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Sample records for repetitive mechanical stimulation

  1. Unraveling the cellular and molecular mechanisms of repetitive magnetic stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian eMüller-Dahlhaus

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite numerous clinical studies, which have investigated the therapeutic potential of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS in various brain diseases, our knowledge of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying rTMS-based therapies remains limited. Thus, a deeper understanding of rTMS-induced neural plasticity is required to optimize current treatment protocols. Studies in small animals or appropriate in vitro preparations (including models of brain diseases provide highly useful experimental approaches in this context. State-of-the-art electrophysiological and live-cell imaging techniques that are well established in basic neuroscience can help answering some of the major questions in the field, such as (i which neural structures are activated during TMS, (ii how does rTMS induce Hebbian plasticity, and (iii are other forms of plasticity (e.g., metaplasticity, structural plasticity induced by rTMS? We argue that data gained from these studies will support the development of more effective and specific applications of rTMS in clinical practice.

  2. Neuronal mechanisms during repetitive trigemino-nociceptive stimulation in migraine patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aderjan, David; Stankewitz, Anne; May, Arne

    2010-10-01

    Habituation deficits in various sensory modalities have been observed in migraine patients in several experimental designs. The underlying neuronal mechanisms are, however, still unknown. Past studies have used electrophysiological measures and focussed on habituation behaviour during one single session. We were interested in how repeated painful stimulation over several days is processed, perceived and modulated in migraineurs. Fifteen migraine patients and 15 healthy controls were stimulated daily with a 20 min trigeminal pain paradigm for eight consecutive days, using functional MRI performed on days one and eight and one follow-up measurement three months later. The results demonstrate that migraine patients did not differ in behavioural pain ratings compared to the controls at any time. However, functional imaging data revealed a significant difference in several brain areas over time. The activity level in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and the rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) increased in healthy control subjects from day one to day eight, whereas it decreased in migraine patients. These data suggest that several brain areas known to be involved in endogenous pain control show a completely opposite behaviour in migraine patients compared to healthy controls. These brain networks seem not to be disrupted per se in migraine patients but changed activity over time responding to repetitive nociceptive input. The alteration of pain inhibitory circuits may be the underlying mechanism responsible for the dys-functional neuronal filters of sensory input.

  3. Mechanisms of human motor cortex facilitation induced by subthreshold 5-Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation.

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    Sommer, Martin; Rummel, Milena; Norden, Christoph; Rothkegel, Holger; Lang, Nicolas; Paulus, Walter

    2013-06-01

    Our knowledge about the mechanisms of human motor cortex facilitation induced by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is still incomplete. Here we used pharmacological conditioning with carbamazepine, dextrometorphan, lorazepam, and placebo to elucidate the type of plasticity underlying this facilitation, and to probe if mechanisms reminiscent of long-term potentiation are involved. Over the primary motor cortex of 10 healthy subjects, we applied biphasic rTMS pulses of effective posterior current direction in the brain. We used six blocks of 200 pulses at 5-Hz frequency and 90% active motor threshold intensity and controlled for corticospinal excitability changes using motor-evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes and latencies elicited by suprathreshold pulses before, in between, and after rTMS. Target muscle was the dominant abductor digiti minimi muscle; we coregistered the dominant extensor carpi radialis muscle. We found a lasting facilitation induced by this type of rTMS. The GABAergic medication lorazepam and to a lesser extent the ion channel blocker carbamazepine reduced the MEP facilitation after biphasic effective posteriorly oriented rTMS, whereas the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor-antagonist dextrometorphan had no effect. Our main conclusion is that the mechanism of the facilitation induced by biphasic effective posterior rTMS is more likely posttetanic potentiation than long-term potentiation. Additional findings were prolonged MEP latency under carbamazepine, consistent with sodium channel blockade, and larger MEP amplitudes from extensor carpi radialis under lorazepam, suggesting GABAergic involvement in the center-surround balance of excitability.

  4. Inactivation of mechano-sensitive dilatation upon repetitive mechanical stimulation of the musculo-vascular network in the rabbit.

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    Turturici, M; Roatta, S

    2013-06-01

    Mechano-sensitivity of the vascular network is known to be implicated in the rapid dilatation at the onset of exercise, however, it is not known how this mechanism responds to repetitive mechanical stimulation. This study tests the hypothesis that the mechanically-induced hyperaemia undergoes some attenuation upon repetitive stimulation. Muscle blood flow was recorded from 9 masseteric arteries (5 right, 4 left) in 6 anesthetized rabbits. Two mechanical stimuli, masseter muscle compression (MC) and occlusion of the masseteric artery (AO), were provided in different combinations: A) repeated stimulation (0.5 Hz, for 40 s); B) single stimuli delivered at decreasing inter-stimulus interval (ISI) from 4 min to 2 s, C) single AO delivered before and immediately after a series of 20 MCs at 0.5 Hz, and vice-versa. Repetitive AO stimulation at 0.5 Hz produced a transient hyperaemia (378 ±189%) peaking at 4.5 ±1.4 s and then decaying before the end of stimulation. The hyperaemic response to individual AOs progressively decreased by 74 ±39% with decreasing ISI from 4 min to 2 s (p<0.01). Non significant differences were observed between AO and MC stimulation. Decreased response to AO was also provoked by previous repetitive MC stimulation, and vice-versa. The results provide evidence that the mechano-sensitivity of the vascular network is attenuated by previous mechanical stimulation. It is suggested that the mechano-sensitive dilatory mechanisms undergoes some inactivation whose recovery time is in the order of a few minutes.

  5. THE MECHANISM OF CEREBRAL EVOKED POTENTIALS BY REPETITIVE MAGNETIC STIMULATION OF GASTROCNEMIUS MUSCLE IN DUCHENNE MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To study the features and mechanism of the cerebral evoked potentials by repetitive stimulation of calf muscle in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients with obvious muscular dystrophy and psuedohypertrophy. Methods. Cerebral evoked potentials by stimulation of calf muscles and somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) by the stimulation of posterior tibial nerves at ankle were measured in 10 patients with DMD and 10 normal controls matched with gender and age. The intensity of the magnetic stimulation was at 30% of maximal output (2.1 Tesla, MagPro magnetic stimulator, Dantec) and the frequency was 1 Hz. The low intensity of magnetic stimulation was just sufficient to produce a contraction of the muscle belly underneath the coil. Recording electrode was placed at 2 cm posterior to the Cz, reference to Fpz. The latencies of N33, P38, N48 and P55 and amplitude (P38- N48) were recorded. SEPs were recorded by routine methods. Results. In normal subjects, the amplitudes of cerebral evoked potentials by magnetic stimulation of calf muscle was 40% lower than that by electrical stimulation of the posterior tibial nerves at ankle. The latency of P38 was 2.9± 2.1 ms longer compared with electrical stimulation of the posterior tibial nerves at ankle. In 6 patients, P38 latency from magnetic stimulation was remarkably prolonged (P<0.01), and in 4 patients, there was no remarkable response. SEPs evoked by electrical stimulation were normal in all of the patients.? Conclusion. DMD is an available model for the study of mechanism of cerebral evoked potentials by magnetic stimulating muscle. We can conclude that the responses from magnetic stimulation were produced by muscle input. The abnormal responses in patients may relate to decreased input of muscle by stimulating dystrophic and psedohypertrophic muscle.

  6. Short-term adaptations in spinal cord circuits evoked by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation: possible underlying mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez, Monica A.; Lungholt, Bjarke K.S.; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2005-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been shown to induce adaptations in cortical neuronal circuitries. In the present study we investigated whether rTMS, through its effect on corticospinal pathways, also produces adaptations at the spinal level, and what the neuronal mechanisms...... that the depression of the H-reflex by rTMS can be explained, at least partly, by an increased presynaptic inhibition of soleus Ia afferents. In contrast, rTMS had no effect on disynaptic reciprocal Ia inhibition from ankle dorsiflexors to plantarflexors. We conclude that a train of rTMS may modulate transmission...

  7. Pharmacological Mechanisms of Cortical Enhancement Induced by the Repetitive Pairing of Visual/Cholinergic Stimulation.

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    Jun-Il Kang

    Full Text Available Repetitive visual training paired with electrical activation of cholinergic projections to the primary visual cortex (V1 induces long-term enhancement of cortical processing in response to the visual training stimulus. To better determine the receptor subtypes mediating this effect the selective pharmacological blockade of V1 nicotinic (nAChR, M1 and M2 muscarinic (mAChR or GABAergic A (GABAAR receptors was performed during the training session and visual evoked potentials (VEPs were recorded before and after training. The training session consisted of the exposure of awake, adult rats to an orientation-specific 0.12 CPD grating paired with an electrical stimulation of the basal forebrain for a duration of 1 week for 10 minutes per day. Pharmacological agents were infused intracortically during this period. The post-training VEP amplitude was significantly increased compared to the pre-training values for the trained spatial frequency and to adjacent spatial frequencies up to 0.3 CPD, suggesting a long-term increase of V1 sensitivity. This increase was totally blocked by the nAChR antagonist as well as by an M2 mAChR subtype and GABAAR antagonist. Moreover, administration of the M2 mAChR antagonist also significantly decreased the amplitude of the control VEPs, suggesting a suppressive effect on cortical responsiveness. However, the M1 mAChR antagonist blocked the increase of the VEP amplitude only for the high spatial frequency (0.3 CPD, suggesting that M1 role was limited to the spread of the enhancement effect to a higher spatial frequency. More generally, all the drugs used did block the VEP increase at 0.3 CPD. Further, use of each of the aforementioned receptor antagonists blocked training-induced changes in gamma and beta band oscillations. These findings demonstrate that visual training coupled with cholinergic stimulation improved perceptual sensitivity by enhancing cortical responsiveness in V1. This enhancement is mainly mediated by n

  8. Clinical application of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in stroke rehabilitation☆

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    Shin, Joonho; Yang, EunJoo; Cho, KyeHee; Barcenas, Carmelo L; Kim, Woo Jin; Min, Yusun; Paik, Nam-Jong

    2012-01-01

    Proper stimulation to affected cerebral hemisphere would promote the functional recovery of patients with stroke. Effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on cortical excitability can be can be altered by the stimulation frequency, intensity and duration. There has been no consistent recognition regarding the best stimulation frequency and intensity. This study reviews the intervention effects of repetitive transcranial stimulation on motor impairment, dysphagia, visuospatial neglect and aphasia, and summarizes the stimulation frequency, intensity and area for repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation to yield the best therapeutic effects. PMID:25745455

  9. Clinical application of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in stroke rehabilitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joonho Shin; EunJoo Yang; KyeHee Cho; Carmelo L Barcenas; Woo Jin Kim; Yusun Min; Nam-Jong Paik

    2012-01-01

    Proper stimulation to affected cerebral hemisphere would promote the functional recovery of patients with stroke. Effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on cortical excitability can be can be altered by the stimulation frequency, intensity and duration. There has been no consistent recognition regarding the best stimulation frequency and intensity. This study reviews the intervention effects of repetitive transcranial stimulation on motor impairment, dysphagia, visuospatial neglect and aphasia, and summarizes the stimulation frequency, intensity and area for repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation to yield the best therapeutic effects.

  10. Mechanism of functional recovery after repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in the subacute cerebral ischemic rat model: neural plasticity or anti-apoptosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Kyung Jae; Lee, Yong-Taek; Han, Tai Ryoon

    2011-10-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been studied increasingly in recent years to determine whether it has a therapeutic benefit on recovery after stroke. However, the underlying mechanisms of rTMS in stroke recovery remain unclear. Here, we evaluated the effect of rTMS on functional recovery and its underlying mechanism by assessing proteins associated with neural plasticity and anti-apoptosis in the peri-lesional area using a subacute cerebral ischemic rat model. Twenty cerebral ischemic rats were randomly assigned to the rTMS or the sham group at post-op day 4. A total of 3,500 impulses with 10 Hz frequency were applied to ipsilesional cortex over a 2-week period. Functional outcome was measured before (post-op day 4) and after rTMS (post-op day 18). The rTMS group showed more functional improvement on the beam balance test and had stronger Bcl-2 and weaker Bax expression on immunohistochemistry compared with the sham group. The expression of NMDA and MAP-2 showed no significant difference between the two groups. These results suggest that rTMS in subacute cerebral ischemia has a therapeutic effect on functional recovery and is associated with an anti-apoptotic mechanism in the peri-ischemic area rather than with neural plasticity.

  11. Neural dynamics during repetitive visual stimulation

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    Tsoneva, Tsvetomira; Garcia-Molina, Gary; Desain, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs), the brain responses to repetitive visual stimulation (RVS), are widely utilized in neuroscience. Their high signal-to-noise ratio and ability to entrain oscillatory brain activity are beneficial for their applications in brain-computer interfaces, investigation of neural processes underlying brain rhythmic activity (steady-state topography) and probing the causal role of brain rhythms in cognition and emotion. This paper aims at analyzing the space and time EEG dynamics in response to RVS at the frequency of stimulation and ongoing rhythms in the delta, theta, alpha, beta, and gamma bands. Approach.We used electroencephalography (EEG) to study the oscillatory brain dynamics during RVS at 10 frequencies in the gamma band (40-60 Hz). We collected an extensive EEG data set from 32 participants and analyzed the RVS evoked and induced responses in the time-frequency domain. Main results. Stable SSVEP over parieto-occipital sites was observed at each of the fundamental frequencies and their harmonics and sub-harmonics. Both the strength and the spatial propagation of the SSVEP response seem sensitive to stimulus frequency. The SSVEP was more localized around the parieto-occipital sites for higher frequencies (>54 Hz) and spread to fronto-central locations for lower frequencies. We observed a strong negative correlation between stimulation frequency and relative power change at that frequency, the first harmonic and the sub-harmonic components over occipital sites. Interestingly, over parietal sites for sub-harmonics a positive correlation of relative power change and stimulation frequency was found. A number of distinct patterns in delta (1-4 Hz), theta (4-8 Hz), alpha (8-12 Hz) and beta (15-30 Hz) bands were also observed. The transient response, from 0 to about 300 ms after stimulation onset, was accompanied by increase in delta and theta power over fronto-central and occipital sites, which returned to baseline

  12. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and drug addiction.

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    Barr, Mera S; Farzan, Faranak; Wing, Victoria C; George, Tony P; Fitzgerald, Paul B; Daskalakis, Zafiris J

    2011-10-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation technique that is now being tested for its ability to treat addiction. This review discusses current research approaches and results of studies which measured the therapeutic use of rTMS to treat tobacco, alcohol and illicit drug addiction. The research in this area is limited and therefore all studies evaluating the therapeutic use of rTMS in tobacco, alcohol or illicit drug addiction were retained including case studies through NCBI PubMed ( http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov ) and manual searches. A total of eight studies were identified that examined the ability of rTMS to treat tobacco, alcohol and cocaine addiction. The results of this review indicate that rTMS is effective in reducing the level of cravings for smoking, alcohol, and cocaine when applied at high frequencies to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Furthermore, these studies suggest that repeated sessions of high frequency rTMS over the DLPFC may be most effective in reducing the level of smoking and alcohol consumption. Although work in this area is limited, this review indicates that rTMS is a promising modality for treating drug addiction.

  13. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswa Ranjan Mishra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS is a non-invasive and relatively painless tool that has been used to study various cognitive functions as well as to understand the brain-behavior relationship in normal individuals as well as in those with various neuropsychiatric disorders. It has also been used as a therapeutic tool in various neuropsychiatric disorders because of its ability to specifically modulate distinct brain areas. Studies have shown that repeated stimulation at low frequency produces long-lasting inhibition, which is called as long-term depression, whereas repeated high-frequency stimulation can produce excitation through long-term potentiation. This paper reviews the current status of rTMS as an investigative and therapeutic modality in various neuropsychiatric disorders. It has been used to study the cortical and subcortical functions, neural plasticity and brain mapping in normal individuals and in various neuropsychiatric disorders. rTMS has been most promising in the treatment of depression, with an overall milder adverse effect profile compared with electroconvulsive therapy. In other neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, mania, epilepsy and substance abuse, it has been found to be useful, although further studies are required to establish therapeutic efficacy. It appears to be ineffective in the treatment of obsessive compulsive disorder. There is a paucity of studies of efficacy and safety of rTMS in pediatric and geriatric population. Although it appears safe, further research is required to optimize its efficacy and reduce the side-effects. Magnetic seizure therapy, which involves producing seizures akin to electroconvulsive therapy, appears to be of comparable efficacy in the treatment of depression with less cognitive adverse effects.

  14. Illusory sensation of movement induced by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mark Schram; Lundbye-Jensen, J.; Grey, M.J.;

    2010-01-01

    Human movement sense relies on both somatosensory feedback and on knowledge of the motor commands used to produce the movement. We have induced a movement illusion using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over primary motor cortex and dorsal premotor cortex in the absence of limb moveme...... premotor cortex stimulation was less affected by sensory and motor deprivation than was primary motor cortex stimulation. We propose that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over dorsal premotor cortex produces a corollary discharge that is perceived as movement....

  15. [Rehabilitation Using Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation].

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    Takeuchi, Naoyuki; Izumi, Shin-Ichi

    2017-03-01

    Various novel stroke rehabilitative methods have been developed based on findings in basic science and clinical research. Recently, many reports have shown that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) improves function in stroke patients by altering the excitability of the human cortex. The interhemispheric competition model proposes that deficits in stroke patients are due to reduced output from the affected hemisphere and excessive interhemispheric inhibition from the unaffected hemisphere to the affected hemisphere. The interhemispheric competition model indicates that improvement in deficits can be achieved either by increasing the excitability of the affected hemisphere using excitatory rTMS or by decreasing the excitability of the unaffected hemisphere using inhibitory rTMS. Recovery after stroke is related to neural plasticity, which involves developing new neural connections, acquiring new functions, and compensating for impairments. Artificially modulating the neural network by rTMS may induce a more suitable environment for use-dependent plasticity and also may interfere with maladaptive neural activation, which weakens function and limits recovery. There is potential, therefore, for rTMS to be used as an adjuvant therapy for developed neurorehabilitation techniques in stroke patients.

  16. Shortening of subjective visual intervals followed by repetitive stimulation.

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    Fuminori Ono

    Full Text Available Our previous research demonstrated that repetitive tone stimulation shortened the perceived duration of the preceding auditory time interval. In this study, we examined whether repetitive visual stimulation influences the perception of preceding visual time intervals. Results showed that a time interval followed by a high-frequency visual flicker was perceived as shorter than that followed by a low-frequency visual flicker. The perceived duration decreased as the frequency of the visual flicker increased. The visual flicker presented in one hemifield shortened the apparent time interval in the other hemifield. A final experiment showed that repetitive tone stimulation also shortened the perceived duration of preceding visual time intervals. We concluded that visual flicker shortened the perceived duration of preceding visual time intervals in the same way as repetitive auditory stimulation shortened the subjective duration of preceding tones.

  17. Handedness, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and bulimic disorders.

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    Van den Eynde, F; Broadbent, H; Guillaume, S; Claudino, A; Campbell, I C; Schmidt, U

    2012-05-01

    Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) research in psychiatry mostly excludes left-handed participants. We recruited left-handed people with a bulimic disorder and found that stimulation of the left prefrontal cortex may result in different effects in left- and right-handed people. This highlights the importance of handedness and cortex lateralisation for rTMS.

  18. [Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation: A potential therapy for cognitive disorders?

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    Nouhaud, C; Sherrard, R M; Belmin, J

    2017-03-01

    Considering the limited effectiveness of drugs treatments in cognitive disorders, the emergence of noninvasive techniques to modify brain function is very interesting. Among these techniques, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can modulate cortical excitability and have potential therapeutic effects on cognition and behaviour. These effects are due to physiological modifications in the stimulated cortical tissue and their associated circuits, which depend on the parameters of stimulation. The objective of this article is to specify current knowledge and efficacy of rTMS in cognitive disorders. Previous studies found very encouraging results with significant improvement of higher brain functions. Nevertheless, these few studies have limits: a few patients were enrolled, the lack of control of the mechanisms of action by brain imaging, insufficiently formalized technique and variability of cognitive tests. It is therefore necessary to perform more studies, which identify statistical significant improvement and to specify underlying mechanisms of action and the parameters of use of the rTMS to offer rTMS as a routine therapy for cognitive dysfunction.

  19. Improved Discrimination of Visual Stimuli Following Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Waterston, Michael L.; Pack, Christopher C.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) at certain frequencies increases thresholds for motor-evoked potentials and phosphenes following stimulation of cortex. Consequently rTMS is often assumed to introduce a "virtual lesion" in stimulated brain regions, with correspondingly diminished behavioral performance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we investigated the effects of rTMS to visual cortex on subjects' ability to perform visual psychophysical tasks. Contrary t...

  20. Use of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for treatment in psychiatry.

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    Aleman, André

    2013-08-01

    The potential of noninvasive neurostimulation by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for improving psychiatric disorders has been studied increasingly over the past two decades. This is especially the case for major depression and for auditory-verbal hallucinations in schizophrenia. The present review briefly describes the background of this novel treatment modality and summarizes evidence from clinical trials into the efficacy of rTMS for depression and hallucinations. Evidence for efficacy in depression is stronger than for hallucinations, although a number of studies have reported clinically relevant improvements for hallucinations too. Different stimulation parameters (frequency, duration, location of stimulation) are discussed. There is a paucity of research into other psychiatric disorders, but initial evidence suggests that rTMS may also hold promise for the treatment of negative symptoms in schizophrenia, obsessive compulsive disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder. It can be concluded that rTMS induces alterations in neural networks relevant for psychiatric disorders and that more research is needed to elucidate efficacy and underlying mechanisms of action.

  1. Illusory sensation of movement induced by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Schram Christensen

    Full Text Available Human movement sense relies on both somatosensory feedback and on knowledge of the motor commands used to produce the movement. We have induced a movement illusion using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over primary motor cortex and dorsal premotor cortex in the absence of limb movement and its associated somatosensory feedback. Afferent and efferent neural signalling was abolished in the arm with ischemic nerve block, and in the leg with spinal nerve block. Movement sensation was assessed following trains of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation applied over primary motor cortex, dorsal premotor cortex, and a control area (posterior parietal cortex. Magnetic stimulation over primary motor cortex and dorsal premotor cortex produced a movement sensation that was significantly greater than stimulation over the control region. Movement sensation after dorsal premotor cortex stimulation was less affected by sensory and motor deprivation than was primary motor cortex stimulation. We propose that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over dorsal premotor cortex produces a corollary discharge that is perceived as movement.

  2. Effects of repetition and temperature on Contingent Electrical Stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castrillon, Eduardo E.; Zhou, Xinwen; Svensson, Peter

    Effects of repetition and temperature on Contingent Electrical Stimulation. E.E. Castrillon W1, 2, Xinwen Zhou 3, P. Svensson1, 2, 4 1 Department of Dentistry and Oral Health, Section of Orofacial Pain and Jaw Function, Aarhus University, Denmark2 Scandinavian Center for Orofacial Neuroscience...... (SCON)3 Department of Dentistry, Beijing Shijitan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, China. 4 Department of Dental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden  Background: Contingent electrical stimulation (CES) of the facial skin has been shown to reduce electromyographic (EMG......) activity associated with bruxism. Repetition of the electrical stimulus and skin surface temperature (ST) may affect the perception of CES and possibly also the inhibitory EMG effects.Objectives: To determine the effects of stimulus repetition and skin ST on the perception of CES.  Methods: Healthy...

  3. Use of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Treatment in Psychiatry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aleman, Andre

    The potential of noninvasive neurostimulation by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for improving psychiatric disorders has been studied increasingly over the past two decades. This is especially the case for major depression and for auditory verbal hallucinations in schizophrenia.

  4. Illusory sensation of movement induced by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Mark Schram Christensen; Jesper Lundbye-Jensen; Michael James Grey; Alexandra Damgaard Vejlby; Bo Belhage; Jens Bo Nielsen

    2010-01-01

    Human movement sense relies on both somatosensory feedback and on knowledge of the motor commands used to produce the movement. We have induced a movement illusion using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over primary motor cortex and dorsal premotor cortex in the absence of limb movement and its associated somatosensory feedback. Afferent and efferent neural signalling was abolished in the arm with ischemic nerve block, and in the leg with spinal nerve block. Movement sensation was...

  5. Role of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in stroke rehabilitation.

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    Pinter, Michaela M; Brainin, Michael

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, efforts have focused on investigating the neurophysiological changes that occur in the brain after stroke, and on developing novel strategies such as additional brain stimulation to enhance sensorimotor and cognitive recovery. In the 1990s, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) was introduced as a therapeutic tool for improving the efficacy of rehabilitation for recovery after stroke. It is evident that disturbances of interhemispheric processes after stroke result in a pathological hyperactivity of the intact hemisphere. The rationale of using rTMS as a complementary therapy is mainly to decrease the cortical excitability in regions that are presumed to hinder optimal recovery by low-frequency rTMS delivered to the unaffected hemisphere, while high-frequency rTMS delivered to the affected hemisphere facilitates cortical excitability. However, the exact mechanisms of how rTMS works are still under investigation. There is a growing body of research in stroke patients investigating the effect of rTMS on facilitating recovery by modifying cortical and subcortical networks. Clinical trials applying rTMS already yielded promising results in improving recovery of sensorimotor and cognitive functions. Altogether, in combination with conventional therapeutic approaches, rTMS has a potential to become a complementary strategy to enhance stroke recovery by modulating the excitability of targeted brain areas. In future studies, emphasis should be placed on selecting patient populations to determine whether treatment response depends on age, lesion acuteness, or stroke severity. Furthermore, it is important to identify parameters optimizing the beneficial effects of rTMS on stroke recovery, and to monitor their long-term effects.

  6. Improved discrimination of visual stimuli following repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael L Waterston

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS at certain frequencies increases thresholds for motor-evoked potentials and phosphenes following stimulation of cortex. Consequently rTMS is often assumed to introduce a "virtual lesion" in stimulated brain regions, with correspondingly diminished behavioral performance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we investigated the effects of rTMS to visual cortex on subjects' ability to perform visual psychophysical tasks. Contrary to expectations of a visual deficit, we find that rTMS often improves the discrimination of visual features. For coarse orientation tasks, discrimination of a static stimulus improved consistently following theta-burst stimulation of the occipital lobe. Using a reaction-time task, we found that these improvements occurred throughout the visual field and lasted beyond one hour post-rTMS. Low-frequency (1 Hz stimulation yielded similar improvements. In contrast, we did not find consistent effects of rTMS on performance in a fine orientation discrimination task. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Overall our results suggest that rTMS generally improves or has no effect on visual acuity, with the nature of the effect depending on the type of stimulation and the task. We interpret our results in the context of an ideal-observer model of visual perception.

  7. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation in motor rehabilitation after stroke: an update.

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    Klomjai, W; Lackmy-Vallée, A; Roche, N; Pradat-Diehl, P; Marchand-Pauvert, V; Katz, R

    2015-09-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of adult motor disability. The number of stroke survivors is increasing in industrialized countries, and despite available treatments used in rehabilitation, the recovery of motor functions after stroke is often incomplete. Studies in the 1980s showed that non-invasive brain stimulation (mainly repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation [rTMS] and transcranial direct current stimulation [tDCS]) could modulate cortical excitability and induce plasticity in healthy humans. These findings have opened the way to the therapeutic use of the 2 techniques for stroke. The mechanisms underlying the cortical effect of rTMS and tDCS differ. This paper summarizes data obtained in healthy subjects and gives a general review of the use of rTMS and tDCS in stroke patients with altered motor functions. From 1988 to 2012, approximately 1400 publications were devoted to the study of non-invasive brain stimulation in humans. However, for stroke patients with limb motor deficit, only 141 publications have been devoted to the effects of rTMS and 132 to those of tDCS. The Cochrane review devoted to the effects of rTMS found 19 randomized controlled trials involving 588 patients, and that devoted to tDCS found 18 randomized controlled trials involving 450 patients. Without doubt, rTMS and tDCS contribute to physiological and pathophysiological studies in motor control. However, despite the increasing number of studies devoted to the possible therapeutic use of non-invasive brain stimulation to improve motor recovery after stroke, further studies will be necessary to specify their use in rehabilitation.

  8. Outcomes in spasticity after repetitive transcranial magnetic and transcranial direct current stimulations

    OpenAIRE

    Gunduz, Aysegul; Kumru, Hatice; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive brain stimulations mainly consist of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation exhibits satisfactory outcomes in improving multiple sclerosis, stroke, spinal cord injury and cerebral palsy-induced spasticity. By contrast, transcranial direct current stimulation has only been studied in post-stroke spasticity. To better validate the efficacy of non-invasive brain stimulations in improving ...

  9. Long-term repetitive mechanical loading of the knee joint by in vivo muscle stimulation accelerates cartilage degeneration and increases chondrocyte death in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horisberger, Monika; Fortuna, Rafael; Valderrabano, Victor; Herzog, Walter

    2013-06-01

    Excessive chronic loading is thought to be one factor responsible for the onset of osteoarthritis. For example, studies using treadmill running have shown an increased risk for osteoarthritis, thereby suggesting that muscle-induced joint loading may play a role in osteoarthritis onset and progression. However, in these studies, muscle-induced loading was not carefully quantified. Here, we present a model of controlled muscular loading which allows for the accurate quantification of joint loading. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of long-term, cyclic, isometric and dynamic, muscle-induced joint loading of physiologic magnitude but excessive intensity on cartilage integrity and cell viability in the rabbit knee. 24 rabbits were divided into an (i) eccentric, (ii) concentric, or (iii) isometric knee extensor contraction group (50 min of cyclic, submaximal stimulation 3 times/week for four weeks=19,500 cycles) controlled by the stimulation of a femoral nerve cuff electrode on the right hind limb. The contralateral knee was used as a non-loaded control. The knee articular cartilages were analysed by confocal microscopy for chondrocyte death, and histologically for Mankin Score, cartilage thickness and cell density. All loaded knees had significantly increased cell death rates and Mankin Scores compared to the non-loaded joints. Cartilage thicknesses did not systematically differ between loaded and control joints. Chondrocyte death and Mankin Scores were significantly increased in the loaded joints, thereby linking muscular exercise of physiologic magnitude but excessive intensity to cartilage degeneration and cell death in the rabbit knee. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Transduction of Repetitive Mechanical Stimuli by Piezo1 and Piezo2 Ion Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda H. Lewis

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Several cell types experience repetitive mechanical stimuli, including vein endothelial cells during pulsating blood flow, inner ear hair cells upon sound exposure, and skin cells and their innervating dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons when sweeping across a textured surface or touching a vibrating object. While mechanosensitive Piezo ion channels have been clearly implicated in sensing static touch, their roles in transducing repetitive stimulations are less clear. Here, we perform electrophysiological recordings of heterologously expressed mouse Piezo1 and Piezo2 responding to repetitive mechanical stimulations. We find that both channels function as pronounced frequency filters whose transduction efficiencies vary with stimulus frequency, waveform, and duration. We then use numerical simulations and human disease-related point mutations to demonstrate that channel inactivation is the molecular mechanism underlying frequency filtering and further show that frequency filtering is conserved in rapidly adapting mouse DRG neurons. Our results give insight into the potential contributions of Piezos in transducing repetitive mechanical stimuli.

  11. The influence of repetitive painful stimulation on peripheral and trigeminal pain thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirkwinkel, Monika; Gralow, Ingrid; Colak-Ekici, Reyhan; Wolowski, Anne; Marziniak, Martin; Evers, Stefan

    2008-10-15

    We were interested in how continuous painful stimulation which is performed as inurement exercises in some Asian martial arts influences sensory and pain perception. Therefore, we examined 15 Kung Fu disciples before and after a 14 day period with repetitive inurement exercises and measured sensory and pain thresholds and intensities in both the trigeminal and the peripheral (peroneal nerve) region. The results of the probands were compared to those of 15 healthy control subjects who were performing sports without painful stimulation during this period. The probands showed a significantly decreased trigeminal pain intensity after repetitive electrical stimulation whereas the control subjects did not show any changes of sensory or pain perception during the study period. This suggests a change of central sensitisation and inhibitory control mechanisms in the nociceptive spinal or cerebral pathways by inurement exercises. In addition, pain thresholds showed an (not significant) increase after the study period whereas the control subjects showed a significant decrease of pain thresholds. In summary, our pilot study suggests that inurement exercises, i.e. repetitive painful stimulation, over a period of 14 days might induce changes of pain perception resulting in trigeminal pain habituation and higher pain thresholds.

  12. The interaction between duration, velocity and repetitive auditory stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makin, Alexis D J; Poliakoff, Ellen; Dillon, Joe; Perrin, Aimee; Mullet, Thomas; Jones, Luke A

    2012-03-01

    Repetitive auditory stimulation (with click trains) and visual velocity signals both have intriguing effects on the subjective passage of time. Previous studies have established that prior presentation of auditory clicks increases the subjective duration of subsequent sensory input, and that faster moving stimuli are also judged to have been presented for longer (the time dilation effect). However, the effect of clicks on velocity estimation is unknown, and the nature of the time dilation effect remains ambiguous. Here were present a series of five experiments to explore these phenomena in more detail. Participants viewed a rightward moving grating which traveled at velocities ranging from 5 to 15°/s and which lasted for durations of 500 to 1500 ms. Gratings were preceded by clicks, silence or white noise. It was found that both clicks and higher velocities increased subjective duration. It was also found that the time dilation effect was a constant proportion of stimulus duration. This implies that faster velocity increases the rate of the pacemaker component of the internal clock. Conversely, clicks increased subjective velocity, but the magnitude of this effect was not proportional to actual velocity. Through considerations of these results, we conclude that clicks independently affect velocity and duration representations.

  13. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulator with controllable pulse parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterchev, Angel V.; Murphy, David L.; Lisanby, Sarah H.

    2011-06-01

    The characteristics of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) pulses influence the physiological effect of TMS. However, available TMS devices allow very limited adjustment of the pulse parameters. We describe a novel TMS device that uses a circuit topology incorporating two energy storage capacitors and two insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) modules to generate near-rectangular electric field pulses with adjustable number, polarity, duration, and amplitude of the pulse phases. This controllable pulse parameter TMS (cTMS) device can induce electric field pulses with phase widths of 10-310 µs and positive/negative phase amplitude ratio of 1-56. Compared to conventional monophasic and biphasic TMS, cTMS reduces energy dissipation up to 82% and 57% and decreases coil heating up to 33% and 41%, respectively. We demonstrate repetitive TMS trains of 3000 pulses at frequencies up to 50 Hz with electric field pulse amplitude and width variability less than the measurement resolution (1.7% and 1%, respectively). Offering flexible pulse parameter adjustment and reduced power consumption and coil heating, cTMS enhances existing TMS paradigms, enables novel research applications and could lead to clinical applications with potentially enhanced potency.

  14. [Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in depression; stimulation of the brain in order to cure the psyche].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmich, R C; Snijders, A H; Verkes, R J; Bloem, B R

    2004-02-28

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive approach to briefly stimulate or inhibit cortical brain areas. A novel approach entails the delivery of repetitive TMS pulses (rTMS) at a fixed frequency. In rTMS cortical activity is altered beyond the period of actual stimulation. The changes occur locally as well as at a distance in functionally connected brain areas. These features render rTMS a suitable tool to study normal brain functions and the pathophysiology of brain diseases. Furthermore, it is expected that rTMS could be used as a novel therapy for neurological or psychiatric diseases characterised by abnormal cortical activation. This possibility has been studied mostly in patients suffering from depression, where rTMS has been used to restore normal activity in the hypoactive prefrontal cortex. Despite statistically significant therapeutic effects in small sized trials, the clinical implications are still limited.

  15. Outcomes in spasticity after repetitive transcranial magnetic and transcranial direct current stimulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aysegul Gunduz; Hatice Kumru; Alvaro Pascual-Leone

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive brain stimulations mainly consist of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation exhib-its satisfactory outcomes in improving multiple sclerosis, stroke, spinal cord injury and cerebral palsy-induced spasticity. By contrast, transcranial direct current stimulation has only been studied in post-stroke spasticity. To better validate the effcacy of non-invasive brain stimulations in im-proving the spasticity post-stroke, more prospective cohort studies involving large sample sizes are needed.

  16. An evaluation of factors affecting duration of treatment with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roni Broder Cohen

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effects of repetitive transcranialmagnetic stimulation in patients with major depression who weresubmitted to this treatment during the period from 2000 to 2006.Methods: A retrospective study with 204 patients who underwenttreatment with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, collectingdata from those who experienced remission (defined as a HDRS scoreequal to or lower than 7. The patients were followed for up to 6 monthsafter treatment. Mean duration of remission for this cohort of patientswas 70.2 (± 58.4 days. Results: The only variable associated withthe duration of remission in the linear regression model was numberof repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation sessions. Conclusion:Our findings suggest that the greater the number of sessions, the longerthe duration of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation effects.Consequently, future research investigating the effects of repetitivetranscranial magnetic stimulation should explore this variable in orderto maximize the therapeutic effects of this new brain stimulationtechnique.

  17. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for hallucination in schizophrenia spectrum disorders A meta-analysis***

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingli Zhang; Wei Liang; Shichang Yang; Ping Dai; Lijuan Shen; Changhong Wang

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study assessed the efficacy and tolerability of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for treatment of auditory hal ucination of patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. DATA SOURCES: Online literature retrieval was conducted using PubMed, ISI Web of Science, EMBASE, Medline and Cochrane Central Register of Control ed Trials databases from January 1985 to May 2012. Key words were “transcranial magnetic stimulation”, “TMS”, “repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation”, and “hal ucination”. STUDY SELECTION: Selected studies were randomized control ed trials assessing therapeutic ef-ficacy of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for hal ucination in patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Experimental intervention was low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in left temporoparietal cortex for treatment of auditory hal ucination in schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Control groups received sham stimulation. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was total scores of Auditory Hal ucinations Rating Scale, Auditory Hal ucination Subscale of Psychotic Symptom Rating Scale, Positive and Negative Symptom Scale-Auditory Hal ucination item, and Hal ucination Change Scale. Secondary outcomes included response rate, global mental state, adverse effects and cognitive function. RESULTS: Seventeen studies addressing repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for treatment of schizophrenia spectrum disorders were screened, with controls receiving sham stimulation. Al data were completely effective, involving 398 patients. Overal mean weighted effect size for repeti-tive transcranial magnetic stimulation versus sham stimulation was statistical y significant (MD =-0.42, 95%CI: -0.64 to -0.20, P = 0.000 2). Patients receiving repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation responded more frequently than sham stimulation (OR = 2.94, 95%CI: 1.39 to 6.24, P =0.005). No significant differences were found

  18. Evidence-based guidelines on the therapeutic use of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal; André-Obadia, Nathalie; Antal, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    A group of European experts was commissioned to establish guidelines on the therapeutic use of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) from evidence published up until March 2014, regarding pain, movement disorders, stroke, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy...

  19. A feasible repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation clinical protocol in migraine prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn Zardouz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This case series was conducted to determine the clinical feasibility of a repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation protocol for the prevention of migraine (with and without aura. Methods: Five patients with migraines underwent five repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation sessions separated in 1- to 2-week intervals for a period of 2 months at a single tertiary medical center. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation was applied to the left motor cortex with 2000 pulses (20 trains with 1s inter-train interval delivered per session, at a frequency of 10 Hz and 80% resting motor threshold. Pre- and post-treatment numerical rating pain scales were collected, and percent reductions in intensity, frequency, and duration were generated. Results: An average decrease in 37.8%, 32.1%, and 31.2% were noted in the intensity, frequency, and duration of migraines post-repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, respectively. A mean decrease in 1.9±1.0 (numerical rating pain scale ± standard deviation; range: 0.4–2.8 in headache intensity scores was noted after the repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation sessions. Conclusion: The tested repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation protocol is a well-tolerated, safe, and effective method for migraine prevention.

  20. Effects of repetitive facilitative exercise with neuromuscular electrical stimulation, vibratory stimulation and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of the hemiplegic hand in chronic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etoh, Seiji; Noma, Tomokazu; Takiyoshi, Yuko; Arima, Michiko; Ohama, Rintaro; Yokoyama, Katsuya; Hokazono, Akihiko; Amano, Yumeko; Shimodozono, Megumi; Kawahira, Kazumi

    2016-11-01

    Repetitive facilitative exercise (RFE) is a developed approach to the rehabilitation of hemiplegia. RFE can be integrated with neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES), direct application of vibratory stimulation (DAVS) and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). The aims of the present study were to retrospectively compare the effects of RFE and NMES, DAVS with those of RFE and rTMS, and to determine the maximal effect of the combination of RFE with NMES, DAVS, rTMS and pharmacological treatments in stroke patients. Thirty-three stroke patients were enrolled and divided into three groups: 15 who received RFE with rTMS (4 min) (TMS4 alone), 9 who received RFE with NMES, DAVS (NMES, DAVS alone) and 9 who received RFE with NMES, DAVS and rTMS (10 min) (rTMS10 + NMES, DAVS). The subjects performed the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) and Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) before and after the 2-week session. The 18 patients in the NMES, DAVS alone and rTMS10 + NMES, DAVS group underwent the intervention for 4 weeks. There were no significant differences in the increases in the FMA, ARAT scores in the three groups. The FMA or ARAT scores in the NMES, DAVS alone and the rTMS10 + NMES, DAVS group were increased significantly. The FMA and ARAT scores were significantly improved after 4 weeks in the NMES, DAVS alone group. RFE with NMES, DAVS may be more effective than RFE with rTMS for the recovery of upper-limb function. Patients who received RFE with NMES, DAVS and pharmacological treatments showed significant functional recovery.

  1. Priming theta-burst repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation with low- and high-frequency stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Gabrielle; Flavel, Stanley C; Ridding, Michael C

    2009-05-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can be used to study metaplasticity in human motor cortex. The term metaplasticity describes a phenomenon where the prior synaptic history of a pathway can affect the subsequent induction of long-term potentiation or depression. In the current study, we investigated metaplasticity in human motor cortex with the use of inhibitory continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS). cTBS involves short bursts of high frequency (50 Hz) rTMS applied every 200 ms for 40 s. In the first series of experiments, cTBS was primed with 10 min of intermittent 2 or 6 Hz rTMS. Subjects (n = 20) received priming stimulation at 70% of active motor threshold or 90% of resting motor threshold. In another series of experiments, cTBS was primed with excitatory intermittent theta-burst stimulation (iTBS). iTBS involves a 2 s train of theta-burst stimulation delivered every 10 s for 190 s. Stimuli were delivered over the first dorsal interosseus motor area.. The effect of cTBS alone and primed cTBS on motor cortical excitability was investigated by recording motor-evoked potentials (MEP) in the first dorsal interosseus following single-pulse TMS. MEP area in the cTBS alone condition was not significantly different from cTBS primed with 2 or 6 Hz rTMS. However, priming cTBS with iTBS suppressed MEP area to a greater extent than in cTBS alone. Our results provide further evidence of metaplasticity in human motor cortex when appropriate priming protocols are employed.

  2. The Effect of 10 Hz Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation of Posterior Parietal Cortex on Visual Attention

    OpenAIRE

    Isabel Dombrowe; Georgiana Juravle; Mohsen Alavash; Carsten Gießing; Claus C Hilgetag

    2015-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) at frequencies lower than 5 Hz transiently inhibits the stimulated area. In healthy participants, such a protocol can induce a transient attentional bias to the visual hemifield ipsilateral to the stimulated hemisphere. This bias might be due to a relatively less active stimulated hemisphere and a relatively more active unstimulated hemisphere. In a previous study, Jin and Hilgetag (2008) tried to switc...

  3. Repetitive electric brain stimulation reduces food intake in humans

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jauch-Chara, Kamila; Kistenmacher, Alina; Herzog, Nina; Schwarz, Marianka; Schweiger, Ulrich; Oltmanns, Kerstin M

    2014-01-01

    ...)) from 20 to 25 were examined during 8 d of daily tDCS or a sham stimulation. After tDCS or sham stimulation on the first and the last day of both experimental conditions, participants consumed food ad libitum from a standardized test buffet...

  4. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation improves consciousness disturbance in stroke patients A quantitative electroencephalography spectral power analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Xie; Tong Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation is a noninvasive treatment technique that can directly alter cortical excitability and improve cerebral functional activity in unconscious patients. To investigate the effects and the electrophysiological changes of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation cortical treatment, 10 stroke patients with non-severe brainstem lesions and with disturbance of consciousness were treated with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. A quantitative electroencephalography spectral power analysis was also performed. The absolute power in the alpha band was increased immediately after the first repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation treatment, and the energy was reduced in the delta band. The alpha band relative power values slightly decreased at 1 day post-treatment, then increased and reached a stable level at 2 weeks post-treatment. Glasgow Coma Score and JFK Coma Recovery Scale-Revised score were improved. Relative power value in the alpha band was positively related to Glasgow Coma Score and JFK Coma Recovery Scale-Revised score. These data suggest that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation is a noninvasive, safe, and effective treatment technology for improving brain functional activity and promoting awakening in unconscious stroke patients.

  5. Transcranial direct current stimulation and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in consultation-liaison psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.C.L. Valiengo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Patients with clinical diseases often present psychiatric conditions whose pharmacological treatment is hampered due to hazardous interactions with the clinical treatment and/or disease. This is particularly relevant for major depressive disorder, the most common psychiatric disorder in the general hospital. In this context, nonpharmacological interventions could be useful therapies; and, among those, noninvasive brain stimulation (NIBS might be an interesting option. The main methods of NIBS are repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS, which was recently approved as a nonresearch treatment for some psychiatric conditions, and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS, a technique that is currently limited to research scenarios but has shown promising results. Therefore, our aim was to review the main medical conditions associated with high depression rates, the main obstacles for depression treatment, and whether these therapies could be a useful intervention for such conditions. We found that depression is an important and prevalent comorbidity in a variety of diseases such as epilepsy, stroke, Parkinson's disease, myocardial infarction, cancer, and in other conditions such as pregnancy and in patients without enteral access. We found that treatment of depression is often suboptimal within the above contexts and that rTMS and tDCS therapies have been insufficiently appraised. We discuss whether rTMS and tDCS could have a significant impact in treating depression that develops within a clinical context, considering its unique characteristics such as the absence of pharmacological interactions, the use of a nonenteral route, and as an augmentation therapy for antidepressants.

  6. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS)-Induced Trigeminal Autonomic Cephalalgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    DURMAZ, Onur; ATEŞ, Mehmet Alpay; ŞENOL, Mehmet Güney

    2015-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is an effective and novel treatment method that has been approved for the treatment of refractory depression by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The most common side effects of rTMS are a transient headache that usually responds to simple analgesics, local discomfort in the stimulation area, dizziness, ipsilateral lacrimation and, very rarely, generalized seizure. TMS is also regarded as a beneficial tool for investigating mechanisms underlying headache. Although rTMS has considerable benefits in terms of headache, there is the potential for rare side effects. In this report, we present the case of a patient with no history of autonomic headache who underwent a course of rTMS for refractory unipolar depression caused by an inadequate response to pharmacotherapy. After his fourth rTMS session, the patient developed sudden headaches with characteristics of trigeminal autonomic cephalalgia on the stimulated side, representing a noteworthy example of the potential side effects of rTMS. PMID:28360729

  7. Theta-burst repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation suppresses specific excitatory circuits in the human motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lazzaro, V; Pilato, F; Saturno, E; Oliviero, A; Dileone, M; Mazzone, P; Insola, A; Tonali, P A; Ranieri, F; Huang, Y Z; Rothwell, J C

    2005-06-15

    In four conscious patients who had electrodes implanted in the cervical epidural space for the control of pain, we recorded corticospinal volleys evoked by single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the motor cortex before and after a 20 s period of continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS). It has previously been reported that this form of repetitive TMS reduces the amplitude of motor-evoked potentials (MEPs), with the maximum effect occurring at 5-10 min after the end of stimulation. The present results show that cTBS preferentially decreases the amplitude of the corticospinal I1 wave, with approximately the same time course. This is consistent with a cortical origin of the effect on the MEP. However, other protocols that lead to MEP suppression, such as short-interval intracortical inhibition, are characterized by reduced excitability of late I waves (particularly I3), suggesting that cTBS suppresses MEPs through different mechanisms, such as long-term depression in excitatory synaptic connections.

  8. Increased probability of repetitive spinal motoneuron activation by transcranial magnetic stimulation after muscle fatigue in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Birgit; Felding, Ulrik Ascanius; Krarup, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Triple stimulation technique (TST) has previously shown that transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) fails to activate a proportion of spinal motoneurons (MNs) during motor fatigue. The TST response depression without attenuation of the conventional motor evoked potential suggested increased prob...... the muscle is fatigued. Repetitive MN firing may provide an adaptive mechanism to maintain motor unit activation and task performance during sustained voluntary activity.......Triple stimulation technique (TST) has previously shown that transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) fails to activate a proportion of spinal motoneurons (MNs) during motor fatigue. The TST response depression without attenuation of the conventional motor evoked potential suggested increased......-exercise behavior of QuadS responses was related to the duration of the contraction pointing to a correlation between repeated activation of MNs and the subject's ability to maintain force. In conclusion, the study confirmed that an increased fraction of spinal MNs fire more than once in response to TMS when...

  9. Phantom Limb Pain: Low Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Unaffected Hemisphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Di Rollo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Phantom limb pain is very common after limb amputation and is often difficult to treat. The motor cortex stimulation is a valid treatment for deafferentation pain that does not respond to conventional pain treatment, with relief for 50% to 70% of patients. This treatment is invasive as it uses implanted epidural electrodes. Cortical stimulation can be performed noninvasively by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS. The stimulation of the hemisphere that isn't involved in phantom limb (unaffected hemisphere, remains unexplored. We report a case of phantom limb pain treated with 1 Hz rTMS stimulation over motor cortex in unaffected hemisphere. This stimulation produces a relevant clinical improvement of phantom limb pain; however, further studies are necessary to determine the efficacy of the method and the stimulation parameters.

  10. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for levodopa-induced dyskinesias in Parkinson's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filipovic, S.R.; Rothwell, J.C.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Bhatia, K.P.

    2009-01-01

    In a placebo-controlled, single-blinded, crossover study, we assessed the effect of "real" repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) versus "sham" rTMS (placebo) on peak dose dyskinesias in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Ten patients with PD and prominent dyskinesias had rTMS (1,8

  11. Reductions in CI amplitude after repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the striate cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutter, D.J.L.G.; Honk, E.J. van

    2003-01-01

    Slow repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a method capable of transiently inhibiting cortical excitability and disrupting information processing in the visual system. This method can be used to topographically map the functional contribution of different cortical brain areas in vis

  12. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Negative Symptoms of Schizophrenia : Review and Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dlabac-de Lange, Jozarni J.; Knegtering, Rikus; Aleman, Andre

    2010-01-01

    Background: Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been proposed as a treatment for the negative symptoms of schizophrenia. During the past decade, several trials have reported on the efficacy of rTMS treatment; however, the results were inconsistent. Objective: To assess the effica

  13. Therapeutic benefit of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for severe mirror movements A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Sun Kim; Sung Ho Jang; Zee-Ihn Lee; Mi Young Lee; Yun Woo Cho; Migyoung Kweon; Su Min Son

    2013-01-01

    Congenital mirror movements retard typical hand functions, but no definite therapeutic modality is available to treat such movements. We report an 8-year-old boy with severe mirror movements of both hands. His mirror movements were assessed using the Woods and Teuber grading scale and his fine motor skills were also evaluated by the Purdue Pegboard Test. A 2-week regimen of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation produced markedly diminished mirror movement symptoms and increased the fine motor skills of both hands. Two weeks after the completion of the regimen, mirror movement grades had improved from grade 4 to 1 in both hands and the Purdue Pegboard Test results of the right and left hands also improved from 12 to 14 or 13. These improvements were maintained for 1 month after the 2-week repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation regimen. After 18 months, the mirror movement grade was maintained and the Purdue Pegboard test score had improved to 15 for the right hand while the left hand score was maintained at 13. This occurred without any additional repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation or other treatment. These findings suggest that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for this patient had a therapeutic and long-term effect on mirror movements.

  14. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Resistant Visual Hallucinations in a Woman With Schizophrenia: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari Jolfaei, Atefeh; Naji, Borzooyeh; Nasr Esfehani, Mehdi

    2016-03-01

    A 29-year-old woman with schizophrenia introduced for application of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for refractory visual hallucinations. Following inhibitory rTMS on visual cortex she reported significant reduction in severity and simplification of complexity of hallucinations, which lasted for three months. rTMS can be considered as a possibly potent treatment for visual hallucinations.

  15. Repetitive magnetic stimulation affects the microenvironment of nerve regeneration and evoked potentials after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jin-Lan; Guo, Xu-Dong; Zhang, Shu-Quan; Wang, Xin-Gang; Wu, Shi-Feng

    2016-05-01

    Repetitive magnetic stimulation has been shown to alter local blood flow of the brain, excite the corticospinal tract and muscle, and induce motor function recovery. We established a rat model of acute spinal cord injury using the modified Allen's method. After 4 hours of injury, rat models received repetitive magnetic stimulation, with a stimulus intensity of 35% maximum output intensity, 5-Hz frequency, 5 seconds for each sequence, and an interval of 2 minutes. This was repeated for a total of 10 sequences, once a day, 5 days in a week, for 2 consecutive weeks. After repetitive magnetic stimulation, the number of apoptotic cells decreased, matrix metalloproteinase 9/2 gene and protein expression decreased, nestin expression increased, somatosensory and motor-evoked potentials recovered, and motor function recovered in the injured spinal cord. These findings confirm that repetitive magnetic stimulation of the spinal cord improved the microenvironment of neural regeneration, reduced neuronal apoptosis, and induced neuroprotective and repair effects on the injured spinal cord.

  16. Repetitive magnetic stimulation affects the microenvironment of nerve regeneration and evoked potentials after spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-lan Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Repetitive magnetic stimulation has been shown to alter local blood flow of the brain, excite the corticospinal tract and muscle, and induce motor function recovery. We established a rat model of acute spinal cord injury using the modified Allen′s method. After 4 hours of injury, rat models received repetitive magnetic stimulation, with a stimulus intensity of 35% maximum output intensity, 5-Hz frequency, 5 seconds for each sequence, and an interval of 2 minutes. This was repeated for a total of 10 sequences, once a day, 5 days in a week, for 2 consecutive weeks. After repetitive magnetic stimulation, the number of apoptotic cells decreased, matrix metalloproteinase 9/2 gene and protein expression decreased, nestin expression increased, somatosensory and motor-evoked potentials recovered, and motor function recovered in the injured spinal cord. These findings confirm that repetitive magnetic stimulation of the spinal cord improved the microenvironment of neural regeneration, reduced neuronal apoptosis, and induced neuroprotective and repair effects on the injured spinal cord.

  17. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation to the Primary Motor Cortex Interferes with Motor Learning by Observing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Liana E.; Wilson, Elizabeth T.; Gribble, Paul L.

    2009-01-01

    Neural representations of novel motor skills can be acquired through visual observation. We used repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to test the idea that this "motor learning by observing" is based on engagement of neural processes for learning in the primary motor cortex (M1). Human subjects who observed another person learning…

  18. Update on repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in obsessive-compulsive disorder: different targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, R.M.; Figee, M.; Vulink, N.; Denys, D.

    2011-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a chronic, disabling disorder. Ten percent of patients remain treatment refractory despite several treatments. For these severe, treatment-refractory patients, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been suggested as a treatment option. Since

  19. Tibialis anterior stretch reflex in early stance is suppressed by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zuur, Abraham T; Christensen, Mark Schram; Sinkjær, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Abstract A rapid plantar flexion perturbation in the early stance phase of walking elicits a large stretch reflex in tibialis anterior (TA). In this study we use repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) to test if this response is mediated through a transcortical pathway. TA stretch...

  20. Multiple sessions of low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in focal hand dystonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kimberley, Teresa Jacobson; Borich, Michael R; Arora, Sanjeev

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The ability of low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to enhance intracortical inhibition has motivated its use as a potential therapeutic intervention in focal hand dystonia (FHD). In this preliminary investigation, we assessed the physiologic and behavioral...

  1. The Cerebellum in Emotion Regulation: A Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutter, D.J.L.G.; Honk, E.J. van

    2009-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that the cerebellum may play a role in the regulation of emotion. The aim of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that inhibition of cerebellar function using slow repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) would lead to increased negative mood as a

  2. Repetitive magnetic stimulation of human-derived neuron-like cells activates cAMP-CREB pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellmann, Julian; Jüttner, Rene; Roth, Clarisse; Bajbouj, Malek; Kirste, Imke; Heuser, Isabella; Gertz, Karen; Endres, Matthias; Kronenberg, Golo

    2012-02-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a non-invasive neurostimulatory technique widely used in research, diagnostics, and neuro-psychiatric therapy. Despite its growing popularity, basic molecular mechanisms underlying the clinical effects of rTMS have remained largely under-researched. Here, we present a human-derived neuronal cell culture system responsive to rTMS effects. SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells were differentiated by retinoic acid treatment for 10 days, resulting in a neuronal phenotype characterized by upregulation of neuronal marker proteins and generation of an action potential in response to depolarizing current step injection. Repetitive magnetic stimulation of these cells resulted in increased intracellular cAMP levels and increased phosphorylation of transcription factor CREB. Pretreatment with ketamine (1 μM) potentiated, while pretreatment with lithium (2 mM) attenuated this cellular response to repetitive magnetic stimulation. In conclusion, we introduce here a novel in vitro system responding to rTMS at the level of second messenger signaling. The use of human-derived cells with neuron-like properties will prove useful for further studies on the cellular effects of rTMS.

  3. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for the treatment of chronic tinnitus after traumatic brain injury: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuzer, Peter Michael; Landgrebe, Michael; Frank, Elmar; Langguth, Berthold

    2013-01-01

    Tinnitus is a frequent symptom of traumatic brain injury, which is difficult to treat. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation has shown beneficial effects in some forms of tinnitus. However, traumatic brain injury in the past has been considered as a relative contraindication for repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation because of the increased risk of seizures. Here we present the case of a 53-year-old male patient suffering from severe tinnitus after traumatic brain injury with comorbid depression and alcohol abuse, who received 5 treatment series of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (1 Hz stimulation protocol over left primary auditory cortex, 10 sessions of 2000 stimuli each, stimulation intensity 110% resting motor threshold). Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation was tolerated without any side effects and tinnitus complaints (measured by a validated tinnitus questionnaire and numeric rating scales) were improved in a replicable way throughout 5 courses of transcranial magnetic stimulation up to now.

  4. Enhanced accuracy in novel mirror drawing after repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation-induced proprioceptive deafferentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, Daniela; Christensen, Lars O.D.; Lee, Ji-hang

    2004-01-01

    a performance benefit. In this study, we tested whether deafferentation induced by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can improve mirror tracing skills in normal subjects. Hand trajectory error during novel mirror drawing was compared across two groups of subjects that received either 1 Hz r......TMS over the somatosensory cortex contralateral to the hand or sham stimulation. Mirror tracing was more accurate after rTMS than after sham stimulation. Using a position-matching task, we confirmed that rTMS reduced proprioceptive acuity and that this reduction was largest when the coil was placed...

  5. Immediate Effects of Repetitive Magnetic Stimulation on Single Cortical Pyramidal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Jineta; Sorrell, Mary E.; Celnik, Pablo A.; Pelled, Galit

    2017-01-01

    Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) has been successfully used as a non-invasive therapeutic intervention for several neurological disorders in the clinic as well as an investigative tool for basic neuroscience. rTMS has been shown to induce long-term changes in neuronal circuits in vivo. Such long-term effects of rTMS have been investigated using behavioral, imaging, electrophysiological, and molecular approaches, but there is limited understanding of the immediate effects of TMS on neurons. We investigated the immediate effects of high frequency (20 Hz) rTMS on the activity of cortical neurons in an effort to understand the underlying cellular mechanisms activated by rTMS. We used whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in acute rat brain slices and calcium imaging of cultured primary neurons to examine changes in neuronal activity and intracellular calcium respectively. Our results indicate that each TMS pulse caused an immediate and transient activation of voltage gated sodium channels (9.6 ± 1.8 nA at -45 mV, p value rTMS stimulation induced action potentials in a subpopulation of neurons, and significantly increased the steady state current of the neurons at near threshold voltages (at -45 mV: before TMS: I = 130 ± 17 pA, during TMS: I = 215 ± 23 pA, p value = 0.001). rTMS stimulation also led to a delayed increase in intracellular calcium (153.88 ± 61.94% increase from baseline). These results show that rTMS has an immediate and cumulative effect on neuronal activity and intracellular calcium levels, and suggest that rTMS may enhance neuronal responses when combined with an additional motor, sensory or cognitive stimulus. Thus, these results could be translated to optimize rTMS protocols for clinical as well as basic science applications. PMID:28114421

  6. Repetitive magnetic stimulation induces plasticity of excitatory postsynapses on proximal dendrites of cultured mouse CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Maximilian; Platschek, Steffen; Priesemann, Viola; Becker, Denise; Willems, Laurent M; Ziemann, Ulf; Deller, Thomas; Müller-Dahlhaus, Florian; Jedlicka, Peter; Vlachos, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the human brain can lead to long-lasting changes in cortical excitability. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms which underlie rTMS-induced plasticity remain incompletely understood. Here, we used repetitive magnetic stimulation (rMS) of mouse entorhino-hippocampal slice cultures to study rMS-induced plasticity of excitatory postsynapses. By employing whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of CA1 pyramidal neurons, local electrical stimulations, immunostainings for the glutamate receptor subunit GluA1 and compartmental modeling, we found evidence for a preferential potentiation of excitatory synapses on proximal dendrites of CA1 neurons (2-4 h after stimulation). This rMS-induced synaptic potentiation required the activation of voltage-gated sodium channels, L-type voltage-gated calcium channels and N-methyl-D-aspartate-receptors. In view of these findings we propose a cellular model for the preferential strengthening of excitatory synapses on proximal dendrites following rMS in vitro, which is based on a cooperative effect of synaptic glutamatergic transmission and postsynaptic depolarization.

  7. The cerebellum in emotion regulation: a repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutter, Dennis J L G; van Honk, Jack

    2009-03-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that the cerebellum may play a role in the regulation of emotion. The aim of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that inhibition of cerebellar function using slow repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) would lead to increased negative mood as a result of impaired emotion regulation. In a randomized counterbalanced within-subjects design, 12 healthy young right-handed volunteers received 20 min of cerebellar, occipital, or sham 1 Hz rTMS on three separate days. Mood state inventories were acquired prior to and immediately after rTMS and after an emotion regulation task (ERT). In the ERT, participants were instructed to either look at aversive and neutral scenes, or to suppress the negative feelings experienced while watching aversive scenes during which the electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded. Results showing no changes in baseline-corrected mood were observed immediately after rTMS. However, significant increases in baseline-corrected negative mood following the ERT were reported after cerebellar rTMS exclusively. No effects on the EEG during the ERT were observed. These findings provide support for the view that the cerebellum is implicated in the regulation of emotion and mood, and concur with evidence of cerebellar abnormalities observed in disorders associated with emotion dysregulation. In order to clarify the underlying biological mechanisms involved, more research is needed.

  8. Cerebral Functional Reorganization in Ischemic Stroke after Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation: An fMRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Zhang, Xue-Wei; Zuo, Zhen-Tao; Lu, Jie; Meng, Chun-Ling; Fang, Hong-Ying; Xue, Rong; Fan, Yong; Guan, Yu-Zhou; Zhang, Wei-Hong

    2016-12-01

    Our study aimed to figure out brain functional reorganization evidence after repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) using the resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI). Twelve patients with unilateral subcortex lesion in the middle cerebral artery territory were recruited. Seven of them received a 10-day rTMS treatment beginning at about 5 days after stroke onset. The remaining five received sham treatment. RsfMRI and motor functional scores were obtained before and after rTMS or sham rTMS. The rTMS group showed motor recovery according to the behavioral testing scores, while there was no significant difference of motor functional scores in the sham group before and after the sham rTMS. It proved that rTMS facilitates motor recovery of early ischemic stroke patients. Compared with the sham, the rTMS treatment group achieved increased functional connectivity (FC) between ipsilesional M1 and contralesional M1, supplementary motor area, bilateral thalamus, and contralesional postcentral gyrus. And decreased FC was found between ipsilesional M1 and ipsilesional M1, postcentral gyrus and inferior and middle frontal gyrus. Increased or decreased FC detected by rsfMRI is an important finding to understand the mechanism of brain functional reorganization. The rTMS treatment is a promising therapeutic approach to facilitate motor rehabilitation for early stroke patients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on synaptic plasticity and apoptosis in vascular dementia rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui-Yun; Liu, Yang; Xie, Jia-Cun; Liu, Nan-Nan; Tian, Xin

    2015-03-15

    This study aims to determine whether low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) protects pyramidal cells from apoptosis and promotes hippocampal synaptic plasticity in a vascular dementia (VaD) rat model. Following establishment of a VaD rat model using two-vessel occlusion (2VO), learning and memory were evaluated via the Morris Water Maze (MWM), hippocampal CA1 neuron ultrastructure was examined via electron microscopy, and hippocampal synaptic plasticity was assessed by long-term potentiation (LTP). Western blot was used to detect the expression of N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor 1 (NMDAR1), Bcl-2, and Bax. Compared with VaD group, rats treated with low-frequency rTMS had reduced-escape latencies, increased swimming time in the target quadrant (PCA3-CA1 synapses was enhanced (P<0.05). Low-frequency rTMS significantly up-regulated NMDAR1 and Bcl-2 expression and down-regulated Bax expression. Low-frequency rTMS improves learning and memory, protects the synapse, and increases synaptic plasticity in VaD model rats. Increased Bcl-2 expression and reduced Bax expression may be a novel protective mechanism of low-frequency rTMS treatment for VaD.

  10. Improvements in emotion regulation following repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diefenbach, Gretchen J; Assaf, Michal; Goethe, John W; Gueorguieva, Ralitza; Tolin, David F

    2016-10-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is characterized by emotion regulation difficulties, which are associated with abnormalities in neural circuits encompassing fronto-limbic regions including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). The aim of this study was to determine whether DLPFC neuromodulation improves emotion regulation in patients with GAD. This is a secondary analysis from a randomized-controlled trial comparing 30 sessions of low-frequency right-sided active (n=13) versus sham (n=12, sham coil) repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) at the right DLPFC in patients with GAD. Results indicated statistically significant improvements in self-reported emotion regulation difficulties at posttreatment and 3-month follow-up in the active group only. Improvements were found primarily in the domains of goal-directed behaviors and impulse control and were significantly associated with a global clinician rating of improvement. These preliminary results support rTMS as a treatment for GAD and suggest improved emotion regulation as a possible mechanism of change. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Basic principles of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and repetitive TMS (rTMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klomjai, Wanalee; Katz, Rose; Lackmy-Vallée, Alexandra

    2015-09-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and repetitive TMS (rTMS) are indirect and non-invasive methods used to induce excitability changes in the motor cortex via a wire coil generating a magnetic field that passes through the scalp. Today, TMS has become a key method to investigate brain functioning in humans. Moreover, because rTMS can lead to long-lasting after-effects in the brain, it is thought to be able to induce plasticity. This tool appears to be a potential therapy for neurological and psychiatric diseases. However, the physiological mechanisms underlying the effects induced by TMS and rTMS have not yet been clearly identified. The purpose of the present review is to summarize the main knowledge available for TMS and rTMS to allow for understanding their mode of action and to specify the different parameters that influence their effects. This review takes an inventory of the most-used rTMS paradigms in clinical research and exhibits the hypotheses commonly assumed to explain rTMS after-effects.

  12. Rehabilitation interventions for chronic motor deficits with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, C; Thiel, A

    2012-12-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a non-invasive electrophysiological method to modulate cortical excitability. As such, rTMS can be used in conjunction with conventional physiotherapy or occupational therapy to facilitate rehabilitation of motor function in patients with focal brain lesions. This review summarizes the rationale for using rTMS in the rehabilitation of motor deficits as derived from imaging and electrophysiological studies of the human motor system. rTMS methodology and its various stimulation modalities are introduced and current evidence for rTMS as supportive therapy for the rehabilitation of chronic motor deficits is discussed.

  13. Glinide, but Not Sulfonylurea, Can Evoke Insulin Exocytosis by Repetitive Stimulation: Imaging Analysis of Insulin Exocytosis by Secretagogue-Induced Repetitive Stimulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyota Aoyagi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the different effects between sulfonylurea (SU and glinide drugs in insulin secretion, pancreatic β-cells were repeatedly stimulated with SU (glimepiride or glinide (mitiglinide. Total internal reflection fluorescent (TIRF microscopy revealed that secondary stimulation with glimepiride, but not glucose and mitiglinide, failed to evoke fusions of insulin granules although primary stimulation with glucose, glimepiride, and mitiglinide induced equivalent numbers of exocytotic responses. Glimepiride, but not glucose and mitiglinide, induced abnormally sustained [Ca2+]i elevations and reductions of docked insulin granules on the plasma membrane. Our data suggest that the effect of glinide on insulin secretory mechanisms is similar to that of glucose.

  14. Suppression of motor cortical excitability in anesthetized rats by low frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation.

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    Paul A Muller

    Full Text Available Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS is a widely-used method for modulating cortical excitability in humans, by mechanisms thought to involve use-dependent synaptic plasticity. For example, when low frequency rTMS (LF rTMS is applied over the motor cortex, in humans, it predictably leads to a suppression of the motor evoked potential (MEP, presumably reflecting long-term depression (LTD -like mechanisms. Yet how closely such rTMS effects actually match LTD is unknown. We therefore sought to (1 reproduce cortico-spinal depression by LF rTMS in rats, (2 establish a reliable animal model for rTMS effects that may enable mechanistic studies, and (3 test whether LTD-like properties are evident in the rat LF rTMS setup. Lateralized MEPs were obtained from anesthetized Long-Evans rats. To test frequency-dependence of LF rTMS, rats underwent rTMS at one of three frequencies, 0.25, 0.5, or 1 Hz. We next tested the dependence of rTMS effects on N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor (NMDAR, by application of two NMDAR antagonists. We find that 1 Hz rTMS preferentially depresses unilateral MEP in rats, and that this LTD-like effect is blocked by NMDAR antagonists. These are the first electrophysiological data showing depression of cortical excitability following LF rTMS in rats, and the first to demonstrate dependence of this form of cortical plasticity on the NMDAR. We also note that our report is the first to show that the capacity for LTD-type cortical suppression by rTMS is present under barbiturate anesthesia, suggesting that future neuromodulatory rTMS applications under anesthesia may be considered.

  15. Cortical excitability changes after high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for central poststroke pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosomi, Koichi; Kishima, Haruhiko; Oshino, Satoru; Hirata, Masayuki; Tani, Naoki; Maruo, Tomoyuki; Yorifuji, Shiro; Yoshimine, Toshiki; Saitoh, Youichi

    2013-08-01

    Central poststroke pain (CPSP) is one of the most refractory chronic pain syndromes. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the primary motor cortex has been demonstrated to provide moderate pain relief for CPSP. However, the mechanism underlying the pain relief remains unclear. The objective of this study was to assess changes in cortical excitability in patients with intractable CPSP before and after rTMS of the primary motor cortex. Subjects were 21 patients with CPSP of the hand who underwent rTMS. The resting motor threshold, the amplitude of the motor evoked potential, duration of the cortical silent period, short interval intracortical inhibition, and intracortical facilitation were measured as parameters of cortical excitability before and after navigation-guided 5 Hz rTMS of the primary motor cortex corresponding to the painful hand. Pain reduction from rTMS was assessed with a visual analog scale. The same parameters were measured in both hemispheres of 8 healthy controls. Eight of 21 patients experienced ≥ 30% pain reduction after rTMS (responders). The resting motor threshold in the patients was higher than those in the controls at baseline (P=.035). Intracortical facilitation in the responders was lower than in the controls and the nonresponders at baseline (P=.035 and P=.019), and significantly increased after rTMS (P=.039). There were no significant differences or changes in the other parameters. Our findings suggest that restoration of abnormal cortical excitability might be one of the mechanisms underlying pain relief as a result of rTMS in CPSP.

  16. Therapeutic effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in an animal model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Yong; Kim, Sung Hoon; Ko, Ah-Ra; Lee, Jin Suk; Yu, Ji Hea; Seo, Jung Hwa; Cho, Byung Pil; Cho, Sung-Rae

    2013-11-06

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is used to treat neurological diseases such as stroke and Parkinson's disease (PD). Although rTMS has been used clinically, its underlying therapeutic mechanism remains unclear. The objective of the present study was to clarify the neuroprotective effect and therapeutic mechanism of rTMS in an animal model of PD. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were unilaterally injected with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the right striatum. Rats with PD were then treated with rTMS (circular coil, 10 Hz, 20 min/day) daily for 4 weeks. Behavioral assessments such as amphetamine-induced rotational test and treadmill locomotion test were performed, and the dopaminergic (DA) neurons of substantia nigra pas compacta (SNc) and striatum were histologically examined. Expression of neurotrophic/growth factors was also investigated by multiplex ELISA, western blotting analysis and immunohistochemistry 4 weeks after rTMS application. Among the results, the number of amphetamine-induced rotations was significantly lower in the rTMS group than in the control group at 4 weeks post-treatment. Treadmill locomotion was also significantly improved in the rTMS-treated rats. Tyrosine hydroxylase-positive DA neurons and DA fibers in rTMS group rats were greater than those in untreated group in both ipsilateral SNc and striatum, respectively. The expression levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, platelet-derived growth factor, and vascular endothelial growth factor were elevated in both the 6-OHDA-injected hemisphere and the SNc of the rTMS-treated rats. In conclusion, rTMS treatment improved motor functions and survival of DA neurons, suggesting that the neuroprotective effect of rTMS treatment might be induced by upregulation of neurotrophic/growth factors in the PD animal model.

  17. Measurement of motor evoked potentials following repetitive magnetic motor cortex stimulation during isoflurane or propofol anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, V; Krombach, G A; Baumert, J H; Kreitschmann-Andermahr, I; Weinzierl, M; Gilsbach, J M

    2003-10-01

    Isoflurane and propofol reduce the recordability of compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) following single transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex (sTCMS). Repetition of the magnetic stimulus (repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, rTCMS) might allow the inhibition caused by anaesthesia with isoflurane or propofol to be overcome. We applied rTCMS (four stimuli; inter-stimulus intervals of 3, 4, 5 ms (333, 250, 200 Hz), output 2.5 Tesla) in 27 patients and recorded CMAP from the hypothenar and anterior tibial muscle. Anaesthesia was maintained with fentanyl 0.5-1 microg kg(-1) x h(-1) and either isoflurane 1.2% (10 patients) or propofol 5 mg kg(-1) x h(-1) with nitrous oxide 60% in oxygen (17 patients). No CMAP were detected during isoflurane anaesthesia. During propofol anaesthesia 333 Hz, four-pulse magnetic stimulation evoked CMAP in the hypothenar muscle in 75%, and in the anterior tibial muscle in 65% of the patients. Less response was obtained with 250 and 200 Hz stimulation. In most patients, rTCMS can overcome suppression of CMAP during propofol/nitrous oxide anaesthesia, but not during isoflurane anaesthesia. A train of four magnetic stimuli at a frequency of 333 Hz is most effective in evoking potentials from the upper and lower limb muscles. The authors conclude that rTCMS can be used for evaluation of the descending motor pathways during anaesthesia.

  18. The effect of 10 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of posterior parietal cortex on visual attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombrowe, Isabel; Juravle, Georgiana; Alavash, Mohsen; Gießing, Carsten; Hilgetag, Claus C

    2015-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) at frequencies lower than 5 Hz transiently inhibits the stimulated area. In healthy participants, such a protocol can induce a transient attentional bias to the visual hemifield ipsilateral to the stimulated hemisphere. This bias might be due to a relatively less active stimulated hemisphere and a relatively more active unstimulated hemisphere. In a previous study, Jin and Hilgetag (2008) tried to switch the attention bias from the hemifield ipsilateral to the hemifield contralateral to the stimulated hemisphere by applying high frequency rTMS. High frequency rTMS has been shown to excite, rather than inhibit, the stimulated brain area. However, the bias to the ipsilateral hemifield was still present. The participants' performance decreased when stimuli were presented in the hemifield contralateral to the stimulation site. In the present study we tested if this unexpected result was related to the fact that participants were passively resting during stimulation rather than performing a task. Using a fully crossed factorial design, we compared the effects of high frequency rTMS applied during a visual detection task and high frequency rTMS during passive rest on the subsequent offline performance in the same detection task. Our results were mixed. After sham stimulation, performance was better after rest than after task. After active 10 Hz rTMS, participants' performance was overall better after task than after rest. However, this effect did not reach statistical significance. The comparison of performance after rTMS with task and performance after sham stimulation with task showed that 10 Hz stimulation significantly improved performance in the whole visual field. Thus, although we found a trend to better performance after rTMS with task than after rTMS during rest, we could not reject the hypothesis that high frequency rTMS with task and high frequency rTMS during rest

  19. The effect of 10 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of posterior parietal cortex on visual attention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Dombrowe

    Full Text Available Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS of the posterior parietal cortex (PPC at frequencies lower than 5 Hz transiently inhibits the stimulated area. In healthy participants, such a protocol can induce a transient attentional bias to the visual hemifield ipsilateral to the stimulated hemisphere. This bias might be due to a relatively less active stimulated hemisphere and a relatively more active unstimulated hemisphere. In a previous study, Jin and Hilgetag (2008 tried to switch the attention bias from the hemifield ipsilateral to the hemifield contralateral to the stimulated hemisphere by applying high frequency rTMS. High frequency rTMS has been shown to excite, rather than inhibit, the stimulated brain area. However, the bias to the ipsilateral hemifield was still present. The participants' performance decreased when stimuli were presented in the hemifield contralateral to the stimulation site. In the present study we tested if this unexpected result was related to the fact that participants were passively resting during stimulation rather than performing a task. Using a fully crossed factorial design, we compared the effects of high frequency rTMS applied during a visual detection task and high frequency rTMS during passive rest on the subsequent offline performance in the same detection task. Our results were mixed. After sham stimulation, performance was better after rest than after task. After active 10 Hz rTMS, participants' performance was overall better after task than after rest. However, this effect did not reach statistical significance. The comparison of performance after rTMS with task and performance after sham stimulation with task showed that 10 Hz stimulation significantly improved performance in the whole visual field. Thus, although we found a trend to better performance after rTMS with task than after rTMS during rest, we could not reject the hypothesis that high frequency rTMS with task and high frequency r

  20. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation to improve mood and motor function in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmich, Rick C; Siebner, Hartwig R; Bakker, Maaike; Münchau, Alexander; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2006-10-25

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation technique that can produce lasting changes in excitability and activity in cortical regions underneath the stimulation coil (local effect), but also within functionally connected cortical or subcortical regions (remote effects). Since the clinical presentation of Parkinson's disease (PD) is related to abnormal neuronal activity within the basal ganglia and cortical regions, including the primary motor cortex, the premotor cortex and the prefrontal cortex, several studies have used rTMS to improve brain function in PD. Here, we review the studies that have investigated the possible therapeutic effects of rTMS on mood and motor function in PD patients. We highlight some methodological inconsistencies and problems, including the difficulty to define the most effective protocol for rTMS or to establish an appropriate placebo condition. We finally propose future directions of research that may help to improve the therapeutic efficacy of rTMS in PD.

  1. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in cervical dystonia: effect of site and repetition in a randomized pilot trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Pirio Richardson

    Full Text Available Dystonia is characterized by abnormal posturing due to sustained muscle contraction, which leads to pain and significant disability. New therapeutic targets are needed in this disorder. The objective of this randomized, sham-controlled, blinded exploratory study is to identify a specific motor system target for non-invasive neuromodulation and to evaluate this target in terms of safety and tolerability in the cervical dystonia (CD population. Eight CD subjects were given 15-minute sessions of low-frequency (0.2 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS over the primary motor cortex (MC, dorsal premotor cortex (dPM, supplementary motor area (SMA, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC and a sham condition with each session separated by at least two days. The Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS score was rated in a blinded fashion immediately pre- and post-intervention. Secondary outcomes included physiology and tolerability ratings. The mean change in TWSTRS severity score by site was 0.25 ± 1.7 (ACC, -2.9 ± 3.4 (dPM, -3.0 ± 4.8 (MC, -0.5 ± 1.1 (SHAM, and -1.5 ± 3.2 (SMA with negative numbers indicating improvement in symptom control. TWSTRS scores decreased from Session 1 (15.1 ± 5.1 to Session 5 (11.0 ± 7.6. The treatment was tolerable and safe. Physiology data were acquired on 6 of 8 subjects and showed no change over time. These results suggest rTMS can modulate CD symptoms. Both dPM and MC are areas to be targeted in further rTMS studies. The improvement in TWSTRS scores over time with multiple rTMS sessions deserves further evaluation.

  2. [Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) for Higher Brain Function Deficits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yukichi

    2016-12-01

    The management of higher brain dysfunctions such as stroke-induced unilateral spatial neglect (USN) or aphasia is crucial because these dysfunctions have devastating neurological repercussions on the patients' daily life and quality of life. Impairment of the physiological interhemispheric rivalry is often the result of brain insults such as strokes or traumatic injuries, and it may lead to USN or aphasia. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), a non-invasive brain stimulation method, is a promising tool for restoring the pathological imbalance in interhemispheric rivalry by either suppressing the hyperactivity of the unaffected hemisphere or facilitating hypoactivity in the affected hemisphere. The concept of paradoxical functional facilitation (Kapur, 1996) has important clinical implications when coupled with rTMS applications. In addition to conventional rTMS (c-rTMS), other clinically relevant protocols of patterned rTMS (p-rTMS) have been developed: the theta burst stimulation (TBS), the paired associative stimulation (PAS), and the quadripulse stimulation (QPS). TBS is commonly used in the rehabilitation of patients with post-stroke USN and those with non-fluent aphasia because of its prolonged beneficial effects and the short duration of stimulation. TBS may be considered an effective and safe protocol of rTMS. We foresee broader clinical applications of p-rTMS (TBS) and c-rTMS in the treatment of various neurological deficits.

  3. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, So Won; Park, Shin Who; Seo, Young Jae; Kim, Jae-Hyung; Lee, Chan Ho; Lim, Jong Youb

    2017-02-01

    A 57-year-old man who was diagnosed with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome showed severe impairment of cognitive function and a craving for alcohol, even after sufficient supplementation with thiamine. After completing 10 sessions of 10 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) at 100% of the resting motor threshold over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, dramatic improvement in cognitive function and a reduction in craving for alcohol were noted. This is the first case report of the efficacy of a high-frequency rTMS in the treatment of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

  4. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    A 57-year-old man who was diagnosed with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome showed severe impairment of cognitive function and a craving for alcohol, even after sufficient supplementation with thiamine. After completing 10 sessions of 10 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) at 100% of the resting motor threshold over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, dramatic improvement in cognitive function and a reduction in craving for alcohol were noted. This is the first case report of the efficacy of a high-frequency rTMS in the treatment of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. PMID:28289650

  5. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Improves Handwriting in Parkinson’s Disease

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    Bubblepreet K. Randhawa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Parkinson disease (PD is characterized by hypometric movements resulting from loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. PD leads to decreased activation of the supplementary motor area (SMA; the net result of these changes is a poverty of movement. The present study determined the impact of 5 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS over the SMA on a fine motor movement, handwriting (writing cursive “l”s, and on cortical excitability, in individuals with PD. Methods. In a cross-over design, ten individuals with PD were randomized to receive either 5 Hz or control stimulation over the SMA. Immediately following brain stimulation right handed writing was assessed. Results. 5 Hz stimulation increased vertical size of handwriting and diminished axial pressure. In addition, 5 Hz rTMS significantly decreased the threshold for excitability in the primary motor cortex. Conclusions. These data suggest that in the short term 5 Hz rTMS benefits functional fine motor task performance, perhaps by altering cortical excitability across a network of brain regions. Further, these data may provide the foundation for a larger investigation of the effects of noninvasive brain stimulation over the SMA in individuals with PD.

  6. Inhibitory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex modulates early affective processing.

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    Zwanzger, Peter; Steinberg, Christian; Rehbein, Maimu Alissa; Bröckelmann, Ann-Kathrin; Dobel, Christian; Zavorotnyy, Maxim; Domschke, Katharina; Junghöfer, Markus

    2014-11-01

    The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) has often been suggested as a key modulator of emotional stimulus appraisal and regulation. Therefore, in clinical trials, it is one of the most frequently targeted regions for non-invasive brain stimulation such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). In spite of various encouraging reports that demonstrate beneficial effects of rTMS in anxiety disorders, psychophysiological studies exploring the underlying neural mechanisms are sparse. Here we investigated how inhibitory rTMS influences early affective processing when applied over the right dlPFC. Before and after rTMS or sham stimulation, subjects viewed faces with fearful or neutral expressions while whole-head magnetoencephalography (MEG) was recorded. Due to the disrupted functioning of the right dlPFC, visual processing in bilateral parietal, temporal, and occipital areas was amplified starting at around 90 ms after stimulus onset. Moreover, increased fear-specific activation was found in the right TPJ area in a time-interval between 110 and 170 ms. These neurophysiological effects were reflected in slowed reaction times for fearful, but not for neutral faces in a facial expression identification task while there was no such effect on a gender discrimination control task. Our study confirms the specific and important role of the dlPFC in regulation of early emotional attention and encourages future clinical research to use minimal invasive methods such as transcranial magnetic (TMS) or direct current stimulation (tDCS). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of Bilateral Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Post-Stroke Dysphagia.

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    Park, Eunhee; Kim, Min Su; Chang, Won Hyuk; Oh, Su Mi; Kim, Yun Kwan; Lee, Ahee; Kim, Yun-Hee

    Optimal protocol of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on post-stroke dysphagia remains uncertain with regard to its clinical efficacy. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effects of high-frequency rTMS at the bilateral motor cortices over the cortical representation of the mylohyoid muscles in the patients with post-stroke dysphagia. This study was a single-blind, randomized controlled study with a blinded observer. Thirty-five stroke patients were randomly divided into three intervention groups: the bilateral stimulation group, the unilateral stimulation group, and the sham stimulation group. For the bilateral stimulation group, 500 pulses of 10 Hz rTMS over the ipsilesional and 500 pulses of 10 Hz rTMS over the contralesional motor cortices over the cortical areas that project to the mylohyoid muscles were administered daily for 2 consecutive weeks. For the unilateral stimulation group, 500 pulses of 10 Hz rTMS over the ipsilesional motor cortex over the cortical representation of the mylohyoid muscle and the same amount of sham rTMS over the contralesional hemisphere were applied. For the sham stimulation group, sham rTMS was applied at the bilateral motor cortices. Clinical swallowing function and videofluoroscopic swallowing studies were assessed before the intervention (T0), immediately after the intervention (T1) and 3 weeks after the intervention (T2) using Clinical Dysphagia Scale (CDS), Dysphagia Outcome and Severity Scale (DOSS), Penetration Aspiration Scale (PAS), and Videofluoroscopic Dysphagia Scale (VDS). There were significant time and intervention interaction effects in the CDS, DOSS, PAS, and VDS scores (p dysphagia therapies. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Effects of low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on event-related potential P300

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    Torii, Tetsuya; Sato, Aya; Iwahashi, Masakuni; Iramina, Keiji

    2012-04-01

    The present study analyzed the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on brain activity. P300 latency of event-related potential (ERP) was used to evaluate the effects of low-frequency and short-term rTMS by stimulating the supramarginal gyrus (SMG), which is considered to be the related area of P300 origin. In addition, the prolonged stimulation effects on P300 latency were analyzed after applying rTMS. A figure-eight coil was used to stimulate left-right SMG, and intensity of magnetic stimulation was 80% of motor threshold. A total of 100 magnetic pulses were applied for rTMS. The effects of stimulus frequency at 0.5 or 1 Hz were determined. Following rTMS, an odd-ball task was performed and P300 latency of ERP was measured. The odd-ball task was performed at 5, 10, and 15 min post-rTMS. ERP was measured prior to magnetic stimulation as a control. Electroencephalograph (EEG) was measured at Fz, Cz, and Pz that were indicated by the international 10-20 electrode system. Results demonstrated that different effects on P300 latency occurred between 0.5-1 Hz rTMS. With 1 Hz low-frequency magnetic stimulation to the left SMG, P300 latency decreased. Compared to the control, the latency time difference was approximately 15 ms at Cz. This decrease continued for approximately 10 min post-rTMS. In contrast, 0.5 Hz rTMS resulted in delayed P300 latency. Compared to the control, the latency time difference was approximately 20 ms at Fz, and this delayed effect continued for approximately 15 min post-rTMS. Results demonstrated that P300 latency varied according to rTMS frequency. Furthermore, the duration of the effect was not similar for stimulus frequency of low-frequency rTMS.

  9. Prefrontal and parietal cortex in human episodic memory: an interference study by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Simone; Pasqualetti, Patrizio; Zito, Giancarlo; Vecchio, Fabrizio; Cappa, Stefano F; Miniussi, Carlo; Babiloni, Claudio; Rossini, Paolo M

    2006-02-01

    Neuroimaging findings, including repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) interference, point to an engagement of prefrontal cortex (PFC) in learning and memory. Whether parietal cortex (PC) activity is causally linked to successful episodic encoding and retrieval is still uncertain. We compared the effects of event-related active or sham rTMS (a rapid-rate train coincident to the very first phases of memoranda presentation) to the left or right intraparietal sulcus, during a standardized episodic memory task of visual scenes, with those obtained in a fully matched sample of subjects who received rTMS on left or right dorsolateral PFC during the same task. In these subjects, specific hemispheric effects of rTMS included interference with encoding after left stimulation and disruption of retrieval after right stimulation. The interference of PC-rTMS on encoding/retrieval performance was negligible, lacking specificity even when higher intensities of stimulation were applied. However, right PC-rTMS of the same intensity lengthened reaction times in the context of a purely attentive visuospatial task. These results suggest that the activity of intraparietal sulci shown in several functional magnetic resonance studies on memory, unlike that of the dorsolateral PFC, is not causally engaged to a useful degree in memory encoding and retrieval of visual scenes. The parietal activations accompanying the memorization processes could reflect the engagement of a widespread brain attentional network, in which interference on a single 'node' is insufficient for an overt disruption of memory performance.

  10. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation decreases the kindling induced synaptic potentiation: effects of frequency and coil shape.

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    Yadollahpour, Ali; Firouzabadi, Seyed Mohammad; Shahpari, Marzieh; Mirnajafi-Zadeh, Javad

    2014-02-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on kindling-induced synaptic potentiation and to study the effect of frequency and coil shape on rTMS effectiveness. Seizures were induced in rats by perforant path stimulation in a rapid kindling manner (12 stimulations/day). rTMS was applied at different frequencies (0.5, 1 and 2 Hz), using either figure-8 shaped or circular coils at different times (during or before kindling stimulations). rTMS had antiepileptogenic effect at all frequencies and imposed inhibitory effects on enhancement of population excitatory postsynaptic potential slope and population spike amplitude when applied during kindling acquisition. Furthermore, it prevented the kindling-induced changes in paired pulse indices. The inhibitory effect of rTMS was higher at the frequency of 1 Hz compared to 0.5 and 2 Hz. Application of rTMS 1Hz by circular coil imposed a weaker inhibitory action compared with the figure-8 coil. In addition, the results showed that pretreatment of animals by both coils had similar preventing effect on kindling acquisition as well as kindling-induced synaptic potentiation. Obtained results demonstrated that the antiepileptogenic effect of low frequency rTMS is accompanied with the preventing of the kindling induced potentiation. This effect is dependent on rTMS frequency and slightly on coil-type.

  11. Pressure pain thresholds increase after preconditioning 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation with transcranial direct current stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloney, Tonya M; Witney, Alice G

    2014-01-01

    The primary motor cortex (M1) is an effective target of non-invasive cortical stimulation (NICS) for pain threshold modulation. It has been suggested that the initial level of cortical excitability of M1 plays a key role in the plastic effects of NICS. Here we investigate whether transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) primed 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) modulates experimental pressure pain thresholds and if this is related to observed alterations in cortical excitability. 15 healthy, male participants received 10 min 1 mA anodal, cathodal and sham tDCS to the left M1 before 15 min 1 Hz rTMS in separate sessions over a period of 3 weeks. Motor cortical excitability was recorded at baseline, post-tDCS priming and post-rTMS through recording motor evoked potentials (MEPs) from right FDI muscle. Pressure pain thresholds were determined by quantitative sensory testing (QST) through a computerized algometer, on the palmar thenar of the right hand pre- and post-stimulation. Cathodal tDCS-primed 1 Hz-rTMS was found to reverse the expected suppressive effect of 1 Hz rTMS on cortical excitability; leading to an overall increase in activity (p<0.001) with a parallel increase in pressure pain thresholds (p<0.01). In contrast, anodal tDCS-primed 1 Hz-rTMS resulted in a corresponding decrease in cortical excitability (p<0.05), with no significant effect on pressure pain. This study demonstrates that priming the M1 before stimulation of 1 Hz-rTMS modulates experimental pressure pain thresholds in a safe and controlled manner, producing a form of analgesia.

  12. Neuronal mechanisms and circuits underlying repetitive behaviors in mouse models of autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyopil; Lim, Chae-Seok; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2016-01-20

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) refers to a broad spectrum of neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by three central behavioral symptoms: impaired social interaction, impaired social communication, and restricted and repetitive behaviors. However, the symptoms are heterogeneous among patients and a number of ASD mouse models have been generated containing mutations that mimic the mutations found in human patients with ASD. Each mouse model was found to display a unique set of repetitive behaviors. In this review, we summarize the repetitive behaviors of the ASD mouse models and variations found in their neural mechanisms including molecular and electrophysiological features. We also propose potential neuronal mechanisms underlying these repetitive behaviors, focusing on the role of the cortico-basal ganglia-thalamic circuits and brain regions associated with both social and repetitive behaviors. Further understanding of molecular and circuitry mechanisms of the repetitive behaviors associated with ASD is necessary to aid the development of effective treatments for these disorders.

  13. Repetitive magnetic stimulation promotes neural stem cells proliferation by upregulating MiR-106b in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hua; Han, Xiao-hua; Chen, Hong; Zheng, Cai-xia; Yang, Yi; Huang, Xiao-lin

    2015-10-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) proliferation can be influenced by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in vivo via microRNA-106b-25 cluster, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. This study investigated the involvement of microRNA-106b-25 cluster in the proliferation of NSCs after repetitive magnetic stimulation (rMS) in vitro. NSCs were stimulated by rMS (200/400/600/800/1000 pulses per day, with 10 Hz frequency and 50% maximum machine output) over a 3-day period. NSCs proliferation was detected by using ki-67 and EdU staining. Ki-67, p21, p57, cyclinD1, cyclinE, cyclinA, cdk2, cdk4 proteins and miR-106b, miR-93, miR-25 mRNAs were detected by Western blotting and qRT-PCR, respectively. The results showed that rMS could promote NSCs proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. The proportions of ki-67+ and Edu+ cells in 1000 pulses group were 20.65% and 4.00%, respectively, significantly higher than those in control group (9.25%, 2.05%). The expression levels of miR-106b and miR-93 were significantly upregulated in 600-1000 pulses groups compared with control group (Pp21 protein were decreased significantly in 800/1000 pulses groups, and those of cyclinD1, cyclinA, cyclinE, cdk2 and cdk4 were obviously increased after rMS as compared with control group (Pp21/cdks/cyclins pathway was involved in the process.

  14. Investigating the Anticonvulsant Effects of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Perforant Path Kindling Model in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Yadollahpour

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Almost 20% of epileptics are drug resistant. Studies have shown that low frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS is with therapeutic effects on epilepsy-affected laboratory models. Anticonvulsant effects of rTMS depend on several parameters among which radiation frequency is the most important one. In this study, the therapeutic impacts of 1 and 2 Hz rTMS on convulsing parameters in epileptic model of electrical kindling stimulation of the perforant path were investigated. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study 21 rats were randomly divided into three groups, namely ‘1 Hz treatment group’ and ‘2 Hz treatment group’ and ‘kindling group’. The kindling group only received kindling stimulations for seven days. One Hz and 2 Hz frequency treatment groups received maximally 5 min rTMS after termination of kindling stimulation per day for a week. Stimulation and stability electrodes had been placed, in turn, on perforant path and dentate gyrus. For quantifying the duration of the subsequent discharge waves, two-way ANOVA test and Bonferroni post-test were employed. In addition, for quantifying the convulsive behaviors, Kruskal-Wallis and the Mann-Whitney U tests were used. Results: The results showed that 1 Hz and 2 Hz frequency rTMS have considerable inhibitory impact on the development of convulsive phases. Anticonvulsive effect was observed from the first day after rTMS was undertaken. In addition, the animals did not show fourth and fifth convulsive stages, and a significant reduction was evident in their recorded peak discharge waves compared with kindle group. Conclusion: Low frequency rTMS possesses significant anticonvulsive effects which depend upon sTMS stimulation frequency.

  15. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) in the Management of Alcohol Dependence and other Substance Abuse Disorders – Emerging Data and Clinical Relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Avinash De

    2013-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been used widely in various psychiatric disorders like depression and schizophrenia. There have been some reports of its usefulness in alcohol dependence and substance use disorders. The present paper reviews the studies done using rTMS in substance use disorders including alcohol and nicotine dependence. Various studies done have been reviewed including the proposed mechanisms of action are outlined with the future research needs and need for further clinical data PMID:25337357

  16. Long-term effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in patients with chronic tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinjung, Tobias; Eichhammer, Peter; Langguth, Berthold; Jacob, Peter; Marienhagen, Joerg; Hajak, Goeran; Wolf, Stephan R; Strutz, Juergen

    2005-04-01

    The pathophysiologic mechanisms of idiopathic tinnitus remain unclear. Recent studies demonstrated focal brain activation in the auditory cortex of patients with chronic tinnitus. Low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is able to reduce cortical hyperexcitability. Fusing of the individual PET-scan with the structural MRI-scan (T1, MPRAGE) allowed us to identify exactly the area of increased metabolic activity in the auditory cortex of patients with chronic tinnitus. With the use of a neuronavigational system, this target area was exactly stimulated by the figure 8-shaped magnetic coil. In a prospective study, rTMS (110% motor threshold; 1 Hz; 2000 stimuli/day over 5 days) was performed using a placebo controlled cross-over design. Patients were blinded regarding the stimulus condition. For the sham stimulation a specific sham-coil system was used. Fourteen patients were followed for 6 months. Treatment outcome was assessed with a specific tinnitus questionnaire (Goebel and Hiller). Tertiary referral medical center. Increased metabolic activation in the auditory cortex was verified in all patients. After 5 days of verum rTMS, a highly significant improvement of the tinnitus score was found whereas the sham treatment did not show any significant changes. The treatment outcome after 6 months still demonstrated significant reduction of tinnitus score. These preliminary results demonstrate that neuronavigated rTMS offers new possibilities in the understanding and treatment of chronic tinnitus.

  17. Lateralized effects of prefrontal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on emotional working memory.

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    Weigand, Anne; Grimm, Simone; Astalosch, Antje; Guo, Jia Shen; Briesemeister, Benny B; Lisanby, Sarah H; Luber, Bruce; Bajbouj, Malek

    2013-05-01

    Little is known about the neural correlates underlying the integration of working memory and emotion processing. We investigated the effects of low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) applied over the left or right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) on emotional working memory. In a sham-controlled crossover design, participants performed an emotional 3-back task (EMOBACK) at baseline and after stimulation (1 Hz, 15 min, 110 % of the resting motor threshold) in two subsequent sessions. Stimuli were words assigned to the distinct emotion categories fear and anger as well as neutral words. We found lateralized rTMS effects in the EMOBACK task accuracy for fear-related words, with enhanced performance after rTMS applied over the right DLPFC and impaired performance after rTMS applied over the left DLPFC. No significant stimulation effect could be found for anger-related and neutral words. Our findings are the first to demonstrate a causal role of the right DLPFC in working memory for negative, withdrawal-related words and provide further support for a hemispheric lateralization of emotion processing.

  18. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)/repetitive TMS in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardone, R; Tezzon, F; Höller, Y; Golaszewski, S; Trinka, E; Brigo, F

    2014-06-01

    Several Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) techniques can be applied to noninvasively measure cortical excitability and brain plasticity in humans. TMS has been used to assess neuroplastic changes in Alzheimer's disease (AD), corroborating findings that cortical physiology is altered in AD due to the underlying neurodegenerative process. In fact, many TMS studies have provided physiological evidence of abnormalities in cortical excitability, connectivity, and plasticity in patients with AD. Moreover, the combination of TMS with other neurophysiological techniques, such as high-density electroencephalography (EEG), makes it possible to study local and network cortical plasticity directly. Interestingly, several TMS studies revealed abnormalities in patients with early AD and even with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), thus enabling early identification of subjects in whom the cholinergic degeneration has occurred. Furthermore, TMS can influence brain function if delivered repetitively; repetitive TMS (rTMS) is capable of modulating cortical excitability and inducing long-lasting neuroplastic changes. Preliminary findings have suggested that rTMS can enhance performances on several cognitive functions impaired in AD and MCI. However, further well-controlled studies with appropriate methodology in larger patient cohorts are needed to replicate and extend the initial findings. The purpose of this paper was to provide an updated and comprehensive systematic review of the studies that have employed TMS/rTMS in patients with MCI and AD.

  19. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation to treat substance use disorders and compulsive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protasio, Maria I B; da Silva, João P L; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Nardi, Antonio E; Machado, Sergio; Cruz, Marcelo S

    2015-01-01

    Compulsions, like pathological gambling, binge-eating disorder, alcohol, tobacco or cocaine abuse and compulsive shopping have similar neurophysiological processing. This study aimed to examine the efficacy of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in improving patient control over compulsive behavior. The rTMS modulatory role in cortical mesolimbic pathways possibly implies improvement of the inhibitory control system and compulsive consumption drive. Thus, craving reduction would be a component for control achievement. Within this context, 17 studies were found. Most studies applied rTMS over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Craving reduction was observed in 10 studies and was associated with improved control of compulsion in two of them. In one study reduction in consumption was found without reduction in craving. In addition, improvement in decision making was found in one study.

  20. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of human MT+ reduces apparent motion perception.

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    Matsuyoshi, Daisuke; Hirose, Nobuyuki; Mima, Tatsuya; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Osaka, Naoyuki

    2007-12-18

    We investigated the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the human cerebral cortex on apparent motion perception. Previous studies have shown that human extrastriate visual area MT+ (V5) processes not only real but also apparent motion. However, the functional relevance of MT+ on long-range apparent motion perception remains unclear. Here, we show direct evidence for the involvement of MT+ in apparent motion perception using rTMS, which is known to temporarily inhibit a localized region in the cerebral cortex. The results showed that apparent motion perception decreased after applying rTMS over MT+, but not after applying rTMS over the control region (inferior temporal gyrus). The decrease in performance caused by applying rTMS to MT+ suggests that MT+ is a causally responsible region for apparent motion perception, and thus, further supports the idea that MT+ plays a major role in the perception of motion.

  1. Slow Repetitive Nerve Stimulation in Patients with Acute Organophosphorus Poisoning after Clinical Recovery

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    Sudheera Jayasinghe

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prolonged inhibition of acetylcholine esterase may lead to the intermediate syndrome. Neuromuscular junction (NMJ dysfunction has been shown with repetitive nerve stimulation (RNS. Subclinical NMJ dysfunction may also occur. We aimed to examine the NMJ function following acute organophosphorus (OP poisoning by using exercise modified slow RNS. Methods: A cohort study was conducted with matched controls. Patients with acute OP poisoning were enrolled. NMJ function, muscle power and tendon reflexes were assessed at discharge and six weeks after exposure. NMJ function was assessed with exercise modified supramaximal slow RNS of the median nerve. Results: There were 68 patients and 71 controls. Mean (SD age of patients and controls were 32 (12 and 33 (12 years. In some particular amplitude, the decrement response was statistically significant. They were decrement response at rest, at fourth amplitude (95% CI: -0.2 to -2.7 and two minutes post-exercise at fourth and fifth amplitudes (95% CI: -0.8 to -5, -1 to -5 respectively in the second assessment compared to controls, decrement response at rest at fourth and fifth amplitudes (95% CI: -4 to -0.5, -3.9 to -0.01 respectively and two minutes post-exercise at fourth amplitude (95% CI: -5 to -0.8 in the second assessment compared to the first assessment. Patients in the first assessment and controls showed more than 8% decrement response either to the second, fourth or fifth stimuli in seven and five occasions respectively. Conclusion:  There was no significant neuromuscular junction dysfunction assessed by exercise modified slow repetitive stimulation following acute exposure to OP. Since, NMJ dysfunctions are likely to occur following OP poisoning, other electrodiagnostic modalities such as SF-EMG are probably more efficient to assess these abnormalities.

  2. Treatment of depression using sleep electroencephalogram modulated repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Ming-li; GU Zheng-tian; WANG Xin-yi; SHI Heng-ping

    2011-01-01

    Background As a treatment of depression, the efficacy of conventional repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is limited, and symptoms recurrence is easy to occur after the treatment. This study aimed to examine the efficacy and safety of sleep electroencephalogram modulated repetitive rTMS (SEM-rTMS) in the treatment of depression.Methods After 7 days without psychoactive medication, 164 patients with clinically defined depression were randomly divided into 3 groups: SEM-rTMS group (n=57), conventional rTMS (C-rTMS, n=55) group and sham-rTMS group (n=S2). Every patient was treated with the corresponding method for 30 minutes everyday for 10 days. Before and after scores on the 24-item Hamilton rating scale for depression (HAMD-24) and the clinical outcome on the 10th day of therapy for all subjects were analyzed.Results Twenty-two cases in the SEM-rTMS group obtained improved mood as compared to 6 in the C-rTMS group and 2 in the sham-rTMS group (X2=15.89, P=0.0004). After completion of the rTMS phase of the protocol, a (51±5)% reduction of HAMD-24 scores from the baseline in the SEM-rTMS group was found compared with a (34±4)% in the C-rTMS group (g=26.09, P=0.001) and a (14±3)% in sham-rTMS group (q=57.53, P=0.000). The 88% total effective rate in the SEM-rTMS group was significantly higher than 68% in the C-rTMS group and 20% in the sham-rTMS group (X2=12.01, P=0.0025). No significant side effects were noted.Conclusion SEM-rTMS is an effective and safe way for treating depression with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (ChiCTR-TRC-00000438).

  3. Repetitive Noninvasive Brain Stimulation to Modulate Cognitive Functions in Schizophrenia: A Systematic Review of Primary and Secondary Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Alkomiet; Strube, Wolfgang; Palm, Ulrich; Wobrock, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Despite many years of research, there is still an urgent need for new therapeutic options for the treatment of cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. Noninvasive brain stimulation (NIBS) has been proposed to be such a novel add-on treatment option. The main objective of this review was to systematically evaluate the cognitive effects of repetitive NIBS in schizophrenia. As most studies have not been specifically designed to investigate cognition as primary outcome, we have focused on both, primary and secondary outcomes. The PubMed/MEDLINE database (1985-2015) was systematically searched for interventional studies investigating the effects of repetitive NIBS on schizophrenia symptoms. All interventional clinical trials using repetitive transcranial stimulation, transcranial theta burst stimulation, and transcranial direct current stimulation for the treatment of schizophrenia were extracted and analyzed with regard to cognitive measures as primary or secondary outcomes. Seventy-six full-text articles were assessed for eligibility of which 33 studies were included in the qualitative synthesis. Of these 33 studies, only 4 studies included cognition as primary outcome, whereas 29 studies included cognitive measures as secondary outcomes. A beneficial effect of frontal NIBS could not be clearly established. No evidence for a cognitive disruptive effect of NIBS (temporal lobe) in schizophrenia could be detected. Finally, a large heterogeneity between studies in terms of inclusion criteria, stimulation parameters, applied cognitive measures, and follow-up intervals was observed. This review provides the first systematic overview regarding cognitive effects of repetitive NIBS in schizophrenia.

  4. Stroke recovery can be enhanced by using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefaucheur, J-P

    2006-01-01

    Post-stroke recovery is based on plastic changes in the central nervous system that can compensate the loss of activity in affected brain regions. In particular, monohemispheric stroke is thought to result in disinhibition of the contralesional unaffected hemisphere. Neurorehabilitation programs improve function partly by enhancing cortical reorganization. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a non-invasive way of producing potent changes in cortical excitability. Therefore, the application of rTMS was recently proposed to promote functional recovery in stroke patients, owing to the induced neuroplasticity. This review discusses the first clinical results that were obtained by rTMS in patients with post-stroke motor deficit, visuospatial neglect, or aphasia. These results are promising and depend on the site and frequency of stimulation. In summary, functional recovery might be obtained either when rTMS is applied at low-frequency (around 1 Hz) over the disinhibited, unaffected hemisphere in order to restore defective inhibition or when rTMS is applied at high-frequency (5 Hz or more) over the affected hemisphere in order to reactivate hypoactive regions. The overall procedure remains to be optimized, in particular regarding the number of rTMS sessions and the time of rTMS application after stroke. Cortical stimulation is an exciting perspective for improving functional recovery from stroke. Transient application of non-invasive transcranial stimulation during the time of the rehabilitation process will be preferable to the temporary implantation of epidural cortical electrodes, as recently proposed. Therefore, in the future, acute or recent stroke might be a major indication of rTMS in neurological practice.

  5. Effect of daily repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on motor performance in Parkinson's disease.

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    Khedr, Eman M; Rothwell, John C; Shawky, Ola A; Ahmed, Mohamed A; Hamdy, Ahmed

    2006-12-01

    Previous studies in patients with Parkinson's disease have reported that a single session of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can improve some or all of the motor symptoms for 30 to 60 minutes. A recent study suggested that repeated sessions of rTMS lead to effects that can last for at least 1 month. Here we report data that both confirm and extend this work. Fifty-five unmedicated PD patients were classified into four groups: two groups (early and late PD) received 25 Hz rTMS bilaterally on the motor arm and leg areas; other groups acted as control for frequency (10 Hz) and for site of stimulation (occipital stimulation). All patients received six consecutive daily sessions (3,000 pulses for each session). The first two groups then received a further three booster sessions (3 consecutive days of rTMS) after 1, 2, and 3 months, while the third group had only one additional session after the first month. Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), walking time, key-tapping speed, and self-assessment scale were measured for each patient before and after each rTMS session and before and after the monthly sessions. Compared to occipital stimulation, 25 Hz rTMS over motor areas improved all measures in both early and late groups; the group that received 10 Hz rTMS improved more than the occipital group but less than the 25 Hz groups. The effect built up gradually during the sessions and was maintained for 1 month after, with a slight reduction in efficacy. Interestingly, the effect was restored and maintained for the next month by the booster sessions. We conclude that 25 Hz rTMS can lead to cumulative and long-lasting effects on motor performance.

  6. Cutting edge: natural DNA repetitive extragenic sequences from gram-negative pathogens strongly stimulate TLR9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Mattias; Tobes, Raquel; Sancho, Jaime; Pareja, Eduardo

    2007-07-01

    Bacterial DNA exerts immunostimulatory effects on mammalian cells via the intracellular TLR9. Although broad analysis of TLR9-mediated immunostimulatory potential of synthetic oligonucleotides has been developed, which kinds of natural bacterial DNA sequences are responsible for immunostimulation are not known. This work provides evidence that the natural DNA sequences named repetitive extragenic palindromic (REPs) sequences present in Gram-negative bacteria are able to produce innate immune system stimulation via TLR9. A strong induction of IFN-alpha production by REPs from Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Neisseria meningitidis was detected in splenocytes from 129 mice. In addition, the involvement of TLR9 in immune stimulation by REPs was confirmed using B6.129P2-Tlr9(tm1Aki) knockout mice. Considering the involvement of TLRs in Gram-negative septic shock, it is conceivable that REPs play a role in its pathogenesis. This study highlights REPs as a potential novel target in septic shock treatment.

  7. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation induces oscillatory power changes in chronic tinnitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eSchecklmann

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic tinnitus is associated with neuroplastic changes in auditory and non-auditory cortical areas. About ten years ago, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS of auditory and prefrontal cortex was introduced as potential treatment for tinnitus. The resulting changes in tinnitus loudness are interpreted in the context of rTMS induced activity changes (neuroplasticity. Here, we investigate the effect of single rTMS sessions on oscillatory power to probe the capacity of rTMS to interfere with tinnitus-specific cortical plasticity. We measured 20 patients with bilateral chronic tinnitus and 20 healthy controls comparable for age, sex, handedness, and hearing level with a 63-channel EEG system. Educational level, intelligence, depressivity and hyperacusis were controlled for by analysis of covariance. Different rTMS protocols were tested: Left and right temporal and left and right prefrontal cortices were each stimulated with 200 pulses at 1Hz and with an intensity of 60% stimulator output. Stimulation of central parietal cortex with 6-fold reduced intensity (inverted passive-cooled coil served as sham condition. Before and after each rTMS protocol five minutes of resting state EEG were recorded. The order of rTMS protocols was randomized over two sessions with one week interval in between.Analyses on electrode level showed that people with and without tinnitus differed in their response to left temporal and right frontal stimulation. In tinnitus patients left temporal rTMS decreased frontal theta and delta and increased beta2 power, whereas right frontal rTMS decreased right temporal beta3 and gamma power. No changes or increases were observed in the control group. Only non-systematic changes in tinnitus loudness were induced by single sessions of rTMS.This is the first study to show tinnitus-related alterations of neuroplasticity that were specific to stimulation site and oscillatory frequency. The observed effects can be interpreted

  8. Safety of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with epilepsy: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Luisa Santos; Müller, Vanessa Teixeira; da Mota Gomes, Marleide; Rotenberg, Alexander; Fregni, Felipe

    2016-04-01

    Approximately one-third of patients with epilepsy remain with pharmacologically intractable seizures. An emerging therapeutic modality for seizure suppression is repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). Despite being considered a safe technique, rTMS carries the risk of inducing seizures, among other milder adverse events, and thus, its safety in the population with epilepsy should be continuously assessed. We performed an updated systematic review on the safety and tolerability of rTMS in patients with epilepsy, similar to a previous report published in 2007 (Bae EH, Schrader LM, Machii K, Alonso-Alonso M, Riviello JJ, Pascual-Leone A, Rotenberg A. Safety and tolerability of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with epilepsy: a review of the literature. Epilepsy Behav. 2007; 10 (4): 521-8), and estimated the risk of seizures and other adverse events during or shortly after rTMS application. We searched the literature for reports of rTMS being applied on patients with epilepsy, with no time or language restrictions, and obtained studies published from January 1990 to August 2015. A total of 46 publications were identified, of which 16 were new studies published after the previous safety review of 2007. We noted the total number of subjects with epilepsy undergoing rTMS, medication usage, incidence of adverse events, and rTMS protocol parameters: frequency, intensity, total number of stimuli, train duration, intertrain intervals, coil type, and stimulation site. Our main data analysis included separate calculations for crude per subject risk of seizure and other adverse events, as well as risk per 1000 stimuli. We also performed an exploratory, secondary analysis on the risk of seizure and other adverse events according to the type of coil used (figure-of-8 or circular), stimulation frequency (≤ 1 Hz or > 1 Hz), pulse intensity in terms of motor threshold (rTMS with maximum stimulator output for speech arrest, clinically arising

  9. A 3 month, follow-up, randomized, placebo-controlles study of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in depression.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koerselman, F; Laman, D.M; van Duijn, H; van Duijn, M.A.J.; Willems, M.AM

    2004-01-01

    Background/Objective: There is evidence for an antidepressant effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), but little is known about posttreatment course. Therefore, we conducted a placebo-controlled, double-blind study in depressed patients in order to investigate the effect of rT

  10. Slow frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation affects reaction times, but not priming effects, in a masked prime task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlaghecken, F.; Munchau, A.; Bloem, B.R.; Rothwell, J.C.; Eimer, M.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Slow frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) reduces motor cortex excitability, but it is unclear whether this has behavioural consequences in healthy subjects. METHODS: We examined the effects of 1 Hz rTMS (train of 20 min; stimulus intensity 80% of active motor thr

  11. A framework for targeting alternative brain regions with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in the treatment of depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutter, D.J.L.G.; Honk, E.J. van

    2005-01-01

    It has been argued that clinical depression is accompanied by reductions in cortical excitability of the left prefrontal cortex (PFC). In support of this, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), which is a method of enhancing cortical excitability, has shown antidepressant efficacy when

  12. Efficacy of slow repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in the treatment of resistant auditory hallucinations in schizophrenia : A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aleman, Andre; Sommer, Iris E.; Kahn, Rene S.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Slow repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), at a frequency of 1 Hz, has been proposed as a treatment for auditory hallucinations. Several studies have now been reported regarding the efficacy of TMS treatment, but results were inconsistent. Therefore, meta-analytic integrati

  13. Sleep disturbances in obsessive-compulsive disorder: Association with non-response to repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donse, L.; Sack, A.T.; Fitzgerald, P.B.; Arns, M.W.

    2017-01-01

    Background Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a promising augmentation strategy for treatment-refractory OCD. However, a substantial group still fails to respond. Sleep disorders, e.g. circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSD), are highly prevalent in OCD and might mediate

  14. Brain responses evoked by high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation: an event-related potential study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Hamidi; H.A. Slagter; G. Tononi; B.R. Postle

    2010-01-01

    Background Many recent studies have used repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to study brain-behavior relationships. However, the pulse-to-pulse neural effects of rapid delivery of multiple TMS pulses are unknown largely because of TMS-evoked electrical artifacts limiting recording of

  15. Brain SPECT guided repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in treatment resistant major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Shailesh; Chadda, Rakesh K; Kumar, Nand; Bal, C S

    2016-06-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has emerged as a potential treatment in treatment resistant major depressive disorder (MDD). However, there is no consensus about the exact site of stimulation for rTMS. Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) offers a potential technique in deciding the site of stimulation. The present study was conducted to assess the difference in outcome of brain SPECT assisted rTMS versus standard protocol of twenty sessions of high frequency rTMS as add on treatment in 20 patients with treatment resistant MDD, given over a period of 4 weeks. Thirteen subjects (group I) received high frequency rTMS over an area of hypoperfusion in the prefrontal cortex, as identified on SPECT, whereas 7 subjects (group II) were administered rTMS in the left dorsoslateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) area. Improvement was monitored using standardized instruments. Patients in the group I showed a significantly better response compared to those in the group II. In group I, 46% of the subjects were responders on MADRS, 38% on BDI and 77% on CGI. The parallel figures of responders in Group II were 0% on MADRS, 14% on BDI and 43% on CGI. There were no remitters in the study. No significant untoward side effects were noticed. The study had limitations of a small sample size and non-controlled design, and all the subjects were also receiving the standard antidepressant therapy. Administration of rTMS over brain SPECT specified area of hypoperfusion may have a better clinical outcome compared to the standard protocol.

  16. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation as an adjuvant method in the treatment of depression: Preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovičić Milica

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS is a method of brain stimulation which is increasingly used in both clinical practice and research. Up-to-date studies have pointed out a potential antidepressive effect of rTMS, but definitive superiority over placebo has not yet been confirmed. Objective. The aim of the study was to examine the effect of rTMS as an adjuvant treatment with antidepressants during 18 weeks of evaluation starting from the initial application of the protocol. Methods. Four patients with the diagnosis of moderate/severe major depression were included in the study. The protocol involved 2000 stimuli per day (rTMS frequency of 10 Hz, intensity of 120% motor threshold administered over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC for 15 days. Subjective and objective depressive symptoms were measured before the initiation of rTMS and repeatedly evaluated at week 3, 6, 12 and 18 from the beginning of the stimulation. Results. After completion of rTMS protocol two patients demonstrated a reduction of depressive symptoms that was sustained throughout the 15-week follow-up period. One patient showed a tendency of remission during the first 12 weeks of the study, but relapsed in week 18. One patient showed no significant symptom reduction at any point of follow-up. Conclusion. Preliminary findings suggest that rTMS has a good tolerability and can be efficient in accelerating the effect of antidepressants, particularly in individuals with shorter duration of depressive episodes and moderate symptom severity. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III41029 i br. ON175090

  17. A Randomised Controlled Trial of Neuronavigated Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) in Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Jessica; Kekic, Maria; Bozhilova, Natali; Nestler, Steffen; Dew, Tracy; Van den Eynde, Frederique; David, Anthony S; Rubia, Katya; Campbell, Iain C; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is associated with morbid fear of fatness, extreme food restriction and altered self-regulation. Neuroimaging data implicate fronto-striatal circuitry, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). In this double-blind parallel group study, we investigated the effects of one session of sham-controlled high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to the left DLPFC (l-DLPFC) in 60 individuals with AN. A food exposure task was administered before and after the procedure to elicit AN-related symptoms. The primary outcome measure was 'core AN symptoms', a variable which combined several subjective AN-related experiences. The effects of rTMS on other measures of psychopathology (e.g. mood), temporal discounting (TD; intertemporal choice behaviour) and on salivary cortisol concentrations were also investigated. Safety, tolerability and acceptability were assessed. Fourty-nine participants completed the study. Whilst there were no interaction effects of rTMS on core AN symptoms, there was a trend for group differences (p = 0.056): after controlling for pre-rTMS scores, individuals who received real rTMS had reduced symptoms post-rTMS and at 24-hour follow-up, relative to those who received sham stimulation. Other psychopathology was not altered differentially following real/sham rTMS. In relation to TD, there was an interaction trend (p = 0.060): real versus sham rTMS resulted in reduced rates of TD (more reflective choice behaviour). Salivary cortisol concentrations were unchanged by stimulation. rTMS was safe, well-tolerated and was considered an acceptable intervention. This study provides modest evidence that rTMS to the l-DLPFC transiently reduces core symptoms of AN and encourages prudent decision making. Importantly, individuals with AN considered rTMS to be a viable treatment option. These findings require replication in multiple-session studies to evaluate therapeutic efficacy. www.Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN

  18. Can neurophysiologic measures serve as biomarkers for the efficacy of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation treatment of major depressive disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Brian; Cook, Ian A; Hunter, Aimee M; Minzenberg, Michael J; Krantz, David E; Leuchter, Andrew F

    2017-03-31

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is an effective treatment for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). There are clinical data that support the efficacy of many different approaches to rTMS treatment, and it remains unclear what combination of stimulation parameters is optimal to relieve depressive symptoms. Because of the costs and complexity of studies that would be necessary to explore and compare the large number of combinations of rTMS treatment parameters, it would be useful to establish reliable surrogate biomarkers of treatment efficacy that could be used to compare different approaches to treatment. This study reviews the evidence that neurophysiologic measures of cortical excitability could be used as biomarkers for screening different rTMS treatment paradigms. It examines evidence that: (1) changes in excitability are related to the mechanism of action of rTMS; (2) rTMS has consistent effects on measures of excitability that could constitute reliable biomarkers; and (3) changes in excitability are related to the outcomes of rTMS treatment of MDD. An increasing body of evidence indicates that these neurophysiologic measures have the potential to serve as reliable biomarkers for screening different approaches to rTMS treatment of MDD.

  19. Effects of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Performing Eye-Hand Integration Tasks: Four Preliminary Studies with Children Showing Low-Functioning Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panerai, Simonetta; Tasca, Domenica; Lanuzza, Bartolo; Trubia, Grazia; Ferri, Raffaele; Musso, Sabrina; Alagona, Giovanna; Di Guardo, Giuseppe; Barone, Concetta; Gaglione, Maria P.; Elia, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    This report, based on four studies with children with low-functioning autism, aimed at evaluating the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation delivered on the left and right premotor cortices on eye-hand integration tasks; defining the long-lasting effects of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation; and…

  20. Dopamine release in human striatum induced by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over dorsolateral prefrontal cortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Sang Soo; Yoon, Eun Jin; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Lee, Won Woo; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    Animal study suggests that prefrontal cortex plays an important Animal studies suggest that prefrontal cortex plays an important role in the modulation of dopamine (DA) release in subcortical areas. However, little is known about the relationship between DA release and prefrontal activation in human. We investigated whether repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) influences DA release in human striatum with SPECT measurements of striatal binding of [123I)iodobenzamide (IBZM), a DA D2 receptor radioligand that is sensitive to endogenous DA. Five healthy male volunteers (age, 25{+-}2 yr) were studied with brain [123I]IBZM SPECT under three conditions (resting, Sham stimulation, and active rTMS over left DLPFC), while receiving a bolus plus constant infusion of [123I]IBZM DLPFC was defined as a 6 cm anterior and 1cm lateral from the primary motor cortex. rTMS session consisted of three blocks, in each block, 15 trains of 2 see duration were delivered with 10 Hz stimulation frequency, 100% motor threshold, and between-train intervals of 10 sec. Striatal V3', calculated as (striatal - occipital) / occipital activity ratio, was measured under equilibrium condition, at baseline and after sham and active rTMS. Sham stimulation did not affect striatal V3'. rTMS over DLPFC induced reduction of V3' in the ipsilateral and contralateral striatum by 9.7% {+-} 1.3% and 10.6% {+-} 3.2%, respectively, compared with sham procedures (P < 0.01 and P < 0.01, respectively), indicating striatal DA release elicited by rTMS over DLPFC. V3' reduction in the ipsilateral caudate nucleus was greater than that in the contralateral caudate nucleus (9.9% {+-} 4.5% vs. 6.6% {+-} 3.1%, P < 0.05). These data demonstrate DA release in human striatum induced by rTMS over DLPFC, supporting that cortico-striatal fibers originating in prefrontal cortex are involved in local DA release.

  1. Striatal dopamine release induced by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over dorsolateral prefrontal cortex: effect of aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Seong Ae; Cho, Sang Soo; Yoon, Eun Jin; Kim, Ji Sun; Lee, Byung Chul; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    We previously demonstrated dopamine (DA) release in the bilateral striatal regions following prefrontal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in young subjects. Several lines of evidence support substantial age-related changes in human dopaminergic neurotransmission. One possible explanation is alteration of cortico striatal neural connection with aging. Therefore, we investigated how frontal activation by rTMS influences striatal DA release in the elderly with SPECT measurements of striatal binding of [123I]iodobenzamide (lBZM), a DA D2 receptor radioligand that is sensitive to endogenous DA. Five healthy elderly male subjects (age, 64 3 y) were studied with brain [123I]IBZM SPECT under three conditions (resting, sham stimulation, and active rTMS over left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC)), while receiving a bolus plus constant infusion of [123I]IBZM. rTMS session consisted of three blocks. In each block, 15 trains of 2 sec duration were delivered with 10 Hz stimulation frequency and 100% motor threshold. Striatal V3', calculated as (striatal - occipital)/occipital radioactivity, was measured under equilibrium condition at baseline and after sham and active rTMS. Sham stimulation did not affect striatal V3'. rTMS over left DLPFC induced no significant change in V3' in the right striatum compared with baseline condition (0.91 0.25 vs. 0.96 0.25, P = NS). Interestingly, left striatal V3' showed a significant increase after rTMS over left DLPFC compared with sham condition (1.09 0.33 vs. 0.93 0.27, P < 0.05; 17.0 11.1% increase). These results are discrepant from previous ones from young subjects, who showed frontal rTMS-induced reduction of striatal V3', indicating rTMS-induced striatal DA release. We found no significant striatal DA release induced by rTMS over DLPFC in healthy elderly subjects using in vivo binding competition techniques. These results may support an altered cortico striatal circuit in normal aging.

  2. 5 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over the ipsilesional sensory cortex enhances motor learning after stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia M Brodie

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sensory feedback is critical for motor learning, and thus to neurorehabilitation after stroke. Whether enhancing sensory feedback by applying excitatory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS over the ipsilesional primary sensory cortex (IL-S1 might enhance motor learning in chronic stroke has yet to be investigated. The present study investigated the effects of 5 Hz rTMS over IL-S1 paired with skilled motor practice on motor learning, hemiparetic cutaneous somatosensation, and motor function. Individuals with unilateral chronic stroke were pseudo-randomly divided into either Active or Sham 5 Hz rTMS groups (n=11/group. Following stimulation, both groups practiced a Serial Tracking Task (STT with the hemiparetic arm; this was repeated for 5 days. Performance on the STT was quantified by response time, peak velocity, and cumulative distance tracked at baseline, during the 5 days of practice, and at a no-rTMS retention test. Cutaneous somatosensation was measured using two-point discrimination. Standardized sensorimotor tests were performed to assess whether the effects might generalize to impact hemiparetic arm function. The active 5Hz rTMS + training group demonstrated significantly greater improvements in STT performance [response time (F1,286.04=13.016, p< 0.0005, peak velocity (F1,285.95=4.111, p=0.044, and cumulative distance (F1,285.92=4.076, p=0.044] and cutaneous somatosensation (F1,21.15=8.793, p=0.007 across all sessions compared to the sham rTMS + training group. Measures of upper extremity motor function were not significantly different for either group. Our preliminary results suggest that, when paired with motor practice, 5Hz rTMS over IL-S1 enhances motor learning related change in individuals with chronic stroke, potentially as a consequence of improved cutaneous somatosensation, however no improvement in general upper extremity function was observed.

  3. Repetitive control mechanism of disturbance cancellation using a hybrid regression and genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jeng-Wen; Shen, Pu Fun; Wen, Hao-Ping

    2015-10-01

    The application of a repetitive control mechanism for use in a mechanical control system has been a topic of investigation. The fundamental purpose of repetitive control is to eliminate disturbances in a mechanical control system. This paper presents two different repetitive control laws using individual types of basis function feedback and their combinations. These laws adjust the command given to a feedback control system to eliminate tracking errors, generally resulting from periodic disturbance. Periodic errors can be reduced through linear basis functions using regression and a genetic algorithm. The results illustrate that repetitive control is most effective method for eliminating disturbances. When the data are stabilized, the tracking error of the obtained convergence value, 10-14, is the optimal solution, verifying that the proposed regression and genetic algorithm can satisfactorily reduce periodic errors.

  4. Long-lasting repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation modulates electroencephalography oscillation in patients with disorders of consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xiaoyu; Liu, Yang; Bai, Yang; Liu, Ziyuan; Yang, Yi; Guo, Yongkun; Xu, Ruxiang; Gao, Xiaorong; Li, Xiaoli; He, Jianghong

    2017-10-18

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been applied for the treatment of patients with disorders of consciousness (DOC). Timely and accurate assessments of its modulation effects are very useful. This study evaluated rTMS modulation effects on electroencephalography (EEG) oscillation in patients with chronic DOC. Eighteen patients with a diagnosis of DOC lasting more than 3 months were recruited. All patients received one session of 10-Hz rTMS at the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and then 12 of them received consecutive rTMS treatment everyday for 20 consecutive days. Resting-state EEGs were recorded before the experiment (T0) after one session of rTMS (T1) and after the entire treatment (T2). The JFK Coma Recovery Scale-Revised scale scores were also recorded at the time points. Our data showed that application of 10-Hz rTMS to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex decreased low-frequency band power and increased high-frequency band power in DOC patients, especially in minimal conscious state patients. Considering the correlation of the EEG spectrum with the consciousness level of patients with DOC, quantitative EEG might be useful for assessment of the effect of rTMS in DOC patients.

  5. Short-term effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on sleep bruxism - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei-Na; Fu, Hai-Yang; Du, Yi-Fei; Sun, Jian-Hua; Zhang, Jing-Lu; Wang, Chen; Svensson, Peter; Wang, Ke-Lun

    2016-03-30

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on patients with sleep bruxism (SB). Twelve patients with SB were included in an open, single-intervention pilot study. rTMS at 1 Hz and an intensity of 80% of the active motor threshold was applied to the 'hot spot' of the masseter muscle representation at the primary motor cortex bilaterally for 20 min per side each day for 5 consecutive days. The jaw-closing muscle electromyographic (EMG) activity during sleep was recorded with a portable EMG recorder at baseline, during rTMS treatment and at follow-up for 5 days. In addition, patients scored their jaw-closing muscle soreness on a 0-10 numerical rating scale (NRS). Data were analysed with analysis of variance. The intensity of the EMG activity was suppressed during and after rTMS compared to the baseline (P = 0.04; P = 0.02, respectively). The NRS score of soreness decreased significantly during and after rTMS compared with baseline (P < 0.01). These findings indicated a significant inhibition of jaw-closing muscle activity during sleep along with a decrease of muscle soreness. This pilot study raises the possibility of therapeutic benefits from rTMS in patients with bruxism and calls for further and more controlled studies.

  6. Short-term effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on sleep bruxism – a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei-Na; Fu, Hai-Yang; Du, Yi-Fei; Sun, Jian-Hua; Zhang, Jing-Lu; Wang, Chen; Svensson, Peter; Wang, Ke-Lun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on patients with sleep bruxism (SB). Twelve patients with SB were included in an open, single-intervention pilot study. rTMS at 1 Hz and an intensity of 80% of the active motor threshold was applied to the ‘hot spot' of the masseter muscle representation at the primary motor cortex bilaterally for 20 min per side each day for 5 consecutive days. The jaw-closing muscle electromyographic (EMG) activity during sleep was recorded with a portable EMG recorder at baseline, during rTMS treatment and at follow-up for 5 days. In addition, patients scored their jaw-closing muscle soreness on a 0–10 numerical rating scale (NRS). Data were analysed with analysis of variance. The intensity of the EMG activity was suppressed during and after rTMS compared to the baseline (P = 0.04; P = 0.02, respectively). The NRS score of soreness decreased significantly during and after rTMS compared with baseline (P < 0.01). These findings indicated a significant inhibition of jaw-closing muscle activity during sleep along with a decrease of muscle soreness. This pilot study raises the possibility of therapeutic benefits from rTMS in patients with bruxism and calls for further and more controlled studies. PMID:27025267

  7. Short-term effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on sleep bruxism-a pilot study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Na Zhou; Hai-Yang Fu; Yi-Fei Du; Jian-Hua Sun; Jing-Lu Zhang; Chen Wang; Peter Svensson; Ke-Lun Wang

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on patients with sleep bruxism (SB). Twelve patients with SB were included in an open, single-intervention pilot study. rTMS at 1 Hz and an intensity of 80% of the active motor threshold was applied to the ‘hot spot’ of the masseter muscle representation at the primary motor cortex bilaterally for 20 min per side each day for 5 consecutive days. The jaw-closing muscle electromyographic (EMG) activity during sleep was recorded with a portable EMG recorder at baseline, during rTMS treatment and at follow-up for 5 days. In addition, patients scored their jaw-closing muscle soreness on a 0–10 numerical rating scale (NRS). Data were analysed with analysis of variance. The intensity of the EMG activity was suppressed during and after rTMS compared to the baseline (P 5 0.04; P 5 0.02, respectively). The NRS score of soreness decreased significantly during and after rTMS compared with baseline (P,0.01). These findings indicated a significant inhibition of jaw-closing muscle activity during sleep along with a decrease of muscle soreness. This pilot study raises the possibility of therapeutic benefits from rTMS in patients with bruxism and calls for further and more controlled studies.

  8. A Retrospective Chart Review of 10 Hz Versus 20 Hz Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristie L. DeBlasio

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We performed a retrospective chart review to examine the progress of patients with depression who received different frequencies of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS delivered to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC. rTMS is a safe and effective alternative treatment for patients with various psychological and medical conditions. During treatment, a coil delivering a time-varying magnetic pulse placed over the scalp penetrates the skull, resulting in clinical improvement. There were 47 patients and three distinct treatment groups found: 10 Hz, 20 Hz, and a separate group who received both frequencies (10/20 Hz. The primary outcome indicator was the difference in Beck Depression Inventory–II (BDI-II scores. Secondary outcomes included categorical indicators of remission, response, and partial response rates as assessed with the BDI-II. In all 3 groups, the majority of patients had depression that remitted, with the highest rate occurring in the 20 Hz group. There were similar response rates in the 10 Hz and 20 Hz groups. There were no patients in the 10/20 Hz group whose depression responded and the highest partial response and nonresponse rates occurred in this group. Although within-group differences were significant from baseline to end of treatment, there were no between-group differences.

  9. Online repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to the parietal operculum disrupts haptic memory for grasping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Luigi; Maule, Francesca; Tabarelli, Davide; Brochier, Thomas; Barchiesi, Guido

    2015-11-01

    The parietal operculum (OP) contains haptic memory on the geometry of objects that is readily transferrable to the motor cortex but a causal role of OP in memory-guided grasping is only speculative. We explored this issue by using online high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). The experimental task was performed by blindfolded participants acting on objects of variable size. Trials consisted in three phases: haptic exploration of an object, delay, and reach-grasp movement onto the explored object. Motor performance was evaluated by the kinematics of finger aperture. Online rTMS was applied to the left OP region separately in each of the three phases of the task. The results showed that rTMS altered grip aperture only when applied in the delay phase to the OP. In a second experiment a haptic discriminative (match-to-sample) task was carried out on objects similar to those used in the first experiment. Online rTMS was applied to the left OP. No psychophysical effects were induced by rTMS on the detection of explicit haptic object size. We conclude that neural activity in the OP region is necessary for proficient memory-guided haptic grasping. The function of OP seems to be critical while maintaining the haptic memory trace and less so while encoding it or retrieving it. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on recovery of function after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazoe, Toshiki; Perez, Monica A

    2015-04-01

    A major goal of rehabilitation strategies after spinal cord injury (SCI) is to enhance the recovery of function. One possible avenue to achieve this goal is to strengthen the efficacy of the residual neuronal pathways. Noninvasive repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been used in patients with motor disorders as a tool to modulate activity of corticospinal, cortical, and subcortical pathways to promote functional recovery. This article reviews a series of studies published during the last decade that used rTMS in the acute and chronic stages of paraplegia and tetraplegia in humans with complete and incomplete SCI. In the studies, rTMS has been applied over the arm and leg representations of the primary motor cortex to target 3 main consequences of SCI: sensory and motor function impairments, spasticity, and neuropathic pain. Although some studies demonstrated that consecutive sessions of rTMS improve aspects of particular functions, other studies did not show similar effects. We discuss how rTMS parameters and postinjury reorganization in the corticospinal tract, motor cortical, and spinal cord circuits might be critical factors in understanding the advantages and disadvantages of using rTMS in patients with SCI. The available data highlight the limited information on the use of rTMS after SCI and the need to further understand the pathophysiology of neuronal structures affected by rTMS to maximize the potential beneficial effects of this technique in humans with SCI.

  11. Cortical excitability in patients with focal epilepsy: a study with high frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Gabriele

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Epileptogenesis involves an increase in excitatory synaptic strength in the brain in a manner similar to synaptic potentiation. In the present study we investigated the mechanisms of short-term synaptic potentiation in patients with focal epilepsy by using 5 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS, a non invasive neurophysiological technique able to investigate the mechanisms of synaptic plasticity in humans. Ten patients with focal idiopathic cortical epilepsy were studied. 5 Hz-rTMS (10 stimuli-trains, 120% of motor threshold, RMT was delivered over the first dorsal interosseus (FDI motor area of both (affected and unaffected hemispheres. Changes in the motor evoked potential (MEP size in the FDI muscle during the trains and the RMT were measured and compared between the hemispheres. 5 Hz-rTMS was also delivered in a group of healthy subjects over both hemispheres. 5 Hz-rTMS in patients elicited a reduced MEP facilitation compared to normal subjects. The reduced MEP amplitude was more evident in the affected hemisphere than in the unaffected hemisphere. RMT in the affected hemisphere was higher than in the unaffected hemisphere and in healthy subjects. Our findings showing a decreased response to 5 Hz-rTMS over the affected hemisphere, differently from the expected results suggest a reduced cortical excitability in epileptic patients. We hypothesize an altered balance between excitatory and inhibitory circuits in epileptic patients under chronic therapy.

  12. A Randomised Controlled Trial of Neuronavigated Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS in Anorexia Nervosa.

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    Jessica McClelland

    Full Text Available Anorexia nervosa (AN is associated with morbid fear of fatness, extreme food restriction and altered self-regulation. Neuroimaging data implicate fronto-striatal circuitry, including the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC.In this double-blind parallel group study, we investigated the effects of one session of sham-controlled high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS to the left DLPFC (l-DLPFC in 60 individuals with AN. A food exposure task was administered before and after the procedure to elicit AN-related symptoms.The primary outcome measure was 'core AN symptoms', a variable which combined several subjective AN-related experiences. The effects of rTMS on other measures of psychopathology (e.g. mood, temporal discounting (TD; intertemporal choice behaviour and on salivary cortisol concentrations were also investigated. Safety, tolerability and acceptability were assessed.Fourty-nine participants completed the study. Whilst there were no interaction effects of rTMS on core AN symptoms, there was a trend for group differences (p = 0.056: after controlling for pre-rTMS scores, individuals who received real rTMS had reduced symptoms post-rTMS and at 24-hour follow-up, relative to those who received sham stimulation. Other psychopathology was not altered differentially following real/sham rTMS. In relation to TD, there was an interaction trend (p = 0.060: real versus sham rTMS resulted in reduced rates of TD (more reflective choice behaviour. Salivary cortisol concentrations were unchanged by stimulation. rTMS was safe, well-tolerated and was considered an acceptable intervention.This study provides modest evidence that rTMS to the l-DLPFC transiently reduces core symptoms of AN and encourages prudent decision making. Importantly, individuals with AN considered rTMS to be a viable treatment option. These findings require replication in multiple-session studies to evaluate therapeutic efficacy

  13. [French guidelines on the use of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS): safety and therapeutic indications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefaucheur, J-P; André-Obadia, N; Poulet, E; Devanne, H; Haffen, E; Londero, A; Cretin, B; Leroi, A-M; Radtchenko, A; Saba, G; Thai-Van, H; Litré, C-F; Vercueil, L; Bouhassira, D; Ayache, S-S; Farhat, W-H; Zouari, H-G; Mylius, V; Nicolier, M; Garcia-Larrea, L

    2011-12-01

    During the past decade, a large amount of work on transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been performed, including the development of new paradigms of stimulation, the integration of imaging data, and the coupling of TMS techniques with electroencephalography or neuroimaging. These accumulating data being difficult to synthesize, several French scientific societies commissioned a group of experts to conduct a comprehensive review of the literature on TMS. This text contains all the consensual findings of the expert group on the mechanisms of action, safety rules and indications of TMS, including repetitive TMS (rTMS). TMS sessions have been conducted in thousands of healthy subjects or patients with various neurological or psychiatric diseases, allowing a better assessment of risks associated with this technique. The number of reported side effects is extremely low, the most serious complication being the occurrence of seizures. In most reported seizures, the stimulation parameters did not follow the previously published recommendations (Wassermann, 1998) [430] and rTMS was associated to medication that could lower the seizure threshold. Recommendations on the safe use of TMS / rTMS were recently updated (Rossi et al., 2009) [348], establishing new limits for stimulation parameters and fixing the contraindications. The recommendations we propose regarding safety are largely based on this previous report with some modifications. By contrast, the issue of therapeutic indications of rTMS has never been addressed before, the present work being the first attempt of a synthesis and expert consensus on this topic. The use of TMS/rTMS is discussed in the context of chronic pain, movement disorders, stroke, epilepsy, tinnitus and psychiatric disorders. There is already a sufficient level of evidence of published data to retain a therapeutic indication of rTMS in clinical practice (grade A) in chronic neuropathic pain, major depressive episodes, and auditory

  14. 重复经颅磁刺激治疗卒中后失语%Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for the treatment of poststroke aphasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李艳红; 张国忠; 李娜; 王艳萍

    2014-01-01

    失语是一种常见的卒中并发症.经颅磁刺激是一种无创性脑部刺激方法.一些病例研究和随机对照试验证实了重复经颅磁刺激治疗卒中后失语的有效性,但其具体机制尚不完全清楚.%Aphasia is a common complication of stroke.Transcranial magnetic stimulation is a noninvasive brain stimulation approach.Some case studies and randomized controlled trials have confirmed the effectiveness of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for the treatment of poststroke aphasia,but its specific mechanism remains unclear.

  15. Effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on non-veridical decision making.

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    Tulviste, Jaan; Goldberg, Elkhonon; Podell, Kenneth; Bachmann, Talis

    2016-01-01

    We test the emerging hypothesis that prefrontal cortical mechanisms involved in non-veridical decision making do not overlap with those of veridical decision making. Healthy female subjects performed an experimental task assessing free choice, agent-centered decision making (The Cognitive Bias Task) and a veridical control task related to visuospatial working memory (the Moving Spot Task). Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was applied to the left and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) using 1 Hz and 10 Hz (intermittent) rTMS and sham protocols. Both 1 Hz and 10 Hz stimulation of the DLPFC triggered a shift towards a more context-independent, internal representations driven non-veridical selection bias. A significantly reduced preference for choosing objects based on similarity was detected, following both 1 Hz and 10 Hz treatment of the right as well as 1 Hz rTMS of the left DLPFC. 1 Hz rTMS treatment of the right DLPFC also triggered a significant improvement in visuospatial working memory performance on the veridical task. The effects induced by prefrontal TMS mimicked those of posterior lesions, suggesting that prefrontal stimulation influenced neuronal activity in remote cortical regions interconnected with the stimulation site via longitudinal fasciculi.

  16. Preliminary guidelines for safe and effective use of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in moderate to severe traumatic brain injury.

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    Nielson, Dylan M; McKnight, Curtis A; Patel, Riddhi N; Kalnin, Andrew J; Mysiw, Walter J

    2015-04-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation has generated extensive interest within the traumatic brain injury (TBI) rehabilitation community, but little work has been done with repetitive protocols, which can produce prolonged changes in behavior. This is partly because of concerns about the safety of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in subjects with TBI, particularly the risk of seizures. These risks can be minimized by careful selection of the rTMS protocol and exclusion criteria. In this article, we identify guidelines for safe use of rTMS in subjects with TBI based on a review of the literature and illustrate their application with a case study. Our subject is a 48-year-old man who sustained a severe TBI 5 years prior to beginning rTMS for the treatment of post-TBI depression. After a 4-week baseline period, we administered daily sessions of low-frequency stimulation to the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex for 6 weeks. After stimulation, we performed monthly assessments for 3 months. The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD) was our primary outcome measure. The stimulation was well tolerated and the patient reported no side effects. After 6 weeks of stimulation, the patient's depression was slightly improved, and these improvements continued through follow-up. At the end of follow-up, the patient's HAMD score was 49% of the average baseline score.

  17. The continuous Wagon wheel illusion and the 'when' pathway of the right parietal lobe: a repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

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    Rufin VanRullen

    Full Text Available A continuous periodic motion stimulus can sometimes be perceived moving in the wrong direction. These illusory reversals have been taken as evidence that part of the motion perception system samples its inputs as a series of discrete snapshots -although other explanations of the phenomenon have been proposed, that rely on the spurious activation of low-level motion detectors in early visual areas. We have hypothesized that the right inferior parietal lobe ('when' pathway plays a critical role in timing perceptual events relative to one another, and thus we examined the role of the right parietal lobe in the generation of this "continuous Wagon Wheel Illusion" (c-WWI. Consistent with our hypothesis, we found that the illusion was effectively weakened following disruption of right, but not left, parietal regions by low frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (1 Hz, 10 min. These results were independent of whether the motion stimulus was shown in the left or the right visual field. Thus, the c-WWI appears to depend on higher-order attentional mechanisms that are supported by the 'when' pathway of the right parietal lobe.

  18. Evidence-based guidelines on the therapeutic use of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS).

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    Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal; André-Obadia, Nathalie; Antal, Andrea; Ayache, Samar S; Baeken, Chris; Benninger, David H; Cantello, Roberto M; Cincotta, Massimo; de Carvalho, Mamede; De Ridder, Dirk; Devanne, Hervé; Di Lazzaro, Vincenzo; Filipović, Saša R; Hummel, Friedhelm C; Jääskeläinen, Satu K; Kimiskidis, Vasilios K; Koch, Giacomo; Langguth, Berthold; Nyffeler, Thomas; Oliviero, Antonio; Padberg, Frank; Poulet, Emmanuel; Rossi, Simone; Rossini, Paolo Maria; Rothwell, John C; Schönfeldt-Lecuona, Carlos; Siebner, Hartwig R; Slotema, Christina W; Stagg, Charlotte J; Valls-Sole, Josep; Ziemann, Ulf; Paulus, Walter; Garcia-Larrea, Luis

    2014-11-01

    A group of European experts was commissioned to establish guidelines on the therapeutic use of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) from evidence published up until March 2014, regarding pain, movement disorders, stroke, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, consciousness disorders, tinnitus, depression, anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder, schizophrenia, craving/addiction, and conversion. Despite unavoidable inhomogeneities, there is a sufficient body of evidence to accept with level A (definite efficacy) the analgesic effect of high-frequency (HF) rTMS of the primary motor cortex (M1) contralateral to the pain and the antidepressant effect of HF-rTMS of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). A Level B recommendation (probable efficacy) is proposed for the antidepressant effect of low-frequency (LF) rTMS of the right DLPFC, HF-rTMS of the left DLPFC for the negative symptoms of schizophrenia, and LF-rTMS of contralesional M1 in chronic motor stroke. The effects of rTMS in a number of indications reach level C (possible efficacy), including LF-rTMS of the left temporoparietal cortex in tinnitus and auditory hallucinations. It remains to determine how to optimize rTMS protocols and techniques to give them relevance in routine clinical practice. In addition, professionals carrying out rTMS protocols should undergo rigorous training to ensure the quality of the technical realization, guarantee the proper care of patients, and maximize the chances of success. Under these conditions, the therapeutic use of rTMS should be able to develop in the coming years.

  19. Effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in drug resistant depressed patients

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    Chung, Yong An; Yoo, Ie Ryung; Kang, Bong Joo; Chae, Jeong Ho; Lee, Hye Won; Moon, Hyun Jin; Kim, Sung Hoon; Sohn, Hyung Sun; Chung, Soo Kyo [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-02-15

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has recently been clinically applied in the treatment of drug resistant depressed patients. There are mixed findings about the efficacy of rTMS on depression. Furthermore, the influence of rTMS on the physiology of the brain is not clear. We prospectively evaluated changes of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) between pre- and post-rTMS treatment in patients with drug resistant depression. Twelve patients with drug-resistant depression (7 male, 5 female; age range; 19{approx} 52 years; mean age: 29.3 {+-} 9.3 years) were given rTMS on right prefrontal lobe with low frequency (1 Hz) and on left prefrontal lobe with high frequency (20 Hz), with 20-minute-duration each day for 3 weeks. Tc-99m ECD brain perfusion SPECT was obtained before and after rTMS treatment. The changes of cerebral perfusion were analyzed using statistical parametric mapping (SPM; t=3.14, uncorrected {rho} < 0.01, voxel = 100). Following areas showed significant increase in rCBF after 3 weeks rTMS treatment: the cingulate gyrus, fusiform gyrus of right temporal lobe, precuneus, and left lateral globus pallidus. Significant decrement was noted in the precental and middle frontal gyrus of right frontal lobe, and fusiform gyrus of left occipital lobe. Low-frequency rTMS on the right prefrontal cortex and high-frequency rTMS on the left prefrontal cortex for 3 weeks as an add-on regimen have increased and decreased rCBF in the specific brain regions in drug-resistant depressed patients. Further analyses correlating clinical characteristics and treatment paradigm with functional imaging data may be helpful in clarifying the pathophysiology of drug-resistant patients.

  20. PERIPHERAL APPLICATION OF REPETITIVE PULSE MAGNETIC STIMULATION ON JOINT CONTRACTURE FOR MOBILITY RESTORATION: CONTROLLED RANDOMIZED STUDY

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    Efthimios J. Kouloulas

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Joint contracture is a limitation in the passive or active range of motion (ROM of a joint, where in addition to the mobility limiting factor the pain is also present. Repetitive pulsed Magnetic Stimulation (rPMS appears to be an effective, non-invasive and safety solution for treating this condition. Therefore aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of rPMS in treating joint contracture. Methods: 30 subjects with joint contracture in the knee were enrolled in this study and divided respectively into Treatment and Control group. The treatment group were delivered with rPMS therapy. The control group was delivered with conventional physiotherapy method (ultrasound. The primary outcome measurements were: 1. Mobility evaluation by goniometry (ROM in degrees while performing flexion and Patient Functional Assessment Questionnaire (PFAQ for ability to perform Activities of Daily Living (ADL and 2. Pain evaluation by 10-point Visual Analog Scale (VAS for pain perception. Absence of adverse events was set as a secondary measure. Results: The results of the study show statistical difference (p<0.05 between the levels of improvement of all studied parameters while comparing between both groups. The results suggest greater immobility restoration and pain relieving effect of the rPMS in comparison to conventional physiotherapy method. Conclusion: rPMS an effective and safe non-invasive method for mobility restoration and pain relief in case of joint contractures. This study suggests the method as beneficial and quality of life ameliorating among patients suffering from immobilized joints accompanied by pain.

  1. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation affects behavior by biasing endogenous cortical oscillations

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    Massihullah Hamidi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A governing assumption about repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS has been that it interferes with task-related neuronal activity – in effect, by “injecting noise” into the brain – and thereby disrupts behavior. Recent reports of rTMS-produced behavioral enhancement, however, call this assumption into question. We investigated the neurophysiological effects of rTMS delivered during the delay period of a visual working memory task by simultaneously recording brain activity with electroencephalography (EEG. Subjects performed visual working memory for locations or for shapes, and in half the trials a 10-Hz train of rTMS was delivered to the superior parietal lobule or a control brain area. The wide range of individual differences in the effects of rTMS on task accuracy, from improvement to impairment, was predicted by individual differences in the effect of rTMS on power in the alpha-band of the EEG (~ 10 Hz: a decrease in alpha-band power corresponded to improved performance, whereas an increase in alpha-band power corresponded to the opposite. The EEG effect was localized to cortical sources encompassing the frontal eye fields and the intraparietal sulcus, and was specific to task (location, but not object memory and to rTMS target (superior parietal lobule, not control area. Furthermore, for the same task condition, rTMS-induced changes in cross-frequency phase synchrony between alpha- and gamma-band (> 40 Hz oscillations predicted changes in behavior. These results suggest that alpha-band oscillations play an active role cognitive processes and do not simply reflect absence of processing. Furthermore, this study shows that the complex effects of rTMS on behavior can result from biasing endogenous patterns of network-level oscillations.

  2. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for the Treatment of Restless Legs Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Cong Lin; Yang Feng; Shu-Qin Zhan; Ning Li; Yan Ding; Yue Hou; Li Wang

    2015-01-01

    Background:Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a noninvasive technique used to alter cortex excitability that has been proposed as an efficient method for treating brain hyperexcitability or hypoexcitability disorders.The aim of this study was to investigate whether high-frequency rTMS could have any beneficial effects in restless legs syndrome (RLS).Methods:Fourteen patients with RLS were given high-frequency rTMS (15 Hz,100% motor threshold) to the leg representation motor cortex area of the frontal lobe for 14 sessions over 18 days.Patients were diagnosed according to the international criteria proposed by the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group in 2003.The International RLS Rating Scale (IRLS-RS),Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI),Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAMA) and Hamilton Depression Scale were used to evaluate the severity of RLS,sleep quality,anxiety and depression,respectively.The scale scores were evaluated at four-time points (baseline,end of the 14th session,and at 1-and 2-month posttreatment).One-way analysis of variance was used to compare scale scores at different time points.Results:There was significant improvement in the IRLS-RS (from 23.86 ± 5.88 to 11.21 ± 7.23,P < 0.05),PSQI (from 15.00 ± 4.88 to 9.29 ± 3.91,P < 0.05),and HAMA (from 17.93 ± 7.11 to 10.36 ± 7.13,P < 0.05) scale scores at the end of 14th session,with ongoing effects lasting for at least 2 months.Conclusions:High-frequency rTMS can markedly alleviate the motor system symptoms,sleep disturbances,and anxiety in RLS patients.These results suggest that rTMS might be an option for treating RLS.

  3. Cognitive safety of dorsomedial prefrontal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Laura; Wheeler, Sarah; McAndrews, Mary Pat; Solomon, Chloe J E; Giacobbe, Peter; Downar, Jonathan

    2016-07-01

    The most widely used target for repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in treatment-resistant depression (TRD) is the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Despite convergent evidence that the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (DMPFC) may be a promising alternative target for rTMS in TRD, its cognitive safety profile has not previously been assessed. Here, we applied 20 sessions of rTMS to the DMPFC in 21 TRD patients. Before and after treatment, a battery of neuropsychological tasks was administered to evaluate changes in cognition across three general cognitive domains: learning and memory, attention and processing speed, and cognitive flexibility. Subjects also completed the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HamD17) prior to and following treatment to measure changes in severity of depressive symptoms, and to assess the relationship between mood and cognitive performance over the course of treatment. No serious adverse effects or significant deterioration in cognitive performance were observed. Overall, subjects improved significantly on Stroop Inhibition/Switching and on Trails B, and this improvement was independent of the degree of improvement in depression symptoms. No domains or items significantly predicted clinical outcome, with the exception of baseline performance on Visual Elevator Accuracy. Clinical improvement correlated to improved performance in the overall domain of attention and processing speed, although this effect was not evident following covariate adjustment. DMPFC-rTMS did not produce any detectable cognitive adverse effects during treatment of TRD. Performance did not deteriorate significantly on any measures. Taken together, the present findings support the tolerability and cognitive safety of DMPFC-rTMS in refractory depression.

  4. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for treatment of major depressive disorder with comorbid generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Daniela; Tavakoli, Sason

    2015-08-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has shown promising results in treating individuals with behavioral disorders such as major depressive disorder (MDD), posttraumatic stress disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and social anxiety disorder. A number of applications of rTMS to different regions of the left and right prefrontal cortex have been used to treat these disorders, but no study of treatment for MDD with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) has been conducted with application of rTMS to both the left and right prefrontal cortex. We hypothesized that applying low-frequency rTMS to the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) before applying it to the left DLPFC for the treatment of depression would be anxiolytic in patients with MDD with GAD. Thirteen adult patients with comorbid MDD and GAD received treatment with rTMS in an outpatient setting. The number of treatments ranged from 24 to 36 over 5 to 6 weeks. Response was defined as a ≥ 50% reduction in symptoms from baseline, and remission was defined as a score of depressive symptoms on the 21-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D-21). At the end of the treatment period, for the GAD-7 scale, 11 out of 13 (84.6%) patients' anxiety symptoms were in remission, achieving a score of depressive symptoms. In this small pilot study of 13 patients with comorbid MDD and GAD, significant improvement in anxiety symptoms along with depressive symptoms was achieved in a majority of patients after bilateral rTMS application.

  5. Knowledge of and Attitude Toward Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Among Psychiatrists in Saudi Arabia

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    AlHadi, Ahmad N.; AlShiban, Abdulrahman M.; Alomar, Majed A.; Aljadoa, Othman F.; AlSayegh, Ahmed M.; Jameel, Mohammed A.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The aims of this study were to assess psychiatrists' knowledge of and attitudes toward repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in Saudi Arabia and to determine the contributing factors. Methods A quantitative observational cross-sectional study was conducted using an online survey. The sample consisted of 96 psychiatrists in Saudi Arabia. A new valid and reliable questionnaire was developed. Results A total of 96 psychiatrists enrolled in the study, 81% of whom were men. Half of the participants were consultants. The sample mainly consisted of general psychiatrists (65%). The mean age of the participants was 37 years. The results showed that 80% of the psychiatrists had a sufficient level of knowledge about rTMS. Consultants had greater knowledge than residents. Training abroad was not significantly associated with the level of knowledge or the type of attitude. Most psychiatrists (79%) had a positive attitude toward rTMS. Only 53% of the psychiatrists said they would agree to receive rTMS if they experienced a psychotic depressive condition. A minority of psychiatrists (7%) said they would not refer their patients for rTMS. Conclusions Most of the psychiatrists surveyed had good knowledge of and a positive attitude toward rTMS. Those who had a high level of training and experience showed higher levels of knowledge. Articles were reported to be a better source for improving physician knowledge than textbooks. Having a family member or relative who was treated with rTMS positively affected psychiatrists' attitudes toward rTMS. PMID:27564426

  6. Effect of low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with physical therapy on L-dopa-induced painful off-period dystonia in Parkinson's disease.

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    Kodama, Mitsuhiko; Kasahara, Takashi; Hyodo, Masaki; Aono, Koji; Sugaya, Mutsumi; Koyama, Yuji; Hanayama, Kozo; Masakado, Yoshihisa

    2011-02-01

    Previous research has shown that low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over the primary motor area and supplementary motor area can reduce L-dopa-induced dyskinesias in Parkinson's disease; however, it involved only patients with peak-dose or diphasic dyskinesia. We report a case of a patient with severely painful off-period dystonia in the unilateral lower limb who underwent 0.9-Hz subthreshold repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over contralateral primary motor area and supplementary motor area. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over the primary motor area significantly reduced the painful dystonia and walking disturbances but repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over the supplementary motor area did not. The cortical silent period also prolonged after repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over the primary motor area. At 5 mos of approximately once a week repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over the primary motor area, the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale motor score also improved. This report shows that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over the inhibitory primary motor area can be useful for rehabilitating patients with Parkinson's disease with off-period dystonia and suggests that this treatment should be further verified in such patients.

  7. A neuronal network model for simulating the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on local field potential power spectra.

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    Alina Bey

    Full Text Available Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS holds promise as a non-invasive therapy for the treatment of neurological disorders such as depression, schizophrenia, tinnitus, and epilepsy. Complex interdependencies between stimulus duration, frequency and intensity obscure the exact effects of rTMS stimulation on neural activity in the cortex, making evaluation of and comparison between rTMS studies difficult. To explain the influence of rTMS on neural activity (e.g. in the motor cortex, we use a neuronal network model. The results demonstrate that the model adequately explains experimentally observed short term effects of rTMS on the band power in common frequency bands used in electroencephalography (EEG. We show that the equivalent local field potential (eLFP band power depends on stimulation intensity rather than on stimulation frequency. Additionally, our model resolves contradictions in experiments.

  8. Improved Acuity and Dexterity but Unchanged Touch and Pain Thresholds following Repetitive Sensory Stimulation of the Fingers

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    Rebecca Kowalewski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroplasticity underlies the brain’s ability to alter perception and behavior through training, practice, or simply exposure to sensory stimulation. Improvement of tactile discrimination has been repeatedly demonstrated after repetitive sensory stimulation (rSS of the fingers; however, it remains unknown if such protocols also affect hand dexterity or pain thresholds. We therefore stimulated the thumb and index finger of young adults to investigate, besides testing tactile discrimination, the impact of rSS on dexterity, pain, and touch thresholds. We observed an improvement in the pegboard task where subjects used the thumb and index finger only. Accordingly, stimulating 2 fingers simultaneously potentiates the efficacy of rSS. In fact, we observed a higher gain of discrimination performance as compared to a single-finger rSS. In contrast, pain and touch thresholds remained unaffected. Our data suggest that selecting particular fingers modulates the efficacy of rSS, thereby affecting processes controlling sensorimotor integration.

  9. Investigating the work-family conflict and health link: Repetitive thought as a mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kelly D; Gere, Judith; Sliwinski, Martin J

    2016-10-06

    Research is needed to investigate mechanisms linking work-family conflict to poor health in working adults. We took a novel approach to build on extant studies by testing a potential mechanism in these associations - repetitive thought. Data came from a sample of 203 partnered working adults. There were significant direct effects of work-family conflict with lower life satisfaction, positive affect, and perceived health as well as greater fatigue. As for total effects, work-family conflict was significantly associated with all health outcomes - life satisfaction, positive affect, negative affect, fatigue, perceived health, and chronic health conditions - in the expected directions through repetitive thought. This study provides support that repetitive thought is one potential mechanism of how work-family conflict can take a toll on psychological and physical health. Findings are discussed in relation to improving workplace policies to improve the health of working adults managing work-family conflict.

  10. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for stroke rehabilitation-potential therapy or misplaced hope?

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    Bates, Kristyn Alissa; Rodger, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Repeated sessions of transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) are capable of changing and modulating neural activity beyond the period of stimulation. Because many neurological disorders are thought to involve abnormal or dysfunctional neuronal activity, it is hypothesised that the therapeutic action of rTMS may occur through modulating and reversing abnormal activity and facilitating neuroplasticity.Numerous clinical studies have investigated the safety and efficacy of rTMS treatment for a wide variety of conditions including depression, anxiety disorders including obsessive compulsive disorder, Parkinson's disease, stroke, tinnitus, affective disorders, schizophrenia and chronic pain. Despite some promising results, rTMS is not currently widely used to assist in recovery from neurotrama. In this review, we argue that the therapeutic promise of rTMS is limited because the mechanisms of action of rTMS are not completely understood and therefore it is difficult to determine which treatment protocols are appropriate for specific neurological conditions. We use the application of rTMS in motor functional recovery from cerebral ischemic stroke to illustrate the difficulties in interpreting and assessing the therapeutic potential of rTMS for neurotrauma in terms of the presumed mechanisms of action of rTMS. Future directions for research will also be discussed.

  11. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) influences spatial cognition and modulates hippocampal structural synaptic plasticity in aging mice.

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    Ma, Jun; Zhang, Zhanchi; Kang, Lin; Geng, Dandan; Wang, Yanyong; Wang, Mingwei; Cui, Huixian

    2014-10-01

    Normal aging is characteristic with the gradual decline in cognitive function associated with the progressive reduction of structural and functional plasticity in the hippocampus. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has developed into a novel neurological and psychiatric tool that can be used to investigate the neurobiology of cognitive function. Recent studies have demonstrated that low-frequency rTMS (≤1Hz) affects synaptic plasticity in rats with vascular dementia (VaD), and it ameliorates the spatial cognitive ability in mice with Aβ1-42-mediated memory deficits, but there are little concerns about the effects of rTMS on normal aging related cognition and synaptic plasticity changes. Thus, the current study investigated the effects of rTMS on spatial memory behavior, neuron and synapse morphology in the hippocampus, and synaptic protein markers and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)/tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) in normal aging mice, to illustrate the mechanisms of rTMS in regulating cognitive capacity. Relative to adult animals, aging caused hippocampal-dependent cognitive impairment, simultaneously inhibited the activation of the BDNF-TrkB signaling pathway, reduced the transcription and expression of synaptic protein markers: synaptophysin (SYN), growth associated protein 43 (GAP43) and post-synaptic density protein 95 (PSD95), as well as decreased synapse density and PSD (post-synaptic density) thickness. Interestingly, rTMS with low intensity (110% average resting motor threshold intensity, 1Hz, LIMS) triggered the activation of BDNF and TrkB, upregulated the level of synaptic protein markers, and increased synapse density and thickened PSD, and further reversed the spatial cognition dysfunction in aging mice. Conversely, high-intensity magnetic stimulation (150% average resting motor threshold intensity, 1Hz, HIMS) appeared to be detrimental, inducing thinning of PSDs, disordered synaptic structure, and a large number of

  12. Functional cortical reorganization after low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation plus intensive occupational therapy for upper limb hemiparesis: evaluation by functional magnetic resonance imaging in poststroke patients.

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    Yamada, Naoki; Kakuda, Wataru; Senoo, Atsushi; Kondo, Takahiro; Mitani, Sugao; Shimizu, Masato; Abo, Masahiro

    2013-08-01

    Low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of the nonlesional hemisphere combined with occupational therapy significantly improves motor function of the affected upper limb in poststroke hemiparetic patients, but the recovery mechanism remains unclear. To investigate the recovery mechanism using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Forty-seven poststroke hemiparetic patients were hospitalized to receive 12 sessions of 40-min low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over the nonlesional hemisphere and daily occupational therapy for 15 days. Motor function was evaluated with the Fugl-Meyer Assessment and Wolf Motor Function Test. The functional magnetic resonance imaging with motor tasks was performed at admission and discharge. The laterality index of activated voxel number in Brodmann areas 4 and 6 on functional magnetic resonance imaging was calculated (laterality index range of -1 to +1). Patients were divided into two groups based on functional magnetic resonance imaging findings before the intervention: group 1: patients who showed bilateral activation (n = 27); group 2: patients with unilateral activation (n = 20). Treatment resulted in improvement in Fugl-Meyer Assessment and Wolf Motor Function Test in the two groups (P functional magnetic resonance imaging indicated that our proposed treatment can induce functional cortical reorganization, leading to motor functional recovery of the affected upper limb. Especially, it seems that neural activation in the lesional hemisphere plays an important role in such recovery in poststroke hemiparetic patients. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2013 World Stroke Organization.

  13. Induction of central nervous system plasticity by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation to promote sensorimotor recovery in incomplete spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellaway, Peter H.; Vásquez, Natalia; Craggs, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Cortical and spinal cord plasticity may be induced with non-invasive transcranial magnetic stimulation to encourage long term potentiation or depression of neuronal circuits. Such plasticity inducing stimulation provides an attractive approach to promote changes in sensorimotor circuits that have been degraded by spinal cord injury (SCI). If residual corticospinal circuits can be conditioned appropriately there should be the possibility that the changes are accompanied by functional recovery. This article reviews the attempts that have been made to restore sensorimotor function and to obtain functional benefits from the application of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the cortex following incomplete spinal cord injury. The confounding issues that arise with the application of rTMS, specifically in SCI, are enumerated. Finally, consideration is given to the potential for rTMS to be used in the restoration of bladder and bowel sphincter function and consequent functional recovery of the guarding reflex. PMID:24904326

  14. Effect of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on motor cortical excitability and sensory nerve conduction velocity in subacute-stage incomplete spinal cord injury patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Hyun Gyu; Ji, Sang-Goo; Kim, Myoung-Kwon

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to determine whether repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation can improve sensory recovery of the lower extremities in subacute-stage spinal cord injury patients. [Subjects and Methods] This study was conducted on 20 subjects with diagnosed paraplegia due to spinal cord injury. These 20 subjects were allocated to an experimental group of 10 subjects that underwent active repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation or to a control group of 10 subjects that underwent sham repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. The SCI patients in the experimental group underwent active repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and conventional rehabilitation therapy, whereas the spinal cord injury patients in the control group underwent sham repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and conventional rehabilitation therapy. Participants in both groups received therapy five days per week for six-weeks. Latency, amplitude, and sensory nerve conduction velocity were assessed before and after the six week therapy period. [Results] A significant intergroup difference was observed for posttreatment velocity gains, but no significant intergroup difference was observed for amplitude or latency. [Conclusion] repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation may be improve sensory recovery of the lower extremities in subacute-stage spinal cord injury patients.

  15. The use of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to relieve pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal; Antal, Andrea; Ahdab, Rechdi; Ciampi de Andrade, Daniel; Fregni, Felipe; Khedr, Eman M; Nitsche, Michael; Paulus, Walter

    2008-10-01

    Chronic pain resulting from injury of the peripheral or central nervous system may be associated with a significant dysfunction of extensive neural networks. Noninvasive stimulation techniques, such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) may be suitable to treat chronic pain as they can act on these networks by modulating neural activities not only in the stimulated area, but also in remote regions that are interconnected to the site of stimulation. Motor cortex was the first cortical target that was proved to be efficacious in chronic pain treatment. At present, significant analgesic effects were also shown to occur after the stimulation of other cortical targets (including prefrontal and parietal areas) in acute provoked pain, chronic neuropathic pain, fibromyalgia, or visceral pain. Therapeutic applications of rTMS in pain syndromes are limited by the short duration of the induced effects, but prolonged pain relief can be obtained by repeating rTMS sessions every day for several weeks. Recent tDCS studies also showed some effects on various types of chronic pain. We review the evidence to date of these two techniques of noninvasive brain stimulation for the treatment of pain.

  16. [Treatment of vascular Parkinson's syndrome after stroke by ultralow frequency and high frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Renming; Li, Yanru; Lei, Da

    2015-04-01

    To determine effect and safety of ultra-low frequency and high frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on treating vascular Parkinson's syndrome (VPS) after stroke. The 0.1 Hz low frequency (n=21) and 5 Hz high frequency (n=21) rTMS were used to treat patients with VPS, and the false stimulation servered as a control group (n=18). The UPDRS score and Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire (PDQ) were chosen to evaluate the curative effect on PD. The patients were given anti-PD drugs continuously during the treatment. UPDRS scores as well as I, II, and III scores after the treatment were significantly decreased in both the ultra-low frequency group and the high frequency group compared with those before the treatment (all Pfrequency and the high frequency group at the same time point before and after the treatment (P>0.05). There was no significant difference in UPDRS scores between before and after the treatment in the control group (P>0.05), but PDQ scores were significantly decreased at the third month after the treatment compared with those of before and after treatment (Pfrequency and high frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation can safely improve the clinical symptoms and life quality of patients with VPS.

  17. Low and High Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for the Treatment of Spasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Angela C.; Dionisio, Karen; Pitskel, Naomi Bass; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Orsati, Fernanda; Ferreira, Merari J. L.; Boggio, Paulo S.; Lima, Moises C.; Rigonatti, Sergio P.; Fregni, Felipe

    2007-01-01

    The development of non-invasive techniques of cortical stimulation, such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), has opened new potential avenues for the treatment of neuropsychiatric diseases. We hypothesized that an increase in the activity in the motor cortex by cortical stimulation would increase its inhibitory influence on spinal…

  18. Low and High Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for the Treatment of Spasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Angela C.; Dionisio, Karen; Pitskel, Naomi Bass; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Orsati, Fernanda; Ferreira, Merari J. L.; Boggio, Paulo S.; Lima, Moises C.; Rigonatti, Sergio P.; Fregni, Felipe

    2007-01-01

    The development of non-invasive techniques of cortical stimulation, such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), has opened new potential avenues for the treatment of neuropsychiatric diseases. We hypothesized that an increase in the activity in the motor cortex by cortical stimulation would increase its inhibitory influence on spinal…

  19. Modulation of N400 in chronic non-fluent aphasia using low frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barwood, Caroline H S; Murdoch, Bruce E; Whelan, Brooke-Mai; Lloyd, David; Riek, Stephan; O'Sullivan, John D; Coulthard, Alan; Wong, Andrew

    2011-03-01

    Low frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) has previously been applied to language homologues in non-fluent populations of persons with aphasia yielding significant improvements in behavioral language function up to 43 months post stimulation. The present study aimed to investigate the electrophysiological correlates associated with the application of rTMS through measurement of the semantic based N400 Event-related brain potentials (ERP) component. Low frequency (1 Hz) rTMS was applied to the anterior portion of the homologue to Broca's area (pars triangularis), for 20 min per day for 10 days, using a stereotactic neuronavigational system. Twelve non-fluent persons with aphasia, 2-6 years post stroke were stimulated. Six participants were randomly assigned to receive real stimulation and six participants were randomly assigned to receive a blind sham control condition. ERP measures were recorded at baseline, 1 week and 2 months subsequent to stimulation. The findings demonstrate treatment related changes observed in the stimulation group when compared to the placebo control group at 2 months post stimulation indicating neuromodulation of N400 as a result of rTMS. No treatment related changes were identified in the stimulation group, when compared to the sham group from baseline to 1 week post stimulation. The electrophysiological results represent the capacity of rTMS to modulate neural language networks and measures of lexical-semantic function in participants with non-fluent aphasia and suggest that time may be an important factor in brain reorganization subsequent to rTMS.

  20. The Effectiveness of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Poststroke Apathy Is Associated with Improved Interhemispheric Functional Connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitaki, Shingo; Onoda, Keiichi; Abe, Satoshi; Oguro, Hiroaki; Yamaguchi, Shuhei

    2016-12-01

    Poststroke apathy is relatively common and has negative effects on the functional recovery of the patient; however, few reports have demonstrated the existence of effective treatments for poststroke apathy. Here, we describe a case of poststroke apathy that was successfully treated with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). Using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, we detected improved interhemispheric functional connectivity that was correlated with the patient's recovery from poststroke apathy. Our case suggests that rTMS can improve the transfer of information through the corpus callosum, which is crucial for helping patients recover from poststroke apathy. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Impact of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Post-Stroke Dysmnesia and the Role of BDNF Val66Met SNP

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Haitao; Zhang, Tong; Wen, Mei; Sun,Li

    2015-01-01

    Background Little is known about the effects of low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on dysmnesia and the impact of brain nucleotide neurotrophic factor (BDNF) Val66Met single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). This study investigated the impact of low-frequency rTMS on post-stroke dysmnesia and the impact of BDNF Val66Met SNP. Material/Methods Forty patients with post-stroke dysmnesia were prospectively randomized into the rTMS and sham groups. BDNF Val66Met SNP was ...

  2. Mechanisms of osteocyte stimulation in osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbruggen, Stefaan W; Vaughan, Ted J; McNamara, Laoise M

    2016-09-01

    Experimental studies have shown that primary osteoporosis caused by oestrogen-deficiency results in localised alterations in bone tissue properties and mineral composition. Additionally, changes to the lacunar-canalicular architecture surrounding the mechanosensitive osteocyte have been observed in animal models of the disease. Recently, it has also been demonstrated that the mechanical stimulation sensed by osteocytes changes significantly during osteoporosis. Specifically, it was shown that osteoporotic bone cells experience higher maximum strains than healthy bone cells after short durations of oestrogen deficiency. However, in long-term oestrogen deficiency there was no significant difference between bone cells in healthy and normal bone. The mechanisms by which these changes arise are unknown. In this study, we test the hypothesis that complex changes in tissue composition and lacunar-canalicular architecture during osteoporosis alter the mechanical stimulation of the osteocyte. The objective of this research is to employ computational methods to investigate the relationship between changes in bone tissue composition and microstructure and the mechanical stimulation of osteocytes during osteoporosis. By simulating physiological loading, it was observed that an initial decrease in tissue stiffness (of 0.425GPa) and mineral content (of 0.66wt% Ca) relative to controls could explain the mechanical stimulation observed at the early stages of oestrogen deficiency (5 weeks post-OVX) during in situ bone cell loading in an oestrogen-deficient rat model of post-menopausal osteoporosis (Verbruggen et al., 2015). Moreover, it was found that a later increase in stiffness (of 1.175GPa) and mineral content (of 1.64wt% Ca) during long-term osteoporosis (34 weeks post-OVX), could explain the mechanical stimuli previously observed at a later time point due to the progression of osteoporosis. Furthermore, changes in canalicular tortuosity arising during osteoporosis were shown

  3. Effects of low- and high-frequency repetitive magnetic stimulation on neuronal cell proliferation and growth factor expression: A preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Yong; Park, Hyung Joong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Cho, Byung Pil; Cho, Sung-Rae; Kim, Sung Hoon

    2015-09-14

    Repetitive magnetic stimulation is a neuropsychiatric and neurorehabilitation tool that can be used to investigate the neurobiology of sensory and motor functions. Few studies have examined the effects of repetitive magnetic stimulation on the modulation of neurotrophic/growth factors and neuronal cells in vitro. Therefore, the current study examined the differential effects of repetitive magnetic stimulation on neuronal cell proliferation as well as various growth factor expression. Immortalized mouse neuroblastoma cells were used as the cell model in this study. Dishes of cultured cells were randomly divided into control, sham, low-frequency (0.5Hz, 1Tesla) and high-frequency (10Hz, 1Tesla) groups (n=4 dishes/group) and were stimulated for 3 days. Expression of neurotrophic/growth factors, Akt and Erk was investigated by Western blotting analysis 3 days after repetitive magnetic stimulation. Neuroblastoma cell proliferation was determined with a cell counting assay. There were differences in cell proliferation based on stimulus frequency. Low-frequency stimulation did not alter proliferation relative to the control, while high-frequency stimulation elevated proliferation relative to the control group. The expression levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) were elevated in the high-frequency magnetic stimulation group. Akt and Erk expression was also significantly elevated in the high-frequency stimulation group, while low-frequency stimulation decreased the expression of Akt and Erk compared to the control. In conclusion, we determined that different frequency magnetic stimulation had an influence on neuronal cell proliferation via regulation of Akt and ERK signaling pathways and the expression of growth factors such as BDNF, GDNF, NT-3 and PDGF. These findings represent a promising opportunity to gain insight into how different

  4. Uncovering the mechanism(s) of deep brain stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Gang; Yu Chao; Lin Ling; Lu, Stephen C-Y [Inspiring Technical Laboratory, College of Precision Instruments and Opto-Electronics Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2005-01-01

    Deep brain stimulators, often called 'pacemakers for the brain', are implantable devices which continuously deliver impulse stimulation to specific targeted nuclei of deep brain structure, namely deep brain stimulation (DBS). To date, deep brain stimulation (DBS) is the most effective clinical technique for the treatment of several medically refractory movement disorders (e.g., Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, and dystonia). In addition, new clinical applications of DBS for other neurologic and psychiatric disorders (e.g., epilepsy and obsessive-compulsive disorder) have been put forward. Although DBS has been effective in the treatment of movement disorders and is rapidly being explored for the treatment of other neurologic disorders, the scientific understanding of its mechanisms of action remains unclear and continues to be debated in the scientific community. Optimization of DBS technology for present and future therapeutic applications will depend on identification of the therapeutic mechanism(s) of action. The goal of this review is to address our present knowledge of the effects of high-frequency stimulation within the central nervous system and comment on the functional implications of this knowledge for uncovering the mechanism(s) of DBS.

  5. Priority of repetitive adaptation to mismatch response following undiscriminable auditory stimulation: a magnetoencephalographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshiyama, Minoru; Okamoto, Hidehiko; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2007-02-01

    We analysed two different neural mechanisms related to the unconscious processing of auditory stimulation, neural adaptation and mismatch negativity (MMN), using magnetoencephalography in healthy non-musicians. Four kinds of conditioning stimulus (CS): white noise, a 675-Hz pure tone, and complex tones with six (CT6) and seven components (CT7), were used for analysing neural adaptation. The seven spectral components of CT7 were spaced by 1/7 octaves between 500 and 906 Hz on the logarithmic scale. The CT6 components contained the same spectral components as CT7, except for the center frequency, 675 kHz. Subjects could not distinguish CT6 from CT7 in a discrimination test. A test stimulus (TS), a 675-Hz tone, was presented after CS, and the effects of the presence of the same 675-Hz frequency in the CS on the magnetoencephalographic response elicited by TS was evaluated. The P2m component following CT7 was significantly smaller in current strength than that following CT6. The equivalent current dipole for P2m was located approximately 10 mm anterior to the preceding N1m. This result indicated that neural adaptation was taking place in the anterior part of the auditory cortex, even if the sound difference was subthreshold. By contrast, the magnetic counterpart of the MMN was not recorded when CT6 and CT7 were used as standard and deviant stimuli, respectively, being consistent with the discrimination test. In conclusion, neural adaptation is considered to be more sensitive than our consciousness or the MMN, or is caused by an independent mechanism.

  6. Automatic Detection of Repetitive Components in 3D Mechanical Engineering Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laixiang Wen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an intelligent method to automatically detect repetitive components in 3D mechanical engineering models. In our work, a new Voxel-based Shape Descriptor (VSD is proposed for effective matching, based on which a similarity function is defined. It uses the voxels intersecting with 3D outline of mechanical components as the feature descriptor. Because each mechanical component may have different poses, the alignment before the matching is needed. For the alignment, we adopt the genetic algorithm to search for optimal solution where the maximum global similarity is the objective. Two components are the same if the maximum global similarity is over a certain threshold. Note that the voxelization of component during feature extraction and the genetic algorithm for searching maximum global similarity are entirely implemented on GPU; the efficiency is improved significantly than with CPU. Experimental results show that our method is more effective and efficient than that existing methods for repetitive components detection.

  7. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) to Treat Social Anxiety Disorder: Case Reports and a Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paes, Flávia; Baczynski, Tathiana; Novaes, Felipe; Marinho, Tamires; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Budde, Henning; Sack, Alexander T.; Huston, Joseph P.; Almada, Leonardo Ferreira; Carta, Mauro; Silva, Adriana Cardoso; Nardi, Antonio E.; Machado, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is a common and debilitating anxiety disorders. However, few studies had been dedicated to the neurobiology underlying SAD until the last decade. Rates of non-responders to standard methods of treatment remain unsatisfactorily high of approximately 25%, including SAD. Advances in our understanding of SAD could lead to new treatment strategies. A potential non invasive therapeutic option is repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). Thus, we reported two cases of SAD treated with rTMS Methods: The bibliographical search used Pubmed/Medline, ISI Web of Knowledge and Scielo databases. The terms chosen for the search were: anxiety disorders, neuroimaging, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. Results: In most of the studies conducted on anxiety disorders, except SAD, the right prefrontal cortex (PFC), more specifically dorsolateral PFC was stimulated, with marked results when applying high-rTMS compared with studies stimulating the opposite side. However, according to the “valence hypothesis”, anxiety disorders might be characterized by an interhemispheric imbalance associated with increased right-hemispheric activity. With regard to the two cases treated with rTMS, we found a decrease in BDI, BAI and LSAS scores from baseline to follow-up. Conclusion: We hypothesize that the application of low-rTMS over the right medial PFC (mPFC; the main structure involved in SAD circuitry) combined with high-rTMS over the left mPFC, for at least 4 weeks on consecutive weekdays, may induce a balance in brain activity, opening an attractive therapeutic option for the treatment of SAD. PMID:24278088

  8. Ventrolateral prefrontal cortex repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in the treatment of depersonalization disorder: A consecutive case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, Emma-Louise; Nestler, Steffen; Sierra, Mauricio; McClelland, Jessica; Kekic, Maria; David, Anthony S

    2016-06-30

    Case reports and an open trial have reported promising responses to repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to prefrontal and temporo-parietal sites in patients with depersonalization disorder (DPD). We recently showed that a single session of rTMS to the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) was associated with a reduction in symptoms and increase in physiological arousal. Seven patients with medication-resistant DSM-IV DPD received up to 20 sessions of right-sided rTMS to the VLPFC for 10 weeks. Stimulation was guided using neuronavigation software based on participants' individual structural MRIs, and delivered at 110% of resting motor threshold. A session consisted of 1Hz repetitive TMS for 15min. The primary outcome measure was reduction in depersonalization symptoms on the Cambridge Depersonalization Scale (CDS). Secondary outcomes included scores on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). 20 sessions of rTMS treatment to right VLPFC significantly reduced scores on the CDS by on average 44% (range 2-83.5%). Two patients could be classified as "full responders", four as "partial" and one a non-responder. Response usually occurred within the first 6 sessions. There were no significant adverse events. A randomized controlled clinical trial of VLPFC rTMS for DPD is warranted.

  9. Efficacy of bilateral repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for negative symptoms of schizophrenia : results of a multicenter double-blind randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dlabac-de Lange, J. J.; Bais, L.; van Es, F. D.; Visser, B. G. J.; Reinink, E.; Bakker, B.; van den Heuvel, E. R.; Aleman, A.; Knegtering, H.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Few studies have investigated the efficacy of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) treatment for negative symptoms of schizophrenia, reporting inconsistent results. We aimed to investigate whether 10 Hz stimulation of the bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex during 3 w

  10. Preliminary Evidence of the Effects of High-frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) on Swallowing Functions in Post-Stroke Individuals with Chronic Dysphagia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ivy K. Y.; Chan, Karen M. K.; Wong, C. S.; Cheung, Raymond T. F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is growing evidence of potential benefits of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in the rehabilitation of dysphagia. However, the site and frequency of stimulation for optimal effects are not clear. Aims: The aim of this pilot study is to investigate the short-term effects of high-frequency 5 Hz rTMS applied to…

  11. Preliminary Evidence of the Effects of High-frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) on Swallowing Functions in Post-Stroke Individuals with Chronic Dysphagia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ivy K. Y.; Chan, Karen M. K.; Wong, C. S.; Cheung, Raymond T. F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is growing evidence of potential benefits of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in the rehabilitation of dysphagia. However, the site and frequency of stimulation for optimal effects are not clear. Aims: The aim of this pilot study is to investigate the short-term effects of high-frequency 5 Hz rTMS applied to…

  12. A comparison of the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) by number of stimulation sessions on hemispatial neglect in chronic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Kyun; Jung, Jae Hwan; Shin, Sung Hun

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) applied either during one session of stimulation, or by ten sessions of low-frequency stimulation over the left parietal cortex, on hemispatial neglect in stroke patients. We enrolled 34 subjects that had experienced a stroke. All subjects received 1,200 real rTMS over the left parietal cortex at an intensity of 90% of motor thresholds with 1 Hz. Subjects were divided into two groups. One group of subjects (n = 19) received real rTMS over the left parietal cortex in a single session of stimulation, and the other group (n = 15), underwent a total of ten sessions of daily stimulations for 2 weeks. Letter cancelation test, line bisection test, and Ota's task were administered to compare the effects of different rTMS protocols, before and after rTMS. The results showed no difference in baseline value between the single session group and the ten sessions group. Total ten sessions of low-frequency rTMS over the left parietal cortex, compared with the single session of rTMS, significantly improved hemispatial neglect in letter cancelation, line bisection, and Ota's task (P rTMS can be used in treatment by rTMS for patients suffering from hemispatial neglect after stroke.

  13. Influence of the Repetitive Corrugation on the Mechanism Occuring During Plastic Deformation of CuSn6 Alloy

    OpenAIRE

    Nuckowski P. M.; Kwaśny W.; Rdzawski Z.; Głuchowski W.; Pawlyta M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the research results of CuSn6 alloy strip at semi-hard state, plastically deformed in the process of repetitive corrugation. The influence of process parameters on the mechanical properties and structure of examined alloy were investigated. Examination in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) confirmed the impact of the repetitive corrugation to obtain the nano-scale structures. It has been found, that the application of repetitive corrugation increases ...

  14. Utilizing repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation to improve language function in stroke patients with chronic non-fluent aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Gabriella; Norise, Catherine; Faseyitan, Olufunsho; Naeser, Margaret A; Hamilton, Roy H

    2013-07-02

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been shown to significantly improve language function in patients with non-fluent aphasia(1). In this experiment, we demonstrate the administration of low-frequency repetitive TMS (rTMS) to an optimal stimulation site in the right hemisphere in patients with chronic non-fluent aphasia. A battery of standardized language measures is administered in order to assess baseline performance. Patients are subsequently randomized to either receive real rTMS or initial sham stimulation. Patients in the real stimulation undergo a site-finding phase, comprised of a series of six rTMS sessions administered over five days; stimulation is delivered to a different site in the right frontal lobe during each of these sessions. Each site-finding session consists of 600 pulses of 1 Hz rTMS, preceded and followed by a picture-naming task. By comparing the degree of transient change in naming ability elicited by stimulation of candidate sites, we are able to locate the area of optimal response for each individual patient. We then administer rTMS to this site during the treatment phase. During treatment, patients undergo a total of ten days of stimulation over the span of two weeks; each session is comprised of 20 min of 1 Hz rTMS delivered at 90% resting motor threshold. Stimulation is paired with an fMRI-naming task on the first and last days of treatment. After the treatment phase is complete, the language battery obtained at baseline is repeated two and six months following stimulation in order to identify rTMS-induced changes in performance. The fMRI-naming task is also repeated two and six months following treatment. Patients who are randomized to the sham arm of the study undergo sham site-finding, sham treatment, fMRI-naming studies, and repeat language testing two months after completing sham treatment. Sham patients then cross over into the real stimulation arm, completing real site-finding, real treatment, fMRI, and two- and six

  15. Blood flow and oxygenation changes due to low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of the cerebral cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Rickson C.; Faseyitan, Olufunsho K.; Turkeltaub, Peter E.; Buckley, Erin M.; Thomas, Amy; Kim, Meeri N.; Durduran, Turgut; Greenberg, Joel H.; Detre, John A.; Yodh, Arjun G.; Hamilton, Roy H.

    2013-06-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) modulates processing in the human brain and is therefore of interest as a treatment modality for neurologic conditions. During TMS administration, an electric current passing through a coil on the scalp creates a rapidly varying magnetic field that induces currents in the cerebral cortex. The effects of low-frequency (1 Hz), repetitive TMS (rTMS) on motor cortex cerebral blood flow (CBF) and tissue oxygenation in seven healthy adults, during/after 20 min stimulation, is reported. Noninvasive optical methods are employed: diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) for blood flow and diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) for hemoglobin concentrations. A significant increase in median CBF (33%) on the side ipsilateral to stimulation was observed during rTMS and persisted after discontinuation. The measured hemodynamic parameter variations enabled computation of relative changes in cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption during rTMS, which increased significantly (28%) in the stimulated hemisphere. By contrast, hemodynamic changes from baseline were not observed contralateral to rTMS administration (all parameters, p>0.29). In total, these findings provide new information about hemodynamic/metabolic responses to low-frequency rTMS and, importantly, demonstrate the feasibility of DCS/DOS for noninvasive monitoring of TMS-induced physiologic effects.

  16. Protective effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in a rat model of transient cerebral ischaemia: a microPET study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Feng [Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Zhejiang University Medical PET Center, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Wang, Shuang; Guo, Yi; Lou, Min; Wu, Jimin; Ding, Meiping [Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Wang, Jing; Zhang, Hong [Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Zhejiang University Medical PET Center, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Tian, Mei [The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Experimental Diagnostic Imaging, Houston, TX (United States)

    2010-05-15

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a noninvasive method to excite neurons in the brain. However, the underlying mechanism of its therapeutic effects in stroke remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the neuroprotective effect of high-frequency rTMS in a rat model of transient cerebral ischaemia using positron emission tomography (PET). Sprague-Dawley rats (n=30) were anaesthetized with chloral hydrate and subjected to 90 min of intraluminal middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) with subsequent reperfusion in three groups: control (n=10), rTMS (n=10), or sham-rTMS groups (n=10). In the rTMS group, rTMS was given 1 h after ischaemia and every 24 h for 7 days after MCAO. In all three groups, small-animal PET (microPET) imaging with {sup 18}F-FDG was used to evaluate brain glucose metabolism. Apoptotic molecules were measured in the infarct margin using immunohistochemical staining. The neurological scores of the rats in the rTMS group were higher than in those of the control group over the whole 7-day observation period. The total, cortical and striatal infarct volumes were significantly less in the rTMS group than in the control group, as measured by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. {sup 18}F-FDG microPET images showed significantly higher standardized uptake values in the cortex and striatum in the rTMS group than in the control group in the affected hemisphere. The number of cells positive for caspase-3 was significantly lower in the rTMS group than in the control group, while the Bcl-2/Bax ratio was significantly higher in the rTMS group than in the control group. rTMS therapy increased glucose metabolism and inhibited apoptosis in the ischaemic hemisphere. {sup 18}F-FDG PET could be used to monitor rTMS therapy in transient cerebral ischaemia in animal studies and in future clinical trials. (orig.)

  17. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) priming of 1Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) modulates experimental pain thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloney, Tonya M; Witney, Alice G

    2013-02-08

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of primary motor cortex (M1) modulate cortical excitability. Both techniques have been demonstrated to modulate chronic pain and experimental pain thresholds, but with inconsistent effects. Preconditioning M1 with weak tDCS (1mA) standardizes the effects of subsequent stimulation via rTMS on levels of cortical excitability. Here we examine whether 1Hz rTMS, primed with tDCS, could effectively standardize the modulation of pain thresholds. Thermal pain thresholds were determined using quantitative sensory testing (QST) of the palmar thenar of both hands in 12 healthy males pre and post tDCS - 1Hz rTMS over the hand area of the left M1. Cathodal tDCS preconditioning of 1Hz rTMS successfully reversed the normal suppressive effect of low frequency rTMS and effectively modulated cold and heat pain thresholds. Conversely, anodal tDCS - 1Hz rTMS led to a decrease in cold pain thresholds. Therefore, this study supports that preconditioning M1 using cathodal tDCS before subsequent stimulation via 1Hz rTMS facilitates the production of analgesia.

  18. Muscle training with repetitive magnetic stimulation of the quadriceps in severe COPD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Víctor; López de Santa María, Elena; Gorostiza, Amaia; Jiménez, Unai; Gáldiz, Juan B

    2010-02-01

    Previous studies have used electrical neuromuscular stimulation as a physical training method in patients with severe COPD. We introduce the use of the more tolerable magnetic stimulation for the same purpose, investigating the effectiveness of an eight-week protocol. Eighteen patients with severe COPD were randomly assigned to a magnetic stimulation training protocol, n=10, FEV(1)=30% (SD: 7) or to parallel clinical monitoring, control group, n=8, FEV(1)=35% (SD: 8). During eight weeks, patients were stimulated for 15min on each quadriceps femoris, three times per week. Quadriceps muscle strength and endurance measurements, quality-of-life questionnaires (SF36, SGRQ) and a six-minute walking test were all carried out before and after the training period in the stimulated and control subjects. All patients completed the training with increasing intensity of stimulation, displaying a significant improvement in voluntary quadriceps strength (17.5% of the baseline value) and exercise capacity, with a mean increase of 23m in the six-minute walking test. The questionnaire scores showed greater increases in quality-of-life scores in the trained subjects compared to the controls, particularly in the physical function areas: mean increments in SF36 in "physical function": +26, "role limitations due to physical problems": +40 and "vitality": +17.5, while +13, -4 and +1, respectively in controls. Saint George's "Activity" score improved by 19.6 points, for 11.5 in controls. In COPD patients who are limited due to dyspnoea, magnetic neuromuscular stimulation of the quadriceps constitutes a feasible training method for the lower limbs, with positive effects on the muscle function, effort capacity and perception areas.

  19. Effects of shifts in the rate of repetitive stimulation on sustained attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krulewitz, J. E.; Warm, J. S.; Wohl, T. H.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of shifts in the rate of presentation of repetitive neutral events (background event rate) were studied in a visual vigilance task. Four groups of subjects experienced either a high (21 events/min) or a low (6 events/min) event rate for 20 min and then experienced either the same or the alternate event rate for an additional 40 min. The temporal occurrence of critical target signals was identical for all groups, irrespective of event rate. The density of critical signals was 12 signals/20 min. By the end of the session, shifts in event rate were associated with changes in performance which resembled contrast effects found in other experimental situations in which shift paradigms were used. Relative to constant event rate control conditions, a shift from a low to a high event rate depressed the probability of signal detections, while a shift in the opposite direction enhanced the probability of signal detections.

  20. Evoking visual neglect-like deficits in healthy volunteers - an investigation by repetitive navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giglhuber, Katrin; Maurer, Stefanie; Zimmer, Claus; Meyer, Bernhard; Krieg, Sandro M

    2016-01-18

    In clinical practice, repetitive navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is of particular interest for non-invasive mapping of cortical language areas. Yet, rTMS studies try to detect further cortical functions. Damage to the underlying network of visuospatial attention function can result in visual neglect-a severe neurological deficit and influencing factor for a significantly reduced functional outcome. This investigation aims to evaluate the use of rTMS for evoking visual neglect in healthy volunteers and the potential of specifically locating cortical areas that can be assigned for the function of visuospatial attention. Ten healthy, right-handed subjects underwent rTMS visual neglect mapping. Repetitive trains of 5 Hz and 10 pulses were applied to 52 pre-defined cortical spots on each hemisphere; each cortical spot was stimulated 10 times. Visuospatial attention was tested time-locked to rTMS pulses by a landmark task. Task pictures were displayed tachistoscopically for 50 ms. The subjects' performance was analyzed by video, and errors were referenced to cortical spots. We observed visual neglect-like deficits during the stimulation of both hemispheres. Errors were categorized into leftward, rightward, and no response errors. Rightward errors occurred significantly more often during stimulation of the right hemisphere than during stimulation of the left hemisphere (mean rightward error rate (ER) 1.6 ± 1.3 % vs. 1.0 ± 1.0 %, p = 0.0141). Within the left hemisphere, we observed predominantly leftward errors rather than rightward errors (mean leftward ER 2.0 ± 1.3 % vs. rightward ER 1.0 ± 1.0 %; p = 0.0005). Visual neglect can be elicited non-invasively by rTMS, and cortical areas eloquent for visuospatial attention can be detected. Yet, the correlation of this approach with clinical findings has to be shown in upcoming steps.

  1. Enhanced accuracy in novel mirror drawing after repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation-induced proprioceptive deafferentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, Daniela; Christensen, Lars O.D.; Lee, Ji-hang;

    2004-01-01

    When performing visually guided actions under conditions of perturbed visual feedback, e.g., in a mirror or a video camera, there is a spatial conflict between visual and proprioceptive information. Recent studies have shown that subjects without proprioception avoid this conflict and show......TMS over the somatosensory cortex contralateral to the hand or sham stimulation. Mirror tracing was more accurate after rTMS than after sham stimulation. Using a position-matching task, we confirmed that rTMS reduced proprioceptive acuity and that this reduction was largest when the coil was placed...

  2. Enhanced accuracy in novel mirror drawing after repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation-induced proprioceptive deafferentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, Daniela; Christensen, Lars O.D.; Lee, Ji-hang

    2004-01-01

    When performing visually guided actions under conditions of perturbed visual feedback, e.g., in a mirror or a video camera, there is a spatial conflict between visual and proprioceptive information. Recent studies have shown that subjects without proprioception avoid this conflict and show......TMS over the somatosensory cortex contralateral to the hand or sham stimulation. Mirror tracing was more accurate after rTMS than after sham stimulation. Using a position-matching task, we confirmed that rTMS reduced proprioceptive acuity and that this reduction was largest when the coil was placed...

  3. Effects of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in the Rehabilitation of Communication and Deglutition Disorders: Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadenz, Camila Dalbosco; Moreira, Tais de Campos; Capobianco, Dirce Maria; Cassol, Mauriceia

    2015-01-01

    To systematically review randomized controlled trials that evaluate the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on rehabilitation aspects related to communication and swallowing functions. A search was conducted on PubMed, Clinical Trials, Cochrane Library, and ASHA electronic databases. Studies were judged according to the eligibility criteria and analyzed by 2 independent and blinded researchers. We analyzed 9 studies: 4 about aphasia, 3 about dysphagia, 1 about dysarthria in Parkinson's disease and 1 about linguistic deficits in Alzheimer's disease. All aphasia studies used low-frequency rTMS to stimulate Broca's homologous area. High-frequency rTMS was applied over the pharyngoesophageal cortex from the left and/or right hemisphere in the dysphagia studies and over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in the Parkinson's and Alzheimer's studies. Two aphasia and all dysphagia studies showed a significant improvement of the disorder, compared to the sham group. The other 2 studies related to aphasia found a benefit restricted to subgroups with a severe case or injury on the anterior portion of the language cortical area, respectively, whereas the Alzheimer's study demonstrated positive effects specific to auditory comprehension. There were no changes for vocal function in the Parkinson's study. The benefits of the technique and its applicability in neurogenic disorders related to communication and deglutition are still uncertain. Therefore, other randomized controlled trials are needed to clarify the optimal stimulation protocol for each disorder studied and its real effects. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Bilateral Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Combined with Intensive Swallowing Rehabilitation for Chronic Stroke Dysphagia: A Case Series Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momosaki, Ryo; Abo, Masahiro; Kakuda, Wataru

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the safety and feasibility of a 6-day protocol of bilateral repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) combined with intensive swallowing rehabilitation for chronic poststroke dysphagia. In-hospital treatment was provided to 4 poststroke patients (age at treatment: 56–80 years; interval between onset of stroke and treatment: 24–37 months) with dysphagia. Over 6 consecutive days, each patient received 10 sessions of rTMS at 3 Hz applied to the pharyngeal motor cortex bilaterally, followed by 20 min of intensive swallowing rehabilitation exercise. The swallowing function was evaluated by the Penetration Aspiration Scale (PAS), Modified Mann Assessment of Swallowing Ability (MMASA), Functional Oral Intake Scale (FOIS), laryngeal elevation delay time (LEDT) and Repetitive Saliva-Swallowing Test (RSST) on admission and at discharge. All patients completed the 6-day treatment protocol and none showed any adverse reactions throughout the treatment. The combination treatment improved laryngeal elevation delay time in all patients. Our proposed protocol of rTMS plus swallowing rehabilitation exercise seems to be safe and feasible for chronic stroke dysphagia, although its efficacy needs to be confirmed in a large number of patients. PMID:24803904

  5. Bilateral Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Combined with Intensive Swallowing Rehabilitation for Chronic Stroke Dysphagia: A Case Series Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Momosaki

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to clarify the safety and feasibility of a 6-day protocol of bilateral repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS combined with intensive swallowing rehabilitation for chronic poststroke dysphagia. In-hospital treatment was provided to 4 poststroke patients (age at treatment: 56-80 years; interval between onset of stroke and treatment: 24-37 months with dysphagia. Over 6 consecutive days, each patient received 10 sessions of rTMS at 3 Hz applied to the pharyngeal motor cortex bilaterally, followed by 20 min of intensive swallowing rehabilitation exercise. The swallowing function was evaluated by the Penetration Aspiration Scale (PAS, Modified Mann Assessment of Swallowing Ability (MMASA, Functional Oral Intake Scale (FOIS, laryngeal elevation delay time (LEDT and Repetitive Saliva-Swallowing Test (RSST on admission and at discharge. All patients completed the 6-day treatment protocol and none showed any adverse reactions throughout the treatment. The combination treatment improved laryngeal elevation delay time in all patients. Our proposed protocol of rTMS plus swallowing rehabilitation exercise seems to be safe and feasible for chronic stroke dysphagia, although its efficacy needs to be confirmed in a large number of patients.

  6. Right secondary somatosensory cortex-a promising novel target for the treatment of drug-resistant neuropathic orofacial pain with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindholm, Pauliina; Lamusuo, Salla; Taiminen, Tero; Pesonen, Ullamari; Lahti, Ari; Virtanen, Arja; Forssell, Heli; Hietala, Jarmo; Hagelberg, Nora; Pertovaara, Antti; Parkkola, Riitta; Jääskeläinen, Satu

    2015-07-01

    High-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the motor cortex has analgesic effect; however, the efficacy of other cortical targets and the mode of action remain unclear. We examined the effects of rTMS in neuropathic orofacial pain, and compared 2 cortical targets against placebo. Furthermore, as dopaminergic mechanisms modulate pain responses, we assessed the influence of the functional DRD2 gene polymorphism (957C>T) and the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) Val158Met polymorphism on the analgesic effect of rTMS. Sixteen patients with chronic drug-resistant neuropathic orofacial pain participated in this randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Navigated high-frequency rTMS was given to the sensorimotor (S1/M1) and the right secondary somatosensory (S2) cortices. All subjects were genotyped for the DRD2 957C>T and COMT Val158Met polymorphisms. Pain, mood, and quality of life were monitored throughout the study. The numerical rating scale pain scores were significantly lower after the S2 stimulation than after the S1/M1 (P = 0.0071) or the sham (P = 0.0187) stimulations. The Brief Pain Inventory scores were also lower 3 to 5 days after the S2 stimulation than those at pretreatment baseline (P = 0.0127 for the intensity of pain and P = 0.0074 for the interference of pain) or after the S1/M1 (P = 0.001 and P = 0.0001) and sham (P = 0.0491 and P = 0.0359) stimulations. No correlations were found between the genetic polymorphisms and the analgesic effect in the present small clinical sample. The right S2 cortex is a promising new target for the treatment of neuropathic orofacial pain with high-frequency rTMS.

  7. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) Modulates Event-Related Potential (ERP) Indices of Attention in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Manuel F.; Baruth, Joshua M.; El-Baz, Ayman; Tasman, Allan; Sears, Lonnie; Sokhadze, Estate

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have previously been shown to have significantly augmented and prolonged event-related potentials (ERP) to irrelevant visual stimuli compared to controls at both early and later stages (e.g., N200, P300) of visual processing and evidence of an overall lack of stimulus discrimination. Abnormally large and indiscriminative cortical responses to sensory stimuli may reflect cortical inhibitory deficits and a disruption in the excitation/inhibition ratio. Low-frequency (≤1HZ) repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been shown to increase inhibition of stimulated cortex by the activation of inhibitory circuits. It was our prediction that after 12 sessions of low-frequency rTMS applied bilaterally to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortices in individuals with ASD there would be a significant improvement in ERP indices of selective attention evoked at later (i.e., 200–600 ms) stages of attentional processing as well as an improvement in motor response error rate. We assessed 25 participants with ASD in a task of selective attention using illusory figures before and after 12 sessions of rTMS in a controlled design where a waiting-list group of 20 children with ASD performed the same task twice. We found a significant improvement in both N200 and P300 components as a result of rTMS as well as a significant reduction in response errors. We also found significant reductions in both repetitive behavior and irritability according to clinical behavioral questionnaires as a result of rTMS. We propose that rTMS has the potential to become an important therapeutic tool in ASD research and treatment. PMID:24683490

  8. Asynchronous recruitment of low-threshold motor units during repetitive, low-current stimulation of the human tibial nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse eDean

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Motoneurons receive a barrage of inputs from descending and reflex pathways. Much of our understanding about how these inputs are transformed into motor output in humans has come from recordings of single motor units during voluntary contractions. This approach, however, is limited because the input is ill-defined. Herein, we quantify the discharge of soleus motor units in response to well-defined trains of afferent input delivered at physiologically-relevant frequencies. Constant frequency stimulation of the tibial nerve (10-100 Hz for 30 s, below threshold for eliciting M-waves or H-reflexes with a single pulse, recruited motor units in 7/9 subjects. All 25 motor units recruited during stimulation were also recruited during weak (<10% MVC voluntary contractions. Higher frequencies recruited more units (n=3/25 at 10 Hz; n=25/25 at 100 Hz at shorter latencies (19.4±9.4 s at 10 Hz; 4.1±4.0 s at 100 Hz than lower frequencies. When a second unit was recruited, the discharge of the already active unit did not change, suggesting that recruitment was not due to increased synaptic drive. After recruitment, mean discharge rate during stimulation at 20 Hz (7.8 Hz was lower than during 30 Hz (8.6 Hz and 40 Hz (8.4 Hz stimulation. Discharge was largely asynchronous from the stimulus pulses with time-locked discharge occurring at an H-reflex latency with only a 24% probability. Motor units discharged after the stimulation ended in 89% of trials, although at a lower rate (5.8 Hz than during the stimulation (7.9 Hz. This work supports the idea that the afferent volley evoked by repetitive stimulation recruits motor units through the integration of synaptic drive and intrinsic properties of motoneurons, resulting in physiological recruitment which adheres to Henneman's size principle and results in relatively low discharge rates and asynchronous firing.

  9. Results on the spatial resolution of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for cortical language mapping during object naming in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollmann, Nico; Hauck, Theresa; Tussis, Lorena; Ille, Sebastian; Maurer, Stefanie; Boeckh-Behrens, Tobias; Ringel, Florian; Meyer, Bernhard; Krieg, Sandro M

    2016-10-24

    The spatial resolution of repetitive navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for language mapping is largely unknown. Thus, to determine a minimum spatial resolution of rTMS for language mapping, we evaluated the mapping sessions derived from 19 healthy volunteers for cortical hotspots of no-response errors. Then, the distances between hotspots (stimulation points with a high error rate) and adjacent mapping points (stimulation points with low error rates) were evaluated. Mean distance values of 13.8 ± 6.4 mm (from hotspots to ventral points, range 0.7-30.7 mm), 10.8 ± 4.8 mm (from hotspots to dorsal points, range 2.0-26.5 mm), 16.6 ± 4.8 mm (from hotspots to apical points, range 0.9-27.5 mm), and 13.8 ± 4.3 mm (from hotspots to caudal points, range 2.0-24.2 mm) were measured. According to the results, the minimum spatial resolution of rTMS should principally allow for the identification of a particular gyrus, and according to the literature, it is in good accordance with the spatial resolution of direct cortical stimulation (DCS). Since measurement was performed between hotspots and adjacent mapping points and not on a finer-grained basis, we only refer to a minimum spatial resolution. Furthermore, refinement of our results within the scope of a prospective study combining rTMS and DCS for resolution measurement during language mapping should be the next step.

  10. Cumulative sessions of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) build up facilitation to subsequent TMS-mediated behavioural disruptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero-Cabré, Antoni; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Rushmore, Richard J

    2008-02-01

    A single session of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can induce behavioural effects that outlast the duration of the stimulation train itself (off-line effects). Series of rTMS sessions on consecutive days are being used for therapeutic applications in a variety of disorders and are assumed to lead to the build-up of cumulative effects. However, no studies have carefully assessed this notion. In the present study we applied 30 daily sessions of 1 Hz rTMS (continuous train of 20 min) to repeatedly modulate activity in the posterior parietal cortex and associated neural systems in two intact cats. We assessed the effect on visuospatial orientation before and after each stimulation session. Cumulative sessions of rTMS progressively induced visuospatial neglect-like 'after-effects' of greater magnitude (from 5-10% to 40-50% error levels) and increasing spatial extent (from 90-75 degrees to 45-30 degrees eccentricity locations), affecting the visual hemifield contralateral to the stimulated hemisphere. Nonetheless, 60 min after each TMS session, visual detection-localization abilities repeatedly returned to baseline levels. Furthermore, no lasting behavioural effect could be demonstrated at any time across the study, when subjects were tested 1 or 24 h post-rTMS. We conclude that the past history of periodically cumulative rTMS sessions builds up a lasting 'memory', resulting in increased facilitation to subsequent TMS-induced disruptions. Such a phenomenon allows a behavioural effect of progressively higher magnitude, but equal duration, in response to individual TMS interventions.

  11. Optimally oriented grooves on dental implants improve bone quality around implants under repetitive mechanical loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroshima, Shinichiro; Nakano, Takayoshi; Ishimoto, Takuya; Sasaki, Muneteru; Inoue, Maaya; Yasutake, Munenori; Sawase, Takashi

    2017-01-15

    The aim was to investigate the effect of groove designs on bone quality under controlled-repetitive load conditions for optimizing dental implant design. Anodized Ti-6Al-4V alloy implants with -60° and +60° grooves around the neck were placed in the proximal tibial metaphysis of rabbits. The application of a repetitive mechanical load was initiated via the implants (50N, 3Hz, 1800 cycles, 2days/week) at 12weeks after surgery for 8weeks. Bone quality, defined as osteocyte density and degree of biological apatite (BAp) c-axis/collagen fibers, was then evaluated. Groove designs did not affect bone quality without mechanical loading; however, repetitive mechanical loading significantly increased bone-to-implant contact, bone mass, and bone mineral density (BMD). In +60° grooves, the BAp c-axis/collagen fibers preferentially aligned along the groove direction with mechanical loading. Moreover, osteocyte density was significantly higher both inside and in the adjacent region of the +60° grooves, but not -60° grooves. These results suggest that the +60° grooves successfully transmitted the load to the bone tissues surrounding implants through the grooves. An optimally oriented groove structure on the implant surface was shown to be a promising way for achieving bone tissue with appropriate bone quality. This is the first report to propose the optimal design of grooves on the necks of dental implants for improving bone quality parameters as well as BMD. The findings suggest that not only BMD, but also bone quality, could be a useful clinical parameter in implant dentistry.

  12. THE MECHANISM OF CEREBRAL EVOKED POTENTIALS BYREPETITIVE MAGNETIC STIMULATION OF GASTROCNEMIUS MUSCLE IN DUCHENNE MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    管宇宙; 崔丽英; 汤晓芙; 李本红; 杜华

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To study the features and mechanism of the cerebral evoked potentials by repetitive stimulation of calf muscle in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients with obvious muscular dystrophy and psuedohypertrophy. Methods. Cerebral evoked potentials by stimulation of calf muscles and somatusensory evoked potentials(SEPs) by the stimulation of posterior tibial nerves at ankle were measured in 10 patients with DMD and 10 norreal controls matched with gender and age. The intensity of the magnetic stimulation was at 30% of maximal output (2. 1 Tesla, MagPro magnetic stimulator, Dantec) and the frequency was 1 Hz. The low intensity of magnet-ic stimulation was just sufficient to produce a contraction of the muscle belly underneath the coil. Recording electrode was placed at 2 cm posterior to the Cz, reference to Fpz. The latencies of N33, P38, N48 and P55 and ampli-tude (P38 - N48) were recorded. SEPs were recorded by routine methods. Results. In normal subjects, the amphtudes of cerebral evoked potentials by magnetic stimulation of calf mus-cle was 40% lower than that by electrical stimulation of the posterior tibial nerves at ankle. The latency of P38 was 2. 9 ± 2. 1 ms longer compared with electrical stimulation of the posterior tibial nerves at ankle. In 6 patients, P38 latency from magnetic stimulation was remarkably prolonged ( P < 0. 01), and in 4 patients, there was no remarkable response. SEPs evoked by electrical stimulation were normal in all of the patients. Conclusion. DMD is an available model for the study of mechanism of cerebral evoked potentials by magnetic stimulating muscle. We can conclude that the responses from magnetic stimulation were produced by muscle input. The abnormal responses in patients may relate to decreased input of muscle by stimulating dystrophic and psedohypertrophic muscle.

  13. REPETITIVE PERIPHERAL MAGNETIC STIMULATION (15 HZ RPMS OF THE HUMAN SOLEUS MUSCLE DID NOT AFFECT SPINAL EXCITABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Behrens

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The electric field induced by repetitive peripheral magnetic stimulation (RPMS is able to activate muscles artificially due to the stimulation of deep intramuscular motor axons. RPMS applied to the muscle induces proprioceptive input to the central nervous system in different ways. Firstly, the indirect activation of mechanoreceptors and secondly, direct activation of afferent nerve fibers. The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of RPMS applied to the soleus. Thirteen male subjects received RPMS once and were investigated before and after the treatment regarding the parameters maximal M wave (Mmax, maximal H-reflex (Hmax, Hmax/Mmax-ratio, Hmax and Mmax onset latencies and plantar flexor peak twitch torque associated with Hmax (PTH. Eleven male subjects served as controls. No significant changes were observed for Hmax and PTH of the treatment group but the Hmax/Mmax-ratio increased significantly (p = 0.015 on account of a significantly decreased Mmax (p = 0.027. Hmax onset latencies were increased for the treatment group (p = 0.003 as well as for the control group (p = 0.011 while Mmax onset latencies did not change. It is concluded that the RPMS protocol did not affect spinal excitability but acted on the muscle fibres which are part of fast twitch units and mainly responsible for the generation of the maximal M wave. RPMS probably modified the integrity of neuromuscular propagation.

  14. Modulation of the Left Prefrontal Cortex with High Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Facilitates Gait in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amer M. Burhan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple Sclerosis (MS is a chronic central nervous system (CNS demyelinating disease. Gait abnormalities are common and disabling in patients with MS with limited treatment options available. Emerging evidence suggests a role of prefrontal attention networks in modulating gait. High-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS is known to enhance cortical excitability in stimulated cortex and its correlates. We investigated the effect of high-frequency left prefrontal rTMS on gait parameters in a 51-year-old Caucasian male with chronic relapsing/remitting MS with residual disabling attention and gait symptoms. Patient received 6 Hz, rTMS at 90% motor threshold using figure of eight coil centered on F3 location (using 10-20 electroencephalography (EEG lead localization system. GAITRite gait analysis system was used to collect objective gait measures before and after one session and in another occasion three consecutive daily sessions of rTMS. Two-tailed within subject repeated measure t-test showed significant enhancement in ambulation time, gait velocity, and cadence after three consecutive daily sessions of rTMS. Modulating left prefrontal cortex excitability using rTMS resulted in significant change in gait parameters after three sessions. To our knowledge, this is the first report that demonstrates the effect of rTMS applied to the prefrontal cortex on gait in MS patients.

  15. Predictors of response to repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in the treatment of major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuzon, G; Timour, Q; Saoud, M

    2017-02-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), based on the principle of electromagnetic induction, consists of applying series of magnetic impulses to the cerebral cortex so as to modulate neurone activity in a target zone. This technique, still experimental, could prove promising in the field of psychiatry, in particular for the treatment of major depressive disorder. It is important for the clinician to be able to assess the response potential of a given patient to rTMS, and this among other things requires relevant predictive factors to be available. This review of the literature aims to determine and analyse reported predictive factors for therapeutic response to rTMS treatment in major depressive disorder. Different parameters are studied, in particular age, the severity of the depressive episode, psychological dimensions, genetic factors, cerebral blood flows via cerebral imagery, and neuronavigation. The factors found to be associated with better therapeutic response were young age, low level of severity of the depressive episode, motor threshold intensity over 100%, more than 1000 stimulations per session, more than 10 days treatment, L/L genotype on the 5-HTTLPR transporter gene, C/C homozygosity on the promotor regions of the 5-HT1A receptor gene, Val/Val homozygosity on the BDNF gene, cordance analyses by EEG, and finally the accurate localisation provided by neuronavigation. The authors conclude that investigations in larger patient samples are required in the future, and that the work already achieved should provide lines of approach for the coming experimental studies.

  16. Effects of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Behavioral Recovery during Early Stage of Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Kyung Jae; Lee, Yong-Taek; Chung, Pil-Wook; Lee, Yun Kyung; Kim, Dae Yul; Chun, Min Ho

    2015-10-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a promising technique that modulates neural networks. However, there were few studies evaluating the effects of rTMS in traumatic brain injury (TBI). Herein, we assessed the effectiveness of rTMS on behavioral recovery and metabolic changes using brain magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in a rat model of TBI. We also evaluated the safety of rTMS by measuring brain swelling with brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent lateral fluid percussion and were randomly assigned to the sham (n=10) or the rTMS (n=10) group. rTMS was applied on the fourth day after TBI and consisted of 10 daily sessions for 2 weeks with 10 Hz frequency (total pulses=3,000). Although the rTMS group showed an anti-apoptotic effect around the peri-lesional area, functional improvements were not significantly different between the two groups. Additionally, rTMS did not modulate brain metabolites in MRS, nor was there any change of brain lesion or edema after magnetic stimulation. These data suggest that rTMS did not have beneficial effects on motor recovery during early stages of TBI, although an anti-apoptosis was observed in the peri-lesional area.

  17. Food cravings and the effects of left prefrontal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation using an improved sham condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly eBarth

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examined whether a single session of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS of the left prefrontal cortex would inhibit food cravings in healthy women who endorsed frequent food cravings. Ten participants viewed images of food and completed ratings for food cravings before and after receiving either real or sham rTMS over the left prefrontal cortex (10Hz, 100% rMT, 10 seconds-on, 20 seconds-off for 15 minutes; 3000 pulses. Sham TMS was matched with real TMS with respect to perceived painfulness of the stimulation. Each participant received both real and sham rTMS in random order and were blind to the condition in a within-subject cross-over design. With an improved sham control condition, prefrontal rTMS inhibited food cravings no better than sham rTMS. The mild pain from the real and sham rTMS may distract or inhibit food craving, and the decreased craving may not be caused by the effect of rTMS itself. Further studies are needed to elucidate whether rTMS has any true effects on food craving and whether painful stimuli inhibit food or other cravings. A sham condition which matches the painfulness is important to understand the true effects of TMS on behaviors and diseases.

  18. Test-retest assessment of cortical activation induced by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation with brain atlas-guided optical topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Fenghua; Kozel, F. Andrew; Yennu, Amarnath; Croarkin, Paul E.; McClintock, Shawn M.; Mapes, Kimberly S.; Husain, Mustafa M.; Liu, Hanli

    2012-11-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a technology that stimulates neurons with rapidly changing magnetic pulses with demonstrated therapeutic applications for various neuropsychiatric disorders. Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a suitable tool to assess rTMS-evoked brain responses without interference from the magnetic or electric fields generated by the TMS coil. We have previously reported a channel-wise study of combined rTMS/fNIRS on the motor and prefrontal cortices, showing a robust decrease of oxygenated hemoglobin concentration (Δ[HbO2]) at the sites of 1-Hz rTMS and the contralateral brain regions. However, the reliability of this putative clinical tool is unknown. In this study, we develop a rapid optical topography approach to spatially characterize the rTMS-evoked hemodynamic responses on a standard brain atlas. A hemispherical approximation of the brain is employed to convert the three-dimensional topography on the complex brain surface to a two-dimensional topography in the spherical coordinate system. The test-retest reliability of the combined rTMS/fNIRS is assessed using repeated measurements performed two to three days apart. The results demonstrate that the Δ[HbO2] amplitudes have moderate-to-high reliability at the group level; and the spatial patterns of the topographic images have high reproducibility in size and a moderate degree of overlap at the individual level.

  19. Abnormal plasticity of the sensorimotor cortex to slow repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with writer's cramp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäumer, Tobias; Demiralay, Cüneyt; Hidding, Ute; Bikmullina, Rosalia; Helmich, Rick C; Wunderlich, Silke; Rothwell, John; Liepert, Joachim; Siebner, Hartwig R; Münchau, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated functional abnormalities in the somatosensory system, including a distorted functional organization of the somatosensory cortex (S1) in patients with writer's cramp. We tested the hypothesis that these functional alterations render S1 of these patients more susceptible to the "inhibitory" effects of subthreshold 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) given to S1. Seven patients with writer's cramp and eight healthy subjects were studied. Patients also received rTMS to the motor cortex hand area (M1). As an outcome measure, short-latency afferent inhibition (SAI) was tested. SAI was studied in the relaxed first dorsal interosseous muscle using conditioning electrical stimulation of the index finger and TMS pulses over the contralateral M1. Baseline SAI did not differ between groups. S1 but not M1 rTMS reduced SAI in patients. rTMS had no effects on SAI in healthy subjects. Because SAI is mediated predominantly at a cortical level in the sensorimotor cortex, we conclude that there is an abnormal responsiveness of this area to 1 Hz rTMS in writer's cramp, which may represent a trait toward maladaptive plasticity in the sensorimotor system in these patients.

  20. Transcranial alternating current stimulation: a review of the underlying mechanisms and modulation of cognitive processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Christoph S; Rach, Stefan; Neuling, Toralf; Strüber, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Brain oscillations of different frequencies have been associated with a variety of cognitive functions. Convincing evidence supporting those associations has been provided by studies using intracranial stimulation, pharmacological interventions and lesion studies. The emergence of novel non-invasive brain stimulation techniques like repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) now allows to modulate brain oscillations directly. Particularly, tACS offers the unique opportunity to causally link brain oscillations of a specific frequency range to cognitive processes, because it uses sinusoidal currents that are bound to one frequency only. Using tACS allows to modulate brain oscillations and in turn to influence cognitive processes, thereby demonstrating the causal link between the two. Here, we review findings about the physiological mechanism of tACS and studies that have used tACS to modulate basic motor and sensory processes as well as higher cognitive processes like memory, ambiguous perception, and decision making.

  1. Priming does not enhance the efficacy of 1 Hertz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for the treatment of auditory verbal hallucinations : Results of a randomized controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slotema, Christina Wilhelmina; Blom, Jan Dirk; de Weijer, Antoin Dave; Hoek, Hans Wijbrand; Sommer, Iris Else

    2012-01-01

    Background Low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) applied to the left temporoparietal area (TP) has been investigated as a treatment method for auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) yielding inconsistent results. In vitro studies have indicated that the effects of low-frequ

  2. Meta-analysis of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in the treatment of auditory verbal hallucinations : Update and effects after one month

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slotema, C. W.; Aleman, A.; Daskalakis, Z. J.; Sommer, I. E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Several meta-analyses considering repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) have been performed with moderate to high mean weighted effect sizes. Since then several negative findings were reported in relatively large samples. The aim of t

  3. Short and Long Term Effects of Left and Bilateral Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Schizophrenia Patients with Auditory Verbal Hallucinations : A Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bais, Leonie; Vercammen, Ans; Stewart, Roy; van Es, Frank; Visser, Bert; Aleman, Andre; Knegtering, Henderikus

    2014-01-01

    Background: Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of the left temporo-parietal junction area has been studied as a treatment option for auditory verbal hallucinations. Although the right temporo-parietal junction area has also shown involvement in the genesis of auditory verbal hallucinations

  4. Low-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Intensive Occupational Therapy for Poststroke Patients with Upper Limb Hemiparesis: Preliminary Study of a 15-Day Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuda, Wataru; Abo, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Kazushige; Momosaki, Ryo; Yokoi, Aki; Fukuda, Akiko; Ishikawa, Atsushi; Ito, Hiroshi; Tominaga, Ayumi

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the safety and feasibility of a 15-day protocol of low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) combined with intensive occupational therapy (OT) on motor function and spasticity in hemiparetic upper limbs in poststroke patients. Fifteen poststroke patients (age at study entry 55 [plus…

  5. Short and Long Term Effects of Left and Bilateral Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Schizophrenia Patients with Auditory Verbal Hallucinations : A Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bais, Leonie; Vercammen, Ans; Stewart, Roy; van Es, Frank; Visser, Bert; Aleman, Andre; Knegtering, Henderikus

    2014-01-01

    Background: Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of the left temporo-parietal junction area has been studied as a treatment option for auditory verbal hallucinations. Although the right temporo-parietal junction area has also shown involvement in the genesis of auditory verbal

  6. Mapping of cortical language function by functional magnetic resonance imaging and repetitive navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation in 40 healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollmann, Nico; Ille, Sebastian; Boeckh-Behrens, Tobias; Ringel, Florian; Meyer, Bernhard; Krieg, Sandro M

    2016-07-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is considered to be the standard method regarding non-invasive language mapping. However, repetitive navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) gains increasing importance with respect to that purpose. However, comparisons between both methods are sparse. We performed fMRI and rTMS language mapping of the left hemisphere in 40 healthy, right-handed subjects in combination with the tasks that are most commonly used in the neurosurgical context (fMRI: word-generation = WGEN task; rTMS: object-naming = ON task). Different rTMS error rate thresholds (ERTs) were calculated, and Cohen's kappa coefficient and the cortical parcellation system (CPS) were used for systematic comparison of the two techniques. Overall, mean kappa coefficients were low, revealing no distinct agreement. We found the highest agreement for both techniques when using the 2-out-of-3 rule (CPS region defined as language positive in terms of rTMS if at least 2 out of 3 stimulations led to a naming error). However, kappa for this threshold was only 0.24 (kappa of <0, 0.01-0.20, 0.21-0.40, 0.41-0.60, 0.61-0.80 and 0.81-0.99 indicate less than chance, slight, fair, moderate, substantial and almost perfect agreement, respectively). Because of the inherent differences in the underlying physiology of fMRI and rTMS, the different tasks used and the impossibility of verifying the results via direct cortical stimulation (DCS) in the population of healthy volunteers, one must exercise caution in drawing conclusions about the relative usefulness of each technique for language mapping. Nevertheless, this study yields valuable insights into these two mapping techniques for the most common language tasks currently used in neurosurgical practice.

  7. A proof-of-concept study on the combination of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and relaxation techniques in chronic tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuzer, Peter M; Poeppl, Timm B; Bulla, Jan; Schlee, Winfried; Lehner, Astrid; Langguth, Berthold; Schecklmann, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Interference of ongoing neuronal activity and brain stimulation motivated this study to combine repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and relaxation techniques in tinnitus patients. Forty-two patients were enrolled in this one-arm proof-of-concept study to receive ten sessions of rTMS applied to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and temporo-parietal cortex. During stimulation, patients listened to five different kinds of relaxation audios. Variables of interest were tinnitus questionnaires, tinnitus numeric rating scales, depressivity, and quality of life. Results were compared to results of historical control groups having received the same rTMS protocol (active control) and sham treatment (placebo) without relaxation techniques. Thirty-eight patients completed the treatment, drop-out rates and adverse events were low. Responder rates (reduction in tinnitus questionnaire (TQ) score ≥5 points 10 weeks after treatment) were 44.7 % in the study, 27.8 % in the active control group, and 21.7 % in the placebo group, differing between groups on a near significant level. For the tinnitus handicap inventory (THI), the main effect of group was not significant. However, linear mixed model analyses showed that the relaxation/rTMS group differed significantly from the active control group showing steeper negative THI trend for the relaxation/rTMS group indicating better amelioration over the course of the trial. Deepness of relaxation during rTMS and selection of active relaxation vs. passive listening to music predicted larger TQ. All remaining secondary outcomes turned out non-significant. This combined treatment proved to be a safe, feasible and promising approach to enhance rTMS treatment effects in chronic tinnitus.

  8. High-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) Improves Functional Recovery by Enhancing Neurogenesis and Activating BDNF/TrkB Signaling in Ischemic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jing; Zheng, Haiqing; Zhang, Liying; Zhang, Qingjie; Li, Lili; Pei, Zhong; Hu, Xiquan

    2017-02-20

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has rapidly become an attractive therapeutic approach for stroke. However, the mechanisms underlying this remain elusive. This study aimed to investigate whether high-frequency rTMS improves functional recovery mediated by enhanced neurogenesis and activation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)/tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) pathway and to compare the effect of conventional 20 Hz rTMS and intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) on ischemic rats. Rats after rTMS were sacrificed seven and 14 days after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), following evaluation of neurological function. Neurogenesis was measured using specific markers: Ki67, Nestin, doublecortin (DCX), NeuN and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and the expression levels of BDNF were visualized by Western blotting and RT-PCR analysis. Both high-frequency rTMS methods significantly improved neurological function and reduced infarct volume. Moreover, 20 Hz rTMS and iTBS significantly promoted neurogenesis, shown by an increase of Ki67/DCX, Ki67/Nestin, and Ki67/NeuN-positive cells in the peri-infarct striatum. These beneficial effects were accompanied by elevated protein levels of BDNF and phosphorylated-TrkB. In conclusion, high-frequency rTMS improves functional recovery possibly by enhancing neurogenesis and activating BDNF/TrkB signaling pathway and conventional 20 Hz rTMS is better than iTBS at enhancing neurogenesis in ischemic rats.

  9. High-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS Improves Functional Recovery by Enhancing Neurogenesis and Activating BDNF/TrkB Signaling in Ischemic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Luo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS has rapidly become an attractive therapeutic approach for stroke. However, the mechanisms underlying this remain elusive. This study aimed to investigate whether high-frequency rTMS improves functional recovery mediated by enhanced neurogenesis and activation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF/tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB pathway and to compare the effect of conventional 20 Hz rTMS and intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS on ischemic rats. Rats after rTMS were sacrificed seven and 14 days after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO, following evaluation of neurological function. Neurogenesis was measured using specific markers: Ki67, Nestin, doublecortin (DCX, NeuN and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, and the expression levels of BDNF were visualized by Western blotting and RT-PCR analysis. Both high-frequency rTMS methods significantly improved neurological function and reduced infarct volume. Moreover, 20 Hz rTMS and iTBS significantly promoted neurogenesis, shown by an increase of Ki67/DCX, Ki67/Nestin, and Ki67/NeuN-positive cells in the peri-infarct striatum. These beneficial effects were accompanied by elevated protein levels of BDNF and phosphorylated-TrkB. In conclusion, high-frequency rTMS improves functional recovery possibly by enhancing neurogenesis and activating BDNF/TrkB signaling pathway and conventional 20 Hz rTMS is better than iTBS at enhancing neurogenesis in ischemic rats.

  10. High-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) Improves Functional Recovery by Enhancing Neurogenesis and Activating BDNF/TrkB Signaling in Ischemic Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jing; Zheng, Haiqing; Zhang, Liying; Zhang, Qingjie; Li, Lili; Pei, Zhong; Hu, Xiquan

    2017-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has rapidly become an attractive therapeutic approach for stroke. However, the mechanisms underlying this remain elusive. This study aimed to investigate whether high-frequency rTMS improves functional recovery mediated by enhanced neurogenesis and activation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)/tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) pathway and to compare the effect of conventional 20 Hz rTMS and intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) on ischemic rats. Rats after rTMS were sacrificed seven and 14 days after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), following evaluation of neurological function. Neurogenesis was measured using specific markers: Ki67, Nestin, doublecortin (DCX), NeuN and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and the expression levels of BDNF were visualized by Western blotting and RT-PCR analysis. Both high-frequency rTMS methods significantly improved neurological function and reduced infarct volume. Moreover, 20 Hz rTMS and iTBS significantly promoted neurogenesis, shown by an increase of Ki67/DCX, Ki67/Nestin, and Ki67/NeuN-positive cells in the peri-infarct striatum. These beneficial effects were accompanied by elevated protein levels of BDNF and phosphorylated-TrkB. In conclusion, high-frequency rTMS improves functional recovery possibly by enhancing neurogenesis and activating BDNF/TrkB signaling pathway and conventional 20 Hz rTMS is better than iTBS at enhancing neurogenesis in ischemic rats. PMID:28230741

  11. Mechanical stimulation improves tissue-engineered human skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Courtney A.; Smiley, Beth L.; Mills, John; Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    2002-01-01

    Human bioartificial muscles (HBAMs) are tissue engineered by suspending muscle cells in collagen/MATRIGEL, casting in a silicone mold containing end attachment sites, and allowing the cells to differentiate for 8 to 16 days. The resulting HBAMs are representative of skeletal muscle in that they contain parallel arrays of postmitotic myofibers; however, they differ in many other morphological characteristics. To engineer improved HBAMs, i.e., more in vivo-like, we developed Mechanical Cell Stimulator (MCS) hardware to apply in vivo-like forces directly to the engineered tissue. A sensitive force transducer attached to the HBAM measured real-time, internally generated, as well as externally applied, forces. The muscle cells generated increasing internal forces during formation which were inhibitable with a cytoskeleton depolymerizer. Repetitive stretch/relaxation for 8 days increased the HBAM elasticity two- to threefold, mean myofiber diameter 12%, and myofiber area percent 40%. This system allows engineering of improved skeletal muscle analogs as well as a nondestructive method to determine passive force and viscoelastic properties of the resulting tissue.

  12. Mechanical stimulation improves tissue-engineered human skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Courtney A.; Smiley, Beth L.; Mills, John; Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    2002-01-01

    Human bioartificial muscles (HBAMs) are tissue engineered by suspending muscle cells in collagen/MATRIGEL, casting in a silicone mold containing end attachment sites, and allowing the cells to differentiate for 8 to 16 days. The resulting HBAMs are representative of skeletal muscle in that they contain parallel arrays of postmitotic myofibers; however, they differ in many other morphological characteristics. To engineer improved HBAMs, i.e., more in vivo-like, we developed Mechanical Cell Stimulator (MCS) hardware to apply in vivo-like forces directly to the engineered tissue. A sensitive force transducer attached to the HBAM measured real-time, internally generated, as well as externally applied, forces. The muscle cells generated increasing internal forces during formation which were inhibitable with a cytoskeleton depolymerizer. Repetitive stretch/relaxation for 8 days increased the HBAM elasticity two- to threefold, mean myofiber diameter 12%, and myofiber area percent 40%. This system allows engineering of improved skeletal muscle analogs as well as a nondestructive method to determine passive force and viscoelastic properties of the resulting tissue.

  13. The clinical utility of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in reducing the risks of transitioning from acute to chronic pain in traumatically injured patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jodoin, Marianne; Rouleau, Dominique; Larson-Dupuis, Camille; Gosselin, Nadia; De Beaumont, Louis

    2017-07-08

    Pain is a multifaceted condition and a major ongoing challenge for healthcare professionals having to treat patients in whom pain put them at risk of developing other conditions. Significant efforts have been invested in both clinical and research settings in an attempt to demystify the mechanisms at stake and develop optimal treatments as well as to reduce individual and societal costs. It is now universally accepted that neuroinflammation and central sensitization are two key underlying factors causing pain chronification as they result from maladaptive central nervous system plasticity. Recent research has shown that the mechanisms of action of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) make it a particularly promising avenue in treating various pain conditions. This review will first discuss the contribution of neuroinflammation and central sensitization in the transition from acute to chronic pain in traumatically injured patients. A detailed discussion on how rTMS may allow the restoration from maladaptive plasticity in addition to breaking down the chain of events leading to pain chronification will follow. Lastly, this review will provide a theoretical framework of what might constitute optimal rTMS modalities in dealing with pain symptoms in traumatically injured patients based on an integrated perspective of the physiopathological mechanisms underlying pain. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Motion as motivation: using repetitive flexion movements to stimulate the approach system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeffel, Gerald J

    2011-12-01

    Research suggests that having a healthy approach system is critical for adaptive emotional functioning. The goal of the current study (n=186 undergraduates) was to determine the efficacy of an easy-to-disseminate and cost-efficient strategy for stimulating this system. The experiment tested the effects of repeated flexion movements (rFM) on approach system activation as measured by both self-report (BAS scales) and behavior. The results showed that rFM increased approach system motivation in men but not women. Men who completed the rFM task reported significantly greater levels of fun-seeking motivation than men in the control task. Moreover, the rFM task led to changes in actual behavior. Men who completed the rFM task exhibited significantly greater persistence on a difficult laboratory task than men in the control task. In contrast, women who completed the rFM task reported significantly lower levels of fun seeking and tended to exhibit less persistence on a difficult laboratory task than women in the control task. These results provide support for embodied theories of emotion as well as additional evidence for a gender difference in approach-avoidance tendencies.

  15. Mechanical Stimulation by Postnasal Drip Evokes Cough.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Iwata

    Full Text Available Cough affects all individuals at different times, and its economic burden is substantial. Despite these widespread adverse effects, cough research relies on animal models, which hampers our understanding of the fundamental cause of cough. Postnasal drip is speculated to be one of the most frequent causes of chronic cough; however, this is a matter of debate. Here we show that mechanical stimuli by postnasal drip cause chronic cough. We distinguished human cough from sneezes and expiration reflexes by airflow patterns. Cough and sneeze exhibited one-peak and two-peak patterns, respectively, in expiratory airflow, which were also confirmed by animal models of cough and sneeze. Transgenic mice with ciliary dyskinesia coughed substantially and showed postnasal drip in the pharynx; furthermore, their cough was completely inhibited by nasal airway blockade of postnasal drip. We successfully reproduced cough observed in these mice by injecting artificial postnasal drip in wild-type mice. These results demonstrated that mechanical stimulation by postnasal drip evoked cough. The findings of our study can therefore be used to develop new antitussive drugs that prevent the root cause of cough.

  16. Mechanical Stimulation by Postnasal Drip Evokes Cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Toshiyuki; Ito, Isao; Niimi, Akio; Ikegami, Koji; Marumo, Satoshi; Tanabe, Naoya; Nakaji, Hitoshi; Kanemitsu, Yoshihiro; Matsumoto, Hisako; Kamei, Junzo; Setou, Mitsutoshi; Mishima, Michiaki

    2015-01-01

    Cough affects all individuals at different times, and its economic burden is substantial. Despite these widespread adverse effects, cough research relies on animal models, which hampers our understanding of the fundamental cause of cough. Postnasal drip is speculated to be one of the most frequent causes of chronic cough; however, this is a matter of debate. Here we show that mechanical stimuli by postnasal drip cause chronic cough. We distinguished human cough from sneezes and expiration reflexes by airflow patterns. Cough and sneeze exhibited one-peak and two-peak patterns, respectively, in expiratory airflow, which were also confirmed by animal models of cough and sneeze. Transgenic mice with ciliary dyskinesia coughed substantially and showed postnasal drip in the pharynx; furthermore, their cough was completely inhibited by nasal airway blockade of postnasal drip. We successfully reproduced cough observed in these mice by injecting artificial postnasal drip in wild-type mice. These results demonstrated that mechanical stimulation by postnasal drip evoked cough. The findings of our study can therefore be used to develop new antitussive drugs that prevent the root cause of cough.

  17. Influence of the Repetitive Corrugation on the Mechanism Occuring During Plastic Deformation of CuSn6 Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuckowski P.M.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the research results of CuSn6 alloy strip at semi-hard state, plastically deformed in the process of repetitive corrugation. The influence of process parameters on the mechanical properties and structure of examined alloy were investigated. Examination in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM confirmed the impact of the repetitive corrugation to obtain the nano-scale structures. It has been found, that the application of repetitive corrugation increases the tensile strength (Rm, yield strength (Rp0.2 and elastic limit (Rp0,05 of CuSn6 alloy strips. In the present work it has been confirmed that the repetitive corrugation process is a more efficient method for structure and mechanical properties modification of commercial CuSn6 alloy strip (semi-hard as compared with the classic rolling process.

  18. Mathematical modeling of sustainable synaptogenesis by repetitive stimuli suggests signaling mechanisms in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromu Takizawa

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of long-term synaptic maintenance are a key component to understanding the mechanism of long-term memory. From biological experiments, a hypothesis arose that repetitive stimuli with appropriate intervals are essential to maintain new synapses for periods of longer than a few days. We successfully reproduce the time-course of relative numbers of synapses with our mathematical model in the same conditions as biological experiments, which used Adenosine-3', 5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate, Sp-isomer (Sp-cAMPS as external stimuli. We also reproduce synaptic maintenance responsiveness to intervals of Sp-cAMPS treatment accompanied by PKA activation. The model suggests a possible mechanism of sustainable synaptogenesis which consists of two steps. First, the signal transduction from an external stimulus triggers the synthesis of a new signaling protein. Second, the new signaling protein is required for the next signal transduction with the same stimuli. As a result, the network component is modified from the first network, and a different signal is transferred which triggers the synthesis of another new signaling molecule. We refer to this hypothetical mechanism as network succession. We build our model on the basis of two hypotheses: (1 a multi-step network succession induces downregulation of SSH and COFILIN gene expression, which triggers the production of stable F-actin; (2 the formation of a complex of stable F-actin with Drebrin at PSD is the critical mechanism to achieve long-term synaptic maintenance. Our simulation shows that a three-step network succession is sufficient to reproduce sustainable synapses for a period longer than 14 days. When we change the network structure to a single step network, the model fails to follow the exact condition of repetitive signals to reproduce a sufficient number of synapses. Another advantage of the three-step network succession is that this system indicates a greater tolerance of parameter

  19. The effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on the changes of depressive like behaviors in chronic unpredictable mild stress model rats and its possible mechanism%重复经颅磁刺激对抑郁模型大鼠行为的改善作用及机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘高华; 陈冠婕; 陈怡环; 杨帆; 张瑞国; 彭正午; 谭庆荣

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on the depressive like behaviors and expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF),IL-1β and NF-κB of hippocampal in chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) rats.Methods Thirty-two adult male rats were randomly divided into four groups (n =8):Control group,Control + rTMS group,CUMS group and CUMS + rTMS group.The sucrose preference test,forced swim test and open field test were used to evaluate depressive like behaviors for each groups.In addition,the expression of BDNF,NF-κB and IL-1 β in hippocampal were detected by western blot and ELISA after behavioral test,respectively.Results 1.The effects of rTMS on depressive like behaviors of CUMS rats:in the sucrose preference test,the sucrose preference rate of CUMS rats (0.67 ± 0.06) was significantly lower than Control group (0.91 ± 0.04),which was higher in the CUMS + rTMS group (0.83 ±0.08).In the forced swim test,the immobility time of CUMS group ((26.88 ± 11.33) s) was longer than Control group ((15.22 ± 6.75) s) and CUMS + rTMS group ((18.41 ± 6.95) s).In the open field test,both the total distance travelled and number of central area entry times of CUMS group((849.165 ± 769.01) cm,(7.42 ± 5.68))were significantly shorter ((6224.81 ± 1403.2) cm) and smaller (22.86 ± 3.72) than Control group,and those of the CUMS + rTMS were longer ((4105.57 ± 1516.92)cm) and larger (21.25 ± 3.45).All the behavioral results were statistically significant (P< 0.05).And of all the aforementioned behavioral parameters,there were no significant differences between Control group and Control + rTMS group(P>0.05).2.The effects of rTMS on the hippocampal expressions of BDNF,NF-κB and IL-1β in CUMS rats:compared with Control group,the hippocampal expression of BDNF in CUMS rats was significantly decreased,while the expressions of NF-κB and IL-1β in the hippocampus were significantly increased (P< 0.05).Compared

  20. Repetitive stimulation of autophagy-lysosome machinery by intermittent fasting preconditions the myocardium to ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godar, Rebecca J; Ma, Xiucui; Liu, Haiyan; Murphy, John T; Weinheimer, Carla J; Kovacs, Attila; Crosby, Seth D; Saftig, Paul; Diwan, Abhinav

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy, a lysosomal degradative pathway, is potently stimulated in the myocardium by fasting and is essential for maintaining cardiac function during prolonged starvation. We tested the hypothesis that intermittent fasting protects against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury via transcriptional stimulation of the autophagy-lysosome machinery. Adult C57BL/6 mice subjected to 24-h periods of fasting, every other day, for 6 wk were protected from in-vivo ischemia-reperfusion injury on a fed day, with marked reduction in infarct size in both sexes as compared with nonfasted controls. This protection was lost in mice heterozygous null for Lamp2 (coding for lysosomal-associated membrane protein 2), which demonstrate impaired autophagy in response to fasting with accumulation of autophagosomes and SQSTM1, an autophagy substrate, in the heart. In lamp2 null mice, intermittent fasting provoked progressive left ventricular dilation, systolic dysfunction and hypertrophy; worsening cardiomyocyte autophagosome accumulation and lack of protection to ischemia-reperfusion injury, suggesting that intact autophagy-lysosome machinery is essential for myocardial homeostasis during intermittent fasting and consequent ischemic cardioprotection. Fasting and refeeding cycles resulted in transcriptional induction followed by downregulation of autophagy-lysosome genes in the myocardium. This was coupled with fasting-induced nuclear translocation of TFEB (transcription factor EB), a master regulator of autophagy-lysosome machinery; followed by rapid decline in nuclear TFEB levels with refeeding. Endogenous TFEB was essential for attenuation of hypoxia-reoxygenation-induced cell death by repetitive starvation, in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, in-vitro. Taken together, these data suggest that TFEB-mediated transcriptional priming of the autophagy-lysosome machinery mediates the beneficial effects of fasting-induced autophagy in myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  1. Sucrose and naltrexone prevent increased pain sensitivity and impaired long-term memory induced by repetitive neonatal noxious stimulation: Role of BDNF and β-endorphin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuseir, Khawla Q; Alzoubi, Karem H; Alhusban, Ahmed; Bawaane, Areej; Al-Azzani, Mohammed; Khabour, Omar F

    2017-10-01

    Pain in neonates is associated with short and long-term adverse outcomes. Data demonstrated that long-term consequences of untreated pain are linked to the plasticity of the neonate's brain. Sucrose is effective and safe for reducing painful procedures from single events. However, the mechanism of sucrose-induced analgesia is not fully understood. The role of the opioid system in this analgesia using the opioid receptor antagonist Naltrexone was investigated, plus the long-term effects on learning and memory formation during adulthood. Pain was induced in rat pups via needle pricks of the paws. Sucrose solution and/or naltrexone were administered before the pricks. All treatments started on day one of birth and continued for two weeks. At the end of 8weeks, behavioral studies were conducted to test spatial learning and memory using radial arm water maze (RAWM), and pain threshold via foot-withdrawal response to a hot plate. The hippocampus was dissected; levels of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and endorphins were assessed using ELISA. Acute repetitive neonatal pain increased pain sensitivity later in life, while naltrexone with sucrose decreased pain sensitivity. Naltrexone and/or sucrose prevented neonatal pain induced impairment of long-term memory, while neonatal pain decreased levels of BDNF in the hippocampus; this decrease was averted by sucrose and naltrexone. Sucrose with naltrexone significantly increased β-endorphin levels in noxiously stimulated rats. In conclusion, naltrexone and sucrose can reverse increased pain sensitivity and impaired long-term memory induced by acute repetitive neonatal pain probably by normalizing BDNF expression and increasing β-endorphin levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Analgesic effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in patients with chronic low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambriz-Tututi, Mónica; Alvarado-Reynoso, Beatriz; Drucker-Colín, René

    2016-08-22

    The objective of the present study was to assess the benefits of 1-week repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in patients with chronic low back pain (LBP). The visual analogue scale (VAS), Short Form McGill pain questionnaire (SF-MPQ), and Short Form 36 Health Survey were used to evaluate the effect of this treatment. Eighty-two patients diagnosed with LBP were divided randomly into three groups: rTMS-treated group, sham group, and physical therapy-treated group. We observed a significant reduction in VAS and SF-MPQ scores in the rTMS-treated group, but not in the sham group. Moreover, patients who received rTMS had a lower mean pain score than patients treated with physical therapy. Our study suggests that rTMS produces safe, significant, and long-term relief in patients with LBP without evident side effects. This study shows for the first time that long-term repeated sessions of rTMS decrease pain perception of LBP. Bioelectromagnetics. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Involvement of the superior temporal cortex and the occipital cortex in spatial hearing: evidence from repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewald, Jörg; Meister, Ingo G; Weidemann, Jürgen; Töpper, Rudolf

    2004-06-01

    The processing of auditory spatial information in cortical areas of the human brain outside of the primary auditory cortex remains poorly understood. Here we investigated the role of the superior temporal gyrus (STG) and the occipital cortex (OC) in spatial hearing using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). The right STG is known to be of crucial importance for visual spatial awareness, and has been suggested to be involved in auditory spatial perception. We found that rTMS of the right STG induced a systematic error in the perception of interaural time differences (a primary cue for sound localization in the azimuthal plane). This is in accordance with the recent view, based on both neurophysiological data obtained in monkeys and human neuroimaging studies, that information on sound location is processed within a dorsolateral "where" stream including the caudal STG. A similar, but opposite, auditory shift was obtained after rTMS of secondary visual areas of the right OC. Processing of auditory information in the OC has previously been shown to exist only in blind persons. Thus, the latter finding provides the first evidence of an involvement of the visual cortex in spatial hearing in sighted human subjects, and suggests a close interconnection of the neural representation of auditory and visual space. Because rTMS induced systematic shifts in auditory lateralization, but not a general deterioration, we propose that rTMS of STG or OC specifically affected neuronal circuits transforming auditory spatial coordinates in order to maintain alignment with vision.

  4. Benefit of Multiple Sessions of Perilesional Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for an Effective Rehabilitation of Visuo-Spatial Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, Linda; Rushmore, R. Jarrett; Valero-Cabré, Antoni

    2012-01-01

    Non-invasive neurostimulation techniques have been used alone or in conjunction with rehabilitation therapy to treat the neurological sequelae of brain damage with rather variable therapeutic outcomes. One potential factor limiting a consistent success for such techniques may be the few sessions carried out in patients, despite reports that their accrual may play a key role in alleviating neurological deficits long-term. In this study, we tested the effects of seventy consecutive sessions of perilesional high frequency (10 Hz) repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in the treatment of chronic neglect deficits in a well-established feline model of visuo-spatial neglect. Under identical rTMS parameters and visuo-spatial testing regimes, half of the subjects improved in visuo-spatial orienting performance. The other half experienced either none or extremely moderate ameliorations in the neglected hemispace and displayed transient patterns of maladaptive visuo-spatial behavior. Detailed analyses suggest that lesion location and extent did not account for the behavioral differences observed between these two groups of animals. We conclude that multi-session perilesional rTMS regimes have the potential to induce functional ameliorations following focal chronic brain injury, and that behavioral performance prior to the onset of the rTMS treatment is the factor that best predicts positive outcomes for non-invasive neurostimulation treatments in visuo-spatial neglect. PMID:23167832

  5. Impact of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) on Brain Functional Marker of Auditory Hallucinations in Schizophrenia Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maïza, Olivier; Hervé, Pierre-Yve; Etard, Olivier; Razafimandimby, Annick; Montagne-Larmurier, Aurélie; Dollfus, Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Several cross-sectional functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) studies reported a negative correlation between auditory verbal hallucination (AVH) severity and amplitude of the activations during language tasks. The present study assessed the time course of this correlation and its possible structural underpinnings by combining structural, functional MRI and repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS). Methods: Nine schizophrenia patients with AVH (evaluated with the Auditory Hallucination Rating scale; AHRS) and nine healthy participants underwent two sessions of an fMRI speech listening paradigm. Meanwhile, patients received high frequency (20 Hz) rTMS. Results: Before rTMS, activations were negatively correlated with AHRS in a left posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS) cluster, considered henceforward as a functional region of interest (fROI). After rTMS, activations in this fROI no longer correlated with AHRS. This decoupling was explained by a significant decrease of AHRS scores after rTMS that contrasted with a relative stability of cerebral activations. A voxel-based-morphometry analysis evidenced a cluster of the left pSTS where grey matter volume negatively correlated with AHRS before rTMS and positively correlated with activations in the fROI at both sessions. Conclusion: rTMS decreases the severity of AVH leading to modify the functional correlate of AVH underlain by grey matter abnormalities. PMID:24961421

  6. Benefit of multiple sessions of perilesional repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for an effective rehabilitation of visuospatial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, Linda; Jarrett Rushmore, R; Valero-Cabré, Antoni

    2013-02-01

    Noninvasive neurostimulation techniques have been used alone or in conjunction with rehabilitation therapy to treat the neurological sequelae of brain damage with rather variable therapeutic outcomes. One potential factor limiting a consistent success for such techniques may be the limited number of sessions carried out in patients, despite reports that their accrual may play a key role in alleviating neurological deficits long-term. In this study, we tested the effects of seventy consecutive sessions of perilesional high-frequency (10 Hz) repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in the treatment of chronic neglect deficits in a well-established feline model of visuospatial neglect. Under identical rTMS parameters and visuospatial testing regimes, half of the subjects improved in visuospatial orienting performance. The other half experienced either none or extremely moderate ameliorations in the neglected hemispace and displayed transient patterns of maladaptive visuospatial behavior. Detailed analyses suggest that lesion location and extent did not account for the behavioral differences observed between these two groups of animals. We conclude that multi-session perilesional rTMS regimes have the potential to induce functional ameliorations following focal chronic brain injury, and that behavioral performance prior to the onset of the rTMS treatment is the factor that best predicts positive outcomes for noninvasive neurostimulation treatments in visuospatial neglect.

  7. Impact of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS on Brain Functional Marker of Auditory Hallucinations in Schizophrenia Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Dollfus

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Several cross-sectional functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI studies reported a negative correlation between auditory verbal hallucination (AVH severity and amplitude of the activations during language tasks. The present study assessed the time course of this correlation and its possible structural underpinnings by combining structural, functional MRI and repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS. Methods: Nine schizophrenia patients with AVH (evaluated with the Auditory Hallucination Rating scale; AHRS and nine healthy participants underwent two sessions of an fMRI speech listening paradigm. Meanwhile, patients received high frequency (20 Hz rTMS. Results: Before rTMS, activations were negatively correlated with AHRS in a left posterior superior temporal sulcus (pSTS cluster, considered henceforward as a functional region of interest (fROI. After rTMS, activations in this fROI no longer correlated with AHRS. This decoupling was explained by a significant decrease of AHRS scores after rTMS that contrasted with a relative stability of cerebral activations. A voxel-based-morphometry analysis evidenced a cluster of the left pSTS where grey matter volume negatively correlated with AHRS before rTMS and positively correlated with activations in the fROI at both sessions. Conclusion: rTMS decreases the severity of AVH leading to modify the functional correlate of AVH underlain by grey matter abnormalities.

  8. The study of clinical value of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with dutoxetine for patients with generalized anxiety disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji-Dong Ren

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the clinical value of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (RTMS) combined with dutoxetine for patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD).Methods:A total of 180 cases of patients with GAD were randomly divided into two groups (the control group and the observation group) with 90 cases each group. Patients in control group were treated with dutoxetine, while those in observation group were treated by dutoxetine combined with RTMS. The Hamilton anxiety scale and the clinical global impression scale were used to evaluate the efficacy of both groups before and after treatment, then the characteristics of mismatch negativity and P300 were detected by using brain evoked potential, and meanwhile, plasma cortisol, brain derived neurotrophic factor and homocysteine levels were detected and compared too.Results:Analysis of variance of repeated measure data showed that the main effect of time, main effect between groups and interaction effect of Hamilton anxiety scale and the clinical global impression scale scores, MMN incubation period, MMN amplitude, target N2 incubation period, target P3 incubation period, P2 non-target amplitude, levels of plasma cortisol, brain derived neurotrophic factor and homocysteine of both groups were statistically significant (P < 0.05).Conclusions:The treatment of RTMS combined with dutoxetine for patients with GAD has a faster and better curative effect, which is worthy of clinical promotion.

  9. Bihemispheric repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with intensive occupational therapy for upper limb hemiparesis after stroke: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Naoki; Kakuda, Wataru; Kondo, Takahiro; Shimizu, Masato; Mitani, Sugao; Abo, Masahiro

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the safety, feasibility, and efficacy of the combination of bihemispheric repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and intensive occupational therapy (OT) for upper limb hemiparesis in poststroke patients. The study participants were eight poststroke patients with upper limb hemiparesis (age at intervention: 62.8±4.9 years, time after stroke: 84.3±87.2 months, mean±SD). During 15 days of hospitalization, each patient received 10 sessions of 40-min bihemispheric rTMS and 240-min intensive OT (120-min one-to-one training and 120-min self-training). One session of bihemispheric rTMS comprised the application of both 1 and 10 Hz rTMS (2000 stimuli for each hemisphere). The Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Wolf Motor Function Test, and the Modified Ashworth Scale were administered on the day of admission and at discharge. All patients completed the treatment without any adverse effects. Motor function of the affected upper limb improved significantly, on the basis of changes in Fugl-Meyer Assessment and Wolf Motor Function Test (Ptherapy for poststroke hemiparetic patients, and improved motor function of the hemiparetic upper limb in poststroke patients. The findings provide a new avenue for the treatment of patients with poststroke hemiparesis.

  10. The effect of computer-assisted cognitive rehabilitation and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on cognitive function for stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, In-Seok; Yoon, Jung-Gyu

    2015-03-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of computer-assisted cognitive rehabilitation (CACR) and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on cognitive function in patients with stroke. [Subjects and Methods] We enrolled 20 patients and divided them into CACR and rTMS groups. CACR and rTMS were performed thrice a week for 4 weeks. Cognitive function was measured with the Korean Mini-Mental State Examination (K-MMSE) and Lowenstein Occupational Therapy Cognitive Assessment-Geriatric (LOTCA-G) before and after treatment. The independent samples t-test was performed to test the homogeneity of K-MMSE and LOTCA-G before treatment and compare the differences in cognitive improvement between the CACR and rTMS groups. A paired samples t-test was used to compare cognitive function before and after treatment. [Results] Cognitive function of both the groups significantly improved after the intervention based on the K-MMSE and LOTCA-G scores. While the LOTCA-G score improved significantly more in the CACR group than in the rTMS group, no significant difference was seen in the K-MMSE scores. [Conclusion] We showed that CACR is more effective than rTMS in improving cognitive function after stroke.

  11. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation induced slow wave activity modification: A possible role in disorder of consciousness differential diagnosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisani, Laura Rosa; Naro, Antonino; Leo, Antonino; Aricò, Irene; Pisani, Francesco; Silvestri, Rosalia; Bramanti, Placido; Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore

    2015-12-15

    Slow wave activity (SWA) generation depends on cortico-thalamo-cortical loops that are disrupted in patients with chronic Disorders of Consciousness (DOC), including the Unresponsive Wakefulness Syndrome (UWS) and the Minimally Conscious State (MCS). We hypothesized that the modulation of SWA by means of a repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) could reveal residual patterns of connectivity, thus supporting the DOC clinical differential diagnosis. We enrolled 10 DOC individuals who underwent a 24hh polysomnography followed by a real or sham 5Hz-rTMS over left primary motor area, and a second polysomnographic recording. A preserved sleep-wake cycle, a standard temporal progression of sleep stages, and a SWA perturbation were found in all of the MCS patients and in none of the UWS individuals, only following the real-rTMS. In conclusion, our combined approach may improve the differential diagnosis between MCS patients, who show a partial preservation of cortical plasticity, and UWS individuals, who lack such properties.

  12. POSSIBLE MECHANISMS UNDERLYING THE THERAPEUTIC EFFECTS OF TRANSCRANIAL MAGNETIC STIMULATION

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    Alexander eChervyakov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS is an effective method used to diagnose and treat many neurological disorders. Although repetitive TMS (rTMS has been used to treat a variety of serious pathological conditions including stroke, depression, Parkinson's disease, epilepsy, pain, and migraines, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the effects of long-term TMS remain unclear. In the present review, the effects of rTMS on neurotransmitters and synaptic plasticity are described, including the classic interpretations of TMS effects on synaptic plasticity via long-term potentiation (LTP and long-term depression (LTD. We also discuss the effects of rTMS on the genetic apparatus of neurons, glial cells and the prevention of neuronal death. The neurotrophic effects of rTMS on dendritic growth and sprouting and neurotrophic factors are described, including change in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF concentration under the influence of rTMS. Also, non-classical effects of TMS related to biophysical effects of magnetic fields are described, including the quantum effects, the magnetic spin effects, genetic magnetoreception, the macromolecular effects of TMS, and the electromagnetic theory of consciousness. Finally, we discuss possible interpretations of TMS effects according to dynamical systems theory. Evidence suggests that a rTMS-induced magnetic field should be considered a separate physical factor that can be impactful at the subatomic level and that rTMS is capable of significantly altering the reactivity of molecules (radicals. It is thought that these factors underlie the therapeutic benefits of therapy with TMS. Future research on these mechanisms will be instrumental to the development of more powerful and reliable TMS treatment protocols.

  13. Effects of low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and neuromuscular electrical stimulation on upper extremity motor recovery in the early period after stroke: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosun, Aliye; Türe, Sabiha; Askin, Ayhan; Yardimci, Engin Ugur; Demirdal, Secil Umit; Kurt Incesu, Tülay; Tosun, Ozgur; Kocyigit, Hikmet; Akhan, Galip; Gelal, Fazıl Mustafa

    2017-07-01

    To assess the efficacy of inhibitory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) on upper extremity motor function in patients with acute/subacute ischemic stroke. Twenty-five ischemic acute/subacute stroke subjects were enrolled in this randomized controlled trial. Experimental group 1 received low frequency (LF) rTMS to the primary motor cortex of the unaffected side + physical therapy (PT) including activities to improve strength, flexibility, transfers, posture, balance, coordination, and activities of daily living, mainly focusing on upper limb movements; experimental group 2 received the same protocol combined with NMES to hand extensor muscles; and the control group received only PT. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scan was used to evaluate the activation or inhibition of the affected and unaffected primary motor cortex. No adverse effect was reported. Most of the clinical outcome scores improved significantly in all groups, however no statistically significant difference was found between groups due to the small sample sizes. The highest percent improvement scores were observed in TMS + NMES group (varying between 48 and 99.3%) and the lowest scores in control group (varying between 13.1 and 28.1%). Hand motor recovery was significant in both experimental groups while it did not change in control group. Some motor cortex excitability changes were also observed in fMRI. LF-rTMS with or without NMES seems to facilitate the motor recovery in the paretic hand of patients with acute/subacute ischemic stroke. TMS or the combination of TMS + NMES may be a promising additional therapy in upper limb motor training. Further studies with larger numbers of patients are needed to establish their effectiveness in upper limb motor rehabilitation of stroke.

  14. Safety and tolerability of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with epilepsy: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Erica Hyunji; Schrader, Lara M; Machii, Katsuyuki; Alonso-Alonso, Miguel; Riviello, James J; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Rotenberg, Alexander

    2007-06-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is emerging as a new therapeutic tool in epilepsy, where it can be used to suppress seizures or treat comorbid conditions such as mood disorder. However, as rTMS carries a risk of inducing seizures among other adverse events, its safety and tolerability in the population with epilepsy warrant distinct consideration, as this group is especially seizure-prone. Accordingly, we performed a review of the literature to estimate the risk of seizures and other adverse events associated with rTMS in patients with epilepsy. We performed an English-language literature search, and reviewed all studies published from January 1990 to February 2007 in which patients with epilepsy were treated with rTMS, and complemented the literature search with personal correspondence with authors when necessary. We identified 30 publications that described patients with epilepsy who underwent rTMS, and noted total number of relevant subjects, medication usage, incidence of adverse events, and rTMS parameters including stimulus frequency, number of stimuli, train duration, intertrain interval, coil type, and stimulation sites. The data were analyzed for adverse events related to rTMS. Crude per-subject risk, as well as per-subject mean risk weighted by sample size and risk per 1000 stimuli weighted by number of stimuli in each study, were computed for seizures and for other adverse events. Adverse events or lack thereof was reported in 26 studies (n=280 subjects). Adverse events attributed to rTMS were generally mild and occurred in 17.1% of subjects. Headache was most common, occurring in 9.6%. The most serious adverse event was seizure during treatment, which occurred in four patients (1.4% crude per-subject risk). All but one case were the patients' typical seizures with respect to duration and semiology, and were associated with low-frequency rTMS. A single case of an atypical seizure appearing to arise from the region of stimulation

  15. Acoustic evaluation of short-term effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on motor aspects of speech in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliasova, I; Mekyska, J; Kostalova, M; Marecek, R; Smekal, Z; Rektorova, I

    2013-04-01

    Hypokinetic dysarthria in Parkinson's disease (PD) can be characterized by monotony of pitch and loudness, reduced stress, variable rate, imprecise consonants, and a breathy and harsh voice. Using acoustic analysis, we studied the effects of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) applied over the primary orofacial sensorimotor area (SM1) and the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) on motor aspects of voiced speech in PD. Twelve non-depressed and non-demented men with PD (mean age 64.58 ± 8.04 years, mean PD duration 10.75 ± 7.48 years) and 21 healthy age-matched men (a control group, mean age 64 ± 8.55 years) participated in the speech study. The PD patients underwent two sessions of 10 Hz rTMS over the dominant hemisphere with 2,250 stimuli/day in a random order: (1) over the SM1; (2) over the left DLPFC in the "on" motor state. Speech examination comprised the perceptual rating of global speech performance and an acoustic analysis based upon a standardized speech task. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare acoustic speech variables between controls and PD patients. The Wilcoxon test was used to compare data prior to and after each stimulation in the PD group. rTMS applied over the left SM1 was associated with a significant increase in harmonic-to-noise ratio and net speech rate in the sentence tasks. With respect to the vowel task results, increased median values and range of Teager-Kaiser energy operator, increased vowel space area, and significant jitter decrease were observed after the left SM1 stimulation. rTMS over the left DLPFC did not induce any significant effects. The positive results of acoustic analysis were not reflected in a subjective rating of speech performance quality as assessed by a speech therapist. Our pilot results indicate that one session of rTMS applied over the SM1 may lead to measurable improvement in voice quality and intensity and an increase in speech rate and tongue movements

  16. Effect of repetitive loading on the mechanical properties of synthetic hernia repair materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliason, Braden J; Frisella, Margaret M; Matthews, Brent D; Deeken, Corey R

    2011-09-01

    Hernia repair materials undergo repeated loading while in the body, and the impact on mechanical properties is unknown. It was hypothesized that exposure to repetitive loading would lead to decreased tensile strength and increased strain, and that these differences would become more pronounced with greater loading and unloading sequences. Polypropylene, expanded polytetrafluoroethylene, composite barrier, and partially absorbable meshes were evaluated. Twenty specimens (7.5 × 7.5 cm) were prepared from each material. Five specimens were subjected to ball burst testing to determine baseline biomechanical properties. Cycles of 10, 100, and 1,000 loading sequences were also performed (n = 5 each). BardMesh (CR Bard/Davol), Dualmesh (WL Gore), and Prolene (Ethicon) exhibited significantly reduced tensile strength; BardMesh, Proceed (Ethicon), Prolene, ProLite (Atrium Medical), ProLite Ultra (Atrium Medical), and Ultrapro (Ethicon) exhibited significantly increased strain after exposure to 1,000 cycles compared with their baseline properties. BardMesh and Prolene demonstrated both reduced tensile strength and increased strain values after 1,000 cycles, suggesting that repetitive loading has the greatest effects on these materials. In addition, BardMesh and Prolene exhibited progressively worsening effects as the number of cycles was increased. Deterioration of the tensile strength of the mesh or an increase in the ability of the mesh material to stretch (ie, increased strain values) could potentially lead to hernia recurrence or a poor functional result. However, the results of this study should not be interpreted to mean that hernia repair materials will fail in the body after only 10, 100, or 1,000 cycles. The conditions used in this study were more extreme than most physiologic scenarios and were intended as a pilot investigation into how the mechanical properties of hernia repair materials are affected by in vitro cyclic testing. Copyright © 2011 American College

  17. Increase in Short-Interval Intracortical Facilitation of the Motor Cortex after Low-Frequency Repetitive Magnetic Stimulation of the Unaffected Hemisphere in the Subacute Phase after Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Arruda Mello

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of the unaffected hemisphere (UH-LF-rTMS in patients with stroke can decrease interhemispheric inhibition from the unaffected to the affected hemisphere and improve hand dexterity and strength of the paretic hand. The objective of this proof-of-principle study was to explore, for the first time, effects of UH-LF-rTMS as add-on therapy to motor rehabilitation on short-term intracortical inhibition (SICI and intracortical facilitation (ICF of the motor cortex of the unaffected hemisphere (M1UH in patients with ischemic stroke. Eighteen patients were randomized to receive, immediately before rehabilitation treatment, either active or sham UH-LF-rTMS, during two weeks. Resting motor threshold (rMT, SICI, and ICF were measured in M1UH before the first session and after the last session of treatment. There was a significant increase in ICF in the active group compared to the sham group after treatment, and there was no significant differences in changes in rMT or SICI. ICF is a measure of intracortical synaptic excitability, with a relative contribution of spinal mechanisms. ICF is typically upregulated by glutamatergic agonists and downregulated by gabaergic antagonists. The observed increase in ICF in the active group, in this hypothesis-generating study, may be related to M1UH reorganization induced by UH-LF-rTMS.

  18. Does a combined intervention program of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and intensive occupational therapy affect cognitive function in patients with post-stroke upper limb hemiparesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Takatoshi; Abo, Masahiro; Kakita, Kiyohito; Masuda, Takeshi; Yamazaki, Ryunosuke

    2016-12-01

    Low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (LF-rTMS) to the contralesional hemisphere and intensive occupational therapy (iOT) have been shown to contribute to a significant improvement in upper limb hemiparesis in patients with chronic stroke. However, the effect of the combined intervention program of LF-rTMS and iOT on cognitive function is unknown. We retrospectively investigated whether the combined treatment influence patient's Trail-Making Test part B (TMT-B) performance, which is a group of easy and inexpensive neuropsychological tests that evaluate several cognitive functions. Twenty-five patients received 11 sessions of LF-rTMS to the contralesional hemisphere and 2 sessions of iOT per day over 15 successive days. Patients with right- and left-sided hemiparesis demonstrated significant improvements in upper limb motor function following the combined intervention program. Only patients with right-sided hemiparesis exhibited improved TMT-B performance following the combined intervention program, and there was a significant negative correlation between Fugl-Meyer Assessment scale total score change and TMT-B performance. The results indicate the possibility that LF-rTMS to the contralesional hemisphere combined with iOT improves the upper limb motor function and cognitive function of patients with right-sided hemiparesis. However, further studies are necessary to elucidate the mechanism of improved cognitive function.

  19. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation enhances spatial learning and synaptic plasticity via the VEGF and BDNF-NMDAR pathways in a rat model of vascular dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, N; Xing, M; Wang, Y; Tao, H; Cheng, Y

    2015-12-17

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on learning and memory in a rat model of vascular dementia (VaD) and to analyze the associated mechanisms. Bilateral carotid artery occlusion (2-VO) was used to establish a rat model of VaD. High-frequency (5Hz) rTMS was performed on rats for four weeks. Spatial learning and memory abilities were evaluated using the Morris water maze (MWM), and synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus was assessed via long-term potentiation (LTP). Hippocampal expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and three subunits of the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR), NR1, NR2A and NR2B, was analyzed by Western blotting. Compared with the VaD group, escape latency was decreased (PCA3-CA1 synapses was enhanced by rTMS (PBDNF, NR1 and NR2B expression was decreased in the VaD group and increased by rTMS (PBDNF and NMDARs. In addition, NR2B may be more important than NR2A for LTP induction in the hippocampus during rTMS treatment of VaD.

  20. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Changes Cerebral Oxygenation on the Left Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex in Bulimia Nervosa: A Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutoh, Chihiro; Koga, Yasuko; Kimura, Hiroshi; Kanahara, Nobuhisa; Numata, Noriko; Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Matsuzawa, Daisuke; Iyo, Masaomi; Nakazato, Michiko; Shimizu, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies showed that food craving in eating disorders can be weakened with high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). The aims of this study were to assess cerebral oxygenation change induced with rTMS and to assess the short-term impact of rTMS on food craving and other bulimic symptoms in patients with bulimia nervosa (BN). Eight women diagnosed with BN according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision criteria participated in this study. We measured haemoglobin concentration changes in the DLPFC with near-infrared spectroscopy during cognitive tasks measuring self-regulatory control in response to food photo stimuli, both at baseline and after a single session of rTMS. Subjective ratings for food cravings demonstrated significant reduction. A significant decrease in cerebral oxygenation of the left DLPFC was also observed after a single session of rTMS. Measurement with NIRS after rTMS intervention may be applicable for discussing the mechanisms underlying rTMS modulation in patients with BN. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  1. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) improves behavioral and biochemical deficits in levodopa-induced dyskinetic rats model.

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    Ba, Maowen; Kong, Min; Guan, Lina; Yi, Maoli; Zhang, Hongli

    2016-09-13

    Fluctuations of dopamine levels and upregulations of NR2B tyrosine phosphorylation in the striatum have been connected with levodopa (L-dopa)-induced dyskinesia (LID) in Parkinson's disease (PD). Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is one of the noninvasive and potential method treating dyskinesia. Yet, the effect of rTMS on the above key pathological events remains unclear. In this study, we gave L-dopa treatment intraperitoneally for 22 days to 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned PD rats to prepare LID rats model, and subsequently applied rTMS daily for 3 weeks to LID rats model. The effect of rTMS on abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs) was assessed. After ending the experiments, we further determined tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive dopaminergic neurons number by immunohistochemistry, dopamine levels by HPLC, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) levels by ELISA, NR2B tyrosine phosphorylation and interactions of NR2B with Fyn by immunoblotting and immunoprecipitation. The results demonstrated that rTMS obviously attenuated AIMs scores, reduced the loss of nigral dopaminergic neurons and the fluctuations of striatal dopamine levels. Meanwhile, rTMS significantly increased the expression of GDNF, which couldrestore the damage of dopaminergic neurons. Additionally, rTMS also reduced the levels of the NR2B tyrosine phosphorylation andits interactions with Fyn in the lesioned striatum of LID rats model. Thus, these data indicate that rTMS can provide benefit for the therapy of LID by improving the key biochemical deficits related to dyskinesia.

  2. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation regulates L-type Ca(2+) channel activity inhibited by early sevoflurane exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Yang, Huiyun; Tang, Xiaohong; Bai, Wenwen; Wang, Guolin; Tian, Xin

    2016-09-01

    Sevoflurane might be harmful to the developing brain. Therefore, it is essential to reverse sevoflurane-induced brain injury. This study aimed to determine whether low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can regulate L-type Ca(2+) channel activity, which is inhibited by early sevoflurane exposure. Rats were randomly divided into three groups: control, sevoflurane, and rTMS groups. A Whole-cell patch clamp technique was applied to record L-type Ca(2+) channel currents. The I-V curve, steady-state activation and inactivation curves were studied in rats of each group at different ages (1 week, 2 weeks, 3 weeks, 4 weeks and 5 weeks old). In the control group, L-type Ca(2+) channel current density significantly increased from week 2 to week 3. Compared with the control group, L-type Ca(2+) channel currents of rats in the sevoflurane group were significantly inhibited from week 1 to week 3. Activation curves of L-type Ca(2+) channel shifted significantly towards depolarization at week 1 and week 2. Moreover, steady-state inactivation curves shifted towards hyperpolarization from week 1 to week 3. Compared with the sevoflurane group, rTMS significantly increased L-type Ca(2+) channel currents at week 2 and week 3. Activation curves of L-type Ca(2+) channel significantly shifted towards hyperpolarization at week 2. Meanwhile, steady-state inactivation curves significantly shifted towards depolarization at week 2. The period between week 2 and week 3 is critical for the development of L-type Ca(2+) channels. Early sevoflurane exposure inhibits L-type Ca(2+) channel activity and rTMS can regulate L-type Ca(2+) channel activity inhibited by sevoflurane. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The Role of Right Inferior Parietal Cortex in Auditory Spatial Attention: A Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study.

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    Debra S Karhson

    Full Text Available Behavioral studies support the concept of an auditory spatial attention gradient by demonstrating that attentional benefits progressively diminish as distance increases from an attended location. Damage to the right inferior parietal cortex can induce a rightward attention bias, which implicates this region in the construction of attention gradients. This study used event-related potentials (ERPs to define attention-related gradients before and after repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS to the right inferior parietal cortex. Subjects (n = 16 listened to noise bursts at five azimuth locations (left to right: -90°, -45°, 0° midline, +45°, +90° and responded to stimuli at one target location (-90°, +90°, separate blocks. ERPs as a function of non-target location were examined before (baseline and after 0.9 Hz rTMS. Results showed that ERP attention gradients were observed in three time windows (frontal 230-340, parietal 400-460, frontal 550-750 ms. Significant transient rTMS effects were seen in the first and third windows. The first window had a voltage decrease at the farthest location when attending to either the left or right side. The third window had on overall increase in positivity, but only when attending to the left side. These findings suggest that rTMS induced a small contraction in spatial attention gradients within the first time window. The asymmetric effect of attended location on gradients in the third time window may relate to neglect of the left hemispace after right parietal injury. Together, these results highlight the role of the right inferior parietal cortex in modulating frontal lobe attention network activity.

  4. Priming Hand Motor Training with Repetitive Stimulation of the Fingertips; Performance Gain and Functional Imaging of Training Effects.

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    Lotze, Martin; Ladda, Aija Marie; Roschka, Sybille; Platz, Thomas; Dinse, Hubert R

    Application of repetitive electrical stimulation (rES) of the fingers has been shown to improve tactile perception and sensorimotor performance in healthy individuals. To increase motor performance by priming the effects of active motor training (arm ability training; AAT) using rES. We compared the performance gain for the training increase of the averaged AAT tasks of both hands in two groups of strongly right-handed healthy volunteers. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) before and after AAT was assessed using three tasks for each hand separately: finger sequence tapping, visually guided grip force modulation, and writing. Performance during fMRI was controlled for preciseness and frequency. A total of 30 participants underwent a two-week unilateral left hand AAT, 15 participants with 20 minutes of rES priming of all fingertips of the trained hand, and 15 participants without rES priming. rES-primed AAT improved the trained left-hand performance across all training tasks on average by 32.9%, non-primed AAT improved by 29.5%. This gain in AAT performance with rES priming was predominantly driven by an increased finger tapping velocity. Functional imaging showed comparable changes for both training groups over time. Across all participants, improved AAT performance was associated with a higher contralateral primary somatosensory cortex (S1) fMRI activation magnitude during the grip force modulation task. This study highlights the importance of S1 for hand motor training gain. In addition, it suggests the usage of rES of the fingertips for priming active hand motor training. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Therapeutic impact of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on tinnitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    Soleimani, Robabeh; Jalali, Mir Mohammad; Hasandokht, Tolou

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we conducted a systematic literature review and meta-analysis on the effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) compared with sham in chronic tinnitus patients. We searched databases, from their onset up to August 2014, for randomized controlled trials (RCT) in English that assessed the effectiveness of rTMS for chronic tinnitus. RCTs were selected according to inclusion/exclusion criteria before data were extracted. For the meta-analysis weighted mean differences (and standard deviations) of Tinnitus Questionnaire (TQ) and Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI) scores were determined. Therapeutic success was defined as difference of at least 7 points in the THI score between baseline and the follow-up assessment after treatment. The odds ratio (OR) for this variable was assessed. Results from 15 RCTs were analyzed. The mean difference for TQ score at 1 week after intervention was 3.42. For THI, the data of mean difference score in two groups, 1 and 6 month after intervention, was 6.71 and 12.89, respectively. The all comparisons indicated a significant medium to large effect size in follow-up which is in favor of the rTMS. The pooled OR of therapeutic success of the studies which used THI at 1 month after intervention was 15.75. These data underscore the clinical effect of rTMS in the treatment of tinnitus. However, there is high variability of studies design and reported outcomes. Replication of data in multicenter trials with a large number of patients and long-term follow-up is needed before further conclusions can be drawn.

  6. Cognitive and anatomical underpinnings of the conceptual knowledge for common objects and familiar people: a repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

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    Fabio Campanella

    Full Text Available Several studies have addressed the issue of how knowledge of common objects is organized in the brain, whereas the cognitive and anatomical underpinnings of familiar people knowledge have been less explored. Here we applied repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS over the left and right temporal poles before asking healthy individuals to perform a speeded word-to-picture matching task using familiar people and common objects as stimuli. We manipulated two widely used semantic variables, namely the semantic distance and the familiarity of stimuli, to assess whether the semantic organization of familiar people knowledge is similar to that of common objects. For both objects and faces we reliably found semantic distance and familiarity effects, with less accurate and slower responses for stimulus pairs that were more closely related and less familiar. However, the effects of semantic variables differed across categories, with semantic distance effects larger for objects and familiarity effects larger for faces, suggesting that objects and faces might share a partially comparable organization of their semantic representations. The application of rTMS to the left temporal pole modulated, for both categories, semantic distance, but not familiarity effects, revealing that accessing object and face concepts might rely on overlapping processes within left anterior temporal regions. Crucially, rTMS of the left temporal pole affected only the recognition of pairs of stimuli that could be discriminated at specific levels of categorization (e.g., two kitchen tools or two famous persons, with no effect for discriminations at either superordinate or individual levels. Conversely, rTMS of the right temporal pole induced an overall slowing of reaction times that positively correlated with the visual similarity of the stimuli, suggesting a more perceptual rather than semantic role of the right anterior temporal regions. Results are discussed in the

  7. Cognitive and anatomical underpinnings of the conceptual knowledge for common objects and familiar people: a repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanella, Fabio; Fabbro, Franco; Urgesi, Cosimo

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have addressed the issue of how knowledge of common objects is organized in the brain, whereas the cognitive and anatomical underpinnings of familiar people knowledge have been less explored. Here we applied repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the left and right temporal poles before asking healthy individuals to perform a speeded word-to-picture matching task using familiar people and common objects as stimuli. We manipulated two widely used semantic variables, namely the semantic distance and the familiarity of stimuli, to assess whether the semantic organization of familiar people knowledge is similar to that of common objects. For both objects and faces we reliably found semantic distance and familiarity effects, with less accurate and slower responses for stimulus pairs that were more closely related and less familiar. However, the effects of semantic variables differed across categories, with semantic distance effects larger for objects and familiarity effects larger for faces, suggesting that objects and faces might share a partially comparable organization of their semantic representations. The application of rTMS to the left temporal pole modulated, for both categories, semantic distance, but not familiarity effects, revealing that accessing object and face concepts might rely on overlapping processes within left anterior temporal regions. Crucially, rTMS of the left temporal pole affected only the recognition of pairs of stimuli that could be discriminated at specific levels of categorization (e.g., two kitchen tools or two famous persons), with no effect for discriminations at either superordinate or individual levels. Conversely, rTMS of the right temporal pole induced an overall slowing of reaction times that positively correlated with the visual similarity of the stimuli, suggesting a more perceptual rather than semantic role of the right anterior temporal regions. Results are discussed in the light of current

  8. Mechanism of adrenergic stimulation of hepatic ketogenesis.

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    Kosugi, K; Harano, Y; Nakano, T; Suzuki, M; Kashiwagi, A; Shigeta, Y

    1983-11-01

    The effects of alpha- and beta-adrenergic stimulation on ketogenesis were examined in freshly isolated rat hepatocytes in order to determine which alpha- or beta-adrenergic stimulation is involved in the enhancement of ketogenesis. In the presence of 0.3 mmol/L (U-14C)-palmitate, epinephrine, norepinephrine, and phenylephrine at 500 ng/mL increased ketogenesis by 25% (16.0 +/- 0.17 v 12.8 +/- 0.13 nmol/mg protein per hour), 20% (15.3 +/- 0.28) and 20% (15.4 +/- 0.36), respectively. However, isoproterenol even at 1 microgram/mL did not stimulate ketogenesis. Phentolamine (5 micrograms/mL) almost completely abolished the effect of epinephrine on ketogenesis (13.7 +/- 0.30 v 16.0 +/- 0.17) but propranolol did not inhibit the stimulation by epinephrine (15.6 +/- 0.38 v 16.0 +/- 0.17). Trifluoperazine (10 mumol/L), presumably an inhibitor of calcium-dependent protein kinase, abolished the effect of epinephrine (13.6 +/- 0.22 v 16.0 +/- 0.17). These results indicate that catecholamines increase ketogenesis predominantly through the alpha-adrenergic system independent of cyclic AMP, and calcium-dependent protein kinase is thought to be involved in the activation of ketogenesis. On the other hand, glucagon stimulated ketogenesis with an increase of cyclic AMP, which was not inhibited by alpha- and beta-adrenergic antagonists. Alpha-adrenergic stimulation increased hepatic glycogenolysis much more at much lower concentrations when compared with ketogenesis. Stimulation of ketogenesis by catecholamines seemed to be less sensitive and responsive compared with hepatic glycogenolysis.

  9. Repetitive Stimulation of the Pituitary with Growth-Hormone-Releasing Hormone Alters the Proportion of 22 and 20 Kilodalton Human-Growth Hormone Released

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    Peter C. Hindmarsh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims. 20 Kilodalton-hGH (20 K-hGH is the second most abundant pituitary GH variant after 22 K-hGH. In the steady state the proportion of 20 : 22 K-hGH appears constant; does this proportion change with repetitive somatotroph stimulation? Methods. Forty adult males were randomised to receive a GHRH(1–29NH2 bolus (0.5 μg/kg (n=20 or 1.0 μg/kg (n=20, preceded or followed by a saline bolus, 1 week apart. Four to six weeks later, 10 subjects received 0.5 μg/kg GHRH(1–29NH2 at 0, 60, 120, and 180 minutes. Clearance rate of 22 and 20 K-hGH was measured in 10 subjects. Results. Total amount/proportion of 22 K-hGH/20 K-hGH secreted was similar for both GHRH(1–29NH2 doses. Repetitive stimulation reduced the amount of 22 K-hGH released whereas the amount of 20 K-hGH did not change significantly leading to an increase in the proportion of 20 K-hGH (P=.05. Half-life of 20 and 22 K-hGH were not significantly different (P=.55. Conclusions. Repetitive stimulation of the somatotroph may alter the proportion of GH variant released.

  10. Repetitive Stimulation of the Pituitary with Growth-Hormone-Releasing Hormone Alters the Proportion of 22 and 20 Kilodalton Human-Growth Hormone Released

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    Robinson IainCAF

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims. 20 Kilodalton-hGH (20 K-hGH is the second most abundant pituitary GH variant after 22 K-hGH. In the steady state the proportion of 20 : 22 K-hGH appears constant; does this proportion change with repetitive somatotroph stimulation? Methods. Forty adult males were randomised to receive a GHRH(1–29 bolus   ( or   (, preceded or followed by a saline bolus, 1 week apart. Four to six weeks later, 10 subjects received   GHRH(1–29 at 0, 60, 120, and 180 minutes. Clearance rate of 22 and 20 K-hGH was measured in 10 subjects. Results. Total amount/proportion of 22 K-hGH/20 K-hGH secreted was similar for both GHRH(1–29 doses. Repetitive stimulation reduced the amount of 22 K-hGH released whereas the amount of 20 K-hGH did not change significantly leading to an increase in the proportion of 20 K-hGH . Half-life of 20 and 22 K-hGH were not significantly different . Conclusions. Repetitive stimulation of the somatotroph may alter the proportion of GH variant released.

  11. Nanoscale Mechanical Stimulation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

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    H Nikukar

    2014-05-01

    We observed significant responses after 1 and 2-week stimulations in cell number, cell shapes and phenotypical markers. Microarray was performed for all groups. Cell count showed normal cell growth with stimulation. However, cell surface area, cell perimeter, and arboration after 1-week stimulation showed significant increases. Immunofluorescent studies have showed significant increase in osteocalcin production after stimulation. Conclusions: Nanoscale mechanical vibration showed significant changes in human mesenchymal stem cell behaviours. Cell morphology changed to become more polygonal and increased expression of the osteoblast markers were noted. These findings with gene regulation changes suggesting nanoscale mechanostimulation has stimulated osteoblastogenesis.  Keywords:  Mesenchymal, Nanoscale, Stem Cells.

  12. The correlation between the length of repetitive domain and mechanical properties of the recombinant flagelliform spidroin

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    Xue Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Spider silk is an attractive biopolymer with numerous potential applications due to its remarkable characteristics. Among the six categories of spider silks, flagelliform (Flag spider silk possesses longer and more repetitive core domains than others, therefore performing the highest extensibility. To investigate the correlation between the recombinant spidroin size and the synthetic fiber properties, four recombinant proteins with different sizes [N-Scn-C (n=1-4] were constructed and expressed using IMPACT system. Subsequently, different recombinant spidroins were spun into fibers through wet-spinning via a custom-made continuous post-drawing device. Mechanical tests of the synthetic fibers with four parameters (maximum stress, maximum extension, Young's modulus and toughness demonstrated that the extensibility of the fibers showed a positive correlation with spidroin size, consequently resulting in the extensibility of N-Sc4-C fiber ranked the highest (58.76% among four fibers. Raman data revealed the relationship between secondary structure content and mechanical properties. The data here provide a deeper insight into the relationship between the function and structure of Flag silk for future design of artificial fibers.

  13. Repetitive measurements of pulmonary mechanics to inhaled cholinergic challenge in spontaneously breathing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaab, Thomas; Mitzner, Wayne; Braun, Armin; Ernst, Heinrich; Korolewitz, Regina; Hohlfeld, Jens M; Krug, Norbert; Hoymann, Heinz G

    2004-09-01

    Precise and repeatable measurements of pulmonary function in intact mice are becoming increasingly important for experimental investigations on various respiratory disorders including asthma. Here, we present validation of a novel in vivo method that, for the first time, combines direct and repetitive recordings of standard pulmonary mechanics with cholinergic aerosol challenges in anesthetized, orotracheally intubated, spontaneously breathing mice. We demonstrate that, in several groups of nonsensitized BALB/c mice, dose-related increases in pulmonary resistance and dynamic compliance to aerosolized methacholine are reproducible over short and extended intervals without causing detectable cytological alterations in the bronchoalveolar lavage or relevant histological changes in the proximal trachea and larynx regardless of the number of orotracheal intubations. Moreover, as further validation, we confirm that allergic mice, sensitized and challenged with Aspergillus fumigatus, were significantly more responsive to cholinergic challenge (P mechanics in studies of various respiratory disorders in mice, including experimental models of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder, investigations of pulmonary pharmacology, or more general investigations of the genetic determinants of lung function.

  14. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation inhibits Sirt1/MAO-A signaling in the prefrontal cortex in a rat model of depression and cortex-derived astrocytes.

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    Peng, Zheng-Wu; Xue, Fen; Zhou, Cui-Hong; Zhang, Rui-Guo; Wang, Ying; Liu, Ling; Sang, Han-Fei; Wang, Hua-Ning; Tan, Qing-Rong

    2017-09-25

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a useful monotherapy for depression or adjunctive therapy for resistant depression. However, the anti-depressive effects of different parameters and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we aimed to assess the effect of rTMS with different parameters (1/5/10 Hz, 0.84/1.26 T) on the depressive-like behaviors, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), 5-HIAA (5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid) and DA and NE levels, and monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) activity in chronic unpredictable stress-treated rats, along with the expression of sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) and MAO-A in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and cortex-derived astrocytes from new-born rats. Moreover, the depressive-like behaviors were monitored following the transcranial injection of the Sirt1 inhibitor EX527 (1 mM) daily for 1 week. We found that rTMS treatment (5/10 Hz, 0.84/1.26 T) ameliorated depressive-like behaviors, increased 5-HT, DA and NE levels, decreased the 5-HIAA level and Sirt1 and MAO-A expression, and reduced MAO-A activity in the PFC. The depressive-like behaviors were also ameliorated after the transcranial injection of EX527. Importantly, rTMS (5/10 Hz, 0.84/1.26 T) inhibited Sirt1 and MAO-A expressions in astrocytes and Sirt1 knockdown with short hairpin RNA decreased MAO-A expression in astrocytes. These results suggest that the inhibition of Sirt1/MAO-A expression in astrocytes in the PFC may contribute to the different anti-depressive effects of rTMS with different parameters, and may also provide a novel insight into the mechanisms underlying major depressive disorder.

  15. Management of Chronic Tinnitus and Insomnia with Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy – a Combined Approach

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    Kneginja Richter

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available It has been estimated that up to 80% of people will experience symptoms of tinnitus over the courses of their lives, with rates of comorbid sleeping problems ranging from 50 to 77%. Because of a potential connection between tinnitus and sleep disorders as well as high rates of comorbid psychiatric disorders, interdisciplinary approaches to treatment seem to be the most efficient option. In this study, we present the case of a 53-year-old male patient, who started to experience symptoms of tinnitus at the age of 49, most likely caused by work-related stress. Over the course of his illness, the patient developed comorbid insomnia. He consulted us for treatment of both conditions and we developed a treatment plan with ten sessions of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS followed by 10 sessions of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT. We used the Tinnitus Fragebogen (TF to assess the severity of the tinnitus, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II for depressive symptoms, and the WHO Well-being Index (WHO-5 for subjective well-being. Improvements could be achieved with regard to both diagnoses and the patient went from severe (48 to clinically negligible (12 TF scores, from minimal (BDI-II score 10 to no (0 depressive symptoms, and from just above critical (WHO-5 percentile 52 to above average (84 well-being. The combination of technological and psychological approaches to treat tinnitus and insomnia thus proved successful in this case. One may therefore conclude that rTMS may be considered an effective first therapeutic step for tinnitus treatment prior to CBT. To our knowledge this is the first published case in which rTMS and CBT were combined for tinnitus therapy. The approach proved successful since it led to a considerable increase in well-being and everyday functioning. To gauge the effect on a more general level, large-scale studies are still needed to cancel out potential placebo effects. Likewise, the importance of the order of

  16. Comparative Evaluation of Tactile Sensation by Electrical and Mechanical Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yem, Vibol; Kajimoto, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    An electrotactile display is a tactile interface that provides tactile perception by passing electrical current through the surface of the skin. It is actively used instead of mechanical tactile displays for tactile feedback because of several advantages such as its small and thin size, light weight, and high responsiveness. However, the similarities and differences between these sensations is still not clear. This study directly compares the intensity sensation of electrotactile stimulation to that of mechanical stimulation, and investigates the characteristic sensation of anodic and cathodic stimulation. In the experiment, participants underwent a 30 pps electrotactile stimulus every one second to their middle finger, and were asked to match this intensity by adjusting the intensity of a mechanical tactile stimulus to an index finger. The results showed that anodic stimulation mainly produced vibration sensation, whereas cathodic sensation produced both vibration and pressure sensations. Relatively low pressure sensation was also observed for anodic stimulation but it remains low, regardless of the increasing of electrical intensity.

  17. Anesthetic ketamine counteracts repetitive mechanical stress-induced learning and memory impairment in developing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Sheng; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Hua; Ren, Bingxu; Zhang, Jiannan

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether ketamine, a noncompetitive N-methyl-D: -aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist, had an influence on learning and memory in developing mice. Fifty Kunming mice aged 21 days were randomly divided into 5 subgroups (n = 10 for each) to receive intraperitoneal injection of equal volume of saline (S group) or ketamine (25, 50 or 100 mg/kg of body weight/day) for 7 consecutive days, or to be left untreated (C group). A step-down passive avoidance test was performed to evaluate learning and memory in these mice on days 8 and 9. Additionally, the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus was determined. Rats receiving saline or sub-anesthetic dose of ketamine (25 mg/kg) showed significantly decreased abilities of learning and memory and reduced expression of BDNF, compared to the normal controls (P learning and memory and expression of BDNF were found for anesthetic doses of ketamine (50 or 100 mg/kg)-treated rats and controls (P > 0.05). Repetitive mechanical stress impairs learning and memory performance in developing mice, which may be associated with decreased BDNF expression. The stress-induced learning and memory impairment can be prevented by anesthetic doses of ketamine.

  18. Neuronal mechanisms and circuits underlying repetitive behaviors in mouse models of autism spectrum disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hyopil; Lim, Chae-Seok; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) refers to a broad spectrum of neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by three central behavioral symptoms: impaired social interaction, impaired social communication, and restricted and repetitive behaviors. However, the symptoms are heterogeneous among patients and a number of ASD mouse models have been generated containing mutations that mimic the mutations found in human patients with ASD. Each mouse model was found to display a unique set of repetitive b...

  19. Role of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Beneficial Effects of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Upper Limb Hemiparesis after Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niimi, Masachika; Hashimoto, Kenji; Kakuda, Wataru; Miyano, Satoshi; Momosaki, Ryo; Ishima, Tamaki; Abo, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can improve upper limb hemiparesis after stroke but the mechanism underlying its efficacy remains elusive. rTMS seems to alter brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and such effect is influenced by BDNF gene polymorphism. To investigate the molecular effects of rTMS on serum levels of BDNF, its precursor proBDNF and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in poststroke patients with upper limb hemiparesis. Poststroke patients with upper limb hemiparesis were studied. Sixty-two patients underwent rehabilitation plus rTMS combination therapy and 33 patients underwent rehabilitation monotherapy without rTMS for 14 days at our hospital. One Hz rTMS was applied over the motor representation of the first dorsal interosseous muscle on the non-lesional hemisphere. Fugl-Meyer Assessment and Wolf Motor Function (WMFT) were used to evaluate motor function on the affected upper limb before and after intervention. Blood samples were collected for analysis of BDNF polymorphism and measurement of BDNF, proBDNF and MMP-9 levels. Two-week combination therapy increased BDNF and MMP-9 serum levels, but not serum proBDNF. Serum BDNF and MMP-9 levels did not correlate with motor function improvement, though baseline serum proBDNF levels correlated negatively and significantly with improvement in WMFT (ρ = -0.422, p = 0.002). The outcome of rTMS therapy was not altered by BDNF gene polymorphism. The combination therapy of rehabilitation plus low-frequency rTMS seems to improve motor function in the affected limb, by activating BDNF processing. BDNF and its precursor proBDNF could be potentially suitable biomarkers for poststroke motor recovery.

  20. Role of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Beneficial Effects of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Upper Limb Hemiparesis after Stroke.

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    Masachika Niimi

    Full Text Available Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS can improve upper limb hemiparesis after stroke but the mechanism underlying its efficacy remains elusive. rTMS seems to alter brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and such effect is influenced by BDNF gene polymorphism.To investigate the molecular effects of rTMS on serum levels of BDNF, its precursor proBDNF and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 in poststroke patients with upper limb hemiparesis.Poststroke patients with upper limb hemiparesis were studied. Sixty-two patients underwent rehabilitation plus rTMS combination therapy and 33 patients underwent rehabilitation monotherapy without rTMS for 14 days at our hospital. One Hz rTMS was applied over the motor representation of the first dorsal interosseous muscle on the non-lesional hemisphere. Fugl-Meyer Assessment and Wolf Motor Function (WMFT were used to evaluate motor function on the affected upper limb before and after intervention. Blood samples were collected for analysis of BDNF polymorphism and measurement of BDNF, proBDNF and MMP-9 levels.Two-week combination therapy increased BDNF and MMP-9 serum levels, but not serum proBDNF. Serum BDNF and MMP-9 levels did not correlate with motor function improvement, though baseline serum proBDNF levels correlated negatively and significantly with improvement in WMFT (ρ = -0.422, p = 0.002. The outcome of rTMS therapy was not altered by BDNF gene polymorphism.The combination therapy of rehabilitation plus low-frequency rTMS seems to improve motor function in the affected limb, by activating BDNF processing. BDNF and its precursor proBDNF could be potentially suitable biomarkers for poststroke motor recovery.

  1. Electric-field-stimulated protein mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekstra, Doeke R; White, K Ian; Socolich, Michael A; Henning, Robert W; Šrajer, Vukica; Ranganathan, Rama

    2016-12-15

    The internal mechanics of proteins-the coordinated motions of amino acids and the pattern of forces constraining these motions-connects protein structure to function. Here we describe a new method combining the application of strong electric field pulses to protein crystals with time-resolved X-ray crystallography to observe conformational changes in spatial and temporal detail. Using a human PDZ domain (LNX2(PDZ2)) as a model system, we show that protein crystals tolerate electric field pulses strong enough to drive concerted motions on the sub-microsecond timescale. The induced motions are subtle, involve diverse physical mechanisms, and occur throughout the protein structure. The global pattern of electric-field-induced motions is consistent with both local and allosteric conformational changes naturally induced by ligand binding, including at conserved functional sites in the PDZ domain family. This work lays the foundation for comprehensive experimental study of the mechanical basis of protein function.

  2. Effect of low frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on kindling-induced changes in electrophysiological properties of rat CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi Chameh, Homeira; Janahmadi, Mahyar; Semnanian, Saeed; Shojaei, Amir; Mirnajafi-Zadeh, Javad

    2015-05-01

    In this study, the effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on the kindling induced changes in electrophysiological firing properties of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons was investigated. Male Wistar rats were kindled by daily electrical stimulation of the basolateral amygdala in a semi-rapid manner (12 stimulations/day) until they achieved stage-5 seizure. One group (kindled+rTMS (KrTMS)) of animals received rTMS (240 pulses at 1 Hz) at 5 min after termination of daily kindling stimulations. Twenty-four hours following the last kindling stimulation electrophysiological properties of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons were investigated using a whole-cell patch clamp technique, under current clamp condition. Amygdala kindling significantly decreased the adaptation index, post-afterhyperpolarization, rheobase current, utilization time, and delay to the first rebound spike. It also caused an increase in the voltage sag, number of rebound spikes and number of evoked action potential. Results of the present study revealed that application of rTMS following kindling stimulations had antiepileptogenic effects. In addition, application of rTMS prevented hyperexcitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons induced by kindling and conserved the normal neuronal firing.

  3. Can repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation increase muscle strength in functional neurological paresis? A proof-of-principle study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broersma, M; Koops, E A; Vroomen, Patrick; Van der Hoeven, J H; Aleman, A; Leenders, K L; Maurits, N M; van Beilen, M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Therapeutic options are limited in functional neurological paresis disorder. Earlier intervention studies did not control for a placebo effect, hampering assessment of effectivity. A proof-of-principle investigation was conducted into the therapeutic potential of repetitive t

  4. Transcranial alternating current stimulation: a review of the underlying mechanisms and modulation of cognitive processes

    OpenAIRE

    Herrmann, Christoph S; Rach, Stefan; Neuling, Toralf; Strüber, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Brain oscillations of different frequencies have been associated with a variety of cognitive functions. Convincing evidence supporting those associations has been provided by studies using intracranial stimulation, pharmacological interventions and lesion studies. The emergence of novel non-invasive brain stimulation techniques like repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) now allows to modulate brain oscillations directly. Pa...

  5. The Effects of Different Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) Protocols on Cortical Gene Expression in a Rat Model of Cerebral Ischemic-Reperfusion Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljubisavljevic, Milos R; Javid, Asma; Oommen, Joji; Parekh, Khatija; Nagelkerke, Nico; Shehab, Safa; Adrian, Thomas E

    2015-01-01

    Although repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) in treatment of stroke in humans has been explored over the past decade the data remain controversial in terms of optimal stimulation parameters and the mechanisms of rTMS long-term effects. This study aimed to explore the potential of different rTMS protocols to induce changes in gene expression in rat cortices after acute ischemic-reperfusion brain injury. The stroke was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) with subsequent reperfusion. Changes in the expression of 96 genes were examined using low-density expression arrays after MCAO alone and after MCAO combined with 1Hz, 5Hz, continuous (cTBS) and intermittent (iTBS) theta-burst rTMS. rTMS over the lesioned hemisphere was given for two weeks (with a 2-day pause) in a single daily session and a total of 2400 pulses. MCAO alone induced significant upregulation in the expression of 44 genes and downregulation in 10. Two weeks of iTBS induced significant increase in the expression of 52 genes. There were no downregulated genes. 1Hz and 5Hz had no significant effects on gene expression, while cTBS effects were negligible. Upregulated genes included those involved in angiogenesis, inflammation, injury response and cellular repair, structural remodeling, neuroprotection, neurotransmission and neuronal plasticity. The results show that long-term rTMS in acute ischemic-reperfusion brain injury induces complex changes in gene expression that span multiple pathways, which generally promote the recovery. They also demonstrate that induced changes primarily depend on the rTMS frequency (1Hz and 5Hz vs. iTBS) and pattern (cTBS vs. iTBS). The results further underlines the premise that one of the benefits of rTMS application in stroke may be to prime the brain, enhancing its potential to cope with the injury and to rewire. This could further augment its potential to favorably respond to rehabilitation, and to restore some of the loss functions.

  6. The Effects of Different Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS Protocols on Cortical Gene Expression in a Rat Model of Cerebral Ischemic-Reperfusion Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milos R Ljubisavljevic

    Full Text Available Although repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS in treatment of stroke in humans has been explored over the past decade the data remain controversial in terms of optimal stimulation parameters and the mechanisms of rTMS long-term effects. This study aimed to explore the potential of different rTMS protocols to induce changes in gene expression in rat cortices after acute ischemic-reperfusion brain injury. The stroke was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO with subsequent reperfusion. Changes in the expression of 96 genes were examined using low-density expression arrays after MCAO alone and after MCAO combined with 1Hz, 5Hz, continuous (cTBS and intermittent (iTBS theta-burst rTMS. rTMS over the lesioned hemisphere was given for two weeks (with a 2-day pause in a single daily session and a total of 2400 pulses. MCAO alone induced significant upregulation in the expression of 44 genes and downregulation in 10. Two weeks of iTBS induced significant increase in the expression of 52 genes. There were no downregulated genes. 1Hz and 5Hz had no significant effects on gene expression, while cTBS effects were negligible. Upregulated genes included those involved in angiogenesis, inflammation, injury response and cellular repair, structural remodeling, neuroprotection, neurotransmission and neuronal plasticity. The results show that long-term rTMS in acute ischemic-reperfusion brain injury induces complex changes in gene expression that span multiple pathways, which generally promote the recovery. They also demonstrate that induced changes primarily depend on the rTMS frequency (1Hz and 5Hz vs. iTBS and pattern (cTBS vs. iTBS. The results further underlines the premise that one of the benefits of rTMS application in stroke may be to prime the brain, enhancing its potential to cope with the injury and to rewire. This could further augment its potential to favorably respond to rehabilitation, and to restore some of the loss

  7. Nociceptive responses to thermal and mechanical stimulations in awake pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    di Giminiani, Pierpaolo; Petersen, Lars Jelstrup; Herskin, Mette S.

    2013-01-01

    animal studies in a large species require further examination. This manuscript describes the initial development of a porcine model of cutaneous nociception and focuses on interactions between the sensory modality, body size and the anatomical location of the stimulation site. METHODS: Pigs of different...... significantly lower pain thresholds (shorter latency to response) than large pigs to thermal and mechanical stimulations. Stimulations at the two anatomical locations elicited very distinct sets of behavioural responses, with different levels of sensitivity between the flank and the hind legs. Furthermore...

  8. Vagus nerve stimulation for epilepsy: A review of central mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Krahl, Scott E.; Clark, Kevin B.

    2012-01-01

    In a previous paper, the anatomy and physiology of the vagus nerve was discussed in an attempt to explain which vagus nerve fibers and branches are affected by clinically relevant electrical stimulation. This companion paper presents some of vagus nerve stimulation's putative central nervous system mechanisms of action by summarizing known anatomical projections of vagal afferents and their effects on brain biogenic amine pathways and seizure expression.

  9. Transcranial alternating current stimulation: A review of the underlying mechanisms and modulation of cognitive processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph S Herrmann

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Brain oscillations of different frequencies have been associated with a variety of cognitive functions. Convincing evidence supporting those associations has been provided by studies using intracranial stimulation, pharmacological interventions and lesion studies. The emergence of novel non-invasive brain stimulation techniques like repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS and transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS now allows to modulate brain oscillations directly. Particularly, tACS offers the unique opportunity to causally link brain oscillations of a specific frequency range to cognitive processes, because it uses sinusoidal currents that are bound to one frequency only. Using tACS allows to modulate brain oscillations and in turn to influence cognitive processes, thereby demonstrating the causal link between the two. Here, we review findings about the physiological mechanism of tACS and studies that have used tACS to modulate basic motor and sensory processes as well as higher cognitive processes like memory, ambiguous perception, and decision making.

  10. Mechanical efficiency and force–time curve variation during repetitive jumping in trained and untrained jumpers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Jeffrey M; Snyder, James G

    2012-10-01

    Mechanical efficiency (ME), the ratio between work performed and energy expenditure, is a useful criterion in determining the roles of stored elastic energy and chemically deduced energy contributing to concentric performance in stretch-shortening cycle movements. Increased force production during the eccentric phase has been shown to relate to optimal muscle-tendon unit (MTU) length change and thus optimization of usage of stored elastic energy. This phenomenon, as previously reported, is reflected by higher jump heights and ME. The purpose of this investigation was to determine if ME may be different between trained and untrained jumpers and thus be accounted for by variation in force production in the eccentric phase as a reflection of usage of stored elastic energy during various jump types. This investigation involved 9 trained (age 20.7 ± 3.2 years, height 178.6 ± 5.3 cm, body mass 79.0 ± 5.5 kg) and 7 untrained (age 21.43 ± 2.37 years, height 176.17 ± 10.89 cm, body mass 78.8 ± 12.5 kg) male jumpers. Trained subjects were Division I track and field athletes who compete in the horizontal or vertical jumping or running events. Force-time and displacement-time curves were obtained during jumping to determine jump height and to calculate work performed and to observe possible differences in force production in the eccentric phase. Respiratory gases with a metabolic cart were obtained during jumping to calculate energy expenditure. ME was calculated as the ratio between work performed and energy expenditure. The subjects completed four sessions involving 20 repetitions of countermovement jumps (CMJ) and drop jumps from 40 cm (DJ40), 60 cm (DJ60) and 80 cm (DJ80). The trained jumpers jumped significantly higher in the CMJ, DJ40, DJ60 and DJ80 conditions than their untrained counterparts (p ≤ 0.05). ME was significantly higher in the trained in comparison to the untrained jumpers during DJ40. The amount of negative work during all jump types was

  11. Noninvasive Brain Stimulation for Motor Recovery after Stroke: Mechanisms and Future Views

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoyuki Takeuchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation are noninvasive brain stimulation (NIBS techniques that can alter excitability of the human cortex. Considering the interhemispheric competition occurring after stroke, improvement in motor deficits can be achieved by increasing the excitability of the affected hemisphere or decreasing the excitability of the unaffected hemisphere. Many reports have shown that NIBS application improves motor function in stroke patients by using their physiological peculiarity. For continuous motor improvement, it is important to impart additional motor training while NIBS modulates the neural network between both hemispheres and remodels the disturbed network in the affected hemisphere. NIBS can be an adjuvant therapy for developed neurorehabilitation strategies for stroke patients. Moreover, recent studies have reported that bilateral NIBS can more effectively facilitate neural plasticity and induce motor recovery after stroke. However, the best NIBS pattern has not been established, and clinicians should select the type of NIBS by considering the NIBS mechanism. Here, we review the underlying mechanisms and future views of NIBS therapy and propose rehabilitation approaches for appropriate cortical reorganization.

  12. Physiological Mechanisms in Combined Electric-Acoustic Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Mika; Baumhoff, Peter; Tillein, Jochen; Kral, Andrej

    2017-09-01

    Electrical stimulation is normally performed on ears that have no hearing function, i.e., lack functional hair cells. The properties of electrically-evoked responses in these cochleae were investigated in several previous studies. Recent clinical developments have introduced cochlear implantation (CI) in residually-hearing ears to improve speech understanding in noise. The present study documents the known physiological differences between electrical stimulation of hair cells and of spiral ganglion cells, respectively, and reviews the mechanisms of combined electric and acoustic stimulation in the hearing ears. Literature review from 1971 to 2016. Compared with pure electrical stimulation the combined electroacoustic stimulation provides additional low-frequency information and expands the dynamic range of the input. Physiological studies document a weaker synchronization of the evoked activity in electrically stimulated hearing ears compared with deaf ears that reduces the hypersynchronization of electrically-evoked activity. The findings suggest the possibility of balancing the information provided by acoustic and electric input using stimulus intensity. Absence of distorting acoustic-electric interactions allows exploiting these clinical benefits of electroacoustic stimulation.

  13. Benefits of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) for Spastic Subjects: Clinical, Functional, and Biomechanical Parameters for Lower Limb and Walking in Five Hemiparetic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Raphael; Leboeuf, Fabien; Desal, Hubert; Hamel, Olivier; Nguyen, Jean Paul; Pérot, Chantal; Buffenoir, Kévin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Spasticity is a disabling symptom resulting from reorganization of spinal reflexes no longer inhibited by supraspinal control. Several studies have demonstrated interest in repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in spastic patients. We conducted a prospective, randomized, double-blind crossover study on five spastic hemiparetic patients to determine whether this type of stimulation of the premotor cortex can provide a clinical benefit. Material and Methods. Two stimulation frequencies (1 Hz and 10 Hz) were tested versus placebo. Patients were assessed clinically, by quantitative analysis of walking and measurement of neuromechanical parameters (H and T reflexes, musculoarticular stiffness of the ankle). Results. No change was observed after placebo and 10 Hz protocols. Clinical parameters were not significantly modified after 1 Hz stimulation, apart from a tendency towards improved recruitment of antagonist muscles on the Fügl-Meyer scale. Only cadence and recurvatum were significantly modified on quantitative analysis of walking. Neuromechanical parameters were modified with significant decreases in Hmax⁡ /Mmax⁡ and T/Mmax⁡ ratios and stiffness indices 9 days or 31 days after initiation of TMS. Conclusion. This preliminary study supports the efficacy of low-frequency TMS to reduce reflex excitability and stiffness of ankle plantar flexors, while clinical signs of spasticity were not significantly modified. PMID:24883390

  14. Effect of single-session repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation applied over the hand versus leg motor area on pain after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetté, Fanny; Côté, Isabelle; Meziane, Hadj Boumediene; Mercier, Catherine

    2013-09-01

    Neuropathic pain often follows spinal cord injury (SCI). To compare the effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) applied over different motor cortex targets (hand vs leg area) versus sham stimulation on neuropathic pain and local neurophysiological changes in patients with SCI. A total of 16 patients with complete or incomplete motor SCI and chronic neuropathic pain participated in a double-blind, cross-over randomized study. Three single sessions of sham or active rTMS (10 Hz, total of 2000 stimuli) were applied in random order over the hand or leg area with a minimal 2-week interval. THE MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: were the numeric rating scale for pain sensation and parameters derived from motor mapping of the first dorsal interosseous muscle, including maximal amplitude of evoked response as well as map area, volume, and location. rTMS applied to either the hand or the leg area, but not sham stimulation, induced a significant but equivalent reduction in pain for the first 48 hours postintervention (P stimulation of the hand area (P = .04) but not for the other conditions. rTMS applied over the hand or leg motor cortex decreased neuropathic pain regardless of any change in cortical excitability, suggesting that the analgesic effect is not associated with local changes at the motor cortex level itself.

  15. Benefits of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS for Spastic Subjects: Clinical, Functional, and Biomechanical Parameters for Lower Limb and Walking in Five Hemiparetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luc Terreaux

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Spasticity is a disabling symptom resulting from reorganization of spinal reflexes no longer inhibited by supraspinal control. Several studies have demonstrated interest in repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in spastic patients. We conducted a prospective, randomized, double-blind crossover study on five spastic hemiparetic patients to determine whether this type of stimulation of the premotor cortex can provide a clinical benefit. Material and Methods. Two stimulation frequencies (1 Hz and 10 Hz were tested versus placebo. Patients were assessed clinically, by quantitative analysis of walking and measurement of neuromechanical parameters (H and T reflexes, musculoarticular stiffness of the ankle. Results. No change was observed after placebo and 10 Hz protocols. Clinical parameters were not significantly modified after 1 Hz stimulation, apart from a tendency towards improved recruitment of antagonist muscles on the Fügl-Meyer scale. Only cadence and recurvatum were significantly modified on quantitative analysis of walking. Neuromechanical parameters were modified with significant decreases in Hmax⁡ /Mmax⁡ and T/Mmax⁡ ratios and stiffness indices 9 days or 31 days after initiation of TMS. Conclusion. This preliminary study supports the efficacy of low-frequency TMS to reduce reflex excitability and stiffness of ankle plantar flexors, while clinical signs of spasticity were not significantly modified.

  16. Channelled scaffolds for engineering myocardium with mechanical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting; Wan, Leo Q; Xiong, Zhuo; Marsano, Anna; Maidhof, Robert; Park, Miri; Yan, Yongnian; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2012-10-01

    The characteristics of the matrix (composition, structure, mechanical properties) and external culture environment (pulsatile perfusion, physical stimulation) of the heart are important characteristics in the engineering of functional myocardial tissue. This study reports on the development of chitosan-collagen scaffolds with micropores and an array of parallel channels (~ 200 µm in diameter) that were specifically designed for cardiac tissue engineering using mechanical stimulation. The scaffolds were designed to have similar structural and mechanical properties of those of native heart matrix. Scaffolds were seeded with neonatal rat heart cells and subjected to dynamic tensile stretch using a custom designed bioreactor. The channels enhanced oxygen transport and facilitated the establishment of cell connections within the construct. The myocardial patches (14 mm in diameter, 1-2 mm thick) consisted of metabolically active cells that began to contract synchronously after 3 days of culture. Mechanical stimulation with high tensile stress promoted cell alignment, elongation, and expression of connexin-43 (Cx-43). This study confirms the importance of scaffold design and mechanical stimulation for the formation of contractile cardiac constructs.

  17. Channeled Scaffolds for Engineering Myocardium with Mechanical Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting; Wan, Leo Q.; Xiong, Zhuo; Marsano, Anna; Maidhof, Robert; Park, Miri; Yan, Yongnian; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2011-01-01

    The characteristics of the matrix (composition, structure, mechanical properties) and external culture environment (pulsatile perfusion, physical stimulation) are critically important for engineering functional myocardial tissue. We report the development of chitosan-collagen scaffolds with micro-pores and an array of parallel channels (~200 μm in diameter) that were specifically designed for cardiac tissue engineering with mechanical stimulation. The scaffolds were designed to have the structural and mechanical properties similar to those of the native human heart matrix. Scaffolds were seeded with neonatal rat heart cells and subjected to dynamic tensile stretch using a custom-designed bioreactor. The channels enhanced oxygen transport and facilitated the establishment of cell connections within the construct. The myocardial patches (14 mm in diameter, 1–2 mm thick) consisted of metabolically active cells and started to contract synchronously after 3 days of culture. Mechanical stimulation with high tensile stresses promoted cell alignment, elongation, and the expression of connexin-43 (Cx-43). This study confirms the importance of scaffold design and mechanical stimulation for the formation of contractile cardiac constructs. PMID:22081518

  18. Mechanism of orientation of stimulating currents in magnetic brain stimulation (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, S.; Matsuda, T.

    1991-04-01

    We made a functional map of the human motor cortex related to the hand and foot areas by stimulating the human brain with a focused magnetic pulse. We observed that each functional area in the cortex has an optimum direction for which stimulating currents can produce neural excitation. The present report focuses on the mechanism which is responsible for producing this anisotropic response to brain stimulation. We first obtained a functional map of the brain related to the left ADM (abductor digiti minimi muscles). When the stimulating currents were aligned in the direction from the left to the right hemisphere, clear EMG (electromyographic) responses were obtained only from the left ADM to magnetic stimulation of both hemisphere. When the stimulating currents were aligned in the direction from the right to the left hemisphere, clear EMG signals were obtained only from the right ADM to magnetic stimulation of both hemisphere. The functional maps of the brain were sensitive to changes in the direction of the stimulating currents. To explain the phenomena obtained in the experiments, we developed a model of neural excitation elicited by magnetic stimulation. When eddy currents which are induced by pulsed magnetic fields flow in the direction from soma to the distal part of neural fiber, depolarized area in the distal part are excited, and the membrane excitation propagates along the nerve fiber. In contrast, when the induced currents flow in the direction from the distal part to soma, hyperpolarized parts block or inhibit neural excitation even if the depolarized parts near the soma can be excited. The model explains our observation that the orientation of the induced current vectors reflect both the functional and anatomical organization of the neural fibers in the brain.

  19. Shaped magnetic field pulses by multi-coil repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) differentially modulate anterior cingulate cortex responses and pain in volunteers and fibromyalgia patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has shown promise in the alleviation of acute and chronic pain by altering the activity of cortical areas involved in pain sensation. However, current single-coil rTMS technology only allows for effects in surface cortical structures. The ability to affect activity in certain deep brain structures may however, allow for a better efficacy, safety, and tolerability. This study used PET imaging to determine whether a novel multi-coil rTMS would allow for preferential targeting of the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC), an area always activated with pain, and to provide preliminary evidence as to whether this targeted approach would allow for efficacious, safe, and tolerable analgesia both in a volunteer/acute pain model as well as in fibromyalgia chronic pain patients. Methods Part 1: Different coil configurations were tested in a placebo-controlled crossover design in volunteers (N = 16). Tonic pain was induced using a capsaicin/thermal pain model and functional brain imaging was performed by means of H215O positron emission tomography – computed tomography (PET/CT) scans. Differences in NRS pain ratings between TMS and sham treatment (NRSTMS-NRSplacebo) which were recorded each minute during the 10 minute PET scans. Part 2: 16 fibromyalgia patients were subjected to 20 multi-coil rTMS treatments over 4 weeks and effects on standard pain scales (Brief Pain Inventory, item 5, i.e. average pain NRS over the last 24 hours) were recorded. Results A single 30 minute session using one of 3 tested rTMS coil configurations operated at 1 Hz consistently produced robust reduction (mean 70% on NRS scale) in evoked pain in volunteers. In fibromyalgia patients, the 20 rTMS sessions also produced a significant pain inhibition (43% reduction in NRS pain over last 24 hours), but only when operated at 10 Hz. This degree of pain control was maintained for at least 4 weeks after the final session

  20. Mimosa pudica: Electrical and mechanical stimulation of plant movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Alexander G; Foster, Justin C; Ashby, Talitha A; Walker, Ronald K; Johnson, Jon A; Markin, Vladislav S

    2010-02-01

    Thigmonastic movements in the sensitive plant Mimosa pudica L., associated with fast responses to environmental stimuli, appear to be regulated through electrical and chemical signal transductions. The thigmonastic responses of M. pudica can be considered in three stages: stimulus perception, electrical signal transmission and induction of mechanical, hydrodynamical and biochemical responses. We investigated the mechanical movements of the pinnae and petioles in M. pudica induced by the electrical stimulation of a pulvinus, petiole, secondary pulvinus or pinna by a low electrical voltage and charge. The threshold value was 1.3-1.5 V of applied voltage and 2 to 10 microC of charge for the closing of the pinnules. Both voltage and electrical charge are responsible for the electro-stimulated closing of a leaf. The mechanism behind closing the leaf in M. pudica is discussed. The hydroelastic curvature mechanism closely describes the kinetics of M. pudica leaf movements.

  1. Whisking recovery after automated mechanical stimulation during facial nerve regeneration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleiss, I.J.; Knox, C.J.; Malo, J.S.; Marres, H.A.M.; Hadlock, T.A.; Heaton, J.T.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Recovery from facial nerve transection is typically poor, but daily mechanical stimulation of the face in rats has been reported to remarkably enhance functional recovery after facial nerve transection and suture repair. This phenomenon needs additional investigation because of its import

  2. Intensity-dependent effects of repetitive anodal transcranial direct current stimulation on learning and memory in a rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xuehong; Li, Yiyan; Wen, Huizhong; Zhang, Yinghui; Tian, Xuelong

    2015-09-01

    Single-session anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can improve the learning-memory function of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). After-effects of tDCS can be more significant if the stimulation is repeated regularly in a period. Here the behavioral and the histologic effects of the repetitive anodal tDCS on a rat model of AD were investigated. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 6 groups, the sham group, the β-amyloid (Aβ) group, the Aβ+20μA tDCS group, the Aβ+60μA tDCS group, the Aβ+100μA tDCS group and the Aβ+200μA tDCS group. Bilateral hippocampus of the rats in the Aβ group and the Aβ+tDCS groups were lesioned by Aβ1-40 to produce AD models. One day after drug injection, repetitive anodal tDCS (10 sessions in two weeks, 20min per session) was applied to the frontal cortex of the rats in the tDCS groups, while sham stimulation was applied to the Aβ group and the sham group. The spatial learning and memory capability of the rats were tested by Morris water maze. Bielschowsky's silver staining, Nissl's staining, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and glial-fibrillary-acidic protein (GFAP) immunohistochemistry of the hippocampus were conducted for histologic analysis. Results show in the Morris water maze task, rats in the Aβ+100μA and the Aβ+200μA tDCS groups had shorter escape latency and larger number of crossings on the platform. Significant histologic differences were observed in the Aβ+100μA and the Aβ+200μA tDCS groups compared to the Aβ group. The behavioral and the histological experiments indicate that the proposed repetitive anodal tDCS treatment can protect spatial learning and memory dysfunction of Aβ1-40-lesioned AD rats.

  3. Recovery of motor disability and spasticity in post-stroke after repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Málly, J; Dinya, E

    2008-07-01

    Lately it has been indicated that the stimulation of both sides of the motor cortices with different frequencies of rTMS can improve the behaviour of a paretic arm. We studied the effect of rTMS in severe cases of post-stroke after nearly 10 years. They had wide hemispheric lesion and their paresis had not changed for more than 5 years. The majority of patients could not move their fingers on the affected side. In our study we examined whether the active movement could be induced by rTMS even several years after stroke and which hemisphere (affected or unaffected) stimulated by rTMS would be the best location for attenuating the spasticity and for developing movement in the paretic arm. Sixty-four patients (more than 5 years after stroke in a stable state) were followed for 3 months. They were treated with rTMS with 1 Hz at 30% of 2.3T 100 stimuli per session twice a day for a week. The area to be stimulated was chosen according to the evoked movement by TMS in the paretic arm. That way, four groups were created and compared. In group A, where both hemispheres were stimulated (because of the single stimulation of TMS could induce movement from both sides of hemispheres) the spasticity decreased but the movement could not be influenced. A highly significant improvement in spasticity, in movement induction and in the behaviour of paresis was observed in group B, where before treatment, there was no evoked movement in the paretic arm from stimulating either hemispheres of the brain. For treatment we stimulated the unaffected hemisphere from where the intact arm is moved (ipsilateral to the paretic side). In both groups C (contralateral hemisphere to the paretic arm) and D (ipsilaterally evoked movement in the paretic arm), the spasticity decreased during the first week, but the movement of the paretic arm improved only in group C. It seems that spasticity can be modified by the stimulation either the affected or the unaffected hemisphere, but the induction of movement

  4. The efficacy of cerebellar vermal deep high frequency (theta range) repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in schizophrenia: A randomized rater blind-sham controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Shobit; Sinha, Vinod Kumar; Tikka, Sai Krishna; Mishra, Preeti; Goyal, Nishant

    2016-09-30

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a promising therapeutic for schizophrenia. Treatment effects of rTMS have been variable across different symptom clusters, with negative symptoms showing better response, followed by auditory hallucinations. Cerebellum, especially vermis and its abnormalities (both structural and functional) have been implicated in cognitive, affective and positive symptoms of schizophrenia. rTMS to this alternate site has been suggested as a novel target for treating patients with this disorder. Hypothesizing cerebellar vermal magnetic stimulation as an adjunct to treat schizophrenia psychopathology, we conducted a double blind randomized sham controlled rTMS study. In this study, forty patients were randomly allocated (using block randomization method) to active high frequency (theta patterned) rTMS (n=20) and sham (n=20) groups. They received 10 sessions over 2 weeks. The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS) scores were assessed at baseline, after last session and at 4 weeks (2 weeks post-rTMS). We found a significantly greater improvement in the group receiving active rTMS sessions, compared to the sham group on negative symptoms, and depressive symptoms. We conclude that cerebellar stimulation can be used as an effective adjunct to treat negative and affective symptoms.

  5. The Role of the Right Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex in Phasic Alertness: Evidence from a Contingent Negative Variation and Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Mannarelli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phasic alertness represents the ability to increase response readiness to a target following an external warning stimulus. Specific networks in the frontal and parietal regions appear to be involved in the alert state. In this study, we examined the role of the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC during the attentional processing of a stimulus using a cued double-choice reaction time task. The evaluation of these processes was conducted by means of Event-Related Potentials (ERPs, in particular by using the Contingent Negative Variation (CNV, and repetitive 1-Hz Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS. Transient virtual inhibition of the right DLPFC induced by real 1-Hz rTMS stimulation led to a significant decrease in total CNV and W1-CNV areas if compared with the basal and post-sham rTMS conditions. Reaction times (RTs did not decrease after inhibitory rTMS, but they did improve after sham stimulation. These results suggest that the right DLPFC plays a crucial role in the genesis and maintenance of the alerting state and learning processes.

  6. Repetitive Arg-Gly-Asp peptide as a cell-stimulating agent on electrospun poly(ϵ-caprolactone) scaffold for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaisri, Pacharaporn; Chingsungnoen, Artit; Siri, Sineenat

    2013-11-01

    Electrospun scaffolds derived from poly(ϵ-caprolactone) (PCL), a well known biodegradable material, have an architecture that is suitable for hosting cells. However, their biomedical applications are restricted because these scaffolds lack the bioactivity necessary to stimulate cell responses. In this work, a repetitive Arg-Gly-Asp (rRGD) peptide was produced as a cell-stimulating agent to provide the PCL scaffold with bioactivity. DNA encoding rRGD was amplified by polymerase chain reaction using overlap primers without a DNA template, and cloned into a protein expression vector to produce a His-tag fusion peptide. In an in vitro cell adhesion assay, the purified rRGD peptide, comprising 30 RGD repeats, promoted a 1.5-fold greater cell adhesion than the commercial tripeptide RGD. The rRGD peptide was immobilized onto an electrospun PCL scaffold that had been pretreated with argon plasma and graft-polymerized with acrylic acid. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis indicated that covalently linked rRGD peptide was present on the scaffold. The PCL scaffold with immobilized rRGD showed significantly changed hydrophilic properties and an enhanced adhesion and proliferation of mouse fibroblast cells by 2.3- and 2.9-fold, respectively, compared to the PCL scaffold alone. Through its ability to promote cell adhesion and proliferation, the rRGD peptide has great potential as a stimulant for improving the suboptimal cell-matrix interaction of polymeric scaffolds for tissue engineering applications.

  7. Repetitive Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Induced Excitability Changes of Primary Visual Cortex and Visual Learning Effects-A Pilot Study.

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    Sczesny-Kaiser, Matthias; Beckhaus, Katharina; Dinse, Hubert R; Schwenkreis, Peter; Tegenthoff, Martin; Höffken, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Studies on noninvasive motor cortex stimulation and motor learning demonstrated cortical excitability as a marker for a learning effect. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive tool to modulate cortical excitability. It is as yet unknown how tDCS-induced excitability changes and perceptual learning in visual cortex correlate. Our study aimed to examine the influence of tDCS on visual perceptual learning in healthy humans. Additionally, we measured excitability in primary visual cortex (V1). We hypothesized that anodal tDCS would improve and cathodal tDCS would have minor or no effects on visual learning. Anodal, cathodal or sham tDCS were applied over V1 in a randomized, double-blinded design over four consecutive days (n = 30). During 20 min of tDCS, subjects had to learn a visual orientation-discrimination task (ODT). Excitability parameters were measured by analyzing paired-stimulation behavior of visual-evoked potentials (ps-VEP) and by measuring phosphene thresholds (PTs) before and after the stimulation period of 4 days. Compared with sham-tDCS, anodal tDCS led to an improvement of visual discrimination learning (p visual perceptual learning and increased cortical excitability. tDCS is a promising tool to alter V1 excitability and, hence, perceptual visual learning.

  8. Increases in frontostriatal connectivity are associated with response to dorsomedial repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in refractory binge/purge behaviors

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    Katharine Dunlop

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Enhanced frontostriatal connectivity was associated with responders to dmPFC-rTMS for binge/purge behavior. rTMS caused paradoxical suppression of frontostriatal connectivity in nonresponders. rs-fMRI could prove critical for optimizing stimulation parameters in a future sham-controlled trial of rTMS in disordered eating.

  9. Successful Treatment of Phantom Limb Pain by 1 Hz Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Over Affected Supplementary Motor Complex: A Case Report

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    Lee, Jong-Hoo; Byun, Jeong-Hyun; Choe, Yu-Ri; Lim, Seung-Kyu; Lee, Ka-Young

    2015-01-01

    A 37-year-old man with a right transfemoral amputation suffered from severe phantom limb pain (PLP). After targeting the affected supplementary motor complex (SMC) or primary motor cortex (PMC) using a neuro-navigation system with 800 stimuli of 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) at 85% of resting motor threshold, the 1 Hz rTMS over SMC dramatically reduced his visual analog scale (VAS) of PLP from 7 to 0. However, the 1 Hz rTMS over PMC failed to reduce pain. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of a successfully treated severe PLP with a low frequency rTMS over SMC in affected hemisphere. PMID:26361601

  10. QEEG Theta Cordance in the Prediction of Treatment Outcome to Prefrontal Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation or Venlafaxine ER in Patients With Major Depressive Disorder.

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    Bares, Martin; Brunovsky, Martin; Novak, Tomas; Kopecek, Miloslav; Stopkova, Pavla; Sos, Peter; Höschl, Cyril

    2015-04-01

    The aims of this double-blind study were to assess and compare the efficacy of quantitative electroencephalographic (QEEG) prefrontal theta band cordance in the prediction of response to 4-week, right, prefrontal, 1-Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) or venlafaxine ER in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Prefrontal QEEG cordance values of 50 inpatients (25 subjects in each group) completing 4 weeks of the study were obtained at baseline and after 1 week of treatment. Depressive symptoms were assessed using Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) at baseline and at week 1 and 4. Treatment response was defined as a ≥50% reduction in baseline MADRS total score. All responders (n = 9) and 6 of 16 nonresponders in the rTMS group had reduced cordance at week 1 (P treatment, with comparable predictive efficacy for both therapeutic interventions. © EEG and Clinical Neuroscience Society (ECNS) 2014.

  11. L-propionylcarnitine does not affect myocardial metabolic or functional response to chronotropic and inotropic stimulation after repetitive ischemia in anesthetized pigs.

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    Duncker, D J; Sassen, L M; Bartels, G L; van Meegen, J R; McFalls, E O; Krams, R; Bezstarosti, K; Lamers, J M; Verdouw, P D

    1993-09-01

    In postischemic myocardium, fatty acid oxidation may be deficient owing to depletion of carnitine and citric acid cycle intermediates and fatty acylCoA-induced inhibition of adenine nucleotide translocase. During postischemic stress, the impairment of the fatty acid oxidation may become more apparent. We therefore investigated in open-chest anesthetized pigs the effect of L-propionylcarnitine [100 mg/kg per day orally (p.o.) for 3 days and 50 mg/kg intravenously (i.v.) 2 h before the first occlusion; n = 13] on myocardial function and metabolism of postischemic (two cycles of 10-min occlusion each followed by 30-min reperfusion) myocardium under resting conditions and during chronotropic and inotropic stimulation with dobutamine. Myocardial levels of free carnitine were higher after pretreatment (5.7 +/- 1.4 vs. 4.0 +/- 1.3 mumol/g protein, p Propionylcarnitine-treated animals displayed slightly better postischemic recovery of systolic SS than did control animals; to 39 and 28% (p = 0.056) of baseline, respectively, probably owing to a reduction in arterial blood pressure (BP), because L-propionylcarnitine prevented the increase in systemic vascular resistance produced by ischemia-reperfusion. L-Propionylcarnitine did not affect myocardial metabolic and contractile functional responses to chronotropic and inotropic stimulation. In a model of repetitive myocardial ischemia, L-propionylcarnitine prevents systemic vasoconstriction in response to ischemia and reperfusion and, probably as a result of the lower afterload, slightly ameliorates postischemic hypofunction, but loss of carnitine apparently does not play a role in myocardial hypofunction after brief repetitive ischemia and reperfusion in pigs.

  12. Comparison of the effects of high- and low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on upper limb hemiparesis in the early phase of stroke.

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    Sasaki, Nobuyuki; Mizutani, Saneyuki; Kakuda, Wataru; Abo, Masahiro

    2013-05-01

    Recently, high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (HF-rTMS) and low-frequency rTMS (LF-rTMS) are reported to improve motor function significantly in chronic hemiparetic stroke patients. However, few studies have investigated the safety and efficacy of these rTMS modalities introduced during the early phase of stroke. The purpose of this study was to clarify the rTMS modality that is more beneficial for upper limb hemiparesis in the early phase of stroke using a randomized controlled trial. Twenty-nine patients with a hemispheric stroke lesion in the early phase of stroke were examined. Patients were randomly assigned into 3 groups: the HF-rTMS group (10 Hz rTMS to the lesional hemisphere [n = 9]), the LF-rTMS group (1 Hz rTMS to the nonlesional hemisphere [n = 11]), and the sham stimulation group [n = 9]). Patients received sessions for 5 consecutive days. Grip strength and tapping frequency were assessed before and after the intervention. Motor improvement of the affected upper limb after intervention was compared among the 3 groups. All patients completed the 5-day protocol. Both the HF-rTMS and LF-rTMS groups had significant increases in both grip strength and tapping frequency. Comparison of the extent of improvement showed a more significant increase in grip strength and tapping frequency in the HF-rTMS group compared to the sham stimulation group (each P stimulation group. HF-rTMS applied to the lesional hemisphere in the early phase of stroke was more beneficial for motor improvement of the affected upper limb than LF-rTMS. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of repetitive peripheral magnetic stimulation on upper-limb spasticity and impairment in patients with spastic hemiparesis: a randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled study.

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    Krewer, Carmen; Hartl, Sandra; Müller, Friedemann; Koenig, Eberhard

    2014-06-01

    To investigate short-term and long-term effects of repetitive peripheral magnetic stimulation (rpMS) on spasticity and motor function. Monocentric, randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled trial. Neurologic rehabilitation hospital. Patients (N=66) with severe hemiparesis and mild to moderate spasticity resulting from a stroke or a traumatic brain injury. The average time ± SD since injury for the intervention groups was 26 ± 71 weeks or 37 ± 82 weeks. rpMS for 20 minutes or sham stimulation with subsequent occupational therapy for 20 minutes, 2 times a day, over a 2-week period. Modified Tardieu Scale and Fugl-Meyer Assessment (arm score), assessed before therapy, at the end of the 2-week treatment period, and 2 weeks after study treatment. Additionally, the Tardieu Scale was assessed after the first and before the third therapy session to determine any short-term effects. Spasticity (Tardieu >0) was present in 83% of wrist flexors, 62% of elbow flexors, 44% of elbow extensors, and 10% of wrist extensors. Compared with the sham stimulation group, the rpMS group showed short-term effects on spasticity for wrist flexors (P=.048), and long-term effects for elbow extensors (P<.045). Arm motor function (rpMS group: median 5 [4-27]; sham group: median 4 [4-9]) did not significantly change over the study period in either group, whereas rpMS had a positive effect on sensory function. Therapy with rpMS increases sensory function in patients with severe limb paresis. The magnetic stimulation, however, has limited effect on spasticity and no effect on motor function. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Short and long term effects of left and bilateral repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in schizophrenia patients with auditory verbal hallucinations: a randomized controlled trial.

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    Leonie Bais

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of the left temporo-parietal junction area has been studied as a treatment option for auditory verbal hallucinations. Although the right temporo-parietal junction area has also shown involvement in the genesis of auditory verbal hallucinations, no studies have used bilateral stimulation. Moreover, little is known about durability effects. We studied the short and long term effects of 1 Hz treatment of the left temporo-parietal junction area in schizophrenia patients with persistent auditory verbal hallucinations, compared to sham stimulation, and added an extra treatment arm of bilateral TPJ area stimulation. METHODS: In this randomized controlled trial, 51 patients diagnosed with schizophrenia and persistent auditory verbal hallucinations were randomly allocated to treatment of the left or bilateral temporo-parietal junction area or sham treatment. Patients were treated for six days, twice daily for 20 minutes. Short term efficacy was measured with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS, the Auditory Hallucinations Rating Scale (AHRS, and the Positive and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS. We included follow-up measures with the AHRS and PANAS at four weeks and three months. RESULTS: The interaction between time and treatment for Hallucination item P3 of the PANSS showed a trend for significance, caused by a small reduction of scores in the left group. Although self-reported hallucination scores, as measured with the AHRS and PANAS, decreased significantly during the trial period, there were no differences between the three treatment groups. CONCLUSION: We did not find convincing evidence for the efficacy of left-sided rTMS, compared to sham rTMS. Moreover, bilateral rTMS was not superior over left rTMS or sham in improving AVH. Optimizing treatment parameters may result in stronger evidence for the efficacy of rTMS treatment of AVH. Moreover, future research should consider

  15. Multi-axial mechanical stimulation of tissue engineered cartilage: Review

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    S D Waldman

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of tissue engineered cartilage is a promising new approach for the repair of damaged or diseased tissue. Since it has proven difficult to generate cartilaginous tissue with properties similar to that of native articular cartilage, several studies have used mechanical stimuli as a means to improve the quantity and quality of the developed tissue. In this study, we have investigated the effect of multi-axial loading applied during in vitro tissue formation to better reflect the physiological forces that chondrocytes are subjected to in vivo. Dynamic combined compression-shear stimulation (5% compression and 5% shear strain amplitudes increased both collagen and proteoglycan synthesis (76 ± 8% and 73 ± 5%, respectively over the static (unstimulated controls. When this multi-axial loading condition was applied to the chondrocyte cultures over a four week period, there were significant improvements in both extracellular matrix (ECM accumulation and the mechanical properties of the in vitro-formed tissue (3-fold increase in compressive modulus and 1.75-fold increase in shear modulus. Stimulated tissues were also significantly thinner than the static controls (19% reduction suggesting that there was a degree of ECM consolidation as a result of long-term multi-axial loading. This study demonstrated that stimulation by multi-axial forces can improve the quality of the in vitro-formed tissue, but additional studies are required to further optimize the conditions to favour improved biochemical and mechanical properties of the developed tissue.

  16. Effect of the stimulus frequency and pulse number of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on the inter-reversal time of perceptual reversal on the right superior parietal lobule

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    Nojima, Kazuhisa; Ge, Sheng; Katayama, Yoshinori; Ueno, Shoogo; Iramina, Keiji

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the stimulus frequency and pulses number of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on the inter-reversal time (IRT) of perceptual reversal on the right superior parietal lobule (SPL). The spinning wheel illusion was used as the ambiguous figures stimulation in this study. To investigate the rTMS effect over the right SPL during perceptual reversal, 0.25 Hz 60 pulse, 1 Hz 60 pulse, 0.5 Hz 120 pulse, 1 Hz 120 pulse, and 1 Hz 240 pulse biphasic rTMS at 90% of resting motor threshold was applied over the right SPL and the right posterior temporal lobe (PTL), respectively. As a control, a no TMS was also conducted. It was found that rTMS on 0.25 Hz 60 pulse and 1 Hz 60 pulse applied over the right SPL caused shorter IRT. In contrast, it was found that rTMS on 1 Hz 240-pulse applied over the right SPL caused longer IRT. On the other hand, there is no significant difference between IRTs when the rTMS on 0.5 Hz 120 pulse and 1 Hz 120 pulse were applied over the right SPL. Therefore, the applying of rTMS over the right SPL suggests that the IRT of perceptual reversal is effected by the rTMS conditions such as the stimulus frequency and the number of pulses.

  17. Effect of inter-train interval on the induction of repetition suppression of motor-evoked potentials using transcranial magnetic stimulation.

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    Pitkänen, Minna; Kallioniemi, Elisa; Julkunen, Petro

    2017-01-01

    Repetition suppression (RS) is evident as a weakened response to repeated stimuli after the initial response. RS has been demonstrated in motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) induced with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Here, we investigated the effect of inter-train interval (ITI) on the induction of RS of MEPs with the attempt to optimize the investigative protocols. Trains of TMS pulses, targeted to the primary motor cortex by neuronavigation, were applied at a stimulation intensity of 120% of the resting motor threshold. The stimulus trains included either four or twenty pulses with an inter-stimulus interval (ISI) of 1 s. The ITI was here defined as the interval between the last pulse in a train and the first pulse in the next train; the ITIs used here were 1, 3, 4, 6, 7, 12, and 17 s. RS was observed with all ITIs except with the ITI of 1 s, in which the ITI was equal to ISI. RS was more pronounced with longer ITIs. Shorter ITIs may not allow sufficient time for a return to baseline. RS may reflect a startle-like response to the first pulse of a train followed by habituation. Longer ITIs may allow more recovery time and in turn demonstrate greater RS. Our results indicate that RS can be studied with confidence at relatively short ITIs of 6 s and above.

  18. Effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of the unaffected hemisphere leg motor area in patients with subacute stroke and substantial leg impairment: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yen-Nung; Hu, Chaur-Jong; Chi, Ju-yang; Lin, Li-Fong; Yen, Tze-Hsun; Lin, Yen-Kuang; Liou, Tsan-Hon

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on mobility among patients with substantial leg impairment after subacute stroke. Double-blinded, stratified, randomized trial involving a sham control group. Patients who developed unilateral hemiplegia after first-ever subacute stroke and underwent inpatient stroke rehabilitation. The 15-day intervention programme used in the present study included the application of rTMS (1 Hz, 15 min) over the leg motor area of the unaffected hemisphere, followed by 45 min physical therapy. Overall, 32 participants were randomly assigned to receive either real rTMS or sham stimulation. Clinical assessments, including the Postural Assessment Scale for Stroke Patients (PASS), balance subscale of the Performance Oriented Mobility Assessment (POMA-b), Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Barthel Index (BI), and Timed Up and Go test, were performed immediately before and after the intervention. Both groups demonstrated significant improvements in all the test results over time. At the post-test assessment, the patients in the real rTMS group demonstrated greater improvements in the PASS, POMA, and BI scores than did the patients in the sham rTMS group. In addition, a significantly higher number of patients in the real rTMS group regained mobility at the post-test assessment compared with the corresponding number of patients in the sham rTMS group. Application of 1-Hz rTMS may improve mobility among patients with substantial leg impairment after subacute stroke.

  19. Should We Expand the Toolbox of Psychiatric Treatment Methods to Include Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS)? A Meta-Analysis of the Efficacy of rTMS in Psychiatric Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slotema, Christina W.; Blom, Jan Dirk; Hoek, Hans W.; Sommer, Iris E. C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a safe treatment method with few side effects However, efficacy for various psychiatric disorders is currently not clear Data sources: A literature search was performed from 1966 through October 2008 using PubMed, Ovid Medline, Embase

  20. Transcranial Alternating Current and Random Noise Stimulation: Possible Mechanisms

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    Andrea Antal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS is a relatively recent method suited to noninvasively modulate brain oscillations. Technically the method is similar but not identical to transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS. While decades of research in animals and humans has revealed the main physiological mechanisms of tDCS, less is known about the physiological mechanisms of tACS. Method. Here, we review recent interdisciplinary research that has furthered our understanding of how tACS affects brain oscillations and by what means transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS that is a special form of tACS can modulate cortical functions. Results. Animal experiments have demonstrated in what way neurons react to invasively and transcranially applied alternating currents. Such findings are further supported by neural network simulations and knowledge from physics on entraining physical oscillators in the human brain. As a result, fine-grained models of the human skull and brain allow the prediction of the exact pattern of current flow during tDCS and tACS. Finally, recent studies on human physiology and behavior complete the picture of noninvasive modulation of brain oscillations. Conclusion. In future, the methods may be applicable in therapy of neurological and psychiatric disorders that are due to malfunctioning brain oscillations.

  1. LTP-like changes induced by paired associative stimulation of the primary somatosensory cortex in humans : source analysis and associated changes in behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Litvak, V.; Zeller, D.; Oostenveld, R.; Maris, E.; Cohen, A.; Schramm, A.; Gentner, R.; Zaaroor, M.; Pratt, H.; Classen, J.

    2007-01-01

    Paired associative stimulation (PAS), which combines repetitive peripheral nerve stimulation with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), may induce neuroplastic changes in somatosensory cortex (S1), possibly by long-term potentiation-like mechanisms. We used multichannel median nerve somatosensory

  2. Control of directional change after mechanical stimulation in Drosophila

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    Zhou Yating

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proper adjustment of moving direction after external mechanical stimulation is essential for animals to avoid danger (e.g. predators, and thus is vital for survival. This process involves sensory inputs, central processing and motor outputs. Recent studies have made considerable progress in identifying mechanosensitive neurons and mechanosensation receptor proteins. Our understandings of molecular and cellular mechanisms that link mechanosensation with the changes in moving direction, however, remain limited. Results In this study, we investigate the control of movement adjustment in Drosophila. In response to gentle touch at the anterior segments, Drosophila larvae reorient and select a new direction for forward movement. The extent of change in moving direction is correlated with the intensity of tactile stimuli. Sensation of gentle touch requires chordotonal organs and class IV da neurons. Genetic analysis indicates an important role for the evolutionarily conserved immunoglobulin (Ig superfamily protein Turtle (Tutl to regulate touch-initiated directional change. Tutl is required specifically in post-mitotic neurons at larval stage after the completion of embryonic development. Circuit breaking analysis identified a small subset of Tutl-positive neurons that are involved in the adjustment of moving direction. Conclusion We identify Tutl and a small subset of CNS neurons in modulating directional change in response to gentle touch. This study presents an excellent starting point for further dissection of molecular and cellular mechanisms controlling directional adjustment after mechanical stimulation.

  3. Berberine stimulates glucose transport through a mechanism distinct from insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Libin; Yang, Ying; Wang, Xiao; Liu, Shangquan; Shang, Wenbin; Yuan, Guoyue; Li, Fengying; Tang, Jinfeng; Chen, Mingdao; Chen, Jialun

    2007-03-01

    Berberine exerts a hypoglycemic effect, but the mechanism remains unknown. In the present study, the effect of berberine on glucose uptake was characterized in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. It was revealed that berberine stimulated glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes in a dose- and time-dependent manner with the maximal effect at 12 hours. Glucose uptake was increased by berberine in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes as well. Berberine-stimulated glucose uptake was additive to that of insulin in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, even at the maximal effective concentrations of both components. Unlike insulin, the effect of berberine on glucose uptake was insensitive to wortmannin, an inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and SB203580, an inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Berberine activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, but PD98059, an ERK kinase inhibitor, only decreased berberine-stimulated glucose uptake by 32%. Berberine did not induce Ser473 phosphorylation of Akt nor enhance insulin-induced phosphorylation of Akt. Meanwhile, the expression and cellular localization of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) were not altered by berberine. Berberine did not increase GLUT1 gene expression. However, genistein, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, completely blocked berberine-stimulated glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and preadipocytes, suggesting that berberine may induce glucose transport via increasing GLUT1 activity. In addition, berberine increased adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase phosphorylation. These findings suggest that berberine increases glucose uptake through a mechanism distinct from insulin, and activated adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase seems to be involved in the metabolic effect of berberine.

  4. Photothermal and mechanical stimulation of cells via dualfunctional nanohybrids

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    Chechetka, Svetlana A.; Doi, Motomichi; Pichon, Benoit P.; Bégin-Colin, Sylvie; Miyako, Eijiro

    2016-11-01

    Stimulating cells by light is an attractive technology to investigate cellular function and deliver innovative cell-based therapy. However, current techniques generally use poorly biopermeable light, which prevents broad applicability. Here, we show that a new type of composite nanomaterial, synthesized from multi-walled carbon nanotubes, magnetic iron nanoparticles, and polyglycerol, enables photothermal and mechanical control of Ca2+ influx into cells overexpressing transient receptor potential vanilloid type-2. The nanohybrid is simply operated by application of highly biotransparent near-infrared light and a magnetic field. The technology may revolutionize remote control of cellular function.

  5. Challenges in comparing the acute cognitive outcomes of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (HF-rTMS) vs. electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in major depression: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedzior, Karina Karolina; Schuchinsky, Maria; Gerkensmeier, Imke; Loo, Colleen

    2017-03-02

    The present study aimed to systematically compare the cognitive outcomes of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (HF-rTMS) and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in head-to-head studies with major depression (MDD) patients. A systematic literature search identified six studies with 219 MDD patients that were too heterogeneous to reliably detect meaningful differences in acute cognitive outcomes after ECT vs. HF-rTMS. Cognitive effects of brain stimulation vary depending on the timeframe and methods of assessment, stimulation parameters, and maintenance treatment. Thus, acute and longer-term differences in cognitive outcomes both need to be investigated at precisely defined timeframes and with similar instruments assessing comparable functions.

  6. Effect of Low-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Naming Abilities in Early-Stroke Aphasic Patients: A Prospective, Randomized, Double-Blind Sham-Controlled Study

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    Konrad Waldowski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose. Functional brain imaging studies with aphasia patients have shown increased cortical activation in the right hemisphere language homologues, which hypothetically may represent a maladaptive strategy that interferes with aphasia recovery. The aim of this study was to investigate whether low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS over the Broca’s homologues in combination with speech/language therapy improves naming in early-stroke aphasia patients. Methods. 26 right-handed aphasic patients in the early stage (up to 12 weeks of a first-ever left hemisphere ischemic stroke were randomized to receive speech and language therapy combined with real or sham rTMS. Prior to each 45-minute therapeutic session (15 sessions, 5 days a week, 30 minutes of 1-Hz rTMS was applied. Outcome measures were obtained at baseline, immediately after 3 weeks of experimental treatment and 15 weeks; posttreatment using the Computerized Picture Naming Test. Results. Although both groups significantly improved their naming abilities after treatment, no significant differences were noted between the rTMS and sham stimulation groups. The additional analyses have revealed that the rTMS subgroup with a lesion including the anterior part of language area showed greater improvement primarily in naming reaction time 15 weeks after completion of the therapeutic treatment. Improvement was also demonstrated in functional communication abilities. Conclusions. Inhibitory rTMS of the unaffected right inferior frontal gyrus area in combination with speech and language therapy cannot be assumed as an effective method for all poststroke aphasia patients. The treatment seems to be beneficial for patients with frontal language area damage, mostly in the distant time after finishing rTMS procedure.

  7. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation improves open field locomotor recovery after low but not high thoracic spinal cord compression-injury in adult rats.

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    Poirrier, Anne-Lise; Nyssen, Yves; Scholtes, Felix; Multon, Sylvie; Rinkin, Charline; Weber, Géraldine; Bouhy, Delphine; Brook, Gary; Franzen, Rachelle; Schoenen, Jean

    2004-01-15

    Electromagnetic fields are able to promote axonal regeneration in vitro and in vivo. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is used routinely in neuropsychiatric conditions and as an atraumatic method to activate descending motor pathways. After spinal cord injury, these pathways are disconnected from the spinal locomotor generator, resulting in most of the functional deficit. We have applied daily 10 Hz rTMS for 8 weeks immediately after an incomplete high (T4-5; n = 5) or low (T10-11; n = 6) thoracic closed spinal cord compression-injury in adult rats, using 6 high- and 6 low-lesioned non-stimulated animals as controls. Functional recovery of hindlimbs was assessed using the BBB locomotor rating scale. In the control group, the BBB score was significantly better from the 7th week post-injury in animals lesioned at T4-5 compared to those lesioned at T10-11. rTMS significantly improved locomotor recovery in T10-11-injured rats, but not in rats with a high thoracic injury. In rTMS-treated rats, there was significant positive correlation between final BBB score and grey matter density of serotonergic fibres in the spinal segment just caudal to the lesion. We propose that low thoracic lesions produce a greater functional deficit because they interfere with the locomotor centre and that rTMS is beneficial in such lesions because it activates this central pattern generator, presumably via descending serotonin pathways. The benefits of rTMS shown here suggest strongly that this non-invasive intervention strategy merits consideration for clinical trials in human paraplegics with low spinal cord lesions.

  8. Can temporal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation be enhanced by targeting affective components of tinnitus with frontal rTMS? a randomized controlled pilot trial

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    Peter Michael Kreuzer

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS of the temporal cortex has been investigated as a new treatment tool for chronic tinnitus during the last years and has shown moderate efficacy. However, there is growing evidence that tinnitus is not a pathology of a specific brain region, but rather the result of network dysfunction involving both auditory and non-auditory brain regions. In functional imaging studies the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex has been identified as an important hub in tinnitus related networks and has been shown to particularly reflect the affective components of tinnitus. Based on these findings we aimed to investigate whether the effects of left low frequency rTMS can be enhanced by antecedent right prefrontal low-frequency rTMS. Study Design: Fifty-six patients were randomized to receive either low-frequency left temporal rTMS or a combination of low-frequency right prefrontal followed by low-frequency left temporal rTMS. The change of the tinnitus questionnaire (TQ score was the primary outcome, secondary outcome parameters included the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory, numeric rating scales and the Beck Depression Inventory. The study is registered in clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01261949.Results: Directly after therapy there was a significant improvement of the TQ-score in both groups. Comparison of both groups revealed a trend towards more pronounced effects for the combined group (effect size: Cohen’s d=0.176, but this effect did not reach significance. A persistent trend towards better efficacy was also observed in all other outcome criteria. Conclusion: Additional stimulation of the right prefrontal cortex seems to be a promising strategy for enhancing TMS effects over the temporal cortex. These results further support the involvement of the right DLPFC in the pathophysiology of tinnitus. The small effect size might be due to the study design comparing the protocol to an active control

  9. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of the primary motor cortex in the treatment of motor signs in Parkinson's disease: A quantitative review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanjani, Anosha; Zakzanis, Konstantine K; Daskalakis, Zafiris J; Chen, Robert

    2015-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive disorder characterized by the emergence of motor deficits. In light of the voluminous and conflicting findings in the literature, the aim of the present quantitative review was to examine the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) targeting the primary motor cortex (M1) in the treatment of motor signs in PD. Studies meeting inclusion criteria were analyzed using meta-analytic techniques and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) sections II and III were used as outcome measures. In order to determine the treatment effects of rTMS, the UPDRS II and III scores obtained at baseline, same day, to 1 day post rTMS treatment (short-term follow-up) and 1-month post stimulation (long-term follow-up) were compared between the active and sham rTMS groups. Additionally, the placebo effect was evaluated as the changes in UPDRS III scores in the sham rTMS groups. A placebo effect was not demonstrated, because sham rTMS did not improve motor signs as measured by UPDRS III. Compared with sham rTMS, active rTMS targeting the M1 significantly improved UPDRS III scores at the short-term follow-up (Cohen's d of 0.27, UPDRS III score improvement of 3.8 points). When the long-term follow-up UPDRS III scores were compared with baseline scores, the standardized effect size between active and sham rTMS did not reach significance. However, this translated into a significant nonstandardized 6.3-point improvement on the UPDRS III. No significant improvement in the UPDRS II was found. rTMS over the M1 may improve motor signs. Further studies are needed to provide a definite conclusion.

  10. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for the treatment of depression in Parkinson disease: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Cheng-Long; Chen, Jie; Wang, Xiao-Dan; Pan, Jia-Lin; Zhou, Yi; Lin, Shi-Yi; Xue, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Wen-Wen

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for the treatment of depression in patients with Parkinson disease in order to arrive at qualitative and quantitative conclusions about the efficacy of rTMS. We included randomized controlled trials examining the effects of rTMS compared with sham-rTMS or selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs). The quality of included studies was strictly evaluated. Data analyses were performed using the RevMan5.1 software. Eight studies including 312 patients met all inclusion criteria. The results showed that rTMS could evidently improve the HRSD score compared with sham-rTMS (p rTMS and SSRIs groups in terms of HRSD and BDI score (p = 0.65; p = 0.75, respectively). Furthermore, patients who received rTMS could evidently show improvement on the unified Parkinson's disease rating scale (UPDRS), ADL score, and UPDRS motor score compared with sham-rTMS or SSRIs (p rTMS evidenced that the efficacy of low-frequency rTMS was superior to sham-rTMS (p rTMS has the same antidepressant efficacy as SSRIs (p = 0.94). The current meta-analysis provided evidence that rTMS was superior to sham-rTMS and had similar antidepressant efficacy as SSRIs, and may have the additional advantage of some improvement in motor function.

  11. Self-harm and suicidal acts: a suitable case for treatment of impulsivity-driven behaviour with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shergill, Sukhwinder S.; David, Anthony S.; Fonagy, Peter; Zaman, Rashid; Downar, Jonathan; Eliott, Emma; Bhui, Kamaldeep

    2015-01-01

    Summary Suicidal thinking, self-harm and suicidal acts are common, although determining their precise prevalence is complex. Epidemiological work has identified a number of associated demographic and clinical factors, though, with the exception of past acts of self-harm, these are non-specific and weak future predictors. There is a critical need shift focus from managing ‘suicidality-by-proxy’ through general mental health treatments, to better understand the neuropsychology and neurophysiology of such behaviour to guide targeted interventions. The model of the cognitive control of emotion (MCCE) offers such a paradigm, with an underlying pan-diagnostic pathophysiology of a hypoactive prefrontal cortex failing to suitably inhibit an overactive threat-responding limbic system. The result is a phenotype – from any number of causative gene–environment interactions – primed to impulsively self-harm. We argue that such neural dysconnectivity is open to potential therapeutic modification from repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). The current evidence base for this is undoubtedly extremely limited, but the societal and clinical burden self-harm and suicide pose warrants such investigation. Declaration of interest K.B. is the Editor of BJPsych Open, but had no editorial involvement in the review or decision process regarding this paper. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2015. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) licence. PMID:27703728

  12. Bilateral repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for treatment-resistant depression: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.Q. Zhang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available There has been concern regarding the use of controversial paradigms for repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS to manage treatment-resistant depression (TRD. This meta-analysis assessed the efficacy of bilateral rTMS compared with unilateral and sham rTMS in patients with TRD. PubMed, Embase, CENTRAL, PsycINFO, Web of Science, EAGLE and NTIS databases were searched to identify relevant studies, and randomized controlled trials (RCTs on bilateral rTMS for TRD patients were included. The response was defined as the primary outcome, and remission was the secondary outcome. Ten RCTs that included 634 patients met the eligibility criteria. The risk ratio (RRs of both the primary and secondary outcomes of bilateral rTMS showed non-significant increases compared to unilateral rTMS (RR=1.01, P=0.93; odds ratio [OR]=0.77, P=0.22. Notably, the RR of the primary bilateral rTMS outcome was significantly increased compared to that for sham rTMS (RR=3.43, P=0.0004. The results of our analysis demonstrated that bilateral rTMS was significantly more effective than sham rTMS but not unilateral rTMS in patients with TRD. Thus, bilateral rTMS may not be a useful paradigm for patients with TRD.

  13. Unanticipated rapid remission of refractory bulimia nervosa, during high-dose repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation of the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan eDownar

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A woman with severe, refractory bulimia nervosa underwent treatment for comorbid depression using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS of the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (DMPFC using a novel technique. Unexpectedly, she showed a rapid, dramatic remission from bulimia nervosa. For 5 months pre-treatment, she had reported two 5-hour binge-purge episodes per day. After rTMS session 2 the episodes stopped entirely for 1 week; after session 10 there were no further recurrences. Depression scores improved more gradually to remission at session 10. Full remission from depression and binge-eating/purging episodes was sustained more than 2 months after treatment completion. In neuroimaging studies, the DMPFC is important in impulse control, and is underactive in bulimia nervosa. DMPFC-rTMS may have enhanced the patient’s ability to deploy previously acquired strategies to avoid binge-eating and purging via a reduction in her impulsivity. A larger sham-controlled trial of DMPFC-rTMS for binge-eating and purging behavior may be warranted.

  14. Safety of primed repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and modified constraint-induced movement therapy in a randomized controlled trial in pediatric hemiparesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillick, Bernadette T; Krach, Linda E; Feyma, Tim; Rich, Tonya L; Moberg, Kelli; Menk, Jeremiah; Cassidy, Jessica; Kimberley, Teresa; Carey, James R

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the safety of combining a 6-Hz primed low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) intervention in the contralesional hemisphere with a modified constraint-induced movement therapy (mCIMT) program in children with congenital hemiparesis. Phase 1 randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled pretest/posttest trial. University academic facility and pediatric specialty hospital. Subjects (N = 19; age range, 8-17 y) with congenital hemiparesis caused by ischemic stroke or periventricular leukomalacia. No subject withdrew because of adverse events. All subjects included completed the study. Subjects were randomized to 1 of 2 groups: either real rTMS plus mCIMT (n = 10) or sham rTMS plus mCIMT (n = 9). Adverse events, physician assessment, ipsilateral hand function, stereognosis, cognitive function, subject report of symptoms assessment, and subject questionnaire. No major adverse events occurred. Minor adverse events were found in both groups. The most common events were headaches (real: 50%, sham: 89%; P = .14) and cast irritation (real: 30%, sham: 44%; P = .65). No differences between groups in secondary cognitive and unaffected hand motor measures were found. Primed rTMS can be used safely with mCIMT in congenital hemiparesis. We provide new information on the use of rTMS in combination with mCIMT in children. These findings could be useful in research and future clinical applications in advancing function in congenital hemiparesis. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of repetitive stimulation test (RST in 30 patients with Myasthenia Gravis, who were previously confirmed by clinical sign and tensilon test 1996-99

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    "Ghabaee M

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available est (RST is the most commonly used electrodiagnostic test to asses the defect of neuromuscular transmission, which is reported to be positive in the diffuse and restricted ocular forms 60-95% and 14-50%, respectively. In a cross-sectional study, to determine the efficacy of repetitive stimulation test in myasthenia gravis, we evaluated the results in 30 cases who were hospitalized in Imam Khomeini Hospital during 1996-1999. Patients were first selected clinically and then confirmed by Tensilon test.Various clinical types including generalized and restricted ocular forms with different severity and duration were entered in this study. Considering the fact that the positiveness of the test is enhanced by assessment of more muscle groups, we evaluated decremental response in the facial, proximal and distal muscles of limbs. 90% of patients had the generalized form of the disease, whereas ocular myasthenia gravis was seen only in 10% of the cases. 74% of females and 73% of males showed positive response (overall: 73.3%. No significant association was found between the positive response, and age and sex. Peaks of incidences of the disease for the males were in fourth and sixth decades and for the females in thired decades

  16. Does Therapeutic Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Cause Cognitive Enhancing Effects in Patients with Neuropsychiatric Conditions? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomised Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Donel M; McClintock, Shawn M; Forster, Jane; Loo, Colleen K

    2016-09-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is increasingly used as a therapeutic intervention for neuropsychiatric illnesses and has demonstrated efficacy for treatment of major depression. However, an unresolved question is whether a course of rTMS treatment results in effects on cognitive functioning. In this systematic review and meta-analysis we aimed to quantitatively determine whether a course of rTMS has cognitive enhancing effects. We examined cognitive outcomes from randomised, sham-controlled studies conducted in patients with neuropsychiatric conditions where rTMS was administered to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) across repeated sessions, searched from PubMed/MEDLINE and other databases up until October 2015. Thirty studies met our inclusion criteria. Cognitive outcomes were pooled and examined across the following domains: Global cognitive function, executive function, attention, working memory, processing speed, visual memory, verbal memory and visuospatial ability. Active rTMS treatment was unassociated with generalised gains across the majority of domains of cognitive functioning examined. Secondary analyses revealed a moderate sized positive effect for improved working memory in a small number of studies in patients with schizophrenia (k = 3, g = 0.507, 95 % CI = [0.183-0.831], p cognitive enhancing effects.

  17. Combination Treatment of Low-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and Intensive Occupational Therapy for Ataxic Hemiparesis due to Thalamic Hemorrhage

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    Naoki Urushidani

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Both low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (LF-rTMS and intensive occupational therapy (OT are clinically beneficial for post-stroke patients with upper-limb hemiparesis. However, the usefulness of LF-rTMS and intensive OT for ataxic hemiparesis (AH is unknown. Methods: The study subjects included 7 patients with AH. All patients had ataxia and mild hemiparesis without a sensory disturbance that was due to thalamic hemorrhage. Each patient was scheduled to receive 20-min rTMS at 1 Hz at the contralesional cerebral hemisphere followed by 120-min intensive OT, daily for 21 sessions. The primary outcome was the motor function of the affected upper limb that was evaluated by using the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA. In addition, the International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale (ICARS score was determined to assess the severity of ataxia. Results: All patients completed the protocol without any adverse effects. The FMA score significantly increased after treatment. Notably, the ICARS score also significantly decreased. Conclusions: Our proposed combination treatment is a safe and feasible neurorehabilitative intervention for patients with AH due to thalamic hemorrhage. Our results demonstrate the possibility that rTMS in combination with intensive OT could improve motor function and alleviated ataxia in patients with AH.

  18. The use of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for modulating craving and addictive behaviours: a critical literature review of efficacy, technical and methodological considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grall-Bronnec, M; Sauvaget, A

    2014-11-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a potential therapeutic intervention for the treatment of addiction. This critical review aims to summarise the recent developments with respect to the efficacy of rTMS for all types of addiction and related disorders (including eating disorders), and concentrates on the associated methodological and technical issues. The bibliographic search consisted of a computerised screening of the Medline and ScienceDirect databases up to December 2013. Criteria for inclusion were the target problem was an addiction, a related disorder, or craving; the intervention was performed using rTMS; and the study was a clinical trial. Of the potential 638 articles, 18 met the criteria for inclusion. Most of these (11 of the 18) supported the efficacy of rTMS, especially in the short term. In most cases, the main assessment criterion was the measurement of craving using a Visual Analogue Scale. The results are discussed with respect to the study limitations and, in particular, the many methodological and technical discrepancies that were identified. Key recommendations are provided.

  19. A Mechanism for Stimulated AGN Feedback in Massive Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    McNamara, B R; Nulsen, P E J; Hogan, M T; Fabian, A C; Pulido, F; Edge, A C

    2016-01-01

    Observation shows that cooling instabilities leading to nebular emission, molecular gas, and star formation in giant galaxies are formed behind buoyantly-rising X-ray bubbles inflated by radio jets launched from massive nuclear black holes. We propose a model where molecular clouds condense from hot but relatively low entropy gas lifted by X-ray bubbles to an altitude where its cooling time is shorter than the time required for it to fall to its equilibrium location in the galaxy i.e., t_c/t_I <~1$. Here the infall time can exceed the free-fall time, t_ff, by factors of a few. This mechanism, which we refer to as stimulated feedback, is motivated by recent ALMA observations of central galaxies in clusters and groups revealing molecular clouds apparently forming in the wakes of rising X-ray bubbles and with surprisingly low cloud velocities. Supported by recent numerical simulations, our model would naturally sustain a continual feedback-loop in galaxies fuelled by cooling gas stimulated by radio-mechanical...

  20. Mechanisms and Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, James; Bikson, Marom; Kappenman, Emily S.; Clark, Vincent P.; Coslett, H. Branch; Hamblin, Michael R.; Hamilton, Roy; Jankord, Ryan; Kozumbo, Walter J.; McKinley, R. Andrew; Nitsche, Michael A.; Reilly, J. Patrick; Richardson, Jessica; Wurzman, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    The US Air Force Office of Scientific Research convened a meeting of researchers in the fields of neuroscience, psychology, engineering, and medicine to discuss most pressing issues facing ongoing research in the field of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and related techniques. In this study, we present opinions prepared by participants of the meeting, focusing on the most promising areas of research, immediate and future goals for the field, and the potential for hormesis theory to inform tDCS research. Scientific, medical, and ethical considerations support the ongoing testing of tDCS in healthy and clinical populations, provided best protocols are used to maximize safety. Notwithstanding the need for ongoing research, promising applications include enhancing vigilance/attention in healthy volunteers, which can accelerate training and support learning. Commonly, tDCS is used as an adjunct to training/rehabilitation tasks with the goal of leftward shift in the learning/treatment effect curves. Although trials are encouraging, elucidating the basic mechanisms of tDCS will accelerate validation and adoption. To this end, biomarkers (eg, clinical neuroimaging and findings from animal models) can support hypotheses linking neurobiological mechanisms and behavioral effects. Dosage can be optimized using computational models of current flow and understanding dose–response. Both biomarkers and dosimetry should guide individualized interventions with the goal of reducing variability. Insights from other applied energy domains, including ionizing radiation, transcranial magnetic stimulation, and low-level laser (light) therapy, can be prudently leveraged. PMID:28210202

  1. A Novel bioreactor with mechanical stimulation for skeletal tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Petrović

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The provision of mechanical stimulation is believed to be necessary for the functional assembly of skeletal tissues, which are normally exposed to a variety of biomechanical signals in vivo. In this paper, we present a development and validation of a novel bioreactor aimed for skeletal tissue engineering that provides dynamic compression and perfusion of cultivated tissues. Dynamic compression can be applied at frequencies up to 67.5 Hz and displacements down to 5 m thus suitable for the simulation of physiological conditions in a native cartilage tissue (0.1-1 Hz, 5-10 % strain. The bioreactor also includes a load sensor that was calibrated so to measure average loads imposed on tissue samples. Regimes of the mechanical stimulation and acquisition of load sensor outputs are directed by an automatic control system using applications developed within the LabView platform. In addition, perfusion of tissue samples at physiological velocities (10–100 m/s provides efficient mass transfer, as well as the possibilities to expose the cells to hydrodynamic shear and simulate the conditions in a native bone tissue. Thus, the novel bioreactor is suited for studies of the effects of different biomechanical signals on in vitro regeneration of skeletal tissues, as well as for the studies of newly formulated biomaterials and cell biomaterial interactions under in vivo-like settings.

  2. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation increases the corticospinal inhibition and the brain-derived neurotrophic factor in chronic myofascial pain syndrome: an explanatory double-blinded, randomized, sham-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Agnol, Letizzia; Medeiros, Liciane Fernandes; Torres, Iraci L S; Deitos, Alicia; Brietzke, Aline; Laste, Gabriela; de Souza, Andressa; Vieira, Júlia Lima; Fregni, Felipe; Caumo, Wolnei

    2014-08-01

    Chronic myofascial pain syndrome has been related to defective descending inhibitory systems. Twenty-four females aged 19 to 65 years with chronic myofascial pain syndrome were randomized to receive 10 sessions of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) (n = 12) at 10 Hz or a sham intervention (n = 12). We tested if pain (quantitative sensory testing), descending inhibitory systems (conditioned pain modulation [quantitative sensory testing + conditioned pain modulation]), cortical excitability (TMS parameters), and the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) would be modified. There was a significant interaction (time vs group) regarding the main outcomes of the pain scores as indexed by the visual analog scale on pain (analysis of variance, P myofascial pain syndrome were mediated by top-down regulation mechanisms, enhancing the corticospinal inhibitory system possibly via BDNF secretion modulation. High-frequency rTMS analgesic effects were mediated by top-down regulation mechanisms enhancing the corticospinal inhibitory, and this effect involved an increase in BDNF secretion. Copyright © 2014 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparing maximum rate and sustainability of pacing by mechanical vs. electrical stimulation in the Langendorff-perfused rabbit heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, T Alexander; Kohl, Peter

    2016-12-01

    Mechanical stimulation (MS) represents a readily available, non-invasive means of pacing the asystolic or bradycardic heart in patients, but benefits of MS at higher heart rates are unclear. Our aim was to assess the maximum rate and sustainability of excitation by MS vs. electrical stimulation (ES) in the isolated heart under normal physiological conditions. Trains of local MS or ES at rates exceeding intrinsic sinus rhythm (overdrive pacing; lowest pacing rates 2.5±0.5 Hz) were applied to the same mid-left ventricular free-wall site on the epicardium of Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts. Stimulation rates were progressively increased, with a recovery period of normal sinus rhythm between each stimulation period. Trains of MS caused repeated focal ventricular excitation from the site of stimulation. The maximum rate at which MS achieved 1:1 capture was lower than during ES (4.2±0.2 vs. 5.9±0.2 Hz, respectively). At all overdrive pacing rates for which repetitive MS was possible, 1:1 capture was reversibly lost after a finite number of cycles, even though same-site capture by ES remained possible. The number of MS cycles until loss of capture decreased with rising stimulation rate. If interspersed with ES, the number of MS to failure of capture was lower than for MS only. In this study, we demonstrate that the maximum pacing rate at which MS can be sustained is lower than that for same-site ES in isolated heart, and that, in contrast to ES, the sustainability of successful 1:1 capture by MS is limited. The mechanism(s) of differences in MS vs. ES pacing ability, potentially important for emergency heart rhythm management, are currently unknown, thus warranting further investigation. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  4. The Mechanisms of Repetitive Spike Generation in an Axonless Retinal Interneuron

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    Mark S. Cembrowski

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Several types of retinal interneurons exhibit spikes but lack axons. One such neuron is the AII amacrine cell, in which spikes recorded at the soma exhibit small amplitudes (5 ms. Here, we used electrophysiological recordings and computational analysis to examine the mechanisms underlying this atypical spiking. We found that somatic spikes likely represent large, brief action potential-like events initiated in a single, electrotonically distal dendritic compartment. In this same compartment, spiking undergoes slow modulation, likely by an M-type K conductance. The structural correlate of this compartment is a thin neurite that extends from the primary dendritic tree: local application of TTX to this neurite, or excision of it, eliminates spiking. Thus, the physiology of the axonless AII is much more complex than would be anticipated from morphological descriptions and somatic recordings; in particular, the AII possesses a single dendritic structure that controls its firing pattern.

  5. Advance of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Aphasia after Stroke (review)%重复经颅磁刺激治疗在脑卒中后失语症中的应用进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡雪艳; 江晓峰; 张通

    2015-01-01

    Aphasia is common after stroke, and seriously influences the family and social communication of the patients. As a safe and noninvasive therapy, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is used to induce or enhance neural plasticity, including promoting the recovery of aphasia after stroke. This paper reviewed mechanism of speech recovery and the application of rTMS for aphasia after stroke.%失语症是脑卒中后常见的并发症,对患者的工作、家庭和社会交往能力影响巨大。重复经颅磁刺激治疗(rTMS)是用于诱导或增强神经可塑性的一种安全无创的方法,有助于脑卒中后失语症的恢复。本文从言语恢复的机制、rTMS治疗在脑卒中后失语症恢复中的应用进行综述。

  6. Different frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD): A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Tingting; Xie, Qinglian; Zheng, Zhong; Zou, Ke; Wang, Lijuan

    2017-06-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a psychiatric disorder. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been found to be effective for treating PTSD, but whether different frequencies have different effects remains controversial. We conducted this systematic review and meta-analysis to address this question. We searched the literature for studies written in English or Chinese in 9 electronic databases from the databases' inception to August 1, 2016. Additional articles were identified from the reference lists of identified studies and from personal reference collections. Eighteen articles were included, and 11 were suitable for the meta-analysis (Combined sample size was 377 (217 in active rTMS groups, 160 in sham-controlled groups)). Low-frequency (LF) rTMS resulted in a significant reduction in the PTSD total score and the depression score (1. PTSD total score: pooled SMD, 0.92; CI, 0.11-1.72; 2. Depression: pooled SMD, 0.54; CI, 0.08-1.00). High-frequency (HF) rTMS showed the following results: 1. PTSD total score: pooled SMD, 3.24; CI, 2.24-4.25; 2. re-experiencing: pooled SMD, -1.77; CI, -2.49-(-1.04); 3. Avoidance: pooled SMD, -1.57; CI, -2.50-(-0.84); 4. hyperarousal: pooled SMD, -1.32; CI, -2.17-(-0.47); 5. depression: pooled SMD, 1.92; CI, 0.80-3.03; and 6. Anxiety: pooled SMD, 2.67; CI, 1.82-3.52. Therefore, both HF and LF rTMS can alleviate PTSD symptoms. Although the evidence is extremely limited, LF rTMS can reduce overall PTSD and depression symptoms. HF rTMS can improve the main and related symptoms of PTSD. However, additional research is needed to substantiate these findings.

  7. Primed low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and constraint-induced movement therapy in pediatric hemiparesis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillick, Bernadette T; Krach, Linda E; Feyma, Tim; Rich, Tonya L; Moberg, Kelli; Thomas, William; Cassidy, Jessica M; Menk, Jeremiah; Carey, James R

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility and efficacy of five treatments of 6 Hz primed, low-frequency, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) combined with constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) to promote recovery of the paretic hand in children with congenital hemiparesis. Nineteen children with congenital hemiparesis aged between 8 and 17 years (10 males, nine females; mean age 10 years 10 months, SD 2 years 10 months; Manual Ability Classification Scale levels I-III) underwent five sessions of either real rTMS (n=10) or sham rTMS (n=9) alternated daily with CIMT. CIMT consisted of 13 days of continuous long-arm casting with five skin-check sessions. Each child received a total of 10 hours of one-to-one therapy. The primary outcome measure was the Assisting Hand Assessment (AHA) and the secondary outcome variables were the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) and stereognosis. A Wilcoxon signed-rank sum test was used to analyze differences between pre- and post-test scores within the groups. Analysis of covariance was used to compute mean differences between groups adjusting for baseline. Fisher's exact test was used to compare individual change in AHA raw scores with the smallest detectable difference (SDD) of 4 points. All participants receiving treatment finished the study. Improvement in AHA differed significantly between groups (p=0.007). No significant differences in the secondary outcome measures were found. Eight out of 10 participants in the rTMS/CIMT group showed improvement greater than the SDD, but only two out of nine in the sham rTMS/CIMT group showed such improvement (p=0.023). No serious adverse events occurred. Primed, low-frequency rTMS combined with CIMT appears to be safe, feasible, and efficacious in pediatric hemiparesis. Larger clinical trials are now indicated. © 2013 Mac Keith Press.

  8. Effects of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on spontaneously hypertensive rats, an animal model of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jungyun; Park, Heamen; Yu, Seong-Lan; Jee, Sungju; Cheon, Keun-Ah; Song, Dong Ho; Kim, Seung Jun; Im, Woo-Young; Kang, Jaeku

    2016-10-01

    The current treatment of choice for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is pharmacotherapy. A search for new treatment options is underway, however, as the wide application of drugs to the general population of patients with ADHD is limited by side effects and the variance of pharmacokinetic effects of the drugs in each patient. In the present study, we applied repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), a non-invasive treatment used in a number of other psychiatric disorders, to spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs), an animal model of ADHD, in order to assess the efficacy of the treatment in modifying behavioural symptoms as well as levels of dopamine, noradrenaline, serotonin, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). A total of fifteen sessions of high-frequency rTMS treatment were administered. Behavioural symptoms were observed using open field, Y-maze, and elevated plus-maze tests. Upon completion of the experiments, rats were sacrificed, and the neurochemical changes in brain tissue were analysed using high performance liquid chromatography and Western blotting. The SHRs treated with rTMS tended to exhibit less locomotor activity in the open field test over the course of treatment, but there was no improvement in inattention as measured by the Y-maze test. Furthermore, BDNF concentration increased and noradrenaline concentration decreased in the prefrontal cortex of SHRs treated with rTMS. The results of the present preclinical study indicate that rTMS may constitute a new modality of treatment for patients with ADHD, through further evaluation of specific treatment parameters as well as safety and efficacy in humans are required.

  9. Effectiveness and acceptability of accelerated repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for treatment-resistant major depressive disorder: an open label trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGirr, Alexander; Van den Eynde, Frederique; Tovar-Perdomo, Santiago; Fleck, Marcelo P A; Berlim, Marcelo T

    2015-03-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a significant cause of worldwide disability and treatment resistance is common. High-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (HF-rTMS) has emerged as a treatment for MDD, and while efficacious, the daily commitment for typical 4-6 weeks of treatment poses a significant challenge. We aimed to determine the effectiveness and acceptability of an accelerated rTMS protocol for MDD. In this naturalistic trial, 27 patients with moderate to severe chronic and treatment-resistant MDD were treated with twice-daily HF-rTMS (10 Hz) applied over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex for 2 consecutive weeks (60,000 pulses). The primary outcomes were rates of clinical remission and response (16-item Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology post-treatment score ≤ 6, and ≥ 50% reduction, respectively). Secondary outcomes were self-reported anxious symptoms, depressive symptoms and quality of life, and dropout rates as a proxy for acceptability. Ten (37.0%) patients met criteria for clinical remission and 15 (55.6%) were classified as responders, with comparable outcomes for both moderate and severe MDD. Clinician-rated improvements in depressive symptoms were paralleled in self-reported depressive and anxious symptoms, as well as quality of life. No patient discontinued treatment. This study is limited by short treatment duration that might be lengthened with corresponding improvements in effectiveness, limited duration of follow-up, small sample size, and an open-label design requiring randomized controlled replication. An accelerated protocol involving twice-daily sessions of HF-rTMS over the left DLPFC for 2 weeks was effective in treatment-resistant MDD, and had excellent acceptability. Additional research is required to optimize accelerated rTMS treatment protocols and determine efficacy using sham-controlled trials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in obese females with binge eating disorder: a protocol for a double-blinded, randomized, sham-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranhão, Mara Fernandes; Estella, Nara Mendes; Cury, Maria Elisa Gisbert; Amigo, Veruska Lastoria; Picasso, Clarissa Mollinero; Berberian, Arthur; Campbell, Iain; Schmidt, Ulrike; Claudino, Angélica Medeiros

    2015-08-12

    Binge eating disorder is a new category in DSM-5 and highly associated with higher body mass index. The neural mechanisms that underlie binge eating are of great interest in order to improve treatment interventions. Brain mechanisms underlying drug and food craving are suggested to be similar: for example, both are reported to be associated with increased neural activity in the orbitofrontal and anterior cingulate cortex, and a diminished regulatory influence from lateral prefrontal circuits. Several studies have begun to assess the potential benefits of brain stimulation in reducing craving and addictive behaviors. Data from a study of a one-off session of transcranial magnetic stimulation in healthy women identified as strong cravers and of individuals with bulimic-type eating disorders, reported a reduction in food craving and binge eating episodes. This provides support for a more extensive investigation of the potential therapeutic benefits of transcranial magnetic stimulation. Lastly, brain imaging studies and a dimensional approach, will improve understanding of the neural correlates of the disorders and of the mode of action of transcranial magnetic stimulation. Sixty eligible obese females, with binge eating disorder, will be randomly allocated to receive 20 sessions of transcranial magnetic stimulation intervention (n = 30) or the sham transcranial magnetic stimulation intervention (n = 30) scattered 3 days/week. Thirty eligible controls will complete the baseline assessment. The primary outcome (number of binge eating episodes) will be assed at each treatment sessions, and 8 weeks after intervention completion (follow-up). It is hypothesized that mean weekly binge-eating episodes will be reduced in the intervention group, compared to the sham group, and that the effect will be maintained at follow-up. Despite the severity associated with Binge Eating Disorder, there are limited treatment options. This study is an important step in the development of more

  11. Mechanisms of deep brain stimulation for obsessive compulsive disorder: effects upon cells and circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Kathleen Bourne

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Deep brain stimulation (DBS has emerged as a safe, effective, and reversible treatment for a number of movement disorders. This has prompted investigation of its use for other applications including psychiatric disorders. In recent years, DBS has been introduced for the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD, which is characterized by recurrent unwanted thoughts or ideas (obsessions and repetitive behaviors or mental acts performed in order to relieve these obsessions (compulsions. Abnormal activity in cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical (CSTC circuits including the orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, ventral striatum, and mediodorsal thalamus has been implicated in OCD. To this end a number of DBS targets including the anterior limb of the internal capsule, ventral capsule/ventral striatum, ventral caudate nucleus, subthalamic nucleus, nucleus accumbens, and the inferior thalamic peduncle have been investigated for the treatment of OCD. Despite its efficacy and widespread use in movement disorders, the mechanism of DBS is not fully understood, especially as it relates to psychiatric disorders. While initially thought to create a functional lesion akin to ablative procedures, it is increasingly clear that DBS may induce clinical benefit through activation of axonal fibers spanning the CSTC circuits, alteration of oscillatory activity within this network, and/or release of critical neurotransmitters. In this article we review how the use of DBS for OCD informs our understanding of both the mechanisms of DBS and the circuitry of OCD. We review the literature on DBS for OCD and discuss potential mechanisms of action at the neuronal level as well as the broader circuit level.

  12. Mechanisms of mRNA translation of interferon stimulated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Sonali; Kaur, Surinder; Kroczynska, Barbara; Platanias, Leonidas C

    2010-01-01

    Over the last two decades, a lot of research work has been focused on the interferon (IFN)-regulated JAK-STAT pathway and understanding the mechanisms governing the transcription of interferon stimulated genes (ISGs). Evidence suggests that the JAK-STAT pathway alone does not account in its entirety for mediating cellular responses to IFNs. There is emerging evidence that non-Stat pathways play important roles in mediating signals for the generation of IFN-responses. Various studies have underscored the importance of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs), especially p38 and ERK1/2, as well as the PI 3'K/AKT pathway in transmitting signals that are of critical importance for the biological effects of IFNs. Besides regulating the transcription of ISGs in some cases, engagement of these signaling pathways by the IFN-receptor (IFNR) associated complexes also plays an important role in mediating the translation of ISGs. The mechanisms regulating mRNA translation of ISGs is an area of ongoing active research and a lot more efforts will be required to complete our understanding of the various cellular elements involved in this process. In this review we highlight the mechanisms regulating translation of ISGs. We focus on the proteins regulated by the PI 3'K/AKT pathway, their role in mediating mRNA translation of ISGs and the functional consequences of this regulation. In addition, MAPKs are known to regulate the phosphorylation of various eukaryotic initiation factors and we summarize the roles of eIF4B and eIF4E phosphorylations on the translation of ISGs. The emerging roles of microRNAs in mRNA translation of ISGs are also discussed.

  13. A high pulse repetition frequency ultrasound system for the ex vivo measurement of mechanical properties of crystalline lenses with laser-induced microbubbles interrogated by acoustic radiation force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sangpil; Aglyamov, Salavat; Karpiouk, Andrei; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2012-08-07

    A high pulse repetition frequency ultrasound system for an ex vivo measurement of mechanical properties of an animal crystalline lens was developed and validated. We measured the bulk displacement of laser-induced microbubbles created at different positions within the lens using nanosecond laser pulses. An impulsive acoustic radiation force was applied to the microbubble, and spatio-temporal measurements of the microbubble displacement were assessed using a custom-made high pulse repetition frequency ultrasound system consisting of two 25 MHz focused ultrasound transducers. One of these transducers was used to emit a train of ultrasound pulses and another transducer was used to receive the ultrasound echoes reflected from the microbubble. The developed system was operating at 1 MHz pulse repetition frequency. Based on the measured motion of the microbubble, Young's moduli of surrounding tissue were reconstructed and the values were compared with those measured using the indentation test. Measured values of Young's moduli of four bovine lenses ranged from 2.6 ± 0.1 to 26 ± 1.4 kPa, and there was good agreement between the two methods. Therefore, our studies, utilizing the high pulse repetition frequency ultrasound system, suggest that the developed approach can be used to assess the mechanical properties of ex vivo crystalline lenses. Furthermore, the potential of the presented approach for in vivo measurements is discussed.

  14. Efficacy and safety of the Chinese herbal medicine shuganjieyu with and without adjunctive repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for geriatric depression: a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    XIE, Minmin; JIANG, Wenhai; YANG, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Background Pharmacological treatment of geriatric depression is often ineffective because patients cannot tolerate adequate doses of antidepressant medications. Aim Examine the efficacy and safety of shuganjieyu – the first Chinese herbal medicine approved for the treatment of depression by China’s drug regulatory agency -- with and without adjunctive treatment with repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in the treatment of geriatric depression. Methods Sixty-five inpatients 60 or older who met ICD-10 criteria for depression were randomly assigned to an experimental group (shuganjieyu + rTMS) (n=36) or a control group (shuganjieyu + sham rTMS)(n=29). All participants received 4 capsules of shuganjieyu daily for 6 weeks. rTMS (or sham rTMS) was administered 20 minutes daily, five days a week for 4 weeks. Blinded raters used the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD-17) and the Treatment Emergent Symptom Scale to assess clinical efficacy and safety at baseline and 1, 2, 4, and 6 weeks after starting treatment. Over the six-week trial, there was only one dropout from the experimental group and two dropouts from the control group. Results None of the patients had serious side effects, but 40% in the experimental group and 50% in the control group experienced minor side effects that all resolved spontaneously. Both groups showed substantial stepwise improvement in depressive symptoms over the 6 weeks. Repeated measures ANOVA found no differences between the two groups. After 6 weeks, 97% of the experimental group had experienced a 25% or greater drop in the level of depression, but only 20% had experience a 50% or greater drop in the level of depression; the corresponding values in the control group were 96% and 19%. There were some minor, non-significant differences in the onset of the treatment effect between the different types of depressive symptoms, but by the second week of treatment all five HAMD-17 subscale scores had improved significantly

  15. Effects of Electroconvulsive Therapy and Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Serum Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Levels in Patients with Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedge, Laura; Beaudoin, Ashley; Lazowski, Lauren; du Toit, Regina; Jokic, Ruzica; Milev, Roumen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels are decreased in individuals with depression and increase following antidepressant treatment. The objective of this study is to compare pre- and post-treatment serum BDNF levels in patients with drug-resistant major depressive disorder (MDD) who received either electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) or repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS). It is hypothesized that non-pharmacological treatments also increase serum BDNF levels. Methods: This was a prospective, single-blind study comparing pre- and post-treatment serum BDNF levels of 29 patients with drug-resistant MDD who received ECT or rTMS treatment. Serum BDNF levels were measured 1 week prior to and 1 week after treatment using the sandwich ELISA technique. Depression severity was measured 1 week before and 1 week after treatment using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Two-sided normal distribution paired t-test analysis was used to compare pre- and post-treatment BDNF concentration and illness severity. Bivariate correlations using Pearson’s coefficient assessed the relationship between post-treatment BDNF levels and post-treatment depression severity. Results: There was no significant difference in serum BDNF levels before and after ECT, although concentrations tended to increase from a baseline mean of 9.95–12.29 ng/ml after treatment (p = 0.137). Treatment with rTMS did not significantly alter BDNF concentrations (p = 0.282). Depression severity significantly decreased following both ECT (p = 0.003) and rTMS (p < 0.001). Post-treatment BDNF concentration was not significantly correlated with post-treatment depression severity in patients who received either ECT (r = −0.133, p = 0.697) or rTMS (r = 0.374, p = 0.126). It is important to note that these results are based on the small number of patients included in this study. Conclusion: This study suggests that ECT and rTMS may not exert their

  16. Effects of low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with intensive speech therapy on cerebral blood flow in post-stroke aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Takatoshi; Abo, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Kentaro; Watanabe, Motoi; Kakuda, Wataru; Senoo, Atushi

    2015-10-01

    We provided an intervention to chronic post-stroke aphasic patients using low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (LF-rTMS) guided by a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) evaluation of language laterality, combined with intensive speech therapy (ST). We performed a single photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT) scan pre- and post-intervention and investigated the relationship between cerebral blood flow (CBF) and language function. Fifty right-handed chronic post-stroke aphasic patients were enrolled in the study. During their 11-day hospital admission, the patients received a 40-min session of 1-Hz LF-rTMS on the left or right hemisphere, according to language localization identified by the fMRI evaluation, and intensive ST daily for 10 days, except for Sunday. A SPECT scan and language evaluation by the Standard Language Test of Aphasia (SLTA) were performed at the time of admission and at 3 months following discharge. We calculated laterality indices (LIs) of regional CBF (rCBF) in 13 language-related Brodmann area (BA) regions of interest. In patients who received LF-rTMS to the intact right hemisphere (RH-LF-rTMS), the improvement in the total SLTA score was significantly correlated with the pre- and post-intervention change of LI (ΔLI) in BA44. In patients who received LF-rTMS to the lesional left hemisphere (LH-LF-rTMS), this association was not observed. Analyses of the SLTA subscales and rCBF ΔLI demonstrated that in the RH-LF-rTMS group, the SLTA Speaking subscale scores were significantly correlated with ΔLIs in BA11, 20, and 21, and the SLTA Writing subscale scores were significantly correlated with ΔLIs in BA6 and 39. Conversely, in the LH-LF-rTMS group, the SLTA Speaking subscale scores were correlated with ΔLI in BA10, and the SLTA Reading subscale scores were significantly correlated with ΔLIs in BA13, 20, 22, and 44. Our results suggest the possibility that fMRI-guided LF-rTMS combined with intensive ST may

  17. Effects of electroconvulsive therapy and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in patients with depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eGedge

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF levels are decreased in individuals with depression and increase following antidepressant treatment. The objective of this study is to compare pre- and post-treatment serum BDNF levels in patients with drug-resistant major depressive disorder (MDD who received either electroconvulsive therapy (ECT or repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS. It is hypothesized that non-pharmacological treatments also increase serum BDNF levels.Methods: This was a prospective, single-blind study comparing pre- and post-treatment serum BDNF levels of twenty-nine patients with drug-resistant MDD who received ECT or rTMS treatment. Serum BDNF levels were measured one week prior to and one week after treatment using the sandwich ELISA technique. Depression severity was measured one week before and one week after treatment using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Two-sided normal distribution paired t-test analysis was used to compare pre- and post-treatment BDNF concentration and illness severity. Bivariate correlations using Pearson's coefficient assessed the relationship between post-treatment BDNF levels and post-treatment depression severity.Results: There was no significant difference in serum BDNF levels before and after ECT, although concentrations tended to increase from a baseline mean of 9.95 ng/ml to 12.29 ng/ml after treatment (p= 0.137. Treatment with rTMS did not significantly alter BDNF concentrations (p= 0.282. Depression severity significantly decreased following both ECT (p= 0.003 and rTMS (p< 0.001. Post-treatment BDNF concentration was not significantly correlated with post-treatment depression severity in patients who received either ECT (r= -0.133, p= 0.697 or rTMS (r= 0.374, p= 0.126.Conclusion: This study suggests that ECT and rTMS may not exert their clinical effects by altering serum BDNF levels. Serum BDNF concentration may not be a biomarker of ECT or rTMS treatment response.

  18. Effect of low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation combining task-oriented training on upper limb motor function recovery after stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-bin WANG

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the effect of low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS combined with task-oriented training on the recovery of upper limb motor function of stroke patients. Methods A total of 42 patients with hemiplegia after stroke were randomly divided into control group (N = 20 and treatment group (N = 22. Control group received routine rehabilitation training and task-oriented training, and treatment group received low-frequency (1 Hz rTMS over the contralesional cortex addition to routine rehabilitation and task-oriented training. Fugl-Meyer Assessment Scale for Upper Extremity (FMA-UE and Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT were used to evaluate upper limb motor function of all patients before treatment, after 4-week treatment and 3 months after treatment. The latency and central motor conduction time (CMCT of motor-evoked potential (MEP in the contralesional cortex were recorded and analyzed. Results Compared with control group, FMA-UE score (P = 0.006 and WMFT score (P = 0.024 were significantly increased in treatment group. There was significant difference in FMA-AUE score (P = 0.000 and WMFT score (P = 0.000 at different time points. Compared with before treatment, FMA-UE score (P = 0.000, for all and WMFT score (P = 0.000, for all of patients in both groups were all significantly increased after 4-week treatment and 3 months after treatment. Besides, FMA-UE score (P = 0.000, for all and WMFT score (P = 0.000, for all 3 months after treatment were higher than those after 4-week treatment. There was no statistically significant difference between 2 groups on the latency (P = 0.979 and CMCT (P = 0.807 of MEP before and after treatment, and so was the difference on the latency (P = 0.085 and CMCT (P = 0.507 of MEP in the contralesional cortex at different time points (before treatment, after 4-week treatment and 3 months after treatment. Conclusions Low-frequency rTMS over the contralesional cortex combined

  19. Neuroprotective effect of repetitive magnetic stimulation on primarily cultured hippocampus neurons in rats%重复性磁刺激对原代培养大鼠海马神经元的保护作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏莉; 林宏; 李柱一; 刘煜

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Much has been studied on the neuroprotective effect of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on the morphology and vitality of rat hippocampus neurons in vitro in order to verify its protective effect on neurons.DESIGN: A completely randomized controlled experiment with animals as subjects.SETTING: Institute of neuroscience of a military medical university of Chinese PLA.MATERIALS: The experiment was conducted at the Institute of Neuroscience, Fourth Military Medical University of Chinese PLA, from April to June 2004. Primary cultured hippocampus neurons of neonatal SD rats were used in the experiment. The cells were randomly assigned to control group,repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation group, H2O2 group and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation-H2O2 group, each group having 10 wells.METHODS: Hippocampus neurons of the rats were cultured by common culture method. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation group and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation-H2O2 group were treated with 1 Hz 100 mT repetitive magnetic stimulation for 1 000 times 48 hours after being seeded, whereas the control group and H2O2 group were left untreated. H2O2group and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation-H2O2 group were incubated with 100 μmol/L H2O2 56 hours after being seeded. Seventy-two hours after being seeded, the cellular morphology of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation group and control group was observed under an inverted phase contrast microscope. Cell vitality was assayed with 3-(4, 5)-dimethythioazol-2-yl-2, 5-diphenyl-tetrazoliumbromide method (MTT).MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The morphology and viability of the neurons in repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation group and control group.RESULTS: Seventy-two hours after being seeded, the cellular morphology of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation group and control group was

  20. Strong modulation of ectopic focus as a mechanism of repetitive interpolated ventricular bigeminy with heart rate doubling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayanagi, Kan; Nakahara, Shiro; Toratani, Noritaka; Chida, Ryuji; Kobayashi, Sayuki; Sakai, Yoshihiko; Takeuchi, Akihiro; Ikeda, Noriaki

    2013-10-01

    Repetitive interpolated ventricular bigeminy (RIVB) can introduce a doubling of the ventricular rate. To clarify the mechanism of RIVB, we hypothesized that it was introduced by a strong modulation of the ventricular automatic focus. RIVB, defined as more than 7 bigeminy events, was detected by instantaneous heart rate and bigeminy interval (BI) tachograms in 1450 successive patients with frequent ventricular premature contractions (≥3000 per day). Postextrasystolic interval bigeminy interval curves were plotted to determine the degree of modulation. Mean sinus cycle length bigeminy interval curves were plotted for selection. RIVB was simulated by using a computer-based parasystole model. RIVB was observed in 7 patients (age 60 ± 16 years; 2 men and 5 women) with a heart rate of 58.2 ± 6.5 beats/min during a rest period both during the day and at night. The tachograms disclosed the onset of the RIVB with a doubled ventricular rate to 112.3 ± 8.5 beats/min. On the postextrasystolic interval bigeminy interval curves, compensatory bigeminy and interpolated bigeminy constituted overlapping regression lines with slopes close to 1.00 and RIVB was located in the lower left portion. RIVB lasting for up to 3 hours was quickly detected by mean sinus cycle length bigeminy interval curve. The PQ interval immediately after RIVB was prolonged in comparison with baseline (0.18 ± 0.02 to 0.21 ± 0.02 seconds; P heart rate. Our findings support the hypothesis that RIVB was introduced by strongly modulated ventricular pacemaker accelerated by an intervening normal QRS. © 2013 Heart Rhythm Society. All rights reserved.

  1. Transcutaneous mechanical nerve stimulation using perineal vibration: a novel method for the treatment of female stress urinary incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønksen, Jens; Ohl, Dana A; Bonde, Birthe;

    2007-01-01

    We defined basic guidelines for transcutaneous mechanical nerve stimulation in modifying pelvic floor responses in women and determined the efficacy of transcutaneous mechanical nerve stimulation in treating stress urinary incontinence.......We defined basic guidelines for transcutaneous mechanical nerve stimulation in modifying pelvic floor responses in women and determined the efficacy of transcutaneous mechanical nerve stimulation in treating stress urinary incontinence....

  2. 重复经颅磁刺激器电容充电技术发展现状%Current progress of capacitor charging techniques for repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷发胜; 赵晓昕; 张广浩; 霍小林

    2016-01-01

    经颅磁刺激( TMS)是一种非侵入式、无创无痛的神经检测和治疗技术。其中,重复经颅磁刺激( rTMS)具有调节病变区皮质兴奋性等复杂机制,在神经性疾病治疗研究方面具有巨大潜在价值,已经成为当今的研究热点。电容器充电技术是重复经颅磁刺激的核心技术,直接影响rTMS的性能,研制高效和可靠的电容充电电源成为rTMS技术发展的迫切需求。目前比较成熟的电容器充电技术中,高频开关变换器充电方式较其他方式具有明显的优势,随着电力电子器件的发展已成为当今的主流。本文首先详细介绍了两种高频变换器拓扑结构:PWM变换器和谐振变换器,随后从效率、充电速度、体积等几方面阐述了可用于rTMS系统的电容器充电电源技术的最新研究进展,最后指明了rTMS电源技术未来的发展方向。%Transcranial magnetic stimulation ( TMS ) is a non⁃invasive neural detection and treatment technique without causing the subject discomfort. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation ( rTMS) which has some com⁃plex regulatory mechanisms, such as regulating excitability of cortical areas, has great potential value in therapy re⁃search for neurological diseases, and it has become a current research hotspot. The capacitor charging technology is the core of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, directly impacting on the performance of rTMS. Developing highly efficient and reliable capacitor charging power supply ( CCPS) becomes urgent requirements for the advance⁃ment of rTMS techniques. With the mushroom growth of power electronic devices, compared with the other two kinds of techniques, high frequency switching converter has become current mainstream. Firstly two topologies of high frequency converter, PWM converter and resonant convertor, are introduced in detail, and then the latest re⁃search progress of capacitor charging power supply

  3. Mechanisms of Cochlear Stimulation Through the Round Window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukashkin, Andrei N.; Weddell, Thomas; Russell, Ian J.

    2011-11-01

    The round window membrane (RW) functions as a pressure relief valve in conventional hearing allowing structures of the middle ear to move. Investigations in recent years have shown that middle ear implants can be used to stimulate the cochlea via the RW. Isolated clinical uses of this technique have been applied but more thorough theoretical and empirical studies are required. Using guinea pigs as test subjects we have investigated physiological effects of RW stimulation using a simulation of active middle ear prosthesis, a cylindrical neodymium iron boron disk magnet placed upon the RW which can be stimulated by an electromagnetic coil positioned in close proximity to the magnet.

  4. Mechanical stimulation increases proliferation, differentiation and protein expression in culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossi, Alberto; Yadav, Kavita; Lawson, Moira Ann

    2007-01-01

    Myogenesis is a complex sequence of events, including the irreversible transition from the proliferation-competent myoblast stage into fused, multinucleated myotubes. Myogenic differentiation is regulated by positive and negative signals from surrounding tissues. Stimulation due to stretch- or lo...

  5. Inhibitory Effect and Possible Mechanism of Intraurethral Stimulation on Overactive Bladder in Female Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yu; Liao, Limin; Wyndaele, Jean Jacques

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the inhibitory effect and possible mechanism of intraurethral stimulation on overactive bladder (OAB) induced by acetic acid irritation. Cystometry was performed in 13 urethane-anesthetized female rats. Intravesical infusion of 0.5% acetic acid was used to irritate the bladder and induce OAB. Multiple cystometrograms were performed with mirabegron, continuous stimulation, mirabegron plus continuous stimulation, and β3-adrenoceptor antagonist plus continuous stimulation to determine the mechanism underlying the inhibitory effect by intraurethral stimulation. Infusion of acetic acid significantly decreased bladder capacity. Intraurethral stimulation at 2.5 Hz plus mirabegron significantly increased bladder capacity and decreased the nonvoiding contraction count. The changes were strongly inhibited after the β3-adrenoceptor antagonist was administered. Activation of urethral afferent nerves can reverse OAB, which activates C-fiber afferent nerves. This animal study indicates that intraurethral stimulation may interfere with OAB through hypogastric nerve activation and pudendal nerve neuromodulation.

  6. Disturbance and recovery of trunk mechanical and neuromuscular behaviours following repetitive lifting: influences of flexion angle and lift rate on creep-induced effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toosizadeh, Nima; Bazrgari, Babak; Hendershot, Brad; Muslim, Khoirul; Nussbaum, Maury A; Madigan, Michael L

    2013-01-01

    Repetitive lifting is associated with an increased risk of occupational low back disorders, yet potential adverse effects of such exposure on trunk mechanical and neuromuscular behaviours were not well described. Here, 12 participants, gender balanced, completed 40 min of repetitive lifting in all combinations of three flexion angles (33, 66, and 100% of each participant's full flexion angle) and two lift rates (2 and 4 lifts/min). Trunk behaviours were obtained pre- and post-exposure and during recovery using sudden perturbations. Intrinsic trunk stiffness and reflexive responses were compromised after lifting exposures, with larger decreases in stiffness and reflexive force caused by larger flexion angles, which also delayed reflexive responses. Consistent effects of lift rate were not found. Except for reflex delay no measures returned to pre-exposure values after 20 min of recovery. Simultaneous changes in both trunk stiffness and neuromuscular behaviours may impose an increased risk of trunk instability and low back injury. An elevated risk of low back disorders is attributed to repetitive lifting. Here, the effects of flexion angle and lift rate on trunk mechanical and neuromuscular behaviours were investigated. Increasing flexion angle had adverse effects on these outcomes, although lift rate had inconsistent effects and recovery time was more than 20 min.

  7. A CHROMATIN MODIFYING ENZYME, SDG8, IS REQUIRED FOR MORPHOLOGICAL, GENE EXPRESSION, AND EPIGENETIC RESPONSES TO MECHANICAL STIMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Ian Cazzonelli

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Thigmomorphogenesis is viewed as being a response process of acclimation to short repetitive bursts of mechanical stimulation or touch. The underlying molecular mechanisms that coordinate changes in how touch signals lead to long-term morphological changes are enigmatic. Touch responsive gene expression is rapid and transient, and no transcription factor or DNA regulatory motif has been reported that could confer a genome wide mechanical stimulus. We report here on a chromatin modifying enzyme, SDG8/ASHH2, which can regulate the expression of many touch responsive genes identified in Arabidopsis. SDG8 is required for the permissive expression of touch induced genes; and the loss of function of sdg8 perturbs the maximum levels of induction on selected touch gene targets. SDG8 is required to maintain permissive H3K4 trimethylation marks surrounding the Arabidopsis touch-inducible gene TOUCH 3 (TCH3, which encodes a calmodulin-like protein (CML12. The gene neighbouring was also slightly down regulated, revealing a new target for SDG8 mediated chromatin modification. Finally, sdg8 mutants show perturbed morphological response to wind-agitated mechanical stimuli, implicating an epigenetic memory-forming process in the acclimation response of thigmomorphogenesis.

  8. Mechanical Stimulation Protocols of Human Derived Cells in Articular Cartilage Tissue Engineering - A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khozoee, Baktash; Mafi, Pouya; Mafi, Reza; Khan, Wasim S

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical stimulation is a key factor in articular cartilage generation and maintenance. Bioreactor systems have been designed and built in order to deliver specific types of mechanical stimulation. The focus has been twofold, applying a type of preconditioning in order to stimulate cell differentiation, and to simulate in vivo conditions in order to gain further insight into how cells respond to different stimulatory patterns. Due to the complex forces at work within joints, it is difficult to simulate mechanical conditions using a bioreactor. The aim of this review is to gain a deeper understanding of the complexities of mechanical stimulation protocols by comparing those employed in bioreactors in the context of tissue engineering for articular cartilage, and to consider their effects on cultured cells. Allied and Complementary Medicine 1985 to 2016, Ovid MEDLINE[R] 1946 to 2016, and Embase 1974 to 2016 were searched using key terms. Results were subject to inclusion and exclusion criteria, key findings summarised into a table and subsequently discussed. Based on this review it is overwhelmingly clear that mechanical stimulation leads to increased chondrogenic properties in the context of bioreactor articular cartilage tissue engineering using human cells. However, given the variability and lack of controlled factors between research articles, results are difficult to compare, and a standardised method of evaluating stimulation protocols proved challenging. With improved standardisation in mechanical stimulation protocol reporting, bioreactor design and building processes, along with a better understanding of joint behaviours, we hope to perform a meta-analysis on stimulation protocols and methods.

  9. Resveratrol stimulates mitochondrial fusion by a mechanism requiring mitofusin-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Ellen L; Moradi, Fereshteh; Maddalena, Lucas A; Valente, Andrew J F; Fonseca, Joao; Stuart, Jeffrey A

    2017-04-01

    Resveratrol (RES) is a plant-derived stilbene associated with a wide range of health benefits. Mitochondria are a key downstream target of RES, and in some cell types RES promotes mitochondrial biogenesis, altered cellular redox status, and a shift toward oxidative metabolism. Mitochondria exist as a dynamic network that continually remodels via fusion and fission processes, and the extent of fusion is related to cellular redox status and metabolism. We investigated RES's effects on mitochondrial network morphology in several cell lines using a quantitative approach to measure the extent of network fusion. 48 h continuous treatment with 10-20 μM RES stimulated mitochondrial fusion in C2C12 myoblasts, PC3 cancer cells, and mouse embryonic fibroblasts stimulated significant increases in fusion in all instances, resulting in larger and more highly branched mitochondrial networks. Mitofusin-2 (Mfn2) is a key protein facilitating mitochondrial fusion, and its expression was also stimulated by RES. Using Mfn2-null cells we demonstrated that RES's effects on mitochondrial fusion, cellular respiration rates, and cell growth are all dependent upon the presence of Mfn2. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Mfn2 and mitochondrial fusion are affected by RES in ways that appear to relate to RES's known effects on cellular metabolism and growth.

  10. Sensory stimulation (TENS): effects of parameter manipulation on mechanical pain thresholds in healthy human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesterton, Linda S; Barlas, Panos; Foster, Nadine E; Lundeberg, Thomas; Wright, Christine C; Baxter, G David

    2002-09-01

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a popular form of electrostimulation. Despite an extensive research base, there remains no consensus regarding the parameter selection required to achieve maximal hypoalgesic effects. The aim of this double blind, sham-controlled study was to investigate the relative hypoalgesic effects of different TENS parameters (frequency, intensity and stimulation site) upon experimentally induced mechanical pain. Two hundred and forty participants were recruited in order to provide statistical analysis with 80% power at alpha = 0.05. Subjects were randomised to one of the six TENS groups, a control, and a sham TENS group (n = 30, 15 males, 15 females, per group). TENS groups differed in their combinations of stimulation; frequency (4 or 110 Hz), intensity ('to tolerance' or 'strong but comfortable') and stimulation site (segmental--over the distribution of the radial nerve or, extrasegmental--over acupuncture point 'gall bladder 34', or a combination of both segmental and extrasegmental). Pulse duration was fixed at 200 micros. Stimulation was delivered for 30 min and subjects were then monitored for a further 30 min. Mechanical pain threshold (MPT) was measured using a pressure algometer and taken from the first dorsal interosseous muscle of the dominant hand, ipsilateral to the stimulation site. MPT measures were taken, at baseline, and at 10-min intervals for 60 min. Difference scores were analysed using repeated measures and one-way ANOVA and relevant post hoc tests. Low frequency, high intensity, extrasegmental stimulation produced a rapid onset hypoalgesic effect, which increased during the stimulation period (P < 0.0005 control and sham) and was sustained for 30 min post-stimulation (P < 0.0005(control), P = 0.024(sham)). Whilst high frequency, 'strong but comfortable' intensity, segmental stimulation produced comparable hypoalgesic levels during stimulation, this effect was not sustained post-stimulation

  11. Mechanisms of high-regularity periodic structuring of silicon surface by sub-MHz repetition rate ultrashort laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnilitskyi, Iaroslav; Gruzdev, Vitaly; Bulgakova, Nadezhda M.; Mocek, Tomáš; Orazi, Leonardo

    2016-10-01

    Silicon is one of the most abundant materials which is used in many areas of modern research and technology. A variety of those applications require surface nanopatterning with minimum structure defects. However, the high-quality nanostructuring of large areas of silicon surface at industrially acceptable speed is still a challenge. Here, we report a rapid formation of highly regular laser-induced periodic surface structures (HR-LIPSS) in the regime of strong ablation by infrared femtosecond laser pulses at sub-MHz repetition rate. Parameters of the laser-surface interactions and obtained experimental results suggest an important role of electrostatically assisted bond softening in initiating the HR-LIPSS formation.

  12. Animal models of transcranial direct current stimulation: Methods and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Mark P; Rahman, Asif; Lafon, Belen; Kronberg, Gregory; Ling, Doris; Parra, Lucas C; Bikson, Marom

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this review is to summarize the contribution of animal research using direct current stimulation (DCS) to our understanding of the physiological effects of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). We comprehensively address experimental methodology in animal studies, broadly classified as: (1) transcranial stimulation; (2) direct cortical stimulation in vivo and (3) in vitro models. In each case advantages and disadvantages for translational research are discussed including dose translation and the overarching "quasi-uniform" assumption, which underpins translational relevance in all animal models of tDCS. Terminology such as anode, cathode, inward current, outward current, current density, electric field, and uniform are defined. Though we put key animal experiments spanning decades in perspective, our goal is not simply an exhaustive cataloging of relevant animal studies, but rather to put them in context of ongoing efforts to improve tDCS. Cellular targets, including excitatory neuronal somas, dendrites, axons, interneurons, glial cells, and endothelial cells are considered. We emphasize neurons are always depolarized and hyperpolarized such that effects of DCS on neuronal excitability can only be evaluated within subcellular regions of the neuron. Findings from animal studies on the effects of DCS on plasticity (LTP/LTD) and network oscillations are reviewed extensively. Any endogenous phenomena dependent on membrane potential changes are, in theory, susceptible to modulation by DCS. The relevance of morphological changes (galvanotropy) to tDCS is also considered, as we suggest microscopic migration of axon terminals or dendritic spines may be relevant during tDCS. A majority of clinical studies using tDCS employ a simplistic dose strategy where excitability is singularly increased or decreased under the anode and cathode, respectively. We discuss how this strategy, itself based on classic animal studies, cannot account for the

  13. External Ca(2+) is essential for chloroplast movement induced by mechanical stimulation but not by light stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Y; Wada, M; Kadota, A

    2001-10-01

    In the fern Adiantum capillus-veneris, chloroplast movement is induced by mechanical stimulation as well as by light stimulation. Directional movement of both types depends on an actin-based motile system. To investigate the physiological relationship between mechanical and light signaling in the regulation of chloroplast movement, we examined the mechano-response of chloroplasts whose motility had been already restricted after photo-relocation. Chloroplast mechano-avoidance movement was induced under all of the photo-relocation conditions tested, indicating that mechano-specific signals generated by mechanical stimulation dominate over the light signals and reactivate the motility of chloroplasts. When the effects of external Ca(2+) on the induction of mechano- and light responses were examined, strikingly different requirements of external Ca(2+) were found for each. In medium without Ca(2+), the mechano-response was suppressed but no effects were observed on photo-response. Mechano-relocation movement of chloroplasts was inhibited by 100 microM lanthanum (La(3+)), a plasma membrane calcium channel blocker, and by 10 microM gadolinium (Gd(3+)), a stretch-activated channel blocker. However, the same concentrations of these drugs did not affect the photo-relocation movement at all. These results suggest that the influx of external Ca(2+) is crucial for the early signaling step of chloroplast mechano-relocation but not for that of photo-relocation. This is the first report showing the separation of signaling pathways in mechano- and photo-relocation of chloroplasts.

  14. Transcutaneous mechanical nerve stimulation using perineal vibration: a novel method for the treatment of female stress urinary incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønksen, Jens; Ohl, Dana A; Bonde, Birthe

    2007-01-01

    We defined basic guidelines for transcutaneous mechanical nerve stimulation in modifying pelvic floor responses in women and determined the efficacy of transcutaneous mechanical nerve stimulation in treating stress urinary incontinence....

  15. Production of PGE(2) increases in tendons subjected to repetitive mechanical loading and induces differentiation of tendon stem cells into non-tenocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianying; Wang, James H-C

    2010-02-01

    Whether tendon inflammation is involved in the development of tendinopathy or degenerative changes of the tendon remains a matter of debate. We explored this question by performing animal and cell culture experiments to determine the production and effects of PGE(2), a major inflammatory mediator in tendons. Mouse tendons were subjected to repetitive mechanical loading via treadmill running, and the effect of PGE(2) on proliferation and differentiation of tendon stem cells (TSCs) was assessed in vitro. Compared to levels in cage control mice, PGE(2) levels in mouse patellar and Achilles tendons were markedly increased in response to a bout of rigorous treadmill running. PGE(2) treatment of TSCs in culture decreased cell proliferation and induced both adipogenesis and osteogenesis of TSCs, as evidenced by accumulation of lipid droplets and calcium deposits, respectively. Effects of PGE(2) on both TSC proliferation and differentiation were apparently PGE(2)-dose-dependent. These findings suggest that high levels of PGE(2), which are present in tendons subjected to repetitive mechanical loading conditions in vivo as shown in this study, may result in degenerative changes of the tendon by decreasing proliferation of TSCs in tendons and also inducing differentiation of TSCs into adipocytes and osteocytes. The consequences of this PGE(2) effect on TSCs is the reduction of the pool of tenocytes for repair of tendons injured by mechanical loading, and production of fatty and calcified tissues within the tendon, often seen at the later stages of tendinopathy.

  16. Low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic simulation prevents chronic epileptic seizure*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yinxu Wang; Xiaoming Wang; Sha Ke; Juan Tan; Litian Hu; Yaodan Zhang; Wenjuan Cui

    2013-01-01

    Although low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic simulation can potentially treat epilepsy, its underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study investigated the influence of low-frequency re-petitive transcranial magnetic simulation on changes in several nonlinear dynamic electroenceph-alographic parameters in rats with chronic epilepsy and explored the mechanism underlying repeti-tive transcranial magnetic simulation-induced antiepileptic effects. An epilepsy model was estab-lished using lithium-pilocarpine intraperitoneal injection into adult Sprague-Dawley rats, which were then treated with repetitive transcranial magnetic simulation for 7 consecutive days. Nonlinear elec-electroencephalographic parameters were obtained from the rats at 7, 14, and 28 days post-stimulation. Results showed significantly lower mean correlation-dimension and Kolmogo-rov-entropy values for stimulated rats than for non-stimulated rats. At 28 days, the complexity and point-wise correlation dimensional values were lower in stimulated rats. Low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic simulation has suppressive effects on electrical activity in epileptic rats, thus explaining its effectiveness in treating epilepsy.

  17. Neural mechanisms underlying transcranial direct current stimulation in aphasia: A feasibility study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena eUlm

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the neural mechanisms by which transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS impacts on language processing in post-stroke aphasia. This was addressed in a proof-of-principle study that explored the effects of tDCS application in aphasia during simultaneous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. We employed a single subject, cross-over, sham-tDCS controlled design and the stimulation was administered to an individualized perilesional stimulation site that was identified by a baseline fMRI scan and a picture naming task. Peak activity during the baseline scan was located in the spared left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG and this area was stimulated during a subsequent cross-over phase. tDCS was successfully administered to the target region and anodal- vs. sham-tDCS resulted in selectively increased activity at the stimulation site. Our results thus demonstrate that it is feasible to precisely target an individualized stimulation site in aphasia patients during simultaneous fMRI which allows assessing the neural mechanisms underlying tDCS application. The functional imaging results of this case report highlight one possible mechanism that may have contributed to beneficial behavioural stimulation effects in previous clinical tDCS trials in aphasia. In the future, this approach will allow identifying distinct patterns of stimulation effects on neural processing in larger cohorts of patients. This may ultimately yield information about the variability of tDCS-effects on brain functions in aphasia.

  18. Neural Mechanisms Underlying Perilesional Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation in Aphasia: A Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulm, Lena; McMahon, Katie; Copland, David; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Meinzer, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the neural mechanisms by which transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) impacts on language processing in post-stroke aphasia. This was addressed in a proof-of-principle study that explored the effects of tDCS application in aphasia during simultaneous functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We employed a single subject, cross-over, sham-tDCS controlled design, and the stimulation was administered to an individualized perilesional stimulation site that was identified by a baseline fMRI scan and a picture naming task. Peak activity during the baseline scan was located in the spared left inferior frontal gyrus and this area was stimulated during a subsequent cross-over phase. tDCS was successfully administered to the target region and anodal- vs. sham-tDCS resulted in selectively increased activity at the stimulation site. Our results thus demonstrate that it is feasible to precisely target an individualized stimulation site in aphasia patients during simultaneous fMRI, which allows assessing the neural mechanisms underlying tDCS application. The functional imaging results of this case report highlight one possible mechanism that may have contributed to beneficial behavioral stimulation effects in previous clinical tDCS trials in aphasia. In the future, this approach will allow identifying distinct patterns of stimulation effects on neural processing in larger cohorts of patients. This may ultimately yield information about the variability of tDCS effects on brain functions in aphasia. PMID:26500522

  19. [Nutritional management of intestinal failure and potential stimulation mechanisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez de la Cruz, A J; Moreno-Torres Herrera, R; Pérez Roca, C

    2007-05-01

    Severe forms of intestinal failure represent one of the most complex pathologies to manage, in both children and adults. In adults, the most common causes are chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction and severe short bowel syndrome following large intestinal resections, particularly due to massive mesenteric ischemic, within the context of cardiopathies occurring with atrial fibrillation. The essential management after stabilizing the patient consists in nutritional support, either by parenteral or enteral routes, with tolerance to oral diet being the final goal of intestinal adaptation in these pathologies. Surgery may be indicated in some cases to increase the absorptive surface area. Parenteral nutrition is an essential support measure that sometimes has to be maintained for long time, even forever, except for technique-related complications or unfavorable clinical course that would lead to extreme surgical alternatives such as intestinal transplantation. Hormonal therapy with trophism-stimulating factors opens new alternatives that are already being tried in humans.

  20. Mechanism of attenuation of leptin signaling under chronic ligand stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bamberg-Lemper Simone

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leptin is an adipocyte-derived hormone that acts via its hypothalamic receptor (LEPRb to regulate energy balance. A downstream effect essential for the weight-regulatory action of leptin is the phosphorylation and activation of the latent transcription factor STAT3 by LEPRb-associated Janus kinases (JAKs. Obesity is typically associated with chronically elevated leptin levels and a decreased ability of LEPRb to activate intracellular signal transduction pathways (leptin resistance. Here we have studied the roles of the intracellular tyrosine residues in the negative feedback regulation of LEPRb-signaling under chronic leptin stimulation. Results Mutational analysis showed that the presence of either Tyr985 and Tyr1077 in the intracellular domain of LEPRb was sufficient for the attenuation of STAT3 phosphorylation, whereas mutation of both tyrosines rendered LEPRb resistant to feedback regulation. Overexpression and RNA interference-mediated downregulation of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3 revealed that both Tyr985 and Tyr1077 were capable of supporting the negative modulatory effect of SOCS3 in reporter gene assays. In contrast, the inhibitory effect of SOCS1 was enhanced by the presence of Tyr985 but not Tyr1077. Finally, the reduction of the STAT-phosphorylating activity of the LEPRb complex after 2 h of leptin stimulation was not accompanied by the dephosphorylation or degradation of LEPRb or the receptor-associated JAK molecule, but depended on Tyr985 and/or Tyr1077. Conclusions Both Tyr985 and Tyr1077 contribute to the negative regulation of LEPRb signaling. The inhibitory effects of SOCS1 and SOCS3 differ in the dependence on the tyrosine residues in the intracellular domain of LEPRb.

  1. Molecular mechanisms of glucose-stimulated GLP-1 secretion from perfused rat small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhre, Rune E; Frost, Charlotte R; Svendsen, Berit; Holst, Jens J

    2015-02-01

    Glucose is an important stimulus for glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) secretion, but the mechanisms of secretion have not been investigated in integrated physiological models. We studied glucose-stimulated GLP-1 secretion from isolated perfused rat small intestine. Luminal glucose (5% and 20% w/v) stimulated the secretion dose dependently, but vascular glucose was without significant effect at 5, 10, 15, and 25 mmol/L. GLP-1 stimulation by luminal glucose (20%) secretion was blocked by the voltage-gated Ca channel inhibitor, nifedipine, or by hyperpolarization with diazoxide. Luminal administration (20%) of the nonmetabolizable sodium-glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1) substrate, methyl-α-D-glucopyranoside (α-MGP), stimulated release, whereas the SGLT1 inhibitor phloridzin (luminally) abolished responses to α-MGP and glucose. Furthermore, in the absence of luminal NaCl, luminal glucose (20%) did not stimulate a response. Luminal glucose-stimulated GLP-1 secretion was also sensitive to luminal GLUT2 inhibition (phloretin), but in contrast to SGLT1 inhibition, phloretin did not eliminate the response, and luminal glucose (20%) stimulated larger GLP-1 responses than luminal α-MGP in matched concentrations. Glucose transported by GLUT2 may act after metabolization, closing KATP channels similar to sulfonylureas, which also stimulated secretion. Our data indicate that SGLT1 activity is the driving force for glucose-stimulated GLP-1 secretion and that KATP-channel closure is required to stimulate a full-blown glucose-induced response.

  2. Biochemical analysis of the response in rat bone marrow cell cultures to mechanical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, T; Peel, S A; Gladstone, J R; Davies, J E

    1997-01-01

    Bone marrow cells obtained from rat femora were subjected to primary culture with 15% fetal bovine serum in the presence of 10(-8) M dexamethasone, and following trypsin treatment 5 days later were seeded on Petriperm dishes which have a flexible bottom. After a 2-day subculture, a cyclic stress consisting of a 1 s stretch (0.3% strain. 0.5 Hz) and a 1 s relaxation for 30 min every day was started. Culture tissue was removed on day 2 of the subculture (immediately prior to start of stimulation), and then on days 5 and 8 (3 and 6 days after the start of stimulation, respectively), at which times dry weight, DNA, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and bone Gla protein (BGP, osteocalcin) were measured. Both the dry weight and DNA showed a significant increase in the stimulated group by day 8, while the ALP activity showed a significant increase by day 5. The BGP began to increase in the stimulated group on day 5 in contrast to the control group in which it only increased on day 8. These results support the contention that mechanical stimulation promotes the differentiation of osteogenic cells and enhances bone formation. Since in this experimental model the acceleration of bone formation by mechanical stimulation can be reproduced in vitro, it is extremely useful for investigating the mechanisms underlying mechanical stimulation.

  3. Mechanical stimulation in the engineering of heart muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Norman Yu; Zimmermann, Wolfram-Hubertus

    2016-01-15

    Recreating the beating heart in the laboratory continues to be a formidable bioengineering challenge. The fundamental feature of the heart is its pumping action, requiring considerable mechanical forces to compress a blood filled chamber with a defined in- and outlet. Ventricular output crucially depends on venous loading of the ventricles (preload) and on the force generated by the preloaded ventricles to overcome arterial blood pressure (afterload). The rate of contraction is controlled by the spontaneously active sinus node and transmission of its electrical impulses into the ventricles. The underlying principles for these physiological processes are described by the Frank-Starling mechanism and Bowditch phenomenon. It is essential to consider these principles in the design and evaluation of tissue engineered myocardium. This review focuses on current strategies to evoke mechanical loading in hydrogel-based heart muscle engineering.

  4. HDAC inhibitors stimulate viral transcription by multiple mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milavetz Barry

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effects of histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi treatment on SV40 transcription and replication were determined by monitoring the levels of early and late expression, the extent of replication, and the percentage of SV40 minichromosomes capable of transcription and replication following treatment with sodium butyrate (NaBu and trichostatin A (TSA. Results The HDACi treatment was found to maximally stimulate early transcription at early times and late transcription at late times through increased numbers of minichromosomes which carry RNA polymerase II (RNAPII transcription complexes and increased occupancy of the transcribing minichromosomes by RNAPII. HDACi treatment also partially relieved the normal down-regulation of early transcription by T-antigen seen later in infection. The increased recruitment of transcribing minichromosomes at late times was correlated to a corresponding reduction in SV40 replication and the percentage of minichromosomes capable of replication. Conclusion These results suggest that histone deacetylation plays a critical role in the regulation of many aspects of an SV40 lytic infection.

  5. 76 FR 44489 - Medical Devices; Neurological Devices; Classification of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-26

    ... transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) system into class II (special controls). The Agency is classifying...; Classification of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation System AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... entitled ``Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic......

  6. 重复经颅直流电刺激帕金森病模型大鼠的旋转行为%Effects of repetitive transcranial direct current stimulation on praxiology of rats with Parkinson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞雪鸿; 田学隆; 李一言; 蒋巍巍; 钱龙

    2012-01-01

    背景:经颅直流电刺激对帕金森病具有潜在的治疗作用,然而单次经颅直流电刺激的后效往往只能维持几个小时.目的:观察重复经颅直流电刺激对帕金森病大鼠旋转行为的治疗作用.方法:在SD大鼠黑质致密部和腹侧被盖区注射6-羟基多巴胺制作帕金森病大鼠模型,并完全随机分成阳极经颅直流电刺激组、阴极经颅直流电刺激组和对照组.对前两组大鼠初级运动区进行连续刺激10 d,电流强度为80 μA,刺激时间为30 min/d的经颅直流电刺激.对照组不施加电刺激.结果与结论:重复阳极或阴极经颅直流电刺激对大鼠平均转速的减小存在显著的时间效应(P 0.05).若保持两刺激组的刺激时间、刺激强度、刺激位置一致,则发现阴极经颅直流电刺激较阳极经颅直流电刺激对大鼠平均转速的减小更显著.结果提示使用重复经颅直流电刺激能够显著减小帕金森大鼠的旋转运动中的平均转速,且阴极刺激的效果更好.%BACKGROUND: Although transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has potential applications in clinical treatment of Parkinson's disease, the aftereffects of single tDCS are limited in a few hours.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the efficacy of repetitive tDCS on rotational behavior of the rat models of Parkinson's disease.METHODS: Substantia nigra pars compacta and ventral tegmental area of Sprague Dawley rats were injected 6-hydroxydopamine solution to construct Parkinson's disease models and then were randomly divided into three groups: anodal tDCS, cathodal tDCS and control groups. The rats in the first two groups received single stimulation lasted for 10 consecutive days (current intensity: 80 μA, stimulation time: 30 min/d) at primary motor cortex, while in control group without any electrical stimulation.RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Repetitive tDCS could lead to statistically significant difference of time in decreasing average speed (P 0

  7. Tissue heterogeneity as a mechanism for localized neural stimulation by applied electric fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, P C [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Sciences, University of Lisbon, 1749-016 Lisbon (Portugal); Correia, L [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Sciences, University of Lisbon, 1749-016 Lisbon (Portugal); Salvador, R [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Sciences, University of Lisbon, 1749-016 Lisbon (Portugal); Basser, P J [Section on Tissue Biophysics and Biomimetics, NICHD, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892-1428 (United States)

    2007-09-21

    We investigate the heterogeneity of electrical conductivity as a new mechanism to stimulate excitable tissues via applied electric fields. In particular, we show that stimulation of axons crossing internal boundaries can occur at boundaries where the electric conductivity of the volume conductor changes abruptly. The effectiveness of this and other stimulation mechanisms was compared by means of models and computer simulations in the context of transcranial magnetic stimulation. While, for a given stimulation intensity, the largest membrane depolarization occurred where an axon terminates or bends sharply in a high electric field region, a slightly smaller membrane depolarization, still sufficient to generate action potentials, also occurred at an internal boundary where the conductivity jumped from 0.143 S m{sup -1} to 0.333 S m{sup -1}, simulating a white-matter-grey-matter interface. Tissue heterogeneity can also give rise to local electric field gradients that are considerably stronger and more focal than those impressed by the stimulation coil and that can affect the membrane potential, albeit to a lesser extent than the two mechanisms mentioned above. Tissue heterogeneity may play an important role in electric and magnetic 'far-field' stimulation.

  8. Computational Modeling and Analysis of Mechanically Painful Stimulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manafi Khanian, Bahram

    to expand the current knowledge on the mechanical influences of cuff algometry on deep-tissue nociceptors. Additionally, this is one of the pioneering projects utilizing the finite element simulation as a computationally reliable method of modelling in pain research field. The present findings are highly...... relevant to biomechanical studies for defining a valid methodology to appropriately activate deep-tissue nociceptors and hence to develop biomedical devices used for pain sensitivity assessment....

  9. Perception of electrical and mechanical stimulation of the skin: implications for electrotactile feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Patrick L.; Fuglevand, Andrew J.

    2009-12-01

    Spinal cord injury is often accompanied by impaired tactile and proprioceptive sensations. Normally, somatosensensory information derived from such sensations is important in the formation of voluntary motor commands. Therefore, as a preliminary step toward the development of an electrotactile feedback system to restore somatosensation, psychophysical methods were used to characterize perceptual attributes associated with electrical stimulation of the skin on the back of the neck in human subjects. These data were compared to mechanical stimulation of the skin on the back of neck and on the distal pad of the index finger. Spatial acuity of the neck, evaluated using two-point thresholds, was not significantly different for electrical (37 ± 14 mm) or mechanical stimulation (39 ± 10 mm). The exponent (β) of the best fitting power function relating perceived intensity to applied stimulus strength was used to characterize perceptual sensitivity to mechanical and electrical stimuli. For electrical stimuli, both current amplitude-modulated and frequency-modulated trains of pulses were tested. Perceptual sensitivity was significantly greater for current amplitude modulation (β = 1.14 ± 0.37) compared to frequency modulation (β = 0.57 ± 0.24) and mechanical stimulation (0.51 ± 0.12). Finally, based on the data gathered here, we derive a transfer function that could be used in the future to convert mechanical stimuli detected with artificial sensors placed on the fingers into electrotactile signals that evoke perceptions similar to those arising from normal mechanical stimulation of the skin.

  10. Molecular Mechanisms of Glucose-Stimulated GLP-1 Secretion From Perfused Rat Small Intestine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhre, Rune E.; Frost, Charlotte R.; Svendsen, Berit;

    2015-01-01

    Glucose is an important stimulus for glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) secretion, but the mechanisms of secretion have not been investigated in integrated physiological models. We studied glucose-stimulated GLP-1 secretion from isolated perfused rat small intestine. Luminal glucose (5% and 20% w...... (20%) of the nonmetabolizable sodium-glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1) substrate, methyl-α-d-glucopyranoside (α-MGP), stimulated release, whereas the SGLT1 inhibitor phloridzin (luminally) abolished responses to α-MGP and glucose. Furthermore, in the absence of luminal NaCl, luminal glucose (20%) did...... not stimulate a response. Luminal glucose-stimulated GLP-1 secretion was also sensitive to luminal GLUT2 inhibition (phloretin), but in contrast to SGLT1 inhibition, phloretin did not eliminate the response, and luminal glucose (20%) stimulated larger GLP-1 responses than luminal α-MGP in matched concentrations...

  11. Mechanisms of change during group metacognitive therapy for repetitive negative thinking in primary and non-primary generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, Peter M; Erceg-Hurn, David M; Anderson, Rebecca A; Campbell, Bruce N C; Nathan, Paula R

    2015-10-01

    Repetitive negative thinking (RNT) is a transdiagnostic process that serves to maintain emotional disorders. Metacognitive theory suggests that positive and negative metacognitive beliefs guide the selection of RNT as a coping strategy which, in turn, increases psychological distress. The aim of this study was to test the indirect effect of metacognitive beliefs on psychological distress via RNT. Patients (N=52) with primary and non-primary generalized anxiety disorder attended a brief, six-week group metacognitive therapy program and completed measures of metacognitive beliefs, RNT, and symptoms at the first and final treatment sessions, and at a one-month follow-up. Prospective indirect effects models found that negative metacognitive beliefs (but not positive metacognitive beliefs) had a significant indirect effect on psychological distress via RNT. As predicted by metacognitive theory, targeting negative metacognitions in treatment appears to reduce RNT and, in turn, emotional distress. Further research using alternative measures at multiple time points during therapy is required to determine whether the absence of a relationship with positive metacognitive beliefs in this study was a consequence of (a) psychometric issues, (b) these beliefs only being relevant to a subgroup of patients, or (c) a lack of awareness early in treatment.

  12. Deep brain stimulation mechanisms: the control of network activity via neurochemistry modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Cameron C; Anderson, Ross W

    2016-10-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has revolutionized the clinical care of late-stage Parkinson's disease and shows promise for improving the treatment of intractable neuropsychiatric disorders. However, after over 25 years of clinical experience, numerous questions still remain on the neurophysiological basis for the therapeutic mechanisms of action. At their fundamental core, the general purpose of electrical stimulation therapies in the nervous system are to use the applied electric field to manipulate the opening and closing of voltage-gated sodium channels on neurons, generate stimulation induced action potentials, and subsequently, control the release of neurotransmitters in targeted pathways. Historically, DBS mechanisms research has focused on characterizing the effects of stimulation on neurons and the resulting impact on neuronal network activity. However, when electrodes are placed within the central nervous system, glia are also being directly (and indirectly) influenced by the stimulation. Mounting evidence shows that non-neuronal tissue can play an important role in modulating the neurochemistry changes induced by DBS. The goal of this review is to evaluate how DBS effects on both neuronal and non-neuronal tissue can potentially work together to suppress oscillatory activity (and/or information transfer) between brain regions. These resulting effects of ~ 100 Hz electrical stimulation help explain how DBS can disrupt pathological network activity in the brain and generate therapeutic effects in patients. Deep brain stimulation is an effective clinical technology, but detailed therapeutic mechanisms remain undefined. This review provides an overview of the leading hypotheses, which focus on stimulation-induced disruption of network oscillations and integrates possible roles for non-neuronal tissue in explaining the clinical response to therapeutic stimulation. This article is part of a special issue on Parkinson disease.

  13. Mechanically stimulated bone cells secrete paracrine factors that regulate osteoprogenitor recruitment, proliferation, and differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, Robert T. [Tissue Engineering Research Group, Dept. of Anatomy, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (Ireland); Trinity Centre for Bioengineering, School of Engineering, Trinity College Dublin (Ireland); Advanced Materials and BioEngineering Research Centre (AMBER), Trinity College Dublin & Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (Ireland); Dept. of Mechanical, Aeronautical and Biomedical Engineering, University of Limerick (Ireland); O' Brien, Fergal J. [Tissue Engineering Research Group, Dept. of Anatomy, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (Ireland); Trinity Centre for Bioengineering, School of Engineering, Trinity College Dublin (Ireland); Advanced Materials and BioEngineering Research Centre (AMBER), Trinity College Dublin & Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (Ireland); Hoey, David A., E-mail: david.hoey@ul.ie [Trinity Centre for Bioengineering, School of Engineering, Trinity College Dublin (Ireland); Dept. of Mechanical, Aeronautical and Biomedical Engineering, University of Limerick (Ireland); The Centre for Applied Biomedical Engineering Research, University of Limerick (Ireland); Materials & Surface Science Institute, University of Limerick (Ireland)

    2015-03-27

    Bone formation requires the recruitment, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal progenitors. A potent stimulus driving this process is mechanical loading, yet the signalling mechanisms underpinning this are incompletely understood. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of the mechanically-stimulated osteocyte and osteoblast secretome in coordinating progenitor contributions to bone formation. Initially osteocytes (MLO-Y4) and osteoblasts (MC3T3) were mechanically stimulated for 24hrs and secreted factors within the conditioned media were collected and used to evaluate mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) and osteoblast recruitment, proliferation and osteogenesis. Paracrine factors secreted by mechanically stimulated osteocytes significantly enhanced MSC migration, proliferation and osteogenesis and furthermore significantly increased osteoblast migration and proliferation when compared to factors secreted by statically cultured osteocytes. Secondly, paracrine factors secreted by mechanically stimulated osteoblasts significantly enhanced MSC migration but surprisingly, in contrast to the osteocyte secretome, inhibited MSC proliferation when compared to factors secreted by statically cultured osteoblasts. A similar trend was observed in osteoblasts. This study provides new information on mechanically driven signalling mechanisms in bone and highlights a contrasting secretome between cells at different stages in the bone lineage, furthering our understanding of loading-induced bone formation and indirect biophysical regulation of osteoprogenitors. - Highlights: • Physically stimulated osteocytes secrete factors that regulate osteoprogenitors. • These factors enhance recruitment, proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. • Physically stimulated osteoblasts secrete factors that also regulate progenitors. • These factors enhance recruitment but inhibit proliferation of osteoprogenitors. • This study highlights a contrasting

  14. Can endurance sports stimulate immune mechanisms against cancer and metastasis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlenbruck, G; Order, U

    1991-06-01

    Proceeding from a brief historical contemplation of the problematic nature of "exercise and malignancy" a training investigation (running on a treadmill) with animals is presented. By means of the experimental tumor model fibrosarcoma L-1 of BALB/c mice differences in growth, size, and metastatic spreading have been proven depending upon the mode and more significantly on the intensity of training and upon the mode of application and inoculation of tumor cells. Accordingly the best cancer protective effect could be observed when the animals performed a pre- and a post-running training before and after inoculation. More over mechanisms of the acute phase response of human athletes are discussed in relation to possible prophylactic effects on the prevention of infections and on the development of cancer.

  15. Vagal stimulation modulates inflammation through a ghrelin mediated mechanism in traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Bansal, V; Ryu, SY; Lopez, N; Allexan, S; Krzyzaniak, M; Eliceiri, B; Baird, A.; Coimbra, R

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) releases a cascade of inflammatory cytokines. Vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) and ghrelin have known anti-inflammatory effects; furthermore, ghrelin release is stimulated by acetylcholine. We hypothesized VNS decreases post-TBI inflammation through a ghrelin-mediated mechanism. TBI was created in five groups of mice: sham, TBI, TBI/ghrelin, TBI/VNS, and TBI/VNS/ghrelin receptor antagonist (GRa). Serum and tissue ghrelin, and serum TNF-αwere measured. Ghrelin increas...

  16. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Rta Tetramers Make High-Affinity Interactions with Repetitive DNA Elements in the Mta Promoter To Stimulate DNA Binding of RBP-Jk/CSL ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmeri, Diana; Carroll, Kyla Driscoll; Gonzalez-Lopez, Olga; Lukac, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV; also known as human herpesvirus 8 [HHV-8]) is the etiologic agent of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and lymphoproliferative diseases. We previously demonstrated that the KSHV lytic switch protein Rta stimulates DNA binding of the cellular RBP-Jk/CSL protein, the nuclear component of the Notch pathway, on Rta target promoters. In the current study, we define the promoter requirements for formation of transcriptionally productive Rta/RBP-Jk/DNA complexes. We show that highly pure Rta footprints 7 copies of a previously undescribed repetitive element in the promoter of the essential KSHV Mta gene. We have termed this element the “CANT repeat.” CANT repeats are found on both strands of DNA and have a consensus sequence of ANTGTAACANT(A/T)(A/T)T. We demonstrate that Rta tetramers make high-affinity interactions (i.e., nM) with 64 bp of the Mta promoter but not single CANT units. The number of CANT repeats, their presence in palindromes, and their positions relative to the RBP-Jk binding site determine the optimal target for Rta stimulation of RBP-Jk DNA binding and formation of ternary Rta/RBP-Jk/DNA complexes. DNA binding and tetramerization mutants of Rta fail to stimulate RBP-Jk DNA binding. Our chromatin immunoprecipitation assays show that RBP-Jk DNA binding is broadly, but selectively, stimulated across the entire KSHV genome during reactivation. We propose a model in which tetramerization of Rta allows it to straddle RBP-Jk and contact repeat units on both sides of RBP-Jk. Our study integrates high-affinity Rta DNA binding with the requirement for a cellular transcription factor in Rta transactivation. PMID:21880753

  17. Entry of large nanoparticles into cells aided by nanoscale mechanical stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, Ramanathan; Curtis, Adam; Mullin, Margaret

    2011-10-01

    Nanoparticle entry into the cell depends on the surface charge and also on their size. Here, we report the entry of large magnetic nanoparticles (500 nm mean diameter) into the cell, being mediated by a mechanical stimulus supplied to the culture flasks. Investigations were carried out at 2-10 Hz frequency range with the vertical excursions ranging from 5 to 20 nm. Mechanical stimulation was found to aid the entry of both positive and negatively charged nanoparticles over a frequency range of 2-10 Hz. Transmission electron microscopy analysis indicated that, the stimulated samples could possibly mediate particle uptake through membrane invaginations, while the control samples indicated particles at the cell periphery, just outside the cell membrane. Mechanical stimulation had no significant effect on the cell morphology. Bromodeoxyuridine incorporation resulted in an increase in the proportion of S-phase in the stimulated samples compared with the controls, suggesting a reduction in the cell cycle duration. Mechanical stimulation could very well extend its effects to nanoscale cellular movements, and also facilitate the entry of large magnetic nanoparticle. This could be an interesting prospect for nanoparticle mediated drug delivery.

  18. Membrane potential and mechanical responses of the opossum esophagus to vagal stimulation and swallowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattan, S; Gidda, J S; Goyal, R K

    1983-10-01

    Studies were performed in anesthetized opossums. The electrical changes, recorded using a suction electrode applied to the outside of the esophagus, and mechanical activity, recorded by an intraluminal catheter, were monitored from 5 cm above the lower esophageal sphincter. Swallowing was associated with membrane hyperpolarization followed by depolarization and spike burst. Electrical stimulation of the decentralized vagus also caused a prompt hyperpolarization followed by an overshoot depolarization. Single pulses of stimulation caused primarily hyperpolarization. The amplitude and duration of hyperpolarization increased with increasing frequencies of vagal stimulation. Spike burst occurred as the membrane potential was recovering from the peak hyperpolarization and moving toward peak depolarization. The latency of onset of spike burst decreased with increasing frequency of vagal stimulation. The muscle contraction occurred after a latency. The latency of contractions, like the latency of spike burst, decreased with increased frequency of vagal stimulation. These studies show that (a) membrane hyperpolarization is present during the latent period of contraction associated with swallowing, suggesting that swallow-induced esophageal response may be mediated by vagal inhibitory pathway to the esophagus and (b) spike bursts can be temporally dissociated from depolarization by changing the vagal stimulation frequency, suggesting that spike burst and depolarization may be mediated by different excitatory mechanisms.

  19. Mechanisms for chelator stimulation of microbial Fe(III) -oxide reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovley, D.R.; Woodward, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    The mechanisms by which nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) stimulated Fe(III) reduction in sediments from a petroleum-contaminated aquifer were investigated in order to gain insight into how added Fe(III) chelators stimulate the activity of hydrocarbon-degrading, Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms in these sediments, and how naturally occurring Fe(III) chelators might promote Fe(III) reduction in aquatic sediments. NTA solubilized Fe(III) from the aquifer sediments. NTA stimulation of microbial Fe(III) reduction did not appear to be the result of making calcium, magnesium, potassium, or trace metals more available to the microorganisms. Stimulation of Fe(III) reduction could not be attributed to NTA serving as a source of carbon or fixed nitrogen for Fe(III)-reducing bacteria as NTA was not degraded in the sediments. Studies with the Fe(III)-reducing microorganism, Geobacter metallireducens, and pure Fe(III)-oxide forms, demonstrated that NTA stimulated the reduction of a variety of Fe(III) forms, including highly crystalline Fe(III)-oxides such as goethite and hematite. The results suggest that NTA solubilization of insoluble Fe(III)-oxide is an important mechanism for the stimulation of Fe(III) reduction by NTA in aquifer sediments.

  20. The positive effects of high-frequency right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on memory, correlated with increases in brain metabolites detected by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in recently detoxified alcohol-dependent patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao J

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Jun Qiao,1,2 Guixing Jin,1,2 Licun Lei,3 Lan Wang,1,2 Yaqiang Du,3 Xueyi Wang1,2 1Institute of Mental Health, The First Hospital of Hebei Medical University, 2Brain Ageing and Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory, Hebei Medical University, 3Department of Radiology, The First Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Hebei, People’s Republic of China Objective: To explore the effect of right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS on memory, and its correlation with levels of hippocampal brain metabolites detected by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS in recently detoxified alcohol-dependent patients. Materials and methods: In this randomized, double-blind sham-controlled trial, alcohol-dependent patients were enrolled and randomized into two groups: the experimental group (rTMS, 10 Hz, on right DLPFC, 20 sessions and the control group (sham stimulation. Memory function was assessed using Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised (HVLT-R and Brief Visuospatial Memory Test-Revised (BVMT-R before and after treatment. 1H-MRS was used to detect the levels of N-acetyl aspartic acid (NAA, choline (Cho, and creatine (Cr in bilateral hippocampi before and after treatment. Results: Thirty-eight patients (18 in the experimental group and 20 in the control group were included in the analyses. The experimental group showed significantly greater changes in HVLT-R, BVMT-R, NAA/Cr, and Cho/Cr after rTMS from baseline than the control group. The percentage change in BVMT-R and HVLT-R correlated with the percentage change in NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr in the right brain. Conclusion: High-frequency right DLPFC rTMS was associated with improvement in memory dysfunction, which is correlated with levels of hippocampal brain metabolites detected by 1H-MRS in recently detoxified alcohol-dependent patients. Keywords: alcohol dependence, memory, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, MR spectroscopy

  1. Medulla Oblongata Mechanism of Inhibitory Effect of Thermal Stimulation to Nociceptive Colorectal Distention in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang Li; Pei-Jing Rong; Xin-Yan Gao; Hui Ben; Hong Cai; Bing Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To discuss mechanism of moxibustion (thermal stimulation) effect and best moxibustion stimulus parameter. Methods: Experiments were performed on 48 male Sprague-Dawley rats. Unit discharges from individual single neuron were recorded extracellularly with glass-microelectrode in Subnucleus Reticularis Dorsalis (SRD). Visceral-intrusive stimulation is done by colorectal distension. Thermal stimulation with different temperature (40°C, 42°C, 44°C, 46°C, 48°C, 50°C, 52°C) and different stimulus area (diameter of circle:1.0 cm, 1.5 cm, 2.0 cm, 2.5 cm, 3.0 cm, 3.5 cm, 4.0cm) was applied around RN12 during nociceptive colorectal distension. Results: SRD neurons could be activated by visceral stimulation within noxious range. Under low temperature of stimulus, especially under 45°C of pain threshold to ordinary people, visceral nociceptive afferent facilitated thermal stimulus from the body surface. While after thermal stimulation reached a harmful degree, the thermal stimulus will inhibit visceral nociceptive afferent. Moreover, statistics show that the higher the temperature is, the smaller the size of stimulation area is needed, and they correlate with each other negatively. Conclusion: Visceral nociception could be inhibited by somatic thermal stimulation with specific parameter at medulla level. According to our finding, best thermal stimulation temperature is around 48°C and the best size of stimulation area is around 3.14-7.07cm2 (with 2.0-3.0cm diameter).

  2. The Impact of Accelerated Right Prefrontal High-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) on Cue-Reactivity: An fMRI Study on Craving in Recently Detoxified Alcohol-Dependent Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herremans, Sarah C; Van Schuerbeek, Peter; De Raedt, Rudi; Matthys, Frieda; Buyl, Ronald; De Mey, Johan; Baeken, Chris

    2015-01-01

    In alcohol-dependent patients craving is a difficult-to-treat phenomenon. It has been suggested that high-frequency (HF) repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) may have beneficial effects. However, exactly how this application exerts its effect on the underlying craving neurocircuit is currently unclear. In an effort to induce alcohol craving and to maximize detection of HF-rTMS effects to cue-induced alcohol craving, patients were exposed to a block and event-related alcohol cue-reactivity paradigm while being scanned with fMRI. Hence, we assessed the effect of right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) stimulation on cue-induced and general alcohol craving, and the related craving neurocircuit. Twenty-six recently detoxified alcohol-dependent patients were included. First, we evaluated the impact of one sham-controlled stimulation session. Second, we examined the effect of accelerated right DLPFC HF-rTMS treatment: here patients received 15 sessions in an open label accelerated design, spread over 4 consecutive days. General craving significantly decreased after 15 active HF-rTMS sessions. However, cue-induced alcohol craving was not altered. Our brain imaging results did not show that the cue-exposure affected the underlying craving neurocircuit after both one and fifteen active HF-rTMS sessions. Yet, brain activation changes after one and 15 HF-rTMS sessions, respectively, were observed in regions associated with the extended reward system and the default mode network, but only during the presentation of the event-related paradigm. Our findings indicate that accelerated HF-rTMS applied to the right DLPFC does not manifestly affect the craving neurocircuit during an alcohol-related cue-exposure, but instead it may influence the attentional network.

  3. Application of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Neuropathic Pain (review)%重复经颅磁刺激治疗神经病理性疼痛研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩晓阁; 杨晓秋

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) may release neuropathic pain (NeP) by changing the excitability of cor-tex, improving the cerebral blood flow, regulating the expression of neurotransmitter, fitting the plasticity, reducing the overexpression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase and overaction of astrocyte, etc. It is used for management of post-herpetic neuralgia, thalamic pain after stroke, NeP after spinal cord injury, phantom limb pain, atypical facial pain post operation of trigeminal nerve, etc. The outcome is associat-ed with the location, frequency, pulses, intensity of stimulation, as well as the shape of the stimulator, etc.%重复经颅磁刺激通过改变大脑皮质的兴奋性,改善脑血流和代谢,调节神经递质表达,改变神经系统可塑性,降低背根神经节内过度表达的神经元型一氧化氮合酶、抑制星形胶质细胞活性等途径,发挥治疗神经病理性疼痛的作用,目前已用于带状疱疹后神经痛、脑卒中后丘脑痛、脊髓损伤后神经痛、幻肢痛、三叉神经术后非典型面痛等的治疗中,疗效与刺激部位、频率、脉冲数、刺激器形状、刺激强度等因素有关。

  4. Repetition, Use of L1 and Reading Aloud as Mediational Mechanism during Collaborative Activity at the Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganem-Gutierrez, G. A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on an investigation of semiotic mechanisms mediating collaborative activity during pair/group work interaction at the computer. The study is informed by sociocultural theory. The participants were university students of L2 Spanish performing three tasks in two modes of implementation: computer vs. paper-based. The questions…

  5. Probing cell structure responses through a shear and stretching mechanical stimulation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steward, Robert L; Cheng, Chao-Min; Wang, Danny L; LeDuc, Philip R

    2010-04-01

    Cells are complex, dynamic systems that respond to various in vivo stimuli including chemical, mechanical, and scaffolding alterations. The influence of mechanics on cells is especially important in physiological areas that dictate what modes of mechanics exist. Complex, multivariate physiological responses can result from multi-factorial, multi-mode mechanics, including tension, compression, or shear stresses. In this study, we present a novel device based on elastomeric materials that allowed us to stimulate NIH 3T3 fibroblasts through uniaxial strip stretching or shear fluid flow. Cell shape and structural response was observed using conventional approaches such as fluorescent microscopy. Cell orientation and actin cytoskeleton alignment along the direction of applied force were observed to occur after an initial 3 h time period for shear fluid flow and static uniaxial strip stretching experiments although these two directions of alignment were oriented orthogonal relative to each other. This response was then followed by an increasingly pronounced cell and actin cytoskeleton alignment parallel to the direction of force after 6, 12, and 24 h, with 85% of the cells aligned along the direction of force after 24 h. These results indicate that our novel device could be implemented to study the effects of multiple modes of mechanical stimulation on living cells while probing their structural response especially with respect to competing directions of alignment and orientation under these different modes of mechanical stimulation. We believe that this will be important in a diversity of fields including cell mechanotransduction, cell-material interactions, biophysics, and tissue engineering.

  6. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) combined with cognitive training is a safe and effective modality for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease: clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabey, Jose Martin; Dobronevsky, Evgenia

    2016-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common type of dementia among the elderly. Common treatments available and non-pharmacological interventions have their limitations, and new therapeutic approaches are critically needed. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive technique that generates an electric current-inducing modulation in cortical excitability. The previous clinical trials showed that combinations of rTMS and cognitive training (rTMS-COG), as provided by the NeuroAD medical device system, offer a novel, safe, and effective method improving mild-to-moderate AD patients. In this article, we present our experience with rTMS-COG treatment, in clinical settings, of 30 mild-to-moderate AD patients that received rTMS-COG commercial treatments in two clinics for 1-h daily sessions, 5 days per week, for 6 weeks (30 sessions). Five patients returned for a second treatment. ADAS-Cog and MMSE scores were measured pre- and post-treatments. The main analyses were conducted on patients who received 1 treatment (n = 30). Data received from the five returning patients were analyzed separately. The effect of rTMS-COG treatment was statistically significant regarding both ADAS-Cog (-2.4 point improvement, PV <0.001) and MMSE (+1.7 points improvement, PV <0.001) scores. About 80 % of patients gained some cognitive improvement following NeuroAD treatment, with more than 60 % improving by more than two points, for a minimum of 9 months. The Neuronix NeuroAD System was shown to be a safe and effective non-invasive modality for cognitive improvement of Alzheimer patients, with measurable outcomes lasting, in some of them, for up to 1 year, following completion of the 6-week daily intervention course (a carryover effect).

  7. Nonconventional interventions for chronic post-traumatic stress disorder: Ketamine, repetitive trans-cranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), and alternative approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Basant; Kluewer D'Amico, Jessica; Makani, Ramkrishna; Parikh, Tapan

    2016-01-01

    It is alarming that only 59% of those who have post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) respond to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Many existing treatments, both pharmacological and nonpharmacological, do not directly target trauma memories that lay at the core of the PTSD pathogenesis. Notable exceptions are medications like ketamine and propranolol and trauma-focused psychotherapies like eye-movement desensitization and reprocessing therapy (developed by Shapiro) and Trauma Interventions using Mindfulness Based Extinction and Reconsolidation (TIMBER) for trauma memories (developed by Pradhan). Although the antidepressant effects of ketamine are no longer news, ketamine's effects on treatment refractory PTSD (TR-PTSD) is a recent concept. As TR-PTSD has a marked public health burden and significant limitations in terms of treatment interventions, a thorough assessment of current strategies is required. Research to bring clarity to the underlying pathophysiology and neurobiology of TR-PTSD delineating the chemical, structural, and circuitry abnormalities will take time. In the interim, in the absence of a 1-size-fits-all therapeutic approach, pragmatically parallel lines of research can be pursued using the pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatments that have a strong theoretical rationale for efficacy. This article aims to review the current literature on interventions for PTSD, most notably ketamine, trans-cranial magnetic stimulation treatment, yoga and mindfulness interventions, and TIMBER. We present an outline for their future use, alone as well as in combination, with a hope of providing additional insights as well as advocating for developing more effective therapeutic intervention for this treatment-resistant and debilitating condition.

  8. Repetition rate stabilization of an erbium-doped all-fiber laser via opto-mechanical control of the intracavity group velocity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Xuling; He, Boqu; Zhao, Jian; Liu, Yang; Bai, Dongbi; Wang, Chao; Liu, Geping; Luo, Daping; Liu, Fengjiang; Li, Wenxue; Zeng, Heping, E-mail: hpzeng@phy.ecnu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Yang, Kangwen; Hao, Qiang [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Modern Optical System, Engineering Research Center of Optical Instrument and System (Ministry of Education), School of Optical-Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, Shanghai 200093 (China)

    2015-01-19

    We present a method for stabilizing the repetition rate of an erbium-doped all-fiber laser by inserting an electronic polarization controller (EPC) in the fiber laser cavity. The device exhibited good integration, low cost, and convenient operation. Such a repetition rate stabilization may facilitate an all-fiber laser comb system with high integration. The repetition rate was phase-locked to a Rb reference more than 72 h with a low feedback voltage applied to one channel of the EPC. The repetition rate was 74.6 MHz. The standard deviation and the repetition rate linewidth were 1.4 and 1.7 mHz, respectively.

  9. Myocardial scaffold-based cardiac tissue engineering: application of coordinated mechanical and electrical stimulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Wang, Guangjun; To, Filip; Butler, J Ryan; Claude, Andrew; McLaughlin, Ronald M; Williams, Lakiesha N; de Jongh Curry, Amy L; Liao, Jun

    2013-09-03

    Recently, we developed an optimal decellularization protocol to generate 3D porcine myocardial scaffolds, which preserve the natural extracellular matrix structure, mechanical anisotropy, and vasculature templates and also show good cell recellularization and differentiation potential. In this study, a multistimulation bioreactor was built to provide coordinated mechanical and electrical stimulation for facilitating stem cell differentiation and cardiac construct development. The acellular myocardial scaffolds were seeded with mesenchymal stem cells (10(6) cells/mL) by needle injection and subjected to 5-azacytidine treatment (3 μmol/L, 24 h) and various bioreactor conditioning protocols. We found that after 2 days of culturing with mechanical (20% strain) and electrical stimulation (5 V, 1 Hz), high cell density and good cell viability were observed in the reseeded scaffold. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that the differentiated cells showed a cardiomyocyte-like phenotype by expressing sarcomeric α-actinin, myosin heavy chain, cardiac troponin T, connexin-43, and N-cadherin. Biaxial mechanical testing demonstrated that positive tissue remodeling took place after 2 days of bioreactor conditioning (20% strain + 5 V, 1 Hz); passive mechanical properties of the 2 day and 4 day tissue constructs were comparable to those of the tissue constructs produced by stirring reseeding followed by 2 weeks of static culturing, implying the effectiveness and efficiency of the coordinated simulations in promoting tissue remodeling. In short, the synergistic stimulations might be beneficial not only for the quality of cardiac construct development but also for patients by reducing the waiting time in future clinical scenarios.

  10. The cell-stretcher: A novel device for the mechanical stimulation of cell populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seriani, S.; Del Favero, G.; Mahaffey, J.; Marko, D.; Gallina, P.; Long, C. S.; Mestroni, L.; Sbaizero, O.

    2016-08-01

    Mechanical stimulation appears to be a critical modulator for many aspects of biology, both of living tissue and cells. The cell-stretcher, a novel device for the mechanical uniaxial stimulation of populations of cells, is described. The system is based on a variable stroke cam-lever-tappet mechanism which allows the delivery of cyclic stimuli with frequencies of up to 10 Hz and deformation between 1% and 20%. The kinematics is presented and a simulation of the dynamics of the system is shown, in order to compute the contact forces in the mechanism. The cells, following cultivation and preparation, are plated on an ad hoc polydimethylsiloxane membrane which is then loaded on the clamps of the cell-stretcher via force-adjustable magnetic couplings. In order to show the viability of the experimentation and biocompatibility of the cell-stretcher, a set of two in vitro tests were performed. Human epithelial carcinoma cell line A431 and Adult Mouse Ventricular Fibroblasts (AMVFs) from a dual reporter mouse were subject to 0.5 Hz, 24 h cyclic stretching at 15% strain, and to 48 h stimulation at 0.5 Hz and 15% strain, respectively. Visual analysis was performed on A431, showing definite morphological changes in the form of cellular extroflections in the direction of stimulation compared to an unstimulated control. A cytometric analysis was performed on the AMVF population. Results show a post-stimulation live-dead ratio deviance of less than 6% compared to control, which proves that the environment created by the cell-stretcher is suitable for in vitro experimentation.

  11. Potential mechanisms supporting the value of motor cortex stimulation to treat chronic pain syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Fabio DosSantos

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the first years of the twenty-first century, neurotechnologies such as motor cortex stimulation (MCS, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS have attracted scientific attention and been considered as potential tools to centrally modulate chronic pain, especially for those conditions more difficult to manage and refractory to all types of available pharmacological therapies. Interestingly, although the role of the motor cortex in pain has not been fully clarified, it is one of the cortical areas most commonly targeted by invasive and non-invasive neuromodulation technologies. Recent studies have provided significant advances concerning the establishment of the clinical effectiveness of primary motor cortex stimulation to treat different chronic pain syndromes. Concurrently, the neuromechanisms related to each method of primary motor cortex (M1 modulation have been unveiled. In this respect, the most consistent scientific evidence originates from MCS studies, which indicate the activation of top-down controls driven by M1 stimulation. This concept has also been applied to explain M1-TMS mechanisms. Nevertheless, activation of remote areas in the brain, including cortical and subcortical structures, has been reported with both invasive and non-invasive methods and the participation of major neurotransmitters (e.g. glutamate, GABA and serotonin as well as the release of endogenous opioids has been demonstrated. In this critical review, the putative mechanisms underlying the use of motor cortex stimulation to provide relief from chronic migraine and other types of chronic pain are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the most recent scientific evidence obtained from chronic pain research studies involving MCS and non-invasive neuromodulation methods (e.g. tDCS and TMS, which are analyzed comparatively.

  12. Cyclic mechanical deformation stimulates human lung fibroblast proliferation and autocrine growth factor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, J E; Mitchell, J J; Absher, P M; Baldor, L; Geller, H A; Woodcock-Mitchell, J; Hamblin, M J; Vacek, P; Low, R B

    1993-08-01

    Cellular hypertrophy and hyperplasia and increased extracellular matrix deposition are features of tissue hypertrophy resulting from increased work load. It is known, for example, that mechanical forces play a critical role in lung development, cardiovascular remodeling following pressure overload, and skeletal muscle growth. The mechanisms involved in these processes, however, remain unclear. Here we examined the effect of mechanical deformation on fibroblast function in vitro. IMR-90 human fetal lung fibroblasts grown on collagen-coated silastic membranes were subjected to cyclical mechanical deformation (10% increase in culture surface area; 1 Hz) for up to 5 days. Cell number was increased by 39% after 2 days of deformation (1.43 +/- .01 x 10(5) cells/membrane compared with control, 1.03 +/- 0.02 x 10(5) cells; mean +/- SEM; P < 0.02) increasing to 163% above control by 4 days (2.16 +/- 0.16 x 10(5) cells compared with 0.82 +/- 0.03 x 10(5) cells; P < 0.001). The medium from mechanically deformed cells was mitogenic for IMR-90 cells, with maximal activity in the medium from cells mechanically deformed for 2 days (stimulating cell replication by 35% compared with media control; P < 0.002). These data suggest that mechanical deformation stimulates human lung fibroblast replication and that this effect is mediated by the release of autocrine growth factors.

  13. Inhibitory mechanisms following electrical stimulation of tendon and cutaneous afferents in the lower limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Serajul I; Burne, John A

    2010-01-13

    Electrical stimulation of the Achilles tendon (TES) produced strong reflex depression (duration>250 ms) of a small background contraction in both heads of gastrocnemius (GA) via large diameter electrodes localized to the tendon. The inhibitory responses were produced without electrical (M wave) or mechanical (muscle twitch) signs of direct muscle stimulation. In this study, the contribution of presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms to the depression was investigated by studying conditioning effects of tendon afferent stimulation on the mechanical tendon reflex (TR) and magnetic motor evoked potential (MEP). TES completely inhibited the TR over an ISI of 300 ms that commenced before and continued during and after the period of voluntary EMG depression. Tendon afferent conditioning stimuli also partially inhibited the MEP, but over a short time course confined to the period of voluntary EMG depression. The strength and extended time course of tendon afferent conditioning of the TR and its failure to produce a similar depression of the MEP are consistent with a mechanism involving presynaptic inhibition of Ia terminals. Cutaneous (sural nerve) afferent conditioning partially inhibited the TR and MEP over a short time course (ISI voluntary EMG. This was consistent with the postsynaptic origin of cutaneous inhibition of the motoneurons.

  14. Repetitive behavior profile and supersensitivity to amphetamine in the C58/J mouse model of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, Sheryl S; Riddick, Natallia V; Nikolova, Viktoriya D; Teng, Brian L; Agster, Kara L; Nonneman, Randal J; Young, Nancy B; Baker, Lorinda K; Nadler, Jessica J; Bodfish, James W

    2014-02-01

    Restricted repetitive behaviors are core symptoms of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). The range of symptoms encompassed by the repetitive behavior domain includes lower-order stereotypy and self-injury, and higher-order indices of circumscribed interests and cognitive rigidity. Heterogeneity in clinical ASD profiles suggests that specific manifestations of repetitive behavior reflect differential neuropathology. The present studies utilized a set of phenotyping tasks to determine a repetitive behavior profile for the C58/J mouse strain, a model of ASD core symptoms. In an observational screen, C58/J demonstrated overt motor stereotypy, but not over-grooming, a commonly-used measure for mouse repetitive behavior. Amphetamine did not exacerbate motor stereotypy, but had enhanced stimulant effects on locomotion and rearing in C58/J, compared to C57BL/6J. Both C58/J and Grin1 knockdown mice, another model of ASD-like behavior, had marked deficits in marble-burying. In a nose poke task for higher-order repetitive behavior, C58/J had reduced holeboard exploration and preference for non-social, versus social, olfactory stimuli, but did not demonstrate cognitive rigidity following familiarization to an appetitive stimulus. Analysis of available high-density genotype data indicated specific regions of divergence between C58/J and two highly-sociable strains with common genetic lineage. Strain genome comparisons identified autism candidate genes, including Cntnap2 and Slc6a4, located within regions divergent in C58/J. However, Grin1, Nlgn1, Sapap3, and Slitrk5, genes linked to repetitive over-grooming, were not in regions of divergence. These studies suggest that specific repetitive phenotypes can be used to distinguish ASD mouse models, with implications for divergent underlying mechanisms for different repetitive behavior profiles.

  15. Phospholipase C-zeta deficiency as a cause for repetitive oocyte fertilization failure during ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization with ICSI: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chithiwala, Zahabiya H; Lee, Hoi Chang; Hill, David L; Jellerette-Nolan, Teru; Fissore, Rafael; Grow, Daniel; Dumesic, Daniel A

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe impaired oocyte fertilization from phospholipase C-zeta (PLC-ζ) deficiency in normal-appearing sperm that was successfully treated using calcium (Ca(2+)) ionophore with intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) of oocytes matured in vitro. An infertile couple undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) experienced failed oocyte fertilization following ICSI with normal-appearing sperm. A semen sample collected from the patient was used to assess the expression of sperm PLC- ζ protein by Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence and PLC-ζ bioactivity by an in vitro model of Ca(2+) release. A second IVF cycle was performed using Ca(2+) ionophore with ICSI to enhance Ca(2+)-induced oocyte activation of oocytes matured in vitro. Sperm PLC-ζ protein deficiency was demonstrated by Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence and confirmed by reduced PLC-ζ bioactivity using an in vitro model of Ca(2+) release. Nevertheless, with this sperm and supplementation of Ca(2+) ionophore following ICSI, fertilization of four of six oocytes matured in vitro was obtained. In addition, four embryos underwent cleavage and two of them reached the blastocyst stage. Transfer of these blastocysts into the uterus led to a single pregnancy and live birth. Deficiency of PLC-ζ in normal-appearing human sperm is associated with impaired Ca(2+)-dependent oocyte activation during ICSI. Under this condition, use of Ca(2+) ionophore following ICSI of oocytes matured in vitro improves embryo developmental competence, possibly through the activation of Ca(2+)-dependent mechanisms governing fertilization and preimplantation embryogenesis.

  16. Theoretical Debate and Brain Mechanisms of Repetition Blindness Effect%重复知盲效应的理论之争及脑机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖雪珍; 王爱平

    2015-01-01

    重复知盲现象自被发现至今已走过四分之一世纪,这期间重复知盲的产生机制一直是争论的焦点,并有标记个体化理论、类型节点不应期理论、竞争理论、提取失败理论和建构/归因理论等多种理论解释。大量研究证明,重复知盲是一种视知觉失败现象,但也有研究认为它是一种记忆失败现象。很多研究还发现,重复知盲不仅受到呈现时间和间隔刺激个数的限制,还受到实验材料的性质、刺激的空间位置及人们的反应方式等多种因素的影响。近些年来,随着ERP和fMRI等技术的利用,从更深层次揭示了重复知盲产生的脑机制。同时,重复知盲也作为一种实验范式应用于视觉加工领域的研究中。目前关于重复知盲仍然有很多问题值得探索。%It has been over a quarter of a century since the repetition blindness (RB) effect was first reported by Kanwisher (1987) and the precise mechanism underlying RB has been extensively debated. Researchers proposed different theories to account for the effect, for example, it has been argued that RP occurs due to a failure at the visual perception level; alternatively, it has also been argued that RP involves failure to memorize the repeated stimulus. Meanwhile, RB is influenced by many factors, such as presentation durations, lags, experimental materials, spatial locations and tasks. The popularization of neuroscience technology such as ERP and fMRI in recent years allows researchers to reveal the brain activity of RB. As a kind of experimental method, researchers have applied RB effect to explore some phenomena of the visual perception. The current paper reviews these basic research topics. However, many aspects of repetition blindness are still worth of further exploration.

  17. [M. sternocleidomastoideus mechanical stimulation produces lateralized effect on body schema perception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zartor, A S; Mikheev, M M; Popov, P V; Afanas'ev, S V

    2014-09-01

    Neck muscles play important role in body schema perception, pose and motor control. The mechanical neck muscles stimulation can influence these processes. On present investigation the kinesiology tape (KT) application was used as a local mechanical stimulation for M. sternocleidomastoideus. The results confirmed the influence of the KT application on the body schema perception. Moreover, the influence effect was lateralized in dependence on the side of the KT application. In most of the subjects the KT left application diminished the reaction time in the body schema mental rotation task. The right the KT application has not shown this effect. The possible causes of the KT application lateralized effect can be the proprioceptive asymmetry in neck muscles or the hemispheric functional asymmetry of the body schema perception process. The results may be useful for understanding the neurological nature of asymmetric body schema perception impairments as well as for the development of sport training methods.

  18. On-chip microrobot for investigating the response of aquatic microorganisms to mechanical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Tomohiro; Sugita, Masakuni; Hagiwara, Masaya; Arai, Fumihito; Kawano, Hiroyuki; Shihira-Ishikawa, Ikuko; Miyawaki, Atsushi

    2013-03-21

    In this paper, we propose a novel, magnetically driven microrobot equipped with a frame structure to measure the effects of stimulating aquatic microorganisms. The design and fabrication of the force-sensing structure with a displacement magnification mechanism based on beam deformation are described. The microrobot is composed of a Si-Ni hybrid structure constructed using micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) technologies. The microrobots with 5 μm-wide force sensors are actuated in a microfluidic chip by permanent magnets so that they can locally stimulate the microorganisms with the desired force within the stable environment of the closed microchip. They afford centimetre-order mobility (untethered drive) and millinewton-order forces (high power) as well as force-sensing. Finally, we apply the developed microrobots for the quantitative evaluation of the stimuation of Pleurosira laevis (P. laevis) and determine the relationship between the applied force and the response of a single cell.

  19. Mechanical forces and their second messengers in stimulating cell growth in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    1992-01-01

    Mechanical forces play an important role in modulating the growth of a number of different tissues including skeletal muscle, smooth muscle, cardiac muscle, bone, endothelium, epithelium, and lung. As interest increases in the molecular mechanisms by which mechanical forces are transduced into growth alterations, model systems are being developed to study these processes in tissue culture. This paper reviews the current methods available for mechanically stimulating tissue cultured cells. It then outlines some of the putative 'mechanogenic' second messengers involved in altering cell growth. Not surprisingly, many mechanogenic second messengers are the same as those involved in growth factor-induced cell growth. It is hypothesized that from an evolutionary standpoint, some second messenger systems may have initially evolved for unicellular organisms to respond to physical forces such as gravity and mechanical perturbation in their environment. As multicellular organisms came into existence, they appropriated these mechanogenic second messenger cascades for cellular regulation by growth factors.

  20. The effect of oscillatory mechanical stimulation on osteoblast attachment and proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aryaei, Ashkan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Jayasuriya, Ambalangodage C., E-mail: a.jayasuriya@utoledo.edu [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, College of Medicine and Life Sciences, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43614 (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the effect of the magnitude and duration of oscillatory mechanical stimulation on osteoblast attachment and proliferation as well as the time gap between seeding and applying the stimulation. Cells were exposed to three levels of speed at two different conditions. For the first group, mechanical shear stress was applied after 20 min of cell seeding. For the second group there was no time gap between cell seeding and applying mechanical stimulation. The total area subjected to shear stress was divided into three parts and for each part a comparative study was conducted at defined time points. Our results showed that both shear stress magnitude and the time gap between cell seeding and applying shear stress, are important in further cell proliferation and attachment. The effect of shear stress was not significant at lower speeds for both groups at earlier time points. However, a higher percentage of area was covered by cells at later time points under shear stress. In addition, the time gap can also improve osteoblast attachment. For the best rate of cell attachment and proliferation, the magnitude of shear stress and time gap should be optimized. The results of this paper can be utilized to improve cell attachment and proliferation in bioreactors. - Highlights: • The effect of oscillatory mechanical stimulation on osteoblast functions was studied. • Cells were exposed at three levels of speed to attach cells. • Shear stress magnitude and time gap are important for cell functions. • Cells start developing extracellular components at the early stage of seeding.

  1. Action mechanisms of transcranial direct current stimulation in Alzheimer´s disease and memory loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels eHansen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The pharmacological treatment of Alzheimer´s disease (AD is often limited and accompanied by drug side effects. Thus alternative therapeutic strategies such as non-invasive brain stimulation are needed. Few studies have demonstrated that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS, a method of neuromodulation with consecutive robust excitability changes within the stimulated cortex area, is beneficial in AD. There is also evidence that tDCS enhances memory function in cognitive rehabilitation in depressive patients, Parkinson´s disease and stroke. TDCS improves working and visual recognition memory in humans and object-recognition learning in the elderly. Neurobiological mechanisms of AD comprise changes in neuronal activity and the cerebral blood flow caused by altered microvasculature, synaptic dysregulation from ß-amyloid peptide accumulation, altered neuromodulation by degeneration of modulatory amine transmitter systems, altered brain oscillations, and changes in network connectivity. tDCS alters (i neuronal activity and (ii human cerebral blood flow, (iii has synaptic and non-synaptic after-effects (iv, can modify neurotransmitters polarity-dependently, (v and alter oscillatory brain activity and (vi functional connectivity patterns in the brain. It thus is reasonable to use tDCS as a therapeutic instrument in AD as it improves cognitive function in manner based on a disease mechanism. Moreover, it might prove valuable in other types of dementia. Future large-scale clinical and mechanism-oriented studies may enable to identify its therapeutic validity in other types of demential disorders.

  2. A dual flow bioreactor with controlled mechanical stimulation for cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitters, Tim W G M; Leijten, Jeroen C H; Deus, Filipe D; Costa, Ines B F; van Apeldoorn, Aart A; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Karperien, Marcel

    2013-10-01

    In cartilage, tissue engineering bioreactors can create a controlled environment to study chondrocyte behavior under mechanical stimulation or produce chondrogenic grafts of clinically relevant size. Here we present a novel bioreactor that combines mechanical stimulation with a two compartment system through which nutrients can be supplied solely by diffusion from opposite sides of a tissue-engineered construct. This design is based on the hypothesis that creating gradients of nutrients, growth factors, and growth factor antagonists can aid in the generation of zonal tissue-engineered cartilage. Computational modeling predicted that the design facilitates the creation of a biologically relevant glucose gradient. This was confirmed by quantitative glucose measurements in cartilage explants. In this system, it is not only possible to create gradients of nutrients, but also of anabolic or catabolic factors. Therefore, the bioreactor design allows control over nutrient supply and mechanical stimulation useful for in vitro generation of cartilage constructs that can be used for the resurfacing of articulated joints or as a model for studying osteoarthritis disease progression.

  3. Animal Hairs as Water-stimulated Shape Memory Materials: Mechanism and Structural Networks in Molecular Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xueliang; Hu, Jinlian

    2016-05-01

    Animal hairs consisting of α-keratin biopolymers existing broadly in nature may be responsive to water for recovery to the innate shape from their fixed deformation, thus possess smart behavior, namely shape memory effect (SME). In this article, three typical animal hair fibers were first time investigated for their water-stimulated SME, and therefrom to identify the corresponding net-points and switches in their molecular and morphological structures. Experimentally, the SME manifested a good stability of high shape fixation ratio and reasonable recovery rate after many cycles of deformation programming under water stimulation. The effects of hydration on hair lateral size, recovery kinetics, dynamic mechanical behaviors and structural components (crystal, disulfide and hydrogen bonds) were then systematically studied. SME mechanisms were explored based on the variations of structural components in molecular assemblies of such smart fibers. A hybrid structural network model with single-switch and twin-net-points was thereafter proposed to interpret the water-stimulated shape memory mechanism of animal hairs. This original work is expected to provide inspiration for exploring other natural materials to reveal their smart functions and natural laws in animals including human as well as making more remarkable synthetic smart materials.

  4. Dichloroacetate Stimulates Glycogen Accumulation in Primary Hepatocytes through an Insulin-Independent Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lingohr, Melissa K.(Washington State University); Bull, Richard J.(SELF-EMPLOYED CONSULTANTS); Kato-Weinstein, Junko (UNIVERSITY PROGRAMS); Thrall, Brian D.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    2002-01-01

    Dichloroacetate (DCA), a by-product of water chlorination, causes liver cancer in B6C3F1 mice. A hallmark response observed in mice exposed to carcinogenic doses of DCA is an accumulation of hepatic glycogen content. To distinguish whether the in vivo glycogenic effect of DCA was dependent on insulin and insulin signaling proteins, experiments were conducted in isolated hepatocytes where insulin concentrations could be controlled. In hepatocytes isolated from male B6C3F1 mice, DCA increased glycogen levels in a dose-related manner, independently of insulin. The accumulation of hepatocellular glycogen induced by DCA was not the result of decreased glycogenolysis, since DCA had no effect on the rate of glucagon-stimulated glycogen breakdown. Glycogen accumulation caused by DCA treatment was not hindered by inhibitors of extracellular-regulated protein kinase kinase (Erk1/2 kinase or MEK) or p70 kDa S6 protein kinase (p70(S6K)), but was completely blocked by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors, LY294002 and wortmannin. Similarly, insulin-stimulated glycogen deposition was not influenced by the Erk1/2 kinase inhibitor, PD098509, or the p70(S6K) inhibitor, rapamycin. Unlike DCA-stimulated glycogen deposition, PI3K-inhibition only partially blocked the glycogenic effect of insulin. DCA did not cause phosphorylation of the downstream PI3K target protein, protein kinase B (PKB/Akt). The phosphorylation of PKB/Akt did not correlate to insulin-stimulated glycogenesis either. Similar to insulin, DCA in the medium decreased IR expression in isolated hepatocytes. The results indicate DCA increases hepatocellular glycogen accumulation through a PI3K-dependent mechanism that does not involve PKB/Akt and is, at least in part, different from the classical insulin-stimulated glycogenesis pathway. Somewhat surprisingly, insulin-stimulated glycogenesis also appears not to involve PKB/Akt in isolated murine hepatocytes.

  5. Endotoxin-stimulated Rat Hepatic Stellate Cells Induce Autophagy in Hepatocytes as a Survival Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangi, Anil; Huang, Chao; Tandon, Ashish; Stolz, Donna; Wu, Tong; Gandhi, Chandrashekhar R

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) produce many cytokines including IFNβ, TNFα, and IL6, strongly inhibit DNA synthesis, but induce apoptosis of a small number of hepatocytes. In vivo administration of LPS (up to 10 mg/mL) causes modest inflammation and weight loss in rats but not mortality. We determined whether LPS-stimulated HSCs instigate mechanisms of hepatocyte survival. Rats received 10 mg/kg LPS (i.p.) and determinations were made at 6 h. In vitro, HSCs were treated with 100 ng/mL LPS till 24 h. The medium was transferred to hepatocytes, and determinations were made at 0-12 h. Controls were HSC-conditioned medium or medium-containing LPS. LPS treatment of rats caused autophagy in hepatocytes, a physiological process for clearance of undesirable material including injured or damaged organelles. This was accompanied by activation of c-Jun NH2 terminal kinase (JNK) and apoptosis of ~4-5% of hepatocytes. In vitro, LPS-conditioned HSC medium (LPS/HSC) induced autophagy in hepatocytes but apoptosis of only ~10% of hepatocytes. While LPS/HSC stimulated activation of JNK (associated with cell death), it also activated NFkB and ERK1/2 (associated with cell survival). LPS-stimulated HSCs produced IFNβ, and LPS/HSC-induced autophagy in hepatocytes and their apoptosis were significantly inhibited by anti-IFNβ antibody. Blockade of autophagy, on the other hand, strongly augmented hepatocyte apoptosis. While LPS-stimulated HSCs cause apoptosis of a subpopulation of hepatocytes by producing IFNβ, they also induce cell survival mechanisms, which may be of critical importance in resistance to liver injury during endotoxemia.

  6. Repetitive maladaptive behavior: beyond repetition compulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowins, Brad

    2010-09-01

    Maladaptive behavior that repeats, typically known as repetition compulsion, is one of the primary reasons that people seek psychotherapy. However, even with psychotherapeutic advances it continues to be extremely difficult to treat. Despite wishes and efforts to the contrary repetition compulsion does not actually achieve mastery, as evidenced by the problem rarely resolving without therapeutic intervention, and the difficulty involved in producing treatment gains. A new framework is proposed, whereby such behavior is divided into behavior of non-traumatic origin and traumatic origin with some overlap occurring. Repetitive maladaptive behavior of non-traumatic origin arises from an evolutionary-based process whereby patterns of behavior frequently displayed by caregivers and compatible with a child's temperament are acquired and repeated. It has a familiarity and ego-syntonic aspect that strongly motivates the person to retain the behavior. Repetitive maladaptive behavior of traumatic origin is characterized by defensive dissociation of the cognitive and emotional components of trauma, making it very difficult for the person to integrate the experience. The strong resistance of repetitive maladaptive behavior to change is based on the influence of both types on personality, and also factors specific to each. Psychotherapy, although very challenging at the best of times, can achieve the mastery wished and strived for, with the aid of several suggestions provided.

  7. Influence of mechanical stimulation on human dermal fibroblasts derived from different body sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Ruixia; Wang, Zhiguo; Xu, Quanchen; Liu, Su; Zhang, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical stimulation is highly associated with pathogenesis of human hypertrophic scar. Although much work has focused on the influence of mechanical stress on fibroblast populations from various tissues and organs in the human body, their effects on cultured dermal fibroblasts by the area of the body have not been as well studied. In this study, cultures of skin fibroblasts from two different body sites were subjected to cyclic mechanical stimulation with a 10% stretching amplitude at a frequency of 0.1 Hz for 24, 36 and 48 hours, respectively, and thereafter harvested for experimental assays. Fibroblasts from scapular upper back skin, subjected to mechanical loads for 36 and 48 hours, respectively, were observed to proliferate at a higher rate and reach confluent more rapidly during in vitro culturing, had higher expression levels of mRNA and protein production of integrin β1, p130Cas and TGF β1 versus those from medial side of upper arm. These data indicate that skin fibroblasts, with regard to originated body sites studied in the experiments, display a diversity of mechanotransduction properties and biochemical reactions in response to applied mechanical stress, which contributes to the increased susceptibility to hypertrophic scars formation at certain areas of human body characterized by higher skin and muscle tension.

  8. Cyclic mechanical stimulation rescues achilles tendon from degeneration in a bioreactor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Lin, Zhen; Ni, Ming; Thien, Christine; Day, Robert E; Gardiner, Bruce; Rubenson, Jonas; Kirk, Thomas B; Smith, David W; Wang, Allan; Lloyd, David G; Wang, Yan; Zheng, Qiujian; Zheng, Ming H

    2015-12-01

    Physiotherapy is one of the effective treatments for tendinopathy, whereby symptoms are relieved by changing the biomechanical environment of the pathological tendon. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we first established a model of progressive tendinopathy-like degeneration in the rabbit Achilles. Following ex vivo loading deprivation culture in a bioreactor system for 6 and 12 days, tendons exhibited progressive degenerative changes, abnormal collagen type III production, increased cell apoptosis, and weakened mechanical properties. When intervention was applied at day 7 for another 6 days by using cyclic tensile mechanical stimulation (6% strain, 0.25 Hz, 8 h/day) in a bioreactor, the pathological changes and mechanical properties were almost restored to levels seen in healthy tendon. Our results indicated that a proper biomechanical environment was able to rescue early-stage pathological changes by increased collagen type I production, decreased collagen degradation and cell apoptosis. The ex vivo model developed in this study allows systematic study on the effect of mechanical stimulation on tendon biology.

  9. The effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with abdominal muscle electrical stimulation on the pulmonary ventilation of patients with cervical spinal cord injury%重复功能性磁刺激联合腹直肌电刺激对颈髓损伤患者肺通气功能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李宁; 袁华; 牟翔; 杜起; 毛利; 惠楠

    2013-01-01

    Objective To observe the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) combined with abdominal muscle electrical stimulation on the pulmonary ventilation of patients with cervical spinal cord injury.Methods Twenty-five patients with cervical spinal cord injury were randomized into an experimental group (n =13) and a control group (n =12).The control group was given comprehensive rehabilitation treatment,including upper limb movements,standing training and training of respiratory function,while the experimental group was given repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and abdominal muscle electrical stimulation in addition to the comprehensive rehabilitation treatment.The patients' maximum lung capacity (VC),forced expiratory volume for 1 second (FEV1),peak expiratory flow rate (PEF) and tidal volume (VT) were measured at the outset and after 3 months of treatment.Results The lung function indexes increased in both groups after treatment,but each index improved significantly more in the experimental group,on average,than in the control group.Conclusion As a supplement to routine respiratory function training,repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation combined with abdominal intermediate frequency electrical stimulation can improve the pulmonary ventilation function of patients with middle and lower cervical spinal cord injury.%目的 观察重复功能性磁刺激(rFMS)联合腹直肌电刺激对中、低位颈髓损伤(CSCI)患者肺通气功能的影响.方法 共选取25例中、低位CSCI患者,采用随机数字表法将其分为治疗组及对照组.对照组给予上肢主动运动、站立训练、呼吸功能训练等综合康复治疗,治疗组在此基础上辅以rFMS及腹直肌中频电刺激.分别于治疗前、治疗3个月后对2组患者肺功能[包括最大肺活量(VC)、1秒钟用力呼气量(FEV1)、呼气峰值流速(PEF)及潮气量(VT)等指标]进行评定.结果 2组患者分别经3个

  10. Investigation of mechanism of fade of gastrin-stimulated gastric acid secretion in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, B H

    1988-01-01

    1. In conscious cats prepared with gastric fistulae gastric acid secretion in response to pentagastrin was found to reach a maximum after 45 min of stimulation, and to fade thereafter. Over the period 45-150 min of stimulation the fade was 5.4-7.8% of the maximum response per 15 min. 2. Once the response to pentagastrin had declined, acid secretion could not be restored by doubling the dose of pentagastrin, although an equisecretory dose of histamine could restore it. 3. Low doses of histamine were additive to the pentagastrin acid secretory response; they tended to prolong the peak response, but did not alter the subsequent fade of acid secretion. The histamine H1-receptor antagonist mepyramine did not affect maximal acid secretion or the fade of the pentagastrin response. 4. The beta-adrenoreceptor antagonist propranolol increased the secretory response to pentagastrin, whilst the alpha-adrenoreceptor antagonist phentolamine was without effect. Neither agent altered the fade of the pentagastrin response. Isoprenaline tended to inhibit pentagastrin-stimulated acid secretion and increase the rate of fade of the response. 5. The 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor antagonist methylsergide slightly enhanced the acid secretory response to pentagastrin, but did not alter the fade of the response. A low dose of 5-HT did not alter pentagastrin-stimulated acid secretion, whilst a higher dose of 5-HT inhibited it. 6. Tetra-, penta- and pentadecagastrin demonstrated tachyphylaxis, i.e. progressively reduced responses upon repeated stimulation, whilst histamine did not. A low dose of histamine did not prevent tachyphylaxis of the pentagastrin response. 7. It is concluded that fade of pentagastrin-stimulated acid secretion in the conscious cat cannot be satisfactorily explained by the failure of the acid secretory mechanism, depletion of histamine, release of 5-HT, or activation of histamine H1-, alpha- or beta-adreno-, or 5-HT-receptors. The similar characteristics of fade

  11. A novel approach to mechanical foot stimulation during human locomotion under body weight support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravano, S; Ivanenko, Y P; Maccioni, G; Macellari, V; Poppele, R E; Lacquaniti, F

    2011-04-01

    Input from the foot plays an essential part in perceiving support surfaces and determining kinematic events in human walking. To simulate adequate tactile pressure inputs under body weight support (BWS) conditions that represent an effective form of locomotion training, we here developed a new method of phasic mechanical foot stimulation using light-weight pneumatic insoles placed inside the shoes (under the heel and metatarsus). To test the system, we asked healthy participants to walk on a treadmill with different levels of BWS. The pressure under the stimulated areas of the feet and subjective sensations were higher at high levels of BWS and when applied to the ball and toes rather than heels. Foot stimulation did not disturb significantly the normal motor pattern, and in all participants we evoked a reliable step-synchronized triggering of stimuli for each leg separately. This approach has been performed in a general framework looking for "afferent templates" of human locomotion that could be used for functional sensory stimulation. The proposed technique can be used to imitate or partially restore surrogate contact forces under body weight support conditions.

  12. Identification of organic acids in wine that stimulate mechanisms of gastric acid secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liszt, Kathrin Ingrid; Walker, Jessica; Somoza, Veronika

    2012-07-18

    Wine may cause stomach irritation due to its stimulatory effect on gastric acid secretion, although the mechanisms by which wine or components thereof activate pathways of gastric acid secretion are poorly understood. Gastric pH was measured with a noninvasive intragastric probe, demonstrating that administration of 125 mL of white or red wine to healthy volunteers stimulated gastric acid secretion more potently than the administration of equivalent amounts of ethanol. Between both beverages, red wine showed a clear trend for being more active in stimulating gastric acid secretion than white wine (p = 0.054). Quantification of the intracellular proton concentration in human gastric tumor cells (HGT-1), a well-established indicator of proton secretion and, in turn, stomach acid formation in vivo, confirmed the stronger effect of red wine as compared to white wine. RT-qPCR experiments on cells exposed to red wine also revealed a more pronounced effect than white wine on the fold change expression of genes associated with gastric acid secretion. Of the quantitatively abundant organic acids in wine, malic acid and succinic acid most actively stimulated proton secretion in vitro. However, addition of ethanol to individual organic acids attenuated the secretory effect of tartaric acid, but not that of the other organic acids. It was concluded that malic acid for white wine and succinic acid for red wine are key organic acids that contribute to gastric acid stimulation.

  13. Studies of the neural mechanisms of deep brain stimulation in rodent models of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jing-Yu; Shi, Li-Hong; Luo, Fei; Zhang, Wang-Ming; Woodward, Donald J

    2008-01-01

    Several rodent models of deep brain stimulation (DBS) have been developed in recent years. Electrophysiological and neurochemical studies have been performed to examine the mechanisms underlying the effects of DBS. In vitro studies have provided deep insights into the role of ion channels in response to brain stimulation. In vivo studies reveal neural responses in the context of intact neural circuits. Most importantly, recording of neural responses to behaviorally effective DBS in freely moving animals provides a direct means for examining how DBS modulates the basal ganglia thalamocortical circuits and thereby improves motor function. DBS can modulate firing rate, normalize irregular burst firing patterns and reduce low frequency oscillations associated with the Parkinsonian state. Our current efforts are focused on elucidating the mechanisms by which DBS effects on neural circuitry improve motor performance. New behavioral models and improved recording techniques will aide researchers conducting future DBS studies in a variety of behavioral modalities and enable new treatment strategies to be explored, such as closed-loop stimulations based on real time computation of ensemble neural activity.

  14. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) augmentation of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for SSRI-resistant obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD): a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhong-Rui; Shi, Li-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Background and objective: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) as augmentation of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) for SSRI-resistant obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have yielded conflicting results. Therefore, this meta-analysis was conducted to assess the efficacy of this strategy for SSRI-resistant OCD. Methods: Scientific and medical databases, including international databases (PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CCTR, Web of Science, PsycINFO), two Chinese databases (CBM-disc, CNKI), and relevant websites dated up to July 2014, were searched for RCTs on this strategy for treating OCD. Mantel-Haenszel random-effects model was used. Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) score, response rates and drop-out rates were evaluated. Results: Data were obtained from nine RCTs consisting of 290 subjects. Active rTMS was an effective augmentation strategy in treating SSRI-resistant OCD with a pooled WMD of 3.89 (95% CI = [1.27, 6.50]) for reducing Y-BOCS score and a pooled odds ratio (OR) of 2.65 (95% CI = [1.36, 5.17] for response rates. No significant differences in drop-out rates were found. No publication bias was detected. Conclusion: The pooled examination demonstrated that this strategy seems to be efficacious and acceptable for treating SSRI-resistant OCD. As the number of RCTs included here was limited, further large-scale multi-center RCTs are required to validate our conclusions. PMID:25663986

  15. 重复经颅磁刺激辅助治疗精神分裂症的双盲对照研究%Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation for the treatment of schizophrenia:a double-blind study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丹逢; 郭建雄; 刘恩益; 张春平; 卢想云

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨重复经颅磁刺激治疗( rTMS)对精神分裂症阳性症状及阴性症状的效果。方法采用随机数字表法将64例符合《精神障碍诊断与统计手册(第4版)》( DSM-IV)诊断标准的精神分裂症患者分为研究组(真刺激)和对照组(伪刺激)各32例,在原有抗精神病药物剂量保持不变基础上,分别予2周10次的1Hz左侧颞顶叶rTMS真性刺激和假性刺激治疗。治疗开始前和治疗结束后均采用阳性和阴性症状量表( PANSS)评定临床疗效。结果两组在治疗后阳性症状评分、阴性症状评分、一般精神病理学评分、PANSS 总评分差异无统计学差异(P>0.05);治疗后研究组的幻觉性行为(P3)的减分率与对照组相比,差异有统计学差异(P0. 05). However,we do found that the hallucinatory behavior(P3)of the study group was significantly lower than it in the control group(P<0. 05). Conclusion Repeti-tive transcranial magnetic stimulation can improve the hallucinatory behavior(P3)of schizophrenia.

  16. Low frequency (1-Hz), right prefrontal repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) compared with venlafaxine ER in the treatment of resistant depression: a double-blind, single-centre, randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bares, Martin; Kopecek, Miloslav; Novak, Tomas; Stopkova, Pavla; Sos, Peter; Kozeny, Jiri; Brunovsky, Martin; Höschl, Cyril

    2009-11-01

    Previous studies have shown effectiveness of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in the treatment of depression. This double-blind study compared efficacy of l Hz rTMS over the right prefrontal dorsolateral cortex with venlafaxine ER in the treatment of resistant depression. A total of 60 inpatients with depressive disorder (DSM-IV criteria), who previously did not respond to at least one antidepressant treatment, were randomly assigned to 1 Hz rTMS with placebo and venlafaxine ER with sham rTMS for 4 weeks. The primary outcome measure was score change in the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). We also used Clinical Global Impression (CGI) and Beck Depressive. Inventory-Short Form (BDI-SF). The response was defined as a >or=50% reduction of MADRS score. There were no significant differences between treatment groups in MADRS (p=0.38), BDI-SF (p=0.56) and CGI (p=0.17) scores from baseline to endpoint. Response rates for rTMS (33%) and venlafaxine (39%) as well as remission (MADRS score

  17. A single-subject study to evaluate ‎the inhibitory repetitive transcranial ‎magnetic stimulation combined ‎with traditional dysphagia‎ therapy in patients with‎ post-stroke dysphagia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Ghelichi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Post-stroke dysphagia is common and is associated with the development of pneumonia. To investigate the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS combined with traditional dysphagia therapy (TDT on swallowing function in patients with post-stroke dysphagia.Methods: In this single-subject study, four patients with dysphagia post-stroke included. The patients received the rTMS applied to the intact cerebral hemisphere at 1 Hz with train of 1200 for 5 consecutive days combined with TDT 3 days per week for 6 weeks. The main outcome measure was the Mann Assessment of Swallowing Ability (MASA. Measurements were taken before, after the end of 5th, 10th, 15th treatment sessions, and after the end of the treatment (18th session.Results: The MASA scores improved in all patients following treatment. The maximum and minimum change in level between the baseline phase and treatment phase was +84 and +36. The greatest percentage improvement was observed after 5th treatment sessions ranging between 11 and 35%. The treatment trend was upward shown by the directions of the slopes indicated by positive values (+9.1-+20.7. The dysphagia was resolved after 10th treatment session in all participants. The aspiration resolved in two participants after the 5th treatment session and resolved in another 2 participants after the 10th treatment session.Conclusion: The combination therapy of rTMS plus TDT improved swallowing function in patients with post-stroke dysphagia. Further research with a larger sample size is recommended.

  18. Posture-cognitive dual-tasking: A relevant marker of depression-related psychomotor retardation. An illustration of the positive impact of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschamps, Thibault; Sauvaget, Anne; Pichot, Anne; Valrivière, Pierre; Maroulidès, Maxime; Bois, Aurore; Bulteau, Samuel; Thomas-Ollivier, Véronique

    2016-12-01

    This study examined whether postural control variables, particularly the center-of-pressure (COP) velocity-based parameters, could be a relevant hallmark of depression-related psychomotor retardation (PMR). We first aimed at investigating the interplay between the PMR scores and the COP performance in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), as compared to age-matched healthy controls; secondly, we focused on the impact of a repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) treatment on depression, PMR scores and postural performance. 16 MDD patients, and a control group of 16 healthy adults, were asked to maintain quiet standing balance during two trials with or without vision, and while backward counting (dual task). All the position and velocity-based COP variables were computed. Before and after the rTMS session (n eligible MDD = 10), we assessed the depression level with the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), the PMR scores with the French Retardation Rating Scale for Depression (ERD), and postural performance. Before the treatment, significant positive partial correlations were found between the pre-ERD scores and the velocity-based COP variables, especially in the dual-task conditions (p < 0.05). In contrast, there was no significant correlation between the post-ERD scores and any postural parameter after the treatment. The MADRS and ERD scores showed a significant decrease between before and after the rTMS intervention. For the first time, the findings clearly validated the view that the assessment of postural performance - easy to envisage in clinical settings-constitutes a reliable and objective marker of PMR in MDD patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. 重复经颅磁刺激对冰毒成瘾患者认知功能的影响%Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Effects on Cognitive Function in Patients with Methamphetamine Addiction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐进; 周利洪

    2013-01-01

    目的:评价重复经颅磁刺激rTMS对冰毒成瘾患者认知功能的影响。方法90例冰毒成瘾患者接受10Hz rTMS治疗20次,治疗前后应用韦氏记忆量表(WMS--RS)、心理旋转试验(MR)、威斯康星卡片分类测验(WCST)进行评定。结果 WMS--RS、中大部分测验项目在治疗前后都有统计学意义,MR在治疗前后有显著统计学意义,WCST错误应答(RE)有显著下降,非持续性错误(NRPE)也有显著下降。结论 rTMS可以改善冰毒成瘾患者的认知功能。%Objective Evaluation of Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS )ef ects on cognitive function in patients with methamphetamine addiction. Methods 90 methamphetamine addiction patients accept 10 Hz rTMS treatment for 20 times,Before and after treatment using wechsler memory scale (WMS-RS), mental rotation test (MR), Wisconsin card sorting test (WCST) were assessed. Results Most of the WMS- RS test item before and after treatment was statistical y significant,MR significant statistical significance before and after therapy,WCST RE has dropped significantly,NRPE has dropped significantly. Conclusion rTMS can improve cognitive function in patients with methamphetamine addiction.

  20. Retinoic acid and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 stimulate osteoclast formation by different mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheven, B.A.; Hamilton, N.J. (Rowett Research Institute, Bucksburn, Aberdeen (Scotland))

    1990-01-01

    The effects of retinoic acid (RA) and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25-(OH)2D3) on osteoclast formation were examined in intact fetal long bones of different ages/developmental stages maintained in organ culture using a chemically defined medium with or without the presence of serum. Besides stimulating bone resorption, RA and 1,25-(OH)2D3 increased the number of osteoclasts in 19-day-old fetal rat tibiae. Likewise, these bone-resorbing agents induced and stimulated osteoclast formation in 19- and 18-day-old metatarsal bones which were osteoclast-free at the beginning of the culture. The response to 1,25-(OH)2D3 was greatly enhanced by 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) irrespective of the developmental stage of the long bone. The response to RA was not. Light microscopic autoradiography after labeling of the cultures with tritiated thymidine showed that both RA and 1,25-(OH)2D3 induced osteoclast differentiation from proliferating and postmitotic precursors. However, neither agent was able to stimulate proliferation of osteoclast progenitor cells in the older bones (19 days). Studies on the formation of osteoclast-like (tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase positive) cells in bone marrow cultures indicated that FBS was a potent inducer of osteoclast-like cell formation. In the presence of FBS, 1,25-(OH)2D3 significantly stimulated this response, but RA did not. The results demonstrate that although both RA and 1,25-(OH)2D3 stimulate osteoclast formation from proliferating and postmitotic precursors in long bones in vitro, they do so by different mechanisms.

  1. Longitudinal growth of skeletal myotubes in vitro in a new horizontal mechanical cell stimulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenburgh, Herman H.; Karlisch, Patricia

    1989-01-01

    A tissue-culture model system for growing skeletal-muscle cells under more dynamic conditions than found in normal tissue-culture environments is described. A computerized device presented allows mechanical stimulation of the cell's substratum by 300 to 400 pct in length in the horizontal plane. Cell growth rates and skeletal-muscle organogenesis are stimulated in this in vitro system. It is noted that longitudinal myotube growth observed is accompanied by increased rates of cell proliferation and myoblast fusion. Prestretching the collagen-coated substratum before cell plating is shown to lead to increased cell proliferation, myotube orientation, and longitudinal myotube growth. The effects of substratum stretching on myogenesis in the model system are also assessed and attributed to alterations in the cell's extracellular matrix.

  2. Repetition suppression and repetition priming are processing outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wig, Gagan S

    2012-01-01

    Abstract There is considerable evidence that repetition suppression (RS) is a cortical signature of previous exposure to the environment. In many instances RS in specific brain regions is accompanied by improvements in specific behavioral measures; both observations are outcomes of repeated processing. In understanding the mechanism by which brain changes give rise to behavioral changes, it is important to consider what aspect of the environment a given brain area or set of areas processes, and how this might be expressed behaviorally.

  3. Local Mechanical Stimulation of Mardin-Darby Canine Kidney Cell Sheets on Temperature-Responsive Hydrogel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiro Akaike

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Collective motion of cell sheets plays a role not only in development and repair, but also in devastating diseases such as cancer. However, unlike single-cell motility, collective motion of cell sheets involves complex cell-cell communication during migration; therefore, its mechanism is largely unknown. To elucidate propagation of signaling transduced by cell-cell interaction, we designed a hydrogel substrate that can cause local mechanical stretching of cell sheets. Poly (N-isopropyl acrylamide (PNIPAAm hydrogel is a temperature-responsive polymer gel whose volume changes isotropically in response to temperature changes below 37 °C. We designed a combined hydrogel substrate consisting of collagen-immobilized PNIPAAm as the local stimulation side and polyacrylamide (PAAm as the non-stimulation side to assess propagation of mechanical transduction. Mardin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK cells adhered to the collagen-immobilized PNIPAAm gel increased it area and were flattened as the gel swelled with temperature decrease. E-cadherin in these cells became undetectable in some domains, and actin stress fibers were more clearly observed at the cell base. In contrast, E-cadherin in cells adhered to the collagen-immobilized PAAm side was equally stained as that in cells adhered to the collagen-immobilized PAAm side even after temperature decrease. ERK1/2 MAPK activation of cells on the non-stimulated substrate occurred after partial stretching of the cell sheet suggesting the propagation of signaling. These results indicate that a change in the balance of mechanical tension induced by partial stretching of cell sheets leads to activation and propagation of the cell signaling.

  4. Potential Mechanisms Supporting the Value of Motor Cortex Stimulation to Treat Chronic Pain Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    DosSantos, Marcos F.; Ferreira, Natália; Toback, Rebecca L.; Carvalho, Antônio C.; DaSilva, Alexandre F.

    2016-01-01

    Throughout the first years of the twenty-first century, neurotechnologies such as motor cortex stimulation (MCS), transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) have attracted scientific attention and been considered as potential tools to centrally modulate chronic pain, especially for those conditions more difficult to manage and refractory to all types of available pharmacological therapies. Interestingly, although the role of the motor cortex in pain has not been fully clarified, it is one of the cortical areas most commonly targeted by invasive and non-invasive neuromodulation technologies. Recent studies have provided significant advances concerning the establishment of the clinical effectiveness of primary MCS to treat different chronic pain syndromes. Concurrently, the neuromechanisms related to each method of primary motor cortex (M1) modulation have been unveiled. In this respect, the most consistent scientific evidence originates from MCS studies, which indicate the activation of top-down controls driven by M1 stimulation. This concept has also been applied to explain M1-TMS mechanisms. Nevertheless, activation of remote areas in the brain, including cortical and subcortical structures, has been reported with both invasive and non-invasive methods and the participation of major neurotransmitters (e.g., glutamate, GABA, and serotonin) as well as the release of endogenous opioids has been demonstrated. In this critical review, the putative mechanisms underlying the use of MCS to provide relief from chronic migraine and other types of chronic pain are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the most recent scientific evidence obtained from chronic pain research studies involving MCS and non-invasive neuromodulation methods (e.g., tDCS and TMS), which are analyzed comparatively. PMID:26903788

  5. Ceruloplasmin ferroxidase activity stimulates cellular iron uptake by a trivalent cation-specific transport mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attieh, Z. K.; Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Seshadri, V.; Tripoulas, N. A.; Fox, P. L.

    1999-01-01

    The balance required to maintain appropriate cellular and tissue iron levels has led to the evolution of multiple mechanisms to precisely regulate iron uptake from transferrin and low molecular weight iron chelates. A role for ceruloplasmin (Cp) in vertebrate iron metabolism is suggested by its potent ferroxidase activity catalyzing conversion of Fe2+ to Fe3+, by identification of yeast copper oxidases homologous to Cp that facilitate high affinity iron uptake, and by studies of "aceruloplasminemic" patients who have extensive iron deposits in multiple tissues. We have recently shown that Cp increases iron uptake by cultured HepG2 cells. In this report, we investigated the mechanism by which Cp stimulates cellular iron uptake. Cp stimulated the rate of non-transferrin 55Fe uptake by iron-deficient K562 cells by 2-3-fold, using a transferrin receptor-independent pathway. Induction of Cp-stimulated iron uptake by iron deficiency was blocked by actinomycin D and cycloheximide, consistent with a transcriptionally induced or regulated transporter. Cp-stimulated iron uptake was completely blocked by unlabeled Fe3+ and by other trivalent cations including Al3+, Ga3+, and Cr3+, but not by divalent cations. These results indicate that Cp utilizes a trivalent cation-specific transporter. Cp ferroxidase activity was required for iron uptake as shown by the ineffectiveness of two ferroxidase-deficient Cp preparations, copper-deficient Cp and thiomolybdate-treated Cp. We propose a model in which iron reduction and subsequent re-oxidation by Cp are essential for an iron uptake pathway with high ion specificity.

  6. Tendon response to pharmaco-mechanical stimulation of the chronically retracted rotator cuff in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieser, Karl; Farshad, Mazda; Meyer, Dominik C; Conze, Philipp; von Rechenberg, Brigitte; Gerber, Christian

    2015-02-01

    Chronic tearing of tendons is associated with molecular and structural alterations causing biomechanical changes, which compromise musculotendinous function and become limiting factors for tendon repair. This study investigated the histological response of chronically retracted sheep rotator cuff tendons to mechanical and pharmacological stimulation in view of tendon repair. Sixteen weeks after experimental release of the infraspinatus tendon in 20 sheep, the retracted musculotendinous unit was subjected to continuous traction either with [anabolic steroids (nandrolone) group/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) group] or without (control group) additional pharmacological treatment during 6 weeks. A new degeneration score for tendinous tissues (DSTT), based on established knowledge on histological changes associated with tendon degeneration, was used for histological analysis at the time of tendon release, at the beginning of continuous re-lengthening and at repair in all animals. The DSTT score (inter-observer correlation: r = 0.83), quantifiably representing tendon degeneration, improved from 15.5 (SD 1.3) points before to 9.8 (SD 3.8) points after re-lengthening. It improved in a qualitatively and quantitatively similar fashion if pharmacological stimulation was added. The nandrolone group improved from 13.7 (SD 1.6) to 9.8 (SD 1.9) and the IGF group from 13.3 (SD 3.6) to 8.8 (SD 1.8) points. Mechanical stimulation significantly reduced tissue degeneration. However, the addition of a pharmacological stimulation with anabolic steroids or IGF had neither a measurable positive nor negative effect on the degenerative process. Therefore, this investigation does neither support the additional pharmacological use of the anabolic steroid nandrolone or of IGF decanoate for restoration of tendon degeneration, nor otherwise provide evidence for additional tendon damage, if those substances are used to alter the muscular metabolism.

  7. Grammatical Change through Repetition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arevart, Supot

    1989-01-01

    The effect of repetition on grammatical change in an unrehearsed talk is examined based on a case study of a single learner. It was found that repetition allows for accuracy monitoring in that errors committed in repeated contexts undergo correction. Implications for teaching are discussed. (23 references) (LB)

  8. The Negative Repetition Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Neil W.; Peterson, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental property of human memory is that repetition enhances memory. Peterson and Mulligan (2012) recently documented a surprising "negative repetition effect," in which participants who studied a list of cue-target pairs twice recalled fewer targets than a group who studied the pairs only once. Words within a pair rhymed, and…

  9. Roles of repetitive sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, G.I.

    1991-12-31

    The DNA of higher eukaryotes contains many repetitive sequences. The study of repetitive sequences is important, not only because many have important biological function, but also because they provide information on genome organization, evolution and dynamics. In this paper, I will first discuss some generic effects that repetitive sequences will have upon genome dynamics and evolution. In particular, it will be shown that repetitive sequences foster recombination among, and turnover of, the elements of a genome. I will then consider some examples of repetitive sequences, notably minisatellite sequences and telomere sequences as examples of tandem repeats, without and with respectively known function, and Alu sequences as an example of interspersed repeats. Some other examples will also be considered in less detail.

  10. Roles of repetitive sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, G.I.

    1991-12-31

    The DNA of higher eukaryotes contains many repetitive sequences. The study of repetitive sequences is important, not only because many have important biological function, but also because they provide information on genome organization, evolution and dynamics. In this paper, I will first discuss some generic effects that repetitive sequences will have upon genome dynamics and evolution. In particular, it will be shown that repetitive sequences foster recombination among, and turnover of, the elements of a genome. I will then consider some examples of repetitive sequences, notably minisatellite sequences and telomere sequences as examples of tandem repeats, without and with respectively known function, and Alu sequences as an example of interspersed repeats. Some other examples will also be considered in less detail.

  11. Gene Expression Responses to Mechanical Stimulation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Seeded on Calcium Phosphate Cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharibi, Borzo; Cama, Giuseppe; Capurro, Marco; Thompson, Ian; Deb, Sanjukta; Di Silvio, Lucy

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study reported here was to investigate the molecular responses of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) to loading with a model that attempts to closely mimic the physiological mechanical loading of bone, using monetite calcium phosphate (CaP) scaffolds to mimic the biomechanical properties of bone and a bioreactor to induce appropriate load and strain. Methods Human MSCs were seeded onto CaP scaffolds and subjected to a pulsating compressive force of 5.5±4.5 N at a frequency of 0.1 Hz. Early molecular responses to mechanical loading were assessed by microarray and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and activation of signal transduction cascades was evaluated by western blotting analysis. Results The maximum mechanical strain on cell/scaffolds was calculated at around 0.4%. After 2 h of loading, a total of 100 genes were differentially expressed. The largest cluster of genes activated with 2 h stimulation was the regulator of transcription, and it included FOSB. There were also changes in genes involved in cell cycle and regulation of protein kinase cascades. When cells were rested for 6 h after mechanical stimulation, gene expression returned to normal. Further resting for a total of 22 h induced upregulation of 63 totally distinct genes that were mainly involved in cell surface receptor signal transduction and regulation of metabolic and cell division processes. In addition, the osteogenic transcription factor RUNX-2 was upregulated. Twenty-four hours of persistent loading also markedly induced osterix expression. Mechanical loading resulted in upregulation of Erk1/2 phosphorylation and the gene expression study identified a number of possible genes (SPRY2, RIPK1, SPRED2, SERTAD1, TRIB1, and RAPGEF2) that may regulate this process. Conclusion The results suggest that mechanical loading activates a small number of immediate-early response genes that are mainly associated with transcriptional

  12. Models of intracellular mechanisms of plant bioelectrical potentials caused by combined stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Chernetchenko

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with bioelectrical potentials of the plants recorded during different types of stimuli and combined stimulus as well. All registrations were observed on the leaves of the corn. We used different stimuli, such as cold, heat, photo- and electrical stimulation, and certain combination of this stimuli. Hardware and software system for automated recording of bioelectrical potentials has been successfully used in this work. We proposed the universal pattern of bioelectrical potentials’ recording which allowed to detect the response of the biological object to different stimuli and various combinations of these stimuli. This pattern can be used for the deeper understanding of biological mechanisms of electrical potentials’ generation in cells and discovering of processes of accommodation of whole organisms to these stimuli. Integrated system of recording and biometrical processing was used for analysis of corn leaves electrical responses to the thermal stimuli. The dynamics of these potentials was studied, with the quantitative analysis of the potential level stabilization.We calculated the ratio of amplitude of response potentials to the first response amplitude. Mathematical models of the plant cell were used for studying of intracellular mechanisms of biopotentials gereration. As a result of modeling, we revealed that electrical response of the cells was based on selectiveconductivity of cell membrane for Н+ and Ca2+ ions. Therefore, we showed the biophysical relation of plant potentials to underlying intracellular biophysical mechanisms during thermal and combined stimulation.

  13. Direct Mechanical Stimulation of Stem Cells: A Beating Electromechanically Active Scaffold for Cardiac Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelmi, Amy; Cieslar-Pobuda, Artur; de Muinck, Ebo; Los, Marek; Rafat, Mehrdad; Jager, Edwin W H

    2016-06-01

    The combination of stem cell therapy with a supportive scaffold is a promising approach to improving cardiac tissue engineering. Stem cell therapy can be used to repair nonfunctioning heart tissue and achieve myocardial regeneration, and scaffold materials can be utilized in order to successfully deliver and support stem cells in vivo. Current research describes passive scaffold materials; here an electroactive scaffold that provides electrical, mechanical, and topographical cues to induced human pluripotent stem cells (iPS) is presented. The poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) fiber scaffold coated with conductive polymer polypyrrole (PPy) is capable of delivering direct electrical and mechanical stimulation to the iPS. The electroactive scaffolds demonstrate no cytotoxic effects on the iPS as well as an increased expression of cardiac markers for both stimulated and unstimulated protocols. This study demonstrates the first application of PPy as a supportive electroactive material for iPS and the first development of a fiber scaffold capable of dynamic mechanical actuation.

  14. Heart Rate Changes in Response to Mechanical Pressure Stimulation of Skeletal Muscles Are Mediated by Cardiac Sympathetic Nerve Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Nobuhiro; Hotta, Harumi

    2017-01-01

    Stimulation of mechanoreceptors in skeletal muscles such as contraction and stretch elicits reflexive autonomic nervous system changes which impact cardiovascular control. There are pressure-sensitive mechanoreceptors in skeletal muscles. Mechanical pressure stimulation of skeletal muscles can induce reflex changes in heart rate (HR) and blood pressure, although the neural mechanisms underlying this effect are unclear. We examined the contribution of cardiac autonomic nerves to HR responses induced by mechanical pressure stimulation (30 s, ~10 N/cm2) of calf muscles in isoflurane-anesthetized rats. Animals were artificially ventilated and kept warm using a heating pad and lamp, and respiration and core body temperature were maintained within physiological ranges. Mechanical stimulation was applied using a stimulation probe 6 mm in diameter with a flat surface. Cardiac sympathetic and vagus nerves were blocked to test the contribution of the autonomic nerves. For sympathetic nerve block, bilateral stellate ganglia, and cervical sympathetic nerves were surgically sectioned, and for vagus nerve block, the nerve was bilaterally severed. In addition, mass discharges of cardiac sympathetic efferent nerve were electrophysiologically recorded. Mechanical stimulation increased or decreased HR in autonomic nerve-intact rats (range: −56 to +10 bpm), and the responses were negatively correlated with pre-stimulus HR (r = −0.65, p = 0.001). Stimulation-induced HR responses were markedly attenuated by blocking the cardiac sympathetic nerve (range: −9 to +3 bpm, p mechanical stimulation increased, or decreased the frequency of sympathetic nerve activity in parallel with HR (r = 0.77, p = 0.0004). Furthermore, the changes in sympathetic nerve activity were negatively correlated with its tonic level (r = −0.62, p = 0.0066). These results suggest that cardiac sympathetic nerve activity regulates HR responses to muscle mechanical pressure stimulation and the direction of HR

  15. The Role of ATP in Mechanically Stimulated Rapid Closure of the Venus's Flytrap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, M J

    1973-01-01

    When the midribs of untreated traps of Dionaea muscipula are frozen in liquid nitrogen after rapid closure, they contain significantly less ATP than those frozen before closure. Exogenous ATP causes a significant increase in the rate of mechanically stimulated trap closure. Illuminated traps close faster than those kept in the dark. The traps of plants placed in 100% O(2) close much faster than do air controls, while 100% CO(2) inhibits closure. It is concluded that ATP is probably the native source of potential energy for contraction of the trap's midrib, and that if the endogenous ATP titer is increased by oxidative phosphorylation or an exogenous source, the trap will close faster.

  16. Mechanisms of amino acid-stimulated insulin secretion in congenital hyperinsulinism

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Tingting; Li, Changhong

    2012-01-01

    The role of amino acids in the regulation of insulin secretion in pancreatic beta-cells is highlighted in three forms of congenital hyperinsulinism (HI), namely gain-of-function mutations of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), loss-of-function mutations of ATP-dependent potassium channels, and a deficiency of short-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase. Studies on disease mouse models of HI suggest that amino acid oxidation and signaling effects are the major mechanisms of amino acid-stimulated in...

  17. [Mechanism of stimulation of angiogenesis in ischemic myocardium with the help of adipose tissue stromal cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubina, K A; Kalinina, N I; Efimenko, A Iu; Lopatina, T V; Melikhova, V S; Tsokolaeva, Z I; Sysoeva, V Iu; Tkachuk, V A; Parfenova, E V

    2010-01-01

    Stromal cells from subcutaneous adipose tissue (adipose derived stromal cells - ASCs) are perspective for cell therapy of ischemic states because of ability to stimulate growth of vessels. For the elucidation of mechanisms of angiogenic action of ASCs we used the model of co-cultivation of ASCs with cells isolated from postnatal hearts (fraction of cardiomyocutes - CMC). CMC fraction contained mature cardiomyocytes, endothelial and progenitor cells. On the 2-nd day spontaneously beating colonies of CMC with growing from them CD31-positive capillary-like structures were formed in CMC culture. Observed structures were unstable and came apart after 5 days of cultivation. At co-cultivation of CMC with ASCs formation of stable ramified CD31-positive structures was observed. Using the method of co-cultivation of CMC with mitomycin C treated ASCs and the method of immune magnetic depletion for removal of epithelial cells from the CMC fraction we found that ASCs stimulates formation of capillary like structure at the account of secretion of angiogenic factors, stabilization of forming CD31-positive structures at the account of intercellular contacts and stimulation of endothelial differentiation of progenitor cells present in CMC fraction.

  18. Effect of thermal cutaneous stimulation on the gastric motor activity: Study of the mechanism of action

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ahmed Shafik; Ali A Shafik; Olfat El Sibai; Ismail A Shafik

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the mechanism of action of thermal cutaneous stimulation on the gastric motor inhibition.METHODS: The gastric tone of 33 healthy volunteers (20 men, mean age 36.7 ±8.4 years) was assessed by a barostat system consisting of a balloon-ended tube connected to a strain gauge and air-injection system. The tube was introduced into the stomach and the balloon was inflated with 300 mL of air. The skin temperature was elevated in increments of 3℃ up to 49℃ and the gastric tone was simultaneously assessed by recording the balloon volume variations expressed as the percentage change from the baseline volume. The test was repeated after separate anesthetization of the skin and stomach with lidocaine and after using normal saline instead of lidocaine.RESULTS: Thermal cutaneous stimulation resulted in a significant decrease of gastric tone 61.2% ±10.3% of the mean baseline volume. Mean latency was 25.6 ± 1.2 ms.After 20 min of individual anesthetization of the skin and stomach, thermal cutaneous stimulation produced no significant change in gastric tone.CONCLUSION: Decrease in the gastric tone in response to thermal cutaneous stimulation suggests a reflex relationship which was absent on individual anesthetization of the 2 possible arms of the reflex arc:the skin and the stomach. We call this relationship the "cutaneo-gastric inhibitory reflex". This reflex may have the potential to serve as an investigative tool in the diagnosis of gastric motor disorders, provided further studies are performed in this respect.

  19. Concanavalin A as a probe for studying the mechanism of metabolic stimulation of leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, D; Zabucchi, G; Jug, M; Miani, N; Soranzo, M R

    1975-01-01

    The disruption of the molecular organization of the plasma membrane of leukocytes by phagocytosable particles, or by agents such as surfactants, antibodies, phospholipase C, fatty acids and chemotactic factors, leads to a stimulation of the phagocyte oxidative metabolism. Concanavalin A (Con A) has been used as a tool to study the mechanism of this metabolic regulation. The binding of Con A to the surface of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) or macrophages produces a rapid enhancement of oxygen uptake and glucose oxidation through the hexose monophosphate pathway (HMP). This is explained by an activation of the granular NADPH oxidase, the key enzyme in the metabolic stimulation. The effect of Con A is not due to endocytosed lectin, since Con A covalently coupled to large sepharose beads still acts as stimulant. The metabolic changes caused by Con A are reversible. If, after the onset of stimulation, sugars with high affinity for Con A are added to the leukocyte suspension, the activity of granular NADPH oxidase and the rate of respiration and glucose oxidation return to their resting values. The metabolic burst, while partially supressed by treatment of PMNL with iodoacetate, sodium flouride and cytochalasin B, is slightly increased by colchicine. Con A induces a selective release of granular enzymes (beta-glucuronidase, peroxidase, alkaline phosphatase) from PMNL, whereas no leakage of cytoplasmic enzymes is observed. The enzyme release is inhibited by iodoacetate and by drugs known to increase cell levels of cyclic AMP. Based on a current view of the mode of interaction between Con A and cell surfaces, a model of the metabolic disruption of leukocytes is presented.

  20. Repetition and Translation Shifts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Zupan

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Repetition manifests itself in different ways and at different levels of the text. The first basic type of repetition involves complete recurrences; in which a particular textual feature repeats in its entirety. The second type involves partial recurrences; in which the second repetition of the same textual feature includes certain modifications to the first occurrence. In the article; repetitive patterns in Edgar Allan Poe’s short story “The Fall of the House of Usher” and its Slovene translation; “Konec Usherjeve hiše”; are compared. The author examines different kinds of repetitive patterns. Repetitions are compared at both the micro- and macrostructural levels. As detailed analyses have shown; considerable microstructural translation shifts occur in certain types of repetitive patterns. Since these are not only occasional; sporadic phenomena; but are of a relatively high frequency; they reduce the translated text’s potential for achieving some of the gothic effects. The macrostructural textual property particularly affected by these shifts is the narrator’s experience as described by the narrative; which suffers a reduction in intensity.

  1. Cerebellar transcranial direct current stimulation effects on saccade adaptation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Avila (Eric); J.N. van der Geest (Jos); S. Kengne Kamga (Sandra); M.C. Verhage (M. Claire); O. Donchin (Opher); M.A. Frens (Maarten)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractSaccade adaptation is a cerebellar-mediated type of motor learning in which the oculomotor system is exposed to repetitive errors. Different types of saccade adaptations are thought to involve distinct underlying cerebellar mechanisms. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) induc

  2. A Simple fMRI Compatible Robotic Stimulator to Study the Neural Mechanisms of Touch and Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riillo, F; Bagnato, C; Allievi, A G; Takagi, A; Fabrizi, L; Saggio, G; Arichi, T; Burdet, E

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a simple device for the investigation of the human somatosensory system with functional magnetic imaging (fMRI). PC-controlled pneumatic actuation is employed to produce innocuous or noxious mechanical stimulation of the skin. Stimulation patterns are synchronized with fMRI and other relevant physiological measurements like electroencephalographic activity and vital physiological parameters. The system allows adjustable regulation of stimulation parameters and provides consistent patterns of stimulation. A validation experiment demonstrates that the system safely and reliably identifies clusters of functional activity in brain regions involved in the processing of pain. This new device is inexpensive, portable, easy-to-assemble and customizable to suit different experimental requirements. It provides robust and consistent somatosensory stimulation, which is of crucial importance to investigating the mechanisms of pain and its strong connection with the sense of touch.

  3. Sonic hedgehog stimulates neurite outgrowth in a mechanical stretch model of reactive-astrogliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berretta, Antonio; Gowing, Emma K; Jasoni, Christine L; Clarkson, Andrew N

    2016-02-23

    Although recovery following a stroke is limited, undamaged neurons under the right conditions can establish new connections and take on-board lost functions. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling is integral for developmental axon growth, but its role after injury has not been fully examined. To investigate the effects of Shh on neuronal sprouting after injury, we used an in vitro model of glial scar, whereby cortical astrocytes were mechanically traumatized to mimic reactive astrogliosis observed after stroke. This mechanical trauma impaired neurite outgrowth from post-natal cortical neurons plated on top of reactive astrocytes. Addition of Shh to the media, however, resulted in a concentration-dependent increase in neurite outgrowth. This response was inhibited by cyclopamine and activated by oxysterol 20(S)-hydroxycholesterol, both of which modulate the activity of the Shh co-receptor Smoothened (Smo), demonstrating that Shh-mediated neurite outgrowth is Smo-dependent. In addition, neurite outgrowth was not associated with an increase in Gli-1 transcription, but could be inhibited by PP2, a selective inhibitor of Src family kinases. These results demonstrate that neurons exposed to the neurite growth inhibitory environment associated with a glial scar can be stimulated by Shh, with signaling occurring through a non-canonical pathway, to overcome this suppression and stimulate neurite outgrowth.

  4. Mechanical loading prevents the stimulating effect of IL-1{beta} on osteocyte-modulated osteoclastogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulkarni, Rishikesh N.; Bakker, Astrid D.; Everts, Vincent [Department of Oral Cell Biology, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), University of Amsterdam and VU University Amsterdam, Research Institute MOVE, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Klein-Nulend, Jenneke, E-mail: j.kleinnulend@acta.nl [Department of Oral Cell Biology, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), University of Amsterdam and VU University Amsterdam, Research Institute MOVE, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Osteocyte incubation with IL-1{beta} stimulated osteocyte-modulated osteoclastogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conditioned medium from IL-1{beta}-treated osteocytes increased osteoclastogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer IL-1{beta} upregulated RANKL and downregulated OPG gene expression by osteocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CYR61 is upregulated in mechanically stimulated osteocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mechanical loading of osteocytes may abolish IL-1{beta}-induced osteoclastogenesis. -- Abstract: Inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis are often accompanied by higher plasma and synovial fluid levels of interleukin-1{beta} (IL-1{beta}), and by increased bone resorption. Since osteocytes are known to regulate bone resorption in response to changes in mechanical stimuli, we investigated whether IL-1{beta} affects osteocyte-modulated osteoclastogenesis in the presence or absence of mechanical loading of osteocytes. MLO-Y4 osteocytes were pre-incubated with IL-1{beta} (0.1-1 ng/ml) for 24 h. Cells were either or not subjected to mechanical loading by 1 h pulsating fluid flow (PFF; 0.7 {+-} 0.3 Pa, 5 Hz) in the presence of IL-1{beta} (0.1-1 ng/ml). Conditioned medium was collected after 1 h PFF or static cultures. Subsequently mouse bone marrow cells were seeded on top of the IL-1{beta}-treated osteocytes to determine osteoclastogenesis. Conditioned medium from mechanically loaded or static IL-1{beta}-treated osteocytes was added to co-cultures of untreated osteocytes and mouse bone marrow cells. Gene expression of cysteine-rich protein 61 (CYR61/CCN1), receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL), and osteoprotegerin (OPG) by osteocytes was determined immediately after PFF. Incubation of osteocytes with IL-1{beta}, as well as conditioned medium from static IL-1{beta}-treated osteocytes increased the formation of osteoclasts. However, conditioned medium from mechanically loaded IL

  5. More female patients and fewer stimuli per session are associated with the short-term antidepressant properties of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS): a meta-analysis of 54 sham-controlled studies published between 1997–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedzior, Karina Karolina; Azorina, Valeriya; Reitz, Sarah Kim

    2014-01-01

    Background Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) appears to have short-term antidepressant properties. The aim of the current study was to update our previous meta-analysis and to investigate factors associated with the antidepressant properties of rTMS. Method Following a systematic literature search conducted in Medline and PsycInfo, N=14 sham-controlled, parallel design studies (published after 2008 to August 2013) that had utilized rTMS of the DLPFC in major depression were included in the current meta-analysis. The sensitivity and moderator analyses also included data from N=40 studies (published in 1997–2008) from our previous meta-analysis. The effect size (Cohen’s d) in each study was the standardized difference in mean depression scores (on Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale) from baseline to final (after last session) in rTMS compared to sham groups. Results According to a random-effects model with inverse-variance weights, depression scores were significantly reduced after rTMS compared to sham in studies published from 2008–2013 based on N=659 patients (overall mean weighted d=−0.42, 95% confidence interval: −0.66, −0.18, P=0.001). Combining studies from our past and current meta-analyses (published in 1997–2013; N=54) revealed that depression was significantly reduced after left-fast (>1 Hz), right-slow (≤1 Hz), and bilateral (or sequential) rTMS of DLPFC compared to sham. Significant antidepressant properties of rTMS were observed in studies with patients who were treatment resistant, unipolar (or bipolar), non-psychotic, medication-free (or started on antidepressants concurrently with rTMS). According to univariate meta-regressions, depression scores were significantly lower in studies with more female patients and fewer stimuli per session. There was little evidence that publication bias occurred in the

  6. Clinical outcomes and neural correlates of 20 sessions of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in severe and enduring anorexia nervosa (the TIARA study): study protocol for a randomised controlled feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholdy, Savani; McClelland, Jessica; Kekic, Maria; O'Daly, Owen G; Campbell, Iain C; Werthmann, Jessica; Rennalls, Samantha J; Rubia, Katya; David, Anthony S; Glennon, Danielle; Kern, Nikola; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2015-12-03

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a serious mental disorder with multiple comorbidities and complications. In those with a severe and enduring form of the illness (SEED-AN), treatment responsivity is poor and the evidence base limited. Thus, there is a need for novel treatment strategies. This paper describes the theoretical background and protocol of a feasibility randomised controlled trial (RCT) of real versus sham (placebo) therapeutic repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in SEED-AN. The aim of this trial is to obtain information that will guide decision making and protocol development in relation to a future large-scale RCT of rTMS in this group of patients, and also to assess the preliminary efficacy and neural correlates of rTMS treatment. Forty-four adults from the community with a DSM-5 diagnosis of AN, an illness duration>3 years and a previous course of unsuccessful treatment will be randomly allocated to receive 20 sessions of either real or sham rTMS, in a parallel group design. As this is a feasibility study, no primary outcome has been defined and a broad range of outcome variables will be examined. These include weight/body mass index (BMI), eating disorder psychopathology, other psychopathology (for example, depression, anxiety), quality of life, neuropsychological processes (such as self-regulation, attentional bias and food choice behaviour), neuroimaging measures (that is, changes in brain structure or function), tolerability and acceptability of rTMS, and additional service utilisation. The feasibility of conducting a large-scale RCT of rTMS and the appropriateness of rTMS as a treatment for SEED-AN will be evaluated through: assessment of recruitment and retention rates, acceptability of random allocation, blinding success (allocation concealment), completion of treatment sessions and research assessments (baseline, post-treatment and follow-up assessments). The acceptability and tolerability of the treatment will be assessed via semi

  7. 低频重复经颅磁刺激治疗半侧空间忽略的临床研究%Effect of Low Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Unilateral Spatial Neglect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何静杰; 刘丽旭; 公维军; 杨宇琦; 毕晓辉; 崔丽华; 杨凌雨; 山磊; 胡雪艳

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of low frequency repetitive transranial magnetic stimulation (Rtms) on unilateral spatial neglect (USN). Methods 40 stroke patients with USN were divided into treatment group (n=20) and control group (n=20). Patients in the treatment group were treated with low frequency Rtms for 2 weeks. The USN degree of these groups were evaluated before and after the treatment. Results There was no significant difference of USN degree between these groups before the treatment (.P>0.05); Compared with the control group, the treatment group improved significantly after the treatment (P0.05). Conclusion USN induced by stroke could be improved obviously through low frequency Rtms.%目的 探讨低频重复经颅磁刺激治疗半侧空间忽略症的临床疗效。方法 将40例脑卒中所致半侧空间忽略症患者分为治疗组及对照组各20例,并对治疗组进行为期2周的低频重复经颅磁刺激治疗。在治疗前后,采用半侧卒间忽略评估量表分别对两组患者进行评定。结果 治疗前,两组患者半侧空间忽略程度无显著性差异(P>0.05);治疗后,治疗组半侧卒间忽略程度较对照组改善(P<0.05);治疗后,治疗组中重度异常率较治疗前明显降低(P<0.05),对照组无显著性差异(P>0.05)。结论 通过低频重复经颅磁刺激治疗,脑卒中所致半侧空间忽略程度明显改善。

  8. Trialogue: Preparation, Repetition and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberg, Antoinette; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This paper interrogates both curriculum theory and the limits and potentials of textual forms. A set of overlapping discourses (a trialogue) focuses on inquiring into the roles of obsession and repetition in creating deeply interpretive locations for understanding. (SM)

  9. Mechanisms of bioelectric activity in electric tissue. I. The response to indirect and direct stimulation of electroplaques of Electrophorus electricus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALTAMIRANO, M; COATES, C W; GRUNDFEST, H; NACHMANSOHN, D

    1953-09-01

    1. A preparation is described consisting of one or several layers of innervated cells of the electric organ of Electrophorus electricus. 2. Each plaque is multiply innervated and only at its caudal face. The nerve fibers may derive from two or more different nerve trunks. 3. During activity the innervated face becomes negative relative to the non-innervated. 4. The first electrical response of the cell to an increasing neural volley is graded and has the character of a prepotential. At a critical size of the prepotential the cell discharges with an all-or-nothing spike. 5. Both responses have durations of about 2 msec. 6. A neural volley which does not cause the spike discharge facilitates the discharge of the cell by a second subsequent volley in the same nerve (temporal facilitation). 7. The period of facilitation lasts ca. 900 msec. During the first 100 msec., the facilitation is large enough to cause a spike. In the later portion only the prepotential is facilitated. No electrical concomitant has been detected. 8. Neural volleys reaching the plaque from different trunks interact at the cell to produce a period of facilitation lasting only about 2 msec. This interaction is interpreted as spatial summation. 9. In a population of cells, simultaneous stimulation of 2 nerves causes a smaller discharge than the sum of the two isolated responses (occlusion). 10. Cells denervated for 7 weeks or more can be excited directly, but only by a current flow outward through the caudal face. 11. Weak direct stimulation causes a prepotential in the denervated plaque. On increasing the stimulus the prepotential increases to a critical size when a spike develops. The duration of both responses is about 2 msec. 12. The absolutely refractory period of the denervated cell is about 1.5 msec. and relative refractoriness lasts about 15 msec. 13. Direct stimulation causes slight facilitation lasting as long as 200 msec. 14. Repetitive stimulation of the nerve at low frequencies (2 to 3

  10. Mechanical stimulation induces mTOR signaling via an ERK-independent mechanism: implications for a direct activation of mTOR by phosphatidic acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Sung You

    Full Text Available Signaling by mTOR is a well-recognized component of the pathway through which mechanical signals regulate protein synthesis and muscle mass. However, the mechanisms involved in the mechanical regulation of mTOR signaling have not been defined. Nevertheless, recent studies suggest that a mechanically-induced increase in phosphatidic acid (PA may be involved. There is also evidence which suggests that mechanical stimuli, and PA, utilize ERK to induce mTOR signaling. Hence, we reasoned that a mechanically-induced increase in PA might promote mTOR signaling via an ERK-dependent mechanism. To test this, we subjected mouse skeletal muscles to mechanical stimulation in the presence or absence of a MEK/ERK inhibitor, and then measured several commonly used markers of mTOR signaling. Transgenic mice expressing a rapamycin-resistant mutant of mTOR were also used to confirm the validity of these markers. The results demonstrated that mechanically-induced increases in p70(s6k T389 and 4E-BP1 S64 phosphorylation, and unexpectedly, a loss in total 4E-BP1, were fully mTOR-dependent signaling events. Furthermore, we determined that mechanical stimulation induced these mTOR-dependent events, and protein synthesis, through an ERK-independent mechanism. Similar to mechanical stimulation, exogenous PA also induced mTOR-dependent signaling via an ERK-independent mechanism. Moreover, PA was able to directly activate mTOR signaling in vitro. Combined, these results demonstrate that mechanical stimulation induces mTOR signaling, and protein synthesis, via an ERK-independent mechanism that potentially involves a direct interaction of PA with mTOR. Furthermore, it appears that a decrease in total 4E-BP1 may be part of the mTOR-dependent mechanism through which mechanical stimuli activate protein synthesis.

  11. Mechanical stimulation induces mTOR signaling via an ERK-independent mechanism: implications for a direct activation of mTOR by phosphatidic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Jae Sung; Frey, John W; Hornberger, Troy A

    2012-01-01

    Signaling by mTOR is a well-recognized component of the pathway through which mechanical signals regulate protein synthesis and muscle mass. However, the mechanisms involved in the mechanical regulation of mTOR signaling have not been defined. Nevertheless, recent studies suggest that a mechanically-induced increase in phosphatidic acid (PA) may be involved. There is also evidence which suggests that mechanical stimuli, and PA, utilize ERK to induce mTOR signaling. Hence, we reasoned that a mechanically-induced increase in PA might promote mTOR signaling via an ERK-dependent mechanism. To test this, we subjected mouse skeletal muscles to mechanical stimulation in the presence or absence of a MEK/ERK inhibitor, and then measured several commonly used markers of mTOR signaling. Transgenic mice expressing a rapamycin-resistant mutant of mTOR were also used to confirm the validity of these markers. The results demonstrated that mechanically-induced increases in p70(s6k) T389 and 4E-BP1 S64 phosphorylation, and unexpectedly, a loss in total 4E-BP1, were fully mTOR-dependent signaling events. Furthermore, we determined that mechanical stimulation induced these mTOR-dependent events, and protein synthesis, through an ERK-independent mechanism. Similar to mechanical stimulation, exogenous PA also induced mTOR-dependent signaling via an ERK-independent mechanism. Moreover, PA was able to directly activate mTOR signaling in vitro. Combined, these results demonstrate that mechanical stimulation induces mTOR signaling, and protein synthesis, via an ERK-independent mechanism that potentially involves a direct interaction of PA with mTOR. Furthermore, it appears that a decrease in total 4E-BP1 may be part of the mTOR-dependent mechanism through which mechanical stimuli activate protein synthesis.

  12. Compressive nonlinearity in the hair bundle's active response to mechanical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, P; Hudspeth, A J

    2001-12-04

    The auditory system's ability to interpret sounds over a wide range of amplitudes rests on the nonlinear responsiveness of the ear. Whether measured by basilar-membrane vibration, nerve-fiber activity, or perceived loudness, the ear is most sensitive to small signals and grows progressively less responsive as stimulation becomes stronger. Seeking a correlate of this behavior at the level of mechanoelectrical transduction, we examined the responses of hair bundles to direct mechanical stimulation. As reported by the motion of an attached glass fiber, an active hair bundle from the bullfrog's sacculus oscillates spontaneously. Sinusoidal movement of the fiber's base by as little as +/-1 nm, corresponding to the application at the bundle's top of a force of +/-0.3 pN, causes detectable phase-locking of the bundle's oscillations to the stimulus. Although entrainment increases as the stimulus grows, the amplitude of the hair-bundle movement does not rise until phase-locking is nearly complete. A bundle is most sensitive to stimulation at its frequency of spontaneous oscillation. Far from that frequency, the sensitivity of an active hair bundle resembles that of a passive bundle. Over most of its range, an active hair bundle's response grows as the one-third power of the stimulus amplitude; the bundle's sensitivity declines accordingly in proportion to the negative two-thirds power of the excitation. This scaling behavior, also found in the response of the mammalian basilar membrane to sound, signals the operation of an amplificatory process at the brink of an oscillatory instability, a Hopf bifurcation.

  13. Study of synergistic effect of 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on medication - resistant schizophrenia%低频重复经颅磁刺激对难治性精神分裂症的增效作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王雪; 罗炯; 李晓虹; 任艳萍

    2016-01-01

    目的:评价低频重复经颅磁刺激(rTMS)对难治性精神分裂症的疗效和认知功能的影响及其安全性。方法将52例幻听症状突出的难治性精神分裂症患者随机分为真刺激组和伪刺激组,刺激频率为1Hz,部位为背外侧前额叶皮质。在基线期、2周(治疗10次)、6周(治疗20次)和治疗结束后1个月采用阳性和阴性症状量表(PANSS)、幻听量表(AHRS)、临床总体印象量表(CGIS)评价精神症状,采用可反复测查的成套神经心理状态评估工具( RBANS)评价认知功能,采用副反应量表(TESS)评定不良反应。结果 rTMS 治疗10次、20次及随访1个月时,真刺激组和伪刺激组相比,PANSS 幻觉、CGI 评分、AHRS 频率及 RBANS 总评分比较差异均有统计学意义(P ﹤0.05或0.01);rTMS 治疗20次及随访1个月时,AHRS 总评分、影响、痛苦、RBANS 视觉广度、言语功能及注意力评分差异有统计学意义(P ﹤0.05或0.01);随访1个月时,PANSS 阳性症状、一般病理症状评分、RBANS 即刻记忆评分差异有统计学意义(P ﹤0.05或0.01)。rTMS 治疗后未发现明显不良反应。结论低频 rTMS 可改善精神分裂症的幻听、阳性症状和认知功能且安全性好。%Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of 1Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation(rTMS)on audi-tory hallucination and cognitive impairment of schizophrenia. Methods Fifty - two patients who had medication - resistant auditory hallucination were randomized to either active rTMS applied to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex(n = 26)or sham rTMS(n = 26). The outcome measures included Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale(PANSS),Auditory Hallucinations Rating Scale(AHRS),Clinical Global Impression Scale(CGIS),Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status(RBANS)and Treatment Emer-gent Symptom Scale(TESS)at baseline,treatment for 2 weeks,6 weeks and