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Sample records for repeating disaccharide structure

  1. Visualizing Structure and Dynamics of Disaccharide Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, J. F.; Beckham, G. T.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.

    2012-01-01

    We examine the effect of several solvent models on the conformational properties and dynamics of disaccharides such as cellobiose and lactose. Significant variation in timescale for large scale conformational transformations are observed. Molecular dynamics simulation provides enough detail to enable insight through visualization of multidimensional data sets. We present a new way to visualize conformational space for disaccharides with Ramachandran plots.

  2. Disaccharide intolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radlović Nedeljko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Disaccharide intolerance presents a pathogenic heterogeneous and most complex clinical entity. It usually occurs due to primary or secondary deficit of disaccharide activity, and rarely because of disorders of absorption or monomer metabolism. Symptomatology of disaccharide maldigestion and/or malabsorption depends on the severity of the basic disorder, the level of its overload and the patient’s age. In the youngest children, due to a rapid gastrointestinal transit and a low compensatory capacity of the colon, osmotic-fermentative diarrhoea forms the basis of clinical features. Diarrhoeal disorder can be occasionally so intensive that it disturbs not only water and electrolytic balance, but also the nutritive status of the child. In older children and adults, as well as in milder forms of the disorder, the symptomatology, most often without diarrhoea, is dominated by abdominal colic, loud peristaltic sounds, meteorism and increased flatulence. Metabolic disorders followed by conversion disorders of galactose and fructose into glucose are characterized by a hypoglycaemic crisis, as well as by various multisystemic damages due to the deposit of toxic metabolic products. The diagnosis of gastrointestinal forms of disaccharide intolerance is based on the pathologic clinical and laboratory response during the overload test, while that of the metabolic form is based on the confirmed presence of specific enzyme and/or genetic defect. Treatment of disaccharide intolerance is based on the elimination diet. Besides, in the secondary forms of the disorder, it is also necessary to apply the treatment of the basic disease.

  3. Identification of structurally closely related monosaccharide and disaccharide isomers by PMP labeling in conjunction with IM-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongmei; Shi, Lei; Zhuang, Xiaoyu; Su, Rui; Wan, Debin; Song, Fengrui; Li, Jinying; Liu, Shuying

    2016-06-16

    It remains particularly difficult for gaining unambiguous information on anomer, linkage, and position isomers of oligosaccharides using conventional mass spectrometry (MS) methods. In our laboratory, an ion mobility (IM) shift strategy was employed to improve confidence in the identification of structurally closely related disaccharide and monosaccharide isomers using IMMS. Higher separation between structural isomers was achieved using 1-phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone (PMP) derivatization in comparison with phenylhydrazine (PHN) derivatization. Furthermore, the combination of pre-IM fragmentation of PMP derivatives provided sufficient resolution to separate the isomers not resolved in the IMMS. To chart the structural variation observed in IMMS, the collision cross sections (CCSs) for the corresponding ions were measured. We analyzed nine disaccharide and three monosaccharide isomers that differ in composition, linkages, or configuration. Our data show that coexisting carbohydrate isomers can be identified by the PMP labeling technique in conjunction with ion-mobility separation and tandem mass spectrometry. The practical application of this rapid and effective method that requires only small amounts of sample is demonstrated by the successful analysis of water-soluble ginseng extract. This demonstrated the potential of this method to measure a variety of heterogeneous sample mixtures, which may have an important impact on the field of glycomics.

  4. Isolation of a new disaccharide nucleoside from Helleborus caucasicus: structure elucidation and total synthesis of hellecaucaside A and its β-anomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylla, Balla; Gauthier, Charles; Legault, Jean; Fleury, Pierre-Yves; Lavoie, Serge; Mshvildadze, Vakhtang; Muzashvili, Tamar; Kemertelidze, Eter; Pichette, André

    2014-10-29

    Hellecaucaside A, a new disaccharide nucleoside featuring a 2'-O-α-D-ribofuranosyluridine skeleton and a 4-hydroxybenzoyl group at the 5' position, was isolated from the underground part of Helleborus caucasicus. The structure of the compound was elucidated by means of chemical degradation and spectroscopic analyses, such as 1D/2D NMR, chiral-GC, and HRMS. The total synthesis of hellecaucaside A and its β-anomer was accomplished, unequivocally confirming the structure of the natural product. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Sulfation and Cation Effects on the Conformational Properties of the Glycan Backbone of Chondroitin Sulfate Disaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, Christina E.; Guvench, Olgun

    2015-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate (CS) is one of several glycosaminoglycans that are major components of proteoglycans. A linear polymer consisting of repeats of the disaccharide -4GlcAβ1-3GalNAcβ1-, CS undergoes differential sulfation resulting in five unique sulfation patterns. Because of the dimer repeat, the CS glycosidic “backbone” has two distinct sets of conformational degrees of freedom defined by pairs of dihedral angles: (ϕ1, ψ1) about the β1-3 glycosidic linkage and (ϕ2, ψ2) about the β1-4 glycosidic linkage. Differential sulfation and the possibility of cation binding, combined with the conformational flexibility and biological diversity of CS, complicate experimental efforts to understand CS three-dimensional structures at atomic resolution. Therefore, all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations with Adaptive Biasing Force sampling of the CS backbone were applied to obtain high resolution, high precision free energies of CS disaccharides as a function of all possible backbone geometries. All ten disaccharides (β1-3 vs. β1-4 linkage x five different sulfation patterns) were studied; additionally, ion effects were investigated by considering each disaccharide in the presence of either neutralizing sodium or calcium cations. GlcAβ1-3GalNAc disaccharides have a single, broad, thermodynamically important free-energy minimum whereas GalNAcβ1-4GlcA disaccharides have two such minima. Calcium cations but not sodium cations bind to the disaccharides, and binding is primarily to the GlcA –COO− moiety as opposed to sulfate groups. This binding alters the glycan backbone thermodynamics in instances where a calcium cation bound to –COO− can act to bridge and stabilize an interaction with an adjacent sulfate group, whereas, in the absence of this cation, the proximity of a sulfate group to –COO− results in two like charges being both desolvated and placed adjacent to each other and is found to be destabilizing. In addition to providing

  6. Assignment of the stereochemistry and anomeric configuration of structurally informative product ions derived from disaccharides: infrared photodissociation of glycosyl-glycolaldehydes in the negative ion mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendiak, Brad; Fang, Tammy T

    2010-11-01

    Using mass spectrometry in the negative ion mode, m/z 221 ions are frequently observed as product ion substructures derived from reducing disaccharides having 2, 4, or 6 linkages. The ions have been shown to be glycosyl-glycolaldehydes. All 16 stereochemical variants of their pyranosides were prepared and evaluated by infrared photodissociation, in addition to HexNAc-glycolaldehyde variants (m/z 262) of 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-d-glucose and 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-d-galactose. The stereochemistry and anomeric configuration of these ions were differentiated in the gas phase using a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance spectrometer with infrared multiphoton dissociation at 10.6 μm. Results were compared to those obtained by collision-induced dissociation. In some cases, differentiation was far preferable using infrared photodissociation; in others, collision-induced dissociation was preferred. Using an instrument that interfaced a linear trap with a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance spectrometer, either dissociation technique could be used to optimally discriminate between isomers. With infrared photodissociation, spectral differences were highly statistically significant, even between pairs of isomers having spectra that appeared to be visually somewhat similar (pions). Comparisons among different instruments suggest that physical standards of the stereochemical variants of these ions will be required for their detailed structural assignments in unknowns, as some variation was observed among instruments, both using infrared photodissociation and collision-induced dissociation.

  7. Synthesis of oleanolic disaccharide derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu Chen Pei; Jian Bo Wu; Fan Lei; Shan Qian; Li Hai; Yong Wu

    2012-01-01

    Oleanolic acid 1 exists widely in food,medicinal herbs and other plants and possesses many attractive biological activities.Recently,some oleanolic derivatives were reported to have interesting anti-tumor activities.Herein,using association principle of drug design,OA disaccharide 17 was designed and synthesized by coupling α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2)-α-L-arabinopyranosyl disaccharide moiety,which has proved to be a unique sugar sequence with strongly antitumor activity,and modified OA with a nitrile at C-17.

  8. A Structured Group Program for Repeat Dieters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Kathleen

    1989-01-01

    Describes a structured group program for women who repeatedly diet and may be at risk of developing more serious eating disorders. Discusses sessions focusing on eating behavior as well as internal factors that contribute to low body esteem and food and weight preoccupation. Evaluates effectiveness of program by self-reports of members of two…

  9. [superscript 1]H NMR Spectroscopy-Based Configurational Analysis of Mono- and Disaccharides and Detection of ß-Glucosidase Activity: An Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periyannan, Gopal R.; Lawrence, Barbara A.; Egan, Annie E.

    2015-01-01

    A [superscript 1]H NMR spectroscopy-based laboratory experiment explores mono- and disaccharide structural chemistry, and the enzyme-substrate specificity of glycosidic bond cleavage by ß-glucosidase towards cellobiose (ß-linked gluco-disaccharide) and maltose (a-linked gluco-disaccharide). Structural differences between cellobiose, maltose, and…

  10. [superscript 1]H NMR Spectroscopy-Based Configurational Analysis of Mono- and Disaccharides and Detection of ß-Glucosidase Activity: An Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periyannan, Gopal R.; Lawrence, Barbara A.; Egan, Annie E.

    2015-01-01

    A [superscript 1]H NMR spectroscopy-based laboratory experiment explores mono- and disaccharide structural chemistry, and the enzyme-substrate specificity of glycosidic bond cleavage by ß-glucosidase towards cellobiose (ß-linked gluco-disaccharide) and maltose (a-linked gluco-disaccharide). Structural differences between cellobiose, maltose, and…

  11. A New Disaccharide from the Fern Macrothelypteris digophlebia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A new disaccharide,digobiose 1, was isolated from the rhizomes of Macrothelypteris digophlebia (Bak.) Ching var. Elegans (koidz.). Its structure which is very similar with that of sucrose was identified as a -D-glucopyranosyl (1(r) 2¢ )-b -D-sorbopyranoside by spectroscopic analysis.

  12. Identification of keratan sulfate disaccharide at C-3 position of glucuronate of chondroitin sulfate from Mactra chinensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Kyohei; Takeda, Keita; Mukuno, Ann; Okamoto, Yusuke; Masuko, Sayaka; Linhardt, Robert J.; Toida, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), including chondroitin sulfate (CS), dermatan sulfate, heparin, heparan sulfate and keratan sulfate (KS) are linear sulfated repeating disaccharide sequences containing hexosamine and uronic acid [or galactose (Gal) in the case of KS]. Among the GAGs, CS shows structural variations, such as sulfation patterns and fucosylation, which are responsible for their physiological functions through CS interaction with CS-binding proteins. Here, we solved the structure of KS-branched CS-E derived from a clam, Mactra chinensis. KS disaccharide [d-GlcNAc6S-(1→3)-β-d-Gal-(1→] was attached to the C-3 position of GlcA, and consecutive KS-branched disaccharide sequences were found in a CS chain. KS-branched polysaccharides clearly exhibited resistance to degradation by chondroitinase ABC or ACII (at low concentrations) compared with typical CS structures. Furthermore, KS-branched polysaccharides stimulated neurite outgrowth of hippocampal neurons. These results strongly suggest that M. chinensis is a rich source of KS-branched CS, and it has important biological activities. PMID:27647934

  13. RepeatsDB 2.0: improved annotation, classification, search and visualization of repeat protein structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paladin, Lisanna; Hirsh, Layla; Piovesan, Damiano; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.; Kajava, Andrey V.; Tosatto, Silvio C.E.

    2017-01-01

    RepeatsDB 2.0 (URL: http://repeatsdb.bio.unipd.it/) is an update of the database of annotated tandem repeat protein structures. Repeat proteins are a widespread class of non-globular proteins carrying heterogeneous functions involved in several diseases. Here we provide a new version of RepeatsDB with an improved classification schema including high quality annotations for ∼5400 protein structures. RepeatsDB 2.0 features information on start and end positions for the repeat regions and units for all entries. The extensive growth of repeat unit characterization was possible by applying the novel ReUPred annotation method over the entire Protein Data Bank, with data quality is guaranteed by an extensive manual validation for >60% of the entries. The updated web interface includes a new search engine for complex queries and a fully re-designed entry page for a better overview of structural data. It is now possible to compare unit positions, together with secondary structure, fold information and Pfam domains. Moreover, a new classification level has been introduced on top of the existing scheme as an independent layer for sequence similarity relationships at 40%, 60% and 90% identity. PMID:27899671

  14. Mass Spectrometric Evidence of Heparin Disaccharides for the Catalytic Characterization of A Novel Endolytic Heparinase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yapeng CHAO; Shaoxiang XIONG; Xiulan CHENG; Shijun QIAN

    2004-01-01

    Heparinase from different sources can eliminate heparin or/and heparan sulfate into various low-molecular weight heparins with different characteristics. Porcine intestinal mucosa heparin was degraded into a series of oligosaccharides by a novel heparinase from the species Sphingobacterium. Disaccharide components from the digests were separated and purified by ultrafiltration and HPLC. Five major peaks appeared as three types according to their retention time. The mass spectrometry of peak Ⅰ mainly gave the non-sulfated disaccharide with the mass of 379 Da. Peak Ⅱ and Ⅲ were indicated as two major monosulfated disaccharides with molecular mass of 417 and 459 Da respectively. Moreover, the peak Ⅲ represented an Nacetyl disaccharide. Both peak Ⅳ and Ⅴ showed the same mass of 496 Da, hinting that they were disulfatesubstituted disaccharides. No trisulfate-substituted disaccharides were detected in the mixture of the heparin digest though they were abundant in the heparin structure. The results revealed that the heparinase might specifically cut the sites with low sulfated domain in heparin.

  15. Nonabsorbable disaccharides for hepatic encephalopathy. Protocol for a Cochrane Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, B; Kjaergaard, L L; Gluud, C

    2001-01-01

    Nonabsorbable disaccharides (lactulose or lactitol) are considered the treatment of choice for hepatic encephalopathy.......Nonabsorbable disaccharides (lactulose or lactitol) are considered the treatment of choice for hepatic encephalopathy....

  16. Synthesis of a jojoba bean disaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornienko, A; Marnera, G; d'Alarcao, M

    1998-08-01

    A synthesis of the disaccharide recently isolated from jojoba beans, 2-O-alpha-D-galactopyranosyl-D-chiro-inositol, has been achieved. The suitably protected chiro-inositol unit was prepared by an enantiospecific synthesis from L-xylose utilizing SmI2-mediated pinacol coupling as a key step.

  17. Microbial Biosensors for Selective Detection of Disaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seven microbial strains were screened for their ability to detect disaccharides as components of Clark-type oxygen biosensors. Sensors responded to varying degrees to maltose, cellobiose, sucrose, and melibiose, but none responded strongly to lactose. Although microbial sensors are relatively nons...

  18. Structural segmentation of music based on repeated harmonies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Haas, W.B.; Volk, A.; Wiering, F.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a simple, yet powerful method for deriving the structural segmentation of a musical piece based on repetitions in chord sequences, called FORM. Repetition in harmony is a fundamental factor in constituting musical form. However, repeated pattern discovery in music still rema

  19. Strong aphicidal activity of GlcNAc(β1→4)Glc disaccharides: synthesis, physiological effects, and chitinase inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussouy, Christophe; Bultel, Laurent; Saguez, Julien; Cherqui, Anas; Khelifa, Mounia; Grand, Eric; Giordanengo, Philippe; Kovensky, José

    2012-08-06

    The synthesis of four GlcNAc(β1→4)Glc disaccharides containing 2-O-acetyl and/or 6-sulfate groups was performed in high yields with total 1,2-trans stereoselectivity. These disaccharides were evaluated as candidates for insect chitinase inhibition and aphicidal activity. All the compounds prepared displayed physiological effects on M. persicae aphids; however, the inhibition of chitinases of different sources (bacteria, fungus, and aphid) followed different patterns according to subtle structural characteristics.

  20. A structural model for binding of the serine-rich repeat adhesin GspB to host carbohydrate receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasia M Pyburn

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available GspB is a serine-rich repeat (SRR adhesin of Streptococcus gordonii that mediates binding of this organism to human platelets via its interaction with sialyl-T antigen on the receptor GPIbα. This interaction appears to be a major virulence determinant in the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis. To address the mechanism by which GspB recognizes its carbohydrate ligand, we determined the high-resolution x-ray crystal structure of the GspB binding region (GspB(BR, both alone and in complex with a disaccharide precursor to sialyl-T antigen. Analysis of the GspB(BR structure revealed that it is comprised of three independently folded subdomains or modules: 1 an Ig-fold resembling a CnaA domain from prokaryotic pathogens; 2 a second Ig-fold resembling the binding region of mammalian Siglecs; 3 a subdomain of unique fold. The disaccharide was found to bind in a pocket within the Siglec subdomain, but at a site distinct from that observed in mammalian Siglecs. Confirming the biological relevance of this binding pocket, we produced three isogenic variants of S. gordonii, each containing a single point mutation of a residue lining this binding pocket. These variants have reduced binding to carbohydrates of GPIbα. Further examination of purified GspB(BR-R484E showed reduced binding to sialyl-T antigen while S. gordonii harboring this mutation did not efficiently bind platelets and showed a significant reduction in virulence, as measured by an animal model of endocarditis. Analysis of other SRR proteins revealed that the predicted binding regions of these adhesins also had a modular organization, with those known to bind carbohydrate receptors having modules homologous to the Siglec and Unique subdomains of GspB(BR. This suggests that the binding specificity of the SRR family of adhesins is determined by the type and organization of discrete modules within the binding domains, which may affect the tropism of organisms for different tissues.

  1. A Structural Model for Binding of the Serine-Rich Repeat Adhesin GspB to Host Carbohydrate Receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyburn, Tasia M.; Bensing, Barbara A.; Xiong, Yan Q.; Melancon, Bruce J.; Tomasiak, Thomas M.; Ward, Nicholas J.; Yankovskaya, Victoria; Oliver, Kevin M.; Cecchini, Gary; Sulikowski, Gary A.; Tyska, Matthew J.; Sullam, Paul M.; Iverson, T.M. (VA); (UCLA); (Vanderbilt); (UCSF)

    2014-10-02

    GspB is a serine-rich repeat (SRR) adhesin of Streptococcus gordonii that mediates binding of this organism to human platelets via its interaction with sialyl-T antigen on the receptor GPIb{alpha}. This interaction appears to be a major virulence determinant in the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis. To address the mechanism by which GspB recognizes its carbohydrate ligand, we determined the high-resolution x-ray crystal structure of the GspB binding region (GspB{sub BR}), both alone and in complex with a disaccharide precursor to sialyl-T antigen. Analysis of the GspB{sub BR} structure revealed that it is comprised of three independently folded subdomains or modules: (1) an Ig-fold resembling a CnaA domain from prokaryotic pathogens; (2) a second Ig-fold resembling the binding region of mammalian Siglecs; (3) a subdomain of unique fold. The disaccharide was found to bind in a pocket within the Siglec subdomain, but at a site distinct from that observed in mammalian Siglecs. Confirming the biological relevance of this binding pocket, we produced three isogenic variants of S. gordonii, each containing a single point mutation of a residue lining this binding pocket. These variants have reduced binding to carbohydrates of GPIb{alpha}. Further examination of purified GspB{sub BR}-R484E showed reduced binding to sialyl-T antigen while S. gordonii harboring this mutation did not efficiently bind platelets and showed a significant reduction in virulence, as measured by an animal model of endocarditis. Analysis of other SRR proteins revealed that the predicted binding regions of these adhesins also had a modular organization, with those known to bind carbohydrate receptors having modules homologous to the Siglec and Unique subdomains of GspBBR. This suggests that the binding specificity of the SRR family of adhesins is determined by the type and organization of discrete modules within the binding domains, which may affect the tropism of organisms for different tissues.

  2. Sulfoform Generation from an Orthogonally Protected Disaccharide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Runhui; Morales-Collazo, Oscar; Wei, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    An orthogonally protected disaccharide (GlcN(α1→4)Glc) with a β-linked 2′-aminoethyl linker was used to generate a series of sulfated derivatives (sulfoforms), with a 6-O-sulfate on the glucose residue and one or more sulfate esters on the terminal glucosamine. Deprotection and sulfonation steps were performed in solution and in variable order, with isolated yields of 36–54% (85–90% per operation) after HPLC purification. The modular deprotection–sulfonation sequences can be performed with efficient recovery of the polysulfate products, and avoids complications associated with heterogeneous reactivity in solid-phase synthesis. PMID:22624867

  3. Sulfoform Generation from an Orthogonally Protected Disaccharide

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    An orthogonally protected disaccharide (GlcN(α1→4)Glc) with a β-linked 2′-aminoethyl linker was used to generate a series of sulfated derivatives (sulfoforms), with a 6-O-sulfate on the glucose residue and one or more sulfate esters on the terminal glucosamine. Deprotection and sulfonation steps were performed in solution and in variable order, with isolated yields of 36–54% (85–90% per operation) after HPLC purification. The modular deprotection–sulfonation sequences can be performed with ef...

  4. DFT studies of the disaccharide, a-maltose: relaxed isopotential maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The disaccharide, alpha-maltose, forms the molecular basis for the analysis of the structure of starch, and determining the conformational energy landscape as the molecule oscillates around the glycosidic bonds is of importance. Thus, it is of interest to determine, using density functionals and a ...

  5. RB4CD12 epitope expression and heparan sulfate disaccharide composition in brain vasculature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosono-Fukao, T.; Ohtake-Niimi, S.; Nishitsuji, K.; Hossain, M.M.; Kuppevelt, A.H.M.S.M. van; Michikawa, M.; Uchimura, K.

    2011-01-01

    RB4CD12 is a phage display antibody that recognizes a heparan sulfate (HS) glycosaminoglycan epitope. The epitope structure is proposed to contain a trisulfated disaccharide, [-IdoA(2-OSO(3))-GlcNSO(3) (6-OSO(3))-], which supports HS binding to various macromolecules such as growth factors and cytok

  6. Calorimetric study of binding of some disaccharides with crown ethers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davydova, Olga I.; Lebedeva, Nataliya Sh.; Parfenyuk, Elena V

    2004-11-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry has been applied to the determination of the thermodynamic parameters of binding of {beta}-lactose, {alpha},{alpha}-trehalose and sucrose with 15-crown-5 and 18-crown-6 in water at 298.15 K. The formation of 1:1 molecular associates has been found for the systems studied except 18-crown-6 and {beta}-lactose. The associates are preferentially or completely entropy stabilized. The most stable associate is formed between {alpha},{alpha}-trehalose and 18-crown-6. The obtained values of thermodynamic parameters of binding are discussed from the point of view of solute-solvent interactions as well as conformational and structural peculiarities of the disaccharides (DS) and crown ethers (CE)

  7. Heparinase Digestion-based Disaccharide Analysis of Clinical Heparin and Heparinoids Drug%临床肝素类药物酶解分析二糖组成

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩章润; 邢新会; 于广利; 曾洋洋; 张丽娟

    2015-01-01

    Heparin and low molecular weight heparin have been widely used in clinical therapy as anticoagulants in cardiovascular disease and in hemodialysis. Crude heparin is usually prepared from porcine intestinal mucosa. Purified heparin is a mixture of polysaccharides consisting mainly of repeating GlcNS(6S)-IdoA2S disaccharides and other disaccharides with different GlcNAc/GlcNS±3S±6S-GlcA/IdoA±2S residues. Heparin injections are drugs prepared from heparin active pharmaceutical ingredient ( API ) that is prepared from crude heparin. Low molecular weight heparins are dominant heparin-based drugs used clinically, which are prepared by degrading heparin into smaller sizes. As a result, low molecular weight heparins are sharing the same major disaccharides but have different reducing and non-reducing ends. In current study, we focused on the disaccharide compositional analysis of clinically used heparin and heparin-based drugs. HeparinaseⅠ,II, and Ⅲ were used to degrade all heparin and heparin-based drugs including heparin sodium injection, Enoxaparin sodium injection, Nadroparin calcium injection, Dalteparin sodium injection, Fondaparinux sodium into disaccharides. All the degraded products were analyzed by strong anion high perforance liquid chromatography ( SAX-HPLC) coupled with an UV-detector. Commercially available unsaturated disaccharide standards were then used for structral identification. Furthermore, unusual disaccharides present in Nadroparin, Dalteparin, and Fondaparinux were confirmed by reversed-phase ion pair HPLC coupled with mass spectrometry. The developed method produced detailed structural information, which should be useful for quality control of heparin and heparin-based drugs.%肝素是一类结构复杂的高分子糖类,以N-硫酸、6-O硫酸氨基葡萄糖和2-O硫酸艾杜糖醛酸为主要成分组成二糖。常见的肝素注射液是以未分级肝素为原料纯化灭菌制备而来,在临床上使用更为广泛的是将肝素降

  8. Using biological performance similarity to inform disaccharide library design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanikawa, Tetsuya; Fridman, Micha; Zhu, Wenjiang; Faulk, Brian; Joseph, Isaac C; Kahne, Daniel; Wagner, Bridget K; Clemons, Paul A

    2009-04-15

    Designing better small-molecule discovery libraries requires having methods to assess the consequences of different synthesis decisions on the biological performance of resulting library members. Since we are particularly interested in how stereochemistry affects performance in biological assays, we prepared a disaccharide library containing systematic stereochemical variations, assayed the library for different biological effects, and developed methods to assess the similarity of performance between members across multiple assays. These methods allow us to ask which subsets of stereochemical features best predict similarity in patterns of biological performance between individual members and which features produce the greatest variation of outcomes. We anticipate that the data-analysis approach presented here can be generalized to other sets of biological assays and other chemical descriptors. Methods to assess which structural features of library members produce the greatest similarity in performance for a given set of biological assays should help prioritize synthesis decisions in second-generation library development targeting the underlying cell-biological processes. Methods to assess which structural features of library members produce the greatest variation in performance should help guide decisions about what synthetic methods need to be developed to make optimal small-molecule screening collections.

  9. Associations between inverted repeats and the structural evolution of bacterial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achaz, Guillaume; Coissac, Eric; Netter, Pierre; Rocha, Eduardo P C

    2003-08-01

    The stability of the structure of bacterial genomes is challenged by recombination events. Since major rearrangements (i.e., inversions) are thought to frequently operate by homologous recombination between inverted repeats, we analyzed the presence and distribution of such repeats in bacterial genomes and their relation to the conservation of chromosomal structure. First, we show that there is a strong under-representation of inverted repeats, relative to direct repeats, in most chromosomes, especially among the ones regarded as most stable. Second, we show that the avoidance of repeats is frequently associated with the stability of the genomes. Closely related genomes reported to differ in terms of stability are also found to differ in the number of inverted repeats. Third, when using replication strand bias as a proxy for genome stability, we find a significant negative correlation between this strand bias and the abundance of inverted repeats. Fourth, when measuring the recombining potential of inverted repeats and their eventual impact on different features of the chromosomal structure, we observe a tendency of repeats to be located in the chromosome in such a way that rearrangements produce a smaller strand switch and smaller asymmetries than expected by chance. Finally, we discuss the limitations of our analysis and the influence of factors such as the nature of repeats, e.g., transposases, or the differences in the recombination machinery among bacteria. These results shed light on the challenges imposed on the genome structure by the presence of inverted repeats.

  10. Enantiomer-Selective Photo-Induced Reaction of Protonated Tryptophan with Disaccharides in the Gas Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doan, Thuc N.; Fujihara, Akimasa

    2017-07-01

    In order to investigate chemical evolution in interstellar molecular clouds, enantiomer-selective photo-induced chemical reactions between an amino acid and disaccharides in the gas phase were examined using a tandem mass spectrometer containing an electrospray ionization source and a cold ion trap. Ultraviolet photodissociation mass spectra of cold gas-phase noncovalent complexes of protonated tryptophan (Trp) enantiomers with disaccharides consisting of two uc(d)-glucose units, such as uc(d)-maltose or uc(d)-cellobiose, were obtained by photoexcitation of the indole ring of Trp. NH2CHCOOH loss via cleavage of the Cα-Cβ bond in Trp induced by hydrogen atom transfer from the NH3 + group of a protonated Trp was observed in a noncovalent heterochiral H+(uc(l)-Trp)(uc(d)-maltose) complex. In contrast, a photo-induced chemical reaction forming the product ion with m/z 282 occurs in homochiral H+(uc(d)-Trp)(uc(d)-maltose). For uc(d)-cellobiose, both NH2CHCOOH elimination and the m/z 282 product ion were observed, and no enantiomer-selective phenomena occurred. The m/z 282 product ion indicates that the photo-induced C-glycosylation, which links uc(d)-glucose residues to the indole moiety of Trp via a C-C bond, can occur in cold gas-phase noncovalent complexes, and its enantiomer-selectivity depends on the structure of the disaccharide.

  11. Dielectric studies on mobility of the glycosidic linkage in seven disaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, K; Kaminska, E; Wlodarczyk, P; Pawlus, S; Kimla, D; Kasprzycka, A; Paluch, M; Ziolo, J; Szeja, W; Ngai, K L

    2008-10-09

    Isobaric dielectric relaxation measurements were performed on seven chosen disaccharides. For five of them, i.e., sucrose, maltose, trehalose, lactulose, and leucrose, we were able to observe the temperature evolution of the structural relaxation process. In the case of the other disaccharides studied (lactose and cellobiose), it was impossible to obtain such information because of the large contribution of the dc conductivity and polarization of the capacitor plates to the imaginary and real part of the complex permittivity, respectively. On the other hand, in the glassy state, two secondary relaxations have been identified in the dielectric spectra of all investigated carbohydrates. The faster one (gamma) is a common characteristic feature of the entire sugar family (mono-, di-, oligo-, and polysaccharide). The molecular origin of this process is still not unambiguously identified but is expected to involve intramolecular degrees of freedom as inferred from insensitivity of its relaxation time to pressure found in some monosaccharides (fructose and ribose). The slower one (labeled beta) was recently identified to be intermolecular in origin (i.e., a Johari-Goldstein (JG) beta-relaxation), involving twisting motion of the monosugar rings around the glycosidic bond. The activation energies and dielectric strengths for the beta-relaxation determined herein provide us valuable information about the flexibility of the glycosidic bond and the mobility of this particular linkage in the disaccharides studied. In turn, this information is essential for the control of the diffusivity of drugs or water entrapped in the sugar matrix.

  12. Local chromatin structure of heterochromatin regulates repeated DNA stability, nucleolus structure, and genome integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Jamy C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Heterochromatin constitutes a significant portion of the genome in higher eukaryotes; approximately 30% in Drosophila and human. Heterochromatin contains a high repeat DNA content and a low density of protein-encoding genes. In contrast, euchromatin is composed mostly of unique sequences and contains the majority of single-copy genes. Genetic and cytological studies demonstrated that heterochromatin exhibits regulatory roles in chromosome organization, centromere function and telomere protection. As an epigenetically regulated structure, heterochromatin formation is not defined by any DNA sequence consensus. Heterochromatin is characterized by its association with nucleosomes containing methylated-lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9me), heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) that binds H3K9me, and Su(var)3-9, which methylates H3K9 and binds HP1. Heterochromatin formation and functions are influenced by HP1, Su(var)3-9, and the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. My thesis project investigates how heterochromatin formation and function impact nuclear architecture, repeated DNA organization, and genome stability in Drosophila melanogaster. H3K9me-based chromatin reduces extrachromosomal DNA formation; most likely by restricting the access of repair machineries to repeated DNAs. Reducing extrachromosomal ribosomal DNA stabilizes rDNA repeats and the nucleolus structure. H3K9me-based chromatin also inhibits DNA damage in heterochromatin. Cells with compromised heterochromatin structure, due to Su(var)3-9 or dcr-2 (a component of the RNAi pathway) mutations, display severe DNA damage in heterochromatin compared to wild type. In these mutant cells, accumulated DNA damage leads to chromosomal defects such as translocations, defective DNA repair response, and activation of the G2-M DNA repair and mitotic checkpoints that ensure cellular and animal viability. My thesis research suggests that DNA replication, repair, and recombination mechanisms in heterochromatin differ from those in

  13. Unusual structures are present in DNA fragments containing super-long Huntingtin CAG repeats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Duzdevich

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the R6/2 mouse model of Huntington's disease (HD, expansion of the CAG trinucleotide repeat length beyond about 300 repeats induces a novel phenotype associated with a reduction in transcription of the transgene. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analysed the structure of polymerase chain reaction (PCR-generated DNA containing up to 585 CAG repeats using atomic force microscopy (AFM. As the number of CAG repeats increased, an increasing proportion of the DNA molecules exhibited unusual structural features, including convolutions and multiple protrusions. At least some of these features are hairpin loops, as judged by cross-sectional analysis and sensitivity to cleavage by mung bean nuclease. Single-molecule force measurements showed that the convoluted DNA was very resistant to untangling. In vitro replication by PCR was markedly reduced, and TseI restriction enzyme digestion was also hindered by the abnormal DNA structures. However, significantly, the DNA gained sensitivity to cleavage by the Type III restriction-modification enzyme, EcoP15I. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: "Super-long" CAG repeats are found in a number of neurological diseases and may also appear through CAG repeat instability. We suggest that unusual DNA structures associated with super-long CAG repeats decrease transcriptional efficiency in vitro. We also raise the possibility that if these structures occur in vivo, they may play a role in the aetiology of CAG repeat diseases such as HD.

  14. Triplet repeat DNA structures and human genetic disease: dynamic mutations from dynamic DNA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Richard R Sinden; Vladimir N Potaman; Elena A Oussatcheva; Christopher E Pearson; Yuri L Lyubchenko; Luda S Shlyakhtenko

    2002-02-01

    Fourteen genetic neurodegenerative diseases and three fragile sites have been associated with the expansion of (CTG)n•(CAG)n, (CGG)n•(CCG)n, or (GAA)n•(TTC)n repeat tracts. Different models have been proposed for the expansion of triplet repeats, most of which presume the formation of alternative DNA structures in repeat tracts. One of the most likely structures, slipped strand DNA, may stably and reproducibly form within triplet repeat sequences. The propensity to form slipped strand DNA is proportional to the length and homogeneity of the repeat tract. The remarkable stability of slipped strand DNA may, in part, be due to loop-loop interactions facilitated by the sequence complementarity of the loops and the dynamic structure of three-way junctions formed at the loop-outs.

  15. Functional characterization of a novel disaccharide transporter in lobster hepatopancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffler, Olivia; Ahearn, Gregory A

    2017-02-08

    In animals, the accepted model of carbohydrate digestion and absorption involves reduction of disaccharides into the monosaccharides glucose, fructose, and galactose followed by their individual transmembrane transport into cells. In 2011, a gene for a distinct disaccharide sucrose transporter (SCRT) was found in Drosophila melanogaster and characterized in a yeast expression system. The purpose of the present investigation was to functionally identify and characterize a putative disaccharide transporter analog in the hepatopancreas of the American lobster, Homarus americanus. Purified hepatopancreatic brush-border membrane vesicles (BBMV) were used in transport experiments using (14)C-sucrose and a Millipore filter isolation technique. In the absence of sodium, an external pH of 4 significantly stimulated the uptake of (14)C-sucrose compared to that occurring at pH 5, 6, or 7. At pH 7, increasing external concentrations of sodium increased (14)C-sucrose uptake by BBMV in a hyperbolic fashion and this stimulation was significantly reduced when the pH was changed to 4, suggesting that both protons and sodium ions were each capable of driving the uptake of the sugar. In experiments with a variety of monosaccharides, disaccharides, and trisaccharides, used as potential inhibitors of (14)C-sucrose uptake, only maltose and trehalose inhibited carrier-mediated (14)C-sucrose transport. An additional experiment showed that 20 mM maltose was a competitive inhibitor of (14)C-sucrose uptake. The use of a putative lobster SCRT by both maltose and trehalose is nutritionally appropriate for lobsters as they commonly digest glycogen and chitin, polymers of maltose and trehalose, respectively. These findings suggest there is a brush-border proton- or sodium-dependent, hepatopancreatic carrier process, shared by sucrose, maltose, and trehalose, that may function to absorb disaccharides that are produced from digestion of naturally occurring dietary constituents.

  16. Large cryptic internal sequence repeats in protein structures from Homo sapiens

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Sarani; N A Udayaprakash; R Subashini; P Mridula; T Yamane; K Sekar

    2009-03-01

    Amino acid sequences are known to constantly mutate and diverge unless there is a limiting condition that makes such a change deleterious. However, closer examination of the sequence and structure reveals that a few large, cryptic repeats are nevertheless sequentially conserved. This leads to the question of why only certain repeats are conserved at the sequence level. It would be interesting to find out if these sequences maintain their conservation at the three-dimensional structure level. They can play an active role in protein and nucleotide stability, thus not only ensuring proper functioning but also potentiating malfunction and disease. Therefore, insights into any aspect of the repeats – be it structure, function or evolution – would prove to be of some importance. This study aims to address the relationship between protein sequence and its three-dimensional structure, by examining if large cryptic sequence repeats have the same structure.

  17. Disaccharides Protect Antigens from Drying-Induced Damage in Routinely Processed Tissue Sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boi, Giovanna; Scalia, Carla Rossana; Gendusa, Rossella; Ronchi, Susanna; Cattoretti, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Drying of the tissue section, partial or total, during immunostaining negatively affects both the staining of tissue antigens and the ability to remove previously deposited antibody layers, particularly during sequential rounds of de-staining and re-staining for multiple antigens. The cause is a progressive loss of the protein-associated water up to the removal of the non-freezable water, a step which abolishes the immunoavailability of the epitope. In order to describe and prevent these adverse effects, we tested, among other substances, sugars, which are known to protect unicellular organisms from freezing and dehydration, and stabilize drugs and reagents in solid state form in medical devices. Disaccharides (lactose, sucrose) prevented the air drying-induced antigen masking and protected tissue-bound antigens and antibodies from air drying-induced damage. Complete removal of the bound antibody layers by chemical stripping was permitted if lactose was present during air drying. Lactose, sucrose and other disaccharides prevent air drying artifacts, allow homogeneous, consistent staining and the reuse of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections for repeated immunostaining rounds by guaranteeing constant staining quality in suboptimal hydration conditions.

  18. Chromatin structure of repeating CTG/CAG and CGG/CCG sequences in human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuh-Hwa

    2007-05-01

    In eukaryotic cells, chromatin structure organizes genomic DNA in a dynamic fashion, and results in regulation of many DNA metabolic processes. The CTG/CAG and CGG/CCG repeating sequences involved in several neuromuscular degenerative diseases display differential abilities for the binding of histone octamers. The effect of the repeating DNA on nucleosome assembly could be amplified as the number of repeats increases. Also, CpG methylation, and sequence interruptions within the triplet repeats exert an impact on the formation of nucleosomes along these repeating DNAs. The two most common triplet expansion human diseases, myotonic dystrophy 1 and fragile X syndrome, are caused by the expanded CTG/CAG and CGG/CCG repeats, respectively. In addition to the expanded repeats and CpG methylation, histone modifications, chromatin remodeling factors, and noncoding RNA have been shown to coordinate the chromatin structure at both myotonic dystrophy 1 and fragile X loci. Alterations in chromatin structure at these two loci can affect transcription of these disease-causing genes, leading to disease symptoms. These observations have brought a new appreciation that a full understanding of disease gene expression requires a knowledge of the structure of the chromatin domain within which the gene resides.

  19. Retardation of Bulk Water Dynamics by Disaccharide Osmolytes

    CERN Document Server

    Shukla, Nimesh; Chen, Lee; Chergui, Majed; Othon, Christina M

    2016-01-01

    The bioprotective nature of disaccharides is hypothesized to derive from the modification of the hydrogen bonding network of water which protects biomolecules through lowered water activity at the protein interface. Using ultrafast fluorescence spectroscopy we measured the relaxation of bulk water dynamics around the induced dipole moment of two fluorescent probes (Lucifer Yellow Ethylenediamine and Tryptophan). Our results indicate a reduction in bulk water reorganization rate of approximately of 30%. We observe this retardation in the low concentration regime measured at 0.1M and 0.25 M, far below the onset of glassy dynamics. This reduction in water activity could be significant in crowded biological systems, contributing to global change in protein energy landscape, resulting in a significant enhancement of protein stability under environmental stress. We observed similar dynamic reduction for two disaccharide osmolytes, sucrose and trehalose, with trehalose being the more effective dynamic reducer.

  20. Activation energies of fragmentations of disaccharides by tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuki, Ákos; Nagy, Lajos; Szabó, Katalin E; Antal, Borbála; Zsuga, Miklós; Kéki, Sándor

    2014-03-01

    A simple multiple collision model for collision induced dissociation (CID) in quadrupole was applied for the estimation of the activation energy (E(o)) of the fragmentation processes for lithiated and trifluoroacetated disaccharides, such as maltose, cellobiose, isomaltose, gentiobiose, and trehalose. The internal energy-dependent rate constants k(E(int)) were calculated using the Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) or the Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel (RRK) theory. The E(o) values were estimated by fitting the calculated survival yield (SY) curves to the experimental ones. The calculated E(o) values of the fragmentation processes for lithiated disaccharides were in the range of 1.4-1.7 eV, and were found to increase in the order trehalose < maltose < isomaltose < cellobiose < gentiobiose.

  1. Efficient Procedures of Sensitivity Analysis for Structural Vibration Systems with Repeated Frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shijia Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Derivatives of eigenvectors with respect to structural parameters play an important role in structural design, identification, and optimization. Particularly, calculation of eigenvector sensitivity is considered when the eigenvalues are repeated. A relaxation factor embedded in the combined approximations (CA method makes it effective to the structural response at various modified designs. The proposed method is feasible after overcoming the defection of irreversibility of the characteristic matrix. Numerical examples show that it is easy to implement the computational procedure, and the method presented in this paper is efficient for the general linear vibration damped systems with repeated frequencies.

  2. Evolutionary conservation of sequence and secondary structures inCRISPR repeats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunin, Victor; Sorek, Rotem; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2006-09-01

    Clustered Regularly Interspaced Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs) are a novel class of direct repeats, separated by unique spacer sequences of similar length, that are present in {approx}40% of bacterial and all archaeal genomes analyzed to date. More than 40 gene families, called CRISPR-associated sequences (CAS), appear in conjunction with these repeats and are thought to be involved in the propagation and functioning of CRISPRs. It has been proposed that the CRISPR/CAS system samples, maintains a record of, and inactivates invasive DNA that the cell has encountered, and therefore constitutes a prokaryotic analog of an immune system. Here we analyze CRISPR repeats identified in 195 microbial genomes and show that they can be organized into multiple clusters based on sequence similarity. All individual repeats in any given cluster were inferred to form characteristic RNA secondary structure, ranging from non-existent to pronounced. Stable secondary structures included G:U base pairs and exhibited multiple compensatory base changes in the stem region, indicating evolutionary conservation and functional importance. We also show that the repeat-based classification corresponds to, and expands upon, a previously reported CAS gene-based classification including specific relationships between CRISPR and CAS subtypes.

  3. Preparative scale purification of fucosyl-N-acetylglucosamine disaccharides and their evaluation as potential prebiotics and antiadhesins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra, Jimmy E; Coll-Marqués, José M; Rodríguez-Díaz, Jesús; Monedero, Vicente; Yebra, María J

    2015-09-01

    Fucosyl-N-acetylglucosamine disaccharides are important core structures that form part of human mucosal and milk glyco-complexes. We have previously shown that AlfB and AlfC α-L-fucosidases from Lactobacillus casei are able to synthesize fucosyl-α-1,3--N-acetylglucosamine (Fuc-α1,3-GlcNAc) and fucosyl-α-1,6-N-acetylglucosamine (Fuc-α1,6-GlcNAc), respectively, in transglycosylation reactions. Here, these reactions were performed in a semipreparative scale, and the produced disaccharides were purified. The maximum yields obtained of Fuc-α1,3-GlcNAc and Fuc-α1,6-GlcNAc were 4.2 and 9.3 g/l, respectively. The purified fucosyl-disaccharides were then analyzed for their prebiotic effect in vitro using strains from the Lactobacillus casei/paracasei/rhamnosus group and from Bifidobacterium species. The results revealed that 6 out of 11 L. casei strains and 2 out of 6 L. rhamnosus strains tested were able to ferment Fuc-α1,3-GlcNAc, and L. casei BL87 and L. rhamnosus BL327 strains were also able to ferment Fuc-α1,6-GlcNAc. DNA hybridization experiments suggested that the metabolism of Fuc-α1,3-GlcNAc in those strains relies in an α-L-fucosidase homologous to AlfB. Bifidobacterium breve and Bibidobacterium pseudocatenolatum species also metabolized Fuc-α1,3-GlcNAc. Notably, L-fucose was excreted from all the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains fermenting fucosyl-disaccharides, except from strains L. rhamnosus BL358 and BL377, indicating that in these latest strains, L-fucose was catabolized. The fucosyl-disaccharides were also tested for their inhibitory potential of pathogen adhesion to human colon adenocarcinoma epithelial (HT29) cell line. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) strains isolated from infantile gastroenteritis were used, and the results showed that both fucosyl-disaccharides inhibited adhesion to different extents of certain EPEC strains to HT29 cells in tissue culture.

  4. Structural Studies of a Four-MBT Repeat Protein MBTD1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eryilmaz, Jitka; Pan, Patricia; Amaya, Maria F.; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Dong, Aiping; Adams-Cioaba, Melanie A.; MacKenzie, Farrell; Vedadi, Masoud; Min, Jinrong; (Toronto); (Toronto)

    2010-08-17

    The Polycomb group (PcG) of proteins is a family of important developmental regulators. The respective members function as large protein complexes involved in establishment and maintenance of transcriptional repression of developmental control genes. MBTD1, Malignant Brain Tumor domain-containing protein 1, is one such PcG protein. MBTD1 contains four MBT repeats. We have determined the crystal structure of MBTD1 (residues 130-566aa covering the 4 MBT repeats) at 2.5 {angstrom} resolution by X-ray crystallography. The crystal structure of MBTD1 reveals its similarity to another four-MBT-repeat protein L3MBTL2, which binds lower methylated lysine histones. Fluorescence polarization experiments confirmed that MBTD1 preferentially binds mono- and di-methyllysine histone peptides, like L3MBTL1 and L3MBTL2. All known MBT-peptide complex structures characterized to date do not exhibit strong histone peptide sequence selectivity, and use a 'cavity insertion recognition mode' to recognize the methylated lysine with the deeply buried methyl-lysine forming extensive interactions with the protein while the peptide residues flanking methyl-lysine forming very few contacts. Nevertheless, our mutagenesis data based on L3MBTL1 suggested that the histone peptides could not bind to MBT repeats in any orientation. The four MBT repeats in MBTD1 exhibits an asymmetric rhomboid architecture. Like other MBT repeat proteins characterized so far, MBTD1 binds mono- or dimethylated lysine histones through one of its four MBT repeats utilizing a semi-aromatic cage.

  5. Structure of thrombospondin type 3 repeats in bacterial outer membrane protein A reveals its intra-repeat disulfide bond-dependent calcium-binding capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Shuyan; Sun, Cancan; Tan, Kemin; Ye, Sheng; Zhang, Rongguang

    2017-09-01

    Eukaryotic thrombospondin type 3 repeat (TT3R) is an efficient calcium ion (Ca2+) binding motif only found in mammalian thrombospondin family. TT3R has also been found in prokaryotic cellulase Cel5G, which was thought to forfeit the Ca2+-binding capability due to the formation of intra-repeat disulfide bonds, instead of the inter-repeat ones possessed by eukaryotic TT3Rs. In this study, we have identified an enormous number of prokaryotic TT3R-containing proteins belonging to several different protein families, including outer membrane protein A (OmpA), an important structural protein connecting the outer membrane and the periplasmic peptidoglycan layer in gram-negative bacteria. Here, we report the crystal structure of the periplasmic region of OmpA from Capnocytophaga gingivalis, which contains a linker region comprising five consecutive TT3Rs. The structure of OmpA-TT3R exhibits a well-ordered architecture organized around two tightly-coordinated Ca2+ and confirms the presence of abnormal intra-repeat disulfide bonds. Further mutagenesis studies showed that the Ca2+-binding capability of OmpA-TT3R is indeed dependent on the proper formation of intra-repeat disulfide bonds, which help to fix a conserved glycine residue at its proper position for Ca2+ coordination. Additionally, despite lacking inter repeat disulfide bonds, the interfaces between adjacent OmpA-TT3Rs are enhanced by both hydrophobic and conserved aromatic-proline interactions.

  6. Repeating Patterns: Strategies to Assist Young Students to Generalise the Mathematical Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Elizabeth; Miller, Jodie; Cooper, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on very young students' ability to engage in repeating pattern tasks and identifying strategies that assist them to ascertain the structure of the pattern. It describes results of a study which is part of the Early Years Generalising Project (EYGP) and involves Australian students in Years 1 to 4 (ages 5-10). This paper reports…

  7. Effect of repeated contact on adhesion measurements involving polydimethylsiloxane structural material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroner, E.; Maboudian, R.; Arzt, E.

    2009-09-01

    During the last few years several research groups have focused on the fabrication of artificial gecko inspired adhesives. For mimicking these structures, different polymers are used as structure material, such as polydimethylsiloxanes (PDMS), polyurethanes (PU), and polypropylene (PP). While these polymers can be structured easily and used for artificial adhesion systems, the effects of repeated adhesion testing have never been investigated closely. In this paper we report on the effect of repeated adhesion measurements on the commercially available poly(dimethylsiloxane) polymer kit Sylgard 184 (Dow Corning). We show that the adhesion force decreases as a function of contact cycles. The rate of change and the final value of adhesion are found to depend on the details of the PDMS synthesis and structuring.

  8. Effect of repeated contact on adhesion measurements involving polydimethylsiloxane structural material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroner, E; Arzt, E [INM-Leibniz Institute for New Materials, Campus D2 2, 66125 Saarbruecken (Germany); Maboudian, R, E-mail: elmar.kroner@inm-gmbh.de [Department of Chem. Eng., 201 Gilman Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1462 (United States)

    2009-09-15

    During the last few years several research groups have focused on the fabrication of artificial gecko inspired adhesives. For mimicking these structures, different polymers are used as structure material, such as polydimethylsiloxanes (PDMS), polyurethanes (PU), and polypropylene (PP). While these polymers can be structured easily and used for artificial adhesion systems, the effects of repeated adhesion testing have never been investigated closely. In this paper we report on the effect of repeated adhesion measurements on the commercially available poly(dimethylsiloxane) polymer kit Sylgard 184 (Dow Corning). We show that the adhesion force decreases as a function of contact cycles. The rate of change and the final value of adhesion are found to depend on the details of the PDMS synthesis and structuring.

  9. Evolutionary Origin of Higher-Order Repeat Structure in Alpha-Satellite DNA of Primate Centromeres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Akihiko; Hirai, Yuriko; Terada, Shoko; Jahan, Israt; Baicharoen, Sudarath; Arsaithamkul, Visit; Hirai, Hirohisa

    2014-01-01

    Alpha-satellite DNA (AS) is a main DNA component of primate centromeres, consisting of tandemly repeated units of ∼170 bp. The AS of humans contains sequences organized into higher-order repeat (HOR) structures, in which a block of multiple repeat units forms a larger repeat unit and the larger units are repeated tandemly. The presence of HOR in AS is widely thought to be unique to hominids (family Hominidae; humans and great apes). Recently, we have identified an HOR-containing AS in the siamang, which is a small ape species belonging to the genus Symphalangus in the family Hylobatidae. This result supports the view that HOR in AS is an attribute of hominoids (superfamily Hominoidea) rather than hominids. A single example is, however, not sufficient for discussion of the evolutionary origin of HOR-containing AS. In the present study, we developed an efficient method for detecting signs of large-scale HOR and demonstrated HOR of AS in all the three other genera. Thus, AS organized into HOR occurs widely in hominoids. Our results indicate that (i) HOR-containing AS was present in the last common ancestor of hominoids or (ii) HOR-containing AS emerged independently in most or all basal branches of hominoids. We have also confirmed HOR occurrence in centromeric AS in the Hylobatidae family, which remained unclear in our previous study because of the existence of AS in subtelomeric regions, in addition to centromeres, of siamang chromosomes. PMID:24585002

  10. The impact of CRISPR repeat sequence on structures of a Cas6 protein-RNA complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ruiying; Zheng, Han; Preamplume, Gan; Shao, Yaming; Li, Hong [FSU

    2012-03-15

    The repeat-associated mysterious proteins (RAMPs) comprise the most abundant family of proteins involved in prokaryotic immunity against invading genetic elements conferred by the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) system. Cas6 is one of the first characterized RAMP proteins and is a key enzyme required for CRISPR RNA maturation. Despite a strong structural homology with other RAMP proteins that bind hairpin RNA, Cas6 distinctly recognizes single-stranded RNA. Previous structural and biochemical studies show that Cas6 captures the 5' end while cleaving the 3' end of the CRISPR RNA. Here, we describe three structures and complementary biochemical analysis of a noncatalytic Cas6 homolog from Pyrococcus horikoshii bound to CRISPR repeat RNA of different sequences. Our study confirms the specificity of the Cas6 protein for single-stranded RNA and further reveals the importance of the bases at Positions 5-7 in Cas6-RNA interactions. Substitutions of these bases result in structural changes in the protein-RNA complex including its oligomerization state.

  11. Distinct C9orf72-Associated Dipeptide Repeat Structures Correlate with Neuronal Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krans, Amy; Sawaya, Michael R.; Paulson, Henry L.; Todd, Peter K.; Barmada, Sami J.; Ivanova, Magdalena I.

    2016-01-01

    Hexanucleotide repeat expansions in C9orf72 are the most common inherited cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). The expansions elicit toxicity in part through repeat-associated non-AUG (RAN) translation of the intronic (GGGGCC)n sequence into dipeptide repeat-containing proteins (DPRs). Little is known, however, about the structural characteristics and aggregation propensities of the dipeptide units comprising DPRs. To address this question, we synthesized dipeptide units corresponding to the three sense-strand RAN translation products, analyzed their structures by circular dichroism, electron microscopy and dye binding assays, and assessed their relative toxicity when applied to primary cortical neurons. Short, glycine-arginine (GR)3 dipeptides formed spherical aggregates and selectively reduced neuronal survival compared to glycine-alanine (GA)3 and glycine-proline (GP)3 dipeptides. Doubling peptide length had little effect on the structure of GR or GP peptides, but (GA)6 peptides formed β-sheet rich aggregates that bound thioflavin T and Congo red yet lacked the typical fibrillar morphology of amyloids. Aging of (GA)6 dipeptides increased their β-sheet content and enhanced their toxicity when applied to neurons. We also observed that the relative toxicity of each tested dipeptide was proportional to peptide internalization. Our results demonstrate that different C9orf72-related dipeptides exhibit distinct structural properties that correlate with their relative toxicity. PMID:27776165

  12. The design and structural characterization of a synthetic pentatricopeptide repeat protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gully, Benjamin S; Shah, Kunal R; Lee, Mihwa; Shearston, Kate; Smith, Nicole M; Sadowska, Agata; Blythe, Amanda J; Bernath-Levin, Kalia; Stanley, Will A; Small, Ian D; Bond, Charles S

    2015-02-01

    Proteins of the pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) superfamily are characterized by tandem arrays of a degenerate 35-amino-acid α-hairpin motif. PPR proteins are typically single-stranded RNA-binding proteins with essential roles in organelle biogenesis, RNA editing and mRNA maturation. A modular, predictable code for sequence-specific binding of RNA by PPR proteins has recently been revealed, which opens the door to the de novo design of bespoke proteins with specific RNA targets, with widespread biotechnological potential. Here, the design and production of a synthetic PPR protein based on a consensus sequence and the determination of its crystal structure to 2.2 Å resolution are described. The crystal structure displays helical disorder, resulting in electron density representing an infinite superhelical PPR protein. A structural comparison with related tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) proteins, and with native PPR proteins, reveals key roles for conserved residues in directing the structure and function of PPR proteins. The designed proteins have high solubility and thermal stability, and can form long tracts of PPR repeats. Thus, consensus-sequence synthetic PPR proteins could provide a suitable backbone for the design of bespoke RNA-binding proteins with the potential for high specificity.

  13. Identification of a benzyladenine disaccharide conjugate produced during shoot organogenesis in Petunia leaf explants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auer, C.A. (Univ. of Connecticute, Storrs, CT (United States)); Cohen, J.D. (Beltsville Agricultural Research Ctr., MD (United States))

    1993-06-01

    Prior studies of benzyladenine (BA) metabolism in Petunia hybrida Vilm. leaf explants during shoot organogenesis revealed the presence of an abundant unidentified BA conjugate. The BA conjugate, compound C, made up to 39% of the total pool of BA conjugates in two Petunia lines and was associated with an increased shoot organogenic response when compared with a third Petunia line that did not produce any compound C. Structural analysis of compound C utilizing fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry, two methods of carbohydrate analysis, ultraviolet absorption spectra, and Fourier transform infrared spectra identified it as a new cytokinin conjugate, 6-benzylamino-9-[O-glucopyranosyl-(1[yields]3)-ribofuranosyl]-purine. Based on our prior biological studies and the similarity of this compound to related cytokinin conjugates, this disaccharide cytokinin conjugate may be part of the interconvertible pool of cytokinins active in Petunia shoot organogenesis. 17 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. [Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats: structure, function and application--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yujun; Li, Yanjun; Yan, Yanfeng; Yang, Ruifu

    2008-11-01

    CRISPRs (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats), the basis of spoligotyping technology, can provide prokaryotes with heritable adaptive immunity against phages' invasion. Studies on CRISPR loci and their associated elements, including various CAS (CRISPR-associated) proteins and leader sequences, are still in its infant period. We introduce the brief history', structure, function, bioinformatics research and application of this amazing immunity system in prokaryotic organism for inspiring more scientists to find their interest in this developing topic.

  15. Structural Analyses of the Ankyrin Repeat Domain of TRPV6 and Related TRPV Ion Channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phelps, C.B.; Huang, R.J.; Lishko, P.V.; Wang, R.R.; Gaudet, R. (Harvard)

    2008-06-03

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) proteins are cation channels composed of a transmembrane domain flanked by large N- and C-terminal cytoplasmic domains. All members of the vanilloid family of TRP channels (TRPV) possess an N-terminal ankyrin repeat domain (ARD). The ARD of mammalian TRPV6, an important regulator of calcium uptake and homeostasis, is essential for channel assembly and regulation. The 1.7 A crystal structure of the TRPV6-ARD reveals conserved structural elements unique to the ARDs of TRPV proteins. First, a large twist between the fourth and fifth repeats is induced by residues conserved in all TRPV ARDs. Second, the third finger loop is the most variable region in sequence, length and conformation. In TRPV6, a number of putative regulatory phosphorylation sites map to the base of this third finger. Size exclusion chromatography and crystal packing indicate that the TRPV6-ARD does not assemble as a tetramer and is monomeric in solution. Adenosine triphosphate-agarose and calmodulin-agarose pull-down assays show that the TRPV6-ARD does not interact with either ligand, indicating a different functional role for the TRPV6-ARD than in the paralogous thermosensitive TRPV1 channel. Similar biochemical findings are also presented for the highly homologous mammalian TRPV5-ARD. The implications of the structural and biochemical data on the role of the ankyrin repeats in different TRPV channels are discussed.

  16. Exploring bacterial community structure and function associated with atrazine biodegradation in repeatedly treated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Hua; Lian, Jianjun; Wang, Huifang; Cai, Lin; Yu, Yunlong

    2015-04-09

    Substantial application of the herbicide atrazine in agriculture leads to persistent contamination, which may damage the succeeding crops and pose potential threats to soil ecology and environmental health. Here, the degradation characteristics of atrazine and dynamic change of soil bacterial community structure and function as well as their relations were studied during three repeated treatments at the recommended, double, and five-fold doses. The results showed that the degradation half-life of atrazine obviously decreased with increased treatment frequency. Soil microbial functional diversity displayed a variation trend of suppression-recovery-stimulation, which was associated with increased degradation rate of atrazine. 16S amplicon sequencing was conducted to explore bacterial community structure and correlate the genus to potential atrazine degradation. A total of seven potentially atrazine-degrading bacterial genera were found including Nocardioides, Arthrobacter, Bradyrhizobium, Burkholderia, Methylobacterium, Mycobacterium, and Clostridium. These bacterial genera showed almost complete atrazine degradation pathways including dechlorination, dealkylation, hydroxylation, and ring cleavage. Furthermore, the relative abundance of four of them (i.e., Nocardioides, Arthrobacter, Methylobacterium, and Bradyrhizobium) increased with treatment frequency and atrazine concentration, suggesting that they may participate in atrazine degradation during repeated treatments. Our findings reveal the potential relationship between atrazine degradation and soil bacterial community structure in repeatedly treated soils. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of repeated use and resterilization on structural and functional integrity of microwave ablation antennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finck, Cyrielle A; Zur Linden, Alex R; Singh, Ameet; Foster, Robert A; Nykamp, Stephanie G; Sears, William C

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine effects of repeated use and resterilization on structural and functional integrity of microwave ablation (MWA) antennas. SAMPLE 17 cooled-shaft MWA antennas (3 groups of 5 antennas/group and 2 control antennas). PROCEDURES 1, 2, and 3 ablations in the livers of bovine cadavers were performed at the maximum recommended settings. Antennas were cleaned and sterilized in hydrogen peroxide plasma, and the process was repeated (reprocessing cycle; n = 6). Control antennas were only sterilized (6 times). Aerobic and anaerobic bacterial cultures were performed, and antennas were microscopically assessed for damage. RESULTS 6 cycles were completed. Thirteen of 15 MWA antennas remained functional for up to 4 cycles, 10 were functional after 5 cycles, and only 7 were functional after 6 cycles. Progressive tearing of the silicone coating of the antennas was observed, with a negative effect of the number of cycles for silicone tearing. Size of the ablation zone decreased mildly over time after cycles 5 and 6; however, this was not considered clinically relevant. No significant changes in the shape of ablation zones were detected. All cultures yielded negative results, except for an isolated case, which was considered a contaminant. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Structural and functional integrity of the microwave antennas remained acceptable during repeated use and reprocessing for up to 4 cycles. However, there was a decrease in functional integrity at cycles 5 and 6. We suggest that these microwave antennas be subjected to > 3 reprocessing cycles. Antennas should be carefully examined before reuse.

  18. Long-term effects of repeated superovulation on ovarian structure and function in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Guoying; Guo, Yueshuai; Cao, Huarong; Zhou, Tao; Zhou, Zuomin; Sha, Jiahao; Guo, Xuejiang; Zhu, Hui

    2014-11-01

    To assess the long-term effects of repeated controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) on ovarian structure and function. Experimental study. Laboratory. Adult female rhesus macaques. A repeated COH rhesus macaque model (superovulation group) with spontaneously ovulating macaques used as controls (normal group) and samples of serum and ovarian tissue collected over a 5-year period. Steroid hormone levels, and structural, functional, and protein changes in ovaries. The follicular histology, proportion of follicles at each developmental stage, and expression levels of oocyte-specific genes showed no statistically significant differences between the two groups. However, the superovulation group exhibited mitochondrial abnormalities in the granulosa cells and a low expression of genes involved in steroid hormone synthesis compared with the normal group. A comparison of protein expression in the ovaries of both groups using tandem mass tag labeling with mass spectrometry revealed that most of the differentially-expressed proteins were down-regulated in the superovulation group. These proteins were mainly localized in the mitochondria and cytosol, and changes in protein levels in the superovulation group mainly inhibited cell proliferation and differentiation but promoted apoptosis. Our study indicates that repeated COH could change the expression of many proteins in the ovaries even after several years, potentially affecting the development and function of ovarian cells. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Assignment of the Stereochemistry and Anomeric Configuration of Sugars within Oligosaccharides Via Overlapping Disaccharide Ladders Using MSn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konda, Chiharu; Londry, Frank A.; Bendiak, Brad; Xia, Yu

    2014-08-01

    A systematic approach is described that can pinpoint the stereo-structures (sugar identity, anomeric configuration, and location) of individual sugar units within linear oligosaccharides. Using a highly modified mass spectrometer, dissociation of linear oligosaccharides in the gas phase was optimized along multiple-stage tandem dissociation pathways (MSn, n = 4 or 5). The instrument was a hybrid triple quadrupole/linear ion trap mass spectrometer capable of high-efficiency bidirectional ion transfer between quadrupole arrays. Different types of collision-induced dissociation (CID), either on-resonance ion trap or beam-type CID could be utilized at any given stage of dissociation, enabling either glycosidic bond cleavages or cross-ring cleavages to be maximized when wanted. The approach first involves optimizing the isolation of disaccharide units as an ordered set of overlapping substructures via glycosidic bond cleavages during early stages of MSn, with explicit intent to minimize cross-ring cleavages. Subsequently, cross-ring cleavages were optimized for individual disaccharides to yield key diagnostic product ions ( m/ z 221). Finally, fingerprint patterns that establish stereochemistry and anomeric configuration were obtained from the diagnostic ions via CID. Model linear oligosaccharides were derivatized at the reducing end, allowing overlapping ladders of disaccharides to be isolated from MSn. High confidence stereo-structural determination was achieved by matching MSn CID of the diagnostic ions to synthetic standards via a spectral matching algorithm. Using this MSn ( n = 4 or 5) approach, the stereo-structures, anomeric configurations, and locations of three individual sugar units within two pentasaccharides were successfully determined.

  20. Structural determination of Streptococcus pneumoniae repeat units in serotype 41A and 41F capsular polysaccharides to probe gene functions in the corresponding capsular biosynthetic loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Bent O.; Skovsted, Ian C.; Paulsen, Berit Smestad

    2014-01-01

    We report the repeating unit structures ofthe native capsular polysaccharidesof S. pneumoniaeserotypes 41A and 41F. Structuraldeterminationsyieldedsix carbohydrate units in the doubly branched repeating unit to givethe following structure for serotype 41A:The structure determinations were motivat...

  1. Glass transition behavior of ternary disaccharide-ethylene glycol-water solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tongxu; Zhao, Lishan; Wang, Qiang; Cao, Zexian

    2017-06-01

    Glass transition behavior of ternary disaccharide-ethylene glycol-water solutions, in reference to that of the binary combinations, has been investigated towards a better understanding of their cryoprotective ability. In water-deficient solutions, the disaccharides, including trehalose, sucrose and maltose, can associate with more than 100 ethylene glycol molecules to form amorphous complex, one order of magnitude larger than the corresponding hydration numbers. In water-rich solutions, a second glass transition emerges with increasing molar fraction of ethylene glycol, indicating the possible synergy of disaccharides and ethylene glycol in vitrification of the ternary aqueous solution.

  2. Repeatability of ellipsometric data in cholera toxin G M1-ELISA structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Leon G.; Thompson, Daniel W.; Tiwald, Thomas; Berberov, Emil M.; Woollam, John A.

    2007-04-01

    The need for repeated measurements in a wide range of biological testing due to statistical variations is well known. In this paper, we discuss a specific example in which the measurement probe is a spectroscopic ellipsometer. Repeatable results are needed in a wide range of applications such as drug testing, immunoassays and other tests for disease, and fundamental biomaterial research. The present paper seeks to help reduce the non-meaningful causes of lack of repeatability by identifying a large number of externally controllable factors. Another goal of this work was to quantify the effects of many of these factors on ellipsometric measurements. By exploiting the sensitivity of spectroscopic ellipsometry to ultrathin layers, improved ways to detect and quantitatively differentiate biological events can be explored. This initial work was motivated from an interest to distinguish one disease from another or discern effects of one drug from another using the high surface sensitivity of spectroscopic ellipsometry. In this paper, we investigate the example biological system of cholera toxin (CT) in an ELISA structure with monosialoganglioside (G M1).

  3. Plasmodium alveolins possess distinct but structurally and functionally related multi-repeat domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khattaf, Fatimah S; Tremp, Annie Z; Dessens, Johannes T

    2015-02-01

    The invasive and motile life stages of malaria parasites (merozoite, ookinete and sporozoite) possess a distinctive cortical structure termed the pellicle. The pellicle is characterised by a double-layered 'inner membrane complex' (IMC) located underneath the plasma membrane, which is supported by a cytoskeletal structure termed the subpellicular network (SPN). The SPN consists of intermediate filaments, whose major constituents include a family of proteins called alveolins. Here, we re-appraise the alveolins in the genus Plasmodium with respect to their repertoire, structure and interrelatedness. Amongst 13 family members identified, we distinguish two domain types that, albeit distinct at the primary structure level, are structurally related and contain tandem repeats with a consensus 12-amino acid periodicity. Analysis in Plasmodium berghei of the most divergent alveolin, PbIMC1d, reveals a zoite-specific expression in ookinetes and a subcellular localisation in the pellicle, consistent with its predicted role as a SPN component. Knockout of PbIMC1d gives rise to a wild-type phenotype with respect to ookinete morphogenesis, tensile strength, gliding motility and infectivity, presenting the first example of apparent functional redundancy amongst alveolin family members.

  4. The crystal structure of a partial mouse Notch-1 ankyrin domain: Repeats 4 through 7 preserve an ankyrin fold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lubman, Olga Y.; Kopan, Raphael; Waksman, Gabriel; Korolev, Sergey (Birbeck); (St. Louis-MED); (WU-MED)

    2010-07-20

    Folding and stability of proteins containing ankyrin repeats (ARs) is of great interest because they mediate numerous protein-protein interactions involved in a wide range of regulatory cellular processes. Notch, an ankyrin domain containing protein, signals by converting a transcriptional repression complex into an activation complex. The Notch ANK domain is essential for Notch function and contains seven ARs. Here, we present the 2.2 {angstrom} crystal structure of ARs 4-7 from mouse Notch 1 (m1ANK). These C-terminal repeats were resistant to degradation during crystallization, and their secondary and tertiary structures are maintained in the absence of repeats 1-3. The crystallized fragment adopts a typical ankyrin fold including the poorly conserved seventh AR, as seen in the Drosophila Notch ANK domain (dANK). The structural preservation and stability of the C-terminal repeats shed a new light onto the mechanism of hetero-oligomeric assembly during Notch-mediated transcriptional activation.

  5. 树舌灵芝中分离得到非还原性二糖-海藻糖%Trehalose,a non-reducing disaccharide from Ganoderma applanatum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马红霞; 周忠波; 包海鹰; 图力古尔; 李玉

    2008-01-01

    Trehalose,a non-reducing disaccharide,was separated for the first time from Ganoderma applanatum fruit body.The structure of trehalose was determined by electrospray ionization mass spectrometric and NMR data.The content of trehalose was determined by improved anthrone-sulphuric acid colorimetric method and it was 0.48% of dried weight of G.applanatum fi'uit body.Mannitol was simultaneously obtained during separation of trehalose from G applanatum.

  6. Modelling Structure-Property Relationship for Copolymers by Structured Representation of Repeating Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertinetto, Carlo; Duce, Celia; Micheli, Alessio; Starita, Antonina; Solaro, Roberto; Tiné, Maria R.

    2009-08-01

    We report here a recent study on the prediction by recursive neural network of the glass transition temperature of (meth)acrylic copolymers, for which appropriate structured representations are proposed. It is shown that the flexibility of such description allows for simultaneously treating different classes of compounds as well as accounting for different average properties such as tacticity and molar composition.

  7. Molecular mechanisms for maintenance of G-rich short tandem repeats capable of adopting G4 DNA structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagama, Hitoshi [Biochemistry Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)]. E-mail: hnakagam@gan2.res.ncc.go.jp; Higuchi, Kumiko [Biochemistry Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Tanaka, Etsuko [Biochemistry Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Tsuchiya, Naoto [Biochemistry Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Nakashima, Katsuhiko [Biochemistry Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Katahira, Masato [Biochemistry Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Fukuda, Hirokazu [Biochemistry Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)

    2006-06-25

    Mammalian genomes contain several types of repetitive sequences. Some of these sequences are implicated in various specific cellular events, including meiotic recombination, chromosomal breaks and transcriptional regulation, and also in several human disorders. In this review, we document the formation of DNA secondary structures by the G-rich repetitive sequences that have been found in several minisatellites, telomeres and in various triplet repeats, and report their effects on in vitro DNA synthesis. d(GGCAG) repeats in the mouse minisatellite Pc-1 were demonstrated to form an intra-molecular folded-back quadruplex structure (also called a G4' structure) by NMR and CD spectrum analyses. d(TTAGGG) telomere repeats and d(CGG) triplet repeats were also shown to form G4' and other unspecified higher order structures, respectively. In vitro DNA synthesis was substantially arrested within the repeats, and this could be responsible for the preferential mutability of the G-rich repetitive sequences. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays using NIH3T3 cell extracts revealed heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A1 and A3, which were tightly and specifically bound to d(GGCAG) and d(TTAGGG) repeats with K {sub d} values in the order of nM. HnRNP A1 unfolded the G4' structure formed in the d(GGCAG) {sub n} and d(TTAGGG) {sub n} repeat regions, and also resolved the higher order structure formed by d(CGG) triplet repeats. Furthermore, DNA synthesis arrest at the secondary structures of d(GGCAG) repeats, telomeres and d(CGG) triplet repeats was efficiently repressed by the addition of hnRNP A1. High expression of hnRNPs may contribute to the maintenance of G-rich repetitive sequences, including telomere repeats, and may also participate in ensuring the stability of the genome in cells with enhanced proliferation. Transcriptional regulation of genes, such as c-myc and insulin, by G4 sequences found in the promoter regions could be an intriguing field of

  8. Evolutionary fate of memory-one strategies in repeated prisoner's dilemma game in structured populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xu-Sheng; Wu, Zhi-Xi; Chen, Michael Z. Q.; Guan, Jian-Yue

    2017-07-01

    We study evolutionary spatial prisoner's dilemma game involving a one-step memory mechanism of the individuals whenever making strategy updating. In particular, during the process of strategy updating, each individual keeps in mind all the outcome of the action pairs adopted by himself and each of his neighbors in the last interaction, and according to which the individuals decide what actions they will take in the next round. Computer simulation results imply that win-stay-lose-shift like strategy win out of the memory-one strategy set in the stationary state. This result is robust in a large range of the payoff parameter, and does not depend on the initial state of the system. Furthermore, theoretical analysis with mean field and quasi-static approximation predict the same result. Thus, our studies suggest that win-stay-lose-shift like strategy is a stable dominant strategy in repeated prisoner's dilemma game in homogeneous structured populations.

  9. Crystal Structure of a Designed Tetratricopeptide Repeat Module in Complex with its Peptide Ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortajarena, A.; Wang, J; Regan, L

    2010-01-01

    Tetratricopeptide repeats (TPRs) are protein domains that mediate key protein-protein interactions in cells. Several TPR domains bind the C-termini of the chaperones heat shock protein (Hsp)90 and/or Hsp70, and exchange of such binding partners is key for the heat shock response. We have previously described the design of a TPR protein that binds tightly and specifically to the C-terminus of Hsp90, and in doing so, is able to inhibit chaperone function in vivo. Here we present the X-ray crystal structure of the designed TPR domain (CTPR390) in complex with its peptide ligand - the C-terminal residues of Hsp90 (peptide MEEVD). This structure reveals two interesting aspects of the TPR modules. First, a new packing arrangement of 3-TPR modules is observed. The TPR units stack against each other in an unusual fashion to form infinite superhelices in the crystal. Second, the structure provides insights into the molecular basis of TPR-ligand recognition.

  10. Creation and structure determination of an artificial protein with three complete sequence repeats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Motoyasu, E-mail: adachi.motoyasu@jaea.go.jp; Shimizu, Rumi; Kuroki, Ryota [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakatashirane 2-4, Nakagun Tokaimura, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Blaber, Michael [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakatashirane 2-4, Nakagun Tokaimura, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306-4300 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    An artificial protein with three complete sequence repeats was created and the structure was determined by X-ray crystallography. The structure showed threefold symmetry even though there is an amino- and carboxy-terminal. The artificial protein with threefold symmetry may be useful as a scaffold to capture small materials with C3 symmetry. Symfoil-4P is a de novo protein exhibiting the threefold symmetrical β-trefoil fold designed based on the human acidic fibroblast growth factor. First three asparagine–glycine sequences of Symfoil-4P are replaced with glutamine–glycine (Symfoil-QG) or serine–glycine (Symfoil-SG) sequences protecting from deamidation, and His-Symfoil-II was prepared by introducing a protease digestion site into Symfoil-QG so that Symfoil-II has three complete repeats after removal of the N-terminal histidine tag. The Symfoil-QG and SG and His-Symfoil-II proteins were expressed in Eschericha coli as soluble protein, and purified by nickel affinity chromatography. Symfoil-II was further purified by anion-exchange chromatography after removing the HisTag by proteolysis. Both Symfoil-QG and Symfoil-II were crystallized in 0.1 M Tris-HCl buffer (pH 7.0) containing 1.8 M ammonium sulfate as precipitant at 293 K; several crystal forms were observed for Symfoil-QG and II. The maximum diffraction of Symfoil-QG and II crystals were 1.5 and 1.1 Å resolution, respectively. The Symfoil-II without histidine tag diffracted better than Symfoil-QG with N-terminal histidine tag. Although the crystal packing of Symfoil-II is slightly different from Symfoil-QG and other crystals of Symfoil derivatives having the N-terminal histidine tag, the refined crystal structure of Symfoil-II showed pseudo-threefold symmetry as expected from other Symfoils. Since the removal of the unstructured N-terminal histidine tag did not affect the threefold structure of Symfoil, the improvement of diffraction quality of Symfoil-II may be caused by molecular characteristics of

  11. Disruption of Higher Order DNA Structures in Friedreich's Ataxia (GAA)(n) Repeats by PNA or LNA Targeting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergquist, Helen; Rocha, Cristina S. J.; Alvarez-Asencio, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    Expansion of (GAA)n repeats in the first intron of the Frataxin gene is associated with reduced mRNA and protein levels and the development of Friedreich’s ataxia. (GAA)n expansions form non-canonical structures, including intramolecular triplex (H-DNA), and R-loops and are associated with epigen......Expansion of (GAA)n repeats in the first intron of the Frataxin gene is associated with reduced mRNA and protein levels and the development of Friedreich’s ataxia. (GAA)n expansions form non-canonical structures, including intramolecular triplex (H-DNA), and R-loops and are associated...... with epigenetic modifications. With the aim of interfering with higher order H-DNA (like) DNA structures within pathological (GAA)n expansions, we examined sequence-specific interaction of peptide nucleic acid (PNA) with (GAA)n repeats of different lengths (short: n=9, medium: n=75 or long: n=115) by chemical...... probing of triple helical and single stranded regions. We found that a triplex structure (H-DNA) forms at GAA repeats of different lengths; however, single stranded regions were not detected within the medium size pathological repeat, suggesting the presence of a more complex structure. Furthermore, (GAA...

  12. Repeatability of the Dust and Gas Morphological Structures in the Coma of Comet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejoly, Cassandra; Samarasinha, N. H.; Ojha, L.; Schleicher, D. G.

    2013-10-01

    Comet 1P/Halley is the most famous comet in history and has been observed for over two millennia, making it one of the most extensively studied comets. The morphology in the coma of comet 1P/Halley originates due to the activity at the nucleus and could be used as a probe of the nuclear rotation and the activity. We will present the results from a study summarizing the evolution of coma morphology of comet 1P/Halley observed from ground between October 1985 and June 1986. The results to be presented include analysis of dust features as well as gas (CN) features in the coma and comparisons will be made between their spatial and temporal evolution. About 80 CN images and 300 continuum images from the Small Bodies Node of the NASA Planetary Data System were analyzed using image enhancement techniques that were not available n the 1980s. This enables us to see coma structure never observed before in comet 1P/Halley. Because of the comet's proximity to Earth, most of our best signal-to-noise images were taken in the March-April interval of 1986. Despite the limited coverage of preceding and following months, there is a sufficient number of images to monitor morphological evolution over many months. The initial synodic periods as a function of time used to phase the images together were extrapolated from the lightcurves of the active coma (Schleicher et al. 1990, AJ, 100, 896-912). We will present the periods of repeatability of individual coma features measured using the position angle at different spatial distances from the nucleus in adjacent cycles. Separate features appear to have slightly different periods of repeatability, perhaps depending on the corresponding source regions on the nucleus and/or projection effects. The periods of repeatability of coma morphologies will be presented as a function of time from the perihelion. These results will ultimately be used in detailed modeling of the coma morphologies of comet 1P/Halley over the 1985-1986 apparition in

  13. [Foods as sources of mono and disaccharides: biochemical and metabolic aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza-Díaz, Julio; Martínez Augustín, Olga; Gil Hernández, Angel

    2013-07-01

    Carbohydrates are important and necessary components of human diet. Although they primarily play an energetic function, they also have structural and functional roles. According to the European Food Safety Authority, carbohydrate intake should range between 45 and 60 percent of the energy in adults and children older than one year of age. An important part of carbohydrates available in foods are mono and disaccharides, commonly referred to as sugars. Dietary sources of sugars include fruits, fruit juices, vegetables, milk and milk products, and foods containing added sucrose and starch hydrolyzates. Despite their importance in daily life, there is currently no clear and adequate terminology on the various types of carbohydrates, particularly sugars. Nor are there available sugar intake recommendations or food composition tables. Without these recommendations or reference values, dietary unbalances might occur, which subsequently may end in the premature onset of most chronic or degenerative diseases of our society. The aims of the present work are: to classify dietary carbohydrates, to define the biochemical and common terms for sugars, to explain their nutritional value and their metabolism as well as their food sources and to carry out a SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats) analysis about the nomenclature and dietary intakes of sugars. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of mono- and disaccharides on the antimicrobial activity of bovine lactoperoxidase system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Baarri, Ahmad Nimatullah; Hayashi, Makoto; Ogawa, Masahiro; Hayakawa, Shigeru

    2011-01-01

    The effects of mono- and disaccharides on the antimicrobial activity of the lactoperoxidase (LPO) system against Salmonella Enteritidis were investigated. The results clearly reveal that most of the sugars inhibit the antimicrobial activity of the LPO system. The inhibitory potency varies depending on the structure of sugar. L-Fructose and D-allose were strongly inhibitive to the action of the LPO system, while sucrose was the weakest inhibitor. The decreased antimicrobial activity is due to the reduction of LPO catalytic activity by sugar. An inhibitory kinetic study showed the noncompetitive inhibitor. D-Allose and L-fructose yielded strikingly low K(i) values of 0.36 and 0.42 mM, respectively, while the K(i) values of the other sugars ranged from 1.37 to 3.60 mM. Since LPO activity is inhibited by the saccharides, the sugar content in food should be considered when the LPO system is applied to the preservation of food.

  15. Sequence-structure-function relations of the mosquito leucine-rich repeat immune proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Povelones Michael

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The discovery and characterisation of factors governing innate immune responses in insects has driven the elucidation of many immune system components in mammals and other organisms. Focusing on the immune system responses of the malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae, has uncovered an array of components and mechanisms involved in defence against pathogen infections. Two of these immune factors are LRIM1 and APL1C, which are leucine-rich repeat (LRR containing proteins that activate complement-like defence responses against malaria parasites. In addition to their LRR domains, these leucine-rich repeat immune (LRIM proteins share several structural features including signal peptides, patterns of cysteine residues, and coiled-coil domains. Results The identification and characterisation of genes related to LRIM1 and APL1C revealed putatively novel innate immune factors and furthered the understanding of their likely molecular functions. Genomic scans using the shared features of LRIM1 and APL1C identified more than 20 LRIM-like genes exhibiting all or most of their sequence features in each of three disease-vector mosquitoes with sequenced genomes: An. gambiae, Aedes aegypti, and Culex quinquefasciatus. Comparative sequence analyses revealed that this family of mosquito LRIM-like genes is characterised by a variable number of 6 to 14 LRRs of different lengths. The "Long" LRIM subfamily, with 10 or more LRRs, and the "Short" LRIMs, with 6 or 7 LRRs, also share the signal peptide, cysteine residue patterning, and coiled-coil sequence features of LRIM1 and APL1C. The "TM" LRIMs have a predicted C-terminal transmembrane region, and the "Coil-less" LRIMs exhibit the characteristic LRIM sequence signatures but lack the C-terminal coiled-coil domains. Conclusions The evolutionary plasticity of the LRIM LRR domains may provide templates for diverse recognition properties, while their coiled-coil domains could be involved in the formation

  16. Effect of repeated retrogradation on structural characteristics and in vitro digestibility of waxy potato starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yao-Yu; Hu, Xiao-Pei; Jin, Zheng-Yu; Xu, Xue-Ming; Chen, Han-Qing

    2014-11-15

    The effects of repeated retrogradation (RR) treatment on the structural characteristics and in vitro digestibility of waxy potato starch were investigated. The cycling times of RR ranging from 1 to 5 were designated as RR-1, RR-2, RR-3, RR-4, and RR-5, respectively. A maximum SDS content (40.41%) was obtained by RR-2 treatment with the time interval of 48h. RR-2-treated starch product exhibited a narrower melting temperature range, a higher onset temperature and a lower melting enthalpy compared with RR-1 treatment. Compared with native starch, X-ray diffraction patterns of treated starches were altered from B-type to C-type. The variation in relative crystallinity of RR-treated starch products was consistent with that in melting enthalpy. Moreover, compared with RR-1-treated starch, a large number of cavities were observed on the surface of RR-2-treated starch product with a time interval of 48h, whereas more smooth regions were found on the surface of RR-5-treated starch product. This study suggested that structural changes of waxy potato starch treated with different cycling times of RR significantly affected the digestibility.

  17. Effect of repeated cycled crystallization on digestibility and molecular structure of glutinous Bora rice starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borah, Pallab Kumar; Deka, Sankar Chandra; Duary, Raj Kumar

    2017-05-15

    The effects of repeated cycled crystallization on the digestibility and molecular structure of glutinous Bora rice starch were investigated. Temperature cycle 4/45°C; cycle duration 5d; time interval of cycles 24h; and starch to water ratio 1:2 were found to be optimum for SDS (slow digestible starch) product development. The SDS content increased from 18.01±2.11% to 82.81±2.34%. An increase in the resistance to digestion, crystallinity, molecular weight, polydispersity and molecular order was observed in the optimal SDS product. Notably, the FT-IR peak at 947cm(-1) and XRD peaks at 2θ≈13° and 20° in the optimal SDS product indicated the formation of V-type complexes even without the presence of co-polymers. Birefringence studies showed a loss of typical Maltese cross in the SDS product and revealed a reorientation of crystalline structures within starch granules, suggestive of imperfect crystallite development.

  18. The Repeat Pattern Toolkit (RPT): Analyzing the structure and evolution of the C. elegans genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, P.; States, D.J. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Over 3.6 million bases of DNA sequence from chromosome III of the C. elegans have been determined. The availability of this extended region of contiguous sequence has allowed us to analyze the nature and prevalence of repetitive sequences in the genome of a eukaryotic organism with a high gene density. We have assembled a Repeat Pattern Toolkit (RPT) to analyze the patterns of repeats occurring in DNA. The tools include identifying significant local alignments (utilizing both two-way and three-way alignments), dividing the set of alignments into connected components (signifying repeat families), computing evolutionary distance between repeat family members, constructing minimum spanning trees from the connected components, and visualizing the evolution of the repeat families. Over 7000 families of repetitive sequences were identified. The size of the families ranged from isolated pairs to over 1600 segments of similar sequence. Approximately 12.3% of the analyzed sequence participates in a repeat element.

  19. Investigations of homologous disaccharides by elastic incoherent neutron scattering and wavelet multiresolution analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magazù, S.; Migliardo, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica e di Scienze della Terra dell’, Università degli Studi di Messina, Viale F. S. D’Alcontres 31, 98166 Messina (Italy); Vertessy, B.G. [Institute of Enzymology, Hungarian Academy of Science, Budapest (Hungary); Caccamo, M.T., E-mail: maccamo@unime.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e di Scienze della Terra dell’, Università degli Studi di Messina, Viale F. S. D’Alcontres 31, 98166 Messina (Italy)

    2013-10-16

    Highlights: • Innovative multiresolution wavelet analysis of elastic incoherent neutron scattering. • Elastic Incoherent Neutron Scattering measurements on homologues disaccharides. • EINS wavevector analysis. • EINS temperature analysis. - Abstract: In the present paper the results of a wavevector and thermal analysis of Elastic Incoherent Neutron Scattering (EINS) data collected on water mixtures of three homologous disaccharides through a wavelet approach are reported. The wavelet analysis allows to compare both the spatial properties of the three systems in the wavevector range of Q = 0.27 Å{sup −1} ÷ 4.27 Å{sup −1}. It emerges that, differently from previous analyses, for trehalose the scalograms are constantly lower and sharper in respect to maltose and sucrose, giving rise to a global spectral density along the wavevector range markedly less extended. As far as the thermal analysis is concerned, the global scattered intensity profiles suggest a higher thermal restrain of trehalose in respect to the other two homologous disaccharides.

  20. Disruption of Higher Order DNA Structures in Friedreich's Ataxia (GAA)(n) Repeats by PNA or LNA Targeting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergquist, Helen; Rocha, Cristina S. J.; Alvarez-Asencio, Ruben;

    2016-01-01

    Expansion of (GAA)n repeats in the first intron of the Frataxin gene is associated with reduced mRNA and protein levels and the development of Friedreich’s ataxia. (GAA)n expansions form non-canonical structures, including intramolecular triplex (H-DNA), and R-loops and are associated with epigen......Expansion of (GAA)n repeats in the first intron of the Frataxin gene is associated with reduced mRNA and protein levels and the development of Friedreich’s ataxia. (GAA)n expansions form non-canonical structures, including intramolecular triplex (H-DNA), and R-loops and are associated...

  1. Hydrolysis-dependent absorption of disaccharides in the rat small intestine (chronic experiments and mathematical modeling).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromova, L V; Gruzdkov, A A

    1999-06-01

    In order to throw light on the mechanisms responsible for the enzyme-dependent absorption of disaccharides membrane hydrolysis of maltose and trehalose and the absorption of glucose (free and that derived from disaccharides) were studied in isolated loops (20 cm) of the rat small intestine in chronic experiments. The rates of glucose absorption were 0.26-0.81 micromol x min(-1) x cm(-1) when the loop was perfused with a 12.5 to 75.0 mmol/l free glucose solution, which is only insignificantly higher than the rates observed during perfusion with equivalent maltose solutions. The coupling coefficient (the ratio of glucose absorption rate to the rate of disaccharide hydrolysis) decreased from 0.90 to 0.60 with the increasing maltose concentrations in the infusate from 6.25 to 37.5 mmol/l, but remained unchanged (approximately 0.95) within the same range of trehalose concentrations. The permeability of the pre-epithelial barrier was equivalent to that of unstirred water layer of less than 40 microm thickness. Fluid absorption was within the range of 0.73-2.55 microl x min(-1) x cm(-1), and it showed a correlation with the rates of glucose absorption. The results agree with a model developed on the assumption that free glucose and that released from disaccharides share the same membrane transporters. It could be concluded that a close coupling of disaccharide hydrolysis with derived glucose absorption in chronic experiments is achieved mainly due to a high activity of glucose transporters, which are presumably not associated with membrane disaccharidases. The transcellular active transport is a predominant mechanism of disaccharide-derived glucose absorption under conditions close to physiological.

  2. Children's Conceptions of Bullying and Repeated Conventional Transgressions: Moral, Conventional, Structuring and Personal-Choice Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornberg, Robert; Thornberg, Ulrika Birberg; Alamaa, Rebecca; Daud, Noor

    2016-01-01

    This study examined 307 elementary school children's judgements and reasoning about bullying and other repeated transgressions when school rules regulating these transgressions have been removed in hypothetical school situations. As expected, children judged bullying (repeated moral transgressions) as wrong independently of rules and as more wrong…

  3. Genetic Diversity and Structure of Lolium Species Surveyed on Nuclear Simple Sequence Repeat and Cytoplasmic Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei Cai

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available To assess the genetic diversity and population structure of Lolium species, we used 32 nuclear simple sequence repeat (SSR markers and 7 cytoplasmic gene markers to analyze a total of 357 individuals from 162 accessions of 9 Lolium species. This survey revealed a high level of polymorphism, with an average number of alleles per locus of 23.59 and 5.29 and an average PIC-value of 0.83 and 0.54 for nuclear SSR markers and cytoplasmic gene markers, respectively. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA revealed that 16.27 and 16.53% of the total variation was due to differences among species, with the remaining 56.35 and 83.47% due to differences within species and 27.39 and 0% due to differences within individuals in 32 nuclear SSR markers set and 6 chloroplast gene markers set, respectively. The 32 nuclear SSR markers detected three subpopulations among 357 individuals, whereas the 6 chloroplast gene markers revealed three subpopulations among 160 accessions in the STRUCTURE analysis. In the clustering analysis, the three inbred species clustered into a single group, whereas the outbreeding species were clearly divided, especially according to nuclear SSR markers. In addition, almost all Lolium multiflorum populations were clustered into group C4, which could be further divided into three subgroups, whereas Lolium perenne populations primarily clustered into two groups (C2 and C3, with a few lines that instead grouped with L. multiflorum (C4 or Lolium rigidum (C6. Together, these results will useful for the use of Lolium germplasm for improvement and increase the effectiveness of ryegrass breeding.

  4. Genetic structure of the Azores Islands: a study using 15 autosomal short tandem repeat loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Cristina; Alvarez, Luis; Aluja, Maria Pilar; Bruges-Armas, Jacome; Lima, Manuela

    2009-12-01

    The Azores archipelago (Portugal), located in the Atlantic Ocean, 1,500 km from the European mainland, is formed by nine islands of volcanic origin. The relative position of these islands allows the definition of three geographical groups: Eastern, Central and Western. Previous studies of the Azores using Short Tandem Repeats (STRs) have highlighted differences in the frequencies of several loci, when compared to Mainland Portugal or Madleira Island. Furthermore, linkage disequilibrium (LD), described for Azorean samples has been tentatively explained as reflecting the presence of genetic sub-structuring in the archipelago. To provide information concerning the genetic profile of the Azores Islands and to evaluate the presence of substructuring we have determined the allelic frequencies of 15 autosomal STR loci, using the AmpFlSTR Identifiler Kit, in representative samples from the Azorean Islands. Either considering the Azores as a whole, or analysing by island all the loci were in conformity with Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Average gene diversity ranged from 0.7669 in Corvo to 0.7972 in Terceira Island. Allelic independence between loci, tested for the global sample, detected significant LD (after correction for multiple tests) for pairs D21S11/D7S820 and D3S1358/D5S818. The exact test of population differentiation, combining the information of the 15 markers analysed, revealed significant differences between the three groups of islands, and between islands. Inter-island analysis reinforces the previous data that suggested the existence of sub-structuring in the Azores archipelago. Moreover, the data generated by this study can be used in a future forensic genetic database of the Azores after the appropriate enlacement of sample size by island, preventing, in that way, misinterpretations caused by population substructuring and small sample sizes.

  5. Modified oligosaccharides. Pt. 1. Analysis of the /sup 13/C NMR spectra of some keto derivatives of disaccharides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temeriusz, A.; Piekarska, B.; Radomski, J.; Stepinski, J. (Warsaw Univ. (Poland). Inst. Podstawowych Problemow Chemii)

    1980-01-01

    The /sup 13/C-NMR spectra of substituted disaccharides and their keto derivatives are analyzed and discussed. The peaks have been assigned by correlating the spectra of disaccharides with those of the constituent monosaccharides. Substituent effects caused by the formation of a new glycosyl bond are described.

  6. Diversity, population structure, and evolution of local peach cultivars in China identified by simple sequence repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Z J; Ma, R J; Cai, Z X; Yu, M L; Zhang, Z

    2015-01-15

    The fruit peach originated in China and has a history of domestication of more than 4000 years. Numerous local cultivars were selected during the long course of cultivation, and a great morphological diversity exists. To study the diversity and genetic background of local peach cultivars in China, a set of 158 accessions from different ecological regions, together with 27 modern varieties and 10 wild accessions, were evaluated using 49 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) covering the peach genome. Broad diversity was also observed in local cultivars at the SSR level. A total of 648 alleles were amplified with an average of 13.22 observed alleles per locus. The number of genotypes detected ranged from 9 (UDP96015) to 58 (BPPCT008) with an average of 27.00 genotypes per marker. Eight subpopulations divided by STRUCTURE basically coincided with the dendrogram of genetic relationships and could be explained by the traditional groups. The 8 subpopulations were juicy honey peach, southwestern peach I, wild peach, Buddha peach + southwestern peach II, northern peach, southern crisp peach, ornamental peach, and Prunus davidiana + P. kansuensis. Most modern varieties carried the genetic backgrounds of juicy honey peach and southwestern peach I, while others carried diverse genetic backgrounds, indicating that local cultivars were partly used in modern breeding programs. Based on the traditional evolution pathway, a modified pathway for the development of local peach cultivars in China was proposed using the genetic background of subpopulations that were identified by SSRs. Current status and prospects of utilization of Chinese local peach cultivars were also discussed according to the SSR information.

  7. Comparative solution and solid-phase glycosylations toward a disaccharide library

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agoston, K.; Kröger, Lars; Agoston, Agnes

    2009-01-01

    A comparative study on solution-phase and solid-phase oligosaccharide synthesis was performed. A 16-member library containing all regioisomers of Glc-Glc, Glc-Gal, Gal-Glc, and Gal-Gal disaccharides was synthesized both in solution and on solid phase. The various reaction conditions for different...

  8. Solution structure of the spectrin repeat: a left-handed antiparallel triple-helical coiled-coil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, J; Pfuhl, M; Walther, D; Saraste, M; Nilges, M

    1997-10-31

    Cytoskeletal proteins belonging to the spectrin family have an elongated structure composed of repetitive units. The three-dimensional solution structure of the 16th repeat from chicken brain alpha-spectrin (R16) has been determined by NMR spectroscopy and distance geometry-simulated annealing calculations. We used a total of 1035 distance restraints, which included 719 NOE-based values obtained by applying the ambiguous restraints for iterative assignment (ARIA) method. In addition, we performed a direct refinement against 1H-chemical shifts. The final ensemble of 20 structures shows an average RMSD of 1.52 A from the mean for the backbone atoms, excluding loops and N and C termini. R16 is made up of three antiparallel alpha-helices separated by two loops, and folds into a left-handed coiled-coil. The basic unit of spectrin is an antiparallel heterodimer composed of two homologous chains, beta and alpha. These assemble a tetramer via a mechanism that relies on the completion of a single repeat by association of the partial repeats located at the C terminus of the beta-chain (two helices) and at the N terminus of the alpha-chain (one helix). This tetramer is the assemblage able to cross-link actin filaments. Model building by homology of the "tetramerization" repeat from human erythrocyte spectrin illuminates the possible role of point mutations which cause hemolytic anemias.

  9. Reduction in the structural instability of cloned eukaryotic tandem-repeat DNA by low-temperature culturing of host bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapana, Watcharaporn; Sujiwattanarat, Penporn; Srikulnath, Kornsorn; Hirai, Hirohisa; Koga, Akihiko

    2014-10-27

    Summary For accurate analyses of eukaryotic tandem-repeat DNA, it is often required to clone a genomic DNA fragment into a bacterial plasmid. It is, however, a serious problem that tandem-repeat DNA is frequently subjected to structural changes during maintenance or amplification in the host bacteria. Here, we show an example of a clear difference in the instability of tandem-repeat DNA between different culturing temperatures. A fragment of monkey centromeric DNA carried by pUC19 was considerably degraded by culturing bacteria at 37 °C, but the damage was reduced at 25 °C. Thus, culturing temperature is a significant factor for avoiding degradation, in addition to the genotype of the host bacteria.

  10. Structural analysis of the KRIT1 ankyrin repeat and FERM domains reveals a conformationally stable ARD-FERM interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Rong [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Li, Xiaofeng [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Boggon, Titus J. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2015-10-14

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM) are vascular dysplasias that usually occur in the brain and are associated with mutations in the KRIT1/CCM1, CCM2/MGC4607/OSM/Malcavernin, and PDCD10/CCM3/ TFAR15 genes. Here we report the 2.9 Å crystal structure of the ankyrin repeat domain (ARD) and FERM domain of the protein product of KRIT1 (KRIT1; Krev interaction trapped 1). The crystal structure reveals that the KRIT1 ARD contains 4 ankyrin repeats. There is also an unusual conformation in the ANK4 repeat that is stabilized by Trp-404, and the structure reveals a solvent exposed ankyrin groove. Domain orientations of the three copies within the asymmetric unit suggest a stable interaction between KRIT1 ARD and FERM domains, indicating a globular ARD–FERM module. It resembles the additional F0 domain found N-terminal to the FERM domain of talin. Structural analysis of KRIT1 ARD–FERM highlights surface regions of high evolutionary conservation, and suggests potential sites that could mediate interaction with binding partners. The structure therefore provides a better understanding of KRIT1 at the molecular level.

  11. Structural analysis of the KRIT1 ankyrin repeat and FERM domains reveals a conformationally stable ARD-FERM interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rong; Li, Xiaofeng; Boggon, Titus J

    2015-12-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM) are vascular dysplasias that usually occur in the brain and are associated with mutations in the KRIT1/CCM1, CCM2/MGC4607/OSM/Malcavernin, and PDCD10/CCM3/TFAR15 genes. Here we report the 2.9 Å crystal structure of the ankyrin repeat domain (ARD) and FERM domain of the protein product of KRIT1 (KRIT1; Krev interaction trapped 1). The crystal structure reveals that the KRIT1 ARD contains 4 ankyrin repeats. There is an unusual conformation in the ANK4 repeat that is stabilized by Trp-404, and the structure reveals a solvent exposed ankyrin groove. Domain orientations of the three copies within the asymmetric unit suggest a stable interaction between KRIT1 ARD and FERM domains, indicating a globular ARD-FERM module. This resembles the additional F0 domain found N-terminal to the FERM domain of talin. Structural analysis of KRIT1 ARD-FERM highlights surface regions of high evolutionary conservation, and suggests potential sites that could mediate interaction with binding partners. The structure therefore provides a better understanding of KRIT1 at the molecular level.

  12. Crystal structures of the human G3BP1 NTF2-like domain visualize FxFG Nup Repeat Specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vognsen, Tina Reinholdt; Möller, Ingvar Rúnar; Kristensen, Ole

    2013-01-01

    Ras GTPase Activating Protein SH3 Domain Binding Protein (G3BP) is a potential anti-cancer drug target implicated in several cellular functions. We have used protein crystallography to solve crystal structures of the human G3BP1 NTF2-like domain both alone and in complex with an FxFG Nup repeat...... crystal form might indicate a novel ligand binding site that, however, remains to be validated. The crystal structures give insight into the nuclear transportation mechanisms of G3BP and provide a basis for future structure based drug design....

  13. Synthesis and conformational analysis of the repeating units of bacterial spore peptidoglycan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keglević, Dina; Kojić-Prodić, Biserka; Tomisić, Zrinka Banić

    2003-06-16

    Deprotection of the fully blocked disacharide allyl O-(2-amino-4,6-O-benzylidene-3-O-[(R)-1-carboxyethyl]-2-deoxy-beta-D-glucopyranosyl-1',2-lactam)-(1-->4)-2-acetamido-3,6-di-O-benzyl-2-deoxy-beta-D-glucopyranoside by selective de-O-allylation and parallel removal of the benzylidene and O-benzyl groups is described. The resulting beta-muramyl lactam-(1-->4)-GlcNAc disaccharide is characterised as the per-O-acetylated derivative by 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy and X-ray structure analysis. Conformational analysis about glycosidic bond of repeating units of bacterial spore cortex is based on experimental data and molecular modelling.

  14. Fine structures and states of water in poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogels prepared by repeated freezing and thawing

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    Investigations have been made into the relationship between structure and states of water in unfrozen poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogels prepared by repeated freezing and thawing of aqueous solution with various PVA concentrations. The states of water were investigated by using a pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Every unfrozen PVA hydrogel gave only one spin-lattice relaxation time (T-1) value. T-1 of all unfrozen hydrogels were smaller than that of free water and decreased w...

  15. A genetic and structural study of genome rearrangements mediated by high copy repeat Ty1 elements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason E Chan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Ty elements are high copy number, dispersed repeated sequences in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome known to mediate gross chromosomal rearrangements (GCRs. Here we found that introduction of Ty912, a previously identified Ty1 element, onto the non-essential terminal region of the left arm of chromosome V led to a 380-fold increase in the rate of accumulating GCRs in a wild-type strain. A survey of 48 different mutations identified those that either increased or decreased the rate of Ty-mediated GCRs and demonstrated that suppression of Ty-mediated GCRs differs from that of both low copy repeat sequence- and single copy sequence-mediated GCRs. The majority of the Ty912-mediated GCRs observed were monocentric nonreciprocal translocations mediated by RAD52-dependent homologous recombination (HR between Ty912 and a Ty element on another chromosome arm. The remaining Ty912-mediated GCRs appeared to involve Ty912-mediated formation of unstable dicentric translocation chromosomes that were resolved by one or more Ty-mediated breakage-fusion-bridge cycles. Overall, the results demonstrate that the Ty912-mediated GCR assay is an excellent model for understanding mechanisms and pathways that suppress genome rearrangements mediated by high copy number repeat sequences, as well as the mechanisms by which such rearrangements occur.

  16. Impacts of Repeat Unit Structure and Copolymer Architecture on Thermal and Solution Properties in Homopolymers, Copolymers, and Copolymer Blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrou, Stephen Raye

    Gradient copolymers are a relatively new type of copolymer architecture in which the distribution of comonomers gradually varies over the length of the copolymer chain, resulting in a number of unusual properties derived from the arrangement of repeat units. For example, nanophase-segregated gradient copolymers exhibit extremely broad glass transition temperatures (Tgs) resulting from the wide range of compositions present in the nanostructure. This dissertation presents a number of studies on how repeat unit structure and copolymer architecture dictate bulk and solution properties, specifically taking inspiration from the gradient copolymer architecture and comparing the response from this compositionally heterogeneous material to other more conventional materials. The glass transition behavior of a range of common homopolymers was studied to determine the effects of subunit structure on Tg breadth, observing a significant increase in T g breadth with increasing side chain length in methacrylate-based homopolymers and random copolymers. Additionally, increasing the composition distribution of copolymers, either by blending individual random copolymers of different overall composition or synthesizing random copolymers to high conversion, resulted in significant increases to Tg breadth. Plasticization of homopolymers and random copolymers with low molecular weight additives also served to increase the Tg breadth; the most dramatic effect was observed in the selective plasticization of a styrene/4-vinylpyridine gradient copolymer with increases in T g breadth to values above 100 °C. In addition, the effects of repeat unit structure and copolymer architecture on other polymer properties besides Tg were also investigated. The intrinsic fluorescence of styrene units in styrene-containing copolymers was studied, noting the impact of repeat unit structure and copolymer architecture on the resulting fluorescence spectra in solution. The impact of repeat unit structure on

  17. Repeated Demographic-Structural Crises Propel the Spread of Large-scale Agrarian States Throughout the Old World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Bennett

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available I investigate the geographical consequences of demographic-structural dynamics using a spatially resolved agent-based model of agrarian empires in several Old World regions between 1500 BCE and 1500 CE. I estimate and bound key model parameters from two historical datasets. Although several very large-scale polities (e.g., Roman, Persian, Tang empires do not arise and certain geographical expansions occur at different times, overall the model suggests that factional civil wars, the result of repeated internal demographic-structural crises, can substantially account for the spread of large-scale agriculture throughout the Old World after the Bronze Age.

  18. De novo synthesis of D- and L-fucosamine containing disaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Leonori

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The availability of rare monosaccharides that cannot be isolated from natural sources is currently limiting the access to the synthesis and the biological evaluation of complex bacterial cell-surface glycans. Here, we report the synthesis of D- and L-fucosamine building blocks by a de novo approach from L- and D-Garner aldehydes. These differentially protected monosaccharide building blocks were utilized to prepare disaccharides present on the surface of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria.

  19. Rifaximin versus Nonabsorbable Disaccharides for the Treatment of Hepatic Encephalopathy: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Many studies have found that the antibiotic rifaximin is effective for the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy. However, there is no uniform view on the efficacy and safety of rifaximin. Methods. We performed a meta-analysis through electronic searches to evaluate the efficacy and safety of rifaximin in comparison with nonabsorbable disaccharides. Results. A total of 8 randomized controlled trials including 407 patients were included. The efficacy of rifaximin was equivalent to nonabsorbable disaccharides according to the statistical data (risk ratio (RR: 1.06, 95% CI: 0.94–1.19; P=0.34. Analysis showed that patients treated with rifaximin had better results in serum ammonia levels (weighted mean difference (WMD: −10.63, 95% CI: −30.63–9.38; P=0.30, mental status (WMD: −0.32, 95% CI: −0.67–0.03; P=0.07, asterixis (WMD: −0.12, 95% CI: −0.31–0.08; P=0.23, electroencephalogram response (WMD: −0.21, 95% CI: −0.34–−0.09; P=0.0007, and grades of portosystemic encephalopathy (WMD: −2.30, 95% CI: −2.78–−1.82; P<0.00001, but only the last ones had statistical significance. The safety of rifaximin was better than nonabsorbable disaccharides (RR: 0.19, 95% CI: 0.10–0.34; P<0.00001. Conclusion. Rifaximin is at least as effective as nonabsorbable disaccharides, maybe better for the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy. And the safety of rifaximin is better.

  20. Structure and organization of the mitochondrial DNA control region with tandemly repeated sequence in the Amazon ornamental fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terencio, Maria Leandra; Schneider, Carlos Henrique; Gross, Maria Claudia; Feldberg, Eliana; Porto, Jorge Ivan Rebelo

    2013-02-01

    Tandemly repeated sequences are a common feature of vertebrate mitochondrial DNA control regions. However, questions still remain about their mode of evolution and function. To better understand patterns of variation in length and to explore the existence of previously described domain, we have characterized the control region structure of the Amazonian ornamental fish Nannostomus eques and Nannostomus unifasciatus. The control region ranged from 1121 to 1142 bp in length and could be separated into three domains: the domain associated with the extended terminal associated sequences, the central conserved domain, and the conserved sequence blocks domain. In the first domain, we encountered a sequence repeated 10 times in tandem (variable number tandem repeat (VNTR)) that could adopt an "inverted repetitions" type structural conformation. The results suggest that the VNTR pattern encountered in both N. eques and N. unifasciatus is consistent with the prerequisites of the illegitimate elongation model in which the unequal pairing of the chains near the 5'-end of the control region favors the formation of repetitions.

  1. The dependence of the electrochemical properties of perfluorosulfonic acid membrane/water systems on repeat unit structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Gyun; Bae, Young Chan

    2009-07-01

    We developed a molecular thermodynamic framework to describe the dependence of the electrochemical properties of a perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) membrane/water system on the polymer structure. To better understand the behavior of the polymer membrane/water system, we developed a lattice model based on lattice cluster theory. We performed hypothetical calculations for a variety of repeat unit structures. We also investigated the correlation between the interaction energy and extending or reducing the chain length of the polymer repeat unit using COMPASS force fields. Our results indicate that the ionic conductivity of the nonpolar CF2CF2 group in the main chain varies with the length of the chain. In addition, the ionic conductivity of different CF2CF2 group chain lengths fluctuates according to hydration level. When OCF2CF3CF groups are substituted at 0 and 1, the predictions of the PFSA membrane agreed well with the experimental data from a Dow membrane. To obtain good ionic conductivity at a high vapor equilibrated hydration level, the nonpolar group in the polymer repeat unit and the substituted group chain connecting the nonpolar group length should both be short, and the substituted group chain connected with the sulfonic group should be long.

  2. Investigation of the population structure of Legionella pneumophila by analysis of tandem repeat copy number and internal sequence variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visca, Paolo; D'Arezzo, Silvia; Ramisse, Françoise; Gelfand, Yevgeniy; Benson, Gary; Vergnaud, Gilles; Fry, Norman K; Pourcel, Christine

    2011-09-01

    The population structure of the species Legionella pneumophila was investigated by multilocus variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) and sequencing of three VNTRs (Lpms01, Lpms04 and Lpms13) in selected strains. Of 150 isolates of diverse origins, 136 (86 %) were distributed into eight large MLVA clonal complexes (VACCs) and the rest were either unique or formed small clusters of up to two MLVA genotypes. In spite of the lower degree of genome-wide linkage disequilibrium of the MLVA loci compared with sequence-based typing, the clustering achieved by the two methods was highly congruent. The detailed analysis of VNTR Lpms04 alleles showed a very complex organization, with five different repeat unit lengths and a high level of internal variation. Within each MLVA-defined VACC, Lpms04 was endowed with a common recognizable pattern with some interesting exceptions. Evidence of recombination events was suggested by analysis of internal repeat variations at the two additional VNTR loci, Lpms01 and Lpms13. Sequence analysis of L. pneumophila VNTR locus Lpms04 alone provides a first-line assay for allocation of a new isolate within the L. pneumophila population structure and for epidemiological studies.

  3. In silico structural and functional analysis of fragments of the ankyrin repeat protein p18(INK4c).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklenovsý, P; Otyepka, M

    2010-02-01

    Ankyrin repeat proteins (ARPs) are ubiquitous proteins that play critical regulatory roles in organisms and consist of repeating motifs (ankyrin repeats) stacked in non-globular, almost linear, "quasi one-dimensional" configurations. They also have highly unusual mechanical properties, notably ARPs can behave as nano-springs. Both their essential cellular functions and distinctive nano-mechanical properties have aroused interest in ARPs for potential applications in medicine and nanotechnology. Further, the modular architecture of ARPs, which lack the long-range contacts that typically stabilize globular proteins, provides a new paradigm for understanding protein stability and folding mechanisms of proteins. In the present study, the stability of ARP p18INK4c (p18) and fifty p18 fragments was investigated by all- atomic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in explicit water on a ~3.3 micro- seconds timescale. The fragment simulations indicate that p18 alpha-helices are significantly stabilized by tertiary interactions, because in the absence of their native context they readily melt. All single p18 ARs and their structural elements are also unstable outside their native context. The minimal stable motifs are pairs of ARs, implying that inter-repeat contacts are essential for AR stability. Further, pairs of internal ARs are less stable than pairs that include a native capping AR. The MD simulations also provide indications of the functional roles of p18 turns and loops; the turns appear to be essential for the stability of the protein, while the loops both help to stabilize the p18 structure and are involved in recognition processes. Temperature-induced unfolding analysis shows that the p18 melts from the N-terminus to the C- terminus.

  4. Controlled growth of DNA structures from repeating units using the vernier mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greschner, Andrea A; Bujold, Katherine E; Sleiman, Hanadi F

    2014-08-11

    In this report, we demonstrate the assembly of length-programmed DNA nanostructures using a single 16 base sequence and its complement as building blocks. To achieve this, we applied the Vernier mechanism to DNA assembly, which uses a mismatch in length between two monomers to dictate the final length of the product. Specifically, this approach relies on the interaction of two DNA strands containing a different number (n, m) of complementary binding sites: these two strands will keep binding to each other until they come into register, thus generating a larger assembly whose length (n × m) is encoded by the number of binding sites in each strand. While the Vernier mechanism has been applied to other areas of supramolecular chemistry, here we present an application of its principles to DNA nanostructures. Using a single 16 base repeat and its complement, and varying the number of repeats on a given DNA strand, we show the consistent construction of duplexes up to 228 base pairs (bp) in length. Employing specific annealing protocols, strand capping, and intercalator chaperones allows us to further grow the duplex to 392 base pairs. We demonstrate that the Vernier method is not only strand-efficient, but also produces a cleaner, higher-yielding product than conventional designs.

  5. A Disaccharide that Inhibits Tumor Necrosis Factor α is Formed from the Extracellular Matrix by the Enzyme Heparanase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lider, Ofer; Cahalon, Liora; Gilat, Dalia; Hershkoviz, Rami; Siegel, Daniel; Margalit, Raanan; Shoseyov, Oded; Cohen, Irun R.

    1995-05-01

    The activation of T cells by antigens or mitogens leads to the secretion of cytokines and enzymes that shape the inflammatory response. Among these molecular mediators of inflammation is a heparanase enzyme that degrades the heparan sulfate scaffold of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Activated T cells use heparanase to penetrate the ECM and gain access to the tissues. We now report that among the breakdown products of the ECM generated by heparanase is a trisulfated disaccharide that can inhibit delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) in mice. This inhibition of T-cell mediated inflammation in vivo was associated with an inhibitory effect of the disaccharide on the production of biologically active tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) by activated T cells in vitro; the trisulfated disaccharide did not affect T-cell viability or responsiveness generally. Both the in vivo and in vitro effects of the disaccharide manifested a bell-shaped dose-response curve. The inhibitory effects of the trisulfated disaccharide were lost if the sulfate groups were removed. Thus, the disaccharide, which may be a natural product of inflammation, can regulate the functional nature of the response by the T cell to activation. Such a feedback control mechanism could enable the T cell to assess the extent of tissue degradation and adjust its behavior accordingly.

  6. Structural and Biochemical Consequences of Disease-Causing Mutations in the Ankyrin Repeat Domain of the Human TRPV4 Channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inada, Hitoshi; Procko, Erik; Sotomayor, Marcos; Gaudet, Rachelle (Harvard-Med); (Harvard)

    2012-10-23

    The TRPV4 calcium-permeable cation channel plays important physiological roles in osmosensation, mechanosensation, cell barrier formation, and bone homeostasis. Recent studies reported that mutations in TRPV4, including some in its ankyrin repeat domain (ARD), are associated with human inherited diseases, including neuropathies and skeletal dysplasias, probably because of the increased constitutive activity of the channel. TRPV4 activity is regulated by the binding of calmodulin and small molecules such as ATP to the ARD at its cytoplasmic N-terminus. We determined structures of ATP-free and -bound forms of human TRPV4-ARD and compared them with available TRPV-ARD structures. The third inter-repeat loop region (Finger 3 loop) is flexible and may act as a switch to regulate channel activity. Comparisons of TRPV-ARD structures also suggest an evolutionary link between ARD structure and ATP binding ability. Thermal stability analyses and molecular dynamics simulations suggest that ATP increases stability in TRPV-ARDs that can bind ATP. Biochemical analyses of a large panel of TRPV4-ARD mutations associated with human inherited diseases showed that some impaired thermal stability while others weakened ATP binding ability, suggesting molecular mechanisms for the diseases.

  7. Crystal structure of the dimeric protein core of decorin, the archetypal small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Paul G; McEwan, Paul A; Dodd, Carole M; Bergmann, Ernst M; Bishop, Paul N; Bella, Jordi

    2004-11-02

    Decorin is a ubiquitous extracellular matrix proteoglycan with a variety of important biological functions that are mediated by its interactions with extracellular matrix proteins, cytokines, and cell surface receptors. Decorin is the prototype of the family of small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycans and proteins (SLRPs), characterized by a protein core composed of leucine-rich repeats (LRRs), flanked by two cysteine-rich regions. We report here the crystal structure of the dimeric protein core of decorin, the best characterized member of the SLRP family. Each monomer adopts the curved solenoid fold characteristic of LRR domains, with a parallel beta-sheet on the inside interwoven with loops containing short segments of beta-strands, 3(10) helices, and polyproline II helices on the outside. Two main features are unique to this structure. First, decorin dimerizes through the concave surfaces of the LRR domains, which have been implicated previously in protein-ligand interactions. The amount of surface buried in this dimer rivals the buried surfaces of some of the highest-affinity macromolecular complexes reported to date. Second, the C-terminal region adopts an unusual capping motif that involves a laterally extended LRR and a disulfide bond. This motif seems to be unique to SLRPs and has not been observed in any other LRR protein structure to date. Possible implications of these features for decorin ligand binding and SLRP function are discussed.

  8. Structure-Correlation NMR Spectroscopy for Macromolecules Using Repeated Bidirectional Photoisomerization of Azobenzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Toshio; Ueda, Keisuke; Nishimura, Chiaki; Yamazaki, Toshio

    2015-11-17

    Control over macromolecular structure offers bright potentials for manipulation of macromolecular functions. We here present structure-correlation NMR spectroscopy to analyze the correlation between polymorphic macromolecular structures driven by photoisomerization of azobenzene. The structural conversion of azobenzene was induced within the mixing time of a NOESY experiment using a colored light source, and the reverse structural conversion was induced during the relaxation delay using a light source of another color. The correlation spectrum between trans- and cis-azobenzene was then obtained. To maximize the efficiency of the bidirectional photoisomerization of azobenzene-containing macromolecules, we developed a novel light-irradiation NMR sample tube and method for irradiating target molecules in an NMR radio frequency (rf) coil. When this sample tube was used for photoisomerization of an azobenzene derivative at a concentration of 0.2 mM, data collection with reasonable sensitivity applicable to macromolecules was achieved. We performed isomerization of an azobenzene-cross-linked peptide within the mixing time of a NOESY experiment that produced cross-peaks between helix and random-coil forms of the peptide. Thus, these results indicate that macromolecular structure manipulation can be incorporated into an NMR pulse sequence using an azobenzene derivative and irradiation with light of two types of wavelengths, providing a new method for structural analysis of metastable states of macromolecules.

  9. The repeat domain of the type III effector protein PthA shows a TPR-like structure and undergoes conformational changes upon DNA interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Mário Tyago; Sforça, Mauricio Luis; Neves, Jorge Luiz; Paiva, Joice Helena; Domingues, Mariane Noronha; Pereira, André Luiz Araujo; Zeri, Ana Carolina de Mattos; Benedetti, Celso Eduardo

    2010-12-01

    Many plant pathogenic bacteria rely on effector proteins to suppress defense and manipulate host cell mechanisms to cause disease. The effector protein PthA modulates the host transcriptome to promote citrus canker. PthA possesses unusual protein architecture with an internal region encompassing variable numbers of near-identical tandem repeats of 34 amino acids termed the repeat domain. This domain mediates protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions, and two polymorphic residues in each repeat unit determine DNA specificity. To gain insights into how the repeat domain promotes protein-protein and protein-DNA contacts, we have solved the structure of a peptide corresponding to 1.5 units of the PthA repeat domain by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and carried out small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and spectroscopic studies on the entire 15.5-repeat domain of PthA2 (RD2). Consistent with secondary structure predictions and circular dichroism data, the NMR structure of the 1.5-repeat peptide reveals three α-helices connected by two turns that fold into a tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR)-like domain. The NMR structure corroborates the theoretical TPR superhelix predicted for RD2, which is also in agreement with the elongated shape of RD2 determined by SAXS. Furthermore, RD2 undergoes conformational changes in a pH-dependent manner and upon DNA interaction, and shows sequence similarities to pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR), a nucleic acid-binding motif structurally related to TPR. The results point to a model in which the RD2 structure changes its compactness as it embraces the DNA with the polymorphic diresidues facing the interior of the superhelix oriented toward the nucleotide bases.

  10. Resistance and resilience of removal efficiency and bacterial community structure of gas biofilters exposed to repeated shock loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrol, Léa; Malhautier, Luc; Poly, Franck; Roux, Xavier Le; Lepeuple, Anne-Sophie; Fanlo, Jean-Louis

    2012-11-01

    Since full-scale biofilters are often operated under fluctuating conditions, it is critical to understand their response to transient states. Four pilot-scale biofilters treating a composting gas mixture and undergoing repeated substrate pulses of increasing intensity were studied. A systematic approach was proposed to quantify the resistance and resilience capacity of their removal efficiency, which enabled to distinguish between recalcitrant (ammonia, DMDS, ketones) and easily degradable (esters and aldehyde) compounds. The threshold of disturbing shock intensity and the influence of disturbance history depended on the contaminant considered. The spatial and temporal distribution of the bacterial community structure in response to the perturbation regime was analysed by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE). Even if the substrate-pulses acted as a driving force for some community characteristics (community stratification), the structure-function relationships were trickier to evidence: the distributions of resistance and composition were only partially coupled, with contradictory results depending on the contaminant considered.

  11. Resurrecting Van Leeuwenhoek's rotifers: a reappraisal of the role of disaccharides in anhydrobiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunnacliffe, A; Lapinski, J

    2003-10-29

    In 1702, Van Leeuwenhoek was the first to describe the phenomenon of anhydrobiosis in a species of bdelloid rotifer, Philodina roseola. It is the purpose of this review to examine what has been learned since then about the extreme desiccation tolerance in rotifers and how this compares with our understanding of anhydrobiosis in other organisms. Remarkably, much of what is known today about the requirements for successful anhydrobiosis, and the degree of biostability conferred by the dry state, was already determined in principle by the time of Spallanzani in the late 18th century. Most modern research on anhydrobiosis has emphasized the importance of the non-reducing disaccharides trehalose and sucrose, one or other sugar being present at high concentrations during desiccation of anhydrobiotic nematodes, brine shrimp cysts, bakers' yeast, resurrection plants and plant seeds. These sugars are proposed to act as water replacement molecules, and as thermodynamic and kinetic stabilizers of biomolecules and membranes. In apparent contradiction of the prevailing models, recent experiments from our laboratory show that bdelloid rotifers undergo anhydrobiosis without producing trehalose or any analogous molecule. This has prompted us to critically re-examine the association of disaccharides with anhydrobiosis in the literature. Surprisingly, current hypotheses are based almost entirely on in vitro data: there is very limited information which is more than simply correlative in the literature on living systems. In many species, disaccharide accumulation occurs at approximately the same time as desiccation tolerance is acquired. However, several studies indicate that these sugars are not sufficient for anhydrobiosis; furthermore, there is no conclusive evidence, through mutagenesis or functional knockout experiments, for example, that sugars are necessary for anhydrobiosis. Indeed, some plant seeds and micro-organisms, like the rotifer, exhibit excellent desiccation

  12. Crystal Structure of DNA-PKcs Reveals a Large Open-Ring Cradle Comprised of HEAT Repeats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibanda, Bancinyane L.; Chirgadze, Dimitri Y.; Blundell, Tom L.

    2009-01-01

    Broken chromosomes arising from DNA double strand breaks result from endogenous events such as the production of reactive oxygen species during cellular metabolism, as well as from exogenous sources such as ionizing radiation1, 2, 3. Left unrepaired or incorrectly repaired they can lead to genomic changes that may result in cell death or cancer. DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), a holo-enzyme that comprises DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs)4, 5 and the heterodimer Ku70/Ku80, plays a major role in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), the main pathway in mammals used to repair double strand breaks6, 7, 8. DNA-PKcs is a serine/threonine protein kinase comprising a single polypeptide chain of 4128 amino acids and belonging to the phosphotidyl inositol 3-kinase (PI3-K)- related protein family9. DNA-PKcs is involved in the sensing and transmission of DNA damage signals to proteins such as p53, setting off events that lead to cell cycle arrest10, 11. It phosphorylates a wide range of substrates in vitro, including Ku70/Ku80, which is translocated along DNA12. Here we present the crystal structure of human DNA-PKcs at 6.6Å resolution, in which the overall fold is for the first time clearly visible. The many α-helical HEAT repeats (helix-turn-helix motifs) facilitate bending and allow the polypeptide chain to fold into a hollow circular structure. The C-terminal kinase domain is located on top of this structure and a small HEAT repeat domain that likely binds DNA is inside. The structure provides a flexible cradle to promote DNA double-strand-break repair. PMID:20023628

  13. Analysis of changes of vibrational properties of water in the presence of disaccharides

    CERN Document Server

    Branca, C; Maisano, G; Migliardo, F; Romeo, G; Bennington, S M; Fak, B; Bellocco, E; Lagana', G

    2002-01-01

    Results of inelastic neutron scattering (INS) measurements performed by the MARI spectrometer (ISIS, UK) on aqueous solutions of sucrose and alpha,alpha-trehalose are reported. To get some insight into the effects of disaccharides on the hydrogen-bond network of water, we investigated the intramolecular O-H stretching modes. The obtained spectra show that, contrary to sucrose, the presence of trehalose affects significantly the pure-water O-H stretching mode. The observed changes can be related to the presence of heavier vibrating units, namely to the higher hydration number of trehalose with respect to sucrose. (orig.)

  14. Syntheses of 5-Thio-D-Mannose from Petrochemicals and a Disaccharide Analog Containing It

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideya Yuasa

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Per-O-acetyl-5-thio-DL-mannose was synthesized from petrochemicals in six steps and 9% overall yield. It was then derivatized into glycosyl trichloroacetimidate and subjected to glycosidation reaction with a mannosyl acceptor to give a separatable mixture of disaccharides with 5-thio-D- and L-mannosides. This is the first synthesis of an enantiomerically pure 5-thiosugar derivative from racemic chemicals. The D-glycoside was derivatized into methyl (5-thio-α-D-mannopyranosyl-2-O-α-D-mannopyranoside 6-phosphate as a potential inhibitor of a golgi α-1,2-mannosidase.

  15. Taste cell-expressed α-glucosidase enzymes contribute to gustatory responses to disaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukumaran, Sunil K.; Yee, Karen K.; Iwata, Shusuke; Kotha, Ramana; Quezada-Calvillo, Roberto; Nichols, Buford L.; Mohan, Sankar; Pinto, B. Mario; Shigemura, Noriatsu; Ninomiya, Yuzo; Margolskee, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    The primary sweet sensor in mammalian taste cells for sugars and noncaloric sweeteners is the heteromeric combination of type 1 taste receptors 2 and 3 (T1R2+T1R3, encoded by Tas1r2 and Tas1r3 genes). However, in the absence of T1R2+T1R3 (e.g., in Tas1r3 KO mice), animals still respond to sugars, arguing for the presence of T1R-independent detection mechanism(s). Our previous findings that several glucose transporters (GLUTs), sodium glucose cotransporter 1 (SGLT1), and the ATP-gated K+ (KATP) metabolic sensor are preferentially expressed in the same taste cells with T1R3 provides a potential explanation for the T1R-independent detection of sugars: sweet-responsive taste cells that respond to sugars and sweeteners may contain a T1R-dependent (T1R2+T1R3) sweet-sensing pathway for detecting sugars and noncaloric sweeteners, as well as a T1R-independent (GLUTs, SGLT1, KATP) pathway for detecting monosaccharides. However, the T1R-independent pathway would not explain responses to disaccharide and oligomeric sugars, such as sucrose, maltose, and maltotriose, which are not substrates for GLUTs or SGLT1. Using RT-PCR, quantitative PCR, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemistry, we found that taste cells express multiple α-glycosidases (e.g., amylase and neutral α glucosidase C) and so-called intestinal “brush border” disaccharide-hydrolyzing enzymes (e.g., maltase-glucoamylase and sucrase-isomaltase). Treating the tongue with inhibitors of disaccharidases specifically decreased gustatory nerve responses to disaccharides, but not to monosaccharides or noncaloric sweeteners, indicating that lingual disaccharidases are functional. These taste cell-expressed enzymes may locally break down dietary disaccharides and starch hydrolysis products into monosaccharides that could serve as substrates for the T1R-independent sugar sensing pathways. PMID:27162343

  16. Total Synthesis of 4"-O-Acetylmananthoside B Part Ⅱ: Synthesis of the Disaccharide Fragment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO,Gui-Long; YU,Zhao-Yun; LI,Yan; PANG,Li-Na; WANG,Jian-Wu

    2008-01-01

    A disaccharide compound, p-methoxyphenyl 2,3,4-tri-O-benzyl-β-L-arabinopyranosyl-(1→6)-2-O-benzyl-3,4-di-O-acetyl-β-D-galactopyranoside (17), was successfully synthesized from two monosaccharides L-arabinose and D-galactose and fully characterized. This compound can be used to build a natural product 4"-O-acetylmanan thoside B, which was isolated from the leaves and stems of a kind of Vietnamese Acanthaceae Justicia patentiflora.

  17. Solid acid catalysed formation of ethyl levulinate and ethyl glucopyranoside from mono- and disaccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shunmugavel, Saravanamurugan; Riisager, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Sulfonic acid functionalised SBA-15 (SO3H-SBA-15), sulfated zirconia and beta, Y, ZSM-5 and mordenite zeolite catalysts have been applied for the dehydration of sugars to ethyl levulinate and ethyl-D-glucopyranoside (EDGP) using ethanol as solvent and reactant. The SO3H-SBA-15 catalyst showed...... a high catalytic activity for the selective conversion of fructose to ethyl levulinate (57%) and glucose to EDGP (80%) at 140 °C, whereas the disaccharide sucrose yielded a significant amount of both products. The SO3H-SBA-15 catalysts were found to be highly active compared to the zeolites under...

  18. Structural model for the interaction of a designed Ankyrin Repeat Protein with the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Chandana Epa

    Full Text Available Designed Ankyrin Repeat Proteins are a class of novel binding proteins that can be selected and evolved to bind to targets with high affinity and specificity. We are interested in the DARPin H10-2-G3, which has been evolved to bind with very high affinity to the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2. HER2 is found to be over-expressed in 30% of breast cancers, and is the target for the FDA-approved therapeutic monoclonal antibodies trastuzumab and pertuzumab and small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Here, we use computational macromolecular docking, coupled with several interface metrics such as shape complementarity, interaction energy, and electrostatic complementarity, to model the structure of the complex between the DARPin H10-2-G3 and HER2. We analyzed the interface between the two proteins and then validated the structural model by showing that selected HER2 point mutations at the putative interface with H10-2-G3 reduce the affinity of binding up to 100-fold without affecting the binding of trastuzumab. Comparisons made with a subsequently solved X-ray crystal structure of the complex yielded a backbone atom root mean square deviation of 0.84-1.14 Ångstroms. The study presented here demonstrates the capability of the computational techniques of structural bioinformatics in generating useful structural models of protein-protein interactions.

  19. Repeated Structural Imaging Reveals Nonlinear Progression of Experience-Dependent Volume Changes in Human Motor Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Elisabeth; Kühn, Simone; Verrel, Julius; Mårtensson, Johan; Bodammer, Nils Christian; Lindenberger, Ulman; Lövdén, Martin

    2017-05-01

    Evidence for experience-dependent structural brain change in adult humans is accumulating. However, its time course is not well understood, as intervention studies typically consist of only 2 imaging sessions (before vs. after training). We acquired up to 18 structural magnetic resonance images over a 7-week period while 15 right-handed participants practiced left-hand writing and drawing. After 4 weeks, we observed increases in gray matter of both left and right primary motor cortices relative to a control group; 3 weeks later, these differences were no longer reliable. Time-series analyses revealed that gray matter in the primary motor cortices expanded during the first 4 weeks and then partially renormalized, in particular in the right hemisphere, despite continued practice and increasing task proficiency. Similar patterns of expansion followed by partial renormalization are also found in synaptogenesis, cortical map plasticity, and maturation, and may qualify as a general principle of structural plasticity. Research on human brain plasticity needs to encompass more than 2 measurement occasions to capture expansion and potential renormalization processes over time. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Investigating the Structural Impact of the Glutamine Repeat in Huntingtin Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perevozchikova, Tatiana [ORNL; Stanley, Christopher B [ORNL; McWilliams-Koeppen, Helen P [ORNL; Rowe, Erica L [ORNL; Berthelier-Jung, Valerie M [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Acquiring detailed structural information about the various aggregation states of the huntingtin-exon1 protein (Htt-exon1) is crucial not only for identifying the true nature of the neurotoxic species responsible for Huntington s disease (HD) but also for designing effective therapeutics. Using time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering (TR-SANS), we followed the conformational changes that occurred during fibrillization of the pathologic form of Htt-exon1 (NtQ42P10) and compared the results with those obtained for the wild-type (NtQ22P10). Our results show that the aggregation pathway of NtQ22P10 is very different from that of NtQ42P10, as the initial steps require a monomer to 7-mer transition stage. In contrast, the earliest species identified for NtQ42P10 are monomer and dimer. The divergent pathways ultimately result in NtQ22P10 fibrils that possess a pack- ing arrangement consistent with the common amyloid sterical zipper model, whereas NtQ42P10 fibrils present a better fit to the Perutz b-helix structural model. The structural details obtained by TR-SANS should help to delineate the key mechanisms that underpin Htt-exon1 aggregation leading to HD.

  1. Revisiting the TALE repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Dong; Yan, Chuangye; Wu, Jianping; Pan, Xiaojing; Yan, Nieng

    2014-04-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors specifically bind to double stranded (ds) DNA through a central domain of tandem repeats. Each TAL effector (TALE) repeat comprises 33-35 amino acids and recognizes one specific DNA base through a highly variable residue at a fixed position in the repeat. Structural studies have revealed the molecular basis of DNA recognition by TALE repeats. Examination of the overall structure reveals that the basic building block of TALE protein, namely a helical hairpin, is one-helix shifted from the previously defined TALE motif. Here we wish to suggest a structure-based re-demarcation of the TALE repeat which starts with the residues that bind to the DNA backbone phosphate and concludes with the base-recognition hyper-variable residue. This new numbering system is consistent with the α-solenoid superfamily to which TALE belongs, and reflects the structural integrity of TAL effectors. In addition, it confers integral number of TALE repeats that matches the number of bound DNA bases. We then present fifteen crystal structures of engineered dHax3 variants in complex with target DNA molecules, which elucidate the structural basis for the recognition of bases adenine (A) and guanine (G) by reported or uncharacterized TALE codes. Finally, we analyzed the sequence-structure correlation of the amino acid residues within a TALE repeat. The structural analyses reported here may advance the mechanistic understanding of TALE proteins and facilitate the design of TALEN with improved affinity and specificity.

  2. Exposure to Hycanthone alters chromatin structure around specific gene functions and specific repeats in Schistosoma mansoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David eRoquis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Schistosoma mansoni is a parasitic plathyhelminth responsible for intestinal schistosomiasis (or bilharziasis, a disease affecting 67 million people worldwide and causing an important economic burden. The schistosomicides hycanthone, and its later proxy oxamniquine, were widely used for treatments in endemic areas during the 20th century. Recently, the mechanism of action, as well as the genetic origin of a stably and Mendelian inherited resistance for both drugs was elucidated in two strains. However, several observations suggested early on that alternative mechanisms might exist, by which resistance could be induced for these two drugs in sensitive lines of schistosomes. This induced resistance appeared rapidly, within the first generation, but was metastable (not stably inherited. Epigenetic inheritance could explain such a phenomenon and we therefore re-analyzed the historical data with our current knowledge of epigenetics. In addition, we performed new experiments such as ChIP-seq on hycanthone treated worms. We found distinct chromatin structure changes between sensitive worms and induced resistant worms from the same strain. No specific pathway was discovered, but genes in which chromatin structure modification were observed are mostly associated with transport and catabolism, which makes sense in the context of the elimination of the drug. Specific differences were observed in the repetitive compartment of the genome. We finally describe what types of experiments are needed to understand the complexity of heritability that can be based on genetic and/or epigenetic mechanisms for drug resistance in schistosomes.

  3. Population distribution of flexible molecules from maximum entropy analysis using different priors as background information: application to the Φ, Ψ-conformational space of the α-(1-->2)-linked mannose disaccharide present in N- and O-linked glycoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Säwén, Elin; Massad, Tariq; Landersjö, Clas; Damberg, Peter; Widmalm, Göran

    2010-08-21

    The conformational space available to the flexible molecule α-D-Manp-(1-->2)-α-D-Manp-OMe, a model for the α-(1-->2)-linked mannose disaccharide in N- or O-linked glycoproteins, is determined using experimental data and molecular simulation combined with a maximum entropy approach that leads to a converged population distribution utilizing different input information. A database survey of the Protein Data Bank where structures having the constituent disaccharide were retrieved resulted in an ensemble with >200 structures. Subsequent filtering removed erroneous structures and gave the database (DB) ensemble having three classes of mannose-containing compounds, viz., N- and O-linked structures, and ligands to proteins. A molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of the disaccharide revealed a two-state equilibrium with a major and a minor conformational state, i.e., the MD ensemble. These two different conformation ensembles of the disaccharide were compared to measured experimental spectroscopic data for the molecule in water solution. However, neither of the two populations were compatible with experimental data from optical rotation, NMR (1)H,(1)H cross-relaxation rates as well as homo- and heteronuclear (3)J couplings. The conformational distributions were subsequently used as background information to generate priors that were used in a maximum entropy analysis. The resulting posteriors, i.e., the population distributions after the application of the maximum entropy analysis, still showed notable deviations that were not anticipated based on the prior information. Therefore, reparameterization of homo- and heteronuclear Karplus relationships for the glycosidic torsion angles Φ and Ψ were carried out in which the importance of electronegative substituents on the coupling pathway was deemed essential resulting in four derived equations, two (3)J(COCC) and two (3)J(COCH) being different for the Φ and Ψ torsions, respectively. These Karplus relationships are denoted

  4. Effect of buffer systems and disaccharides concentration on Podoviridae coliphage stability during freeze drying and storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dini, C; de Urraza, P J

    2013-06-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the stability of Podoviridae coliphage CA933P during lyophilization and storage in different media, and to establish similarities between the results obtained and those expected through mechanisms described for proteins stabilization during freeze-drying. PBS and SM buffer were assayed as lyophilization media. The effect of inorganic salts concentration as well as the addition of disaccharides on phage stability during freeze-drying and storage was also studied. The addition of low sucrose concentration (0.1 mol l⁻¹) to SM buffer stabilized phage during freezing and drying steps of the lyophilization process, but higher sugar concentrations were detrimental to phage stability during freeze-drying. Sucrose stabilized phage during storage for at least 120 days. The lyoprotective effect of low concentrations of disaccharides during the drying step of the lyophilization of proteins as well as the stabilization of the freeze-dried product in time correlated with the results obtained for phage CA933P.

  5. Structure-function Aspects of Extracellular Leucine-rich Repeat-containing Cell Surface Receptors in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Zhang; Bart PHJ Thomma

    2013-01-01

    Plants exploit several types of cell surface receptors for perception of extracellular signals, of which the extracellular leucine-rich repeat (eLRR)-containing receptors form the major class. Although the function of most plant eLRR receptors remains unclear, an increasing number of these receptors are shown to play roles in innate immunity and a wide variety of developmental processes. Recent efforts using domain swaps, gene shuffling analyses, site-directed mutagenesis, interaction studies, and crystallographic analyses resulted in the current knowledge on ligand binding and the mechanism of activation of plant eLRR receptors. This review provides an overview of eLRR receptor research, specifically summarizing the recent understanding of interactions among plant eLRR receptors, their co-receptors and corresponding ligands. The functions of distinct eLRR receptor domains, and their role in structure, ligand perception and multimeric complex formation are discussed.

  6. Long inverted repeat transiently stalls DNA replication by forming hairpin structures on both leading and lagging strands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Pey Jiun; Lim, Chew Theng; Le, Hang Phuong; Katayama, Tsutomu; Leach, David R F; Furukohri, Asako; Maki, Hisaji

    2016-02-01

    Long inverted repeats (LIRs), often found in eukaryotic genomes, are unstable in Escherichia coli where they are recognized by the SbcCD (the bacterial Mre11/Rad50 homologue), an endonuclease/exonuclease capable of cleaving hairpin DNA. It has long been postulated that LIRs form hairpin structures exclusively on the lagging-strand template during DNA replication, and SbcCD cleaves these hairpin-containing lagging strands to generate DNA double-strand breaks. Using a reconstituted oriC plasmid DNA replication system, we have examined how a replication fork behaves when it meets a LIR on DNA. We have shown that leading-strand synthesis stalls transiently within the upstream half of the LIR. Pausing of lagging-strand synthesis at the LIR was not clearly observed, but the pattern of priming sites for Okazaki fragment synthesis was altered within the downstream half of the LIR. We have found that the LIR on a replicating plasmid was cleaved by SbcCD with almost equal frequency on both the leading- and lagging-strand templates. These data strongly suggest that the LIR is readily converted to a cruciform DNA, before the arrival of the fork, creating SbcCD-sensitive hairpin structures on both leading and lagging strands. We propose a model for the replication-dependent extrusion of LIRs to form cruciform structures that transiently impede replication fork movement.

  7. Crystal structures of ryanodine receptor SPRY1 and tandem-repeat domains reveal a critical FKBP12 binding determinant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuchi, Zhiguang; Yuen, Siobhan M Wong King; Lau, Kelvin; Underhill, Ainsley Q; Cornea, Razvan L; Fessenden, James D; Van Petegem, Filip

    2015-08-06

    Ryanodine receptors (RyRs) form calcium release channels located in the membranes of the sarcoplasmic and endoplasmic reticulum. RyRs play a major role in excitation-contraction coupling and other Ca(2+)-dependent signalling events, and consist of several globular domains that together form a large assembly. Here we describe the crystal structures of the SPRY1 and tandem-repeat domains at 1.2-1.5 Å resolution, which reveal several structural elements not detected in recent cryo-EM reconstructions of RyRs. The cryo-EM studies disagree on the position of SPRY domains, which had been proposed based on homology modelling. Computational docking of the crystal structures, combined with FRET studies, show that the SPRY1 domain is located next to FK506-binding protein (FKBP). Molecular dynamics flexible fitting and mutagenesis experiments suggest a hydrophobic cluster within SPRY1 that is crucial for FKBP binding. A RyR1 disease mutation, N760D, appears to directly impact FKBP binding through interfering with SPRY1 folding.

  8. Monitoring fluvial erosion of the Oso landslide, Washington, using repeat Structure-from-Motion photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, S. W.; Magirl, C. S.; Keith, M. K.

    2015-12-01

    On March 22, 2014, the Oso landslide, located in northwestern Washington State, catastrophically mobilized about 8 million m3 of mixed glacial sediment, creating a valley-wide blockage that impounded the North Fork Stillaguamish River to a height of 8 m. The river overtopped the landslide blockage within several days and incised a new channel through predominately fine-grained, cohesive glaciolacustrine sediment in the center of the deposit. Our research focuses on the evolution of this new channel. Using a consumer-grade digital camera mounted on a fixed wing-aircraft, we used structure-from-motion (SfM) photogrammetry to produce 25 cm digital elevation models (DEMs) of the channel at one-month intervals between November 2014 and July 2015. A large RTK GPS validation dataset and inter-survey comparisons documents sub-decimeter vertical and horizontal accuracies. In combination with aerial lidar surveys acquired in March and April 2014, this dataset provides a uniquely resolved look at the erosion of a landslide dam. The newly-formed channel incised rapidly, lowering to within a meter of its pre-slide elevation by May 2014 despite modest flows. During high flows of the 2014-2015 winter flood season, erosion was dominated by channel widening of tens of meters with an overall stable planform. Incision fully returned the channel to pre-slide elevations by December 2014. A total of 510,000 +/- 50,000 m3 of material was eroded between March 2014 and July 2015, split evenly between the initial period of incision and the later period of widening. Sediment yield and channel morphology showed asymptotic trends towards stability. Measurements of deposit bulk density and grain size allowed conversion of volumetric sediment yields to mass yields by size classes. Over the 16 months after the slide, the river eroded about 0.82 +/- 0.1 Mt of sediment, of which 0.78 Mt was finer than 2mm. This yield agrees within 15% of an independent estimate based on concurrent sediment gaging

  9. Structure of the O-specific polysaccharide from the lipopolysaccharide of Aeromonas sobria strain Pt312.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turska-Szewczuk, Anna; Pietras, Hubert; Duda, Katarzyna A; Kozińska, Alicja; Pękala, Agnieszka; Holst, Otto

    2015-02-11

    The O-specific polysaccharide (OPS) obtained by mild-acid degradation of the lipopolysaccharide from Aeromonas sobria strain Pt312 was studied by sugar and methylation analyses along with 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy, including 2D 1H,1H COSY, TOCSY, NOESY, 1H-detected 1H,13C HSQC, and HMBC experiments. The sequence of the sugar residues was determined using 1H,1H NOESY and 1H,13C HMBC experiments. It was found that the OPS was built up of disaccharide repeating units composed of GlcpNAc and non-stoichiometrically O-acetylated Rhap residues, and had the structure.

  10. Distinct Secondary Structures of the Leucine-Rich Repeat Proteoglycans Decorin and Biglycan: Glycosylation-Dependent Conformational Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Priya; Hocking, Anne M.; Scholtz, J. Martin; Pace, C. Nick; Holik, Kimberly K.; McQuillan, David J.

    1998-01-01

    Biglycan and decorin, closely related small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycans, have been overexpressed in eukaryotic cers and two major glycoforms isolated under native conditions: a proteoglycan substituted with glycosaminoglycan chains; and a core protein form secreted devoid of glycosaminoglycans. A comparative biophysical study of these glycoforms has revealed that the overall secondary structures of biglycan and decorin are different. Far-UV Circular Dichroism (CD) spectroscopy of decorin and biglycan proteoglycans indicates that, although they are predominantly Beta-sheet, biglycan has a significantly higher content of alpha-helical structure. Decorin proteoglycan and core protein are very similar, whereas the biglycan core protein exhibits closer similarity to the decorin glycoforms than to. the biglycan proteoglycan form. However, enzymatic removal of the chondroitin sulfate chains from biglycan proteoglycan does not induce a shift to the core protein structure, suggesting that the fmal form is influenced by polysaccharide addition only during biosynthesis. Fluorescence emission spectroscopy demonstrated that the single tryptophan residue, which is at a conserved position at the C-terminal domain of both biglycan and decorin, is found in similar microenvironments. This indicates that at least in this specific domain, the different glycoforms do exhibit apparent conservation of structure. Exposure of decorin and biglycan to 10 M urea resulted in an increase in fluorescent intensity, which indicates that the emission from tryptophan in the native state is quenched. Comparison of urea-induced protein unfolding curves provided further evidence that decorin and biglycan assume different structures in solution. Decorin proteoglycan and core protein unfold in a manner similar to a classic two-state model, in which there is a steep transition to an unfolded state between 1-2 M urea. The biglycan core protein also shows a similar steep transition. However, biglycan

  11. A little adjustment of synthetic strategy led to a new highly repeated heteropolyblue: Structure, characterizations and photocatalytic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wu-Hua; Zhang, Zhu-Sen; Zhao, Jin-Hua; Qiu, Ze-Hai; Yuan, Qiu-Lan; Huang, Tian-Fu; Lin, Xue-Yu; Hu, Zhi-Biao

    2017-06-01

    Hydrothermal synthesis is known as the most efficient method to prepare novel structural polyoxometalate (POM)-based materials, but controlled synthesis of a structure-directing POM is always challenging task. The experimental repeatability is usually one of the key topics. To explore a reliable hydrothermal synthesis approach for new POMs will be a meaningful work. Our previous work, which we have hydrothermally synthesized the first Cr-complexes-capped Keggin-type POM, [Hdma]3[H2phen]{[Cr(phen)]2[MoV8MoVI4O36(PO4)]}·nH2O (n ≈ 2) (Chen et al., polyhedron, 2015, 85, 117), afford us some commendable synthetic experiences, arouse us some introspections as well for its tricky preparation conditions and low experimental repeatability. Based on the aforementioned work, a new high-repetition-rate and more steady heteropolyblue, [H3O]0.5(Hdma)2.5(dma)0.25{[Cr(phen)]2[MoV6MoVI6O8(PO4)]}·2H2O (1) (dma = dimethylamine (C2H7N), phen = 1,10-phenanthroline (C12H8N2)), has been successfully obtained by virtue of reasonably adjusting synthetic strategy. The adjustment of synthetic strategy includes controlling ratio of reactants and aging time, reasonably using redoxes and stepwise self-assembly plans. Compound 1 is the second POM with Keggin-type polyanion capped by Cr-complexes. Experiments demonstrate that compound 1 has good catalytic activity in the both degradation reactions of rhodamine B (RHB) and methyl orange (MO) under ultraviolet (UV)-light and oxidant H2O2 conditions. Detailed structural characterizations include single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses, energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) analyses, elemental analyses, cerate oxidimetry, powder XRD, fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared (UV-Vis-NIR) solid diffuse reflection spectrum and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses. The electrochemical property (cyclic voltammetry (CV)) of compound 1 has also been studied.

  12. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structure of a Novel Globular Domain in RBM10 Containing OCRE, the Octamer Repeat Sequence Motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Bryan T; Serrano, Pedro; Geralt, Michael; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    The OCtamer REpeat (OCRE) has been annotated as a 42-residue sequence motif with 12 tyrosine residues in the spliceosome trans-regulatory elements RBM5 and RBM10 (RBM [RNA-binding motif]), which are known to regulate alternative splicing of Fas and Bcl-x pre-mRNA transcripts. Nuclear magnetic resonance structure determination showed that the RBM10 OCRE sequence motif is part of a 55-residue globular domain containing 16 aromatic amino acids, which consists of an anti-parallel arrangement of six β strands, with the first five strands containing complete or incomplete Tyr triplets. This OCRE globular domain is a distinctive component of RBM10 and is more widely conserved in RBM10s across the animal kingdom than the ubiquitous RNA recognition components. It is also found in the functionally related RBM5. Thus, it appears that the three-dimensional structure of the globular OCRE domain, rather than the 42-residue OCRE sequence motif alone, confers specificity on RBM10 intermolecular interactions in the spliceosome.

  13. Context-Dependent Sensitivity to Mutations Disrupting the Structural Integrity of Individual EGF Repeats in the Mouse Notch Ligand DLL1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster-Gossler, Karin; Cordes, Ralf; Müller, Julia; Geffers, Insa; Delany-Heiken, Patricia; Taft, Manuel; Preller, Matthias; Gossler, Achim

    2016-03-01

    The highly conserved Notch-signaling pathway mediates cell-to-cell communication and is pivotal for multiple developmental processes and tissue homeostasis in adult organisms. Notch receptors and their ligands are transmembrane proteins with multiple epidermal-growth-factor-like (EGF) repeats in their extracellular domains. In vitro the EGF repeats of mammalian ligands that are essential for Notch activation have been defined. However, in vivo the significance of the structural integrity of each EGF repeat in the ligand ectodomain for ligand function is still unclear. Here, we analyzed the mouse Notch ligand DLL1. We expressed DLL1 proteins with mutations disrupting disulfide bridges in each individual EGF repeat from single-copy transgenes in the HPRT locus of embryonic stem cells. In Notch transactivation assays all mutations impinged on DLL1 function and affected both NOTCH1 and NOTCH2 receptors similarly. An allelic series in mice that carried the same point mutations in endogenous Dll1, generated using a mini-gene strategy, showed that early developmental processes depending on DLL1-mediated NOTCH activation were differently sensitive to mutation of individual EGF repeats in DLL1. Notably, some mutations affected only somite patterning and resulted in vertebral column defects resembling spondylocostal dysostosis. In conclusion, the structural integrity of each individual EGF repeat in the extracellular domain of DLL1 is necessary for full DLL1 activity, and certain mutations in Dll1 might contribute to spondylocostal dysostosis in humans.

  14. Fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs) and nonallergic food intolerance: FODMAPs or food chemicals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Jacqueline S; Gibson, Peter R

    2012-07-01

    Food intolerance in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is increasingly being recognized, with patients convinced that diet plays a role in symptom induction. Evidence is building to implicate fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs) in the onset of abdominal pain, bloating, wind and altered bowel habit through their fermentation and osmotic effects. Hypersensitivity to normal levels of luminal distension is known to occur in patients with IBS, with consideration of food chemical intolerance likely to answer many questions about this physiological process. This paper summarizes the evidence and application of the most common approaches to managing food intolerance in IBS: the low-FODMAP diet, the elimination diet for food chemical sensitivity and others including possible noncoeliac gluten intolerance.

  15. Tree diversity, composition, forest structure and aboveground biomass dynamics after single and repeated fire in a Bornean rain forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slik, J W Ferry; Bernard, Caroline S; Van Beek, Marloes; Breman, Floris C; Eichhorn, Karl A O

    2008-12-01

    Forest fires remain a devastating phenomenon in the tropics that not only affect forest structure and biodiversity, but also contribute significantly to atmospheric CO2. Fire used to be extremely rare in tropical forests, leaving ample time for forests to regenerate to pre-fire conditions. In recent decades, however, tropical forest fires occur more frequently and at larger spatial scales than they used to. We studied forest structure, tree species diversity, tree species composition, and aboveground biomass during the first 7 years since fire in unburned, once burned and twice burned forest of eastern Borneo to determine the rate of recovery of these forests. We paid special attention to changes in the tree species composition during burned forest regeneration because we expect the long-term recovery of aboveground biomass and ecosystem functions in burned forests to largely depend on the successful regeneration of the pre-fire, heavy-wood, species composition. We found that forest structure (canopy openness, leaf area index, herb cover, and stem density) is strongly affected by fire but shows quick recovery. However, species composition shows no or limited recovery and aboveground biomass, which is greatly reduced by fire, continues to be low or decline up to 7 years after fire. Consequently, large amounts of the C released to the atmosphere by fire will not be recaptured by the burned forest ecosystem in the near future. We also observed that repeated fire, with an inter-fire interval of 15 years, does not necessarily lead to a huge deterioration in the regeneration potential of tropical forest. We conclude that burned forests are valuable and should be conserved and that long-term monitoring programs in secondary forests are necessary to determine their recovery rates, especially in relation to aboveground biomass accumulation.

  16. Streptococcus salivarius Fimbriae Are Composed of a Glycoprotein Containing a Repeated Motif Assembled into a Filamentous Nondissociable Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévesque, Céline; Vadeboncoeur, Christian; Chandad, Fatiha; Frenette, Michel

    2001-01-01

    Streptococcus salivarius, a gram-positive bacterium found in the human oral cavity, expresses flexible peritrichous fimbriae. In this paper, we report purification and partial characterization of S. salivarius fimbriae. Fimbriae were extracted by shearing the cell surface of hyperfimbriated mutant A37 (a spontaneous mutant of S. salivarius ATCC 25975) with glass beads. Preliminary experiments showed that S. salivarius fimbriae did not dissociate when they were incubated at 100°C in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. This characteristic was used to separate them from other cell surface components by successive gel filtration chromatography procedures. Fimbriae with molecular masses ranging from 20 × 106 to 40 × 106 Da were purified. Examination of purified fimbriae by electron microscopy revealed the presence of filamentous structures up to 1 μm long and 3 to 4 nm in diameter. Biochemical studies of purified fimbriae and an amino acid sequence analysis of a fimbrial internal peptide revealed that S. salivarius fimbriae were composed of a glycoprotein assembled into a filamentous structure resistant to dissociation. The internal amino acid sequence was composed of a repeated motif of two amino acids alternating with two modified residues: A/X/T-E-Q-M/φ, where X represents a modified amino acid residue and φ represents a blank cycle. Immunolocalization experiments also revealed that the fimbriae were associated with a wheat germ agglutinin-reactive carbohydrate. Immunolabeling experiments with antifimbria polyclonal antibodies showed that antigenically related fimbria-like structures were expressed in two other human oral streptococcal species, Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus constellatus. PMID:11292790

  17. Structural Analysis and Anticoagulant Activities of the Novel Sulfated Fucan Possessing a Regular Well-Defined Repeating Unit from Sea Cucumber

    OpenAIRE

    Mingyi Wu; Li Xu; Longyan Zhao; Chuang Xiao; Na Gao; Lan Luo; Lian Yang; Zi Li; Lingyun Chen; Jinhua Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Sulfated fucans, the complex polysaccharides, exhibit various biological activities. Herein, we purified two fucans from the sea cucumbers Holothuria edulis and Ludwigothurea grisea. Their structures were verified by means of HPGPC, FT-IR, GC–MS and NMR. As a result, a novel structural motif for this type of polymers is reported. The fucans have a unique structure composed of a central core of regular (1→2) and (1→3)-linked tetrasaccharide repeating units. Approximately 50% of the units from...

  18. Crystal structure of the Xpo1p nuclear export complex bound to the SxFG/PxFG repeats of the nucleoporin Nup42p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Masako; Hirano, Hidemi; Shirai, Natsuki; Matsuura, Yoshiyuki

    2017-08-08

    Xpo1p (yeast CRM1) is the major nuclear export receptor that carries a plethora of proteins and ribonucleoproteins from the nucleus to cytoplasm. The passage of the Xpo1p nuclear export complex through nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) is facilitated by interactions with nucleoporins (Nups) containing extensive repeats of phenylalanine-glycine (so-called FG repeats), although the precise role of each Nup in the nuclear export reaction remains incompletely understood. Here we report structural and biochemical characterization of the interactions between the Xpo1p nuclear export complex and the FG repeats of Nup42p, a nucleoporin localized at the cytoplasmic face of yeast NPCs and has characteristic SxFG/PxFG sequence repeat motif. The crystal structure of Xpo1p-PKI-Nup42p-Gsp1p-GTP complex identified three binding sites for the SxFG/PxFG repeats on HEAT repeats 14-20 of Xpo1p. Mutational analyses of Nup42p showed that the conserved serines and prolines in the SxFG/PxFG repeats contribute to Xpo1p-Nup42p binding. Our structural and biochemical data suggest that SxFG/PxFG-Nups such as Nup42p and Nup159p at the cytoplasmic face of NPCs provide high-affinity docking sites for the Xpo1p nuclear export complex in the terminal stage of NPC passage and that subsequent disassembly of the nuclear export complex facilitates recycling of free Xpo1p back to the nucleus. © 2017 Molecular Biology Society of Japan and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  19. Exons I and VII of the gene (Ker10) encoding human keratin 10 undergo structural rearrangements within repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkachenko, A V; Buchman, V L; Bliskovsky, V V; Shvets YuP; Kisselev, L L

    1992-07-15

    A genomic fragment containing the K51 gene previously isolated from a rat genomic library by hybridization with the v-mos probe in nonstringent conditions [Chumakov et al., Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 290 (1986) 1252-1254], resembles a human keratin type-I-encoding gene [Shvets et al., Mol. Biol. 24 (1990) 663-677]. This genomic clone, K51, has been used as a probe to search for related human genes. A recombinant clone, HK51, with a 1.5-kb insert, was isolated from a human embryonic skin cDNA library, and its nucleotide (nt) sequence was determined. Analysis has shown that the cloned cDNA encodes human keratin 10 (Ker10). All presently known nt sequences of the human Ker10-encoding gene (Ker10) are not identical. Differences are concentrated in the 5'-end of the first exon and in the middle of the seventh exon within repeats. In spite of structural rearrangements in two of eight exons, the reading frame and position of the stop codon are preserved. The genetic rearrangements cause changes in hydrophobicity profiles of the N and C termini of Ker10. It was also noticed that insertion of one nt leads to the formation of an unusual 3'-end of the transcript.

  20. Evaluation of Population Structure, Genetic Diversity and Origin of Northeast Asia Weedy Rice Based on Simple Sequence Repeat Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Mao-bai

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Weedy rice exerts a severe impact on rice production by competing for sunlight, water and nutrients. This study assayed the population structure, genetic diversity and origin of Northeast Asia weedy rice by using 48 simple sequence repeat markers. The results showed that weedy rice in Northeast Asia had a high genetic diversity, with Shannon's diversity index (I of 0.748 and the heterozygosity (He of 0.434. In each regional population, I value varied widely. The widest range of I (0.228–0.489 was observed in the weedy rice of Eastern China, which was larger than that of Northeast China and Korea (0.168–0.270. The F-statistics of regional populations (Fis, Fit and Fst also showed higher values in the weedy rice of Eastern China than those of Northeast China and Korea. All weedy rice accessions were grouped into two clusters in the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean cluster analysis dendrogram, namely Eastern China branch and Northeastern China plus Korea branch. There was significant differentiation in genetic characteristics in weedy rice of northeastern and eastern Asia, especially in Eastern China.

  1. Short consensus repeat domains extend the E-selectin structure in order to grab cells out of flow

    KAUST Repository

    Aleisa, Fajr

    2017-01-08

    Selectins are key adhesion molecules responsible for initiating a multistep process that leads a cell out of the blood circulation and into a tissue or organ. They are composed of an N-terminal extracellular C-type lectin like domain, followed by an Endothelial Growth Factor like domain (EGF), a defined number of short consensus repeats SCR (also called “sushi” domains), a transmembrane domain and a C-terminal cytoplasmic tail. The adhesion of cells (expressing ligands) to the endothelium (expressing the selection i.e., E-selectin) occurs through the interaction between the lectin domain of selectins and sLeX presenting ligands. Structural/function studies to date have mainly focused on investigating the influence of the lectin domain of E-selectin on its ability to bind its ligands while other domains received less atention. We prepared a number of different recombinant E-selectin proteins with changes in the SCR units. Specifically we generated wild-type E-selectin proteins as monomeric or dimeric structures, mutant proteins with varied numbers of SCRs as well as proteins where strategic residues were mutated to change the conformation of the selectin. Using a novel real time immunoprecipitation surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based in vitro binding study developed in our lab, the interaction of recombinant E-selectin proteins with immunoprecipitated endogenous ligands (i.e. CD44) captured on a CM-5 chip was assessed. These studies provided quantitative binding kinetics with on and off rates of selectin-ligand interactions and suggested that robust binding is dependent on the presence of the SCRs and oligomerization. These results provide significant implications on the functional mechanism of E-selectin binding to its ligands.

  2. Clustering of Tuberculosis Cases Based on Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Typing in Relation to the Population Structure of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloot, R.; Borgdorff, M.W.; Beer, J.L. de; Ingen, J. van; Supply, P.; Soolingen, D. van

    2013-01-01

    The population structure of 3,776 Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates was determined using variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) typing. The degree of clonality was so high that a more relaxed definition of clustering cannot be applied. Among recent immigrants with non-Euro-American isolates, transmi

  3. The Effect of Repeated Listenings on Ability to Recognize the Structural Elements of Music and the Influence of this Ability on Affective Shift. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Dale L.

    This study, conducted over a period of three weeks at the University of Kansas, attempted to determine whether knowledge of musical structure would effect greater understanding and, eventually, enjoyment of music. Experimental and control groups comprising freshmen who were not enrolled in a music course listened repeatedly to excerpts of…

  4. The 1.7 Å resolution structure of At2g44920, a pentapeptide-repeat protein in the thylakoid lumen of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, Shuisong; McGookey, Michael E.; Tinch, Stuart L.; Jones, Alisha N.; Jayaraman, Seetharaman; Tong, Liang; Kennedy, Michael A. (Miami U); (Columbia)

    2012-01-09

    At2g44920 belongs to a diverse family (Pfam PF00805) of pentapeptide-repeat proteins (PRPs) that are present in all known organisms except yeast. PRPs contain at least eight tandem-repeating sequences of five amino acids with an approximate consensus sequence (STAV)(D/N)(L/F)(S/T/R)(X). Recent crystal structures show that PRPs adopt a highly regular four-sided right-handed {beta}-helical structure consisting mainly of type II and type IV {beta}-turns, sometimes referred to as a repeated five-residue (or Rfr) fold. Among sequenced genomes, PRP genes are most abundant in cyanobacteria, leading to speculation that PRPs play an important role in the unique lifestyle of photosynthetic cyanobacteria. Despite the recent structural characterization of several cyanobacterial PRPs, most of their functions remain unknown. Plants, whose chloroplasts are of cyanobacterial origin, have only four PRP genes in their genomes. At2g44920 is one of three PRPs located in the thylakoid lumen. Here, the crystal structure of a double methionine mutant of residues 81-224 of At2g44920, the naturally processed fragment of one of its full-length isoforms, is reported at 1.7 {angstrom} resolution. The structure of At2g44920 consists of the characteristic Rfr fold with five uninterrupted coils made up of 25 pentapeptide repeats and {alpha}-helical elements capping both termini. A disulfide bridge links the two {alpha}-helices with a conserved loop between the helical elements at its C-terminus. This structure represents the first structure of a PRP protein whose subcellular location has been experimentally confirmed to be the thylakoid lumen in a plant species.

  5. Effects of Repeated Growing Season Prescribed Fire on the Structure and Composition of Pine–Hardwood Forests in the Southeastern Piedmont, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Reilly

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We examined the effects of repeated growing season prescribed fire on the structure and composition of mixed pine–hardwood forests in the southeastern Piedmont region, Georgia, USA. Plots were burned two to four times over an eight-year period with low intensity surface fires during one of four six-week long periods from early April to mid-September. Density of saplings (0.25–11.6 cm diameter at breast height was significantly reduced after one or two fires during the first four-year period. Sapling density declined with additional burning over the next four years, but density of mesic hardwoods including sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua and red maple (Acer rubrum remained relatively high (~865 stems ha−1. Repeated burning had little effect on density or basal area of trees (≥11.7 cm dbh and changes in overstory structure were limited to small increases in the quadratic mean diameter of all trees and pines. We found little evidence to suggest differential effects on structure or composition due to timing of burn within the growing season. Although repeated growing season burning alters midstory structure and composition, burning alone is unlikely to result in immediate shifts in overstory composition or structure in mixed pine–hardwood forests of the southeastern Piedmont region.

  6. Deployment Repeatability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    controlled to great precision, but in a Cubesat , there may be no attitude determination at all. Such a Cubesat might treat sun angle and tumbling rates as...could be sensitive to small differences in motor controller timing. In these cases, the analyst might choose to model the entire deployment path, with...knowledge of the material damage model or motor controller timing precision. On the other hand, if many repeated and environmentally representative

  7. Preparation of D-gulose from disaccharide lactitol using microbial and chemical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Kenji; Shimonishi, Tsuyoshi; Miyake, Seiki; Takata, Goro; Izumori, Ken

    2013-01-01

    When an M31 strain of Agrobacterium tumefaciens was grown in a mineral salt medium at 30 °C containing 1.0% lactitol as sole carbon source, a keto-sugar was efficiently accumulated in the supernatant. This oxidation from lactitol to the keto-sugar was caused by M31 cells grown with medium containing a disaccharide unit, including sucrose, lactitol, lactose, maltose, or maltitol, suggesting that the enzyme is inducible. M31 also demonstrated good growth characteristics in Tryptic Soy Broth (TSB) medium containing 1.0% sucrose, and cells grown under these conditions showed strong lactitol transformation activity. The keto-sugar product was reduced by chemical hydrogenation and the resulting product was hydrolyzed to D-gulose, D-galactose, and D-sorbitol by acid hydrolysis, revealing that the reduced products are lactitol and D-gulosyl-(β-1,4)-D-sorbitol. Taken together, these results indicate that M31 can convert lactitol to 3-ketolactitol and thus provide access to the rare sugar D-gulose.

  8. Three-Dimensional Structural Aspects of Protein–Polysaccharide Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masamichi Nagae

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Linear polysaccharides are typically composed of repeating mono- or disaccharide units and are ubiquitous among living organisms. Polysaccharide diversity arises from chain-length variation, branching, and additional modifications. Structural diversity is associated with various physiological functions, which are often regulated by cognate polysaccharide-binding proteins. Proteins that interact with linear polysaccharides have been identified or developed, such as galectins and polysaccharide-specific antibodies, respectively. Currently, data is accumulating on the three-dimensional structure of polysaccharide-binding proteins. These proteins are classified into two types: exo-type and endo-type. The former group specifically interacts with the terminal units of polysaccharides, whereas the latter with internal units. In this review, we describe the structural aspects of exo-type and endo-type protein-polysaccharide interactions. Further, we discuss the structural basis for affinity and specificity enhancement in the face of inherently weak binding interactions.

  9. Non-absorbable disaccharides versus placebo/no intervention and lactulose versus lactitol for the prevention and treatment of hepatic encephalopathy in people with cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Lise Lotte; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Morgan, Marsha Y

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-absorbable disaccharides (lactulose and lactitol) are recommended as first-line treatment for hepatic encephalopathy. The previous (second) version of this review included 10 randomised clinical trials (RCTs) evaluating non-absorbable disaccharides versus placebo/no intervention...... and eight RCTs evaluating lactulose versus lactitol for people with cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy. The review found no evidence to either support or refute the use of the non-absorbable disaccharides and no differences between lactulose versus lactitol. OBJECTIVES: To assess the beneficial...... and harmful effects of i) non-absorbable disaccharides versus placebo/no intervention and ii) lactulose versus lactitol in people with cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy. SEARCH METHODS: We carried out electronic searches of the Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Controlled Trials Register, the Cochrane Central...

  10. In situ optical sequencing and structure analysis of a trinucleotide repeat genome region by localization microscopy after specific COMBO-FISH nano-probing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuhlmüller, M.; Schwarz-Finsterle, J.; Fey, E.; Lux, J.; Bach, M.; Cremer, C.; Hinderhofer, K.; Hausmann, M.; Hildenbrand, G.

    2015-10-01

    Trinucleotide repeat expansions (like (CGG)n) of chromatin in the genome of cell nuclei can cause neurological disorders such as for example the Fragile-X syndrome. Until now the mechanisms are not clearly understood as to how these expansions develop during cell proliferation. Therefore in situ investigations of chromatin structures on the nanoscale are required to better understand supra-molecular mechanisms on the single cell level. By super-resolution localization microscopy (Spectral Position Determination Microscopy; SPDM) in combination with nano-probing using COMBO-FISH (COMBinatorial Oligonucleotide FISH), novel insights into the nano-architecture of the genome will become possible. The native spatial structure of trinucleotide repeat expansion genome regions was analysed and optical sequencing of repetitive units was performed within 3D-conserved nuclei using SPDM after COMBO-FISH. We analysed a (CGG)n-expansion region inside the 5' untranslated region of the FMR1 gene. The number of CGG repeats for a full mutation causing the Fragile-X syndrome was found and also verified by Southern blot. The FMR1 promotor region was similarly condensed like a centromeric region whereas the arrangement of the probes labelling the expansion region seemed to indicate a loop-like nano-structure. These results for the first time demonstrate that in situ chromatin structure measurements on the nanoscale are feasible. Due to further methodological progress it will become possible to estimate the state of trinucleotide repeat mutations in detail and to determine the associated chromatin strand structural changes on the single cell level. In general, the application of the described approach to any genome region will lead to new insights into genome nano-architecture and open new avenues for understanding mechanisms and their relevance in the development of heredity diseases.

  11. Conformational analysis of a Chlamydia-specific disaccharide {alpha}-Kdo-(2{sup {yields}}8)-{alpha}-Kdo-(2{sup {yields}}O)-allyl in aqueous solution and bound to a monoclonal antibody: Observation of intermolecular transfer NOEs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolowski, Tobias; Haselhorst, Thomas; Scheffler, Karoline [Medizinische Universitaet, Institut fuer Chemie (Germany); Weisemann, Ruediger [Bruker Analytik GmbH, Silberstreifen (Germany); Kosma, Paul [Institut fuer Chemie der Universitaet fuer Bodenkultur Wien (Austria); Brade, Helmut; Brade, Lore [Forschungszentrum Borstel, Zentrum fuer Medizin und Biowissenschaften Parkallee 22 (Germany); Peters, Thomas [Medizinische Universitaet, Institut fuer Chemie (Germany)

    1998-07-15

    The disaccharide {alpha}-Kdo-(2{sup {yields}}8)-{alpha}-Kdo (Kdo: 3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid) represents a genus-specific epitope of the lipopolysaccharide of the obligate intracellular human pathogen Chlamydia. The conformation of the synthetically derived disaccharide {alpha}-Kdo-(2{sup {yields}}8)-{alpha}-Kdo-(2{sup {yields}}O)-allyl was studied in aqueous solution, and complexed to a monoclonal antibody S25-2. Various NMR experiments based on the detection of NOEs (or transfer NOEs) and ROEs (or transfer ROEs) were performed. A major problem was the extensive overlap of almost all {sup 1}H NMR signals of {alpha}-Kdo-(2{sup {yields}}8)-{alpha}-Kdo-(2{sup {yields}}O)-allyl. To overcome this difficulty, HMQC-NOESY and HMQC-trNOESY experiments were employed. Spin diffusion effects were identified using trROESY experiments, QUIET-trNOESY experiments and MINSY experiments. It was found that protein protons contribute to the observed spin diffusion effects. At 800 MHz, intermolecular trNOEs were observed between ligand protons and aromatic protons in the antibody binding site. From NMR experiments and Metropolis Monte Carlo simulations, it was concluded that {alpha}-Kdo-(2{sup {yields}}8)-{alpha}-Kdo-(2{sup {yields}}O)-allyl in aqueous solution exists as a complex conformational mixture. Upon binding to the monoclonal antibody S25-2, only a limited range of conformations is available to {alpha}-Kdo-(2{sup {yields}}8)-{alpha}-Kdo-(2{sup {yields}}O)-allyl. These possible bound conformations were derived from a distance geometry analysis using transfer NOEs as experimental constraints. It is clear that a conformation is selected which lies within a part of the conformational space that is highly populated in solution. This conformational space also includes the conformation found in the crystal structure. Our results provide a basis for modeling studies of the antibody-disaccharide complex.

  12. Structure elucidation and gene cluster characterization of the O-antigen of Escherichia coli O80.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senchenkova, Sof'ya N; Guo, Xi; Filatov, Andrei V; Perepelov, Andrei V; Liu, Bin; Shashkov, Alexander S; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2016-09-02

    Mild alkaline degradation of the lipopolysaccharide of Escherichia coli O80 afforded a polysaccharide, which was studied by sugar analysis, selective cleavage of glycosidic linkages, and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. Solvolysis of the polysaccharide with CF3CO2H cleaved the linkages of α-Fuc and β-linked GlcNAc and GalNAc residues to give two disaccharides. The following structure of the hexasaccharide repeating unit of the O-polysaccharide was established: The polysaccharide repeat also contains a minor O-acetyl group but its position was not determined. The O-antigen gene cluster of E. coli O80 between the conserved galF and gnd genes was analyzed and found to be consistent with the O-polysaccharide structure established.

  13. An all-atom model of the chromatin fiber containing linker histones reveals a versatile structure tuned by the nucleosomal repeat length.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Wong

    Full Text Available In the nucleus of eukaryotic cells, histone proteins organize the linear genome into a functional and hierarchical architecture. In this paper, we use the crystal structures of the nucleosome core particle, B-DNA and the globular domain of H5 linker histone to build the first all-atom model of compact chromatin fibers. In this 3D jigsaw puzzle, DNA bending is achieved by solving an inverse kinematics problem. Our model is based on recent electron microscopy measurements of reconstituted fiber dimensions. Strikingly, we find that the chromatin fiber containing linker histones is a polymorphic structure. We show that different fiber conformations are obtained by tuning the linker histone orientation at the nucleosomes entry/exit according to the nucleosomal repeat length. We propose that the observed in vivo quantization of nucleosomal repeat length could reflect nature's ability to use the DNA molecule's helical geometry in order to give chromatin versatile topological and mechanical properties.

  14. Structural determination of Streptococcus pneumoniae repeat units in serotype 41A and 41F capsular polysaccharides to probe gene functions in the corresponding capsular biosynthetic loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Bent O; Skovsted, Ian C; Paulsen, Berit Smestad; Redondo, Antonio R; Meier, Sebastian

    2014-12-05

    We report the repeating unit structures of the native capsular polysaccharides of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes 41A and 41F. Structural determinations yielded six carbohydrate units in the doubly branched repeating unit to give the following structure for serotype 41A: The structure determinations were motivated (1) by an ambition to help close the remaining gaps in S. pneumoniae capsular polysaccharide structures, and (2) by the attempt to derive functional annotations of carbohydrate active enzymes in the biosynthesis of bacterial polysaccharides from the determined structures. An activity present in 41F but not 41A is identified as an acetyltransferase acting on the rhamnopyranosyl sidechain E. The genes encoding the formation of the six glycosidic bonds in serogroup 41 were determined from the capsular polysaccharide structures of serotype 41A, 41F, and genetically related serotypes, in conjunction with corresponding genomic information and computational homology searches. In combination with complementary information, NMR spectroscopy considerably simplifies the functional annotation of carbohydrate active enzymes in the biosynthesis of bacterial polysaccharides.

  15. Structural Insights Reveal the Dynamics of the Repeating r(CAG) Transcript Found in Huntington's Disease (HD) and Spinocerebellar Ataxias (SCAs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawani, Arpita; Kumar, Amit

    2015-01-01

    In humans, neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease (HD) and many spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) have been found to be associated with CAG trinucleotide repeat expansion. An important RNA-mediated mechanism that causes these diseases involves the binding of the splicing regulator protein MBNL1 (Muscleblind-like 1 protein) to expanded r(CAG) repeats. Moreover, mutant huntingtin protein translated from expanded r(CAG) also yields toxic effects. To discern the role of mutant RNA in these diseases, it is essential to gather information about its structure. Detailed insight into the different structures and conformations adopted by these mutant transcripts is vital for developing therapeutics targeting them. Here, we report the crystal structure of an RNA model with a r(CAG) motif, which is complemented by an NMR-based solution structure obtained from restrained Molecular Dynamics (rMD) simulation studies. Crystal structure data of the RNA model resolved at 2.3 Å reveals non-canonical pairing of adenine in 5´-CAG/3´-GAC motif samples in different syn and anti conformations. The overall RNA structure has helical parameters intermediate to the A- and B-forms of nucleic acids due to the global widening of major grooves and base-pair preferences near internal AA loops. The comprehension of structural behaviour by studying the spectral features and the dynamics also supports the flexible nature of the r(CAG) motif.

  16. Structural Insights Reveal the Dynamics of the Repeating r(CAG Transcript Found in Huntington's Disease (HD and Spinocerebellar Ataxias (SCAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpita Tawani

    Full Text Available In humans, neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease (HD and many spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs have been found to be associated with CAG trinucleotide repeat expansion. An important RNA-mediated mechanism that causes these diseases involves the binding of the splicing regulator protein MBNL1 (Muscleblind-like 1 protein to expanded r(CAG repeats. Moreover, mutant huntingtin protein translated from expanded r(CAG also yields toxic effects. To discern the role of mutant RNA in these diseases, it is essential to gather information about its structure. Detailed insight into the different structures and conformations adopted by these mutant transcripts is vital for developing therapeutics targeting them. Here, we report the crystal structure of an RNA model with a r(CAG motif, which is complemented by an NMR-based solution structure obtained from restrained Molecular Dynamics (rMD simulation studies. Crystal structure data of the RNA model resolved at 2.3 Å reveals non-canonical pairing of adenine in 5´-CAG/3´-GAC motif samples in different syn and anti conformations. The overall RNA structure has helical parameters intermediate to the A- and B-forms of nucleic acids due to the global widening of major grooves and base-pair preferences near internal AA loops. The comprehension of structural behaviour by studying the spectral features and the dynamics also supports the flexible nature of the r(CAG motif.

  17. The Pentapeptide Repeat Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetting,M.; Hegde, S.; Fajardo, J.; Fiser, A.; Roderick, S.; Takiff, H.; Blanchard, J.

    2006-01-01

    The Pentapeptide Repeat Protein (PRP) family has over 500 members in the prokaryotic and eukaryotic kingdoms. These proteins are composed of, or contain domains composed of, tandemly repeated amino acid sequences with a consensus sequence of [S, T,A, V][D, N][L, F]-[S, T,R][G]. The biochemical function of the vast majority of PRP family members is unknown. The three-dimensional structure of the first member of the PRP family was determined for the fluoroquinolone resistance protein (MfpA) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The structure revealed that the pentapeptide repeats encode the folding of a novel right-handed quadrilateral {beta}-helix. MfpA binds to DNA gyrase and inhibits its activity. The rod-shaped, dimeric protein exhibits remarkable size, shape and electrostatic similarity to DNA.

  18. Complex repeat structures and novel features in the mitochondrial genomes of the diatoms Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudot-Le Secq, Marie-Pierre; Green, Beverley R

    2011-05-01

    The mitochondrial genome of the raphid pennate diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum has several novel features compared with the mitochondrial genomes of the centric diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana and the araphid pennate diatom Synedra acus. It is almost double the size (77,356 bp) due to a 35,454 bp sequence block consisting of an elaborate combination of direct repeats, making it the largest stramenopile (heterokont) mitochondrial genome known. In addition, the cox1 gene has a +1 translational frameshift involving Pro codons CCC and CCT, the first translational frameshift to be detected in an algal mitochondrial genome. The nad9 and rps14 genes are fused by the insertion of an in-frame sequence and cotranscribed. The nad11 gene is split into two parts corresponding to the FeS and molybdate-binding domains, but both parts are still on the mitochondrial genome, in contrast to the brown algae where the second domain appears to have been transferred to the nucleus. In contrast to P. tricornutum, the repeat region of T. pseudonana consists of a much smaller 4790 bp string of almost identical double-hairpin elements, evidence of slipped-strand mispairing and active gene conversion. The diatom mitochondrial genomes have undergone considerable gene rearrangement since the three lineages of diatoms diverged, but all three have kept their repeat regions segregated from their relatively compact coding regions.

  19. Large-scale analysis of structural, sequence and thermodynamic characteristics of A-to-I RNA editing sites in human Alu repeats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eisenberg Eli

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alu repeats in the human transcriptome undergo massive adenosine to inosine RNA editing. This process is selective, as editing efficiency varies greatly among different adenosines. Several studies have identified weak sequence motifs characterizing the editing sites, but these alone do not account for the large diversity observed. Results Here we build a dataset of 29,971 editing sites and use it to characterize editing preferences. We focus on structural aspects, studying the double-stranded RNA structure of the Alu repeats, and show the editing frequency of a given site to depend strongly on the micro-structure it resides in. Surprisingly, we find that interior loops, and especially the nucleotides at their edges, are more likely to be edited than helices. In addition, the sequence motifs characterizing editing sites vary with the micro-structure. Finally, we show that thermodynamic stability of the site is important for its editing. Conclusions Analysis of a large dataset of editing events reveals more information on sequence and structural motifs characterizing the A-to-I editing process

  20. Structural analysis and anticoagulant activities of the novel sulfated fucan possessing a regular well-defined repeating unit from sea cucumber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mingyi; Xu, Li; Zhao, Longyan; Xiao, Chuang; Gao, Na; Luo, Lan; Yang, Lian; Li, Zi; Chen, Lingyun; Zhao, Jinhua

    2015-04-13

    Sulfated fucans, the complex polysaccharides, exhibit various biological activities. Herein, we purified two fucans from the sea cucumbers Holothuria edulis and Ludwigothurea grisea. Their structures were verified by means of HPGPC, FT-IR, GC-MS and NMR. As a result, a novel structural motif for this type of polymers is reported. The fucans have a unique structure composed of a central core of regular (1→2) and (1→3)-linked tetrasaccharide repeating units. Approximately 50% of the units from L. grisea (100% for H. edulis fucan) contain sides of oligosaccharides formed by nonsulfated fucose units linked to the O-4 position of the central core. Anticoagulant activity assays indicate that the sea cucumber fucans strongly inhibit human blood clotting through the intrinsic pathways of the coagulation cascade. Moreover, the mechanism of anticoagulant action of the fucans is selective inhibition of thrombin activity by heparin cofactor II. The distinctive tetrasaccharide repeating units contribute to the anticoagulant action. Additionally, unlike the fucans from marine alga, although the sea cucumber fucans have great molecular weights and affluent sulfates, they do not induce platelet aggregation. Overall, our results may be helpful in understanding the structure-function relationships of the well-defined polysaccharides from invertebrate as new types of safer anticoagulants.

  1. Structural Analysis and Anticoagulant Activities of the Novel Sulfated Fucan Possessing a Regular Well-Defined Repeating Unit from Sea Cucumber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyi Wu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Sulfated fucans, the complex polysaccharides, exhibit various biological activities. Herein, we purified two fucans from the sea cucumbers Holothuria edulis and Ludwigothurea grisea. Their structures were verified by means of HPGPC, FT-IR, GC–MS and NMR. As a result, a novel structural motif for this type of polymers is reported. The fucans have a unique structure composed of a central core of regular (1→2 and (1→3-linked tetrasaccharide repeating units. Approximately 50% of the units from L. grisea (100% for H. edulis fucan contain sides of oligosaccharides formed by nonsulfated fucose units linked to the O-4 position of the central core. Anticoagulant activity assays indicate that the sea cucumber fucans strongly inhibit human blood clotting through the intrinsic pathways of the coagulation cascade. Moreover, the mechanism of anticoagulant action of the fucans is selective inhibition of thrombin activity by heparin cofactor II. The distinctive tetrasaccharide repeating units contribute to the anticoagulant action. Additionally, unlike the fucans from marine alga, although the sea cucumber fucans have great molecular weights and affluent sulfates, they do not induce platelet aggregation. Overall, our results may be helpful in understanding the structure-function relationships of the well-defined polysaccharides from invertebrate as new types of safer anticoagulants.

  2. [Comparative study of postprandial glycaemia in type 2 diabetic patients after consumption of mono- and disaccharides and sweeteners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharafetdinov, Kh Kh; Meshcheriakova, V A; Plotnikova, O A; Gapparov, M G

    2002-01-01

    It was investigated the influence of mono- and disaccharides, sugar alcohols, honey, corn patoka and products with nutritive and nonnutritive sweeteners on dynamic of postprandial glycaemia in type 2 diabetic patients. After ingestion of 30 g fructose, blood glucose did not show a marked increase in comparison with sucrose or honey. After ingestion of 30 g sorbitol or isomalt, blood glucose curve was not significantly different. It was indicated that corn patoka in chewing candies with isomalt has a high hyperglycaemic effect whereas drink with nonnutritive sweeteners did not change blood glucose from fasting levels.

  3. Structural Basis for Sialoglycan Binding by the Streptococcus sanguinis SrpA Adhesin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensing, Barbara A; Loukachevitch, Lioudmila V; McCulloch, Kathryn M; Yu, Hai; Vann, Kendra R; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Anderson, Spencer; Chen, Xi; Sullam, Paul M; Iverson, T M

    2016-04-01

    Streptococcus sanguinisis a leading cause of infective endocarditis, a life-threatening infection of the cardiovascular system. An important interaction in the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis is attachment of the organisms to host platelets.S. sanguinisexpresses a serine-rich repeat adhesin, SrpA, similar in sequence to platelet-binding adhesins associated with increased virulence in this disease. In this study, we determined the first crystal structure of the putative binding region of SrpA (SrpABR) both unliganded and in complex with a synthetic disaccharide ligand at 1.8 and 2.0 Å resolution, respectively. We identified a conserved Thr-Arg motif that orients the sialic acid moiety and is required for binding to platelet monolayers. Furthermore, we propose that sequence insertions in closely related family members contribute to the modulation of structural and functional properties, including the quaternary structure, the tertiary structure, and the ligand-binding site.

  4. Source parameters of a M4.8 and its accompanying repeating earthquakes off Kamaishi, NE Japan: Implications for the hierarchical structure of asperities and earthquake cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, N.; Matsuzawa, T.; Ellsworth, W.L.; Imanishi, K.; Okada, T.; Hasegawa, A.

    2007-01-01

    We determine the source parameters of a M4.9 ?? 0.1 'characteristic earthquake' sequence and its accompanying microearthquakes at ???50 km depth on the subduction plate boundary offshore of Kamaishi, NE Japan. The microearthquakes tend to occur more frequently in the latter half of the recurrence intervals of the M4.9 ?? 0.1 events. Our results show that the microearthquakes are repeating events and they are located not only around but also within the slip area for the 2001 M4.8 event. From the hierarchical structure of slip areas and smaller stress drops for the microearthquakes compared to the M4.8 event, we infer the small repeating earthquakes rupture relatively weak patches in and around the slip area for the M4.8 event and their activity reflects a stress concentration process and/or change in frictional property (healing) at the area. We also infer the patches for the M4.9 ?? 0.1 and other repeating earthquakes undergo aseismic slip during their interseismic period. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. Influence of in ovo injection of disaccharides, glutamine and β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate on the development of small intestine in duck embryos and neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W; Wang, R; Xiong, X L; Wan, H F; Xu, J; Peng, J

    2010-10-01

    1. The objective of the present study was to examine the effect of in ovo injection of disaccharides (DS), disaccharides and glutamine (DS + Gln) or disaccharides and β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate (DS + HMB) at d 23 of incubation on the development of the small intestine. 2. In DS + Gln-injected ducks, the greatest relative small intestine mass and muscularis layer thickness among 4 treatments was observed from d 25 of incubation to 7 d of age. 3. Jejunal sucrase activity in DS-injected ducks was significantly greater than in controls at hatch and on d 7. 4. In DS + HMB-treated ducks, a tendency toward slightly higher jejunal DNA concentration was observed throughout the experiment. 5. Greater body weight was found in DS + Gln and DS + HMB treated ducks in the first two weeks. However, there was no significant difference in the market weight (35 d) of ducks among the 4 treatments. 6. The results of present study suggest that administering disaccharides and Gln, or disaccharides and HMB, to the duck embryos exerted a beneficial effect on the early development of small intestine and on growth performance.

  6. A new method to determine the structure of the metal environment in metalloproteins: investigation of the prion protein octapeptide repeat Cu(2+) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentler, Matthias; Weiss, Andreas; Grantner, Klaus; del Pino, Pablo; Deluca, Dominga; Fiori, Stella; Renner, Christian; Klaucke, Wolfram Meyer; Moroder, Luis; Bertsch, Uwe; Kretzschmar, Hans A; Tavan, Paul; Parak, Fritz G

    2005-03-01

    Since high-intensity synchrotron radiation is available, "extended X-ray absorption fine structure" spectroscopy (EXAFS) is used for detailed structural analysis of metal ion environments in proteins. However, the information acquired is often insufficient to obtain an unambiguous picture. ENDOR spectroscopy allows the determination of hydrogen positions around a metal ion. However, again the structural information is limited. In the present study, a method is proposed which combines computations with spectroscopic data from EXAFS, EPR, electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM). From EXAFS a first picture of the nearest coordination shell is derived which has to be compatible with EPR data. Computations are used to select sterically possible structures, from which in turn structures with correct H and N positions are selected by ENDOR and ESEEM measurements. Finally, EXAFS spectra are re-calculated and compared with the experimental data. This procedure was successfully applied for structure determination of the Cu(2+) complex of the octapeptide repeat of the human prion protein. The structure of this octarepeat complex is rather similar to a pentapeptide complex which was determined by X-ray structure analysis. However, the tryptophan residue has a different orientation: the axial water is on the other side of the Cu.

  7. Dynamic Effects of Embedded Macro-Fiber Composite Actuators on Ultra-Light Flexible Structures of Repeated Pattern- a Homogenization Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Salehian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by deployable satellite technology, this article presents a homogenization model of an inflatable, rigidized lattice structure with distributed macro-fiber composite (MFC actuation. The model is based upon a general expression for the strain and kinetic energy of a fundamental repeated element of the structure. These expressions are reduced in order and expressed in terms of the strain and displacement components of an equivalent one-dimensional vibration model. The resulting model is used to analyze changes in the structural natural frequencies introduced by the local effects of the added macro-fiber composite actuators for several configurations. A finite element solution is used as a comparison for the homogenization model, and the two are shown to be in good agreement, although the latter requires significantly less computational effort.

  8. Structure and Membrane Binding Properties of the Endosomal Tetratricopeptide Repeat (TPR) Domain-containing Sorting Nexins SNX20 and SNX21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clairfeuille, Thomas; Norwood, Suzanne J; Qi, Xiaying; Teasdale, Rohan D; Collins, Brett M

    2015-06-01

    Sorting nexins (SNX) orchestrate membrane trafficking and signaling events required for the proper distribution of proteins within the endosomal network. Their phox homology (PX) domain acts as a phosphoinositide (PI) recognition module that targets them to specific endocytic membrane domains. The modularity of SNX proteins confers a wide variety of functions from signaling to membrane deformation and cargo binding, and many SNXs are crucial modulators of endosome dynamics and are involved in a myriad of physiological and pathological processes such as neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, and inflammation. Here, we have studied the poorly characterized SNX20 and its paralogue SNX21, which contain an N-terminal PX domain and a C-terminal PX-associated B (PXB) domain of unknown function. The two proteins share similar PI-binding properties and are recruited to early endosomal compartments by their PX domain. The crystal structure of the SNX21 PXB domain reveals a tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR)-fold, a module that typically binds short peptide motifs, with three TPR α-helical repeats. However, the C-terminal capping helix adopts a highly unusual and potentially self-inhibitory topology. SAXS solution structures of SNX20 and SNX21 show that these proteins adopt a compact globular architecture, and membrane interaction analyses indicate the presence of overlapping PI-binding sites that may regulate their intracellular localization. This study provides the first structural analysis of this poorly characterized subfamily of SNX proteins, highlighting a likely role as endosome-associated scaffolds.

  9. Comparative Geometrical Analysis of Leucine-Rich Repeat Structures in the Nod-Like and Toll-Like Receptors in Vertebrate Innate Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norio Matsushima

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The NOD-like receptors (NLRs and Toll-like receptors (TLRs are pattern recognition receptors that are involved in the innate, pathogen pattern recognition system. The TLR and NLR receptors contain leucine-rich repeats (LRRs that are responsible for ligand interactions. In LRRs short β-strands stack parallel and then the LRRs form a super helical arrangement of repeating structural units (called a coil of solenoids. The structures of the LRR domains of NLRC4, NLRP1, and NLRX1 in NLRs and of TLR1-5, TLR6, TLR8, TLR9 in TLRs have been determined. Here we report nine geometrical parameters that characterize the LRR domains; these include four helical parameters from HELFIT analysis. These nine parameters characterize well the LRR structures in NLRs and TLRs; the LRRs of NLR adopts a right-handed helix. In contrast, the TLR LRRs adopt either a left-handed helix or are nearly flat; RP105 and CD14 also adopt a left-handed helix. This geometrical analysis subdivides TLRs into four groups consisting of TLR3/TLR8/TLR9, TLR1/TLR2/TRR6, TLR4, and TLR5; these correspond to the phylogenetic tree based on amino acid sequences. In the TLRs an ascending lateral surface that consists of loops connecting the β-strand at the C-terminal side is involved in protein, protein/ligand interactions, but not the descending lateral surface on the opposite side.

  10. A Study for the Characteristic Changes Under the Repeated Thermal Exposure in the Process of Repairing Aircraft Sandwich Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yun Hae; Han, Joong Won; Kim, Don Won; Choi, Byung Keun; Murakami, R.

    Delamination can be observed in the sound areas during and/or after a couple times exposure to the elevated curing temperature due to the repeated repair condition. This study was conducted for checking the degree of degradation of properties of the cured parts and delamination between skin prepreg and honeycomb core. Specimens with glass honeycomb sandwich construction and glass/epoxy prepreg were prepared. The specimens were cured 1 to 5 times at 260°F in an autoclave and each additionally exposed 50, 100 and 150 hours in the 260°F oven. Each specimen was tested for tensile strength, compressive strength, flatwise tensile strength and interlaminar shear strength. To monitor the characteristics of the resin itself, the cured resin was tested using DMA and DSC. As a results, the decrease of Tg value were observed in the specific specimen which is exposed over 50 hrs at 260°F. This means the change or degradative of resin properties is also related to the decrease of flatwise tensile properties. Accordingly, minimal exposure on the curing temperature is recommended for parts in order to prevent the delation and maintain the better condition.

  11. Expansion of protein domain repeats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asa K Björklund

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Many proteins, especially in eukaryotes, contain tandem repeats of several domains from the same family. These repeats have a variety of binding properties and are involved in protein-protein interactions as well as binding to other ligands such as DNA and RNA. The rapid expansion of protein domain repeats is assumed to have evolved through internal tandem duplications. However, the exact mechanisms behind these tandem duplications are not well-understood. Here, we have studied the evolution, function, protein structure, gene structure, and phylogenetic distribution of domain repeats. For this purpose we have assigned Pfam-A domain families to 24 proteomes with more sensitive domain assignments in the repeat regions. These assignments confirmed previous findings that eukaryotes, and in particular vertebrates, contain a much higher fraction of proteins with repeats compared with prokaryotes. The internal sequence similarity in each protein revealed that the domain repeats are often expanded through duplications of several domains at a time, while the duplication of one domain is less common. Many of the repeats appear to have been duplicated in the middle of the repeat region. This is in strong contrast to the evolution of other proteins that mainly works through additions of single domains at either terminus. Further, we found that some domain families show distinct duplication patterns, e.g., nebulin domains have mainly been expanded with a unit of seven domains at a time, while duplications of other domain families involve varying numbers of domains. Finally, no common mechanism for the expansion of all repeats could be detected. We found that the duplication patterns show no dependence on the size of the domains. Further, repeat expansion in some families can possibly be explained by shuffling of exons. However, exon shuffling could not have created all repeats.

  12. Structure of bacteriophage [phi]29 head fibers has a supercoiled triple repeating helix-turn-helix motif

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Ye; Rossmann, Michael G. (Purdue)

    2011-12-22

    The tailed bacteriophage {phi}29 capsid is decorated with 55 fibers attached to quasi-3-fold symmetry positions. Each fiber is a homotrimer of gene product 8.5 (gp8.5) and consists of two major structural parts, a pseudohexagonal base and a protruding fibrous portion that is about 110 {angstrom} in length. The crystal structure of the C-terminal fibrous portion (residues 112-280) has been determined to a resolution of 1.6 {angstrom}. The structure is about 150 {angstrom} long and shows three distinct structural domains designated as head, neck, and stem. The stem region is a unique three-stranded helix-turn-helix supercoil that has not previously been described. When fitted into a cryoelectron microscope reconstruction of the virus, the head structure corresponded to a disconnected density at the distal end of the fiber and the neck structure was located in weak density connecting it to the fiber. Thin section studies of Bacillus subtilis cells infected with fibered or fiberless {phi}29 suggest that the fibers might enhance the attachment of the virions onto the host cell wall.

  13. Structure of bacteriophage phi29 head fibers has a supercoiled triple repeating helix-turn-helix motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Ye; Rossmann, Michael G

    2011-03-22

    The tailed bacteriophage 29 capsid is decorated with 55 fibers attached to quasi-3-fold symmetry positions. Each fiber is a homotrimer of gene product 8.5 (gp8.5) and consists of two major structural parts, a pseudohexagonal base and a protruding fibrous portion that is about 110 Å in length. The crystal structure of the C-terminal fibrous portion (residues 112-280) has been determined to a resolution of 1.6 Å. The structure is about 150 Å long and shows three distinct structural domains designated as head, neck, and stem. The stem region is a unique three-stranded helix-turn-helix supercoil that has not previously been described. When fitted into a cryoelectron microscope reconstruction of the virus, the head structure corresponded to a disconnected density at the distal end of the fiber and the neck structure was located in weak density connecting it to the fiber. Thin section studies of Bacillus subtilis cells infected with fibered or fiberless 29 suggest that the fibers might enhance the attachment of the virions onto the host cell wall.

  14. The structural basis of actinomycin D-binding induces nucleotide flipping out, a sharp bend and a left-handed twist in CGG triplet repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Yu-Sheng; Tseng, Wen-Hsuan; Chuang, Chien-Ying; Hou, Ming-Hon

    2013-04-01

    The potent anticancer drug actinomycin D (ActD) functions by intercalating into DNA at GpC sites, thereby interrupting essential biological processes including replication and transcription. Certain neurological diseases are correlated with the expansion of (CGG)n trinucleotide sequences, which contain many contiguous GpC sites separated by a single G:G mispair. To characterize the binding of ActD to CGG triplet repeat sequences, the structural basis for the strong binding of ActD to neighbouring GpC sites flanking a G:G mismatch has been determined based on the crystal structure of ActD bound to ATGCGGCAT, which contains a CGG triplet sequence. The binding of ActD molecules to GCGGC causes many unexpected conformational changes including nucleotide flipping out, a sharp bend and a left-handed twist in the DNA helix via a two site-binding model. Heat denaturation, circular dichroism and surface plasmon resonance analyses showed that adjacent GpC sequences flanking a G:G mismatch are preferred ActD-binding sites. In addition, ActD was shown to bind the hairpin conformation of (CGG)16 in a pairwise combination and with greater stability than that of other DNA intercalators. Our results provide evidence of a possible biological consequence of ActD binding to CGG triplet repeat sequences.

  15. The crystal structure of HIV CRF07 B′/C gp41 reveals a hyper-mutant site in the middle of HR2 heptad repeat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Jiansen; Xue, Hailing; Ma, Jing; Liu, Fang [State Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemical Biology, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Zhou, Jianhua [Harbin Veterinary Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Harbin 150001 (China); Shao, Yiming [State Key Laboratory for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, and National Center for AIDS/STD Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 102206 (China); Qiao, Wentao, E-mail: wentaoqiao@nankai.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemical Biology, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Liu, Xinqi, E-mail: liu2008@nankai.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemical Biology, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2013-11-15

    HIV CRF07 B′/C is a strain circulating mainly in northwest region of China. The gp41 region of CRF07 is derived from a clade C virus. In order to compare the difference of CRF07 gp41 with that of typical clade B virus, we solved the crystal structure of the core region of CRF07 gp41. Compared with clade B gp41, CRF07 gp41 evolved more basic and hydrophilic residues on its helix bundle surface. Based on sequence alignment, a hyper-mutant cluster located in the middle of HR2 heptads repeat was identified. The mutational study of these residues revealed that this site is important in HIV mediated cell–cell fusion and plays critical roles in conformational changes during viral invasion. - Highlights: • We solved the crystal structure of HIV CRF07 gp41 core region. • A hyper-mutant cluster in the middle of HR2 heptads repeat was identified. • The hyper-mutant site is important in HIV-cell fusion. • The model will help to understand the HIV fusion process.

  16. Evaluation of genetic diversity and population structure in a commercially important freshwater fish Prochilodus costatus (Characiformes, Prochilodontidae) using complex hypervariable repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroca, T M; Santos, G B; Duarte, N V R; Kalapothakis, E

    2012-12-17

    We used complex hypervariable repeats to evaluate the genetic diversity and structure of Prochilodus costatus (Characiformes), an ecologically and economically important species endemic to the São Francisco River basin. Hydroelectric dams along the river have led to population fragmentation, which can limit gene flow. Restocking from hatcheries has been used to repopulate declining populations. To determine how fragmentation and hatchery supplementation affect P. costatus population structure, we studied populations from three sites up and downstream of the Gafanhoto Dam (Pará River, State of Minas Gerais). High levels of genetic diversity were found within populations (0.926 to 0.873); the three populations showed significant differentiation (F(ST) = 0.16), suggesting that populations from the three sites were affected by fragmentation of the river and by hatchery contributions. These results will be useful for developing a management and conservation plan for fish species in this area.

  17. The structure formed by inverted repeats in p53 response elements determines the transactivation activity of p53 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brázda, Václav; Čechová, Jana; Battistin, Michele; Coufal, Jan; Jagelská, Eva B; Raimondi, Ivan; Inga, Alberto

    2017-01-29

    The TP53 gene is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancer and p53 protein plays a crucial role in gene expression and cancer protection. Its role is manifested by interactions with other proteins and DNA. p53 is a transcription factor that binds to DNA response elements (REs). Due to the palindromic nature of the consensus binding site, several p53-REs have the potential to form cruciform structures. However, the influence of cruciform formation on the activity of p53-REs has not been evaluated. Therefore, we prepared sets of p53-REs with identical theoretical binding affinity in their linear state, but different probabilities to form extra helical structures, for in vitro and in vivo analyses. Then we evaluated the presence of cruciform structures when inserted into plasmid DNA and employed a yeast-based assay to measure transactivation potential of these p53-REs cloned at a chromosomal locus in isogenic strains. We show that transactivation in vivo correlated more with relative propensity of an RE to form cruciforms than to its predicted in vitro DNA binding affinity for wild type p53. Structural features of p53-REs could therefore be an important determinant of p53 transactivation function.

  18. Tree diversity, composition, forest structure and aboveground biomass dynamics after single and repeated fire in a Bornean rain forest

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slik, J.W.F.; Bernard, C.S.; Beek, van M.; Breman, F.C.; Eichhorn, K.A.O.

    2008-01-01

    Forest fires remain a devastating phenomenon in the tropics that not only affect forest structure and biodiversity, but also contribute significantly to atmospheric CO2. Fire used to be extremely rare in tropical forests, leaving ample time for forests to regenerate to pre-fire conditions. In recent

  19. Teaching with Crystal Structures: Helping Students Recognize and Classify the Smallest Repeating Particle in a Given Substance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithenry, Dennis W.

    2009-01-01

    Classifying a particle requires an understanding of the type of bonding that exists within and among the particles, which requires an understanding of atomic structure and electron configurations, which requires an understanding of the elements of periodic properties, and so on. Rather than getting tangled up in all of these concepts at the start…

  20. Genetic variation and population structure of Sudanese populations as indicated by 15 Identifiler sequence-tagged repeat (STR loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babiker Hiba MA

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is substantial ethnic, cultural and linguistic diversity among the people living in east Africa, Sudan and the Nile Valley. The region around the Nile Valley has a long history of succession of different groups, coupled with demographic and migration events, potentially leading to genetic structure among humans in the region. Result We report the genotypes of the 15 Identifiler microsatellite markers for 498 individuals from 18 Sudanese populations representing different ethnic and linguistic groups. The combined power of exclusion (PE was 0.9999981, and the combined match probability was 1 in 7.4 × 1017. The genotype data from the Sudanese populations was combined with previously published genotype data from Egypt, Somalia and the Karamoja population from Uganda. The Somali population was found to be genetically distinct from the other northeast African populations. Individuals from northern Sudan clustered together with those from Egypt, and individuals from southern Sudan clustered with those from the Karamoja population. The similarity of the Nubian and Egyptian populations suggest that migration, potentially bidirectional, occurred along the Nile river Valley, which is consistent with the historical evidence for long-term interactions between Egypt and Nubia. Conclusion We show that despite the levels of population structure in Sudan, standard forensic summary statistics are robust tools for personal identification and parentage analysis in Sudan. Although some patterns of population structure can be revealed with 15 microsatellites, a much larger set of genetic markers is needed to detect fine-scale population structure in east Africa and the Nile Valley.

  1. Effect of repeat unit structure and molecular mass of lactic acid bacteria hetero-exopolysaccharides on binding to milk proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birch, Johnny; HarÐarson, HörÐur Kári; Khan, Sanaullah

    2017-01-01

    -exopolysaccharides (HePSs) of 0.14–4.9 MDa from lactic acid bacteria to different milk proteins (β-casein, κ-casein, native and heat-treated β-lactoglobulin) at pH 4.0–5.0. Maximum binding capacity (RUmax) and apparent affinity (KA,app) were HePS- and protein-dependent and varied for example 10- and 600-fold......Interactions of exopolysaccharides and proteins are of great importance in food science, but complicated to analyze and quantify at the molecular level. A surface plasmon resonance procedure was established to characterize binding of seven structure-determined, branched hetero...

  2. The population structure of Trypanosoma cruzi: expanded analysis of 54 strains using eight polymorphic CA-repeat microsatellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riva P Oliveira

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently we cloned and sequenced the first eight Trypanosoma cruzi polymorphic microsatellite loci and studied 31 clones and strains to obtain valuable information about the population structure of the parasite. We have now studied 23 further strains, increasing from 11 to 31 the number of strains obtained from patients with chronic Chagas disease. This expanded set of 54 strains and clones analyzed with the eight microsatellites markers confirmed the previously observed diploidy, clonal population organization and very high polymorphism of T. cruzi. Moreover, this new study disclosed two new features of the population genetic structure of T. cruzi. The first was the discovery that, similarly to what we had previously shown for strains isolated from insect vectors, mammals and humans with acute disease, isolates from patients in the chronic phase of Chagas disease could also be multiclonal, albeit at a reduced proportion. Second, when we used parsimony to display the genetic relationship among the clonal lineages in an unrooted Wagner network we observed, like before, a good correlation of the tree topography with the classification in three clusters on the basis of single locus analysis of the ribosomal RNA genes. However, a significant new finding was that now the strains belonging to cluster 2 split in two distant sub-clusters. This observation suggests that the evolutionary history of T. cruzi may be more complex than we previously thought.

  3. Dynamics and internal structure of an Alaskan debris-covered glacier from repeat airborne photogrammetry and surface geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, John; Levy, Joseph; Petersen, Eric; Larsen, Chris; Fahnestock, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Debris-covered glaciers and rock glaciers encompass a range of compositions and activity, and can be useful paleoclimate indicators. They also respond differently to ongoing climate change than glaciers without a protective cover. Their flow dynamics are not well understood, and their unique surface morphologies, including lobate fronts and arcuate ridges, likely result from viscous flow influenced by a combination of composition, structure, and climatic factors. However, basic connections between flow kinematics and surface morphology have not yet been established, limiting our ability to understand these features. In order to begin to address this problem we have undertaken airborne and surface studies of multiple debris-covered glaciers in Alaska and the western U.S. Sourdough Rock Glacier in the St. Elias Mountains, Alaska, is completely debris-covered and exhibits numerous transverse compressional ridges. Its trunk also exhibits highly regular bumps and swales with a wavelength of ~175 m and amplitudes up to 12 m. In the middle trunk, lineations (boulder trains and furrows) bend around a point roughly 200m from the eastern edge. We acquired five high-resolution airborne surveys of Sourdough Rock Glacier between late 2013 and late 2015 using lidar and photogrammetry to assess annual and seasonal change at the sub-meter level. Differencing the DTMs provides vertical change while feature tracking in orthophotos provide horizontal velocities that indicate meters of annual motion. The flow field is highly correlated with surface features; in particular, compressional ridges in the lower lobe. Stranded, formerly active lobes are also apparent. Surface geophysical studies were undertaken to constrain internal structure and composition using a combination of ground-penetrating radar (GPR) at 50 and 100 MHz in six transects, and time-domain electromagnetic (TDEM) measurements at 47 locations, primarily in an along-flow transect and two cross-flow transects. We infer

  4. [The structure of the O-specific polysaccharide from a mutant of nitrogen-fixing rhizobacterium Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 with an altered plasmid content].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedonenko, Iu P; Katsy, E I; Petrova, L P; Boĭko, A S; Zdorovenko, E L; Kachala, V V; Shashkov, A S; Knirel', Iu A

    2010-01-01

    The rhizobacteria Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 produce antigenically different lipopolysaccharides LPSI and LPSII, both containing identical pentasaccharides built from D-rhamnose residues as the repeated chains of O-specific oligosaccharides (OPS). In this study, we report the structure of the OPS from A. brasilense LPSI(-)LPSII(-)-mutant Sp245.5, which spontaneously lost the p85 and p120 plasmids upon the formation of a new 300-MDa megaplasmid after the long-term storage of the bacteria in a rich medium. The repeating unit of the A. brasilense mutant Sp245.5 appeared to be a disaccharide consisting of residues of N-acetyl-D-galactosamine and N-acetyl-D-mannosaminuronic acid: [Formula: see text].

  5. Structural and Functional Characterization of an Archaeal Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat (CRISPR)-associated Complex for Antiviral Defense (CASCADE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lintner, Nathanael G; Kerou, Melina; Brumfield, Susan K

    2011-01-01

    In response to viral infection, many prokaryotes incorporate fragments of virus-derived DNA into loci called clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs). The loci are then transcribed, and the processed CRISPR transcripts are used to target invading viral DNA and RNA....... The Escherichia coli "CRISPR-associated complex for antiviral defense" (CASCADE) is central in targeting invading DNA. Here we report the structural and functional characterization of an archaeal CASCADE (aCASCADE) from Sulfolobus solfataricus. Tagged Csa2 (Cas7) expressed in S. solfataricus co-purifies with Cas5......a-, Cas6-, Csa5-, and Cas6-processed CRISPR-RNA (crRNA). Csa2, the dominant protein in aCASCADE, forms a stable complex with Cas5a. Transmission electron microscopy reveals a helical complex of variable length, perhaps due to substoichiometric amounts of other CASCADE components. A recombinant Csa2...

  6. Effect of different disaccharides on the integrity and fertilising ability of freeze-dried boar spermatozoa: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, A; Gil, L; Malo, C; Martinez, F; Kershaw-Young, C; de Blas, I

    2014-01-01

    Freeze-drying spermatozoa is a developing technique that facilitates semen storage and transport. However, freeze-dried sperm exhibits impaired DNA integrity, which is associated with reduced fertilizing ability. Boar spermatozoa were freeze-dried in three different freeze-drying EDTA buffers with trehalose (75mM) and lactose (75mM) (EDTA-TL), (2) with sucrose (75mM) and lactose (75mM) (EDTA-SL) or just lactose (150mM) (EDTA-LL) using two freeze-drying protocols. In experiment 1 a one-step protocol was used and in experiment 2 a two-steps protocol was used. Spermatozoa were stored in1.5 mL cryo-tubes and 1.5 mL glass ampules at both 16 degree C and 25 degree C for 1 month. Successfully freeze-dried spermatozoa were stained with acridine-orange to assess chromatin stability. Freeze-drying was most successful when the 2-step protocol was used (experiment 2). Chromatin stability was greater in samples stored in glass ampules compared to cryo tubes. Chromatin stability was also greater in samples freeze-dried in EDTA-LL compared to EDTA-SL or EDTA-TL buffers. Spermatozoa freeze-dried in EDTA-LL and stored for 14 and 28 days at either 16 degree C or 25 degree C were utilized for ICSI. Two pronuclear formation wasgreatest using spermatozoa stored at 25 degree C (69.23%) and for 28 days (50%). Although 16 degree C spermatozoa samples had better stable chromatin, 25 degree C spermatozoa samples offered better two pronuclear formation results. In conclusion, boar spermatozoa freeze-dried using media containing disaccharides exhibit high chromatin stability and are able to fertilise oocytes following ICSI. Disaccharides may therefore advance the development of freeze-drying techniques for spermatozoa enabling ease of sperm storage and transportation.

  7. Preparation of a polyclonal antibody that recognizes a unique galactoseβ1-4fucose disaccharide epitope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Tomoharu; Nishiyama, Kazusa; Saito, Saori; Tamura, Mayumi; Fuwa, Takashi J; Nishihara, Shoko; Takahashi, Hideyo; Natsugari, Hideaki; Arata, Yoichiro; Kasai, Ken-ichi

    2015-08-14

    Galactoseβ1-4fucose (Galβ1-4Fuc) is a unique disaccharide unit that has been found only in the N-glycans of protostomia. We demonstrated that this unit has a role as an endogenous ligand for Caenorhabditis elegans galectins. This unit is also recognized by fungal and mammalian galectins possibly as a non-self glycomarker. In order to clarify its biological function, we made a polyclonal antibody using (Galβ1-4Fuc)n-BSA as the antigen, which was prepared by crosslinking Galβ1-4Fuc-O-(CH2)2-SH and BSA. The binding specificity of the antibody was analyzed by frontal affinity chromatography, and it was confirmed that it recognizes naturally occurring N-glycans containing the Galβ1-4Fuc unit linked to the reducing-end GlcNAc via α1-6 linkage. By western blotting analysis, the antibody was also found to bind to (Galβ1-4Fuc)n-BSA but not to BSA or asialofetuin, which has N-glycan chains containing Galβ1-4GlcNAc. Western blotting experiments also revealed presence of stained proteins in crude extracts of C. elegans, the parasitic nematode Ascaris suum, and the allergenic mite Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, while those from Drosophila melanogaster, Mus musculus, and the allergenic mites Dermatophagoides farinae and Tyrophagus putrescentiae were negative. This antibody should be a very useful tool for research on the distribution of the Galβ1-4Fuc disaccharide unit in glycans in a wide range of organisms.

  8. Structural and Functional Characterization of an Archaeal Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat (CRISPR)-associated Complex for Antiviral Defense (CASCADE)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lintner, Nathanael G.; Kerou, Melina; Brumfield, Susan K.; Graham, Shirley; Liu, Huanting; Naismith, James H.; Sdano, Matthew; Peng, Nan; She, Qunxin; Copié, Valérie; Young, Mark J.; White, Malcolm F.; Lawrence, C. Martin

    2011-01-01

    In response to viral infection, many prokaryotes incorporate fragments of virus-derived DNA into loci called clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs). The loci are then transcribed, and the processed CRISPR transcripts are used to target invading viral DNA and RNA. The Escherichia coli “CRISPR-associated complex for antiviral defense” (CASCADE) is central in targeting invading DNA. Here we report the structural and functional characterization of an archaeal CASCADE (aCASCADE) from Sulfolobus solfataricus. Tagged Csa2 (Cas7) expressed in S. solfataricus co-purifies with Cas5a-, Cas6-, Csa5-, and Cas6-processed CRISPR-RNA (crRNA). Csa2, the dominant protein in aCASCADE, forms a stable complex with Cas5a. Transmission electron microscopy reveals a helical complex of variable length, perhaps due to substoichiometric amounts of other CASCADE components. A recombinant Csa2-Cas5a complex is sufficient to bind crRNA and complementary ssDNA. The structure of Csa2 reveals a crescent-shaped structure unexpectedly composed of a modified RNA-recognition motif and two additional domains present as insertions in the RNA-recognition motif. Conserved residues indicate potential crRNA- and target DNA-binding sites, and the H160A variant shows significantly reduced affinity for crRNA. We propose a general subunit architecture for CASCADE in other bacteria and Archaea. PMID:21507944

  9. Structural and functional characterization of an archaeal clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-associated complex for antiviral defense (CASCADE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lintner, Nathanael G; Kerou, Melina; Brumfield, Susan K; Graham, Shirley; Liu, Huanting; Naismith, James H; Sdano, Matthew; Peng, Nan; She, Qunxin; Copié, Valérie; Young, Mark J; White, Malcolm F; Lawrence, C Martin

    2011-06-17

    In response to viral infection, many prokaryotes incorporate fragments of virus-derived DNA into loci called clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs). The loci are then transcribed, and the processed CRISPR transcripts are used to target invading viral DNA and RNA. The Escherichia coli "CRISPR-associated complex for antiviral defense" (CASCADE) is central in targeting invading DNA. Here we report the structural and functional characterization of an archaeal CASCADE (aCASCADE) from Sulfolobus solfataricus. Tagged Csa2 (Cas7) expressed in S. solfataricus co-purifies with Cas5a-, Cas6-, Csa5-, and Cas6-processed CRISPR-RNA (crRNA). Csa2, the dominant protein in aCASCADE, forms a stable complex with Cas5a. Transmission electron microscopy reveals a helical complex of variable length, perhaps due to substoichiometric amounts of other CASCADE components. A recombinant Csa2-Cas5a complex is sufficient to bind crRNA and complementary ssDNA. The structure of Csa2 reveals a crescent-shaped structure unexpectedly composed of a modified RNA-recognition motif and two additional domains present as insertions in the RNA-recognition motif. Conserved residues indicate potential crRNA- and target DNA-binding sites, and the H160A variant shows significantly reduced affinity for crRNA. We propose a general subunit architecture for CASCADE in other bacteria and Archaea.

  10. Structural and biochemical analysis of nuclease domain of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-associated protein 3 (Cas3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulepati, Sabin; Bailey, Scott

    2011-09-09

    RNA transcribed from clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) protects many prokaryotes from invasion by foreign DNA such as viruses, conjugative plasmids, and transposable elements. Cas3 (CRISPR-associated protein 3) is essential for this CRISPR protection and is thought to mediate cleavage of the foreign DNA through its N-terminal histidine-aspartate (HD) domain. We report here the 1.8 Å crystal structure of the HD domain of Cas3 from Thermus thermophilus HB8. Structural and biochemical studies predict that this enzyme binds two metal ions at its active site. We also demonstrate that the single-stranded DNA endonuclease activity of this T. thermophilus domain is activated not by magnesium but by transition metal ions such as manganese and nickel. Structure-guided mutagenesis confirms the importance of the metal-binding residues for the nuclease activity and identifies other active site residues. Overall, these results provide a framework for understanding the role of Cas3 in the CRISPR system.

  11. Repeat-until-success quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruschi, David Edward; Barlow, Thomas M.; Razavi, Mohsen; Beige, Almut

    2014-09-01

    We propose a repeat-until-success protocol to improve the performance of probabilistic quantum repeaters. Conventionally, these rely on passive static linear-optics elements and photodetectors to perform Bell-state measurements (BSMs) with a maximum success rate of 50%. This is a strong impediment for entanglement swapping between distant quantum memories. Every time a BSM fails, entanglement needs to be redistributed between the corresponding memories in the repeater link. The key ingredients of our scheme are repeatable BSMs. Under ideal conditions, these turn probabilistic quantum repeaters into deterministic ones. Under realistic conditions, our protocol too might fail. However, using additional threshold detectors now allows us to improve the entanglement generation rate by almost orders of magnitude, at a nominal distance of 1000 km, compared to schemes that rely on conventional BSMs. This improvement is sufficient to make the performance of our scheme comparable to the expected performance of some deterministic quantum repeaters.

  12. ProtRepeatsDB: a database of amino acid repeats in genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chauhan Virander S

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome wide and cross species comparisons of amino acid repeats is an intriguing problem in biology mainly due to the highly polymorphic nature and diverse functions of amino acid repeats. Innate protein repeats constitute vital functional and structural regions in proteins. Repeats are of great consequence in evolution of proteins, as evident from analysis of repeats in different organisms. In the post genomic era, availability of protein sequences encoded in different genomes provides a unique opportunity to perform large scale comparative studies of amino acid repeats. ProtRepeatsDB http://bioinfo.icgeb.res.in/repeats/ is a relational database of perfect and mismatch repeats, access to which is designed as a resource and collection of tools for detection and cross species comparisons of different types of amino acid repeats. Description ProtRepeatsDB (v1.2 consists of perfect as well as mismatch amino acid repeats in the protein sequences of 141 organisms, the genomes of which are now available. The web interface of ProtRepeatsDB consists of different tools to perform repeat s; based on protein IDs, organism name, repeat sequences, and keywords as in FASTA headers, size, frequency, gene ontology (GO annotation IDs and regular expressions (REGEXP describing repeats. These tools also allow formulation of a variety of simple, complex and logical queries to facilitate mining and large-scale cross-species comparisons of amino acid repeats. In addition to this, the database also contains sequence analysis tools to determine repeats in user input sequences. Conclusion ProtRepeatsDB is a multi-organism database of different types of amino acid repeats present in proteins. It integrates useful tools to perform genome wide queries for rapid screening and identification of amino acid repeats and facilitates comparative and evolutionary studies of the repeats. The database is useful for identification of species or organism specific

  13. Common interruptions in the repeating tripeptide sequence of non-fibrillar collagens: sequence analysis and structural studies on triple-helix peptide models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiagarajan, Geetha; Li, Yingjie; Mohs, Angela; Strafaci, Christopher; Popiel, Magdalena; Baum, Jean; Brodsky, Barbara

    2008-02-22

    Interruptions in the repeating (Gly-X1-X2)(n) amino acid sequence pattern are found in the triple-helix domains of all non-fibrillar collagens, and perturbations to the triple-helix at such sites are likely to play a role in collagen higher-order structure and function. This study defines the sequence features and structural consequences of the most common interruption, where one residue is missing from the tripeptide pattern, Gly-X1-X2-Gly-AA(1)-Gly-X1-X2, designated G1G interruptions. Residues found within G1G interruptions are predominantly hydrophobic (70%), followed by a significant amount of charged residues (16%), and the Gly-X1-X2 triplets flanking the interruption are atypical. Studies on peptide models indicate the degree of destabilization is much greater when Pro is in the interruption, GP, than when hydrophobic residues (GF, GY) are present, and a rigid Gly-Pro-Hyp tripeptide adjacent to the interruption leads to greater destabilization than a flexible Gly-Ala-Ala sequence. Modeling based on NMR data indicates the Phe residue within a GF interruption is located on the outside of the triple helix. The G1G interruptions resemble a previously studied collagen interruption GPOGAAVMGPO, designated G4G-type, in that both are destabilizing, but allow continuation of rod-like triple helices and maintenance of the single residue stagger throughout the imperfection, with a loss of axial register of the superhelix on both sides. Both kinds of interruptions result in a highly localized perturbation in hydrogen bonding and dihedral angles, but the hydrophobic residue of a G4G interruption packs near the central axis of the superhelix, while the hydrophobic residue of a G1G interruption is located on the triple-helix surface. The different structural consequences of G1G and G4G interruptions in the repeating tripeptide sequence pattern suggest a physical basis for their differential susceptibility to matrix metalloproteinases in type X collagen.

  14. An Empirical Comparison of Competing Factor Structures for the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status: A Project FRONTIER Study†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrence, Nicole D.; John, Samantha E.; Gavett, Brandon E.; O'Bryant, Sid E.

    2016-01-01

    The original factor structure of the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS) has received little empirical support, but at least eight alternative factor structures have been identified in the literature. The current study used confirmatory factor analysis to compare the original RBANS model with eight alternatives, which were adjusted to include a general factor. Participant data were obtained from Project FRONTIER, an epidemiological study of rural health, and comprised 341 adults (229 women, 112 men) with mean age of 61.2 years (SD = 12.1) and mean education of 12.4 years (SD = 3.3). A bifactor version of the model proposed by Duff and colleagues provided the best fit to the data (CFI = 0.98; root-mean-squared error of approximation = 0.07), but required further modification to produce appropriate factor loadings. The results support the inclusion of a general factor and provide partial replication of the Duff and colleagues RBANS model. PMID:26429558

  15. Analysis of genetic diversity and population structure of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) from China and Malaysia based on species-specific simple sequence repeat markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, L X; Xiao, Y; Xia, W; Yang, Y D

    2015-12-08

    Genetic diversity and patterns of population structure of the 94 oil palm lines were investigated using species-specific simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. We designed primers for 63 SSR loci based on their flanking sequences and conducted amplification in 94 oil palm DNA samples. The amplification result showed that a relatively high level of genetic diversity was observed between oil palm individuals according a set of 21 polymorphic microsatellite loci. The observed heterozygosity (Ho) was 0.3683 and 0.4035, with an average of 0.3859. The Ho value was a reliable determinant of the discriminatory power of the SSR primer combinations. The principal component analysis and unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic averaging cluster analysis showed the 94 oil palm lines were grouped into one cluster. These results demonstrated that the oil palm in Hainan Province of China and the germplasm introduced from Malaysia may be from the same source. The SSR protocol was effective and reliable for assessing the genetic diversity of oil palm. Knowledge of the genetic diversity and population structure will be crucial for establishing appropriate management stocks for this species.

  16. Crystal Structure of Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)-associated Csn2 Protein Revealed Ca[superscript 2+]-dependent Double-stranded DNA Binding Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Ki Hyun; Kurinov, Igor; Ke, Ailong (Cornell); (NWU)

    2012-05-22

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and their associated protein genes (cas genes) are widespread in bacteria and archaea. They form a line of RNA-based immunity to eradicate invading bacteriophages and malicious plasmids. A key molecular event during this process is the acquisition of new spacers into the CRISPR loci to guide the selective degradation of the matching foreign genetic elements. Csn2 is a Nmeni subtype-specific cas gene required for new spacer acquisition. Here we characterize the Enterococcus faecalis Csn2 protein as a double-stranded (ds-) DNA-binding protein and report its 2.7 {angstrom} tetrameric ring structure. The inner circle of the Csn2 tetrameric ring is {approx}26 {angstrom} wide and populated with conserved lysine residues poised for nonspecific interactions with ds-DNA. Each Csn2 protomer contains an {alpha}/{beta} domain and an {alpha}-helical domain; significant hinge motion was observed between these two domains. Ca{sup 2+} was located at strategic positions in the oligomerization interface. We further showed that removal of Ca{sup 2+} ions altered the oligomerization state of Csn2, which in turn severely decreased its affinity for ds-DNA. In summary, our results provided the first insight into the function of the Csn2 protein in CRISPR adaptation by revealing that it is a ds-DNA-binding protein functioning at the quaternary structure level and regulated by Ca{sup 2+} ions.

  17. Analysis of genetic diversity and population structure of peanut cultivars and breeding lines from China, India and the US using simple sequence repeat markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Khera, Pawan; Huang, Bingyan; Yuan, Mei; Katam, Ramesh; Zhuang, Weijian; Harris-Shultz, Karen; Moore, Kim M; Culbreath, Albert K; Zhang, Xinyou; Varshney, Rajeev K; Xie, Lianhui; Guo, Baozhu

    2016-05-01

    Cultivated peanut is grown worldwide as rich-source of oil and protein. A broad genetic base is needed for cultivar improvement. The objectives of this study were to develop highly informative simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and to assess the genetic diversity and population structure of peanut cultivars and breeding lines from different breeding programs in China, India and the US. A total of 111 SSR markers were selected for this study, resulting in a total of 472 alleles. The mean values of gene diversity and polymorphic information content (PIC) were 0.480 and 0.429, respectively. Country-wise analysis revealed that alleles per locus in three countries were similar. The mean gene diversity in the US, China and India was 0.363, 0.489 and 0.47 with an average PIC of 0.323, 0.43 and 0.412, respectively. Genetic analysis using the STRUCTURE divided these peanut lines into two populations (P1, P2), which was consistent with the dendrogram based on genetic distance (G1, G2) and the clustering of principal component analysis. The groupings were related to peanut market types and the geographic origin with a few admixtures. The results could be used by breeding programs to assess the genetic diversity of breeding materials to broaden the genetic base and for molecular genetics studies.

  18. Analysis of genetic diversity and population structure of peanut cultivars and breeding lines from China, India and the US using simple sequence repeat markers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Wang; Xinyou Zhang; Rajeev K. Varshney; Lianhui Xie; Baozhu Guo; Pawan Khera; Bingyan Huang; Mei Yuan; Ramesh Katam; Weijian Zhuang; Karen Harris-Shultz; Kim M. Moore; Albert K. Culbreath

    2016-01-01

    Cultivated peanut is grown worldwide as rich-source of oil and protein. A broad genetic base is needed for cultivar improvement. The objectives of this study were to develop highly informative simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and to assess the genetic diversity and population structure of peanut cultivars and breeding lines from different breeding programs in China, India and the US. A total of 111 SSR markers were selected for this study, resulting in a total of 472 alleles. The mean values of gene diversity and polymorphic information content (PIC) were 0.480 and 0.429, respectively. Country-wise analysis revealed that alleles per locus in three countries were similar. The mean gene diversity in the US, China and India was 0.363, 0.489 and 0.47 with an average PIC of 0.323, 0.43 and 0.412, respectively. Genetic analysis using the STRUCTURE divided these peanut lines into two populations (P1, P2), which was consistent with the dendro-gram based on genetic distance (G1, G2) and the clustering of principal component analysis. The groupings were related to peanut market types and the geographic origin with a few admixtures. The results could be used by breeding programs to assess the genetic diversity of breeding materials to broaden the genetic base and for molecular genetics studies.

  19. [Conformational polymorphysm of G-rich fragments of DNA Alu-repeats. II. the putative role of G-quadruplex structures in genomic rearrangements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varizhuk, A M; Sekridova, A V; Tankevich, M V; Podgorsky, V S; Smirnov, I P; Pozmogova, G E

    2016-11-01

    Three evolutionary conserved sites of Alu repeats (PQS2, PQS3 and PQS4) were shown to form stable inter- and intramolecular G-quadruplexes (GQs) in vitro. Structures and topologies of these GQs were elucidated using spectral methods. Self-association of G-rich Alu fragments was studied. Dimeric GQ formation from two distal identical or different putative quadruplex sites - (PQS2)2, (PQS3)2 or PQS2-PQS3 - within one lengthy DNA strand was demonstrated by a FRET-based method. Oligomer PQS4 (folded into a parallel intramolecular GQ) was shown to form stacks of quadruplexes that are stabilized by stacking interactions of external G-tetrads (this was confirmed by DOSY NMR, AFM microscopy and differential CD spectroscopy). Comparative analysis of the properties of various GQs allowed us to put forward a hypothesis of two general mechanisms of intermolecular GQ-dependant genomic rearrangements: 1) formation of a dimeric GQs; 2) association of pre-folded intramolecular parallel GQs from different strands into GQ-stacks. Thus, the observed co-localization of G-rich motifs of Alu elements with double-strand break hotspots and rearrangement hotspots may be accounted for by the specific secondary structure of these motifs. At the same time, this is likely primarily due to high abundance of such G-rich Alu fragments in the genome.

  20. Crystal structure of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated Csn2 protein revealed Ca2+-dependent double-stranded DNA binding activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Ki Hyun; Kurinov, Igor; Ke, Ailong

    2011-09-02

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and their associated protein genes (cas genes) are widespread in bacteria and archaea. They form a line of RNA-based immunity to eradicate invading bacteriophages and malicious plasmids. A key molecular event during this process is the acquisition of new spacers into the CRISPR loci to guide the selective degradation of the matching foreign genetic elements. Csn2 is a Nmeni subtype-specific cas gene required for new spacer acquisition. Here we characterize the Enterococcus faecalis Csn2 protein as a double-stranded (ds-) DNA-binding protein and report its 2.7 Å tetrameric ring structure. The inner circle of the Csn2 tetrameric ring is ∼26 Å wide and populated with conserved lysine residues poised for nonspecific interactions with ds-DNA. Each Csn2 protomer contains an α/β domain and an α-helical domain; significant hinge motion was observed between these two domains. Ca(2+) was located at strategic positions in the oligomerization interface. We further showed that removal of Ca(2+) ions altered the oligomerization state of Csn2, which in turn severely decreased its affinity for ds-DNA. In summary, our results provided the first insight into the function of the Csn2 protein in CRISPR adaptation by revealing that it is a ds-DNA-binding protein functioning at the quaternary structure level and regulated by Ca(2+) ions.

  1. Partial structural characterization of pectin cell wall from Argania spinosa leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachem, Kadda; Benabdesslem, Yasmina; Ghomari, Samia; Hasnaoui, Okkacha; Kaid-Harche, Meriem

    2016-02-01

    The pectin polysaccharides from leaves of Argania spinosa (L.) Skeels, collected from Stidia area in the west coast of northern Algeria, were investigated by using sequential extractions and the resulting fractions were analysed for monosaccharide composition and chemical structure. Water-soluble pectic (ALS-WSP) and chelating-soluble pectic (ALS-CSP) fractions were obtained, de-esterified and fractionated by anion-exchange chromatography and characterized by sugar analysis combined with methylation analysis and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy. The data reveal the presence of altering homogalacturonan (HG) and rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I) in both pectin fraction. The rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I) are consisted of a disaccharide repeating unit [→ α-D-GalpA-1,2-α-L-Rhap-1,4 →] backbone, with side chains contained highly branched α-(1 → 5)-linked arabinan and short linear β-(1 → 4)-linked galactan, attached to O-4 of the rhamnosyl residues.

  2. The secondary structure of the R region of a murine leukemia virus is important for stimulation of long terminal repeat-driven gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupelli, L; Okenquist, S A; Trubetskoy, A; Lenz, J

    1998-10-01

    In addition to their role in reverse transcription, the R-region sequences of some retroviruses affect viral transcription. The first 28 nucleotides of the R region within the long terminal repeat (LTR) of the murine type C retrovirus SL3 were predicted to form a stem-loop structure. We tested whether this structure affected the transcriptional activity of the viral LTR. Mutations that altered either side of the stem and thus disrupted base pairing were generated. These decreased the level of expression of a reporter gene under the control of viral LTR sequences about 5-fold in transient expression assays and 10-fold in cells stably transformed with the LTR-reporter plasmids. We also generated a compensatory mutant in which both the ascending and descending sides of the stem were mutated such that the nucleotide sequence was different but the predicted secondary structure was maintained. Most of the activity of the wild-type SL3 element was restored in this mutant. Thus, the stem-loop structure was important for the maximum activity of the SL3 LTR. Primer extension analysis indicated that the stem-loop structure affected the levels of cytoplasmic RNA. Nuclear run-on assays indicated that deletion of the R region had a small effect on transcriptional initiation and no effect on RNA polymerase processivity. Thus, the main effect of the R-region element was on one or more steps that occurred after the template was transcribed by RNA polymerase. This finding implied that the main function of the R-region element involved RNA processing. R-region sequences of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 or mouse mammary tumor virus could not replace the SL3 element. R-region sequences from an avian reticuloendotheliosis virus partially substituted for the SL3 sequences. R-region sequences from Moloney murine leukemia virus or feline leukemia virus did function in place of the SL3 element. Thus, the R region element appears to be a general feature of the mammalian type C genus of

  3. Genetic diversity and population structure among pea (Pisum sativum L.) cultivars as revealed by simple sequence repeat and novel genic markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shalu; Kumar, Ajay; Mamidi, Sujan; McPhee, Kevin

    2014-10-01

    Field pea (Pisum sativum L.) is an important cool season legume crop widely grown around the world. This research provides a basis for selection of pea germplasm across geographical regions in current and future breeding and genetic mapping efforts for pea improvement. Eleven novel genic markers were developed from pea expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences having significant similarity with gene calls from Medicago truncatula spanning at least one intron. In this study, 96 cultivars widely grown or used in breeding programs in the USA and Canada were analyzed for genetic diversity using 31 microsatellite or simple sequence repeat (SSR) and 11 novel EST-derived genic markers. The polymorphic information content varied from 0.01-0.56 among SSR markers and 0.04-0.43 among genic markers. The results showed that SSR and EST-derived genic markers displayed one or more highly reproducible, multi-allelic, and easy to score loci ranging from 200 to 700 bp in size. Genetic diversity was assessed through unweighted neighbor-joining method, and 96 varieties were grouped into three main clusters based on the dissimilarity matrix. Four subpopulations were determined through STRUCTURE analysis with no significant geographic separation of the subpopulations. The findings of the present study can be used to select diverse genotypes to be used as parents of crosses aimed for breeding improved pea cultivars.

  4. An evaluation of a structured learning program as a component of the clinical practicum in undergraduate nurse education: A repeated measures analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Elizabeth; Murphy, Maria; MacDonald, Lee; Pascoe, Elizabeth; Storen, Heather; Scanlon, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence that nursing students experience stress and anxiety and a reduction in self-efficacy when undertaking clinical placements. Previous reports have identified that a structured three-day program within the Bachelor of Nursing (BN) clinical practicum reduces the students self-report of anxiety and increases self-efficacy. However, it is unreported whether these improved outcomes are sustained for the duration of the clinical placement. The aim of this study was to evaluate the duration of the effect of a three-day structured learning program within the clinical placement on final year Bachelor of Nursing student's report of anxiety and self-efficacy pre- and post-program participation in this intervention and following completion of the clinical practicum. A repeated measures design. University-based Clinical School of Nursing, acute care clinical practicum. Final year Bachelor of Nursing students. The intervention comprised the three-day program on starting the clinical practicum. A questionnaire included the anxiety subscale of The Hospital Anxiety & Depression Scale (The HAD) and the General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES-12). The questionnaire was completed on day one (time one), upon completion of the three-day program (time two) and upon completion of placement on day 18 (time three). The questionnaire response rate varied over time. There was a statistically significant effect in reducing anxiety over time: F(1.73,74.46)=25.20, plearning program and the benefit of the intervention is sustained for the clinical placement duration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Influenza A Virus Non-structural Protein NS1 Upregulates The Expression of Collagen Triple Helix Repeat Containing 1 Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, C; Peng, G; Yi, W; Song, H; Liu, F; Liu, X

    2016-12-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) infection induces a strong immune response and regulates the expression of many host proteins. The collagen triple helix repeat containing 1 (CTHRC1) protein is a secreted protein that exhibits increased expression during the viral infection process. However, the regulatory function of IAV on CTHRC1 expression is obscure. In this study, we investigated the effect of IAV on CTHRC1 expression and its regulatory mechanism. A total of 106 serum specimens from healthy people and 80 serum specimens from patients infected with IAV were collected. The CTHRC1 levels in the sera from the IVA patients and healthy individuals were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and the differences were statistically analysed. A549 cells were infected with the IAV or delNS1 virus. Additionally, A549 cells were cotransfected with a eukaryotic non-structural NS1 protein gene expression plasmid and the CTHRC1 gene promoter reporter plasmid (pCTHRC1-Luc), and, the luciferase activities were assessed. The CTHRC1 mRNA and protein expression were detected using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting, respectively. The serum CTHRC1 level was significantly higher in the IAV patients than in the healthy individuals. IAV upregulated the CTHRC1 mRNA and protein expression. The non-structural NS1 protein specifically activated CTHRC1 gene promoter activity and upregulated CTHRC1 mRNA and protein expression. The activation function had a dose-dependent effect, indicating that influenza virus upregulated CTHRC1 expression through its NS1 protein.

  6. Application of the Modified Urey-Bradley-Shimanouchi Force field of α-D-Glucopyranose and β-D-Fructopyranose to Predict the Vibrational Spectra of Disaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafour, H. M.; Sekkal-Rahal, M.; Sail, K.

    2014-01-01

    The vibrational frequencies of the disaccharide isomaltulose in the solid state have been reproduced in the 50-4000 cm-1 range. The modified Urey-Bradley-Shimanouchi force field was used, combined with an inter molecular potential energy function that includes van der Waals interactions, electrostatic terms, and an explicit hydrogen bond function. The force constants previously established for α-D-glucopyranose and β-D-fructo pyranose, as well as the crystallographic data of isomaltulose monohydrate, were the starting parameters for the present work. The vibrational frequencies of isomaltulose were calculated and assigned to the experimentally observed vibrational frequencies. Overall, there was good agreement between the observed and calculated frequencies with an average error of 4 cm-1. Furthermore, good agreement was found between our calculated results and the vibration spectra of other disaccharides and monosaccharides.

  7. THE EFFECT OF PLASTICIZER CONTENT AND DISACCHARIDE TYPE ON THE MECHANICAL, BARRIER AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF BOVINE GELATIN-BASED FILMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PEDRO GUERRERO1

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Gelatins are regarded as alternative raw materials to prepare films for food packaging. However, the improvement of their mechanical and water barrier properties is necessary in order to obtain useful materials in service conditions. To improve these functional properties, two strategies have been carried out in this work. First, glycerol was added as plasticizer to increase the flexibility of the films. Second, lactose or sucrose was added to react with gelatin and increase water resistance of gelatin-based films. Commercial gelatin, glycerol and lactose or sucrose were employed in this work and processing of the films was carried out by solution casting. All gelatin films obtained were transparent and flexible. Moreover, the hydrophobic character of the films was increased and the film solubility was decreased by the addition of glycerol and disaccharides. As was observed via FTIR, the changes were due to the interactions between gelatin and glycerol and Maillard reaction between gelatin and disaccharides.

  8. Michaelis-Menten Kinetics in Transient State: Proposal for Reversible Inhibition Model and its Application on Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Disaccharides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Rosa Martins

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The enzymatic processes according Michaelis-Menten kinetics have been studied from various approaches to describe the inhibition state. Proposals for inhibition were compared from a generic process, where kinetic constants have received unitary values, and the numeric value of the concentration of substrate was ten (10 times higher than the numerical value of the concentration of enzyme. For each inhibition model proposed, numerical solutions were obtained from nonlinear system of ordinary differential equations, generating results presents by graphs showing the variation of the enzyme and enzyme complexes, also the variation of substrate and product of the reaction. Also, was designed a model with performance, indicating similar behavior to that seen in the Michaelis-Menten kinetics, where complex of reaction is rapidly formed and throughout the process, tends to decay to zero. Thus, in this new proposed model, the effect of inhibition starts at zero and, throughout the process, tends to the nominal value of the initial enzyme concentration. Such responses have proved to be valid for different values of enzyme concentration and process time, showing robustness. The proposed model was applied to the hydrolysis of disaccharides, providing a setting with conservation of mass of the model at the end of the process regarding the responses of the carbohydrate concentration.

  9. The companion cell-specific Arabidopsis disaccharide carrier AtSUC2 is expressed in nematode-induced syncytia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juergensen, Katja; Scholz-Starke, Joachim; Sauer, Norbert; Hess, Paul; van Bel, Aart J E; Grundler, Florian M W

    2003-01-01

    Cyst nematodes induce a metabolically highly active syncytial cell complex in host roots. The syncytia are symplastically isolated. Because they form a strong sink, assimilates must be imported via the apoplast, thus suggesting that specific membrane-bound sugar transport proteins are expressed and activated. To identify possible candidate genes, transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing different reporter genes under the control of different promoters from Arabidopsis sugar transporter genes were infected with the beet cyst nematode (Heterodera schachtii). With polymerase chain reaction, 13 additional sugar transporters were tested for their presence in the syncytia through the use of a syncytium-specific cDNA library. Analysis of the infected roots showed that the promoter of the sucrose (Suc) transporter AtSUC2 gene that codes for a companion cell-specific Suc transporter in noninfected plants was found to be expressed in syncytia. Its expression patterns in beta-glucuronidase and green fluorescent protein plants were monitored. Syncytium-specific gene expression was confirmed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Results support the idea that AtSUC2 mediates the transmembrane transfer of Suc. AtSUC2 is the first disaccharide carrier described to be activated by pathogens.

  10. Fermentable oligosaccharide, disaccharide, monosaccharide and polyol content of foods commonly consumed by ethnic minority groups in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prichard, Rebeca; Rossi, Megan; Muir, Jane; Yao, Ck; Whelan, Kevin; Lomer, Miranda

    2016-06-01

    Dietary restriction of fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAPs) is an effective management approach for functional bowel disorders; however, its application is limited by the paucity of food composition data available for ethnic minority groups. The aim was to identify and measure the FODMAP content of these commonly consumed foods. According to their perceived importance to clinical practise, the top 20 ranked foods underwent FODMAP analysis using validated analytical techniques (total fructans, Megazyme hexokinase (HK) assay; all others, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with evaporative light scattering detectors). Of the 20 foods analysed, five were identified as significant sources of at least one FODMAP. Fructans and galacto-oligosaccharides were the major FODMAPs in these foods, including channa dal (0.13 g/100 g; 0.36 g/100 g), fenugreek seeds (1.11 g/100 g; 1.27 g/100 g), guava (0.41 g/100 g; not detected), karela (not detected; 1.12 g/100 g) and tamarind (2.35 g/100 g; 0.02 g/100 g). Broadening the availability of FODMAP composition data will increase the cultural application of low FODMAP dietary advice.

  11. Use of an activated carbon column for the synthesis of disaccharides by use of a reversed hydrolysis activity of beta-galactosidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajisaka, K.; Nishida, H.; Fjuimoto, H.

    1987-01-01

    An activated carbon column was utilized for the synthesis of disaccharides by use of a reversed hydrolysis activity of an immobilized beta-galactosidase column in order to shift the equilibrium to the direction of condensation. The yields of lactulose and allo-lactulose from galactose and fructose, and N-acetyl lactosamine and N-acetyl allo-lactosamine from galactose and N-acetyl glucosamine, were 11.3% and 10.0%, respectively. (Refs. 5).

  12. Development of a Multiple Loci Variable Number of Tandem Repeats Analysis (MLVA to Unravel the Intra-Pathovar Structure of Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae Populations Worldwide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Ciarroni

    Full Text Available The bacterial canker of kiwifruit by Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae is an emblematic example of a catastrophic disease of fruit crops. In 2008 a new, extremely virulent form of the pathogen emerged and rapidly devastated many Actinidia spp. orchards all over the world. In order to understand differences in populations within this pathovar and to elucidate their diffusion and movements on world scale, it is necessary to be able to quickly and on a routine basis compare new isolates with previous records. In this report a worldwide collection of 142 strains was analyzed by MLVA, chosen as investigative technique for its efficacy, reproducibility, simplicity and low cost. A panel of 13 Variable Number of Tandem Repeats (VNTR loci was identified and used to describe the pathogen population. The MLVA clustering is highly congruent with the population structure as previously established by other molecular approaches including whole genome sequencing and correlates with geographic origin, time of isolation and virulence. For convenience, we divided the VNTR loci in two panels. Panel 1 assay, using six loci, recognizes 23 different haplotypes, clustered into ten complexes with highest congruence with previous classifications. Panel 2, with seven VNTR loci, provides discriminatory power. Using the total set of 13 VNTR loci, 58 haplotypes can be distinguished. The recent hypervirulent type shows very limited diversity and includes, beside the strains from Europe, New Zealand and Chile, a few strains from Shaanxi, China. A broad genetic variability is observed in China, but different types are also retrievable in Japan and Korea. The low virulent strains cluster together and are very different from the other MLVA genotypes. Data were used to generate a public database in MLVAbank. MLVA represents a very promising first-line assay for large-scale routine genotyping, prior to whole genome sequencing of only the most relevant samples.

  13. Development of a Multiple Loci Variable Number of Tandem Repeats Analysis (MLVA) to Unravel the Intra-Pathovar Structure of Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae Populations Worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarroni, Serena; Gallipoli, Lorenzo; Taratufolo, Maria C; Butler, Margi I; Poulter, Russell T M; Pourcel, Christine; Vergnaud, Gilles; Balestra, Giorgio M; Mazzaglia, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial canker of kiwifruit by Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae is an emblematic example of a catastrophic disease of fruit crops. In 2008 a new, extremely virulent form of the pathogen emerged and rapidly devastated many Actinidia spp. orchards all over the world. In order to understand differences in populations within this pathovar and to elucidate their diffusion and movements on world scale, it is necessary to be able to quickly and on a routine basis compare new isolates with previous records. In this report a worldwide collection of 142 strains was analyzed by MLVA, chosen as investigative technique for its efficacy, reproducibility, simplicity and low cost. A panel of 13 Variable Number of Tandem Repeats (VNTR) loci was identified and used to describe the pathogen population. The MLVA clustering is highly congruent with the population structure as previously established by other molecular approaches including whole genome sequencing and correlates with geographic origin, time of isolation and virulence. For convenience, we divided the VNTR loci in two panels. Panel 1 assay, using six loci, recognizes 23 different haplotypes, clustered into ten complexes with highest congruence with previous classifications. Panel 2, with seven VNTR loci, provides discriminatory power. Using the total set of 13 VNTR loci, 58 haplotypes can be distinguished. The recent hypervirulent type shows very limited diversity and includes, beside the strains from Europe, New Zealand and Chile, a few strains from Shaanxi, China. A broad genetic variability is observed in China, but different types are also retrievable in Japan and Korea. The low virulent strains cluster together and are very different from the other MLVA genotypes. Data were used to generate a public database in MLVAbank. MLVA represents a very promising first-line assay for large-scale routine genotyping, prior to whole genome sequencing of only the most relevant samples.

  14. Crystal structure and size-dependent neutralization properties of HK20, a human monoclonal antibody binding to the highly conserved heptad repeat 1 of gp41.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Sabin

    Full Text Available The human monoclonal antibody (mAb HK20 neutralizes a broad spectrum of primary HIV-1 isolates by targeting the highly conserved heptad repeat 1 (HR1 of gp41, which is transiently exposed during HIV-1 entry. Here we present the crystal structure of the HK20 Fab in complex with a gp41 mimetic 5-Helix at 2.3 Å resolution. HK20 employs its heavy chain CDR H2 and H3 loops to bind into a conserved hydrophobic HR1 pocket that is occupied by HR2 residues in the gp41 post fusion conformation. Compared to the previously described HR1-specific mAb D5, HK20 approaches its epitope with a different angle which might favor epitope access and thus contribute to its higher neutralization breadth and potency. Comparison of the neutralization activities of HK20 IgG, Fab and scFv employing both single cycle and multiple cycle neutralization assays revealed much higher potencies for the smaller Fab and scFv over IgG, implying that the target site is difficult to access for complete antibodies. Nevertheless, two thirds of sera from HIV-1 infected individuals contain significant titers of HK20-inhibiting antibodies. The breadth of neutralization of primary isolates across all clades, the higher potencies for C-clade viruses and the targeting of a distinct site as compared to the fusion inhibitor T-20 demonstrate the potential of HK20 scFv as a therapeutic tool.

  15. Some remarks on the influence of temperature-variations, non-linearities, repeatability and ageing on modal-analysis for structural health monitoring of real bridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maas Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural Health Monitoring (SHM intends to identify damage by changes of characteristics as for instance the modal parameters. The eigenfrequencies, mode-shapes and damping-values are either directly used as damage indicators or the changes of derived parameters are analysed, such as e.g. flexibilities or updated finite element models. One common way is a continuous monitoring under environmental excitation forces, such as wind or traffic, i.e. the so-called output-only modal analysis. Alternatively, a forced measured external excitation in distinct time-intervals may be used for input-output modal analysis. Both methods are limited by the precision or the repeatability under real-life conditions at site. The paper will summarize several field tests of artificially step-by-step damaged bridges prior to their final demolishment and it will show the changes of eigenfrequencies due to induced artificial damage. Additionally, some results of a monitoring campaign of a healthy bridge in Luxembourg are presented. Reinforced concrete shows non-linear behaviour in the sense that modal parameters depend on the excitation force amplitude, i.e. higher forces lead often to lower eigenfrequencies than smaller forces. Furthermore, the temperature of real bridges is neither constant in space nor in time, while for instance the stiffness of asphalt is strongly dependant on it. Finally, ageing as such can also change a bridge’s stiffness and its modal parameters, e.g. because creep and shrinkage of concrete or ageing of elastomeric bearing pads influence their modulus of elasticity. These effects cannot be considered as damage, though they influence the measurement of modal parameters and hinder damage detection.

  16. Methods for the synthesis of polyhydroxylated piperidines by diastereoselective dihydroxylation: Exploitation in the two-directional synthesis of aza-C-linked disaccharide derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Adam

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Many polyhydroxylated piperidines are inhibitors of the oligosaccharide processing enzymes, glycosidases and glycosyltransferases. Aza-C-linked disaccharide mimetics are compounds in which saturated polyhydroxylated nitrogen and oxygen heterocycles are linked by an all-carbon tether. The saturated oxygen heterocycle has the potential to mimic the departing sugar in a glycosidase-catalysed reaction and aza-C-linked disaccharide mimetics may, therefore, be more potent inhibitors of these enzymes. Results: The scope, limitations and diastereoselectivity of the dihydroxylation of stereoisomeric 2-butyl-1-(toluene-4-sulfonyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-pyridin-3-ols is discussed. In the absence of a 6-substituent on the piperidine ring, the Upjohn (cat. OsO4, NMO, acetone-water and Donohoe (OsO4, TMEDA, CH2Cl2 conditions allow complementary diastereoselective functionalisation of the alkene of the (2R*,3R* diastereoisomer. However, in the presence of a 6-substituent, the reaction is largely controlled by steric effects with both reagents. The most synthetically useful protocols were exploited in the two-directional synthesis of aza-C-linked disaccharide analogues. A two-directional oxidative ring expansion was used to prepare bis-enones such as (2R,6S,2'S-6-methoxy-2-(6-methoxy-3-oxo-3,6-dihydro-2H-pyran-2-ylmethyl-1-(toluene-4-sulfonyl-1,6-dihydro-2H-pyridin-3-one from the corresponding difuran. Selective substitution of its N,O acetal was possible. The stereochemical outcome of a two-directional Luche reduction step was different in the two heterocyclic rings, and depended on the conformation of the ring. Finally, two-directional diastereoselective dihydroxylation yielded seven different aza-C-linked disaccharide analogues. Conclusion: A two-directional approach may be exploited in the synthesis of aza-C-linked disaccharide mimetics. Unlike previous approaches to similar molecules, neither of the heterocyclic rings is directly derived

  17. Complex fragmentation and silicification structures in fault zones: quartz mineralization and repeated fragmentation along the Fountain Range Fault (Mt. Isa Inlier, Australia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seybold, Lina; Blenkinsop, Tom; Heuss, Soraya; Ord, Alison; Kruhl, Jörn H.

    2015-04-01

    In large-scale fault zones fracture networks are commonly generated by high volumes of pressurized fluids, followed by quartz precipitation. In this way large amounts of quartz are formed as microcrystalline masses and as complex vein systems, with partly highly different textures, as a result of different formation processes. Based on field and microstructural data and the quantification of vein patterns, the spatial and temporal connection between fragmentation, quartz crystallization and fluid and material flow along the Fountain Range Fault at Fountain Springs was investigated. Dextral strike-slip led to up to 25 km horizontal displacement along the fault. Due to various fragmentation and quartz formation processes, a ca. 100 m high, 80 - 100 m wide and km-long quartz ridge with numerous vein systems and variable microfabrics was formed. Locally, lenses of highly altered metamorphic wall-rocks occur in the quartz zone. Where exposed, the contact to wall rocks is sharp. Millimetre- to decimetre-thick quartz veins penetrate the wall-rocks only within metre distance from the contact. Several clearly distinguishable fine-grained reddish, brownish to dark and pigment-rich quartz masses form up to 50 m wide and up to several 100 m long steep lenses that build the major part of the silicified fault zone. A chronology can be established. Some of these lenses are oriented slightly oblique to the general trend of the quartz zone, in agreement with the supposed dextral strike slip along the fault. Numerous generations of typically µm-cm thick quartz veins transect the microcrystalline quartz masses and, locally, form anisotropic networks. In the quartz masses, angular fragments often composed of quartz with, again, internal fragmentation structures, indicate earlier fracturing and silicification events. Within the veins, quartz forms geodes, locally filled with fine-grained reddish quartz and palisade structures with feathery textures and fluid-inclusion zoning

  18. Modeling the effect of soil structure on water flow and isoproturon dynamics in an agricultural field receiving repeated urban waste compost application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipović, Vilim; Coquet, Yves; Pot, Valérie; Houot, Sabine; Benoit, Pierre

    2014-11-15

    Transport processes in soils are strongly affected by heterogeneity of soil hydraulic properties. Tillage practices and compost amendments can modify soil structure and create heterogeneity at the local scale within agricultural fields. The long-term field experiment QualiAgro (INRA-Veolia partnership 1998-2013) explores the impact of heterogeneity in soil structure created by tillage practices and compost application on transport processes. A modeling study was performed to evaluate how the presence of heterogeneity due to soil tillage and compost application affects water flow and pesticide dynamics in soil during a long-term period. The study was done on a plot receiving a co-compost of green wastes and sewage sludge (SGW) applied once every 2 years since 1998. The plot was cultivated with a biannual rotation of winter wheat-maize (except 1 year of barley) and a four-furrow moldboard plow was used for tillage. In each plot, wick lysimeter outflow and TDR probe data were collected at different depths from 2004, while tensiometer measurements were also conducted during 2007/2008. Isoproturon concentration was measured in lysimeter outflow since 2004. Detailed profile description was used to locate different soil structures in the profile, which was then implemented in the HYDRUS-2D model. Four zones were identified in the plowed layer: compacted clods with no visible macropores (Δ), non-compacted soil with visible macroporosity (Γ), interfurrows created by moldboard plowing containing crop residues and applied compost (IF), and the plow pan (PP) created by plowing repeatedly to the same depth. Isoproturon retention and degradation parameters were estimated from laboratory batch sorption and incubation experiments, respectively, for each structure independently. Water retention parameters were estimated from pressure plate laboratory measurements and hydraulic conductivity parameters were obtained from field tension infiltrometer experiments. Soil hydraulic

  19. Gentamicin binds to the megalin receptor as a competitive inhibitor using the common ligand binding motif of complement type repeats: insight from the nmr structure of the 10th complement type repeat domain alone and in complex with gentamicin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dagil, R.; O'Shea, C.; Nykjaer, A.; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.; Kragelund, B.B.

    2013-01-01

    Gentamicin is an aminoglycoside widely used in treatments of, in particular, enterococcal, mycobacterial, and severe Gram-negative bacterial infections. Large doses of gentamicin cause nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity, entering the cell via the receptor megalin. Until now, no structural information ha

  20. Quantum repeated games revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Frackiewicz, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    We present a scheme for playing quantum repeated 2x2 games based on the Marinatto and Weber's approach to quantum games. As a potential application, we study twice repeated Prisoner's Dilemma game. We show that results not available in classical game can be obtained when the game is played in the quantum way. Before we present our idea, we comment on the previous scheme of playing quantum repeated games.

  1. Monitoring Intravenous Abuse of Methadone or Buprenorphine in Opiate Maintenance Treatment (OMT): A Simple and Fast LC-MS-MS Method for the Detection of Disaccharides in Urine Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungen, Hilke; Andresen-Streichert, Hilke; Müller, Alexander; Iwersen-Bergmann, Stefanie

    2017-01-01

    The detection of disaccharides in urine is under investigation to act as a marker for intravenous abuse of disaccharide formulations, like liquid methadone with syrup (sucrose), methadone tablets (lactose and sucrose), or buprenorphine tablets (lactose). As the detection time in urine has not yet been investigated and a routine method for detecting disaccharides is still lacking, a study was performed to estimate the window of detection in urine after intravenous consumption of disaccharides. Furthermore, an analytical LC-MSMS method for the quantification of sucrose and lactose in urine was validated. The method was applied to urine samples of intravenous substitute consumers, with urine being sampled before intravenous use of substitutes and approximately 30 minutes later. Twenty users provided information regarding their most recent prior intravenous consumption. Disaccharides were detectable in all 20 urine samples about 30 minutes after consumption. A cut off for both disaccharides of 40mg/L was used. Based on these conditions 81% of the persons who consumed in a time frame of 24 hours ago showed positive results for disaccharides. The study showed that the validated LC-MSMS method with an easy and fast workup is usable for daily routine in the laboratory. It might be helpful for methadone and buprenorphine prescribing physicians to check whether the opiate maintenance treatment patient takes his or her substitution medicines orally as intended, or continues with intravenous misuse by injecting substitution medicines instead of heroin. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Reconfigurable multiport EPON repeater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Masayuki; Inohara, Ryo; Agata, Akira; Horiuchi, Yukio

    2009-11-01

    An extended reach EPON repeater is one of the solutions to effectively expand FTTH service areas. In this paper, we propose a reconfigurable multi-port EPON repeater for effective accommodation of multiple ODNs with a single OLT line card. The proposed repeater, which has multi-ports in both OLT and ODN sides, consists of TRs, BTRs with the CDR function and a reconfigurable electrical matrix switch, can accommodate multiple ODNs to a single OLT line card by controlling the connection of the matrix switch. Although conventional EPON repeaters require full OLT line cards to accommodate subscribers from the initial installation stage, the proposed repeater can dramatically reduce the number of required line cards especially when the number of subscribers is less than a half of the maximum registerable users per OLT. Numerical calculation results show that the extended reach EPON system with the proposed EPON repeater can save 17.5% of the initial installation cost compared with a conventional repeater, and can be less expensive than conventional systems up to the maximum subscribers especially when the percentage of ODNs in lightly-populated areas is higher.

  3. Recursive quantum repeater networks

    CERN Document Server

    Van Meter, Rodney; Horsman, Clare

    2011-01-01

    Internet-scale quantum repeater networks will be heterogeneous in physical technology, repeater functionality, and management. The classical control necessary to use the network will therefore face similar issues as Internet data transmission. Many scalability and management problems that arose during the development of the Internet might have been solved in a more uniform fashion, improving flexibility and reducing redundant engineering effort. Quantum repeater network development is currently at the stage where we risk similar duplication when separate systems are combined. We propose a unifying framework that can be used with all existing repeater designs. We introduce the notion of a Quantum Recursive Network Architecture, developed from the emerging classical concept of 'recursive networks', extending recursive mechanisms from a focus on data forwarding to a more general distributed computing request framework. Recursion abstracts independent transit networks as single relay nodes, unifies software layer...

  4. Cloning of cellobiose phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase genes: Functional expression in recombinant Escherichia coli and identification of a putative binding region for disaccharides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Xiaokuang; Davis, F.C.; Ingram, L.O. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Hespell, R.B. [USDA Agricultural Research Service, Peoria, IL (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Genomic libraries from nine cellobiose-metabolizing bacteria were screened for cellobiose utilization. Positive clones were recovered from six libraries, all of which encode phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) proteins. Clones from Bacillus subtilis, Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens, and Klebsiella oxytoca allowed the growth of recombinant Escherichia coli in cellobiose-M9 minimal medium. The K. oxytoca clone, pLOI1906, exhibited an unusually broad substrate range (cellobiose, arbutin, salicin, and methylumbelliferyl derivatives of glucose, cellobiose, mannose, and xylose) and was sequenced. The insert in this plasmid encoded the carboxy-terminal region of a putative regulatory protein, cellobiose permease (single polypeptide), and phospho-{beta}-glucosidase, which appear to form an operon (casRAB). Subclones allowed both casA and casB to be expressed independently, as evidenced by in vitro complementation. An analysis of the translated sequences from the EIIC domains of cellobiose, aryl-{beta}-glucoside, and other disaccharide permeases allowed the identification of a 50-amino-acid conserved region. A disaccharide consensus sequence is proposed for the most conserved segment (13 amino acids), which may represent part of the EIIC active site for binding and phosphorylation. 63 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. XML Genetic Structure of SSR1 & SSR2 loci from Iranian Mycobacterium Avium Subspecies Paratuberculosis Isolates by a Short Sequence Repeat Analysis Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida Chalesh (MSc

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Paratuberculosis has been repeatedly reported from Iranian ruminant herds. The extrem fastidious nature of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculsos hinders genomic diversity studies of the pathogen. Short Sequence Repeat analysis is one of the genome-based approches recently developed to overcome this difficulty. In this study we describe the application of SSR genotyping on three Iranian MAP type strains plus the III & V vaccinal strain. Methods: All the bacteria were examined by PCR-F57 and PCR-IS900 experiments in order to authenticate their identity as MAP. SSR genotyping using SSR1 & SSR2 loci was conducted according to the Amonsin method. PCR amplicons were sequenced to guarantee the accuracy of findings. Results: At SSR1 locus two allels were identified, a larger allel of 770 bp and a smaller allel of 763 bp long. At SSR2 only a single allele, 800 bp long, was detected. Two Iranian bovine and ovine MAP isolates along with the vaccinal III & V strain shared a single SSR1/SSR2 pattern while a different SSR1/SSR2 was represented by the third (caprine Iranian MAP isolate. Conclusion: While finding a shared SSR type between the two Iranian MAP isolates and the III & V strain might represent a mutual ancestral background but this has to be assessed through further studies. Detection of two SSR genotypes between three Iranian type strains is likely a reflection of more MAP clones in Iran.

  6. Conformational behaviour of glycomimetics: NMR and molecular modelling studies of the C-glycoside analogue of the disaccharide methyl beta-D-galactopyranosyl-(1-->3)-beta-D-glucopyranoside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Paloma; Vauzeilles, Boris; Blériot, Yves; Sollogoub, Matthieu; Sinaÿ, Pierre; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Espinosa, Juan F

    2007-09-03

    The conformational behaviour of the C-glycoside beta-C-Gal-(1-->3)-beta-Glc-OMe (1) has been studied using a combination of molecular mechanics and NMR spectroscopy (proton-proton coupling constants and nuclear Overhauser effects). It is shown that the C-disaccharide populates two distinctive conformational families in solution, the normal syn-psi conformation, which is the predominating conformation of parent O-glycoside 2, and the anti-psi conformation, which has not been detected for the O-disaccharide.

  7. Repeating the Past

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John W.

    1998-05-01

    As part of the celebration of the Journal 's 75th year, we are scanning each Journal issue from 25, 50, and 74 years ago. Many of the ideas and practices described are so similar to present-day "innovations" that George Santayana's adage (1) "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it" comes to mind. But perhaps "condemned" is too strong - sometimes it may be valuable to repeat something that was done long ago. One example comes from the earliest days of the Division of Chemical Education and of the Journal.

  8. Inhibition of the leucine-rich repeat protein LINGO-1 enhances survival, structure, and function of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Haruhisa; Lin, Ling; Lee, Xinhua; Shao, Zhaohui; Mendes, Shannon; Snodgrass-Belt, Pamela; Sweigard, Harry; Engber, Tom; Pepinsky, Blake; Yang, Lichuan; Beal, M Flint; Mi, Sha; Isacson, Ole

    2007-09-04

    The nervous system-specific leucine-rich repeat Ig-containing protein LINGO-1 is associated with the Nogo-66 receptor complex and is endowed with a canonical EGF receptor (EGFR)-like tyrosine phosphorylation site. Our studies indicate that LINGO-1 expression is elevated in the substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients compared with age-matched controls and in animal models of PD after neurotoxic lesions. LINGO-1 expression is present in midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the human and rodent brain. Therefore, the role of LINGO-1 in cell damage responses of DA neurons was examined in vitro and in experimental models of PD induced by either oxidative (6-hydroxydopamine) or mitochondrial (N-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine) toxicity. In LINGO-1 knockout mice, DA neuron survival was increased and behavioral abnormalities were reduced compared with WT. This neuroprotection was accompanied by increased Akt phosphorylation (p-Akt). Similar neuroprotective in vivo effects on midbrain DA neurons were obtained in WT mice by blocking LINGO-1 activity using LINGO-1-Fc protein. Neuroprotection and enhanced neurite growth were also demonstrated for midbrain DA neurons in vitro. LINGO-1 antagonists (LINGO-1-Fc, dominant negative LINGO-1, and anti-LINGO-1 antibody) improved DA neuron survival in response to MPP+ in part by mechanisms that involve activation of the EGFR/Akt signaling pathway through a direct inhibition of LINGO-1's binding to EGFR. These results show that inhibitory agents of LINGO-1 activity can protect DA neurons against degeneration and indicate a role for the leucine-rich repeat protein LINGO-1 and related classes of proteins in the pathophysiological responses of midbrain DA neurons in PD.

  9. Effects of repeated low-dose exposure of the nerve agent VX on monoamine levels in different brain structures in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziani, S; Christin, D; Daulon, S; Breton, P; Perrier, N; Taysse, L

    2014-05-01

    In a previous report, alterations of the serotonin metabolism were previously reported in mice intoxicated with repeated low doses of soman. In order to better understand the effects induced by repeated low-dose exposure to organophosphorus compounds on physiological and behavioural functions, the levels of endogenous monoamines (serotonin and dopamine) in different brain areas in mice intoxicated with sublethal dose of (O-ethyl-S-[2(di-isopropylamino) ethyl] methyl phosphonothioate) (VX) were analysed by HPLC method with electrochemical detection. Animals were injected once a day for three consecutive days with 0.10 LD50 of VX (5 μg/kg, i.p). Neither severe signs of cholinergic toxicity nor pathological changes in brain tissue of exposed animals were observed. Cholinesterase (ChE) activity was only inhibited in plasma (a maximum of 30% inhibition 24 h after the last injection of VX), but remained unchanged in the brain. Serotonin and dopamine (DA) metabolism appeared significantly modified. During the entire period of investigation, at least one of the three parameters investigated (i.e. DA and DOPAC levels and DOPAC/DA ratio) was modified. During the toxic challenge, an increase of the serotonin metabolism was noted in hippocampus (HPC), hypothalamus/thalamus, pons medulla and cerebellum (CER). This increase was maintained 4 weeks after exposure in HPC, pons medulla and CER whereas a decrease in cortex 3 weeks after the toxic challenge was observed. The lack of correlation between brain ChE activity and neurochemical outcomes points out to independent mechanisms. The involvement in possibly long-lasting behavioural disorders is discussed.

  10. All-optical repeater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberberg, Y

    1986-06-01

    An all-optical device containing saturable gain, saturable loss, and unsaturable loss is shown to transform weak, distorted optical pulses into uniform standard-shape pulses. The proposed device performs thresholding, amplification, and pulse shaping as required from an optical repeater. It is shown that such a device could be realized by existing semiconductor technology.

  11. Bidirectional Manchester repeater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, J.

    1980-01-01

    Bidirectional Manchester repeater is inserted at periodic intervals along single bidirectional twisted pair transmission line to detect, amplify, and transmit bidirectional Manchester 11 code signals. Requiring only 18 TTL 7400 series IC's, some line receivers and drivers, and handful of passive components, circuit is simple and relatively inexpensive to build.

  12. Artificial leucine rich repeats as new scaffolds for protein design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baabur-Cohen, Hemda; Dayalan, Subashini; Shumacher, Inbal; Cohen-Luria, Rivka; Ashkenasy, Gonen

    2011-04-15

    The leucine rich repeat (LRR) motif that participates in many biomolecular recognition events in cells was suggested as a general scaffold for producing artificial receptors. We describe here the design and first total chemical synthesis of small LRR proteins, and their structural analysis. When evaluating the tertiary structure as a function of different number of repeating units (1-3), we were able to find that the 3-repeats sequence, containing 90 amino acids, folds into the expected structure.

  13. Investigation of the population structure of Mycobacterium abscessus complex strains using 17-locus variable number tandem repeat typing and the further distinction of Mycobacterium massiliense hsp65 genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Shiomi; Arikawa, Kentaro; Tsuyuguchi, Kazunari; Kurashima, Atsuyuki; Harada, Toshiyuki; Nagai, Hideaki; Suzuki, Katsuhiro; Iwamoto, Tomotada; Hayashi, Seiji

    2015-03-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus complex is a significant pathogen in patients with non-cystic fibrosis (non-CF). Nevertheless, there is little description of the genetic diversity of this species. The aims of this study were to investigate the distribution of M. abscessus complex isolated from respiratory specimens by variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) typing. The results of 104 clinical isolates from 104 non-CF patients were compared using PFGE, hsp65 genotypes and clarithromycin susceptibility. The allelic diversity (Hunter-Gaston Discriminatory Index) of the 17 loci examined by VNTR typing was high (0.977). We determined that C28 sequevar erm(41) genotypes and clarithromycin-acquired resistance isolates were scattered in the minimum spanning tree. Intriguingly, VNTR typing and PFGE were highly congruent and revealed that there were clear examples of grouping of isolates from different individuals amongst both M. abscessus and M. massiliense, and showed five clusters of distinct identical isolates. Within these clusters, M. massiliense hsp65 type I formed three different clusters. Although the distribution of M. massiliense hsp65 type II-1 was low (9.3 %), M. massiliense hsp65 type II-1 isolates separated from clusters contained hsp65 type I isolates. Thus, M. massiliense hsp65 genotypes could be discriminated by analysing VNTRs with sufficient genetic distance for intra-species-level discrimination.

  14. The nondigestible disaccharide epilactose increases paracellular Ca absorption via rho-associated kinase- and myosin light chain kinase-dependent mechanisms in rat small intestines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takuya; Nishimukai, Megumi; Takechi, Maki; Taguchi, Hidenori; Hamada, Shigeki; Yokota, Atsushi; Ito, Susumu; Hara, Hiroshi; Matsui, Hirokazu

    2010-02-10

    We previously showed that epilactose, a nondigestible disaccharide, increased calcium (Ca) absorption in the small intestines of rats. Here, we explored the mechanism(s) underlying the epilactose-mediated promotion of Ca absorption in a ligated intestinal segment of anesthetized rats. The addition of epilactose to the luminal solution increased Ca absorption and chromium (Cr)-EDTA permeability, a paracellular indicator, with a strong correlation (R = 0.93) between these changes. Epilactose induced the phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chains (MLCs), which is known to activate the paracellular route, without any change in the association of tight junction proteins with the actin cytoskeleton. The epilactose-mediated promotion of the Ca absorption was suppressed by specific inhibitors of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and Rho-associated kinase (ROCK). These results indicate that epilactose increases paracellular Ca absorption in the small intestine of rats through the induction of MLC phosphorylation via MLCK- and ROCK-dependent mechanisms.

  15. Duct Leakage Repeatability Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Iain [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sherman, Max [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Duct leakage often needs to be measured to demonstrate compliance with requirements or to determine energy or Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) impacts. Testing is often done using standards such as ASTM E1554 (ASTM 2013) or California Title 24 (California Energy Commission 2013 & 2013b), but there are several choices of methods available within the accepted standards. Determining which method to use or not use requires an evaluation of those methods in the context of the particular needs. Three factors that are important considerations are the cost of the measurement, the accuracy of the measurement and the repeatability of the measurement. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the repeatability of the three most significant measurement techniques using data from the literature and recently obtained field data. We will also briefly discuss the first two factors. The main question to be answered by this study is to determine if differences in the repeatability of these tests methods is sufficient to indicate that any of these methods is so poor that it should be excluded from consideration as an allowed procedure in codes and standards.

  16. Two-dimensional quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallnöfer, J.; Zwerger, M.; Muschik, C.; Sangouard, N.; Dür, W.

    2016-11-01

    The endeavor to develop quantum networks gave rise to a rapidly developing field with far-reaching applications such as secure communication and the realization of distributed computing tasks. This ultimately calls for the creation of flexible multiuser structures that allow for quantum communication between arbitrary pairs of parties in the network and facilitate also multiuser applications. To address this challenge, we propose a two-dimensional quantum repeater architecture to establish long-distance entanglement shared between multiple communication partners in the presence of channel noise and imperfect local control operations. The scheme is based on the creation of self-similar multiqubit entanglement structures at growing scale, where variants of entanglement swapping and multiparty entanglement purification are combined to create high-fidelity entangled states. We show how such networks can be implemented using trapped ions in cavities.

  17. Family structure and breakfast consumption of 11-15 year old boys and girls in Scotland, 1994-2010: a repeated cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levin Kate A

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The benefits of breakfast during childhood and adolescence have been reported previously though few studies have considered family structure inequalities in breakfast consumption. The proportion of young people living in non-traditional family types has increased in recent years, strengthening the need to describe and monitor the impact of the changing family unit on adolescent breakfast consumption. This study aimed to describe changes in daily breakfast consumption among adolescents in Scotland between 1994 and 2010, while also considering family structure inequalities, and the degree to which these have changed over time. Methods Data from the 1994, 1998, 2002, 2006 and 2010 Scottish Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC surveys were analysed using logistic multilevel regression models for binary outcome variable daily breakfast consumption. Results Daily breakfast consumption among adolescents increased between 1994 and 2010, although there were differences by age and sex. In fact those aged over 14.5 years saw decreases in breakfast consumption, and girls saw significantly larger increases than boys. Daily breakfast consumption was more prevalent among adolescents from 'both parent' families, with lowest prevalence among those from single parent families. Trends in daily breakfast consumption between 1994 and 2010 also varied by family structure. While prevalence of daily breakfast consumption increased among those living with 'both parents', the largest proportion of the population, prevalence decreased over time among adolescents of single parent families, and particularly among those living with their father. Conclusions Family structure inequalities in daily breakfast consumption increased between 1994 and 2010, while breakfast consumption across the population as a whole increased. As the proportion of young people living in an alternative family structure continues to grow it is important to understand why

  18. NMR studies of the R2 repeat and related peptide fragments of the DNA binding domain of c-Myb. New light on the structure and folding of R2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ségalas, I.; Desjardins, S.; Oulyadi, H.; Prigent, Y.; Tribouillard, S.; Bernardi, E.; Schoofs, A. R.; Davoust1, D.; Toma, F.

    1999-10-01

    The solution structure of the R2 repeat of the DNA binding domain of the protooncogene c-Myb contains a N-terminal structural motif comprising two antiparallel helices. The motif is stabilized by interactions involving conserved residues. The recognition region in C-terminal position is flexible. This structure differs from that of R2 of another c-Myb protein. La structure en solution de la répétition R2 du domaine de liaison à l'ADN du protooncogène c-Myb possède un motif à deux hélices antiparallèles dans la moitié N-terminale, stabilisé par des interactions entre résidus conservés. La région de reconnaissance à l'ADN en position C-terminale est flexible. Cette structure diffère de celle montrée pour la répétition R2 d'une autre protéine c-Myb.

  19. Fine-resolution repeat topographic surveying of dryland landscapes using UAS-based structure-from-motion photogrammetry: Assessing accuracy and precision against traditional ground-based erosion measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillian, Jeffrey K.; Karl, Jason W.; Elaksher, Ahmed; Duniway, Michael C.

    2017-01-01

    Structure-from-motion (SfM) photogrammetry from unmanned aerial system (UAS) imagery is an emerging tool for repeat topographic surveying of dryland erosion. These methods are particularly appealing due to the ability to cover large landscapes compared to field methods and at reduced costs and finer spatial resolution compared to airborne laser scanning. Accuracy and precision of high-resolution digital terrain models (DTMs) derived from UAS imagery have been explored in many studies, typically by comparing image coordinates to surveyed check points or LiDAR datasets. In addition to traditional check points, this study compared 5 cm resolution DTMs derived from fixed-wing UAS imagery with a traditional ground-based method of measuring soil surface change called erosion bridges. We assessed accuracy by comparing the elevation values between DTMs and erosion bridges along thirty topographic transects each 6.1 m long. Comparisons occurred at two points in time (June 2014, February 2015) which enabled us to assess vertical accuracy with 3314 data points and vertical precision (i.e., repeatability) with 1657 data points. We found strong vertical agreement (accuracy) between the methods (RMSE 2.9 and 3.2 cm in June 2014 and February 2015, respectively) and high vertical precision for the DTMs (RMSE 2.8 cm). Our results from comparing SfM-generated DTMs to check points, and strong agreement with erosion bridge measurements suggests repeat UAS imagery and SfM processing could replace erosion bridges for a more synoptic landscape assessment of shifting soil surfaces for some studies. However, while collecting the UAS imagery and generating the SfM DTMs for this study was faster than collecting erosion bridge measurements, technical challenges related to the need for ground control networks and image processing requirements must be addressed before this technique could be applied effectively to large landscapes.

  20. Repeatability of Cryogenic Multilayer Insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. L.; Vanderlaan, M.; Wood, J. J.; Rhys, N. O.; Guo, W.; Van Sciver, S.; Chato, D. J.

    2017-01-01

    Due to the variety of requirements across aerospace platforms, and one off projects, the repeatability of cryogenic multilayer insulation has never been fully established. The objective of this test program is to provide a more basic understanding of the thermal performance repeatability of MLI systems that are applicable to large scale tanks. There are several different types of repeatability that can be accounted for: these include repeatability between multiple identical blankets, repeatability of installation of the same blanket, and repeatability of a test apparatus. The focus of the work in this report is on the first two types of repeatability. Statistically, repeatability can mean many different things. In simplest form, it refers to the range of performance that a population exhibits and the average of the population. However, as more and more identical components are made (i.e. the population of concern grows), the simple range morphs into a standard deviation from an average performance. Initial repeatability testing on MLI blankets has been completed at Florida State University. Repeatability of five GRC provided coupons with 25 layers was shown to be +/- 8.4 whereas repeatability of repeatedly installing a single coupon was shown to be +/- 8.0. A second group of 10 coupons have been fabricated by Yetispace and tested by Florida State University, through the first 4 tests, the repeatability has been shown to be +/- 16. Based on detailed statistical analysis, the data has been shown to be statistically significant.

  1. The structure, mechanism and application of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats system%成簇规律间隔短回文重复系统的结构、作用机制及应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈瑾; 王素英; 董世瑞

    2016-01-01

    成簇的规律间隔短回文重复( CRISPR)是一类广泛分布于细菌和古细菌基因组中的DNA重复结构。重复结构与前导序列、一系列相关蛋白一起,为原核生物提供抵御噬菌体和质粒等外源基因的获得性免疫能力。综述了CRISPR系统的结构、作用机制及应用,介绍了最新的研究成果,并对其发展前景进行了展望。%Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats ( CRISPR) is a kind of repetitive DNA structure, which is widely distributed in bacterial and archaeal genomes. The structure with leader sequence and a series of associated proteins together provide acquired immunity against phage and plasmid genes for prokaryotes. In this paper, the structure, mechanism and application of CRISPR system are summarized, the latest research progress is introduced, and the prospect of its development is prospected.

  2. Native tandem and ion mobility mass spectrometry highlight structural and modular similarities in clustered-regularly-interspaced shot-palindromic-repeats (CRISPR)-associated protein complexes from Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duijn, Esther; Barbu, Ioana M; Barendregt, Arjan; Jore, Matthijs M; Wiedenheft, Blake; Lundgren, Magnus; Westra, Edze R; Brouns, Stan J J; Doudna, Jennifer A; van der Oost, John; Heck, Albert J R

    2012-11-01

    The CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated genes) immune system of bacteria and archaea provides acquired resistance against viruses and plasmids, by a strategy analogous to RNA-interference. Key components of the defense system are ribonucleoprotein complexes, the composition of which appears highly variable in different CRISPR/Cas subtypes. Previous studies combined mass spectrometry, electron microscopy, and small angle x-ray scattering to demonstrate that the E. coli Cascade complex (405 kDa) and the P. aeruginosa Csy-complex (350 kDa) are similar in that they share a central spiral-shaped hexameric structure, flanked by associating proteins and one CRISPR RNA. Recently, a cryo-electron microscopy structure of Cascade revealed that the CRISPR RNA molecule resides in a groove of the hexameric backbone. For both complexes we here describe the use of native mass spectrometry in combination with ion mobility mass spectrometry to assign a stable core surrounded by more loosely associated modules. Via computational modeling subcomplex structures were proposed that relate to the experimental IMMS data. Despite the absence of obvious sequence homology between several subunits, detailed analysis of sub-complexes strongly suggests analogy between subunits of the two complexes. Probing the specific association of E. coli Cascade/crRNA to its complementary DNA target reveals a conformational change. All together these findings provide relevant new information about the potential assembly process of the two CRISPR-associated complexes.

  3. Structure, organization, and sequence of alpha satellite DNA from human chromosome 17: evidence for evolution by unequal crossing-over and an ancestral pentamer repeat shared with the human X chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waye, J S; Willard, H F

    1986-09-01

    The centromeric regions of all human chromosomes are characterized by distinct subsets of a diverse tandemly repeated DNA family, alpha satellite. On human chromosome 17, the predominant form of alpha satellite is a 2.7-kilobase-pair higher-order repeat unit consisting of 16 alphoid monomers. We present the complete nucleotide sequence of the 16-monomer repeat, which is present in 500 to 1,000 copies per chromosome 17, as well as that of a less abundant 15-monomer repeat, also from chromosome 17. These repeat units were approximately 98% identical in sequence, differing by the exclusion of precisely 1 monomer from the 15-monomer repeat. Homologous unequal crossing-over is suggested as a probable mechanism by which the different repeat lengths on chromosome 17 were generated, and the putative site of such a recombination event is identified. The monomer organization of the chromosome 17 higher-order repeat unit is based, in part, on tandemly repeated pentamers. A similar pentameric suborganization has been previously demonstrated for alpha satellite of the human X chromosome. Despite the organizational similarities, substantial sequence divergence distinguishes these subsets. Hybridization experiments indicate that the chromosome 17 and X subsets are more similar to each other than to the subsets found on several other human chromosomes. We suggest that the chromosome 17 and X alpha satellite subsets may be related components of a larger alphoid subfamily which have evolved from a common ancestral repeat into the contemporary chromosome-specific subsets.

  4. Studies of an expanded trinucleotide repeat in transgenic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingham, P.; Wang, S.; Merry, D. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a progressive motor neuron disease caused by expansion of a trinucleotide repeat in the androgen receptor gene (AR{sup exp}). AR{sup exp} repeats expand further or contract in approximately 25% of transmissions. Analogous {open_quotes}dynamic mutations{close_quotes} have been reported in other expanded trinucleotide repeat disorders. We have been developing a mouse model of this disease using a transgenic approach. Expression of the SBMA AR was documented in transgenic mice with an inducible promoter. No phenotypic effects of transgene expression were observed. We have extended our previous results on stability of the expanded trinucleotide repeat in transgenic mice in two lines carrying AR{sup exp}. Tail DNA was amplified by PCR using primers spanning the repeat on 60 AR{sup exp} transgenic mice from four different transgenic lines. Migration of the PCR product through an acrylamide gel showed no change of the 45 CAG repeat length in any progeny. Similarly, PCR products from 23 normal repeat transgenics showed no change from the repeat length of the original construct. Unlike the disease allele in humans, the expanded repeat AR cDNA in transgenic mice showed no change in repeat length with transmission. The relative stability of CAG repeats seen in the transgenic mice may indicate either differences in the fidelity of replicative enzymes, or differences in error identification and repair between mice and humans. Integration site or structural properties of the transgene itself might also play a role.

  5. Structure-Based Optimization of a Small Molecule Antagonist of the Interaction Between WD Repeat-Containing Protein 5 (WDR5) and Mixed-Lineage Leukemia 1 (MLL1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getlik, Matthäus; Smil, David; Zepeda-Velázquez, Carlos; Bolshan, Yuri; Poda, Gennady; Wu, Hong; Dong, Aiping; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Marcellus, Richard; Senisterra, Guillermo; Dombrovski, Ludmila; Hajian, Taraneh; Kiyota, Taira; Schapira, Matthieu; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Brown, Peter J; Vedadi, Masoud; Al-Awar, Rima

    2016-03-24

    WD repeat-containing protein 5 (WDR5) is an important component of the multiprotein complex essential for activating mixed-lineage leukemia 1 (MLL1). Rearrangement of the MLL1 gene is associated with onset and progression of acute myeloid and lymphoblastic leukemias, and targeting the WDR5-MLL1 interaction may result in new cancer therapeutics. Our previous work showed that binding of small molecule ligands to WDR5 can modulate its interaction with MLL1, suppressing MLL1 methyltransferase activity. Initial structure-activity relationship studies identified N-(2-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)-5-substituted-phenyl) benzamides as potent and selective antagonists of this protein-protein interaction. Guided by crystal structure data and supported by in silico library design, we optimized the scaffold by varying the C-1 benzamide and C-5 substituents. This allowed us to develop the first highly potent (Kdisp < 100 nM) small molecule antagonists of the WDR5-MLL1 interaction and demonstrate that N-(4-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)-3'-(morpholinomethyl)-[1,1'-biphenyl]-3-yl)-6-oxo-4-(trifluoromethyl)-1,6-dihydropyridine-3-carboxamide 16d (OICR-9429) is a potent and selective chemical probe suitable to help dissect the biological role of WDR5.

  6. Genus-specific protein binding to the large clusters of DNA repeats (short regularly spaced repeats) present in Sulfolobus genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Xu; Brügger, Kim; Shen, Biao

    2003-01-01

    Short regularly spaced repeats (SRSRs) occur in multiple large clusters in archaeal chromosomes and as smaller clusters in some archaeal conjugative plasmids and bacterial chromosomes. The sequence, size, and spacing of the repeats are generally constant within a cluster but vary between clusters...... that are identical in sequence to one of the repeat variants in the S. solfataricus chromosome. Repeats from the pNOB8 cluster were amplified and tested for protein binding with cell extracts from S. solfataricus. A 17.5-kDa SRSR-binding protein was purified from the cell extracts and sequenced. The protein is N...... terminally modified and corresponds to SSO454, an open reading frame of previously unassigned function. It binds specifically to DNA fragments carrying double and single repeat sequences, binding on one side of the repeat structure, and producing an opening of the opposite side of the DNA structure. It also...

  7. Structural basis for triplet repeat disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldi, Pierre; Brunak, Søren; Chauvin, Yves

    1999-01-01

    Motivation: Over a dozen major degenerative disorders, including myotonic distrophy, Huntington's disease and fragile X syndrome result from unstable expansions of particular trinucleotides. Remarkably, only some of all the possible triplets, namely CAG/CTG, CGG/CCG and GAA/TTC, have been associa......, which we predict to have very high flexibility, may play a role in the pathogenesis of the neurodegenerative disorder multiple system atrophy (MSA)....

  8. DWI Repeaters and Non-Repeaters: A Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeber, Stan

    1981-01-01

    Discussed how driving-while-intoxicated (DWI) repeaters differed signigicantly from nonrepeaters on 4 of 23 variables tested. Repeaters were more likely to have zero or two dependent children, attend church frequently, drink occasionally and have one or more arrests for public intoxication. (Author)

  9. To Repeat or Not to Repeat a Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Michael J.; Biktimirov, Ernest N.

    2013-01-01

    The difficult transition from high school to university means that many students need to repeat (retake) 1 or more of their university courses. The authors examine the performance of students repeating first-year core courses in an undergraduate business program. They used data from university records for 116 students who took a total of 232…

  10. Repeatable mechanochemical activation of dynamic covalent bonds in thermoplastic elastomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imato, Keiichi; Kanehara, Takeshi; Nojima, Shiki; Ohishi, Tomoyuki; Higaki, Yuji; Takahara, Atsushi; Otsuka, Hideyuki

    2016-08-18

    Repeated mechanical scission and recombination of dynamic covalent bonds incorporated in segmented polyurethane elastomers are demonstrated by utilizing a diarylbibenzofuranone-based mechanophore and by the design of the segmented polymer structures. The repeated mechanochemical reactions can accompany clear colouration and simultaneous fading.

  11. Exploring the repeat protein universe through computational protein design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunette, T J; Parmeggiani, Fabio; Huang, Po-Ssu; Bhabha, Gira; Ekiert, Damian C; Tsutakawa, Susan E; Hura, Greg L; Tainer, John A; Baker, David

    2015-12-24

    A central question in protein evolution is the extent to which naturally occurring proteins sample the space of folded structures accessible to the polypeptide chain. Repeat proteins composed of multiple tandem copies of a modular structure unit are widespread in nature and have critical roles in molecular recognition, signalling, and other essential biological processes. Naturally occurring repeat proteins have been re-engineered for molecular recognition and modular scaffolding applications. Here we use computational protein design to investigate the space of folded structures that can be generated by tandem repeating a simple helix-loop-helix-loop structural motif. Eighty-three designs with sequences unrelated to known repeat proteins were experimentally characterized. Of these, 53 are monomeric and stable at 95 °C, and 43 have solution X-ray scattering spectra consistent with the design models. Crystal structures of 15 designs spanning a broad range of curvatures are in close agreement with the design models with root mean square deviations ranging from 0.7 to 2.5 Å. Our results show that existing repeat proteins occupy only a small fraction of the possible repeat protein sequence and structure space and that it is possible to design novel repeat proteins with precisely specified geometries, opening up a wide array of new possibilities for biomolecular engineering.

  12. Structural Studies of the Lipopolysaccharide from the Fish Pathogen Aeromonas veronii Strain Bs19, Serotype O16

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Turska-Szewczuk

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Chemical analyses, mass spectrometry, and NMR spectroscopy were applied to study the structure of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS isolated from Aeromonas veronii strain Bs19, serotype O16. ESI-MS revealed that the most abundant LPS glycoforms have tetra-acylated or hexa-acylated lipid A species, consisting of a bisphosphorylated GlcN disaccharide with an AraN residue as a non-stoichiometric substituent, and a core oligosaccharide composed of Hep5Hex3HexN1Kdo1P1. Sugar and methylation analysis together with 1D and 2D 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy were the main methods used, and revealed that the O-specific polysaccharide (OPS of A. veronii Bs19 was built up of tetrasaccharide repeating units with the structure: →4-α-d-Quip3NAc-(1→3-α-l-Rhap-(1→4-β-d-Galp-(1→3-α-d-GalpNAc-(1→. This composition was confirmed by mass spectrometry. The charge-deconvoluted ESI FT-ICR MS recorded for the LPS preparations identified mass peaks of SR- and R-form LPS species, that differed by Δm = 698.27 u, a value corresponding to the calculated molecular mass of one OPS repeating unit (6dHexNAc6dHexHexHexNAc-H2O. Moreover, unspecific fragmentation spectra confirmed the sequence of the sugar residues in the OPS and allowed to assume that the elucidated structure also represented the biological repeating unit.

  13. Nifty Nines and Repeating Decimals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    The traditional technique for converting repeating decimals to common fractions can be found in nearly every algebra textbook that has been published, as well as in many precalculus texts. However, students generally encounter repeating decimal numerals earlier than high school when they study rational numbers in prealgebra classes. Therefore, how…

  14. Nifty Nines and Repeating Decimals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    The traditional technique for converting repeating decimals to common fractions can be found in nearly every algebra textbook that has been published, as well as in many precalculus texts. However, students generally encounter repeating decimal numerals earlier than high school when they study rational numbers in prealgebra classes. Therefore, how…

  15. Structural investigation of the O-specific polysaccharides of Morganella morganii consisting of two higher sugars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilcoyne, Michelle; Shashkov, Alexander S; Senchenkova, Sof'ya A; Knirel, Yuriy A; Vinogradov, Evgeny V; Radziejewska-Lebrecht, Joanna; Galimska-Stypa, Regina; Savage, Angela V

    2002-10-01

    The lipopolysaccharide of the bacterium Morganella morganii (strain KF 1676, RK 4222) yielded two polysaccharides, PS1 and PS2, when subjected to mild acid degradation followed by GPC. The polysaccharides were studied by 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy, including two-dimensional COSY, TOCSY, NOESY, 1H,(13)C HMQC, and HMBC experiments. Each polysaccharide was found to contain a disaccharide repeating unit consisting of two higher sugars, 5-acetamidino-7-acetamido-3,5,7,9-tetradeoxy-L-glycero-D-galacto-non-2-ulosonic acid (a derivative of 8-epilegionaminic acid, 8eLeg5Am7Ac) and 2-acetamido-4-C-(3'-carboxamide-2',2'-dihydroxypropyl)-2,6-dideoxy-D-galactose (shewanellose, She). The two polysaccharides differ only in the ring size of shewanellose and have the following structures:Shewanellose has been previously identified in a phenol-soluble polysaccharide from Shewanella putrefaciens A6, which shows a close structural similarity to PS2.

  16. All-photonic quantum repeaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-01-01

    Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all-photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. In particular, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster-state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such all-photonic quantum repeaters, the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route towards quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories. PMID:25873153

  17. An Expanded CAG Repeat in Huntingtin Causes +1 Frameshifting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffert, Paul; Adamla, Frauke; Schieweck, Rico; Atkins, John F; Ignatova, Zoya

    2016-08-26

    Maintenance of triplet decoding is crucial for the expression of functional protein because deviations either into the -1 or +1 reading frames are often non-functional. We report here that expression of huntingtin (Htt) exon 1 with expanded CAG repeats, implicated in Huntington pathology, undergoes a sporadic +1 frameshift to generate from the CAG repeat a trans-frame AGC repeat-encoded product. This +1 recoding is exclusively detected in pathological Htt variants, i.e. those with expanded repeats with more than 35 consecutive CAG codons. An atypical +1 shift site, UUC C at the 5' end of CAG repeats, which has some resemblance to the influenza A virus shift site, triggers the +1 frameshifting and is enhanced by the increased propensity of the expanded CAG repeats to form a stem-loop structure. The +1 trans-frame-encoded product can directly influence the aggregation of the parental Htt exon 1.

  18. Structural reevaluation of Streptococcus pneumoniae Lipoteichoic acid and new insights into its immunostimulatory potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisch, Nicolas; Kohler, Thomas; Ulmer, Artur J; Müthing, Johannes; Pribyl, Thomas; Fischer, Kathleen; Lindner, Buko; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Zähringer, Ulrich

    2013-05-31

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a Gram-positive human pathogen with a complex lipoteichoic acid (pnLTA) structure. Because the current structural model for pnLTA shows substantial inconsistencies, we reinvestigated purified and, more importantly, O-deacylated pnLTA, which is most suitable for NMR spectroscopy and electrospray ionization-MS spectrometry. We analyzed pnLTA of nonencapsulated pneumococcal strains D39Δcps and TIGR4Δcps, respectively. The data obtained allowed us to (re)define (i) the position and linkage of the repeating unit, (ii) the putative α-GalpNAc substitution at the ribitiol 5-phosphate (Rib-ol-5-P), and (iii) the length of (i.e. the number of repeating units in) the pnLTA chain. We here also describe for the first time that the terminal sugar residues in the pnLTA (Forssman disaccharide; α-D-GalpNAc-(1→3)-β-D-GalpNAc-(1→)), responsible for the cross-reactivity with anti-Forssman antigen antibodies, can be heterogeneous with respect to its degree of phosphorylcholine substitution in both O-6-positions. To assess the proinflammatory potency of pnLTA, we generated a (lipopeptide-free) Δlgt mutant of strain D39Δcps, isolated its pnLTA, and showed that it is capable of inducing IL-6 release in human mononuclear cells, independent of TLR2 activation. This finding was quite in contrast to LTA of the Staphylococcus aureus SA113Δlgt mutant, which did not activate human mononuclear cells in our experiments. Remarkably, this is also contrary to various other reports showing a proinflammatory potency of S. aureus LTA. Taken together, our study refines the structure of pnLTA and indicates that pneumococcal and S. aureus LTAs differ not only in their structure but also in their bioactivity.

  19. TPR repeats and ELTR pattern: length variation as a function evolution mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ke-Qian

    2007-12-01

    TPR repeat was originally defined as a 34 amino acid structural repeat (TPR-34). Equal length tandem repeats (ELTR) was proposed to represent the ancestral repeat pattern. Length polymorphism of TPR repeats was analyzed using PATTINPROT, two new versions of TPR repeat of 40 and 42 amino acids were identified. These 'long' TPRs endow new functional capacities to the resulting proteins. A strong correlation between varied lengths and new functions supports the hypothesis that length variation is an underlying mechanism for the function evolution of repeat containing proteins.

  20. 6-alkynyl fucose is a bioorthogonal analog for O-fucosylation of epidermal growth factor-like repeats and thrombospondin type-1 repeats by protein O-fucosyltransferases 1 and 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shareffi, Esam; Chaubard, Jean-Luc; Leonhard-Melief, Christina; Wang, Sheng-Kai; Wong, Chi-Huey; Haltiwanger, Robert S

    2013-02-01

    Protein O-fucosyltransferase 1 (Pofut1) and protein O-fucosyltransferase 2 (Pofut2) add O-linked fucose at distinct consensus sequences in properly folded epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like repeats and thrombospondin type-1 (TSR) repeats, respectively. Glycan chain elongation past O-fucose can occur to yield a tetrasaccharide on EGF repeats and a disaccharide on TSRs. Elimination of Pofut1 in mice causes embryonic lethality with Notch-like phenotypes demonstrating that O-fucosylation of Notch is essential for its function. Similarly, elimination of Pofut2 results in an early embryonic lethal phenotype in mice, although the molecular mechanism for the lethality is unknown. The recent development of sugar analogs has revolutionized the study of glycans by providing a convenient method for labeling and tracking glycosylation. In order to study O-fucosylation, we took advantage of the recently developed reporter, 6-alkynyl fucose. Using the Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC), or "click" reaction, azido-biotin allows tagging and detection of 6AF-modified proteins. Here we examine whether proteins containing EGF repeats or TSRs with O-fucose consensus sequences are specifically modified with 6AF in cell culture. Using mass spectrometry (MS), we demonstrate that 6AF is efficiently incorporated onto the appropriate consensus sequences on EGF repeats and TSRs. Furthermore, the elongation of the O-fucose monosaccharide on EGF repeats and TSRs is not hampered when 6AF is used. These results show that 6AF is efficiently utilized in a truly bioorthogonal manner by Pofut1, Pofut2 and the enzymes that elongate O-fucose, providing evidence that 6AF is a significant new tool in the study of protein O-fucosylation.

  1. Analysis of repeated measures data

    CERN Document Server

    Islam, M Ataharul

    2017-01-01

    This book presents a broad range of statistical techniques to address emerging needs in the field of repeated measures. It also provides a comprehensive overview of extensions of generalized linear models for the bivariate exponential family of distributions, which represent a new development in analysing repeated measures data. The demand for statistical models for correlated outcomes has grown rapidly recently, mainly due to presence of two types of underlying associations: associations between outcomes, and associations between explanatory variables and outcomes. The book systematically addresses key problems arising in the modelling of repeated measures data, bearing in mind those factors that play a major role in estimating the underlying relationships between covariates and outcome variables for correlated outcome data. In addition, it presents new approaches to addressing current challenges in the field of repeated measures and models based on conditional and joint probabilities. Markov models of first...

  2. Landauer's Principle in Repeated Interaction Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Eric P.; Joye, Alain; Pautrat, Yan; Raquépas, Renaud

    2017-01-01

    We study Landauer's Principle for Repeated Interaction Systems (RIS) consisting of a reference quantum system S in contact with a structured environment E made of a chain of independent quantum probes; S interacts with each probe, for a fixed duration, in sequence. We first adapt Landauer's lower bound, which relates the energy variation of the environment E to a decrease of entropy of the system S during the evolution, to the peculiar discrete time dynamics of RIS. Then we consider RIS with a structured environment E displaying small variations of order {T^{-1}} between the successive probes encountered by S, after {n ˜eq T} interactions, in keeping with adiabatic scaling. We establish a discrete time non-unitary adiabatic theorem to approximate the reduced dynamics of S in this regime, in order to tackle the adiabatic limit of Landauer's bound. We find that saturation of Landauer's bound is related to a detailed balance condition on the repeated interaction system, reflecting the non-equilibrium nature of the repeated interaction system dynamics. This is to be contrasted with the generic saturation of Landauer's bound known to hold for continuous time evolution of an open quantum system interacting with a single thermal reservoir in the adiabatic regime.

  3. Partial structural characterization of pectin cell wall from Argania spinosa leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadda Hachem

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The pectin polysaccharides from leaves of Argania spinosa (L. Skeels, collected from Stidia area in the west coast of northern Algeria, were investigated by using sequential extractions and the resulting fractions were analysed for monosaccharide composition and chemical structure. Water-soluble pectic (ALS-WSP and chelating-soluble pectic (ALS-CSP fractions were obtained, de-esterified and fractionated by anion-exchange chromatography and characterized by sugar analysis combined with methylation analysis and 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. The data reveal the presence of altering homogalacturonan (HG and rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I in both pectin fraction. The rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I are consisted of a disaccharide repeating unit [→ α-D-GalpA-1,2-α-L-Rhap-1,4 →] backbone, with side chains contained highly branched α-(1 → 5-linked arabinan and short linear β-(1 → 4-linked galactan, attached to O-4 of the rhamnosyl residues.

  4. Structure-Activity Relation of AMOR Sugar Molecule That Activates Pollen-Tubes for Ovular Guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Jiao; Mizukami, Akane G; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian; Yamguchi, Junichiro; Itami, Kenichiro; Higashiyawma, Tetsuya

    2017-01-01

    Successful fertilization in flowering plants depends on the precise directional growth control of pollen tube through the female pistil tissue toward the female gametophyte contained in the ovule for delivery of nonmotile sperm cells. Cys-rich peptides LUREs secreted from the synergid cells on either side of the egg cell act as ovular attractants of pollen tubes. Competency control by the pistil is crucial for the response of pollen tubes to these ovular attractants. We recently reported that ovular 4-O-methyl-glucuronosyl arabinogalactan (AMOR) induces competency of the pollen tube to respond to ovular attractant LURE peptides in Torenia fournieri. The beta isomer of the terminal disaccharide 4-O-methyl-glucuronosyl galactose was essential and sufficient for the competency induction. However, critical and noncritical structures in the disaccharide have not been dissected deeply. Herein, we report the synthesis of new AMOR analogs and the structure-activity relationships for AMOR activity in the presence of these synthesized analogs. Removal of 4-O-methyl group or -COOH from the glucuronosyl residue of the disaccharide dramatically reduces AMOR activity. The pyranose backbone of the second sugar of disaccharide is essential for the activity but not hydroxy groups. The role of beta isomer of the disaccharide 4-Me-GlcA-β(1,6)-Gal is very specific for competency control, as there was no difference in effect among the sugar analogs tested for pollen germination. This study represents the first structure-activity relationship study, to our knowledge, of a sugar molecule involved in plant reproduction, which opens a way for modification of the molecule without loss of activity.

  5. Limitations on quantum key repeaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäuml, Stefan; Christandl, Matthias; Horodecki, Karol; Winter, Andreas

    2015-04-23

    A major application of quantum communication is the distribution of entangled particles for use in quantum key distribution. Owing to noise in the communication line, quantum key distribution is, in practice, limited to a distance of a few hundred kilometres, and can only be extended to longer distances by use of a quantum repeater, a device that performs entanglement distillation and quantum teleportation. The existence of noisy entangled states that are undistillable but nevertheless useful for quantum key distribution raises the question of the feasibility of a quantum key repeater, which would work beyond the limits of entanglement distillation, hence possibly tolerating higher noise levels than existing protocols. Here we exhibit fundamental limits on such a device in the form of bounds on the rate at which it may extract secure key. As a consequence, we give examples of states suitable for quantum key distribution but unsuitable for the most general quantum key repeater protocol.

  6. Hysteresis of magnetostructural transitions: Repeatable and non-repeatable processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Provenzano, Virgil [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Della Torre, Edward; Bennett, Lawrence H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); ElBidweihy, Hatem, E-mail: Hatem@gwmail.gwu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    The Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 2}Si{sub 2} alloy and the off-stoichiometric Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}In{sub 15} Heusler alloy belong to a special class of metallic materials that exhibit first-order magnetostructural transitions near room temperature. The magnetic properties of this class of materials have been extensively studied due to their interesting magnetic behavior and their potential for a number of technological applications such as refrigerants for near-room-temperature magnetic refrigeration. The thermally driven first-order transitions in these materials can be field-induced in the reverse order by applying a strong enough field. The field-induced transitions are typically accompanied by the presence of large magnetic hysteresis, the characteristics of which are a complicated function of temperature, field, and magneto-thermal history. In this study we show that the virgin curve, the major loop, and sequentially measured MH loops are the results of both repeatable and non-repeatable processes, in which the starting magnetostructural state, prior to the cycling of field, plays a major role. Using the Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 2}Si{sub 2} and Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}In{sub 15} alloys, as model materials, we show that a starting single phase state results in fully repeatable processes and large magnetic hysteresis, whereas a mixed phase starting state results in non-repeatable processes and smaller hysteresis.

  7. Analysis of CR1 Repeats in the Zebra Finch Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George E. Liu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Most bird species have smaller genomes and fewer repeats than mammals. Chicken Repeat 1 (CR1 repeat is one of the most abundant families of repeats, ranging from ~133,000 to ~187,000 copies accounting for ~50 to ~80% of the interspersed repeats in the zebra finch and chicken genomes, respectively. CR1 repeats are believed to have arisen from the retrotransposition of a small number of master elements, which gave rise to multiple CR1 subfamilies in the chicken. In this study, we performed a global assessment of the divergence distributions, phylogenies, and consensus sequences of CR1 repeats in the zebra finch genome. We identified and validated 34 CR1 subfamilies and further analyzed the correlation between these subfamilies. We also discovered 4 novel lineage-specific CR1 subfamilies in the zebra finch when compared to the chicken genome. We built various evolutionary trees of these subfamilies and concluded that CR1 repeats may play an important role in reshaping the structure of bird genomes.

  8. Native tandem and ion mobility mass spectrometry highlight structural and modular similarities in clustered-regularly-interspaced shot-palindromic-repeats (CRISPR)-associated protein complexes from Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijn, E. van; Barbu, I.M.; Barendregt, A.; Jore, M.M.; Wiedenheft, B.; Lundgren, M.; Westra, E.R.; Brouns, S.J.J.; Doudna, J.A.; van der Oost, J.; Heck, A.J.R.

    2012-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated genes) immune system of bacteria and archaea provides acquired resistance against viruses and plasmids, by a strategy analogous to RNA-interference. Key components of the defense system are ribonucleoprotein

  9. EAMJ Dec. Repeatability.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-12-12

    Dec 12, 2008 ... Results:Kappa values for four-week repeatability for the wheeze and asthma questions were 0.61 ... for logistic, cultural and ethical reasons, to use ... individual with baseline forced expiratory volume in .... period is likely to also include the effects of true ... data, the writing of the manuscript or the decision.

  10. Statistical analysis of the Bacterial Carbohydrate Structure Data Base (BCSDB): Characteristics and diversity of bacterial carbohydrates in comparison with mammalian glycans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herget, Stephan; Toukach, Philip V; Ranzinger, René; Hull, William E; Knirel, Yuriy A; von der Lieth, Claus-Wilhelm

    2008-01-01

    Background There are considerable differences between bacterial and mammalian glycans. In contrast to most eukaryotic carbohydrates, bacterial glycans are often composed of repeating units with diverse functions ranging from structural reinforcement to adhesion, colonization and camouflage. Since bacterial glycans are typically displayed at the cell surface, they can interact with the environment and, therefore, have significant biomedical importance. Results The sequence characteristics of glycans (monosaccharide composition, modifications, and linkage patterns) for the higher bacterial taxonomic classes have been examined and compared with the data for mammals, with both similarities and unique features becoming evident. Compared to mammalian glycans, the bacterial glycans deposited in the current databases have a more than ten-fold greater diversity at the monosaccharide level, and the disaccharide pattern space is approximately nine times larger. Specific bacterial subclasses exhibit characteristic glycans which can be distinguished on the basis of distinctive structural features or sequence properties. Conclusion For the first time a systematic database analysis of the bacterial glycome has been performed. This study summarizes the current knowledge of bacterial glycan architecture and diversity and reveals putative targets for the rational design and development of therapeutic intervention strategies by comparing bacterial and mammalian glycans. PMID:18694500

  11. Research on properties of fine recycled aggregate for structural concrete from repeatedly recycling concrete waste%循环再生高性能混凝土细骨料性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牟晓芳; 郑俊健; 李浩然; 朱平华

    2014-01-01

    In order to explore the possibility of repeatedly recycling the waste concrete from different sources for structural concrete ag-gregate,the experiment researched the performance of recycled fine aggregate from both secondary renewable single sources and mixed sources,analysing the mineral and chemical component,grading the test results according to Japanese technical standards for recycled ag-gregate,ASTM and China GB/T 25177-2010 and other relevant recycled aggregate standards,establishing a relationship between aggre-gate indicators through the data fitting.The experimental results show that:with the increase of the cycle,the apparent density of recycled fine aggregate,the water absorption and water demand ratio decreases while the intensity ratio increases;the surface absorption mortar con-tent of circulation recycled aggregate increases;compared with natural fine aggregate,the mass fraction of CaO from first recycled fine ag-gregate increased by an average of 5 times,which from the second recycled fine aggregate increased by an average of 10 times;the com-pressive strength radio of recycled mortar and the absorption mortar content shows a quadratic relationship ,the curve down first then up shows that with the increase of regeneration frequencies,the compressive strength radio of recycled mortar elevates;The secondary recy-cled aggregates are satisfied with the performance requirements of structural concrete with fine aggregate regardless of what the standards and criteria taken.%系统研究了由废弃混凝土二次再生制备的结构混凝土细骨料性能,分析了矿物与化学成分,依据日本JISA、美国ASTM和中国GB/T 25176-2010等相关再生细骨料标准对试验结果进行了等级评定,并建立了表观密度、胶砂强度与吸附砂浆含量之间的关系。结果表明:随着循环次数的增加,再生细骨料表观密度、吸水率、需水量比降低,胶砂强度比与细度模数增大,吸附的砂浆含量

  12. Directionality switchable gain stabilized linear repeater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Takayuki; Ohmachi, Tadashi; Aida, Kazuo

    2004-10-01

    We propose a new approach to realize a bidirectional linear repeater suitable for future optical internet networks and fault location in repeater chain with OTDR. The proposed approach is the linear repeater of simple configuration whose directionality is rearranged dynamically by electrical control signal. The repeater is composed of a magneto-optical switch, a circulator, a dynamically gain stabilized unidirectional EDFA, and control circuits. The repeater directionality is rearranged as fast as 0.1ms by an electrical control pulse. It is experimentally confirmed that OTDR with the directionality switchable repeater is feasible for repeater chain. The detailed design and performance of the repeater are also discussed, including the multi-pass interference (MPI) which may arise in the proposed repeater, the effect of the MPI on SNR degradation of the repeater chain and the feed-forward EDFA gain control circuit.

  13. Measurement-based quantum repeaters

    CERN Document Server

    Zwerger, M; Briegel, H J

    2012-01-01

    We introduce measurement-based quantum repeaters, where small-scale measurement-based quantum processors are used to perform entanglement purification and entanglement swapping in a long-range quantum communication protocol. In the scheme, pre-prepared entangled states stored at intermediate repeater stations are coupled with incoming photons by simple Bell-measurements, without the need of performing additional quantum gates or measurements. We show how to construct the required resource states, and how to minimize their size. We analyze the performance of the scheme under noise and imperfections, with focus on small-scale implementations involving entangled states of few qubits. We find measurement-based purification protocols with significantly improved noise thresholds. Furthermore we show that already resource states of small size suffice to significantly increase the maximal communication distance. We also discuss possible advantages of our scheme for different set-ups.

  14. A Repeating Fast Radio Burst

    CERN Document Server

    Spitler, L G; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-01-01

    Fast Radio Bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measures (i.e. integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of the fast radio bursts has led several authors to hypothesise that they originate in cataclysmic astrophysical events. Here we report the detection of ten additional bursts from the direction of FRB121102, using the 305-m Arecibo telescope. These new bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and wh...

  15. A further analysis of the relationship between yellow ripe-fruit color and the capsanthin-capsorubin synthase gene in pepper (Capsicum sp.) indicated a new mutant variant in C. annuum and a tandem repeat structure in promoter region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng; Wang, Shu; Gui, Xiao-Ling; Chang, Xiao-Bei; Gong, Zhen-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Mature pepper (Capsicum sp.) fruits come in a variety of colors, including red, orange, yellow, brown, and white. To better understand the genetic and regulatory relationships between the yellow fruit phenotype and the capsanthin-capsorubin synthase gene (Ccs), we examined 156 Capsicum varieties, most of which were collected from Northwest Chinese landraces. A new ccs variant was identified in the yellow fruit cultivar CK7. Cluster analysis revealed that CK7, which belongs to the C. annuum species, has low genetic similarity to other yellow C. annuum varieties. In the coding sequence of this ccs allele, we detected a premature stop codon derived from a C to G change, as well as a downstream frame-shift caused by a 1-bp nucleotide deletion. In addition, the expression of the gene was detected in mature CK7 fruit. Furthermore, the promoter sequences of Ccs from some pepper varieties were examined, and we detected a 176-bp tandem repeat sequence in the promoter region. In all C. annuum varieties examined in this study, the repeat number was three, compared with four in two C. chinense accessions. The sequence similarity ranged from 84.8% to 97.7% among the four types of repeats, and some putative cis-elements were also found in every repeat. This suggests that the transcriptional regulation of Ccs expression is complex. Based on the analysis of the novel C. annuum mutation reported here, along with the studies of three mutation types in yellow C. annuum and C. chinense accessions, we suggest that the mechanism leading to the production of yellow color fruit may be not as complex as that leading to orange fruit production.

  16. A further analysis of the relationship between yellow ripe-fruit color and the capsanthin-capsorubin synthase gene in pepper (Capsicum sp. indicated a new mutant variant in C. annuum and a tandem repeat structure in promoter region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Li

    Full Text Available Mature pepper (Capsicum sp. fruits come in a variety of colors, including red, orange, yellow, brown, and white. To better understand the genetic and regulatory relationships between the yellow fruit phenotype and the capsanthin-capsorubin synthase gene (Ccs, we examined 156 Capsicum varieties, most of which were collected from Northwest Chinese landraces. A new ccs variant was identified in the yellow fruit cultivar CK7. Cluster analysis revealed that CK7, which belongs to the C. annuum species, has low genetic similarity to other yellow C. annuum varieties. In the coding sequence of this ccs allele, we detected a premature stop codon derived from a C to G change, as well as a downstream frame-shift caused by a 1-bp nucleotide deletion. In addition, the expression of the gene was detected in mature CK7 fruit. Furthermore, the promoter sequences of Ccs from some pepper varieties were examined, and we detected a 176-bp tandem repeat sequence in the promoter region. In all C. annuum varieties examined in this study, the repeat number was three, compared with four in two C. chinense accessions. The sequence similarity ranged from 84.8% to 97.7% among the four types of repeats, and some putative cis-elements were also found in every repeat. This suggests that the transcriptional regulation of Ccs expression is complex. Based on the analysis of the novel C. annuum mutation reported here, along with the studies of three mutation types in yellow C. annuum and C. chinense accessions, we suggest that the mechanism leading to the production of yellow color fruit may be not as complex as that leading to orange fruit production.

  17. Repeatability of Harris Corner Detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Lili

    2003-01-01

    Interest point detectors are commonly employed to reduce the amount of data to be processed. The ideal interest point detector would robustly select those features which are most appropriate or salient for the application and data at hand. This paper shows that interest points are geometrically stable under different transformations.This property makes interest points very successful in the context of image matching. To measure this property quantatively, we introduce a evaluation criterion: repeatability rate.

  18. Potential Role of the Last Half Repeat in TAL Effectors Revealed by a Molecular Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Wan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available TAL effectors (TALEs contain a modular DNA-binding domain that is composed of tandem repeats. In all naturally occurring TALEs, the end of tandem repeats is invariantly a truncated half repeat. To investigate the potential role of the last half repeat in TALEs, we performed comparative molecular dynamics simulations for the crystal structure of DNA-bound TALE AvrBs3 lacking the last half repeat and its modeled structure having the last half repeat. The structural stability analysis indicates that the modeled system is more stable than the nonmodeled system. Based on the principle component analysis, it is found that the AvrBs3 increases its structural compactness in the presence of the last half repeat. The comparison of DNA groove parameters of the two systems implies that the last half repeat also causes the change of DNA major groove binding efficiency. The following calculation of hydrogen bond reveals that, by stabilizing the phosphate binding with DNA at the C-terminus, the last half repeat helps to adopt a compact conformation at the protein-DNA interface. It further mediates more contacts between TAL repeats and DNA nucleotide bases. Finally, we suggest that the last half repeat is required for the high-efficient recognition of DNA by TALE.

  19. Potential Role of the Last Half Repeat in TAL Effectors Revealed by a Molecular Simulation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Hua; Chang, Shan; Hu, Jian-ping; Tian, Xu-hong

    2016-01-01

    TAL effectors (TALEs) contain a modular DNA-binding domain that is composed of tandem repeats. In all naturally occurring TALEs, the end of tandem repeats is invariantly a truncated half repeat. To investigate the potential role of the last half repeat in TALEs, we performed comparative molecular dynamics simulations for the crystal structure of DNA-bound TALE AvrBs3 lacking the last half repeat and its modeled structure having the last half repeat. The structural stability analysis indicates that the modeled system is more stable than the nonmodeled system. Based on the principle component analysis, it is found that the AvrBs3 increases its structural compactness in the presence of the last half repeat. The comparison of DNA groove parameters of the two systems implies that the last half repeat also causes the change of DNA major groove binding efficiency. The following calculation of hydrogen bond reveals that, by stabilizing the phosphate binding with DNA at the C-terminus, the last half repeat helps to adopt a compact conformation at the protein-DNA interface. It further mediates more contacts between TAL repeats and DNA nucleotide bases. Finally, we suggest that the last half repeat is required for the high-efficient recognition of DNA by TALE. PMID:27803930

  20. ACCA phosphopeptide recognition by the BRCT repeats of BRCA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Hind; Moreau, Karen; Dizin, Eva; Callebaut, Isabelle; Venezia, Nicole Dalla

    2006-06-16

    The tumour suppressor gene BRCA1 encodes a 220 kDa protein that participates in multiple cellular processes. The BRCA1 protein contains a tandem of two BRCT repeats at its carboxy-terminal region. The majority of disease-associated BRCA1 mutations affect this region and provide to the BRCT repeats a central role in the BRCA1 tumour suppressor function. The BRCT repeats have been shown to mediate phospho-dependant protein-protein interactions. They recognize phosphorylated peptides using a recognition groove that spans both BRCT repeats. We previously identified an interaction between the tandem of BRCA1 BRCT repeats and ACCA, which was disrupted by germ line BRCA1 mutations that affect the BRCT repeats. We recently showed that BRCA1 modulates ACCA activity through its phospho-dependent binding to ACCA. To delineate the region of ACCA that is crucial for the regulation of its activity by BRCA1, we searched for potential phosphorylation sites in the ACCA sequence that might be recognized by the BRCA1 BRCT repeats. Using sequence analysis and structure modelling, we proposed the Ser1263 residue as the most favourable candidate among six residues, for recognition by the BRCA1 BRCT repeats. Using experimental approaches, such as GST pull-down assay with Bosc cells, we clearly showed that phosphorylation of only Ser1263 was essential for the interaction of ACCA with the BRCT repeats. We finally demonstrated by immunoprecipitation of ACCA in cells, that the whole BRCA1 protein interacts with ACCA when phosphorylated on Ser1263.

  1. Origin and fate of repeats in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achaz, G; Rocha, E P C; Netter, P; Coissac, E

    2002-07-01

    We investigated 53 complete bacterial chromosomes for intrachromosomal repeats. In previous studies on eukaryote chromosomes, we proposed a model for the dynamics of repeats based on the continuous genesis of tandem repeats, followed by an active process of high deletion rate, counteracted by rearrangement events that may prevent the repeats from being deleted. The present study of long repeats in the genomes of Bacteria and Archaea suggests that our model of interspersed repeats dynamics may apply to them. Thus the duplication process might be a consequence of very ancient mechanisms shared by all three domains. Moreover, we show that there is a strong negative correlation between nucleotide composition bias and the repeat density of genomes. We hypothesise that in highly biased genomes, non-duplicated small repeats arise more frequently by random effects and are used as primers for duplication mechanisms, leading to a higher density of large repeats.

  2. Rational design of alpha-helical tandem repeat proteins with closed architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Lindsey; Hallinan, Jazmine; Bolduc, Jill; Parmeggiani, Fabio; Baker, David; Stoddard, Barry L.; Bradley, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Tandem repeat proteins, which are formed by repetition of modular units of protein sequence and structure, play important biological roles as macromolecular binding and scaffolding domains, enzymes, and building blocks for the assembly of fibrous materials1,2. The modular nature of repeat proteins enables the rapid construction and diversification of extended binding surfaces by duplication and recombination of simple building blocks3,4. The overall architecture of tandem repeat protein structures – which is dictated by the internal geometry and local packing of the repeat building blocks – is highly diverse, ranging from extended, super-helical folds that bind peptide, DNA, and RNA partners5–9, to closed and compact conformations with internal cavities suitable for small molecule binding and catalysis10. Here we report the development and validation of computational methods for de novo design of tandem repeat protein architectures driven purely by geometric criteria defining the inter-repeat geometry, without reference to the sequences and structures of existing repeat protein families. We have applied these methods to design a series of closed alpha-solenoid11 repeat structures (alpha-toroids) in which the inter-repeat packing geometry is constrained so as to juxtapose the N- and C-termini; several of these designed structures have been validated by X-ray crystallography. Unlike previous approaches to tandem repeat protein engineering12–20, our design procedure does not rely on template sequence or structural information taken from natural repeat proteins and hence can produce structures unlike those seen in nature. As an example, we have successfully designed and validated closed alpha-solenoid repeats with a left-handed helical architecture that – to our knowledge – is not yet present in the protein structure database21. PMID:26675735

  3. Rational design of α-helical tandem repeat proteins with closed architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Lindsey; Hallinan, Jazmine; Bolduc, Jill; Parmeggiani, Fabio; Baker, David; Stoddard, Barry L; Bradley, Philip

    2015-12-24

    Tandem repeat proteins, which are formed by repetition of modular units of protein sequence and structure, play important biological roles as macromolecular binding and scaffolding domains, enzymes, and building blocks for the assembly of fibrous materials. The modular nature of repeat proteins enables the rapid construction and diversification of extended binding surfaces by duplication and recombination of simple building blocks. The overall architecture of tandem repeat protein structures--which is dictated by the internal geometry and local packing of the repeat building blocks--is highly diverse, ranging from extended, super-helical folds that bind peptide, DNA, and RNA partners, to closed and compact conformations with internal cavities suitable for small molecule binding and catalysis. Here we report the development and validation of computational methods for de novo design of tandem repeat protein architectures driven purely by geometric criteria defining the inter-repeat geometry, without reference to the sequences and structures of existing repeat protein families. We have applied these methods to design a series of closed α-solenoid repeat structures (α-toroids) in which the inter-repeat packing geometry is constrained so as to juxtapose the amino (N) and carboxy (C) termini; several of these designed structures have been validated by X-ray crystallography. Unlike previous approaches to tandem repeat protein engineering, our design procedure does not rely on template sequence or structural information taken from natural repeat proteins and hence can produce structures unlike those seen in nature. As an example, we have successfully designed and validated closed α-solenoid repeats with a left-handed helical architecture that--to our knowledge--is not yet present in the protein structure database.

  4. Improving repeatability by improving quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronen, Shuki; Ackers, Mark; Schlumberger, Geco-Prakla; Brink, Mundy

    1998-12-31

    Time lapse (4-D) seismic is a promising tool for reservoir characterization and monitoring. The method is apparently simple: to acquire data repeatedly over the same reservoir, process and interpret the data sets, then changes between the data sets indicate changes in the reservoir. A problem with time lapse seismic data is that reservoirs are a relatively small part of the earth and important reservoir changes may cause very small differences to the time lapse data. The challenge is to acquire and process economical time lapse data such that reservoir changes can be detected above the noise of varying acquisition and environment. 7 refs., 9 figs.

  5. Coordinated hybrid automatic repeat request

    KAUST Repository

    Makki, Behrooz

    2014-11-01

    We develop a coordinated hybrid automatic repeat request (HARQ) approach. With the proposed scheme, if a user message is correctly decoded in the first HARQ rounds, its spectrum is allocated to other users, to improve the network outage probability and the users\\' fairness. The results, which are obtained for single- and multiple-antenna setups, demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed approach in different conditions. For instance, with a maximum of M retransmissions and single transmit/receive antennas, the diversity gain of a user increases from M to (J+1)(M-1)+1 where J is the number of users helping that user.

  6. Crowding by a repeating pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Sarah; Pelli, Denis G

    2015-01-01

    Theinability to recognize a peripheral target among flankers is called crowding. For a foveal target, crowding can be distinguished from overlap masking by its sparing of detection, linear scaling with eccentricity, and invariance with target size.Crowding depends on the proximity and similarity of the flankers to the target. Flankers that are far from or dissimilar to the target do not crowd it. On a gray page, text whose neighboring letters have different colors, alternately black and white, has enough dissimilarity that it might escape crowding. Since reading speed is normally limited by crowding, escape from crowding should allow faster reading. Yet reading speed is unchanged (Chung & Mansfield, 2009). Why? A recent vernier study found that using alternating-color flankers produces strong crowding (Manassi, Sayim, & Herzog, 2012). Might that effect occur with letters and reading? Critical spacing is the minimum center-to-center target-flanker spacing needed to correctly identify the target. We measure it for a target letter surrounded by several equidistant flanker letters of the same polarity, opposite polarity, or mixed polarity: alternately white and black. We find strong crowding in the alternating condition, even though each flanker letter is beyond its own critical spacing (as measured in a separate condition). Thus a periodic repeating pattern can produce crowding even when the individual elements do not. Further, in all conditions we find that, once a periodic pattern repeats (two cycles), further repetition does not affect critical spacing of the innermost flanker.

  7. Automatization and familiarity in repeated checking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dek, Eliane C P; van den Hout, Marcel A.; Giele, Catharina L.; Engelhard, Iris M.

    2014-01-01

    Repeated checking paradoxically increases memory uncertainty. This study investigated the underlying mechanism of this effect. We hypothesized that as a result of repeated checking, familiarity with stimuli increases, and automatization of the checking procedure occurs, which should result in decrea

  8. CDC Vital Signs: Preventing Repeat Teen Births

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... file Error processing SSI file Preventing Repeat Teen Births Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this ... Too many teens, ages 15–19, have repeat births. Nearly 1 in 5 births to teens, ages ...

  9. Ising Model Reprogramming of a Repeat Protein's Equilibrium Unfolding Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millership, C; Phillips, J J; Main, E R G

    2016-05-08

    Repeat proteins are formed from units of 20-40 aa that stack together into quasi one-dimensional non-globular structures. This modular repetitive construction means that, unlike globular proteins, a repeat protein's equilibrium folding and thus thermodynamic stability can be analysed using linear Ising models. Typically, homozipper Ising models have been used. These treat the repeat protein as a series of identical interacting subunits (the repeated motifs) that couple together to form the folded protein. However, they cannot describe subunits of differing stabilities. Here we show that a more sophisticated heteropolymer Ising model can be constructed and fitted to two new helix deletion series of consensus tetratricopeptide repeat proteins (CTPRs). This analysis, showing an asymmetric spread of stability between helices within CTPR ensembles, coupled with the Ising model's predictive qualities was then used to guide reprogramming of the unfolding pathway of a variant CTPR protein. The designed behaviour was engineered by introducing destabilising mutations that increased the thermodynamic asymmetry within a CTPR ensemble. The asymmetry caused the terminal α-helix to thermodynamically uncouple from the rest of the protein and preferentially unfold. This produced a specific, highly populated stable intermediate with a putative dimerisation interface. As such it is the first step in designing repeat proteins with function regulated by a conformational switch. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Expanded complexity of unstable repeat diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Polak, Urszula; McIvor, Elizabeth; Dent, Sharon Y.R.; Wells, Robert D.; Napierala, Marek.

    2012-01-01

    Unstable Repeat Diseases (URDs) share a common mutational phenomenon of changes in the copy number of short, tandemly repeated DNA sequences. More than 20 human neurological diseases are caused by instability, predominantly expansion, of microsatellite sequences. Changes in the repeat size initiate a cascade of pathological processes, frequently characteristic of a unique disease or a small subgroup of the URDs. Understanding of both the mechanism of repeat instability and molecular consequen...

  11. 47 CFR 97.205 - Repeater station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Repeater station. 97.205 Section 97.205... SERVICE Special Operations § 97.205 Repeater station. (a) Any amateur station licensed to a holder of a Technician, General, Advanced or Amateur Extra Class operator license may be a repeater. A holder of...

  12. 47 CFR 22.1015 - Repeater operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Repeater operation. 22.1015 Section 22.1015... Offshore Radiotelephone Service § 22.1015 Repeater operation. Offshore central stations may be used as repeater stations provided that the licensee is able to maintain control of the station, and in...

  13. Pentatricopeptide repeat proteins in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkan, Alice; Small, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins constitute one of the largest protein families in land plants, with more than 400 members in most species. Over the past decade, much has been learned about the molecular functions of these proteins, where they act in the cell, and what physiological roles they play during plant growth and development. A typical PPR protein is targeted to mitochondria or chloroplasts, binds one or several organellar transcripts, and influences their expression by altering RNA sequence, turnover, processing, or translation. Their combined action has profound effects on organelle biogenesis and function and, consequently, on photosynthesis, respiration, plant development, and environmental responses. Recent breakthroughs in understanding how PPR proteins recognize RNA sequences through modular base-specific contacts will help match proteins to potential binding sites and provide a pathway toward designing synthetic RNA-binding proteins aimed at desired targets.

  14. General benchmarks for quantum repeaters

    CERN Document Server

    Pirandola, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Using a technique based on quantum teleportation, we simplify the most general adaptive protocols for key distribution, entanglement distillation and quantum communication over a wide class of quantum channels in arbitrary dimension. Thanks to this method, we bound the ultimate rates for secret key generation and quantum communication through single-mode Gaussian channels and several discrete-variable channels. In particular, we derive exact formulas for the two-way assisted capacities of the bosonic quantum-limited amplifier and the dephasing channel in arbitrary dimension, as well as the secret key capacity of the qubit erasure channel. Our results establish the limits of quantum communication with arbitrary systems and set the most general and precise benchmarks for testing quantum repeaters in both discrete- and continuous-variable settings.

  15. Hungarian repeat station survey, 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péter Kovács

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The last Hungarian repeat station survey was completed between October 2010 and February 2011. Declination, inclination and the total field were observed using one-axial DMI fluxgate magnetometer mounted on Zeiss20A theodolite and GSM 19 Overhauser magnetometer. The magnetic elements of the sites were reduced to the epoch of 2010.5 on the basis of the continuous recordings of Tihany Geophysical Observatory. In stations located far from the reference observatory, the observations were carried out in the morning and afternoon in order to decrease the effect of the distant temporal correction. To further increase the accuracy, on-site dIdD variometer has also been installed near the Aggtelek station, in the Baradla cave, during the survey of the easternmost sites. The paper presents the technical details and the results of our last campaign. The improvement of the accuracy of the temporal reduction by the use of the local variometer is also reported.

  16. TPRpred: a tool for prediction of TPR-, PPR- and SEL1-like repeats from protein sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Söding Johannes

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Solenoid repeat proteins of the Tetratrico Peptide Repeat (TPR family are involved as scaffolds in a broad range of protein-protein interactions. Several resources are available for the prediction of TPRs, however, they often fail to detect divergent repeat units. Results We have developed TPRpred, a profile-based method which uses a P-value-dependent score offset to include divergent repeat units and which exploits the tendency of repeats to occur in tandem. TPRpred detects not only TPR-like repeats, but also the related Pentatrico Peptide Repeats (PPRs and SEL1-like repeats. The corresponding profiles were generated through iterative searches, by varying the threshold parameters for inclusion of repeat units into the profiles, and the best profiles were selected based on their performance on proteins of known structure. We benchmarked the performance of TPRpred in detecting TPR-containing proteins and in delineating the individual repeats therein, against currently available resources. Conclusion TPRpred performs significantly better in detecting divergent repeats in TPR-containing proteins, and finds more individual repeats than the existing methods. The web server is available at http://tprpred.tuebingen.mpg.de, and the C++ and Perl sources of TPRpred along with the profiles can be downloaded from ftp://ftp.tuebingen.mpg.de/ebio/protevo/TPRpred/.

  17. Insertion device and method for accurate and repeatable target insertion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubeli, III, Joseph F.; Shinn, Michelle D.; Bevins, Michael E.; Dillon-Townes, Lawrence; Neil, George R.

    2017-07-04

    The present invention discloses a device and a method for inserting and positioning a target within a free electron laser, particle accelerator, or other such device that generates or utilizes a beam of energy or particles. The system includes a three-point registration mechanism that insures angular and translational accuracy and repeatability of positioning upon multiple insertions within the same structure.

  18. Properties of Forested Loess Soils After Repeated Prescribed Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.M. Moehring; C.X. Grano; J.R. Bassett

    1966-01-01

    Nine annual burns have had little effect on the nutrient content and structure of the surface 4 inches of loess soils on flat terrain.Because prescribed burns must often be repeated to obtain desired results, many foresters are apprehensive about the possible deleterious effects on soils. In 1954 the Timber Management Laboratory at Crossett, Arkansas, in co-...

  19. Quality control during repeated fryings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuesta, C.

    1998-08-01

    Full Text Available Most of the debate ¡s about how the slow or frequent turnover of fresh fat affects the deterioration, of fat used in frying. Then, the modification of different oils used in repeated fryings of potatoes without or with turnover of fresh oil, under similar frying conditions, was evaluated by two criteria: by measuring the total polar component isolated by column chromatography and by the evaluation of the specific compounds related to thermoxidative and hydrolytic alteration by High Performance Size Exclusion Chromatography (HPSEC. The results indicate that with frequent turnover of fresh oil, the critical level of 25% of polar material is rarely reached, and there are fewer problems with fat deterioration because the frying tended to increase the level of polar material and thermoxidative compounds (polymers and dimers of triglycerides and oxidized triglycerides in the fryer oil during the first fryings, followed by minor changes and a tendency to reach a near-steady state in successive fryings. However, in repeated frying of potatoes using a null turnover the alteration rate was higher being linear the relationship found between polar material or the different thermoxidative compounds and the number of fryings. On the other hand chemical reactions produced during deep-fat frying can be minimized by using proper oils. In addition the increased level of consumers awareness toward fat composition and its impact on human health could had an impact on the selection of fats for snacks and for industry. In this way monoenic fats are the most adequate from a nutritional point of view and for its oxidative stability during frying.

  20. Structural and functional analysis of slit and heparin binding to immunoglobulin-like domains 1 and 2 of Drosophila Robo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuhara, Noémi; Howitt, Jason A; Hussain, Sadaf-Ahmahni; Hohenester, Erhard

    2008-06-06

    Recognition of the secreted protein Slit by transmembrane receptors of the Robo family provides important signals in the development of the nervous system and other organs, as well as in tumor metastasis and angiogenesis. Heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans serve as essential co-receptors in Slit-Robo signaling. Previous studies have shown that the second leucinerich repeat domain of Slit, D2, binds to the N-terminal immunoglobulin-like domains of Robo, IG1-2. Here we present two crystal structures of Drosophila Robo IG1-2, one of which contains a bound heparin-derived oligosaccharide. Using structure-based mutagenesis of a Robo IG1-5 construct we identified key Slit binding residues (Thr-74, Phe-114, Arg-117) forming a conserved patch on the surface of IG1; mutation of similarly conserved residues in IG2 had no effect on Slit binding. Mutation of conserved basic residues in IG1 (Lys-69, Arg-117, Lys-122, Lys-123), but not in IG2, reduced binding of Robo IG1-5 to heparin, in full agreement with the Robo-heparin co-crystal structure. Our collective results, together with a recent crystal structure of a minimal human Slit-Robo complex ( Morlot, C., Thielens, N. M., Ravelli, R. B., Hemrika, W., Romijn, R. A., Gros, P., Cusack, S., and McCarthy, A. A. (2007) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 104, 14923-14928 ), reveal a contiguous HS/heparin binding surface extending across the Slit-Robo interface. Based on the size of this composite binding site, we predict that at least five HS disaccharide units are required to support Slit-Robo signaling.

  1. Relación entre factores micro- estructurales e impacto repetido en aleaciones de alto cromo para bolas de molino. // Relationship among factors micro - structural and impact repeated in alloys of high chromium for mill balls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Albertin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Las aleaciones de alto cromo son empleadas para la fabricación de bolas de molino en industrias de procesamiento deminerales. Los usuarios y fabricantes requieren lograr mejores resultados técnicos-económicos en sus aplicaciones, por loque necesitan aumentar los conocimientos relacionados con los aspectos estructurales de estos materiales. En este trabajo serealiza una investigación con vistas a establecer relaciones entre la estructura de las aleaciones y su comportamiento ante elimpacto repetido que es un fenómeno característico en estos procesos.Se funden bolas con varias aleaciones hipo eutécticas, eutécticas, e hipereutécticas; se prueban en un equipo que simula elimpacto repetido. Los resultados permiten comprobar los buenos resultados de aleaciones hipo eutécticas con relaciones deCr/C altas y a su vez altos contenidos de Cr y de aleaciones eutécticas para menores relaciones de Cr/C y menorescontenidos de Cr, en ambos casos los carburos eutécticos son de forma simétrica, regulares y no forman redes continuas decarburos asimétricos bordeando los granos, que presentan peores comportamiento en el impacto repetido y que son el casode las hipoeutécticas con bajas relaciones Cr/C y las hipereutécticas donde aparecen también grandes carburos primariosPalabras claves: Alto-cromo, bolas de molino, impacto repetido, desgaste.____________________________________________________________________________Abstract.High Chromium alloys are used to manufacture grinding balls for the Industry of Construction Materials. Customers andusers need to improve their knowledge about the relationships between microstructure and the parts damage in these alloysto obtain better technical-economics results. In this paper the results of a research to obtain different microstructures ofeutectics, hipoeutectics and hipereutectics alloys are presented, searching for the lesser damage in these alloys. These alloysare tested in a repeated impact testing

  2. Filamin repeat segments required for photosensory signalling in Dictyostelium discoideum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Afsar U

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Filamin is an actin binding protein which is ubiquitous in eukaryotes and its basic structure is well conserved – an N-terminal actin binding domain followed by a series of repeated segments which vary in number in different organisms. D. discoideum is a well established model organism for the study of signalling pathways and the actin cytoskeleton and as such makes an excellent organism in which to study filamin. Ddfilamin plays a putative role as a scaffolding protein in a photosensory signalling pathway and this role is thought to be mediated by the unusual repeat segments in the rod domain. Results To study the role of filamin in phototaxis, a filamin null mutant, HG1264, was transformed with constructs each of which expressed wild type filamin or a mutant filamin with a deletion of one of the repeat segments. Transformants expressing the full length filamin to wild type levels completely rescued the phototaxis defect in HG1264, however if filamin was expressed at lower than wild type levels the phototaxis defect was not restored. The transformants lacking any one of the repeat segments 2–6 retained defective phototaxis and thermotaxis phenotypes, whereas transformants expressing filaminΔ1 exhibited a range of partial complementation of the phototaxis phenotype which was related to expression levels. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed that filamin lacking any of the repeat segments still localised to the same actin rich areas as wild type filamin. Ddfilamin interacts with RasD and IP experiments demonstrated that this interaction did not rely upon any single repeat segment or the actin binding domain. Conclusion This paper demonstrates that wild type levels of filamin expression are essential for the formation of functional photosensory signalling complexes and that each of the repeat segments 2–6 are essential for filamins role in phototaxis. By contrast, repeat segment 1 is not essential provided the mutated

  3. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats:structure, function and application——A review%规律成簇的间隔短回文重复:结构,功能与应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔玉军; 李艳君; 颜焱锋; 杨瑞馥

    2008-01-01

    规律成簇的间隔短回文重复(Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats,CRISPRs)是一类广泛分布于细菌和古菌基因组中的重复结构.最近研究表明,CRISPR与一系列相关蛋白、前导序列一起,为原核生物提供对噬菌体等外源基因的获得性免疫能力,其作用机制可能与真核生物的RNA干扰过程类似.作为基因组中高度可变的区域,CRISPR非常适合成为研究细菌种内分型和微进化的分子靶标.本文综述了CRISPR系统的结构、功能及其应用概况,并对CRISPR研究的前景进行了展望.

  4. A Model of DNA Repeat-Assembled Mitotic Chromosomal Skeleton

    OpenAIRE

    Shao-Jun Tang

    2011-01-01

    Despite intensive investigation for decades, the principle of higher-order organization of mitotic chromosomes is unclear. Here, I describe a novel model that emphasizes a critical role of interactions of homologous DNA repeats (repetitive elements; repetitive sequences) in mitotic chromosome architecture. According to the model, DNA repeats are assembled, via repeat interactions (pairing), into compact core structures that govern the arrangement of chromatins in mitotic chromosomes. Tandem r...

  5. Repeat Sequences and Base Correlations in Human Y Chromosome Palindromes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Neng-zhi Jin; Zi-xian Liu; Yan-jiao Qi; Wen-yuan Qiu

    2009-01-01

    On the basis of information theory and statistical methods, we use mutual information, n-tuple entropy and conditional entropy, combined with biological characteristics, to analyze the long range correlation and short range correlation in human Y chromosome palindromes. The magnitude distribution of the long range correlation which can be reflected by the mutual information is P5>P5a>P5b (P5a and P5b are the sequences that replace solely Alu repeats and all interspersed repeats with random uncorrelated sequences in human Y chromosome palindrome 5, respectively); and the magnitude distribution of the short range correlation which can be reflected by the n-tuple entropy and the conditional entropy is P5>P5a>P5b>random uncorrelated sequence. In other words, when the Alu repeats and all interspersed repeats replace with random uncorrelated sequence, the long range and short range correlation decrease gradually. However, the random uncorrelated sequence has no correlation. This research indicates that more repeat sequences result in stronger correlation between bases in human Y chromosome. The analyses may be helpful to understand the special structures of human Y chromosome palindromes profoundly.

  6. Strengthening concept learning by repeated testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiklund-Hörnqvist, Carola; Jonsson, Bert; Nyberg, Lars

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether repeated testing with feedback benefits learning compared to rereading of introductory psychology key-concepts in an educational context. The testing effect was examined immediately after practice, after 18 days, and at a five-week delay in a sample of undergraduate students (n = 83). The results revealed that repeated testing with feedback significantly enhanced learning compared to rereading at all delays, demonstrating that repeated retrieval enhances retention compared to repeated encoding in the short- and the long-term. In addition, the effect of repeated testing was beneficial for students irrespectively of working memory capacity. It is argued that teaching methods involving repeated retrieval are important to consider by the educational system.

  7. Repeat concussions in the national football league.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casson, Ira R; Viano, David C; Powell, John W; Pellman, Elliot J

    2011-01-01

    Repeat concussion is an important issue in the National Football League (NFL). An initial description of repeat injuries was published for 6 years (1996-2001). The characteristics and frequency of repeat concussion in the NFL have not changed in the subsequent 6 years (2002-2007). Case control. From 1996 to 2007, concussions were reported using a standardized form documenting signs and symptoms, loss of consciousness and medical action taken. Data on repeat concussions were analyzed for the 12 years and compared between the 2 periods. In 2002-2007, 152 players had repeat concussions (vs 160 in 1996-2001); 44 had 3+ head injuries (vs 52). The positions most often associated with repeat concussion in 2002-2007 were the defensive secondary, kick unit, running back, and linebacker. The odds for repeat concussion were elevated for wide receivers, tight ends, and linebackers but lower than in the earlier period. During 2002-2007, over half of players with repeat concussion were removed from play, and fewer immediately returned (vs 1996-2001). The average duration between concussions was 1.25 years for 2002-2007 and 1.65 years for the 12-year period. Over 12 years, 7.6% of all repeat concussions occurred within 2 weeks of the prior concussion. The defensive secondary, kick unit, running back, and linebacker have the highest incidence of repeat concussion. During 2002-2007, more than half of players with repeat concussion were removed from play, and only a fraction immediately returned. Although concussion was managed more conservatively by team physicians in the recent 6 years, repeat concussions occurred at similar rates during both periods.

  8. Automated quality checks on repeat prescribing.

    OpenAIRE

    Rogers, Jeremy E; Wroe, Christopher J; Roberts, Angus; Swallow, Angela; Stables, David; Cantrill, Judith A; Rector, Alan L.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Good clinical practice in primary care includes periodic review of repeat prescriptions. Markers of prescriptions that may need review have been described, but manually checking all repeat prescriptions against the markers would be impractical. AIM: To investigate the feasibility of computerising the application of repeat prescribing quality checks to electronic patient records in United Kingdom (UK) primary care. DESIGN OF STUDY: Software performance test against benchmark manual...

  9. Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 130 Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database (Web, free access)   Short Tandem Repeat DNA Internet Database is intended to benefit research and application of short tandem repeat DNA markers for human identity testing. Facts and sequence information on each STR system, population data, commonly used multiplex STR systems, PCR primers and conditions, and a review of various technologies for analysis of STR alleles have been included.

  10. Automated Detection of Trinucleotide Repeats in Fragile X Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan; Tynan; Fenwick; Leon

    1997-12-01

    Background: The conventional method for diagnosis of fragile X syndrome has been amplification of the trinucleotide repeat region of the FMR-1 gene by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern blot analysis to detect full expansion and hypermethylation. "Stuttering" resulting from incomplete amplification is still observed in the PCR products despite the use of reagents that reduce the secondary structure of the GC-rich template. In addition, PCR products can be detected by autoradiography only after 1 to 2 days of exposure. By combination of a recently reported amplification protocol with fluorescence detection of PCR products in an automated DNA sequencer, the PCR protocol for amplification of trinucleotide repeats was simplified. This modified protocol is highly reproducible, more accurate, and less costly than the conventional protocol because of the elimination of radioisotopes from the PCR. Methods and Results: PCRs were conducted with betaine and Pfu DNA polymerase. This improved PCR protocol allowed immediate detection of PCR products in agarose gels containing ethidium bromide. Stuttering was completely eliminated and fragments of up to 1kb ( approximately 250 repeats) were visible in agarose gels. PCR products were automatically detected by laser fluorescence in an automated DNA sequencer by inclusion of a fluorescently-labeled primer in the PCR reaction. A short electrophoresis run of 100 minutes in denaturing acrylamide gels was sufficient to give high resolution of fragments with higher accuracy and sensitivity than conventional detection by autoradiography. Conclusions: A simple, nonradioactive protocol that is more rapid and less expensive than the conventional PCR protocol for the detection of trinucleotide repeats has been developed. By use of this detection protocol, fragment sizes containing up to 100 repeats could be detected, alleles differing by one trinucleotide repeat were clearly resolved, and heterogeneous repeat patterns such as those

  11. Intra-genomic variation in the ribosomal repeats of nematodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly M Bik

    Full Text Available Ribosomal loci represent a major tool for investigating environmental diversity and community structure via high-throughput marker gene studies of eukaryotes (e.g. 18S rRNA. Since the estimation of species' abundance is a major goal of environmental studies (by counting numbers of sequences, understanding the patterns of rRNA copy number across species will be critical for informing such high-throughput approaches. Such knowledge is critical, given that ribosomal RNA genes exist within multi-copy repeated arrays in a genome. Here we measured the repeat copy number for six nematode species by mapping the sequences from whole genome shotgun libraries against reference sequences for their rRNA repeat. This revealed a 6-fold variation in repeat copy number amongst taxa investigated, with levels of intragenomic variation ranging from 56 to 323 copies of the rRNA array. By applying the same approach to four C. elegans mutation accumulation lines propagated by repeated bottlenecking for an average of ~400 generations, we find on average a 2-fold increase in repeat copy number (rate of increase in rRNA estimated at 0.0285-0.3414 copies per generation, suggesting that rRNA repeat copy number is subject to selection. Within each Caenorhabditis species, the majority of intragenomic variation found across the rRNA repeat was observed within gene regions (18S, 28S, 5.8S, suggesting that such intragenomic variation is not a product of selection for rRNA coding function. We find that the dramatic variation in repeat copy number among these six nematode genomes would limit the use of rRNA in estimates of organismal abundance. In addition, the unique pattern of variation within a single genome was uncorrelated with patterns of divergence between species, reflecting a strong signature of natural selection for rRNA function. A better understanding of the factors that control or affect copy number in these arrays, as well as their rates and patterns of evolution

  12. Tumor marker disaccharide D-Gal-beta 1,3-GalNAc complexed to heat-labile enterotoxin from Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VandenAkker, F; Steensma, E; Hol, WGJ

    1996-01-01

    Heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) is part of the cholera toxin (CT) family and consists of a catalytic A subunit and a B pentamer that serves to recognize the oligosaccharide part of the G(M1) ganglioside receptor. We report here the crystal structure of heat-labile enterotoxin in complex with the disacc

  13. Synthesis of a derivative of α-D-Glcp(1->2-D-Galf suitable for further glycosylation and of α-D-Glcp(1->2-D-Gal, a disaccharide fragment obtained from varianose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Marino

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The presence of galactofuranoyl units in infectious microorganisms has prompted the study of the metabolic pathways involved in their incorporation in glycans. Although much progress has been made with respect to the biosynthesis of β-D-Galf-containing glycoconjugates, the mechanisms by which α-D-Galf units are incorporated remain unclear. Penicillium varians is a non-pathogenic fungus that produces varianose, a polysaccharide containing both α- and β-D-Galf units, which can be used as a model for biosynthetic studies on α-D-Galf incorporation. Synthetic oligosaccharide fragments related to varianose are useful as potential substrates or standards for characterization of the α-galactofuranosyl transferases. In this paper we report a straightforward procedure for the synthesis of α-D-Glcp(1→2-D-Gal (1 and the use of this compound to monitor the natural disaccharide released from varianose by mild acid degradation. The synthesis, performed by the glycosylaldonolactone approach, involved a glucosylgalactofuranose derivative, suitable for the synthesis of higher oligosaccharides with an internal D-Galf.

  14. Repeatability & Workability Evaluation of SIGMOD 2009

    KAUST Repository

    Manegold, Stefan

    2010-12-15

    SIGMOD 2008 was the first database conference that offered to test submitters\\' programs against their data to verify the repeatability of the experiments published [1]. Given the positive feedback concerning the SIGMOD 2008 repeatability initiative, SIGMOD 2009 modified and expanded the initiative with a workability assessment.

  15. Gene conversion homogenizes the CMT1A paralogous repeats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hurles Matthew E

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-allelic homologous recombination between paralogous repeats is increasingly being recognized as a major mechanism causing both pathogenic microdeletions and duplications, and structural polymorphism in the human genome. It has recently been shown empirically that gene conversion can homogenize such repeats, resulting in longer stretches of absolute identity that may increase the rate of non-allelic homologous recombination. Results Here, a statistical test to detect gene conversion between pairs of non-coding sequences is presented. It is shown that the 24 kb Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A paralogous repeats (CMT1A-REPs exhibit the imprint of gene conversion processes whilst control orthologous sequences do not. In addition, Monte Carlo simulations of the evolutionary divergence of the CMT1A-REPs, incorporating two alternative models for gene conversion, generate repeats that are statistically indistinguishable from the observed repeats. Bounds are placed on the rate of these conversion processes, with central values of 1.3 × 10-4 and 5.1 × 10-5 per generation for the alternative models. Conclusions This evidence presented here suggests that gene conversion may have played an important role in the evolution of the CMT1A-REP paralogous repeats. The rates of these processes are such that it is probable that homogenized CMT1A-REPs are polymorphic within modern populations. Gene conversion processes are similarly likely to play an important role in the evolution of other segmental duplications and may influence the rate of non-allelic homologous recombination between them.

  16. Gene conversion homogenizes the CMT1A paralogous repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurles, M E

    2001-01-01

    Non-allelic homologous recombination between paralogous repeats is increasingly being recognized as a major mechanism causing both pathogenic microdeletions and duplications, and structural polymorphism in the human genome. It has recently been shown empirically that gene conversion can homogenize such repeats, resulting in longer stretches of absolute identity that may increase the rate of non-allelic homologous recombination. Here, a statistical test to detect gene conversion between pairs of non-coding sequences is presented. It is shown that the 24 kb Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A paralogous repeats (CMT1A-REPs) exhibit the imprint of gene conversion processes whilst control orthologous sequences do not. In addition, Monte Carlo simulations of the evolutionary divergence of the CMT1A-REPs, incorporating two alternative models for gene conversion, generate repeats that are statistically indistinguishable from the observed repeats. Bounds are placed on the rate of these conversion processes, with central values of 1.3 x 10(-4) and 5.1 x 10(-5) per generation for the alternative models. This evidence presented here suggests that gene conversion may have played an important role in the evolution of the CMT1A-REP paralogous repeats. The rates of these processes are such that it is probable that homogenized CMT1A-REPs are polymorphic within modern populations. Gene conversion processes are similarly likely to play an important role in the evolution of other segmental duplications and may influence the rate of non-allelic homologous recombination between them.

  17. Cloning, characterization, and properties of seven triplet repeat DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, K; Kang, S; Larson, J E; Wells, R D

    1996-07-12

    Several neuromuscular and neurodegenerative diseases are caused by genetically unstable triplet repeat sequences (CTG.CAG, CGG.CCG, or AAG.CTT) in or near the responsible genes. We implemented novel cloning strategies with chemically synthesized oligonucleotides to clone seven of the triplet repeat sequences (GTA.TAC, GAT.ATC, GTT.AAC, CAC.GTG, AGG.CCT, TCG.CGA, and AAG.CTT), and the adjoining paper (Ohshima, K., Kang, S., Larson, J. E., and Wells, R. D.(1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 16784-16791) describes studies on TTA.TAA. This approach in conjunction with in vivo expansion studies in Escherichia coli enabled the preparation of at least 81 plasmids containing the repeat sequences with lengths of approximately 16 up to 158 triplets in both orientations with varying extents of polymorphisms. The inserts were characterized by DNA sequencing as well as DNA polymerase pausings, two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis, and chemical probe analyses to evaluate the capacity to adopt negative supercoil induced non-B DNA conformations. AAG.CTT and AGG.CCT form intramolecular triplexes, and the other five repeat sequences do not form any previously characterized non-B structures. However, long tracts of TCG.CGA showed strong inhibition of DNA synthesis at specific loci in the repeats as seen in the cases of CTG.CAG and CGG.CCG (Kang, S., Ohshima, K., Shimizu, M., Amirhaeri, S., and Wells, R. D.(1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 27014-27021). This work along with other studies (Wells, R. D.(1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 2875-2878) on CTG.CAG, CGG.CCG, and TTA.TAA makes available long inserts of all 10 triplet repeat sequences for a variety of physical, molecular biological, genetic, and medical investigations. A model to explain the reduction in mRNA abundance in Friedreich's ataxia based on intermolecular triplex formation is proposed.

  18. Reward modulation of contextual cueing: Repeated context overshadows repeated target location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifian, Fariba; Contier, Oliver; Preuschhof, Claudia; Pollmann, Stefan

    2017-08-07

    Contextual cueing can be enhanced by reward. However, there is a debate if reward is associated with the repeated target-distractor configurations or with the repeated target locations that occur in both repeated and new displays. Based on neuroimaging evidence, we hypothesized that reward becomes associated with the target location only in new displays, but not in repeated displays, where the repeated target location is overshadowed by the more salient repeated target-distractor configuration. To test this hypothesis, we varied the reward value associated with the same target location in repeated and new displays. The results confirmed the overshadowing hypothesis in that search facilitation in repeated target-distractor configurations was modulated by the variable value associated with the target location. This effect was observed mainly in early learning.

  19. Childhood experiences and repeated suicidal behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Gertrud; Nielsen, Bent; Rask, P

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the influence of various events in childhood on suicidal behavior in adult age. For this purpose, 99 patients admitted to the Department of Psychiatry of Odense University Hospital after making a suicide attempt were followed for 5 years, to register repeated...... suicidal behavior. The results showed that three fourths of the patients attempted suicide more than once (62% nonfatal and 14% fatal outcome). The sex distribution was about the same among the first-evers as among the repeaters. Most repeaters were younger people in their twenties and thirties......, and the first-evers on average were past the age of 40. Somewhat unexpectedly, significantly more repeaters than first-evers had grown up with both their parents. However, the results also showed that significantly more repeaters than first-evers had had an unhappy childhood. This indicates...

  20. UK 2009-2010 repeat station report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J.G. Shanahan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The British Geological Survey is responsible for conducting the UK geomagnetic repeat station programme. Measurements made at the UK repeat station sites are used in conjunction with the three UK magnetic observatories: Hartland, Eskdalemuir and Lerwick, to produce a regional model of the local field each year. The UK network of repeat stations comprises 41 stations which are occupied at approximately 3-4 year intervals. Practices for conducting repeat station measurements continue to evolve as advances are made in survey instrumentation and as the usage of the data continues to change. Here, a summary of the 2009 and 2010 UK repeat station surveys is presented, highlighting the measurement process and techniques, density of network, reduction process and recent results.

  1. Repeated games and direct reciprocity under active linking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Jorge M; Traulsen, Arne; Ohtsuki, Hisashi; Nowak, Martin A

    2008-02-21

    Direct reciprocity relies on repeated encounters between the same two individuals. Here we examine the evolution of cooperation under direct reciprocity in dynamically structured populations. Individuals occupy the vertices of a graph, undergoing repeated interactions with their partners via the edges of the graph. Unlike the traditional approach to evolutionary game theory, where individuals meet at random and have no control over the frequency or duration of interactions, we consider a model in which individuals differ in the rate at which they seek new interactions. Moreover, once a link between two individuals has formed, the productivity of this link is evaluated. Links can be broken off at different rates. Whenever the active dynamics of links is sufficiently fast, population structure leads to a simple transformation of the payoff matrix, effectively changing the game under consideration, and hence paving the way for reciprocators to dominate defectors. We derive analytical conditions for evolutionary stability.

  2. Conservative Sample Size Determination for Repeated Measures Analysis of Covariance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Timothy M; Case, L Douglas

    2013-07-05

    In the design of a randomized clinical trial with one pre and multiple post randomized assessments of the outcome variable, one needs to account for the repeated measures in determining the appropriate sample size. Unfortunately, one seldom has a good estimate of the variance of the outcome measure, let alone the correlations among the measurements over time. We show how sample sizes can be calculated by making conservative assumptions regarding the correlations for a variety of covariance structures. The most conservative choice for the correlation depends on the covariance structure and the number of repeated measures. In the absence of good estimates of the correlations, the sample size is often based on a two-sample t-test, making the 'ultra' conservative and unrealistic assumption that there are zero correlations between the baseline and follow-up measures while at the same time assuming there are perfect correlations between the follow-up measures. Compared to the case of taking a single measurement, substantial savings in sample size can be realized by accounting for the repeated measures, even with very conservative assumptions regarding the parameters of the assumed correlation matrix. Assuming compound symmetry, the sample size from the two-sample t-test calculation can be reduced at least 44%, 56%, and 61% for repeated measures analysis of covariance by taking 2, 3, and 4 follow-up measures, respectively. The results offer a rational basis for determining a fairly conservative, yet efficient, sample size for clinical trials with repeated measures and a baseline value.

  3. The child accident repeater: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J G

    1980-04-01

    The child accident repeater is defined as one who has at least three accidents that come to medical attention within a year. The accident situation has features in common with those of the child who has a single accident through simple "bad luck", but other factors predispose him to repeated injury. In the child who has a susceptible personality, a tendency for accident repetition may be due to a breakdown in adjustment to a stressful environment. Prevention of repeat accidents should involve the usual measures considered appropriate for all children as well as an attempt to provide treatment of significant maladjustment and modification of a stressful environment.

  4. DNA Replication Dynamics of the GGGGCC Repeat of the C9orf72 Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thys, Ryan Griffin; Wang, Yuh-Hwa

    2015-11-27

    DNA has the ability to form a variety of secondary structures in addition to the normal B-form DNA, including hairpins and quadruplexes. These structures are implicated in a number of neurological diseases and cancer. Expansion of a GGGGCC repeat located at C9orf72 is associated with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia. This repeat expands from two to 24 copies in normal individuals to several hundreds or thousands of repeats in individuals with the disease. Biochemical studies have demonstrated that as little as four repeats have the ability to form a stable DNA secondary structure known as a G-quadruplex. Quadruplex structures have the ability to disrupt normal DNA processes such as DNA replication and transcription. Here we examine the role of GGGGCC repeat length and orientation on DNA replication using an SV40 replication system in human cells. Replication through GGGGCC repeats leads to a decrease in overall replication efficiency and an increase in instability in a length-dependent manner. Both repeat expansions and contractions are observed, and replication orientation is found to influence the propensity for expansions or contractions. The presence of replication stress, such as low-dose aphidicolin, diminishes replication efficiency but has no effect on instability. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analysis demonstrates a replication stall with as few as 20 GGGGCC repeats. These results suggest that replication of the GGGGCC repeat at C9orf72 is perturbed by the presence of expanded repeats, which has the potential to result in further expansion, leading to disease.

  5. Synthesis of Natural O-Linked Carba-Disaccharides, (+)- and (−)-Pericosine E, and Their Analogues as α-Glucosidase Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usami, Yoshihide; Mizuki, Koji; Kawahata, Rikiya; Shibano, Makio; Sekine, Atsuko; Yoneyama, Hiroki; Harusawa, Shinya

    2017-01-01

    Pericosine E (6), a metabolite of Periconia byssoides OUPS-N133 was originally isolated from the sea hare Aplysia kurodai, which exists as an enantiomeric mixture in nature. The enantiospecific syntheses of both enantiomers of Periconia byssoides OUPS-N133 has been achieved, along with six stereoisomers, using a common simple synthetic strategy. For these efficient syntheses, highly regio- and steroselective processes for the preparation of bromohydrin and anti-epoxide intermediates were applied. In order to access the unique O-linked carbadisaccharide structure, coupling of chlorohydrin as a donor and anti-epoxide as an acceptor was achieved using catalytic BF3·Et2O. Most of the synthesized compounds exhibited selectively significant inhibitory activity against α-glycosidase derived from yeast. The strongest analog showed almost 50 times the activity of the positive control, deoxynojirimycin.

  6. The Rhodomonas salina mitochondrial genome: bacteria-like operons, compact gene arrangement and complex repeat region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauth, Amy M; Maier, Uwe G; Lang, B Franz; Burger, Gertraud

    2005-01-01

    To gain insight into the mitochondrial genome structure and gene content of a putatively ancestral group of eukaryotes, the cryptophytes, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial DNA of Rhodomonas salina. The 48 063 bp circular-mapping molecule codes for 2 rRNAs, 27 tRNAs and 40 proteins including 23 components of oxidative phosphorylation, 15 ribosomal proteins and two subunits of tat translocase. One potential protein (ORF161) is without assigned function. Only two introns occur in the genome; both are present within cox1 belong to group II and contain RT open reading frames. Primitive genome features include bacteria-like rRNAs and tRNAs, ribosomal protein genes organized in large clusters resembling bacterial operons and the presence of the otherwise rare genes such as rps1 and tatA. The highly compact gene organization contrasts with the presence of a 4.7 kb long, repeat-containing intergenic region. Repeat motifs approximately 40-700 bp long occur up to 31 times, forming a complex repeat structure. Tandem repeats are the major arrangement but the region also includes a large, approximately 3 kb, inverted repeat and several potentially stable approximately 40-80 bp long hairpin structures. We provide evidence that the large repeat region is involved in replication and transcription initiation, predict a promoter motif that occurs in three locations and discuss two likely scenarios of how this highly structured repeat region might have evolved.

  7. The Moral Maturity of Repeater Delinquents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petronio, Richard J.

    1980-01-01

    Differences in moral development (as conceived by Kohlberg) were examined in a sample of delinquent teenagers. The repeater group was not found, as had been hypothesized, to be lower on moral maturity than those who engaged in less delinquency. (GC)

  8. Star repeaters for fiber optic links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, D H; Gravel, R L

    1977-02-01

    A star repeater combines the functions of a passive star coupler and a signal regenerating amplifier. By more effectively utilizing the light power radiated by a light emitting diode, the star repeater can, when used with small diameter channels, couple as much power to all receivers of a multiterminal link as would be coupled to the single receiver of a simple point-to-point link.

  9. GAA triplet-repeats cause nucleosome depletion in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongyu; Xing, Yongqiang; Liu, Guoqing; Chen, Ping; Zhao, Xiujuan; Li, Guohong; Cai, Lu

    2015-08-01

    Although there have been many investigations into how trinucleotide repeats affect nucleosome formation and local chromatin structure, the nucleosome positioning of GAA triplet-repeats in the human genome has remained elusive. In this work, the nucleosome occupancy around GAA triplet-repeats across the human genome was computed statistically. The results showed a nucleosome-depleted region in the vicinity of GAA triplet-repeats in activated and resting CD4(+) T cells. Furthermore, the A-tract was frequently adjacent to the upstream region of GAA triplet-repeats and could enhance the depletion surrounding GAA triplet-repeats. In vitro chromatin reconstitution assays with GAA-containing plasmids also demonstrated that the inserted GAA triplet-repeats destabilized the ability of recombinant plasmids to assemble nucleosomes. Our results suggested that GAA triplet-repeats have lower affinity to histones and can change local nucleosome positioning. These findings may be helpful for understanding the mechanism of Friedreich's ataxia, which is associated with GAA triplet-repeats at the chromatin level.

  10. Modulations in the intestinal disaccharide hydrolases and membrane dynamics: effect of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs aspirin and nimesulide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal, Naveen; Sanyal, S N

    2007-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the influence of two commonly prescribed non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), aspirin and nimesulide on the biochemical composition and membrane dynamics of rat intestine. Female Wistar rats were divided into three different groups viz: Group I (Control), Group II (aspirin-treated, 50 mg/kg body weight) and Group III (nimesulide-treated, 10 mg/kg body weight). After 28 days, biochemical estimations in both drug treated groups showed an increase in sucrase, lactase, maltase and alkaline phosphatase as compared to the control. Alterations in the intestinal membrane dynamics by fluidity studies and Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) spectroscopy also showed considerable changes. The alterations in the histoarchitecture of the intestine were also seen, which correlated well with the changes in structure and composition of the intestine. The use of NSAIDs like aspirin and nimesulide may cause the gastrointestinal side effects due to initial changes in the enzyme activities and membrane dynamics.

  11. Replication Stalling and Heteroduplex Formation within CAG/CTG Trinucleotide Repeats by Mismatch Repair

    KAUST Repository

    Viterbo, David

    2016-03-16

    Trinucleotide repeat expansions are responsible for at least two dozen neurological disorders. Mechanisms leading to these large expansions of repeated DNA are still poorly understood. It was proposed that transient stalling of the replication fork by the repeat tract might trigger slippage of the newly-synthesized strand over its template, leading to expansions or contractions of the triplet repeat. However, such mechanism was never formally proven. Here we show that replication fork pausing and CAG/CTG trinucleotide repeat instability are not linked, stable and unstable repeats exhibiting the same propensity to stall replication forks when integrated in a yeast natural chromosome. We found that replication fork stalling was dependent on the integrity of the mismatch-repair system, especially the Msh2p-Msh6p complex, suggesting that direct interaction of MMR proteins with secondary structures formed by trinucleotide repeats in vivo, triggers replication fork pauses. We also show by chromatin immunoprecipitation that Msh2p is enriched at trinucleotide repeat tracts, in both stable and unstable orientations, this enrichment being dependent on MSH3 and MSH6. Finally, we show that overexpressing MSH2 favors the formation of heteroduplex regions, leading to an increase in contractions and expansions of CAG/CTG repeat tracts during replication, these heteroduplexes being dependent on both MSH3 and MSH6. These heteroduplex regions were not detected when a mutant msh2-E768A gene in which the ATPase domain was mutated was overexpressed. Our results unravel two new roles for mismatch-repair proteins: stabilization of heteroduplex regions and transient blocking of replication forks passing through such repeats. Both roles may involve direct interactions between MMR proteins and secondary structures formed by trinucleotide repeat tracts, although indirect interactions may not be formally excluded.

  12. Digital repeat analysis; setup and operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nol, J; Isouard, G; Mirecki, J

    2006-06-01

    Since the emergence of digital imaging, there have been questions about the necessity of continuing reject analysis programs in imaging departments to evaluate performance and quality. As a marketing strategy, most suppliers of digital technology focus on the supremacy of the technology and its ability to reduce the number of repeats, resulting in less radiation doses given to patients and increased productivity in the department. On the other hand, quality assurance radiographers and radiologists believe that repeats are mainly related to positioning skills, and repeat analysis is the main tool to plan training needs to up-skill radiographers. A comparative study between conventional and digital imaging was undertaken to compare outcomes and evaluate the need for reject analysis. However, digital technology still being at its early development stages, setting a credible reject analysis program became the major task of the study. It took the department, with the help of the suppliers of the computed radiography reader and the picture archiving and communication system, over 2 years of software enhancement to build a reliable digital repeat analysis system. The results were supportive of both philosophies; the number of repeats as a result of exposure factors was reduced dramatically; however, the percentage of repeats as a result of positioning skills was slightly on the increase for the simple reason that some rejects in the conventional system qualifying for both exposure and positioning errors were classified as exposure error. The ability of digitally adjusting dark or light images reclassified some of those images as positioning errors.

  13. Quantum Key Distribution over Probabilistic Quantum Repeaters

    CERN Document Server

    Amirloo, Jeyran; Majedi, A Hamed

    2010-01-01

    A feasible route towards implementing long-distance quantum key distribution (QKD) systems relies on probabilistic schemes for entanglement distribution and swapping as proposed in the work of Duan, Lukin, Cirac, and Zoller (DLCZ) [Nature 414, 413 (2001)]. Here, we calculate the conditional throughput and fidelity of entanglement for DLCZ quantum repeaters, by accounting for the DLCZ self-purification property, in the presence of multiple excitations in the ensemble memories as well as loss and other sources of inefficiency in the channel and measurement modules. We then use our results to find the generation rate of secure key bits for QKD systems that rely on DLCZ quantum repeaters. We compare the key generation rate per logical memory employed in the two cases of with and without a repeater node. We find the cross-over distance beyond which the repeater system outperforms the non-repeater one. That provides us with the optimum inter-node distancing in quantum repeater systems. We also find the optimal exci...

  14. Remarkable selective constraints on exonic dinucleotide repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haasl, Ryan J; Payseur, Bret A

    2014-09-01

    Long dinucleotide repeats found in exons present a substantial mutational hazard: mutations at these loci occur often and generate frameshifts. Here, we provide clear and compelling evidence that exonic dinucleotides experience strong selective constraint. In humans, only 18 exonic dinucleotides have repeat lengths greater than six, which contrasts sharply with the genome-wide distribution of dinucleotides. We genotyped each of these dinucleotides in 200 humans from eight 1000 Genomes Project populations and found a near-absence of polymorphism. More remarkably, divergence data demonstrate that repeat lengths have been conserved across the primate phylogeny in spite of what is likely considerable mutational pressure. Coalescent simulations show that even a very low mutation rate at these loci fails to explain the anomalous patterns of polymorphism and divergence. Our data support two related selective constraints on the evolution of exonic dinucleotides: a short-term intolerance for any change to repeat length and a long-term prevention of increases to repeat length. In general, our results implicate purifying selection as the force that eliminates new, deleterious mutants at exonic dinucleotides. We briefly discuss the evolution of the longest exonic dinucleotide in the human genome--a 10 x CA repeat in fibroblast growth factor receptor-like 1 (FGFRL1)--that should possess a considerably greater mutation rate than any other exonic dinucleotide and therefore generate a large number of deleterious variants. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  15. Dynamic combinatorial libraries of artificial repeat proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Margarita; Shumacher, Inbal; Cohen-Luria, Rivka; Ashkenasy, Gonen

    2013-06-15

    Repeat proteins are found in almost all cellular systems, where they are involved in diverse molecular recognition processes. Recent studies have suggested that de novo designed repeat proteins may serve as universal binders, and might potentially be used as practical alternative to antibodies. We describe here a novel chemical methodology for producing small libraries of repeat proteins, and screening in parallel the ligand binding of library members. The first stage of this research involved the total synthesis of a consensus-based three-repeat tetratricopeptide (TPR) protein (~14 kDa), via sequential attachment of the respective peptides. Despite the effectiveness of the synthesis and ligation steps, this method was found to be too demanding for the production of proteins containing variable number of repeats. Additionally, the analysis of binding of the individual proteins was time consuming. Therefore, we designed and prepared novel dynamic combinatorial libraries (DCLs), and show that their equilibration can facilitate the formation of TPR proteins containing up to eight repeating units. Interestingly, equilibration of the library building blocks in the presence of the biologically relevant ligands, Hsp90 and Hsp70, induced their oligomerization into forming more of the proteins with large recognition surfaces. We suggest that this work presents a novel simple and rapid tool for the simultaneous screening of protein mixtures with variable binding surfaces, and for identifying new binders for ligands of interest.

  16. In Vitro Expansion of CAG, CAA, and Mixed CAG/CAA Repeats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Figura

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Polyglutamine diseases, including Huntington’s disease and a number of spinocerebellar ataxias, are caused by expanded CAG repeats that are located in translated sequences of individual, functionally-unrelated genes. Only mutant proteins containing polyglutamine expansions have long been thought to be pathogenic, but recent evidence has implicated mutant transcripts containing long CAG repeats in pathogenic processes. The presence of two pathogenic factors prompted us to attempt to distinguish the effects triggered by mutant protein from those caused by mutant RNA in cellular models of polyglutamine diseases. We used the SLIP (Synthesis of Long Iterative Polynucleotide method to generate plasmids expressing long CAG repeats (forming a hairpin structure, CAA-interrupted CAG repeats (forming multiple unstable hairpins or pure CAA repeats (not forming any secondary structure. We successfully modified the original SLIP protocol to generate repeats of desired length starting from constructs containing short repeat tracts. We demonstrated that the SLIP method is a time- and cost-effective approach to manipulate the lengths of expanded repeat sequences.

  17. Investigation of a Quadruplex-Forming Repeat Sequence Highly Enriched in Xanthomonas and Nostoc sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehm, Charlotte; Wurmthaler, Lena A; Li, Yuanhao; Frickey, Tancred; Hartig, Jörg S

    2015-01-01

    In prokaryotes simple sequence repeats (SSRs) with unit sizes of 1-5 nucleotides (nt) are causative for phase and antigenic variation. Although an increased abundance of heptameric repeats was noticed in bacteria, reports about SSRs of 6-9 nt are rare. In particular G-rich repeat sequences with the propensity to fold into G-quadruplex (G4) structures have received little attention. In silico analysis of prokaryotic genomes show putative G4 forming sequences to be abundant. This report focuses on a surprisingly enriched G-rich repeat of the type GGGNATC in Xanthomonas and cyanobacteria such as Nostoc. We studied in detail the genomes of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris ATCC 33913 (Xcc), Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri str. 306 (Xac), and Nostoc sp. strain PCC7120 (Ana). In all three organisms repeats are spread all over the genome with an over-representation in non-coding regions. Extensive variation of the number of repetitive units was observed with repeat numbers ranging from two up to 26 units. However a clear preference for four units was detected. The strong bias for four units coincides with the requirement of four consecutive G-tracts for G4 formation. Evidence for G4 formation of the consensus repeat sequences was found in biophysical studies utilizing CD spectroscopy. The G-rich repeats are preferably located between aligned open reading frames (ORFs) and are under-represented in coding regions or between divergent ORFs. The G-rich repeats are preferentially located within a distance of 50 bp upstream of an ORF on the anti-sense strand or within 50 bp from the stop codon on the sense strand. Analysis of whole transcriptome sequence data showed that the majority of repeat sequences are transcribed. The genetic loci in the vicinity of repeat regions show increased genomic stability. In conclusion, we introduce and characterize a special class of highly abundant and wide-spread quadruplex-forming repeat sequences in bacteria.

  18. Effects of repeated regrouping on horse behaviour and injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Janne Winther; Søndergaard, Eva; Thodberg, Karen;

    2011-01-01

    Domestic horses are faced with social challenges throughout their lives due to limitations in social contact, space restrictions and frequent changes in social companionship. This is in contrast to natural conditions where horses live in relatively stable harem bands. Currently, little is known...... about how repeated regrouping affect horse behaviour and welfare, and it is unknown whether horses may adapt to regrouping. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of an unstable group structure, caused by weekly regroupings, on behaviour and frequency of injuries in young horses. Forty......, to repeated regrouping. Compared to horses in Stable groups, more agonistic behaviour was shown by horses in Unstable groups (i.e. non-contact agonistic; F1,65 = 5.60, P = 0.02), whereas there was no treatment effect on other variables. The level of play behaviour appeared, however, to be more variable...

  19. Automated genotyping of dinucleotide repeat markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlin, M.W.; Hoffman, E.P. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)]|[Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The dinucleotide repeats (i.e., microsatellites) such as CA-repeats are a highly polymorphic, highly abundant class of PCR-amplifiable markers that have greatly streamlined genetic mapping experimentation. It is expected that over 30,000 such markers (including tri- and tetranucleotide repeats) will be characterized for routine use in the next few years. Since only size determination, and not sequencing, is required to determine alleles, in principle, dinucleotide repeat genotyping is easily performed on electrophoretic gels, and can be automated using DNA sequencers. Unfortunately, PCR stuttering with these markers generates not one band for each allele, but a pattern of bands. Since closely spaced alleles must be disambiguated by human scoring, this poses a key obstacle to full automation. We have developed methods that overcome this obstacle. Our model is that the observed data is generated by arithmetic superposition (i.e., convolution) of multiple allele patterns. By quantitatively measuring the size of each component band, and exploiting the unique stutter pattern associated with each marker, closely spaced alleles can be deconvolved; this unambiguously reconstructs the {open_quotes}true{close_quotes} allele bands, with stutter artifact removed. We used this approach in a system for automated diagnosis of (X-linked) Duchenne muscular dystrophy; four multiplexed CA-repeats within the dystrophin gene were assayed on a DNA sequencer. Our method accurately detected small variations in gel migration that shifted the allele size estimate. In 167 nonmutated alleles, 89% (149/167) showed no size variation, 9% (15/167) showed 1 bp variation, and 2% (3/167) showed 2 bp variation. We are currently developing a library of dinucleotide repeat patterns; together with our deconvolution methods, this library will enable fully automated genotyping of dinucleotide repeats from sizing data.

  20. Solution properties of the archaeal CRISPR DNA repeat-binding homeodomain protein Cbp2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kenchappa, Chandra; Heiðarsson, Pétur Orri; Kragelund, Birthe;

    2013-01-01

    in facilitating high affinity DNA binding of Cbp2 by tethering the two domains. Structural studies on mutant proteins provide support for Cys(7) and Cys(28) enhancing high thermal stability of Cbp2(Hb) through disulphide bridge formation. Consistent with their proposed CRISPR transcriptional regulatory role, Cbp2......Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) form the basis of diverse adaptive immune systems directed primarily against invading genetic elements of archaea and bacteria. Cbp1 of the crenarchaeal thermoacidophilic order Sulfolobales, carrying three imperfect repeats, binds...... specifically to CRISPR DNA repeats and has been implicated in facilitating production of long transcripts from CRISPR loci. Here, a second related class of CRISPR DNA repeat-binding protein, denoted Cbp2, is characterized that contains two imperfect repeats and is found amongst members of the crenarchaeal...

  1. Solution properties of the archaeal CRISPR DNA repeat-binding homeodomain protein Cbp2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kenchappa, Chandra; Heiðarsson, Pétur Orri; Kragelund, Birthe

    2013-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) form the basis of diverse adaptive immune systems directed primarily against invading genetic elements of archaea and bacteria. Cbp1 of the crenarchaeal thermoacidophilic order Sulfolobales, carrying three imperfect repeats, binds...... specifically to CRISPR DNA repeats and has been implicated in facilitating production of long transcripts from CRISPR loci. Here, a second related class of CRISPR DNA repeat-binding protein, denoted Cbp2, is characterized that contains two imperfect repeats and is found amongst members of the crenarchaeal...... in facilitating high affinity DNA binding of Cbp2 by tethering the two domains. Structural studies on mutant proteins provide support for Cys(7) and Cys(28) enhancing high thermal stability of Cbp2(Hb) through disulphide bridge formation. Consistent with their proposed CRISPR transcriptional regulatory role, Cbp2...

  2. A Model of DNA Repeat-Assembled Mitotic Chromosomal Skeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Jun Tang

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite intensive investigation for decades, the principle of higher-order organization of mitotic chromosomes is unclear. Here, I describe a novel model that emphasizes a critical role of interactions of homologous DNA repeats (repetitive elements; repetitive sequences in mitotic chromosome architecture. According to the model, DNA repeats are assembled, via repeat interactions (pairing, into compact core structures that govern the arrangement of chromatins in mitotic chromosomes. Tandem repeat assemblies form a chromosomal axis to coordinate chromatins in the longitudinal dimension, while dispersed repeat assemblies form chromosomal nodes around the axis to organize chromatins in the halo. The chromosomal axis and nodes constitute a firm skeleton on which non-skeletal chromatins can be anchored, folded, and supercoiled.

  3. A model of DNA repeat-assembled mitotic chromosomal skeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shao-Jun

    2011-01-01

    Despite intensive investigation for decades, the principle of higher-order organization of mitotic chromosomes is unclear. Here, I describe a novel model that emphasizes a critical role of interactions of homologous DNA repeats (repetitive elements; repetitive sequences) in mitotic chromosome architecture. According to the model, DNA repeats are assembled, via repeat interactions (pairing), into compact core structures that govern the arrangement of chromatins in mitotic chromosomes. Tandem repeat assemblies form a chromosomal axis to coordinate chromatins in the longitudinal dimension, while dispersed repeat assemblies form chromosomal nodes around the axis to organize chromatins in the halo. The chromosomal axis and nodes constitute a firm skeleton on which non-skeletal chromatins can be anchored, folded, and supercoiled.

  4. Mining of simple sequence repeats in the Genome of Gentianaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Sathishkumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Simple sequence repeats (SSRs or short tandem repeats are short repeat motifs that show high level of length polymorphism due to insertion or deletion mutations of one or more repeat types. Here, we present the detection and abundance of microsatellites or SSRs in nucleotide sequences of Gentianaceae family. A total of 545 SSRs were mined in 4698 nucleotide sequences downloaded from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI. Among the SSR sequences, the frequency of repeat type was about 429 -mono repeats, 99 -di repeats, 15 -tri repeats, and 2 --hexa repeats. Mononucleotide repeats were found to be abundant repeat types, about 78%, followed by dinucleotide repeats (18.16% among the SSR sequences. An attempt was made to design primer pairs for 545 identified SSRs but these were found only for 169 sequences.

  5. PolyQ repeat expansions in ATXN2 associated with ALS are CAA interrupted repeats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenming Yu

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a devastating, rapidly progressive disease leading to paralysis and death. Recently, intermediate length polyglutamine (polyQ repeats of 27-33 in ATAXIN-2 (ATXN2, encoding the ATXN2 protein, were found to increase risk for ALS. In ATXN2, polyQ expansions of ≥ 34, which are pure CAG repeat expansions, cause spinocerebellar ataxia type 2. However, similar length expansions that are interrupted with other codons, can present atypically with parkinsonism, suggesting that configuration of the repeat sequence plays an important role in disease manifestation in ATXN2 polyQ expansion diseases. Here we determined whether the expansions in ATXN2 associated with ALS were pure or interrupted CAG repeats, and defined single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs rs695871 and rs695872 in exon 1 of the gene, to assess haplotype association. We found that the expanded repeat alleles of 40 ALS patients and 9 long-repeat length controls were all interrupted, bearing 1-3 CAA codons within the CAG repeat. 21/21 expanded ALS chromosomes with 3CAA interruptions arose from one haplotype (GT, while 18/19 expanded ALS chromosomes with <3CAA interruptions arose from a different haplotype (CC. Moreover, age of disease onset was significantly earlier in patients bearing 3 interruptions vs fewer, and was distinct between haplotypes. These results indicate that CAG repeat expansions in ATXN2 associated with ALS are uniformly interrupted repeats and that the nature of the repeat sequence and haplotype, as well as length of polyQ repeat, may play a role in the neurological effect conferred by expansions in ATXN2.

  6. Repeatability of peripheral aberrations in young emmetropes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskaran, Karthikeyan; Theagarayan, Baskar; Carius, Staffan; Gustafsson, Jörgen

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the intrasession repeatability of ocular aberration measurements in the peripheral visual field with a commercially available Shack-Hartmann aberrometer (complete ophthalmic analysis system-high definition-vision research). The higher-order off-axis aberrations data in young healthy emmetropic eyes are also reported. The aberrations of the right eye of 18 emmetropes were measured using an aberrometer with an open field of view that allows peripheral measurements. Five repeated measures of ocular aberrations were obtained and assessed in steps of 10° out to ±40° in the horizontal visual field (nasal + and temporal -) and -20° in the inferior visual field. The coefficient of repeatability, coefficient of variation, and the intraclass correlation coefficient were calculated as a measure of intrasession repeatability. In all eccentric angles, the repeatability of the third- and fourth-order aberrations was better than the fifth and sixth order aberrations. The coefficient of variation was coefficient was >0.90 for the third and fourth order but reduced gradually for higher orders. There was no statistical significant difference in variance of total higher-order root mean square between on- and off-axis measurements (p > 0.05). The aberration data in this group of young emmetropes showed that the horizontal coma (C(3)(1)) was most positive at 40° in the temporal field, decreasing linearly toward negative values with increasing off-axis angle into the nasal field, whereas all other higher-order aberrations showed little or no change. The complete ophthalmic analysis system-high definition-vision research provides fast, repeatable, and valid peripheral aberration measurements and can be used efficiently to measure off-axis aberrations in the peripheral visual field.

  7. Safety of Repeated Yttrium-90 Radioembolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, Marnix G. E. H.; Louie, John D. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Interventional Radiology (United States); Iagaru, Andrei H.; Goris, Michael L. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Nuclear Medicine (United States); Sze, Daniel Y., E-mail: dansze@stanford.edu [Stanford University School of Medicine, Division of Interventional Radiology (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Repeated radioembolization (RE) treatments carry theoretically higher risk of radiation-induced hepatic injury because of the liver's cumulative memory of previous exposure. We performed a retrospective safety analysis on patients who underwent repeated RE. Methods: From 2004 to 2011, a total of 247 patients were treated by RE. Eight patients (5 men, 3 women, age range 51-71 years) underwent repeated treatment of a targeted territory, all with resin microspheres (SIR-Spheres; Sirtex, Lane Cove, Australia). Adverse events were graded during a standardized follow-up. In addition, the correlation between the occurrence of RE-induced liver disease (REILD) and multiple variables was investigated in univariate and multivariate analyses in all 247 patients who received RE. Results: Two patients died shortly after the second treatment (at 84 and 107 days) with signs and symptoms of REILD. Both patients underwent whole liver treatment twice (cumulative doses 3.08 and 2.66 GBq). The other 6 patients demonstrated only minor toxicities after receiving cumulative doses ranging from 2.41 to 3.88 GBq. All patients experienced objective tumor responses. In the whole population, multifactorial analysis identified three risk factors associated with REILD: repeated RE (p = 0.036), baseline serum total bilirubin (p = 0.048), and baseline serum aspartate aminotransferase (p = 0.043). Repeated RE proved to be the only independent risk factor for REILD in multivariate analysis (odds ratio 9.6; p = 0.002). Additionally, the administered activity per target volume (in GBq/L) was found to be an independent risk factor for REILD, but only in whole liver treatments (p = 0.033). Conclusion: The risk of REILD appears to be elevated for repeated RE. Objective tumor responses were observed, but establishment of safety limits will require improvement in dosimetric measurement and prediction.

  8. Repeat Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Trigeminal Neuralgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubuchon, Adam C., E-mail: acaubuchon@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Chan, Michael D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Lovato, James F. [Department of Public Health Sciences, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Balamucki, Christopher J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Ellis, Thomas L.; Tatter, Stephen B. [Department of Neurosurgery, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); McMullen, Kevin P.; Munley, Michael T.; Deguzman, Allan F.; Ekstrand, Kenneth E.; Bourland, J. Daniel; Shaw, Edward G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Repeat gamma knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKRS) for recurrent or persistent trigeminal neuralgia induces an additional response but at the expense of an increased incidence of facial numbness. The present series summarized the results of a repeat treatment series at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, including a multivariate analysis of the data to identify the prognostic factors for treatment success and toxicity. Methods and Materials: Between January 1999 and December 2007, 37 patients underwent a second GKRS application because of treatment failure after a first GKRS treatment. The mean initial dose in the series was 87.3 Gy (range, 80-90). The mean retreatment dose was 84.4 Gy (range, 60-90). The dosimetric variables recorded included the dorsal root entry zone dose, pons surface dose, and dose to the distal nerve. Results: Of the 37 patients, 81% achieved a >50% pain relief response to repeat GKRS, and 57% experienced some form of trigeminal dysfunction after repeat GKRS. Two patients (5%) experienced clinically significant toxicity: one with bothersome numbness and one with corneal dryness requiring tarsorraphy. A dorsal root entry zone dose at repeat treatment of >26.6 Gy predicted for treatment success (61% vs. 32%, p = .0716). A cumulative dorsal root entry zone dose of >84.3 Gy (72% vs. 44%, p = .091) and a cumulative pons surface dose of >108.5 Gy (78% vs. 44%, p = .018) predicted for post-GKRS numbness. The presence of any post-GKRS numbness predicted for a >50% decrease in pain intensity (100% vs. 60%, p = .0015). Conclusion: Repeat GKRS is a viable treatment option for recurrent trigeminal neuralgia, although the patient assumes a greater risk of nerve dysfunction to achieve maximal pain relief.

  9. Long-term elastic durability of polymer matrix composite materials after repeated steam sterilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Alexander C M; Fischer, Gustav; Dart, Bradley R; Wooley, Paul H

    2015-11-01

    We compared the durability of 3 different selected composite materials that underwent repeated steam sterilization with the durability of traditional metal materials. Composite materials Tepex, CFR-PPS (carbon-fiber-reinforced polyphenylene sulfide), and HTN-53 (Zytel HTN53G50HSLR NC010) were evaluated for durability and water retention after repeated steam sterilization. These composites were compared with stainless steel and aluminum. The structural properties of these materials were measured (short-beam load-to-failure and cyclic compression loading tests) before, during, and after repeated steam sterilization. The relative radiographic density of these materials was also compared. There was no significant difference in the moisture retention of these composite materials before and after repeated sterilization. The composite materials were significantly more radiolucent than the metals. For all the composite materials, load to failure deteriorated after repeated sterilization. The cyclic compression loading tests showed HTN-53 had the poorest performance, with complete failure after 400 cycles of repeated sterilization. CFR-PPS performed slightly better, with 33% failure at final testing. Tepex had no failures at final testing. Although HTN-53 has shown promise in other orthopedic applications, its performance after repeated sterilization was relatively poor. Tepex showed the most potential for durability after repeated sterilization. Further study is needed to identify specific applications for these materials in the orthopedic industry.

  10. Copy number of tandem direct repeats within the inverted repeats of Marek's disease virus DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanamori, A; Nakajima, K; Ikuta, K; Ueda, S; Kato, S; Hirai, K

    1986-12-01

    We previously reported that DNA of the oncogenic strain BC-1 of Marek's disease virus serotype 1 (MDV1) contains three units of tandem direct repeats with 132 base pair (bp) repeats within the inverted repeats of the long regions of the MDV1 genome, whereas the attenuated, nononcogenic viral DNA contains multiple units of tandem direct repeats (Maotani et al., 1986). In the present study, the difference in the copy numbers of 132 bp repeats of oncogenic and nononcogenic MDV1 DNAs in other strains of MDV1 was investigated by Southern blot hybridization. The main copy numbers in different oncogenic MDV1 strains differed: those of BC-1, JM and highly oncogenic Md5 were 3, 5 to 12 and 2, respectively. The viral DNA population with two units of repeats was small, but detectable, in cells infected with either the oncogenic BC-1 or JM strain. The MDV1 DNA in various MD cell lines contained either two units or both two and three units of repeats. The significance of the copy number of repeats in oncogenicity of MDV1 is discussed.

  11. Non-Absorbable Disaccharides for Hepatic Encephalopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Lise L; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Morgan, Marsha Y

    2016-01-01

    -effects meta-analyses showed that, compared to placebo/no intervention, NADs had a beneficial effect on HE (relative risk [RR], 0.63; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.53-0.74; Number Needed to Treat [NNT] = 4) and serious liver-related adverse events such as: liver failure, variceal bleeding, serious infections...

  12. DNA-binding proteins from marine bacteria expand the known sequence diversity of TALE-like repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lange, Orlando; Wolf, Christina; Thiel, Philipp; Krüger, Jens; Kleusch, Christian; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Lahaye, Thomas

    2015-11-16

    Transcription Activator-Like Effectors (TALEs) of Xanthomonas bacteria are programmable DNA binding proteins with unprecedented target specificity. Comparative studies into TALE repeat structure and function are hindered by the limited sequence variation among TALE repeats. More sequence-diverse TALE-like proteins are known from Ralstonia solanacearum (RipTALs) and Burkholderia rhizoxinica (Bats), but RipTAL and Bat repeats are conserved with those of TALEs around the DNA-binding residue. We study two novel marine-organism TALE-like proteins (MOrTL1 and MOrTL2), the first to date of non-terrestrial origin. We have assessed their DNA-binding properties and modelled repeat structures. We found that repeats from these proteins mediate sequence specific DNA binding conforming to the TALE code, despite low sequence similarity to TALE repeats, and with novel residues around the BSR. However, MOrTL1 repeats show greater sequence discriminating power than MOrTL2 repeats. Sequence alignments show that there are only three residues conserved between repeats of all TALE-like proteins including the two new additions. This conserved motif could prove useful as an identifier for future TALE-likes. Additionally, comparing MOrTL repeats with those of other TALE-likes suggests a common evolutionary origin for the TALEs, RipTALs and Bats.

  13. Determination of Monosaccharides and Disaccharides in Dairy Product by Ions Chromatography and Pulsed Amperometric Detection%离子色谱脉冲安培法测定乳制品中5种单双糖

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨晓敏

    2015-01-01

    提出了一种以离子色谱-脉冲安培检测法测定乳制品中5种单双糖(半乳糖、葡萄糖、果糖、蔗糖、乳糖)的方法。乳制品经前处理后采用CarboPac PA10色谱柱为分离柱,氢氧化钾为淋洗液,梯度洗脱,脉冲安培检测器( PAD)检测,以保留时间定性,外标法定量。结果表明,半乳糖、葡萄糖、果糖、蔗糖、乳糖在0.1~20.0 mg/kg浓度范围内呈良好的线性关系,回收率分别为:84.3%~91.0%、83.2%~93.5%、88.0%~93.3%、89.2%~98.0%、85.9%~96.9%,检出限分别为0.18、0.75、2.3、1.5、3.0 mg/kg,精密度分别为2.65%~4.55%、3.29%~5.01%、3.45%~4.10%、1.89%~3.62%、2.31%~4.57%。对市场上主要的几种乳制品进行检测,效果良好。%A chromatographic method was developed for the determination of monosaccharides and disaccharides (galactose, glucose, fructose, sucrose and lactose) in dairy product. CarboPac PA10 high performance anion exchange column ( HPAEC ) as splitter, KOH as eluent, gradient elution, pulsed amperometric detection ( PAD ) , qualitative analysis with retaining time, quantitative analysis with external reference method. The results showed that the linear relation of galactose, glucose, fructose, sucrose and lactose was well in the range of 0. 1~20. 0 mg/kg, the recoveries of these using PAD were 84. 3% ~91. 0%, 83. 2% ~93. 5%, 88. 0% ~93. 3%, 89. 2% ~98. 0%, 85. 9% ~96. 9%, the detection limits of these were 0. 18, 0. 75, 2. 3, 1. 5, 3. 0 mg/kg, the precision of these were 2. 65% ~4. 55%, 3. 29% ~5. 01%, 3. 45% ~4. 10%, 1. 89% ~3. 62%, 2. 31% ~4. 57%. The result about the detection of several main dairy product showed the effect was good.

  14. REPEATABILITY OF THE FRENCH HIGHER VEGETATION TYPES ACCORDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. BRISSE

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available Higher vegetation types are generally determined by successive approximations and defined by a common consent. Instead, they might be statistically determined and repeated, according to a numerical method called ‘socio-ecology’. This method deals only with floristical data, but gives them an ecological meaning by a previous calibration of the relations between plants, computed as ecological indices. It is applied to a pair of two homologous samples, each having 2.000 relevés and coming from the 60.000 relevés stored in the French data bank ‘Sophy’. Each sample covers the main ecological gradients of the bank, it defines a hierarchy of vegetation types and it explains half the peculiarity of a type with only 10 to 30 discriminant plants, out of the 5.000 plants observed in the relevés. Results : 1 The discriminant plants may characterize the vegetation types, including the higher ones, in a coherent and readable form. 2 In the two independent classifications, having different structures, the same vegetation types are repeated. They are the reciprocal nearest types, in the socio-ecological space. Though the two classifications have no one relevé in common, the repeated types have nearly the same discriminant plants. 3 At the highest level, two clear-cut main types show the difference between light and shadow. The same herbaceous discriminant plants, for a type, and the ligneous or sciaphilous ones, for the other, have similar fidelities and constancies in the two classifications. 4 Such a numerical agreement, instead of common consent, appears again in the sub-types, which remind the classical ones, but which are repeatable.

  15. Trinucleotide repeat expansions catalyzed by human cell-free extracts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jennifer R Stevens; Elaine E Lahue; Guo-Min Li; Robert S Lahue

    2013-01-01

    Trinucleotide repeat expansions cause 17 heritable human neurological disorders.In some diseases,somatic expansions occur in non-proliferating tissues such as brain where DNA replication is limited.This finding stimulated significant interest in replication-independent expansion mechanisms.Aberrant DNA repair is a likely source,based in part on mouse studies showing that somatic expansions are provoked by the DNA repair protein MutSβ (Msh2-Msh3complex).Biochemical studies to date used cell-free extracts or purified DNA repair proteins to yield partial reactions at triplet repeats.The findings included expansions on one strand but not the other,or processing of DNA hairpin structures thought to be important intermediates in the expansion process.However,it has been difficult to recapitulate complete expansions in vitro,and the biochemical role of MutSβ remains controversial.Here,we use a novel in vitro assay to show that human cell-free extracts catalyze expansions and contractions of trinucleotide repeats without the requirement for DNA replication.The extract promotes a size range of expansions that is similar to certain diseases,and triplet repeat length and sequence govern expansions in vitro as in vivo.MutSβ stimulates expansions in the extract,consistent with aberrant repair of endogenous DNA damage as a source of expansions.Overall,this biochemical system retains the key characteristics of somatic expansions in humans and mice,suggesting that this important mutagenic process can be restored in the test tube.

  16. Semihierarchical quantum repeaters based on moderate lifetime quantum memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao; Zhou, Zong-Quan; Hua, Yi-Lin; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2017-01-01

    The construction of large-scale quantum networks relies on the development of practical quantum repeaters. Many approaches have been proposed with the goal of outperforming the direct transmission of photons, but most of them are inefficient or difficult to implement with current technology. Here, we present a protocol that uses a semihierarchical structure to improve the entanglement distribution rate while reducing the requirement of memory time to a range of tens of milliseconds. This protocol can be implemented with a fixed distance of elementary links and fixed requirements on quantum memories, which are independent of the total distance. This configuration is especially suitable for scalable applications in large-scale quantum networks.

  17. Y Se Repite = And It Repeats Itself

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzew, Adriana

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses Y Se Repite [And It Repeats Itself], a project she conceptualized due to the growing number of Latino/a Mexican migrant workers in dairy farms in the state of Vermont. In 2006, approximately 2,000 Latinos/as--most of them undocumented Mexican migrant workers--worked throughout the state's dairy farms, yet…

  18. Repeater For A Digital-Communication Bus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Guzman, Esteban; Olson, Stephen; Heaps, Tim

    1993-01-01

    Digital repeater circuit designed to extend range of communication on MIL-STD-1553 bus beyond original maximum allowable length of 300 ft. Circuit provides two-way communication, one way at time, and conforms to specifications of MIL-STD-1553. Crosstalk and instability eliminated.

  19. Episodes of repeated sudden deafness following pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak-Osinska, Katarzyna; Burduk, Pawel K; Kopczynski, Andrzej

    2009-04-01

    Sex hormones influence and provoke changes in hearing levels. Sudden deafness is rarely observed in pregnant women. The effective treatment of sudden deafness in pregnant women is a challenging problem. We present a case of repeatable, completely regressed sudden deafness in a woman during her first and second pregnancies.

  20. Repeated sprint training in normobaric hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, Harvey M; Cooke, Karl; Sumners, David P; Mileva, Katya N; Bowtell, Joanna L

    2013-12-01

    Repeated sprint ability (RSA) is a critical success factor for intermittent sport performance. Repeated sprint training has been shown to improve RSA, we hypothesised that hypoxia would augment these training adaptations. Thirty male well-trained academy rugby union and rugby league players (18.4 ± 1.5 years, 1.83 ± 0.07 m, 88.1 ± 8.9 kg) participated in this single-blind repeated sprint training study. Participants completed 12 sessions of repeated sprint training (10 × 6 s, 30 s recovery) over 4 weeks in either hypoxia (13% FiO₂) or normoxia (21% FiO₂). Pretraining and post-training, participants completed sports specific endurance and sprint field tests and a 10 × 6 s RSA test on a non-motorised treadmill while measuring speed, heart rate, capillary blood lactate, muscle and cerebral deoxygenation and respiratory measures. Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Level 1 test performance improved after RS training in both groups, but gains were significantly greater in the hypoxic (33 ± 12%) than the normoxic group (14 ± 10%, prepeated aerobic high intensity workout than an equivalent normoxic training. Performance gains are evident in the short term (4 weeks), a period similar to a preseason training block.

  1. Adaptation and complexity in repeated games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maenner, Eliot Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents a learning model for two-player infinitely repeated games. In an inference step players construct minimally complex inferences of strategies based on observed play, and in an adaptation step players choose minimally complex best responses to an inference. When players randomly ...

  2. Why Do Students Repeat Admissions Tests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Martha S.

    Attitudes and beliefs about the admissions process, especially the role of standardized testing in admissions, were examined for students who took a standardized admissions test more than once. Their attitudes were compared with those of students who did not repeat the test. About 200 preveterinary students who had taken the Veterinary Aptitude…

  3. The Effect of Repeaters on Equating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, HeeKyoung; Kolen, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Test equating might be affected by including in the equating analyses examinees who have taken the test previously. This study evaluated the effect of including such repeaters on Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) equating using a population invariance approach. Three-parameter logistic (3-PL) item response theory (IRT) true score and…

  4. Triggering of repeating earthquakes in central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chunquan; Gomberg, Joan; Ben-Naim, Eli; Johnson, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic stresses carried by transient seismic waves have been found capable of triggering earthquakes instantly in various tectonic settings. Delayed triggering may be even more common, but the mechanisms are not well understood. Catalogs of repeating earthquakes, earthquakes that recur repeatedly at the same location, provide ideal data sets to test the effects of transient dynamic perturbations on the timing of earthquake occurrence. Here we employ a catalog of 165 families containing ~2500 total repeating earthquakes to test whether dynamic perturbations from local, regional, and teleseismic earthquakes change recurrence intervals. The distance to the earthquake generating the perturbing waves is a proxy for the relative potential contributions of static and dynamic deformations, because static deformations decay more rapidly with distance. Clear changes followed the nearby 2004 Mw6 Parkfield earthquake, so we study only repeaters prior to its origin time. We apply a Monte Carlo approach to compare the observed number of shortened recurrence intervals following dynamic perturbations with the distribution of this number estimated for randomized perturbation times. We examine the comparison for a series of dynamic stress peak amplitude and distance thresholds. The results suggest a weak correlation between dynamic perturbations in excess of ~20 kPa and shortened recurrence intervals, for both nearby and remote perturbations.

  5. A Repeater in the Language Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, B. T.

    1969-01-01

    Discusses the feasilility of the use of repeater devices in the language laboratory in order to enable the student to "recapitulate effortlessly and and indefinitely any utterance of any length which is causing him difficulty or is of special interest. (FWB)

  6. The Differential Effects of Repeating Kindergarten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkam, David T.; LoGerfo, Laura; Ready, Doug; Lee, Valerie E.

    2007-01-01

    We use the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study to investigate national patterns addressing (a) who repeats kindergarten, and (b) the subsequent cognitive effects of this event. Using OLS regression techniques, we investigate 1st-time kindergartners who are promoted, 1st-time kindergartners who are retained, and children who are already repeating…

  7. Preventing Repeat Teen Births PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-04-02

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the April 2013 CDC Vital Signs report, which discusses repeat teen births and ways teens, parents and guardians, health care providers, and communities can help prevent them.  Created: 4/2/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 4/2/2013.

  8. Epigenetics and triplet repeat neurological diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathiji eNageshwaran

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The term ‘junk DNA’ has been reconsidered following the delineation of the functional significance of repetitive DNA regions. Typically associated with centromeres and telomeres, DNA repeats are found in nearly all organisms throughout their genomes. Repetitive regions are frequently heterchromatinised resulting in silencing of intrinsic and nearby genes. However, this is not a uniform rule, with several genes known to require such an environment to permit transcription. Repetitive regions frequently exist as dinucleotide, trinucleotide and tetranucleotide repeats. The association between repetitive regions and disease was emphasised following the discovery of abnormal trinucleotide repeats underlying spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (Kennedy’s disease and fragile X syndrome of mental retardation (FRAXA in 1991. In this review we provide a brief overview of epigenetic mechanisms and then focus on several diseases caused by DNA triplet-repeat expansions, which exhibit diverse epigenetic effects. It is clear that the emerging field of epigenetics is already generating novel potential therapeutic avenues for this group of largely incurable diseases.

  9. Costly renegotiation in repeated Bertand games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Ola; Wengström, Erik Roland

    2010-01-01

    This paper extends the concept of weak renegotiation-proof equilibrium (WRP) to allow for costly renegotiation and shows that even small renegotiation costs can have dramatic effects on the set of equilibria. More specifically, the paper analyzes the infinitely repeated Bertrand game. It is shown...

  10. EVOLUTION AND RECOMBINATION OF BOVINE DNA REPEATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JOBSE, C; BUNTJER, JB; HAAGSMA, N; BREUKELMAN, HJ; BEINTEMA, JJ; LENSTRA, JA

    The history of the abundant repeat elements in the bovine genome has been studied by comparative hybridization and PCR. The Bov-A and Bov-B SINE elements both emerged just after the divergence of the Camelidae and the true ruminants. A 31-bp subrepeat motif in satellites of the Bovidae species

  11. Building Fluency through the Repeated Reading Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Joshua

    2011-01-01

    For the last two years the author has used Repeated Reading (RR) to teach reading fluency in English as a Foreign Language classrooms in colleges and universities in Japan. RR is a method where the student reads and rereads a text silently or aloud from two to four times to reach a predetermined level of speed, accuracy, and comprehension. RR…

  12. History repeats itself: genomic divergence in copepods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaut, Sébastien; Dion-Côté, Anne-Marie

    2016-04-01

    Press stop, erase everything from now till some arbitrary time in the past and start recording life as it evolves once again. Would you see the same tape of life playing itself over and over, or would a different story unfold every time? The late Steven Jay Gould called this experiment replaying the tape of life and argued that any replay of the tape would lead evolution down a pathway radically different from the road actually taken (Gould 1989). This thought experiment has puzzled evolutionary biologists for a long time: how repeatable are evolutionary events? And if history does indeed repeat itself, what are the factors that may help us predict the path taken? A powerful means to address these questions at a small evolutionary scale is to study closely related populations that have evolved independently, under similar environmental conditions. This is precisely what Pereira et al. (2016) set out to do using marine copepods Tigriopus californicus, and present their results in this issue of Molecular Ecology. They show that evolution can be repeatable and even partly predictable, at least at the molecular level. As expected from theory, patterns of divergence were shaped by natural selection. At the same time, strong genetic drift due to small population sizes also constrained evolution down a similar evolutionary road, and probably contributed to repeatable patterns of genomic divergence.

  13. Costly renegotiation in repeated Bertand games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Ola; Wengström, Erik Roland

    2010-01-01

    This paper extends the concept of weak renegotiation-proof equilibrium (WRP) to allow for costly renegotiation and shows that even small renegotiation costs can have dramatic effects on the set of equilibria. More specifically, the paper analyzes the infinitely repeated Bertrand game. It is shown...

  14. Photometric Repeatability of Scanned Imagery: UVIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanahan, Clare E.; McCullough, Peter; Baggett, Sylvia

    2017-08-01

    We provide the preliminary results of a study on the photometric repeatability of spatial scans of bright, isolated white dwarf stars with the UVIS channel of the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). We analyze straight-line scans from the first pair of identical orbits of HST program 14878 to assess if sub 0.1% repeatability can be attained with WFC3/UVIS. This study is motivated by the desire to achieve better signal-to-noise in the UVIS contamination and stability monitor, in which observations of standard stars in staring mode have been taken from the installation of WFC3 in 2009 to the present to assess temporal photometric stability. Higher signal to noise in this program would greatly benefit the sensitivity to detect contamination, and to better characterize the observed small throughput drifts over time. We find excellent repeatability between identical visits of program 14878, with sub 0.1% repeatability achieved in most filters. These! results support the initiative to transition the staring mode UVIS contamination and photometric stability monitor from staring mode images to spatial scans.

  15. Repeat surgery after failed midurethral slings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss Hansen, Margrethe; Lose, Gunnar; Kesmodel, Ulrik Schiøler

    2016-01-01

    MUS from 1998 through 2007. The outcome was repeat surgery with any subsequent procedure code for urinary incontinence within a 5-year period of the first procedure. RESULTS: A total of 5,820 women (mean age 55.4 years, ± 12.1) were registered with a synthetic MUS, and 354 (6 %) underwent reoperation...

  16. EVOLUTION AND RECOMBINATION OF BOVINE DNA REPEATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JOBSE, C; BUNTJER, JB; HAAGSMA, N; BREUKELMAN, HJ; BEINTEMA, JJ; LENSTRA, JA

    1995-01-01

    The history of the abundant repeat elements in the bovine genome has been studied by comparative hybridization and PCR. The Bov-A and Bov-B SINE elements both emerged just after the divergence of the Camelidae and the true ruminants. A 31-bp subrepeat motif in satellites of the Bovidae species cattl

  17. Multivariate linear models and repeated measurements revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Methods for generalized analysis of variance based on multivariate normal theory have been known for many years. In a repeated measurements context, it is most often of interest to consider transformed responses, typically within-subject contrasts or averages. Efficiency considerations leads...

  18. On balanced minimal repeated measurements designs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakeel Ahmad Mir

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Repeated Measurements designs are concerned with scientific experiments in which each experimental unit is assigned more than once to a treatment either different or identical. This class of designs has the property that the unbiased estimators for elementary contrasts among direct and residual effects are obtainable. Afsarinejad (1983 provided a method of constructing balanced Minimal Repeated Measurements designs p < t , when t is an odd or prime power, one or more than one treatment may occur more than once in some sequences and  designs so constructed no longer remain uniform in periods. In this paper an attempt has been made to provide a new method to overcome this drawback. Specifically, two cases have been considered                RM[t,n=t(t-t/(p-1,p], λ2=1 for balanced minimal repeated measurements designs and  RM[t,n=2t(t-t/(p-1,p], λ2=2 for balanced  repeated measurements designs. In addition , a method has been provided for constructing              extra-balanced minimal designs for special case RM[t,n=t2/(p-1,p], λ2=1.

  19. Extraction, Isolation, Structural Characterization and Anti-Tumor Properties of an Apigalacturonan-Rich Polysaccharide from the Sea Grass Zostera caespitosa Miki

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youjing Lv

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available An apigalacturonan (AGA-rich polysaccharide, ZCMP, was isolated from the sea grass Zostera caespitosa Miki. The depolymerized fragments derived from ZCMP were obtained by either acidic degradation or pectinase degradation, and their structures were characterized by electrospray ionization collision-induced-dissociation mass spectrometry (ESI-CID-MS2 and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy. The average molecular weight of ZCMP was 77.2 kD and it consisted of galacturonic acid (GalA, apiosefuranose (Api, galactose (Gal, rhamnose (Rha, arabinose (Ara, xylose (Xyl, and mannose (Man, at a molar ratio of 51.4꞉15.5꞉6.0꞉11.8꞉4.2꞉4.4꞉4.2. There were two regions of AGA (70% and rhamnogalacturonan-I (RG-Ι, 30% in ZCMP. AGA was composed of an α-1,4-D-galactopyranosyluronan backbone mainly substituted at the O-3 position by single Api residues. RG-Ι possessed a backbone of repeating disaccharide units of →4GalAα1,2Rhaα1→, with a few α-L-arabinose and β-D-galactose residues as side chains. The anti-angiogenesis assay showed that ZCMP inhibited the migratory activity of human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVECs, with no influence on endothelial cells growth. ZCMP also promoted macrophage phagocytosis. These findings of the present study demonstrated the potential anti-tumor activity of ZCMP through anti-angiogenic and immunoregulatory pathways.

  20. 47 CFR 80.1179 - On-board repeater limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false On-board repeater limitations. 80.1179 Section... On-board repeater limitations. When an on-board repeater is used, the following limitations must be met: (a) The on-board repeater antenna must be located no higher than 3 meters (10 feet) above...

  1. Dispersion Measure Variation of Repeating Fast Radio Burst Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuan-Pei; Zhang, Bing

    2017-09-01

    The repeating fast radio burst (FRB) 121102 was recently localized in a dwarf galaxy at a cosmological distance. The dispersion measure (DM) derived for each burst from FRB 121102 so far has not shown significant evolution, even though an apparent increase was recently seen with newly detected VLA bursts. It is expected that more repeating FRB sources may be detected in the future. In this work, we investigate a list of possible astrophysical processes that might cause DM variation of a particular FRB source. The processes include (1) cosmological scale effects such as Hubble expansion and large-scale structure fluctuations; (2) FRB local effects such as gas density fluctuation, expansion of a supernova remnant (SNR), a pulsar wind nebula, and an H ii region; and (3) the propagation effect due to plasma lensing. We find that the DM variations contributed by the large-scale structure are extremely small, and any observable DM variation is likely caused by the plasma local to the FRB source. In addition to mechanisms that decrease DM over time, we suggest that an FRB source in an expanding SNR around a nearly neutral ambient medium during the deceleration (Sedov–Taylor and snowplow) phases or in a growing H ii region can increase DM. Some effects (e.g., an FRB source moving in an H ii region or plasma lensing) can produce either positive or negative DM variations. Future observations of DM variations of FRB 121102 and other repeating FRB sources can provide important clues regarding the physical origin of these sources.

  2. Thermal stability of chicken brain {alpha}-spectrin repeat 17: a spectroscopic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenner, Annette K. [University of Bergen, Department of Chemistry (Norway); Kieffer, Bruno [Ecole Superieure de Biotechnologie de Strasbourg, IGBMC Biomolecular NMR Group, CNRS UMR 7104 (France); Trave, Gilles [Ecole Superieure de Biotechnologie de Strasbourg, Equipe Oncoproteines, IREBS, UMR 7242 (France); Froystein, Nils Age [University of Bergen, Department of Chemistry (Norway); Raae, Arnt J., E-mail: arnt.raae@mbi.uib.no [University of Bergen, Department of Molecular Biology (Norway)

    2012-06-15

    Spectrin is a rod-like multi-modular protein that is mainly composed of triple-helical repeats. These repeats show very similar 3D-structures but variable conformational and thermodynamical stabilities, which may be of great importance for the flexibility and dynamic behaviour of spectrin in the cell. For instance, repeat 17 (R17) of the chicken brain spectrin {alpha}-chain is four times less stable than neighbouring repeat 16 (R16) in terms of Increment G. The structure of spectrin repeats has mainly been investigated by X-ray crystallography, but the structures of a few repeats, e.g. R16, have also been determined by NMR spectroscopy. Here, we undertook a detailed characterization of the neighbouring R17 by NMR spectroscopy. We assigned most backbone resonances and observed NOE restraints, relaxation values and coupling constants that all indicated that the fold of R17 is highly similar to that of R16, in agreement with previous X-ray analysis of a tandem repeat of the two domains. However, {sup 15}N heteronuclear NMR spectra measured at different temperatures revealed particular features of the R17 domain that might contribute to its lower stability. Conformational exchange appeared to alter the linker connecting R17 to R16 as well as the BC-loop in close proximity. In addition, heat-induced splitting was observed for backbone resonances of a few spatially related residues including V99 of helix C, which in R16 is replaced by the larger hydrophobic tryptophan residue that is relatively conserved among other spectrin repeats. These data support the view that the substitution of tryptophan by valine at this position may contribute to the lower stability of R17.

  3. Stability of dental waxes following repeated heatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsiomiti, E; McCabe, J F

    1995-02-01

    The flow and strength properties of dental waxes were examined following excessive and repeated heatings of the materials. For one product, the flow at 40 +/- 0.5 degrees C was reduced by 25.3% following heating above 200 degrees C. A decrease of the elastic modulus at 20 +/- 1 degree C by approximately 66% was observed in some cases after the heating temperature had been increased to 300 degrees C. Property variations were related to compositional changes, which were investigated by infrared spectoscopy and thermal analysis. Exposure of dental waxes to temperatures higher than 200 degrees C, particularly if it is repeated, may affect the composition and properties, resulting in inferior materials.

  4. Learning with repeated-game strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannou, Christos A; Romero, Julian

    2014-01-01

    We use the self-tuning Experience Weighted Attraction model with repeated-game strategies as a computer testbed to examine the relative frequency, speed of convergence and progression of a set of repeated-game strategies in four symmetric 2 × 2 games: Prisoner's Dilemma, Battle of the Sexes, Stag-Hunt, and Chicken. In the Prisoner's Dilemma game, we find that the strategy with the most occurrences is the "Grim-Trigger." In the Battle of the Sexes game, a cooperative pair that alternates between the two pure-strategy Nash equilibria emerges as the one with the most occurrences. In the Stag-Hunt and Chicken games, the "Win-Stay, Lose-Shift" and "Grim-Trigger" strategies are the ones with the most occurrences. Overall, the pairs that converged quickly ended up at the cooperative outcomes, whereas the ones that were extremely slow to reach convergence ended up at non-cooperative outcomes.

  5. Learning With Repeated-Game Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos A. Ioannou

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We use the self-tuning Experience Weighted Attraction model with repeated-game strategies as a computer testbed to examine the relative frequency, speed of convergence and progression of a set of repeated-game strategies in four symmetric 2x2 games: Prisoner's Dilemma, Battle of the Sexes, Stag-Hunt, and Chicken. In the Prisoner's Dilemma game, we fi□nd that the strategy with the most occurrences is the Grim-Trigger. In the Battle of the Sexes game, a cooperative pair that alternates between the two pure-strategy Nash equilibria emerges as the one with the most occurrences. In the Stag-Hunt and Chicken games, the Win-Stay, Lose-Shift and Grim-Trigger strategies are the ones with the most occurrences. Overall, the pairs that converged quickly ended up at the cooperative outcomes, whereas the ones that were extremely slow to reach convergence ended up at non-cooperative outcomes.

  6. Quantum repeaters with entangled coherent states

    CERN Document Server

    Sangouard, Nicolas; Gisin, Nicolas; Laurat, Julien; Tualle-Brouri, Rosa; Grangier, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Entangled coherent states can be prepared remotely by subtracting non-locally a single photon from two quantum superpositions of coherent states, the so-called "Schroedinger's cat" state. Such entanglement can further be distributed over longer distances by successive entanglement swapping operations using linear optics and photon-number resolving detectors. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the performance of this approach to quantum repeaters for long distance quantum communications. Despite many attractive features at first sight, we show that, when using state-of-the-art photon counters and quantum memories, they do not achieve higher entanglement generation rates than repeaters based on single-photon entanglement. We discuss potential developments which may take better advantage of the richness of entanglement based on continuous variables, including in particular efficient parity measurements.

  7. Quantum repeaters based on heralded qubit amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Minář, Jiří; Sangouard, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    We present a quantum repeater scheme based on the recently proposed qubit amplifier [N. Gisin, S. Pironio and N. Sangouard, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 070501 (2010)]. It relies on a on-demand entangled-photon pair source which uses on-demand single-photon sources, linear optical elements and atomic ensembles. Interestingly, the imperfections affecting the states created from this source, caused e.g. by detectors with non-unit efficiencies, are systematically purified from an entanglement swapping operation based on a two-photon detection. This allows the distribution of entanglement over very long distances with a high fidelity, i.e. without vacuum components and multiphoton errors. Therefore, the resulting quantum repeater architecture does not necessitate final postselections and thus achieves high entanglement distribution rates. This also provides unique opportunities for device-independent quantum key distribution over long distances with linear optics and atomic ensembles.

  8. Nonparametric additive regression for repeatedly measured data

    KAUST Repository

    Carroll, R. J.

    2009-05-20

    We develop an easily computed smooth backfitting algorithm for additive model fitting in repeated measures problems. Our methodology easily copes with various settings, such as when some covariates are the same over repeated response measurements. We allow for a working covariance matrix for the regression errors, showing that our method is most efficient when the correct covariance matrix is used. The component functions achieve the known asymptotic variance lower bound for the scalar argument case. Smooth backfitting also leads directly to design-independent biases in the local linear case. Simulations show our estimator has smaller variance than the usual kernel estimator. This is also illustrated by an example from nutritional epidemiology. © 2009 Biometrika Trust.

  9. Repeat-PPM Super-Symbol Synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, J.

    2016-11-01

    To attain a wider range of data rates in pulse position modulation (PPM) schemes with constrained pulse durations, the sender can repeat a PPM symbol multiple times, forming a super-symbol. In addition to the slot and symbol synchronization typically required for PPM, the receiver must also properly align the noisy super-symbols. We present a low-complexity approximation of the maximum-likelihood method for performing super-symbol synchronization without use of synchronization sequences. We provide simulation results demonstrating performance advantage when PPM symbols are spread by a pseudo-noise sequence, as opposed to simply repeating. Additionally, the results suggest that this super-symbol synchronization technique requires signal levels below those required for reliable communication. This validates that the PPM spreading approach proposed to CCSDS can work properly as part of the overall scheme.

  10. High-bandwidth hybrid quantum repeater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, W J; Van Meter, R; Louis, Sebastien G R; Nemoto, Kae

    2008-07-25

    We present a physical- and link-level design for the creation of entangled pairs to be used in quantum repeater applications where one can control the noise level of the initially distributed pairs. The system can tune dynamically, trading initial fidelity for success probability, from high fidelity pairs (F=0.98 or above) to moderate fidelity pairs. The same physical resources that create the long-distance entanglement are used to implement the local gates required for entanglement purification and swapping, creating a homogeneous repeater architecture. Optimizing the noise properties of the initially distributed pairs significantly improves the rate of generating long-distance Bell pairs. Finally, we discuss the performance trade-off between spatial and temporal resources.

  11. Do Gamma-Ray Burst Sources Repeat?

    OpenAIRE

    Meegan, Charles A.; Hartmann, Dieter H.; Brainerd, J. J.; Briggs, Michael S.; Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Fishman, Gerald; Blumenthal, George; Brock, Martin

    1995-01-01

    The demonstration of repeated gamma-ray bursts from an individual source would severely constrain burst source models. Recent reports (Quashnock and Lamb 1993; Wang and Lingenfelter 1993) of evidence for repetition in the first BATSE burst catalog have generated renewed interest in this issue. Here, we analyze the angular distribution of 585 bursts of the second BATSE catalog (Meegan et al. 1994). We search for evidence of burst recurrence using the nearest and farthest neighbor statistic and...

  12. 2D Metals by Repeated Size Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hanwen; Tang, Hao; Fang, Minghao; Si, Wenjie; Zhang, Qinghua; Huang, Zhaohui; Gu, Lin; Pan, Wei; Yao, Jie; Nan, Cewen; Wu, Hui

    2016-10-01

    A general and convenient strategy for manufacturing freestanding metal nanolayers is developed on large scale. By the simple process of repeatedly folding and calendering stacked metal sheets followed by chemical etching, free-standing 2D metal (e.g., Ag, Au, Fe, Cu, and Ni) nanosheets are obtained with thicknesses as small as 1 nm and with sizes of the order of several micrometers.

  13. Repeatability and Workability Evaluation of SIGMOD 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnet, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    SIGMOD has offered, since 2008, to verify the experiments published in the papers accepted at the conference. This year, we have been in charge of reproducing the experiments provided by the authors (repeatability), and exploring changes to experiment parameters (workability). In this paper, we a...... find that most experiments are distributed as Linux packages accompanied by instructions on how to setup and run the experiments. We are still far from the vision of executable papers...

  14. Repeatability of Response to Asthma Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ann; Tantisira, Kelan; Li, Lingling; Schuemann, Brooke; Weiss, Scott

    2010-01-01

    Background Pharmacogenetic studies of drug response in asthma assume that patients respond consistently to a treatment but that treatment response varies across patients, however, no formal studies have demonstrated this. Objective To determine the repeatability of commonly used outcomes for treatment response to asthma medications: bronchodilator response, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), and provocative concentration of methacholine producing a 20% decline in FEV1 (PC20). Methods The Childhood Asthma Management Program (CAMP) was a multi-center clinical trial of children randomized to receiving budesonide, nedocromil, or placebo. We determined the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for each outcome over repeated visits over four years in CAMP using mixed effects regression models. We adjusted for the covariates: age, race/ethnicity, height, family income, parental education, and symptom score. We incorporated each outcome for each child as repeated outcome measurements and stratified by treatment group. Results The ICC for bronchodilator response was 0.31 in the budesonide group, 0.35 in the nedocromil group, and 0.40 in the placebo group, after adjusting for covariates. The ICC for FEV1 was 0.71 in the budesonide group, 0.60 in the nedocromil group, and 0.69 in the placebo group, after adjusting for covariates. The ICC for PC20 was 0.67 in the budesonide and placebo groups and 0.73 in the nedocromil group, after adjusting for covariates. Conclusion The within treatment group repeatability of FEV1 and PC20 are high; thus these phenotypes are heritable. FEV1 and PC20 may be better phenotypes than bronchodilator response for studies of treatment response in asthma. PMID:19064281

  15. Repeated extraction of DNA from FTA cards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangegaard, Michael; Ferrero, Laura; Børsting, Claus

    2011-01-01

    Extraction of DNA using magnetic bead based techniques on automated DNA extraction instruments provides a fast, reliable and reproducible method for DNA extraction from various matrices. However, the yield of extracted DNA from FTA-cards is typically low. Here, we demonstrate that it is possible...... to repeatedly extract DNA from the processed FTA-disk. The method increases the yield from the nanogram range to the microgram range....

  16. Repeated extraction of DNA from FTA cards

    OpenAIRE

    Stangegaard, Michael; Ferrero, Laura; Børsting, Claus; Frank-Hansen, Rune; Hansen, Anders Johannes; Morling, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Extraction of DNA using magnetic bead based techniques on automated DNA extraction instruments provides a fast, reliable and reproducible method for DNA extraction from various matrices. However, the yield of extracted DNA from FTA-cards is typically low. Here, we demonstrate that it is possible to repeatedly extract DNA from the processed FTA-disk. The method increases the yield from the nanogram range to the microgram range.

  17. Repeated extraction of DNA from FTA cards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stangegaard, Michael; Ferrero, Laura; Børsting, Claus

    2011-01-01

    Extraction of DNA using magnetic bead based techniques on automated DNA extraction instruments provides a fast, reliable and reproducible method for DNA extraction from various matrices. However, the yield of extracted DNA from FTA-cards is typically low. Here, we demonstrate that it is possible...... to repeatedly extract DNA from the processed FTA-disk. The method increases the yield from the nanogram range to the microgram range....

  18. A Central Limit Theorem for Repeating Patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Abrams, Aaron; Landau, Henry; Landau, Zeph; Pommersheim, James

    2012-01-01

    This note gives a central limit theorem for the length of the longest subsequence of a random permutation which follows some repeating pattern. This includes the case of any fixed pattern of ups and downs which has at least one of each, such as the alternating case considered by Stanley in [2] and Widom in [3]. In every case considered the convergence in the limit of long permutations is to normal with mean and variance linear in the length of the permutations.

  19. Repeatability and Workability Evaluation of SIGMOD 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnet, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    SIGMOD has offered, since 2008, to verify the experiments published in the papers accepted at the conference. This year, we have been in charge of reproducing the experiments provided by the authors (repeatability), and exploring changes to experiment parameters (workability). In this paper, we a...... find that most experiments are distributed as Linux packages accompanied by instructions on how to setup and run the experiments. We are still far from the vision of executable papers...

  20. Epigenetics and Triplet-Repeat Neurological Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Nageshwaran, Sathiji; Festenstein, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The term “junk DNA” has been reconsidered following the delineation of the functional significance of repetitive DNA regions. Typically associated with centromeres and telomeres, DNA repeats are found in nearly all organisms throughout their genomes. Repetitive regions are frequently heterochromatinized resulting in silencing of intrinsic and nearby genes. However, this is not a uniform rule, with several genes known to require such an environment to permit transcription. Repetitive regions f...

  1. Epigenetics and triplet repeat neurological diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Sathiji eNageshwaran; Richard eFestenstein

    2015-01-01

    The term ‘junk DNA’ has been reconsidered following the delineation of the functional significance of repetitive DNA regions. Typically associated with centromeres and telomeres, DNA repeats are found in nearly all organisms throughout their genomes. Repetitive regions are frequently heterchromatinised resulting in silencing of intrinsic and nearby genes. However, this is not a uniform rule, with several genes known to require such an environment to permit transcription. Repetitive regions fr...

  2. Intermediates in the folding equilibrium of repeat proteins from the TPR family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Charro, Vicente; Rey, Antonio

    2014-09-01

    In recent decades, advances in computational methods and experimental biophysical techniques have improved our understanding of protein folding. Although some of these advances have been remarkable, the structural variability of globular proteins usually encountered makes it difficult to extract general features of their folding processes. To overcome this difficulty, experimental and computational studies of the folding of repeat (or modular) proteins are of interest. Because their native structures can be described as linear arrays of the same, repeated, supersecondary structure unit, it is possible to seek a possibly independent behavior of the different modules without taking into account the intrinsic stability associated with different secondary structure motifs. In this work we have used a Monte Carlo-based simulation to study the folding equilibrium of four repeat proteins belonging to the tetratricopeptide repeat family. Our studies provide new insights into their energy profiles, enabling investigation about the existence of intermediate states and their relative stabilities. We have also performed structural analyses to describe the structure of these intermediates, going through the vast number of conformations obtained from the simulations. In this way, we have tried to identify the regions of each protein in which the modular structure yields a different behavior and, more specifically, regions of the proteins that can stay folded when the rest of the chain has been thermally denatured.

  3. Repeated-sprint ability and aerobic fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thébault, Nicolas; Léger, Luc A; Passelergue, Philippe

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to reinvestigate the relationship between aerobic fitness and fatigue indices of repeated-sprint ability (RSA), with special attention to methodological normalization. Soldiers were divided into low (n = 10) and high (n = 9) fitness groups according to a preset maximal aerobic speed (MAS) of 17 km·h(-1) (∼60 ml O2·kg(-1)·min) measured with the University of Montreal Track Test (UMTT). Subjects' assessment included the RSA test (3 sets of 5 40-m sprints with 1-minute rest between sprints and 1.5 minutes between sets), a 40-m sprint (criterion test used in the computation of fatigue indices for the RSA test), strength and power measurement of the lower limbs, and the 20-m shuttle run test (20-m SRT) and the UMTT, which are measures of maximal aerobic power. The highest correlation with the RSA fatigue indices was obtained with the 20-m SRT (r = 0.90, p = 0.0001, n = 19), a test with 180° direction changes and accelerations and decelerations. The lower correlation (r = 0.66, p repeated sprints and achieved better recovery between series. A MAS of at least 17 km·h(-1) favors constant and high speed level during repeated sprints. From a practical point of view, a high aerobic fitness is a precious asset in counteracting fatigue in sports with numerous sprint repetitions.

  4. Histone deacetylase complexes promote trinucleotide repeat expansions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Debacker

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Expansions of DNA trinucleotide repeats cause at least 17 inherited neurodegenerative diseases, such as Huntington's disease. Expansions can occur at frequencies approaching 100% in affected families and in transgenic mice, suggesting that specific cellular proteins actively promote (favor expansions. The inference is that expansions arise due to the presence of these promoting proteins, not their absence, and that interfering with these proteins can suppress expansions. The goal of this study was to identify novel factors that promote expansions. We discovered that specific histone deacetylase complexes (HDACs promote CTG•CAG repeat expansions in budding yeast and human cells. Mutation or inhibition of yeast Rpd3L or Hda1 suppressed up to 90% of expansions. In cultured human astrocytes, expansions were suppressed by 75% upon inhibition or knockdown of HDAC3, whereas siRNA against the histone acetyltransferases CBP/p300 stimulated expansions. Genetic and molecular analysis both indicated that HDACs act at a distance from the triplet repeat to promote expansions. Expansion assays with nuclease mutants indicated that Sae2 is one of the relevant factors regulated by Rpd3L and Hda1. The causal relationship between HDACs and expansions indicates that HDACs can promote mutagenesis at some DNA sequences. This relationship further implies that HDAC3 inhibitors being tested for relief of expansion-associated gene silencing may also suppress somatic expansions that contribute to disease progression.

  5. Tandem Repeats in Proteins : Prediction Algorithms and Biological Role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco ePellegrini

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Tandem repetitions in protein sequence and structure is a fascinatingsubject of research which has been a focus of study since the late 1990's.In this survey we give an overviewon the multi-faceted aspects of research on protein tandem repeats textcolor{red}{(PTR for short}, including prediction algorithms, databases,early classification efforts, mechanisms of PTR formation and evolution, and synthetic PTR design.We also touch on the rather open issue of the relationship between PTRand flexibility (or disorder in proteins.Detection of PTR either from protein sequence or structure data is challenging due to inherent high (biological signal-to-noise ratio that is a key feature of this problem.As early in silico analytic tools have been key enablers for starting this field of study, we expect that current and future algorithmic and statistical breakthroughs willhave a high impact on the investigations of the biological role of PTR.

  6. A Unified Model for Repeating and Non-repeating Fast Radio Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagchi, Manjari

    2017-04-01

    The model that fast radio bursts (FRBs) are caused by plunges of asteroids onto neutron stars can explain both repeating and non-repeating bursts. If a neutron star passes through an asteroid belt around another star, there would be a series of bursts caused by a series of asteroid impacts. Moreover, the neutron star would cross the same belt repetitively if it were in a binary with the star hosting the asteroid belt, leading to a repeated series of bursts. I explore the properties of neutron star binaries that could lead to the only known repeating FRB so far (FRB121102). In this model, the next two epochs of bursts are expected around 2017 February 27 and 2017 December 18. On the other hand, if the asteroid belt is located around the neutron star itself, then a chance fall of an asteroid from that belt onto the neutron star would lead to a non-repeating burst. Even a neutron star grazing an asteroid belt can lead to a non-repeating burst caused by just one asteroid plunge during the grazing. This is possible even when the neutron star is in a binary with the asteroid-hosting star, if the belt and the neutron star orbit are non-coplanar.

  7. CuAAC click chemistry with N-propargyl 1,5-dideoxy-1,5-imino-D-gulitol and N-propargyl 1,6-dideoxy-1,6-imino-D-mannitol provides access to triazole-linked piperidine and azepane pseudo-disaccharide iminosugars displaying glycosidase inhibitory properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamoner, Luís Otávio B; Aragão-Leoneti, Valquíria; Mantoani, Susimaire P; Rugen, Michael D; Nepogodiev, Sergey A; Field, Robert A; Carvalho, Ivone

    2016-06-24

    Protecting group-free synthesis of 1,2:5,6-di-anhydro-D-mannitol, followed by ring opening with propargylamine and subsequent ring closure produced a separable mix of piperidine N-propargyl 1,5-dideoxy-1,5-imino-D-gulitol and azepane N-propargyl 1,6-dideoxy-1,6-imino-D-mannitol. In O-acetylated form, these two building blocks were subjected to CuAAC click chemistry with a panel of three differently azide-substituted glucose building blocks, producing iminosugar pseudo-disaccharides in good yield. The overall panel of eight compounds, plus 1-deoxynojirimycin (DNJ) as a benchmark, was evaluated as prospective inhibitors of almond β-glucosidase, yeast α-glucosidase and barley β-amylase. The iminosugar pseudo-disaccharides showed no inhibitory activity against almond β-glucosidase, while the parent N-propargyl 1,5-dideoxy-1,5-imino-D-gulitol and N-propargyl 1,6-dideoxy-1,6-imino-D-mannitol likewise proved to be inactive against yeast α-glucosidase. Inhibitory activity could be reinstated in the former series by appropriate substitution on nitrogen. The greater activity of the piperidine could be rationalized based on docking studies. Further, potent inhibition of β-amylase was observed with compounds from both the piperidine and azepane series.

  8. Association of condensin with chromosomes depends on DNA binding by its HEAT-repeat subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Ilaria; Rutkowska, Anna; Ori, Alessandro; Walczak, Marta; Metz, Jutta; Pelechano, Vicent; Beck, Martin; Haering, Christian H

    2014-06-01

    Condensin complexes have central roles in the three-dimensional organization of chromosomes during cell divisions, but how they interact with chromatin to promote chromosome segregation is largely unknown. Previous work has suggested that condensin, in addition to encircling chromatin fibers topologically within the ring-shaped structure formed by its SMC and kleisin subunits, contacts DNA directly. Here we describe the discovery of a binding domain for double-stranded DNA formed by the two HEAT-repeat subunits of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae condensin complex. From detailed mapping data of the interfaces between the HEAT-repeat and kleisin subunits, we generated condensin complexes that lack one of the HEAT-repeat subunits and consequently fail to associate with chromosomes in yeast and human cells. The finding that DNA binding by condensin's HEAT-repeat subunits stimulates the SMC ATPase activity suggests a multistep mechanism for the loading of condensin onto chromosomes.

  9. Renormalization and small-world model of fractal quantum repeater networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zong-Wen; Wang, Bing-Hong; Han, Xiao-Pu

    2013-01-01

    Quantum networks provide access to exchange of quantum information. The primary task of quantum networks is to distribute entanglement between remote nodes. Although quantum repeater protocol enables long distance entanglement distribution, it has been restricted to one-dimensional linear network. Here we develop a general framework that allows application of quantum repeater protocol to arbitrary quantum repeater networks with fractal structure. Entanglement distribution across such networks is mapped to renormalization. Furthermore, we demonstrate that logarithmical times of recursive such renormalization transformations can trigger fractal to small-world transition, where a scalable quantum small-world network is achieved. Our result provides new insight into quantum repeater theory towards realistic construction of large-scale quantum networks. PMID:23386977

  10. Renormalization and small-world model of fractal quantum repeater networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zong-Wen; Wang, Bing-Hong; Han, Xiao-Pu

    2013-01-01

    Quantum networks provide access to exchange of quantum information. The primary task of quantum networks is to distribute entanglement between remote nodes. Although quantum repeater protocol enables long distance entanglement distribution, it has been restricted to one-dimensional linear network. Here we develop a general framework that allows application of quantum repeater protocol to arbitrary quantum repeater networks with fractal structure. Entanglement distribution across such networks is mapped to renormalization. Furthermore, we demonstrate that logarithmical times of recursive such renormalization transformations can trigger fractal to small-world transition, where a scalable quantum small-world network is achieved. Our result provides new insight into quantum repeater theory towards realistic construction of large-scale quantum networks.

  11. Discovery, Characterization, and Functional Study of a Novel MEF2D CAG Repeat in Duck (Anas platyrhynchos).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yushi; Wang, Jiwen; Liu, Hehe; Zhang, Rongping; Zhang, Tao; Gan, Xiang; Huang, Huilan; Chen, Da; Li, Liang

    2016-08-01

    Myocyte enhancer transcription factor 2D (MEF2D) is an important transcription factor for promoting the growth and development of muscle. CAG repeats have been found in the coding sequence (CDS) of avian MEF2D; however, their functions remain unknown and require further investigation. Here, we examined the characteristics and functional role of MEF2D CAG repeat in duck. The full-length CDS of duck MEF2D was cloned for the first time, and a novel CAG repeat was identified and located in exon 9. Sequence analysis indicated that the protein domains of duck MEF2D are highly conserved relative to other vertebrates, whereas MEF2D CAG repeats with variable repeat numbers are specific to avian species. Furthermore, sequencing has revealed polymorphisms in MEF2D CAG repeat at both DNA and mRNA levels. Four MEF2D CAG repeat genotypes and 10 MEF2D cDNA variants with different CAG repeat numbers were detected in two duck populations. A t-test showed that the expanded CAG repeat generated significantly longer transcription products (p analysis demonstrated positive correlations between the expansion of the CAG repeat and five muscle-related traits. By using protein structure prediction, we suggested that the polymorphisms of the CAG repeat affect protein structures within protein domains. Taken together, these findings reveal that duck MEF2D CAG repeat is a potential functional element with polymorphisms and may cause differences in MEF2D function between duck and other vertebrate species.

  12. Structural basis of heparin binding to camel peptidoglycan recognition protein-S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pradeep; Dube, Divya; Sinha, Mau; Dey, Sharmistha; Kaur, Punit; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Tej P.

    2012-01-01

    Short peptidoglycan recognition protein (PGRP-S) is a member of the innate immunity system in mammals. PGRP-S from Camelus dromedarius (CPGRP-S) is found to be highly potent against bacterial infections. It is capable of binding to a wide range of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) including lipopolysaccharide (LPS), lipoteichoic acid (LTA) and peptidoglycan (PGN). The heparin-like polysaccharides have also been observed in some bacteria such as the capsule of K5 Escherichia coli thus making them relevant for determining the nature of their interactions with CPGRP-S. The binding studies of CPGRP-S with heparin disaccharide in solution using surface plasmon resonance gave a value 3.3×10-7 M for the dissociation constant (Kd). The structure of the heparin bound CPGRP-S determined at 2.8Å resolution revealed the presence of a bound heparin molecule in the binding pocket of CPGRP-S. It was found anchored tightly to the protein with the help of several ionic and hydrogen bonded interactions. Three sulphate groups of heparin S1, S2 and S3 have been found to interact with residues, Arg-31, Lys-90, Thr- 97, Asn-99 Asn-140, Gln-150 and Arg-170 of CPGRP-S. The binding site includes two subsites, S-I and S-II with cleft-like structures. Heparin disaccharide is bound in subsite S-I. Previously determined structures of the complexes of CPGRP-S with LPS, LTA and PGN also showed that their glycan moieties were also held in subsite S-I indicating that heparin disaccharide also represents an important element for the recognition by CPGRP-S. PMID:22509483

  13. Computational study of the human dystrophin repeats: interaction properties and molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrand, Baptiste; Giudice, Emmanuel; Nicolas, Aurélie; Delalande, Olivier; Le Rumeur, Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    Dystrophin is a large protein involved in the rare genetic disease Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). It functions as a mechanical linker between the cytoskeleton and the sarcolemma, and is able to resist shear stresses during muscle activity. In all, 75% of the dystrophin molecule consists of a large central rod domain made up of 24 repeat units that share high structural homology with spectrin-like repeats. However, in the absence of any high-resolution structure of these repeats, the molecular basis of dystrophin central domain's functions has not yet been deciphered. In this context, we have performed a computational study of the whole dystrophin central rod domain based on the rational homology modeling of successive and overlapping tandem repeats and the analysis of their surface properties. Each tandem repeat has very specific surface properties that make it unique. However, the repeats share enough electrostatic-surface similarities to be grouped into four separate clusters. Molecular dynamics simulations of four representative tandem repeats reveal specific flexibility or bending properties depending on the repeat sequence. We thus suggest that the dystrophin central rod domain is constituted of seven biologically relevant sub-domains. Our results provide evidence for the role of the dystrophin central rod domain as a scaffold platform with a wide range of surface features and biophysical properties allowing it to interact with its various known partners such as proteins and membrane lipids. This new integrative view is strongly supported by the previous experimental works that investigated the isolated domains and the observed heterogeneity of the severity of dystrophin related pathologies, especially Becker muscular dystrophy.

  14. Computational study of the human dystrophin repeats: interaction properties and molecular dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baptiste Legrand

    Full Text Available Dystrophin is a large protein involved in the rare genetic disease Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. It functions as a mechanical linker between the cytoskeleton and the sarcolemma, and is able to resist shear stresses during muscle activity. In all, 75% of the dystrophin molecule consists of a large central rod domain made up of 24 repeat units that share high structural homology with spectrin-like repeats. However, in the absence of any high-resolution structure of these repeats, the molecular basis of dystrophin central domain's functions has not yet been deciphered. In this context, we have performed a computational study of the whole dystrophin central rod domain based on the rational homology modeling of successive and overlapping tandem repeats and the analysis of their surface properties. Each tandem repeat has very specific surface properties that make it unique. However, the repeats share enough electrostatic-surface similarities to be grouped into four separate clusters. Molecular dynamics simulations of four representative tandem repeats reveal specific flexibility or bending properties depending on the repeat sequence. We thus suggest that the dystrophin central rod domain is constituted of seven biologically relevant sub-domains. Our results provide evidence for the role of the dystrophin central rod domain as a scaffold platform with a wide range of surface features and biophysical properties allowing it to interact with its various known partners such as proteins and membrane lipids. This new integrative view is strongly supported by the previous experimental works that investigated the isolated domains and the observed heterogeneity of the severity of dystrophin related pathologies, especially Becker muscular dystrophy.

  15. Association between a Tetranucleotide Repeat Polymorphism of SPAG16 Gene and Cataract in Male Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shipra Mehra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Studies involving genotyping of STR markers at 2q34 have repeatedly found the region to host the disease haplotype for pediatric cataract. Present study investigated the association of D2S2944 marker, in sperm associated antigen 16 (SPAG16 gene and rs2289917 polymorphism, in γ-crystallin B gene, with childhood cataract. Methods. 97 pediatric cataract cases and 110 children with no ocular defects were examined for tetranucleotide repeat marker/SNP using PCR-SSLP/RFLP techniques. Polymorphisms were assessed for association using contingency tables and linkage disequilibrium among alleles of the markers was estimated. Energy-optimization program predicted the secondary structure models of repeats of D2S2944. Results. Seven alleles of D2S2944, with 9–15 “GATA” repeats, were observed. Frequency of the longer allele of D2S2944, ≥(GATA13 repeats, was 0.73 in cases and 0.56 in controls (P=0.0123. Male children bearing ≥(GATA13 repeats showed >3-fold higher risk for cataract (CI95% = 1.43–7.00, P=0.0043, Pc=0.0086 as compared to female children (OR=1.19, CI95% = 0.49–2.92, P=0.70. Cases with haplotype—≥(GATA13 of D2S2944 and “C” allele rs2289917—have a higher risk for pediatric cataract (OR=2.952, CI95% = 1.595~5.463, P=0.000453. >(GATA13 repeats formed energetically more favorable stem-loop structure. Conclusion. Intragenic microsatellite repeat expansion in SPAG16 gene increases predisposition to pediatric cataract by probably interfering posttranscriptional events and affecting the expression of adjacent lens transparency gene/s in a gender bias manner.

  16. Short Tandem Repeats in Human Exons: A Target for Disease Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villesen Palle

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years it has been demonstrated that structural variations, such as indels (insertions and deletions, are common throughout the genome, but the implications of structural variations are still not clearly understood. Long tandem repeats (e.g. microsatellites or simple repeats are known to be hypermutable (indel-rich, but are rare in exons and only occasionally associated with diseases. Here we focus on short (imperfect tandem repeats (STRs which fall below the radar of conventional tandem repeat detection, and investigate whether STRs are targets for disease-related mutations in human exons. In particular, we test whether they share the hypermutability of the longer tandem repeats and whether disease-related genes have a higher STR content than non-disease-related genes. Results We show that validated human indels are extremely common in STR regions compared to non-STR regions. In contrast to longer tandem repeats, our definition of STRs found them to be present in exons of most known human genes (92%, 99% of all STR sequences in exons are shorter than 33 base pairs and 62% of all STR sequences are imperfect repeats. We also demonstrate that STRs are significantly overrepresented in disease-related genes in both human and mouse. These results are preserved when we limit the analysis to STRs outside known longer tandem repeats. Conclusion Based on our findings we conclude that STRs represent hypermutable regions in the human genome that are linked to human disease. In addition, STRs constitute an obvious target when screening for rare mutations, because of the relatively low amount of STRs in exons (1,973,844 bp and the limited length of STR regions.

  17. Crystallographic and Computational Analyses of AUUCU Repeating RNA That Causes Spinocerebellar Ataxia Type 10 (SCA10).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, HaJeung; González, Àlex L; Yildirim, Ilyas; Tran, Tuan; Lohman, Jeremy R; Fang, Pengfei; Guo, Min; Disney, Matthew D

    2015-06-23

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10) is caused by a pentanucleotide repeat expansion of r(AUUCU) within intron 9 of the ATXN10 pre-mRNA. The RNA causes disease by a gain-of-function mechanism in which it inactivates proteins involved in RNA biogenesis. Spectroscopic studies showed that r(AUUCU) repeats form a hairpin structure; however, there were no high-resolution structural models prior to this work. Herein, we report the first crystal structure of model r(AUUCU) repeats refined to 2.8 Å and analysis of the structure via molecular dynamics simulations. The r(AUUCU) tracts adopt an overall A-form geometry in which 3 × 3 nucleotide (5')UCU(3')/(3')UCU(5') internal loops are closed by AU pairs. Helical parameters of the refined structure as well as the corresponding electron density map on the crystallographic model reflect dynamic features of the internal loop. The computational analyses captured dynamic motion of the loop closing pairs, which can form single-stranded conformations with relatively low energies. Overall, the results presented here suggest the possibility for r(AUUCU) repeats to form metastable A-from structures, which can rearrange into single-stranded conformations and attract proteins such as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K). The information presented here may aid in the rational design of therapeutics targeting this RNA.

  18. Repeatability and Reproducibility of Virtual Subjective Refraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perches, Sara; Collados, M Victoria; Ares, Jorge

    2016-10-01

    To establish the repeatability and reproducibility of a virtual refraction process using simulated retinal images. With simulation software, aberrated images corresponding with each step of the refraction process were calculated following the typical protocol of conventional subjective refraction. Fifty external examiners judged simulated retinal images until the best sphero-cylindrical refraction and the best visual acuity were achieved starting from the aberrometry data of three patients. Data analyses were performed to assess repeatability and reproducibility of the virtual refraction as a function of pupil size and aberrometric profile of different patients. SD values achieved in three components of refraction (M, J0, and J45) are lower than 0.25D in repeatability analysis. Regarding reproducibility, we found SD values lower than 0.25D in the most cases. When the results of virtual refraction with different pupil diameters (4 and 6 mm) were compared, the mean of differences (MoD) obtained were not clinically significant (less than 0.25D). Only one of the aberrometry profiles with high uncorrected astigmatism shows poor results for the M component in reproducibility and pupil size dependence analysis. In all cases, vision achieved was better than 0 logMAR. A comparison between the compensation obtained with virtual and conventional subjective refraction was made as an example of this application, showing good quality retinal images in both processes. The present study shows that virtual refraction has similar levels of precision as conventional subjective refraction. Moreover, virtual refraction has also shown that when high low order astigmatism is present, the refraction result is less precise and highly dependent on pupil size.

  19. Oxygen uptake during repeated-sprint exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGawley, Kerry; Bishop, David J

    2015-03-01

    Repeated-sprint ability appears to be influenced by oxidative metabolism, with reductions in fatigue and improved sprint times related to markers of aerobic fitness. The aim of the current study was to measure the oxygen uptake (VO₂) during the first and last sprints during two, 5 × 6-s repeated-sprint bouts. Cross-sectional study. Eight female soccer players performed two, consecutive, 5 × 6-s maximal sprint bouts (B1 and B2) on five separate occasions, in order to identify the minimum time (trec) required to recover total work done (Wtot) in B1. On a sixth occasion, expired air was collected during the first and last sprint of B1 and B2, which were separated by trec. The trec was 10.9 ± 1.1 min. The VO₂ during the first sprint was significantly less than the last sprint in each bout (psprint (measured in kJ) was significantly related to VO₂max in both B1 (r=0.81, p=0.015) and B2 (r=0.93, p=0.001). In addition, the VO₂ attained in the final sprint was not significantly different from VO₂max in B1 (p=0.284) or B2 (p=0.448). The current study shows that the VO₂ increases from the first to the last of 5 × 6-s sprints and that VO₂max may be a limiting factor to performance in latter sprints. Increasing V˙O₂max in team-sport athletes may enable increased aerobic energy delivery, and consequently work done, during a bout of repeated sprints. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Mechanical processes with repeated attenuated impacts

    CERN Document Server

    Nagaev, R F

    1999-01-01

    This book is devoted to considering in the general case - using typical concrete examples - the motion of machines and mechanisms of impact and vibro-impact action accompanied by a peculiar phenomenon called "impact collapse". This phenomenon is that after the initial collision, a sequence of repeated gradually quickening collisions of decreasing-to-zero intensity occurs, with the final establishment of protracted contact between the interacting bodies. The initiation conditions of the impact collapse are determined and calculation techniques for the quantitative characteristics of the corresp

  1. Source coding model for repeated snapshot imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Junhui; Yang, Dongyue; wu, Guohua; Yin, Longfei; Guo, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Imaging based on successive repeated snapshot measurement is modeled as a source coding process in information theory. The necessary number of measurement to maintain a certain level of error rate is depicted as the rate-distortion function of the source coding. Quantitative formula of the error rate versus measurement number relation is derived, based on the information capacity of imaging system. Second order fluctuation correlation imaging (SFCI) experiment with pseudo-thermal light verifies this formula, which paves the way for introducing information theory into the study of ghost imaging (GI), both conventional and computational.

  2. REPEAT facility. Report for May, June, July

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winn, C. B.

    1981-08-01

    The construction of the REPEAT facility, a test facility for passive and hybrid solar heating systems is reported. The development of a simulation program for envelope type passive solar systems, constructing an envelope test cell, collecting data to validate the program, and application of the program to determine the best envelope type design are discussed. A low cost monitoring system using a dedicated microprocessor system, an inexpensive, high accuracy A/D converter, and minimum system hardware is developed. A method to determine the average temperature and the average daily temperature variation inside a passively heated solar building is presented.

  3. Cataractogenesis after Repeat Laser in situ Keratomileusis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad M. Mansour

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available There has been the unsubstantiated clinical impression that laser refractive surgery accelerates cataract development along with solid experimental data about the cataractogenic effects of excimer laser treatment. We present the first documented case of significant cataract formation in a young myope after repeat excimer laser ablation necessitating phacoemulsification with a posterior chamber implant. Proposed explanations include focusing of the ablation wave on the posterior capsule (acoustic wave lens epithelial damage, photooxidative stress of the lens (ultraviolet and inflammatory oxidative stress, and corticosteroid-induced cataract (lens toxicity.

  4. Multiplicatively Repeated Non-Binary LDPC Codes

    CERN Document Server

    Kasai, Kenta; Poulliat, Charly; Sakaniwa, Kohichi

    2010-01-01

    We propose non-binary LDPC codes concatenated with multiplicative repetition codes. By multiplicatively repeating the (2,3)-regular non-binary LDPC mother code of rate 1/3, we construct rate-compatible codes of lower rates 1/6, 1/9, 1/12,... Surprisingly, such simple low-rate non-binary LDPC codes outperform the best low-rate binary LDPC codes so far. Moreover, we propose the decoding algorithm for the proposed codes, which can be decoded with almost the same computational complexity as that of the mother code.

  5. Improving repeated sprint ability in young elite soccer players: repeated shuttle sprints vs. explosive strength training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchheit, Martin; Mendez-Villanueva, Alberto; Delhomel, Gregory; Brughelli, Matt; Ahmaidi, Said

    2010-10-01

    To compare the effects of explosive strength (ExpS) vs. repeated shuttle sprint (RS) training on repeated sprint ability (RSA) in young elite soccer players, 15 elite male adolescents (14.5 ± 0.5 years) performed, in addition to their soccer training program, RS (n = 7) or ExpS (n = 8) training once a week for a total of 10 weeks. RS training consisted of 2-3 sets of 5-6 × 15- to 20-m repeated shuttle sprints interspersed with 14 seconds of passive or 23 seconds of active recovery (≈2 m·s⁻¹); ExpS training consisted of 4-6 series of 4-6 exercises (e.g., maximal unilateral countermovement jumps (CMJs), calf and squat plyometric jumps, and short sprints). Before and after training, performance was assessed by 10 and 30 m (10 and 30 m) sprint times, best (RSAbest) and mean (RSAmean) times on a repeated shuttle sprint ability test, a CMJ, and a hopping (Hop) test. After training, except for 10 m (p = 0.22), all performances were significantly improved in both groups (all p's repeated shuttle sprint test were only observed after RS training, whereas CMJ height was only increased after ExpS. Because RS and ExpS were equally efficient at enhancing maximal sprinting speed, RS training-induced improvements in RSA were likely more related to progresses in the ability to change direction.

  6. Repeated vitrification/warming of human sperm gives better results than repeated slow programmable freezing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Teraporn Vutyavanich; Worashorn Lattiwongsakorn; Waraporn Piromlertamorn; Sudarat Samchimchom

    2012-01-01

    In this study,we compared the effects of repeated freezing/thawing of human sperm by our in-house method of rapid freezing with slow programmable freezing.Sperm samples from 11 normozoospermic subjects were processed through density gradients and divided into three aliquots:non-frozen,rapid freezing and slow programmable freezing.Sperm in the rapid freezing group had better motility and viability than those in the slow freezing group (P<O.01) after the first,second and third cycles of freezing/thawing,but there was no difference in morphology.In the second experiment,rapid freezing was repeated three times in 20 subjects.The samples from each thawing cycle were evaluated for DNA fragmentation using the alkaline comet assay.DNA fragmentation began to increase considerably after the second cycle of freezing/thawing,but to a level that was not clinically important.In the third experiment,rapid freezing was done repeatedly in 10 subjects,until no motile sperm were observed after thawing.The median number of repeated freezing/thawing that yielded no motile sperm was seven (range:5-8,mean:6.8).In conclusion,we demonstrated that repeated freezing/thawing of processed semen using our rapid freezing method gave better results than standard slow programmable freezing.This method can help maximize the usage of precious cryopreserved sperm samples in assisted reproduction technology.

  7. HIV-1CRF07_BC毒株gp41NHR结构域N51的表达及结构分析%Expression, structure and antigenicity analysis of N51 derived from the N-terminal heptad repeat domain in gp41 of HIV-1 CRF07_BC strain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵继平; 姜世勃; 刘叔文

    2012-01-01

    Objective To express N51 derived from the N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) domain in gp41 of the HIV-1 CRF07_BC strain and analyze its molecular structure and antigenicity. Methods Overlapping PCR was used to amplify the DNA fragment encoding N51Fd gene, which was then subcloned into the vector pFUSE-hIgGl-Fc2. The construct was confirmed by DNA sequencing. The structure and antigenicity of the recombinant protein N51FdFc-BC were analyzed using bioinformatic software, circular dichroism, and Western blotting. Results A recombinant expression vector pFUSE/N51Fd-BC was successfully constructed. N51FdFc-BC recombinant protein with a relative molecular mass of about 35 000 was effectively expressed in mammalian 293T cells and could be recognized by rabbit antibodies against HIV-1 gp41 N/C peptides as shown by Western blotting. Bioinformatic analysis showed that the recombinant protein N51FdFc-BC, with a relative molecular mass of 34 315.1 and a PI of 7.59, formed a secondary structure of random coil to allow its interactions as an antigen with antibodies. Circular dichroism measurement confirmed the random coil structure of N51FdFc-BC protein. Conclusion The recombinant protein N51FdFc-BC has a random coil structure and can be used as an immunogen for development of HIV-1 subunit vaccine.%目的 对来源于HIV-1中国流行株CRF07 BC的包膜糖蛋白gp41 NHR结构域的N51进行表达和结构及抗原性分析.方法 运用重叠延伸PCR方法扩增出N51Fd基因,将其插入真核表达载体pFUSE-hIgG1-Fc2,并进行核苷酸序列测定.利用生物信息学软件、圆二色谱法、免疫印迹法对表达的N51FdFc-BC重组蛋白进行结构和抗原性分析.结果 成功构建pFUSE/N51Fd-BC表达载体,并在真核表达体系实现了目的蛋白的高效表达.免疫印迹结果显示该重组蛋白大小约为35 000,可与抗HIV-1 gp41 N/C多肽的抗体反应.生物信息学分析显示N51 FdFc-BC重组蛋白相对分子质量为34 315.1,等电点PI为7

  8. Investigation of a Quadruplex-Forming Repeat Sequence Highly Enriched in Xanthomonas and Nostoc sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Rehm

    Full Text Available In prokaryotes simple sequence repeats (SSRs with unit sizes of 1-5 nucleotides (nt are causative for phase and antigenic variation. Although an increased abundance of heptameric repeats was noticed in bacteria, reports about SSRs of 6-9 nt are rare. In particular G-rich repeat sequences with the propensity to fold into G-quadruplex (G4 structures have received little attention. In silico analysis of prokaryotic genomes show putative G4 forming sequences to be abundant. This report focuses on a surprisingly enriched G-rich repeat of the type GGGNATC in Xanthomonas and cyanobacteria such as Nostoc. We studied in detail the genomes of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris ATCC 33913 (Xcc, Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri str. 306 (Xac, and Nostoc sp. strain PCC7120 (Ana. In all three organisms repeats are spread all over the genome with an over-representation in non-coding regions. Extensive variation of the number of repetitive units was observed with repeat numbers ranging from two up to 26 units. However a clear preference for four units was detected. The strong bias for four units coincides with the requirement of four consecutive G-tracts for G4 formation. Evidence for G4 formation of the consensus repeat sequences was found in biophysical studies utilizing CD spectroscopy. The G-rich repeats are preferably located between aligned open reading frames (ORFs and are under-represented in coding regions or between divergent ORFs. The G-rich repeats are preferentially located within a distance of 50 bp upstream of an ORF on the anti-sense strand or within 50 bp from the stop codon on the sense strand. Analysis of whole transcriptome sequence data showed that the majority of repeat sequences are transcribed. The genetic loci in the vicinity of repeat regions show increased genomic stability. In conclusion, we introduce and characterize a special class of highly abundant and wide-spread quadruplex-forming repeat sequences in bacteria.

  9. Performance Degradation of the Repeated Recycled Aggregate Concrete with 70% Replacement of Three-generation Recycled Coarse Aggregate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Pinghua; ZHANG Xinxin; WU Junyong; WANG Xinjie

    2016-01-01

    The feasibility of using different generations recycled coarse aggregate (RCA) on structural concrete was fully evaluated by studying the performance of the recycled coarse aggregates and their corresponding concretes, the different generations of RCA were recycled by following the repeated mode of ‘concrete-waste concrete-coarse aggregate-concrete’. Moreover, the focus was on ‘three generations’ of repeated RCAs, the RCA was produced by crushing and regenerating the artiifcial accelerated degraded concrete, the process was designed to follow the nature degradation of the concrete with a coupling action of accelerated carbonation and bending load. The properties ofx-generation (x=1, 2 or 3) of repeated RCA were systematically investigated and the compressive and splitting tensile strengths of relating structural concretes(with 70% replacement ofx-generation of RCA) were studied accordingly. The results show a competent compressive and splitting tensile strength of 30 MPa at 28th day of structural concretes with all generations of repeated RAC. And the gradual degraded performance of the repeated RCAs was observed with an increased numbers of repetition (1﹥2﹥3 generations), the overall performances of all repeated RCAs fulifll the ClassⅢaccording to Chinese Standards GB25177-2010. Our gained insight demonstrates a feasibility of using at least 3 generations of repeated RCA for the production of normal structural concrete.

  10. Comparative genomics and molecular dynamics of DNA repeats in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Guy-Franck; Kerrest, Alix; Dujon, Bernard

    2008-12-01

    Repeated elements can be widely abundant in eukaryotic genomes, composing more than 50% of the human genome, for example. It is possible to classify repeated sequences into two large families, "tandem repeats" and "dispersed repeats." Each of these two families can be itself divided into subfamilies. Dispersed repeats contain transposons, tRNA genes, and gene paralogues, whereas tandem repeats contain gene tandems, ribosomal DNA repeat arrays, and satellite DNA, itself subdivided into satellites, minisatellites, and microsatellites. Remarkably, the molecular mechanisms that create and propagate dispersed and tandem repeats are specific to each class and usually do not overlap. In the present review, we have chosen in the first section to describe the nature and distribution of dispersed and tandem repeats in eukaryotic genomes in the light of complete (or nearly complete) available genome sequences. In the second part, we focus on the molecular mechanisms responsible for the fast evolution of two specific classes of tandem repeats: minisatellites and microsatellites. Given that a growing number of human neurological disorders involve the expansion of a particular class of microsatellites, called trinucleotide repeats, a large part of the recent experimental work on microsatellites has focused on these particular repeats, and thus we also review the current knowledge in this area. Finally, we propose a unified definition for mini- and microsatellites that takes into account their biological properties and try to point out new directions that should be explored in a near future on our road to understanding the genetics of repeated sequences.

  11. Labor union members play an OLG repeated game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandori, Michihiro; Obayashi, Shinya

    2014-07-22

    Humans are capable of cooperating with one another even when it is costly and a deviation provides an immediate gain. An important reason is that cooperation is reciprocated or rewarded and deviations are penalized in later stages. For cooperation to be sustainable, not only must rewards and penalties be strong enough but individuals should also have the right incentives to provide rewards and punishments. Codes of conduct with such properties have been studied extensively in game theory (as repeated game equilibria), and the literature on the evolution of cooperation shows how equilibrium behavior might emerge and proliferate in society. We found that community unions, a subclass of labor unions that admits individual affiliations, are ideal to corroborate these theories with reality, because (i) their activities are simple and (ii) they have a structure that closely resembles a theoretical model, the overlapping generations repeated game. A detailed case study of a community union revealed a possible equilibrium that can function under the very limited observability in the union. The equilibrium code of conduct appears to be a natural focal point based on simple heuristic reasoning. The union we studied was created out of necessity for cooperation, without knowing or anticipating how cooperation might be sustained. The union has successfully resolved about 3,000 labor disputes and created a number of offspring.

  12. Recursion Of Binary Space As A Foundation Of Repeatable Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Horne

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Every computation, including recursion, is based on natural philosophy. Our world may be expressed in terms of a binary logical space that contains functions that act simultaneously as objects and processes (operands and operators. This paper presents an outline of the results of research about that space and suggests routes for further inquiry. Binary logical space is generated sequentially from an origin in a standard coordinate system. At least one method exists to show that each of the resulting 16 functions repeats itself by repeatedly forward-feeding outputs of a function operating over two others as new operands of the original function until the original function appears as an output, thus behaving as an apparent homeostatic automaton. As any space of any dimension is composed of one or more of these functions, so the space is recursive, as well. Semantics gives meaning to recursive structures, computer programs and fundamental constituents of our universe being two examples. Such thoughts open inquiry into larger philosophical issues as free will and determinism.

  13. Extending Teach and Repeat to Pivoting Wheelchairs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Del Castillo

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper extends the teach-and-repeat paradigm that has been successful for the control of holonomic robots to nonholonomic wheelchairs which may undergo pivoting action over the course of their taught movement. Due to the nonholonomic nature of the vehicle kinematics, estimation is required -- in the example given herein, based upon video detection of wall-mounted cues -- both in the teaching and the tracking events. In order to accommodate motion that approaches pivoting action as well as motion that approaches straight-line action, the estimation equations of the Extended Kalman Filter and the control equations are formulated using two different definitions of a nontemporal independent variable. The paper motivates the need for pivoting action in real-life settings by reporting extensively on the abilities and limitations of estimation-based teach-and-repeat action where pivoting and near-pivoting action is disallowed. Following formulation of the equations in the near-pivot mode, the paper reports upon experiments where taught trajectories which entail a seamless mix of near-straight and near-pivot action are tracked.

  14. The Perpetual Repeater: an Educative Musical Experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Skriagina

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available To commemorate the 40th anniversary of the Music Undergraduate Program of the Universidad Pedagógica Nacional (National Pedagogic University, two musical events were planned: an original work written for choir, soloists and symphonic band, and an opera for children. As a result, the cantata ‘The Perpetual Repeater” has been created as an adaptation of a work named “50 Milions de Segons” (50 Millions of Seconds, staged by the CATANIA project of the Barcelona Servei Educatiu de L’Auditori. This work tells the story of those school teachers who, paradoxically enough repeat the same course year after year. After visiting L’Auditori of Barcelona to participate in the pedagogic musical work carried out with school children, we considered the possibility of developing an analogous project, in a similar sociocultural and educational environment, within our Music Undergraduate Program. So, this article deals with two fundamental moments which are essential to understand the educational work implemented with the ISPA students of sixth degree, as well as with a group of the program’s students: The Purpose, which describes in detail the planning of the musical work for children, and The Experience, in which the way the process of The Perpetual Repeater Cantatawas carried out is described.

  15. Airborne Radar Interferometric Repeat-Pass Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Scott; Michel, Thierry R.; Jones, Cathleen E.; Muellerschoen, Ronald J.; Chapman, Bruce D.; Fore, Alexander; Simard, Marc; Zebker, Howard A.

    2011-01-01

    Earth science research often requires crustal deformation measurements at a variety of time scales, from seconds to decades. Although satellites have been used for repeat-track interferometric (RTI) synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) mapping for close to 20 years, RTI is much more difficult to implement from an airborne platform owing to the irregular trajectory of the aircraft compared with microwave imaging radar wavelengths. Two basic requirements for robust airborne repeat-pass radar interferometry include the ability to fly the platform to a desired trajectory within a narrow tube and the ability to have the radar beam pointed in a desired direction to a fraction of a beam width. Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) is equipped with a precision auto pilot developed by NASA Dryden that allows the platform, a Gulfstream III, to nominally fly within a 5 m diameter tube and with an electronically scanned antenna to position the radar beam to a fraction of a beam width based on INU (inertial navigation unit) attitude angle measurements.

  16. Aggregating quantum repeaters for the quantum internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Koji; Kato, Go

    2017-09-01

    The quantum internet holds promise for accomplishing quantum teleportation and unconditionally secure communication freely between arbitrary clients all over the globe, as well as the simulation of quantum many-body systems. For such a quantum internet protocol, a general fundamental upper bound on the obtainable entanglement or secret key has been derived [K. Azuma, A. Mizutani, and H.-K. Lo, Nat. Commun. 7, 13523 (2016), 10.1038/ncomms13523]. Here we consider its converse problem. In particular, we present a universal protocol constructible from any given quantum network, which is based on running quantum repeater schemes in parallel over the network. For arbitrary lossy optical channel networks, our protocol has no scaling gap with the upper bound, even based on existing quantum repeater schemes. In an asymptotic limit, our protocol works as an optimal entanglement or secret-key distribution over any quantum network composed of practical channels such as erasure channels, dephasing channels, bosonic quantum amplifier channels, and lossy optical channels.

  17. Automated Planning in Repeated Adversarial Games

    CERN Document Server

    de Cote, Enrique Munoz; Sykulski, Adam M; Jennings, Nicholas R

    2012-01-01

    Game theory's prescriptive power typically relies on full rationality and/or self-play interactions. In contrast, this work sets aside these fundamental premises and focuses instead on heterogeneous autonomous interactions between two or more agents. Specifically, we introduce a new and concise representation for repeated adversarial (constant-sum) games that highlight the necessary features that enable an automated planing agent to reason about how to score above the game's Nash equilibrium, when facing heterogeneous adversaries. To this end, we present TeamUP, a model-based RL algorithm designed for learning and planning such an abstraction. In essence, it is somewhat similar to R-max with a cleverly engineered reward shaping that treats exploration as an adversarial optimization problem. In practice, it attempts to find an ally with which to tacitly collude (in more than two-player games) and then collaborates on a joint plan of actions that can consistently score a high utility in adversarial repeated gam...

  18. Chromosome-specific DNA Repeat Probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumgartner, Adolf; Weier, Jingly Fung; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    2006-03-16

    In research as well as in clinical applications, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has gained increasing popularity as a highly sensitive technique to study cytogenetic changes. Today, hundreds of commercially available DNA probes serve the basic needs of the biomedical research community. Widespread applications, however, are often limited by the lack of appropriately labeled, specific nucleic acid probes. We describe two approaches for an expeditious preparation of chromosome-specific DNAs and the subsequent probe labeling with reporter molecules of choice. The described techniques allow the preparation of highly specific DNA repeat probes suitable for enumeration of chromosomes in interphase cell nuclei or tissue sections. In addition, there is no need for chromosome enrichment by flow cytometry and sorting or molecular cloning. Our PCR-based method uses either bacterial artificial chromosomes or human genomic DNA as templates with {alpha}-satellite-specific primers. Here we demonstrate the production of fluorochrome-labeled DNA repeat probes specific for human chromosomes 17 and 18 in just a few days without the need for highly specialized equipment and without the limitation to only a few fluorochrome labels.

  19. Repeat-induced gene silencing in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrick, D; Fiering, S; Martin, D I; Whitelaw, E

    1998-01-01

    In both plants and Drosophila melanogaster, expression from a transgenic locus may be silenced when repeated transgene copies are arranged as a concatameric array. This repeat-induced gene silencing is frequently manifested as a decrease in the proportion of cells that express the transgene, resulting in a variegated pattern of expression. There is also some indication that, in transgenic mammals, the number of transgene copies within an array can exert a repressive influence on expression, with several mouse studies reporting a decrease in the level of expression per copy as copy number increases. However, because these studies compare different sites of transgene integration as well as arrays with different numbers of copies, the expression levels observed may be subject to varying position effects as well as the influence of the multicopy array. Here we describe use of the lox/Cre system of site-specific recombination to generate transgenic mouse lines in which different numbers of a transgene are present at the same chromosomal location, thereby eliminating the contribution of position effects and allowing analysis of the effect of copy number alone on transgene silencing. Reduction in copy number results in a marked increase in expression of the transgene and is accompanied by decreased chromatin compaction and decreased methylation at the transgene locus. These findings establish that the presence of multiple homologous copies of a transgene within a concatameric array can have a repressive effect upon gene expression in mammalian systems.

  20. Crack Propagation in a Toughened Epoxy Adhesive under Repeated Impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian A. Ashcroft

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Adhesives are being increasingly used in structural applications, especially in aerospace, automotive and naval structures, making their structural integrity an important issue. In-service loading histories of such structures usually contain low-energy impacts, repetition of which can significantly affect their performance. This paper deals with the behaviour of the toughened epoxy adhesive FM73 under repeated impacts, known as impact fatigue. Izod impact fatigue tests were performed on FM73 specimens in order to study the evolution of damage and to characterise this via measurable parameters, such as the maximum force and the contact time. A finite element model was developed to simulate the impact tests and this was used to calculate the dynamic strain energy release rate, which was compared with that determined using a simple analytical method. A relationship between the maximum dynamic strain energy release rate and impact fatigue crack growth rate was established that was used as the basis of an impact fatigue crack growth law.

  1. Discrepancies in reporting the CAG repeat lengths for Huntington's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quarrell, Oliver W; Handley, Olivia; O'Donovan, Kirsty

    2011-01-01

    Huntington's disease results from a CAG repeat expansion within the Huntingtin gene; this is measured routinely in diagnostic laboratories. The European Huntington's Disease Network REGISTRY project centrally measures CAG repeat lengths on fresh samples; these were compared with the original...

  2. Myotonin protein-kinase [AGC]n trinucleotide repeat in seven nonhuman primates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novelli, G.; Sineo, L.; Pontieri, E. [Catholic Univ. of Rome (Italy)]|[Univ. of Milan (Italy)]|[Univ. Florence (Italy)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is due to a genomic instability of a trinucleotide [AGC]n motif, located at the 3{prime} UTR region of a protein-kinase gene (myotonin protein kinase, MT-PK). The [AGC] repeat is meiotically and mitotically unstable, and it is directly related to the manifestations of the disorder. Although a gene dosage effect of the MT-PK has been demonstrated n DM muscle, the mechanism(s) by which the intragenic repeat expansion leads to disease is largely unknown. This non-standard mutational event could reflect an evolutionary mechanism widespread among animal genomes. We have isolated and sequenced the complete 3{prime}UTR region of the MT-PK gene in seven primates (macaque, orangutan, gorilla, chimpanzee, gibbon, owl monkey, saimiri), and examined by comparative sequence nucleotide analysis the [AGC]n intragenic repeat and the surrounding nucleotides. The genomic organization, including the [AGC]n repeat structure, was conserved in all examined species, excluding the gibbon (Hylobates agilis), in which the [AGC]n upstream sequence (GGAA) is replaced by a GA dinucleotide. The number of [AGC]n in the examined species ranged between 7 (gorilla) and 13 repeats (owl monkeys), with a polymorphism informative content (PIC) similar to that observed in humans. These results indicate that the 3{prime}UTR [AGC] repeat within the MT-PK gene is evolutionarily conserved, supporting that this region has important regulatory functions.

  3. Repeatability Using Automatic Tracing with Canon OCT- HS100 and Zeiss Cirrus HD-OCT 5000.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rune Brautaset

    Full Text Available Optical coherence tomography (OCT, can be used in clinical practice to provide high resolution cross-sectional images of the retina, optic disc and macula structure. These measurements can be useful for early detection, diagnosis, monitoring and treatment guidance for retinal diseases. Therefore, repeatability of measurements in OCT is of great importance.Macula and optic disc parameters from the right eye of 30 healthy subjects were obtained twice with the Canon OCT-HS100 and Zeiss Cirrus HD-OCT 5000. Repeatability was evaluated by use of the coefficient of repeatability (CR and the coefficient of repeatability as a percentage of the mean (CR%, and the obtained measurements were compared between the instruments.CR% of optic disc parameters ranged between 0.90 and 22.22% and 0.00 and 16.00% with the Canon and Zeiss OCT respectively. For macular parameters CR% ranged between 0.62 and 2.81% and 0.99 and 1.81% with the Canon and Zeiss OCT respectively. No statistical difference could be found when comparing the CR of all macular and disc measurements between the instruments. Compared to our previously published data repeatability has significantly improved with the inclusion of automatic tracking systems with both the Canon and Zeiss OCT.Automatic tracking function improves repeatability in both Canon OCT-HS100 and Zeiss Cirrus HD-OCT 5000. However, measurements generated by the two instruments are still not interchangeable.

  4. An ancient repeat sequence in the ATP synthase beta-subunit gene of forcipulate sea stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foltz, David W

    2007-11-01

    A novel repeat sequence with a conserved secondary structure is described from two nonadjacent introns of the ATP synthase beta-subunit gene in sea stars of the order Forcipulatida (Echinodermata: Asteroidea). The repeat is present in both introns of all forcipulate sea stars examined, which suggests that it is an ancient feature of this gene (with an approximate age of 200 Mya). Both stem and loop regions show high levels of sequence constraint when compared to flanking nonrepetitive intronic regions. The repeat was also detected in (1) the family Pterasteridae, order Velatida and (2) the family Korethrasteridae, order Velatida. The repeat was not detected in (1) the family Echinasteridae, order Spinulosida, (2) the family Astropectinidae, order Paxillosida, (3) the family Solasteridae, order Velatida, or (4) the family Goniasteridae, order Valvatida. The repeat lacks similarity to published sequences in unrestricted GenBank searches, and there are no significant open reading frames in the repeat or in the flanking intron sequences. Comparison via parametric bootstrapping to a published phylogeny based on 4.2 kb of nuclear and mitochondrial sequence for a subset of these species allowed the null hypothesis of a congruent phylogeny to be rejected for each repeat, when compared separately to the published phylogeny. In contrast, the flanking nonrepetitive sequences in each intron yielded separate phylogenies that were each congruent with the published phylogeny. In four species, the repeat in one or both introns has apparently experienced gene conversion. The two introns also show a correlated pattern of nucleotide substitutions, even after excluding the putative cases of gene conversion.

  5. Quasar Variability Measurements With SDSS Repeated Imaging and POSS Data

    CERN Document Server

    Ivezic, Z; Juric, M; Anderson, S; Hall, P B; Richards, G T; Rockosi, C M; Vanden Berk, Daniel E; Turner, E L; Knapp, G R; Gunn, J E; Schlegel, D J; Strauss, M A; Schneider, D P

    2004-01-01

    We analyze the properties of quasar variability using repeated SDSS imaging data in five UV-to-far red photometric bands, accurate to 0.02 mag, for 13,000 spectroscopically confirmed quasars. The observed time lags span the range from 3 hours to over 3 years, and constrain the quasar variability for rest-frame time lags of up to two years, and at rest-frame wavelengths from 1000 Ang. to 6000 Ang. We demonstrate that 66,000 SDSS measurements of magnitude differences can be described within the measurement noise by a simple function of only three free parameters. The addition of POSS data constrains the long-term behavior of quasar variability and provides evidence for a turn-over in the structure function. This turn-over indicates that the characteristic time scale for optical variability of quasars is of the order 1 year.

  6. Cytogenetic studies in couples experiencing repeated pregnancy losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Braekeleer, M; Dao, T N

    1990-07-01

    A computerized database generated from the literature on cytogenetic studies in couples experiencing repeated pregnancy losses has been set up at the University of Quebec at Chicoutimi. At the present time, it contains data on 22,199 couples (44,398 individuals). The statistical analyses showed a relationship between the distribution of the chromosome abnormalities and the number of abortions. An uneven distribution of the chromosomal structural rearrangements according to the sex of the carrier was found (P less than 0.05). Overall, 4.7% of the couples ascertained for two or more spontaneous abortions included one carrier. It also appeared that only translocations (both reciprocal and Robertsonian) and inversions were associated with a higher risk of pregnancy wastage. Therefore, genetic counselling should be offered to these couples and investigations performed on their extended families.

  7. The chromatin remodeller ATRX: a repeat offender in human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clynes, David; Higgs, Douglas R; Gibbons, Richard J

    2013-09-01

    The regulation of chromatin structure is of paramount importance for a variety of fundamental nuclear processes, including gene expression, DNA repair, replication, and recombination. The ATP-dependent chromatin-remodelling factor ATRX (α thalassaemia/mental retardation X-linked) has emerged as a key player in each of these processes. Exciting recent developments suggest that ATRX plays a variety of key roles at tandem repeat sequences within the genome, including the deposition of a histone variant, prevention of replication fork stalling, and the suppression of a homologous recombination-based pathway of telomere maintenance. Here, we provide a mechanistic overview of the role of ATRX in each of these processes, and propose how they may be connected to give rise to seemingly disparate human diseases.

  8. 47 CFR 90.247 - Mobile repeater stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mobile repeater stations. 90.247 Section 90.247... MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Non-Voice and Other Specialized Operations § 90.247 Mobile repeater stations. A... repeater to extend the communications range of hand-carried units subject to the following: (a)...

  9. Polymorphic GGC repeat differentially regulates human reelin gene expression levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persico, A M; Levitt, P; Pimenta, A F

    2006-10-01

    The human gene encoding Reelin (RELN), a pivotal protein in neurodevelopment, includes a polymorphic GGC repeat in its 5' untranslated region (UTR). CHO cells transfected with constructs encompassing the RELN 5'UTR with 4-to-13 GGC repeats upstream of the luciferase reporter gene show declining luciferase activity with increasing GGC repeat number (P autism.

  10. CGG repeat in the FMR1 gene: Size matters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A. Willemsen (Ralph); G.J. Levenga (Josien); B.A. Oostra (Ben)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe FMR1 gene contains a CGG repeat present in the 5'-untranslated region which can be unstable upon transmission to the next generation. The repeat is up to 55 CGGs long in the normal population. In patients with fragile X syndrome (FXS), a repeat length exceeding 200 CGGs (full

  11. Alternative conformations of the Tau repeat domain in complex with an engineered binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grüning, Clara S R; Mirecka, Ewa A; Klein, Antonia N; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Willbold, Dieter; Marino, Stephen F; Stoldt, Matthias; Hoyer, Wolfgang

    2014-08-15

    The aggregation of Tau into paired helical filaments is involved in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer disease. The aggregation reaction is characterized by conformational conversion of the repeat domain, which partially adopts a cross-β-structure in the resulting amyloid-like fibrils. Here, we report the selection and characterization of an engineered binding protein, β-wrapin TP4, targeting the Tau repeat domain. TP4 was obtained by phage display using the four-repeat Tau construct K18ΔK280 as a target. TP4 binds K18ΔK280 as well as the longest isoform of human Tau, hTau40, with nanomolar affinity. NMR spectroscopy identified two alternative TP4-binding sites in the four-repeat domain, with each including two hexapeptide motifs with high β-sheet propensity. Both binding sites contain the aggregation-determining PHF6 hexapeptide within repeat 3. In addition, one binding site includes the PHF6* hexapeptide within repeat 2, whereas the other includes the corresponding hexapeptide Tau(337-342) within repeat 4, denoted PHF6**. Comparison of TP4-binding with Tau aggregation reveals that the same regions of Tau are involved in both processes. TP4 inhibits Tau aggregation at substoichiometric concentration, demonstrating that it interferes with aggregation nucleation. This study provides residue-level insight into the interaction of Tau with an aggregation inhibitor and highlights the structural flexibility of Tau. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Repeat Testing Effects on Credentialing Exams: Are Repeaters Misinformed or Uninformed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Richard A.; Raymond, Mark R.; Haist, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    To mitigate security concerns and unfair score gains, credentialing programs routinely administer new test material to examinees retesting after an initial failing attempt. Counterintuitively, a small but growing body of recent research suggests that repeating the identical form does not create an unfair advantage. This study builds upon and…

  13. Who Repeats Algebra, and How Does Initial Performance Relate to Improvement When the Course Is Repeated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Anthony; Jaquet, Karina; Finkelstein, Neal

    2016-01-01

    The information provided in this report shows how students perform when they repeat algebra I and how the level of improvement varies depending on initial course performance and the academic measure (course grades or CST scores). This information can help inform decisions and policies regarding whether and under what circumstances students should…

  14. Hybrid quantum repeater using bright coherent light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loock, P; Ladd, T D; Sanaka, K; Yamaguchi, F; Nemoto, Kae; Munro, W J; Yamamoto, Y

    2006-06-23

    We describe a quantum repeater protocol for long-distance quantum communication. In this scheme, entanglement is created between qubits at intermediate stations of the channel by using a weak dispersive light-matter interaction and distributing the outgoing bright coherent-light pulses among the stations. Noisy entangled pairs of electronic spin are then prepared with high success probability via homodyne detection and postselection. The local gates for entanglement purification and swapping are deterministic and measurement-free, based upon the same coherent-light resources and weak interactions as for the initial entanglement distribution. Finally, the entanglement is stored in a nuclear-spin-based quantum memory. With our system, qubit-communication rates approaching 100 Hz over 1280 km with fidelities near 99% are possible for reasonable local gate errors.

  15. Potential of repeated polymer well treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakatos, I.; Lakatos-Szabo, J. (Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary)); Munkacsi, I.; Troemboeczki, S.

    1993-11-01

    This paper analyzes field results obtained by routine application of a polymer/silicate well treatment technique at the Algyo-2 field in Hungary. First, the reservoir is described briefly; then, the basic concept of the method is outlined. Reference is made to the multifunctioning chemical mechanism of gelation and the favorable rheological properties of the treating fluids that jointly result in a highly selective placement and an efficient permeability reduction in the target reservoir space. Application of the method 17 times in 16 producing wells yielded more than 90,000 Mg of incremental oil production. Typical well behaviors also are illustrated. Finally, the potential of repeated treatments is discussed, taking laboratory and field results into account.

  16. Quantum repeaters using continuous-variable teleportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Josephine; Ralph, T. C.

    2017-02-01

    Quantum optical states are fragile and can become corrupted when passed through a lossy communication channel. Unlike for classical signals, optical amplifiers cannot be used to recover quantum signals. Quantum repeaters have been proposed as a way of reducing errors and hence increasing the range of quantum communications. Current protocols target specific discrete encodings, for example quantum bits encoded on the polarization of single photons. We introduce a more general approach that can reduce the effect of loss on any quantum optical encoding, including those based on continuous variables such as the field amplitudes. We show that in principle the protocol incurs a resource cost that scales polynomially with distance. We analyze the simplest implementation and find that while its range is limited it can still achieve useful improvements in the distance over which quantum entanglement of field amplitudes can be distributed.

  17. Statistical Properties of repeating FRB 121102

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, F Y

    2016-01-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are millisecond-duration radio signals possibly occurring at cosmological distances. However the physical model of FRBs is mystery, many models have been proposed. Here we study the frequency distributions of peak flux, fluence, duration and waiting time for repeating FRB 121102. The cumulative distributions of peak flux, fluence and duration show power-law forms. The waiting time distribution also shows power-law distribution, and is consistent with a non-stationary Poisson process. We also use the statistical results to test the proposed models for FRBs. Comparing with the model predications, we find that the theoretical models proposed by Dai et al. (2016) and Katz (2016) are favored. These distributions are consistent with the predications from avalanche models of driven systems.

  18. [Advances in clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lili; He, Jin; Wang, Jieping

    2011-08-01

    The recently discovered Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat (CRISPRs) can protect bacteria and archaea with adaptive and heritable defense systems against the invasion of phage- and plasmid- associated mobile genetic elements. Here, we review the structure, diversity, mechanism of interference and self versus non-self discrimination of CRISPR systems. We also discuss the potential applications of this novel interference system.

  19. HOT1 is a mammalian direct telomere repeat-binding protein contributing to telomerase recruitment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kappei, D.; Butter, F.; Benda, C.; Scheibe, M.; Draskovic, Irena; Stevense, M.; Novo, C.L.; Basquin, C.; Araki, M.; Araki, K.; Krastev, D.B.; Kittler, R.; Jessberger, R.; Londono-Vallejo, J.A.; Mann, M.; Buchholz, F.

    2013-01-01

    Telomeres are repetitive DNA structures that, together with the shelterin and the CST complex, protect the ends of chromosomes. Telomere shortening is mitigated in stem and cancer cells through the de novo addition of telomeric repeats by telomerase. Telomere elongation requires the delivery of the

  20. Mortality estimates from repeated visual censuses of a parrotfish (Sparisoma viride) population : Demographic implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanRooij, JM; Videler, JJ

    1997-01-01

    Repeated visual censuses of different categories (juveniles, females, territorial and group males) of the stoplight parrotfish (Sparisoma viride, a protogynous hermaphrodite) over a 3-year period indicated a relatively stable size and structure of the adult population. This allowed estimates of size

  1. Structural Snapshots of Heparin Depolymerization by Heparin Lyase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Young-Hyun; Garron, Marie-Line; Kim, Hye-Yeon; Kim, Wan-Seok; Zhang, Zhenqing; Ryu, Kyeong-Seok; Shaya, David; Xiao, Zhongping; Cheong, Chaejoon; Kim, Yeong Shik; Linhardt, Robert J.; Jeon, Young Ho; Cygler, Miroslaw; (SNU); (Korea BSI); (McGill); (UST-Korea); (Rensselaer)

    2010-01-12

    Heparin lyase I (heparinase I) specifically depolymerizes heparin, cleaving the glycosidic linkage next to iduronic acid. Here, we show the crystal structures of heparinase I from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron at various stages of the reaction with heparin oligosaccharides before and just after cleavage and product disaccharide. The heparinase I structure is comprised of a {beta}-jellyroll domain harboring a long and deep substrate binding groove and an unusual thumb-resembling extension. This thumb, decorated with many basic residues, is of particular importance in activity especially on short heparin oligosaccharides. Unexpected structural similarity of the active site to that of heparinase II with an ({alpha}/{alpha}){sub 6} fold is observed. Mutational studies and kinetic analysis of this enzyme provide insights into the catalytic mechanism, the substrate recognition, and processivity.

  2. Simple sequence repeats in mycobacterial genomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vattipally B Sreenu; Pankaj Kumar; Javaregowda Nagaraju; Hampapathalu A Nagarajaram

    2007-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) or microsatellites are the repetitive nucleotide sequences of motifs of length 1–6 bp. They are scattered throughout the genomes of all the known organisms ranging from viruses to eukaryotes. Microsatellites undergo mutations in the form of insertions and deletions (INDELS) of their repeat units with some bias towards insertions that lead to microsatellite tract expansion. Although prokaryotic genomes derive some plasticity due to microsatellite mutations they have in-built mechanisms to arrest undue expansions of microsatellites and one such mechanism is constituted by post-replicative DNA repair enzymes MutL, MutH and MutS. The mycobacterial genomes lack these enzymes and as a null hypothesis one could expect these genomes to harbour many long tracts. It is therefore interesting to analyse the mycobacterial genomes for distribution and abundance of microsatellites tracts and to look for potentially polymorphic microsatellites. Available mycobacterial genomes, Mycobacterium avium, M. leprae, M. bovis and the two strains of M. tuberculosis (CDC1551 and H37Rv) were analysed for frequencies and abundance of SSRs. Our analysis revealed that the SSRs are distributed throughout the mycobacterial genomes at an average of 220–230 SSR tracts per kb. All the mycobacterial genomes contain few regions that are conspicuously denser or poorer in microsatellites compared to their expected genome averages. The genomes distinctly show scarcity of long microsatellites despite the absence of a post-replicative DNA repair system. Such severe scarcity of long microsatellites could arise as a result of strong selection pressures operating against long and unstable sequences although influence of GC-content and role of point mutations in arresting microsatellite expansions can not be ruled out. Nonetheless, the long tracts occasionally found in coding as well as non-coding regions may account for limited genome plasticity in these genomes.

  3. Repeat Gamma Knife surgery for vestibular schwannomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonneville, Sarah; Delbrouck, Carine; Renier, Cécile; Devriendt, Daniel; Massager, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gamma Knife (GK) surgery is a recognized treatment option for the management of small to medium-sized vestibular schwannoma (VS) associated with high-tumor control and low morbidity. When a radiosurgical treatment fails to stop tumor growth, repeat GK surgery can be proposed in selected cases. Methods: A series of 27 GK retreatments was performed in 25 patients with VS; 2 patients underwent three procedures. The median time interval between GK treatments was 45 months. The median margin dose used for the first, second, and third GK treatments was 12 Gy, 12 Gy, and 14 Gy, respectively. Six patients (4 patients for the second irradiation and 2 patients for the third irradiation) with partial tumor regrowth were treated only on the growing part of the tumor using a median margin dose of 13 Gy. The median tumor volume was 0.9, 2.3, and 0.7 cc for the first, second, and third treatments, respectively. Stereotactic positron emission tomography (PET) guidance was used for dose planning in 6 cases. Results: Mean follow-up duration was 46 months (range 24–110). At the last follow-up, 85% of schwannomas were controlled. The tumor volume decreased, remained unchanged, or increased after retreatment in 15, 8, and 4 cases, respectively. Four patients had PET during follow-up, and all showed a significant metabolic decrease of the tumor. Hearing was not preserved after retreatment in any patients. New facial or trigeminal palsy did not occur after retreatment. Conclusions: Our results support the long-term efficacy and low morbidity of repeat GK treatment for selected patients with tumor growth after initial treatment. PMID:26500799

  4. The excess of small inverted repeats in prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladoukakis, Emmanuel D; Eyre-Walker, Adam

    2008-09-01

    Recent analyses have shown that there is a large excess of perfect inverted repeats in many prokaryotic genomes but not in eukaryotic ones. This difference could be due to a genuine difference between prokaryotes and eukaryotes or to differences in the methods and types of data analyzed--full genome versus protein coding sequences. We used simulations to show that the method used previously tends to underestimate the expected number of inverted repeats. However, this bias is not large and cannot explain the excess of inverted repeats observed in real data. In contrast, our method is unbiased. When both methods are applied to bacterial protein coding sequences they both detect an excess of inverted repeats, which is much lower than previously reported in whole prokaryotic genomes. This suggests that the reported large excess of inverted repeats is due to repeats found in intergenic regions. These repeats could be due to transcription factor binding sites, or other types of repetitive DNA, on opposite strands of the DNA sequence. In contrast, the smaller, but significant, excess of inverted repeats that we report in protein coding sequences may be due to sequence-directed mutagenesis (SDM). SDM is a process where one copy of a small, imperfect, inverted repeat corrects the other copy via strand misalignment, resulting in a perfect repeat and a series of mutations. We show by simulation that even very low levels of SDM, relative to the rate of point mutation, can generate a substantial excess of inverted repeats.

  5. Role of DNA Polymerases in Repeat-Mediated Genome Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kartik A. Shah

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Expansions of simple DNA repeats cause numerous hereditary diseases in humans. We analyzed the role of DNA polymerases in the instability of Friedreich’s ataxia (GAAn repeats in a yeast experimental system. The elementary step of expansion corresponded to ∼160 bp in the wild-type strain, matching the size of Okazaki fragments in yeast. This step increased when DNA polymerase α was mutated, suggesting a link between the scale of expansions and Okazaki fragment size. Expandable repeats strongly elevated the rate of mutations at substantial distances around them, a phenomenon we call repeat-induced mutagenesis (RIM. Notably, defects in the replicative DNA polymerases δ and ∊ strongly increased rates for both repeat expansions and RIM. The increases in repeat-mediated instability observed in DNA polymerase δ mutants depended on translesion DNA polymerases. We conclude that repeat expansions and RIM are two sides of the same replicative mechanism.

  6. Infant macronutrient composition is associated with differences in cardiovascular structures and function in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Hooven, Edith H; de Jonge, Layla L; Kiefte-de Jong, Jessica C; Raat, Hein; Villamor, Eduardo; Hofman, Albert; Felix, Janine F; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Moll, Henriette A; Franco, Oscar H

    2013-12-01

    Early-life nutrition may influence cardiovascular development. Not much is known about the associations between dietary composition and cardiovascular risk factors in childhood. We examined the associations of infant macronutrient intake with cardiovascular structures and function in 2882 children participating in a prospective, population-based cohort study. Information on macronutrient intake at the age of 14 mo was obtained from food-frequency questionnaires completed by a parent. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV), fractional shortening, and left cardiac structures (left atrial diameter, aortic root diameter, and left ventricular mass) were measured at the age of 6 y. Linear regression analyses were performed by using energy-adjusted macronutrient intakes, adjusted for maternal, child, and other dietary factors. Higher total fat intake was associated with higher carotid-femoral PWV (P-trend = 0.03), whereas higher intakes of total carbohydrate and mono- and disaccharides were associated with lower carotid-femoral PWV. No consistent associations were observed for macronutrient intake with systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, fractional shortening, and aortic root diameter. Higher intakes of total, saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated fat were associated with lower left atrial diameter (all P-trend ≤ 0.01), and higher total carbohydrate and mono- and disaccharide intakes were associated with higher left atrial diameter (P-trend cardiovascular structures and function in childhood. Further studies are needed to investigate whether these differences have consequences for the risk of future cardiovascular disease.

  7. Human mitochondrial mTERF wraps around DNA through a left-handed superhelical tandem repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Menéndez, Nereida; Fernández-Millán, Pablo; Rubio-Cosials, Anna; Arnan, Carme; Montoya, Julio; Jacobs, Howard T; Bernadó, Pau; Coll, Miquel; Usón, Isabel; Solà, Maria

    2010-07-01

    The regulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) processes is slowly being characterized at a structural level. We present here crystal structures of human mitochondrial regulator mTERF, a transcription termination factor also implicated in replication pausing, in complex with double-stranded DNA oligonucleotides containing the tRNA(Leu)(UUR) gene sequence. mTERF comprises nine left-handed helical tandem repeats that form a left-handed superhelix, the Zurdo domain.

  8. Preferential Nucleosome Assembly at DNA Triplet Repeats from the Myotonic Dystrophy Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuh-Hwa; Amirhaeri, Sorour; Kang, Seongman; Wells, Robert D.; Griffith, Jack D.

    1994-07-01

    The expansion of CTG repeats in DNA occurs in or near genes involved in several human diseases, including myotonic dystrophy and Huntington's disease. Nucleosomes, the basic structural element of chromosomes, consist of 146 base pairs of DNA coiled about an octamer of histone proteins and mediate general transcriptional repression. Electron microscopy was used to examine in vitro the nucleosome assembly of DNA containing repeating CTG triplets. The efficiency of nucleosome formation increased with expanded triplet blocks, suggesting that such blocks may repress transcription through the creation of stable nucleosomes.

  9. Repeat Purchase Intention of Starbucks Consumers in Indonesia: A Green Brand Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naili Farida

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study develops and tests the repeat purchase intention model (with a green brand approach. The model considers four determinants; perceived image, satisfaction, trust, and attitude. The model is tested using data and a survey of 203 Starbucks customers in Indonesia. The analysis was carried out by employing Structural Equation Modeling. The data was processed with AMOS 21. The results confirm that the company’s green brand image is positively and significantly related to consumer satisfaction, trust, and attitude. On the other hand, consumer satisfaction and trust are shown to have insignificant influence on repeat purchase intention.

  10. Heparan sulfate chains from glypican and syndecans bind the Hep II domain of fibronectin similarly despite minor structural differences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tumova, S; Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    2000-01-01

    of syndecan-4 correlates with a distinct heparan sulfate structure, we have analyzed heparan sulfate chains from the different surface proteoglycans of a single fibroblast strain and compared their ability to bind the Hep II domain of fibronectin, a ligand known to promote focal adhesion formation through...... syndecan-4. Despite distinct molecular masses of glypican and syndecan glycosaminoglycans and minor differences in disaccharide composition and sulfation pattern, the overall proportion and distribution of sulfated regions and the affinity for the Hep II domain were similar. Therefore, adhesion regulation...

  11. Repeat Colonoscopy within 6 Months after Initial Outpatient Colonoscopy in Ontario: A Population-Based Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Paszat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The goal of this study is to examine utilization of early repeat colonoscopy ≤ 6 months after an index procedure. Methods. We identified persons having repeat colonoscopy ≤ 6 months following outpatient colonoscopy without prior colonoscopy ≤ 5 years or prior diagnosis of colorectal cancer (CRC. We modeled repeat colonoscopy using a generalized estimating equation with an exchangeable correlation structure to account for clustering of patients by endoscopist. Results. The population included 334,663 persons, 7,892 (2.36% of whom had an early repeat colonoscopy within 6 months. Overall, endoscopist prior year colonoscopy volume was inversely related to repeat ≤ 6 months. Repeat colonoscopy ≤ 6 months varied by the clinical setting of the index colonoscopy (adjusted OR = 1.41 (95% CI 1.29–1.55 at nonhospital facilities compared to teaching or community hospitals. Among those who had polypectomy or biopsy, the adjusted OR for early repeat ≤ 6 months was elevated among those whose index colonoscopy was at a nonhospital facility (OR 1.44, 95% CI 1.30–1.60, compared to those at a teaching hospital or community hospital. Conclusions. Repeat colonoscopy ≤ 6 months after an index procedure is associated with the clinical setting of the index colonoscopy.

  12. REPdenovo: Inferring De Novo Repeat Motifs from Short Sequence Reads.

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    Chong Chu

    Full Text Available Repeat elements are important components of eukaryotic genomes. One limitation in our understanding of repeat elements is that most analyses rely on reference genomes that are incomplete and often contain missing data in highly repetitive regions that are difficult to assemble. To overcome this problem we develop a new method, REPdenovo, which assembles repeat sequences directly from raw shotgun sequencing data. REPdenovo can construct various types of repeats that are highly repetitive and have low sequence divergence within copies. We show that REPdenovo is substantially better than existing methods both in terms of the number and the completeness of the repeat sequences that it recovers. The key advantage of REPdenovo is that it can reconstruct long repeats from sequence reads. We apply the method to human data and discover a number of potentially new repeats sequences that have been missed by previous repeat annotations. Many of these sequences are incorporated into various parasite genomes, possibly because the filtering process for host DNA involved in the sequencing of the parasite genomes failed to exclude the host derived repeat sequences. REPdenovo is a new powerful computational tool for annotating genomes and for addressing questions regarding the evolution of repeat families. The software tool, REPdenovo, is available for download at https://github.com/Reedwarbler/REPdenovo.

  13. The CRISPRdb database and tools to display CRISPRs and to generate dictionaries of spacers and repeats

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    Vergnaud Gilles

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Archeae and Bacteria, the repeated elements called CRISPRs for "clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats" are believed to participate in the defence against viruses. Short sequences called spacers are stored in-between repeated elements. In the current model, motifs comprising spacers and repeats may target an invading DNA and lead to its degradation through a proposed mechanism similar to RNA interference. Analysis of intra-species polymorphism shows that new motifs (one spacer and one repeated element are added in a polarised fashion. Although their principal characteristics have been described, a lot remains to be discovered on the way CRISPRs are created and evolve. As new genome sequences become available it appears necessary to develop automated scanning tools to make available CRISPRs related information and to facilitate additional investigations. Description We have produced a program, CRISPRFinder, which identifies CRISPRs and extracts the repeated and unique sequences. Using this software, a database is constructed which is automatically updated monthly from newly released genome sequences. Additional tools were created to allow the alignment of flanking sequences in search for similarities between different loci and to build dictionaries of unique sequences. To date, almost six hundred CRISPRs have been identified in 475 published genomes. Two Archeae out of thirty-seven and about half of Bacteria do not possess a CRISPR. Fine analysis of repeated sequences strongly supports the current view that new motifs are added at one end of the CRISPR adjacent to the putative promoter. Conclusion It is hoped that availability of a public database, regularly updated and which can be queried on the web will help in further dissecting and understanding CRISPR structure and flanking sequences evolution. Subsequent analyses of the intra-species CRISPR polymorphism will be facilitated by CRISPRFinder and the

  14. Tandem repeat markers as novel diagnostic tools for high resolution fingerprinting of Wolbachia

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    Riegler Markus

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Strains of the endosymbiotic bacterium Wolbachia pipientis are extremely diverse both genotypically and in terms of their induced phenotypes in invertebrate hosts. Despite extensive molecular characterisation of Wolbachia diversity, little is known about the actual genomic diversity within or between closely related strains that group tightly on the basis of existing gene marker systems, including Multiple Locus Sequence Typing (MLST. There is an urgent need for higher resolution fingerprinting markers of Wolbachia for studies of population genetics, horizontal transmission and experimental evolution. Results The genome of the wMel Wolbachia strain that infects Drosophila melanogaster contains inter- and intragenic tandem repeats that may evolve through expansion or contraction. We identified hypervariable regions in wMel, including intergenic Variable Number Tandem Repeats (VNTRs, and genes encoding ankyrin (ANK repeat domains. We amplified these markers from 14 related Wolbachia strains belonging to supergroup A and were successful in differentiating size polymorphic alleles. Because of their tandemly repeated structure and length polymorphism, the markers can be used in a PCR-diagnostic multilocus typing approach, analogous to the Multiple Locus VNTR Analysis (MLVA established for many other bacteria and organisms. The isolated markers are highly specific for supergroup A and not informative for other supergroups. However, in silico analysis of completed genomes from other supergroups revealed the presence of tandem repeats that are variable and could therefore be useful for typing target strains. Conclusions Wolbachia genomes contain inter- and intragenic tandem repeats that evolve through expansion or contraction. A selection of polymorphic tandem repeats is a novel and useful PCR diagnostic extension to the existing MLST typing system of Wolbachia, as it allows rapid and inexpensive high-throughput fingerprinting of

  15. Repeated-sprint and effort ability in rugby league players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Rich D; Gabbett, Tim J

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to (a) investigate the influence of tackling on repeated-sprint performance; (b) determine whether repeated-sprint ability (RSA) and repeated-effort ability (REA) are 2 distinct qualities; and (c) assess the test-retest reliability of repeated-sprint and repeated-effort tests in rugby league. Twelve rugby league players performed a repeated-sprint (12 × 20-m sprints performed on a 20-second cycle) and a repeated-effort (12 × 20-m sprints with intermittent tackling, performed on a 20-second cycle) test 7 days apart. The test-retest reliability of these tests was also established. Heart rate and rating of perceived exertion were recorded throughout the tests. There was a significantly greater (p ≤ 0.05) and large effect size (ES) differences for total sprint time (ES = 1.19), average heart rate (ES = 1.64), peak heart rate (ES = 1.35), and perceived exertion (ES = 3.39) for the repeated-effort test compared with the repeated-sprint test. A large difference (ES = 1.02, p = 0.06) was detected for percentage decrement between the 2 tests. No significant relationship was found between the repeated-sprint and repeated-effort tests for any of the dependent variables. Both tests proved reliable, with total sprint time being the most reliable method of assessing performance. This study demonstrates that the addition of tackling significantly increases the physiological response to repeated-sprint exercise and reduces repeated-sprint performance in rugby league players. Furthermore, RSA and REA appear to be 2 distinct qualities that can be reliably assessed with total time being the most reliable measure of performance.

  16. Multineuronal Spike Sequences Repeat with Millisecond Precision

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    Koki eMatsumoto

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Cortical microcircuits are nonrandomly wired by neurons. As a natural consequence, spikes emitted by microcircuits are also nonrandomly patterned in time and space. One of the prominent spike organizations is a repetition of fixed patterns of spike series across multiple neurons. However, several questions remain unsolved, including how precisely spike sequences repeat, how the sequences are spatially organized, how many neurons participate in sequences, and how different sequences are functionally linked. To address these questions, we monitored spontaneous spikes of hippocampal CA3 neurons ex vivo using a high-speed functional multineuron calcium imaging technique that allowed us to monitor spikes with millisecond resolution and to record the location of spiking and nonspiking neurons. Multineuronal spike sequences were overrepresented in spontaneous activity compared to the statistical chance level. Approximately 75% of neurons participated in at least one sequence during our observation period. The participants were sparsely dispersed and did not show specific spatial organization. The number of sequences relative to the chance level decreased when larger time frames were used to detect sequences. Thus, sequences were precise at the millisecond level. Sequences often shared common spikes with other sequences; parts of sequences were subsequently relayed by following sequences, generating complex chains of multiple sequences.

  17. Modelling repeatedly flaring delta-sunspots

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Piyali; Carlsson, Mats

    2016-01-01

    Active regions (AR) appearing on the surface of the Sun are classified into $\\alpha$, $\\beta$, $\\gamma$, and $\\delta$ by the rules of the Mount Wilson Observatory, California on the basis of their topological complexity. Amongst these, the $\\delta$-sunspots are known to be super-active and produce the most X-ray flares. Here, we present results from a simulation of the Sun by mimicking the upper layers and the corona, but starting at a more primitive stage than any earlier treatment. We find that this initial state consisting of only a thin sub-photospheric magnetic sheet breaks into multiple flux-tubes which evolve into a colliding-merging system of spots of opposite polarity upon surface emergence, similar to those often seen on the Sun. The simulation goes on to produce many exotic $\\delta$-sunspot associated phenomena: repeated flaring in the range of typical solar flare energy release and ejective helical flux ropes with embedded cool-dense plasma filaments resembling solar coronal mass ejections.

  18. A Repeated Signal Difference for Recognising Patterns

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    Kieran Greer

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a new mechanism that might help with defining pattern sequences, by the fact that it can produce an upper bound on the ensemble value that can persistently oscillate with the actual values produced from each pattern. With every firing event, a node also receives an on/off feedback switch. If the node fires then it sends a feedback result depending on the input signal strength. If the input signal is positive or larger, it can store an ‘on’ switch feedback for the next iteration. If the signal is negative or smaller it can store an ‘off’ switch feedback for the next iteration. If the node does not fire, then it does not affect the current feedback situation and receives the switch command produced by the last active pattern event for the same neuron. The upper bound therefore also represents the largest or most enclosing pattern set and the lower value is for the actual set of firing patterns. If the pattern sequence repeats, it will oscillate between the two values, allowing them to be recognised and measured more easily, over time. Tests show that changing the sequence ordering produces different value sets, which can also be measured.

  19. Statistical analysis of simple repeats in the human genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, F.; Liò, P.

    2005-03-01

    The human genome contains repetitive DNA at different level of sequence length, number and dispersion. Highly repetitive DNA is particularly rich in homo- and di-nucleotide repeats, while middle repetitive DNA is rich of families of interspersed, mobile elements hundreds of base pairs (bp) long, among which belong the Alu families. A link between homo- and di-polymeric tracts and mobile elements has been recently highlighted. In particular, the mobility of Alu repeats, which form 10% of the human genome, has been correlated with the length of poly(A) tracts located at one end of the Alu. These tracts have a rigid and non-bendable structure and have an inhibitory effect on nucleosomes, which normally compact the DNA. We performed a statistical analysis of the genome-wide distribution of lengths and inter-tract separations of poly(X) and poly(XY) tracts in the human genome. Our study shows that in humans the length distributions of these sequences reflect the dynamics of their expansion and DNA replication. By means of general tools from linguistics, we show that the latter play the role of highly-significant content-bearing terms in the DNA text. Furthermore, we find that such tracts are positioned in a non-random fashion, with an apparent periodicity of 150 bases. This allows us to extend the link between repetitive, highly mobile elements such as Alus and low-complexity words in human DNA. More precisely, we show that Alus are sources of poly(X) tracts, which in turn affect in a subtle way the combination and diversification of gene expression and the fixation of multigene families.

  20. Determination of the number of years in Arabic coffee progenies selection through repeatability

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    Júlio César Mistro

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to estimate the repeatability coefficient of grain yield in Arabic coffee and todetermine the minimal number of annual harvests required for a satisfactory level of reliability at the plant level. Theexperiment was conducted in Campinas (SP in a randomized complete block design with 21 F3RC2 progenies of Icatugermplasm, for nine years, in nine replications. The repeatability coefficients were estimated by the method of analyses ofvariance, principal components based on correlation and covariance matrices and structural analyses based on correlationmatrices. The selection of F3RC2 progenies of Icatu germplasm can be carried out with an accuracy of 80% in the three firstharvests. The repeatability coefficient estimated by the covariance matrix method was the most adequate methodology toestimate this coefficient, since it minimizes the effect of biennial bearing.

  1. HHrep: de novo protein repeat detection and the origin of TIM barrels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söding, Johannes; Remmert, Michael; Biegert, Andreas

    2006-07-01

    HHrep is a web server for the de novo identification of repeats in protein sequences, which is based on the pairwise comparison of profile hidden Markov models (HMMs). Its main strength is its sensitivity, allowing it to detect highly divergent repeat units in protein sequences whose repeats could as yet only be detected from their structures. Examples include sequences with beta-propellor fold, ferredoxin-like fold, double psi barrels or (betaalpha)8 (TIM) barrels. We illustrate this with proteins from four superfamilies of TIM barrels by revealing a clear 4- and 8-fold symmetry, which we detect solely from their sequences. This symmetry might be the trace of an ancient origin through duplication of a betaalphabetaalpha or betaalpha unit. HHrep can be accessed at http://hhrep.tuebingen.mpg.de.

  2. Enhanced methane production via repeated batch bioaugmentation pattern of enriched microbial consortia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhiman; Guo, Rongbo; Xu, Xiaohui; Wang, Lin; Dai, Meng

    2016-09-01

    Using batch and repeated batch cultivations, this study investigated the effects of bioaugmentation with enriched microbial consortia (named as EMC) on methane production from effluents of hydrogen-producing stage of potato slurry, as well as on the indigenous bacterial community. The results demonstrated that the improved methane production and shift of the indigenous bacterial community structure were dependent on the EMC/sludge ratio and bioaugmentation patterns. The methane yield and production rate in repeated batch bioaugmentation pattern of EMC were, respectively, average 15% and 10% higher than in one-time bioaugmentation pattern of EMC. DNA-sequencing approach showed that the enhanced methane production in the repeated batch bioaugmentation pattern of EMC mainly resulted from the enriched iron-reducing bacteria and the persistence of the introduced Syntrophomonas, which led to a rapid degradation of individual VFAs to methane. The findings contributed to understanding the correlation between the bioaugmentation of microbial consortia, community shift, and methane production.

  3. Repeat scanning technology for laser ultrasonic propagation imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Ryul; Yenn Chong, See; Sunuwar, Nitam; Park, Chan Yik

    2013-08-01

    Laser ultrasonic scanning in combination with contact or non-contact sensors provides new paradigms in structural health management (SHM) and non-destructive in-process quality control (IPQC) for large composite structures. Wave propagation imaging technology based on laser ultrasonic scanning and fixed-point sensing shows remarkable advantages, such as minimal need for embedded sensors in SHM, minimum invasive defect visualization in IPQC and general capabilities of curved and complex target inspection, and temporal reference-free inspection. However, as with other SHM methods and non-destructive evaluation based on ultrasound, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is a prevalent issue in real structural applications, especially with non-contact thin-composite sensing or with thick and heterogeneous composites. This study proposes a high-speed repeat scanning technique for laser ultrasonic propagation imaging (UPI) technology, which is realized with the scanning speed of 1 kHz of a Q-switched continuous wave laser, and precise control of the laser beam pulses for identical point scanning. As a result, the technique enables the achievement of significant improvement in the SNR to inspect real-world composite structures. The proposed technique provides enhanced results for impact damage detection in a 2 mm thick wing box made of carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic, despite the low sensitivity of non-contact laser ultrasonic sensing. A field-applicable pure laser UPI system has been developed using a laser Doppler vibrometer as the non-contact ultrasonic sensor. The proposed technique enables the visualization of the disbond defect in a 15 mm thick wind blade specimen made of glass-fiber-reinforced plastic, despite the high dissipation of ultrasound in the thick composite.

  4. Structure of a phosphoethanolamine-containing O-polysaccharide of Citrobacter freundii strain PCM 1443 from serogroup O39 and its relatedness to the Klebsiella pneumoniae O1 polysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzenellenbogen, Ewa; Toukach, Philip V; Kocharova, Nina A; Korzeniowska-Kowal, Agnieszka; Gamian, Andrzej; Shashkov, Alexander S; Knirel, Yuriy A

    2008-06-01

    Lipopolysaccharide was extracted from cells of Citrobacter freundii PCM 1443 from serogroup O39 and degraded by mild acid hydrolysis to give an O-polysaccharide. Based on enzymatic and methylation analyses, along with 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, it was found that the lipopolysaccharide studied has two different linear polysaccharide chains of d-galactan type containing 3-substituted galactose residues. One of the galactans has the disaccharide repeating units of alpha-D-galactopyranose and beta-D-galactofuranose and the other is comprised of alpha-D-galactopyranose and beta-D-galactopyranose, the latter being substituted in 25% repeats with PEtN at O-6. An immunoblotting assay demonstrated that the lipopolysaccharide of C. freundii PCM 1443 is serologically related to that of Klebsiella pneumoniae O1, which contains the same galactan chains but is devoid of phosphoethanolamine.

  5. A versatile palindromic amphipathic repeat coding sequence horizontally distributed among diverse bacterial and eucaryotic microbes

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    Glass John I

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intragenic tandem repeats occur throughout all domains of life and impart functional and structural variability to diverse translation products. Repeat proteins confer distinctive surface phenotypes to many unicellular organisms, including those with minimal genomes such as the wall-less bacterial monoderms, Mollicutes. One such repeat pattern in this clade is distributed in a manner suggesting its exchange by horizontal gene transfer (HGT. Expanding genome sequence databases reveal the pattern in a widening range of bacteria, and recently among eucaryotic microbes. We examined the genomic flux and consequences of the motif by determining its distribution, predicted structural features and association with membrane-targeted proteins. Results Using a refined hidden Markov model, we document a 25-residue protein sequence motif tandemly arrayed in variable-number repeats in ORFs lacking assigned functions. It appears sporadically in unicellular microbes from disparate bacterial and eucaryotic clades, representing diverse lifestyles and ecological niches that include host parasitic, marine and extreme environments. Tracts of the repeats predict a malleable configuration of recurring domains, with conserved hydrophobic residues forming an amphipathic secondary structure in which hydrophilic residues endow extensive sequence variation. Many ORFs with these domains also have membrane-targeting sequences that predict assorted topologies; others may comprise reservoirs of sequence variants. We demonstrate expressed variants among surface lipoproteins that distinguish closely related animal pathogens belonging to a subgroup of the Mollicutes. DNA sequences encoding the tandem domains display dyad symmetry. Moreover, in some taxa the domains occur in ORFs selectively associated with mobile elements. These features, a punctate phylogenetic distribution, and different patterns of dispersal in genomes of related taxa, suggest that the

  6. Plasmodium interspersed repeats: the major multigene superfamily of malaria parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Christoph S.; Phillips, R. Stephen; Turner, C. Michael R.; Barrett, Michael P.

    2004-01-01

    Functionally related homologues of known genes can be difficult to identify in divergent species. In this paper, we show how multi-character analysis can be used to elucidate the relationships among divergent members of gene superfamilies. We used probabilistic modelling in conjunction with protein structural predictions and gene-structure analyses on a whole-genome scale to find gene homologies that are missed by conventional similarity-search strategies and identified a variant gene superfamily in six species of malaria (Plasmodium interspersed repeats, pir). The superfamily includes rif in P.falciparum, vir in P.vivax, a novel family kir in P.knowlesi and the cir/bir/yir family in three rodent malarias. Our data indicate that this is the major multi-gene family in malaria parasites. Protein localization of products from pir members to the infected erythrocyte membrane in the rodent malaria parasite P.chabaudi, demonstrates phenotypic similarity to the products of pir in other malaria species. The results give critical insight into the evolutionary adaptation of malaria parasites to their host and provide important data for comparative immunology between malaria parasites obtained from laboratory models and their human counterparts. PMID:15507685

  7. Hypoxic Repeat Sprint Training Improves Rugby Player's Repeated Sprint but Not Endurance Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlin, Michael J; Olsen, Peter D; Marshall, Helen C; Lizamore, Catherine A; Elliot, Catherine A

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the performance changes in 19 well-trained male rugby players after repeat-sprint training (six sessions of four sets of 5 × 5 s sprints with 25 s and 5 min of active recovery between reps and sets, respectively) in either normobaric hypoxia (HYP; n = 9; FIO2 = 14.5%) or normobaric normoxia (NORM; n = 10; FIO2 = 20.9%). Three weeks after the intervention, 2 additional repeat-sprint training sessions in hypoxia (FIO2 = 14.5%) was investigated in both groups to gauge the efficacy of using "top-up" sessions for previously hypoxic-trained subjects and whether a small hypoxic dose would be beneficial for the previously normoxic-trained group. Repeated sprint (8 × 20 m) and Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Level 1 (YYIR1) performances were tested twice at baseline (Pre 1 and Pre 2) and weekly after (Post 1-3) the initial intervention (intervention 1) and again weekly after the second "top-up" intervention (Post 4-5). After each training set, heart rate, oxygen saturation, and rate of perceived exertion were recorded. Compared to baseline (mean of Pre 1 and Pre 2), both the hypoxic and normoxic groups similarly lowered fatigue over the 8 sprints 1 week after the intervention (Post 1: -1.8 ± 1.6%, -1.5 ± 1.4%, mean change ± 90% CI in HYP and NORM groups, respectively). However, from Post 2 onwards, only the hypoxic group maintained the performance improvement compared to baseline (Post 2: -2.1 ± 1.8%, Post 3: -2.3 ± 1.7%, Post 4: -1.9 ± 1.8%, and Post 5: -1.2 ± 1.7%). Compared to the normoxic group, the hypoxic group was likely to have substantially less fatigue at Post 3-5 (-2.0 ± 2.4%, -2.2 ± 2.4%, -1.6 ± 2.4% Post 3, Post 4, Post 5, respectively). YYIR1 performances improved throughout the recovery period in both groups (13-37% compared to baseline) with unclear differences found between groups. The addition of two sessions of "top-up" training after intervention 1, had little effect on either group. Repeat-sprint training in

  8. Hypoxic Repeat Sprint Training Improves Rugby Player's Repeated Sprint but Not Endurance Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlin, Michael J.; Olsen, Peter D.; Marshall, Helen C.; Lizamore, Catherine A.; Elliot, Catherine A.

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the performance changes in 19 well-trained male rugby players after repeat-sprint training (six sessions of four sets of 5 × 5 s sprints with 25 s and 5 min of active recovery between reps and sets, respectively) in either normobaric hypoxia (HYP; n = 9; FIO2 = 14.5%) or normobaric normoxia (NORM; n = 10; FIO2 = 20.9%). Three weeks after the intervention, 2 additional repeat-sprint training sessions in hypoxia (FIO2 = 14.5%) was investigated in both groups to gauge the efficacy of using “top-up” sessions for previously hypoxic-trained subjects and whether a small hypoxic dose would be beneficial for the previously normoxic-trained group. Repeated sprint (8 × 20 m) and Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Level 1 (YYIR1) performances were tested twice at baseline (Pre 1 and Pre 2) and weekly after (Post 1–3) the initial intervention (intervention 1) and again weekly after the second “top-up” intervention (Post 4–5). After each training set, heart rate, oxygen saturation, and rate of perceived exertion were recorded. Compared to baseline (mean of Pre 1 and Pre 2), both the hypoxic and normoxic groups similarly lowered fatigue over the 8 sprints 1 week after the intervention (Post 1: −1.8 ± 1.6%, −1.5 ± 1.4%, mean change ± 90% CI in HYP and NORM groups, respectively). However, from Post 2 onwards, only the hypoxic group maintained the performance improvement compared to baseline (Post 2: −2.1 ± 1.8%, Post 3: −2.3 ± 1.7%, Post 4: −1.9 ± 1.8%, and Post 5: −1.2 ± 1.7%). Compared to the normoxic group, the hypoxic group was likely to have substantially less fatigue at Post 3–5 (−2.0 ± 2.4%, −2.2 ± 2.4%, −1.6 ± 2.4% Post 3, Post 4, Post 5, respectively). YYIR1 performances improved throughout the recovery period in both groups (13–37% compared to baseline) with unclear differences found between groups. The addition of two sessions of “top-up” training after intervention 1, had little effect on either

  9. Electron density analysis of the effects of sugars on the structure of lipid bilayers at low hydration - a preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenné, T.; Kent, B.; Koster, K.L.; Garvey, C.J.; Bryant, G. (ANSTO); (USD); (ANU); (RMIT)

    2012-02-06

    Small angle X-ray scattering is used to study the effects of sugars on membranes during dehydration. Previous work has shown that the bilayer and chain-chain repeat spacings of DPPC bilayers are relatively unaffected by the presence of sugars. In this work we present a preliminary analysis of the electron density profiles of DPPC in the presence of sugars at low hydration. The difficulties of determining the correct phasing are discussed. Sugars and other small solutes have been shown to have an important role in improving the tolerance of a range of species to desiccation and freezing. In particular it has been shown that sugars can stabilize membranes in the fluid membrane phase during dehydration, and in the fully dehydrated state. Equivalently, at a particular hydration, the presence of sugars lowers the transition temperature between the fluid and gel phases. There are two competing models for explaining the effects of sugars on membrane phase transition temperatures. One, designated the water replacement hypothesis (WRH) states that sugars hydrogen bond to phospholipid headgroups, thus hindering the fluid-gel phase transition. One version of this model suggests that certain sugars (such as trehalose) achieve the measured effects by inserting between the phospholipid head groups. An alternative model explains the observed effects of sugars in terms of the sugars effect on the hydration repulsion that develops between opposing membranes during dehydration. The hydration repulsion leads to a lateral compressive stress in the bilayer which squeezes adjacent lipids more closely together, resulting in a transition to the gel phase. When sugars are present, their osmotic and volumetric effects reduce the hydration repulsion, reduce the compressive stress in the membranes, and therefore tend to maintain the average lateral separation between lipids. This model is called the hydration forces explanation (HFE). We recently showed that neither mono- nor di-saccharides

  10. Structural and dynamical characteristics of trehalose and sucrose matrices at different hydration levels as probed by FTIR and high-field EPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malferrari, M; Nalepa, A; Venturoli, G; Francia, F; Lubitz, W; Möbius, K; Savitsky, A

    2014-06-07

    Some organisms can survive complete dehydration and high temperatures by adopting an anhydrobiotic state in which the intracellular medium contains large amounts of disaccharides, particularly trehalose and sucrose. Trehalose is most effective also in protecting isolated in vitro biostructures. In an attempt to clarify the molecular mechanisms of disaccharide bioprotection, we compared the structure and dynamics of sucrose and trehalose matrices at different hydration levels by means of high-field W-band EPR and FTIR spectroscopy. The hydration state of the samples was characterized by FTIR spectroscopy and the structural organization was probed by EPR using a nitroxide radical dissolved in the respective matrices. Analysis of the EPR spectra showed that the structure and dynamics of the dehydrated matrices as well as their evolution upon re-hydration differ substantially between trehalose and sucrose. The dehydrated trehalose matrix is homogeneous in terms of distribution of the residual water and spin-probe molecules. In contrast, dehydrated sucrose forms a heterogeneous matrix. It is comprised of sucrose polycrystalline clusters and several bulk water domains. The amorphous form was found only in 30% (volume) of the sucrose matrix. Re-hydration leads to a structural homogenization of the sucrose matrix, whilst in the trehalose matrix several domains develop differing in the local water/radical content and radical mobility. The molecular model of the matrices provides an explanation for the different protein-matrix dynamical coupling observed in dried ternary sucrose and trehalose matrices, and accounts for the superior efficacy of trehalose as a bioprotectant. Furthermore, for bacterial photosynthetic reaction centers it is shown that at low water content the protein-matrix coupling is modulated by the sugar/protein molar ratio in sucrose matrices only. This effect is suggested to be related to the preference for sucrose, rather than trehalose, as a

  11. Repeats in transforming acidic coiled-coil (TACC) genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Seema

    2013-06-01

    Transforming acidic coiled-coil proteins (TACC1, 2, and 3) are essential proteins associated with the assembly of spindle microtubules and maintenance of bipolarity. Dysregulation of TACCs is associated with tumorigenesis, but studies of microsatellite instability in TACC genes have not been extensive. Microsatellite or simple sequence repeat instability is known to cause many types of cancer. The present in silico analysis of SSRs in human TACC gene sequences shows the presence of mono- to hexa-nucleotide repeats, with the highest densities found for mono- and di-nucleotide repeats. Density of repeats is higher in introns than in exons. Some of the repeats are present in regulatory regions and retained introns. Human TACC genes show conservation of many repeat classes. Microsatellites in TACC genes could be valuable markers for monitoring numerical chromosomal aberrations and or cancer.

  12. Survey of simple sequence repeats in woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, L; Huang, J F; Feng, G Q; Wang, X W; Wang, Y; Chen, B Y; Qiao, Y S

    2013-07-30

    The use of simple sequence repeats (SSRs), or microsatellites, as genetic markers has become popular due to their abundance and variation in length among individuals. In this study, we investigated linkage groups (LGs) in the woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca) and demonstrated variation in the abundances, densities, and relative densities of mononucleotide, dinucleotide, and trinucleotide repeats. Mononucleotide, dinucleotide, and trinucleotide repeats were more common than longer repeats in all LGs examined. Perfect SSRs were the predominant SSR type found and their abundance was extremely stable among LGs and chloroplasts. Abundances of mononucleotide, dinucleotide, and trinucleotide repeats were positively correlated with LG size, whereas those of tetranucleotide and hexanucleotide SSRs were not. Generally, in each LG, the abundance, relative abundance, relative density, and the proportion of each unique SSR all declined rapidly as the repeated unit increased. Furthermore, the lengths and frequencies of SSRs varied among different LGs.

  13. Quasimonomorphic Mononucleotide Repeats for High-Level Microsatellite Instability Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Buhard

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Microsatellite instability (MSI analysis is becoming more and more important to detect sporadic primary tumors of the MSI phenotype as well as in helping to determine Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC cases. After some years of conflicting data due to the absence of consensus markers for the MSI phenotype, a meeting held in Bethesda to clarify the situation proposed a set of 5 microsatellites (2 mononucleotide repeats and 3 dinucleotide repeats to determine MSI tumors. A second Bethesda consensus meeting was held at the end of 2002. It was discussed here that the 1998 microsatellite panel could underestimate high-level MSI tumors and overestimate low-level MSI tumors. Amongst the suggested changes was the exclusive use of mononucleotide repeats in place of dinucleotide repeats. We have already proposed a pentaplex MSI screening test comprising 5 quasimonomorphic mononucleotide repeats. This article compares the advantages of mono or dinucleotide repeats in determining microsatellite instability.

  14. Repeat-swap homology modeling of secondary active transporters: updated protocol and prediction of elevator-type mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara-Jaque, Ariela; Fenollar-Ferrer, Cristina; Kaufmann, Desirée; Forrest, Lucy R

    2015-01-01

    Secondary active transporters are critical for neurotransmitter clearance and recycling during synaptic transmission and uptake of nutrients. These proteins mediate the movement of solutes against their concentration gradients, by using the energy released in the movement of ions down pre-existing concentration gradients. To achieve this, transporters conform to the so-called alternating-access hypothesis, whereby the protein adopts at least two conformations in which the substrate binding sites are exposed to one or other side of the membrane, but not both simultaneously. Structures of a bacterial homolog of neuronal glutamate transporters, GltPh, in several different conformational states have revealed that the protein structure is asymmetric in the outward- and inward-open states, and that the conformational change connecting them involves a elevator-like movement of a substrate binding domain across the membrane. The structural asymmetry is created by inverted-topology repeats, i.e., structural repeats with similar overall folds whose transmembrane topologies are related to each other by two-fold pseudo-symmetry around an axis parallel to the membrane plane. Inverted repeats have been found in around three-quarters of secondary transporter folds. Moreover, the (a)symmetry of these systems has been successfully used as a bioinformatic tool, called "repeat-swap modeling" to predict structural models of a transporter in one conformation using the known structure of the transporter in the complementary conformation as a template. Here, we describe an updated repeat-swap homology modeling protocol, and calibrate the accuracy of the method using GltPh, for which both inward- and outward-facing conformations are known. We then apply this repeat-swap homology modeling procedure to a concentrative nucleoside transporter, VcCNT, which has a three-dimensional arrangement related to that of GltPh. The repeat-swapped model of VcCNT predicts that nucleoside transport also

  15. Zinc-finger directed double-strand breaks within CAG repeat tracts promote repeat instability in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelman, David; Moye, Christopher; Morton, Jason; Sykoudis, Kristen; Lin, Yunfu; Carroll, Dana; Wilson, John H

    2009-06-16

    Expanded triplet repeats have been identified as the genetic basis for a growing number of neurological and skeletal disorders. To examine the contribution of double-strand break repair to CAG x CTG repeat instability in mammalian systems, we developed zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) that recognize and cleave CAG repeat sequences. Engineered ZFNs use a tandem array of zinc fingers, fused to the FokI DNA cleavage domain, to direct double-strand breaks (DSBs) in a site-specific manner. We first determined that the ZFNs cleave CAG repeats in vitro. Then, using our previously described tissue culture assay for identifying modifiers of CAG repeat instability, we found that transfection of ZFN-expression vectors induced up to a 15-fold increase in changes to the CAG repeat in human and rodent cell lines, and that longer repeats were much more sensitive to cleavage than shorter ones. Analysis of individual colonies arising after treatment revealed a spectrum of events consistent with ZFN-induced DSBs and dominated by repeat contractions. We also found that expressing a dominant-negative form of RAD51 in combination with a ZFN, dramatically reduced the effect of the nuclease, suggesting that DSB-induced repeat instability is mediated, in part, through homology directed repair. These studies identify a ZFN as a useful reagent for characterizing the effects of DSBs on CAG repeats in cells.

  16. Experimental research on the creep behavior and bearing capacity of repeatedly prestressed concrete beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO Xudong; LI Lifeng; YANG Jianjun

    2007-01-01

    In the prestress tensioning process of medium or short span prestressed concrete beam bridges,there are always many serious problems,such as the camber of straight beam being too large,curved beam going crosswise,and columns of rigid beam bridge cracking,that can be commonly seen because of its greater additional stress in prestressing.To solve the above problems,a new concept of repeatedly prestressed bridge structure was innovatively proposed in this work.It was proved,through theoretical and experimental comparison between this new structure and the traditional prestressed structure,that the application of repeated prestressing technology can greatly improve the mechanical and deformational performance of the low height beam during construction and long-term use.Furthermore,a kind of computational formula to calculate creep strain and deformation due to repeated prestressing in terms of time t was derived in this paper and the bearing capacity of this new structure has been tested.Finally,the work concludes that there is a bright application prospect for this new structure for medium and short span prestressed beam bridges to control deformations.

  17. Assembly of Repeat Content Using Next Generation Sequencing Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    labutti, Kurt; Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor; Copeland, Alex

    2014-03-17

    Repetitive organisms pose a challenge for short read assembly, and typically only unique regions and repeat regions shorter than the read length, can be accurately assembled. Recently, we have been investigating the use of Pacific Biosciences reads for de novo fungal assembly. We will present an assessment of the quality and degree of repeat reconstruction possible in a fungal genome using long read technology. We will also compare differences in assembly of repeat content using short read and long read technology.

  18. Neuropathological diagnosis and CAG repeat expansion in Huntington's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Xuereb, J H; MacMillan, J C; Snell, R; Davies, P.; Harper, P S

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To correlate the degree of CAG repeat expansion with neuropathological findings in Huntington's disease. METHODS--The CAG repeat polymorphism was analysed in a large series of brain samples from 268 patients with a clinical diagnosis of Huntington's disease in which full neuropathological data was available. RESULTS--Analysis by polymerase chain reaction was successful in 63% of samples (169 of 268). Repeat expansions were detected in 152 of 153 (99%) samples with a neuropathologic...

  19. The evolution of filamin – A protein domain repeat perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Light, Sara; Sagit, Rauan; Ithychanda, Sujay S.; Qin, Jun; Elofsson, Arne

    2012-01-01

    Particularly in higher eukaryotes, some protein domains are found in tandem repeats, performing broad functions often related to cellular organization. For instance, the eukaryotic protein filamin interacts with many proteins and is crucial for the cytoskeleton. The functional properties of long repeat domains are governed by the specific properties of each individual domain as well as by the repeat copy number. To provide better understanding of the evolutionary and functional history of rep...

  20. Repeated fecal microbiota transplantation in a child with ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Hirotaka; Arai, Katsuhiro; Abe, Jun; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Yoshioka, Takako; Hosoi, Kenji; Kuroda, Makoto

    2016-08-01

    We report the case of an 11-year-old girl with ulcerative colitis refractory to conventional therapy, who was subsequently treated successfully with repeated fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT). The patient was steroid dependent despite several infliximab treatments, and colectomy was proposed to improve quality of life. After repeated FMT, she was able to maintain remission with on minimal dose of steroid. Although her fecal microbiota was dysbiotic before FMT, it was restored to a similar pattern as the donor after repeated FMT.