (> 95 %) in < 5 min residence time. This requires a combination of high catalyst concentration and good mixing. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Oscillatory bistability of real-space transfer in semiconductor heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do˙ttling, R.; Scho˙ll, E.

    1992-01-01

    Charge transport parallel to the layers of a modulation-doped GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs heterostructure is studied theoretically. The heating of electrons by the applied electric field leads to real-space transfer of electrons from the GaAs into the adjacent AlxGa1-xAs layer. For sufficiently large dc bias, spontaneous periodic 100-GHz current oscillations, and bistability and hysteretic switching transitions between oscillatory and stationary states are predicted. We present a detailed investigation of complex bifurcation scenarios as a function of the bias voltage U0 and the load resistance RL. For large RL subcritical Hopf bifurcations and global bifurcations of limit cycles are displayed.

  5. Waves spontaneously generated by heterogeneity in oscillatory media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiaohua; Huang, Xiaodong; Hu, Gang

    2016-05-01

    Wave propagation is an important characteristic for pattern formation and pattern dynamics. To date, various waves in homogeneous media have been investigated extensively and have been understood to a great extent. However, the wave behaviors in heterogeneous media have been studied and understood much less. In this work, we investigate waves that are spontaneously generated in one-dimensional heterogeneous oscillatory media governed by complex Ginzburg-Landau equations; the heterogeneity is modeled by multiple interacting homogeneous media with different system control parameters. Rich behaviors can be observed by varying the control parameters of the systems, whereas the behavior is incomparably simple in the homogeneous cases. These diverse behaviors can be fully understood and physically explained well based on three aspects: dispersion relation curves, driving-response relations, and wave competition rules in homogeneous systems. Possible applications of heterogeneity-generated waves are anticipated.

  6. Oscillatory Dynamics of One-Dimensional Homogeneous Granular Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starosvetsky, Yuli; Jayaprakash, K. R.; Hasan, Md. Arif; Vakakis, Alexander F.

    The acoustics of the homogeneous granular chains has been studied extensively both numerically and experimentally in the references cited in the previous chapters. This chapter focuses on the oscillatory behavior of finite dimensional homogeneous granular chains. It is well known that normal vibration modes are the building blocks of the vibrations of linear systems due to the applicability of the principle of superposition. One the other hand, nonlinear theory is deprived of such a general superposition principle (although special cases of nonlinear superpositions do exist), but nonlinear normal modes ‒ NNMs still play an important role in the forced and resonance dynamics of these systems. In their basic definition [1], NNMs were defined as time-periodic nonlinear oscillations of discrete or continuous dynamical systems where all coordinates (degrees-of-freedom) oscillate in-unison with the same frequency; further extensions of this definition have been considered to account for NNMs of systems with internal resonances [2]...

  7. Understanding Epileptiform After-Discharges as Rhythmic Oscillatory Transients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baier, Gerold; Taylor, Peter N; Wang, Yujiang

    2017-01-01

    Electro-cortical activity in patients with epilepsy may show abnormal rhythmic transients in response to stimulation. Even when using the same stimulation parameters in the same patient, wide variability in the duration of transient response has been reported. These transients have long been considered important for the mapping of the excitability levels in the epileptic brain but their dynamic mechanism is still not well understood. To investigate the occurrence of abnormal transients dynamically, we use a thalamo-cortical neural population model of epileptic spike-wave activity and study the interaction between slow and fast subsystems. In a reduced version of the thalamo-cortical model, slow wave oscillations arise from a fold of cycles (FoC) bifurcation. This marks the onset of a region of bistability between a high amplitude oscillatory rhythm and the background state. In vicinity of the bistability in parameter space, the model has excitable dynamics, showing prolonged rhythmic transients in response to suprathreshold pulse stimulation. We analyse the state space geometry of the bistable and excitable states, and find that the rhythmic transient arises when the impending FoC bifurcation deforms the state space and creates an area of locally reduced attraction to the fixed point. This area essentially allows trajectories to dwell there before escaping to the stable steady state, thus creating rhythmic transients. In the full thalamo-cortical model, we find a similar FoC bifurcation structure. Based on the analysis, we propose an explanation of why stimulation induced epileptiform activity may vary between trials, and predict how the variability could be related to ongoing oscillatory background activity. We compare our dynamic mechanism with other mechanisms (such as a slow parameter change) to generate excitable transients, and we discuss the proposed excitability mechanism in the context of stimulation responses in the epileptic cortex.

  8. Oscillatory fluid flow influences primary cilia and microtubule mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinha, Lina C; Hoey, David A; Fernandes, Paulo R; Rodrigues, Hélder C; Jacobs, Christopher R

    2014-07-01

    Many tissues are sensitive to mechanical stimuli; however, the mechanotransduction mechanism used by cells remains unknown in many cases. The primary cilium is a solitary, immotile microtubule-based extension present on nearly every mammalian cell which extends from the basal body. The cilium is a mechanosensitive organelle and has been shown to transduce fluid flow-induced shear stress in tissues, such as the kidney and bone. The majority of microtubules assemble from the mother centriole (basal body), contributing significantly to the anchoring of the primary cilium. Several studies have attempted to quantify the number of microtubules emanating from the basal body and the results vary depending on the cell type. It has also been shown that cellular response to shear stress depends on microtubular integrity. This study hypothesizes that changing the microtubule attachment of primary cilia in response to a mechanical stimulus could change primary cilia mechanics and, possibly, mechanosensitivity. Oscillatory fluid flow was applied to two different cell types and the microtubule attachment to the ciliary base was quantified. For the first time, an increase in microtubules around primary cilia both with time and shear rate in response to oscillatory fluid flow stimulation was demonstrated. Moreover, it is presented that the primary cilium is required for this loading-induced cellular response. This study has demonstrated a new role for the cilium in regulating alterations in the cytoplasmic microtubule network in response to mechanical stimulation, and therefore provides a new insight into how cilia may regulate its mechanics and thus the cells mechanosensitivity. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Oscillatory EEG correlates of arithmetic strategies: A training study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland H. Grabner

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available There has been a long tradition of research on mathematics education showing that children and adults use different strategies to solve arithmetic problems. Neurophysiological studies have recently begun to investigate the brain correlates of these strategies. The existing body of data, however, reflect static end points of the learning process and do not provide information on how brain activity changes in response to training or intervention. In this study, we explicitly address this issue by training participants in using fact retrieval strategies. We also investigate whether brain activity related to arithmetic fact learning is domain-specific or whether this generalizes to other learning materials, such as the solution of figural-spatial problems. Twenty adult students were trained on sets of two-digit multiplication problems and figural-spatial problems. After the training, they were presented with the trained and untrained problems while their brain activity was recorded by means of electroencephalography (EEG . In both problem types, the training resulted in accuracies over 90 % and significant decreases in solution times. Analyses of the oscillatory EEG data also revealed training effects across both problem types. Specifically, we observed training-related activity increases in the theta band (3-6 Hz and decreases in the lower alpha band (8-10 Hz, especially over parieto-occipital and parietal brain regions. These results provide the first evidence that a short term fact retrieval training results in significant changes in oscillatory EEG activity. These findings further corroborate the role of the theta band in the retrieval of semantic information from memory and suggest that theta activity is not only sensitive to fact retrieval in mental arithmetic but also in other domains.

  10. High frequency oscillatory ventilation in meconium aspiration syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Nona

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate and compare the management and associated morbidity in inborn and outborn babies with meconium aspiration syndrome admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and ventilated with high frequency oscillatory ventilation. Methods: A retrospective cohort study with a review of clinical data from newborns, admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit during a six-year period (from 1999 to 2004 and ventilated with early high frequency oscillatory ventilation, first intention in inborns and immediately after Neonatal Intensive Care Unit arrival in outborns. Rresults: In the present study, 27 newborns were included: 12 inborn and 15 outborn infants. Severity criteria were similar in both groups. The pulmonary morbidity associated was severe persistent pulmonary hypertension - 12 (seven outborns, pneumothorax - five (three outborns, interstitial emphysema – two (one outborn and pulmonary hemorrhage – one outborn. Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy II-III occurred in six newborns (four outborns. The therapeutic procedures were surfactant administration in 22 newborns (13 outborns, nitric oxide in 12 newborns (7 outborns and magnesium sulphate in four newborns (three outborns. The median length of ventilation was six days (inborn infants: four and half days; outborn infants: ten days and the median length of oxygenation supply was ten days (inborn infants: four and half days; outborn infants: 15 days. The median length of stay was 13 days (inborn infants: 11 days; outborn infants: 16 days. One outborn infant died. Cconclusions: With this ventilation strategy, we have found no significant statistical differences between the two newborn groups, except for the length of oxygenation supply that was longer in the Outborn Group.

  11. Is theta burst stimulation applied to visual cortex able to modulate peripheral visual acuity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Brückner

    Full Text Available Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation is usually applied to visual cortex to explore the effects on cortical excitability. Most researchers therefore concentrate on changes of phosphene threshold, rarely on consequences for visual performance. Thus, we investigated peripheral visual acuity in the four quadrants of the visual field using Landolt C optotypes before and after repetitive stimulation of the visual cortex. We applied continuous and intermittend theta burst stimulation with various stimulation intensities (60%, 80%, 100%, 120% of individual phosphene threshold as well as monophasic and biphasic 1 Hz stimulation, respectively. As an important result, no serious adverse effects were observed. In particular, no seizure was induced, even with theta burst stimulation applied with 120% of individual phosphene threshold. In only one case stimulation was ceased because the subject reported intolerable pain. Baseline visual acuity decreased over sessions, indicating a continuous training effect. Unexpectedly, none of the applied transcranial magnetic stimulation protocols had an effect on performance: no change in visual acuity was found in any of the four quadrants of the visual field. Binocular viewing as well as the use of peripheral instead of foveal presentation of the stimuli might have contributed to this result. Furthermore, intraindividual variability could have masked the TMS- induced effects on visual acuity.

  12. Advances in gamma-ray burst astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cline, T.L.; Desai, U.D.

    1976-01-01

    Work at Goddard is presently being carried out in three major areas of gamma-ray burst research: (1) A pair of simultaneously operating 0.8-m 2 burst detectors were successfully balloon-borne at locations 800 miles apart on 9 May, 1975, each to atmospheric depths of 3 to 4 g cm -2 , for a 20-h period of coincident data coverage. This experiment investigates the size spectrum of bursts in the 10 -7 to 10 -6 erg cm -2 size region where dozens of events per day are expected on a -1.5 index integral power-law extrapolation. Considerable separation in latitude was used to avoid possible atmospheric and auroral secondary effects. Its results are not yet available. (2) A deep-space burst detector, the first spacecraft instrument built specifically for gamma-ray burst studies, was recently successfully integrated into the Helios-B space probe. Its use at distances of up to 2 AU will make possible the first high-resolution directional study of gamma-ray burst source locations. Similar modifications to several other space vehicles are also being prepared. (3) The gamma-ray instrument on the IMP-7 satellite is presently the most sensitive burst detector still operating in orbit. Its results have shown that all measured event-average energy spectra are consistent with being alike. Using this characteristic spectrum to select IMP-7 candidate events of smaller size than those detected using other spacecraft in coincidence, a size spectrum is constructed which fits the -1.5 index power law down to 2.5 x 10 -5 erg cm -2 per event, at an occurrence rate of about once per month. (Auth.)

  13. Coronal mass ejections and solar radio bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundu, M.R.

    1990-01-01

    The properties of coronal mass ejection (CME) events and their radio signatures are discussed. These signatures are mostly in the form of type II and type IV burst emissions. Although type II bursts are temporally associated with CMEs, it is shown that there is no spatial relationship between them. Type II's associated with CMEs have in most cases a different origin, and they are not piston-driven by CMEs. Moving type IV and type II bursts can be associated with slow CMEs with speeds as low as 200 km/s, contrary to the earlier belief that only CMEs with speeds >400 km/s are associated with radio bursts. A specific event has been discussed in which the CME and type IV burst has nearly the same speed and direction, but the type II burst location was behind the CME and its motion was transverse. The speed and motion of the type II burst strongly suggest that the type II shock was decoupled from the CME and was probably due to a flare behind the limb. Therefore only the type IV source could be directly associated with the slow CME. The electrons responsble for the type IV emission could be produced in the flare or in the type II and then become trapped in a plasmoid associated with the CME. The reconnected loop could then move outwards as in the usual palsmoid model. Alternatively, the type IV emission could be interpreted as due to electrons produced by acceleration in wave turbulence driven by currents in the shock front driven by the CME. The lower-hybrid model Lampe and Papadopoulos (1982), which operates at both fast and slow mode shocks, could be applied to this situation. (author). 31 refs., 12 figs

  14. Swift pointing and gravitational-wave bursts from gamma-ray burst events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, Patrick J; Finn, Lee Samuel; Krishnan, Badri

    2003-01-01

    The currently accepted model for gamma-ray burst phenomena involves the violent formation of a rapidly rotating solar-mass black hole. Gravitational waves should be associated with the black-hole formation, and their detection would permit this model to be tested. Even upper limits on the gravitational-wave strength associated with gamma-ray bursts could constrain the gamma-ray burst model. This requires joint observations of gamma-ray burst events with gravitational and gamma-ray detectors. Here we examine how the quality of an upper limit on the gravitational-wave strength associated with gamma-ray bursts depends on the relative orientation of the gamma-ray-burst and gravitational-wave detectors, and apply our results to the particular case of the Swift Burst-Alert Telescope (BAT) and the LIGO gravitational-wave detectors. A result of this investigation is a science-based 'figure of merit' that can be used, together with other mission constraints, to optimize the pointing of the Swift telescope for the detection of gravitational waves associated with gamma-ray bursts

  15. Localization of Gamma-Ray Bursts Using the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M.S.; Goldstein, A.; Meegan, C.A.; Paciesas, W.S.; Preece, R.D.; Wilson-Hodge, C.A.; Gibby, M.H.; Greiner, J.; Gruber, D.; Jenke, P.; Kippen, R.M.; Pelassa, V.; Xiong, S.; Yu, H-F.; Bhat, P.N.; Burgess, J.M.; Byrne, D.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Foley, S.; Giles, M.M.; Guiriec, S.; van der Horst, A.J.; von Kienlin, A.; McBreen, S.; McGlynn, S.; Tierney, D.; Zhang, B..B.

    2015-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected over 1400 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) since it began science operations in 2008 July. We use a subset of over 300 GRBs localized by instruments such as Swift, the Fermi Large Area Telescope, INTEGRAL, and MAXI, or through triangulations from the

  16. Recovery of oscillatory magneto-resistance in phase separated La0.3Pr0.4Ca0.3MnO3 epitaxial thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alagoz, H. S.; Jeon, J.; Mahmud, S. T.; Saber, M. M.; Chow, K. H.; Jung, J.; Prasad, B.; Egilmez, M.

    2013-01-01

    In-plane angular dependent magneto-resistance has been studied in La 0.3 Pr 0.4 Ca 0.3 MnO 3 (LPCMO) manganite thin films deposited on the (100) oriented NdGaO 3 , and (001) oriented SrTiO 3 and LaAlO 3 substrates. At temperatures where the electronic phase separation is the strongest, a metastable irreversible state exists in the films whose resistivity ρ attains a large time dependent value. The ρ decreases sharply with an increasing angle θ between the magnetic field and the current, and does not display an expected oscillatory cos 2 θ/sin 2 θ dependence for all films. The regular oscillations are recovered during repetitive sweeping of θ between 0° and 180°. We discuss possible factors that could produce these unusual changes in the resistivity

  17. QKD-Based Secured Burst Integrity Design for Optical Burst Switched Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balamurugan, A. M.; Sivasubramanian, A.; Parvathavarthini, B.

    2016-03-01

    The field of optical transmission has undergone numerous advancements and is still being researched mainly due to the fact that optical data transmission can be done at enormous speeds. It is quite evident that people prefer optical communication when it comes to large amount of data involving its transmission. The concept of switching in networks has matured enormously with several researches, architecture to implement and methods starting with Optical circuit switching to Optical Burst Switching. Optical burst switching is regarded as viable solution for switching bursts over networks but has several security vulnerabilities. However, this work exploited the security issues associated with Optical Burst Switching with respect to integrity of burst. This proposed Quantum Key based Secure Hash Algorithm (QKBSHA-512) with enhanced compression function design provides better avalanche effect over the conventional integrity algorithms.

  18. Continuous theta-burst stimulation modulates tactile synchronization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kevin Gh; Jacobs, Mark F; Asmussen, Michael J; Zapallow, Christopher M; Tommerdahl, Mark; Nelson, Aimee J

    2013-08-23

    Temporal order judgement (TOJ) is the ability to detect the order of occurrence of two sequentially delivered stimuli. Previous research has shown that TOJ in the presence of synchronized periodic conditioning stimuli impairs TOJ performance, and this phenomenon is suggested to be mediated by GABAergic interneurons that cause perceptual binding across the two skin sites. Application of continuous theta-burst repetitive TMS (cTBS) over primary somatosensory cortex (SI) alters temporal and spatial tactile perception. The purpose of this study was to examine TOJ perception in the presence and absence of synchronized periodic conditioning stimuli before and after cTBS applied over left-hemisphere SI. A TOJ task was administered on the right index and middle finger (D2 and D3) in two separate sessions in the presence and absence of conditioning stimuli (a background low amplitude sinusoidal vibration). CTBS reduced the impact of the conditioning stimuli on TOJ performance for up to 18 minutes following stimulation while sham cTBS did not affect TOJ performance. In contrast, the TOJ task performed in the absence of synchronized conditioning stimulation was unaltered following cTBS. We conclude that cTBS suppresses inhibitory networks in SI that mediate perceptual binding during TOJ synchronization. CTBS offers one method to suppress cortical excitability in the cortex and potentially benefit clinical populations with altered inhibitory cortical circuits. Additionally, TOJ measures with conditioning stimuli may provide an avenue to assess sensory processing in neurologically impaired patient populations.

  19. Pacific and Atlantic herring produce burst pulse sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Ben; Batty, Robert S; Dill, Lawrence M

    2004-02-07

    The commercial importance of Pacific and Atlantic herring (Clupea pallasii and Clupea harengus) has ensured that much of their biology has received attention. However, their sound production remains poorly studied. We describe the sounds made by captive wild-caught herring. Pacific herring produce distinctive bursts of pulses, termed Fast Repetitive Tick (FRT) sounds. These trains of broadband pulses (1.7-22 kHz) lasted between 0.6 s and 7.6 s. Most were produced at night; feeding regime did not affect their frequency, and fish produced FRT sounds without direct access to the air. Digestive gas or gulped air transfer to the swim bladder, therefore, do not appear to be responsible for FRT sound generation. Atlantic herring also produce FRT sounds, and video analysis showed an association with bubble expulsion from the anal duct region (i.e. from the gut or swim bladder). To the best of the authors' knowledge, sound production by such means has not previously been described. The function(s) of these sounds are unknown, but as the per capita rates of sound production by fish at higher densities were greater, social mediation appears likely. These sounds may have consequences for our understanding of herring behaviour and the effects of noise pollution.

  20. Scientific Applications Performance Evaluation on Burst Buffer

    KAUST Repository

    Markomanolis, George S.

    2017-10-19

    Parallel I/O is an integral component of modern high performance computing, especially in storing and processing very large datasets, such as the case of seismic imaging, CFD, combustion and weather modeling. The storage hierarchy includes nowadays additional layers, the latest being the usage of SSD-based storage as a Burst Buffer for I/O acceleration. We present an in-depth analysis on how to use Burst Buffer for specific cases and how the internal MPI I/O aggregators operate according to the options that the user provides during his job submission. We analyze the performance of a range of I/O intensive scientific applications, at various scales on a large installation of Lustre parallel file system compared to an SSD-based Burst Buffer. Our results show a performance improvement over Lustre when using Burst Buffer. Moreover, we show results from a data hierarchy library which indicate that the standard I/O approaches are not enough to get the expected performance from this technology. The performance gain on the total execution time of the studied applications is between 1.16 and 3 times compared to Lustre. One of the test cases achieved an impressive I/O throughput of 900 GB/s on Burst Buffer.

  1. Sources of type III solar microwave bursts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhdanov D.A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Microwave fine structures allow us to study plasma evolution in an energy release region. The Siberian Solar Radio Telescope (SSRT is a unique instrument designed to examine fine structures at 5.7 GHz. A complex analysis of data from RATAN-600, 4–8 GHz spectropolarimeter, and SSRT, simultaneously with EUV data, made it possible to localize sources of III type microwave bursts in August 10, 2011 event within the entire frequency band of burst occurrence, as well as to determine the most probable region of primary energy release. To localize sources of III type bursts from RATAN-600 data, an original method for data processing has been worked out. At 5.7 GHz, the source of bursts was determined along two coordinates, whereas at 4.5, 4.7, 4.9, 5.1, 5.3, 5.5, and 6.0 GHz, their locations were identified along one coordinate. The size of the burst source at 5.1 GHz was found to be maximum as compared to those at other frequencies.

  2. Bursting synchronization in clustered neuronal networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Hai-Tao; Wang Jiang; Deng Bin; Wei Xi-Le

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal networks in the brain exhibit the modular (clustered) property, i.e., they are composed of certain subnetworks with differential internal and external connectivity. We investigate bursting synchronization in a clustered neuronal network. A transition to mutual-phase synchronization takes place on the bursting time scale of coupled neurons, while on the spiking time scale, they behave asynchronously. This synchronization transition can be induced by the variations of inter- and intracoupling strengths, as well as the probability of random links between different subnetworks. Considering that some pathological conditions are related with the synchronization of bursting neurons in the brain, we analyze the control of bursting synchronization by using a time-periodic external signal in the clustered neuronal network. Simulation results show a frequency locking tongue in the driving parameter plane, where bursting synchronization is maintained, even in the presence of external driving. Hence, effective synchronization suppression can be realized with the driving parameters outside the frequency locking region. (interdisciplinary physics and related areas of science and technology)

  3. REPEATING FAST RADIO BURSTS FROM HIGHLY MAGNETIZED PULSARS TRAVELING THROUGH ASTEROID BELTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Z. G.; Wang, J. S.; Huang, Y. F.; Wu, X. F.

    2016-01-01

    Very recently, Spitler et al. and Scholz et al. reported their detections of 16 additional bright bursts in the direction of the fast radio burst (FRB) 121102. This repeating FRB is inconsistent with all of the catastrophic event models put forward previously for hypothetically non-repeating FRBs. Here, we propose a different model, in which highly magnetized pulsars travel through the asteroid belts of other stars. We show that a repeating FRB could originate from such a pulsar encountering a large number of asteroids in the belt. During each pulsar-asteroid impact, an electric field induced outside of the asteroid has such a large component parallel to the stellar magnetic field that electrons are torn off the asteroidal surface and accelerated to ultra-relativistic energies instantaneously. The subsequent movement of these electrons along magnetic field lines will cause coherent curvature radiation, which can account for all of the properties of an FRB. In addition, this model can self-consistently explain the typical duration, luminosity, and repetitive rate of the 17 bursts of FRB 121102. The predicted occurrence rate of repeating FRB sources may imply that our model would be testable in the next few years.

  4. REPEATING FAST RADIO BURSTS FROM HIGHLY MAGNETIZED PULSARS TRAVELING THROUGH ASTEROID BELTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Z. G.; Wang, J. S.; Huang, Y. F. [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Wu, X. F., E-mail: dzg@nju.edu.cn [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2016-09-20

    Very recently, Spitler et al. and Scholz et al. reported their detections of 16 additional bright bursts in the direction of the fast radio burst (FRB) 121102. This repeating FRB is inconsistent with all of the catastrophic event models put forward previously for hypothetically non-repeating FRBs. Here, we propose a different model, in which highly magnetized pulsars travel through the asteroid belts of other stars. We show that a repeating FRB could originate from such a pulsar encountering a large number of asteroids in the belt. During each pulsar-asteroid impact, an electric field induced outside of the asteroid has such a large component parallel to the stellar magnetic field that electrons are torn off the asteroidal surface and accelerated to ultra-relativistic energies instantaneously. The subsequent movement of these electrons along magnetic field lines will cause coherent curvature radiation, which can account for all of the properties of an FRB. In addition, this model can self-consistently explain the typical duration, luminosity, and repetitive rate of the 17 bursts of FRB 121102. The predicted occurrence rate of repeating FRB sources may imply that our model would be testable in the next few years.

  5. Storytelling and Repetitive Narratives for Design Empathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritsch, Jonas; Judice, Andrea; Soini, Katja

    2007-01-01

    study. In this paper, we show how we attained an empathic understanding through storytelling and aroused empathy to others using repetitive narratives in an experimental presentation bringing forth factual, reflective and experiential aspects of the user information. Taking as a starting point our...

  6. Universal data compression and repetition times

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, Frans M J

    1989-01-01

    A new universal data compression algorithm is described. This algorithm encodes L source symbols at a time. For the class of binary stationary sources, its rate does not exceed [formula omitted] [formula omitted] bits per source symbol. In our analysis, a property of repetition times turns out to be

  7. Matriculation Research Report: Course Repetition Data & Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerda, Joe

    Due to concerns that its policy on class repetition was not promoting student success, California's College of the Canyons (CoC) undertook a project to analyze student course-taking patterns and make recommendations to modify the policy. Existing college policy did not follow Section 58161 of the State Educational Code that allows colleges to…

  8. Reducing Repetitive Speech: Effects of Strategy Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipipi, Caroline M.; Jitendra, Asha K.; Miller, Judith A.

    2001-01-01

    This article describes an intervention with an 18-year-old young woman with mild mental retardation and a seizure disorder, which focused on her repetitive echolalic verbalizations. The intervention included time delay, differential reinforcement of other behaviors, and self-monitoring. Overall, the intervention was successful in facilitating…

  9. Neurobehavioural Correlates of Abnormal Repetitive Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Ford

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Conditions in which echolalia and echopraxia occur are reviewed, followed by an attempt to elicit possible mechanisms of these phenomena. A brief description of stereotypical and perseverative behaviour and obsessional phenomena is given. It is suggested that abnormal repetitive behaviour may occur partly as a result of central dopaminergic dysfunction.

  10. Verbal Repetitions and Echolalia in Alzheimer's Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Cruz, Fernanda Miranda

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on an investigation of echolalic repetition in Alzheimer's disease (AD). A qualitative analysis of data from spontaneous conversations with MHI, a woman with AD, is presented. The data come from the DALI Corpus, a corpus of spontaneous conversations involving subjects with AD. This study argues that echolalic effects can be…

  11. Bystanders' Reactions to Witnessing Repetitive Abuse Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janson, Gregory R.; Carney, JoLynn V.; Hazler, Richard J.; Oh, Insoo

    2009-01-01

    The Impact of Event Scale-Revised (D. S. Weiss & C. R. Marmar, 1997) was used to obtain self-reported trauma levels from 587 young adults recalling childhood or adolescence experiences as witnesses to common forms of repetitive abuse defined as bullying. Mean participant scores were in a range suggesting potential need for clinical assessment…

  12. Fuzzy correlations of gamma-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, D.H.; Linder, E.V.; Blumenthal, G.R.

    1991-01-01

    The origin of gamma-ray bursts is not known, both in the sense of the nature of the source emitting the radiation and literally, the position of the burst on the sky. Lacking unambiguously identified counterparts in any wavelength band studied to date, statistical approaches are required to determine the burster distance scale. Angular correlation analysis is one of the most powerful tools in this regard. However, poor detector resolution gives large localization errors, effectively beam smearing the positions. The resulting fuzzy angular correlation function is investigated and the generic isotropization that smearing induces on any intrinsic clustering is discussed. In particular, the extent to which gamma-ray burst observations by the BATSE detector aboard the Gamma-Ray Observatory might recover an intrinsic source correlation is investigated. 16 refs

  13. Gamma-ray burst polarimeter (GAP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihara, Tatehiro; Murakami, Toshio; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Gunji, Shuichi; Kubo, Shin

    2013-01-01

    The gamma-ray burst polarimeter (GAP: GAmma-ray burst Polarimeter), which had been almost handcrafted by scientists, has succeeded in working normally in interplanetary space, and in detecting the polarization of the gamma-ray from a mysterious astronomical object 'gamma-ray burst'. It is the first result of the detectors in the world exclusively aiming at detecting gamma-ray polarization. We mainly describe the hardware of our GAP equipment and show the method of preparing equipment to work in the cosmic space with a tight budget. The mechanical structure, the electronic circuits, the software on the equipment, the data analysis on the earth, and the scientific results gained by the observation just over one year, are presented after explaining the principle of gamma-ray polarization detection. Our design to protect equipment against mechanical shock and cosmic radiation may provide useful information for future preparation of compact satellite. (J.P.N.)

  14. Gamma-ray burst theory after Swift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piran, Tsvi; Fan, Yi-Zhong

    2007-05-15

    Afterglow observations in the pre-Swift era confirmed to a large extend the relativistic blast wave model for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Together with the observations of properties of host galaxies and the association with (type Ic) SNe, this has led to the generally accepted collapsar origin of long GRBs. However, most of the afterglow data was collected hours after the burst. The X-ray telescope and the UV/optical telescope onboard Swift are able to slew to the direction of a burst in real time and record the early broadband afterglow light curves. These observations, and in particular the X-ray observations, resulted in many surprises. While we have anticipated a smooth transition from the prompt emission to the afterglow, many observed that early light curves are drastically different. We review here how these observations are changing our understanding of GRBs.

  15. High sensitivity neutron bursts detecting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shyam, A.; Kaushik, T.C.; Srinivasan, M.; Kulkarni, L.V.

    1993-01-01

    Technique and instrumentation to detect multiplicity of fast neutrons, emitted in sharp bursts, has been developed. A bank of 16 BF 3 detectors, in an appropriate thermalising assembly, efficiency ∼ 16%, is used to detect neutron bursts. The output from this setup, through appropriate electronics, is divided into two paths. The first is directly connected to a computer controlled scalar. The second is connected to another similar scalar through a delay time unit (DTU). The DTU design is such that once it is triggered by a count pulse than it does not allow any counts to be recorded for a fixed dead time set at ∼ 100 μs. The difference in counts recorded directly and through DTU gives the total number of neutrons produced in bursts. This setup is being used to study lattice cracking, anomalous effects in solid deuterium systems and various reactor physics experiments. (author). 3 refs., 1 fig

  16. Gamma-Ray Bursts: A Radio Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs are extremely energetic events at cosmological distances. They provide unique laboratory to investigate fundamental physical processes under extreme conditions. Due to extreme luminosities, GRBs are detectable at very high redshifts and potential tracers of cosmic star formation rate at early epoch. While the launch of Swift and Fermi has increased our understanding of GRBs tremendously, many new questions have opened up. Radio observations of GRBs uniquely probe the energetics and environments of the explosion. However, currently only 30% of the bursts are detected in radio bands. Radio observations with upcoming sensitive telescopes will potentially increase the sample size significantly and allow one to follow the individual bursts for a much longer duration and be able to answer some of the important issues related to true calorimetry, reverse shock emission, and environments around the massive stars exploding as GRBs in the early Universe.

  17. Localised Microwave Bursts During ELMs on MAST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freethy Simon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bursts of microwave emission are observed during ELM events on the Mega Ampère Spherical Tokamak. In agreement with observations on other machines, these bursts are up to 3 orders of magnitude more intense than the thermal background, but are electron cyclotron in nature. The peak in microwave emission is ~20μ before the peak in midplane Dα emission. Using the Synthetic Aperture Microwave Imaging radiometer, we are able to demonstrate that these bursts are often highly spatially localised and preferentially occur at the tokamak midplane. It is hypothesised that the localisation is a result of Doppler resonance broadening for electron Bernstein waves and the high perpendicular electron energies could be the result of pitch angle scattering in high collisionality regions of the plasma.

  18. Frequency Chirping during a Fishbone Burst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchenko, V.; Reznik, S., E-mail: march@kinr.kiev.ua [Institute for Nuclear Research, Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2012-09-15

    Full text: It is shown that gradual (more than a factor of two, in some cases - down to zero in the lab frame) reduction of the mode frequency (the so called frequency chirping) can be attributed to the reactive torque exerted on the plasma during the fishbone instability burst, which slows down the plasma rotation inside the q = 1 surface and reduces the mode frequency in the lab frame, while frequency in the plasma frame remains constant. This torque arises due to imbalance between the power transfered to the mode by energeric ions and the power of the mode dissipation by thermal species. Estimates show that the peak value of this torque exceeds the neutral beam torque in modern tokamaks and in ITER. The line-broadened quasilinear burst model, properly adapted for the fishbone case, is capable of reproducing the key features of the bursting mode. (author)

  19. Interaction function of coupled bursting neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Xia; Zhang Jiadong

    2016-01-01

    The interaction functions of electrically coupled Hindmarsh–Rose (HR) neurons for different firing patterns are investigated in this paper. By applying the phase reduction technique, the phase response curve (PRC) of the spiking neuron and burst phase response curve (BPRC) of the bursting neuron are derived. Then the interaction function of two coupled neurons can be calculated numerically according to the PRC (or BPRC) and the voltage time course of the neurons. Results show that the BPRC is more and more complicated with the increase of the spike number within a burst, and the curve of the interaction function oscillates more and more frequently with it. However, two certain things are unchanged: ϕ = 0, which corresponds to the in-phase synchronization state, is always the stable equilibrium, while the anti-phase synchronization state with ϕ = 0.5 is an unstable equilibrium. (paper)

  20. Solvent Fermentation From Palm Oil Mill Effluent Using Clostridium acetobutylicum In Oscillatory Flow Bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takriff, M.S.; Masngut, N.; Kadhum, A.A.H.; Kalil, M.S.; Mohammad, A.W.

    2009-01-01

    Acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation from Palm Oil Mill Effluent (POME) by C. acetobutylicum NCIMB 13357 in an oscillatory flow bioreactor was investigated. Experimental works were conducted in a U-shaped stainless steel oscillatory flow bioreactor at oscillation frequency between 0.45-0.78 Hz and a constant amplitude of 12.5 mm. Fermentations were carried out for 72 hr at 35 degree Celsius using palm oil mill effluent and reinforced clostridia medium as a growth medium in batch culture. Result of this investigation showed that POME is a viable media for ABE fermentation and oscillatory flow bioreactor has an excellent potential as an alternative fermentation device. (author)

  1. Activation energies as the validity criterion of a model for complex reactions that can be in oscillatory states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anić S.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Modeling of any complex reaction system is a difficult task. If the system under examination can be in various oscillatory dynamic states, the apparent activation energies corresponding to different pathways may be of crucial importance for this purpose. In that case the activation energies can be determined by means of the main characteristics of an oscillatory process such as pre-oscillatory period, duration of the oscillatory period, the period from the beginning of the process to the end of the last oscillation, number of oscillations and others. All is illustrated on the Bray-Liebhafsky oscillatory reaction.

  2. New decoding methods of interleaved burst error-correcting codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Y.; Kasahara, M.; Namekawa, T.

    1983-04-01

    A probabilistic method of single burst error correction, using the syndrome correlation of subcodes which constitute the interleaved code, is presented. This method makes it possible to realize a high capability of burst error correction with less decoding delay. By generalizing this method it is possible to obtain probabilistic method of multiple (m-fold) burst error correction. After estimating the burst error positions using syndrome correlation of subcodes which are interleaved m-fold burst error detecting codes, this second method corrects erasure errors in each subcode and m-fold burst errors. The performance of these two methods is analyzed via computer simulation, and their effectiveness is demonstrated.

  3. X-ray bursts observed with JEM-X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren Kristian; Chenevez, Jérôme; Lund, Niels

    2006-01-01

    We report on the search for X-ray bursts in the JEM-X X-ray monitor on INTEGRAL during the first two years of operations. More than 350 bursts from 25 different type-I X-ray burst sources were found.......We report on the search for X-ray bursts in the JEM-X X-ray monitor on INTEGRAL during the first two years of operations. More than 350 bursts from 25 different type-I X-ray burst sources were found....

  4. Probing Motion of Fast Radio Burst Sources by Timing Strongly Lensed Repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Liang; Lu, Wenbin

    2017-09-01

    Given the possible repetitive nature of fast radio bursts (FRBs), their cosmological origin, and their high occurrence, detection of strongly lensed sources due to intervening galaxy lenses is possible with forthcoming radio surveys. We show that if multiple images of a repeating source are resolved with VLBI, using a method independent of lens modeling, accurate timing could reveal non-uniform motion, either physical or apparent, of the emission spot. This can probe the physical nature of FRBs and their surrounding environments, constraining scenarios including orbital motion around a stellar companion if FRBs require a compact star in a special system, and jet-medium interactions for which the location of the emission spot may randomly vary. The high timing precision possible for FRBs (˜ms) compared with the typical time delays between images in galaxy lensing (≳10 days) enables the measurement of tiny fractional changes in the delays (˜ {10}-9) and hence the detection of time-delay variations induced by relative motions between the source, the lens, and the Earth. We show that uniform cosmic peculiar velocities only cause the delay time to drift linearly, and that the effect from the Earth’s orbital motion can be accurately subtracted, thus enabling a search for non-trivial source motion. For a timing accuracy of ˜1 ms and a repetition rate (of detected bursts) of ˜0.05 per day of a single FRB source, non-uniform displacement ≳0.1-1 au of the emission spot perpendicular to the line of sight is detectable if repetitions are seen over a period of hundreds of days.

  5. Broadband Spectral Investigations of Magnetar Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kırmızıbayrak, Demet; Şaşmaz Muş, Sinem; Kaneko, Yuki; Göğüş, Ersin

    2017-09-01

    We present our broadband (2-250 keV) time-averaged spectral analysis of 388 bursts from SGR J1550-5418, SGR 1900+14, and SGR 1806-20 detected with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) here and as a database in a companion web-catalog. We find that two blackbody functions (BB+BB), the sum of two modified blackbody functions (LB+LB), the sum of a blackbody function and a power-law function (BB+PO), and a power law with a high-energy exponential cutoff (COMPT) all provide acceptable fits at similar levels. We performed numerical simulations to constrain the best fitting model for each burst spectrum and found that 67.6% of burst spectra with well-constrained parameters are better described by the Comptonized model. We also found that 64.7% of these burst spectra are better described with the LB+LB model, which is employed in the spectral analysis of a soft gamma repeater (SGR) for the first time here, than with the BB+BB and BB+PO models. We found a significant positive lower bound trend on photon index, suggesting a decreasing upper bound on hardness, with respect to total flux and fluence. We compare this result with bursts observed from SGR and AXP (anomalous X-ray pulsar) sources and suggest that the relationship is a distinctive characteristic between the two. We confirm a significant anticorrelation between burst emission area and blackbody temperature, and find that it varies between the hot and cool blackbody temperatures differently than previously discussed. We expand on the interpretation of our results in the framework of a strongly magnetized neutron star.

  6. Broadband Spectral Investigations of Magnetar Bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kırmızıbayrak, Demet; Şaşmaz Muş, Sinem; Kaneko, Yuki; Göğüş, Ersin, E-mail: demetk@sabanciuniv.edu [Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Sabancı University, Orhanlı Tuzla, Istanbul 34956 (Turkey)

    2017-09-01

    We present our broadband (2–250 keV) time-averaged spectral analysis of 388 bursts from SGR J1550−5418, SGR 1900+14, and SGR 1806−20 detected with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer ( RXTE ) here and as a database in a companion web-catalog. We find that two blackbody functions (BB+BB), the sum of two modified blackbody functions (LB+LB), the sum of a blackbody function and a power-law function (BB+PO), and a power law with a high-energy exponential cutoff (COMPT) all provide acceptable fits at similar levels. We performed numerical simulations to constrain the best fitting model for each burst spectrum and found that 67.6% of burst spectra with well-constrained parameters are better described by the Comptonized model. We also found that 64.7% of these burst spectra are better described with the LB+LB model, which is employed in the spectral analysis of a soft gamma repeater (SGR) for the first time here, than with the BB+BB and BB+PO models. We found a significant positive lower bound trend on photon index, suggesting a decreasing upper bound on hardness, with respect to total flux and fluence. We compare this result with bursts observed from SGR and AXP (anomalous X-ray pulsar) sources and suggest that the relationship is a distinctive characteristic between the two. We confirm a significant anticorrelation between burst emission area and blackbody temperature, and find that it varies between the hot and cool blackbody temperatures differently than previously discussed. We expand on the interpretation of our results in the framework of a strongly magnetized neutron star.

  7. Estimating confidence intervals in predicted responses for oscillatory biological models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St John, Peter C; Doyle, Francis J

    2013-07-29

    The dynamics of gene regulation play a crucial role in a cellular control: allowing the cell to express the right proteins to meet changing needs. Some needs, such as correctly anticipating the day-night cycle, require complicated oscillatory features. In the analysis of gene regulatory networks, mathematical models are frequently used to understand how a network's structure enables it to respond appropriately to external inputs. These models typically consist of a set of ordinary differential equations, describing a network of biochemical reactions, and unknown kinetic parameters, chosen such that the model best captures experimental data. However, since a model's parameter values are uncertain, and since dynamic responses to inputs are highly parameter-dependent, it is difficult to assess the confidence associated with these in silico predictions. In particular, models with complex dynamics - such as oscillations - must be fit with computationally expensive global optimization routines, and cannot take advantage of existing measures of identifiability. Despite their difficulty to model mathematically, limit cycle oscillations play a key role in many biological processes, including cell cycling, metabolism, neuron firing, and circadian rhythms. In this study, we employ an efficient parameter estimation technique to enable a bootstrap uncertainty analysis for limit cycle models. Since the primary role of systems biology models is the insight they provide on responses to rate perturbations, we extend our uncertainty analysis to include first order sensitivity coefficients. Using a literature model of circadian rhythms, we show how predictive precision is degraded with decreasing sample points and increasing relative error. Additionally, we show how this method can be used for model discrimination by comparing the output identifiability of two candidate model structures to published literature data. Our method permits modellers of oscillatory systems to confidently

  8. INVESTIGATION OF PRIMORDIAL BLACK HOLE BURSTS USING INTERPLANETARY NETWORK GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ukwatta, T. N. [Director' s Postdoctoral Fellow, Space and Remote Sensing (ISR-2), Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Hurley, K. [University of California, Berkeley, Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); MacGibbon, J. H. [Department of Physics, University of North Florida, Jacksonville, FL 32224 (United States); Svinkin, D. S.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Frederiks, D. D.; Pal' shin, V. D. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation); Goldsten, J. [Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Boynton, W. [Department of Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Kozyrev, A. S. [Space Research Institute, 84/32, Profsoyuznaya, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Rau, A.; Kienlin, A. von; Zhang, X. [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, Postfach 1312, Garching, D-85748 (Germany); Connaughton, V. [University of Alabama in Huntsville, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Yamaoka, K. [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Aoyama Gakuin University, 5-10-1 Fuchinobe, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-8558 (Japan); Ohno, M. [Department of Physics, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Ohmori, N. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Miyazaki, 1-1 Gakuen kibanadai-nishi, Miyazaki-shi, Miyazaki 889-2192 (Japan); Feroci, M. [INAF/IAPS-Roma, via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133, Roma (Italy); Frontera, F., E-mail: tilan@lanl.gov [Department of Physics and Earth Science, University of Ferrara, via Saragat 1, I-44122 Ferrara (Italy); and others

    2016-07-20

    The detection of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) in the solar neighborhood would have very important implications for GRB phenomenology. The leading theories for cosmological GRBs would not be able to explain such events. The final bursts of evaporating primordial black holes (PBHs), however, would be a natural explanation for local GRBs. We present a novel technique that can constrain the distance to GRBs using detections from widely separated, non-imaging spacecraft. This method can determine the actual distance to the burst if it is local. We applied this method to constrain distances to a sample of 36 short-duration GRBs detected by the Interplanetary Network (IPN) that show observational properties that are expected from PBH evaporations. These bursts have minimum possible distances in the 10{sup 13}–10{sup 18} cm (7–10{sup 5} au) range, which are consistent with the expected PBH energetics and with a possible origin in the solar neighborhood, although none of the bursts can be unambiguously demonstrated to be local. Assuming that these bursts are real PBH events, we estimate lower limits on the PBH burst evaporation rate in the solar neighborhood.

  9. Bursting Smoke as an Infrared Countermeasure

    OpenAIRE

    Amarjit Singh; P. J. Kamale; S. A. Joshi; L. K. Bankar

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the experimental setup for the evaluation of bursting smoke for anti-infrared role using SR-5000 spectroradiometer and a source of IR radiation (8-13 micrometer) using cadmium-mercury-telluride (CMI) detector cooled by liquid nitrogen. The particle size and shape of the powders used in the bursting smokes were determined microscopically using Carl Zeiss Jena Neophot- 21. Highest attenuation of 97 -lOO percent was produced for about 12 s using a mixture of bronze fl...

  10. Radon and rock bursts in deep mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulashevich, Yu.P.; Utkin, V.I.; Yurkov, A.K.; Nikolaev, V.V.

    1996-01-01

    Variation fields of radon concentration in time to ascertain stress-strain state of the North Ural bauxite mines have been studied. It is shown that dynamic changes in the stress-strain state of the rocks prior to the rock burst bring about variations in radon concentration in the observation wells. Depending on mutual positioning of the observation points and the rock burst epicenter, the above-mentioned variations differ in principle, reduction of radon concentration in the near zone and its increase in the far zone are observed [ru

  11. Spike Bursts from an Excitable Optical System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios Leite, Jose R.; Rosero, Edison J.; Barbosa, Wendson A. S.; Tredicce, Jorge R.

    Diode Lasers with double optical feedback are shown to present power drop spikes with statistical distribution controllable by the ratio of the two feedback times. The average time between spikes and the variance within long time series are studied. The system is shown to be excitable and present bursting of spikes created with specific feedback time ratios and strength. A rate equation model, extending the Lang-Kobayashi single feedback for semiconductor lasers proves to match the experimental observations. Potential applications to construct network to mimic neural systems having controlled bursting properties in each unit will be discussed. Brazilian Agency CNPQ.

  12. Prediction of the Maximum Number of Repetitions and Repetitions in Reserve From Barbell Velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ramos, Amador; Torrejón, Alejandro; Feriche, Belén; Morales-Artacho, Antonio J; Pérez-Castilla, Alejandro; Padial, Paulino; Haff, Guy Gregory

    2018-03-01

    To provide 2 general equations to estimate the maximum possible number of repetitions (XRM) from the mean velocity (MV) of the barbell and the MV associated with a given number of repetitions in reserve, as well as to determine the between-sessions reliability of the MV associated with each XRM. After determination of the bench-press 1-repetition maximum (1RM; 1.15 ± 0.21 kg/kg body mass), 21 men (age 23.0 ± 2.7 y, body mass 72.7 ± 8.3 kg, body height 1.77 ± 0.07 m) completed 4 sets of as many repetitions as possible against relative loads of 60%1RM, 70%1RM, 80%1RM, and 90%1RM over 2 separate sessions. The different loads were tested in a randomized order with 10 min of rest between them. All repetitions were performed at the maximum intended velocity. Both the general equation to predict the XRM from the fastest MV of the set (CV = 15.8-18.5%) and the general equation to predict MV associated with a given number of repetitions in reserve (CV = 14.6-28.8%) failed to provide data with acceptable between-subjects variability. However, a strong relationship (median r 2  = .984) and acceptable reliability (CV  .85) were observed between the fastest MV of the set and the XRM when considering individual data. These results indicate that generalized group equations are not acceptable methods for estimating the XRM-MV relationship or the number of repetitions in reserve. When attempting to estimate the XRM-MV relationship, one must use individualized relationships to objectively estimate the exact number of repetitions that can be performed in a training set.

  13. [Emotional intelligence and oscillatory responses on the emotional facial expressions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kniazev, G G; Mitrofanova, L G; Bocharov, A V

    2013-01-01

    Emotional intelligence-related differences in oscillatory responses to emotional facial expressions were investigated in 48 subjects (26 men and 22 women) in age 18-30 years. Participants were instructed to evaluate emotional expression (angry, happy and neutral) of each presented face on an analog scale ranging from -100 (very hostile) to + 100 (very friendly). High emotional intelligence (EI) participants were found to be more sensitive to the emotional content of the stimuli. It showed up both in their subjective evaluation of the stimuli and in a stronger EEG theta synchronization at an earlier (between 100 and 500 ms after face presentation) processing stage. Source localization using sLORETA showed that this effect was localized in the fusiform gyrus upon the presentation of angry faces and in the posterior cingulate gyrus upon the presentation of happy faces. At a later processing stage (500-870 ms) event-related theta synchronization in high emotional intelligence subject was higher in the left prefrontal cortex upon the presentation of happy faces, but it was lower in the anterior cingulate cortex upon presentation of angry faces. This suggests the existence of a mechanism that can be selectively increase the positive emotions and reduce negative emotions.

  14. Microstructure characterization of Cu processed by compression with oscillatory torsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodak, K.; Pawlicki, J.

    2014-01-01

    High purity Cu (99.9%) was subjected to severe plastic deformation up to a total effective strain ε ft = 130 through compression with the oscillatory torsion method at room temperature. This method produces an ultrafine grain microstructure. The microstructure evolution was investigated with respect to the value of the total effective strain using a scanning electron microscope with an electron-backscattered diffraction technique and a scanning transmission electron microscope. The results of the structural analyses show that increasing ε ft from 2 to 50 causes progress in the grain refinement. A quantitative study of the microstructure parameters, such as fraction of high angle boundaries, grain and subgrain diameter, and the area fraction of grains up to 1 μm, shows that deformation at ε ft = 45 guaranteed the best conditions for refining the microstructure of Cu. Using high values of ε ft in the range 60 to 130 restricts grain refinement because intensive recovery begins to dominate in the microstructure. - Highlights: • Cu was processed by SPD metodto an effective strain 130. • The microstructure evolution has been investigated. • The method allows to produce an ultrafine grain microstructure

  15. Oscillatory frontal theta responses are increased upon bisensory stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakowitz, O W; Schürmann, M; Başar, E

    2000-05-01

    To investigate the functional correlation of oscillatory EEG components with the interaction of sensory modalities following simultaneous audio-visual stimulation. In an experimental study (15 subjects) we compared auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) and visual evoked potentials (VEPs) to bimodal evoked potentials (BEPs; simultaneous auditory and visual stimulation). BEPs were assumed to be brain responses to complex stimuli as a marker for intermodal associative functioning. Frequency domain analysis of these EPs showed marked theta-range components in response to bimodal stimulation. These theta components could not be explained by linear addition of the unimodal responses in the time domain. Considering topography the increased theta-response showed a remarkable frontality in proximity to multimodal association cortices. Referring to methodology we try to demonstrate that, even if various behavioral correlates of brain oscillations exist, common patterns can be extracted by means of a systems-theoretical approach. Serving as an example of functionally relevant brain oscillations, theta responses could be interpreted as an indicator of associative information processing.

  16. The Voice of Anger: Oscillatory EEG Responses to Emotional Prosody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Del Giudice

    Full Text Available Emotionally relevant stimuli and in particular anger are, due to their evolutionary relevance, often processed automatically and able to modulate attention independent of conscious access. Here, we tested whether attention allocation is enhanced when auditory stimuli are uttered by an angry voice. We recorded EEG and presented healthy individuals with a passive condition where unfamiliar names as well as the subject's own name were spoken both with an angry and neutral prosody. The active condition instead, required participants to actively count one of the presented (angry names. Results revealed that in the passive condition the angry prosody only elicited slightly stronger delta synchronization as compared to a neutral voice. In the active condition the attended (angry target was related to enhanced delta/theta synchronization as well as alpha desynchronization suggesting enhanced allocation of attention and utilization of working memory resources. Altogether, the current results are in line with previous findings and highlight that attention orientation can be systematically related to specific oscillatory brain responses. Potential applications include assessment of non-communicative clinical groups such as post-comatose patients.

  17. Particle and Blood Cell Dynamics in Oscillatory Flows Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restrepo, Juan M.

    2008-01-01

    Our aim has been to uncover fundamental aspects of the suspension and dislodgement of particles in wall-bounded oscillatory flows, in flows characterized by Reynolds numbers encompassing the situation found in rivers and near shores (and perhaps in some industrial processes). Our research tools are computational and our coverage of parameter space fairly broad. Computational means circumvent many complications that make the measurement of the dynamics of particles in a laboratory setting an impractical task, especially on the broad range of parameter space we plan to report upon. The impact of this work on the geophysical problem of sedimentation is boosted considerably by the fact that the proposed calculations can be considered ab-initio, in the sense that little to no modeling is done in generating dynamics of the particles and of the moving fluid: we use a three-dimensional Navier Stokes solver along with straightforward boundary conditions. Hence, to the extent that Navier Stokes is a model for an ideal incompressible isotropic Newtonian fluid, the calculations yield benchmark values for such things as the drag, buoyancy, and lift of particles, in a highly controlled environment. Our approach will be to make measurements of the lift, drag, and buoyancy of particles, by considering progressively more complex physical configurations and physics.

  18. Microstructure characterization of Cu processed by compression with oscillatory torsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodak, K., E-mail: kinga.rodak@polsl.pl [Institute of Materials Science, Silesian University of Technology, Krasińskiego 8, 40-019 Katowice (Poland); Pawlicki, J., E-mail: jacek.pawlicki@polsl.pl [Department of Automotive Vehicle Construction, Silesian University of Technology, Krasińskiego 8, 40–019 Katowice (Poland)

    2014-08-15

    High purity Cu (99.9%) was subjected to severe plastic deformation up to a total effective strain ε{sub ft} = 130 through compression with the oscillatory torsion method at room temperature. This method produces an ultrafine grain microstructure. The microstructure evolution was investigated with respect to the value of the total effective strain using a scanning electron microscope with an electron-backscattered diffraction technique and a scanning transmission electron microscope. The results of the structural analyses show that increasing ε{sub ft} from 2 to 50 causes progress in the grain refinement. A quantitative study of the microstructure parameters, such as fraction of high angle boundaries, grain and subgrain diameter, and the area fraction of grains up to 1 μm, shows that deformation at ε{sub ft} = 45 guaranteed the best conditions for refining the microstructure of Cu. Using high values of ε{sub ft} in the range 60 to 130 restricts grain refinement because intensive recovery begins to dominate in the microstructure. - Highlights: • Cu was processed by SPD metodto an effective strain 130. • The microstructure evolution has been investigated. • The method allows to produce an ultrafine grain microstructure.

  19. Bright to dim oscillatory response of the Neurospora circadian oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooch, Van D; Johnson, Alicia E; Larrondo, Luis F; Loros, Jennifer J; Dunlap, Jay C

    2014-02-01

    The fungus Neurospora crassa constitutes an important model system extensively used in chronobiology. Several studies have addressed how environmental cues, such as light, can reset or synchronize a circadian system. By means of an optimized firefly luciferase reporter gene and a controllable lighting system, we show that Neurospora can display molecular circadian rhythms in dim light when cultures receive bright light prior to entering dim light conditions. We refer to this behavior as the "bright to dim oscillatory response" (BDOR). The bright light treatment can be applied up to 76 h prior to dim exposure, and it can be as short as 15 min in duration. We have characterized this response in respect to the duration of the light pulse, the time of the light pulse before dim, the intensity of dim light, and the oscillation dynamics in dim light. Although the molecular mechanism that drives the BDOR remains obscure, these findings suggest that a long-term memory of bright light exists as part of the circadian molecular components. It is important to consider the ecological significance of such dim light responses in respect to how organisms naturally maintain their timing mechanism in moonlight.

  20. Powerful Radio Burst Indicates New Astronomical Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    Astronomers studying archival data from an Australian radio telescope have discovered a powerful, short-lived burst of radio waves that they say indicates an entirely new type of astronomical phenomenon. Region of Strong Radio Burst Visible-light (negative greyscale) and radio (contours) image of Small Magellanic Cloud and area where burst originated. CREDIT: Lorimer et al., NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for high-resolution file ( 114 KB) "This burst appears to have originated from the distant Universe and may have been produced by an exotic event such as the collision of two neutron stars or the death throes of an evaporating black hole," said Duncan Lorimer, Assistant Professor of Physics at West Virginia University (WVU) and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). The research team led by Lorimer consists of Matthew Bailes of Swinburne University in Australia, Maura McLaughlin of WVU and NRAO, David Narkevic of WVU, and Fronefield Crawford of Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. The astronomers announced their findings in the September 27 issue of the online journal Science Express. The startling discovery came as WVU undergraduate student David Narkevic re-analyzed data from observations of the Small Magellanic Cloud made by the 210-foot Parkes radio telescope in Australia. The data came from a survey of the Magellanic Clouds that included 480 hours of observations. "This survey had sought to discover new pulsars, and the data already had been searched for the type of pulsating signals they produce," Lorimer said. "We re-examined the data, looking for bursts that, unlike the usual ones from pulsars, are not periodic," he added. The survey had covered the Magellanic Clouds, a pair of small galaxies in orbit around our own Milky Way Galaxy. Some 200,000 light-years from Earth, the Magellanic Clouds are prominent features in the Southern sky. Ironically, the new discovery is not part of these galaxies, but rather is much more distant

  1. If you negate, you may forget: negated repetitions impair memory compared with affirmative repetitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Ruth; Schul, Yaacov; Rosenthal, Meytal

    2014-08-01

    One of the most robust laws of memory is that repeated activation improves memory. Our study shows that the nature of repetition matters. Specifically, although both negated repetition and affirmative repetition improve memory compared with no repetition, negated repetition hinders memory compared with affirmative repetition. After showing participants different entities, we asked them about features of these entities, leading to either "yes" or "no" responses. Our findings show that correctly negating an incorrect feature of an entity elicits an active forgetting effect compared with correctly affirming its true features. For example, after seeing someone drink a glass of white wine, answering "no" to "was it red wine?" may lead one to greater memory loss of the individual drinking wine at all compared with answering "yes" to "was it white wine?" We find this negation-induced forgetting effect in 4 experiments that differ in (a) the meaning given for the negation, (b) the type of stimuli (visual or verbal), and (c) the memory measure (recognition or free recall). We discuss possible underlying mechanisms and offer theoretical and applied implications of the negation-induced forgetting effect in relation to other known inhibition effects. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  2. Exactly complete solutions of the Schroedinger equation with a spherically harmonic oscillatory ring-shaped potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Mincang; Sun Guohua; Dong Shihai

    2010-01-01

    A spherically harmonic oscillatory ring-shaped potential is proposed and its exactly complete solutions are presented by the Nikiforov-Uvarov method. The effect of the angle-dependent part on the radial solutions is discussed.

  3. Numerical calculation of a class of highly oscillatory integrals with the Mathieu function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Yongxing

    1992-01-01

    The author describes a method for computing highly oscillatory integrals with the Mathieu function. The practice proves that not only the results are highly satisfactory, but also the method is time-saving

  4. Noise measurements during high-frequency oscillatory and conventional mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berens, R J; Weigle, C G

    1995-10-01

    To evaluate the noise levels with high-frequency oscillatory ventilation and conventional mechanical ventilation. An observational, prospective study. Pediatric intensive care unit. The caretakers and environment of the pediatric intensive care unit. High-frequency oscillatory and conventional mechanical ventilation. Caretakers evaluated noise using a visual analog scale. Noise was measured with a decibel meter and an octave band frequency filter. There was twice as much noise perceived by the caretakers and as measured on the decibel A scale. All measures showed significantly greater noise, especially at low frequencies, with high-frequency oscillatory ventilation. High-frequency oscillatory ventilation exposes the patient to twice as much noise as does the use of conventional mechanical ventilation.

  5. On the Nature of the Gamma-ray Bursts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Ai Hong

    1987-12-01

    Full Text Available Review of the γ-ray burst phenomena are presented. History of the γ-ray bursts, characteristics, and three radiation mechanisms of thermal bremsstrahlung, thermal synchrotron, and inverse Compton scattering processes are considered.

  6. THE FIVE YEAR FERMI/GBM MAGNETAR BURST CATALOG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collazzi, A. C. [SciTec, Inc., 100 Wall Street, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Kouveliotou, C.; Horst, A. J. van der; Younes, G. A. [Department of Physics, The George Washington University, 725 21st Street NW, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Kaneko, Y.; Göğüş, E. [Sabancı University, Orhanlı-Tuzla, İstanbul 34956 (Turkey); Lin, L. [François Arago Centre, APC, 10 rue Alice Domon et Léonie Duquet, F-75205 Paris (France); Granot, J. [Department of Natural Sciences, The Open University of Israel, 1 University Road, P.O. Box 808, Raanana 43537 (Israel); Finger, M. H. [Universities Space Research Association, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Chaplin, V. L. [School of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, 1161 21st Avenue S, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Huppenkothen, D. [Center for Data Science, New York University, 726 Broadway, 7th Floor, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Watts, A. L. [Anton Pannekoek Institute, University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kienlin, A. von [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Baring, M. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Gruber, D. [Planetarium Südtirol, Gummer 5, I-39053 Karneid (Italy); Bhat, P. N. [CSPAR, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Gibby, M. H., E-mail: acollazzi@scitec.com [Jacobs Technology, Inc., Huntsville, AL (United States); and others

    2015-05-15

    Since launch in 2008, the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected many hundreds of bursts from magnetar sources. While the vast majority of these bursts have been attributed to several known magnetars, there is also a small sample of magnetar-like bursts of unknown origin. Here, we present the Fermi/GBM magnetar catalog, providing the results of the temporal and spectral analyses of 440 magnetar bursts with high temporal and spectral resolution. This catalog covers the first five years of GBM magnetar observations, from 2008 July to 2013 June. We provide durations, spectral parameters for various models, fluences, and peak fluxes for all the bursts, as well as a detailed temporal analysis for SGR J1550–5418 bursts. Finally, we suggest that some of the bursts of unknown origin are associated with the newly discovered magnetar 3XMM J185246.6+0033.7.

  7. THE FERMI-GBM X-RAY BURST MONITOR: THERMONUCLEAR BURSTS FROM 4U 0614+09

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linares, M.; Chakrabarty, D.; Connaughton, V.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Preece, R.; Jenke, P.; Kouveliotou, C.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Van der Horst, A. J.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Finger, M.; Paciesas, W. S.; Beklen, E.; Von Kienlin, A.

    2012-01-01

    Thermonuclear bursts from slowly accreting neutron stars (NSs) have proven difficult to detect, yet they are potential probes of the thermal properties of the NS interior. During the first year of a systematic all-sky search for X-ray bursts using the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope we have detected 15 thermonuclear bursts from the NS low-mass X-ray binary 4U 0614+09 when it was accreting at nearly 1% of the Eddington limit. We measured an average burst recurrence time of 12 ± 3 days (68% confidence interval) between 2010 March and 2011 March, classified all bursts as normal duration bursts and placed a lower limit on the recurrence time of long/intermediate bursts of 62 days (95% confidence level). We discuss how observations of thermonuclear bursts in the hard X-ray band compare to pointed soft X-ray observations and quantify such bandpass effects on measurements of burst radiated energy and duration. We put our results for 4U 0614+09 in the context of other bursters and briefly discuss the constraints on ignition models. Interestingly, we find that the burst energies in 4U 0614+09 are on average between those of normal duration bursts and those measured in long/intermediate bursts. Such a continuous distribution in burst energy provides a new observational link between normal and long/intermediate bursts. We suggest that the apparent bimodal distribution that defined normal and long/intermediate duration bursts during the last decade could be due to an observational bias toward detecting only the longest and most energetic bursts from slowly accreting NSs.

  8. Oscillatory integrals on Hilbert spaces and Schroedinger equation with magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albeverio, S.; Brzezniak, Z.

    1994-01-01

    We extend the theory of oscillatory integrals on Hilbert spaces (the mathematical version of ''Feynman path integrals'') to cover more general integrable functions, preserving the property of the integrals to have converging finite dimensional approximations. We give an application to the representation of solutions of the time dependent Schroedinger equation with a scalar and a magnetic potential by oscillatory integrals on Hilbert spaces. A relation with Ramer's functional in the corresponding probabilistic setting is found. (orig.)

  9. BACODINE/3rd Interplanetary Network burst localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurley, K.; Barthelmy, S.; Butterworth, P.; Cline, T.; Sommer, M.; Boer, M.; Niel, M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Fishman, G.; Meegan, C.

    1996-01-01

    Even with only two widely separated spacecraft (Ulysses and GRO), 3rd Interplanetary Network (IPN) localizations can reduce the areas of BATSE error circles by two orders of magnitude. Therefore it is useful to disseminate them as quickly as possible following BATSE bursts. We have implemented a system which transmits the light curves of BACODINE/BATSE bursts directly by e-mail to UC Berkeley immediately after detection. An automatic e-mail parser at Berkeley watches for these notices, determines the Ulysses crossing time window, and initiates a search for the burst data on the JPL computer as they are received. In ideal cases, it is possible to retrieve the Ulysses data within a few hours of a burst, generate an annulus of arrival directions, and e-mail it out to the astronomical community by local nightfall. Human operators remain in this loop, but we are developing a fully automated routine which should remove them, at least for intense events, and reduce turn-around times to an absolute minimum. We explain the current operations, the data types used, and the speed/accuracy tradeoffs

  10. Gamma-ray bursts at high redshift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijers, R.A.M.J.

    1999-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are much brighter than supernovae, and could therefore possibly probe the Universe to high redshift. The presently established GRB redshifts range from 0.83 to 5, and quite possibly even beyond that. Since most proposed mechanisms for GRB link them closely to deaths of massive

  11. Robust Bayesian detection of unmodelled bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Searle, Antony C; Sutton, Patrick J; Tinto, Massimo; Woan, Graham

    2008-01-01

    We develop a Bayesian treatment of the problem of detecting unmodelled gravitational wave bursts using the new global network of interferometric detectors. We also compare this Bayesian treatment with existing coherent methods, and demonstrate that the existing methods make implicit assumptions on the distribution of signals that make them sub-optimal for realistic signal populations

  12. Extragalactic dispersion measures of fast radio bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Jun; Han, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    Fast radio bursts show large dispersion measures, much larger than the Galactic dispersion measure foreground. Therefore, they evidently have an extragalactic origin. We investigate possible contributions to the dispersion measure from host galaxies. We simulate the spatial distribution of fast radio bursts and calculate the dispersion measures along the sightlines from fast radio bursts to the edge of host galaxies by using the scaled NE2001 model for thermal electron density distributions. We find that contributions to the dispersion measure of fast radio bursts from the host galaxy follow a skew Gaussian distribution. The peak and the width at half maximum of the dispersion measure distribution increase with the inclination angle of a spiral galaxy, to large values when the inclination angle is over 70°. The largest dispersion measure produced by an edge-on spiral galaxy can reach a few thousand pc cm −3 , while the dispersion measures from dwarf galaxies and elliptical galaxies have a maximum of only a few tens of pc cm −3 . Notice, however, that additional dispersion measures of tens to hundreds of pc cm −3 can be produced by high density clumps in host galaxies. Simulations that include dispersion measure contributions from the Large Magellanic Cloud and the Andromeda Galaxy are shown as examples to demonstrate how to extract the dispersion measure from the intergalactic medium. (paper)

  13. Radio Afterglows of Gamma Ray Bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lekshmi Resmi

    2017-09-12

    Sep 12, 2017 ... ments on-board high energy missions like BeppoSAX1,. CGRO2, HETE3, .... rest energy of a solar mass object (GRB 080916C; Abdo et al. 2009). ..... Though the same afterglow physics applies to short bursts too, there are.

  14. PHYSICAL CONSTRAINTS ON FAST RADIO BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luan, Jing; Goldreich, Peter, E-mail: jingluan@caltech.edu [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2014-04-20

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are isolated, ms radio pulses with dispersion measure (DM) of order 10{sup 3} pc cm{sup –3}. Galactic candidates for the DM of high latitude bursts detected at GHz frequencies are easily dismissed. DM from bursts emitted in stellar coronas are limited by free-free absorption and those from H II regions are bounded by the nondetection of associated free-free emission at radio wavelengths. Thus, if astronomical, FRBs are probably extragalactic. FRB 110220 has a scattering tail of ∼5.6 ± 0.1 ms. If the electron density fluctuations arise from a turbulent cascade, the scattering is unlikely to be due to propagation through the diffuse intergalactic plasma. A more plausible explanation is that this burst sits in the central region of its host galaxy. Pulse durations of order ms constrain the sizes of FRB sources implying high brightness temperatures that indicates coherent emission. Electric fields near FRBs at cosmological distances would be so strong that they could accelerate free electrons from rest to relativistic energies in a single wave period.

  15. Magnetized environs of a repeating radio burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Brian D.

    2018-03-01

    One of the astrophysical sources that gives rise to the mysterious transients known as fast radio bursts is embedded in a highly magnetized environment, such as the vicinity of an accreting massive black hole or the birth nebula of a highly magnetized neutron star.

  16. PHYSICAL CONSTRAINTS ON FAST RADIO BURSTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luan, Jing; Goldreich, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are isolated, ms radio pulses with dispersion measure (DM) of order 10 3 pc cm –3 . Galactic candidates for the DM of high latitude bursts detected at GHz frequencies are easily dismissed. DM from bursts emitted in stellar coronas are limited by free-free absorption and those from H II regions are bounded by the nondetection of associated free-free emission at radio wavelengths. Thus, if astronomical, FRBs are probably extragalactic. FRB 110220 has a scattering tail of ∼5.6 ± 0.1 ms. If the electron density fluctuations arise from a turbulent cascade, the scattering is unlikely to be due to propagation through the diffuse intergalactic plasma. A more plausible explanation is that this burst sits in the central region of its host galaxy. Pulse durations of order ms constrain the sizes of FRB sources implying high brightness temperatures that indicates coherent emission. Electric fields near FRBs at cosmological distances would be so strong that they could accelerate free electrons from rest to relativistic energies in a single wave period

  17. 3rd Interplanetary Network Gamma-Ray Burst Website

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Kevin

    1998-05-01

    We announce the opening of the 3rd Interplanetary Network web site at http://ssl.berkeley.edu/ipn3/index.html This site presently has four parts: 1. A bibliography of over 3000 publications on gamma-ray bursts, 2. IPN data on all bursts triangulated up to February 1998, 3. A master list showing which spacecraft observed which bursts, 4. Preliminary IPN data on the latest bursts observed.

  18. BurstMem: A High-Performance Burst Buffer System for Scientific Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Teng [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Oral, H Sarp [ORNL; Wang, Yandong [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Settlemyer, Bradley W [ORNL; Atchley, Scott [ORNL; Yu, Weikuan [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama

    2014-01-01

    The growth of computing power on large-scale sys- tems requires commensurate high-bandwidth I/O system. Many parallel file systems are designed to provide fast sustainable I/O in response to applications soaring requirements. To meet this need, a novel system is imperative to temporarily buffer the bursty I/O and gradually flush datasets to long-term parallel file systems. In this paper, we introduce the design of BurstMem, a high- performance burst buffer system. BurstMem provides a storage framework with efficient storage and communication manage- ment strategies. Our experiments demonstrate that BurstMem is able to speed up the I/O performance of scientific applications by up to 8.5 on leadership computer systems.

  19. High power, repetitive stacked Blumlein pulse generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davanloo, F; Borovina, D L; Korioth, J L; Krause, R K; Collins, C B [Univ. of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX (United States). Center for Quantum Electronics; Agee, F J [US Air Force Phillips Lab., Kirtland AFB, NM (United States); Kingsley, L E [US Army CECOM, Ft. Monmouth, NJ (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The repetitive stacked Blumlein pulse power generators developed at the University of Texas at Dallas consist of several triaxial Blumleins stacked in series at one end. The lines are charged in parallel and synchronously commuted with a single switch at the other end. In this way, relatively low charging voltages are multiplied to give a high discharge voltage across an arbitrary load. Extensive characterization of these novel pulsers have been performed over the past few years. Results indicate that they are capable of producing high power waveforms with rise times and repetition rates in the range of 0.5-50 ns and 1-300 Hz, respectively, using a conventional thyratron, spark gap, or photoconductive switch. The progress in the development and use of stacked Blumlein pulse generators is reviewed. The technology and the characteristics of these novel pulsers driving flash x-ray diodes are discussed. (author). 4 figs., 5 refs.

  20. A repetitive elements perspective in Polycomb epigenetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina eCasa

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Repetitive elements comprise over two-thirds of the human genome. For a long time, these elements have received little attention since they were considered non functional. On the contrary, recent evidence indicates that they play central roles in genome integrity, gene expression and disease. Indeed, repeats display meiotic instability associated with disease and are located within common fragile sites, which are hotspots of chromosome rearrangements in tumors. Moreover, a variety of diseases have been associated with aberrant transcription of repetitive elements. Overall this indicates that appropriate regulation of repetitive elements’ activity is fundamental.Polycomb group (PcG proteins are epigenetic regulators that are essential for the normal development of multicellular organisms. Mammalian PcG proteins are involved in fundamental processes, such as cellular memory, cell proliferation, genomic imprinting, X-inactivation, and cancer development. PcG proteins can convey their activity through long-distance interactions also on different chromosomes. This indicates that the 3D organization of PcG proteins contributes significantly to their function. However, it is still unclear how these complex mechanisms are orchestrated and which role PcG proteins play in the multi-level organization of gene regulation. Intriguingly, the greatest proportion of Polycomb-mediated chromatin modifications is located in genomic repeats and it has been suggested that they could provide a binding platform for Polycomb proteins.Here, these lines of evidence are woven together to discuss how repetitive elements could contribute to chromatin organization in the 3D nuclear space.

  1. Imaging assessment of vertebral burst fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Jianlin; Liang Lihua; Wang Yujia

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the diagnostic value of radiography, CT and MRI in diagnosis of vertebral burst fracture. Methods: 51 patients with vertebral burst fracture were evaluated with X-ray, CT and MRI, including 3 cases in cervical vertebra, 18 cases in thoracic vertebra, and 30 cases in lumbar vertebra. The imaging features were comparatively studied. Results: Radiography showed decreased height of the vertebral body, increased antero-posterior diameter and the transverse diameter, and/or the widened interpedicle distance, the inter-spinous distance, as well as the bony fragment inserted into the vertebral canal in 28 cases(54.90%). X-ray findings similar to the compression fracture were revealed in 20 cases(39.21%). And missed diagnosis was made in 3 cases (5.88%). CT clearly demon-strated the vertebral body vertically or transversely burst crack in 49 cases (96.07%); bony fragment inserted into the vertebral canal and narrowed vertebral canal in 35 cases(68. 62% ); fracture of spinal appendix in 22 cases(43.14%). Meanwhile MRI showed abnormal signals within the spinal cord in 35 cases (68.62%),injured intervertebral disk in 29 cases(56.86% ), extradural hematoma in 12 cases(23.52% ) and torn posterior longitudinal ligament in 6 cases (11.76%). Conclusions: Radiography is the routine examination, while with limited diagnostic value in vertebral burst fracture. These patients who have nervous symptoms with simple compression fracture or unremarkable on X-ray should receive the CT or MRI examination. CT is better than MRI in demonstrating the fracture and the displaced bony fragment, while MRI is superior to CT in showing nervous injuries. CT and MRI will provide comprehensive information guiding clinical treatment of vertebral burst fracture. (authors)

  2. Gamma-ray burst observations: the present situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vedrenne, G.

    1984-01-01

    Recent results in gamma ray burst investigations concerning the spectral variability on a short time scale, precise locations, and the discovery of optical flashes in gamma ray burst positions on archival plates are presented. The implications of optical and X-ray observations of gamma ray burst error boxes are also discussed. 72 references

  3. Gamma ray bursts: Current status of observations and theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meegan, C.A.

    1990-04-01

    Gamma ray bursts display a wide range of temporal and spectral characteristics, but typically last several seconds and emit most of their energy in a low energy, gamma ray region. The burst sources appear to be isotropically distributed on the sky. Several lines of evidence suggest magnetic neutron stars as sources for bursts. A variety of energy sources and emission mechanisms are proposed

  4. Heuristic burst detection method using flow and pressure measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.; Vreeburg, J.H.G.; Roer, Van de M.; Rietveld, L.C.

    2014-01-01

    Pipe bursts in a drinking water distribution system lead to water losses, interruption of supply, and damage to streets and houses due to the uncontrolled water flow. To minimize the negative consequences of pipe bursts, an early detection is necessary. This paper describes a heuristic burst

  5. IGR J17254-3257, a new bursting neutron star

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chenevez, Jérôme; Falanga, M.; Kuulkers, E.

    2007-01-01

    Aims. The study of the observational properties of uncommonly long bursts from low luminosity sources is important when investigating the transition from a hydrogen - rich bursting regime to a pure helium regime and from helium burning to carbon burning as predicted by current burst theories. On ...

  6. Fast radio bursts and their possible neutron star origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessels, J. W. T.

    2017-12-01

    The discovery of the ‘Lorimer Burst’, a little over a decade ago, ignited renewed interest in searching for short-duration radio transients (Lorimer et al 2007 Science 318 777). This event is now considered to be the first established Fast Radio Burst (FRB), which is a class of millisecond-duration radio transients (Thornton et al 2013 Science 341 53). The large dispersive delays observed in FRBs distinguish them from the individual bright pulses from Galactic pulsars, and suggests that they originate deep in extragalactic space. Amazingly, FRBs are not rare: the implied event rate ranges up to many thousands of events per sky, per day (Champion et al 2016 MNRAS 460 L30). The fact that only two dozen FRBs have been discovered to date is a consequence of the limited sensitivity and field of view of current radio telescopes (Petroff et al 2016 PASA 33 e045). The precise localization of FRB 121102, the first and currently only FRB observed to repeat (Spitler et al 2014 ApJ 790 101; Spitler et al 2016 Nature 531 202; Scholz et al 2016 ApJ 833 177), has led to the unambiguous identification of its host galaxy and thus proven its extragalactic origin and large energy scale (Chatterjee et al 2017 Nature 541 58; Tendulkar et al 2017 ApJL 834 L7; Marcote et al 2017 ApJL 834 L8). It remains unclear, however, whether all FRBs are capable of repeating [many appear far less active (Petroff et al 2015 MNRAS 454 457)] or whether FRB 121102 implies that there are multiple sub-classes. Regardless, the repetitive nature of FRB 121102 and its localization to within a star-forming region in the host galaxy (Bassa et al 2017 ApJL 843 L8) imply that the bursts might originate from an exceptionally powerful neutron star - one necessarily quite unlike any we have observed in the Milky Way. In these proceedings, I give a very brief introduction to the FRB phenomenon and focus primarily on the insights that FRB 121102 has provided thus far.

  7. Modeling repetitive motions using structured light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yi; Aliaga, Daniel G

    2010-01-01

    Obtaining models of dynamic 3D objects is an important part of content generation for computer graphics. Numerous methods have been extended from static scenarios to model dynamic scenes. If the states or poses of the dynamic object repeat often during a sequence (but not necessarily periodically), we call such a repetitive motion. There are many objects, such as toys, machines, and humans, undergoing repetitive motions. Our key observation is that when a motion-state repeats, we can sample the scene under the same motion state again but using a different set of parameters; thus, providing more information of each motion state. This enables robustly acquiring dense 3D information difficult for objects with repetitive motions using only simple hardware. After the motion sequence, we group temporally disjoint observations of the same motion state together and produce a smooth space-time reconstruction of the scene. Effectively, the dynamic scene modeling problem is converted to a series of static scene reconstructions, which are easier to tackle. The varying sampling parameters can be, for example, structured-light patterns, illumination directions, and viewpoints resulting in different modeling techniques. Based on this observation, we present an image-based motion-state framework and demonstrate our paradigm using either a synchronized or an unsynchronized structured-light acquisition method.

  8. Repetitive Elements in Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Transcriptional Regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Malvessi Cattani

    Full Text Available Transcriptional regulation, a multiple-step process, is still poorly understood in the important pig pathogen Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae. Basic motifs like promoters and terminators have already been described, but no other cis-regulatory elements have been found. DNA repeat sequences have been shown to be an interesting potential source of cis-regulatory elements. In this work, a genome-wide search for tandem and palindromic repetitive elements was performed in the intergenic regions of all coding sequences from M. hyopneumoniae strain 7448. Computational analysis demonstrated the presence of 144 tandem repeats and 1,171 palindromic elements. The DNA repeat sequences were distributed within the 5' upstream regions of 86% of transcriptional units of M. hyopneumoniae strain 7448. Comparative analysis between distinct repetitive sequences found in related mycoplasma genomes demonstrated different percentages of conservation among pathogenic and nonpathogenic strains. qPCR assays revealed differential expression among genes showing variable numbers of repetitive elements. In addition, repeats found in 206 genes already described to be differentially regulated under different culture conditions of M. hyopneumoniae strain 232 showed almost 80% conservation in relation to M. hyopneumoniae strain 7448 repeats. Altogether, these findings suggest a potential regulatory role of tandem and palindromic DNA repeats in the M. hyopneumoniae transcriptional profile.

  9. Repetitive Elements in Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Transcriptional Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattani, Amanda Malvessi; Siqueira, Franciele Maboni; Guedes, Rafael Lucas Muniz; Schrank, Irene Silveira

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation, a multiple-step process, is still poorly understood in the important pig pathogen Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae. Basic motifs like promoters and terminators have already been described, but no other cis-regulatory elements have been found. DNA repeat sequences have been shown to be an interesting potential source of cis-regulatory elements. In this work, a genome-wide search for tandem and palindromic repetitive elements was performed in the intergenic regions of all coding sequences from M. hyopneumoniae strain 7448. Computational analysis demonstrated the presence of 144 tandem repeats and 1,171 palindromic elements. The DNA repeat sequences were distributed within the 5' upstream regions of 86% of transcriptional units of M. hyopneumoniae strain 7448. Comparative analysis between distinct repetitive sequences found in related mycoplasma genomes demonstrated different percentages of conservation among pathogenic and nonpathogenic strains. qPCR assays revealed differential expression among genes showing variable numbers of repetitive elements. In addition, repeats found in 206 genes already described to be differentially regulated under different culture conditions of M. hyopneumoniae strain 232 showed almost 80% conservation in relation to M. hyopneumoniae strain 7448 repeats. Altogether, these findings suggest a potential regulatory role of tandem and palindromic DNA repeats in the M. hyopneumoniae transcriptional profile.

  10. A search for optical bursts from the repeating fast radio burst FRB 121102

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, L. K.; Dhillon, V. S.; Spitler, L. G.; Littlefair, S. P.; Ashley, R. P.; De Cia, A.; Green, M. J.; Jaroenjittichai, P.; Keane, E. F.; Kerry, P.; Kramer, M.; Malesani, D.; Marsh, T. R.; Parsons, S. G.; Possenti, A.; Rattanasoon, S.; Sahman, D. I.

    2017-12-01

    We present a search for optical bursts from the repeating fast radio burst FRB 121102 using simultaneous observations with the high-speed optical camera ULTRASPEC on the 2.4-m Thai National Telescope and radio observations with the 100-m Effelsberg Radio Telescope. A total of 13 radio bursts were detected, but we found no evidence for corresponding optical bursts in our 70.7-ms frames. The 5σ upper limit to the optical flux density during our observations is 0.33 mJy at 767 nm. This gives an upper limit for the optical burst fluence of 0.046 Jy ms, which constrains the broad-band spectral index of the burst emission to α ≤ -0.2. Two of the radio pulses are separated by just 34 ms, which may represent an upper limit on a possible underlying periodicity (a rotation period typical of pulsars), or these pulses may have come from a single emission window that is a small fraction of a possible period.

  11. Feature-based motion control for near-repetitive structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Best, de J.J.T.H.

    2011-01-01

    In many manufacturing processes, production steps are carried out on repetitive structures which consist of identical features placed in a repetitive pattern. In the production of these repetitive structures one or more consecutive steps are carried out on the features to create the final product.

  12. Lingual Kinematics during Rapid Syllable Repetition in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Min Ney; Murdoch, Bruce E.; Whelan, Brooke-Mai

    2012-01-01

    Background: Rapid syllable repetition tasks are commonly used in the assessment of motor speech disorders. However, little is known about the articulatory kinematics during rapid syllable repetition in individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). Aims: To investigate and compare lingual kinematics during rapid syllable repetition in dysarthric…

  13. Grade Repetition and Primary School Dropout in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabay, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Research on education in low-income countries rarely focuses on grade repetition. When addressed, repetition is typically presented along with early school dropout as the "wasting" of educational resources. Simplifying grade repetition in this way often fails to recognize significant methodological concerns and also overlooks the unique…

  14. Fluid mechanics experiments in oscillatory flow. Volume 1: Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seume, J.; Friedman, G.; Simon, T. W.

    1992-01-01

    Results of a fluid mechanics measurement program in oscillating flow within a circular duct are presented. The program began with a survey of transition behavior over a range of oscillation frequency and magnitude and continued with a detailed study at a single operating point. Such measurements were made in support of Stirling engine development. Values of three dimensionless parameters, Re(sub max), Re(sub w), and A(sub R), embody the velocity amplitude, frequency of oscillation and mean fluid displacement of the cycle, respectively. Measurements were first made over a range of these parameters which included operating points of all Stirling engines. Next, a case was studied with values of these parameters that are representative of the heat exchanger tubes in the heater section of NASA's Stirling cycle Space Power Research Engine (SPRE). Measurements were taken of the axial and radial components of ensemble-averaged velocity and rms-velocity fluctuation and the dominant Reynolds shear stress, at various radial positions for each of four axial stations. In each run, transition from laminar to turbulent flow, and its reverse, were identified and sufficient data was gathered to propose the transition mechanism. Models of laminar and turbulent boundary layers were used to process the data into wall coordinates and to evaluate skin friction coefficients. Such data aids in validating computational models and is useful in comparing oscillatory flow characteristics to those of fully-developed steady flow. Data were taken with a contoured entry to each end of the test section and with flush square inlets so that the effects of test section inlet geometry on transition and turbulence are documented. Volume 1 contains the text of the report including figures and supporting appendices. Volume 2 contains data reduction program listings and tabulated data (including its graphical presentation).

  15. Instantaneous sediment transport model for asymmetric oscillatory sheet flow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Chen

    Full Text Available On the basis of advanced concentration and velocity profiles above a mobile seabed, an instantaneous analytical model is derived for sediment transport in asymmetric oscillatory flow. The applied concentration profile is obtained from the classical exponential law based on mass conservation, and asymmetric velocity profile is developed following the turbulent boundary layer theory and the asymmetric wave theory. The proposed model includes two parts: the basic part that consists of erosion depth and free stream velocity, and can be simplified to the total Shields parameter power 3/2 in accordance with the classical empirical models, and the extra vital part that consists of phase-lead, boundary layer thickness and erosion depth. The effects of suspended sediment, phase-lag and asymmetric boundary layer development are considered particularly in the model. The observed instantaneous transport rate proportional to different velocity exponents due to phase-lag is unified and summarised by the proposed model. Both instantaneous and half period empirical formulas are compared with the developed model, using extensive data on a wide range of flow and sediment conditions. The synchronous variation in instantaneous transport rate with free stream velocity and its decrement caused by increased sediment size are predicted correctly. Net transport rates, especially offshore transport rates with large phase-lag under velocity skewed flows, which existing instantaneous type formulas failed to predict, are predicted correctly in both direction and magnitude by the proposed model. Net sediment transport rates are affected not only by suspended sediment and phase-lag, but also by the boundary layer difference between onshore and offshore.

  16. Fluid mechanics experiments in oscillatory flow. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seume, J.; Friedman, G.; Simon, T.W.

    1992-03-01

    Results of a fluid mechanics measurement program is oscillating flow within a circular duct are present. The program began with a survey of transition behavior over a range of oscillation frequency and magnitude and continued with a detailed study at a single operating point. Such measurements were made in support of Stirling engine development. Values of three dimensionless parameters, Re max , Re W , and A R , embody the velocity amplitude, frequency of oscillation and mean fluid displacement of the cycle, respectively. Measurements were first made over a range of these parameters which included operating points of all Stirling engines. Next, a case was studied with values of these parameters that are representative of the heat exchanger tubes in the heater section of NASA's Stirling cycle Space Power Research Engine (SPRE). Measurements were taken of the axial and radical components of ensemble-averaged velocity and rms-velocity fluctuation and the dominant Reynolds shear stress, at various radial positions for each of four axial stations. In each run, transition from laminar to turbulent flow, and in reverse, were identified and sufficient data was gathered to propose the transition mechanism. Models of laminar and turbulent boundary layers were used to process the data into wall coordinates and to evaluate skin friction coefficients. Such data aids in validating computational models and is useful in comparing oscillatory flow characteristics to those of fully-developed steady flow. Data were taken with a contoured entry to each end of the test section and with flush square inlets so that the effects of test section inlet geometry on transition and turbulence are documented. The following is presented in two-volumes. Volume I contains the text of the report including figures and supporting appendices. Volume II contains data reduction program listings and tabulated data (including its graphical presentation)

  17. Large amplitude oscillatory motion along a solar filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vršnak, B.; Veronig, A. M.; Thalmann, J. K.; Žic, T.

    2007-08-01

    Context: Large amplitude oscillations of solar filaments is a phenomenon that has been known for more than half a century. Recently, a new mode of oscillations, characterized by periodical plasma motions along the filament axis, was discovered. Aims: We analyze such an event, recorded on 23 January 2002 in Big Bear Solar Observatory Hα filtergrams, to infer the triggering mechanism and the nature of the restoring force. Methods: Motion along the filament axis of a distinct buldge-like feature was traced, to quantify the kinematics of the oscillatory motion. The data were fitted by a damped sine function to estimate the basic parameters of the oscillations. To identify the triggering mechanism, morphological changes in the vicinity of the filament were analyzed. Results: The observed oscillations of the plasma along the filament were characterized by an initial displacement of 24 Mm, an initial velocity amplitude of 51 km s-1, a period of 50 min, and a damping time of 115 min. We interpret the trigger in terms of poloidal magnetic flux injection by magnetic reconnection at one of the filament legs. The restoring force is caused by the magnetic pressure gradient along the filament axis. The period of oscillations, derived from the linearized equation of motion (harmonic oscillator) can be expressed as P=π√{2}L/v_Aϕ≈4.4L/v_Aϕ, where v_Aϕ =Bϕ0/√μ_0ρ represents the Alfvén speed based on the equilibrium poloidal field Bϕ0. Conclusions: Combination of our measurements with some previous observations of the same kind of oscillations shows good agreement with the proposed interpretation. Movie to Fig. 1 is only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. Rheological changes of polyamide 12 under oscillatory shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielicki, C.; Gronhoff, B.; Wortberg, J.

    2014-05-01

    Changes in material properties as well as process deviation prevent Laser Sintering (LS) technology from manufacturing of quality assured parts in a series production. In this context, the viscosity of Polyamide 12 (PA12) is assumed to possess the most significant influence, as it determines the sintering velocity, the resistance towards melt formation and the bonding strength of sintered layers. Moreover, the viscosity is directly related to the structure of the molten polymer. In particular, it has been recently reported that LS process conditions lead to structural changes of PA12 affecting viscosity and coalescence of adjacent polymer particles, i.e. melt formation significantly. Structural change of PA12 was understood as a post condensation. Its influence on viscosity was described by a time and temperature depending rheological model whereas time dependence was considered by a novel structural change shift factor which was derived from melt volume rate data. In combination with process data that was recorded using online thermal imaging, the model is suitable to control the viscosity (processability of the material) as result of material and process properties. However, as soon as laser energy is exposed to the powder bed PA12 undergoes a phase transition from solid to molten state. Above the melting point, structural change is expected to occur faster due to a higher kinetic energy and free volume of the molten polymer. Oscillatory shear results were used to study the influence of aging time and for validation of the novel structural change shift factor and its model parameters which were calibrated based on LS processing condition.

  19. Diagnostics from three rising submillimeter bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Ai-Hua; Li, Jian-Ping; Wang, Xin-Dong

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we investigate three novel rising submillimeter (THz) bursts that occurred sequentially in Super Active Region NOAA 10486. The average rising rate of the flux density above 200 GHz is only 20 sfu GHz −1 (corresponding to spectral index α of 1.6) for the THz spectral components of the 2003 October 28 and November 4 bursts, but it attained values of 235 sfu GHz −1 (α = 4.8) in the 2003 November 2 burst. The steeply rising THz spectrum can be produced by a population of highly relativistic electrons with a low-energy cutoff of 1 MeV, but it only requires a low-energy cutoff of 30 keV for the two slowly rising THz bursts, via gyrosynchrotron (GS) radiation based on our numerical simulations of burst spectra in the magnetic dipole field case. The electron density variation is much larger in the THz source than in the microwave (MW) source. It is interesting that the THz source radius decreased by 20%–50% during the decay phase for the three events, but the MW source increased by 28% for the 2003 November 2 event. In the paper we will present a formula that can be used to calculate the energy released by ultrarelativistic electrons, taking the relativistic correction into account for the first time. We find that the energy released by energetic electrons in the THz source exceeds that in the MW source due to the strong GS radiation loss in the THz range, although the modeled THz source area is 3–4 orders smaller than the modeled MW source one. The total energies released by energetic electrons via the GS radiation in radio sources are estimated, respectively, to be 5.2 × 10 33 , 3.9 × 10 33 and 3.7 × 10 32 erg for the October 28, November 2 and 4 bursts, which are 131, 76 and 4 times as large as the thermal energies of 2.9 × 10 31 , 2.1 × 10 31 and 5.2 × 10 31 erg estimated from soft X-ray GOES observations. (paper)

  20. INTEGRAL monitoring of unusually long X-ray bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chenevez, Jérôme; Falanga, M.; Kuulkers, E.

    2008-01-01

    of exceptional burst events lasting more than ~10 minutes. Half of the dozen so-called intermediate long bursts registered so far have been observed by INTEGRAL. The goal is to derive a comprehensive picture of the relationship between the nuclear ignition processes and the accretion states of the system leading...... up to such long bursts. Depending on the composition of the accreted material, these bursts may be explained by either the unstable burning of a large pile of mixed hydrogen and helium, or the ignition of a thick pure helium layer. Intermediate long bursts are particularly expected to occur at very...

  1. Evidence for repetitive load in the trapezius muscle during a tapping task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomatis, L; Müller, C; Nakaseko, M; Läubli, T

    2012-08-01

    Many studies describe the trapezius muscle activation pattern during repetitive key-tapping focusing on continuous activation. The objectives of this study were to determine whether the upper trapezius is phasically active during supported key tapping, whether this activity is cross-correlated with forearm muscle activity, and whether trapezius activity depends on key characteristic. Thirteen subjects (29.7 ± 11.4 years) were tested. Surface EMG of the finger's extensor and flexor and of the trapezius muscles, as well as the key on-off signal was recorded while the subject performed a 2-min session of key tapping at 4 Hz. The linear envelopes obtained were cut into single tapping cycles extending from one onset to the next onset signal and subsequently time-normalized. Effect size between mean range and maximal standard deviation was calculated to determine as to whether a burst of trapezius muscle activation was present. Cross-correlation was used to determine the time-lag of the activity bursts between forearm and trapezius muscles. For each person the mean and standard deviation of the cross-correlations coefficient between forearm muscles and trapezius were determined. Results showed a burst of activation in the trapezius muscle during most of the tapping cycles. The calculated effect size was ≥0.5 in 67% of the cases. Cross-correlation factors between forearm and trapezius muscle activity were between 0.75 and 0.98 for both extensor and flexor muscles. The cross-correlated phasic trapezius activity did not depend on key characteristics. Trapezius muscle was dynamically active during key tapping; its activity was clearly correlated with forearm muscles' activity.

  2. Psychoacoustic Tinnitus Loudness and Tinnitus-Related Distress Show Different Associations with Oscillatory Brain Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkenhol, Tobias; Wallhäusser-Franke, Elisabeth; Delb, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Background The phantom auditory perception of subjective tinnitus is associated with aberrant brain activity as evidenced by magneto- and electroencephalographic studies. We tested the hypotheses (1) that psychoacoustically measured tinnitus loudness is related to gamma oscillatory band power, and (2) that tinnitus loudness and tinnitus-related distress are related to distinct brain activity patterns as suggested by the distinction between loudness and distress experienced by tinnitus patients. Furthermore, we explored (3) how hearing impairment, minimum masking level, and (4) psychological comorbidities are related to spontaneous oscillatory brain activity in tinnitus patients. Methods and Findings Resting state oscillatory brain activity recorded electroencephalographically from 46 male tinnitus patients showed a positive correlation between gamma band oscillations and psychoacoustic tinnitus loudness determined with the reconstructed tinnitus sound, but not with the other psychoacoustic loudness measures that were used. Tinnitus-related distress did also correlate with delta band activity, but at electrode positions different from those associated with tinnitus loudness. Furthermore, highly distressed tinnitus patients exhibited a higher level of theta band activity. Moreover, mean hearing loss between 0.125 kHz and 16 kHz was associated with a decrease in gamma activity, whereas minimum masking levels correlated positively with delta band power. In contrast, psychological comorbidities did not express significant correlations with oscillatory brain activity. Conclusion Different clinically relevant tinnitus characteristics show distinctive associations with spontaneous brain oscillatory power. Results support hypothesis (1), but exclusively for the tinnitus loudness derived from matching to the reconstructed tinnitus sound. This suggests to preferably use the reconstructed tinnitus spectrum to determine psychoacoustic tinnitus loudness. Results also support

  3. Fermi/GAMMA-RAY BURST MONITOR OBSERVATIONS OF SGR J0501+4516 BURSTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Lin; Zhang Shuangnan; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Baring, Matthew G.; Van der Horst, Alexander J.; Finger, Mark H.; Guiriec, Sylvain; Preece, Robert; Chaplin, Vandiver; Bhat, Narayan; Woods, Peter M.; Goegues, Ersin; Kaneko, Yuki; Scargle, Jeffrey; Granot, Jonathan; Von Kienlin, Andreas; Watts, Anna L.; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Gehrels, Neil; Harding, Alice

    2011-01-01

    We present our temporal and spectral analyses of 29 bursts from SGR J0501+4516, detected with the gamma-ray burst monitor on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope during 13 days of the source's activation in 2008 (August 22- September 3). We find that the T 90 durations of the bursts can be fit with a log-normal distribution with a mean value of ∼123 ms. We also estimate for the first time event durations of soft gamma repeater (SGR) bursts in photon space (i.e., using their deconvolved spectra) and find that these are very similar to the T 90 values estimated in count space (following a log-normal distribution with a mean value of ∼124 ms). We fit the time-integrated spectra for each burst and the time-resolved spectra of the five brightest bursts with several models. We find that a single power law with an exponential cutoff model fits all 29 bursts well, while 18 of the events can also be fit with two blackbody functions. We expand on the physical interpretation of these two models and we compare their parameters and discuss their evolution. We show that the time-integrated and time-resolved spectra reveal that E peak decreases with energy flux (and fluence) to a minimum of ∼30 keV at F = 8.7 x 10 -6 erg cm -2 s -1 , increasing steadily afterward. Two more sources exhibit a similar trend: SGRs J1550-5418 and 1806-20. The isotropic luminosity, L iso , corresponding to these flux values is roughly similar for all sources (0.4-1.5 x 10 40 erg s -1 ).

  4. Hierarchic Analysis Method to Evaluate Rock Burst Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Ji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to reasonably evaluate the risk of rock bursts in mines, the factors impacting rock bursts and the existing grading criterion on the risk of rock bursts were studied. By building a model of hierarchic analysis method, the natural factors, technology factors, and management factors that influence rock bursts were analyzed and researched, which determined the degree of each factor’s influence (i.e., weight and comprehensive index. Then the grade of rock burst risk was assessed. The results showed that the assessment level generated by the model accurately reflected the actual risk degree of rock bursts in mines. The model improved the maneuverability and practicability of existing evaluation criteria and also enhanced the accuracy and science of rock burst risk assessment.

  5. Impulsive EUV bursts observed in C IV with OSO-8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant Athay, R.; White, O.R.; Lites, B.W.

    1980-01-01

    Time sequences of profiles of the lambda 1548 line of C IV containing 51 EUV bursts observed in or near active regions are analyzed to determine the brightness. Doppler shift and line broadening characteristics of the bursts. The bursts have mean lifetimes of approximately 150s, and mean increases in brightness at burst maximum of four-fold as observed with a field of view of 2'' x 20''. Mean burst diameters are estimated to be 3'', or smaller. All but three of the bursts show Doppler shift with velocities sometimes exceeding 75 km s -1 ; 31 are dominated by red shifts and 17 are dominated by blue shifts. Approximately half of the latter group have red-shifted precursors. We interpret the bursts as prominence material, such as surges and coronal rain, moving through the field of view of the spectrometer. (orig.)

  6. Imbalance between abstract and concrete repetitive thinking modes in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurage, Pierre; Philippot, Pierre; Grynberg, Delphine; Leleux, Dominique; Delatte, Benoît; Mangelinckx, Camille; Belge, Jan-Baptist; Constant, Eric

    2017-10-01

    Repetitive thoughts can be divided in two modes: abstract/analytic (decontextualized and dysfunctional) and concrete/experiential (problem-focused and adaptive). They constitute a transdiagnostic process involved in many psychopathological states but have received little attention in schizophrenia, as earlier studies only indexed increased ruminations (related to dysfunctional repetitive thoughts) without jointly exploring both modes. This study explored the two repetitive thinking modes, beyond ruminations, to determine their imbalance in schizophrenia. Thirty stabilized patients with schizophrenia and 30 matched controls completed the Repetitive Response Scale and the Mini Cambridge-Exeter Repetitive Thought Scale, both measuring repetitive thinking modes. Complementary measures related to schizophrenic symptomatology, depression and anxiety were also conducted. Compared to controls, patients with schizophrenia presented an imbalance between repetitive thinking modes, with increased abstract/analytic and reduced concrete/experiential thoughts, even after controlling for comorbidities. Schizophrenia is associated with stronger dysfunctional repetitive thoughts (i.e. abstract thinking) and impaired ability to efficiently use repetitive thinking for current problem-solving (i.e. concrete thinking). This imbalance confirms the double-faced nature of repetitive thinking modes, whose influence on schizophrenia's symptomatology should be further investigated. The present results also claim for evaluating these processes in clinical settings and for rehabilitating the balance between opposite repetitive thinking modes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Repetitive thinking, executive functioning, and depressive mood in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippot, Pierre; Agrigoroaei, Stefan

    2017-11-01

    Previous findings and the depressive-executive dysfunction hypothesis suggest that the established association between executive functioning and depression is accounted for by repetitive thinking. Investigating the association between executive functioning, repetitive thinking, and depressive mood, the present study empirically tested this mediational model in a sample of older adults, while focusing on both concrete and abstract repetitive thinking. This latter distinction is important given the potential protective role of concrete repetitive thinking, in contrast to the depletive effect of abstract repetitive thinking. A sample of 43 elderly volunteers, between 75 and 95 years of age, completed tests of executive functioning (the Stroop test, the Trail Making test, and the Fluency test), and questionnaires of repetitive thinking and depression. Positive correlations were observed between abstract repetitive thinking and depressive mood, and between concrete repetitive thinking and executive functioning; a negative correlation was observed between depressive mood and executive functioning. Further, mediational analysis evidenced that the relation between executive functioning and depressive mood was mediated by abstract repetitive thinking. The present data provide, for the first time, empirical support to the depressive-executive dysfunction hypothesis: the lack of executive resources would favor a mode of abstract repetitive thinking, which in turn would deplete mood. It suggests that clinical intervention targeting depression in the elderly should take into consideration repetitive thinking modes and the executive resources needed to disengage from rumination.

  8. Burst Mode ASIC-Based Modem

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center is sponsoring the Advanced Communication Technology Insertion (ACTION) for Commercial Space Applications program. The goal of the program is to expedite the development of new technology with a clear path towards productization and enhancing the competitiveness of U.S. manufacturers. The industry has made significant investment in developing ASIC-based modem technology for continuous-mode applications and has made investigations into East, reliable acquisition of burst-mode digital communication signals. With rapid advances in analog and digital communications ICs, it is expected that more functions will be integrated onto these parts in the near future. In addition custom ASIC's can also be developed to address the areas not covered by the other IC's. Using the commercial chips and custom ASIC's, lower-cost, compact, reliable, and high-performance modems can be built for demanding satellite communication application. This report outlines a frequency-hop burst modem design based on commercially available chips.

  9. Bursting behaviours in cascaded stimulated Brillouin scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zhan-Jun; He Xian-Tu; Zheng Chun-Yang; Wang Yu-Gang

    2012-01-01

    Stimulated Brillouin scattering is studied by numerically solving the Vlasov—Maxwell system. A cascade of stimulated Brillouin scattering can occur when a linearly polarized laser pulse propagates in a plasma. It is found that a stimulated Brillouin scattering cascade can reduce the scattering and increase the transmission of light, as well as introduce a bursting behaviour in the evolution of the laser-plasma interaction. The bursting time in the reflectivity is found to be less than half the ion acoustic period. The ion temperature can affect the stimulated Brillouin scattering cascade, which can repeat several times at low ion temperatures and can be completely eliminated at high ion temperatures. For stimulated Brillouin scattering saturation, higher-harmonic generation and wave—wave interaction of the excited ion acoustic waves can restrict the amplitude of the latter. In addition, stimulated Brillouin scattering cascade can restrict the amplitude of the scattered light. (physics of gases, plasmas, and electric discharges)

  10. A review of gamma ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Rees, Martin J

    2000-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts, an enigma for more than 25 years, are now coming into focus. They involve extraordinary power outputs, and highly relativistic dynamics. The 'trigger' involves stellar-mass compact objects. The most plausible progenitors, ranging from neutron star binary mergers to collapsars (sometimes called 'hypernovae') eventually lead to the formation of a black hole with a torus of hot neutron-density material around it, the extractable energy being up to 10 sup 5 sup 4 ergs. Magnetic fields may exceed 10 sup 1 sup 5 G and particles may be accelerated up to > or approx. 10 sup 2 sup 0 eV. Details of the afterglow may be easier to understand than the initial trigger. Bursts at very high redshift can be astronomically-important as probes of the distant universe.

  11. Environmental Effects of Gamma Ray Bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Osmel; Zarauza, Dario; Cardenas, Rolando

    2007-01-01

    Gamma rays bursts, coming from very massive stars, are the most powerful explosions in our Universe. Some authors have linked them to some of the climatic changes and consequent biological mass extinctions of the Phanerozoic eon. However, the consequences of their direct impact on primitive Earth, is today a hot topic of debate. On the other hand, it is usually assumed that they were more common in earlier stages of our galaxy. So it is important to evaluate its potential effects on terrestrial paleoenvironments. We outline some simple models to estimate their influence mainly on the primordial atmospheric chemistry of Earth and on the climate in general. To do that, we consider different scenarios where the atmospheric composition diverges substantially from the atmosphere today, and compute the evolution of principal chemical species under the intense radiational stress of a gamma ray burst. Furthermore, the possible impact on the isotopic composition, geochemistry and the biosphere are mentioned in general way

  12. Coherent combining pulse bursts in time domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvanauskas, Almantas

    2018-01-09

    A beam combining and pulse stacking technique is provided that enhances laser pulse energy by coherent stacking pulse bursts (i.e. non-periodic pulsed signals) in time domain. This energy enhancement is achieved by using various configurations of Fabry-Perot, Gires-Tournois and other types of resonant cavities, so that a multiple-pulse burst incident at either a single input or multiple inputs of the system produces an output with a solitary pulse, which contains the summed energy of the incident multiple pulses from all beams. This disclosure provides a substantial improvement over conventional coherent-combining methods in that it achieves very high pulse energies using a relatively small number of combined laser systems, thus providing with orders of magnitude reduction in system size, complexity, and cost compared to current combining approaches.

  13. Explaining fast radio bursts through Dicke's superradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houde, Martin; Mathews, Abhilash; Rajabi, Fereshteh

    2018-03-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs), characterized by strong bursts of radiation intensity at radio wavelengths lasting on the order of a millisecond, have yet to be firmly associated with a family, or families, of astronomical sources. It follows that despite the large number of proposed models, no well-defined physical process has been identified to explain this phenomenon. In this paper, we demonstrate how Dicke's superradiance, for which evidence has recently been found in the interstellar medium, can account for the characteristics associated with FRBs. Our analysis and modelling of previously detected FRBs suggest they could originate from regions in many ways similar to those known to harbour masers or megamasers, and result from the coherent radiation emanating from populations of molecules associated with large-scale entangled quantum mechanical states. We estimate this entanglement to involve as many as ˜1030 to ˜1032 molecules over distances spanning 100-1000 au.

  14. A 7.8 kV nanosecond pulse generator with a 500 Hz repetition rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, M.; Liao, H.; Liu, M.; Zhu, G.; Yang, Z.; Shi, P.; Lu, Q.; Sun, X.

    2018-04-01

    Pseudospark switches are widely used in pulsed power applications. In this paper, we present the design and performance of a 500 Hz repetition rate high-voltage pulse generator to drive TDI-series pseudospark switches. A high-voltage pulse is produced by discharging an 8 μF capacitor through a primary windings of a setup isolation transformer using a single metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) as a control switch. In addition, a self-break spark gap is used to steepen the pulse front. The pulse generator can deliver a high-voltage pulse with a peak trigger voltage of 7.8 kV, a peak trigger current of 63 A, a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of ~30 ns, and a rise time of 5 ns to the trigger pin of the pseudospark switch. During burst mode operation, the generator achieved up to a 500 Hz repetition rate. Meanwhile, we also provide an AC heater power circuit for heating a H2 reservoir. This pulse generator can be used in circuits with TDI-series pseudospark switches with either a grounded cathode or with a cathode electrically floating operation. The details of the circuits and their implementation are described in the paper.

  15. MHz repetition rate solid-state driver for high current induction accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooksby, C; Caporaso, G; Goerz, D; Hanks, R; Hickman, B; Kirbie, H; Lee, B; Saethre, R.

    1999-01-01

    A research team from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Bechtel Nevada Corporation is developing an all solid-state power source for high current induction accelerators. The original power system design, developed for heavy-ion fusion accelerators, is based on the simple idea of using an array of field effect transistors to switch energy from a pre-charged capacitor bank to an induction accelerator cell. Recently, that idea has been expanded to accommodate the greater power needs of a new class of high-current electron accelerators for advanced radiography. For this purpose, we developed a 3-stage induction adder that uses over 4,000 field effect transistors to switch peak voltages of 45 kV at currents up to 4.8 kA with pulse repetition rates of up to 2 MHz. This radically advanced power system can generate a burst of five or more pulses that vary from 200 ns to 2 ampersand micro;s at a duty cycle of up to 25%. Our new source is precise, robust, flexible, and exceeds all previous drivers for induction machines by a factor of 400 in repetition rate and a factor of 1000 in duty cycle

  16. Identifying crucial parameter correlations maintaining bursting activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca Doloc-Mihu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent experimental and computational studies suggest that linearly correlated sets of parameters (intrinsic and synaptic properties of neurons allow central pattern-generating networks to produce and maintain their rhythmic activity regardless of changing internal and external conditions. To determine the role of correlated conductances in the robust maintenance of functional bursting activity, we used our existing database of half-center oscillator (HCO model instances of the leech heartbeat CPG. From the database, we identified functional activity groups of burster (isolated neuron and half-center oscillator model instances and realistic subgroups of each that showed burst characteristics (principally period and spike frequency similar to the animal. To find linear correlations among the conductance parameters maintaining functional leech bursting activity, we applied Principal Component Analysis (PCA to each of these four groups. PCA identified a set of three maximal conductances (leak current, [Formula: see text]Leak; a persistent K current, [Formula: see text]K2; and of a persistent Na+ current, [Formula: see text]P that correlate linearly for the two groups of burster instances but not for the HCO groups. Visualizations of HCO instances in a reduced space suggested that there might be non-linear relationships between these parameters for these instances. Experimental studies have shown that period is a key attribute influenced by modulatory inputs and temperature variations in heart interneurons. Thus, we explored the sensitivity of period to changes in maximal conductances of [Formula: see text]Leak, [Formula: see text]K2, and [Formula: see text]P, and we found that for our realistic bursters the effect of these parameters on period could not be assessed because when varied individually bursting activity was not maintained.

  17. Thermonuclear model for γ-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woosley, S.E.

    1981-01-01

    The evolution of magnetized neutron stars with field strengths of approx. 10 12 gauss that are accreting mass onto kilometer-sized polar regions at a rate of approx. 13 M 0 yr -1 is examined. Based on the results of one-dimensional calculations, one finds that stable hydrogen burning, mediated by the hot CNO-cycle, will lead to a critical helium mass in the range 10 20 to 10 22 g km -2 . Owing to the extreme degeneracy of the electron gas providing pressure support, helium burning occurs as a violent thermonuclear runaway which may propagate either as a convective deflagration (Type I burst) or as a detonation wave (Type II burst). Complete combustion of helium into 56 Ni releases from 10 38 to 10 40 erg km -2 and pushes hot plasma with β > 1 above the surface of the neutron star. Rapid expansion of the plasma channels a substantial fraction of the explosion energy into magnetic field stress. Spectral properties are expected to be complex with emission from both thermal and non-thermal processes. The hard γ-outburst of several seconds softens as the event proceeds and is followed by a period, typically of several minutes duration, of softer x-ray emission as the subsurface ashes of the thermonuclear explosion cool. In this model, most γ-ray bursts currently being observed are located at a distance of several hundred parsecs and should recur on a timescale of months to centuries with convective deflagrations (Type I bursts) being the more common variety. An explanation for Jacobson-like transients is also offered

  18. Gamma-ray bursts - a critical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tudose, Valeriu; Biermann, Peter

    2003-01-01

    We present a short general introduction into the field of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) research, summarizing the past and the present status. We give an general view of the GRBs observations to date, both in the prompt emission phase as well as in the afterglow phase, and a brief primer into the theory, mainly in the frame-work of the fireball model. (authors)

  19. The behaviour of neutron bursts in matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syros, C.

    1978-01-01

    An exact method is developed for solving the time-dependent linear transport equation for neutrons. The problem of finding the behaviour of neutron bursts in matter have been considered. The method leads to a new kind of perturbation theory applicable to the transport theoretical reactor dynamics. Applications of the theory are given for discontinuously or continuously distributed initial values of the neutron population. The boundary and initial conditions are exactly fulfilled. (author)

  20. Adiabatic burst evaporation from bicontinuous nanoporous membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichilmann, Sachar; Rücker, Kerstin; Haase, Markus; Enke, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Evaporation of volatile liquids from nanoporous media with bicontinuous morphology and pore diameters of a few 10 nm is an ubiquitous process. For example, such drying processes occur during syntheses of nanoporous materials by sol–gel chemistry or by spinodal decomposition in the presence of solvents as well as during solution impregnation of nanoporous hosts with functional guests. It is commonly assumed that drying is endothermic and driven by non-equilibrium partial pressures of the evaporating species in the gas phase. We show that nearly half of the liquid evaporates in an adiabatic mode involving burst-like liquid-to-gas conversions. During single adiabatic burst evaporation events liquid volumes of up to 107 μm3 are converted to gas. The adiabatic liquid-to-gas conversions occur if air invasion fronts get unstable because of the built-up of high capillary pressures. Adiabatic evaporation bursts propagate avalanche-like through the nanopore systems until the air invasion fronts have reached new stable configurations. Adiabatic cavitation bursts thus compete with Haines jumps involving air invasion front relaxation by local liquid flow without enhanced mass transport out of the nanoporous medium and prevail if the mean pore diameter is in the range of a few 10 nm. The results reported here may help optimize membrane preparation via solvent-based approaches, solution-loading of nanopore systems with guest materials as well as routine use of nanoporous membranes with bicontinuous morphology and may contribute to better understanding of adsorption/desorption processes in nanoporous media. PMID:25926406

  1. Bursts of occipital theta and alpha amplitude preceding alternation and repetition trials in a task-switching experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gladwin, T.E.; De Jong, Ritske

    The instantaneous amplitude of the theta and alpha bands of the electroencephalogram (EEG) was studied during preparation periods in a task-switching experiment. Subjects had to switch between tasks in which they were to respond to either the visual or the auditory component of the stimulus. 11-13

  2. Interactions among oscillatory pathways in NF-kappa B signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    White Michael RH

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sustained stimulation with tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha induces substantial oscillations—observed at both the single cell and population levels—in the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappa B system. Although the mechanism has not yet been elucidated fully, a core system has been identified consisting of a negative feedback loop involving NF-kappa B (RelA:p50 hetero-dimer and its inhibitor I-kappa B-alpha. Many authors have suggested that this core oscillator should couple to other oscillatory pathways. Results First we analyse single-cell data from experiments in which the NF-kappa B system is forced by short trains of strong pulses of TNF-alpha. Power spectra of the ratio of nuclear-to-cytoplasmic concentration of NF-kappa B suggest that the cells' responses are entrained by the pulsing frequency. Using a recent model of the NF-kappa B system due to Caroline Horton, we carried out extensive numerical simulations to analyze the response frequencies induced by trains of pulses of TNF-alpha stimulation having a wide range of frequencies and amplitudes. These studies suggest that for sufficiently weak stimulation, various nonlinear resonances should be observable. To explore further the possibility of probing alternative feedback mechanisms, we also coupled the model to sinusoidal signals with a wide range of strengths and frequencies. Our results show that, at least in simulation, frequencies other than those of the forcing and the main NF-kappa B oscillator can be excited via sub- and superharmonic resonance, producing quasiperiodic and even chaotic dynamics. Conclusions Our numerical results suggest that the entrainment phenomena observed in pulse-stimulated experiments is a consequence of the high intensity of the stimulation. Computational studies based on current models suggest that resonant interactions between periodic pulsatile forcing and the system's natural frequencies may become evident for sufficiently

  3. Transcription of repetitive DNA in Neurospora crassa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, S K; Chaudhuri, R K

    1975-01-01

    Repeated DNA sequences of Neurospora crassa were isolated and characterized. Approximately 10 to 12 percent of N. crassa DNA sequence were repeated, of which 7.3 percent were found to be transcribed in mid-log phase of mycelial growth as measured by DNA:RNA hybridization. It is suggested that part of repetitive DNA transcripts in N. crassa were mitochondrial and part were nuclear DNA. Most of the nuclear repeated DNAs, however, code for rRNA and tRNA in N. crassa. (auth)

  4. Black Hole Accretion in Gamma Ray Bursts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Janiuk

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We study the structure and evolution of the hyperaccreting disks and outflows in the gamma ray bursts central engines. The torus around a stellar mass black hole is composed of free nucleons, Helium, electron-positron pairs, and is cooled by neutrino emission. Accretion of matter powers the relativistic jets, responsible for the gamma ray prompt emission. The significant number density of neutrons in the disk and outflowing material will cause subsequent formation of heavier nuclei. We study the process of nucleosynthesis and its possible observational consequences. We also apply our scenario to the recent observation of the gravitational wave signal, detected on 14 September 2015 by the two Advanced LIGO detectors, and related to an inspiral and merger of a binary black hole system. A gamma ray burst that could possibly be related with the GW150914 event was observed by the Fermi satellite. It had a duration of about 1 s and appeared about 0.4 s after the gravitational-wave signal. We propose that a collapsing massive star and a black hole in a close binary could lead to the event. The gamma ray burst was powered by a weak neutrino flux produced in the star remnant’s matter. Low spin and kick velocity of the merged black hole are reproduced in our simulations. Coincident gravitational-wave emission originates from the merger of the collapsed core and the companion black hole.

  5. Burst firing enhances neural output correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Ka eChan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Neurons communicate and transmit information predominantly through spikes. Given that experimentally observed neural spike trains in a variety of brain areas can be highly correlated, it is important to investigate how neurons process correlated inputs. Most previous work in this area studied the problem of correlation transfer analytically by making significant simplifications on neural dynamics. Temporal correlation between inputs that arises from synaptic filtering, for instance, is often ignored when assuming that an input spike can at most generate one output spike. Through numerical simulations of a pair of leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF neurons receiving correlated inputs, we demonstrate that neurons in the presence of synaptic filtering by slow synapses exhibit strong output correlations. We then show that burst firing plays a central role in enhancing output correlations, which can explain the above-mentioned observation because synaptic filtering induces bursting. The observed changes of correlations are mostly on a long time scale. Our results suggest that other features affecting the prevalence of neural burst firing in biological neurons, e.g., adaptive spiking mechanisms, may play an important role in modulating the overall level of correlations in neural networks.

  6. Burst fracture of the fifth lumber vertebra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Hetao; Hu Zhenmin; Shi Yuxin

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the stability of the fifth lumber vertebra after burst fracture. Methods: 7 patients with burst fracture of the fifth lumber vertebra were examined by X-ray and CT, and followed for 6-36 months. The changes of wedge index, lordosis, degree of spinal canal stenosis and neurological features were observed during the episode and followed up. Results: The three spinal column structure was disrupted in 6 of 7 patients. The anterior and mid columns were involved in 1 case. Spinal stenosis of first and second degrees was seen in 3 cases, and in one case, there was no spinal canal stenosis. Lower lumber motor-root deficits were found in 2 of 7 patients and resolved in follow up. There was no tendency of progressive collapse of the vertebral body and spinal stenosis. Conclusions: Burst fracture of the fifth lumber vertebra was specific, most of them were stable fractures, although two or three columns of the spine were disrupted and accompanied by spinal canal stenosis

  7. Burst fracture of the fifth lumber vertebra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hetao, Cao; Zhenmin, Hu; Yuxin, Shi [Affiliated Hosptial of Nantong Medical College, JS, Nantong (China). Dept. of Radiology

    1999-04-01

    Objective: To investigate the stability of the fifth lumber vertebra after burst fracture. Methods: 7 patients with burst fracture of the fifth lumber vertebra were examined by X-ray and CT, and followed for 6-36 months. The changes of wedge index, lordosis, degree of spinal canal stenosis and neurological features were observed during the episode and followed up. Results: The three spinal column structure was disrupted in 6 of 7 patients. The anterior and mid columns were involved in 1 case. Spinal stenosis of first and second degrees was seen in 3 cases, and in one case, there was no spinal canal stenosis. Lower lumber motor-root deficits were found in 2 of 7 patients and resolved in follow up. There was no tendency of progressive collapse of the vertebral body and spinal stenosis. Conclusions: Burst fracture of the fifth lumber vertebra was specific, most of them were stable fractures, although two or three columns of the spine were disrupted and accompanied by spinal canal stenosis

  8. Rock burst prevention at steep seam mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efremov, G D

    1988-09-01

    At steep shield longwalls one method of preventing rock bursts is to avoid sharp angles during working. Stress in coal and rock body that appears when steep seams are worked where rock bursts occur at corners of set-up entries is discussed. The dynamic interaction between gas and rock pressure is assessed. Maintains that in order to avoid rock bursts at these places it is necessary to turn the protruding coal wall by 20-30 degrees towards the coal body to divert the action of shift forces. At the same time the face should also be inclined (by 10-15 degrees) to move the zones of increased stress away from the corner into the coal and rock body. Stress at workings with round cross-sections is 3-4 times lower than at square cross-sections. Recommendations are given that concern shearer loader operation (semi-spherical shape of the face), borehole drilling and water injection. Initial distance of 10-15 m between boreholes is suggested. 3 refs.

  9. Radio Flares from Gamma-ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopač, D.; Mundell, C. G.; Kobayashi, S.; Virgili, F. J.; Harrison, R.; Japelj, J.; Guidorzi, C.; Melandri, A.; Gomboc, A.

    2015-06-01

    We present predictions of centimeter and millimeter radio emission from reverse shocks (RSs) in the early afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with the goal of determining their detectability with current and future radio facilities. Using a range of GRB properties, such as peak optical brightness and time, isotropic equivalent gamma-ray energy, and redshift, we simulate radio light curves in a framework generalized for any circumburst medium structure and including a parameterization of the shell thickness regime that is more realistic than the simple assumption of thick- or thin-shell approximations. Building on earlier work by Mundell et al. and Melandri et al. in which the typical frequency of the RS was suggested to lie at radio rather than optical wavelengths at early times, we show that the brightest and most distinct RS radio signatures are detectable up to 0.1-1 day after the burst, emphasizing the need for rapid radio follow-up. Detection is easier for bursts with later optical peaks, high isotropic energies, lower circumburst medium densities, and at observing frequencies that are less prone to synchrotron self-absorption effects—typically above a few GHz. Given recent detections of polarized prompt gamma-ray and optical RS emission, we suggest that detection of polarized radio/millimeter emission will unambiguously confirm the presence of low-frequency RSs at early time.

  10. RADIO FLARES FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopač, D.; Mundell, C. G.; Kobayashi, S.; Virgili, F. J.; Harrison, R.; Japelj, J.; Gomboc, A.; Guidorzi, C.; Melandri, A.

    2015-01-01

    We present predictions of centimeter and millimeter radio emission from reverse shocks (RSs) in the early afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with the goal of determining their detectability with current and future radio facilities. Using a range of GRB properties, such as peak optical brightness and time, isotropic equivalent gamma-ray energy, and redshift, we simulate radio light curves in a framework generalized for any circumburst medium structure and including a parameterization of the shell thickness regime that is more realistic than the simple assumption of thick- or thin-shell approximations. Building on earlier work by Mundell et al. and Melandri et al. in which the typical frequency of the RS was suggested to lie at radio rather than optical wavelengths at early times, we show that the brightest and most distinct RS radio signatures are detectable up to 0.1–1 day after the burst, emphasizing the need for rapid radio follow-up. Detection is easier for bursts with later optical peaks, high isotropic energies, lower circumburst medium densities, and at observing frequencies that are less prone to synchrotron self-absorption effects—typically above a few GHz. Given recent detections of polarized prompt gamma-ray and optical RS emission, we suggest that detection of polarized radio/millimeter emission will unambiguously confirm the presence of low-frequency RSs at early time

  11. Secured Hash Based Burst Header Authentication Design for Optical Burst Switched Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balamurugan, A. M.; Sivasubramanian, A.; Parvathavarthini, B.

    2017-12-01

    The optical burst switching (OBS) is a promising technology that could meet the fast growing network demand. They are featured with the ability to meet the bandwidth requirement of applications that demand intensive bandwidth. OBS proves to be a satisfactory technology to tackle the huge bandwidth constraints, but suffers from security vulnerabilities. The objective of this proposed work is to design a faster and efficient burst header authentication algorithm for core nodes. There are two important key features in this work, viz., header encryption and authentication. Since the burst header is an important in optical burst switched network, it has to be encrypted; otherwise it is be prone to attack. The proposed MD5&RC4-4S based burst header authentication algorithm runs 20.75 ns faster than the conventional algorithms. The modification suggested in the proposed RC4-4S algorithm gives a better security and solves the correlation problems between the publicly known outputs during key generation phase. The modified MD5 recommended in this work provides 7.81 % better avalanche effect than the conventional algorithm. The device utilization result also shows the suitability of the proposed algorithm for header authentication in real time applications.

  12. Pull-production in repetitive remanufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCaskey, D.W. Jr.

    1992-09-01

    In the past, production activity control practices in most repetitive remanufacturing facilities resembled those used in intermittent production operations. These operations were characterized by large amounts of work-in-process (WIP), frequent work stoppages due to part shortages, excessive overtime, low product velocity, informal scheduling between dependent operations, low employee and management moral, and a lot of wasted time, material, labor, and space. Improvement in production activity control (PAC) methods for repetitive remanufactures has been hampered by uncertainty in: supply of incoming assets, configuration of assets, process times to refurbish assets, and yields in reclamation processes. collectively these uncertainties make shop floor operations seem uncontrollable. However, one United States Army depot has taken on the challenge. Through management supported, cross-functional teams, the Tooele Army Depot has designed and implemented pull-production systems for two of its major products, with several others to follow. This article presents a generalized version of Tooele`s pull-production system and highlights design characteristics which are specific to remanufacturing applications.

  13. Pull-production in repetitive remanufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCaskey, D.W. Jr.

    1992-09-01

    In the past, production activity control practices in most repetitive remanufacturing facilities resembled those used in intermittent production operations. These operations were characterized by large amounts of work-in-process (WIP), frequent work stoppages due to part shortages, excessive overtime, low product velocity, informal scheduling between dependent operations, low employee and management moral, and a lot of wasted time, material, labor, and space. Improvement in production activity control (PAC) methods for repetitive remanufactures has been hampered by uncertainty in: supply of incoming assets, configuration of assets, process times to refurbish assets, and yields in reclamation processes. collectively these uncertainties make shop floor operations seem uncontrollable. However, one United States Army depot has taken on the challenge. Through management supported, cross-functional teams, the Tooele Army Depot has designed and implemented pull-production systems for two of its major products, with several others to follow. This article presents a generalized version of Tooele's pull-production system and highlights design characteristics which are specific to remanufacturing applications.

  14. Simulating X-ray bursts during a transient accretion event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Zac; Heger, Alexander; Galloway, Duncan K.

    2018-06-01

    Modelling of thermonuclear X-ray bursts on accreting neutron stars has to date focused on stable accretion rates. However, bursts are also observed during episodes of transient accretion. During such events, the accretion rate can evolve significantly between bursts, and this regime provides a unique test for burst models. The accretion-powered millisecond pulsar SAX J1808.4-3658 exhibits accretion outbursts every 2-3 yr. During the well-sampled month-long outburst of 2002 October, four helium-rich X-ray bursts were observed. Using this event as a test case, we present the first multizone simulations of X-ray bursts under a time-dependent accretion rate. We investigate the effect of using a time-dependent accretion rate in comparison to constant, averaged rates. Initial results suggest that using a constant, average accretion rate between bursts may underestimate the recurrence time when the accretion rate is decreasing, and overestimate it when the accretion rate is increasing. Our model, with an accreted hydrogen fraction of X = 0.44 and a CNO metallicity of ZCNO = 0.02, reproduces the observed burst arrival times and fluences with root mean square (rms) errors of 2.8 h, and 0.11× 10^{-6} erg cm^{-2}, respectively. Our results support previous modelling that predicted two unobserved bursts and indicate that additional bursts were also missed by observations.

  15. Synergy Repetition Training versus Task Repetition Training in Acquiring New Skill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vrajeshri; Craig, Jamie; Schumacher, Michelle; Burns, Martin K; Florescu, Ionut; Vinjamuri, Ramana

    2017-01-01

    Traditionally, repetitive practice of a task is used to learn a new skill, exhibiting as immediately improved performance. Research suggests, however, that a more experience-based rather than exposure-based training protocol may allow for better transference of the skill to related tasks. In synergy-based motor control theory, fundamental motor skills, such as hand grasping, are represented with a synergy subspace that captures essential motor patterns. In this study, we propose that motor-skill learning through synergy-based mechanisms may provide advantages over traditional task repetition learning. A new task was designed to highlight the range of motion and dexterity of the human hand. Two separate training strategies were tested in healthy subjects: task repetition training and synergy training versus a control. All three groups showed improvements when retested on the same task. When tested on a similar, but different set of tasks, only the synergy group showed improvements in accuracy (9.27% increase) compared to the repetition (3.24% decline) and control (3.22% decline) groups. A kinematic analysis revealed that although joint angular peak velocities decreased, timing benefits stemmed from the initial feed-forward portion of the task (reaction time). Accuracy improvements may have derived from general improved coordination among the four involved fingers. These preliminary results warrant further investigation of synergy-based motor training in healthy individuals, as well as in individuals undergoing hand-based rehabilitative therapy.

  16. Oscillatory Hierarchy Controlling Cortical Excitability and Stimulus Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, A. S.; Lakatos, P.; McGinnis, T.; O'Connell, N.; Mills, A.; Knuth, K. H.; Chen, C.; Karmos, G.; Schroeder, C. E.

    2004-01-01

    Cortical gamma band oscillations have been recorded in sensory cortices of cats and monkeys, and are thought to aid in perceptual binding. Gamma activity has also been recorded in the rat hippocampus and entorhinal cortex, where it has been shown, that field gamma power is modulated at theta frequency. Since the power of gamma activity in the sensory cortices is not constant (gamma-bursts). we decided to examine the relationship between gamma power and the phase of low frequency oscillation in the auditory cortex of the awake macaque. Macaque monkeys were surgically prepared for chronic awake electrophysiological recording. During the time of the experiments. linear array multielectrodes were inserted in area AI to obtain laminar current source density (CSD) and multiunit activity profiles. Instantaneous theta and gamma power and phase was extracted by applying the Morlet wavelet transformation to the CSD. Gamma power was averaged for every 1 degree of low frequency oscillations to calculate power-phase relation. Both gamma and theta-delta power are largest in the supragranular layers. Power modulation of gamma activity is phase locked to spontaneous, as well as stimulus-related local theta and delta field oscillations. Our analysis also revealed that the power of theta oscillations is always largest at a certain phase of delta oscillation. Auditory stimuli produce evoked responses in the theta band (Le., there is pre- to post-stimulus addition of theta power), but there is also indication that stimuli may cause partial phase re-setting of spontaneous delta (and thus also theta and gamma) oscillations. We also show that spontaneous oscillations might play a role in the processing of incoming sensory signals by 'preparing' the cortex.

  17. Dynamic encoding of natural luminance sequences by LGN bursts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas A Lesica

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available In the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN of the thalamus, visual stimulation produces two distinct types of responses known as tonic and burst. Due to the dynamics of the T-type Ca(2+ channels involved in burst generation, the type of response evoked by a particular stimulus depends on the resting membrane potential, which is controlled by a network of modulatory connections from other brain areas. In this study, we use simulated responses to natural scene movies to describe how modulatory and stimulus-driven changes in LGN membrane potential interact to determine the luminance sequences that trigger burst responses. We find that at low resting potentials, when the T channels are de-inactivated and bursts are relatively frequent, an excitatory stimulus transient alone is sufficient to evoke a burst. However, to evoke a burst at high resting potentials, when the T channels are inactivated and bursts are relatively rare, prolonged inhibitory stimulation followed by an excitatory transient is required. We also observe evidence of these effects in vivo, where analysis of experimental recordings demonstrates that the luminance sequences that trigger bursts can vary dramatically with the overall burst percentage of the response. To characterize the functional consequences of the effects of resting potential on burst generation, we simulate LGN responses to different luminance sequences at a range of resting potentials with and without a mechanism for generating bursts. Using analysis based on signal detection theory, we show that bursts enhance detection of specific luminance sequences, ranging from the onset of excitatory sequences at low resting potentials to the offset of inhibitory sequences at high resting potentials. These results suggest a dynamic role for burst responses during visual processing that may change according to behavioral state.

  18. Bursting endemic bubbles in an adaptive network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherborne, N.; Blyuss, K. B.; Kiss, I. Z.

    2018-04-01

    The spread of an infectious disease is known to change people's behavior, which in turn affects the spread of disease. Adaptive network models that account for both epidemic and behavioral change have found oscillations, but in an extremely narrow region of the parameter space, which contrasts with intuition and available data. In this paper we propose a simple susceptible-infected-susceptible epidemic model on an adaptive network with time-delayed rewiring, and show that oscillatory solutions are now present in a wide region of the parameter space. Altering the transmission or rewiring rates reveals the presence of an endemic bubble—an enclosed region of the parameter space where oscillations are observed.

  19. Phase-dependent effects of stimuli locked to oscillatory activity in cultured cortical networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegenga, J.; le Feber, Jakob; Marani, Enrico; Rutten, Wim

    The archetypal activity pattern in cultures of dissociated neurons is spontaneous network-wide bursting. Bursts may interfere with controlled activation of synaptic plasticity, but can be suppressed by the application of stimuli at a sufficient rate. We sinusoidally modulated (4 Hz) the pulse rate

  20. Effect of sp3-hybridized defects on the oscillatory behavior of carbon nanotube oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Taiyu; Ding, Tony Weixi; Pei, Qing-Xiang; Zhang, Yong-Wei

    2011-01-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the oscillatory behaviors of carbon nanotube oscillators containing sp 3 -hybridized defects formed by hydrogen chemisorption. It is found that the presence of these defects significantly affects the kinetic and potential energies of the nanotube systems, which in turn affects their oscillation periods and frequencies. We have also studied the oscillatory characteristics of the oscillators containing sp 3 -hybridized Stone-Wales defects. Our results show that it is possible to control the motion of the inner nanotube by introducing sp 3 -hybridized defects on the outer nanotube, which provides a potential way to tune the oscillatory behavior of nanotube oscillators. -- Highlights: → sp 3 -hybridized defects increase energy dissipation. → sp 3 -hybridized defects arranged in a row have stronger effect than that in a ring. → sp 3 -hybridized defects reduces the effect of SW defects.

  1. Shear and loading in channels: Oscillatory shearing and edge currents of superconducting vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wambaugh, J. F.; Marchesoni, F.; Nori, Franco

    2003-04-01

    Via computer simulations we study the motion of quantized magnetic flux-lines, or vortices, confined to a straight pin-free channel in a strong-pinning superconducting sample. We find that, when a constant current is applied across this system, a very unusual oscillatory shearing appears, in which the vortices moving at the edges of the channel periodically trail behind and then suddenly leapfrog past the vortices moving in the inner rows. For small enough driving forces, this oscillatory shearing dynamic phase is replaced by a continuous shearing phase in which the distance between initially-nearby vortices grows in time, quickly destroying the order of the lattice. An animation of this novel “oscillatory leapfrogging shear” effect of the vortex edge currents appears in http://www-personal.engin.umich.edu/˜nori/channel/

  2. The effect of a laser beam displacement on parametric oscillatory instabilities for Advanced LIGO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinert, D.; Strigin, S.E.

    2011-01-01

    The arm cavities of real gravitational wave detectors can show small deviations like a tilt or a spatial shift between the cavity mirrors. These deviations lead to a separation of the optical mode centres with respect to the mirror's centre. In this Letter we perform the computation of parametric instable modes considering the described displacement. We further analyse the possibility of parametric oscillatory instability in the Advanced LIGO interferometer for the case of a displaced arm cavity. Our results reveal an additional number of optical and elastic mode combinations due to a displacement that can give rise to the undesirable effect of parametric oscillatory instability. -- Highlights: → We analyse the possibility of parametric oscillatory instability in the Advanced LIGO interferometer. → We perform the computation of parametric instable modes considering the mirror displacement. → Our results reveal an additional number of optical and elastic mode unstable combinations.

  3. The role of high-frequency oscillatory activity in reward processing and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco-Pallarés, Josep; Münte, Thomas F; Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni

    2015-02-01

    Oscillatory activity has been proposed as a key mechanism in the integration of brain activity of distant structures. Particularly, high frequency brain oscillatory activity in the beta and gamma range has received increasing interest in the domains of attention and memory. In addition, a number of recent studies have revealed an increase of beta-gamma activity (20-35 Hz) after unexpected or relevant positive reward outcomes. In the present manuscript we review the literature on this phenomenon and we propose that this activity is a brain signature elicited by unexpected positive outcomes in order to transmit a fast motivational value signal to the reward network. In addition, we hypothesize that beta-gamma oscillatory activity indexes the interaction between attentional and emotional systems, and that it directly reflects the appearance of unexpected positive rewards in learning-related contexts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Approximate damped oscillatory solutions and error estimates for the perturbed Klein–Gordon equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Caier; Zhang, Weiguo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Analyze the dynamical behavior of the planar dynamical system corresponding to the perturbed Klein–Gordon equation. • Present the relations between the properties of traveling wave solutions and the perturbation coefficient. • Obtain all explicit expressions of approximate damped oscillatory solutions. • Investigate error estimates between exact damped oscillatory solutions and the approximate solutions and give some numerical simulations. - Abstract: The influence of perturbation on traveling wave solutions of the perturbed Klein–Gordon equation is studied by applying the bifurcation method and qualitative theory of dynamical systems. All possible approximate damped oscillatory solutions for this equation are obtained by using undetermined coefficient method. Error estimates indicate that the approximate solutions are meaningful. The results of numerical simulations also establish our analysis

  5. High energy, single frequency, tunable laser source operating in burst mode for space based lidar applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, Alberto; Mondello, Alessia; Sapia, Adalberto; D'Ottavi, Alessandro; Brotini, Mauro; Gironi, Gianna; Suetta, Enrico

    2017-11-01

    This paper describes energetic, spatial, temporal and spectral characterization measurements of the Engineering Qualification Model (EQM) of the Laser Transmitter Assembly (TXA) used in the ALADIN instrument currently under development for the ESA ADM-AEOLUS mission (EADS Astrium as prime contractor for the satellite and the instrument). The EQM is equivalent to the Flight Model, with the exception of some engineering grade components. The Laser Transmitter Assembly, based on a diode pumped tripled Nd:YAG laser, is used to generate laser pulses at a nominal wavelength of 355 nm. This laser is operated in burst mode, with a pulse repetition cycle of 100 Hz during bursts. It is capable to operate in Single Longitudinal Mode and to be tuned over 25 GHz range. An internal "network" of sensors has been implemented inside the laser architecture to allow "in flight" monitoring of transmitter. Energy in excess of 100 mJ, with a spatial beam quality factor (M2) lower than 3, a spectral linewidth less than 50 MHz with a frequency stability better than 4 MHz on short term period have been measured on the EQM. Most of the obtained results are well within the expected values and match the Instrument requirements. They constitute an important achievement, showing the absence of major critical areas in terms of performance and the capability to obtain them in a rugged and compact structure suitable for space applications. The EQM will be submitted in the near future to an Environmental test campaign.

  6. The role of short-term memory impairment in nonword repetition, real word repetition, and nonword decoding: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Beate

    2018-01-01

    In a companion study, adults with dyslexia and adults with a probable history of childhood apraxia of speech showed evidence of difficulty with processing sequential information during nonword repetition, multisyllabic real word repetition and nonword decoding. Results suggested that some errors arose in visual encoding during nonword reading, all levels of processing but especially short-term memory storage/retrieval during nonword repetition, and motor planning and programming during complex real word repetition. To further investigate the role of short-term memory, a participant with short-term memory impairment (MI) was recruited. MI was confirmed with poor performance during a sentence repetition and three nonword repetition tasks, all of which have a high short-term memory load, whereas typical performance was observed during tests of reading, spelling, and static verbal knowledge, all with low short-term memory loads. Experimental results show error-free performance during multisyllabic real word repetition but high counts of sequence errors, especially migrations and assimilations, during nonword repetition, supporting short-term memory as a locus of sequential processing deficit during nonword repetition. Results are also consistent with the hypothesis that during complex real word repetition, short-term memory is bypassed as the word is recognized and retrieved from long-term memory prior to producing the word.

  7. PWR clad ballooning: The effect of circumferential clad temperature variations on the burst strain/burst temperature relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barlow, P.

    1983-01-01

    By experiment, it has been shown by other workers that there is a reduction in the creep ductility of Zircaloy 4 in the α+β phase transition region. Results from single rod burst tests also show a reduction in burst strain in the α+β phase region. In this report it is shown theoretically that for single rod burst tests in the presence of circumferential temperature gradients, the temperature dependence of the mean burst strain is not determined by temperature variations in creep ductility, but is governed by the temperature sensitivity of the creep strain rate, which is shown to be a maximum in the α+β phase transition region. To demonstrate this effect, the mean clad strain at burst was calculated for creep straining at different temperature levels in the α, α+β and β phase regions. Cross-pin temperature gradients were applied which produced strain variations around the clad which were greatest in the α+β phase region. The mean strain at burst was determined using a maximum local burst strain (i.e. a creep ductility) which is independent of temperature. By assuming cross-pin temperature gradients which are typical of those observed during burst tests, then the calculated mean burst strain/burst temperature relationship gave good agreement with experiment. The calculations also show that when circumferential temperature differences are present, the calculated mean strain at burst is not sensitive to variations in the magnitude of the assumed creep ductility. This reduces the importance of the assumed burst criterion in the calculations. Hence a temperature independent creep ductility (e.g. 100% local strain) is adequate as a burst criterion for calculations under PWR LOCA conditions. (author)

  8. Dynamic behavior of the bray-liebhafsky oscillatory reaction controlled by sulfuric acid and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pejić, N.; Vujković, M.; Maksimović, J.; Ivanović, A.; Anić, S.; Čupić, Ž.; Kolar-Anić, Lj.

    2011-12-01

    The non-periodic, periodic and chaotic regimes in the Bray-Liebhafsky (BL) oscillatory reaction observed in a continuously fed well stirred tank reactor (CSTR) under isothermal conditions at various inflow concentrations of the sulfuric acid were experimentally studied. In each series (at any fixed temperature), termination of oscillatory behavior via saddle loop infinite period bifurcation (SNIPER) as well as some kind of the Andronov-Hopf bifurcation is presented. In addition, it was found that an increase of temperature, in different series of experiments resulted in the shift of bifurcation point towards higher values of sulfuric acid concentration.

  9. Oscillatory regime in the multidimensional homogeneous cosmological models induced by a vector field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benini, R; Kirillov, A A; Montani, Giovanni

    2005-01-01

    We show that in multidimensional gravity, vector fields completely determine the structure and properties of singularity. It turns out that in the presence of a vector field the oscillatory regime exists in all spatial dimensions and for all homogeneous models. By analysing the Hamiltonian equations we derive the Poincare return map associated with the Kasner indexes and fix the rules according to which the Kasner vectors rotate. In correspondence to a four-dimensional spacetime, the oscillatory regime here constructed overlaps the usual Belinski-Khalatnikov-Liftshitz one

  10. Capacity of oscillatory associative-memory networks with error-free retrieval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, Takashi; Lai Yingcheng; Hoppensteadt, Frank C.

    2004-01-01

    Networks of coupled periodic oscillators (similar to the Kuramoto model) have been proposed as models of associative memory. However, error-free retrieval states of such oscillatory networks are typically unstable, resulting in a near zero capacity. This puts the networks at disadvantage as compared with the classical Hopfield network. Here we propose a simple remedy for this undesirable property and show rigorously that the error-free capacity of our oscillatory, associative-memory networks can be made as high as that of the Hopfield network. They can thus not only provide insights into the origin of biological memory, but can also be potentially useful for applications in information science and engineering

  11. Review of GRANAT observations of gamma-ray bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terekhov, O.; Denissenko, D.; Sunyaev, R.

    1995-01-01

    The GRANAT observatory was launched into a high apogee orbit on 1 December, 1989. Three instruments onboard GRANAT - PHEBUS, WATCH and SIGMA are able to detect gamma-ray bursts in a very broad energy range from 6 keV up to 100 MeV. Over 250 gamma-ray bursts were detected. We discuss the results...... of the observations of the time histories and spectral evolution of the detected events provided by the different instruments in different energy ranges. Short Gamma-Ray Bursts ( 2 s) events. Evidence of the existence...... of four differently behaving componenents in gamma-ray burst spectra is discussed. Statistical properties of the gamma-ray burst sources based on the 5 years of observations with (∼ 10−6 erg/cm2) sensitivity as well as the results of high sensitivity (∼ 10−8 erg/cm2) search for Gamma-Ray Bursts within...

  12. Observation of cosmic gamma ray burst by Hinotori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okudaira, Kiyoaki; Yoshimori, Masato; Hirashima, Yo; Kondo, Ichiro.

    1982-01-01

    The solar gamma ray detecor (SGR) on Hinotori has no collimator, and the collimator of a hard X-ray monitor is not effective for gamma ray with energy more than 100 KeV. Accordingly, the detection system can detect cosmic gamma ray burst, and two bursts were observed. The first burst was detected on February 28, 1981, and the source of the burst was in the direction of 81 degree from Venus. The time profile and the spectrum were observed. In July 21, 1981, the second burst was detected. The time profile obtained with the SGR was compared with those of PVO (Pioneer Venus Orbiter) and LASL-ISEE. The time difference among the data of time profiles indicated that the source of the burst was not the sun. The spectrum was also measured. (Kato, T.)

  13. Gamma-Ray Bursts: 4th Huntsville Symposium. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meegan, C.A.; Preece, R.D.; Koshut, T.M.

    1998-01-01

    These proceedings represent papers presented at the Fourth Huntsville Gamma-Ray Bursts Symposium held in September, 1997 in Huntsville, Alabama, USA. This conference occurred at a crucial time in the history of the gamma-ray burst research. In early 1997, 30 years after the detection of the first gamma-ray burst by the Vela satellites, counterparts to bursts were finally detected at optical and radio wavelengths. The symposium attracted about 200 scientists from 16 countries. Some of the topics discussed include gamma-ray burst spectra, x-ray observations, optical observations, radio observations, host galaxies, shocks and afterglows and models of gamma-ray bursts. There were 183 papers presented, out of these, 16 have been abstracted for the Energy Science and Technology database

  14. Implications of fast radio bursts for superconducting cosmic strings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Yun-Wei [Institute of Astrophysics, Central China Normal University, 152 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430079 (China); Cheng, Kwong-Sang [Department of Physics, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China); Shiu, Gary; Tye, Henry, E-mail: yuyw@phy.ccnu.edu.cn, E-mail: hrspksc@hku.hk, E-mail: shiu@ust.hk, E-mail: iastye@ust.hk [Department of Physics and Institute for Advanced Study, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Hong Kong (China)

    2014-11-01

    Highly beamed, short-duration electromagnetic bursts could be produced by superconducting cosmic string (SCS) loops oscillating in cosmic magnetic fields. We demonstrated that the basic characteristics of SCS bursts such as the electromagnetic frequency and the energy release could be consistently exhibited in the recently discovered fast radio bursts (FRBs). Moreover, it is first showed that the redshift distribution of the FRBs can also be well accounted for by the SCS burst model. Such agreements between the FRBs and SCS bursts suggest that the FRBs could originate from SCS bursts and thus they could provide an effective probe to study SCSs. The obtained values of model parameters indicate that the loops generating the FRBs have a small length scale and they are mostly formed in the radiation-dominated cosmological epoch.

  15. Implications of fast radio bursts for superconducting cosmic strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Yun-Wei; Cheng, Kwong-Sang; Shiu, Gary; Tye, Henry

    2014-01-01

    Highly beamed, short-duration electromagnetic bursts could be produced by superconducting cosmic string (SCS) loops oscillating in cosmic magnetic fields. We demonstrated that the basic characteristics of SCS bursts such as the electromagnetic frequency and the energy release could be consistently exhibited in the recently discovered fast radio bursts (FRBs). Moreover, it is first showed that the redshift distribution of the FRBs can also be well accounted for by the SCS burst model. Such agreements between the FRBs and SCS bursts suggest that the FRBs could originate from SCS bursts and thus they could provide an effective probe to study SCSs. The obtained values of model parameters indicate that the loops generating the FRBs have a small length scale and they are mostly formed in the radiation-dominated cosmological epoch

  16. Gamma ray bursts of black hole universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T. X.

    2015-07-01

    Slightly modifying the standard big bang theory, Zhang recently developed a new cosmological model called black hole universe, which has only a single postulate but is consistent with Mach's principle, governed by Einstein's general theory of relativity, and able to explain existing observations of the universe. In the previous studies, we have explained the origin, structure, evolution, expansion, cosmic microwave background radiation, quasar, and acceleration of black hole universe, which grew from a star-like black hole with several solar masses through a supermassive black hole with billions of solar masses to the present state with hundred billion-trillions of solar masses by accreting ambient matter and merging with other black holes. This study investigates gamma ray bursts of black hole universe and provides an alternative explanation for the energy and spectrum measurements of gamma ray bursts according to the black hole universe model. The results indicate that gamma ray bursts can be understood as emissions of dynamic star-like black holes. A black hole, when it accretes its star or merges with another black hole, becomes dynamic. A dynamic black hole has a broken event horizon and thus cannot hold the inside hot (or high-frequency) blackbody radiation, which flows or leaks out and produces a GRB. A star when it collapses into its core black hole produces a long GRB and releases the gravitational potential energy of the star as gamma rays. A black hole that merges with another black hole produces a short GRB and releases a part of their blackbody radiation as gamma rays. The amount of energy obtained from the emissions of dynamic star-like black holes are consistent with the measurements of energy from GRBs. The GRB energy spectra derived from this new emission mechanism are also consistent with the measurements.

  17. Emergent synchronous bursting of oxytocin neuronal network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Rossoni

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available When young suckle, they are rewarded intermittently with a let-down of milk that results from reflex secretion of the hormone oxytocin; without oxytocin, newly born young will die unless they are fostered. Oxytocin is made by magnocellular hypothalamic neurons, and is secreted from their nerve endings in the pituitary in response to action potentials (spikes that are generated in the cell bodies and which are propagated down their axons to the nerve endings. Normally, oxytocin cells discharge asynchronously at 1-3 spikes/s, but during suckling, every 5 min or so, each discharges a brief, intense burst of spikes that release a pulse of oxytocin into the circulation. This reflex was the first, and is perhaps the best, example of a physiological role for peptide-mediated communication within the brain: it is coordinated by the release of oxytocin from the dendrites of oxytocin cells; it can be facilitated by injection of tiny amounts of oxytocin into the hypothalamus, and it can be blocked by injection of tiny amounts of oxytocin antagonist. Here we show how synchronized bursting can arise in a neuronal network model that incorporates basic observations of the physiology of oxytocin cells. In our model, bursting is an emergent behaviour of a complex system, involving both positive and negative feedbacks, between many sparsely connected cells. The oxytocin cells are regulated by independent afferent inputs, but they interact by local release of oxytocin and endocannabinoids. Oxytocin released from the dendrites of these cells has a positive-feedback effect, while endocannabinoids have an inhibitory effect by suppressing the afferent input to the cells.

  18. Object color affects identification and repetition priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uttl, Bob; Graf, Peter; Santacruz, Pilar

    2006-10-01

    We investigated the influence of color on the identification of both non-studied and studied objects. Participants studied black and white and color photos of common objects and memory was assessed with an identification test. Consistent with our meta-analysis of prior research, we found that objects were easier to identify from color than from black and white photos. We also found substantial priming in all conditions, and study-to-test changes in an object's color reduced the magnitude of priming. Color-specific priming effects were large for color-complex objects, but minimal for color-simple objects. The pattern and magnitude of priming effects was not influenced either by the extent to which an object always appears in the same color (i.e., whether a color is symptomatic of an object) or by the object's origin (natural versus fabricated). We discuss the implications of our findings for theoretical accounts of object perception and repetition priming.

  19. PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION IN ORGANISATIONS OF REPETITIVE ACTIVITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek WIRKUS

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The study presents the implementation of projects in organisations that achieve business objectives through the imple-mentation of repetitive actions. Projects in these organisations are, on the one hand, treated as marginal activities, while the results of these projects have significant impact on the delivery of main processes, e.g. through the introduction of new products. Human capital and solutions in this field bear impact on the success of projects in these organisations, which is not always conducive to smooth implementation of projects. Conflict results from the nature of a project, which is a one-time and temporary process, so organisational solutions are also temporary. It influences on attitudes and com-mitment of the project contractors. The paper identifies and analyses factors which affect the success of the projects.

  20. Low-Intensity Repetitive Exercise Induced Rhabdomyolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Tran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyolysis is a rare condition caused by the proteins of damaged muscle cells entering the bloodstream and damaging the kidneys. Common symptoms of rhabdomyolysis are muscle pain and fatigue in conjunction with dark urine; kidney damage is a common symptom among these patients. We present a case of a 23-year-old woman who displayed myalgia in the upper extremities caused by low-intensity and high-repetition exercise. She was successfully diagnosed and treated for exertional rhabdomyolysis. This patient had no significant medical history that would induce this condition. We urge the emergency medical community to observe and monitor patients that complain of myalgia to ensure they are not suffering from rhabdomyolysis even in atypical cases.

  1. Near stellar sources of gamma-ray bursts

    OpenAIRE

    Luchkov, B. I.; Markin, P. D.

    2012-01-01

    Correlation analysis of gamma-ray burst coordinates and nearby stars, registered on 2008-2011, revealed 5 coincidences with angular accuracy better than 0.1 degree. The random probability is $7\\times 10^{-7}$, so evidencing that coincident stars are indeed gamma-ray burst sources. The proposed method should be continued in order to provide their share in common balance of cosmic gamma-ray bursts.

  2. On Burst Detection and Prediction in Retweeting Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-22

    We conduct a comprehensive empirical analysis of a large microblogging dataset collected from the Sina Weibo and report our observations of burst...whether and how accurate we can predict bursts using classifiers based on the extracted features. Our empirical study of the Sina Weibo data shows the...feasibility of burst prediction using appropriately extracted features and classic classifiers. 1 Introduction Microblogging, such as Twitter and Sina

  3. Voltage interval mappings for an elliptic bursting model

    OpenAIRE

    Wojcik, Jeremy; Shilnikov, Andrey

    2013-01-01

    We employed Poincar\\'e return mappings for a parameter interval to an exemplary elliptic bursting model, the FitzHugh-Nagumo-Rinzel model. Using the interval mappings, we were able to examine in detail the bifurcations that underlie the complex activity transitions between: tonic spiking and bursting, bursting and mixed-mode oscillations, and finally, mixed-mode oscillations and quiescence in the FitzHugh-Nagumo-Rinzel model. We illustrate the wealth of information, qualitative and quantitati...

  4. The velocities of type II solar radio bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tlamicha, A.; Karlicky, M.

    1976-01-01

    A list is presented of type II radio bursts identified at Ondrejov between January 1973 and December 1974 in the frequency range of the dynamic spectrum 70 to 810 MHz. The velocities of shock waves in the individual cases of type II bursts are given using the fourfold Newkirk model. Some problems associated with type II radio bursts and with the propagation of the shock wave into the interplanetary space and into the region of the Earth are also discussed. (author)

  5. Infrared and X-ray bursts from the rapid burster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apparao, K.M.V.; Chitre, S.M.

    1979-01-01

    Studies on sudden bursts from the cosmic X-ray sources are reported. The processes occuring from the rise in luminosity of an x-ray source to its collapse are described. Records of the x-ray burst from the globular cluster NGC 6624 and the 'Rapid Burster' are shown. The Infra-red bursts from the Rapid Burster are also explained. (A.K.)

  6. Physical characterization of the Skua fast burst assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paternoster, R.; Bounds, J.; Sanchez, R.; Miko, D.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the system design and ongoing efforts to characterize the machine physics and operating properties of the Skua fast burst assembly. The machine is currently operating up to prompt critical while we await approval for super-prompt burst operations. Efforts have centered on characterizing neutron kinetic properties, comparing calculated and measured temperature coefficients and power distributions, improving the burst reproducibility, examining the site-wide dose characteristics, and fitting the machine with cooling and filtration systems

  7. Self-regulation of turbulence bursts and transport barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floriani, E; Ciraolo, G; Ghendrih, Ph; Sarazin, Y; Lima, R

    2013-01-01

    The interplay between turbulent bursts and transport barriers is analyzed with a simplified model of interchange turbulence in magnetically confined plasmas. The turbulent bursts spread into the transport barriers and, depending on the competing magnitude of the burst and stopping capability of the barrier, can burn through. Simulations of two models of transport barriers are presented: a hard barrier where interchange turbulence modes are stable in a prescribed region and a soft barrier with external plasma biasing. The response of the transport barriers to the non-linear perturbations of the turbulent bursts, addressed in a predator–prey approach, indicates that the barriers monitor an amplification factor of the turbulent bursts, with amplification smaller than one for most bursts and, in some cases, amplification factors that can significantly exceed unity. The weak barriers in corrugated profiles and magnetic structures, as well as the standard barriers, are characterized by these transmission properties, which then regulate the turbulent burst transport properties. The interplays of barriers and turbulent bursts are modeled as competing stochastic processes. For different classes of the probability density function (PDF) of these processes, one can predict the heavy tail properties of the bursts downstream from the barrier, either exponential for a leaky barrier, or with power laws for a tight barrier. The intrinsic probing of the transport barriers by the turbulent bursts thus gives access to the properties of the barriers. The main stochastic variables are the barrier width and the spreading distance of the turbulent bursts within the barrier, together with their level of correlation. One finds that in the case of a barrier with volumetric losses, such as radiation or particle losses as addressed in our present simulations, the stochastic model predicts a leaky behavior with an exponential PDF of escaping turbulent bursts in agreement with the simulation

  8. Repetitively pulsed power for meat pasteurization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, E.L.; Kaye, R.J.; Neau, E.L.

    1994-01-01

    Electronic pasteurization of meat offers the potential for drastically reducing the incidence of food poisoning caused by biological pathogens accidentally introduced into meat products. Previous work has shown that γ-rays are an effective method of destroying E. coli 0157:H7, Salmonella, C. jejuni, L. monocytogenes, Listeria, and S. aureus bacteria types. The concern with the use of γ-rays is that radioactive material must be used in the pasteurization process that can lead to some market resistance and activist pressure on the meat industry. The use of accelerator generated high average power electron beams, at energies less than 10 MeV, or X-rays, with energies below 5 MeV, have been approved by the FDA for use in pasteurizing foods. Accelerator produced electronic pasteurization has the advantage that no radioactive material inventory is required. Electronic pasteurization has the additional benefit that it removes bacterial pathogens on the meat surface as well as within the volume of the meat product. High average power, repetitively-pulsed, broad-area electron beam sources being developed in the RHEPP program are suitable for large scale meat treatment in packing plant environments. RHEPP-II, which operates at 2.5 MeV and 25 kA at pulse repetition frequencies up to 120 Hz has adequate electron energy to penetrate hamburger patties which comprise about half of the beef consumption in the United States. Ground beef also has the highest potential for contamination since considerable processing is required in its production. A meat pasteurization facility using this size of accelerator source should be capable of treating 10 6 pounds of hamburger patties per hour to a dose of up to 3 kGy (300 kilorads). The RHEPP modular accelerator technology can easily be modified for other production rates and types of products

  9. Optical burst switching based satellite backbone network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tingting; Guo, Hongxiang; Wang, Cen; Wu, Jian

    2018-02-01

    We propose a novel time slot based optical burst switching (OBS) architecture for GEO/LEO based satellite backbone network. This architecture can provide high speed data transmission rate and high switching capacity . Furthermore, we design the control plane of this optical satellite backbone network. The software defined network (SDN) and network slice (NS) technologies are introduced. Under the properly designed control mechanism, this backbone network is flexible to support various services with diverse transmission requirements. Additionally, the LEO access and handoff management in this network is also discussed.

  10. Decay time of type III solar bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, H.; Haddock, F.T.

    1972-01-01

    Sixty-four Type III bursts that drifted to frequencies below 600 kHz between March 1968 and February 1970 were analyzed. Decay times were measured and combined with published data ranging up to about 200 MHz. By fitting power functions to the computed and observed decay times, and using the local plasma hypothesis, it was found that the ratio rho of computed to observed values varies with radiocentric radial distance according to a power function rho = 3r 0 . 7 . (U.S.)

  11. Burst protected nuclear reactor plant with PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harand, E.; Michel, E.

    1978-01-01

    In the PWR, several integrated components from the steam raising unit and the main coolant pump are grouped around the reactor pressure vessel in a multiloop circuit and in a vertical arrangement. For safety reasons all primary circuit components and pipelines are situated in burst protection covers. To reduce the area of the plant straight tube steam raising units with forced circulation are used as steam raising units. The boiler pumps are connected to the vertical tubes and to the pressure vessel via double pipelines made as twin chamber pipes. (DG) [de

  12. Gamma ray bursts from extragalactic sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyle, Fred; Burbidge, Geoffrey

    1992-01-01

    The properties of gamma ray bursts of classical type are found to be explicable in terms of high speed collisions between stars. A model is proposed in which the frequency of such collisions can be calculated. The model is then applied to the nuclei of galaxies in general on the basis that galaxies, or at least some fraction of them, originate in the expulsion of stars from creation centers. Evidence that low level activity of this kind is also taking place at the center of our own Galaxy is discussed. The implications for galactic evolution are discussed and a negative view of black holes is taken.

  13. Capabilities of the Power Burst Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, W.A.; Jensen, A.M.; McCardell, R.K.

    1982-01-01

    The unique and diverse test capabilities of the Power Burst Facility (PBF) are described in this paper. The PBF test reactor, located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, simulates normal, off-normal, and accident operating conditions of light water reactor fuel rods. An overview description is given, with specific detail on design and operating characteristics of the driver core, experiment test loop, fission product detection system, test train assembly facility, and support equipment which make the testing capability of the PBF so versatile

  14. Burst-Mode Asynchronous Controllers on FPGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duarte L. Oliveira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available FPGAs have been mainly used to design synchronous circuits. Asynchronous design on FPGAs is difficult because the resulting circuit may suffer from hazard problems. We propose a method that implements a popular class of asynchronous circuits, known as burst mode, on FPGAs based on look-up table architectures. We present two conditions that, if satisfied, guarantee essential hazard-free implementation on any LUT-based FPGA. By doing that, besides all the intrinsic advantages of asynchronous over synchronous circuits, they also take advantage of the shorter design time and lower cost associated with FPGA designs.

  15. Prompt Emission Observations of Swift BAT Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthelmy, Scott

    2009-01-01

    We review the prompt emission properties of Swift BAT gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We present the global properties of BAT GRBs based on their spectral and temporal characteristics. The BAT T90 and T50 durations peak at 80 and 20 s, respectively. The peak energy (Epeak) of about 60% of BAT GRBs is very likely to be less than 1.00 keV. We also present the BAT characteristics of GRBs with soft spectra, so called Xray flashes (XRFs). We will compare the BAT GRBs and XRFs parameter distribution to the other missions.

  16. Accident analysis for US fast burst reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paternoster, R.; Flanders, M.; Kazi, H.

    1994-01-01

    In the US fast burst reactor (FBR) community there has been increasing emphasis and scrutiny on safety analysis and understanding of possible accident scenarios. This paper summarizes recent work in these areas that is going on at the different US FBR sites. At this time, all of the FBR facilities have or in the process of updating and refining their accident analyses. This effort is driven by two objectives: to obtain a more realistic scenario for emergency response procedures and contingency plans, and to determine compliance with changing regulatory standards

  17. Burst Alert Robotic Telescope and Optical Afterglows

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nekola, Martin; Hudec, René; Jelínek, M.; Kubánek, P.; Polášek, Cyril; Štrobl, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 18, 3/4 (2009), s. 374-378 ISSN 1392-0049. [INTEGRAL/BART workshop 2009. Karlovy Vary, 26.03.2009-29.03.2009] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/08/1207 Grant - others:ESA(XE) ESA-PECS project No. 98023; Spanish Ministry of Education and Science(ES) AP2003-1407 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : gamma rays bursts, * observations * robotic telescopes Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 1.032, year: 2009

  18. Solar energetic particles and radio burst emission

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Miteva, R.; Samwel, S. W.; Krupař, Vratislav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7 (2017), č. článku A37. ISSN 2115-7251 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GJ17-06818Y Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : solar energetic particles * solar radio burst emission * solar cycle Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics OBOR OECD: Fluids and plasma physics (including surface physics) Impact factor: 2.446, year: 2016 https://www.swsc-journal.org/ articles /swsc/abs/2017/01/swsc170028/swsc170028.html

  19. FEMA Hazard Mitigation Assistance Severe Repetitive Loss (SRL) Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This dataset contains closed and obligated projects funded under the following Hazard Mitigation Assistance (HMA) grant programs: Severe Repetitive Loss (SRL). The...

  20. FEMA Hazard Mitigation Assistance Repetitive Flood Claims (RFC) Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This dataset contains closed and obligated projects funded under the following Hazard Mitigation Assistance (HMA) grant programs: Repetitive Flood Claims (RFC). The...

  1. Frequency of fast, narrow γ-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, J.P.; Maryland Univ., College Park; Cline, T.L.; Desai, U.D.; Teegarden, B.J.

    1984-01-01

    The paper describes the existence of two γ-ray burst populations detected by the ISEE-3 experiment. Data from the distribution of 123 Venera 13 and 14 events (60 detected by both spacecraft) also suggests two γ-ray burst populations in each experiment sample, the domains separated with a minimum near 1 or 2 s. The authors point out that the results of the Goddard ISEE-3 γ-ray burst spectrometer actually enhance the appearance of two burst populations suggested in the Venera data. (author)

  2. Multiparameter Monitoring and Prevention of Fault-Slip Rock Burst

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Shan-chao; Tan, Yun-liang; Ning, Jian-guo; Guo, Wei-Yao; Liu, Xue-sheng

    2017-01-01

    Fault-slip rock burst is one type of the tectonic rock burst during mining. A detailed understanding of the precursory information of fault-slip rock burst and implementation of monitoring and early warning systems, as well as pressure relief measures, are essential to safety production in deep mines. This paper first establishes a mechanical model of stick-slip instability in fault-slip rock bursts and then reveals the failure characteristics of the instability. Then, change rule of mining-i...

  3. Type III bursts in interplanetary space - Fundamental or harmonic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulk, G. A.; Steinberg, J. L.; Hoang, S.

    1984-01-01

    ISEE-3 spacecraft observation of 120 relatively simple, isolated bursts in the 30-1980 kHz range are the basis of the present study of Type III bursts in the solar wind. Several characteristics are identified for many of these bursts which imply that the mode of emission changes from predominantly fundamental plasma radiation during the rise phase to predominantly second harmonic during decay. The fundamental emission begins in time coincidence with the start of Langmuir waves, confirming the conventional belief in these waves' causation of Type III bursts. Attention is given to the characteristics of fundamental components, by comparison to harmonics, at km-wavelengths.

  4. Coupled hydro-neutronic calculations for fast burst reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paternoster, R.; Kimpland, R.; Jaegers, P.; McGhee, J.

    1994-01-01

    Methods are described for determining the fully coupled neutronic/hydrodynamic response of fast burst reactors (FBR) under disruptive accident conditions. Two code systems, PAD (1 -D Lagrangian) and NIKE-PAGOSA (3-D Eulerian) were used to accomplish this. This is in contrast to the typical methodology that computes these responses by either single point kinetics or in a decoupled manner. This methodology is enabled by the use of modem supercomputers (CM-200). Two examples of this capability are presented: an unreflected metal fast burst assembly, and a reflected fast burst assembly typical of the Skua or SPR-III class of fast burst reactor

  5. Limits of the memory coefficient in measuring correlated bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Hang-Hyun; Hiraoka, Takayuki

    2018-03-01

    Temporal inhomogeneities in event sequences of natural and social phenomena have been characterized in terms of interevent times and correlations between interevent times. The inhomogeneities of interevent times have been extensively studied, while the correlations between interevent times, often called correlated bursts, are far from being fully understood. For measuring the correlated bursts, two relevant approaches were suggested, i.e., memory coefficient and burst size distribution. Here a burst size denotes the number of events in a bursty train detected for a given time window. Empirical analyses have revealed that the larger memory coefficient tends to be associated with the heavier tail of the burst size distribution. In particular, empirical findings in human activities appear inconsistent, such that the memory coefficient is close to 0, while burst size distributions follow a power law. In order to comprehend these observations, by assuming the conditional independence between consecutive interevent times, we derive the analytical form of the memory coefficient as a function of parameters describing interevent time and burst size distributions. Our analytical result can explain the general tendency of the larger memory coefficient being associated with the heavier tail of burst size distribution. We also find that the apparently inconsistent observations in human activities are compatible with each other, indicating that the memory coefficient has limits to measure the correlated bursts.

  6. X-ray echoes from gamma-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dermer, C.D.; Hurley, K.C.; Hartmann, D.H.

    1991-01-01

    The identification of an echo of reflected radiation in time histories of gamma-ray burst spectra can provide important information about the existence of binary companions or accretion disks in gamma-ray burst systems. Because of the nature of Compton scattering, the spectrum of the echo will be attenuated at gamma-ray energies compared with the spectrum of the primary burst emission. The expected temporal and spectral signatures of the echo and a search for such echoes are described, and implications for gamma-ray burst models are discussed. 35 refs

  7. INTEGRAL monitoring of unusually long X-ray bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    of the accreted material, these bursts may be explained by either the unstable burning of a large pile of mixed hydrogen and helium, or the ignition of a thick pure helium layer. Long duration bursts are particularly expected at very low accretion rates and make possible to study the transition from a hydrogen......Thermonuclear bursts on the surface of accreting neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries have been studied for many years and have in a few cases confirmed theoretical models of nuclear ignition and burning mechanisms. The large majority of X-ray bursts last less than 100s. A good number......-rich bursting regime to a pure helium regime. Moreover, a handful of long bursts have shown, before the extended decay phase, an initial spike similar to a normal short X-ray burst. Such twofold bursts might be a sort of link between short and super-bursts, where the premature ignition of a carbon layer could...

  8. Study on cosmic gamma bursts in the ''KONUS'' experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazets, E.P.; Golenetskij, S.V.; Il'inskij, V.N.; Panov, V.N.; Aptekar', R.L.; Gur'yan, Yu.A.; Sokolov, I.A.; Sokolova, Z.Ya.; Kharitonova, T.V.

    1979-01-01

    Made are the investigations of cosmic gamma bursts with the help of the ''Konus'' apparatus, positioned on the ''Venera 11'' and ''Venera 12'' automatic interplanetary stations. 37 gamma bursts have been recorded in the energy range from 50 to 150 keV during the observation period from September to December 1978. Time profiles of bursts on 4, 9 and 24.11.1978 are presented. For the most events the time of burst increase and decrease constitute parts and units of seconds. Differential energy spectra are measured for all recorded bursts. In many cases the spectrum shape is similar to the grade one with the 1.5-2.3 index. In a graphical form built up are the integral distributions of gamma bursts appearence frequency in dependence on their intensity and maximum capacity in the burst peak. Galaxy coordinates of the 17-teen bursts, for which a simple localization is possible, are put on the celestial sphere map. The type of the integral distributions and the source distribution about the celestial sphere show that the gamma burst sources are whithin the Galaxy

  9. The Second SWIFT Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, T.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Baumgartner, W. H.; Cummings, J. R.; Fenimore, E. E.; Gehrels, N.; Krimm, H. A.; Markwardt, C. B.; Palmer, D. M.; Parsons, A. M.; hide

    2012-01-01

    We present the second Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) catalog of gamma-ray bursts. (GRBs), which contains 476 bursts detected by the BAT between 2004 December 19 and 2009 December 21. This catalog (hereafter the BAT2 catalog) presents burst trigger time, location, 90% error radius, duration, fluence, peak flux, time-averaged spectral parameters and time-resolved spectral parameters measured by the BAT. In the correlation study of various observed parameters extracted from the BAT prompt emission data, we distinguish among long-duration GRBs (L-GRBs), short-duration GRBs (S-GRBs), and short-duration GRBs with extended emission (S-GRBs with E.E.) to investigate differences in the prompt emission properties. The fraction of L-GRBs, S-GRBs and S-GRBs with E.E. in the catalog are 89%, 8% and 2% respectively. We compare the BAT prompt emission properties with the BATSE, BeppoSAX and HETE-2 GRB samples.. We also correlate the observed prompt emission properties with the redshifts for the GRBs with known redshift. The BAT T(sub 90) and T(sub 50) durations peak at 70 s and 30 s, respectively. We confirm that the spectra of the BAT S-GRBs are generally harder than those of the L-GRBs.

  10. Star bursts and giant HII regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagel, B.E.J.

    1990-01-01

    Massive star formation bursts occur in a variety of galactic environments and can temporarily dominate the light output of a galaxy even when a relatively small proportion of its mass is involved. Inferences about their ages, the IMF and its dependence on chemical composition are still somewhat wobbly owing to an excess of unknowns, but certain things can be deduced from emission spectra of associated H II regions when due regard is paid to the effects of chemical composition and ionization parameter: In particular, largest ionization parameters and effective temperatures of exciting stars, at any given oxygen abundance, are anti-correlated with the abundance, and the second effect suggests an increasing proportion of more massive stars at lower abundances, although this is not yet satisfactorily quantified. A new blue compact galaxies could be very young, but it is equally possible that there is an older population of low surface brightness. Some giant H II regions may be self-polluted with nitrogen and helium due to winds from massive stars in the associated burst. (orig.)

  11. The Golden Ratio of Gait Harmony: Repetitive Proportions of Repetitive Gait Phases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Iosa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In nature, many physical and biological systems have structures showing harmonic properties. Some of them were found related to the irrational number known as the golden ratio that has important symmetric and harmonic properties. In this study, the spatiotemporal gait parameters of 25 healthy subjects were analyzed using a stereophotogrammetric system with 25 retroreflective markers located on their skin. The proportions of gait phases were compared with , the value of which is about 1.6180. The ratio between the entire gait cycle and stance phase resulted in 1.620 ± 0.058, that between stance and the swing phase was 1.629 ± 0.173, and that between swing and the double support phase was 1.684 ± 0.357. All these ratios did not differ significantly from each other (, , repeated measure analysis of variance or from (, resp., t-tests. The repetitive gait phases of physiological walking were found in turn in repetitive proportions with each other, revealing an intrinsic harmonic structure. Harmony could be the key for facilitating the control of repetitive walking. Harmony is a powerful unifying factor between seemingly disparate fields of nature, including human gait.

  12. Grasping hand verbs: oscillatory beta and alpha correlates of action-word processing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Niccolai

    Full Text Available The grounded cognition framework proposes that sensorimotor brain areas, which are typically involved in perception and action, also play a role in linguistic processing. We assessed oscillatory modulation during visual presentation of single verbs and localized cortical motor regions by means of isometric contraction of hand and foot muscles. Analogously to oscillatory activation patterns accompanying voluntary movements, we expected a somatotopically distributed suppression of beta and alpha frequencies in the motor cortex during processing of body-related action verbs. Magnetoencephalographic data were collected during presentation of verbs that express actions performed using the hands (H or feet (F. Verbs denoting no bodily movement (N were used as a control. Between 150 and 500 msec after visual word onset, beta rhythms were suppressed in H and F in comparison with N in the left hemisphere. Similarly, alpha oscillations showed left-lateralized power suppression in the H-N contrast, although at a later stage. The cortical oscillatory activity that typically occurs during voluntary movements is therefore found to somatotopically accompany the processing of body-related verbs. The combination of a localizer task with the oscillatory investigation applied to verb reading as in the present study provides further methodological possibilities of tracking language processing in the brain.

  13. Oscillatory behaviors and hierarchical assembly of contractile structures in intercalating cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Zallen, Jennifer A

    2011-01-01

    Fluctuations in the size of the apical cell surface have been associated with apical constriction and tissue invagination. However, it is currently not known if apical oscillatory behaviors are a unique property of constricting cells or if they constitute a universal feature of the force balance between cells in multicellular tissues. Here, we set out to determine whether oscillatory cell behaviors occur in parallel with cell intercalation during the morphogenetic process of axis elongation in the Drosophila embryo. We applied multi-color, time-lapse imaging of living embryos and SIESTA, an integrated tool for automated and semi-automated cell segmentation, tracking, and analysis of image sequences. Using SIESTA, we identified cycles of contraction and expansion of the apical surface in intercalating cells and characterized them at the molecular, cellular, and tissue scales. We demonstrate that apical oscillations are anisotropic, and this anisotropy depends on the presence of intact cell–cell junctions and spatial cues provided by the anterior–posterior patterning system. Oscillatory cell behaviors during axis elongation are associated with the hierarchical assembly and disassembly of contractile actomyosin structures at the medial cortex of the cell, with actin localization preceding myosin II and with the localization of both proteins preceding changes in cell shape. We discuss models to explain how the architecture of cytoskeletal networks regulates their contractile behavior and the mechanisms that give rise to oscillatory cell behaviors in intercalating cells

  14. The Nonlinear Distortions in the Oscillatory System of Generator on CFOA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuriy Konstantinovich Rybin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, many articles came out where one could find the analysis of oscillatory systems of electric sinusoid signals generators with amplifiers called CFOA—current feedback operational amplifiers. As a rule, the analysis of such systems is made by applying mathematical modeling methods on the basis of the amplifier linear model, which does not allow estimating advantages and disadvantages of the systems realized with those amplifiers in comparison with classical systems. A nonlinear model of a current feedback operational amplifier (CFOA is introduced in the paper; nonlinearity of “current mirror” is reflected in the form of current double limiting. The analysis of two known oscillatory systems has been carried out with the use of this non-linear model. Dependence between current limiting level, output voltage amplitude, and maximum oscillation frequency has been obtained. The paper shows that output current limiting under current output connection of capacitive load reduces frequency range and output voltage amplitude considerably and increases harmonic distortions in comparison with classical oscillatory systems. The research done has found that the application of new amplifiers does not give considerable advantages to the oscillatory systems with CFOA.

  15. The influence of low-grade glioma on resting state oscillatory brain activity: a magnetoencephalography study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, I.; Stam, C.; Douw, L.; Bartolomei, F.; Heimans, J.; Dijk, van B.; Postma, T.; Klein, M.; Reijneveld, J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: In the present MEG-study, power spectral analysis of oscillatory brain activity was used to compare resting state brain activity in both low-grade glioma (LGG) patients and healthy controls. We hypothesized that LGG patients show local as well as diffuse slowing of resting state brain

  16. Impact of Heat and Mass Transfer on MHD Oscillatory Flow of Jeffery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this paper is to study Dufour, Soret and thermal conductivity on unsteady heat and mass transfer of magneto hydrodynamic (MHD) oscillatory flow of Jeffery fluid through a porous medium in a channel. The partial differential equations governing the flow have been solved numerically using semi-implicit ...

  17. Heat transfer to MHD oscillatory dusty fluid flow in a channel filled ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, we examine the combined effects of thermal radiation, buoyancy force and magnetic field on oscillatory flow of a conducting optically thin dusty fluid through a vertical channel filled with a saturated porous medium. The governing partial differential equations are obtained and solved analytically by variable ...

  18. Oscillatory phase dynamics in neural entrainment underpin illusory percepts of time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Björn; Henry, Molly J; Grigutsch, Maren; Obleser, Jonas

    2013-10-02

    Neural oscillatory dynamics are a candidate mechanism to steer perception of time and temporal rate change. While oscillator models of time perception are strongly supported by behavioral evidence, a direct link to neural oscillations and oscillatory entrainment has not yet been provided. In addition, it has thus far remained unaddressed how context-induced illusory percepts of time are coded for in oscillator models of time perception. To investigate these questions, we used magnetoencephalography and examined the neural oscillatory dynamics that underpin pitch-induced illusory percepts of temporal rate change. Human participants listened to frequency-modulated sounds that varied over time in both modulation rate and pitch, and judged the direction of rate change (decrease vs increase). Our results demonstrate distinct neural mechanisms of rate perception: Modulation rate changes directly affected listeners' rate percept as well as the exact frequency of the neural oscillation. However, pitch-induced illusory rate changes were unrelated to the exact frequency of the neural responses. The rate change illusion was instead linked to changes in neural phase patterns, which allowed for single-trial decoding of percepts. That is, illusory underestimations or overestimations of perceived rate change were tightly coupled to increased intertrial phase coherence and changes in cerebro-acoustic phase lag. The results provide insight on how illusory percepts of time are coded for by neural oscillatory dynamics.

  19. Slowing of oscillatory brain activity is a stable characteristic of Parkinson's disease without dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoffers, D.; Bosboom, JL; Deijen, J.B.; Wolters, E.C.M.J.; Berendse, H.W.; Stam, L.

    2007-01-01

    Extensive changes in resting-state oscillatory brain activity have recently been demonstrated using magnetoencephalography (MEG) in moderately advanced, non-demented Parkinson's disease patients relative to age-matched controls. The aim of the present study was to determine the onset and evolution

  20. Determination of crystal oscillatory spectra by internal friction data spectroscopic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaykin, Yu.A.

    1998-01-01

    Technique for relaxation spectra determination on the basis of internal friction averaging over relaxation frequencies is developed. It is shown that mathematically the problem is reduced to solution of the first type Fredholm integral equation. Impurity oscillatory spectra in alpha-iron, molybdenum and Fe-Cr-Ni alloy are obtained. (author)

  1. Oscillatory water sorption test for determining water uptake behavior in bread crust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuijzen, N.H. van; Tromp, R.H.; Hamer, R.J.; Vliet, T. van

    2007-01-01

    In this work, water sorption kinetics of bread crust are described using an oscillatory sorption test in combination with a Langmuir type equation. Both kinetic and thermodynamic information could be obtained at the same time. An advantage of applying a Langmuir type equation for a quantitative

  2. Severity of Hypoxemia and Effect of High-Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meade, Maureen O; Young, Duncan; Hanna, Steven; Zhou, Qi; Bachman, Thomas E; Bollen, Casper; Slutsky, Arthur S; Lamb, Sarah E; Adhikari, Neill K J; Mentzelopoulos, Spyros D; Cook, Deborah J; Sud, Sachin; Brower, Roy G; Thompson, B Taylor; Shah, Sanjoy; Stenzler, Alex; Guyatt, Gordon; Ferguson, Niall D

    2017-01-01

    RATIONALE: High-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) is theoretically beneficial for lung protection, but the results of clinical trials are inconsistent, with study-level meta-analyses suggesting no significant effect on mortality. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this individual patient data

  3. Finite-size scaling for quantum chains with an oscillatory energy gap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeger, C.; Gehlen, G. von; Rittenberg, V.

    1984-07-01

    We show that the existence of zeroes of the energy gap for finite quantum chains is related to a nonvanishing wavevector. Finite-size scaling ansaetze are formulated for incommensurable and oscillatory structures. The ansaetze are verified in the one-dimensional XY model in a transverse field. (orig.)

  4. Stability of oscillatory solutions of differential equations with a general piecewise constant argument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Shou Chiu

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We examine scalar differential equations with a general piecewise constant argument, in short DEPCAG, that is, the argument is a general step function. Criteria of existence of the oscillatory and nonoscillatory solutions of such equations are proposed. Necessary and sufficient conditions for stability of the zero solution are obtained. Appropriate examples are given to show our results.

  5. Information-geometric measures estimate neural interactions during oscillatory brain states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yimin eNie

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The characterization of functional network structures among multiple neurons is essential to understanding neural information processing. Information geometry (IG, a theory developed for investigating a space of probability distributions has recently been applied to spike-train analysis and has provided robust estimations of neural interactions. Although neural firing in the equilibrium state is often assumed in these studies, in reality, neural activity is non-stationary. The brain exhibits various oscillations depending on cognitive demands or when an animal is asleep. Therefore, the investigation of the IG measures during oscillatory network states is important for testing how the IG method can be applied to real neural data. Using model networks of binary neurons or more realistic spiking neurons, we studied how the single- and pairwise-IG measures were influenced by oscillatory neural activity. Two general oscillatory mechanisms, externally driven oscillations and internally induced oscillations, were considered. In both mechanisms, we found that the single-IG measure was linearly related to the magnitude of the external input, and that the pairwise-IG measure was linearly related to the sum of connection strengths between two neurons. We also observed that the pairwise-IG measure was not dependent on the oscillation frequency. These results are consistent with the previous findings that were obtained under the equilibrium conditions. Therefore, we demonstrate that the IG method provides useful insights into neural interactions under the oscillatory condition that can often be observed in the real brain.

  6. Oscillatory Critical Amplitudes in Hierarchical Models and the Harris Function of Branching Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costin, Ovidiu; Giacomin, Giambattista

    2013-02-01

    Oscillatory critical amplitudes have been repeatedly observed in hierarchical models and, in the cases that have been taken into consideration, these oscillations are so small to be hardly detectable. Hierarchical models are tightly related to iteration of maps and, in fact, very similar phenomena have been repeatedly reported in many fields of mathematics, like combinatorial evaluations and discrete branching processes. It is precisely in the context of branching processes with bounded off-spring that T. Harris, in 1948, first set forth the possibility that the logarithm of the moment generating function of the rescaled population size, in the super-critical regime, does not grow near infinity as a power, but it has an oscillatory prefactor (the Harris function). These oscillations have been observed numerically only much later and, while the origin is clearly tied to the discrete character of the iteration, the amplitude size is not so well understood. The purpose of this note is to reconsider the issue for hierarchical models and in what is arguably the most elementary setting—the pinning model—that actually just boils down to iteration of polynomial maps (and, notably, quadratic maps). In this note we show that the oscillatory critical amplitude for pinning models and the Harris function coincide. Moreover we make explicit the link between these oscillatory functions and the geometry of the Julia set of the map, making thus rigorous and quantitative some ideas set forth in Derrida et al. (Commun. Math. Phys. 94:115-132, 1984).

  7. Measurement of transmitted power in untapered multifibre unions oscillatory spectral behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez Horche, Paloma; Muriel Fernández, Miguel Ángel; Martín Pereda, José Antonio

    1989-01-01

    Shows a new structure, the untapered multifibre union, with similar oscillation behaviour to that of tapered single-mode fibres. As a consequences conical regions are not relevant to the final results. This oscillatory behaviour opens the way to low-cost all-fibre devices such as optical filters

  8. Phase lags in oscillatory sheet flow: experiments and bed load modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dohmen-Janssen, Catarine M.; Kroekenstoel, D.F.; Kroekenstoel, D.F.; Hassan, Wael; Ribberink, Jan S.

    2002-01-01

    Sheet flow corresponds to the high velocity regime when small bed ripples are washed out and sand is transported in a thin layer close to the bed. Therefore, it is often assumed that sand transport in oscillatory sheet flow behaves quasi-steady: time-dependent transport rates are assumed to be

  9. Reversibility and hysteresis of the sharp yielding transition of a colloidal glass under oscillatory shear

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dang, M. T.; Denisov, D.; Struth, B.; Zaccone, A.; Schall, P.

    The mechanical response of glasses remains challenging to understand. Recent results indicate that the oscillatory rheology of soft glasses is accompanied by a sharp non-equilibrium transition in the microscopic dynamics. Here, we use simultaneous x-ray scattering and rheology to investigate the

  10. Shadows of Music-Language Interaction on Low Frequency Brain Oscillatory Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrus, Elisa; Koelsch, Stefan; Bhattacharya, Joydeep

    2011-01-01

    Electrophysiological studies investigating similarities between music and language perception have relied exclusively on the signal averaging technique, which does not adequately represent oscillatory aspects of electrical brain activity that are relevant for higher cognition. The current study investigated the patterns of brain oscillations…

  11. The influence of low-grade glioma on resting state oscillatory brain activity: a magnetoencephalography study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, I.; Stam, C. J.; Douw, L.; Bartolomei, F.; Heimans, J. J.; van Dijk, B. W.; Postma, T. J.; Klein, M.; Reijneveld, J. C.

    2008-01-01

    In the present MEG-study, power spectral analysis of oscillatory brain activity was used to compare resting state brain activity in both low-grade glioma (LGG) patients and healthy controls. We hypothesized that LGG patients show local as well as diffuse slowing of resting state brain activity

  12. Photocathodes for High Repetition Rate Light Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy. Center for Accelerator Science and Education

    2014-04-20

    This proposal brought together teams at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Stony Brook University (SBU) to study photocathodes for high repetition rate light sources such as Free Electron Lasers (FEL) and Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL). Below details the Principal Investigators and contact information. Each PI submits separately for a budget through his corresponding institute. The work done under this grant comprises a comprehensive program on critical aspects of the production of the electron beams needed for future user facilities. Our program pioneered in situ and in operando diagnostics for alkali antimonide growth. The focus is on development of photocathodes for high repetition rate Free Electron Lasers (FELs) and Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs), including testing SRF photoguns, both normal-­conducting and superconducting. Teams from BNL, LBNL and Stony Brook University (SBU) led this research, and coordinated their work over a range of topics. The work leveraged a robust infrastructure of existing facilities and the support was used for carrying out the research at these facilities. The program concentrated in three areas: a) Physics and chemistry of alkali-­antimonide cathodes (BNL – LBNL) b) Development and testing of a diamond amplifier for photocathodes (SBU -­ BNL) c) Tests of both cathodes in superconducting RF photoguns (SBU) and copper RF photoguns (LBNL) Our work made extensive use of synchrotron radiation materials science techniques, such as powder-­ and single-­crystal diffraction, x-­ray fluorescence, EXAFS and variable energy XPS. BNL and LBNL have many complementary facilities at the two light sources associated with these laboratories (NSLS and ALS, respectively); use of these will be a major thrust of our program and bring our understanding of these complex materials to a new level. In addition, CHESS at Cornell will be used to continue seamlessly throughout the NSLS dark period and

  13. Visual attention to advertising : The impact of motivation and repetition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters, RGM; Rosbergen, E; Hartog, M; Corfman, KP; Lynch, JG

    1996-01-01

    Using eye-tracking data, we examine the impact of motivation and repetition on visual attention to advertisements differing in argument quality. Our analyses indicate that repetition leads to an overall decrease in the amount of attention. However, while at first high motivation subjects attend to

  14. Repetitively pulsed, double discharge TEA CO/sub 2/ laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, D C; James, D J; Ramsden, S A

    1975-10-01

    The design and operation of a repetitively pulsed TEA CO/sub 2/ laser is described. Average powers of up to 400 W at a repetition frequency of 200 pulses/s have been obtained. The system has also been used to provide long pulses (over 20 ..mu..s) and tunable single axial mode pulses.

  15. Effects of repetition and temperature on Contingent Electrical Stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castrillon, Eduardo E.; Zhou, Xinwen; Svensson, Peter

    ) activity associated with bruxism. Repetition of the electrical stimulus and skin surface temperature (ST) may affect the perception of CES and possibly also the inhibitory EMG effects.Objectives: To determine the effects of stimulus repetition and skin ST on the perception of CES.  Methods: Healthy...

  16. Repetition Blindness: Out of Sight or Out of Mind?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Alison L.; Harris, Catherine L.

    2004-01-01

    Does repetition blindness represent a failure of perception or of memory? In Experiment 1, participants viewed rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) sentences. When critical words (C1 and C2) were orthographically similar, C2 was frequently omitted from serial report; however, repetition priming for C2 on a postsentence lexical decision task was…

  17. Evidence-Based Behavioral Interventions for Repetitive Behaviors in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Brian A.; McDonough, Stephen G.; Bodfish, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Restricted and repetitive behaviors (RRBs) are a core symptom of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). There has been an increased research emphasis on repetitive behaviors; however, this research primarily has focused on phenomenology and mechanisms. Thus, the knowledge base on interventions is lagging behind other areas of research. The literature…

  18. Pre-Lexical Disorders in Repetition Conduction Aphasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidiropoulos, Kyriakos; de Bleser, Ria; Ackermann, Hermann; Preilowski, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    At the level of clinical speech/language evaluation, the repetition type of conduction aphasia is characterized by repetition difficulties concomitant with reduced short-term memory capacities, in the presence of fluent spontaneous speech as well as unimpaired naming and reading abilities. It is still unsettled which dysfunctions of the…

  19. Oscillatory transenantiomerization of the selected 2-arylpropionic acid (2-APAs) in vitro as a spontaneous phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajewicz, M.; Alska, T.K.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we summarize the results of our earlier investigations on an attempted enantioseparation of the selected 2-arylpropionic acids (2-APAs) by means of the chiral thin layer chromatography (TLC). These results have been originally presented in a series of the research papers published in several chromatography journals. In the current article it was reminded that the prolonged storage of the investigated 2-APAs in the aqueous and the non-aqueous solutions results in an oscillatory change of the respective retardation factor (RF) and the specific rotation (alfa)/sub P/) values. An assumption is introduced as to the chemical nature of the observed phenomenon. It is assumed that the observed oscillations are due to the repeated structural inversion (in our study labelled as oscillatory transenantiomerization) of one enantiomer to its respective antimer. One attempts to at least roughly explain the molecular mechanism of transenantiomerization either by keto-enol tautomerism, or by formation of an intermediate enolic anion, any of these two reaction mechanisms possible only in the basic environment. Then one reflects on the most probable mechanism responsible for the oscillatory nature of the observed structural inversion. It is concluded that the oscillations could be due to an enhanced viscosity of the investigated 2-APA solutions (as compared with those of the respective pure solvents) and/or due to the molecular self-organization within these solutions, resulting in anisotropic properties thereof. Finally, it is concluded that an ultimate explanation of the observed oscillatory transenantiomerization of the selected 2-APAs could probably be offered by the Brusselator-type kinetic model implemented with the diffusion term. In the last section of this paper, argumentation is presented strongly in favour of this particular model and against any alternative speculation as to the supramolecular nature of the observed oscillatory phenomena. (author)

  20. Structural state diagram of concentrated suspensions of jammed soft particles in oscillatory shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabaz, Fardin; Cloitre, Michel; Bonnecaze, Roger T.

    2018-03-01

    In a recent study [Khabaz et al., Phys. Rev. Fluids 2, 093301 (2017), 10.1103/PhysRevFluids.2.093301], we showed that jammed soft particle glasses (SPGs) crystallize and order in steady shear flow. Here we investigate the rheology and microstructures of these suspensions in oscillatory shear flow using particle-dynamics simulations. The microstructures in both types of flows are similar, but their evolutions are very different. In both cases the monodisperse and polydisperse suspensions form crystalline and layered structures, respectively, at high shear rates. The crystals obtained in the oscillatory shear flow show fewer defects compared to those in the steady shear. SPGs remain glassy for maximum oscillatory strains less than about the yield strain of the material. For maximum strains greater than the yield strain, microstructural and rheological transitions occur for SPGs. Polydisperse SPGs rearrange into a layered structure parallel to the flow-vorticity plane for sufficiently high maximum shear rates and maximum strains about 10 times greater than the yield strain. Monodisperse suspensions form a face-centered cubic (FCC) structure when the maximum shear rate is low and hexagonal close-packed (HCP) structure when the maximum shear rate is high. In steady shear, the transition from a glassy state to a layered one for polydisperse suspensions included a significant induction strain before the transformation. In oscillatory shear, the transformation begins to occur immediately and with different microstructural changes. A state diagram for suspensions in large amplitude oscillatory shear flow is found to be in close but not exact agreement with the state diagram for steady shear flow. For more modest amplitudes of around one to five times the yield strain, there is a transition from a glassy structure to FCC and HCP crystals, at low and high frequencies, respectively, for monodisperse suspensions. At moderate frequencies, the transition is from glassy to HCP via