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Sample records for repeated-measures anova results

  1. A Simple and Transparent Alternative to Repeated Measures ANOVA

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    James W. Grice

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Observation Oriented Modeling is a novel approach toward conceptualizing and analyzing data. Compared with traditional parametric statistics, Observation Oriented Modeling is more intuitive, relatively free of assumptions, and encourages researchers to stay close to their data. Rather than estimating abstract population parameters, the overarching goal of the analysis is to identify and explain distinct patterns within the observations. Selected data from a recent study by Craig et al. were analyzed using Observation Oriented Modeling; this analysis was contrasted with a traditional repeated measures ANOVA assessment. Various pitfalls in traditional parametric analyses were avoided when using Observation Oriented Modeling, including the presence of outliers and missing data. The differences between Observation Oriented Modeling and various parametric and nonparametric statistical methods were finally discussed.

  2. Best practices for repeated measures ANOVAs of ERP data: Reference, regional channels, and robust ANOVAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dien, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Analysis of variance (ANOVA) is a fundamental procedure for event-related potential (ERP) research and yet there is very little guidance for best practices. It is important for the field to develop evidence-based best practices: 1) to minimize the Type II error rate by maximizing statistical power, 2) to minimize the Type I error rate by reducing the latitude for varying procedures, and 3) to identify areas for further methodological improvements. While generic treatments of ANOVA methodology are available, ERP datasets have many unique characteristics that must be considered. In the present report, a novelty oddball dataset was utilized as a test case to determine whether three aspects of ANOVA procedures as applied to ERPs make a real-world difference: the effects of reference site, regional channels, and robust ANOVAs. Recommendations are provided for best practices in each of these areas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Incomplete quality of life data in lung transplant research: comparing cross sectional, repeated measures ANOVA, and multi-level analysis

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    van der Bij Wim

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In longitudinal studies on Health Related Quality of Life (HRQL it frequently occurs that patients have one or more missing forms, which may cause bias, and reduce the sample size. Aims of the present study were to address the problem of missing data in the field of lung transplantation (LgTX and HRQL, to compare results obtained with different methods of analysis, and to show the value of each type of statistical method used to summarize data. Methods Results from cross-sectional analysis, repeated measures on complete cases (ANOVA, and a multi-level analysis were compared. The scores on the dimension 'energy' of the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP after transplantation were used to illustrate the differences between methods. Results Compared to repeated measures ANOVA, the cross-sectional and multi-level analysis included more patients, and allowed for a longer period of follow-up. In contrast to the cross sectional analyses, in the complete case analysis, and the multi-level analysis, the correlation between different time points was taken into account. Patterns over time of the three methods were comparable. In general, results from repeated measures ANOVA showed the most favorable energy scores, and results from the multi-level analysis the least favorable. Due to the separate subgroups per time point in the cross-sectional analysis, and the relatively small number of patients in the repeated measures ANOVA, inclusion of predictors was only possible in the multi-level analysis. Conclusion Results obtained with the various methods of analysis differed, indicating some reduction of bias took place. Multi-level analysis is a useful approach to study changes over time in a data set where missing data, to reduce bias, make efficient use of available data, and to include predictors, in studies concerning the effects of LgTX on HRQL.

  4. Detecting variable responses in time-series using repeated measures ANOVA: Application to physiologic challenges [version 2; referees: 2 approved

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    Paul M. Macey

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We present an approach to analyzing physiologic timetrends recorded during a stimulus by comparing means at each time point using repeated measures analysis of variance (RMANOVA. The approach allows temporal patterns to be examined without an a priori model of expected timing or pattern of response. The approach was originally applied to signals recorded from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI volumes-of-interest (VOI during a physiologic challenge, but we have used the same technique to analyze continuous recordings of other physiological signals such as heart rate, breathing rate, and pulse oximetry. For fMRI, the method serves as a complement to whole-brain voxel-based analyses, and is useful for detecting complex responses within pre-determined brain regions, or as a post-hoc analysis of regions of interest identified by whole-brain assessments. We illustrate an implementation of the technique in the statistical software packages R and SAS. VOI timetrends are extracted from conventionally preprocessed fMRI images. A timetrend of average signal intensity across the VOI during the scanning period is calculated for each subject. The values are scaled relative to baseline periods, and time points are binned. In SAS, the procedure PROC MIXED implements the RMANOVA in a single step. In R, we present one option for implementing RMANOVA with the mixed model function “lme”. Model diagnostics, and predicted means and differences are best performed with additional libraries and commands in R; we present one example. The ensuing results allow determination of significant overall effects, and time-point specific within- and between-group responses relative to baseline. We illustrate the technique using fMRI data from two groups of subjects who underwent a respiratory challenge. RMANOVA allows insight into the timing of responses and response differences between groups, and so is suited to physiologic testing paradigms eliciting complex

  5. Teaching renewable energy using online PBL in investigating its effect on behaviour towards energy conservation among Malaysian students: ANOVA repeated measures approach

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    Nordin, Norfarah; Samsudin, Mohd Ali; Hadi Harun, Abdul

    2017-01-01

    This research aimed to investigate whether online problem based learning (PBL) approach to teach renewable energy topic improves students’ behaviour towards energy conservation. A renewable energy online problem based learning (REePBaL) instruction package was developed based on the theory of constructivism and adaptation of the online learning model. This study employed a single group quasi-experimental design to ascertain the changed in students’ behaviour towards energy conservation after underwent the intervention. The study involved 48 secondary school students in a Malaysian public school. ANOVA Repeated Measure technique was employed in order to compare scores of students’ behaviour towards energy conservation before and after the intervention. Based on the finding, students’ behaviour towards energy conservation improved after the intervention.

  6. ANOVA parameters influence in LCF experimental data and simulation results

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    Vercelli A.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The virtual design of components undergoing thermo mechanical fatigue (TMF and plastic strains is usually run in many phases. The numerical finite element method gives a useful instrument which becomes increasingly effective as the geometrical and numerical modelling gets more accurate. The constitutive model definition plays an important role in the effectiveness of the numerical simulation [1, 2] as, for example, shown in Figure 1. In this picture it is shown how a good cyclic plasticity constitutive model can simulate a cyclic load experiment. The component life estimation is the subsequent phase and it needs complex damage and life estimation models [3-5] which take into account of several parameters and phenomena contributing to damage and life duration. The calibration of these constitutive and damage models requires an accurate testing activity. In the present paper the main topic of the research activity is to investigate whether the parameters, which result to be influent in the experimental activity, influence the numerical simulations, thus defining the effectiveness of the models in taking into account of all the phenomena actually influencing the life of the component. To obtain this aim a procedure to tune the parameters needed to estimate the life of mechanical components undergoing TMF and plastic strains is presented for commercial steel. This procedure aims to be easy and to allow calibrating both material constitutive model (for the numerical structural simulation and the damage and life model (for life assessment. The procedure has been applied to specimens. The experimental activity has been developed on three sets of tests run at several temperatures: static tests, high cycle fatigue (HCF tests, low cycle fatigue (LCF tests. The numerical structural FEM simulations have been run on a commercial non linear solver, ABAQUS®6.8. The simulations replied the experimental tests. The stress, strain, thermal results from the thermo

  7. The Bootstrap and Multiple Comparisons Procedures as Remedy on Doubts about Correctness of ANOVA Results

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    Izabela CHMIEL

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine and analyse an alternative methodology for the analysis of a set of Likert responses measured on a common attitudinal scale when the primary focus of interest is on the relative importance of items in the set - with primary application to health-related quality of life (HRQOL measures. HRQOL questionnaires usually generate data that manifest evident departures from fundamental assumptions of Analysis of Variance (ANOVA approach, not only because of their discrete, bounded and skewed distributions, but also due to significant correlation between mean scores and their variances. Material and Methods: Questionnaire survey with SF-36 has been conducted among 142 convalescents after acute pancreatitis. The estimated scores of HRQOL were compared with use of the multiple comparisons procedures under Bonferroni-like adjustment, and with the bootstrap procedures. Results: In the data set studied, with the SF-36 outcome, the use of the multiple comparisons and bootstrap procedures for analysing HRQOL data provides results quite similar to conventional ANOVA and Rasch methods, suggested at frames of Classical Test Theory and Item Response Theory. Conclusions: These results suggest that the multiple comparisons and bootstrap both are valid methods for analysing HRQOL outcome data, in particular at case of doubts with appropriateness of the standard methods. Moreover, from practical point of view, the processes of the multiple comparisons and bootstrap procedures seems to be much easy to interpret by non-statisticians aimed to practise evidence based health care.

  8. Correct use of repeated measures analysis of variance.

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    Park, Eunsik; Cho, Meehye; Ki, Chang-Seok

    2009-02-01

    In biomedical research, researchers frequently use statistical procedures such as the t-test, standard analysis of variance (ANOVA), or the repeated measures ANOVA to compare means between the groups of interest. There are frequently some misuses in applying these procedures since the conditions of the experiments or statistical assumptions necessary to apply these procedures are not fully taken into consideration. In this paper, we demonstrate the correct use of repeated measures ANOVA to prevent or minimize ethical or scientific problems due to its misuse. We also describe the appropriate use of multiple comparison tests for follow-up analysis in repeated measures ANOVA. Finally, we demonstrate the use of repeated measures ANOVA by using real data and the statistical software package SPSS (SPSS Inc., USA).

  9. Effects of repeatability measures on results of fMRI sICA: a study on simulated and real resting-state effects.

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    Remes, Jukka J; Starck, Tuomo; Nikkinen, Juha; Ollila, Esa; Beckmann, Christian F; Tervonen, Osmo; Kiviniemi, Vesa; Silven, Olli

    2011-05-15

    Spatial independent components analysis (sICA) has become a widely applied data-driven method for fMRI data, especially for resting-state studies. These sICA approaches are often based on iterative estimation algorithms and there are concerns about accuracy due to noise. Repeatability measures such as ICASSO, RAICAR and ARABICA have been introduced as remedies but information on their effects on estimates is limited. The contribution of this study was to provide more of such information and test if the repeatability analyses are necessary. We compared FastICA-based ordinary and repeatability approaches concerning mixing vector estimates. Comparisons included original FastICA, FSL4 Melodic FastICA and original and modified ICASSO. The effects of bootstrapping and convergence threshold were evaluated. The results show that there is only moderate improvement due to repeatability measures and only in the bootstrapping case. Bootstrapping attenuated power from time courses of resting-state network related ICs at frequencies higher than 0.1 Hz and made subsets of low frequency oscillations more emphasized IC-wise. The convergence threshold did not have a significant role concerning the accuracy of estimates. The performance results suggest that repeatability measures or strict converge criteria might not be needed in sICA analyses of fMRI data. Consequently, the results in existing sICA fMRI literature are probably valid in this sense. A decreased accuracy of original bootstrapping ICASSO was observed and corrected by using centrotype mixing estimates but the results warrant for thorough evaluations of data-driven methods in general. Also, given the fMRI-specific considerations, further development of sICA methods is strongly encouraged. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Analysis of repeated measures data

    CERN Document Server

    Islam, M Ataharul

    2017-01-01

    This book presents a broad range of statistical techniques to address emerging needs in the field of repeated measures. It also provides a comprehensive overview of extensions of generalized linear models for the bivariate exponential family of distributions, which represent a new development in analysing repeated measures data. The demand for statistical models for correlated outcomes has grown rapidly recently, mainly due to presence of two types of underlying associations: associations between outcomes, and associations between explanatory variables and outcomes. The book systematically addresses key problems arising in the modelling of repeated measures data, bearing in mind those factors that play a major role in estimating the underlying relationships between covariates and outcome variables for correlated outcome data. In addition, it presents new approaches to addressing current challenges in the field of repeated measures and models based on conditional and joint probabilities. Markov models of first...

  11. The effect of repeated measurements and working memory on the most comfortable level in the ANL test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brännström, K Jonas; Olsen, Steen Østergaard; Holm, Lucas

    2014-01-01

    interleaved methodology during one session using a non-semantic version. Phonological (PWM) and visuospatial working memory (VSWM) was measured. STUDY SAMPLE: Thirty-two normal-hearing adults. RESULTS: Repeated measures ANOVA, intraclass correlations, and the coefficient of repeatability (CR) were used...

  12. Model comparison in ANOVA.

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    Rouder, Jeffrey N; Engelhardt, Christopher R; McCabe, Simon; Morey, Richard D

    2016-12-01

    Analysis of variance (ANOVA), the workhorse analysis of experimental designs, consists of F-tests of main effects and interactions. Yet, testing, including traditional ANOVA, has been recently critiqued on a number of theoretical and practical grounds. In light of these critiques, model comparison and model selection serve as an attractive alternative. Model comparison differs from testing in that one can support a null or nested model vis-a-vis a more general alternative by penalizing more flexible models. We argue this ability to support more simple models allows for more nuanced theoretical conclusions than provided by traditional ANOVA F-tests. We provide a model comparison strategy and show how ANOVA models may be reparameterized to better address substantive questions in data analysis.

  13. Assessing agreement with repeated measures for random observers.

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    Chen, Chia-Cheng; Barnhart, Huiman X

    2011-12-30

    Agreement studies are often concerned with assessing whether different observers for measuring responses on the same subject or sample can produce similar results. The concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) is a popular index for assessing the closeness among observers for quantitative measurements. Usually, the CCC is used for data without and with replications based on subject and observer effects only. However, we cannot use this methodology if repeated measurements rather than replications are collected. Although there exist some CCC-type indices for assessing agreement with repeated measurements, there is no CCC for random observers and random time points. In this paper, we propose a new CCC for repeated measures where both observers and time points are treated as random effects. A simulation study demonstrates our proposed methodology, and we use vertebral body data and image data for illustrations.

  14. Multivariate linear models and repeated measurements revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Methods for generalized analysis of variance based on multivariate normal theory have been known for many years. In a repeated measurements context, it is most often of interest to consider transformed responses, typically within-subject contrasts or averages. Efficiency considerations leads...

  15. On balanced minimal repeated measurements designs

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    Shakeel Ahmad Mir

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Repeated Measurements designs are concerned with scientific experiments in which each experimental unit is assigned more than once to a treatment either different or identical. This class of designs has the property that the unbiased estimators for elementary contrasts among direct and residual effects are obtainable. Afsarinejad (1983 provided a method of constructing balanced Minimal Repeated Measurements designs p < t , when t is an odd or prime power, one or more than one treatment may occur more than once in some sequences and  designs so constructed no longer remain uniform in periods. In this paper an attempt has been made to provide a new method to overcome this drawback. Specifically, two cases have been considered                RM[t,n=t(t-t/(p-1,p], λ2=1 for balanced minimal repeated measurements designs and  RM[t,n=2t(t-t/(p-1,p], λ2=2 for balanced  repeated measurements designs. In addition , a method has been provided for constructing              extra-balanced minimal designs for special case RM[t,n=t2/(p-1,p], λ2=1.

  16. 3-way Anova Interactions: Deconstructed

    OpenAIRE

    Phil Ender

    2008-01-01

    Three approaches to understanding 3-way anova interactions will be presented: 1) a conceptual approach, 2) an anova approach and 3) a regression approach using dummy coding. The three approaches are illustrated through the use of a synthetic dataset with a significant 3-way interaction.

  17. Conservative Sample Size Determination for Repeated Measures Analysis of Covariance.

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    Morgan, Timothy M; Case, L Douglas

    2013-07-05

    In the design of a randomized clinical trial with one pre and multiple post randomized assessments of the outcome variable, one needs to account for the repeated measures in determining the appropriate sample size. Unfortunately, one seldom has a good estimate of the variance of the outcome measure, let alone the correlations among the measurements over time. We show how sample sizes can be calculated by making conservative assumptions regarding the correlations for a variety of covariance structures. The most conservative choice for the correlation depends on the covariance structure and the number of repeated measures. In the absence of good estimates of the correlations, the sample size is often based on a two-sample t-test, making the 'ultra' conservative and unrealistic assumption that there are zero correlations between the baseline and follow-up measures while at the same time assuming there are perfect correlations between the follow-up measures. Compared to the case of taking a single measurement, substantial savings in sample size can be realized by accounting for the repeated measures, even with very conservative assumptions regarding the parameters of the assumed correlation matrix. Assuming compound symmetry, the sample size from the two-sample t-test calculation can be reduced at least 44%, 56%, and 61% for repeated measures analysis of covariance by taking 2, 3, and 4 follow-up measures, respectively. The results offer a rational basis for determining a fairly conservative, yet efficient, sample size for clinical trials with repeated measures and a baseline value.

  18. Power analysis for multivariate and repeated measures designs: a flexible approach using the SPSS MANOVA procedure.

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    D'Amico, E J; Neilands, T B; Zambarano, R

    2001-11-01

    Although power analysis is an important component in the planning and implementation of research designs, it is often ignored. Computer programs for performing power analysis are available, but most have limitations, particularly for complex multivariate designs. An SPSS procedure is presented that can be used for calculating power for univariate, multivariate, and repeated measures models with and without time-varying and time-constant covariates. Three examples provide a framework for calculating power via this method: an ANCOVA, a MANOVA, and a repeated measures ANOVA with two or more groups. The benefits and limitations of this procedure are discussed.

  19. Power analysis for multivariate and repeated measurements designs via SPSS: correction and extension of D'Amico, Neilands, and Zambarano (2001).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, Jason W

    2006-05-01

    D'Amico, Neilands, and Zambarano (2001) published SPSS syntax to perform power analyses for three complex procedures: ANCOVA, MANOVA, and repeated measures ANOVA. Unfortunately, the published SPSS syntax for performing the repeated measures analysis needed some minor revision in order to perform the analysis correctly. This article presents the corrected syntax that will successfully perform the repeated measures analysis and provides some guidance on modifying the syntax to customize the analysis.

  20. Nonparametric additive regression for repeatedly measured data

    KAUST Repository

    Carroll, R. J.

    2009-05-20

    We develop an easily computed smooth backfitting algorithm for additive model fitting in repeated measures problems. Our methodology easily copes with various settings, such as when some covariates are the same over repeated response measurements. We allow for a working covariance matrix for the regression errors, showing that our method is most efficient when the correct covariance matrix is used. The component functions achieve the known asymptotic variance lower bound for the scalar argument case. Smooth backfitting also leads directly to design-independent biases in the local linear case. Simulations show our estimator has smaller variance than the usual kernel estimator. This is also illustrated by an example from nutritional epidemiology. © 2009 Biometrika Trust.

  1. REPEATED MEASURES ANALYSIS OF CHANGES IN PHOTOSYNTHETIC EFFICIENCY IN SOUR CHERRY DURING WATER DEFICIT

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    Marija Viljevac

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate changes in photosynthetic efficiency applying repeated measures ANOVA using the photosynthetic performance index (PIABS of the JIP-test as a vitality parameter in seven genotypes of sour cherry (Prunus cerasus, L. during 10 days of continuous water deficit. Both univariate and multivariate ANOVA repeated measures revealed highly significant time effect (Days and its subsequent interactions with genotype and water deficit. However, the multivariate Pillai’s trace test detected the interaction Time × Genotype × Water deficit as not significant. According to the Tukey’s Studentized Range (HSD test, differences between the control and genotypes exposed to water stress became significant on the fourth day of the experiment, indicating that the plants on the average, began to lose their photosynthetic efficiency four days after being exposed to water shortage. It corroborates previous findings in other species that PIABS is very sensitive tool for detecting drought stress.

  2. Repeated measurement sampling in genetic association analysis with genotyping errors.

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    Lai, Renzhen; Zhang, Hong; Yang, Yaning

    2007-02-01

    Genotype misclassification occurs frequently in human genetic association studies. When cases and controls are subject to the same misclassification model, Pearson's chi-square test has the correct type I error but may lose power. Most current methods adjusting for genotyping errors assume that the misclassification model is known a priori or can be assessed by a gold standard instrument. But in practical applications, the misclassification probabilities may not be completely known or the gold standard method can be too costly to be available. The repeated measurement design provides an alternative approach for identifying misclassification probabilities. With this design, a proportion of the subjects are measured repeatedly (five or more repeats) for the genotypes when the error model is completely unknown. We investigate the applications of the repeated measurement method in genetic association analysis. Cost-effectiveness study shows that if the phenotyping-to-genotyping cost ratio or the misclassification rates are relatively large, the repeat sampling can gain power over the regular case-control design. We also show that the power gain is not sensitive to the genetic model, genetic relative risk and the population high-risk allele frequency, all of which are typically important ingredients in association studies. An important implication of this result is that whatever the genetic factors are, the repeated measurement method can be applied if the genotyping errors must be accounted for or the phenotyping cost is high.

  3. Non-parametric three-way mixed ANOVA with aligned rank tests.

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    Oliver-Rodríguez, Juan C; Wang, X T

    2015-02-01

    Research problems that require a non-parametric analysis of multifactor designs with repeated measures arise in the behavioural sciences. There is, however, a lack of available procedures in commonly used statistical packages. In the present study, a generalization of the aligned rank test for the two-way interaction is proposed for the analysis of the typical sources of variation in a three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures. It can be implemented in the usual statistical packages. Its statistical properties are tested by using simulation methods with two sample sizes (n = 30 and n = 10) and three distributions (normal, exponential and double exponential). Results indicate substantial increases in power for non-normal distributions in comparison with the usual parametric tests. Similar levels of Type I error for both parametric and aligned rank ANOVA were obtained with non-normal distributions and large sample sizes. Degrees-of-freedom adjustments for Type I error control in small samples are proposed. The procedure is applied to a case study with 30 participants per group where it detects gender differences in linguistic abilities in blind children not shown previously by other methods.

  4. Incomplete quality of life data in lung transplant research : comparing cross sectional, repeated measures ANOVA, and multi-level analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, KM; Post, WJ; Span, MM; van der Bij, W; Koeter, GH; TenVergert, EM

    2005-01-01

    Background: In longitudinal studies on Health Related Quality of Life (HRQL) it frequently occurs that patients have one or more missing forms, which may cause bias, and reduce the sample size. Aims of the present study were to address the problem of missing data in the field of lung transplantation

  5. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) models in lower extremity wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, James F

    2003-06-01

    Consider a study in which 2 new treatments are being compared with a control group. One way to compare outcomes would simply be to compare the 2 treatments with the control and the 2 treatments against each using 3 Student t tests (t test). If we were to compare 4 treatment groups, then we would need to use 6 t tests. The difficulty with using multiple t tests is that as the number of groups increases, so will the likelihood of finding a difference between any pair of groups simply by change when no real difference exists by definition a Type I error. If we were to perform 3 separate t tests each at alpha = .05, the experimental error rate increases to .14. As the number of multiple t tests increases, the experiment-wise error rate increases rather rapidly. The solution to the experimental error rate problem is to use analysis of variance (ANOVA) methods. Three basic ANOVA designs are reviewed that give hypothetical examples drawn from the literature to illustrate single-factor ANOVA, repeated measures ANOVA, and randomized block ANOVA. "No frills" SPSS or SAS code for each of these designs and examples used are available from the author on request.

  6. The application of analysis of variance (ANOVA) to different experimental designs in optometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, R A; Eperjesi, F; Gilmartin, B

    2002-05-01

    Analysis of variance (ANOVA) is the most efficient method available for the analysis of experimental data. Analysis of variance is a method of considerable complexity and subtlety, with many different variations, each of which applies in a particular experimental context. Hence, it is possible to apply the wrong type of ANOVA to data and, therefore, to draw an erroneous conclusion from an experiment. This article reviews the types of ANOVA most likely to arise in clinical experiments in optometry including the one-way ANOVA ('fixed' and 'random effect' models), two-way ANOVA in randomised blocks, three-way ANOVA, and factorial experimental designs (including the varieties known as 'split-plot' and 'repeated measures'). For each ANOVA, the appropriate experimental design is described, a statistical model is formulated, and the advantages and limitations of each type of design discussed. In addition, the problems of non-conformity to the statistical model and determination of the number of replications are considered.

  7. Multiple comparison analysis testing in ANOVA.

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    McHugh, Mary L

    2011-01-01

    The Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) test has long been an important tool for researchers conducting studies on multiple experimental groups and one or more control groups. However, ANOVA cannot provide detailed information on differences among the various study groups, or on complex combinations of study groups. To fully understand group differences in an ANOVA, researchers must conduct tests of the differences between particular pairs of experimental and control groups. Tests conducted on subsets of data tested previously in another analysis are called post hoc tests. A class of post hoc tests that provide this type of detailed information for ANOVA results are called "multiple comparison analysis" tests. The most commonly used multiple comparison analysis statistics include the following tests: Tukey, Newman-Keuls, Scheffee, Bonferroni and Dunnett. These statistical tools each have specific uses, advantages and disadvantages. Some are best used for testing theory while others are useful in generating new theory. Selection of the appropriate post hoc test will provide researchers with the most detailed information while limiting Type 1 errors due to alpha inflation.

  8. Comparison of Repeated Measurement Design and Mixed Models in Evaluation of the Entonox Effect on Labor Pain

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    Nasim Karimi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: In many medical studies, the response variable is measured repeatedly over time to evaluate the treatment effect that is known as longitudinal study. The analysis method for this type of data is repeated measures ANOVA that uses only one correlation structure and the results are not valid with inappropriate correlation structure. To avoid this problem, a convenient alternative is mixed models. So, the aim of this study was to compare of mixed and repeated measurement models for examination of the Entonox effect on the labor pain. Methods: This experimental study was designed to compare the effect of Entonox and oxygen inhalation on pain relief between two groups. Data were analyzed using repeated measurement and mixed models with different correlation structures. Selection and comparison of proper correlation structures performed using Akaike information criterion, Bayesian information criterion and restricted log-likelihood. Data were analyzed using SPSS-22. Results: Results of our study showed that all variables containing analgesia methods, labor duration of the first and second stages, and time were significant in these tests. In mixed model, heterogeneous first-order autoregressive, first-order autoregressive, heterogeneous Toeplitz and unstructured correlation structures were recognized as the best structures. Also, all variables were significant in these structures. Unstructured variance covariance matrix was recognized as the worst structure and labor duration of the first and second stages was not significant in this structure. Conclusions: This study showed that the Entonox inhalation has a significant effect on pain relief in primiparous and it is confirmed by all of the models.

  9. Analysis of repeated measurements from medical research when observations are missing

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, K.

    2007-01-01

    Subject dropout is a common problem in repeated measurements health stud ies. Where dropout is related to the response, the results obtained can be substantially biased. The research in this thesis is motivated by a repeated measurements asthma clinical trial with substantial patient dropout. In practice the extent to which missing observations affect parameter esti mates and their efficiency is not clear. Through extensive simulation studies under various scenarios and missing data mechanism...

  10. Capturing learning effects on eye movements in repeated measures experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Martin; Orquin, Jacob Lund; Fiedler, Susann

    We propose and illustrate that repeated exposure to stimuli sets increases the size of the saccade amplitudes. Saccadic amplitudes are closely related to the perceptual span and therefore used as a measure for the information intake in an experiment. Studies on expertise have shown that experts...... experiment in which 68 participants made choices between four alternatives with three different between subject conditions varying in presentation format (verbal matrix, a pictorial matrix, and a realistic product representation). The results consistently demonstrate an increase of the saccade amplitude over...... the course of the experiment independent of condition. We conclude by discussing our results in the light of the possible increase of the perceptual span and its implications for the research procedure in eye-tracking experiments with a repeated measurement design....

  11. Teaching Principles of Inference with ANOVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarlow, Kevin R.

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of variance (ANOVA) is a test of "mean" differences, but the reference to "variances" in the name is often overlooked. Classroom activities are presented to illustrate how ANOVA works with emphasis on how to think critically about inferential reasoning.

  12. Introducing ANOVA and ANCOVA a GLM approach

    CERN Document Server

    Rutherford, Andrew

    2000-01-01

    Traditional approaches to ANOVA and ANCOVA are now being replaced by a General Linear Modeling (GLM) approach. This book begins with a brief history of the separate development of ANOVA and regression analyses and demonstrates how both analysis forms are subsumed by the General Linear Model. A simple single independent factor ANOVA is analysed first in conventional terms and then again in GLM terms to illustrate the two approaches. The text then goes on to cover the main designs, both independent and related ANOVA and ANCOVA, single and multi-factor designs. The conventional statistical assumptions underlying ANOVA and ANCOVA are detailed and given expression in GLM terms. Alternatives to traditional ANCO

  13. Bayesian model selection of informative hypotheses for repeated measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, Joris; Klugkist, I.G.; Schoot, Rens van de; Meeus, W.H.J.; Selfhout, Maarten; Hoijtink, Herbert

    2010-01-01

    When analyzing repeated measurements data, researchers often have expectations about the relations between the measurement means. The expectations can often be formalized using equality and inequality constraints between (i) the measurement means over time, (ii) the measurement means between

  14. Bayesian model selection of informative hypotheses for repeated measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304823031; Klugkist, I.G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/27330089X; Van de Schoot, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304833207; Meeus, W.H.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070442215; van Zalk, M.H.W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304836214; Hoijtink, H.J.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075184427

    2009-01-01

    When analyzing repeated measurements data, researchers often have expectations about the relations between the measurement means. The expectations can often be formalized using equality and inequality constraints between (i) the measurement means over time, (ii) the measurement means between groups,

  15. ANOVA and ANCOVA A GLM Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Rutherford, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Provides an in-depth treatment of ANOVA and ANCOVA techniques from a linear model perspective ANOVA and ANCOVA: A GLM Approach provides a contemporary look at the general linear model (GLM) approach to the analysis of variance (ANOVA) of one- and two-factor psychological experiments. With its organized and comprehensive presentation, the book successfully guides readers through conventional statistical concepts and how to interpret them in GLM terms, treating the main single- and multi-factor designs as they relate to ANOVA and ANCOVA. The book begins with a brief history of the separate dev

  16. Discriminant analysis for repeated measures data: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Lix

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Discriminant analysis (DA encompasses procedures for classifying observations into groups (i.e., predictive discriminative analysis and describing the relative importance of variables for distinguishing amongst groups (i.e., descriptive discriminative analysis. In recent years, a number of developments have occurred in DA procedures for the analysis of data from repeated measures designs. Specifically, DA procedures have been developed for repeated measures data characterized by missing observations and/or unbalanced measurement occasions, as well as high-dimensional data in which measurements are collected repeatedly on two or more variables. This paper reviews the literature on DA procedures for univariate and multivariate repeated measures data, focusing on covariance pattern and linear mixed-effects models. A numeric example illustrates their implementation using SAS software.

  17. Bayesian Concordance Correlation Coefficient with Application to Repeatedly Measured Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atanu BHATTACHARJEE

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In medical research, Lin's classical concordance correlation coefficient (CCC is frequently applied to evaluate the similarity of the measurements produced by different raters or methods on the same subjects. It is particularly useful for continuous data. The objective of this paper is to propose the Bayesian counterpart to compute CCC for continuous data. Material and Methods: A total of 33 patients of astrocytoma brain treated in the Department of Radiation Oncology at Malabar Cancer Centre is enrolled in this work. It is a continuous data of tumor volume and tumor size repeatedly measured during baseline pretreatment workup and post surgery follow-ups for all patients. The tumor volume and tumor size are measured separately by MRI and CT scan. The agreement of measurement between MRI and CT scan is calculated through CCC. The statistical inference is performed through Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC technique. Results: Bayesian CCC is found suitable to get prominent evidence for test statistics to explore the relation between concordance measurements. The posterior mean estimates and 95% credible interval of CCC on tumor size and tumor volume are observed with 0.96(0.87,0.99 and 0.98(0.95,0.99 respectively. Conclusion: The Bayesian inference is adopted for development of the computational algorithm. The approach illustrated in this work provides the researchers an opportunity to find out the most appropriate model for specific data and apply CCC to fulfill the desired hypothesis.

  18. Calculating and graphing within-subject confidence intervals for ANOVA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baguley, Thom

    2012-03-01

    The psychological and statistical literature contains several proposals for calculating and plotting confidence intervals (CIs) for within-subjects (repeated measures) ANOVA designs. A key distinction is between intervals supporting inference about patterns of means (and differences between pairs of means, in particular) and those supporting inferences about individual means. In this report, it is argued that CIs for the former are best accomplished by adapting intervals proposed by Cousineau (Tutorials in Quantitative Methods for Psychology, 1, 42-45, 2005) and Morey (Tutorials in Quantitative Methods for Psychology, 4, 61-64, 2008) so that nonoverlapping CIs for individual means correspond to a confidence for their difference that does not include zero. CIs for the latter can be accomplished by fitting a multilevel model. In situations in which both types of inference are of interest, the use of a two-tiered CI is recommended. Free, open-source, cross-platform software for such interval estimates and plots (and for some common alternatives) is provided in the form of R functions for one-way within-subjects and two-way mixed ANOVA designs. These functions provide an easy-to-use solution to the difficult problem of calculating and displaying within-subjects CIs.

  19. Modeling repeated measurement data for occupational exposure assessment and epidemiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peretz, Chava

    2004-01-01

    Repeated measurements designs, occur frequently in the assessment of exposure to toxic chemicals. This thesis deals with the possibilities of using mixed effects models for occupational exposure assessment and in the analysis of exposure response relationships. The model enables simultaneous estima

  20. Applying the General Linear Model to Repeated Measures Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlmann, John T.; McShane, Michael G.

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the use of the general linear model (GLM) in problems with repeated measures on a dependent variable. Such problems include pretest-posttest designs, multitrial designs, and groups by trials designs. For each of these designs, a GLM analysis is demonstrated wherein full models are formed and restrictions…

  1. Graphic Methods for Interpreting Longitudinal Dyadic Patterns From Repeated-Measures Actor-Partner Interdependence Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perry, Nicholas; Baucom, Katherine; Bourne, Stacia

    2017-01-01

    Researchers commonly use repeated-measures actor–partner interdependence models (RM-APIM) to understand how romantic partners change in relation to one another over time. However, traditional interpretations of the results of these models do not fully or correctly capture the dyadic temporal...

  2. The concordance correlation coefficient for repeated measures estimated by variance components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Josep L; King, Tonya S; Chinchilli, Vernon M

    2009-01-01

    The concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) is an index that is commonly used to assess the degree of agreement between observers on measuring a continuous characteristic. Here, a CCC for longitudinal repeated measurements is developed through the appropriate specification of the intraclass correlation coefficient from a variance components linear mixed model. A case example and the results of a simulation study are provided.

  3. Concordance correlation coefficients estimated by generalized estimating equations and variance components for longitudinal repeated measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Miao-Yu

    2017-04-15

    The concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) is a commonly accepted measure of agreement between two observers for continuous responses. This paper proposes a generalized estimating equations (GEE) approach allowing dependency between repeated measurements over time to assess intra-agreement for each observer and inter- and total agreement among multiple observers simultaneously. Furthermore, the indices of intra-, inter-, and total agreement through variance components (VC) from an extended three-way linear mixed model (LMM) are also developed with consideration of the correlation structure of longitudinal repeated measurements. Simulation studies are conducted to compare the performance of the GEE and VC approaches for repeated measurements from longitudinal data. An application of optometric conformity study is used for illustration. In conclusion, the GEE approach allowing flexibility in model assumptions and correlation structures of repeated measurements gives satisfactory results with small mean square errors and nominal 95% coverage rates for large data sets, and when the assumption of the relationship between variances and covariances for the extended three-way LMM holds, the VC approach performs outstandingly well for all sample sizes. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. ANOVA for the behavioral sciences researcher

    CERN Document Server

    Cardinal, Rudolf N

    2013-01-01

    This new book provides a theoretical and practical guide to analysis of variance (ANOVA) for those who have not had a formal course in this technique, but need to use this analysis as part of their research.From their experience in teaching this material and applying it to research problems, the authors have created a summary of the statistical theory underlying ANOVA, together with important issues, guidance, practical methods, references, and hints about using statistical software. These have been organized so that the student can learn the logic of the analytical techniques but also use the

  5. ANOVA like analysis of cancer death age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areia, Aníbal; Mexia, João T.

    2016-06-01

    We use ANOVA to study the influence of year, sex, country and location on the average cancer death age. The data used was from the World Health Organization (WHO) files for 1999, 2003, 2007 and 2011. The locations considered were: kidney, leukaemia, melanoma of skin and oesophagus and the countries: Portugal, Norway, Greece and Romania.

  6. Modeling intraindividual variability with repeated measures data methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hershberger, Scott L

    2013-01-01

    This book examines how individuals behave across time and to what degree that behavior changes, fluctuates, or remains stable.It features the most current methods on modeling repeated measures data as reported by a distinguished group of experts in the field. The goal is to make the latest techniques used to assess intraindividual variability accessible to a wide range of researchers. Each chapter is written in a ""user-friendly"" style such that even the ""novice"" data analyst can easily apply the techniques.Each chapter features:a minimum discussion of mathematical detail;an empirical examp

  7. Empirical Likelihood-Based ANOVA for Trimmed Means

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velina, Mara; Valeinis, Janis; Greco, Luca; Luta, George

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce an alternative to Yuen’s test for the comparison of several population trimmed means. This nonparametric ANOVA type test is based on the empirical likelihood (EL) approach and extends the results for one population trimmed mean from Qin and Tsao (2002). The results of our simulation study indicate that for skewed distributions, with and without variance heterogeneity, Yuen’s test performs better than the new EL ANOVA test for trimmed means with respect to control over the probability of a type I error. This finding is in contrast with our simulation results for the comparison of means, where the EL ANOVA test for means performs better than Welch’s heteroscedastic F test. The analysis of a real data example illustrates the use of Yuen’s test and the new EL ANOVA test for trimmed means for different trimming levels. Based on the results of our study, we recommend the use of Yuen’s test for situations involving the comparison of population trimmed means between groups of interest. PMID:27690063

  8. Analysis of oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures using mixed models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getchell Thomas V

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two or more factor mixed factorial experiments are becoming increasingly common in microarray data analysis. In this case study, the two factors are presence (Patients with Alzheimer's disease or absence (Control of the disease, and brain regions including olfactory bulb (OB or cerebellum (CER. In the design considered in this manuscript, OB and CER are repeated measurements from the same subject and, hence, are correlated. It is critical to identify sources of variability in the analysis of oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures and correlations among data points have to be considered. In addition, multiple testing problems are more complicated in experiments with multi-level treatments or treatment combinations. Results In this study we adopted a linear mixed model to analyze oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures. We first construct a generalized F test to select differentially expressed genes. The Benjamini and Hochberg (BH procedure of controlling false discovery rate (FDR at 5% was applied to the P values of the generalized F test. For those genes with significant generalized F test, we then categorize them based on whether the interaction terms were significant or not at the α-level (αnew = 0.0033 determined by the FDR procedure. Since simple effects may be examined for the genes with significant interaction effect, we adopt the protected Fisher's least significant difference test (LSD procedure at the level of αnew to control the family-wise error rate (FWER for each gene examined. Conclusions A linear mixed model is appropriate for analysis of oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures. We constructed a generalized F test to select differentially expressed genes, and then applied a specific sequence of tests to identify factorial effects. This sequence of tests applied was designed to control for gene based FWER.

  9. High-Dimensional Multivariate Repeated Measures Analysis with Unequal Covariance Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrar, Solomon W.; Kong, Xiaoli

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, test statistics for repeated measures design are introduced when the dimension is large. By large dimension is meant the number of repeated measures and the total sample size grow together but either one could be larger than the other. Asymptotic distribution of the statistics are derived for the equal as well as unequal covariance cases in the balanced as well as unbalanced cases. The asymptotic framework considered requires proportional growth of the sample sizes and the dimension of the repeated measures in the unequal covariance case. In the equal covariance case, one can grow at much faster rate than the other. The derivations of the asymptotic distributions mimic that of Central Limit Theorem with some important peculiarities addressed with sufficient rigor. Consistent and unbiased estimators of the asymptotic variances, which make efficient use of all the observations, are also derived. Simulation study provides favorable evidence for the accuracy of the asymptotic approximation under the null hypothesis. Power simulations have shown that the new methods have comparable power with a popular method known to work well in low-dimensional situation but the new methods have shown enormous advantage when the dimension is large. Data from Electroencephalograph (EEG) experiment is analyzed to illustrate the application of the results. PMID:26778861

  10. [Analysis of binary classification repeated measurement data with GEE and GLMMs using SPSS software].

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Shengli; Zhang, Yanhong; Chen, Zheng

    2012-12-01

    To analyze binary classification repeated measurement data with generalized estimating equations (GEE) and generalized linear mixed models (GLMMs) using SPSS19.0. GEE and GLMMs models were tested using binary classification repeated measurement data sample using SPSS19.0. Compared with SAS, SPSS19.0 allowed convenient analysis of categorical repeated measurement data using GEE and GLMMs.

  11. Matrix-based concordance correlation coefficient for repeated measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiriote, Sasiprapa; Chinchilli, Vernon M

    2011-09-01

    In many clinical studies, Lin's concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) is a common tool to assess the agreement of a continuous response measured by two raters or methods. However, the need for measures of agreement may arise for more complex situations, such as when the responses are measured on more than one occasion by each rater or method. In this work, we propose a new CCC in the presence of repeated measurements, called the matrix-based concordance correlation coefficient (MCCC) based on a matrix norm that possesses the properties needed to characterize the level of agreement between two p× 1 vectors of random variables. It can be shown that the MCCC reduces to Lin's CCC when p= 1. For inference, we propose an estimator for the MCCC based on U-statistics. Furthermore, we derive the asymptotic distribution of the estimator of the MCCC, which is proven to be normal. The simulation studies confirm that overall in terms of accuracy, precision, and coverage probability, the estimator of the MCCC works very well in general cases especially when n is greater than 40. Finally, we use real data from an Asthma Clinical Research Network (ACRN) study and the Penn State Young Women's Health Study for demonstration.

  12. Rank-Based Analysis of Unbalanced Repeated Measures Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mushfiqur Rashid

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";} In this article, we have developed a rank (intra-subject based analysis of clinical trials with unbalanced repeated measures data. We assume that the errors within each patient are exchangeable and continuous random variables. This rank-based inference is valid when the unbalanced data are missing either completely at random or by design. A drop in dispersion test is developed for general linear hypotheses. A numerical example is given to illustrate the procedure.

  13. ANOVA-principal component analysis and ANOVA-simultaneous component analysis: a comparison.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwanenburg, G.; Hoefsloot, H.C.J.; Westerhuis, J.A.; Jansen, J.J.; Smilde, A.K.

    2011-01-01

    ANOVA-simultaneous component analysis (ASCA) is a recently developed tool to analyze multivariate data. In this paper, we enhance the explorative capability of ASCA by introducing a projection of the observations on the principal component subspace to visualize the variation among the measurements.

  14. Sequential experimental design based generalised ANOVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Souvik, E-mail: csouvik41@gmail.com; Chowdhury, Rajib, E-mail: rajibfce@iitr.ac.in

    2016-07-15

    Over the last decade, surrogate modelling technique has gained wide popularity in the field of uncertainty quantification, optimization, model exploration and sensitivity analysis. This approach relies on experimental design to generate training points and regression/interpolation for generating the surrogate. In this work, it is argued that conventional experimental design may render a surrogate model inefficient. In order to address this issue, this paper presents a novel distribution adaptive sequential experimental design (DA-SED). The proposed DA-SED has been coupled with a variant of generalised analysis of variance (G-ANOVA), developed by representing the component function using the generalised polynomial chaos expansion. Moreover, generalised analytical expressions for calculating the first two statistical moments of the response, which are utilized in predicting the probability of failure, have also been developed. The proposed approach has been utilized in predicting probability of failure of three structural mechanics problems. It is observed that the proposed approach yields accurate and computationally efficient estimate of the failure probability.

  15. Sequential experimental design based generalised ANOVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Souvik; Chowdhury, Rajib

    2016-07-01

    Over the last decade, surrogate modelling technique has gained wide popularity in the field of uncertainty quantification, optimization, model exploration and sensitivity analysis. This approach relies on experimental design to generate training points and regression/interpolation for generating the surrogate. In this work, it is argued that conventional experimental design may render a surrogate model inefficient. In order to address this issue, this paper presents a novel distribution adaptive sequential experimental design (DA-SED). The proposed DA-SED has been coupled with a variant of generalised analysis of variance (G-ANOVA), developed by representing the component function using the generalised polynomial chaos expansion. Moreover, generalised analytical expressions for calculating the first two statistical moments of the response, which are utilized in predicting the probability of failure, have also been developed. The proposed approach has been utilized in predicting probability of failure of three structural mechanics problems. It is observed that the proposed approach yields accurate and computationally efficient estimate of the failure probability.

  16. Scaling in ANOVA-simultaneous component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmerman, Marieke E; Hoefsloot, Huub C J; Smilde, Age K; Ceulemans, Eva

    In omics research often high-dimensional data is collected according to an experimental design. Typically, the manipulations involved yield differential effects on subsets of variables. An effective approach to identify those effects is ANOVA-simultaneous component analysis (ASCA), which combines analysis of variance with principal component analysis. So far, pre-treatment in ASCA received hardly any attention, whereas its effects can be huge. In this paper, we describe various strategies for scaling, and identify a rational approach. We present the approaches in matrix algebra terms and illustrate them with an insightful simulated example. We show that scaling directly influences which data aspects are stressed in the analysis, and hence become apparent in the solution. Therefore, the cornerstone for proper scaling is to use a scaling factor that is free from the effect of interest. This implies that proper scaling depends on the effect(s) of interest, and that different types of scaling may be proper for the different effect matrices. We illustrate that different scaling approaches can greatly affect the ASCA interpretation with a real-life example from nutritional research. The principle that scaling factors should be free from the effect of interest generalizes to other statistical methods that involve scaling, as classification methods.

  17. Iterative Weighted Semiparametric Least Squares Estimation in Repeated Measurement Partially Linear Regression Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ge-mai Chen; Jin-hong You

    2005-01-01

    Consider a repeated measurement partially linear regression model with an unknown vector pasemiparametric generalized least squares estimator (SGLSE) ofβ, we propose an iterative weighted semiparametric least squares estimator (IWSLSE) and show that it improves upon the SGLSE in terms of asymptotic covariance matrix. An adaptive procedure is given to determine the number of iterations. We also show that when the number of replicates is less than or equal to two, the IWSLSE can not improve upon the SGLSE.These results are generalizations of those in [2] to the case of semiparametric regressions.

  18. ANOVA parameters influence in LCF experimental data and simulation results

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The virtual design of components undergoing thermo mechanical fatigue (TMF) and plastic strains is usually run in many phases. The numerical finite element method gives a useful instrument which becomes increasingly effective as the geometrical and numerical modelling gets more accurate. The constitutive model definition plays an important role in the effectiveness of the numerical simulation [1, 2] as, for example, shown in Figure 1. In this picture it is shown how a good cyclic plasti...

  19. A default Bayesian hypothesis test for ANOVA designs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wetzels, R.; Grasman, R.P.P.P.; Wagenmakers, E.J.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a Bayesian hypothesis test for analysis of variance (ANOVA) designs. The test is an application of standard Bayesian methods for variable selection in regression models. We illustrate the effect of various g-priors on the ANOVA hypothesis test. The Bayesian test for ANOVA desig

  20. Understanding one-way ANOVA using conceptual figures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Kyun

    2017-02-01

    Analysis of variance (ANOVA) is one of the most frequently used statistical methods in medical research. The need for ANOVA arises from the error of alpha level inflation, which increases Type 1 error probability (false positive) and is caused by multiple comparisons. ANOVA uses the statistic F, which is the ratio of between and within group variances. The main interest of analysis is focused on the differences of group means; however, ANOVA focuses on the difference of variances. The illustrated figures would serve as a suitable guide to understand how ANOVA determines the mean difference problems by using between and within group variance differences.

  1. Alcohol intake and colorectal cancer: a comparison of approaches for including repeated measures of alcohol consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Wu, Kana; Grønbaek, Morten

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In numerous studies, alcohol intake has been found to be positively associated with colorectal cancer risk. However, the majority of studies included only one exposure measurement, which may bias the results if long-term intake is relevant.METHODS: We compared different approaches...... for including repeated measures of alcohol intake among 47,432 US men enrolled in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Questionnaires including questions on alcohol intake had been completed in 1986, 1990, 1994, and 1998. The outcome was incident colorectal cancer during follow-up from 1986 to 2002.RESULTS......: During follow-up, 868 members of the cohort experienced colorectal cancer. Baseline, updated, and cumulative average alcohol intakes were positively associated with colorectal cancer, with only minor differences among the approaches. These results support moderately increased risk for intake >30 g...

  2. Graphic Methods for Interpreting Longitudinal Dyadic Patterns From Repeated-Measures Actor-Partner Interdependence Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perry, Nicholas; Baucom, Katherine; Bourne, Stacia

    2017-01-01

    Researchers commonly use repeated-measures actor–partner interdependence models (RM-APIM) to understand how romantic partners change in relation to one another over time. However, traditional interpretations of the results of these models do not fully or correctly capture the dyadic temporal...... patterns estimated in RM-APIM. Interpretation of results from these models largely focuses on the meaning of single-parameter estimates in isolation from all the others. However, considering individual coefficients separately impedes the understanding of how these associations combine to produce...... to improve the understanding and presentation of dyadic patterns of association described by standard RM-APIMs. The current article briefly reviews the conceptual foundations of RM-APIMs, demonstrates how change-as-outcome RM-APIMs and VFDs can aid interpretation of standard RM-APIMs, and provides a tutorial...

  3. Inmate responses to prison-based drug treatment: a repeated measures analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Wayne N

    2010-06-01

    Using a sample of 347 prison inmates and general linear modeling (GLM) repeated measures analyses, this paper examined during-treatment responses (e.g., changes in psychological and social functioning) to prison-based TC drug treatment. These effects have rarely been examined in previous studies, and never with a fully multivariate model accounting for within-subjects effects (changes over time), between-subjects effects (e.g., levels of risk and motivation), and within/between-subjects interactions (timexriskxmotivation). The results provide evidence of positive inmate change in response to prison TC treatment, but the patterns of results varied depending upon: (a) specific indicators of psychological and social functioning, motivation, and treatment process; (b) the time periods examined (1, 6, and 12 months during treatment); and (c) baseline levels of risk and motivation. Significant interactions between time and type of inmate suggest important new directions for research, theory, and practice in offender-based substance abuse treatment.

  4. [Repeated measurement of memory with valenced test items: verbal memory, working memory and autobiographic memory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuffel, A; Terfehr, K; Uhlmann, C; Schreiner, J; Löwe, B; Spitzer, C; Wingenfeld, K

    2013-07-01

    A large number of questions in clinical and/or experimental neuropsychology require the multiple repetition of memory tests at relatively short intervals. Studies on the impact of the associated exercise and interference effects on the validity of the test results are rare. Moreover, hardly any neuropsychological instruments exist to date to record the memory performance with several parallel versions in which the emotional valence of the test material is also taken into consideration. The aim of the present study was to test whether a working memory test (WST, a digit-span task with neutral or negative distraction stimuli) devised by our workgroup can be used with repeated measurements. This question was also examined in parallel versions of a wordlist learning paradigm and an autobiographical memory test (AMT). Both tests contained stimuli with neutral, positive and negative valence. Twenty-four participants completed the memory testing including the working memory test and three versions of a wordlist and the AMT at intervals of a week apiece (measuring points 1. - 3.). The results reveal consistent performances across the three measuring points in the working and autobiographical memory test. The valence of the stimulus material did not influence the memory performance. In the delayed recall of the wordlist an improvement in memory performance over time was seen. The tests on working memory presented and the parallel versions for the declarative and autobiographical memory constitute informal economic instruments within the scope of the measurement repeatability designs. While the WST and AMT are appropriate for study designs with repeated measurements at relatively short intervals, longer intervals might seem more favourable for the use of wordlist learning paradigms. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Unitarity, Feedback, Interactions -- Dynamics Emergent from Repeated Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Altamirano, Natacha; Mann, Robert B; Zych, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the recent efforts to describe the gravitational interaction as a classical channel arising from continuous quantum measurements, we study what types of dynamics can emerge from a model of repeated short interactions of a system with a set of ancillae. We show that contingent on the model parameters the resulting dynamics ranges from exact unitarity to arbitrary fast decoherence (quantum Zeno effect). For a series of measurements the effective dynamics includes feedback-control, which for a composite system yields effective interactions between the subsystems. We quantify the amount of decoherence accompanying such induced interactions, generalizing the lower bound of the gravitational example. However, by allowing multipartite measurements, the interactions can be induced with arbitrary low decoherence. Our results have implications for gravity-inspired decoherence models and the simple framework used in the present study can find applications in devising novel quantum control protocols, or quan...

  6. Characterization of the peripheral blood transcriptome in a repeated measures design using a panel of healthy individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Boever, Patrick; Wens, Britt; Forcheh, Anyiawung Chiara

    2014-01-01

    A repeated measures microarray design with 22 healthy, non-smoking volunteers (aging 32. ±. 5. years) was set up to study transcriptome profiles in whole blood samples. The results indicate that repeatable data can be obtained with high within-subject correlation. Probes that could discriminate....... Our study suggests that the blood transcriptome of healthy individuals is reproducible over a time period of several months. © 2013 Elsevier Inc....

  7. Positional Repeatability Measurements Of Stepper Motors At Cryogenic Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompea, Stephen M.; Hall, Michael S.; Bartko, Frank; Houck, James R.

    1983-08-01

    Stepper motors operating at liquid helium temperature have multiple applications in cryogenically-cooled telescopes such as the Shuttle Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF). These SIRTF applications include driving cryogen flow valves, operating the Multiple Instrument Chamber (MIC) beam splitter mechanism, and operating filters and grating wheel mechanisms in the scientific instruments. The positional repeatability of the beam splitter drive mechanism is especially critical since it feeds the optical beam to the scien-tific instruments. Despite these important applications, no significant data on the positional repeatability of stepper motors at cryogenic temperatures has been available. Therefore, we conducted a series of measurements to determine the positional repeatability of a modified, off-the-shelf Berger/Lahr stepper motor (model RDM 253/25, step angle 3.6°) which had demonstrated excellent performance in previous endurance testing at LHe temperature. These test results indicated that the positional repeatability of the motor was excellent at all temperatures, with somewhat better performance at cryogenic temperatures. Another important result was that the motor could be repeatedly turned off and on while still accurately retaining its rotor position.

  8. Modelling uncertainty in incompressible flow simulation using Galerkin based generalized ANOVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Souvik; Chowdhury, Rajib

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a new algorithm, referred to here as Galerkin based generalized analysis of variance decomposition (GG-ANOVA) for modelling input uncertainties and its propagation in incompressible fluid flow. The proposed approach utilizes ANOVA to represent the unknown stochastic response. Further, the unknown component functions of ANOVA are represented using the generalized polynomial chaos expansion (PCE). The resulting functional form obtained by coupling the ANOVA and PCE is substituted into the stochastic Navier-Stokes equation (NSE) and Galerkin projection is employed to decompose it into a set of coupled deterministic 'Navier-Stokes alike' equations. Temporal discretization of the set of coupled deterministic equations is performed by employing Adams-Bashforth scheme for convective term and Crank-Nicolson scheme for diffusion term. Spatial discretization is performed by employing finite difference scheme. Implementation of the proposed approach has been illustrated by two examples. In the first example, a stochastic ordinary differential equation has been considered. This example illustrates the performance of proposed approach with change in nature of random variable. Furthermore, convergence characteristics of GG-ANOVA has also been demonstrated. The second example investigates flow through a micro channel. Two case studies, namely the stochastic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and stochastic vortex dipole, have been investigated. For all the problems results obtained using GG-ANOVA are in excellent agreement with benchmark solutions.

  9. Hierarchical linear model: thinking outside the traditional repeated-measures analysis-of-variance box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lininger, Monica; Spybrook, Jessaca; Cheatham, Christopher C

    2015-04-01

    Longitudinal designs are common in the field of athletic training. For example, in the Journal of Athletic Training from 2005 through 2010, authors of 52 of the 218 original research articles used longitudinal designs. In 50 of the 52 studies, a repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to analyze the data. A possible alternative to this approach is the hierarchical linear model, which has been readily accepted in other medical fields. In this short report, we demonstrate the use of the hierarchical linear model for analyzing data from a longitudinal study in athletic training. We discuss the relevant hypotheses, model assumptions, analysis procedures, and output from the HLM 7.0 software. We also examine the advantages and disadvantages of using the hierarchical linear model with repeated measures and repeated-measures analysis of variance for longitudinal data.

  10. Hierarchical Linear Model: Thinking Outside the Traditional Repeated-Measures Analysis-of-Variance Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lininger, Monica; Spybrook, Jessaca; Cheatham, Christopher C.

    2015-01-01

    Longitudinal designs are common in the field of athletic training. For example, in the Journal of Athletic Training from 2005 through 2010, authors of 52 of the 218 original research articles used longitudinal designs. In 50 of the 52 studies, a repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to analyze the data. A possible alternative to this approach is the hierarchical linear model, which has been readily accepted in other medical fields. In this short report, we demonstrate the use of the hierarchical linear model for analyzing data from a longitudinal study in athletic training. We discuss the relevant hypotheses, model assumptions, analysis procedures, and output from the HLM 7.0 software. We also examine the advantages and disadvantages of using the hierarchical linear model with repeated measures and repeated-measures analysis of variance for longitudinal data. PMID:25875072

  11. Analyzing repeated measures semi-continuous data, with application to an alcohol dependence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Strawderman, Robert L; Johnson, Bankole A; O'Quigley, John M

    2016-02-01

    Two-part random effects models (Olsen and Schafer,(1) Tooze et al.(2)) have been applied to repeated measures of semi-continuous data, characterized by a mixture of a substantial proportion of zero values and a skewed distribution of positive values. In the original formulation of this model, the natural logarithm of the positive values is assumed to follow a normal distribution with a constant variance parameter. In this article, we review and consider three extensions of this model, allowing the positive values to follow (a) a generalized gamma distribution, (b) a log-skew-normal distribution, and (c) a normal distribution after the Box-Cox transformation. We allow for the possibility of heteroscedasticity. Maximum likelihood estimation is shown to be conveniently implemented in SAS Proc NLMIXED. The performance of the methods is compared through applications to daily drinking records in a secondary data analysis from a randomized controlled trial of topiramate for alcohol dependence treatment. We find that all three models provide a significantly better fit than the log-normal model, and there exists strong evidence for heteroscedasticity. We also compare the three models by the likelihood ratio tests for non-nested hypotheses (Vuong(3)). The results suggest that the generalized gamma distribution provides the best fit, though no statistically significant differences are found in pairwise model comparisons.

  12. Detection of epigenetic changes using ANOVA with spatially varying coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guanghua, Xiao; Xinlei, Wang; Quincey, LaPlant; Nestler, Eric J; Xie, Yang

    2013-03-13

    Identification of genome-wide epigenetic changes, the stable changes in gene function without a change in DNA sequence, under various conditions plays an important role in biomedical research. High-throughput epigenetic experiments are useful tools to measure genome-wide epigenetic changes, but the measured intensity levels from these high-resolution genome-wide epigenetic profiling data are often spatially correlated with high noise levels. In addition, it is challenging to detect genome-wide epigenetic changes across multiple conditions, so efficient statistical methodology development is needed for this purpose. In this study, we consider ANOVA models with spatially varying coefficients, combined with a hierarchical Bayesian approach, to explicitly model spatial correlation caused by location-dependent biological effects (i.e., epigenetic changes) and borrow strength among neighboring probes to compare epigenetic changes across multiple conditions. Through simulation studies and applications in drug addiction and depression datasets, we find that our approach compares favorably with competing methods; it is more efficient in estimation and more effective in detecting epigenetic changes. In addition, it can provide biologically meaningful results.

  13. Are multiple contrast tests superior to the ANOVA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konietschke, Frank; Bösiger, Sandra; Brunner, Edgar; Hothorn, Ludwig A

    2013-08-01

    Multiple contrast tests can be used to test arbitrary linear hypotheses by providing local and global test decisions as well as simultaneous confidence intervals. The ANOVA-F-test on the contrary can be used to test the global null hypothesis of no treatment effect. Thus, multiple contrast tests provide more information than the analysis of variance (ANOVA) by offering which levels cause the significance. We compare the exact powers of the ANOVA-F-test and multiple contrast tests to reject the global null hypothesis. Hereby, we compute their least favorable configurations (LFCs). It turns out that both procedures have the same LFCs under certain conditions. Exact power investigations show that their powers are equal to detect their LFCs.

  14. Cross-trimester repeated measures testing for Down's syndrome screening: an assessment.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wright, D

    2010-07-01

    To provide estimates and confidence intervals for the performance (detection and false-positive rates) of screening for Down\\'s syndrome using repeated measures of biochemical markers from first and second trimester maternal serum samples taken from the same woman.

  15. The Multilevel Approach to Repeated Measures for Complete and Incomplete Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, CJM; Snijders, TAB

    2003-01-01

    Repeated measurements often are analyzed by multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA). An alternative approach is provided by multilevel analysis, also called the hierarchical linear model (HLM), which makes use of random coefficient models. This paper is a tutorial which indicates that the HLM can

  16. Repeated measures of serum glucose and insulin in relation to postmenopausal breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Geoffrey C; Kim, Mimi; Caan, Bette J; Chlebowski, Rowan T; Gunter, Marc J; Ho, Gloria Y F; Rodriguez, Beatriz L; Shikany, James M; Strickler, Howard D; Vitolins, Mara Z; Rohan, Thomas E

    2009-12-01

    Experimental and epidemiological evidence suggests that circulating glucose and insulin may play a role in breast carcinogenesis. However, few cohort studies have examined breast cancer risk in association with glucose and insulin levels, and studies to date have had only baseline measurements of exposure. We conducted a longitudinal study of postmenopausal breast cancer risk using the 6% random sample of women in the Women's Health Initiative clinical trials whose fasting blood samples, provided at baseline and at years 1, 3 and 6, were analyzed for glucose and insulin. In addition, a 1% sample of women in the observational study, who had glucose and insulin measured in fasting blood samples drawn at baseline and in year 3, were included in the analysis. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the association of baseline and follow-up measurements of serum glucose and insulin with breast cancer risk. All statistical tests were 2-sided. Among 5,450 women with baseline serum glucose and insulin values, 190 incident cases of breast cancer were ascertained over a median of 8.0 years of follow-up. The highest tertile of baseline insulin, relative to the lowest, was associated with a 2-fold increase in risk in the total population (multivariable hazard ratio 2.22, 95% confidence interval 1.39-3.53) and with a 3-fold increase in risk in women who were not enrolled in the intervention arm of any clinical trial (multivariable hazard ratio 3.15, 95% confidence interval 1.61-6.17). Glucose levels showed no association with risk. Analysis of the repeated measurements supported the results of the baseline analysis. These data suggest that elevated serum insulin levels may be a risk factor for postmenopausal breast cancer.

  17. A marginal-mean ANOVA approach for analyzing multireader multicase radiological imaging data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillis, Stephen L

    2014-01-30

    The correlated-error ANOVA method proposed by Obuchowski and Rockette (OR) has been a useful procedure for analyzing reader-performance outcomes, such as the area under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve, resulting from multireader multicase radiological imaging data. This approach, however, has only been formally derived for the test-by-reader-by-case factorial study design. In this paper, I show that the OR model can be viewed as a marginal-mean ANOVA model. Viewing the OR model within this marginal-mean ANOVA framework is the basis for the marginal-mean ANOVA approach, the topic of this paper. This approach (1) provides an intuitive motivation for the OR model, including its covariance-parameter constraints; (2) provides easy derivations of OR test statistics and parameter estimates, as well as their distributions and confidence intervals; and (3) allows for easy generalization of the OR procedure to other study designs. In particular, I show how one can easily derive OR-type analysis formulas for any balanced study design by following an algorithm that only requires an understanding of conventional ANOVA methods.

  18. Analysis of oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures using mixed models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Wood, Constance L; Getchell, Thomas V; Getchell, Marilyn L; Stromberg, Arnold J

    2004-12-30

    Two or more factor mixed factorial experiments are becoming increasingly common in microarray data analysis. In this case study, the two factors are presence (Patients with Alzheimer's disease) or absence (Control) of the disease, and brain regions including olfactory bulb (OB) or cerebellum (CER). In the design considered in this manuscript, OB and CER are repeated measurements from the same subject and, hence, are correlated. It is critical to identify sources of variability in the analysis of oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures and correlations among data points have to be considered. In addition, multiple testing problems are more complicated in experiments with multi-level treatments or treatment combinations. In this study we adopted a linear mixed model to analyze oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures. We first construct a generalized F test to select differentially expressed genes. The Benjamini and Hochberg (BH) procedure of controlling false discovery rate (FDR) at 5% was applied to the P values of the generalized F test. For those genes with significant generalized F test, we then categorize them based on whether the interaction terms were significant or not at the alpha-level (alphanew = 0.0033) determined by the FDR procedure. Since simple effects may be examined for the genes with significant interaction effect, we adopt the protected Fisher's least significant difference test (LSD) procedure at the level of alphanew to control the family-wise error rate (FWER) for each gene examined. A linear mixed model is appropriate for analysis of oligonucleotide array experiments with repeated measures. We constructed a generalized F test to select differentially expressed genes, and then applied a specific sequence of tests to identify factorial effects. This sequence of tests applied was designed to control for gene based FWER.

  19. On the repeated measures designs and sample sizes for randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tango, Toshiro

    2016-04-01

    For the analysis of longitudinal or repeated measures data, generalized linear mixed-effects models provide a flexible and powerful tool to deal with heterogeneity among subject response profiles. However, the typical statistical design adopted in usual randomized controlled trials is an analysis of covariance type analysis using a pre-defined pair of "pre-post" data, in which pre-(baseline) data are used as a covariate for adjustment together with other covariates. Then, the major design issue is to calculate the sample size or the number of subjects allocated to each treatment group. In this paper, we propose a new repeated measures design and sample size calculations combined with generalized linear mixed-effects models that depend not only on the number of subjects but on the number of repeated measures before and after randomization per subject used for the analysis. The main advantages of the proposed design combined with the generalized linear mixed-effects models are (1) it can easily handle missing data by applying the likelihood-based ignorable analyses under the missing at random assumption and (2) it may lead to a reduction in sample size, compared with the simple pre-post design. The proposed designs and the sample size calculations are illustrated with real data arising from randomized controlled trials.

  20. GSTM1 and APE1 genotypes affect arsenic-induced oxidative stress: a repeated measures study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quamruzzaman Quazi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic arsenic exposure is associated with an increased risk of skin, bladder and lung cancers. Generation of oxidative stress may contribute to arsenic carcinogenesis. Methods To investigate the association between arsenic exposure and oxidative stress, urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG was evaluated in a cohort of 97 women recruited from an arsenic-endemic region of Bangladesh in 2003. Arsenic exposure was measured in urine, toenails, and drinking water. Drinking water and urine samples were collected on three consecutive days. Susceptibility to oxidative stress was evaluated by genotyping relevant polymorphisms in glutathione-s transferase mu (GSTM1, human 8-oxoguanine glycosylase (hOGG1 and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE1 genes using the Taqman method. Data were analyzed using random effects Tobit regression to account for repeated measures and 8-OHdG values below the detection limit. Results A consistent negative effect for APE1 was observed across water, toenail and urinary arsenic models. APE1 148 glu/glu + asp/glu genotype was associated with a decrease in logged 8-OHdG of 0.40 (95%CI -0.73, -0.07 compared to APE1 148 asp/asp. An association between total urinary arsenic and 8-OHdG was observed among women with the GSTM1 null genotype but not in women with GSTM1 positive. Among women with GSTM1 null, a comparison of the second, third, and fourth quartiles of total urinary arsenic to the first quartile resulted in a 0.84 increase (95% CI 0.27, 1.42, a 0.98 increase (95% CI 033, 1.66 and a 0.85 increase (95% CI 0.27, 1.44 in logged 8-OHdG, respectively. No effects between 8-OHdG and toenail arsenic or drinking water arsenic were observed. Conclusion These results suggest the APE1 variant genotype decreases repair of 8-OHdG and that arsenic exposure is associated with oxidative stress in women who lack a functional GSTM1 detoxification enzyme.

  1. Assessing variability and comparing short-term biomarkers of styrene exposure using a repeated measurements approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fustinoni, S; Manini, P; Campo, L; De Palma, G; Andreoli, R; Mutti, A; Bertazzi, P A; Rappaport, S M

    2010-01-15

    The aim of this work is to compare several short-term biomarkers of styrene exposure, namely urinary styrene (StyU), mercapturic acids (M1+M2), mandelic acid (MA), phenylglyoxylic acid (PGA), phenylglycine (PHG), and 4-vinylphenol conjugates (VP), for use as biomarkers of exposure in epidemiologic studies. A repeated measurements protocol (typically 4 measurements per worker over 6 weeks) was applied to measure airborne styrene (StyA) and urinary biomarkers in 10 varnish and 8 fiberglass reinforced plastic workers. Estimated geometric mean personal exposures to StyA were 2.96mg/m(3) in varnish workers and 15.7mg/m(3) in plastic workers. The corresponding levels of StyU, M1+M2, MA, PGA, MA+PGA, PHG and VP were 5.13microg/L, 0.111, 38.2, 22.7, 62.6, 0.978, and 3.97mg/g creatinine in varnish workers and 8.38microg/L, 0.303, 146, 83.4, 232, 2.85 and 3.97mg/g creatinine in plastic workers. Within-worker (sigma(wY)(2)) and between-worker (sigma(bY)(2)) variance components were estimated from the log-transformed data as were the corresponding fold ranges containing 95% of the respective lognormal distributions of daily levels ((w)R(0.95)) and subject-specific mean levels ((b)R(0.95)). Estimates of (w)R(0.95) (range: 4-26) were generally smaller than those of (b)R(0.95) (range: 5-790) for both environmental and biological markers; this indicates that exposures varied much more between workers than within workers in these groups. Since attenuation bias in an estimated exposure-response relationship increases with the variance ratio lambda=sigma(wY)(2)/sigma(bY)(2), we estimated values of lambda for all exposure measures in our study. Values of lambda were typically much less than one (median=0.220) and ranged from 0.089 for M1+M2 in plastic workers to 1.38 for PHG in varnish workers. Since values of lambda were 0.147 and 0.271 for StyA in varnish workers and plastic workers, respectively, compared to 0.178 and 0.210 for MA in the same groups, our results suggest that either

  2. ANOVA like analysis for structured families of stochastic matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Cristina; Santos, Carla; Varadinov, Maria; Mexia, João T.

    2016-12-01

    Symmetric stochastic matrices width a width a dominant eigenvalue λ and the corresponding eigenvector α appears in many applications. Such matrices can be written as M =λ α αt+E¯. Thus β = λ α will be the structure vector. When the matrices in such families correspond to the treatments of a base design we can carry out a ANOVA like analysis of the action of the treatments in the model on the structured vectors. This analysis can be transversal-when we worked width homologous components and - longitudinal when we consider contrast on the components of each structure vector. The analysis will be briefly considered at the end of our presentation.

  3. Smoothing spline ANOVA frailty model for recurrent event data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Pang; Jiang, Yihua; Wang, Yuedong

    2011-12-01

    Gap time hazard estimation is of particular interest in recurrent event data. This article proposes a fully nonparametric approach for estimating the gap time hazard. Smoothing spline analysis of variance (ANOVA) decompositions are used to model the log gap time hazard as a joint function of gap time and covariates, and general frailty is introduced to account for between-subject heterogeneity and within-subject correlation. We estimate the nonparametric gap time hazard function and parameters in the frailty distribution using a combination of the Newton-Raphson procedure, the stochastic approximation algorithm (SAA), and the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. The convergence of the algorithm is guaranteed by decreasing the step size of parameter update and/or increasing the MCMC sample size along iterations. Model selection procedure is also developed to identify negligible components in a functional ANOVA decomposition of the log gap time hazard. We evaluate the proposed methods with simulation studies and illustrate its use through the analysis of bladder tumor data.

  4. On the Analysis of a Repeated Measure Design in Genome-Wide Association Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Lee

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Longitudinal data enables detecting the effect of aging/time, and as a repeated measures design is statistically more efficient compared to cross-sectional data if the correlations between repeated measurements are not large. In particular, when genotyping cost is more expensive than phenotyping cost, the collection of longitudinal data can be an efficient strategy for genetic association analysis. However, in spite of these advantages, genome-wide association studies (GWAS with longitudinal data have rarely been analyzed taking this into account. In this report, we calculate the required sample size to achieve 80% power at the genome-wide significance level for both longitudinal and cross-sectional data, and compare their statistical efficiency. Furthermore, we analyzed the GWAS of eight phenotypes with three observations on each individual in the Korean Association Resource (KARE. A linear mixed model allowing for the correlations between observations for each individual was applied to analyze the longitudinal data, and linear regression was used to analyze the first observation on each individual as cross-sectional data. We found 12 novel genome-wide significant disease susceptibility loci that were then confirmed in the Health Examination cohort, as well as some significant interactions between age/sex and SNPs.

  5. A Network-Based Algorithm for Clustering Multivariate Repeated Measures Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koslovsky, Matthew; Arellano, John; Schaefer, Caroline; Feiveson, Alan; Young, Millennia; Lee, Stuart

    2017-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Astronaut Corps is a unique occupational cohort for which vast amounts of measures data have been collected repeatedly in research or operational studies pre-, in-, and post-flight, as well as during multiple clinical care visits. In exploratory analyses aimed at generating hypotheses regarding physiological changes associated with spaceflight exposure, such as impaired vision, it is of interest to identify anomalies and trends across these expansive datasets. Multivariate clustering algorithms for repeated measures data may help parse the data to identify homogeneous groups of astronauts that have higher risks for a particular physiological change. However, available clustering methods may not be able to accommodate the complex data structures found in NASA data, since the methods often rely on strict model assumptions, require equally-spaced and balanced assessment times, cannot accommodate missing data or differing time scales across variables, and cannot process continuous and discrete data simultaneously. To fill this gap, we propose a network-based, multivariate clustering algorithm for repeated measures data that can be tailored to fit various research settings. Using simulated data, we demonstrate how our method can be used to identify patterns in complex data structures found in practice.

  6. Multiple-objective response-adaptive repeated measurement designs in clinical trials for binary responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yuanyuan; Li, Yin; Wang, Jing; Carriere, Keumhee C

    2014-02-20

    A multiple-objective allocation strategy was recently proposed for constructing response-adaptive repeated measurement designs for continuous responses. We extend the allocation strategy to constructing response-adaptive repeated measurement designs for binary responses. The approach with binary responses is quite different from the continuous case, as the information matrix is a function of responses, and it involves nonlinear modeling. To deal with these problems, we first build the design on the basis of success probabilities. Then we illustrate how various models can accommodate carryover effects on the basis of logits of response profiles as well as any correlation structure. Through computer simulations, we find that the allocation strategy developed for continuous responses also works well for binary responses. As expected, design efficiency in terms of mean squared error drops sharply, as more emphasis is placed on increasing treatment benefit than estimation precision. However, we find that it can successfully allocate more patients to better treatment sequences without sacrificing much estimation precision.

  7. One-way ANOVA based on interval information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesamian, Gholamreza

    2016-08-01

    This paper deals with extending the one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) to the case where the observed data are represented by closed intervals rather than real numbers. In this approach, first a notion of interval random variable is introduced. Especially, a normal distribution with interval parameters is introduced to investigate hypotheses about the equality of interval means or test the homogeneity of interval variances assumption. Moreover, the least significant difference (LSD method) for investigating multiple comparison of interval means is developed when the null hypothesis about the equality of means is rejected. Then, at a given interval significance level, an index is applied to compare the interval test statistic and the related interval critical value as a criterion to accept or reject the null interval hypothesis of interest. Finally, the method of decision-making leads to some degrees to accept or reject the interval hypotheses. An applied example will be used to show the performance of this method.

  8. A novel AX+/BX- paradigm to assess fear learning and safety-signal processing with repeated-measure designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazama, Andy M; Schauder, Kimberly B; McKinnon, Michael; Bachevalier, Jocelyne; Davis, Michael

    2013-04-15

    One of the core symptoms of anxiety disorders, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, is the failure to overcome feelings of danger despite being in a safe environment. This deficit likely stems from an inability to fully process safety signals, which are cues in the environment that enable healthy individuals to over-ride fear in aversive situations. Studies examining safety signal learning in rodents, humans, and non-human primates currently rely on between-groups designs. Because repeated-measure designs reduce the number of subjects required, and facilitate a broader range of safety signal studies, the current project sought to develop a repeated-measures safety-signal learning paradigm in non-human primates. Twelve healthy rhesus macaques of both sexes received three rounds of auditory fear-potentiated startle training and testing using an AX+/BX- design with all visual cues. Cue AX was paired with an aversive blast of air, whereas the same X cue in compound with another B cue (BX) signaled the absence of an air blast. Hence, cue B served as a safety signal. Once animals consistently discriminated between the aversive (AX+) and safe (BX-) cues, measured by greater startle amplitude in the presence of AX vs. BX, they were tested for conditioned inhibition by eliciting startle in the presence of a novel ambiguous combined cue (AB). Similar to previous AX+/BX- studies, healthy animals rapidly learned to discriminate between the AX+ and BX- cues as well as demonstrate conditioned inhibition in the presence of the combined AB cue (i.e. lower startle amplitude in the presence of AB vs. AX). Additionally, animals performed consistently across three rounds of testing using three new cues each time. The results validate this novel method that will serve as a useful tool for better understanding the mechanisms for the regulation of fear and anxiety. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Estimation of the concordance correlation coefficient for repeated measures using SAS and R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Josep L; Phillips, Brenda R; Puig-Martinez, Josep; King, Tonya S; Chinchilli, Vernon M

    2013-03-01

    The concordance correlation coefficient is one of the most common approaches used to assess agreement among different observers or instruments when the outcome of interest is a continuous variable. A SAS macro and R package are provided here to estimate the concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) where the design of the data involves repeated measurements by subject and observer. The CCC is estimated using U-statistics (UST) and variance components (VC) approaches. Confidence intervals and standard errors are reported along with the point estimate of the CCC. In the case of the VC approach, the linear mixed model output and variance components estimates are also provided. The performance of each function is shown by means of some examples with real data sets.

  10. Bayesian latent variable models for hierarchical clustered count outcomes with repeated measures in microbiome studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lizhen; Paterson, Andrew D; Xu, Wei

    2017-04-01

    Motivated by the multivariate nature of microbiome data with hierarchical taxonomic clusters, counts that are often skewed and zero inflated, and repeated measures, we propose a Bayesian latent variable methodology to jointly model multiple operational taxonomic units within a single taxonomic cluster. This novel method can incorporate both negative binomial and zero-inflated negative binomial responses, and can account for serial and familial correlations. We develop a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm that is built on a data augmentation scheme using Pólya-Gamma random variables. Hierarchical centering and parameter expansion techniques are also used to improve the convergence of the Markov chain. We evaluate the performance of our proposed method through extensive simulations. We also apply our method to a human microbiome study.

  11. Causal inference in longitudinal comparative effectiveness studies with repeated measures of a continuous intermediate variable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen-Pin; Jo, Booil; Brown, C Hendricks

    2014-09-10

    We propose a principal stratification approach to assess causal effects in nonrandomized longitudinal comparative effectiveness studies with a binary endpoint outcome and repeated measures of a continuous intermediate variable. Our method is an extension of the principal stratification approach originally proposed for the longitudinal randomized study "Prevention of Suicide in Primary Care Elderly: Collaborative Trial" to assess the treatment effect on the continuous Hamilton depression score adjusting for the heterogeneity of repeatedly measured binary compliance status. Our motivation for this work comes from a comparison of the effect of two glucose-lowering medications on a clinical cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes. Here, we consider a causal inference problem assessing how well the two medications work relative to one another on two binary endpoint outcomes: cardiovascular disease-related hospitalization and all-cause mortality. Clinically, these glucose-lowering medications can have differential effects on the intermediate outcome, glucose level over time. Ultimately, we want to compare medication effects on the endpoint outcomes among individuals in the same glucose trajectory stratum while accounting for the heterogeneity in baseline covariates (i.e., to obtain 'principal effects' on the endpoint outcomes). The proposed method involves a three-step model estimation procedure. Step 1 identifies principal strata associated with the intermediate variable using hybrid growth mixture modeling analyses. Step 2 obtains the stratum membership using the pseudoclass technique and derives propensity scores for treatment assignment. Step 3 obtains the stratum-specific treatment effect on the endpoint outcome weighted by inverse propensity probabilities derived from Step 2.

  12. A Bayesian subgroup analysis using collections of ANOVA models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinzhong; Sivaganesan, Siva; Laud, Purushottam W; Müller, Peter

    2017-03-20

    We develop a Bayesian approach to subgroup analysis using ANOVA models with multiple covariates, extending an earlier work. We assume a two-arm clinical trial with normally distributed response variable. We also assume that the covariates for subgroup finding are categorical and are a priori specified, and parsimonious easy-to-interpret subgroups are preferable. We represent the subgroups of interest by a collection of models and use a model selection approach to finding subgroups with heterogeneous effects. We develop suitable priors for the model space and use an objective Bayesian approach that yields multiplicity adjusted posterior probabilities for the models. We use a structured algorithm based on the posterior probabilities of the models to determine which subgroup effects to report. Frequentist operating characteristics of the approach are evaluated using simulation. While our approach is applicable in more general cases, we mainly focus on the 2 × 2 case of two covariates each at two levels for ease of presentation. The approach is illustrated using a real data example.

  13. Factor selection and structural identification in the interaction ANOVA model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Justin B; Bondell, Howard D

    2013-03-01

    When faced with categorical predictors and a continuous response, the objective of an analysis often consists of two tasks: finding which factors are important and determining which levels of the factors differ significantly from one another. Often times, these tasks are done separately using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) followed by a post hoc hypothesis testing procedure such as Tukey's Honestly Significant Difference test. When interactions between factors are included in the model the collapsing of levels of a factor becomes a more difficult problem. When testing for differences between two levels of a factor, claiming no difference would refer not only to equality of main effects, but also to equality of each interaction involving those levels. This structure between the main effects and interactions in a model is similar to the idea of heredity used in regression models. This article introduces a new method for accomplishing both of the common analysis tasks simultaneously in an interaction model while also adhering to the heredity-type constraint on the model. An appropriate penalization is constructed that encourages levels of factors to collapse and entire factors to be set to zero. It is shown that the procedure has the oracle property implying that asymptotically it performs as well as if the exact structure were known beforehand. We also discuss the application to estimating interactions in the unreplicated case. Simulation studies show the procedure outperforms post hoc hypothesis testing procedures as well as similar methods that do not include a structural constraint. The method is also illustrated using a real data example.

  14. Factor Selection and Structural Identification in the Interaction ANOVA Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Justin B.; Bondell, Howard D.

    2013-01-01

    Summary When faced with categorical predictors and a continuous response, the objective of analysis often consists of two tasks: finding which factors are important and determining which levels of the factors differ significantly from one another. Often times these tasks are done separately using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) followed by a post-hoc hypothesis testing procedure such as Tukey’s Honestly Significant Difference test. When interactions between factors are included in the model the collapsing of levels of a factor becomes a more difficult problem. When testing for differences between two levels of a factor, claiming no difference would refer not only to equality of main effects, but also equality of each interaction involving those levels. This structure between the main effects and interactions in a model is similar to the idea of heredity used in regression models. This paper introduces a new method for accomplishing both of the common analysis tasks simultaneously in an interaction model while also adhering to the heredity-type constraint on the model. An appropriate penalization is constructed that encourages levels of factors to collapse and entire factors to be set to zero. It is shown that the procedure has the oracle property implying that asymptotically it performs as well as if the exact structure were known beforehand. We also discuss the application to estimating interactions in the unreplicated case. Simulation studies show the procedure outperforms post hoc hypothesis testing procedures as well as similar methods that do not include a structural constraint. The method is also illustrated using a real data example. PMID:23323643

  15. Microcomputer-based tests for repeated-measures: Metric properties and predictive validities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Robert S.; Baltzley, Dennis R.; Dunlap, William P.; Wilkes, Robert L.; Kuntz, Lois-Ann

    1989-01-01

    A menu of psychomotor and mental acuity tests were refined. Field applications of such a battery are, for example, a study of the effects of toxic agents or exotic environments on performance readiness, or the determination of fitness for duty. The key requirement of these tasks is that they be suitable for repeated-measures applications, and so questions of stability and reliability are a continuing, central focus of this work. After the initial (practice) session, seven replications of 14 microcomputer-based performance tests (32 measures) were completed by 37 subjects. Each test in the battery had previously been shown to stabilize in less than five 90-second administrations and to possess retest reliabilities greater than r = 0.707 for three minutes of testing. However, all the tests had never been administered together as a battery and they had never been self-administered. In order to provide predictive validity for intelligence measurement, the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised and the Wonderlic Personnel Test were obtained on the same subjects.

  16. Impact of repeated measures and sample selection on genome-wide association studies of fasting glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Alonso, Alvaro; Li, Man; Kao, Wen; Köttgen, Anna; Yan, Yuer; Couper, David; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bielinski, Suzette J.; Pankow, James S.

    2010-01-01

    Although GWAS have been performed in longitudinal studies, most used only a single trait measure. GWAS of fasting glucose have generally included only normoglycemic individuals. We examined the impact of both repeated measures and sample selection on GWAS in ARIC, a study which obtained four longitudinal measures of fasting glucose and included both individuals with and without prevalent diabetes. The sample included Caucasians and the Affymetrix 6.0 chip was used for genotyping. Sample sizes for GWAS analyses ranged from 8372 (first study visit) to 5782 (average fasting glucose). Candidate SNP analyses with SNPs identified through fasting glucose or diabetes GWAS were conducted in 9133 individuals, including 761 with prevalent diabetes. For a constant sample size, smaller p-values were obtained for the average measure of fasting glucose compared to values at any single visit, and two additional significant GWAS signals were detected. For four candidate SNPs (rs780094, rs10830963, rs7903146, and rs4607517), the strength of association between genotype and glucose was significantly (p-interaction fasting glucose candidate SNPs (rs780094, rs10830963, rs560887, rs4607517, rs13266634) the association with measured fasting glucose was more significant in the smaller sample without prevalent diabetes than in the larger combined sample of those with and without diabetes. This analysis demonstrates the potential utility of averaging trait values in GWAS studies and explores the advantage of using only individuals without prevalent diabetes in GWAS of fasting glucose. PMID:20839289

  17. Preliminary evaluation of a micro-based repeated measures testing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Robert S.; Wilkes, Robert L.; Lane, Norman E.

    1985-01-01

    A need exists for an automated performance test system to study the effects of various treatments which are of interest to the aerospace medical community, i.e., the effects of drugs and environmental stress. The ethics and pragmatics of such assessment demand that repeated measures in small groups of subjects be the customary research paradigm. Test stability, reliability-efficiency and factor structure take on extreme significance; in a program of study by the U.S. Navy, 80 percent of 150 tests failed to meet minimum metric requirements. The best is being programmed on a portable microprocessor and administered along with tests in their original formats in order to examine their metric properties in the computerized mode. Twenty subjects have been tested over four replications on a 6.0 minute computerized battery (six tests) and which compared with five paper and pencil marker tests. All tests achieved stability within the four test sessions, reliability-efficiencies were high (r greater than .707 for three minutes testing), and the computerized tests were largely comparable to the paper and pencil version from which they were derived. This computerized performance test system is portable, inexpensive and rugged.

  18. Selecting a linear mixed model for longitudinal data: repeated measures analysis of variance, covariance pattern model, and growth curve approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Siwei; Rovine, Michael J; Molenaar, Peter C M

    2012-03-01

    With increasing popularity, growth curve modeling is more and more often considered as the 1st choice for analyzing longitudinal data. Although the growth curve approach is often a good choice, other modeling strategies may more directly answer questions of interest. It is common to see researchers fit growth curve models without considering alterative modeling strategies. In this article we compare 3 approaches for analyzing longitudinal data: repeated measures analysis of variance, covariance pattern models, and growth curve models. As all are members of the general linear mixed model family, they represent somewhat different assumptions about the way individuals change. These assumptions result in different patterns of covariation among the residuals around the fixed effects. In this article, we first indicate the kinds of data that are appropriately modeled by each and use real data examples to demonstrate possible problems associated with the blanket selection of the growth curve model. We then present a simulation that indicates the utility of Akaike information criterion and Bayesian information criterion in the selection of a proper residual covariance structure. The results cast doubt on the popular practice of automatically using growth curve modeling for longitudinal data without comparing the fit of different models. Finally, we provide some practical advice for assessing mean changes in the presence of correlated data.

  19. Constrained statistical inference: sample-size tables for ANOVA and regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanbrabant, Leonard; Van De Schoot, Rens; Rosseel, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Researchers in the social and behavioral sciences often have clear expectations about the order/direction of the parameters in their statistical model. For example, a researcher might expect that regression coefficient β1 is larger than β2 and β3. The corresponding hypothesis is H: β1 > {β2, β3} and this is known as an (order) constrained hypothesis. A major advantage of testing such a hypothesis is that power can be gained and inherently a smaller sample size is needed. This article discusses this gain in sample size reduction, when an increasing number of constraints is included into the hypothesis. The main goal is to present sample-size tables for constrained hypotheses. A sample-size table contains the necessary sample-size at a pre-specified power (say, 0.80) for an increasing number of constraints. To obtain sample-size tables, two Monte Carlo simulations were performed, one for ANOVA and one for multiple regression. Three results are salient. First, in an ANOVA the needed sample-size decreases with 30-50% when complete ordering of the parameters is taken into account. Second, small deviations from the imposed order have only a minor impact on the power. Third, at the maximum number of constraints, the linear regression results are comparable with the ANOVA results. However, in the case of fewer constraints, ordering the parameters (e.g., β1 > β2) results in a higher power than assigning a positive or a negative sign to the parameters (e.g., β1 > 0).

  20. A repeated measures experiment of green exercise to improve self-esteem in UK school children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine Reed

    Full Text Available Exercising in natural, green environments creates greater improvements in adult's self-esteem than exercise undertaken in urban or indoor settings. No comparable data are available for children. The aim of this study was to determine whether so called 'green exercise' affected changes in self-esteem; enjoyment and perceived exertion in children differently to urban exercise. We assessed cardiorespiratory fitness (20 m shuttle-run and self-reported physical activity (PAQ-A in 11 and 12 year olds (n = 75. Each pupil completed two 1.5 mile timed runs, one in an urban and another in a rural environment. Trials were completed one week apart during scheduled physical education lessons allocated using a repeated measures design. Self-esteem was measured before and after each trial, ratings of perceived exertion (RPE and enjoyment were assessed after completing each trial. We found a significant main effect (F (1,74, = 12.2, p<0.001, for the increase in self-esteem following exercise but there was no condition by exercise interaction (F (1,74, = 0.13, p = 0.72. There were no significant differences in perceived exertion or enjoyment between conditions. There was a negative correlation (r = -0.26, p = 0.04 between habitual physical activity and RPE during the control condition, which was not evident in the green exercise condition (r = -0.07, p = 0.55. Contrary to previous studies in adults, green exercise did not produce significantly greater increases in self-esteem than the urban exercise condition. Green exercise was enjoyed more equally by children with differing levels of habitual physical activity and has the potential to engage less active children in exercise.

  1. Splashing Our Way to Playfulness! An Aquatic Playgroup for Young Children with Autism, A Repeated Measures Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrizi, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of an aquatic playgroup on the playfulness of children, ages 2 to 3 with autism spectrum disorder. Using a repeated measures design, we followed 10 children and their caregivers who participated in a 6-week aquatic playgroup in southwest Florida. Four dyads completed the entire 12-week study period. The…

  2. Cardiometabolic treatment decisions in patients with type 2 diabetes : the role of repeated measurements and medication burden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorham, J.; Haaijer-Ruskamp, F. M.; Wolffenbuttel, B. H. R.; Stolk, R. P.; Denig, P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Clinical guidelines for cardiometabolic risk management indicate a simple threshold-based strategy for treatment, but physicians and their patients may be reluctant to modify drug treatment after a single elevated measurement. We determined how repeated measurements of blood pressure, choles

  3. Splashing Our Way to Playfulness! An Aquatic Playgroup for Young Children with Autism, A Repeated Measures Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrizi, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of an aquatic playgroup on the playfulness of children, ages 2 to 3 with autism spectrum disorder. Using a repeated measures design, we followed 10 children and their caregivers who participated in a 6-week aquatic playgroup in southwest Florida. Four dyads completed the entire 12-week study period. The…

  4. A Correction for the Epsilon Approximate Test in Repeated Measures Designs with Two or More Independent Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecoutre, Bruno

    1991-01-01

    The routine epsilon approximate test in repeated measures designs when the condition of circularity is unfulfilled uses an erroneous formula in the case of two or more groups. Because this may lead to underestimation of the deviation from circularity when the subject number is small, a correction is proposed. (Author/SLD)

  5. Cardiometabolic treatment decisions in patients with type 2 diabetes : the role of repeated measurements and medication burden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorham, J.; Haaijer-Ruskamp, F. M.; Wolffenbuttel, B. H. R.; Stolk, R. P.; Denig, P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Clinical guidelines for cardiometabolic risk management indicate a simple threshold-based strategy for treatment, but physicians and their patients may be reluctant to modify drug treatment after a single elevated measurement. We determined how repeated measurements of blood pressure,

  6. Phylogenetic ANOVA: The Expression Variance and Evolution Model for Quantitative Trait Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohlfs, Rori V; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2015-09-01

    A number of methods have been developed for modeling the evolution of a quantitative trait on a phylogeny. These methods have received renewed interest in the context of genome-wide studies of gene expression, in which the expression levels of many genes can be modeled as quantitative traits. We here develop a new method for joint analyses of quantitative traits within- and between species, the Expression Variance and Evolution (EVE) model. The model parameterizes the ratio of population to evolutionary expression variance, facilitating a wide variety of analyses, including a test for lineage-specific shifts in expression level, and a phylogenetic ANOVA that can detect genes with increased or decreased ratios of expression divergence to diversity, analogous to the famous Hudson Kreitman Aguadé (HKA) test used to detect selection at the DNA level. We use simulations to explore the properties of these tests under a variety of circumstances and show that the phylogenetic ANOVA is more accurate than the standard ANOVA (no accounting for phylogeny) sometimes used in transcriptomics. We then apply the EVE model to a mammalian phylogeny of 15 species typed for expression levels in liver tissue. We identify genes with high expression divergence between species as candidates for expression level adaptation, and genes with high expression diversity within species as candidates for expression level conservation and/or plasticity. Using the test for lineage-specific expression shifts, we identify several candidate genes for expression level adaptation on the catarrhine and human lineages, including genes putatively related to dietary changes in humans. We compare these results to those reported previously using a model which ignores expression variance within species, uncovering important differences in performance. We demonstrate the necessity for a phylogenetic model in comparative expression studies and show the utility of the EVE model to detect expression divergence

  7. Prediction and Control of Cutting Tool Vibration in Cnc Lathe with Anova and Ann

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Abuthakeer

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Machining is a complex process in which many variables can deleterious the desired results. Among them, cutting tool vibration is the most critical phenomenon which influences dimensional precision of the components machined, functional behavior of the machine tools and life of the cutting tool. In a machining operation, the cutting tool vibrations are mainly influenced by cutting parameters like cutting speed, depth of cut and tool feed rate. In this work, the cutting tool vibrations are controlled using a damping pad made of Neoprene. Experiments were conducted in a CNC lathe where the tool holder is supported with and without damping pad. The cutting tool vibration signals were collected through a data acquisition system supported by LabVIEW software. To increase the buoyancy and reliability of the experiments, a full factorial experimental design was used. Experimental data collected were tested with analysis of variance (ANOVA to understand the influences of the cutting parameters. Empirical models have been developed using analysis of variance (ANOVA. Experimental studies and data analysis have been performed to validate the proposed damping system. Multilayer perceptron neural network model has been constructed with feed forward back-propagation algorithm using the acquired data. On the completion of the experimental test ANN is used to validate the results obtained and also to predict the behavior of the system under any cutting condition within the operating range. The onsite tests show that the proposed system reduces the vibration of cutting tool to a greater extend.

  8. Reinforcing Sampling Distributions through a Randomization-Based Activity for Introducing ANOVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Laura; Doehler, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the use of a randomization-based activity to introduce the ANOVA F-test to students. The two main goals of this activity are to successfully teach students to comprehend ANOVA F-tests and to increase student comprehension of sampling distributions. Four sections of students in an advanced introductory statistics course…

  9. Predictors and Variability of Repeat Measurements of Urinary Phenols and Parabens in a Cohort of Shanghai Women and Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Jessie P.; Yang, Gong; Liao, Linda M.; Satagopan, Jaya; Calafat, Antonia M.; Matthews, Charles E.; Cai, Qiuyin; Ji, Bu-Tian; Cai, Hui; Wolff, Mary S.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Zheng, Wei; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Gao, Yu-Tang; Chow, Wong-Ho

    2014-01-01

    , under certain circumstances, among women. Citation: Engel LS, Buckley JP, Yang G, Liao LM, Satagopan J, Calafat AM, Matthews CE, Cai Q, Ji BT, Cai H, Engel SM, Wolff MS, Rothman N, Zheng W, Xiang YB, Shu XO, Gao YT, Chow WH. 2014. Predictors and variability of repeat measurements of urinary phenols and parabens in a cohort of Shanghai women and men. Environ Health Perspect 122:733–740; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1306830 PMID:24659570

  10. Kerf modelling in abrasive waterjet milling using evolutionary computation and ANOVA techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberdi, A.; Rivero, A.; Carrascal, A.; Lamikiz, A.

    2012-04-01

    Many researchers demonstrated the capability of Abrasive Waterjet (AWJ) technology for precision milling operations. However, the concurrence of several input parameters along with the stochastic nature of this technology leads to a complex process control, which requires a work focused in process modelling. This research work introduces a model to predict the kerf shape in AWJ slot milling in Aluminium 7075-T651 in terms of four important process parameters: the pressure, the abrasive flow rate, the stand-off distance and the traverse feed rate. A hybrid evolutionary approach was employed for kerf shape modelling. This technique allowed characterizing the profile through two parameters: the maximum cutting depth and the full width at half maximum. On the other hand, based on ANOVA and regression techniques, these two parameters were also modelled as a function of process parameters. Combination of both models resulted in an adequate strategy to predict the kerf shape for different machining conditions.

  11. A hybrid anchored-ANOVA - POD/Kriging method for uncertainty quantification in unsteady high-fidelity CFD simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margheri, Luca; Sagaut, Pierre

    2016-11-01

    To significantly increase the contribution of numerical computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation for risk assessment and decision making, it is important to quantitatively measure the impact of uncertainties to assess the reliability and robustness of the results. As unsteady high-fidelity CFD simulations are becoming the standard for industrial applications, reducing the number of required samples to perform sensitivity (SA) and uncertainty quantification (UQ) analysis is an actual engineering challenge. The novel approach presented in this paper is based on an efficient hybridization between the anchored-ANOVA and the POD/Kriging methods, which have already been used in CFD-UQ realistic applications, and the definition of best practices to achieve global accuracy. The anchored-ANOVA method is used to efficiently reduce the UQ dimension space, while the POD/Kriging is used to smooth and interpolate each anchored-ANOVA term. The main advantages of the proposed method are illustrated through four applications with increasing complexity, most of them based on Large-Eddy Simulation as a high-fidelity CFD tool: the turbulent channel flow, the flow around an isolated bluff-body, a pedestrian wind comfort study in a full scale urban area and an application to toxic gas dispersion in a full scale city area. The proposed c-APK method (anchored-ANOVA-POD/Kriging) inherits the advantages of each key element: interpolation through POD/Kriging precludes the use of quadrature schemes therefore allowing for a more flexible sampling strategy while the ANOVA decomposition allows for a better domain exploration. A comparison of the three methods is given for each application. In addition, the importance of adding flexibility to the control parameters and the choice of the quantity of interest (QoI) are discussed. As a result, global accuracy can be achieved with a reasonable number of samples allowing computationally expensive CFD-UQ analysis.

  12. Reduced basis ANOVA methods for partial differential equations with high-dimensional random inputs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Qifeng, E-mail: liaoqf@shanghaitech.edu.cn [School of Information Science and Technology, ShanghaiTech University, Shanghai 200031 (China); Lin, Guang, E-mail: guanglin@purdue.edu [Department of Mathematics & School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    In this paper we present a reduced basis ANOVA approach for partial deferential equations (PDEs) with random inputs. The ANOVA method combined with stochastic collocation methods provides model reduction in high-dimensional parameter space through decomposing high-dimensional inputs into unions of low-dimensional inputs. In this work, to further reduce the computational cost, we investigate spatial low-rank structures in the ANOVA-collocation method, and develop efficient spatial model reduction techniques using hierarchically generated reduced bases. We present a general mathematical framework of the methodology, validate its accuracy and demonstrate its efficiency with numerical experiments.

  13. Reduced basis ANOVA methods for partial differential equations with high-dimensional random inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Qifeng; Lin, Guang

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we present a reduced basis ANOVA approach for partial deferential equations (PDEs) with random inputs. The ANOVA method combined with stochastic collocation methods provides model reduction in high-dimensional parameter space through decomposing high-dimensional inputs into unions of low-dimensional inputs. In this work, to further reduce the computational cost, we investigate spatial low-rank structures in the ANOVA-collocation method, and develop efficient spatial model reduction techniques using hierarchically generated reduced bases. We present a general mathematical framework of the methodology, validate its accuracy and demonstrate its efficiency with numerical experiments.

  14. MorePower 6.0 for ANOVA with relational confidence intervals and Bayesian analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Jamie I D; Thompson, Valerie A

    2012-12-01

    MorePower 6.0 is a flexible freeware statistical calculator that computes sample size, effect size, and power statistics for factorial ANOVA designs. It also calculates relational confidence intervals for ANOVA effects based on formulas from Jarmasz and Hollands (Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology 63:124-138, 2009), as well as Bayesian posterior probabilities for the null and alternative hypotheses based on formulas in Masson (Behavior Research Methods 43:679-690, 2011). The program is unique in affording direct comparison of these three approaches to the interpretation of ANOVA tests. Its high numerical precision and ability to work with complex ANOVA designs could facilitate researchers' attention to issues of statistical power, Bayesian analysis, and the use of confidence intervals for data interpretation. MorePower 6.0 is available at https://wiki.usask.ca/pages/viewpageattachments.action?pageId=420413544 .

  15. A Hybrid One-Way ANOVA Approach for the Robust and Efficient Estimation of Differential Gene Expression with Multiple Patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Manir Hossain Mollah; Rahman Jamal; Norfilza Mohd Mokhtar; Roslan Harun; Md. Nurul Haque Mollah

    2015-01-01

    Background Identifying genes that are differentially expressed (DE) between two or more conditions with multiple patterns of expression is one of the primary objectives of gene expression data analysis. Several statistical approaches, including one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), are used to identify DE genes. However, most of these methods provide misleading results for two or more conditions with multiple patterns of expression in the presence of outlying genes. In this paper, an attempt ...

  16. How integrated are behavioral and endocrine stress response traits? A repeated measures approach to testing the stress-coping style model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulton, Kay; Couto, Elsa; Grimmer, Andrew J; Earley, Ryan L; Canario, Adelino V M; Wilson, Alastair J; Walling, Craig A

    2015-02-01

    It is widely expected that physiological and behavioral stress responses will be integrated within divergent stress-coping styles (SCS) and that these may represent opposite ends of a continuously varying reactive-proactive axis. If such a model is valid, then stress response traits should be repeatable and physiological and behavioral responses should also change in an integrated manner along a major axis of among-individual variation. While there is some evidence of association between endocrine and behavioral stress response traits, few studies incorporate repeated observations of both. To test this model, we use a multivariate, repeated measures approach in a captive-bred population of Xiphophorus birchmanni. We quantify among-individual variation in behavioral stress response to an open field trial (OFT) with simulated predator attack (SPA) and measure waterborne steroid hormone levels (cortisol, 11-ketotestosterone) before and after exposure. Under the mild stress stimulus (OFT), (multivariate) behavioral variation among individuals was consistent with a strong axis of personality (shy-bold) or coping style (reactive-proactive) variation. However, behavioral responses to a moderate stressor (SPA) were less repeatable, and robust statistical support for repeatable endocrine state over the full sampling period was limited to 11-ketotestosterone. Although post hoc analysis suggested cortisol expression was repeatable over short time periods, qualitative relationships between behavior and glucocorticoid levels were counter to our a priori expectations. Thus, while our results clearly show among-individual differences in behavioral and endocrine traits associated with stress response, the correlation structure between these is not consistent with a simple proactive-reactive axis of integrated stress-coping style. Additionally, the low repeatability of cortisol suggests caution is warranted if single observations (or indeed repeat measures over short sampling

  17. Functional Analysis: Evaluation of Response Intensities - Tailoring ANOVA for Lists of Expression Subsets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Hertogh Benoît

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray data is frequently used to characterize the expression profile of a whole genome and to compare the characteristics of that genome under several conditions. Geneset analysis methods have been described previously to analyze the expression values of several genes related by known biological criteria (metabolic pathway, pathology signature, co-regulation by a common factor, etc. at the same time and the cost of these methods allows for the use of more values to help discover the underlying biological mechanisms. Results As several methods assume different null hypotheses, we propose to reformulate the main question that biologists seek to answer. To determine which genesets are associated with expression values that differ between two experiments, we focused on three ad hoc criteria: expression levels, the direction of individual gene expression changes (up or down regulation, and correlations between genes. We introduce the FAERI methodology, tailored from a two-way ANOVA to examine these criteria. The significance of the results was evaluated according to the self-contained null hypothesis, using label sampling or by inferring the null distribution from normally distributed random data. Evaluations performed on simulated data revealed that FAERI outperforms currently available methods for each type of set tested. We then applied the FAERI method to analyze three real-world datasets on hypoxia response. FAERI was able to detect more genesets than other methodologies, and the genesets selected were coherent with current knowledge of cellular response to hypoxia. Moreover, the genesets selected by FAERI were confirmed when the analysis was repeated on two additional related datasets. Conclusions The expression values of genesets are associated with several biological effects. The underlying mathematical structure of the genesets allows for analysis of data from several genes at the same time. Focusing on expression

  18. Detection of quasi-periodic processes in repeated measurements: New approach for the fitting and clusterization of different data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigmatullin, R.; Rakhmatullin, R.

    2014-12-01

    Many experimentalists were accustomed to think that any independent measurement forms a non-correlated measurement that depends weakly from others. We are trying to reconsider this conventional point of view and prove that similar measurements form a strongly-correlated sequence of random functions with memory. In other words, successive measurements "remember" each other at least their nearest neighbors. This observation and justification on real data help to fit the wide set of data based on the Prony's function. The Prony's decomposition follows from the quasi-periodic (QP) properties of the measured functions and includes the Fourier transform as a partial case. New type of decomposition helps to obtain a specific amplitude-frequency response (AFR) of the measured (random) functions analyzed and each random function contains less number of the fitting parameters in comparison with its number of initial data points. Actually, the calculated AFR can be considered as the generalized Prony's spectrum (GPS), which will be extremely useful in cases where the simple model pretending on description of the measured data is absent but vital necessity of their quantitative description is remained. These possibilities open a new way for clusterization of the initial data and new information that is contained in these data gives a chance for their detailed analysis. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements realized for empty resonator (pure noise data) and resonator containing a sample (CeO2 in our case) confirmed the existence of the QP processes in reality. But we think that the detection of the QP processes is a common feature of many repeated measurements and this new property of successive measurements can attract an attention of many experimentalists. To formulate some general conditions that help to identify and then detect the presence of some QP process in the repeated experimental measurements. To find a functional equation and its solution that

  19. Developing the Pieta House Suicide Intervention Model: a quasi-experimental, repeated measures design.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Surgenor, Paul Wg

    2015-01-01

    While most crisis intervention models adhere to a generalised theoretical framework, the lack of clarity around how these should be enacted has resulted in a proliferation of models, most of which have little to no empirical support. The primary aim of this research was to propose a suicide intervention model that would resolve the client\\'s suicidal crisis by decreasing their suicidal ideation and improve their outlook through enhancing a range of protective factors. The secondary aim was to assess the impact of this model on negative and positive outlook.

  20. ±25ppm repeatable measurement of trapezoidal pulses with 5MHz bandwidth

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)712364; Arpaia, Pasquale; Cerqueira Bastos, Miguel; Martino, Michele

    2015-01-01

    High-quality measurements of pulses are nowadays widely used in fields such as radars, pulsed lasers, electromagnetic pulse generators, and particle accelerators. Whilst literature is mainly focused on fast systems for nanosecond regime with relaxed metrological requirements, in this paper, the high-performance measurement of slower pulses in microsecond regime is faced. In particular, the experimental proof demonstration for a 15 MS/s,_25 ppm repeatable acquisition system to characterize the flat-top of 3 ms rise-time trapezoidal pulses is given. The system exploits a 5MHz bandwidth circuit for analogue signal processing based on the concept of flat-top removal. The requirements, as well as the conceptual and physical designs are illustrated. Simulation results aimed at assessing the circuit performance are also presented. Finally, an experimental case study on the characterization of a pulsed power supply for the klystrons modulators of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) under study at CERN is reported. In ...

  1. Extended fluctuation theorems for repeated measurements and feedback within Hamiltonian framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahiri, Sourabh, E-mail: sourabhlahiri@gmail.com [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie Théorique, ESPCI, 10 rue Vauquelin, F-75231 Paris (France); Jayannavar, A.M. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India)

    2016-04-29

    We derive the extended fluctuation theorems in presence of multiple measurements and feedback, when the system is governed by Hamiltonian dynamics. We use only the forward phase space trajectories in the derivation. However, to obtain an expression for the efficacy parameter, we must necessarily use the notion of reverse trajectory. Our results show that the correction term appearing in the exponent of the extended fluctuation theorems is non-unique, whereas the physical meaning of the efficacy parameter is unique. - Highlights: • Extended Fluctuation Theorems under multiple measurements and feedback have been derived using Hamiltonian dynamics. • We prove the theorems without using the notion of reverse trajectory. • We show that the correction terms are not unique. • The efficacy parameter is shown to have a unique physical meaning.

  2. Mediation of the Relationship between Maternal Phthalate Exposure and Preterm Birth by Oxidative Stress with Repeated Measurements across Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Kelly K; Chen, Yin-Hsiu; VanderWeele, Tyler J; McElrath, Thomas F; Meeker, John D; Mukherjee, Bhramar

    2017-03-01

    Mediation analysis is useful for understanding mechanisms and has been used minimally in the study of the environment and disease. We examined mediation of the association between phthalate exposure during pregnancy and preterm birth by oxidative stress. This nested case-control study of preterm birth (n = 130 cases, 352 controls) included women who delivered in Boston, Massachusestts, from 2006 through 2008. Phthalate metabolites and 8-isoprostane, an oxidative stress biomarker, were measured in urine from three visits in pregnancy. We applied four counterfactual mediation methods: method 1, utilizing exposure and mediator averages; method 2, using averages but allowing for an exposure-mediator interaction; method 3, incorporating longitudinal measurements of the exposure and mediator; and method 4, using longitudinal measurements and allowing for an exposure-mediator interaction. We observed mediation of the associations between phthalate metabolites and all preterm birth by 8-isoprostane, with the greatest estimated proportion mediated observed for spontaneous preterm births specifically. Fully utilizing repeated measures of the exposure and mediator improved precision of indirect (i.e., mediated) effect estimates, and including an exposure-mediator interaction increased the estimated proportion mediated. For example, for mono(2-ethyl-carboxy-propyl) phthalate (MECPP), a metabolite of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), the percent of the total effect mediated by 8-isoprostane increased from 47% to 60% with inclusion of an exposure-mediator interaction term, in reference to a total adjusted odds ratio of 1.67 or 1.48, respectively. This demonstrates mediation of the phthalate-preterm birth relationship by oxidative stress, and the utility of complex regression models in capturing mediated associations when repeated measures of exposure and mediator are available and an exposure-mediator interaction may exist. Citation: Ferguson KK, Chen YH, VanderWeele TJ, Mc

  3. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Patients with Insomnia: A Repeated Measurement Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegelhalder, Kai; Regen, Wolfram; Nissen, Christoph; Feige, Bernd; Baglioni, Chiara; Riemann, Dieter; Hennig, Jürgen; Lange, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Chronic insomnia is one of the most prevalent central nervous system disorders. It is characterized by increased arousal levels, however, the neurobiological causes and correlates of hyperarousal in insomnia remain to be further determined. In the current study, magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used in the morning and evening in a well-characterized sample of 20 primary insomnia patients (12 females; 8 males; 42.7 ± 13.4 years) and 20 healthy good sleepers (12 females; 8 males; 44.1 ± 10.6 years). The most important inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmitters of the central nervous system, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate/glutamine (Glx), were assessed in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). The primary hypothesis, a diurnal effect on GABA levels in patients with insomnia, could not be confirmed. Moreover, the current results did not support previous findings of altered GABA levels in individuals with insomnia. Exploratory analyses, however, suggested that GABA levels in the ACC may be positively associated with habitual sleep duration, and, thus, reduced GABA levels may be a trait marker of objective sleep disturbances. Moreover, there was a significant GROUP x MEASUREMENT TIME interaction effect on Glx in the DLPFC with increasing Glx levels across the day in the patients but not in the control group. Therefore, Glx levels may reflect hyperarousal at bedtime in those with insomnia. Future confirmatory studies should include larger sample sizes to investigate brain metabolites in different subgroups of insomnia.

  4. Breath acidification in adolescent runners exposed to atmospheric pollution: A prospective, repeated measures observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Sickle David

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vigorous outdoors exercise during an episode of air pollution might cause airway inflammation. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of vigorous outdoor exercise during peak smog season on breath pH, a biomarker of airway inflammation, in adolescent athletes. Methods We measured breath pH both pre- and post-exercise on ten days during peak smog season in 16 high school athletes engaged in daily long-distance running in a downwind suburb of Atlanta. The association of post-exercise breath pH with ambient ozone and particulate matter concentrations was tested with linear regression. Results We collected 144 pre-exercise and 146 post-exercise breath samples from 16 runners (mean age 14.9 years, 56% male. Median pre-exercise breath pH was 7.58 (interquartile range: 6.90 to 7.86 and did not change significantly after exercise. We observed no significant association between ambient ozone or particulate matter and post-exercise breath pH. However both pre- and post-exercise breath pH were strikingly low in these athletes when compared to a control sample of 14 relatively sedentary healthy adults and to published values of breath pH in healthy subjects. Conclusion Although we did not observe an acute effect of air pollution exposure during exercise on breath pH, breath pH was surprisingly low in this sample of otherwise healthy long-distance runners. We speculate that repetitive vigorous exercise may induce airway acidification.

  5. Psychological impact and recovery after involvement in a patient safety incident: a repeated measures analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gerven, Eva; Bruyneel, Luk; Panella, Massimiliano; Euwema, Martin; Sermeus, Walter; Vanhaecht, Kris

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine individual, situational and organisational aspects that influence psychological impact and recovery of a patient safety incident on physicians, nurses and midwives. Design Cross-sectional, retrospective surveys of physicians, midwives and nurses. Setting 33 Belgian hospitals. Participants 913 clinicians (186 physicians, 682 nurses, 45 midwives) involved in a patient safety incident. Main outcome measures The Impact of Event Scale was used to retrospectively measure psychological impact of the safety incident at the time of the event and compare it with psychological impact at the time of the survey. Results Individual, situational as well as organisational aspects influenced psychological impact and recovery of a patient safety incident. Psychological impact is higher when the degree of harm for the patient is more severe, when healthcare professionals feel responsible for the incident and among female healthcare professionals. Impact of degree of harm differed across clinicians. Psychological impact is lower among more optimistic professionals. Overall, impact decreased significantly over time. This effect was more pronounced for women and for those who feel responsible for the incident. The longer ago the incident took place, the stronger impact had decreased. Also, higher psychological impact is related with the use of a more active coping and planning coping strategy, and is unrelated to support seeking coping strategies. Rendered support and a support culture reduce psychological impact, whereas a blame culture increases psychological impact. No associations were found with job experience and resilience of the health professional, the presence of a second victim support team or guideline and working in a learning culture. Conclusions Healthcare organisations should anticipate on providing their staff appropriate and timely support structures that are tailored to the healthcare professional involved in the incident and to the specific

  6. Understanding how adherence goals promote adherence behaviours: a repeated measure observational study with HIV seropositive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Gareth

    2012-08-01

    behaviours over and above the effects of the behaviour-specific thinking and ii the relationship between adherence to exercise and to medical treatment is stronger among those with more favourable views about the goal. Results from this study should identify the key contributing factors to inform subsequent adherence research and afford a more streamlined assessment matrix. The project also aims to inform patient care practices. UK Clinical Research Network registration number UKCRN 7842.

  7. Are There Linguistic Markers of Suicidal Writing That Can Predict the Course of Treatment? A Repeated Measures Longitudinal Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brancu, Mira; Jobes, David; Wagner, Barry M; Greene, Jeffrey A; Fratto, Timothy A

    2016-07-02

    The purpose of this pilot study was to predict resolution of suicidal ideation and risk over the course of therapy among suicidal outpatients (N = 144) using a novel method for analyzing Self- verses Relationally oriented qualitative written responses to the Suicide Status Form (SSF). A content analysis software program was used to extract word counts and a repeated measures longitudinal design was implemented to assess improvement over time. Patients with primarily Relationally focused word counts were more likely to have a quicker suicide risk resolution than those with more Self-focused word counts (6-7 sessions versus 17-18 sessions). Implications of these data are discussed, including the potential for enhancing treatment outcomes using this method with individuals entering treatment.

  8. A Bayesian model for repeated measures zero-inflated count data with application to outpatient psychiatric service use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelon, Brian H.; O’Malley, A. James; Normand, Sharon-Lise T.

    2009-01-01

    In applications involving count data, it is common to encounter an excess number of zeros. In the study of outpatient service utilization, for example, the number of utilization days will take on integer values, with many subjects having no utilization (zero values). Mixed-distribution models, such as the zero-inflated Poisson (ZIP) and zero-inflated negative binomial (ZINB), are often used to fit such data. A more general class of mixture models, called hurdle models, can be used to model zero-deflation as well as zero-inflation. Several authors have proposed frequentist approaches to fitting zero-inflated models for repeated measures. We describe a practical Bayesian approach which incorporates prior information, has optimal small-sample properties, and allows for tractable inference. The approach can be easily implemented using standard Bayesian software. A study of psychiatric outpatient service use illustrates the methods. PMID:21339863

  9. Global sensitivity analysis for repeated measures studies with informative drop-out: A semi-parametric approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharfstein, Daniel; McDermott, Aidan; Díaz, Iván; Carone, Marco; Lunardon, Nicola; Turkoz, Ibrahim

    2017-05-23

    In practice, both testable and untestable assumptions are generally required to draw inference about the mean outcome measured at the final scheduled visit in a repeated measures study with drop-out. Scharfstein et al. (2014) proposed a sensitivity analysis methodology to determine the robustness of conclusions within a class of untestable assumptions. In their approach, the untestable and testable assumptions were guaranteed to be compatible; their testable assumptions were based on a fully parametric model for the distribution of the observable data. While convenient, these parametric assumptions have proven especially restrictive in empirical research. Here, we relax their distributional assumptions and provide a more flexible, semi-parametric approach. We illustrate our proposal in the context of a randomized trial for evaluating a treatment of schizoaffective disorder. © 2017, The International Biometric Society.

  10. Global Testing under Sparse Alternatives: ANOVA, Multiple Comparisons and the Higher Criticism

    CERN Document Server

    Arias-Castro, Ery; Plan, Yaniv

    2010-01-01

    Testing for the significance of a subset of regression coefficients in a linear model, a staple of statistical analysis, goes back at least to the work of Fisher who introduced the analysis of variance (ANOVA). We study this problem under the assumption that the coefficient vector is sparse, a common situation in modern high-dimensional settings. Suppose the regression vector is of dimension p with S non-zero coefficients with S = p^{1 -alpha}. Under moderate sparsity levels, i.e. alpha 1/2. In such settings, a multiple comparison procedure is often preferred and we establish its optimality when alpha >= 3/4. However, these two very popular methods are suboptimal, and sometimes powerless, under moderately strong sparsity where 1/2 1/2. This optimality property is true for a variety of designs, including the classical (balanced) multi-way designs and more modern `p > n' designs arising in genetics and signal processing. In addition to the standard fixed effects model, we establish similar results for a rando...

  11. Monte Carlo evaluation of the ANOVA's F and Kruskal-Wallis tests under binomial distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Batista Ferreira

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available To verify the equality of more than two levels of a factor under interest in experiments conducted under a completely randomized design (CRD it is common to use the F ANOVA test, which is considered the most powerful test for this purpose. However, the reliability of such results depends on the following assumptions: additivity of effects, independence, homoscedasticity and normality of the errors. The nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test requires more moderate assumptions and therefore it is an alternative when the assumptions required by the F test are not met. However, the stronger the assumptions of a test, the better its performance. When the fundamental assumptions are met the F test is the best option. In this work, the normality of the errors is violated. Binomial response variables are simulated in order to compare the performances of the F and Kruskal-Wallis tests when one of the analysis of variance assumptions is not satisfied. Through Monte Carlo simulation, were simulated $3,150,000$ experiments to evaluate the type I error rate and power rate of the tests. In most situations, the power of the F test was superior to the Kruskal-Wallis and yet, the F test controlled the Type I error rates.

  12. Understanding statistical power using noncentral probability distributions: Chi-squared, G-squared, and ANOVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Hélie

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a graphical way of interpreting effect sizes when more than two groups are involved in a statistical analysis. This method uses noncentral distributions to specify the alternative hypothesis, and the statistical power can thus be directly computed. This principle is illustrated using the chi-squared distribution and the F distribution. Examples of chi-squared and ANOVA statistical tests are provided to further illustrate the point. It is concluded that power analyses are an essential part of statistical analysis, and that using noncentral distributions provides an argument in favour of using a factorial ANOVA over multiple t tests.

  13. GENERALIZED CONFIDENCE REGIONS OF FIXED EFFECTS IN THE TWO-WAY ANOVA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weiyan MU; Shifeng XIONG; Xingzhong XU

    2008-01-01

    The authors discuss the unbalanced two-way ANOVA model under heteroscedasticity. By taking the generalized approach, the authors derive the generalized p-values for testing the equality of fixed effects and the generalized confidence regions for these effects. The authors also provide their frequentist properties in large-sample cases. Simulation studies show that the generalized confidence regions have good coverage probabilities.

  14. Use of "t"-Test and ANOVA in Career-Technical Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojewski, Jay W.; Lee, In Heok; Gemici, Sinan

    2012-01-01

    Use of t-tests and analysis of variance (ANOVA) procedures in published research from three scholarly journals in career and technical education (CTE) during a recent 5-year period was examined. Information on post hoc analyses, reporting of effect size, alpha adjustments to account for multiple tests, power, and examination of assumptions…

  15. Cautionary Note on Reporting Eta-Squared Values from Multifactor ANOVA Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Charles A.; Block, Richard A.; Aguinis, Herman

    2004-01-01

    The authors provide a cautionary note on reporting accurate eta-squared values from multifactor analysis of variance (ANOVA) designs. They reinforce the distinction between classical and partial eta-squared as measures of strength of association. They provide examples from articles published in premier psychology journals in which the authors…

  16. Quantitative Comparison of Three Standardization Methods Using a One-Way ANOVA for Multiple Mean Comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrows, Russell D.

    2007-01-01

    A one-way ANOVA experiment is performed to determine whether or not the three standardization methods are statistically different in determining the concentration of the three paraffin analytes. The laboratory exercise asks students to combine the three methods in a single analytical procedure of their own design to determine the concentration of…

  17. Cautionary Note on Reporting Eta-Squared Values from Multifactor ANOVA Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Charles A.; Block, Richard A.; Aguinis, Herman

    2004-01-01

    The authors provide a cautionary note on reporting accurate eta-squared values from multifactor analysis of variance (ANOVA) designs. They reinforce the distinction between classical and partial eta-squared as measures of strength of association. They provide examples from articles published in premier psychology journals in which the authors…

  18. Discovering gene expression patterns in time course microarray experiments by ANOVA-SCA.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Nueda; A. Conessa; J.A. Westerhuis; H.C.J. Hoefsloot; A.K. Smilde; M. Talon; A. Ferrer

    2007-01-01

    In this work, we develop the application of the Analysis of variance-simultaneous component analysis (ANOVA-SCA) Smilde et al. Bioinformatics, (2005) to the analysis of multiple series time course microarray data as an example of multifactorial gene expression profiling experiments. We denoted this

  19. Parametric study of the biopotential equation for breast tumour identification using ANOVA and Taguchi method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Eddie Y K; Ng, W Kee

    2006-03-01

    Extensive literatures have shown significant trend of progressive electrical changes according to the proliferative characteristics of breast epithelial cells. Physiologists also further postulated that malignant transformation resulted from sustained depolarization and a failure of the cell to repolarize after cell division, making the area where cancer develops relatively depolarized when compared to their non-dividing or resting counterparts. In this paper, we present a new approach, the Biofield Diagnostic System (BDS), which might have the potential to augment the process of diagnosing breast cancer. This technique was based on the efficacy of analysing skin surface electrical potentials for the differential diagnosis of breast abnormalities. We developed a female breast model, which was close to the actual, by considering the breast as a hemisphere in supine condition with various layers of unequal thickness. Isotropic homogeneous conductivity was assigned to each of these compartments and the volume conductor problem was solved using finite element method to determine the potential distribution developed due to a dipole source. Furthermore, four important parameters were identified and analysis of variance (ANOVA, Yates' method) was performed using design (n = number of parameters, 4). The effect and importance of these parameters were analysed. The Taguchi method was further used to optimise the parameters in order to ensure that the signal from the tumour is maximum as compared to the noise from other factors. The Taguchi method used proved that probes' source strength, tumour size and location of tumours have great effect on the surface potential field. For best results on the breast surface, while having the biggest possible tumour size, low amplitudes of current should be applied nearest to the breast surface.

  20. Multi-level Clustering of Wear Particles Based on ANOVA-KW Test%基于ANOVA-KW检验的磨粒多级聚类分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄成; 王仲君; 潘岚; 吕植勇

    2010-01-01

    针对46个非正常磨粒样本形态参数数据进行分析,提出并确定多级聚类的思想以及具体实施步骤,然后通过对磨粒形态参数进行ANOVA-KW检验确定对磨粒分类有影响的参数变量,根据对确定的变量进行多级聚类分析,对球型、切削磨粒的识别度达到了95.6%,对疲劳、层状、片状磨粒的识别度达到了82.6%.

  1. Investigation of flood pattern using ANOVA statistic and remote sensing in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ya'acob, Norsuzila; Syazwani Ismail, Nor; Mustafa, Norfazira; Laily Yusof, Azita

    2014-06-01

    Flood is an overflow or inundation that comes from river or other body of water and causes or threatens damages. In Malaysia, there are no formal categorization of flood but often broadly categorized as monsoonal, flash or tidal floods. This project will be focus on flood causes by monsoon. For the last few years, the number of extreme flood was occurred and brings great economic impact. The extreme weather pattern is the main sector contributes for this phenomenon. In 2010, several districts in the states of Kedah neighbour-hoods state have been hit by floods and it is caused by tremendous weather pattern. During this tragedy, the ratio of the rainfalls volume was not fixed for every region, and the flood happened when the amount of water increase rapidly and start to overflow. This is the main objective why this project has been carried out, and the analysis data has been done from August until October in 2010. The investigation was done to find the possibility correlation pattern parameters related to the flood. ANOVA statistic was used to calculate the percentage of parameters was involved and Regression and correlation calculate the strength of coefficient among parameters related to the flood while remote sensing image was used for validation between the calculation accuracy. According to the results, the prediction is successful as the coefficient of relation in flood event is 0.912 and proved by Terra-SAR image on 4th November 2010. The rates of change in weather pattern give the impact to the flood.

  2. Prediction Accuracy in Multivariate Repeated-Measures Bayesian Forecasting Models with Examples Drawn from Research on Sleep and Circadian Rhythms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clark Kogan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In study designs with repeated measures for multiple subjects, population models capturing within- and between-subjects variances enable efficient individualized prediction of outcome measures (response variables by incorporating individuals response data through Bayesian forecasting. When measurement constraints preclude reasonable levels of prediction accuracy, additional (secondary response variables measured alongside the primary response may help to increase prediction accuracy. We investigate this for the case of substantial between-subjects correlation between primary and secondary response variables, assuming negligible within-subjects correlation. We show how to determine the accuracy of primary response predictions as a function of secondary response observations. Given measurement costs for primary and secondary variables, we determine the number of observations that produces, with minimal cost, a fixed average prediction accuracy for a model of subject means. We illustrate this with estimation of subject-specific sleep parameters using polysomnography and wrist actigraphy. We also consider prediction accuracy in an example time-dependent, linear model and derive equations for the optimal timing of measurements to achieve, on average, the best prediction accuracy. Finally, we examine an example involving a circadian rhythm model and show numerically that secondary variables can improve individualized predictions in this time-dependent nonlinear model as well.

  3. Prediction Accuracy in Multivariate Repeated-Measures Bayesian Forecasting Models with Examples Drawn from Research on Sleep and Circadian Rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, Clark; Kalachev, Leonid; Van Dongen, Hans P A

    2016-01-01

    In study designs with repeated measures for multiple subjects, population models capturing within- and between-subjects variances enable efficient individualized prediction of outcome measures (response variables) by incorporating individuals response data through Bayesian forecasting. When measurement constraints preclude reasonable levels of prediction accuracy, additional (secondary) response variables measured alongside the primary response may help to increase prediction accuracy. We investigate this for the case of substantial between-subjects correlation between primary and secondary response variables, assuming negligible within-subjects correlation. We show how to determine the accuracy of primary response predictions as a function of secondary response observations. Given measurement costs for primary and secondary variables, we determine the number of observations that produces, with minimal cost, a fixed average prediction accuracy for a model of subject means. We illustrate this with estimation of subject-specific sleep parameters using polysomnography and wrist actigraphy. We also consider prediction accuracy in an example time-dependent, linear model and derive equations for the optimal timing of measurements to achieve, on average, the best prediction accuracy. Finally, we examine an example involving a circadian rhythm model and show numerically that secondary variables can improve individualized predictions in this time-dependent nonlinear model as well.

  4. A method to construct a points system to predict cardiovascular disease considering repeated measures of risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbayo-Herencia, Julio Antonio; Vigo, Maria Isabel; Gil-Guillén, Vicente Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Current predictive models for cardiovascular disease based on points systems use the baseline situation of the risk factors as independent variables. These models do not take into account the variability of the risk factors over time. Predictive models for other types of disease also exist that do consider the temporal variability of a single biological marker in addition to the baseline variables. However, due to their complexity these other models are not used in daily clinical practice. Bearing in mind the clinical relevance of these issues and that cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death worldwide we show the properties and viability of a new methodological alternative for constructing cardiovascular risk scores to make predictions of cardiovascular disease with repeated measures of the risk factors and retaining the simplicity of the points systems so often used in clinical practice (construction, statistical validation by simulation and explanation of potential utilization). We have also applied the system clinically upon a set of simulated data solely to help readers understand the procedure constructed. PMID:26893963

  5. Smoothing spline ANOVA decomposition of arbitrary splines: an application to eye movements in reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matuschek, Hannes; Kliegl, Reinhold; Holschneider, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The Smoothing Spline ANOVA (SS-ANOVA) requires a specialized construction of basis and penalty terms in order to incorporate prior knowledge about the data to be fitted. Typically, one resorts to the most general approach using tensor product splines. This implies severe constraints on the correlation structure, i.e. the assumption of isotropy of smoothness can not be incorporated in general. This may increase the variance of the spline fit, especially if only a relatively small set of observations are given. In this article, we propose an alternative method that allows to incorporate prior knowledge without the need to construct specialized bases and penalties, allowing the researcher to choose the spline basis and penalty according to the prior knowledge of the observations rather than choosing them according to the analysis to be done. The two approaches are compared with an artificial example and with analyses of fixation durations during reading.

  6. Repeated measurements of cerebral blood flow in the left superior temporal gyrus reveal tonic hyperactivity in patients with auditory verbal hallucinations: A possible trait marker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp eHoman

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The left superior temporal gyrus (STG has been suggested to play a key role in auditory verbal hallucinations in patients with schizophrenia. Methods: Eleven medicated subjects with schizophrenia and medication-resistant auditory verbal hallucinations and 19 healthy controls underwent perfusion magnetic resonance imaging with arterial spin labeling. Three additional repeated measurements were conducted in the patients. Patients underwent a treatment with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS between the first 2 measurements. The main outcome measure was the pooled cerebral blood flow (CBF, which consisted of the regional CBF measurement in the left superior temporal gyrus (STG and the global CBF measurement in the whole brain.Results: Regional CBF in the left STG in patients was significantly higher compared to controls (p < 0.0001 and to the global CBF in patients (p < 0.004 at baseline. Regional CBF in the left STG remained significantly increased compared to the global CBF in patients across time (p < 0.0007, and it remained increased in patients after TMS compared to the baseline CBF in controls (p < 0.0001. After TMS, PANSS (p = 0.003 and PSYRATS (p = 0.01 scores decreased significantly in patients.Conclusions: This study demonstrated tonically increased regional CBF in the left STG in patients with schizophrenia and auditory hallucinations despite a decrease in symptoms after TMS. These findings were consistent with what has previously been termed a trait marker of auditory verbal hallucinations in schizophrenia.

  7. Using the American alligator and a repeated-measures design to place constraints on in vivo shoulder joint range of motion in dinosaurs and other fossil archosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutson, Joel D; Hutson, Kelda N

    2013-01-15

    Using the extant phylogenetic bracket of dinosaurs (crocodylians and birds), recent work has reported that elbow joint range of motion (ROM) studies of fossil dinosaur forearms may be providing conservative underestimates of fully fleshed in vivo ROM. As humeral ROM occupies a more central role in forelimb movements, the placement of quantitative constraints on shoulder joint ROM could improve fossil reconstructions. Here, we investigated whether soft tissues affect the more mobile shoulder joint in the same manner in which they affect elbow joint ROM in an extant archosaur. This test involved separately and repeatedly measuring humeral ROM in Alligator mississippiensis as soft tissues were dissected away in stages to bare bone. Our data show that the ROMs of humeral flexion and extension, as well as abduction and adduction, both show a statistically significant increase as flesh is removed, but then decrease when the bones must be physically articulated and moved until they separate from one another and/or visible joint surfaces. A similar ROM pattern is inferred for humeral pronation and supination. All final skeletonized ROMs were less than initial fully fleshed ROMs. These results are consistent with previously reported elbow joint ROM patterns from the extant phylogenetic bracket of dinosaurs. Thus, studies that avoid separation of complementary articular surfaces may be providing fossil shoulder joint ROMs that underestimate in vivo ROM in dinosaurs, as well as other fossil archosaurs.

  8. INFLUENCE OF TECHNOLOGICAL PARAMETERS ON AGROTEXTILES WATER ABSORBENCY USING ANOVA MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUPU Iuliana G.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Agrotextiles are now days extensively being used in horticulture, farming and other agricultural activities. Agriculture and textiles are the largest industries in the world providing basic needs such as food and clothing. Agrotextiles plays a significant role to help control environment for crop protection, eliminate variations in climate, weather change and generate optimum condition for plant growth. Water absorptive capacity is a very important property of needle-punched nonwovens used as irrigation substrate in horticulture. Nonwovens used as watering substrate distribute water uniformly and act as slight water buffer owing to the absorbent capacity. The paper analyzes the influence of needling process parameters on water absorptive capacity of needle-punched nonwovens by using ANOVA model. The model allows the identification of optimal action parameters in a shorter time and with less material expenses than by experimental research. The frequency of needle board and needle depth penetration has been used as independent variables while the water absorptive capacity as dependent variable for ANOVA regression model. Based on employed ANOVA model we have established that there is a significant influence of needling parameters on water absorbent capacity. The higher of depth needle penetration and needle board frequency, the higher is the compactness of fabric. A less porous structure has a lower water absorptive capacity.

  9. A Hybrid One-Way ANOVA Approach for the Robust and Efficient Estimation of Differential Gene Expression with Multiple Patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Manir Hossain Mollah

    Full Text Available Identifying genes that are differentially expressed (DE between two or more conditions with multiple patterns of expression is one of the primary objectives of gene expression data analysis. Several statistical approaches, including one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA, are used to identify DE genes. However, most of these methods provide misleading results for two or more conditions with multiple patterns of expression in the presence of outlying genes. In this paper, an attempt is made to develop a hybrid one-way ANOVA approach that unifies the robustness and efficiency of estimation using the minimum β-divergence method to overcome some problems that arise in the existing robust methods for both small- and large-sample cases with multiple patterns of expression.The proposed method relies on a β-weight function, which produces values between 0 and 1. The β-weight function with β = 0.2 is used as a measure of outlier detection. It assigns smaller weights (≥ 0 to outlying expressions and larger weights (≤ 1 to typical expressions. The distribution of the β-weights is used to calculate the cut-off point, which is compared to the observed β-weight of an expression to determine whether that gene expression is an outlier. This weight function plays a key role in unifying the robustness and efficiency of estimation in one-way ANOVA.Analyses of simulated gene expression profiles revealed that all eight methods (ANOVA, SAM, LIMMA, EBarrays, eLNN, KW, robust BetaEB and proposed perform almost identically for m = 2 conditions in the absence of outliers. However, the robust BetaEB method and the proposed method exhibited considerably better performance than the other six methods in the presence of outliers. In this case, the BetaEB method exhibited slightly better performance than the proposed method for the small-sample cases, but the the proposed method exhibited much better performance than the BetaEB method for both the small- and large

  10. Characterization of Near-Infrared Spectral Variance in the Authentication of Skim and Nonfat Dry Milk Powder Collection Using ANOVA-PCA, Pooled-ANOVA, and Partial Least-Squares Regression

    OpenAIRE

    Harnly, James M.; Peter de B. Harrington; Botros, Lucy L.; Jablonski, Joseph; Chang, Claire; Bergana, Marti Mamula; Wehling, Paul; Downey, Gerard; Potts, Alan R.; Moore, Jeffrey C.

    2014-01-01

    Forty-one samples of skim milk powder (SMP) and nonfat dry milk (NFDM) from 8 suppliers, 13 production sites, and 3 processing temperatures were analyzed by NIR diffuse reflectance spectrometry over a period of 3 days. NIR reflectance spectra (1700–2500 nm) were converted to pseudoabsorbance and examined using (a) analysis of variance-principal component analysis (ANOVA-PCA), (b) pooled-ANOVA based on data submatrices, and (c) partial least-squares regression (PLSR) coupled with pooled-ANOVA....

  11. 厚尾相依序列均值多变点 ANOVA 型检验%An ANOVA-type test for multiple change points in the mean of heavy-tailed dependent sequence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕会琴; 赵文芝; 赵蕊

    2016-01-01

    In order to study multiple breaks detection of mean in heavy-tailed dependent se-quence,under the null hypothesis of no change against the alternative hypothesis of multiple change points,an ANOVA-type test statistic is proposed.Then the limiting distribution of the test statistic under the null hypothesis and the consistence of the test statistic is obtained re-spectively.Finally,the results of Monte Carlo is shown to support the argument.%为了研究厚尾相依序列均值的多变点检验问题,在厚尾相依随机变量序列原假设无变点与备择假设存在多个变点的假设检验下,提出 ANOVA 型的检验统计量。分别得到在原假设下统计量的极限分布,并对统计量的一致性检验进行推导证明。最后通过数值模拟验证了该方法的有效性。

  12. The clinical applicability of a daily summary of patients' self-reported postoperative pain-A repeated measure analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikström, Lotta; Eriksson, Kerstin; Fridlund, Bengt; Nilsson, Mats; Årestedt, Kristofer; Broström, Anders

    2017-03-23

    (i) To determine whether a central tendency, median, based on patients' self-rated pain is a clinically applicable daily measure to show patients' postoperative pain on the first day after major surgery (ii) and to determine the number of self-ratings required for the calculation of this measure. Perioperative pain traits in medical records are difficult to overview. The clinical applicability of a daily documented summarising measure of patients' self-rated pain scores is little explored. A repeated measure design was carried out at three Swedish country hospitals. Associations between the measures were analysed with nonparametric statistical methods; systematic and individual group changes were analysed separately. Measure I: pain scores at rest and activity postoperative day 1; measure II: retrospective average pain from postoperative day 1. The sample consisted of 190 general surgery patients and 289 orthopaedic surgery patients with a mean age of 65; 56% were men. Forty-four percent had a pre-operative daily intake of analgesia, and 77% used postoperative opioids. A range of 4-9 pain scores seem to be eligible for the calculation of the daily measures of pain. Rank correlations for individual median scores, based on four ratings, vs. retrospective self-rated average pain, were moderate and strengthened with increased numbers of ratings. A systematic group change towards a higher level of reported retrospective pain was significant. The median values were clinically applicable daily measures. The risk of obtaining a higher value than was recalled by patients seemed to be low. Applicability increased with increased frequency of self-rated pain scores and with high-quality pain assessments. The documenting of daily median pain scores at rest and during activity could constitute the basis for obtaining patients' experiences by showing their pain severity trajectories. The measures could also be an important key to predicting postoperative health

  13. Structural equation modeling and nested ANOVA: Effects of lead exposure on maternal and fetal growth in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, J.D. (Rohm and Haas Company, Spring House, PA (United States)); O' Flaherty, E.J.; Shukla, R.; Gartside, P.S. (Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)); Ross, R. (Univ. of Cincinnati Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States))

    1994-01-01

    This study provided an assessment of the effects of lead on early growth in rats based on structural equation modeling and nested analysis of variance (ANOVA). Structural equation modeling showed that lead in drinking water (250, 500, or 1000 ppm) had a direct negative effect on body weight and tail length (i.e., growth) in female rats during the first week of exposure. During the following 2 weeks of exposure, high correlation between growth measurements taken over time resulted in reduced early postnatal growth. By the fourth week of exposure, reduced growth was not evident. Mating began after 8 weeks of exposure, and exposure continued during gestation. Decreased fetal body weight was detected when the effects of litter size, intrauterine position, and sex were controlled in a nested ANOVA. Lead exposure did not appear to affect fetal skeletal development, possibly because lead did not alter maternal serum calcium and phosphorus levels. The effect of lead on individual fetal body weight suggests that additional studies are needed to examine the effect of maternal lead exposure on fetal development and early postnatal growth. 24 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. The Effects of Group Leader Learning Style on Student Knowledge Gain in a Leadership Camp Setting: A Repeated-Measures Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Nicholas R.; Terry, Robert, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Many state FFA associations conduct summer camps focusing on leadership and personal development for FFA members. Interestingly, little research has been conducted on the impact or outcomes of these common activities. The purpose of this split-plot factorial repeated-measures experiment was to assess the level of campers' learning of the…

  15. Power and sample size for the S:T repeated measures design combined with a linear mixed-effects model allowing for missing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tango, Toshiro

    2017-02-13

    Tango (Biostatistics 2016) proposed a new repeated measures design called the S:T repeated measures design, combined with generalized linear mixed-effects models and sample size calculations for a test of the average treatment effect that depend not only on the number of subjects but on the number of repeated measures before and after randomization per subject used for analysis. The main advantages of the proposed design combined with the generalized linear mixed-effects models are (1) it can easily handle missing data by applying the likelihood-based ignorable analyses under the missing at random assumption and (2) it may lead to a reduction in sample size compared with the simple pre-post design. In this article, we present formulas for calculating power and sample sizes for a test of the average treatment effect allowing for missing data within the framework of the S:T repeated measures design with a continuous response variable combined with a linear mixed-effects model. Examples are provided to illustrate the use of these formulas.

  16. Repeated measures dose-finding design with time-trend detection in the presence of correlated toxicity data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jun; Paoletti, Xavier; Sargent, Daniel J; Mandrekar, Sumithra J

    2017-08-01

    Phase I trials are designed to determine the safety, tolerability, and recommended phase 2 dose of therapeutic agents for subsequent testing. The dose-finding paradigm has thus traditionally focused on identifying the maximum tolerable dose of an agent or combination therapy under the assumption that there is a non-decreasing relationship between dose-toxicity and dose-efficacy. The dose is typically determined based on the probability of severe toxicity observed during the first treatment cycle. A novel endpoint, the total toxicity profile, was previously developed to account for the multiple toxicity types and grades experienced in the first cycle. More recently, this was extended to a repeated measures design based on the total toxicity profile to account for longitudinal toxicities over multiple treatment cycles in the absence of within-patient correlation. In this work, we propose to extend the design in the presence of within-patient correlation. Furthermore, we provide a framework to detect a toxicity time trend (toxicity increasing, decreasing, or stable) over multiple treatment cycles. We utilize a linear mixed model in the Bayesian framework, with the addition of Bayesian risk functions for decision-making in dose assignment. The performance of this design was evaluated using simulation studies and real data from a phase I trial. We demonstrated that using available toxicity data from all cycles of treatment improves the accuracy of maximum tolerated dose identification and allows for the detection of a time trend. The performance is consistent regardless of the strength of the within-patient correlation. In addition, the use of a quasi-continuous total toxicity profile score significantly increased the power to detect time trends compared to when binary data only were used. The increased interest in molecularly targeted agents and immunotherapies in oncology necessitates innovative phase I study designs. Our proposed framework provides a tool to tackle

  17. Visualizing Experimental Designs for Balanced ANOVA Models using Lisp-Stat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip W. Iversen

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The structure, or Hasse, diagram described by Taylor and Hilton (1981, American Statistician provides a visual display of the relationships between factors for balanced complete experimental designs. Using the Hasse diagram, rules exist for determining the appropriate linear model, ANOVA table, expected means squares, and F-tests in the case of balanced designs. This procedure has been implemented in Lisp-Stat using a software representation of the experimental design. The user can interact with the Hasse diagram to add, change, or delete factors and see the effect on the proposed analysis. The system has potential uses in teaching and consulting.

  18. ANOVA-like differential expression (ALDEx) analysis for mixed population RNA-Seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Andrew D; Macklaim, Jean M; Linn, Thomas G; Reid, Gregor; Gloor, Gregory B

    2013-01-01

    Experimental variance is a major challenge when dealing with high-throughput sequencing data. This variance has several sources: sampling replication, technical replication, variability within biological conditions, and variability between biological conditions. The high per-sample cost of RNA-Seq often precludes the large number of experiments needed to partition observed variance into these categories as per standard ANOVA models. We show that the partitioning of within-condition to between-condition variation cannot reasonably be ignored, whether in single-organism RNA-Seq or in Meta-RNA-Seq experiments, and further find that commonly-used RNA-Seq analysis tools, as described in the literature, do not enforce the constraint that the sum of relative expression levels must be one, and thus report expression levels that are systematically distorted. These two factors lead to misleading inferences if not properly accommodated. As it is usually only the biological between-condition and within-condition differences that are of interest, we developed ALDEx, an ANOVA-like differential expression procedure, to identify genes with greater between- to within-condition differences. We show that the presence of differential expression and the magnitude of these comparative differences can be reasonably estimated with even very small sample sizes.

  19. Fatigue of NiTi SMA-pulley system using Taguchi and ANOVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Jani, Jaronie; Leary, Martin; Subic, Aleksandar

    2016-05-01

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators can be integrated with a pulley system to provide mechanical advantage and to reduce packaging space; however, there appears to be no formal investigation of the effect of a pulley system on SMA structural or functional fatigue. In this work, cyclic testing was conducted on nickel-titanium (NiTi) SMA actuators on a pulley system and a control experiment (without pulley). Both structural and functional fatigues were monitored until fracture, or a maximum of 1E5 cycles were achieved for each experimental condition. The Taguchi method and analysis of the variance (ANOVA) were used to optimise the SMA-pulley system configurations. In general, one-way ANOVA at the 95% confidence level showed no significant difference between the structural or functional fatigue of SMA-pulley actuators and SMA actuators without pulley. Within the sample of SMA-pulley actuators, the effect of activation duration had the greatest significance for both structural and functional fatigue, and the pulley configuration (angle of wrap and sheave diameter) had a greater statistical significance than load magnitude for functional fatigue. This work identified that structural and functional fatigue performance of SMA-pulley systems is optimised by maximising sheave diameter and using an intermediate wrap-angle, with minimal load and activation duration. However, these parameters may not be compatible with commercial imperatives. A test was completed for a commercially optimal SMA-pulley configuration. This novel observation will be applicable to many areas of SMA-pulley system applications development.

  20. 基于ANOVA-like方差分解的非线性系统控制性能评估%Control performance assessment based on ANOVA-like variance decomposition for nonlinear systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王志国; 刘飞

    2014-01-01

    In practice, many industrial control loops inevitably include nonlinearites, so the estimates of the control performance may not be correct. Firstly, the existence of the minimum variance performance lower bound(MVPLB) for a class of nonlinear systems is analyzed and the relation between the MVPLM and disturbance terms is determined. Then, the model of closed-loop system is identified by using orthogonal least square algorithm. Based on the achieved model, the contribution to the output variance due to the uncertainties in most recent ahead disturbance terms is calculated according to ANOVA-like decomposition formula, so that the control performance of the nonlinear system is obtained. Finally, simulation results show the effectiveness and feasibility of the proposed algorithm.%针对实际控制回路大多包含非线性特征,导致评估结果存在偏差的问题,以一类非线性系统为对象,首先分析其最小方差性能下限的存在性,并推导出其与系统干扰项的关系式;然后用正交最小二乘方法辨识系统闭环模型,进而使用ANOVA-like方差分解公式估计超前干扰项对输出方差的贡献,由此获得非线性系统的控制性能;最后,将所提出的方法与传统方法通过仿真实例进行比较。仿真结果表明,所提出的方法是可行且有效的。

  1. Generalized F test and generalized deviance test in two-way ANOVA models for randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Juan; He, Xuming

    2014-01-01

    We consider the problem of detecting treatment effects in a randomized trial in the presence of an additional covariate. By reexpressing a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) model in a logistic regression framework, we derive generalized F tests and generalized deviance tests, which provide better power in detecting common location-scale changes of treatment outcomes than the classical F test. The null distributions of the test statistics are independent of the nuisance parameters in the models, so the critical values can be easily determined by Monte Carlo methods. We use simulation studies to demonstrate how the proposed tests perform compared with the classical F test. We also use data from a clinical study to illustrate possible savings in sample sizes.

  2. Assessing and Evaluating UBT Model of Student Management Information System using ANOVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekim Fetaji

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The research study focus is set in assessing the efficiency and impact of Student Management Information System in facilitating students during registration and examination periods in the aspect of efficiency, performance and usability. As Case Study is chosen University for Business and Technology-UBT, where the system has been designed and tailored to, implemented, tested, evaluated and re-engineered. The analyses tries to identify whether the developed UBT model shows improvement in student services, data centralization, data security, and the entire process of student eservices. Through the Case Study investigated several impacting factors. Afterwards evaluated the usability and user-friendliness of the developed UBT model and solutions of Management Information System and used ANOVA regression analyses to determine the impact. Insights and recommendations are provided.

  3. Analysis of Aluminium Nano Composites using Anova in CNC Machining Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Joe Christopher Poonthota Irudaya Raj

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The Objective of this work is to reinforce the Aluminum alloy with CNT by Stir Casting Method in different weight percentage of CNT was added to Aluminium separately to make composites and it physical and thermal properties have been investigated using test like tensile, hardness, Micro Structure and XRD. The improvement of mechanical, Physical and thermal properties for both the cases has been compared with pure aluminum. The TAGUCHI – ORTHOGONAL ARRAY experimental technique is used to optimize the machining parameters. The predicted surface roughness was estimated using S/N ratio and compared with actual values. ANOVA analysis is used to find the significant factors affecting the machining process in order to improve the surface characteristics of Al Material.

  4. Heart rate variability and DNA methylation levels are altered after short-term metal fume exposure among occupational welders: a repeated-measures panel study

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background: In occupational settings, boilermakers are exposed to high levels of metallic fine particulate matter (PM2.5) generated during the welding process. The effect of welding PM2.5 on heart rate variability (HRV) has been described, but the relationship between PM2.5, DNA methylation, and HRV is not known. Methods: In this repeated-measures panel study, we recorded resting HRV and measured DNA methylation levels in transposable elements Alu and long interspersed nuclear element-1 (LINE...

  5. Characterization of near-infrared spectral variance in the authentication of skim and nonfat dry milk powder collection using ANOVA-PCA, pooled-ANOVA, and partial least-squares regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnly, James M; Harrington, Peter B; Botros, Lucy L; Jablonski, Joseph; Chang, Claire; Bergana, Marti Mamula; Wehling, Paul; Downey, Gerard; Potts, Alan R; Moore, Jeffrey C

    2014-08-13

    Forty-one samples of skim milk powder (SMP) and nonfat dry milk (NFDM) from 8 suppliers, 13 production sites, and 3 processing temperatures were analyzed by NIR diffuse reflectance spectrometry over a period of 3 days. NIR reflectance spectra (1700-2500 nm) were converted to pseudoabsorbance and examined using (a) analysis of variance-principal component analysis (ANOVA-PCA), (b) pooled-ANOVA based on data submatrices, and (c) partial least-squares regression (PLSR) coupled with pooled-ANOVA. ANOVA-PCA score plots showed clear separation of the samples with respect to milk class (SMP or NFDM), day of analysis, production site, processing temperature, and individual samples. Pooled-ANOVA provided statistical levels of significance for the separation of the averages, some of which were many orders of magnitude below 10⁻³. PLSR showed that the correlation with Certificate of Analysis (COA) concentrations varied from a weak coefficient of determination (R²) of 0.32 for moisture to moderate R² values of 0.61 for fat and 0.78 for protein for this multinational study. In this study, pooled-ANOVA was applied for the first time to PLS modeling and demonstrated that even though the calibration models may not be precise, the contribution of the protein peaks in the NIR spectra accounted for the largest proportion of the variation despite the inherent imprecision of the COA values.

  6. Simulated Conversations With Virtual Humans to Improve Patient-Provider Communication and Reduce Unnecessary Prescriptions for Antibiotics: A Repeated Measure Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Background Despite clear evidence that antibiotics do not cure viral infections, the problem of unnecessary prescribing of antibiotics in ambulatory care persists, and in some cases, prescribing patterns have increased. The overuse of antibiotics for treating viral infections has created numerous economic and clinical consequences including increased medical costs due to unnecessary hospitalizations, antibiotic resistance, disruption of gut bacteria, and obesity. Recent research has underscored the importance of collaborative patient-provider communication as a means to reduce the high rates of unnecessary prescriptions for antibiotics. However, most patients and providers do not feel prepared to engage in such challenging conversations. Objectives The aim of this pilot study was to assess the ability of a brief 15-min simulated role-play conversation with virtual humans to serve as a preliminary step to help health care providers and patients practice, and learn how to engage in effective conversations about antibiotics overuse. Methods A total of 69 participants (35 providers and 34 patients) completed the simulation once in one sitting. A pre-post repeated measures design was used to assess changes in patients’ and providers’ self-reported communication behaviors, activation, and preparedness, intention, and confidence to effectively communicate in the patient-provider encounter. Changes in patients’ knowledge and beliefs regarding antibiotic use were also evaluated. Results Patients experienced a short-term positive improvement in beliefs about appropriate antibiotic use for infection (F1,30=14.10, P=.001). Knowledge scores regarding the correct uses of antibiotics improved immediately postsimulation, but decreased at the 1-month follow-up (F1,30=31.16, P.10) Patients with lower levels of activation exhibited positive, short-term benefits in increased intent and confidence to discuss their needs and ask questions in the clinic visit, positive attitudes

  7. Biomarker Detection in Association Studies: Modeling SNPs Simultaneously via Logistic ANOVA

    KAUST Repository

    Jung, Yoonsuh

    2014-10-02

    In genome-wide association studies, the primary task is to detect biomarkers in the form of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) that have nontrivial associations with a disease phenotype and some other important clinical/environmental factors. However, the extremely large number of SNPs comparing to the sample size inhibits application of classical methods such as the multiple logistic regression. Currently the most commonly used approach is still to analyze one SNP at a time. In this paper, we propose to consider the genotypes of the SNPs simultaneously via a logistic analysis of variance (ANOVA) model, which expresses the logit transformed mean of SNP genotypes as the summation of the SNP effects, effects of the disease phenotype and/or other clinical variables, and the interaction effects. We use a reduced-rank representation of the interaction-effect matrix for dimensionality reduction, and employ the L 1-penalty in a penalized likelihood framework to filter out the SNPs that have no associations. We develop a Majorization-Minimization algorithm for computational implementation. In addition, we propose a modified BIC criterion to select the penalty parameters and determine the rank number. The proposed method is applied to a Multiple Sclerosis data set and simulated data sets and shows promise in biomarker detection.

  8. Identification of bacteriophage virion proteins by the ANOVA feature selection and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hui; Feng, Peng-Mian; Chen, Wei; Lin, Hao

    2014-08-01

    The bacteriophage virion proteins play extremely important roles in the fate of host bacterial cells. Accurate identification of bacteriophage virion proteins is very important for understanding their functions and clarifying the lysis mechanism of bacterial cells. In this study, a new sequence-based method was developed to identify phage virion proteins. In the new method, the protein sequences were initially formulated by the g-gap dipeptide compositions. Subsequently, the analysis of variance (ANOVA) with incremental feature selection (IFS) was used to search for the optimal feature set. It was observed that, in jackknife cross-validation, the optimal feature set including 160 optimized features can produce the maximum accuracy of 85.02%. By performing feature analysis, we found that the correlation between two amino acids with one gap was more important than other correlations for phage virion protein prediction and that some of the 1-gap dipeptides were important and mainly contributed to the virion protein prediction. This analysis will provide novel insights into the function of phage virion proteins. On the basis of the proposed method, an online web-server, PVPred, was established and can be freely accessed from the website (http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/PVPred). We believe that the PVPred will become a powerful tool to study phage virion proteins and to guide the related experimental validations.

  9. Value added analysis and its distribution: a study on BOVESPA-listed banks using ANOVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo José Seixas Pinto

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The value added generated by the financial institutions listed on BOVESPA and its distribution in the years between 2007 to 2011 are the subject of this research which shows how banks divided his wealth with the people, government, third parties and shareholders. Through the use of ANOVA test average in the companies that took part in this research concluded that: (a the average value added of foreign banks differs from national banks. (b The remuneration policy of equity foreign banks differs from national banks. (c The policy of distribution of value added to employees of foreign banks Santander and HSBC differs from the other banks. (d Taxes paid to the government have equal means with the exception of Santander. (e Although curious, Banco Itau and Banco do Brazil is equal in all analyzes in the distribution of value added since it is a private and one public. It appears this way a policy unequal distribution of wealth generation and foreign banks compared with the national public and private banks.

  10. Parametric optimization for tumour identification: bioheat equation using ANOVA and the Taguchi method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudharsan, N M; Ng, E Y

    2000-01-01

    Breast cancer is the number one killer disease among women. It is known that early detection of a tumour ensures better prognosis and higher survival rate. In this paper an intelligent, inexpensive and non-invasive diagnostic tool is developed for aiding breast cancer detection objectively. This tool is based on thermographic scanning of the breast surface in conjunction with numerical simulation of the breast using the bioheat equation. The medical applications of thermographic scanning make use of the skin temperature as an indication of an underlying pathological process. The thermal pattern over a breast tumour reflects the vascular reaction to the abnormality. Hence an abnormal temperature pattern may be an indicator of an underlying tumour. Seven important parameters are identified and analysis of variance (ANOVA) is performed using a 2n design (n = number of parameters, 7). The effect and importance of the various parameters are analysed. Based on the above 2(7) design, the Taguchi method is used to optimize the parameters in order to ensure the signal from the tumour maximized compared with the noise from the other factors. The model predicts that the ideal setting for capturing the signal from the tumour is when the patient is at basal metabolic activity with a correspondingly lower subcutaneous perfusion in a low temperature environment.

  11. Tests for ANOVA models with a combination of crossed and nested designs under heteroscedasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liwen; Tian, Maozai

    2016-06-01

    In this article we consider unbalanced ANOVA models with a combination of crossed and nested designs under heteroscedasticity. For the problem of testing no nested interaction effects, we propose two tests based on a parametric bootstrap (PB) approach and a generalized p-value approach, respectively. The PB test does not depend on the chosen weights used to define the parameters uniquely. These two tests are compared through their simulated Type I error rates and powers. The simulations indicate that the PB test outperforms the generalized p-value test. The PB test performs very satisfactorily even for extensive cases of samples while the generalized p-value test has Type I error rates much less than the nominal level most of the time. Both tests exhibit similar power properties provided the Type I error rates are close to each other. In some cases, the GF test appears to be more powerful than the PB tests because of its inflated Type I error rates.

  12. Application of Anova on Fly Ash Leaching Kinetics for Value Addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Ranjita; Mohapatro, Rudra Narayana; Bhima Rao, Raghupatruni

    2016-04-01

    Fly ash is a major problem in power plant sectors as it is dumped at the plant site. Fly ash generation increases day to day due to rapid growth of steel industries. Ceramic/refractory industries are growing rapidly because of more number of steel industries. The natural resources of the ceramic/refractory raw materials are depleting with time due to its consumption. In view of this, fly ash from thermal power plant has been identified for use in the ceramic/refractory industries after suitable beneficiation. In this paper, sample was collected from the ash pond of Vedanta. Particle size (d80 passing size) of the sample is around 150 micron. The chemical analysis of the sample shows that 3.9 % of Fe2O3 and CaO is more than 10 %. XRD patterns show that the fly ash samples consist predominantly of the crystalline phases of quartz, hematite and magnetite in a matrix of aluminosilicate glass. Leaching of iron oxide is 98.3 % at 3 M HCl concentration at 90 °C for 270 min of leaching time. Kinetic study on leaching experiment was carried out. ANOVA software is utilized for curve fitting and the process is optimized using MATLAB 7.1. The detailed study of properties for ceramic material is compared with the standard ceramic materials. The product contains 0.3 % of iron. The other properties of the product have established the fact that the product obtained can be a raw material for ceramic industries.

  13. Similarities and Differences of the Soleus and Gastrocnemius H-reflexes during Varied Body Postures, Foot Positions, and Muscle Function: Multifactor Designs for Repeated Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabbahi Mohamed A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the soleus (Sol, medial gastrocnemius (MG, and lateral gastrocnemius (LG muscles differ in function, composition, and innervations, it is a common practice is to investigate them as single H-reflex recording. The purpose of this study was to compare H-reflex recordings between these three sections of the triceps surae muscle group of healthy participants while lying and standing during three different ankle positions. Methods The Sol, MG and LG muscles' H-reflexes were recorded from ten participants during prone lying and standing with the ankle in neutral, maximum dorsiflexion, and maximum plantarflexion positions. Four traces were averaged for each combination of conditions. Three-way ANOVAs (posture X ankle position X muscle with planned comparisons were used for statistical comparisons. Results Although the H-reflex in the three muscle sections differed in latency and amplitude, its dependency on posture and ankle position was similar. The H-reflex amplitudes and maximum H-reflex to M-response (H/M ratios were significantly 1 lower during standing compared to lying with the ankle in neutral, 2 greater during standing with the ankle in plantarflexion compared to neutral, and 3 less with the ankle in dorsiflexion compared to neutral during lying and standing for all muscles (p ≤ .05. Conclusion Varying demands are required for muscles activated during distinctly different postures and ankle movement tasks.

  14. Comparison of intraclass correlation coefficient estimates and standard errors between using cross-sectional and repeated measurement data: the Safety Check cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Edward H; Wasserman, Richard; Barkin, Shari

    2011-03-01

    Designing cluster randomized trials in clinical studies often requires accurate estimates of intraclass correlation, which quantifies the strength of correlation between units, such as participants, within a cluster, such as a practice. Published ICC estimates, even when available, often suffer from the problem of wide confidence intervals. Using data from a national, randomized, controlled study concerning violence prevention for children--the Safety Check--we compare the ICC values derived from two approaches only baseline data and using both baseline and follow-up data. Using a variance component decomposition approach, the latter method allows flexibility in handling complex data sets. For example, it allows for shifts in the outcome variable over time and for an unbalanced cluster design. Furthermore, we evaluate the large-sample formula for ICC estimates and standard errors using the bootstrap method. Our findings suggest that ICC estimates range from 0.012 to 0.11 for providers within practice and range from 0.018 to 0.11 for families within provider. The estimates derived from the baseline-only and repeated-measurements approaches agree quite well except in cases in which variation over repeated measurements is large. The reductions in the widths of ICC confidence limits from using repeated measurement over baseline only are, respectively, 62% and 42% at the practice and provider levels. The contribution of this paper therefore includes two elements, which are a methodology for improving the accuracy of ICC, and the reporting of such quantities for pediatric and other researchers who are interested in designing clustered randomized trials similar to the current study.

  15. Otlu Peynir Yapımında Farklı Hammadde Karışımlarının Peynir Parametreleri Üzerine Etkisinin Anova ve Manova Metotları Kullanılarak Araştırılması

    OpenAIRE

    Kocabaş, Zahide; Kesici, Tahsin; Yetişmeyen, Atilla

    1997-01-01

    In this study, the effects of the use of different raw materials (milks) and herb combinations in the manufacturing of cheese with herb on total-solid, fat in total-solid, protein and titretible acidty were investigated using ANOVA (Univariate analysis of variance) and MANOVA (Multivariate analysis of variance). On the 15th day, the results obtained using ANOVA and MANOVA were similar to each other. However, different results were observed by using ANOVA and MANOVA techniques for the cheese p...

  16. Optimization of tensile strength of friction welded AISI 1040 and AISI 304L steels according to statistics analysis (ANOVA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirik, Ihsan [Batman Univ. (Turkey); Ozdemir, Niyazi; Firat, Emrah Hanifi; Caligulu, Ugur [Firat Univ., Elazig (Turkey)

    2013-06-01

    Materials difficult to weld by fusion welding processes can be successfully welded by friction welding. The strength of the friction welded joints is extremely affected by process parameters (rotation speed, friction time, friction pressure, forging time, and forging pressure). In this study, statistical values of tensile strength were investigated in terms of rotation speed, friction time, and friction pressure on the strength behaviours of friction welded AISI 1040 and AISI 304L alloys. Then, the tensile test results were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) with a confidence level of 95 % to find out whether a statistically significant difference occurs. As a result of this study, the maximum tensile strength is very close, which that of AISI 1040 parent metal of 637 MPa to could be obtained for the joints fabricated under the welding conditions of rotation speed of 1700 rpm, friction pressure of 50 MPa, forging pressure of 100 MPa, friction time of 4 s, and forging time of 2 s. Rotation speed, friction time, and friction pressure on the friction welding of AISI 1040 and AISI 304L alloys were statistically significant regarding tensile strength test values. (orig.)

  17. Repeated measurements of blood lactate concentration as a prognostic marker in horses with acute colitis evaluated with classification and regression trees (CART) and random forest analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, M B; Tolver, A; Husted, L; Tølbøll, T H; Pihl, T H

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the prognostic value of single and repeated measurements of blood l-lactate (Lac) and ionised calcium (iCa) concentrations, packed cell volume (PCV) and plasma total protein (TP) concentration in horses with acute colitis. A total of 66 adult horses admitted with acute colitis (2 mmol/L (sensitivity, 0.72; specificity, 0.8). In conclusion, blood lactate concentration measured at admission and repeated 6 h later aided the prognostic evaluation of horses with acute colitis in this population with a very high mortality rate. This should allow clinicians to give a more reliable prognosis for the horse.

  18. Ethyl chitosan synthesis and quantification of the effects acquired after grafting it on a cotton fabric, using ANOVA statistical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Vasilica; Muresan, Augustin; Popescu, Gabriel; Balan, Mihaela; Dobromir, Marius

    2016-03-15

    Three ethyl chitosans (ECSs) have been prepared using the ethyl chloride (AA) that was obtained in situ. Each ECS was applied on a 100% cotton fabric through a pad-dry-cure technology. Using the ANOVA as statistic method, the wrinkle-proofing effects have been determined varying the concentrations of AA (0.1-2.1mmol) and chitosan (CS) (0.1-2.1mmol). Alkylation and grafting mechanisms have been confirmed by the results of FTIR, (1)H NMR, XPS, SEM, DSC and termogravimetric analyses. The performances of each ECS as wrinkle-proofing agent have been revealed through quantitative methods (taking-up degree, wrinkle-recovering angle, tensile strength and effect's durability). The ECSs confer wrinkle-recovering angle and tensile strength higher than those of the witness sample. Durability of ECSs grafted on cotton have been demonstrated by a good capacity of dyeing with non-specific (acid/anionic and cationic) dyes under severe working conditions (100°C, 60min) and a good antimicrobial capacity.

  19. Application of ANOVA and Taguchi-based Mutation Particle Swarm Algorithm for Parameters Design of Multi-hole Extrusion Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Jong Chen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the Taguchi method and the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO technique which uses mutation (MPSO and dynamic inertia weight to determine the best ranges of process parameters (extrusion velocity, eccentricity ratio, billet temperature and friction coefficient at the die interface for a multi-hole extrusion process. A L18(21×37 array, signal-to-noise (S/N ratios and analysis of variance (ANOVA at 99% confidence level were used to indicate the optimum levels and the effect of the process parameters with consideration of mandrel eccentricity angle and exit tube bending angle. As per the Taguchi-based MPSO algorithm using DEFORMTM 3D Finite Element Analysis (FEA software, the minimum mandrel eccentricity and exit tube bending angles were respectively calculated to be 0.03°, which are significantly less than those based on Genetic Algorithm (GA and the Taguchi method, respectively. This indicates that the Taguchi-based MPSO algorithm can effectively and remarkably reduce the warp angles of Ti-6Al-4V extruded products and the billet temperature is the most influencing parameter. The results of this study can be extended to multi-hole extrusion beyond four holes and employed as a predictive tool to forecast the optimal parameters of the multi-hole extrusion process.

  20. Geophysical data integration, stochastic simulation and significance analysis of groundwater responses using ANOVA in the Chicot Aquifer system, Louisiana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, A.; Tsai, F.T.-C.; White, C.D.; Carlson, D.A.; Willson, C.S.

    2008-01-01

    Data integration is challenging where there are different levels of support between primary and secondary data that need to be correlated in various ways. A geostatistical method is described, which integrates the hydraulic conductivity (K) measurements and electrical resistivity data to better estimate the K distribution in the Upper Chicot Aquifer of southwestern Louisiana, USA. The K measurements were obtained from pumping tests and represent the primary (hard) data. Borehole electrical resistivity data from electrical logs were regarded as the secondary (soft) data, and were used to infer K values through Archie's law and the Kozeny-Carman equation. A pseudo cross-semivariogram was developed to cope with the resistivity data non-collocation. Uncertainties in the auto-semivariograms and pseudo cross-semivariogram were quantified. The groundwater flow model responses by the regionalized and coregionalized models of K were compared using analysis of variance (ANOVA). The results indicate that non-collocated secondary data may improve estimates of K and affect groundwater flow responses of practical interest, including specific capacity and drawdown. ?? Springer-Verlag 2007.

  1. An introduction to analysis of variance (ANOVA) with special reference to data from clinical experiments in optometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, R A; Slade, S V; Eperjesi, F

    2000-05-01

    This article is aimed primarily at eye care practitioners who are undertaking advanced clinical research, and who wish to apply analysis of variance (ANOVA) to their data. ANOVA is a data analysis method of great utility and flexibility. This article describes why and how ANOVA was developed, the basic logic which underlies the method and the assumptions that the method makes for it to be validly applied to data from clinical experiments in optometry. The application of the method to the analysis of a simple data set is then described. In addition, the methods available for making planned comparisons between treatment means and for making post hoc tests are evaluated. The problem of determining the number of replicates or patients required in a given experimental situation is also discussed.

  2. Evaluation of Multiple Imputation in Missing Data Analysis: An Application on Repeated Measurement Data in Animal Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gazel Ser

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of multiple imputation method in case that missing observation structure is at random and completely at random from the approach of general linear mixed model. The application data of study was consisted of a total 77 heads of Norduz ram lambs at 7 months of age. After slaughtering, pH values measured at five different time points were determined as dependent variable. In addition, hot carcass weight, muscle glycogen level and fasting durations were included as independent variables in the model. In the dependent variable without missing observation, two missing observation structures including Missing Completely at Random (MCAR and Missing at Random (MAR were created by deleting the observations at certain rations (10% and 25%. After that, in data sets that have missing observation structure, complete data sets were obtained using MI (multiple imputation. The results obtained by applying general linear mixed model to the data sets that were completed using MI method were compared to the results regarding complete data. In the mixed model which was applied to the complete data and MI data sets, results whose covariance structures were the same and parameter estimations and standard estimations were rather close to the complete data are obtained. As a result, in this study, it was ensured that reliable information was obtained in mixed model in case of choosing MI as imputation method in missing observation structure and rates of both cases.

  3. Feedback from an image of finger and an actual finger produce similar prismatic after-effect: a repeated measures study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilms, Inge Linda; Assentoft, Emilie

    2014-01-01

    by seeing their fingertip. In the second condition subjects saw an image of a fingertip. The results indicate that the two conditions are significantly different. The study is an important step in understanding what actually makes a difference in training when trying to convert paper-and-pencil training...... if it is the format rather than the indirectness of the feedback creating this difference. 27 healthy subjects were subjected to a single session of Prism Adaptation Training under two different feedback conditions. In the first feedback condition, subjects were exposed to visual feedback on pointing precision...

  4. Effects of ambient air pollution on functional status in patients with chronic congestive heart failure: a repeated-measures study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillips Russell S

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies using administrative data report a positive association between ambient air pollution and the risk of hospitalization for congestive heart failure (HF. Circulating levels of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP are directly associated with cardiac hemodynamics and symptom severity in patients with HF and, therefore, serves as a marker of functional status. We tested the hypothesis that BNP levels would be positively associated with short-term changes in ambient pollution levels among 28 patients with chronic stable HF and impaired systolic function. Methods BNP was measured in whole blood at 0, 6, and 12 weeks. We used linear mixed models to evaluate the association between fine particulate matter (PM2.5, carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, and black carbon and log(BNP. Lags of 0 to 3 days were considered in separate models. We calculated the intraclass correlation coefficient and within-subject coefficient of variation as measures of reproducibility. Results We found no association between any pollutant and measures of BNP at any lag. For example, a 10 μg/m3 increase in PM2.5 was associated with a 0.8% (95% CI: -16.4, 21.5; p = 0.94 increase in BNP on the same day. The within-subject coefficient of variation was 45% on the natural scale and 9% on the log scale. Conclusion These results suggest that serial BNP measurements are unlikely to be useful in a longitudinal study of air pollution-related acute health effects. The magnitude of expected ambient air pollution health effects appears small in relation to the considerable within-person variability in BNP levels in this population.

  5. NEIGHBOURHOOD POVERTY, PERCEIVED DISCRIMINATION AND CENTRAL ADIPOSITY IN THE USA: INDEPENDENT ASSOCIATIONS IN A REPEATED MEASURES ANALYSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwarteng, Jamila L; Schulz, Amy J; Mentz, Graciela B; Israel, Barbara A; Shanks, Trina R; Perkins, Denise White

    2016-11-01

    This study examines the independent effects of neighbourhood context (i.e. neighbourhood poverty) and exposure to perceived discrimination in shaping risk of obesity over time. Weighted three-level hierarchical linear regression models for a continuous outcome were used to assess the independent effects of neighbourhood poverty and perceived discrimination on obesity over time in a sample of 157 non-Hispanic Black, non-Hispanic White and Hispanic adults in Detroit, USA, in 2002/2003 and 2007/2008. Independent associations were found between neighbourhood poverty and perceived discrimination with central adiposity over time. Residents of neighbourhoods with high concentrations of poverty were more likely to show increases in central adiposity compared with those in neighbourhoods with lower concentrations of poverty. In models adjusted for BMI, neighbourhood poverty at baseline was associated with a greater change in central adiposity among participants who lived in neighbourhoods in the second (B=3.79, p=0.025) and third (B=3.73, p=0.024) poverty quartiles, compared with those in the lowest poverty neighbourhoods. The results from models that included both neighbourhood poverty and perceived discrimination showed that both were associated with increased risk of increased central adiposity over time. Residents of neighbourhoods in the second (B=9.58, p<0.001), third (B=8.25, p=0.004) and fourth (B=7.66, p=0.030) quartiles of poverty were more likely to show greater increases in central adiposity over time, compared with those in the lowest poverty quartile, with mean discrimination at baseline independently and positively associated with increases in central adiposity over time (B=2.36, p=0.020). The results suggest that neighbourhood poverty and perceived discrimination are independently associated with a heightened risk of increase in central adiposity over time. Efforts to address persistent disparities in central adiposity in the USA should include strategies to

  6. Comparing the Performance of Approaches for Testing the Homogeneity of Variance Assumption in One-Factor ANOVA Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Rodríguez de Gil, Patricia; Chen, Yi-Hsin; Kromrey, Jeffrey D.; Kim, Eun Sook; Pham, Thanh; Nguyen, Diep; Romano, Jeanine L.

    2017-01-01

    Various tests to check the homogeneity of variance assumption have been proposed in the literature, yet there is no consensus as to their robustness when the assumption of normality does not hold. This simulation study evaluated the performance of 14 tests for the homogeneity of variance assumption in one-way ANOVA models in terms of Type I error…

  7. Ambient particulate air pollution and circulating antioxidant enzymes: A repeated-measure study in healthy adults in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shaowei; Wang, Bin; Yang, Di; Wei, Hongying; Li, Hongyu; Pan, Lu; Huang, Jing; Wang, Xin; Qin, Yu; Zheng, Chanjuan; Shima, Masayuki; Deng, Furong; Guo, Xinbiao

    2016-01-01

    The association of systemic antioxidant activity with ambient air pollution has been unclear. A panel of 40 healthy college students underwent repeated blood collection for 12 occasions under three exposure scenarios before and after relocating from a suburban area to an urban area in Beijing, China in 2010-2011. We measured various air pollutants including fine particles (PM2.5) and determined circulating levels of antioxidant enzymes extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) and glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1) in the laboratory. An interquartile range increase of 63.4 μg/m(3) at 3-d PM2.5 moving average was associated with a 6.3% (95% CI: 0.6, 12.4) increase in EC-SOD and a 5.5% (95% CI: 1.3, 9.8) increase in GPX1. Several PM2.5 chemical constituents, including negative ions (nitrate and chloride) and metals (e.g., iron and strontium), were consistently associated with increases in EC-SOD and GPX1. Our results support activation of circulating antioxidant enzymes following exposure to particulate air pollution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Bayesian hierarchical joint modeling of repeatedly measured continuous and ordinal markers of disease severity: Application to Ugandan diabetes data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhule, O D; Wahed, A S; Youk, A O

    2017-08-22

    Modeling of correlated biomarkers jointly has been shown to improve the efficiency of parameter estimates, leading to better clinical decisions. In this paper, we employ a joint modeling approach to a unique diabetes dataset, where blood glucose (continuous) and urine glucose (ordinal) measures of disease severity for diabetes are known to be correlated. The postulated joint model assumes that the outcomes are from distributions that are in the exponential family and hence modeled as multivariate generalized linear mixed effects model associated through correlated and/or shared random effects. The Markov chain Monte Carlo Bayesian approach is used to approximate posterior distribution and draw inference on the parameters. This proposed methodology provides a flexible framework to account for the hierarchical structure of the highly unbalanced data as well as the association between the 2 outcomes. The results indicate improved efficiency of parameter estimates when blood glucose and urine glucose are modeled jointly. Moreover, the simulation studies show that estimates obtained from the joint model are consistently less biased and more efficient than those in the separate models. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Are diagnostic criteria for acute malnutrition affected by hydration status in hospitalized children? A repeated measures study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fegan Gregory

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Dehydration and malnutrition commonly occur together among ill children in developing countries. Dehydration (change in total body water is known to alter weight. Although muscle tissue has high water content, it is not known whether mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC may be altered by changes in tissue hydration. We aimed to determine whether rehydration alters MUAC, MUAC Z score (MUACz, weight-for-length Z-score (WFLz and classification of nutritional status among hospitalised Kenyan children admitted with signs of dehydration. Study procedure We enrolled children aged from 3 months to 5 years admitted to a rural Kenyan district hospital with clinical signs compatible with dehydration, and without kwashiorkor. Anthropometric measurements were taken at admission and repeated after 48 hours of treatment, which included rehydration by WHO protocols. Changes in weight observed during this period were considered to be due to changes in hydration status. Results Among 325 children (median age 11 months the median weight gain (rehydration after 48 hours was 0.21 kg, (an increase of 2.9% of admission body weight. Each 1% change in weight was associated with a 0.40 mm (95% CI: 0.30 to 0.44 mm, p Conclusion MUAC is less affected by dehydration than WFLz and is therefore more suitable for nutritional assessment of ill children. However, both WFLz and MUAC misclassify SAM among dehydrated children. Nutritional status should be re-evaluated following rehydration, and management adjusted accordingly.

  10. Investigation of 1H NMR Profile of Vegetarian Human Urine Using ANOVA-based Multi-factor Analysis%素食人群尿液1H NMR代谢轮廓的多因素方差分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董继扬; 邓伶莉; CHENG Kian-Kai; GRIFFIN Julian L.; 陈忠

    2011-01-01

    结合方差分析(ANOVA)和偏最小二乘法判别分析(PLS-DA)两种分析技术,对素食和普食人群的尿液1H NMR谱进行分析.利用ANOVA方法将数据矩阵分解为几个独立因素矩阵,滤除干扰因素后,再利用PLS-DA对单因素数据进行建模分析.实验结果表明,ANOVA/PLS-DA方法可以有效地减少饮食因素和性别因素之间的相互影响,使分析结果更具有生物学意义.%In this study, a technique that combined both analysis of variance ( ANOVA) and partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was used to compare the urine XH NMR spectra of healthy people from a vegetarian and omnivorous population. In ANOVA/PLS-DA, the variation in data was first decomposed into different variance components that each contains a single source of variation. Each of the resulting variance components was then analyzed using PLS-DA. The experimental results showed that ANOVA/PLS-DA is efficient in disentangling the effect of diet and gender on die metabolic profile, and the method could be used to extract biologically relevant information for result interpretation.

  11. Changes in surgical team performance and safety climate attitudes following expansion of perioperative services: a repeated-measures study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Brigid M; Harbeck, Emma; Kang, Evelyn; Steel, Catherine; Fairweather, Nicole; Chaboyer, Wendy

    2017-08-10

    Objective The aim of the present study was to describe process changes in surgical team performance and team members' attitudes to safety culture following hospital relocation and expansion of perioperative services.Methods The study was a naturalistic study using structured observations and surveys to assess non-technical skills (NTS; i.e. communication, teamwork, situational awareness, decision making and leadership) in surgery. This interrupted time series design used mixed-linear regression models to examine the effect of phase (before and after hospital relocation) on surgical teams' NTS and their processes that may affect performance. Differences in self-reported teamwork and safety climate attitudes were also examined.Results In all, 186 procedures (100 before and 81 after hospital relocation) were observed across teams working in general, paediatric, orthopaedic and thoracic surgeries. Interobserver agreement ranged from 86% to 95%. An effect of phase was found, indicating that there were significant improvements after relocation in the use of NTS by the teams observed (P=0.020; 95% confidence interval 1.9-4.7).Conclusions The improvements seen in surgical teams' NTS performance and safety culture attitudes may be related to the move to a new state-of-the-art perioperative department.What is known about the topic? Patient safety in surgery relies on optimal team performance, underpinned by effective NTS.What does this paper add? The NTS of surgical teams may be improved through ergonomic innovations that promote teams' shared mental models.What are the implications for practitioners? Effective multidisciplinary teamwork relies on a combination of NTS and ergonomic factors, which inherently contribute to team performance and safety climate attitudes.

  12. Repeated measures of body mass index and C-reactive protein in relation to all-cause mortality and cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Doherty, Mark G; Jørgensen, Torben; Borglykke, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Obesity has been linked with elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), and both have been associated with increased risk of mortality and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Previous studies have used a single 'baseline' measurement and such analyses cannot account for possible changes in these which...... body mass index (BMI) and CRP with all-cause mortality and CVD. Being overweight (≥25-obese (≥30-....79-0.94) and 0.80 (0.72-0.89). A similar relationship was found, but only for overweight in Glostrup, HR (95 % CI) 0.88 (0.76-1.02); and moderately obese in Tromsø, HR (95 % CI) 0.79 (0.62-1.01). Associations were not evident between repeated measures of BMI and CVD. Conversely, increasing CRP concentrations...

  13. Tests of additivity in mixed and fixed effect two-way ANOVA models with single sub-class numbers

    OpenAIRE

    Rasch, Dieter; Rusch, Thomas; Simeckova, Marie; Kubinger, Klaus D.; Moder, Karl; Simecek, Petr

    2009-01-01

    In variety testing as well as in psychological assessment, the situation occurs that in a two-way ANOVA-type model with only one replication per cell, analysis is done under the assumption of no interaction between the two factors. Tests for this situation are known only for fixed factors and normally distributed outcomes. In the following we will present five additivity tests and apply them to fixed and mixed models and to quantitative as well as to Bernoulli distributed data....

  14. Optimizing Injection Molding Parameters of Different Halloysites Type-Reinforced Thermoplastic Polyurethane Nanocomposites via Taguchi Complemented with ANOVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayser Sumer Gaaz

    2016-11-01

    Taguchi and ANOVA approaches. Seemingly, mHNTs has shown its very important role in the resulting product.

  15. The near-infrared spectroscopy-derived deoxygenated haemoglobin breaking-point is a repeatable measure that demarcates exercise intensity domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannetta, Danilo; Qahtani, Ahmad; Mattioni Maturana, Felipe; Murias, Juan Manuel

    2017-09-01

    A breaking-point in the near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)-derived deoxygenated haemoglobin ([HHb]) profile towards the end of a ramp incremental (RI) cycling test has been associated to the respiratory compensation point (RCP). Despite the physiological value of this measure, its repeatability remains unknown. The aim was to examine the repeatability of the [HHb] breaking-point ([HHb]BP) and its association to RCP during a RI cycling test. A repeated measures design was performed on 11 males (30.5±8.4 year; 76.5±8.4kg) and 4 females (30.5±5.9 year; 61.9±4.4 Kg). Gas exchange and NIRS [HHb] data were collected during RI tests performed on two different days separated by 48h. The [HHb]BP and the RCP were determined and compared for each trial. The [HHb]BP and the respiratory compensation point (RCP) occurred at the same VO2 in test 1 and test 2 ([HHb]BP: 3.49±0.52Lmin(-1) test 1; 3.48±0.45Lmin(-1) test 2; RCP: 3.38±0.40Lmin(-1) test 1; 3.38±0.44Lmin(-1) test 2) (P>0.05). The VO2 associated with the [HHb]BP and the VO2 at RCP were not significantly different from each other either in test 1 as well as in test 2 (P>0.05). Neither test 1 nor test 2 showed significant mean average error between the VO2 at the [HHb]BP and RCP using Bland & Altman plots. The [HHb]BP is a repeatable measure that consistently occurs towards the end of a RI test. The association between the [HHb]BP and the RCP reinforces the idea that these parameters may share similar mechanistic basis. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of measurement errors on psychometric measurements in ergonomics studies: Implications for correlations, ANOVA, linear regression, factor analysis, and linear discriminant analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Salvendy, Gavriel

    2009-05-01

    This paper aims to demonstrate the effects of measurement errors on psychometric measurements in ergonomics studies. A variety of sources can cause random measurement errors in ergonomics studies and these errors can distort virtually every statistic computed and lead investigators to erroneous conclusions. The effects of measurement errors on five most widely used statistical analysis tools have been discussed and illustrated: correlation; ANOVA; linear regression; factor analysis; linear discriminant analysis. It has been shown that measurement errors can greatly attenuate correlations between variables, reduce statistical power of ANOVA, distort (overestimate, underestimate or even change the sign of) regression coefficients, underrate the explanation contributions of the most important factors in factor analysis and depreciate the significance of discriminant function and discrimination abilities of individual variables in discrimination analysis. The discussions will be restricted to subjective scales and survey methods and their reliability estimates. Other methods applied in ergonomics research, such as physical and electrophysiological measurements and chemical and biomedical analysis methods, also have issues of measurement errors, but they are beyond the scope of this paper. As there has been increasing interest in the development and testing of theories in ergonomics research, it has become very important for ergonomics researchers to understand the effects of measurement errors on their experiment results, which the authors believe is very critical to research progress in theory development and cumulative knowledge in the ergonomics field.

  17. Knowledge and skill retention of in-service versus preservice nursing professionals following an informal training program in pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a repeated-measures quasiexperimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Jhuma; Vijayakanthi, Nandini; Sankar, M Jeeva; Dubey, Nandkishore

    2013-01-01

    Our objective was to compare the impact of a training program in pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on the knowledge and skills of in-service and preservice nurses at prespecified time points. This repeated-measures quasiexperimental study was conducted in the pediatric emergency and ICU of a tertiary care teaching hospital between January and March 2011. We assessed the baseline knowledge and skills of nursing staff (in-service nurses) and final year undergraduate nursing students (preservice nurses) using a validated questionnaire and a skill checklist, respectively. The participants were then trained on pediatric CPR using standard guidelines. The knowledge and skills were reassessed immediately after training and at 6 weeks after training. A total of 74 participants-28 in-service and 46 preservice professionals-were enrolled. At initial assessment, in-service nurses were found to have insignificant higher mean knowledge scores (6.6 versus 5.8, P = 0.08) while the preservice nurses had significantly higher skill scores (6.5 versus 3.2, P nurses performing better in knowledge test (10.5 versus 9.1, P = 0.01) and the preservice nurses performing better in skill test (9.8 versus 7.4, P skills of in-service and preservice nurses in pediatric CPR improved with training. In comparison to preservice nurses, the in-service nurses seemed to retain knowledge better with time than skills.

  18. Tooth Discoloration Resulting from a Nano Zinc Oxide-Eugenol Sealer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Mina; Javidi, Maryam; Jafari, Marzieh; Gharechahi, Maryam; Javidi, Pedram; Shayani Rad, Maryam

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: A desirable quality of any endodontic sealer is its ability to be tooth color friendly. Therefore the aim of the present study was to evaluate the tooth discoloration potential of a nano zinc oxide-eugenol (NZOE) sealer. Methods and Materials: In order to evaluate tooth discoloration, the pulp chamber of 60 human maxillary central and lateral incisors were filled with one of the sealers, naming AH-26 (resin-based sealer), Pulpdent sealer (ZOE-based) and a NZOE experimental sealer. Color measurements was assessed at the baseline (before placement of sealers) (T0), 24 h (T1) and 72 h (T2) h, 1-week (T3), and 1-month (T4) after the placement of sealers using the Easy Shade spectrophotometer. Data were analyzed in SPSS software using one-way ANOVA, and repeated measured ANOVA. Results: No significant differences were observed when the paired comparison test was performed (P>0.05). Conclusion: The tested NZOE sealer had similar tooth discoloration potential in comparison with AH-26 and ZOE sealer. PMID:28179929

  19. Simultaneous Optimality of LSE and ANOVA Estimate in General Mixed Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mi Xia WU; Song Gui WANG; Kai Fun YU

    2008-01-01

    Problems of the simultaneous optimal estimates and the optimal tests in general mixed models are considered.A necessary and sufficient condition is presented for the least squares estimate of the fixed effects and the analysis of variance (Hendreson III's) estimate of variance components being uniformly minimum variance unbiased estimates simultaneously.This result can be applied to the problems of finding uniformly optimal unbiased tests and uniformly most accurate unbiased confidential interval on parameters of interest,and for finding equivalences of several common estimates of variance components.

  20. The effect of activating fluxes in TIG welding by using Anova for SS 321

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akash.B.Patel

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Gas tungsten arc welding is fundamental in those industries where it is important to control the weld bead shape and its metallurgical characteristics. However, compared to the other arc welding process, the shallow penetration of the TIG welding restricts its ability to weld thick structures in a single pass (~ 2 mm for stainless steels, thus its productivity is relativity low. This is why there have been several trials to improve the productivity of the TIG welding. The use of activating flux in TIG welding process is one of such attempts. In this study, first, the effect of each TIG welding parameters on the weld’s joint strength was shown and then, the optimal parameters were determined using the Taguchi method with L9 (9 orthogonal array. SiO2 and TiO2 oxide powders were used to investigate the effect of activating flux on the TIG weld mechanical properties of 321austenitic stainless steel. The experimental results showed that activating flux aided TIG welding has increased the weld penetration, tending to reduce the width of the weld bead. The SiO2 flux produced the most noticeable effect. Furthermore, the welded joint presented better tensile strength and hardness.

  1. Effect of variance ratio on ANOVA robustness: Might 1.5 be the limit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanca, María J; Alarcón, Rafael; Arnau, Jaume; Bono, Roser; Bendayan, Rebecca

    2017-06-22

    Inconsistencies in the research findings on F-test robustness to variance heterogeneity could be related to the lack of a standard criterion to assess robustness or to the different measures used to quantify heterogeneity. In the present paper we use Monte Carlo simulation to systematically examine the Type I error rate of F-test under heterogeneity. One-way, balanced, and unbalanced designs with monotonic patterns of variance were considered. Variance ratio (VR) was used as a measure of heterogeneity (1.5, 1.6, 1.7, 1.8, 2, 3, 5, and 9), the coefficient of sample size variation as a measure of inequality between group sizes (0.16, 0.33, and 0.50), and the correlation between variance and group size as an indicator of the pairing between them (1, .50, 0, -.50, and -1). Overall, the results suggest that in terms of Type I error a VR above 1.5 may be established as a rule of thumb for considering a potential threat to F-test robustness under heterogeneity with unequal sample sizes.

  2. APPLICATION OF TAGUCHI AND ANOVA IN OPTIMIZATION OF PROCESS PARAMETERS OF LAPPING OPERATION FOR CAST IRON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.R. Parate

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Lapping appears like a miraculous process, because it can produce surfaces that are perfectly flat, perfectly round, perfectly smooth, perfectly sharp, or perfectly accurate. Under the correct circumstances, it can impart or improve precise geometry (flatness, roundness, etc., improve surface finish, improve surface quality, achieve high dimensional accuracy (length, diameter, etc., improve angular accuracy (worm gears, couplings, etc., improve fit, and above all, sharpen the tools. This paper presents research on calculating the material removal rate for a machining component by the lapping process. The cast iron sample with an outer diameter of 50 mm and an inner diameter of 45 mm was tested on a single plate tabletop lapping machine. Experiments based on design of experiments were conducted by varying lapping load, lapping time, paste concentration, lapping fluid, and by using different types of abrasives. The Taguchi statistical method has been used in this work. Optimum machining parameters for material removal rate are estimated and verified with experimental results and are found to be in good agreement. The confirmation test exhibits high material removal rate by using Al2O3 abrasive particles together with oil as a carrier fluid under the impression of high load. Further material removal rate increases with an increase in lapping load and time.

  3. Minimizing Drilling Thrust Force for HFRP Composite by Optimizing Process Parameters using Combination of ANOVA Approach and S/N Ratios Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maoinser Mohd Azuwan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Drilling hybrid fiber reinforced polymer (HFRP composite is a novel approach in fiber reinforced polymer (FRP composite machining studies as this material combining two different fibers in a single matrix that resulted in considerable improvement in mechanical properties and cost saving as compared to conventional fiber composite material. This study presents the development and optimized way of drilling HFRP composite at various drilling parameters such as drill point angle, feed rate and cutting speed by using the full factorial design experiment with the combination of analysis of variance (ANOVA approach and signal to noise (S/N ratio analysis. The results identified optimum drilling parameters for drilling the HFRP composite using small drill point angle at low feed rate and medium cutting speed that resulted in lower thrust force.

  4. THE CONNECTION IDENTIFICATION BETWEEN THE NET INVESTMENTS IN HOTELS AND RESTORANTS AND TOURISTIC ACCOMODATION CAPACITY BY USING THE ANOVA METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena STAN

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In the purpose of giving the answers to customers’ harsh exigencies, in the Romanian tourism development hasto be taking into account especially the “accommodation” component. The dimension of technical and material base ofaccommodation can be express through: units’ number, rooms’ number, places number. The most used is “placesnumber” indicator. Nowadays as regarding the tourism Romanian investments there are special concerns caused bypeculiar determinations. The study aim is represented by identifying of a connection existence between net investmentsin hotels and restaurants and tourism accommodation capacity, registered among 2002 -2007period in Romania, byusing the dispersion analysis ANOVA method.

  5. Telomere shortening unrelated to smoking, body weight, physical activity, and alcohol intake: 4,576 general population individuals with repeat measurements 10 years apart.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maren Weischer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Cross-sectional studies have associated short telomere length with smoking, body weight, physical activity, and possibly alcohol intake; however, whether these associations are due to confounding is unknown. We tested these hypotheses in 4,576 individuals from the general population cross-sectionally, and with repeat measurement of relative telomere length 10 years apart. We also tested whether change in telomere length is associated with mortality and morbidity in the general population. Relative telomere length was measured with quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Cross-sectionally at the first examination, short telomere length was associated with increased age (P for trend across quartiles = 3 × 10(-77, current smoking (P = 8 × 10(-3, increased body mass index (P = 7 × 10(-14, physical inactivity (P = 4 × 10(-17, but not with increased alcohol intake (P = 0.10. At the second examination 10 years later, 56% of participants had lost and 44% gained telomere length with a mean loss of 193 basepairs. Change in leukocyte telomere length during 10 years was associated inversely with baseline telomere length (P<1 × 10(-300 and age at baseline (P = 1 × 10(-27, but not with baseline or 10-year inter-observational tobacco consumption, body weight, physical activity, or alcohol intake. Prospectively during a further 10 years follow-up after the second examination, quartiles of telomere length change did not associate with risk of all-cause mortality, cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes mellitus, ischemic cerebrovascular disease, or ischemic heart disease. In conclusion, smoking, increased body weight, and physical inactivity were associated with short telomere length cross-sectionally, but not with telomere length change during 10 years observation, and alcohol intake was associated with neither. Also, change in telomere length did not associate prospectively with mortality or morbidity in the general population.

  6. An evaluation of a structured learning program as a component of the clinical practicum in undergraduate nurse education: A repeated measures analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Elizabeth; Murphy, Maria; MacDonald, Lee; Pascoe, Elizabeth; Storen, Heather; Scanlon, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence that nursing students experience stress and anxiety and a reduction in self-efficacy when undertaking clinical placements. Previous reports have identified that a structured three-day program within the Bachelor of Nursing (BN) clinical practicum reduces the students self-report of anxiety and increases self-efficacy. However, it is unreported whether these improved outcomes are sustained for the duration of the clinical placement. The aim of this study was to evaluate the duration of the effect of a three-day structured learning program within the clinical placement on final year Bachelor of Nursing student's report of anxiety and self-efficacy pre- and post-program participation in this intervention and following completion of the clinical practicum. A repeated measures design. University-based Clinical School of Nursing, acute care clinical practicum. Final year Bachelor of Nursing students. The intervention comprised the three-day program on starting the clinical practicum. A questionnaire included the anxiety subscale of The Hospital Anxiety & Depression Scale (The HAD) and the General Self-Efficacy Scale (GSES-12). The questionnaire was completed on day one (time one), upon completion of the three-day program (time two) and upon completion of placement on day 18 (time three). The questionnaire response rate varied over time. There was a statistically significant effect in reducing anxiety over time: F(1.73,74.46)=25.20, plearning program and the benefit of the intervention is sustained for the clinical placement duration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Two to five repeated measurements per patient reduced the required sample size considerably in a randomized clinical trial for patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smedslund Geir

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient reported outcomes are accepted as important outcome measures in rheumatology. The fluctuating symptoms in patients with rheumatic diseases have serious implications for sample size in clinical trials. We estimated the effects of measuring the outcome 1-5 times on the sample size required in a two-armed trial. Findings In a randomized controlled trial that evaluated the effects of a mindfulness-based group intervention for patients with inflammatory arthritis (n=71, the outcome variables Numerical Rating Scales (NRS (pain, fatigue, disease activity, self-care ability, and emotional wellbeing and General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-20 were measured five times before and after the intervention. For each variable we calculated the necessary sample sizes for obtaining 80% power (α=.05 for one up to five measurements. Two, three, and four measures reduced the required sample sizes by 15%, 21%, and 24%, respectively. With three (and five measures, the required sample size per group was reduced from 56 to 39 (32 for the GHQ-20, from 71 to 60 (55 for pain, 96 to 71 (73 for fatigue, 57 to 51 (48 for disease activity, 59 to 44 (45 for self-care, and 47 to 37 (33 for emotional wellbeing. Conclusions Measuring the outcomes five times rather than once reduced the necessary sample size by an average of 27%. When planning a study, researchers should carefully compare the advantages and disadvantages of increasing sample size versus employing three to five repeated measurements in order to obtain the required statistical power.

  8. Comparison of ANOVA, McSweeney, Bradley, Harwell-Serlin, and Blair-Sawilowsky Tests in the Balanced 2x2x2 Layout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, D. Lynn; And Others

    The Type I error and power properties of the 2x2x2 analysis of variance (ANOVA) and tests developed by McSweeney (1967), Bradley (1979), Harwell-Serlin (1989; Harwell, 1991), and Blair-Sawilowsky (1990) were compared using Monte Carlo methods. The ANOVA was superior under the Gaussian and uniform distributions. The Blair-Sawilowsky test was…

  9. Is the ANOVA F-Test Robust to Variance Heterogeneity When Sample Sizes are Equal?: An Investigation via a Coefficient of Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogan, Joanne C.; Keselman, H. J.

    1977-01-01

    The effects of variance heterogeneity on the empirical probability of a Type I error for the analysis of variance (ANOVA) F-test are examined. The rate of Type I error varies as a function of the degree of variance heterogeneity, and the ANOVA F-test is not always robust to variance heterogeneity when sample sizes are equal. (Author/JAC)

  10. Are droughts occurrence and severity aggravating? A study on SPI drought class transitions using loglinear models and ANOVA-like inference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Moreira

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Long time series (95 to 135 yr of the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI computed with the 12-month time scale relative to 10 locations across Portugal were studied with the aim of investigating if drought frequency and severity are changing through time. Considering four drought severity classes, time series of drought class transitions were computed and later divided into 4 or 5 sub-periods according to length of time series. Drought class transitions were calculated to form a 2-dimensional contingency table for each period. Two-dimensional loglinear models were fitted to these contingency tables and an ANOVA-like inference was then performed in order to investigate differences relative to drought class transitions among those sub-periods, which were considered as treatments of only one factor. The application of ANOVA-like inference to these data allowed to compare the four or five sub-periods in terms of probabilities of transition between drought classes, which were used to detect a possible trend in time evolution of droughts frequency and severity that could be related to climate change. Results for a number of locations show some similarity between the first, third and fifth period (or the second and the fourth if there were only 4 sub-periods regarding the persistency of severe/extreme and sometimes moderate droughts. In global terms, results do not support the assumption of a trend for progressive aggravation of droughts occurrence during the last century, but rather suggest the existence of long duration cycles.

  11. Adaptive surrogate modeling by ANOVA and sparse polynomial dimensional decomposition for global sensitivity analysis in fluid simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Kunkun, E-mail: ktg@illinois.edu [The Center for Exascale Simulation of Plasma-Coupled Combustion (XPACC), University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, 1308 W Main St, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Inria Bordeaux – Sud-Ouest, Team Cardamom, 200 avenue de la Vieille Tour, 33405 Talence (France); Congedo, Pietro M. [Inria Bordeaux – Sud-Ouest, Team Cardamom, 200 avenue de la Vieille Tour, 33405 Talence (France); Abgrall, Rémi [Institut für Mathematik, Universität Zürich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2016-06-01

    The Polynomial Dimensional Decomposition (PDD) is employed in this work for the global sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification (UQ) of stochastic systems subject to a moderate to large number of input random variables. Due to the intimate connection between the PDD and the Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) approaches, PDD is able to provide a simpler and more direct evaluation of the Sobol' sensitivity indices, when compared to the Polynomial Chaos expansion (PC). Unfortunately, the number of PDD terms grows exponentially with respect to the size of the input random vector, which makes the computational cost of standard methods unaffordable for real engineering applications. In order to address the problem of the curse of dimensionality, this work proposes essentially variance-based adaptive strategies aiming to build a cheap meta-model (i.e. surrogate model) by employing the sparse PDD approach with its coefficients computed by regression. Three levels of adaptivity are carried out in this paper: 1) the truncated dimensionality for ANOVA component functions, 2) the active dimension technique especially for second- and higher-order parameter interactions, and 3) the stepwise regression approach designed to retain only the most influential polynomials in the PDD expansion. During this adaptive procedure featuring stepwise regressions, the surrogate model representation keeps containing few terms, so that the cost to resolve repeatedly the linear systems of the least-squares regression problem is negligible. The size of the finally obtained sparse PDD representation is much smaller than the one of the full expansion, since only significant terms are eventually retained. Consequently, a much smaller number of calls to the deterministic model is required to compute the final PDD coefficients.

  12. Adaptive surrogate modeling by ANOVA and sparse polynomial dimensional decomposition for global sensitivity analysis in fluid simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Kunkun; Congedo, Pietro M.; Abgrall, Rémi

    2016-06-01

    The Polynomial Dimensional Decomposition (PDD) is employed in this work for the global sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification (UQ) of stochastic systems subject to a moderate to large number of input random variables. Due to the intimate connection between the PDD and the Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) approaches, PDD is able to provide a simpler and more direct evaluation of the Sobol' sensitivity indices, when compared to the Polynomial Chaos expansion (PC). Unfortunately, the number of PDD terms grows exponentially with respect to the size of the input random vector, which makes the computational cost of standard methods unaffordable for real engineering applications. In order to address the problem of the curse of dimensionality, this work proposes essentially variance-based adaptive strategies aiming to build a cheap meta-model (i.e. surrogate model) by employing the sparse PDD approach with its coefficients computed by regression. Three levels of adaptivity are carried out in this paper: 1) the truncated dimensionality for ANOVA component functions, 2) the active dimension technique especially for second- and higher-order parameter interactions, and 3) the stepwise regression approach designed to retain only the most influential polynomials in the PDD expansion. During this adaptive procedure featuring stepwise regressions, the surrogate model representation keeps containing few terms, so that the cost to resolve repeatedly the linear systems of the least-squares regression problem is negligible. The size of the finally obtained sparse PDD representation is much smaller than the one of the full expansion, since only significant terms are eventually retained. Consequently, a much smaller number of calls to the deterministic model is required to compute the final PDD coefficients.

  13. 重複觀測量數之分析:多群體多變項線性成長模式的估計Data Analysis of Repeated Measures: Estimating a Multi-Group Multivariate Linear Growth Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    溫福星 Fur-Hsing Wen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available 本研究利用「台灣教育長期追蹤資料庫」的一般分析能力與數學分析能力的四波調查結果,配合男、女學生樣本進行多群體多條追蹤資料的線性成長模式估計。在考慮重複觀測資料誤差項在不同時點的變異數非同質與不同時點間的共變數非獨立情況下,以及男、女學生的不同成長軌跡,將誤差項結構設為無限制結構,利用虛擬變項交互項法與虛擬變項多樣本法同時估計不同性別、不同能力的線性成長軌跡變化。由於全部追蹤資料樣本存在遺失值的情形,本研究以階層線性模式(hierarchical linear modeling, HLM)軟體對完整資料2,806位學生進行分析,其估計結果發現,在完整資料的兩條成長軌跡模式中,男、女學生誤差項共變異數矩陣結構相同,但線性成長軌跡不恆等。除此之外,本文並對競爭模式比較的結果在文章最後進行討論並提出相關的建議。 This paper demonstrates the data analysis of the repeated measures from the Taiwan Education Panel Survey (TEPS. Based on the four data waves on the TEPS, we consider two abilities (general and mathematic and two population groups (male and female students to construct a multi-group multivariate linear growth model. Because the two-group multivariate repeated measures belong to the different populations and the different research variables, the residual terms of linear growth models may imply heterogeneity of the error covariance structure. We treat the error covariance structure as an unrestricted structure to compare the various types of models. The results from the HLM on the complete data (2,806 students reveal that the male and female students in this study have the same error covariance structure but have distinct linear growth trajectories. In addition, comparisons of the competitive models and related suggestions are discussed in the results and conclusion

  14. 重复测试和不同性别对小鼠旷场行为的影响%Repeated Measurement and Sex for the Behavior in Open Field in Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈超杰; 钟志凤; 俞昌喜

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To study the effect on the locomotory activity and anxiety-like behavior of laboratory mice by both factors of repeated measurement and sex.METHODS The total distance traveled ,total mean velocity , total parallel index,the percentage of distance in center zone ,the mean velocity in center zone ,the center zone en-tries,the percentage of time spent in center zone and the parallel index in center zone of the female and male mice for 5 minutes were recorded and analyzed in open field test by animal video tracking analysis system ,once a day for 3 days.RESULTS In the open field test ,the indexes of the total distance traveled ,total mean velocity ,total parallel index ,the percentage of distance in center zone ,the mean velocity in center zone ,the center zone entries ,the percent-age of time spent in center zone and the parallel index in center zone in mice showed the downtrend as the measure -ment numbers were increasing ( P0.05 ).However ,as repeating the tests ,the downtrend of these in male mice were seemly more significant than female mice ,especially in the third time measurement ,in which the mean velocity ( P<0.05 ) and parallel index ( P<0.01 ) in center zone were lower than the ones in female mice ,respectively.CONCLUSION The repeated measurement inferences the locomotory activity and interrupted the anxiety state of mice.Sex of mice does not make the behavior in open field different at the first time ,but the repeated measurement seemly more signifi-cantly affect the locomotory activity of the male mice than the female.%目的:研究重复测试和不同性别两个因素对小鼠在旷场试验中自主行为活动和焦虑行为的影响。方法通过动物视频行为分析系统,分别记录和分析雌雄小鼠5 min内在旷场中的总路程、总体平均速度、总体平行指数、中央区的路程占总路程的比例、中央区的平均速度、中央区进入次数、中央区停留时间占整体测试时间的比例和中

  15. 基于 ANOVA-IPA的旅行社售后服务研究--以H市为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵静; 龚荷

    2013-01-01

    旅行社售后服务对于增强游客让渡价值感知有着非常重要的作用,是培育忠诚顾客的有力保证。在科学认识售后服务的内涵、意义及方式途径的基础上,以问卷调查为途径获得相关数据,从游客视角探析旅行社行业售后服务现状和游客期望。基于信息不对称理论、80/20法则和激励理论,并结合旅行社访谈资料,通过定性和定量分析构建ANOVA-IPA模型,确定优势区、维持区、弱势区和关注区,进而采取有针对性的措施拓展售后服务渠道,促进旅行社行业竞争向良性循环转变。

  16. Alternatives to F-Test in One Way ANOVA in case of heterogeneity of variances (a simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Moder

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Several articles deal with the effects of inhomogeneous variances in one way analysis of variance (ANOVA. A very early investigation of this topic was done by Box (1954. He supposed, that in balanced designs with moderate heterogeneity of variances deviations of the empirical type I error rate (on experiments based realized α to the nominal one (predefined α for H0 are small. Similar conclusions are drawn by Wellek (2003. For not so moderate heterogeneity (e.g. σ1:σ2:...=3:1:... Moder (2007 showed, that empirical type I error rate is far beyond the nominal one, even with balanced designs. In unbalanced designs the difficulties get bigger. Several attempts were made to get over this problem. One proposal is to use a more stringent α level (e.g. 2.5% instead of 5% (Keppel & Wickens, 2004. Another recommended remedy is to transform the original scores by square root, log, and other variance reducing functions (Keppel & Wickens, 2004, Heiberger & Holland, 2004. Some authors suggest the use of rank based alternatives to F-test in analysis of variance (Vargha & Delaney, 1998. Only a few articles deal with two or multifactorial designs. There is some evidence, that in a two or multi-factorial design type I error rate is approximately met if the number of factor levels tends to infinity for a certain factor while the number of levels is fixed for the other factors (Akritas & S., 2000, Bathke, 2004.The goal of this article is to find an appropriate location test in an oneway analysis of variance situation with inhomogeneous variances for balanced and unbalanced designs based on a simulation study.

  17. Verificação da prótese auditiva realizada face a face e via teleconsulta: medidas repetidas Telecounselling and face to face hearing aid verification: repeated measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Viviane Ferrari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar as medidas repetidas da resposta de ressonância da orelha externa sem (REUR e com uso de amplificação (REAR e o ganho de inserção (REIG, realizados face a face e via teleconsulta. MÉTODO: estudo prospectivo longitudinal. Foram realizadas quatro repetições da REUR, REAR e REIG (com estímulo speech noise apresentado em 65 dB NPS e 0º azimute em 19 orelhas de adultos ouvintes normais, via face a face (F e teleconsulta síncrona por controle remoto de aplicativo (T e vídeo interativo. O software Polycom PVX foi utilizado para compartilhamento e transmissão de áudio e vídeo. A conexão foi realizada via LAN (Local Area Network USP na velocidade de 384 kbps Foi calculado o erro causal (Dalhberg entre as quatro medidas para frequências de 250 a 8000 Hz. RESULTADOS: os erros casuais entre as medidas F e T foram muito semelhantes, sendo maiores nas frequências acima de 4 kHz. As diferenças e variações entre as medidas F e T estavam dentro da magnitude de variabilidade do procedimento de medidas com microfone sonda. CONCLUSÃO: as medidas com microfone sonda via teleconsulta fornece resultados confiáveis e similares aos obtidos pelo procedimento padrão.PURPOSE: to evaluate the repeated measurements of the real ear unaided response (REUR, real ear aided response (REAR and insertion gain (REIG conducted as face to face (F and via telecounselling (T. METHOD: longitudinal prospective study. Four measures of REUR, REAR and REIG (carried out with speech noise stimulus presented at 65 dB SPL at 0° azimuth were obtained in 19 ears in normal hearing adults, face to face and via synchronous telecounsellings with remote control of the real ear equipment and interactive video. Polycom PVX software was used for desktop sharing and video and audio transmission. The Loca Area Network (LAN USP was used for the connection (transmission rate: 384 kbps. Dahlberg’s casual errors were calculated for obtaining the measures for

  18. Reader variability in QT measurement due to measurement error and variability in leads selection: a simulation study comparing 2-way vs. 3-way interaction ANOVA model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natekar, Mili; Karnad, Dilip R; Salvi, Vaibhav; Ramasamy, Arumugam; Kerkar, Vaibhav; Panicker, Gopi Krishna; Kothari, Snehal

    2014-01-01

    Reader variability (RV) results from measurement differences or variability in lead used for QT measurements; the latter is not reflected in conventional methods for estimating RV. Mean and SD of QT intervals in 12 leads of 100 ECGs measured twice were used to simulate data sets with inter-RV of 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 ms and intra-RV of 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15 ms. Six hundred twenty-five data sets were simulated such that different leads were used in Read1 and Read2 in 0, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% of ECGs by 25 readers. RV was estimated using ANOVA interaction models: three-way model using Reader, ECG and lead as factors, and 2-way model using reader and ECG as factors. Estimates from three-way model accurately matched inter- and intra-RV that were introduced during simulation regardless of percent of ECGs with lead selection variability. The two-way model provides identical estimates when both reads are in same leads, but higher, more realistically estimates when measurements are made in different leads. © 2013.

  19. 数据统计分析软件SPSS的应用(四)--广义因素方差分析(GLM-General Factorial ANOVA)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张苏江; 陈庆波

    2003-01-01

    @@ 广义因素分析过程是广义线性模型(General Linear Models)模块的一个子模块,用于分析多个因素(变量)对一个因素(反应变量)的影响,包含了一般的方差分析内容,如完全随机设计资料的方差分析(one-way ANOVA),随机单位组设计资料的方差分析(two-way ANOVA),拉丁方设计资料的方差分析(three-way ANOVA),析因分析(factorial analysis),交叉设计(cross-over design),正交设计(orthogonal design),裂区设计(split-plot design)资料的方差分析,协方差

  20. Seasonal variation in objectively measured physical activity, sedentary time, cardio-respiratory fitness and sleep duration among 8–11 year-old Danish children: a repeated-measures study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Mads F.; Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Michaelsen, Kim;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Understanding fluctuations in lifestyle indicators is important to identify relevant time periods to intervene in order to promote a healthy lifestyle; however, objective assessment of multiple lifestyle indicators has never been done using a repeated-measures design. The primary aim...... was, therefore, to examine between-season and within-week variation in physical activity, sedentary behaviour, cardio-respiratory fitness and sleep duration among 8–11 year-old children. METHODS: A total of 1021 children from nine Danish schools were invited to participate and 834 accepted. Due...

  1. A Didactic Experience of Statistical Analysis for the Determination of Glycine in a Nonaqueous Medium Using ANOVA and a Computer Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Delgado, M. J.; Larrea-Tarruella, L.

    2004-01-01

    The back-titration methods are compared statistically to establish glycine in a nonaqueous medium of acetic acid. Important variations in the mean values of glycine are observed due to the interaction effects between the analysis of variance (ANOVA) technique and a statistical study through a computer software.

  2. Optimization of friction welding by taguchi and ANOVA method on commercial aluminium tube to Al 2025 tube plate with backing block using an external tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanna, S.; Kumaraswamidhs, L. A. [Indian Institute of Technology, Dhanbad (India); Kumaran, S. Senthil [RVS School of Engineering and Technology, Dindigul (India)

    2016-05-15

    The aim of the present work is to optimize the Friction welding of tube to tube plate using an external tool (FWTPET) with clearance fit of commercial aluminum tube to Al 2025 tube plate using an external tool. Conventional frictional welding is suitable to weld only symmetrical joints either tube to tube or rod to rod but in this research with the help of external tool, the welding has been done by unsymmetrical shape of tube to tube plate also. In this investigation, the various welding parameters such as tool rotating speed (rpm), projection of tube (mm) and depth of cut (mm) are determined according to the Taguchi L9 orthogonal array. The two conditions were considered in this process to examine this experiment; where condition 1 is flat plate with plain tube Without holes [WOH] on the circumference of the surface and condition 2 is flat plate with plane tube has holes on its circumference of the surface With holes [WH]. Taguchi L9 orthogonal array was utilized to find the most significant control factors which will yield better joint strength. Besides, the most influential process parameter has been determined using statistical Analysis of variance (ANOVA). Finally, the comparison of each result has been done for conditions by means percentage of contribution and regression analysis. The general regression equation is formulated and better strength is obtained and it is validated by means of confirmation test. It was observed that value of optimal welded joint strength for both tube without holes and tube with holes are to be 319.485 MPa and 264.825 MPa, respectively.

  3. Relative contributions of interface pressure, shear stress, and temperature on ischemic-induced, skin-reactive hyperemia in healthy volunteers: a repeated measures laboratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachenbruch, Charlie; Tzen, Yi-Ting; Brienza, David; Karg, Patricia E; Lachenbruch, Peter A

    2015-02-01

    Although the primary risk factors for pressure ulcer development - pressure, shear, skin temperature, moisture, and friction - have been identified for decades, the relative contribution of each to this risk remains unclear. To confirm the results of and expand upon earlier research into the relative contributions of interface pressures, shear stress, and skin temperature among 4 healthy volunteers, a study involving 6 additional healthy 40- to 75-year-old volunteers was conducted and results of the 2 studies were pooled. All 3 variables (interface pressures, shear stress, and skin temperature) were systematically and randomly varied. In the prone position, volunteers each underwent 18 test conditions representing different combinations of temperature (28˚ C, 32˚ C, 36˚ C), pressure (8.0 and 13.3 kPa), and shear (0, 6.7, and 14.0 kPa) using a computer-controlled indenter applied to the sacrum for 20 minutes exerting weights of 100 g and 200 g to induce 0.98 N and 1.96 N of shear force, respectively. Each condition was tested twice, resulting in a total of 360 trials. Magnitude of postload reactive hyperemia as an index of ischemia was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry. Fixed effects regression models were used to predict 3 different indices of reactive hyperemic magnitude. Friedman tests were performed to compare the reactive hyperemia among 3 different skin temperatures or shear stresses under the same amount of localized pressure. In all regression models, pressure and temperature were highly significant predictors of the extent of reactive hyperemia (P pressure and shear stress, and the difference was more profound between 32˚ C and 36˚ C than between 28˚ C and 32˚ C. These results confirm that, in laboratory settings, temperature is an important factor in tissue ischemia. Additional studies examining the relative importance of pressure, shear, and temperature and potential effects of lowering temperature on tissue ischemia in healthy volunteers and

  4. [Comparison of several expressions of two-way ANOVA for a latent factor: analysis of the relation between music and mood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Koken; Toyoda, Hideki

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of this research is to provide a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) model for a latent factor. Typical psychological studies measure mental states with questionnaires and analyze the variance of the measures into the portions attributable to various sources. This type of research, when conducted under regular ANOVA designs, uses total score as the dependent measures. However, this method is based on the unrealistic presumption that every item on the questionnaire has the same factor loading on the attribute being measured. In this research, we incorporated factor analysis model, and used a latent factor instead of total score as the dependent measure, thereby applying ANOVA under a more realistic assumption. Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) was used to express statistical models. This paper also examined a relation between music and mood, which is a quite popular area of research in psychology of music. To study the possible effects of tonality and key-signature on mood, music was chosen to represent tonality and key-signature conditions.

  5. Evaluation of repeated measurements of radon-222 concentrations in well water sampled from bedrock aquifers of the Piedmont near Richmond, Virginia, USA: effects of lithology and well characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Shelley A; Billmeyer, Ernest R; Robinson, Michael A

    2006-07-01

    Radon (222Rn) concentrations in 26 ground water wells of two distinct lithologies in the Piedmont of Virginia were measured to assess variation in ground water radon concentrations (GWRC), to evaluate differences in concentrations related to well characteristics, lithology, and spatial distributions, and to assess the feasibility of predicting GWRC. Wells were sampled in accordance with American Public Health Association Method 7500 Rn-B, with modifications to include a well shaft profile analysis that determined the minimum purge time sufficient to remove the equivalent of one column of water from each well. Statistically significant differences in GWRC were found in the Trssu (1482 +/- 1711 pCi/L) and Mpg (7750 +/- 5188 pCi/L) lithologies, however, no significant differences were found among GWRC at each well over time. Using multiple regression, 86% of the variability (R2) in the GWRC was explained by the lithology, latitudinal class, and water table elevation of the wells. The GWRC in a majority of the wells studied exceed US Environmental Protection Agency designated maximum contaminant level and AMCL. Results support modifications to sampling procedures and indicate that, in previous studies, variations in GWRC concentrations over time may have been due in part to differences in sampling procedures and not in source water.

  6. Multiple imputation of completely missing repeated measures data within person from a complex sample: application to accelerometer data in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Benmei; Yu, Mandi; Graubard, Barry I; Troiano, Richard P; Schenker, Nathaniel

    2016-12-10

    The Physical Activity Monitor component was introduced into the 2003-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) to collect objective information on physical activity including both movement intensity counts and ambulatory steps. Because of an error in the accelerometer device initialization process, the steps data were missing for all participants in several primary sampling units, typically a single county or group of contiguous counties, who had intensity count data from their accelerometers. To avoid potential bias and loss in efficiency in estimation and inference involving the steps data, we considered methods to accurately impute the missing values for steps collected in the 2003-2004 NHANES. The objective was to come up with an efficient imputation method that minimized model-based assumptions. We adopted a multiple imputation approach based on additive regression, bootstrapping and predictive mean matching methods. This method fits alternative conditional expectation (ace) models, which use an automated procedure to estimate optimal transformations for both the predictor and response variables. This paper describes the approaches used in this imputation and evaluates the methods by comparing the distributions of the original and the imputed data. A simulation study using the observed data is also conducted as part of the model diagnostics. Finally, some real data analyses are performed to compare the before and after imputation results. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  7. Long-term aerobic exercise and omega-3 supplementation modulate osteoporosis through inflammatory mechanisms in post-menopausal women: a randomized, repeated measures study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanaley Jill

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence indicates that dietary fats and physical activity influence bone health. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of long-term aerobic exercise and omega-3 (N-3 supplementation on serum inflammatory markers, bone mineral density (BMD, and bone biomarkers in post-menopausal women. Methods Seventy-nine healthy sedentary post-menopausal women aged 58-78 years participated in this study. Subjects were randomized to one of 4 groups: exercise + supplement (E+S, n = 21, exercise (E, n = 20, supplement (S, n = 20, and control (Con, n = 18 groups. The subjects in the E+S and E groups performed aerobic exercise training (walking and jogging up to 65% of HRmax, three times a week for 24 weeks. Subjects in the E+S and S groups consumed 1000 mg/d N-3 for 24 weeks. The lumbar spine (L2-L4 and femoral neck BMD, serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF α, interleukin (IL 6, prostaglandin (PG E2, estrogen, osteocalcin, 1, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1, 25 Vit D, C-telopeptide (CTX, parathyroid hormone (PTH and calcitonin (CT were measured at baseline, the end of week 12 and 24. Results Serum estrogen, osteocalcin, 1, 25 Vit D, CT, L2-L4 and femoral neck BMD measures increased (P 2 decreased (P 2-L4 and femoral neck BMD, estrogen, osteocalcin, and CT were negatively (P 2. PTH and CT were correlated positively and negatively with IL-6, respectively (P Conclusions The present study demonstrates that long-term aerobic exercise training plus N-3 supplementation have a synergistic effect in attenuating inflammation and augmenting BMD in post-menopausal osteoporosis.

  8. Fixed-flexion knee radiography using a new positioning device produced highly repeatable measurements of joint space width: ELSA-Brasil Musculoskeletal Study (ELSA-Brasil MSK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telles, Rosa Weiss; Costa-Silva, Luciana; Machado, Luciana A C; Reis, Rodrigo Citton Padilha Dos; Barreto, Sandhi Maria

    To describe the performance of a non-fluoroscopic fixed-flexion PA radiographic protocol with a new positioning device, developed for the assessment of knee osteoarthritis (OA) in Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health Musculoskeletal Study (ELSA-Brasil MSK). A test-retest design including 19 adults (38 knee images) was conducted. Feasibility of the radiographic protocol was assessed by image quality parameters and presence of radioanatomic alignment according to intermargin distance (IMD) values. Repeatability was assessed for IMD and joint space width (JSW) measured at three different locations. Approximately 90% of knee images presented excellent quality. Frequencies of nearly perfect radioanatomic alignment (IMD ≤1mm) ranged from 29% to 50%, and satisfactory alignment was found in up to 71% and 76% of the images (IMD ≤1.5mm and ≤1.7mm, respectively). Repeatability analyses yielded the following results: IMD [SD of mean difference=1.08; coefficient of variation (%CV)=54.68%; intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) (95%CI)=0.59 (0.34-0.77)]; JSW [SD of mean difference=0.34-0.61; %CV=4.48%-9.80%; ICC (95%CI)=0.74 (0.55-0.85)-0.94 (0.87-0.97)]. Adequately reproducible measurements of IMD and JSW were found in 68% and 87% of the images, respectively. Despite the difficulty in achieving consistent radioanatomic alignment between subsequent radiographs in terms of IMD, the protocol produced highly repeatable JSW measurements when these were taken at midpoint and 10mm from the medial extremity of the medial tibial plateau. Therefore, measurements of JSW at these locations can be considered adequate for the assessment of knee OA in ELSA-Brasil MSK. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  9. Repeated Measurement of Divers’ Word Fluency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-01

    function (Fillskov & Boll, -V 1981). One type of test with clinical significance reflects Word Fluency (Borkowski, Benton & Spreen, 1967; Lezak, 1983). Word...Fluency is "the facility to produce words that fit one or more structural, phonetic , or orthographic restrictions that are not relevant to the meaning...toxic chemical exposure (Anger, 1984) and closed head injury (Borkowski et al, 1967). Word Fluency reflects mild linguistic deficits in expressive speech

  10. 关于谱分解估计和方差分析估计在线性混合模型中的比较%On Comparison of Spectral Decomposition Estimate and ANOVAE in Linear Mixed Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史建红

    2003-01-01

    在文献[1]中提出的谱分解估计是一种在线性混合模型中同时估计固定效应和方差分量的新方法.在本文中,我们对带有两个方差分量的线性混合模型进行了谱分解估计和方差分析估计的比较.得出了方差分量的这两种估计在某些条件下方差相等,而且谱分解估计具有一些方差分析估计的最优性.%The spectral decomposition estimate(SDE) proposed by Wang and Yin[1] is a new method of simultaneously estimating fixed effects and variance components in linear mixed models. In this paper,we compare the SDE with ANOVAE in the linear mixed models with two variance components. Our results show that these two estimates of variance components have equal variance under some conditions. Thus the SDE shares some optimalities of the ANOVAE.

  11. Optimization MRR Of Stainless Steel 403 In Abrasive Water Jet Machining UsingAnova And Taguchi Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramprasad,

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Stainlesssteel 403 is high-alloysteelwith good corrosion resistance and it’svery hard material. Abrasive water jet is an effective method for machining, cutting and drilling of stainlesssteel 403. In thispaperweoptimize the metalremoval rate of stainlesssteel 403 in abrasive water jet machining. The MRRisoptimize by usingthreeparameters water pressure, abrasive flow rate and stand-off distance and L9 orthogonal array of Taguchimethod use to analyse the result. 9 experimentalrunsbased on L9 orthogonal array of Taguchimethod.

  12. Optimization of Process Parameters During Drilling of Glass-Fiber Polyester Reinforced Composites Using DOE and ANOVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.S. Mohan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Polymer-based composite material possesses superior properties such as high strength-to-weight ratio, stiffness-to-weight ratio and good corrosive resistance and therefore, is attractive for high performance applications such as in aerospace, defense and sport goods industries. Drilling is one of the indispensable methods for building products with composite panels. Surface quality and dimensional accuracy play an important role in the performance of a machined component. In machining processes, however, the quality of the component is greatly influenced by the cutting conditions, tool geometry, tool material, machining process, chip formation, work piece material, tool wear and vibration during cutting. Drilling tests were conducted on glass fiber reinforced plastic composite [GFRP] laminates using an instrumented CNC milling center. A series of experiments are conducted using TRIAC VMC CNC machining center to correlate the cutting parameters and material parameters on the cutting thrust, torque and surface roughness. The measured results were collected and analyzed with the help of the commercial software packages MINITAB14 and Taly Profile. The surface roughness of the drilled holes was measured using Rank Taylor Hobson Surtronic 3+ instrument. The method could be useful in predicting thrust, torque and surface roughness parameters as a function of process variables. The main objective is to optimize the process parameters to achieve low cutting thrust, torque and good surface roughness. From the analysis it is evident that among all the significant parameters, speed and drill size have significant influence cutting thrust and drill size and specimen thickness on the torque and surface roughness. It was also found that feed rate does not have significant influence on the characteristic output of the drilling process.

  13. Stability and adaptability analysis of rice cultivars using environment-centered yield in two-way ANOVA model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Sumith De. Z. Abeysiriwardena

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Identification of rice varieties with wider adaptability and stability are the important aspects in varietal recommendation to achieve better economic benefits for farmers. Multi locational trails are conducted in different locations / seasons to test and identify the consistently performing varieties in wider environments and location specific high performing varieties. The interaction aspect of varieties with environment is complex and highly variable across locations. Thus, the identifying varieties under these circumstances are difficult for varietal recommendations. However, several methods have been proposed in the recent past with the complex computation requirements. But, the aid of statistical software and other programs capabilities ease the complexity to a large extent. In this study, we employed one of the established techniques called variance component analysis (VCA to make the varietal recommendation for wider adaptability for many varying environments and the location specific recommendations. In this method variety × environment interaction is portioned into components for individual varieties using yield deviation approach. The average effect of variety (environment centered yield deviation - Dk and the stability measure of each variety (variety interaction variance -Sk2 are used make the recommendations. The rice yield data of cultivars of three month maturity duration, cultivated across diverse environments during the 2002/03 wet–season in Sri Lanka was analyzed for making recommendations. Based on the results the variety At581 gave the highest D2ksk value with wide adaptability selected for general recommendation. Varieties Bg305 and At303 also had relatively higher Dk and thus these two can also be selected for general cultivation purpose.

  14. The Influencing Factor Analysis on the Performance Evaluation of Assembly Line Balancing Problem Level 1 (SALBP-1) Based on ANOVA Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Hu, Jiangnan

    2017-06-01

    Industry 4.0 and lean production has become the focus of manufacturing. A current issue is to analyse the performance of the assembly line balancing. This study focus on distinguishing the factors influencing the assembly line balancing. The one-way ANOVA method is applied to explore the significant degree of distinguished factors. And regression model is built to find key points. The maximal task time (tmax ), the quantity of tasks (n), and degree of convergence of precedence graph (conv) are critical for the performance of assembly line balancing. The conclusion will do a favor to the lean production in the manufacturing.

  15. Eliminating Aggregation Bias in Experimental Research: Random Coefficient Analysis as an Alternative to Performing a ‘by-subjects’ and/or ‘by-items’ ANOVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn L. Thompson

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Experimental psychologists routinely simplify the structure of their data by computing means for each experimental condition so that the basic assumptions of regression/ANOVA are satisfied. Typically, these means represent the performance (e.g. reaction time or RT of a participant over several items that share some target characteristic (e.g. Mean RT for high-frequency words. Regrettably, analyses based on such aggregated data are biased toward rejection of the null hypothesis, inflating Type-I error beyond the nominal level. A preferable strategy for analyzing such data is random coefficient analysis (RCA, which can be performed using a simple method proposed by Lorch and Myers (1990. An easy to use SPSS implementation of this method is presented using a concrete example. In addition, a technique for evaluating the magnitude of potential aggregation bias in a dataset is demonstrated. Finally, suggestions are offered concerning the reporting of RCA results in empirical articles.

  16. A repeated-measures analysis of the effects of soft tissues on wrist range of motion in the extant phylogenetic bracket of dinosaurs: Implications for the functional origins of an automatic wrist folding mechanism in Crocodilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutson, Joel David; Hutson, Kelda Nadine

    2014-07-01

    A recent study hypothesized that avian-like wrist folding in quadrupedal dinosaurs could have aided their distinctive style of locomotion with semi-pronated and therefore medially facing palms. However, soft tissues that automatically guide avian wrist folding rarely fossilize, and automatic wrist folding of unknown function in extant crocodilians has not been used to test this hypothesis. Therefore, an investigation of the relative contributions of soft tissues to wrist range of motion (ROM) in the extant phylogenetic bracket of dinosaurs, and the quadrupedal function of crocodilian wrist folding, could inform these questions. Here, we repeatedly measured wrist ROM in degrees through fully fleshed, skinned, minus muscles/tendons, minus ligaments, and skeletonized stages in the American alligator Alligator mississippiensis and the ostrich Struthio camelus. The effects of dissection treatment and observer were statistically significant for alligator wrist folding and ostrich wrist flexion, but not ostrich wrist folding. Final skeletonized wrist folding ROM was higher than (ostrich) or equivalent to (alligator) initial fully fleshed ROM, while final ROM was lower than initial ROM for ostrich wrist flexion. These findings suggest that, unlike the hinge/ball and socket-type elbow and shoulder joints in these archosaurs, ROM within gliding/planar diarthrotic joints is more restricted to the extent of articular surfaces. The alligator data indicate that the crocodilian wrist mechanism functions to automatically lock their semi-pronated palms into a rigid column, which supports the hypothesis that this palmar orientation necessitated soft tissue stiffening mechanisms in certain dinosaurs, although ROM-restricted articulations argue against the presence of an extensive automatic mechanism. Anat Rec, 297:1228-1249, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. “Optimization of Heat Gain by Air Exchange through the Window of Cold Storage Using S/N Ratio and ANOVA Analysis”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Nimai Mukhopadhyay

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Energy is at scarcity, crisis of energy is leading towards a world where growth might come to an absolute hold and optimizing the processes might give a way out to save energy for future generations and give some positive way out. In this situation if the maximum heat energy (Q is absorbed by the evaporator inside the cold room through convective heat transfer process in terms of –heat transfer due to convection and heat transfer due to condensation and also heat enter in the cold store due to air exchange through the windows more energy has to be wasted to maintain the evaporator space at the desired temperature range of 2-6 degree centigrade. In this paper we have tried to optimize the heat gain by the air exchange through the windows of cold storage in the evaporator space using regression analysis. Temperature difference (dT, Height of cold store Window (H and Relative Humidity (RH are the basic variable and three ranges are taken each of them in the model development. Graphical interpretations from the model justify the reality through S/N ratio calculation and ANOVA analysis

  18. Comparison between ANOVA estimator and SD estimator under balanced data%平衡数据结构下ANOVA估计和SD估计的比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴密霞; 孙兵

    2013-01-01

    在线性混合效应模型下,方差分析(ANOVA)估计和谱分解(SD)估计对构造精确检验和广义P-值枢轴量起着非常重要的作用.尽管这两估计分别基于不同的方法,但它们共享许多类似的优点,如无偏性和有精确的表达式等.本文借助于已得到的协方差阵的谱分解结果,揭示了平衡数据一般线性混合效应模型下ANOVA估计与SD估计的关系,并分别针对协方差阵两种结构:套结构和多项分类随机效应结构,给出了ANOVA估计与SD估计等价的充分必要条件.

  19. Com aplicar les proves paramètriques bivariades t de Student i ANOVA en SPSS. Cas pràctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María-José Rubio-Hurtado

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Les proves paramètriques són un tipus de proves de significació estadística que quantifiquen l'associació o independència entre una variable quantitativa i una categòrica. Les proves paramètriques són exigents amb certs requisits previs per a la seva aplicació: la distribució Normal de la variable quantitativa en els grups que es comparen, l'homogeneïtat de variàncies en les poblacions de les quals procedeixen els grups i una n mostral no inferior a 30. El seu no compliment comporta la necessitat de recórrer a proves estadístiques no paramètriques. Les proves paramètriques es classifiquen en dos: prova t (per a una mostra o per a dues mostres relacionades o independents i prova ANOVA (per a més de dues mostres independents.

  20. Seasonal variations and sources study by way of back trajectories and ANOVA for ambient air pollutants (particulates and metallic elements) within a mixed area at Longjing, central Taiwan: 1-year observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Guor-Cheng; Lo, Chaur-Tsuen; Zhuang, Yuan-Jie; Cho, Meng-Hsien; Huang, Chao-Yang; Xiao, You-Fu; Tsai, Kai-Hsiang

    2017-02-01

    This study measured the concentrations of particulates and metallic elements in ambient air by using PS-1 sampler (TSP) at Longjing area. And this study focuses on the collection of ambient air particulates, metallic elements, particulate-bound mercury Hg(p), concentrations. In addition, the sources of ambient pollutants by way of back trajectory analysis are found. Moreover, test mean concentration variance differences for metallic elements (PM, Hg(p), Mn, Fe, Zn, Cr, Cu, and Pb) among the four seasons (spring, summer, autumn and winter) through ANOVA are calculated. The result indicates that the average highest particulate concentration occurred in winter season, and the order was winter > spring > autumn > summer, and the mostly highest average metallic element (Mn, Fe, Zn, Cr, Cu, Pb) concentrations occurred in autumn. Moreover, the mostly average lowest metallic element concentrations occurred in summer. In addition, the above results of backward trajectories that the major particulate pollutants parcel mainly come from northeastern Taiwan. Moreover, when comparing the results of the first half year to that of the second half year, the they indicated that all metallic elements displayed significant differences in concentrations except those of Hg(p), Mn, Fe, Zn. Finally, metallic element Hg(p) is the only one which showed no significant concentration difference from either seasonal variations or half-year observations.

  1. Avaliação do desempenho zootécnico de genótipos de frangos de corte utilizando-se a análise de medidas repetidas Performance evaluation of broiler genotypes by repeated measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millor Fernandes do Rosário

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se avaliar genótipos de frangos de corte por meio do desempenho zootécnico utilizando-se medidas repetidas. Os tratamentos consistiram de quatro genótipos (A, B, C e D e dois sexos avaliados em seis idades (7, 14, 21, 28, 35 e 42 dias. As variáveis analisadas foram: consumo médio de alimento (CONS, peso vivo médio (PV e conversão alimentar (CA. O delineamento experimental foi em blocos incompletos desbalanceados, em esquema fatorial 4x2 nas parcelas experimentais, com seis medidas realizadas no decorrer do experimento. A análise estatística foi realizada por meio do procedimento MIXED do SAS®, sendo testadas cinco estruturas de variância e covariância do erro. As médias foram estimadas por quadrados mínimos e comparadas pelo teste Tukey-Kramer. Foram estimadas funções de resposta quadrática para CONS e CA e Gompertz para PV e seus respectivos coeficientes de determinação, pelo procedimento NLIN do SAS®. Detectaram-se efeitos de algumas interações triplas ou duplas para todas as variáveis. Verificaram-se diferenças significativas entre genótipos dentro de cada idade e sexo para CONS e PV e para CA entre genótipos e sexos, dentro de cada idade, apenas aos 42 e a partir dos 21 dias, respectivamente. Constatou-se que o genótipo D, apesar de apresentar maiores médias de CONS e PV, não mostrou menor CA, que foi verificada nos genótipos C e B. As funções de resposta estimadas explicaram adequadamente cada variável em função da idade, constatando-se que o CONS e PV dos machos do genótipo D foram maiores a partir dos 14 dias e dos 28 aos 42 dias, distinguindo este tratamento dos demais. A melhor CA foi verificada nos machos e no genótipo C. É possível avaliar o desempenho zootécnico de frangos de corte por medidas repetidas, sendo que os genótipos B e C apresentaram melhor desempenho zootécnico.The objetive of this study was to evaluate the performance of broiler genotypes using repeated measurements

  2. 基于Kruskal-Wallis单因素方差分析的武汉高校大学生英语水平研究%Wuhan College Students' English Proficiency Based on Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余艳

    2014-01-01

    For the study of Wuhan university English language proficiency of non-English majors, this paper collected some colleges and universities in Wuhan National College English Contest 2014 preliminary results, first through the icon to show the characteristics of the data, and then focuses on the Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA test principles, and using the test method of diverse data that is part of the preliminary results of college students, and finally concluded that the level of English non-Eng-lish majors Wuhan raised conjecture.%为研究武汉高校非英语专业大学生的英语水平,本文搜集了武汉部分高校2014年全国大学生英语竞赛初赛成绩,首先通过图示来展现数据的特点,然后集中阐述了Kruskal-Wallis单因素方差检验的原理,并利用该检验方法对多样本数据即部分高校大学生初赛成绩进行检验,最后得出结论并且对武汉非英语专业大学生的英语水平提出了猜想。

  3. Early Effect of Amyloid β-Peptide on Hippocampal and Serum Metabolism in Rats Studied by an Integrated Method of NMR-Based Metabolomics and ANOVA-Simultaneous Component Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yao; Xia, Huanhuan; Zhao, Liangcai; Hu, Wenyi; Bai, Guanghui

    2017-01-01

    Amyloid β (Aβ) deposition has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. However, the early effect of Aβ deposition on metabolism remains unclear. In the present study, thus, we explored the metabolic changes in the hippocampus and serum during first 2 weeks of Aβ25–35 injection in rats by using an integrated method of NMR-based metabolomics and ANOVA-simultaneous component analysis (ASCA). Our results show that Aβ25–35 injection, time, and their interaction had statistically significant effects on the hippocampus and serum metabolome. Furthermore, we identified key metabolites that mainly contributed to these effects. After Aβ25–35 injection from 1 to 2 weeks, the levels of lactate, N-acetylaspartate, creatine, and taurine were decreased in rat hippocampus, while an increase in lactate and decreases in LDL/VLDL and glucose were observed in rat serum. Therefore, we suggest that the reduction in energy and lipid metabolism as well as an increase in anaerobic glycolysis may occur at the early stage of Aβ25–35 deposition.

  4. Early Effect of Amyloid β-Peptide on Hippocampal and Serum Metabolism in Rats Studied by an Integrated Method of NMR-Based Metabolomics and ANOVA-Simultaneous Component Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yao; Zheng, Hong; Xia, Huanhuan; Zhao, Liangcai; Hu, Wenyi; Bai, Guanghui; Yan, Zhihan; Gao, Hongchang

    2017-01-01

    Amyloid β (Aβ) deposition has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. However, the early effect of Aβ deposition on metabolism remains unclear. In the present study, thus, we explored the metabolic changes in the hippocampus and serum during first 2 weeks of Aβ25-35 injection in rats by using an integrated method of NMR-based metabolomics and ANOVA-simultaneous component analysis (ASCA). Our results show that Aβ25-35 injection, time, and their interaction had statistically significant effects on the hippocampus and serum metabolome. Furthermore, we identified key metabolites that mainly contributed to these effects. After Aβ25-35 injection from 1 to 2 weeks, the levels of lactate, N-acetylaspartate, creatine, and taurine were decreased in rat hippocampus, while an increase in lactate and decreases in LDL/VLDL and glucose were observed in rat serum. Therefore, we suggest that the reduction in energy and lipid metabolism as well as an increase in anaerobic glycolysis may occur at the early stage of Aβ25-35 deposition.

  5. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF SOME EXPERIMENTAL FATIGUE TESTS RESULTS

    OpenAIRE

    Adrian Stere PARIS; Gheorghe AMZA; Claudiu BABIŞ; Dan Niţoi

    2012-01-01

    The paper details the results of processing the fatigue data experiments to find the regression function. Application software for statistical processing like ANOVA and regression calculi are properly utilized, with emphasis on popular software like MSExcel and CurveExpert

  6. Evaluation of corrosion of steel embedded in concrete exposed to carbonation AAS using a factorial experiment with repeated measures. Evaluación de la corrosión del acero embebido en concreto AAS, expuesto a carbonatación mediante un experimento factorial con medidas repetidas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Aperador Chaparro

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents various techniques for assessing corrosion, the linear polarization resistance and galvanostatic pulse, the analysis was performed using analysis of variance models using a factorial experiment with three factors, one repeated measure, because on the same experimental unit (reinforced concrete, it experienced several samples to be measured in time (0 h=1, 350 h=2, 700 h=3, 1050 h=4, 1700 h=5 y 2600 h=6. This makes the observations are not independent, the other two factors relate to, the binder (ce: 1 = activatedslag [AAS] and 2 = ordinary Portland concrete [OPC] and the exposure condition (ca: 1 = y 2 = environmental exposure accelerated carbonation. These factors were discussed according to the results of the electrochemical properties. Initially performed the statistical processing of each of the variables in relation to the properties and analyzed the interaction between them. Where they established the differences in materials used as coating steel, concrete, OPC and AAS. OPC concrete specimens, exhibited a resting potential, polarization resistance and ohmic (CO2 condition than those obtained for reinforced concrete in AAS.En este artículo se presentan las técnicas de evaluación de la corrosión, tales como potencial de corrosión, resistencia lineal a la polarización y pulso galvanostático a los concretos de activación alcalina (AAS y Portland tipo I (OPC. El estudio se realizó por medio de modelos de análisis de varianza, aplicando un experimento factorial con tres factores, uno de ellos medida repetida, debido a que sobre la misma unidad experimental (concreto armado AAS y OPC se ensayaron varias muestras para medirlas en el tiempo (0 h=1, 350 h=2, 700 h=3, 1050 h=4, 1700 h=5 y 2600 h=6, lo que hace que las observaciones no sean independientes; los otros dos factores corresponden al cementante (ce: 1=escoria activada alcalinamente [AAS] y 2=concreto Portland ordinario [OPC] y la condición de exposici

  7. Slow cortical potential Neurofeedback and self-management training in outpatient care for children with ADHD: study protocol and first preliminary results of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna eChristiansen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Treatment for children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD today is predominantly pharmacological. While it is the most common treatment, it might not always be the most appropriate one. Moreover, long term effects remain unclear. Behavior therapy and non-pharmacological treatments such as neurofeedback (NF are promising alternatives, though there are no routine outpatient care/effectiveness studies yet that have included children with medication or changes in medication.Methods/design: This paper presents the protocol of a randomized controlled trial to compare the effectiveness of a Slow Cortical Potential (SCP NF protocol with self-management (SM in a high frequent outpatient care setting. Both groups (NF/SM receive a total of 30 high frequent therapy sessions. Additionally, 6 sessions are reserved for comorbid problems. The primary outcome measure is the reduction of ADHD core symptoms according to parent and teacher ratings.Preliminary Results: Untill now 58 children were included in the study (48 males, with a mean age of 8.42 (1.34 years, and a mean IQ of 110 (13.37. Conners-3 parent and teacher ratings were used to estimate core symptom change. Since the study is still ongoing, and children are in different study stages, pre-post and follow-up results are not yet available for all children included. Preliminary results suggest overall good pre-post effects, though. For parent and teacher ratings an ANOVA with repeated measures yielded overall satisfying pre-post effects (η2 .175 to .513. Differences between groups (NF vs. SM could not yet be established (p = .81.Discussion: This is the first randomized controlled trial to test the effectiveness of a NF protocol in a high frequent outpatient care setting that does not exclude children on or with changes in medication. First preliminary results show positive effects. The rationale for the trial, the design, and the strengths and limitations of the study are

  8. Application of multivariate Meta-analytical model in Meta-analysis of repeated measures outcomes%生存资料的二次研究系列之六:多元Meta分析模型在重复测量结局Meta分析中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟详喻; 田国祥; 周新雨; 孙竹; 李胜; 曾宪涛

    2016-01-01

    Repeated measures data are one of major data types in medical studies, especially in those related to prognosis. Correlation exists among multiple measures values corresponding to different time points, thus separate analyses for single outcome in secondary studies, e.g. Meta-analysis, should be avoided since bias might be introduced and the multivariate Meta-analysis model which well manages dependence across effect sizes is recommended. In this article, a multivariate Meta-analytical model was presented to merge multiple binary repeated measures outcomes, as well as actualized in R software through example analysis.%目的:重复测量资料是医学研究尤其是预后相关研究中重要的资料类型之一。不同时间点重复测量值之间存在相关性,若在二次研究如Meta分析中分开分析的结果可能存在偏倚,采用多元Meta分析模型能够有效避免因分开分析而导致的偏倚。本文介绍使用多元Meta分析模型合并多个二分类重复测量结局的方法,并通过实例分析演示如何在R软件中实现。

  9. The engineering analysis of bioheat equation and penile hemodynamic relationships in the diagnosis of erectile dysfunction: part II-model optimization using the ANOVA and Taguchi method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, E Y K; Ng, W K; Huang, J; Tan, Y K

    2008-01-01

    The authors aimed to study the skin surface bioheat perfusion model described in part I numerically. The influence of each constituent in the determination of surface temperature profile was statistically examined. The theoretically derived data will then be benchmarked with clinically measured data to develop the artificial intelligence system for the diagnosis of erectile dysfunction (ED). The new approach is based on the hypothesis that there exists a constitutive relationship between surface temperature profiles and the etiology of ED. By considering the penis model as a group of reservoirs with irregular cavities, we built a numerical model, simplified to save computational costs while still realistically able to represent the actual for partial differential calculation. Incompressible blood flow was assumed coupled with the classical bioheat transfer equation which was solved using the finite element method. Isotropic homogeneous heat diffusivity was assigned to each tissue layer. The results of simulations were tested for sensitivity analysis and further optimized to obtain the 'best' signal from the simulations using the Taguchi method. Four important parameters were identified and analysis of variance was performed using the 2(n) design (n=number of parameters, in this case, 4). The implications of these parameters were hypothesized based on physiological observations. Our results show that for an optimum signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio, the noise factors (thermal conductivity of skin, A and tunica albuginea, B) must be set high and low, respectively. Hence, at this setting, the signal will be captured based on the perfusion rate of the boundary layer of the sinusoidal space and the blood pressure (perfusion of sinusoidal space, C and blood pressure, D) will be optimal as their S/N ratios (C (low) and D (low)) are larger than the former.

  10. Linear Bayes estimator of parameters and its superiorities for one-way ANOVA model%单向分类方差分析模型中参数的Bayes估计及其优良性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    童楠; 韦来生

    2008-01-01

    对平衡的单向分类方差分析(ANOVA)模型导出了效应参数向量可估函数的线性Bayes无偏估计(LBUE),并在均方误差矩阵(MSEM)准则、predictive Pitman closeness(PRPC)准则和posterior Pitman closeness(PPC)准则下分别讨论了它相对于最小二乘估计(LSE)的优良性.

  11. Lógica Central de los Principales Métodos Estadísticos: El anova, La prueba t, La correlación Y la regresión

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Cuadros

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available El propósito del artículo es unificar los conocimientos acerca de los principales métodos estadísticos. El modelo lineal general equipara el valor de una variable con la suma de una constante, más la influencia parcial y ponderada de cada una de las otras variables, más el error. El coeficiente de correlación y la REG/CORR.MÚLT. (y las correspondientes pruebas de significación, la pruebat y el ANOVA, son todos casos especiales del modelo lineal general.

  12. Seasonal variation in objectively measured physical activity, sedentary time, cardio-respiratory fitness and sleep duration among 8–11 year-old Danish children: a repeated-measures study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Mads F.; Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Michaelsen, Kim

    2013-01-01

    was, therefore, to examine between-season and within-week variation in physical activity, sedentary behaviour, cardio-respiratory fitness and sleep duration among 8–11 year-old children. METHODS: A total of 1021 children from nine Danish schools were invited to participate and 834 accepted. Due...... to missing data, 730 children were included in the current analytical sample. An accelerometer was worn for 7 days and 8 nights during autumn, winter and spring, from which physical activity, sedentary time and sleep duration were measured. Cardio-respiratory fitness was assessed using a 10-min intermittent...... running test. RESULTS: The children had 5% more sedentary time, 23% less time in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and 2% longer sleep duration during winter compared to spring and cardio-respiratory fitness was 4% higher during spring compared to autumn (P Sedentary time was higher...

  13. ONE WAY ANOVA RANDOMIZED COMPLETE BLOCKS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ******

    2012-04-24

    Apr 24, 2012 ... Effect of rainbow trout growth hormone complementary DNA on body shape, carcass yield, .... injected into mouse brain with lipofectin can be incorporated and expressed by brain ... Gut size in GH- transgenic Coho salmon is ...

  14. Improvement in Depressive Symptoms Is Associated with Reduced Oxidative Damage and Inflammatory Response in Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Subsyndromal Depression: The Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Psychoeducation, Physical Exercise, and Enhanced Treatment as Usual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vučić Lovrenčić, Marijana; Pibernik-Okanović, Mirjana; Šekerija, Mario; Prašek, Manja; Ajduković, Dea; Kos, Jadranka; Hermanns, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Aims. To examine one-year changes in oxidative damage and inflammation level in type 2 diabetic patients undergoing behavioral treatment for subsyndromal depression. Materials and Methods. A randomized controlled comparison of psychoeducation (A), physical exercise (B), and enhanced treatment as usual (C) was performed in 209 eligible subjects in a tertiary diabetes care setting. Depressive symptoms (primary outcome) and selected biomarkers of oxidative damage and inflammation (secondary outcomes) were assessed at baseline and six- and twelve-month follow-up. Results. Out of the 74, 67, and 68 patients randomised into groups A, B, and C, respectively, 201 completed the interventions, and 179 were analysed. Participants in all three groups equally improved in depressive symptoms from baseline to one-year follow-up (repeated measures ANOVA; F = 12.51, p < 0.0001, η2 = 0.07). Urinary 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine (u-8-oxodG) decreased (F = 10.66, p < 0.0001, η2 = 0.06), as did sialic acid and leukocytes (F = 84.57, η2 = 0.32 and F = 12.61, η2 = 0.07, resp.; p < 0.0001), while uric acid increased (F = 12.53, p < 0.0001, η2 = 0.07) in all subjects during one year. Improvement of depressive symptoms at 6 months significantly predicted one-year reduction in u-8-oxodG (β = 0.15, p = 0.044). Conclusion. Simple behavioral interventions are capable not only of alleviating depressive symptoms, but also of reducing the intensity of damaging oxidative/inflammatory processes in type 2 diabetic patients with subsyndromal depression. This trial is registered with ISRCTN05673017. PMID:26347775

  15. Improvement in Depressive Symptoms Is Associated with Reduced Oxidative Damage and Inflammatory Response in Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Subsyndromal Depression: The Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Psychoeducation, Physical Exercise, and Enhanced Treatment as Usual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijana Vučić Lovrenčić

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To examine one-year changes in oxidative damage and inflammation level in type 2 diabetic patients undergoing behavioral treatment for subsyndromal depression. Materials and Methods. A randomized controlled comparison of psychoeducation (A, physical exercise (B, and enhanced treatment as usual (C was performed in 209 eligible subjects in a tertiary diabetes care setting. Depressive symptoms (primary outcome and selected biomarkers of oxidative damage and inflammation (secondary outcomes were assessed at baseline and six- and twelve-month follow-up. Results. Out of the 74, 67, and 68 patients randomised into groups A, B, and C, respectively, 201 completed the interventions, and 179 were analysed. Participants in all three groups equally improved in depressive symptoms from baseline to one-year follow-up (repeated measures ANOVA; F=12.51, p<0.0001, η2=0.07. Urinary 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine (u-8-oxodG decreased (F=10.66, p<0.0001, η2=0.06, as did sialic acid and leukocytes (F=84.57, η2=0.32 and F=12.61, η2=0.07, resp.; p<0.0001, while uric acid increased (F=12.53, p<0.0001, η2=0.07 in all subjects during one year. Improvement of depressive symptoms at 6 months significantly predicted one-year reduction in u-8-oxodG (β=0.15, p=0.044. Conclusion. Simple behavioral interventions are capable not only of alleviating depressive symptoms, but also of reducing the intensity of damaging oxidative/inflammatory processes in type 2 diabetic patients with subsyndromal depression. This trial is registered with ISRCTN05673017.

  16. 混合效应模型下ANOVA估计和SD估计相等的充分条件%Some Sufficient Conditions for the Identity of ANOVA Estimator and SD Estimator in Mixed-Effects Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴密霞; 赵延

    2014-01-01

    混合效应模型是统计模型中非常重要的一类模型,广泛地应用到许多领域.本文比较了该模型下方差分量的两种估计:方差分析(ANOVA)估计和谱分解(SD)估计,借助吴密霞和王松桂[A new method of spectral decomposition of covariance matrix in mixed effects models and its applications,Sci.China,Ser.A,2005,48:1451-1464]协方差矩阵的谱分解结果,给出了ANOVA估计和SD估计相等的两个充分条件及其相应的统计性质,并将以上的结果应用于圆形部件数据模型和混合方差分析模型.

  17. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF SOME EXPERIMENTAL FATIGUE TESTS RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Stere PARIS

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper details the results of processing the fatigue data experiments to find the regression function. Application software for statistical processing like ANOVA and regression calculi are properly utilized, with emphasis on popular software like MSExcel and CurveExpert

  18. Brain response to images of food varying in energy density is associated with body composition in 7- to 10-year-old children: Results of an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearnbach, S Nicole; English, Laural K; Lasschuijt, Marlou; Wilson, Stephen J; Savage, Jennifer S; Fisher, Jennifer O; Rolls, Barbara J; Keller, Kathleen L

    2016-08-01

    Energy balance is regulated by a multifaceted system of physiological signals that influence energy intake and expenditure. Therefore, variability in the brain's response to food may be partially explained by differences in levels of metabolically active tissues throughout the body, including fat-free mass (FFM) and fat mass (FM). The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that children's body composition would be related to their brain response to food images varying in energy density (ED), a measure of energy content per weight of food. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to measure brain response to High (>1.5kcal/g) and Low (food images, and Control images, in 36 children ages 7-10years. Body composition was measured using bioelectrical impedance analysis. Multi-subject random effects general linear model (GLM) and two-factor repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to test for main effects of ED (High ED vs. Low ED) in a priori defined brain regions of interest previously implicated in energy homeostasis and reward processing. Pearson's correlations were then calculated between activation in these regions for various contrasts (High ED-Low ED, High ED-Control, Low ED-Control) and child body composition (FFM index, FM index, % body fat). Relative to Low ED foods, High ED foods elicited greater BOLD activation in the left thalamus. In the right substantia nigra, BOLD activation for the contrast of High ED-Low ED foods was positively associated with child FFM. There were no significant results for the High ED-Control or Low ED-Control contrasts. Our findings support literature on FFM as an appetitive driver, such that greater amounts of lean mass were associated with greater activation for High ED foods in an area of the brain associated with dopamine signaling and reward (substantia nigra). These results confirm our hypothesis that brain response to foods varying in energy content is related to measures of child body

  19. Results of a sector-wide quality improvement initiative for substance-abuse care: an uncontrolled before-after study in Catalonia, Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colom Joan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Health Department of the Regional Government of Catalonia, Spain, issued a quality plan for substance abuse centers. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the impact of a multidimensional quality improvement initiative in the field of substance abuse care and to discuss potentials and limitations for further quality improvement. Methods The study uses an uncontrolled, sector-wide pre-post design. All centers providing services for persons with substance abuse issues in the Autonomous Community of Catalonia participated in this assessment. Measures of compliance were developed based on indicators reported in the literature and by broad stakeholder involvement. We compared pre-post differences in dimension-specific and overall compliance-scores using one-way ANOVA for repeated measures and the Friedman statistic. We described the spread of the data using the inter-quartile range and the Fligner-Killen statistic. Finally, we adjusted compliance scores for location and size using linear and logistic regression models. Results We performed a baseline and follow up assessment in 22 centers for substance abuse care and observed substantial and statistically significant improvements for overall compliance (pre: 60.9%; post: 79.1% and for compliance in the dimensions 'care pathway' (pre: 66.5%; post: 83.5% and 'organization and management' (pre: 50.5%; post: 77.2%. We observed improvements in the dimension 'environment and infrastructure' (pre: 81.8%; post: 95.5% and in the dimension 'relations and user rights' (pre: 66.5%; post: 72.5%; however, these were not statistically significant. The regression analysis suggests that improvements in compliance are positively influenced by being located in the Barcelona region in case of the dimension 'relations and user rights'. Conclusion The positive results of this quality improvement initiative are possibly associated with the successful involvement of stakeholders, the consciously

  20. Result of randomized control trial to increase breast health awareness among young females in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtari-Zavare, Mehrnoosh; Juni, Muhamad Hanafiah; Said, Salmiah Md; Ismail, Irmi Zarina; Latiff, Latiffah A; Ataollahi Eshkoor, Sima

    2016-08-08

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer and the second principal cause of cancer deaths in women worldwide as well as in Malaysia. Breast self-examination (BSE) has a role in raising breast cancer awareness among women and educational programs play an important role in breast cancer preventive behavior. The aim of this study is to develop, implement and evaluate the effectiveness of Breast Health Awareness program based on health belief model on knowledge of breast cancer and breast-selfexamination and BSE practice among female students in Malaysia. A single-blind randomized controlled trial was carried out among 370 female undergraduate students from January 2011 to April 2012 in two selected public universities in Malaysia. Participants were randomized to either the intervention group or the control group. The educational program was delivered to the intervention group. The outcome measures were assessed at baseline, 6, and 12 months after implementing the health educational program. Chi-square, independent samples t-test and two-way repeated measures ANOVA (GLM) were conducted in the course of the data analyses. Mean scores of knowledge on breast cancer (pknowledge on breast self examination (pBreast Health Awareness program based on health the belief model had a positive effect on knowledge of breast cancer and breast self-examination and practice of BSE among females in Malaysia. The ANZCTR clinical trial registry ( ACTRN12616000831482 ), retrospectively registered on Jun 23, 2016 in ANZCTR.org.au.

  1. Classroom Behaviour Management: The Effects of In-Service Training on Elementary Teachers' Self-Efficacy Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudreau, Nancy; Royer, Égide; Frenette, Éric; Beaumont, Claire; Flanagan, Tara

    2013-01-01

    We examined a training program in classroom management in relation to the efficacy beliefs of elementary school teachers. The training program used a quasi-experimental design with a waitlist control group. Twenty-seven elementary school teachers in the greater Quebec City area participated. The repeated measures ANOVA results revealed positive…

  2. Classroom Behaviour Management: The Effects of In-Service Training on Elementary Teachers' Self-Efficacy Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudreau, Nancy; Royer, Égide; Frenette, Éric; Beaumont, Claire; Flanagan, Tara

    2013-01-01

    We examined a training program in classroom management in relation to the efficacy beliefs of elementary school teachers. The training program used a quasi-experimental design with a waitlist control group. Twenty-seven elementary school teachers in the greater Quebec City area participated. The repeated measures ANOVA results revealed positive…

  3. Enceladus Results

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Here are some results from the Spectra Decomposition Algorithm on infrared spectral images of Saturn's moon Enceladus. Figure 1 is the spatial contribution of the...

  4. NIF Target Assembly Metrology Methodology and Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alger, E. T. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Kroll, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dzenitis, E. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Montesanti, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hughes, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Swisher, M. [IAP, Livermore, CA (United States); Taylor, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Segraves, K. [IAP, Livermore, CA (United States); Lord, D. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Reynolds, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Castro, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Edwards, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    During our inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) we require cryogenic targets at the 1-cm scale to be fabricated, assembled, and metrologized to micron-level tolerances. During assembly of these ICF targets, there are physical dimensmetrology is completed using optical coordinate measurement machines that provide repeatable measurements with micron precision, while also allowing in-process data collection for absolute accuracy in assembly. To date, 51 targets have been assembled and metrologized, and 34 targets have been successfully fielded on NIF relying on these metrology data. In the near future, ignition experiments on NIF will require tighter tolerances and more demanding target assembly and metrology capability. Metrology methods, calculations, and uncertainty estimates will be discussed. Target diagnostic port alignment, target position, and capsule location results will be reviewed for the 2009 Energetics Campaign. The information is presented via control charts showing the effect of process improvements that were made during target production. Certain parameters, including capsule position, met the 2009 campaign specifications but will have much tighter requirements in the future. Finally, in order to meet these new requirements assembly process changes and metrology capability upgrades will be necessary.

  5. Hidden multiplicity in exploratory multiway ANOVA: Prevalence and remedies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Angélique O J; van Ravenzwaaij, Don; Matzke, Dora; Steingroever, Helen; Wetzels, Ruud; Grasman, Raoul P P P; Waldorp, Lourens J; Wagenmakers, Eric-Jan

    2016-04-01

    Many psychologists do not realize that exploratory use of the popular multiway analysis of variance harbors a multiple-comparison problem. In the case of two factors, three separate null hypotheses are subject to test (i.e., two main effects and one interaction). Consequently, the probability of at least one Type I error (if all null hypotheses are true) is 14 % rather than 5 %, if the three tests are independent. We explain the multiple-comparison problem and demonstrate that researchers almost never correct for it. To mitigate the problem, we describe four remedies: the omnibus F test, control of the familywise error rate, control of the false discovery rate, and preregistration of the hypotheses.

  6. Randomized clinical trial of four adhesion strategies in cervical lesions: 12-month results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paula, Eloisa Andrade; Tay, Lidia Yileng; Kose, Carlos; Mena-Serrano, Alexandra; Reis, Alessandra; Perdigão, Jorge; Loguercio, Alessandro D

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the 6- and 12-month clinical performance of four adhesion strategies from the same manufacturer (Kerr) in non-carious cervical lesions (NCCLs) using two evaluation criteria. Thirty-five patients, with at least four NCCLs each, participated in this study. After samplesize calculation, 180 restorations were assigned to one of the following groups: OFL (Optibond FL), OSP (Optibond Solo Plus), XTR (Optibond XTR), and AIO (Optibond All-In-One). The composite resin Filtek Supreme Ultra (3M ESPE) was placed incrementally. The restorations were evaluated at baseline, after 6 months, and after 12 months, using both the FDI and the USPHS-modified criteria. Statistical analyses were performed with Friedman repeated measures, ANOVA by rank, and the McNemar test for significance in each pair (α=0.05). Six restorations (2 for OFL, 1 for OSP, 2 for XTR, and 1 for AIO) were lost at 12 months (P>0.05 for both evaluation criteria). Marginal staining was observed in seven restorations using the FDI criteria (P>0.05) and three restorations using the USPHSmodified criteria (P>0.05). Eight restorations (2 for OSP, 3 for XTR, and 3 for AIO) were classified as Bravo for marginal adaptation using the USPHSmodified criteria (P>0.05). However, 62 restorations (14 for OFL, 12 for OSP, 15 for XTR, and 21 for AIO) were classified as Bravo using the FDI criteria (P>0.05). The four adhesion strategies showed similar clinical retention at 6 and 12 months. The FDI evaluation criteria tend to be more sensitive than the USPHS-modified criteria.

  7. Maraviroc 150 mg QD plus lopinavir/ritonavir, a NRTI-sparing regimen for HIV-infected naïve patients: 48-weeks final results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Nozza

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Novel strategies with NRTIs-sparing regimen in antiretroviral naïve HIV-infected patients are currently used in clinical trials [1]. We previously presented preliminary results of this study [2] and here we present the 48-weeks final results. Prospective, open-label, randomised (1:1, multicenter, proof-of-concept trial. HIV-infected naïve patients were assigned to once daily maraviroc (MVC plus lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r or to tenofovir/emtricitabine (TDF/FTC plus LPV/r. Objectives of the study were the 48-weeks virological and immunological efficacy. Data were collected at baseline (BL and at 4, 12, 24, 36 and 48 weeks. T cell subsets from frozen peripheral blood mononuclear cells collected at BL, 4 and 48 weeks were also evaluated. ANOVA for repeated measures performed and Greenhouse-Geisser probabilities calculated. Results reported as median (Q1–Q3 or frequency (%. Fifty patients (26 in MVC group and 24 in TDF/FTC group were enrolled and reached week 48. Similar BL characteristics were observed in the two study groups; age: 39.1 (34.2–44 years, 2/50 (4% females, infected since 2.9 (0.8–5.3 years, CD4+ nadir 266 (242–315 cells/µL, BL CD4+ 295 (260–369 cells/µL; CD4% 18.6 (14.6–23, HIV-RNA 4.4 (3.9–4.8 log10 copies/mL. At W48, all patients in MVC group and 22/24 (96% in TDF/FTC group had HIV-RNA<50 copies/ml (p=0.225. CD4+ trend during follow-up was different between the two groups (p=0.046 with a higher CD4 gain of 286 (183–343 vs 199 (125–285 cells/mL in MVC and TDF/FTC, respectively (p=0.033. In MVC vs TDF/FTC group, we observed a higher expression of CCR5+CD4+ T cells [W48 change: +7.5% (−4.5/11 vs −5.4 (−15.1/−0.5, p=0.016] and a higher increase of CD4+ effector memory [W48 change: +1.6% (0.7/4.8 vs -4.4 (−13.5/−0.2, p=0.007]. No significant variations in naïve and central memory CD4+ T cells. Treatment was well tolerated, without grade 3 or 4 adverse events. No significant difference between the two

  8. Using repeated measures of sleep disturbances to predict future diagnosis-specific work disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salo, Paula; Vahtera, Jussi; Hall, Martica

    2012-01-01

    It is unknown whether or not measuring sleep disturbances repeatedly, rather than at only one point in time, improves prediction of work disability.......It is unknown whether or not measuring sleep disturbances repeatedly, rather than at only one point in time, improves prediction of work disability....

  9. Assessment of individual agreements with repeated measurements based on generalized confidence intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Jorge; Burdick, Richard K

    2009-01-01

    Individual agreement between two measurement systems is determined using the total deviation index (TDI) or the coverage probability (CP) criteria as proposed by Lin (2000) and Lin et al. (2002). We used a variance component model as proposed by Choudhary (2007). Using the bootstrap approach, Choudhary (2007), and generalized confidence intervals, we construct bounds on TDI and CP. A simulation study was conducted to assess whether the bounds maintain the stated type I error probability of the test. We also present a computational example to demonstrate the statistical methods described in the paper.

  10. Persistent repeated measurements by magnetic resonance spectroscopy demonstrate minimal hepatic encephalopathy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheau, C; Popa, G A; Ghergus, A E; Preda, E M; Capsa, R A; Lupescu, I G

    2013-09-15

    Minimal Hepatic Encephalopathy (MHE), previously referred to as infraclinical or subclinical is a precursor in the development of clinical hepatic encephalopathy (HE). The demonstration of MHE is done through neuropsychological testing in the absence of clinical evidence of HE, patients showing only a mild cognitive impairment. Neuropsychological tests employed consist of Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS) and portosystemic encephalopathy (PSE) test score. Unfortunately, there are numerous occasions when the tests prove irrelevant: in the situation of inexperienced investigators, the patient's poor education, vision problems or concurring central nervous system disease, all of which may delay or deviate from the correct diagnosis.

  11. GSTM1 and APE1 genotypes affect arsenic-induced oxidative stress: a repeated measures study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Breton, Carrie V; Kile, Molly L; Catalano, Paul J; Hoffman, Elaine; Quamruzzaman, Quazi; Rahman, Mahmuder; Mahiuddin, Golam; Christiani, David C

    2007-01-01

    .... Generation of oxidative stress may contribute to arsenic carcinogenesis. To investigate the association between arsenic exposure and oxidative stress, urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG...

  12. Repeated Measures in Case Studies Relating Social Competence and Weight Loss in Two Obese Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Sonia Beatriz; Barbosa, Debora Regina

    2009-01-01

    In individual behavior therapy two clients were evaluated using behavior categories created by the therapist. Both clients were observed to improve in terms of social competence. One demonstrated a significant inverse correlation between improvement of social competence and weight loss during treatment (16 sessions) and lost weight. The other…

  13. Repeated measures of urinary oxidative stress biomarkers during pregnancy and preterm birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Kelly K; McElrath, Thomas F; Chen, Yin-Hsiu; Loch-Caruso, Rita; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Meeker, John D

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate oxidative stress as a mechanism of preterm birth in human subjects; we examined associations between urinary biomarkers of oxidative stress that were measured at multiple time points during pregnancy and preterm birth. This nested case-control study included 130 mothers who delivered preterm and 352 mothers who delivered term who were originally recruited as part of an ongoing prospective birth cohort at Brigham and Women's Hospital. Two biomarkers that included 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and 8-isoprostane were measured in urine samples that were collected at up to 4 time points (median 10, 18, 26, and 35 weeks) during gestation. Urinary concentrations of 8-isoprostane and 8-OHdG decreased and increased, respectively, as pregnancy progressed. Average levels of 8-isoprostane across pregnancy were associated with increased odds of spontaneous preterm birth (adjusted odds ratio, 6.25; 95% confidence interval, 2.86-13.7), and associations were strongest with levels measured later in pregnancy. Average levels of 8-OHdG were protective against overall preterm birth (adjusted odds ratio, 0.19; 95% confidence interval, 0.10-0.34), and there were no apparent differences in the protective effect in cases of spontaneous preterm birth compared with cases of placental origin. Odds ratios for overall preterm birth were more protective in association with urinary 8-OHdG concentrations that were measured early in pregnancy. Maternal oxidative stress may be an important contributor to preterm birth, regardless of subtype and timing of exposure during pregnancy. The 2 biomarkers that were measured in the present study had opposite associations with preterm birth; an improved understanding of what each represents may help to identify more precisely important mechanisms in the pathway to preterm birth. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Stress Levels of Agricultural Science Cooperating Teachers and Student Teachers: A Repeated Measures Comparative Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKim, Billy R.; Rayfield, John; Harlin, Julie; Adams, Andy

    2013-01-01

    This study compared job stress levels of Texas agricultural science cooperating teachers and Texas agricultural science student teachers across a semester. The research objectives included describing secondary agricultural science cooperating teachers and student teachers perceptions of stressors, by time of semester (beginning, middle, and end),…

  15. C-reactive Protein: Repeated Measurements will Improve Dialysis Patient Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobo, Gabriela; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Lindholm, Bengt; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammation is a common feature in the uremic phenotype and associates with poor outcomes. The awareness regarding the importance of inflammation assessment in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients has risen in recent years, and despite the development of novel biomarkers, C-reactive protein (CRP) is still the most measured inflammatory parameter. Notwithstanding, the possible weak points of CRP determination, this biomarker has demonstrated being useful both for guidance in clinical practice and for risk estimation. In addition, regular determination of CRP among dialysis patients has been associated with better outcomes in different dialysis facilities. Because persistent inflammation may be a silent reflection of various pathophysiologic alterations in CKD, it is crucial that inflammatory markers are regularly monitored and therapeutic attempts be made to target this inflammation.

  16. Reliability of plasma lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) from repeated measures in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citronberg, Jessica S; Wilkens, Lynne R; Lim, Unhee; Hullar, Meredith A J; White, Emily; Newcomb, Polly A; Le Marchand, Loïc; Lampe, Johanna W

    2016-09-01

    Plasma lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP), a measure of internal exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide, has been associated with several chronic conditions and may be a marker of chronic inflammation; however, no studies have examined the reliability of this biomarker in a healthy population. We examined the temporal reliability of LBP measured in archived samples from participants in two studies. In Study one, 60 healthy participants had blood drawn at two time points: baseline and follow-up (either three, six, or nine months). In Study two, 24 individuals had blood drawn three to four times over a seven-month period. We measured LBP in archived plasma by ELISA. Test-retest reliability was estimated by calculating the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Plasma LBP concentrations showed moderate reliability in Study one (ICC 0.60, 95 % CI 0.43-0.75) and Study two (ICC 0.46, 95 % CI 0.26-0.69). Restricting the follow-up period improved reliability. In Study one, the reliability of LBP over a three-month period was 0.68 (95 % CI: 0.41-0.87). In Study two, the ICC of samples taken ≤seven days apart was 0.61 (95 % CI 0.29-0.86). Plasma LBP concentrations demonstrated moderate test-retest reliability in healthy individuals with reliability improving over a shorter follow-up period.

  17. Mouth opening in patients irradiated for head and neck cancer : A prospective repeated measures study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamstra, J. I.; Dijkstra, P. U.; van Leeuwen, M.; Roodenburg, J. L. N.; Langendijk, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Aims of this prospective cohort study were (1) to analyze the course of mouth opening up to 48 months post-radiotherapy (RT), (2) to assess risk factors predicting decrease in mouth opening, and (3) to develop a multivariable prediction model for change in mouth opening in a large sample

  18. Mouth opening in patients irradiated for head and neck cancer : A prospective repeated measures study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamstra, J. I.; Dijkstra, P. U.; van Leeuwen, M.; Roodenburg, J. L. N.; Langendijk, J. A.

    Objectives: Aims of this prospective cohort study were (1) to analyze the course of mouth opening up to 48 months post-radiotherapy (RT), (2) to assess risk factors predicting decrease in mouth opening, and (3) to develop a multivariable prediction model for change in mouth opening in a large sample

  19. Repeated measures of inflammation and oxidative stress biomarkers in preeclamptic and normotensive pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Kelly K; Meeker, John D; McElrath, Thomas F; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Cantonwine, David E

    2017-05-01

    Preeclampsia is a prevalent and enigmatic disease, in part characterized by poor remodeling of the spiral arteries. However, preeclampsia does not always clinically present when remodeling has failed to occur. Hypotheses surrounding the "second hit" that is necessary for the clinical presentation of the disease focus on maternal inflammation and oxidative stress. Yet, the studies to date that have investigated these factors have used cross-sectional study designs or small study populations. In the present study, we sought to explore longitudinal trajectories, beginning early in gestation, of a panel of inflammation and oxidative stress markers in women who went on to have preeclamptic or normotensive pregnancies. We examined 441 subjects from the ongoing LIFECODES prospective birth cohort, which included 50 mothers who experienced preeclampsia and 391 mothers with normotensive pregnancies. Participants provided urine and plasma samples at 4 time points during gestation (median, 10, 18, 26, and 35 weeks) that were analyzed for a panel of oxidative stress and inflammation markers. Oxidative stress biomarkers included 8-isoprostane and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine. Inflammation biomarkers included C-reactive protein, the cytokines interleukin-1β, -6, and -10, and tumor necrosis factor-α. We created Cox proportional hazard models to calculate hazard ratios based on time of preeclampsia diagnosis in association with biomarker concentrations at each of the 4 study visits. In adjusted models, hazard ratios of preeclampsia were significantly (Pinflammation biomarkers that were measured at visit 2 (median, 18 weeks; hazard ratios, 1.31-1.83, in association with an interquartile range increase in biomarker). Hazard ratios at this time point were the most elevated for C-reactive protein, for interleukin-1β, -6, and -10, and for the oxidative stress biomarker 8-isoprostane (hazard ratio, 1.68; 95% confidence interval, 1.14-2.48) compared to other time points. Hazard ratios for tumor necrosis factor-α were consistently elevated at all 4 of the study visits (hazard ratios, 1.49-1.63; Pinflammation and oxidative stress in preeclamptic compared with normotensive pregnancies. Within these groups, inflammation and oxidative stress biomarkers show different patterns across gestation, beginning as early as 10 weeks. The start of the second trimester appears to be a particularly important time point for the measurement of these biomarkers. Although biomarkers alone do not appear to be useful in the prediction of preeclampsia, these data are useful in understanding the maternal inflammatory profile in pregnancy before the development of the disease and may be used to further develop an understanding of potentially preventative measures. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. An Introduction to Latent Growth Models: Analysis of Repeated Measures Physical Performance Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ilhyeok; Schutz, Robert W.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce the Latent Growth Model (LGM) to researchers in exercise and sport science. Although the LGM has several merits over traditional analysis techniques in analyzing change and was first introduced almost 20 years ago, it is still underused in exercise and sport science research. This statistical model can be…

  1. A Finite Mixture of Nonlinear Random Coefficient Models for Continuous Repeated Measures Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, Nidhi; Harring, Jeffrey R; Zopluoglu, Cengiz

    2016-09-01

    Nonlinear random coefficient models (NRCMs) for continuous longitudinal data are often used for examining individual behaviors that display nonlinear patterns of development (or growth) over time in measured variables. As an extension of this model, this study considers the finite mixture of NRCMs that combine features of NRCMs with the idea of finite mixture (or latent class) models. The efficacy of this model is that it allows the integration of intrinsically nonlinear functions where the data come from a mixture of two or more unobserved subpopulations, thus allowing the simultaneous investigation of intra-individual (within-person) variability, inter-individual (between-person) variability, and subpopulation heterogeneity. Effectiveness of this model to work under real data analytic conditions was examined by executing a Monte Carlo simulation study. The simulation study was carried out using an R routine specifically developed for the purpose of this study. The R routine used maximum likelihood with the expectation-maximization algorithm. The design of the study mimicked the output obtained from running a two-class mixture model on task completion data.

  2. Prevention of eating disorders among minority youth: a matched-sample repeated measures study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook-Cottone, Catherine; Jones, Lakaii A; Haugli, Sara

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine ethnic differences in primary prevention programs for eating disorders in young girls. In order to address the dearth of research in this area, this study examined the comparative response to an eating disorder prevention program on fifth-grade minority and White females. Pre- and post-test data were collected from 10 groups participating in the prevention program for a total of 50 girls. Minority participants and White participants were then matched based on Body Mass Index (BMI) and socioeconomic status in order to examine ethnic differences in group effectiveness. Findings indicated that minority and White participants were equally responsive to the prevention program.

  3. Repeated measurements of P retention in ponies fed rations with various Ca:P ratios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doorn, D A; Schaafstra, F J W C; Wouterse, H; Everts, H; Estepa, J C; Aguilera-Tejero, E; Beynen, A C

    2014-01-01

    This study addresses the question of whether feeding rations rich in P for a period of up to 42 d induces a positive P balance in adult ponies. Biochemical bone markers and parathyroid hormone (PTH; intact as well as whole PTH) were measured to obtain clues as to the effect of P loading on bone meta

  4. First clinicial results on the feasibility, quality and reproducibility of aberrometry-based intraoperative refraction during cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huelle, Jan O; Katz, Toam; Druchkiv, Vasyl; Pahlitzsch, Milena; Steinberg, Johannes; Richard, Gisbert; Linke, Stephan J

    2014-11-01

    To provide the first clinical data in determining the feasibility, quality and precision of intraoperative wavefront aberrometry (IWA)-based refraction in patients with cataract. IWA refraction was recorded at 7 defined measurement points during standardised cataract surgery in 74 eyes of 74 consecutive patients (mean age 69±11.3 years). Precision and measurement quality was evaluated by the 'limits of agreement' approach, regression analysis, correlation analysis, Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and ORs for predicting measurement failure. Wavefront map (WFM) quality was objectivised and compared with the Pentacam Nuclear Staging analysis. Out of 814 IWA measurement attempts, 462 WFMs could be obtained. The most successful readings (n=63) were achieved in aphakia with viscoelastic. The highest (50.63%, SD 20.23) and lowest (29.19%, SD 13.94) quality of WFMs across all measurement points were found after clear corneal incision and in pseudophakia with viscoelastic, respectively. High consistency across repeated measures were found for mean spherical equivalent (SE) differences in aphakia with -0.01D and pseudophakia with -0.01D, but ranges were high (limits of agreement +0.69 D and -0.72 D; +1.53 D and -1.54 D, respectively). With increasing WFM quality, higher precision in measurements was observed. This is the first report addressing quality and reproducibility of WA in a large sample. IWA refraction in aphakia, for instance, appears to be reliable once stable and pressurised anterior chamber conditions are achieved. More efforts are required to improve the precision and quality of measurements before IWA can be used to guide the surgical refractive plan in cataract surgery. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. Effectiveness of meta-cognitive and cognitive-behavioral therapy in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashouri, Ahmad; Atef Vahid, Mohammad Kazem; Gharaee, Banafsheh; Rasoulian, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to compare the effectiveness of metacognitive therapy (MCT) and cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) in treating Iranian patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Thirty three outpatients meeting DSM-IV-TR criteria for MDD without any other axis I and II disorders were randomly assigned to one of three treatment conditions, i.e. MCT, CBT and pharmacotherapy. The Beck Depression Inventory-II-Second Edition (BDI-II), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Ruminative Response Scale (RRS) and Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (DAS) were administered for pre-treatment, post-treatment and follow-up. Data were analyzed by repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). Based on repeated measures ANOVA, all the participants demonstrated improvement in depression, anxiety, dysfunctional attitude and ruminative response. Based on percentage results, all the patients in MCT and CBT groups showed significant improvement at post-treatment phase. MCT and CBT were more effective than pharmacotherapy alone In treatment of MDD. None.

  6. Arterial stiffness results from eccentrically biased downhill running exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burr, J F; Boulter, M; Beck, K

    2015-03-01

    There is increasing evidence that select forms of exercise are associated with vascular changes that are in opposition to the well-accepted beneficial effects of moderate intensity aerobic exercise. To determine if alterations in arterial stiffness occur following eccentrically accentuated aerobic exercise, and if changes are associated with measures of muscle soreness. Repeated measures experimental cohort. Twelve (m=8/f=4) moderately trained (VO₂max=52.2 ± 7.4 ml kg(-1)min(-1)) participants performed a downhill run at -12° grade using a speed that elicited 60% VO₂max for 40 min. Cardiovascular and muscle soreness measures were collected at baseline and up to 72 h post-running. Muscle soreness peaked at 48 h (p=<0.001). Arterial stiffness similarly peaked at 48 h (p=0.04) and remained significantly elevated above baseline through 72 h. Eccentrically accentuated downhill running is associated with arterial stiffening in the absence of an extremely prolonged duration or fast pace. The timing of alterations coincides with the well-documented inflammatory response that occurs from the muscular insult of downhill running, but whether the observed changes are a result of either systemic or local inflammation is yet unclear. These findings may help to explain evidence of arterial stiffening in long-term runners and following prolonged duration races wherein cumulative eccentric loading is high. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. What a Difference a Tag Cloud Makes: Effects of Tasks and Cognitive Abilities on Search Results Interface Use

    CERN Document Server

    Gwizdka, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study is to expand our understanding of the relationships between selected tasks, cognitive abilities and search result interfaces. The underlying objective is to understand how to select search results presentation for tasks and user contexts. Twenty three participants conducted four search tasks of two types and used two interfaces (List and Overview) to refine and examine search results. Clickthrough data were recorded. This controlled study employed a mixed model design with two within-subject factors (task and interface) and two between-subject factors (two cognitive abilities: memory span and verbal closure). Quantitative analyses were carried out by means of the statistical package SPSS. Specifically, multivariate analysis of variance with repeated measures and non-parametric tests were performed on the collected data. The overview of search results appeared to have benefited searchers in several ways. It made them faster; it facilitated formulation of more effective queries and helped...

  8. Cholesterol testing and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholesterol test results; LDL test results; VLDL test results; HDL test results; Coronary risk profile results; Hyperlipidemia- ... Some cholesterol is considered good and some is considered bad. Different blood tests can be done to measure each ...

  9. Lipasuria in acute pancreatitis: result of tubular dysfunction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muench, R; Buehler, H; Kehl, O; Ammann, R

    1987-01-01

    Lipase, in contrast to amylase, is completely reabsorbed by the proximal tubules after glomerular filtration. Therefore, no lipase is detectable in the unconcentrated urine according to the current opinion. The handling of lipase (detected with an enzyme-immunoassay) by the kidney was investigated in comparison with creatinine, amylase, and beta-2-microglobulin by clearance studies in acute pancreatitis (n = 10), burn injury (n = 4), glomerular proteinuria (n = 8), and controls without evidence of pancreatic or renal diseases (n = 5). In initial stages of acute pancreatitis a measurable clearance of lipase (mean: 49.6 microliters/min, range: 0.5-234) was found in association with corresponding increased clearances of beta-2-microglobulin (mean: 10.5 ml/min, range: 0.02-58.9) and of amylase (mean: 8.9 ml/min, range: 2.4-22.6) in nine of ten patients. This finding is consistent with a defect of tubular function. However, regression analysis failed to show a significant correlation between lipase and beta-2-microglobulin clearance. Repeated measurements during the course of pancreatitis in seven patients showed reversibility of tubular dysfunction. In patients with burn injury a similar elevation of clearances of beta-2-microglobulin and of amylase was found, but tubular dysfunction in this condition was not associated with lipasuria. In glomerular proteinuria a lipase clearance was found in two of five cases with moderate, and in the other three cases with severe impairment of creatinine clearance. beta-2-microglobulin clearance was normal in the former and only slightly elevated in the latter group. In conclusion lipase is measurable in the urine of most patients with acute pancreatitis as a result of a reversible tubular dysfunction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Combination of statistical approaches for analysis of 2-DE data gives complementary results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grove, Harald; Jørgensen, Bo; Jessen, Flemming;

    2008-01-01

    from a time-series experiment exploring the changes in metabolic enzymes in bovine muscle at five time-points after slaughter. The data set consisted of 1377 protein spots, and for each analysis, the data set were preprocessed to fit the requirements of the chosen method. The generated results were one......Five methods for finding significant changes in proteome data have been used to analyze a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis data set. We used both univariate (ANOVA) and multivariate (Partial Least Squares with jackknife, Cross Model Validation, Power-PLS and CovProc) methods. The gels were taken...

  11. RESULTS RESULTING FROM AUTOFRETTAGE OF CYLINDER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Ruilin

    2008-01-01

    Autofrettage is used to introduce advantageous residual stresses into wall of a cylinder and to even distributions of total stresses. Basic theory on autofrettage has been functioning for several decades. It is necessary to reveal profound relations between parameters in the theory. Therefore, based on the 3rd strength theory, δei/δy, δei/δy, δei′/δy, δei′/δy and their relations, as well as p/δy, are studied under ideal conditions, where δei/δy is equivalent stress of total stresses at elastoplastic juncture/yield strength, δei/δy is equivalent stress of total stresses at inside surface/yield strength, δei′/δy is equivalent stress of residual stresses at elastoplastic juncture/yield strength, δei′/δy is equivalent stress of residual stresses at inside surface/yield strength, p/δy is load-bearing capacity of an autofrettaged cylinder/yield strength. Theoretical study on the parameters results in noticeable results and laws. The main idea is: to satisfy |δei′|=δy, the relation between kj and k is , where k is outside/inside radius ratio of a cylinder, kj is ratio of elastoplastic juncture radius to inside radius of a cylinder; when the plastic region covers the whole wall of a cylinder, for compressive yield not to occur after removing autofrettage pressure, the ultimate k is k=2.218 46, with k=2.218 46, a cylinder's ultimate load-bearing capacity equals its entire yield pressure, or =lnk; when kj≤=1.648 72, no matter how great k is, compressive yield never occurs after removing pa; the maximum and optimum load-bearing capacity of an autofrettaged cylinder is just two times the loading which an unautofrettaged cylinder can bear elastically, or , thus the limit of the load-bearing capacity of an autofrettaged cylinder is also just 2 times that of an unautofrettaged cylinder.

  12. Species-specific and seasonal differences in chlorophyll fluorescence and photosynthetic light response among three evergreen species in a Madrean sky island mixed conifer forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, D. L.; Minor, R. L.; Braun, Z.; Barron-Gafford, G. A.

    2012-12-01

    -use efficiency (AQE) was similar among P. strobiformis and P. ponderosa and least in P. menziesii (repeated-measures ANOVA; species, F2,8 = 13.83, P = 0.002). Across all three species, monsoon onset increased AQE (repeated-measures ANOVA; time, F1,8= 10.04, P = 0.01). Likewise, P. strobiformis and P. ponderosa shared a similar, greater light compensation point than P. menziesii (repeated-measures ANOVA; species, F2,8 = 5.89, P = 0.02). However, across species, monsoon onset did not influence light compensation points. These results support the hypothesis that the monsoon has species-specific effects on evergreen physiological performance and are broadly consistent with predictions of stress tolerance based on species' latitudinal and elevational range distributions. Moreover, with year-to-year rainfall variability predicted to increase under future climate scenarios, species-specific functional traits related to stress tolerance and photosynthesis may promote ecosystem functional resilience in Madrean sky island mixed conifer forests.

  13. Original Research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    home

    2014-12-23

    Dec 23, 2014 ... School of Psychology, Addis Ababa University, P.O. Box: 33617, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia ... a bird‟s-eye- view of the burgeoning literature in the area ..... Table 3: Repeated measures ANOVA (Ways by desires by roles).

  14. Effects of diets containing Cissus rotundifolia flour on lipid profile of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of diets containing Cissus rotundifolia flour on lipid profile of rats and ... CR flour was processed using traditional Nigerian method of processing. ... Analysis of variance and repeated measure analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to ...

  15. Resultative Predicates in Japanese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori Takamine

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Washio (1997; 1999 observes that resultative predicates are divided into two different groups, strong and weak resultatives, depending on ‘patienthood’ of the object. This typology of resultatives seems to capture a point of crosslinguistic variation in resultatives; Japanese has weak but not strong resultatives, while English has both. Washio also observes that there is another group of examples that bears a superficial resemblance to resultatives but constitutes a different phenomenon, hence spurious resultatives. The difference between weak and strong resultatives is made in terms of the ‘affectedness’ of the verb. Thus the typology of resultatives proposed by Washio is semantically grounded. In this paper, I propose: (i a fine-grained distinction for Washio’s weak resultatives: (ii a syntactic analysis of the different resultative types. On the basis of syntactic evidence, I argue that there are two types of weak resultatives, an adjunct of VP and a complement of VP within the vP projection. I also argue that spurious resultatives are structurally higher than weak resultatives in Japanese.

  16. Psychophysical and ergogenic effects of synchronous music during treadmill walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karageorghis, Costas I; Mouzourides, Denis A; Priest, David-Lee; Sasso, Tariq A; Morrish, Daley J; Walley, Carolyn J

    2009-02-01

    The present study examined the impact of motivational music and oudeterous (neutral in terms of motivational qualities) music on endurance and a range of psychophysical indices during a treadmill walking task. Experimental participants (N=30; mean age=20.5 years, SD=1.0 years) selected a program of either pop or rock tracks from artists identified in an earlier survey. They walked to exhaustion, starting at 75% maximal heart rate reserve, under conditions of motivational synchronous music, oudeterous synchronous music, and a no-music control. Dependent measures included time to exhaustion, ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), and in-task affect (both recorded at 2-min intervals), and exercise-induced feeling states. A one-way repeated measures ANOVA was used to analyze time to exhaustion data. Two-way repeated measures (Music Condition ? Trial Point) ANOVAs were used to analyze in-task measures, whereas a one-way repeated measures MANOVA was used to analyze the exercise-induced feeling states data. Results indicated that endurance was increased in both music conditions and that motivational music had a greater ergogenic effect than did oudeterous music (pmusic when compared with control throughout the trial (p.05) upon RPE or exercise-induced feeling states, although a moderate effect size was recorded for the latter (etap2=.09). The present results indicate that motivational synchronous music can elicit an ergogenic effect and enhance in-task affect during an exhaustive endurance task.

  17. The influence of selected factors and sport results of endurance horses on their saliva cortisol concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janczarek, I; Bereznowski, A; Strzelec, K

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to define the influence of the selected factors (gender, age, transportation time, riding distance and air temperature during the ride) on the cortisol secretion and finding a correlation between the hormone level and the horses' sport results (veterinary parameters and the ride route parameters). The research was performed on 38 Arabian pure breed horses taking part in the endurance rides. The cortisol level was measured with enzyme-immunological method in saliva samples, taken four times from each horse. In order to verify the differences between the mean results the repeated measures design was applied. The significance of the differences between the mean values was determined by the Tukey test. To evaluate the interrelations between the analysed attributes Pearson's correlation analysis was applied. The cortisol level at rest was not affected by any of the analysed factors. In case of other results, the most significant influence (P cortisol level was noted in mares, horses running the longest distances and at the highest temperatures. A significant increase in the cortisol level was noted when the ride distance was longer. There were no clear correlation between the adrenal cortex activity and the veterinary parameters at different riding speed. High cortisol concentration can negatively affect the heart rate (HR) by increasing it, but it can simultaneously stimulate the body to fight dehydration.

  18. Repeated-measure validation of craniofacial metrics from three-dimensional surface scans: application to medical genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Eric A.; Corner, Brian D.; Li, Peng; Beecher, Robert M.; Deutsch, Curtis

    2002-03-01

    Traditionally, medical geneticists have employed visual inspection (anthroposcopy) to clinically evaluate dysmorphology. In the last 20 years, there has been an increasing trend towards quantitative assessment to render diagnosis of anomalies more objective and reliable. These methods have focused on direct anthropometry, using a combination of classical physical anthropology tools and new instruments tailor-made to describe craniofacial morphometry. These methods are painstaking and require that the patient remain still for extended periods of time. Most recently, semiautomated techniques (e.g., structured light scanning) have been developed to capture the geometry of the face in a matter of seconds. In this paper, we establish that direct anthropometry and structured light scanning yield reliable measurements, with remarkably high levels of inter-rater and intra-rater reliability, as well as validity (contrasting the two methods).

  19. Repeated measures of inflammation, blood pressure, and heart rate variability associated with personal traffic exposures in healthy adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Previous human exposure studies of traffic-related air pollutants have demonstrated adverse health effects in human populations by comparing areas of high and low traffic, but few studies have utilized microenvironmental monitoring of pollutants at multiple traffic lo...

  20. Repeated measurements of mite and pet allergen levels in house dust over a time period of 8 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antens, C. J. M.; Oldenwening, M.; Wolse, A.; Gehring, U.; Smit, H. A.; Aalberse, R. C.; Kerkhof, M.; Gerritsen, J.; de Jongste, J. C.; Brunekreef, B.

    2006-01-01

    Background Studies of the association between indoor allergen exposure and the development of allergic diseases have often measured allergen exposure at one point in time. Objective We investigated the variability of house dust mite (Der p 1, Der f 1) and cat (Fel d 1) allergen in Dutch homes over a

  1. Repeated measures of inflammation, blood pressure, and heart rate variability associated with personal traffic exposures in healthy adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Previous human exposure studies of traffic-related air pollutants have demonstrated adverse health effects in human populations by comparing areas of high and low traffic, but few studies have utilized microenvironmental monitoring of pollutants at multiple traffic lo...

  2. Measurement of bedform migration rates on the Lower Missouri River in Missouri, USA using repeat measurements with a multibeam echosounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Caroline M.; Jacobson, Robert B.

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution repeat multibeam echosounder measurements on the Lower Missouri River near Boonville, Missouri, USA show bedform movement and sand storage patterns over daily to seasonal time scales and a range of discharges. Higher flows are frequently, but not always, associated with larger bedforms, higher bedform movement rates, and higher bedload transport rates. Measurements of the temporal and spatial variability in sand dune sizes, transport rates, and sand storage across the river channel have increased understanding of the dynamics of habitats utilized by benthic organisms over multiple life stages and daily to seasonal time scales.

  3. A repeated-measures study of recreational water exposure, non-point source pollution, and risk of illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Discharge of stormwater runoff onto beaches is a major cause of beach closings and advisories in the United States. Prospective studies of recreational water quality and health have often been limited to two time points (baseline and follow-up). Little is known about the risk of ...

  4. An integrated approach to biomonitoring exposure to styrene and styrene-(7,8)-oxide using a repeated measurements sampling design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fustinoni, S; Campo, L; Manini, P; Buratti, M; Waidyanatha, S; De Palma, G; Mutti, A; Foa, V; Colombi, A; Rappaport, S M

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate urinary analytes and haemoglobin and albumin adducts as biomarkers of exposure to airborne styrene (Sty) and styrene-(7,8)-oxide (StyOX) and to evaluate the influence of smoking habit and genetic polymorphism of metabolic enzymes GSTM1 and GSTT1 on these biomarkers. We obtained three or four air and urine samples from each exposed worker (eight reinforced plastics workers and 13 varnish workers), one air and urine samples from 22 control workers (automobile mechanics) and one blood sample from all subjects. Median levels of exposure to Sty and StyOX, respectively, were 18.2 mg m(-3) and 133 microg m(-3) for reinforced plastics workers, 3.4 mg m(-3) and 12 microg m(-3) for varnish workers, and <0.3 mg m(-3) and <5 microg m(-3) for controls. Urinary levels of styrene, mandelic acid, phenylglyoxylic acid, phenylglycine (PHG), 4-vinylphenol (VP) and mercapturic acids (M1+M2), as well as cysteinyl adducts of serum albumin (but not those of haemoglobin) were significantly associated with exposure status (controls

  5. Repeated measurements of mite and pet allergen levels in house dust over a time period of 8 years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antens, C. J. M.; Oldenwening, M.; Wolse, A.; Gehring, U.; Smit, H. A.; Aalberse, R. C.; Kerkhof, M.; Gerritsen, J.; de Jongste, J. C.; Brunekreef, B.

    2006-01-01

    Background Studies of the association between indoor allergen exposure and the development of allergic diseases have often measured allergen exposure at one point in time. Objective We investigated the variability of house dust mite (Der p 1, Der f 1) and cat (Fel d 1) allergen in Dutch homes over a

  6. Total 2004 results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-02-01

    This document presents the 2004 results of Total Group: consolidated account, special items, number of shares, market environment, adjustment for amortization of Sanofi-Aventis merger-related intangibles, 4. quarter 2004 results (operating and net incomes, cash flow), upstream (results, production, reserves, recent highlights), downstream (results, refinery throughput, recent highlights), chemicals (results, recent highlights), Total's full year 2004 results (operating and net income, cash flow), 2005 sensitivities, Total SA parent company accounts and proposed dividend, adoption of IFRS accounting, summary and outlook, main operating information by segment for the 4. quarter and full year 2004: upstream (combined liquids and gas production by region, liquids production by region, gas production by region), downstream (refined product sales by region, chemicals), Total financial statements: consolidated statement of income, consolidated balance sheet (assets, liabilities and shareholder's equity), consolidated statements of cash flows, business segments information. (J.S.)

  7. Unfavorable results in replantation

    OpenAIRE

    Abraham G Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Reattachment of amputated parts of the body (Replantation) has become a reality since the first arm replant was carried out six decades ago. Failures were not uncommon in the beginning, leading on to the analysis of the problem and refinements in technique. Improvements in sutures, instrumentation and better microscopes further helped the surgeons to do replantation with better finesse and functional results. Evaluation of results and particularly failure and long term results help the younge...

  8. Overview of ALICE results

    CERN Document Server

    Ortiz, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The ALICE detector was designed to study the physics of matter under extreme conditions of high energy density. Different results were reported by the experiment using data from the successful run I of the LHC. The goal of the present work is to present an overview of recent ALICE results. This comprises selected results from several analyses of pp, p-pb and Pb-Pb data at the LHC energies.

  9. The Arising of Results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sobisch, Jan-Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    Some Buddhist scholars have periodized the expected lifetime of the Buddha's teachings. According to them, these periods of 500 years each have different characteristics. The first is called 'the period of the results'. Therefore some scholars have claimed that only in the first 500 years after...... the Buddha results can arise. Kyobpa Jigten Sumgön has argued that results arise through practise as long as Dharma and Sangha exist....

  10. New results from COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Kabuß, Eva-Maria

    2015-01-01

    An overview on recent COMPASS results is given, including the extraction of the longitudinal spin structure functions interpreted with a NLO QCD fit, new results on the gluon polarisation and a measurement of pion and kaon multiplicities with a LO extraction of quark-to-hadron fragmentation functions

  11. Duration and Results (PECODR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Dawes

    2007-01-01

    Conclusions Results suggest a PECODR-related structure exists in medical abstracts and that there might be lexical patterns specific to these elements. More sophisticated computer-assisted lexical-semantic analysis might refine these results, and pave the way to automating PECODR indexing, and improve information retrieval in primary care.

  12. Recent results from TRISTAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enomoto, Ryoji [National Laboratory for High Energy Physics, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-01-01

    TRISTAN results on {gamma}{gamma} physics from 1994 to 1995 are reviewed in this report. We have systematically investigated jet production, the {gamma}-structure function, and charm pair production in {gamma}{gamma} processes. The results are discussed, and future prospects are presented.

  13. Haiti DevResults

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — DevResults is a web-based portfolio management system that tracks program data for the Haiti Mission that was awarded in April of 2013. (The Mozambique and/or...

  14. Transacsys PLC - Final Results

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Final results from Transacsys PLC. A subsidary of this company was set up to develop the CERN EDH system into a commercial product but incurred too much financial loss so the project was cancelled (1/2 page).

  15. Ibis DDT test results

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document contains test results from a study done to determine the organochlorine levels in the livers of white-faced ibis from Stillwater Wildlife Management...

  16. Arsenic speciation results

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Linear combination fitting results of synchrotron data to determine arsenic speciation in soil samples. This dataset is associated with the following publication:...

  17. Microenterprise Results Reporting

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — Microenterprise Results Reporting (MRR) is an annual report to the U.S. Congress providing funding and program data on USAID's microenterprise activities. The MRR...

  18. Overview of ATLAS results

    CERN Document Server

    Di Ciaccio, Anna; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    This talk presents recent ATLAS results on performances and physics concerning in particular: di-boson, single top cross-section measurements, Higgs measurement, SUSY and beyond Standard model searches.

  19. ATLAS physics results

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2074312

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN has been successfully taking data since the end of 2009 in proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, and in heavy ion collisions. In these lectures, some of the most recent ATLAS results will be given on Standard Model measurements, the discovery of the Higgs boson, searches for supersymmetry and exotics and on heavy-ion results.

  20. SLD electroweak physics results

    CERN Document Server

    De Groot, N

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we present three updates to heavy flavour results from the SLD detector at SLAC. These results are preliminary, based on our full 1993-1998 dataset of 550 000 hadronic Z0 decays produced with an average electron polarisation of 73%. The new measurements are of the hadronic branching fractions into heavy quarks (Rb, Rc), the b quark asymmetry (Ab) using jet charge, and the heavy quark asymmetries (Ab and Ac) using vertex charge and kaons.

  1. Higgs results from ATLAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The updated Higgs measurements in various search channels with ATLAS Run 1 data are reviewed. Both the Standard Model (SM Higgs results, such as H → γγ, ZZ, WW, ττ, μμ, bb̄, and Beyond Standard Model (BSM results, such as the charged Higgs, Higgs invisible decay and tensor couplings, are summarized. Prospects for future Higgs searches are briefly discussed.

  2. Unfavorable results in replantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham G Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Reattachment of amputated parts of the body (Replantation has become a reality since the first arm replant was carried out six decades ago. Failures were not uncommon in the beginning, leading on to the analysis of the problem and refinements in technique. Improvements in sutures, instrumentation and better microscopes further helped the surgeons to do replantation with better finesse and functional results. Evaluation of results and particularly failure and long term results help the younger surgeons to learn from the difficulties faced earlier to do better in the future. An attempt is made to list various aspects of replantation experienced by the author during the past 30 years, particularly in reference to unfavorable results, which had been occasionally total failure, or a partial failure, with poor function and cosmesis due to infection. An insensate limb with poor function is the result of inadequate or improper nerve coaptation or infection destroying the whole repair. It is apt to mention that infection is mostly the result of poor vascularity due to devitalized tissue. Difficulties arise often in identifying the viable tissue, particularly while debriding in the distal amputated part since there is no bleeding. Experience counts in this, specifically to identify the viable muscle. The factors that may lead to complications are listed with remarks to avoid them.

  3. Unfavorable results in replantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Abraham G

    2013-05-01

    Reattachment of amputated parts of the body (Replantation) has become a reality since the first arm replant was carried out six decades ago. Failures were not uncommon in the beginning, leading on to the analysis of the problem and refinements in technique. Improvements in sutures, instrumentation and better microscopes further helped the surgeons to do replantation with better finesse and functional results. Evaluation of results and particularly failure and long term results help the younger surgeons to learn from the difficulties faced earlier to do better in the future. An attempt is made to list various aspects of replantation experienced by the author during the past 30 years, particularly in reference to unfavorable results, which had been occasionally total failure, or a partial failure, with poor function and cosmesis due to infection. An insensate limb with poor function is the result of inadequate or improper nerve coaptation or infection destroying the whole repair. It is apt to mention that infection is mostly the result of poor vascularity due to devitalized tissue. Difficulties arise often in identifying the viable tissue, particularly while debriding in the distal amputated part since there is no bleeding. Experience counts in this, specifically to identify the viable muscle. The factors that may lead to complications are listed with remarks to avoid them.

  4. [The results of intravitreal bevacizumab in high myopic subretinal neovascularisation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branisteanu, D; Moraru, Andreea

    2013-01-01

    To asses the anatomical and functional results after intravitreal bevacizumab administration in choroidal neovascularization secondary to pathologic myopia; To asses the safety and results stability; Prospective, interventional case study of 18 eyes with choroidal neovascularization secondary to pathologic myopia treated with 1.25 mg. intravitreal bevacizumab (AVASTIN). Intravitreal injection was repeated, if needed, at 4-6 weeks until leakage stopped. In all cases fluorescein angiograms and Spectral 3D OCTs were performed. Visual acuity was measured with ETDRS optotype. Cases were followed-up at least 6 months. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA and Wilcoxon tests. Mean age of patients in the study was 43.86%--6.32 years (ranging 24-62 years). The mean number of intravitreal injections was 2.62%--0.53 (ranging between 1 - 4 injections). Mean visual acuity improved in all cases. An increase of more than 15 letters was noted in 44.44.% of the cases. OCT confirmed a reduced depth of lesion and also a reduced lesion volume after treatment. No major local or systemic side-effects were noted. At 6 months follow-up the choroidal neovascularization reappeared in 5 cases (27.77%) requiring additional treatment. These results confirm the efficacy and safety of intravitreal bevacizumab in controlling the choroidal neovascularization secondary to pathologic myopia. More than 40% of the cases regained at least 3 lines in ETDRS chart but a recurrence was noted in 27.77% of the cases at 6 months.

  5. A simplified, result oriented supplier performance management system testing framework for SME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satya Parkash Kaushik

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Supplier performance management continues to be a significant concern for small & medium enterprises (SME. How can small & medium enterprises better position themselves to check and sustain actual supplier performance improvement? A key framework is the establishment of a value-added supplier performance audit program that places significant emphasis on supplier performance controls. A value-added supplier audit program can help SME mitigate business and regulatory risk while reducing the cost of poor quality (COPQ. Thus a good supplier performance audit program is the cornerstone of supplier performance management integrity. Methods: By acknowledging and addressing the challenges to an effective supplier Performance Audit program, this paper proposes an objective framework of supplier performance audit program, built on a strong, yet versatile statistical methodology - Analysis of variance (ANOVA. This performance audit framework considers process definition, standardization, review of the contemporary literature on ANOVA & its practical application in supplier performance scorecard of one of the reputed Sports Goods Industry in India. Results and conclusions: The advantages of this framework are that: it simultaneously considers multiple supplier performance in multiple time frames and effectively identifies the differences across the suppliers in terms of their performance. Through this framework the organization will be able to increase the odds of performing a predictable and successful implementation of a value-added supplier performance audit.

  6. New results from KLOE

    CERN Document Server

    Versaci, R; Antonelli, A; Antonelli, M; Bacci, C; Beltrame, P; Bencivenni, G; Bertolucci, S; Bini, C; Bloise, C; Bocchetta, S; Bocci, V; Bossi, F; Bowring, D; Branchini, P; Caloi, R; Campana, P; Capon, G; Capussela, T; Ceradini, F; Chi, S; Chiefari, G; Ciambrone, P; Conetti, S; De Lucia, E; De Santis, A; De Simone, P; De Zorzi, G; Dell'Agnello, S; Denig, A; Di Domenico, A; Di Donato, C; Di Falco, S; Di Micco, B; Doria, A; Dreucci, M; Felici, G; Ferrari, A; Ferrer, M L; Finoc-, G; Fiore, S; Forti, C; Franzini, P; Gatti, C; Gauzzi, P; Giovannella, S; Gorini, E; Graziani, E; Incagli, M; Kluge, W; Kulikov, V; Lacava, F; Lanfranchi, G; Lee-Franzini, J; Leone, D; Martini, M; Massarotti, P; Mei, W; Meola, S; Miscetti, S; Moulson, M; Müller, S; Murtas, F; Napolitano, M; Nguyen, F; Palutan, M; Pasqualucci, E; Passeri, A; Patera, V; Perfetto, F; Pontecorvo, L; Primavera, M; Santangelo, P; Santovetti, E; Saracino, G; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Scuri, F; Sfiligoi, I; Spadaro, T; Testa, M; Tortora, L; Valente, P; Valeriani, B; Venanzoni, G; Veneziano, S; Ventura, A; Xu, G

    2007-01-01

    The most precise determination of Vus comes from semileptonic kaon decays. We have measured with the KLOE detector at DAFNE, the Frascati phi-factory, all the experimental inputs to Vus for both neutral and charged kaons. Using our results we extract the value of Vus with ~0.9% fractional error, which is dominated by the theoretical error on the form factor, f+(0). A new determination of the ratio Vus/Vud is also presented, based on our precise measurement of the absolute branching ratio for the decay K -> mu nu (gamma), combined with lattice results for the ratio f_K/f_pi. New results on CPT symmetry and quantum mechanics test have also been achieved, which are based on the first measurement of the charged asymmetry for KS -> pi e nu decay and on interferometry studies using the phi -> KL KS -> pi+ pi- pi+ pi-.

  7. NIH Research to Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on. The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) is researching treatments that can be given in the first hours after a TBI to prevent or reverse much of the brain damage resulting from the injury. A recently completed NINDS– ...

  8. Recent CDF results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, Gervasio; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2007-11-01

    As of November of 2007, the CDF detector has recorded approximately 2.7 fb{sup -1} of data. This contribution describes some of the most recent and most relevant results from the CDF collaboration in all areas of its wide physics program, as well as some insights into the Tevatron reach for Higgs searches within the next few years.

  9. Top Quark Results

    CERN Document Server

    ATLAS collaboration; LHCb collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of top quarks from Run-I and Run-II of the LHC are presented. Results on differential and inclusive top quark production cross sections, measured by the ATLAS, CMS and LHCb experiments, and measurements of top quark properties and mass are reported.

  10. Sharing Research Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbrook, Peggy

    2011-01-01

    There are many ways to share a collection of data and students' thinking about that data. Explaining the results of science inquiry is important--working scientists and amateurs both contribute information to the body of scientific knowledge. Students can collect data about an activity that is already happening in a classroom (e.g., the qualities…

  11. Results of CPLEAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rickenbach, R. [Basel Univ. (Switzerland); Adler, R. [Basel Univ. (Switzerland); Alhalel, T.; Angelopoulos, A.; Apostolakis, A.; Aslanides, E.; Backenstoss, G.; Bargassa, P.; Bee, C.P.; Behnke, O.; Benelli, A.; Bertin, V.; Blanc, F.; Bloch, P.; Carlson, P.; Carroll, M.; Carvalho, J.; Cawley, E.; Charalambous, S.; Chardin, G.; Chertok, M.B.; Cody, A.; Danielsson, M.; Dejardin, M.; Derre, J.; Ealet, A.; Eckart, B.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Evangelou, I.; Faravel, L.; Fassnacht, P.; Felder, C.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fetscher, W.; Fidecaro, M.; Filipcic, A.; Francis, D.; Fry, J.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Garreta, D.; Gerber, H.-J.; Go, A.; Guyot, C.; Haselden, A.; Hayman, P.J.; Henry-Couannier, F.; Hollander, R.W.; Hubert, E.; Jon-And, K.; Kettle, P.-R.; Kochowski, C.; Kokkas, P.; Kreuger, R.; Le Gac, R.; Leimgruber, F.; Liolios, A.; Machado, E.; Mandic, I.; Manthos, N.; Marel, G.; Mikuz, M.; Miller, J.; Montanet, F.; Nakada, T.; Pagels, B.; Papadopoulos, I.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Pinto da Cunha, J.; Policarpo, A.; Polivka, G.; Roberts, B.L.; Ruf, T.; Sakeliou, L.; Sanders, P.; Santoni, C.; Schaefer, M.; Schaller, L.A.; Schietinger, T.; Schopper, A.; Schune, P.; Soares, A.; Tauscher, L.; Thibault, C.; Touchard, F.; Touramanis, C.; Triantis, F.; Van Beveren, E.; Van Eijk, C.W.E.; Vlachos, S.; Weber, P.; Wigger, O.; Wolter, M.; Yeche, C.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zimmerman, D.; CPLEAR Collaboration

    1997-06-01

    The CPLEAR experiment uses tagged K{sup 0} and K{sup 0} produced in pp annihilation at rest to measure CP-, T- and CPT-violation parameters in the neutral kaon system. The results of these measurements and some implications are reported. (orig.).

  12. Recent results from MAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MAC Collaboration

    1982-05-01

    Some preliminary results from the MAC detector at PEP are presented. These include measurements of the angular distribution of ..gamma gamma.., ..mu mu.. and tau tau final states, a determination of the tau lifetime, a measurement of R, and a presentation of the inclusive muon p/sub perpendicular/ distribution for hadronic events.

  13. CPT Results from Ktev

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hogan

    2002-02-01

    We present several preliminary measurements from KTeVREFID="9789812778123_0014FN001"> of the fundamental neutral K parameters, and their implications for CPT violation. A new limit is given on the sidereal time dependence of φ+-. The results are based on data collected in 1996-97.

  14. Recent results from INDRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chbihi A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent results of the INDRA collaboration are presented in this contribution. They concern the evolution of reaction dynamics from the first stage of the collision to the production of fragments. Different probes are used to evidence the stopping/transparency, collective flow and the symmetry energy term of the nuclear equation of state.

  15. Roadmap of Infinite Results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Srba, Jiří

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive summary of equivalence checking results for infinite-state systems. References to the relevant papers will be updated continuously according to the development in the area. The most recent version of this document is available from the web-page http://www.brics.dk/~srba/roadmap....

  16. Recent CMS Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorigo Tommaso

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The CMS experiment obtained a large number of groundbreaking results from the analysis of 7- and 8-TeV proton-proton collisions produced so far by the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. In this brief summary only a few of those results will be discussed. The new scalar discovered in 2012 has been studied in detail and all its characteristics have been found in agreement with standard model predictions for a Brout-Englert-Higgs boson. The large sample of top quark events collected in 2011 and 2012 have allowed world-class measurements of its mass; the combination of those results is Mt = 173.49 ± 0.36 ± 0.91 GeV. The rare decay Bs0 → μμ has been observed and found in agreement with standard model predictions; the search for the rare decay B0 → μμ has allowed to set a 95% CL limit on the branching fraction at 1.1 × 10−9. These two results strongly constrain new physics models.

  17. Review of LEP results

    CERN Document Server

    Parodi, F

    2001-01-01

    I present a review of the results obtained during 10 years of activity in b-physics at LEP. Special emphasis is put on measurements that attained precisions not even envisaged at the beginning of the LEP programme (V/sub ub/ and Delta m/sub s/). Finally the impact of these measurements on the CKM parameters determination is presented. (16 refs).

  18. Results from ARGUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darden, C.

    1984-10-01

    The ARGUS collaboration reports results bearing on the fragmentation function for D*± mesons, the mass of the F± meson, the decays F±→φπ± and F±→φπ+π-π±, the decay γ'→π+π-γ and the radiative decay γ'→γΥ(3Pj).

  19. Your Kidney Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Less than 200 Your Result: HDL Cholesterol LDL Cholesterol Triglycerides Hemoglobin (Hgb) *Normal ranges may vary. Normal: More ... out of your arteries. LDL is the bad cholesterol and can clog your arteries. Triglyceride is a type of fat in the blood. ...

  20. Final results from the $\

    CERN Document Server

    Vidal-Sitjes, G

    2001-01-01

    An updated analysis of the full NOMAD data corresponding to approx 1.35 x 10 sup 6 charged current interactions has been performed to search for neutrino oscillations through nu subtau appearance. This document updates the recently published results on the nu submu -> nu subtau and nu submu -> nu sub e oscillations search in NOMAD with a unified analysis of the hadronic channels.

  1. Plan Merging: Experimental results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Weerdt, M.M.; Van der Krogt, R.P.J.; Zutt, J.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the results of a plan merging algorithm. This algorithm coordinates the plans of multiple, autonomous agents, each able to independently find a plan. This algorithm is evaluated using realistic data from a taxi company. We show that when we allow passengers to be a few minut

  2. Involution of categorical thinking processes in Alzheimer's disease: Preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Berlim de Mello

    Full Text Available Abstract Alzheimer's disease (AD is a degenerative brain disorder characterized by progressive losses in cognitive functions, including memory. The sequence of these losses may correspond to the inverse order of the normal sequence of ontogenetic cognitive acquisitions, a process named retrogenesis. One of the acquisitions that improve in normal development is the ability to retrieve previously acquired categorical knowledge from semantic memory in order to guide associative thinking and memory processes; consequently, children become able to associate verbal stimuli in more complex taxonomic ways and to use this knowledge to improve their recall. Objective: In this study, we investigated if AD-related deterioration of semantic memory involves a decrease in categorical thinking processes with progression of the disease, according to the retrogenesis hypothesis. Methods: We compared the performance of AD patients at mild and moderate stages, and of groups of 7, 10 and 14-year-old children in tasks of free association along with recall tasks of perceptually and semantically related stimuli. Results: ANOVAS showed a decrease in taxonomic associations and an increase in diffuse associations between mild and moderate stages, corresponding to the inverse order shown by the child groups. At the moderate AD stage, the pattern was similar to that of 7-year-old children. Both groups of patients performed worse than child groups in recall tasks. Conclusions: These results corroborate the hypothesis of an involution of the processes of categorical associative thinking in the course of the disease.

  3. Processing of toxicological studies results in the statistical program R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedoseeva Elena Vasilyevna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The presented article is devoted to the analysis of the experimental values and the applicability of the toxicological studies results in the statistical environment R. This freely distributed program has great functional potential and well-designed algorithm, these make it "...the undisputed leader among the freely distributed systems for statistical analysis..." As the data, the experimental results to assess the toxicity of a highly- mineralized sample in the industrial production wastes were used. We evaluated two test-functions: the change in the population increase of cells and the fluorescence level of laboratory culture of the marine diatom algae Phaeodactylum tricornutum. The detailed algorithm of the analysis, namely: data initialization, evaluation of selective parameters of descriptive statistics, toxicity assessment, single-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA, Tukey and Dunnett multiple comparison tests, evaluation of correlation between the observed variable (Spearman and Pearson correlation coefficients are presented in the article. The complete list of scripts in the program R allows to reproduce a similar analysis.

  4. CLEO Results B Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Cassel, David G

    2001-01-01

    Measurements of many Standard Model constants are clouded by uncertainties in nonperturbative QCD parameters that relate measurable quantities to the underlying parton-level processes. Generally these QCD parameters have been obtained from model calculations with large uncertainties that are difficult to quantify. The CLEO Collaboration has taken a major step towards reducing these uncertainties in determining the CKM matrix elements Vcb and Vub using new measurements of the branching fraction and photon energy spectrum of B -> s gamma decays. This report includes: the new CLEO measurements of B -> s gamma decays, Vcb, and Vub; the first results from CLEO III data -- studies of B -> K pi, pi pi, and K Kbar decays; mention of some other recent CLEO B decay results; and plans for operating CESR and CLEO in the charm threshold region.

  5. RESULTS OF SLICE MEASUREMENTS

    CERN Document Server

    Rudolph, J

    2011-01-01

    The linear accelerator ELBE delivers high-brightness electron bunches to multiple user stations, including two IR-FEL oscillators [1], [2]. In the framework of an upgrade program the current thermionic injector is being replaced by a SRF-photoinjector [3], [4]. The SRF injector promises higher beam quality, especially required for future experiments with high power laser radiation. During the commissioning phase, the SRF-injector was running in parallel to the thermionic gun. After installation of a injection beamline (dogleg), beam from the SRF-injector can now be injected into the ELBE linac. Detailed characterization of the electron beam quality delivered by the new electron injector includes vertical slice emittance measurements in addition to measurements of projected emittance values. This report gives an overview of the status of the project and summarizes first measurement results as well as results of simulations performed with measurement settings.

  6. Early results from ISO

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    First findings by Europe's new space telescope ISO (Infrared Space Observatory) will be announced at a press conference to be held at ESA's satellite tracking station in Villafranca, Apartado 50727 - 28080-Madrid, on Wednesday 14 February 1996 Astronomers responsible for ISO's instruments will show results ranging from materials in the planet Saturn, through the birth and death of stars, to the behaviour of colliding galaxies. All instruments are working well and even their preliminary results confirm that ISO is a unique observatory making an unprecedented exploration of the universe by infrared rays. Parallel press conferences will be held at ESA Headquarters in Paris, ESTEC Noordwijk (the Netherlands) and ESOC Darmstadt (Germany) where a live television link will be established with Villafranca and from where the media can participate in the discussion.

  7. New Results from RENO

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2013-01-01

    RENO (Reactor Experiment for Neutrino Oscillation) is an experiment dedicated to measure the smallest neutrino mixing angle {\\theta}_13 using reactor neutrinos in Korea. Our first result measured in 2012 using about 220 live days of data showed non-zero {\\theta}_13 value with 4.9 {\\sigma} significance. In March 2013 we updated our first result with improvements in both statistical and systematic errors using 403 live days of data. The measured value using rate-only analysis is sin^2(2{\\theta}_13) = 0.100 +/- 0.010 (stat) +/- 0.015 (sys.) corresponding to 6.3 {\\sigma} significance. RENO has been taking data almost continuously since August 2011 and we have reached more than 800 live days of data that is currently being analyzed.

  8. Final NOMAD results on $\

    CERN Document Server

    Astier, Pierre; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baldo-Ceolin, Massimilla; Banner, M; Bassompierre, Gabriel; Benslama, K; Besson, N; Bird, I; Blumenfeld, B; Bobisut, F; Bouchez, J; Boyd, S; Bueno, A G; Bunyatov, S A; Camilleri, L L; Cardini, A; Cattaneo, Paolo Walter; Cavasinni, V; Cervera-Villanueva, A; Chukanov, A; Collazuol, G; Conforto, G; Conta, C; Contalbrigo, M; Cousins, R D; Daniels, D C; Degaudenzi, H M; Del Prete, T; De Santo, A; Dignan, T; Di Lella, L; do Couto e Silva, E; Dumarchez, J; Ellis, M; Feldman, G J; Ferrari, R; Ferrère, D; Flaminio, Vincenzo; Fraternali, M; Gaillard, Jean-Marc; Gangler, E; Geiser, A; Geppert, D; Gibin, D; Gninenko, S N; Godley, A; Gómez-Cadenas, J J; Gosset, J; Gössling, C; Gouanère, M; Grant, A; Graziani, G; Guglielmi, A M; Hagner, C; Hernando, J; Hubbard, D B; Hurst, P; Hyett, N; Iacopini, E; Joseph, C L; Juget, F R; Kirsanov, M M; Klimov, O L; Kokkonen, J; Kovzelev, A; Krasnoperov, A V; Kustov, D V; Kuznetsov, V E; Lacaprara, S; Lachaud, C; Lakic, B; Lanza, A; La Rotonda, L; Laveder, M; Letessier-Selvon, A A; Lévy, J M; Linssen, Lucie; Ljubicic, A; Long, J; Lupi, A; Marchionni, A; Martelli, F; Méchain, X; Mendiburu, J P; Meyer, J P; Mezzetto, Mauro; Mishra, S R; Moorhead, G F; Naumov, D V; Nédélec, P; Nefedov, Yu A; Nguyen-Mau, C; Orestano, D; Pastore, F; Peak, L S; Pennacchio, E; Pessard, H; Petti, R; Placci, Alfredo; Polesello, G; Pollmann, D; Polyarush, A Yu; Popov, B; Poulsen, C; Rico, J; Riemann, P; Roda, C; Rubbia, André; Salvatore, F; Schahmaneche, K; Schmidt, B; Schmidt, T; Sconza, A; Sevior, M E; Sillou, D; Soler, F J P; Sozzi, G; Steele, D; Stiegler, U; Stipcevic, M; Stolarczyk, T; Tareb-Reyes, M; Taylor, G N; Tereshchenko, V V; Toropin, A N; Touchard, A M; Tovey, Stuart N; Tran, M T; Tsesmelis, E; Ulrichs, J; Vacavant, L; Valdata-Nappi, M; Valuev, V Yu; Vannucci, François; Varvell, K E; Veltri, M; Vercesi, V; Vidal-Sitjes, G; Vieira, J M; Vinogradova, T G; Weber, F V; Weisse, T; Wilson, F F; Winton, L J; Yabsley, B D; Zaccone, Henri; Zuber, K; Zuccon, P; Krasnoperov, A V

    2001-01-01

    Results from the nu_tau appearance search in a neutrino beam using the full NOMAD data sample are reported. A new analysis unifies all the hadronic tau decays, significantly improving the overall sensitivity of the experiment to oscillations. The "blind analysis" of all topologies yields no evidence for an oscillation signal. In the two-family oscillation scenario, this sets a 90% C.L. allowed region in the sin^2(2theta)-Delta m^2 plane which includes sin^2(2theta)nu_tau oscillation hypothesis results in sin^2(2theta)<1.5 x 10^{-2} at large Delta m^2 and Delta m^2 < 5.9 eV^2/c^4 at sin^2(2theta)=1. We also derive limits on effective couplings of the tau lepton to nu_mu or nu_e.

  9. Recent results from LEP

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Gurtu

    2000-04-01

    Recent results from the LEP collider at CERN are presented: on the identification of +- → +- and the determination of the mass and width and limits on its anomalous couplings; the search for the Standard Model and non-minimal Higgs; search for SUSY and other new particles. Fits to all electroweak data leading to predictions of the Higgs mass within the Standard Model are presented.

  10. Overview of ATLAS results

    CERN Document Server

    Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider has undertaken a broad physics program to probe and characterize the hot nuclear matter created in relativistic lead-lead collisions. This talk presents recent results based on Run 2 data on production of jet, electroweak bosons and quarkonium, electromagnetic processes in ultra-peripheral collisions, and bulk particle collectivity from PbPb, pPb and pp collisions.

  11. Recent QCD Results

    CERN Document Server

    Lincoln, Don

    2009-01-01

    The study of the inelastic scattering of hadrons has progressed in the last decade. With the availability of high-statistics data sets from HERA and the Tevatron, our understanding of high energy and high jet multiplicity events has become rather precise. In this Proceedings, I present an overview of recent jet-only results, as well as measurements of events which combine both jets and a W or Z boson.

  12. Recent BABAR Results

    CERN Document Server

    Eigen, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    We present herein the most recent BABAR results on direct CP asymmetry measurements in B -> Xs gamma, on partial branching fraction and CP asymmetry measurements in B -> Xs l+l-, on a search for B -> pi/eta l+l- decays, on a search for lepton number violation in B -> X-l+l'+ modes and a study of B-> omega omega and B-> omega phi decays.

  13. GIRAFFE test results summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokobori, S.; Arai, K.; Oikawa, H. [Toshiba Corporation, Kawasaki (Japan)

    1996-03-01

    A passive system can provide engineered safety features enhancing safety system reliability and plant simplicity. Toshiba has conducted the test Program to demonstrate the feasibility of the SBWR passive safety system using a full-height, integral system test facility GIRAFFE. The test facility GIRAFFE models the SBWR in full height to correctly present the gravity driving head forces with a 1/400 volume scale. The GIRAFFE test Program includes the certification tests of the passive containment cooling system (PCCS) to remove the post-accident decay heat and the gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) to replenish the reactor coolant inventory during a LOCA. The test results have confirmed the PCCS and GDCS design and in addition, have demonstrated the operation of the pCCS with the presence of a lighter-than-steam noncondensable as well as with the presence of a heavier-than-steam, noncondensable. The GIRAFFE test Program has also provided the database to qualify a best estimate thermal-hydraulic computer code TRAC. The post test analysis results have shown that TRAC can accurately predict the PCCS heat removal Performance and the containment pressure response to a LOCA. This paper summarizes the GIRAFFE test results to investigate post-LOCA PCCS heat removal performance and post-test analysis using TRAC.

  14. Explaining embodied cognition results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakoff, George

    2012-10-01

    From the late 1950s until 1975, cognition was understood mainly as disembodied symbol manipulation in cognitive psychology, linguistics, artificial intelligence, and the nascent field of Cognitive Science. The idea of embodied cognition entered the field of Cognitive Linguistics at its beginning in 1975. Since then, cognitive linguists, working with neuroscientists, computer scientists, and experimental psychologists, have been developing a neural theory of thought and language (NTTL). Central to NTTL are the following ideas: (a) we think with our brains, that is, thought is physical and is carried out by functional neural circuitry; (b) what makes thought meaningful are the ways those neural circuits are connected to the body and characterize embodied experience; (c) so-called abstract ideas are embodied in this way as well, as is language. Experimental results in embodied cognition are seen not only as confirming NTTL but also explained via NTTL, mostly via the neural theory of conceptual metaphor. Left behind more than three decades ago is the old idea that cognition uses the abstract manipulation of disembodied symbols that are meaningless in themselves but that somehow constitute internal "representations of external reality" without serious mediation by the body and brain. This article uniquely explains the connections between embodied cognition results since that time and results from cognitive linguistics, experimental psychology, computational modeling, and neuroscience.

  15. Pressure locking test results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeWall, K.G.; Watkins, J.C.; McKellar, M.G.; Bramwell, D. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, is funding the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in performing research to provide technical input for their use in evaluating responses to Generic Letter 95-07, {open_quotes}Pressure Locking and Thermal Binding of Safety-Related Power-Operated Gate Valves.{close_quotes} Pressure locking and thermal binding are phenomena that make a closed gate valve difficult to open. This paper discusses only the pressure locking phenomenon in a flexible-wedge gate valve; the authors will publish the results of their thermal binding research at a later date. Pressure locking can occur when operating sequences or temperature changes cause the pressure of the fluid in the bonnet (and, in most valves, between the discs) to be higher than the pressure on the upstream and downstream sides of the disc assembly. This high fluid pressure presses the discs against both seats, making the disc assembly harder to unseat than anticipated by the typical design calculations, which generally consider friction at only one of the two disc/seat interfaces. The high pressure of the bonnet fluid also changes the pressure distribution around the disc in a way that can further contribute to the unseating load. If the combined loads associated with pressure locking are very high, the actuator might not have the capacity to open the valve. The results of the NRC/INEL research discussed in this paper show that the relationship between bonnet pressure and pressure locking stem loads appears linear. The results also show that for this valve, seat leakage affects the bonnet pressurization rate when the valve is subjected to thermally induced pressure locking conditions.

  16. Results of railgun experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawke, R.S.; Brooks, A.L.; Fowler, C.M.; Peterson, D.R.

    1983-04-01

    During the 1979 Megagauss II conference the hypervelocity potential of railguns and the pulsed power technology needed to power them were discussed. Since then, many laboratories have initiated railgun R and D projects for a variety of potential applications. Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories initiated a collaborative experimental railgun project which resulted in several successes in accelerating projectiles to high velocities, emphasized the limits on railgun operation, and indicated that the numerical modeling of railgun operation was in good agreement with the experiments.

  17. Recent BABAR Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eigen, Gerald [University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway). Dept. of Physics

    2015-04-29

    We present herein the most recent BABAR results on direct CP asymmetry measurements in B → Xsγ, on partial branching fraction and CP asymmetry measurements in B → Xs+-, on a search for B → π/ηℓ+- decays, on a search for lepton number violation in B+ → X-+ℓ'+ modes and a study of B0 →ωω and B0 → ωφ decays.

  18. Results from AMANDA

    CERN Document Server

    Wiebusch, C; Bai, X; Barwick, S W; Becka, T; Becker, K H; Bertrand, D; Bernadini, E; Binon, Freddy G; Biron, A; Boser, S; Botner, O; Bouchta, A; Bouhali, O; Burgess, T; Carius, S; Castermans, T; Chen, A; Chirkin, D; Conrad, J; Cooley, J; Cowen, D F; Davour, A; De Clercq, C; De Young, T R; Desiati, P; Dewulf, J P; Doksus, P; Ekstrom, P; Feser, T; Gaisser, T K; Gaug, M; Gerhardt, L; Goldschmidt, A; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Hardtke, R; Hauschildt, T; Hellwig, M; Herquet, P; Hill, G C; Hulth, P O; Hundertmark, S; Jacobsen, J; Karle, A; Koci, B; Köpke, L; Kowalski, M; Kühn, K; Lamoureux, J I; Leich, H; Leuthold, M J; Lindahl, P; Liubarsky, I; Madsen, J; Marciniewski, P; Matis, H S; McParland, C P; Minaeva, Y; Minocinovic, P; Mock, P C; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Neunhoffer, T; Niessen, P; Nygren, D R; Ögelman, H B; Olbrechts, P; Pérez de los Heros, C; Pohl, A C; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rawlins, K; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richter, S; Rodríguez-Martino, J; Ross, D; Sander, H G; Schmidt, T; Schneider, D; Schwarz, R; Silvestri, A; Solarz, M; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Steele, D; Steffen, P; Stokstad, R G; Sudhoff, P; Sulanke, K H; Taboada, I; Thollander, L; Tilav, S; Walck, C; Weinheimer, C; Wiebusch, C; Wiedemann, C; Wischnewski, R; Wissing, H; Woschnagg, K; Yodh, G B; Young, S

    2002-01-01

    The Antarctic Muon and Neutrino Detector Array (AMANDA) is a high- energy neutrino telescope operating at the geographic South Pole. It is a lattice of photomultiplier tubes buried deep in the polar ice. The primary goal of this detector is to discover astrophysical sources of high energy neutrinos. We describe the detector methods of operation and present results from the AMANDA-B10 prototype. We demonstrate the improved sensitivity of the current AMANDA-II detector. We conclude with an outlook to the envisioned sensitivity of the future IceCube detector. (37 refs).

  19. Latest LHCb results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinelli Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The LHCb experiment is one of the major research projects at the Large Hadron Collider. Its acceptance and instrumentation is optimised to perform high-precision studies of flavour physics and particle production in a unique kinematic range at unprecedented collision energies. Using large data samples accumulated in the years 2010-2012, the LHCb collaboration has conducted a series of measurements providing a sensitive test of the Standard Model and strengthening our knowledge of flavour physics, QCD and electroweak processes. The status of the experiment and some of its recent results are presented here.

  20. Overview of ATLAS results

    CERN Document Server

    Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The heavy-ion programme in the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider aims to probe and characterise hot and dense matter created in relativistic lead-lead collisions. Moreover, smaller collision systems involving nuclei and hadrons are of interest to disentangle initial- from final-state effects. This report presents new results based on lead-lead and proton-proton data collected at √sNN = 5.02 TeV in 2015, including measurements of bulk collectivity, charged-particle production, electroweak bosons, photon-jet correlations, and quarkonium suppression. First attempts to measure electromagnetic processes in ultra-peripheral collisions are also discussed.

  1. Recent results from CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Dordevic, Milos

    2016-01-01

    The highlights of the most recent CMS results with 13 TeV data will be presented in this overview. The Standard Model precision measurements, including the top quark production, will be shown first. This will be followed by the presentation of Higgs boson studies with the early 13 TeV data. Then the focus will shift to searches for physics beyond the Standard Model, including the searches for several Supersymmetric scenarios, using different analysis techniques. The talk will conclude with searches for the exotic resonances, with an emphasis on studies of the high-mass diphoton production.

  2. New results from CLEO

    CERN Document Server

    Dubrovin, M S; Huang, G S; Lee, J; Miller, D H; Pavlunin, V; Rangarajan, R; Sanghi, B; Shibata, E I; Shipsey, I P J; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Park, C S; Park, W; Thayer, J B; Thorndike, E H; Coan, T E; Gao, Y S; Liu, F; Stroynowski, R; Artuso, M; Boulahouache, C; Blusk, S; Dambasuren, E; Dorjkhaidav, O; Mountain, R; Muramatsu, H; Nandakumar, R; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Csorna, S E; Danko, I; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; McGee, S; Bornheim, A; Lipeles, E; Pappas, S P; Shapiro, A; Sun, W M; Weinstein, A J; Briere, R A; Chen, G P; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G T; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Adam, N E; Alexander, J P; Berkelman, K; Boisvert, V; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ecklund, K M; Ehrlich, R; Galik, R S; Gibbons, L; Gittelman, B; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hsu, L; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Magerkurth, A; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Meyer, T O; Mistry, N B; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Pivarski, J; Richichi, S J; Riley, D; Sadoff, A J; Schwarthoff, H; Shepherd, M R; Thayer, J G; Urner, D; Wilksen, T; Warburton, A; Weinberger, M; Athar, S B; Avery, P; Breva-Newell, L; Potlia, V; Stöck, H; Yelton, J; Benslama, K; Cawlfield, C; Eisenstein, B I; Gollin, G D; Karliner, I; Lowrey, N; Plager, C; Sedlack, C; Selen, M; Thaler, J J; Williams, J; Edwards, K W; Besson, D; Anderson, S; Frolov, V V; Gong, D T; Kubota, Y; Li, S Z; Poling, R A; Smith, A; Stepaniak, C J; Urheim, J; Metreveli, Z V; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A G; Zweber, P; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J; Jian, L; Saleem, M; Wappler, F; Arms, K; Eckhart, E; Gan, K K; Gwon, C; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pedlar, T K; Von Törne, E; Severini, H; Skubic, P L; Dytman, S A; Müller, J A; Nam, S; Savinov, V

    2005-01-01

    We present recent results from the CLEO Collaboration. The data used were collected from 1995 untill now at the Cornell Electron-positron Storage Ring (CESR). Measurements of the leptonic branching fractions for $\\psi(2S) \\to e^+ e^-, \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ and $\\Upsilon(1,2,3S) \\to \\mu^+ \\mu^-$, search for $D^0-\\bar{D^0}$ mixing using time dependent Dalitz plot analyses of the decay $D^0 \\to K^0_S\\pi^+\\pi^-$, and search for the process $e^+e^- \\to \\Lambda_b \\bar{\\Lambda_b}$ near threshold are discussed.

  3. Recent CDF results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conway, J.S. [Rutgers--the State Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; CDF Collaboration

    1996-07-01

    Preliminary results form the CDF detector, based on analysis of data collected in Run 1a and Run 1b at the Tevatron, totaling 110 pb{sup - 1} integrated luminosity, place new limits on the masses and couplings of new particles including charged Higgs bosons, supersymmetric gauge particles and quarks, and new vector bosons. One of the observed events, having an {ital e}{sup +}{ital e}{sup -} pair, two photons, and large missing energy would not occur with significant rate in the Standard Model, leading to speculation regarding its origin and the possible existence of related events.

  4. First LHC Results

    CERN Document Server

    Horn, Claus; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    Since four month the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is producing proton-proton collisions with a center of mass energy of 7 TeV offering the potential of directly producing dark matter particles in an energy range never reached before in accelerator-based particle physics. First the performance and first Standard Model measurements of the general purpose experiments CMS and ATLAS is presented. This talk then focuses on their potential to detect dark matter candidates. Results from ongoing physics analyzes are presented and expectations for possible future discoveries are discussed.

  5. Recent results from SELEX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russ, J.S. [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2001-07-01

    The SELEX experiment (E781) is 3-stage magnetic spectrometer for the study of charm hadroproduction at large x{sub F} using 600 Gev {sigma}{sup -}, {pi}{sup -} and p beams. New precise measurements of the {lambda}{sub c}, D{sup 0}, and D{sub s} lifetimes are presented. We also report results on {lambda}{sub c} and D{sub s} production by {sigma}{sup -}, {pi}{sup -} and p beams at x{sub F}>0.2. The data agree with expectations from color -drag models to explain charm particle/antiparticle production asymmetries. (author)

  6. Recent Results from SELEX

    CERN Document Server

    Russ, J

    2001-01-01

    The SELEX experiment (E781) is 3-stage magnetic spectrometer for the study of charm hadroproduction at large xF using 600 Gev Sigma-, pi- and p beams. New precise measurements of the Lambda_c, D0, and Ds lifetimes are presented. We also report results on Lambda_c and Ds production by Sigma-, pi- and p beams at xF>0.2. The data agree with expectations from color-drag models to explain charm particle/antiparticle production asymmetries.

  7. Recent results from selex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iori, M.; SEL. E. X. Collaboration

    2001-03-01

    The SELEX experiment (E781) is a 3-stage magnetic spectrometer for a high statistics study of hadroproduction of charm baryons out to large x F using 650 GeV Σ -, π - and p beams. The main features of the spectrometer are: a high precision silicon vertex system; powerful particle identification provided by TRD and RICH; forward Λ s decay spectrometer; and 3-stage lead glass photon detector. Preliminary results on asymmetry for Λ c produced by Σ -, π - and p beams at x F > 0.2 and precise measurements of the Λ c, D0, and preliminary D s lifetimes are presented.

  8. Overview of ALICE results

    CERN Document Server

    Gagliardi, M

    2014-01-01

    The ALICE experiment at the CERN LHC studies the hot and dense medium formed in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions, and the transition to Quark Gluon Plasma. Several observables are used to characterise the medium. In this contribution we report on the main ALICE results on global properties, particle spectra, anisotropies, heavy flavour and quarkonium production, obtained in Pb-Pb collisions at √ s rmNN =2 . 76 TeV. Measurements performed in p-Pb and pp collisions are also part of the ALICE physics program: selected highlights from such measurements are discussed.

  9. Organic Separation Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2014-09-22

    Separable organics have been defined as “those organic compounds of very limited solubility in the bulk waste and that can form a separate liquid phase or layer” (Smalley and Nguyen 2013), and result from three main solvent extraction processes: U Plant Uranium Recovery Process, B Plant Waste Fractionation Process, and Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Process. The primary organic solvents associated with tank solids are TBP, D2EHPA, and NPH. There is concern that, while this organic material is bound to the sludge particles as it is stored in the tanks, waste feed delivery activities, specifically transfer pump and mixer pump operations, could cause the organics to form a separated layer in the tank farms feed tank. Therefore, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is experimentally evaluating the potential of organic solvents separating from the tank solids (sludge) during waste feed delivery activities, specifically the waste mixing and transfer processes. Given the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste acceptance criteria per the Waste Feed Acceptance Criteria document (24590-WTP-RPT-MGT-11-014) that there is to be “no visible layer” of separable organics in the waste feed, this would result in the batch being unacceptable to transfer to WTP. This study is of particular importance to WRPS because of these WTP requirements.

  10. Recent Results from ARGUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Henning

    Using the ARGUS detector at the e+e- storage ring DORIS II at DESY new results on beauty and τ physics have been obtained. In particular, new measurements on fundamental constants in the Yukawa sector of the Standard Model are presented. These comprise measurements of CKM matrix elements from the study of B decays as well as determinations of properties of the τ lepton and its neutrino vτ. From semileptonic B decays ARGUS finds |Vcb|=0.050±0.008±0.007 and from B0 bar B0 mixing |Vtd|= 0.007±0.002. An analysis of the decay type τ-→π-π-π+ντ yields a τ mass of mτ=(1776.3±2.4±1.4) MeV/c2. This result also leads to an improvement of the upper limit on the m{ν r } < 31 {{{MeV}} {/ {{{MeV}} {{c}{2} }}} ; } {{c}{2} }} at the 95% confidence level.

  11. Double Chooz: Latest results

    CERN Document Server

    Crespo-Anadón, J I

    2014-01-01

    The latest results from the Double Chooz experiment on the neutrino mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ are presented. A detector located at an average distance of 1050 m from the two reactor cores of the Chooz nuclear power plant has accumulated a live time of 467.90 days, corresponding to an exposure of 66.5 GW-ton-year (reactor power $\\times$ detector mass $\\times$ live time). A revised analysis has boosted the signal efficiency and reduced the backgrounds and systematic uncertainties compared to previous publications, paving the way for the two detector phase. The measured $\\sin^2 2\\theta_{13} = 0.090^{+0.032}_{-0.029}$ is extracted from a fit to the energy spectrum. A deviation from the prediction above a visible energy of 4 MeV is found, being consistent with an unaccounted reactor flux effect, which does not affect the $\\theta_{13}$ result. A consistent value of $\\theta_{13}$ is measured in a rate-only fit to the number of observed candidates as a function of the reactor power, confirming the robustness of the ...

  12. Unfavourable results in pollicisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukund R Thatte

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pollicisation of the index finger is perhaps one of the most complex and most rewarding operations in hand and plastic surgery. It however has a steep learning curve and demands very high skill levels and experience. There are multiple pitfalls and each can result in an unfavourable result. In essence we need to: Shorten the Index, recreate the carpo metacarpal joint from the metacarpo phalangeal (MP joint, rotate the digit by about 120° for pulp to pulp pinch, palmarly abduct by 40-50° to get a new first web gap, Shorten and readjust the tension of the extensors, re attach the intrinsics to form a thenar eminence capable of positioning the new thumb in various functional positions and finally close the flaps forming a new skin envelope. The author has performed over 75 pollicisations personally and has personal experience of some of the issues raised there. The steps mentioned therefore are an algorithm for helping the uninitiated into these choppy waters.

  13. Maquet Osteotomy, Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Jorge Luis; Vega, Marcelo; Matesevach, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The objectives are to assess the results and to discuss the indications for Maquet osteotomy in patients with patellofemoral osteoarthritis. Methods: Retrospective study of a series of 32 patients (4 bilateral, that is to say, 36 knees) operated between March 1999 and October 2013 in " Arthroscopy Private Center ", 12 male and 20 female, average age 59 years with an average postoperative surgery outcomes of 53 months. The technique consists of an arthroscopic procedure to treat joint lesions and a tibial tuberosity osteotomy of 5 cm long, by embedding a 1cm subsequent graft taken from the same metaphysis and fixed with 2 screws. Results: All patients had significant improvement, evaluated with Kujala’s score (54 points preop to 86 points postop) and Guillamon Ferguson’s criteria (27.2 very good and 60.7 good). The complication rate was acceptable. Conclusion: The available technics are surgeries on proximal soft structures, osteotomies of tibial tuberosity and patellofemoral arthroplasty. Maquet osteotomy is an excellent procedure when the patient’s selection is right. Obtaining the graft from the same metaphysis simplified the procedure.

  14. Recent Results from Borexino

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeschke, D.; Agostini, M.; Altenmüller, K.; Appel, S.; Atroshchenko, V.; Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Bick, D.; Bonfini, G.; Bravo, D.; Caccianiga, B.; Calaprice, F.; Caminata, A.; Carlini, M.; Cavalcante, P.; Chepurnov, A.; Choi, K.; D'Angelo, D.; Davini, S.; Derbin, A.; Di Noto, L.; Drachnev, I.; Etenko, A.; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Galbiati, C.; Ghiano, C.; Giammarchi, M.; Goeger-Neff, M.; Goretti, A.; Gromov, M.; Hagner, C.; Hungerford, E.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Jany, A.; Jedrzejczak, K.; Jeschke, D.; Kobychev, V.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kryn, D.; Laubenstein, M.; Lehnert, B.; Litvinovich, E.; Lombardi, F.; Lombardi, P.; Ludhova, L.; Lukyanchenko, G.; Machulin, I.; Manecki, S.; Maneschg, W.; Manuzio, G.; Marcocci, S.; Meroni, E.; Meyer, M.; Miramonti, L.; Misiaszek, M.; Montuschi, M.; Mosteiro, P.; Muratova, V.; Neumair, B.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Ortica, F.; Pallavicini, M.; Papp, L.; Pocar, A.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Re, A.; Romani, A.; Roncin, R.; Rossi, N.; Schönert, S.; Semenov, D.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Sukhotin, S.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G.; Thurn, J.; Toropova, M.; Unzhakov, E.; Vishneva, A.; Vogelaar, R. B.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Wang, H.; Weinz, S.; Winter, J.; Wojcik, M.; Wurm, M.; Yokley, Z.; Zaimidoroga, O.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2017-01-01

    The Borexino experiment is taking data since 2007 at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso in Italy accomplishing outstanding achievements in the field of neutrino physics. Its success is strongly based on the unprecedented ultra-high radio-purity of the inner scintillator core. The main features of the detector and the impressive results for solar and geo-neutrinos obtained by Borexino so far are summarized. The main focus is laid on the most recent results, i.e. the first real-time measurement of the solar pp neutrino flux and the detection of the signal induced by geo-neutrinos with a significance as high as 5.9σ. The measurement of the pp neutrino flux represents a direct probe of the major mechanism of energy production in the Sun and its observation at a significance of 10σ proves the stability of the Sun over a time of at least 105 years. It further puts Borexino in the unique position of being capable to test the MSW-LMA paradigm across the whole solar energy range. The geo-neutrino data allow to infer information concerning important geophysical properties of the Earth that are also discussed. The perspectives of the final stage of the Borexino solar neutrino program that are centered on the goal of measuring the CNO neutrinos that so far escaped any observation are outlined.

  15. Latest results from ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Scapparone, Eugenio

    2011-01-01

    In this paper selected results obtained by the ALICE experiment at the LHC will be presented. Data collected during the pp runs taken at sqrt(s)=0.9, 2.76 and 7 TeV and Pb-Pb runs at sqrt(s_NN)=2.76 TeV allowed interesting studies on the properties of the hadronic and nuclear matter: proton runs gave us the possibility to explore the ordinary matter at very high energy and up to very low pt, while Pb-Pb runs provided spectacular events where several thousands of particles produced in the interaction revealed how a very dense medium behaves, providing a deeper picture on the quark gluon plasma(QGP) chemical composition and dynamics.

  16. Overview of HERMES results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Hulse Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The HERMES experiment has collected a wealth of deep-inelastic scattering data using the 27.6 GeV polarized lepton beam at HERA and various pure gas targets, both unpolarized and polarized. This allowed for a series of diverse and unique measurements. Among them are measurements that provide information on the threedimensional structure of the nucleon, both in momentum space and in position space. Results of measurements of exclusive ω production on an unpolarized and transversely polarized nucleon target, sensitive to the distribution in transverse-position and longitudinalmomentum space, are discussed as well as the three-dimensional extraction of azimuthal asymmetries measured in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering, sensitive to twist-2 and twist-3 distributions in three-dimensional momentum space.

  17. ATLAS Top Quark Results

    CERN Document Server

    Black, Kevin; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The top quark is the heaviest known fundamental particle. As it is the only quark that decays before it hadronizes, this gives us the unique opportunity to probe the properties of bare quarks at the Large Hadron Collider. This talk will present highlights of a few recent precision measurements by the ATLAS Collaboration of the top quark using 13 TeV and 8 TeV collision data: top-quark pair and single top production cross sections including differential distributions will be presented alongside top quark properties measurements. These measurements, including results using boosted top quarks, probe our understanding of top quark production in the TeV regime. Measurements of the top quark mass and searches for rare top quark decays are also presented.

  18. Payment by Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan A. Rapple

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Today the public is demanding that it exercise more control over how tax dollars are spent in the educational sphere, with multitudes also canvassing that education become closely aligned to the marketplace's economic forces. In this paper I examine an historical precedent for such demands, i.e. the comprehensive 19th century system of accountability, "Payment by Results," which endured in English and Welsh elementary schools from 1862 until 1897. Particular emphasis is focused on the economic market-driven aspect of the system whereby every pupil was examined annually by an Inspector, the amount of the governmental grant being largely dependent on the answering. I argue that this was a narrow, restrictive system of educational accountability though one totally in keeping with the age's pervasive utilitarian belief in laissez-faire. I conclude by observing that this Victorian system might be suggestive to us today when calls for analogous schemes of educational accountability are shrill.

  19. Recent results from ANTARES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trovato Agata

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Operating 40 km off the coast of France since 2007, the ANTARES detector is the largest deep-sea neutrino telescope in the Northern Hemisphere with an instrumented volume of more than 0.01 cubic kilometers. It consists of an array of 885 photomultipliers detecting the Cherenkov light induced by charged leptons produced by neutrino interactions in and around the detector. The primary goal of ANTARES is to search for astrophysical neutrinos in the TeV–PeV range. This comprises generic searches for any diffuse cosmic neutrino flux as well as more specific searches for astrophysical galactic and extragalactic sources. The search program also includes multi-messenger analyses based on time and/or space coincidences with other cosmic probes. The ANTARES observatory is sensitive to a wide-range of other phenomena, from atmospheric neutrino oscillations to dark matter annihilation. In this contribution, recent results from the ANTARES neutrino telescope will be presented.

  20. 2012 election results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Robert; Tetzlaff, Doerthe

    2012-10-01

    On 4 October 2012, AGU members completed voting for the 2013-2014 leadership term. Union officers, Board members, section and focus group officers, and student and early career representatives to the Council were elected. All members who joined or renewed their membership by 1 July 2012 were eligible to vote in this year's leadership election. The vote was held electronically, and access to voting was provided to all eligible voters for a period of 31 days. The voting was conducted by Survey and Ballot Systems, Inc. (SBS). SBS, which offers election planning and management services, provided unique login credentials and other support services for eligible voters throughout the election. Voting results were certified by SBS on 8 October and by the AGU Tellers Committee on 9 October. The overall participation rate was 21.9%, an increase over previous AGU elections.

  1. Iron Mountain Electromagnetic Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gail Heath

    2012-07-01

    Iron Mountain Mine is located seventeen miles northwest of Redding, CA. After the completion of mining in early 1960s, the mine workings have been exposed to environmental elements which have resulted in degradation in water quality in the surrounding water sheds. In 1985, the EPA plugged ore stoops in many of the accessible mine drifts in an attempt to restrict water flow through the mine workings. During this process little data was gathered on the orientation of the stoops and construction of the plugs. During the last 25 years, plugs have begun to deteriorate and allow acidic waters from the upper workings to flow out of the mine. A team from Idaho National Laboratory (INL) performed geophysical surveys on a single mine drift and 3 concrete plugs. The project goal was to evaluate several geophysical methods to determine competence of the concrete plugs and orientation of the stopes.

  2. Emittance exchange results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fliller, R.P., III; /Brookhaven; Koeth, T.; /Rutgers U., Piscataway

    2009-09-01

    The promise of next-generation light sources depends on the availability of ultra-low emittance electron sources. One method of producing low transverse emittance beams is to generate a low longitudinal emittance beam and exchange it with a large transverse emittance. Experiments are underway at Fermilab's A0 Photoinjector and ANL's Argonne Wakefield Accelerator using the exchange scheme of Kim and Sessler. The experiment at the A0 Photoinjector exchanges a large longitudinal emittance with a small transverse emittance. AWA expects to exchange a large transverse emittance with a small longitudinal emittance. In this paper we discuss recent results at A0 and AWA and future plans for these experiments.

  3. Emittance Exchange Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fliller III,R.; Koeth, T.

    2009-05-04

    The promise of next-generation light sources depends on the availability of ultra-low emittance electron sources. One method of producing low transverse emittance beams is to generate a low longitudinal emittance beam and exchange it with a large transverse emittance. Experiments are underway at Fermilab's A0 Photoinjector and ANL's Argonne Wakefield Accelerator using the exchange scheme of Kim and Sessler. The experiment at the A0 Photoinjector exchanges a large longitudinal emittance with a small transverse emittance. AWA expects to exchange a large transverse emittance with a small longitudinal emittance. In this paper we discuss recent results at A0 and AWA and future plans for these experiments.

  4. Recent results from CMS

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    With the increase in center-of-mass energy, a new energy frontier has been opened by the Large Hadron Collider. More than 25 fb^-1 of proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s)=13 TeV have been delivered to both ATLAS and CMS experiments during 2016. This enormous dataset can be used to test the Standard Model in a complete new regime with tremendous precision and it has the potential to unveil new physics or set strong bounds on it. In this talk some of the most recent results made public by the CMS Collaboration will be presented. The focus will mainly be on searches for physics beyond the Standard Model, with particular emphasis on searches for dark matter candidates.

  5. Recent results from SELEX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iori, M

    2001-03-01

    The SELEX experiment (E781) is a 3-stage magnetic spectrometer for a high statistics study of hadroproduction of charm baryons out to large x{sub F} using 650 GeV {sigma}{sup -}, {pi}{sup -} and p beams. The main features of the spectrometer are: a high precision silicon vertex system; powerful particle identification provided by TRD and RICH; forward {lambda}{sub s} decay spectrometer; and 3-stage lead glass photon detector. Preliminary results on asymmetry for {lambda}{sub c} produced by {sigma}{sup -}, {pi}{sup -} and p beams at x{sub F} > 0.2 and precise measurements of the {lambda}{sub c}, D{sup 0}, and preliminary D{sub s} lifetimes are presented.

  6. FIRE Science Results 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdougal, David S. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    FIRE (First ISCCP Regional Experiment) is a U.S. cloud-radiation research program formed in 1984 to increase the basic understanding of cirrus and marine stratocumulus cloud systems, to develop realistic parameterizations for these systems, and to validate and improve ISCCP cloud product retrievals. Presentations of results culminating the first 5 years of FIRE research activities were highlighted. The 1986 Cirrus Intensive Field Observations (IFO), the 1987 Marine Stratocumulus IFO, the Extended Time Observations (ETO), and modeling activities are described. Collaborative efforts involving the comparison of multiple data sets, incorporation of data measurements into modeling activities, validation of ISCCP cloud parameters, and development of parameterization schemes for General Circulation Models (GCMs) are described.

  7. Report on Results 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This report discusses work being carried out in Norway to promote energy efficiency and the production of new renewable energy. An overall review of the quantifiable results of last year's activities at national level is available. It will serve to initiate an annual reporting tradition. The report represents a step towards an ongoing process for improved targeting and management of national efforts. During the course of the year 2000, NVE has evaluated and adjusted its activities and established a system involving indicators and reporting procedures. It is also important to take notice of the long-term work being undertaken to influence people's attitudes, even though this work is difficult to assess. NVE is investing in i.a. measures aimed at children and young people. Apart from directly influencing future energy users, this investment is also having an effect due to the children's encouragement of their parents to engage in more energy and environment-friendly behaviour. Published in 2000, the IEA report ''Trends in Norwegian Stationary Energy Use'' shows that total Norwegian energy consumption per GDP is not much higher than in other IEA countries, when adjusted for cold climate and industrial structure. However, Norwegians do stand out as intensive users of electricity. The IEA report shows a reduction of 10 TWh in energy usage when compared to the projected post 1990 figures. Energy efficiency activities have contributed towards this reduction. However, the potential for a more rational use of energy in Norway is still substantial and well documented. Based on experience most enterprises could save around 10% of energy used just by making changes to their operations, i.e. without major investments. Furthermore, the potential is growing because of massive technological developments in respect of energy usage, production and distribution. With this in mind, it is necessary to take full advantage of the extensive knowledge

  8. Simpler images, better results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chance, Britton

    1999-03-01

    The very rapid development of optical technology has followed a pattern similar to that of nuclear magnetic resonance: first, spectroscopy and then imaging. The accomplishments in spectroscopy have been significant--among them, early detection of hematomas and quantitative oximetry (assuming that time and frequency domain instruments are used). Imaging has progressed somewhat later. The first images were obtained in Japan and USA a few years ago, particularly of parietal stimulation of the human brain. Since then, rapid applications to breast and limb, together with higher resolution of the brain now make NIR imaging of functional activation and tumor detection readily available, reliable and affordable devices. The lecture has to do with the applications of imaging to these three areas, particularly to prefrontal imaging of cognitive function, of breast tumor detection, and of localized muscle activation in exercise. The imaging resolution achievable in functional activation appears to be FWHM of 4 mm. The time required for an image is a few seconds or even much less. Breast image detection at 50 microsecond(s) ec/pixel results in images obtainable in a few seconds or shorter times (bandwidths of the kHz are available). Finally, imaging of the body organs is under study in this laboratory, particularly in the in utero fetus. It appears that the photon migration theory now leads to the development of a wide number of images for human subject tissue spectroscopy and imaging.

  9. ALICE TPC commissioning results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, D.T., E-mail: dagtl@ift.uib.n [Department of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway)

    2010-05-21

    ALICE is a dedicated heavy-ion experiment at CERN LHC aiming to study the properties of the quark-gluon plasma. A lead-lead collision might produce several 10 00 new particles. Detailed study of the event requires precise measurements of the particle tracks. A 90m{sup 3} Time Projection Chamber (TPC) with more than 500 000 read-out pads was built as the main central barrel tracker. Collisions can be recorded at a rate of up to about 1 kHz. The front-end electronics, designed from FPGAs and custom ASICs, performs shaping, amplification, digitisation and digital filtering of the signals. The data are forwarded to DAQ via 216 1.25 Gb/s fibre-optical links. Configuration, control and monitoring is done by an embedded Linux system on the front-end electronics. Before production runs with beam, extensive commissioning using tracks from cosmics and from the laser system as well as clusters from radioactive krypton gas is needed. Extensive results have been obtained with respect to the performance of the TPC including its sub-systems.

  10. Results of hip resurfacing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favetti, Fabio; Casella, Filippo; Papalia, Matteo; Panegrossi, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    Background The renewed popularity of resurfacing hip arthroplasty in the last 10 years has generated a remarkable quantity of scientific contributions based on mid- and short-term follow-up. More than one paper has reported a consistent early revision rate as a consequence of biological or biomechanical failure. Two major complications are commonly described with resurfacing implants: avascular necrosis and femoral-neck fracture. A close relationship between these two events has been suggested, but not firmly demonstrated, whereas cementing technique seems to be better understood as potential cause of failure. Methods We performed an in vitro study in which four different resurfacing implants were evaluated with a simulated femoral head, two types of cement, (low and high viscosity) and two cementing techniques: direct (cement apposition directly on the femoral head) and indirect (cement poured into the femoral component). Results High-viscosity cement showed homogeneous distribution over the entire femoral head. Low-viscosity cement showed a massive polar concentration with insufficient, if not absent, distribution in the equatorial zone. Conclusion Polar cement concentration could be a risk factor for early implant failure due to two effects on the femoral head: biological (excessive local exothermic reaction could cause osteocyte necrosis) and biomechanical (which could lead to uneven load distribution on the femoral head). PMID:21234563

  11. Results from SNO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Yuen-dat

    2001-10-01

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is an underground heavy water Cherenkov detector for studying solar neutrinos. SNO is capable of performing both flavor sensitive and flavor blind measurements of the solar neutrino flux. The first charged current (CC) measurement is found to be: {psi}{sub SNO}{sup CC}({nu}{sub e}) = 1.75 {+-} 0.07(stat.){sub -0.11}{sup +0.12}(sys.) {+-} 0.05 (theor.) x 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} and the elastic scattering fluxes (ES) is: {psi}{sub SNO}{sup ES}({nu}{sub x}) = 2.39 {+-} 0.34(stat.){sub -0.14}{sup +0.16} (sys.) x 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The {psi}{sub SNO}{sup CC}({nu}{sub e}) result, when combined with the high statistics elastic scattering (ES) measurement from Super-Kamiokande, provide a strong evidence for solar neutrino flavor transformation (3.3{sigma}). The deduced total solar neutrino flux is in good agreement with standard solar model predictions. No significant distortion in the energy spectrum is observed.

  12. LEARNING RESULTS TIME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Polo Martínez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the changes to education norms in our country in the last ten years, where we have tried to integrate the different curriculum components in teaching and learning design, it is still typical to detect (1 curriculum plans that encourage rote learning and (2 teachers that continue teaching in the same style in which they were taught as students, and/or simply copying the textbook, even though sometimes it doesn´t provide the appropriate teaching and reliable assessment which meets the needs of our society. The insufficient academic training of (1 teachers, superintendents, and education authority members and (2 staff assessment that assures the best teaching practices in the classrooms, may be contributing to the inability to improve our education system. With respect to these deficiencies, we may come to the conclusion that the inclusion of these competencies in the curriculum and evaluation is a superficial action to fullfill European education requirements, more than a real plan to improve teaching and learning processes, and therefore, learning results in our country.

  13. SAA drift: Experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryan, O. R.; Romashova, V. V.; Petrov, A. N.

    According to the paleomagnetic analysis there are variations of Earth’s magnetic field connected with magnetic moment changing. These variations affect on the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) location. Indeed different observations approved the existence of the SAA westward drift rate (0.1 1.0 deg/year) and northward drift rate (approximately 0.1 deg/year). In this work, we present the analysis of experimental results obtained in Scobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University (SINP MSU) onboard different Earth’s artificial satellites (1972 2003). The fluxes of protons with energy >50 MeV, gamma quanta with energy >500 keV and neutrons with energy 0.1 1.0 MeV in the SAA region have been analyzed. The mentioned above experimental data were obtained onboard the orbital stations Salut-6 (1979), MIR (1991, 1998) and ISS (2003) by the similar experimental equipment. The comparison of the data obtained during these two decades of investigations confirms the fact that the SAA drifts westward. Moreover the analysis of fluxes of electrons with energy about hundreds keV (Cosmos-484 (1972) and Active (Interkosmos-24, 1991) satellites) verified not only the SAA westward drift but northward drift also.

  14. Results from LHCf Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tricomi Alessia

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The LHCf experiment has taken data in 2009 and 2010 p-p collisions at LHC at √s = 0.9 TeV and √s = 7 TeV. The measurement of the forward neutral particle spectra produced in proton-proton collisions at LHC up to an energy of 14 TeV in the center of mass system are of fundamental importance to calibrate the Monte Carlo models widely used in the high energy cosmic ray (HECR field, up to an equivalent laboratory energy of the order of 1017 eV. In this paper the first results on the inclusive photon spectrum measured by LHCf is reported. Comparison of this spectrum with the model expectations show significant discrepancies, mainly in the high energy region. In addition, perspectives for future analyses as well as the program for the next data taking period, in particular the possibility to take data in p-Pb collisions, will be discussed.

  15. New results from VES

    CERN Document Server

    Dorofeev, V A

    1999-01-01

    The results of the patial wave analysis(PWA) of the pi+pi-pi- and omegapi-pi0 systems are presented. The a3 and a4(2040) signals are observed in the rho(770)pi and f2(1270)pi channels. Indications of the a1' meson existence was found in the 1+0+ rhopi S-wave. The decay branching ratio of the a2(1320)- to omegapi-pi0 was measured. The 2+1+ wave shows a broad bump at M~1.7GeV. The decays of the pi2(1670), a4(2040) and pi(1740) into omegarho- were found. The resonance in the b1(1235)pi wave with exotic quantum numbers jpc=1-+ at M~1.6 is observed and the simultaneous analysis of the 1-+ wave in the b1(1235)pi, etha'pi and rhopi final states is presented.

  16. ALOS-2 initial results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankaku, Yukihiro; Suzuki, Shinichi; Shimada, Masanobu

    2015-10-01

    The Advanced Land Observing Satellite-2 (ALOS-2) was launched from Tanegashima Space Center by H-IIA rocket successfully on 24th May 2014. ALOS-2 carries the Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar-2 (PALSAR-2) as the state-of-the-art L-band SAR system which succeeds to PALSAR onboard ALOS. PALSAR-2 uses almost whole bandwidth allocated for L-band active sensor of Earth Exploration Satellites Service specified by the Radio Regulation in order to realize the high resolution observation, and also, it transmits more than 6 kW power for lower Noise Equivalent Sigma Zero using 180 TRMs driven by Gallium Nitride (GaN) amplifier which is the first use in space. Furthermore, because ALOS-2 carries the SAR system only, PALSAR-2 antenna can be mounted under the satellite body. It enables to observe right-/left-looking observation by satellite maneuvering. And the high accuracy orbit control to maintain the satellite within 500 m radius tube against the reference orbit enables high coherence for the InSAR processing. Using these new technologies, ALOS-2 has been operating to fulfill the mission requirements such as disaster monitoring and so on. This document introduces the initial result of ALOS-2 from the first year operation.

  17. esophageal cancer: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsaneh Maddah Safaei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Dysphagia is a common initial presentation in locally advanced esophageal cancer and negatively impacts patient quality of life and treatment compliance. To induce fast relief of dysphagia in patients with potentially operable esophageal cancer high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy was applied prior to definitive radiochemotherapy. Material and methods : In this single arm phase II clinical trial between 2013 to 2014 twenty patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer (17 squamous cell and 3 adenocarcinoma were treated with upfront 10 Gy HDR brachytherapy, followed by 50.4 Gy external beam radiotherapy (EBRT and concurrent chemotherapy with cisplatin/5-fluorouracil. Results : Tumor response, as measured by endoscopy and/or computed tomography scan, revealed complete remission in 16 and partial response in 4 patients (overall response rate 100%. Improvement of dysphagia was induced by brachytherapy within a few days and maintained up to the end of treatment in 80% of patients. No differences in either response rate or dysphagia resolution were found between squamous cell and adenocarcinoma histology. The grade 2 and 3 acute pancytopenia or bicytopenia reported in 4 patients, while sub-acute adverse effects with painful ulceration was seen in five patients, occurring after a median of 2 months. A perforation developed in one patient during the procedure of brachytherapy that resolved successfully with immediate surgery. Conclusions : Brachytherapy before EBRT was a safe and effective procedure to induce rapid and durable relief from dysphagia, especially when combined with EBRT.

  18. [SENTIERI Project: results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocetti, Emanuele; Pirastu, Roberta; Buzzoni, Carlotta; Minelli, Giada; Manno, Valerio; Bruno, Caterina; Fazzo, Lucia; Iavarone, Ivano; Pasetto, Roberto; Ricci, Paolo; Zona, Amerigo; Conti, Susanna; Comba, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    Of the 18 National Priority Contaminated Sites (NPCSs) analysed in this Report, some have a single source of environmental contamination (such as fluoro-edenite in Biancavilla). In most cases, however, we are looking at multiple heterogeneous sources of contamination. In this respect, the a priori causal evaluation of the association between diseases and environmental exposures in NPCSs, based on epidemiological evidence, can help trace the health impact back to specific types of environmental exposure. There are several cases in which the project's findings have been consistent with a priori evidence: stomach cancer (both genders, excess cancer incidence) in the Fidenza NPCS; stomach cancer (women, excess mortality, cancer incidence and hospital discharges) in the Laguna di Grado e Marano NPCS; excess hospitalisation from respiratory diseases in Brescia-Caffaro, Milazzo and Terni Papigno NPCSs; excesses for non-Hodgkin lymphomas and melanoma (incidence and hospitalisation in men and women) and breast cancer (incidence and hospital discharges, women) in Brescia-Caffaro NPCS. In preorder to properly evaluate the population's health profile, we must also observe whether results remain consistent for all three health outcomes or in both genders. The first is the case of excess mortality, cancer incidence and hospital discharges for bladder cancer (men) in Porto Torres and diseases of the urinary tract in the Basso bacino del fiume Chienti NPCS). Gender consistency is observed, for instance, for all cancer in Bolzano, Porto Torres, Venice, Litorale Domizio Flegreo, Priolo, and Taranto, for all causes in Taranto, Litorale Domizio Flegreo and Trieste. The health impact in the various NPCSs needs to be considered carefully and used as a springboard for further analytical research that could confirm and explain causal links to specific environmental exposures. The observations can, however, already be considered as a basis for mandatory primary prevention measures.

  19. `Is the Hypothesis Correct’ or `Is it not’? Bayesian Evaluation of One Informative Hypthesis in ANOVA.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossum, Maaike A. van; Schoot, A.G.J. van de; Hoijtink, H.

    2011-01-01

    Researchers in the behavioral and social sciences often have one informative hypothesis with respect to the state of affairs in the population from which they sampled their data. The question they would like an answer to is ‘‘Is the Hypothesis Correct’’ or ‘‘Is it Not.’’ Classical statistics has not

  20. Statistical analysis of relative labeled mass spectrometry data from complex samples using ANOVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberg, Ann L.; Mahoney, Douglas W.; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E.; Malone, Christopher J.; Wolfinger, Russell D.; Hill, Elizabeth G.; Cooper, Leslie T.; Onuma, Oyere K.; Spiro, Craig; Therneau, Terry M.; Bergen, H. Robert

    2008-01-01

    Statistical tools enable unified analysis of data from multiple global proteomic experiments, producing unbiased estimates of normalization terms despite the missing data problem inherent in these studies. The modeling approach, implementation and useful visualization tools are demonstrated via case study of complex biological samples assessed using the iTRAQ™ relative labeling protocol. PMID:18173221

  1. Value added analysis and its distribution: a study on BOVESPA-listed banks using ANOVA

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leonardo José Seixas Pinto; Fátima de Souza Freire

    2013-01-01

      The value added generated by the financial institutions listed on BOVESPA and its distribution in the years between 2007 to 2011 are the subject of this research which shows how banks divided his...

  2. Discovering gene expression patterns in time course microarray experiments by ANOVA-SCA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nueda, M.J.; Conesa, A.; Westerhuis, J.A.; Hoefsloot, H.C.J.; Smilde, A.K.; Talón, M.; Ferrer, A.

    2007-01-01

    Motivation: Designed microarray experiments are used to investigate the effects that controlled experimental factors have on gene expression and learn about the transcriptional responses associated with external variables. In these datasets, signals of interest coexist with varying sources of unwant

  3. Overview of MAST results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, I. T.; Adamek, J.; Akers, R. J.; Allan, S.; Appel, L.; Asunta, O.; Barnes, M.; Ben Ayed, N.; Bigelow, T.; Boeglin, W.; Bradley, J.; Brünner, J.; Cahyna, P.; Carr, M.; Caughman, J.; Cecconello, M.; Challis, C.; Chapman, S.; Chorley, J.; Colyer, G.; Conway, N.; Cooper, W. A.; Cox, M.; Crocker, N.; Crowley, B.; Cunningham, G.; Danilov, A.; Darrow, D.; Dendy, R.; Diallo, A.; Dickinson, D.; Diem, S.; Dorland, W.; Dudson, B.; Dunai, D.; Easy, L.; Elmore, S.; Field, A.; Fishpool, G.; Fox, M.; Fredrickson, E.; Freethy, S.; Garzotti, L.; Ghim, Y. C.; Gibson, K.; Graves, J.; Gurl, C.; Guttenfelder, W.; Ham, C.; Harrison, J.; Harting, D.; Havlickova, E.; Hawke, J.; Hawkes, N.; Hender, T.; Henderson, S.; Highcock, E.; Hillesheim, J.; Hnat, B.; Holgate, J.; Horacek, J.; Howard, J.; Huang, B.; Imada, K.; Jones, O.; Kaye, S.; Keeling, D.; Kirk, A.; Klimek, I.; Kocan, M.; Leggate, H.; Lilley, M.; Lipschultz, B.; Lisgo, S.; Liu, Y. Q.; Lloyd, B.; Lomanowski, B.; Lupelli, I.; Maddison, G.; Mailloux, J.; Martin, R.; McArdle, G.; McClements, K.; McMillan, B.; Meakins, A.; Meyer, H.; Michael, C.; Militello, F.; Milnes, J.; Morris, A. W.; Motojima, G.; Muir, D.; Nardon, E.; Naulin, V.; Naylor, G.; Nielsen, A.; O'Brien, M.; O'Gorman, T.; Ono, Y.; Oliver, H.; Pamela, S.; Pangione, L.; Parra, F.; Patel, A.; Peebles, W.; Peng, M.; Perez, R.; Pinches, S.; Piron, L.; Podesta, M.; Price, M.; Reinke, M.; Ren, Y.; Roach, C.; Robinson, J.; Romanelli, M.; Rozhansky, V.; Saarelma, S.; Sangaroon, S.; Saveliev, A.; Scannell, R.; Schekochihin, A.; Sharapov, S.; Sharples, R.; Shevchenko, V.; Silburn, S.; Simpson, J.; Storrs, J.; Takase, Y.; Tanabe, H.; Tanaka, H.; Taylor, D.; Taylor, G.; Thomas, D.; Thomas-Davies, N.; Thornton, A.; Turnyanskiy, M.; Valovic, M.; Vann, R.; Walkden, N.; Wilson, H.; van Wyk, F.; Yamada, T.; Zoletnik, S.; MAST; MAST Upgrade Teams

    2015-10-01

    The Mega Ampère Spherical Tokamak (MAST) programme is strongly focused on addressing key physics issues in preparation for operation of ITER as well as providing solutions for DEMO design choices. In this regard, MAST has provided key results in understanding and optimizing H-mode confinement, operating with smaller edge localized modes (ELMs), predicting and handling plasma exhaust and tailoring auxiliary current drive. In all cases, the high-resolution diagnostic capability on MAST is complemented by sophisticated numerical modelling to facilitate a deeper understanding. Mitigation of ELMs with resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) with toroidal mode number nRMP = 2, 3, 4, 6 has been demonstrated: at high and low collisionality; for the first ELM following the transition to high confinement operation; during the current ramp-up; and with rotating nRMP = 3 RMPs. nRMP = 4, 6 fields cause less rotation braking whilst the power to access H-mode is less with nRMP = 4 than nRMP = 3, 6. Refuelling with gas or pellets gives plasmas with mitigated ELMs and reduced peak heat flux at the same time as achieving good confinement. A synergy exists between pellet fuelling and RMPs, since mitigated ELMs remove fewer particles. Inter-ELM instabilities observed with Doppler backscattering are consistent with gyrokinetic simulations of micro-tearing modes in the pedestal. Meanwhile, ELM precursors have been strikingly observed with beam emission spectroscopy (BES) measurements. A scan in beta at the L-H transition shows that pedestal height scales strongly with core pressure. Gyro-Bohm normalized turbulent ion heat flux (as estimated from the BES data) is observed to decrease with increasing tilt of the turbulent eddies. Fast ion redistribution by energetic particle modes depends on density, and access to a quiescent domain with ‘classical’ fast ion transport is found above a critical density. Highly efficient electron Bernstein wave current drive (1 A W-1) has been achieved

  4. First results from the RAO Variable Star Search Program: I. Background, Procedure, and Results from RAO Field 1

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Michael D

    2011-01-01

    We describe an ongoing variable star search program and present the first reduced results of a search in a 19 square degree (4.4\\circle x 4.4\\circle) field centered on J2000 {\\alpha} = 22:03:24, {\\delta} = +18:54:32. The search was carried out with the Baker-Nunn Patrol Camera located at the Rothney Astrophysical Observatory in the foothills of the Canadian Rockies. A total of 26,271 stars were detected in the field, over a range of about 11-15 (instrumental) magnitudes. Our image processing made use of the IRAF version of the DAOPHOT aperture photometry routine and we used the ANOVA method to search for periodic variations in the light curves. We formally detected periodic variability in 35 stars, that we tentatively classify according to light curve characteristics: 6 EA (Algol), 5 EB ({\\beta} Lyrae), 19 EW (W UMa), and 5 RR (RR Lyrae) stars. Eleven of the detected variable stars have been reported previously in the literature. The eclipsing binary light curves have been analyzed with a package of light cur...

  5. Overview of MAST results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counsell, G. F.; Akers, R. J.; Appel, L. C.; Applegate, D.; Axon, K. B.; Baranov, Y.; Brickley, C.; Bunting, C.; Buttery, R. J.; Carolan, P. G.; Challis, C.; Ciric, D.; Conway, N. J.; Cox, M.; Cunningham, G.; Darke, A.; Dnestrovskij, A.; Dowling, J.; Dudson, B.; Dunstan, M. R.; Delchambre, E.; Field, A. R.; Foster, A.; Gee, S.; Gryaznevich, M. P.; Helander, P.; Hender, T. C.; Hole, M.; Howell, D. H.; Joiner, N.; Keeling, D.; Kirk, A.; Lehane, I. P.; Lisgo, S.; Lloyd, B.; Lott, F.; Maddison, G. P.; Manhood, S. J.; Martin, R.; McArdle, G. J.; McClements, K. G.; Meyer, H.; Morris, A. W.; Nelson, M.; O'Brien, M. R.; Patel, A.; Pinfold, T.; Preinhaelter, J.; Price, M. N.; Roach, C. M.; Rozhansky, V.; Saarelma, S.; Saveliev, A.; Scannell, R.; Sharapov, S.; Shevchenko, V.; Shibaev, S.; Stammers, K.; Storrs, J.; Sykes, A.; Tabasso, A.; Tallents, S.; Taylor, D.; Tournianski, M. R.; Turner, A.; Turri, G.; Valovic, M.; Volpe, F.; Voss, G.; Walsh, M. J.; Watkins, J. R.; Wilson, H. R.; Wisse, M.; MAST, the; NBI; ECRH Teams

    2005-10-01

    . Early edge localized mode activity on MAST is associated with the formation of narrow filamentary structures following field lines in the edge. These filaments rotate toroidally with the edge plasma and, away from the X-points, accelerate radially outwards from the edge up to 20 cm. Studies of disruptions on MAST demonstrate a complex evolution of core energy loss and resultant divertor power loads, including phases where the target heat flux width is broadened by a factor of 8. Observations of energetic particle modes driven by super-Alfvénic beam ions provide support for a model for the non-linear evolution of toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs) forming Bernstein-Green-Krushal waves. The AE activity reduces to low levels with increasing β. Plasma start-up without a central solenoid and in a manner compatible with future large spherical tokamak (ST) devices has been demonstrated using breakdown at a quadrupole magnetic null. Closed flux surface plasmas with peak plasma currents up to 370 kA have been generated and sustained for 0.3 s. New error field correction coils have extended the operational space for low density plasmas and enabled scaling studies of error field induced locked mode formation in the ST.

  6. GAUSS Project Trials Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fazio, Antonella; Vernucci, Antonio; Rossini, Eugenio

    2003-07-01

    , specifically operating in inland- waterways and roads. Safety-of-life applications for assisted vessel navigation and for management of hazardous goods (gas) transhipment over the Po river were thoroughly tested and assessed. Applications for emergency assistance, Point of Interest inquiry, localisation of commercial fleet were also proven.GAUSS successfully demonstrated integrated GNSS1 precise positioning based on EGNOS and satellite UMTS packet communication. The new technology with respect to the current state-of the art, developed within the project, was validated during the trial campaign, including the implemented broadcasting and multicasting communication of data packet compliant to 3GPP standard (current release 4). Horizontal accuracy better than 3-m was achieved in the trial area (Northern Italy - Lario - Como Lake, Parma and Po river areas), thanks to the navigation functions based on GPS signals augmented with SBAS techniques. The MTB (Mediterranean Test Bed) was utilised because of the poor performance coverage of the ESTB system over the Italian regions.In this paper, the results of the GAUSS trial campaign are reported, along with their assessment and evaluation in terms of possible enhancements and future exploitations.

  7. Evaluation of results in coronary surgery using EuroSCORE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihajlović Bogoljub

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE was developed in order to predict operative risk in cardiac surgery and to assess the quality of the cardio-surgical care. Introduction of the uniform terminology in result evaluation process leads to the significant improvement in measuring and evaluation of surgical treatment quality. Objective. The aim of the study was to evaluate our results in isolated coronary surgery using the EuroSCORE. Methods. The study was done respectively by analyzing predicted mortality according to the EuroSCORE model and observed operative risk in 4,675 coronary patients operated at our Clinic during the period 2001-2008. For statistical analyses, the Pearson, Chisquare and ANOVA tests were used. Results. The total postoperative mortality predicted by the EuroSCORE was 2.9±2.25, while the observed one was 2.2%. When the scoring system and observed results were compared over the years, a considerably lower observed mortality was found during the last 4 years. Overall average number of distal anastomoses was 2.62±0.84. During the period 2004-2008, the average number of coronary anastomoses increased over the years reaching the value of 2.77±0.88. The difference is at the level of statistical significance with the trend of further increase. Percentage of the patients with single or double graft myocardial revascularization decreases, while the number of the patients with triple or more bypasses increases. Conclusion. During the last years, the results in isolated coronary surgery have considerably improved. The EuroSCORE overestimates operative risk. In order to improve its predictive value, the model should be recalibrated.

  8. Assessing Hemorrhage Severity with Continuous Automatic Heart-Rate-Complexity Monitoring in Swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-02

    200 UI/L. Repeated measures were analysed using two-way ANOVA. Results: A total of 69 patients were included; 2 patients received VA ECMO for severe...diately after ECMO initiation (median AST 482[345-1802] UI/L and median ALT 401 [177-1215] UI/L. There was a significant increase in PT and...multiple organ failure. Of the 19 patients with reduction of AST/ALT, only 7 normalized their levels within 3 days since ECMO initiation. The reduction in

  9. Indigenous Adoption of Novaco's Model of Anger Management Among Individuals with Psychiatric Problems in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, Sumara; Khalily, Muhammad Tahir

    2016-04-01

    The present study was designed to indigenously adopt Novaco's model of anger management and examine its efficacy among individuals with psychiatric problems in Pakistan. For the assessment of anger and psychiatric problems, Urdu-translated versions of Novaco Anger Inventory (NAI), Anger Self-Report Questionnaire (ASR) and Depression Anxiety Stress Scale were used. A sample of 100 individuals was divided into two groups: a treatment group (received the indigenously adopted model of anger management) and a control group (received general counseling). Results of mixed repeated-measures ANOVA revealed that individuals in the treatment group significantly (p anger management was shown to be more effective than general counseling for anger management.

  10. Impact of idpn on kt/v

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dukkipati R

    2012-06-01

    A repeated measures ANOVA indicated a statistically significant difference (p<0.0001. A Tukey’s adjustment resulted in non-significant differences between month 1 and month 2 (p=0.995, month 1 and month 3 (p=0.987, and month 2 and month 3 (p=0.936. In conclusion, the initial decrease in Kt/V was followed by a period of stabilization, and the mean Kt/V never dropped below the KDOQI recommendation of 1.2.

  11. Computer-Assisted Training as a Complement in Rehabilitation of Patients With Chronic Vestibular Dizziness-A Randomized Controlled Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Michael Smærup; Gro¨nvall, Erik; Larsen, Simon B.

    2015-01-01

    . Participants Sixty-three elderly patients with chronic dizziness due to vestibular dysfunction were randomly assigned to either rehabilitation in the clinic followed by computer-assisted home exercises (intervention group: n=32), or rehabilitation in the clinic followed by home exercises according to printed...... Sensitivity Test, Short Form-12, Dizziness Handicap Inventory and Visual Analog Scale. Results Both groups improved significantly during 16 weeks of rehabilitation. However, neither t-tests nor repeated measurement ANOVA demonstrated any significant differences between the two groups. The overall compliance...

  12. BOUNCE: an exploratory healthy lifestyle summer intervention for girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olvera, Norma; Scherer, Rhonda; McLeod, Jessica; Graham, Marilyn; Knox, Brook; Hall, Kayce; Butte, Nancy F; Bush, Jill A; Smith, Dennis W; Bloom, Joel

    2010-01-01

    To assess the efficacy of the BOUNCE parent-daughter intervention in promoting selected physical fitness measures and activity. Thirty-seven Latino and African American parent-daughter pairs participated. The intervention entailed physical activities, nutrition classes, and self-esteem activities. Child's height, weight, waist circumference, body fat %, blood pressure, physical fitness, and activity were assessed pre- and postintervention. A repeated-measures ANOVA yielded significant results [F(4,26) = 793.003, P fitness, and activity. The BOUNCE intervention was effective in promoting fitness and activity in minority girls.

  13. Effect of cycloplegia on axial length and anterior chamber depth measurements in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Sin Wan; Chan, Rufina; Cheng, Roy Cs; Cho, Pauline

    2009-11-01

    Cycloplegia has been shown to have no effect on axial length measurement made with the IOLMaster in adults. The current study aimed at evaluating the effect of cycloplegia on axial length and anterior chamber depth (ACD) measurements made with the IOLMaster and an ultrasonic biometer in children. Pre- and post-cycloplegic axial length and ACD were measured with the IOLMaster followed by the Sonomed A-5500 in 31 children aged from seven to 15 years by the same examiner. The 95% limits of agreement (LoA) were determined, if there were no significant correlations found between the mean differences and their means. Seven subjects were excluded. Results from the remaining 24 subjects show that the effects of cycloplegia, instruments, and interaction between cycloplegia and instrument on axial length measurement were insignificant (repeated measure ANOVA F(1,23) 0.15). The 95% LoA in cycloplegia were better with the IOLMaster (-0.04 to 0.04 mm) than with the Sonomed A-5500 (-0.13 to 0.14 mm). The 95% LoA between the two instruments were similar with and without cycloplegia (pre-cycloplegia: -0.20 to 0.27 mm; post-cycloplegia: -0.17 to 0.22 mm). There was no significant interaction between cycloplegia and instrument in ACD measurement (repeated measure ANOVA F(1,23)= 0.85, p = 0.37), however, ACD was 0.05 to 0.06 mm shorter before cycloplegia (repeated measure ANOVA F(1,23)= 44.70, p Sonomed A-5500 were insignificant. In contrast, ACD measurement was significantly affected by cycloplegia and different instruments.

  14. Abundance and Isotopic Composition of Gases in the Martian Atmosphere: First Results from the Mars Curiosity Rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaffy, Paul; Webster, Chris R.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Franz, Heather; Wong, Michael; Conrad, Pamela G.; Harpold, Dan; Jones, John J.; Leshin, Laurie, A.; Manning, Heidi; Owen, Tobias; Pepin, Robert O.; Squyres, Steven; Trainer, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    Repeated measurements of the composition of the Mars atmosphere from Curiosity Rover yield a (40)Ar/N2 ratio 1.7 times greater and the (40)Ar/(36)Ar ratio 1.6 times smaller than the Viking Lander values in 1976. The unexpected change in (40)Ar/N2 ratio probably results from different instrument characteristics although we cannot yet rule out some unknown atmospheric process. The new (40)Ar/(36)Ar ratio is more aligned with Martian meteoritic values. Besides Ar and N2 the Sample Analysis at Mars instrument suite on the Curiosity Rover has measured the other principal components of the atmosphere and the isotopes. The resulting volume mixing ratios are: CO2 0.960(+/- 0.007); (40)Ar 0.0193(+/- 0.0001); N2 0.0189(+/- 0.0003); O2 1.45(+/- 0.09) x 10(exp -3); and CO 5.45(+/- 3.62) x 10(exp 4); and the isotopes (40)Ar/(36)Ar 1.9(+/- 0.3) x 10(exp 3), and delta (13)C and delta (18)O from CO2 that are both several tens of per mil more positive than the terrestrial averages. Heavy isotope enrichments support the hypothesis of large atmospheric loss. Moreover, the data are consistent with values measured in Martian meteorites, providing additional strong support for a Martian origin for these rocks.

  15. The role of apparent diffusion coefficient values in detecting testicular intraepithelial neoplasia: Preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsili, Athina C., E-mail: a_tsili@yahoo.gr [Department of Radiology, Medical School, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Ntorkou, Alexandra, E-mail: alexdorkou@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Medical School, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Baltogiannis, Dimitrios, E-mail: Greece.dbaltog@cc.uoi.gr [Department of Urology, Medical School, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Goussia, Anna, E-mail: agoussia@uoi.gr [Department of Pathology, Medical School, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Astrakas, Loukas G., E-mail: astrakas@uoi.gr [Department of Medical Physics, Medical School, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Malamou-Mitsi, Vasiliki, E-mail: vmalamou@cc.uoi.gr [Department of Pathology, Medical School, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Sofikitis, Nikolaos, E-mail: akrosnin@hotmail.com [Department of Urology, Medical School, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Argyropoulou, Maria I., E-mail: margyrop@cc.uoi.gr [Department of Radiology, Medical School, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • ADC values proved useful in the discrimination between TGCNs and normal testis. • Testicular intraepithelial neoplasia represents the precursor of most TGCNs. • ADC values cannot be used to detect testicular intraepithelial neoplasia. - Abstract: Introduction: The aim of this study is to improve detection of testicular intraepithelial neoplasia (TIN) by measurement of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values. Materials and methods: Fifty-six MRI examinations of the scrotum, including 26 histologically proven testicular germ cell neoplasms were retrospectively evaluated. DWI was performed using a single shot, multi-slice spin-echo planar diffusion pulse sequence and b-values of 0 and 900 s mm{sup −2}. ADC measurements were classified into three groups according to their location: group 1 (n = 19), non-tumoral part, adjacent to testicular carcinoma, where the possible location of TIN was; group 2 (n = 26), testicular carcinoma; and group 3 (n = 60), normal testicular parenchyma. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by post hoc analysis (Dunnett T3) was used for statistical purposes. Results: The mean ± s.d. of ADC values (×10{sup −3} mm{sup 2}/s) of different groups were: group 1, 1.08 ± 0.20; group 2, 0.72 ± 0.27; and group 3, 1.11 ± 0.14. ANOVA revealed differences of mean ADC between groups (F = 38.859, P < 0.001). Post hoc analysis showed differences between groups 2 and 3 (P < 0.001), groups 2 and 1 (P < 0.001), but not between groups 3 and 1 (P = 0.87). Conclusions: Based on our preliminary results, ADC values do not provide a reliable differentiation between TIN and testicular carcinoma or normal testicular parenchyma.

  16. Effectiveness of humor intervention for patients with schizophrenia: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chunfeng; Yu, Liping; Rong, Lan; Zhong, Hanling

    2014-12-01

    The primary aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the possible therapeutic effects of a 10-session humor intervention program in improving rehabilitative outcomes and the effects of the intervention on patients' sense of humor among patients with schizophrenia. Thirty subjects were randomly assigned into either the intervention (humor skill training) group (n = 15) or the control (doing handwork) group (n = 15). The results were analyzed using descriptive statistics, t-tests and ANOVA. Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) tests were conducted to examine the differences across conditions and time. A group by time interaction effect was observed on all of the outcomes, except positive symptoms of PANSS. The time main effect was also significant on the total score (p humor skill training in a mental health service can improve rehabilitative outcomes and sense of humor for schizophrenia patients who were in the rehabilitation stage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Publishing nutrition research: a review of multivariate techniques--part 2: analysis of variance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jeffrey E; Sheean, Patricia M; Gleason, Philip M; Bruemmer, Barbara; Boushey, Carol

    2012-01-01

    This article is the eighth in a series exploring the importance of research design, statistical analysis, and epidemiology in nutrition and dietetics research, and the second in a series focused on multivariate statistical analytical techniques. The purpose of this review is to examine the statistical technique, analysis of variance (ANOVA), from its simplest to multivariate applications. Many dietetics practitioners are familiar with basic ANOVA, but less informed of the multivariate applications such as multiway ANOVA, repeated-measures ANOVA, analysis of covariance, multiple ANOVA, and multiple analysis of covariance. The article addresses all these applications and includes hypothetical and real examples from the field of dietetics.

  18. Predictors of Postpartum Weight Change Among Overweight and Obese Women: Results from the Active Mothers Postpartum Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Bercedis L.; Krause, Katrina M.; Swamy, Geeta K.; Lovelady, Cheryl A.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The postpartum period may be critical for the development of midlife obesity. Identifying factors associated with postpartum weight change could aid in targeting women for healthy lifestyle interventions. Methods Data from Active Mothers Postpartum (AMP), a study of overweight and obese postpartum women (n=450), were analyzed to determine the effect of baseline characteristics, breastfeeding, diet, physical activity, and contraception on weight change from 6 weeks to 12, 18, and 24 months postpartum. The repeated measures mixed model was used to test the association of these effects with weight change. Results Although mean weight loss was modest (0.49 kg by 24 months), the range of weight change was striking (+21.5 kg to −24.5 kg, standard deviation [SD] 7.4). Controlling only for baseline weight, weight loss was associated with breastfeeding, hormonal contraception, lower junk food and greater healthy food intake, and greater physical activity. Only junk food intake and physical activity were significant after controlling for all other predictors. Conclusions Eating less healthy foods and being less physically active put overweight and obese women at risk of gaining more weight after a pregnancy. PMID:22092110

  19. The cosmetic results after oncoplastic breast surgery in Iranian women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaviani A

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: The oncoplastic surgery has been revolutionized breast conservative surgery. The aim of our study was to represent the cosmetic outcome of oncoplastic breast surgery in Iran and to evaluate its determinants. "n"nMethods: Fifty eight patients with unilateral breast neoplasm operated with single surgeon in Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tehran, Iran. Three view photographs were obtained pre and post operatively and were put in separate PowerPoint slides. The photographs were evaluated by six health related professionals. They scored the cosmetic outcome with modified questionnaire containing general and specific questions. Weighted kappa used for intra and inters rater reliability and ANOVA was used for analyzing cosmetic outcome determinants. "n"nResults: Generally, 72.2% of the photographs got the excellent or good score in a single breast evaluation part. Its items breast size, nipple deviation and scar quality scored 94.2, 67.9 and 88.8 respectively. "In comparison with contra-lateral breast" part shape asymmetry, need for surgery of contra lateral breast and size asymmetry scored 68.9, 75.8 and 69% respectively. Tumor size greater than two cm had poorer outcome (p=0.039 upper outer quadrant tumor had the worst and upper inner quadrant tumors had the best outcomes (p<0.0001. Patient with 50 to 60 years of age had the poorest outcomes (p<0.0001. Weighted kappa for inter and intra rater kappa was 0.12 and 0.58 respectively. "n"nConclusions: Acceptable cosmetic outcome is obtained in the first experience of oncoplastic breast surgery in Iran. Long term monitoring of oncologic and cosmetic outcomes in greater numbers of patients is recommended.

  20. Longitudinal associations of health-related behavior patterns in adolescence with change of weight status and self-rated health over a period of 6 years: results of the MoMo longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spengler, Sarah; Mess, Filip; Schmocker, Eliane; Woll, Alexander

    2014-09-30

    Promoting a healthy lifestyle especially in adolescents is important because health-related behaviors adopted during adolescence most often track into adulthood. Longitudinal studies are necessary for identifying health-related risk groups of adolescents and defining target groups for health-promoting interventions. Multiple health behavior research may represent a useful approach towards a better understanding of the complexity of health-related behavior. The aim of this study was to examine the longitudinal association of health-related behavior patterns with change of weight status and self-rated health in adolescents in Germany. Within the framework of the longitudinal German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children and Adolescents (KiGGS) and the Motorik-Modul (MoMo), four clusters of typical health-related behavior patterns of adolescents have been previously identified. Therefor the variables 'physical activity', 'media use' and 'healthy nutrition' were included. In the current study longitudinal change of objectively measured weight status (N = 556) and self-rated health (N = 953) in the four clusters was examined. Statistical analyses comprised T-tests for paired samples, McNemar tests, multinomial logistic regression analysis and two-way ANOVA with repeated measures. The prevalence of overweight increased in all four clusters. The health-related behavior pattern of low activity level with high media use and low diet quality had the strongest increase in prevalence of overweight, while the smallest and non-significant increase was found with the behavior pattern of a high physical activity level and average media use and diet quality. Only some significant relationships between health-related behaviour patterns and change in self-rated health were observed. High-risk patterns of health-related behavior were identified. Further, cumulative as well as compensatory effects of different health-related behaviors on each other were found. The

  1. Unconstrained, phonemic and semantic verbal fluency: age and education effects, norms and discrepancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolle Zimmermann

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To present performance norms and discrepancy score of three one-minute verbal fluency tasks (VFTs; to investigate age and education effects; to analyze the differences between time intervals; and to investigate whether these differences varied according to age and education. METHOD: Three hundred adults divided into three age groups (19-39; 40-59; 60-75 and two groups of educational level (2 to 7 years; 8 years or more performed unconstrained, semantic, and phonemic VFTs. We compared the performance of the groups using two-way ANOVA with post-hoc Bonferroni test. The depression scale score was covariate. The time interval of verbal fluency was the variable used for subjects' comparison (repeated measures ANOVA. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that there are age and education effects on phonemic and unconstrained VFTs. We also found an interaction between those variables in the semantic VFT (time intervals and total time and in the differences between semantic and phonemic tasks. The repeated measures analysis revealed age effects on semantic VFTs and education effects on the phonemic and semantic VFTs. Such findings are relevant for clinical neuropsychology, contributing to avoid false-positive or false-negative interpretation.

  2. Watershed Assessment, Tracking & Environmental ResultS (WATERS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Watershed Assessment, Tracking & Environmental Results (WATERS) is an integrated information system for the nation's surface waters connecting Office of...

  3. The effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral interventions in reduction of distress resulting from dentistry procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolghasemi A

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Dental anxiety is a common problem in pediatric dentistry and results in behaviors like fear and anger that can negatively affect dental treatments. Exposure to various dental treatments and distressful experiences are reasons for anxiety during dental treatments. The aim of this study was to evaluate effect of cognitive behavioral interventions in reduction of stress during dental procedures in children. Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial, 42 boys and girls, undergoing dental treatments were selected from dental clinics in Tehran. Patients were assigned to cognitive-behavioral interventions, placebo and control conditions. The fear scale, anger facial scale, pain facial scale and physiologic measure of pulse beat were evaluated. One way ANOVA and Tukey test were used to analyze the results and p<0.05 was the level of significance. Results: Results showed significant differences between cognitive-behavioral interventions, placebo and control groups regarding fear, anger, pain and pulse beat. Comparison tests revealed that cognitive-behavioral interventions were more effective in reducing fear, anger, pain and pulse beat compared to the placebo or control.Conclusion: According to the results of this study cognitive-behavioral interventions can be used to reduce distress of children undergoing dental procedures.

  4. Aesthetic rhinoplasty: Avoiding unfavourable results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulwant S Bhangoo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhinoplasty is one of the most challenging surgical procedures in plastic surgery. It is not surprising that a significant number of patients end up with unfavourable outcomes. Many of these unfavourable outcomes could be the result of poor judgment and wrong decision making. Most frequently, the unfavourable outcome is the result of errors in surgical technique. In this paper, unfavourable outcomes resulting from errors in surgical technique are discussed under the heading of each operative step. Poor placement of intra-nasal incision can result in internal valve obstruction. Bad columellar scars can result from errors during open rhinoplasty. Unfavourable results associated with skeletonisation are mentioned. Tip plasty, being the most difficult part of rhinoplasty, can result in lack of tip projection, asymmetry and deformities associated with placement of tip grafts. Over-resection of the lower lateral cartilages during tip plasty can also result in pinched nose, alar collapse causing external valve obstruction and other alar rim deformities. Humpectomy can result in open roof deformity, inverted V deformity and over-resection resulting in saddle nose. The so-called poly beak deformity is also a preventable unfavourable outcome when dealing with a large dorsal hump. Complications resulting from osteotomies include narrowing of nasal airway, open roof deformity, inverted V deformity and asymmetry of the bony wall resulting from incomplete or green stick fractures. Judicious use of grafts can be very rewarding. By the same token, grafts also carry with them the risk of complications. Allografts can result in recurrent infection, atrophy of the overlying skin and extrusion resulting in crippling deformities. Autografts are recommended by the author. Unfavourable results from autografts include displacement of graft, visibility of the graft edges, asymmetry, warping, and resorption.

  5. Oscillation of plantar pressure center in athletes and non-athletes with and without ankle sprains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Kenzo Saito

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To assess whether there is any difference in the oscillation of the plantar pressure center in single-leg stance between athletes and non-athletes with and without ankle sprains. METHODS: 54 volunteers performed four static assessments and one dynamic assessment while standing on one foot on a baropodometer, barefoot, for 10 s in each test. The variables of area (cm2, distance (cm, anteroposterior oscillation (cm, mediolateral oscillation (cm and mean velocity (cm/s were analyzed. The items "other symptoms" and "sports and recreation" of the subjective Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS questionnaire were applied. For the statistical analysis, repeated-measurement ANOVA (ANOVA-MR, multivariate ANOVA (MANOVA, Tukey's post hoc test and partial eta squared were used. RESULTS: ANOVA-MR revealed differences regarding distance, with major effects for eyes (p 0.05; and "sport and recreation", p > 0.05. CONCLUSION: Athletes present higher mean velocity of oscillation of plantar pressure center and generally do not have differences in oscillation amplitude in the sagittal and coronal planes, in comparison with non-athletes.

  6. The Gluten-Free, Casein-Free Diet in Autism: Results of a Preliminary Double Blind Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Jennifer Harrison; Shankar, Meena; Shuster, Jonathan; Theriaque, Douglas; Burns, Sylvia; Sherrill, Lindsay

    2006-01-01

    This study tested the efficacy of a gluten-free and casein-free (GFCF) diet in treating autism using a randomized, double blind repeated measures crossover design. The sample included 15 children aged 2-16 years with autism spectrum disorder. Data on autistic symptoms and urinary peptide levels were collected in the subjects' homes over the 12…

  7. CARDIORESPIRATORY RESPONSES TO STATIONARY RUNNING IN WATER AND ON LAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    uiz Fernando M. Kruel

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to compare maximal and submaximal cardiorespiratory responses between progressive tests on a treadmill on land (TRE, and stationary running on land (SRL and in water (SRW, while also comparing two methods of determining the second turn point (ST (ventilatory curve and heart rate deflection point. The study sample consisted of nine active women (23 ± 1.94 years that performed three maximal protocols in separate days. Heart rate (HR and oxygen uptake (VO2 were measured in all sessions. The data were analyzed using repeated-measures ANOVA and two-way repeated measures ANOVA with post-hoc Bonferroni test. Greater values of maximal HR (HRmax and HR at ST (HRST were observed during exercise performed on TRE and during the SRL, compared to the SRW (p < 0.05. The results for maximal VO2 (VO2max and VO2 at ST (VO2ST showed greater and significant values on TRE compared to STL and STW (p < 0.05. Furthermore, the HR and VO2 corresponding to the ST showed similar values between the two methods. Thus, the main conclusion of the present study was that the HR deflection point seems to be a simple and practical alternative method for determining the ST in all protocols analyzed

  8. Result merging method based on combined kernels for distributed information retrieval%基于混合核函数的分布式信息检索结果融合

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王秀红; 鞠时光

    2011-01-01

    To enhance the performance of result merging for distributed information retrieval (DIR), a novel merging method was put forward, which was based on relevance between retrieved results and query. Improved latent semantic kernel (LSK) was combined with analysis of variance (ANOVA) kernel to calculate the relevance. Experimental results showed that the result merging precision of the combination of LSK and ANOVA kernel (CLA) is 16.79%, 30.73%,20.37%, 24.17%, 14.25%, 13.50% and 7.53% higher than that of Round-robin, ComMNZ, Bayesian, Borda, SDM, MEM and regression SVM respectively. CLA kernel method has better performance for result merging and is a practical method for result merging in DIR.%为了提高分布式信息检索(DIR)的结果融合表现,基于改进的潜在语义核(LSK)和复合方差(ANOVA)核构建了新的复合(CLA)核,通过直接计算检索结果和提问之间相关度来对检索结果进行融合研究.实验结果表明:CLA核的融合精度和招回率分别仅略次于LSK和ANOVA核,但其综合评价指标F1优于其他核;其融合精度比Round-robin、ComMNZ、Bayesian、Borda、SDM、MEM和regression SVM等分别提高了16.79%、30.73%、20.37%、24.17%、14.25%、13.50%和7.53%.CLA核具有较好的融合表现,适用于DIR结果融合.

  9. Testbeam Results of Endcap RPC's

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, Ijaz; Hoorani, Hafeez; Aftab, Zia; Jan, J. A; Shariq Khan, M; Solaija, Tariq

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, results are presented from the beamtest in 2002 of the full-scale RE-2/2 prototype RPC chamber assembled in Pakistan. The results are mainly related with the efficiency, time resolution, and rate capability of this non-oiled RPC. The CMS collaboration has imposed strict criteria on the performance parameters for RPC's. These results show that prototype RPC's meet with all the CMS criteria and are suitable for installation in CMS detector.

  10. Investigation of surgically induced astigmatism resulting from femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery using a 2.2 mm clear corneal incision%2.2mm透明角膜切口飞秒激光辅助白内障超声乳化手术术源性散光的临床研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李博; 张素华; 张哲; 刘建亭; 曹伟芳; 李晓艳; 董慧; 郭彩虹; 张海宁

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate surgically induced astigmatism (SIA) resulting from femtosecond laser-assisted phacoemulsification cataract surgery with a 2.2 mm clear corneal incision.Methods A prospective,comparative analysis was performed in a case series.A total of 105 eyes of 84 patients (from No.1 cataract department of Shanxi Eye Hospital) who underwent femtosecond laser-assisted phacoemulsification cataract surgery between March 2014 and April 2016 were enrolled in this study.The main outcomes were a comparison of SIA,far visual acuity,and spherical refractive power preoperatively and 1,3,and 6 months postoperatively.Distance visual acuity was recorded as logMAR.Based on follow-up times (1,3,and 6 months postoperatively),lens nucleus hardness (grades Ⅱ,Ⅲ,Ⅳ),corneal astigmatism types (with-the-rule,against-the-rule,oblique) and laterality (left,right),SIA was analyzed using Alphins vector analysis.Data were analyzed using repeated measured ANOVA.Results The mean preoperative logMAR visual acuity was 0.65±0.24,which was significantly different from postoperative logMAR visual acuity at 1 month (0.07±0.02),3 months (0.06±0.01),and 6 months (0.06±0.01).No significant logMAR visual acuity differences were found at the three postoperative follow-up times.SIAs at 1,3,and 6 months after surgery were 0.28±0.11 D,0.25±0.13 D,0.24±0.10 D,respectively.No statistically significant differences in SIA were found when postoperative follow-up times (1,3,and 6 months) and factor groups for lens nucleus hardness (grades Ⅱ,Ⅲ,Ⅳ),corneal astigmatism types (with-the-rule,against-the-rule,oblique) and laterality (left,right) were compared.Conclusion Femtosecond laser-assisted phacoemulsification cataract surgery using a 2.2 mm clear corneal incision can provide stable SIA and better postoperative visual acuity.%目的 观察飞秒激光辅助白内障超声乳化手术中2.2 mm透明角膜切口引起的术源性散光(SIA)的影响因素.方法 前瞻性研究.纳入2014

  11. ISOCAM experiment cryogenic test results

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sa, L.; Collaudin, B.

    The thermal requirements for ISOCAM, an IR camera to be mounted aboard the ISO satellite, are reviewed, and model predictions are matched with test results. The degree of model validation suggested by analytical prediction vs test results is described. Predictions of thermal conduction through mounting screws, from ball bearings, and of the heat distribution in the rotor and stator of a cryogenic stepper motor correlate well with actual test results. It is shown that ISOCAM meets the thermal requirements necessary for successful on-orbit operation. The model predicted such phenomena as 'chopped' motor function and the twofold increase in temperature resulting from continuous motor operation.

  12. Quadriceps tendon rupture - treatment results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popov Iva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Quadriceps tendon rupture is a rare but rather serious injury. If this injury is not promptly recognized and early operated, it may lead to disability. This research was aimed at pointing out the results and complications of the quadriceps tendon rupture surgical treatment. Material and Methods. This retrospective multicentric study was conducted in a group of 29 patients (mostly elderly men. Lysholm knee scoring scale was used to evaluate the surgical results. The post-operative results were compared in relation to the type of tendon rupture reconstructions (acute or chronic, various surgical techniques, type of injuries (unilateral or bilateral as well as the presence or absence of comorbid risk factors in the patients. Results. The average value of a Lysholm score was 87.6. Excellent and satisfactory Lysholm score results dominated in our sample of patients. Better post-operative results were recorded in the group of patients without risk factors, in case of a bilateral injury, and in case of an acute injury. The best result was obtained after performing the reconstruction using anchors, and the worst result came after using Codivilla technique. Discussion and Conclusion. Early diagnosis and surgical treatment are an absolute imperative in management of this injury. We have not proven that a certain surgical technique has an advantage over the others. A comorbid risk factor is related to a lower Lysholm score. Despite a few cases of complications, we can conclude that the surgical treatment yields satisfactory results.

  13. Retirement Applicant Satisfaction Survey Results

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — This dataset contains information about the Retirement Applicant Survey (RAS). The survey measured satisfaction results with the retirement application process. The...

  14. New results from NA49

    CERN Document Server

    Afanasiev, S V; Bächler, J; Barna, D; Barnby, L S; Bartke, Jerzy; Barton, R A; Behler, M; Betev, L; Bialkowska, H; Billmeier, A; Blume, C; Blyth, C O; Boimska, B; Botje, M; Bracinik, J; Brady, F P; Bramm, R; Brun, R; Buncic, P; Carr, L; Cebra, D; Cerny, V; Cooper, G E; Cramer, J G; Csató, P; Dinkelaker, P; Eckardt, V; Eckhardt, F; Ferenc, D; Filip, P; Fischer, H G; Foder, Z; Foka, P Y; Freund, P; Friese, V; Gál, J; Ganz, R E; Gazdzicki, M; Georgopoulos, G; Gladysz-Dziadus, E; Harris, J W; Hegyi, S; Höhne, C; Igo, G; Jacobs, P; Jones, P G; Kadija, K; Kolesnikov, V I; Kollegger, T; Kowalski, M; Kraus, I; Kreps, M; Lasiuk, B; Van Leeuwen, M; Lévai, Peter; Malakhov, A I; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Mayes, B W; Melkumov, G L; Mischke, A; Molnár, J; Nelson, J M; Odyniec, Grazyna Janina; Oldenburg, M; Pálla, G; Panagiotou, A D; Perl, K; Petridis, A; Pikna, M; Pinsky, L; Poskanzer, A M; Prindle, D J; Pühlhofer, F; Putschke, J; Reid, J G; Renfordt, A; Retyk, W; Ritter, H G; Röhrich, D; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rybicki, A; Sammer, T; Sann, H; Schäfer, E; Schmitz, N; Seyboth, P; Siklér, F; Sitár, B; Skrzypczak, E; Snellings, R; Squier, G T A; Stock, Reinhard; Ströbele, H; Susa, T; Szentpétery, I; Sziklai, J; Toy, M; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Ullrich, T S; Varga, D; Vassiliou, Maria; Veres, G I; Vesztergombi, G; Voloshin, S A; Vranic, D; Wang, F; Weerasundara, D D; Wenig, S; Wetzler, A; Whitten, C; Xu, N; Yates, T A; Koo, I K; Zaranek, J; Zimányi, J

    2002-01-01

    Recent results of the NA49 experiment are presented. These cover first results on pion and kaon production, HBT, and charge fluctuations from Pb+Pb reactions at 40 AGeV and their comparison to 158 AGeV beam energy. Furthermore a study on baryon number transfer in p+p, centrality selected p+Pb and Pb+Pb collisions at 158 AGeV and new results on the system size dependence of kaon yields, including C+C and Si+Si data, are presented. Additionally, a first result on Lambda Lambda correlations is shown. (11 refs).

  15. Top physics results at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vickey, Trevor; /Illinois U., Urbana

    2005-05-01

    The most recent results on top quark physics at CDF are reported. Measurements of cross-section and mass are presented, and the status of single top quark production searches are discussed. The results obtained from probing various top quark properties are also presented.

  16. Complexity Results in Epistemic Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolander, Thomas; Jensen, Martin Holm; Schwarzentruber, Francois

    2015-01-01

    Epistemic planning is a very expressive framework that extends automated planning by the incorporation of dynamic epistemic logic (DEL). We provide complexity results on the plan existence problem for multi-agent planning tasks, focusing on purely epistemic actions with propositional preconditions......-hardness of the plan verification problem, which strengthens previous results on the complexity of DEL model checking....

  17. Some Results behind Dividend Problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Zhou; Li Wei; Jun-yi Guo

    2006-01-01

    We consider the basic dividend problem of the compound Poisson model with constant barrier strategy. Some results concealed behind the dividend problem are made explicit in the present work. Different methods and some of which are firstly given in this paper. All these results presented certain direct relationship between some important actuary variables in classical risk theory is also revealed.

  18. Heavy Ion Results from ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Jia, Jiangyong; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    These proceedings provide an overview of the new results obtained with the ATLAS Detector at the LHC, which are presented in the Quark Matter 2017 conference. These results are covered in twelve parallel talks, one flash talk and eleven posters, and they are grouped into five areas: initial state, jet quenching, quarkonium production, longitudinal flow dynamics, and collectivity in small systems.

  19. Top physics results at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vickey, Trevor; /Illinois U., Urbana

    2005-05-01

    The most recent results on top quark physics at CDF are reported. Measurements of cross-section and mass are presented, and the status of single top quark production searches are discussed. The results obtained from probing various top quark properties are also presented.

  20. Latest Electroweak Results from CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lancaster, Mark

    2010-05-01

    The latest results in electroweak physics from proton anti-proton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron recorded by the CDF detector are presented. The results provide constraints on parton distribution functions, the mass of the Higgs boson and beyond the Standard Model physics.

  1. Modeling individual differences in randomized experiments using growth models: Recommendations for design, statistical analysis and reporting of results of internet interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Hesser

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Growth models (also known as linear mixed effects models, multilevel models, and random coefficients models have the capability of studying change at the group as well as the individual level. In addition, these methods have documented advantages over traditional data analytic approaches in the analysis of repeated-measures data. These advantages include, but are not limited to, the ability to incorporate time-varying predictors, handle dependence among repeated observations in a very flexible manner, and to provide accurate estimates with missing data under fairly unrestrictive missing data assumptions. The flexibility of the growth curve modeling approach to the analysis of change makes it the preferred choice in the evaluation of direct, indirect and moderated intervention effects. Although offering many benefits, growth models present challenges in terms of design, analysis and reporting of results. This paper provides a nontechnical overview of growth models in the analysis of change in randomized experiments and advocates for their use in the field of internet interventions. Practical recommendations for design, analysis and reporting of results from growth models are provided.

  2. Pilot Randomized Trial Comparing Intersession Scheduling of Biofeedback Results to Individuals with Chronic Pain: Influence on Psychologic Function and Pain Intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Douglas L; Whitney, Anthony A; Tindall, Angelique G; Carter, Gregory T

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of two biofeedback schedules on long-term improvement in physical and psychologic reactivity to chronic nonmalignant pain. This study is a prospective, randomized pilot trial. Twenty adults with chronic pain engaged in heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback training for nine sessions with HRV presented visually. Two groups, formed by random assignment, were compared: The faded feedback group received concurrent visual HRV biofeedback in session 1, with the amount of biofeedback systematically reduced for ensuing sessions so that, by session 9, the participants were controlling HRV without external feedback. The full feedback group received visual HRV biofeedback continuously across all sessions. Outcome measures assessed at baseline, immediately after the program, and 3 mos after the program included pain intensity, fear-avoidance beliefs, and self-report physical functioning. Use of biofeedback skills was also assessed 3 mos after the program. Nominal variables were analyzed with χ. Continuous measures were analyzed with repeated-measures analyses of variance. The faded feedback schedule resulted in greater use of biofeedback skills at 3 mos and improved pain intensity and fear-avoidance beliefs after the program and at 3 mos. Physical functioning did not differ between groups. Systematically reducing the frequency of external visual feedback during HRV biofeedback training was associated with reduced reactivity to chronic pain. Results of this pilot study should be confirmed with a larger randomized study.

  3. Planck 2013 results. I. Overview of products and scientific results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Planck Collaboration,; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.

    2013-01-01

    spectrum. The Planck values for some of these parameters and others derived from them are significantly different from those previously determined. Several large scale anomalies in the CMB temperature distribution detected earlier by WMAP are confirmed with higher confidence. Planck sets new limits...... on the number and mass of neutrinos, and has measured gravitational lensing of CMB anisotropies at 25 sigma. Planck finds no evidence for non-Gaussian statistics of the CMB anisotropies. There is some tension between Planck and WMAP results; this is evident in the power spectrum and results for some...... the robust detection of the E-mode polarization signal around CMB hot- and cold-spots....

  4. Spacelab Life Sciences 1 results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddon, Rhea

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented from the experiments conducted by the first Shuttle/Spacelab mission dedicated entirely to the life sciences, the Spacelab Life Sciences 1, launched on June 5, 1991. The experiments carried out during the 9-day flight included investigations of changes in the human cardiovascular, pulmonary, renal/endocrine, blood, and vestibular systems that were brought about by microgravity. Results were also obtained from the preflight and postflight complementary experiments performed on rats, which assessed the suitability of rodents as animal models for humans. Most results verified, or expanded on, the accepted theories of adaptation to zero gravity.

  5. Customer interruption cost and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eua-Arporn, B.; Bisarnbutra, S. [Chulalongkorn Univ., Bangkok (Thailand)

    1997-12-31

    Results of a comprehensive study on short-term direct impacts and consumer interruption costs, incurred as a result of power supply interruption, were discussed. The emphasis was on questionnaire development, general responses and the average customer damage function of some selected sectors. The customer damage function was established for each category of customers (agriculture, industry, mining, wholesale, retail merchandising, residential, etc) as well as for different locations. Results showed that the average customer damage function depended mostly on customer category. Size and location were not significant factors. 5 refs., 7 tabs.

  6. PHENIX recent heavy flavor results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sanghoon

    2014-06-15

    Cold nuclear matter (CNM) effects provide an important ingredient to interpret the results from heavy-ion collisions. Such effects include nuclear shadowing, intrinsic parton transverse momentum broadening, and initial patron energy loss. The measurement of heavy quark production is a good probe to study the CNM effects particularly on gluons, since heavy quarks are mainly produced via gluon fusions at RHIC energy. The PHENIX experiment has an ability to study the CNM effects by measuring leptons from heavy-flavor decay in a broad kinematic range. Comparisons of the results measured in different rapidity regions allow us to study modification of gluon density function in the Au nucleus depending on parton fractional momentum x. In addition, comparisons to the results from heavy-ion collisions (Au + Au and Cu + Cu) measured by PHENIX provide an insight into the role of CNM effects in such collisions. Recent PHENIX results on heavy quark production are discussed in this presentation.

  7. Retrospective Evaluation of Colonoscopy Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaşar M et al.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is the retrospective evaluation of colonoscopy results between 2005 January- 2009 December in General Surgery Department of Düzce University.Materials and Methods: Admitted to our department with lower gastrointestinal symptoms, and colonoscopy is indicated 500 male and 538 female total 1038 patients were performed flexible colonoscopic examinations after bowel cleansing.Results: According to results of colonoscopic findings, 42.9% No pathology, 32.5% Hemorrhoids, 17.6% Anal fissures were detected.Conclusion: As a result of this study, half of patients admitted to our surgical clinic with lower gastrointestinal complaints have no pathology and in the other half of patients have various pathologies such as hemorrhoids and anal fissures.

  8. Electroweak phase transition recent results

    CERN Document Server

    Csikor, Ferenc

    2000-01-01

    Recent results of four-dimensional (4d) lattice simulations on the finite temperature electroweak phase transition (EWPT) are discussed. The phase transition is of first order in the SU(2)-Higgs model below the end point Higgs mass 66.5$\\pm$1.4 GeV. For larger masses a rapid cross-over appears. This result completely agrees with the results of the dimensional reduction approach. Including the full Standard Model (SM) perturbatively the end point is at 72.1$\\pm$1.4 GeV. Combined with recent LEP Higgs mass lower bounds, this excludes any EWPT in the SM. A one-loop calculation of the static potential makes possible a precise comparison of the lattice and perturbative results. Recent 4d lattice studies of the Minimal Supersymmetric SM (MSSM) are also mentioned.

  9. Results from NA61/SHINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unger M.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we summarize recent results from NA61/SHINE relevant for heavy ion physics, neutrino oscillations and the interpretation of air showers induced by ultra-high energy cosmic rays.

  10. Selection of LHCb Physics Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Burkhard

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available LHCb is a dedicated flavour physics experiment at the LHC searching for physics beyond the Standard Model through precision measurements of CP-violating observables and the study of very rare decays of beauty- and charm-flavoured hadrons. In this article a selection of recent LHCb results is presented. Unless otherwise stated, the results are based on an integrated luminosity of 1 fb−1 accumulated during the year 2011 at √s = 7 TeV.

  11. New CDF results on diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesropian, Christina; /Rockefeller U.

    2006-12-01

    We report new diffraction results obtained by the CDF collaboration in proton-antiproton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron collider at {radical}s=1.96 TeV. The first experimental evidence of exclusive dijet and diphoton production is presented. The exclusive results are discussed in context of the exclusive Higgs production at LHC. We also present the measurement of the Q{sup 2} and t dependence of the diffractive structure function.

  12. Heavy flavour results from ATLAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bell P. J.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A selection of heavy-flavour physics results from the ATLAS experiment is presented, based on data collected in proton-proton collisions at the LHC during 2010. Differential cross-sections for the production of heavy flavours, charmonium and bottomonium states and D-mesons are presented and compared to various theoretical models. Results of B-hadron lifetime measurements are also reported.

  13. Electroweak results from the tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, D. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Electroweak results are presented from the CDF and DO experiments based on data collected in recent runs of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The measurements include the mass and width of the W boson, the production cross sections of the W and Z bosons, and the W charge asymmetry. Additional results come from studies of events with pairs of electroweak gauge bosons and include limits on anomalous couplings.

  14. Biochemical and physiological changes in plants as a result of different sonic exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yu-Chuan; Lee, Won-Chu; Choi, Young-Cheol; Kim, Tae-Wan

    2003-07-01

    The effects of two different sonic exposures on two vegetables, namely Chinese cabbage and cucumber at two growth stages, including seedlings and mature plants were investigated. The 3 h exposures included either 20 kHz sound waves or "green music" that comprised classic music and natural sounds such as those of birds, insects, water, etc. Analysis of variance between groups (ANOVA) was used to determine the appropriate statistics parameters for the different treatments. Both exposures caused significant elevations in the level of polyamines (PAs) and increased uptake of oxygen O(2) in comparison with the controls. For Chinese cabbage the highest PAs' levels were determined for both seedlings and mature plants that were exposed to "green music". The oxygen uptake in Chinese cabbage also increased as a result of sonic exposures, and the highest oxygen uptake was also observed after "green music" treatment. For cucumber, the highest content of PAs for both seedlings and mature cucumber plants was determined as a result of 20 kHz ultrasound exposure. 20 kHz exposure of mature plants also resulted in the highest level of oxygen uptake. No statistically significant differences in the vitamin C level were determined between the different sonic treatments and sham exposed vegetables.

  15. Persistence of psychological distress in surgical patients with interest in psychotherapy: results of a 6-month follow-up.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Léonie F Kerper

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: This prospective observational study investigated whether self-reported psychological distress and alcohol use problems of surgical patients change between preoperative baseline assessment and postoperative 6-month follow-up examination. Patients with preoperative interest in psychotherapy were compared with patients without interest in psychotherapy. METHODS: A total of 1,157 consecutive patients from various surgical fields completed a set of psychiatric questionnaires preoperatively and at 6 months postoperatively, including Patient Health Questionnaire-4 (PHQ-4, Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI, Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D, World Health Organization 5-item Well-Being Index (WHO-5, and Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT. Additionally, patients were asked for their interest in psychotherapy. Repeated measure ANCOVA was used for primary data analysis. RESULTS: 16.7% of the patients were interested in psychotherapy. Compared to uninterested patients, they showed consistently higher distress at both baseline and month 6 regarding all of the assessed psychological measures (p's between <0.001 and 0.003. At 6-month follow-up, neither substantial changes over time nor large time x group interactions were found. Results of ANCOVA's controlling for demographic variables were confirmed by analyses of frequencies of clinically significant distress. CONCLUSION: In surgical patients with interest in psychotherapy, there is a remarkable persistence of elevated self-reported general psychological distress, depression, anxiety, and alcohol use disorder symptoms over 6 months. This suggests high and chronic psychiatric comorbidity and a clear need for psychotherapeutic and psychiatric treatment rather than transient worries posed by facing surgery.

  16. Planck 2013 results. I. Overview of products and scientific results

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P.A.R.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A.J.; Barreiro, R.B.; Bartelmann, M.; Bartlett, J.G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit, A.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Bernard, J.P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J.J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.R.; Boulanger, F.; Bowyer, J.W.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R.C.; Cappellini, B.; Cardoso, J.F.; Carr, R.; Casale, M.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, L.Y.; Chiang, H.C.; Christensen, P.R.; Church, S.; Clements, D.L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L.P.L.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B.P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R.D.; Davis, R.J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.M.; Desert, F.X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J.M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Dore, O.; Douspis, M.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Ensslin, T.A.; Eriksen, H.K.; Falgarone, E.; Finelli, F.; Foley, S.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Freschi, M.; Fromenteau, S.; Gaier, T.C.; Galeotta, S.; Gallegos, J.; Gandolfo, B.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Gorski, K.M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Haissinski, J.; Hansen, F.K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S.R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W.A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K.M.; Jaffe, T.R.; Jaffe, A.H.; Jewell, J.; Jones, W.C.; Juvela, M.; Kangaslahti, P.; Keihanen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lahteenmaki, A.; Lamarre, J.M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R.J.; Lawrence, C.R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leach, S.; Leahy, J.P.; Leonardi, R.; Leon-Tavares, J.; Leroy, C.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P.B.; Linden-Vornle, M.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Lowe, S.; Lubin, P.M.; Macias-Perez, J.F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D.J.; Martin, P.G.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; McDonald, A.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P.R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miniscalco, R.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschenes, M.A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J.A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C.B.; Norgaard-Nielsen, H.U.; North, C.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Dwyer, I.J.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C.A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, D.; Pearson, T.J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Platania, P.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G.W.; Prezeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.L.; Rachen, J.P.; Reach, W.T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ringeval, C.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubino-Martin, J.A.; Rusholme, B.; Salerno, E.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M.D.; Shellard, E.P.S.; Smoot, G.F.; Spencer, L.D.; Starck, J.L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.S.; Sygnet, J.F.; Tauber, J.A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Taylor, D.; Terenzi, L.; Texier, D.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Turler, M.; Tuttlebee, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Varis, J.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L.A.; Wandelt, B.D.; Watson, R.; Watson, C.; White, M.; White, S.D.M.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-01-01

    The ESA's Planck satellite, dedicated to studying the early universe, was launched on May 2009 and has been surveying the microwave and submillimetre sky since August 2009. In March 2013, ESA and the Planck Collaboration publicly released the initial cosmology products based on the first 15.5 months of Planck operations, along with a set of scientific and technical papers and a web-based explanatory supplement. This paper describes the mission and its performance, and gives an overview of the processing and analysis of the data, the characteristics of the data, the main scientific results, and the science data products and papers in the release. Scientific results include robust support for the standard, six parameter LCDM model of cosmology and improved measurements for the parameters that define this model, including a highly significant deviation from scale invariance of the primordial power spectrum. The Planck values for some of these parameters and others derived from them are significantly different fr...

  17. Planck 2015 results. I. Overview of products and scientific results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck Collaboration; Adam, R.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Akrami, Y.; Alves, M. I. R.; Argüeso, F.; Arnaud, M.; Arroja, F.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaglia, P.; Battaner, E.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bertincourt, B.; Bielewicz, P.; Bikmaev, I.; Bock, J. J.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Carvalho, P.; Casaponsa, B.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chiang, H. C.; Chluba, J.; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Church, S.; Clemens, M.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Contreras, D.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cruz, M.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Eisenhardt, P. R. M.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Farhang, M.; Feeney, S.; Fergusson, J.; Fernandez-Cobos, R.; Feroz, F.; Finelli, F.; Florido, E.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschet, C.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Gauthier, C.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Giusarma, E.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Grainge, K. J. B.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hamann, J.; Handley, W.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Heavens, A.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huang, Z.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Ilić, S.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jin, T.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Karakci, A.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Khamitov, I.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lacasa, F.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leahy, J. P.; Lellouch, E.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Lewis, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lilley, M.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Lindholm, V.; Liu, H.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Ma, Y.-Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mak, D. S. Y.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marchini, A.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Marinucci, D.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martinelli, M.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; McEwen, J. D.; McGehee, P.; Mei, S.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.-B.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mikkelsen, K.; Millea, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Moreno, R.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Mottet, S.; Münchmeyer, M.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Narimani, A.; Naselsky, P.; Nastasi, A.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Negrello, M.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Olamaie, M.; Oppermann, N.; Orlando, E.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Pandolfi, S.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Peel, M.; Peiris, H. V.; Pelkonen, V.-M.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrott, Y. C.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pogosyan, D.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Romelli, E.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Rotti, A.; Roudier, G.; Rouillé d'Orfeuil, B.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Rumsey, C.; Rusholme, B.; Said, N.; Salvatelli, V.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Sanghera, H. S.; Santos, D.; Saunders, R. D. E.; Sauvé, A.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Schaefer, B. M.; Schammel, M. P.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Serra, P.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Shimwell, T. W.; Shiraishi, M.; Smith, K.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, L. D.; Spinelli, M.; Stanford, S. A.; Stern, D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Strong, A. W.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutter, P.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Texier, D.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tornikoski, M.; Tramonte, D.; Tristram, M.; Troja, A.; Trombetti, T.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vassallo, T.; Vibert, L.; Vidal, M.; Viel, M.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Walter, B.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I. K.; Welikala, N.; Weller, J.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zibin, J. P.; Zonca, A.

    2016-09-01

    The European Space Agency's Planck satellite, which is dedicated to studying the early Universe and its subsequent evolution, was launched on 14 May 2009. It scanned the microwave and submillimetre sky continuously between 12 August 2009 and 23 October 2013. In February 2015, ESA and the Planck Collaboration released the second set of cosmology products based ondata from the entire Planck mission, including both temperature and polarization, along with a set of scientific and technical papers and a web-based explanatory supplement. This paper gives an overview of the main characteristics of the data and the data products in the release, as well as the associated cosmological and astrophysical science results and papers. The data products include maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect, diffuse foregrounds in temperature and polarization, catalogues of compact Galactic and extragalactic sources (including separate catalogues of Sunyaev-Zeldovich clusters and Galactic cold clumps), and extensive simulations of signals and noise used in assessing uncertainties and the performance of the analysis methods. The likelihood code used to assess cosmological models against the Planck data is described, along with a CMB lensing likelihood. Scientific results include cosmological parameters derived from CMB power spectra, gravitational lensing, and cluster counts, as well as constraints on inflation, non-Gaussianity, primordial magnetic fields, dark energy, and modified gravity, and new results on low-frequency Galactic foregrounds.

  18. [Analysis of variance of repeated data measured by water maze with SPSS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Hong; Jin, Guo-qin; Jin, Ru-feng; Zhao, Wei-kang

    2007-01-01

    To introduce the method of analyzing repeated data measured by water maze with SPSS 11.0, and offer a reference statistical method to clinical and basic medicine researchers who take the design of repeated measures. Using repeated measures and multivariate analysis of variance (ANOVA) process of the general linear model in SPSS and giving comparison among different groups and different measure time pairwise. Firstly, Mauchly's test of sphericity should be used to judge whether there were relations among the repeatedly measured data. If any (PSPSS statistical package is available to fulfil this process.

  19. Planck 2013 results. I. Overview of products and scientific results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Aussel, H.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Barrena, R.; Bartelmann, M.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaner, E.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bertincourt, B.; Bethermin, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bikmaev, I.; Blanchard, A.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J. J.; Böhringer, H.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bourdin, H.; Bowyer, J. W.; Bridges, M.; Brown, M. L.; Bucher, M.; Burenin, R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cappellini, B.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Carr, R.; Carvalho, P.; Casale, M.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, H. C.; Chiang, L.-Y.; Chon, G.; Christensen, P. R.; Churazov, E.; Church, S.; Clemens, M.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Cruz, M.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Da Silva, A.; Dahle, H.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Déchelette, T.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Démoclès, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Dick, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fabre, O.; Falgarone, E.; Falvella, M. C.; Fantaye, Y.; Fergusson, J.; Filliard, C.; Finelli, F.; Flores-Cacho, I.; Foley, S.; Forni, O.; Fosalba, P.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Freschi, M.; Fromenteau, S.; Frommert, M.; Gaier, T. C.; Galeotta, S.; Gallegos, J.; Galli, S.; Gandolfo, B.; Ganga, K.; Gauthier, C.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Gilfanov, M.; Girard, D.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Haissinski, J.; Hamann, J.; Hansen, F. K.; Hansen, M.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Heavens, A.; Helou, G.; Hempel, A.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Ho, S.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hou, Z.; Hovest, W.; Huey, G.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Ilić, S.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jasche, J.; Jewell, J.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Kalberla, P.; Kangaslahti, P.; Keihänen, E.; Kerp, J.; Keskitalo, R.; Khamitov, I.; Kiiveri, K.; Kim, J.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lacasa, F.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Laureijs, R. J.; Lavabre, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leach, S.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Leroy, C.; Lesgourgues, J.; Lewis, A.; Li, C.; Liddle, A.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Lowe, S.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; MacTavish, C. J.; Maffei, B.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marcos-Caballero, A.; Marinucci, D.; Maris, M.; Marleau, F.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matsumura, T.; Matthai, F.; Maurin, L.; Mazzotta, P.; McDonald, A.; McEwen, J. D.; McGehee, P.; Mei, S.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.-B.; Mendes, L.; Menegoni, E.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mikkelsen, K.; Millea, M.; Miniscalco, R.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Morisset, N.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Negrello, M.; Nesvadba, N. P. H.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; North, C.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; O'Dwyer, I. J.; Orieux, F.; Osborne, S.; O'Sullivan, C.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Pandolfi, S.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Paykari, P.; Pearson, D.; Pearson, T. J.; Peel, M.; Peiris, H. V.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Platania, P.; Pogosyan, D.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Pullen, A. R.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Rahlin, A.; Räth, C.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Riazuelo, A.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ringeval, C.; Ristorcelli, I.; Robbers, G.; Rocha, G.; Roman, M.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Rusholme, B.; Salerno, E.; Sandri, M.; Sanselme, L.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Schaefer, B. M.; Schiavon, F.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Serra, P.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Smith, K.; Smoot, G. F.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, L. D.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutter, P.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Taylor, D.; Terenzi, L.; Texier, D.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Torre, J.-P.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Tuttlebee, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Varis, J.; Vibert, L.; Viel, M.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, C.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I. K.; Welikala, N.; Weller, J.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Wilkinson, A.; Winkel, B.; Xia, J.-Q.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zibin, J. P.; Zonca, A.

    2014-11-01

    The European Space Agency's Planck satellite, dedicated to studying the early Universe and its subsequent evolution, was launched 14 May 2009 and has been scanning the microwave and submillimetre sky continuously since 12 August 2009. In March 2013, ESA and the Planck Collaboration released the initial cosmology products based on the first 15.5 months of Planck data, along with a set of scientific and technical papers and a web-based explanatory supplement. This paper gives an overview of the mission and its performance, the processing, analysis, and characteristics of the data, the scientific results, and the science data products and papers in the release. The science products include maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and diffuse extragalactic foregrounds, a catalogue of compact Galactic and extragalactic sources, and a list of sources detected through the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. The likelihood code used to assess cosmological models against the Planck data and a lensing likelihood are described. Scientific results include robust support for the standard six-parameter ΛCDM model of cosmology and improved measurements of its parameters, including a highly significant deviation from scale invariance of the primordial power spectrum. The Planck values for these parameters and others derived from them are significantly different from those previously determined. Several large-scale anomalies in the temperature distribution of the CMB, first detected by WMAP, are confirmed with higher confidence. Planck sets new limits on the number and mass of neutrinos, and has measured gravitational lensing of CMB anisotropies at greater than 25σ. Planck finds no evidence for non-Gaussianity in the CMB. Planck's results agree well with results from the measurements of baryon acoustic oscillations. Planck finds a lower Hubble constant than found in some more local measures. Some tension is also present between the amplitude of matter fluctuations (σ8) derived from

  20. Overview of recent ALICE results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaldi Roberta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available ALICE is the LHC experiment devoted to the study of heavy-ion collisions. While results from Pb-Pb collisions at √sNN = 2.76 TeV provide insight on the properties of the plasma of quarks and gluons, formed in nucleus-nucleus interactions, the study of p-Pb collisions at √sNN = 5.02 TeV allows a deeper understanding of cold nuclear matter effects. Therefore, p-Pb results turn out to be a powerful tool to provide a baseline for Pb-Pb, to correctly quantify how the various observables are affected by genuine hot medium effects. In this proceeding, a selection of the most recent ALICE results on the medium global properties and on heavy-flavour and quarkonium production will be discussed.

  1. Result-Based Public Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boll, Karen

    the performance measure that guides the inspectors’ inspection (or nudging) of the businesses. The analysis shows that although a result-based governance system is advocated on a strategic level, performance measures which are not ‘result-based’ are developed and used in the daily coordination of work. The paper......Within the public sector, many institutions are either steered by governance by targets or result-based governance. The former sets up quantitative internal production targets, while the latter advocates that production is planned according to outcomes which are defined as institution......-produced effects on individuals or businesses in society; effects which are often produced by ‘nudging’ the citizenry in a certain direction. With point of departure in these two governance-systems, the paper explores a case of controversial inspection of businesses’ negative VAT accounts and it describes...

  2. Complexity Results in Epistemic Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bolander, Thomas; Jensen, Martin Holm; Schwarzentruber, Francois

    2015-01-01

    Epistemic planning is a very expressive framework that extends automated planning by the incorporation of dynamic epistemic logic (DEL). We provide complexity results on the plan existence problem for multi-agent planning tasks, focusing on purely epistemic actions with propositional preconditions....... We show that moving from epistemic preconditions to propositional preconditions makes it decidable, more precisely in EXPSPACE. The plan existence problem is PSPACE-complete when the underlying graphs are trees and NP-complete when they are chains (including singletons). We also show PSPACE......-hardness of the plan verification problem, which strengthens previous results on the complexity of DEL model checking....

  3. Impossibility results for distributed computing

    CERN Document Server

    Attiya, Hagit

    2014-01-01

    To understand the power of distributed systems, it is necessary to understand their inherent limitations: what problems cannot be solved in particular systems, or without sufficient resources (such as time or space). This book presents key techniques for proving such impossibility results and applies them to a variety of different problems in a variety of different system models. Insights gained from these results are highlighted, aspects of a problem that make it difficult are isolated, features of an architecture that make it inadequate for solving certain problems efficiently are identified

  4. Recent Beijing Spectroscopy (BES) results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI WeiGuo

    2008-01-01

    Recent experimental results from Beijing Spectroscopy (BES) are reviewed,in-cluding the hadron spectroscopy from J/ψdecays,and a number of new states are found or confirmed,including σ,κ;X(1835),ωψ threshold enhancement in J/ψ→γωψ,a broad resbnance in J/ψ→K+K-π0,decay studies of ψ(2S) and χCJ,as well as the results of ψ(3770) non-DD decays.The current status of BEPCⅡ/BESⅢ,the major upgrade of BEPC/BESⅡ,is also reported.

  5. Results from Numerical General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John G.

    2011-01-01

    For several years numerical simulations have been revealing the details of general relativity's predictions for the dynamical interactions of merging black holes. I will review what has been learned of the rich phenomenology of these mergers and the resulting gravitational wave signatures. These wave forms provide a potentially observable record of the powerful astronomical events, a central target of gravitational wave astronomy. Asymmetric radiation can produce a thrust on the system which may accelerate the single black hole resulting from the merger to high relative velocity.

  6. Recent QCD Results from ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Sinervo, Pekka; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS collaboration has performed studies of a wide range of QCD phenomena, from soft particle to hard photon and jet production. Among recent results are the measurement of Z event shape observables sensitive to the modelling of the underlying event, and the measurement of diffractive dijet production with a large rapidity gap, which tests the interplay of soft and hard phenomena. The inelastic pp cross section, a fundamental property of the strong interaction, is measured. Precision measurements of the isolated high pT inclusive photon cross section at cms energies of 8TeV test the theoretical predictions and constrain parton density functions. An overview of these results is given.

  7. Supersymmetry results at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manca, Giulia; /Liverpool U.

    2005-05-01

    The Run II physics programme of the Tevatron is proceeding with more than 300 pb{sup -1} of analysis quality data, collected at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. Searches for supersymmetric particles are starting to set new limits, improving over the LEP and Run I results and exploring new regions of parameter space. They present recent results in Supersymmetry with the upgraded CDF and D0 detectors and give some prospects for the future of these searches.

  8. Spatiotemporal ecohydrological patterns and processes in temperate uplands: linking field observations and model results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, N. H.; Baird, A. J.; Wainwright, J.; Dunn, S. M.

    2011-12-01

    There are obvious surface expressions - in terms of vegetation patterning - of ecohydrological feedbacks on dryland and peatland hillslopes. Much less is known about subsurface ecohydrological patterns, and whether or not they 'map onto' surface patterns. Likewise, few attempts have been made to investigate how such ecohydrological patterns affect whole-hillslope hydrological behaviour or how widespread they are in non-dryland and non-peatland hillslopes. In this study we investigate surface and near- surface patterning in temperate hillslopes, which to date have been the focus of much hydrological work but little ecohydrological work. In particular, we consider the extent to which the direct and the indirect effects of past and present plant assemblages on local and whole-hillslope soil moisture conditions may contribute to patterning. We have conducted a field study of two temperate upland hillslopes in Northern Scotland, UK, on one of which human intervention plays a major part in shaping the landscape. Repeat measurements have been made of near- surface soil-moisture content, taken at lag distances of 0.25 m to 20 m, under different antecedent hydrological conditions together with characterisation of plant assemblages at the same points through both ground-based vegetation surveys of 1 m × 1 m plots and kite aerial photography (KAP) of > 20 m2 plots. Results from this have indicated that changes in ecohydrological patterns can occur over small spatial scales (practices. Evidence of sustained patterning under relatively steady environmental conditions has prompted us to consider how internal system dynamics such as competition and facilitation between different plant assemblages, and persistence of ecological memory at a range of timescales may lead to a range of ecohydrological behaviours at the scale of whole hillslopes. To help conceptualize ways in which patterning may arise, we have built a two-dimensional cellular automata-type model in which local

  9. Spinal Cord Stimulation Provides Pain Relief with Improved Psychosocial Function: Results from EMP3OWER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Jason; Fabi, Alain; Candido, Kenneth; Knezevic, Nick; Creamer, Michael; Carayannopoulos, Alexios; Ghodsi, Abdi; Nelson, Christopher; Bennett, Matthew

    2016-12-01

    The EMP(3)OWER™ study evaluated spinal cord stimulation (SCS) safety and efficacy and the associated changes in psychosocial and functional outcomes. Upon informed consent and IRB approval, 620 eligible subjects were enrolled prior to SCS trial evaluation and were assessed at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months post-implant. Patient-reported pain relief (PRP), numerical rating scale (NRS), satisfaction, quality of life (QOL), and pain disability index (PDI) were assessed at all follow-up visits while the pain catastrophizing scale (PCS), short form-36 (SF-36), short form-McGill pain questionnaire version 2 (SF-MPQ-2), and the state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI) were assessed at the 6- and 12-month follow-up visits. Device and/or procedure-related adverse events were also recorded and reported. Subjects reporting a PRP ≥ 50% were considered responders. Repeated measures analysis of variance (RMANOVA) examined the changes across time for all continuous measures. A total of 401 (71%) subjects received a permanent implant. Mean (±SD) patient-reported pain relief was 59.3% (±26.2), 59.2% (±28.9), and 58.2% (±32.0) at 3, 6, and 12 months, respectively. A majority of enrolled subjects were responders at 3 (75.5%), 6 (74.7%), and 12 months (69.7%). RMANOVA revealed a statistically significant change for NRS, PCS, PDI, SF-36, SF-MPQ-2, and STAI scores. At 3 months, the majority of subjects (85.7%) were either very satisfied or satisfied with their device, with similar results at 6 and 12 months. At 3 months, the majority of subjects (73.3%) reported greatly improved or improved QOL with similar results at 6 and 12 months. Spinal cord stimulation provided pain relief and significant improvement of patient psychological and functional outcome measures. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. ATLAS H(125) difermion results

    CERN Document Server

    Shabalina, Elizaveta; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    We present a summary of the recent measurements of the Standard Model Higgs production in fermionic decay modes. New results are presented for the dimuon Higgs decays, for Higgs decaying in a $b\\bar{b}$ pair in the VH and ttH production modes and in the VBF channel with photon production.

  11. Results from the AMANDA telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahrens, J.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S.W.; Becka, T.; Becker, K.-H.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Binon, F.; Biron, A.; Boeser, S.; Botner, O.; Bouhali, O.; Burgess, T.; Carius, S.; Castermans, T.; Chirkin, D.; Conrad, J.; Cooley, J.; Cowen, D.F.; Davour, A.; De Clercq, C.; DeYoung, T.; Desiati, P.; Dewulf, J.-P.; Ekstroem, P.; Feser, T.; Gaisser, T.K.; Ganupati, R.; Gaug, M.; Geenen, H.; Gerhardt, L.; Goldschmidt, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Hardtke, R.; Hauschildt, T.; Hellwig, M.; Herquet, Ph.; Hill, G.C.; Hulth, P.O.; Hultqvist, K.; Hundertmark, S.; Jacobsen, J.; Karle, A.; Koepke, L.; Kuehn, K.; Kowalski, M.; Lamoureux, J.I.; Leich, H.; Leuthold, M.; Lindahl, P.; Liubarsky, I.; Madsen, J.; Mandli, K.; Marciniewski, P.; Matis, H.S.; McParland, C.P.; Messarius, T.; Minaeva, Y.; Miocinovic, P.; Morse, R.; Nahnhauer, R.; Neunhoeffer, T.; Niessen, P.; Nygren, D.R.; Ogelman, H.; Olbrechts, Ph.; Perez de los Heros, C.; Pohl, A.C.; Price, P.B.; Przybylski, G.T.; Rawlins, K.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Richter, S.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, D.; Schinarakis, K.; Schwarz, R.; Silvestri, A.; Solarz, M.; Spiczak, G.M.; Spiering, C.; Steele, D.; Steffen, P.; Stokstad, R.G.; Sudoff, P.; Sudoff, K.-H.; Sulanke, K.-H.; Taboada, I.; Thollander, L.; Tilav, S.; Wagner, W.; Walck, C.; Weinheimer, C.; Wiebusch, C.H.; Wiedemann, C.; Wischnewski, R.; Wissing, H.; Woschnagg, K.; Yodh, G.; Young, S

    2003-06-30

    We present results from the AMANDA high energy neutrino telescope located at the South Pole. They include measurements of the atmospheric neutrino flux, search for UHE point sources, and diffuse sources producing electromagnetic/hadronic showers at the detector or close to it.

  12. HADES results in elementary reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramstein B.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent results obtained with the HADES experimental set-up at GSI are presented with a focus on dielectron production and strangeness in pp and quasi-free np reactions. Perspectives related to the very recent experiment using the pion beam at GSI are also discussed.

  13. FFTF startup: status and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noordhoff, B.H.; Moore, C.E.

    1980-03-01

    Startup testing on the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) during the past three years has progressed beyond initial criticality toward the principal goal of power demonstration in 1980. An overview is presented of technical results to date and project plans to achieve power demonstration and complete the startup test program.

  14. Latest results from B factories

    CERN Document Server

    Ben Haim, Eli

    2015-01-01

    I will briefly review recent results from Babar and Belle. For example, I will discuss probes for new physics in radiative penguin decays and the CP asymmetry in B0-B0bar mixing. I will also discuss direct searches for new physics, such as a light Higgs resonance or long lived particles.

  15. Recent results from KLOE experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosino, F; Antonelli, M; Archilli, F; Bacci, C; Beltrame, P; Bencivenni, G; Bertolucci, S; Bini, C; Bloise, C; Bocchetta, S; Bossi, F; Branchini, P; Caloi, R; Campana, P; Capon, G; Capussela, T; Ceradini, F; Cesario, F; Chi, S; Chiefari, G; Ciambrone, P; Crucianelli, F; De Lucia, E; De Santis, A; De Simone, P; De Zorzi, G; Denig, A; Di Domenico, A; Di Donato, C; Di Micco, B; Doria, A; Dreucci, M; Felici, G; Ferrari, A; Ferrer, M L; Fiore, S; Forti, C; Franzini, P; Gatti, C; Gauzzi, P; Giovannella, S; Gorini, E; Graziani, E; Kluge, W; Kulikov, V; Lacava, F; Lanfranchi, G; Lee-Franzini, J; Leone, D; Martini, M; Massarotti, P; Mei, W; Meola, S; Miscetti, S; Moulson, M; Müller, S; Murtas, F; Napolitano, M; Nguyen, F; Palutan, M; Pasqualucci, E; Passeri, A; Patera, V; Perfetto, F; Primavera, M; Santangelo, P; Saracino, G; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Sibidanov, A; Spadaro, T; Testa, M; Tortora, L; Valente, P; Venanzoni, G; Versaci, R; Xu, G

    2008-01-01

    We report the newest results from the KLOE experiment on hadronic physics, such as the parameters of scalars f0 and a0, the eta meson mass measurements and dynamics, the first observation of the eta -> p+p-e+e- rare decay, and study of e+e- -> omega p0 cross section around the phi resonance.

  16. HADES results in elementary reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramstein, B.; Adamczewski-Musch, J.; Arnold, O.; Atomssa, E. T.; Behnke, C.; Berger-Chen, J. C.; Biernat, J.; Blanco, A.; Blume, C.; Böhmer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Chernenko, S.; Deveaux, C.; Dybczak, A.; Epple, E.; Fabbietti, L.; Fateev, O.; Fonte, P.; Franco, C.; Friese, J.; Fröhlich, I.; Galatyuk, T.; Garzón, J. A.; Gill, K.; Golubeva, M.; Guber, F.; Gumberidze, M.; Harabasz, S.; Hennino, T.; Hlavac, S.; Höhne, C.; Holzmann, R.; Ierusalimov, A.; Ivashkin, A.; Jurkovic, M.; Kämpfer, B.; Karavicheva, T.; Kardan, K.; Koenig, I.; Koenig, W.; Kolb, B. W.; Korcyl, G.; Kornakov, G.; Kotte, R.; Krása, A.; Krebs, E.; Kuc, H.; Kugler, A.; Kunz, T.; Kurepin, A.; Kurilkin, A.; Kurilkin, P.; Ladygin, V.; Lalik, R.; Lapidus, K.; Lebedev, A.; Lopes, L.; Lorenz, M.; Mahmoud, T.; Maier, L.; Mangiarotti, A.; Markert, J.; Metag, V.; Michel, J.; Müntz, C.; Münzer, R.; Naumann, L.; Palka, M.; Parpottas, Y.; Pechenov, V.; Pechenova, O.; Petousis, V.; Pietraszko, J.; Przygoda, W.; Rehnisch, L.; Reshetin, A.; Rost, A.; Rustamov, A.; Sadovsky, A.; Salabura, P.; Scheib, T.; Schmidt-Sommerfeld, K.; Schuldes, H.; Sellheim, P.; Siebenson, J.; Silva, L.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Spataro, S.; Ströbele, H.; Stroth, J.; Strzempek, P.; Sturm, C.; Svoboda, O.; Tarantola, A.; Teilab, K.; Tlusty, P.; Traxler, M.; Tsertos, H.; Vasiliev, T.; Wagner, V.; Wendisch, C.; Wirth, J.; Wüstenfeld, J.; Zanevsky, Y.; Zumbruch, P.

    2014-11-01

    Recent results obtained with the HADES experimental set-up at GSI are presented with a focus on dielectron production and strangeness in pp and quasi-free np reactions. Perspectives related to the very recent experiment using the pion beam at GSI are also discussed.

  17. Electroweak results from hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcel Demarteau

    1999-09-02

    A very brief summary of recent electroweak results from hadron colliders is given. The emphasis is placed on inclusive W{sup {+-}} and Z{sup 0} production, the measurement of the mass of the W boson and the measurement of trilinear gauge boson couplings.

  18. Superconductivity resulting from antiferromagnetic states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng Shi-Ping (Department of Physics, Beijing Normal University (CN))

    1989-09-01

    When the dopping is low enough, the holes obey Bose statistics, Bose-Einstein condensation of these holes may lead to occurance of superconductivity. In this framework, we have calculated some physical quantities, the results are in qualitative agreement with experiments.

  19. Recent results from DORIS II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloom, E.D.

    1985-01-01

    This report contains a brief review of recent results from the ARGUS and Crystal Ball experiments at DORIS II, concentrating on UPSILON(1S) and UPSILON(2S) spectroscopy with a short foray into ..gamma gamma.. physics. 18 refs., 10 figs.

  20. Results from the AMANDA telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Bouhali, O

    2003-01-01

    We present results from the AMANDA high energy neutrino telescope located at the South Pole. They include measurements of the atmospheric neutrino flux, search for UHE point sources, and diffuse sources producing electromagnetic/hadronic showers at the detector or close to it. (4 refs).

  1. Heavy flavor results from CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Ronchese, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Heavy flavor particles produced in LHC $pp$ collisions at $7, 8,$ and $13~\\mathrm{TeV}$ constitute an excellent opportunity to test the standard model and probe for new physics effects. Recent results by the CMS Collaboration on heavy flavor production and decays are presented.

  2. Perseids 2006 results in Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigore, Valentin; Berinde, Stefan; Conu, Alexandru

    2007-12-01

    The results of 14th edition of the Perseide (Perseid) project organized by SARM are presented. PERSEIDE 2006 - the national astronomical camp for yought had two distinct parts: a summer astronomical school and a national Perseid network. Over 60 persons attended this event which lasted for four weeks and had both a training and observing component.

  3. B0s Oscillation Results

    CERN Document Server

    Willocq, S

    2002-01-01

    We review new studies of the time dependence of B0s - B0s-bar mixing by the ALEPH, DELPHI and SLD Collaborations, with an emphasis on the different analysis methods used. Combining all available results yields a preliminary lower limit on the oscillation frequency of dms > 14.4 ps-1 at the 95% C.L.

  4. Results-based management - Developing one's key results areas (KRAs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansal, Om Prakash; Goel, Sonu

    2015-01-01

    In spite of aspiring to be a good manager, we public health experts fail to evaluate ourselves against our personal and professional goals. The Key Result Areas (KRAs) or key performance indicators (KPIs) help us in setting our operational (day-to-day) and/or strategic (long-term) goals followed by grading ourselves at different times of our careers. These shall help in assessing our strengths and weaknesses. The weakest KRA should set the maximum extent to which one should use his/her skills and abilities to have the greatest impact on his/her career.

  5. Short-term effects of a brief intervention to reduce alcohol use and sexual risk among homeless young adults: Results from a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Ronald G; Elliott, Jennifer C; Hu, Mei-Chen; Aivadyan, Christina; Aharonovich, Efrat; Hasin, Deborah S

    2017-01-01

    Homeless young adults are more likely than their never-homeless counterparts to abuse alcohol and engage in risky sexual behaviors, yet no interventions to simultaneously reduce both these behaviors among this vulnerable population have been systematically designed and evaluated. We therefore developed a brief intervention (BI) to reduce both alcohol use and sexual risk behaviors among homeless young adults. The results of a randomized trial testing the BI against an education comparison (EC) are presented. Young adults (N=61; age 17-22 years) from an urban, Northeastern crisis shelter were randomly assigned to either the 2-session, individual-level BI or a time-matched, 2-session, individual-level EC. Generalized linear mixed models for repeated measures determined effects of treatment condition on outcomes. The BI significantly increased participant readiness to change alcohol use. However, it did not significantly decrease primary alcohol or HIV sexual risk outcomes, independently or relative to EC (all ps>.05). Participants in the EC reduced times engaged in unprotected sex between baseline and post-intervention to a significantly greater extent (phomeless young adults.

  6. Deferiprone versus deferoxamine in sickle cell disease: results from a 5-year long-term Italian multi-center randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvaruso, Giusi; Vitrano, Angela; Di Maggio, Rosario; Ballas, Samir; Steinberg, Martin H; Rigano, Paolo; Sacco, Massimiliano; Telfer, Paul; Renda, Disma; Barone, Rita; Maggio, Aurelio

    2014-12-01

    Blood transfusion and iron chelation currently represent a supportive therapy to manage anemia, vasculopathy and vaso-occlusion crises in Sickle-Cell-Disease. Here we describe the first 5-year long-term randomized clinical trial comparing Deferiprone versus Deferoxamine in patients with Sickle-Cell-Disease. The results of this study show that Deferiprone has the same effectiveness as Deferoxamine in decreasing body iron burden, measured as repeated measurements of serum ferritin concentrations on the same patient over 5-years and analyzed according to the linear mixed-effects model (LMM) (p=0.822). Both chelators are able to decrease, significantly, serum ferritin concentrations, during 5-years, without any effect on safety (p=0.005). Moreover, although the basal serum ferritin levels were higher in transfused compared with non-transfused group (p=0.031), the changes over time in serum ferritin levels were not statistically significantly different between transfused and non-transfused cohort of patients (p=0.389). Kaplan-Meier curve, during 5-years of study, suggests that Deferiprone does not alter survival in comparison with Deferoxamine (p=0.38). In conclusion, long-term iron chelation therapy with Deferiprone was associated with efficacy and safety similar to that of Deferoxamine. Therefore, in patients with Sickle-Cell-Disease, Deferiprone may represent an effective long-term treatment option.

  7. Intervention Based Exclusively on Stage-Matched Printed Educational Materials Regarding Healthy Eating Does Not Result in Changes to Adolescents’ Dietary Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natacha Toral

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To assess the impact of a six-month stage-based intervention on fruit and vegetable intake, regarding perceived benefits and barriers, and self-efficacy among adolescents. Design. Randomized treatment-control, pre-post design. Subjects/Setting. Schools were randomized between control and experimental groups. 860 adolescents from ten public schools in Brasília, Federal District, Brazil were evaluated at baseline; 771 (81% completed the study. Intervention. Experimental group received monthly magazines and newsletters aimed at promotion of healthy eating. Measures. Self-reported fruit and vegetable intake, stages of change, self-efficacy and decisional balance scores were evaluated at baseline and post-intervention in both groups. Analysis. The effectiveness of the intervention was evaluated using the analysis of covariance model (ANCOVA and repeated measurement analysis by means of weighted least squares. Comparison between the proportions of adolescents who advanced through the stages during the intervention was performed using the Mantel-Haenszel chi-square test. Results. After adjusting for sex and age, study variables showed no modifications through the proposed intervention. There was no statistical difference in participant mobility in the intervention and control groups between the stages of change, throughout the study. Conclusion. A nutritional intervention based exclusively on distribution of stage-matched printed educational materials was insufficient to change adolescents’ dietary behavior.

  8. Advancing the science of spatial neglect rehabilitation: an improved statistical approach with mixed linear modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly M Goedert

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Valid research on neglect rehabilitation demands a statistical approach commensurate with the characteristics of neglect rehabilitation data: Neglect arises from impairment in distinct brain networks leading to large between-subject variability in baseline symptoms and recovery trajectories. Studies enrolling medically-ill, disabled patients, may suffer from missing, unbalanced data, and small sample sizes. Finally, assessment of rehabilitation requires a description of continuous recovery trajectories. Unfortunately, the statistical method currently employed in most studies of neglect treatment (repeated-measures ANOVA does not well-address these issues. Here we review an alternative, mixed linear modeling (MLM, that is more appropriate for assessing change over time. MLM better accounts for between-subject heterogeneity in baseline neglect severity and in recovery trajectory. MLM does not require complete or balanced data, nor does it make strict assumptions regarding the data structure. Furthermore, because MLM better models between-subject heterogeneity it often results in increased power to observe treatment effects with smaller samples. After reviewing current practices in the field, and the assumptions of repeated-measures ANOVA, we provide an introduction to MLM. We review its assumptions, uses, advantages and disadvantages. Using real and simulated data, we illustrate how MLM may improve the ability to detect effects of treatment over ANOVA, particularly with the small samples typical of neglect research. Furthermore, our simulation analyses result in recommendations for the design of future rehabilitation studies. Because between-subject heterogeneity is one important reason why studies of neglect treatments often yield conflicting results, employing statistical procedures that model this heterogeneity more accurately will increase the efficiency of our efforts to find treatments to improve the lives of individuals with neglect.

  9. Basic results on braid groups

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Meneses, Juan

    2010-01-01

    These are Lecture Notes of a course given by the author at the French-Spanish School "Tresses in Pau", held in Pau (France) in October 2009. It is basically an introduction to distinct approaches and techniques that can be used to show results in braid groups. Using these techniques we provide several proofs of well known results in braid groups, namely the correctness of Artin's presentation, that the braid group is torsion free, or that its center is generated by the full twist. We also recall some solutions of the word and conjugacy problems, and that roots of a braid are always conjugate. We also describe the centralizer of a given braid. Most proofs are classical ones, using modern terminology. I have chosen those which I find simpler or more beautiful.

  10. Forget about data, deliver results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Roland

    2015-12-01

    High-energy astrophysics space missions have pioneered and demonstrated the power of legacy data sets for generating new discoveries, especially when analysed in ways original researchers could not have anticipated. The only way to ensure that the data of present observatories can be effectively used in the future is to allow users to perform on-the-fly data analysis to produce straightforwardly scientific results for any sky position, time and energy intervals without requiring mission specific software or detailed instrumental knowledge. Providing a straightforward interface to complex data and data analysis makes the data and the process of generating science results available to the public and higher education and promotes the visibility of the investment in science to the society. This is a fundamental step to transmit the values of science and to evolve towards a knowledge society.

  11. Results from the NOMAD experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Lupi, A

    2000-01-01

    he NOMAD experiment has been searching for νμ ↔ ντ oscillations by looking for the appearance of τ− in events from the CERN-SPS neutrino beam. With some improvements in the analysis techniques with respect to the previous published results and including data from 1995 to 1997, no evidence for oscillations is found, resulting in an updated limit in the oscillation probability of P(νμ↔ντ) < 0.6 × 10−3 at 90% C.L. This corresponds to a limit on the oscillation mixing angle of sin22θμτ < 1.2 × 10−3 for large Δm2.

  12. First Physics Results from ALICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peressounko, Dmitri [Russian Research Centre - RRC ' Kurchatov Institute' , Kurchatov sq.1, Moscow, 123182 (Russian Federation); Castillo Castellanos, Javier [service de physique nucleaire - SPhN, IRFU, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Belikov, Iouri [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien - IPHC, 23 rue du loess - BP28, 67037 Strasbourg cedex 2 (France)

    2010-07-01

    ALICE is the LHC experiment dedicated to the study of heavy-ion collisions. The main purpose of ALICE is to investigate the properties of a state of deconfined nuclear matter, the Quark Gluon Plasma. Heavy flavour measurements will play a crucial role in this investigation. The physics programme of ALICE has started by studying proton-proton collisions at unprecedented high energies. We will present the first results on open heavy flavour and quarkonia in proton-proton collisions at {radical}s = 7 TeV measured by the ALICE experiment at both mid- and forward-rapidities. We will conclude with the prospects for heavy flavour and quarkonium measurements in both proton-proton and nucleus-nucleus collisions. Also presented are first results of neutral meson reconstruction and its perspectives, as well as further physics studies. (author)

  13. Results from PLUTO at PETRA

    CERN Document Server

    Blobel, Volker

    1979-01-01

    Results obtained at the e/sup +/e/sup -/ storage ring PETRA by the PLUTO collaboration at c.m. energies of 13, 17 and 27.4 GeV are presented. New limits on QED cut-off parameters are determined from Bhabha scattering; at 27.4 GeV the limits are Lambda /sub +/>38 GeV and Lambda /sub -/>60 GeV. The measured values of the total hadronic cross section, and the study of the jet character of the hadronic events are well consistent with the expected production of b mesons (with q/sub b/=1/3), but do not require additional new quarks with charge 2/3. Hadronic events from two-photon exchange processes are observed with comparable rates as events from one-photon exchange. First results on the hadronic cross section in gamma gamma collisions are given. (8 refs).

  14. Audit result and its users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalimova Nataliya S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article identifies essence of the “audit result” and “users of audit result” notions and characteristics of the key audit results user. It shows that in order to give a wide characteristic of users it is expedient to unite all objects, which could be used (audit report, fact of refusal to conduct audit and information that is submitted to managers in the process of audit with the term “audit result” and classify it depending on the terms of submission by final and intermediate result. The article offers to define audit results user as a person, persons or category of persons for whom the auditor prepares the audit report and, in cases, envisaged by international standards of the audit and domestic legislative and regulatory acts, provides other additional information concerning audit issues. In order to identify the key audit results user the article distributes all audit tasks into two groups depending on possibilities of identification of users. The article proves that the key user should be identified especially in cases of a mandatory audit and this process should go in interconnection with the mechanism of allocation of a key user of financial reports. It offers to consider external users with direct financial interests, who cannot request economic subjects directly to provide information and who should rely on general financial reports and audit report when receiving significant portion of information they need, as the key user. The article makes proposals on specification of the categorical mechanism in the sphere of audit, which are the basis for audit quality assessment, identification of possibilities and conditions of appearance of the necessary and sufficient trust to the auditor opinion.

  15. Top physics results with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Massa, Lorenzo; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    This paper contains some of the most recent results on top-quark physics obtained by the ATLAS collaboration from the analysis of $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV and 8 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider. Measurement of total and differential top-quark pair ($t\\bar{t}$), single top and $t\\bar{t}+\\gamma$ production cross sections and some top properties like mass, charge asymmetry and spin correlation are presented.

  16. SPQR -- Spectroscopy: Prospects, Questions & Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennington, Michael R. [JLAB

    2014-06-01

    Tremendous progress has been made in mapping out the spectrum of hadrons over the past decade with plans to make further advances in the decade ahead. Baryons and mesons, both expected and unexpected, have been found, the results of precision experiments often with polarized beams, polarized targets and sometimes polarization of the final states. All these hadrons generate poles in the complex energy plane that are consequences of strong coupling QCD. They reveal how this works.

  17. Results of the BSE experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Kurakake, Y.; Kinoshita, S.

    Results of satellite broadcasting experiments carried out using the BSE (Japan's Medium-scale Broadcasting Satellite for Experimental Purpose) are described. Consideration is given to the following experiments: the reception of radio waves from the satellite, radio wave attenuation and scattering, the uplink power control experiment, experiments with transportable earth stations, the transmission of FM-TV signals, and frequency sharing between the broadcasting satellite and broadcasting services in the 12 GHz band.

  18. PHENIX Spin Program, Recent Results

    CERN Document Server

    Bazilevsky, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Amirikas, R; Aphecetche, L; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, R; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, Alberto; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Berdnikov, Yu A; Bhagavatula, S; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Borenstein, S R; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Büsching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camard, X; Chai, J S; Chand, P; Chang, W C; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Constantin, P; D'Enterria, D G; Dávid, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, Abhay A; Desmond, E J; Devismes, A; Dietzsch, O; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Du Rietz, R; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Chenawi, K F; Enokizono, A; Enyo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L A; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fox, B D; Fraenkel, Zeev; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, K; Glenn, A; Gogiberidze, G; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, Hans Åke; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hartouni, E P; Harvey, M; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Ikonnikov, V V; Imai, K; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jeong, Y; Jia, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kang, J H; Kapoor, S S; Katou, K; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, D W; Kim, E; Kim, G B; Kim, H J; Kistenev, E P; Kiyomichi, A; Kiyoyama, K; Klein-Bösing, C; Kobayashi, H; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kuberg, C H; Kurita, K; Kuroki, Y; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Ladygin, V P; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, S; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A G; Liu, M X; Liu, Y; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Man'ko, V I; Mao, Y; Martínez, G; Marx, M D; Masui, H; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E A; Messer, F; Miake, Y; Milan, J; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Muhlbacher, F; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Nakamura, T; Nandi, B K; Nara, M; Newby, J; Nilsson, P; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, K; Ono, M; Onuchin, V A; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V S; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Parmar, A; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Peng, J C; Peresedov, V; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Plasil, F; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosnet, P; Ryu, S S; Sadler, M E; Saitô, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, M; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sanfratello, L; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shaw, M R; Shea, T K; Shibata, T A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sørensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarjan, P; Tepe, J D; Thomas, T L; Tojo, J; Torie, H A; Towell, R S; Tserruya, Itzhak; Tsuruoka, H; Tuli, S K; Tydesjo, H; Tyurin, N; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Veszpremi, V; Villatte, L; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vznuzdaev, E A; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yang, Y; Yanovich, A A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zhou, S J; Zolin, L S; Adler, S S; Bazilevsky, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    Acceleration of polarized protons in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provides unique tool to study the spin structure of the nucleon. We give a brief overview of the PHENIX program to investigate poorly known gluon and flavor decomposed see quark polarization in the proton, utilizing polarized proton collisions at RHIC. We report PHENIX first results on transverse single-spin asymmetry in pi0 and charged hadron production and longitudinal double-spin asymmetry in pi0 production at mid-rapidity.

  19. LHC Results Highlights (CLASHEP 2013)

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, O

    2015-01-01

    The good performance of the LHC provided enough data at 7 TeV and 8 TeV to allow the experiments to perform very competitive measurements and to expand the knowledge about the fundamental interaction far beyond that from previous colliders. This report summarizes the highlights of the results obtained with these data samples by the four large experiments, covering all the topics of the physics program and focusing on those exploiting the possibilities of the LHC.

  20. Which Reconstruction Results are Significant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-01

    other significant result is due to Tutte [17]. Tutte’s Theorem: The characteristic polynomial of a graph can be reconstructed. Equivalently, two...hypomorphic graphs must have the same characteristic polynomial . Several points should be noted concerning this theorem: 1. The derivative of the...characteristic polynomial is the sum of the char- acteristic polynomials of the vertex-deleted subgraphs. Thus the characteristic polynomials of hypomorphic